Old Bailey Proceedings, 21st October 1844.
Reference Number: t18441021
Reference Number: f18441021

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

SESSIONS PAPER.

MAGNAY, MAYOR.

TWELFTH SESSION, HELD OCTOBER 21ST, 1844.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

Taken in Short-hand

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

TYLER & REED, PRINTERS, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

1844.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT,

Held on Monday, October 21st, 1844, and following Days.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM MAGNAY , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir William Henry Maule, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Robert Monsey Rolfe, Knt., one of the Barons of Her Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq.;, Sir John Key, Bart.; Charles Farebrother, Esq.; Thomas Kelly, Esq.; and Sir Chapman Marshall, Knt.; Aldermen of the said City: the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City: Thomas Wood, Esq.; Sir George Carroll, Knt.; John Kinnersley Hooper, Esq.; Sir James Duke, Knt.; Thomas Farncomb, Esq.; Thomas Challis, Esq.; and William Hughes Hughes, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and Edward Bullock, Esq., Judge of the Sheriffs Court; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

David Ray

James Tucker

James Henry Layall

Richard Scott

William Pearman

Joseph Pickett

Warren Dunford

William Parsons

Samuel H. Richess

Jenkins Phillips

Thomas Meredith

Arthur Murch

Second Jury.

David Matthews

Stephen Thomas Robinson

George Rowe

Thomas Robinson

Thomas Claringbould

Henry Kilvington

George Marshall

Edwin Burgess

Peter Ross

Luke Street

Charles Frederick Rilett

William Parkins

Third Jury.

John Jerberry

Thomas Clark

Thomas Pratt

James Butcher

Frederick Creek

Archibald Strachan

Henry Rudkin

Joseph Goulding

William Odell

John Rose

John Dalton Owen Ryan

Fourth Jury.

George Reed

Henry Castle

Robert William Pearce

Jonathan Richards

William Ballantine

William Barton

John Bates

Michael Pike

Charles Henry Bowerie

William Pyland

James Robins

Kenneth M'Kenzie

Fifth Jury.

Charles Penton

W. Neale

W. Scoombs

John Murray

Nathaniel Nichols

James Phillips

James Pitkinley

Philip Rooke

Thomas Trinder

Henry Asher Israel

Daniel Kingsmith

Thomas Pickworth

Sixth Jury.

William Patterson

Isaac Liasson

W. Pope

Robert Robinson Chandler

Richard Randall

James Rackastraw

George Roberts

Joseph Veary

Henry Procter

W. Pether

W. Saul

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

MAGNAY, MAYOR. TWELFTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—Two stars (**) that they have been more than once in custody—An obelisk (†) that a prisoner is known to be the associate of bad characters.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, October 21 st, 1844.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18441021-2384

2384. GEORGE HENRY WARD and GEORGE WARD were indicted for unlawfully obtaining from William Angerstein, Esq., an order for the payment of 115l. 10s., by false pretences.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM ANGERSTEIN, ESQ . I reside at Woolmer Lodge, Hampshire. At the time in question I was staying with my father at Blackheath—I saw an advertisement in the Times newspaper referring to some horses—I will not be quite certain as to the date—(looking at the Times newspaper)—it was an advertisement to this effect—I had occasion to buy smile horses at that time, and on seeing the advertisement, I went to Gloucester-mews, Montague-square—I was there shown two horses and a mare by the younger prisoner, George Ward—on going into the stable, I inquired of the younger prisoner, before the elder came in, whether the two horses and mare then in the stable were the horses advertised in the Times newspaper, which I produced—he said they were, that he had the care of the horses, and that they belonged to a third party, who had sent them for sale on commission to the elder prisoner, stating his name to be Mr. Ward—from about twenty minutes to half an hour after, the elder prisoner came into the stable—I inquired about the horses, and the elder prisoner told me they were sent to him by a family of the name of Lloyd, that he had long known that family, that they lived near Stratford-upon-Avon, and that on the decease of the elder member of that family, these horses had been sent for sale, as they wished to have ponies instead—it had been stated by one and both of them that the two smaller horses had been driven together, and that the larger horse had been driven in a clarence, or brougham—at the time I was having this conversation with the elder prisoner, the younger one was in the stable, and within hearing—I agreed to purchase the three horses for 115l. 10s.—gave a check on Messrs. Glynn and Co. for that amount—this is the check—at the time I gave that check I had cash to that amount in the hands of Messrs. Glynn—it has been returned to me as paid—I received this receipt at the time—this was either a little before or after twelve o'clock in the morning, but I was there a considerable time talking about the horses, and seeing them out—I left about two—the elder prisoner handed me the receipt, not in the presence of the other—there was a small counting-house attached to the stables, in which he delivered it to me—I should say the terms of the receipt

were not arranged in the presence of both the prisoners—I should say I was addressing the elder prisoner only—the terms were arranged entirely with the elder prisoner—I do not know that the younger prisoner heard what the horses were to be sold for, but he told me that 40l. had been offered for the larger horse, and he thought something about that price would be taken—that was at some period before the sale took place, and I rather think it was before the elder prisoner came into the stable—(Receipt read, "Received, July 9, 1844, of William Angerstein, Esq., 110 guineas, for two bay geldings, and a bay mare; all warranted sound, quiet to ride, and quiet in double or single harness, and if not approved of at the expiration of seven days, the whole or either to be returned, and the money refunded,—GEORGE HENRY WARD.")—there being three horses, and having my servant with me, who was riding behind me, I was obliged to get somebody to help my servant in taking them up to the Veterinary College, and I employed the younger prisoner to do that—my servant took the horses to the Veterinary College, in company with the younger prisoner—before that he told me his name was George Glass—he also stated that as the horses were sold he should lose his situation, and I agreed to take him to assist my servant in taking the horses down to Blackheath, and I also said he should remain in my stable till I could get a permanent helper—he acquiesced in the arrangement of going down to Blackheath, but he said he could not stay, because, a relation of his had died at Doncaster, and had left him money which he must look after—I got a report from the Veterinary College, I should say between four and five o'clock, and in consequence of that report I told my servant to take the horses from the college, to take them back to the stables from whence they came, and leave them there, and I gave him a letter at the same time—next morning, about eleven o'clock, I went with my solicitor to the stables—neither of the prisoners were there—I cannot tell whether the horses were there—the stables were locked—this was on the 10th of July—on the 26th of Aug. I was taken by the police to a mews near Fitzroy-square, to identify the horses—they were all there—the prisoners were then in custody.

WILLIAM WHISTLER . I am groom to Mr. Angerstein. I went with him to Gloucester-mews on the 9th of July—my master went on horseback, and I also—I saw the younger prisoner first—after some time the elder prisoner came in—after my master had talked with them about the horses, the elder prisoner came into the stable and asked me what was my master's name, and where he came from—I told him—he said my master wanted a great deal of coaxing—a short time after that my master purchased the horses—the elder prisoner said the horses did not belong to him, but he would speak to the groom and get something for me, and make that all right—the younger prisoner was then in the stable with my master, I believe—he was not with us—after my master had purchased the horses I took them, by his direction, to the Veterinary College with the younger prisoner—Mr. Spooner examined them directly—after the examination I heard it said they were all unsound—Mr. Spooner gave me a note to take to my master—I took the note, leaving the horses and the younger prisoner behind—in consequence of a message I received from my master, after delivering him the note, I returned to the college for the horses—the younger prisoner was then gone—it was, I should think, between two and three o'clock when my master sent me to the college to have the horses examined—it is three miles from Gloucester-mews—in consequence of directions I took the horses from the college, with assistance, and left them at the stables where we had brought them from—I delivered the note to an old woman there—neither of the prisoners were there—I got back to the stables, I should think, between five and six o'clock—I put them into the stables that they came from, and left—I saw nothing

more of the prisoners till the 26th of Aug., when I went with Whicher to a stable in Fitzroy-mews—I there saw both the prisoners, and the two horses and the mare that I had taken back to the stables in Gloucester-mews on the 9th of July—I pointed them out to the policeman—I heard the elder prisoner say on being taken, that he knew he owed the man the money, and he meant say, and he meant to pay it to him as soon as it was convenient.

HANNAH POTTER . I live in Gloucester-mews, West George-street, Mary-leboae. I let stables—my husband, in my presence, let a three-stall stable to the elder prisoner, by the week—they occupied them for fifteen weeks, at 6s., a week—the younger prisoner attended to the horses—the same three horses were not always there—I recollect these three—there had been other horses before—the younger prisoner attended to other horses as well as these—I believe his name is George Ward—I have heard him called by that name, I do not exactly know by whom—he went by that name—I have heard the elder prisoner speak to him, and of him—I never heard him call him by his name—I have spoken to him myself—I called him George—he answered to that name—I understood that the prisoners were uncle and nephew—the younger prisoner said that Mr. Ward was his uncle—they left the stable on the 9th of July—I cannot say at what time—it was in the afternoon—the horses were brought back the same day—the prisoners never occupied the stables afterwards—the horses that were brought back were removed next morning by the younger prisoner I believe—he came and told me he was going to take them away—I cannot say at what time it was—I recollect Mr. Angerstein coming to inquire about them—the prisoners came to the stables two or three times afterwards, but they did not bring any more horses after—they did not tell me where they were, or where they lived, and I did not know—they gave up the stable on the 10th of July—they had not given any notice of their intention to quit before that day—the younger prisoner came a few days after and paid me the rent—he paid me 12s., a fortnight's rent.

ELIZABETH HEMBROW . I am the wife of Samuel Hembrow, who occupies No. 4, Boston-mews, Dorset-square. On the 10th of July I let the elder prisoner a coach-house and stable—the younger prisoner was with him—he took it by the week, at 5s. a week—about four or five o'clock in the afternoon they brought three horses there—Mr. Ward rode one—I did not notice the horses particularly—I do not know whether one of them was a mare—two of them remained in the place till the 23rd of July, and the third left on the 28th—the younger prisoner took away the two—he did not tell me where he was taking them to, nor when he came back did he tell me where he had taken them—I never heard from either prisoners where they had been taken to—the younger prisoner took the third away—I never saw anything of them after the 28th—I did not get my rent—I did not know they were going to quit for good—I have never got the key of the stable—I never heard from either of the prisoners whether they were related—the younger one went by the name of George, and the other by the name of Mr. Ward.

GEORGE WELDON . I occupy No. 26 stable, Fitzroy—mews. On the 23rd of July I let a three-stall stable to the elder prisoner—the younger prisoner brought three horses there—I saw three there—they remained there till the 26th of August.

JOHN PRIOR, ESQ . I live at Herne-hill. In August I was in want of a horse—I saw an advertisement in the Times of that day, and on the 26th of Aug., after some observations from my servant, I went to the stable No. 26, Fitzroy-mews—I saw both the prisoners there—I saw the younger

one first, and he showed me two horses—I had heard from my servant that they were the property of a widow, and I said, "These are the horses, the property of the widow lady, I suppose?"—he said, "Yes"—I then asked him a few questions as to the qualities of the horses, about riding and drawing, just the usual questions, and of course they were perfect—I asked him which horse his late master was most in the habit of riding—he said, "Such a one," pointing out one of the horses, but added, "He used to ride them both, and also Miss Emily," or Miss somebody—in the course of conversation about the horses, I asked his late master's name, and, to the best of my recollection, he said Hicks—I would not positively swear, but that is my impression—I am quite sure it was not Lloyd—there was no mention of the widow's name—I was going to ask the younger prisoner about the price—he said, "About 80l., or 90l., but I think you can have them for less, "(in a confidential sort of way) "but I will go and call Mr. Ward," and he left me—he returned, I think, before the other prisoner; but as the elder prisoner was coming to the stable, I went out and met him, and said, "I understand you have the disposal of these horses?"—he said, "Yes"—he then said, "I suppose you knew Mr. Lloyd?"—I said, "I suppose you mean Mr. Lloyd, the banker; I did not know him personally"—he seemed to acquiesce in that, and immediately said, "Oh, they are a very wealthy family, sir, and they reside near Bristol"—he did not tell me in direct terms at first that these horses belonged to a person named Lloyd, but insinuated it—he never represented that they belonged to Mr. Hicks—while I was proceeding to examine the horses, the elder prisoner suddenly left me, to go and speak to some men that were coming into the yard, who turned out to be policemen—when he came back he did not come up to me—I beckoned to him, and asked him who those persons were, if they were coming to treat for the horses—he said, "Oh, no, they have nothing to do with the horses"—he then left me again suddenly—I had asked him the price, and he said, I think, about 100 guineas, or pounds—at the same time one of the men made a sign to me, and I thought something, was not right—I called the elder prisoner back to me a second time, took him aside, and asked him to explain—he said he could not tell me at that time who those persons were—I then saw there was something wrong, and went away—after I had got into my carriage, he came near the window, and I said, "'Why cannot you tell me? what is this?"—he said, "I am an unfortunate man, sir, and these two men you are inquiring about are sheriff's-officers"—I said,—"Oh, if that is the case, drive on"'—he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. I believe one of these horses was a dark grey? A. No, a bay—I think the third horse was a bay, but I did not look at that.

COURT. Q. How many horses did you want? A. If they had suited I should have bought the pair.

JONATHAN WHICHER (police-sergeant A 27.) I went to this stable in Fitzroy-mews on the 26th of Aug., and found three horses there—one was a mare—they were the same three that were afterwards shown to Mr. Angerstein—in consequence of directions, about a week afterwards, I went to Stratford-upon-Avon, and made inquiries after a family of the name of Lloyd—I could not find any such family—there had been a family of that name about eight years ago, but the gentleman died—he lived about two miles from Stratford-upon-Avon, and was a bachelor—the elder prisoner was well known at Stratford-upon-Avon—I did not tell him what I had learned there concerning him—I found no widow there who had any horses to sell.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. I believe Mr. Angerstein has got the horses now? A. They are in the possession of the police.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Where did you inquire? A. Of the postmaster, and most of the oldest inhabitants, at all the inns, and the parties most likely to know, in the town of Stratford.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you inquire of the postmaster of any such person in or near Stratford? A. Yes, and no such person was known.

EDWARD M'KEON . I am a clerk in Messrs. Glynn's hank. Mr. Angerstein banks with us—he had an account with us on the 9th of July last—I cashed this check on the day it was drawn, and by reference to my book, I have no doubt it was cashed very soon after two o'clock.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am the son of Mr. Prior's coachman. I knew from my father that Mr. Prior wanted a horse—I saw an advertisement in the Times newspaper, and on the 24th of Aug. I went to Fitzroy-mews—I saw a person there who appeared to be a helper at the stables—he brought the younger prisoner there—I asked him if those were the horses that were for sale—lie said "Yes"—I saw the bay gelding—he wished me to see the horses out—I saw them out, and said I thought one was most likely to suit Mr. Prior—he said they belonged to a widow lady at Stratford-on-Avon, and that his master was just dead—he did not tell me the name of the widow lady—I asked him the price of the bay gelding, and he told me fifty guineas—he said his mistress had written for them to be sold, and he thought they might be bought for much less—I went from thence and told my father.

FREDERICK SHAW (police-sergeant A 129.) I took the younger prisoner into custody on the 26th of Aug., at the stable in Fitzroy-mews—I told him he was charged with being concerned with the elder prisoner in obtaining 115l. from a gentleman named Angerstein, living at Blackheath, on the 9th of July last—he said he knew nothing at all about it.

JONATHAN WHICHER re-examined. I took the elder prisoner into custody—I told him I apprehended him for defrauding Mr. Angerstein of 115l. 10s.,—he said he had done no such thing, it was a fair bargain—I do not recollect that he said anything about the money.

CHARLES SPOONER . I am one of the professors at the Veterinary College, Camden-town. I have been connected with the college for the last fourteen years—I remember these two horses and the mare being brought to the college to be examined on the 9th of July—I examined them—they were all unsound.

COURT. Q. What did the unsoundness consist of? A. The larger gelding was defective in his respiration, what is termed a roarer—he also had spavin in the hocks, and was vicious when mounted to ride—the other gelding was unsound from chronic lameness in the off fore-leg, and the mare was unsound from lameness in both fore-feet, and she had all the nerves of both fore-legs divided—that was done to prevent the sense of pain—the mare and larger gelding were six years old, and the smaller gelding was about eight years old.

(Advertisement read.)—"For sale, three superior horses; first, a pair of bay phaeton horses, 15 hands 1 inch high, remarkably handsome, and nearly thorough bred; match well together, have both carried ladies, and very clever in saddle; also go well in double or single harness. Second, a bay gelding, well adapted for a brougham or cab; all warranted sound: a liberal trial granted to ride or drive. Apply at No. 5, Gloucester—mews, West George-street, Montague-square."

MR. ANGERSTEIN re-examined. I had arranged the terms that are mentioned

in the receipt before it was written, and handed to me—I should not have let the man write his own terms on a stamped receipt before I had previously arranged the terms—before I gave him the check, I had arranged the terms of the bargain, and all the particulars—I had arranged with the elder prisoner that the sum should be 100 guineas, that it was for two bay geldings and a bay-mare; that they should be warranted sound, quiet to ride, and quiet in double and single harness; and if not approved of at the expiration of seven days, the whole or either of them to be returned, and the money refunded—I had arranged every particular before I gave him the check.

GEORGE H. WARD— GUILTY .— Confined Twelve Months.

GEORGE WARD— GUILTY .— Confined Four Months.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, October 22nd, 1844.

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18441021-2385

2385. ANN JONES was indicted for stealing 2 sheets and 1 apron, the goods of George Pelton, from the person of George Pelton, the younger; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . * Aged 26.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2386

2386. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of George Edwards, from his person.

GUILTY .* Aged 20.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18441021-2387

2387. ALFRED TOMKINS was indicted for stealing 1 box, value 1s. 6d.; and 216 files, 7l. 9s.; the goods of John Dale.

JOHN LEWIS . I live in Colchester-street, Whitechapel. Between seven and eight o'clock. on Thursday evening, the 19th of September, I was in Fen-church-street, and saw the prisoner take a box off the hind part of Mr. John Dale's wagon, which was going on at the time—he walked away with it—I went and stopped the wagon, and told the driver directly.

CHARLES GARRETT ROE . I am foreman to John Dale, of Stoney-lane, Southwark. I saw the wagon loaded, and this box put into it—it was directed to Perry, of Bow—I could find no such person there, and it was brought back in the wagon—it contained files from Sheffield—the invoice value of them was 7l. 11s. 4d.—it was under the charge of John Dale, who was responsible for its safety.

ELIAS BENEY . I am wagoner to Mr. Dale. This box was on my wagon on the evening of the 19th of Sept.—I found it was taken out—I know it again.

JAMES LAMBOLE (City police-constable, No. 511.) I saw the prisoner carrying this box—before I could get to him he dropped it—I followed him calling, "Stop thief"—my brother officer stopped him in Catherinewheel-alley, leading from Fenchurch-street—the box was taken up by another officer and a young man—it weighs above 1 cwt.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Fenchurch-street; a man tapped me on the shoulder, and asked me to carry a box to the corner of St. Katharine's Docks, and lie would give me 1s.; being in great distress, 1 did so; at the corner of the alley I heard a cry of "Stop thief," turned round, and saw the man run away; I was frightened, and ran also.

JOHN LEWIS re-examined. The prisoner is the man I saw take it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2388

2388. WILLIAM FRANCIS JOHNSON was indicted for obtaining an order for the payment of 52l., from John Hill, by false pretences; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 51.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Three Months, having been Four Months in Custody.

Reference Number: t18441021-2389

2389. MOSES COHEN was indicted for stealing 5 coats, value 42s., the goods of William Bryant.

JAMES KEAN . I am in the service of William Bryant, a clothier, at Aldgate. On the night of the 17th of October I had five coats inside the door-way of the shop, and noticed a motion as if somebody was moving them—I ran out and saw the prisoner with them in his arms—I seized hold of him, and he dropped them—a policeman came up soon after—the coats were worth two guineas—they laid partly on some others, and were fastened with a chain, which was broken—they were not tied together—he might as well have taken one as the five.

HENRY FINN'S (City police-constable, No. 607.) I took the prisoner into custody, and produce the clothes—he had a large bag, which he wore before him as an apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Aldgate; the prosecutor laid hold of me and threw me on the ground; he said I had stolen his coats.

JAMES KEAN re-examined. I am quite sure he had them in his possession.

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

(The prisoner had been in custody twice before, and once summarily convicted.)

Reference Number: t18441021-2390

2390. DANIEL DONOVAN was indicted for stealing 281bs. weight of copper, value 18s. 8d., the goods of the East and West India Dock Company, in a port of entry and discharge.

ABRAHAM BOUTELL . I am a constable of the West India Docks. On the morning of the 28th of Sept., about eight o'clock, I stopped the prisoner, took him into my box, searched him, and asked him where he bad picked up this tile of copper, which he had got concealed under his clothes, slung to his back, over his loins, with a piece of twine—he said he picked it up against one of tile privies on the south side of the Export-dock—there was no copper there—I took him to the dock police-office, then went on board the ship Sir Charles Napier, and in the hold of the vessel I saw tiles of copper of the same description and the same mark—I compared it with the piece in question—the vessel laid within the docks.

Prisoner. Q. Where was the copper stowed? A. Between decks—this copper weighs 28lbs.

JAMES COLE . I am employed to stow cargoes on board vessels, and am called a stevedoor—I live in Carter-terrace, Poplar—the prisoner was employed by me the first three days of the week ending the 28th of Sept., taking the carp of copper in, which was put into the after-hold of the vessel—it was taken out of a barge alongside the vessel, and put into the Sir Charles Napier, and was such copper as that produced—the prisoner had no business on board the vessel on the 28th of Sept.—the copper corresponds with the mark on the copper on board.

Prisoner. I was stowing beer the first four days, and two days coals. Witness. The last day you were at work was the 26th, and you were stowing copper.

JAMES MURPHY . I am ship-keeper of the Sir Charles Napier. On Saturday, the 8th of Sept., about ten minutes past six o'clock in the morning

I saw the prisoner on board, and again about ten minutes to eight on the quay—I saw him in custody about ten.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up; I had had a drop of drink, and could not attend to anything.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2391

2391. HENRY WINMILL was indicted for stealing 1 tea-kettle, value 4s.; 2 frying-pans, 2s. 6d.; 2 tea-pots, 5s.; 6 knives, 2s. 6d.; 6 forks, 2s.; 1 saucepan, 10d.; and 2 tea—trays, 4s.; the goods of Lewis Lewis, his master.

LEWIS LEWIS . I am an ironmonger, and have a shop, No. 11, Little Pulteney-street, St. James's; I live in Wardour-street. The prisoner was employed by me occasionally as a tailor—on the 16th of Sept., on going to my shop in Little Pulteney-street, I missed several articles, tea-pots and frying-pans, which I had left safe on Saturday night—I spoke to him about them on Monday morning—he said he did not know anything of them—in consequence of further information I received, I gave him into custody—the tea-pots, frying-pans, and other articles, now produced, are part of the articles I lost—I know them by private marks, and I lost other articles, worth about 1l. altogether.

MARGARET SEARS . I am the wife of Benjamin Sears, of Hopkins-street. On Sunday morning, the 15th of Sept., I bought of the prisoner two tea-pots, two tea-trays, a frying-pan, tea-kettle, and saucepan—he had told me he would fetch them in the course of the week, and brought them, the tea-pot on Sunday morning, and the rest on Sunday night—he said he did not exactly know the value of them—I gave him 3s. 6d., and he was to call on Monday for the remainder of the money, and change any article I did not like—he told me he and his brother kept a shop, that the things were rather damaged—they were going to remove to another shop, and he would sell them to me cheaper than I could buy them.

Prisoner. I bought the articles produced on Sunday morning of the prosecutor's son, at the shop; he told me I was to have them on Friday; he told me, at the shop in Wardour-street, to come down on Sunday morning, when he opened the shop, and I should have them to take out; they were selling off under prime cost; I expected him here; I understood the shop belonged to him; he said the shop was his when he was asked for the poor-rates.

LEWIS LEWIS re-examined. The shop is my own, and not my son's—he attends to it for me—the prisoner never suggested this before to-day, but denied all knowledge of the articles—my son was not bound over, as he knew nothing of the matter.

JAMES CLARK (policeman.) I took the prisoner in charge, and received the articles produced from Mrs. Sears.

EDWIN CHARLES KNELL . I live at No. 11, Little Pulteney-street. I saw the prisoner there on the 15th of Sept., between eight and nine o'clock, on Sunday morning—I saw a young person standing at the door—she called me, and gave me information—I went with a candle into Lewis's shop, and saw the prisoner there—I asked him what he wanted—he said Mr. Lewis's son had sent him down for his books—I had seen him there before, and left him—in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour I saw him come out of the shop, with tea-trays in his hand—he seemed confused, and put them down again—I said, "Have not you been home yet?"—he said, "Yes, I have been home, and come back, but cannot find the books now"—the prosecutor's son was not there—he asked if I would have anything to drink, and we had a little porter—he then said, "He is not come, I will go, I shall not wait longer for him."

LEWIS LEWIS re-examined. The prisoner was there on Sunday morning to assist my son, to take home anything that was sold—the shop is open till ten o'clock on Sunday morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the things of his son; I have worked for the prosecutor, and never received but half-a-crown and 1s. from him; I asked his son for some money on the Friday; he said he had none, but I might have anything out of the shop; the witness wanted some things; I spoke to the son about them; he said I should have them on Friday, but he had not time to look them out on Sunday; he looked over the things; a customer bought some things; he went with them, and, instead of coming back, he went home; he told me he had put the things in a corner, and I took them from there, took the keys back again, and told him I had got them; I slept with him that night, and was at the ironmonger's shop all the next day.

LEWIS LEWIS re-examined. My son knows the prisoner is charged with this offence; I had the key of the shop—the prisoner must have got the key of the parlour door, which fits the shop door—I was at the shop on Sunday morning, and my son took the key—I paid the prisoner for all he did for me—he never bought any things of me.

GUILTY. Aged 34.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2392

2392. ALBERT COOMBER was indicted for embezzlement.

JOHN TAYLOR . I keep the White Horse public-house at Shepherd's-bush, Hammersmith. The prisoner was my pot-boy, and was employed to receive money on my account—Mrs. Logan owed me 18s. 1d. on the 7th of Aug.

HANNAH BUZACOT . I am a widow, and live as servant to Mrs. Logan, of Goldenhawk-villas. She deals with Mr. Taylor—the prisoner used to deliver the beer—on the 7th of Aug. my mistress was indebted 18s. 1d. to Mr. Taylor—I gave the prisoner a sovereign, and told him to bring the change when he brought the nine o'clock beer—I gave him the bill with the sovereign—I never saw him again—Mr. Taylor had delivered the bill to Mrs. Logan—I do not know how long Mrs. Logan had it before she paid it—the prisoner is the person I paid.

MARY WENFIELD . I am in the employment of Mrs. Steinberg, of Goldenhawk-road, Shepherd's-bush, New-road. She deals with Mr. Taylor'—on the 7th of Aug. I paid the prisoner a sovereign to bring the change—he brought the full change to Miss Steinberg, and he was paid 4s. for some stout—he gave the 16s. to my daughter.

MR. TAYLOR re-examined. The prisoner never accounted to me for the 4s. out of the sovereign received from Mary Wenfield, or for the 18s. 1d. from Mrs. Buzacot—when he took the change to Miss Steinberg he did not return—I had him apprehended about six weeks after.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2393

2393. JOHN WHITEHEAD was indicted for embezzlement.

ANN COLLINS . I am housemaid in the service of Mr. Richardson, of Royal-crescent, Notting-hill. Mr. Baldwin supplies my master with beer—the prisoner was in the habit of delivering it—I was in the habit of paying for the beer between the 14th of July and 10th of Aug. when it was brought, or the night following—I do not know what it amounted to—the bill was brought to me by Mr. Baldwin's servant, who succeeded the prisoner—it had all been paid—we generally had fourpenny—worth a day.

THOMAS ROBINSON . I am in the service of Mr. Shepherd, of Union-terrace, Notting-hill. My master was supplied with beer by Mr. Baldwin—the

prisoner delivered the beer—on the 5th of Aug. I paid him 1s., 8d. for the preceding day, and 4d. for that day.

WILLIAM BALDWIN . I keep the Stuart Arms, Norland-road, Kensington, Up to the 9th of Sept. the prisoner had been in my employment for about three weeks—he had 10s. a week, and a discount on the beer he took out, and his lodging and board—Mr. Richardson was one of my customers—if he had not paid through his servants from time to time for the beer supplied, he would have been indebted to me 17s. 2d.—I have not received any of that money—the constable has got the account that was delivered—there was one found upon the prisoner of 14s. 8d.—that I thought he had delivered, but he had not, and after he left me I sent in a bill of 17s. 2d.—I had never received that amount—beer to that amount was booked to Mr. Richardson—he took the beer to Mr. Richardson, and on his return had it booked, at the same time he was in the habit of receiving it once or twice a week—the account was made out on his statement from time to time—on the 5th of Aug. the prisoner did not account to me for 1s. received from Mr. Shepherd—I sent in no account to Mr. Shepherd of 17s. 2d.—the prisoner had accounted to me for 4d. out of the shilling, and left 8d.—I have not received any money on account of, Mr. Richardson for this debt—I have before this—this is a running account with Mr. Richardson from the 21st of Aug., I think, to the 10th of Sept,—he paid me no money on account of Mr. Richardson from that time—he never paid me that or any other sum, and he would certainly receive 4d., 5d., or 6d. a day.

JOHN AYRE (policeman.) I apprehended the prisoner. I told him he was charged with embezzling money—he said he did not do it from any dishonest intention, but he meant to repay it as soon as he could get the money—I found on him 13s. 6 1/2 d.

Prisoner's Defence. I often paid 4d. or 5d. of a night to the house-keeper, or Miss Baldwin.

MR. BALDWIN re-examined. He never accounted to other persons besides myself. My daughter and housekeeper both declare they never received any money from him—they were in the habit of receiving money from him—it is booked in their handwriting in several places, but the prisoner acknowledged to owing 14s. 8d. and the shilling before the committing Magistrate.

JOHN AYRE re-examined. I was before the Magistrate, and saw the deposition taken. I do not know his handwriting—I did not hear the prisoner give any account at all.

GUILTY of embezzling 8d. Aged 25.— Confined Three Months.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, October 23rd, 1844.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2394

2394. JAMES STOREY, alias JONES, was indicted for stealing a ham, value 9s., the goods of John Butler; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

EMMA BUTLER . I am the wife of John Butler, a cheesemonger, and live in St. Pancras. On the 30th of Sept., about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was at the back of the shop, and heard my boy calling out, "Stop thief," and saw him run out of the shop after somebody—I went to the shop door, and saw the boy pick up something—this ham is my husband's—I know it by my two B's on it—the prisoner was brought to the shop soon after.

FREDERICK LEONARD . I am fourteen years old, and am in the service of Mr. Butler. On Monday night, the 30th of Sept., I saw the prisoner take a

ham off the block, and run away with it—I am sure of him—I saw his face—I called out "Stop thief," and ran out—I saw the ham on the pavement, about two doors off—I picked it up, and took it to my master's—the prisoner was brought back by the policeman in about ten minutes.

HENRY BERRY (policeman.) I heard the cry of "Stop thief," and saw a mob of persons run across the road—I ran up, and apprehended the prisoner, who was then at a stand-still between several people—he said, "I have done nothing "—I took him on suspicion, not knowing of the robbery at that time, but on returning towards the station I met the boy, who said he had stolen his master's ham—I took him to the station.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of "Stop thief," some yards before I got up to the shop; I saw a man running across the road; I ran after him through a dark place. I was laid hold of by some man; I asked what I was laid hold of for, and said I had done nothing; nor more I had. I saw the boy run out of the shop.

JOHN LAWRENCE (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was present at the trial—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2395

2395. ALFRED LOVEL was indicted for stealing a gelding, price 4l.; the property of Abraham Dodd.

CHRISTOPHER NORTH (policeman.) On the morning of the 28th of Sept., about half-past ten o'clock, I was at the station—the prisoner came there, and said he had committed a crime—I asked him what—he said he had stolen a horse—I told him whatever he said to me I should state before a Magistrate—he then told me where the horse was—I went with him, and found the horse at a livery-stable—he said he wanted to be transported, he did it for that purpose—he told me he took it from the Chalk-road, near Mr. Harris's beer-shop—he said he took it to Smithfield in the morning, between seven and eight, he was told the horse market did not commence till two, and he put it into the livery-stable, and told the ostler to give it a feed of corn—I detained the prisoner—he pointed the horse out to me—it was a bay gelding.

ABRAHAM DODD . I live at Islington. I had a horse in a field there—it was safe on the 26th of Sept.—I used it that day—I missed it on the 27th, and found it on the 28th in a livery-stable, or green-yard, at Islington, in the custody of the police—the prisoner showed it to me—I knew it to be my own.

WILLIAM HARRIS (policeman.) On the 26th of Sept. I was sent for from the station, to turn the prisoner out of the house of his master, Mr. Adams, a milkman, at Islington—he had discharged him from his service—he went out, with a good deal of persuasion, and when he got outside, he said he would go and do something, and get transported—I saw the horse—I did not see it with Mr. Dodd.

CHRISTOPHER NORTH re-examined. I took the horse from Smithfield to the Police-court, and put it into a livery-stable in Theberton-street, Islington—the owner afterwards came forward and identified it in my presence—it was the horse that I took from the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know what I was doing at the time. I had lived with my master nearly three years; he discharged me. I had given him no provocation; I was hardly in my senses.

WILLIAM HARRIS re-examined. I know the prisoner—he always appeared to be a very steady young man—his master said it was only for his temper he discharged him, he was a very honest boy—he pointed to his master, when he was discharged, and said, "That man has ruined me; and unless he takes

me back again, I will do something else "—the master said he would not—I have known him about two years—he was in the service of Mr. Adams, a dairyman.

GUILTY. Aged 20.—Strongly recommended to mercy. — Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Justice Maule.

Reference Number: t18441021-2396

2396. WILLIAM ROSS TUCHET was indicted for feloniously shooting off and discharging a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, at Thomas Smith, and wounding him in and upon his back, with intent to murder him.—2nd COUNT, for wounding only, with a like intent.—3rd COUNT, stating his intent to he to maim and disable.—4th COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. CHARNOCK conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a gunmaker, and reside at No. 288, High Holborn. I keep a shooting-gallery there. On the 6th of July last the prisoner came to my premises—I had never seen him before that I recollect—I was in the gallery when he came in—my son Alfred was at work in the gallery, which is at the end of the shop, at the back—it is a place where people practise pistol and rifle-shooting—it was between twelve and one o'clock when the prisoner came in—he spoke to me first—he asked me if he could be accommodated with a brace of duelling pistols—I said, "Yes, sir, you can"—I gave him them, and took him to the pistol length of practice, which is fifteen yards, where gentlemen generally stand, when they fire at the figure which I keep—I loaded both the pistols—I handed him one—it was regularly loaded with ball—he fired that off; and said, "This pistol pulls of too hard, I should like one to go easier "—I told him I would in the next set the air-trigger, and that would go easier for him—I did so—the second pistol was loaded the same as the first—he fired that, and complained of that going too easy—he was a very good shot—he marked the figure every time—he said, "I will not have the air-trigger set now, let me have it as I had the first"—I loaded him a third, and after that he came back to the loading-place, and said, "I will stand the long distance now"—that was about thirty yards in length—the third was loaded in like manner—he hit the mark then—our longest distance is fifty yards—the third pistol he fired off at thirty yards—after he fired the third I gave him a fourth—that was loaded exactly the same—I did it myself—I then proceeded to load another, which would be the fifth—he was about two yards from me when I gave him the fourth, and my back was towards him—I had the other pistol, and was beginning to load it, and his pistol went off and shot me—it pushed me against the bench—I leant over and seized the rail, and said, "Good God, I am shot!"—my son said, "That gentleman has shot you"—my son was at the end of the loading-place—I fell forward towards the wall—I was not sufficiently sensible to speak a word—I heard the report of the pistol—there was no person in the gallery at the time but the prisoner and my son—a medical man was sent for, and I was afterwards taken to the hospital—I remained there nine weeks before I went before the Magistrate, and I was taken ill again, and obliged to go for a fortnight or three weeks—I am labouring now under very severe pain—the ball was extracted five weeks after I was in the hospital—they made several attempts before they could venture to get it.

ALFRED SMITH . I am the son of last witness. On the 6th of July I was in the shooting-gallery—I saw the different pistols that were fired by the prisoner at the mark—my father was standing at the loading-bench—I

saw the prisoner turn round and deliberately shoot my father—I saw him take a deliberate aim—my father fell towards the bench, and said, "My God, I am shot in the back"—I was about a yard from my father—I said nothing to the prisoner—my father said, "You rascal, why did you shoot me?"—he said, "I have done it on purpose, as I wish to be hung"—I fetched a policeman, and he was given into custody.

ADOLPHUS LONSDALE (police-constable F 110.) On Saturday, the 6th of July, about a quarter before one o'clock, I was called into Mr. Smith's shooting-gallery—I saw the prisoner standing in the shooting—gallery, alone, with his umbrella under his arm, standing against the bench—I asked him why he shot Mr. Smith—he said he did it on purpose, he was tired of his life, he wished to get hung—those are the words he made use of, I am sure of that—Mr. Smith was up stairs then—I took the prisoner into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. He did not appear at all to regret what he had done, did he? A. No—he stood with his arms folded—nobody else was in the place with him.

GEORGE ROYDE . I was house-surgeon at St. Bartholomew's Hospital at the time this occurred. On Saturday, the 6th of July, the prosecutor was admitted into the hospital as an in-door patient—I examined the wound—it was just on the right of the spine, and immediately above the loin—I probed it, and found a resisting body, but it was impossible at the time to say whether it was bone or the bullet—from time to time I endeavoured to find what the hard substance was; and ultimately I found it, on the 16th of Aug.—I first extracted a small piece of bone, and then a bullet, which I produce; a piece of cloth with a seam in it also came away—it appeared like the cloth of a coat—the prosecutor remained under my care a considerable time—he went out on the 24th of Aug., and was re-admitted—he is now labouring severely under the effect of the wound—at first we considered the wound dangerous, and even now, with portions of the bone coming away, we do not consider him out of ultimate danger—he is out of immediate danger—he is not very likely to be fit for active business again.

MR. CLARKSON called the following witnesses.

RIGHT HON. LORD AUDLEY . The prisoner is my brother. He will be twenty-three years of age next Nov.—he is the third and youngest son of the late Lord Audley, who died on the 14th of January, 1837—shortly before his death a very protracted litigation commenced respecting his property, which has gone on ever since—it has practically been adverse to our family, and has left us in very embarrassed circumstances in point of pecuniary matters—I consider that the prisoner has from his youth been very sensitive and reserved generally—I remember the loss of an associate of his, of the name of Weston—he was about sixteen then—Weston died at sea; his death seemed to make a very great impression on the mind of my brother, I think stronger than on persons generally under such circumstances—he was not educated for any profession—he became from time to time acquainted with the embarrassed situation of the family—those circumstances seemed to make a very great impression on his mind, and I think it depressed his mind to notice things which persons generally would not—we were not a very great deal together during the year 1842—we saw each other oftener than we had done some time previous—I was in Ireland in the latter end of 1842—I had gone over in March, 1842, and, I believe, a third time—I was a good deal backwards and forwards—he was in Ireland at that time, and I saw him frequently, particularly towards the latter part of the year we were more together—he left Ireland, to come to London, in Jan., 1843, leaving me in Ireland—I did not see him during the whole of the year 1843, after he left in Jan.—I did not see him till last April, when I came over to England; and from that time down to this

unfortunate occurrence we were living together constantly in the same apartments—as he became acquainted with the circumstances of difficulty in the family, he made them the subject of observation to me, and I thought he took a very depressed view of things; he showed great depression of spirits, more so than perhaps I felt myself; and I attribute this view entirely to the circumstances in which we were placed acting on his peculiar temperament—I have sat with him in the same room for many hours together—on those occasions he was very reserved; occasionally he would be not so much so, but rather cheerful—generally speaking he was very reserved—during the time I have been living with him, from April down to last July, he has very seldom spoken to me—when we have been sitting together in the same room, he has been doing nothing but sitting in a pensive manner—when I addressed him he very seldom did more than answer, "Yes" or "No," and sometimes he would not answer me at all—he generally seemed to avoid conversation—when he sat in this way without speaking I have observed that the expression of his countenance would sometimes alter, but generally it was a very settled expression of countenance—I remarked his countenance particularly, because I did not consider at that time that his bodily health was good—generally speaking, when he was sitting in this pensive way, his look was downcast—sometimes he had, I thought, a very fixed, severe expression, very great austerity of countenance, and sometimes rather the reverse—these changes were not produced by conversation but by what was passing in his own mind—his eyes were very suffused at times, he had a very dreamy expression of countenance, very melancholy and dejected—he was very sensitive of public observation, and complained that he was constantly the subject of observation—the house we lived in was in a street with houses facing us—he said he thought the people in the houses opposite watched him, or us rather—I remember on one particular occasion his stating that they were then watching us—I did not consider that that was the fact—I was near the window at the time, but not before the window—I was between two windows—I think I was rather nearer the window than he was, and on his mentioning that there were people watching, I looked, and saw no one—I think the neighbours might have watched, just as neighbours will do, but I do not think we were the subject of any particular observation—I do not consider we were watched by them—he was not in the habit of dining at an eating-house while he was with me—we generally dined at home, except on Sunday—lie did not dine at any one particular place when he dined out—he was in the habit of frequenting certain places—mostly two, I believe—he said he was known by the people there, that they made observations respecting him—that struck me as very improbable at the time, and I went afterwards to take means to satisfy myself of the fact—I found no foundation for it—they did not know him—he did not show any disinclination to go out into the public streets, but he had a great disinclination to be observed in the neighbourhood—the first thing that struck me when he walked in the streets was the heedless manner in which lie walked along—his head was generally raised—he appeared to be looking up and not heeding the passers-by—he seemed to feel his way by my shoulder, so much so that it was rather a subject of annoyance to me—he did not make way for people he met in the street—he walked with his face, generally speaking, upwards—although he walked generally wherever I chose to take him, he would show hesitation to go in particular directions—he would yield to me, but would rather that I would not go that way—he gave no reason for that except that he evidently did not like to go that way—I think it was in the direction of High-street that he disliked—when we used to take a walk we generally walked in the Park, or Regent-street, and sometimes I would go to Hyde-park—the nearest way was by High-street,

Marylebone—he appeared always to evince a disinclination to go by that particular way—I know no reason for that except that it was a more public direction, and he was very sensitive of observation by anybody—he did not wish that I should stop for a moment to look at anything, and objected passing any shops—he was very restless, indeed, very impatient if I stopped to look into any shops—he would not look in himself, he would stand with his face down on the pavement, evidently wishing I should leave as soon as possible—I thought he did not like anybody to come into the room suddenly—he did not appear to wish any one—he was very reserved—I could not exactly understand what his feeling was, but he did not like anything to disturb him—my mother was a daughter of Sir Ross Donelly—Sir Ross Donelly became insane before his death—I know the fact of my own knowledge—it did not occur so long ago—I am aware that there were proceedings taken by Admiral Sir Ross Donelly's family, and the result of the commission of lunacy which was issued was, that he was not of sound mind—he was a very old man—my brother often alluded to this circumstance when he was speaking to me in these times of depression—he alluded to it during the time that I was so much in England, 1841 and 1842—he was left very much alone, in 1841 particularly, and I have no doubt that at that time, from the observations he made to me, when I saw him after a long interval, his mind then first began to suffer, and in order to divert his attention from his affairs he said he used to walk about Dublin, and at those times he very often went into Mr. Sharp's literary rooms, there looking over books, and I have every reason to believe, from what he stated, he found matters there which fixed his attention and caused him to make them matters of reflection—he said he was very much annoyed indeed in taking up an old publication to see some allusion to an ancestor of his, a member of his family, and he expressed himself to the effect that he con-sidered he had unfortunate blood in his veins, and that there was unfortunate blood in the family—he spoke it generally—my impression is that he communicated to me to the effect that he felt it himself—he said he considered there was unfortunate blood in the family, and that he sometimes felt it himself—he has several times complained of pains in the head, a long time back—he first complained of head-ache on the last occasion of my coming over to England—observing that his health appeared to be not good, I questioned him on the subject, and he stated to me that it was not very good—I said I hoped his last visit to England and seeing his family would have improved his health—he replied that was not the case, for nearly the last year, in fact ever since he came over, he was getting worse, particularly for the last four months—he said he had a constant noise in his head—he has occasionally complained of giddiness—he said that he passed many sleepless nights, and complained very much of his head, and of agony of mind at night—he said he could not turn his attention to anything apart from the subject of our affairs—I advised him to consult a physician—seeing that this feeling was increasing latterly, I spoke to him rather strongly—he seemed indifferent about it—he said to me one day, with I thought a peculiar air, that these things might go on sometimes too long—since this unfortunate event I have looked into a box of his which was at the same lodging where we lived together—it was locked up—I found in it a tin letter-box, and on opening that I found a bottle containing a few drops of laudanum, also a bottle nearly full of acetate of morphia, and a small paper containing a few grains, marked "A few grains of acetate of morphia "—it was not very long before this event that I spoke to him on the subject of consulting sulting a physician—I do not think he did consult any physician, but I prevaded on him to have a little prescription made up, which I furnished him with—from what he stated I believe he did have it made up, and took

some of it—it appeared to me that his health was declining down to the day on which this occurred—I saw him on the morning this happened—he left home between eleven and twelve o'clock—he did not tell me for what purpose he was going out—I thought he might be going to my agents—I consider that he was formerly neat in his dress, and cleanly in his person—I have noticed an alteration in that respect latterly—he became indifferent—sometimes he did not shave, and allowed his hair to grow.

MR. CHARNOCK. Q. Is Sir Ross Donelly dead? A. He has been dead between two and three years—he was a very aged gentleman—the proceedings were taken against him about a year before his death—his age was not exactly known—some supposed he might have been seventy-five, and some thought he was near eighty-three—I believe he stood very high in his profession—I had been on sociable terms with him for many years before, but I saw him very seldom—Lady Audley is about forty-five or forty-six years of age, I believe—I have been speaking principally from the period between April and July this year—the Ladies Audley did not visit him during that time—they were at Sandgate, in Kent—the prisoner and I lived together at this lodging—we had separate bed-rooms—he went out when he pleased, and I went out when I pleased—no restraint was put upon him—he has neglected to shave himself latterly—I have observed that he allowed his beard to grow—he had shaving materials—nothing was taken from him.

MR. BODKIN. Q. I suppose until this event occurred you never had any thought that he was of unsound mind, so as to be dangerous to himself? A. No—I thought him highly eccentric—if he had been of another disposition I perhaps might have taken some proceedings, but he was very gentle, and I thought there was nothing to precipitate his mind—I observed that his health appeared to be declining as far back as 1841.

CHARLOTTE LAWLEDGE . My husband keeps an upholsterer's shop, in Weymouth-street, Portland-place. The prisoner lodged at my house from January, 1843, till the 6th of July, when he was taken on this charge—he occupied two rooms on the second floor—Lord Audley came on a visit to him about four months since—I think it was in April—he had a bed-room in my house—he sat in the same sitting-room with his brother—the prisoner was a very regular, quiet person—I have thought that he looked very ill lately—he used to complain of a sensation of boiling on the top of the head—he appeared very much disconcerted if any persons came where he was—he appeared to desire to keep by himself—his demeanor was very unhappy, very gloomy—I have noticed that, I think, since Christmas last—I noticed it since the latter end of last year—this unhappiness appeared to increase very much since then—the week before he was apprehended he appeared to be worse—his habits were originally inally very cleanly—he was in the habit of changing his linen as other gentlemen would do, and on this very week, which ended on the 6th of July, he never changed it all the whole week—he used to ask me if there was anything very gloomy in the morning, for he could not read—he was obliged to get up from his book and walk the room—he wanted to know if there was anything miserable in the morning, for it seemed to have a great effect—I told him I thought his stomach was out of order—he was a gentleman of particularly gentle and mild habits—he used to sit in the elbow chair, in a very strange way—he would sit himself down, and put his hand on the right elbow, put his head on his hand, and watch me about the room when I went in to him—I noticed latterly that he paid so little attention to himself, that he did not take his dressing-gown off the chair—I thought he was very uncomfortable, and he paid no attention to himself—I have observed him sit in that manner repeatedly when I have been in the room, very much so latterly—he

seemed to avoid conversing with me very much—he appeared to me to be in a very melancholy state at this time—I have frequently endeavoured to rouse him, and speak to him, and offer him kindnesses from time to time, which he has avoided latterly—I knew he was the member of a noble family, and felt for him; and when I have made little advances to relieve him from what I thought were the appearances he presented, he has avoided those advances, and seemed to decline to converse with me—he was a very good deal at home—he endeavoured to avoid public observation—I took most notice of this melancholy and wretchedness about him from about last November—I recollect his going out on the morning of the 6th of July—I saw him pass the shop window—I did not see him come down stairs—I was not aware of any object he had in going out then—I did not see him afterwards till he was in custody.

MR. CHARNOCK. Q. I suppose when the prisoner hired your lodging he made some arrangements about the rent he was to pay? A. Yes—he paid me the rent every week—he paid me the sum he agreed to pay—I used to take him up a bill once a week, and he regularly settled it with me—he sometimes gave directions about his dinner—he generally dined by himself till Lord Audley came—he never had any friends to dine with him—there was nothing in his manner which created any alarm in my mind so as to make me afraid of him—knives and dangerous instruments were in his way.

JOSEPH LAWLEDGE . I am the son of last witness—I live with her at the house where the prisoner lodged—within about a month before he committed this act, I have noticed a change in the manner and habits of the prisoner—he has been very dejected; and within about a week before this occurrence, careless—I do not know whether he was a good deal alone during that week—he appeared to shun society—I have not heard him complain of anything being the matter with his head—he did not appear to me to be out of health—I have not spoken to him at all on the subject—I was out on the 6th of July, about ten minutes to twelve in the day, at St. Giles's church, and saw the prisoner—he was going towards the City—he appeared very agitated, and was walking quicker than usual—he stared very hard at me, and passed on very quickly.

EDWARD THOMAS MONRO , M. D. I reside in Harley-street. I was called on by Lord Audley, on the 8th of July last, two days after this occurred, and visited the prisoner in Clerkenwell prison on that day—I saw him ten or twelve times in the course of July, and I have seen him since occasionally, in Newgate—I saw him yesterday—Dr. Warburton accompanied me, I think, on about five occasions, about three to Clerkenwell, and two latterly, to Newgate—I have had considerable experience in the treatment of persons of unsound mind—it has been my constant profession for more than thirty years—when I first saw the prisoner I was aware that he was the grandson of Sir Ross Donelly—I had attended Sir Ross Donelly for several weeks at his house in Harley-street, and gave evidence at the commission of lunacy which took place shortly after that, about five years ago—at that time Sir Ross Donelly was certainly in an unsound state of mind, not merely the result of old age and imbecility, but labouring under delusions—he was found of unsound mind by the Jury—I have every reason to believe that he remained so to his death—his affairs were in Chancery ever afterwards—I have heard the evidence of Lord Audley, Mrs. Lawledge, and her son, to-day, and have had submitted to me an account of the prisoner for some time past—I have made minute inquiry as to his whole history to enable me the better to ascertain the state of his mind on examining him—I first saw him on the 8th of July, at Clerkenwell—I was with him I think nearly an hour on that occasion—I–saw

him in a small cell on the first occasion, and so I did on the second occasion, and I have seen him in the infirmary, and sometimes in the court-yard of the infirmary—from my examination of him on the 8th of July, I had no doubt in my own mind that he was of unsound mind—he told me that his sole object in this transaction was to get hanged, that he had no knowledge of Mr. Smith, and did not even know his name—he also told me that he had been brooding over suicide for years, that he had purchased laudanum at Savory and Moore's, in Regent—street, that he had purchased morphia at Dinneford's, in Bond-street, that he had taken on one occasion, about a week before this transaction occurred, about an ounce of laudanum, without any fatal effect; and he had also taken some small quantity of the morphia—he told me that he had no occupation, no friends, no companions, that he had been brooding over melancholy subjects for years, not only on his own family affairs, but every event that happened of a horrible description, occupied his attention, and worried his mind constantly; that he cut out of the papers all the dreadful events that occurred, particularly one that happened at Brighton, where a policeman was killed, I think, and that this event ran in his head for weeks, and it struck him if he were to do the same, he should attain his object, which was to get hanged—he told me that he was watched, not only by his own landlord, in Weymouth-street, but by the neighbours; and that the clock in the house kept saying to him all night, for several nights before this occurred, "Don't attempt it, don't attempt it!"—he told me also, on one occasion, especially, that he had the strongest inclination to repeat this thing, and that if he had a pistol at the moment he certainly should shoot anybody that was near him; that he could not trust himself—he told me that he had sought comfort in religion, but he had found none, that he had studied metaphysics; that he could find comfort nowhere, that he had been driven to desperation; and in fact, not only in my judgment, to desperation, but to distinct mental derangement—I have not the slightest doubt that his conduct was genuine; his whole history gives the lie to any idea of simulation—he is in a state of downright melancholia, and not to be trusted for five minutes—if he were at liberty to-day, I should expect the same thing to occur—he is enveloped by strong feelings, which he is not able to resist—on one occasion, in Newgate, about a month since, when I saw him in the dining-room of the Governor, he was so extremely bewildered that he could not answer the commonest question—if I asked him where he slept, what sort of bed he had, or what he had for dinner, he said he did not know what I meant—I saw him alone in that room—he was sent for from his cell to see me—he was in extreme confusion of mind—he seemed to be much worse on that occasion than I had ever seen him—I think he had that peculiar expression of eye which denoted that his head was affected by physical pain—melancholia is some-times times attended by delusion, and sometimes not—I do not think that this representation presentation about the clock saying, "Don't attempt it," was a pure substantial delusion—I think that his extreme melancholy induced him to suppose that the clock said that—it proved that he had been brooding over some terrible affair—I believe that he perfectly understands what is going on now—I have no doubt of it, but he is in a state of apathy—lie has no compunction—he has repeatedly stated that he was without any feeling, that he felt quite indifferent, he could not understand how it all was, and he hoped the time might come when he should feel as he ought; but he had no compunction, and no feeling—he appeared to be very indifferent about the consequences—madness is notoriously hereditary—there are intervals in which there may be soundness in one member of a family direct from another member who has been

unsound, and the subsequent member may be as unsound as the first—that is not at all unusually the case—it is quite in the common order of things.

Q. Would the state of mind in which you found Sir Ross Donelly be one of the circumstances which you would take into your consideration in arriving at a conclusion as to the state of the prisoner's mind? A. By no means necessarily so—I should have come to the same conclusion had I never known Sir Ross Donelly, because the points are so strong—they tend to throw some light on the matter, but the other circumstances are ample without it—if I had heard of such an act as this, committed without any motive, the fact of an ancestor having been deranged, would assist me in coming to a conclusion as to the state of the man's mind—I should have thought it an important circumstance, but in this case I thought there was sufficient without.

MR. CHARNOCK. Q. I believe Sir Ross Donelly was very aged? A. He was, I believe, seventy-five—I had known him about a year before his death—I believe he had been labouring under this complaint only a few weeks before I saw him—he was a very hale old man—he had been an admiral, and was a strong hearty man—he was not bowed down by bodily infirmity—he was not of feeble body, but of feeble mind—as far as I remember he died of dropsy—I cannot say whether the complaint under which he laboured was hereditary—I had never seen the prisoner till the 8th of July.

DR. WARBURTON. I have been practising as a physician for about twenty years—during that period I have directed my attention chiefly to diseases of the mind—at the time of the last Sessions I was exceedingly ill, and confined to my bed at Bath—I have visited the prisoner six times altogether in company with Dr. Monro since this unhappy transaction—I have been in Court, and heard the statement of the circumstances attending the prisoner's life, and the manner in which this act was committed—my opinion is that he is most decidedly of unsound mind at this time—I believe him to have been so at the time this transaction occurred—I have made notes, which I have got with me, but I came to the conclusion from the extraordinary solitary mode of life which the unfortunate gentleman had been leading, from the strong marks of melancholy and great depression which had existed all the way through, from the attempt which he made on his own life, and from his having told me that he bought double the quantity of laudanum which he had taken, that he only took one half of it, because he had heard or read in medical books that if he took an over dose, it might not produce death, but would cause vomiting; he was, therefore, anxious to destroy himself by only taking part of the dose—he also told me he had bought morphia, both solid and liquid, for the same purpose, and from the act being committed apparently without any motive whatever, and from his telling me that he did not even know Mr. Smith's name when he went to the shooting-gallery—my opinion is that he committed the act when he had lost all self-control, and did not possess anything like moral liberty.

MR. CHARNOCK. Q. Your opinion that he is insane arises, I think you say, from what he stated to you when you were in the prison? A. From my examination of him, and what he stated to me—I first saw him on the 10th—I consider that during part of the year 1843 he was labouring under what is called melancholia—I should say there must have been a diseased mind for a considerable period—I can undertake to say that he is labouring under melancholia to such an extent as to render him incapable of distinguishing right from wrong.

NOT GUILTY, being insane.

Reference Number: t18441021-2397

2397. ANN FOX, alias Regan , was indicted for uttering counterfeit coin, after a previous conviction of a like offence.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant solicitor to the Mint. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Ann Fox—I have examined it with the original record, and it is a true copy—(read.)

WILLIAM WINSBURY (police-constable N 115.) I was present at the prisoner's trial in Oct., 1839—she is the person described in the record.

JOHN HEATLEY GABB . I am a butcher, and live in Great James-street. The prisoner came to my shop on the 10th of Oct. last, about half-past twelve o'clock in the day—she asked for some pieces that laid on the board, which came to 4 1/2 d.—she paid me a shilling—in taking her hand out of her pocket she dropped a shilling, which I suspected to be bad, as it laid on the ground—she put her foot over it, and gave me another one—I looked at it—it was bad, and I purposely dropped it, in order to get the other—I said, "Stand on one side, I have dropped the shilling"—I pushed her foot on one side, and got possession of the two—I examined the other, and that was also bad—I sent for a policeman, and gave her into custody with both the shillings—the prisoner said she was a poor hard-working woman, and that her husband worked in the stone-yard.

ROBERT FRESHWATER (police-constable D 133.) I took the prisoner into custody. I received 2s. from Gabb, which I produce.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint, and have been so for many years. The two shillings produced are both counterfeit, and have been cast in the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Before Mr. Baron Rolfe.

Reference Number: t18441021-2398

2398. THOMAS STOKES was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Obadiah Garrett; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 30.—Received a good character.—Recommended to mercy — Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Justice Maule.

Reference Number: t18441021-2399

2399. JAMES BLAKE was indicted for feloniously setting fire to a house belonging to Ruth Ann Perry, with intent to injure and defraud her.—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to injure and defraud William Sibley.—Other COUNTS, varying the manner of stating the charge.

