Old Bailey Proceedings, 22nd August 1842.
Reference Number: t18420822
Reference Number: f18420822

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

SESSIONS PAPER.

PIRIE, MAYOR.

TENTH SESSION, HELD AUGUST 22ND, 1842.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

Taken in Short-hand

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

TYLER & REED, PRINTERS, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET

1842.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

Held on Monday, August 22nd, 1842, and following Days.

Before the Right Honourable Sir JOHN PIRIE, Bart., LORD MAYOR, of the City of London; the Right Hon. James Lord Abinger, Chief Baron of Her Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Williams, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's Court of Queen's Bench; Sir Robert Monsey Rolfe, Knt., one of the Barons of Her Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Knt.; Sir William Heygate, Bart; Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq.; Sir Peter Laurie, Knt.; Charles Farebrother, Esq.; and Samuel Wilson, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City: Thomas Wood, Esq.; John Humphrey, Esq.; John Kinnersley Hooper, Esq.; Sir James Duke Knt.; and Thomas Farncombe, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and Edward Bullock, Esq., Judge of the Sheriff's Court; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer and Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

George Aldridge

Joseph Procter

George Bowers

William Burn

William Edward Caldicott

Thomas Caston

John Clay

Thomas Howard

Robert Young

Abraham May

William Charles Gee

John Thomas Bowden

Second Jury.

John Bernard

Edmund Collingwood

John Collings

James Breeze

George Armstrong

William Henry Bagnall

Charles Rose Brown

John Sowerby

Isaac Coppen

Charles Brock

William Clark

Anthony Clark

Third Jury.

Thomas Burnham Clark

George Andrews

Thomas Hone Butler

John Barton

Philip E. Plum

Valentine Strong

John Chester

Edward Baker

John Blake

Edward Carter

James Cobbett

David Chattell

Fourth Jury.

Robert Clark

William Buck

Joseph Cole

William Cooper

Frederick Terelly

Caleb Challen

William Davies

John Bennett

John Cook

Thomas Guest Blofield

James Bryan Bond

Samuel Attinsel

Fifth jury.

J. Anderson

J. Clause

Joseph Wing Arnold

Anthony Bismeer

J. Brooksbank

Charles Gabriel Davey

Robert Armstrong

Richard Collins

W. Robertson

Charles Churley

J. Church

James Addinsel

Sixth Jury.

Charles Bartram

Thomas Betts

Stephen Bishop

William Sykes

Richard Atkinson

James Elisha

George Thomas Dearberg

William Challis

Benjamin Chatfield

William Atwater

J. Chipperfield

W. Cottrell

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

PIRIE, MAYOR. TENTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—Two stars (**) that they have been more than once in custody—An obelisk (†). that a prisoner is known to be the associate of bad characters.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, August 22nd, 1842.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420822-2174

2174. CHARLES OSMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July, 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 48 pence, and 12 halfpence; the property of Michael Delaney; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

MICHAEL DELANEY . I live in George's-row, and sell fruit in the street—I engaged the prisoner to assist me, and found him in food and lodging. On the 31st of July I told him to take 3s. out of a bason in the closet, to go and buy a bushel of fruit—he asked what he was to do for a basket—I told him to take 4s.—it was all in copper—when I counted it afterwards, 4s. 6d. was gone—there had been 5s. there—I lost a handkerchief and a pair of boots, which were safe before he went out—he did not return with the money or fruit—the boots and handkerchief are now here.

CHARLES CLELAND . I was present when the prisoner was sent out—I saw him take the boots from the foot of the bed, and put them on—he went out after going to the closet for the money.

GEORGE DEWAR (police-constable G 151.) The prisoner was given into my charge three days after this—I found the boots and handkerchief on him, but no money.

WILLIAM TILLIER . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from the office of the Clerk of the Peace for Middlesex—(read)—I was present at the time and had apprehended him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2175

2175. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing 32 half-crowns, 30 shillings, and 12 sixpences; the monies of Samuel Mitchell, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2176

2176. GEORGE PEARCE was indicted for stealing 1 pewter pot, value 18d., the goods of John Heslop Peacock; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 77.— Confined Seven Days.

Reference Number: t18420822-2177

2177. FREDERICK HOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April, 236 printed books, value 40l., of our Lady the Queen:—also on the 1st of July, 1 printed book, value 4s., the goods of Edward John Luck; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18420822-2178

2178. THOMAS HUNTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 3/4 of a yard of Valentia, value 1s. 6d., and 11 1/2 yard of tweed, value 2s., the goods of David Moses and others, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2179

2179. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July, 1 coat, value 6s.; 1 waistcoat, value 6d.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 3s. 6d.; 3 spoons, value 9s.; and 1 cash-box, value 8s.; the goods of Thomas Elliott, his master.

THOMAS ELLIOTT . I am an upholsterer, and live in Long-alley, Worship-street—the prisoner was in my service three or four months. On the 4th of July I went to Gravesend with the Cabinet-maker's Society, leaving the prisoner in care of the shop—on my return I found him gone, and next morning found my cash-box broken open, and missed a coat, a waistcoat, and a pair of boots—I did not miss the spoons till the policeman came with them—I went with him to Ealing, saw the prisoner there, and he owned to breaking the cash-box open, and taking the things away.

JOHN PASCOE (police-constable T 19.) I apprehended the prisoner, lying by the side of a hay-stack, in the parish of Ealing, about eleven o'clock on the night of the 4th of July, about eleven miles from the prosecutor's—I searched him, and found a screw-driver and chisel, this coat, waistcoat, and boots—I detained him—in the morning I received information of the robbery, and the things were identified by the prosecutor—the prisoner told me he had stolen three silver spoons, and sold them to a Jew for 9s., and that he had also broken open the cash-box—I did not trace the spoons.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18420822-2180

2180. SAMUEL TOMKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July, 2 tame ducks, price 3s., the property of Joseph Bryant.

JOSEPH BRYANT . I live at Longford. I had six ducks in a shed—I shut them up at nine o'clock—the policeman called me up between twelve and one—I found the shed door open, and three ducks gone—one was found in the ditch—I never sold the prisoner any—when he was taken he said he had bought them of me, and told me to say he had bought them, and he would satisfy me.

Prisoner. I had been drinking all day, and was intoxicated. I saw the ducks in the road; I did not know they were his, and thought it no barm to take them. Witness. They could not get out—I shut them up at nine o'clock, and put a brick against the door.

THOMAS DUGGIN (police-constable T 28.) I was at Longford about twelve o'clock on the night of the 31st of July—I heard the ducks cackle, and in a short time I saw the prisoner coming along the road with this basket—I asked what he had got in it—he said, "Nothing"—I found it contained two ducks, and asked where he got them from—he said he bought them of a man at Colebrook—I asked who the man was—he said he should not satisfy me—I said I should lock him up if he did not—he

then said, "I bought them of Bryant, who lives just over the bridge"—he was about a quarter of a mile from there—I said, "Very well, we will go to Bryant, and see"—I went with the prisoner, called Bryant up, and asked if he knew the prisoner—be said he did—I asked if he had seen him that day—he said no, he had not seen him for a week—I asked him if he had sold him any ducks at any time—he said no, he had never sold him any ducks—I told him to get up, and come to the public-house—he did to—I asked him if he had lost any ducks—he said he had, two, a white one, and a black speckled one, which was a very remarkable one, which he could swear to from a hundred—he examined the ducks, and said he could swear they were his—on the road to the station, I heard the prisoner tell the prosecutor to say he had purchased them from him, that then he would be liberated, and he would satisfy him—he said, "You don't wish to hurt me, I suppose."

(Property produced and swarm to.)

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 28.—Recommended to mercy .— confined Fourteen Days.

Reference Number: t18420822-2181

2181. CHARLES PALMER the younger, was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May, 3 presses, value 3l., the goods of Charles Palmer the elder ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420822-2182

2182. JAMES MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 1 coat, value 1l. 5s., the goods of Ephraim Haley.

EPHRAIM HALEY . I am a plumber and painter, and live at Uxbridge. On Thursday evening, the 28th of July, I hung a black coat up in the passage of my house—I went out on Friday mo wring, returned on Saturday, and missed the coat—there was a bill in the pocket—I have since seen the coat and the bill—the prisoner is a stranger.

ISAAC QUINNEY (police-constable T 87.) I met the prisoner near Hillingdon, on Thursday, the 28th, at a quarter past twelve o'clock at night, with a sack on his back—I searched it, and found this black coat in it, and this bill in the coat, with mr. Haley's name on it—the prisoner told me he had bought it at Uxbridge for three half-crowns. (Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I buy marine-stores; I bought the coat of a man for three half-crowns; I came into Uxbridge in the afternoon, and went to a lodging; I gave a woman half-a-crown to get some ale; she would not give it me back again; I would not stop, but came off towards London, and was taken; I bought the coat about five o'clock in the afternoon, in a back street; as I was calling "old umbrellas," the man came out, and asked me to buy it; he looked like a gentleman's servant.

EPHRAIM HALEY re-examined. I had the coat on at nine o'clock that very night, so that he must have bought it four hours before I lost it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2183

2183. JAMES MURRAY was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 1 boiler, value 10s.; 1 hammer, value 8d.; the goods of Henry Cox 1 handsaw, value 2s. 6d.; 1 yard of drugget, value 6d.; the goods of Robert Stevens: and 1 towel, value 6d., the goods of Joseph Lowe.

HENRY COX . On the 28th of July I lost a copper boiler from an out-house, in the parish of Hillingdon, this now produced is it—I also lost a hammer, which I have found.

ROBERT STEVENS . I lost a handsaw from an outhouse on my premises, not from the same outhouse as the boiler.

ISAAC QUINNEY . I am a policeman. I found the copper boiler in the same bag with the coat, also this hammer, two towels, a saw, a piece of list, and several other articles, which I cannot find an owner for.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who had come from Bristol, and said he sold redding and ochre; he left the sack in a public-house. I was coming on the road with him; he said if I would carry it to Uxbridge for him, he would give me 6d. I took the sack; he went into the Green Man, and I never saw any more of him.

ISAAC QUINNEY re-examined. He was about 200 yards from the Green Man—he said nothing about the man in the Green Man then—there is a name on the sack—I cannot find an owner for it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.—

Reference Number: t18420822-2184

2184. NOAH HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July, 4lbs. weight of lamb, value 2s.; 2lbs. weight of beef, value 1s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; the goods of Richard Ruby.

ISAAC QUINNEY . I am a policeman. On the 12th of July, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I found the prisoner at the Green Man at Hillingdon, with two breasts of lamb and a piece of beef, in this handkerchief—I asked what he had got there—he said (pointing to the prosecutor, who was with me,) "That man's meat"—the prosecutor claimed it, and it was delivered to him at the office.

Prisoner. I drove the man's cart for him from Bayswater—I got off for a purpose, and picked this bundle up—I went on to where I came from, untied the bundle, and knew it was his meat, but not before—when he came into the Green Man he said, "Where is my meat?"—I said, "Here is the meat; I was going to bring it to you in the morning." Witness. He told me, when I was bringing him here, that he did do it, and he ought to pet seven years for robbing such a poor man.

RICHARD RUBY . I am a hay-dealer, and live at Langley. I bought some lamb, some beef, and some steak, in Oxford-square, for 3s. 4d.—I ate the steak at Bayswater, tied the remainder in my handkerchief, and hung it on the fore-ladder of my cart—on the road the prisoner asked me for a ride, and said he was going to Chalford—we walked together as far as Shepherd's-bush, and there I let him ride by the fore-ladder, which was where the meat was—we stopped at the Coach and Horses, and walked together to Hanwell—we then rode together to Hayes, and about a mile from Hillingdon I missed him from the cart—I called to him two or three times, and asked if he had got down—he did not answer—it was dark, and after eleven o'clock—I spoke to a policeman, went with him to the Green Man, and saw the prisoner and the meat there—he said he was going to bring it me over in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2185

2185. SAMUEL LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July, 1 box, value 2s., and 72lbs. weight of candles, value 2l.; the goods of Francis Chatting.

ABRAHAM GRAY . I am twelve years old, and live at No. 15, Carter-street, Cutler-street, Houndsditch. On Monday, the 4th of July, I was coming down Houndsditch, and saw a truck, with a box of candles in it—another man put it on the prisoner's shoulder, and he ran away with it—the witness Akers came up—I told him what I had seen, and he ran after the prisoner—I followed him into Petticoat-lane, and there saw the same man that had put the box on the prisoner's shoulder take it off the prisoner's shoulder, give it to Akers, and he got off—the prisoner got out the back-way, down a little court out of Petticoat-lane—I was going to ran after him, but the Jews hit me, and would not let me do so.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Your father has hit yon very often, has he not? A. Yes; not for dishonesty, not for stealing jackets, or any thing of that sort—I swear that—Carter-street is a place where they sell old clothes—I go to school—I knew the prisoner before—it was about a quarter of a mile from Houndsditch to the shop in Petticoat-lane—I am quite sure it was the prisoner I saw carry the box—Akers was with me at the shop—I did not know the man that put the box on the prisoner's shoulder—I should know him again—I had seen him walking down Houndsditch before he took the box—I have not seen him since.

WILLIAM AKERS . I am a porter, in the service of Mrs. Burrows and Son, confectioners in Houndsditch. On Monday, the 4th of July, I was in the shop, and saw a truck with a box of candles—an alarm was given soon after, and I went towards Petticoat-lane, and saw the prisoner with a box of 'candles on his shoulder—I saw him turn into a shop in Essex-street, the party that belonged to the shop took it off his shoulder, and he escaped by a back entrance, which I was not aware of, or I could have taken him—several people came into the shop while I was in there—it was some man in the shop that took the "box off the prisoner's shoulder—I believe he was the master of the shop, but I do not know it—I knew nothing of him before—I seized hold of the box—I afterwards saw the prisoner in Clerk en well prison—I knew him directly.

Cross-examined. Q. He was shown to you without anybody else being with him, was he not? A. No, with four or five others, and I picked him out—I swear that—I cannot say where Gray was when I went into the shop—I did not see him there, not till I was going up Houndsditch to the station—a lad had charge of the truck, he is not here—I saw the prisoner at Clerkenwell on the Saturday following—when I first saw the prisoner with the box, going down Petticoat-lane, I saw him turn into the shop, and I was in the shop before he got the box off his shoulder—the other man remained in the shop about a quarter of an hour—the prisoner went out the back way—I have not been to the shop since, to see if the man belonged to it.

FRANCIS CHATTING . I am a tallow-chandler, and live in Ireland-row, Mile-end-road—this box is my property—it contained six dozen candles, worth 2l. 2s.—I sent them in a truck with a lad, to Mrs. Burrows, to be delivered there.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is your lad? A. At home—his evidence was not considered necessary—I delivered the box of candles to him from my house.

JAMES HALL (City police-constable, No. 644.) I went with Akers to Clerkenwell prison, and he identified the prisoner in my presence—I first asked the prisoner if he knew me—he said he did not—I then asked the

prosecutor if he knew him, and he said, "Yes"—I looked at the book. and he was in the name of William Jones there.

Cross-examined. Q. How many other persons were there at the time? A. I should think five or six—I pointed out the prisoner, and asked Akers if that was not him—I turned round, looked at him, and said, "Is not that the prisoner?"—he said, "Yes."

COURT. Q. Had you looked at him first? A. Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Monday, August 22nd, 1842.

Fifth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420822-2186

2186. GEORGE SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July, 5 cucumbers, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Simmons.

BENJAMIN WATSON . I am in the employ of Thomas Simmons, a fruiterer. I was in his shop about half-past nine o'clock at night on the 11th of July—in consequence of information, I followed the prisoner, and came up with him about a hundred yards from the shop—I said, "You have got some cucumbers belonging to me"—he said I might take them if I pleased—I took them, and said he must go back with me—after some time I got him back—he struck me several times—a policeman came—I gave him the cucumbers—they were my master's, and I had seen them on the ledge of the window about two minutes before.

ADOLPHUS VALENTINE LONSDALE . I was called to the prosecutor's shop, and received these cucumbers.

GUILTY .* Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2187

2187. GEORGE KING and JOHN DONOVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 20 yards of Orleans cloth, value 28s., the goods of James Simmonds Atkinson and others.

JOHN WILSON . I am assistant to Mr. Mott, a jeweller. I was at the corner of Friday-street on the 16th of July—I saw the prisoners together—they went away for a short time—Donovan returned, and King stood opposite Friday-street, in Cheapside—Donovan waited at the corner of Friday-street about a minute and a half—he then went down Friday-street, into Messrs. Atkinson's warehouse—King was still waiting opposite Friday-street in Cheapside—Donovan then came out with a piece of Orleans cloth under his arm, went over to King, and they went together up Wood-street—I gave information, and followed them with Mr. Atkinson—they turned into Mitre-court, and we captured them—I saw the goods in King's possession—the policeman came up in two or three minutes, and they were delivered to him.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. About How far was King from the warehouse when Donovan went in? A. At the opposite side—Donovan was in the warehouse about a quarter of a minute.

JAMES SIMMONS ATKINSON . I am a wholesale dealer in woollen and worsted cloth, in partnership with Mr. Poynter, in Friday-street. In consequence of information from Wilson, I went after the prisoners, and overtook them in Mitre-court—I seized Donovan, and Wilson seized King, who had the piece of Orleans cloth, and dropped it by his side—

it was taken up and given to the policeman—these goods are our property.

WILLIAM MAYLE (City police-constable, No. 58.) I took the prisoners, and have the cloth.

(Donovan received a good character.)

KING— GUILTY . Aged 22.

DONOVAN— GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2188

2188. DANIEL TRINDER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August, 2 sovereigns and 1 shilling, the monies of John Hayes.

JOHN HAYES . On the 9th of August I slept at Bedfont, at my mother-in-law's—the prisoner slept with me—I had four sovereigns and tea shillings in my breeches pocket when I went to bed—one sovereign bad a mark on the hind part of the head—we got up much about the same time, and each went to our work—between ten and eleven o'clock that day my wife came to me—I took my purse out of my pocket to give her two shillings, and missed two sovereigns and a shilling—I suspected the prisoner, and went to the field where he had been at work, but he was gone—I found him at Han well, at the Tom and Jerry, kept by Seal—I got a policeman—the prisoner was charged with having taken my money—he said he had not taken it at first, and afterwards he said he had—I applied to Mrs. Seal for the money the prisoner had given to her—she gave me a sovereign—"it was the one which was marked as mine was.

ANN SEAL . I am the wife of Robert Seal, who keeps a beer-shop at Hanwell. The prisoner gave me this sovereign to pay for something he owed me—the prosecutor came with a policeman, and I gave him a purse with some sovereigns in it—this sovereign was in it—the prosecutor picked it out.

JAMES BLANCHARD (police-constable 7116.) I went to the beer-shop, and an application was made for some money given by the prisoner—he pointed out one sovereign, and said it was the one he gave to Seal—it was the one identified by Hayes.

Prisoner's Defence. When I put on my clothes I saw some money tying on the floor; I had some money; I could not see whether it was gold or silver; I took it up and put it into my pocket; I was taken poorly; I went to the public-house, and pulled out a sovereign; I did not know I had such a thing.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2189

2189. HENRY GAMBLE and JAMES JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 12 handkerchiefs, value 5l., the goods of Stephen Winkworth Silver and others.

EDWARD BRABROOK . I am assistant to Stephen Winkworth Silver and two others, outfitters in Cornhill. At half-past eight o'clock in the morning of the 12th of July the prisoners came there-Gamble asked for some Berlin gloves—I went to get them, and they were not the right colour—I took a drawer out to look for others, and in which were silk and satin handkerchiefs—Gamble bought a pair of gloves—he offered me a sovereign, and asked for change—I went to ring the bell, and sent up for change—I was absent from the counter a short time—I then got the change, and gave it him—they went out, then both returned, and purchased a pair of

half-hose—they went away again together—about half-an-hour after they were gone we missed upwards of twelve satin handkerchiefs—I had not been absent from the shop from the time they first came—the handkerchiefs have not been found.

GEORGE BRAKE BARKER (City police-constable, No. 485.) On that morning Johnson was given into my charge by Braybrook—he had a coat on his arm.

JOHN DAVIS (City police-constable No. 407.) I took Gamble, but found no property.

Gamble's Defence. We were remanded, and the next day the prosecutor came in; we were all together at the station; he went up, and came down, and said, "The parties are not here;" that evening two more young men came, and he came to look at them; he said it was not us, but when we came to the Mansion-house he swore to us.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2190

2190. HENRY GAMBLE and JAMES JOHNSON were again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August, 8 handkerchiefs, value 2l. 8s. the goods of Henry Drew May.

THOMAS BARNES . I am shopman to Henry Drew May, a hosier, in Moorgate-street. About eight o'clock in the morning of the 16th of July the prisoners came into the shop, and asked for stockings, and afterwards for a silk cravat—I showed them some—Johnson had a coat hanging on his left arm, and while holding up a cravat to examine, he drew some others from the pile, and concealed them under the coat—they bought one cravat, and left a deposit on it—they left together—I went after them, and pointed them out to a policeman—they were together—Johnson was taken by the Bank—he had the coat, and under it were the silk handkerchief I had missed—these now produced are them—they are Mr. May's.

GEORGE BARKER (City police-constable, No. 485.) Johnson was given into my custody—I opened the coat, which was on his arm, and found these silk handkerchiefs.

Gamble's Defence. I know nothing of the robbery; I went into the sbop, but do not know the other man.

GAMBLE— GUILTY . Aged 37.

JOHNSON— GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Nine Months.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, August 23rd. 1842.

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420822-2191

2191. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 31bs. weight of mutton, value 1s. 6d. the goods of Elizabeth Clisby; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420822-2192

2192. CATHERINE GARVY CALLANAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September, 2 table-cloths, value 8s., the goods of Andrew M'Culloch and others, her masters.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Sir Andrew Francis Barnard, Knt., and others:—also, on the 21st of September, 2 table cloths, value 8s., the goods of the same parties. Hotham and others; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2193

2193. WILLIAM HENDERSON was indicted for stealing 250 yards of ribbon, value 12l., the goods of James Morrison, and others, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Eighteen Months.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Reference Number: t18420822-2194

2194. JAMES DENNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January, 83lbs. weight of sugar, value 2l. 5s., the goods of John Dale, his master.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN DALE . I am assistant to my father, John Dale, carman, of Stoney-lane, Tooley-street, Borough. On the 10th of January, 1838, the prisoner was in our employ as carman, and was sent to the sugar-house, Lambeth-street, for two hogsheads of sugar, one to be taken to Mr. Sayers, St. Dunstan's-hill, and the other to Mr. Davis, in Cullum-street—as he was gone longer than proper, I went to the corner of Cullum-street, and found the cart standing there—a man named Garrett got out of it, and ran away—he was afterwards tried here—the prisoner was standing by the side of the cart, and as soon as Garrett ran away the prisoner ran away also—there was a tilt over the cart, but Garrett could not get up without the prisoner knowing it, as he must get in at the front—the prisoner stood on the pavement, about two feet from the cart—I have not seen him since till within the last three months—when I saw him I gave information—I drove the cart to Mr. Davis's warehouse, Cullum-street, and found the two hogsheads in the cart, the tin off one hole in the hogshead, and a bag on one side, containing 83lbs. of sugar, of the same quality as that in the hogshead, which we found 831bs. deficient.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. Hew would a person get into the cart? A. By removing the tilt—I examined it, and it was tied down behind so that nobody could get in—the cart was not in its proper place—it ought to have been opposite Mr. Davis's warehouse—he had no business there—I said nothing to him, for he ran off.

CHARLES WALLER . I am an inspector of the City police. I received information, and took the prisoner on the 12th of August—I told him I took him for stealing sugar—he said, "Oh, as for that, Mr. Dale has forgiven me."

JAMES LEE . I apprehended Garrett—the prisoner was shown to me last Friday week—I told him he was indicted for stealing sugar—he said that was all settled and all made right, Mr. Dale bad forgiven him.

JOHN DALE re-examined. The sugar was taken out of a sort of bung, hole, which would take a long lime—I found an old iron hoop which it had been scraped out with.

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2195

2195. THOMAS ALLEY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September, 1 pair of snuffers, value 5s.; and 1 snuffer-tray, value 1s.; the goods of Alexander Saunders and George Gibson.—Three other COUNTS, stating them to belong to different persons.

MESSRS. PHILLIPS, CLARKSON, and BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

ALEXANDER SAUNOERS . I have acted as assignee to the estate of George Fuller—Mr. George Gibson is the official assignee—the fiat issued on the 6th of May, 1841—I am a house decorator in Regent-street.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long did Fuller carry on business before he became embarrassed? A. I think about nine months—I was not aware of his being in difficulties before the fiat was issued—before that an execution had taken place under a bill of sale by Mr. Chamberlain—I do not know whether we withdrew and yielded to the sale made by the Sheriff—I am brother-in-law to one of the solicitors for the fiat—proceedings were taken to set the bill of sale aside—the property was transferred to the Sheriff—I never understood that we withdrew our claim—I believe an action is now pending about the bill—the solicitor will answer.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What is the amount of Mr. Chamberlain's execution? A. I think 1900l.—I do not know whether there was property on the premises after satisfying that.

PERCIVAL HAMILTON CHAMBERLAIN . I know George Fuller, who became a bankrupt—he is a connexion of my wife's—I advanced about 2,000l. to him, for which I received a warrant of attorney—I employed one Hoad to go into the premises—Fuller became a bankrupt about the latter end of April I believe—Had was put in two or three days after that to take charge of the property in the house—I know the prisoner—I had seen him frequently during these proceedings—I do not know of the snuffers and tray being at the house—I did not give authority to Hoad to deliver any thing of that kind to the prisoner, nor authorize the prisoner to take articles of that kind from the house—I did not order him to bring any thing to me—I ordered him to send some articles I had there belonging to me for the use of the man I had in possession—it was not anything belonging to the bankrupt—I have not received any snuffers or tray from the prisoner belonging to the bankrupt.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. I believe you married a lady who has daughters? A. Yes—one of the daughters married Fuller—I know one Lawrence, of Hammersmith—he is not an old acquaintance—I became acquainted with him in May or the latter end of April, about eighteen months ago—Jones introduced me to him—I believe the prisoner is articled clerk to a solicitor—he offered his advice to me gratuitously, being a barrister—I believed that—I am ignorant of the ways of the world—he acted in the course of this affair—I believe Fuller was seven or eight months in business before he became embarrassed—my money was gone, and he was in difficulties—it was my wife's property—about 200l. and odd of it was my own—I had a warrant of attorney to secure 1600l.—I entered up judgment, and took possession of the property under that—an assignment of the property was made by a bill of sale from the Sheriff—a fiat of bankruptcy was afterwards issued, at the instance of Fuller's father, I believe—a second fiat was issued at the instance of Mr. Saunders—after the sale from the Sheriff I believe the assignees withdrew their claim, but I do not understand it—I am totally ignorant of business—I employed Messrs. Capes and Steward—I was in London—I did not go backward and forward to the premises—I directed the sale to take place—it took place under Mr. Bingham—the messenger under the fiat came in on the day of sale, and the delivery of the goods was stopped—this (looking at a paper) is the bill of sale I believe—it is dated the 29th of April, 1841—under this I became the purchaser of all the property of Fuller which could be found on the premises—I authorised Mr. Bingham to sell them by auction—the fiat issued by Fuller's father stopped the delivery of the goods—after an interval I proceeded to sell, the claim of each fiat being withdrawn

—Bingham sold on the second occasion about June—I directed the prisoner to give instructions to Bingham with respect to the tale—I did not tell him he might buy any lots he thought fit for himself—I did not know be wanted any—I have heard since that he did—the goods were sold, except the shop furniture—I advised with the prisoner to have the shop furniture kept there till I could get a customer for the lease—it was by his advice; I instructed him to tell Bingham so—the lease was put up for sale—there were no bidders, and then there was a tale of the shop furniture—that was done through the instrumentality of the prisoner—I authorised him to receive the amount, and I believe he did—after the tale there was a clearance of things left, things the man had to sleep on, and so on—I desired the prisoner to go and have the articles belonging to me packed up and sent away—at the latter end of September, after the tale of the lease, he said I should have to pay a quarter's rent if I remained longer in possession—I authorised him to pay the rent which was due before that—I generally gave him money to pay Hoad's wages—the snuffers are worth about 6s.

COURT. Q. About How much money was he authorised to receive for the sale of shop furniture, payment of rent, and to on? what did he have to pay or receive? A. About 500l. or 600l. would past through his bands in one shape or other.

MR. BODKIN. Q. When did you see the snuffers? A. In Fuller's house, before the bankruptcy—I had brought them to him—I taw them some weeks or perhaps a month, before the bankruptcy.

Q. When did you first know these snuffers bad got into the prisoner's possession? A. At the Court, at Kensington, for the first time—I cannot remember that I heard of them before—I should not like to swear it—I was not at the Bankruptcy Court when he pas examined—I did not see Hoad after he left possession, not for weeks—some months—not for a quarter of a year, I should think.

Q. Did you ask him what had become of the things in the place? A. I had received a mattress—I was not aware of anything being there—he said nothing to me about the snuffers, nor I to him—to the best of my belief, it was at the Court, at Kensington, I first heard of them—I was asked if I had received them.

Q. Did not you go to the Court for the purpose of charging him, among other things, with having obtained a pair of snuffers and tray from the house in Regent-street by false pretences? A. Yet—I had heard from the bankrupt that he had had them—I have no idea How long before—I charged him with obtaining a pair of snuffers and tray, a piece of marble, and blacking-brushes, by false pretences.

Q. Have you indicted him for obtaining the marble and blacking-brushes and things by false pretences? A. I suppose so, by the indictment—Jones has taken proceedings against me—he brought an action against me in December—I owe him nothing—the trial was fixed to come on on the 23rd of June last, by a Special Jury—he was before the Magistrate the day before that action was to be tried—I had no warrant to search hit house——I heard it had been searched—I did not ask for another search-warrant on the 22nd—I believe it was asked for in my presence—I cannot say whether the Magistrate refused it, and do not know whether he granted it—I had nothing to do with searching his house—I know Fuller has been indicted for perjury, at the instance of Jones, before this charge was preferred—Fuller was out of the country before this—he came back just

about the time the trial between me and Jones came on—I was no party to fetching him over.

Q. When the action was pending, I believe Fuller and you became very friendly? A. We became friendly the week before Christmas—I believe that was soon after the action was brought—I swear I never saw the snuffers after that time—I was in the habit of being at Lawrence's house, at Hammersmith, about the time the snuffers were stolen—I swear Jones did not come there one evening when I was drinking tea, and produce the snuffers in my presence, and give them to me—(he was always there when I have been there)—I did not thank him for doing 30—I never saw them—he did not produce them from his pocket, wrapped in a brown paper—I never had such a thing in my possession, nor any brown paper parcel, at that time—I was not pursuing any business before I married—I was a gentleman—I was not in any business at any time—I lived with my mother, at Lincoln—she was not in business—I had no property of my own when I married—I lent about 200l. of this money—I acquired money after my marriage—I followed no business when I was married—I never followed any business or employment—I have not been employed at a linen-draper's shop—I have been in a linendraper's shop—I was an assistant, at Spalding, for about twelve months.

Q. You have sworn you were in no trade or employ at any time? A. Not when I was married—I was a gentleman when I was married—I was not a draper before I was married—I did not receive any wages at Spalding—it was seven or eight years before my marriage—I was supported at the linen-draper's—I bad food and lodging—I was not employed anywhere else—I occasionally used to be employed in a shop at Lincoln, at a draper's—I merely went on a market-day—I was paid for that—it continued a few months, not a year—I do not recollect any other employment—I have been fond of attending the theatre as one of the audience—I never acted in my life, that I swear—the lady I married is forty-seven or fortyeight—I am thirty-six—I have been married seven years—I have a sister on the stage.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What is Mr. Lawrence? A. Not anything; he is a retired conveyancer, I believe.

Q. How did you become acquainted with the prisoner, who introduced you to Lawrence? A. He called on me—I had never seen him before—the bankrupt and myself were at variance, and be called to try to make us friends—he was represented to me as a barrister, and when I have spoken of it to himself he never contradicted it—he never said himself that he was a barrister—I now know he was an articled clerk to Mr. Eden—I know it by the different transactions we have had in the Court of Chancery—he has said he was an articled clerk—I think that was about November last—these snuffers are not named in the bill of sale—I did not know they were on the premises—Mr. Jones removed the indictment against Fuller, by certiorari, into the Queen's Bench—Fuller was there to meet it—I do not know whether Jones was there—I was not there I do not know from Jones what became of the indictment—the first fiat was at the instance of Fuller's father—Mr. Eden conducted it—I do not know whether it was Mr. Eden in person, or Jones—I did not see Jones there—that fiat was set aside—I know Fuller's father—he lives in London—Bingham lives at No. 12, Villiers-street, Strand—Jones lives with his mother, at Hammersmith—Mr. Eden's offices are in Villiers-street, at the

same place as Bingham lives—Jones introduced Bingham to me—I became possessed of the goods, under the bill of sale, on the 19th of April, 1841—Jones produced a witness named Lucy Lawrence before the Magistrate—she came to speak on the subject of the snuffers being produced to me at Lawrence's house.

JOHN HOAD . Mr. Chamberlain left me in possession of Fuller's property in Regent-street—I saw the prisoner often, while I was in possession—I did not know from him what he was—it was my business to take care of the things—I had the snuffers and tray, among other things—I taw Mr. Jones take them away—he put them into his pocket—I do not know that I spoke to him about them—he told me be was going to take them to Mr. Chamberlain—I cannot give his exact words—I do not know that I said anything when I saw him put them into hit pocket—he told me he was going to take them to Mr. Chamberlain—he took them away—I have not seen them since.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You had been in Fuller's employ as porter, before? A. Yes—I had seen the prisoner there frequently before—I may have seen him there two or three times—it might be more.

Q. You have been examined before; on your oath, did not you hand these snuffers and tray to him? A. cannot say—I will not swear I did not—I saw Mr. Chamberlain about two or three weeks after this—I cannot recollect whether I told him of these things being taken—I was there to take care of them—I might tell him what had become of them—I have no recollection of saying anything to him—I did not get all my wages when I left—they owe me 4l., odd—I have not been paid since the indictment was filed, nor been promised to be paid—they have not promised to pay me if I came forward against the prisoner—they said, perhaps, if there was any thing to be got, I might be paid out of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2196

2196. THOMAS ALLEY JONES was again indicted for a misdemeanor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2197

2197. HENRY ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 44 pieces of galloon, value 3l. 15s., the goods of Benjamin Bradley Ward and others; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 37.— Confined Six Months.

(The prisoner received an excellent character.)

Reference Number: t18420822-2198

2198. JOSEPH WOODEN was indicted for bigamy.

BENJAMIN BURTON (police-sergeant T 25.) I produce an examined copy of the register of the parish of Shepperton—I got it from the parishclerk—I examined the copy with the book at Shepperton church, in the presence of the clerk.

ANN COOPER . I am the wife of James Cooper, of Addlestone, in Surrey. I was present at the marriage of the prisoner to Ann Boddington, to the best of my knowledge, it was eighteen years ago, between Michaelmas and Christmas, at Shepperton—I knew both the parties—I saw her last Thursday, about twelve o'clock—she was the same person the prisoner was married to.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. After she was married, did you

know her for any time? A. No—about twelve years ago I saw her at Staines—I saw her last Thursday at home at her own house, where she lives—I did not know that she lived there—I did not know that she absconded, and left her husband—I know it now—I did not see any other man living in the house with her, nor see any children—the prisoner was in prison last Thursday—I lost sight of them altogether father their marriage—I have not seen the first wife in the interval between twelve years ago and last Thursday—I cannot say exactly How long after they were married I saw them together—it was more than a year or two—they had two children.

BENJAMIN BURTON re-examined. I have here the examined copy of another register, which I got from the vicar of the parish-church of Feltham—I examined it with the original in the church.

(The copies of the registers being read, the first stated that Joseph Wooden and Ann Boddington were married at Shepperton on the 29the of November, 1824; and the second, that Joseph Wooden and Elizabeth Hyatt were arried at Feltham, on the 20th of September, 1841.)

ELIZABETH HYATT . I was married to the prisoner in September last, at Feltham—he represented himself as a bachelor, a single man, not as a widower.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear that? A. Yes—I did not know he had a wife—I had not lodged in the house with him before I married him—I had known him about six months—he was employed at throwing mud—I lived at Staines—I did not know of his first marriage till afterwards.

MR. PHILLIPS called

WILLIAM HAYNES . I am a slater, and live at Staines. I have known the prisoner between seven and eight years—I remember his first wife living with him—she left him about four years ago—I lived next door to him—he behaved very well indeed to her during the time I knew him—she left him because there was another man, named William Blackman, lodging with him, and the prisoner ordered that man out of his lodgings several times, and he would not go—he told him, as soon as be went out, he would be the breaking up of his house—he left the house, and, about a fortnight after, the wife went away—they went to live at her mother's house—I know of Blackman's living there with her—there has been one child, but I do not know who by—she has had a child since she left her husband—it is about twelve months old now.

COURT. Q. Where did the prisoner live after his wife left him? A. With his mother, in the same street—not where the other man and his wife were lodging—they were living at the one end of the lane, and this man at the other, in the same town.

GUILTY. Aged 36.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2199

2199. RICHARD APPLEBY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August, 1 turkey, value 5s., the goods of George Fagg.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be a dead turkey.

WILLIAM MILAN . On the 6th of August I was employed by George Fagg, at Bedfont, threshing, and saw the prisoner on the river bank, running to and fro after something, I cannot say what—he ran into a ditch, and pulled the turkey out with his left hand—I ran off and met my master, and told him—he ran one way, and I another, up the bank where I had seen the prisoner—I met Mr. Downes, the foreman, and told him something—I secured the prisoner—he had nothing with him then—I found

the turkey in the ditch, about 150 or 170 yards from where he had been, right in the lane—he ran up the bank—it was dead—the head was very nearly separated from the body—it was quite as warm as if alive—it was not cut, it was pulled in some way.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not see the turkey at all before it was found in the ditch? A. Yes, I saw him hold it up in his hand—the head and legs are here.

