Old Bailey Proceedings, 8th May 1843.
Reference Number: t18430508
Reference Number: f18430508

HUMPHERY, MAYOR.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

Taken in Short-hand,

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

VOLUME XVIII.

SESSION VII. TO SESSION XII.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

TYLER & REED, PRINTERS, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

1843.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

Held on Monday, May 8th, 1843, and following Days.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN HUMPHERY, LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Gurney, Knt., one of the Barons of Her Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Thomas Coltman, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's Court of Common Pleas: William Thompson. Esq.; William Taylor Copeland, Esq.; Sir Chapman Marshall, Knt.; and Thomas Johnson, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City: Thomas Wood, Esq.; Michael Gibbs, Esq.; John Johnson, Esq.; John Kinnesley Hooper, Esq.; Sir James Duke, Knt.; Thomas Farncombe, Esq.; and John Musgrove, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and Edward Bullock, Esq., Judge of the Sheriff's Court; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer and Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

Isaiah Joyce

Thomas Hunt

Robert Poole

John Luke

John Layzell

Frederick E. Leith

Edward Healey

John Henry Jackson

William Hunter

Charles Cadwell

William Henry Kipps

John Southern

Second Jury.

Thomas Wilkinson Kershaw

William Kendall

James Hill

Thomas Lane

Joshua Malcher Beech

John Jepson

George Winson

Frederick Jones

Charles Logan

James Jeffrey

Francis Heaney

Thomas Higham

Third Jury.

Thomas Goodman

Anthony Hudson

Benjamin Wells

William Adams Larby

Thomas Jeavons

Thomas James

William Ayscough Hallows

Benjamin Young

William Lamb

Anthony Gibson

John Litton

Joseph Lane

Fourth Jury.

Alfred England

John Haslock

John Bowden

Henry Howell

James Watson

Thomas Walker

John Sutton

Edward Lawrence

Henry Tyler

Francis Lamb

Orlando Wade

Thomas Walton

Fifth Jury.

William Hall

J. Gardner

Thomas James Hill

Robert Salter

Matthew Trevon Hooker

Thomas Stock

Thomas Smith

William Hampshar

Charles Hernden

Charles Johnson

Frederick Lloyd

William Thacker

Sixth Jury.

Joseph Hoare

J. Leonard

Edward Hunt

Barton William Hughes

Henry Hemmings

Charles Luff

J. Herbert

Henry Keene

Robert Stokes

J. Trevor Hankey

J. Loomes

William Guerrier

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

HUMPHERY, MAYOR. SEVENTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—Two stars (**) that they have been more than once in custody—An obelisk (†) that a prisoner is known to be the associate of bad characters.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT, Monday, May 8th, 1843.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18430508-1398

1398. JULES FREDERICK MAILLARD DUMESTE and FRANCOIS ESTEIU were indicted for a libel; to which they pleaded GUILTY , and entered into their own recognizances of 100l. each to appear to receive judgment when called upon, and to keep the peace.

Reference Number: t18430508-1399

1399. JOHN BENJAMIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 140 yards of printed cotton, value 2l. 8s., the goods of Woolfrey Middleditch and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Six Months.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Reference Number: t18430508-1400

1400. THOMAS SALT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April, 1 pair of boots, value 5s., the goods of Owen Martin; and that he had been previously convicted of felony.

OWEN MARTIN . I live with Mr. Fagg, at Bedfont. I missed a pair of boots from a small room, on the morning of the 29th of April—the prisoner had been in the service for a week as helper—he came that day for some things which he had left—I followed him towards Staines, and overtook him—he was sitting on the road-side with a bundle—I asked him if he had got a pair of my boots—he said, "No"—the policeman was coming up, and I gave him in charge—my boots were found in the bundle—these now produced are them.

THOMAS BRAY (police-constable T 200.) I took the prisoner into custody, and took this pair of boots out of it, which the prosecutor claimed.

Prisoner. I went to Mr. Faggs, to fetch a few things I had left there, and as I came away I overtook a man who offered me these boots for sale—I gave him 3s. 6d. for them, and that man was sitting down on the road-side with me at the time the officer came up. Witness. He did not say a word about buying them of another man when I took him—when I asked what he had got in the bundle, he jumped up and showed fight—there was another man there, and he lifted up the bundle and gave it to me—the prosecutor said the boots were his, in the presence of the prisoner and the other man.

WILLIAM HOWARD GILLMAN . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read)—I was present at his trial, and know him to be the person.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, May 9th, 1843.

Second Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1401

1401. WILLIAM WILDING was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 27th of February, a request for the delivery of 6 skins of leather, with intent to defraud Alfred Rymer.—2nd COUNT, for uttering the same, with the like intent; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1402

1402. JOHN MANNERING was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 1 clock, value 20l., the goods of the Warden and Commonalty of the Fishmongers of the City of London: also, on the 25th of April, 1 timepiece, value 7l., and 1 clock, value 7l.; the goods of George Carr Glynn, in his dwelling-house.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of George Carr Glynn and others; to both which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 42.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1403

1403. JAMES MUMFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 1 jacket, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, 3s.; 1 pair of trowsers, 12s.; 2 handkerchiefs, 4s.; 1 half-crown, and 18 shillings; the property of John Skeggs: 1 knife, value 4s., and 1 yard measure, 2d.; the goods of James Faulkner; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1404

1404. JOHN M'BANE and PETER GLENNING were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Ball, on the 28th of April, at St. Giles's Without, Cripplegate, and stealing therein, 1 sheet, value 3s. 3d.; 1 towel, 6d.; 3 pair of stockings, 6d.; 1 candle-stick, 1s.; and 1 handkerchief, 6d.; his property.

FRANCES BALL . I am the wife of Joseph Ball, a labourer, and live at No. 10, Ratcliff-Street, Gulston-street; the prisoner, M'Bane, lodged in the same house over head, and Glenning was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards. On the 28th of April I went out, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, leaving my husband at home—about twelve o'clock he brought me the key of the door—I went home between four and five, found the door open, and missed the articles stated, the candlestick from the mantel-shelf, and the other things from a box under the bed—these now produced are them—M'Bane's brother brought me the candlestick next day—the house is let out in lodgings—we have two rooms—the landlord does not live in the house.

WILLIAM M'BANE . I live in the same house as the prosecutrix; the prisoner is my brother. On the 28th of April, he told me that the old gentleman down stairs (Mr. Ball) was gone out, and asked me if I would break the door open down stairs—I said, no, I would not—he went down stairs, saying he would go and fetch Peter Glenning—I knew him by coming backwards and forwards—they both came up stairs—Glenning took a bit of iron, and they both went down stairs together—I heard them breaking the door open, but did not see them—they came up stairs again in five or ten minutes, and brought up a sheet, three pairs of stockings, a coarse towel, a handkerchief, and candlestick—they put them into their jackets and trowsers, and went out with them, leaving the candlestick—I went out soon after, and met them in Whitecross-street—they asked me if I would sell the things for them—I did not sell them, but took them to Mrs. Nicholls, who lent some money on them.

JAMES KNIGHT . I live in Smith's-court, near the prosecutor's house. On the 28th of April, between one and two o'clock, I was coming from No. 17, and saw the prisoners come out of the prosecutor's house, each having something under their jackets—M'Bane walked first, and Glenning came out after, and shut the door—directly M'Bane saw me, he held down his head and walked on.

JAMES ELLIS (City police-constable, No. 142.) I went to Mrs. Nicholls with the witness, M'Bane, and she delivered these things up to me.

M'Bane's Defence. I went to call Glenning, as we were going up into the fields together; I asked my brother if he would come; he said, "No;" we went, and about half an hour after my brother came.

Glenning's Defence. I went up into the fields with M'Bane, and about half an hour after he came up.

M'BANE— GUILTY . Aged 15.

GLENNING— GUILTY . Aged 15.

of Stealing Only.

confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1405

1405. MORDECAI MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April, 2 3/4 yards of fur, called squirrel flounce, value 10s.; and 1 skin, called squirrel skin, 2d.; the goods of Barnett Fox.

BARNETT FOX . I live in Gun-street, Spitalfields, and am a furrier; the prisoner was my apprentice. On the 28th of April I went with him to Newgate-street—we were returning between five and six o'clock in the evening—he was walking by my side in South-place, Finsbury, and somebody called out, "You are losing your furs"—I observed a bit of a squirrel fur flounce coming out of the prisoner's trowsers, at the bottom—I asked how he came by it—he said he did not know—I gave him in charge—I had not been above three quarters of an hour from home—when I returned I found I had but forty-three flounces instead of forty-four, which were safe shortly before I left home with the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How long had he been apprenticed?

A. Nearly four years—I can say nothing against him, and if I had not another servant I would give him another trial.

ROBERT MASON . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner—he said he was very sorry, and begged his master's pardon—I found another skin in his pocket.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy— Confined Fourteen Days.

Reference Number: t18430508-1406

1406. THOMAS HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 1 coat, value 10s., the goods of Samuel Ash.

WILLIAM ELLSWORTHY . I live in Bank-chambers, Lothbury. On the 12th of April, about twelve o'clock in the day, I was in Bishopsgate-street, and saw the prisoner take a coat from the back of a chaise, and run away with it—there was a lady sitting in the chaise by herself—he ran across the road, and gave it to a lad who was a companion—they ran away together—I followed—they threw the coat on the ground—I saw the prisoner stopped—I did not lose sight of him—I am sure he is the same person—I picked up the coat—this now produced is it.

SAMUEL CLARK . I am a gentleman's coachman. I heard a cry of "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner with another running very fast—the other dropped the coat—I stopped the prisoner.

JOHN GEORGE WAY (City police-constable, No. 623.) I took the prisoner and the coat.

ELIZABETH ASH . I am the wife of Samuel Ash. I was in the chaise when the coat was lost—this is it—it is my husband's.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along Bishopsgate-street, and saw two boys run; hearing a cry of "Stop thief," I ran also, and was stopped; I had not been from home ten minutes.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1407

1407. ANN REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 half-sovereign; 1 half-crown; 7 shillings, and 1 six-pence; the property of John Prior, from his person.

JOHN PRIOR . I am cook at Simpson's Tavern, Bond-court, Cornhill. On the 12th of April, about a quarter-past twelve o'clock, I was going up Snow-hill, and saw the prisoner—she began to pull me about, and put her hand into my trowsers-pocket—I found I had lost my purse from that pocket—I directly seized her, held her, and called "Police," who came up—she took my purse away.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. What time did you leave work?

A. About half-past eight o'clock—I had been to a draw at a Derby club, or Derby sweeps, at the White Lion, Bride-lane—I left there at a quarter or half-past twelve, came down Farringdon-street, and was going towards my lodgings, in Henry-street, St. Luke's—I believe there was another party ran across the road with the prisoner, for a party ran from her, and the prisoner swang me round—the other woman went on—I will not swear they were together, but they were quite close to each other—I was turning the corner of Snow-hill—I suppose they ran from Farringdon-street, but did not see them—the prisoner pulled me about—she made an indecent observation—I told her to go to the devil, and not bother me—she might be four or five minutes pulling me about—I gave way to her—she did not ask me for anything—when she got the purse she wanted to get into a cab, to be off—a cab stopped, and she hailed it as it was passing—I saw the purse in her band, and took hold of it after she called the cab—I told the cabman to go on—I called a policeman, but before that she called a cab—the cab came up before the policeman—I was quite sober—I at first thought she was intoxicated, and gave way to her, but afterwards thought not.

THOMAS KENNARD . I am a City policeman. Hearing a cry of "Police," I went to the spot, found the prosecutor holding the prisoner by the hand—he had one end of the purse in his hand, and the prisoner the other end in hers—he charged her with stealing it—she said nothing to me—the prosecutor gave her in charge—she was not drunk, she might have taken a little—she did not say that he had not given her anything, and ought to give her something.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1408

1408. WILLIAM BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April, 1lb. weight of cigars, value 10s.; and 1 box, 4d.; the goods of Solomon Barraclough; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

GEORGE EDWARD SMITH . I am in the employ of Solomon Barraclough, a tobacconist, in Ludgate-hill. On the night of the 10th of April the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for half-an-ounce of snuff—I commenced weighing it—I looked at him very hard, because he stood by some cigars, and I saw him take a box of cigars off the counter, and run out of the shop—I called to a lad who stood at the bottom of the shop to follow him, which he did—this is the box which I saw him take—it was full at the time.

WILLIAM HAYES . I live in Elliot's-court, Old Bailey. On the 10th of April, about a quarter past nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Farringdon-street, I heard a cry of "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner coming along about four yards from me, and saw him throw something from his hand, which I

believe was this box—I heard it go against the lamp-post, and several cigars fell out.

SAMUEL MARTIN (City police-constable, No. 331.) I heard a cry of "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner running—he was stopped, and given into my custody—as he was running, I heard something knock against the lamp-post, but did not see what it was—I afterwards took the prisoner back to the lamp-post, and then saw this cigar-box lying on the ground, and several cigars, which were handed to me by different people.

CHARLES WILLIAM PYE . I am errand-boy to Mr. Barraclough. I was in the shop when the prisoner came in—I saw him take the box off the counter, and run off with it—I ran after him, and never lost sight of him—he is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Farringdon-street, and heard a cry of "Stop thief;" I saw several persons run by me; I asked what was the matter, and was told some one had stolen a box of cigars; I then ran as others did, and was given in charge, but nothing was found on me.

JOHN HAMPTON (City police-constable, No. 471.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—he pleaded guilty—I was not present at the time, but I know he is the person I had in custody.

GUILTY of the Larceny, but not of the previous conviction. Aged 21.

Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1409

1409. CHARLES REDWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April, 3 handkerchiefs, value 3s., the goods of Stephen Keene.

JOSEPH HANCOCK . I am a labourer, and live at Hillingdon. On Monday afternoon, the 10th of April, I was at Keene's beer-shop, and saw a basket of clothes in the kitchen, with some handkerchiefs among them—the prisoner was in the kitchen—in consequence of something I heard, I went to the basket, and missed the handkerchiefs—the prisoner had then gone into the tap-room.

WILLIAM COOMBES . I am in the service of Mr. Keene. I was in the yard, and saw the prisoner pulling the things about in the basket, in the kitchen—I went and told Hancock.

EDWIN HUGGINS . I am a brick-maker, and live at Hillingdon. On Monday afternoon, the 10th of April, I was at Keene's, and saw the prisoner there—Mrs. Keene came and asked which was the man that came with the brewer—he said he was—she said, "You have stolen three silk handkerchiefs"—he denied it—she asked whether he would stand search—he said he would—she went to fasten the door—he then came and sat by the side of me and another young man, and I saw him chuck the handkerchiefs underneath my legs, under the form.

HENRY RANDALL . I was at Keene's, and saw the prisoner take two handkerchiefs out of his pocket, and chuck them underneath the form.

Prisoner. You did not say so till the policeman said you would be paid for your time if you came here. Witness. I did not hear him say so—it was a light and red handkerchief that he chucked—he took them from his side breeches pocket.

RICHARD KEENE . I am the son of Stephen Keene. I picked up this handkerchief—I know it to be my father's, and also these other two.

WILLIAM NEWLAND . I am a policeman. I was sent for, and took the prisoner—I found these two handkerchiefs under the form described by the witnesses.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the handkerchief; I went along with the drays, and followed the brewer up into the tap-room.

GUILTY . * Aged 32.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1410

1410. ALFRED LAMBARD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Freeman, from his person.

JOHN FREEMAN . I am a baker, and live at Lower Clapton. On the evening of the 26th of April I was in Lawrence-lane, looking in at Tregear's print-shop, and missed my handkerchief from my pocket—it had been safe a minute before—I turned round, and saw a lesser lad than the prisoner handing my handkerchief to the prisoner—they were both close together—the prisoner put it into his pocket—I took hold of the corner of it, and pulled it out of his pocket before he could get it quite in, and gave him into custody—this now produced is my handkerchief.

WILLIAM MOFFATT (City police-constable, No. 462.) The pisoner was given into my custody, with the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking past Lawrence-lane, and saw the handkerchief lying at the feet of a young man; I asked if it was his; he said, "No;" I took it up, and put it into my pocket; when I got about three yards off, the gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, and said, "You have got my handkerchief;" I said, "I have a handkerchief, I don't know whose it is," and he gave me into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1411

1411. JOHN DYKES and RICHARD BURCHELL were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April, 7 bottles, value 1s. 6d.; 2 quarts of preserved gooseberries, 4s.; and 3 quarts of preserved greengages, 1s. 8d.; the goods of Thomas Quested Finnis.—2nd Count, stating them to be the goods of Frederick Cowdery.

FREDERICK COWDERY . I am an oilman, and live in Tower-street. On Saturday afternoon, the 15th of April, the prisoners came to my place with a cart, to take away the dust and rubbish—they were there about half an hour—in consequence of information, before they left I searched their cart, and found five bottles of preserves, in the first instance, and two in the next—these are them—they belong to Thomas Quested Finnis and Mr. Fisher, but they are under my care as their warehouseman—I manufacture these things—they had been in the cellar.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Have you any interest in the ware-house? A. No; every thing there is under my care, and I am accountable for it as their servant—the bottles had been in a basket, but were loose when found in the cart, under the rubbish—I can swear to them.

JOHN HUBBARD (City police-constable 551.) I was sent for, and searched the cart—I found these five bottles at the tail of the cart, covered over with rubbish—I took the prisoners in charge, and took them to where they shoot dust, but found nothing more.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1412

1412. JOHN SMITHERS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 1 fender, value 12s.; and 1 padlock, 2d.; the goods of George Henry Francis, to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1413

1413. LOUISA VEREY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April, 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 watch-guard, 1s.; 1 handkerchief, 1s.; 1 half-crown; and 1 groat; the property of John Whitesides.

JOHN WHITESIDES . I live in Swan-yard, Bishopsgate. On the morning of

the 17th of April, I saw the prisoner in Bishopsgate-street, and took her with me to my lodging—I put my watch and guard on the table, took off my-trowsers and put them on the floor, and went to bed—she was not with me more than half an hour—she then went away—in the morning I missed my watch, handkerchief, and money.

Prisoner. You said you had no money about you, and asked a lodger in the house to lend you five shillings, as you were going to a fight in the morning—he said you were not in a fit state to go out, and told you to go to bed—I lost my handkerchief from my neck, and you took your pocket handkerchief out of your pocket, and tied it round my neck—it was taken from me next day at the station-house—he was very much in liquor. Witness. I was in liquor—I do not recollect tying my handkerchief round her neck.

JOHN LEARY (City police-constable 657.) On the morning of the 17th of April, I saw the prisoner and prosecutor in New-street, Bishopsgate-street—I said to him, "Young man, take care; if you have got any property about you, perhaps you will be robbed"—I saw them go into No. 1, Swan-yard—I went round my beat, and about half an hour afterwards I saw her run out of Swan-yard—I followed her to her lodging in Petticoat-lane—I searched her, and found on her this watch, guard, and handkerchief.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect my coming out from the young man's residence the first time? A. I only saw you when you ran out—I was not in company with you and the prosecutor at any public-house.

Prisoner's Defence. When I first met the prosecutor he was drinking with the policeman in New-street, between one and two o'clock in the morning; he asked if I would go home with him; as we were coming out of the public-house, the policeman took out of his pocket a purse with four sovereigns; we went to a house, but could not get in; and the prosecutor said, "Come along with me;" the policeman said, "You will do right to go with him." I went to his lodging, he said he had no money, and would give me his watch till the morning; he put the watch down my bosom; I stopped with him some time; I put the watch on the table again, and came out I saw the policeman, and told him what had occurred; he said, "You are a fool not to have the watch;" I said, "You don't mean that, do you?" he said, "Yes, go and get it, and I will see it is all right." I went back and got the watch, thinking it might be gone, and I should be accused of stealing it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Four Months.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, May 10th, 1843.

Reference Number: t18430508-1414

1414. JACOB SMALL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, at St. Botolph Without, Aldgate, in the dwelling-house of Ann Denholm, 1 coat, value 3l.; 3 pairs of trowsers, 2l. 14s.; 5 waistcoats, 3l. 13s.; 1 pair of drawers, 2s.; 1 handkerchief, 1s.; 1 stock, 1s.; 3 studs, 3s.; 1 pair of ear-drops, 5s.; 1 ring, 10s.; 1 pair of stockings, 1s.; and 2 promissory notes for payment of 1l. each; the property of James Dutt; and that he had been previously convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1415

1415. ROBERT BOURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April, 1/2lb. weight of tea, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Alfred Corder, from the person of George Alfred Corder Penney.

GEORGE ALFRED CORDER PENNEY . I am nine years old, and live with my uncle, Alfred Corder. On Thursday, in last month, I had half-a-crown from my aunt to buy half-a-pound of tea—when I was coming home with it

under my arm, I saw the prisoner, and a boy with him—the prisoner began following me at the Sir John Conroy—I saw him before I went into the tea-shop—he was stopping at Mr. Lomas's, where I bought the tea, and he followed me again—I went up a court—he then came up to me, and, without speaking a word, pulled the tea out of my hand, and ran off down the alley.

MICHAEL NAGLE . I am ten years old, and live with my father, at Kensington. I was walking with Penney—we went up an alley, called Bullingham place—the prisoner and another came up—the prisoner took hold of the tea—I was trying to help Penney, and he bit my hand—he got the tea away, and ran down the alley—I am sure he is the boy—he gave it to the other boy, and told to him put it into his pocket, which he did.

HENRY MOUNT . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner between one and two o'clock on Saturday—I told him it was for stealing half-a-pound of tea from a little boy—he at first denied it—when the witnesses came, and mentioned Nagle, the other boy, he asked me if I was going after Nagle—I said, "Yes"—he said it was through him he stole the tea; that he wanted him to steal the half-crown before he bought the tea.

Prisoner. The other boy took it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Two Months, and Whipped.

Before Mr. Justice Coltman.

Reference Number: t18430508-1416

1416. HENRY ROOK was indicted for a rape.

GUILTY of an Assault. Aged 19.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18430508-1417

1417. EDWARD HEYLIN was indicted for stealing 3 post letters, containing 2 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign, the property of the Postmaster-General, he being employed in the General Post Office; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Life.

( Robert Charles Smith, superintending president of the Twopenny Post Office; Rev. John Kershaw, of Cumming-street, Pentonville; and James Kershaw, gave the prisoner a good character.)

Reference Number: t18430508-1418

1418. GEORGE DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April, 1 letter, containing 1 sovereign, the property of the Postmaster-General.—2nd Count, stating it to be the property of the Right Hon. William, Baron Lowther.—3rd Count, stating it to be the property of John Playle.

MESSRS. SHEPHERD and ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN PLAYLE . I am assistant-inspector of letter-carriers at the Post Office. The prisoner was a letter-carrier in the Dorset-square district, Regent's-park—in consequence of complaints at the Office, I made up a letter on the 17th of April, and addressed it to "Mr. Midlam, bread and biscuit baker, No. 6, Dorset-place, London"—I put two penny adhesive stamps on it, and next morning, Tuesday, the 18th, I put into the letter one sovereign, in the presence of Mr. Russell—we each put a private mark on the sovereign—I now produce that sovereign, and am quite sure it is the identical one I put into the letter on the 18th—here is both my mark and Mr. Russell's—I noticed also that it was the coinage of Victoria, 1843, which this is—the paper had a yellowish cast, not the usual colour of letter paper, and the letter was rather large—I sealed it, and gave it into the hands of Mr. Brodie, a clerk in the superintending president's room, to take the address—I afterwards went to one of the windows in the hall, and gave it into his hands at the window—he put the obliterating stamp on it, and the day of the month—he then brought it back to me, in the superintending president's room, and I took it into the inspector's room, and gave it to Mr. Russell, who had seen me make it up—he sent for Henry Rice, a sorter, and gave it to him—this was about

twenty-five minutes past seven o'clock in the morning—I have never seen the letter since—it is the practice in the office for the letter-carriers to pay their charges to the receiver-general three times a week—they pay the amount of two days' letters—one carrier takes it from what is called the division, and hands it to the receiver-general's clerk—there are fifteen divisions—there are seventeen carriers in the prisoner's division—when their pay papers are made up, each paper is delivered separately to the receiver-general's clerk, with the money in it—Hipp is collector of charges to the prisoner's division—on the morning after this, after Hipp had collected the payments from the different carriers, he brought them to me, about seven o'clock in the morning of the 19th.

THOMAS RUSSELL . I am assistant-inspector of letter-carriers. On the 18th of April I saw Mr. Playle inclose a sovereign in a letter, about a quarter past seven o'clock in the morning, directed to "Mr. Midlam, bread and biscuit baker, No. 6, Dorset-place, London"—a sovereign was fastened into it by a piece of card—I had marked the sovereign, and saw Mr. Playle mark it—I noticed that it was the reign of Victoria, 1843—that produced is it—Mr. Playle sealed the letter—I shortly after saw it in Mr. Playle's hands—it had then received two post-office stamps—Rice was called up, and directed to put it among the Dorset-place division, with Davis's letters—about a quarter past eight o'clock that morning I saw the letter again on the prisoner's seat, having passed through the first sorting, and put up in one of the divisions of letters, as is the custom, to be delivered in different streets—the letters are first sorted by a sub-sorter into divisions, and afterwards into walks—they are then brought out into another office, and placed on the seats of the respective letter-carriers who have to deliver them—they are brought out in a tray, and placed on the carriers' seats—they then arrange them for delivery—I saw this letter after it had been arranged for delivery—that it done by the carrier.

Q. How could you tell it was after it was arranged? A. They are first placed flat on the desk, but afterwards placed upon two shelves, and stand upon one end—this being a larger letter than common, and of a peculiar yellow tint, and what is rather unusual, two stamps, that satisfied me it was the same letter—I saw the two stamps and the colour of the paper—it was rather a large letter, but I think not to large as to project so much as it did—I did not see the prisoner leave the office that morning—I saw him with his hat on, and he came into the private office where I was, preparing to go out—I think it was a little after eight—I was present next morning when Hipp brought the charges into what we call the inquiry room—Mr. Playle was there—we both began to open the different charges—Mr. Playle opened Davis's, when it came to its turn, and put it on one side, without speaking, for me to look; at, which I did.

COURT. Q. How did you know it was Davis's charge? A. I knew that afterwards—here is the paper with Davis's name at the bottom of the amount, in his handwriting—there was six sovereigns and one shilling in it, and among them was the sovereign which he bad marked—the prisoner was called in that morning, and placed in charge of Tyrrell, the officer—he remained in his custody an hour or two before he was examined by Mr. Peacock.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When was this plan of putting sovereigns into letters first commenced? A. About a year and a half or two years ago—Mr. Playle was entrusted with the management of it—if a man is suspected, we have recourse to this to discover if it is correct, intending he should take the letter and money if so disposed.

Q. I believe it has turned out once or twice that the wrong man has been suspected? A. I should think so—Mr. Playle detected a relation or his own

in that way after giving another man into custody—I was concerned with Mr. Playle in'getting up that plan—I noticed the date of the sovereign at Mr. Playle's suggestion—anybody into whose hands this paper came, might open it and change the money—there is no seal—it has the prisoner's signature to it, showing that for two days his letters came to 6l. 1s. all but 1d. I made a dent on the sovereign with a brad-awl, on the shield side, between the stems of the wreath—Hipp has been seven or eight years, I think, in the Post-office—his situation is the same kind as the prisoner's—I saw Mr. Playle put the wax on the letter in the superintending president's room, and saw him leave with it—I saw the letter afterwards—I do not know whether I had it in my hand, but am pretty certain I handed it over to Rice, but do not exactly recollect—the prisoner's is the fifteenth division—I do not know how many letter-carriers there are in it—there are a great many—if a letter is given to a carrier, whose division it does not belong to, he would not be fined if he does not carry it out, that I am aware of—the carriers' seats are divided by a partition—each man has a seat to himself—I did not put the letter on the prisoner's seat, nor see it put on—on the division of his seat that I saw this letter, there were about twenty—they varied in size—Mr. Playle selected the paper for the letter, and directed it, by Mr. Kelly's direction—I saw Mr. Playle mark the sovereign at the end of the curl of the Queen's hair—it was an indentation of the same brad-awl—I was not acquainted with Midlam—I have since found there is a person of that name—the prisoner's ordinary weekly payment was about 6l.

MR. SHEPHERD. Q. Do you put down in writing the date of collecting? A. I take the particulars on paper.

JAMES BRODLE . I am a clerk in the General Post-office. On Tuesday morning, the 18th of April, I remember Mr. Playle bringing me a letter to the window, addressed to Mr. Midlam, bread and biscuit baker, 6, Dorset-place, London—it appeared to contain a piece of coin, and had two 1d. postage stamps on it—I obliterated them, stamped it with the date-stamp of the office, and gave it back to Mr. Playle.

HENRY RICE . I am a superintending-sorter in the General Post-office. I was on duty on the 18th of April, and received from Mr. Russell a letter directed to Mr. Midlam, bread and biscuit baker, 6, Dorset-place, London—it contained some hard substance, which I supposed to be cash—Mr. Playle was present—I placed it among the letters for the Dorset-square delivery, after they had been sorted in the inland-office—the other letters for the district had been sorted into walks—the delivery is what we term a walk or district—it was the division, No. 15—I placed it among the prisoner's walk, which is the Dorset-square walk—the letters were at that time standing up on their ends as they had been sorted—Thomas Le Good, the collector, came in while I was there, and took the letters away into the letter-carrier's-office, in a tray—he took those of the Dorset-square walk, and the whole of the fifteen divisions at the same time—the letter I had placed there was among them—it was what we call the last collection after the sorters had done—the collector takes letters away several times in the course of the morning for the sorters—this was the last collection of that morning—there were two stamps on the right hand corner of the letter, and the paper was rather of a yellowish cast.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. About how many letters went to that division that morning? A. Perhaps from 8,000 to 10,000, carried in this tray at separate times—the man who takes them out places them on each letter-carrier's seat—the letter-carrier is sometimes at his seat and sometimes

not—the walks are divided on the tray, by one letter being put upright—there is no wooden partition to the tray—there are about twenty-three letter-carriers in this division—only one person carries the letters for each division—some of the heavier divisions employ two men—I have seen letters dropped, at times, in carrying from one office to the other.

THOMAS BURSTON LE GOOD . I am letter-carrier in the General Post-office. On Tuesday, the 18th of April, I was employed in collecting letters from the Inland-office, for the last collection of the fifteenth division—those intended for the Dorset-square district I laid on the prisoner's seat, about ten minutes or a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning—I saw Mr. Rice there at the time—prisoner's duty was arrange those letters for delivery.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where was the prisoner when you placed them there? A. He was not at his seat, to the best my knowledge—I had not been made acquainted with the plan—I put on his seat about as many letter as I could take in my hand, perhaps thirty—I took them from the table in the Inland-office, where they are sorted—there are two sorters appointed for that purpose, Ray and another—I do not know who it was that morning—I earned them in an open tray—it was not full at the last collection, but nearly so—I did not observe the colour of them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whom did you receive the letters from? A. From the table—Rice was close behind when I put them on the prisoner's seat, and when I took them from the table—I did not in any way alter them.

HENRY RICE re-examined. Q. Did you see Le Good carry the letters to the prisoner's seat? A. I saw him take them into the letter-carrier's office, and afterwards, saw the letters placed on the seat—I did not see the letter in question on the seat—I believe I afterwards saw it on the seat, but will not swear that I saw that letter in particular, I saw him placing the letters on the seats—I did not see him actually place them on the prisoner's seat, but saw them on it immediately afterwards—I cannot speak to seeing that particular letter there at that time—I can say I saw a letter, which I suppose to be the letter—I have scarcely any doubt it was the same—for I observed in it two stamps, and the colour of the paper—that was when I pointed it out to Mr. Russell—that was about ten minutes after I first saw the bundle of letters on the prisoner's seat—they had then all been sorted by the prisoner—I do not know whether he had arranged them quite for delivery, but he had thrown do that—I did not see Le Good put them on the prisoner's a seat, as I did not like to follow very closely.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Would not the prisoner be absent at different times, calling the charges that morning? A. Yes, he would be engaged the principal part of the morning, perhaps about an hour, from seven till eight o'clock—he would be from his seat occasionally, and it might be as early as half-past six, according to the duty—he had to call the carriers to fetch their own charges duty to call them to retell their charges—there is only one besides the prisoner employed on that duty—he would be occasionally doing that from half-past six to eight, most of thetime, he would be occasionally at his seat—they arrange between themselves, one to be absent a few minutes, and the other to attend to it.

COURT. Q. How then could he sort the letters to the different streets? A. He would have part of his letter, at his seat, which are brought out at different time, to his seat—he would occasionally get a few minutes to sort them, then go away to call the charges.

WILLIAM GEORGE MIDLAM . I am a bread and biscuit baker, and live at

No. 6, Dorset-place, Pall-mall. I know Mr. Playle—I did not, in April, or at any time, receive from him a letter with a sovereign in it.

WILLIAM HENRY HIPP . I am a letter-carrier at the General Post-office. It was part of my duty to receive from the letter-carriers of fifteen divisions their pay-lists. On the 19th of April I received a pay-list from the prisoner—this is it—(looking at it)—it contained money—I put it into my pocket, and took it into the room to Mr. Playle—I received lists from all the other carriers that morning—I put them all into my pocket, and delivered them to Mr. Playle, in Mr. Kelly's room.

Q. From the time you received these pay-lists till you delivered them up, had they been broken open, or the money at all mixed? A. No; each man's money was wrapped in his own pay-list—I delivered it exactly in the same condition as I received it from the prisoner—I marked one of the coins which was taken out of it by desire of Mr. Russell—I had seen it taken out—it was in the paper at the time I received it from the prisoner—that now produced is it—I put my name on it.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long elapsed from the time you received the money and handing it over? A. It might be twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour—it was not an hour—after I received it I was engaged collecting the others—I put them into my right hand coat pocket—I do not know the amount of any of the others—this was the highest amount—some of them were in silver—the lists are all the same size—I received them from the different men—I went about from place to place receiving them—some came to me, and some I went to—I dropped them into my coat pocket.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you break bulk, or cause any of the money to come out in dropping them into your pocket? A. No, I did not—there was no loose money in my pocket that morning.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am a constable of the Post-office. I was in the inspector's room on the morning of the 19th of April—Mr. Playle, Mr. Peacock, Mr. Russell, and, I think, Mr. Kelly, who belongs to the Post-office, were there—the prisoner was with me—I was called, and brought him into the inspector's room, and he was delivered into my custody—I had had him in my custody for some time before—this paper was opened by Mr. Playle, who looked at one sovereign in particular, and identified it—the prisoner was then asked how he accounted for the sovereigns—he said he had received one the day before, (the Tuesday) from the bar-maid of the Alsop Arms, New-road; two he had received from the same house on the Monday, and he received the other three on the Friday previous—he was asked to look at the sovereign which Mr. Playle had previously identified, and he said he believed that to be the sovereign he had received from the bar-maid, as the one he had received was a new one—Mr. Peacock said a letter directed to Mr. Midlam, baker, No. 6, Dorset-place, London, on his walk, had never been delivered—the prisoner was asked if he had seen it, and said he had seen no such a letter, for he knew No. 6 was a Mr. Robinson's, a surgeon—I have inquired, and found there is a Mr. Robinson at No. 6.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did not he tell you he had not seen such a letter, and if he had he should know it was not for his delivery, as Mr. Robinson, a surgeon, resided at No. 6? A. Yes.

JOHN PLAYLE re-examined. On the morning of the 19th of April, Hipp brought me a pay-list, which contains the amount each man has to pay—he also delivered to me the packets of money named in that pay-list—they were all in separate papers, and apparently unbroken—I proceeded to examine them—I took them as the names appear on the list, but did not examine the amounts of each paper—I only looked at the sovereigns—I had examined about five

before I came to the prisoner's packet, which contained six sovereigns and one shilling, his charge being 6l. 0s. 11d.—I looked particularly at the sovereigns in that paper, which was signed by the prisoner himself—among them I found the sovereign I named as having marked and put into the letter—it is the identical sovereign—here are the marks which I and Mr. Russell put—I desired Hipp instantly to mark it, which he did—I gave the prisoner into custody of Tyrrell, and in about half an hour afterwards I saw him in the inspector's room—he was asked by Mr. Peacock what money he had given to Hipp that morning—he said 6l. 1s.—he said he gave them to him in the usual way, folded up in the paper—Mr. Peacock told him there had been a letter missing in the morning, directed to Mr. Midlam, which had not been delivered, and that letter contained a sovereign, and one of the sovereigns found in his paper was known to be the identical sovereign that letter contained—he said he could not tell how that could be, for he could account for where he obtained all the sovereigns—he said he had no such name in his district; that a surgeon named Robinson lived at No. 6 in his district, and not a baker—he said if a letter had been directed to Dorset-place, Pall-mall, he should have taken it either to the letter-carrier's seat for Pall-mall, or put it among the blind, or miss-sorted letters, as we term them—he said one sovereign he had taken of the bar-maid of the Alsop Arms, New-road, the bright sovereign, and that was the one I had marked.

Q. How did he point that out as the one he bad take n? A. Hestood at a distance, and was looking over the different sovereigns—he said he remembered taking three of one, and two of another, and the bright one he said, "I took of the bar-maid of the Alsop Arms"—that was the one which was marked.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did he say he knew nothing about the letter, but if it had come to him, he would not have taken it out, for he had no bread and biscuit baker living in Dorset-place, but a doctor lived there? A. I will not say those were the identical words, but it was to that effect.

ELEANOR HORLOCK . I am bar-maid at the Alsop Arms, New-road—I know the prisoner. On Tuesday morning, the 18th of April, he brought me 20s. in silver, and I gave him a sovereign, which I took from my purse—I had had it about a fortnight or three weeks—I am quite sure I had had it longer than a week, unless I gave somebody else change, which I do not remember—I am quite sure I had it before that day—I had it on the 17th—I gave it him between eleven and twelve in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I believe your master had a very high opinion of the prisoner? A. Very high indeed, and so had I—I have known him eleven years—he was very largely trusted with money by my master—it is very likely I change money every five minutes in the day, but that is from the till—the sovereign I gave him was of the present reign, but I cannot say whether it was of this year.

MR. SHEPPARD. Q. Was that sovereign out of your purse? A. Yes—that is not common for me to do, but there was no sovereign in the till, and I took it from my purse—the first I took out I did not give him, but the second—I think I had had that sovereign a fortnight.

COURT. Q. Are you able to say with certainty whether you took that sovereign the preceding day, or might you have got it that morning in change? A. I am sure I did not get it that morning—I have no recollection of giving any one a sovereign for silver—the last money I put into my purse was about a fortnight before, when I received my wages—I might have given change since that, but do not remember it—I am sure I did not

that day—that was the only time I opened my purse that day—I kept my purse in a drawer in the bar—it had been there about a month.

MATTHEW MORRISS . I am a letter-carrier at the Post-office. Dorset-place, Pall-mall, is in my division—Mr. Midlam, a biscuit-baker, lives there—I had no letter to deliver to him that day—the prisoner did not deliver one to me, or communicate to me that I ought to have had one.

MR. PLAYLE re-examined. The sovereign I put into the letter was my own.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is a letter with an equivocal address called a blind letter? A. Yes—it would be handed over to what is called the blind sorter.

MR. RUSSELL re-examined. The name of Davis on this pay-bill is the prisoner's writing—it is usual for the carriers to write their names outside.

(Thomas Wintle, landlord of the Alsop Arms; Richard Goldsmith, Esq., a barrister; Thomas Bull, of New-street, Dorset-square; Thomas Jackson, cheesemonger, New-street, Dorset-square; George Andrews, oilman, New-street; Thomas Hale, collector of sewer-rate, Upper Baker-street; William Terry, of Gloster-place; John Bennett, surgeon, Upper Baker-street; and Henry Child, farmer, of Edgeware-road; gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 44.—Strongly Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Transported for Seven Years.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18430508-1419

1419. WILLIAM HANKERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 watch-guard, 2s.; 2 seals, 1s.; and 1 watch-key, 6d.; the goods of Charles Smith; and that he bad been previously convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1420

1420. WILLIAM ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April, 1 square, value 2s.; 2 razors and case, 2s.; 1 waistcoat, 1s.; 1 apron, 9d.; 1 towel, 8d.; and 3lbs. weight of brass, 1s. 6d.; the goods of Alfred Lane: 2 saws, value 7s.; 1 jacket, 8s.; 1 apron, 9d.; and 1 square, 3s.; the goods of Joseph Green Wilson; 1 saw, 7s.; 1 jacket, 6s.; 1 pocket-book, 6d.; and 3lbs. weight of brass, 1s. 6d.; the goods of George Hernaman Cole: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1421

1421. ELIZABETH MASON, JUN ., was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April, 1 shift, value 1s.; 4 handkerchiefs, 6s.; 2 frocks, 4s.; 4 shawls, 15s.; 1 pillow-case, 6d.; 2 bed-gowns, 2s.; 1 shirt, 1s.; 1 petticoat, 3s.; 1 pair of boots, 4s.; 3 printed books, 2s.; 1 locket, 5s.; 1 ring, 1s.; 3 printed books, 2s.; 3 bottles, 6d.; 1 quart of wine, 5s.; and 1 corkscrew, 3d.; the goods of George Frederick Lambert, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1422

1422. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Radford, on the 1st of May, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, 1 hat, value 12s., his property.

JOHN RADFORD, JUN . I live in Wilson-street, Finsbury. Between one and two o'clock in the morning of the 1st of May, I was returning home alone—I am almost a stranger in London—I received a blow at the back of my head—I felt the effect for some days after—I rather think it was from behind—it knocked me down—it was with the fist I believe—as soon as I got up, I saw the prisoner running off with my hat—I instantly called the police—this hat produced resembles mine—I have no particular mark on it.

WILLIAM WEBB . I am a cab-man. On the night of the 1st of May I

heard a cry of "Stop thief!"—I saw a mob of people running—I ran with the rest of them, and saw the prisoner chuck a hat down off his head—I picked it up, and gave it to the policeman—I saw no other hat with him at the time—he had no hat when the policeman took him.

HENRY COLE (City police-constable, No. 219.) I saw the prisoner running along Farringdon-street at a furious rate—hearing a cry of "Stop thief," I ran after him—he ran up Turnagain-lane—seeing I was close at his heels, he fell down—the hat was picked up, and given to me—he had no hat on—the prosecutor identified the hat—he was a little excited in liquor—he was not drunk—he had been drinking—the prisoner was drank—I did not see the prisoner with any cap—he came up, and said he had lost his hat.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor had come in contact with him: after which a scuffle ensued, he being intoxicated, that he found the hat on the ground and took it up, believing it to be his own.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1423

1423. CHARLES CURTIS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Owen Hughes, on the 6th of April, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing therein 4 gowns, value 1l.; 1 shawl, 3s.; 1 pair of boots, 2s.; 1 petticoat, 1s.; 1 bed-gown, 6d.; 1 shift, 1s.; 1 sheet, 6d.; 1 pillowcase, 1s.; 1 yard of calico, 6d.; and 1 apron, 6d.; his property.

JANE HUGHES . I am the wife of Owen Hughes, a mangle-maker, No. 8, City-terrace, Old-street-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On Thursday, the 6th of April, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, I went into the back parlour—I found the door and two of the drawers open—I missed the articles stated, which I had seen safe in the back parlour about nine o'clock—no one else was in the room then—I went down into the kitchen—I shut the door, I am sure, but my boy went up afterwards—he is not here—he is fifteen years old—when I came up stairs at nine the street-door was shut—when I left the parlour I did not pass the street-door—I saw it shut at nine—nobody came in after, that I know of—there are lodgers on the first and second floors—some lodgers came in between nine and my missing the things—they have got keys, and come in and out—this property now produced is all mine, and is what I lost that night.

ALFRED EDWARDS . I am a labourer, and live in Gee-street, St. Luke's. On Thursday, the 6th of April, about half-past nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Short-street, Tabernacle-square, about a minutes' walk from the prosecutor's house, tying up a large bundle—two men were there as well—I heard some one say, "Go on," as they crossed the street—I followed the prisoner—he went about 100 yards down Cowper-street, and returned back about two yards—I followed him—he went down the street about three parts of the way, to within about four yards of where I first saw him—he then threw the bundle at me—I followed him close—I did not lose sight of him—I picked it up—he ran—I cried, "Stop thief"—I stopped him myself—this is the bundle.

JOHN JONES . I am a policeman. I heard a cry of, "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner run out of Tabernacle-square—he was stopped before I came up—I took him—Edwards was after him—he produced a bundle—these are the contents.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry this bundle as far as the Bell Inn, Aldgate, and he would give me 1s.; he said it was some washing; I went a little way; the man walked behind me; I afterwards turned round, and he was gone.

JOHN JONES re-examined. He did not tell me he was going to carry the bundle—he said he knew nothing about it.

GUILTY of Larceny. Aged 21.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1424

1424. MARY CARROLL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Morgan, about the hour of ten in the night of the 12th of April, at St. John, Wapping, and stealing therein 1 bonnet, 4s. 6d.; and 1 handkerchief, 6d.; his goods.

CHARLES MORGAN, JUN . I am a light porters, living in Coopers-row, Upper East-Smithfield, in the parish of St. John, Wapping. It is my father, Charles Morgan's house. On the evening of the 12th of April, about half-past nine o'clock, I left home—I saw my mother lock the door—the house was all shut up—the shutters were fastened—I am sure it was past nine o'clock—the Dockbell rang at nine, which was half an hour before—I went on an errand, and was coming back—I saw a light in the first floor window—that room has got no shutters—I went back for my father and mother—when I came home I saw the prisoner standing in the middle of the room—I did not know her—I said, "I have caught you"—I saw a bundle tied up in a handkerchief on a chair, which she was standing by the side of—the policeman came—I observed the staple of the street-door lying on the floor, by the door-post—this is it—there is a back yard door—I am sure that was shut when I left home—I did not notice it when I came home—it had only got a latch to it—I do not know whether there was any possibility of getting in at the back—it is a low wall—there is a public-house at the back of it—it appeared the staple had been forced off.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Your father, and mother, and you adjourned to the public-house, and left your own house without any one in it? A. Yes, to the Anchor and Hope, close by—I was not drinking there the best part of the day—I was not there drinking at all before this—I am porter to Mr. Castle, No. 19, Minories—I have been in his employ about twelve months, but have been in the firm before, in regular employment—my father is a hair-dresser—there is no shop—my mother does not carry on any business, nor do I there—when I said to the prisoner, "I have caught you," she began to cry—she said a young woman gave her 1d. to stop in the house a few minutes till she came back—there was no lock to the back door—it might have been left ajar.

CATHERINE MORGAN . I am the wife of Charles Morgan, a hair-dresser. I left home on this night about half-past nine o'clock—I am sure I locked the outer door—I was going somewhere—my son called me—I came back to the house, and found the prisoner, the policeman, and my son there—the bonnet was in the policeman's hands—it had been in my middle room cupboard up stairs, not in the room where she was found.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the girl at all? A. I never saw her in my life before, nor her parents—I went to the public-house to have a pint of beer.

JESSEE TROWER . I am a policeman. I came to the house a little before ten o'clock, and saw the prisoner standing in the bottom room—the bonnet was on the chair by the side of her—I asked her where she lived—she said she had come from Wapping, that a girl gave her 1d., and told her to go up stairs, but when she came down the girl was gone—she did not say what she was to go up for—Wapping is half-a-mile from the prosecutor's house—I did not ask her name—I asked her where she lived, and went to the place she told me, next day—it was not correct.

Cross-examined. Q. What was it incorrect in? A. She told me she lived in Williams'-court, and it was in Spitalfields, a mile from there—I did not misunderstand her—I took the direction down—I think it was No. 4, Williams'-court, Cable-street—I have seen her father—I have known the

Morgan's a good white—he is a pensioner, and goes about shaving—the Anchor and Hope used to be a very bad house—it is better now.

COURT. Q. Did you examine the door? A. The lock was locked, and the staple was lying down inside—I saw Morgan pick the staple up—it had been forced—a push might do it—I cannot say whether a girl of the prisoner's size could force it.

MRS. MORGAN re-examined. I never knew the staple out before—I did not take notice whether it was fast or loose.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY of stealing in the dwelling-house. Aged 16.—Recommended to mercy. Confined One Year, the last Month Solitary.

Reference Number: t18430508-1425

1425. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 15 yards of calico, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Robert Nicholson.

ENOCH JONES . I am errand-boy to Mr. Hawes, of Albany-street, and live in Roberts'-mews, Hampstead-road. On the 12th of April, about a quarter to nine o'clock, I was going on an errand, and saw the prisoner and three others standing next door to Mr. Nicholson's, a linen-draper's shop, at the corner of Ernest-street—I saw the prisoner go up and feel the calico, which was outside the shop—he came away again to his companions, went back again, took it, wrapped it in his handkerchief, and went away with it and the others—I told the policeman.

JOSEPH SKINMORE . I am a policeman. I received information from Jones, ran after the prisoner, and took him—he had this calico with him—the ticket was pinned to it.

ROBERT NICHOLSON . This calico is mine—it was outside the door.

Prisoner's Defence. The calico was wrapped up in a handkerchief; I picked it up at the doorway; I did not go and feel it first.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months, the last Fortnight Solitary.

OLD COURT.—Thursday, May 11th, 1843.

Second Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1426

1426. JAMES PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March, at St. Andrew, Holborn, 1 clock, value 7l., the goods of Prothero Smith, in his dwelling-house; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Ten Years.

(There were two other indictments against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18430508-1427

1427. JOHN BARON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Butcher, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1428

1428. GEORGE BIRCH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of Feb., 1 quilt, value 3s., 1 blanket, 2s. 6d.; 2 pillow-cases, 1s.; 1 bolster, 2s.; 1 set of fire-irons, 1s. 6d.; 1 tea-kettle, 3s.; 2 saucepans, 4s.; 1 frying-pan, 6d.; 1 flat-iron, 6d.; and 1 candlestick, 6d.; the goods of Martha Pullen.

ELIZA COLLINS . I am the wife of William Davis Collins, and live with my mother, Martha Pullen; she has a house, No. 22, Collingwood-street, Bethnal-green, which she lets out in lodgings. On the 26th of Nov., while she was out of town, I let the prisoner a room in that house, and the articles stated were let with it—he brought a woman as his wife, and lived there.

MARTHA PULLEN . I am a widow, and live in Castle-street, Bethnal-green; the house, No. 22, Collingwood-street, belongs to me, and I let it out in tenements. In Nov. I was in the country, and my daughter had charge of the house—I returned to town in a few days, and found the prisoner occupying a furnished room in the house—he remained there till February—I was then informed that he had left—he gave me no notice—I have since let the apartments again—I have never seen the things since.

HENRY ROBINSON . I live in Collingwood-street; I helped to look after the prosecutrix's house. I remember the prisoner being in possession of a room there—I saw a quilt, blanket, sheets and other things, in that room—on the 27th of February, in consequence of information, I went there, and the prisoner and the things were gone—the door was just closed—I could not find the key anywhere.

MARGARET ATKINSON . I live in the house where the prisoner lodged. On the 27th of Feb. I went into the back yard, and saw the curtain torn down from the window—I sent to Mrs. Pullen, and we found the prisoner and the things were gone.

GEORGE TEAKLE (police-sergeant H 8.) On the 25th of March I took the prisoner into custody—I said, "I suppose you know what I am come about; it is about Mrs. Pullen"—he said, "Yes, but it is all settled"—I said it was no such thing, that I had instructions from Mrs. Pullen to take him into custody—he said that some one had been and presented 1s. in payment. MARTHA PULLEN re-examined. I never settled or offered to settle this with the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work for some time; I left on Saturday night, knowing they would come on Sunday for the rent, and I was not able to pay it; I got into employ a short time after, and they came and said I had stolen the goods; one of my shopmates advised me to go and make an agreement, and my master gave me some money to do so; he went and gave 1s.; it turned out to be the prosecutrix's servant.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1429

1429. HARRIET MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 1 purse, value 3d.; 1 sovereign, 3 shillings, and 1 10l. note; the property of Rees Walter, from his person.

REES WALTER . I live in Buttesland-street, Hoxton. On the morning of 18th of April I met the prisoner; I cannot say precisely the time; it was somewhere about four o'clock—I was in the neighbourhood of Wilmington-square—she followed me, and wanted me to go home with her—I would not, and during the conversation she took my purse from my pocket—no one else was near me—I missed it about two or three minutes after she left me—I know I had it in my pocket before I met her—it contained the money stated—I gave information to the first policeman I met—I was not sober at the time, but I knew what took place.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not meet me at seven o'clock in the evening? A. No; I was not in the neighbourhood at that time—I swear you are the woman that took my purse; you dived your hand into my left hand pocket.

JOHN AWRENCE . I am a policeman. In consequence of information from a brother-constable, I took the prisoner into custody at her residence, No. 3, Spa-cottages, about half-past five o'clock—I told her what I wanted with her—she said it was a false accusation, and told me she had been in bed five hours—I said I knew that was wrong, for I saw her myself at four o'clock that morning, which I did, in Lloyd's-row—I took her to the station, and she there said she was drunk, or she should not have robbed the man.

MARY ANN REDMAN . I am employed as searcher at the station-house. I

searched the prisoner, and while doing so observed a piece of paper drop from her—I picked it up—the inspector said, "That is the 10l. note the man has lost"—she held up this purse, and said, "Yes, it is the man's, and here is his purse," which she gave to me.

REES WALTER re-examined. This is my purse and note—I know it by the endorsement which I made on it at the time

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove that I was in bed at four o'clock; I met the prosecutor at seven, by Sadler's-wells; he asked me to have something to drink; we went to a house in St. John-street-road, and had a glass of short; he was a little in liquor then, but not much; we went to the Hugh Myddleton, into the parlour, where there were some gentlemen, and some of the performers; it was then eight; we had some half-and-half and gin-and-water; he went to pay the waiter, and dropped sixpence; he then took out his purse to pay for it, and instead of replacing it in his pocket, he dropped he it; he was very tipsy then, and could hardly stagger; this was at one o'clock; he then went out at the back-door; as I was coming out at the front door, I kicked against the purse; I picked it up, and waited outside to see if I could meet with him, and inquired of the waiter for him; I could not see anything of him, and went home, and to bed, as I was much the worse for liquor; when the policeman came, I said, "Where is the man that accuses me of this theft? I have a purse, but I will take it to the station;" I took it in my hand, and gave it up.