WILLIAM SIBLEY . I live at Colham-green, near Hillingdon. I lived there on the 29th of Sept. last, in a house belonging to Miss Perry—I was the tenant, and lived there with my wife and family—on Sunday morning, the 29th of Sept., I was aroused at half-past two by the policeman—I got up and went down stairs, opened the door and went out—the policeman said, "All the back part of your place is on fire"—I ran to the back of the house, and the shed at the back of the house was all on fire—the shed leaned to the house—it was the shed which I occupied with the house—it was all burned down, and two carts were burned also, a little one and a big one—it was not down when I got out—it was all in flames, and the two carts were burning—I laid hold of the shafts of one cart and pulled it out all in flames—the shed was covered in at one side and one end—there was no door to it—it was open at the other end—there were two bundles of straw bands in the shed—the prisoner lived in the next house to me—he had lived there all the summer—he

came some time last year—I had lived in that house five years, and have lived three years in the house I am in now—his house is about eight—yards from mine—his garden adjoined the shed—the prisoner worked for me all the summer at bearing off and brick-making—I was his employer—he has quarrelled with me several times, and threatened to fight, but I never had any words with him—the quarrel was not about his work in particular, but about running away from his work, sometimes one thing, and sometimes another; and when I have spoken to him he has threatened to fight me—about nine or ten weeks before the fire I heard him threatening us, that he should like to set the place all on fire, and burn the b—s out—I was leaning over the pales in front of my house at the time, smoking my pipe after supper—it was between ten and eleven o'clock at night—it was a summer's night—the pri= soner was in his own house, and his wife with him—he was talking to his wife—I had used the out-house as a pig-sty, but after selling my pigs I put two carts into it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Are you a master bricklayer? A. A brickmaker—we worked together all the summer—there were some disputes about his not attending to his hours strictly—it was nine or ten weeks before the fire that he said he would like to burn us out—he called it out to his wife—my wife and I were standing outside our place at the time—we could hear what he said very plainly—he shouted it out—his door was shut—it was a light summer's night—I do not know whether he could see me or not—his wife came out at the same time, after they had been threatening, and saw my wife and me standing—she turned herself in doors and said, "Blake, mind what you are saying, for they are outside, listening"—I heard her say that—he said, "I do not care, that is the b----that I mean that is standing out there listening"—he repeated it over two or three times—the shed was used by me.

ELIZABETH SIBLEY . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw the shed on fire on the Sunday morning—about nine or ten weeks before that I had been standing with my husband out of doors, and heard my husband's name and mine repeated in a most infamous manner, in a jealousy sort of way—I heard the prisoner say, "There is one at work, the other at work, Dick at work, Hannah at work; he wants to get rich; he wants all the money; he wants to get rich before his neighbours are out of debt; I should like to set light to his b----place, and burn the b----s out of it"—I had repeatedly heard him say the same words before, that he would like to set light to the place, and burn us out—he has said it to his wife in-doors—we have not been listening particularly—we were standing in the yard, as they were in the front of their house.

Cross-examined. Q. Then you heard him utter these threats without any attempt at listening? A. Yes—he did not lower his voice—he said it quite loud—I could hear every word plainly—I had heard this, it might be, three or four times before, I cannot exactly say.

COURT. Q. What do you mean by a "jealousy sort of way?" A. Getting on better than them—he was jealous of our getting on better in the world than him—our house is a little better than the prisoner's, which we lived in before—we pay 7l. a-year now, and we paid 5l. a-year for the other house.

HENRY CLARK (police-constable T 109.) I was on duty on the 29th of Sept. about two o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner at Hillingdon-green, green, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's house—I knew him before—he was going towards his own house—he wished me good morning, and I returned him the same compliment—he spoke to me first, and looked me very hard in the face at the time—about a quarter of an hour afterwards I observed

a fire in the shed adjoining Sibley's dwelling-house—I aroused Sibley and his wife and children—they all came out of the house—I went to the prisoner's house, which was close by, and saw his wife—she was up and dressed, and there was a fire in the sitting-room—I called Blake several times, but received no answer until his wife told him to answer me—he then answered, and asked what was the matter—I told him there was a fire, and asked the reason he did not come and assist in putting it out—he said he knew nothing at all about it—I told him I had met him at two o'clock—he said he was in bed by eleven—I asked his wife for a candle—she said she had ne'er a one—I then went to Sibley's, and got one—I came back and saw the prisoner in bed—he asked his wife if we had been trampling his plants down—he then asked her to give him his trowsers, and said he would soon bundle the b----s out of it—I then returned to the fire, and after I had been there a minute or so the prisoner came out—I heard him say he had no water—I searched his garden on the Wednesday, two days after, and found this burnt rag between two and three yards from the shed, in the direction of the prisoner's house—I had a warrant for him on the Tuesday—I saw him that evening come out of the Crown public-house, on Fulham-green—I said, "Hallo, Blake"—he said his name was not Blake—I asked him if he intended to deny living up the lane close by—he said he did not live in the lane, he lived in Cane's brick-field—I took him to the light, identified him, and took him into custody—when I went into his house I saw a coat lying on the bed, which he had on when I met him—I had seen him wear that coat a great many times—he had it on when I met him at two o'clock—it was a very bright moonlight night; the moon was just at the full—I afterwards looked for the coat on the Wednesday, but could not find it.

Cross-examined. Q. You had known him for some time before, had you not? A. Yes, five or six months—he knew me—I had been in the habit of accosting him with "Good day" as he passed, and he me—I frequently saw him—I passed his house twenty times in a night—I knew his person well, and have not the slightest doubt about him—he was the first to challenge me—he did not mention my name—he said, "Good morning," and I returned it—it was light enough for him to see me.

GEORGE GIBSON LYNN (police-constable T 197.) I was with Clark when he met the prisoner—he bid us good morning, and we returned the same—I have known him perfectly well for the last twelve months, and he knew me—I was never in the habit of speaking to him—I was frequently in the habit of seeing him—he used to say "Good day" to me when he met me—I saw nothing of the fire—on the Thursday after, the 3rd of Oct. I saw the prisoner at the station, at twelve o'clock at night, when he was remanded on this charge—he did not seem out of spirits at all, or uncomfortable—he made a moaning noise, and I went into the cell, thinking he was ill—I asked him if anything was the matter—he said no; he supposed he should either be hung or transported—he appeared cheerful.

Cross-examined. Q. Was this moaning such a noise as induced you to ask what was the matter with him? A. Yes—he seemed very restless and uneasy before I went in, but he answered cheerfully—he did not seem pleased with his situation.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Rolfe.

Reference Number: t18441021-2400

2400. HENRY JONES, JOHN HILL, WILLIAM BENSON, JAMES FOREMAN , and HENRY KEY , were indicted for feloniously killing and slaying George Benson.

WILLIAM GEPPS BENNETT . My mother keeps the Wellesley Arms public-house, at Chelsea—I conduct her business. On the evening of the 21st of Sept. the prisoners Jones, Hill, Benson, and Key came to our house—they were in the habit of using the tap-room regularly—there were a great number of their shopmates in the tap-room, as there generally was on a Saturday evening—a dispute and scuffle took place between Jones and George Benson, the brother of William Benson—I was in the parlour at the time—the persons at the bar called me, and I went in and parted them—I told them I could not allow anything of that sort going on in the house, and if they persisted in fighting I should give them in charge—Jones immediately said he did not wish to fight, and put on his coat—I heard no more of any scuffling—Jones left a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes before the others, and I did not observe him come in again—he might have done so, but I did not see it—George Benson put on his coat too.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you known Jones for any length of time? A. About seven years and a half—he has borne the character of a particularly quiet, peaceable, inoffensive young man—he was in the service of Mr. Thomas Pye, a timber and coal-merchant, who is also the proprietor of large saw-mills—the deceased had formerly been in Mr. Pye's employ, and had been discharged in consequence of some irregularity—he and Jones were particularly intimate friends—I have heard that Mr. Pye invited Jones to succeed to the place which Benson was discharged from—Jones did not come and consult me before he went into the place, as to whether he could with propriety do so—he afterwards applied to me as to whether he had done right or wrong in taking the situation, as he was out of a situation—I have known Benson about the same time as I have Jones—I cannot say that he was a particularly violent or excitable man—he was rather irritable—I saw him soon after he came into the tap-room—I did not see him come in and send for Jones out, and challenge him to fight—Jones appeared unwilling to fight when I went in—I did not see the commencement—he was quite willing to put on his coat and go out quietly—Benson did not come to me after Jones had left, and state his satisfaction that he had succeeded in compelling him to fight him—I saw nothing of the fight, and did not hear of it till afterwards.

JOHN HOGAN (police-constable T 25.) On Sunday morning, the 22nd of Sept., I went to the Warwick Arms, Kensington, about a quarter past eight o'clock, and in a stable belonging to that public-house saw the body of a dead man, who was said to be killed in a fight—there was a mark of violence on the neck, immediately under the left ear, a kind of cut—there was also a mark on the bridge of the nose—he appeared to have been dead about half-an-hour—the body was warm and quite limber—I went into the bar of the public-house, and saw the five prisoners sitting down all together—I said, "This is a bad job"—they said, "Yes, it is a bad job, and we are willing to go with you"—Foreman said, "It was a fair fight, there was no foul play"—I sent to the station for assistance, and they went quietly with me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When Foreman said it was a fair fight and no foul play, did he not refer to young Benson, the deceased's brother, and ask whether it was not so? A. He did, and he confirmed it—they all appeared sincerely sorry for what bad happened, and were willing to go with us—an inquest was held on the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of misadventure.

JOHN THOMAS . I keep the Warwick Arms, near Kensington-basin. The dead body of George Benson was brought to my house about a quarter past

eight o'clock on Sunday morning, the 22nd of Sept.—I had never seen him before—the parties who were along with him told me it was George Benson—Dr. Waller was one, and a man named Chalk, who is not here—he was brought by ten or twelve men, and put into the stable—I got two trussels, fixed some boards on it, and saw the body placed on the boards—I went out of the stable, went inside of my bar, and said to the prisoners, who were all standing outside the bar, "This is a dreadful job you have been doing this morning"—they all said yes, it was—some of the prisoners pointed out Jones to me as the man that had been fighting—I asked them what they meant to do about it—one and all of them said, "The best thing we can do, master, is to go to the station-house, and give ourselves up to the police"—Jones said he did not wish to fight, but he had been struck at the Wellesley Arms, on the Saturday night previous, by Benson—I then saw Dr. Waller going from my house to his own residence, and asked him, if he saw a policeman, to send one down, and in about ten minutes Sergeant Coggins came with another constable—he sent for more men—the prisoners said, "You have no occasion to send for any more men, for we will go voluntarily along with you to the police."

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you recollect Jones saying that he had been provoked and goaded to fight, by Benson, who had struck him? A. Yes, he said Benson had struck him once the night before, and he would give, if he had it, 1000l., or all he had to restore him to life.

COURT. Q. Did anybody mention the name of this man that was dead? A. Yes, the prisoners said it was George Benson.

JOHN BROWNING . I now work at Kingston. At the time this took place I was working in the brick-fields at Kensington—on Sunday morning, the 22nd of Sept., I was walking over the Lilly Arms bridge, between six and seven o'clock, and saw a few men going towards the Kensington canal-basin—I thought it was a fight, and followed—when I got there I saw two men tucking up their shirt sleeves—I did not know them then—I know them now—it was Jones and the deceased—they went to fighting, and kept on a little while, very near a quarter of an hour, I should think, or it might not have been so long—Jones then hit Benson on the breast, and then under the left ear—Benson then said, "I am done"—he fell on his hands, his arms spread out, and he fell on his face—Jones said to William Benson, "Is there any fear?"—all the prisoners were there—Foreman and Key were sitting on the bank—Hill picked up Jones, and Benson picked his brother up—Foreman went and knocked the captain of the barge up to get a drop of water to wash the dead man's face—Jones and two more men ran after the doctor, and they carried the dead man away—I cannot say who carried him away—there were not a great many persons about at the time—there were two or three more than the prisoners—Hill picked up Jones, and Benson his brother, three or four times, whenever they fell—they rested—there were rounds—they rested on Hill and Benson's knees.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. There were not above six or seven rounds, were there? A. I cannot swear—there might be eight or nine—the fight was fairly conducted as far as I know about fighting—I saw it from the beginning—there was only one knock-down blow, but they fell down two or three times, hugging one another, and then they were picked up—they had rounds in the way in which English people fight—I do not know whether the deceased wished to fight or no—they all seemed very much terrified when they found the man was in danger—they were all very sorry for what had happened, for they stood and cried.

SAMUEL ROBSHAW . I am a sawyer, and live in Wellesley-grove, Chelsea.

About seven o'clock on the Sunday morning, I was at the Kensington-canal—I saw a little of the fight between Jones and George Benson—I knew them both—Hill was second to Jones, and William Benson to the deceased—the other prisoners were there—I did not see Foreman and Key do anything—I cannot tell how the blows were given—I had been to the Wellesley Arms the night before—Jones and George Benson had a bit of a grumbling in the tap-room there.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you known Jones for any time? A. Yes, we were brought up as children together—he was particularly peaceable and quiet in his disposition and conduct, very good-tempered, and inoffensive—Benson, when he had a little liquor, was apt to be very quarrelsome—from what I saw on the Saturday night, Jones appeared unwilling to fight if he could help it—the other one challenged him—I did not see any blow struck.

GEORGE LEWIS . I was at the Wellesley Arms on the Saturday night before the fight, and heard the dispute—I saw Jones, William Benson, Hill, and Key, leave the public-house with George Benson—I heard Jones and George Benson agree to fight on the Sunday morning—I do not know whether all the prisoners heard that agreement—they were there—they made it between themselves—I got up about six next morning, and met some of them at the top of Wellesley-grove—I cannot exactly say which—there were three or four—Jones was not there—I saw him after—I met George Benson at the top of the Grove, and two or three more of them—I did not see William Benson there, or Hill, or Foreman—Key came up just after I was there—they all came up afterwards—they went down the side of the Kensington-canal, and when they got there, Jones and George Benson stripped to fight—they did fight, and eventually Benson lost his life—the prisoners were all there—Hill seconded Jones—he picked him up-William Benson seconded his brother—I did not see the others do anything.

AUGUSTUS WALLER . I am a surgeon. On Sunday morning, the 22nd of Sept., between seven and eight o'clock, I saw the body of the deceased, on the spot where he was killed, before it was conveyed to the Warwick Arms—life was perfectly extinct—the body was still warm at the trunk, but getting cold at the extremities—I examined the body, and perceived on the left collarbone the mark of a bruise—on the lower lip there was the appearance of a cut, and on the bridge of the nose was the appearance of another severe contusion—behind the left ear there was a wound or cut in the skin, about an inch and a half in length—it is difficult to say what that might have been caused by—it might have been by pulling the ear forcibly forward—there was the appearance of some blood coming from the inner right ear—those were the only traces of violence that I perceived—on the following day, by order of the Coroner, I examined the body—I found no appearance of fracture of the cranium, but on taking off the skull, I perceived, on the right side of the brain, at the upper part, appearances of severe contusion, and a considerable quantity of blood effused in the cavity of the cranium, such as would he caused by the rupture of a blood-vessel—that was, in my opinion, the cause of death—in nine cases out of ten, I should say rupture of a blood-vessel would not be caused by such a blow as I saw under the ear—such a blow, combined with the excitement the man was in at the moment, would be sufficient to account for the rupture, but I should say a man might very frequently receive such a blow as that, unless he was of very weak constitution, as I found afterwards was the case, from my examination—I have no doubt that such a blow might cause the rupture of the blood-vessel, and that that was the cause of his death—apoplexy,

and a great many other causes, might occasion rupture of a blood-vessel on the brain.

JONES— GUILTY . Aged 21.

HILL— GUILTY . Aged 27.

BENSON— GUILTY . Aged 28.

Strongly recommended to mercy. Confined Two Months.

FOREMAN and KEY— NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Thursday, October 24th, 1844.

Second Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2401

2401. WILLIAM STEVENS, JOHN WHITE , and JOHN LONG , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Nicholas Walker, about the hour of three in the night of the 21st of Oct., at St. Clement Danes, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 4 half-crowns, 8 shillings, 4 sixpences, and 100 pence; his property; to which

STEVENS pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

WILLIAM WEST (policeman.) On the 21st of Oct., about three o'clock in the morning, I was in Drury-lane, on duty, and saw the three prisoners standing ing at the corner of Bury-court, in Drury-lane—the prosecutor keeps a public-house at the corner—I asked them what they did there that wet morning—Long said they had been at a raffle, had stopped late, and were locked out—I left them, went round my beat, and in seven or eight minutes, when I returned, I only saw White and Long—I said, "You have dispensed with one of your party"—they said, "Yes, he is gone home; we are going there also"—I went round my beat again, returned, and saw the same two leave the place—I went down the court, listened, and heard something like sliding down something—I went and looked up at the prosecutor's house, and saw Stevens standing on the top of a stone of a watering-place—I took him in charge—the water-spout runs up from the watering-place below—I found 11s. 10d. in copper money in his pocket, four half-crowns in his hat, 10s. in a tobacco-box in his pocket, and a screw-driver without a handle—I went back to the public—house, and met Long at the corner of Russell-street—I gave him in charge, went to the public-house again, and saw White, and took him in charge—I asked what he was waiting for—he said, "Nothing particular"—I then asked him where the other prisoners were—he said they were gone home—I found on him a handle, exactly fitting the part of the screw-driver found on Stevens—I afterwards examined the water-spout, and saw marks on the side of it.

NICHOLAS WALKER . I keep the Barley Mow, in Drury-lane. Stevens lived in my service about sixteen months ago—I do not know the other prisoners—about four o'clock on this morning I was called up by the police—I let West in—I examined my bar, and missed 1l. in silver, and 11s. 10d. in penny-pieces, four half-crowns, eight shillings, and four sixpences—I examined my premises—they had entered by the scullery window, which was open—it was shut when I went to bed—I saw it myself about one o'clock—it was fastened by a brass spring, and a little brass bolt—the waterspout is about three yards from the scullery window—I had locked all the house before I went to bed—it was all safe and shut up.

White's Defence. About half-past ten o'clock on Monday night, Long and I were going to a raffle, up at the Jolly Butchers, in Newportmarket. Stevens came in, got in conversation with us, and asked us to drink, which we

did. On coming out, he asked us which way we were going home; I said to Seven-dials, as our lodging was closed, as the landlady locks the door at twelve o'clock, and we cannot get in after. He said, "Then you may as well come down to where I live." We went along, and when we came to the corner of this court, he said, "Wait just round the corner, I shan't be long." I said, "Very well;" we waited there, and did not know what he was after till the policeman came and tapped us on the shoulder, and took us to the station; he was a stranger to both of us.

Long's Defence. I have the same to say as White.

WHITE— GUILTY . Aged 18.

LONG— GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2402

2402. GEORGE JAMES was indicted for feloniously assaulting (with another person) Henry Horton, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 4 shillings, 1 sixpence, 3 pence, and 6 halfpence; his monies.

HENRY HORTON . I shall be fifteen years old next month; I did live at Cheltenham, I came to London to look for a ship; I have been three voyages. On the afternoon of the 24th of Sept., about four o'clock, I was by St. Katharine's Dock, and met the prisoner by Solomon's shippingoffice—there was another lad with him—I was saying I wished I could get a ship—the other lad said he knew where I could get one—(the prisoner was by)—I told him if he could get me a ship, I would give him 1s.—the prisoner did not come up at all—he stood apart, about four yards off—he had been with the other lad before—they spoke to each other—after I said I would give the other lad 1s., he went up and spoke to the prisoner—I did not hear what he said—he came back to me again, and told me to come on, or the captain would be gone out—I had another lad with me, but we left him, because they said if the other lad went with me the captain would kick up a row—I left the other, and went with those two—we went up to Blackwall to a public-house, called the Gun—they took me to a shed there, and then asked me where my money was—I was so frightened, I could not answer—the prisoner took and bound a handkerchief about my mouth—he said if I hallooed he would stifle me to death—the other lad ransacked my pockets—they took away 4s. 6d. in silver, three penny-pieces, six halfpence, and six halffarthings—I snatched the handkerchief from my mouth, and hallooed out, "Stop thief"—they pretended to run after me, and as soon as they got a little way, they ran away as hard as they were able—I kept hallooing, "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner stopped by a policeman—the other lad ran away.

JOHN DAVIS (police-constable K 94.) On the 24th of Sept. I heard the cry of "Stop thief!" and saw the prisoner running as hard as he could, pursued by the prosecutor—he cried out, "Stop thief!" likewise—I pursued, and caught him—he said, "O Sir! it was not me, it was my shipmate"—I said, "What has he done?"—he said, "Robbed that boy," pointing to Horton, "of 3s. 6d."—Horton came up and said, "You have done sufficient to transport you, you have robbed me of 5s."—the prisoner said, "No, I did not do it, it was my shipmate"—Horton said, "You put the handkerchief over my mouth"—the prisoner said, "Well, what if I did, what of it?"—he said, "If you go after the other boy, I dare say you will overtake him, and get the money from him"—I took him to the station, but found nothing upon him—when I stopped him he had this handkerchief in his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I came up from Liverpool with a lad; we saw this lad at a shipping agent's, near the Londondock; he said he knew a ship he would take him to; when he got to Blackwall he put his handkerchief over

his mouth and took the money from him; I ran after him, and he knocked me down, and the policeman took me; I had nothing to do with it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

Before Mr. Justice Maule.

Reference Number: t18441021-2403

2403. JOHN MANNING was indicted for b----y.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Rolfe.

Reference Number: t18441021-2404

2404. JAMES BALL was indicted for a rape.

GUILTY of an Assault. Aged 31.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Before Mr. Justice Maule.

Reference Number: t18441021-2405

2405. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying ing Hannah Edwards: he was also charged with the like offence on the Coroner's inquisition.

ROBERT MOON BOWMAN . I am house-surgeon of Westminster-hospital. Hannah Edwards was admitted there as an in-patient on Monday, the 30th of Sept.—she had a wound on the back part of her head, on the left side—the face and scalp were affected with erysipelas—she died on the following Saturday, at five o'clock, of the erysipelas—I think the erysipelas was caused by the wound in the scalp—that is a usual consequence of such a wound—I believe she was an out-patient of the hospital before the 30th.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. I believe the wound of itself was not dangerous? A. It was not—I examined the viscera—there was sufficient to lead me to suppose she had been a woman of intemperate habits—erysipelas arises sometimes spontaneously—a person of intemperate habits would be likely to have spontaneous erysipelas—I think it probably arose from the wound, but cannot take upon myself to say positively—the wound might be occasioned by her falling down intoxicated against a stone.

COURT. Q. Is a wound more likely to occasion erysipelas in persons of intemperate habits than in a sound constitution? A. It is.

SARAH RICHMOND . I knew Hannah Edwards, who is now dead. She was servant to the prisoner at a house of ill fame which he kept, at No. 17, New-way, Westminster—it is a common brothel—I live at No. 20—the prisoner lives at another house of his in the Almonry, in Westminster—all the houses in New-way are bad houses—I was at the door of the prisoner's house, No. 17, a month ago last Monday four weeks, between ten and eleven o'clock at night—the deceased had been drinking a little I acknowledge—she was a little tipsy—the prisoner and her had a few words, and he accused her of robbing him of a pair of sheets—she had the care of No. 17, and acted as mistress—she said she had not stolen them, but somebody, who occasionally came to sleep there, had taken them, but she would replace them as soon as she could—it caused several words—he said she should not be there—she said, "I have nowhere to go to"—she went towards the door—he pushed her, and she had a dreadful fall—(she had been living there from before last Christmas)—her right foot was on the step of the door, and the left on the curb—he pushed her from the door, which was open—she fell into the road, and was senseless—I picked her up—he did not strike her—it was a violent push with his open hand—the stones in the road are very uneven—they are round pebbles, and most of them flints—she was quite senseless when I picked her up—she could not speak for several moments, and was all in a gore of blood—I got a person to take her to the hospital—I was too much alarmed to, take her myself—they brought her back again, and put her to bed in the

next house to Brown's—she was in great pain—they bad dressed her wound at the hospital—I saw her next morning about twelve o'clock—she was then living at No. 17 again—I saw her two or three times a day afterwards—she was very indifferent, and got worse, and was taken to the hospital on the following Monday—when she fell down the prisoner said he would nail the house up, and used very obscene language—he made an attempt to kick her—I said, "Do not ill use her any more, she is rather in liquor, and is a woman," and then he did not kick her—he was perfectly sober—he went away.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the house you live in one of illfame? A. They are all unfortunate gay women—I have known the deceased ten or eleven years—she bad been drinking—I did not see her put to bed—Brown told her a great many times to leave his house before he pushed her out, and he had done so weeks before—she was at the door when he pushed her—he pushed her with both hands very violently—Mrs. Brent was before the Magistrate, and Seeley also, but he was not present before the accident—I did not hear the deceased use any bad language—she was too much frightened.

Q. Did not she get up almost instantly on falling down? A. No—not without my assistance—she did not try to get into the house again—I put her into the next house—the prisoner sells fish, poultry, and fruit—the deceased did her work as well as she could during the rest of the week—I did not drink with her at all.

SARAH PENNY . I live in Rope-street, Soho. Hannah Edwards was my sister, and was in the prisoner's house, in New-way, to take care of it—I did not often see her, as I did not approve of her life—I am a laundress—after she received the injury I visited her in the hospital—she made a statement to me the day before she died—I do not think she was aware she was going to die.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe she was rather addicted to habits of intemperance? A. That I am perfectly aware of—she was thirty-seven years old.

WILLIAM UPCHURCH (policeman.) I took the prisoner to Newgate, but know nothing of the case.

MR. WILKINS called

MARY ANN BRENT . I am the wife of George Brent, a poulterer, in York-street, Gardener's-lane, Westminster. On the night when Edwards met with this fall I was corning down New-way, between nine and ten o'clock—I heard a row—I stood opposite Brown's door and listened—the woman was very elevated in liquor—she was no sooner down than up again when she had the fall—before she fell I heard Brown say, "You have robbed me quite enough, Ann, and shall not rob me any longer"—with that she used very bad language—he said, "You have imposed upon me quite long enough, you shall not stop any longer"—she came and stood at the door—Brown gave her a shove from the door, and with that her foot caught in the step and she fell—he did not give her a violent shove—she got up again directly and tried to get into the house, and I saw her about half an hour after the row was over, standing against the door—Brown did not attempt to kick her—he never put his foot near her—Richmond did not beg him not to kick her—she never came near till she was going to the hospital, till she heard the rapping outside the door—when Edwards tried to get in again he would not let her in—he kept the door fast—she hammered against it—I left her there, and within half an hour I was going home with my husband I looked in at Mrs. Moses' gin-shop, and saw the deceased drinking a glass of rum—she had her arm up to her head.

COURT. Q. How far do you live from this house? A. Two streets—I had seen Brown at the same market with my husband before that—I know him in that way—the deceased's head was bleeding when she got up.

THOMAS SEELEY . I live in Great Almonry, and am a green-grocer. I have worked for the prisoner as a green-grocer—I went with him on this night to the house, No. 17, New-way, and found the deceased lying there asleep on the bed, intoxicated—Brown awoke her up, and they went to the street-door—he said he had been robbed quite long enough and would not be robbed any longer—Brown went to shut the street door, and in shutting it the deceased fell down—she got up again and began knocking at the door, trying to get in again—I did not see him shove her at all, no more than shutting the door—I was inside the street door—I opened the door when she got up and went to the stable—that was all I saw—I have known Edwards eight or nine years, and knew her to be addicted to drink—she came next morning, begged Mr. and Mrs. Brown's pardon, and lived there a week after till she went to the hospital—I heard her use very bad language.

COURT. A. If he had pushed her, must you have seen it? A. Yes, I will swear he did not push her with his hand—she fell down with the door pushing her—he went to shove the door—I live in Brown's house, No. 24, and am backwards and forwards at No. 17.

NOT GUILTY .

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18441021-2406

2406. ISAAC JACOBS was indicted for stealing 1 box, value 1s., and 4,332 lead-pencils, value 6l., the goods of William Chaplin and another; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2407

2407. EDWARD WILSON was indicted for stealing 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. 6d.; and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d.; the property of Philip Crellin, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18441021-2408

2408. ELIZA BARDIN was indicted for stealing 2 coal-scuttles, value 14s., the goods of James Alexander Manning, her master, to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2409

2409. JOSEPH HAIST CARR was indicted for unlawfully obtaining 3 stock-brushes, and 3 dusting-brushes, the property of Robert Ellis, by false pretences; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Confined Nine Months.

(The prisoner received an excellent character, and was stated to be, with his family, in extreme poverty.)

Reference Number: t18441021-2410

2410. JOSEPH HAIST CARR was again indicted for feloniously forging and uttering a request for the delivery of 12 brushes, with intent to defraud George Edward James Perkins.

MR. PAYNE, on behalf of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2411

2411. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously cutting and wounding Catherine Wilson on her head, with intent to do her some grievous bodily harm.

MR. CROUCH conducted the Prosecution.

CATHERINE WILSON . I live in Gee's-court, Oxford-street. The prisoner is my husband—he is a boot-closer—on the morning of the 17th of Sept., about nine o'clock, I went out on an errand, leaving my husband in bed—he did not send me out—I went to fetch some tea for breakfast—I remained out

about a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes—when I returned, he was sitting by the fireside, eating some cold giblet pie—he called me a b—w—, or a b—, and said I had been out drinking—I said I had not—several words occurred—he asked me for a shilling, which he said I had got, belonging to him—I said I had only got sixpence—I put the sixpence on the table—with that he got up, and hit me on the right side of the head, and then on the left, with his hand—I made towards the other end of the room—he followed, and hit me on the back of the head with his hand, and I fell on my little girl's bed—I got up—a candlestick which he uses in his work was standing on the floor, and I took it up, and said if he hit me again I would mark him—I did not hit him—he took the candlestick out of my hand, and hit me on the top of the head with it—it bled profusely—I turned towards the door and said, "O, do pray let me out"—he said, "No, you shall not go out, for you look like a b—stuck pig, and you shall not go out"—he fastened the door—the room is on the first-floor—I opened the window, and screamed out for assistance—no one came for some time—I lost my recollection—I afterwards saw the room full of people, and have some confused recollection of giving my husband in charge—the blow was given wilfully—I believe I retained the top part of the candlestick in my hand—I did not strike or touch him with it—I lost all recollection after he struck me the second time with the candlestick.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You took something stronger than tea when you went out, did you not? A. No, I did not come back the worse for liquor—I had not taken anything—as I went to buy the tea, I met my daughter-in-law, with her little baby, going on an errand, and I held her baby for her till she came back—I stood at my own door, nursing it—a daughter of my husband's was in the room when this occurred, and must have seen what happened—I am not in the habit of getting drunk—I have the misfortune to have a drunken husband—I have been married six years—I do not recollect giving my husband in charge—I do not know that I had part of the candle-stick stick in my hand, except from what the policeman says—I lost my recollection from loss of blood—Mr. Black is my attorney—I know nothing about any counsel being instructed—I left it to the policeman to look at the list—I have not given Mr. Black any money—I have not retained counsel in this case—I asked Mr. Black if he would speak for me—I swear I was not intoxicated when I came home, and that I did not strike my husband before he touched me—I did not make a motion to strike him with the candlestick—I certainly said, if he hit me again I would mark him.

MR. CROUCH. Q. Was it to prevent his striking you that you threatened him? A. Yes—this is the candlestick.

JOHN CUTTING (police-constable D 33.) On Tuesday morning, the 17th of Sept., I was in Gee's-court at about a quarter to ten o'clock, and heard a boy crying "Murder! policeman, come this way, there is a woman with her throat cut!"—I saw the prosecutrix at the window, with blood running down each side of her face—I went into the room, and saw the prisoner standing with the long part of this candlestick in his hand, and his wife with this other part in her left hand—there was a little girl in the room at the time—she said, "I give him in charge"—I took him to the station—she was bleeding very much—her hair, and all under her throat was smothered with blood—she could stand, but could not walk to the station—she did not appear in the slightest intoxicated, nor smell of drink—when I entered the room, the prisoner was standing with this staff part of the candlestick in his hand—he said, "The b—b—has been out drinking this morning; she has come home and abused me, and don't know what to kick up a row about"—at the station he said, "She has wanted to get me into trouble a long time, and I suppose she has

got what she wants now"—he said she took the candlestick to hit him, and he certainly took it out of her hand and hit her with it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say she was always drinking and messing about, and he did not know what to do with her? A. Yes.

MR. CROUCH. Q. Do you know the parties? A. Yes—I have known the woman about four years—I never saw her drunk—I have often seen her waiting at the door till twelve, one, two, and three o'clock in the morning, and she has stated to me that she was not allowed to get in.

JOHN BIRCH . I am a surgeon, and live in Great Marylebone-street. On the 17th of Sept. I was called to the station about ten o'clock, and saw the prosecutrix—she was bleeding very much from a cut in the head, and I had great difficulty in stopping it—she was very weak and exhausted—the wound was about half an inch deep and an inch and a half long, cut down to the pericardium or covering of the skull—if she had been a woman of dissipated habits crysipelas might have come on—she did not appear to have been drinking in the least—I attended her ten or twelve days—that was necessary—she complains even now of the blow.

Cross-examined. Q. You are assistant to Mr. Joseph, are you not? A. Yes—I attended the Middlesex Hospital three years—I anticipated danger for the first two or three days, but I prevented it by giving her cooling medicine, to keep the fever down—erysipelas did not come on.

GUILTY of an Assault . Aged. 50.— Confined Six Months, and to enter into his own recognizance of fifty pounds to keep the peace for Two Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2412

2412. EDWARD WATSON was indicted for stealing, at St. George's, Hanover-square, 1 watch, value 9l. 9s., the goods of William Payne, in his dwelling-house.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a watchmaker, and live at No. 163, New Bond-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. On Saturday afternoon, the 14th of Sept., I was up stairs in the sitting room—at ten minutes past five o'clock I was called down, and found the prisoner in my shop—my foreman man said, "This gentleman wishes to see some watches"—I went to the prisoner—he said he wished to see a watch similar to one his brother, Captain Phillips, had bought, and described it as a very expensive watch, but his brother gave but twenty guineas for it—I said I had no watch of that description, the one he described would be thirty guineas—he looked at some watches—I said I had one I could let him have for 27l., and directed the foreman to get it from the window—he could not find it—I went myself, and pointed it out to him—I showed it to the prisoner—he said that would not suit him, he would go and fetch his brother, with the watch he had purchased at my house some few years since at twenty guineas—five minutes after he was gone I missed a gold watch from a tray I had shown him, but I had previously suspected him, and sent my foreman out to follow him—nobody had entered the shop after I had showed him the tray, and before I missed the watch.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had you ever seen him before? A. I thought I had at the time, but I cannot be sure—he was not more than ten minutes in the shop—nobody but my foreman was in the shop—my back was turned while I went to the window—I speak to the prisoner from my recollection of him—I think I recollect his hand—if a man has a clean hand I am not suspicious of him—there was not anything particular about his hand—it was not particularly dirty nor clean—I am confident he is the man—he was dressed nearly as he is now—I think he had on the same coat—I did not notice his neckcloth—I think he had a crape hatband—I did not observe whether his hat

was white or black, and am not sure his hat was on—my attention was fixed on his hand, to see that he did not take a watch—I sent a lad to send the foreman back, and the lad followed him—he did not return for an hour—the foreman is not here—he could not have taken the watch, for he was not near the tray after giving the watch into my hand—the foreman could not handle it after giving it to me—it was not the one the foreman brought to me—he was about six yards from the watches—there was a partition between him and the watches, as he was in the inner part of the shop—he was before me, and the prisoner behind me—the partition runs across the front of the shop—I showed the prisoner from ten to sixteen watches.

COURT. Q. Had he the opportunity of taking this particular watch when your attention was directed to the window? A. Yes—my back was turned to him, and he had the control of the tray at that moment—I had shown him that very watch.

JURY. Q. Where was your boy at the time? A. In the parlour behind—he could not touch the watch.

MICHAEL SHERHY (policeman.) On the 17th of Sept. I was on duty in the City-road, and the prisoner was given into my custody by one King—on looking at the book I found he answered the description of a man who had stolen a watch from the prosecutor's—Mr. Payne attended at the Police-court, and identified him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2413

2413. EDWARD WATSON was again indicted for stealing 1 watch, value 20l., the goods of John Naphtali Hart.

ABRAHAM LEO . I am clerk to John Naphtali Hart and Co., of Cornhill, watchmakers. On Friday afternoon, the 30th of Aug., there were several ladies and gentlemen at our shop, looking at a very handsome enamelled watch—the prisoner came in, and I went to attend on him—he expressed a wish to see some gold three-quarter-plate lever watches—some were taken from the window, and put on a glass case on the counter—he took up some of them, and asked the price—he said the first lot were too thick, he wished to see some flatter—he said he wished one similar to one purchased by his brother, Captain Edwards, he believed, of us; that his brother had it stolen from him at the Italian Opera-house—I showed him some watches—my eye was off him while getting him goods—he did not think the second sufficiently flat—I showed him some Geneva watches, which were flatter—he said he did not like Geneva watches—he placed two watches aside, and requested us to keep them till four or half-past four o'clock, when he would see his brother on the subject, and let us know whether he would have one or not—before leaving, he asked if a gold dial could be placed on a Geneva watch—as he was about to leave the shop I proposed to show him the enamelled watch, and said the Queen and Prince Albert had seen it—he declined looking at it, and appeared very much excited, so that he went to open the door at the hinge side instead of the handle, and fumbled some time there—I directed one of our men to open it—he did so—I then went to arrange the watches he had seen, and one was gone which had been on the glass case—nobody but me and the prisoner had been near those watches—I missed it within five minutes of his leaving—no one else had entered the shop, or come near the spot—it is Mr. Stanbridge's house, Mr. Hart has merely the shop—Naphtali Hart is the sole proprietor—I have not the slightest doubt about the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How do you know him? A. By his general appearance, and a particular expression of his eye; in my opinion, a very villanous expression—he has sore eyes, and a remarkably thievish appearance

about his eyes—I believe he had on the coat he wears now, and a black stock with a pin with a chain to it.

COURT. Q. Did he come back at four o'clock? A. No—Mr. Hart was in the shop—he is not here—I will not be positive there was not half a dozen people in the shop.

HENRY KING . I live in Canal-street, Hoxton, and am a watch-finisher; I work in Mr. Hart's shop. On Friday afternoon, the 30th of Aug., I remember a person coming there to look at a watch, between three and four o'clock—I have no doubt it was the prisoner—as I sat at work I heard him ask to see some gold watches—some were shown him, which were not sufficiently flat—he requested two to be laid aside till half-past four, when his brother would call and look at them—as he left he went to the hinge side of the door—I was ordered to open it for him, which I did, and let him out—he was very much excited before I opened the door, but not after he got out—I was sent out directly—on my return I heard of the loss of a gold watch—on the 17th of Sept. I saw the prisoner in the City-road with a female, who left him—I told a policeman, and gave him in charge—he was quite indignant, and said he had never seen me before, nor been in Mr. Hart's shop; he did not know the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. You were not attending to him, were you? A. No; I was at work—I know him by the peculiarity of his countenance; he has no eye-lashes—he had sore eyes—I have not the smallest doubt of his identity.

MICHAEL SHEEHY (policeman.) I took him in charge—he appeared very indignant, and told the witness he was much mistaken—I found 4l. 10s. in gold and silver on him—he said he was not in the habit of using a watch.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Friday, October 25th, 1844.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2414

2414. FREDERICK SEPPENFELT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of Sept., at St. Giles-in-the-Fields, 5 pairs of trowsers, value 2l. 5s.; 10 waistcoats, 2l. 15s.; 4 pairs of drawers, 4s.; 13 shirts, 3l. 5s.; 1 pair of boots, 2s.; 10 shirt collars, 10s.; 4 scarfs, 4s.; 5 pairs of gloves, 2s.; 1 pair of socks, 2s.; 2 breast-pins, and chain, 5s.; 2 sets of shirts, 15s.; 4 flannel shirts, 6s.; 5 pairs of stocks, 15s.; 33 handkerchiefs, 3l. 17s.; 1 purse, 1s.; 1 counterpane, 2l. 10s.; 1 dressing-case and fittings, 2s.; 1 cigar-case, 4s.; and 3 brushes, 2s.; the goods of Charles Henry Congreve, in the dwelling-house of Charlotte Elizabeth Austin: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 33.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2415

2415. JOSEPH LEE was indicted for stealing 1 half-sovereign, 8 half-crowns, 54 shillings, and 40 sixpences, the monies of Mary Lee, in her dwelling house; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2416

2416. WILLIAM ELKINS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of the Guardians of the poor of the Kensington Union, about the hour of one in the night of the 12th of Oct., at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 11lbs. 15oz. weight of cheese, value 5s.; and 19 3/4 lbs. weight of beef, 7s.; their goods.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of James Thomas Dyson.

JAMES THOMAS DYSON . I am master of the Union Workhouse at Kensington—my dwelling-house is in the workhouse—it is rented by the guardians of the poor of the Kensington Union—I and my family live there exclusively—provisions and other stores belonging to the guardians are kept there. On Saturday night, the 12th of Oct., at nine o'clock, I inspected the premises, and found everything perfectly safe—the things stated were kept in the cellars—there is a door which opens into an area—that door communicates with the interior of the house—that was shut, bolted, and barred with a cross—bar—I went to bed between eleven and twelve—next morning, about eight, in consequence of some information, I went down stairs—I was not the first person up—I found the door forced open, and missed from the cellar a large piece of beef and some cheese, which I know was perfectly safe the night before—I found a strong wooden bar had been forced away from the door so as to admit a man's arm to unbolt the top bolt, and lift the cross-bar up—the door was open—it opens into the area—they had forced some wooden palings away, and got down into the area from the back yard—the beef and cheese is the property of the guardians, and was in my care.

MARY M'LEOD . I am an inmate of this workhouse. On Sunday morning, the 13th, between seven and eight o'clock, I went down to Mr. Dyson's cellar to take the milk—I had the keys of the cellar-door—I found that locked—I opened it, and on going into the larder, found the area-door which opens into the yard, open—I was the first person that had gone there that morning.

JOHN HOGAN (policeman.) On Sunday morning, the 13th, about half-past five o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Kensington New-town, about 100 yards from the workhouse—I stopped him, and asked what he had—he said, "Some pieces of cheese"—I examined a bundle which he had, and found a whole cheese, this piece of cheese, and a large piece of beef—I asked where he was taking it to—he said to his lodging—I asked where he brought it from—he said he bought it in a court in Oxford-street, the name of which he could not recollect—I searched him at the station, and found this iron instrument on him—I afterwards went to the workhouse, and saw Mr. Dyson—he took me to the cellar—I found the outer door open—it looks into the garden—a piece of board was torn away from over the door, which would admit a man's arm—I found some marks of violence on the lock of an inner door—I compared this instrument found on the prisoner, with those marks, and they corresponded—I found this piece of cheese in the cellar, which exactly fits in with the piece I found on the prisoner.

Prisoner. I always carry that instrument in my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Twelve Months.

Before Mr. Justice Maule.

Reference Number: t18441021-2417

2417. JOHN COOPER, alias Timberlake , GEORGE JACKSON, alias Edward Contensen , and GEORGE WESTON, alias John White , were indicated for stealing, at St. Anne, Westminister, 1 watch, value 2l.; and 1 watch-guard, 1s.; the goods of John Burrows: and 1 watch, 2l.; 1 watch-guard, 10s.; 1 purse, 1s.; 5 half-crowns, 7 shillings, and 7 sixpences, the property of Fanny Tanner, in the dwelling-house of John Burrows; and the Weston and Jackson had been before convicted of felony.

MR. SIMON conducted the Prosecution

FANNY TANNER . I am housekeeper to John Burrows, No. 5, Grafton-street, Soho—he keeps a coffee-shop—I know all the prisoners—I had known Cooper for two years, at Carshalton, where he lived—he went by the name of Timberlake there—on the 2nd of Sept. he came into the house to see Mr. Burrows—he

asked how I was, and said, "How is John, where is he?"—I said he was gone out—he said, "What time will he return?"—I said I did not know, for he was gone to Gravesend for a day's pleasure—he said he wanted something to eat, would I get him a chop—I said, "Very well, I will get you one"—he said, "Get more than one, I have a couple of friends I will bring in here, who are close by, to have one with me"—I did so—he returned with the two other prisoners in a minute or so—they occupied a private parlour, used by Mr. Burrows and myself—after they had had their chops, Cooper asked for a sheet of paper, he wished to write a letter—Jackson was pretending to write the letter—I was not in the room all the time—I was in and out, attending to my business—I was in sometimes with them—after they had written the letter, and had their chops, they all three went out—they left the letter, directed, on the table, unsealed—I put a wafer in it, and sent it to the post by a woman—the direction was, "Simmonds, 30, George-street, Hanover-square"—Cooper came in directly after, and said they would post the letter themselves—he followed the woman, came back again, and stayed all the afternoon with me—the other two prisoners went away—he said they would return to tea, which they did about six—the three prisoners and I all had tea together in the private room—after we had had tea, a person came into the shop—I got up to serve him with some coffee, and Cooper followed me out into the shop, and kept me talking there for about two or three minutes—the other two prisoners followed him out while he was talking to me in the shop—they wished me good night as they passed me, and I wished them good night—Cooper remained about two minutes till the other two had got just to the corner of Moor-street, and were turning the corner—I stood at the door talking to him, when all of a moment he suddenly left me, and ran to Moor-street—I thought it very odd he should leave me in that manner—I walked straight back into the room, and the first thing that struck my eye was a little basket which had my money in it—I saw the lid of it had been lifted up, and moved—I went and looked, and missed a little black bag and a purse containing 23s.—I had seen it safe in the bag about an hour before they were there—no one had been in besides them—on turning round I missed two watches from the mantelpiece, a small hunting-watch of my own, with a silver chain attached, and an old-fashioned silver watch of Mr. Burrow's, with a brown guard attached—the value of mine was 2l. 10s., and the other about 2l.

Prisoner Cooper. I am guilty.

EDWARD LANGLEY (police-sergeant A 11.) On the 2nd of Sept., about seven o'clock in the evening, I apprehended Cooper and Jackson in the Westminster-road—I had been on the look out for them on another charge—I took them to Tower-street station, and searched them—I found this watch and guard in Cooper's left-hand waistcoat-pocket, the chain and watch all together—I asked him if that was his watch—he said, "Yes"—on further searching him, I found this letter in his coat-pocket, behind—on Jackson I found this other silver watch—it was in the right-side coat-pocket of the coat he has on now—the chain and watch was all together, in the same way as the other was.

FANNY TANNER re-examined. This watch is John Burrows's, and this other is my own—the guards are the same—this is the letter the prisoners left—(this was a sheet of paper folded and directed, but contained no writing.)

CHARLES BURGESS GOFF (police-constable L 83.) I took Weston into custody on Wednesday, the 11th of Sept., about two o'clock—I told him I took him for being concerned in several robberies, one was at a coffee-shop in Grafton-street, Soho—he said, "You must be mistaken"—I took him to the station, where he was identified—I found on him 8s. 6d., a pencil-case, and silver knife

Weston's Defence. I hope you will not find me guilty of this; there is no proof against me; I am perfectly innocent of it.

Jackson's Defence. The prosecutrix has never stated that we were drinking together; we had nearly a pint of rum, and she was intoxicated at the time.

FANNY TANNER re-examined. They had a little rum, but I had none to hurt me—I just tasted it with them—they sent for some rum, on purpose, I suppose, to see if I would drink it—a charwoman in the house went for it—it might be a quartern—I did not get intoxicated with tasting it—they did not get drunk—they had nothing in my place to make them drunk—it was when they had the chops that they had the rum, and the robbery did not take place till past seven in the evening.

FREDERICK SHAW (police-constable A 29.) I produce a certificate of Jackson's former conviction in the name of Edward Contensen—I got it from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was present at the trial, and am sure he is the person.

Jackson. I deny all knowledge of ever having been convicted; I am not the party. Witness. He pleaded guilty—I did not know him before, but I recollect him from seeing him on that occasion—he was examined at the police-office several times.

SAMUEL BALSDEN . I know Jackson—he was in my employ in the name of Edward Contensen from March last till July—I know his father very well—I understand he returned from transportation in Nov. last—I did not know him before his conviction—I only found it out by looking after him for a case of forgery.

Jackson. I know that person very well, but I was never convicted before; I have plenty of relations of the same name; I was never here before, and never pleaded guilty; I am not the party.

WILLIAM STURGES . I produce a certificate of Weston's former coniviction—I had it from Goff the policeman—(read)—I was present at his trial on the 6th of Jan., 1840—I was the prosecutor—I am quite certain he is the person who was tried and convicted on that occasion.

Weston. I am not the person; I was never here in my life, and never convicted before; there are many persons like me; it is not likely a person could recognise me after five years. Witness. If five more were added to it I should recollect him—he was four months in my employ.

COOPER— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Ten Years.

JACKSON— GUILTY . Aged 23.

WESTON— GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fifteen Years. See Surrey Cases.)

Reference Number: t18441021-2418

2418. JAMES CARRUTHERS was indicted for feloniously sending to Angelina Georgiana Burdett Coutts and others a certain letter—(see letter marked A, page 822)—directed to them in the name of J. Coutts, Esq., banker, demanding money with menaces, and without any reasonable or probable cause; 9 other COUNTS, stating letters to be sent to different parties.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

EDWARD MAJORIBANKS, JUN . I am one of the firm of Coutts and Co., carrying on business as bankers in the Strand—Angelina Georgiana Burdett Coutts is one of the firm—there is no other partner named Coutts—there are seven partners—on the 28th of Aug. I received this letter marked A—it came by post—the house received it—I opened it, and from reading the contents, we communicated with Pearce, the police-inspector, and an advertisement was Inserted in the Times—this is it—on the 2nd of Sept. I received this letter marked B—in consequence of which another advertisement was put in the

Times of the 4th of Sept.—this is it—we carry on business under the name of Coutts and Co.—the house is known by the name of Coutts' banking-house.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were the words "Important and private "on the letter when you received it? A. Yes.

CHARLES MILLARD . I live at No. 18, Charles-street, Westminster, with my father, who is a painter. I was sent on the 30th of Aug. to the Monument, by a policeman, with a parcel, which I carried in my hand—I got there a little after nine o'clock in the evening—the prisoner came up and asked me if I came from Coutts', the bankers, in the Strand—I said, "Yes"—he took the parcel, and walked to the corner and then ran—I lost sight of him.

MR. MAJORIBANKS re-examined. There is no other banker's named Coutts in the Strand, or anywhere else.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is there any bankers in the Strand by the name of Coutts? A. We are known by the name of Coutts and Co.—there is no J. Coutts, Esq., a banker, in the Strand—my father, Edward Majoribanks, the elder, is a partner in the house—I know no J. Coutts.

(Letter marked A, read—postmark 27th Aug.)

(A)—Sir, The most desperate gang in the metropolis have resolved to obtain possession, by whatever means, of a certain portion of your property. It is composed of starving men, and no efforts will be spared in effecting their firm resolves. If any of their numbers fall in the requirement of sustenance from those they have marked out for prey, the remainder have sworn full revenge. Desperation is in their hearts. Not from design, but accident, I was led into their society. Curiosity (being desirous of contemplating human nature in all degrees of life) caused me to seek initiation into all their secrets; I now rue my act. I had previously to take a solemn oath (which nothing, however, will ever induce me to break) that I would preserve eternal secrecy concerning their names and places of abode. Learning their design upon you as one of the proscribed number, and having further a strong consideration for you, I made every effort to dissuade them, at the risk of personal suspicion and consequent danger, to abolish their intentions as respects yourself. Further than this I dared not go. But intense suffering closes the ear of mercy; to remove that suffering is the only way to give success unto its natural dictates. They, however, mutually agree that if I will give them one hundred pounds in solid gold they will relinquish their designs upon you; nothing less will satisfy. I communicate to you their demand. Personal safety will, I hope, induce compliance. It is hard that you should thus suffer, but I have done my utmost in vain to ward off the inevitable catastrophe. Had I this been an ordinary conspiracy it would have been sufficient for me merely to give you warning to cause you to be on your guard. But so resolute and determined are these men that no vigilance, however acute—no defences, however strong, will shield from their hands. Fearing the inevitable results of their decisions in this case that I have been providentially made aware of, I have almost promised compliance with their demands, satisfied that could I but communicate with you, you would, for obvious reasons, consent. If they receive the sum in question I am firmly convinced you will never have any cause of fear from them, but if not, non-compliance will hereafter be repented of too late. My oath prevents me from detailing their plans, which also, if revealed, would subject me to most imminent danger. I have already stated that I am in no way an accomplice. Though poor, I am honest. If you comply with my recommendation you are safe. If you preserve secrecy, I am safe. But too often the innocent suffer for the guilty. Circumstantial evidence is too much honoured; purity of motive, however generous the deed enacted, uniformly denied. Therefore, as I have consented through the hope of securing good and averting wrong, to be a mediator, I require, to avoid

treachery, that inviolable secrecy be preserved—that you take a solemn oath that you will make no attempt, through yourself or by others, directly or indirectly, to discover who I am, or cause me in any way to be molested; that on Friday night next, at half-past nine o'clock, you will cause a little boy to be stationed at the base of the Fire Monument (near Lower Thames-st.), who shall have in his possession the sum of one hundred pounds in solid gold, encased by boards, so that he shall not be aware of the contents, and deliver the same to the individual who asks for a parcel; that this boy be alone, and in no communication by sign or word with any other individual whatsoever; that on Friday morning next you cause the following advertisement to appear in the Times newspaper,—'C. C. desires to inform T. T. that his request has been fully complied with.' If, notwithstanding this information and offer you should fail to comply with my recommendation, the consequences will be fearful. My oath prevents me from saying more.—Adieu. Yours, T. T."

"(Important) J. Coutts, Esq., banker, Strand, (Private)."

(The advertisement was also read, which was in the terms described in the letter.)

WILLIAM MATTHEW COULTHURST . I am a partner in the firm of Coutts and Co., bankers, Strand. On the 6th of Sept. I received this letter, marked C, by the post, and gave directions to Pearce respecting it.

NICHOLAS PEARCE . I am inspector of the A division of police. I was sent for to the banking-house of Messrs. Coutts, on the 29th Aug., and shown the letter marked A—in consequence of what I was told I proposed to prepare a parcel according to the instructions in the letter—it contained two pieces of clay and half-a-crown in the centre—it was not incased in boards, but in stout paper—I believe it was given to the witness Millard—on the 6th of Sept. I was again at Messrs. Coutts' banking-house, and was shown the letters marked B and C—I arranged to make another parcel, which was given to Charles Stanley—I went with him to a place near Southwark-bridge—I stationed Stanley there, with instructions how to act—I went into a room opposite which commanded a view of where I had stationed him, about half-past nine o'clock, and while I was in the room, I saw the prisoner go up to Stanley—I was not near enough to hear what passed—he appeared to be speaking to Stanley, and I saw him turn round with a parcel in his hand—it appeared such as I had given Stanley—I went out and stopped the prisoner, told him I was an officer, and said, "Who are you? what is your name?"—he said, "I am so confused I don't know what you mean"—Haines, another inspector, came up at the time and took the parcel from the prisoner's pocket—it was the parcel I had given Stanley—the prisoner was taken into a house in the neighbourhood—I asked his name and address—his answer was again, "I feel so confused, I don't know what you mean"—I told him I should take him into custody for attempting to obtain a sum of money from Coutts and Co., bankers, Strand—he said he had been sent for the parcel—I asked him who by—he said by a man named Thornley—I asked if he could tell me who Thornley was, or where I could see or find him—he said he could not, and said, "He sent me for a parcel last week, and I fetched it"—I proceeded to search him, and discovered his lodging, by part of a letter found on him, to be No. 15, Windsor-place, Southwark-bridge-road—I went there that night—a room was pointed ont to me by the landlady as his room—I there found a parcel containing papers, and this American Almanac—there is written on it some names of individuals, and among others Miss Burdett Coutts—I found a seal at his lodgings, and have compared it with the impression on the letter—it appears to be such a seal as would make the impression on the letter C.

CHARLES STANLEY . I live at No. 1, North-street, Westminster, with my father, who is a police-constable. On the 6th of September, I saw Inspector Pearce—I know Millard, who has been examined—in consequence of instructions I received, I accompanied Millard to the Monument—I kept my eye on him—he had a parcel—I saw him give it to the prisoner—he is the person—in consequence of instructions, on the 6th of Sept., about eight o'clock at night, I accompanied Inspector Pearce to Southwark-bridge—I received a parcel from him—he directed me what to do with it, and about half-past nine, I saw the prisoner about five minutes after I had been there—I observed him come past me and go towards Southwark-bridge—in a few minutes be came back again, and was coming up to me—a woman was crossing the road, he waited till she was gone, then came up to me and asked if that was Anchor-terrace—I said, I believed it was—he said, "Are you come from Mr. Coutts's, the bankers, in the Strand?"—I said, "Yes" he said, "I believe you have a parcel?"—I said, "Yes, sir, I have; I am to give it to some gentleman who asks me for it"—he said, "Yes, it is quite right; it is for me"—I then gave it to him, and he walked with me a little way in the same direction, and after a time was taken into custody by Pearce.

LOUISA JULLIETTS . I live at No. 15, Windsor-terrace, Southwark-bridge-road. The prisoner lodged at my house—I remember Pearce coming there—I showed him the room occupied by the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you reason to know, while he was with you, that he was in great distress? A. Very much distressed indeed—he had no shirt, and often nothing to eat—he appeared occasionally to have a piece of dry bread in his drawer—he was a well-conducted lad, and never stopped out till the night he was apprehended.

(Letter B was here read as follows:—)

("Important.)

"SIR—At the commencement of last week, I wrote you a letter to the following effect:—I recapitulate, under the belief, that the letter in question did not reach your hand, notwithstanding its importance. It contained information, that owing to circumstances which the writer could not control, not knowing previously their tendency, that the writer was associated for a period unexpectedly with a set of men who have failed in their efforts to support port themselves by manual labour, and apparently driven half mad by desperation, have determined, with a fixedness of resolve that no fear can daunt, to possess themselves of a portion of the property of several individuals in affluent circumstances: not that these persons have in any measure influenced their present wretched situation, as I understand; but that being amidst the largest possessors of wealth, they are held as the least liable to suffer from the contemplated depredation. These men, hoping, probably, that H----, imparted to me the above information, which I consented to learn in the secret hope that I might be enabled to dissuade them therefrom, or at least point out such a course as might remove the necessity of effecting their lawless purposes. Previously, I had taken a solemn oath, from which I cannot be absolved, that I would not betray them; that oath I now reverence. I have learnt further, that five individuals are marked out of this number. I regret, Sir, to say, that you are one, and that the plan, which involves possible danger to yourself, as well as property, has been fully matured. By dint of strong argument and much hazard, I have brought these men to agree, that could they, without resorting to the intended measures, obtain five hundred pounds, so as to enable them to go to America, and there settle, so as to obtain support by honest labour, it would be far preferable. I am convinced of their sincerity; they have been honest men; starvation and

death are hurrying them to crime: in their despair they would hardly listen to my recommendation, considering it absolutely impossible that the sum could otherwise be obtained than by accomplishing their purposes, which, however, if once put into operation, will not stay with the above pittance. There is a restraining power and self-respect in honesty, which, if its moral limits be once overstepped, is for ever lost. Under my assurances that the sum might be obtained, they are now waiting. They firmly rely on my sincerity and earnestness to avert from them, crime. Unfortunately I have not myself the means of satisfying their demands, otherwise I should do so, considering that I would be conferring a general good: not in the belief that crime deserves a premium, but that it is the duty of all good citizens, if possible, to nip it in the bud by removing its cause. I undertake the cause of these people for two reasons: first, that I desire to remove impending ill from their victims, whom I respect; and second, that I have a firm conviction, that they will not further make their present dark designs a means of extorting money, but that, with the sum I have mentioned, will leave for ever this country.