DAVID DOWNES . Milan gave me information—I searched the ditch, and found a turkey—it was Mr. Fagg's—I am quite certain of it—the head was nearly severed from the body—it was a hen turkey, with a brood—here is the head, legs, and tail.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know that to be Mr. Fagg's turkey? A. I am quite satisfied about that—it was a black speckled one, and I had seen it every day.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2200

2200. MARY ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July, 1 spoon, value 10s., the goods of John Jones Vaughan:—also, on the 4th of July, 1 ring, value 5l. 5s., the goods of William Rump Williams and others:—also, on the 23rd of June, 1 pencil-case, value 1l. 4s., the goods of John Phillips; to all which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Confined Six Months.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Reference Number: t18420822-2201

2201. ELIAS DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June, 61 knives, value 2l. 3s; 25 forks, value 1l. 3s.; 36 pairs of scissors, value 15s. 4d.; and 36 pencil-cases, value 12s.; the goods of William Woods the elder, and another.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM WOODS . I am in partnership with my father, William Woods, a dealer in hardware, in Newgate-street The prisoner has been to our shop, and had some small dealings for ready money—I never gave him credit—on the 25th of June he brought a list of articles, and said he had an order for those goods from a Captain Smith, and if I would allow my porter to go with him to Captain Smith's, I should get the money for them—there was one set of ivory-handled table cutlery worth 2l., not exactly the pattern he wanted—he said he would take them to Captain Smith; if they were approved they would be kept, if not, they would be returned—I made up the goods in two parcels, and told the porter to go with him to Captain Smith, at the Jamaica Coffee-house, where the prisoner said Captain Smith was waiting—he was to deliver the goods on the money being paid by Captain Smith, and not otherwise—if he approved of the goods there was 12l. to be returned, the whole amount; if not, there was to be minus 2l. for the table cutlery—he was to deliver the goods on the money being paid by Captain Smith, and not else—the porter and the prisoner left the shop together—the porter returned some time after, with one of the parcels of goods—the parcel the prisoner kept contained the set of cutlery that he was to show Captain Smith, also some penknives, scissors, and pencil-cases, amounting to 4l. 14s. 4d.—they were not sold by me at all—all the goods in the parcel that the porter brought back were the goods positively ordered.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the prisoner in the habit

of coming to your warehouse for goods? A. Sometimes—I had been acquainted with him three or four years—he has purchased small quantities of goods of me before—when he came into my shop, he said, "Mr. Woods, I have an order from Captain Smith; you remember sending some down twelve months ago, do you not? it is for the same party"—I said I did not recollect, but it might possibly be so, as we do sometimes send goods by our porters in hopes of selling them—we allowed the prisoner no commission—he was to put his own profit on the goods—he spoke of penknives, scissors, razors, and many articles—his list contained more articles than I supplied him with—the set of cutlery, I think, was 2l. 3s.—the other things were differently priced—I gave him no invoice—I put the price down on a piece of paper—I did not give it to him—it was 12l.—I think I enumerated to him the price of the articles as I put them down—all the goods were purchased unconditionally, except the set of table cutlery—I did not sell them to the prisoner, but to Captain Smith, if he approved of them—I did not give him credit for the goods—the money was to be returned for them—they were not to be parted without the money—I did not know where the prisoner lived.

GEORGE GEMMIL . I am porter to Mr. Woods. On the 25th of June I received instructions from Mr. Woods, junior, to take the goods, and receive the money—I went with the prisoner to No. 7, St. Michael's-alley, Cornhill—while going along, the prisoner proposed to carry one parcel, and then wished to carry the other, that being the larger—I told him I could manage it myself very well—I was lame at the time—I let him have the larger one—he offered to take the other one as well—when we got to St. Michael's-alley, he said he would go up stairs, and see if Captain Smith was up at the shipping agent's—he went up stairs, and took the smaller parcel with him—he came down stairs again, and said Captain Smith was not there, he was round at the coffee-house, if I would wait a few minutes he would bring him back, and have the other goods—I said I would go with him—I turned into the passage, to get the other goods to go with him, but I was not fast enough, and he was gone with the parcel before I got into the passage—I had laid the parcel down in the passage to rest—he did not return to me at all, nor pay for them—I did not see Captain Smith—I saw the prisoner next at the Computer, about six weeks afterwards.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 30.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury ,

believing him to be in distress.— Confined Eight Months.

(There were three other indictments against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18420822-2202

2202. ELLEN COAKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July, 1 napkin, value 2s., the goods of Andrew M'Culloch and others, her masters.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Sir Andrew Francis Barnard, knight, and others.

WILLIAM M'ALPINE . I am partner with Andrew M'Culloch and Sons, bleachers, at Spring Vale, Hammersmith:—we wash and bleach for the United Service Club. The prisoner was in our service upwards of three years—we lost some table-cloths sent to be washed, for which we were accountable.

RICHARD HANCOCK (police-constable T 10.) The prisoner was given into my custody by Mr. M'Alpine, at Spring Vale, Hammersmith—I followed her up stairs—she unlocked her box in my presence—I found in it

this table napkin with the mark of the "United Service" wove on it—it was not recently washed—I also found another one in the box with no mark on it.

Prisoner. I took it to wrap up a gown in, and intended to return it in the morning, but forgot to do so; I did not intend to steal it.

MARY JURLESTAN . I am single, and am housekeeper to the United Service Club. The linen belonging to the club is committed to my care, and I give security for its safe custody—this napkin was wove for the club—I know it to be their property—I had sent such napkins to be washed to M'Culloch's—it is worth about half-a-crown or 3s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2203

2203. JOHN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Jean Antoine Colliard, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2204

2204. JOHN BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July, 1 shilling and 2 sixpences, the monies of Daniel Wilson.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the monies of Noah Bond.

DANIEL WILSON . I am manager of the Nag's Head, James-street, Covent-garden. On the 12th of July, at a quarter before six o'clock in the morning—a stranger came up to the counter, and put down half-a-Crown for payment of a pot of porter—I put down one shilling and two sixpences in change, and was going to give 2d. more—the prisoner took three halfpence from his pocket, put it over the shilling and two sixpences, drew it away, and put it into his right hand jacket pocket—I told him it was not his change, and desired him to give it to the man that gave me the half-crown—he said he had not got it—I took hold of him, and sent for a policeman, who came and took him—he then said, "I have 2s. in my pocket, but it is my own money"—one shilling and two sixpences were taken out of his pocket at the station—I did not know him before.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What do you mean by being manager of a public-house? A. Noah Bond is an invalid in the country, and I manage the business for him—it is a morning house for market people—I should think there were six or eight people in the house at this time, standing in front of the bar—there were two other persons serving besides myself, but they did not see it—I do not know the person who put down the half-crown—he is not here—I was standing close to the counter, and the man was standing opposite—I was looking at him the whole time, because when I put down the money to give change I endeavour to see if the right party gets it—the prisoner came close up to the bar—the man was standing a little before him—he put his arm over to put the three half-pence down before he asked for the ale, and drew the shilling and two sixpences away—I saw that, and told him before it was taken out of his pocket what it was—I know the money to be the same—one was a new sixpence, and another sixpence was rather worn and dark.

JAMES LEWIS ASHMAN (police-constable F 119.) I took the prisoner into custody, and found in his right hand jacket pocket one shilling, two sixpences, and one penny-piece.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2205

2205. JAMES BRANNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November, 6 pairs of trowsers, value 3l., the goods of Benjamin Prew, his master.

JOSEPH VICKERS BURTON . I manage the business of Mr. Fleming, a pawnbroker, of High-street, Whitechapel. I have known the prisoner as a customer four or five years—on the 16th of November he came to the shop and pledged a pair of trowsers—I produce two pairs—I can swear to this pair being pawned by the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What colour are they? A. Drab—he pledged them in his own name for 7s.—I did not take the others in.

THOMAS GURNEY . I am shopman to Mr. Rutland, of Whitechapel-road. I produce a pair of cloth trowsers pawned on the 3rd of December by the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. What colour are they? A. Oxford mixture—he had 6s. on them—they are worth 8s. or 9s. I should say—he gave his own name—I have known him four or five years.

JOHN SYMONDS . I am shopman to Mr. Dunney, a pawnbroker, of the Commercial-road. I have known the prisoner upwards of twelve months—I produce three pairs of trowsers pledged by him, one on the 11th of September for 8s.; one on the 21st of September for 10s.; and one on the 19th of March for 7s.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he pledge them all in his own name? A. Yes—he was a customer.

BENJAMIN PREW . I am a tailor and outfitter, and live in Aldgate High-street—here is my mark on these trowsers—these five pairs I can swear to—I marked them myself—this other pair I have no doubt are mine, but they never were marked—the prisoner had been working for me for four years—on missing trowsers from the shop I went to the pawnbroker's, and traced them out.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not in the habit of buying a good deal of you? A. He never bought any thing made—he could have bought the cloth, but these are my own marking—I did not mark his trowsers—these have been in my stock—I am the only person who marks any thing—two young men sell in my shop besides myself—they are not here.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 43.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2206

2206. MARIA CRISP was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March, 2 pillows, value 4s.; 3 blankets, value 8s.; 2 table cloths, value 4s.; 1 counterpane, value 2s.; 2 cloaks, value 4s.; 1 gown, value 2s.; and 1 sheet, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of James Crisp; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2207

2207. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August, 18 yards of woollen cloth, value 10l., the goods of Henry Martyn; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2208

2208. WILLIAM WHEEL was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August, 39 squirrel skins, value 19s. 6d., the goods of John Morris Arpenheim and others; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2209

2209. WILLIAM WILCOX was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of James Salmon, from his person.

JAMES SALMON . I was walking in Fleet-street, in company with my brother—a woman asked me, by Temple-bar, if I had lost any thing, and pointed out the prisoner to me—I followed him up Shire-lane, and accused him of stealing my handkerchief—he dropped it from his person—he said he had picked it up—I did not see him till about three minutes after I lost my handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. The woman is not here? A. I believe not—when she told me somebody had taken my handkerchief I was just on this side of Temple-bar—I know this handkerchief, I can swear to it.

GEORGE SALMON . I was with the last witness—I saw the prisoner with the handkerchief in his hand, and saw him drop it, after he was accused of it—I picked it up at his feet—we took him—he begged very hard to be let off—my brother said, "Come to the station," and he walked very quietly till we got into Wych-street—he got away from us then, and was taken into custody in Newcastle-street—he wanted to go on his knees to beg pardon.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say he picked it up? A. Not that night, he did next morning—I heard him say he had got nothing, he had not taken it.

THOMAS WHITEHEAD (police-constable F 53.) I saw the prisoner in Newcastle-street—I heard a cry of "Stop him," and took him into custody—he said, "I beg the gentleman's pardon."

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Six Months.

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, August 23rd, 1842.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18420822-2210

2210. JOHN TUCKER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August, 14 penny-pieces, the monies of John Farrant; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined Three Months, the last week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18420822-2211

2211. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August, 12 forks, value 2s.; and 12 knives, value 2s.; the goods of Thomas Walter; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 50.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2212

2212. JAMES MADDOX was indicted for embezzling, on the 23rd of July, 9s. 6d., the monies of Edward Jopson, his master; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2213

2213. ISAAC SHUCKFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 1 watch, value 6l.; and 1 ribbon, value 1d.; the goods of Benjamin Dutton, from his person.

BENJAMIN DUTTON . I am waiter at the Saracen's Head at Aldgate, I slept in a double-bedded room, the prisoner slept in the same room. On the 20th of July, I went to bed with my clothes on, about three o'clock in the afternoon—I had my watch in my waistcoat-pocket when I went to sleep—I awoke about eleven and missed it—the prisoner was gone, without paying for what he had—this is my watch.

HENRY UNWIN . I got this watch at Mr. Herring's, an outfitter's shop on Tower-hill.

FREDERICK HENRY HERRING . I bought the watch of the prisoner on the 21st of June, for two guineas.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2214

2214. GEORGE SOUTHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August, 1 bag, value 1d.; 1 measure, value 3d.; and 1 quart of nuts, value 6d.; the goods of Thomas Taylor.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I was at Hayes on the 16th of August—I had these articles in a bag—I lost them between four and five o'clock—this is my bag.

Cross-examined by MR. ESPINASSE. Q. You drank at the Cross with the prisoner? A. Yes—there were some other persons there—I saw the prisoner again that evening, near the Adam and Eve—he had his hand in the bag—be said to me, "Tom"—I did not stop him—I knew him before—he did not say "Here, Taylor, take your nuts."

JOHN SMITH (police-constable F 190.) I went to the prisoner at the Adam and Eve—he asked me to buy some nuts—I asked where he got them—he said, "From Uxbridge"—I said, "I know better"—he then said, "I own I took them from Taylor, but I took them to sell for him"—he was quite sober.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18420822-2215

2215. JOHN MULLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July, 1 1/2 lb. weight of cigars, value 8s., the goods of Felix Langston.

ANN M'NALLY . I am servant to Felix Langston, a tobacconist, in Aldersgate-street. At half-past eight o'clock at night, on the 7th of July, I was in the shop—I heard a noise, and saw the prisoner going out with a bundle of cigars in his arms—I ran out, and hallooed "Stop thief"—he chucked them down—I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where were you? A. In the parlour—he was brought back in about a quarter of an hour—his back was to me when he went out—he went half-a-dozen steps before he dropped them—I then lost sight of him—the cigars were in a glass case, in the window, near the door—I never saw him before—I did not speak to him.

JOSEPH FRY . I saw the prisoner come out of the shop with two bundles of cigars under his arm, and M'Nally coming out after him—he dropped them—I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen him before? A. No—I ran after him—I did not see him stopped—I lost sight of him when he turned the corner of Redcross-street—they took me, and put me in prison, because my father said I was not going to appear, and my father was obliged to be answerable for my appearance—he is not acquainted with the prisoner.

DANIEL CARTER (City police-constable, No. 148.) I saw the prisoner running in Redcross-street—I saw him stopped, and took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was he when you first saw him? A. In Prince's-street, Barbican—I lost sight of him for a minute, as he turned into Prince's-street, but I am sure he is the person—I did not see any one running before him.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2216

2216. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August, 1 pair of boots, value 9s., the goods of James Wright.

JAMES WRIGHT . I am a boot and shoemaker, and live in Stonecutter-street, Farringdon-street. I lost this pair of boots on the 6th of August—they were tied to a nail.

WILLIAM HOWELL . I live in Stonecutter-street, Farringdon-street, next door to the prosecutor. On the morning of the 6th of August I saw the prisoner pass my shop-door, endeavouring to conceal something under his jacket—I went out, and he ran across the road into a house—I overtook him, and took these boots from his hand—he said, "Take the boots, and let me go"—I dragged him out—he kicked my shins, and tried to throw me.

Prisoner. I was going through Farringdon-market; a young man asked me to buy a pair of boots; I bought them, and went home with them.

GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2217

2217. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August, 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 half-crown, 8 shillings, and 4 sixpence; the property of William Kerr Reed, from his person.

WILLIAM KERR REED . I am a silversmith, living in Bream's-buildings, Chancery-lane. About half-past twelve o'clock at night, on the 9th of August, I was in Skinner-street—two women met me—I believe the prisoner was one of them—they held up their arms, to obstruct my going on—the other took hold of my arm, and when we got to the bottom of Holborn-hill she suddenly left—I felt, and missed my purse—I looked round, and saw the woman that left me had gone across the road—I went over, and charged her with it—she denied it—I thought I saw something pass to the prisoner—I said, "She has given the purse to this woman"—the prisoner walked away—I followed her to Field-lane, and called "Stop thief"—the policeman being at hand, he took her within twenty yards—on our way to the station, something dropped, which turned out to be my purse.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How far did the other woman walk with you? A. From the top of Skinner-street nearly to the bottom of Holborn-hill—the second woman walked behind me—I only saw two women there—I will not swear positively that the prisoner was the woman that walked behind me—my purse was in my trowsers' pocket.

COURT. Q. To the best of your belief, was the prisoner the woman who was behind you when the other walked with you? A. Yes.

THOMAS HANDLEY SPARKS (City police-constable, No. 292.) The prosecutor followed the prisoner, and charged her with stealing his purse and money—I took her—she had got about twenty yards, when she attempted to give this purse to some girl—it dropped from her hand—I took it up.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear it must have dropped from the prisoner? A. Yes, I saw it come out of her hand—the prosecutor was on the opposite side.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2218

2218. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, 1 box, value 1s.; and 15lbs. weight of tea, value 5l.; the goods of Joseph Bulkeley Johnson and others; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JOSEPH BULKELEY JOHNSON . I am a tea-dealer, and live in Nicholas-lane. I have more than one partner—this box of tea is mine.

THOMAS KNIGHT . I am porter to the prosecutors. At a quarter-past two o'clock on the 5th of July I was returning from dinner,—on coming in at the door I saw the prisoner coming out at the door with the box of tea under his arm—I said, "Where are you going with that?"—he made no answer, but dropped his arm, sprang off the steps, and ran off about a hundred yards—he was caught by two men—I never lost sight of him—this is the box of tea.

Prisoner's Defence. I and another lad were sky-larking; he knocked my hat off, and threw it into the warehouse; I went to get it, and knocked down the tea-chest; I took it up, and was going to put it in its place, when this man was coming in, and I was stopped on the steps. Witness. We do not keep the chests of tea at the door—it was about eleven feet inside the shop—I saw no other man there.

WILLIAM BUTCHER (City police-constable, No. 540.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2219

2219. WILLIAM COWLINGE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 sovereign and 1 shilling, the monies of Samuel Jennings, his master.

SAMUEL WILLIAM FRANCIS . I am servant to the prosecutor. On the 16th of July the prisoner sent me to Foster and Smith, in Bishopsgate-street, with a picture which my master had to be framed—I got a sovereign and a shilling for it—it was my master's money, and I gave it to the prisoner as his servant—he ought to have given it to my master.

SAMUEL JENNINGS . I live in Goswell-street; the prisoner was my servant. I ought to have received a sovereign and a shilling from the prisoner—he never paid it me—he ought to have paid it the same evening.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2220

2220. THOMAS KITCHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Snoder, from his person.

WILLIAM SNODER . I am a tallow-chandler, and live in Red Lion-street, Holborn. I was in Newgate-street at a quarter-past three o'clock on the 15th of July—I felt something at my coat, turned round, missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoner with it under his coat—I said, "You have got my handkerchief"—he ran and dropped it—I picked it up and gave it to the policeman.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How near were you to him when you saw it? A. About three yards—I saw him stopped—I never lost sight of him.

EDWARD COTT (City police-constable, No. 285.) I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2221

2221. JOHN PITTS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July, 13oz. of cigars, value 8s., the goods of John Matthew Smith.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Ann Smith.

ANN SMITH . I am the wife of John Matthew Smith; I have not

beard of my husband for two years; he was alive then; I keep a tobacconist's-shop in Fetter-lane. On the 27th of July I was in my parlour adjoining my shop—the prisoner walked into the shop, opened the glass case of the window, and took out a bundle of cheroots—he went to the door, then returned, shut the glass door, and walked out—I walked after him, and spoke to a neighbour—I took him—he had thrown the cigars away—he was never out of my sight.

JAMES STREIGHT . I live in Plough-court. I saw the cigars picked up—they were given to me—I gave them to the prosecutrix, who identified them.

HENRY WHITECHURCH . I am a gentleman's servant. I saw the prisoner pass under my master's carriage, and throw down these cigars.

GUILTY .* Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420822-2222

2222. ELIZABETH LITCHFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June, I watch, value 4l.; I watch-guard, value 2s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; I purse, value 2s.; 1 sovereign, and 3 shillings; the property of George Carr, from his person.

GEORGE CARR . I am a seaman, and live In Jubilee-place, On the 29th of Jane I went with the prisoner to a house in Watney-passage—I had a watch and guard, two handkerchiefs, a purse, and a sovereign—she said she would take care of them, and took them out of my pocket—I did not wish her to do it, but she said she would take better care of them than I could—I have never received them since—I asked for them when I was leaving the house—she showed them to me out of her pocket, and then went away with them. I was all night searching for her, and found her the next night in a house in Watney-passage—she acknowledged having the watch and things in her possession—she did not give them to me—this is my handkerchief—I hemmed it myself.

Prisoner. I gave him the property in the Highway. Witness. It is false.

ANN BARTON . I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor—I heard him ask her for his watch—she said it was right enough, she would give it him by-and-by, she would not give it him then—I saw the guard hanging out of her pocket—he asked her for it—she said it was all right, she would keep it.

THOMAS DAWSON (police-constable K 251.) I took the prisoner—she said she had the property in her possession when she went out of the house, and they went into the Star; and afterwards he asked her for it, and she gave it him; but afterwards he met a lot more girls, and went with them—she gave me this handkerchief going along, and said it fell from his person, and she picked it up.

GEORGE CARR re-examined. I saw some more girls when I was in her company, but did not go with them—I am sure she is the only person I gave the watch to.

Prisoner. He made me intoxicated, took me to a house of ill-fame, and gave me the things. Witness. I did not make her intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2223

2223. THOMAS LEATHER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August, 141 lbs. weight of spelter, value 2l., the goods of the Great Western Railway Company.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN PITMAN (Great Western Railway police-constable.) I am employed at Bull Bridge, at Hayes. On Tuesday, the 2nd of August, there was a truck there containing a quantity of spelter—on the night of Tuesday, the 2nd of August, I watched the truck in which it was—I went round between nine and ten o'clock—it was safe then—it was covered with a sort of tarpaulin, tied down quite safe by a cord—between ten and eleven, I found that the cord was cut—I fastened it again—some time after, I went out, and found it was slipped off the corner of the truck, which must have been done purposely—it could not have come off itself—in the morning I reported what I had observed to the clerk—it was under the Railway Company's care—I do not know the prisoner—I was present when Davey examined this spelter—he missed eight lumps out of 403.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had you not the curiosity to look or to station yourself to see whether any body came there? A. I looked to see if I could see any person, but I could not—there is a great deal of property there—it is left standing on the railway—it was not locked up—there is a man named Kitchen in the employ of the Company.

MR. PRENDEBGAST. Q. Is their yard enclosed? A. Yes, by a wooden fence on one side, and a canal on the other, and there is a public footpath across the line, at the bottom of the yard.

JOHN DAVEY . On the morning of Wednesday I counted some spelter, there ought to have been 403 lumps—I found 395, eight were gone—I gave information of the loss to Webber—the spelter had "M R" marked on it—it belonged to Mines Royal Company—this piece is marked in that way (looking at one.)

Cross-examined. Q. You had never seen any of it before it was shown to you? A. No—I am sure this is our spelter—no other Company manufactures this sort of spelter but us—this is marked according to the invoice I received—it is manufactured in Wales—there is no other English spelter made—they make sheets of zinc of this.

JOHN LARKINS . I am constable of Iver. The Company's yard where this was is at Hayes, in the county of Middlesex—I received information of this on the 4th of August—I apprehended the prisoner, and on the 5th I found the property in the water of the canal, close underneath where he stood—on my journey back with the prisoner I met Talbot, with a dog—I took him, and put him in the cage—I afterwards received information from the lad, went and searched the place, and found seven pieces of spelter—the eighth was brought to me afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner denied all knowledge of it? A. Yes—he was standing near the bridge.

JAMES TALBOT . The officer took me to the watch-house with the prisoner—the prisoner said there was no harm in telling me what he had done—I said, "No, not a bit"—he said he had been stealing some zinc, that he stole them out of Bull Bridge-yard, and put them in the canalbridge hole—he said there was another concerned in it, but he would not mention his name—he said he went after copper, but he went to the wrong truck, and got zinc, if he had had copper it would have been worth about 5l. 10s.—he told me How many bits he took at a time—he said he saw a policeman coming over the railway, and he ran away, and left his shoes, watched the policeman back, then ran back and got two bits more, and got

his shoes—the next morning I told Woodruff, and afterwards I told the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Was that the first time you had been in custody? A. No, I was once before, for a pair of horses' ear-caps—I was in Aylesbury gaol seventeen weeks altogether—I was tried, and had three months—I never saw the prisoner before—he told me be meant to take them away on Thursday night—the officer took me on suspicion of stealing the dog—I know the lady the dog is said to belong to—I had nothing about me to induce the dog to follow me.

RICHARD PRICE . I am a labourer in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company—I had seen the prisoner on the Saturday before this occurred—he asked me if there was any copper in the trucks that were standing there—I gave information about it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you taken before the Magistrate? A. Yes—I told Davey about it after the spelter had been missed, not before—the prisoner asked me whether there was any copper in the trucks—I told him no—he said, "What sort of pieces, what did they weigh?"—I said, "Some 100 cwt., some 80lbs., some more, and some less"—he said, "Supposing a bit was gone, would they miss it?"—I said, "Yes"—he said, "Supposing a bit was dropped in the water"—I said, "They must fetch it out again"—I mentioned this before this spelter was found.

JAMES KITCHEN . In consequence of Larkins's directions, I took these lamps of spelter out of the water in the hole just by the bridge—I have known the prisoner from his birth—before we went before the Magistrate the prisoner said he should wish to speak to me, but being a prisoner be supposed he did not dare to speak to me—he wished to speak to me privately—I said, "You can"—we went out of the room to another—he he said, what a fool he was for confessing to his fellow prisoner about his stealing the property—if he had not confessed they could only have given him six months, and it was him and my brother that got it from the place, and put it into the water—he lives close by this canal.

Q. Where was the officer all the time? A. I cannot say, he had left the prisoner in my care—he said Talbot was put in the cage for a trap, and that no one saw him put the things into the water.

GUILTY .* Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2224

2224. WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 pair of boots, value 8s., the goods of James Davis and another, his masters:—also for stealing, on the 24th of July, I watch, value 2l. 10s., the goods of Joshua Salter, from his person; to both which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2225

2225. SAMUEL CUMBER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 1 crown, 3 half-crowns, 7 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of John Farron; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 11.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420822-2226

2226. HENRY MORLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August, 22 yards of woollen cloth, value 4l., the goods of William Clay.

WILLIAM CLAY . I am a woollen-draper, and live in Skinner-street,

Snow-hill. About two o'clock on the 9th of August, I was coming home, and met the prisoner about two yards from my house, coming out of my house with a roll of my cloth under his arm—I went in and made inquiries, then came out and followed the prisoner, and took him with this cloth under his arm—he said somebody had given it him—it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Six Months, the last Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18420822-2227

2227. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 1 memorandum-book, value 1d.; 26 sovereigns, 32 half-crowns, 7 shillings, 6 sixpences, and 2 5l. Bank-notes, the property of John Mercer and another.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN MERCER . I am a miller, and live at Uxbridge, in partnership with my brother—Howe was in our service. On the 19th of July last he went to London with a load of flour, and was to call at Shepherd's-bush on his return—I was in the way when he came back at night—it was near ten o'clock—he was perfectly sober—his boy was with him—some communication was made to me about a parcel supposed to be in a basket in the wagon, and it was found not to be there.

THOMAS WESTALL . I am a baker at Shepherd's-bush. On the 18th of July I had to remit a sum of money to the prosecutor—I made it up into a parcel, with a small memorandum-book—there were two 5l. notes, twenty-six sovereigns, thirty-two half-crowns, seven shillings, and six sixpences—this is the paper in which I packed the money—the address on it is in my handwriting—it was a paper bag, and I cut it—I tied it round with string, and sealed it—I gave it to my lad to take to the White Horse, to give to the wagoner.

JOHN GUTTERIDGE . I am servant to Mr. Westall. He gave me a brown paper parcel to take to the wagoner—the paper was like this—I took it to the White Horse—I found the wagoner, Howe, sitting at the table—I laid the parcel on the table, and asked whether he was Mr. Mercer's man—he said "Yes"—I asked him if he was going to Mr. Mercer's—he said, "Yes"—I said, "Will you give this to Mr. Mercer?"—he said, "Yes"—the parcel was pretty heavy—it did not sound when it was put on the table—I did not know what it contained.

JAMES HOWE . I am wagoner to the prosecutor, and have been so about twenty years. On the 18th of July, after having been to London with a load, I stopped at Shepherd's-bush on my return—I had before that seen the prisoner—I first saw him at Bays water—he asked me to let him ride to Uxbridge—I knew him as an Uxbridge man—he said he had got no money, and I let him get up—he got up in front, and afterwards went to the back part—I went on to Shepherd's-bush—I had some bread and meat in a little flat basket in the wagon—I took it into the house at Shepherd's-bush, and gave him some—we sat down together—while we were there, Gutteridge came to me from the baker's, with a parcel, which he put down on the table—it felt heavy—I do not know what was in it—I could not tell whether it was money or not—I had carried parcels of that kind before—I had carried halfpence packed in the same way—I had been told to call there for a parcel—I did not hear any jink when it was put on

the table—I took it up, and kept it in my hand until we were going to start—I then gave it to my little boy, and told him to put it safe into the basket which had been put into the wagon before—afterwards the prisoner got into the wagon again—he sat down behind, and I sat on some sacks piled up in front of the wagon—the basket was close to the front of the wagon—there was a young girl and a child entrusted to me to take to the Green Dragon at Uxbridge, and I took up a man on the road who left the wagon within six miles of Uxbridge—when we got to the Green Dragon, no one was in the wagon but the prisoner, the little girl, the child, my boy, and myself—my boy was fast asleep—just before that the prisoner had asked me for some bread as we were going down Hillingdonhill—I put my hand into the basket, and gave him some, and the parcel was there then—I am sure of that—I then went on, and before I got to the Green Dragon, I had occasion to leave the wagon for a particular purpose, and left the prisoner down from the wagon, standing near it—I was not gone many minutes—I came back to the wagon and the prisoner was standing on the shafts—I told him to get down, or get into the wagon—he got up into the wagon, and I walked by the side of the horses—I did not get up again—I then went to the Green Dragon, and put down the children there—I went just into the passage, and left the prisoner, and went on home—my boy was still asleep in the wagon—my master asked me when I got home, whether I had got a parcel—I said, "Yes"—I looked, and it was gone—I then drew the wagon into the yard, and went up to town—we could not find the prisoner—we were about till twelve or one in the morning.

Prisoner. When his master asked him if he brought any body in the wagon, he said no. Witness. No, I said I brought a man in the wagon.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you mention the name of this man to your master? A. No, I saw the police, and described him to them, and went out with them—I saw the parcel safe when they were all gone out but the two children and the prisoner.

PETER HOWE . I am the son of James Howe. My father gave me a parcel to put into the basket which was up in the wagon, on the close side, the fore part—I went to sleep a good part of the journey, and was asleep when I got to Uxbridge.

JANE CHARLES . I am eleven years old. I remember being at Shepherd's-bush—I was put into the wagon with my little cousin, to be taken to the Green Dragon, at Uxbridge—I was at the tail of the wagon—the prisoner was there—I saw Peter Howe put something into the basket just as we were going to start—a man and woman got into the wagon, and got out again—after they had got out the prisoner asked for a bit of bread—the wagoner threw him a bit of bread and meat out of the basket—just before we came to the Green Dragon the wagon stopped, and the wagoner got down—the prisoner got down with him—the prisoner then got up on the shafts, got in, and sat in the wagoner's place, close to the basket—he turned his back towards me—he sat there till we got to the Green Dragon—there was no one in the wagon but me, my cousin, the boy who was asleep, and the prisoner—we got to the Green Dragon—the prisoner then got down, and went into the passage, and there I lost sight of him—I stopped at the Green Dragon till the Wednesday.

JOHN MEAKIN . I keep the Green Dragon. I remember the wagon

stopping, and the two children being taken out—the other child was about three years old—the prisoner and the wagoner came into my passage—I noticed that the prisoner had a parcel under his left arm, the colour of brown paper—he lifted it up with his right band under his left arm—he stopped in my house from five to ten minutes—I did not see any more of him that night—there is a way near my house across the country to Tring.

Prisoner. This handkerchief (producing a parcel in a handkerchief) is the parcel I had under my arm when I went into the house. Witness. I do not know whether it was that, I took it to be a brown paper parcel—it was between the lights.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you see this brown paper before the Magistrate? Witness. A. Yes, it was something similar to this.

JAMES HOWE re-examined. My boy was asleep in the wagon—he awoke, and put the horses in the stable—when I got home, about one o'clock, he was in bed—he got up between seven and eight in the morning, and was working with me the next day.

JOHN SCOTNEY (police-constable T 180.) I am a policeman at Uxbridge. I had information of this on the following morning, between six and seven o'clock—I looked about the town, and could not find the prisoner—I at last found him at Bradley's, a blacksmith, at Tring, on the Thursday—I knew Bradley to be poor, and in a destitute state—the prisoner cohabited with Bradley's daughter—I asked him first if he recollected me—he said, "Yes, I recollect you very well." I said, "I want you, you must accompany me to Uxbridge; what have you got about you?"—I searched him—he had nothing—I then looked about the house, and on the plate shelf I found 4d.—the daughter and her father declared that was all the money they had in the world, and when that was gone they did not know what they should do—her father handed a petition to me, and said he had been out of employ six months—I then told the prisoner I took him on suspicion of robbing Mr. Mercer's wagoner of this money—he said he knew nothing about it—I said, "You recollect riding in the wagon"—he said, "Yes, I came down with old Howe"—I said he was robbed of a parcel containing the money—he said, "I recollect seeing a person come in with a parcel, but I do not know what it contained"—on Monday, the 25th, I went again to this house, and on the same shelf I found 10d. in copper, two shillings in silver, and in a little box, four half-crowns and two shillings—one of the half-crowns was a very new one—there was no mark on it—I did not take it—I stated before the Magistrate, in the prisoner's presence, that I had found that money.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not find a petition in the box? A. No, the old man handed it to me, and said he had obtained this money by the petition—there were several signatures to it—I went to those persons, and not one of them had given him any money within the last month.

RICHARD ROADNIGHT (police-sergeant T 11.) I was told of the robbery that night—I sent the wagoner with another officer—the wagoner appeared to be active in searching for the prisoner—I went to the prisoner's father's that night, and he had not seen him for six months.

WILLIAM STILLMAN . I am a farmer's labourer, and live at Rickmansworth. I found the piece of paper produced in a clump of trees, at Mr. Scott's, about half-a-mile from Uxbridge, in a cross-country road, in the direction of Tring.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; I came down, and had no money to pay my lodging; I went from there to Truing, and got there about seven o'clock in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2228

2228. RICHARD BROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 8 yards of oil-cloth, value 1l. 10s., the goods of Michael Parnell.

ROBERT JOHN PARNELL . In consequence of information, on the 8th of July, I ran down Farringdon-street, and overtook the prisoner with this roll of oil-cloth—it is my father's, Michael Parnell's, property—the prisoner had no right to it.

REUBEN GLOVER . I was passing down, and saw the prisoner take the roll of oil-cloth from the prosecutor's house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it? A. Yes, you snatched it from inside the door.

Prisoner. I plead guilty to receiving it, but I charge him with stealing it.

GUILTY .** Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2229

2229. JAMES MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July, 1 coat, value 2l. 2s., the goods of Charles Rouse.

CHARLES ROUSE . I live in Little Britain. About nine o'clock in the evening, on the 14th of July, I was stopping with my cab at Staples-inn, Holborn, and missed a coat from the dickey—I found it under the prisoner's arm.

Prisoner. He stated that I flung the coat on the ground. Witness. I ran after him, seized him, and threw him down with it.

FREDERICK AGATE (City police-constable, No. 277.) I saw the prosecutor catch the prisoner with the coat under his arm—he had got across the road then.

Prisoner. I never saw the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2230

2230. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August, 2 waistcoats, value 5s.; and 1 yard of linen-cloth, value 1s.; the goods of Philip Lorton.

JAMES PAIN . I am shopman to Philip Lorton, of Bishopsgate-street. On the 19th of August the prisoner came to our shop, and asked about a coat—I thought I saw him take a piece of linen off the shelf—I said I would send for a policeman—he said, "Oh, don't," and when he found I insisted on having one, he drew from his coat pocket two waistcoats, and threw them on the counter—they were not Lorton's.

JAMES COOPER (City police-constable, No. 127.) I took the prisoner, and found 5s. 2d. on him, and a skeleton key.

Prisoner. I saw a coat at the side of the door; the witness was standing at the door, and he said he had some coats inside; he showed me several, but they did not fit; he then said he had one outside; while he was gone, I took up one coat, and was putting it on, and I touched this parcel; it fell down; I picked it up, and threw it on the shelf; he came, and said, "I will nail you for taking this cloth." Witness. I did not say so—I do not know the meaning of "nail."

Prisoner. The policeman was standing outside; he called him in; I

took up my coat, and there were two waistcoats under it; he said, "These two waistcoats you have been taking;" I declare I am innocent; I have had that key in my possession six months; it belonged to a place I lodged at.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined One Year.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, August 24th, 1842.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420822-2231

2231. HENRY WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, at Hillingdon, 8 crowns, 16 half-crowns, 20 shillings, 40 sixpences, and 4 5l. bank-notes, the property of James Salter, his master, in his dwelling-house; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2232

2232. CHARLES FREDERICK HEBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August, 1 cash-box, value 6s.; 17 sovereigns, 16 half-sovereigns, 64 half-crowns, 120 shillings, 30 sixpences, and 15 groats; the property of Mark Hayes, his master, in his dwelling-house; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18420822-2233

2233. THOMAS NORWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 9 packets, the goods of her Majesty's Postmaster-General, he being employed under the Post-office; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 52.— Confined Six Months.

Before Lord Chief Baron Abinger.

Reference Number: t18420822-2234

2234. NICOLAS SUISSE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March, at St. George Hanover-square, 30 securities, called coupons, each entitling the bearer to 500 francs, in the French Five per Cent. Rentes, value 600l.; 3 other coupons, value 60l.; 2 other coupons, value 20l.; 1 other coupon, value 20l.; 3 other coupons, value 60l.; 16 other coupons, value 320l.; 2 other coupons, value 200l.; 2 other coupons, value 60l.; 2 other coupons, value 40l.; 3 other coupons, value 60l.; 4 other coupons, value 40l.; 1 other-coupon, value 6l.; and 1 other coupon, value 2l.; the property of Francis Charles, Marquis of Hertford, his master, in his dwelling-house.—Other COUNTS, varying the description of the securities, and the manner of stating the charge.

MESSRS. KELLY, PHILLIPS, and BODKIN, conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES MALLETT . I carry on business as a banker at Paris. I transacted business for the late Marquis of Hertford—in October, 1836, our firm purchased some certificates to bearer in the French Five per Cent. Rentes for him—I did not purchase them myself—I have here the leaves from the books of the house—the entries are not in my handwriting—I had daily access to them—on the 16th of October, 1836, we bought five Inscriptions, of 1000 francs each, which were delivered to Lord Hertford on the 23rd of April, 1838—I did not myself deliver them to him, but a person of the same name as myself, who is not here—these papers were given by that person, and brought back to us—Lord Hertford was in Paris at the time—they are signed by the Marquis—I know they are his handwriting—in January, 1837, he bought three certificates, of 1000

francs each—they were bought by our firm, I believe—I did not deliver them myself to the Marquis—I have a receipt for them—in April, 1838, ten, of 1000 francs each, in the Five per Cents., were purchased for the Marquis—I did not deliver them—in May, 1838, there were ten more, of 1000 francs, bought—I delivered them, and received a receipt for them from him, and compared the numbers on the certificates with the receipt—this is the receipt—they were 1711, 1712, 1713, 1714, and 1715, and 1789, 1790, 1791, 1792, and 1793—there was a further purchase in October, 1838—I delivered those to the Marquis, and took his receipt, which I compared with the numbers on the certificates—they were 1828 to 1832, inclusive; 1866 to 1870, inclusive; and 1920 to 1924, inclusive; all for 1000 francs each—they were all delivered on the 3rd of April, 1839, by myself—there were some Three per Cents, certificates purchased in August, 1836—four were purchased—I did not deliver them to the Marquis—in June, 1838, we purchased seven certificates, which were delivered by myself to the Marquis, and I took his receipt—I compared the numbers on the receipt with the certificate—they were 1663, 1664, and 1665, for 1000 francs; 791, 792, 793, and 794, for 500 francs each, in the Three per Cents.—I was in the habit of receiving from the Marquis coupons to place to his credit at different times—the numbers of these were kept in some instances, but this part of the book does not show it—two of the same number and date are never issued—a person in possession of a certificate would obtain the money without any transfer, on production of the inscription—the production of the coupon would entitle the party to receive the dividends—the production of the inscription itself would entitle the bearer to have the inscription transferred in his own name—to convert it into an inscription nominative, it would be necessary to produce all the coupons not then due.