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18430508-1430

1430. ELIJAH HODGE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry William Pickersgill, about the hour of two in the night of the 18th of July, at St. Ann, Westminster, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 cloak, value 6l.; 1 pair of trowsers, 10s.; 1 hat, 8s.; 1 card-case, 5s.; 1 pair of gloves, 2s.; and 1 napkin, 2s.; his goods: 2nd COUNT, for burglariously breaking out of the said dwelling-house.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

MART M'ARTHUR . In the summer of last year I lived as cook with Mr. Pickersgill, in Soho-square. One morning when I came down at half-past five o'clock, I found the house had been entered in the night—I was the first who came down in the morning, and found the street-door unlocked, unchained, and unbolted—there was an appearance in the kitchen of somebody having been into the house—I communicated this to the man-servant, and Mr. Pickersgill was called down—I had not fastened the door the night before myself.

CHARLES DOE . I was in the service of Mr. Pickersgill, in July last, as footman—I am not so now. On Tuesday morning, the 19th of July, I was alarmed by the cook, who told me what had happened—I had fastened the street-door the night before, at eleven—we all went up stairs nearly together—I bolted both bolts, locked it, and put the chain up—I fastened the dining-room shutters, and locked the study—when the cook called me in the morning, I found the dining-room door open, the study, and all the doors open which I had locked the night before—they were opened by turning the keys—the street-door key was found in the area—I had left it in the door the night before—Mr. Pickersgill was called—I afterwards looked over the kitchen door, and found two rails taken down and laid inside the kitchen, by the dresser—the kitchen door opens on to the stairs which lead to the dining-room—by removing those rails, a person could put a hand through to undo the bolt inside, and so get into the house.

THOMAS WOOTTON . I live at 13, Little Pulteney-street, and keep a public-house.

I know the prisoner very well—he lodged at my house some time in the summer, for a fortnight or three weeks—I cannot remember the particular time—I remember Beresford, the police-inspector, calling on me—I think he must have called in a day or two from the time the prisoner slept at my house last—I never saw him since.

WILLIAM ROWE . I am constable of Truro, in Cornwall. In Sept. last I had occasion to go to the house of the prisoner's mother, who lives at Truro—I searched her house, and found in the kitchen a box, which is here—the prisoner was not there when I went—I knew he had been there the day before, and was living there—I searched that box, and found in it five duplicates in a tortoiseshell card-case—one of them refers to a cloak, pawned at Cording's—the others do not refer to this matter—I have been searching for the prisoner since that, and found him at last in the island of Jersey—I apprehended him there, the Thursday before last Easter—I told him what I took him for—he made no reply.

Prisoner. He did not tell me what he took me for; he is not the man who took me. Witness. I did not go into the house myself, as he knew me very well—I went to ask a, person to take him—he brought him out—I went to him in the prison, and told him the charge—I was in sight when he was taken.

Prisoner. You charged me with robbing a gentleman in Cornwall, you said that was what I was taken for. Witness. I did not say a word of the kind—I asked if he knew Mr. Pickersgill, of London, and told him what he was charged with.

WILLIAM FERNES . I am assistant to Mr. Cording, pawnbroker, Aldgate, High-street—I produce a cloak—the duplicate produced was issued from our shop—the cloak was pawned on the 19th of July, to the best of my recollection, between twelve and two o'clock, by a man—I have the counter duplicate.

HENRY BERESFORD . I am an inspector of the police. A communication was made to me, and I was inquiring about the prisoner at Mr. Wootton's, on Monday, the 18th of July, the day of the robbery.

Prisoner. I employed this man at the time to come to that house, as I charged a man with taking clothes from me. Witness. I never knew of that till afterwards.

HENRY WILLIAM PICKERSGILL, ESQ ., R.A. I am an artist, and reside at No. 18, Soho-square, in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster—the prisoner was in my service for about six weeks, and left on the 5th of April, 1842—I was called up on the morning of the 19th of July, when this discovery took place—this is my cloak, and one of the things stolen on the night in question—I know it by the clasp, which I bought in France—this is part of my card-case which was stolen that night—it was whole when stolen—I lost some tray-cloths and other things from the house—all the food in the house was disturbed and thrown about, and part carried away.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of this charge; my brother was in London at the time, and I left London with him sailing in a vessel to the West of England; and if the things were found in my mother's house, I know nothing of them.

MR. PICKERSGILL. This is the box the prisoner had in my house.

HENRY PICKERSGILL . I am the prosecutor's son, I do not reside with him—my attention was directed to the prisoner's box before he left the house—this is the box he had then—I am quite sure of it.

Prisoner. It is not the box I had at Mr. Pickersgill's, that was stolen from me when I left; it is very extraordinary this should have come into my mother's house without my knowledge—I have only one brother besides

myself—I never did it—I was in a situation, when I was taken, with a gentleman where I can get a good character, and he would take me back again.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1431

1431. JANE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April, 66 yards of lace, value 5l. 9s., the goods of William Phipps Simons, in his dwelling-house.

ANN MARIA SIMONS . I am the wife of William Phipps Simons, who keeps a lace-shop in High Holborn. On the 10th of April, about three o'clock in the day, the prisoner came in, and asked to look at some lace—Elizabeth Sanford showed her some, as I was engaged with a customer—Sanford came and spoke to me—I then went to the door, and asked Sanford, in the prisoner's presence, what had become of the lace that was missing from my box—Sanford said she had not got it—I told her that she must account for it—she then came round the counter, lifted up the prisoner's shawl, and took from under her arm seven cards of lace—she was given into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Does your husband occupy the whole house? A. Yes, he is the leaseholder—it was in consequence of what passed between me and Sanford, that I said the lace must be accounted for—it did not appear to be entangled in her shawl—she had on a black satin shawl with a fringe—the lace was not at all likely to adhere to the shawl—all the cards are marked.

ELIZABETH SANFORD . I assist in Mr. Simons' shop. The prisoner came in, and asked for thread lace—I showed her a box with cards of lace in it—she would not decide on any piece—she then wished to look at a collar in the window—I put the lid on the box and went to the window to take the collar out—while doing so I saw, from the reflection in the glass, the prisoner take out one piece of lace from the box—I gave Mrs. Simons information, who came and demanded the lace of me, which was missing from the box—I said I had not got it—she asked the prisoner to move from her seat, that she might look for the lace on the floor—the prisoner rose, and moved into the centre of the shop, and pretended to look for the lace—I came round the counter, threw up the back of her shawl, and took from under her left arm these seven cards of thread lace.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a policeman. I was sent for, and took the prisoner.

MRS. SIMONS re-examined. The value of the lace is 5l. 9s. 6d. at cost price—it cost us more—it was slightly measured at Bow-street, and reckoned up—it is English lace—there are sixty-six yards altogether—one piece is 1s. 10d. a yard, and another 8d.—Mr. Simons buys of the maker—the prices are marked on the card—some has been cut off—I do not know how much—I speak of the value as they are now—some of it is of more value, and some less.

GUILTY of stealing under the value of 5l.Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18430508-1432

1432. MARIA ROBERTSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Norris, on the 28th of March, at St. Pancras, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 5s.; 7 plates, 1s. 4d.; 1 bird-cage, 1s.; 1 knife, 1s.; 1 hammer, 6d.; and 1 tobacco-box, 6d.; his property: and that she had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS NORRIS . I live in Brunswick-street, Brunswick-buildings, Brunswick-square, in the parish of St. Pancras—I occupy the house—on Tuesday, the 28th of March, I went out about ten or half-past ten o'clock, leaving no one in the house—the door has a spring lock—I open it with a key, but there is a string which will open it—when I went out I left the door shut, and the

lock too, and I thought that the string was hid—I returned about half-past twelve, and found the door shut—I missed seven blue and white plates, a bird-cage, and a steel tobacco-box, from the parlour—I remained at home about two hours, or two hours and a half—the door then opened, as I was sitting by the fire-side, and in came the prisoner—she never knocked—she opened the door by pulling back the string which I had left there—I said, "What business have you here?"—she said, "I am come to take tea with you"—she is no acquaintance of mine—I said I had no tea at all—she said, "Will you give me some gin?"—I said, "No, I have got no money"—she sat there some time, then got up, and looked about the place, as if she wanted to go out at my back door—she was there some time—I turned my head, and saw her double something up—she then turned round and said, "As long as you can't give me no tea and no gin, I shall go;" and out she went—I saw no more of her.

Prisoner. I have known the man some time; and whenever he has met me, he has taken me home and treated me—there was another female with me—he told me to call there. Witness, I did not.

SUSANNAH MAGONA . I live in Cromer-street, Gray's-inn-road. On Tuesday, the 28th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought a bird-cage to my shop, and asked sixpence for it—I asked if it was her own, and she said "Yes"—I gave her sixpence—she came again in the evening with a coat—I did not buy that because she was tipsy.

MARTIN M'HALE (police-constable S 182.) On the 4th of April I apprehended the prisoner in Brunswick-court—I received this bird-cage from Magona.

THOMAS NORRIS re-examined. This is my cage; I have had it eighteen months—the other things have not been found.

Prisoner. He gave me the cage—I had been with him drinking in the morning—I called on him and had a glass of gin and some porter with him—he told me to come in the afternoon, and have some tea—I went with the young woman—he said some one bad been and taken his plates—he often wanted me to come, and said he wanted a woman to do for him. Witness. It is all false.

HENRY JONES . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was present at the trial—she is the woman.

GUILTY . Aged 38.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1433

1433. THOMAS WEBB was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Webb and another, about five o'clock in the night of the 5th of April, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 3 spoons, value 12s.; 2 towels, 1s.; 1 napkin, 6d.; 3 pinafores, 3s.; 1 frock, 1s. 6d.; 2 bed gowns, 2s.; the goods of Edward Tessier: also, 1 gown, 1s.; 1 apron, 1s.; 1 petticoat, 1s.; and 1 bed-gown, 1s.; the goods of Hannah Wilton.—2nd Count, for burglariously breaking out of the said dwelling-house; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

HANNAH WILTON . I am servant to Mr. Tessier, who lodges at No. 186, Oxford-street, at Mrs. Webb's house. On the morning of the 6th of April I came down stairs about a quarter to seven o'clock—I went into the kitchen, and observed the lock of the door was turned, and had not caught in the bolt—the kitchen was in great confusion—it had been left in order the night before—a quantity of clothes were taken from the clothes-horse—I went up and told my mistress—I went into the back area, and found the water-closet

door fastened inside—a policeman was sent for, the door was broken open, and the prisoner was found inside—a bundle was found in a washing-tub there, containing things that were gone from the kitchen—there were three silver spoons found at the side of the flag-stone in the closet in the area—they are my mistress' property—he must have got down the area in the early part of the evening, and secreted himself in the closet—he got out by opening the outer area door, and then got into the closet—that door was shut the night before.

MARY WEBB . I live in Oxford-street. This house is mine and my sister Sarah's—the prisoner is my nephew—I had forbidden his coming to the bouse.

JOHN BAKER . I have been in the police. I was called into Mrs. Webb's, and found the water-closet door bolted inside—I looked through the hole of the door, and saw the prisoner sitting inside—I asked him to open it—he never answered—I broke it open, and found him—I found two towels, a knife, and tobacco-box.

JOHN CUTTING . I am a policeman. I produce the bundle—it contains two boys' night-gowns, a napkin, and other things.

HANNAH WILTOM re-examined. This gown, night-gown, petticoat, and apron, are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out late, and did not know where to go; I got down the area, found the two towels there, went into the water-closet, and fell asleep.

JOHN CUTTING re-examined. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I did not have him in custody.

MRS. WEBB re-examined. The prisoner is the person who was convicted—we have done every thing we could to reclaim" him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported far Fifteen Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1434

1434. MARY LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, at St. James's, Westminster, 30 yards of silk, value 6l., the goods of Joseph Allison, in his dwelling-house.

GEORGE BRADLEY . I am shopman to Joseph Allison, of Regent-street. On Tuesday, the 11th of April, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the pri-soner came to our shop—I went to the top of the shop, and saw her take ft piece of silk from two shutters supported on tressels, for showing the goods—she sat down on a chair—I passed by her, and saw part of it protruding through her cloak—I asked what she had there, and said, "That won't do"—she said, "Pray, forgive me"—I took her into the back room, and sent for Mr. Allison and a constable—I gave the silk to the constable—there is above thirty yards—it is worth more than 6l. at the wholesale price—it is French silk.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What was paid for it? A. 4s. a yard—the mark is on it—there is about thirty yards—when I said, "What have you got here?"—she made no reply at first—she said, "Pray, forgive me"—when I took the silk from her she appeared fainting—she came in to match a very peculiar silk about a fortnight before.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Transported for Ten Year

Reference Number: t18430508-1435

1435. CATHERINE HILLMAN, JANE DAVIS , and ANN BARRETT , were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Chenoweth, on the 22nd of April, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 crown, 2 half-crowns, and 6 shillings, his monies, and beating, striking, and using other personal violence to him; and that Hillman had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM CHENOWETH . I am a sailor. On Sunday morning, the 23rd of April, I met the prisoner Davis in the Back-road—I cannot say what time it was, but it was between two and four o'clock—I told her I wanted a place to lie down—I was not perfectly sober, but I had been walking for two or three hours since I was drinking—she took me to a house, took me up stairs, and asked me to give her some money—I gave her 6d.—she went down stairs, came up again, and asked me for more—I gave her 1s.—she immediately went down stairs, and brought five or six women up—they took hold of my arms, and Barrett picked my pocket—Hillman beat me about the face, and othert ill-used me—they took a crown, two half-crowns, and six shil-lings, out of my pocket—after that they let me go—I made the best of my way out of the house—I walked about till 1 could get home to my lodging, which is at Mr. Salter's, the White Lion, Old Gravel-lane—I was covered with blood—my money was safe when I went into the house—I went to a policeman, and took Barrett into custody—I let her go again—when I found the state I was in, I got another policeman, and gave her in charge again, in about five minutes—I was perfectly sure of her—the first policeman is not here—it was directly after I was robbed that I first gave her in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. CROUCH. Q. At what time did you go to this place? A. Between two and four o'clock—I had the money then—I was drunk at twelve o'clock, but bad been walking till that time, and bad gained my senses—I could walk perfectly steady—the last public-house I was in was the Jolly Sailors—I treated some women I was acquainted with there—I did not change any money there—I had got a sovereign from my landlord, and I had five shillings in my pocket—I spent the five shillings—I commenced spending it between eight and nine o'clock—I spent most of the five shillings in the Jolly Sailors—I changed the sovereign before I left the Jolly Sailors—I did not sit down and fall asleep there—no one came out with me—I cannot say bow much I spent out of the sovereign—I was drunk at the time—I know what I had in the morning—Davis was the first woman I spoke to after I left the Jolly Sailors—I took her to Bluegate-fields—I did not remain in the house she took me to, half an hour altogether—whtn I left the Jolly Sailors I was not accompanied by two women—I swear no women came out of the public-house with me—they might come to the door—I did not accuse any woman in the public-house with robbing me—I did not come down stairs after giving Davis the money—I was sitting in the chair, and she brought the party up—I did not take Barrett to the Station in the first instance—I fetched the policeman, and accused her—I was quite sure of her—I let her go, because I was going home without troubling myself any more about it—I took a second thought, and had her taken again—I am sure she is the person—I went back to the house, and gave Hillman in charge—I only accused Barrett at first—I went back to the house a third time, and gave Davis into custody—I did not see any of the other women when I went back.

COURT. Q. When you got out of the house after being robbed, where did you go? A. I went to a policeman, took him to the house, and accused Barrett—I took her, and in going along I told the policeman to let her go, which he did—I then walked about for five minutes, then took a second thought, took another policeman, and took her again—I did not charge any one else then—I took her to the station, went back again with a policeman, and charged Davis—I then returned and charged Hillman, and took her to the station.

FRANCIS GOWRY (police-constable K 258.) The prosecutor applied to me in Bluegate-fields—I went to Hillman's house, and saw Hillman and Barrett there—the prosecutor pointed out Barrett as the girl who robbed him—he did

not make any charge against Hillman at that time—I took Barrett oat of the house—ihe said she had been given in custody before to another policeman, but the prosecutor was not able to identify her—the prosecutor made no reply—he was walking behind—I think he might have heard it—he was the worse for liquor—I took her to the station—on going there the prosecutor com-plained of Hillman ill-using him in the house, and I went back and took her into custody—she said she had not seen the man in her house all night, and knew nothing of him—I went back to the bouse the third time with the pro-secutor, and he then gave Davis into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time was it you saw the prosecutor? A. Be-tween four and five o'clock in the morning—the constable that took Barrett first is not here—the prosecutor did not want to go back to the house to take anybody else after we took Davis—he said he had been robbed, that Davis took him to the house about an hour before—he said he had been in the house but a very short time—he did not tell me when he went there.

DAVIS'S DEFENCE . A young man brought the prosecutor home, and asked for a girl; he and I came up stairs, and he gave me 6d. I asked him for another shilling, to pay for the bed; he said I had got all he had got, except two or three halfpence, and when he came up from the boarding-house he would give me the rest of the money. I called up the landlord's daughter, and gave her 18d., and told him I could not stop; he kicked the landlord's girl; she called out, "Mother;" the old lady went up stairs; the prosecutor kicked her down stairs, and blew out the light.

Barrett's Defence. About three o'clock in the morning I was sitting by the fire, and heard a noise; the prosecutor came in, and wanted to sleep with this young woman for 18d.; she would not go to bed with him, but said he might sleep there if he liked. I stopped there a quarter of an hour; the prosecutor came in, with two policemen, and gave me in charge; the policeman asked if he could swear I was the girl that robbed him; he said no, he could not swear to anybody. I came home again, and remained about a quarter of an hour, when he came with another policeman, and gave me into custody again.

HILLMAN— GUILTY . Aged 58.

DAVIS— GUILTY . Aged 17.

BARRETT— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of an assault only

Confined six months.

First Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18430508-1436

1436. WILLIAM GEORGE FITCH was indicted for stealing, on tie 13th of April, 171bs. weight of sugar, value 9s., the goods of John Fuirrie and others; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1437

1437. CHARLES SIMS was indicted for embezzling the sums of 1l. 12s. 6d., 2l. 13s., 2l. 17s. 11d., 4l. 45. 6d., and 15s., which he bad received on account of William Fair, his master; to which be pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 31.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1438

1438. GEORGE HAMILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 1 pocket-book, value 3s., the goods of Benjamin Webster, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

BENJAMIN WEBSTER . I live at No. 13, Old Brompton, On the 21st of April, about six o'clock in the evening, I was at the Hungerford steam-boat pier—as I was stepping from one steam-boat to another I felt a tug at my pocket—I turned round, and saw the prisoner close behind me—he immediately made away round the fannel of the steam-boat—I felt, and missed my pocketbook—I went round the funnel and called out, he ran to me in great agitation,

and handed me my pocket-book, and said, "I trust you will treat me like a gentleman"—he was going from the vessel towards land—he had not come out of any vessel—I have the pocket-book, and produce it.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What pocket was it in? A. My coat-pocket—I had some papers in the same pocket—my handkerchief was in Another pocket—I had not used my pocket-book for two or three hours—I was about a yard from the funnel when I felt something at my pocket—it was a Greenwich boat—he was not above a yard off when he produced the pocketbook—he had gone round the funnel, and I called to him, "Halloo, you sir, stop"—he then came to me, and handed it to me—he did not say he had picked it up—he said so at the office, not before.

JEAN KEPPLER (through an interpreter.) I was with the prosecutor, and saw the prisoner with the pocket-book in his hand—I did not see him do anything.

Cross-examined. Q. How was the prisoner standing in reference to the prosecutor? A. Back to back—when I first saw him he had the book in his hand.

CHARLES BURGESS GOFF . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read)—he is the person who was convicted.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1439

1439. WILLIAM SKINNER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Rodgers, on the 15th of April, at St. Leonard Shoreditch, and stealing therein 1 work-box, value 4s.; 1 pocketbook, 6d.; 1 printed book, 6d.; 1 necklace, 6d.; 1 bag, 6d.; 1 seal, 6d.; and 1s.; her property.

MART ANN RODGERS . I live in Peller-street, Kingsland-road. It is my dwelling-house—I am a widow—I was at home all day on Saturday, the 15th of April—I left my work-box on a table, under the parlour window, and saw it safe about four or five o'clock in the afternoon—I did not go into the room again till between six and seven, when the policeman alarmed me—the work-box was then gone—the window was not open—I had not left the door open—I had shut both the street-door and window—this is my work-box, and the articles in it, also this book.

GEORGE KEMP . I am a policeman. I know the prosecutrix's house—it is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch—I was going up Peller-street between six and seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner, in company with another one—they passed me, and looked through the prosecutrix's window—they went down several streets—I watched, and saw them come back again—the prisoner's companion lifted the window up about three inches, and went away—they came back again, and lifted the window up—the prisoner put his body in, took the box out, and walked off with it—his companion covered it over—I took the pri-soner with it under his arm—he dropped it in struggling—it was taken up and given to me—his companion got away.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy. Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1440

1440. JAMES PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 16 yards of woollen cloth, value 14l., the goods of Thomas Nicholls, in his dwelling-house.

GEORGE WEDLAKE . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Nicholls, tailor, Regent-street. I was cleaning the inside of the shop window, on the 24th of April, and saw the prisoner walking out of the shop, with the cloth under his arm—he turned round to see if any body was coming—I beckoned to him—he turned the corner, and got out of my sight—I saw him in Maddox-street—I pursued till I got nearly opposite him—two men came up—I sung out, "Stop thief!"

—he then threw cloth doth down, and ran away—I punned, and never lost sight of him till he was stopped—I am certain be is the man—this it the cloth—it is worth 14l.—it is Mr. Nicholls' dwelling-house, and in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square—the doth was at the further end of the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. He had the cloth under his arm? A. Yes, when he went out of the shop—he had it on his shoulder in Maddoz-street—he dropped it, about thirty yards from the shop—he was stopped about 150 yards from where he dropped it, by a pot-boy—it was about ten minutes past eight o'clock in the morning—I was on the opposite side of the way, pa-rallel with him—there is one turning between our shop and where he dropped it—I am sure he is the person.

JAMES SCHOOLING . I am a tailor, and live in Windmill-street. I was in Maddox-street, and saw the prisoner running, with the cloth on his shoulder-he threw it down—I took it up.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure it was the prisoner you saw running with it? A. No, I will not swear that—I saw him in custody, and, to the best of my belief, he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1441

1441. JAMES LEE was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Hayes, on the 11th of April, and cutting and wounding him in and upon his head, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

WILLIAM HAYES . I am a corn-meter, and live in White Horse-lane, Stepney. On the 11th of April I went into the Black Lion, Mile-end-road, about half-past ten o'clock—I was not exactly sober—there were several quarrels in the room—I said nothing to the prisoner, but I saw he had been very ill-used-he took up the poker, and struck me by accident instead of somebody else on the top of my head—it was only a very flight wound—I received no in-convenience from it—it did not bleed mucfi—I am satisfied he never intended to do me any harm—I told the Magistrate so, and wanted him to discharge him—he had been struck by other people, and was defending himself when he took up the poker—he had no malice towards me, for I never saw him before.

CHARLES CLARK . I took the prisoner in charge for bitting the prosecutor, who was bleeding—I asked how he came to do it—he said he did not do it at all.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1442

1442. WILLIAM THOMPSON and GEORGE DIXON were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April, at St. Ann, Limehouse, 10 1/2 yards of plush, value 7l. 4s.; 2 1/8 yards of velvet, 1l. 4s.; 12 yards of satin, 6l. 18s.; 9 yards of silk, 3l. 2s.; and 12 3/4 yards of waistcoating, 4l. 14s.; the goods of William Harrison, in his dwelling-house.

WILLIAM HARRISON . I live in Ebenezer-place, in the parish of St Ann, Limehouse—it is my dwelling-house. On the 15th of April, about eight o'clock in the morning, the two prisoners came into the shop—Thompson asked for a pair of trowser-straps—I tried on one, which did not suit—I tried on two or three others, and cut them to fit him—Dixon was near the door, and Thompson came right into the shop, and put his foot up on a ladder, keeping himself between me and the door, to conceal Dixon and the doorway from me—while I was trying the straps, Dixon had a cloak over his arm, which he seemed to move from one arm to the other—I know that more from the rustling noise and the shadow, I did not see him, but I noticed that he took the cloak, and, as I thought, was putting it on—I lost sight of him, and saw by the shadow that he went out of the door—in a few minutes he returned—I very soon then fitted Thompson with straps, and

they walked out, Dixon rather before Thompson, but he loitered a little till Thompson went out to him, which was not half a minute, and they walked away arm in arm—the moment they left the door I noticed the empty shelf, where the waistcoat-pieces had been, and the noise Dixon made I am certain was his moving them—all the articles named in the indictment were on one shelf—I had seen them safe, and handled them seven or eight minutes before they came in—nobody had been into the shop between my seeing them safe and the prisoners coming in, either from the street or from my house—none of the property has been found—I directed my apprentice to follow them instantly—I followed them myself, and overtook them—I said I had lost a lot of waistcoating, and asked if they had seen any thing of them—they said, "O dear, no"—I threw open Dixon's cloak instinctively, and he took it off, but I did not find them—they were worth 20l.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Is this the first time you have said you heard the noise of the waistcoats? A. I believe I said I heard the rustling noise before—it did not strike me at the time that it was the waist-coats, but instantly I missed them—I knew the sound was not exactly that of a cloak; indeed, I looked up, but Thompson was between me and the door—I am quite sure it was the sound of the waistcoats, but did not suspect at the instant, but looked up and saw the shadow of Dixon going out—Thompson's foot was on the ladder, to have the strap fitted, but he did not stand fair—I could not get him to move his body round, he seemed so stiff—I pulled his trowsers down with difficulty—Dixon was absent two or three minutes—my apprentice came in as they were leaving—I joined them four or five hundred yards from my shop—I did not expect to find they had the waistcoats exactly—I threw his cloak aside instinctively—I left them under the watch of my apprentice after Dixon pulled his cloak off, and came up with them again in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes at the Brunswick-pier—I had gone back to inquire of my neighbours—I occupy the house, and the shop communicates with it—there is a back-door from my shop to the house, that cannot be opened without my seeing it—I was close to that door, trying on the straps—I had opened the shop myself—the articles are silk, plush, and velvet, to make waistcoats of—I call them waistcoating.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. How many yards are there altogether? A. About fifty—the articles were all on one shelf, on the top of each other—there was some satin, silk, and Thibet cloth—the velvet would make the collar of a coat, or anything.

JOHN JEHU . I am a shoemaker. I was standing at my father's door, in Jamaica-terrace, about eight houses from Mr. Harris's shop—I saw Dixon coming up Robert-street, in a direction from Harris's shop, with a cloak on his arm—he turned the corner—he was going towards the shop again—he had come round a back street, and in two or three minutes I saw the two prisoners come down together—Dixon then had his cloak on.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. When you saw him running, he was running towards the shop? A. Yes, with his cloak over his arm—I noticed him as he was a stranger—there was nothing about the cloak that struck me—there is a public-house at the corner.

ARTHUR LEMAY, JUN . I am the apprentice. When I got into the shop I followed the prisoners—they went to Poplar, to the Three Tuns at first.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. At what time did you get to your master's? A. A few minutes to eight o'clock—the prisoners came out as I went in—my master instantly told me to watch them—I did not lose sight of them till they got to Brunswick-pier, and then master came up.

THOMPSON— GUILTY . Aged 30.

DIXON— GUILIY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18430508-1443

1443. MARY ANN WOOD was indicted for feloniously assaulting Sarah Edensor, on the 21st of April, and cutting and wounding her on the head, with intent to do her grievous bodily harm.

SARAH EDENSOR . I live in Old Pye-street, Westminster. On the 21st of April I was at Mr. Teasey's public-house, at St. Margaret's, Westminster—the prisoner came up to me, and asked me to give her some beer—I said I had no money—a young woman gave her a pot—she drank some of it, and threw the rest over me, and before I could recover myself, she hit me on the head with the pot—my head bled very much—I was quite sober—she was a little in liquor—the wound is well now.

WALTER JOHNSON . I was at the public-house—the prosecutrix was sitting down—the prisoner crossed towards her—they had about half-a-dozen words—a person handed a pot to the prisoner—she threw the contents in the prosecutor's face, and struck her twice on the head with the quart pot—it sounded very hard indeed—a great deal of blood came from her.

WILLIAM CAPLIN . I am a policeman. About twenty minutes to two o'clock I was called, and took the prisoner—I produce the pot, which is dented at the bottom, and has blood on it—the prosecutrix was bleeding—the prisoner said she would serve her ten times worse as soon as she had her liberty—she was a little intoxicated.

Prisoner's Defence. She had my apron on that day, and said Eliza Jones had lent it to her, and I should not have it—she aggravated me; I hope you will have mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18430508-1444

1444. THOMAS CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April, 6lbs. weight of bacon, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Richard Carr.

JOSHUA EWBANK . I am in the service of Richard Carr, a cheesemonger. On the 18th of April I received information; went out, and saw the prisoner running with this bacon—he dropped it—I overtook him—another person took it up and brought it to the shop.

GUILTY. Aged 12.—Recommended to mercy. Confined Ten Days.

Reference Number: t18430508-1445

1445. WILLIAM DURRANT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March, 1 copper, value 20s., the goods of Mary Howse.

MARY HOWSE . The prisoner lived with a lodger of mine at my house—I saw my copper safe in the morning of the 10th of March, and missed it next day—it was fixed—I told the prisoner I had lost it—he told me to be quiet for two or three days, and he dare say I should hear of it—I have not found it.

ANDREW BIRCH . I lodge at this house. The prisoner lodged with me, and left on the 13th of March, to go to a place at Highbury-vale—he said he would return on Sunday, but did not.

THOMAS COX . I know the prisoner. I saw him on the 10th of March, at Hoxton New-town, about 100 yards from the prosecutrix's, with the copper on his head in a sack—I said, "Bill, where are you going with that?"—he said, "I am going to carry a washing-tub to King's-cross"—I said, "It is a copper"—he said, "No it ain't, it is a washing-tub"—I said it was not, and he went on—I am sure it was a copper.

Prisoner. He could not see what it was through the sack. Witness. I saw it through the head of the sack.

ROBERT DEANS . I was at Worship-street on the 15th, when the prisoner was locked in a cell—he called me to the window, asked me to go to Mrs. Howse, and ask her to be as lenient as possible, and as soon as he got out he, or his friends would buy her another copper.

HUMPHERY, Mayor.

Prisoner. I know nothing about it.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

OLD COURT.—Friday, May 12, 1843.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1446

1446. WILLIAM NOTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May, 1 ring, value 10s., the goods of our Lady the Queen.—2nd Count, stating it to be the goods of Ann Watson; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1447

1447. ELIZABETH ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April, at St. Martin-in-the-fields, 2 rings, value 7l. 10s.; and 2 brooches, 4l. 10s.; the goods of Hon. Dame Mary Glynne, in the dwelling-house of the Right Hon. William Ewart Gladstone, to which she pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Strongly recommended to mercy. Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1448

1448. HARRIET COUSENS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, at St. George, Hanover-square, 1 boa, value 1l. 10s.; 2 gowns, 9l. 10s.; 1 watch, 24l.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, 2l. 10s.; 2 rings, 1l.; 1 parasol, 7s.; 1 scarf, 1l. 10s.; 1 pair of shoes, 3s.; and 2 capes, 1s. 10s.; the goods of Elizabeth Sarah Bonnett: and 1 muff, 6l. and 3 gowns, 24l.; the goods of James Bonnett, her master, in his dwelling-house; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Ten Years.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18430508-1449

1449. HUGH FRASER was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering a power of attorney for the sale of 1779l. 8s. 9d., in the new 3 1/2 per cents., standing in the names of Edward Yardley and William Corrie, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.—Other Counts stating his intent to be to defraud other parties; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Transported for Life.

Reference Number: t18430508-1450

1450. THOMAS CLIFFORD was indicted for feloniously and knowingly uttering a forged 5l. Bank of England note, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Life.

Before Mr. Justice Coltman.

Reference Number: t18430508-1451

1451. JOHN PHILLIPS and GEORGE DRAPER were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Palmer, on the 13th of April, at St. James, Clerkenwell, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 clock, value 1l. 10s.; and 1 glass shade, 10s.; his goods; and that Phillips had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM ROBERT HUNT . I am in the employ of Messrs. Palmer, and live in Albemarle-street, Clerkenwell. Mr. William Palmer has a dwelling-house at No. 29 1/2, Great Sutton-street, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell. On the 13th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was in Sutton-street, and saw the prisoner Draper between the two parlour windows of Mr. Palmer's house—one of the windows was open, and when I got up to the window, I saw Phillips in the parlour, with the clock in his hand—I asked what he did there, and shut the window down—I then knocked at the door of the house, and called out, "Police"—I then saw Phillips getting out of the window—he ran down the street, and at the same time I saw Draper

nearly at the bottom of the street, running—I did not see him commence running—I had walked past him to get to the door—it was the first window that was open, and which I shut down—I followed Phillips, crying, "Stop thief," till he was stopped by a policeman—I lost sight of him for about half a minute, in turning the corner of Sutton-street into St. John-street—I followed him round the corner, and saw him running about fifty yards from me—he ran about 500 yards after getting round the corner—I am certain he is the man I saw get out of the window—I had a full view of his face at the time he was in the parlour, and of his back when he was running—he put the clock on the side-board again, he did not bring it out with him—as we were bringing Phillips back to the prosecutor's house, another constable brought Draper towards us, and he went back along with Phillips—I firmly believe he is the same man I had seen between the windows, by his dress and appearance—I speak to him from his face and dress both

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. In what capacity are you employed at Messrs. Palmers? A. As a labourer—I generally go in at the gates, close by, at six and seven in the morning—I have been informed that the parish is St. James's—I live in St. John's parish—the number of the house is No. 29 1/2,—it is a whole house, and is occupied separately by Mr. Palmer—I went close to the window, and Phillips was in the room close to the window with the clock in his hands—he came out of the same window which I shut down—I had never seen him before, to my knowledge—I had been in the house some hundreds of times, and had often seen the clock in the room—I am positive Phillips had it in his hand—it usually stood on a little sideboard, about four feet from the window—I am positive it was not on the sideboard then, but in Phillips's hands—as soon as I saw it in his hand, I spoke to him, which caused him to put it on the sideboard again—I saw him stopped in St. John's-lane by a policeman—I was close to him.

CHARLOTTE BATES . I am servant to Mr. Palmer. I heard a loud knocking at the door, and a cry of "Police"—I went into the parlour and found the window thrown up to the top, and the time-piece moved from the place where I had seen it before—this is it—it is the property of Mr. William Palmer—I had been in that room at eight that morning, and opened the shutters—I am quite sure the windows were both shut down then—they are common sash windows—no one but myself had been into the room that morning—there was only one other person in the house, and a female servant named Clark—she had only just got up, and was at breakfast in the kitchen with me—I am certain she was not in the room.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there no fastenings to the windows? A. Yes—I opened the shutters a few minutes before eight o'clock—I dusted the room, and left it about eight—the clock then stood on a little sideboard, with its back against the wall, where it always stood—when I went into the room after the alarm was given it was moved close to the edge of the sideboard—I opened the windows, in order to open the shutters, and then shut them down again—there is a little catch to the windows—I know one was fastened—I cannot say whether the other was—Clark was not out of my sight after coming down stairs till the alarm was given.

THOMAS DULLEY . I am a policeman. I stopped the prisoner Phillips in St. John's-lane—he was running without a hat—there was a great cry of "Stop thief."

Cross-examined. Q. Are you the person that stopped him? A. Yes—I did not see any man in a long brown coat with him—he was coming towards me—I met him, said, "Halloo, old fellow," and caught hold of him directly.

ARCHIBALD JEFFREY . I am a policeman. On the morning in question I

was walking down St. John-street, heard an outcry, and saw Draper run from the direction of Mr. Palmer's house—he was about two or three yards from Mr. Palmer's when I first saw him—he was then walking—he was pointed out to me by a person in the street, I do not know who—after walking three or four paces, he set off, running as fast as he could—I ran after him as fast as I could through Albemarle-street—I did not call out—he ran 500 or 600 yards, and was stopped by another person—I was about ten yards behind him at the time—I said, "Come back with me to Mr. Palmer's" and he came back.

Cross-examined. Q. How many turnings are there between Sutton-street and St. John's-lane? A. Two.

COURT. Q. Then how could you see Mr. Palmer's house? A. I was in St. John-street when I heard the outcry—the end of Sutton-street comes into St. John-street, and I could see down Sutton-street.

THOMAS BRADLEY (City police-constable, No. 269.) I produce a certificate of Phillips's former conviction—(read)—I was a witness in the case, and know him to be the man.

PHILLIPS— GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

DRAPER— NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18430508-1452

1452. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April, at St. Marylebone, 11 spoons, value 11l.; and 8 forks, 4l.; the goods of Hugh Parkin, in his dwelling-house.

HARRIET CRAMP . I am lady's-maid in the service of Mr. Hugh Parkin, of No. 33, Montague-square, in the parish of St. Marylebone. On the afternoon of Friday fortnight I saw the prisoner go up the area steps—he was brought back to the house shortly after, and drew from his breast eleven table-spoons and eight forks—he gave them to me, and said, "If you will forgive me, this is all I have taken"—they are my master's.

MARY BARTON . I live in Paradise-buildings. On Friday afternoon fortnight I was at Mr. Parkins's house as charwoman—I heard a noise while at tea, went out, and saw two boys on the top of the area steps—some one cried out, "Stop him"—I saw the prisoner run from the area—he was pursued and stopped—I told him to give up what he had got—he said, "Shall I be forgiven?"—I said I had not the least doubt he would if he would give me what he had—he returned to Mr. Parkins's with me, and I saw him deliver up to Cramp eleven table-spoons and eight dessert forks—I afterwards saw the plate counted, and eleven spoons and eight forks were deficient—the plate was given to the policeman, with the prisoner.

WILLIAM ROBERT BLACK . I am a police-inspector of the D division. I received the property from the constable who took the prisoner—it has been in my possession ever since, and I produce it.

JAMES DEWHURST . I am butler to Mr. Parkin. These spoons and forks are his property—they are worth 15l. or 16l.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along; I heard a cry of "Stop thief;" a gentleman came and caught hold of me; the woman took me back to the house; they took me into the kitchen; they took up a quantity of plate, and charged me with stealing it.

GUILTY . ** Aged 18.— Transported for Twelve Years.

Before Mr. Justice Coliman.

Reference Number: t18430508-1453

1453. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April, at St. Marylebone, 9 spoons, value 14l.; and 3 forks, 1l.; the goods of Stephen Adey, in his dwelling-house.

HAMUTAL BALCOME . I am cook to Mr. Adey, of Glocester-place, New-road. On Wednesday, the 26th of April, I was coming out of the kitchen door, and saw the prisoner come out of the pantry door, and go behind the bottle-rack—I went and bolted the area door, and gave an alarm of "Thief"—my master came, and the prisoner then concealed the plate under the bottle-rack—I had seen him with the plate in his hand, and a handkerchief wrapped round it—my master staid with him while I fetched a policeman—I took the plate from under the bottle-rack, and gave it to my master.

STEPHEN ADEY . On the alarm being given by Balcomb, I went down stairs, and saw the prisoner—she said, "Here is a thief that has taken some of the plate, and he has put it under the bottle-rack"—the prisoner heard what she said—she took it out from under the bottle-rack, wrapped up in the handkerchief, and gave it to me—I sent her for a policeman, and she returned with one—this is the plate now produced—they are all silver but two forks, which are plated—they are worth from 12l. or 14l. certainly above 5l.

THOMAS SHAW . I am a policeman. I was called and took the prisoner—I received the plate from Mr. Adey—I found it on the pantry-table.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not hide behind the bottle-rack; I stood between the door and bottle-rack. I called at the house to ask if any chimneys wanted sweeping; I got as far as the pantry-door, and saw no one: as I was returning, the young woman saw me; I stopped; she gave an alarm, pulled out the handkerchief and plate, and went for a policeman.

MR. ADEY re-examined. The plate in use was kept in a drawer in the pantry—it must have been taken from there, and wrapped in this handkerchief, which does not belong to us.

HAMUTAL BALCOMB re-examined. I was in the pantry twice, ten minutes before this happened, and am sure the plate was then in the drawer—I am sure I saw it in the prisoner's hand.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Twelve Months.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18430508-1454

1454. ELIZABETH NORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April, 1 half-crown, the property of Enoch Anslow, from his person.

ENOCH ANSLOW . I am a mason, and live in Cornelia-place, Brook-street, New-road. On the 17th of April I went to spend the evening at Mr. Triggs', Nathan-court, Church-street, Somers-town—between one and two o'clock in the morning I was coming down stairs to come away, and at the bottom of the stairs I saw the prisoner—she lives in the parlour of the same house—I had been with a party up stairs—as I was going out at the street-door, the prisoner said, "My dear sir, are you going?"—I said, "What is that to you?" she then caught me round the waist, pulled me into her room, and put her hand into my right-hand trowsers pocket—I caught hold of her arm to pull her hand out—she pulled it out herself—I felt in my pocket and missed half-a-crown—I said, "Give me my half-crown"—she said she had not got it—I said, "You have got it"—I had felt it in my pocket five minutes before I came down stairs—some of the company then came down into the room—I then went up stairs, came down, and asked her again for it—she said she had not got it—I went up again, she followed me up, and abused my friends—I went down again, to, see if she was there—she was gone—I ran after her down Church-way, and found her—I said, "Give me my half-crown"—she said she had not got it—I met a policeman, and gave her in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did not she say you had promised to give her more money, and that was what she followed you for? A. No; there were about a dozen of us up stairs—I went there between seven and

eight o'clock in the evening—we had a pot or two of beer among us—we did not go there to get tipsy—we did not have more, and no gin, rum, or brandy—we might have had more beer—I dare say we had one pot or two—I spent about a sixpence—that is what I paid—I did not see the others pay anything—I paid it to treat my friends, who were men and women—I did not tell them when I was going away—I had no lady up stairs—I was doing nothing in the prisoner's parlour—she polled me in—I did not want to go in—I did not scream out—I had seen the prisoner before, but not to speak to her—I had not seen her that evening before she pulled me into her room—I had not shown the half-crown to anybody—I am not married. Jury. Q. Do you have tobacco and pipes there? A. Yes—I had about 4s. in my pocket—I spent 1s. before I went to my friends, and had 3s. when I went there.

GEORGE PEAKE . I live in Drunmond-crescent—I was at Nathan-court, and remember the prosecutor leaving the room, and going down stairs—I followed him down, and beard a noise in the passage—I opened the prisoner's room door, and saw the prosecutor pulling the prisoner's hand out of his right hand pocket—I saw half-a-crown in her hand—she at first said she had not got it—then she said, if she had she would stick to it—she came up stairs and abused the company, then went out—the prosecutor followed, and gave her in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you been there the whole evening? A. The best part of it—I went by accident—there were about nine of us, ladies and gentlemen—we had a few pots of beer, a pot a-piece would not hurt—I paid about sixpence—some did not pay anything—I saw the prosecutor give half-a-crown from his pocket, to take for some beer—I had paid him two in the day, and this was one of them—I do not know whether he received any change—I think it was to Mr. Triggs be paid it.

GEORGE WILLIAM TANBOROUGH . I live in Langley-street, Long-acre—I was at Nathan-street—we missed Anslow from the room, I went after him—the prisoner's room door was pushed open—Peake went in first—I followed and laid hold of Anslow, took him out of the room and up stairs—he said he had lost half-a-crown, and would have it or have her taken to the station—the prisoner came up and was abusive—she went down again, came up, abused my friends again, then went down and went out—the prosecutor and Peake followed, and I followed her into Church-way—she was then in custody, and put into a cell—a woman was sent to search her, and there was a scuffle in the cell—I looked through the door, and saw half-a-crown in her hand—she was making towards the water-closet, and said she was going to put it down—the searcher prevented her.

JURY. Q. What was the reason of her abusing you? A. She abused us because we came and fetched Anslow away.

WILLIAM ELMER (police-sergeant S 187.) I was in Church-way, the prosecutor was running after the prisoner—he charged her with taking half-a-crown of his—she said, "He gave it to me"—the prosecutor said she took it out of his trowsers' pocket—she said she had not got it, she had been and spent part of it—she pulled off her shawl, and told him to take that for the half-crown—she was taken to a cell at the station—I heard her tell the searcher she should not search her—we heard the searcher tell her to keep away from a certain place—I went into the cell to search—the prisoner took half-a-crown from her bosom, and gave it to me—the prosecutor knew what he was about, but was fresh.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1455

1455. CAROLINE TURNER and SARAH GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April, 50 yards of calico, value 20s., the goods of John Swaine.

JOHN WAINE . I live in Chapel-street, Edgeware-road, and am a linen-draper. On the afternoon of the 15th of April, Mr. Simpson, who lives opposite, pointed out the prisoner Green going down the street—I went and brought her back, charged her with taking some calico—she said she knew nothing about any calico—I told my young man to take care she did not run away—I went round different streets to look for another woman—I met Turner with another woman, followed them some distance, at last went up to Turner, took hold of her cloak, and said, "You have been to my shop," and I saw my calico under her cloak under her arm—I brought her back, and gave her in charge—she said, "Let me go, my child is dead, and I want to bury it"—she slipped from me and ran across the road, leaving her cloak and shawl in my hand—I caught her again—I took her full three quarters of a mile from my shop—the other woman ran away.

Turner. I said, "That is the woman who gave it to me, take her as well;" but he would not.

FRANCE MOUND . I am servant to Mr. Simpson, of Chapel-street, opposite Mr. Swaine's. On the 15th of September I saw both the prisoners, opposite Swaine's shop-window—both in company, talking and nodding, and making motions to each other—there was a pile of goods near where they stood—I saw them both pull the calico down out of the pile—Green then helped Turner to pick it up, she put it under her cloak, and went away with it—Green remained a short time, I suppose to see if anybody came out.

Green. Q. How many females were there? A. I only saw you two—I am certain the prisoners are the two—I am sure there was nobody else at the window at the time—it was about a quarter to five o'clock.

JAMES PORTER . I am a policeman. I went to the shop, and found Green there, about half-past four o'clock—she said she did not know what she was brought there for—Turner was brought in afterwards by Mr. Swaine with the calico—they were searched at the station—the searcher produced in their presence 1l. 11s. 4 1/2 d., as found on Turner, and 6d. on Green—Turner said it was her husband's wages, she had just been and drawn it.

MR. WAINE re-examined. There was a pile of about forty pieces of calico, and a quantity of flannel—it must have taken four or five minutes to get the calico from the pile, and would require two persons—the other woman was taller than either of the prisoners, and dressed in a light shawl and black bonnet—she had a large bundle under her arm—I first caught sight of Turner half a mile from the shop.

Turner's Defence. The money was my husband's. Green if innocent The one who got away is the one who helped me to take it; she took it down, and gave it into my hands. I never saw Green before.

FRANCES MOUND re-examined. I had an opportunity of seeing Green, and am sure she is the girl—Green had a black and white plaid shawl.

JANE CARNEY . I am Green's sister, and live in Buckeridge-street, Blooms-bury, at Mr. Scott's—she left my house about four o'clock that afternoon—I do not know where she was going—she is a shoe-binder—I do not know where she works—she lived in Welcott-street, Borough, before Christmas—I hawk needle-work about the country, and do not know where she works.

JAMES PORTER re-examined. Green had on a dark plaid shawl.

MR. SWAINE re-examined. I should know the woman who was with Turner—Turner said I should have taken that Woman, and always said Green was innocent—she said she knew nothing of her, but in my shop there was

a recognition of countenance and a muttering between them—the other woman was considerably taller than either of the prisoners—Green could not be mistaken for her, she had got a contrary appearance altogether, both in dress and appearance—there was more difference in height between Turner and that woman than between Green and Turner.

FRANCE MOUND re-examined. I did not notice more difference in the height than there is between the prisoners now—I was up stairs looking out of the window right opposite, looking down on them—I ran down directly, and told my master—I did not notice Green's bonnet—when they turned round to pick up the calico I saw their faces, and can recognise both their faces.

TURNER— GUILTY . Aged 21.

GREEN— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined six months.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, May 13th, 1843.

Second Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1456

1456. ALFRED PINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May, 1 pair of leather fronts for boots, value 4s. 6d.; and 1 pair of leather backs, 1s. 6d.; the goods of Benjamin Barber, his master.

GUILTY .— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18430508-1457

1457. JEREMIAH NOWLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May, 2 decanters, value 1l. 4l., the goods of James Greatbach.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1458

1458. JOSEPH BEST was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 83 yards of gingham, value 24s., the goods of James Stephenson.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1459

1459. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April, at St. Pancras, 1 watch, value 14l.; 3 seals, 3l.; 2 rings, 12s.; 2 watch-keys, 1l. 15s.; 1 locket, 1l. 10s.; and 1 watch-case, 2s. 6d.; the goods of Elizabeth Bosfield, in the dwelling-house of Barnet Slowman.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

ESTHER COOPER . I am in the service of Barnet Slowman, landlord of the house, No. 91, Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square—Elizabeth Bosfield occupies the first floor of the house. On the evening of the 19th of April, about half-past seven o'clock, I answered a knock at the door, and found the prisoner there—he asked for Miss Bosfield—I asked him to stand in the hall while I went up stairs to her, but he followed me up stairs to the room door—I went into the bed-room to Miss Bosfield, and fetched out a candlestick—I went through the drawing-room into the bed-room—I lighted the candle, put it on the table, and showed the prisoner into the room—Miss Bosfield's watch and appendages were in the room between the two candlesticks, and the watch-case underneath them—I then went in to Miss Bosfield, and before I could return out of the bed-room I heard him running down stairs—I ran down as quick as I could—he slammed the door after him—I could not overtake him—I never saw him afterwards till the 22nd of April, when he was at the police-court.

Q. When you fetched the candlestick from Miss Bosfield's room, where was the prisoner? A. Outside the door—I thought he was standing in the hall, but I found him on the landing up stairs—when I went in to get the candle I left him outside the door—nobody came into the house from the

time of my seeing the watch safe and his running down stairs, when it was missed—it was all done in two or three minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long have you been servant to Mr. Slowman? A. Rather better than four months—he keeps the house—two people reside there besides Miss Bosfield—private gentlemen do not come there very often—I had seen the prisoner only once before myself—I was examined before the Magistrate on the 22nd of April and the 4th of May—I think I did not state at the first examination that I saw the watch on the table—there is one other servant in the house—Mrs. Slowman lives in the house—they have no family.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You are not the servant who was directed not to let him in, from what had happened the day before? A. No—I am quite certain I saw the watch on the table when I lighted the candles.

ELIZABETH BOSFIELD . I am single, and live at Mr. Slowman's. I have a friend who provides for me—I saw the prisoner first in Regent-street about three months ago—he came to my apartments for the first time about a week before this occurred—he came home with me—I met him in the street, and he asked where I lived—on the Tuesday I left him on the sofa in my sitting-room—I went out to speak to the servant, and on my return I found him in my bed-room, and he had just shut one of my drawers—I went and looked in the drawer, and missed four rings—he saw me looking, and then said he only merely took them for a joke—he had got them on his fore-finger—he returned them to me—I saw a bottle in his pocket, and asked what it was—he said it was a sample of port wine, that he was a wine-merchant—I asked him to let me smell it, and it was laudanam—I said I was very much frightened—he said, "I will show you something to frighten you more," and pulled out a brace of pistols—I was frightened, and ran out at the door—I at last got rid of him—I told the servant not to let him in any more—that was not Cooper—on the 19th of April I was dressing in my bed-room—I had just placed my watch and seals on the drawing-room table, between the two candlesticks—the candles at that time were not lighted—the servant came into the room for a light to light the candles, and before she could hardly return I heard the prisoner running down stairs—I went to the table directly—my watch, with three gold seals, two keys, a locket and case, were gone—there was no opportunity for any body to have taken them but the person who had gone into the room—I had seen them there within three or four minutes—on the 21st of April I was walking in Waterloo-place, and saw him—I said, "That is the man who stole my watch"—as soon as he saw me he ran away—a gentleman ran and stopped him—he was delivered to the police—it was a gold watch, worth about 22l.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he put all the rings on one finger? A. Yes, and had got into the front room with them—he told me he drank the contents of the bottle every night in his grog to make him sleep—he did not attempt to fire the pistols—he said he did not mean to do me any harm—I have not found my watch.

JAMES FENNELL (police-constable C 34.) On the 21st of April, about 11 o'clock at night, I took the prisoner from the gentleman who stopped him—I saw him running—he said he did not understand what he was taken for, he did not understand being led through the streets in that manner—he was searched at the station—I found in his left-hand coat-pocket two pistols loaded with powder and ball, and a percussion cap upon each—I found on him a silver watch and chain, some percussion caps, half a sovereign, and 11s.—he did not say why he was running away—there was a memorandum in a pocket-book, which he had.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the memorandum? A. I cannot find it now—the inspector made every inquiry about the prisoner—we could not find out anything of him, except that he came from Manchester—the inspector went there—there were three examinations after being adjourned, and inquiries made about the pistols—it was further remanded for a week, then fresh evidence taken from the servant.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. The property has never been found? A. No—inquiry has been made for it—the object of the postponement was to inquire about the memorandum and pistols—I heard the Magistrate ask him what he had to say, and saw the clerk take down what he said.

MR. WOOLF. I was present at the examination, and heard the Magistrate ask the prisoner what he had to say—I heard what he said, which was taken down by the clerk, and countersigned by the Magistrate—this is it—I know Mr. Long's handwriting—I have repeatedly seen him put his name to papers—(read)—"The prisoner says 'I have nothing to say.'"