In my letter of last week I urged you, as you value your comfort and hap-piness, to comply with their demands, so far as one hundred pounds. It is a large sum to be lost; but nothing in comparison with the negative benefit that will ensue. From what I have seen of these men, I am convinced that when able, they will return the whole sum. In view of their present designs, this may hardly be credited, but it must be remembered that they have not yet passed the line of redemption: human hearts are every where nearly the same in their component elements; circumstances form actions. In the letter I refer to, I pointed out a spot to which you might send the money, enjoined secrecy, and further requested, if you agreed in the conditions of good faith, etc., for mine is in this case a delicate position, to signify so by a notice in the Times of Friday, which I dictated. The advertisement appeared, the spot specified was resorted to, a parcel was delivered by a little boy, on which he immediately diately ran away. About one hour afterwards, it was opened by the individual who went for it, from whose possession it had not passed since delivery, and was found to contain two rolls of damp clay, so placed as to give the outward form to the parcel of inclosed sovereigns. There was also half-a-crown. These were first wrapped in a sheet of police-paper, from which fact I concluded, that the parcel did not come from you, and that my letter having fallen into other hands, some party had engaged in frivolous play. This is deeply to be lamented, as it would have been far better not to have been sent at all, as the men in whose presence it was opened, and who from the advertisement in the morning were satisfied their demands would be complied with, were deeply enraged, believing that you had received my letter, and that this was the answer. It is possible you may have received the letter, and sent the money, and that the lad entrusted with it has proved a rogue; but there is no alternative, if it be not made good. The passions of these men are like a pent-up torrent, ready at any moment to burst forth. Starvation produces the deepest madness. Reason is forgotten, and stern necessity impels to crime. Whatever be the facts in this mysterious case, it is your interest to forward the sum. The hour will otherwise soon come when I shall not be able to make this offer. Delay will be dangerous; the individual who now writes will make known himself to you, when these men shall have left the country. But this I know will not be, unless, so far as you are concerned, you forward them the sum in question. If to this you agree, pledge your honour in an advertisement in the Times of Tuesday next, that you will in no way attempt, directly or indirectly, to molest me, or in any manner seek to discover who I am, or enable others so to do; and lastly, that you

will throw over this transaction a profound secrecy. The advertisement need merely signify your agreement to the above terms, without mentioning them; and on its appearance, I will despatch to you the direction of a house where the sum in question, so encased and sealed as not easily to proclaim its nature, may be left by a trustworthy individual.

T. T."

"J. Coutts, Esq., 59, Strand. Private."

(Letter C) "T. T. has seen an advertisement in the Times of this day which be presumes, comes from you. All the facts stated in former communications are strictly true. The reasons which cause T. T. to conceal at present (and for the present only) his real name are such as it would be neither wise nor beneficial ficial to disregard. Let, then, a young lad, with the sum I have before mentioned be stationed at the lamp opposite No. 6, Hankard-terrace, Southwark-bridge-road (which is situated several paces to the left after passing Southwark-bridge) at half-past nine o'clock, on Friday, the 6th instant, if possible; if not, on Saturday, at the same time.

T. T."

"J. Coutts, Esq., 59, Strand. Private."

(The Rev. Thomas Binney, minister of the Independent Chapel, Fish Street-hill; Robert Millard, Albany-street, Regent's-park; John Coates, Alfred-place, Bedford-square; and Mary Larkin, Wellington-street, Blackfriars-road; deposed to the prisoner's good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.—Strongly recommended to mercy on account of his character. — Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18441021-2419

2419. JOHN HENDERSON was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering an order for the payment of 40l., with intent to defraud John Martin and others; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Two Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2420

2420. JOHN HENDERSON was again indicted for stealing 4 napkins, value 1s., the goods of Thomas James; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .

(Thomas White, a cheesemonger; and John Wright, his brother, gave the prisoner a good character.)

Seventh Jury, before Mr. Justice Maule.

Reference Number: t18441021-2421

2421. PATRICK HARVEY was indicted for feloniously cutting and wounding Robert Hannant, in and upon his head, face, arms, and breast, with intent to murder him.—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to maim.—3rd COUNT, to disable.—4th COUNT, to do some grievous bodily harm.—5th COUNT, to resist and prevent his lawful apprehension and detainer.

MESSRS. BODKIN and CHAMBERS conducted the Prosecution.

ROBERT HANNANT (police-constable N 325.) I have been in the police force eight years—about the 15th of Sept. I was instructed by my sergeant and Mr. Risley to watch one of Risley's fields, at Winchmore-hill, Edmonton—I went there a little before two o'clock in the morning, and placed myself in a tree in the field—I had been there an hour and a half, or more—there were cows in the field—about twenty minutes to four o'clock I saw the prisoner come towards the tree where I was, within six or seven yards of where I stood—he was in his police clothes—he was a policeman at the time, and was on duty near that spot, in the road, about 120 yards from the spot in the field where I saw him—the cows were lying within thirty yards of me—he turned to where the cows laid—he put

one of them up and drove it towards the fence—I saw him stoop towards the cow, as if in the act of milking it—it was a dark morning, but the cow was white—I stepped up nearly to him, and heard as if milk rattled into some vessel—I think he saw me, for he got up from the cow—I approached him, and said, "Harvey, you villain, what are you about?"—he said, "What do you mean?" and at the time I heard something rattle behind him in his pocket, as if it was milk—it was the noise of something running down on the ground—I flew to get hold of it—I went up to him, and got hold of his hand, which was behind him—he had his great-coat on, which had pocket behind—I succeeded in getting hold of his hand, and felt it was wet—he tried to trip me up—we had a scuffle, and both fell—I was on the top—I succeeded in taking a bottle from his great-coat pocket—it contained milk—being white, I could see, and it was warm—while he was on the ground, he said, "Hannant, for God's sake, forgive me, I know I am guilty; forgive me, for the sake of my wife and dear children; for God's sake, forgive me"—I said I could not—he then asked me to let him get up, which I did—I had hold of his collar—he asked me to take hold of his hand which I did—he asked what I intended to do with him—I said I would treat him as I would anybody else—I shifted my hand from his collar to his wrist; and while in the act of putting the bottle into my own coat pocket, he attempted to get from me—my hat came off in the struggle, and he struck me a violent blow two or three times with his stave—the first blow was on the top of my head—I found myself stunned, and lost my sight, with that blow—I could not hear or see—I shifted my hold then, and got hold of his collar—he struck me two or three times—I think I recollect his Have breaking—I think then we went on the ground, but I lost my recollection for a time from the effects of the blow—when I came to my recollection, I was up, and had hold of him by the collar, and he was biting my hand to get clear from me—here are the scars now—I felt my head, and felt a hole in it and the blood was running from all quarters of my head—I said, "Harvey, you villain, you have murdered me"—he said, "No, I have not; leave go of me, and lay on my coat"—he was then in the act of getting his coat off, and threw it down on the ground, asking me to lay on it—I said, "No, Harvey, I will never leave you while I have life"—I called, "Murder," and Risley's boy, William, came to my assistance—I told him I had caught Harvey milking his master's cow, and asked him to assist me—Harvey said, "No, I have caught Hannant, "meaning me—we took him out of the field, into the road to Risley's house, the boy holding him with me—when we got near the house, the boy let go, to undo the door, and Harvey made another desperate effort to get away—he dragged me along six, seven, or ten yards, trying to get away—I have measured it since, and it is fourteen yards—assistance came, and we got him into Risley's house, as the boy came back—Risley came down, and we got further assistance—I got exhausted, and was obliged to sit down—Risley fastened the door to keep him in—I said, in Risley's presence, "Harvey, how could you serve me in the way you have done?"—he said, "B—y into you, it serves you right; you are always after me; you have always been watchine me, or dodging after me, when you have no business;" or some such words—Mr. Cresswell, the surgeon, afterwards attended me—I was not conscious of anything but the stave being used till I was stripped in the house—I then said he must have stabbed me, and found I had been stabbed in each arm, and, on looking at my coat, I found it was stabbed through—I had also one wound in my throat, others on my head and face, and one right through—I could put my tongue through one—I had a stock on—Mr. Cresswell my wouds—I was carried home afterwards—I

gave the bottle of milk to Mrs. Risley—I had a stave in my hand a little before the prisoner came into the field, and after I got into Risley's house, I think the prisoner said, "Where is your stave?"—I looked for it, and could not find it—I did not use it at all in the struggle—I never could have strength, for I was stunned from the first blow.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You say he took off his coat? A. He had his coat on one arm, and said, "No, I have not, lay on my coat"—I recollect his throwing it down, but not his taking it off—I believe he was either taking it off, or had it on his hand—I may have said he was taking it off—in the state I was in I was not confident—he had it on when I first saw him—I cannot tell whether it was buttoned up—I know Durance, a policeman—he did not come to my assistance—he came to Risley's house afterwards, I believe, but I was exhausted and insensible then—I believe I saw him—I have no doubt there was a conversation between him and the prisoner, but in the state I was in I have no recollection of what occurred—they were talking together—the prisoner has been four years and three quarters ters in the police, I believe—not so long as I have—that was the first morning I had watched the field—I am generally employed on Winchmore-hill and the green lanes—I am on the same beat occasionally—I cannot tell what became of my stave—I have no recollection of feeling for it when I was struck—I have since seen it at the police-court—I will not undertake to swear I did not strike him, but I never struck with my staff—I came from Norfolk—I never milked a cow in my life—men do not milk—I have been employed in farming, and seen cows milked.

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I am in the service of Mr. Risley, a farmer and cowman on Winchmore-hill. On the 15th of Sept., about four o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by a noise, and heard Hannant the prosecutor's voice—I heard him cry "Murder!"—I knew his voice—it came from the further side of master's field, where the cows were—I did not hear any other voice calling for assistance till I got close to them—I went into the field, and found Hannant and the prisoner struggling—the prosecutor called to me, "Bill, come to me, he has almost killed me, "and said, before I got up to him, "I have caught Harvey milking your cows"—the prisoner said, "No, I have caught him at it"—he was trying to get away—the prosecutor said, "Take hold of his hand or arm, and help to take him out of the field, for he will get away from me now"—I took hold of him, and assisted Hannant in taking him to master's house—when I got near master's house I let go of him, to go and unlock the door—he then tried to get from the prosecutor—I ran back, and Hannant said, "Come, Bill, or else he will get from me"—I ran back, and succeeded in getting him into master's house—I got a light—Hannant's face was covered with blood, also his cape, and the front part of his coat—his strength was almost exhausted—he could scarcely stand upright—I saw no mark of injury on the prisoner—there was some of the blood which had come from Hannant on him—master got up, and Mr. Cresswell, the surgeon, was sent for—Hannant gave mistress a bottle with milk in it—it was afterwards given to sergeant Emery—I had got up that morning to watch the cows, having lost milk before—Hannant was aware that I was going to get up that morning—I was up at the time the alarm morning—I was up at the time the alarm was given.

Cross-examined. Q. This was the time you usually get up, was it not? A. I generally get up about five o'clock, but I had been up an hour and a half—master called me at half-past two o'clock—I know the prosecutor perfectly well, and so does my master—I do not know the prisoner so well—I never heard a complaint made to the prisoner about our missing milk.

MR. PRENDERGAST to HANNANT. Q. Do not you know that the prisoner was

aware of the complaints about the milk being missed? A. I told him Risley had complained to me about it.

WILLIAM RISLEY . I am a cow-keeper at Winchmore-hill. In consequence of missing milk from the cows I gave Hannant directions to watch the field where they were, and on the 14th of Sept., about four o'clock in the morning, I was called up—my boy had got up about two o'clock—I called him, but he did not go out till about four o'clock—when I was called up I heard the prosecutor say, "For God's sake, Risley, come down, for I am a murdered man"—I went down stairs—my boy, who had the key, unlocked the door—I went out and saw the prisoner trying to get from the prosecutor, tassling with him—they were about twelve yards from the door when I first saw them—my boy assisted in bringing the prisoner into the house, and while he was there Hannant said, "You cruel wretch, how could you use me so?"—he answered, "B—y into you, it serves you right; you are always looking after me"—I saw that they were all bloody, and the prosecutor was wounded wonderfully—my wife had much to do to stop the blood—the prisoner was not wounded at all—I had not given the prisoner permission to go into the field.

Cross-examined. Q. You had complained of the loss of your milk? A. Yes, to many people—I knew Hannant in the neighbourhood, but I was not more intimate with him than the prisoner—I do not know that the boy got up when I called him—he generally gets up at five o'clock.

JOSEPH MELLISH . I am an inspector of the N division of police. My attention was called to this when I arrived at Risley's house, about half-past six o'clock—I produce a great coat belonging to the prisoner, which I took possession of—I examined the pocket, and found it wet with milk inside and outside the pocket—I examined the inside of his coat, and found milk spilt on different parts of the coat—I examined the prosecutor's clothes, and observed some traces of milk on the skirt of his coat inside in the pocket—I found three cuts on one arm of his coat, and two on the other—they went through both his coats—I found a cut on the collar, and a corresponding cut also in his small-clothes, and there was a cut partially through the stock he had on his neck—I compared a chisel which Emery has with the mark on the stock—it appeared to correspond—I produce the prisoner's stave—it is broken—I found no wound whatever about the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you know the prisoner has been a long time in the police force? A. Yes—I did not give Hannant instructions that night.

JOSEPH ROBINS . On the 14th of Sept. I lived with Mr. Horlin near Winchmore-hill. On the 14th of Sept I found a lantern in his shed, which is about a hundred yards from the field where the prosecutor's cows were—No. 39 is on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the shed near the road side? A. It if in the field—you must go into the field to get into the shed.

JOHN MITCHELL . About six o'clock on the morning of the 15th I went to Mr. Risley's field where the cows had been, and found this chisel—there was blood on it, much more than there is now—it was quite fresh blood, and on the spot where I found it there was a great quantity of blood, as if somebody had been bleeding there, and marks of a struggle having taken place—it was fifty or sixty yards from the tree further from Risley's house than the tree—I know Horlin's field—there are two or three gardens between that and Risley's field.

GEORGE DURANCE . I am a policeman of the district. I was on duty that morning, and about four o'clock I heard a cry of "Murder," which led

me to Risley's house—I found the prisoner and prosecutor there—I gave an alarm, and Emery and another policeman came—I was one of the persons who took the prisoner to the station, about an hour after I first came there—as we went along to the station he said he saw Hannant get over the hedge and milk the cow, and he followed him; that Hannant begged of him to let him go, as it would be a disgrace to his wife and family; that he said no, he would serve him the same as he would another man—he said the first blow the prosecutor struck him had broken his (the prisoner's) stave—this lantern I had at nine o'clock, and gave it to the prisoner at that time—I found his hat in the field afterwards near where the blood was.

Cross-examined. Q. Are the staves numbered? A. Yes—this stave has a piece of twine round it—I only know it from the others by being numbered the same as the policeman.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Had that broken staff the prisoner's number on it? A. Yes.

THOMAS EMERY (police-sergeant.) On the morning of the 15th of Sept. I searched the prisoner's lodging about seven o'clock, and found some carpenter's tools there—I have them here—this chisel was given to me, and this quart bottle with about half a pint of milk in it—the cork was out—I had given orders to the prosecutor the night before respecting Risley's field—I told him to watch.

Cross-examined. Q. There is but one lantern, I believe, between three policemen? A. Yes.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Has the prosecutor anything to do with the lantern? A. It is left to him to be trimmed after it is done with—he was not on duty that night—he went off duty at two o'clock in the morning, and was directed to watch in the field—he would have nothing to do with the lantern then—I did not see him at two o'clock.

JAMES HARRISON (policeman.) I searched the prisoner's lodging on the morning this occurred about ten or eleven o'clock—I produce some tools which I found there.

JAMES SELL . I am a carpenter, and live at Winchmore-hill. I have examined these tools—some of them belong to me, and some to my father—this chisel is a mortice chisel—I do not know who that belongs to, but it has been in our shop among my father's tools and mine—I remember having used it myself—it has been left in our shop two or three years—I do not know whose it was, but we used it—since this matter has been investigated I have applied that chisel to work on which I believe I used it, and found it exactly corresponded—we had no other chisel of that size—our shop stands in the yard, and most of the tools were kept there—they might be left about the premises—we missed this plane from two to three years, and this other plane about three weeks—I did not know the chisel was gone—it could not have been taken long without our missing it—it was the only one of the size we had—I know the prisoner, having seen him in the garden of our premises—he has been there to borrow a barrow at times—I remember having seen him there six or nine months ago—I think I have seen him there twice.

Cross-examined. Q. He was never in your shop that you know of? A. Not that I know of—I have seen him at the door—one Morrison lived with the prisoner—he died some time ago—I know he had some tools—he was in the habit of coming to our place—he died in the same house as the prisoner lived—I had the chisel after Morrison died—the other tools were missed al quite a different time, except one plane, which was lost about six weeks ago.

JAMES RADFORD . My father has a field at Winchmore-hill, near Mr. Risley's cow field—on the Saturday, two or three days after the prisoner was

found there, I found a stave in my father's field—they would not hare to cross my father's field, from where the cows were, to get to Risley's—there is a road between our field and Mr. Risley's—the road goes down past Mr. Risley's house—my father's field is one side of the road, and Mr. Risley's on the other—I took the stave up, and gave it to Risley's man, Freeman.

Cross-examined. Q. To get to the cow field at Risley's house do you go by a road at all? A. Yes, you can go to the house from the field without going along a road, but not without breaking bounds.

COURT. Q. Is there a gate from the field to the road? A. Yet—you go out at the gate into the road to get to the house.

JOHN CRESWELL . I am a surgeon, and live at Winchmore-hill. On the morning in question I was called into Mr. Risley's house, and saw the prosecutor bleeding very profusely, from a great number of wounds on his head—his hair was so clotted with blood I could not see what was the matter—I cut his hair off, cleared the blood away, and wound several deep wounds, some contused and some incised, and a wound on his arm, which was evidently done with a stab—that made me notice the other wounds more particularly—I found some of them evidently done by a some of them evidently done by a cutting instrument—I think five wounds were done by a cutting instrument on his head, besides one on the top of the breast-bone, and one on each fore-arm—three cuts in his face, I think, were done with a cutting instrument, or else with the broken stave—the others were decidedly done with a cutting instrument—this chisel would inflict them—I attended him till he was taken home, about eight o'clock in the morning, and gave him over to the surgeon of the force—two wounds injured his bone, denuded the bone on the head, but none of them were to be called dangerous, beyond the concussion they produced at the time, and the consequences which might ensue from inflammation or erysipelas—which might supervene—they were not mortal wounds in themselves—one of them was within one-eighth of an inch of the temporal artery—that was a chisel wound.

Cross-examined. Q. They were wounds of the scalp? A. All the chisel wounds penetrated to the scalp—he never showed symptoms of erysipelas, and he recovered from the concussion while I was there—erysipelas may ensue from all wounds where the skin is broken.

WILLIAM RISLEY re-examined. I called my boy up about two o'clock in the morning, to go to watch the cows—I had told him that the night before—I had also told Hannant about it, about eight o'clock the night before—I told him I had missed milk a good many times, and thought it was done on Sunday night—I told him I had got a lad and another man coming to watch that same morning, and I wished him to watch that night, until my lad and man earae, which I thought would be between three and four.

GUILTY on 4th and 5th Counts. Aged 26.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18441021-2422

2422. JOHN CHARLES LACY was indicted for feloniously assaulting David Buffrey, and stabbing and wounding him, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

DAVID BUFFREY . I am a brass-finisher, and live in Wilsted-street, Somers-town, I am married. About seven months after my marriage the prisoner came to my place, and asked me, as a friend, if I would allow him to do a job of work there—I believe he had to fit up a shop for a man in Exmouth-street, and he wanted to prepare the work in my place—I had known him about seven months—he came, and remained some time there—my wife afterwards left me—I

observed nothing particular between her and the prisoner before she left me—I had had a man named Parker in my employ a short time before—he wished me to give him a character, but I refused, as he left me in a very unmanly sort of manner—on the 24th of Sept. a person named Helus called on me, to ask where Parker was, and in consequence of a message he brought I went to Parker's house, in Rawstorne-street, St. John-street, to tell him of a situation, understanding he was out of one—Moore went with me—as I was going up the staircase of Parker's house, I heard the prisoner's voice—I did not expect to find him there—the voice seemed to proceed from Parker's room—I walked up stairs very slowly, looked over the window, and there I saw the prisoner and my wife together, near the door, in the first floor room, as if going out together—she had her bonnet on and he his hat—I immediately came down stairs again, and said something to Moore—I was determined to watch them, and did watch them upwards of two hours—I went up Parker's staircase during that time, and saw them there still—the last time I went up, they appeared to be making a move, and in coming down again I stumbled and made a noise—Parker opened the door, and saw me—he came out, and walked up and down the street several times, but he could not see us, as we concealed ourselves in a doorway—he went in, and then two females came out, and walked up and down for ten minutes—then they went in—and soon after I saw the prisoner come out of Parker's house, and stand at the street-door—I said, "Here he is," and he ran away, with his hands in his pocket—I ran after him, caught him by the collar, and said, "You vagabond, you have been with my wife"—he drew a burnisher out of his pocket, and said, "O Lord!" and made an attitude, as if he was going to run it through my body—I struck him—he made several attempts to run it through my body—I warded it off as well as I could, but he stabbed me in the hind part of the thigh—it was a wound an inch deep—we both called "Police"—the policeman came up—I gave the prisoner in charge, and he gave me in charge—the policeman, seeing the prisoner bleeding from the nose and mouth, took his charge in preference to mine, as I did not appear to be hurt, and I was taken in charge—I had struck the prisoner, on seeing him draw the burnisher out of his pocket, with intent to stab me—I took hold of him first, and then struck him with my fist, and he fought with me with the burnisher and his fists too—I parried it off, and then he put his hand behind me, and stabbed me in the thigh—I believe he knew I was there, for Parker and the women came out to watch whether I was gone—this is the burnisher—it is an instrument strument used in our business—the prisoner has burnishing to do occasionally in his business.

COURT. Q. Were you on him at the time you were struck with this? A. Yes—I had hold of his collar—he was not on the ground—he did not make any motion to stab me till I had struck him—he had it in the attitude as if he was going to stab me—I felt the stab—I felt the blood in my trowsers, but in the excitement of the moment was not aware that I was stabbed—I did not go to a surgeon's that night—it was late—I did next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. Did you ever beat your wife? A. Never—nor kick her—I swear I never assaulted her—she was living at Kennington I believe when I married her—I do not know what she was—when I first knew her I did not know but what she was a respectable girl—I found out after that she was not—I did not marry her from a brothel—I had seen her at a brothel—I was not locked up at the station more than half an hour—I got bail—I exclaimed to Moore when I came out of the station that I felt wet at the back part of my thigh—he said, "Perhaps you are stabbed"—I said it did not fuel like a stab—that was an hour after it happened—the

wound was not dressed—the surgeon said it did not require it—the prisoner and I were down on the floor together at one time—he was at the bottom, and I at the top—he had this burnisher in his hand at that time—it was not then that I felt the prick, but when we were up fighting together—Moore had not come up then—I believe no one saw this besides myself—I believe when I caught the prisoner by the collar with one hand, I struck him with my other on the nose—I complained to the sergeant at the station that I was stabbed in the hand—I was stabbed in the hand—it was not very much—I showed it to the sergeant, but he detained me in custody notwithstanding—I am not aware of a man named Miller being called in—I did not tell the sergeant that there was a man outside the station who saw it all—I did not mention Miller to him—I mentioned Moore, and he was called in—Moore saw the prisoner attempt to stab me—I will swear that he did not say in my presence that he did not—the policeman did not on that detect me winking ing my eye, and making a face at Moore, nor did I say, "You saw him attempt to stab me"—I could not swear that I did not say so—I might have winked at him, but I never made any face at him, and never spoke to him till after we came out of the station again—the sergeant did not say he would have no signals—he said he saw me wink my eye.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. What did you mean by winking your eye? A. I had no intention in it that I know of—we are all liable to wink our eyes—I think it was involuntary—a wink between me and Moore did not mean anything—I never spoke to him at the time—no signal had been agreed on between us—I was standing up when I received the stab, and the prisoner also—I afterwards threw him down, and fell on him—I felt the blow before I fell.

COURT. Q. Might it not have been accidental, by rushing on him with this instrument in his hand? A. No—he had it in his pocket when I went up to him, and when I caught him by the collar, and said, "You vagabond you have been with my wife, "he drew it from his pocket, and was in the act of stabbing me when I struck him—I struck him to defend myself.

MR. WILKINS. Q. Have you not said that you could not tell whether he did it accidentally or not? A. I believe there was a misunderstanding—the Magistrate asked me whether it was done intentionally—I said, "I cannot say; it was momentary, but he made several attempts at my body before he did so"—that is why I think it was done intentionally.

FREDERICK MOORE . I went with the prosecutor to Parker's house—he had no intention to meet his wife or the prisoner—he did not know they were there—when he got there he told me to wait outside—I waited till he came back—while we were waiting about there, I saw two or three persons go in and out of Parker's house—I did not see Parker himself—I saw two women—I saw the prisoner come out—he stood for a few moments talking to a female at the gate—I do not know who she was—he then went up the street—I believe Buffrey followed him—I ran after him, and when I got into St. John-street-road, they were both down together, fighting—I did not see the wound given.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you saw no blow struck, or any attempt at any stab? A. I saw him hold the burnisher in his hand in a threatening attitude, to keep him oflf I suppose—they both called for the police, and charged one another—it was while they were on the ground together, that he held it in a threatening attitude—the prisoner was undermost, and Buffrey said, "O my God, he has got a knife."

JOHN WRENTMORE . I am a surgeon. I looked at the prosecutor's thigh—it was a punctured wound, nearly an inch deep—it might have been

made by this burnisher—I did not dress it—it healed in four or five days—I attended him, and gave him what was requisite—he was ordered lotion and poultice one night, and I gave him a little medicine—I directed him to keep quiet—I do not know whether he did any work—he might—it was not a wide wound.

Cross-examined. Q. There was not the slightest danger attending it? A. No—it might be made by accident in a struggle on the ground, if he had it in his hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2423

2423. JAMES LEWIS and SARAH HAYMAN were indicted for unlawfully leaving and deserting a certain male child of the said Sarah Hayman's, then in their care and custody.—Other Counts, varying the manner of stating the charge.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

ELIZABETH GRAY . I am the wife of John Gray, a clerk in an attorney's office. On Friday night, the 31st of May, about eleven o'clock, I was at a place in Mile-end, between Jubilee-place and Henry-street—I was alone—I had been into Jubilee-place—I had not seen any person there then, but on my return I distinctly heard the cries of an infant; and on turning round the corner into Henry-street I saw something lying on the pavement—I went and looked at it, and an infant stretched its foot from under the rags in which it was enveloped—I told a young man who was passing to call the police, and three policemen came—I took the child home to my place, with two policemen, and warmed it by the fire—it was a male child—the policemen said I must go to the station with them, which I did—it was then near one o'clock—we took it to Mile-end workhouse, but could not make any one hear, and I took it home to sleep with me that night—I took the same rags that I found—they were, an old calico shirt, a body-flannel or baby's blanket, a roller, about a yard of calico, a flannel belly-band, an old calico bed-gown, and it was covered over with an old black merino rag—it was very meanly dressed indeed—sergeant Harrison called between seven and eight in the morning, and took it to the station just as I found it—it was a particularly fine healthy child—I saw nothing particular about it, no injury or any deformity or mark—I should expect it had not been placed on the spot five minutes—it was no doubt put there for the express press purpose of being found by some one—I afterwards went before the Justice, and gave my deposition.

MARY ATHILL . I live in Sebright-street, Bethnal-green-road; my husband band is a weaver. I first became acquainted with the prisoners by their coming to lodge with me—Lewis came last Feb. twelve months, and took a lodging—I asked whether he had got a wife—at first he did not tell me exactly, but afterwards he told me he had, but said she was going to a situation—he afterwards brought Hayman to the house, and they lived there together—while they were there, on the 7th of April last (Easter Sunday) she was delivered of a male child—it had a prominent navel—Mrs. Ridley, of Brick-lane, attended as midwife—I saw that child often—I washed it and took care of it for several days, and got so acquainted with it as to be sure to know it again when I saw it—I saw the clothing it had at our house—I afterwards saw that clothing in the hands of the police, with the same child, at Worship-street—the child was about nine weeks old when the prisoners left me on the 31st of May—they gave me about two days' warning—Lewis left in the morning, and took away the things—Hayman remained till about dusk, then she left, and took the child with her—Lewis returned about ten that evening, and told my husband, in my hearing, that he had got her in the mind to go to Bristol—about

a fortnight afterwards he called at our house again—I asked how the baby was—he said it had been very bad in the bowels—about a fortnight after that I saw him at the shop where he works, in Hare-street, Bethnal-green—I asked him how the baby was—he said it had been very bad in the bowels, but was better—I saw no more of him till he was in custody—the child and things produced at Worship-street were the child and things I had known before—when Lewis took the lodging he told me he came from Bristol, and his wife also—he told me nothing of their previous life—I saw Hayman about three weeks before she was taken into custody, and asked her how the baby was—she told me it was quite well, that his sister had got it—I saw her about a week after that, and asked her again after the baby—she said his sister had got it.

LEWIS— GUILTY . Aged 25.

HAYMAN— GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year

Reference Number: t18441021-2424

2424. JOSEPH CHARLES PATON was indicted for unlawfully obtaining 10 pairs of morocco boot-legs from John Taylor, by false pretences.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2425

2425. JOHN CARTER was indicted for unlawfully obtaining 12lbs. of beef, the property of Brooks Bridges Palby, from John Griffiths, by false pretences.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am footman to Mrjor Brooks Bridges Palby, of Rutland-gate, Knightsbridge. On Saturday, the 28th of Sept., I heard a ring at the area bell—I was in the area, and saw the prisoner—he said he had come from Mr. Hardy's, for a piece of beef that was left in mistake, which was to go up to the floor-cloth manufactory, that it was a larger piece than was intended to come, and he would be back in about ten minutes—the cook asked me to let him down the area—I directed him towards the kitchen—the cook went and got the meat, and the prisoner came up the steps with it in a butcher's tray—I followed him—he went in a contrary direction to the floor-cloth manufactory—I followed nearly half a mile down the road—I then spoke to Mott, the policeman, and pointed out the prisoner to him—he was going along the road, with the tray on his shoulder—I went and seized hold of him—he put the beef down, and said, "You have got the beef, and let me go"—I said I should not, and gave him in charge.

BENJAMIN WILTSHIRE HARDY . I am a butcher, and live in Grove-terrace, Brompton. I serve Major Palby with meat—on Saturday morning, the 28th of Sept., I sent a piece of beef weighing 121bs. there—I did not send the prisoner to fetch it away, or to promise to bring a smaller piece in its place, or to take it to the floor-cloth manufactory—I have a customer there—I supply the two—I never saw the prisoner before this—I had no order for beef from the floor-cloth manufactory on the Saturday—if he used my name, it was wholly without my authority.

CHARLES MOTT (policeman.) On the 28th of Sept. Griffiths pointed out the prisoner to me—he was going down Kensington Gore, carrying a butcher's tray, with a piece of beef in it—Griffith stopped him in the park—on the way to the station the prisoner said he had better do that than starve.

Prisoner. It was stated before the Magistrate that I owned to the officer that I had done so before, and that I left my hat in care of a party before I went after the meat. Witness. Nothing of the kind was mentioned to the Magistrate—the prisoner told me to go to Queen's-buildings, Brompton, that his hat was under a woman's stall there, and that he had got her to take care of it—I

asked why he left his hat there—he said because he should look like a butcher going down—he had on blue apron—he told me that he stopped outside Mr. Hardy's door till he saw the little boy come out—he said it would not do to follow a butcher about that carried a large quantity of meat because he should not know what was left at gentlemen's houses; but the boy brought some mutton to leave at the floor-cloth manufactory, and also some beef at Major Palby's.

MR. HARDY re-examined. I had sent some mutton to the floor-cloth manufactory.

Prisoner. It was entirely through distress; I have a wife and two children; I was looking after a situation in the King's-road; I never knew there was a floor-cloth manufactory in the road.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2426

2426. ELIZABETH ROSE was indicted for unlawfully concealing the birth of her child.

GUILTY. Aged 27.—Strongly recommended to mercy. — Confined Three Months.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, October 26th, 1844.

Second Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2427

2427. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for unlawfully assaulting John Dallas, with intent, &c.

GUILTY . Aged 38.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2428

2428. JACOB TENNANT was indicted for a like offence.

GUILTY . Aged 38.— Confined Six Month.

Before Mr. Baron Rolfe.

Reference Number: t18441021-2429

2429. ABRAHAM MYERS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Clayards, and stabbing, cutting, and wounding him in and upon the left side of his chest and right hand, with intent to murder him.—2nd Count, stating his intent to be to maim and disable him.—3rd COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. CHARNOCK conducted the Prosecution.

ROBERT CLAYARDS . I am a stable-keeper, and live in White Bear-yard, Lisle-street, Leicester-square—I know the prisoner. On Tuesday evening, the 24th of Sept., about half-past six o'clock, I went with some friends to the Crown, in Cranbourne-passage—I went in the front of the house into a little bar where they serve from—the prisoner was not there then—I saw him about half an hour after I went in—I was sitting down on the seat, and he commenced bullying me, stating something about a quarrel which I had with a friend of his on the previous Saturday—he said if I served him as I had his friend he would punch my head—I said, "In what way?"—he said, "By calling me the names you called him, or saying any words to insult me"—I laughed at him, and said, "What words would insult you?"—I called him some name, I cannot exactly say what it was, but it was something to try to irritate him, and he directly struck me—I got up, and struck him again—a scuffle ensued—I got him in the corner of the bar, and he put his finger and thumb into my mouth, and tried to gouge my eye out—he tore my mouth—it bled very much—I said, "If you don't take your fingers out of my mouth I will bite them"—he kept them still in, and I believe I did bite them—after this

scuffle we went into the parlour—I went in first, and the prisoner followed me—we took our seats in different parts of the parlour—we were sitting there an hour or an hour and a half after the scuffle—during that time the prisoner came over to me, and said why did I kick his hat—I said, "Don't let us annoy the company any more, don't let us bother, "and I moved to another part of the room, and he to the other part—no words ensued between us after that—about half an hour after, the prisoner quitted the room—before he left he said to a person sitting alongside of him, "You are not going to leave the room just yet, are you?"—he said "No"—he said, "Then you will give an eye to my coat"—he left his coat on the settle, and went out of the room—he returned in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, went and sat down in the seat he had left, and drank out of a glass of gin and water which he had left—he then picked up a bit of cigar, and walked to the fire-place, which was within six feet of me—he had been sitting seventeen or eighteen feet from me—when he came up to the fire I said to him, "Myers, don't let us bear any animosity, let us shake hands"—I was sitting in a chair at the time—he said something—whether I said, "With all my heart," or whether he did, I do not know, but the words were used—he walked towards me—I extended my right hand—he held it with his left, and shook hands with me with his left hand—he put his right hand behind him, and scuffled with his coat—I could not see what he was doing—presently he drew a large knife out, saying, "You b—, I will have your b—heart," and stabbed me just above my left breast, right in the collar-bone—I felt myself struck with the point of the knife, and got up out of the chair—he made a second thrust at my left side, but I screwed myself round from him, put out my hand, and caught the knife in my hand—it was done so momentarily that I can hardly tell whether it was a violent blow—he then drew back—the persons in the room halloed out, "Do you know what you have done? why you have murdered the man"—he said nothing, but walked backwards towards the door, and stood at the door about a minute with the knife in his hand—all the people ran after him—there were twelve or fourteen—I saw no more of him till he was in custody—the knife was picked up in the passage—my hand bled very much—I walked to Mr. Morgan's, the surgeon, and saw Mr. M'Greal, who dressed the wounds—I was under him about a fortnight—I have the use of the hand now—I cannot get it up properly—I can use it very well, but not quite the same as before.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You have known the prisoner for some years, have you not? A. I was never very much acquainted with him—I let horses and gigs—the prisoner has hired about two of me I think—I do not recollect any fighting men being at this house on the night in question—I should say not one was there that night—I have not been in the habit of associating with those sort of men—I am often in their company—the prisoner had been drinking, but was not drunk—I had not spoken to him before he came into the house—it was not a minute after he came in that he said if I called him such a name as I had called his friend he would punch my head—I did not commence it with him—I might have said to him, "No person wants to think what you are, for everybody knows that you are the biggest b—afloat"—I dare say I did say so—that was after his calling on me, exciting ing me to something, when he talked about his friend—I had not on the previous night poured some water and saw-dust on some mutton chops which he and his friend were having dressed—I poured some barley water on the fire, not on the chops—it was not saw-dust or water—I did not know they were his mutton chops—it was quite accidental, by laying hold of the saucepan which stood on the hob—I swear I did not do it on purpose—on the

evening in question I beat him at the bar till he admitted he could contend with me no longer—I struck him in the face—I did not give him a black eye—I struck him in the mouth, and fetched blood—he did not cry for quarter and say he could not fight with me—I may be twice as his as him—he went in to the parlour—I was not chaffing him—he kept talking to me in the parlour—I tried to make peace more than anything else—I did not see his new bat—I had kicked his hat in the bar—I did not know where it was then—I kicked his hat after he had kicked me in the groin—I stamped on it so spitefully, because I did not want to strike him—I do not know that I crushed it to pieces—I never saw it afterwards—I went into the parlour first, and he came in after—there were very ill names used after we went into the parlour, which made me say to him, "Come, let us have no more of this"—I do not know what words they were—I am in the habit of using vile terms—I dare say words did ensue between us—he said he would have me out of my yard, I should not stop in my yard long, he would do for me—I did not challenge him to fight, and have it out with me, nor did I offer to come and fetch him in a chaise next day, and take him five miles out of town that we might have it out then—I made use of no such words, or any such proposition—I was not drunk, or anything like drunk—I was sober—I cannot say quite sober, perhaps, because I am always perhaps, because I am always drinking—I do not know whether I am scarcely ever sober—I am sober now—I am frequently drunk, but not every day of my life, or anything near it—I did not go up to him, and pretend to hold out my hand to be friends with him—I was not near him—the crushing of the hat was in the bar in the first instance.

MR. CHARNOCK. Q. The first blow was given to you by the prisoner when you were in the bar? A. Yes—he struck me in the mouth first, and after he had kicked me in the groin I kicked his hat—upwards of half an hour elapsed after the bad words were used before he left the room—I had not spoken to him after he returned to the room—the first and only words I said to him were, "Let us have no animosity," and on that the blow was given.

COURT. Q. How long had he been sitting there after he returned before you shook hands with him, and he struck you? A. I should say not more than a minute—he directly sat down, and took his glass of gin and water, then took the cigar and walked up the room.

JOHN ACTON . I am waiter, at the Crown, in Cranbourne-passage. On Tuesday evening, the 24th of Sept., about eight or nine o'clock I was in the parlour, and saw the prisoner with a large butcher's knife in his hand—to the best of my belief this now produced is it—he was standing in the middle of the room looking at everybody about the rooms, after he had struck Mr. Clayard he stood there about half a minute—I went behind him, and was in the act of laying hold of him, when my master who was on the other side of the room shook his head at me not to touch him—the prisoner turned round and walked out of the room—I followed him, and going along the passage he dropped the knife—he walked as far as the beer engine in the bar, and then commenced running—at the bottom of the passage I threw him down, and gave him into custody—we had no such knife as this in our house—it does not belong to our premises—I had seen the prisoner leave about twenty-five minutes to nine, which was about ten minutes before this occurred—I saw him return—I was standing at the top of the court talking to a lad who lives opposite, and saw him coming down the court shuffling something in his left coat pocket with his right hand—I was not present when the blows were given—I heard the screaming and noise.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Clayards drunk? A. No—he had been drinking—the

prisoner was not tipsy that I saw—he had been drinking, but I saw no tipsy action in him—he did not tumble down, or walk crooked, or anything of that sort—I am servant to Mr. Banks—he formerly kept a public-house in the Rookery, St. Giles's—it was after the blow was struck that I came into the room—the prisoner was then standing with his hand out, staring wildly round him—I did not notice whether he was in a violent frenzy or rage, I was so frightened seeing such a knife in his hand.

COURT. Q. Do you know the prisoner? A. Yes—I do not know what he is.

ROBERT CLAYARDS re-examined. I do not krow what the prisoner is—I believe he keeps an open house in North-alley—I believe he did keep some wine rooms in Windmill-street, but he keeps a house of ill fame.

JOSEPH BANKS . I keep the Crown, in Cranbourne-passage. On Tuesday evening the 24th, about seven o'clock I was in the bar parlour when Clayards came in—my attention was called by my daughter saying there was a fight with Clayards and Myers in front of the bar—I did not see who gave the first blow—Clayards afterwards went into the parlour, and Myers followed him some time after—I was in and out of the parlour several times—when I first saw them I think they were not far from each other, but Clayards left and went to the other end of the room, which was seventeen or eighteen feet from where Myers was sitting—that was at a subsequent part of the evening—I recollect Myers saying to a person, "Give an eye to my coat," and he went out of the house—on his return I was in the parlour—I should say it was half-past eight when he went out—it was an hour or better after the commencement—on his return he said, "I suppose there has been a good deal said about Abey Myers"—he resumed his seat which was about seventeen feet from where Clayards was sitting—he drank and sat down—in a minute or so he went to the fire to light his cigar, and Clayards wished to make friends—I believe he said, "Let us be friendly again," or something of that sort—Clayards was at that time sitting in a chair—he held out his hand-Myers went to him to shake hands—I was sitting by the side—he put his hand behind him, and I really do not recollect seeing what he pulled from it, but in the course of a second or so Clayards was stabbed—he put hit right hand behind him, and that is all I recollect till Clayards rose and said, "I am stabbed"—I saw the knife in Myers's hand after he drew back—I hear that he struck at him twice, but it was so quick I did not see how the blow was averted at the second strike, I was so close to him—I saw him put his hand out, but I was so alarmed—I saw Clayards hand and thumb bleeding, and he was sent to the doctor's—when Myers put his hand behind him I was so frightened that I cannot say what was said—he drew himself backwards to the door, and stood—my boy came in, hearing the noise—he says I shook my head for him not to touch Myers, but I do not recollect it—I got on a seat—Myers turned round, and opened the door, and we then all ran after him—when we got to the end of the court the boy had overtaken him—I had been in the parlour about half an hour before Myers went away—during that half hour I do not think there were any words of irritation on the part of Clayards towards Myers—I think Myers was fresh in liquor, and everybody more avoided him than to enter into any debate particularly.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he fresh in liquor before he went out? A. When he came in first I should say he was fresh in liquor, when the row commenced—he only had fourpenny worth of gin and water in my house in the space of two hours, and he left nearly all that when he left the house—he did not get more drunk in my house—I should say he was more than three parts drunk when he came—I should say Clayards was sober, for he avoided having anything to do with Myers all the way through, seeing him so excited—I

saw him stamp the hat to pieces in the bar—I did not see him strike him, because they were in the scuffle—he was not knocked down at all—he was struck in the mouth, I believe—I did not see the whole of it—I was called out in the scuffle—I saw Myers kick Clayards, and I said to him, "If my leg was well, I would knock you down for kicking so unmanly" (I had the gout at the time), and then Clayards broke the hat—I do not recollect the circumstance of the mutton-chops—I was not in the room at the time—I have kept this house eleven months—I lived at the Rookery, in St. Giles's, ten years—I do not mind going into rows—I can take my own part—I am "the Mr. Banks that went to the theatre."

MR. CHARNOCK. Q. Was it after Myers had kicked Clayards in the unmanly way you describe, that he kicked Myers's hat? A. Yes.

LOUIS BOUROGEAUX . I am a tailor, and live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury, I was at the Crown on the 24th of Sept.—I saw nothing of the scuffle at the bar—I found all the parties in the parlour—when I went in Banks shook hands with me, and Myers came to me, shook hands with me, and asked me how I was—I found all sitting except Myers, who was standing by the fire—I sat down, and he came and sat by my side—I saw he had a swollen lip, and said to him, "Halloo, what is the matter with you, have you been fighting?"—he said, "Yes, I have been having a row, and they are all against me here, landlord and all"—Banks said to him, "You had better leave the landlord alone, for he does not want to have anything to do with you"—nothing was said or done by Clayards—I did not know him—I was in the parlour from a quarter of an hour to twenty minutes before Myers left—during that time nothing was done by Clayards to irritate or aggravate him, not in the least—they were sitting apart, and separate from each other, quite at opposite ends of the room—before Myers went out, he said to me, "Are you going just yet?"—I said, "No"—he said, "Then will you please to give an eye to my coat?"—I said, "Certainly"—on his coming back he resumed the same scat—he got up again instantly, and was going to light his cigar—during the time he was reaching a paper off the mantel-piece to get a light, Clayards said to him, "There should be no animosity between us, come, come, let us shake hands and be friends "—he held out his right hand, Myers gave his left, and when Clayards said, "Here is my hand, and heart with it, "Myers said, "And here is my hand"—he kept his hand behind his back, and made a plunge at him, and as he was making the plunge, he said, "I will have your b—heart"—I saw this knife in his hand—he made the plunge towards Clayards—I do not know whether it went into his abdomen or his breast—I did not see any second thrust or attempt—he drew himself back—as he was going away, a man cried out, "Good God, you have stabbed the man! "—he looked at him, and said, "That is the way to serve such a b—as him."

Cross-examined. Q. You were not before the Magistrate? A. No—I carry on my business at No. 41, Broad-street, Bloomsbury—I have private apartments there—I was subpoenaed last Saturday—that was the first time I was called on about it.

MR. CHARNOCK. Q. I believe you are not the friend of Clayards? A. I never knew him before—I am no acquaintance of Myers—I have met him.

THOMAS MC GREAL . I am assistant to Mr. Morgan, a surgeon, in St. Martin's-lane. On the night in question the prosecutor came to our house—I found two wounds on him, one on the left side of his chest, and the other on his right thumb—the wound on the chest was about an inch and a half long—a superficial wound—it was just over the second rib, extending obliquely over it—I dressed it—the other was also a simple wound, inflicted with some sharp instrument—I think this knife might inflict such a wound—he

was under my care about ten days or a fortnight—the wound on the chest was not, as it was, a dangerous wound, it merely divided the skin—it did not go to the bone.

Cross-examined. Q. And the other was quite a superficial wound? A. It was a little deeper, but a simple wound, nothing to place him in any jeopardy.

JAMES AMOS FISHER (policeman). I have produced the knife—the prisoner was taken into custody by another constable.

GUILTY on the 3rd Count, Aged 30.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2430

2430. GEORGE CASTLES was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Millerman, and cutting and wounding him on the head, with intent to murder him.—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to maim and disable him.—3rd COUNT, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM MILLERMAN (police-constable B 95.) I was on duty on Saturday night, the 10th of Oct., about half-past ten o'clock, or rather more, in the neighbourhood of the Broadway, Westminster—there was a great crowd of persons assembled in Strutton-ground, which is a sort of market on a Saturday night—I saw the prisoner there—I knew him before, and thought it right to watch him—he observed that I was watching him—he said nothing then, but after he got further he called me a black looking b—, what was I watching him for? and made use of very abusive language—I took no notice of him, and made him no answer—he had no stick in his hand at that time—he kept on abusing me—I said, "I don't want to have anything to do with you at all, I wish you would go away, I don't want to be bothered by you"—he went away, threatening that he would knock my b—head off—I did not see him again for above half an hour after, he was then in York-st.—that is in the same neighbourhood—I was still on duty—as I was walking up York-street, I saw him coming down the street with the bludgeon, now produced, in his hand—he began abusing me, and said he would knock my b—head off—I walked along for above 100 yards, and took no notice of him—he followed me, and kept abusing me all the way I went—he was in the road, and I on the pavement—I said not a word to him—he followed me about 100 yards, and then came up with this stick, and struck me a violent blow on the right eye with it—I closed on him at the time, or else I should have had all the full length of it—I closed on him, so as to shorten it as the blow was aimed—it knocked me down and stunned me—in closing in, I got hold of the stick, and when I was down, the prisoner got hold of * * *—I kept hold of the stick when I was down, that pulled him down—he fell with me—he held me by my * * * three or four minutes, I cannot exactly say how long, till I was very sick—another constable came up—I begged and prayed of him to take his hand away from me—my trowsers are here, with the front all torn out—my eye bled very much indeed, it was cut—I was taken to a surgeon—I was very sore in the other part of my person, and have been so ever since—he also kicked the other constable, and kicked me very violently too.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. He was walking about in York-street, was he, when you first saw him? A. In the Broadway—I did not keep following him altogether—he was by himself—he lives in the neighbourhood—I bourhood—I never knew him in any situation—when he left me in the Broadway he went round by York-street way, somewhere—I do not know exactly which way he turned—I did not go after him—York-street is in my beat—he

went a little way down Strutton-ground, and came back again into the Broadway—I did not go after him—I left him at the Broadway—I followed him from Strutton-ground to the Broadway—that is not above twenty yards, just across the road—I followed him a very little way down Strutton-ground, not more than forty yards, I should say—I saw no more of him again till I saw him with the stick—I did not walk up to him then—I was going up the street and he was coming down—I never saw him till he came right on me—I was quite surprised to hear his threat—it made me turn round to look at him—I was not aware he was there till he was on me—he was in the middle of the road—he turned back, and followed me along York-street 100 yards, abusing me all the way—I took no notice of him—he had been drinking—I did not see him drinking, but I am sure he had been, he was in such a passion—he accused me in the Broadway of being drunk and kicking him, but I took no notice, I am used to those things—I denied it, and told him to go away—I told him I had never kicked him, nor yet put my hands near him—I do not say he was drunk—he was a little affected by liquor—I swear I did not kick him, or put my hand near him—I was walking about as usual next day, in the course of my duty—I did not lay up.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You were asked whether you knew the prisoner in any situation? A. No, he was always loitering about the street, associating with thieves, and I think he has been here for smashing.

THOMAS GREEN (police-constable B 122.) On Saturday night I was on duty in York-street, and saw the prisoner on the ground, and Millerman on the top of him—the prisoner had hold of Millerman's * * *—they were not struggling together—Millerman was begging of me to get the prisoner's hand away from him—I tried for about five minutes, I should say, to get his hand away, and at last succeeded, by taking him by the throat, and choking him—I found that was the only way—when he did let go, Millerman got up—we let the prisoner get up—he made a kick at Millerman three or four times, kicked him in the leg, and said, "You b—, I will kill you"—he kicked him three or four times in the thick part of the thigh in front—I threw him down—he then seized Millerman by the * * * again—I tried again for four or five minutes to get his hands away, but could not—I was obliged to choke him again, to make him let go—with some assistance he was then secured, and went along to the station—I had hold of his collar, and he kicked me—in going along, he said to Millerman he would do for him, if ever he got loose, and me also—when we got into Tothill-street, we got the assistance of another constable, and going through a little passage to the station, he kicked me in the thick part of the thigh, and made a kick at my * * *—he kicked me two or three times—at last we got him to the station—Millerman's head was bleeding.

WILLIAM RANDALL . I live in Gardener's-lane, Westminster. I was in York-street when this happened, and saw Millerman and the prisoner there—I heard the prisoner say he would knock his b—head off—he had this stick in his hand at the time—I did not see him do anything with it at that time—I saw him afterwards strike Millerman over the eye with the stick—it cut him, and knocked him down—they both ell down at the same time—the prisoner got hold of his * * * and held him till the other constable came up.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. I make tire wheels for my brother.

JOHN LEE HANLEY . I am a surgeon—Millerman was brought to me, I believe, but I was not at home, and did not see him till next day—I then found a cut on his forehead, and the forehead was darkened about half way up—it was a peculiarly shaped cut—it might have been inflicted with this stick—it

is very likely to have done it—he complained of another injury, but I conceived that was not of any importance, and did not inquire into it.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not do much to the other? *A. No.

GUILTY on the 3rd Count. Aged 19.— Confined Eighteen Months.

NEW COURT.—Monday, October 21st, 1844.

Fifth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2431

2431. ELIZABETH REEVES was indicted for feloniously receiving, of a certain evil-disposed person, 4 pairs of boots, value 1l. 14s.; and 1 pair of shoes, 4s.; the goods of James Levers; well knowing the same to have been stolen.

FREDERICK LEVERS . I am apprentice to Mr. James Levers, a boot and shoemaker, in Brompton-terrace. These boots and shoes are his property—they were safe in his shop about ten o'clock in the morning, on the 2nd of Sept.—I recollect seeing them there—about three in the afternoon my attention was called by some person, and I missed four pairs of boots and one pair of shoes—these are one pair of the boots.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Were these made by your master? A. No, we bought them—there was a private mark on them—it was put by the maker, I suppose—he does not make exclusively for my master—I know them merely from having the mark of the maker on them—probably there would be other shoes of the same maker the same as these in other shops in London—we had other boots and shoes, marked in a similar way.

GEORGE WILSON . On the 3rd of Sept I was walking in front of Mr. Mullen's, I saw Robertson [Note. Robertson has died since his apprehension] standing in front of Mr. Levers' window, and a young man who is not here—I saw Robertson take up a pile of boots and shoes—I told Parsons, and we went and overtook him at the corner of Sloane-street—one of them ran down Sloane-street—Robertson was taken into custody.

JOHN RUSSELL . I am assistant to Mr. Dicker, a pawnbroker, in New Cut, Lambeth. I produce this pair of half-boots—the prisoner pledged them on the 3rd of Sept.

ANDREW SWINTON CRIPPS (police-constable B 169.) From information I went to No. 6, William-street, Lambeth-walk, on the 7th of Sept. and took the prisoner, and told her it was for unlawfully pledging boots at Mr. Dicker's shop—she denied it—I searched the house, and found a quantity of duplicates in a letter, purporting to come from Tothill-fields prison, in the name of Robertson—I asked her who the letter was from—she said her brother.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell her she was charged with stealing boots that had been stolen from Mr. Levers'? A. No, for unlawfully pawning boots—I did not have any conversation with her as to who had committed the robbery—I never said a word about that—I did not know that she had been living with a man before, that time—I am a stranger in the neighbourhood, and know nothing at all about that.

JAMES LAMB (police-constable B 72.) I was with Cripps when the prisoner was apprehended—another female came into the room while the prisoner was in my custody—the other female said, "What is the matter?"—the prisoner said, "It is for pawning the boots that Jack nailed at Dicker's."

Cross-examined. Q. Who took Robertson into custody? A. Cripps—that was before the prisoner had been taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2432

2432. EDWARD MOLINEAUX and JAMES OSMON were indicted for stealing 1 live goose, value 5s., the property of Richard Bavin.

MARY ANN BAVIN . I am the wife of Richard Bavin, a cow-keeper, at Staines. About half-past one o'clock, on the morning of the 28th of Sept., Buckle, a constable, called on me—he had a goose with him, which was mine—it was marked on the feet—I then went on the common—I had the geese on the common—I had seen this gander some time before—it might be a week—when I went on the common I missed this gander, belonging to the geese—I missed the one that was brought back by the police-constable—it was my husband's property.

Cross-examined by MR. O'BRIEN. Q. Can you undertake to swear that you had seen it before? A. Yes, within a week of the time—I have known Osmon from a child—I never heard anything wrong of him before—he was in the employ of Mrs. Rock.

RICHARD MOORE (police-sergeant T 4.) On the morning of the 28th of Sept., about seven o'clock, I saw both the prisoners together, coming into Staines—I went across the road to them—I saw Molineaux had something in his lap—I asked him what he had got—he said he had got a bag—I said I must see what he had got in it—I took it of him, and found in it a large gander, weighing upwards of 12 1/2 lbs.—it was quite warm, and bleeding at the neck—there was a piece of flag round the neck, as if it had been recently killed—Osraon said it had been lying about the common ill for three weeks, and that they had killed it—I took them into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Osmon? A. Yes, about eight or nine months—I never heard anything wrong of him—after I took them to the station Osmon said, "I killed the goose."

MARY ANN BAVIN re-examined. The goose was not ill, that I am aware off.

Molineaux's Defence. I was getting a few mushrooms; I saw the goose lying there bleeding, and said, "Look at that poor thing," and knocked it with a bit of a stone; it fell back, and I said I should take it home to the owner; the policeman asked me, and I said I was going to take it to the owner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2433

2433. MARY ANN WHEATLEY was indicted for endeavouring to conceal the birth of a child.

GUILTY. Aged 22.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. — Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18441021-2434

2434. JOSEPH LAW was indicted for assaulting Anna Maria Robinson, with intent, &c.—2nd COUNT, for a common assault.

GUILTY of a Common Assault. Aged 70.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2435

2435. MICHAEL NEILL was indicted for stealing 2 loaves of bread, value 6d., the goods of John Thomas Hidden; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 14.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. — Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18441021-2436

2436. THOMAS BLANCHARD was indicted for stealing 10 ounces of tea, value 2s., the goods of St. Katharine Dock Company, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 36.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2437

2437. WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT was indicted for stealing 11b. 5 ounces weight of opium, value 16s., the goods of Henry Hearon and others, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 15.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18441021-2438

2438. EDWARD DRAKE was indicted for stealing 1 gelding, value 16l., the property of Thomas Munn.

NOEL MUNN . I live with my father, Thomas Munn, a farmer, at Kempsey. On the 7th of Sept. I saw a brown gelding of my father's in a field at Kempsey—it was missed the next morning at five o'clock—in consequence of some information, I came to town after it—on the 16th of Sept. I went to Mr. Young's, at Paddington—I did not see the horse there—the policeman showed it to me at the Red Lion—the prisoner is a native of Kempsey—I saw the prisoner, and gave him into custody—I had no conversation with him at all about it—I asked him how he came by the horse—he said he bought it at Banbury—I asked him of whom—he said he did not know.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Did you ever see him at Kempsey? A. Yes, once—it might be seventeen or eighteen years ago—Young is likewise a native of Kempsey.

JAMES YOUNG . I am a tripe-dresser, and live in Paddington-street. I am a Kempsey man—I know the prisoner—on the 12th of Sept I had some communication from Mr. Munn, at Kempsey, about a horse—on the 14th of Sept. I saw the prisoner at my door—he had a hone and cart with him—he told me he had got that horse for sale, and wanted me to buy it, or if I did not want one myself, could I recommend him a customer, as he could warrant the horse sound and quiet—I wrote to Mr. Munn about it—I refused to buy the horse, but told him it was most likely I should find him a customer in the course of a few days—I knew where he lived, and let him go away—on the Monday the prosecutor came—as we were going over the bridge in the Harrow-road we met the prisoner with the saddle and bridle, and he was riding the horse—I had before taken Mr. Loder, a neighbour, down, with a view of buying the horse—we tried it in harness, and when we got down to the Red Lion Mr. Munn and the officer came, and we gave the prisoner in charge—he said he had bought the horse on Saturday week, at Banbury, of a farmer that bred him, and he had been in no dealer's hands beside his—he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner knew you to be a Kempsey man? A. Yes, I had been at school with his son—I heard him say at the station that he was wrong about having bought it on Saturday, that he bought it on the Monday.

JOSEPH WALKER (police-constable D 5.) I took the prisoner. He said he bought it on the Saturday week, and then he said at the station it was on the Monday.

MR. BALLANTINE called

JOSEPH COVENTRY . I am a publican. I keep the Horse and Groom at Woodstock—on Saturday night, the 7th of Sept., the prisoner slept at my house—I saw him about eight o'clock on Sunday morning, and he had slept at my house.