COURT. Q. On production of the inscriptions, with all the coupons not then due, he could have the inscriptions put in his own name, bat not otherwise? A. No.

CHARLES EDWARD PASTEUR . (Through an interpreter.) I am a banker, at Milan, of the firm of Pasteur Giraud and Co.—our firm was instructed to purchase French certificates, for the late Marquis of Hertford—the firm caused some to be purchased in Paris, in February, 1839—I afterwards received them, and delivered them to Lord Hertford—I have a memorandum of all the inscriptions which were given to the Marquis—it was made before quitting Milan—I have a receipt for those I did not deliver, but not for those I delivered myself—I know the numbers of those by our books, they were entered at the time I personally delivered them—I saw the entry—the numbers were entered at the time I received them from Paris, and I saw the entry at the time—I have the original letters from Paris, and have taken the numbers from those letters—we always compare the inscription with the numbers in the letters, and did so then—I have the letters here—my memorandum is taken from the books and letters also—on the 21st of December, 1838, I delivered Nos. 335, 336, and 433, for 2500 francs; on the 16th of January, 1839, 438, for 2500 francs, 337, for 5000 francs; 338 for 5000 francs; on the 15th of February, 1839, 340 and 341, for 5000 francs, and 441, for 2500 francs—all these I delivered personally—there were also some Three per Cents.—I have not got the letters referring to them—I took the numbers from the original letters, at Milan—I compared them with the letters at the time I delivered them to the Marquis—this memorandum was copied from the letters by one of the

clerks, not by myself—the numbers were 881, for 15,000 francs; 1312 and 1315, for 3000 francs; 1316, for 300 francs; and 1317, for 300 francs—I received them from Deichtal and Son, of Paris—in 1840, I received some coupons from the Marquis, to cash for him—this letter is signed by me—I compared the numbers of the coupons I received with the letter—they were 2622, 2621, 2697, all for 250 francs, Five per Cents.; 1322, 1323, 1326, and 1338, 1944 to 1950, of 500 francs each, Five per Cents.; 430, 431, 433, 438, 441, all for 1250 francs each, Five per Cents.; and 335, 336, 337, and 338, for 2500 francs each.

FREDERICK VANDENBROOK . (Through an interpreter.) I am in the employ of Adolphus Deichtal, banker, at Paris—Pasteur and Co. are our correspondents—in February, 1839, I remember eight certificates being bought by our house for the Marquis of Hertford, for 1000 francs each—they were bought by a money-changer, and never came into my hands—I never saw them.

STEPHEN PENFOLD . I am clerk to Messrs. Rothschild—in April, 1840, our house cashed a quantity of coupons—I received them myself, from Messrs. Hopkinson's clerk, and this paper, with the numbers on it, which were 1828 to 1832, 1866 to 1870, 1920 to 1924—those from No. 1866 were for 500 francs each, Five per Cents.

JAMES DIXON . I am clerk in the banking-house of Sir Charles Price and Co.—on the 21st of April, 1840, I received from Messrs. Hopkinson a quantity of coupons, to be sold—I did not take the numbers—I sent them to Mr. Bordier, a foreign broker, by a messenger—I afterwards received the proceeds of that sale, from Mr. Bordier, 157l. 9s. 7d., on account of Messrs. Hopkinson—on the 28th of April, I received some more, from the same house—I sent them to Bordier, and afterwards received a cheque for 1082l. 13s. 6d. as the proceeds—on the 9th of May, I had a similar transaction, and received 204l. 14s. 6d. on account of Messrs. Hopkinson—and on the 15th of May, 374l. 0s. 4d.—in each of these instances I sent them to Bordier, and sold them on account of Messrs. Hopkinson.

MR. PENFOLD re-examined. I paid to Messrs. Hopkinson, for the coupons, 295l. 9s. 6d.—I paid it to Messrs. Hopkinson's clerk.

THOMAS WILLIAM HARMSTEAD . I am clerk to Mr. Bordier, of Austinfriars—on the 21st of April, he bought some coupons of Sir Charles Price, which came to 157l. 9s. 7d.—I took the numbers of them—they were 1322, 1323, 1324, 1326, 1327, 1328, 1337 and 1338—I cannot tell whether they were Five per Cents.—I think they were for 500 francs each, but cannot be positive—on the 28th of April, we bought some of Sir Charles Price, amounting to 1082l. 13s. 6d., and I took the numbers—among them were Nos. 1711 to 1715, 1789 to 1793, 1944 to 1951—they were for 500 francs each—I cannot say whether they were Five per Cents.—they were for the half-yearly dividend.

HARVEY GOODHALL . I was clerk to Mr. Bordier in May, 1840—he purchased of Sir Charles Price and Co., some coupons on the 9th of May, 1840, we paid 204l. 14s. 6d. for them—Nos. 521 and 522, 664 and 665 were among them—they were for 500 francs—I cannot say whether they were Five per Cents.—Nos. 603 and 604 for 750 francs each were bought at the same time, making 1500 francs together—there was 889 for 150 francs, 791 to 794 for 250 francs each, and 2867 for 50 francs.

WILLIAM CROW . I am clerk to Mr. Bordier—on the 15th of May, 1840, some coupons were bought of Sir Charles Price—I entered them in

the book—the amount in English money was 374l. 0s. 4d., numbers 1395, 1400, 1678 to 1681, 1690 to 1692, being nine coupons, of 500 francs each, and 340 and 341 for 2500 francs each—I do not know How much per cent, the interest was.

THOMAS CHUMLEY . I am clerk to Messrs. Hopkinsons—the late Marquis of Hertford kept an account at our house, and was in the habit of sending us coupons to be sold—they were sent by us to Sir Charles Price and Co. to be sold—(looking at a book)—on the 13th of April, 1840, a number were sent to be sold on account of the Marquis of Hertford—those were sent to Rothschild's, not by myself, and afterwards 295l. 9s. 6d. was paid to us for them, and placed to the Marquis's account—the entry it in my own handwriting.

MR. THESIOER. Q. Do you know anything beyond the house crediting the Marquis for the amount? A. I know it was for coupons, by the entry stating so.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You did not take an account of the numbers? A. No—on the 21st of April, the same year, another parcel was received at our house, on the Marquis's account, which were sent to Sir Charles Price—we received a cheque of 157l. 9s. 7d. from them, and placed that to the Marquis's account.

COURT. Q. Were you in the habit of receiving coupons from other customers? A. Yes, I think I may say we were, of various values, and about the same time—I only presume those sent to Sir Charles Price were those which were received from the Marquis, from the transaction in our books—if we received two of equal value from different customers we should send them all to Sir Charles Price—I expect that each coupon has the name of the proprietor on it, but I am not in the Habit of seeing the documents—we do not enter any numbers—if different customers sent coupons about the same time, and we sent them all to Sir C. Price, we do not distinguish the lots, we leave it to them and their broker.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Suppose they sold to the broker two lots, the same day, and he returned you a cheque for them, How would you know to which it belonged? A. There would be a distinct account rendered—I believe the rate of exchange settles the amount of the interest of coupons—we do not keep an account of that, but there is an account in the market—we do not credit Lord Hertford with the amount till we receive the return from Sir Charles Price—we enter that amount to the credit of Lord Hertford, from another book, a sort of cash-book of City transactions—the coupons would be made up from Sir Charles Price's book.

Q. Suppose the amount of 157l. had included coupons the property of another person, as well as Lord Hertford, How would you have dealt with it? A. The probability is, it would be discovered by the party not having the amount passed to his account; inquiry would be made and the error detected; we should not enter the whole sum to Lord Hertford if it did not belong to him—on the 28th of April, we received 1082l. 13d. 6d. from Sir Charles Price, and passed it to Lord Hertford's account.

MR. THESIGER. Q. Was that by cheque? A. No—I dare say credit would be given by Sir C. Price in a pass-book we have with them—they give credit for certain sums.

MR. BODKIN. Q. On the 9th of May was 204l. 14s. 6d. and on the 15th of May 374l. 0s. 4d. placed to the same account? A. Yes.

WILLIAM HENRY THOMAS . I am a bullion dealer, in Cornhill. I know the prisoner—he brought me a quantity of coupons to be converted into English money on the 16th of March last—I took the numbers and amounts, which were 2697, 250 francs, payable in March; another of the same number payable in September, 1841; 1394, 500 francs, payable March 1839; 1394, in March 1840, 500 francs; 1395 and 1400, payable in March 1840, for 500 francs each; and thirty more for 500 francs each, all payable in March 1841; Nos. 1322, 1323, 1324, 1326, 1327, 1328, 1337, and 1338, 1678, 1679, 1680, 1681, 1690, and 1691, 1868, 1869, and 1870, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, and 1924, 1944 to 1951—payable in September 1840, three of 500 francs, 1793, 1868, and 1923—payable on the 22nd of September, 1841, sixteen more of 500 francs, 1711, 1712, 1713, 1714, 1715, 1789 to 1793, 1944 to 1949—payable on the 22nd of September, 1841, Nos. 340 and 341, for 2500 francs each—payable on the 22nd of June, 1841, two of 750 francs each, 603 and 604—payable at the same time, Nos. 521 and 522, 500 francs each—on the 22nd of December, 1841, Nos. 663, 664, and 665, 500 francs each; also 791 to 794, 250 francs each—on the 22nd of June, 1841, Nos. 889, 150 francs; 2867, 50 francs, making altogether 70 coupons, and the sum payable 37, 200 francs; these were all due at the time he brought them to be cashed—I did not give him the money at the time—I sent them to Paris to tee if they were all in order, and he was to call again for the money—he called on the 28th of March, and I paid him for 32,000 francs of them, 1237l. 18s. 2d—I sent a cheque for the amount to my bankers, and gave him the same money as I received from my bankers—I am not able to say whether there was a 1000l. note among it—I believe the payment of the remaining coupons was not going on.

Cross-examined by MR. THESIGER. Q. Had you known him before? A. I had seen him some time before—I understood him to be steward to the Marquis of Hertford—I have carried on business some time as a money changer.

MR. KELLY. Q. How long had you known him? A. I am not able to say—I should say the first time I saw him was in October 1841, probably, when he came and requested cash for some coupons—I find by my book that on the 22nd of October I cashed 3,000 francs for him, on the 17th of November I cashed 10,000 franca for him, and on the 24th 10,000—on the 22nd of February we received from Mr. Graham 17, 500 francs, which I understood belonged to Mr. Suisse.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am cashier at Messrs. Glyn's banking-house. On the 28th of March I cashed a cheque drawn by William Henry Thomas for 1237l. 18s. 2d.—I paid for it No. 1266, dated the 13th of January, 1842, 1000l. note, and among others, a 200l. note, No. 88404, dated the 10th of January, 1842.

WILLIAM RAWLINS . I am in partnership with Mr. Lambert, as silversmiths, in Coventry-street. I know the prisoner very well—he came to our house, and gave me an order in April or March—he ordered a great many things—it may be called a small service of plate—the price was to be 2, 200l. or 2,100l.—on the 4th of April he paid me 1, 800l. on account, among which was a 1000l. note, No. 1266, dated the 13th of January, 1842, and a 200l. note, No. 88404, dated the 10th of January, 1842.

Cross-examined by MR. THESIGER. Q. You have known Suisse some years? A. Yes—the Marquis did not deal with me—I knew him

to be the Marquis's servant very well—his character was that of an upright, honourable man.

MR. WILLIAM HUGHES BRABANT . I am one of the firm of Capron and Co.—we were solicitors to the late Lord Hertford, and after his death acted for the executors—Lord Hertford died on the 1st of March—I had certain communications from time to time with the executors relative to the estate—on the 4th of April Suisse came to our office—I had at that time ascertained that there were some accounts between him and Lord Hertford, and that he had received several sums of money during Lord Hertford's lifetime—I had not sent for him—he came voluntarily to ask for permission to go to Paris—I told him to come again in half-an-hour—in the mean time I communicated with the executors—he came again in half-an-hour—I then called his attention to a sum of 9,200l., which he had received from Messrs. Coutts and Co., Lord Hertford's bankers, between the 1st and 9th of February, on his lordship's account—be said that he had credited what he wanted for the current expenses in his book, and paid the rest into my lord's hands—when I expressed some surprise at it, he added that the accounts he had sent in to Mr. Capron would show How a great part of the money had been applied, and that in addition to that he had paid Charlemagne, the cook, nearly 2,000l.—he then renewed his application to go abroad, and expressed a hope that the executors would settle his accounts—he said he wanted money to pay his passage, for that in fact he was living upon borrowed money—the executors did not permit him to proceed to Paris—they were in the house at the time, I communicated with them and it ended in their refusing to let him go.

Cross-examined by MR. THESIGER. Q. At the time yon told him to return in half-an-hour, do you recollect whether he said that he would go for his passport, and come back in that time? A. Yes, he did, and he did so—Mr. Croker was at the office at the time, and I think Lord Lowther, but I am not sure—I remember Mr. Croker being there, and I think one or two others of the executors, but I only with certainty recollect Mr. Croker—I have heard that Mr. Croker was at Dorchester-house two or three days before the Marquis's death—I did not see the Marquis shortly before his death, I did some time previous—Mr. Capron generally transacted business with Lord Hertford—when I told the prisoner the executors would not allow him to go abroad, he complained bitterly of being confined to a very small room, and of his health suffering—he said he had nearly killed himself twice, and he would not kill himself a third time for those gentlemen—I have the probate of Lord Hertford's will in Court—Suisse was taken very ill, I believe, before the Marquis's last illness—I do not know exactly who attended the Marquis in his last illness—I have understood it was Mr. Copeland and Mr. Fuller—I believe Mr. Fuller is not here—I have not seen him—he was examined as a witness for the prosecution on the last trial—I saw Mr. Copeland in Court this morning—163l. was the amount claimed by Suisse, as due to him from the executors from his book—I do not know what his wages were.

Q. During the whole of the month of March, had not the prisoner been pressing for a settlement of his account with the executors? A. Not that I am aware of—from what I have heard he had done so—he certainly never applied, either directly or by letter to our firm, that I am aware of.

Q. Do you remember, on a former occasion, being asked, whether he wanted a settlement of his accounts, and you answering, he expressed

anxiety? A. He certainly, while with me, expressed anxiety about it—more than that I do not know.

FRANCIS FREDERICK PARTRIDGE . I am an inspector of police. I went to Dorchester-house on the 4th of April last, to apprehend the prisoner—I found him in his room, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening—I told him I had come there for the purpose of apprehending him on a charge of embezzlement—he asked me what the meaning of embezzlement was—I told him the appropriating the monies of others to his own use—I gave him into the custody of Sergeant Lund—in the mean time I searched, and found some papers in the room, which I produce—there are two letters—some papers were in a tin case in the same room, with his name marked on it—here is one letter, with a portion of the top torn off, that was among them—I then returned to the prisoner—next morning I found the piece of the letter that was torn off, underneath the grate of the fire-place in the same room, where the cinders fall—I searched the prisoner, but nothing material was found on his person—he gave me his keys, with which I opened the drawers—I found in the table-drawer thirteen sovereigns in a purse, and forty-two Napoleons, in one of a chest of drawers in his room—I searched a box marked, "Suisse, private," and found in it several memorandums, a will, and also a list of articles of plate relating to Lambert and Rawlins.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did he appear to be very unwell at the time? A. He did, he had on his night-cap and morninggown—he subsequently stated, that he had been endeavouring to procure the executors to settle his accounts, but he could not succeed—that was on one occasion in going from Bow-street—I found him in a small room in Dorchester-house—I presume that is the room he usually occupied—I took possession of every kind of paper I could find—I kept them in my own possession, produced them at Bow-street, and produce them now—I have kept all the papers, memorandums, and letters I could find—they are in the possession of the executors, or those that represent them.

MR. GEORGE CAPRON . I am one of the firm of Capron and Co., solicitors to the late Lord Hertford, and to the executors—I was solicitor to the late Lord Hertford between twenty and thirty years—during the latter part of his life he passed many years abroad, for the greater portion of the latter part of his life—when he was in England I had very frequent communication with him on matters of business—I remember, in the year 1840, his having an illness—I cannot exactly say the time of the year—from that time to the present I should say his health was decidedly impaired—he came to England last, I think, in October 1841—be then resided at Dorchester-house until his death—I saw him frequently during that period, but not so frequently as I did previously, for in fact it was difficult to understand his lordship, and I abstained from troubling him more than was necessary.

Q. During the last few months of his life did you find him equal to business at all times as formerly? A. I should say there was a material difference at times—there were times when I should not have thought proper at all to trouble him on any important matters of business.

COURT. Q. That is to say, during the last two months, there were times when you thought him unfit for fatiguing business? A. Yes—there were times when he was much more fit than at other times—in my opinion, the intellect was much more impaired than before the time to which Mr. Kelly alludes.

MR. KELLY. Q. Did you continue to tee Lord Hertford, occasionally, down to the time of his death? A. I did—I was in the room within twenty minutes of his death—Suisse had been his valet and personal attendant for a great many years, and was very high in his confidence—at the close of Lord Hertford's life, Suisse was confined to his room by illness—I cannot state for How long, but I should think he roust have been ill ten days, or a fortnight—except when prevented by illness, he was constantly about the Marquis's person—Lord Hertford slept in a room adjoining the library, the library being, generally, the sitting-room—I have seen him wheeled out of the bed-room into the library of a morning—he died in the library—I never saw Suisse, during his illness, until after the death of Lord Hertford—he was then in a small room adjoining the library, and I believe it was the room in which he generally slept—I do not know where Lord Hertford kept his money—I have never seen money taken from any drawer—in opening the drawers after his death, some money was found in different drawers, but I was not privy to any particular place in which he kept it.

Q. Do you know, from anything that ever passed between yon and Suisse, whether he had anything to do with the money transactions of Lord Hertford? A. After Lord Hertford's death, he sent some accounts to our office—on the 14th of January last, I waited on Lord Hertford with a cheque for a particular sum which had been received on his lordship's account—it was received on a particular account, and I was anxious to hand it over to his lordship—I think I waited some few minutes, till his lordship came out of his bed-room—he was wheeled out—I then presented him with the cheque—he asked for pen and ink—I gave him the amount, and told him it was money I had received on his account, which I explained to him, and was anxious to give to him—he took the pen, and wrote his signature, "Hertford," immediately along the signature of Coutts and Co., which had the effect of obliterating it—I observed to Suisse, that Lord Hertford seemed not to be in a very proper state of mind to transact business, and therefore I should take the cheque home and pay it into his bankers, Messrs. Hopkinson's—Suisse acquiesced in the observation, that Lord Hertford's mind was not so collected as it ought to be—I think he said something to this effect, that if he found money, or anything, lying on the table, he paid it into Coutts's himself—I do not exactly remember the observation he made use of.

COURT. Q. His lordship had two bankers, then? A. He had—Coutts and Hopkinson—this took place in the library.

Cross-examined by MR. THESIGER. Q. You were examined on the former trial? A. I was.

Q. Did you state one word of this, that you have told us now? A. I was asked no questions upon it—I did not—Mr. Fuller attended Lord Hertford in his last illness—I have seen him there repeatedly—I heard him examined as a witness for the prosecution on the former trial—I heard inquiries made of him as to the state of Lord Hertford's mind, and heard the answers which he gave—I have not seen Mr. Fuller in Court to-day—I do not, of my own knowledge, know whether he is here, or not—I am not conducting the prosecution—I do not know whether he has been subpconaed—I should say not, probably—Mr. Hobler conducts the prosecution, not for us—he is employed solely by the executors, not by us, ortainly—I believe I am justified in saying that I know Suisse had been ill and confined to his bed during the last illness of Lord Hertford—I

never saw him till the death of Lord Hertford—I have every reason to believe he was taken ill before Lord Hertford's death.

Q. Was Mr. Croker in the house, prior to the death of Lord Hertford? A. On the Sunday evening, I went to Dorcheste-house, and saw Mr. Croker there—he went home occasionally, but he was there principally from Sunday till Tuesday, because I saw him there repeatedly—I was there twenty minutes before Lord Hertford's death—I saw Mr. Croker there then—he did not take up his residence at Dorchester-house after the death of the Marquis—he left immediately after the breath was out of the body, and I believe I am justified in saying he never slept there to my knowledge, and I do not believe he did—the doors of the library were sealed up, and the boxes and papers which were about—some days afterwards, some policemen were employed—I should think it must have been four or five days—Mr. Hopkinson went down to the police-office on the day the will was opened, to request their attendance—I was present, but I really do not recollect the precise day.

Q. How long did Suisse continue ill after the death of the Marquis? A. On one occasion, when I was in the library with the executors, Suisse came into the library in his night-cap and dressing-gown—he was not about his ordinary business at the time we left town for the funeral, which was on Saturday, the 18th of March—the Marquis died on Tuesday, and was buried on the Saturday fortnight afterwards.

EDMUND HOPKINSON, ESQ . I was formerly a banker—I am one of the executors of the late Lord Hertford—I was present, and was one of the executors that took possession of the effects after Lord Hertford's death—I was present when certain inscriptions were found—(looking at some produced by Mr. Englebatt)—I have every reason to believe that these were found among the late Marquis's effects, because I see here are my remarks in pencil on some of them—when they were found they were sent to Messrs. Coutts—I did not take them—they were put into a box, which was conveyed by Mr. Englebatt—these incriptions are all that have been found belonging to the late Lord Hertford—here are 27,000 francs per annum, Three per Cents., and 8,000 francs per annum, Five per Cents.—they are annuities—the value of the Three per Cents, would be about 1080l. a-year, and the Five per Cents. 320l. per annum; but to state correctly, I must know the market price—the Five per Cents, are at three years' purchase, and the Three per Cents, about 27 years' purchase—these were all the certificates of French stock to bearer that were found belonging to Lord Hertford in his lordship's box.

COURT. Q. Do you mean by that, that there were also certificates in the name of Lord Hertford? A. Yes, inscribed to Lord Hertford in the great book of finance, and payable only to him—I had no personal communication with Lord Hertford during the last few months of his life.

Cross-examined by MR. THESIGER. Q. What was the amount of the inscriptions nominative? A. Speaking from recollection, I should say 87, 500 francs a-year—I cannot speak exactly—it was 78, 800, I think—I think the original sum was 79, 200, and an inscription of 500 francs a-year was left at Messrs. Mallett's, and that deducted would make 78, 800—the value in English money would be about 70,000l. odd—the gross amount which his lordship possessed was inscribed in the book of finance in Paris—78, 700 was what we found the receipts for; and there was one besides that at his banker's at Paris, for 500 francs.

MR. KELLY. Q. Do you happen to recollect of what date those noninative

inscriptions were? A. 1823, I think—I should think they were purchased in 1823, as far as my recollection goes.

FREDERICK RICHARD SASSE . I am a professor of languages. I have made a translation of this letter—(one produced by Partridge)—(read)—"Mr. Benoit Cailliez has handed over to us on your account 58 coupons of interest of Five per Cent. Rentes, which we have placed in our bank, in the sum of 44, 250, to your credit, at 5 per cent, interest. We shall have to debit to you francs 12,000, which we remit to your son in bills on Nancy. We hope soon to have the pleasure of seeing you, and that you will have entirely recovered from your indisposition. In that hope we present to you our sincere salutations.—CAILLIEZ & DE BACQUE."

ROBERT HARE . I know the prisoner's handwriting—I believe these letters to be his writing—(looking at some.)

MR. SASSE re-examined. These are translations of these letters—(read)—"5th April, 1842. My dear—, I have just received your kind letter, by which I perceive that I can reckon on your friendship, which I cannot too much appreciate, and of which I am proud to make myself worthy. Here is the plan which I had formed—to send, by Brussels, two fine horses, with their coachman and their harness. I intend buying from you one of those Brussels carriages, the same as that in which I have seen you drive so often with all your family, a kind of covered char-a-banc. As to my plate, far from selling it here, I am having a service made here, for which I expect to pay the duty; but I shall draw back here the duty on re-exportation, which will cover that which I shall have to pay abroad. As to the stamp, I had no idea of it, as new plate; and I am ignorant whether, by Calais, it would be the same thing. My first idea is, that from Calais to Nancy the distance is double that from Brussels to Nancy. If, nevertheless, the same formalities do not exist by the way of France, I will send plate by Calais. In any case, that will not prevent my passing through Brussels; that is to say, from Calais I shall go to you. That cannot in any case be before the month of June next. I shall not be ready before that time. I reckon on your kindness until then. If you can give me other information, have that kindness. Pray present my respectful duty to Madame, and dispose of him who will be all his life, with high consideration, your sincere and very devoted friend, SUISSE.—A million of thanks to M. Felice for the good opinion he has of me, and of the preference he gives me. I am sincerely grateful for it; but at my age, and with sufficient for me and mine, one must be more than mad to go into business, and spoil so fine an independence. The heart and friendship of M. Felice's entirely devoted servant for life, SUISSE."

"To N. PROFT , Hotel Belle Vue, Brussels."

"My dear friend,—I answer your amiable letter, the contents of which make me more and more regret not being able to depart so soon as I had hoped. These gentlemen do not allow me, seeing that my presence is too useful to them for some time longer—at all events, at least, I see that if we lose three quarters, we shall only lose that. I say 'we,' because those that I intend for you are in the same predicament as those that you have—they are all quite naked. Perhaps among those that you have been repaid one might find the means of dressing them; perhaps among those which remain with me—if that, it would be necessary that I should depart immediately, which is impossible. If you or your brother could make a trip over here at my cost and expense, if it were only for the time of our understanding

one another, and you running back again very quickly, I should be enchanted; and I think the thing is worth the trouble, &c."

THOMAS LAWSON . I reside in Paris, and act as a law-agent for the English there. I have several times applied to Mr. Benoit Cailliez to induce him to come over here as a witness—six inscriptions were procured under certain proceedings in the French Courts—I was present when they were delivered—I have an examined copy of the proceedings, which I produce—there was an attachment framed on them—I have examined the numbers to see if they were the same—they were delivered by the subtreasurer of the case of deposit to Mr. Jules Mallett, in my presence—the French avocat was also present, the attorney of the executors—Cailliez and De Bacque, were not present, but there was some one present from the prisoner.

MR. MALLETT re-examined. The Three per Cent. French stock is payable half-yearly, in June and December; and the Five per Cent, in March and September.

(Upon reference to the late Marquis's will, the following sums were, by different codicils, bequeathed to Suisse, the first in 1829, and the last in November, 1839, viz., 1000l., 2000l., 3000l., 2, 600l., 2000l., 8000l.—total, 18, 600l.—in the last, he calls Suisse "an excellent man.")

Witnesses for the Defence.

THOMAS FOOTE . I was in the service of the late Marquis of Hertford nearly seventeen years—I am not yet discharged from the service of the present Marquis—I was in the habit of attending about the person of the Marquis for the last few years, to assist Suisse—Suisse was the person almost entirely employed about the person of the Marquis—he accompanied him on his travels as his valet—he was in the habit of paying monies on his account, in short he acted as valet and steward—he was house-steward—Suisse was in the Marquis's service before I came—the Marquis was very much attached to Suisse, and he became a good deal more so towards the latter part of his life, since 1839—I do not know whether he was entrusted on the private matters of the Marquis—I believe he was.

Q. Was the Marquis in the habit of receiving females at his different houses? A. Yes, he was—at Dorchester-house and the Regency-park—he was in the habit of travelling on the Continent with those persons.

Q. Was Suisse in the confidence of the Marquis with reference to the management of those concerns? A. He was—no one but Suisse was entrusted with the management of those matters—the Marquis became seriously ill about a month before his death, but he could not move about without assistance for the last twelve months or more—I and Suisse were the persons that assisted the Marquis on those occasions—Suisse was over me—I acted in Suisse's absence—the females that visited the Marquis were in the habit of coming to him every day for months—some of them came nearly up to the time of his death—one of them was in the house at the time of his death—that was Henriette—that was the only name I knew her by—there was a door at the back of the premises of Dorchester-house, through which the females sometimes used to come, and sometimes they came in at the front—they sometimes came in at the back door of an evening, and went away again next morning—I know Miss Borel—she lived with the Marquis for six or seven years—she quitted him about six weeks before his death—the Marquis's bodily health failed him at times—about June, 1840—his memory was good—for the last twelve months his lordship's habits were not cleanly—he could not help himself on necessary occasions—

somebody was obliged to assist him—I or Suisse assisted him—at times it was necessary to change his linen both by day and night, and latterly more than once or twice in the course of the night—not always in the day—Suisse was in the habit of doing so when he was in the way, and when be was not, I did it, or both of us together, assisting each other—towards the latter part of his lordship's life he was not able to control the calls of nature—I have frequently known Suisse to be called up from his bed in the course of the night, two or three times, to attend on him—he slept in a room near to his lordship's, that he might always be handy in attendance—his lordship returned from France in October last—I had been travelling abroad with him—Miss Borel was in his company at that time, and a Madame Dubois was with him—after his lordship's return in October, he continued in about the same health until he was taken ill finally—he would go out in the day-time for an hour or so in the carriage, and back—in October last he was unable to help himself at the calls of nature, and was so for twelve months or more—during the, latter part of his life he had a spasmodic affection in the throat, which rendered his speech difficult to understand to those not constantly about him—before he was finally taken ill he took a journey to Richmond—it was nearly a month before his death—he was in the habit of being medically attended daily—I do not know whether his medical advisers were aware of his going—he was not in a state of health to have undertaken a dinner party on such an occasion—his coachman went with him—no one else—I did not go—the ladies went in the carriage with him—Suisse did not go, nor did he join the Marquis at Richmond—I do not know whether, Suisse was aware he was going—the Marquis was very much attached to Suisse, and he appeared very much attached to the Marquis—I knew the Marquis gave Suisse money once—it was 160l., in one lump—the Marquis was in the habit of consulting Suisse when he was abroad, as to what he should do, and where he should go—Suisse paid all expenses abroad, both public and private—he mode payments of all kinds—the gift of 160l. was after his lordship had had a long illness of the gout in 1838—I think just before the coronation at Milan—I cannot say who used to pay the Marquis's women—I have not seen that done.

Q. Do you remember his landing at Ramsgate on his last return to England? A. Yes, in October last—we had to take him out of the steam boat into a small boat to land him—he was not at that time able to help himself—he could not stand upright without assistance—Suisse, and I, and the persons, lifted him out of the boat to the harbour steps, which we had very great difficulty in doing, and nearly tumbled into the water—we had very great difficulty to get him on to the steps of the pier—Suisse secured the person of the Marquis by holding him fast by the body—the Marquis's arms were round his neck, and I had fast hold of Suisse, pulling, and others were behind to assist him—there was difficulty and danger in getting from the boat to the steps—a man cried out, "Let go of the boat," and at the same time we were not landed—it was dark, and we were on the boat's head—not clear of the steps, and when we got the Marquis on the steps, Suisse and I managed him by our two selves—I do not remember the Marquis showing the least appearance on the cry of, "Let go"—he made no observation about it to me when he got ashore—he might have done so to Suisse—he did not refer to it afterwards in my hearing—for a month before he died he became much worse—during the

latter part of his life it was his practice to ring in the middle of the night for Suisse, more frequently than before—Suisse was himself taken very dangerously ill about three weeks or a month before his lordship's death—he was ill almost all the time his lordship was—he did not get up the last fourteen days—the duty principally devolved on me then—Suisse was totally unable to help him for the last fourteen days; he was confined to his bed.

MR. KELLY. A. I think you say that you, as well as Suisse, assisted in attending Lord Hertford personally? A. Yes, during the latter part of his life, and during the last fourteen days I alone attended him—I do not remember the day that Lord Hertford was taken seriously ill with his last illness—I should say it was about a fortnight before his death, or it might be three weeks—when he was first taken ill Suisse and I, jointly, attended him for a little while, until Suisse was taken ill himself—during his personal attendance he was frequently in the bed-room with Lord Hertford—his lordship had boxes in the library—I cannot say what property was in them—he took those boxes with him when he travelled, and kept the keys of them himself—the keys were on his bed-room table, on his dressing-case, where they always remained while his lordship was ill—I do not know where he kept money—I have seen a small quantity, such as 10l., taken from the table drawer in the library by Lord Hertford, and I have seen Suisse take it to give him change, and I have seen Lord Hertford do it as well—I saw Suisse take it once, to give his lordship change of a 10l. note—Lord Hertford was in the room at that time, and saw him do it—he directed him to do it—his lordship gave me a good many presents—he made me a present at Turin, at the same time as he gave Suisse the 160l.—on that occasion his lordship was recovering from a long illness, and had been attended by Suisse and myself—he did not give money to the other servants on that occasion, that I know of—no other servants attended him—I got 50l., and Suisse 160l.—I do not know of anybody else having had a present at that time—his lordship gave me 200 guineas for me to give Suisse 160l., and to keep the remainder myself—Lord Hertford bad been ill about a month at that time—that was the only occasion on which I knew Suisse to receive a present from the Marquis—I received a present of 20l. once a-year, besides my wages.

Q. While you attended on Lord Hertford, during the latter part of his life, had you occasionally to perform those disagreeable offices as well as Suisse? A. Yes, I had—during the last few months, after his return to England, his health was not worse than it had been—he required these peculiar assistances at night for about twelve months—it was the ease while he travelled on the continent—I saw him start for Richmond, and his coachman drove him—he left the house alone—I did not see him again until his return—he returned alone—I did not see anybody go with him—there was no footman behind the carriage.

ANGELIQUE FELICITE BOREL (through an interpreter.) I am a native of France—I am twenty-four years of age—I lived with the late Marquis of Hertford between seven and eight years, from the age of sixteen—I always travelled with him on the continent—when in England I resided in apartments, which were provided by Suisse on the Marquis's account—the Marquis paid for them—I slept at Dorchester-house—I went from my apartments to Dorchester-house, and slept with the Marquis there—I was

very often in the habit of dining at Dorchester-house—I know the Count and Countess Zichy by name—I have seen them at Dorchester-house—when the Count and Countess Zichy dined at Dorchester-house, I dined at home, and then went in the evening—I have often dined with Mr. Croker at Dorchester-house—Suisse has sometimes come to my apartments to fetch me to Dorchester-house, and after stopping there the night, I went away in the morning—the Marquis bad an attack of the gout in 1840—bis health and constitution appeared to be very much affected after that illness—some time before his death he was affected with a spasm in his throat, which at times made it difficult to understand him—Suisse was in the habit of constantly attending on the Marquis—he appeared to possess his confidence—the Marquis appeared to entertain a very great regard for him.

Q. Do you know whether Suisse was called up frequently during the night to attend on the Marquis? A. I have heard him ring for him three or four times in the course of the night, and Suisse has come directly on the bell being rung—I cannot say whether the Marquis had such confidence in Suisse as scarcely to do anything without consulting him—Suisse paid the money in travelling—he has advanced sums of money to the Marquis out of his own funds—I received a private allowance from the Marquis—that was at times paid by Suisse—my expenditure was 7,000l. or 8,000l. a year—that was not besides the private allowance.

Q. If you wanted 200l. or 300l., were you in the habit of asking Suisse for it, and getting it? A. I have sometimes asked from Suisse, and sometimes from the Marquis—I have got it from Suisse when I have asked—I have now an income of 15,000 francs a-year derived from the bounty of the Marquis—Suisse's attendance on the Marquis became more necessary as he advanced in years—I have heard Suisse, in the Marquis's presence, speak of his kindness and bounty to him—he has said, that, thanks to the Marquis's kindness, he had become a very rich man—I remember being at Paris with the Marquis and Suisse in October, 1841—the Marquis had promised me, when in Italy, to buy me a house at Paris—no sum was mentioned as the price of the house—we were about to leave Paris for London at that time, and I said that unless the Marquis gave me the money he had promised for the purchase of this house I would not leave with him—there was no box on the table where the Marquis was sitting—the Marquis offered me some coupons at that time, which he took from a box on the table—I refused them, because I did not know the value of them—I received the money for the purchase of the house from the Marquis that same day—it was 211,000 francs—Suisse afterwards said something to me on the subject—I did not mention to the Marquis what Suisse had told me—I asked the Marquis what was the amount of coupons that he had given to Suisse—that was not in consequence of my conversation with Suisse; it was one or two days afterwards that I mentioned it to the Marquis in travelling—after having told him the use I had made of the money, the subject of the coupons came into my memory, and I then spoke about them, and asked of what value the coupons were which he had given to Suisse—(Suisse had told me the Marquis had given them to him)—he said above 100,000 francs, and that he had given them to Suisse—I returned to England with the Marquis, and continued to live with him until December, 1841.

Q. How came you to leave the Marquis? A. I went to see him earlier

than usual one day, and seeing another woman, of the name of Henrietta, there, I would not live with him any longer—the Marquis came to my lodging once after, but did not come up stairs—he came to fetch me to go into the country, and I refused—that was two months before his death, in December—I saw the Marquis twice since January—I received 120l. from him for a carriage that belonged to me—I received 500l., in two cheques, from Suisse on the Marquis's account.

MR. KELLY. Q. When did you leave England, after having come over in October? A. At the end of December—I then went to Paris—I remained there some days—I cannot recollect How many—I then came back to London at the end of January—I left London again, I think about July—I was in London from January to July this year—I left London towards the end of July—on leaving London I went to Paris—I cannot say to the precise time—it was in July—I remained in Paris until I came to England the last time—I asked the Marquis when in the carriage the value of the coupons which he had given to Suisse, and his answer was, "Above 100,000 francs, and I have given them to Suisse"—this conversation took place on leaving Paris—Miss Dubois, one of my friends, was in the carriage—Miss Dubois was not in Paris with me after my return in July last—nothing else was said on the subject of the coupons—I arrived in England last on Sunday—I came to England alone, with a servant—I was not examined at Paris in July last—I do not exactly know at what time it was—I had not said anything on the subject of the coupons before this conversation—we were some relays from Paris when this passed.