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Ten Years.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18430508-1460

1460. AUGUSTUS SINTZENICH was indicted , for that he on the 1st of April, having in his hand a pistol loaded with gunpowder and leaden shot, did by feloniously drawing the trigger endeavour to discharge the same at and against John Clarke Haden, clerk, with intent to maim him. Two other COUNTS, varying the manner of stating the charge.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DASENT conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES EBENEZER HARKE . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. On the 1st of April, I was at the afternoon service at St. Paul's Cathedral, in one of the stalls on the north side—the clergyman officiating was nearly opposite to me, and a little lower on the south side—he was on a line with other persons, rather elevated, but lower than me—I was in one of the stalls—it was Mr. Haden—at the prayer for the Queen, I observed a person nearly opposite to me, and about two yards from the officiating clergyman, appeared to stand while the majority of the congregation were kneeling—he appeared to me to have a book under a bag or handkerchief, or something of a red colour—I thought he was about to follow the clergyman in his duty—the red bag was before him—his face was to the east—I was on his left hand, as the last gentleman in the jury box is—the congregation were with their faces as mine is, towards your lordship, consequently the congretion behind and before could not see him, but I could see him, being on his left hand—the clergyman was on his right-hand—the light comes from the east window—I saw him, as I thought about to open his book, but instead of the book the light fell on the barrel of the pistol—I immediately rose up and screamed out "Seize him," or something, "he has a pistol"—I alarmed the congregation, and saw him at the same time turn the pistol round—I distinctly saw the brass from the light falling on it—I left my seat, calling out during the whole time, came along the stalls towards the body of the church, and came down the steps—while I was on the steps the pistol was elevated by him, and I saw the sparks from the pan—I cannot distinctly say whether it was pointed at any one in particular then, as I had altered my position—my eye was directed more to the pistol than to the direction of it—I went a few days afterwards into the same stall, and Mr. Haden was also performing duty in the same situation, and I was surprised to find that from the situation I was in, and the situation Mr. Haden was in, that if the pistol was turned at all it must be turned in the direction of that clergyman—after I had called out for some moments, the congre-

gation were alarmed—the pistol was seized by one person close to him, and he was seized by another person—I think the pistol was knocked down—I saw the sparks when the pistol was elevated, and before the pistol was seized.

Cross-examined by MR. BRYARLEY. Q. You say it was impossible the pistol could be directed otherwise than at the clergyman? A. I have not said so—I did not afterwards measure the spot from where the prisoner stood to where Mr. Haden stood, but feel satisfied it was not three yards certainly.

Q. Do you know whether anybody struck the prisoner's arm before the pistol went off? A. There was some struggling—the impression on my mind is that the sparks were distinctly discharged from the pistol before the prisoner was touched—though I had left my seat, I think I could see the whole that was going on—I kept my eye distinctly on the pistol, and on his hand—he sunk his hand, certainly, after raising it—he raised the pistol, and discharged it—whether he discharged it at any person I cannot say.

Q. So that in the interval nothing was done between his holding the pistol in the direction you suppose, his presenting it, and it going off—were you so placed as to tell the pistol could not have been raised, taken down, and afterwards go off in the scuffle? A. No, certainly not—it did not go off in the scuffle—the pistol was not seized, nor was he seized till the sparks had been emitted from the hammer—he was very sullen afterwards.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You have measured to see where Mr. Haden was? A. No, I measured the distance I was at from the prisoner before I removed—I was about twenty feet from him, nearly in a straight line.

MR. BRYARLEY. Q. Were you in a state of great agitation, or ia a condition to notice? A. I was not so agitated but I intended to seize the man, had I been near him—of course I was very much alarmed at such an extraordinary circumstance, believing the man to be about to enter into the devotions of the service, and then to have a murderous attempt, I of course was alarmed—I should be sorry to say I was not agitated.

COURT. Q. How much higher than the prisoner was Mr. Haden? A. He would be in the situation of the first tier of desks from the floor—the prisoner was on the floor.

Q. Did the muzzle of the pistol appear to be pointed so as to reach the clergyman? A. It was most certainly elevated, and not elevated to strike any one level with the prisoner, but if discharged, the ball or contents must go above the heads of the congregation on the floor, but what the precise direction the muzzle of the pistol was I cannot say—when he discharged it I was further from him—when I saw the sparks—I was then more behind him, and in a lower situation—I had descended a step or two, and got into the body of the church—I think I was on the last step.

JOHN MAURICE GIRLING . I was in St. Paul's cathedral when this happened—I was on the left hand side of the prisoner, on the north side, sitting close to him—he was on a seat on a level with the floor—about the middle of the prayer for the Queen, I heard somebody scream out, "He has a pistol"—I turned round and saw the prisoner standing up and aiming a pistol at the gentleman who was reading—I heard the snap of the pistol, and saw two or three sparks from the flint—two or three persons ran and seized him—I was next to him, on the other side of the clergyman—the clergyman was one seat higher than the floor—before I heard the snap of the pistol, a person behind tried to knock, the prisoner's arm down with an umbrella, and another seized his arm, but let go—the umbrella struck him on the arm he was holding the pistol with—the blow had no effect on his arm—he still continued

the pistol up—the other person knocked his arm down, but he raised it again—it was then that I heard the snap, and saw the sparks.

COURT. Q. Had any person hold of his arm or the pistol, at the time you heard the snap, and saw the sparks? A. No—it was up in the same direction at the time the snap took place, and the sparks came out, in the direction of the clergyman who was reading.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any interval between the time his arm was struck, and the pistol going off, for him to raise the pistol deliberately, and point it at the clergyman? A. There was.

Q. Do you mean that he raised it up, and pointed it deliberately at the clergyman after his arm was struck? A. Yes—it did not go off in the scuffle—I did not see him point it at the clergyman the first time, nor sink his arm.

HENRY PLYMSELL . I was at St. Paul's cathedral on this afternoon, in the choir, standing under the organ—after the anthem, during the prayer for the Queen, I saw the prisoner in the act of presenting a pistol at the gentleman who was reading the prayer—I immediately rushed forward, and laid hold of him—I kept hold of him—he said, "You need not hold me so tight, for I am not going to run away"—I was, I should suppose, about four or five yards from him before I moved—I was leaning against one of the pillars under the portico of the organ—some one had succeeded in knocking the pistol out of his hand when I got up, and before I got hold of him—I should say the pistol was pointed in a parallel line with the gentleman who was reading the prayers—whether it was intended for that gentleman I cannot take on myself to say—I did not hear any snap, or see any sparks.

HENRY WOOLF . I was in St. Paul's cathedral when this occurred, sitting two seats behind the prisoner, the next seat but one behind him—I heard a cry of some description, which directed my attention to the prisoner—I instantly rose up on my seat, and saw him with a pistol in his hand, presented towards the stalls, towards the side where the clergyman was reading the service—I had an umbrella in my hand, and struck the prisoner on the shoulder, somewhere about the arm—I think it was the arm which held the pistol—he instantly turned round, faced me, and dropped his arm—he was instantly seized, and the pistol was snatched from his hand—I did not hear any snap, or notice any sparks—the whole affair occupied a very few seconds.

EDWARD HOUGHTON . I was in St. Paul's cathedral on the afternoon of the 1st of April, in the middle aisle, sitting on the seat before the prisoner—during the reading of the prayer for the Queen, I heard a noise, looked round, and saw the prisoner presenting a pistol, to the best of my belief, towards the minister—he was standing—I made a grasp at the pistol—I did not succeed in getting it in the first instance—I made another snatch at it, and got hold of it—when I made the first snatch he was taking an aim—I cannot exactly say whether it was at the minister, or any person—his face was towards the minister—he was looking along the barrel of the pistol, as persons do when they shoot pistols—the clergyman was much higher than he was—the prisoner was facing the altar and facing the clergyman—while I was attempting to take the pistol from him he pulled the trigger—at the time he pulled the trigger, the pistol was pointed in the same direction that I saw it in the first instance—he was taking an aim—I had not hold of it at the time the trigger was pulled, nor had any other person—that occurred between the two snatches—I saw one or two sparks come from the pistol—I then got hold of the pistol, and some one seized him at the same time.

Cross-examined. Q. When you say you made a snatch at the pistol, did you touch him? A. I did not the first time.

MR. BODKIN. Q. So that you did not disturb his aim at all? A. I did not.

Court. Q. Did you examine the floor, to see whether the powder had been spilt? A. No.

JOHN LINGARD . I am a verger of St. Paul's cathedral. I was there on the 1st of April, sitting under the Bishop of Llandaff, the dean of the church—the Rev. John Clarke Haden was officiating—I saw no part of the transaction till the bustle of securing the prisoner—I examined the pistol which he had—it was presented to me by the persons who took it from the prisoner, I understood—the lock was open—I should imagine it had been struck by the hammer—the hammer was down—there did not appear to have been any powder in the pan—the lock was in the state it is now—there did not appear to have been any powder in the pan—I examined the barrel—I found the end of the muzzle stopped up with a piece of paper twisted up very tight—when I took it out there were five or six shots, No. 4, or about that size, and the smallest quantity of powder imaginable, and no wadding between the powder and shot—if the paper had not been put into the end of the muzzle, the least movement of the pistol would have made the shot drop out.

cross-examined. Was the powder and shot put together in a paper in the pistol? A. They were not in paper at all, nor was there paper between the one and the other.

Court. Q. Did you preserve the powder? A. I sent it to the Lord Mayor, and the shot also—I cannot tell how many grains of powder there were, but it was a very small quantity; I rather think not twenty grains—I did not make any search near the place where the prisoner stood, to see whether there was any powder on the pavement.

SAMUEL LLOYD . I am an inspector of the City police. The prisoner was given into my custody on this charge, and conveyed to the station—next morning (Sunday) be gave me a letter, to forward to his friends—I produce it—(letter read)—. "To E. R. Sintzenich, Esq., 41, Moscow-road, Bayswater, April 1, 1843. Dear Brother,—I wish to inform you of the situation I am in; I took it into my head this afternoon to have a pop at the clergyman in St. Paul's, and am now in a police-station in an alley that leads out of Fleet-street. I don't care much about it, as I did no harm; but be so good as not to tell papa and mamma yet, as it will put them out. My examination comes on on Monday at twelve o'clock, as I hear. I want you to come to see me, and no one else till I see you; but it did exasperate me above a bit when I heard the fellow calling the usurper, Queen, when I have lately discovered that James Stuart is the right sovereign. Give my love to all, and tell them not to be uneasy about me. Inquire for me at the police-station, Fleet-street."

Cross-examined. Q. You saw the pistol after it had been attempted to be discharged? A. The moment it was given into my custody—two grains of shot, and, I suppose, five or six grains of powder, was shown to me—I have been accustomed to the use of fire-arms from a very early period of life—I was for thirty-four years an officer of the Royal Marines—I examined the pan of the pistol minutely—I wiped it with my finger—there was no appearance of its having been recently primed—if it had been primed to any extent, and it had gone off with sparks, I conceive I should have found it by rubbing it with my finger—I did not find it so—if the quantity of powder I saw had been set fire to, in my opinion it would scarcely have caused a flash, or removed the paper which was twisted into the muzzle—I should conceive the

shot could not have reached the clergyman—the quantity of powder shown to me would decidedly not have removed the shot that distance—I have no doubt of it—I went to the prisoner's house next morning—I applied to examine his books and papers, and was permitted to do so without any trouble whatever.

MR. BODKIN. Q. By whom were you shown this small quantity of powder? A. It was handed by some of the authorities in the cathedral to the officer who had the prisoner in custody—he had it in a small bit of paper when it was shown to me—I did not see it taken out of the pistol—it was about ten minutes after the prisoner was taken that it was shown to me—I cannot say how many hands it had passed through—it was not Mr. Lingard that showed it to me—it is not unusual for the flint of a pistol or gun to strike sparks without igniting the powder, if it is in the pan—if a pan is properly charged with powder to go off, you will generally see some little soil on the hammer, and there was none whatever on the part of the hammer that presses on the pan—had it been primed as pistols usually are, it would have left a little foulness—the portion of charcoal in the powder would have caused that—I think a pistol having powder in the pan, and powder dropping out without being ignited, would probably leave a mark; it is usual; I am speaking generally of what I should conceive would be the case.

MR. BRYARLEY. Q. Is it not almost invariably the case, when powder is put into the pan, that some will remain? A. The generality of powder used, the common kind, from the greater portion of charcoal being mixed with it, would decidedly leave a portion to cause a soil, so as to be shown when rubbed, and the powder shown to me appeared to be a very inferior large grain.

JURY. Q. If priming was put in the pan of a pistol, and fell out without igniting, could you then detect whether there had been powder or not? A. I conceive that would depend on the quantity of powder put in the pan—the smaller the quantity the less chance would there be of its leaving any sign.

COURT. Q. Supposing there was a small quantity, yet sufficient to discharge a pistol, and that bad fallen out, would it necessarily leave powder for you to discover? A. It is not unlikely it would deceive me—it might leave no mark.

MR. BRYARLEY. Q. If there had been three or four times the quantity of powder you saw, would it have propelled the shot to the distance of the clergyman? A. Why I should suppose if there had been four times the quantity, it would have blown the shot out, decidedly—it would then reach a person six feet off—but unless it hit the eye I conceive it would have done no harm—if it hit the eye it would.

(Witnesses for the Defence.)

EDGAR RAY . I live in Euston-grove, Euston-square, and am a chorister at the chapel-royal. I was present at St. Paul's on the 1st of April—I saw the prisoner draw a pistol from his breast—I cannot say who he aimed it at—it did not go off—he drew it back, and I believe somebody hit him on the head, and it was then taken away from him—he put it a little forward again after he was struck, and then he was pulled back—I saw him try to cock the pistol after he had presented it—I did not see in what direction it was when it went off—I did not see the sparks or bear the snap—it did not go off.

REV. CHRISTOPHER PACK . I am one of the minor canons of St. Paul's. I was present there on the 1st of April, and saw the pistol fired—my attention was called to what was going on, by hearing a violent noise on the opposite side of the choir, from some gentlemen in the stalls—I jumped up, looked towards the person making a noise, saw his gesticulation with his arms—he

seemed in violent agitation—at last I heard the words, "The pistol" pronounced—I immediately turned my eye under where I was sitting, and there saw the prisoner, at the very instant my eye caught him, throw his right arm round, as if endeavouring to extricate it from the grasp of somebody behind, I saw a pistol in his hand—it was then extended to about an angle of forty-five degrees, towards that part of the choir in which the communion-table is placed—there were two gentlemen sitting on the seat immediately behind him, and when the pistol came in contact almost with their heads, they seemed to shrink back, almost involuntarily—the gentleman who gave the alarm immediately cried out, "Seize the pistol!" when one of them darted his arm forward with the utmost rapidity, and grasped the barrel of the pistol—a very short struggle took place, in which the pistol was snapped, as if the man's hand was on the trigger, and the act of drawing it out of his hand had caused it to go off—I observed something white protruding from the mouth of the pistol—the man was then seized and taken away—immediately after the service I went into the vestry, where he was secured—the policeman gave me the pistol, and I drew a dirty white paper from the muzzle—there were two inches of it protruding from the muzzle—I found some paper at the bottom of the pistol, besides what was in the muzzle—it was in the barrel—it was crumpled paper—Mr. Lingard extracted it with a piece of wire—I took the paper, and spread it open on the vestry table, and should think twenty or thirty grains of powder dropped from the paper—it was apparently inclosed in the paper with the shot, which had dropped out when I spread it on the table.

Q. Are you of opinion, supposing the paper to have been set fire to, that it would have projected the shot, that it would have gone off? A. Certainly not—I am accustomed to fire-arms, and in my opinion it could not have exploded—it did not appear to me to have been primed.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Could you find any powder in the pan? A. None—I assume it was not primed, from the quantity of sparks emitted—if it had been primed it would have exploded, probably from the sparks—they appeared sparks from the flint and steel—I observed then it was a flint and steel pistol—I saw the charge drawn by Mr. Lingard—I do not know how for down the barrel it was—I was sounding it myself with the wire before he drew it—it was down quite at the breech of the pistol—it is my firm belief the powder and shot were inclosed in the paper—I cannot distinctly say whether they dropped from the paper, or followed it when it was drawn out, but am perfctly clear the grains of powder were inclosed in the paper, for I brushed them off from it on opening it—I do not think they adhered to the outside of the paper—after the paper was drawn, Mr. Lingard put the wire down the barrel again, stirred it about, and on rapping the muzzle on the table, a small quantity of powder came out, with a great quantity of rust.

Q. Then the next thing to the touch-hole was powder? A. It may be so—there certainly was a few grains of powder at the bottom of the pistol, mixed with rust—I was immediately over the spot where the occurrence took place—I was next to Mr. Haden—the prisoner was between me and the person who seized the pistol—his face was towards me—the person who seized the pistol was behind the prisoner—the pistol has a very large touch-hole, and if it had been loaded with powder, a great quantity of the charge must have come into the pan—if the trigger had been pulled without igniting, it is very probable a great quantity of the charge might have been lost.

MR. HARKE re-examined. I wish to say, on account of the last gentleman's evidence, that the pistol was directed towards the communion table—I think it right I should state the impression I had on my mind when I saw the sparks from the pistol—I was either on the steps, or in the body of the church, and

from that situation, whether the pistol was directed to the clergyman, or more towards the communion-table, as the gentleman has said, I cannot say; but it appeared, from the situation I was in, it was directed more towards the com-munion-table than towards the clergyman; but I think that appearance arose from my altered situation.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18430508-1461

1461. GIOVANNI OTTOLONI was indicted for feloniously assaulting Giovanni Rabajotti, on the 9th of April, and stabbing and wounding him on the left side of his belly, and other parts of his body, with intent to murder him.—Two other Counts, stating his intent to be to disable, and to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

GIOVANNI RABAJOTTI (through an interpreter.) On Sunday, the 9th of April last, about twelve o'clock at night, I was on Saffron-hill, in company with Luigi Berni—I met Dominico Belli, a countryman of mine—I had previously had some conversation with Belli about ten francs, which I was to have advanced for his father—on the Sunday night we had some words about it again—Belli pushed me, and I pushed him again—Berni came, and said, "Don't make any words"—the prisoner then came up—I did not see where he came from—he did not say anything, but stabbed me with a knife in the stomach in seven places—there were more blows, but only seven that made me bleed—I did not fall—Berni pulled him away—a policeman came up, and took me to the hospital—I was there eight days—I had had no quarrel or words with the prisoner before this happened.

Cross-examined by MR. HAKE. Q. What are you by trade? A. I buy and sell instruments, and let them out at so much a week—I employ about twenty men and boys, and pay them so much a week for taking out instruments to play about the street—Berni is my partner—I have been four years and a half in this country—I returned to Italy, and came back again—I was brought up to work in the fields—the prisoner was never in my service, or in Berni's—his master has returned to his own country—all my men belong to Parma—the prisoner did not say, on coming up, "Desist, and be friends," meaning me and Belli—I did not say to him, "Will you take part with Belli?"—when he struck me with the knife I tried to help myself—the police separated us—I had been in my own lodging till nine o'clock that evening—my brother-in-law sent for me to a public-house on Saffron-hill, and I went—I do not know the name of it—I was in the public-house an hour and a half or two hours—I was not the worse' for drink—I was not at all angry when Belli pushed me—we pushed one another, I took off my coat and threw down my hat, because Belli began to strike me; and I said, "I must take my coat off as well as you, to defend myself"—I did not strike Belli first-he pushed me first, and I pushed him back, and Berni came up and parted us—the prisoner did not try to part us—Belli and I only pushed each other once or twice before the prisoner came up—I did not intend to fight Belli—I am not in the habit of carrying a knife—I swear that—I have a knife to cut bread, one worth 6d.—sometimes I leave it at home, and sometimes I take it with me—I had no knife with me on the night in question—I recollect that, because I changed my jacket to come out—I have never threatened the prisoner to any one—I never threatened to transport him—I have had nothing to do with him.

LUIGI BERNI (through an interpreter.) I am an organ and instrument dealer. On the night of the 9th of April I was with the prosecutor on Saffron-hill—we met Dominico Belli—some words passed between the prosecutor and

Belli about ten francs, which ended in a scuffle between the two—I pushed Belli away from him, and then I saw the prisoner strike the prosecutor with a knife many times—if I had not interfered the man would have been killed—the prisoner cut me with the knife in the squabble—the prosecutor had no knife—after they were parted, and after the blows were struck, the prisoner said, "I will give you some more, if you want anything, if you have not had enough"—the prosecutor gave the prisoner no provocation before he struck him—he had not done or said anything to him.

cross-examined. Q. Was there a struggle between the prosecutor and yourself on one side, and the prisoner on the other? A. It was only a question between Belli and the prosecutor—they had a struggle—I only tried to part them—Belli took no part in it while the prisoner was in contact with the prosecutor—Belli and the police were by when the prisoner said if he had not enough he would give him more—he spoke in Italian—it was all in Italian—I did not see any other Italians there—I have never stated, that if the policemen had not arrived at the time they did, I and the prosecutor would have kicked the prisoner to death, nor that nothing less than the prisoner's tranportation would satisfy me—I have not said that in the last week.

JAMES CHURCHYARD (police-constable G 174.) On the night in question I was on duty on Saffron-hill, and found the prisoner and prosecutor together—I saw the prisoner flourishing this knife in his right hand—the prosecutor was in the act of falling, from loss of blood—I caught him in my left arm—I was rather fearful of going near the prisoner—I struck him twice, once on the arm and once on the head, with my fist, and he flung the knife over the people's heads—I told my brother constable to take him—I took the prosecutor to the Royal Free Hospital in Gray's Inn-road—I saw this knife picked up by a stranger, and received it from him—it was covered with blood—it is now encrusted on the blade—it is a spring knife, which will not shut unless the spring is touched.

Cross-examined. Q. It is a common clasp-knife, is it not? A. I never saw one like it before—the prosecutor walked to the hospital with my assistance—the prisoner appeared in a very great passion when I came up, and was flourishing the knife over his head—I heard him say something, but I could not understand him, as he spoke in Italian—he was scoured at the moment.

HENRY TATE . I am a policeman. I was present on this occasion.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe a scratch on the prisoner's brow? A. I did—I produce the prosecutor's clothes—there are thirteen or fourteen cuts in the waistcoat and trowsers together—just previous to this occurring, I heard a loud talking and quarrelling, and went up immediately after Churchyard—I should say there were about fifteen or twenty people there then.

THOMAS HILL . I am house surgeon at the Royal Free Hospital. The prosecutor was brought there on the night of the 9th of April—I found six or seven wounds about him, one on the left arm, and five or six in different parts of the body—there were two wounds in his left side, inflicted by a knife, such as the one produced—they were of a more serious nature than the others—they might have been attended with serious consequences—I saw the prisoner next morning, and saw a skin scratch over the eye, and various bruises on his face, from a fist.

Cross-examined. Q. The prosecutor's wounds, I suppose, were common incised wounds? A. They were—he was at the hospital eight days—I have not examined him since—the wounds all healed by the first intention, without much inflammation—if there was a struggle between two men, one being

under the other, and striking with a knife at random, the prosecutor's wounds might have been received when in such a position—the wounds were oblique, but the extent of them was stopped by the knife passing over the ribs—the wound which passed over the ribs was an oblique wound—to the best of my belief they were both oblique.

MR. DOANE. Q. Supposing the parties to be both standing up, might the wounds be inflicted in that position? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. That is, you cannot judge what their position was? A. I cannot—one of the wounds was turned aside by the rib—if it had not been for the rib it would have gone deeper—one wound was in the side, and the second lower down—there was nothing in the lower wound to stop it—the upper wound was the most serious—there was nothing but skin and fat between the outer skin and the rib—it might have been a fatal wound had it not been stopped by the rib.

Witnesses for the Defence.

CHERISTINO COLUMBO (through an interpreter.) I live in Eyre-street-hill. On the night in question I was on Saffron-hill—I was coming out of a public-house with the prisoner to go home—Belli and Rabajotti were together—as I was passing with the prisoner, I saw Belli, Rabajotti, and his partner, making a noise—when I heard them quarrelling together, I said, "Let us go and part them"—Belli said, "I told you to give ten francs to my father, and you did not give it to him," and he called Rabajotti a liar, because he did not give the ten francs—then Rabajotti said, "You are a liar," and then they began to quarrel and fight together—Berni said, "Come, don't quarrel, don't fight together"—the prisoner also told them not to quarrel together—Rabaj otti gave the prisoner a blow on the face—the prisoner turned back to hit him again, and Berni, when he saw that, pulled him back—they then walked five or six, or seven yards, all fighting together; then the police came up, and took the prisoner, because his shirt was out—the prisoner said to the policeman, "Look, policeman," holding his clothes—the policeman said, "Never mind, go on, go on"—Rabajotti tried to hit him again, and after they were parted I saw Rabajotti bleeding at the arm—the prisoner had no knife in his hand when he first came up—the police pushed the prisoner down on the ground in trying to part them—two or three came up and sprang their rattles, and tried to part them—he was not struggling with any one while he was on the ground—I have known him two years in England—he was in the army in Italy, and served the Queen—I never heard any harm of him.

DOMINICO BELLI . I live on Saffron-hill. On the night in question I had some words with Rabajotti—I did not push him or hit him at all, nor did he hit or push me—we only had words—he pulled off his coat, and was going to fight with me—I had not provoked him—his partner, Luigi Berni, was there, and he said, "You be quiet, Dominico," and would not let me do anything—he kept me on one side—the prisoner came by and asked us what was the matter—they said nothing—he said to me and Rabajotti, "Go home, and be quiet"—Rabajotti said to the prisoner, "Will you take Dominico Belli's part"—he was angry with me—he had been drinking—they had all been drinking—both sides were very much heated in drink—the prisoner said, "Oh, I don't mind"—Rabajotti had his coat and hat off to fight with me, and he pitched into the prisoner first with his fists—Berni was present at the time—he took no part when he saw Rabajotti pitching into the prisoner, he only told me to be quiet, to keep on one side, and let them fight it themselves—they went down the street, seven doors or so—I stood on the pavement—they were fighting all the way—I cannot tell what happened then, because I was far away, and the persons began to come round, and I could not see anything

—I did not see Berni interfere—I did not see the prisoner down—I never went near any of them—I have known the prisoner well for two years—I never knew anything bad about him—I never saw him quarrel with anybody.

ZAMONI MARENGI (through an interpreter.) I live in Saffron-hill-court. I know Berni—since this matter occurred I heard him say if it had not been for the policeman he would have killed or murdered the prisoner—I have known the prisoner a year and a half or two years, and have known him to be a good man.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How many times have you been in custody in this country for fighting and beating persons? A. I never was in prison—I was taken to Hatton-garden once when there was a quarrel—I have only been there once.

(Luigi Castanielli, No. 18, Somers-street, Eyre-street-hill; Andrea Peni Guichamo Columbo, No. 3, Eyre-place, Eyre-street-hill; Guichamo Canti-chello; Andrea Cunao; Pietro Canippa; Stephano Denagra; Pietro Malverni; Ferrari de Malverni; and Argostino Peni; deposed to the prisoner's good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.— DEATH recorded.

First Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18430508-1462

1462. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Ann Caton, on the 30th of April, and cutting and wounding her upon her head, with intent to do her grievous bodily harm.

MARY ANN CATON . I live in Angel-gardens. I was sitting down in a beer-shop in Blue-gate-fields, on the 30th of April—the prisoner was there—I was tipsy, and took up his pot, and drank out of it—I abused him—he heaved some beer in my face—I abused him again, and then he struck me with the pot on the head, and made it bleed.

Prisoner. She called me all manner of names, and the pot knocked her on the head by accident.

LAVINIA ROGERS . I saw the prisoner hit the prosecutrix on the head with the pot once—it cut her, and it bled a little—he had said he would hit her on the head with the pot—she said he had better not.

JAMES FISHER . I saw this done. I cannot say whether it was accidental—she aggravated him very much.

JOHN WILLIAM BIRD . I am a surgeon. I examined the prosecutrix's head—it was a severe wound, about two inches—the scalp was completely divided—she was ill two days.

GUILTY of an Assault. Aged 25.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1463

1463. SUSAN TAYLOR and JOHN WARD were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of Jan., 1 spoon, value 1l. 1s., the goods of Elizabeth Groves, the mistress of Susan Taylor.

WILLIAM GROVES . I live in Cloudesley-terrace, Islington, with my mother Elizabeth Groves—the prisoner Taylor was in her service in January—I can swear this spoon is my mother's—I have the fellow one here—(the spoons were here placed together)—I cannot now tell which is the stolen one.

THOMAS MORRIS HARVEY . I am a pawnbroker. The spoon was pawned with me by Mary Ann Ward, on the 17th of January—there are no initials on it—we missed it.

MARY ANN WARD . I pawned the spoon—I received it from the prisoner Ward, who is my brother—I gave the duplicates to the policeman. Henry Dubois. I am a policeman. I received the duplicates from Mary Ann Ward.

Ward's Defence. I asked her to lend me tome money—she said she had not got any, and lent me the spoon to pawn.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1464

1464. SUSAN TAYLOR was again indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 2 spoons, value 14s., the goods of William Hazlewood.

SAMUEL LAURENCE . I am footman to William Hazlewood, Esq., of Upper Gower-street. On Friday, the 21st of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the house, and wanted to wait to see Miss Hazlewood, who was not at home—I asked her to walk in—I had seen her once before—next morning I missed two silver spoons from the kitchen she had been sitting in—these are them.

JAMES STEWART . I am a pawnbroker. To the best of my belief these spoons were pawned by the prisoner, on the 21st of April, about seven o'clock in the evening—here is the counter duplicate.

JANE JOHNSON . I am searcher at the station. I found nine duplicates on the prisoner, and gave them to the officer.

WILLIAM HOLLAND . I am a policeman. I received the duplicates from Johnson—one corresponds with the one the pawnbroker has produced.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There were three other indictments against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18430508-1465

1465. ROBERT BIRRILL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John White Frederick Powrie, about 4 in the night of the 26th of April, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 9 biscuits, value 3d., his property.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES BRANNAN . I am a sergeant of the police. By desire of Mr. Powrie, I was concealed with him in a room over the back parlour, above the shop, where we had command of his shop about a quarter or twenty minutes after eleven o'clock, on the night of the 26th of April—the prisoner had been pointed out to me—about a quarter after four, I heard the lock go leading from the bake-house to the shop—I heard the turning of a key in the lock—I saw the prisoner go into the shop with a pot with a candle stuck into it—I saw him turn round into the parlour under where I was—I lost sight of him for about seven minutes—I then saw him come into the shop and try the desk, which was placed against the window—he could not open that—he then opened a drawer, and took some biscuits from it, put some into his pocket, and commenced eating them—I went round to the side door to secure him—I was without my boots—I took him into custody in the shop—I told him I belonged to the police, that he had been suspected of robbing his master some time, and must consider himself in my custody—he commenced breaking the biscuits and putting them into his mouth—he said he would be d----d if he would be accused—I took him into custody—I found the shop-door open, and received a pair of pincers from Mr. Powrie—I examined the door, and saw this end of the key projected about one-eigth of an inch through the lock, so that it might be turned, and by the constant application of something the key was worn away.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Was not this charge withdrawn by the prosecutor at the police office? A. No, the prisoner was not committed on it—I do not know that the charge was dismissed—the Magistrate ordered me to take the case into the deposition-room, and I did so—I had another prisoner in custody, and it appears the embezzlement was gone into by Mr. Vine, the clerk, instead of this—nothing was said about dismissing

this case—I gave evidence, and he was remanded on it—I made a deposition in the case, and signed it, but it was not transmitted here—the Magistrate did not commit, and the prosecutor was so surprised that he went back and made farther application, and was ordered to prefer an indictment—he felt dissatisfied that the prisoner was not committed on the burglary—the prosecutor followed me down directly—the biscuits were put into a bag, when I took them from the prisoner—he was going to return to the bakehouse when I stopped him—probably he heard me coming down stairs—I had my shoes off, but I made a noise getting down so quick—I met him at the bakehouse door—the biscuits were in his waistcoat pocket—Mrs. Powrie afterwards came into the shop, as there was a noise—the prisoner began to get very violent—he said he would bed—d if he would be accused, and spoke very loud—no conversation took place between her and him—there were some words passed on Mrs. Powrie's part—what they were I did not attend to—she was very much agitated, and I had a great deal to do to keep the prisoner quiet, as he wanted to go down to the bakehouse—he said at Worship-street that he wanted some oil for a lamp—he did not say so that night.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was the noise you made coming down stairs such as the prisoner might have heard? A. I am satisfied it was—the desk he went to was beyond where he took the biscuits from.

JOHN WHITE FREDERICK POWRIE . I am a baker, and live in Finsbury-place, St. Luke's—the prisoner was in my employ for nine or ten months—my parlour is quite away from the bakehouse—it was the prisoner's duty to attend to the bakehouse from half-past eleven at night, till the following morning—he had no right in any other part of the premises—my desk is next the shop window—I frequently kept cash there—on the night of the 26th, I watched with Brannan, and while waiting we heard footsteps coming up the stairs—I then saw the prisoner come into the shop—he had no right in the shop—he opened the door into the shop—I positively swear it was locked over night, about half an hour before we went to watch—after the prisoner had been secured, I went to the door, between four and five o'clock in the morning, and found it open—I had left the key inside the lock, on the shop side—a portion of the other end projected through the key-hole, and it had been turned from the outside—after the prisoner came into the shop he went into the parlour, as I suppose—we lost sight of him in that direction—he then came into the shop, went to the desk, and appeared to try to open it with both hands, but it was locked and he could not—he then went to several drawers, opened them, and took out these biscuits—I produce a pair of pincers which my wife gave me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you give information against the prisoner your-self? A. No, I did not—I had assistance to detect somebody who I knew robbed my place—I have known the prisoner ten months—I do not know any of his family—I have been friendly to him, as I have to all my men—I have not fought with him, neither jokingly nor in earnest—I have not drank with him—I might perhaps, on one occasion—I am not aware that he and my wife have been very intimate, and sat together at the same table—I have drank with him on one occasion; it may be two, but I think not—I will swear it was not three—I think I have a recollection of two—I cannot say whether all the biscuits were in one drawer—he opened more than one drawer—we counted nine biscuits originally—I dare say there are not more than eight now, but they are broken—it is not a rule for bakers to eat as much as they like, provided they do not pocket any—I never knew it a rule for them to take biscuits to eat—it was never done where I hate been—a moderate quantity of bread is generally allowed to bakers—I lived with a Mr. Adamson

once—I was discharged—I also lived with a Mr. Lowe—I was not discharged from there—I was never charged with robbing him that I know of—I think I gave him notice to quit—I do not exactly remember—I cannot positively say, at this distance of time, whether I was discharged or gave notice—the shop door was locked in the usual way, by a key—I locked it myself, to the best of my recollection—I know I tried it—I will swear I locked it—when the policeman was sitting in the parlour, I went to the door myself, and locked it—I afterwards tried it—I cannot say where my wife was at that time—she was not with me—I do not know what became of her after I went out, which was about half-past eleven—I left her up then in the parlour, I think—when I returned I found her down in the passage—I am quite sure of that—after the alarm, to the best of my knowledge she was dressed, not dressed to go out, but so far covered that she could not catch cold very easily.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Have you ever been charged anywhere with any act of dishonesty whatever? A. Never—I have been three years in business in the lame place.

CAROLINE ELIZABETH POWRIE . I am the prosecutor's wife—I found this pair of pincers on the step at the top of the bakehouse stairs, close to the door which was opened—I heard a noise in the night, and came down.—I had been in bed previously, the whole night with the servant and my boy.

Cross-examined. Q. How was the door fastened? A. Locked, and the key left in it—I locked the door myself—I will swear that, about a quarter to twelve—my husband was then in the parlour—I did not lock it by his direction—it is a thing I always do—he knew that I should do it—he knew that I had done it—he asked me, and I said "Yes"—after locking it, I returned to the parlour—it was the shop-door that I locked—I should imagine the pincers had been applied to the knib of the key, and turned round—I found the pincers about an hour after the prisoner was taken—I directly took them down to Mr. Powrie, who was at work in the bakehouse, after the prisoner had been taken away—I went to bed about a quarter to twelve—my husband was gone out then—I went to bed as he went out—he went out at one door, while I went out at the other, locked it, and went to bed—when he came home I was in bed—he knocked at the door—the prisoner was to have let him in—he did not do so; and I went down, let him in, and returned to bed immediately—I came down stairs afterwards, on hearing the noise—I was not dressed—I was in my gown and flannel dress—I went down to see if the prisoner was detected—I knew he was there—I had let him in—I never had a cup with him, and never allowed him the least liberty.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Is there a word of truth in your having been intimate with him? A. Certainly not—I generally locked the door at night—my husband has occasionally done so—it is more left to me—I swear I locked it on this night.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 23.—Recommended to mercy. Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18430508-1466

1466. JAMES STILE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June, 1 pair of boots, value 25s., the goods of John Birmingham.

JOHN BIRMINGHAM . I now live in High Holborn; I kept a stop in Long-acre. On the 30th of June the prisoner rode up to my shop on horseback, and called to me to come out—he said, "I want to see a pair of 12s. boots"—he got off his horse, came into the shop, and tried on a pair of 12s. boots—he said, "These are ugly things, let me have a pair of those yellow ones in the window"—they were a pair of patent boots—he liked them very well, and took off a pair of old boots with the heels hanging to them, offered me 6s.,

and said, "I am a respectable man, a hone-keeper, and keep twenty horses"—I said, "I will not take the 6s., I must have the money or the boots"—he looked into his hat, and said, "I am very well known in the neighbourhood"—he could see no maker's name in his hat—he said, "Come up to George Allen's, at the Cock and Bottle, Bedfordbury, he will give me a respectable character, and you will see I am not a rogue"—I went to the Cock and Bottle—Mr. Allen was not there—Mrs. Allen told me to get the money or the boots—I wanted him to come back and take off the boots and take his own—he had my boots on, and left his own in the shop—he had something to drink at the Cock and Bottle, and when he came out he would not come back to my shop, to return my boots and take his own—he said, "If you will come with me over Waterloo-bridge I will pay you; I have plenty of friends about here, and I will pay for a cab to take you home, that you shall not lose time from your business"—when I got to Waterloo-bridge he went down the steps to a hair-dresser's shop, and said, "Lend me 1l., d----n it, this man mistrusts my honesty"—the man said he had not got it—he asked the man to drink—he stopped loitering about—the man would not come with me—he went as far as the theatre—it came on to hail or rain—I caught hold of the bridle of the horse—it was a very spirited animal, and began to rear—his hat fell off—he came off the horse and said, "Yon d----d fool, the horse will kick your brains out"—I let the horse go—he got up on the horse—a policeman came up—I was going to give him in charge, but the horse ran away with him on it.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. When did you next see him? A. Not till nine months afterwards, when I gave him in charge—I am sure he is the man—I have heard he has been in Whitecross-street prison since—I did not know where his wife was—he gave me his right address—I went there, and told his wife about it—I did not leave a bill on his wife for 25s., the amount of the boots—I told her of it, and she said, "He came home to me last night, and was in such trouble in the morning; it was a lark, and he was very uneasy about it."

COURT. Q. Did he appear to know the hair-dresser? A. The hairdresser said he did not know him before.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Did not you go out and drink together? A. No—he treated people at the Cock and Bottle—I went there intending to get my money or my boots—I did not give credit—I went for a reference and to get the money—the boots he left with me were to be refooted and sent home—he said he would then pay me for the boots—the spurs Were with the old boots—I have used them long ago.

WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH . The prisoner came into the prosecutor's shop on the 30th of June, and asked for a pair of boots, which he tried on—he did not like them—he saw a pair of patent leather ones in the window, tried them on, and offered 6s. of the money—master said he would have the boots or the money—he said he would take him to Allen's, at the Cook and Bottle, Bed-fordbury, and give him proof of his respectability, and pay him the money—he left a pair of boots to be refooted, and a pair of spurs which he said were worth 14s.

Cross-examined. Q. When did your master tell you to say he said he would pay the money? A. He did not tell me—I mentioned it before the Magistrate—he said he would give him proof of his respectability, and pay the money; he had not got the money with him.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

OLD COURT.—Monday, May 15th, 1843.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1467

1467. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May, 1 copper, value 8s., the goods of William Bedford, and fixed to a building; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1468

1468. CHARLES HERMITAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May, at St. George, Hanover-square, 12 spoons, value 10l., the goods of Robert Henry Clive, Esq., in his dwelling-house; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . ** Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1469

1469. MARGARET TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April, 24 yards of gambroon, value 16s.; and 6 1/2 yards of printed cotton, value 1s. 4d.; the goods of James Stephenson.

JAMES STEPHENSON . I am a linen-draper, and live in Sidney-place, Commercial-road. On the night of the 28th of April I went to my shop door, and observed the prisoner standing by the side of some remnants of print, rolling her cloak up, and putting the remnants of print between the lining of it—I watched her some time—she saw me looking at her, and palled out one piece, came and asked me to measure it, which I did, and said it came to 7 1/4 d.—she paid me for it, and I afterwards saw her go and take three more remnants—she then went to the window, threw her cloak over some goods which lay there, and took a piece of gambroon—she could not see me, as I was behind some goods—she went ont, I followed, stopped her four or five doors off, opened her cloak, and saw the gambroon—she dropped it on the pavement—I took it up, took her back to the shop, and took the remnants of print out of her cloak—she said she had not done it, and afterwards acknowledged it, and begged forgiveness.

THOMAS SQUIRES . I took her in charge—she was sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not sober.

GUILTY . * Aged 59.— Confined Eight Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1470

1470. ANN RYAN and ELIZA HEDGER were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May, 11 pairs of stays, value 10s.; the goods of James Stephenson; and that Hedger had been before convicted of felony.

RYAN pleaded GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Year.

JOHN M'PHERSON . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Read, linen-draper, of the Commercial-road. On the 1st of May I was standing outside the shop door, minding the things—the prisoners and another young woman came to the shop, looked about the things, then walked to Mr. Stephen son's—I saw Hedger go to the farther end of the shop, and attract the boy's attention while Ryan took a pair of stays, and walked away with them down Exmouth-street—they had been talking together before they went in—I went and told Mr. Stephenson.

JAMES STEPHENSON . I am a linen-draper. I received information, went down Exmouth-street, and saw Ryan going up Charles-street—she ran two or three yards, took the stays from under her shawl, and threw them into a fore-court—I stopped her, and took them up—they are mine.

THOMAS FORBES . I am a policeman. I took Ryan in charge—Hedger was brought to the station—M'Pherson said she had been with Ryan—she said she had never seen her in her life till that moment.

JOHN BAKER . I am a policeman. I was called into Mr. Stephenson's shop—I saw Hedger standing over the counter—she was charged with being

in company with Ryan by M'Pherson—the said she was not, for the was not in the shop.

Hedger's Defence. I went into the shop to boy a cap; I was not near the other shop.

JAMES MACKLIN (police-constable K 99.) I produce a certificate of Hedger's former conviction—(read)—I was present at the trial—she is the person.

HEDGER. GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Justice Coltman.

Reference Number: t18430508-1471

1471. JOSE BERNARDO GUEDES OLIVEIRA was indicted for feloniously engraving and making upon a certain copper-plate part of a bill of Exchange in the Portuguese language, purporting to be part of a bill of Exchange of a certain foreign state called Portugal.—2nd COUNT, for engraving the same without the authority of one Baroa do Tojal.—6 other COUNTS, varying the manner of stating the charge.

MR. PLATT, SIR JOHN BAYLEY , and MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE SMITH . I am in the employ of Mr. Reynolds, an engraver and printer, of No. 115, Fleet-street About the 8th or 9th of February last, as near as I can recollect, the prisoner called at Mr. Reynolds's shop—Mr. Reynolds was not at home—he presented a bill, and asked if we did things of that sort—I said, "Yes"—(looking at a paper)—I cannot swear this was the bill—it was one exactly like it—he wanted an estimate for doing a plate of this sort—I told him I could not give an estimate, and referred him to Mr. Reynolds, who would be in about two o'clock—I understood him to say that he would call at two o'clock next day—I do not recollect seeing him next day—I was not in the shop at the time—I saw him several times in the shop after that, and on one occasion he left me a "piece of paper—I think it was about the 28th or 29th of March—(looking at a paper marked "E")—I cannot swear it was this, but it was a piece exactly like this—I showed the prisoner a proof of one with the die struck up that Mr. Reynolds had done, and he complained of its not being like the original pattern—the die was used to produce the stamp—it was an impression of the die which we had executed of the one he first brought—he brought the paper to show that the die which we had engraved for him was not like the original that he had brought—he gave me that piece of paper, and told me to show it to Mr. Reynolds, to show him wherein the difference lay—he pointed out the difference to me—he then left—I gave that piece of paper to Mr. Reynolds the same day.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you understand the Portuguese language? A. No—Mr. Reynolds engraved this himself—his is a large shop, and he does a great deal of business.

ROBERT REYNOLDS . I am an engraver and stationer, and carry on business at No. 115, Fleet-street. On Wednesday, the 8th of February, Smith made a communication to me as to somebody calling—next day the prisoner called—he did not say who or what he was—he asked me if I could execute a document exactly like this—this is the paper he produced—(marked "A")—I told him I could—he asked how much it would be, I said I thought about 20l.—that waa for the engraving, including 1,000 impressions—he said he thought that was a great deal of money—I said there was a water-mark in it, which was not in my department, that I should have to get it done, and I did not exactly know what they might charge for it—(there is a water-mark in the centre)—I think I then told him if he would leave it till, the

next day I would tell him exactly what I could do it for—he agreed to that, and left the shop, leaving the paper with me—after he was gone I examined the paper more minutely—I observed in the centre of it the initials "C. P." with the words "credito publico," and that was also in another part of the paper, like a water-mark, round the stamp—in consequence of discovering those words, I consulted Mr. Withers, a friend of mine, who is a cashier in the London and Westminster Bank—in consequence of what passed I went that same afternoon to St. Mary Axe, and saw Mr. Vanzalla, the Consul-General of Portugal—Mr. Vanzalla told me something, and gave me some instructions—next day the prisoner came again—I told him I had looked at it, and there was not so much work as I had thought, and I could do them, the first thousand for 10l., and 4l. a thousand afterwards, as he said he should want a great quantity—he said that was nearer the price—before he came that day I had seen Mr. Bush, of the firm of Bush and Mullins, solicitors for the prosecution—the prisoner took the paper away with him, and said I should see him in a day or two perhaps—in all my subsequent interviews with the prisoner I acted under the advice of Mr. Bush—I knew what I was about—I saw the prisoner again on Monday, the 13th of February—he brought the same paper marked "A"—he said that I should execute the order, and to let him have them as soon as possible, 1,000 first, but it was not to be stinted to that—I said it was usual for strangers to leave their address or a deposit—I think he said, "Quite right"—he gave no address, but he put a half-sovereign down on the counter, and said, "Will that do?"—I said, "Yes"—he then left—in consequence of the paper not being in my line I went to Mr. Saunders, a well-known paper-manufacturer, on the next day, the 11th—I left the paper marked "A" with Mr. Saunders, pointing out the water-mark—I saw the prisoner two or three times after that, up to the 25th of February, when he called—he merely came to inquire if the paper was ready—I told him I had got the paper in hand—on the 25th I had some paper from Mr. Saunders—I showed the prisoner one of those pieces of paper with the water-mark—I have not got the one that I showed him, but I have a similar piece, from the same mould—it is marked "B."—there are the figures "1000" in a circular wreath—he objected to the way in which the leaves were done—he compared it with the original—he pointed out to me what alteration it required—I said I thought it might be done—he shortly left, promising to call again—he called again on Monday, the 27th of Feb.—I had been engaged on the plate during that time—I showed him the plate which I bad been at work on—this is the plate—(producing it)—it was not quite finished—I told the prisoner so—I had not taken any proof from it at that time—I think the prisoner complained about my being so long about it, but he did not complain about the plate—I promised to let him have a proof on the following day—he came again on the Wednesday—I then showed him a proof similar to one which I produce, marked "C"—that was the state of the plate on that day—on seeing that, he pointed out some alterations which he wished to be made in the engraving of the plate—he called on several occasions, and watched the progress of the plate, and the alterations I was making—he pointed out what he found fault with in the proofs that I produced to him—he was present on several occasions when I altered the plate itself—he stood over me while I did it—I recollect his doing so on the 29th of March—the alterations I then made are marked here on this proof, in pencil—he pencilled them, and I took my graver and altered the plate whilst he stood by—I think the alterations he then required was the white part of the "C" to be thinner—it is in the flourish over the "C"—that is what I call part of the

"C"—it is not united with; the "C"—it is the "C'upon which the word "credito" is—the flourish comes over the "P," and then touches the "C"—there is another mark at the bottom of the "C," which be also pencillef—the "P" and "C" are both altered—the mark at the bottom of the "C" was to make it thinner, not to show so much white—he stood over me whilst I made those alterations with my gravet—on Saturday, the 18th of March, he called and asked for a proof—he said be wished to send it off by the post that evening—I gave him one, and he took it away with him—he said he wished to go to Paris, and that I was putting him to a deal of expense by stopping in London—on the 25th of March he came again, and had two more proofs—I think he said he was going to send them by the post—on that day there was some alteration made on this piece of paper, marked "F," by his direction—I do not know whether he was present on that day when I made this alteration—I made the alteration he requested—on the 28th he called again—I showed him a proof—I produce one marked "G"—he marked certain alterations on that, to be done by me—he then said that would do—I think those alterations were made whilst he staid—those on the 28th I know were—he called on Wednesday morning, the 29th, and suggested alterations, which I have named—I was then at work on the proofs, and showed them to him—he waited while I was doing them, and saw them after the alterations were made—he then said that would do—he said he should want 2000 on the following Saturday, and more next week—he came on Saturday, the 1st of April, and wished four early in the morning—I gave him four—they were quite perfect engravings from the plate, and the dies, water-mark, and all—I told him I was sorry I could not let him have the 2000, and said I most let him have as many as I could by five that afternoon—he said he would call at three to see how I was getting on—he called afterwards, and took 1000 with him on that day—he paid me 5l. 10s. on account on that occasion—I proceeded to make out a receipt, and asked him what name I was to draw it in—he said, "Mello"—he was looking over the desk, and seeing me write it, told me how to spell it—he said, "M-e-1-l-o"—this is the receipt—(produced)—he left me about four—that was the last time 1 saw him before he was in custody before the Justice—he spoke in English on all these occasions—on one occasion he left with me this paper, marked "D"—it is part of a bill—the original paper, marked "A," had been lying about the work-board—I wanted a more perfect specimen to work from, and he left me this to enable me to copy the stamp the better—Smith produced to me the paper marked "E"—I have three dies here—one is the die of the "1000," the water-mark in the middle of the paper—one has got "C. P.," with a little border round it, and the other has "C. P," raised lip with "Credito publico," that was for the striking up—they work together.

COURT. Q. The other two dies make the mark "PC" and "publico credito?" A. Yes, in the centre—I mean the stamp and the water-mark "publico credito"—the two dies produce the raised circular part, and the words "credito publico" in the water-mark.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long have you been carrying on the business of an engraver? A. About fifteen years—not all that time in Fleet-street—I have lived there between six and seven years—it is an open shop—it was about two o'clock in the middle of the day when I first saw the prisoner—our conversation took place in the shop—my door is constantly open, for persons to come in and out upon business—I have printers at work up stairs, they do not attend in the shop—there are other shopmen in the shop besides Smith—they generally attend there during the day—we engave

down stairs, at the back part of the shop—it is an open place—there is no division—I think, on one occasion, he went up stairs—with that exception, all our conversation took place in the shop—that conversation up stairs was not in the presence of the printers—we did not go up to the top of the house—I asked him 20l. at first for the job—he refused to give that, and went away—I then saw Mr. Bush—I expected the prisoner to return, as he had left the document—I told him, when he first came, that I should have to communicate with other persons, about some parts which did not lie within my trade—it was not at Mr. Bush's suggestion that I lowered my price from 20l. to 10l.—it was not suggested that I should offer to do it cheap, in order to induce him to have it done—Mr. Bush said I was to do it in the ordinary way of business—it was our usual charge, for I had inquired of one of the printers what the Croydon railway had their shares done for, which was a very large thing—he clearly understood that I should have to communicate with others to have it done, and after that he continued to come to my place, from the 8th of February down to the 1st of April—there has been nothing done to the plate since the 1000 impressions were taken off—this is one of the 1000—there is no difference between this and the copy originally brought to me—it is done in a different way to what the Portuguese government do it, but the effect is precisely the same.

Q. Pray did the prisoner at any time ask you anything about this transaction, whether there was any harm in it? A. He asked me if there was any harm in my doing it—I do not know when that was—it was after he had given the order, during the progress of the work—he only asked me once, and I said there was no harm to me—I think those were the words I used as near as possible—I perceived that he was a foreigner—he asked me if there was any harm in doing it, in my doing it—I said, "No; you tell me to do it, and I will do it."

MR. PLATT. Q. Give, as near as possible, the language which he used to you? A. I think it was as near as possible these words, "Is there any harm in your doing this?" or, "in doing this?"—I am certain he used the word "your," because the remark I made was, "Why, if you will give me the order, I will do it in the usual way of business. I do not know what you are going to do with them when you get them"—my engraving is done at the back part of the shop, quite away from the front shop—persons at the counter would not see what was going on in the back room, where I was engraving—when I made the alterations in his presence, I was at a bench that I work at, at the very end of the shop.

COURT. Q. You had seen Mr. Vanzalla, the consul-general of Portugal? A. Yes, I showed him the paper, marked "A," which the prisoner had left with me, and communicated to him, in substance, the application which had been made to me—the order for the plate had not then been given to me—I saw Mr. Vanzalla once after the order was given, and before the plate was completed—I told him then what had taken place—I saw Mr. Bush from time to time, during the progress of the plate.