THOMAS BENNETT . I was at the Horse and Groom at Woodstock on Saturday night, the 7th of Sept. I saw the prisoner there between seven and nine o'clock—Kempsey is about fortythree miles from Woodstock.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, October 22nd, 1844.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2439

2439. CHARLES WOOD was indicted for stealing 1 till, value 1s.; 2 half-crowns, 1 shilling, 4 sixpences, 1 groat, 3 pence, 9 halfpence, and 4 farthings; the monies of John Farrant: and that he had been before con victed of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18441021-2440

2440. GEORGE RICE was indicted for obtaining, by false pretences, 2 face pieces, and 24 knots of whip-cord, value 13s., the goods of Giles Bell Hutson; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2441

2441. GEORGE MURPHY was indicted for stealing 1 cape, value 1s. the goods of Thomas Watts: and 16 yards of canvas, value 5s., the goods of Charles Parrott and others, his masters.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES THAIN (City police-constable, No. 19.) I was employed in consequence of something I heard from Messrs. Parrott and Co., to watch their premises in Tenter-street, Moorfields. I went there for that purpose about seven o'clock, on the evening of Saturday, the 5th of Oct., with William Payne, the engineer, who was employed with me—I concealed myself—the business of the day ceased about that time, and the men went away—the prisoner was employed there as a sort of foreman, and looked after the premises—after the engineer had left the premises the prisoner went out, and remained out about ten minutes, between eight and nine o'clock—when he went out he locked the door, which locked me into the warehouse—he was not aware that I was there—he returned in about ten minutes alone—he unlocked the door and came in—the gas was burning in the warehouse—I could see him come in at the door perfectly clear—he took a yard measure from under the table close by the doorway—he went up stairs, and I could hear him rolling about some cloth, or something soft—he remained there about half an hour, to the best of my knowledge—he then came down stairs with two bundles, one in a red handkerchief, and one in a blue one—he had the yard measure with him, and placed it under the table, where he took it from—he then took a Mackintosh cape from behind a post in the ware-house, and threw it upon his shoulders, took both bundles off the table and placed one under each arm, reached the key from behind the door, opened the door, and was going out—I rushed out, and gave the alarm of fire—the prisoner said, "I thought it would come to this"—I asked what he had got—he said, "I have got some canvas"—I said, "I shall take you for stealing this from the premises of your employer"—he said, "I took it that I might be transported for life"—I took him to the station—he admitted that he took it in hopes that he should get fourteen years of it—I went back to the warehouse, and went up stairs, and found four pieces of canvas rolled up in the same way as that in the two bundles that I took from him—they appeared to have been cut from bolts of canvas and rolled up, and there were four pieces and one bale of goods at a considerable distance from where the canvas was kept—I allowed that to remain on the premises till I got the foreman, and then I marked the goods—these are the pieces of goods that I took from the prisoner—it is new canvas, and such as is used for packing—I went to the station the following day with the engineer—the engineer said to the prisoner,

"George, you had some more canvas packed up?"—the prisoner said, "Yes, I meant to take that too before I went home"—I searched him, and found 29s. and some pence in his pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Was anybody with you when you were watching there? A. No one; the conversation was between me and the prisoner alone.

THOMAS WATTS . I am in partnership with Mr. Charles Parrott and three others, as calenderers and packers. I have no doubt at all about this being our property.

GUILTY . Aged 50.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2442

2442. WILLIAM BERRY was indicted for stealing 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 waistcoat, 7s.; 1 pair of trowsers, 2s.; 2 shirts, 4s.; 1 bag, 1s.; and 1 breast-pin, 12s.; the goods of Israel Lyons.

ISRAEL LYONS . I live in Great Alie-street, Goodman's-fields. The prisoner was in the service of my son, Henry Robert Lyons—I was at his house in High Holborn on the 20th of Aug.—I gave the prisoner a bundle, containing a coat, waistcoat, trowsers, two shirts, and the other things stated—he was to take them to my house—when I arrived there was no bundle—about a month after the policeman called and showed me this handkerchief, which I know is one that I gave the prisoner.

HUGH DUPREE (City police-constable No. 260.) On the 15th of Sept. the prisoner was given into my charge for picking pockets—I locked him up, and my brother officer found this handkerchief upon him.

THOMAS BROWN (City police-constable, No. 215.) I found this handkerchief on the prisoner's neck.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the bundle taken away from me; I got this handkerchief out of pledge; the prosecutor, makes a mistake, it is not his handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18441021-2443

2443. GEORGE BLAIR and JOSHUA WRIGHT were indicted for stealing 1 watch, value 2l., the goods of Frederick Amey.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

ELIZA FOOT . I am in the service of Frederick Amey, who keeps the Red Lion public-house, at Enfield. About the middle of the day of Wednesday, the 16th of Oct., I saw the two prisoners at my master's house, sitting at the bar, drinking—there were seven or eight more persons in the bar—I saw my master's watch hanging up in the bar between ten and eleven o'clock—the prisoners came in just before dinner—after that I saw the prisoners against the haystack—I did not see either of them take anything out of the stack—I saw them in the bar about a quarter of an hour after.

Cross-examined by MR. MELLOR. Q. You have two stacks, have you not? A. Yes—situated at the back of the premises—any person going to the back of the house must necessarily have gone near those stacks—there were a great many persons in the bar—I do not know how many persons there were, or at what time the watch was missed—there had been some money missing at my masters'—my master said he had lost some a good while ago—he has not lost money more than once—it is two or three months ago—he did not make any fuss about it—he asked persons about it—he asked me, and thought that I must have had it—I cleared myself of it—it was not so much as two months ago—he did not ask any one else.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you take it? A. No—my master continued me in his service afterwards.

SARAH PRATT . I am employed at Mr. Amey's, at the Red Lion. On Wednesday, the 16th of Oct., I was in the wash-house—the stacks are ten or twelve yards from the house—while I was in the wash-house I saw Wright at the corner of the first hay-stack, pulling out a piece of hay and smelling it—there was a fence round the stack which was broken at the corner where I stood—Wright was inside the fence—after that he went straight up into the house—about a quarter of an hour after that I was coming out of the wash-house, and saw Blair at the corner of the next haystack, inside the fence, and he pulled a piece of hay out—I am not able to say what time it was—it was before dinner.

Cross-examined. Q. When you saw Blair, was he not making water? A. Not that I know of—I will not swear that he was not—I did not notice it enough—he might have been seen by any one at the back of the house—I know nothing of the prosecutor losing money in his house.

CHARLES FISH . I am ostler at the Red Lion, at Enfieldhighway. On the 16th of Oct. I was at the place, and in consequence of hearing that my master had lost his watch I went to the haystacks between one and two o'clock—there were other persons searching about—I searched in the hay-stacks, and found my master's watch in the second stack, very near the corner, just under the thatch—I gave the watch to my master.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been in your master's employ? A. Very near fifteen months—I heard him say that he lost some money—he did not accuse any one in his establishment—he did not ask me if I had it.

PHILIP MARTIN . I am a labouring man, and live in Turkey-street, Enfield—I happened to be in the yard at the Red Lion, at Enfield, when Fish found the watch at the comer of the stack.

HENRY JORDAN (police-constable, N 96.) I am stationed at Enfield-highway. About two o'clock in the afternoon of the 16th of Oct. I went to the Red Lion, and saw the two prisoners there and other persons sitting in the bar—I asked Mr. Amey, in the presence of Blair, who Blair was—he said, "I don't know him "—Blair looked very confused, and jumped up and asked me to search him—I said, "No "—I went out and he followed me into the back kitchen, and said, "If you think I have got it, search me "—I went into the kitchen, and Foot told me something—Blair said he went round the stacks to see if he could buy the hay—I went round the stacks and did not find anything—a short time after I saw Blair in custody of another officer—I took Wright ajid asked him what he wanted round the stacks—he said he went round for the purpose of making water.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you not know that Blair is a haycarter? A. I do not—I never saw him before the circumstances of the loss of the watch were mentioned—I pointed him out as a stranger in the room, and then he looked confused—I will swear that he said he went round the stacks to see if he could buy the hay—I did not write the words down.

ROBERT STEVENS (police-constable N 269.) Mr. Amey, after the watch had been found by the ostler, handed it to me—this is it.

Cross-examined. Q. When you saw Blair, did you notice any appearance of agitation about him? A. No—the other officer had left when I took the prisoner Blair.

FREDERICK AMEY . I am landlord of the Red Lion, Enfieldhighway. This is my watch—it was hanging up in the bar on the 16th of Oct.—it was after that brought to me by the ostler, from the stack—I gave it to the officer—I had seen both the prisoners in the bar about one o'clock—I had not seen my watch at all that morning—I placed it there over night—neither of the prisoners

said anything about any desire to purchase any hay—they had no business at my hay-stack, to my knowledge.

Cross-examined. Q. Blair was never in your house before the day in question? A. I never saw him before—it is not an unusual thing for persons to go round a stack of hay.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2444

2444. ANN SMITH and GEORGE DAVIS were indicted for stealing 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 breast-pin, 10s.; 10 shillings, and 10 sixpences; the property of John Horsford, from his person.

JOHN HORSFORD . I live in Copthall-terrace, St. John's-wood. About seven o'clock in the evening of the 24th of Dec, I was going up Park-road, towards my home, which leads from the top of Baker-street, towards St. John's-wood chapel—I was an out-patient of the hospital at the time—I was walking very lame—Smith came and asked me the way to Caroline-place—I did not recollect it for the moment—I had not been speaking to her for three minutes, when I heard a snap, and found my watch-guard was snapped in two, and my watch gone—I accused her of stealing ray watch—she ran away, and as well as I was able I pursued her, and cried out, "Police," and "Stop thief"—I got up with her when I had run forty or fifty yards—the instant that I got hold of her, she turned, and threw the watch away—I held her a minute or two, when Davis came across the road, took me by the shoulders, and asked me bow dared I insult a respectable woman, and he shoved me about with some violence, but I still kept hold of Smith, and then Davis struck me under the ear with his clenched fist—my leg gave way, and I fell down, but I still kept hold of Smith, and struggled very much with her—a shorter man came up, and kicked me in the side while I was down—I still kept Smith—a soldier came up, and he assisted the prisoners in getting away—I afterwards found I had lost a breast-pin, and from 14s. to 17s.—after they got away, my watch was brought to me by some groom—there was about two inches of chain hanging to my watch—I am quite sure that Davis is the man—there are lamps on each side of the road—I went to the station next morning, and gave a description of them—on the 15th of Jan. I was returning from Brompton—I met Smith with a man—they went down towards Piccadilly, and turned up to a street that leads to Curzon-street, and just as they got to the top of Brook-street—(I knew the man as belonging to the same party)—I went up to Smith, and saw her—I intended to have given her into custody, but could not see a policeman—I went into a public-house to see if I could see any one there that I knew—I treated Smith and the man with four penny worth of gin—I saw no one there—I came out—we parted, aad I went to Vine-street, and gave information—I did not take Smith that night, because I was lame, and I knew that the man who was with wier would not allow me to take her.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Were you at all tipsy on the night of the robbery? A. I was not sober—I knew what I was about—I lost my pin from my handkerchief, and the money out of my trowsers pocket—that was done while I was down—I did not throw my arms round any woman's neck, or round Smith's neck—my pin was sent to my brother, who is a constable—he brought me the parcel containing k—he is not here—I have not received any money either directly or indirectly—I met Smith and the man about eight o'clock on the 15th of Jan.—they went down Piccadilly about 800 yards, as far as Down-street—I met no policeman—there was a cat-stand which I got behind—I did not tell any cabman that Smith was the woman who had robbed me—I was not quite sure at the first moment—I was

quite certain when they turned down Down-street—I spoke to the man, and asked him if he would have a glass of anything—I was sure then that Smith was the thief—we went into the public-house together—there was no one in the house but a female—there was no one drinking there—we drank a quartern of gin—we had not more than one glass each—I did not 6ay a word to the woman—I did not address her at all—I did not say anything about my having lost my watch—I went out, leaving them in—they went on towards Hertford-street, and I followed them—it was a dark street, and no one to be seen for some time—I have not seen Davis since, or conversed with him—I have not been in his company to my knowledge—I know the Harp public-house, it is in Exeter-street, Lisson-grove—I have not been in his company since this at the Harp public-house—I have been there, but the sergeant of police was with me—I was not there when Neebone was with me—I have never seen Neebone before to my knowledge—I do not recollect Neebone bringing in a pair of boots and shoes—I swear that within three weeks or a month after the robbery I was not drinking in the Harp with Davis to my knowledge—he might be in the house—I was not drinking with him—I am quite certain about that—Mr. Moseley was not before the Magistrate—he was in the country at. the time—I had known him before—I do not know what he is—I believe he is out of business—I had seen him before at his father's, who is a publican—he came in consequence of seeing this in the paper—he came to me at the Botanical Garden, where I am an officer.

MARY ANN BRIDGE . I am searcher at the station-house. On Monday night, the 2nd of Sept., I was called to search Smith—I found on her these scissors, knife, and sheath, and 9s.—she said I had no occasion to give them up—I said, "I must give everything up."

WILLIAM CHARLES ROSS (police-constable D 157.) On the 2nd of Sept. I was in Montague-square—I saw Davis with Butler, who was in custody, but was discharged—Davis came and looked me in the face—Smith came out of Montague-square, and passed between me and Davis, and said to Davis, "It is no go "—I followed the three down different streets for about an hour and a half—there is another witness named Williams—I have known him some time—I believe he was an inspector down in the country.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am doing nothing at present—I was in the Hertfordshire police—I knew Davis and Smith living at my uncle's, in North-street, Lisson-grove, as man and wife in Sept., 1843—I saw them in Oct., Nov., and Dec.

JOHN MOSELEY . I was passing by accident, and saw the prosecutor in a violent struggle with a female—I walked over to see what was the matter—I saw a man knock the prosecutor down very powerfully—he positively reeled on to the road—he got up again, seized the woman again, and got on the pavement—I should not know who was the man or woman again—I assisted the prosecutor, and had it not been for a soldier, he would not have got the woman from him—I was coming from the Gloucester Arms.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A licensed victualler—I keep the Hope in New-street, Dorset-square—I succeeded my brotherinlaw—I have been there thirteen months—I do not know whether the prosecutor uses the Hope—I do not think I have taken 2s. of him in my life—I have seen him in the Hope twice during the last month—I never told him at all about the matter—I was subpoenaed to come here.

MR. BALLANTINE called

WILLIAM NEEBONE . I am a boot and shoemaker. I know the Harp public-house—I was there six or seven months since—I took a pair of boots to the prisoner Davis—he was drinking with Horsford when I came in—after I

took in the boots, he told Mr. Horsford if he wanted anything done in that line, he could recommend me as a good workman.

COURT. Q. How long have you known Davis? A. About eighteen months—I have done nothing more than worked for him—I did not always the goods to the Harp—sometimes I took them to Exeter-street, to a plumber and glazier's, of the name of Alders—I do not know when I took them there—the first time I worked for him was in 1843—the first pair I made was a pair of cloth boots, buttoned outside—I took them to Exeter-street—I should say that that was eighteen months ago—I cannot say when the next pair was made—I have made several pairs, four or five pairs—I have taken the greater part to Exeter-street, but two or three pairs to the Harp—I know North-street—I took the first order there—I do not know the name of the owner of the house—I am quite sure I saw the prosecutor and Davis drinking about six months since—I cannot be certain of the month—I am quite sure they were drinking together—there was no one with them that I know of.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2445

2445. JOHN BUTTON was indicted for stealing 1 tame duck, price 2s., the property of Mordon Martin Monroe.

JAMES COCK . I am servant to Mordon Martin Monroe. On the 23rd of Sept. he had seventeen ducks, and on the 24th I missed one white speckled one, and two were crippled—I had fed them ever since they were born, and knew them well—I believe this (looking at it) to be the one I lost—there was but this one of this colour.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. They were a good way off the house, in a meadow adjoining the farm? A. Yes—they used to go about in the water—it appeared some of them had been hurt by throwing stones at them, or hurting them with a pole, which was fundon the bank.

GEORGE HOBBY (police-constable N 314.) I found this duck in the prisoner's pocket, about half-past twelve o'clock, on the night of the 24th of Sept., near the prosecutor's house—it was quite warm—I asked him how he came by it—he said his master gave it him three hours before.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not take the duck away out of the pocket? A. The pocket was tight, I could not get it out without using bolh hands, and I must have let go of him—he tried to make his escape—it was Enfield fair time—the prisoner did not appear to be drunk—I had heard the ducks crying out before—he did not say that he did not steal it.

GUILTY. Aged 27.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. — Confined Six Days .

Reference Number: t18441021-2446

2446. GEORGE STEWARD was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 knife, value 10s., the goods of John Williams, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I keep a cutler's shop, in Longacre. I had a knife before the 6th of Aug.—I missed it—it is a sportsman's knife, and I had it to do something with it—I had it safe about the latter end of July in the shop—I do not know the prisoner.

JOSEPH JACKSON MANTING . I keep a shop in Gray's Inn-lane. I bought this knife of the prisoner some time in Aug.—he after that came to my shop, and just as he was going he turned round, and said, "What have you done with that knife?"—I said, "It is somewhere lying about, I thought of taking it for my own use"—I said, "Why?"—he said, "There has been a bother about it"—he said something else, but I did not hear what—he came twice

after that when I was not at home—the third time he came I was at home—he brought some wire, and I gave him into custody—he said, "There is no harm in the knife"—I said, "I think there is, by what you said before; you will get me into trouble if this knife should happen to be wrong"—he said, "It is not wrong."

Prisoner. Q. When I brought you the knife I asked you 1s. 6d. for it; there were some initials on it, and you gave me a file to rub it out? A. I did not—I went outside to serve a customer, he took up a file, and stood, filing this out, and before I could make any remark on it he was gone.

CHARLES CLARKE (police-constable G 213.) I took the prisoner—he had this wire and this box on him—this knife was given to me.

JAMES SILL . I am usher of Worship-street Police-court. This is Mr. Coombe's handwriting to these depositions—(read)—"The prisoner says, 'The prosecutor has false sworn himself; I told him I had bought the knife."

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the market, when a man came into the public-house with several knives and razors; I bought this knife of him for 9d. and a pint of beer; I had it in my possession about a fortnight, but I saw the man about six days after, offering knives and razors in the street; about a fortnight after I went to the witness's shop, and asked him to purchase it; I said I wanted 1s. 6d. for it; he said, "It is not worth that, I will give you 1s.;" he said, "There are some initials on it;" I said, "Yes," and he gave me a file to rub it out; he then took the file, and rubbed it out

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2447

2447. CHARLES PERKINS was indicted for stealing 33 yards of doe-skin, value 5l. 16s., the goods of Charles Wilson.

SAMUEL KENISTON . I am assistant to Charles Wilson, a woollendraper, on Ludgate-street. I received some information about half-past eleven o'clock, on the 10th of Oct., and found the prisoner with this piece of cloth, belonging to my master—I had seen it a day or two before inside the lobby—I know it by a private mark—it goes by the name of doeskin—the prisoner said he was very badly off, and merely took it to be transported, he wished to be transported.

JAMES RADCLIFF (City police-constable, No. 375.) I took the prisoner and the doeskin—he said if he had not stolen this he should have stolen something else; he wanted to be sent out of the country.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2448

2448. HENRY TOWELL and THOMAS HEATH were indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Skinner, the younger.

WILLIAM SKINNER , the younger. On the 28th of Sept. I was walking in Leaden hall-street—I had a handkerchief with me—it was safe between eight and nine o'clock that evening, in my coat pocket; I am not certain whether in the right or left pocket—I received some information—I turned, and saw one of the prisoners struggling with Brown—a person took my handkerchief up, and gave it to me—it is mine—it is marked in the corner.

CHARLES BROWN . I am a coach-smith, and live in Chapel-place, Lincoln's-inn-fields. About nine o'clock on the night of the 28th of Sept., I wasin Leadenhall-street—I saw the prisoners in company try five or six pockets—I saw three gentlemen come along, and the prosecutor in the middle—I saw Towell take the handkerchief out of his pocket—Heath was behind hime

holding out his coat to prevent persons seeing Towell—I laid hold of Towell—he struggled very violently, and some persons came round me, and kicked me—the officer came up and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Where do you work? A. I have no work at present; I have not left the police above five or six weeks—I was discharged for talking to a prostitute—I was fined before three times, once for talking to my brother, and once for speaking to another officer—I was in the police three years—I have not been working since I left the police—my wife earns a few shillings—I do not expect to get into the police again—I have tried.

GEORGE BRIGGS (City police-constable, No. 565.) I was on duty, and saw Brown take Towell—I went and took him, and Brown took Heath.

TOWELL— GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

HEATH*— GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2449

2449. WILLIAM HOBBS was indicted for stealing 1 mare, price 25l., the property of Arnold Heath and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2450

2450. WILLIAM COLEMAN was indicted for stealing 1 dead fowl, value 2s., the goods of George Bowler and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2451

2451. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing 99 yards of carpet, value 4l. 12s., the goods of Joshua Monkham and others.

WILLIAM OAKLEY . I live in Aldermanbury. On the 18th of Sept., about half-past five o'clock, I was standing at my door—I saw the prisoner past from the end of Addle-street, and turn into the lobby of No. 51, Mr. Margetson's—in a few minutes after, as I was crossing the street, I saw him come out with a piece of carpet on his shoulder—he had a blue bag in his hand—he passed down Aldermanbury, and I, seeing Mr. Margetson at the end of the warehouse, called to him—he came out, and I spoke to him.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear that the carpet was not given to me? A. I will swear that no one passed the door during the time you went in, till you came out.

RICHARD MARGETSON . I live in Aldennanbury. From what Oakley told me, I ran down Aldermanbury, and saw the prisoner with a piece of carpeting. on his shoulder—I ran up to him and collared him with it on his shoulder—it belongs to Mr. John Monkton and belongs to Mr. John Monkton and others—I am their agent.

Prisoner. Q. This is the piece you found on my shoulder? A. Yes, I can swear to it, and did so at Guildhall—I know it by the make of it—it is not the only piece of carpet of that description that has ever been made—I can swear that this piece had been in the warehouse a quarter of an hour before.

Prisoner's Defence, I was coming down Aldermanbury on the 18th of Sept.; a man respectably dressed asked me if I would earn 6d.; I asked him how; he said lie would give me 6d. to iake a piece of carpet to St. Martin's-le-grand; I took it, and put it on my shoulder; he told me to go on, and take it to the Bull and Mouth, and wait till he came; I saw no more of him; this gentleman came and tapped me on the shoulder, and said it was his.

GUILTY .* Aged 21,— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, October 22nd, 1844.

Reference Number: t18441021-2452

2452. GEORGE WALKER was indicted for obtaining money by false pretences.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2453

2453. GEORGE OBERHAUSER was indicted for stealing 1 cask, value 3s.; and 841bs. weight of Chinese blue, 6l.; the goods of Thomas De La Rue and others, his masters.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and FRY conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY TURNER . I am in the employ of Messrs. Dickenson, of the Old Bailey. I saw the prisoner about the end of May or the beginning of June—he brought a cask of colour to our house about that time, according to the invoice which I received with it—there was a kind of card on the cask, marked "No. 65, Old Bailey"—I received it from the prisoner, and gave it to our carman to pass it to Paddington, to go down to the Home Park Mill, at King's Langley, which is one of my employer's mills—I wrote on the card, "Home Park Mill"—this is the card.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You know nothing about the colour? A. No: I delivered the invoice to Mr. Patrick, our head manager.

THOMAS PATRICK . I am clerk to Messrs. Dickenson and Co. On or about the 25th of May, there was a bill of parcels or invoice presented to me for payment—I do not know whether the prisoner presented it, but he was there, because he was at the office, and I recognized him as the man—this is the bill (looking at it) which was produced to me while the prisoner was in the house, and I paid the money, 6l. 9s. 6d. to the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Messrs. Dickenson are large papermanufacturers? A. Yes—I am not at all acquainted with the process of papermaking, but I believe this colour is used to colour the paper.

JAMES BRANNAN (police-sergeant G 20.) On the 5th of Sept., I went to Messrs. Dickenson's, in the Old Bailey—I received this bill of parcels from Mr. Patrick—I went with Mr. Shackle on the following day to the mill at King's-Langley—the servants there pointed out this cask of colour, to which this bill of parcels had reference—we took a sample out of the cask, and I took this card off the cask—Mr. Shackle marked the cask in my presence—this is the cask.

JOSEPH SHACKLE (police-inspector.) I went down to the mill with Sergeant Brannan—I found this cask there, containing blue—I marked the cask, and took a sample from it—this is the cask.

WARREN DE LA RUE . I am one of the firm of De La Rue and Company—my father, Thomas De La Rue, is one of the firm—we are stationers, and it is part of our business to manufacture coloured cards—I have turned my attention to the manufacture of Chinese blue—there are a great number of blues, which are called Chinese, in which all the trade deal; but I have produced one of a superior colour, and of a durable tint—one of the defects of other blues is that they do not stand—in the manufacture of this article I am obliged to use a variety of materials, and it is necessary it should be made in vats, in large quantities—it requires very large apparatus to manufacture it—it could not be made in a house in which any persons lived, by the process which we use—there is no person out of our firm, to my knowledge, who is acquainted with the means by which I prepare this colour—in Sept., I

received information which induced me to send for the prisoner, who was an ingrinder and confidential storekeeper in our employ—he used to assist me in making the colour—I asked him if he had sold any blue to any person in the trade—he said, "No"—I asked him if he had sold any to Messrs. Dickenson—he said, "No"—I asked him whether he had ever made any blue, and he denied it—I told him we had a person in the next counting-house who could prove that he had sold some blue—he then said he had sold some, and he had made it at home—I asked him to describe the process by which he had made it at home, and the quantity of materials that he had used; and he gave me wrong proportions, which I wrote down—he said, 71bs. of prussiate of potass, one-third of 14lbs. of copperas, onefourth of 14Ibs. of sulphuric acid, and one-fourth of 11lbs. of nitrous acid—I asked him to describe the apparatus he made it in, and he described making use of an iron pot and a few tubs which he had by him—I asked him whether anybody in the house knew that he made it—he said, "No"—I asked him whether his wife knew it—he said no, he made it when she was in bed—as I knew that in one part of the processi a vast quantity of nitrous fumes are given out, so that any person in the house would be almost suffocated, we sent for the police and gave him into custody—we sent the officers down to King's-Langley, to see some goods that we understood he had sold to Dickensons—this is such a tub as we put our blue in, and I have not the slightest doubt that this blue is our manufacture—I am a member of the Chemical Society—blue could not have been produced by what the prisoner described—it would have turned to green.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you write the paper you have produced to-day, from which you have read what the prisoner said? A. At the time I was putting questions to the prisoner, on the 2nd of Sept.; my father was present at the time—I remembered all Ibis conversation at the police-court—I told the Magistrate I had made notes of the conversation, but he stopped me—this is the memorandum I made at the time—it has not been touched since—it has been in my pocket-book all the time—copperas is mentioned twice, but that is a mistake—it was sulphuric acid that he named, though it stands "copperas" here—I could recollect all the materials used in the proper mode of making the blue, and put them down one after the other, but I would not communicate them—I have been making it about two years—I employed the prisoner merely as a labourer to assist me—he saw some of the materials weighed, but two of them he never saw—I use 1 cwt. of each material at a time—I manufacture it in an open yard in Bunhillrow—no injury can result to the neighbours when it is made in an open yard—about 1lb. of each of the materials will make 2 1/4 lbs. of the stuff—we do not sell the blue at all—we use it simply in manufacturing our own paper and cards—one of the materials is very expensive to purchase—we use large vats and steam-pipes in making it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the prisoner in your employ on the 25th of May? A. Yes, he has been so for five years—his wages were about 23s. a-week—he was engaged with us from morning till night.

(Invoice read.) "May 25, 1844. Messrs. Dickenson to George Oberhauser—

£ s. d.

3/4 cwt. of bronze blue. 6 6 0

Cask. 0 3 6

"Recieved. J. OBERHAUSER." £6 9 6

GUILTY. Aged 33.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Confined Six Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18441021-2454

2454. EDWIN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing 1 clock, value 4l., the goods of Stephen Simpson; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined Four Months.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Reference Number: t18441021-2455

2455. GEORGE ARNOLD was indicted for stealing 1 plough, value 6s. 1 gauge, 2s.; and 1 basket, 1s.; the goods of Peter Graves: 1 saw, value 7s.; and 1 jacket, 6s.; the goods of Samuel Lathey: 1 saw, value 4s.; and 1 gauge, 3s. 6d.; the goods of Charles Wadham: 1 stock, value 5s. 1 plane, 3s.; 2 saws, 4s.; 1 chisel, 1s.; 1 jacket, 2s.; and 1 basket, 6d.; the goods of James Inwood: and that he had been before convicted of felony.

PHILIP STEVENS (police-constable S 200.) I stopped the prisoner about a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening on the 25th of Sept., in Acacia-road, St. John's-wood, with this basket of tools—I asked him what he had got—he said, "My tools"—I said, "What have you got under your arm?" where he had a white jacket, and in looking to see what that was, he dropped the basket, and ran about 100 yards—I ran and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did he do anything as he was going along? A. Yes, he attempted to cut his throat—he had seven saws under his arm, folded in the jacket, and the other tools were in the basket.

PETER GRAVES . I am a carpenter. I was at work on the 25th of Sept., at No. 18, Ordnance-road, St. John's wood—I left three saws, which are here now, in the parlour about a quarter before seven in the evening—they were gone the next morning, and I found them at the police-office.

Cross-examined. Q. It is a house not finished? A. Yes—nobody is living in it—I locked the front door, and next morning I found it ajar.

SAMUEL LATHEY . I lost a saw and a jacket from that place—these are them.

Cross-examined. Q. Were your tools in the jacket? A. No—the saw was on the bench, and the jacket by the side of it.

CHARLES WADHAM . I was at work there. I lost this saw and square.

JAMES INWOOD . I was at work there. I lost two saws, a flannel jacket, and a basket—they are all here.

LEWIS FOSTER (police-constable S 126.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2456

2456. THOMAS LEE and MARGARET BURKE were indicted for stealing 4 bottles, value 4d.; half an ounce of essence of lemon, 1s. 6d.; 1 1/2 oz. of oil, 6d.; and 1 oz. of lavenderwater, 6d.; the goods of Thomas Broad, their master.

THOMAS BROAD . I am a surgeon, and live in Goswell-street. On the 4th of Oct. I had suspicion of Burke, who was in my service, she beins rather tipsy—I went up stairs and found the articles stated in her box—they are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Is this a bottle of hairoil? A. Yes—I cannot swear to this—I can only swear to the lavenderwater, which is of a peculiar make.

COURT. Q. What did Burke say? A. She said they were mine—I said, "Who gave them to you?"—she said, "The boy"—these things were kept in the surgery—Burke and Lee both had access to it—Burke was cook, and Lee was in the surgery—Burke said before Lee that he gave them to her, and he said he had—I do not wish to press the case further.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2457

2457. HENRY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing 61bs. weight of tobacco, value 1l. 4s., the goods of William Creed; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM SAMUEL CREED . I live with my father, William Creed, a tobacconist, in Hungerford-street, Strand. Between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening of the 23rd of Sept., 6lbs. of tobacco was taken off the counter—it was in a paper, which had my writing on it—this is it—I know the writing on it, and here is a piece of paper pasted inside.

THOMAS GARLAND (police-constable F 21.) On tne 23rd of Sept., about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was on duty in Little Shire-lane—I saw the prisoner with this bundle under his arm—that was about half a mile from Hungerford-street—I followed him to Newcastle-court, and asked him what he had got—he said he believed it was tobacco, that a man gave it him at a public-house in Clare-market, and he was going to take it to Fetter-lane, and he was to see the man that gave it him on the following morning—I took him to the station.

Prisoner. I said I was going to take it to a public-house there; it was given to me at the Crown and Still; I was going along, and the officer stopped me, and asked what I had; when I went to the station it wanted a quarter to twelve o'clock. Witness. No, it was not so late.

Prisoner. I was in the Adelaide Gallery at past ten o'clock; the officer knows that, he saw me there, and the prosecutor said he did not miss the tobacco till next morning.

WILLIAM SAMUEL CREED re-examined. No, we did not, but it was taken between ten and eleven o'clock, because it was standing on the counter at ten—we shut the doors at eleven, and it must have been gone before then.

LUKE CARTER (police-constable F 64.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2458

2458. JOSEPH DOYLE was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Linscott, from his person.

JOHN LINSCOTT . I am foreman to Mr. Bonham. On the 13th of Oct., about ten o'clock in the evening, I was walking with my wife in Osborne-street—I felt a tug at my pocket—I turned, and saw the prisoner passing my handkerchief to another person—I am sure of that—I collared the prisoner, and called the police—the prisoner said, if I would go with him, he would endeavour to get the handkerchief back.

Prisoner. He charged me with having the handkerchief on me; he searched me, and I had not got it; he then said he had a case or two at Newgate, and he would send me there. Witness. I am sure the prisoner is the man whom I saw in possession of the handkerchief, and passing it away—I am a witness in another case, and I told Mr. Henry so—I did not say that I had a case or two at Newgate, and I would send the prisoner there.

THOMAS BURCHETT (police-constable H 33.) I was called, and took the prisoner—he said, "I am sure I never touched your pocket"—the prosecutor said he saw him pass the handkerchief to another person.

Prisoner. He did not charge me at all that night, not till the next moming. Witness. The prosecutor was following as down to the station, and another officer met him, who knew him, and told him if he came the next morning it would do.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

Sixth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2459

2459. JOHN SCHULTZ was indicted for stealing 64lbs. weight of coals, value 8d., the goods of John Charrington and another, in a barge on the navigable river Thames.

HENRY JOHN KING (Thames police-constable, No. 30.) On the morning of the 23rd of Sept. I saw the prisoner, between six and seven o'clock, in a laden coal-barge, which was lying under the bows of a vessel, at Shadwell, on the Thames—I saw him take something three or four times, and put it over the bows of the vessel—I went on board the vessel, and followed the prisoner to the cook-house—I there found these four large lumps of coal—I told the prisoner I suspected he had been taking the coals out of the barge—he said they were only two or three lumps that he took for the fire, and, if I would allow him, he would take them back to the barge—the name of Charrington was on the barge of coals.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. There were only four lumps of coal? A. No—he was about to light the fire when I went into the cook-house—I believe he is a foreigner, but he spoke good English.

CHARLES BRAITHWAITE . I am in the employ of Mr. John Charrington and another. I know these coals—they were in their barge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2460

2460. JOHN PROWSE was indicted for stealing 45 grains of gold, value 5s., the goods of Henry Slater Gilling and another, his masters.

HENRY SLATER GILLING . I am in partnership with Mr. Peter Clare, and no one else—we are watch-case manufacturers, and live in Clerkenwell. The prisoner had been in our service nearly twelve months—here are some cuttings of gold here, which I know from their description—watch-case makers do not have such, but engine-turners and dial-makers may have such—these are mine and my partners'—I saw them before they were lost, partly on the prisoner's bench, at dinner time, on the 23rd of Sept.—he left between seven and eight o'clock—I then received information, and went to a refiner's, where I saw this gold—I then gave the prisoner into custody—the policeman said to him, "You are given into custody for robbing your employers"—I said, "Prowse, you have been at it ever since you have been with me"—he said, "No, not ever since I have been with you, only since I have got into bad company, and given way to drinking."

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Is it not the practice of your business that the filings and cuttings should be collected at the end of the day's work? A. Yes—I have about eighteen men in my employ—all the sweepings are collected by my brother—he is not here—when they accumulate they are melted—it is impossible to tell what is collected at the end of any day—anybody might have the same sort of cuttings from the same materials—the prisoner has a wife and family.

CHARLES SCOTCHMER (police-sergeant G 2.) I took the prisoner—I said it was for stealing gold from his employers—Mr. Gilling was present, and said, "Yes, ever since you have been with us"—he said, "No, only since I have got into bad company and drinking."

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 29.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor. — Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2461

2461. JOSEPH HITCHCOCK was indicted for stealing 1 pair of boots, value 13s. 6d.; the goods of William Smith.

JAMES WEBB . I am a porter, in the service of Mr. William Smith, of Barge-yard, Bucklerebury—he is a boot and shoe dealer the prisoner worked on the same premises, but not for my master—he was in the habit of coming into our warehouse. On the 27th of Sept. I suspected something, and went down stairs—I found a pair of boots under the stairs in the cellar—I brought them up, showed them to one of the men, then took them down again, and put them where they were—about half an hour afterwards the prisoner went down with a basket under his arm—he brought up the pair of boots in the basket, and went just outside the door—I stopped him, and a person who was waiting on the stairs came and took the hoots out of the basket—these are them—they are my master's.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Are these the pair you first saw? A. Yes.

WILLIAM SMITH . These boots are mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any doubt about it? A. Not the slightest—the prisoner works on the first floor, and came through the warehouse to go down to the cellar.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Four Months.

(There were three other indictments against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18441021-2462

2462. LOUISA GEORGE was indicted for stealing 1 shawl, value 10s., the goods of Mary Beecher; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

MARY BEEGHER . I am single, and live in Baldwin-street, City-road—the prisoner used to come and work for me at my house. On the 20th of Sept. I had a shawl safe in my box in my room—the box was not locked—I missed the shawl on the Sunday morning after—I accused the prisoner of stealing it—she said she had not done so—I gave her in charge—I saw my shawl at the pawnbroker's, and it is here now—this is it.

Prisoner. She told me, if I would tell her she would not give me in charge, and I told her. Witness. I told her, if she would tell me I would not give her in charge, and she would not—I then gave her in charge, and she afterwards confessed it to the policeman—she said she would confess she had pawned it at a pawnbroker's in Redcross-street.

THOMAS TAYLOR (police-constable G 111.) I took the prisoner into custody—I told her what for, and she said she knew nothing at all about it—during the time I was searching the house she said she had taken it, and pawned it in Redcross-street—she said she had destroyed the duplicate.

GIBSON REEVE . I am in the service of a pawnbroker in Redcross-street. I produce this shawl, which was pawned on Saturday, the 21st of Sept—I cannot say by whom.

Prisoner. I never took it with the intent of not getting it back again.

WILLIAM BARROW . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Six Months

Reference Number: t18441021-2463

2463. LOUISA HARDING was indicted for stealing 3; spoons, value 7s.; 1 fork, 2d.; 1 plate, 1d.; 1 saucer, 1d.; 1 pincushion, 1d.; and 1 slipper, 1d.; the goods of Edmund Henry Kent, her masters: and MARY HARDING for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing, them to have been stolen; against the Satute, &c.: to which

L. HARDING pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined One Month.

ELIZABETH KENT . I am the wife of Edmund Henry Kent—he is landlord of the Prince of Wales, at Kensington—Louisa Harding lived in my service since last May—I lost these spoons—I had them in my possession on the 1st of Aug.—they were then in the kitchen, where they are not usually kept—they were brought there to be used but they were not used—I supposed that I put them away with the remainder of the spoons in a drawer in a closet on the second floor—when I missed them I spoke to Louisa Harding about them, but Mary Harding was not present—I have seen Mary Harding at my house in the passage and the lobby when she has come to see her daughter, but I have not seen her up stairs—these are the spoons—this plate and saucer, and other things, are toys of the children—they are all my husband's.

WILLIAM GEORGE STEWART . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, Notting-hill. On the 17th of Aug. Mary Harding came and pawned these three salt-spoons in the name of "Harding, New-street"—I am sure she is the person.

Mary Harding. You cannot say that I pawned them. Witness. They were pawned by you—this is the duplicate I gave.

SAMUEL PUDDEFOOT (police-constable T 127.) On the 20th of Aug. I went to Town Mailing, in Kent, and apprehended Mary Harding in a hop field—I told her the charge—she denied all knowledge of it—I then took Louisa Harding, and she said on the way to the court, "O mother, if it had not been for you this would not have happened "—Mary Harding said, "Never mind, child, don't cry, you can't help it"—at the station Mary Harding said she pawned them, and that the girl found the spoons opposite the Prince of Wales, three months ago—I searched Mary Harding's lodging, and found a number of duplicates, and amongst them this which refers to the spoons—she directed me to her lodging, and I found her husband there.

Mary Harding. You said you told me the charge, and you did not; and you would not let me speak one word to my child, you well know.

Mary Harding's Defence. During the time the child brought in the spoons I was at work; the children had several little toys, and these spoons, at play, and I asked where they got them: they said perhaps their sister Louisa brought them in. I then went to Town Mailing, and when I was asked about them, I said I knew they were in the house, but I knew no more of them. I have been thirty years in the neighbourhood, and worked for the first of families.

M. HARDING— GUILTY . Aged 45.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2464

2464. RICHARD KINGABY was indicted for embezzling 16l. 11s., 1d., which he had received on account of Alfred Chapman and others, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 40.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutors. — Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2465

2465. HENRY TAPPING was indicted for stealing 1 coat, value 3l., the goods of William Bright.

JOHN WILLIAM FYNN . I am errand-boy to Mr. William Bright, who lives in Whitechapel-road, and is a tailor. On the 26th of Sept., about seven o'clock at night, I was sitting at tea in his shop, and saw a person's hand round a coat, which was on a block between the shop door and the street door—the street door was open—I got up and went to the door—I saw a person taking part of the coat off the block—I did not see his face till he got the coat off the block—I saw his face then—it was the prisoner—he ran away, and dropped

the coat—I picked it up a few steps off—I pursued and caught the prisoner about four yards from the house—he asked me what I wanted with him—I called, "Police," and my master came and held the prisoner—this is the coat—it is my master's.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. This was about seven o'clock in the evening, was it? A. Yes—it is our practice to have the door of the shop shut, and a coat outside the door, and no door closed outside the coat—it was buttoned round the block—it was getting dusk—I laid hold of the prisoner about four yards from the door—I stooped to pick up the coat before I caught the prisoner—Great Garden-street is one door from our place—the prisoner had his hat on, but I saw he had red hair by the side of his face—some men outside told me I had got the wrong person.

COURT. Q. Did you see the prisoner drop the coat? A. Yes, and I caught the same person who dropped it.

JAMES EAVES (police-constable H 14.) I took the prisoner—he said he was perfectly innocent.

MR. PAYNE called

CHARLES NYLES . I live in Flint's-court, Globe-fields, and am a silk-weaver. I know Mr. Bright's shop—I remember the night when the prisoner was taken into custody—I was just at the corner of Great Garden-street—I saw two lads run from Mr. Bright's door, down Great Garden-street, and as they ran they dropped something—I saw the prisoner close to Great Garden-street—he had nothing with him—he did not have the coat in his possession—I told the witness he had got the wrong person.

COURT. Q. How far is the corner of Great Garden-street from the prosecutor's shop? A. Four or five yards, as near as I can guess—I did not see the prisoner before I saw the other two persons drop something—I saw him coming towards me from the way of Mr. Bright's shop—he did not run at all—I saw him almost directly after I saw the lads drop the coat—I had never seen the prisoner in my life before—I had just done work, and was walking home, to go to bed—I work in King-street, Brick-lane—the lads dropped the coat just under the tailor's shop window, on a board—I did not see any oue take the cost from the prosecutor's.

SARAH GILES . I am a widow, and live in King Edward-street, Mileend New-town. I do not know Mr. Bright's shop by name, but I know a tailor's shop in Whitechapel-road—I was coming up Great Garden-street that night, and two men ran down, and nearly knoeked me down—I came up, seeing the mob, and hearing the people say that they had got the wrong person—I did not see any tiling dropped.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Thursday, October 23rd, 1844.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2466

2466. ALEXANDER CHAMBERS was indicted for stealing 8 printed books, value 3s. 6d.; and 1 shilling; the property of John Allen Reed, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 11.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2467

2467. JAMES WATSON was indicted for stealing 1 saw, value 2s.; 3 chisels, 2s.; 6 gauges, 2s.; 1 screw-driver, 6d.; 2 gauges, 6d.; 1 oilstone, 1s.; 1 hammer, 6d.; and 1 basket, 6d.; the goods of William Nash: 1 saw, value 7s. 6d.; and 1 adze, 12s.; the goods of William Barber Acland 1 padlock, value 6d.; and 1 staple, 1d.; the goods of Samuel Sewel Wilson; and that he had been before convicted of felony: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 50.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2468

2468. WILLIAM DERNACOUR was indicted for stealing 1 5l. bank-note, the monies of William George Cooper, his master; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2469

2469. JAMES BARNES was indicted for stealing 3lbs., weight of lead, value 6d.; the goods of John Blyth, and another, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2470

2470. ELIZA DREDGE was indicted for stealing 1 shawl, value 8s.; and 1 blanket, 2s.; the goods of Richard Fairey , her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2471

2471. RICHARD HORNE was indicted for stealing 161bs. weight of mutton, value 5s., the goods of James Clark; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2472

2472. JOHN DYER was indicted for stealing 1 waistcoat, value 3s. 6d. the goods of Charles George Lodensack and another; and SARAH ROBINSON for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

HENRY DOUGLAS . I am shopman to Charles George Lodensack and Daniel Reed, of Ratcliffe-highway. Dyer was in the habit of coming to our shop. Between the 16th and 20th of Sept. I missed a waistcoat—this now produced is it—it is my master's.

Dyer. Q. Did you ever see me in your shop? A. Yes, a long time since.

EDWARD BURGESS (police-constable H 198.) On Friday, the 20th of Sept, I saw the two prisoners in Ratcliffe-highway—Robinson went into Mr. Tellord's, and offered the jacket in pawn—I desired the man not to take it—she said she got it from her husband, outside—the prisoners then joined outside, and I followed them to Cable-street, Dyer took it into a marine-store shop, and offered it for sale—I took it and put it into my pocket, and said he must go to the station—he went a little way, and then became very violent, took the waistcoat out of my pocket, and tore it into pieces—this is the waist-coat.

Dyer's Defence. I had been engaged in loading a ship, and my wages not being due, I had sent my wife to pawn my waistcoat, and they took it from my wife; I went to get 6d. on it, and met the policeman, who took me; I offered to take him to where I bought it.

H. DOUGLAS. I will swear it is my master's, although it is torn in pieces.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2473

2473. JOSHUA DOE and THOMAS RAINEY were indicted for stealing ing 6 bottles, value 9d.; and 1 gallon of rum, 3s.; the goods of William Falconer, and others, in a vessel in a certain port of entry and discharge.

WILLIAM FALCONER . I am part owner of the Ealing Grove, which was lying in the West India Docks—Doe was my apprentice. On the 11th of Oct., there was a cask of rum in the after-hold—I came on board that morning—the

mate reported to me that the cask of rum had been spiled—I went below, and found the cask had been spiled, and in Rainey's berth I found four bottles of rum—he was a sailor in the ship—two bottles of rum had been previously found in Doe's chest—I then sent for an officer who took the prisoners—I have compared the bottles of rum with that in the cask, and I believe it is the same—neither of the prisoners had any business with any rum—I asked Rainey about it, but he denied it till he was in custody—they confessed it before the Magistrate—I saw Mr. Ballantine sign this—(looking at the depositions)—this is his signature—(read)—The prisoner Rainey says, "I had a sixpence in my pocket, and I said, 'Let us have a pot;' Doe said, 'We will have plenty to drink, let us have some soft tack;' I handed Scorey the sixpence, and he brought on board some onions and bread; Doe then said, 'Let us have a drop:' I said, 'I don't mind;' Scorey said, 'You had better take rum, because it belongs to the ship;' Doe said. 'Rum is a very strong thing;' Scorey said, 'It will do very well when beating down channel;' Doe said, 'Take a bucket;' Scorey went up and brought a bucket down; he said, 'The two of you go, and I will go on deck to keep a look-out;' we heard a tap, and blew the light out; Scorey then struck a lucifer, and held it down to us; Doe pierced the vent, and he held the bucket while I drew the gimlet out; Scorey met us, and took it from us; we did it between us.' "

The prisoner Doe says, "I say the same as he does."

DOE— GUILTY . Aged 19.

RAINEY— GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and

Prosecutor.— Confined Six Days .

Reference Number: t18441021-2474

2474. ANN LEE and JOSEPHINE COLLINS were indicted for stealing 1 pair of boots, value 15s.; and 1 pair of trowsers, 14s.; the goods of Thomas Tinsley.

THOMAS TINSLEY . I live in Bridport-street, Marylebone. About a quarter past ten o'clock on the night of the 5th of Oct., I went to a public-house near Paddington-chapel, and called for a pint of beer—Lee came and asked how I did—I said, "Very well"—I asked her to drink, wnich she did, and we went out—she asked me to go home with her—I said I would, and then we went to another house, and had a quartern of gin, then I went to her house—she took me to an upper room, and bolted the door—then she asked me for money, and I gave ner half-a-crown—we then went to bed—I went to sleep—Collins, who was the landlady, came and awoke me, and told me to turn out—I missed three sovereigns, and 6s. or 7s. from my clothes—when I was jangling with Collins, I was sitting on the bed-side—her daughter, the prisoner Josephine Collins, came and took the boots and trowsers—I followed her to the next room, and took possession of them there—I had not paid for the room—I was not asked anything about money—I had paid Lee—Collins took the boots and trowsers before my face—I do not know whether it was to keep until I had paid for the room—she did not speak a word to me—it was Collins's mother that spoke about my staying in the room.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How long had you remained in the room? A. About an hour and a half—I had paid Lee half-a-crown—I do not know whether that was to include the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2475

2475. ANN LEE was again indicted for stealing 3 sovereigns, and 6 shillings, of Thomas Tinsley.

THOMAS TINSLEY . I went into this room with Lee—she bolted the door—I had three sovereigns, six or seven shillings, and a half-crown—I gave her the half-crown—I went to bed, and slept some time, and then Mrs. Collins

came and disputed about the room—I looked in my pocket, and missed all my money—Collins said I should go—I said I would not, and then she got a policeman—I left my money in my waistcoat. pocket on the chair—my waist-coat was not taken at all—Collins awoke me before I missed my money—when Collins came in Lee was up and dressed, and was by the side of the bed—I charged her with stealing it—she said she had not—she told the policeman that she had not had it—no money was found in the house—I went there about eleven o'clock at night, and remained till half-past twelve.

JAMES CLOUTING (police-constable S 15.) I was called in about one o'clock—I found Collins and Lee in the passage together—Lee was given into custody for stealing three sovereigns, and six or seven shillings—I said she must come with me to the station—she said she had not seen it—I took her—she was searched, and on her was found 2s. 6d., and 2d. in copper—I went back gain to search the room, and then the prosecutor gave Collins in charge, for stealing his trowsers and boots.

Prisoner, I never saw a farthing of his money: he gave me 2s. 6d.; that is all I saw.

THOMAS TINSLEY re-examined. I had my money safe in my pocket at a quarter past ten o'clock—I went in the room about eleven, and when I went in I took it all from my waistcoat-pocket—I gave her half-a-crown out of it—I swear I had it when I went in.

JURY. Q. Had you been drinking before you met the prisoner? A. I had had a pint of porter after taking the money from my master.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2476

2476. JOHN ALLWRIGHT was indicted for embezzlement.

THOMAS ROBERT BANKS . I am a tallow-chandler, and am in partnership with Robert Banks. The prisoner was in my employ constantly since July twelve months—if he received money on my account, it was his business to pay me. the same evening—if he received on the 19th of Oct. from Mrs. Everest 9s. 2d., he has not paid me—he came to me the next morning with the money, and said he was tired the night before, when he gave me the money—we came to Mrs. Everest's, he said she had "not paid, and would pay next Wednesday or Thursday, and would not deal with us any more.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAM. Q. He had received this money and it was his duty to come home on Monday night? A. Yes—there was due to him for commission a balance of 1s. beyond the 9s.—I did not know that at the time, but found there was afterwards—he came and demanded it, and I sent it round to him.

HARRIET EVEREST . On Monday, the 16th of Oct., I paid the prisoner 9s. 2d.—this is the receipt I got for it.

GEORGE MURRAY (police-constable K 68.) I took the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. He told you he had received this money? A. Yes, and that he intended to return it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2477

2477. GEORGE JOHNSON was indicted for stealing 1 pair of boots, value 10s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Steele, and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN BROWN . I am foreman to Thomas Steele, a boot and shoemaker, in Oxford-street. About the 27th of Sept. we had some boots hanging outside the shop-window—the policeman told us something, and I missed them—these

are them—they are my mastter's—there is a ticket on them which enables me to swear to them.

Cross-examined by MR. O'BRIEN. Q. When did you see this ticket on them before the policeman called on you? A. About six o'clock in the evening—I believe it was on them at Bow-street—I am not positive—I can swear to the boots without the ticket—I know them by the tops of them—they are not my own make—they are not my master's work—there are three men in my master's shop—he has four shops—in all our shops we have not such a boot as this—I do not think there is such a description of boot as this in any shop in London, from the manner in which it is made on the top—it is done different to what we have any other boot in the shop—these boots were bought by my master—I can swear that I did not sell them.

WILLIAM WEST (police-constable F 106.) About half-past seven o'clock in the evening of the 27th of Sept., I met the prisoner in St. Clement's-lane with something under his arm—knowing him, I went towards him—as soon as he saw me he ran away, and dropped these boots—I had not spoken to him then—I took up the boots, and found the ticket pasted on them—I did not take him then—I knew him well.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was this? A. Half-past seven o'clock in the evening—I saw no persons round but him, and he passed me with the boots—I took him a quarter of an hour after, and he said he knew nothing about it.

GEORGE WILKINS (police-constable F 133.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2478

2478. ELIZABETH GORE was indicted for stealing 1 necklace, value 10s.; 1 cap, 6d.; and 5 yards of lace, 1s.; the goods of Adam Hagmier, her master.

EMMA HAOMIER . I am the wife of Adam Hagmier. The prisoner was my servant, and left on the 12th of Sept.—I missed something, and went to her to the workhouse—I saw her, and told her she had been robbing me of two rows of coral beads, and some work off the baby's robe—she pulled this lace out of her pocket in my presence—this is the necklace I found at the pawnbroker's—they are both mine—I owed her some wages, and she summoned me—she would not take her wages the night before she went—she wanted 8s. instead of 5s. 4d., and I would not pay it to her.

EDWARD BUROESS (police-constable H 198.) I took the prisoner, and asked her if she had anything belonging to her mistress—she took this lace and cap out of her pocket, and said it did not belong to her mistress—then she was taken to the station, searched, and the duplicate of the necklace found on her.

HENRY READ . I am a pawnbroker. I produce the necklace, which was pawned at Mr. Wood's shop by a female in the name of Ann Sparks—I cannot say who by—this is the duplicate I gave.

ANN FAYER . I searched her, and found four duplicates on her—one was for the necklace.

Prisoner's Defence. I own to taking the necklace, and should not if she had paid me; the cap is not hers; the lace was laid about in the rag-box.

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined One Month.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2479

2479. ELIZA CHURCHILL and CATHERINE WILLIS were indicted

for stealing 12 bottles, value 3s.; and 12 quarts of wine, 1l. 17s.; the goods of Mary Benedicta Lloyd Minchall, their mistress.

MARY BENEDICTA LLOYD MINCHALL . I am single, and live in Craven-street. Churchill was my house-maid, and Willis my cook—I went out at half-past twelve o'clock on the 11th of Oct.—a lady who was boarding at my house asked for the keys of my cellar—I gave them to her—I went out, and was absent for half an hour—when I returned the lady gave me the keys, and I immediately locked them in my escrutoire—I went out to visit some friends—I returned and knocked for several minutes, and then Willis opened the door—I asked her where Churchill was—she said she was up stairs—I went up, but could not find her—I went out again to order some oil, and when I returned I had the same trouble to get in—Willis at last opened the door to me—I could not find Churchill—at half-past six o'clock Willis told me that Churchill was ill in bed—I went into her room, and found Churchill there—she was so tipsy that she could not hold up her head—I sent for a surgeon, and he said it was a case which required no medical treatment, it was drunkenness—the room was strewed with broken bottles and wine-Willis was drunk, too, but she was able to walk about—I have no doubt that the wine was mine—I went down, and attempted to turn the key of the wine-cellar, and it would not turn—I then pulled the door, and it was open, and not locked—I missed three or four dozen of wine, which I had seen safe the day before—while we were eating cold meat, W'illis went out and returned with a drunken man in a cook's dress, and called him her brother—she was very impudent, and wanted me to pay her her wages—I said I should not that night—she went away with the man, and stayed all night—she came the next morning and demanded her wages—I went down to the coal-cellar, and under the coals I found this one bottle of wine.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Did you pay her her wages and send them off? A. No, I have not paid them—it is about seven weeks since I paid Willis the last wages—I hired Churchill by the month—she had been but three weeks with me—it was sherry wine, and belonged to me—I have lent Willis 3s. 6d. off her wages, and am prepared to pay.

DOROTHY SENIOR . At half-past twelve o'clock I was at this house. I had the keys, and went into the cellar for some soda water, and when I came out I had a bottle of wine in each hand, which I was going to put down, and Willis said, "Shall I lock the door for you?"—I said, "Yes," and I suppose she did not—she gave me the keys—I saw the prisoners in the course of the evening—Willis was very violent, and Churchill appeared as if she had been up the chimney.

EDWARD BIGG (police-constable A 93.) I found the wine and bottles all about the floor, and the two prisoners drunk.

CHURCHILL— GUILTY . Aged 25.

WILLIS— GUILTY . Aged 26.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2480

2480. HENRY BARBER was indicted for stealing 1 umbrella, value 7s. 6d., the goods of Robert Linwood; and that he had been before convicted of felony,

SAMUEL SMITH . I am apprentice to Mr. Robert Linwood, a pawnbroker—he lives in Clerkenwell. At half-past ten o'clock on Saturday night, the 5th of Oct., I saw this umbrella hanging at the door—I saw it move—I ran out, and saw the prisoner jump off the gate, with the umbrella in his hand—I said I wanted him—he dropped it, and ran off—I ran and caught him—he struggled, but I kept him.

Prisoner. I never ran away at all; I was going up St. John-street, and an umbrella dropped; a gentleman passed me, and I was going to

give it him; this man came and said I stole it Witness. He had only just turned out of the gate, not a yard from the door, when I first saw him—no one else was near that could have dropped it.

EDWARD HARDING (City police-constable, No. 274.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person, and he had been convicted of felony before that.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2481

2481. JOHN ARNOLD and JOSEPH TREVILIAN were indicted for stealing 400 bricks, value 10s.; and 100 bats, 2s.; the goods of John James Harris, the master of John Arnold.

JOHN JAMES HARRIS . I live in Upper East Smithfield. I had a quantity of brick materials, and part of a forge, in my premises, in Glasshouse-yard—on the 30th of Sept. I directed Arnold to go down, take down part of the forge, and put the bricks in the deposit cellar—he said, "Will you let Trevilian help me?"—I said, "Yes"—in the evening they called, and said they were getting on very well; they came again, and said they had done it, taken them down, cleaned the bricks, and put them into the deposit cellar, and they had turned out very well—I heard reports, and went down to Wood, the carman—he told me something—I went to Mr. Harwood's house, where the bricks had been sold, and Trevilian was working there—I spoke to him—he said he was very sorry, that he and Arnold had sold the bricks for 10s., to Mr. Harwood, and he was working part of them then, and Arnold and he divided the money, 5s. apiece—Trevilian begged earnestly for mercy, and hoped I should not prosecute him—I told him I must—as soon as I had locked him up, I went home, and sent for Arnold—he came in—I had the policeman there—I said, "Is it true'that you have packed the bricks up in the vault?"—he said, "They are there"—I said, "Have you sold any?"—he said, "No"—I said, "You have," and I gave him in charge—he begged for mercy, and said he hoped I should not hurt him.