Q. With whom did you communicate on this subject before yon came here to give your evidence? A. Nobody—I was in England at the time of the last trial on the 6th of July—no one had spoken to me on this subject, nor as to my giving evidence, before that trial—I was not in attendance here at the last trial—I was attending as a witness in the neighbourhood—I received a paper to attend—I do not know from whom I received it—I was living in the Rue de Provence in Paris before I came to England this last time—I have never gone by any other name—I swear that positively.

CLARIE JOSEPHINE DUBOIS (through an interpreter.) In October last I was acquainted with Miss Borel. I left Paris with her and the Marquis of Hertford in that month—at that time I had known the Marquis seven years—I travelled during a year with the Marquis and Miss Borel, to London and to Italy—after we left Paris in the carriage I heard Miss Borel ask the Marquis what was the amount of the coupons which be had given to Suisse—the Marquis's answer was that it was above 100,000 francs, and that he had given them to Suisse—I had not myself had any conversation with Suisse about them—I had not the same acquaintance with Suisse as Miss Borel had.

MR. KELLY. Q. Were you in Court during the evidence of Miss Borel? A. Yes, but I did not hear what she said—She did not speak loud enough for me to hear her.

HENRY PETER FULLER . I am a surgeon and apothecary, and reside in Piccadilly. I attended the Marquis of Hertford as his medical attendant—I had been in the habit of attending him altogether about twenty-three years—prior to that, it was only occasionally, when my father was living—I saw him constantly, from the early part of October, 1841, to the time of his death—I was in Court when Foote stated the nature of the Marquis's

bodily infirmities—he has stated them slightly—the Marquis's ordinary state of constitutional health was a semi-paralytic state of certain organs—it was that which led to the trouble that Suisse and Foote had with him, but that was not the cause of the illness under which his lordship died—he did not die from the paralytic seizure—I know nothing of his visit to Richmond except having heard of it.

Q. About what period was he taken ill with that illness which led to his death? A. It was not correctly the beginning of an illness—it was a relapse—he had had bronchitis for many weeks, and he was beginning to rally on the 4th of February; indeed, so much so, that he began to consider of going abroad again—I was in the habit of making up things for him when he went abroad, which he told me to prepare for him about the 4th of February—I cannot exactly tell the day of his going to Richmond, but I remember so far, that he was then getting so far better that I asked him to begin to think of getting into the library, that we might get him out if there was any fine weather—I was at that time seeing him daily, and it was after that return, he had a relapse of the bronchitis from which he never recovered—I think it was about the 18th of February that he was seized with the relapse—Suisse was taken ill about the 14th of February I think, but not so as to be confined for some few days—it was an attack of erysipelas of the neck and external part of the chest, terminating in abscesses, that confined him to his bed for a considerable period—he was confined to his bed at the time of the Marquis's death, and I should think about twelve days before, but I cannot speak positively at this moment, but I think it was twelve days within a day or two—I saw the Marquis almost constantly from October to the end of March.

Q. So far as his mind was concerned, was he, in your judgment, capable of attending to his affairs? A. I considered him sane, certainly—it never entered into my mind to doubt that he was competent to attend to his affairs—on the last trial I was examined as a witness for the prosecution.

MR. KELLY. Q. Had you any occasion to transact any business with him during the last month of his life? A. No business, only as a patient and his medical attendant—I inquired into his case, attended to his answers, and prescribed for him.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420822-2235

2235. GEORGE LEE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Grant, on the 20th of July, at St. Allhallows, London-wall, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 14l., his goods.

JOSEPH DELWARTE . I am servant to John Grant, a pawnbroker, in the parish of Allhallows, London-wall. On the 20th of July, at a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening, after putting up two or three shutters, I heard the window break, turned round, and saw the prisoner come from the window—I stopped him, took him into the shop, and took this gold watch out of his hand, which had been on a tray in the window, against the broken pane.

GEORGE FEW (City police-constable, No. 143.) I took the prisoner in charge, and produce the watch.

Prisoner. I was going past the shop; a man put it into my hand, and ran away; I did not steal it.

JOSEPH DELWARTE re-examined. There was nobody passing at the time—it is Mr. Grant's watch—he rents the whole house.

GUILTY .* Aged 63.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2236

2236. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July, 1 purse, value 1s.; and 10 sovereigns, the property of Annette Butler, in the dwelling-house of Emma Brodie and another.

ANNETTE BUTLER . On the 2nd of July, I went into the service of Miss Brodie, in Somerset-street, as ladies'-maid—I was called down to supper that evening—I had two purses in one bag—one was a green purse, containing ten sovereigns—I put it on the dresser as I sat at supper—the prisoner was the housemaid—I went up stairs, leaving her and the cook at the table, and my purse behind—the cook brought my bag up in the evening, and on looking at it, I missed my green purse—I found the prisoner in the cook's room, and the cook asked her, had she opened the bag—she said, "No; I saw the bag, I did not open it"—I spoke to the servants, that if they had done it out of a joke, and would give it to me, I would say nothing about it—they all denied it—I afterwards told Mr. Brodie, and he got two policemen.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Was the footman, George Whiting, at the supper table at the time? A. He had been—he left the supper table before me—I went up to the drawing-room—I missed the purse a long time after that, at a quarter to eleven—the prisoner had been there about three months.

JOSEPH SEAMAN . I am superintendent of the police on the Croydon-railway. I saw the prisoner there on Friday, the 8th of July—she asked for a ticket to go by the rail-road, and paid for it with half-a-sovereign—she afterwards came into the room where I was, and sat down for a few minutes—she then got up, and said she could stand it no longer, she must give herself up to justice—I looked at her—she said, she and her fellow-servant had been implicated in a robbery, that her fellow-servant had broken open a desk, and taken a 5l. note, and given her half, that be had also taken a green purse from the lady's-maid's bag, which contained ten sovereigns, that he had given her a part of it to take care of, and then burnt the purse—she also said that she had had connexion with him, and likewise that he had had connexion with the cook—she spoke so quick, that, from her manner, I rather suspected she was insane, and, from her persisting in this robbery, I took down two or three of her words, such as the address of Miss Brodie, "19, Somerset-street"—also the 5l. note, and the ten sovereigns—I told her to wait a little while, intending to put on my coat to hand her over to the police—she then resisted very much, and persisted in not going—I got a fly, and took her to the station—she was exceedingly excited and violent—she said she had been in the family way by her fellow-servant, that he had given her pennyroyal to destroy the child, and the phial would be found in the water-closet.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not say that there was a plot against her life? A. Yes, and that they wanted to take her life away—she said she intended going from Brighton to Dieppe—when I went to take her, she screamed, resisted, and ran away—she gave to a stranger, who was standing by, a marriage certificate, a fourpenny-piece, a sovereign, a half-sovereign, and a shilling—it was handed over to me, and I produce it, likewise the ticket, and a striped purse.

JAMES CONNOR (police-constable R 191.) I saw the prisoner at the station on the 8th of July. She repeatedly asked me to go for five sovereigns that she had left on the top of a Dutch clock, at a turning near the Angel at Islington—I said, "What five sovereigns are you talking of? I don't know what you mean"—she said, "Have I not told you? I thought I had; if I have not told you, I have told somebody else"—I said, "You have not told me"—she said there was five sovereigns where the had slept the night before, that it was part of ten which George, the footman, had stolen—she also said he had stolen a 5l. note, and there was a "BH" at the corner of it; that he bought a jacket and trowsers with that 5l. note, that he pawned the jacket and trowsers, and afterwards gave her 2l. 10s. out of it, that made 7l. 10s., and was part of the 15l.—she said that some suspicion fell on her, and she was discharged, that she went to reside with George's wife, afterwards, that they used her very badly, add she was determined to implicate him, if she got transported—she was repeatedly talking during the afternoon, and indeed was a state of madness—a man was tent off to town to ascertain if there had been a robbery—I was sent to the house the prisoner mentioned, next day, by the Magistrate, with another constable—the people were out—I left the constable behind—the prisoner went with us—she gave a wrong direction of the house at first, but afterwards went and showed us the house—nothing was found on the prisoner but two penny-pieces.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe she said it was a very bad job that she ever took it from this person? A. Yes—she said several times that afternoon that she was going to die—she clung to me, and said that somebody was going to murder her—she was in. fits three or four times that afternoon and talked incoherently.

JOHN STANLEY . I am a policeman. I went to No. 19, Somerset-street, and found the prisoner, the cook, and the man-servant, all in the hall—I afterwards went with Connor and the prisoner to No. 14, Metcalf-place, Islington—the prisoner took us there by the Magistrate's direction—the landlord and landlady were out—I sent the prisoner and Connor back, and waited till the landlord and landlady came home—I then went to the first-floor front room—I saw a Dutch clock there, and saw Mrs. Clark, the landlady, take three sovereigns from one side of it—Mr. Clark took the other two, and gave me the five—they all came from the top of the clock.

Cross-examined. Q. When you got to the house, and found it fastened, did not the prisoner say, "Oh, I see it is a do, they have been here and got the money?" A. Yes.

MARTHA CLARK . I live in Metcalf-place—the prisoner came to my house one Saturday evening—I cannot tell the day of the month—she slept with me—she said she had left her please that evening, that she did not come pennyless, as she had come to me before, but that she was able to pay me—(she had lodged with me for. three nights twelve months before)—she went out in the morning, and told me she should return again at one o'clock—she did not return—I afterwards, when the officer came, went to the Dutch clock in the room where she had been, and my husband and I found five sovereigns on the top of it—I did not know of their being there—I had not put them there, nor had my husband, to my knowledge.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not say she had received a quarter's money, that her husband was after her, and wanted to get it from her?

A. Yes, and that she would go and get a warrant out against her husband.

ANN HARRIS . I was cook to Miss Brodie. I remember sitting down to supper with the footman, the prisoner and the ladies'-maid—the footman left the table first, then Madame Butler, and then the prisoner—the prisoner afterwards went out for some beer—I met her coming down stairs with it—the footman was then in the pantry—I went out, and when I returned the footman and the prisoner were in the pantry together—Whiting, the footman, came into the kitchen, took the bag from the kitchen drawer, and asked me whose it was—I said I thought it was Miss Brodie's, I was going up stairs, and I would take it, which I accordingly did—I had left the house, as well as the prisoner, before the bag was noticed.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Whiting taken up about this or not? A. Not till the prisoner gave herself up—he was then taken to the Police-office, and discharged—he was dismissed the service at once—the prisoner was discharged on the Monday, and on the Friday she gave herself up—she was in the service nearly three months—we had no character with her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2237

2237. STEPHEN GALE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August, 1 jacket, value 5s.; 8 shillings, and 1 sixpence; the property of Peter Kirby.

PETER KIRBY . I belong to the Vesuvius steam-ship at Blackwall. On the 14th of August I went to the prisoner's house with a female—I did not see the prisoner or any body in the kitchen of the house when I went up stairs—I did not take notice of any body—I went straight up with the girl—I took off my jacket—there was 8s. 6d. in it—on the following morning I awoke and missed my jacket—the girl was in bed at the time—I afterwards asked the prisoner if he knew any thing about it—he told me he had pledged it—I asked How he came to do so, and he said if I would get him 4s., he would give me the ticket—this is my jacket.

WILLIAM CARPENTER . I produce a jacket pledged by the prisoner, between seven and eight o'clock, for 1s. 6d.—he asked 3s. on it.

Prisoner. It was half-past seven when I went.

WILLIAM RANCE (police-constable K 184.) On the morning in question I went to the prisoner's house, and took him—I asked him about the jacket—he owned that he had got it, but said he had not got any money—he said he would let him have the jacket—I asked him what he had to say about the 8s. 6d.—he said he knew nothing about it, he had not seen it.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor came to the house at half-past twelve o'clock on Sunday night, with a woman, and asked to look at a bed; they went up stairs; I sent the servant after them, to ask for the money; she came down and said she could get no money from him, because he had none; I went up, and asked for it; he said he had not got it; I said he could not have the bed unless he left something for it, and he agreed to leave the jacket to pay for the bed and the girl; I held it up in his presence to see there was nothing in it, and took it down.

PETER KIRBY re-examined. I did not let him have the jacket for the use of the bed—I had plenty of money besides—I paid for the bed, and gave the girl 5s. before I went in doors.

ELIZABETH THOMPSON . I live in High-street, Shadwell, with Ann

Robinson—it is not the prisoner's house—I fell in with the prosecutor on Sunday, between twelve and one o'clock—he asked me where I lived—I said I would take him to where I lived—he said he had no money whatever—I said it was no use his going home with me without money—he said he would leave his jacket if I would take it—I took him to No. 1, Twine-court, where I was going to stop for the night—that was Ann Robinson's, not Gale's house—he called for the landlord—a female came up—he would not give the jacket to her—he said he would have the landlord, and the prisoner came up—I saw him give him the jacket—he sat on the bed-side, he pulled it off, and gave it to the prisoner—he left it in his charge for 5s. till the morning—I slept with the prosecutor all night—between seven and eight in the morning, be said, "I am very thirsty, can you stand a pint of porter?"—I gave him two pints of porter, and 1d. to get tobacco—we went to the public-house, and had the porter—he did not give me 5s. overnight—his jacket was pledged for 18d.—he went away, and promised to be back in two hours—he came back with a policeman, and gave the prisoner in charge.

PETIR KIRBY re-examined. The witness speaks false—I did give her 5s.—she did not treat me to two pints of beer and a pennyworth of tobacco—there was 8s. 6d. in my jacket.

JURY. Q. What time did you leave the house in the morning? A. At half-past eight o'clock—I missed my jacket about three—I remained in the room till about seven—I then came down, and asked the prisoner if be knew any thing about it.

JIMIMA RUTLAND . I was sitting at the door when Elizabeth Thompson brought the prosecutor, and asked for a bed—I said I had none—I heard the prosecutor say he had no money—had female was going away—be called her back, and said he would leave his jacket—she said, "For bow much?"—he said, "For 5s.," and he would come up to-morrow and pay her—she asked me for a light—I gave her one—about five minutes afterwards they called out for the landlord—I went up for the money—the prosecutor said he wanted the landlord, he would not give it to me, and the prisoner came up—he is the landlord, or answers the same as the landlord—the prosecutor was sitting on the bedside—he palled off his jacket, and gave it into the prisoner's hand—it was pledged for 18d.—in the morning, between seven and eight o'clock, he went away—he asked the female to give him a pint of beer—she gave him two pints of porter, and a pennyworth of tobacco—be said be would come back in about two hours, and redeem the jacket—in about an hour he brought a policeman, said he had lost 8s. 6d., and his jacket was stolen from him—he was neither tipsy nor sober—he did not tell the prisoner to pledge it—he said he would leave it for the demand of 5s. till he came back, but the girl wanted food, and therefore we pledged it—it would not fetch more than 18d.—I have lived servant at the house six or seven weeks—the prisoner was also a servant there—he does about for Ann Robinson, the landlady.

PETER KIRBY re-examined. I never saw this girl before the next morning, when I came out of the house—I then saw her at the end of the court—the prisoner did not come up into the room overnight—he came up in the morning, called the girl out, and spoke to her outside the door—I am sure I put my jacket down by the bedside overnight—I was sober—I awoke about five o'clock in the morning—the prisoner called the woman

out before seven o'clock—I had 8s. 6d. in silver, besides the 5s. I gave the girl—I had received a 6l. advance note about six weeks ago.

GUILTY . Aged (65.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18420822-2237a

2237. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, 1 hat, value 17s. 6d., the goods of George Massey.

MARTHA MASSEY . I am the wife of George Massey, a hatter, in the Hampstead-road. On the afternoon of the 15th of July the prisoner and another person came into the shop—the other asked to see a white hat—I showed several—I saw the prisoner take a hat out of the window, and go out—the other man followed in a minute or two afterwards, saying he would call again another day—I ran to the door—a neighbour opposite said something—I saw the prisoner—he turned round twice—the third time he saw me, and ran away—I called, "Stop thief"—when he got into Brook-street I lost sight of him, the mob was so great—he was brought back, and the hat also.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How long after he had been into your shop was he brought back? A. In five or ten minutes—I am able to say with certainty that the person brought back to me is the prisoner—I do not know whether I should know the other man—I had the same opportunity of observing him as the prisoner, but I saw the prisoner go to the window, and take the hat—he went out sideways like—he kept his own hat on his head.

CHARLES RUMNAY . I sell fruit, and live in Henry-passage, Henry-street. I was at the corner of Henry-street, at my stall—I did not see the prisoner come out—I saw him about half-way up Henry-street—I heard the prosecutrix say, "Stop thief"—I did not see any thing with him—be went up Henry-street, along Brook-street, down Charles-street, into Hampstead-road—when he got a good way down the road, just before I got to him, he flung the hat on one side, into the road—I am sure the prisoner is the man that flung the hat down—I never lost sight of him—I stopped him—be turned round, and asked what I caught hold of him for, and said, if I did not let go of him, he would make me—he held his fist up towards me—he tried to get from me—I brought him about thirty yards, and the constable took him from me.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he sober? A. Yes.

MARTIN KING (police-constable S 194.) The prisoner was given into my custody by Rumnay—at the station he gave his name, William Adams, and when asked for his residence, he refused it, saying it was the first thing of the kind he had done—he had a very good bat on his head, 6s. 6d. in his pocket, two silk handkerchiefs, some cigars, and other articles.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he appear to have been drinking? A. He was not drunk, he might have drunk something—be did not say it was the first place of the kind he had ever been in—he said what I have stated—this is the hat.

SARAH HARRISON . I was standing at my own door, and saw two men go into Massey's shop—the one that brought the hat out was very fidgetty while the other was trying a hat on—I watched them, and in about five minutes after he had been in the shop he came out, looked both ways, and then came across, with the hat before him—the other one went up the New-road—I went over to Mrs. Massey, and gave her information.

ISAAC WHITE . I live in George-street, Hampstead-road—the prisoner passed me in Charles-street, Hampstead-road—I heard a cry of "Stop thief"—I looked behind me, saw him coming and pursued him—some persons were behind me—something was dropped—I did not see him drop it, but I picked a hat up.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2238

2238. JOHN DALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 120 skins of leather, value 15l., the goods of Thomas Young Learmouth and others; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am in the service of Messrs. Learmouth and Roberts, in Bride-lane—I know the prisoner by his calling at the warehouse to know if we could tell him of a light porter's place—on the morning of the 20th of July, as I came down Bride-lane, I saw him backing out of the warehouse door with a bundle of skins on his shoulder—I went into the counting-house, and made inquiry—I immediately ran out up Bride-court, and saw him walking deliberately with the bundle of skins on his shoulder—I intended to run softly to try and seize him, but I suppose he must have heard me coming, for he turned his head, pitched the bundle of skins down, and ran across the road—I pursued, calling "Stop thief"—he ran up Union-street, and was stopped at the corner of Shoemaker-alley—the skins are worth 15l.—they are the property of Messrs. Thomas Young Learmouth and others.

Prisoner. He says he saw me come out backwards with them, why not stop me then? Witness. Because I did not exactly know him, and did not know whether it might not be somebody from the factory—he came from the same warehouse where he had been to inquire—I have seen him with another, about the same time in the morning—I lost sight of him for about a quarter of a minute, when he turned from a butcher's shop, opposite Apothecaries' hall—I am positive he is the same man.

Prisoner. Q. Is any witness here who stopped me? A. No; when I stopped you, you wanted to persuade me you were not the same party, but I told your you had been so polite to me for three weeks, taking off your cap, and asking me for a light porter's place, that I was positive of you.

WILLIAM STANTON (City police-constable, No. 336.) On the 20th of July, I received charge of the prisoner, at Shoemaker-alley—Stevens had him by the collar—I collared him—Stevens said they were skins taken from the warehouse—just as we were entering the station the skins dropped, and the prisoner bolted right across Black-horse-court up Fleet-street—one of the turnkeys of Newgate happened to be there and stopped him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home, and was walking up Water-lane, when I was caught. In going to the station, I thought it very hard to be locked up for what I knew nothing about, and when the officer had the things under his arm he shoved me to go into the station, I ran away.

(Thomas Russell, of New-street, Goswell-court, gave the prisoner a good character.)

THOMAS RICHARDS (City police-constable, No. 486.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was present at the trial—he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, August 24th, 1842.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18420822-2239

2239. JOHN BLACKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June, 1 bridle, value 15s., the goods of Charles Farnell; and 1 pair of reins, value 2s., the goods of Francis Stockwell; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2240

2240. JOSEPH STINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August, 1/2 a pint of soap liniment, value 1s. 4d.; and 1 bottle, value 2d.:—also, on the 12th of August, 20lbs. weight of gum, value 1l.; 2 1/4 lbs. weight of almonds, value 5s. 6d.; 1 3/4 lbs. weight of cloves, value 4s.; 1lb. weight of mace, value 13s.; 1lb. weight of nutmegs, value 2s.; 7 1/4 lbs. weight of sugar, value 6s. 6d.; loose. weight of sponge, value 1s.; 1/2 lb. weight of sugar-candy, value 7d.; 1/4 lb. weight of Cascarilla bark, value 3d.; 6oz. weight of lozenges, value 6d.; loom. weight of cinnamon, value 9d.; 1/4 lb. weight of asphalt, value 3d.; 1 pint of French polish, value 3s.; 2 1/2 lbs. weight of pepper, value 10s. 6d.; 1 1/4 lb. weight of rasins, value 6d.; 1/2 oz. weight of oil of cloves, value 8d.; 10oz. weight of ottar of roses, value 15s.; 4 bottles of perfume, value 10s.; and 14 bottles, value 1s.; the goods of Henry John Preston, and another, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 40.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2241

2241. JOHN RIDOUT was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December, 2 rings, value 2s. 10d.; 2 seals, value 2s. 6d.; and 1 pair of ear-rings, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of Charles Noble, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2242

2242. ELIZABETH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 2 pistols, value 6s., the goods of Philip Lorton.

JAMES CAINE . I am shopman to Philip Lorton, of Bishopsgate-street. In consequence of information, on the 23rd of July, I ran after the prisoner—just as I was about to take her, I saw her lay these pistols on some cabbages at a shop-door—I took them up—they are my master's, and were safe in the shop just before.

GEORGE PRICE . I saw the prisoner outside Mr. Lorton's shop-door—I saw her take the pistols up—I informed Caine.

Prisoner. It is all through spite. Witness. I have no spite against her—I never saw her before.

GUILTY . Aged 36.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2243

2243. STEPHEN REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July, 38lbs. weight of lead, value 6s., the goods of Lewis Lucas.—2nd COUNT, stating it to belong to Lewis Lucas and others.

JOHN GEORGE WADE (City police-constable, No. 623.) On the 11th of July, I was on duty in Leadenhall-street, I went to No. 8, Booker's-gardens, and saw the prisoner at the gutter of No. 10, wrenching up the lead with a crow-bar—he got a piece up, cut it off with a saw, and threw it into the yard of No. 9, where no one lives—another piece was lying in the yard of No. 9—I found the prisoner in the cellar of No. 9—this is the saw and crow-bar.

WILLIAM WOOD . The houses, Nos. 9 and 10, Booker's-gardens, are the property of Lewis Lucas, who holds them in the character of trustee.

THOMAS FORDHAM (City police-constable, No. 641.) I was placed on the cellar-door by Martin.

JAMES MARTIN (City police-constable, No. 605.) I saw the prisoner in the cellar, and the lead was in the yard of No. 9—I have cut a piece off, which corresponds exactly with what the prisoner cut off.

GUILTY . Aged 42.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2244

2244. JEREMIAH CONNELL and JOHN LYONS were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Penn Allen, from his person.

JOHN PENN ALLEN . I live in Wimpole-street. On the 22nd of July, between four and five o'clock, I was in the Strand—I received information, and missed my handkerchief—it was afterwards produced to me—this now produced is it—it is mine.

JOHN SIMS HANCOCK (police-constable E 38.) I was on duty—I saw the prisoners and another following the prosecutor seventy or eighty yards—I then saw Connell put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take the handkerchief out—the prisoners ran up Ship-yard—I ran after them—Connell saw me, and threw the handkerchief down—I secured him—Lyons ran up a turning which was no thoroughfare—I secured him as he came out—he and the other were behind Connell when he took it, to prevent any one seeing it done.

CONNELL**— GUILTY . Aged 14.

LYONS*— GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Ten Years.—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420822-2245

2245. JOHN CORMACK was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 1 coat, value 13s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; the goods of Henry Walker.

HENRY WALKER . I live in Plumtree-street. On the 9th of July, I missed my coat and waistcoat when the policeman came to my place—these are them—they were safe in the parlour at eight o'clock that night.

JOHN SIMMS HANCOCK . At half-past ten o'clock at night, the 9th of July, I saw the prisoner in Broad-street with this coat and waistcoat—I showed them to the prosecutor—he said they were his—the prisoner gave no account of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the bundle; I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2246

2246. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 1 spoon, value 12s., the goods of John Clark, his master; and HENRY GATTERELL , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

WILLIAM M'KENZIE . I live with Mr. John Clark, in George-street, Adelphi. Brown was his errand-boy—he had access to the shop where the spoons are kept—this dessert-spoon is my master's—I have lost such a one.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Brown has been in your master's service some time? A. Yes, Miller was in our employ before Brown.

COURT. Q. Is Miller still in the service? A. No, he left two years ago—he had no opportunity of coming to the shop—I am sure this spoon was safe on Friday night, the 8th of July, and it was taken that night or the next morning.

THOMAS MILLER . I live in Cashel-court, Westminster. On the 9th

of July I met Brown in the Broadway, just by the pump—he said, "Halloo, Tom, what do you think I have done?"—I said, "I don't know, have you left?"—he said, "No," and pulled out the spoon—we both went down towards his mother's—he said, "Wait there till I come out"—he just ran in doors and left his bundle, and came out again—he said, "Come and take a walk up Strutton-ground"—he went to Gatterell, who is a jeweller in Castle-lane—we went up stairs, and Brown asked him if he would buy the spoon—he looked at it and said, "My wife is just gone out, I expect her in a few minutes, she will give you 3s."—he did not ask where he got it—he knew it had been taken wrongfully—he merely said, "I have got a wife and a large family, I hope it is all right"—I knew it was all wrong, and went and told Jane Parrott of it—I had not dealt with Gatterell before, I did not know where to go—Brown had the money—Gatterell paid it—his children were lying in bed—his wife did not come in in time, and he put on his shoes and stockings, went out, and got the money—I know Gatterell's boy, which was the reason of our going there—it was about ten o'clock at night.

Cross-examined. Q. You have no experience of these things at all? A. No—I was at Clerkenwell once, because I was with a boy who had a box with some cheroots in it—he was looking at it in the street—the policeman said we did not get it honestly—they took us to the station, and from there to Clerkenwell—I was there a week—then they sent me to the House of Correction for six weeks—I know a boy named Richard, who lives with Mr. Harman, a confectioner over the water—he did not get any money of his master that I know of—I went with him to Hull—he told me he had only got 1l. from his master—we did not stop a day at Hull, we came home, and went on to Portsmouth, and then came home—we got turned away from Ware, in Hertfordshire, for a little piece of meat—he cooked it, and we eat it—they took us to the station, and kept us about half an hour, and then discharged us—I got nothing for this spoon—I came from prison here—I lived with Mrs. Trevon, in Alpha-road—I left, because they were robbed of plate to the amount of 15l.—I was taken up for that.

JOHN BROWN . I live in Little Chapel-street, the prisoner is my brother. On Saturday evening, the 9th of July, I saw him with Miller—I told my brother to come home, and then I left them—I after that went to Gatterell's—I said to him, "Did you on Saturday buy a spoon of two boys"—he said, "Yes"—I said, "What did you give for it?"—he said 3s.—he said it was pawned, and gave me the duplicate—I said he must be a bad man, to buy a spoon of a boy like that, as he must know it was not got honestly—he said, "If I had known it, I would not have bought it"—that he was prevailed on to do it, being a foolish old man—he then left the house, and after the policeman had taken him, he said he had made up his mind for the worst, he should be in prison by night.

Cross-examined. Q. You have known Miller before? A. Yes—he got my brother into this place, and he was seen in front of the prosecutor's house the day before the spoon was taken.

RICHARD BIRCH . I have the spoon, which was pawned on Saturday night by Gatterell.

(The following extract from the examination was read—"Brown says, I should not have done this but for Miller.")

BROWN— GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Ten Days.

GATTERELL— GUILTY . Aged 49.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2247

2247. ROBERT CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July, 1 pulley, value 1s.; 1 pair of compasses, value 1s.; 6 padlocks, value 2s. 6d.; and 1 branding-iron, value 6d.; the goods of George Todd, his master.

SAMUEL RANDALL . I am foreman to George Todd, the prisoner's master, who lives at Chelsea. I missed the things mentioned, on the 6th of July—I believe these are my master's things—(looking at them.)

EDWARD TOMLINS . I am a marine-store dealer, and live in Chelsea-market. The prisoner brought these things to me on the evening of the 5th of July—I said I must know How he came by them, because I put them on the board for sale; he said, "You need not be afraid, they have never been in any man's hand"—I said, "Then you stole them"—"Yes," he said, "I took them out of the shop"—I said, "Yon must call in the morning for your money, I have no change"—he came, and I gave him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2248

2248. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 1 saddle, value 5l. 15s., the goods of William Roberts.

JOHN LOVELL . I am foreman to William Roberts, of Wigmore-street. In consequence of information, on the 8th of July, I ran into Harley-street, and saw the prisoner with a saddle on his arm—I cried "Stop thief"—he ran with the saddle, and threw it on a wagon—this is it, it is my master's—after a long race I succeeded in taking him.

JAMES HOLLAND . I was in Wigmore-street—I saw the prisoner running up the street with a saddle—I took it up, and took it back to Mr. Roberts's.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, and in great distress; it was a great temptation.

GUILTY .* Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2249

2249. HENRY JOHN DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July, 1oz. 12 grains weight of silver, value 5s. 6d., the goods of William Henry Silvester and another, his masters.

WILLIAM HENRY SILVESTER . I have one partner—the prisoner was my apprentice for about nine months. About the 6th of July I thought it necessary to weigh my silver—I found a deficiency of one ounce—I believe this now produced corresponds with what I have lost.

JOSEPH SHACKLE . I am a police inspector. About two o'clock on the 6th of July I went into a shop in Goswell-street—I saw the prisoner coming along Goswell-street—he saw me, and ran into a house where I know they receive things of this kind—I went and asked what he had brought in, and the person had got a pair of scales weighing this piece of silver, and said the prisoner had brought this in—I took it, and said he must go with me—he said he had been playing at skittles and lost a deal of money, and had robbed his master.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Why did you not bring the person here? A. I took him before the Magistrate—the prisoner first said that his brother gave it him.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy — Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2250

2250. JAMES MORGAN was indicted for embezzling and stealing 1 5l. Bank-note, the monies of Elizabeth Gowner, his mistress.

HARRIET GOWNER . I am the sister of Elizabeth Gowner, of Margaret-street, Cavendish-square. On the 2nd of July I gave the prisoner, who was her servant, a 5l. note to change—he did not bring back the note or the change.

ELIZABETH GOWNER . My sister gave the prisoner a 5l. note to change—he did not bring me back the note or the change, but absconded.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it taken from me.

GUILTY. Aged 13.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined One Month, and twice Whipped.

Reference Number: t18420822-2251

2251. WILLIAM BATT was indicted for embezzlement.

ELEER STEPHENSON . I am a news agent, in Fishmongers'-alley. The prisoner was my servant—it was his duty to pay me all the money he received at the time he received it—if on the 14th of February he received 15s. 7d. from Knight, he has not paid it me, nor 6s. 8d.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where did you first become acquainted with the prisoner? A. In Mr. Lee's service—the agreement was that he should be a weekly servant at 1l. a week—no one was present when it was made—I discharged him on the 23rd of June—I found out this case about three weeks ago, before I discharged him—I have not had any interviews with him since he was discharged—I know a Mr. Saffery—about the middle of December I found by my books that there were accounts standing against certain customers to the amount of 45l.—I went through them with the prisoner, and be stated he was not able to get them in, and he suggested the possibility of a loan—he said he would get a paper, and put it in due course—he did so, and a loan of 30l. was obtained—I have paid that up as far as the prisoner was concerned—I believe I stated that at the Mansion-house—I did not state that I had paid the loan to the Society—I swear that—it has not been paid, and two of ray friends are liable for it—when I found the prisoner was guilty of these delinquencies, I placed it in a friend's hands, and gave fresh securities—I had discovered something when I discharged him, but I felt extremely reluctant to give him in custody for the small amount I had found out—I have not represented myself as his brother—a Mr. Dodd advertised for a clerk—I saw the advertisement—I did not go to Mr. Dodd—I did nothing on the subject of it—I did not then state myself to be the brother of Mr. Stephenson, the news agent, nor send any body to Mr. Dodd's house—that loan was the only business I had with the Loan Society, except being security for a little money to furnish the prisoner with a few things—Mr. Lee, the prisoner's former master, gave him into custody for embezzlement—I do not state that to prejudice him, but that the Jury may know his true character—that was two years before he got the loan for me—I did not go for it myself, but I sent him, and be became liable for it—the loan is more than I have indicted him for, but not a twentieth part of what I might have indicted him for—I have no hesitation in saying I would not be seen in one of these Loan Societies, and if the prisoner had paid me the money he received, there would have been no necessity for that loan.

Q. You have stated that the prisoner was taken into custody by Lee, was the prisoner at that time in your service? A. Yes—he was discharged by the Lord Mayor—I employed my attorney to bring an action against Lee, but I did not go on with it, because I thought I should be nonsuited—I held a situation as chief clerk in a wholesale warehouse with a salary

of 300l. a year for ten years, and have left it about six months—the prisoner conducted my news agency business for me while I was in my situation—he was not a sharer in my concern—I swear he had never any share in it—I had nobody else in my business but three boys to deliver the papers—I never had any business to do for one Watson, or in the sale of a cottage—I never employed the prisoner to pawn any thing for me.

Q. Did you not state at the Mansion-house, that you had paid the 30l., and tell Mr. Humphreys that you had? A. In the flurry which naturally attends the examination of a witness, it might not be in my recollection; but, to the best of my belief, I stated that I believed it was settled, I had put it in some person's hands—I do not recollect having stated that I had paid it myself—if I said so, it was not true—I cannot swear that I did not.

ROBERT KNIGHT . On the 14th of February I paid the prisoner 15s. 7d., and on the 31st of May, 6s. 8d., for his master—these are the receipts.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18420822-2252

2252. JOHN HATCH was indicted for stealing; on the 12th of July, 1 shovel, value 2s. 4d., the goods of Samuel Pocock, his master.

WILLIAM HAYNES . I am foreman to Samuel Pocock, of George-place, Holloway—the prisoner was his servant. On the 12th of July I gave him a shovel—this is it.

Prisoner. The shovel the policeman stopped me with is my own. Witness. It is Mr. Pocock's—here is a D on it—the one I gave him was marked in the same way—to the best of my knowledge this is the one.

WILLIAM HARRIS (police-constable N 112.) On the 12th of July I saw the prisoner offering this shovel for pledge outside a pawnbroker's shop at Holloway—I asked where he got it—he said he bought it in Shoreditch—I said I should take him to the station—he said I had no occasion to go to inquire about it, it was no use, it was given him by Haynes to work with, and it was Mr. Pocock's—there were three men outside the shop-door hanging the things out, and he wanted It. on it—I took him about half a mile from Mr. Pocock's.

Prisoner. It was my own; I bought it for 2s. 4d. of Mr. Dawkins; I was going to take it with me; two persons offered me 1s. for it, and the policeman caught hold of it—Haynes said at the office he could not swear to the shovel. I never said it was Mr. Pocock's.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2253

2253. AMELIA JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June, 1 umbrella and case, value 9s., the goods of Robert John Bradshaw.

MARY LADYMAN . I am housemaid to Miss Davis, in Wimpole-street. The prisoner called on me on the 21st of June—after she was gone I missed this umbrella and case—it was a dry day—it is Mr. Robert John Bradshaw's—no other was left instead of this—there was no other in the hall.

Prisoner. Q. When I called on you, had not I a brown silk umbrella in my hand? A. I did not see one.

JAMES ATTENBORO . I am a pawnbroker. I took the umbrella in of a woman, not the prisoner, in the name of Ann Davis—this is the duplicate I gave for it.

MARY RING . The prisoner lodged at my house—I produce this duplicate—the prisoner left it on the table that night when she went to her situation.

Prisoner's Defence. I took my own umbrella, and might have made a mistake; I left my own there.

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420822-2254

2254. ROBERT BAGGOTT and JAMES PULLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July, 10 1/2 lbs. weight of ham, value 10s., the goods of John Smith.

JOHN SMITH . I keep the Victoria tea-gardens at Bayswater. About twenty minutes past eleven o'clock at night, on the llth of July, I missed a ham—I saw it safe just before—this is the knuckle of it.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Is not your name Jones? A. No, I went by that name for thirty years—it was the name of my nurse who brought me up—I did not know my parents.

JOHN KIMBREY (police-constable D 102.) On the night of the 11th of July I stopped Baggott with a ham under his jacket—Pullen was walking with him towards the Edgware-road, down Cambridge-street—I asked Baggott what he had got—they walked on, and I spoke to them again—Pullen fell back, and said it was a ham they had picked up down by the Crown, at Bayswater—I saw there was no dirt upon it—I said, "You never picked this ham up there"—they said they were coming from Hammersmith, and picked it up between the Crown and the Victoria gate—the ham was warm.

BAGGOTT— GUILTY . Aged 23.

PULLEN— GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2255

2255. GEORGE EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Robert Robson, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ROBERT ROBSON . I live in Long Acre. About nine o'clock, on the 8th of August, I was going down Snow-hill—I missed my handkerchief—I turned, and saw the prisoner running—this is my handkerchief—no one was near but the prisoner.

CHARLES GRANT . I live in Alpha-grove, Holloway. I was in Farringdon-market, and heard a cry of "Stop thief"—the prisoner passed me—I followed him to Shoe-lane—he went into a house—he threw this handkerchief behind him—I took it up, and gave it to Mr. Robson.

FREDERICK RUSSELL (City police-constable, No. 503.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2256

2256. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 1 watch-chain, value 3l.; and one opera glass, value 1l.; the goods of James William Jones; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ELIZABETH JONES . I am the wife of James William Jones, of Goswell-street—I came into the shop on the 23rd of July, about ten minutes past one in the day, and saw the prisoner—I had had a chain on the counter, and an opera glass in a glass case—I saw the prisoner putting his hand in his pocket—I thought he had taken something—I went to close the door—he rushed to get out—I took hold of him, and kept him, with the assistance of a witness, till I sent for A policeman—he scuffled a great deal—I found the chain and opera glass on the mat, a considerable distance from where

they had been ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before—I had walked over the mat before and there was nothing there then.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask you to search me? A. Yes.