THOMAS HARRY SAUNDERS . I am a manufacturer of paper. I was applied to by Mr. Reynolds to manufacture this paper with the water-mark in February last—I have heard his evidence—I prepared some paper for him similar to this—(looking at several of the impressions)—this water-mark is part of my manufacture—it corresponds with the water-mark which I made on the paper "1000," with the wreath round it—I did not see Mr. Bush or Mr. Vanzalla before I manufactured any portion of it—I only saw Mr. Reynolds—he mentioned the other parties—I saw Mr. Bush before I delivered the paper which I manufactured.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am one of the principal officers of police. I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of April, in Fleet-street—I had been watching him for about three weeks or a month, not always, but at different days, by Mr. Bush's direction—he had this parcel in his hand—I asked him what it was—he said they were bills—I asked what bills—he said they were his own—I said he must walk with me to the Magistrate, and give some account of them—I then took the parcel, and we went to the Magistrate together—I produce the bills that were in the parcel—I searched him at the Mansion-house, and found on him this receipt—his counting-house was in Rood-lane, No. 6, I think—I had watched him there, and know he was there, and I saw his name on the door, therefore I was satisfied—I searched his counting-house, and found books and papers of different kinds, which have nothing at all to do with this case—Mr. Williams occupies the lower part of the house, and lets part out to different persons—there are one or two person—I do not know exactly—the prisoner lived there, I know, on the second floor—I received three letters from Mr. Williams—this is one of them—I marked it, "Jno. F."—I gave that letter to Mr. Bush, and afterwards received it from him.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a wine-merchant, and carry on business at No. 6, Rood-lane, City. At the time the prisoner was taken into custody he had a counting-house in my house—I am at the premises every day—I was there one day when the general postman came and gave me three letters—that was after the prisoner had been taken—the prisoner's letters were usually delivered there—I gave the three letters to Forrester—I believe this is one of them.

JOHN BUSH, ESQ . I am one of the solicitors for the prosecution. Three letters were produced to me by Forrester, of which this is one—I produced them before the Lord Mayor on the prisoner's examination, and in his presence, about a fortnight or three weeks before he was finally committed, and nearly a fortnight after he was taken—they were sealed—in the presence and hearing of the prisoner and his solicitor, I applied to the Lord Mayor to open them, as a Magistrate—the prisoner and his solicitor objected to their being opened, as I understood from their conduct—I applied to the Lord Mayor to open them, and objections were made on the part of the prisoner, principally, I should say, by his solicitor, who is here—his Lordship refused to open them—I then stated I should apply to the Secretary of State in the proper manner, which I did.

FRANCIS IGNATIUS VANZALLA, ESQ . I am Consul-general in England to the Portuguese Government—my counting-house is at No. 15, St. Mary Axe. I am acquainted with the mode of drawing Portuguese Government bills—they are drawn upon a Financial agency in this country, by the Minister of Finance—(looking at one of the impressions)—this is the form in which a bill is drawn by the Portuguese Government upon the Financial agency in this country—(looking at paper "A")—this is a genuine Portuguese Government bill on the Financial agency here—it is an original bill, already paid—they are partly engraved and partly written—this bill is drawn by the present Minister of Finance at Portugal, whose name is Do Tojal—I have seen his handwriting very often—I did not see him write this—I believe it to be his, or it would not have been paid—I should say he is a person who has authority from the government to draw bills—the engraved part of this bill marked "A," is like the other, which I have in my hand, marked "J. B."—I should suppose "A" to be a genuine bill—it is not filled up—this, marked "J. B.," is a copy of it, as far as the engraving goes—it appears to be an imitation—it is like it in the water-mark, stamp, and the letters "P. C."—the words, "Credito Publico," in those letters, means "public credit"—that is the form in which

Government bills are generally drawn—I know the form in which private bills are drawn in Portugal—private individuals have their own forms, which they have stamped at the board of public credit, exactly as they are stamped at the Excise-office here, that is when they take their own paper—the bills 80 drawn have not the "P. C," "Credito Publico," engraved upon them—I have never seen it on them—the paper which private individuals take to be stamped has the water-mark—I do not know that it is a water-mark, it has the stamp, the sum of money, 1000 reals, or 500 reals—I do not know whether it is done by water-mark or a stamp, but they have the impression of the value of the bill, if it is a 4s. 6d. bill or a 5s. bill, or something of that sort—the "1000" in the corner means 1000 reals—that is a mark of the government—private bills have that mark, and also the stamp in the middle, the "1000," or whatever it may be, with a wreath round it—that is the value of the stamp—this is a private bill—(looking at one)—this has "2000" stamped in the middle, and also at the side—that means 2000 reals—1000 reals is fifty-four pence by the present exchange—the form of a public and of a private bill is different, because a private bill has not the printed "C.P." at the top, with "Credito Publico" round it, and I believe in the stamp also it has not "Credito Publico"—I have generally seen bills like that—I have in my hand one of the blank forms, and a genuine bill filled up in writing—if the blank form was filled up in writing like the genuine bill, I should take it to be a government bill—I do not myself know the distinction between the one and the other—I saw Mr. Reynolds the first day or the day after he saw the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I believe you gave authority for all that Mr. Reynolds did? A. I put him in communication with Mr. Bush—I was informed that Mr. Reynolds had been applied to to do something, and I told Mr. Bush to do what he thought proper with reference to it—I have been consul-general since 1830, I think—I was 'in Portugal about two years ago—I was born there—I should take the paper on which this blank form is engraved to be Government paper, because it is very equal to the original bill—the difference between this paper, and the paper of a private merchant is the "C. P." and "Credito Publico"—the introduction of those words is a criterion by which I form my judgment that this is a good paper, and none other—Government have drawn upon other paper, upon unstamped paper—private individuals draw upon paper of this kind, with "Credito Publico" on it—they buy bills from persons employed by Government, just like you buy in England of persons appointed to sell stamps—if the Portuguese Government had to draw on the Finance Agency here, they would draw on such a bill as this.

Q. Suppose that stamp to be in the hands of a private individual, could he not draw upon it a perfectly innocent bill, as between merchant and merchant? A. It is always done—if a fraud was contemplated on the Government, by the filling up, it would be perfectly easy to insert in that portion of it the address of the Commissioner of Finance—the address to the Commissioner would be writtee—it is a blank bill—this blank form is used both for the Government and for private individuals—it may be used either as a Government bill or a private bill—I cannot say whether the "Credito Publico" denotes that the tax for the stamp has been paid—if a person goes to a shop and buys this, of course be pays for the stamp—it is the form of the Portuguese stamps, bills and stamps—the Board of Public Credit issue these exactly like the Stamp Office issue theirs, part in blank—the stamp "Credito Publico," shows that the amount mentioned in the water-mark has been paid for the stamp—that is all it denotes—the plate from which the

2000 private bill was taken, was engraved by order of the firm whose name appears on it—there is nothing to prevent the engraving of that portion of the stamp which I find on this bill, by any private merchant, who after paying the stamp on it, uses it as a private bill.

COURT. Q. Is the stamp affixed after the bill is printed, or is it affixed before, and issued with a blank? A. No, the blank form goes to the Board of Public Credit, or Stamp Office, and there it is stamped—they do not stamp the "P. C." and "Credito Publico"—they stamp this in the middle.

Q. Then the letters "P. C," and "Credito Publico" are not stamped by that board? A. Yes, in one way—in the same way as the other, but not the printed, not the engraved "P. C."—the "P. C." and "Credito Publico," in the raised part is put on by the Board of Public Credit—the "P. C." and "Credito Publico," which are printed at the top, is not put on in private bills.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Not where the party has a private plate? A. Nor any private bills—I have not seen otherwise—I have had a great many bills drawn upon me, and I have never seen that in any—I believe if you look at that private bill, you will not find "Credito Publico" in the round part, you will only find "C. P."—that is supposed to be the stamp put on the bills that they sell.

JURY. Q. A party preparing for drawing bills, would not put on this stamp himself, he would have it stamped by the Portuguese Government? A. Exactly like that—he would have a blank form, and have it stamped by the Government.

COURT. Q. What is it that the Portuguese Government, when a private bill is carried to them to be stamped, put on it? A. You will see in that private bill what they put—they put this round mark with "C. P." in the middle—the 1000 reals in the water mark, or whatever the amount is, means the amount of the stamp—what they put on does not contain the words "Credito Publico" at all—I do not think they ever put the stamp with "Credito Publico" on a private bill—I think not.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. I should like very much to know whether you mean to swear to that fact? A. As far as my knowledge goes, I do—I have never seen one—I should say that a private individual could go to a vendor of stamps in Portugal, and purchase a stamp for a private bill of Exchange, with all these stamps upon it—I should say he would get every thing upon it, that is on this—"C. P.," and "Credito Publico" in the water-mark, and "C. P.," and "Credito Publico," in the engraving, and also the number of reals—(looking at paper "A")—a person might buy of a vendor of stamps in Portugal just such a blank form as this, for his own private use, to draw bills upon private individuals.

NOT GUILTY .

(The prisoner was again indicted for having in his possession the said plate and paper; upon which indictments no evidence was offered.)

Reference Number: t18430508-1472

1472. HENRY ROWE was indicted for feloniously sending a letter to one Edward Beck, on the 14th of January, demanding with menaces, and without reasonable and probable cause 50l.—Another COUNT, for sending a letter accusing him of an attempt and endeavour to commit b----y.

MR. PRICE conducted the Prosecution.

EDWARD BECK . I am an ale-agent. I live at Peckham, and have had a counting-house at Hungerford Wharf ten years—I have been in my present business from eighteen to twenty years—I first saw the prisoner about a year and a half since—I cannot tell the date—I met him in Drury-lane—I had never seen him before, to my knowledge—he asked me how I did, and said he knew me—I told him he did not, I did not know him, and would

knock him down—he followed me and said he was in distress, asked me whether I would give him a shilling, and handed me his card to call upon him in Kingsgate-street, where I should find his tale was true—this is the card he gave me—I saw no more of him for above four or five months, when he came up to me as I was crossing Finsbury-square, towards Windmill-street—he addressed me—I did not know him at first—he wanted me to read a paper about his failure in trade, in Wild-street, and said he wanted a little assistance to enable him to get to Exeter—I then gave him 5s., and he left me—I saw him again, I should say, four or five months after, at my counting-house door, when I drove up in my chaise in the morning—he said, "Good morning," or something to that purport—I asked him what he wanted, and went into the counting-house—I remained some short time, and when I came out he was there still—he addressed me again, and said he had been very ill, he was just out of the hospital—I told him I knew better, for I had seen an account in the papers of his having been convicted of felony, and imprisoned three months—he said he supposed I was glad to hear of it—I said, "Not particularly so"—he began to cry, and asked me for a little money to help to get him to Cornwall to his friends, that he might retrieve his character—I gave him 30s.—nothing else passed—he left me—I heard nothing more of him till he sent me a letter by an old lady—I received a letter previous to this at the counting-house—the first I had was dated the 6th of Jan.—it came by post in this envelope—I have never spoken to the prisoner about that letter—I do not know his handwriting—this letter, dated the 14th of Jan., was brought to me by a woman—I do not recollect that I had any conversation or correspondence with the prisoner afterwards, about that letter—I do not recollect that I saw him till I received the next letter—I saw him a few days after receiving a third letter, dated the 20th—I do not know that I ever spoke to him about the letter of the 14th—I cannot recollect when I saw him after the 14th—it was within a month, about a fortnight, I think—it was in Hungerford-market—we had very little conversation—he wanted more money—(I do not recollect having any interview with him at all after the letter given me by the old woman)—he said he wanted more money, and I gave him 30s.—he said nothing about my answering his letters—I did not answer the letter of the 14th, but I gave the old woman what he wanted—I told him not to send letters to me by the old woman, for I should give her in charge, as I knew where she lived from the reports in the newspapers—that was after the first letter she brought—I called her "the old woman"—she had only brought me one letter at that time—I am quite sure of that—it was after receiving the letter of the 14th, and before the 20th—I told him I knew her character, and where she resided, that I had seen an account of his trial, and where he was convicted, and of her being the keeper of a low brothel in Shire-lane—he said she was a respectable woman—I told him that he lived with her—he made no answer at all to that—there was no further conversation, to the best of my knowledge—I gave him 30s. again to get rid of him—I had given the old woman 30s. when I received the letter of the 14th—when I gave him the 30s. I left him—he did not say anything to me about his last letter—I met him a few days after receiving a letter by the old woman, on the 25th of January, in Hungerford-market—I spoke to him, on that occasion, about the letter of the 14th, or rather, he first mentioned it to me—he said very little that day—no reference was made at that time to the letter of the 14th—no reference was made to the 30s. demanded in that letter—the 30s. mentioned in the letter of the 14th I gave to the old woman, but I gave him 30s. afterwards—I had no conversation with him with reference to the 30s. which I paid to the old woman on receiving the letter of the 14th—I mentioned to him about receiving the letter of the 14th

—I said if he sent the old lady with any more letters, I should give her in charge—I did not mention the date of the letter, nor describe it to him—he acknowledged having sent the letter by the old woman—when I taxed him about where she lived, and said he must not send her any more, he did not deny it—he did not say he had sent it—he said nothing about sending any letter to me—I had no conversation with him about the letter of the 14th, except what I said about the old woman—the letter of the 25th was delivered to me by the old woman—this is it—also this letter of the 10th of May, that was delivered by the same old woman—I saw him a few days after receiving the letter of the 25th of Jan., about eleven or twelve o'clock—he observed to me I had better let him have the £20, and not trouble me again, as I knew he had a charge to make against me—I told him he ought to know better than to be annoying me as he was—he said I had better have sent him the £20 that was asked for in the letter, and he would not trouble me any more, if I gave it to him—I told him I could not afford it—(I did not show him the letter)—he said, "You had better; you know I have a charge to make against you"—I then told him I would give him 5l. and make it up in a few days, if he would promise not to annoy me again—I appointed a time to pay him the other 15l. and left him—I saw him again in the Strand, some time at the commencement of April, when he asked me for more money.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you ever show the prisoner, on any occasion, the letter of the 14th of Jan.? A. No—I gave him no description of the old woman—I told him I knew who she was—I had never seen the prisoner before I met him in Drury-lane—that I swear—I had never been anywhere with him—I had never taken any wine with him, or given him any wine anywhere—I swear positively that I did not meet him a considerable time before I met him in Drury-lane, and give him some wine—I swear positively I have not been anywhere with him, except at the conversations to which I have alluded—I did not know him when I first met him—I have no attorney, Mr. Price is acting for me.

JAMES IRELAND . I live at No. 25, Kingsgate-street, and am clerk to Mr. Beck. I saw the prisoner at Mr. Beck's counting-house last Friday week—he came and beckoned to Mr. Beck to come out, and Mr. Beck went out and returned.

WILLIAM WEST (police-constable F 106.) I took the prisoner in charge on Friday—he said it was no use for me to take him to the station-house, as the prosecutor would not appear against him—I know the prisoner—he lived in Shire-lane, with an old woman.

(A letter, dated 6th Jan., was here read, in which the prisoner merely soli" cited the prosecutor's assistance to get his tools out of pledge.)

The letter of Jan. 14, 1843, was as follows:—"Sir,—As you did not give me money sufficient to get my working utensils, I am under the necessity of sending to you, as I have paid 5s. off them, and the remainder of what you gave me, I paid my rent, and got my coat; and I have two shops of work, which I cannot do without them. I want 1l. 10s. to get them. When I first see you I was promised 10l. by you. If it was to gratify your filthy passion you would give it. Sir, I have come to the determination never to trouble you any more if you give the money. The bearer of this note is the person where I lodge; if you send it by her it will be safe, as I told her you owed it me for service. H. ROWE."

(A letter, dated 25th Jan., was read, requesting the prosecutor to oblige him with the sum of 20l., which would be the last he should trouble him about.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Life.

Reference Number: t18430508-1473

1473. FREDERICK HOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 1 gelding, value 6l.; 1 cabriolet, 17l.; 1 set of harness, 2l.; 1 sack, 1s. 6d.; and 1 nose-bag, 6d.; the property of Joseph Grayling.

JOSEPH GRAYLING . I live at No. 2, Stable's Green-yard, Eagle-street. On the morning of the 6th of May I had a cab and horse, I was called up at five o'clock in the morning, and found them at the Phoenix station-house—I had trusted them to Townsend.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. Was Townsend usually employed by you? A. Yes, he is a regular driver—he usually drives this cab—it is my cab and harness—I saw him about five o'clock in the morning, after the cab had been taken—the prisoner was quite sober at the station.

SAMUEL TOWNSEND . On the evening of the 5th of May I went out with the prosecutor's cab—I saw it safe at twenty minutes before four o'clock, when I went into a coffee-shop, and left it on the rank, behind another—I sent Bailey out to look after it for a few minutes, while I took refreshment—he returned, and gave me information—I had taken my whip in with me—I went out, and the cab was gone—I saw it next at the station, at near six o'clock—I do not know the prisoner.

ROBERT BAILEY . I live at a coffee-shop in Holborn. On the 6th of May, about twenty minutes to four o'clock in the morning, Townsend came in—he asked me to attend to his cab while he took refreshment—I went out—before I could reach the cab, I saw a man very much resembling the prisoner get on the box and gallop away.

JEREMIAH LOCKERBY . I am a policeman. On the 6th of May I saw the prisoner driving up the New-road on a cab, not more than a mile and a half from High Holborn—he had no whip—I had received information from another cabman, went after him, and overtook him in Seymour-street, Euston-square—he went on the stand there—I went up to him and asked if it was his cab—he said, "No"—I asked where he got it—he said he found it in the New-road—I asked what he was going to do with it—he said he was looking for the owner—I took him in charge; and after I got to the station, asked him how long he had had the cab in his possession—he said, "About three hours," which would make it about two o'clock—I searched him, and found a badge in his pocket, with "1890, driver," written on it—that has nothing to do with the cab—a cab- man is obliged to have a badge—I asked him at the police-court for his license—he said his master that he previously drove for had it.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did be appear to have been drinking? A. I saw him about three quarters of an hour previous, and then he was rather intoxicated—I saw him come out of a coffee-shop in Winslow-street, and go across to the cab-stand to a cab—there were three or four cabs there—I could not say it was this cab—it was about a quarter after four o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1474

1474. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April, 2 coppers, value 2l. 5s.; the goods of Daniel Coales: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1475

1475. SAMUEL CROFTS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April, 1 watch, value 2l. 10s.; and 1 watch-guard, 18s.; the goods of George Cox.

GEORGE COX . I keep a coffee-house in Old-street-road—I took it on the 1st of April, and found the prisoner there, acting as waiter—he had been taken in out of charity by the former landlord—he was not in my employment—I had a silver watch and guard, which I saw safe on the 3rd of April,

at two o'clock in the day, in a draft-board on the mantle-shelf in the back parlour, and missed it at two o'clock on the 4th—I took the house on Saturday, and allowed the prisoner to stop till Monday, the 3rd, as he said he had nowhere to go—the last time I saw him in the house was at ten o'clock on the 4th—I did not see him again till he was in custody on the 13th.

Prisoner. Q. In what situation does your house stand? A. In Old-street-road—it is at the corner of a court—it fronts the street—the back and the side of it is in the court—there is a passage between the court and the parlour, where the watch was—a side door opens into the passage from the court, and a door opens from the passage into the parlour—it is a double-fronted shop, and I occupy a part—a man named Tomlin lives in the upper part of the house—the house was being repaired—it was not finished, but the men were not at work at it after I came there—there has been nothing done, or any workmen about the house since I have been there—they might, perhaps, have been at work in a loft at the top of the house, getting their paint ready—that loft has no connexion with the house—you get to it by a pair of steps from the court—there is no communication from the inside.

JAMES LEACH . I am a coffee-house-keeper—I heard of the watch being missed—I saw the prisoner on the 13th of April, and told him he was the very man I wanted to see—he said, "Well, Mr. Leach, I will tell you; I have taken the watch, and I took it for the purpose of doing myself good; I have got it, and will bring it back next week"—he then tried to get away—I said he had better come with me to my house, and give me the particulars of what he had done with it—he kept going backwards and forwards down the street—I told him whichever way he went I intended to go—he came into Bishopsgate-street with me, and as soon as he saw an officer, he made a stop, and said, "Now I do not know what to do"—I said, "Yes, you do; come with me"—I caught hold of his arm, and gave him into custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you tell the Magistrate, that when you met me you said, that if I had taken the watch, to say so; that Cox would not do any thing to me; that all he wanted was the watch, as it was a family concern? A. No, I did not—before I kept a coffee-shop, I worked at Mr. King's, wholesale tea and coffee dealer, 22, Budge-row—I left on account of trade being bad—before that, I worked at Mr. Wilcox's, Bush-lane, Cannon-street; and before that with Mr. Mott, grocer, in Whitechapel; Mr. Blissett's, of Leadenhall-street; and at Messrs. Lacy and Reynolds, gum makers, in Great St. Helen's, from all of whom I can have a character—I took you into my house when you were so destitute that you had not a meal's victuals, and gave you shelter; and when I left I recommended you to Mr. Cox—there was an Arnott stove in the shop I let to Cox—I never said that I had bought it on the cross—I remember two men coming in one evening with a quantity of cigars to sell—I do not know how they obtained those cigars—I knew them to be dealers in cigars; and from the price I paid, they could have come by them honestly—they had them in a paper parcel, not in their hats—I recollect a person who called himself a minister being there one evening, when a sailor lost his tobacco-pouch, and you and your friend Williams knew more about it than any one else—I did not stand before a cab-man and another man with a paper in my hand, to hide them from the minister while they took the tobacco-pouch out of the sailor's pocket—it is all false.

THOMAS ASHLEY . I am a pawnbroker—I produce a watch and guard-chain which was pawned at my shop on the 4th of April, in the name of John Clark, to the best of my belief by the prisoner—I am quite certain of him in my own mind, but I decline swearing positively to him—I had never seen him before to my knowledge.

Prisoner. Q. When you were first before the Magistrate, you said you could not be positive. A. I said I firmly believed you were the man—I said so at both examinations.

Prisoner. The Magistrate put the words into his mouth, so as to make the case strong enough to send before a Jury.

GEORGE COX re-examined. This is my watch—I am sure of it—I had had it about twelve months—I know it by the maker's name and its general appearance, and the guard also—the chain was broken when I lost it, and it is in the same state now.

Prisoner's Defence. If Inspector Darby was here, I should be able to prove that this Leach is nothing better than a fence; the coffee-shop is nothing but a blinf—it is a receptacle for stolen goods; or if either of the policemen who took me were here, they could confirm what I state. If any doubt should arise in your minds, I hope and expect that you will give me the benefit of it; this charge arises merely out of a few words which passed between us; during the month I was with him, I saw quite sufficient to get him transported a dozen times over; and the first opportunity I have of bringing any charge against him, I certainly will do so.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Nine Months.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18430508-1476

1476. THOMAS JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March, at St. Martin-in-the-Fields, 45 yards of woollen cloth, value 40l., the goods of George Gillott and another, in their dwelling-house.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE GILLOT . I am a tailor, and live in the Strand. On Saturday morning, the 25th of March, at a quarter-past nine o'clock, I missed a piece of brown superfine cloth, measuring forty-five yards and a quarter, worth about 40l., but being damaged, it cost me 38l.—I had seen it safe between seven and eight the same morning—I found a bat left in the shop—on the Wednesday week following I saw the cloth at Mr. Dempster's shop—this now produced is it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Where do you live? A. Two doors from Buckingham-street—the cloth was on a shelf behind my shop-door—I gave an alarm immediately I missed it—it is my dwelling-house, and in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields—I am in partnership with my brother—we both contribute to the rent, but do not both live in the house—it is my dwelling-house.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Have you any right to a portion of it by yourself? A. Yes, I pay rent for part of it to the firm—the business pays the rent and taxes—the servants of the firm do not live in the house.

ELEANOR DARCY . I have the care of a suite of chambers in Buckingham-street, Strand. About nine o'clock in the morning, on the 25th of March, I was standing at No. 3, in the same street, next door to the public-house, which I had a full view of—I saw the prisoner come out of it with a roll of cloth, rolled up much tighter than it is now, and without any paper on it—he brought it out in his arms, put it into a cab, which was coming down the street, and got in himself—he had no hat on, nor any with him.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose this did not take long? A. Not very—the cab came down the street—it stopped opposite the public-house before the prisoner came out—he did not carry it on his shoulder, but in his arms—I was not much farther from him than I am now—he did not speak to me—I had never seen him before—on the 24th of April I went to the station-house, and saw him in custody—I swear positively to him.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Before you saw him had anybody else been pointed out to you? A. Yes, the same morning—I did not know that person—"when I saw the prisoner I knew him directly—I have not seen one Clark.

ELIZA STONE . I am the wife of Richard Stone, a tallow-chandler, of Buckingham-street. On the 25th of March I was at the corner window of my husband's house, which gives me a view up and down the street into the Strand—I know the prosecutor's shop—I saw the prisoner bring some cloth down Buckingham-street, and go into the public-house opposite, and I do not think it was a minute before he put it into a cab, and drove away with it—he had no hat on—he had nothing round the cloth—I am positive of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your house on the same side of the way at Darcy was standing? A. No, opposite—I was at the first floor window—the person walked very quickly—Buckingham-street is on a descent from the Strand—he carried the cloth on his right shoulder coming down the street—as I was at the window his left side was nearest to me, that 1 am sure of—I had never seen him before—I took particular notice, and said I should know him again—I did not call out of the window to him, nor ask him what he had got—he passed very rapidly into the public-house, and immediately came out with the cloth.

FRANCES DAY . I am servant to the Rev. Mr. Isaacs, of Richmond-row, Dalston. On the 25th of April I was cleaning the steps of Mr. Vaughan's private door, in Buckingham-street, where I lived at the time—I saw a person, whom I believe to be the prisoner, with a bale of cloth—he had no hat on—I did not see any hat with him.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you attending to what you was about? A. No, I was gaoing about—I was examined before the Magistrate, but not bound over.

JAMES LOCKYER . I am shopman to Mr. Dempster, pawnbroker, Black-friar's-road—I have a roll of cloth which was pawned at our shop, on the 25th of March, for 19l. 10s., between the hours of three and five, in two pledges, by a person I know perfectly well—his name is Clark—it was not the prisoner—I am sure I could not be mistaken—Clark is twice the prisoner's age and taller—he is full forty-five or fifty.

COURT. Q. What is he? A. A man who pawns things from the Queen's Bench—they are called Benchers.

JOHN BRADDICK (police-constable A 30.) On the 24th of April, I took the prisoner into custody at the Cock and Bottle, Bedfordbury—I found 3l., and some silver on him—I received this hat at Bow-street, from the inspector—I do not know that any one was present—I fitted it on the prisoner's head the following morning—it fitted him very well, in my opinion.

Cross-examined. Q. Would it not fit any body whose head was the same size? A. Yes—it fitted him remarkably well.

GEORGE GILLOT re-examined. This is the hat that I found in the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the whole of the cloth here? A. I have not measured it—it is in three pieces—I can swear they are portions of the cloth I lost.

GUILTY of stealing only. Aged 26.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1477

1477. WILLIAM FULLER, alias Taylor , and THOMAS RILEY , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Frankom, about one in the night of the 2nd of May, at St. Mary, White-chapel, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 cloak, value 105.; 1 pair of boots, 10s.; 1 shawl, 3s.; 1 candlestick, 1s.; 3lbs. weight of tobacco, 9s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, 10s.; 1 toothpick, 5s.; 2 stilettos, 6d.; 1 pair of scissors, 1s.; 1 tobacco-box, 1s.; 1 bottle, 3d.; 1 1/2 pintof brandy, 8s.; 9 halfpence, and 39 farthings, his property. 2nd Count, for burglariously breaking out of the said dwelling-house.

JOSEPH PRICE (police-constable H 15.) About four o'clock in the morning of the 3rd of May, I met the prisoners in Rose-lane, Spitalfields—Fuller was drunk, and Riley was leading him—I went up to them in George-yard, and asked Riley if he knew Fuller—he said he did, he was his brother—he was then lying on the ground—I saw this stiletto projecting out of Fuller's trowsers—I told Riley I should take Fuller to the station, for being drunk—he said I should not—I then went to remove the instrument from his pocket, and found there a pearl knife, tobacco-box, silver tooth-pick, a silver scissors-sheath, one coral ear-ring, a pearl stiletto, thirty-nine farthings, and nine half-pence—I told another constable to secure Riley, which he did—I found in his pocket a brass candlestick, a pair of boots, one in each pocket, a shawl in his breast, and a ladies' cloak between his shirt, waistcoat, and trowsers—I took them both to the station—I found in Riley's hat, 3lbs. weight of tobacco—he had a bottle under his arm, which I believe contained rum—I proceeded to the place where he gave his address, Blue Anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane, I made inquiry and found the side-door of the George the Fourth, Rosemary-lane, was found open about four o'clock in the morning—that is about half a mile from where I found the prisoners—I found the landlord standing inside—he accompanied me to the station, and identified the property I found on both prisoners—Riley said the boots were his own, the cloak was his wife's, and the tobacco his brother's, meaning Fuller, who he said was a tobacconist and cigar manufacturer—the prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Riley had been drinking? A. Yes, they were rolling along together—Fuller could neither speak nor walk.

JOHN FRANKOM . I keep the George the Fourth, in Rosemary-lanr—I was the last person up—I secured the house about half-past eleven o'clock, and went to bed about half-past twelve—at a quarter to five in the morning I was alarmed by the policeman—I found the side-door, which leads from my bar into a court, open, and the policeman in the house—there were no marks on the door—there were no lodgers in the house—the prisoners might have secreted themselves in the tap-room chimney—I had fastened the door before I went to bed with two bolts and a lock—I missed some tobacco, copper money, and spirits from the bar and parlour—the articles produced are all mine—I have seen Riley in the house, but I do not recollect seeing him there that night.

Cross-examined. Q. You have a good deal of business? A. Sometimes—it was very full that night—I did not drink with any of my customers—I drank alone—I shut and bolted that particular door that night—I did not omit to fasten it—I know nothing about Riley, only seeing him once or twice in the house—the door has a bolt and lock—there is no bar across—I looked about the house before I went to bed—the chimney is large enough for three or four persons to hide—there is a little projt ction where they might sit very easily—when I came down I found a fire lighted in the tap-room—it was out when I went to bed—I know the boots—they are cut in the front, and very much worn at one side—the pearl paper-knife has a little speck on it—the cloak is my wife's—it has a patch on it.

RICHARD MAHONEY . I am a policeman. I tried the door of the prosecutor's house, between twelve and one o'clock, it was quite fast then—a little before five I touched it, it gave way and went open—I gave an alarm—I

know the prisoners—I had seen them together between ten and eleven that night, down by the King of Prussia, Blue Anchor-yard, about 30 rods from the prosecutors'.

JOSEPH PRICE re-examined. There was no appearance about the prisoners of their having been up a chimney.

FULLER*— GUILTY . Aged 22.)

RILEY*— GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1478

1478. SIMON MORTLOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March, 1 truck, value 1l., the goods of Alfred Walker; and WILLIAM WILLIAMS , for feloniously inciting, &c. him to commit the said felony, and for receiving the truck, knowing it to be stolen.

MARY WALKER . I am the wife of Alfred Walker, a porter, of Newman-passage, Newman-street, Oxford-street; we have a truck which we let out for hire. On Monday evening, the 20th of March, I went to a beer-shop in Newman-passage, and saw Mortlock—I heard him ask somebody if there was a person of the name of Walker, who let out trucks—a person who stood by the side of me said, "Mrs. Walker you are wanted"—I turned round, and said, "What do you want?"—Mortlock said he wanted the hire of a truck—I told him my name was Walker, and asked what sort of a truck he wanted—he said, "Merely a small one"—I told him to go with me to where my trucks stood, in Rathbone-place—he went with me—I put my hand on a little green truck, and said, "Will this do!"-he said, "I think that will do"—I asked what he was going to do with it—he said, to carry a light bed—I asked where he was going to take it—he said, "To Mr. Line, No. 7, Rathbone-place"—nothing was said about what he was to give for it—there is a regular price, 3d. an hour—he took it away with him—I never saw it again till the 18th of April, when it was at the station—I should not sell it for less than 1l.—it is my husband's.

Cross-examined by MR. PRINDE ROAST. Q. You would get more for it if you could? A. It is worth more to let out—there is a Mr. Line, in Rath-bone-place, a perfumer.

ELIZABETH JENKS . I was at the beer-shop on the evening in question—I heard Mortlock ask where Walker lived, who let out trucks—I accompanied Mrs. Walker to Rathbone-place, where the trucks were—I heard Mortlock say he was going to take it to Rathbone-place, to move a bed.

WILLIAM THOMAS FREWER . I am a bricklayer, and live in Bowling-street, Clerkenwell. I have known Williams five or six years—about the 14th or 15th of March he hired part of a cellar of me, in Twister's-alley, Bunhill-row—on the morning of the 21st of March I found a track in my yard, with two oil-jars alongside of it—I went up to breakfast, and about nine o'clock Williams came to me to take the truck and jars to the cellar—he told me he had brought the truck there—my wife told me something, and I saw him take it away—oil-jars are heavy things, and require a truck—I said it was a nice, handy, light truck, just such a one as I was in want of in my business—he said he be-lieved it was for sale—I asked to whom it belonged, and how much was wanted for it—he said it belonged to a party who had helped him down with the oil-jars—I asked what the party wanted for it—he said, "About 26s."—he said, "I shall see the party in Bunhill-row, to whom it belongs"—he asked me to accompany him, and also a man named Cox, to drag the track, which was in pieces at that time—we put it together, and went to Bunhill-row—he there pointed out a man, who I believe to be Mortlock, as the man who owned the truck—he went and spoke to him on the other side of the way, then came back to me, and Mortlock told me the truck was for sale—I asked him how much he wanted for it—he said, 26s.—I put the truck and jars into Wil-

liams's cellar—then we went into a public-house—I agreed to give Mortlock 1l. for the truck—Williams was present—Mortlock looked over to him, as much as to say should he take it—Williams whispered to him, and then Mortlock agreed to take 1l.—I put 2s. 6d. down on the table to bind the bargain—Williams took it up, and it was spent in drink—Williams said he was fond of gin—I did not drink any gin—I agreed to give him 10s. on the Thursday, or 1l. on the Monday following, which he thought proper—the 2s. 6d. was additional—they whispered together—Mortlock said he would rather have the 1l. on Monday, and agreed to come down for it—this was on Tuesday—on the Tuesday following Williams came and said he had come for the money for the truck—I told him, that on second examination of the truck, I thought I should alter my mind—he said, "Don't tell the other one so" (meaning Mortlock,) "put him off for another week"—I came down stairs, and saw Mortlock—we went to the corner of Benjamin-street, Cow-cross—I told Mortlock I was sorry I had not got the money, and told him to come down on that day week, and he should have it—he said, "Very well," and we parted—on the 5th of April I had the truck in Bartholomew-close, and it was claimed by a boy as Mr. Walker's—I told Walker how I became possessed of it—I went to him the same evening—I afterwards gave both the prisoners into custody—after the truck had been claimed, I put another lock on Williams's cellar, and on Sunday, the 9th, he came to ask me the reason—I said because I wanted to see him—I said I had another customer for the truck, as I did not mean to have it myself—I asked where the other prisoner lived—I said I had a customer that would give 28s., as an enticement for him to get Mortlock—he said he lived some-where in Union-street, but he could not exactly tell where—he told me it did not matter about Mortlock, for he could sell it, in fact he could not sell it without him—I said, "If he could not sell it without you, by the same rule you can't sell it without him"—he said, "Oh, that's all nonsense," he could take the money—I said if he would bring Mortlock to me, I would bring the party who would buy the truck—he agreed to do so, and we parted—he did not bring him.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. I suppose you were not taken up yourself? A. Yes I was, but not till the night I gave Williams in charge to exonerate myself—the oil-jars had come in the day before—I had never seen them before.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. On the last occasion he said, "I can receive the money?" A. Yes—Williams said, "Don't say anything to Mortlock"—he said he believed the truck was for sale—not "It is for sale."

COURT. Q. Who delivered you the truck? A. Williams—he was alone—Mortlock was in Bunhill-row—when I made the bargain the truck was in my cellar—Williams delivered it to me there—he and my labourer got it out—I had it at the time it was bargained for—both the prisoners were present then, at the public-house—it was after we were in the cellar together—I had a key to the cellar as well as Williams.

THOMAS HAMMOND (police-sergeant G 5.) On the 12th of April, Williams was given into my custody—I told him I took him for coming to receive the money for the truck—he said he came to take the money for it, but it belonged to another man—I asked where the man lived—he said he did not know.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did he say he had no notion where he lived? A. No—I did not ask him the man's name.

THOMAS FEW (police-constable G 154.) On the 13th of April I took Mortlock at the York Minster public-house, Bunhill-row—I told him it was for

stealing this truck—he said he was employed by Williams to move some canisters out of Oxford-street, and Williams told him to borrow the truck at Mr. Walker's, but he was not to say it was for him, but for another man, at No. 7—he could not tell the name of the place—he had forgotten it.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, May 16th, 1843.

Second Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1479

1479. GEORGE STAPLES and JOHN HAWKES were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April, 1 boiler, value 7s. 6d., the goods of James Dangerfield.

WILLIAM EEWARD BALL (police-constable N 365.) On Saturday night, the 29th of April, I was in Nile-street, Hoxton, in company with Kemp—I saw the prisoner and another standing at the corner of Plummer-street—I suspected, followed, and saw them loiter about the prosecutor's shop in the City-road—after watching a short time, I saw Hawkes take a boiler from the threshold of the door, and pass it to the one not in custody—he passed it to Staples, who put it into a bag—Hawkes made off—I pursued, and apprehended him in Old-street-road—I did not see what became of the other.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you know the other boy? A. No—he handed it to Staples, who put it into a bag—I came up directly after that.

GEORGE KEMP . I am a policeman. I was in company with Ball, and saw the prisoners and the other at the prosecutor's shop—I watched them, and saw Hawkes take the boiler from the door—I did not see it patted to the other—I pursued, and took Staples in Old-streat, with the boiler in the bag—he said he had brought it from Hoxton, and was going to take it home.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not Old-street-road close by Hoxton? A. It is not ten minutes' walk from there—I took him to Mrs. Dangerfield's—she identified the property.

AMELIA DANGERFIELD . This boiler is my husband's, James Dangerfield's property—it was against the door—I had seen it two minutes before.

(Hawkes received a good character.)

STAPLES— GUILTY . Aged 17.

HAWKES— GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1480

1480. MARIA KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May, 6 yards of diaper, value 3s., the goods of John Hugh Shepherd.

SAMUEL ROSE . I am assistant to Mr. John Hugh Shepherd, pawnbroker, Plummer-row, City-road. On the afternoon of the 1st of May I saw the prisoner take the piece of diaper produced, off the stall in front of the shop, and put it under her cloak—she was going away—I went up and stopped her, and said, "You have got something under your cloak"—she said, "I have got nothing at all"—on taking her into the shop she placed the diaper about three yards from the same place she took it from—I gave her into custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you take it off your board? A. No, I never touched it, I took it up after you put it there.

GEORGE HORNER . I am a policeman, the prisoner was given into my custody—she said she never touched the things.

GUILTY . * Aged 50.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1481

1481. WILLIAM ST. ALBANS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May, 12 brushes, value 3s., the goods of George Robert Galloway; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

SARAH LANWORN . I work for George Robert Galloway, a brush-maker, in St. John-street, Clerkenwell. On the 2nd of May, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I was in the parlour behind the shop—I saw the prisoner come to the door, look in, go to the window, come, and stoop down, take the brushes from a hook by the door, and run out—I took them from his hand, and dropped them—he ran away—I followed till the shopman overtook him about seven or eight yards from the house, brought him back, and gave him to the policeman—he is the same boy—these brushes are Mr. Galloway's.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a policeman. The prisoner was given into my custody, with the brushes.

Prisoner's Defence. A man laid hold of me, and charged me with stealing the brushes, which I never did.

JAMES WARD . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was present at the trial—he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1482

1482. ANN BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Morgan, from his person.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am a tailor, and live in George-street. On the 25th of April, at a quarter to eight o'clock in the morning, I was on the pavement in High-street, St. Giles's, waiting for some person—the prisoner came up to me, said, "Oh, my dear," and put her arm round my waist—I pushed her away, and told her to go about her business—she left me, and the moment after I missed my handkerchief, which I had in my pocket three minutes before—I called a policeman, went after her, and found her in the Hand and Crown, Church-street, St. Giles's—as I spoke to her, I found my handkerchief under her right arm, under her shawl—this is it—it is mine.

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a policeman. I went with the prosecutor, and found the prisoner at a public-house in Church-street—I told her I wanted her for stealing a handkerchief from a gentleman in High-street—she was smoking a pipe—I saw this handkerchief under her arm—I went to get hold of it—she shuffled it down—I took it off the ground—she said at first she knew nothing about it—as we were going to the station, she said, "I suppose, Baker, you mean to lag me."

Prisoner's Defence. I was sitting with another young woman; I got up, and the handkerchief was on the ground.

GUILTY . * Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1483

1483. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March, 2 printed books, value 2s.; 3 pocket-books, 1s.; 2 razor-strops, 1s. 6d.; 1 razor, 3d.; and 2 paper-knives, 1s.; the goods of Edward Jones, his master.

EDWARD JONES . I keep a coffee-house, in Peter's-lane, St. Sepulchre's. The prisoner was my servant from the beginning of January—he left me on the 17th of March—these Looks and articles produced are all mine—the razor and strop were about the house, but these two books were in my bed-room, where I allow nobody to go, except I go with them.

JAMES FLEMING . On the 18th of March the prisoner brought these articles to me—he asked me if he might leave them there—I told him I would put them into the box, and when he wanted them he could have them—he left them in my care—I gave them up when they were inquired for.

JOHN RUSSELL . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner into custody—I

told him he was charged with stealing books and other articles from Mr. Jones—he said they were his own property.

Prisoner's Defence. These books were for three weeks lying about the premises, for any person who thought proper to take them away; I was taking several of the lodgers' shirts out, and, in mistake, took these books; I left them at Fleming's house, and told him if anybody asked for them to give them up; they were there seven weeks, and if I had any intention of stealing them I should not have let them remain there all that time; I had a quarrel with the prosecutor's wife the night previous to my being taken, and, to have her revenge, she has compelled him to come forward; I was a witness for him when he had a quarrel with his wife, six or seven weeks ago, and she has her revenge on me for these trifling things; his lodging-house is a complete den of thieves; I have been robbed myself, even of my shirt and stockings; the razor, strop, and case, are my own; I bought them myself.

EDWARD JONES re-examined. I lost 5l. or 6l. worth of property while he was with me.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18430508-1484

1484. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April, 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Price; also, on the 26th of April, 1 pewter pot, 1s., the goods of Richard Blackett; to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 37.— Confined Two Months.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Reference Number: t18430508-1485

1485. GEORGE HACKETT and JOHN HACKETT were indicted for assaulting, &c., Colby Atkinson Davis and William Allen, Custom-house officers, in the execution of their duty.—Other COUNTS varying the charge.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

COLBY ATKINSON DAVIS . I am an officer of Her Majesty's Customs, and have been so six years next August—I am stationed in the port of London. On Tuesday evening, the 9th of May, about nine o'clock, I was in company with Davy and Allen, two other officers, at the top of Swan-lane, and observed the prisoner John Hackett coming in the direction of Fresh-wharf, towards Swan-lane—he turned round, looked in the direction in which I was, and started off immediately, down Swan-lane, running as hard as he possibly could—I followed, accompanied by my brother officers, from the top of Swan-lane to the bottom, fifty or a hundred yards—I raised a cry, and he was stopped by two policemen—I came up almost immediately—as he was running he was unbuttoning his clothes, as I imagined—when I got hold of him I found his trowsers all down—I caught hold of him, put my arms round his loins—he began immediately to lay out with his hands as hard as he could at me, right and left—while struggling, he took the bottles out of his trowsers, and threw one of them violently down on the ground—one was removed out of his trowsers—they were large glass bottles—the contents were emptied on the ground—I immediately stooped down, got a handful into my hand, tasted it, and found it was French brandy—there was a crowd assembled—the two policemen, and Allen, and Davy, were there—they proposed to take him to the station in the neighbourhood—we had gone scarcely a yard, when I received two or three violent blows on the right side of my head, which knocked my hat off—they were not given me by John Hackett—I had hold of him—he had struck me several times on the ribs and chest, from the effect of which I am labouring now—he said he would do for me if he was to be

taken by us—he was so violent, I tried to handcuff him—I could not succeed—he got my finger into his mouth—the blow on the head was from a person I did not see—it made me stagger and reel about for a minute or so, before I could recover myself to turn round and see who struck me—it caused me to let go of John Hackett—the others took hold of him—in a few seconds after I recovered, I saw George Hackett at my back, in the policeman's hands—he was also taken to the station—as we were going, John was handcuffed, with his left hand to George's right hand—he made several attempts at blows at me in the coach, but was prevented by Allen—he said he would knock my b----brains out, making use of a very desperate expression, saying he should not always be in prison, and when he got out he should know where to meet us, and he would see my b----brains when he came out.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You speak only of what John did? A. Yes, I gave him into custody about six or seven minutes after I overtook him—the police were present when I came up with him—I laid hold of him in the first instance round his loins, and immediately tried to secure what he had about him—I said, "Don't attempt to destroy this brandy, let me have it," and then he tried to break it—I did not give him in custody of the police then—when we found ourselves getting close to the water's side, and an attempt on the part of the mob, I immediately called on the police to assist in taking him to the station-house—the water's edge was not above half a dozen yards from the place—Baker, a policeman, came up and assisted me to lay hold of John, who was running away—I cannot say whether he laid hold of him—they held their arms out and stopped him—I was not there at that time—I had not hold of him then—I handcuffed the two prisoners together at the station—Baker, Allen, and Bailey took John there—I first saw George in the hands of the police—the only thing I complain of from him is receiving the blow on the head—I do not myself know who it came from—the policeman behind me captured him.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you know these men before? A. Yes, and they knew me to be a custom-house officer.

GEORGE BAKER (City police-constable, No. 424.) I was on duty in Swan-lane, and saw John Hackett running—I stopped him—after he was secured, in taking him to the station, I saw George Hackett strike the prosecutor violently on the side of the head—it knocked his hat off, and made him let go of the other prisoner—the conduct of both was very violent.

JOHN HACKETT— GUILTY .

George hackett— GUILTY .

Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18430508-1486

1486. FRANCES LEWIS was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1487

1487. MARY TANSON was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1488

1488. SAMUEL TANSON was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1489

1489. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for unlawfully obtaining a half-sovereign, one half-crown, and two sixpences, the monies of Hannah Lynn, by false pretences.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1490

1490. JAMES FRASER was indicted for unlawfully obtaining goods value 1l. 19s. 4d.; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1491

1491. FREDERICK APPLEBY was indicted for unlawfully obtaining 4,000 nails, and two padlocks, by false pretences.

GEORGE MURRAY . I am an ironmonger, and live in Leather-lane. On the 8th of April, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for 4,000 of three-penny fine clod-nails, and two padlocks for Mr. Cotterell, who is a customer of mine—he produced Mr. Cotterell's book, that he sent backwards and forwards—I gave him the goods, and entered the articles in the book to the value of 7s.—he had been errand-boy to Mr. Cotterell, and had been in the habit of coming from him, and bringing the book to show what he fetched away—this is the book—I made this entry—it is all my writing.

SAMUEL JOHN COTTERELL . I am a blind-manufacturer and live in Holborn. The prisoner was in my service—he left on the 16th of March—some days after, I missed my book—I had been in the habit of sending him to Murray for goods—I did not send him there on the 8th of April—he was not in my service then—he had no right to retain my book at that time.

FRANCIS MORRISS , (police-constable E 78.) The prisoner was brought to the station, and given into my custody.

GUILTY. Aged 10.—Recommended to mercy. Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1492

1492. JOHN CRAIG was indicted for assaulting John Birch, a constable, in the execution of his office.

GUILTY .— Confined Two Months , and to enter into his own recognizances in 60l.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, May 17th, 1843.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1493

1493. ELIZA WYATT was indicted for-stealing, oh the 2nd of May, 1 watch, value 6l. 15s.; and 1 guard, 5s.; the goods of Charles Montague.

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1494

1494. JANE CONLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May, 1 crown-piece, 4 shillings, and 3 sixpences, the monies of Joseph Gill, from his person.

JOSEPH GILL . I live is Waite-street, Poplar. On the 12th of May, about two or three o'clock in the morning, as I was returning home, I met the prisoner and another young woman—they took me to a public-house—I drank with them—I was intoxicated, but knew what I was about—I went with the young woman to a house—I left her, and in consequence of something I afterwards took her to the station, and made a complaint against her—the prisoner was present—I afterwards saw her in the street—she began to abuse the other female, and said what an ungrateful wretch she was for robbing me after the handsome manner in which I had treared her—I made the best of my way home—I did not know the way—she dragged me into a by street—I had thirteen sovereigns, a five-shilling piece, and other silver, in two different pockets—while talking with her the policeman came tip—he said, "I think you must have been robbed, for your pocket is turned inside out"—It was the pocket I had the silver in—I said she must have robbed me—I said, "You have got a crown-piece, and sundry other ailver from me"—she declared she had not, and used very abusive language to me for having accused her of it—I said I was certain she had it, and if she would give me the crown-piece I would say nothing about the remainder, she might go about her business—the declared she had not a crown-piece, and abused me very much—I said, "Very welt,

then you must go with the officer"—on the way to the station she laid, "Are you certain you had a crown-piece?"—I laid, "Yes, I am positive of it"—I was sober enough to be positive—I had examined my money shortly before at the station—she put her hand into her pocket, pulled out the crown-piece, and said, "Here, take it," calling me an offensive name—the officer took it and her at the same time.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you ask me to go down the turning with you, and give me 1s.? A. Certainly not—I did not afterwards say, if you would take me to a place I would give you the crown-piece—I did not say, "If you return me the money I gave you I will not give you in charge."

AUGUSTUS VINE (police-constable K 114.) Between two and three o'clock in the morning of the 2nd of May I was in Vinegar-lane—in consequence of something I went into a house, and saw a person there—I went with the prosecutor to the station—I afterwards saw him with the prisoner up a by street, at the back of Vinegar-lane—I saw them close together—I went up to them—I saw his pocket hanging over the fob of his trowsers—I said, "I think you have been robbed, sir"—he felt in his pocket, and said, "I have lost a crown-piece, and some silver"—he said to her, "You have robbed me; if you don't give me the crown-piece I will give you in charge"—she denied it several times—I took her in charge—as she was going down Vinegar-lane she turned round to him several times, and asked if he was certain it was a crown-piece—he said he was—she then put her hand into her pocket, took out a crown-piece, and said to him, "Take it, you b----s—"—I took it, and took her to the station—I produce it—I found 1s. in her pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the gentleman say at the station he had given me 1s.? A. I did not hear him—I was present when he charged you in the street—he did not say, "Give me back the crown-piece that I gave you," bat said, "the crown-piece that you took from my pocket, and I will forgive you the rest"—I am sure of that.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the crown-piece and the shilling after coming from the station.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1495

1495. ELIZABETH ELY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 1 shift, value 1s.; 1 shawl, 3s.; and 1 handkerchief, 6d.; the goods of Elizabeth Bell.

ELIZABETH BELL . I am a widow, and live in Portpool-Iane, Gray's-inn-lane. On the 27th of April the prisoner came to char for me—next morning I missed a shawl and handkerchief, and the following day a shift—it had been in my parlour—this is it—it has my name on it.

Prisoner. You said you had a few things you wanted, washed, and you threw out an old shift, not worth 4d., and said, "You may have that if you like." Witness. I did not.

MARY ANN REDMAN . I am the wife of Henry Redman, a policeman. The prisoner was brought to the station on this charge—I searched her, and found on her this shift—she said Mrs. Bell gave it her.

GEORGE DOWNES (police-constable F 101.) I took her into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the shift when I was charing for her; it is nothing but mere spite, for the sake of her expenses.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1496

1496. JOHN DURHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May, 1 mattress, value 1l. 5s., the goods of John Thomas Sims.

JOHN THOMAS SIMS . I deal in furniture, and live in Cleveland-street, Marylebone. On the morning of the 8th of May, about twenty minutes to nine o'clock, I left my shop for not more than two minutes—as I came back

I saw the prisoner with a mattress on his shoulder, just leaving my shop—I said, "You had better take that mattress to where you took it from"—he said, "Where is that, sir?"—I said, "You know as well as I do; take it back again"—he immediately turned round, and took it back to the shop—I went for a policeman, and gave him in charge—I had left the mattress in the shop when I went out—it is worth about 25s.—this now produced is it.

Prisoner. I was employed to carry it. Witness. I did not employ him to take it—I had not sold it to any body.

WILLIAM KNAPP (police-constable E 156.) The prisoner was given into my custody with the mattress.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1497

1497. LOUISA PAGE was indicted for unlawfully attempting to drown herself.

GEORGE CLARK . I live in Creed-lane, Ludgate-hill. On the 11th of May, about a quarter to three o'clock in the morning, I was on Blackfriara-bridge—I heard a splash in the water, and a sort of scream—I looked over the bridge, and saw a woman's light-coloured bonnet in the water—I called "Police," and went with the. policeman down the steps by the bridge side, and got the prisoner out of the water—the policeman went into the water, and I assisted.

RICHARD PLUMLEY (City police-constable, No. 357.) I heard a cry of "Police," went down the steps of the bridge, and saw a bonnet in the water—I went into the water, found the prisoner, and got her out, with the assistance of a brother constable—she said, "Oh, let me die in peace"—she said afterwards that she did it in consequence of the ill usage of her husband.

CALEB GROVES (City police-constable, No. 381.) I came at the cry of "Police," and helped to get the prisoner out of the water—she said, why did not we let her die in peace, and that it was from the ill usage of her husband—she was about twelve or fourteen feet from the shore.

GUILTY.—Strongly recommended to mercy. Confined Ten Days.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18430508-1498

1498. JOHN CAWLEY and JOHN DIXON were indicted tor a misdemeanor of an indelicate nature.

CAWLEY— GUILTY . Aged 44.

DIXON— GUILTY . Aged 48.

Judgment Respited.

NEW COURT, Monday, May 8th, 1843.