BENJAMIN HARWOOD . I am a shoemaker. Trevilian came to me on Tuesday evening, the lstof Oct., and told roe he knew a person who had got a few bricks to sell—I asked what be wanted for them—he said 10s.—I said, "Do you think they are worth the money?"—he said, "Yes, I know they are"—I said, "If they are worth the money, buy them for me, you know better than I do"—he said, "How am I to convey them down?"—I said, "There is Mr. Chatham has got a horse and cart, I dare say you can get them by that"—the next morning the bricks came, and were got down by Mr. Chatham's man—I never bought bricks before—I was repairing—I left all to Trevilian.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am carman to Mr. Chatham. Trevilian ordered me to cart the bricks—while we were in Glasshouse-yard, Arnold came up—he saw the bricks in the cart—I delivered about 500 bricks to Harwood—Trevilian was repairing his little cottage for him.

Arnold's Defence. Mr. Harris was about to let this place to Mr. Smith; he said I might sell the bricks if the person wanted them; the Smith that took the place said he had got sufficient bricks given to him to build his place if he wanted them, and Trevilian told me he knew of a person who would buy bricks; I said there was a load there he might sell for 10s.; there were about 500, and when he brought me the money he borrowed 5s. of me; I was at a stand-still whether I would let him have it or not; he said he wanted to buy a shirt and a trowel, and I let him have it; he promised to let me have it on Saturday evening, and he only paid me 2s. of the money; I have been in the prosecutor's service two years.

Trevilian's Defence. I was detected before I could make the money up; I asked Arnold to lend me the 5s., which he did.

JURY to J. J. HARRIS. Q. Did you give Arnold any authority directly or indirectly, to sell any bricks for you? A. Never in my life.

ARNOLD— GUILTY . Aged 29.

TREVILIAN— GUILTY . Aged 55.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.— Confined Six Month.

Reference Number: t18441021-2482

2482. THOMAS BLACKWELL and JOHN KELLY were indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Louis Elliott, from his person.

LOUIS ELLIOTT . I am in service in Cockspur-street. About a quarter past six o'clock, on the 18th of Oct., I was going along the Strand, I stopped at a shop window to look at a picture; two officers came to me, and asked if I had lost any thing—I felt, and said I had lost a silk handkerchief with white spots on it—I went to the station, and there the handkerchief was produced, which I believe to be mine—I have no mark on it, but I have lost one like it—I had seen my handkerchief safe about twenty minutes before—I have every reason to believe that it is my handkerchief—it was in the same condition that it is in now.

JAMES LEWIS ASHMAN (police-constable F 119.) I was on duty in the Strand, at a quarter past six—I saw the two prisoners close behind the prosecutor—they quickly walked away, and Kelly showed Blackwell something—I went and spoke to the prosecutor, and then Pocock went up a turning, and took both the prisoners—I knew both the prisoners before.

WILLIAM POCOCK (police-constable F 81.) I saw the two prisoners close behind the prosecutor—after they walked away, finding from Ashman that the prosecutor had lost his handkerchief, I went up Burleigh-street, and saw both the prisoners there—Kelly was showing Blackwell something—I crossed, and apprehended them, and found this handkerchief in Kelly's pocket—he said he had done nothing, it was his own property.

BLACKWELL— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

KELLY**— GUILTY . Aged 11.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18441021-2483

2483. GARRETT MULLINS was indicted for stealing 12lbs. weight of leaden pipe, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 metal cock, value 1s.; the goods of David Nicholson, his master, and fixed to a building.—2nd Count, not stating it to be fixed.

HENRY CALVERT . I am foreman to David Nicholson, a builder—I am repairing a house at the corner of Guildford-street and Russell-square—I missed some lead, and found it in the butler's pantry—I watched till between five and half-past in the afternoon, and then I saw the prisoner fetch away the lead and the brass-cock from the place where it was hid—I stepped out and stopped him—he said he was very sorry for what he had done, and I gave him in charge—he was in the employ of Mr. Nicholson at the time—my master had the management of the house, and was repairing it.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was this Mr. Nicholson's, or did it belong to the house? A. It belongs to Mr. Nicholson; the old lead was the property of the contractor.

COURT. Q. Had you taken old lead away before from that house? A. Yes—I have been working there six or seven weeks—we have put a good deal of lead on—the old lead was sent away from the premises by me for Mr. Nicholson.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2484

2484. JANE MONEYPENNY was indicted for stealing 1 cloak, value 15s.; 1 bonnet, 2s. 6d.; 1 apron, 2s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, 2s.; 1 necklace, 3s.; 1 pair of boots, 6d.; 2 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, 10 shillings, and 9 sixpences; the property of William Byford, her master.

WILLIAM BYFORD . I live in Tavistockrow, Covent-garden. On the 22nd of Sept., I and my wife went out, at a quarter before five o'clock, leaving the prisoner in charge of our house, and all the property was safe when we went out—there was 3l. 14s. 6d. In money in a chest of drawers; one Orleans cloak, behind the door, and a Tuscan bonnet hanging next to it; an apron, and a pair of boots—we returned a few minutes past nine, and these things were all gone, and the prisoner too—this is the cloak—I can swear to it—I cannot swear to this apron.

JOHN HUGHES . I produce the cloak—it was pawned at our shop on Monday, the 23rd of Sept.—I do not know who by—it was a woman in the name of Osborn.

JAMES COX . I lodge at the prosecutor's house—I saw the prisoner leave the house between five and six—she had a straw bonnet on, similar to the one I have seen the prosecutor's wife wear—she had the prosecutor's three children with her.

SAMUEL WEST (police-constable N 336.) I took the prisoner—I asked her what she had done with the things she had taken from Mrs. Byford's, her mistress—she said she never knew such a person—but, after that, she told me she had sold all the things she brought away, except the bonnet and cloak—the apron I found on her.

MRS. BYFORD. This is my apron

GUILTY .* Aged 16.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2485

2485. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing one half-crown, the monies of James Robbins, her master.

JAMES ROBBINS . I keep the Two angels and Crown public-house in St. Martin's-lane—the prisoner was in my service—on the 22nd of Sept., at night, I marked a half-crown, which I placed against the tableleg on the floor, knowing that the prisoner would have to move the table in the morning, to clean the room—when I came down stairs the next morning, the half-crown was missing—I called the prisoner, and told her I had placed it there, and if she did not give it up I should give her in charge—I told her I had marked the half-crown, and put it there, losing so much property—she denied it, and I called in the policeman—I asked her before him if she had not got it—she denied it, and I gave her in chafge—it was found on her at the station—this is the half-crown.

Prisoner. I found two shillings in the bed-room, and gave them to him.

Witness. I remember she did so.

JANE GARLAND . I found this half-crown on the prisoner at the station.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2486

2486. CORNELIUS DAVIS was indicted for stealing one watch, value 1l. 5s., the property of George Edwards.

SARAH CRAKE . I am a widow, and live in Tabernacle-square—at half-past eight in the evening, on the 3rd of Oct., I saw the prisoner go out of the parlour—I had been in the parlour half an hour before—I had seen the watch safe—no one had any business to go into that room—no one could have gone into the room, as I was in the shop—no one came in between eight and half-past eight, but ray master and the manservant.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You were serving customers in the

shop? A. Yes—there is away into the parlour, without going into the shop—I was busy serving customers, and I wanted change for sixpence at half-past eight—my master is not here, nor the man—the watch belonged to my master, George Edwards—it has not been found.

JOSEPH MARK EDWARDS . (police-constable N 400.) I took the prisoner—I found no watch or duplicate on him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2487

2487. WILLTAM BLACKETT was indicted for stealing 3 half-crowns and 1 shilling, the monies of George Peach, from his person.

GEORGE PEACH . I live in Daniel-street, fiethnal-green. About two o'clock in the morning of the 11th of Oct. I was at the Feathers, in Shore-ditch—I left about two in the morning—I then had three half-crowns, one shilling, and a sixpence in my pocket—I went from there two or three yards, and the prisoner came on my right-hand side, put his hand into my pocket, and got the three half-crowns and the shilling—he drew his hand from my pocket, struck me a violent blow, and knocked me down.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Are you often at this house? A. Not very often—I recollect there being three women there—I did not notice more than three—I had not been drinking with them—they might have drank out of what I paid for—I had drank a small portion myself, I was not drunk—I cannot say that the women did not drink out of what I paid for myself—I cannot say that I drank it all—they might have drank—it was half-and-half in a quart pot—I was sitting at the table some part of the time—the three ladies were not sitting in my company—there were a quantity of people there—I had been three times that night to Hackney-road—the Feathers was in my way home—I had no friends there—I never was a witness here in my life before—the prisoner struck me—I cannot swear with which of his hands—he struck me between the mouth and nose—he was standing on my right-hand side—I had not had my money out at all before he took it—I knew what I had in my pocket—I had not counted it at all—I knew what I had in the evening, past two hours or two hours and a half before—I knew in the street that I had four half-crowns, by having had occasion to put my hand into my pocket in the street—I knew I had that when I went into the house—I changed one half-crown there, and then I had three half-crowns, a six-pence, and a shilling.

JOSEPH PRICE . (police-sergeant H 15.) I took the prisoner from a description of his person, on suspicion of being the person who had robbed the prosecutor—I searched him, and found three half-crowns and a shilling in his shoe—but previous to that I asked him if he had any money, and he said he had not a single farthing—it was about half-past three o'clock in the morning, on the 11th of Oct. that I took him—the prosecutor had complained to another officer, and that officer told me.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the Feathers? A. I do, sir, it is a very bad house.

GUILTY .— Aged 19.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2488

2488. ADELE DUPERE was indicted for stealing six pairs of boots, value 7l.; and 114 pairs of shoes, value 28l.; the goods of Ignace Van Bever, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 21.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor .— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18441021-2489

2489. MARY ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 1 shawl, 6s.; 1 towel, 1s.; 1 shift, 3s. 6d.; 2 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, and 4 half-crowns; the property of Thomas Watson; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

HEPHZIBAH WATSON . I am the wife of Thomas Watson, we live in Radnor-street, St. Luke's; the prisoner lodged at our house. On the 28th of Sept. I missed all the property stated—the money had been in a drawer, which was always kept locked—the things that are here are mine—the prisoner had not left, she was still there—these things were found under her bed—they had been taken from two different drawers in my sleeping-room, which is adjoining to her room—I lost two sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and four half-crowns; 2l. 7s. has been found.

JAMES REDMAN . (police-sergeant G 20.) I was sent for, and found this property concealed under the prisoner's bed—the prosecutrix owned it—the prisoner had denied having any property at all.

HENRY REDMAN . I found a sovereign, eight half-crowns, and seven shillings, in the prisoner's room—she said it was given to her by a gentleman last March—in going to the station, she said, "You will not find the bedgown; I have not got it"—I said, "You said so about the other things"—she said, "The door was open and 1 went in and took them."

Prisoner. I acknowledge taking the other things, but the money was given to me.

JOHN BROWN (police-constable N 180.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2490

2490. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing 15lbs. weight of leather, value 15s., the goods of Thomas Cook, his master.

MR. MELLOR conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS COOK . I am a boot and shoemaker, and life in King-street, Hammersmith. On the evening of the 15th of Oct. I suspected the prisoner of stealing boots and shoes, and I gave him in charge on suspicion—I asked him for the key of his box—he gave the key, and his box was opened—I told him if he did not allow me to search his box, I should give him into custody—he gave up the key, and his box was searched—after I searched it I gave him into custody—I then searched his room, and found a quantity of leather concealed under his bed—the officer was with me all the time—I identified the leather as belonging to me—I had not authorized the prisoner soner to take any leather, and he had no right to take any there for the purpose bf business—it was stolen out of my shop.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. How many men are employed in your shop? A. about eleven in the whole house—five are employed in the bottom part where the prisoner worked—nine sleep in the house—they had to go into the prisoner's room and out at another door, close by, to get into their own room—it was not till the prisoner had been taken away that I found this leather under the bed—I was not absent from the house when the police-man took the prisoner into custody—my foreman went with him—I was in the shop—it was about half an hour before I went into the bed-room again—I had a shopman named Matthews—I gave him in charge on suspicion—he was in the shop and had the care of the leather—he did give out leather to the workmen, but very seldom—he was discharged on that occasion—I believe lieve Matthews stole the leather and gave it to Cook—he and Cook were connected.

MR. MELLOR. Q. Which room was it that the prisoner slept and worked

in? A. The room where we found the leather—he occupied it himself—I think for a fortnight or three weeks, no person had occupied it but him—the other workmen went into his room to go to their other shop—the door opened into his room, and then the door of the work-shop was in the other corner—they had no occasion to go to any other part of his room—the other workmen were not in the habit of carrying leather there, only what I gave them to work—I do not believe it was possible for any leather to have been brought into that room without the prisoner knowing it—there was a considerable quantity of leather—here are the two largest pieces—I know the piece by cutting a bit off one end of it myself.

COURT. Q. Where was Matthews during the half hour after you searched the box? A. In the shop with me—I kept my eye on him all the time—he did not go out of the shop.

SAMUEL PUDDEFOOT (police-constable T 127.) On the evening of the 15th of Oct. I was called to Mr. Cook's, at Hammersmith—he communicated with me and I took the prisoner into custody—I searched the prisoner's box and found some duplicates, and after he was given into custody I found a quantity of leather under the head of the bed in his room, covered with an old piece of rotten leather—when the prisoner was given in charge he said he knew nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2491

2491. WILLIAM COOK was again indicted for stealing 1 pair of boots, value 8s.; and 1 pair of shoes, 8s.; the goods of Thomas Cook, his master.

MR. MELLOR conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS COOK . On the evening of the 15th of Oct. I searched the prisoner's box and found five duplicates, and six sovereigns and a half in money—I know it to be the prisoner's own box—it was not used for any other purpose, and he had the key of it in his own possession—the policeman was with me at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. I think Matthews' department was in the shop? A. Yes—supposing these boots and shoes were stolen, they were stolen out of the shop—no other person had authority to serve in the shop but Matthews—there is a passage between the shop and the room in which the prisoner worked—I went to the pawnbrokers and found these boots and shoes there—the prisoner is twenty-two years of age, I believe, and Matthews is twenty-one—I believe Matthews is the thief, and this prisoner the receiver—I believe they are both connected—if I was out and Matthews had let other parties in, they could have access to the boots and shoes—if Matthews had minded his duty they could not.

MR. MELLOR. Q. Do you mean to say that the prisoner could not have obtained these boots and shoes without the assistance of Matthews? A. I believe they were connected together, and Matthews let him into the shop when I was out of the way—I cannot say who took them—I think the prisoner made away with them and sold them, and thus got the money in his box.

RICHARD REEVES . I am a pawnbroker—I have a pair of men's shoes pawned with me in the name of George Smith, but not by the prisoner—this is the duplicate I gave.

THOMAS COOK re-examined. I swear these shoes are mine—I have the man's name in them that made them, and I know the man's make.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the man's name? A. Thomas Gibbons—he has worked for me six months, and made a great many shoes, and marks them all.

HENRY HAMPSTEAD . I have a pair of boots pawned with me by a man, but I have no recollection of the person.

SAMUEL PUDDEFOOT . I took the prisoner, and found the duplicate of the boots on his person—he did not say in my hearing that he had bought the duplicates.

HENRY HAMPSTEAD . I heard the prisoner say that he bought them, before the Magistrate.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2492

2492. WILLIAM GILL was indicted for stealing 1 pair of boots, value 8s., the goods of Thomas Cook, his master.

MR. MELLOR declined the prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2493

2493. MARY JOCK was indicted for stealing 3 gowns, value 5s.; 1 table-cloth, 1s.; 2 towels, 1s.; and 1 handkerchief, 6d.; the goods of Ann Creedy; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

HARRIET TILLING . I am in the service of Mrs. Ann Creedy, who lives in Drury-lane. On the 9th of Oct. I sent three gowns and other articles by a little boy, named Scott, to be mangled—these now produced are them—they are my mistress's property.

HENRY SCOTT . I was taking this bundle from Mrs. Creedy's to the mangler's—the prisoner came and said, if I would let her have them it would be all right, and she took them from me.

PHILIP PAYNE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoe-lane. I took in these things of the prisoner on the 9th of Oct.

Prisoner. I certainly did take them; and on the Sunday morning Mrs. Creedy said, "Have you taken the things? If you will own to them I will forgive you;" and when I did, she gave me into custody; I was intoxicated at the time.

THOMAS BEVIS (police-sergeant F 6.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2494

2494. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for stealing 1 jacket, value 10s.; 1 watch, 2l.; 3 handkerchiefs, 8s.; 2 waistcoats, 12s.; 1 pair of gloves, 1s.; and 4s.; the property of George Brown.

GEORGE BROWN . I am servant at the Sailors' Home, in Well-street. The prisoner was employed there as cook's mate, and slept in the same room with me—on the morning of the 26th of aug. I missed my watch, jacket, and the other articles stated—some of them were on the bed, and some in a box, which was not locked—this is my waistcoat—it was found on the prisoner; and this is my watch, which was found at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM EDWARD BALL . I received this watch from Deacon, and I took this waistcoat off the prisoner's person.

SAMUEL DEACON . I bought the duplicate of this watch of the prisoner for 3s. 6d.—the watch had been pawned for 15s.—I got it out—it is worth about 2l. 5s.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Fifth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2495

2495. SARAH ADDINGTON was indicted for stealing 2 sheets, value 5s.; 2 shifts, 14s.; and 2 shirts, 5s.; the goods of Philip Jung, her master; and that she had been before convicted of felony; to which she pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 67.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2496

2496. ALFRED TANNER was indicted for embezzling 18l. 16s. 6d., the monies of David Carr and another, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Twelve Months

Reference Number: t18441021-2497

2497. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing 15 yards of carpet, value 15s.; and 10 1/2 yards of drugget, 10s.; the goods of William Brown and another; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which be pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2498

2498. THOMAS BRYAN was indicted for stealing 7 yards of woollen cloth, value 2l. 2s.; 8 pairs of boot fronts, 1l. 9s.; 6 pairs of backs for boots, 10s.; 16lbs. weight of leather, 1l. 4s.; 2 quires of sand paper, 2s.; 2 skins of leather, 3s.; 4 skins, 6d.; 8 skeins of thread, 1d.; 1 pair of gloves, 1s.; 3 awl blades, 2s.; 2 1/2 oz. of hair, 2s.; and 1 steel busk, 2s.; the goods of John Hitchings, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2499

2499. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for stealing 11 handkerchiefs, value 1l. 10s., the goods of David Pitty; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2500

2500. JOHN TANZEN was indicted for stealing 1 snuff-box, value 3l.; 1 handkerchief, 6d.; and 1 bag, 6d.; the goods of Frances Elizabeth Plummer, from her person.

(The prisoner being a foreigner, had the evidence interpreted to him.)

FRANCES ELIZABETH PLUMMER . I am single, and live in Berners-street. On the afternoon of the 6th of Oct. I was walking down Norton-street—I had a black merino bag on my arm—the prisoner pulled the bag off my arm, and broke the string—he ran away a few steps—I turned round, and called "Stop thief"—he then threw the bag down, and ran towards the New Road—I picked up the hag—I saw the policeman stop the prisoner—I kept the bag till I got to the station—there the policeman asked me for it, and I gave it him—there was a handkerchief and a silver snuff-box in it—I had used the box about five minutes before it was taken—the things were in the bag when I picked it up—this is my box, handkerchief, and bag.

JOHN GOVER . I live in Upper Norton-street. On the 6th of Oct. I was at a door in Carburton-street—I saw the prisoner run along on the right hand side, and saw him throw a knife down an area—I went to the house where he threw it down—I rang the bell, and got the knife from the area—I saw the prisoner again—I then went to the station, and gave the knife to a policeman.

JOSEPH CANHAM (police-constable E 138.) I heard a cry, and saw the prisoner running—I took him—he said, "Don't hold me, I have done nothing"—I had the bag given me by the lady, and the knife was brought me by Gover.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2501

2501. ELIAS DAVIS was indicted for stealing 77 gross of steel pens, value 3l. 11s. 6d.; 6 cards of pens, 2s.; 1 pen-case, 2d.; 1 box of pencill leads, 1s.; and 9 gross of pen-holders, 1l. 1s.; the goods of Henry Kalman; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

MESSRS. BALLANTINE and ROBINSON conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY KALMAN . I am a wholesale dealer in steel pens and Birmingham goods, and live in Houndsditch. About nine o'clock, on the 12th of March,

the prisoner came and asked me if I could supply him with steel pens and metal spoons—he said he had got a customer for them—I told him I had such articles I could supply him with—he said he had not got the money in his pocket, but if I would send somebody with him, or go myself, I could have the money directly—he selected seventy-seven gross of steel pens and metal spoons, nine gross of pen-holders, and some pencil-leads, worth 4l. 18s.—I told my lad to take them, and bring the money or the goods back again—they went out together from the warehouse, and the prisoner said he would not be long, he would be back perhaps in ten minutes—when he went out from the shop he said, "It is not a great way, it is only ten minutes' walk"—I expected the lad back in half an hour—he did not come back for five or six hours, and then he came back without any money or pens, but he brought back one parcel, which contained the spoons—I did not see the prisoner afterwards till he was in custody—I recognised him as the same man—I cannot recollect that I had ever known him before—he had only been in my place at the time he bought the goods—he did not tell me the place where he was going to take the pens, nor his own name—he said my father-in-law knew him well, and that he lived in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields—I asked him, "What name can I mention to my father-in-law, if I see him?"—he said, "De Cauder"—he said he expected to sell the goods to a captain that wanted to be off directly—I gave my boy directions not to let the prisoner have the goods without the money—I whispered that low, not to let the prisoner hear it.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. I believe you made out a bill of parcels for the goods? A. Yes, I did, without putting down the name of the party—I did not enter it in a book—I put it on a slate—I made out a bill, and laid it on the counter—I did not give it to the prisoner—I did not notice whether he took it, or the lad took it—I intended the prisoner to take it—I cannot recollect whether there was a name to the bill; if there was it was De Cander—the prisoner told me he expected a customer for them, the captain of a ship—I called on the prisoner's mother the same evening—I knew her—I told her the case—I told her her son had run away with some goods of mine, and I should like to find him out.

Q. Will you swear you did not tell her you had trusted her son with some goods, and you hoped he would pay you? A. I am positive I did not say the word "trusted;" I said he had run away with the goods—I gave the two parcels of goods to my boy—the prisoner did not carry part of them, to my knowledge—he told me himself that he was going to send the money back by the lad, and he hoped to get the money from a captain—the prisoner's wife called on me a few days before he was in custody—I said I hoped I should get the money for my goods, and she said he would call on me the same day, or the day after, to settle with me, but he did not call—no one called on me—I believe the prisoner was at home at his own house when he was taken into custody.

Q. Did not his wife tell you they could pay you by instalments? A. I said if I had got security; I should not like to trust him without security—I did not agree to take it by instalments—I said 1 should consider upon it what I should do—I wanted security—I did not mention about instalments, it was security for payment.

MR. ROBINSON. Q. When did the prisoner's wife come? A. On a Monday or Tuesday morning, three or four days before the prisoner was taken—it was full six months after the prisoner obtained these goods—it was on the 12th of March that he took the goods, and it was on the 1st of this month, I think, when his wife came—I had been looking after the prisoner, and giving information to the police at almost every station—his wife told me she expected

her husband home very soon, but she knew he had not got any money at would I do—I said, "I don't know"—she said he would pay it by instalments—I said, "If he has got no money, how is he to pay instalments?" and I said, if I had security, I should consider it—I wanted to get my money—if any one has got any debts, he likes to get them in—I went to the prisoner's mother the same evening when he went away—it is not my custom to go to the mothers of persons I trust, but I wanted to find the prisoner—I think I did not put any name to the bill of parcels, no name at all—if goods are paid for immediately I give a bill of parcels as well—the most business I do is for cash—I keep a wholesale warehouse, and it is customary to give an invoice, whether I trust or not—I am in the habit of putting down things on a slate—I book everything I sell.

WILLIAM HENRY SEXTON . I am in the employ of the prosecutor. On the day in question I was directed by my master to go with the prisoner, and to bring either the goods back or the money—there were two parcels—the prisoner was present when I was told to take the goods—I heard the prisoner say he expected to sell the goods to a captain of a ship, and if my master would send a perspn, or go himself, directly he got to the captain he should have the money, and it was not above ten minutes' walk—my master said to the prisoner that I should go with him, and receive the money—I went with the prisoner, and he took me as far as the Thames-tunnel, to Mr. Walker's, a ship-cable maker, and asked them to allow me to stop there whilst he went to Frost and Sheedey's—he then said to me, "You had better go in and wait till I come back"—I went in, and the prisoner went away, and took with him one of the parcels, containing the pens—I asked the young man who he was—he said he knew nothing of him, but he came there to sell lampcottons and steel pens—I did not wait at Walker's above five minutes—I then went to Frost and Sheedey's, but did not see the prisoner there—the prisoner had the parcel with the steel pens in it almost all the way—directly I got out of my master's door, he said, "The two parcels will be too heavy for you," and he took the one with the pens—I did not see him again till he was taken into custody at his own residence, in North-street, Commercial-road—I waited at Frost and Sheedey's till past four o'clock, and I gave information in Wapping—I afterwards went to the prisoner's house with the policeman, and when the policeman knocked at the door I saw the prisoner's wife, but the prisoner was within hearing—I saw him in the kitchen, through the grated window, at supper—the policeman spoke to the prisoner's wife at the door, and I should think the prisoner heard what she said—she said, "What do you want of him?" and shut the door in the policeman's face—I do not know that she said whether the prisoner was at home—a candle was fetched, and the prisoner came out of the passage of the next house, and was running away—we followed him—he went into the house of a baker in Back Church-lane, and there he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose these parcels were heavy? A. They were—I was glad to let the prisoner have one of them—my master made out the bill—I do not know that he put down the name—I only saw the bill lying on the counter—I saw the prisoner take it up—my master told me that I was to bring back the money, and of course he told the prisoner so—it is not likely that he should let the goods go without the money—it was by my master's direction that I went to the prisoner's house on the day he was taken.

EDWARD BURGES (police-constable H 198.) I went with Sexton to the prisoner's house—I knocked at the door, and Mrs. Davis came up—I asked if Mr. Davis was in—she said, "No"—I said, "I see him down in the kitchen, what is the use of your denying it?"—she shut the door in my face—I

went into the next house and got a light, and there was an alarm that the prisoner was gone out of the passage—I pursued him—he fell down, and cut his knee—I took him—he said he did not know it was me that was after him, he thought it was Mr. Kalman.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he would not have run away if he had known it was you? A. Yes.

CHARLES THAIN (City police-constable, No. 19.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the man.

GUILTY .* Aged 33.— Transported for Seven Tears .

Reference Number: t18441021-2502

2502. MARY ANN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing 1 shawl, value 6s., the goods of Sarah Muir.

SARAH MUIR . I am the wife of James Muir—I cannot tell whether he is living or dead—I have never heard of him since the day when he went out in liquor, which is nine years ago on the 6th of August—I have inquired about him—I applied to the parish, and to many places—he had no relations in England—he was a Scotchman—I do not know where he went to—I have never heard of him or from him—I had my shawl about two years before I lost it—I bought it, and paid for it—I got the money by hard labour at the wash-tub and mangling—I take in washing and mangling—the prisoner used to work for me—I discharged her five or six weeks before the time she was taken—I had the duplicate of my shawl on the mantel-piece—I had not pawned the shawl myself—an acquaintance of my daughter pawned it for me and my daughter together—the prisoner did not steal the shawl, but the duplicate of it—she bad the shawl on her back in the yard at Worship-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2503

2503. MARY ANN SULLIVAN was again indicted for stealing 4 shirts, value 4s.; 1 frock, 1s.; 1 handkerchief, 1s.; 1 shift, 1s.; and 1 pinafore, 1s.; the goods of John Hall.

SARAH MUIR . On the 5th of Oct. I had mangled four shirts, a handkerchief, a frock, a shift, and a pinafore—I then pinned them up in a bundle in a coloured apron—they were the property of Mrs. Hall, my next door neighbour—I then went out for a few minutes, and when I came back I did not exactly miss this bundle, as there were a good many bundles, and this was the top one—I thought it was all right—I missed it the next morning, when the person came for it—these are the articles—(looking at them)—they are what I mangled for Mrs. Hall, and put up in the bundle.

MARY ANN HALL . I am the wife of John Hall; we live next door to Mrs. Muir—I know every one of the things—I delivered them to Mrs. Muir to mangle for me—on Monday evening, the 7th of Oct., I saw the prisoner at the corner of Shrewsbury-court—she was talking to a person, and she had this handkerchief on her neck—I went up to her, and said I thought I knew that handkerchief, and I should like to see it—she took it off her neck, and said it was her sister's, and that she bought it of a person at a cook-shop in Golden-lane.

HARRIET HAYWARD . I am the wife of James Hay ward, a policeman. I searched the prisoner at the station, and found on her this shift, this frock, and this shawl.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave up a pair of stays for the duplicate of the shawl; I bought those things of a woman in Drury-lane on the Saturday

night; I gave her 1s. 4d. for the shift and the skirt of a gown; it is not a frock, but the skirt of a gown.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 21.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. — Confined Two

Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2504

2504. THOMAS GOULDING was indicted for stealing 9 wooden casks, value 4l. 10s.; the goods of James Houghton and another.

JOHN CAVELY . I live in Wood-street, Old-street, and am a carman. In consequence of some direction, I went a little after seven o'clock lasl Friday morning, to the White Swan in Upper Thames-street—I had Mr. Wilcox's van with me, and met the prisoner there—he said I was to go to Whitecross-street, to load some casks, and he went there with me—we went into a yard, and there was another man there—they rolled the casks up into my van—the other man said he was going after a note—I cannot say whether the prisoner heard that—the other man said I was to take the casks to Love-lane, Shadwell—I was going through the Minories with the casks, I met a policeman, and told him.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. The conduct of the other man excited your suspicion, did it not? A. Yes—in coming down the Minories, I said I did not think it was all right—the other man said he would go on, as perhaps they might want them shipped, and he told the prisoner to go with me down to the place—the other man left at aldgate church—the Minories is in the way to Shadwell—the prisoner kept with me till I met a policeman and gave him in charge.

COURT. Q. Where did you first see the prisoner? A. In Thames-street, and I took up the casks in Lower Whitecross-street.

SAMUEL SIDDERS . I am clerk in the service of James Houghton and another—they are oil-merchants, and live in Bartholomewclose—they have a warehouse in Whitecross-street, and about 100 casks there belonging to them—I do not know the prisoner—he had no orders from my masters or me to remove any of these casks—these are my master's casks.

Cross-examined. Q. Did any one call at your office about the casks? A. No, this was at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, before we were open.

JOHN LEWIS (City police-constable, No. 581.) On Friday morning, the 18th of Oct., I was on duty, and in consequence of information, I stopped the prisoner, I found him with the van and the witness Cavely—I detained these casks—I asked the prisoner if he knew who the casks belonged to—he said, "No"—I asked him if he knew the person whose yard he brought them from—he said, no, but he was employed by a man to assist him in moving them—I asked him if he knew who the man was—he said, "No."

Cross-examined. Q. Do you happen to know whether the prisoner is a porter? A. I believe he is, from the inquiries I have made.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2505

2505. CORNELIUS DRISCOLL was indicted for stealing 1 umbrella, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Elizabeth Hinds.

ELIZABETH HINDS . I am a widow, and live at Acton. On Sunday night, the 6th of Oct., I was in the tap-room of the Pack-horse public-house, at Turnham-green—I had an umbrella—I put it down, and a bundle on a seat, but I never sat down at all—I saw the prisoner there—I had never seen him before in my life—he asked for a drop of beer, and I gave him some—I missed my umbrella, and the prisoner was gone—no one else left but him—my sister went

with the constable to the prisoner's lodging—I did not say that I went—my umbrella was brought back, and then I went to the prisoner's lodging with the officer—I saw my umbrella in the constable's possession—this is it—it it mine.

JOHN LANE . On this Sunday evening, the 6th of Oct., I was at the door of the Packs-horse public-house. I saw the prisoner come out of the door—he had a walking-stick, or umbrella with him—I could not tell which—there was some noise about the umbrella, and I told the constable what I saw—I went to his lodging—when I got to his house I heard the glass break—I got on the tiles of the house, and found the umbrella lying close against the window, on the tiles—I could not go into the house—they would not open the door.

WILLIAM FURNISS . I was at the Pack-horse—I did not see the prisoner go out—I went to his lodgings, tnd knocked three times—I could not get in—there was a light up-stairs—the last time I knocked they opened the door.

EDWARD SCOTNEY (police-constable T 21.) I went with Lake to the prisoner's house—the landlord would not let me in for about half an hour—I heard a smash of glass, and gave Lane the light—I told him to go to the spot—he came back with his umbrella—I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I carried away a stick, or umbrella.

GUILTY . Aged 81.— Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18441021-2506

2506. HENRY MARTIN was indicted for stealing 1 printed book, value 5s. 6d., the goods of Elizabeth Buckley and another.

ELIZABETH BUCKLEY . I am a widow, in partnership with my mother. We keep a bookseller's shop in Covent-garden—a little before nine o'clock on the 10th of Oct., I left the shop in care of my mother, while I went into another room—I was away about two minutes—when I came back, my mother told me something, and I looked at the board outside—I missed "Josephus," in one volume, complete—I had seen it safe not two minutes before—we have not got it back.

HENRY MICHEL . On the night of the 10th of Oct. I was walking in King-street, Covent-garden—I saw the prisoner next the board of the prosecutor's shop—I saw him take the book off the board, open it for half a minute, and then put it under his jacket, and run away—I ran after him into Bedford-court—he asked me the reason why I ran after him—I said for taking the book off the board—he opened his jacket, and said he had not got the book—a policeman came up, and I gave the prisoner in charge—when he took the book there was another young man near him, and as they were crossing the road, the book dropped—the other took it up, and ran away with it.

Prisoners Defence. I had been rather behind my time, and he came up and said I had a book under my arm; I walked with him till I got to New-street, there he saw a policeman and gave me in custody; I never had the book; if I had been guilty I could have run away.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18441021-2507

2507. MARY ANN WARD was indicted for stealing 1 pair of trowsers, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, 1s.; and 1 shawl, 1s.; the goods of William Ward; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

MARY ANN WARD . I am the wife of William Ward, and live in Devonshire-street, Islington—the prisoner is my daughter—these trowsers, jacket, and waistcoat, are my husband's property—they were in my box in my room—sometimes the prisoner was at home and sometimes not—I cannot tell how she got her living—she was last at my house on the morning I lost these things.

HENRY MALLAM . I am shopman to Mr. Needs, a pawnbroker—I produce the trowsers, waistcoat, and shawl, which were pawned in the name of Ann Ward—I do not know who by, but I gave this duplicate for them.

JOHN DENNIS (police-constable N 281.) I took the prisoner—I told her it was on a charge of robbing her father and mother—she told me she had stolen the trowsers, waistcoat, and shawl, and gave me the duplicate of them.

WILLIAM TILLIER (police-constable G 28). I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2508

2508. JOHN FLACK was indicted for stealing 1 bag, value 6d.; and 1 bushel of nuts, 4s.; the goods of Joseph Robinson.

SARAH HOLLINGS . I keep a stall in Covent-garden, near the prosecutor's stall—between three and four o'clock in the afternoon of the 28th of Sept. I was sitting minding my stall—I saw the prosecutor leave his stall, and then I saw the prisoner go to his stall, take a bag of nuts and throw it over his shoulder—I followed him because I thought it was not right—I met Webster and said, "There is the man, fetch him back," and he did.

JOHN WEBSTER . My attention was called to the prisoner by Hollings—I overtook him, took these nuts off his shoulder, and asked him to come back with me—he said it was right, and I said it was not—he got from me a little way, and then I took him and took him back.

JOSEPH ROBINSON . I have a fruit-stand in the market—I had some nuts there in a bag—I can swear to this bag being mine—I saw it safe in my stand when I went away.

RICHARD MOORE . I am beadle of the market—I received this bag of nuts from Webster.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming through the market, and a man asked me to earn threepence by carrying a bag of nuts; he told me to go and bring them to him, while he minded my truck; I was going to take them and was taken.

GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

NEW COURT.—Friday, October 25th, 1844.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2509

2509. JAMES MEARS, JAMES BROAD, WILLIAM HARRISON , and WILLIAM WOODFORD were indicted for stealing 50 blocks of wood, value 2s., the goods of Charles Hulse and others, the masters of Mears, Broad, and Harrison.

THOMAS BURSTAL . I am an engineer in the employ of the Metropolitan Wood Paving Company, of which Charles Hulse, Esq., is the chairman, I believe—I have seen him and received directions from him to act relative to the wood pavement. On the 18th of Oct. we had something to do in Oxford-street—I employed Mears, Broad, and Harrison, for Mr. Hulse and others—they were left there to clear away the old blocks and replace them with the new in the morning—they had no authority from me, or any right to take the old blocks for themselves—the Company sell them for paying stables, and some for firewood.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. Has it not been a sort of accepted notion among these men that there is no great harm in taking a few of the old blocks? A. It would not be allowed—among the workmen generally

there is a notion that it is a sort of perquisite—fifty of these old blocks would be worth 2s.—Mears was the foreman.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say that they might imagine they had a right to take these things away? A. They might imagine so, but they had no authority—I did not tell the Magistrate that—I was not asked.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2510

2510. JAMES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of Sept., 1 jacket, value 16s.; 1 pair of trowsers, 10s.; 1 waistcoat, 6s.; 1 shirt, 2s.; 1 handkerchief, 6d.; and 6 sovereigns; the property of William Smith.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a mariner. On the 5th of Sept. I received my pay, which was eight sovereigns—I bought a suit of clothes with some of the money—I afterwards met with the prisoner—he was not a shipmate—I was a stranger to the place—he said he would take me to his lodging—he took me to the Golden Eagle public-house—we had three pints of ale together there, and, after the last pint, he took my clothes and money off the settle, and ran off with them—they were tied up in a handkerchief—these produced are them—I bought them of Mr. Herring, on Tower-hill—the money has not been found.

FREDERICK HENRY HERRING . I sold Smith these clothes on the 5th of Sept.—I am positive these are the same.

JOHN JUDGE (policeman.) I received these clothes from Mrs. Grinhem, the landlady of the Golden Eagle—I showed them to Mr. Herring, and he identified them.

MARY GRINHEM . The prosecutor and prisoner came to my house in a cab together—the prisoner had the clothes in his possession, and he said to me, "This is my bundle"—he went to the room where some of his shipmates were drinking, and said, "That man has got jny bundle, and not only that, but something of more value"—I said, "I cannot stand and look after him, if it is your property look after him yourself"—the prosecutor on that tried to make his escape out of the window, but could not, and went out at the side-door—the prisoner followed, and brought him back, and said, "This is my property"—they had a few words together, and I sent for an officer—two officers came in, and I said, in their presence, "Now, my good man, if it is your property claim it, and take it from him"—the prosecutor turned, looked in the prisoner's face, laughed, and said, "You know you promised I should take care of your bundle till you went to Temple-bar with me"—the prisoner said, "No, put it on the counter, you want to run away with it"—the officer said, "You had better leave it in Mrs. Grinhem's possession till the morning in case you may lose it; and if you think proper, I will take the man up, if you will give him in charge"—the prisoner said, "No, never mind"—they had three pots of ale together, and some bread and cheese—the property was left with me till the morning, six sovereigns and the clothes—I delivered them up to the prisoner next morning, in the prosecutor's presence—they walked away together, and I saw no more of them.

JURY. Q. Do you know the prisoner? A. No—he has been to my house once before.

WILLIAM SMITH re-examined. This woman is swearing falsely, and has been all the time—I was invalided from Her Majesty's ship Time.

JOHN JUDGE re-examined. Two policemen were called in at the time, I believe—I was not there myself—they were not bound over—I have a letter here from the Admiralty, stating that Smith had received a gratuity of 8l. that day.

FREDERICK HENRY HERRING re-examined. I am quite sure I sold the

clothes to the prosecutor—no person was with him at that time—I saw some gold with him at the time besides, but to what amount I cannot say.

Prisoner's Defence. I have not been long from the West Indies; I met this man on Tower-hill; he told me he had some money; I had some money too; I never saw where he bought his clothes; he had a girl with him; he ordered a cab; we went to the Highway; he asked me to lend him a sovereign, which I did, and gave him 5s.; he was in my company three days; I gave him 1l. 5s. for his clothes, and went to the public-house with him; he tried to run away with the clothes, after I had given him the money for them; I said, "Don't run away; if you want your clothes back, they won't fit me, give me back the money you had;" he would not, but wanted to escape out of the window; the landlady called out, if the clothes belonged to him not to run away with them; he said they did not belong to him, but to me; two policemen came in; we then had something to eat, and I gave him 5s.; the sovereigns were mine; I tied them in the handkerchief.

WILLIAM SMITH re-examined. I was not three days in his company—he had no money belonging to him.

GUILTY .*— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18441021-2511

2511. WILLIAM FARRINGDON was indicted for embezzlement.

HENRY WEST . I am a bedstead-maker, and live in Hackney-road; the prisoner was in my service; he received money for me, and it was his duty to pay it to me immediately after he received it. On the 14th of Aug. I sent him with a bedstead to Mr. Dunn's, in the New North-road—he ought to have received 22s. for it—if he did so, he has never paid it to me—he never came back at all.

EDWARD DUNN . On the 14th of Aug. I received a bedstead from the prisoner, and paid him 1l. 2s. for Mr. West—I have the receipt for it in my hand.

Prisoner. I am very sorry I did it, and am willing to make the money good.

GUILTY Aged 23.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2512

2512. THOMAS FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing 1 live tame fowl, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Philps.

JOHN PHILPS . I am a policeman. On the 18th of Oct. I lost a fowl—I had seen it safe at two o'clock—in consequence of information I went to the house of Catherine Quilty, at No. 21, Holles-street, at five o'clock in the afternoon, and found the fowl in her room—I know it to be mine; I had cut its tail the day before.

CATHERINE QUILTY . I am the wife of Michael Quilty. I bought the fowl of the prisoner about five o'clock that day—I have known him seven or eight years—he lives in the same street—he said he had met my boy, who had told him I would buy it—I asked where he got it—he said he picked it up in Dorset-street—I gave him 3d. for it—it had been very much knocked about.

Prisoner. She heard the people say that Thomas Newman fetched it down the street, and that he had taken it to all parts, to people he thought kept chickens, to see if he could find the owner. Witness. He did say that.

JOHN PHILPS re-examined. My fowl was in the street—it is worth 18d.—the prisoner lives near me—there have been a number of fowls lost in the neighbourhood.

Prisoner's Defence. No one can say I took it; Newman fetched it down the street, and chucked it down; it was walking about for an hour; a lot of

children began knocking it about; this woman's boy said his mother wanted to buy a fowl, I took it to her and sold it for 3d., as I could find no owner, and wanted something to eat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2513

2513. EMMA UNDERWOOD was indicted for stealing 1 watch, value 3l.; 2 seals, 19s. 6d.; and 1 watch-chain, 6d.; the goods of John Frederick Slew.

JOHN FREDERICK SLEW . I am a chimney-sweeper. On Monday, the 22nd of July, I left my room about nine o'clock in the morning, leaving my watch, chain, and two seals on a chair by the bed-side—I returned about two o'clock, or a little after, and found the door unlocked and open, and the watch gone—the prisoner lived in the next room at the time—I saw her last on the Wednesday—I did not see her the night I lost the watch, and never saw her after till she was in custody, which was three months after she left the lodging—she bears a very bad character—she is married—I believe her husband was living with her at that time—this is my watch and seals.

Prisoner. He did see me that night, and next morning he gave me a paper which I took round to the pawnbrokers; he has drank twice with me; it is be that has caused my husband and I to live unhappily.

Witness. I did not see her that night—I did see her on Tuesday morning, and she said, if I would give her a description of the watch, she would go round to the pawnbrokers', and I gave her a kind of note—I saw her again on Wednesday, and after that I lost sight of her—I never drank with her in my life—I have not been acquainted with her more than as a neighbour—she did not go round with me about the watch—she said she went—I have no means of knowing that she did go.

JOHN HASTINGS . I am a pawnbroker. I took this watch in pledge of the prisoner on the 22nd of July—I took the seals and chain the same afternoon, but not at the same time; it was a separate pledge, by the prisoner.

Prisoner. I did not pawn it, I could be on my oath, and I am innocent of taking it; my husband absconded. Witness. She was alone when she pawned the things—no man was with her, that I saw—I did not know her as a customer—I have not the least doubt of her identity.

JOHN FREDERICK SLEW re-examined. I do not know whether her husband absconded—I never saw him there after that time—he was there constantly before, living with her—I believe him to be her husband from what I have heard—I knew him by living in the house—I do not know whether I saw him on the Sunday; I did not on the Monday—I never saw him after losing my watch—4 saw her on the Tuesday and Wednesday after.

JESSE CHESHIRE (policeman.) I found the prisoner in the back kitchen of No. 8, Steven-street, Lisson-grove—she was lodging with another young woman—the other one opened the door when I knocked—I said I wanted Emma Underwood—she dressed herself, and the prosecutor and I entered the room—he said, "What did you do with my watch?"—she said, "I never had your watch, and know nothing at all about it"—he said, "Why, you pawned it"—she began crying, and said, "No, I did not; I was led into it by other people"—she cried very much in going to the station, and said her husband ought to he taken into custody as well as her.

Prisoner. What he has stated is quite false.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2514

2514. JOHN JOHNSON and CHARLES KERCHEVAL were indicted for stealing 1 desk, value 10s. the goods of Frederick acland Hamerton; and that Kercheval had been before convicted of felony.

FREDERICK ACLAND HAMERTON . I live in Belgrave-street, Pimlico. I had a desk in my bed-room, which I had seen safe on Sunday last about five o'clock—I missed it at near eleven o'clock at night—this now produced is it—I lodge at a private house—the street door is kept shut.

FREDERICK JAMES PENNY (policeman.) On the 20th of Oct. I saw the prisoners in company with two others, about a quarter to seven o'clock, loitering on the pavement. I went on my beat twice—on coming back the third time, I was standing under a lamp-post, and Kercheval passed me, and made a noise with his mouth—Johnson crossed the road, and turned into Gillingham-street—I followed him—he saw me coming and ran—I ran after him—Kercheval ran up Frederick-lerrace—I followed Johnson about 300 yards—when he was turning Gillingham-street, into Wilton-road, he had a desk—I saw the brass on it—he took it and throw it on the steps of a door—I followed him 300 yards, hallooing "Stop thief!"—a gentleman stopped him, and I took him—he asked what I wanted him for—I said I would tell him when I got him to Westminster station—he said he would be d—d if he would go to Westminster station, he would go to Pimlico—I asked why—he said he knew his way there—I said I did not—he resisted, caught hold of a shutter-bar, and pulled it down upon us—I had seen them before about a quarter to seven o'clock—they had nothing with them then—this was at eight o'clock.

Johnson. He said he took me for a bundle, and at the station he told the inspector that I had thrown it over a high paling, and he knew where to find it, and the desk was found in a door-way.

Witness. He threw it on the pavement between Gillingham-street and Wilton-road, at the corner house—alter taking him to the station, I returned to look for it at the place where he had thrown it, but it was gone—while I was looking about, the witness, George Hind, came up, and said he had found it, and taken it to Pimlico station—I went there and got it—Mr. Hind took me to the place where he found it, and it was the place where I had seen Johnson throw it.

Johnson. Q. How could you see where I threw it vhen I was in another street? A. I was so close on him—I never lost sight of him from the time Kerchcval made the signal with his mouth—he is an excellent runner, but so am I.

Kercheval. He said at the station-house that I came on first; I was not in company with Johnson, or anybody; the policeman coughed at me, and I at the same time coughed at him, but I did not know what it was for; I know the policeman well by living in the neighbourhood; I was coming along with my hands in my pocket; he had not seen me before; he said at the office I walked away. Witness. I saw him watching the other policeman on duty on the other side—he ran away.

GEORGE HIND . I picked up the desk and took it to the station—I found the policman looking for it when I came back—I picked it up at the place where he was looking.

Johnson's Defence. It is evident the policeman could not see me throw away the desk, when he was in one street and I in the other; no one can say they saw me in Belgrave-street, or near the prosecutor's house; the policeman brought in another prisoner at Queen-square, and the Magistrate would not take his evidence against us; the inspector asked him what sort of a bundle it was, and lie could not tell; but directly he saw the desk he said, "That is it," and ho said he was fifty yards behind me.

Kercheval's Defence. I was not in Johnson's company; I do know him,

but I had been to my grandmother's, who allows me a few shillings-every week, which I had in a piece of paper when I was taken.

FREDERICK JAMES PENNY re-examitied. I was not ten yards behind Johnson. As we were bringing him to the station he threw a key away, which I produce—it does not fit the latch of the house where the prosecutor lives—it was a common spring-latch.

WILLIAM MILLERMAN (police-constable B 95.) I produce a certificate of Kerchevars former conviction—(read)—he is the person—he has not been out of prison above six months.

JOHNSON— GUILTY . Aged 2O.*

KERCHEVAL— GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven years .

Reference Number: t18441021-2515

2515. ELLEN REAGAN was indicted for stealing 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 watch-chain, 1l.; and 1 handkerchief, 2s.; the goods of John Thomas Mayell.

JOHN THOMAS MAYELL . I am a coal-dealer, and live in Litchfield-street. On the 16th of Oct., about four or five o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner at a public-house in Broad-street, and I got into conversation with her—we were drinking for some time, we adjourned to a lodging-house in George-street, and I went to bed with her—I went to sleep—about an hour after I was awoke by a policeman, who produced to me my watch and chain, which had been in my pocket—these are them, and my handkerchief.

ELIZABETH BRYANT . I am servant at this house. The prisoner rapped at the room-door to come out—I opened the door—she ran down stairs to the street-door—I saw her stoop down and put something into her boot—I asked what she had done with the man's watch—she made no answer, but ran up stairs—I would not let her go, and called a policeman.

WILLAIM BAKER (policeman.) I was calledby Bryant. The prisoner was outside the room door, and ran down stairs to the street-door—Bryant gave me information, and I followed her—she went up stairs into the room, and I saw her take the watch from her left boot, and throw it under the pillow; she also took this handkerchief from her bosom—Bryant was with me at the time—the prosecutor was then asleep in bed—I awoke him up with a deal of trouble.

E. BRYANT re-examined. I saw her take the property out of her boot.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with him from four o'clock in the afternoon till twelve, drinking all the time; he gave me the handkerchief; the police-man found the watch under the pillow; I never took it into my hand; I could not go out, as the door was locked on me; I had no boots or shoes on; the policeman said if he did not give me in charge he would lose hit property.

GUILTY .— Aged 26.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2516

2516. ANN PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing 50 brass chains, value 2l. 16s.; 100 pieces of leather, 3s. 6d.; and 1 hank of twine, 1d.; the goods of William Oliver Staples; 1 basket, value 6d.; 6lbs. weight of mutton, value 3s. 7d.; and 2ozs. weight of tea, 7d.; and 1lb. weight of sugar, 7d.; the goods of Adam Crooks; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

MARY ANN STAPLES . I am the wife of William Oliver Staples, and live in Godfrey's-gardens, Millbank-road, Westminster. On Saturday, the 12th of Oct., I went into the angel public-house, Broadway, with my brother and daughter, about nine or ten o'clock at night—I had a basket containing 50 brass chains, 100 pieces of leather, and some twine—my brother took it off my arm, and placed it on the tap, in the corner, while we drank a pot of half-and-half—I saw the prisoner there—we were there about a quarter of an hour

or twenty minutes, and missed the basket and its contents, and also another basket belonging to my brother, which was with it—my brother's has not been found—this is my basket and things.

ADAM CROOKS . I was with my sister in the public-house on this evening—I had a basket containing a loin of mutton, 2oz. of tea, some sugar and butter—I lost my basket—it has not been found.

Prisoner. He has been convicted twice, and had a month at the Sessions-house, and a month here. Witness. I was convicted once at the Sessions for felony, but I was not convicted here—I was charged with felony.

MARY ANN STAPLES , Jun. I went with my mother to the public-house—she put the basket on the tap, and had some half-and-half—I went out with my little cousin to buy a halfpenny-worth of apples, and as I was coming in again I saw the prisoner coming out with my uncle's and mother's baskets—I asked her what made her take the baskets out, and she hit me in the eye—I am quite sure she is the woman.

ANN BURNS . I keep a public-house, in Regent-street, Westminster. On Saturday night the prisoner brought this basket, put it behind the tap-room door, left it there, and walked out again—I took it up stairs on Sunday morning, and brought it down again on Monday—it contained these chains and leathers for soldiers' caps—I did not know her before—she never came after it again.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday evening I went into the Angel; I was rather in liquor; Mr. Crooks was there, and his wife's sister and little girl; I did not speak to his sister; he offered me a glass or pot to drink, and I called for a pot in return; there was a piece of work, and we were all turned out of the house, but I never had the baskets in my hand; I ran, being tipsy, to see what the mob was about, and never went into the house again; in the morning I found myself on a person's bed in Orchard-street.

JOHN HUDSON (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read)—she is the person.

GUILTY .* Aged 29.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2517

2517. PHILIP JOHNSON was indicted for stealing 35lbs. weight of sugar, value 1l., the goods of Thomas Bailey.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES EVE (police-constable H 14.) On the 18th of Oct. I was in the Commercial-road, and saw the prisoner, with a bag in his hand—he was about ten or twelve yards from a wagon, which was standing about the middle of the road, with two hogsheads of sugar in it—before I got up to him he had got against the door of Mr. Mews, a confectioner—I asked what he had got—he said, "A parcel for the mistress"—he could see a woman in the shop at that time—I went in, and asked Mrs. Mews whether the parcel was for her—she said, "No, I know nothing at all about it"—he said, "Yes, you gave me the bag"—I said, "You hear what the woman says, have you got a bill of it?"—he said he had not—I said. "Where did you get it from?"—he said a man had put it into his wagon to leave at Mrs. Mew's, but who the man was he did not know—the bag contained sugar, and weighed 36lbs., bag and all—I compared the sugar in the bag with that in the hogsheads, and it corresponded in colour and quality—I looked into the wagon, and observed the tin over the drawing hole appeared to have been raised up, by, I should say, a similar thing to this small crow-bar, which I saw found in the wagon—the crow-bar appeared to be covered with the same sort of sugar—there was a leather apron spread

down in the wagon, which was also sprinkled with sugar—the prisoner did not claim the apron—it was such a one as a carman would wear.

Cross-examined by MR. MELLOR. Q. What time was this? A. About three o'clock in the afternoon—one of the hogsheads was covered with a tarpaulin, paulin, and the other was in the middle of the wagon, not covered—the prisoner was at the confectioner's shop-door when I first spoke to him; and after I spoke to him he went into the shop.

THOMAS WHITAKER . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Bailey, a town carman—the prisoner was also in his employ—he was sent for these two hogsheads of sugar from the Docks by my master's direction—the sugar was his, and was going to the grocer's.

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2518

2518. JOHN WATTS was indicted for stealing 22 loaves of bread, value 6s. 5d.; the goods of James Lafitte Evans, his master.

JAMES LAFITTE EVANS . I am a baker, and live in Lower Sloane-street, Chelsea. The prisoner was my foreman—he was twelve months in my ser vice—it was his duty to take the bread out to his customers, which was daily counted out to him, to deliver what bread they required, return what he had left, and pay me for what he sold—my wife generally gave out the bread—on the 1st of Aug. my wife called me up stairs—I saw the prisoner about twenty-two yards from my premises, standing by the truck—I ordered my brother, who was then coming across from serving a customer, to fetch the truck; and, in consequence of something Mrs. Evans told me, I went to the prisoner, and asked what bread he had in his truck—he said twenty-two quarterns—I said, "John, your countenance betrays you; we will count it"—he turned ghastly pale, and trembled from head to foot—I opened the truck, and counted the bread on the top of the truck in his presence—! found fifty-two twopound loaves, and five four-pounds—that made nine quarterns more than he ought to have had—I said, "John, you are a pretty scoundrel to rob me iu this whole-sale manner, and now the mystery is unravelled"—he made no reply, but sneaked away—I could not stop him, as the bread was on the truck, and I was fearful of its being stolen—I then went round to my customers, and found four two-pound loaves at one place, which he had left there at his second delivery, which made twenty-two half-quarterns—I gave information to the police, but he was not taken for seven weeks—he had 18s. a week, four quartern loaves, and half a quartern of flour—he is married—no bread or wages was due to him.

Prisoner. What he says his false.

LOUISA EVANS . I am the prosecutor's wife—it was my custom to deliver the bread to the prisoner. On the 1st of Aug. I delivered to him twenty-two quartern loaves in 2lbs. and 4lbs.—that was the quantity he called out to me—"Twenty-two quarterns, ma'am?"—I said, "Yes, that is correct"—I saw them put into the truck, and afterwards retired into a parlour adjoining the shop—he went down stairs as usual to put down his shirt sleeves—I saw him come up again, and distinctly take four 2lb. loaves from the shelf, and place them in the basket—I called him backhand said, "John, your bread is not booked right;" with that, he said, "Yes, ma'am, twenty-two"—I said, "I am well aware that is booked, but not what you took off the shelf; I distinctly saw you take four 2lb. loaves off the shelf"—he said, "No, ma'am, you make a mistake, thac is what I left on the counter"—I said, "No, you left no bread on the counter, I am sure"—he said, "You make a mistake, you are dreaming"—I instantly called to my husband, and saw the truck searched, thirty-one quarterns was found in it—that was a difference of eleven

quarterns—I do not know how the others got into his basket—I know it was all our bread that was there.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that from the time of entering the prosecutor's employ, Mrs. Evans had always evinced a dislike to him, and had declared she would do something to hurt him; that on the morning in question he placed the usual quantity of loaves, amounting to twenty-two quarterns on the counter and went into the bakehouse for about half an hour; that on his return he was leaving with his barrow, when Mrs. Evans laid the present charge against him; and that it was impossible he could have taken eleven quartern loaves without being discovered.

GUILTY . Aged 31.— Confined One Year.

(The prosecutor stated his loss to amount to above 60l.)

Reference Number: t18441021-2519

2519. PETER M'CUE was indicted for unlawfully and knowingly uttering a counterfeit half-crown, having others in his possession, with intent t utter them.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM LAWS . I am in the service of Mr. Robins, a boot and shoemaker, in Tothill-street, Westminster. On the 17th of Sept. the prisoner came to my master's shop for some boots—he paid 7s. 6d. for them in three bad half-crowns—Harris the shopman was there at the time, and I saw him look at them.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am shopman to Mr. Robins. On the 17th of Sept, the prisoner came for a pair of blucher boots, for which he paid 7s. 6d., in three half-crowns—I perceived they were all three bad—they were delivered over to me—I kept them, gave them to the policeman, and gave the prisoner in charge.

JAMES DALTON (policeman.) I produce the three half-crowns which I received from Harris—I found these eight shillings on the prisoner.

MR. JOHN FIELD I am inspector of coin to the Mint—the three half-crowns produced are all counterfeit, and all from the same mould—these eight shillings are also counterfeit, and all from the same mould.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me as good money, and I did not know it was bad. I got it in change, at a place within ten miles of Brighton.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2520

2520. ISAAC WATTS, alias JOB HILL , was indicted for unlawfully and knowingly uttering counterfeit coin.

MARY ANN JENKINS . On Wednesday, the 4th of Sept., between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our house, called for a glass of half-and-half, and paid me a shilling—I kept it in my hand, and afterwards gave it to my husband.

JAMES JENKINS . I am the last witness's husband—she gave me a shilling, and said, in the prisoner's presence that it was bsd—he made no answer—I asked him where he got it from, he made no answer—I said I would send for a constable—he said I might send for one and be d—for what he eared—he took plenty of halfpence and other money out of his pocket, and said he would pay me for it—I gave him into custody, and gave Smith the shilling, after marking it.