JAMES FOOT . I am errand boy to the prosecutor—I saw the prisoner in the shop—I saw him rush out—my mistress asked what he wanted—he asked the way to the Angel—I saw my mistress pick up the chain and glass from the floor.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard of a place at Islington, and did not know my way; I went to the shop and asked; I understood she did not know; I was coming out and she stopped me.

ROBERT M'KENZIE (police-constable B 44.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420822-2257

2257. WILLIAM ASHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June, 2 fishing-nets, value 3l., the goods of Josiah Wilson; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ROBERT WARD . I am in the service of Josiah Wilson, Esq., of Stamford-hill—about the 21st of June, I missed two fishing nets of his—I believe these, now produced, to be them.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. When did you see them last? A. On the 20th of June, in the summer-house adjoining the garden—there are only the servants and the labourers at Mr. Wilson's—I can swear to this net, and have used it in the New River several times—I have no mark upon it.

WILLIAM BARNETT . I am a pawnbroker—I have produced the net—I cannot tell who pawned it—this is the duplicate I gave for it.

CHRISTOPHER NORTH (police-constable N 17.) I took the prisoner on the 9th of July, and found on him the duplicate of this net—this is it.

JOSEPH FOSTER . I am a constable of Tottenham—I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18420822-2258

2258. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July, 1 pewter pot, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Parr.

THOMAS PARR . I keep the Blandford Arms, in Marylebone—this pot is mine, and must have been taken from the premises.

THOMAS HARRAGAN (police-constable D 83.) On the 13th of July I stopped the prisoner, in Paddington, with two bundles, containing a pewter pint pot, a quart pot, and some shoemaker's tools—he seemed to be going from London to the country.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the pots.

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2259

2259. JULIA MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July, 8 yards of printed cotton, value 6s. 6d., the goods of John Parton; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM PLATT (police-constable B 55.) At a quarter past five

o'clock, on Monday evening, the 11th of July, I was called to Mr. Parton's shop—he charged the prisoner, who was in the shop, with stealing eight yards of printed cotton—I took her, and in her apron I found this eight yards of printed cotton, eight printed handkerchiefs, and a gown—she said she had fetched them from a pawnbroker's.

JOHN PARTON . In consequence of information from my young man, I looked into the prisoner's lap, and found eight yards of print, she had no right to it—it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had something to drink, and being in liquor I did not perceive the handkerchiefs till I went to another shop to buy an apron; the shopman asked where I got them—I abused him, and he gave me in charge.

JAMES BRADLEY (police-constable B 134.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, from the Sessions-house, at Westminster—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY .—Aged 30.

Reference Number: t18420822-2260

2260. JULIA MURPHY was again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June, 8 handkerchiefs, value 12s., the goods of Thomas Price.

WILLIAM MEEKING . I am assistant to Thomas Price, a linen draper, in Tothill-street, Westminster—the prisoner was in his shop on the 11th of June—I afterwards missed the handkerchiefs produced, which are my master's.

WILLIAM PLATT (police-constable B 55.) I took these handkerchiefs from the prisoner, in her apron, in Mr. Parton's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. They were put in my apron, but I never stole them.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2261

2261. ELLEN PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July, 2 sovereigns, 1 shilling, 2 sixpences, 1 penny, and 10 halfpence, the monies of John Johnson, from his person.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a sailor—on the 11th of July, I met the prisoner—she took me to a house in West-street, Limehouse—I paid half-a-crown for the bed, and sent for a drop of drink—at that time I pulled my jacket and waistcoat off, and put them on a chair back—while I untied my handkerchief the prisoner took the money out of my waistcoat pocket, and ran off—I called out to stop her, but she got out with it.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. What countryman are you? A. A Swede—I arrived in this country on the 4th of July—my wife is in London, living in Cornwall-street—I was with the prisoner about two hours—I had been to two public-houses, with a woman named Stewart—I was not drunk—I saw when the prisoner took my money—I did not give her any thing—she was not in the house many minutes.

ELIZABETH STEWART . I live in Red Lion-court—the prisoner lived in the same house—I was in bed when she came home that morning—she said she took a sovereign out of the man's pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. And she brought it home, did she not? A. I never saw it—I was at the Red Lion when she came—she went up Poplar with the prosecutor, and his shipmate with me—I was sleeping in the house with the shipmate—the prisoner was in the other bed, but she

did her head under the clothes when the prosecutor came to speak to his shipmate—I was taken up to show where the prisoner's mother was—I was not charged with having something to do with this.

ANN HAWKINS . My mother keeps this house—I went up into the room when the sailor made the alarm—I had before been up and received the money for the room—I saw some gold in the prosecutor's hand when I received the 6d. for the gin—the prisoner then came down and ran through the passage.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2262

2262. JOHN MULDONE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July, 12lbs. weight of lead, value 1s. 11d., the goods of our Lady the Queen his mistress.—2nd COUNT, stating them to belong to the General Penitentiary.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS LEWIS . I am clerk of the works of the General Penitentiary, Millbank. The prisoner was employed at some repairs going on there, as a bricklayer's-labourer. On the 6th of July some lead was found put apart in the visiting-cell—it was covered with a slight book-board—we had missed lead of that sort from some other part—I left it there, and set a man to watch—about five o'clock in the afternoon the prisoner left the building—he passed me at the entrance gate—after he had got out I called him back, and asked him what he had got in his basket—he said, "Nothing but a cloth and a bit of bread—I took hold of him, and found there was something hard about him, and found this piece of lead between his waistcoat and small-clothes—he made no observation.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How long had he been working there? A. Three weeks—we cut this lead that morning from some pieces.

JOHN TEES . I was the smith employed at the Penitentiary—I cut this lead from the gates—I missed it, looked about, and found it in the visiting-cell, behind some boards—I told Mr. Lewis, and I was put to watch—the prisoner came, took it away, and put it between the waistband of his trowsers and his person—I told Mr. Lewis.

Cross-examined. Q. How much does it weigh? A. About 12lbs.—I am quite sure the prisoner is the person.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 36.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury .— Confined Six Weeks.

Reference Number: t18420822-2263

2263. JAMES CASTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., of a man unknown, from his person.

GEORGE MARTIN . I am a police-inspector. I was in plain clothes in St. James's-park on the 10th of July—there were a great many persons assembled, and a person addressing them—the prisoner came up and joined the crowd, then took this handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket, and put it into his own—he went about a yard off—I touched the gentleman, and told him he had lost his handkerchief—he found he had—I told him to come with me, which he did—I went to the prisoner, and said, "Give this gentleman his handkerchief"—he said he had not got it—I put my hand on his trowsers' pocket, and said, "Take it out here"—he did so—the gentleman said it was his—I said, "Accompany me to the station"—

he said, "No," and refused to give his card—I took the prisoner to the station—I found in his hat two other handkerchiefs, one was marked "E. R."—the mark of the other has been taken out.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long was it before you spoke to the gentleman? A. Perhaps a quarter of a minute—I was touching the prisoner at the time I saw him take the handkerchief—I am quite sure he did not pick it up—the gentleman appeared much agitated and frightened—no one was with me—this is the handkerchief.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2264

2264. HENRY TAYLOR SCOBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July, 1 watch, value 15s.; 1 guard-chain, value 1s.; and 1 watch key, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of John Perrow.

JOHN PERROW . I am a seaman belonging to the Bride, lying in the London Docks. I went into the Nag's Head on the night of the 2nd of July, for a pint of porter—the prisoner was there, and asked if I belonged to the brig which was lying alongside his boat—I showed him my watch—he put the chain round his neck, and went down the highway to M'Farlane's.

JOHN THOMAS . I went to M'Farlane's on the 12th of July, and saw the prisoner there—he went out to get change for a sovereign for me—he came back, and could not get it—I said, "I don't care, give it to the land-lady"—he said he would not, but he would go and get the full amount of it—he went out and never returned—I never saw him again till I was at the station—he gave me the watch when he went out, and said if I was afraid to trust him with the sovereign, to take his watch, it was his sister's, that she gave it him when she died—the prosecutor was in company with us—he was present at the time, but I do not know whether he saw the prisoner give me the watch—I did not know it was Perrow's watch—I would not go out without giving some pledge to the landlady—I took out the watch and the prosecutor owned it.

MARY M'FARLANE . Thomas had a dinner at my house—he gave me a sovereign—I said I had no scales to weigh it, and would not take it—it was taken out, and after that I had the watch left.

THOMAS SQUIRE (police-constable K 14.) I received the prisoner at the station—he said the watch belonged to Perrow—he did not produce the sovereign.

GUILTY .† Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2265

2265. GEORGE BARRON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 1 pair of boots, value 9s., the goods of Jane Jones; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JAMES WOLSTONCROPT . I am shopman to Jane Jones, of High Holborn. On the 20th of July the prisoner came to our shop—I saw him take a pair of boots—he walked away—I followed, and took him three doors off, with these boots in his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I pointed to the man who gave them me; he said, "I don't care a d—, I shall take you."

THOMAS BLUNDELL (police-constable L 93.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2266

2266. HENRY CLARK and GEORGE PHILPOT were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July, 4 sovereigns, the monies of Edward Churton, their master; to which CLARK pleaded GUILTY . Aged 14. PHILPOT pleaded GUILTY. Aged 15. Judgment Respited.

Sixth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420822-2267

2267. ROBERT FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th July, 4 goblets, value 3s. 4d.; and 2 tumblers, value 3d.; the goods of Edward Wells.

GEORGE BLACKBURN . I am waiter at the Sir Hugh Myddleton, at Clerkenwell, kept by Edward Wells. I have known the prisoner twenty years—he frequented our house—he was there on the 9th of July—I went to another room, and left him in the coffee-room—there were some glasses on the mantel-piece, and some on the table—when I came back, in about two minutes, the prisoner was the only person in the room—he was reading the paper—I missed the glasses as he came but—I saw him again about thirty yards off—I said he had made a mistake, he had got a glass or two of mine—he said he had not—I said he must come back—I searched him, and took six glasses from him—they are Mr. Wells's, but the loss and breakages are at my expense.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. The prisoner's real name is Honey man, is it not? A. Yes—I knew him when he was proprietor of the Surrey Theatre-one of his daughters is married to one of the most celebrated actors of the day.

JOHN SMART (police-constable G 149.) I received the prisoner, and have the glasses.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 60.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420822-2268

2268. JOB BANGS was indicted for embezzlement.

JAMES BOOTH . I am a baker, and live in the City-road. The prisoner was in my service about twelve months—it was his duty to carry out bread, and bring back the money, and pay it to me, or to my daughter—M'Kenzie, in Cloth-fair, owed me 2l. 13s. 3d. on the 2nd of July—I never received any money on account of that person.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You also charge him with embezzling 5s. 3d.? A. Yes—I suppose he received the money that day—I was at home, but my daughter took his account that day.

JULIA ELIZABETH BOOTH . I am the prosecutor's daughter. On the 2nd of July the prisoner did not pay me any money on account of Mrs. M'Kenzie.

Cross-examined. Q. When was he given into custody? A. I do not know—he left us on the 2nd of July—I took down from him the account of the bread he had sold on the 2nd of July.

COURT. Q. Did he give you an account by word of mouth? A. Yes—I took it down in writing—I have that account at home in the ledger—he booked bread to the M'Kenzies as unpaid—he said he had left them four loaves.

SARAH TIMMERMAN . I live in the service of Mr. M'Kenzie, of Cloth-fair. The prisoner used to deliver bread at our house—On Saturday, the

2nd of July, I saw him at my master's house—I gave him 5s. 3d. for his master.

GEORGE CROSS (police-constable G 209.) On Tuesday night, the 5th of July, I took the prisoner into custody—he said nothing to me.

GUILTY. Aged 14.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Fourteen Days.

Reference Number: t18420822-2269

2269. GEORGE PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July, 2 watches, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 10s.; 1 watch-chain, value 10d.; and 1 key, value 4d.; the goods of Thomas John Turnbull: and JAMES DRAKE , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen.

SARAH HONORA TURNBULL . I am the wife of Thomas John Turnbull, of Whitecross-place, Shoreditch. Porter lodged with his mother at my house for six weeks. On Saturday, the 2nd of July, I had a silver and a metal watch, hanging in the kitchen, against the wainscot—I saw them safe at one o'clock—the silver watch had a gold seal and a steel chain—the metal watch had only a ribbon—at six o'clock I missed them both, also a teaspoon, a pencil-case, and a knife—I had some suspicion—I went up immediately to Porter, and found he was in bed alone—I looked at him, and saw he was not asleep, though his eyes were shut—I said, "George, what have you done with the things you have taken out of the kitchen?"—he said, "I have not been down stairs since I came up last night"—I sent for his mother, who was nursing a friend of mine, and she gave him in charge—he cried very much—when he was at the office, he said he brought some little boy in the house to take them away.

Porter. I did not let the boy in to steal the things, and I did not say so.

JAMES BRANNAN (police-sergeant G 20.) On the 10th of July, I took Porter at Mount Pleasant, East-road, City-road—his mother was present—I told him I belonged to the police, and he was charged with stealing two watches and some other things—he said, "I was persuaded by William Brandon; we opened the door, and took the things"—I took him to the station, and went in pursuit of Drake—I took him about one o'clock the following morning—I told him it was for being concerned with Porter and Brandon in stealing some things from Mr. Turnbull—he said, "I never stole them; I was not there, I pledged the watch, and gave them half the money."

HENRY REDMAN . I am a policeman. On the 10th of July, Brannan gave Porter to me—I took him to the station, and then went for Mrs. Turnbull—there was a charge made against Porter for stealing two watches and other things—he said he should not have done it but for another boy named Brandon—that his mother was out, nursing, and Brandon asked him if he could come to sleep there, and he would give him 1s. a-week—he then asked him if there was any thing he could steal in the drawers, and he said he did not like to do that—that, next morning, they got up at four o'clock, went to the kitchen, and Brandon took the watches out—when the prisoners were brought before the Magistrate, Drake said he received the watch from Brandon, and pawned it at Woolwich.

WILLIAM BREMNER . I am in the employ of a pawnbroker at Woolwich—I remember Drake coming and pawning a silver watch and chain, for 20s., in the name of James Drake—it was taken out on the Saturday

following, by a Post-Office order from London, in a letter signed "James Drake."

Drake's Defence. I became acquainted with Brandon, he lodged at a place I did; I met him one morning, he said his father expected to be seized on; he gave me the watch, which I pawned for 1l.; I gave my right name and address; I bought some clothes, which came to 15s.; I did not know it was stolen.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2270

2270. EDWARD MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July, 1 shawl, value 10s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Walker, his master.

JAMES CHARLES CHURCHER . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Walker, a pawnbroker, in Tabernacle-walk, Finsbury; the prisoner was his apprentice. On the 6th of July he asked leave to go on an errand about seven o'clock in the evening—I let him go, and he went away—about half-past eight that evening I went to the station and found the shawl there, and the prisoner was in custody—I had seen it in the shop about three weeks before—I can swear to it by a stain on it, a stain of beer, I believe.

WILLIAM BOLTWOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Cotton, a pawnbroker, On the 6th of July the prisoner pledged this shawl—I am confident he is the person—he came again in a few minutes with a woman to sell the ticket to her—we had some suspicion, and gave him in charge.

WILLIAM MORRELL . I am a policeman. On the evening of the 6th of July I was called by Boltwood—I received the prisoner into custody, with this shawl—the prisoner first said he had bought the ticket of a man, and then he said he had taken the shawl from his master's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a woman in Shoreditch, who asked me to go and pledge this shawl—She said she did not like to go herself as she owed them some money, and she would give me 6d. and the ticket.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2271

2271. GEORGE THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July, 3 pence, 2 halfpence, and 2 farthings, the monies of Frederick Darby.

FREDERICK DARBY . I am a tobacconist, in Little May's-buildings, Covent-garden. I was in the room at the back of my shop on the 22nd of July, and saw the prisoner come in—he walked up to the counter, opened the till, and took out 4 1/2 d.—I stopped him in the shop, and asked what he had got in his hand—he said he wanted some tobacco, and had the money to pay for it—I told him to lay it down on the counter, and he laid down three penny-pieces, two halfpence, and two farthings—I looked in the till, and there was nothing in it—I know the three penny-pieces had been put in but a few minutes before.

GEORGE WILKINS . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner—I found three penny-pieces, two halfpence, and two farthings on the counter—these are them.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2272

2272. EDWARD GURNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July, 1 half-crown, the money of Samuel Scrivener.

MARY SPINKS . I am bar-maid at the Phoenix public-house, in Norton Falgate, kept by Mr. Samuel Scrivener. On the morning of the 14th of July I was in the bar-parlour—I had only left the bar a few minutes—I

left no one in it—the till was then shut close, and there were four sixpences and a half-crown in it—I had seen it safe about three minutes before—I heard Smith, the policeman, call out—I went to the bar, and saw he had the prisoner in custody—the till was open, and the half-crown which had been in it was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNK. Q. When you came out of the bar-parlour, what was Smith doing with the prisoner? A. The prisoner called for half a pint of beer, and Smith took hold of him directly—I afterwards saw a half-crown in the policeman's possession—I never saw it in the prisoner's possession.

JOHN SMITH . I am a policeman. On the 14th of July I went to the door of the prosecutor's house, and saw the prisoner leaning over the counter, with his hand in the till—I saw him take a half-crown from the till and put it into his mouth—he leaped from the counter, and was coming out, but seeing me at the door, he turned round again and said, "Half a pint of beer"—I took him into custody, and charged him with the offence—I called Spinks, who came out—I asked the prisoner for the half-crown—he denied having it—I took hold of him by the throat, and he put his hand to his mouth—he then put his hand into his pocket, and took out the half-crown, as if from his pocket, and gave it me.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you on duty at the time? A. Yes—I was looking in at that door, because the day before Mr. Scrivener had come to me and said he had had a disturbance at his house, and he desired me to give an eye to his place—I did not see the prisoner go in—I saw him put the half-crown into his mouth—I looked into his mouth, as I was afraid he had swallowed it—I did not see him take it out of his mouth.

GUILTY .** Aged 14.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420822-2273

2273. DANIEL ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 1 pair of boots, value 3s. 6d., the goods of William Ward; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ROBERT TYRRELL READ . I am shopman to Mr. William Ward, a salesman, in Gray's Inn-lane. On the 9th of July, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner stoop down and take a pair of boots from a box under the window, outside the shop—he put them under his coat, and went about two yards—I followed, took hold of him, and took them from under his coat—he did not say anything, but began to wring my ears—the officer came and took him—these are the boots—they are my master's.

JOHN CALLOW (police-constable G 72.) I took the prisoner—he said he was going to try them on in the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about them.

JAMES CHURCHYARD (police-constable G 174.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was present at the trial—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 60.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2274

2274. PHILIP CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 coat, value 3l. 10s., the goods of William Appleford.

WILLIAM APPLEFORD . I keep a tailor's shop in Holborn. On the 16th of July I missed a coat off a horse in the further part of my shop, five or six yards within the door—it was brought back by the pawnbroker, and I recognised it—here is my writing on the sleeve lining.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. you know the coat to be yours?

A. Yes, by the mark inside, and by the size of it as well—it was made for a gentleman at Enfield, who is a large sized person—the man who made it brought it in about half-past eleven o'clock that morning.

JOSEPH MITCHELL . I am in the service of Mr. Rosier, a pawnbroker, in Clerkenwell. On the 16th of July, about half-past twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to pledge this coat—I asked who it belonged to—he said, "Mr. Daley, of Saffron-hill"—I said I thought it did not belong to him—he said it did, and he would go and fetch him—he went away, and left the coat in my possession.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before? A. No, but am quite certain he is the man—I took notice of him—he was in the shop about ten minutes while I was serving another customer.

DENNIS DALEY . I live in Saffron-street, Saffron-hill. I know the prisoner—I did not give him this coat to pledge.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he been in your employment? A. Yes, for upwards of three years—he had been my apprentice—I parted with him, and refused to take him back, because I had been fobbed of 50l. or 60l. worth of property—he and I did not play at cards together—my children and him might have done so—I forbid him, and he said be would not be forbidden by me—I may have played at cards with him after my supper, and on a Sunday—I did not take him before a Magistrate—my son did.

SAMUEL DOYLE . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 16th of July—he said a man named Jones gave him the coat to pledge.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure he did not say Daley? A. No—he asked me what charge I had against him, and I told him—I took him in West-street from a gang of other thieves.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confided Three Months.

OLD COURT.—Thursday, August 25th, 1842.

Second Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420822-2275

2275. JOHN WILSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Burn, about three o'clock in the night of the 21st of July, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 pair of pattens, value 9d.; 1 pail, value 1s.; 1 metal cock, value 18d.; 15 feet of lead pipe, value 15s.; and 1 other metal cock, value 18d., fixed to a building, his property:—also, for; stealing, on the 23rd of December, 1 pair of stockings, value 9d.; 10 sheets, value 3l. 10s.; 11 bed-gowns, value 16s.; 12 shifts, value 1l. 4s.; 7 petticoats, value 10s.; 2 aprons, value 2s.; 3 table-cloths, value 12s.; 3 napkins, value 18d.; 1 towel, value 6d.; 1 pocket, value 6d.; 3 pairs of drawers, value 3s.; 1 quilt, value 6s.; 3 pillow-cases, value 3s.; and 1 table-cover, value 18d.; the goods of James Clews; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to all which he pleaded GUILTY .— Transported for Fifteen Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2276

2276. GEORGE MARTIN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Ridley Beal, about four o'clock in the night of the 21st of July, at St. Andrew, Holborn, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 spoon, value 2s., his property.

JANE FUTCHER . I am servant to Henry Ridley Beale, of Southampton-buildings, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn. On the 22nd of July I

was sleeping in the kitchen, and about four o'clock in the morning I heard somebody walking across the kitchen—I coughed on purpose, then rose in my bed, gave another cough, and saw the kitchen door, which leads into the area, wide open—a man jumped up when I coughed—he had his head bobbed down behind the table in the middle of the kitchen—I jumped out of bed, and ran after him into the area—he was climbing over the rails—I ran to the street door, and then the policeman had got him—the area door had been shut, but not bolted, when I went to bed—I saw the prisoner drop a spoon, which the policeman took up—it is not silver—it belongs to Mr. Beal—the kitchen door had been shut and latched—the other door was latched also—there is no lock on them—it was not bolted—nobody could come in without lifting the latch.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear I am the person you saw in the house? A. Yes, I can—I swear I did not encourage you to come into the house.

GEORGE SULLIVAN . I am a policeman. J was on duty in Southampton-buildings, Chancery-lane, about a quarter past four o'clock—I heard a scream at No. 14, went there, and saw the prisoner getting out of the area—I secured him, and afterwards received the spoon, which I have produced.

Prisoner's Defence. The servant encouraged me to come.

JANE FUTCHER re-examined. I never saw him before—it is customary to fasten the door, but I went to bed poorly and forgot to bolt it.

GUILTY of Stealing only. Aged 19.— Confined Four Months.

Before Lord Chief Baron Abinger.

Reference Number: t18420822-2277

2277. JOHN WILLIAM BEAN was indicted for a misdemeanor.

THE ATTOENEY and SOLICITOR-GENERAL, with MESSES. ADOLPHUS, WADDINOTON, and GURNEY, conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES EDWARD DASSETT . I am an oil and colourman. On Sunday, the 3rd of July, about a quarter to twelve o'clock, I went into St. James's-park, and saw the Royal carriages and the Queen and Prince Albert coming from Buckingham Palace to go to the Chapel Royal, St. James's—I was standing about half way down the Mall, near the watering-place, which is a kind of pump—I did not distinctly see the Queen—She was in the last carriage—there were three carriages, and she was in the last—I did not distinctly see her, but I have heard she was in the last—I have seen her a great number of times—She was always in the last carriage—when the last carriage was passing I observed just before it passed the prisoner come in front' of the crowd, and present a pistol at the last carriage of the three—he seemed to come from the back of the crowd—he elbowed his way to the front—I saw him present a pistol at the last carriage—I heard the click of the hammer striking against the pan, but there was no explosion—I heard that as the last carriage was passing—the pistol was full cocked when he presented it, and he was holding it out at arm's length towards the carriage.

Q. Was it while the pistol was elevated towards the carriage that you heard that click? A. Yes—I immediately seized him by the right arm, which had the pistol in it—I forget my exact words, but I said, How dare he shoot at the Queen? or something of that sort—I took the pistol from him—but before that I turned round to my brother, who stood on the right-hand side (the prisoner was on my left,) and mentioned to my brother what had happened—I held the prisoner by the arm at the time, and after I had told my brother, I took the pistol from him—he made very little resistance—he did not say anything that I remember—He took the pistol from under his coat—I saw him draw it out—I cannot say whether it was in a pocket, or what.

Q. How high towards the carriage was the pistol directed? A. The action was so quick I hardly noticed it—he held it at arm's length, and immediately drew his arm back when he found it missed fire—the carriage was passing at the time—I was about two and a half or from that to three yards from the carriage, standing on the edge of the footpath—there was an immense number of persons there—it was on the right-hand side, as the carriages were going down towards the gardens of St. James's-park—my face was towards St. James's Palace—after taking the pistol from him, I and my brother took him across the Mall, and offered him to the policeman A 56, who was standing across the Mall—a great number of persons followed us, and asked me to give the boy back his pistol, saying they believed it was a hoax, they did not believe it was loaded—the policeman refused to take him into custody—I offered him the pistol—he returned it to me, and said he thought it did not amount to a charge—I had hold of the prisoner all the time—I offered him to Claxton, A 134, who likewise refused to take the charge—the pressure of the crowd became so great, and most of them sided with the prisoner—he was forced from me, and escaped—I still had the pistol, and went down the Mall with it in my hand—I myself was soon after taken into custody by policeman A 136, who stood lower down the Mall—I had the pistol at that time in my hand, and the people were at that time charging me with attempting to shoot the Queen—the constable took the pistol from me—I was taken to Gardiner's-lane station—I saw, when the prisoner pulled the pan up, that it was full of coarse gunpowder; and when I took it from him I put the pan down, and half-cocked the hammer, to save what gunpowder remained, but a portion of it had got out—when I gave it to the policeman I had put the pan down—in other respects it was just the same as when I took it from the prisoner—I do not remember the prisoner saying anything to me—I think he asked me for his pistol again—that was while I had him in custody—I saw him afterwards, when he was taken into custody—I have not the least doubt of his being the person.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. You half-cocked the trigger? A. Yes—the carriages were not in very rapid motion—the horses were going at the usual trot—the last carriage had passed before I took hold of the prisoner's arm—it had not got past before he presented the pistol—it was passing at the time—he was a little before the people—rather before me—the carriage was just before me at the moment he presented it.

COURT. Q. What do you mean by being before you? A. The carriage was passing between two rows of people—it was passing at the time he attempted to fire—it had not passed—it was abreast of me.

MR. HORRY. Q. Was not the carriage in advance of you before you took hold of the prisoner's arm, and before you heard the click? A. The carriage had passed when I took him—the carriage had got just by when I heard the click.

COURT. Q. What do yon mean by just got by you? A. It was passing, it had not passed—when he pulled the trigger it was exactly opposite him.

MR. HORRY. Q. You did not see him pull the trigger, did you? A. Yes—the carriage had not passed at the moment I heard the click—it was just passing—I was standing on the left-hand side of my brother, and the prisoner was standing on the right of me—my back was towards the railing—my uncle was behind me—I should say there were 2000 or 3000 people.

Q. Was not there a good deal of laughing going on? A. No, the people did not laugh that I remember—some might have laughed, I cannot say—

there was a great noise after it happened—while I had hold of the prisoner they kept shouting at me to let him go—they cried out that the pistol was not loaded—I do not think there was a great deal of laughing—I will not swear there was not—I spoke to my brother and uncle—I do not recollect what I said to my uncle—I crossed the Mall towards the Green-park before I met policeman A 56—the people were about me all this time—my brother was helping me to take the prisoner—I do not remember whether he had hold of him—he was walking by the side—I think he had hold of him—I kept hold of him—he made a little resistance.

Q. Was not he pushing and pulling from you as the people pushed and pulled? A. I believe he was—that is what I mean by a little resistance—as he went along I believe he appealed to me to give him his pistol back—I have no doubt of it—he did not follow me, and keep up with me, when I had not hold of him—when he got away he made his way off—we might have gone twelve or fourteen yards before we got to policeman 56 A—he did not ask me to give him the pistol back several times—I will not swear he did not ask twice, nor that he did not ask me when I had not hold of him—I do not think he did—the crowd kept by us half-way across the road—he might then have got away by the assistance of the mob, but I had hold of him—I met policeman A 56 about half-way down the road—I did not cease to keep hold of him till I was made—I said nothing about the click to A 56—I told him I saw him present the pistol—just after the second carriage had passed, I observed him take the pistol and present it at the third—he was by my side at the time the first carriage passed—I was looking down towards Buckingham Palace, and watched the carriages as they came up—the prisoner was standing by the side of me all that time—I saw him take the pistol from his coat—I did not see distinctly that it was a pistol when he was taking it out, but I saw it when he pointed it—he took it out as the second carriage was going by, and as the second had just passed he presented it about the middle of the last carriage—at the moment he took it out he and I were standing exactly abreast of the horses—he presented it immediately he took it out—I heard the click immediately.

FREDERICK AUGUSTUS DASSETT . I am the brother of Charles Edward Dassett. On Sunday, the 3rd of July, I was with him in St. James's-park, seeing Her Majesty going to the chapel—there were a good many people there—I stood on my brother's right-hand—I did not have hold of his arm—I did not see him take hold of any body, but saw him when he had hold of the prisoner—I had not seen the prisoner do any thing before that—when my brother had hold of him he had a pistol in his hand—he got away from him by the crowd pressing on him—my brother kept the pistol.

COURT. Q. But when you first saw the prisoner the pistol was in his hand? A. Yes—I saw my brother take it from him.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At the time your brother took the pistol from the prisoner, where were the carriages, and How many carriages were there? A. Three—the third had passed three or four yards when he took the pistol—we were then about three yards from it—I did not see any body in the carriage—my brother attempted to give charge of the prisoner, but the policeman did not take him—when my brother took the pistol the hammer of it had gone down—the pan was shut as it is when it is being let off.

COURT. Q. Do you know the meaning of shutting the pan? A. Yes, after it is gone off—the pan was in the same state as a pistol is when it has been fired off.

MR. ADOLPJIUS. Q. Your brother took the pistol to a policeman?

A. Yes—it was not then in the state it was when he first got it—I think it was half cocked—my brother took the prisoner over to the policemen—when they refused to take the charge, after taking him tome distance down the Mall, he got away.

Cross-examined. Q. You say the pan was down—do you know what the pan is? A. Yes—both the pan and hammer were down—I had not noticed the prisoner before—I stood by my brother's side, with my back to the railing, looking for the carriages, looking towards Buckingham Palace, before the carriages came up—the prisoner was on my brother's left-hand, and I on his right—I did not notice any thing till my brother spoke to me—I then looked, and found him holding the prisoner's wrist—he said, "Here is a young gentleman going to have a pop at the Queen"—I had hold of one side of him, when my brother took him to the policeman—my brother had the other—I did not notice his asking my brother to give him back his pistol—he did not say anything as we went along, that I recollect—he said nothing, and went quite willingly—he gave very little trouble—he did not walk so fast as my brother wished—he is a cripple—my uncle was behind—when my brother went to the policeman, he laughed, and said it did not amount to a charge—there were a number of people coming by as we went on with the prisoner—there was a great deal of shouting—I believe they said the pistol was not loaded—I did not notice much—I did not notice that any of the mob offered to take the prisoner from us—I cannot swear nobody did—I saw no one particularly—I know the mob pushed very much—they pushed different ways.

COURT. Q. How came he to get away? A. Because the mob was so great.

MR. HORRY. Q. Did not you hear somebody say, "You are a foolish fellow, if you don't want to get into trouble about your pistol, you had better go away?" A. Not that I noticed—I will not swear that was not laid just at the time we got separated—I did not see anybody in the third carriage.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have been asked if somebody did not say the pistol was not loaded, had they looked to see whether it was loaded? A. Not that I know—they could not have seen it in my brother's hand.

COURT. Q. Before your brother seized the prisoner's arm, did you hear anything? A. No.

JOHN JAMES . I am a carpenter and builder, and live at No. 50, North-street, Maida-hill. I am Dassett's uncle, and was with them in St. James's-park on Sunday the 3rd of July—I remember the Royal carriages passing—I was standing on the right-hand side of the road as the carriages came towards us, standing partly by my nephew Charles's side, and partly behind him, close to him—I remember the third carriage passing—I did not recognize the Queen in it—immediately as the last carriage passed us, my nephew Charles held up the prisoner's hand—he had hold of the prisoner's wrist—he said, "Here is a boy wants to have a pop at the Queen"—there was a pistol in the prisoner's hand—I did not observe the pan of it at the time—my nephew kept hold of his wrist—we all three crossed the road to the policemen, who were going off duty, and pointed it out to two policemen—my nephew kept hold of the prisoner's wrist—I saw my nephew take the pistol from the prisoner's hand, as we were crossing the road to the policemen, but kept hold of his wrist—I am quite certain he is the person—I did not see him get away, as there was a great crowd pressing on my nephew and the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you standing on the right or left of your

nephew Charles? A. On his right, rather behind him—there was nobody between us—I was looking towards the Queen's carriage, waiting to see the carriages pass, looking in a direction towards Buckingham Palace—I do not know whether my eyes were fixed that way all the time—I had not noticed the prisoner before—we might not have gone above a dozen yards before the crowd separated us—that was when we were going down the Mall—the policemen refused to take the charge—we walked some little distance down the Mall, and the press of the crowd separated us.

JURY. Q. Did the prisoner run away immediately he was separated by the crowd? A. He disappeared—I did not look for him—my nephew was taken in charge, and I was looking after him.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a wood turner, and live in Hill-street, Finsbury, On the morning of the 3rd of July I went into St. James's-park, and saw the Royal carriages coming from Buckingham Palace, and the moment they passed me, I saw young Dassett in the act of taking a pistol from a young humped-backed boy.

COURT. Q. Do you mean the moment the third carriage had passed? A. Yes.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Should you know the boy you speak of, if you saw him again? A. I should—it was the prisoner—I stood about a yard, or a yard and a half from him—young Dassett taking the pistol out of his hand, was the first thing I observed—I saw him take him across to the policeman.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you standing behind young Dassett, or by the side of him? A. I was in front of the carriage—way, nearer Buckingham-palace than he was, about a yard or two from the prisoner—my eye followed the carriages as they passed—I turned to the right—the crowd directly got round Dassett and the prisoner—just before the moment that my attention was attracted by Dassett taking the pistol from him, I was looking at the carriages.

COURT. Q. Did you see any body in the last carriage? A. Yes, a lady in the last carriage, with either a light green or pale blue bonnet on—I do not know whether it was the Queen or not—I did not see her face.

JAMES TORRINGTON PARTRIDGE (police-constable A 136.) I have been in the police better than seven years—I have been on duty in the Park repeatedly when the Queen has been going to the Chapel Royal—I have been on duty at the Palace nearly twelve months—there are generally three carriages, and Her Majesty usually rides in the third—On the 3rd of July, Her Majesty was in the hind carriage—I saw her so as to recognise her—She sat in the hind part of the carriage—I was on duty in the Green-park, and she was on the side towards where the prisoner was standing—I was keeping the gate going into the Green-park—as soon as the Queen had passed, I returned into the Green-park again, looked round, and saw a mob coming down from Buckingham Palace towards St. James's Palace—I immediately ran down, and when I got about twenty yards from the Duke of Sutherland's house, I saw Charles Dassett with a pistol in his hand, and 400 or 500 persons following him—this was about five minutes after the Royal carriages had passed—I did not see any thing of the prisoner—I took possession of the pistol, and put it into my pocket, on account of the mob of persons crowding around wishing to see it—I afterwards gave it to Inspector Martin, of my division—it was partially examined in my presence, but not unloaded in my presence.

Cross-examined. Q. Which side of the Park were you? A. On the left side, the Green-park—I cannot say whether any body besides the

Queen and the Prince was in the hind carriage—the Prince sat at the back of the carriage, on the left side of Her Majesty, on the side that I was.

GEORGE MARTIN . I am an inspector of police. I was on duty on Sunday, the 3rd of July, in St. James's-park, and observed Dassett in custody of Partridge—I went with them to the station—there was a great crowd, which followed us to the station, and there Partridge gave me a pistol, said to be the one he had taken from Dassett—I have it here—I drew the loading—there was a small quantity of powder, a bit of paper, and two small pieces of pipe, or gravel, or something—it was a coarse sort of powder—it was rammed down with paper—it appeared to be properly rammed down—the powder was not sufficient for an ordinary charge of a pistol of that description—it was about half an ordinary charge—it was rammed down in the usual way—the bits of pipe were loose on the paper, and very small—I have them here—they fell out when the pistol was turned down—one of them is about the size of an ordinary shot—I drew the paper with the ramrod, and then poured the powder out—there was no powder in the pan—there were a few grains sticking about it, as if it had been recently primed.

Q. When you received the pistol from Dassett, the pan was down, was it? A. No, the pan was shut as it is now—I call it down when it it in a condition to go off—the pan was shut—the barrel unscrews.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe the A's are experienced men, are they not? A. do not know—they are picked men—I have fired many pistols—if it had been fired the pieces of pipe would have gone five or six yards I should say—they were at the top of the paper, which is not the usual way of loading—the wadding is usually put at the top of the charge.

MR. SOLICITOR GENERAL . Q. Did you observe whether any thing had recently been done to the lock of the pistol? A. The lock appeared to have been recently oiled, and the flint recently put in.

WILLIAM PENNY . I am inspector of the T division of police. I produce a letter which I got from the prisoner's father—I know them both—I did not show it to the prisoner—he told me he had written to his father to let him know where he was—he said nothing about this particular letter.

Cross-examined. Q. His father showed you all over his house? A. I went but to one room, that was the parlour.

THOMAS WARBOYS . I am a cheesemonger, and live at Pentonville. I know the prisoner—I have seen him write—this letter is his hand-writing.

(Letter read.)—"To Mr. J. Bean, 14, St. James's-buildings, Rosamon-street, Clerkenwell. Dear Father and Mother,—Thinking you may feel surprised at my prolonged absence, I write these few lines to acquaint you I am seeking employment, which if I do not obtain I will not be dishonest though I may be desperate. It is useless to seek for me. I am determined never to be at home again. Please give my love to brothers, though they never used me as such—I have very little more to say, except remember me to my aunt and uncle; thank them for what they have done for me. I should have written sooner, but I did not like. Hoping you will excuse this scribbling, and think no more of me. I am your unhappy, but disobedient Son, "J. B."