Fifth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1499

1499. HARRIET OAKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February, 1 50l. Bank-note, the property of Edward Wyatt, her master, in his dwelling-house.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY MILLS . I live at No. 171, Oxford-street, and am a jeweller. On the 13th of March a woman came to my shop about six o'clock in the evening—I cannot positively say whether it was the prisoner or not—I believe now it was her—she wished to look at some gold watches, and pointed out one in the window—after some time she said she was commissioned by a young lady, who had lost hers, to purchase one—after some time she selected one at 12 guineas—she soon after selected a chain at 5l. 15s.—she ultimately

had six tea-spoons and a key—the total amount was 21l. 10s.—previously to her looking at the spoons she said she wanted some other articles, provided I could give her change for a 50l. note—I said I had no doubt I could do so, and then she selected the other articles—she produced this 50l. note—I had not the change at home, and endeavoured to get it, but could not—I returned and told her it was past banking-hours, but if she had no objection I could give her a cheque for the balance—she hesitated a little, but at last agreed to take it, and I wrote a cheque on the Union bank, Argyle-place, Regent-street, for the balance, 28l. 10s.—when she produced the note I asked her name and address, which she gave me, and I wrote it on the note, "Mrs. Price, 36, Stafford-place, Pimlico"—just previous to her leaving the shop she said, "You need not doubt respecting the note, (or something to that effect,) I took it of Mr. Wyatt, No. 360, Oxford-street," which I wrote on the note—she then left with the goods and my cheque—she was in my shop, as near at I can judge, half an hour—to the best of my recollection she had either a cloak or a shawl on—she had a white bonnet on—I have no doubt of that, and a black veil—I scarcely observed her face at all—she had spectacles on, and a boa round her neck, as far as I can recollect—I think it was a brown sable one—I did not particularly notice her person—she was sitting behind the counter in the corner—she appeared to me to be rather stout, but I could only see the upper part of her person—I directed one of my apprentices to follow her.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Had you known Mr. Wyatt before? A. Not at all—his house is half a mile from mine—the female had a white chip or a straw bonnet—I think it was trimmed with black—I think I saw a bonnet, since that time, at the police-office—I have been shown a bonnet since that by the police-officer—perhaps it might be twice—I do not think he showed it me at all—he might bave shown me the bonnet in Court—it might be there—he did not show it to me—he did show it, I believe—he did not point it out to me particularly, to the best of my recollection—he had the bonnet with other things, which he exhibited—when he first exhibited the bonnet, it had no trimming on, I believe—I think I saw it again the following week—I think it had no trimming on then—I cannot recollect whether I have ever seen it with any trimming—I saw it at Marlborough-street, and I believe I saw it a second time—I never saw it with any trimming on it that I recollect—I think I was shown a shawl and a cloak—we were shown some clothes and a bonnet—I did not ndtfce them so particularly as to recollect from that time to this—I think I have not seen them since the second examination—I do not think I saw the clothes here last session—I might bave seen them in a bundle, but not to examine them—both my apprentices were behind the counter when the woman was there—I said to one of them, "Follow her, and see whether she goes to that address she gave"—he went in the parlour, and got his hat, I believe—he might be from half an hour to three quarters before he came back—I sent my other apprentice to Mr. Wyatt's between half-past six and seven o'clock, before the one returned whom I sent after the woman—I ascertained immediately on his coming back that she had given a false address—I sent to Mr. Wyatt again some time after, as he was to have come down, and I was surprised he did not—I saw him the following day about eleven o'clock—I was present at both examinations—I saw a pair of spectacles produced on the first or the second examination.

WILLIAM CHALLEN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Mills—I saw a female on the evening of the 13th of March—I am not certain that it was the prisoner—she appears to me to be the same person; that is my belief—I was in the shop all the time she was there—I saw her leave; and in consequence of directions

from my master, I got my hat from the parlour, and followed her—when I got to the shop-door, I saw her ten or a dosen yards off—I am sure it was the same woman—I did not particularly notice her dress—I believe she had a dark shawl on—she had a white straw bonnet on—I do not know what it was trimmed with, but I think black, and a black veil—she had spectacles, and she appeared to me rather stout—I followed her to No. 10, Nassau-street, Middlesex-hospital—I did not lose sight of her only for a moment or two, while she turned the corners; but when I turned, I saw her, and I did not see any other woman like her—I am certain the woman who was in my master's shop went into No. 10, Nassau-street—I waited about for three quarters of an hour, but she did not come out that I saw.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you near enough to see whether she did, or not? A. I walked backwards and forwards—while I was walking the reverse way she might have come out-Nassau-street runs parallel with Tot-tenham-court-road—it is not a very narrow street—her bonnet resembled a straw bonnet—I have seen a bonnet since at the police-office, at the second examination—it was trimmed with dark green ribbon then—I have seen it this morning, it has still got a green ribbon on—I could not say positively whether that was the colour that was on the bonnet when she was in the shop, it was some dark ribbon—I thought it was blaek—it was some dark ribbon—the veil was over it—when I went out of the shop, she was ten or a dosen yards off—while she was in the shop, I had not seen her back, and when I went out I did not see her face-she had not crossed the way when I first saw her in the street—she crossed when she got half wav from our house to Regent-street, and crossed back again—I lost sight of her while she turned one or two corners.

WILLIAM BURCHETT . I am in Mr. Mills's service. I was in his shop on the evening of the 13th of March, when a female came in—I believe the prisoner to be the same person—I noticed her dress—she had on a white straw bonnet, and I think, a black ribbon—she had a veil, and wore spectacles—I went by my master's direction to Mr. Wyatt's house that night—I saw the servant first, then Miss Wyatt, and then Mrs. Wyatt.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell them what your master told you to tell? A. Yes—I asked Mrs. Wyatt if she knew whether Mr. Wyatt had paid a female that day a 50l. note—she said she did not know, but she had lost one—it was then about seven o'clock in the evening—I believe the prisoner is the same person—I thought she seemed then five or six years older than the prisoner.

Q. Did you not think and say that she was a much older person? A. I think I did, but I am not positive—the inspector of police has been to our shop three or four times, I think—he has not seen my master every time—he has seen him—I do not know whether he brought a bonnet with him—I am not positive whether he showed me a bonnet at my master's shop, in my master's presence—I forget whether he pointed out a bonnet to me in particular, at my master's shop—he came the first time with Mr. Wyatt—he did not bring anything then—I was shown a bonnet at the police-court—I think I saw it twice there, and I have seen it this morning—I cannot say whether it is in the same state that it was when I first saw it—I think it had trimming on it when I first saw it at the police court—I would not positively say—I was asked if I thought it was the bonnet—I think there was a pair of spectacles produced at the office.

MR. DOANE. Q. You thought she was older; but now, looking at the prisoner, do you think she is the person who was in your master's shop? A. Yes.

EDWARD WYATT . I am a carver and gilder, and live at No. 360, Oxford-street, in the parish of St. James, Westminster. The prisoner has been employed by my wife as a sempstress, for cooking, and various domestic purposes, for about two years, occasionally—she was not living in the house, except for a certain number of days—I received, in January last, a cheque for 131l. 5s. on Jones, Loyd, and Co.—I received for it two 50l. notes, two 10l., two 5l., and the rest in cash, on the 13th of Jan., and on the 17th, I paid one of the 50l. notes to Mrs. Whitehead, and the other I gave to my wife—on the evening of the 13th of March, I heard that Mr. Mills had sent.

Cross-examined. Q. You gave one of these 50l. notes to your wife? A. Yes, and on the 15th of February she made a communication to me that she had lost it, and on the 16th also—I have here a memorandum, which I made at the commencement of these proceedings, and am certain it was on the 15th of Feb.—when I returned home, on the 13th of March, about ten o'clock at night, I received a communication from my wife—I went to Mr. Mills to identify the note—I afterwards went to Nassau-street—I knew from my wife that the prisoner lived there—the prisoner was in bed when I went there—she got up very shortly—I then went into her room—she was partly dressed—it must have been then about eleven o'clock—I said to her, "Harriet, you know what I am come for," or something to that effect—I do not think she said, "No, I do not"—I will swear, to the best of my belief, that she did not; but I was agitated on going into her room, and I will not swear what was the first thing she said—I made it very short—I said, "You know Mrs. Wyatt has lost a 50l. note, and you have taken it to a jeweller's shop, and bought a watch and chain with it"—she said she knew nothing about it—I think I told her the case was perfectly clear against her, and she had better give it up—I meant she had better give up the cheque and the articles, the produce of the note—she said, "If you think proper, bring a policeman in directly, and search every part of the bouse, I am quite willing to submit to it," but 1 left her, and went home—I know that a gentleman named Leader called on her, but not by my direction—I told the prisoner, that if she would give up the cheque and the produce I would not prosecute her—I very unwillingly prosecuted her afterwards—she had been a good servant, as for as we knew; but when I was afterwards at her lodging I saw a pair of sheets that I was quite certain she had pilfered from our house—Mr. Leader went to the prisoner at the instigation of my wife—I returned home the day after I had been to the prisoner, and found her at my house—I had been to the office when my wife told me the note was lost, and got a warrant to search the prisoner's apartment—she came to my bouse two or three times afterwards—I did not say a word to her about it.

MR. DOANE. Q. Why not? A. In consequence of advice from the office—I asked the prisoner to give up the property, and the cheque for 28l. 10s.—she laid quite prostrate on the ground, and seemed quite imploring—she kept saying, "Oh, Mr. Wyatt, I have not got it—I cannot do it—I cannot do it"—that was the property I told her she had purchased, and the cheque—that was the answer she made, that she had not got it—I did not like to call in an officer that night—I went the next morning to South Lambeth, to consult with a friend—I went the next morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, to the prisoner's room, and saw the sheets—this is the note I lost—(looking at it)—it is No. 04528.

FRANCES WYATT . On the 17th of January I received from my husband a 50l. note, with three 5l. notes and a 10l. note—I put them in a pocket-book, in a drawer in my bed-room—the drawer bad no lock to it—the prisoner

was employed by me, from time to time, during Jan. and Feb—I perfectly remember that the was with me on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th of Feb.—on the 30th of Jan. I took a 5l. note from the same pocket-book that these notes were in, but not from that sum—that sum was then safe—I saw the 50l. note there—I went to the drawer after that, but I did not go to the money till the 15th of Feb.—I then missed the 50l. note—the 25l. was there—the prisoner had left me early in Jan., she being in the family way, but she came occasionally in Jan. and Feb.—she always had access to the room in which the drawer was—she has been since confined—I knew she lived at No. 10, Nassau-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Twenty-five remained in the pocket-book? A. Yes—three 5l. notes and a 10l. note—there had frequently been other cash there—the prisoner was at my house on the 1st of Feb.—she came early in the morning on the 2nd, and worked at her needle in the drawing-room with me—on the 5th of Feb. she left me about ten o'clock at night—the last time she was at my house, was on the 11th of March—she then came there to help me to make a cake, just as we were going to dinner—she sat while we dined, and then assisted me—I did not send Mr. Leader to her house with a message—I sent to him to tell him of my distress, and he offered to go to her—he returned, and she came immediately afterwards—I recognised a bonnet at her lodging as being one that she was in the habit of wearing—my daughter put the trimming on it—it was crushed away with some old ones—thrust into some others—it was the inner one—the trimming was then taken off—my friend recognised the trimming, and my daughter put it on—after the prisoner left me, I was without a servant for some time—I got one on the 6th of March—till then I had done as well as I could—I bad an old charwoman come occasionally—I had had her for some years—she was the only person who came after the 1st of Feb.—I am quite certain of that—we have a lad who does not live in the house—the female who came on the 6th of March is thirteen years old—she is with me still—I have a son living at home, and one daughter, who trimmed the bonnet—my servant-of-all-work left at the time I dismissed the prisoner, which I think was on the 15th of Jan.—I never knew the prisoner to wear spectacles—her sight was perfectly good.

MR. DOANE. Q. Did the servant of-all-work wear spectacles? A. No, nor the charwoman—I think the servant occasionally wore a black veil.

JAMES LAKE COY . I am a clerk in the banking-house of Jones, Loyd, and Co. On thr 13th of Jan. I cashed a cheque of Lady Cross, for 131l. 5s.—I gave two 50l. notes—this is one of them—(looking at it.)

JOHN MASSEY TIERNEY . I am inspector of the A division of police. On the 14th of March I found the prisoner at Mr. Wyatt's—I told her she was charged with stealing a 50l. note, the property of Mr. Wyatt—she denied it—I took her to the station in Vine-street—I asked for the key of her room, which she gave me—I then went to the second floor front room at No. 10, Nassau-street, which I found locked—the key the prisoner gave me unlocked it—I found in that room two paper parcels, one contained two sovereigns and six half-sovereigns, and the other three sovereigns and two half-sovereigns—I found 18s. 6d. in silver, and 2 1/2 d. in copper—I found some wearing aparel, and two boas, one of which is brown—a shawl, and this straw bonnet crushed, and put inside two other bonnets—this trimming, which is on it now, was taken off and put into a child's bonnet in the same box—I put it on this bonnet myself—I also found a black lace veil.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you get the key of her lodging? A. On the morning of the 14th—I made a cursory search the same morning before

going before the Magistrate—I found these articles on the Thursday following—I had in the meantime kept the key—I was twice before the Magistrate—I do not know that I showed this bonnet to Mr. Wyatt—it was before the Magistrate—I do not know whether I took it out of the bundle—I do not recollect that I showed it to him at any time, nor to Mr. Mills—he might have seen it before the Magistrate—I do not remember that I showed it him—I am almost sure I did not—I do not know that I showed it at Mr. Mills's shop to either of his shop boys or apprentices—I showed the shawl to Challen, in the room—I went to Mills's shop frequently—I did not see Mr. Mills every time—I went there to caution them to be at Marlborough-street—I went one erening to take one of his apprentices with me about a French basket, which it was said the party who purchased the watch had on her arm—I did not find a French basket at the prisoner's lodging—I went to her lodging again, I think, on the morning before the examination, at Marlborough-street, but I cannot be positive—I took no notice of it—I saw two persons who came for the prisoner—I did not tell them to go away—I saw them with the witnesses for the prosecution, and I did not think that proper—I did not find any spectacles.

ELISABETH GILBERT . I live at No. 10, Nassau-street, Middlesex Hospital—the prisoner lodged in the first floor back room—she then went from me, and took the front room up stairs—the was lodging there on the 13th of March—I never saw her in that room but once, which was the day before this happened—I went up to her then—I did not notice what dress she had on—she came down to my room that evening—she was then in a black dress as usual.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was that? A. I should think between six and seven o'clock—she had no bonnet on—she conducted herself very well in point of honesty, for what I know—I never saw her in a pair of spectacles.

JURY. Q. Do you know whether the prisoner went out that day at all? Witness. Not to my knowledge—the bad a key to let herself in and out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1500

1500. ISAAC LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Kemp Betts, from bis person; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Pour Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1501

1501. ROBERT VAUSEY was indicted for embezzling 98l., the monies of Robert Spence and others, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Two Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1502

1502. JAMES GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 1 pair of pincers, value 8d. the goods of Mary Ann Griffin.

MARY ANN GRIFFIN . I am a widow, and live at Uxbridge. I had a pair of pincers about seven o'clock on Saturday evening, the 22nd of April, for sale on a stall in the market-place—the prisoner and two others came, and the prisoner bought a tobacco-box or a pocket comb, or something, I cannot say what—I missed the pincers as he was turning away—I called a policeman, and gave him in charge—I can swear to them.

RICHARD ROADNIGHT (police-sergeant T 11.) The prisoner was given into my custody, and I found these pincers in his pocket—he said, "Some one else must have put them in."

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take them.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Seven Days.

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, May 9th, 1848.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18430508-1503

1503. PHILIP M'BRIDE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May, 1 coat, value 1l. 10s., the goods of John Fisher Gould: and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, May 10th, 1843.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18430508-1504

1504. ESTHER CRUTCHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April, 6 pairs of stockings, value 2l. 9s., the goods of Richard Howell: also for obtaining goods by false pretences; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1505

1505. GEORGE SERBEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 1 pair of boots, value 7s., the goods of William Cook; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1506

1506. WILLIAM BIDDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November, 13 quarts of beer, 4s. 5d.; 1 pint of gin, 2s.; 20 shillings, and 2 sixpences; the property of William Cartwright Winfield, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1507

1507. JAMES STEPHENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April, 1 ounce 11 penny weights of gold, value 2l. 15s., the goods of Thomas Mortiboy and another, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1508

1508. JOHN CONNELL and PATRICK WELCH were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Sir William Keir Grant, from his penon; and that Connell had been before con-victed of felony.

LUXE RENNET . I am a constable of the Mendicity Society. A little after two o'clock in the afternoon of the 7th of April, I was in Queen-street, May-fair—I saw the prisoners in company at the bottom of Queen-street, Curzon-street—I then saw them following a gentleman, and attempt to pick his pocket—they left him and followed Sir William Keir Grant—Connell took from his pocket a silk handkerchief—they both turned into Clarges-street—Welch was close to Connell when he took the handkerchief—they bad been together from five to ten minutes, both in company and talking previous to their fol-lowing the first gentleman—Sir William crossed the corner of Clarges-street, and the prisoners sat down on the step of a door, opened the handkerchief, and were examining it—Welch was quite close to Connell—he must have seen what he did—I have known Welch nine years, selling flowers and other things.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had Welch with him some account books? A. Yes, some books or prints, I do not know which—he had four or five books wrapped up in brown paper—he is blind with one eye—he was not taken till four days after.

SIR WILLIAM KEIR GRANT . I live in Chapel-street, Belgrave-square—

this is my handkerchief—I had used it close to Devonshire-house—I had it in my pocket in Little Grosvenor-street—my name is marked on it.

Connell's Defence. I was in Curzon-street, and saw this handkerchief on the pavement—I picked it up, and had it about ten minutes—Welch came to me, and I showed it him—I went on to Piccadilly, and the officer took me.

LUKE RENNEY re-examined. I first said I saw him take the handkerchief, at the station, which was previous to Sir William Grant coming to the station.

(Welch received a good character.)

DAVID SHEEN (police-constable C 101.) I produce a certificate of Connell's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person—I was present at the trial.

CONNELL— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Twelve Months.

WELCH— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1509

1509. WILLIAM COLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April, 1 breast-pin, value 2s., the goods of Henry Barwick, from his person.

HENRY BARWICK . I am a painter, and live in Old-street, St. Luke's. On the 30th of April I was in Farringdon-street about eleven o'clock—the prisoner snatched a pin out of my breast—I gave him in charge—this it my pin.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Are you sure it is yours? A. Yes, because it is battered at the back—I seized the prisoner—a policeman came up directly, and took him—I cannot say that the pin did not fall out—he made a snatch at it—it was found on the ground—I held him last from the moment that he made a snatch at it, till the policeman came up—I did not go to a public-house with him afterwards—I will not say whether I did so before—I was a little intoxicated—when I accused him, he said, "I am not going to run away"—he did not say anything about the pin.

WILLIAM MURLEY TEMPLEMAN (City police-constable, No. 253.) I was in Farringdon-street. I saw the prisoner, as I was walking my beat, go up to the prosecutor, and snatch at the pin—I immediately made towards him, knowing him—the prosecutor had got him by the hand, and said he had stolen the pin—I took him to the station, searched him, and found nothing on him—I returned to the spot with a lad named Clark, and Clark found the pin in the kennel.

Cross-examined. Q. How far off were you? A. About twenty yards.

ROBERT CLARK . I accompanied Templeman, and picked up a pin in Farringdon-street, just by Fleet-lane—the policeman pointed out the spot where I should search.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to be there? A. I was passing along there, speaking to the policeman—I merely knew him by his calling me in the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1510

1510. JOHN HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, 10lbs. weight of beef, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Charles Matthews.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a salesman, in Newgate-market. About half-past ten o'clock at night, on the 8th of April, I received information, and saw the prisoner about two yards from my door—I seized him, and found a piece of salt beef wrapped in his apron, which had been exposed for sale on the board outside the door—I had seen it safe just before.

CHARLES CHURCHILL (City police-constable, No. 278.) I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by, and saw it on the ground—there

were two other butchers' shops opposite—I was going over to ask if it belonged to them.

CHARLES MATTHEWS re-examined. It could not have fallen down—it was not dirty—there was no butcher's shop opposite.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1511

1511. WILLIAM GAMBLE and MARY GAMBLE were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April, 1 carpet, value 10s., the goods of Dennis Hude.

DENNIS HUDE . I live in Milton-street, Cripplegate. The prisoners rented a furnished room in my house for about thirteen weeks altogether. On the 9th of April I stopped Mary going out—William had gone out about a quarter of an hour before—I expressed a wish to look over the things in the room—she would not let me at first, till I told her I would send for a policeman—at last she went up and opened the room—she said, "Your suspicions are quite right, the things are all gone"—I asked her where the duplicates were—she said, "There they are"—I gave her in charge, and gave the duplicates, with this letter, which I found by the side of them, to the policeman.

LEONARD WILSON . I am in the service of Mr. Jacob Russell, a pawnbroker, in Fore-street. I produce a carpet pledged on the 5th of April, by Mary—this is the counterpart of the duplicate—it is in my writing.

SAMUEL SPECK (City police-constable, No. 119.) I took Mary on the 9th of April. I produce a letter and some duplicates which I received from the prosecutor—I saw the prisoners write before the Magistrate—I do not know the Magistrate's handwriting—I saw him sign a notice I have in my pocket—I believe the writing to these depositions is his—(read)—"The prisoner, William Gamble, says, voluntarily, the letter is my handwriting.—WILLIAM GAMBLE.")—This letter being read, expressed the prisoner's regret at being compelled to pledge the articles, which they intended to redeem if they had not received notice to quit; but would endeavour to do so.

SOPHIA HUDE . This carpet was let with the room to the prisoners—they passed as man and wife, and I had every reason to believe that they were so—the carpet could not have been taken by one without being missed by the other.

WILLIAM GAMBLE— GUILTY . Aged 32.—

MARY GAMBLE— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1512

1512. WILLIAM GAMBLE and MARY GAMBLE were again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January, 2 pillows, value 5s.; 1 blanket, 4s.; 2 pillow cases, 1s.; 2 sheets, 3s.; and 1 counterpane, 5s.; the goods of Dennis Hude.

LEONARD WILSON . I am assistant to Mr. Russell, a pawnbroker in Fore-street. I produce a quilt, pillow, and blanket, Which were pawned by Mary Gamble in the name of Ann Taylor.

SOPHIA HUDE . These are my husband's—they were let to the prisoners with the room.

SAMUEL SPECK (City police-constable, No. 119.) This letter was produced before the Magistrate—I saw the prisoner sign these depositions, and I believe this to be the Magistrate's handwriting.

WILLIAM GAMBLE— GUILTY . Aged 32.— Confined Six Months.

MARY GAMBLE— NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18430508-1513

1513. JOHN ROBERTS and DANIEL CONNOR were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, I handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Corbyn, from his person.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am a messenger at the Commercial-rooms, and live

in New North-street, Finsbury. A little before five o'clock in the evening of the 24th of April, I was passing down King-street, near London Bridge—I saw the two prisoners, and I think, another, walking close behind Captain Corbyn—Connor put his hand into his pocket—Roberts looked back to see if they were watched—they went on to the corner of Cannon-street—they stood there—the prosecutor went down the street—they ran after him—Connor put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and took out a handkerchief—he turned and went up towards the Mansion-house—Roberts stood looking about, and then went after Connor—I went and told the prosecutor—I then saw the two prisoners in conversation, and told the policeman—they ran after another gentleman, and the officer secured them—the handkerchief was found on Connor, which he said was his own—I found two other handkerchiefs on Roberts.

JOSEPH CORBYN . I am in the Navy, and live at Greenwich Hospital. On the 24th of April I was walking down King William-street, and was accosted by Kennedy—in consequence of what he stated I put my hand into my coat pocket, and missed my handkerchief—this is it—I know it by its being a particular old one, and by its pattern, and being darned—I have bad it many years.

STEPHEN PATMAN (City police-constable, No. 584.) My attention was directed by Kennedy to the prisoners—they were together in King William-street, going towards London-bridge—I took them with Kennedy's assistance—I took them to the station in Tower-street, and on Connor I found this handkerchief, and on Roberts two other silk handkerchiefs—they have no marks on them.

Roberts's Defence. I met Connor, and asked him the way to Dock-head; he told me, and after a little time he came, touched me on the shoulder and said, "I am going that way, I will show you;" he had not said it half a minute before the policeman and the other came up and took me.

Connor's Defence. Roberts asked me the way to Dock-head; I gave him the direction: I thought of going myself; I ran and told him I would tell him, and the policeman got hold of me.

ROBERTS*— GUILTY . Aged 26.

CONNOR*— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Ten Years.

Sixth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1514

1514. JOHN BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 7 glazed window-sashes, value 2l. 10s., the goods of William Dempsey, and fixed to a building.—2nd COUNT, for stealing 35 panes of glass; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1515

1515. GEORGE WARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 1 shirt, value 5s., the goods of Caroline Warman; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1516

1516. WILLIAM MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April, 36 pieces of mother-of-pearl, value 5s., the goods of George Shepherd; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1517

1517. JOHN ELLINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 1 1/2lb. weight of tobacco, value 5s., the goods of John Lloyd and another, his masters.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE BAKER . I am shopman to John and Francis Lloyd. On Friday, the 21st of April, I was directed to watch in the room where the prisoner was drying returns—I watched through a hole in the door—there were other persons there—I saw the prisoner take some shag tobacco from a cask at which he had no business—he took it to the stove, divided it into two parts, stamped on each part, and put one part into each of his trowsers-pockets—I informed Mr. William Lloyd, and he was given into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. WYLDE. Q. How long have you been in the prosecutor's employ? A. About three years and nine months, and the prisoner for eight years.

WILLIAM WATKINS LLOYD . I am in the employ of Messrs. Lloyd, of Snow-hill. I received information from Baker—I directed the men, when they left work at eight o'clock, to be searched—I sent for a policeman—I saw them all searched—there was nothing found on any of them, except this tobacco, which was found in two parts in the prisoner's pockets—it is the same sort as we had in the warehouse—he had no right to remove any of it—it is worth 5s.

EDWARD HUTCHINGS (City police-constable 207.) I searched the persons who came out—I found this tobacco on the prisoner, one parcel in each pocket.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 25.—Recommended to mercy. Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1518

1518. HANNAH MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 7 sovereigns, the monies of John Smith; and JAMES M'CARTHY for feloniously receiving, harbouring, and maintaining her, knowing her to have committed the said felony; and that Moore had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN SMITH . I am a sailor, and live with Mr. Polfer, in Old Gravel-lane. On the afternoon of the 12th of April, about four o'clock, I fell in with Moore, in a grog-shop—she took me to her house—as we went up stairs, I took my purse out and counted my money—she could see me—I had seven sovereigns in my purse—I did not give her any thing—I had nothing to do with her—I went to bed, and went to sleep—when I awoke, my money was gone—my purse was in my trowsers when I went to bed—I was not sober when I went to bed—I was when I awoke—I laid awake, and when Moore came in I accused her of robbing me—she said she had not, and went down on her knees—I went out with her about ten o'clock at night, and saw M'Carthy as I was going out—he asked where I was going—I said to give her in charge—he said I should not—I said I would give both in charge; with that he struck me above the brow, and on the side of the nose, and in my eye—he got down between my legs, and tried to throw me over—Moore got away.

M'Carthy. You did not mention about the robbery. Witness. I did not—I did not strike you.

THOMAS HENRY ELLIS (police-constable K 203.) I was on duty this night, in High-street, Shadwell—I saw the two prisoners about five minutes to eleven o'clock at night—I heard M'Carthy say to Moore, "The first one that touches you, I will knock his b----y eye out"—after that, I was called into the court by the prosecutor—he was bleeding very much in the face—M'Carthy was there—he did not say anything—the prosecutor gave M'Carthy in charge, and told me his story—M'Carthy could hear him, and said nothing—I afterwards found Moore—in going to the station, I received a sovereign from Roberts.

HENRY BATEMAN . I am employed at the Duke of York public-house—about a quarter to nine o'clock, on the 12th of April, Moore came there—

I saw her give two sovereigns to Miss Smith, who waits in the bar—at half-past twelve she came and had threepenny worth of brandy, and Mr. Quin asked if he should take for it out of the sovereign, which he did, and gave her 19s. 9d.—she said she was very nigh done for.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am employed as private watchman in High-street, Shad well—I was in the Duke of York about half-past twelve—a sailor came in; not the prosecutor—something was said to Mr. Quin, and he gave me a sovereign to take to Moore, but I gave it to the officer—I could not see Moore at the top of the street—I came back—Moore came after me, and asked me for the sovereign—I said I should not give it her, I suspected she had robbed some one—I went with her to Mr. Quin's door, and left her there—I went to the station.

Moore's Defence. I met the prosecutor in a public-house, between six and seven o'clock in the evening—he asked me if I would go home with him—his shipmate and his young woman went home with us—we were all in one rcom, as there were two beds—he tried the door, and there was no lock on it—his shipmate replied, "Never mind; let us go to bed"—he said he would give me 5s. to stop all night with him, and he would pay me in the morning, as we were both very much in liquor—I did not awake till about ten that night—the servant came up, and asked if we were going to have anything to drink—I said, "No"—the prosecutor got up, and said I had robbed him—I said, "You had better give me in charge"—we came to the door, and he gave me a dreadful kick—I went to the Duke of York, and got threepenny worth of brandy; the landlord asked what was the matter; I said I was almost done for: M'Carthy had seen him kick me, and a fight ensued between them. I saw no money in the prosecutor's possession; if any one robbed him, it must have been the servant of the house: she has not been heard of since.

JOHN SMITH re-examined. There was no shipmate that went with me—no bne else stayed in the room.

ROBERT BOARD (police-constable K 332.) I produce a certificate of Moore's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

MOORE— GUILTY . Aged 30.— Transported for Seven years.

M'CARTHY— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1519

1519. JAMES M'CARTHY was again indicted for assaulting John Smith, with intent to rescue and set at large Hannah Moore, out of his custody.—2nd COUNT, for a common assault.

JOHN SMITH . I went to a house with Hannah Moore—I had seven sovereigns—I went to bed, and when I awoke I missed them—I charged Moore with stealing them—I came down, and was taking her to give her in charge—the prisoner asked what I was going to do with her—I said to give her in charge—he said I should not—I said I would give them both in charge; and then be struck me above the eye, and on the nose—I had not struck him before he struck me—I was sober then.

THOMAS HENRY ELLIS (police-constable K 30.) I saw Smith bleeding very much.

GUILTY of a common assault. Aged 20.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18430508-1520

1520. ISAAC LEVI and JOHN MURPHY were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April, 1 purse, value 2s.; 1 half-crown, 14 shillings, and 2 sixpences; the property of Francisco Gonzales, from his person.

MR. WILKINS conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN BLUNDELL (City police-constable, No. 32.) About half-past six o'clock, on the evening of the 27th of April, I was on duty, in plain clothes, in Fleet-street,

I saw the prisoners and some others together—from something-that occurred I watched them—I saw them attempt several gentlemen's pockets, and I saw Levi following two gentlemen up Fleet-street—Murphy and two others were behind them—they were close together—I had seen them together before—I followed them as far as the bar—I saw an officer in uniform, and beckoned to him—I kept on the opposite side, and got to the bar before they got there—I saw Levi pull a purse out of a gentleman's top-coat pocket, and put it in his own breeches—I collared him—the others directly ran away—they were then five or six yards from him—Levi tried to get away—I called the policeman, and as soon as Levi saw the officer in uniform, he pulled the purse out of his pocket, and tried to throw it down a sewer grating—it did not go down—Wardle, the other officer, picked it up—Murphy got away then, but I knew him before, for eighteen months—I am certain he was one in company with Levi—I gave Levi in charge to Wardle, and went after the gentleman—I met Murphy next morning in Wentworth-streel, Petticoat-lane—I said, "I want you, Murphy"—he said, "What for?"—I said, "I shall tell you at the station"—I took him there, and told him I took him into custody for being in company with a deaf and dumb boy, who picked a gentleman's pocket in Fleet-street—he said, "I know nothing at all of the boy."

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did Murphy make any resistance? A. No—I found him in the street with a Jew—I am sure he is the person I saw in Fleet-street the previous day—I could not take him then, because he ran away—I have had no quarrel with Murphy—I am sure I am not mistaken in him.

MR. WILKINS. Q. Had you known Levi before? A. Yes, he is a companian of Murphy.

GEORGE WARDLE (City police-constable, No. 325.) I was on duty in Fleet-street—in consequence of a signal from Blunded, I walked towards Temple-bar—when we got near there, he gave another signal—I then went across to him, and he had got hold of Levi by the collar—I ran, and got hold of him by my left hand—he put his right hand into his trowsers pocket, took out this purse, and threw it on the grating of the sewer, and then attempted to kick it down with his foot—I pushed him a little on one side, snatched it up, and have had it ever since.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you see Mr. Gonzales? A. I saw four persons, but I could not identify them—I was close to Levi—I did not see him take the purse out of his pocket.

FRANCISCO GONZALES . I live in Milman-street, Bedford-row. On the evening of the 27th of April I was in Fleet-street, near Temple-bar—the policeman came to me, and afterwards showed me this purse, which is mine—I had felt it safe in my pocket about half an hour before.

LEVI— GUILTY. Aged 17.— Judgment Respited.

MURPHY— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1521

1521. CAROLINE DAVIS and ELIZABETH KIRBY were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April, 1 shawl, value 1l. 10s., the goods of Isaac Chandler.

HENRY WATKINS . I am shopman to Isaac Chandler, a draper, in Aldgate. On Saturday evening, the 29th of April, about six o'clock, I missed this black satin shawl from the lobby of the doorway, where it was thrown loosely over a shawl-stand—several persons gave me information—I followed, and overtook the two prisoners—I asked Davis to produce the shawl, and, on turning round, I saw she had dropped it behind her—there were no other women going the same way—Kirby was close to her—I took her, and Wood brought Davis back, and gave them into custody.

Davis. I never had it in my hand. Witness. When I asked you for it you made no answer, but you had dropped it.

ROBERT WOODS . I am a stationer, in Aldgate. I saw Watkins running—the prisoners were about five yards before him—I saw him speak to them, and then they parted from one another—I saw Davis drop the shawl on the step of a door as soon as I touched her—I saw Watkins pick it up—I took Davis to the shop—when I taxed her with taking the shawl, she said it had been given her by a girl.

WILLIAM HENRY WALLIS (City police-constable, No. 505.) The prisoners were given to me.

Kirby. I knew Davis, and was speaking to her; he came and turned me round, and said, "Where is the shawl?" I said, "I don't know what you mean."

DAVIS— GUILTY . Aged 17.

KIRBY— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1522

1522. ELIZABETH WHITE , SARAH NEALE , and JOHN NEALE , were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May, 1 jacket, value 5s.; and 1 knife, 2s.; the goods of James Carter.

JAMES CARTER . I am a sailor, and lodge in Essex-street, Commercial-road. I was going home on the 1st of May, and saw White—she said she would treat me with a pint of beer if I would go to a public-house—I did, and she treated me with a pint of beer—after that I went home with her, and gave her 3s.—Sarah Neale was in the house—I did not see John at all—I went to bed, and after I got to bed White whispered to Sarah Neale, and White afterwards came to bed—I did not hear what she said—I put my jacket and trowsers under my head—I had a knife in my inside jacket pocket—I had no money—about four o'clock in the morning I was awoke by my pillow moving, and I saw Sarah near the door, with a jacket in her hand—I looked under my pillow, and my jacket was gone—I got out of bed, and went to the door—it was shut—I could not open it—I went back to White, who was in bed, pulled her, and told her my jacket was taken away, and she hallooed out something, I think "Murder"—John Neale then came in, and struck me on the face—we had a scuffle, and he tore my shirt—then Sarah Neale and John pushed me out—White had started off while the others were in the room—they shut the door—I put my foot to it, and told them to give me my jacket—John then came out, and we had a scuffle outside—he threw me down—this is my jacket and knife—I did not give it to either of them.

Sarah Neale. He brought no money into the house. Witness. Yes, I gave White 3s.

SAMUEL LEWIS (police-constable K 155.) About five o'clock on this morning I was on duty—I saw the prosecutor lying on the ground, opposite the door of Neale's house—he had blood on his face—I knew the prisoners lived there—the prosecutor complained that he had lost his jacket—I went into the house, and saw Sarah Neale—I asked her for the jacket—she said White had run out with it—Nicholls went after her—I went into the back yard, and saw John Neale washing the blood off his arm—I asked how he came to ill-use the man—he said he had a right to defend himself—I said I must take him—he took up a poker, and said he would lose his bl—y life before he would come out with us—I told him he had better come, and he did.

WILLIAM NICHOLS (police-constable K 177.) I apprehended White about nine o'clock in the morning—she said the prosecutor had no money, and she took the jacket for it—in going to the station, she said, "Make it as light as you can, I shan't forget you"—she had this knife in her bosom.

FREDERICK JOHN WOOD . I am a pawnbroker, in Ratcliffe-highway. I stopped this jacket that morning, from information that I received.

MARY SKIPP . I live in Angel's-gardens—I took this jacket to Wood's shop, as White asked me to do so.

Whites Defence. He went home with me; he said he had got no money, he had only just come home, but he would leave his jacket with me, and give me 4s. The next day he took it off and gave it to me. Between four and five o'clock in the morning he awoke me, and said he would murder me, if I did not give him his jacket. I said he gave it me; then Sarah Neale came in, and he began to ill-use her; he said he should leave his jacket with his girl for 4s.; and I said directly, "You bring the 4s., and you shall have your jacket." I heard "Murder" cried; I jumped out of bed, and said, "What is the matter?" he said he would have his jacket; he up with his fist, and struck me, and said if I did not hold my tongue, he would murder every one in the house; he said, "I will have my revenge out of the Irish; for through the Irish I got twice into Newgate."

John Neale's Defence. I had to get up at five o'clock to work. I heard a noise; I jumped out, and the prosecutor tore my shirt, and kicked me; and before I could get my trowsers on he challenged me to fight. I was arguing with him. The policeman came, and he gave me in charge.

WHITE— GUILTY . Aged 25.

SARAH NEALE— GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Four Months.

JOHN NEALE— NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT, Thursday, May 11th, 1843.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18430508-1523

1523. MARY MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 3 watches, value 20l., the goods of John Grant and others, in their dwelling-house.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Isabella Fleming.—3rd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of William, Archbishop of Canterbury, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Driscoll.—4th COUNT, stating them to be the goods of the Ordinary of the diocese; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1524

1524. MARY ANN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April, 61 yards of lace, value 10s.; 1 bunch of artificial flowers, 2s.; and 1 pair of scissors, 2s.; the goods of Joseph Wilkinson; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1525

1525. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 3 spoons, 1l. 4s.; 2 forks, 17s.; the goods of Mary Cook; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1526

1526. JAMES M'CLAY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April, 1 chronometer and case, value 40l., the goods of our Lady the Queen.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of the principal officer of her Majesty's ordnance; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1527

1527. ANN LIGHTLY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April, 6 yards of gingham, value 2s. 3d., the goods of Griffith Foulkes.

RICHARD GRIFFITHS . I am in the service of Griffith Foulkes, a draper,

in Little Russel-street, Covent-garden. In the afternoon, of the 15th of April, the prisoner was in the shop, looking at some pieces of gingham, which were placed on a chair by the door—she asked the price of a piece—it was 6 1/2 d.—I went to the door—she was asked into the shop, and we discovered that she had something under her shawl—I lifted it up, and saw this piece—she said she had not taken it with the intention of stealing it—I had told her to bring in another piece that she had in her hand, but not this.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1528

1528. SARAH WELFARE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March, 1 sovereign, the monies of Thomas Brooks, her master.

CATHERINE BROOKS . I am the wife of Thomas Brooks, I am a tambour-worker, and live in Frederick-place, Goswell-road; the prisoner was my apprentice, and has been with me six or seven years. On the 28th of March I missed a sovereign from a work-box on a sideboard in the drawing-room—the box was locked—she was aware of my habit of leaving money in this box—I mentioned the loss of this sovereign to the whole of the girls—there were eighteen girls—I afterwards sent for a policeman—when he came I was up stairs with the prisoner—I asked her what possessed her to take it, as I was convinced she had taken it, by the money she had spent—she said she did take it, but did not know why she took it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. She has lost her mother and father? A. Yes—I had her from Islington workhouse—she is a parish apprentice—I have a great many such—they work ten hours and a half—they work over-hours—she has worked over-hours—I paid for what they did over-hours—they do not get their clothes by over-hours—I do not pay them anything except for over-time—I found that she had spent some of the sovereign in buying a pair of stays, and the rest in a pair of combs—about 7s. was spent in the whole—I think 7s. or 8s. were due to her for over-hours.

COURT. Q. Had she applied for that? A. No—the others have it put into the bank, and she would have had it done so, when it was sufficient—they begin work at seven o'clock in the morning, and have ten hours and a half work given them—they can be as long as they like with it—they finish work on Saturday the same as any other day—on Sunday they go to school and to church—I do not let them go out during the week, there is such a number of them they play about.

JAMES THOMPSON . I am a hairdresser, and live in Goswell-street On the 2nd of April the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for a shilling pair of side combs—I said we had shilling ones, but they were tortoise-shell, and very small, she had better have a common-pair—she had a pair which came to 8d.—she gave me a sovereign—I did not know who she was—I gave her a half-sovereign, and some half-crowns—I told her to be careful of the half-sovereign—she said, "Oh, if I lose it it is of no consequence, it is my own."

REBECCA EASTWOOD . I am one of the apprentices. I was desired by my mistress to watch what the prisoner might do—she went down stairs to the water-closet, and appeared to throw something down—I gave information to the forewoman, Miss Osborn.

HARRIET WELCH . I am one of the apprentices. I went with a light to the water-closet, and saw a half-sovereign and half-a-crown—I got them up.

JOHN HALL (police-constable G 190.) I took the prisoner—she said she had told her mistress all about it—she had spent part of the money in sending the other girls out for sweetmeats—she gave me part of a comb, and said that was part of the comb she had bought where she had changed the sovereign.

HARRIET HAYWARD . I am the wife of James Hayward. I am a searcher it the police-station in Featherstone-street—on the 10th of April I was directed to search the prisoner—she said she had not any money about her—when I came to undress her, she said, "These are the stays which I gave 2s. for out of the money; I changed the sovereign at a hairdresser's for a pair of combs, for 8d., and I bought a great deal of sweet stuff, and treated the other girls"—that she saw her mistress lay a sovereign on the table, and took it and kept it four days, as she thought her mistress would miss it, and that her mistress had got the rest of the money.

GUILTY. Aged 17.—Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury. Confined Eleven Days.

Reference Number: t18430508-1529

1529. WILLIAM TAPP was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, two decanters, value 9s. 6d., the goods of Richard Swinnerton.

JOHN SWINNERTON . I am the son of Richard Swinnerton, and live in Cumberland-row, Battle-bridge. These decanters belong to my father—I saw them in the possession of the prisoner—he went into Meek's house in Fifteen-foot-lane—I called the policeman—the prisoner ran out of the house, without the decanters—I afterwards went to Meeks' house, and there found the decanters—I then went to a house in Harrison-street, Gray's Inn-road—I found the prisoner, and gave him into custody—I knew him before.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How near is your father's house to Fifteenfoot-lane? A. It is at the back of my father's house—you go through a court to get to it—when I saw the prisoner it was half-past nine o'clock—it was dark—I was about ten yards from him—I was close behind him when he went into Meek's house—when he came out I was standing at the door—I hallooed "Police!" and tried to lay hold of him, when he ran through Hope-court, and another person struck me—I followed him to the Britannia public-house, and went in—he went into the tap-room, and sat down—there were a parcel of men there—I came out and hallooed "Police!"—when I went in again he was gone—I found him at home in bed about half an hour after—Harrison-street is about half a mile from my house—Meeks was in bed—the decanters were on the stairs—Meeks was not taken up—I believe he goes about thieving, and buys things that are brought to him—I am sure it was the prisoner I saw the first time.

EMMA MUNDAY . I live in Felix-street, Battle-bridge. On the night of the 12th of April, I saw the prisoner at the prosecutor's shop-door—I saw him take these decanters, and run down Fifteenfoot-lane—I knew him before, and am sure of him.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A stock-maker—I never had any quarrel with the prisoner—these are the same decanters as I saw outside—he took a pair like these.

GEORGE NOCK (police-constable G 99.) I went with John Swinnerton to apprehend the prisoner—I found the decanters at Fifteenfoot-lane, on the stairs—I found the prisoner in Harrison-street, where he lodges.

Cross-examined. Q. He was in bed, was he not? A. Yes, at his father's.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1530

1530. JOSEPH HOLLYHEAD was indicted for embezzlement.

GEORGE WHITWORTH . I am an oilman, and live in Strutton-gronud, Westminster. The prisoner was employed by me for ten or twelve months to go round to my customers and receive money—he ought to account to me the same evening as he received it—if he received 15s. from Mr. Malkern, he has not accounted to me for it—I did not see him again for four days after,

when I found him collecting orders from other customers, and then gave him into custody.

ROBERT MALKERN . I keep a general sale-shop in Albion-street, Lambeth. On the 4th of April I paid the prisoner 15s. on Mr. Whitworth's account—this is the receipt he gave me.

Cross-examined by MR. CROUCH. Q. How long have you dealt with the prosecutor? A. I cannot say—it was previous to the prisoner's coming—he collected once a week—he took orders at the time—I did not require the prosecutor's receipt for any of the monies—(read—"Receired for George Whit worth, 15s., on account; 4th of April: Joseph Hollyhead. Balance due, 6s. 10 1/2 d.")—it was usual to leave a balance—he was to receive this balance the next time.

JAMES STEVENS . I live in Wootton-street, Lambeth, and deal with Mr. Whitworth. On the 4th of April I paid 11s. 6d. to the prisoner on his account—he gave me this receipt.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you dealt with the prosecutor? A. About twelve months—I did not know the prisoner previous to his coming into Mr. Whitworth's employ.

GEORGE WHITWORTH . The prisoner has not accounted for 15s. of Mr. Malkern, or 11s. 6d. from Mr. Stevens.

cross-examined. Q. How long had he been with you? A. Ten or twelve months—he formerly came on commission—I was to give him 6s. a gallon for pickles, and so on—his time for being paid, was every Saturday night—he was on a salary at this time—when he came to me, I do not know whether he had any customers of his own—he went round to get customers—he has no commission now—there is no commission due to him—I allowed him 15s. a-week wages—when he was on commission he earned about 6s.—he has a wife and family—he retained some money about two months ago—it is put down in the book, and he was to pay it off, and he paid about a quarter of it—I never let him have money on any other occasion—he was then a defaulter to the amount of 3l. 8s. 4d., but in consideration of his wife and family, I took him again—he did not return to me every night, but it was his duty to do so—he has remained absent a day or two before—when he was a defaulter before, he staid away a day or two—I do not know what orders he received—when I took him he handed me a paper, but I had been after him, and had taken the orders—I do not remember that I ever applied to my customers for money which had been paid—the prisoner had a sale of hops besides what he did for me—I had a good character of him from a customer—it is not usual to have characters when persons come on commission.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1531

1531. MARY THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, 1 gown, value 10s.; 2 pictures and frames, 1s. 6d.; and 1 shilling; the property of John Crowson.

ANN CROWSON . I am the wife of John Crowson, of Hungerford-street, Commercial-road. The prisoner lived servant with a lodger of mine at Christmas last, and I took her as a lodger afterwards—she was to pay 1s. a-week for lodging and board—she worked at slop-work in the day, and went out in the evening, but I do not know where—she quitted my house rather abruptly, and I missed two pictures, a gown, and a shilling—I found the pictures at Raphael's, and the gown was at an eating-house—they are mine.

ELIZABETH RAPHAEL . I am the wife of Abraham Raphael, of Harper-place, Back-lane. I know the prisoner by her using my shop—she came and said she wanted to sell these two pictures for 1s. 6d. to make up her rent.

ROBERT SMITH . I keep an eating-house in Ratcliff-highway. On the 8th of April the prisoner brought this gown with a dirty wrapper round it—she said, "Let me leave this a little while"—I threw it under the table—I knew her very well—she had been to my shop, and appeared a quiet, harmless girl.

GEORGE ROGERS (police-constable K 182.) The prisoner was given into my charge by Mr. Crowson, on the 9th of April—she said she had got 1s. 6d. on the pictures, and told me where they were—she had only got 1/2 d. GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined One Week.

Reference Number: t18430508-1532

1532. ANN GRIFFIN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April, 2 1/2 pints of rum, value 4s. 6d.; 1 gallon of gin, 8s.; and 8 bottles, 1s. 6d.; the goods of William Pratt, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined One Month.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Reference Number: t18430508-1533

1533. JOHN BIRD and TIMOTHY GAVERGIN were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April, 10 cigars, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Ann Nightingale.

ANN NIGHTINGALE . I am a widow, and keep a tobacconist's shop in Bun-hill-row. On the night of the 16th of April I was in the back of my shop—the prisoners came in, went to the cigar-case, and took some out—I saw Bird with his hand full of cheroots—Gavergin might have had some, but I did not see them—my two sons ran out and caught them—there were ten cigars picked up—I call these cheroots—Cubas and Havannahs are cigars, but these are called Bengal cheroots.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1534

1534. ELIZA COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 2lbs. 8ozs. weight of pork, value 1s. 3d., the goods of Samuel Whatley.

JOHN BAPTIST . I am in the employ of Mr. Samuel Whatley, a cheesemonger in Tarling-street, St. George's-in-the-East. On the 10th of April the prisoner came to the shop—after she was gone, I missed two pieces of pork—I went after her, and just as I was going to lay hold of her, she threw the pork into the gutter—I took it up—it belongs to my master—she said she had not taken it.

Prisoner. I had not been outside above ten minutes. Witness. Yes, I saw you outside about three quarters of an hour—you had not two females with you in the street.

Prisoner's Defence. I went from the hospital, where I had left my child dead; I met a woman whom I know; she asked me to wait outside, as she wanted to buy something—she went in, and I waited—she came out, and two women came and walked behind—the shopman took hold of me, though I was not in the shop at all.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1535

1535. DAVID HENRY DONNEY and EMILY QUANTRILL were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March, 1 chair, value 1s.; the goods of William Bassett: and 2 flat-irons, value 2s.; 1 spice-box, 6d.; 22 yards of tick, 4s.; 4 yards of damask, 4s.; 6 inches of fringe, 2d.; 5 pieces of velvet, 1s. 6d.; 16 yards of lace, 2s. 8d.; 1 petticoat, 2d.; 1 stool, 6d.; 1 valence, 1s.; 1 shelf, 1s.; 5lbs. weight of wool, 10d.; 1 dish, 2d.; and 2 saucers, 2d.; the goods of Mary Simpson.

ANN SIMPSON . I live with my mother, Mary Simpson, a widow, in Charlton-street, Fitzroy-square—she is an upholsterer. At the end of Jan. the prisoners took a lodging at my mother's—after they had been there a few

weeks, they introduced another woman, and ultimately a fourth—I noticed Donney removing boxes and bundles from the premises, and on one occasion I followed him—Quantrill was with him, and the second woman whom he introduced, and who he stated was his sister—they went into the house at No. 3, Middleton-buildings, and Donney took the box which he had with him into the house—when their rent became in arrears, I went into their room, and missed two flat irons—I then gave Donney in charge—I went the same evening to the house, No. 3, Middleton-buildings, and there found several boxes, which were opened in my presence—I found in them several pieces of damask and velvet, which were my mother's cuttings, after she had been at work—the damask had been in a bottom drawer in the room occupied by the prisoners—I also found a chair at Middleton-street, which is the property of Mr. William Bassett, a lodger at my mother's.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How do you know these pieces? A. I have some others like them—I know all these things—I put this damask in the drawer myself—it agrees in quantity and colour with it—I know this bit of fringe, because I put the head of it on myself—here is my own work—there was a broker put in for the rent—this spice-box was in the room for what use they liked to make of it—Middleton-buildings is not far from my mother's, it is only the top of the street—when we searched at Middleton-buildings, Donney was in the station—I know that the boxes I saw there were what I had seen Donney take away—one of them was a leather trunk, with brass nails—I had seen it at my mother's.

WILLIAM JAMES (police-Constable E 146.) Donney was given into my custody for stealing two flat irons—I took him to the station—I went afterwards with Ann Simpson to No. 3, Middleton-buildings, to the front room on the first floor—I saw a light in the room, and Quantrill was burning some papers—she had got a piece of the chair, with which she was poking the lighted papers up the chimney—I forced open the door, and asked Quantrill what she was burning—she said she was going to make a fire—I found the articles here produced—I lifted this damask out of the box—she said, "That is mine; it is part of a dress"—I found this chair there.

JOHN SIMS HANCOCK(police-sergeant E 12.) I went to the front room on the first floor, in the house at No. 3, Middleton-buildings, and found part of a watch-stand, two saucers, a dish, a piece of green baize, a bolster-case, a parasol, 5lbs. and a-half of wool, a policeman's cape, two stares, a rattle, an armlet, and a bed valance.

HANNAH HARRIS . I am a widow, and lodge at Mrs. Simpson's—I remember the broker being in the prisoner's room—Donney came into the house, and said, if anybody dared to interrupt him he would shoot them—I said, sooner than he should shoot anybody, I would open the door—he went in—there was a great confusion; and he was taken into custody for stealing the irons, and in a short time Quantrill brought back the irons—she called out in the passage, in a jeering manner, "I have brought back the irons; what do you want more"—I know these things are Mrs. Simpson's.

MARY BASSETT . I am the wife of William Bassett—this chair is my husband's—I put it into the kitchen, out of my own room, as it was in the way.

THOMAS WITCHER . I live at No. 4, Middleton-buildings—No. 3 belongs to me, and I let it in lodgings—Donney took the first floor front room—Quantrill was with him—he asked me for the key, as he wanted to remove in immediately; and the night following he brought in some things—that was more than a fortnight before he was apprehended—I was present when the policeman took these things out of the boxes—Quantrill was in the room at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. I think you found a large trunk there? A. There was a large portmanteau or trunk there.

ANN SIMPSON re-examined. The rooms were taken of my mother.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where is your mother? A. She is in the country—I remember her telling the prisoners she wanted the back room for the children, during her stay in the country, and she gave them notice to quit—there were three weeks' rent owing, and they paid it all.