ROBERT SMITH (policeman.) On the 4th of Sept. I took the prisoner into custody, and received this shilling from Jenkins—I took the prisoner before a Magistrate next morning, and there being no other bad money found on him he was discharged.

AMELIA QUINNEY . I am the wife of Benjamin Quinney, and live in Barrow-hill-road,

Portland-town. On the 16th of Sept., between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came into my husband's shop for some tobacco—he gave me a shilling in payment—I put it into the drawer—there was no other shilling ling there—I gave him change, and he went away—soon after, in consequence of what a neighbour said to me, I went and looked at the shilling, and discovered it was bad—I afterwards went out, and looked for the prisoner—I asked him to change it—I gave the shilling to the policeman, Woolf, and gave him into custody.

MATILDA ANN PITT . I live with my father, in Henry-street, Portland-town. On the 16th of Sept. the prisoner came and called for a glass of half-and-half—he gave me a shilling in payment—I saw at once it was bad, and gave it to my father.

RICHARD PITT . I received the shilling from my daughter, and signalled to her to fetch a policeman—I told the prisoner it was a bad one—he seemed very anxious to get it back again, and offered to pay me for the half-and-half with a good half-crown—I kept the shilling in my hand, and was giving him change for the half-crown, delaying it as long as 1 could till my daughter returned with the policeman, Woolf—I gave him the shilling, after marking it—I had seen the prisoner in my shop about three weeks before.

JOHN WOOLF (police-sergeant.) I received a shilling from Mr. Pitt, which I produce; also one which I received from Mrs. Quinney.

Prisoner. When I was going down to the station there were two of them; one of them said, "We must ask for a remand, and we shall get 2l. from the Mint, that will be a pound apiece for us."

Witness. There was no other constable—there is no pound apiece that I know of.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint. I am not aware of any reward of a pound apiece—they are paid their expenses like others—I have examined these three shillings—they are all counterfeit

Prisoner's Defence. I was not aware of having them; if 1 had been, I should not have gone into the witness's house, where I had been a fortnight or three weeks before.

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Confined One Year.

The prisoner bad been sixteen times in custody.

Reference Number: t18441021-2521

2521. WILLIAM MAY was indicted for unlawfully and knowingly uttering a counterfeit sixpence, and having others in his possession, with intent to utter them.

HENRY TRIP . I live with my mother, who keeps the King's Head, Uxbridge-road. On Saturday evening, the 12th of Oct, the prisoner came and asked for half a pint of beer, which came to a penny—I watched him—he gave me a sixpence—my mother gave me a groat and a penny to give him change, which I did, and he went away—directly after he had gone my mother called my attention to the sixpence—I wrapped it up in a piece of paper, separate from other coin, and went out after the prisoner, accompanied by Bunce—I overtook him at the Red Lion, at Southall, about a mile or a mile and a half from our house—he was just taking some change from the bar at the Red Lion—I let him pass me, and spoke to the barwoman—he was afterwards stopped by the police—I came up and asked him if he recollected having half a pint of beer down at the parish of Hayes—he said, "Yes"—I said, "Did you have a fourpenny-piece and a penny in change?"—he said, "Yes"—he was then given in charge—I saw his left hand go to his pocket, and drop some coin by his side, which Bunce picked up.

JOHN BUNCE . I accompanied Trip after the prisoner—Goddard, the officer,

came and took him—I picked up eight sixpences which the prisoner dropped—I marked them, and left them at the police station.

JAMES GODDARD (policeman.) I went with Trip and Bunce after the prisoner—he was stopped, and taken into custody—when he was taken I noticed that he dropped something, which Bunce picked up—I am sure he picked up what came from the prisoner—he took them to the station, and the sergeant had them—I searched him after that, and found 9s. 2 3/4 d. all in copper, and two fourpenny-pieces—he said, in going to the station, that we had got him safe enough this time—I received this sixpence from Trip—he marked it in my presence.

THOMAS SULL (police-sergeant.) I produce eight sixpences which I received from Bunce.

MR. JOHN FIELD . This sixpence is counterfeit, and these eight are all counterfeit, and all cast in the same mould as the other.

GUILTY . Aged 38.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2522

2522. FREDERICK STANLEY was indicted for unlawfully and knowingly uttering counterfeit coin.

ISAAC SCOTT . I am a publican, and live in Broad-street, Ratcliff. On the 17th of Oct. the prisoner came to my house, between six and seven in the morning, ing, he called for half a pint of fourpenny ale, and gave me a shilling in payment—I gave him change, and put the shilling into the till—there was no other shilling there—soon after I went to the till, looked at the shilling, and saw it was bad—I bent it, put it into my pocket, and kept it there till the evening—I then put it into the till—I afterwards took it out again, and never lost sight of it till the next morning—I ultimately gave it to Hunnisett, the policeman—the next morning the prisoner came again, about the same time he had some ale, and gave me a shilling—I put it into my mouth, and, finding that was bad also, I went round and laid hold of him—I said I suspected him, because he passed a shilling so easily on me before—he said I must be mistaken, he had not been in the house before—I sent for a policeman, and gave him in charge, and gave the two shillings to the policeman.

Prisoner. I was not there on Thursday.

Witness. I am satisfied he is the man.

CHARLES HUNNISETT (policeman.) I took the prisoner at Mr. Scott's, and received from him two shillings, which I produce.

MR. JOHN FIELD . These two shillings are both counterfeit, but not from the same mould.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny the first, and the second I did not know was bad; I had it in payment for an old coat and a pair of trowsers which I sold the night before.

GUILTY . Aged 37.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2523

2523. JOHN ANDREWS, alias Charles Fidler , was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Thomas John Pitt, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS JOHN PITT . I am a ship's steward, and live in John's-place, Stepney. About three o'clock in the afternoon of the 14th of Oct., I was walking in Cannon-street—the prisoner passed me—a boy hallooed out to me loud enough for the prisoner to hear, "Hoy, hoy, sir!"and informed me that the prisoner had robbed me of my handkerchief—I missed it, and ran after him—he ran up a wheelwright's yard, and I found my handkerchief on the ground, nearly a quarter of a mile from where I missed it—I gave it to the policeman—this produced is it.

EDWIN FREDERICK CLOKE . I was in Cannon-street, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket.

EDWARD BURGESS (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read)—he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Ten Yean .

The prisoner had only been a fortnight out of prison.

Reference Number: t18441021-2524

2524. GEORGE FILLINGHAM was indicted for stealing 5 yards of doe-skin, value 2l., the goods of Peter Shield.

WILLIAM BROCKLISS . I am a tailor, and live in Villiers-street, Albany-road, Camberwell. On the 11th of Oct., 1843, I was foreman to Peter Shield, of High-street, Shoreditch—he had some doe-skin, which I missed from the door—I attended here at a former session, when the doe-skin was produced by Kemp, and 1 swear that was the doe-skin belonging to Mr. Shield, which was lost—here is the ticket which was on it—it has our private mark.

GEORGE KEMP (policeman.) On the 11th of Oct., 1843, I was on duty in Shoreditch, and saw the prisoner, and one Freeman, who has since been tried for this, go into Mr. Shield's shop—the prisoner took a piece of doe-skin cloth off the counter, and gave it to Freeman—the prisoner escaped, and has been taken lately by another constable—I produced the cloth at the last trial, after which it was given up to the prosecutor—this ticket was pinned on the cloth at the time—I kept this by me after marking it—I am sure the prisoner is the man that took the cloth.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBINSON. Q. This was at nine o'clock at night? A. No, between seven and eight—it is twelve months ago—I knew him very well, and have no doubt of him.

GUILTY .** Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2525

2525. ANN BONNER was indicted for stealing 1 petticoat, value 1s. 9d., the goods of John Pink Chambers.

DAVID CHAMPER . I am assistant to John Pink Chambers, a pawnbroker, in Regent-street, Westminster. About six o'clock in the evening of the 15th of Oct., the prisoner came to our shop, and pledged a gown for 6d.—there were several other persons in the shop—I missed a flannel petticoat, which I had seen safe not a quarter of an hour before—I immediately followed the prisoner, and brought her back—I accused her of taking it, and asked if she had it in her basket—she said she had nothing in her basket—we opened it, and found the petticoat that I had missed—it is the property of Mr. Chambers, I am sure of that—she said it belonged to her daughter, who is here.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did this petticoat belong to any of the family? A. No, it is one we had for sale—it was the only one we had at that time—it hung up in the shop—there was a mark on it, but that was taken off, and was found on the floor—the pin must have been taken out—the petticoat has the knot on it which was tied when it was hung up—there is no mark on the petticoat itself, but 1 will swear positively to it from having it in my hand so often—I know it by the fineness of the flannel, and the band—I told the Magistrate that the prisoner said it belonged to her daughter—I do not recollect that I said she denied having it in her basket.

COURT. Q. Who tied the knot? A. I did—I cannot swear to my knot—there is a hole in the petticoat—the one we lost had a hole in it, and was tied just as this is, and this is the ticket that was pinned on it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Three Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18441021-2526

2526. JOHN PYLE was indicted for stealing 8lbs., weight of beef, value 5s. 4d.; 3lbs. weight of bacon, 2s.; 1lb. weight of butter, 1s.; 1lb. weight of suet, 8d.; and 1 1/2 lbs. weight of lard, 1s.; the goods of George Hawkins.

WILLIAM BUTLER (police-sergeant B 3.) About a quarter to three o'clock on Sunday morning, the 13th of Oct., I met the prisoner carrying a bundle on his head. I stopped him, and asked what he had got—I took him to the station, and found the articles stated on him—they were given up to the prosecutor.

MARY RUST . I am in the service of George Hawkins, of Canterbury-street, Lambeth. The things produced by the officer were lost from our safe—we lost all that exactly, and I am able to swear it was my master's property—it was the same in quality and appearance—the basket is not ours.

GUILTY .** Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18441021-2527

2527. MARY WOOD was indicted for stealing a pewter jug, value 5s., the goods of John Cross.

JOHN CROSS . I am a licensed victualler, and live in Princes-street, Portmanmarket. I lost this pewter jug from the house—the prisoner was there at the time with another female.

RICHARD COMPTON (policeman.) I saw the prisoner in Salisbury-street, with something under her arm, which she was covering over with her shawl. I asked what she had—she said what was that to me, and refused to let me look—she threw herself down as if she was very much in liquor—this pewter jug fell from under her shawl—I took ber to the station.

Prisoner. I was going to take H back to the public-house; I had had three quarterns of rum, and then called for a pint of beer; I thought it was the beer I had in my hand; when I had got a little way I saw what it was, and was going to take it back when he stopped me.

Witness. She was going from the prosecutor's house towards her own home.

GUILTY. Aged 22.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18441021-2528

2528. MARGARET NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing 1 coat, value 5s. 6d., the goods of William Barker; and 1 bat, value 1s., the goods of James Barker.

WILLIAM BAKER . I live in Preston-terrace, Queen-street, Bethnal-green. I had a coat, which I saw safe between ten and eleven o'clock on Tuesday night, the 22nd of Oct. I fell in with a shipmate, and went and had a little drop to drink—some coal-heavers came in and knocked my brother's hat off—I laid my coat down on the step and went to assist, and when I went to look for it, in two or three minutes, it was gone—this now produced is it.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You were drunk? A. No, I had had a little too much—I did not fight—I was going to fight, but the police came up—I took off my coat, and laid it on the step outside the public-house, lic-house, during the time there was a scuffle with my brother—I was afterwards taken to the station for being tipsy.

JAMES BAKER . I was in this row, and lost my hat—this is it.

CHARLES POTTER (policeman.) I was called to quiet this row. I saw the prosecutor's coat and hat lay on the door—after 1 had dispersed the people, the prosecutor looked round and said, "My hat and coat are gone; some one has stolen them"—I said, "No one has been here but that woman"—I followed the prisoner to No. 4, Wellington-place, Brook-street, and found her in the

set of getting into bed—I asked her if she had the man's ecat and hat—she said she knew nothing about it—I took her into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe she was rather the worse for liquor? A. Yes, she had been drinking.

WILLIAM BREACH (policeman.) I found this coat and hat in the room next to where the prisoner was—her husband, a coloured man, was in the room—he had not been in the row—he was not in bed when we got there—he opened the door to us—the prisoner was just going to get into bed—she had her shoes off, but all her clothes and her bonnet on.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 84.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Six Days .

Reference Number: t18441021-2529

2529. NATHAN BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of Oct., at St. George-in-the-East, 1 watch, value 9l.; 1 watch-chain, 10s.; 1 seal, 10s.; 1 watch-key, 6d.; and 1 handkerchief, 2s.; the goods of James Herring, in the dwelling-house of Henry Turner.

JAMES HERRING . I live near Green Bank, Wapping, in the house of Henry Turner—I do not know the parish. I had a watch, chain, and seals in my room, which I put under my pillow when I went to bed on the 8th of Oct., about ten o'clock at night—next morning, at half-past six, I looked at it—it was safe then—I did not leave my room till seven o'clock—I returned at night, and my watch was then gone—the prisoner had slept with me that night—I took him in as he was shut out of the dock, and gave him a night's lodging—we both went out of the room together in the morning—I locked the door, and put the key into my pocket—I found it locked on my return—he must have taken it when I turned my back in getting out of bed—I did not look at it after half-past six o'clock, and did not leave the room till seven—there was time enough for him to have taken it—thit now produced is it.

JOHN MAXWELL . I am a licensed victualler. I have produced this watch—the prisoner brought it to me on the evening of the 8th of Oct., and left it as security for six dollars which he requested for his shipmate and himself—I believe he is an american—I lent him six dollars on it—he said the watch had cost him so many dollars some time ago—we frequently lend money on coats and watches which seamen leave.

GEORGE MUMFORD (policeman.) I took the prisoner into custody—he acknowledged taking the watch, and said he took it to somebody up the Highway, and sold it for six dollars—the watch was given to me by Maxwell—the prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. George-in-the-East.

JAMES HERRING re-examined. The value of the watch is 9l.—it was made for my son-in-law for 12l.—he pledged it for 6l.

GUILTY of stealing under 5l. Aged 22.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2530

2530. THOMAS TRIGGEY and JOSEPH TEARNE were indicted for unlawfully obtaining 7s. 8 1/2 d. from Mary Griffith, by false pretences.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2531

2531. MARIA TURNER was indicted for stealing 1 fork, value 8s., the goods of Ann Barker: also, 1 blanket, value 4a.; 1 table-cloth, 3s. 6d.; 1 iron, 6d.; and 1 primed book, 2s.; the goods of John Smith; to which she pleaded.

GUILTY .— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2532

2532. WILLIAM FRANCIS BECKFORD was indicted for stealing 14lbs. 11ozs. weight of tea, value 2l. 5s.; and 1 box, 1s.; the goods of the St. Katharine Dock Company.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES REEVE I am a weigher in the Customs—the prisoner was also a weigher. I was on duty as Custom gate-keeper at St. Katharine's Dock at No. 10 gate on the 8th of Oct., at half-past two o'clock in the afternoon—the prisoner came from the inside of the dock—he had a small chest of tea with a handkerchief loosely over it—some part of the chest was visible—I asked him what he had there—he said, "A present"—I told him I could not allow him to pass with any present—Mr. Taylor, the inspector, came up—he spoke to him, and took the chest, and examined it—it contained 14lbs. 11ozs. of tea—I do not know the vessel that the prisoner had been employed on that day.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. It was your duty to see that nobody went out with any property? A. Yes—this was a well-known regulation in the dock—the prisoner had been in the service six or seven years—he would know that the gatekeepers were there to watch—he usually left at four o'clock—half-past two was an unusual hour—he appeared very wild, as though he had been in liquor.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am superintendent of police in St. Katharine Dock. At half-past two o'clock in the afternoon in question I beard something, and went up to the prisoner—I saw a package in his hand partly covered—I followed him to No. 10 gate, and saw him stopped—he walked some little distance with me with the chest in his hand—I took it from him—he went as far as the wood walk, and wanted me to let him go—I told him I could not, and asked for an explanation—he said it was a present to him from a captain of a ship—I asked him what it was—he said a few silk handkerchiefs, or it might be a little tea or a bread bag—I asked him where he got it—he said he would take me to a ship in the London Docks, where he came in possession of it.

Cross-examined. Q. He appeared very strange? A. Yes, as if he had been drinking—he bad been promoted that day for his good conduct—I made inquiries, and found where the tea came from.

JAMES ILSTON . I am a labourer in the a warehouse of the St. Katharine Dock. There was a ship load of tea being landed on that day on the A quay—the prisoner was there on duty from about one till half-past two o'clock—I saw him sitting on a small chest of tea away from the vessel—after he had sat on it some time he got up from it, and threw a blue handkerchief over it, took it up in his arms, and went down towards the wood walk—I gave information.

ALFRED BEACHCROFT . I am clerk of the a warehouse. I received information from Ilston as I was passing along the quay, which induced me to look at No. 10 gate—I saw the prisoner with a package covered over with a blue handkerchief—he went towards the gate—I saw the superintendent of police, and told him—the tea was worth about 1s. a pound without the duty—this is the chest—the duty is 2s. 2 1/2 d.

SAMUEL THORNTON SCHROEDER . I am gate-keeper of the St. Katherine Dock gate, No. 2. It was a closed gate—the prisoner could have passed through if I had let him—I was on duty at eleven o'clock on the 8th of Oct.—the prisoner came, and asked me if I would accept of a caddy of gunpowder—I said, "What do you mean?"—he said, "Will you accept of a caddy of gunpowder tea?"—I said, "I am a single man, and require nothing of the kind"—he said, "Will you accept of a couple of sovereigns, and allow me

to go out by the side of the van with a packet of tea?"—I said "No"—he said, "You are a fool, others do the same"—I told what I had seen—I should say the prisoner was not drunk.

Cross-examined. Q. Was your judgment of him such from the state in which you saw him, that you did not think he meant it? A. Yes, decidedly—he had been drinking—I reported him to the watchman.

HENRY SHERWOOD . I am a landing-waiter in the service of the Customs. On the 8th of October, I was engaged in discharging tea from a ship there, called the Corcacas—the prisoner was employed as a weigher—he was at work receiving tea from the vessel to the van—I do not know whether he had an opportunity, if so minded, of taking tea—there appeared a deficiency of one package of tea.

GUILTY. Aged 29.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18441021-2533

2533. ANN BEARD was indicted for stealing, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, one 50l. bank note, the property of Thomas Treble Tappin, her master, in his dwelling-house; and CHRISTOPHER WREN , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

THOMAS TREBLE TAPPIN . I am landlord of the Red Lion public-house, in Hoxton Old-town. Beard was in my service—I have seen Wren several times—I saw him one morning sitting talking in my public parlour—he was in the habit of coming to my house occasionally—I had a bank-note of 50l., No. 75027, and missed it on the 30th of August—I saw it safe a day or two before that—it was in my note-case, in my side-coat pocket—no one had access to my room, but my wife and Beard—I mentioned it to Beard on the 30th, when I missed it—she said she knew nothing about it—Wren had no opportunity of coming to the place where my-note was—it was impossible—I went to the Bank, and stopped the note, and advertised it in the Advertiser and the Times.

HENRY BAYFIELD . I am bar-man to James Smith, of the Carpenter's. Arms, in the Kingsland-road—I know Wren by sight—on the 10th of Sept., he came to my master's house, and asked for his beer, as usual, and asked for change for a 50l. note—he paid me this 50l. note—I wrote on the back of it.

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am clerk in the Bank—this 50l. note was paid in to me, it is dated 8th Feb., 1844, No. 75027.

WILLIAM HOLLAND (police-constable N 146.) I went to Beard on the 26th of Sept.—I said to her, "Ann, have you seen Wren?"—she said, "Yes, this morning"—I said, "You are charged with stealing a 50l. note, the property of your master"—she made no reply—I said, "Go up stairs," which she did—I said, "How much money have you got?"—she said, "Between four and five shillings"—I saw a great deal of new furniture—I took her to the station, and found on her a purse containing a sovereign and some silver—she was asked where she got the furniture—she said, the young man gave her the money to buy it—I went to the Lyceum theatre, with Dubois, on the 30th of Sept., and saw Wren sitting in the pit, with three women—we waited till it was over, and when he came out, I touched him on the shoulder, and said, "I want you, for receiving a 50l. note, knowing it to be stolen"—I put him in the lobby, and found on him a cigar-case and some other things—he said to me, "Holland, you can let this girl go; she knows nothing about it"—when before the Magistrate, he said, "The girl gave me the note, and told me sho found it"—I did not see him sign his name to these depositions—he said it before the Magistrate, and then I stated it.

Wren. Q. Did you ever know me in custody? A. I believe you, up to the present time, to have been always honest.

HENRY WILLIAM DUROIS (police-sergeant N 14.) I accompanied Holland to Beard's, and saw a great number of things about the room—I asked who they belonged to—another man in the room said, "They belong to this girl"—I then went to Doctor Heath, where Wren was servant—I opened his box, and found six sovereigns, one half-sovereign, and five shillings in pence and halfpence, a new pair of trowsers, and a pocket-book with some duplicates in it—I accompanied Holland to the Lyceum, and then Wren came out, and Holland spoke to him—he said, "Let this girl go; she knows nothing about it; the note was not stolen, it was picked up"—when brought to the station, Holland searched him, and on him a key was found, with which I opened the box.

MARY WRIGHT . I live in Hoxton Old-town—Beard came to lodge with me—there was a young man came frequently to her, and she went out to buy furniture, saying she was going to be married—Wren came frequently to see her.

THOMAS TREBLE TAPPING re-examined. It was impossible for me to have dropped the note out of the pocket-book—I put it in, and doubled it over—it was kept in my side-coat pocket, which I left by my bed-side.

BEARD— GUILTY . Aged 23.

WREN— GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18441021-2534

2534. JAMES HADFIELD was indicted for stealing 12 padlocks, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Robert Knowles, his master.

WILLIAM CLOSE SMITH . I am warehouseman to Robert Knowles, of Wood-street, Cheapside—on the 19th of Sept., I saw the prisoner take a dozen padlocks from a drawer in the warehouse—r accused him of it, and he said he had taken them with the intention of stealing them, and he was sorry for it—I found these padlocks in his coat-pocket—they had no business there—he was engaged in the warehouse.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. Did you not say, that he said, in your presence and another person's, that he had taken the locks intending to steal them? A. Yes—that other person is not here—my master is not here—I had been in my master's employ about a week—the prisoner had been there about nine months—I have not got the situation that he had—I am engaged in a higher situation than him—my wages are 25s. a week—he got about 1l.—these locks are worth about 1s. 6d.—I know there has been one anonymous letter written to my master—he told me he had received a letter from some party—I have been to see the prisoner since he has been in jail—I did not ask him if he would go back to his work if his master would forgive him—I went to ask him how he cut out some particular sort of work—he told me how to cut it out—I did not know how to cut it out—he did not till me I ought to be ashamed of myself for daring to prefer such a charge—he never sells by sample from our warehouse—he has never sold while I have been there, to Mr. Garratt, goods amounting to 6l. 10s. 4d., by sample, from our warehouse; neither have I heard of it—the prisoner came to his work as usual, the morning after this took place—he did not insist on having his tools and his wages before he went away—he told me to pay his wages to his sister.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2535

2535. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Henry Hegart Breen, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

HENRY HEGART BREEN . I live in Gower-street, Bedford-square. About half-past four o'clock on the 3rd of Oct., I was passing Drury-lane—Clapham said something to me, and produced my handkerchief to me—I missed it from my pocket—I had seen it safe about half an hour before—this is my handkerchief—there is no mark on it—it is of the same pattern.

PETER FAIRBAIRN CLAPHAM . On the 3rd of Oct. I was standing at a public-house door with a friend, in Drury-lane—I saw the prisoner in the act of taking the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket—I came across the road, and pursued him—I thought he was with the prosecutor, because he walked about three yards by the side of him, in taking it out—the prisoner threw the handkerchief down—I fallowed him to the Broadway, and the officer came up with the handkerchief in his hand.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Was your attention drawn to the prisoner? A. It was, by some females inside the public-house—I am a warehouseman to Mr. Jones, of Finsbury-terrace, and live in Smith's-buildings—there were very few people about at this time—the handkerchief was thrown down in the middle of the causeway in Drury-lane.

GEORGE RUSSEN (police-constable F 9.) At half-past four o'clock on the 3rd of Oct. I was in Hoi born—I saw the prisoner running away, and saw the handkerchief lying on the ground—I took it up, and ran after the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Upon your oath did you pick up the handkerchief? A. I did—it was picked up, and attempted to be given to me, but it fell on the ground before I could get it, and I took it up.

THOMAS HINDS (police-constable E 83.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Ten Years.

First Jury, before Mr. Baron Rolfe.

Reference Number: t18441021-2536

2536. JANE HAGUE was indicted for feloniously cutting Elisabeth Bryant in and upon her left temple, with intent to do her some grievous bodily harm.

ELIZABETH BRYANT . I live in Ropemaker's-fields, Limehouse. About six o'clock in the evening of last Monday month I was standing at my own door—Mrs. Mann was removing—I said, "You are going; it is a good job; have you got a feather pillow to sell?"—Mrs. Mann had a part of her bedstead in her hand, and she made a run at me, and attempted to strike me—the prisoner was there—she had an iron bed-winch in her hand, and she struck me with it very severely on the temple—she struck me once, and would have struck me again, but a person stopped her hand—the blood flew from my head, and 1 was attended by a surgeon, who is here—I was very unwell from it, as of course I must be, losing so much blood—I did not keep my bed.

Prisoner. You struck me first. Witness. No, I did not—I was not fighting with Mrs. Mann—I was not drunk—I had had a drop of beer, but no spirits at all—I did not see anybody strike the prisoner.

SARAH VANE . I live near the prosecutrix. I was there on the Monday evening, when this took place—the prosecutrix was not eery tipsy, but she was rather the worse for liquor—she and Mrs. Mann were fighting and quarrelling—they were striking one another, and the prisoner said if Mrs. Mann did not beat Mrs. Bryant she would—Mrs. Bryant made answer, "No, you will not beat me"—the prisoner said, "Yes, I will," and she struck her with the bed-winch in her hand—the prisoner had been drinking all day with

the woman that she was helping to move—she said she had taken several glasses of rum.

Prisoner. You know Mrs. Bryant struck me first; you saw her strike me, and it is a plot between her and you to bring me here; you said you would have a good spree after it; you said you would not come against me if I would. I give you something.

Witness. No, I did not—Mrs. Bryant did not strike you first—I said I would say the same here as I did at the police-office—I have said no more than I did at the office, and what 1 have said is true—you said you had had some drink, because you had taken a ring off your finger, and pledged it to get some drink with Mrs. Mann, and your husband has now the duplicate in his possession—you told me that at the end of the court, when you came to strike me after striking Mrs. Bryant.

REUBEN WEBB . I apprehended the prisoner at Duke's-shore, Limehouse, just going across the water—she said, "I hit the woman over the head with the bed-winch, but I did not go to do it."

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you that Mrs. Bryant struck me first? A. No.

Prisoner. Yes, I did; I said she struck me; I expected she was coming again, and I held my hand up which had the bed-winch in it; I had no animosity against any of them.

ADOLPHUS BARNETT . I am a surgeon. I attended Mrs. Bryant—I found a slight contused wound on her left temple—I did not see it till two days after the accident—it was a slight wound—there was no danger whatever—it was a sort of wound that drunken persons might easily inflict.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my own house, and had this bed-winch in my hand; Mrs. Bryant and Mrs. Mann were beating each other; there was a mob of people about, and I said what a shame it was to see women fighting in that manner; Mrs. Bryant turned and gave me a blow in the right eye; I expected she was coming again, and she knocked against the bed-winch as she was coming to me again to strike me; if I had a mind to hit her it would have been a deep wound.

GUILTY of an Assault only. Aged 44.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18441021-2537

2537. ELLEN CRONIN, MICHAEL COCKLIN, DENNIS MAHONEY, MARGARET MAHONEY , and WILLIAM CRONIN , were indicted for feloniously cutting Johanna Wilson in and upon her head, with intent to do her some grievous bodily harm.

JOHANNA WILSON . I am the wife of George Wilson; he is a seafaring man; I live at Mill-wall, in the parish of Poplar. Last Saturday night three weeks I went to a raffle, about nine o'clock, at a beer-shop right opposite where I live—the prisoner Michael Cocklin and his wife were in the beershop, and several other persons—a man of the name of Carvell, who was there, went to the bar and brought a pot of beer into the tap-room—he gave it to me to drink out of—I drank out of it, and put it on the table—Michael Cocklin drank out of the pot, and likewise his wife—there was some of the company sat at the opposite table, I took the pot of beer, and drank to a young man who sat at the opposite table, and 1 handed the pot to another young man—Michael Cocklin said, "Hallo, young woman, where are you going with that beer?"or "What are you doing? bring that beer back, it is not yours"—I said, "It is not yours, it is Mr. Carvell's pot of beer, for he just gave it to me"—Michael Cocklin said, "You are a liar, you b—w—; it is mine, I have just paid for it"—my mother, hearing the noise, came in

to see what was the matter, and Michael Cocklin hit her a stroke with his fist in the lip—it looked as if there was a bit right out of it—the doctor sewed it up—my mother and I then came home directly—then all the prisoners, soners, and a man named Ragan, came throwing stone at our door and windows, and calling names—I told my sister to go for a policeman, and she did—after that my father opened the door, to know what they wanted at that hour, and as soon as he opened the door, all the prisoners, and the other man, rushed in—they got us out before our door, and Michael Cocklin hit my mother in both her eyes—he then caught hold of me by the hair of my head, and pulled me by my hair—then Dennis Mahony hit my mother a stroke with his fist, and he pulled me by my hair, and so did Margaret Mahony—I saw my mother down, and Margaret Mabony down upon her, close by the step of our door—I then saw Dennis Mahony with a fire-shovel in his hand—I do not know whether he took it from our house or not, but we missed ours the next day—I then saw William Cronin hit my father, and throw him down on the grating that is beneath our window—Ellen Cronin hit me on the head with a piece of stick that looked like a piece of railing—she then hit my mother, and cut her head with it—she then dropped the piece of railing, and took a piece of stone or a piece of brick, and kept hammering my mother on the head with it—my mother was cut in three different places on the head.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. When did you last see your husband? A. Not since last November—he left London to go to New Orleans—of course he left me when he went away, but I hope I shall see him again—he lived with me till he went—I have been working in a cement factory ever since, and I worked there before I was married—I had not been speaking to Michael Cocklin in the tap-room any more than I had to any one else in the company—Carvell is not here—he is working for Mr. Mitchim, a blacksmith, I believe—no one that is here, that I know of, Who was at the raffle, except my father, and he did not stop to throw for the articles—Mill-wall is not very wide—Cocklin and Carvell, and all of them, were drinking together—I was handing the pot over to the other company—I have not tried to get any of the parties here who were at the raffle—I told the officer about Cocklin hitting us—I did not tell him of the other parties who saw what took place—there were plenty there to see what took place—I never went up to Cocklin at all more than to any one else—I took the pot off the table that Carvell gave me, and that I put on the table—I did not take it till Cocklin and his wife had drank out of it—I went there about eight o'clock, and I dare say I had been there till near twelve o'clock, before this took place—it occurred before our door, about half-past twelve o'clock—my mother came to the beershop, but I did not see my sister come—I had made no observation at all to Cocklin, and had not called him any names—neither my mother or sister took off his straw hat, and took it away—his straw hat and Dennis Mahoney's cap were found in our house, the next morning, and we took them to the office—I did not hear Cocklin or his wife say anything about his hat—I did not hear his wife say, "Oh, that was done out of freedom"—I did not hear Cocklin say, "I thought so, for her nails were in my face"—I did not pull Mrs. Cocklin about—I did not see any one do it, or tear her cap.

Q. Upon your oath, were not you, and your mother, and sister, turned out of the room at the beer-shop by the company, or by some of them for disturbing them? A. There were two or three put their hands to me, and said, "Never mind what he said, Johanna, go home;" and when they said that I went home directly—I did not hear any one say that I made a disturbance—I was not turned out—I do not know whether the fireshovel that Dennis Mahoney had was ours, but our shovel is missing—I did not see anybody take it, but I

saw it in his hand—I will swear it was not taken out by me, and I was not going to strike Dennis Mahoney with it—I know Driscoll—Flynn was there but he is not here—I did not come out with the poker, and the poker is not missing—I have not seen Mrs. Regan here to-day—I had neither the poker nor the shevel in my hands, and how the shovel came into Dennis Mahoney's hand I do not know—Ellen Flynn was there—I do not know that she struck Cronin with the poker.

MARY CANTY . I am the mother of Johanna Wilson. She went to the raffle that night—I did not go with her—I was at market—I was not at my own house when she went—I went when I heard that Cocklin was hitting her, which was about twelve o'clock—it is a beer-shop—when I went in Cocklin had not the satisfaction to hit her, and he struck me, and slit my lip—he only struck me once—I ran home, and my daughter came with me—my husband was at home—he shut up the house, and all the prisoners came there about half-past twelve o'clock—they were kicking at the door, and leaping up upon it, to break it in—my husband opened the door, and they ran in—they caught him and me—Mrs. Cronin got a piece of brick or stone and heaved it at me—she caught me by the throat, against my own door, and kept pounding my head with a piece of brick or stone—Dennis Mahoney struck me—I was full of my blood, and it took my senses away—they got me down on my own threshold—I sent for the policeman.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there another of your daughters with you? A. Yes—she got the policeman—Cocklin's wife was outside—I did not notice her cap—I heard a row, and went over to the beer-shop—I did not go in, for Cocklin struck me just as I was going into the tap-room—I did not go into the tap-room—I did not see Cocklin's wife there at that time—Cocklin did not give me liberty to go in—no one turned me out, or told me or my daughter to go out—I did not see any fight outside the beer-shop.

DANIEL CANTY . I am the husband of Mary Canty. I remember her and my daughter coming in about twelve o'clock that night—my wife had not been gone out above a quarter of an hour before she came back—she and my daughter came in about twelve o'clock, as far as I can guess, and in about ten minutes afterwards a party came round the house—all the prisoners were amongst them—they were calling all manner of names, and throwing bricks and stones and gravel at the door—at last I went to the door to try to persuade suade them to go off—as soon as I opened the door they all rushed in—William Cronin got hold of me by the collar, he dragged me out, and knocked me down—very soon after the policeman came—I did not see what took place in the house.

Cross-examined. Q. When you heard a noise at the door, did you see out at the window? A. I did at first—there is no shutter to one of the windows—these people were making a noise outside before I opened the door.

JOHN BRENCHLEY (police-constable K 214.) I went to Canty's house, about half-past twelve o'clock on the morning of the 29th of Sept.—I saw Mary Canty and Wilson lying down on the ground at the door, bleeding very much from their heads—there was a great mob outside the house—Dennis Mahoney and Margaret Mahoney were amongst them—when I got up I saw Dennis Mahoney with this shovel in his hand—I asked him what he did with such a weapon, and he said it was only a bit of an iron shovel—his wife and he were given into my custody by Canty, some person sprung a rattle, which they took from my pocket, and, with the assistance of other officers who came we took Dennis and Margaret Mahoney to the station—the inspector then ordered us to go and fetch Michael Cocklin and William Cronin—I took Cocklin out of bed—Ellen Cronin was taken at the same time—William

Cronin was oa the road—Canty gave him into custody, and ray brother officer took him—I asked Cocklin how he came to strike people so, and he said if Mrs. Canty had not struck him he should not have struck her, and it was only on I rish row.

Cross-examined. Q. William Cronin was on the way, as if he was going to the station? A. Yes, he was—I did not hear Mrs. Cronio complain of being robbed of 15s.—I saw Mrs. Flynn there—no one wanted to give her in charge—I received no instructions to look after any other persons at the beer-shop—there was some blood on Dennis Mahoney's head—I cannot say whether it was from a blow or not.

RONALD ROBERTSON . I am a surgeon. I attended Johanna Wilson—she had an incised wound, about one inch in length, on the upper part of her head, extending down to the bone, such as might have been inflicted with a piece of broken rail—it was a bad wound—I merely saw her at the station-house—I did not attend her afterwards—I did not anticipate any danger from it—I have not examined her head since—I saw Mary Canty at the station-house also.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see Dennis Mahoney's head? A. Yes—there was a severe wound on the side of his head.

MR. HORRY called

JOHANNA RAGAN . I am the wife of Daniel Ragan, and live in Castlerow, Mill-wall, not five minutes' walk from the house where Wilson lives. I recollect Saturday night, the 28th of Sept.—I never saw nor heard any row, no more than when I went out Wilson was coming out of her house with a poker, and was bringing it down, with both her hands, on Dennis Mahoney's head—that was all I saw—I said, "For God's sake, don't hit the man on the head with it"—she told me to cut.

COURT. Q. You saw her come out of her house with a poker? A. Yes, and she had both her hands on it, going to hit Dennis Mahoney with it, so I caught hold of the poker—he did not receive the blow—I think this was between eleven and twelve o'clock, or from that to one—it was after twelve, or a little before—I know the policemen, and I saw them there, but I saw nobody do anything amiss.

MR. HORRY. Q. Have you known any of the prisoners for any time? A. Yes, every one of them as long as I have known myself, they have never been in any hold, or in such a place as this.

JOHN DRISCOLL . I live in Mill-wall. I am fifteen years old, and go to school. On Saturday night, the 28th of Sept., I heard a row at Mill-wall, close by where I live—I was at home, and I came out—I saw Wilson, but I did not see anything in her hand—Mrs. Flynn had an iron poker in her hand, and I saw her hit Ellen Cronin with it—I saw Mrs. Ragan there.

COURT. Q. Was Mrs. Ragan by at the time you saw Flynn with the poker? A. I did not see her at that time—I staid till it was over, and the policeman came and took them away—I did not see Wilson strike Dennis Mahoney at all—I saw Flynn with the fire-shovel, and Dennis Mahoney tock it from her—she had the shovel or poker in one hand—she went into her own house—I have not seen her since—I know the prisoners—I have never seen them do anything out of the way, and never heard of their getting into any disturbance.

MR. HORRY. Q. Do you know whose daughter Mrs. Flynn is? A. Mr. Canty's daughter—I saw Mrs. Flynn bring out a bottle and basin, and heave at Ellen Cronin—they were crockery-ware—I saw a wound on Dennis Mahony's head—there was some blood.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

E. CRONIN— GUILTY .

MICHAEL COCKLIN— GUILTY .

DENNIS MAHONEY— GUILTY .

MARGARET MAHONEY— GUILTY .

WILLIAM CRONIN— GUILTY .

Of a Common Assault— Confined Two Months.

The prisoners were again indicted for assaulting Mary Canty and Daniel Canty, with intent to do them grievous bodily harm.

Upon which no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2538

2538. JAMES FOREMAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Benjamin Brewer, and cutting and wounding him upon his right hand, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

RICHARD BENJAMIN BREWER . I keep a beer-shop, in Little Hermitage-street, St. John's, Wapping. On Friday night, the 11th of Oct., about half-past eleven o'clock, the prisoner was at my house with two friends, for threequarters of an hour—I then cleared my house, and he went away with the other customers, peaceably and quietly—about half-past twelve I had occasion to open my door to let one of my lodgers in—the prisoner came across the street to me, and wanted a bed—I told him I had not a bed to spare—he said he insisted on a bed—I was in the act of going in and closing the door, when he caught me by the collar of my coat, and pulled me out of my door—he pulled me into the street, and in the scuffle we fell—when I disengaged myself from him I found my hand was cut—I did not feel him cut it—there were some slight marks in my cheek—there were two cuts in my trowsers, and one on my left sleeve of my coat—Mr. Gorratt, a medical man, saw me—my hand is very nearly well now.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. When the prisoner left your house did he appear to have been drinking a great deal? A. Yes, he appeared to have been drinking a great deal before he came into my house—I think that was his first night on shore—we had a scuffle together—there was not a blow struck—it did not last half a minute before I fell—we were rolling about on the ground.

EDWARD ORAM (police-constable H 18.) About half-past twelve o'clock in the morning of the 12th of Oct., the prisoner was given into my custody by Mr. Brewer, in the street—I observed some blood on Mr. Brewer's hand—I told the prisoner he must go with me—he said, "I will go"—in going to the station, Mr. Brewer said something about cutting his hand—the prisoner said he did cut his hand, and he would have cut his head off if he could have got hold of it—I searched the prisoner at the station, and found on him a knife and two razors—the razors appeared quite new as though they had never been used—I saw a slight mark of blood upon the handle of the knife, but in consequence of its being in my pocket, it is not now to be seen—I saw two cuts in the prosecutor's trowsers, one about two inches long, the other not so long—the prisoner had been drinking freely, but seemed conscious of what he was doing—he seemed to answer every question very clearly.

Cross-examined. Q. The razors were in a case? A. Yes, and in a different pocket to the knife—I saw some blood on the prisoner's left-hand—I did not examine whether it arose from a cut on his own hand—a man, named Carver, did not go to the station, he was present at the examination, but not at the time Mr. Brewer said, "You have cut my hand."

WILLIAM CARVER . I was standing at Hermitage-stairs, right opposite the street where Brewer lives—I ran up, and law the prisoner in the act of getting

up off the ground, with something in his hand—I could not swear what it was—the prisoner walked away, and Brewer said he was cut—the prisoner was away then, two or three yards, and did not hear him—I told the prosecutor if the prisoner had cut him, to give him in charge.

MR. GARRATT. I am a surgeon, and attended the prosecutor on the morning of the 12th of Oct.—there was an incised wound on die back part of the right hand, about an inch and a half in length—it was not a bad wound—I have seen him three or four times since—he is not well now—it was done by a knife or a sharp instrument—I form that opinion from the clean edge of the wound, and the quantity of blood he lost.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose the rust from the knife would affect the wound? A. I should have thought it had been a sharper instrument than this—it could not have been a stab.

GUILTY of an Assault. Aged 37.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2539

2539. THOMAS ROCKWOOD was indicted for a robbery on Richard Lance, and stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 5 gownskirts, 1l.; 1s.; and 1 gown, value 1l. 10s.; from his person; and immediately before, at the time, and after the robbery, feloniously beating, striking, and using other personal violence to the said Richard Lance.

RICHARD LANCE . I am a dyer, and live at Bow, in Middlesex. Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening of Tuesday, the 1st of Oct., I was going from Poplar to Bow, to my own house—when I got to a place called Bromley Hall-field, I heard quick footsteps behind me, which I thought nothing of, till immediately after I felt some person endeavouring to take my bundle from under my arm—I then turned round, and was immediately attacked by the prisoner, who was endeavouring to get my parcel from me—I then called out for assistance, and immediately a struggle took place between me and the prisoner, soner, which lasted about two minutes, we then fell on the ground together, and after that he succeeded in taking my parcel from me—I then got, up and followed him, calling "Stop thief!" as loud as I could—in following, I kicked my foot against a stone, or something in my way, and fell—when I got up again to pursue the prisoner he had gained the advantage of me, and got out of sight—I saw no more of him till he was brought to the station, about twenty minutes after—I went towards Poplar, and met a policeman, at the corner of Bow-lane—I told him, and gave him a description of the person as well as I could—he immediately went after the man, and took him—the parcel contained five skirts of children's dresses, and one Iustredress—they were found on the prisoner.

THOMAS WATKINS (police-constable K 310.) I received information from the prosecutor on the evening of the 1st of Oct.—I went in pursuit of the prisoner—I apprehended him at a place called the Copperas-walls, leading to Barking, in the parish of St. Leonard, Bromley—I found this handkerchief on him, and these things in it, and one parcel, which was in the handkerchief, was concealed up his back.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You told him you wanted him on suspicion of knocking a gentleman down and robbing him? A. Yes—and he said, "I am the person."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY of Robbery only. Aged 35.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. — Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2540

2540. HENRY WILLIAMS, alias Rutter , was indicted for stealing 1 watch, value 12l., and 1 watch guard-chain, 6l.; the goods of Henry Gehle, in the dwelling-house of William Howell.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

ANN GEHLE . I am the wife of the Rev. Henry Gehle, a clergyman. In July, we occupied apartments in Oakwood-cottage, Highgate, and still do so—we rent them of Mr. William Howell. On the 31st of July I was sitting at work, in the right-hand parlour, on the ground floor, about twenty minutes to three o'clock, I heard my little boy cry—there is a window which opens from the parlour on to the front garden—I went up stairs, leaving my gold watch, and gold chain attached, in a rosewood case, on the mantel-piece—it was three o'clock when I came into the room again—I noticed that the flowerpots had been removed from the window—I looked on the mantel-piece, and found my watch and chain were gone—the watch was worth about 12l., and the chain about 6l.—I should know them again.

MARY SLADE . I live with my mother, in a cottage exactly opposite Oakwood-cottage. On the 31st of July, from twenty-five minutes to three o'clock till three o'clock, I was standing at my mother's window—the prisoner passed under my mother's window, close by it—I was up one story high—I remained at the window, and looked down upon the man as he passed, and he looked up at me again—I still remained at the window, and in about five minutes he returned on the opposite side of the way with a boy—the boy sat down on the step of the next gate, adjoining Oakwood-cottage—the prisoner went into the garden of Oakwood-cottage—there is a gate there—he was in about five or six minutes—he came out and spoke to the boy, as he sat on the steps of the gate—the boy then went into Oakwood-cottage garden, where the prisoner had been, and the prisoner walked up the hill about half a dozen houses from the house, not out of sight of the house—the boy was not in a minute and a half—he came out, and overtook the prisoner—I saw no more of them—they walked up the hill together—the prisoner had dark trowsers on, something of a pepper and salt coat, and a black hat, with the brim turned up on each side—I had sufficient opportunity to see his face, as I took particular notice of it as he passed down, and when he returned on the opposite side again.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You have no garden of any kind in front of your cottage? A. No, Oakwood-cottage has a garden before it—our cottage is only one story high—I was in the top room—the prisoner passed close under the window, very near the wall, not so near as to touch it—I had my bonnet and shawl on to go out—I did not speak—I do not know how he came to see me, but he looked up to me as I looked down—that I always remembered—I remembered it when I was before the Magistrate, but I do not know that I mentioned it—I do not know why I did not mention it—I have been talking of this since—I have not talked to the policeman Chadwick about it, since the day it happened, till he came with me to Bow-street—I have not been talking to Chadwick about it since the last examination—I may have mentioned it this morning—I told him the same that I told him at first—I do not recollect where I was when I spoke to him—it must have been in this Court—I have not seen him out of this Court—I do not know that he asked me about it—I began the conversation—I had no reason for it—I told him the prisoner looked up at me—he did not say that I never could have told the prisoner's face by seeing his hat—he did not mention about the prisoner's hat—I do not recollect his saying anything about his hat—I cannot swear to it—I first gave a description of the prisoner to

Sergeant Kell at six o'clock in the evening—I first saw Chadwick on the Monday that I attended at Bow-street on the Tuesday—that was three months after Dr. Gehle sent for me—Chadwick said he thought he had got the man who had committed the robbery and I was to go to Bow-street the next morning—Chadwick brought the prisoner into the room—there were a great many persons there—Chadwick did not point him out—he brought the prisoner in and set him down by the side of me—Chadwick had not told me what he left me for—I did not know whether I was to see the prisoner before the bar—Chadwick did not bring anybody else in, but he set the prisoner down by my side—he did not say anything, but he looked at me and I turned round and looked at the prisoner—I thought Chadwick's looks might be a sign for me to do so—I do not know that I had any doubt about it—there were other persons in the room, but no other young man sitting by me—I do not know what is the distance from our cottage across to Oakwood-cottage—I do not visit the servants on the opposite side—I have not been in Oakwood-cottage these two years—I was at the window for twenty-five minutes—there are no curtains or blinds at the window—I was not sitting down.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When the prisoner was sitting by your side, and you looked at him, had you any doubt that he was the man? A. No.

REV. JOHN WILKINS . I am a clergyman, and live in Stangar-place, Edgware-road. On the 29th of Aug. I answered an advertisement to a person who wished to borrow some money, and the prisoner came—he said he was a master jeweller, and had a great order, and he wanted a little money to pay his workmen to complete it—I agreed to lend him 17l., and he gave me a bill of exchange; and by way of security he gave me this gold chain, which was attached to another watch, not to the prosecutor's.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe there were other things besides? A. Yes, there were duplicates on articles of jewellery, I think, to the amount of about 50l.—I left them and the watch with my attorney—I do not know what value the watch purported to be—I took the duplicates, the gold chain and watch, and lent 17l., which was to be returned in three weeks—I was to get 4l. for it—that was his own offer—I told him I would not be particular about the bonus if I found him an honest man—I do not know that it was mentioned that I was to be entitled to keep these things if the money had not been returned in three weeks—I answered three or four other advertisements the same week, not always getting the same bonus, though not very different.

WILLIAM ROWLAND DANIELS . I am in the service of Mr. Hawes, a pawnbroker, in Old-street. On the 28th of Sept. I took this watch in pledge, and lent 4l. on it—I do not speak positively to the prisoner, but I believe him to be the person who pawned it—I gave this duplicate to the person who pawned the watch.

WILLIAM CHADWICK (police-sergeant F 2.) I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of Oct., in Russell-court, but not on this charge—I searched a room in the house in which I apprehended him, and found some pawnbrokers' duplicates which the prisoner claimed—amongst them I found the duplicate of this watch.

Cross-examined. Q. How many other duplicates did you find? A. Twenty-four in the room, and four upon his person—they were for articles of jewellery, and have been given up to the attorney—he was apprehended for having passed a gold watch with a forged mark on it—he was discharged for that—I think I first saw the witness Slade on the Friday previous to the prisoner's coming up on the following Tuesday—I went with Mr. Ghele to his house, and he sent over for Slade—I told her I had got a person in custody—I could not tell her he was the person who stole the watch, because I did not know

that he was—I said I had a young man in custody, and he was remanded till the Tuesday, and when she saw him, not to say that he was the man if he was not—I did not show her the prisoner when he came up on the Tuesday—I brought him into the room, and he sat down behind the door—I did not call her attention to him, nor to where he sat—I did not look at her to call her attention to him—I have seen her once since her examination, that is all—I have had no conversation with her about this—I never asked her anything about it—she said she was positive he was the man, that was all—that was in the Court here to-day—she was saying, "These are the parties' witnesses"—nothing was said about his passing under her window but what she said at the police-court—I do not recollect anything being said outside here about his looking up.

ANN GEHLE re-examined. This watch and chain are mine—I know the chain, because it had been broken—there is a link broken now.

MR. BALLANTINE called

ROBERT HARRISON . I am a wine commission-agent, and live in Whiskin-street, Clerkenwell. In July I lived at the same place—I know the prisoner—I had never seen him before the 31st of July—that was the first time—I wrote this letter (looking at one) and posted it on the morning of the 30th of July—I saw the prisoner afterwards, on the following afternoon, the Wednesday, about a quarter past two o'clock—I was just sitting down to dinner—dinner was ready at two o'clock, and he came while I was at dinner—he remained with me to the best of my recollection till about half-past three, about an hour and a quarter—I never saw this letter after I posted it—when I saw the prisoner, he introduced himself by stating his name to be Rutter—he held this letter in his hand at the time—he introduced himself to me—I recollect a person coming with him, but I did not know him—if I were to see him I should know him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was this at your cellars? A. No, at my private lodging, in Whiskin-street—it is a greengrocer's shop—the shop-door is in Gloucester-street, and the private door in Whiskin-street—I have been married eleven years, and live with my wife—I have no children—I and my wife live alone—we have one servant—Ann Wilson is the name of the girl that waited that day at table—my wife was at home—I occupy the drawing-room on the first floor, and a bed-room—I pay 12s. a week, and 1s. for the use of the servant—I have no place of business—I transact my business at the Docks, and at Garrard's Coffee-house—I have been in business eight years—my last transaction was, I sold a gentleman named Grace, of the Colosseum Tavern, Portland-place, two butts of sherry, for which he paid me cash—I have no cellars of my own—I have no principal—I purchase wines on my own account, and sell them—I sometimes transact business for other persons—Mr. Wells has consigned wine to me, 150 dozen of champagne, 100 dozen of hock, and five pipes of port—they are now under offer to Mr. Grace—I do not recollect that I transacted any business in July last—I cannot say whether I did in June last—sometimes three or four months elapse and I do no business—I do not recollect whether I did any business in June, or May, or April—I sold a hogshead of sherry to a gentleman in the Exchequer—Ido not recollect his name—I think it was in April, I will not swear positively—I cannot give you the name of any one I did business with in March—in January last, or the beginning of February, I shipped three pipes of port to Mr. William Day, a wine-merchant, at Hull—I keep no books—I keep no man, because there is no occasion for it—I sometimes go to the Docks of a morning at ten, sometimes at half-past twelve, and sometimes at half-past one o'clock, just as

it suits my convenience, or the convenience of those persons whom I take down to taste the wines.

Q. Tell the Jury the name of any gentleman, principal, in London, with whom you did any business in the wine-trade in the year 1843? A. I do not recollect any, because my wife has property, and I do not make a matter of business of it—I merely do it, almost, I may say, for the sake of amusement—my wife has an income allowed her by her father—I know a man named Russell—he is foreman to a man named Dyer, a fishmonger, in the Haymarket, just by the theatre—I received a letter from the country on the 18th of July, to make inquiries for an individual of the name of Rutter, whose evidence was wanting upon a very important trial at the ensuing term—I was directed to go to No. 413, Strand, and there I was directed to go to Mr. Dyer, and see Mr. Russell, and he would tell me where Ratter lived—he said Rutter was in the habit of calling every day almost, or every evening, and the better way would be for me to write a letter, committed to his care, and he would give it to Rutter; I did so, on the 30th, and the prisoner called next day, at a quarter past two o'clock, and I found he could not be the person I wanted, as he must be a person about forty-five years of age, and the prisoner was only twenty three—the important trial was about the estates of Parting ton-hall, in Yorkshire—the note was simply directed to Mr. Russell, at Mr. Dyer's, fishmonger, near the Italian Opera, Haymarket—I saw Rutter twice afterwards—he called on me again, I think, the week after, or a fortnight, but I only saw him about five minutes each time—he called about business—I told him I had some wines to sell, and, seeing he was a respectable looking man, I took it for granted he had a connexion, and I thought he might be able to sell some wine for me—we talked about Yorkshire and Doncaster races, and other things—that was not at my house the first time he called there, but we adjourned to a public-house opposite to where I live—it is an hotel, kept by an individual named Nutter, and it was there that this communication took place between us about the evidence of the individual that I wanted, relative to some estates in Yorkshire; and then I began to speak about Doncaster races and other things, and, finding he was a Yorkshireman, I went into very familiar conversation—he came to my house, and he was standing in the shop—I said, "Will you have the goodness to go over to the parlour of the gin palace opposite, I will come to you immediately"—he did not come up stairs—I know this gentleman—(looking at one)—I saw him yesterday, or the day before, when I was requested to call on him, by the prisoner's wife calling on me—I do not know her except by her calling on me—I did not know where he lived, or what business he followed—I do not know now—I went to this gentleman's office, in Dalziel-street, Drury-lane, yesterday, or the day before, for the first time—I came here to-day at a quarter to nine—I have been here to-day and yesterday—I have only been to the top of the street—I have not been to Barbican, or any place, so as to make it necessary to postpone the trial.

Q. Did you effect a bargain with the prisoner? A. I told him I had wines in bond, some champagne and some hock, some claret, and some other French wines—I have some port and sherry of my own in the London Docks and St. Katharine's Dock, in my own name—I have some claret in the case wine department of the London Docks—I have seen this watch before, within the last quarter of an hour—it was shown me, I believe, by the pawnbroker, at the door, when the witnesses were ordered out of Court—he pulled out the watch, and said, "This is the watch"—I did not see the name, "Rutter, London," on it—I just saw it for a minute—I do not know the name of the other gentleman who was turned out when I went out—I did not see him at

Mr. Greenwood's—when I was seventeen I was taken from school, and articled to my brother-in-law, Mr. Scotsbury, of the firm of Shepherd and Scotsbury, at Griffin, in Yorkshire—I was there seven years, and then went to Hamburgh, as a private individual—I had got a sum of money, and I travelled for my own pleasure—I was on the Continent five years—I was in England up to 1827, then went to Hamburgh, and resided there till 1830—I did not do any business then—I came to London in 1832, and lived on my wife's allowance.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. In what part of Yorkshire is Griffin? A. Twenty-two miles on the other side of Hull—my wife's father resides at Thirske, in Yorkshire—I have an allowance from him of 125l. a year—when I gave my evidence to the attorney no one else was present.

COURT. Q. What was your reason for knowing it was on Wednesday, the 31st, that he called on you? A. I had never seen him before, and I had a small bill due of 12l. at the Westend, and, remaining so long with the prisoner, soner, I missed my appointment—that led on to the individual I made the appointment with being very sore, and he would not make another appointment with me—I only know it was the 31st of July from its being impressed on my mind—it might have been the 1st of August—I only know that Russell saw the prisoner every day from what he told me—I wrote this letter in the morning—I do not recollect the precise time of day—"3A." on it, which means three o'clock in the afternoon.

HENRY EDEN . I am a carriage-broker and valuer, and dealer in carriages. On Wednesday, the 31st of July, about two o'clock, or a little after, I accompanied the prisoner to Harrison's—we remained there about an hour and a half—I have never seen him from that day to this.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. It is a greengrocer's shop, is it not? A. I think it is an oil-shop—I did not go into the house at all—I went to a public-house—I do not know the sign—it is the corner house—I sat about ten minutes when the gentleman came—the prisoner went with me—he did not go into Harrison's house that I know of—we called at the door, and they sent Harrison to us—I saw nothing of Harrison till he came to the public-house—I did not call at the door—I stood by while the prisoner went into the oil-shop—I do not know who he spoke to—it was no business of mine—my carriage factory is in Cardington-street, Hampstead—I am backwards and forwards there—whenever I have got any carriages I put them in the yard—I have got two gentlemen's chariots and a landau there now—I live in Church-street, Portman-market—I do not know Mr. Russell, who keeps an oyster-shop—I have known the prisoner about eight or nine months—I do not know Dyer at the oyster-shop—I never was there to my knowledge—the prisoner lived in Portland-town when I first knew him—I have not seen him for the last two or three months—I believe he is a jeweller—I have seen him buy pins at auctions and of dealers—I never knew him by the name of Williams—he never showed me his watch or chain—I have never been in any trouble in my life—the prisoner lived over the water the last time I saw him, but I never went to his place—I was called on to be a witness at the beginning of this week—a lady came to me, and asked me if I recollected the day that I had the quarrel with Mr. Rutter—I said, "Yes"—the conversation, the day I went, was something about Darlington Hall—it was about some property in Yorkshire—I did not hear about wines—I had some brandy and water—I know it was the 31st of July because I frequent sales, and I went to Robinson's Repository, in Little Britain, to see what was for sale on the next day—I went into the yard—I saw the men about the yard—we went in both together, and staid about a quarter of an hour, and

then I walked back, and he with me, to a coffee-shop in Russell-street, kept by a person named Stangwick—we staid there about an hour—we quarrelled there, and I went away—I have never seen him from that day to this—I had some coffee—I do not know what he had.

ANN GEHLE re-examined. Our house is in the parish of Hornsey—at the time I lost my watch there was not the name of "Rutter, London," on it.

(Letter read.)—"To Mr. Russell, at Mr. Dyer's, fishmonger, near the Italian Opera, Hay market. Mr. Russell, will you have the goodness to tell Mr. Rutter to call to-morrow, Wednesday, about two o'clock, and ask to speak with Mr. Duffield, from Yorkshire. At Mrs. Ashell's, 13, Gloucester-street, St. John-street-road. July 30, 1844."