WILLIAM JOHN BIRD . I am a general salesman, at No. 26, Exmouth-street, Spafields. I have seen the prisoner several times—I sold him the pistol produced—(looking at it)—this is it—I sold it to him about the

latter end of June—a few days after that he brought the pistol to my shop, and said he wanted to see me about it—I could not attend to him—he came two or three times—he said it would not strike fire—this was, I think, either Thursday or Friday previous to the Sunday on which this affair happened—there was no flint in it—I said, "How could you expect it to strike fire, there is no flint?"—I put him this flint in—he paid me 1d. for it, and 3s. or 3s. 6d. for the pistol—I think it is capable of being discharged—it is a very old pistol, rather rusty, but not-withstanding it could be discharged—I believe the touch-hole was perfect when I was at the Home Office.

Cross-examined. Q. You mean it could be discharged when properly put to rights, all the rust taken off it, and cleaned? A. It would go off now in its present state, I think I may say so with certainty—I should be surprised to hear it would not go off, if it was loaded as it should be—there is not quite enough powder here—it is a screw barrel—I do not think there is quite sufficient powder here.

COURT. Q. Do you mean not sufficient to explode? A. Oh, it would explode, but not carry a ball any distance.

JURY. Q. Would it hurt any body three or four yards distance? A. Oh yes.

MR. HORRT. Q. What that powder alone? A. Not the powder alone, nor the paper on the top of it, nor would the tobacco-pipe.

COURT. Q. It would make some noise, would it not? A. It would make a noise, but not a great deal—I do not think there is sufficient powder to do mischief—it might alarm any body who was not aware of it.

GEORGE JOHN WHITMORE . I have known the prisoner about four years—I live opposite his father—shortly before the 3rd of July he came to me—it was the Friday before he ran away from home, which was a week before he was apprehended—he told me he had got a pistol up stairs—I asked him to show it to me, and on Saturday morning he brought it down to me—I asked if I should clean it for him—I oiled it up for him on the Saturday, but could not clean it—I returned it to him on the Monday following, it was then very rusty—I believe there was no flint to it then—he said he had it given to him—I asked who gave it to him—he said he had it given to him, he would not tell me by whom—it was the pistol produced—here is the dent I made on putting it into the vice.

Cross-examined. Q. You tried it, I believe, with a bit of a flint? A. Yes, it was not strong enough to go off when I had it—I got a spark from it—it was not strong enough to light the powder.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. When you tried it, had it a flint in it? A. No, I put a bit of stone in it and tried it, and got a spark with that.

BENJAMIN JEYNES . I am one of the domestic servants of Her Majesty. On Sunday, the 3rd of July, I was in attendance on the hind carriage of all, the third carriage, which Her Majesty was in, in her usual place, which is on the right-hand side of Prince Albert, with her face to the horses.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Prince Albert on the side of her? A. On her left; there was a lady on the other side of the carriage, I cannot say who.

COURT. Q. Was it an open carriage? A. A close landau—it is always closed on Sundays—the window was down, it being a hot day.

HENRY WEBB . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner about nine o'clock on Sunday night, the 3rd of August—he told me he had been at Barnsbury-park that Sunday—that is towards Islington—he said he had

been as far as Regent's-park—I asked if he had been any where else—he said, "No."

MR. HORRY, on the prisoner's behalf, called the following witnesses:

HENRY HAWKES . I am a printer, and live at No. 21, Brunswick-place, City-road. I was in St. James's-park, on the 3rd of July, and saw Bean there and Charles Dassett—I saw the Royal carriages pass—at the time they were opposite me I did not see the prisoner nor Dassett—I first saw them immediately after the third carriage had passed—I saw the elder Dassett in the act of taking the prisoner into the middle of the road, stating at the same time that he had taken a pistol, which he held in his right hand, from the prisoner—I do not exactly recollect his words—it was to that effect—I did not see him take the pistol from him—the first time I saw Dassett, was when he had the pistol in his hand.

Q. Were you standing in the front row? A. Behind a little boy—I was about six feet from them when I first saw them going into the middle of the road—as they went into the road they were on the right of me, not far away from me.

COURT. Q. Which side of the road were you? A. Facing the railings of the Green-park, I believe they call it, on the side by St. James's-park—I do not know the names of the places.

MR. HORRY. Q. You say you stood behind a little boy, was that little boy in the front row? A. Yes, immediately before me—I saw Dassett and Bean go into the road perhaps a few seconds after the third carriage passed—the carriage had quite passed—I was looking at the carriage—I did not see any body's arm present a pistol—if in the direction I was looking towards the carriage any body had presented it, it is probable I must have seen it—I am a stranger to Bean, and all the parties—Dassett and Bean were separated after they had left the two policemen, and were going down the middle of the mob—Bean was going along by the side of Dassett—I did not hear him say any thing to Dassett—he might have gone away at that time—there was nothing to prevent him—there was a crowd of some hundreds of people—nobody had hold of him, that I saw, and I believe not—I followed the parties down—I headed them—I went before Dassett and Bean—I might have been a few yards from them—I saw Dassett playing with the pistol—he held it in his hand, turning it over—he was turning it round—I did not see him playing with it—he was turning it over, examining the pan and the whole of the pistol—he appeared to me to be treating the matter very lightly, laughing, and smiling—the people about were laughing, and smiling, and joking too, and among them, myself, as far as smiling went—I went before them—my back was turned to them—I saw them by turning round occasionally.

Q. How far did you go down the road with them? A. As far as the station—the people were laughing.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. I understand you to have been on the side towards St. James's-park? A. Yes, fronting the railing—my back was towards St. James's-park, to the railings of the inclosure—I was on the same side with Dassett and the prisoner—I was not in front—there was only one between us, who was a boy, rather short—I saw neither of them till they left the line—I know what part of the line they were in, because they moved from the right hand of me—I did not see them standing in the line—the first I saw of them was going towards the middle of the road—that was a few seconds after the last carriage had passed.

JURY. Q. You speak of hearing laughing, did that occur before this

transaction, or after? A. After—I heard no laughing before—it seemed to be general.

THOMAS BOSPHER . I am a painter, and reside at the Running Horse Duke-street, Grosvenor-square. I was present in St. James's-park on Sunday, the 3rd of July, and saw the prisoner there and Dassett—I noticed them about ten minutes, or more, before the Royal carriages came up—I was standing about three feet distant from them—I particularly noticed Bean—I noticed him as having a pistol in his hand—he held it very carelessly in his hand, the stock in his hand, and the muzzle inclining towards the ground, on his right side, in his right hand—I was about three feet behind him—this attracted my attention, and I observed him—after the carriages had passed I saw Dassett lay hold of his arm—the carriages had at that time passed thirty or forty yards, as near as I can possibly say—Her Majesty's carriage, which was the last, had passed that distance, to the best of my recollection—I do not speak positively—had the prisoner at the bar presented the pistol, as he is charged, I certainly must have seen it, unless I was blind—my attention was drawn to him at the time—he never did present it—I saw Dassett take hold of his arm, and take the pistol out of his hand, and turn the pistol round in this way—I cannot say whether he raised Bean's arm in taking it from him.

COURT. Q. You say you saw him take the pistol from him, and hold it up? A. He took hold of the prisoner with intent to take the pistol out of his hand, by turning it this way.

MR. HORRY. Q. While it was still in his hand? A. While it was still in his hand—he took it out of his hand—as soon as he took it out of his hand, he advanced towards the policeman, who was passing at the time, using the words, "Here is a lad wants to have a pop at her Majesty"—after what had been said to the policeman, I turned round with the policeman, who treated it with a smile, as I did myself—with that I advanced towards my home, towards Constitution-hill—as I suddenly turned round, I saw the prisoner proceeding with Dassett towards St. James's-palace—at that time nobody had hold of him, to my recollection—he appeared as if he could have got away.

MR. SOLICITOR GENERAL . Q. What do you say you are? A. A painter, a journeyman—I have been out of employ for the last three months, and was out of employ at that time—I was taking a walk in the Park, the same as any person—I am not in employ now—I have been since—I have been employed four days opposite Marylebone police-court, for a man named Nicholson, residing in Exmouth-street—before that time I had been at work for a master—builder, residing in Park-street—that is about eight months ago—I have been out of work from eight months ago down to the present time—I merely went to walk through the Park—I did not expect to see the Queen—I did not know of her going to church till I was in the Park—there was a great congregation assembled in a line—I had no friend with me—I took my station not a great way from the grand entrance of Buckingham Palace, where the Queen came out, not a great way from the gate—I could see the Queen come from the gate of Buckingham Palace where I stood—I cannot say How far I was from the gate—it was about the first seat from Buckingham-gate—I have been in the Park before—I was in the part opposite the gates of the Palace, in the road leading down to St. James's Palace—there is a row of trees—I cannot say whether the scat is at the end of the trees—I cannot say how

far I was from the gate of the Palace—as near as I can guess, it may be forty or fifty yards, more or less, it was further than across this Court—I saw the three carriages come out—I saw the pump, or watering place—I may have been ten or twelve feet from there, to the best of my recollection, towards St. James's Palace—I was on this side of the pump—the seat from the pump—I was on the other side of the pump from the Palace, nearer St. James's.

Q. Do you mean you could see the carriages coming out there? A. I could see the grand gate—I cannot say How far that is from the gate turning into St. James's Palace—I saw the carriages turn into the Palace—I saw the prisoner at the time I saw the carriages coming out—I kept my eye on him during the whole time—I looked at the carriages, but still had my eye on him.

Q. What made you keep your eye on him? A. Seeing him in the position he was, with the pistol—I did not mention it to anybody—I did not say any thing to him.

Q. Did not you point out a person with a pistol in his hand to the persons near you? A. I had not the opportunity, because Dassett had taken hold of the prisoner—I saw him before that, but did not mention it to any one.

COURT. Q. Did it not strike you as extraordinary, that a boy should have a pistol in his right hand, in a great crowd, while the Queen was passing? A. It did—I waited to see the result of it.

MR. SOLICITOR GENERAL . What do you mean by saying you were not able to tell any body of it, for Dassett took him? How long do you suppose you had him in sight with the pistol? How long do you suppose you saw him? Witness. Do you mean before the carriages passed, or before Dassett took hold of him?

Q. Before Dassett took hold of him. A. I saw him, it might have been a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes before—I had seen him with the pistol in his hand all that time, and kept my eye on him—he held the pistol in his hand the whole time, by his side—I was about three feet from him—I cannot positively say whether any one was between me and him, I cannot recollect—of course the people were round, but for to say who was between me and him I cannot—there were several people round the prisoner, they were drawn up at various places round him; but to say who was, or was not, round, I cannot say—I cannot say whether any one was between me and the prisoner—several persons were standing near me—I did not point him out to them—I was standing by the side of the prisoner, not before him—I was standing to his right, about three feet from him—I saw Dassett, he seemed to be standing in front of the prisoner—I cannot say whether he was nearer to him than me—I did not see Dassett before I saw him standing near the prisoner—how long that was before I saw Dassett take the pistol from him I cannot positively say—I am sure I saw him—nothing out of the common way made me observe him, I noticed him, that was all—to the best of my recollection he was standing rather nearer to the prisoner than me, but I cannot say—he was standing in front of the prisoner, to the best of my recollection—immediately before him—I was standing by the side of him—I cannot say whether any one was between me and the prisoner—I saw Dassett take hold of his arm, after the carriages had passed about thirty or forty yards—the carriages had passed thirty or forty yards before I saw

him take hold of the prisoner—the last carriage passed, as near as I can tell, about twelve o'clock—it might be five or six minutes after the last carriage had passed that I saw Dasset take hold of him—I cannot say the time exactly—to the best of my recollection the distance was thirty or forty yards, and to the best of my recollection it was four or five minutes after the carriage had passed—I was standing looking on, looking at the prisoner—I continued to look at him after the carriage had passed; and, as I have before described, saw Dassett take hold of the prisoner's arm after the carriage passed—Dassett was standing in front at the time—he took hold of his arm, by turning round in this position—he turned round and took hold of him—he was standing between the prisoner and the carriage, which had passed, and I by the right side—I saw the whole of the carriages—I did not notice whether any body was with them—I noticed that there were three carriages.

Q. Did you see the boy get away? A. I saw the boy walk, as I before described, walking down towards St. James's Palace, very leisurely, after what had occurred, as if he might have gone away if he chose—Dassett was walking down in company, but whether he had hold of the boy I cannot say—I cannot tell whether he was walking before, or behind, or by his side—I saw the boy go down the park, Dassett was in company with him—I did not see him go away without Dassett.

COURT. Q. Did you see him when he quitted Dassett's company, in the park? A. I did not; the last I saw of him he was walking with Dassett.

MR. SOLICITOR GENERAL . Q. You did not see Dassett taken into custody? A. I did not—I returned towards my home, by Constitution-hill—I resided at the time in Brown-great, Grosvenor-square—I did not hear of these inquiries till next day, when I took a walk in the park—I was walking towards the Horse Guards, and saw an assemblage of people at the Home-office—I inquired what it was all about, and then heard—I gave information at the time—the statement I made was, that I wished to see the boy's father—I did not see the father at the time—I went to the Home-office, but it appears I could not see the boy's father.

Q. Did you give information to anybody at the Home-office? A. I gave information, near the Home-office, to the boy's uncle—I do not know who his uncle is—I gave the information that day—I was not taken before anybody at the Home-office, nor before the Magistrate—I was not examined by an attorney before I came here, not at all.

MR. HORRY. Q. You did not know anything at all of what was going on till next day? A. Not till next day—I saw an assemblage of people by the Home-office, and made inquiry what it was about—I said I wanted to see the father—a person spoke to me—I went towards the police-office, and saw a policeman—I said something to him—it was a policeman of the A division—it was near Gardener's-lane station—I told that policeman I wanted to find the residence of the father, and gave him a reason in relation to this transaction—I learnt the father's address, after I left the policeman, by communicating with the uncle—I communicated with the father, and told him what I had seen.

Q. As far as you can judge, what distance were you standing from Buckingham Palace and St. James's Palace? were you standing between the two? A. Between the two palaces—I was standing near the first seat from Buckingham-palace—I could see the gate of Buckingham Palace by turning my head in that direction—I did so when I saw the carriages

—I saw them coming along the road up to where I was standing, and where Bean and Dassett were—having seen them together, as I have described, I left them.

Q. At the time you saw Bean with the pistol by his side, did you see Dassett before he took his arm? A. I observed Dassett a moment or two before he turned round to take the pistol away—I did not see Dassett move before that—I had only seen Dassett a minute or two before he took hold of the arm.

COURT. Q. Attend to me. You went originally to take a walk in the Park? A. I did, and afterwards heard Her Majesty was going to church, and placed myself where I might see the carriages—I saw the prisoner for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before the carriages came out—all that time he had the pistol in his right hand, the stock in his hand, and the muzzle down towards the ground—his right hand was towards me—he had the pistol in his right hand—his right side was towards my left—we were both looking towards the road.

Q. You stated just now that you did not take any notice of it to anybody else, because you waited to see the result? A. Yes—the result was, whether any attempt, as described, might have been made.

Q. Then you thought it probable, seeing a boy in that situation, and knowing the Queen's carriage was passing, that some attempt might be made? A. I did not know—my attention was drawn to the prisoner, seeing him in that way—I thought it likely some attempt might be made—I could not say whether he was waiting to make an attempt on Her Majesty—I was looking on, the same as another might, to see the carriages pass—I could not say whether an attempt might be made.

Q. Did you wait to see whether he would do it or not? A. I waited to see whether it might be; whether he would do it, it was not for me to say.

Q. If you saw the boy with a pistol in his hand ten minutes, and was waiting to see the result, and that result you thought possibly might be some attempt on Her Majesty, How came you not to interfere yourself, and take hold of him? A. My Lord, I had not the self-possession, at least, I did not think anything of doing anything of that—I did not know whether there was mischief in it or not.

Q. Did it not occur to you to have gone to the boy and said, "What are you going to do?" A. I did not give it a thought—I looked at the carriages, but still looked at the boy, expecting some result.

JURY. Q. Did you see Dassett offer Bean into custody of the policeman? A. I did—that was five or six minutes after the third carriage had passed—I was near enough to see if Bean had raised the pistol at Her Majesty's carriage—I must have seen it, unless I was blind.

JOHN GRAY . I am the prisoner's uncle. I was in the Park on the 4th of July, near the Home-office, awaiting my nephew's examination—I saw Bospher there, and spoke to him—there was a quantity of people round at the time—knowing the result, and hearing Bospher say he wished to know where the father of the boy lived, I noticed what he said, and after he separated from the people there, I told him I knew where the father lived—I took him to the father—I have known the prisoner from his birth—I always considered him a mild and peaceable youth.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What day of the examination at the Home-office was it that you saw Bospher? A. On the Monday—I never got Bospher to

attend at the Home-office to state what he knew—he told me what he knew.

Q. And you never got him to go before the Secretary of State to tell it? A. No, by no means, being a total stranger, I could not do it, because I did not know where to find him—it was on the Saturday after that he went to my brother, when I promiscuously met him—I did not tell him at first where my brother lived—he gave me his address by word of mouth, and I could not recollect it—I thought to bear it in mind, but could not—it was somewhere near Oxford-street—I cannot write well—I was in search to find out where he was, and on the Saturday, promiscuously, as I was coming past the end of Oxford-street I met him, knowing him to be a remarkable person from his features, and then I took him home to the father.

COURT. Q. That was the Saturday following? A. Yes—at that time I did not know what he had to say.

JOHN WILLIAM BEAN . I am the prisoner's father. I first saw Bospher on the Sunday after the occurrence had taken place in the park—I have not been able to employ an attorney in this case—I did not know How to take witnesses before a Magistrate, or anything of the sort—I first heard what Bospher could state on the Saturday—my son was committed on the Wednesday—his conduct has always been particularly mild, peaceable, and inoffensive.

(David Hilton, a newsman, of Penton-street, Pentonville; John Bickley, a watch finisher, White Conduit-fields, Islington; and Jabez Elliott; also deposed to the prisoner's good character.)

GUILTY on 2nd Count. Aged 17.— Confined Eighteen Months in the Penitentiary.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420822-2278

2278. JOHN SLORA was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Christopher Ibberson, about one o'clock in the night of the 19th of August, at St. Nicholas Acorn, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 drawer, value 2s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d.; and 14ozs. weight of tobacco, value 3s. 10d.; his property.

ADAM GOZZARD (City police-constable, No. 476.) On the morning of the 20th of August, between one and two o'clock, I was in Nicholas-lane, near the Black Boy and Horse Shoe—after hearing the landlady lock the door and go up stairs, I saw a light in the bar—I watched it for some time, listened at the door, and heard a lock forced back—I knocked at the door, and asked three times whether all was right—I could get no answer—I tried the door, and found it unfastened—I went inside, and there was a light in the bar—I asked if it was all right—it was put out immediately—I went out and sprung my rattle—Lamboll came up immediately—we called the landlord down, searched the house, and found the prisoner in the water-closet below pretending to be asleep—I took him out, searched him, but found nothing on him—I took him to the station.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. You heard the landlady lock the door? A. Yes, because the keys were on a bunch—She was inside and I outside—I heard her pull the keys out—I went round my beat two or three times, and then saw the light—it was then about one o'clock—it was nearly an hour between the house being locked up and my seeing the light—when I went inside I saw a man in the bar with a light-nobody went outside the door but me—I never left the door—I am sure there was not two men—there are winding stairs down this place, rather deep—it would

not be a very awkward place for anybody to go down in the dark—I had a lantern when I went down—it is a regular staircase.

JAMES LAMBOLL (City police-constable, No. 511.) At a quarter past two o'clock I went to the Black Buy and Horseshoe—I found Gozzard at the door, and left him there with a brother officer while I went inside and aroused the inhabitants—the landlady, the barmaid, and the boy came down—I went into the bar with the landlady, and found a screw-driver lying alongside the till, which was on the floor—I was called to the water-closet by Gozzard, and found the prisoner there—I took him out, and searched him—he said he had come in there a little after nine o'clock, called for half a pint of beer, and asked the waiter to show him down, and he supposed he had fallen asleep—the stairs are rather steep.

Cross-examined. Q. You found no housebreaking implements on him? A. Nothing but a broken knife—it was apparently tie screw-driver which opened the bar door-nothing could open the street door but a false key—I found marks of the screw-driver having been used on the bar door, and also a little dinner knife, which the landlady owns.

ELIZABETH IBBERSON . I am the wife of Christopher Ibberson, and keep the Black Boy and Horseshoe, in the parish of St. Nicholas Acorn. I was aroused by Lamboll—I found the bar door open, which I had locked overnight, the lock was forced—I found the screw-driver on the floor—I had left a silk handkerchief and a tea spoon in a locker in the bar—they were removed, and placed on the floor by the side of the drawer—about ten o'clock at night three men came in to be served—I think the prisoner was one of them—he might have remained in the house from that time—my waiter's name is George Shriven—he was not in the house when the men were there—he never sleeps there—I waited on them.

Prisoner. It was the potman that showed me to the water-closet. Witness. His name is Broughton—he is not here—he said he did not show him down stairs—the front door was barred inside as well as locked and bolted—it must have been opened by some one inside the house.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2279

2279. JOHN BROWN and JOSEPH PALMER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse and counting-house of Nunn Morgan Harry and others, on the 15th of August, and stealing therein 1 pair of spectacles, value 8s.; 1 watch, value 6s.; 1 child's coral, value 2s.; 1 snuff-box, value 6s.; 1 eye-glass, value 1s.; 3 knives, value 2s.; 3 seals, value 5s.; and 1 necklace, value 1s.; the goods of Alexander Brockway.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

DANIEL BLAY (City police-constable, No. 159.) On the 15th of August, a little before two o'clock in the morning, I was passing New Broad-street, and heard a noise like a lock being forced inside No. 19, which is the Peace Society's Office—I stopped listening a little time—I then called for Thomas, another policeman, and sent for the sergeant—we continued listening about twenty minutes—I went round to the back of the building, in Bell-square, and in about five or ten minutes heard a noise as though some one was coming over the roofs of the out-buildings—I stood at the corner of the square, and distinctly saw the two prisoners drop into the square—I immediately took Palmer into custody—the place where they

came off leads to the Peace Society's Office—they came the way they would most naturally have come if they came from the back—Thomas and the sergeant ran after Brown, I got some ladders, and went into the office—I got in by the front way—in the back office I found a writing-table with the lock forced, and the articles mentioned on the table—there is a partition between the back-office and the warehouse, a door communicates between the two—a large hole was cut in the panel of that door, apparently by a knife—nobody could get through the panel of the door—there is a skylight above, which I examined—it might be reached from the outside by climbing up—there was a pane of glass broken out of it sufficient for a person to get through, on doing which they would arrive at the office.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. By getting through the skylight, would they not tumble on the floor? A. They would drop on the floor—they would hold by the edge of the fan-light—it is a dome fan-light, with an edge round inside—the piece that was broken was on the top—the glass was lying broken on the wall outside—it was picked out—I do not know that it had been broken from within—it seemed to have been broken roughly, not cut with a diamond—I could not tell How to do it—the premises of two or three different people lay between the Peace Society's Office and the place the prisoners came over—I had never seen Brown before—he dropped, and was off—there was a gas-light in the square—there was sufficient light for me to recognize him—he did not show me his face—I had them in the square, I suppose, three seconds dodging them, trying to apprehend both—he was moving about as fast as he could—I did not catch hold of him—I was about a yard and a half from him at one time, but generally much farther off—I was about twelve yards from him when he dropped—I saw his face then—I did not know his name at that time, but I knew the man so as to be able to swear to him—as soon as he dropped, he turned round to me—I saw his face, and he was off directly—he passed close by me, under the gas-lamp—I can tell bow he was dressed.

Cross-examined by MR. FRAZER. Q. Did you take Palmer? A. yes, I know him as well as Brown—I took Palmer in the square—I was sent there by the sergeant—it is a small square, with a wideish opening to it—at the time I took Palmer, he was trying to make his escape—I took him in the square, not coming down the pipe—he was dodging about the square—I knew nothing of him before.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How long was it after Brown came down that he was brought back to you in custody? A. Five minutes—I recognized him directly—Bell-square is very small, with one lamp at the corner, and it has only one entrance to it—there were no other persons in the square but myself and the two prisoners.

FRANCIS THOMAS (City police-constable, No. 137.) I was with Blay on the night of the 15th of August—I heard very distinctly the forcing of locks, while listening at the door, I fetched the sergeant, and then we all three listened—Blay then went round the square, by order of the sergeant, and I placed another policeman in Broad-street—I and the sergeant remained at the door, we knocked and all was then quiet—we then heard a jumbling noise, like getting on the roof of the premises—I ran round directly to the London Missionary Society house, thinking they might go through their premises, because they are unoccupied at night—I heard Blay call for assistance, in Bell-square—I ran to his assistance, and Brown, who is a most notorious thief, ran away from me—I attempted to seize him by the chest—

he got away from me—I followed him through Finsbury-circus, and took him in Little Moorfields, about a quarter of a mile from Bell-square—I did not lose sight of him at all—a private watchman tried to stop him, but he knocked him down, and ran away—I laid hold of him, and took him into custody—I afterwards went back to the house—I found no person inside who could have made the noise—I, the sergeant, and the other policeman got in by means of the lamplighter's ladder, at the time he was putting the gas out—a ladder was afterwards found inside.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDEROAST. Q. Who is this private watchman? A. His name is Smith, he is not here—he and Brown were both lying on the ground struggling together—I know Brown well—I have seen him several times—I saw him running from Bell-square as hard as he could—I did not call him by any name, he did not give me time—I called "Stop thief!"—there was no one about but him—the watchman was at Guildhall at the time the prisoners were examined—he was not bound over—Brown did not appear in the least intoxicated—the watchman and he were both in the kennel—I saw them both fall.

THOMAS DUNGLISON (City police-sergeant.) On the night of the 15th I was at these premises, in company with the two other officers—after the prisoners were in custody I got into the premises, by borrowing two short ladders of Mr. Jay, the builder—we joined them together by our belts, and got on the roof of the premises, and into the inner office—I found the place in confusion—the lock of the door had been broken open, and the door which leads from the back-warehouse to the front was partly broken from the panel—the lock had been forced, but being a mortice lock, they could not open it—I found a rope lying on the floor, directly under the skylight—it had a large weight attached to it, but they had taken that off—I have not got the weight here, I have only brought the rope—it is evidently what the parties were let down by to cut the cornice of the skylight, and it fits—I showed the inspector that it was possible for a man to get through, by getting through myself—I did not get in by the rope—by one person getting down, and putting the ladder on the table, the other could easily get down—he could assist the other down—these are the articles I found.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Does this rope belong to any part of the premises? A. I cannot say—I did not slip through the pane of glass—I got up the ladder from within, and put my body partly through the glass, sufficient to show that it could be done.

Cross-examined by MR. FRAZER. Q. How far is Bell-square from the roof where they fell from? A. About thirty yards—I suppose they got through the skylight, and found no other means.

ALEXANDER BROCKWAY . I am assistant secretary to the Peace Society, where offices were broken into—I act under a committee, who are a self-constituted body—I have charge of the things that were disturbed, and of all the property in the house—the occupiers of the premises are Nun Morgan Harry and others—they are the lessees of the place, under the London Missionary Society—Mr. Harry pays the rent of the premises, and is one of the honorary secretaries—these things are all my property, and were in the table-drawer, which was locked—this rope hung from the skylight.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

BROWN— GUILTY . Aged 19.

PALMER— GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of Larceny only.— Confined One Year.

NEW COURT.—Thursday, August 25th, 1842.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18420822-2280

2280. JAMES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of June, 4 forks, value 2l. 10s.; 11 spoons, value 3l.; 4 bottle-ladles, value 15s. and 1 skewer, value 15s.:—also, on the 13th of June, 1 coat, value 1l., the goods of Leonard Horner, his master; to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2281

2281. SAMUEL DICKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 15 yards of satin, value 3l.; 34 yards of silk, value 4l. 19s.; 10 yards of linen-cloth, value 1l. 2s.; half a yard of lawn, value 1s. 6d.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 19s.; 1 shawl, value 2l. 10s.; 1 scarf, value 10s.; 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 2s.; and 3 handkerchiefs, value 9s.;—also, on the 1st of July, 5 handkerchiefs, value 15s.; and 1 pair of gloves, value 1s. 6d.:—also, on the 25th of July, 2 handkerchiefs, value 8s., the goods of Griffith Thomas, his master: to both of which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2282

2282. ROBERT STOCKS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 2 time-piece-movements, value 2l., the goods of John Lancelot and another, his masters; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2283

2283. WILLIAM GREENFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June, 1 half-sovereign, 1 sixpence, and 3 pence; also, on the 10th of June, 4 half-crowns, 4 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 1 penny; the monies of John Pavey, his master; to both of which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2284

2284. GEORGE HAWKINS was indicted for embezzling and stealing 1s. 4d., the monies of Felix John Beale, his master; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2285

2285. ROBERT THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 2 waistcoats, value 5s., the goods of William Holmes, in a vessel in a certain port of entry and discharge; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 73.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2286

2286. SAMUEL BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, 1 set of fire-irons, value 5s.; and 31bs. weight of nails, value 1s.; the goods of George Baker, his master; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 43.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2287

2287. JOHN LODGE was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2288

2288. JAMES MALAY was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined Ten Days, and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18420822-2289

2289. CAROLINE CAMERON waft indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June, 2 dressing-gowns, value 1l.; 4 shirts, value 12s.; 1 bed-gown, value 5s.; 1 frock, value 3s.; 6 caps, value 8s.; 4 cap-crowns, value 2s.; 12 yards of ribbon, value 6s.; 1 yard of muslin, value 1s.; 3 yards of calico, value 1s. 6d.; 15 yards of cloth, value 1l. 2s.; 2 yards of diaper, value 2s.; 1 yard of lace, value 3d.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 1 towel, value 1s.; half-a-yard of flannel, value 6d.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d.; 1 bonnet, value 2s.; 1 pincushion, value 2d.; and 1 miniature-case, value 10s.; the goods of William Corbet Smith, her master.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

PHILIP SMITH COX. I am a solicitor, and live in Park-road, Regent's-park. Mr. William Corbet Smith, of Biddleswade-hall, Leicestershire, is a client of mine—I received a letter from him respecting the prisoner, and gave information at the Police-office—On Saturday, the 2nd of July, I was informed she was in custody—I went to the station and saw her—I said, "This is a bad business"—She said she had some things of Mrs. Smith's, and if I would let her go, she would give them all up on the following morning—I said I could not do that—we waited till the officer returned—I then consented that she should go till Monday morning, as the Magistrate was not sitting, and she then returned.

Cross-examined by MR. CLABKSON. Q. Did she tell you she had put the things into her trunk on removing from the country to London, and had forgotten to take them out? A. No—Mr. and Mrs. Smith had a relation in Quebec-street, of the name of Mellon—I instructed the officer to go there to take the prisoner.

GEORGE BISHOP (police-constable D 30.) On Saturday, the 2nd of July, I took the prisoner in Quebec-street, where she was lodging—I asked her name—She said, "Cameron"—I said I wanted to speak to her, I thought I had something that would suit her—I was in plain clothes—we walked round into Berkeley-street—I then told her I was a constable, and must take her into custody—She said, "Oh dear, what for?"—I said, "For robbing Mrs. Smith"—She said, "Of what?"—I said, "Articles of wearing-apparel"—She then wanted to go to Mrs. Mellon's—I said I could not allow her—after that it came on to rain—She wanted to go into a public-house to have some beer—I said I could not allow her—I took her to the station—I asked if she had got the keys of her box—She said, "Yes"—after hesitating a moment, she gave them to me—She told mo correctly where her boxes were—She said there was an old flannel dressing-gown in the box, I was to bring it with me—I went to her lodgings, and in the back room, first-floor, I found a box—I opened it with one of the keys, brought the whole of the contents to the station, and put them on the table in her presence—I told her where I got them from—she said some of the articles were hers, and did not belong to Mrs. Smith—She selected one towel that she said was hers—I stopped her with that, and said, "No, there is Mrs. Smith's mark on it"—She selected a good many things—she said she took the dressing-gown by mistake—I released her from custody till the Monday morning, when she appeared, and was committed—these are the articles—here are some pieces of ribbon.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear she hesitated about giving you her keys? A. Yes—I never forgot that—I do not think I mentioned

it before the Magistrate—I do not know why—I first went to Mr. Mellon's to find the prisoner.

MARY ECKETT . I am the wife of John Eckett, a policeman. When the prisoner came on Monday, I searched her, and found on her a baby's bonnet, a packet of powder, and a pair of gloves—She brought them in her hand in a handkerchief—She seemed very much agitated, and said she took them by mistake, and did I know what she would be done to for it—I said no.

ANN TWIGDEN . I live with Mr. William Corbet Smith. I am Mrs. Smith's maid—the prisoner lived as nurse in the family—She gave warning herself, and left—my mistress remained in town about ten days or a fortnight after the prisoner left—during that time she came to the house for her clean linen—I believe this to be the dressing-gown, but it has been unpicked since—this towel has the name on it—it would not be used for the baby—it is what we call a servant's towel—here are two pocket handkerchiefs which have my mistress's initials on them—these articles are worth from 2l. to 3l.—articles of this description are missing.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear to the flannel? A. It corresponds with one she had in her possession—I believe it belongs to my master.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2290

2290. ANN CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August, 1 watch, value 5l., the goods of John Munroe, from his person.

JOHN MUNROE . I am a surgeon, and live in Hart-street, Bloomsbury, About two o'clock in the morning of the 24th of August, I was in Watling-street—I met the prisoner—She followed me, and asked for money—I refused—after following me two or three minutes, she went away—I immediately missed my watch from my waistcoat pocket—I charged her with it—She was taken, and the watch found on her by the searcher—this is it.

SUSANNAH DROVER . I found this watch on the prisoner.

Prisoner. I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2291

2291. EDWARD ELMES was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July, 1 bag, value 6d., and 6 1/2 lbs. weight of tobacco, value 18s.; the goods of Joseph Ryder and another, his masters.

JOSEPH RTDER . I am in partnership with another person—the prisoner was our servant. About seven o'clock in the evening of the 21st of July, I went to the warehouse, and heard a lid fall down—I saw the prisoner run across the warehouse—he went up to his room, where he ought to be at work—I went up—he was in a rising posture, and had got something bulky in his apron—I stopped with him till he went away, and locked the door after him—I then went in to see what was laid down, and saw some shag tobacco—I then saw Carritt, and told him to come early in the morning, to watch what was done with it—this is the tobacco—it corresponds with what was in the warehouse—there is about 6 1/2 lbs.

THOMAS AUGUSTUS CARRJTT . I received instructions to watch this up-stairs room, and saw the prisoner and his son come in—he took the bag, gave it to his son, and told him to hold it while he put this tobacco in—he put it under the table—I waited there till Mr. Ryder came, and then told him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where was this tobacco? A. On some baskets under the table—the son was taken up, and discharged—the prisoner bad been in the service about three years and a half.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 41.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2292

2292. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July, 1 purse, value 1s.; 3 sovereigns, and 6 shillings; the property of James Hird, from his person.

JAMES HIRD . I am butler to John Tennant, Esq., of Albemarle-street. On the 12th of July I was in Piccadilly—the prisoner accosted me, and said she would go with me—I told her she could not—she said she would go where I was going—I went and drank with her at a public-house—we then went to Jermyn-street—she put her hand into my pocket, and took out my purse, containing three sovereigns and six shillings—I gave the alarm, and ran after her—the policeman secured her—I was knocked down by two men when I gave the alarm.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long after she took it was she taken? A. I think in five minutes—she ran away—I lost sight of her in York-street—she was taken in St. James's-square, about 100 yards from York-street—a female was with her when she was taken, and when she spoke to me—the purse and money have not been found—it was a little after ten o'clock when I left Albemarle-street—I was to sleep at Mr. Howard's, in Swallow-street—I went to Jermyn-street because I did not wish the prisoner to accompany me—she would not leave hold of me—I did not see a policeman when I met her—I walked with her arm-in-arm—I had been in London about a month—she had some rum to drink, and I had some porter—I got into Jermyn-street by going down Regent-street—I felt my purse a moment before she took it—my bands were down against me—she took out my purse while my hands were there—I last saw my purse when I left the house—I did not pull it out at the public-house—I paid 6d., which I took from the same pocket where my purse was—I did not try to push her up a court.

SAMUEL PARSONS (police-constable C 78.) At a quarter before eleven o'clock I heard a cry of "Stop thief"—I saw the prisoner running down Jermyn-street, towards York-street—I ran after her, and took her—the prosecutor was behind me—I believe he was knocked down—I overtook the prisoner in St. James's-square—she was willing to go to the station, and said, "Search me."

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2293

2293. WILLIAM TUCKER was indicted for embezzling 12s., which he received for his master, Samuel Luke Pratt: also, for stealing, on the 10th of July, I crucifix, value 30s.; and 1 rosary, value 20s.; the goods of Samuel Luke Pratt: to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 30.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18420822-2294

2294. ANN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July, 1 pair of gloves, value 1s. 6d., the goods of William Henry Clayton; and 1 habit-shirt, value 1s.; I veil, value 9s.; and 1 yard of ribbon, value 3d.; the goods of Henry Clayton, her master.

MARY CLAYTON . I am the wife of Henry Clayton, of Notting-hill—

the prisoner was in my service. I thought it necessary to send for a police man, on the 25th of July, who searched her box in my presence—he found a shirt and a remnant of ribbon of mine, and a pair of gloves, of my son, William Henry Clayton.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What do you speak to? A. This habit-shirt—there is no mark on it—I had seen it safe about a month before—there is not another like it in London—I have had it a number of years—this sort of work is not done now—the policeman opened her box with a key which she gave him—this veil was found on her person at the station, and this I swear to—I have five sons, but none in the Navy—I did not tell the prisoner it should be a sorrowful hour for her—two of my sons were in the house at the time—I had not observed anything between my son and her—I found my cellars had been broken open, and some wine and spirits taken—I accused her of breaking open the door—she denied it, but I sent for a policeman—I have a son who used to go to the docks on his father's business—he was living in the house at that time—I swear I never reproached him with taking liberties with the prisoner.

WILLIAM HENRY CLAYTON . This pair of gloves are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know them? A. They are a pair bought at Brussels for me, they have been worn and cleaned, and, to the best of my recollection, before they went one button was off—I never was in the Navy, nor was any body in our house—I am nearly nineteen—my mother did not suspect that something passed between me and the prisoner—I have never been in the prisoner's bed-room—I have been in in the day-time, when no one was in the room—I had missed my neck-handkerchief, and I went to see if it was there—I did not find it.