COURT. Q. Had Donney been removing things before your mother gave him notice? A. No—the box I saw him carry was a leathern trunk, with brass nails, that he kept his clothes in.

(Donney received a good character.)

DONNEY— GUILTY . Aged 23.—

QUANTRILL— GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Six Weeks.

Reference Number: t18430508-1536

1536. DAVID HENRY DONNEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 30th of Jan., 1 cape, value 5s., the goods of John Wray.—2nd Count, stating it to be the goods of the receiver of the Metropolitan Police district.—3rd Count, stating it to be the goods of George Miller Gibbs.

JOHN SIMS HANCOCK (police-sergeant E 12.) I found in a box on the first floor front room of the house No. 3, Middleton-buildings, a policeman's cape, a truncheon, and a rattle—I noticed on the cape the name and number, and where the broad arrow is usually put the piece cut out—I found this armlet there, but this might belong to the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What is the use of this armlet? A.

We wear them on the arm when we are on our beat.

GEORGE MILLER GIBBS (police-sergeant C 4.) The prisoner was a policeman in the C division, and quitted it in February last—in January, while he belonged to the division, I missed my police cape—this is it—the number is cut out, but I know it by three straps which I sewed on it myself—I had the use of it, but it was under the charge of the receiver, John Wray, Esq.—inquiry was made when I lost my cape, and I could not learn what had become of it.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you last see it? A. When I put it down in the station—the prisoner was a policeman about twelve months—I never had any quarrel with him, and I have no ill will to him—it must have been the latter end of January that I saw my cape last—they are sometimes taken by mistake when men are going out, and I supposed that was the case—the prisoner was not discharged for dishonesty—his beat was in Upper Brook-street—there is a shutter-box in that street—he never stated to me how he became possessed of the cape—he stated before the Magistrate that he found it in the shutter-box, but it was his duty to have reported at the station every thing he found—when I missed it the number was painted on the canvass. Thomas Witcher. I let the room at No. 3, Middleton-buildings, to the prisoner—it was in his occupation.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1537

1537. CHARLES SHORE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 2 printed books, value 6s., the goods of William Hunt Corfield; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ISSAC MASON . I keep a music-seller's shop, in Gray's Inn-passage. On the 11th of April I noticed the prisoner standing opposite Mr. Corfield's shop, which fronts mine—I saw him take two books from the shelf, put them under his coat, and walk away—I called to him, and he came back, with the books still under his coat—I then left him in charge of the prosecutor, as I had to go to my own shop—he had the books concealed under his coat.

Prisoner. When he called me I went to him; he took no books from me. Witness. I took him into the shop, with the books under his arm—as I went into the shop there were some books which I knocked down—I think, in the bustle, I might have taken these from under his coat, I cannot say.

WILLIAM HUNT CORFIELD . The prisoner was brought to my shop by Mr. Mason in charge—I saw these books, but whether they were given me by Mr. Mason or the prisoner, I do not know, owing to the confusion by knocking down a pile of books—Mr. Mason said, "Here is a man who has taken two books of yours, and these are the books," but whether he gave them me or the prisoner I do not know—the prisoner asked me to let him go, as I had never seen him there before—I said, "No, I have suffered too much from thieves"—I sent for the policeman, and gave him into custody—they are my books, and cost me 6s.

FREDERICK DANN (police-constable E 71.) The prisoner was given into my custody—the prosecutor gave me these books at the same time—the prisoner said nothing then, but in going to the station he asked how I thought he would get on.

THOMAS SCOTT (police-constable C 119.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—I was present when he was on trial—he is the same person—I took him on the 19th of last August, for stealing a pair of trowsers in St. Martin's-court—(read.)

Prisoner. I do not know this witness. Witness. I know you—he had the trowsers in the same way that he had these books under his arm.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1538

1538. JOHN HODGES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 17lbs. weight of currants, value 5s.; and 1/2 gallon of brandy, 12s.; the goods of the St. Katharine's Dock Company.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY POPE . I am a constable belonging to St. Katharine Docks. On the 11th of April, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going up the stairs in the Dock-house—the prisoner was a weigher in the Customs, but he was then acting as locker in the warehouse C—I believe he had no business through the dock-house—there is a regulation that they are not to go through the dock-house—as I was going up the staircase, I saw the prisoner going towards the back yard—he had his great coat on his arm—I watched him, and saw him underneath the door-way, between two doors, in a kind of arch-way—I saw him lift up his coat, and adjust it on his arm, and smooth it down—in consequence of what I saw and thought, I stopped him, as he was coming out of the gate opposite the Mint—I said, "What have you got here?"—he said, "Pray let me go back; let me go back"—I said, "No; I will see what you have got: you must come into the office"—I took him into the office, and searched his great coat—I found in the pockets two quart bottles of brandy, and his other pockets were full of currants, principally from Zante—I found in the coat pocket he had on two pint bottles of brandy, and his hat was nearly full of currants; he could scarcely keep it on his head—these are the currants and the brandy—there is a box on the quay, letter C, which he had the key of—he gave me the key—I opened the box, and in his desk I found 5lbs. of loose currants, similar to those he had on him—when I found these things, I asked him where he got them—he said he had them given to him—I said, "By whom?" and he said he could not tell me—he said the fact was, it was no use to get others into trouble; he would not tell me; he did not intend to tell me—he said he was very sorry for it—in the C

warehouse there is a large quantity of these currants; 2,000 barrels, or more—these are the currants that were on the prisoner—they weight 12lb.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. These are a mixture of dif-ferent sorts of currants? A. I believe they are—these come from Zante—there was a vessel in the dock unloading—I do not know that it came from Zante—it was called the Zante packet—I cannot say that I know of articles of this kind being given away by mates of those vessels—not such a quantity as this—I have known of some things being given—I have detected such things—it might have been smuggling—they were given by somebody on board, but they were not got out without paying the duty for them—I stopped them on many occasions, when I have no doubt that was the nature of the transaction—I know the prisoner to be an officer of the customs—I never knew anything particular of him—I know he deals in canary-birds—I do not know that he was in the habit of changing birds with the people in the vessels—I have known him sell birds—I never remember his selling them to mates of ves-sels.

RICHARD MARSHALL FARNCOMB . I am warehouse-keeper of the letter C warehouse in St. Katharine Docks—it is a fruit warehouse—the prisoner was doing duty at that warehouse as a customs locker, that is to unlock the ware-house in the morning, and to lock it at night—the Dock Company has the care of the warehouse, but he would have a double lock over the warehouse at night against me and all the world—in letter C warehouse there were butts of currants—they are very heavy—most of them weigh a ton—if the prisoner had been disposed, he had opportunities of taking the currants—the casks are bound down, but we are frequently opening them for grocers and others to look at—I have known thirty or forty opened in a day—I have looked at the currants produced from the prisoner's hat and pockets—currants are very similar—these are such as were in the tons in the C warehouse—on the 11th of April some of these currants had been landed from the Zante packet, but none of them had been warehoused—I suppose these currants were out of different casks, but they are so mixed you cannot distinguish them.

Cross-examined. Q. I presume they are there till they are taken out of bond? A. Yes; they are frequently opened during the day, for the purpose of being shown to customers—here are some which I took out of several packages and mixed them, to show that they will assimilate to those taken on the prisoner—I have taken some from the Zante packet, but they will not agree with those taken from the prisoner—they come in large packages and in small ones—they never leave any quantity in the vessels—I know that a quantity escape on the voyage—they mostly fall down amongst the cargo, and are lost—if they were found they would not be of much use—when the gro-cery have looked at the casks, they are nailed up, at soon afterwards as it is convenient—I do not know that any were opened on that particular day—when casks are opened, the foreman of the warehouse is present—he is not here—the prisoner had full access to where the Zante vessel was unpacking—I never heard of the mates of vessels giving a quantity of currants—I have heard of smuggling, which is getting articles out of bonded places, and not paying the duty-these currants were in a bonded place—the Zante packet is a ship.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Can you say of your own knowledge that these vessels of currants were open on the 11th of April? A. I was not present at the opening—there are some remaining open every day—the currants found on the prisoner are not at all like the rubbish dropped from a barrel—they are in a perfect state—this is a lump of, currants—they are pressed

down in the barrels very hard—I did not see these barrels open on the 11th of April.

HENRY POPE re-examined. I was present at the prisoner's first examina-tion, and heard him make a statement—I saw the Magistrate write—I have seen his writing on several occasions, and I believe this to be his signature to this deposition—(read)—" The prisoner, on being asked whether he wished to say anything in his defence, says, 'I have nothing to say; I throw myself on your mercy.'"

NOT GUILTY .

Fifth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1539

1539. JANE BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April, 2 salt-cellars, value 14s.; 1 cream-jug, 1l. 5s.; 1 mustard-pot, 1l. 1s.; 1 veil, 10s.; and 1 pair of trowsers, 5s.; the goods of Isaac Nathan, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1540

1540. MARY BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April, 1 desk, value 10s., the goods of Mary Dorville; and that she had been before convicted of felony; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 68.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1541

1541. JAMES TILL was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1542

1542. HENRY JONES and ROSA BARRY were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April, 1 bag, value 1s.; 6 sheets, 4l.; 2 table-cloths, 3l.; 6 pillow-cases, 6s.; 12 towels, 10s.; the goods of William Erie, Esq: 3 aprons, 8s.; 2 shifts, 8s.; 1 towel, 1s.; 1 petticoat, 2s.; and 1 cap, 1s.; the goods of Elizabeth Coates: 2 shirts, 6s.; 2 shirt-fronts, 2s.; and 2 cravats, 2s.; the goods of John Goater: 1 shift, 1s.; 3 towels, 3s.; and 2 aprons, 6d.; the goods of Hannah Benson: and that Jones had been before convicted of felony; to which

JONES pleaded GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

MARY BEVIS . I am in the service of Mrs. Cary, of Charlotte-street, Bed-ford-square. On the evening of the 10th of April, I was at my master's third floor front room window, and saw the prisoner Jones take a bag off a truck which was standing at our door—he ran down the street with it—I called out—I afterwards saw him brought back with it.

JOHN NEILAN . I am a laundryman, and live at Chelsea. I was with my truck at the house No. 17, Charlotte-street—I went inside the hall door, and while there I heard a cry from up stairs—I ran out—a policeman saw me running, and joined me—he ran faster than I did—I afterwards came up and found Jones in custody—there was a cab there—the cab-door was open, and I saw this bag of clothes, now produced, in it—it is the bag of clothes that was on my truck—I had received it at the house of Mr. Erie, in Bedford-square

SUSAN WILLIAMS . I am in the service of William Erle, Esq., of Bedford-square. On the evening of the 10th of April I delivered this bag of clothes to Neilan—here are six sheets and some other things belonging to Mr. Erie, some aprons and a shift belonging to Hannah Benson, a cap belonging to Eli-zabeth Coates, and two shirts and two shirt-fronts belonging to John Goater, the footman—I put another small bundle into the bag, but I did not examine the articles that were in that.

EDWARD HARRIS (police-constable E 50.) I saw Neilanrunning in Char-lotte-street—I received information from him—I went through Montague-court, and raised a cry of "Stop thief," ran round the houses and came into Russell-street again—Jones was then stopped, and was in the hands of two or three persons—I took him into custody—I saw a cab on the other side of the way in Russell-street—I said, "Where is the property?"—some one said, "It is in the cab"—I went to the cab with Jones, and took it out—I took Jones to No. 17, Charlotte-street, and then to the station—Barry followed to the station-house door, and the inspector told me to bring her in, which I did.

GEORGE BEOWN . I am driver of the cab, No. 1993. On the evening of the 10th of April, about half-past six o'clock, I was in Gower-street—I saw Barry standing alone on the pavement—she hailed me, and I pulled up to the pavement side—she told me to turn round, and asked me to have a glass of gin—we went into the public-house at the corner of Store-street, and had it—Jones then came up, and said, in Barry's presence, that be should want me in eight or ten minutes, and I was to go to the top of Russell-street—I left the prisoners in the public-house, and went to the corner of Russell-street—I waited about eight minutes—the prisoners then came to the cab together—Jones opened the door, Barry got in, Jones put the bag in, and then he got in also—they told me to drive to Hampstead as hard as I could, but I did not—I drove down towards the British Museum—I was then called to stop—I pulled up in the middle of the road—Jones opened the door, jumped out, and ran away—I jumped off my cab, and ran after him—a man stopped him at the corner of Museum-street—while I was gone, Barry escaped out of the cab—I gave information.

Barry, He said he could not swear that I got in first; I did not get in first; I was not with Jones. Witness. I awear she got in first, then the bundle, and then Jones.

BARRY.— GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1543

1543. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March, 1 sheet, value 2s., the goods of Eunice Hayles.

EUNICE HAYLES . I am single, and live at the Alton beer-house, in King-street, Hammersmith. On the 9th of March, the prisoner and his wife came to the house for a lodging—I let them one—next morning I went up to the room, and missed a sheet, a blanket, and a pillow—this is the sheet—it is mine, and was in the room when I let it—I made it myself—the prisoner and his wife both came down that morning—I did not see him, but I saw the woman at the bottom of the stairs—I asked where her husband was, and she said he was gone—here is no mark on the sheet, but I made it myself.

JAMES CHESHIRE (police-constable T 124.) I apprehended the prisoner the same morning—I found on him the duplicate of this sheet, and three other duplicates.

JAMES SELWYN . I am assistant to Mr. Wells, a pawnbroker, in Adam-row. On the 10th of March this sheet was pawned with me, I believe, by the prisoner—I gave this duplicate to the person who pawned it, and I have the corresponding one.

Prisoner. Q. Has the sheet ever been out of your possession? A. Never—I produced it at Kensington—I believe it was opened before the Magistrate—the prosecutrix said she knew it by the make.

Prisoner's Defence. I have only to say that it neither is, nor ever was, her property.

GUILTY . Aged 54.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1544

1544. THOMAS ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 1 pair of boots, value 8d., the property of William Bygrove.

ELIZABETH BYGROVE . I am the wife of William Bygrove, who keeps a marine-store shop in Church-row, St. George's-in-the-East. On the morning of the 11th of April, I was in a room opposite the shop—I saw the shop-door opened—I did not see who by—I went into the shop, and missed a pair of boots—I went up Martha-street—I knew the prisoner, and knew where he lived—I passed his door—he had one boot in his hand—I went to take hold of him—he ran down into the kitchen, and dropped it—I took it up—this is it—it is my husband's—there had been a pair of them.

WILLIAM HENRY WOOD . I live in John-street—I saw the prisoner go up the steps of Mr. Bygrove's shop, and take a pair of boots out of the window—he came out, and ran down Martha-street, and two more boys after him—Mrs. Bygrove came out, and I told her which way he had gone.

HENRY GOULD (police-constable K 79.) I took the prisoner—he cried, and said he begged the lady's pardon.

Prisoner, I am quite innocent.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.—Recommended to Mercy. Confined Ten Days, and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18430508-1545

1545. GEORGE HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April, 561bs. weight of lead, value 8s., the goods of Thomas William Wood, and fixed to a building.

GEORGE DOWNES (police-constable F 101.) On the 4th of April I was in Broad-street, St. Giles's, about nine o'clock at nighf, I saw the prisoner car-rying this lead under his arm, in this handkerchief, as a bundle—I asked where he got it, he said he bought it, but he should not tell where, it was not my business—I took him to the station, and weighed it—here is 561bs. of it—I received information, and went on the 7th of April to No. 32, King-street, Holborn—I fitted this lead on the head of the back dormer, and found it exactly corresponded with the mortar, the tiles, and the paint—here is paint on the lead, and there was on the dormer.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Who was with you? A. Collis the bricklayer—several houses had been taken down, quite as near to where I found the prisoner as that house was—the top of this dormer was fiat, and I have no doubt some of the others had windows of the same form—this lead exactly corresponded with the house in size and length, and everything—there are no nails in this piece—part of the lead is still missing, and there were nails in that—there is about one-third of it still missing—I will not wear it would not completely cover the dormer of one of the other houses which have been pulled down—I found no instrument for cutting lead on him.

AMBROSE COLLIS . I am a bricklayer. I was at work at the house, No. 32, King-street, it was under repair—I left at half-past five o'clock on the 4th of April—the lead was all safe on the dormer then—I went the next morning, and the lead was gone from the dormer—I was present when this lead was laid on the dormer—it exactly fits it as far as it goes—one piece of it is lost.

Cross-examined. Q. This does not agree in width with the dormer? A. No, it could not, as part of it is gone—it is the right length—I would swear this belonged to that dormer.

THOMAS WILLIAM WOOD . I live in Queen-street, Holborn. The house No. 32, King-street, belongs to the Duke of Bedford—I am the lessee—the lead on it belonged to me—I did not authorize it to be removed.

Cross-examined. Q. How does it belong to you? A. I have to keep it

in repair, and have a right to remove the lead, but I am not aware that it wanted removing—I will not undertake to swear that this lead belonged to that house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1546

1546. MARY ANN DAVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August, 2 blankets, value 5s.; 3 sheets, 5s.; 4 flat irons, 2s.; 2 coverlids, 2s.; 2 saucepans, 4s.; 1 poker, 1s.; 1 shovel, 1s.; 1 Italian iron, 6d.; 2 heaters, 6d.; and 1 pillow, 1s.; the goods of Thomas Kendrick.

MART KENDRICK . I am the wife of John Kendrick; we live in Leader-street, Chelsea, but in August we were living in Suffolk-mews—the prisoner and her husband had a furnished room of us in that house—these blankets, sheets, aud other things, were let them with the room—the prisoner left on the 25th of March, and I did not see her again till she was at the police-office—I missed the articles on the 26th of March—her husband did not leave till the 27th.

FREDERICK POOLS . I am shopman to Mr. Robertson, a pawnbroker in Mortimer-street—I produce a blanket pawned by the prisoner on the 31st of Aug., two sheets pawned by her in Sept. and Oct., an iron on the 25th of Mar., and some other things—she had pawned and redeemed these things again and again.

MARY CAMPBELL . I am the wife of Anderson Campbell, a broker. The prisoner sold me these two saucepans, bolster, Italian iron, and two heaters as her own property.

Prisoner. I never sold them to you, I brought them to pawn. Witness. You sold them to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GRORGE HINDERSON . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner on the 5th of April—she said she had done it, and was very sorry, but she hoped the prosecutor would not be very hard with her.

Prisoner. It was not my intention to rob; I should have replaced them, but we were not aware that they were going to move so soon.

GUILTY. Aged 43.—Recommended to mercy. Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1547

1547. JAMES OSBORN and MARY OSBORN were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December, 1 quilt, value 1s.; 1 set of fire-irons, 2s.; 1 pillow, 2s.; and 1 sheet, value 2s.; the property of Ann Carman, to which

MARY OSBORN pleaded GUILTY . Aged 41.— Confined Four Months.

ANN CARMAN . I live in Crown-court, Liquorpond-street, and am a widow. The prisoners lodged in a room in my house for about sixteen weeks—I had suspicion, but was not allowed to go in the room while they were "there—when I went in with the policeman, I missed the articles stated—the tickets were given up—these are my property.

HENRY LAWRENCE . I am shopman to a pawnbroker—these fire-irons were pawned I believe by Mary Osborn, but I cannot swear positively to her—this is the duplicate I gave for them—I have a quilt and a sheet, but I do not know who pawned them.

WILLIAM CAULCOTT . I am shopman to a pawnbroker—this pillow was pawned by Mary Osborn.

ROBERT ANDREWS . I am a policeman. I found some of these duplicates on the man, and some on the woman.

JAMES OSBORN— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1548

1548. CHARLES MOATE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 1 box, value 3d.; and a 1/2lb. weight of cigars, 8s., the goods of Willliam Obbard.

HENRY LOCKYER . I am a policeman. On the night of the 21st of April I was in King-street, Westminster—I saw the prisoner running towards me with this box of cigars under his arm—I stopped him, and asked him where he had got them—he said he had picked them up in the road—he was fifteen or twenty yards from the prosecutor's shop—I took him to the shop, and asked the witness if she had missed these cigars—she went to the other side of the shop, and said she had—I took him to the station, and then he said a boy gave them to him.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Did he not say about the boy the first time? A. No.

MARGARET MATILDA OBBARD . I live with my father, William Obbard, a tobacconist, in King-street, Westminster. The prisoner was brought to the shop by the policeman, with this box of cigars, which had been safe five minutes before—they are my father's.

GEORGE FREDERICK OBBARD . I live with my father. This box is his—I know it by this mark on it.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.—Recommended to mercy. Confined Fourteen Days.

Reference Number: t18430508-1549

1549. CHARLES MOON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April, 2 half-crowns, and 1 shilling, the monies of Henry Johnson.

MARY JOHNSON . I am the wife of Henry Johnson; we live in Park-place; the prisoner lives in the same house. On the 6th of April I went out, and left the prisoner to take care of my children—I told him I had put two half-crowns and a shilling under a china basin on the mantel-shelf, and if the land-lord called, to give it him—I came home in the afternoon, he was then gone, and the money was gone also—I saw him next day, and he told me he had given the landlord the money—the landlord came on the Tuesday following—the prisoner saw him, and ran away—I got a policeman, and went to a baker's shop in Milton-street—I found him there, and the officer took him—I asked what he meant by telling me that story, and he said he would pay it again.

JAMES ELMER . I am a policeman. I found the prisoner at the baker's shop—in going to the station he said he had bought a pair of stockings, and paid for another boy to go to the play with him.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Ten Days, and Whipped

NEW COURT.—Friday, May 12, 1843.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18430508-1550

1550. EDWARD JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 1 pair of trowsers, value 19s., and 1 handkerchief, 1s., the goods of Edward Kite; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1551

1551. MARTHA SPIRIT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 1 shawl, value 7s., 1 pair of boots, 2s., and 2 yards of ribbon, 1s., the goods of Robert Glendenning, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months, the three last Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18430508-1552

1552. EUSTACHE FENDT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April, 1 penny, and 18 halfpence, the monies of George Armstrong, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Month.

Reference Number: t18430508-1553

1553. JAMES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April, 17lbs., weight of cheese, value 8s., the goods of William Prestige; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1554

1554. SAMUEL MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, 1 basket, value 5s.; and 42 loaves of bread, 1l. 6s.; also for embezzling, on the 19th of April, 5s. 11d.; and on the 20th of April, 2s. 9 3/4 d.; and 2s. 5 1/4 d.; the goods and monies of John Watson, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1555

1555. JOSHUA JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 2 metal cocks, value 2s.; and 3lbs. weight of brass, 2s.: also, on the 1st of April, 4 metal cocks, 4s.; and 2lbs. weight of brass, 1s.; the goods of James Pelton and another, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1556

1556. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May, 3 weights, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Sewell; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Three Months, and Twice Whipped.

Reference Number: t18430508-1557

1557. ALFRED ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April, 1 blanket, value 3s., the goods of Ann Goulding; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined ThreeMonths.

Reference Number: t18430508-1558

1558. THOMAS TILL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April, 11lbs. weight of brass, value 11s.; and 8lbs. weight of copper, 5s.; the goods of Sir Henry Meux, Bart., and another, his masters: to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 48.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1559

1559. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. ELLIS and BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

JESSEY RICHARDS . I am the wife of John Alfred Richards—his mother keeps a chandler's shop in Chelsea—about ten minutes past seven o'clock on the 21st of April, the prisoner came and asked for change for a half-crown—I gave him 1s., two sixpences, and sixpenny worth of halfpence—I put the half-crown in a drawer—there was no other silver there loose—there was some wrapped in a piece of paper—I put it away from other money—in a quarter of an hour or ten minutes I went to the drawer, and found the half-crown, and no other money—I gave it to my father-in-law—I am sure it was the one I took of the prisoner.

WILLIAM HENRY RICHARDS . Jessey Richards gave me a half-crown—I examined, and found it was a bad one—I went in search of the prisoner, and I found him in custody—I had seen him in the shop in the evening—I gave the same half-crown to Roberts.

JOHN PEARCE RAPKIN . I keep an eating-house in Bermondsey-place—about a quarter to eight in the evening of the 21st of April, the prisoner came to my shop, which is about 200 yards from Richards'—he asked for two-pennyworth of plum-pudding—he put down a half-crown—I took it up—I said it was bad—he said he hoped not—I asked him several questions—he

said he took it in Marylebone—I came round by the shop-door, and he immediately ran away—I went after him, and called "Stop thief"—he was stopped by a man, and turned back—I took him—Roberts came up after I had taken him into a public-house—I kept the half-crown separate from other money—I gave it to Roberts—it was not out of my sight.

JOHN ROBERTS (police-constable D 180.) The prisoner was given into my custody—I produce two half-crowns, one of which I got from Rapkin, and one from Richards—I searched the prisoner, and found nothing on him—here was another man given into custody—I found four half-crowns on him—I had not seen him in company with the prisoner myself.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint—these are both counterfeit, and both cast in one mould.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1560

1560. EDWARD COATES was indicted for a like offence.

MESSRS. ELLIS and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

SARAH HORROCKS . I am the wife of James Horrocks, who keeps the Victoria beer-shop in Strutton-ground, Westminster—the prisoner frequented my shop—on the 29th of April he had run up a score at my shop, and that evening he asked me to lend him some money to buy a pair of shoes—I told him I would not lend any money, but I had a pair of boots I had bought for my son which he might have—he put them on, and said they did very well—he was to give me 5s. for them—he went away, came back in half an hour, and paid me for the score—he gave me a five-shilling-piece—I gave him a fourpenny-piece and a 6d. out—I put the crown in my pocket—in about five minutes he gave me another crown, and said he would take the boots with him—I put both the crowns in my pocket—I had no other there, only one shilling—I gave the crowns to my husband—I after that gave them to the police—these are them.

Prisoner. Q. How did you discover they were bad? A. As soon as his back was turned, I said to my husband, "They are bad," and he went after him, but could not find him—I said he was coming back in half an hour, but he did not come back at all—the next morning I gave information—I did not hand them round among my customers—he drank some beer while I was reaching the boots—he had it out of the 5s. for the boots.

WILLIAM NOWLAN (police-constable B 56.) I had the prisoner in charge—I took him to Horrocks' house—he said if she would return him the two five-shilling-pieces, or destroy them, he would pay her—I got these two crowns there.

MR. JOHN FIELD . These crowns are both counterfeit, and both cast in one mould.

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1561

1561. WILLIAM GADD was indicted for unlawfully having counterfeit coin in his possession.

MESSRS. ELLIS and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE TREW (police-constable H 125.) On the evening of the 22nd of April, I was with Malin in the passage of the Wonderful Man beer-shop, in Whitechapel—the prisoner was there—I went behind him, and laid bold of his arm—I heard something drop—I picked up a counterfeit shilling, and saw Malin pick up something—I found one shilling on the prisoner in copper, but no silver—he said, "That man who is just gone out or you have dropped them yourself"—that is not true—the prisoner dropped them—this is the shilling I took up.

Prisoner. Q. How came you to pull that young man out from the door? A. I did not.

THOMAS MALIN (police-constable H 74.) I was with Trew—I heard something fall from the prisoner, after I had laid hold of him—I picked up fire counterfeit shillings—there was no one else in the passage.

MR. JOHN FIELD . These six shillings are all counterfeit, and all cast in one mould.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sitting in this beer-shop—a young man called me out—I went with him—I did not know what he wanted—directly I came to the door with this man, these two policemen rushed in, and the young man dropped something—I could not see what—they pulled him out, and took me—a man said, "Why do you not take the man that ran past you?"—they said, "Mind your own business."

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18430508-1562

1562. CHARLES THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, 4 spoons, value 2l. 10s.; and 2 forks, 1l. 10s.; the goods of William Manning, his master.

WILLIAM MANNING . I am a captain in the East India Company's service, and live in Euston-square—the prisoner was my footman—I left town on the 20th of April—I left some spoons and forks at home—these are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. HUDDLESTON. Q. How long had he been in your service? A. Since the 5th of December—I left only a dozen of each in his charge—there was other plate in the house in an iron chest, which I had the key of—I lost four spoons and two forks—I know these spoons and forks by their general appearance, and by my crest.

JOSEPH BURGESS . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner brought these spoons to me—I made inquiries and gave him into custody—he said the crest on them was his father's.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe he said he had some little money to make up? A. Yes, and afterwards he told me they belonged to his master, Captain Manning, of Euston-square.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1563

1563. ALICE THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April, 1 purse, value 6d.; 3 sovereigns, and 2 10l. Bank notes; the property of George Dickinson, from his person.

GEORGE DICKINSON . I am master of the Retrenchment, of Boston, in Lincolnshire. I was at the Nag's Head, Tower-hill, on the 5th of April—there was a concert there—I met the prisoner—I spent the evening there in company with her and some others—I had two 10l. notes, three sovereigns, and some silver—I had the notes from Robarts, Curtis, and Co., Lombard-street, for a cheque—the prisoner and I drank together some part of the evening—I missed these notes next morning—I was intoxicated—these are the notes.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. The prisoner sat next to you at the concert? A. Yes—I was sober when I went in—I did not feel the effects of the liquor till I went out—I believe I did not sleep alone that night—I left the concert about a quarter to twelve—the prisoner came ont of the room with me, and we went one way some few yards—I was walking down to go on board my vessel, and picked up another person—I remained with her till six in the morning—when I awoke in the morning I found my property was gone, and gave her in charge for robbing me—I thought she might have got it.

HENRY GOLLINGS . I gave a ticket for the concert to the prosecutor—the

prisoner asked him for one, and he gave her one—they went up, and were drinking together.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there a good many persons in the room? A. Yes—the admission money is 2d.

THOMAS JOHN BLAKE (police-constable, K 137.) I took the prisoner at the Ship and Sailor, Rosemary-lane, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening of the 6th of April—I found some gowns and shawls by her side, some were new and some second-hand—she said they were hers—I asked where she got them—she refused to tell me, and I took her to the station.

Cross-examined. Q. You had taken another person before? A. Yes, and found nothing on her.

MARY DOUGLAS . I am searcher at the station. The prisoner was brought in by Blake—I searched her—I saw something in her mouth—I asked her what she had got—she said "Nothing"—I called the police—I saw her pull something out of her mouth, and throw it on the floor—I picked it up and gave it to the policeman—he opened it—it was this 10l. note—I have kept it in my possession ever since.

ROSETTA JOSEPHS . I live in Rosemary-lane. I sold this silk dress to a young woman, on the 6th of April—I do not know who.

WILLIAM WAITE . I am a shoemaker, and live in Whitechapel. I sold these boots to a female—I do not know who.

EMMA SANDER . I keep a shop in Whitechapel. I sold this Tuscan bonnet to the prisoner.

JOSEPH MINSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Robarts and Curtis. This note is one of those I paid for this cheque.

Cross-examined. Q. To whom did you pay the money? A. I have no recollection—I paid it on the 4th of April to a man—here is the cheque—I paid it and cancelled it.

GEORGE DICKINSON re-examined. This is the cheque I received the notes for—I had it from Douglas and Son.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18430508-1564

1564. GEORGE GIBBS and EDWARD GIBBS were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 1 shawl, value 7s.; 2 shifts, 2s.; and 1 pair of drawers, 2s.; the goods of Elizabeth Sarah Parsons: to which

GEORGE GIBBS pleaded GUILTY . * Aged 19.— Confined One Year.

MICHAEL PURCELL . I am gardener to John Kelly, who lives near Hampstead. Between three and four o'clock, on the 4th of April, I was at work in my garden, and saw the two prisoners on the road—George left Edward, went across the road, opened the gate, and went to the door of Mr. Kelly's house, tried the door, and went in—Edward was walking about in front of the house—George came out with a bundle, and went to Edward—I called to the bricklayers for assistance—we followed and took them—they both came up to the gate together.

ELIZABETH SARAH PARSONS . I am single. I was doing needle-work for Mrs. Kelly, on the 13th of April—I took a shawl, two shifts, and a pair of drawers to Mrs. White's to mangle—I left them at Mrs. Kelly's—I missed them—these are them—this shawl is mine.

HENRY PEARCE . I was at work at Mr. Kelly's house—I saw Edward come up to the gate—he asked for a job, and said he was a plasterer—we told him our job was nearly finished—he went from the gate, and left us—I saw no more of him till the gardener ran down to say that something was the matter—I ran out, and saw George—I pursued, and he chucked down

these things—I sent my brother after Edward, who I saw as I was running after George.

GEORGE PEARCE . I am a bricklayer. I was working for Mr. Kelly—I saw both prisoners—Edward asked me for a job—I said we had nothing for him to do—I went back to my work, and a few minutes after the gardener called us—I ran and saw George with a bundle under his arm—I ran out, and said, "You drop those things," which he did—I picked them up—Edward was close by—he came up to me—I said, "I think you are one of the party"—I stopped him till the others came back, and took them into Mr. Kelly's house.

Edward. He said, "I shall get 3s. 6d. a day for making a Newgate job of it." Witness. No, I did not

ELIZABETH WHITE . I mangled these things, and sent them to Mrs. Kelly's.

RUTH LOVE . I took these things home.

MART PURCELL . I took them of Love, and laid them on the kitchen drawers.

Edward's Defence. We were both looking for work—I went to ask for a job—I knew nothing about where my brother was gone.

EDWARD GIBBS— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1565

1565. HENRY STOCKS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March, 1 hammer, value 1s., the goods of Samuel Wheater, his master.

SAMUEL WHEATER . I live in Golden-lane, St. Luke's. The prisoner occasionally works for me—I missed this hammer—it is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. HUDDLESTON. Q. Does any person livewith you? A. Yes, Mr. Crown, and his wife and son—there is a little bit knocked off this hammer—it is chipped in the face—I know it by its general appearance—I do not owe the prisoner any money—I have paid him his wages.

EDWARD WILLIAMS . I am a publican. The prisoner has been in the habit of using my house—he left me some duplicates—I lent him a half-crown on them—one of the duplicates enabled me to get this hammer out—I was to get these tools out, and then afterwards to let him have them as he could redeem them.

WILLIAM BURGESS . I am waiter to Mr. Williams—he gave me some duplicates, and I went to Mr. Hayes's, a pawnbroker, and gave him the duplicate—he gave me this hammer.

MR. HUDDLESTON called

----STOCKS. I am the prisoner's mother—his father has an engine to pieces, and his master said if he lost any more time he must go for good—my husband has got such a hammer as this, and he gave a large bag of tools, and such a hammer as this, to my son.

SAMUEL WHEATER re-examined. I have used this hammer myself a hundred times.

Cross-examined. Q. How many hammers have you got like this? A. No other—I am satisfied this is mine—the prisoner did not leave any hammer when he left my service.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1566

1566. HENRY STOCKS was again indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of January, 1 wrench, value 5s., the goods of Henry Fairbank, his master.

HENRY FAIRBANK . I am a tool-maker, and live in Old-street, St. Luke's. I missed a wrench—I believe this one to be mine—I will not swear to it.

EDWARD WILLIAMS . This is a wrench that was got out of pawn with the duplicates, which I got from the prisoner.

WILLIAM BURGESS . I went to the pawnbroker's, and got this wrench.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1567

1567. HENRY STOCKS was again indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March, 1 stake, value 4s., the goods of Samuel Wheater, his master.—2nd Count, stating it to be the goods of William dark.

SAMUEL WHEATER . I lost a coppersmith's stake, among other things—I know this, because I put this head on it—it is an unusual thing to turn a stake like this—I had a difficulty to get it in the turning lathe.

Cross-examined. Q. How many have you had in your time? A. I never had but one in my life—this is my property, I swear—Mr. Clark is a coppersmith, in Sun-street—he sent it to me to be repaired, and I am responsible for it—I have not been talking to the constable in this case—there was no occasion for it—I did not show this mark that is on it to the Magistrate, because I was not asked—I have not said one word about it till to-day—there was no occasion—I have seen this mark before many times—it was repaired, and sent home—the head of it split, and it came to be repaired again—I have not heard that an article of this description was in pawn before it came to me—there is a little nick under the collar—it is used for planching scales, and the size of the head makes a difference in the size of the scales—I have made scales myself, but what I made were generally flat—this is a sort of tool which would be in possession of a person who makes scales—the prisoner did not see Mr. Clark come to the house with this.

CHARLES CLARK . I am a coppersmith, working with my father, William Clark. This is my father's stake—I sent it to Mr. Wheater, in Golden-lane—in April the prisoner brought it to me to sell—I told him it was my father's, and detained it—I am positive he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is your shop? A. In Great Sutton-street—my father sent the stake to Mr. Wheater about three months before it was brought for sale.

WILLIAM BURGESS re-examined. Q. Did you see the tickets? A. I did—I gave them all back to the pawnbroker—there was not one for this among them.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Five Days.

Reference Number: t18430508-1568

1568. JOHN PROWSE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April, 1 fender, value 10s., the goods of Abraham James.

ABRAHAM JAMES . I am an ironmonger, and live in Grenada-terrace, Commercial-road. I saw this fender safe about seven o'clock, on the 17th of April, and missed it next morning—this is it.

FREDERICK PICKERING (police-constable K 87.) I stopped the prisoner with this fender on the 17th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening—I asked where he got it—he said he picked it up—he was about half a mile from the prosecutor's.

Prisoners Defence. I was going to Blackwall; this fender laid down; I took it up, and carried it openly.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1569

1569. JOHN FLINT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March, 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; and 3 10l. and 17 5l. Bank-notes; the property of Charles Robert Rose, from his person.

MR. WILKINS conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES ROBERT ROSE . I am a tobacconist, and live in the Hackney-road. On the 7th of March I presented a cheque for 150l., at the house of Barclay and Co., in Lombard-street—I got it cashed in 5l. and 10l. notes,

and five sovereigns—I put them into a pocket-book in my inside pocket—I paid away 35l. of it—I got home between three and four o'clock in the afternoon—I found the prisoner and my wife there—I had known him six or seven months—after I had been at home some time, I and the prisoner went to a public-house to drink, and from thence to a brothel—we staid there all night, and the following morning went to the Royal Oak, and played at skittles—I had occasion to change a 5l. note there—I took my pocket-book out of my side pocket to get at the note—the prisoner saw that—the note was inside other notes, and I had to unroll them—I counted my money, and I had then 115l.—I returned my pocket-book back—I and the prisoner went back again to the brothel, and while I was there Procter came for me in a cab—I, and the prisoner, and Mr. Procter went back again home—when I got home my book was safe—I had a couple of box tickets given me to go to the City Theatre—I and Procter went to the Theatre, leaving the prisoner at home with my wife, and on leaving my home, my wife said, in the prisoner's hearing, "My dear, you had better leave your pocket-book at home"—I did not do it—the play was over at ton minutes past twelve—Procter and I returned home—the prisoner was at my house then—Procter said to my wife, "I have brought your husband home safe and sound, and his pocket-book in bis pocket"—the prisoner must have heard that my pocket-book was in my pocket—I put my hand upon it—my waistcoat was but-toned up—Procter then left—he said, "Good night, Mr. Rose"—I fell asleep—my wife, the prisoner, and the servant-girl were in the room at the time—after I had been asleep some time, I was awoke by my wife—my waistcoat was then unbuttoned, and my pocket-book and its contents gone, and the prisoner was gone—I gave information to the police the next day, and gave a description of the prisoner—I next saw him when I went with the superintendent to Eastbourn, in April—I cannot tell the day when he was apprehended—I said to him it was a hard thing that he should rob me when I had behaved so much like a friend, a brother, and a father to him.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. What time did you get this cheque changed? A. Between twelve and one o'clock—the prisoner was in the habit of being at my house almost every day—I went with him between six and seven at night—I had no dinner that day—we went to a public-house between seven and eight, and remained there till between nine and ten—I do not know the public-house—we were drinking together—I did not get drunk—we went to a brothel in Plumber's-row, Commercial-road—we found company there, and remained there all night, and the next morning, between ten and eleven we went to the Royal Oak, and had something to drink—we went back to the brothel, between one and two—a message was sent to Procter to say that I was there spending my money, and he came for me—I did not spend above 1l. or 30s.—I was not giving my money away—I swear I did not take out my pocket-book at the brothel—the only time I pulled it out, was at the Royal Oak.

JOSEPH PROCTER . I keep a beer-shop in the Hackney-road. I live next door to the prosecutor. On the afternoon of the 8th of March, in consequence of something the prosecutor's wife said, I went to fetch the prosecutor from a brothel, in Plumber's-row, Commercial-road—I found him and the prisoner there, from two to four o'clock in the afternoon—I took them to the prosecutor's house in a cab—I left the prisoner and prosecutor there for a short time—I went into the house with them—in the course of the evening I went to the play with Rose, leaving the prisoner and Mrs. Rose in the house—we returned at twelve—I went into the prosecutor's house, and saw Mrs. Rose and the prisoner, and the servant, in the parlour—I said to Mrs. Rose, "Here

he is, Mrs. Rose, according to my word, safe and sound, and there is his book and his money," pointing to his waistcoat—previous to our going to the theatre, I saw the pocket-book and its contents on my counter, and all the evening, if I turned and looked towards him, I could see the corner of the book in his waistcoat—I had seen Rose count his notes previous to his going to the theatre, and he put the book into his inside waistcoat pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew where to find him? A. Yes, his wife knew, and she knew the prisoner was with him—I found they were both rather drunk, but both capable of contracting business—I have known the prosecutor from five to six months, and we have been intimate—he was in a fit state to go to the play after I brought him home—he asked me to go with him—he had had two tickets given him—we did not go to any place to drink before we went to the theatre—previous to going, he took out the book and laid it on my counter, and counted his money—there were a great many bank-notes—I did not tell him he had been giving away large sums of money—I have known the prisoner from four to six months—he was at one time more than half his time at the prosecutor's.

JANE ROSE . I am the prosecutor's wife. In consequence of information, on the 8th of March, I sent Mr. Procter to fetch my husband home—he brought him and the prisoner home—my husband went to the play with Procter—they returned between twelve and one o'clock, and Procter said, "I have brought your husband home safe and sound, and his money is all right"—Procter left the house, and my husband fell asleep on my arm—I saw his pocket-book safe in his pocket, and the corner was sticking out—after he had fallen asleep I sent the servant out for half-a-pint of porter for my supper—I was called into the shop to a customer, and left my husband asleep, and the prisoner with him in the parlour—while I was in the shop the prisoner passed round the counter, wished me a very good night, and told me he should see me again in the morning—I returned to my husband about two minutes after, he was still asleep—his waistcoat was buttoned before I went out, and when I returned it was unbuttoned, all but one button—I screamed out, "Where is your pocket-book?" and aroused him—I went after the prisoner, but did not see him again till he was at Worship-street.

Cross-examined. Q. About how long after Procter went were you sitting with the prisoner? A. My husband left me about seven o'clock, and the prisoner was sitting with me occasionally from then till my husband came home—I do not eat or drink anything when my husband is out, because of his absence, as I have a shop to attend to—I knew where my husband and the prisoner came from—I did not remonstrate at being left alone with the man who had taken my husband to that place—I took the prisoner for a friend, but he has proved a foe—I have been very much injured, and am not fit to stand here at this moment—I was glad for any one to keep me company—I was quite as capable of observing the pocket-book that night as I am at this moment, and far better—I have not been taking anything to-day—no more I had that night.

MR. WILKINS. Q. Why are you not capable of standing here? A. I am unwell—my illness is the result of my husband's indiscretion—I have had nothing but a glass of porter and a cup of coffee to-day.

JOHN MITCHELL . I am a clerk in the bank of Barclay and Co., of Lombard-street. The prosecutor came to the bank on the 7th of March, and drew 150l.—I paid him nineteen 5l. notes, five 10l. notes, and 5l. in cash.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you pay the cheque yourself? A. Yes, I took down the numbers of the notes I gave him on this cheque—the 5l. notes were Nos. 94616, 94617, 94618, 81926, 94200, 94199, 94351, 94352, 81242, 87699, all dated the 13th of April, 1843; and 22321, 10976, 20062, 28210,

13306, 13307, 1436, 20577, 32061. of the 11th of Feb.—the 10l. notes were Nos. 50946, 50947, 50948, 39872, 66327, dated the 10th of January.

ROBERT JOHN WARD . I am landlord of the Britannia, South wark-bridge-road. On the 9th of March the prisoner came to my house, and had some refreshment in front of the bar—he tendered me a 5l. Bank-note—I hesitated to give him change for some time, but he referred to two or three names in the neighbourhood, and I gave him change—he gave me the name of Flint, of Reigate—I paid away the note to a corn-chandler, and he has paid it away since—this is it—its number is 81242.

HENRY HABBIGAM . I live at the William the Fourth, George-street, Blackfriars-road—the prisoner came to my house on the morning of the 9th of March—he took breakfast, and I afterwards accompanied him to a Mrs. Stevens, a butcher—he gave her a note.

SARAH STEVENS . I am the wife of John Stevens, a butcher in George-street, Blackfriars-road—Habbigam came to our shop on the 9th of March, with another man—I do not know who—I gave change for a 5l. note to that man—Mr. Flint, of Reigate, was the name given with the note—I wrote it on the note—I did not take account of the number—this is the note—(produced by Mr. Beamish)—it has my writing on it.

MARY MOORE . I am the wife of James Moore, who keeps the Goldsmith's Arms, in Southwark-bridge-road. On the 9th of March the prisoner came for some refreshment—he asked me for change for a 10l. note—I did not touch it, but I saw it—I could not change it—he had what I supposed to be the other notes.

HENRY ELMES . I am inspector of police at Brighton. I took the prisoner at the Horse and Groom, near Eastbourne, in Sussex—I charged him with robbing Mr. Rose of bank-notes to the amount of 115l.—he made no answer—I searched him, and found on him a letter and this hand-bill.

Cross-examined. Q. What were the words you used? A. I said, "I take you on suspicion of robbing Mr. Rose"—I will not swear whether I mentioned the amount—(hand-bill read—"Twenty pounds reward. Whereas, on the morning of the 9th instant, there were stolen from the person of Charles Robert Rose, of No. 4, Hackney-road, Bethnal-green, a pocket-book containing notes to the amount of 115l. Suspicion is attached to a man named James Flint; he is a butcher by trade, and occasionally deals in horses"—(here followed a description of the prisoner.)

JOHN FERGUSON SMITH BEAMISH . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I have a 5l. note paid in on the 13th of March, another, 81242, paid in on the 13th of March, and several others—I have compared them with the notes read by the banker's clerk.

GUILTY . Aged 43.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1570

1570. JOHN CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 1 sack, value 1s.; and 3 bushels of beans, 14s.; the goods of Daniel Wilshin, his master.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

JOSEPH HENCHER . I work for Mr. Morton, a maltster. I loaded twenty-two sacks of split beans on Wilshin's cart on Friday, the 21st of April—the prisoner helped to carry them out—when I left the cart there were only the twenty-two sacks in it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What time did you leave it? A. Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon—these beans were sent to my master by Mr. Wilshin to be dried and split—I loaded them, by my master's orders, from his malt-house—I counted them over before I put them into the cart, and after.

JOHN CHAMP (police-constable T 137.) Early in the morning of the 22nd of April I was on duty in the Uxbridge-road—the prisoner came up to the Coach and Horses, at Ealing, with his cart and horses—he went to the shed to the ostler, and asked if he would buy a sack of beans—the ostler said he had no money—I watched, and saw the prisoner and the ostler come out of the shed, go up to the cart, and awake the boy who was in it—they said, "Where is he gone?" meaning me, I suppose—the boy pointed to where I was gone, and said, "Over there"—the cart went on—I went after it, and stopped it—I asked the prisoner what he had got on the cart—he said twenty-two sacks of split beans—I asked if he had got any more—he said no—I got up into his cart, and found a sack of whole uncleaned beans, and after I got to London I found twenty-two sacks of split beans—I asked where he got the uncleaned beans from—he said he did not know, neither should be satisfy me how they came there—I took him to the station, and found on him a bunch of keys, and one single key which is filed very much at the point.

Cross-examined. Q. How near were you when you heard this conversation? A. Ten or twelve yards—I could not see the parties then—It was a dark night.

JOHN PASCAL (police-sergeant T 19.) Champ brought the prisoner to the station, at Ealing—I asked how he came by the beans—he said there was another cart gone up the road with two sacks of beans, under some straw, belonging to Mr. Wilshin—I said, "That is not an answer"—he said, "I have no more, and we were ordered to load them, and there is another cart gone up with two sacks of the same sort under the straw"—I went to Mr. Wilshin, and told him—I then asked him for the key of his barn where the beans were threshed—the barn was open, and there was a man at work there—I tried the key taken from the prisoner, and it opened the look of the barn—I said to the prisoner, "How this key has been filed about"—he said he did it, to make It fit his corn-bin lock—I tried it to his corn-bin lock, and it would not go in it.

JASON WILSHIN . I live at Hayes; my father carries on a large farm there; the prisoner was his carman. I saw the sack in which the uncleaned beans were, on the Saturday, at Brentford—it is one of my father's—on Friday I had written a ticket for twenty-two sacks of split beans—I laid it on the table, as I always do for the men, if they are gone to bed—it would have been his duty to go with these beans between one and two o'clock in the morning—I have examined the beans found in the prisoner's possession, and compared them with the bulk in the barn—I believe them to be part of the the same beans—they are the same kind in all respects as those in my father's barn—I never sent out beans in that state—the padlock and key produced belong to my father.

DANIEL WILSHIN . I carry on this farm at Hayes. The prisoner had no right to have a key to the barn, or to have access to the barn—when the officer brought this key it would not open any building besides this barn.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you other carts? A. Yes; two more went up the same night, one with hay and one with straw, and one had a quarter of beans and a ton of straw.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Six Months.

Sixth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1571

1571. JOHN PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May, 1 watch, value 8s., the goods of William Gradey Mott.

ROBERT STEVENS . I am shopman to William Gradey Mott, a jeweller. On the evening of the 9th of May the prisoner came and asked to look at a watch from 30s. to two guineas—I showed him two—he said he should like

to look at another—he snatched up one marked 1l. 8s. 6d., and ran out, up Acorn-street—I ran after him, and Mr. Glover stopped him.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am a gold and silver chain-maker, and life in Skinner-street, Bishopsgate. I was coming down Skinner-street, and saw the prisoner running with great speed, and just as he came by me he turned down a turning—I pursued, laid hold of him, and kept him till he was taken to the station.

JAMES TURNER . I am ten years old. I was going down Skinner-street this evening—I saw the prisoner running down Skinner-street, and heave something over the church—I afterwards saw him stopped by another person—he is the person.

LYDIA NASH . I live in Angel-court, Skinner-street. I was going down the fore-court of our house that night—I picked up a watch in the court by the church—the policeman came up, and I gave it him.

HENRY FINNIS (City police-constable No. 625.) On this evening I was on duty in Bishopsgate-street—I heard a cry, and went to Skinner-street—I went to a place called the ruins, and found the prisoner in custody of Glover—I conveyed him to the station, and received this watch from Mrs. Nash.

ROBERT STEVENS re-examined. This is my employer's watch.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear to it? A. Yes, here is "195 DL" inside, which is our private mark.

Prisoner. I heard a noise, and ran to see what was the matter.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1572

1572. ELIZABETH NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April, 2 half-crowns, 1 shilling, and 6 sixpences, the monies of Frances Howe, her mistress.

FRANCES HOWE . I am a widow and keep the Globe public-house, Black-wall. The prisoner came into my service on the 23rd of January, and left on the 13th of April, when she was given in charge—she occasionally came in the bar of an evening to clear it up—in consequence of suspicion, I marked some shillings, half-crowns and sixpences, on the 14th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, and put them into a bag where I kept my silver, not in the regular till—I left the bar for a few moments—she went in and staid about ten minutes, came out, and went through the kitchen—I did not lose sight of her—the bell rang, and she came out to answer it—I went to the bag in the till, and missed some money—I called a constable, and put him into a room on the same floor with the bar—I then called the prisoner, and locked her in—I told her she had robbed me—she shook her dress, and said she could not have robbed me—I said, "Yes, you have, I know"—she said, "No, I have not"—I then called the officer, and gave her in charge—she turned round, and went to get some water at a pipe there—she came away again—the officer took a light, and looked in the place where the water came from—there was a bowl there with some soap-suds in it, which I had been using shortly before—the officer found 16s. 8 1/2 d.—it was all my marked money—he said, "Whose money is this?"—she said, "8 1/2 d. is mine"—he said, "The rest, I suppose, is your mistress's?"—she said, "Yes."

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How long after you put it into the till was it found in the bowl? A. About two hours, but not above ten minutes after she was in the bar—she did not serve at the bar—she had access to the bar to wash the glasses.

GEORGE NIPPARD (police-constable K 292.) I was called, and was put in a side parlour, and after that the prosecutrix called me—she charged the prisoner with robbing her of 19s.—she said, she felt pain, and wanted a drink.

of water—she went to a side cupboard—I went close after her with a light—I found a bowl of water with 16s. 8 1/2 d. in it—she said 8 1/2 d. was her own, and the rest belonged to her mistress—I searched a box, and found some sovereigns, and other money.

CATHERINE BEALE . I am searcher at the station. I searched the prisoner—she told me she had no money about her, and a sixpence dropped from her stays—she told me not to show that, it was her own money—she had a pocket in her petticoat—I heard some money in it—she told me not to show it—it was her own—this is the money—I was not aware it was marked.

MRS. HOWE re-examined. This is money I had marked before.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1573

1573. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 61bs. weight of beef, value 8s., the goods of Robert Garraway, and that he had been before convicted of felony.

HANNAH GARRAWAY . I am the wife of Robert Garraway, a butcher, in Market-place, Stepney. On the 10th of April, I missed some beef from the showboard outside, which I had seen safe five minutes before—I sent for a constable—this is the beef.

ELIZABETH SARAH MATTHEWS . I live in Trafalgar-terrace, Stepney, About twenty minutes after eight o'clock, on the night of the 11th of April, I saw the prisoner, as he was crossing the road, take some meat off the prosecutor's board, and put it under his coat—he walked away with it—I went and told.

THOMAS BURNS (police-constable K 255.) I went after the prisoner to his house—I found him there—I told him to consider himself in custody for stealing a piece of beef—he made no reply—I found this beef on a plate in the cupboard.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I got to the stair-case, he put out his foot, and threw me down from the top to the bottom—I have been in the hospital here through his ill usage.