(Charles Proctor, licensed victualler, of Tower-street, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Ten Years.

Sixth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2541

2541. WILLIAM THOMAS MULLINS was indicted for stealing 8 pence and fourteen halfpence, the monies of Edmund Stevens Smets, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 15.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18441021-2542

2542. WILLIAM WEST and RICHARD COLE were indicted for stealing 2 pairs of boots, value 13s., the goods of Phillippa Parish.

PHILLIPPA PARISH . I am a widow, and am a boot and shoemaker, and live in the Kingsland-road. About two o'clock in the afternoon of the 15th of Oct. I saw Cole, and another man, shorter than West—the shorter one asked for some morning slippers—I showed them about two dozen—Cole was standing by the counter, by the side of the other one—they did not purchase any slippers—they asked for different sorts of slippers—they turned round after a short time, and went out—after they were gone Westbury came and gave me some information—I then looked in my shop window, and missed a pair of Blucher boots—I turned round after the officer had gone out, and saw a pair lying on the floor—they had been in the window—my daughter missed another pair—I know these boots to be mine—they are the boots I picked up from the floor.

Cole. Q. Did you not say at Worship-street, you had missed nothing at all? A. No.

AMELIA PARISH . I am daughter of the prosecutrix, and am thirteen years old—I live with my mother. On Tuesday, the 16th of Oct., Cole and another man came into my mother's shop—they asked to look at some slippers—my mother showed them some—they did not buy any slippers—they turned about, and walked out—after the policeman came in, I missed two pairs of Bluchers out of the window—I had seen them in the window the day before.

JOHN WESTBURY (police-constable N 215.) Between two and three o'clock in the morning of the 16th of Oct., I was in the Kingsland-road—I saw the two prisoners in company with another—I am sure it was the prisoners—I knew them well—I followed them to the shop of the prosecutrix, and they all three stopped and looked in at the window—Cole and the third one went in—West walked backwards and forwards in front of the shop—he then went to the corner of Union-street, where he had a full view of the shop—I went into a confectioner's shop, opposite, and saw Cole and the other in the shop—they seemed to be looking at slippers—the prosecutrix seemed to be in the other part of the shop—I saw Cole take a pair of Blucherboots out of the

window, and place them under his coat—in a few minutes he turned his back to the counter, took his hat off, and wiped his face with a lightcoloured handkerchief, and then he put the boots further up his coat, came out, and turned up the Kingsland-road—West joined them—I went into the shop, and made inquiries—I came out, and then lost sight of them—I turned down Thomas-street, and then saw them again—I laid hold of Cole and the other, and said, "You must go with me"—the third one then had the handkerchief with him—I said to West, "And you too"—he laid hold of the other, and rescued him from me, and he got away—I took Cole to the station—I went out the next night, and found West at a public-house, the resort of prostitutes and thieves.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long have you been in the police? A. Three years.

Cole. Q. How was it you did not take me? A. Because I wished to have all three of you—I saw you come out with something under your coat—I saw you plainly.

JURY. Q. Was there any light in the back part of your shop? A. No—the shop window is opposite the parlour-door, and there is a back parlour-window which gives light into the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Saturday, October 26th, 1844.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18441021-2543

2543. JOHN M'GREGOR was indicted for embezzlement.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

SARAH LEMM . I am the wife of Edward Lemm—we live in St. John-street, Clerkenwell. I went to Hall and Allan's, in St. Paul's Churchyard, on the 8th of Oct., about five o'clock—the prisoner served me, and I purchased goods which came to 1l. 9s. 2 1/2 d.—he handed me a bill to that amount—I said, "Will you take the 2 1/2 d.?"—he said, "Never mind that"—I paid him a sovereign, two half-crowns, and four shillings—I took away the goods and the bill—this is the bill—(looking at it)—after I got home I found I should wish to exchange some of the articles for others, and I sent my son, John Lemm, to Hall and Allan's with the bill, and some fringe, which I wished to exchange for gimp.

Cross-examined by MR. O'BRIEN. Q. I believe Hall and Allan's is an extensive establishment? A. Yes—when I first went the shop was nearly full of people, but there were not a great many when I left—there were a great many young men behind the counter—I see here is "Served by M'Gregor" on the bill.

JOHN LEMM . I am the son of Sarah Lemm. I remember her sending me to Hall and Allan's with some fringe on the 8th of Oct., a little after five o'clock—I gave the fringe and the bill to Mr. Gold—I got the article I wanted and went home, leaving the bill behind me.

CHARLES GOLD . I am in the employ of Mr. Michael Hall and his partner Mr. Allan. I remember on the evening of the 8th of Oct., John Lemm coming with some fringe to be exchanged for some gimp—he produced this bill—I looked at it, and found no countersign on it, or any examiners signature—I am what is called the "Call back shopman"—it is the duty of a person who has sold goods to make out a bill, and to have it examined by myself, and after I have signed it, he is to take it to the next hand, who is

called the "Examiner"—he puts his name to it, and then a boy if called to take the bill and the money to the desk, and there the bill is stamped—I found that this bill had not the call-back man's name, nor the examiner's name on it, nor yet a stamp—the prisoner should have given a small diamond ticket to the cashier with the money, after he had signed the amount of the bill in a little book which he keeps—this bill is not entered in the prisoner's book—when I saw that the bill was deficient in all these particulars, I said to the prisoner, "Young man, here is something wrong here; you have not had this bill examined, nor called back, nor stamped"—he made me no answer—I said, "Hand me your book, Sir"—he gave it me, and I opened it, and found there is no entry of this bill, which he should have made and kept—I handed the bill to Mr. Hall—the diamond ticket, which the prisoner should have handed to the cashier should have been filed, and there was no such ticket on the file—he had no authority to take a farthing less than the amount of the bill.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had the prisoner been in your employ? A. Perhaps a fortnight or three weeks—I have never known this system of checks and counter checks to lead to error—I have been in the establishment ten years—I have nothing to do with the cash department—I was in the shop that evening—the cashier's name is Brouse—Mr. Frederick Bullen was then in the desk.

FREDERICK BULLEN . Q. I am cashier to Messrs. Hall and Allan. I was in the desk on the 8th of Oct., from eight o'clock till one, and from two till five—I was then relieved for about a quarter of an hour—I came back to the desk about a quarter past five—this bill (looking at it) was not brought to me by anybody—it was the duty of the shopman to bring or send it to me, after being examined, to be stamped—the 1l. 9s. in respect of this bill was never handed to me, and no diamond ticket was brought to me.

COURT. Q. When do you pay your money that you receive in the day? About seven o'clock in the evening—I counted 14l. for the boy who relieved me to give change while I was gone—I locked up the till—I did not count the contents of it—I keep the key of the till, and take it away till I return—I am the general cashier, and it is only to be relieved that I go away—when my cash is counted in the evening by Mr. Hall or Mr. Allan, 5l. is left with me.

GEORGE BROWSE . I relieved Frederick Bullen as cashier on the 8th of Oct., a little after five o'clock—I did not receive a sum of 1l. 9s.—I did not receive any money from the prisoner—I did not see this bill.

JOHN BRACKENSEDGE ALLAN . I am one of the prosecutors. At seven o'clock in the evening the accounts are closed, and 5l. is left to commence the business of the next day with—I examine the till, and check the cash with the diamond tickets—on the evening of the 8th of Oct. the tickets and the cash tallied exactly—there was no ticket for 1l. 9s.—supposing the prisoner to have received 1l. 9s. in respect of this bill, it does not appear—there was no increase of 1l. 9s. over the amount of the tickets—I spoke to the prisoner, and asked him to be very particular—I put the question to him twice—I said, "Did the lady pay you the money?"—he said, "Yes she did"—I said, "What was it?"—he said, "A sovereign, and the rest in silver"—I said, "Did she give you the 2 1/2 d.?"—he said, "Yes she did," and he repeated it twice—he said he had paid the money to a cashier, but he could not say who—besides the two cashiers who sit in the desk there are generally three who run about to take the money to the cashier who sits in the desk—the prisoner ought to have handed to the boy, that runs about, the bill, the money, and the diamond ticket, the boy ought to take them and the money to the desk—each young man has a book similar to this one for

his own pocket—the cashier certainly has the power of tearing up the diamond check, and putting the money into his pocket, but he should post the amount of the diamond checks in his ledger, and we add that ledger up every night—supposing he had left out that entry there would be nothing to protect the young man but his own book, but he should have had the bill signed and stamped.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you examined at the police-office? A. I was not—supposing one of these "flying cashiers" did not hand the money to the man at the desk with the diamond check, the check that we should have would be the prisoner having it in his book—he would say, "I swear I gave it, for here it is in my book"—I balance the accounts every night—I have occasionally found the cash exceed the diamond tickets, and occasionally found it was less—when I asked the prisoner he said the lady paid him a sovereign and 9s. 2 1/2 d.—I do not think that the prisoner had been more than a fortnight in our employ—he had board and lodging, and 45l. a year salary—we pay once a month.

ISAAC NOBLE (City police-constable, No. 318.) I took the prisoner into custody at his employers' on the 8th of Oct.—I found on him a sovereign, two half-crowns, four shillings, and one sixpence.

MR. WILLIAM CORN HUMPHREYS . I was before Mr. Alderman Copeland on the subject of this prosecution—the prisoner made a statement, and after it was taken down I saw the Alderman sign it—(read)—the prisoner says voluntarily, "I am guilty of keeping the money."

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2544

2544. GEORGE FOREY was indicted for embezzlement.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN WHEELER . I have been for a great many years in the service of Mr. Defries—I principally keep the books. In Sept. last the prisoner was in his service as a traveller—it was his duty to collect orders and to receive money on account of his master, and when he received it to bring the money to Mr. Defries the day afterwards—that was the rule, except he went out of town, and then he accounted on his return—I know a customer named Dawkes—on the 20th of Sept. the prisoner came in, and said Mr. Dawkes wanted some cottons—Mr. Defries gave the prisoner one gross of soda cottons and one gross of other cottons to take to Mr. Dawkes—I booked them to George Forey—the next morning the prisoner came, and said he had left the two gross of cottons at Mr. Dawkes', in Shoreditch, and they were not paid for, and I booked them to Mr. Dawkes—the prisoner never paid me the money for them.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. The prisoner was a traveller, was not he? A. Yes—an out-door traveller, to collect orders, and deliver them to me or Mr. Defries—he never received goods to carry out—they were sent out by somebody else, in general—this was in Sept., 1843—he collected no orders from Mr. Dawkes, from Sept., 1843, till he left in June last—I cannot say how many other orders he brought—they were different in different weeks—there were a good many orders in Sept., 1843—he gave the orders to Mr. Defries—this order was given in my presence, and Mr. Defries gave the two gross of cottons to the prisoner—this was on the 20th of Sept.—I have told Mr. Defries of it once or twice—my attention was called to it two or three months back, when I was looking over the books—perhaps it was more recently—it might be two months or six weeks—I pointed it out as a deficiency to Mr. Defries, two or three months after the transaction—I did not give any

invoice of these goods—I was told to come here as a witness, six weeks or two months back, when I named it to Mr. Defries—it might have been before Sept.—it might be in July or August—the books are here—I keep the accounts—this is the book—here is the entry of the goods.

MR. DOANE. Q. Does it appear unpaid still? A. Yes—the prisoner was there on the 2nd of June—he has not been there much since, that I know of—I do not know when he was discharged.

COURT. Q. You said the prisoner was, last year, in the service of Mr. Defries; was he in the employ of other persons beside? A. No, as far as I am aware of, exclusively in Mr. Defries'—he was his collecting clerk, and went out for orders.

DAVID DAWKES . I am a customer of Mr. Defries—I do not know that I had two gross of cottons of him in Sept. last—we are frequently having goods in from him, at different times—we might have had a gross of soda cottons, and a gross of other cottons, from him—we are in the habit of having them—I always pay for them across the counter, on the delivery of the goods.

COURT. Q. Have you any recollection of receiving these personally yourself? A. No—all I can say is, their cart comes to the door, and they come and ask us what we want; it is brought in, and paid for over the counter.

ANN JULIERS . My husband is a naphtha-lamp manufacturer, and lives in Cambridge-road. We had dealings with Mr. Defries—I did not pay for any goods I had of him in Dec. last—I do not know whether I paid afterwards, or my husband—here is a receipt to this bill, which I believe is Mr. Forey's writing; but I was not there to see the bill receipted—I handed this bill to Mr. Defries; but I cannot say when—I can only suppose about two months ago—I found it amongst my receipts, and handed it to Mr. Defries.

Cross-examined. Q. Might it have been three months ago? A. It is useless for me to say—I cannot—it was some time ago—they sent for me yesterday, and the day before, to come here.

JOHN WHEELER re-examined. I believe this receipt to be the handwriting of George Forey.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2545

2545. GEORGE FOREY was again indicted for stealing 20 Vesta Lotus lamp glasses, value 20l.; 20 pieces of Vesta tape cotton, value 20l.; 20 opal glass ornaments, value 20l.; and 20 coloured peg glass lamps, value 20l.; the goods of Jonas Defries.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

JONAS DEFRIES . I carry on business as a lampglass and lampcotton manufacturer, in Gravel-lane, Houndsditch—the prisoner was in my service in April—I paid him a guinea a-week, and a commission if he collected orders above a certain sum—I had an account with Clark and Haynes, of Brighton, which was due in April—I gave the prisoner instructions to go down to Brighton and collect that account; and at the same time, I gave him the articles stated in the indictment, to take down as patterns—they came to about 19s. 9d.—he took them, and returned in two or three days—he told me that they had been left at Messrs. Hayne's, as patterns, and he was positive he should get orders on them—he said they were not paid for; and in his presence I ordered a clerk to book them to Haynes and Clark—the value of them was under 1l.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. When did you find out this alleged stealing? A. I think it was about August when I went down to Brighton

to see Mrs. Defries—I had not had any communication with Mr. Haynes in the mean time, no more than sending him his account down—I said my family was there and I should call in a few days—I did not go before a Magistrate—I went before the Grand Jury the day before yesterday—I called to my solicitor to attend to it—I did not direct him not to go before a Magistrate, neither one way or the other—I left it in his hands entirely—when I came back from Brighton I named to him that I called at Clark and Haynes for an account, and they said they had never had the goods—I cannot remember that I entrusted Mr. Scard to communicate with the prisoner about an action of damages for leaving my service—I think the prisoner had been in my service about eight or nine months—he left me in June—I believe he lived in Gloucester-place, cester-place, Hoxton—I told Mr. Scard where he lived—there was an agreement with me and the prisoner that he was to have a guinea a week, and a commission if he realised 30l. a week—if he was ill he was to have no salary, but I paid it him out of good feeling—he was to give me three months' notice if leaving me—I had the security of a friend, but we could not find him—the prisoner was not to sell any person's goods but mine—he did not complain of my conduct till I complained of his—I swear he did not give me three months' notice of leaving me—he did not give me a day's notice—I do not remember that I authorised anybody to write to him demanding 100l.—if this letter (looking at it) is Mr. Scard's writing, I have no doubt that I told him to do it—I cannot remember how long ago it is since I first spoke to Mr. Scard about the prisoner—perhaps it might have been a month or six weeks—I think it was longer—I will swear I did not go over the prisoner's accounts before he left, nor immediately after he left—I cannot say when I went over his accounts—I do not think it was very long after he left—I think he left on the 2nd of June—I have not suffered at all in my business by Forey's leaving—I do not know that he has been travelling on his own account—I can prove by my books that the orders he brought me were not 3l. a week a few weeks before he left, he was travelling for other houses—the first house was Castle's, in the Minories—I mean to swear that I have never wanted him back—I never told anybody that I was satisfied with the prisoner—I have never told Lynes so—I certainly was satisfied with the prisoner for the first month or two—this bill was found the day before yesterday—I knew this morning that the prisoner had surrendered to be tried—I left it entirely to my solicitor—I should not have come but I have had two travellers abscond with money—the prisoner has not said that he should bring an action against me for slander, and commenced the action—I swear I have not received a letter from his solicitor—I supply the same houses that the prisoner does, and I supply the same houses myself that I did through his agency—I cannot tell how many houses he procured for me—we are the largest manufacturers in England—for the last few weeks the prisoner was with us what he procured was not 2l. a week—I paid his travelling expenses—it was not part of the conditions when he first came that he should pay them—I do not know that I have a memorandum of that in my books, but he cannot say that I did not pay him—I do not keep an account of the wages I pay—I give a sum of money to my clerks to pay, and they give me an account of what they have paid on Monday morning—I delivered these goods to the prisoner—I looked out some and he the others—they went away in a basket which he carried away—he told me he was going to Brighton—I gave him money for his journey—my clerk was present when I delivered these things to the prisoner—I think it was on the 8th of April.

MR. DOANE. Q. About how many persons have you in your employ? A. With cotton-weavers and others, about forty—I do not keep an account of

what I pay for wages, I merely enter it on a sheet of paper—the cash-keeper puts down the gross amount—when the prisoner left I did not suspect his honesty—it was after he left that I found out this affair at Brighton—I think it was in Aug., on my going down, that I ascertained that these things had not been left, when I called for the account—I found out Dawke's case when we went through the books, about three weeks or a month back, and then I had these proceedings taken—I paid the prisoner's expenses to Brighton—there was some dispute about their being rather large.

JAMES SAMUEL . I am warehouseman to the prosecutor, and have been so for about twenty years. About April last the prisoner packed up some patterns to take to Brighton—I knew he was going to Brighton—he came back some days afterwards—Mr. Defries ordered me, in the prisoner's presence, to enter these things to Clark and Haynes—this is the book in which I put down these patterns to Clark and Haynes.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you supplied Clark and Haynes since? A. No, they have not dealt with us since—I made this entry at the time the prisoner returned—it was on the 11th of April when the prisoner returned, but I believe the goods are booked on the 10th, because he left Brighton on the 10th—I cannot recollect when I was asked to become a witness here—it is a month ago, or rather more, since I knew of this business going on—I have not said that I forgot whether these goods were delivered to the prisoner or not—I have not said so to two persons—what was packed up was three vesta lotus lamps, six pieces of vesta tape cotton, six opal ornaments, and one peglamp, and they amounted to 19s. 9d.

GEORGE HAYNES . I had a partner named Clark in April last—I remember the prisoner coming in April last for an account due from me to Mr. Defries—I paid it to him—he did not leave with me any vesta lotus glasses, or anything of the kind.

COURT. Q. Did you see him on the subject of these things? A. No; he did not call my attention to any patterns at all.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it through the prisoner calling on you that you became a customer of Mr. Defries? A. Yes.

JURY to JAMES SAMUEL. Q. Is this the day-book? A. This is the book for the country orders, and here is another book in which we enter all memorandums that occur in the course of the day—here is the entry of the goods in the rough book, when the prisoner took them—here is the entry, "Patterns delivered to George Forey"—this was written on the 8th of April—it is all my own handwriting—it was all made at the same time on the morning he left, and made by me.

COURT. Q. Who wrote this "August 26, bill delivered?" A. Levy, who is here—the whole of the other was written by me at one time.

MR. HORRY called

WILLIAM LYNES . I am shopman to Garss and Co., in the Minories. I have known the prisoner ever since he has been in Mr. Defries's employ—about a month after he left him, Mr. Defries told me, in my employer's shop, that he had examined his books, and found George Forey a very honest man.

WILLIAM HENRY AUSTIN . I am solicitor to the prisoner. I wrote a letter to Mr. Defries, in the course of my business, but I cannot undertake to say that it went—I wrote it by the instruction of the prisoner in the middle of last Session, and left it in my office.

MR. DOANE called

JONAS DEFRIES . I did not receive a letter from the prisoner's solicitor, and never heard of such a letter coming to my establishment.

JOHN SCARD . I am a solicitor, and have lived in Bedford-street, Bedford-square,

for ten years—I have been solicitor to Mr. Defries for four or five years—Mr. Defries came to me, and produced an agreement between him and the prisoner—in consequence of that I wrote this letter—I did not know of the present case till after Aug.—I then requested Mr. Defries to allow me to apply to Forey for an explanation of these irregularities—I wrote Forey this letter, and he came to my office on the 10th or the 11th of Sept.—he said, "What has Mr. Defries got to complain against me"—I told him the first was Mrs. Juliers, and he took a memorandum of it—I then told him of one of which the bill was thrown out at Chelsea—I then said, "I suppose the next case you are aware of, when I tell you Mr. Defries has been to Brighton"—I then read to him Mr. Hayne's letter from Brighton, but I do not know that I read it verbatim—I said it was respecting some goods which he said he had sold to Mr. Haynes, at Brighton, which had not been delivered—he requested an hour or two to consider of it—I gave him the time—he went out and came in again, and said he should give no explanation, he would meet Mr. Defries at the Old Bailey.

COURT. Q. You meant if he had given any explanation, to have advised Mr. Defries to desist from criminal proceedings? A. Yes—(Letter read)—"To Mr. George Forey, 49, Gloucester-street, Hoxton Old-town,—Sir, I am instructed by Mr. Defries, of Gravel-lane, to call upon you for the amount of damages mentioned in the agreement between you and him, relative to your employment as traveller, which agreement has been broken by you; and unless the amount, together with 6s. 8d., the costs of this application, be paid to me, on or before twelve o'clock on Friday next, I shall issue a writ against you for the recovery of the amount. JOHN SCARD, 11, Bedford-street, Bedford-square, 31 July, 1844."

Cross-examined. Q. Was there another person present of the name of Wootton? A. There was another person, but I do not know who it was—I believe it was a person here present—(looking at Wootton)—I have related all that took place to the best of my recollection—the prisoner came to me in consequence of the letter, and asked, "What has Mr. Defries to complain of?" and I told him of these lamps—he might have said, "I know nothing about it"—he requested time to consider—he did not deny all knowledge of these goods in those express terms—he said he knew nothing about it—at this distance of time I cannot recollect all that passed—I have been in the profession twenty-five years, and have been before a Magistrate professionally many times—I never attended a criminal court—I advised Mr. Defries not to go before a Magistrate—he said there were two courses, one to take him before a Magistrate, and the other to go before the Grand Jury—I advised the last, as we had a great many witnesses; and I thought he might have bail, and not have to be in custody an hour—I received the instructions for this indictment just before last Session—I did not file the bill before this Session because I could not get my witnesses—I believe this is the agreement between Mr. Defries and the prisoner—Mr. Austin requested me to give him the particulars of the case, to prevent his application to the Court—I had the certificates for the warrant, but I did not have the prisoner taken, as Mr. Defries gave me positive instructions not to put them in force.

COURT. Q. In your communication with the prisoner on the supposed irregularities of the transactions between him and the prosecutor, was any allusion made to your previous letter of demand for the 100l? A. No, not at all—it was not at all mixed up with my civil demand.

MR. HORRY called

SAMUEL WOOTTON . I accompanied the prisoner to Mr. Scard's office. Mr. Scard told Forey there had been

some irregularities which were to be explained—Forey asked what they were—Mr. Scard told him there had been some deficiencies about three combs or lamps, and another one about a case at Brighton, and another of a trifling sum of money—he said he knew nothing about it.

COURT. Q. What information did he give the prisoner about the transaction at Brighton? A. He told him Mr. Defries had made a charge against him of some irregularity about the lamps at Brighton—he said it was a trumped-up case, and he should let it proceed further—he did not say whether or not he had had the lamps to take to Haynes—he said he did not know anything about it

MR. DOANE. Q. After this Brighton case was mentioned, did Mr. Scard offer him an hour's time for explanation? A. No; we did not retire that day for about an hour, and then return.

MR. SCARD re-examined. This person went away with the prisoner, but he did not return with him, and then the prisoner said he should give no explanation.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2546

2546. JAMES CROW was indicted for assaulting Rosalia Beveridge, with intent, &c.:—2nd COUNT, for a common assault.

GUILTY . Aged 48.— Confined Twelve Months.

ESSEX CASES.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18441021-2547

2547. JAMES WHITE was indicted for stealing 2 iron railway-chairs, value 3s., the goods of the Eastern Counties Railway Company; and JAMES SAMPSON for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to be stolen.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM HOWES . I live in Channel-sea-street, and am employed by the contractors for the Eastern Counties Railway. On Friday, the 20th of Sept, I fetched a load of iron chairs, which are used on the railway, and I left twenty-five of them on a line near the junction point at Stratford, in Essex—I have since seen six of them at the Stepney police-court.

HENRY HUTTON (police-constable K 60.) I apprehended the prisoner Sampson, and told him he was charged with stealing some iron railway-chairs—he said, "I met White on Saturday morning; he told me he knew where there was some iron belonging to the railway; he said, 'Let us go and take them, and sell them;' we went, and White took them, but I did not know they were stolen;'" Benton, a policeman, took White—previous to that I went to the shop of Rainer, a marine-store dealer, and found seven chairs

JOHN CRAWLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Rainer, a marine-store dealer. On the 20th of Sept. the prisoner White, and one Salmon, brought two pieces of iron into the shop—I gave them 4d. each for them—next day, Saturday, Sampson brought two pieces of the same kind—I gave him 8d. for them—he said they picked them out of the river.

JOSEPH BENTON (police-constable K 381.) I apprehended White on Sunday, the 22nd of Sept.—I told him I took him on suspicion of stealing some iron railway-chairs off the railway—he said him and Salmon took two on Friday morning, and him and Sampson went on Saturday morning and took two more.

DAVID MOORE . I am a constable of the Eastern Counties Railway Company. On the 21st of Sept. I saw some railway-chairs placed near the railway—I

counted them after the robbery—there was then only seventeen—I believe those produced to be the property of the company—they are marked alphabetically.

JOHN CRAWLEY re-examined. I cannot distinguish which chair each of the prisoners sold.

HENRY HUTTON re-examined. I believe this examination to be the writing of Mr. Ballantine, the Magistrate—(read)—"The prisoner Sampson says, "On Saturday I met with James White, and he said to me, 'There are two or three bits of cast iron in the river and he says to me, 'Come along with me, I'll go in the river and get a piece;' and he went and got a piece, and asked me whether I'd go and sell it; I did not know where they came from, and I went and sold it at Rayner's."

HENRY HUTTON re-examined. Sampson said, "I met White on Saturday morning—he told me he knew where there were some of the railway irons—he said, 'Let us go and get them, and sell them'—White went and got them, I sold them—I did not know where he got them"—he did not say he went with White.

DAVID MOORE re-examined. They were about two yards from the river—they could not have rolled into the river—they were upon a high bank.

Sampson's Defence. What the policeman says is false; I did not say, White said they were chairs; I did not know what they were.

WHITE— GUILTY . Aged 17.—

SAMPSON— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2548

2548. FREDERICK SALMON and JOHN WHITE were indicted for stealing 2 iron railway-chairs, value 35., the goods of the Eastern Counties Railway Company.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM HOWES . I am in the employ of Mr. Brown, contractor for the Eastern Counties Railway. On the 20th of Sept. I took a cart-load of chairs to Ilford, to a place in the parish of Stratford—I left them about twelve o'clock, by the Junction point—they were to be used there.

JOHN CRAWLEY . I bought two chairs on the 20th of Sept., between six and seven o'clock in the evening, of the prisoners, for old iron—they said they pulled them up in the river.

HENRY HUTTON (police-constable K 60.) I took Salmon in custody—he said he met White, and they went and took a chair each—I went to Rainer's, and got four chairs—I believe they cost the company from 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. each—they weigh 23lbs. each.

White's Defence. I pulled them out of the river.

Salmon's Defence. The one who chucked them into the river got discharged at the police-court.

HENRY HUTTON re-examined. One man was discharged, as there was no evidence against him.

SALMON— GUILTY . Aged 14.

WHITE— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month

Reference Number: t18441021-2549

2549. JOHN GENTRY was indicted for stealing 1 iron railwaychair, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of the Eastern Counties Railway Company.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM HOWES . On the 25th of Sept. I deposited twenty-five chairs against the Junction point—I believe the one now produced to be one of them.

DAVID MOORE . I am a policeman of the Eastern Counties Railway. On the 21st of Sept. I was returning from dinner, and saw two boys coming from

the railway—one of them, which was the prisoner, bad something in his possession—he ran along the side of the river, and hid it in the high grass—I secured him, and asked what he had been hiding—he said, "Nothing"—I found it was this bag, with an iron chair in it—the inspector at the station asked whose bag it was—he said it was his.

Prisoner. The other boy stole it.

GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined One Month.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2550

2550. CHARLES MOORE was indicted for stealing 1 box, value 6d.; 1 pair of scales, 4s.; and 2 brass weights, 8d.; the goods of Matthew Aylett.

LYDIA AYLETT . I am the wife of Matthew Aylett, and live in Marsh-street, Walthamstow. About four o'clock, on the 2nd of Oct. I was in the washhouse, at the back of my shop—the prisoner and another boy, named Laws, came in for some gingerbread—I served them—they went out again, and about half-past five they came in again for a brown cake—the box of scales and weights were in the till—I did not miss them till the policeman came to acquaint me of it—my husband saw the scales again at the station—I missed them—I am certain the prisoner was in the shop.

MATTHEW AYLETT . I left the scales in a little box in the till, at ten o'clock in the morning—I saw them afterwards at the station—they were my scales.

ROBERT SMITH . I was in the Plough, in Wood-street, Walthamstow—Laws came and offered the scales for sale—he said his father's name was Layford, and he had sent him to sell the scales for 1s.—I thought it was not right, and questioned him about it—he told me his name was Layford, and the boy Moore gave him the scales to sell—I took him and Moore.

JONATHAN LAWS . Moore and I went into the shop—Moore took out the scales, and put them into his pocket, and then I asked for the gingerbread—we went out, and put them in the hedge—we then went in again for a halfpenny cake—then Moore took the scales out of the hedge, put them into his pocket, and went home—he gave me them, and I took them to the public-house.

GUILTY .* Aged 13.— Confined Three Months.

KENT CASES.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18441021-2551

2551. JOSEPH JENKINS was indicted for stealing 1 pair of boots, value 10s., the goods of William Whitworth.

WILLIAM WHITWORTH . I am a gunner in the Royal Artillery at Woolwich. wich. On the 12th of Sept. I left a pair of boots in my barrack-room—I returned on Saturday and missed my boots, which were worth 10s.—other persons were quartered in the same room—the prisoner was one of them—the boots now produced are mine.

THOMAS M'GRAW . I live at Woolwich, and am waiter at the Three Daws, High-street. On the 13th of Sept. Alice Ambrose was in the house with the boots in her hand for sale—I bought them of her—the prisoner was not present.

WILLIAM GLADWIN (police-constable R 122.) I took the prisoner in charge.

ALICE AMBROSE being called on her recognizance, did not appear.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18441021-2552

2552. JOHN STROUD was indicted for stealing 1 cloak, value 6s., the goods of Harris Evans; and 3 planes, 5s.; the goods of William Barrington Brown.

CATHERINE JOHNSON . I live in High-street, Woolwich. The prisoner applied to me to go and pawn a cloak for him, which he gave me—it was about two months ago—I asked him whose it was—he said it belonged to the servant maid, living at the house at Shooter's-hill, where he worked; that she wanted a little money, and had not time to go out with it herself—I pledged it at Mr. Denny's, brought the money, 2s., and the ticket, and gave it to the prisoner—he then asked me to sell the ticket for him—I said I would try—I sold it to Mrs. Bull.

RACHEL BULL . I am the wife of Charles Bull. Johnson sold me the duplicate—I redeemed the cloak by that duplicate at Davis's in Crown-street.

WILLIAM BARRINGTON BROWN . I live at Shooter's-hill, in the parish of Plumstead. I occasionally employed the prisoner as a day servant—this cloak belongs to Harriet Evans, who resided with me on account of ill health—she wore it constantly—I have seen her wear it, and remember it being missed—the prisoner had access to the premises—I keep the house—I had no female servant.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal it; more people worked in the house besides me.

GUILTY of stealing the Cloak only. Aged 32.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined One Year.

(There were other indictments against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18441021-2553

2553. MICHAEL BROSNAHAN was indicted for stealing 1 half-crown, 1 shilling, and 3 halfpence, the monies of William Shelly, from his person.

WILLIAM SHELLY . I am a chimney-sweeper. On the 23rd of Aug. I laid down in Mr. Beard's yard, in Coppice-lane, Church-street, Deptford, and went to sleep. I awoke and missed half-a-crown, a shilling, and three half-pence, which were safe in my pocket when I first laid down—I went to the pump, where the workmen were, and said, "Who has got my money? you had better deliver it up, or I shall fetch a policeman"—I went out for a policeman, and the prisoner went out of the yard—we then had suspicion of him, as he went away from the pump.

THOMAS COOK . I employed the prisoner and others to empty a privy on 23rd of Aug.—when the prosecutor awoke he said he had lost his money, and charged all the men who were there with it, me among the rest—I told him to get a policeman, and have us all searched—when he came back the prisoner had left the yard, to get a flower, and we suspected he had got the money—I followed him, after the job was over, with another young man—I turned back and stopped in a summer-house for about an hour—the prisoner then came back, went down the yard, and took the money from under a piece of wood—he was looking about—I saw he had a half-crown and three half-pence—I said, "I wanted to find out the thief; I have been blamed for it myself"—he gave me the half-crown and three halfpence—I said, "Shelly lost more than this"—he said, "So help me God, this is all I took out of his pocket"—he asked me to have a drop of rum, and not say anything about it—I gave information to the police—he absconded, but was taken a few days after—I gave the money to Shelly—the prisoner bore a very good character.

JOHN EVANS (police-constable B 190.) I took the prisoner into custody on the 23rd of Aug.—I told him he was charged with stealing a half-crown, one shilling, and three half-pence—he denied it—I asked if his name was Brosnahan—he said no, his name was Lovitt—I took him to the station—he

said, "The truth is the best; so help me God, half-a-crown and three half-pence is all I took from Shelly."

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. — Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2554

2554. MARY ANN STOW was indicted for stealing 17 3/4 yards of printed cotton, value 7s. the goods of Charles Harris.

CHARLES HARRIS . I am a linen-draper, and live in Brunswick-place, Straitsmouth, Greenwich. I lost some print from my shop before the 3rd of Sept., and again on the 7th—I did not miss it till I saw it at Delaney's, the pawnbroker, three or four days after—it is worth 5s. or 6s.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. Have you any partner? A. No—I lost 17 3/4 yards of pink, but did not miss that—Watkins was the only person in my shop at that time—half a yard has been cut off the print to destroy the mark—I know it by these holes—I could swear to it when I saw it at the pawnbroker's—it had been cut off within two days of being stolen—I do not know the prisoner as a customer—I must have seen her if she came often—the print was in my possession the night before it was stolen, and next morning it was put at the door—I received information soon after that it was stolen.

GEORGE NORTH WATKINS . I am in the prosecutor's service. I missed a piece of lilac print from the door on Saturday, the 7th of Sept., about ten o'clock—I have seen it since—this is it—I know it by the pattern—I saw it safe ten minutes before I missed it—I had not sold it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you put your sales down in a book? A. No—it is a very common pattern.

MR. HARRIS. This lilac measures abou fourteen and a half yards—I lost fifteen yards.

HENRY REARDON . I am shopman to Mr. Delaney, a pawnbroker, at Greenwich. This piece of printed cotton was pawned on the 3rd of Sept. for 4s. by the prisoner—on the 7th she pawned a piece of lilac—I had her detained when she came to redeem the piece pawned on the 7th.

Cross-examined. Q. What time of day was the lilac pawned? A. I presume about the evening—the address on the duplicate is George-street.

BENJAMIN LOVELL (police-constable R 15.) I produce some duplicates, which I found in the back bed-room, No. 4, Brand-street, Greenwich, where the prisoner told me she lodged—one of them relates to this print.

PRISCILLA MILLER . My husband is a broker, and lives at No. 4, Brand-street. The prisoner occupied our front sitting-room and back bed-room—I was present when the officer found these duplicates in her bed-room.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known her? A. Since the 30th of July, when she took the apartments—her brother's wife always paid me—she is a dressmaker.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Reference Number: t18441021-2555

2555. MARY ANN STOW was again indicted for stealing 26 yards of linen cloth, value 1l. 10s.; and 22 yards of printed cashmere, 1l.; 16s.; the goods of John Lowe and another:— also, 28 yards of linen cloth, value 1l. 12s.; and 14 yards of silk, 21.; the goods of John Lowe and another:— also, 69 yards of calico, value 15s., the goods of William Henry Hardman; to all of which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined One Year.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2556

2556. JOSEPH TOMBLIN was indicted for unlawfully assaulting Henry Arnold, with intent to cut and wound him.—2nd COUNT, for a common assault.

HENRY ARNOLD . I am an excavator, and lodge at the Golden Fleece. On Monday, the 14th of Oct., I discharged the prisoner, and he said he would be my b—butcher before I was five hours older—he came the night after, as I was sitting down at my tea, caught up the poker as I was sitting with my back to the settle, struck one blow at me and missed me, and the second I defended off with my arm—the poker was taken away from him, and as he was going out of the house afterwards he said he would do for me before the night was over—he struck me on the arm with the poker, and the poker was buried about half an inch in the settle—he struck it with both his hands—if it had hit me, it would have knocked my brains out—he was perfectly sober.

WILLIAM SARNEY . I saw this—I have heard what Arnold has said—it is all true.

JOHN HALL . I saw the blow given by the prisoner—I have heard the prosecutor's statement—it is true.

Prisoner's Defence. I have worked very hard for the man, and came at his beck and call; I know nothing of the case.

GUILTY of a common Assault. Aged 32.— Confined Nine Months.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2557

2557. WILLIAM COPELAND was indicted for stealing 1 holland coat, value 6d.; 1 shawl, 12s. 6d.; 1 table-cloth, 1s. 6d. and 1 scarf, 1s.; the goods of William Nash; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2558

2558. MARIA SMITH was indicted for stealing 3 handkerchiefs, value 9s.; the goods of James Baker, her master.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Joseph Fenn.— Also, 8 napkins, 7s. 6d.; 3 shirts, 2s.; 2 bed-gowns, 4s.; and 2 blankets, 6s.; the goods of John Benjamin Burling; and that she had been before convicted of felony; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 46.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2559

2559. WILLIAM MELLIS was indicted for stealing 3 sovereigns and 1 half-sovereign, the money of Henry Edwin Jaggars.

MARY JAGGARS . I am the wife of Henry Edwin Jaggars. On the 18th of Oct. I was at the bar of my public-house, at Woolwich—I had some sovereigns and a half-sovereign on a shelf—I had occasion to leave the bar a short time, and when I returned I saw the prisoner going under the counter, where he had no business to be—I asked him what he wanted, and accused him of having taken the money—after that I took three sovereigns and one halfsovereign out of his hand—I sent for a file of the guards, and he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Can you say whether he was drunk or not? A. I cannot say—I cannot say that he had been drinking at our house that day—there was no one but me in the bar—he did not make any resistance—when I took him he stood still—I opened his hand, and took out the money—he has borne a very good character up to the present time—he has a wife and family.

JAMES PARRY (police-constable R 8.) I took the prisoner, and asked him how long he had been in the army—he said, "Eighteen years"—I said it was a pity—he said, "I do not know what possessed me, it was a sudden

temptation," or words to that effect—I said, "Had you been drinking?"—he said, "I was drunk"—I said, "You were not so when I took you"—he said, "No, the shock sobered me"—it was an hour and a half afterwards that I took him.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 38.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor. — Confined Three Days .

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2560

2560. GEORGE FAULKNER was indicted for assaulting Louisa Brown, with intent, &c.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2561

2561. CHARLES MAYHEW and HENRY HOPWOOD were indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 1s. the goods of Thomas Clement, from his person.

THOMAS CLEMENT . I live at Plumstead, in Kent—on the evening of the 18th of October, I was at Charlton fair, looking at some singers at a show—the officer came up, and called my attention—he said, "Young man, you have lost your handkerchief"—I said, "No"—he said, "Feel your pockets"—I did so, and said, "Yes, I have"—he showed roe a handkerchief, and said, "Is that your property?"—I said, "Yes, it is mine"—I had had it in my pocket five minutes before—I had not been in the fair above five minutes—I nutes—I then turned, and saw the two prisoners in a scuffle with another person and a policeman—this is the handkerchief—it is one I brought from India, and the one I had in my pocket.

WILLIAM GLADWIN (police-constable R 122.) I was on duty at the fair, and saw the two prisoners attempt several pockets—I then saw Mayhew go and put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take his handkerchief out—Hopwood was standing by him—he tried to pass the handkerchief to Hopwood, and I took hold of him—he dropped it on the ground—I told the prosecutor—a gentleman picked up the handkerchief—I found another handkerchief on them.

MAYHEW— GUILTY . Aged 19.

HOPWOOD— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2562

2562. ELLEN HART and EMMA WEST were indicted for stealing 30 yards of doeskin, value 4l., the goods of John Lowe and another; and that West had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN LOWE . I am a woollen-draper, and live in London-street, Greenwich—I am in partnership with Thomas Wilkinson Kershaw—about three o'clock, on the 30th of Sept., I had some cloth standing outside the door—I missed it about a quarter of an hour after—this is it.

West. When he was at the Mansion-house, he said he missed it from his door at half-past two. Witness. No—it was secured at the top and cut off.

JOHN FOREMAN . I am shopman to the prosecutor—about a quarter past three, on Monday, Sept. 30th, Mr. Lowe came and told me something—I went to the railway station, and was ordered to go to London; and, just at the moment the train was starting, the two prisoners came in with this piece of doeskin, in this black cloth, in their arms—I cannot say which of them had it—they went in the third class; and the train being about to start, I could not stop them—I watched that they did not get out—on arriving at London, they called a cab, and went in, taking this piece of cloth with them—I

could not see a policeman, and I followed them to Gracechurch-street—I there saw an officer, and gave them into custody.

WILLIAM EDMONDS (police-constable C 528.) I took the prisoners, and produce the doeskin.

Hart's Defence. I was coming up, a woman came and asked me to carry the bundle, and she would pay me for it; and I did; she said, "When you come out of the train, take a cab, and carry it down to Rosemary-lane."

West. It is true what Hart has said.

WILLIAM EDMONDS re-examined. They said, a woman gave it them to carry, and they were to meet her by Aldgate Pump, and if she was not there, to go on to Rosemary-lane.

EDWARD BURGESS (police-constable H 198.) I produce a certificate of West's former conviction, from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

HART— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

WEST— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

SURREY CASES.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18441021-2563

2563. RICHARD BANBURY, JAMES GILLARD , and JOHN GROVES , were indicted for stealing 1 sack, value 2s. 6d.; and 1 bushel of a mixture of oats and chaff; the goods of Ann Elizabeth Norton, the mistress of Banbury and Gillard.

RICHARD ROBERTS . I am clerk to Ann Elizabeth Norton, widow, of Knight's-place, Belmont-wharf, Battersea—she is a coal-merchant. The horses are kept on the premises, and their provision in a loft over the stable—the corn and chaff was mixed on the floor of the loft—rn consequence of suspicion I entertained, I introduced some small pieces of brown paper into a mixture of chaff and oats in the loft and gave information to a policeman—the prisoners Banbury and Gillard were in my mistress's employ, Banbury as horsekeeper, and Gillard as coal-porter—Groves works with a horse and cart, but we never employ him—I afterwards saw at the Wandsworth station a sack of oats and chaff mixed, with pieces of paper among them, which I believe to be the same—Alfred Brown, the policeman, produced it to me.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. Did you know Groves before? A. Yes, for some time—he bore the character of an honest, respectable man, as far as I knew.

ALFRED SPICE (police-constable V 4l.) In consequence of information, I watched the premises of Mrs. Norton, at Nine Elms, and between nine and ten o'clock at night, on the 3rd of Oct., I saw Banbury and Gillard standing near the entrance of the wharf—Groves came up and entered into conversation with them—Gillard left them, went into the premises, and returned with a sack, which I saw Groves receive, and walk away from the premises—I jumped over the fence, and secured him with it—Gillard stopped there till I returned, and I secured him—Banbury went to the stable—I sent another constable to secure him—Groves had entered into conversation with them before the sack was given to him—Banbury stood about two yards from Groves at the time he received the sack; Groves then walked off towards his own stable, where his horses were standing—I stopped him about twelve yards from the prosecutrix's—he begged me not to take him into custody—the mixture had pieces of paper in it.

Cross-examined. Q. The two men stood at the entrance of the wharf? A. Yes—it is not a private wharf, that I know of, but close to the road—there was only one person passing at the time—Groves said before the Magistrate that he was out of provender, it was too late to get it that night, and he borrowed this till morning, and the other prisoners said the same—the stables are 300 or 400 yards from the prosecutrix's premises—I have known Groves two years—he always bore the character of a respectable man.

ROBERT RATCLIFF (policeman) I took Banbury into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. It was night, was it not? A. Yes—the other prisoners were in custody first.

JURY to RICHARD ROBERTS. Q. Do you know whether there it any corndealers open in the immediate neighbourhood at this hour? A. There is one 700 or 800 yards off—they generally shut up about half-past nine o'clock, or a quarter to ten—another of our sacks was found on Groves's premises.

ROBERT RATCLIFF re-examined. I searched Groves's premises, and found no horse provender there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2564

2564. MARY HAGGERSTONE was indicted for stealing 1 brooch, value 1l. 5s. 3 yards of lace, 3s.; and 2 yards of silk fringe, 1d.; the goods of James Stapleton Collingbourne, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2565

2565. JOHN TYERMAN was indicted for stealing 1 purse, value 6d.; 3 sovereigns, 3 half-crowns, and 8 shillings; the property of Robert Johnson, in a vessel on the navigable river Thames.

WILLIAM M'LAREN . I belong to the brig Alexander, which was lying in the Thames, at Mill-hole. On the night of the 22nd of Sept. I was in bed in the forecastle—I heard the prisoner come down the forecastle, and heard him at one of the chests—he sat there a while—I laid awake, and heard him—he went to go up out of the forecastle—I asked where he was going—he said, "On deck"—I asked him a second time, and he said, "To make water"—I asked what he was doing at the chest—he went up the ladder, and ran along the deck—I followed, and he jumped overboard to the next ship—I lost sight of him there for a good bit—the people were all aroused out of bed on the other ships, and they found him under the heel of the howsprit—they put him out of there, and I said, "You have robbed Robert Johnson, give him the money"—he said, "Do you want to rob me"—I said I only wanted some of the money—he delivered up the money into the man's own hands.

ROBERT JOHNSON . I belong to the Alexander. My chest was in the forecastle. On the 22nd of Sept., when I went to bed, I know I had three sovereigns in it, and nearly 12. in silver—the prisoner was ashore when I went to bed—I was aroused up in the night, and went on deck to look after him, and when I came below again the money was gone—I demanded the money back of him—he delivered me my purse—it contained three sovereigns, three half-crowns, and eight shillings.

JOSEPH TRICKEY (Thames police-constable, No. 53.) I heard an alarm given on board the brig Alexander—I saw the prosecutor on deck—he delivered me this purse—when I charged the prisoner with it he said he had given the man back his money, he did not intend to rob him, or he had not robbed him—the vessel was lying in the second tier, Mill-hole, in the navigable part of the Thames.

Prisoner. He was not on board when I gave the man his money back.

ROBERT JOHNSON re-examined. The prisoner was a seaman on board the

ship—she was going to sea next day—he had been about a fortnight in the ship.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18441021-2566

2566. JOHN GEORGE PRESTAGE, alias Bracebridge , was indicted for bigamy.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

ANN COOPER . I am the wife of Daniel Cooper; he lives at Warwick. The prisoner is my cousin—I remember his being married, in 1836, at the parish church of Bishops Statchbrook, in that county, to Letitia Blackmore—I was present, and was a subscribing witness to the register—my maiden name was Ann Shellard—I saw his first wife alive yesterday—I cannot say how long they lived together—they have been together ever since, on and off—she had been a servant, and so had he—I do not know of his being in service at the Queen's Hotel, at Birmingham—I visited them after their marriage—they lived at Warwick at first—they went to Leamington—I lived in service at Warwick—the prisoner was married in the name of Bracebridge.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. A. Did you know anything of them for twelve months before the last marriage? A. No—I have seen them, but never together.

WILLIAM BARRELL . I am employed as a law-stationer, and live in Albany-road, Camberwell. I first saw the prisoner about three months ago—he lived next door to me—a cousin of my wife, named Mary Ann Banks, was employed at the Queen's Hotel, belonging to the Birmingham terminus, at Birmingham—she was engaged there as a needle-woman—the prisoner came up, about three months ago, and lived next door to me—I then saw Miss Banks—they came up together by coach—she lived with me till they were married, which was about three weeks after their arrival in town—the banns were put up in the course of a day or two after they arrived—I was present at the marriage—it was in the district church of St. George, Camberwell—I was attesting witness to the register—I produce an examined copy of the register of the parish of Bishops Statchbrook—I examined it with the other witness, and compared it with the original—it is a correct extract from the book—I saw the register at the vicarage-house—the parish clerk was present, and the other witness to the first marriage—(the copy of the register was here read)—they continued to live together after their marriage—they left my house, and went into lodgings—I saw them afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Is not the second wife here? A. Not that I am aware of—I have not seen her since the day that she went to the station to give him into custody—she went by herself first, and with me afterwards—I did not see her go by herself—my solicitor instructs Mr. Doane to conduct this prosecution—I represent the second wife—she has not authorised me to conduct the prosecution—the first wife was willing to prosecute—she secute—she has been before the Magistrate—I am not aware that she is paying the expences.

MR. DOANE. Q. Did the second wife accompany you, and make a charge against this man? A. She did at the station.

DENNIS DONOVAN (police-constable L 77.) I produce an examined copy of the register of St. George's, Camberwell—I examined it—it is a correct copy—(this was dated the 22nd of July, and described the prisoner as John George Prestage, bachelor)—on the 4th of Oct. I was on duty in the New Cut, Lambeth, and took the prisoner into custody for an assault—I took him to the station—my sergeant was there on duty, and when he came in he said, "You

are the man we want for bigamy"—he said, "I am glad it has come to light."

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined One Year.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18441021-2567

2567. MATTHEW SMITH, THOMAS HALL, JOHN HUMPHREYS , and DANIEL CARROLL , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Booth, putting him in fear, and stealing from his person 1 watch, value 2l.; 2 seals, 5s.; 1 watch-chain, 5s.; and 3 shillings; his property; and immediately before, at the time, and after the said robbery, beating, striking, and using other personal violence to him.

ROBERT BOOTH . I am agent to Clark and Wells, coal-merchants, Bank-side—I live in Kennington-lane, St. Mary, Lambeth. On Saturday the 14th of Sept., about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the Kent-road—the prisoner Smith came up to me, got hold of my arm, and walked a little way up New-street with me—I had but a glass or two of beer in the course of the day, at one place or another—I was not tipsy, nor had I been drinking freely—I knew what I was doing—when he took me by the arm he said, "Where are you going?"—I said, "To Mr. Billing's," and asked him to go about his business—he said he was going my way, and just as I got to Davis' back-door, in New-street, New Kent-road, several others came up, rushed round me, knocked me down, and knocked my head about so that I did not know where I was—they put a stick between my legs, and threw me down—I lost my watch, two seals, and a chain, and about 3s. in silver from my pocket—I had counted my money about an hour before—they put their hands over my mouth—I said, "Don't take my watch"—they directly snapped my watch-guard, and downed me, and cut off my fob, took my watch, fob and all—I felt the watch go—I was much hurt—I was not well for two or three days—I did not know where I was, they knocked my head about and stunned me so—how I got home I cannot tell—I did not recover for two or three days—I recovered my senses three or four days after—I was insensible for three days, and my head is bad now.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Was not your head hurt much more from what you had taken, than what happened? A. No—I was not drunk—I had called on different customers I had to attend to—I had some beer in the Borough—I had not been with any women—I might have had half a dozen glasses of beer in the course of the day—I had no wine—I will not swear I did not have a drop of spirits, but I believe not—I do not know Mrs. Ledger, of New-street—I lived in New-st. for about eighteen years, previous to going to Kennington—it was Tuesday before I found I was at home—they had put me to bed, but I do not recollect it, my head was so bad—I had no doctor—I do not know whether I had any dinner, tea, or supper, the next day—I missed my watch when I came to my senses about Tuesday, but I had felt them take it.

Cross-examined by MR. SIMON. Q. Where were you going? A. To Mr. Billing, a green-grocer, on business—I went out first about half-past eight o'clock in the morning—I do not treat people I call on—I had been into three or four public-houses that day—I had a pint of half-and-half with one Snelling—I dined at home—I was able to walk straight—I always lurch about—I cannot help it—I was not drunk—when Smith came up he did not say, "You are not walking straight"—he said he knew me, and forced his conversation on me—he did not say, "You are lurching about, why don't you walk straight?"—I had seen him before—he used to come to my shop when I kept one—he lived in the neighbourhood somewhere—I do not know where—one of them put a stick between my legs, and threw me down—I did

not fall from tipsincss—I could feel the stick between my legs—my head is not right now—I was not talking for some time to a prostitute—I might have spoken to a customer—I cannot recollect speaking to a woman that evening—I will not swear about it—I did not stop and talk with a common prostitute, not to know it—they knocked my head about so that I forget almost everything.

COURT. Q. Did you know any of the other persons about you? A. I knew them all by sight at Union-hall, but not at the time I was knocked down, except Smith.

MR. SIMON. Q. When did you first say Smith was the person who came up to speak to you? A. At the station—I gave information about this I suppose a fortnight or three weeks after, I was not able to go to the police for two or three days—I could hardly get out of my bed.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am between eleven and twelve years of age, and live with my father, in New-street, New Kent-road. On the night of the 14th of Sept., I was in New-street, playing, and saw Smith and Humphreys, one they call Hall, Forrester, and Hardiman—I did not see Carroll—Forrester had a walking-stick in his hand—I saw him put it between the prosecutor's legs, and throw him down—I could not tell what they did then—they got round him—I heard him call out, "Don't take my watch, don't take my watch!"—Mrs. Kelly came out of her house with a light—the prosecutor had some blood on his face, and she washed his face—when he was walking about there be nearly tumbled down again, and appeared hurt.

Cross-examined by MR. SIMON. Q. How long bad you seen him before he was thrown down? A. About five minutes—he was walking on—he appeared as if he had been drinking—he had not taken much—he staggered a little—I saw him before he was knocked down—they led him out of the Old Kent-road—he did not stagger then, but when Smith had hold of his arm, and was leading him, then he was not trying to keep him up—they were leading him down the place to get his things away—I have not been speaking to-day with any of the parties connected with the prosecution—they have not spoken to me as to what I should say—this was about the middle of New-street—there were several people about besides the prosecutor and prisoners—there was Mrs. Manning came down to see how they got on—the witness, Jane Ledger, was there—there was no one else in the street—a little girl was playing with me, but she had gone in for a light, and I was waiting for her—when the prosecutor fell, there was a great deal of confusion—there were not a great many people stopping to see what was going on—about four—there was, no one besides the parties I have named—I saw a little blood come out of ihe prosecutor's mouth.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What is your father? A. A pipe maker—I go to a Sunday-school, and to church—Mrs. Kelly lives at No. 12, New-street—it is not ten minutes' walk from the Elephant and Castle, about three turnings past it—this was about eight o'clock—therte are shops in New-street—I had seen Hall before—he used to live down a street opposite me—I did not see him do anything particular—they were all round the prosecutor—Mrs. Manning wiped his face—Mrs. Manning had hold of the water, and Mrs. Kelly washed his face—they both washed his face—I have had no quarrel with any of these people, nor has my father—I told Mrs. Kelly that I had seen Forrester put the stick between the prosecutor's legs, and I told my father—I went before the Magistrate, about three weeks after—nobody took Booth home—he went home by himself, without anybody to help him—he nearly struck his head against the cart—he staggered about—I do not know what Mrs. Ledger is—she lives next door but one to us.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Did you see the prosecutor's trowsers

before anybody came about him, except Smith? A. Yes, his front was not down, nor did they hang about him—I was at play with a little girl who lives up the street, running round the cart, at whoop; but when I saw these persons, she had gone in, and I was waiting—I first saw Smith leading the prosecutor down, and the others were following close behind him—they were all together—I was standing by the cart—they passed me—I saw Smith and Booth first by the chandler's shop, about twenty yards before they came up—the others were close behind him—this happened about ten yards from the cart, further on—they could see me—I know Humphreys—he is the son of a respectable painter and glazier, living close by, and lives with his father.

COURT Q. Does he work for his father? A. No—he does not work at all—they came out of the Old Kent-road into New-street—directly they saw him they ran across to him, and led him down the street to a dark place, and there he was tripped up—Smith walked faster than he did—he was pulling him along, and making him walk quick too.

JANE LEDGER . I live at No. 10, New-street. On the 14th of Sept. I saw Mr. Booth pass by—Smith had hold of his right arm, Hall was next, and Carroll was, it may be, three yards behind—I stood at the street-door—there were others with them—they went to a dead wall—there are two doors besides the dead wall from our house, and it was too dark for me to see what they did there from where I stood—I did not see him surrounded, only as they passed my street-door and went to the dead wall—I only heard Smith say, "You are down now, and we shall not get you up again, we shall never get you home to-night"—I knew Booth before, when be kept a shop in Lyon-street, and I knew Smith, Carroll, and Hall, before by sight.

Cross-examined by MR. SIMON. Q. How long had you seen Booth before they got out of sight? A. It might be five minutes—I did not see him stagger—they were holding him up—I stood at the street-door, and there was a light from the shop-window—I was two doors from the cart—I lodge with Isabella Rattray, in New-street—I have been doing for her, as she is laid up—she is a married woman—it is a two-roomed house—she does not let it out to lodgers—people are not in the habit of coming there and remaining for a short time—I have got my living for the last three weeks by doing for her—I have not got my living in the streets lately—I have been an unfortunate girl—I have never stated that I saw nothing of this matter—I do not know Franklin, a butcher—I never said that I knew nothing about it, only what my landlord told me—it was me that told my landlord—I never said that I would go out of the way for 20s.—they offered me money to go out of the way, and as late as last night they threatened my life—the butcher's brother came to me, with another man, last week, and asked me to take the money and go out of the way—they proposed to buy me a new pair of shoes, a gown, a bonnet, and shawl, if I would go, and to find me a situation at 1s. a-week, and I was to go a long way off with his mother till the trial was over, and then come and live with her at 1s. a-week—since that they have threatened my life, so that I am afraid to go outside the street-door after dark on an errand or anything—I was standing at the street-door—I believe it is a street where girls stand at the doors—it was a starlight night—the stars were just coming out—I did not see very many people about—I do not owe Booth anything, nor does my landlady—I have not seen him about occasionally intoxicated—he did not appear intoxicated that night, and did not stagger, that I saw—they were not walking very slow nor very fast—there was no pulling him along.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where did you live when you knew Booth? A. At No. 4, opposite his house—he never came to see me there—I never had anything to do with him—he did not see me on this night—he

did not come to my place that night—I do not think I had seen him from the time he left his shop, which was soon after last Christmas—I am sure I had not spoken to him—I did not give any alarm when they said, "We shall not get you home"—I did not hear anything wrong then.

COURT. Q. Did it appear to you they were leading a drunken man home? A. No—I did not perceive that he was drunk.

WILLIAM MARTIN (policeman.) I apprehended Smith and Humphreys on the 4th of Oct., and Hall on the 5th—I told them I wanted them for assaulting and robbing Robert Booth of a watch on the 14th of last month—they all totally denied the charge, and said they knew nothing of it whatever.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where did you take Hall? A. I do not recollect the name of the street—we had a run for him—I first saw him in Gun-street—there were a great quantity of thieves and associates of thieves in the public-house I saw him in—I told him I wanted to speak to him—as soon as I told him the charge he ran away as fast as he could—two other constables stopped him, and he kicked one very much—I mentioned that to the Magistrate, but it was not taken down.