JAMES FARRANT (police-constable S 173.) I was present when the prisoner's box was searched—I found these things—the prisoner was present—they were all quite sober.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 26.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury .— Confined Six Weeks.

Reference Number: t18420822-2295

2295. JOHN BARR was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, I shirt, value 2s.; and 1 pair of stockings, value 9d.; the goods of Frederick Moore: 1 pair of shoes, value 1s., the goods of George Vernon: and 1lb. weight of copper, value 8d., the goods of George Bunce and another; in a certain vessel, in a port of entry and discharge.

GEORGE VERNON . I am steward of the Castle Lockrane. The prisoner came on board on the 18th of July—he had his own shoes on then—I afterwards found my shoes on him—I took them off, and saw he had on a pair of stockings belonging to Frederick Moore—I then over hauled him, and found a shirt belonging to the boy—these are the articles.

Prisoner. Q. What do you swear to these shoes by? A. By the mark—the left one is torn, and sewn up.

FREDERICK MOORE . These stockings and shirt, which were taken off the prisoner, are mine—they have marks on them.

Prisoner. Q. What is the mark? A. Blood on the right arm—there are marks of blood on one of the tops of the stockings—I swear it is my shirt.

JOHN M'CARTHY . I watched the prisoner, and saw him leave the ship, which was in the dock at Poplar—I heard of this loss—I told the prisoner, if he knew any thing about these things, to put them back—he denied it—I followed him to the necessary—he was sitting there—I said, "What is the matter?"—he said, "I am bad in my bowels;" but his breeches were not down—I said, "What have you got?"—he said, "I have only got a bit of copper"—I found this piece on him.

Prisoner, Q. Did you say I had it about me? A. You handed it to me out of your hand.

WILLIAM LONG . I am a constable. I took the prisoner—he said he purchased the shoes in Backchurch-lane—I went with him there, and the person said he knew nothing of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the shirt of a sailor, for half-a-crown; the shoes I had thirteen months, and never slept them on but on Sunday; the right one is burst from the tie down to the toe in my putting them on.

ELIZABETH BROWN . I am the wife of a coalwhipper, and live in St. George's. I washed for the prisoner—on the Wednesday night be came to me, and had a dirty shirt and a pair of stockings tied up in a handkerchief.

FREDERICK MOORE re-examined. I pulled this shirt off that day, and lost it out of my chest.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2296

2296. ELIZABETH COVENTRY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, I bonnet, value 1s.; I shawl, value 2s.; I gown, value 2s.; I apron, value 3d.; and 1 towel, value 3d.; the goods of Elizabeth Gladman.

ELIZABETH GLADMAN . I am a widow, living in a small parish-house at Han well. I came to London on the 16th of July, and locked my room—I returned on the Tuesday night following—a girl in the house informed me my things were taken out of my room—I found the door fast, as I had left it, but I missed from the room a bonnet, shawl, and apron—these now produced are them.

JOHN GREYGOOSE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Crawford-street. I produce a shawl pawned on the 21st of July, by Cuzer.

HANNAH CUZER . I pawned this shawl a month ago last Monday—I went to a young woman's room, and saw the prisoner there—she gave me this shawl to pawn, and said it was her own—these; other things were on the prisoner.

(Property produced and storm to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2297

2297. DENNIS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 1 till, value 2s.; 2 boxes, value 1s; 4 keys, value 1d.; 4 watch-keys, value 4d.; 1 scent-bottle, value 6d.; I half-crown, 10 shillings, 13 sixpences, 32 groats, 27 pence, 159 halfpence, and 116 farthings; the property of William Curryer.

MARY CURRYER . I am the wife of William Curryer. I keep a stationer's shop in Coburgh-place, Bayswater. About ten minutes before

four o'clock in the afternoon of the 21st of July I was sitting in my back parlour—I heard a noise in the shop, and found the prisoner sitting down behind the counter—he had got the till out, and was emptying the contend into his pockets—there was in the till some watch-keys, and the other things—I stood and watched him—he did not see me—I went to the street door to look for a policeman, and the prisoner made a rush to get out under my arm—I caught him, and called to a neighbour, who secured him, till the policeman came.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did he not say a man had sent him in, and promised him a lot of bread and meat? A. Yes, but he said at first he had not taken any thing—I bad not seen him before—be had no shoes or stockings on—there were three other boys outside.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 11.— Confined One Month, the first and last Week Solitary, and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18420822-2298

2298. SAMUEL TURNER and HENRY DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August, 1 pair of shoes, value 6s. 6d., the goods of Daniel Butler; to which

DAVIS pleaded GUILTY .— Confined Eight Days, and Whipped.

GEORGE COURTICE . I work with Daniel Butler, at Hammersmith. I missed a pair of shoes on the 13th of August, which hung at the door-post outside—these now produced are them.

WILLIAM POTTER . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Old Brentford. Between nine and ten o'clock on Saturday night, the 13th of August, Turner offered these shoes to me—I asked whose they were—he said his mother's—I said he must go with me—I went out, and he ran from me—I caught him, and took him to the station—he laid hold of Davis, and brought him in too—as Turner came along, he called out some other name in the crowd.

TURNER*— GUILTY .— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420822-2299

2299. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, I printed book, value 6s., the goods of Isaac Gregory.

ISAAC GREGORY . I keep a bookseller's shop, in Bloomsbury. This is my book—I saw it safe at twenty minutes before four o'clock, on the 19th of July, when the prisoner came to my shop with another young man—my attention was attracted to his companion—after the prisoner had looked at the books some time, I saw him go to the window, and he left the shop—I then missed this book, and followed—he dropped it, and I took it up.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it? A. Yes, I did, from the window—I saw you drop it from under your coat—I grasped you, but you ran away—I lost sight of you—you were brought back in about seven minutes.

WILLIAM HARRIS (police-constable E 161.) I saw the prisoner drop the book in Broad-street, as the prosecutor caught hold of him—I then chased, and took him.

Prisoner. Q. Was there no mob came round when you took me? A. Yes, there was.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Holborn; I saw a crowd; I ran,

and got at the head of the mob; I got as far as Monmouth-street; the policeman took me; he supposed I had done something wrong.

GUILTY .* Aged 17. Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2300

2300. EDMUND M'GILL and JOHN PERKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July, 1 diamond brooch, value 5s., the goods of Henry Peckham, from his person.

MR. BODKIN. declined the Prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2301

2301. DAVID HEALY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 1lb. of leaden pipe, value 1s. 6d., the goods of the Society of Licensed Victuallers.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of James Frederick Blake.—3rd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Robert Selmon Mulley.

JAMES FREDERICK BLAKE . I produce the charter of incorporation of the Society of Licensed Victuallers—the whole of the property of the Morning Advertiser belongs to the Society—I reside on the premises—they are all under my care.

GEORGE BEDFORD . I live in Gold-place, Clerkenwell. I saw the prisoner coming out of the Morning Advertiser office on the 18th of July—I saw a piece of lead projecting out of his pocket—I told of it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Do you know that he is a workman that had been employed there? A. No, he was employed there the week before—I was waiting outside—some work had been carried on there by the prisoner's master—I saw him coming out the back way into Shoe-lane.

JOHN WAYTE . I am employed in this office. I followed the prisoner to the house of Mrs. Clark, a marine-store dealer.

MARY CLARK . On the 18th of July, a man came to my house, and brought a bit of lead—to the best of my belief the prisoner is the man—I gave the piece of lead to the boy, and then to the policeman—this piece of lead is like it.

Cross-examined. Q. "You will not swear that is the lead he brought? A. No, directly he left me two little boys came, and said, "What did that man sell?" and Waited took the lead.

JOHN SPRING (City police-constable, No. 315.) I went to Clark's, and received this lead there—I took the prisoner in Holborn, about three quarters of an hour afterwards—he said, "I will go any where with you"—he accompanied me down to the station, and there I told him the nature of the charge—he denied it.

RICHARD CLOAK . I am stoker at the steam-engine, at the Morning Advertiser office—I have lost fifteen feet of lead—I saw the prisoner going to the vault on the morning of the 18th of July—I told Wayte to follow him—this is part of the lead I lost—Mr. Blake is the secretary of the Licensed Victuallers' Society—Mr. Mulley had been master of the prisoner, but he was discharged on the Saturday. night before.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take this piece of lead, and fit it to any place? A. This is the remainder of the fifteen feet I lost—I cannot tell How many workmen of Mulley's were there on the 18th—there were a number of men at work there.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 36. Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2302

2302. CHARLES BEDFORD and CHARLES EVANS were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of June, 10 glazed window sashes, value 5l., the goods of James Brooker and another; to which BEDFORD pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.

JAMES BROOKER . I live at Walworth, and have a partner. I deal in building materials—I purchased some old houses in Lothbury, on the 24th of June—I missed ten sashes from there—I had seen them safe the night before—I have seen them since—I can swear they are the same.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. When did you see them again? A. About three weeks after I missed them—Evans had been employed by me at the buildings—I think I missed them on the night of the 24th.

ELIZABETH PIPER . I am a widow. I deal in building materials, and live at Bethnal-green—the two prisoners brought these sashes to me about six weeks ago, and I bought them for 2l. 15s.—I gave the money to Evans.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you keep some books? A. No, I buy all for ready money—I attend sales—the prisoners have pulled down for me—they never bought for me at sales.

WILLIAM GRIGGS . I am servant to Mrs. Piper. I know the prisoners are the two men who brought the sashes to my mistress.

WILLIAM CLAY (police-constable K 278.) I found the six sashes at Mrs. Piper's yard, in Bethnal-green-road—I asked if she had not got some sashes—she said yes.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known Piper? A. About five years—I was once on her premises, after a thief who I thought had got into her yard—that was the only time—there was another person charged with, this who is in the Compter.

JAMES HAMS (police-constable K 248.) I took Evans info custody—I told him it was for a robbery in the City—he said he had,' heard of it, and he knew the party, but he had nothing to do with the transaction.

(Evans received a good character.)

EVANS— GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2303

2303. CHARLES BEDFORD was again indicted for stealing on the 6th of July, 500 bricks, value 10s.; also, on the 8th of July, 1000 bricks, value 20s.; the goods of the Commissioners of Her Majesty's Woods and Forests; to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2304

2304. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 18 cheroots, value 16s.; 156 cigars, value 1l. 4s.; and 1 cigar-case, value 2l.; the goods of Samuel Garrett; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2305

2305. RICHARD GLADWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 2 3/4 lbs. weight of lead, value 6d., the goods of George Bird, his master.

THOMAS JOHNSTON . I am a carpenter in the employ of Mr. George Bird. The prisoner was in his employ at a church at Paddington—on the 16th of July I had some suspicion, and placed this piece of lead under a

piece of timber, which was to be removed—in about an hour I gave the prisoner orders to remove the timber, which he did, and put some shavings over the lead—at twelve o'clock he put the lead into his pocket, and deposited it in one of the vaults in the body of the church—he then went to his dinner—at about five minutes past one, he came to me, and said the carpenters wanted some bolts, and asked if he should go to the smith's, and get them—I said yes—he then went to the vault—I followed, and saw him put the lead into His pocket—he took it out, and got half way down Westbourn-terrace—I then brought him back with it.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. How long had he been with your master? A. Three or four months—he had been with Mr. Speller seven or eight years before.

CHARLES READ . I watched the prisoner, and saw him take the lead and put it into his pocket—he was brought back, and I took the lead out of his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 56.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2306

2306. JAMES BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July, 39lbs. weight of lead, value 5s.; and one piece of matting, value 2d.; the goods of William Jeaks, his master.

WILLIAM JEARS . I keep an ironmonger's shop in Russell-street, Bloomsbury. On the 22nd of July I was in Museum-street, returning home—about two hundred yards from my own house, I met the prisoner who was my servant, coming in a direction from my house, without his hat or coat, and with something heavy in his apron—he saw me, turned, and walked back again—I went on to the corner of the street, and there lost sight of him—I stood at the corner, and in about ten minutes he came out of a public-house—I asked him what he had in his apron—he said, "Nothing"—I said, "Yes, you had"—he then said he had a mat—the landlady of the house then came out and said he had left a parcel in the tap-room—I found it was this lead in a mat—I believe the lead is mine—it is the ordinary kind of cuttings that we have.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You would not swear to this? A. No, I have no mark on it—it is similar to what we have—I cannot say that I missed any—I never go into the cellar where my lead is placed, but I went there afterwards, and saw lead similar to this.

ELIZABETH BENNETT . I remember the prisoner bringing the parcel into my house—I saw Mr. Jeaks at the door talking to the prisoner and I told him.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 37.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2307

2307. MARY LYNCH was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 3 sovereigns and 2 half-crowns, the monies of Henry Palmer Phillips, her master.

ELIZABETH JANE PHILLIPS . I am the wife of Henry Palmer Phillips, the prisoner was in my service. On the 23rd of July I left two sovereigns and two half-crowns in the kitchen—I went away for a few minutes and they were gone—I charged the prisoner with stealing them—she denied it.

ELIZA BUCK . I am searcher at the station in Russell-street, Covent-garden—the prisoner was given into my custody—she said she had no money—I searched her clothes and found no money—I then searched the hair of her head, and found two sovereigns, two half-crowns, and two halfpence.

Prisoner. The money was mine—I was not in the kitchen when Mrs. Phillips was thee.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2308

2308. THOMAS CHARLES JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May, 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 guard-chain, value 10s.; the goods of Joseph Ellis, his master.

JOSEPH ELLIS . The prisoner was in my service. On the 18th of May I lost my watch and guard-chain, I had seen it on the 18th of May—the prisoner and I went out on business, I then missed my watch and chain, and on the 16th of July I heard it was at a pawnbroker's in Goswell-street—this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. What time on the 18th did you see it safe? A. Between eleven and twelve o'clock—the prisoner was an apprentice of mine—his fellow-apprentice is with me now—I received information that the watch was stolen, from my elder apprentice—I sent for Standard immediately—before I gave the prisoner into custody, I told Standard what I suspected him of, and all the circumstances—I did not tell him to ask the prisoner about it—I have not received the value of the watch from any body—no one that I know of paid for taking the watch out.

ALEXANDER ADAMS . I am shopman to Robert Moss, a pawnbroker in Goswell-road—I produce a watch and chain, pledged by the prisoner on the 21st of May.

Cross-examined. Q. You are certain it was the prisoner? A. Yes—this is the duplicate.

JOSEPH STANNARD (police-constable G 229.) I took the prisoner—he said he did take the watch, about half an hour after he came home, that he hid it in a dust-hole, and pawned it on the Saturday following—he said the other apprentice was quite innocent of it.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been in the police-force? A. Thirteen years—I was called in by the prosecutor—I said to the prisoner, "I take you into custody for stealing your master's watch"—I had never spoken to him on the subject before, or to the other apprentice—the prisoner said, "I have stolen it"—I did not charge him before, because his master said it was impossible he could take it, as he was not home half an hour before him.

COURT to JOSEPH ELLIS. Q. When you went out with the prisoner, was the other apprentice at home? A. Yes—I said I thought it was not likely the prisoner could have stolen it, as he was only home half an hour before me—the other boy was out when I came home—the prisoner seems to have a wish to go to sea—the other apprentice would come here willingly, but was not bound over—the prisoner first threw it on the other apprentice—then he said he could not sleep night or day, and told the other apprentice of it, and he told me—the indenture of the prisoner's apprenticeship was enrolled at the Chamberlain's office.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2309

2309. GEORGE SLADE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July, 1 coat, value 2l. the goods of William James Somerville.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Robert Sanders.

ROBERT SANDERS . I am coachman to Miss Lamburn, of Fitzroy-square. On the 6th of July last I lost a coat from my box, in the harness-room

—I charged the prisoner with stealing it—he said he did not know How to get it, he had not got the money, and before I could get an officer he wanted to be off—I took him myself into a public-house—I saw him give a man some things, and one of them was a duplicate, but I could not get it. This coat belonged to a friend, a groom, who was out of employ—he gave it into my care—it was in my harness-room on the 6th of July, with my own great coat—I left the prisoner cleaning the harness-room.

THOMAS MANSELL . I produce this coat, which was pawned with me by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. It is true I pawned the coat, but it was my own—I purchased it a few days previously.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Four Months.

Fifth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420822-2310

2310. ANN MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July, 20lbs. weight of feathers, value 1l.; 1 bolster, value 1s. 6d.; I blanket, value 2s. 6d.; 1 pillow, value 2s.; 2 flat-irons, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 pair of snuffers and tray, value 6d.; the goods of Thomas George.

THOMAS GEORGE . I am a baker, and live in Brook-street, St. Pancras.

The prisoner hired a room in my house on the 29th of June—a person calling himself her husband, lodged with her for a short time, and then left—on the 18th of July, in consequence of suspicion, I went into the prisoner's room, she was there—I found the room strewed all over with feathers—the bed-tick had been cut in half, and the feathers taken out—I also missed a blanket, a bolster, a saw, two pillows, a candlestick, a pair of snuffers and tray, 2 flat-irons, and a saw, which were lent to her with the room—I did not see her after I missed these things, till she was taken.

Prisoner. I was out at work, and had the key, and they entered my room while I was out; my husband was with me there a week and ten days, and he pawned these things; I can prove I was married at Shoreditch.

JOHN BROBECK (police-constable S 46.) The prisoner was given into my custody on the 18th of July—I said to her, "What has become of the things you have taken away?"—she said she had pawned them—I took her to Mrs. George—she there gave Mrs. George the key to go up to her room, and get the duplicates, which she did, and gave them to me—I went up to the room, and found the bed cut open in the middle.

THOMAS MANSELL . I live with Mr. Wells, a pawnbroker, in the New-road. I produce a blanket and saw—I did not take them in, but I have a bolster, which I took in of the prisoner.

WILLIAM CROW . I live with a pawnbroker in Munster-street. I produce a pillow, a pair of snuffers, a tray, and a candlestick, pawned by the prisoner.

Prisoner. I am sure I did not pawn them. Witness. I took them all in of you.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I own I pawned the bolster, but the other things I know nothing of; I am a destitute poor woman; I had two children to bring up with my own hands.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18420822-2311

2311. ANN MASON was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, I shirt, value 4s., the goods of Alexander Munro.

ALEXANDER MUNRO . I lodged at Mr. George's house in a room adjoining the prisoner's—on the 18th of July, when I heard Mr. George's things had been taken, I looked over my shirts, and missed one from a shelf in my room, where it had been among half-a-dozen others—I think I had seen it about a fortnight before I missed it—I generally locked my room door when I went out, but Mrs. George had a key that opened it, and I have since found that the key of the prisoner's room opened my door—this is my shirt.

THOMAS MANSELL . I live with Mr. Wells, a pawnbroker. This shirt was pawned by the prisoner on the 8th of July—I know her, and can say that it was her.

Prisoner. You cannot say that I pawned it. Witness. Yes, you did.

Prisoner's Defence. It was my husband's shirt, and I did not pawn it.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2312

2312. ELIZABETH CUMMINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 1 necklace, value 10s., the goods of Harriet Charles; to which she pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 22.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18420822-2313

2313. WILLIAM WALTER WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, I pistol, value 30s., the goods of John William Rowe, his master.

JOHN WILLIAM ROWE . I am a builder, and live at Dalston. The prisoner worked for me for two or three years—I had a pair of pistols—this is one of them—I had them safe about ten o'clock in the morning on the 18th of July, they were on the kitchen mantel-piece, and the prisoner was at work in the parlour adjoining the kitchen—he left about four—he had his left hand in his pocket when he went out—I called to him, and said, "What are you going for?"—he said, "For the compo-tub"—I said, "We don't want it," but he went out into another house—I afterwards saw this pistol in Bensley's hand—he asked me if I had lost it—I then sent for the policeman.

THOMAS BENSLEY . I work for Mr. Rowe. On the 18th of July I was at work eighteen or twenty yards from his house—I saw the. prisoner take this pistol from his left hand pocket—he went into No. 1, which is a house belonging to Mr. Rowe—it is not occupied at present—I and another man went after the prisoner into the house—he came down the stairs—we went up, and found this pistol on the top of a cupboard.

GEORGE WILLIAMS (police-constable N 44.) I was sent for to Mr. Rowe's—the prisoner was given into my charge with this pistol.

GUILTY . Aged 19— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420822-2314

2314. MARY ANDRAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July, 1 gown, value 3s. 6d., the goods of William Tilliar.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Jemima Tilliar.

JEMIMA TILLIAR . I am the wife of William Tilliar—he is a convict, and is not in this country—I and the prisoner worked at Mr. Neales, a gardener, and we slept in the same room—on the 11th of July, between four and five o'clock in the morning, when I went to work, I left my gown hanging in the bed-room—when I returned to dinner I missed

it—I found it at Mr. Burford's, a pawnbroker, in Brentford—I charged the prisoner with taking it, and she said she was very sorry she had done it she was in liquor, and did not know what she was about.

JOHN BURFORD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brentford—on the 11th of July, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pawned this gown with me, for 2s.—she was perfectly sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it in mistake for one of my own gowns.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2315

2315. ISAAC WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July, I dish, value 1d.; 5 shillings, and 4 sixpences; the property of Francis Palmer.

ANN PALMER . I am the wife of Francis Palmer, and keep the Sugar Loaf, in Mile-end New Town—on the afternoon of the 25th of July I was in the parlour, by the side of the bar—there was a chain to the key of the till—I heard the chain make a noise—I got up, and saw the prisoner go from the direction of the till towards the door—I went after him, and caught hold of him three or four yards from the house—he asked me what I held him for—I said he had robbed my till—he said he had not, and got from me—I asked Topping to hold him—he made a catch at the prisoner, but he ran away, and Topping ran after him—I went back to my till, and missed a little tin dish, and the silver which had been in it, about 7s. or 8s.—I had seen it safe about half-an-hour before—I cannot say whether the till was locked—the key was in it—the officer brought the prisoner back—one of the witnesses brought the dish—the prisoner said he never was in the house—this is my dish.

JAMES TOPPING . I was passing, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon—I saw Mrs. Palmer outside the house, and the prisoner making his escape from her—she said, "Take hold of this boy"—I tried to do so, but he ran off—I pursued, and called out "Stop thief"—the prisoner dropped two sixpences—I pursued him and another, who made his escape—on my return, a little girl gave me a tin dish.

LOUISA LOCKE . I am the wife of Joseph Locke—I was at my window, which is opposite Mrs. Palmer's—I saw the prisoner and two others, on the trap door by the side of Mrs. Palmer's—the prisoner then went in, he came out in two minutes, and said something to one who was on the trap door—the prisoner went into Mrs. Palmer's again with another—they came out nearly together, but the prisoner was more behind than the other—I saw the prisoner pad some money to the other—Mrs. Palmer carne out and took him—she could not hold him—Topping came up and pursued him.

ALLEN PIPE (police-constable H 51.) I was at my house—I heard a cry of "Stop thief"—I ran to the door, and saw the prisoner running up the street—I pursued through several courts and streets—he ran into a house—I burst the door open, and took him to the prosecutrix—Topping gave me this tin dish and two sixpences.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the door; Mrs. Palmer came out and caught hold of me; Topping came up, and said I had dropped two sixpences—there were two boys ran away, but I did not know any thing of them.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2316

2316. CATHERINE ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June, 3 sheets, value 4s.; 2 shifts, value 2s.; 3 towels, value 2s.; 2 tumblers, value 1s. 6d.; I snuff-box, value 4d.; 2 table-cloths, value 1s.; I saltcellar, value 9d.; I brush, value 6d.; 12 knives, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 3s.; and 12 forks, value 2s.; the goods of Helen Connor.

HELEN CONNOR . I occupy a room in Islington—the prisoner lodged about two months in the same room with me—on the 25th of June, I bad some sheets and other things—at nine o'clock that morning, when I went out to work, they were in my box in the room, and they were not there when I came back—I had not seen the prisoner there that morning—I left my son Robert in the house, to take care of the things—when I came back he told me something—I then went to the police-office and gave information—I did not see the prisoner again for three weeks—I have seen some of the articles since.

ROBERT CONNOR . I was left at home, by my mother, to take care of the things, on Saturday, the 25th of June—the prisoner came, while I was playing with some boys—she told me to play away, like a good boy—I went down to the water-closet while she was there, and as I came up again I met her on the stairs, with a bundle under her arm, and she put the shawl over it—she went away with it, and told me to play away in the room.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not leave you and two or three other boys sitting on your mother's box? A. Yes.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am in the service of Mr. Moss, a pawnbroker, in Goswell-street—I produce some articles pledged at our house, but I cannot say who by.

THOMAS SWAIN . I am in the service of Mr. Walter, a pawnbroker, in Goswell-road—I produce two tumblers, pawned I believe by the prisoner—she offered me three sheets at the time—I offered her money on them, which she would not take.

JOHN MAYES (police-constable N 10.) I took the prisoner—I told her it was for robbing Mrs. Connor—she denied all knowledge of it—I found tome duplicates on her, which did not belong to these.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know any thing about it—I never saw these two young men till at the office.

GUILTY . Aged 50.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2317

2317. BRIDGET ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June, at St. Marylebone, I cash-box, value 4s.; 24 sovereigns, I half-sovereign, 8 half-crowns, 40 shillings, 20 sixpences, I 10l. note, and 3 5l. Bank notes, the property of John Stroud, her master, in his dwelling-house.

JOHN STROUD . I am a draper, living in the Edgeware-road, in the parish of St. Marylebone—it is my dwelling-house—the prisoner was my servant for about seven weeks—I kept my money in a cash-box in my linen chest—I generally lock the chest, but it so happened that I did not on Saturday, the 11th of June—I had that day in my cash-box a 10l. note, three 5l. notes, and money making it up to about 58l.—my insurance papers were there, and all the papers connected with my business—I saw the cash-box safe about three o'clock—the prisoner left the house between eight and nine that night, on pretence of going for a pint of ale—about twelve o'clock at night I went to put the money I had taken into my box, and I missed my cash-box and its contents—the prisoner did not return—she

left two gowns and a shawl at my house, which are there now—I went to the station between one and two o'clock—they sent an officer to my house—I traced the prisoner to George-street, Paddington—on the Sunday morning the officer came to me in plain clothes, and she was taken—she denied having seen any thing of the box—I can swear to this box by a mark on it—it had contained the money and notes.

GEORGE BISHOP (police-constable D 30.) On Sunday morning, the 12th of June, I received information, and went to Anthony Cunningham's, in George-street, Lisson-grove—I found the prisoner there, and said I was an officer, come to take her in custody, on suspicion of stealing a cash-box, from Mr. Stroud, of Edgeware-road—she denied it—she was taken and had three hearings, and then was discharged—I took her again on the 6th of July, with four others, to the station—when we got to the station Creen was charged by Cunningham, and then the prisoner said, "As it has gone so far, I will tell all. I did take the cash-box; Mrs. Cunningham broke it open, and took the contents out"—she said Mr. Cunningham had persuaded her to take it, and told her to bring it there; nobody would ever hear of it—she said the situation was hard, and the children were cross—I found the box in a water-closet, where the prisoner told me it was thrown—there was nothing in it—I have not traced any of the notes.

JAMES ELMER (police-constable D 79.) On the morning of the 7th of July I was on the premises when this box was taken up from a water-closet.

Prisoner. I am very sorry; I was advised by Cunningham to take it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2318

2318. MARGARET DALE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June, I cloak, value 10s.; and 2 pairs of boots, value 10s.; the goods of James Daly.

ALICE DALY . I am the wife of James Daly, a shoemaker, in High-street, St. Giles's. I was robbed, on the 6th of July, of two shawls, a gown, and a silk handkerchief, and on the 9th I missed all the articles stated—I know nothing of the boots.

JOHN THOMAS VITON . I am in the service of David Jones, a pawnbroker, in High Holborn. I produce a pair of boy's Blucher-boots—I do not know who pawned them—this is the duplicate I gave for them.

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX (police-constable E 49.) I received three duplicates from Mr. Daly, one for a cloak, one for a pair of boots, and one. for a pair of shoes.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You apprehended the prisoner, and she said she had nothing to do with it? A. Yes.

JAMES DALY . I received these three duplicates from my wife, and gave them to Restieaux—I went with him to the pawnbroker's, and got this cloak and this pair of Blucher-boots—I know them to be mine—the cloak I had bought and paid for—we lost 10s. or 12l. worth of things.

Q. Were these boots taken from your stock? A. Yes—I am sure they had never been sold—my wife gave me these duplicates on the 18th of July, I think.

ALICE DALY re-examined. I found these duplicates on our own shop-floor—I have known the prisoner in the neighbourhood nearly three years.

Cross-examined. Q. They tell me you love a drop of the cratur? A.

It is not true—if I have that character, it is from some low people—I know Mrs. Cochrane by the name of Ryan—I never sent her to pawn a shawl at Mr. Wells's unknown to my husband, that I might get some drink—I did not send Mrs. Wood to pawn this pair of boots and the cloak—I picked these duplicates up near the door, and, as I cannot read writing, I gave them to my husband—I thought they were for some of my property—I cannot remember the day.

GEORGE GRANGE . I am in the service of Mr. Wells, a pawnbroker. I took in this pair of boots of the prisoner—I only know her from her pledging these, but I can swear to her as the person—she gave her name "Ann Dale, lodger, High-street"—I produce this cloak, which was also pawned by the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see her before? A. No—she was in the shop about five minutes—I swear she did not give the name of Daly, but Dale—she pledged the cloak before the boots, and I remarked her as being the same person—I cannot tell How long it was after the boot! were pawned—we have a great many people come—the boots were pledged about half-past five or six o'clock—she might have pawned the cloak two or three hours before the boots.

THOMAS CALVER . I am in the service of Mr. Wells, the pawnbroker, On the 8th of June the prisoner pawned this cloak for 5s. 6d.—I can speak to her as being the person.

Cross-examined. Q. Whose writing is the duplicate? A. The foreman's—he is not here—when the prisoner was in our shop I was crossing off bills in our books—I had seen her in our shop before—we do a great deal of business—I cannot say when I had seen the prisoner before.

Witnesses for the Defence.

KITTY WOOD . I know Mrs. Daly—I pledged this cloak for her at Mr. Wells's, for 5s. 6d., and a pair of boots the same day—I pawned them by Mrs. Daly's desire, and gave her the duplicates—I think she is fond of a drop of drink.

JURY. Q. When did you pledge this cloak? A. I think it must he three months ago—in the month of June, I think.

THOMAS SHEEHAN . I know Mrs. Daly—she told me she had been robbed, but she did not lose all, for she lent a cloak and two pairs of boots to a Mrs. Woods, and she was afraid it would come to her husband's knowledge—she begged me not to tell him, nor even my own wife.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2319

2319. JANE BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 1 pair of trowsers, value 1l., the goods of Sir Henry Mervyn Vavasour, Baronet.

JAMES SISMAN . I live in Charles-street, Grosvenor-square, and keep a brush warehouse. On the 9th of July, Sir Henry Mervyn Vavasour occupied apartments in my house, and the prisoner lived servant to another lodger there—on the 12th of July, Sir Henry Mervyn Vavasour was packing up, and I heard of his missing some things—I inquired of the prisoner about them—she protested she knew nothing about them, and had not seen them—I said I strongly suspected her, and should go to the police-office, and investigate the matter further—I waited for an hour and a half, then went to the office, and the sergeant came with me—the prisoner then gave me the duplicate of the trowsers, and said she was very sorry she had taken

them—I handed it to the officer, and he took her away—these are the trowsers—I have brushed them several times, and I know they are the property of Sir Henry Mervyn Vavasour—I believe he is now at his residence at Melbourn-hall, in Yorkshire.

FREDERICK NORMAN . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Portman-street. These trowsers were pawned there by the prisoner—I knew her before quite well.

THOMAS STEWART ROGERS (police-sergeant C 5.) I received charge of the prisoner on the 12th of July, with this duplicate.

GUILTY. Aged 16.— Judgment Respited.

OLD COURT.—Friday, August 26th, 1842.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420822-2320

2320. CAROLINE MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July, 1 frock, value 16s.; and 1 pair of shoes, value 2s.; the goods of John Willis, from the person of George Leslie Willis.

LUCINDA SARAH WILLIS . I am the wife of John Willis, and live at Stepney. On Monday, the 25th of July, I dressed my little boy, George Leslie Willis, and sent him to stand at the door—the policeman afterwards brought him home without shoes or frock, which he had on before—the policeman bad them—these now produced are them.

CHARLES FOSSEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Commercial-road. On the afternoon of the 25th of July, the prisoner came to the shop with the frock and shoes produced—I asked How old she was—she said fifteen, and that her sister, who lived in Commercial-road, had sent her—I had suspicion, and gave her in charge.

ABRAHAM SPEARY . I am a policeman. I apprehended—the prisoner at Fossey's, with the frock and shoes—she said they belonged to her sister—another policeman afterwards brought the little boy and Mrs. Willis to the station—the little boy said she was the girl that took his frock off—she said nothing to it.

WILLIAM EAREE . I am a policeman. I saw the little boy sitting without his shoes or frock, crying—I took him home.

GUILTY. Aged 13.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18420822-2321

2321. THOMAS SHORT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Gandy, on the 16th of August, at St. George-in-the-East, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, I Work-box, value 4s., his goods.

WILLIAM KELLY . I am a policeman. About half-past three o'clock, on the morning of the 17th of August, I saw the prisoner in Brook-street, Ratcliffe, with a blue shirt on, and this work-box under it—I stopped him and took it from him, and asked where he brought it from—he said, "From the West Indies a long time ago," and that Johnson, a shipmate, left it him there—I asked where Johnson lived—he said at Shadwell—I said I must go to him—he then said all he had said was untrue; that he picked it up in the Back-road.

SARAH DARBY . I live at No. 6, Back-road, St. George-in-the-East. This box is the property of Richard Gandy—I saw it on Tuesday night, the 16th of August, in the front room, on the table, at Richard Gandy's

house, which is in the parish of St. George-in-the-East—it was on a teachest close to the window—I slept in that room, which is on the ground-floor—when I went to bed the window was shut down close, but not fastened—I swear it was shut down that night—I heard a noise in the night, which awoke me—I observed a man outside, with a low hat on, shoving the blinds open—the window was then up, and the shutters open, which were shut at night, but not bolted—I said, "Halloo, who is there?"—he directly ran off—I did not look to see if anything was gone till daylight—I then missed this box.

Prisoner's Defence. I found this box at four o'clock in the morning, and thought it no harm to take it.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18420822-2322

2322. NICOLAS SUISSE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March, at St. George, Hanover-square, 47 securities called "certificate to bearer," each entitling the bearer to 1,000 francs in the French Fire per Cent. Rentes, value 36,000l.; 6 other "certificates to bearer," value 24,000l.; 4 other "certificates to bearer," value 8000l.; I other "certificate to bearer," value 400l.; the property of Francis Charles Marquis of Hertford, his master:—also, for stealing, on the 23rd of November, 4 coupons, value 200l.; and 2 other coupons, value 200l.;—also, on the 22nd of February, 16 coupons, value 320l.; 4 other coupons, value 240l.; and 7 other coupons, value 140l.; the property of Francis Charles Marquis of Hertford, his master.—Other COUNTS varying the manner of stating the charges.

On these indictments MR. KELLY offered no evidence.

(See page 696.) NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2323

2323. THOMAS HILLS was indicted for feloniously forging an acceptance to a bill of exchange for 29l. 5s., with intent to defraud Henry Joseph Adcock.—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to defraud John Munday.

MR. CHARNOCK conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY JOSEPH ADCOCK . I am a solicitor, and live in Copthall-buildings, Throgmorton-street. I was concerned last year for a gentleman named Pinner, who had proceedings against one Charbean—Pinner requested me to pay some money for him, and he was indebted to me for some costs in the action, and he deposited with me a bill of exchange, which I produce—it was afterwards dishonoured—proceedings were taken on it, and the plaintiff was nonsuited—Mr. Pinner brought the prisoner to me, to prove the handwriting of the acceptor—I asked him if that was the writing of John Monday, the acceptor—he said it was, and that he saw him write it—he said he took the bill to him, and saw him accept it, in Whitecross-street prison.

Cross-examined by MR. CROUCH. Q. Did you make any inquiry regarding the acceptor when you received the bill? A. I do not recollect that I did—Pinner told me it was given by Monday, who owed him a great deal of money—when due, I presented it at the residence on the bill, No. 45, Bow-lane—it was not paid—I saw Munday's brother, who said his brother was out of town, and said, "I don't think it is his hand-writing"—I immediately went to Pinner—I have an indictment against

Pinner for uttering—he was not examined before the Magistrate, as he was in custody in Whitecross-street at the time the warrant was lodged at the prison—the prisoner has not been examined before a Magistrate-several months passed before an indictment was found—the bill became due in June, 1841—I could not then find the prisoner out—I swear Pinner never told me he was all along in Munday's employ—I inquired of' Pinner where he was—I wrote to him several times to know where Hill was, but he never came near me—no action was commenced till October or September, at the desire of Pinner, because he was a customer, and he would be sure to pay it—the action was tried at the sittings after Michaelmas term, and we failed in proving the handwriting.

JOHN MUNDAY (looking at the bill.) This acceptance is not my hand-writing—I did not give the prisoner, or anybody, authority to write my name across it—I know the prisoner—he was formerly in partnership with me—we dissolved in February, 1841—I got into trouble in 1841, and was in Whitecross-street prison—the prisoner came to me there in April, but not with this bill—he came with a blank piece of paper, and asked me to accept a bill—I think it was 29l: odd—I refused to do so—he did not ask me to give him permission to put my name—I came out of prison early in May, and saw the prisoner afterwards in my own premises in May—he was in my employ, and he said he had accepted the bill—I forget How the conversation arose, except that he stated he had accepted a bill in my name—I do not think he mentioned the sum, I am not positive—I was extremely angry about it—he said it was in the hands of Pinner, the drawer—he proposed to go with me to Pinner, which we did, and demanded the bill—Pinner said it should be destroyed, and relying on that, I thought it a dead letter—I was afterward sued on the bill, and defended the action.

Cross-examined. Q. You say the prisoner was a partner of yours? A. Yes—the partnership ceased some time in February, 1840—I accepted bills in the name of Munday and Hills, in 1841—I do not recollect the date, but I recollect there was an acceptance drawn in the name of Munday and Hills, which was given—I accepted it myself—I do not recollect who drew it, but think it was one David Pinner—I accepted it in Hills' presence.

Q. Have not you been sued on a bill accepted by you as Munday and Hills? A. I beg to decline till I see the bill in question—I have been sued to judgment on a bill accepted by me in the name of Munday and Hills—I swear I never gave Hills authority to accept bills for me.