DANIEL PRESCOTT (police-constable K 75.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1574

1574. GEORGE THOMAS ALLSTON was indicted for embezzlement.

WILLIAM REEVE .I keep the Pindar of Wakefield public-house in Gray's-inn-road—the prisoner was in my employ—between nine and ten in the morning of the 22nd of April, I sent him with eleven sovereigns to my son, in Gray's-inn-lane—he was to ask my son to send me 11l. in silver, and to make haste—I saw no more of him till the policeman brought him on the Tuesday—I asked him what he had done with the money—he said he had spent it—this is the bag the money was in.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLENTINE. Q. In what capacity was he? A. As pot-boy—there was some money found.

THOMAS REEVE . I am the prosecutor's son. On the morning of the 22nd of April, the prisoner brought eleven sovereigns in this bag, and said my father sent him—I was to send him 11l. in silver—I had not got it—I went to a neighbour and borrowed 9l., which I put into the bag with two sovereigns, wrapped in a bit of paper—I told him to make haste home.

ABRAHAM KENT . I am superintendant of the police at Colchester. I apprehended the prisoner on the coach, going from Ipswich to London—I

asked if his name was not Allston—he said, "No"—I asked him about the money—he denied all knowledge of it—I searched him, and found on-him this bag, and 3l. 13s. 4d.

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18430508-1575

1575. FREDERICK PERCEVAL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April, 2 coats, value 10l.; the goods of James Campbell; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

HENRY CROOT . I am coachman to Mr. James Campbell, of Lower Berkeley-street. On the morning of the 18th of April, I missed two box-coats from the coach-house, which had been safe at seven o'clock the evening before—these are them—I have seen the prisoner before.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Do you mean to swear that? A. Yes—I have seen him in Seymour-mews.

JOHN BATEMAN (police-constable F 99.) About six o'clock on Tuesday morning, the 18th of April, I received information, and went after the prisoner—I saw him go out of his lodging—he had nothing—he went back again, about a quarter to ten, with this large empty black bag in his hand—I followed him up stairs, and knocked at the door—he said to the person that was in the room, "That is Bill, I dare say; come in, Bill"—I went in—there was the prisoner and a female; and in a chair was this drab coat—I asked him whose it was—he said his own—I asked how he got it—he said he bought it—I looked round, and saw the black bag standing by the fire, and in it found this other coat—I asked whose it was—he said his, he bought them both—he went to the station with me, and there he told the inspector that he bought them, the day before, of a groom in Russell-square.

MR. BALLANTINE called

THOMAS HOLLOWAY . I am a tailor. On the 17th of April I was at the Friend in Need public-house, in the Colonnade, in Russell-square, about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening—I saw the prisoner there with a groom, a short man, he had on top boots and a dark coat—he had two coats—the prisoner and he came in together; and after some conversation, I saw the prisoner hand some money to the groom, and they went away together—the prisoner took the coats—I never saw the prisoner before.

COURT. Q. Did you hear anything said between them? A. I could not—I was sitting at the fire—they were sitting opposite—they sat about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour—they had something to drink—I did not know either of them before—I live in Charlotte-street, Waterloo-road—I was going to Judd-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1576

1576. ELLEN REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of Dec., 7 pains of gloves, value 12s.; 1 pair of stays, 4s.; 7 yards of printed cotton, 6s.; 16 pairs of stockings, 1l.; 90 yards of ribbon, 1l. 60 yards of lace, 1l. 10s.; 30 yards of flannel, 2l. 30 yards of calico, 15s.; 4 yards of Holland, 2s.; 3 yards of lawn, 3s.; 3 veils, 15s.; 1 handkerchief, 1s. 6d.; and 1 thimble, 1s. 6d.; the goods of Henry Toyne, her master.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY TOYNE . I am a linen-draper, and live in High-street, Shoreditch—the prisoner was my servant of all work for about thirteen months, at 8l. a-year—on looking to my stock, I missed some articles—I called in an officer, and desired that the prisoner and my other two servants should come into a private room—I said I had been robbed to a considerable amount, I was satisfied that the thief must live in the house, and asked if they had any objection to have their boxes searched—they all consented—the prisoner pointed

out her boxes—there were five of them; three of them were locked—there was nothing found belonging to me in the two unlocked boxes—the officer unlocked the others—in them were these seven pairs of gloves, a pair of stays, seven yards of printed cotton, sixteen pairs of stockings, ninety yards of ribbon, sixty yards of lace, thirty yards of flannel, thirty yards of calico, four yards of holland, thirty yards of lawn, three veils, a handkerchief, and a thimble—they formed part of the stock of my shop—they have not been sold—they are worth about 10l.—her lodgings were afterwards searched.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Some things were found at her mother's? A. Yes—she was living in my house—I began to miss things seven or eight months ago—the prisoner came from Mr. Smith's, the vestry clerk of Bishopsgate—the first articles I missed were two or three pairs of lace gloves from a box out of the fixture—we keep an errand-boy—the prisoner had no business in the shop—we had only one dozen of these gloves, which was the reason I missed them so easily—about a month after, I began to miss fine cotton hose—I was determined to be very quiet, to see if I could detect any one—I kept missing things every three or four weeks; and on the Monday before she was taken, I missed this print—it is a gown length, seven or eight yards—I inquired about it, because it had only been cut once—I might have mentioned it to my wife—I can swear that these gloves were not sold to the prisoner, or it must have passed under my own eye—this silk has our stamp, with my name on it; and these stays have my private mark on them—the gloves are new—this piece of black net I lost four or five months ago—there was not a word said till the officer was taken up stairs—the prisoner was in the kitchen, up stairs, and the others went up stairs—the prisoner was the last spoken to—she opened one of her boxes herself—she offered no resistance—we searched the boxes of all the persons in the house—I always said so—her boxes were the first searched—I will swear that all the persons boxes were searched—after the prisoner's boxes were searched, I searched Miss Everett's, the shopwoman—the shopwoman had got a box which was open—I had heard that one of the prisoner's boxes had been opened before the policeman came, about half an hour—my wife opened it with a key she had, and called me—I was at home on the Sunday previous—I never heard of the prisoner going out with my child till this moment—I never told any body so—I do not know a person named Watkins—there is no way out of my bouse but through the shop—I have had no dispute with my wife about the prisoner—my wife was going to discharge her—I said she was a good servant, and she might get a worse—I never told any one that my wife would not let me have any peace of mind about her—she had given warning to leave—about that time I had began to miss things—then she came into the parlour, and asked my wife to let her stop—I said I would have nothing to do with it—I did not give directions for my wife to open her boxes—it was done without my knowledge—I never told my wife, that if the prisoner went, the other servants should go too—I have not near all the articles I have missed—it is impossible for me to state the value of the articles—I said about 20l.; and then I said, as I had not measured the flannel which was found at her mother's house, I would say 10l.—I identify nearly the whole of these things which were taken from her box—some of these were taken from the mother's—some of them have got mixed—I can speak to every thing but the flannel—the things I can identify are worth about 10l.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Did your shopmen and shopwomen know that the policeman was coming? A. No—not even my own wife—nobody had an opportunity of putting anything into the prisoner's box after the officer came—there are a great many more goods gone than these.

GEORGE TEAKLE (police-sergeant H 8.) On the 7th of April I went to the prosecutor's shop—the prisoner, and the shopman, and shopwoman were called up before me—the prosecutor told them he had got a thief in his house, and asked if they had any objection to have their boxes searched—they said, "No"—I searched the prisoner's boxes first, and found in them part of these articles—I believe the boxes were locked—she opened one of them herself—in one box I found a piece of paper rolled up very hard, and some ribbon bound round it—I asked her what was in this—she said, "You need not open it, it is only paper"—I opened it, and found in it five pairs of new gloves—I asked how she came by them—she made no reply—I found another small paper rolled up in the same box, and found in it two pairs of kid gloves—she did not say that the shopmen and shopwoman had put them in—I took her into custody, and went next day with the prosecutor to a room in Fleur-de-lis-court, Spitalfields, belonging to her mother—I found there some flannel petticoats, some flannel, a piece of print, and some other articles.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you open the other boxes? A. Yes.

MARY REYNOLDS . I am the prisoner's mother. The officer came to my house and found some things—the prisoner was in the habit of coming there.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner had been out to service since she was eleven years old? A. Yes—she left Mr. Smart's, the Vestry-clerk of Bishopsgate to go to the prosecutor's—she was there some months—she was very fond of spending her money in dress—none of her family had anything from her—she brought a piece of flannel to me about four months ago—she said she gave 1s. 4d. a yard for it, and some calico to make her some chemises—I used to make up her things—these things were brought openly, just as though they came out of the shop.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. What is the value of the flannel? A. 1s. 4d. a-yard—I have not had any of these petticoats in wear—I should think 2l. would buy the whole that have been in my place—these are all that have been in my place, except this little handkerchief, which she made me a present of at Christmas.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Twelve Months. (See the next case.)

Reference Number: t18430508-1577

1577. THOMAS REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March, 9 yards of cloth, called mouslin-de-laine, value 6s., the goods of Nathaniel Nathan, and others, his masters; and ELLEN REYNOLDS for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE TEAKLE (police-sergeant K 8.) I searched Ellen eynolds's boxes—I found this print, which was not claimed by Mr. Toyne—I ascertained that she had a brother in the employ of Nathaniel Nathan, in Great Garden-street. I went there, and the prisoner Thomas was called into the room up stairs—I said to him, "Do you know anything of this?"—he said, "Yes, I know that perfectly well, my sister bought it at our shop, with some others, some time ago"—Mr. Nathan said it was no such a thing, he was satisfied he was robbed to a considerable extent, and sent for two or three shopmen to know if they had sold anything of the kind—they said they had not—Mr. Nathan said, "I am sure you have been robbing me, take him away, policeman"—he then began crying, and said, "Pray forgive me, I will tell you all about it, it never was sold, I took it to my sister Ellen, and she gave me 3s. for it, this is the only thing I ever took."

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Did he not say his sister desired

him to buy a print for her, and gave him the money? A. I think he said something about his sister having given him the money.

NATHANIEL NATHAN . The male prisoner was in my employ. On the 10th of April the policeman brought this print and some other articles to me, but all the marks were taken off, and I could not tell whether they had been sold or not—this mouslin-de-laine is mine—it has never been sold—it is worth 6s.—I never gave Thomas any authority to sell it to his sister—he first said his sister Ann bought it at our shop—all our young men denied having sold it—we never sold one of the pattern—we said we would give him in charge—he burst into tears, and said, "This was never sold, I took it myself; my sister gave me 3s. for it;" this article could not be got in any shop for 3s.

Cross-examined. Q. He said his sister had given him the money for it?

A. Yes—I have been a partner five years—my father's name is John, and my brother's, Henry—my father is senior partner—our bills are made out in the name of Nathans—I am not receiving a salary from my father—I have never said so, nor ever stated the amount—our bills have been issued in the name of Nathans ever since my father has been in business, and we have never chosen to alter it.

THOMAS REYNOLDS— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Two Months.

ELLEN REYNOLDS— NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Saturday, May 13th, 1843.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18430508-1578

1578. ROBERT SUGARD was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May, 1 bridle, value 15s.; 1 pair of stirrup-leathers, 1s. 6d.; and 1 strap, 1s. 6d.; the goods of William Bryant; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1579

1579. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April, 2 brass screws, value 2s. 6d., and 2 nuts, 2s. 6d.; the goods of Charles Kingaby; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1580

1580. JANE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April, 1 frock, value 2s., the goods of Francis Thompson; and that she had been before convicted of felony; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 36.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1581

1581. JOSEPH TUCKER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April, 1 pair of shoes, value 7s., the goods of Anthony Leechley:—also, on the 6th of April, 1 pair of boots, value 6s., the goods of John Chapman:—also, on the 12th of April, 1 pair of boots, value 11s., and 1 pair of shoes, 7s.; the goods of Charles Heather:—also, on the 15th of April, 1 pair of boots, value 9s.; 1 pair of shoes, 6s.; and 1 bag, 2s.; the goods of William Jones; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to all which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1582

1582. RHODA WIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, 1 purse, value 1s., and 1 printed book, 1s.; the goods of Isabella Louisa Cockley: and 1 brooch, value 1s. 6d.; 1 blanket, 3s.; and 1 pair of scissors, 6d.; the goods of Isaac Cockley, her master.

MR. WYLDE conducted the Prosecution.

MART AANN COCKLEY . I am the wife of Isaac Cockley—we live ia Whitecross-street, St. Luke's—the prisoner came to lodge with us in September last, and subsequently worked for me in my house—she was in the habit of making a bed for my apprentice—I missed a blanket from that bed—I asked her about it, she said she had had an accident, and let it fall in some water, and had taken it up stairs to dry—I consulted my husband, and we sent for a sergeant of police—we searched her apartment—the blanket was not found, but I saw a purse found and a printed book, which was the property of my daughter, Isabella Louisa Cockley, and a brooch and a pair of scissors, which are mine—I cannot tell when I missed the brooch, but it was soon after the prisoner was in attendance on me—I made inquiry of her about it several times—she said she did not know anything about it, that she had seen it on the writing-desk, but had not removed it.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. About what time had you seen the blanket? A. It must have been two or three months before—I must have missed the brooch about a month before that—I had seen the purse and the book the week before the prisoner was taken—I have three children, but they do not go into the prisoner's room—she has been in the habit of doing needle-work for me—I have not the slightest recollection of my child's going into her room, for her to take the size of the waist of a frock—she knocked at her door, and gave in the size for her, and she took it at the door—I understood she did not go in, but I was not there—I have three children—the eldest is eleven years old—I have another lodger besides the prisoner, who is married, and has two children—the elder of them is about eight years old—my children do not play with hers, I never allow it—I went to Deptford three or four Sundays following, and left my children in the prisoner's care—I left her in care of my house—when the officer came to search, she asked me to step aside, that she might speak to me—I believe she said she had sent the blanket to some person at Hoxton to be washed—I am almost confident that the blanket was safe when I missed the brooch.

MR. WTLDE. Q. What do you know about this brooch? A. When the officer found it, it was taken off the table by the prisoner, who twisted it in a cloth, and put it on her seat—the officer found it in a cupboard I believe—I afterwards saw him take it from under the cushion, on the chair on which the prisoner sat—he took the cloth up, and it dropped out.

MR. WILKINS. Q. Was any person in the room besides the prisoner? A. Yes, her sister—I am not aware that the prisoner called me up stairs, the officer called me—the prisoner's sister came down into the kitchen to me, and made a statement—the cloth the brooch fell from was a sort of towel—I believe it was used for wiping down the table—I saw the brooch fall, from shaking the towel—it is a jet brooch—I set but very little value on it, or I should not have laid it about—I value it at 1s. 6d.

JAMES BRANNAN (police-sergcant G 20.) On the 9th of April I went to the prisoner's apartment with Mrs. Cockley—I found a brooch in a cupboard in the room—I placed it on a table with other things—I saw the prisoner take something from the table, and wrap it in a cloth, which was placed on a chair, and she sat on it—I afterwards found it on the chair she had been sitting on—I shook the cloth, and out fell the brooch.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1583

1583. RHODA WIGGINS was again indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March, 1 1/2lb. weight of bacon, value 9d., the goods of Isaac Cockley, her master.

JOHN BOND . I am apprentice to Mr. Cockley, who lives in Whitecross-street. On Sunday, the 9th of April, I was called to look at a piece of bacon, and identified it as my master's—I had seen it on the Saturday week before, and missed it the next day, which was a week before it was found in the prisoner's room.

COURT. Q. Who sells in the shop? A. I and my master—my mistress does not serve bacon—my master is not here—a man serves in the shop, but he is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1584

1584. RHODA WIGGINS was again indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of Feb., 1 necklace, value 5s., the goods of Isaac Cockley, her master.

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1585

1585. JOSEPH JAMES and GEORGE ANDREW JAMES were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April, 4 1/2lbs. weight of nails, value 1s. 2d.; and 2 bolts, 1s.; the goods of John Fuller, the master of Joseph James.

WILLIAM BRIDGES (Thames police-constable 27.) I saw the prisoner George Andrew James on the 25th of April, in the West India Dock-road, in a direction coming from the canal-bridge—he was pulling these two iron bolts out of his trowsers pocket—I stopped him, and asked him where he brought them from—he said, from home, and he was going to take them to Mr. Dalman, his master, in Salmon-lane—I asked what he had in his handkerchief—he said, some nails, and he had been at work for Mr. Jeffrey in the Folley-wall—I went there, and found it was not true—I then went and found Mr. Fuller—he said the nails were his—I found Joseph James at work on his premises—I told him I had his brother in custody—he said he knew nothing about it—I asked him to come in and see Mr. Fuller—he then said he had taken them, and given them to his brother that morning to build a shed.

JOHN FULLER . I am a barge-builder. Joseph James worked on my premises on the 25th of April, and he has done so for seven or eight years—I placed great confidence in him—I have occasionally seen George Andrew James passing my premises—he lives close by me—these nails are such as I have lost, and these bolts I know are mine—I had had them in my hand on the Saturday previous.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What do you know these by? A. I had these bolts in my hand, and headed them as they are now—I had Joseph when he was a child, and he is now about sixteen years old.

(George Andrew James received a good character.)

G. A. JAMES— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Six Months.

JOSEPH JAMES— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1586

1586. DENNIS M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Samuel Swire Plues, from his person.

SAMUEL SWIRE PLUES . I am an attorney, and am lodging in Belgrave-square. On the 29th of April my attention was drawn to some books in the shop window of Mr. Gregory, in Museum-street—I saw Mr. Gregory run after the prisoner—he did not succeed in coming up with him, but I overtook him, and brought him back to Mr. Gregory's shop, and Mr. Gregory said he had stolen my handkerchief out of my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You did not find it? A. No.

ISAAC GREGORY . I am a bookseller. On the evening of the 29th of April I saw the prosecutor looking in at my window—the prisoner was close behind

him, and I suspected he was committing a robbery—I went to the door, and found he had drawn a handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket—he had it in his right hand, and placed it in his breast—I did not see his hand in the prosecutor's pocket—he ran off—I could not follow him farther than High-street, for fear I might lose a book—the prosecutor came up, and I pointed him out to him.

WILLIAM HILES . I took the prisoner. I found nothing on him but a very old dirty handkerchief.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1587

1587. CATHERINE WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of Nov., 3 shawls, value 6s.; 2 table-cloths, 3s.; 2 pairs of shoes, 2s.; 1 petticoat, 1s. 6d.; 1 shift, 1s.; 1 sheet, 2s.; 3 gowns, 14s.; and 1 handkerchief, 1s.; the goods of Ann Rix, her mistress.

ELIZABETH ANN DYMOND . I am a widow, and lire in Bedford-street, Commercial-road. My mother, Ann Rix, is eighty-nine years old, and lives in Temple-street, Hackney-road—she engaged the prisoner to attend on her—I think that was in July last—I called on my mother on the 11th of April—the prisoner was there—my mother told me to take something out of her drawer, upon which the prisoner put down the broom that she had in her hand, and left the room, and went out of the house—I went to the drawer, and missed, a great many things—she sent a packet to my mother the same day, containing twenty-one duplicates—on the 20th of April, I saw her at her daughter's house, in Widegate-street—she asked me how my mother was—I said, "You have almost killed her; what led you to steal the things?"—she said, "I don't know what impelled me, but I will pay you by instalments"—I have since seen the articles mentioned in this indictment—they are my mother's, and had been formerly in her drawers—she is not able to come here.

HENET EMBLEM . I am in the employ of Mr. Kelly, a pawnbroker—I produce a variety of articles, which have been identified by Mrs. Dymond—they were pawned by the prisoner—I took in die whole of them, and have seen the duplicates which I gave her—these things were pawned between the 14th of Nov. and the 4th of April—the most valuable article is this silk, which was pawned for 3s., on the 3rd of Jan. last.

ANN RICHARDSON . I am the wife of Thomas Richardson, a bookbinder, in Northampton-street, Mile-end. I know Mrs. Rix, and I know these articles to have been in her possession—the prisoner came to me on the 11th of April, and gave me a parcel of duplicates, which I took to Mrs. Rix, and, by Mrs. Rix'a desire, I traced these articles by means of those duplicates.

LEWIS NOTLEY (City police-constable, No. 665.) On the 20th of April the prisoner was given into my custody—she said, if Mrs. Dymond would let her, she would pay her a small sum of money a-week till they were paid for.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 63.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1588

1588. ELEANOR JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 1 shilling, 1 halfpenny, and 1 farthing, the monies of James Treuham, from his person.

JAMES TRENHAM . I am an engineer, and live in Three Colt-street, Old Ford. I was at the White Hart public-house, Mile-end-gate, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, on the 12th of April—I remained there about twenty minutes—I afterwards stopped at the door with an acquaintance—I had then a sovereign in a tobacco-box in my right hand trowsers' pocket, and a shilling, a halfpenny, and a farthing in my left trowsers' pocket—I

walked down the road, and called to my friend, "Bill," and he called me "Jem"—the prisoner then came up to me and said, "Well, Jem, how are you?"—there was another woman with her—the prisoner then asked if I would treat them to some gin—I said, no, I did not keep company with lewd women, and if I had been ever so desirous of treating them there were no houses open—I was going on, and they came one on each side of me, and as I put one off the other came on—the prisoner put her hand into my left hand pocket, and got the money—I caught her hand before she got it out of my pocket, but she had got the money fast—I told her she had criminated herself for a very little, and if she did not let it go, I would give her in charge—she made nothing but scorn and laugh of it—I kept her, and gave her in charge of the policeman—I lost a shilling, a halfpenny, and a farthing.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not show us a farthing, and say you could not say you was without money, and force my hand into your trowsers? A. No—the only way in which I touched her was, to press her off from me, not wishing her to advance—I had a hole in my trowsers, at the top of the thigh, but it was not near where I had my money—I felt my money after I came out of the house, and had my hands in my pocket, as I went down the road—I took my hands out to beat the prisoner and the other woman off, first on the right and then on the left—I did not tell her I had lost all my money through a hole in my trowsers—I do not know how the prisoner knew I had a hole in my trowsers—I mentioned it before the Magistrate, but it was a rent between the legs, not at all attached to the pocket.

WILLIAM FEARNE (police-constable K 105.) I came up when the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner—she was taken to the station, but nothing found on her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1589

1589. MARIA LARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April, 3 half-crowns, and 4 shillings, the monies of John M'Nally, from the person of Charles M'Nally.

CHARLES M'NALLY . I am fourteen years old; I live with my parents, in Shadwell-market; my father's name is John. On the 15th of April my mother gave me three half-crowns and four shillings, to go to Mr. Crawley's, the pawnbroker, to get some things out of pawn—I had the money tied up in a handkerchief, and the duplicates in my hand—before I got to the shop the prisoner came to me—she said, "Is not your mother's name Mrs.—? I have some beads to give to your mother"—I said, "You don't know my mother; my mother's name is M'Nally"—she said, "Oh, yes, I does; that is the name;" and she said, "Come along with me as far as Love-lane"—when I was in Mr. Crawley's passage I had the handkerchief in my hand, and she said, "Give it to me, I won't touch nothing"—she pulled the handkerchief out of my hand—I then had 3d. in my pocket, and she said, "What is that you have got in your pocket? give it all to me, and I will tie it up"—I gave her the 3d.—she then gave me 2d. back, and said, "That is for yourself"—she then said, "Look at that bit of paper"—I went and picked it up—she said, "This handkerchief is not big enough to put the beads in; I will go home and get a cup"—she gave me back the handkerchief—I then went with her to Love-lane, and then she said, "Go and give your tickets up, and wait outside the door till I come"—when I had gone and given them up, I found there was only 3d. in the handkerchief—the silver was gone, and the prisoner was gone—she did not come to me—I went with a policeman to Mr. Brown's, at Stepney-causeway, and found her there—she had a half-crown in her hand—I am quite sure she is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had you ever seen her before? A. No—I had no notion that she had undone the handkerchief and got the money out while I went to get the paper—when I went into the public-house I said, "You are the person that robbed me"—I will swear I did not say, "I think you are the person"—she denied it.

BRIDGET M'NALLY . I am the witness's mother. I gave him three half-crowns and four shillings tied up in a handkerchief—I did not see him any more till the prisoner was in custody in King David-lane—I did not expect any beads from her in a cup.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you live? A. In one of the shambles in Shad well-market, which is about five minutes' walk from Stepney-causeway—my son generally goes to St. Patrick's-school—he is a good boy—I never knew him make a mistake in a farthing of money.

ELLEN WELSH . I live with my parents, in Shadwell-market. On the 15th of April I saw the prisoner sitting down in Mr. Crawley's passage, by the side of the shutters—I am sure she is the person—I saw M'Nally go in there—I then missed the prisoner—I went home with my mother's things, and went back for another errand—M'Nally then came and gave up his tickets, and said he was robbed.

Cross-examined. Q. What is your father? A. A coal-whipper—I go to service—I had never seen the prisoner before.

ROBERT BOARD (police-constable K 332.) On Saturday night, the 15th of April, I saw a mob round Mr. Brown's public-house door, on Stepneycauseway—that is about half a mile from Mr. Crawley's shop—I went in, and M'Nally was accusing the prisoner of robbing him of three half-crowns and four shillings—she denied it—she said she had been at Mrs. Barnes's and in the City all the afternoon, and had not left her house above half an hour; that she had a half-crown in her hand which she had received from Mrs. Barnes for her work—it was then about twenty minutes to ten o'clock.

CHARLES M'NALLY re-examined. The prisoner left Mr. Crawley's between eight and nine o'clock—I was then running up Love-lane to see for her—the people said, "What is the matter?"—I told them—they said, "Any person who had done like that, is sure to be in Mr. Brown's side-box"—I went there, and found her eating bread and pork, and drinking out of a quart mug.

MR. PAYNE called

CHRISTMAS BARNES . My husband is a cripple, and is in Mile-end work-house; I live in Dunstan-place, opposite Stepney-causeway, and make hammocks for Mr. Henry, of Mark-lane; I employed the prisoner to work for me. I remember the night when she was taken at Mr. Brown's—she had been with me from half-past four o'clock that afternoon till half-past nine, when she left my room—she had gone with me that afternoon to Mark-lane, where I have worked for so many years—the day before was Good Friday, and we were paid on that Saturday—we went into the City at half-past four, and we were there till near nine, when we got our money.

COURT. Q. Where did you pass these four hours and a half? A. They make us work in folding up sheeting—there is no one here from Mark-lane—I paid her that night in my room, half-a-crown, a sixpence, and 2 1/2 d. for her work—we left my place to go to Mark-lane about half-past four—she carried half the work, and I carried the other half—we got to Mark-lane about five o'clock—we went to get work, and to be paid—we were kept there till nine, folding sheets and bags for the stores—when I came away I brought ten hammocks—the prisoner and I went straight to my room, and there she sat a bit—her friends live in Queen Catherine-court, just below my house—she went straight home with the

hammocks she had to make—her mother and she came out again to get something for supper—she did not have anything with me—I never was in Mr. Crawley's shop, but I know where he lives—it is on Cock-hill—that is quite different to the way we went—Shadwell-market may be a quarter of a mile from where I live—I went to the station the evening the prisoner was taken, and showed the other half-crown which I had in my pocket—I had had two half-crowns, but I changed one—I had received three half-crowns for my work.

MARIA LARMAN . I am the prisoner's mother. My husband is a rigger—he lives in Queen Catherine-court—Mrs. Barnes gives my daughter half her work, and has done so about two years—my daughter goes with her to carry work home, and to bring fresh work—on the night she was taken I was with her—she had been in the City, and brought the work home to me—then I and she went out together.

COURT. Q. What time was it when you went to the public-house? A. About twenty minutes before ten o'clock—we had a pint of porter, and my daughter changed a sixpence for it—she gave me the rest of the halfpence, and the half-crown she still had in her hand—I have worked for Mr. Gale thirty-seven years—I do not know any one in the neighbourhood like my daughter—she had a blue shawl on, a light gown, and a black bonnet.

CHARLES M'NALLY re-examined. The woman who took my money had a blue shawl with a white edge, a velvet bonnet, and I think a light gown—the person I saw at the public-house was dressed as the woman was who took my money—I had noticed her dress, and her countenance—I am certain she had a velvet bonnet on—I noticed her voice, and the prisoner's voice appeared the same.

ELLEN WELSH re-examined. Q. How was the girl dressed that you saw in the passage? A. She had a black velvet bonnet on, and a black shawl with a white edge, and a couple of white stitches in her shawl—I saw the prisoner in custody that day.

ROBERT BOARD re-examined. The prisoner was dressed as the boy has described—it was not the shawl she has got on now—it was an older shawl with a white fringe round it—she had a dark bonnet—I do not know whether it was velvet—she made the same defence at the time, speaking of Mrs. Barnes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1590

1590. THOMAS RUTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April, 4 live tame fowls, price 4s. 6d. the goods of James Gibbs.

The prosecutor's name being James Witchell Gibbs, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Fifth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1591

1591. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April, 6oz. weight of leather, value 9 1/2 d., the goods of John Giblett, and another.

GEORGE GOWER . I am in the service of John and James Giblett, curriers, in Vere-street, Clare-market. On the 19th of April, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner came in—there was another customer there—the prisoner went out, and came in again, and asked for a pair of 9 1/2 d. soles—I showed him some—he did not choose any, but asked to look at some 8d. ones—I gave him six pairs—he picked out one pair, and paid me for them—I counted up the soles, and found only four pairs—I accused him of it, and he said he would pay me for them as well—he ran out, I ran after him, and cried, "Stop thief"—the pair which he bought was not found on him, but this pair of 9 1/2 d. soles were found on him—he had not paid for these.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What money did he pay you? A. 10 1/2 d. for a pair of 8d. soles, and another article, which he bought—I believe my master knows where he lives—when I missed the pair of soles, he said, "I have got them, I will pay you for them."

JOHN THOMAS HANSLOW (police-sergeant F 10.) I went to the prisoner, and saw him coming down stairs—he gave me his bag—I found this pair of soles in it—he said, "It is only a lark."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1592

1592. JAMES WAY and THOMAS RUDD was indicted for stealing, on the llth of March, 3 brushes, value 10s., the goods of John Robert Ellis; and that Way had been before convicted of felony.

EDWARD CHARLES EVANS . I live in Park-street, Islington. On the llth of March I saw the prisoners at Mr. Ellis's shop, in Theberton-street—Way stood on the step, and took down three brushes which hang over the door—Rudd was close to him—Way offered them to Rudd—he hesitated, and then took them, and they ran down the street together—I had two baskets, which I left at Mr. Ellis's, and went after them—I saw an officer, and told him—I did not see Way again till he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You had known Rudd before? A. Yes—his father is a bricklayer.

CHARLES WRIGHT (police-constable N 304.) I apprehended Way on the 27th of April—Rudd was brought to me by his father.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Rudd's father use every exertion to find Way? A. Yes—I believe he watched night after night that he might find Way—he has surrendered his own son here to-day.

JOHN ROBERT ELLIS . I keep a brush-shop in Theberton-street. On the llth of March, when I came home, I received information, and missed three brushes which had hung over the highest part of the door—I have never seen them since.

CHRISTOPHER NORTH (police-sergeant N 17.) I produce a certificate of Way's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

WAY— GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Twelve Months.

RUDD— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1593

1593. JOHN DUDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April, 1 sixpence, the money of Catherine Smith, from her person.

CATHERINE SMITH . I am single, and live in Ratcliff. I was at Stepney-fair on the 17th of April—I felt a tug at my pocket—I turned, and saw the prisoner quite close to me, handing over a sixpence wrapped up in a bit of newspaper, which had been in my pocket—I put my hand into my pocket, and missed the sixpence—I took hold of him, and accused him—a gentleman came and took him to a policeman—the prisoner denied it—I know I had had it in my pocket not five minutes before—I had only just taken my hand out of my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Do you wrap up your sixpences in paper? A. I wrapped this up because I thought I might pull it out with my handkerchief—I work at my needle, and live in Ratcliff—I can swear that what I saw in the prisoner's hand was what I had had in my pocket—I can swear to the manner in which it was wrapped up—it was rather larger than a sixpence—I do not know who it was handed to.

ELIZABETH WEAVER . I live in Fashion-street. I was near to the prosecutrix—I saw the prisoner put his hand into her pocket, take out a piece

of newspaper, and give it over to a woman—it appeared to have something in it.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A shoe-binder. I sometimes help my father in his business—I get no money in any other way—I was never in custody—I had no bonnet or shawl on—my mother said I should not go to the fair, and two or three young girls said it was a very nice fair, and I went away without my mother's consent—I never was charged at any Police-office—the prisoner's mother said I ought not to go against her boy, as I was in prison myself, and I said it was false—I was never charged with taking any beads from a child's neck—nor by any woman living in Spital-fields with stealing a gown—nor ever committed for six weeks from Worship-street.

JOHN WLLIAM MANNING (police-constable K 379.) I took the prisoner in Stepney-fair—he said he was innocent; but he said, "I will give you 6d.," and he tendered the prosecutrix 1s.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is your beat? A. I do duty at Bromley, but I was at Stepney during the fair.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1594

1594. ANDREW BURNS and WILLIAM CARMICHAEL were indieted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 2 whips, value 8s.; the goods of Thomas Bright.

THOMAS BRIGHT . I live in Great St. Andrew-street—I sell riding whips—on the 11th of April Burns came into my shop, in the evening—he asked what I would make him a gross of fours for—I said I did not know; for I did not know what they were—a boy called out that there was somebody stealing the whips—(I bad fourteen whips at my door)—Burns turned round, and I saw he had a whip by his side—I said, "This is my whip;" and took it from him—he said, "Yes, it is; but I want to know what you will make me a gross of fours for"—I told my boy to fetch a policeman—my wife counted the whips, and said there were two missing—my son went soon afterwards to the Seven Dials, and came back with Carmichael, who had a whip, which I believe was one of mine—I told him it was one of mine—he said it was not; he had bought it—the constable took it from him, and both the prisoners were taken to the station—these are the two whips—they resemble mine; but I should be very sorry to swear to them positively.

HENRY BRIGHT . I am the prosecutor's son—I was in my father's shop—Burns came in, and asked for a gross of fours—I observed a whip under his arm—one of these whips looks very much like it—I know there were fourteen whips at the door before Burns came—I then saw them counted, and there were only twelve—I got an officer, and went to the Seven Dials—I saw Carmichael coming out of the Grapes with a whip in his pocket—one of these whips seems very much like it—I laid hold of him, and said the whip did not belong to him, and he must come with me—he said, "Very well;" and said he had picked the whip up—I took him with me—he afterwards said he bought the whip of a boy for 8d.

Carmichael. He said it was his whip; I said it was not; for I gave 8d. for it to a boy, half an hour before: he asked me to go with him, and he took me.

JAMES LEWIS ASHMAN (police-constable F 119.) I saw the two prisoners in company just before the robbery.

Carmichael. I never saw this prisoner before in my life; the whip I had was my own.

Burns. The prosecutor's son gave me the whip at the door, to go in and ask his father about it; in searching the whips he found thirteen, and his other whip was in the window, which made the fourteen.

HENRY BRIGHT re-examined. I did not give it him.

*BURNS— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Six Months.

CARMICHAEL— GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1595

1595. JOHN CORDWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 2 pairs of shoes, value 2s.; the goods of George Lowe; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

CHARLOTTE LOWE . I am the wife of George Lowe—we keep a clothes-shop in Union-street, Lisson-grove—on the 22nd of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, the putty was cut away from a square in the window—it was broken before—we heard the crack, and the glass was poshed in, but nothing was taken away—it was put back again; and the next day, at a quarter before four o'clock, I caught the prisoner with his arm in at the same place in the window—he took out these two pairs of shoes, and put them in his other hand—he put his arm in again to take more, but I collared him—he dropped these shoes on the area—he said he hoped I should forgive him—these are my husband's shoes.

WILLIAM HOLDER (police-constable E 100.) The prisoner and the shoes were given to me—he begged for mercy.

Prisoner. I am guilty of being with the boy, but I am innocent of taking them.

WILLIAM CROUCHIR . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was at that time in the police, and was present at his trial—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Transported for Seven Years—Parkhurst.

Reference Number: t18430508-1596

1596. JAMES ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April, 1 pair of boots, value 7s.; the goods of George Walker.

GEORGE WALKER . I live in Greville-street, Leather-lane, and am a boot-maker—this pair of boots are mine—I missed them on the 13th of April—about four o'clock in the afternoon I went out, and they were then safe in my window—I returned at five, and they were then gone—there was a piece of paper stuck up at the window, in the place of a pane of glass, and when I returned, I found that paper broken in, and these boots could have been taken through the hole.

NATHANIEL SIMONDS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Baldwin's-gardens—the prisoner pawned these boots with me on the 13th of April.

HENRY HAYWARD (police-constable G 97.) I took the prisoner—he said, he, had had the boots given to him by a boy named Jones, to pawn for his brother.

Prisoner's Defence. I was on the water at the time these were taken; a boy named Jones brought me these boots in a handkerchief; he said they were his brother's, and they were too small; he asked me to pawn them.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy. Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18430508-1597

1597. JOHN LUFF, WILLIAM LUFF , and WILLIAM TACK , were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 2 jackets, value 6s., the goods of Israel Alexander.

JOSEPH NIFTON (police-constable D 118.) On the 12th of April, I was on duty in Crawford-street, Manchester-square, about two o'clock in the afternoon—I saw the three prisoners together, and William Luff had a bundle—they went into Spring-street—the bundle wus opened, and they all three

examined the contents—it was these two jackets—I saw both the Luffs take their own jackets off, and put on these two from the bundle, and they carried their own jackets—William Luff had his in a handkerchief under his arm, and John Luff had his jacket between his legs when he was taken into custody—Sergeant Harrison came up—I went and took William Luff and Tack—I asked William Luff where he got the jacket from—he said he had bought it in Marylebone-lane for half-a-crown—Tack said he did not know anything about it.

THOMAS HARRISON (police-sergeant 14 D.) I took John Luff with this jacket on and another between his legs—this jacket was too small for him, he could not get it on or off—I asked how he came by it—he said he bought two jackets of a boy in Marylebone-lane for half-a-crown, but he did not know the boy—I found eight German silver spoons on him.

EDWARD ROWLETT . I live with my father, a green-grocer, in Marylebone-lane. On the 12th of April, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw William Luff and Tack standing at Mr. Alexander's shop window—John Luff passed by with something that appeared a jacket or a coat—he turned up his finger to the other two, and said, "Come along, Jem" and they all three went together down the lane—I can positively swear to John Luff, and I think it was the other two.

ANN ALEXANDER . I am the wife of Israel Alexander—he keeps a clothes's shop in Marylebone-lane—these two jackets are his—they were safe at twelve o'clock on the 12th of April, when I placed them with my own hands on a shelf, about a quarter of a yard from the door—the officer came about three o'clock—I then looked and missed them—I can swear to them—one has got a little figured button on and the other a plain one.

John Luff's Defence. I bought them for half-a-crown of a boy with a fustian coat on.

J. LUFF— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Two Months.

W. LUFF— GUILTY . Aged 15.

TACK— GUILTY . Aged 15.

confined Ten Days, and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18430508-1598

1598. ALFRED EAST was indicted for embezzlement.

AARON HART . I am a shoemaker, in partnership with my brother—the prisoner was in our employ for about two years and seven months—he had to attend the shop and to take money—on the morning of 27th of April, I left my shop about half-past eight or nine o'clock, leaving him in charge of the business—I returned about eleven, and examined the till—there was no money in it—when be received any money he was to put it into the till, and enter the amount in a book kept for that purpose—I said nothing, but at five o'clock Mr. Preen came in, and in consequence of what he said, when the prisoner came home, I asked if there was anything to go down in the book, or he had sold anything—he said, "No"—I said, "What has become of the pair of kid shoes that were in the case behind me?"—he said, "I know nothing about the kid shoes"—I said, "I mean the pair of kid shoes that you sold to the old man at Coat's"—he seemed confused, and I said, "How long have you been going on with this game?"—I do not know whether he made any answer—I sent for a policeman, who I believe put some questions to him—I heard him say, "This is the first time I ever did it"—he said he had made use of the money, and intended to account for it some other time.

Cross-examined by MR. WILKINS. Q. Did he not say he intended to account for it on the Saturday? A. I did not hear him—I cannot swear he did not say so—he has sometimes had to settle with me for articles which

he had had from me, when I have paid him hit wages—he had a pair of shoes of me on one occasion, and on another a coat that I waa responsible for—he never had to account to me for money on a Saturday night—he had no right to be out when I was not at home—there are two counters in my shop—I do not always put the money into the till myself—I sometimes put it into my pocket—it is never placed on a shelf.

ROMEO PREEN . I am a porter. On the 27th of April, I went for a person in Mr. Coats's shop, in Whitechapel, to Mr. Hart's shop, to purchase a pair of shoes—I purchased them of the prisoner—I gave him two half-crowns, and he returned me sixpence—they came to 4s. 6d.—I went to the shop again in the afternoon, and said something to Mr. Hart.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you notice where he took the sixpence from? A. He went out to get change—I gave the money into his hand—it was not placed on the counter, to my knowledge—when he came in and gave me the change, I do not remember that he put the other money into the till—I did not see the change in his hand—I received a sixpence from him—that was all I saw—I am quite certain I did not put the money on the counter—I swear I gave it into the prisoner's hand—it was about ten o'clock in the morning.

JAMES BROWN DOUGHTY . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner—he said he put the money into his pocket, and meant to put it into the till at some future day, and make an account of it—I took him to the station and found two half-crowns aad one shining on him—he said 1s. 6d. of it was his own.

GUILTY. Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy. Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1599

1599. MARY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, 1s. 1 pair of stockingtings, 6d.; and I printed book, 6d.; the goods of William Ray.

WILLIAM RAY . I live at High Wood-hill, Hendon, and am a labourer. On the 22nd of April, at a little past nine o'clock in the evening; I was at the Red Lion at Kilburn—the prisoner was sitting in the tap-room—I had a quarrel with another man—I pulled off my coat to fight him and laid it down On the seat—there was a pair of stockings, a handchief, and a prayer book, in my coat—I was about half-and-half—I did not fight with the man long, as we made it up—I went to look for my coat, and could not find it—the prisonerwas gone.

CHARLES STOLLARD . I am a policeman. I met the prisoner about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, on the 22nd of April, in Abbiey-fields, coming from the direction of Kilburn, with a fustian frock coat in her apron—I asked how she came by it—she said it was her father's, who worked on the railway—I asked if he was going home without a coat—she said, "No, when I brought his dinner down to-day, I brought him his great coat, and I am going to take this one home"—about twelve that night I heard there was a coat lost, and I looked after the prisoner; but I did not meet with her till the Thursday after, when I found her in Salisbury-street, Portman-market—I said, "I want you about the coat I stopped you with on Saturday night"—she said, "Yes, I told you a fine tale, but I did not think you would let me go"—in going to the station, she said, "You will not find the coat; there is another in that; it is not pawned, but sold."

WILLIAM HENRY MILLS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Edgewart-road. On Saturday night, the 22nd of April, the prisoner came to me with a fustian coat on her back—she threw down this handkerchief on the counter, and asked me to lend her 6d. on it, which I did—she said her name was Mary

Ann Johnson, and she lived in Lancashire—I said, "I suppose you mean the boats"—she left the handkerchief, and went away, wearing the coat.

WILLIAM RAY re-examined. This is my handkerchief, and was in the inside pocket of my coat.

Prisoner. It is false; he tied that handkerchief round my neck, and wanted me to go home with him. Witness. I did not—she followed me, and wanted me to go with her, and I would not.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1600

1600. JOHN MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 1 pair of boots, value 21s., the goods of William Davies.

JOHN LECKIE . I am shopman to Mr. William Davies, a boot-maker, in Lamb's Conduit-street. On the 6th of May I saw the prisoner stooping before the counter—the boots were in front of the counter, on the floor—he ran away immediately—I ran after him—he was stopped, and begged me to forgive him, and let him go—I returned, and found these boots about half a yard from where they were before—some other boots, had been, knocked down—none were taken away.

BENJAMIN GUEST . I live in Little St. Andrew's-street. I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Davis's shop—he stooped down, and took a pair of boots, came out of the shop with them, and threw them down when be got about two yards from the shop door—I saw a lad pick them up, and take them into the shop, and put them there—Leckie ran after the prisoner.

JOHN NUTTALL (police-constable E 92.) I saw the prisoner running in Devonshire-street, Queen-square—Leckie was following—I took him back to the shop—he begged me to let him go.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1601

1601. ROBERT WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April, 1 brush, value 2s., the goods of Henry Goddard Watling.

EDWARD WRIGHT . I am in the service of Mr. Henry Goddard Watling, a butcher, in Marchmont-street. This brush is his—it was safe in the manger in the stable, in Compton-mews, on the 28th of April—I left the prisoner and two boys in the stable—I received information from the boys—I went after the prisoner, and found him in Harrison-street—I called to him three times, and said, "You have got my brush"—he said, "I have not got it"—I said he should either come back to my master's, or I would give him in charge—he was coming back, and a woman said, "Your brush is over the wall"—I got on the wall, and could not see it—the prisoner said, "There it is."

WILLIAM CHARLES BRANCH . I was in the stable with another boy, sweeping the dung, and I saw the horse-brush in a little manger—the prisoner went out, and then I missed it—I told Wright of it

Prisoner. Q. Did not another man come in to fetch an oil-can? A. No—he stopped in the other stable while Wright came in.

Prisoner's Defence. The woman said it was over the wall; I got up, saw it, and said, "There it is;" another man who had been in the stable was standing at the corner at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Monday, May 15th, 1843.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18430508-1602

1602. ANN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May, 6 combs, value 2s., the goods of Frederick Smyth; to which she pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1603

1603. CHARLES WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 7 handkerchiefs, value 1l. 2s. 6d., the goods of William Thomas Richens.—2nd Count, stating it to be 7 yards of silk, 1l. 2s. 6d.; to which be pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1604

1604. MARY ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of Feb., 6 sheets, value 1l. 6s.; 6 shirts, 1l. 10s.; ten towels, 5s.; 3 pillow-cases, 2s.; 3 table-cloths, 9s.; and 3 handkerchiefs, 3s.: also, on the 23rd, 1 waist-coat, 2s.; 1 pillow-case, 1s.; and 1 sheet, 4s.; the goods of Thomas Bennett; and that she had been before convicted of felony; to all of which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1605

1605. GEORGE HICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May, 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, 3s.; 1 pair of braces, 6d.; 1 pair of gloves, 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, 5s.; the goods of James Harvey: 1 dozen of rings,. 1s., the goods of George Henry Barns: and 1 handkerchief, 6d., in a certain vessel in a port of entry and discharge; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1606

1606. WILLIAM LAIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April, 1 ass, price 1l.; 1 cart, value 1l. 2 sacks, 2s.; and 168Ibs. weight of potatoes, 4s.; the property of Dennis M'Carthy.

DENNIS M'CARTHY . I am a greengrocer, and live in Shakspeare-walk, Shadwell. On the 28th of April I went to the St. Katharine's Docks with, four sacks of potatoes—I put them on board the Zante packet—I took five sacks altogether—I delivered four—I waited a quarter of an hour, and took the donkey and cart round to the main entrance, and came in again for the empty sacks and the money—I waited half an hour or twenty minutes—I then, went out again, and the donkey and cart were there—I came in, and waited half an hour before I could get the sacks or the money—when I came out the third time the donkey and cart were gone—I went up the Minories, and, spoke to the toll-man—I had left one sack of potatoes in my cart and two empty sacks—about an hour afterwards I found the prisoner and another man in Devonport-street, about three quarters of a mile off, with my cart, sacks, and potatoes—the prisoner was holding a handkerchief, and the other man filling the potatoes into it—directly I laid hold of the prisoner he shook the potatoes out of his handkerchief—a woman called to me, and told me to let the man go, he knew nothing of it.

WILLIAM HAVENS . I live in Brook-street. I was passing up Devonport-street—I saw the prisoner and another one standing in the road—the prisoner had hold of a handkerchief—the other was putting potatoes into it—I passed on, and heard the cry of "Police"—I turned—the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner, and accused him of stealing the donkey, cart, and a sack of potatoes—the other man ran away—the prisoner did not run—he said he was merely passing, and the other one asked him to hold the handkerchief—he gave the prosecutor his own direction.

JOHN WETTON . I am a toll-collector, at King David-lane bar. About four

o'clock on this day I saw a donkey and cart pass through my bar—there were two persoos with it—I cannot say whether the prisoner was one.

JAMES HAMS (police-constable K 248.) On the 28th of April I was in Devonport-street, and found the prisoner in the prosecutor's charge—he had a handkerchief in his hand full of potatoes—he said he did not steal the donkey and cart, but he met the man who had run away, and asked him to hold the handkerchief while the other filled it, that he knew the man very well by working with him, but did not know his name, nor where he lived, if I would leave it till the following day he would go with me, and point it out—I went to the house where he gave his address, and there was no one living there.

Prisoner. I said No. 12, Marmadoke-place. Witness. No, you never mentioned any such place—I went where you told me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Devonport-street, and a man called me across the road; there was a woman who said she saw him call me.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1607

1607. JOHN BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of George Huxtable, from bis person.

GEORGE HUXTABLE . I am a servant, living in Bedford-square. About nine o'clock on the 21st of April, I was in Tottenham-court-road, listening to a woman singing—the prisoner came and stood behind me for about a minute—I felt him move—I turned, and then my handkerchief was gone—I took him by the collar, and said he had taken my handkerchief—he said he had not, but I took it out of his waistcoat.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1608

1608. JOHN WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May, 1 purse, 6d.; 11 half-crowns, 5 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Clara Breton, from her person.

CLARA BRETON . I am single, and live in Gray's-inn-lane. About twelve o'clock, on the 1st of May, I was in the Strand—I saw the prisoner close by me—I received information, looked into my pocket, and missed my purse, containing eleven half-crowns, five shillings, and ft sixpence—I went after the prisoner, and found him with two others in a street near the English Opera-house, nearly opposite Waterloo-bridge—I said "You have picked my pocket"—he said, "Me, Ma'am, I have just come from "Waterloo-bridge, it is another boy"—I took him—I did not see anything pass from him to the others.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I am waiter at the Garrick's Head. I wish in the Strand, and saw the prisoner alongside the prosecutrix—he nad a white handkerchief in his fingers—he put it on one side, and took something out of the prosecutrix's pocket, and put it into his left hand trowsers' pocket—he walked up the street—a tall young roan had held his coat out behind the prisoner—there was another one close to him—I went with the prosecutrix to the street, and saw the same man with the prisoner that held his coat out.

GUILTY . ** Aged 15.— Transported for Ten Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18430508-1609

1609. ALEXANDER SADLER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April, 3 pieces of wood, value 6s., the goods of George Todd.

JOHN TODD . I live in Alford-terrace, Chelsea, and am the son of George Todd. I heard something, and went to some vacant ground at the back of where the prisoner was living, on the 29th of April—I saw some scaffolding, and various other articles on the tiles of a washhouse belonging to a house occupied by the prisoner—they were my father's—I desired the prisoner to

go with me, and we went to this vacant ground—I asked him if he lived at that house—he said he did—I said there are things at the top of your wash-house, which have been taken from Alford-street—he denied it—I said, I knew where they came from, when they were taken, and who took them—I wished to go round to see if there was anything else—in going, he said there might be a batten he had used for a running-rail—he then wanted to pay me for them, which I refused—I went to my father, he desired me to get a policeman, and I did—the prisoner had worked for us about two years ago—I saw these articles safe about a-week before—two of these had been used at running-rails—he had no business with them.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Was hot what he said, that there "might be two?" A. No—I will not swear he did not say to—the yard was very small, and was not long enough to lay then down—they were on the tiles—the prisoner is a plasterer—these things are sot used in his business—these were lying at our place in a heap—I never knew of plasterers borrowing things without asking leave—I did not say, "Now you have got them, you shall either pay me, or I will take you"—he was admitted to bail—the battens came back to my premises while I went for the policeman.

HENRY SIMPSON . I am a plasterer, and live in Chelsea. On the 28th of April 1 saw the prisoner come from the heap where the battens laid, with some battens in his hand—he went into the house next to where I was at work.

JURY to JOHN TODD. When you first spoke to him, what did he say? A. He said he had nothing that came from Robert-street, that every thing he had on his washhouse came from a job he had at Hammersmith.

(The prisoner received a good charatcter.)

GUILTY. Aged 80.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18430508-1610

1610. EDWARD GRIGGS was lndicted for stealing, on the 28th of April, 14lbs. weight of lead, value 1s. 6d., the goods of George Colvin.

SOPHIA COLVIN . I am the wife of George Colvin, and live in Priory-street, Camden-town. About eight o'clock on the 28th of April, I put three pieces of lead into the washhouse, and missed one of them about a quarter of an hour after—I afterwards found the same lead at a marine store shop—the prisoner lodged in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. He had done so for six or seven years, had he not? A. I do not know—I was only there one night—he had the use of the washhouse as well as I—there is another family in the house—this lead is part of the pipe of a beer-engine—we had a fire, and it was burnt with some pots—I have been a publican—the prisoner's wife had her washing-tubs in the washhouse.

ROGER GRIFFITHS . I am a dealer in marine-stores. The prisoner brought this lead to my shop on the 28th of April—I bought it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he it openly in his hand? A. Yes—he told me his name, and that he lived in Priory-street.

WILLIAM RANSLEY (police-constable S 61.) I took the prisoner—he asked what I wanted—I said he was charged with stealing a piece of lead, and on the way to the station he said he was so confused he did not know what he did.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say nothing but that all the way to the station? A. No—he appeared confused.

MR. PRENDERGAST called

----GRIGGS. I am the prisoner's son—he his lived in the house about eight years—there was some lead in the washhouse—my mother bad sold it before this took place—my mother brought it there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1611

1611. FREDERICK THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Henry Jarvis, from his person.

HENRY JARVIS . I am a stationer, and live in Tooley-street, Southward. On the 4th of May I was standing at the Queen's Head, Paddington, seeing the funeral procession of the Duke of Sussex pass—I had a handkerchief in my pocket—I missed it—it was shown to me in the policeman's hand.