MR. SIMON to JANE LEDGER. Q. Did you see Mrs. Manning there? A. No, I did not—she lives at No. 21, on the other side of the road, below where the prosecutor was knocked down—I do not know that she has been attending here with the witnesses for the prosecution—I saw her about half an hour ago—Mrs. Kelly was told at Union-hall she was not wanted.

Witnesses for the Defence.

SARAH MANNING . I am married. On Saturday night, the 14th of Sept., I saw Booth on the opposite side to where I live—I knew him—I saw him move in the gutter—I was on my street-door mat—I went out to him—I asked a person to bring me a light—a little boy brought me one—he was lying on the right side of his head, and I rolled him—his clothes were hanging about him in a very improper manner—his fob was torn off—he was all unbuttoned—he appeared to be quite in liquor—I have no doubt about that—he did not know me—I asked him, and he did not make me any reply—there was no violence on him—I washed his face, I thought he was another gentleman, who was subject to fits—there was gravel on his face—I saw his mouth, there was no blood on it—the witness Jackson is the boy who brought me the candle—I did not see Ledger—one of the neighbours gave me a quart of water to wash his face—a female brought it—a gentleman named Middleton, over my head, helped me up with him—he is not here—he then went away—I left him about twenty yards from where he was lying—he was very much in liquor—he went away staggering down New-street.

COURT. Q. He did not appear to understand what you said to him at first? A. No, he did not—he smelt very much of liquor—I did not notice him before he was down—his clothes were very much disordered and torn open—I did not see his fob—he was lying in a very improper manner, with his smallolothes down—I did not take that particular notice, to see whether his fob was torn off—I led him twenty yards—he staggered very much—I then left him, and he went away—Tasked him if he knew where he was—he said it was all right—he did not say where he was—I did not see any violence on him—there was no blood—I did not examine his head—I had his face washing a few minutes—I was not applied to to come here as a witness until to-day—I was asked to come up—one of the neighbours said I ought to come up to speak—several neighbours told me, Mr. Middleton was one—I do not know why he did not come himself—I did not know any of these parties before, nor any of their friends—I do not know where they live, anything of them—Middleton said I ought to come, to speak the

truth—the attorney in the case spoke to me this morning—I do not know his name—he spoke to me in my own place—it was he that came for me—I do not know how he was aware that I knew anything of the matter.

MR. HORRY. Q. When did you see the attorney's clerk first? A. This morning—I said nothing to the prosecutor about what he had lost.

MR. SIMON. Q. How far from your door was he lying? A. Four or five yards—my house is four or five yards from the dead wall where he was lying—I heard no disturbance at all—I was in-doors, ironing—I came out to clean my flat-iron on the street-door mat, and saw the man rolling in the gutter—it was over before I came out—he did not appear able to talk—he did not talk to me—he just said, "It is all right."

WILLIAM MARTIN re-examined. I beg to state this witness has told me since the occurrence, that it was a most shameful thing for the old man to be knocked about in this manner, and that he was used most shamefully.

SARAH MANNING re-examined. I did not state that to Martin—I swear it—I have had no conversation with him at all—he came to me, and asked if I knew anything about it, and I happened to tell him the truth—I did not tell him the man was most shamefully used, nor any words to that effect.

WILLIAM MARTIN re-examined. She said it was a most shameful thing the man should be treated in the manner he was, and very proper they should be taken, but she hoped she should not be a witness in the case.

SARAH MANNING re-examined. It is false—I did not say that, nor any part of it.

MR. SIMON to WILLIAM MARTIN. Q. Did you go to her to inquire what she knew of the matter? A. I did; and she told me the words I have made use of—she said, he was down in the gutter, that his pockets were cut off, that he was used in a most shameful manner, and she washed his face—she did not say she had not seen the transaction—she did not tell me that he said, it was all right; and that Middleton had gone out and helped him—I do not know a man named Middleton in the house.

MR. HORRY. Q. How was it you never mentioned this to anybody before? You were sent there to inquire of her—A. I was not sent—I went there because I heard she knew something about it—I did not have her as a witness, because I understood she did not see the transaction; merely went up afterwards.

COURT. Q. She told you she did not see the transaction? A. Yes—she described his condition as that of a man who had recently received violence, and that his pockets were cut off.

(—Humphreys, the prisoner's father, gave him a good character; but admitted he had been in custody before, on two occasions; James Adlard, butcher, Whitechapel-road; and Henry Brooks, butcher, Henry-street, Hampstead-road, gave Hall a good character.)

SMITH— GUILTY . Aged 25.*

HALL— GUILTY . Aged 21.*

HUMPHREYS— GUILTY . Aged 20.*

CARROLL— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fifteen Years.

Before Mr. Baron Rolfe.

Reference Number: t18441021-2568

2568. WILLIAM WATTS was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Michael Manning.

OWEN COILEY . I am a tanner, and live in Turner's-place, Bermondsey. On Friday night, Sept. 20th, between seven and eight o'clock, I was standing at the passage near my house, and saw a wagon with two horses standing in the street near me—the little boy, Michael Manning, and a good many children, were playing about the wagon—there were about ten or twelve of them—some

were going up the hind part of the wagon, and fiddling and playing with the spokes—the prisoner, who was the driver of the wagon, was at that time inside a public-house, close by—he came out, spoke to his horses, and made a little motion with his whip, and started off his horses—they went on—a great number cf children were at that time playing about the wagon, and some of them were on the hind parts of the wagon, and handling the spokes and the wheels, and all round it, playing with one another—some were from five to sixteen years of age—the deceased was at that time standing between the fore and hind wheels, and I saw the hind wheel go right over his head—the witness Brennan called out, "Michael Manning is killed; Michael Manning is killed"—I went over, and found the child in Brennan's hands—I left it to him, and went after the prisoner—he went off a little distance with the horses, and then stopped—I came up to him, and said, "Do you not know that you have killed a child?"—he said, "No—I did not do it"—I said, "Yes, you did"—he said, "Well, if I did, I could not help it"—I said, "Could you not have cleared the children off before you started the wagon, at the time you came out of the public-house?"—he said, "That was not my business "—I and another man followed him a good way, till we met a policeman, and gave him in charge—he could easily have cleared away the children before he started, if he had had the sense of doing it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you see John Hill, or any boy there, who was with the prisoner, taking charge of the wagon? A. No—I was about half-an-hour at my door—two boys of my own were about the wagon, and I came down to turn them away from it—the prisoner was not at the leading horse's head when he moved the wagon on—he only came out of the public-house door, spoke to the horses, and made a motion with his whip—he was coming towards the leading horse when he spoke to the horses—the deceased was between the hind and fore wheels—it was not dark—there was plenty of light—it was past seven—I cannot tell how near it was to eight—I stated to the Magistrate the conversation I had with the prisoner, as well as I could, and I think in the lame words I have stated to-day—my deposition was read over to me after it was taken down—I stated it, whether it was put down or not.

JOHN BRENNAN . I am turned fifteen years of age—I saw about nine or ten children playing about the wagon on this evening—Michael Manning was one of them—the wagon was standing—I do not know whether any one was standing with the horses—I did not see anybody—I did not see the prisoner there—I saw him afterwards, when we were going with the child to the hospital, but not before the accident—I saw the child after the wagon had gone over it, lying on the ground—I know it was Michael Manning.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was it, as well as you recollect? A. Just dusk, about seven o'clock—I cannot tell how much after—I was at the inquest about this.

MICHAEL COILEY . I was looking through the window on the evening in question, and saw the wagon standing still—I afterwards saw it move on, and as soon as it moved on I saw Michael Manning lay on the ground, motionless—I heard somebody exclaim, "He is dead"—I ran down stairs, ran after the prisoner, and said he had run over a child—he said, "Well, I could not help itit"—I saw the child afterwards—he was quite dead.

JUSTIN M'CARTHY (police-constable M 131.) I took the prisoner into custody about a quarter of an hour after the accident—he was sober, and seemed to regret what had occurred—he said he could not help it—that he regretted it.

MR. CLARKSON called

JOHN HILL . I am fifteen years old, and am in the employ of Mr. Morgan

a cheese-factor, in George-yard, Snow-hill. The prisoner was in the same employ—I was his mate—on the night in question I had been with him in my master's wagon, from the Birmingham Railway warehouses at Camden-town, with goods to Mr. Smith, a tanner, in Orange-road, Bennondsey—on our return, after unloading the wagon, about eight o'clock, we came to the corner of a street where the Horns public-house is—we stopped there—the prisoner went into the public-house, and I remained with the horses—he came speedily out, with a pint of beer in his hand—there were some boys playing about the wagon, some getting under it, and some into it—the prisoner more than once or twice drove away the children—I saw him do it two or three times—after having done so he went to the leading horse—(I was standing by the shaft)—he could not see from there whether there was any child between the two wheels—it was dusk at the time—he moved on the leading horse with his whip, and immediately after there was a cry that a child was killed, and in a very few minutes the prisoner was taken into custody—I went home to my master's, to tell him what had happened.

COURT. Q. Did he go in and out the public house once or twice, or only once? A. Once—he took the pot in again—he remained in there about five minutes—it was when he came out the last time that he moved the children away from the wagon.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Maule.

Reference Number: t18441021-2569

2569. GEORGE WESTON, alias John White , and JOHN COOPER, alias Timberlake , were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of Aug., at Lambeth, 6 spoons, value 25s.; 2 brooches, 20s.; 2 rings, 15s.; 2 eardrops, 2s.; 1 cross, 4s.; 1 locket, 2s.; 1 purse, 1s.; 12 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign; the property of Edward Brundell, in his dwelling-house; and GEORGE JACKSON, alias Edward Contensen , for feloniously receiving 1 ring, part of the said goods, well knowing it to have been stolen; and that Weston had been before convicted of felony.

MR. SIMON conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLOTTE BRUNDELL . I am the wife of Edward Brundell, and, live at No. 24, Agnes-street, Waterloo-road, Lambeth. My husband is in the employ of Mr. Patrick, a builder, in Belvedere-road, Lambeth, and has been so about ten or eleven months—on the 27th of Aug. last I was about a fortnight and two or three days after my confinement—Mrs. Cooper, my nurse, had not left me—between two and three o'clock that day a knock came to the street-door—the nurse answered it, and in consequence of a communication from her, I told her to ask the persons down stairs—the prisoner Weston came down into the kitchen, and said, "Are you aware where your husband is?"—I said I hoped he was at his work—he said no, he was not at his work, he was taken from his work into custody, concerning something that had been lost from Mr. Patrick's, his employer—he took a paper out of his pocket, with two large seals on it, and a deal of writing—he handed it to me—I did not take it into my hand—I was in such a fright I could not read it—he folded it up and put it into his pocket again—we went up stairs after that, into the lodger's room—he requested me to go—he looked round, and asked for the keys of the boxes—I said I had not the keys of the boxes—he said he was a police-officer in private clothes, that he had come in private clothes as he did not wish to frighten me, as I was in such ill health—as I was going up stairs I noticed Coopre standing at the door—he had his hand on the latch, and his foot against the door—Weston told me that he was a person from the employ

of Mr. Patrick, one of the firm—we went into two rooms up stairs—the boxes were locked—he said, "It is very strange, very strange indeed; what part of the house do you hold?"—I said, "Only the lower part, we let all the other part out"—we went down stairs again into the kitchen—as I went down I noticed Cooper still at the door, in the same position as when we had left him—we went down stairs into the bed-room, and he wished to see what papers and property I had—I opened a drawer—it contained only clothes—we opened another—there were only a few odds and ends—he took nothing from there—the next drawer was locked—he requested the key—I asked the nurse to bring them to me, which she did—I unlocked the drawer, and there was a little cash-box in there—he took it out—I told him there were no papers in there concerning Mr. Patrick, the money which was in the box we had put by to pay the rent and taxes—he desired me to unlock the box—I did so, and he took the money out of the box—it was in a green silk purse—there was twelve sovereigns and a half in it—he put it on the end of the drawers—he wished to know if I had any papers or property anywhere—I told him I had some papers in the cupboard—I took them out—he took them off the file, and laid them with the money—he said it was very strange, he did not know what to do; he could not find the property belonging to Mr. Patrick; he must write a letter for me to take to the station-house—he had a sheet of paper, which the nurse gave him out of the drawer—he turned on to the dresser in the front kitchen, and scribbled something on the paper, which I thought was a letter—he asked the nurse for a candle, and while she was getting it, he said, "Are you certain that you have no more property anywhere, jewellery, or anything concealed?"—I said, "I have a little box of jewellery, but nothing of consequence"—the nurse went and fetched it out of the bed-room, out of a little drawer—on that being brought, he said, "You ought to have brought this out before; did not I ask you for all your property? "—that box contained two brooches, a pair of coral drops, a little cross, a silver locket, and two wedding-rings—the box was placed in the end of the drawers, with the money—Weston also took half a dozen silver teaspoons out of my workbox in the front kitchen—it was open—I then prepared to go to the station-house—he sealed the letter with his own seal, which he took out of his pocket—when I was ready, I told him I did not think I was able to go to the station-house, the baby was crying—he said, "Don't be in a hurry, you can suckle the baby first"—I was in such a fright I could not, and I went up-stairs—he said, "The young man that is in the employ of Mr. Patrick will allow you to take his arm"—he called Cooper down, and whispered something to him—he was up at the street-door at the time—what Weston said to me was not in his hearing—he called him down directly after—I was then in the front kitchen, putting my boots on—I did not see him come down—as I was going up-stairs I came back again, and said to Weston, "I leave everything in your care"—he said, "They shall be all safe; you shall have everything returned to you quite safe"—I then went out with Cooper—we went up Agnes-street, and turned round Vine-street, by the Hero of Waterloo public-house—Vine-street runs along by the side of the Hero of Waterloo—the Waterloo-road faces the street—as we came near the Hero of Waterloo, Cooper said he was going in there for an officer, and we three would go down to the station-house together—I waited for him about three or four minutes, and felt so faint I hardly knew how to stand—I had not been out of the house before—finding he did not return, I went into the Hero of Waterloo and looked round—I could not see anything of him—I came out again, and stood in the Waterloo-road two or three minutes, considering what I should do, go to the station-house or return home—I felt so ill I returned home, and as I was going

along I thought to myself they were thieves—I went home as fast as I could, but I was very ill, and could not go very fast—I found the street-door open—I ran down-stairs, and asked my nurse if the man was in the house that I had left there—she said, "I don't know; he was here just this minute, walking in the passage"—I went into the bed-room—Weston was gone, and all the property I have mentioned, purse and everything—the bed-room is the back-kitchen—I gave the letter to Mrs. Courtney, who occupies the parlours, to take to the station-house—I never saw Jackson during any part of this transaction—he had lodged in the same house in which we had apartments, at No. 43, Agnes-street—I know him very well, and his father also—his mother nursed me with my second child—I have had three, but my first died—I saw Jackson the night Cooper was taken to the station, which was on the Monday after the robbery—he was standing in the yard—he was in custody with Cooper—Mrs. Courtney gave him in charge—he had a weddingring on his finger—Sergeant Langley tried to get it off, but did not.

Cross-examined by MR. BALDWIN. Q. The first time you saw Cooper was after Weston had come in, and represented himself to you as being a policeman in private clothes? A. Yes, he did not come into the kitchen—he came down to the bottom of the stairs—he might see into the passage, and into the front kitchen—I do not know that he saw the money and other articles where Weston had placed them.

Jackson. Q. What did you say when you came to the station-house, and saw me there, and was asked if you knew me? A. I said I did not know you—you had your hat on, and put on such a long face, and looked so different in appearance, that I did not know you, but the moment I saw you again at Union-hall with your hat off, I knew you directly—when the policeman asked me if the ring on your finger was mine, I said I could not tell unless I saw it off your finger—the two rings had been worn together—I did not swear to it on your finger—I said if it were taken off I should know whether it was mine or no—I have every reason to believe you have been the ringleader of them.

SARAH COOPER . I live at Lewisham. I was Mrs. Brundell's nurse during her late confinement—on the 27th of Aug. last, between two and three o'clock in the day, nearly three o'clock, a knock came at the door—I answered it, and Weston and Cooper were there—they wished to speak to Mrs. Brundell—Weston spoke—I said I did not know that he could speak to her, but I would go and ask her—he said he must speak to her, for he had some very particular business—I went to ask her if she could speak to them, and they walked in after me, and shut the door after them—I spoke to Mrs. Brundell, and before I bad time to return Weston followed me down stairs into the front kitchen, to Mrs. Brundell—she was not keeping her bed, but sitting in the front kitchen, which was the sitting-room—I neard him say to Mrs. Brundell that he was come on very particular business—I went into the back kitchen on hearing that—I afterwards came into the front kitchen, and asked Mrs. Brundell what was the matter—she said she could hardly tell me what was the matter—Weston was there then—they went up stairs—I did not go up stairs with them—when they came down again they went into the back kitchen—I did not go in whilst they were there—I heard the money jink, but I did not know what the meaning of it was—when they came out of the bed-room, Weaton asked for a sheet of paper to write a letter—I gave him paper, pen, and ink, sealing-wax, and a candle—he wrote the letter, and sealed it—he got the seal from his waistcoat-pocket—I heard him ask about writings and other property—Mrs. Brundell said she had but very little of jewellery, or anything of that—he said why had she not told him what she had before, for everything must be brought to court—she told me to get the keys, and go and get the jewellery, which I did, and gave it to Weston—he gave it me back again—I went and put it on the corner of the drawers, with the money and other articles—he gave the letter to Mrs. Brundell—he then wanted to know if there were any more writings anywhere, and Mrs. Brundell recollected she had a few old letters in her work-box—she gave me the keys to unlock her work-box to get them out—there was half a dozen silver tea-spoons in the box—he gave them to me to take to the drawers and put with the other things—Mrs. Brundell then put on her things to go to the station—he asked her about going to the station with this letter—I said she was not able to go by herself, without somebody to assist her, and he said his friend, the gentleman who was up stairs, would assist her there—I asked if he would allow her to take hold of the gentleman's arm—he said, O yes, for he had come from the firm where her husband was at work, and he would assist her there—he called to the other party to come down—I did not hear what name he called, or what he said—he whispered something on the stairs—I think when he called him, he said, "Here," but I will not be sure what it was—Mrs. Brundell and Cooper then went off to go to the station—Weston did not remain in the kitchen many minutes after they were gone—he went into the bed-room—I had occasion to go out into the yard, and saw him picking up the money, and putting it into a green purse—he put it into his pocket—the silver spoons he put into his coat pocket, and the box of jewellery in his waistcoat—he afterwards came into the room where I was and sat down on the table—the eldest child was crying, and he talked to it, and tried to pacify it—he gave it a halfpenny, and said, "Do not cry, your mother will soon be back again"—he had not been there long when Mrs. Courtney came down into the kitchen, and he went out into the passage, but he walked as many as three times along the little passage, between the kitchen and staircase, before he went up stairs. I do not know what became of him afterwards—he was gone when Mrs. Brundell returned.

Cross-examined by MR. BALDWIN. Q. When Cooper came down and spoke to Weston, whereabouts where they standing? A. Weston was against the kitchen door, and Cooper just in the passage—they whispered, so that I could not bear what they said.

JANE COURTNEY . I am married, and lodge in Mrs. Brundell's house. On the 27th of Aug. I recollect a knock coming to the door about two o'clock, and Weston coming down stairs—I noticed Cooper at the door—I occupy the two parlours adjoining the passage—my doors were both closed—I was in the kitchen—I passed up stairs when Weston came down—I went up and saw Cooper at the street door—I had a good opportunity of seeing him—I was with him the whole of the time—I spoke to him—all I said to him at the door was, "It is a fine morning"—he answered very shortly, "Yes, it is"—I had occasion to go into my parlour, and he followed me—I asked him what was the matter; I hoped there was nothing the matter—he said he did not know, he hoped there was not—I locked my door, and still kept walking to and fro in the passage—he went out of the parlour, and went to the street door again—he stood inside the door, in the passage—he said nothing more to me—after that, as I was walking to and fro in the passage, I heard a sound of gold, and I went to the edge of the kitchen stairs—when I had stood there about half a minute, Cooper came and took me by the shoulder, and put me on one side the passage, to prevent me from listening—he perceived that I was listening—he did not say a word—he then went back to the street door—about a minute after that Weston came to the bottom of the kitchen stairs and said, "Will you step down, Sir, if you please"—Cooper stepped down three stairs, and he said, "The door, the door," three times—Weston said, "I have got all there is; you must take that to Mr. Patrick, and make the best of it"—he said after that, that the letter he was going to seal he would give to the lady, and he (Cooper) was to go with her to the station—Cooper came up again after that, and stood at the street door—I saw Mrs. Brundell come up and go away with Cooper—I afterwards went down into the kitchen to inquire what was the matter—I saw Weston, but did not speak to him—I was there when Mrs. Brundell returned—she gave me a letter, which I gave to the inspector at the station—I do not know his name—I have not seen him here to-day.

Cross-examined by MR. BALDWIN. Q. Did Weston say this to Cooper loudly? A. Yes, so that I could hear—he did not give him anything at the time.

EDWARD LANGELY (police-sergeant A 11.) From a communication I received I took the prisoners Cooper and Jackson into custody on the 7th of Sept., about seven o'clock in the evening, in the Westminster-road—I told Cooper he must consider himself in my custody on suspicion of being concerned in that robbery in Agnes-street, Waterloo-road—he said I was mistaken, he was not the person—he was in company with Jackson—I had followed them about a hundred yards before I took them into custody—they were walking and talking—I had assistance with me, and took both—I asked Cooper whether he knew Jackson—he said no, he merely met him by accident that day—he was then walking behind me with a brother constable—he said he knew nothing of him except that day by chance he ran against him—at the station my attention was drawn to a ring on Jackson's finger—it was a wedding ring, and apparently much worn—I said, "I must have that ring off your finger"—he said, "You can't get it off, I have worn it for years and years, it has been on for years and years"—I attempted to get it off—I found it was very tight on, and being a slight ring I did not wish to break it, but wanted to wait till the prosecutrix saw it—she was sent for, and I asked her if she could say that was her ring—I made another effort to get it off on the following morning—I got a pail of water and some soap—I well soaped it, and then tried to get it off—I was the more anxious to get it off in consequence of what the prosecutrix had said—I could not get it off then—at his first examination at the police-court he bad not got the ring on—I had sent them down handcuffed together with another constable, and being in the dock I did not know the ring was not on—the Magistrate was telling me how to get it off by a thread, and when I took his finger up the ring was off—that was the same day as I had tried to get it off in the morning—Jackson said that in my endeavouring to get it off at the station I had broken it, and that in coming down in the cab he threw it out of the cab window, that it was only a metal ring, not a wedding ring—I am quite positive I did not break the ring in attempting to get it off, and I feel quite confident that it was a wedding ring—on searching Jackson I found a silver watch and guard in his coat pocket, and a small French gold watch—on Cooper I found 12s. 6d. and a silver watch and chain in his waistcoat pocket—they have nothing to do with this indictment.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you remember the exact words Cooper made use of when you took him into custody? A. Yes—he said I was mistaken, he knew nothing about it—I found seven sovereigns on Jackson, and 25s. in silver.

JAMES BROOK (police-constable L 118.) On Friday, the 13th of Sept., I went to a house in Park-place, Carlisle-street, Lambeth—I saw Mrs. Jones there—she pointed out a room as being the prisoner Weston's, which I

the keys, and go and get the jewellery, which I did, and gave it to Weston—he gave it me back again—I went and put it on the corner of the drawers, with the money and other articles—he gave the letter to Mrs. Brundell—he then wanted to know if there were any more writings anywhere, and Mrs. Brundell recollected she had a few old letters in her work-box—she gave me the keys to unlock her work-box to get them dut—there was half a dozen silver tea-spoons in the box—he gave them to me to take to the drawers and put with the other things—Mrs. Brundell then put on her things to go to the station—he asked her about going to the station with this letter—I said she was not able to go by herself, without somebody to assist her, and he said his friend, the gentleman who was up stairs, would assist her there—I asked if he would allow her to take hold of the gentleman's arm—he said, O yes, for he had come from the firm where her husband was at work, and he would assist her there—he called to the other party to come down—I did not hear what name he called, or what he said—he whispered something on the stairs—I think when he called him, he said, "Here," but I will not be sure what it was—Mrs. Brundell and Cooper then went off to go to the station—Weston did not remain in the kitchen many minutes after they were gone—he went into the bed-room—I had occasion to go out into the yard, and saw him picking up the money, and putting it into a green purse—he put it into his pocket—the silver spoons he put into his coat pocket, and the box of jewellery in his waistcoat—he afterwards came into the room where I was and sat down on the table—the eldest child was crying, and he talked to it, and tried to pacify it—he gave it a halfpenny, and said, "Do not cry, your mother will soon be back again"—he had not been there long when Mrs. Courtney came down into the kitchen, and he went out into the passage, but he walked as many as three times along the little passage, between the kitchen and staircase, before he went up stairs. I do not know what became of him afterwards—he was gone when Mrs. Brundell returned.

Cross-examined by MR. BALDWIN. Q. When Cooper came down and spoke to Weston, whereabouts where they standing? A. Weston was against the kitchen door, and Cooper just in the passage—they whispered, so that I could not bear what they said.

JANE COURTNEY . I am married, and lodge in Mrs. Brundell's house. On the 27th of Aug. I recollect a knock coming to the door about two o'clock, and Weston coming down stairs—I noticed Cooper at the door—I occupy the two parlours adjoining the passage—my doors were both closed—I was in the kitchen—I passed up stairs when Weston came down—I went up and saw Cooper at the street door—I had a good opportunity of seeing him—I was with him the whole of the time—I spoke to him—all I said to him at the door was, "It is a fine morning"—he answered very shortly, "Yes, it is"—I had occasion to go into my parlour, and he followed me—I asked him what was the matter; I hoped there was nothing the matter—he said he did not know, he hoped there was not—I locked my door, and still kept walking to and fro in the passage—he went out of the parlour, and went to the street door again—he stood inside the door, in the passage—he said nothing more to me—after that, as I was walking to and fro in the passage, I heard a sound of gold, and I went to the edge of the kitchen stairs—when I had stood there about half a minute, Cooper came and took me by the shoulder, and put me on one side the passage, to prevent me from listening—he perceived that I was listening—he did not say a word—he then went back to the street door—about a minute after that Weston came to the bottom of the kitchen stairs and said, "Will you step down, Sir, if you please"—Cooper stepped down three stairs, and he said, "The door, the door," three times—Weston said, "I

have got all there is; you must take that to Mr. Patrick, and make the best of it"—he said after that, that the letter he was going to seal he would give to the lady, and he (Cooper) was to go with her to the station—Cooper came up again after that, and stood at the street door—I saw Mrs. Brundell come up and go away with Cooper—I afterwards went down into the kitchen to inquire what was the matter—I saw Weston, but did not speak to him—I was there when Mrs. Brundell returned—she gave me a letter, which I gave to the inspector at the station—I do not know his name—I have not seen him here to-day.

Cross-examined by? MR. BALDWIN. Q. Did Weston say this to Cooper loudly? A. Yes, so that I could hear—he did not give him anything at the time.

EDWARD LANGELY (police-sergeant A 11.) From a communication I received I took the prisoners Cooper and Jackson into custody on the 7th of Sept., about seven o'clock in the evening, in the Westminster-road—I told Cooper he must consider himself in my custody, on suspicion of being concerned in that robbery in Agnes-street, Waterloo-road—he said I was mistaken, he was not the person—he was in company with Jackson—I had followed them about a hundred yards before I took them into custody—they were walking and talking—I had assistance with me, and took both—I asked Cooper whether he knew Jackson—he said no, he merely met him by accident that day—he was then walking behind me with a brother constable—he said he knew nothing of him except that day by chance he ran against him—at the station my attention was drawn to a ring on Jackson's finger—it was a wedding ring, and apparently much worn—I said, "I must have that ring off your finger"—he said, "You can't get it off, I have worn it for years and years, it has been on for years and years"—I attempted to get it off—I found it was very tight on, and being a slight ring I did not wish to break it, but wanted to wait till the prosecutrix saw it—she was sent for, and I asked her if she could say that was her ring—I made another effort to get it off on the following morning—I got a pail of water and some soap—I well soaped it, and then tried to get it off—I was the more anxious to get it off in consequence of what the prosecutrix had said—I could not get it off then—at his first examination at the police-court he had not got the ring on—I had sent them down handcuffed together with another constable, and being in the dock I did not know the ring was not on—the Magistrate was telling me how to get it off by a thread, and when I took his finger up the ring was off—that was the same day as I had tried to get it off in the morning—Jackson said that in my endeavouring to get it off at the station I had broken it, and that in coming down in the cab he threw it out of the cab window, that it was only a metal ring, not a wedding ring—I am quite positive I did not break the ring in attempting to get it off, and I feel quite confident that it was a wedding ring—on searching Jackson I found a silver watch and guard in his coat pocket, and a small French gold watch—on Cooper I found 12s. 6d. and a silver watch and chain in his waistcoat pocket—they have nothing to do with this indictment.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you remember the exact words Cooper made use of when you took him into custody? A. Yes—he said I was mistaken, he knew nothing about it—I found seven sovereigns on Jackson, and 25s. in silver.

JAMES BROOK (police-constable L 118.) On Friday, the 13th of Sept., I went to a house in Park-place, Carlisle-street, Lambeth—I saw Mrs. Jones there—she pointed out a room as being the prisoner Weston's, which I

searched, and found a brooch, a locket, a cross, a pair of eardrops, and a seal—they were in a hat-box all together.

MRS. BRUNDELL re-examined. These articles are all mine, and what I have spoken of as being taken out of the box—this is the letter which was given to me by Weston to take to the station—(this was a paper folded as a letter, but contained no writing, merely a scrawl; the impression on the seal corresponded with the seal found at Weston's lodging.)

SARAH ANN JONES . I am the wife of William Jones, and live at No. 3, Park-place, Carlisle-street, Lambeth. The prisoner Weston lodged in my house for two days before he was taken into custody—he occupied the front room unfurnished, with a female who he represented was his wife—when Brook came to the house I pointed out Weston's room to him.

FRANCES LUSCOMBE . I live in Thomas-street, Portland-road. A person very much like Weston came to my house—I cannot say it was him exactly.

MARY FISHER . On the 26th of July last Weston came to my house, and took my apartments furnished in the name of White—he took possession on Sunday, the 28th, and came to live there—he brought a lady with him as his wife, and a little boy—they remained with me till the Monday before he was taken—he had only two small boxes of his own at that time—when he left he had something more, but not any furniture.

SARAH ANN JONES re-examined. At the time Weston came to lodge with me he brought a bed and bedstead, four chairs, a table, and washhandstand.

Weston's Defence (written.) I have only to say that I am a hardworking mechanic, and have not got it in my power to defend myself by counsel. Had I been guilty of what I am charged with, most likely I should have been defended by counsel; at the time I was taken into custody I was going to work with my apron on, and my rule in my pocket; I am an upholsterer by trade, and the policeman has since found out that I was working at an upholsterer's at the time; the reason I give for having in my possession the articles the prosecutrix has sworn to is this, that I was in the George public-house, Waterloo-road, about two months ago; a young man came in, and in the course of conversation offered them for sale: this is the truth; I hope you will take into consideration that the prosecutrix was some time after being asked before she could swear to me, in fact she could not till she was told.

John Taylor, licensed victualler, Carshalton; William Armstrong, baker, Harrow; James Chapman, smith, Harrow; John Hodsden, farmer, Harrow; John Langford Hughes, tallow-chandler, Curzon-street, Mayfair; James Greenhill, farmer, Harrow; William Arnold, jun., plumber and glazier, Harrow; Adam Taylor, retired innkeeper, Carshtlton; Thomas Walker, butcher, Harrow; William Baker, farmer, Harrow; William Arnold, the elder, shopkeeper, Harrow; and Joel Tilk, coffee-house keeper, No. 9, Warwick-lane, Newgate-street, deposed to the good character of Cooper, by the name of Timberlake, but only down to about twelve months previous to his apprehension.

WILLIAM STURGES . I produce a certificate of Weston's former conviction, which I got from the office here—(read)—I was present at the trial—he is the person—I was the prosecutor, and am quite sure of him.

Weston. I deny having been convicted before.

Witness. He was in my employ four or five months as a waiter and potman—I have no doubt about him.

Weston. I would ask if it is likely I could be recognised; this was five years ago; I must have been very young then: I am only twentythree now, and lie has not seen me from that time to this.

Witness. I think he was eighteen when in my employ—he was always tall, but he has grown taller, and has whiskers now, which he had not then,

but his features will always be impressed on my mind—I can recognise his voice—he came to me from a coffee-house keeper in Bedfordbury—I was ushered into a room at Union-hall, without being told the prisoner was there; I looked round, and fixed my eye on him directly—I understood when I came out that I was being watched, which I was not aware of—I have not the slightest doubt of his being the man, not the most remote—I only had one waiter at that time.

WESTON— GUILTY . Aged 23.

COOPER— GUILTY . Aged 27.

of Larceny only

JACKSON— NOT GUILTY

(The prisoners were also indicted for a like offence in Middlesex. See page 819.)

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18441021-2570

2570. JOHN MORRIS was indicted for feloniously cutting and wounding John Donovan on the left hand, with intent to maim and disable him.—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

HENDRY CHENERY (policeman.) The prosecutor has not been seen since Tuesday, nor the witnesses; they are all a regular set of thieves together, and I have every reason to believe they are not coming—I inquired last night where the prosecutor was said to lodge, and he was denied.

The witnesses being called on their recognizances, and not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Before Mr. Baron Rolfe.

Reference Number: t18441021-2571

2571. WALTER BAKER was indicted for feloniously administering to Esther Sednem 1/2 oz. weight of nitric acid with intent to murder her.—2nd COUNT, for attempting to administer it.—3rd and 4th COUNTS, calling it aquafortis.—5th COUNT, tor casting and throwing the said nitric acid on and over her face, with intent to burn her, and whereby she was burnt.—6th COUNT, for applying the same to her lips and mouth, and attempting to pour it into her mouth, with a like intent.

EDWARD PICTON PHILLIPS . I am a surgeon at Guy's Hospital. Last Sunday night week, about half-past one o'clock, Esther Sednem came to the hospital accompanied by two policemen—her lips were very much swollen, and there were marks as if produced by fire, or being burnt by some corrosive substance—I examined inside her mouth, but could find no injury beyond the margin of the lips—I observed yellow stains on her clothes, which might have been produced by corrosive acid, as well as the marks on her person—I kept her in the hospital that night—next morning her lips were rather more swollen, and had a whitish appearance—I observed her throat again, but could not find any injury done to it—there was a stiffness about the mouth, she could not open it easily—a tea-spoonful of aqua-fortis taken might cause death—it would depend on a great many circumstances.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You mean, if not attended to? A. If not attended to, and the state of the contents of the stomach might influence it also—I should say the appearances I saw were consistent with a person having been about to drink something, and it being suddenly snatched from them.

COURT. Q. All that you saw was, that there appeared to have been some corrosive acid in contact with the lips, and some spilt over the clothes? A. Yes.

ESTHER SEDNEM . I live at No. 29, College-street, South wark. I know

the prisoner—he was my seducer—I did not live with him—I have known him upwards of four years—last Sunday week he passed by where I live—he accosted me first, and asked if I would walk with him as far as Magdalencircus, and I did—he asked me if I had 1s., as he had 6d.—I told him I had not—he then flew into a passion with me—I tried to wish him good night, when I saw something in his pocket—I asked what he had got there—he pulled a bottle out, and said, "It is something very nice, taste it"—it was a phial—he held the back of my neck with his right hand, while he put the bottle to my mouth with his left—I frit a burning in my mouth, and put my hands up, and struggled with him to release myself—I did not swallow any. thing—some of it went into my mouth, and part of the way down my throat, but I felt the burning, and spit it out—I struggled with him violently to release his hand from my mouth, and in doing so it burnt my face and my clothes, and likewise my hands—I asked him what it was—he said, "It is only hair-oil, you b—, finish it"—I asked him again what it was, when he emptied the remainder on the pavement—he then told me it was aqua-fortis—he walked away from me—I still followed, and asked why he had given me that stuff—when he came to his own door he called a policeman to move me away—the policeman desired him to go in-doors, and me to go home, which I did, and I was then taken to the hospital.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not give him in charge then, or make any complaint to the policeman at the time that he had been trying to poison you? A. I did not wish to hurt him, and was not able till he passed me again on the Tuesday night—I spoke to the policeman, but I was so excited, and in such pain, that I could not tell him what he had been doing to me—I have been intimately acquainted with him for more than four years—I was going on an errand on the night in question—I am an unfortunate female—it was a little after twelve o'clock when I first saw him.

Q. Did not you, seeing the bottle in his waistcoat pocket, yourself take it out, and want to taste it, and see what it was; and did he not snatch it away from you, and, in so doing, spill some of it on you, and on his own hands also? A. No—that I swear—I did not state a few days afterwards to a person, in the presence of one Woodhouse, that I took it out of his pocket myself—the prisoner is a cutler—I do not know that he uses aqua-fortis in his business—I never saw him with it in his possession before—I never was at his house—we had had no quarrel that day before that—I did not wish to hurt him till after the Tuesday, when he threatened me—it was in consequence of that that I made this charge against him—he has been out on bail—he lives at No. 186, Tooley-street.

COURT Q. What do you mean by saying you did not mention it that night, but on the Tuesday, in consequence of his threatening you? A. When I went home I said he had been giving me aquafortis, but I did not wish to hurt him—I would have let it pass, till he threatened my life again—on the Tuesday evening I was going to the chemist's for something for my face, and he passed me—I asked him why he had been so cruel as to give me aqua-fortis, and he said, "I have not done for you yet, but I will."

JOHN GOLDING (police-constable M 87.) I apprehended the prisoner last Wednesday week in the evening—he was pointed out to me by the prosecutrix—I told him I wanted him for attempting to administer aqua-fortis to her—he said, "Very well, it is quite different"—he said she took the bottle out of his pocket, and attempted to drink it herself, that he prevented her, and, in striving to prevent her, part was spilled on his own hands, which he showed me—they were discoloured.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they discoloured apparently in the same

manner as the prosecutrix's hands? A. The same—the prosecutrix came to me, made me acquainted with the case, and I went and apprehended him.

ROBERT IRESON (police-constable M 113.) Last Monday week morning, early, I was called on by the prosecutrix's landlady to see her—she said some person that had been to her had administered some poison to her, and she asked me to come and see what I could do for her—I found her mouth very much swollen, and her tongue appeared to be swollen also—she complained of having a pain in her throat—I took her to the hospital—she had this shawl and apron on at the time—there are marks of aqua-fortis on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you accompany the prisoner to hit mother's house in Tooley-street? A. Yes, on the day of his examination—he took a phial from a shelf in the shop where he worked, and said that was the phial he had in his pocket at the time—this is it—it was about half-past one o'clock when I went with the prosecutrix to the hospital—she made no complaint against any person then, not till the Wednesday.

COURT. Q. Did she describe what had happened to her? A. I asked her how she came to take this stuff—she said she had received a bottle of Walter Baker, and he told her it was hair-oil, and said, "It is very nice, taste it," and she took and drank it—I asked how much of it she had drunk—she said she had drunk the whole of the bottle-full, that it was about that length, (the length of the finger,) and she had taken about so much, putting her hand to her finger in this way (to the first joint.)

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2572

2572. JOSEPH CANE was indicted for unlawfully assaulting James Hawkins, with intent, &c.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2573

2573. ROBERT WAY was indicted for stealing 1 jacket, value 10s., the goods of Edward Clark; and 71bs. weight of pork, 1s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Fisher, in a certain vessel on the Thames.

EDWARD CLARK . I am a seaman on board the ship Milward—she is lying at Griffin's Wharf, on the Thames. The prisoner belonged to the Elizabeth, which was adjoining our ship—about seven o'clock in the evening of the 11th of Oct. I saw the prisoner on board our vessel, in the forecattle—he had been there several times with us, but he had nothing to do with the ship—he had liberty to go there—I saw him come up from the forecastle, with something under his arm—he went on board his own vessel—I after that spoke to him—the next morning, at breakfast, I missed a jacket out of my chest—I had seen it safe at tea-time the night before, an hour and a half before I saw the prisoner come out of the forecastle—this is my jacket.

Henry John Hambrook (inspector of the Thames-police.) On the morning of the 12th of Oct. I went on board the Elizabeth, and saw the prisoner—I told him there had been a jacket and some meat stolen from the next vessel—he said he knew nothing of it—I went down into the hold of the vessel, and found the jacket and two pieces of pork—the prisoner said he knew nothing about it—on proceeding to the station, he said he took the jacket from the prosecutor's chest—after getting to the station he said, "I took the pork."

GEORGE FISHER . I am mate of the ship Milward. On the morning of the 12th of Oct. I looked into the tub and missed two pieces of pork—I cannot

swear to the pork, but this very much resembles it—it was under my care—what is lost I have to make good.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday night we were all drinking together, and we were all intoxicated; I did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2574

2574. DANIEL FLAVAN was indicted for stealing 3 epaulettes, value 9l.; 6 pairs of trowsers, 4l.; 18 shirts, 4l.; 1 sword, 3l.; 3 ozs. weight of silver-lace, 3l. 105.; 4 spoons, 3l.; 1 jacket, 1l.; 2 forks, 1l. 5s.; 10 handkerchiefs, 1l. 5s.; 2 caps, 1l.; 1 waistcoat, 15s.; 2 pairs of socks, 7s.; 1 table-cloth, 5s.; 2 purses, 10s.; 2 pairs of braces, 2s.; 2 towels, 1s.; and 6 foreign copper coins, value 6d.; the goods of John Stewart.

MR. SIMON conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN STEWART . I am a naval surgeon, and reside in Perthshire. In Oct. last I left a sea chest in the care of my cousin, in the London-road—it was about six feet long and three broad—a number of things which I did not want, were deposited in the chest, and it was locked—it contained my uniform, epaulettes, sword, and some plate; a pair of gloves, a pair of braces, and a large collection of Indian coins, shirts, trowsers, and other things—I returned from Scotland on the 21st of last Sept., to join my ship at Portsmouth—I found the cord of my chest cut off, and all these things taken.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. When was it you saw these things safe? A. Two or three days after I arrived here, before I went down to Scotland, I saw them at my cousin's on the 13th or 14th of Oct., 1843.

ALEXANDER STEWART . I am an upholsterer, and live in the London-road, St. George the Martyr, Southwark. My cousin left a chest in my care—I have an impression that it was safe about a fortnight before my cousin arrived from Perth—I cannot say to a day—I had occasion to go to the ware-house where it was deposited, a few days previous to my cousin arriving—I looked at it then, and it appeared to me to be safe—it was corded—I did not try it with my hands to see if it was fast—I could not positively say that the cord was on—the prisoner was in my employ, and was so at the time my cousin arrived—he came about Whitsuntide—he had access in the course of his business as my servant, to this warehouse, which is in the back part of the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you prepared to say that you observed this box after it was deposited with you by your cousin? A. Yes, I may say daily—I cannot fix on any day or date—the prisoner came into my employ last Whitsuntide—I had various parties in my employ before—they have left me—I had three servants in the interval, between my cousin leaving, and his missing these things—I do not know what has become of them—they have left me—there was no particular reason for the last one leaving—there was one I turned away because I was not satisfied with him—he was inattentive to his work—there was a charge of dishonesty against him—that was the reason that I turned him away—he left on the 29th of Sept. of the present year—he had access to the place where the trunk was deposited—I charged him with stealing bed-ticking in the first instance—he was there part of the time the prisoner was there, but he had been longer than the prisoner—the trunk was in a large warehouse—there were various goods in the warehouse, some wools and some palliasses.

MR. SIMON. Q. When you went to look at the trunk with your cousn, had it a different appearance to what it had on former occasions when you saw it? A. No.

JOHN SMITH . I was in the employ of Alexander Stewart. About the beginning of Sept., I was at work in the back-warehouse where this chest was placed—it was a common chest, standing in the warehouse—I wanted a work bench, and I had to move the chest—I took the lid up and found it was full—I could not move it—I asked the prisoner if he had got a board six feet long to lend me to make a squab on—he said he had one that he was not making use of—the lid of the chest was fast down, but not corded—I found I could not move it without the prisoner's assistance—he lent me a hand—it was a tremendous weight—I never saw the chest corded.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to leave the prosecutor the last time? A. He had nothing for me to do—he made no charge against ms—I work on the Surrey-side of the water now for twenty different masters—I was ordered to go down before the Magistrate, but gave no evidence—my brother has not been in the prosecutor's employ at all.

ROSA MURRAY . I am the wife of Michael Murray, and live in Mead's-place, Newington-causeway—the prisoner lodged with me in a back room, second floor—I pointed out the room to the policeman—he took some silks and other things that he found there.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen these silks before? A. Yes—I do not know whether these are the articles—they are the same tort of things, but I could not swear to them—I have seen articles of this description nearly three months ago—the prisoner allowed my child to play with them whenever she liked—there was no lock on his bed-room or his box.

CHARLES BURGESS GOFF (police-constable L 83.) I took the prisoner—I said he was suspected of stealing some plate and other articles from a chest on his master's premises—I went to Murray's place—she pointed me out the room—I looked over the place, and in a hat-box I found some of these things and in a coat-pocket I found this pair of gloves—in the prisoner's bed I found this pair of braces, and in his pocket two pieces of copper coin.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2575

2575. DAVID MILNE was indicted for stealing 8 sovereigns, 10 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 2 pence, the monies of John Jennings, his master.

JOHN JENNINGS . I am a gold-beater, and live in Margaret-street, St. George's, Southwark—the prisoner was my apprentice for about six months. On the 13th of Aug., 1841, I gave the prisoner 8l. 10s. 8d., to get 2ozs. of gold from Mr. Alcock's, in Little-Britain—I did not see him again till the 23rd of Sept., 1844, when he was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE Q. I believe you know that he went on board a ship, and has been serving faithfully till this time? A. Yes—I will take him back if I am allowed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18441021-2576

2576. THOMAS BOOTH was indicted for stealing 1 coat, value 20s.; 1 box, 1s.; and 2 handkerchiefs, 1s.; the goods of Thomas Booth: and 2 sheets, value 10s., the goods of Samuel Colverd; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 3O.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18441021-2577

2577. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing 2 spoons, value 10s., the goods of Mary Ann Hubbard; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

MR. HORRY conducted the Prosecution.

ANN HUBBARD . I am a widow, and keep a confectioner's shop, in Queen's Head-row, Newington. On Wednesday, the 2nd of Oct., the prisoner came a little before four o'clock, and asked for a plate of soup—he went to take it into the parlour adjoining my shop—I took it to him—I had one silver spoon lying on the side-board, behind where he sat, and one I gave him—about a quarter of an hour after he came out of the parlour, he wished me good afternoon—he paid me when I took the soup—I did not go into the parlour—I was sitting in the shop—my son came and told me something—I then went and looked, and found the two silver spoons gone—in the soup-plate which I had handed to the prisoner, I found a metal spoon—these spoons are my property—they are worth 10s.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON Q. How long have you carried on business? A. Twenty-five years—I had no conversation with the prisoner about the spoons—I had never seen him before.

HENRY DEIGHTON . I am shopman to Charles and George Mullens, pawnbrokers in the Wai worth-road. On Wednesday afternoon, the 2nd of Oct., I saw the prisoner in my master's shop, between three and four o'clock—he offered me a pair of table-spoons in pledge—I believe these to be the same spoons—while I was weighing them with my back to the counter, I heard a noise—I turned, and the prisoner was gone—I heard a cry of "Police!"—my fellow-shopman ran round to the other door—I had not paid for the spoons.

GEORGE TOMPKINS (police-constable M 166.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Ten Years

Reference Number: t18441021-2578

2578. JOHN RILEY was indicted for stealing 4 sovereigns, 4 half-sovereigns, 16 half-crowns, 35 shillings, and 5 sixpences, the monies of Charles Carden.

MR. SIMON conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES CARDEN . I am in the employ of Mr. Smith, of Fore-street, Cripplegate. On the 12th of Aug. I returned from Tonbridge Wells—about six o'clock that evening I was walking along the Borough, and the prisoner walked by the side of me, and said, could I direct him to Covent-garden—he said he had not been in London before for five years—he asked me to have a glass of ale, and we went into a house and had it—an old man came in, and wished to take us to the play—I declined that—the prisoner and I then went back to a beer-shop near the Elephant and Castle—that was at the prisoner's suggestion—when we got there, the prisoner shook hands with Mr. Abinger, the landlord, and we went up stairs—the prisoner had previous to that told me that the landlord had had dealings with his father—after we had been in the room some time, an Irishman came in, and said his grandfather had left him a great deal of money, and he said he had been to a party last night and won half-a-crown, and the man had not got half-a-crown to give him, and he gave him a pack of cards—I said, "Let me look at them"—he showed me them, and be began to bet, and talked about play—I said I did not know how to play at cards—the prisoner then said he wished me to let him have some money for him to play with the other man—they played at "Cutting up"—I let the prisoner have altogether at different times 9l. 17s. 6d.—I saw him play all the time with the other man—he was sometimes losing, and sometimes gaining—the money I let the prisoner have was four sovereigns, four half-sovereigns,

and the rest in silver—he said lie would pay me again If I let him have the money, as he had money to receive—he did not say then from whom, but on the way he told me he had money to receive from Mr. Abinger, who keeps the beer-shop—he went away, and I did not see him again till he was in custody—I went for a policeman that night, after I found the prisoner did not come back—I went and asked Mr. Abinger if he knew him—he said, no, he had never seen him but once before.

Q. After you left the first public-house, where something took place about the man speaking to you, did the prisoner make any remark about his own property? A. Yes, he said he hoped he bad not lost his money—he put his hand into his pocket, and pulled out a green purse with steel slides, which appeared to contain gold and some notes—I saw it for about a minute—he took it out, and I heard something rattle.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS Q. Had you ever seen this man before in your life? A. No—I am twenty-three years old—I am shopman to Mr. Smith, a grocer—my wages are 25l. a year—I had received money of my master the last week before I left—I had been to Tonbridge Wells, to see my friends—I took 10l. 10s. when I went from London—I have lived in my present place six weeks—I had before that lived at Mr. Hutton's in the Borough for nine months, where I had 26l. a year—I did not stake this money as my own part of the wager—I did not go shares with the prisoner in his portion of the wager.

Q. If you had previously seen in his possession a puree which you supposed contained gold and notes, why did you not say, "Take your own money, you have some?" A. He bad lost some of his money before that, but I cannot say how much—he lost some gold, not notes—I cannot say why I did not tell him to take money out of has own purse—I was in his company from about six o'clock till eight.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not tell the policeman that you had been playing at cards, and had been cheated out of your money? A. No—I said I lost my money with men who were playing at cards—I came out, saw the policeman, and told him the circumstances—one of the men came out of a court opposite, and I said, "That man and another man robbed me of 9l. 17s."—I did not tell the policeman that I had been playing at cards, and had lost my money—I had seen the prisoner with a purse—I saw notes and gold in it—he did not tell me how much it contained—he said he had to receive a large sum—though he had notes and gold of his own, I let him have my money.

COURT. Q. Suppose he had won 20l., would you have had any of the profits? A. Not that I know of—I should not have claimed any.

MR. WILKINS Q. How soon afterwards did you see the prisoner? A. On the 12th of Sept.—it was on the 12th of Aug. that I first saw him—my master knows of this—the policeman came to our house, and asked if I had been robbed—my master knew this on the 11th of Sept., but this is a fresh situation—I was not in a situation at that time—I had left my situation, and went to my friends to get another—I slept that night in a house on the other side London-bridge—my money was gone—I got into a situation about a fortnight after—I never mentioned it to my master till the day before the policeman came—I have a father, who lives near Tonbridge Wells—I sent word down to him three or four days afterwards, during the fortnight I was looking for a situation—I have a brother-in-law in London, who is a cheesemonger—I let him know the next evening—I am not married—I do not visit any female in Kent-street—I have never been living with any woman, and do not keep a woman.

MR. SIMON. Q. Was there a word said about your getting anything from the winning? A. No.

WILLIAM PARNELL(police-sergeant M 5.) On the night of the 10th of Sept. I took the prisoner into custody for assaulting a female—on the way to the station he put his hand into his right-hand pocket, and took something out, and threw it behind him, which sounded like money—I looked, but could not find it then—I went afterwards and found this purse and in it three flash notes, and fourteen pieces of flash coin—I am satisfied that he threw it down.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the source of your satisfaction? A. From the gink of it on the stones—I was not the person to whom the prosecutor made a complaint, it was to another policeman, who was before the Magistrate, but is not here.

CHARLES CARDEN re-examined. This is the purse, or one exactly like it, that the prisoner had that night.

GUILTY .— Judgment Arrested .

Reference Number: t18441021-2578a

2578. AMELIA SMITH and ELEANOR STANTON were indicted for maliciously and feloniously, by fraud, taking away and detaining a certain male child, under the age of ten years; the son of Zachariah Francis Daniel and Elizabeth Purdy, with intent to deprive them of the possession of the said child.

MR. CROUCH conducted the Prosecution.

ELIZABETH PURDY . I am the wife of Zachariah Francis Daniel Purdy. I have a baby, which was eight weeks old last Friday. About one o'clock this day week Blake came to my house—she said, "Mrs. Purdy, will you let me take your baby out for a walk?"—I said, "You can't take it out"—in consequence of something she said, she took the child out of the cradle, and I gave her the hood and the shawl, to put over the baby—I did not see it again till two in the morning—I had been searching for the child all the day and all the night—it was very ill when it came back—it has been in fits ever since—I took it to the doctor—it is a male child—it was not christened—I was very ill during the day—I have seen the prisoner Smith passing by my door.

SARAH BLAKE . I live in Rose-court, Bermondsey New-road, I lodge with the prisoner Stanton. On the 17th of Oct. Stanton asked me to go and ask Mrs. Purdy to let me take the child out for a walk—Smith was there at the time—they said they would not be gone above a quarter of an hour, and told me to clean the room out—they said they would give me a shawl and some shoes after they returned—the prosecutor did not live above a minute's walk from our house—I got the child, and brought it home to Stanton, as she asked me for it—I gave it her—I remained in the house, and they went away immediately—I was taken to the station—I did not know Smith before, any more than by her coming to Mrs. Stanton's, a fortnight ago last Tuesday—I remained at the station till the child was brought home—I am sure it is the same baby.

EMMA WATSON . I live in Kirkham-place, Tottenham-court-road—on the 17th of October, Smith came and rang the bell—I went down, and took the child out of her arms, and took it into Smith's mother's room—Smith told me to take the child up stairs, and she went into the room—Smith had lived at the house before—her husband is a policeman, and lives at the station—she resided in Kirkham-place before her marriage, and for seven or eight weeks since—she came up stairs—I made her tea, and then I changed the child's bed-gown, because it was dirty—I did not hear her say whose child it was—we thought it was her own—she had been away ten days, and we did not know where she was—she said, some one had run for Smith—meaning her

husband—he came and went up stairs, and they were talking about a ring that she had pawned, and he went to get it—Smith said, the child was like her husband—she said she had been confined, and he wanted to know where she had been confined—she said she would tell him in the morning—the child was black round the mouth—Smith's husband asked her what it was, and she said the child had been delivered by instruments—the child was well—I made it some victuals.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. The child was taken care of while it was there? A. Yes—I had been in the house five months—Smith appeared to be very large in the family way on the Sunday—she went away on the Monday—she looked like a woman about to be confined, and that was gone when she came back with the child—when her husband came up, he said, "This is no child of mine."

ZACHARIAH FRANCIS DANIEL PURDY . I am father of the child—I met Stanton about six o'clock that day, and asked her where my baby was—she said, "What baby?"—I said, "My baby, you know it; what have you done with it? "—she said, "I know nothing about it, don't pester me"—I said to a person, "Fetch a policeman"—one came up—I gave her in charge, and she was taken to the station—my wife and I were in a dreadful state; and had it not been for the company of other women, my wife would have destroyed herself—she was forced to be kept in a room.

THOMAS WATKINS (police-constable M 18.) I made inquiries after this child, and' from information I went to Charing Cross, to a public-house opposite site the Cross—I heard there that both the prisoners had been there, and achild—I child—I then went to our station, and found that another division had misseda a woman—I then went to Kirkham-place, Tottenham-court-road, and found-Smith in bed with the child—I took her to the station—she said, she did not intend to keep the child.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you mentioned it to Smith, her husband; he told you, and went with you to the house? A. Yes—Smith said she intended to take the child back—I heard her husband say, that the child was to be returned the next morning.

WILLIAM NORRIS (police-constable M 98.) On the 17th of Oct. I was called to apprehend Stanton, near the Bricklayer's Arms, Kent-road, about six o'clock in the evening—the prosecutor was present—I took Stanton to the station, and asked her where she left Mrs. Purdy's child—she said, at Charingcross, with a young person; but she helped to carry it part of the way—she said, "I waited there two hours, and did not see any more of her, and she then left.".

SMITH— GUILTY . Aged 22.

STANTON— GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18441021-2579

2579. JOSEPH SHOULTS was indicted for stealing 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of the Guardians of the Poor of the St. Saviour's Union.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Britain Benson; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

MR. BODKIN. conducted the Prosecution.

BRITAIN BENSON . I am master of the workhouse of St. Saviour's. It is managed by a board of guardians of the poor—the property in that house is under my care and custody—the prisoner had been an inmate of the workhouse—he came in some time in Aug.—he left, on the 23rd of Sept, by discharging himself—he had been provided with a pair of shoes, for his wear in the house—these shoes are a pair of new shoes, part of the stock of the house, not what the prisoner had worn—he had a pair of shoes on when he went out.

SAMUEL HARRIS (police-constable L 177.) I was near the workhouse between seven and eight o'clock in the morning of the 24th of Sept.—I saw the prisoner standing underneath the side door which goes into the yard, which is surrounded by a wall—I saw him repeatedly look through the key. hole of the door, and then a bundle was thrown over the wall near where he was—he took it up, put it under his arm, and walked away with it towards me—directly he saw me he turned and ran away—I pursued and took him and the bundle—it contained this new pair of shoes.

Prisoner's Defence, I was passing there, and looked through once; I was then going away, and this bundle came over with the shoes in it.

GEORGE GIRLING (police-constable G 94.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18441021-2580

2580. JOHN VALLENDER was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Alexander James Joshua Latter, from his person.

ALEXANDER JAMBS JOSHUA LATTER . I live in Canterbury-place, Newington. ington. On Monday evening last I was returning from business, and felt aslight slight pull at my coat—I turned, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchiefin in his hand—he was drawing it from my pocket, and threw it behind him—Ihad had used it not two minutes before—there were two parties with the prisoner—I seized the prisoner—this is my handkerchief—it was picked up by a gentleman, who gave it to me.

JAMES RACKSTRAW (police-constable L 120.) I received the prisoner and his handkerchief in charge.

Prisoner. I was walking along, and this gentleman turned round, and seized me, and said I had got his handkerchief, and I had not.

GUILTY .** Aged 23.— Transported for Ten Years.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18441021-2581

2581. WILLIAM ASHLEY and GEORGE RANDALL were indicted for stealing 1 time-piece, value 1l., the goods of Edward Bigg; and that Randall had been before convicted of felony.

MARY ANN BIGG . I am the wife of Edward Bigg—we live in Westmoreland-place, land-place, Camberwell. On the 18th of Oct. we had a time-piece—I saw it safe at half-past seven o'clock that morning—I missed it at ten minutes past eight—this is it—I had left the parlour window open a little way—there were flower-pots outsid