CHARLES BURGESS GOFF (police-sergeant A 28.) I was on duty at Paddington—the prisoner pressed very close to the prosecutor, and his coat was under the prisoner's coat—I saw him turn away, and put his hand to the bottom of his person—I took him and found this handkerchief on him—I found another handkerchief on him, and a latch-key.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw this gentleman's handkerchief on the ground; I took it up, and the officer took me.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1612

1612. RICHARD MOORE, WILLIAM WINSLADE , and DANIEL SULLIVAN , were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April, 1 coat, value 19s.; and 1 handkerchief, 1s.; the goods of Lawrence Kenny; and that Sullivan had been before convicted of felony; to which

MOORE* pleaded GUILTY . Aged 13.— Transported for Seven Years. Convict Ship.

LAWRENCE KENNY . I live with my father, in Back-bill, Hatton-garden. Moore was in my father's service about seven or eight months back, and I have frequently seen Winslade and Sullivan with him. On the 27th of April I left a coat and handkerchief in the shop, about half-past nine o'clock at night—the next morning the policeman called me—the coat and handkerchief were then gone—these are them—they are mine.

JOHN ARCHER (police-constable G 8.) At half-past ten o'clock that night I was going down Saffron-hill—I saw the three prisoners together, coming along—Moore had the coat under his arm—I took him—the other two immediately ran away—I asked Moore what he had—he said a coat that his mother gave him to sell—I went to the prosecutor's shop, and found the place under the shutters broken, and the boards lying on the pavement—I afterwards took Winslade out of bed, and told him what I wanted him for—he said, "It is the first thing I ever stole in my life"—I then went and took Sullivan out of bed, and under him I found this handkerchief which the prosecutor says was in the coat.

Sullivan. We went out, and Moore said to Winslade, "I know a place where we can get a coat"—Winslade said, "I don't care"—Moore said, "We shall not be long, I know a place to go in"—he gave me the coat, and said, "If you don't tell I will give you half the money."

GEORGE BRISSENDEN (City police-constable, No. 322.) I produce a certificate of Sullivan's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

WINSLADE— GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined Three Months.

SULLIVAN— GUILTY . Aged 14.— Transported for Seven Years.—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18430508-1613

1613. ROBERT BEMAND was indicted for embezzlement.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE STAGG . I am a linen-draper, and live in Leicester-square; I am in partnership with Mr. Mantle. The prisoner was our salesman in the cloak department—it was part of his duty to take out goods, receive money, and

to account for it on his return—on Friday, the 21st of April, I desired him to take some goods to Mr. Harrison's—I saw him select the goods in the shop—about a quarter of an hour after he came back for other goods—he returned again—I asked if they had taken 10l. worth—he said more—I then called the entering clerk, and an account was given to him by the prisoner, and the prisoner's book was produced to him, in which he enters the goods as he sells them—I saw Mr. Harrison the same evening—he produced an account—this entry in the prisoner's book is his own handwriting—(reads)—"13 yards of silk at 22 1/2 d.; 30 yards of silk at 1s. 9 1/2 d.; 15 yards of silk at 3s. 11 1/2 d.; 2 pairs of gloves, 1s. 9 1/2 d.; 4 pairs of gloves, 2s. 3d., and 6 pairs, 2s. 3d.; and 8 pairs of hose, 5s., 6d."—there is no alteration there, it it, "8 pairs" quite plain—this other is the account given to the entering clerk by the prisoner—it is in his handwriting—the account in the prisoner's book would amount to 11l. 10s. 8 1/2 d., and that is the amount be gave the clerk—the amount of the account that I received from Mr. Harrison was 12l. 8s. 8 1/2 d.—I calculated the articles in the prisoner's book, and they amounted to the same as the day-book, 11l. 10s. 8 1/2 d.—the entry was checked by means of this book.

Cross-examined by MR. WYLDE. Q. Are the instructions for the people you employ written down? A. No; but it was the habit of the men, when they return, to account to me or to the clerk—I was by on this occasion, and so was the clerk and cashier—when goods are taken out they are always taken down by some one, and the prisoner was aware of the custom—I have the entry of the goods taken out—I called them out to the clerk—I saw the goods the prisoner took out put down—it it left to our men to tell at such diminution as they think best for their employers—there is no dimiution in the price of these silks, that I am aware of.

COURT. Q. Did you tell him be bad only sold eight pairs of stockings and ask for the other two? A. We only count the papers of stockings he took, not how many pairs are in the paper, because they are frequently opened and sold in the course of the day.

MR. WYLDE. Q. What time of day did he take these things to Mr. Harrison? A. About a quarter to four o'clock—he came back to me in about a quarter of an hour, and then he had other goods—he immediately went back again, and came back in about half an hour—I left the shop for two or three hours in the course of the day—he was out in the course of the afternoon—I asked for him in the course of the evening, once or twice—when I saw him the second time he said he had bad a glass of ale with Mr. Harrison.

RICHARD HUGHES . I am entering clerk to the prosecutor. On the 21st of April, the prisoner came back with some goods that he had been sent with to Mr. Harrison—he accounted to me for having sold eight pairs of stockings—I saw him pay 11l. 10s. 6d. to Mr. Seaman.

WILLIAM SEAMAN . I am cashier to the prosecutor. On the 21st of April, the prisoner accounted to me for 11s. 10s. 6d. from Mr. Harrison.

GEORGE HARRISON . I keep the Marquis of Granby tavern, South Audley-street. About a quarter before four o'clock, on the 21st of April, I sent to the prosecutor for some goods—I went to No. 27, Castle-street, Manchester-square, and there saw the prisoner—he said he came from Messrs. Stagg and Mantell—he showed me tome goods—I made a selection from them—this is the account he gave me, it amounts to 12l. 8s. 8 1/2 d.—I paid him 12l. 8s. 6d.—I bought ten pairs of stockings—there was some bargaining about the price of them—some hours after I received 8s. in this piece of paper at my own house.

GEORGE STAGG re-examined. This paper is the prisoner's handwriting—(read)—"Overcharged on silk, 6s., ditto on hose, 2s. = 8s."

MR. WLDE to Geo. Harrison. Q. The prisoner gave this to Mrs. Baker? A. Yes, she is the wife of a respectable roan in Castle-street—the goods were brought to me at Mrs. Baker's—she sent these 8s. up to me, wrapped in this piece of paper—I did not trouble my head about the matter, as it was not a bona fide sale—it is the first time I ever lent myself to such a scheme at this—there were ten pairs of hose sold at 5s. 6d. a pair, and if five pairs had been put down at 6s. 6d., and five pairs at 4s. 6d., it would make it the same as ten pairs at 5s. 6d.—four pairs were charged 4s. 6d., and six pairs at 6s. 6d.—that was an additional 4s. on the ladies' stockings—I was present before the Magistrate—he offered the prisoner bail—I paid him all in gold, and received 1s. 6d. change—I am not certain whether there were three and a half sovereigns or one.

MRS. BAKER. The 8s. were sent to me at two separate times—6s. at six o'clock, and 2s. more at half-past eight.

Cross-examined. Q. On the second occasion, when the prisoner came, did he not ask for the bill? A. He said he was very sorry he had made a mistake in the bill, and brought back the difference.

GEORGE STAGG re-examined. I gave him into custody about half-past nine o'clock—I had made no communication to him before.

JOSEPH WILLIS . I am in the prosecutor's employ—on the afternoon of the day the prisoner was taken, I relieved him that he might go out with some goods—in the course of the morning he had asked me for 2d. to get a glass of ale—I said I had no halfpence—I lent him 6d.—he at the time owed me a shilling—some hours after I heard what I believe to be a half-sovereign drop from his hand or his pocket—the porter said, "You have dropped something."

Cross-examined. Q. I believe the prisoner has often lent you money? A. Yes.

WROWN. I am porter to the prosecutor—about an hour before the prisoner was taken, I saw him drop a half-sovereign—I called heads, he picked it up.

Cross-examined. Q. Willis was by, was he not? A. Yes, in the middle of the shop—the prisoner and I were behind the counter.

JAMES BILLETT (police-constable C 100.) On the evening of the 21st of April, I received the prisoner in charge—I found on him three letters, his account-book, and 9s. 8d.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 38.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1614

1614. CHARLES SAVAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April, 1 pistol, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Vesper.

THOMAS CLARKE . I am shopman to Thomas Vesper, a pawnbroker, in Grenada-terrace, Commercial-road. On the 28th of April, I had a pistol—I saw it safe a week before—this is it—it is my master's—I know it by the fellow one—I will swear to it—I have seen the prisoner about the door.

HENRY JAMES PITT (police-constable K 40.) I apprehended the prisoner on the 2nd of May—I asked where the pistol was—he said he did not know any thing about it—I asked him to go to his mother's—he beckoned to her, and told her to give it me—he said he had bought it—he did not tell me where.

Prisoner's Defence. Two boys came and asked me to buy it; I asked what they wanted, they said 6d., which I gave.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1615

1615. THOMAS DUNKLEY and WILLIAM TAYLOR were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of a man, whose name it unknown, from his person.

JAMES LEWIS ASHMAN (police-constable F 119.) A little before five o'clock on the 4th of May, I was in Long Acre, and saw the prisoners following a gentleman—I saw Dunkley lift the gentleman's pocket with his left hand and take out this handkerchief with his right—Taylor was covering Dunkley at the time, walking close behind him—they walked off together down Mercer-street—Dunkley looked at the handkerchief, and gave it to Taylor, who put it into his hat—I took him, and took it out of his hat—Dunkley ran away—I hallooed to the gentleman, but he did not hear.

DUNKLEY— GUILTY . * Aged 24.— Confined Nine Months.

TAYLOR— GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1616

1616. MARY NORRIS, JOHANNA BOURKE , and EDWARD WARD were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May, 1 watch, value 2l. 10s.; 1 watch-chain, 6d.; and 2 watch-keys, 1s.; the goods of James Frederick Edwards: and that Bourke had been before convicted of felony.

JAMES FREDERICK EDWARDS . I am a traveller, and live in Paddington-street—between two and three o'clock in the afternoon of Wednesday, the 3rd of May, I was near Well-street—I went to a public-house to take my orders—Bourke came in, and said if I would come to her house, she would give mean order—I went with her to Well-street—she took me to a public-house, and tried to get some orders, and then asked me to give her something—I said I would give her 1 1/2 d. of gin—she then said, if I would go to her place, I might get an order from the landlady—I went up stairs with her, and Norris came in, and took my watch, which was on the mantel-piece—I do not know what induced me to put it there, but I did—she gave it to Ward, who came into the room, and Bourke held me, that I could not run after him—I told Bourke I had no objection to stop with her if she was not married, but there was nothing improper between us—the watch has not been found.

JOHN GARRARD . I saw the prisoners going up Well-street together—Ward said to another person, "There is something up, come on"—I have known all the prisoners perfectly well for years.

SAMUEL MOYES (police-constable D 45.) I took Norris and Bourke in Caventdish-square—the prosecutor was with them—he said they had stolen his watch, and gave them into custody—they said he never had a watch—he afterwards pointed out Ward to me—Ward said he never saw Norris that day, and knew nothing of the charge.

Norris's Defence. I went up to Bourke for some things; I came out, and saw her and the prosecutor turn into a public-house; I called her out; the prosecutor followed her; he asked if she was single, and whether she would let him go into her room: we came up stairs, and he gave me 6d. to go for sixpennyworth of gin; we drank that; he put down 1s., and wanted more; I refused to go: I had 1 1/2 d. and a latch key in my hand; he jumped up, and said, "I have lost my watch; I hear the chain." I showed him what I had; he threatened me, and this young woman said, "Do not hurt her;" he said he would stick me. I came down with the prosecutor, and walked about fifty yards from the police-station; Bourke came after me, and the prosecutor gave me into custody: as to Ward, I never saw him.

Bourke's Defence. I was going up Well-street, very much in liquor; I met the prosecutor and two more; he said he would get me employ at a pickle warehouse. I have often drank with him for five or six years; I met

him again in a public-house in Union-street; he had got no orders; he went come with us. I never saw any watch.

JAMES FREDRICK EDWARDS re-examined. I never saw her before. Ward's Defence. I was standing at the corner of Union-street; the prosecutor came up, and said, "I want to speak with you;" I went round the corner, and he got a policeman; he said, "This is the man that has got my watch;" and then he said, "It is not you, it is some one else." I never saw Norris or Bourke that day.

SAMUEL MOYES re-examined. The prosecutor knew him again, but said he was in a different dress.

JAMES LEWIS ASHMAN (police-constable F 119.) I produce a certificate of Bourke's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner Bourke is the same person.

(Ellen Moriarty gave Norris a good character.)

NORRIS— GUILTY . Aged 20.

BOURKE— GUILTY . Aged 26.

WARD— GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1617

1617. JAMES COOPE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of Feb., 2lbs. weight of hair, value 2l. 8s.; the goods of James Dingley, his master.

James Dingley. I am a hair-dresser, and live in Emery-street, Russell-square—I sold the prisoner some hair, and gave him credit for it—on the1st of Feb. he brought me an order from Mr. Connell for 2lbs. weight of hair, which I supplied him with, to take to Mr. Connell—he said it was on two months' credit—some time after he brought me further orders, and gave me a return of sales—he said Mr. Connell wanted three months credit, which I gave him—I had never dealt with Connell before—the prisoner was to have 10 per cent. for selling it—here is a return of sales which he made—it is in his handwriting—I gave credit to Mr. Connell.

PHILIP HINDS CONNELL . The prisoner did not deliver to me 2lbs. of hair—I never directed him to get this from Mr. Dingley—he never mentioned hair of any kind to me; and I never bought any of him.

Prisoner's Defence. This is a debtor and creditor account: he said he had 20l. worth, which was a drug; I said, "On what terms shall it be;" he said, "I am not particular, so long as you can turn it to account." I said, "Well, the first transaction we will see how it shall be;" he delivered me a lot of hair, which I sold to whom I thought proper; after that, I executed an order of 1l. 8s. for him; he entered a quantity of hair, from time to time, at the latter end of the book.

JAMES DINGLEY re-examined. He never entered my service in any way any more than as agent—I let him have this hair for Connell—I knew Connell's shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1618

1618. JAMES COOPE was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of Feb., 2lbs. weight of hair, value 2l. 8s.; the goods of James Dingley, his matter.

JAMES DINGLEY . The prisoner said he had got an order from Mr. Trotman; and took patterns there to show him—he brought me an order, and entered it in the name of Trotman—I should not have let him have it if he had not said it was for Mr. Trotman.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1619

1619. JAMES COOPE was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of Jan., 3lbs. 4oz. weight of hair, value 3l. 7s.; the goods of James Dingley, his master.

JAMES DINGLEY . I let the prisoner have 3lbs. more of hair for Mr. Schofield—I entered it to Mr. Schofield—the prisoner was not my servant.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1620

1620. JAMES COOPE was again indicted for embezzlement.

EBENEZER ARNOLD . I am a printer, and live in Tabernacle-walk. The prisoner was employed by me as traveller—if on the 20th of May he received 2l. 19s. 6d. from Mr. Griffiths, or on the 24th of June, 15s. from Mr. Bennett he has not paid them to me—he has only paid me 10s. from Bennett, and he ought to have given it me the same day—if he received, on the 20th of August, 1l. 1s. from Mr. Bennett, he has not paid it me.

JAMES WHITNEY GRIFFITHS . I am a chemist, and live in Mitford-place, Old Kent-road—on the 20th of May I paid the prisoner 2l. 19s. 6d. for Mr. Arnold.

FREDERICK BENNETT . On the 24th of June I paid the prisoner 15s., as Mr. Arnold's traveller; and on the 20th of August a guinea.

Prisoner. Q. Did you pay me a guinea? A. I think I paid you 1l., and you gave me credit for 1s.

Prisoner's Defence. There was no specified time for me to render these accounts.

EBENEZER ARNOLD re-examined. It was a specified understanding, that the money should be paid over to me directly.

GUILTY . Aged 31.— Confined Nine Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18430508-1621

1621. MARY HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May, 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, 2s.; 1 handkerchief, 2d.; and 1 comb, 1d.; the goods of George Mead.

GEORGE MEAD . I am a bricklayer, and live in Newland-street, Kensington—my brother keeps the Eagle public-house, Shepherd's-bush—at seven o'clock in the morning of the 1st of May, I placed my coat and waistcoat in the kitchen—I missed it at three in the afternoon—I found the prisoner the same day at a public-house, with this coat, waistcoat, and other things, under her arm.

JOSEPH CUNNINGHAM . About three o'clock in the afternoon I took a dish home—I saw the prisoner and two others standing against the kitchen at the Eagle—the prisoner spoke to me—I walked away—I then observed her with a bundle—she came to the bar, and offered to be a pot of beer to two other women's pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the public-house very much in liquor; a man came and told me to pawn his coat and waistcoat.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1622

1622. EDWARD OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April, 1 sovereign, the monies of George Apted.

GEORGE APTED . I am a baker, and live in Lisson-street, Marylebone. On the 30th of April I went to Steven-street—I was drunk, laid on the floor, and went to sleep—I heard a whispering—I had a sovereign on the table—the prisoner came in, took it, and said that was what he wanted, and ran out—I followed him, and stumbled—I called the police—I found him in a brothel in Great James-street, Lisson-grove in about ten minutes—I asked him to give me the sovereign—he said he had not got it, if I would go back he would give it me, or make it all right.

JAMES M'RAW (police-constable D 89.) I heard the cry of "Police"—the prosecutor said, "Take this man for stealing a sovereign"—in going to

the station, he said, "If you will let me go, I will make it all right"—the prosecutor seemed very much excited—no sovereign was found.

Prisoner. I was not near the place; he came and caught hold of me, and said, "Give me the sovereign;" I said, "What sovereign? I have got no sovereign;" and I said to the policeman, "If you will let me go back, I will show you the girl he was along with in the public-house."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1623

1623. WILLIAM HAWKES and DAVID WRIGHT were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 3 bushels of coke, value 1s. 3d., the goods of Samuel Spencer and another, the masters of Hawkes.—Two other Counts, stating it to be the goods of the Gas Light and Coke Company, and of Joseph Smith.

ROBERT DEANS (police-constable N 227.) About half-past six o'clock, on the 6th of May, I was in the City-road, I saw a van standing there, containing five sacks of coke—I saw Wright moving the fifth sack from the head of the van, and looking towards Mr. Smith's, where he was emptying them—presently he laid it down at the bottom of the van, and covered it with some empty sacks—I watched him till he went down to the other four, that were standing at the bottom of the wagon—I then saw both the prisoners assist in emptying the four sacks—I went across and spoke to Kidney—Mr. Smith's servant came and counted the empty sacks they were then throwing into the van—they counted twelve sacks, the number Mr. Smith expected to have—I went and told Mr. Smith—I asked the prisoners where they emptied the first—they said they had left eleven at Mr. Powell's, and he was coming to tell them where they were to leave the other in town, and they had left twelve sacks at Mr. Smith's; and when I came from Mr. Powell's, they said the other sack belonged to Mr. Smith, but I had not given them time to empty it—they brought twelve empty sacks from Mr. Powell's.

HENRY KIDNEY (police-constable G 6.) Deans came and mentioned his suspicions to me—we saw the prisoners count some sacks in the van, and I directed him to cross over to the servant—I went in, and nsked what they had delivered—they said twelve, that they had taken eleven to Mr. Powell, and were to take the other one to town, where Mr. Powell directed them, but he did not come—they afterwards said the sack belonged to Mr. Smith, he might have it if he liked.

WILLIAM TINNEY . I am foreman to the Gas Company. On Saturday, the 6th of May, I delivered twenty-four sacks to Hawkes—twelve to go to Powell's and twelve to Smith's—they were all in the van—each sack contains three bushels.

HENRY FRANCIS . I am shopman to Mr. Powell, a greengrocer, in Wellington-street—I received twelve sacks of coke—they were all right.

WILLIAM KINGSTON . I am foreman to Joseph Smith, a goldbeater, in Union-place, City-road—I counted twelve sacks—whether the whole twelve sacks were emptied there I cannot tell.

Hawkes. I took in the coke, and when I came out, I did not see any more in the cart—Mr. Smith's servant ran away before they were half counted, because it rained. Witness. No, I did not.

Wright's Defence. I took down the last sack I saw in the van, and I thought Hawkes would take it in.

HAWKES— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Four Months.

WRIGHT— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1624

1624. ELIZABETH THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May, 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 seal, 5s.; 1 watch-key, 5s.; and 1 watch-chain, value 6d., the goods of Patrick Riley.

PATRICK RILEY . I am a ropemaker, and live in Caroline-street, Ratcliffe. On the 3rd of May I received 15s. at the bank—I was too late to go home, and went to a house with a woman—I had a watch and chain and key when I went to bed—no one was with me—in the morning my watch was gone—this is it—no female slept with me.

Prisoner. Q. Don't you recollect, in the morning, when I brought your coat up to you, I told you your watch was gone? A. I never saw you.

JOHN WENBORN . I am assistant to Mr. Haven, a pawnbroker, in High-street, Shad well. I took in this watch of the prisoner, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, of the 3rd of May.

JAMES PORCH (police-constable K 91.) I took the prisoner—I said it was for robbing a gentleman of a watch in the morning—she said she knew nothing about it—at the station she acknowledged taking it, and said she would get no one into trouble but herself.

MARGARET ASH . I slept in the next room—I heard the prisoner call to a young man who was down stairs—she was in the same room as the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor; he asked me to take him home to my lodging, and he would give me a half-sovereign, but would not give it mo overnight; he told the landlady, if she disputed his word, to take his coat, and it was left with her; she chucked it over the bed; when I took the coat up in the morning, the watch fell out; I said, there was no occasion to pawn the coat, I would pawn the watch, and pawned it for 11s.; I took the ticket back, and gave the landlady 2s. for the bed; she not being satisfied, would not let me go up to the man with the duplicate; I sent it up to him, and went away.

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1625

1625. CHARLES DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May, 2 cigars, value 2d., the goods of Thomas Thompkins; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS THOMPKINS . I live in Ball's-place, Fulham. About two o'clock on the 4th of May, the prisoner came to my place, and asked if I knew of a situation—after some time, I saw him take two cigars from a box on the counter—I jumped over the counter and seized him—I saw the cigars drop down his trowsers, and took them.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. He was convening with you some time? A. Yes—they are cheroots, not cigars.

JOHN JONES (police-constable T 31.) I took the prisoner near the Red Cow public-house—he said he had taken the cigars, and was sorry for it

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1626

1626. HENRY KNOWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 1 bonnet, value 10s.; 1 shawl, 1l.; 1 gown, 4s.; 9 yards of printed cotton, 6s.; 1 petticoat, 2s.; 2 collars, 4s.; 1 1/2 yard of ribbon, 1s.; 3 pairs of stockings, 2s. 1 umbrella, 2s.; 1 basket, 1s.; 2 brushes, 1s.; and 1 pair of boots, 3s.; the goods of Elizabeth Margaret Arnold, now Elizabeth Margaret Fisher .

ELIZABETH MARGARET FISHER . I am the wife of William Fisher, a bootmaker, and live in Carlisle-street, Portman-market—I lived with him before I was married, and we were married in September. On the 9th of July the prisoner took me to a house in Adam-street—I left him in the house, and he said, "Be back as quick as you can, I shall be anxious for your Teturn"—I left a shawl, some printed cotton, and other things, with him—I was not away more than ten minutes—then the prisoner and the

things were gone—my name was then Elizabeth Margaret Arnold—I did not, directly or indirectly, allow the prisoner to take them.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You did not give him in charge till you found he was married to somebody else? A. I never knew he was married—the day after he was married, I met him promiscuously in Church-street, and gave him in charge—I lived with Fisher three years before I married him—I got some money, and the prisoner took me away—I never enquired whether he was at his mother's—I do not know how far he lived from Fisher's—I did not tempt him into a house, and put him to bed—it was business that called me to his house—I was going to be married to him—I slept with him three nights—I did not sleep with a cab-man two nights after—I have slept with a good many men—the prisoner was never to be found—I did not go to his mother's to look for him—I will swear I never saw him till I gave him into custody.

COURT. Q. When did you employ a constable? A. On the 9th of July—this is my property.

FERRAND BROOKER GIRLING . I live with Mr. Mills, a pawnbroker, in the Edgeware-road. I produce a piece of print pawned at our shop on the 30th of September, for 2s., 6d., in the name of Ann Wood, Praed-street.

JOHN SPIERS (police-constable D 142.) I went after the prisoner, and told him to return with me, a person wanted him—he said, "It is very strange, is it a lady or a gentleman?"—I said, "A lady"—I took him back to the prosecutrix, and she mentioned these articles—I then took him to the station—he told me he lodged at No. 5, Dudley-street—I went there, and saw a woman, who represented herself as his wife—she gave me two tickets, one for a scarf—on further search, I found this piece of gown in his box, resembling the pattern given me by the prosecutrix.

CHARLES BULL . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a scarf pawned on the 1st of September, 1842—it corresponds with this duplicate.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1627

1627. DENNIS M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Sproat, from his person.

JOHN SPROAT . I live, in Newgate-street. About two o'clock in the afternoon of the 10th of May I was passing down Holborn-hill—I was pressed—I turned round suddenly, and found I had lost my handkerchief—I found two young men and the prisoner behind me—I told him he had picked my pocket—he said he had not—I accused him again, and, seeing a policeman come across the road, the prisoner said, "Here is your handkerchief," producing it—the policeman took him.

JOHN JEFFERY (City police-constable, No. 256.) I received information—I went towards the hill, and saw the prisoner and two others talking to the prosecutor—he took this handkerchief out of his pocket, and gave it to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two boys pick the pocket, and throw down the handkerchief; I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18430508-1628

1628. GEORGE KENDALL and GEORGE SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April, 1 pair of boots, value 6s., the goods of Joseph Henry Nail; to which

KENDALL pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

JOSEPH HENRY NAIL . On the 29th of April I had a pair of boots safe at seven o'clock, and missed them at eleven the same evening—these are mine.

JOHN SIMS HANCOCK (police-constable E 12.) At half-past eight o'clock, on the 29th of April, I followed the prisoners for three quarters of an hour—they

went to the prosecutor's shop, in John-street, and watched about—they then went into another street—I saw something pass between them—I took Smith, and took these boots from Kendall.

Smith's Defence. I was coining down the street, and was looking for work; the policeman took me; I never saw Kendall before.

SMITH— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1629

1629. GEORGE TANDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April, 1 decanter, value 10s., the goods of Sarah Element.

BENJAMIN ROGERS . I am waiter to Sarah Element. On the 19th of April the prisoner came, and said he came for a decanter, for Mr. Hackwell, his master, had got another, and wanted that as a pattern—it was given to him—I knew Mr. Hackwell very well, or I should not have given it to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1630

1630. GEORGE TANDLEY was again indicted for a fraud.

MARY SULSH . I am the wife of Louis Sulsh, and live at the Red Lion public-house, Robert-street, Grosvenor-equare. On the 15th of April the prisoner came, and wanted half a gallon of the best gin, which came to 6s., for Mr. Hackwell, of Covent-garden—I knew him, and, believing the prisoner came from him, I let him have the gin, and some rum, which came to 2s. 6d.

Prisoner. Q. How do you swear to me? A. I am quite positive of you—I kept you full twenty minutes at the bar.

JAMES HACKWELL . The prisoner was in my service for a fortnight, but was not on the 15th of April—I did not authorise him to get any gin or rum from Sulsh—I had not seen him for six months.

Prisoner. I was never in her house.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1631

1631. HENRY DOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 1 shawl, value 5s., the goods of Henry Pige.

THOMAS COMBS . I am shopman to Henry Pige, of West-street, Bethnal-green. About half-past one o'clock, on the 24th of April, I was standing inside the shop—I saw the prisoner and another boy standing outside the door—the other boy went up to the door, took down a shawl, and gave it to the prisoner, who put it into his apron—I caught hold of the prisoner—he struggled some time, threw the shawl down to me, and ran away—it was my master's—the officer came and took him.

Prisoner. It was not me; the boy took the shawl, and this man came and caught hold of me; I walked away; he came after me; I told him it was not me.

GUILTY . ** Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18430508-1632

1632. MARGARET QUINN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May, 1 1/2lb. weight of bacon, value 7d., the goods of William Gunston.

JOHN WHITTEY . I am shopman to William Gunston, of Exmouth-street. About a quarter before ten o'clock, on the 10th of May, I was outside the shop—I saw the prisoner come to the board, take a bit of bacon up, and put it under her shawl—she walked about two yards towards me, and then asked the price of another piece—I told her 5d.—she said it was too dear, and was going to walk on—I pushed her into the shop, and said she had got a piece—she said she had not—I found it on her, and she said, "If it is yours I will pay you."

Prisoner. I never moved out of the place.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1633

1633. WILLIAM CHAD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May, 30 sticks of wood, value 8d., the goods of Joseph Tyler.

JOSEPH TYLER . I am a timber-merchant, and live in Grove-street, Camden-town—I purchased some trees which were standing in some ground at Bayswater, and employed the prisoner to take them up—I saw them safe on Friday, the 5th of May, and missed them on the 6th—I found them in Mr. Thompson's garden—these are them.

JOSEPH THOMPSON . I live at Sturm's cottage—the prisoner brought these sticks to our house on Friday morning, at eight o'clock—he asked my mother if she wanted to buy any pea-sticks—she bought them—I am sure he is the person.

Prisoner. The prosecutor's man authorized me to sell them.

JOHN PIPER . I am the prosecutor's man—he was never authorized by me to sell them.

Prisoner. You did over and over again; I was to pay you if your lad came for the money on the Sunday. Witness. It is false.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1634

1634. GEORGE CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 4lbs. weight of beef, value 1s.; the goods of John George Crook.

GEORGE DARLING . I am servant to John George Crook, a butcher, in William-street, Lisson-grove. At ten minutes past twelve o'clock on Saturday night, the 4th of May, I saw the prisoner take something off the block—I went after him, and asked for the beef he had taken from the block—he said he had not taken any—I took it from him—he tried to get away—I took him back, and my master gave him into custody—it is my master's, and corresponds with the piece I had missed.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any mark on it? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up on the pavement away from the door.

GUILTY . * Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

Sixth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18430508-1635

1635. THOMAS CLEARY, JOHN FITZGERALD , and WILLIAM SUTTON , were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May, 1 coat, value 1l.; the goods of William Bridges; to which

FITZGERALD pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

WILLIAM BRIDGES . I live in Grosvenor-crescent, Belgrave-square—I went to the British Museum between one and two o'clock on the 11th of May—I left my chaise in Sutton's charge, with a coat in it—I was in the Museum about twenty minutes—when I came back I found the chaise surrounded by police, with Sutton—this is my coat.

MICHAEL TURNER . I live in Upper King-street, Blomsbury—I was in Great Russell street—I saw all three prisoners and another person—when first I saw them there were three on one side and one on the other—I then saw Sutton with the prosecutor's chaise—Fitzgerald was by himself—I saw Sutton call Fitzgerald over, and speak to him—Fitzgerald then went and took the coat out twice, and looked at it—Cleary was about twenty yards off—at last Fitzgerald took the coat out, and gave it to Cleary—I went to take Cleary—he dropped it, and ran away—I followed Fitzgerald, and took him—I took the coat, and gave it and Fitzgerald to the policeman—I then returned to the Museum, and found Sutton there with the horse and chaise—I gave him in charge—he said he did not know the other boy.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. When you first saw Sutton, was he not by the horse's head, and by himself? A. I saw him take the horse and chaise in charge, when the prosecutor got out—he walked the horse up and down, about two yards—I saw Sutton beckon Fitzgerald over—that is what I call calling him—I was examined before the Magistrate—the signature to

these depositions is my writing—I said before the Magistrate that Sutton called him over—(the depositions being read, did not state the circumstance)—I persist in saying, that I told the Magistrate that Sutton beckoned him over—I am Turner the pedestrian—I had been walking a match down in Kent, and had not been two hours in town—Sutton continued to go down towards the square—when Fitzgerald took the coat out, Sutton's back was to him.

WALTER DALGEISH (police-sergeant E 3.) I saw Sutton leading the horse backwards and forwards—I saw Fitzgerald take the coat out of the gig—I saw him in conversation with Sutton before that; but previously I saw Cleary and another not in custody standing on the pavement, not more than three yards from the gig—when I saw Fitzgerald take the coat, I went in a different direction—I saw Fitxgerald, Cleary, and the other together—Cleary was then carrying the coat—I saw him throw the coat away—Turner picked it up, and stopped Fitzgerald—Cleary went in a different direction—I went after him, and found him in custody—I went back to the Museum, and found Sutton in charge of the gig—I asked if he knew what was gone from the gig—he said, a coat; a soldier told him so.

JOHN JAMES ALLEN (police-constable E 159.) On this evening I was at the station, when the prisoners were brought in—I had seen them all together at the corner of Han way-street the previous evening.

CLEARY— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

SUTTON— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1636

1636. EDWARD WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May, 1 plank of wood, value 4s.; the goods of Thomas Hill Mortimer.

GEORGE BROWN . I am a carpenter, and live in Albany-cottages, Westend-lane, Kilburn. On the morning of the 7th of May I was spoken to, and went to the station—I there saw a deal plank, which was the property of Thomas Hill Mortimer—it had been taken from outside a hoard where there was repairs going on—I saw it safe on the evening of the 5th of May—it is eighteen feet long.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Where is the hoard? A. In Mortimer-market, Tottenham-court-road.

PHILIP JACOBI (police-constable E 141.) On the morning of the 7th of May, I saw the prisoner in Mortimer-market, where they are repairing a building, with a plank on his shoulder—I asked where he was going to take it—he said to a ladder-maker's in the New-road—I asked where he got it—he said from Mr. Hyde, a carpenter, in Mortimer-market, it was all right, he bought it for 4s. 6d.—I said he should go back with me to the carpenter where he bought it—he said no, he would not, it was all right—he offered me some halfpence, and said, "Here, you can get yourself something to drink; I have been out with him all day; I am going to take it home"—I told him he should go back—we went back, and saw the person named Hyatt—I asked if he had sold him a plank—he said he should not answer that question—I then called another constable, and gave him and the prisoner into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Hyatt sober? A. No—the prisoner was I will swear—I have been in the force about two years and a half.

JAMES SMITH . About three o'clock on the morning of the 7th, I received the prisoner from Jacobi—I asked where he got the plank—he said from Mr. Hyatt—I said he must come to the station—he said he would go back to Hyatt, and get him to say that he had it from him—I took him to Hyatt, who was drunk, and said he would not answer any questions—the prisoner

rushed inside the door, and shut me out—I heard him say to Hyatt, "Bill, you must make it all right for me, or so help me God I shall be lagged"—I then went round and saw him stepping out of a back window—I went round and took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he not been drinking? A. Yes—I have known him two years—he appeared dirty, as though he had been out all night.

THOMAS HILL MORTIMER . I have chambers in the Albany. This property was at some premises of mine in Mortimer-market—I did not wish to prosecute the prisoner—I thought it was a drunken frolic.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1637

1637. HENRY PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May, 6 pence, and 15 halfpence, the monies of Edward Mordecai, his master.

RACHAEL MORDECAI . I am the wife of Edward Mordecai, a fruiterer—the prisoner was our carman. In consequence of something that happened, I called in Sergeant Jackson, on Wednesday evening—he marked some copper money, and some shillings, in my presence, and put 5s. 6d. of marked copper, 10s. of copper not marked, and 6s., in silver marked, into the till, which was locked, and I put the key into my pocket—early in the morning of the 11th I heard the gingling of some halfpence—I rushed into the shop and saw the prisoner coming from the direction of the till—the moment he saw me, his hand dropped from his waistcoat-pocket—I said, "Halloo, Harry, what are you after?"—he seemed very much flurried, and said, "What do you suppose I am after?"—I shut the parlour door, and called Jackson—I went to the till and found it locked—I still had the key—I counted the money, and found fifteen halfpence were gone, and six pennies, which were marked the night before—no silver was gone.

HENRY WAITMAN . I live in Westburn-street. I saw Jackson mark 6s. worth of fourpenny-pieces in Mrs. Mordecai's presence—they were placed in a bag, and then counted into the till with some copper—the till was locked—Mrs. Mordecai took the key, and put it into her pocket—I was in the shop the next morning when Jackson came—they called the prisoner into the parlour, and he put his hand into his trowsers' pocket and threw something towards the lemon-bin—I went to the bin, and found a key which I gave to Jackson.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Were there any lemons in the bin? A. No—it was three feet from the shop floor.

ROBERT JACKSON (police-sergeant D 25.) I was called in—I marked 5s. 6d. in copper, and eighteen fourpenny-pieces, and gave them to Waitman—I arranged to be there at six o'clock the next morning—I was called in about half-past seven—the prisoner was in the shop—I asked what he had got—he made no answer—in taking him to the parlour-door I saw his left hand drop by bis side as if throwing something away—Waitman brought the key to me—I went to the till, and trying the key, found it fitted—I found on the prisoner six penny-pieces and fifteen halfpence, which I had marked—he said, "I have taken no silver"—I went to the till and missed six penny-pieces and fifteen halfpence that I had marked—there was a sixpence and other marked money found on him, but not that I had marked.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see anything put into the till? A. No—there was a good deal of silver in the till next morning.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1638

1638. JOHN JONES and WILLIAM DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of Aug., 50 yards of printed cotton, value 1l., the goods of Charles Carter; to which

JONES pleaded GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Twelve Months.

CHARLES CARTER . I am a draper, and live in Cross-street, Hoxton. On Thursday evening, the 11th of May, I was standing at my shop-door—I saw Jones standing looking in at the window—Davis came and took four pieces of print from a pile at the door, and put it into Jones's apron—they were moving off—I followed them—Davis got away, and I held Jones—the prints dropped on the ground—they are my property.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had you ever seen Davis before? A. Yes—he was stopped a few yards from me—I think he had been drinking.

HENRY LAMBERT (police-sergeant N 2.) The prisoners were given into my charge with the print.

(Davis received a good character.)

DAVIS— GUILTY. Aged 40.—Recommended to mercy. Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1639

1639. HENRY SAUNDERS was indicted for embezzlement.

JOHN PEARCE MATTHEWS . I am a hatter, and live in the Minories. I have a shop in Tottenham-court-road, which the prisoner manages—he was to receive money there on my account, and I generally received the cash once a week—I went to the shop about eleven o'clock on Monday, the 24th of April—he was perfectly sober—I went to him again on the Monday following, the 1st of May—he was then very drunk—I requested him to make up his week's account—he told me he was incapable of doing so, as he had been out all night with a female, and she had robbed him of six sovereigns and a half—I saw him about six the same evening—he was then more drunk—I requested him to make up his account—he made up a portion of it—I turned the cash out of the till on to the counter, and made it up myself—we made up the account to Saturday night—I then requested him to make it up for that day—he put down two articles at 11s. 6d., and told me that was all he had sold—I requested htm to give me the cash—he produced 8s. 6d., and told me that was all he had left.

Cross-examined by MR. CHAKNOCK. Q. How long had he been in your employ? A. Three months—I had been in the habit of taking the cash weekly, generally on Monday—I made it up to Saturday.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1640

1640. HENRY SAUNDERS was again indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April, 11 sovereigns, the monies of John Pearce Matthews, his master.

JOHH PEARCE MATTHEWS . I live in the Minories, and have a hat shop in Tottenham-court-road. On Moaday, the 24th of April, I gave the prisoner eleven sovereigns to pay the rent if it was called for, and a debt that was due—he was to take some cash from the till which would make up 12l. 10s., the quarter's rent—I asked once or twice if he had paid it, he said he had not—I saw him again on Monday, the 1st of May—he was drunk, and told me he had been with a female, and lost six sovereigns and a half—he was to keep the money in the till until the landlord called—on the Monday, I balanced up the week's account, and found 4l. 10s. 5d. over the week's account—the landlord is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18430508-1641

1641. ELIZABETH SUSSONS and AMELIA SALTER were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May, 2 pewter pots, value 2s.; and 1 copper ball, 1s.; the goods of Robert Burcham.

ROBERT BURCHAM . I keep a coffee and beer-house in Lisson-grove-north, These two pots and copper ball are mine—about half-past nine o'clock, on the 9th of May, I heard some one put the key in the door—I thought it was one of my lodgers—they made their way to the yard passing the cellar-door—in about a minute I heard a scuffle—I went and found the door ajar—I went to the cellar and found an ale glass had been knocked down and broken—the policeman came to my place a little before twelve—I then missed the two pots and a copper ball from behind the door—they were safe at nine o'clock.

JOHN WOOLLARD . I am a boot-maker, and live in Great James-street, Lisson-grove—about a quarter to ten o'clock, on the 9th of May, I heard a noise in my back kitchen—I went into the passage, and saw the two prisoners going up stairs—they each had a bundle in their arms—I caught hold of them, and they dropped these two pewter pots and copper ball—Salter got from me—I kept Sussons.

LAWRENCE ANDERSON . I am a policeman. I found these two pots on the step of the door of Woollard's house, and the ball outside.

CHARLES SOAMES . I am a policeman. I went to Grove-mews, leading out of Great James-street—I found Salter behind a cart of timber—I said, "Halloo, my girl, are you here?"—she said, "Yes, but I have not taken any thing"—on the way to the station, she said she wished she had never gone to the house with the woman.

Sussons Defence. I never was in Woollard's house; I was passing and a man ran up the street; I never saw the pots.

Salter's Defence. We were both walking by the door, we were not in the house.

SUSSONS— GUILTY . Aged 39.

SALTER— GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1642

1642. SARAH GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May, 2 sheets, value 15s., the goods of Edward Vandergatch, her master.

FRANCIS MANLEY DICKER . I am shopman to William Martin, a pawn-broker. On Saturday evening, the 6th of May, the prisoner came to pawn two sheets for 5s.—I asked if they were her own property—she said yes, and she lived at No. 17, Jermyn-street—I asked her if she had any objection to my going with her—she said, "No"—she went past the house, and then I asked her again—she said it was No. 17—she went back and knocked, and asked if Mrs. Brown was at home—the servant said "No," and she did not know the prisoner—I took her back to the shop—she would not go in at the front door, but went into the boxes—I saw her in, and went round to the front door—I then heard the box door go, and she was gone—I went out, and saw her beginning to run—she said she would go and fetch the person that she had them of—I gave her in charge.

JOHN MAYHEW CHAPMAN . The prisoner lived with my employer Mr. Edward Vandergatch—these are his sheets—they were in a cupboard in the housekeeper's room, and trusted to the prisoner to put on a bed.

GUILTY .— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1643

1643. MICHAEL TOOMEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May, 1 plane, value 4s. 6d., the goods of Samuel Wright.

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I am a carpenter. I work at Messrs. Cubit's, in Gray's-inn-road—the prisoner worked there—this is my smoothing plane—I had it on a bench in the yard about twelve o'clock, on the 4th of May—I missed it at ten minutes before one—I had information, and gave the prisoner in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. How long have you known him working there? A. About four years.

BENJAMIN MOSS . I am shopman to Mr. Attenborough, pawnbroker, Compton-street—this plane was pawned by the prisoner in the name of Samuel Wright, on the 4th of May—I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you a large business? A. Not very—I had never seen him before—I was applied to about this plane on the following morning, and saw him at work at Mr. Cubit's that day, and there are a number of men there—he saw me and went to the other end of the room—he took a piece of wood and walked out—it was about twelve o'clock—I saw none of the other men going out—I expressed a doubt about him at first, because he was in a different dress.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, May 16th, 1843.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18430508-1644

1644. JOHN CUTHBERTSON was indicted for embezzlement.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN WHITMORE . I am a millwright, and carry on business at Brunswickmews, and in St. John-street; the prisoner was in my service for about two years and a half, he had 24s. a week. On the 31st of March I gave him a coffee-mill, to take to a gentleman named Lazarus, with a bill—on the following evening, Saturday, when I was about to pay him, I asked whether Mr. Lazarus had paid for the mill—he said "No"—I said he might as well, and have saved any further trouble of going after it—the amount was 13s.—he said Mr. Lazarus would have paid him, but Mrs. Lazarus said, "Let it be till we try it, and let him call himself"—on the 26th of April I called on Lazarus—he produced a receipt in the prisoner's handwriting—the prisoner left my service on the 10th of April, and on the Wednesday before, I called on Mr. James, for the money for a mill which the prisoner had taken there, and found he had been paid for it—he never accounted to me for Mr. Lazarus's or Mr. James's money.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long had you known him? A. Six years—he was many years in business for Mr. Neale—I was not in business with Mr. Neale—some time ago he received some money, and said he had lost a sovereign—I stopped 13s. out of his wages—when he left me he went to work for Mr. Neale.

MOSES LAZARUS . I live in Duke-street, Aldgate. I received from Mr. Whitmore, by the hands of the prisoner, a coffee-mill, on the 31st of March—I paid the prisoner 13s. for it—here is the receipt.

EDWARD JAMES . I paid the prisoner 13s. on the 16th of Feb., for cutting a mill—he delivered it at my place at Shoreditch—I took this receipt for it.

JOHN WHITMORE re-examined. These two receipts are in the prisoner's handwriting.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am the prosecutor's, nephew—I never received either of these sums from the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Do you remember the loss of the sovereign? A. Yes—I have never received money and forgotten to enter it.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18430508-1645

1645. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of Jan., 127 buckles, value 3l. 12s., and 148 dozen of screws, value 1l. 19s., the goods of John Canning, his master: and GEORGE ABBOTT , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing the same to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN CANNING . I live in Long-acre—Wood was my errand-boy—I have been losing screws and buckles for about a year—we could not tell who took them—they went day after day in small quantities—these papers that inclose the buckles now produced have all got my private mark on them—I spoke to Wood on the 27th of April, and accused him of taking them—I said if he did not bring them back I should proceed against him—he made no remark, and I left him—he afterwards communicated with my warehouseman—I went with a policeman to Abbott's house—I saw Abbott, and asked him if he had any buckles of a particular kind, he said, "Yes," and showed me some—I said, "These are not the sort I want, I want some smaller"—he said, "I have not got any, I sold them"—he said he bought them of a boy—I said, "How could you think of buying these buckles of a boy, and giving so small a sum as 2s. 3d. for three dozen and a half," (which he said he did,) "when they are worth 3s. a dozen?"—he said the boy was a plater, or his father was—I then looked round, and saw these other things, which are also mine—I said, "These are mine"—he said he had them of a boy who he knew very well—we brought them away, and the policeman took Abbott to the station—these things are all mine, and most of them have my private mark on.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. I believe the amount of the whole was about 1l. 13s.? A. More than that, there are buckles and screws tied up in what we call grosses—my mark had been removed from some of the papers, but on some it is still remaining—Abbott described the boy—I said directly "That is the boy"—these articles were open all over the shop, or else I could not have seen them—Abbott's conduct throughout was perfectly fair and open, and he was admitted to bail—I am not aware that persons who make these things are obliged to part with them under great loss—there were four buckles there which were worth 12s.—I asked what he wanted for them, he said, "3s. 6d."

FREDERICK MASON . I am warehouseman to the prosecutor. On the 27th of April I spoke to Wood about the buckles—he said he knew nothing of them—he came to me again, and said, "If I can't get the buckles back, will Mr. Canning discharge me?"—I said, "I don't know"—I then asked where he had sold them—he said Mr. Canning knew—I said, "Yes, but I don't"—he said it was a kind of grinder's shop in St. Andrew's-street, and he got 2s. 3d. for them—that he asked 3s. 6d. for them, and the man said he could buy them for that in a shop—he said he took them from the warehouse.

ROBERT TAYLOR (police-constable F 37.) I went with the prosecutor to Abbott's—the prosecutor asked for some buckles—Abbott had not got the sort he asked for—he then said, "You have some you bought of a boy"—he said he had some more—he then asked the price of these buckles—he said 3s. 6d. for the four—the prosecutor said they were worth 12s.—these are the articles we found there—the prosecutor identifies them all.

Wood's Defence. I did not take them there.

WOOD*— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Eighteen Months.

ABBOTT— NOT GUILTY .

(There was another indictment against the prisoners.)

Reference Number: t18430508-1646

1646. HENRY STOCKER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March, 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; 6 100l., 1 20l., 3 30s., and 2 1l. notes of the Governor and Company of the Bank of Ireland; the property of Thomas Jeffs and others.—2nd COUNT, calling them promissory notes.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS JEFFS . I am in partnership with my father and brother; we are contractors for the Dublin and Drogheda Railway. On Saturday, the 25th of March, I was in Dublin—I had occasion to change a cheque for 1194l. 13s. 9d. at the Royal Bank of Ireland—there is a bank called the Bank of Ireland, besides the Royal Bank—they are about fifty or sixty yards from each other—I received in exchange for my cheque ten 100l. notes, and the rest in other notes and cash—I put the notes and money in my pocket-book, which I put into my left hand pocket, and held it in my hand till I went into the Bank of Ireland—I there took out of it 450l.—I gave 150l. to my brother—I put my book into my left hand pocket again, and still kept hold of it till I got to the counter; I then let it go while I was indorsing three notes—when I put my hand to my pocket again my book was gone—there were, perhaps, a hundred people there—it is generally very much thronged on Saturdays—my pocket-book at the time I missed it contained six 100l. Irish notes—I immediately gave information—I know that there are packets which leave Kingston and Dublin for Liverpool, and there is one which leaves Dublin for London—one left Dublin for London that day, and arrived in London on the Thursday following.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Can you say that you did not drop your pocket-book? A. Yes, positively.

WILLIAM DYOTT BURNABY . I am chief clerk at Bow-street Police-court. I produce two notes which I received, one from Mr. Vanghan, and one from Mr. Deane.

JOHN JAMES VAUGHAN . I am a silversmith, and live in the Strand; I likewise change foreign notes. On the morning of the 27th of March I received this note from the prisoner about ten o'clock in the morning—it is an Irish bank-note for 100l., No. 75424, dated the 3rd of Feb., 1842—I did not know him before, though he was known at the house—he wanted change for the note, and I gave him a cheque for 98l. 6s. 8d., deducting 1l. 13s. 4d. for discount—he put his name and address on the note of his own accord, "Henry Stocker, No. 22, Swallow-street, Piccadilly"—on the Wednesday after I received information—I went to No. 22, Swallow-street, about twelve o'clock—I found the prisoner's name over the door, but I did not find him—the premises appeared shut up.

JOHN DEANE . I am partner with Mr. Seeley; we live in Coventry-street, Haymarket. I exchanged one of these notes, No. 75420, for the prisoner on the 27th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock in the forenoon—I deducted 1l. 15s. for discount—he wrote his own name and address on the note.

Prisoner. Q. I believe I said I had been fortunate that morning in selling a quantity of stout? A. Yes; and he said he should have part of the discount to pay himself, as the person would not pay it all.

ABRAHAM PALMER . I am one of the cashiers of the Bank of Ireland. On Saturday, the 25th of March, I paid some notes to a clerk of the Royal Bank of Ireland for a cheque of 3000l.—these are two of the twenty 100l. notes that I gave to the Royal Bank that day—four of the notes were paid into our bank that day—I have them—they are part of the notes that had been paid by me to a clerk of the Royal Bank.

ROBERT FREEMAN . I am a clerk of the Royal Bank of Ireland. I received of Mr. Turner a cheque for 3000l.—I got it cashed, on the 25th of March, at the Bank of Ireland—I received 3000l. in notes from Mr. Palmer—I took them directly to Mr. Turner, the cashier of the Royal Bank.

TIMOTHY TURNER . I am cashier to the Royal Bank of Ireland. I gave

a cheque to Mr. Freeman to be cashed at the Bank of Ireland on the 25th of March—I received from Mr. Freeman twenty 100l. notes—I do not know the dates, only the numbers—I paid ten of those notes to Mr. Jeffs—these two notes (looking at them) were amongst the number I paid to him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you any means of knowing that, but by the memorandum you have? A. I know it by the notes that still remain on hand—I paid Mr. Jeffs ten 100l. notes within a few minutes after I got them, and before I parted with the other ten, I had notice that these notes were lost—I referred to those still remaining—this is the memorandum I have of those remaining.

JOHN HAYNES . I am an inspector of police. From information I received I apprehended the prisoner on the 31st of March, as he was going into his own lodging at No. 19, Garden-row, St. George's-road, or London-road—I told him what I took him for, and said anything that he said might be used either for or against him—he asked what I wanted him for—I said, "For those notes that you changed on Monday"—I think he said he could explain that, or something of that kind—I said if he did not give a satisfactory account who he took them of, I must take him into custody—he said he took them of a person named Feeling, a steward or mate of one of the Irish steamers for some stout, and he afterwards said he changed one at Mr. Vaughan's, in the Strand, and deducted 50l. for some stout he sold to Feeling, and after that he changed the other note at the request of Feeling, at Seeley and Deane's—I asked who Feeling was, and whether he had known him before—he said he had dealt with him before for small quantities of stout—that he had had a dozen or two at a time, but Feeling came on Friday and had a dozen of stout—that he came again on Saturday, and said, "What will you put me in twenty dozen for?" and he ordered twenty-four gross, or twelve gross—I asked where they were—he said at his stores, or warehouse, in Cushion-court—I asked how long he had been there—he said he had left Swallow-street on Monday, and his place of busines was Cushion-court—he said the stout was packed on Saturday by Jones, his cellar-man, and that Feeling came on Monday morning, between eight and nine, and fetched the stout away in his van and truck—he did not know where Feeling lived—I have been since then to Cushion-court—I did not find his name there—there are some cellars there—the first is in a Cushion-court, out of Broad-street, and then there is another Cushion-court, which is a narrow passage—there was a hamper and a few bottles, and the name of Painter on one door—I found some duplicates in the room the prisoner occupied—his wife gave them to me in his presence—he admitted they were his—some of these articles were pawned upwards of twelve months since—one is for three books pawned on the 7th of Jan., for two guineas—one for a book on the 20th of Feb., for 2s.; and on the 6th of Feb., an umbrella for 5s.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you not, on your oath, tell him to tell all he knew, it would be better for him? A. No—I made inquiries, and no one knew the name of Stocker, in Cushion-court—I foun