Q. Since this bill was known to you to have been accepted in your name, has not the prisoner drawn bills, and you have accepted them? A. Certainly—I have not accepted bills drawn by the prisoner on me since this—I know one Marks—I have said the prisoner has drawn bills on me since that—I never denied my acceptance to a bill which I afterwards paid—I know Hall, of York-street, Black friars—I have bad conversation with him—I did not say J had given Hills authority to accept this bill, nor that I had accepted it myself—there has not been bills both drawn and accepted between the prisoner and me—on my oath, I never gave him authority to sign my name, not when in partnership—there was no arrangement that I was to accept all the bills for the firm.

MR. CHARNOCK. Q. You have been asked about a bill which you did accept, was not that a balance of the partnership between you? Witness.

You must name the particular bill. I never gave him authority to accept this bill.

MR. CROUCH called

JOHN HALL . I live at No. 3, William-street, Charlotte-street, Black-friars-road, and am a smith. I know John Munday—I took a bill of 15l. of his acceptance, of a person named Pinner—it was Hills' acceptance jointly—I have not got it—when the 15l. bill became due on the 26th of May, I presented it to Munday—I saw Hills there—he said Mr. Munday was out, and he had not collected the money, would I call again—I called again, about four, and Munday, Hills, and Pinner, were together at Munday 's premises—they then tendered me 10l., asked me to take that, and they would make up the other 5l. in a few days—I agreed to do so, and begged Munday not to let me have any trouble—he said, "You shall not"—in the course of a few days I called again—Munday said he was very sorry he could not furnish me with the money—he said, "The real truth is, I have no business with this bill, for I have given Pinner a further acceptance, including this bill"—he did not say the amount, but he said Pinner ought to pay me the remaining 5l. due on the 15l. bill—I told Munday I should not come any more for it, I had had trouble enough—he said, "Don't take proceedings, I will see you in a few days."

COURT. Q. Was any mention made at any time about a 29l. bill? A. Pinner told me he had accepted a 29l. bill for him, but Munday never mentioned the amount of the bill—he never mentioned the prisoner's name.

MR. CROUCH. Q. When you had the conversation with the prisoner, Pinner and Munday, was any mention made about the amount of the bill? A. No, he never mentioned anything about a bill, but the last time I called, he said he had no business to have anything to do with it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2324

2324. JUAN MONTANARI was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously assaulting Robert Oxley Richardson, on the 6th of July, and stabbing, cutting, and wounding him in and upon his belly, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

ROBERT OXLEY RICHARDSON . I am a plasterer, and live in Henry-street, Hampstead-road. On Wednesday night, the 6th of July, I was at the corner of Munster-street, York-street, Regent's-park, between twelve and one o'clock at night, in company with five or six young men, conversing about going to have some half-and-half—we had had some before—I was not fresh in liquor, nor were any of the others—while we were talking, the prisoner and two more men passed—they rushed against us, pushed past us—one of my companions said to them he would toss them for half-and-half—they had passed us about three yards at that time—some of them said something, which I could not understand—they spoke in a foreign language—they turned and looked at me—the prisoner spoke—they then went on, without saying any thing more—they met a policeman, and complained to him that our party had insulted them—I did not hear that, but saw them talking to the policeman—the prisoner then left the two others, and leaned against a lamp-post—he came nearer to me in coming from them—he hallooed out something in a foreign language—I went towards him—he met me, and thrust a knife into me about the groin—I saw he had something in his hand

that looked like a penknife—I cried out, "Fred, I am stabbed"—Mr. Barfoot saw the wound at the station,—I never saw the prisoner before in my life.

Cross-examined by MR. HAKE. Q. How many men were standing with you? A. I have said five or six—there was Skillington, Hughes, Haggersten, and Smith, and one or two more—we did not rush against the foreigners, they rushed on us—I swear we did not begin the assault, nor use a single word of foul language to them—we did not surround the prisoner till after he had stabbed me—I never spoke a single sentence to him, nor did my friends—I do not know what words were used by him—be spoke in a foreign language—I did not hear "It is not good to insult persons passing along the street" said in English—I did not separate him from his companions—I did not call them "French dogs," nor hear them called so, nor "b—foreigners," nor "b——s"—if my companions had called them so I should have heard them—we did nothing to provoke them by word or sign—I did not make indecent gestures to them—after I was stabbed I let down the fall of my trowsers, and there was blood from the wound, that is all—Skillington said he would toss them for half-and-half—he did not say, "I will pay you a pint of beer," making at the same time indecent gestures—I went to the prisoner immediately he called me—I have a brother named Cornelius, and they call him, for shortness, Cor—I thought he uttered the word Cor, and I went towards him—I thought he might know me—I had a good opportunity of seeing his face as be passed—I did not recollect having seen him—I merely went to see if he wanted to speak to me—I kept my bed three or four days, by Mr. Barfoot's advice—he was afraid of inflammation—I could not hear what the prisoner said to the policeman, but supposed be was complaining about us insulting him—I went before the Magistrate next day in a cab, and told the whole truth—my. statement was read over, and I signed it—it was correct—I was perfectly sober—I came out of the public-house at the corner of Munster-street, where I had been about half-an-hour—I believe this is a low neighbourhood—I never saw any but respectable people in the house—there were fourteen or fifteen people in the house when I came out, including our party.

JOSEPH HUGHES . I am a dyer, and live in Little Marylebone-street, Manchester-square. On Wednesday, the 6th of July, I was in the public-house at the corner of York-square—I came out, and saw two or three persons at the corner of the square—I went over to them, and they were talking of tossing for half-and-half—there were several of them together—I was not of the prosecutor's party, but was accidentally passing—I saw them at the corner of York-square and Munster-street, and crossed over—there appeared nine or ten people—one of them was challenging the prisoner, I believe, to toss for half-and-half, and be refused—he spoke in a foreign language, but I could tell by his manner that he did not wish to do it—he said something about one man to one man—he and his two friends then went on to the first lamp-post—the others stopped where they were—the prisoner and his companions stopped by the lamp-post—I believe it was from the others calling after them, "Are you going to toss for the half-and-half?"—I do not know whether they said any thing or not, but the prisoner beckoned over to those who were standing at the corner—the prosecutor then said he would go over to them—he went, and I followed him, and when he got within three yards of them, the prisoner rushed out from the lamp-post, where he was leaning, and made a thrust at him—I cannot

say whether he had any thing in his hand—I heard Richardson call out "Fred, I am stabbed"—he opened his trowsers—I saw the wound, and the blood flowing—I went up to the prisoner, and said, "You have stabbed this man"—he said, "Oh no, oh no," and seemed quite surprised—he said in English, "That not fresh done, that done three or four days"—I said, "That cannot be, for the blood is coming out now"—just at that moment the constable came up, and he complained of being insulted by the party—somebody said, "They insult me first," whether it was him or his friends I don't know"—the prosecutor showed his wound, and he took the prisoner into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. When you came out were the prosecutor's friends about the public-house? A. No, on the opposite side of the way, the prosecutor and the prisoner, and their friends, were all together, within three yards, talking—they did not seem very friendly—I was not present when the prisoner and his companions first came up—they were just going away when I came up—I heard some of them call after them, "Go on, you foreigners," or something, in rather a sneering way—there were nine or ten persons together—I asked one or two of them what was the matter, seeing them all assembled together—I do not know that there was any disturbance.

WILLIAM FREDERICK SKILLINGTON . I am independent—I was at the corner of York-square on the 6th of July—I had been into a public-house in the neighbourhood with Richardson—I came out before him—he joined me at the corner—there were four or five of us together—we stood there talking about tossing for half-and-half—the prisoner and two others came up from the west side of the square arm-in-arm—they ran up against us as they passed, and I asked one of them to toss for a pot of half-and-half—I addressed myself to no one in particular—neither of them answered—I then walked a few paces from them towards the public-house I had come from—they stood still a short time with the rest—I turned round, and saw the prisoner and his two companions walk on—they stopped under the second lamp-post—one of them called out something which I could not hear—I saw the prosecutor run towards the three immediately—the prisoner immediately left the curbstone on which he was standing, and advanced towards the prosecutor—I immediately heard the prosecutor exclaim, "I am stabbed"—on going to the spot I found the prisoner in custody of a policeman—I did not hear the prosecutor call anybody by name.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you in company with dyers and plasterers? A. I was not in company—I met them casually in the public-house in the evening—I had been treating them—I had been out to dinner, and might have been rather fresh—I went to the public-house about half-past ten o'clock—I do not know whether the prosecutor was there when I went in—I imagine I had been in the house ten minutes before I saw him—I left about twenty minutes past eleven o'clock—I treated nearly everybody in the house—there were about a dozen at one time—there might be eight or ten pots of beer drank—I had about a glass and a half of brandy and water and some beer—I cannot say whether my friends had any brandy and water—the prosecutor might have had some—I think he had—I do not know what beer he had—it must have been twenty minutes or half-past eleven o'clock when the prisoner came among them—they pushed against some of the persons standing there—they were walking

fast—it did not appear to be accidental—there were not more than five or six of us standing there—the others did not leave the house with me—I was going to Robert-street, Hampstead-road—I cannot swear that Hughes was there when the prisoner came up—I do not know the names of the parties—(I know Jane Wilson—she resides, or did reside, in York-square—I do not know her personally—I have been in the habit of going there to see a dog fancier—I never went to see her—she is not related to the prosecutor, that I know of—that square is principally inhabited by gay women)—I did not see any of the parties with me rushing or pushing against them—they might without my seeing them—there was language used not what I could call foul language, what is vulgarly called chaff—I did not tell the prisoner I would pay a pint for him—all I said was, "I'll toss you for a pint of beer"—I was certainly rather fresh.

WILLIAM SCOFFIELD . I am a policeman. I was in York-square on the night in question—I did not hear anything till the prisoner was given into my custody by Richardson on a charge of having stabbed him—he asked me to let him go several times, and said he had been insulted by Richardson and some more—he spoke in English—he said, "Let me go, let me go, police," pretty plain—I said no, I could not—he talked English next morning when I was taking him to the office—he said, "It seems to be a long time since I was locked up last night."

EDWARD WADE BARFOOT . I am a surgeon. I examined the prosecutor, on the 6th of July, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, at the station—I found a small wound in the lower part of the abdomen—it was fresh, and bleeding a little, about half an inch deep and a quarter of an inch wide—there was no danger—it was in a dangerous part—if it had gone into the intestines it would have been dangerous—the penknife produced might have made it.

Cross-examined. Q. How soon was it healed? A. On the fourth day.

JOSEPH SKIDMORE . I am a policeman. On the morning of the 2nd of July, just at daybreak, I found this penknife in the road at the corner of William-street, Regent's-park, in a line from York-square to oar station, fifty or sixty yards from York-square, and about a hundred yards from where this happened—it was shut.

Evidence for the Defence.

JOSEPH LOVARTI (through an interpreter.) On the 6th of July I was in the employ of Messrs. Stultz till half-past seven o'clock—I supped at a coffee-house—I do not recollect the name of the street—it was near Leicester-square—I found the prisoner there at supper, and a Belgian friend named Bousai—he is now gone to Havre—we staid there about an hour and a half, and all three left together and went to a public-house, which we left at half-past ten o'clock—we walked towards my house, and came to a street which crosses York-square—there is a public-house near the square—we met seven or eight persons, who insulted us—they were standing all together outside the public-house—several voices said, "Bl—t the b—s"—they offered us a pint of beer, making at the same time an indecent sign—they said, "French dogs; French not good people"—they surrounded the prisoner, and pushed him backwards and forwards—the prisoner said it was not fair to insult people that go peaceably along—he was not in a passion—he was excited—I said nothing, but went away, being afraid of being assassinated myself—the prisoner appeared frightened—they surrounded

him—we extricated ourselves from them—after we got some distance the prosecutor beckoned to us to come hack, and after that I saw nothing—I saw no blows—I cannot say whether the prisoner had a knife—a policeman came—the prisoner called him, and told him they had all been insulted—when these persons saw the prisoner talking to the policeman they came up, and said that one had been wounded—I have known the prisoner from his birth—I never knew him to have a quarrel with any man—he was always quiet.

COURT. Q. Had Montanari, yourself, or the Belgian any stick, or any thing of that sort, in your hands? A. No, neither.

WILLIAM UPBRIDGE . I am in the same employ as the prisoner. On the day in question he asked me to lend him a knife, as he had not got his, or whether he could obtain one in the shop—he could not, and was obliged to use scissors.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420822-2325

2325. ROBERT DICKENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 981bs. weight of fat, value 1l. 12s., the goods of William Snowdin; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2326

2326. JOHN HAWKES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August, 1 glass goblet, value 1s., the goods of William Howell; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 50.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420822-2327

2327. WILLIAM LEGGATT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. 6d., the goods of James Bagley; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 51.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2328

2328. WILLIAM DAY was indicted for stealing 1 set of bed furniture, value 18s., the goods of Simeon Dick:—also, 1 pair of boots, value 15s. the goods of James Carsdell; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 41.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420822-2329

2329. JOHN TYLER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Savage, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, after nine o'clock in the night, on the 14th of August, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 candlestick, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 seal, value 1s.; his goods.

ROBERT SAVAGE . I live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields. On the 14th of August, at ten minutes past nine o'clock at night, I drove up to my brother George's door, in Church-street, Shoreditch, and noticed one of the first-floor windows a little way open, and a light—I called out, "George"—nobody answered, and as the light was going away, I thought he was coming to let me in, but he did not—I went to the door, and rang the bell—nobody answered for several minutes, at last the door opened, and two persons rushed out—the prisoner was the last—I laid hold of him—he dragged me across the road in trying to escape—I gave him to Walker.

ALFRED WALKER . I live with the last witness, and was with him on the

night in question—I noticed a light in the prosecutor's first-floor—I afterwards saw the prisoner come out, and took him in charge from Mr. Savage.

ESTHER TASKER . I saw the prisoner in Walker's hands—there was a crowd about the house—I saw the prisoner chuck something from his hand—I went to see what it was, and picked up two skeleton keys, which I gave to the policeman.

THOMAS MALIN . I am a policeman. I was on duty in Church-street—I came up to Mr. George Savage's house about twelve minutes after nine o'clock—I am quite certain it was after nine, for we did not leave the station till nine—I saw the prisoner in Walker's hands—when I ran up he was delivered to me, and at the station I found a small crowbar in his pocket—I went to the house afterwards and found a large brass candlestick had been carried up stairs—there was a small seal on the mantel-piece.

Prisoner. Q. What time does the relief leave the station? A. They are regularly marched off at nine o'clock—those going out when I took you to the station, it was the day duty which had been relieved—it was near half-past nine.

WILLIAM ALDERMAN . I am a policeman. The prisoner was brought to the station—I saw the crowbar taken from his pocket—I examined the prosecutor's drawers and windows, but saw no marks of violence—I founds small gold seal at one end of the mantel-piece, which appeared to have been moved from a small box, which was upset—the skeleton keys did not fit the door lock.

GEORGE SAVAGE . The house in question is mine, and is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch—I found a small work-box turned upside-down, the seal out of it, and placed at the other end of the mantel-piece—I had left the candle and candlestick on the dresser down stairs—it was found up stairs—I left the door locked, and took the key out—there was nobody in the house—I had left the seal at the bottom of the box on the back-parlour mantel-piece—I had gone out a few minutes after seven o'clock.

THOMAS MALIN re-examined. It always takes seven minutes for me to walk to my beat—I should say it was twelve minutes past nine.

(John Pitt, of Bolt-in-Tun Gateway, Fleet-street, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2330

2330. EDWARD HASLER was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering an acquittance and receipt for 3s. 10d., on the 14th of June, with intent to defraud Charlotte Pegrim.—Two other COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud James Francis Ceal.

MARY ANN DONNE . I am the wife of William Donne, and live in William-street, Islington. The prisoner was in the habit of bringing beer from Pegrim's beer-shop—on the evening of the 13th of June he brought some beer for a person named Ceal, who lived there—I had authority to pay a bill of 3s. 10d. for Ceal—I asked the prisoner for the bill—he gave me this bill with 3s. 10d. on it—I gave him 4s.—he did not receipt the bill then—I told him to bring it receipted—he said he would—he took it away, and brought it next day, receipted as it is now—(read)—"Mr. Ceal

to C. Pegrim, for beer, 3s. 10d. Paid. C. Pegrim."—he gave it to me as a receipt of Mrs. Pegrim's.

CHARLOTTE PEGRIM . I keep a beer-shop in King-street, Lower-road, Islington. The prisoner was my pot-boy for about three weeks, and wag authorised to receive my accounts—I never signed this bill, nor authorised the receipt to be put—I had given the prisoner the bill to deliver—he told me the parties were out of town, and that they had not paid.

Cross-examined by MR. LUCAS. Q. He ought to have brought you the money for the bill, ought he not? A. Yes—if he had done so it would not have signified—he was not at liberty to sign my name—I never authorised him to do so, directly or indirectly—he has received small accounts for me before of 1s. or 1s. 6d. but never put my name to a bill, that I know of—I never saw the bills after I received the money for them—I had no character with him—I took him on the respectability of his friends—I do not know his handwriting—I cannot say whose handwriting this receipt is.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Two Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2331

2331. CATHERINE SULLIVAN, HARRIET BIRD , and SOPHIA GILES , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry William Brewer, on the 6th of July, at St. Andrew, Holborn, and stealing therein, 1 coat, value 6s.; 1 blanket, value 2s.; 2 gowns, value 4s.; 1 waistcoat, value 6d.; and 1 padlock, value 6d.; his goods; and that Sullivan and Bird had been before convicted of felony.

HENRY WILLIAM BREWZR . I live at No. 12, Brook's-market, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn. On the 6th of July I left my wife in the house, and went out a little after nine o'clock in the morning—I occupy two rooms on the ground-floor, which open on to the landing—the land-lord does not live in the house—it is let out in lodgings—I returned about five minutes after four, and found the room-door on the right-hand wide open, and the padlock and hasp, which I had left on in the morning taken away—my wife had been out, and returned about two minutes before me—I missed a coat, two gowns, two frocks, a blanket, a sheet, a shift, and a band—the street-door ought always to be shut, but most likely it was left open.

ELIZABETH BLAKE . I now live in Baldwin's-gardens. On the 6th of July, I was Jiving at No. 19, Peter-street, and Bird lodged with me—the other two prisoners are acquaintances of hers—she went out that morning—about one o'clock Sullivan came to my room, and asked for Bird—I said she was not at home—she had a bundle with her—she went away again, and then they all three came in together each with a bundle—Sullivan had the same bundle that she had brought before—they opened the bundles in my room, and sorted the things—I saw two frocks, two gowns, a coat, and a band, which I thought was a pillow-case—one gown was a mourning one, and the other a light one—they each took some things, and Bird left behind her the padlock and two sleeves belonging to a gown, which I gave to the policeman next morning.

Sullivan. She is a common prostitute—she has come here in disguise—she pawned a sheet belonging to her landlord. Witness. I get my living by going out charing, and in no other way—I did pawn my land-lord's sheet, but I got it out again.

BENJAMIN FARROW (police-constable G 200.) I apprehended Giles on Saffron-hill—I told her she was charged with a robbery in Brook's-market—she said she knew nothing about it—I asked her if she was not in a house in Peter-street the day before—she said she was at No. 19, Peter-street, with Bird and Sullivan—between one and two o'clock the same day I took Sullivan at No. 7, Pigeon-court, Clerkenwell—I told her she was charged with a robbery in Brook's-market—she said she knew nothing about it—I asked her if she was not in a house in Peter-street the day before—she said she was not—but afterwards, in going to the station, she said she was, with Giles and Bird—the prisoners were ail searched at the station, and nothing found on them.

RICHARD WALKER (police-constable G 83.) I apprehended Bird—when she was at the station I saw that she was passing something in her hand to Giles, I asked her what it was—she said it was the ticket of a shawl they had pledged the day before at Rosier's, in Turnmill-street, but it relates to a gown and two frocks, pledged on the 6th of July—as she was banding it to Giles she said, "You may take the ticket, I don't want it; I want none of the tickets," as if putting it away from her.

ROBERT UPSALL . I am a pawnbroker—I produce a gown and two frocks, pledged on the 6th of July by a woman—it was neither of the prisoners nor Blake—this is the duplicate I gave.

HENRY WILLIAM BREWER re-examined. This gown, these two frocks, this padlock, and these sleeves are mine—Blake lives about 100 yards from me.

ELIZABETH BLAKE re-examined. I can speak to all these things, as having been in my room when the three prisoners were there.

Sullivan. She would swear any thing—I was not in the room at all, only on the stairs, and she was in the yard washing—I said, "Is Harriet Bird at home?"—she said, "No;" and as I was coming out of the door Bird came in. Witness. She was in the room when the things were parted—the bulk of the things were taken away—all the three bundles were opened.

Bird. She is the biggest thief going, the would encourage any body into her place.

MART ANN BREWER . I am the prosecutor's wife—I left the house between eleven and twelve o'clock, and left the place safe, the door locked, and the padlock on it—I am sure I locked it—I returned about four.

SAMUEL JEKKS . I produce a certificate of Sullivan's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—I was present at her trial, last December twelvemonth, in this Court, and was a witness in the case—I know her to be the person—I was a policeman at that time—(read.)

CHARLES ELLIOTT (police-constable G 132.) I produce a a certificate of Bird's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read.) I was present at her trial last February, and know her to be the person—she was also convicted in 1841—I believe Giles has been led away by the other two.

SULLIVAN*— GUILTY . Aged 19.

) BIRD**— GUILTY . Aged 17.

GILES— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Ten Years.

Fourth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420822-2332

2332. WILLIAM GOODMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 1 spoon, value 10s. 6d., the goods of John Jones.

FREDERICK EDWARD BALL . I am in the employ of John Jones, of Oxford-place, Chelsea. On the morning of the 26th of July the prisoner was employed to take away the dust—he had to go through the kitchen, where there was a silver salt-spoon on the shelf—he left about a quarter-past eight o'clock—about twelve, in consequence of information from the servant, we looked for the spoon, and missed it—this now produced is it.

HARRIET PIGEON . I am in the prosecutor's service—I saw the spoon on the shelf about eight o'clock—it was there when the prisoner came in.

GEORGE HEIGHAM . My father is a pawnbroker, in Onslow-place, Fulham-road. About eleven o'clock, on the 26th of July, the prisoner offered this spoon for sale—I asked How he came by it, he laid he found it in the dust—I bought it for 16d.

MAURICE MULCAIIAY . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner—I told him the charge—he denied all knowledge of it, but when he was identified by Mr. Heigham as the person that sold it, he acknowledged selling it, and said he found it in the dust.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2333

2333. JOHN MARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of August, 3 half-crowns, 1 shilling, 1 sixpence, and 1 halfpenny, the monies of William Robert Stewart, from the person of Mary Stewart.

HANNAH RAYMONT . I live in Little George-street, Hampstead-road. On the night of the 23rd of August, I was walking along King William-street, and saw the prisoner lift up the dress of my friend, Mary Stewart, with his right hand, and put his left hand into her pocket—she had a shawl on—I said to her, "Your pocket is being picked"—I seized him instantly with his hand in her pocket, and he dropped the money—I said, "You villain, you have picked my friend's pocket"—he said, "I did not, you make a mistake"—I held him, and gave him to a policeman—Mrs. Stewart was walking on my left side—he was close to her, looking over her right shoulder—I am quite sure he dropped the money.

MARY STEWART . I am the wife of William Robert Stewart. I was walking with the last witness—she said to me, "Mrs. Stewart, there is a boy at your pocket"'—I instantly turned round, put my hand into my pocket, and missed my money—it was in my pocket the instant before, and I saw it fall—I picked up half-a-crown, and one shilling—a strange lad behind me picked up half-a-crown and a sixpence, and gave me.

WILLIAM WREFORD . I am a policeman. The prisoner was given into my custody by Raymont—he said he was walking close to them, but did not commit the crime—I received a half-crown from Mrs. Stewart, and marked it—this is it.

GUILTY .*— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2334

2334. CATHERINE COFFEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July, I jacket, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Morley.

THOMAS MORLEY . I am nineteen years old next March, and live with my father, at Bexley-heath, Kent. On the 25th of July, I came up to London by the barge, and saw the prisoner in Ratcliffe-highway, by Towerhill—I went with her to a house, and staid with her—I gave her 15d.—I

afterwards left that house with her, and went to another house—she asked me to sleep there—I said I would not, I had somebody waiting for me outside, and I should not like to stop ail night—she pressed me to stop all night—she asked me How much money I had—I said 1s.—she said that would do—I went home with her—there was a sailor at that house, a woman, and her daughter—I had a glass or two of beer with him—the sailor asked the prisoner if she had got 2d.—she said I was to give him 2d.—I threw down 1s.—he took 2d. out of it, and she picked up the change—they asked me to drink, but I would not—the prisoner, the woman, and I went up stairs—I and the prisoner remained alone, and went to bed—she asked me what she should do about any more money—I said I did not know, I had no more with me—I took off my clothes, and laid them on the table—about four or five o'clock in the morning the prisoner got up, and went away—I got up about eight or nine, and missed my jacket—the prisoner came back afterwards—I asked her for my jacket—she said it was in pawn, and she put the ticket into my band—I went, and informed the policeman—this is my jacket.

WILLIAM CARPENTER . I am a pawnbroker in Charles-street, St. George's-in-the-East. This jacket was pledged at my shop on the 25th of July, in the name of Ann Coffey, by a girl of the name of Coffey—the prisoner was with her—this is the ticket I gave her.

Prisoner. The person that pledged it was in the shop about twenty minutes before I was—I went after her, for the landlady—the other person pledged it, and not me. Witness. They were together when I gave them the ticket—I could not observe whether they came in together—the other woman gave roe the jacket, and received the money—they were both together then—I did not observe the prisoner at first.

JAMES MALIN . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner, and asked her what she had done with the boy's jacket—she said he had given it to her, and she had pawned it for 4s., at Mr. Carpenter's, and the prosecutor had got the duplicate.

Prisoner's Defence. The person of the house took the jacket, and pledged it; the prosecutor had only 1s., and that he threw down on the table to send out for some drink; the landlady fetched drink; I told him to come out, that she would hot let us sleep in the house; he would not do so, and we went up stairs; there was nothing but rowing all night; they brought the jacket down stairs, and I would not pledge it; another woman pledged it; she had another man there, and she took the two jackets together; the landlady sent me after her to see that she did not go away with the money; the other woman was present when the jacket was taken, and Was the cause of its being taken.

THOMAS MORLEY re-examined. I had 2s. 3d. when I first spoke to her—I gave her the whole of that at two different times—I did not give her or any one permission to pawn the jacket to pay for the room—I did not see her take it—I was sober when she put the ticket into my hand—I said I would not have it—I told her I would have her taken up if she did not get my jacket back—the ticket did not fall on the floor—I kept it.

WILLIAM CARPENTER re-examined. The person did pledge two jackets—the other was afterwards redeemed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2335

2335. JULIA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 frock, value 4s.; I shawl, value 1s.; and 1 apron, value 6d.; the goods of William Smith.

ALICIA SMITH . I am the wife of William Smith, who is at sea—I live at No. 10, Walton-place, Ratcliffe—the prisoner lives within fourteen doors of me. On the 16th of July, about four o'clock, I saw her in School-house-lane, and finding she had quarrelled with her husband, I allowed her to sleep at my place, because she was afraid to go home—I said I would speak to her husband in the morning and make up matters—in the morning I went out to work, and left her in the kitchen with my children—I came back between four and five, and she was gone—I missed from the clothes'-basket, a frock which I had taken in to wash, and an apron and handkerchief next morning—they were safe in the kitchen before I took her in—I suspected her, as there had been nobody else there—I found her about half-past ten that night, rather tipsy—I asked her if she had got the ticket of the frock—she said she had not—I said, "It is no use denying it, you certainly have, there was no one else in the place"—she said, "No, I have not got the frock, it is safe for you"—I said, "You will get yourself into trouble, come with me, and get it"—when I got as far as Whitecross-street, she said, "Mrs. smith, I have lost the ticket"—I said, "Then come with me to the pawnbroker's, and give me satisfaction about the ticket"—I went with her, and she asked the pawnbroker if she had pawned it there—he said, "No"—I brought her home—she would not confess it then, but she afterwards said she had taken it, but not pawned it—this is it—(produced)—and this handkerchief also—I have not got the apron.

CHARLES POTTER . I am a policeman. The prosecutrix gave the prisoner into my custody for stealing the frock—she was very much in liquor—she said she knew nothing of it, she had not had it—when the charge was booked, she said she had not got the ticket, but the woman who had, was named Warden, in Harriss-court—I went after Warden, and she said she knew nothing of it—I have not brought her here.

JOHN THOMAS LEACH . I am in the service of Messrs. Walters, pawnbrokers, in Waterloo-terrace, Commercial-road. I produce a frock and shawl pawned, to the best of my belief, by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Smith—I am almost certain of her—I gave a ticket for it—on Saturday about ten o'clock, the prisoner and prosecutrix came to the shop together—the prisoner said, "Did you take a robe in of me?"—I said, "No"—after they were gone, I thought I had a recollection of her features, and what made me recollect it was, I put "a child's gown" on the ticket, instead of a frock, and that is on the ticket now—when the prosecutrix brought her, the shop was full of people, and we were very busy—I afterwards felt certain it was her—I am almost certain the prisoner is the person—I cannot positively say.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 36.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix .

Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2336

2336. GEORGE EDWARDS, alias Johnson , was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August, 1lb. weight of tobacco, value 3s. 8d., the goods of William Horatio Hollingworth.

ELIZABETH IIOLLINOWORTH . I am the wife of William Horatio Hollingworth,

a tobacconist, in Gloucester-street. On the afternoon of the 5th of August, I was in the parlour behind my shop, and saw the prisoner come in and take 1lb. weight of tobacco which was lying on the counter, and place it under his frock-coat—I went in to serve him, and he asked for a quarter of an ounce of Irish twist—I took no notice then, as I was serving—my husband came up into the shop—I asked him in the prisoner's hearing, where he had placed the tobacco that he was going to take out with him—he looked on the counter and found it was gone—I collared the prisoner across the counter, and said, "This is the thief, he has got it"—my husband went to call a policeman—the prisoner offered to pay for it—we would not take it—he struck me on my hand to leave go—I let him go when the shop-door was shut, and the policeman came—this tobacco is my husband's.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You were in the back parlour, were you? A. Yes—I was sitting facing the door at the time he came in, and could see plainly into the shop—the door was open—there was nothing to prevent anybody seeing me—I do not think he did see me—my husband had placed the tobacco on the counter—he is not here—it was about the centre of the counter—he slipped it from under his coat when I collared him, into the chair—he said he would rather pay for it, and offered the money—the parlour-door was partly shut—he could not well run away, as my husband was beside him.

JOHN SIMS HANCOCK . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner into custody, and took the tobacco—he told me in the shop that he had offered to pay for it, but she would not take it—immediately be got outside the door, he ran away upwards of 100 yards—when I took him, I had my staff in my hand—I was about to push him with it—he said, "Don't strike me, it is no more than you would have done yourself, had you been similarly situated"—I took him to the station, and found on him four skeleton-keys, a common key, some lucifer-matches, and the bottom of a lucifer-match box, in different pockets, 7s. 6d., some odd halfpence, and I think five duplicates for his own things.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2337

2337. MARTIN WOODS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August, 2 half-crowns, 1 shilling, and 2 sixpences, the monies of John Main.

JOHN MAIN . I am a baker, and live in Grafton-street, Finsbury-square. On the 30th of August, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in my parlour by the side of my shop, and saw the prisoner behind the counter, with his hand in the till—I stepped out of the parlour, and caught his band in the till, with some silver in it, which he dropped into the silver box, in the till—he had removed it from its place—I considered he had got no more money, till I put my hand to his cheek, and out dropped half-a-crown, one shilling, and two sixpences—my man came up and took hold of him—I asked him How he came to do this—he said two other boys had sent him in—I saw two other boys, they had run away—I do not know How much money was is the till before this—I know I had got some half-crowns.

Prisoner. Two boys sent me in to do it; I was behind the counter; I put my hand in and got two half-crowns.

SAMUEL WOOD . I am a policeman. I took him in the shop—I found two halfcrowns, one shilling, and two sixpences in his hand—he had just taken them out of his mouth—he said two other boys had sent him in—I asked him where his mother was—he said she was in prison for begging.

Prisoner. I know the two boys, one was my brother.

GUILTY . Aged 6.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2338

2338. GEORGE PENFOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August, 9 printed books, value 20s., the goods of Edward Churton, his master.

MR. BURKE conducted the Prosecution.

EDWARD CHURTON . I am a bookseller, and live in Holies-street. The prisoner was in my service about three weeks—these books are mine—they came from my library—I never gave the prisoner permission to take them.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Who did you have the prisoner from? A. A Mr. Randall, a silk mercer in Bond-street, who gave him a very excellent character—he said before the Magistrate that the other boy had taken some of them—the other boy has been within a day or two of the same time in my service.

ELIZA CLARK . I am a widow, and keep a news shop in Dean-street. On the 2nd of August, the prisoner came to my shop, and brought three books called "Selwyn in Search of a Daughter"—he offered them for sale for 5s.—I said I would give him four—I gave him 2s. of it at that time—he came again on the 4th, and brought three more, for the same price—I was not present at the time—he left them with my little child—on my return I found them at my house—they were "Uncle Horace"—I saw him the same night—he said he had had some clothes from the tailor, and wanted to pay for them, and that was the reason be sold his books—that his sister was in service, and had twelve months' wages due to her, and had to take it out in books—he came again on Friday the 5th, with three more books, and pressed me very hard for the money—I said I could not pay him then, but would on Monday night—he pressed me for 12s. which I was to give for the books altogether—he had 6d. from me then—on Sunday the 7th, about twelve o'clock, he came and asked me to lend him 1s.—I gave it him—my suspicions were excited, and if it had not been Sunday evening I should have endeavoured to find out the owner—on Monday the 8th, about five o'clock, he came and asked me to pay him the money, as he was going after a situation a little way out of town—I said I could not till eight o'clock—in the mean time I searched out who the books belonged to—a policeman was sent for, and Mr. Churton came and identified the books—I gave them to the policeman—the prisoner was at the back of the shop, when the name of Mr. Churton was mentioned, but he did not speak to me, nor I to him.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How much did you pay him all together? A. 3s. 6d.—he told me he was out of employment—I suspected him, because I saw marks on the books on the Sunday, which I did not perceive before.

CHARLES CHAMBERLAIN (policeman 96 D.) I went to Mr. Churton's on the 8th of August, and took the prisoner into custody, charged with stealing nine books—he said he knew nothing about it—in going from the station he said, "I took some of the books, and the other boy the others."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2339

2339. JEREMIAH GILDER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August, 71bs. weight of bacon, value 4s., the goods of Thompson Webb.

ANN TAYLOR . I live in Mitford-place, Tottenham Court-road. About five o'clock in the afternoon of the 3rd of July, I was near Mr. Webb's shop, and saw the prisoner come towards the shop, and take something from the board outside the window—I did not see what it was—he went a little distance, and then put it under his jacket—I told Mr. Webb, and the shopman went after him.

WILLIAM PARSLOW . I am shopman to Mr. Thompson Webb, a cheesemonger, in Tottenham-court-road. I had information from Taylor, and went after the prisoner—I overtook him, and saw something under his jacket—I told him he had stolen the bacon, and I should give him in charge—he said, "Here it is, don't hold me"—he tried to escape—I struggled with him till somebody fetched a constable—I was obliged to drop the bacon to hold him—the policeman picked it up—I had put it in the window in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You put it outside? A. Yes, on the board.

JAMES MANNERS . I am a policeman. I was called by Parslow, who gave the prisoner in charge—I picked up the bacon—I found 4d. in the prisoner's pocket—I have ascertained that he bears a very good character.

GUILTY. Aged 53.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2340

2340. JOSEPH HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 3 1/2 lbs. weight of soap, value 3s.; 1 shaving-brush, value 5s.; 1 pot of paste, value 2s.; 2 quarts of oil of carraway, value 2l.; 19 bottles, value 10s.; and 1/2 lb. weight of powder, value 4d.; the goods of Robert Hendrie, his master.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

ROBERT HENDRIE . I am a perfumer, and live in Titchbourne-street, St. James's—the prisoner was my shopman for about two years. In consequence of suspicions I entertained, I had an interview with Vallance, the policeman, on the 12th of August, and soon after the prisoner left the shop, he was brought back in custody—he immediately begged for mercy, for the sake of his wife and family—I replied, that my mercy was only to the innocent men whose characters were brought into suspicion by his conduct—I saw taken from his pockets four packets of soap, and two packets from his hat—I have not the least doubt they are my property—something was then said about some oil of carraway, which induced me to accompany the officer to the prisoner's lodgings, where we found other property.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had you caused him to be watched? A. I had—my suspicions attached to him some days previously—this soap did not come from the shop, but from the manufactory, where the prisoner was employed.

ANDREW VALLANCE (police-constable C 11.) In consequence of instructions I received, I apprehended the prisoner as he left his master's

shop—I took him back, and found these four packets in his pocket, and these two in his hat.

CHARLES OSBORNE . I am in the prosecutor's service. I put up this soap—I know it by handling so many packages—I counted them before I went to my dinner, and on my return I missed more than these—these correspond in every respect with the soap belonging to Mr. Hendrie, and if opened, you will see a mark inside of "C O" in the corner of the white paper—(one being opened, was so marked)—there is nothing in the exterior to enable me to identify them, only by handling them and doing them up.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2341

2341. GEORGE WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July, 1 metal collet, value 5s.; the goods of James Hay and another.

JOHN WATTS . I am a coach-painter, in the service of Mr. Hay, a coach-builder, in Great Queen-street. On the morning of the 27th of July, I was standing looking towards the shop, and saw the prisoner bringing some caps out of the shop, in his hand—I believe he observed me, for he' went back again to the back part of the shop, and returned without any thing—I followed him up Queen-street, and told him he had got some caps belonging to us—he said he had not—I felt the pocket of his coat behind—it appeared to contain something heavy, and it was found to contain a metal collet, which is a thing that goes on the axletree—it is Mr. Hay's property.

JAMES ALFRED HAY . I am in the service of Mr. James Hay, my father, and another, coach-builders, in Queen-street—I was present when Watts took the collet from the prisoner's pocket—I felt it from the outside of his pocket previous to Watts putting his hand in—I can swear to it—it is one of a set—they are all marked with separate letters, and this letter corresponds with the letters on the nuts of the set off which this collet was missed.

FREDERICK DUNSTAN . I am a policeman. I saw the prisoner stopped in Great Queen-street—I went up, and saw Watts running—he said the man had got some of his master's property, put his hand into his pocket, and took the collet out—the prisoner said, "You must have put it there"—I took him to the station, and found 2 1/2 d. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop after a young man named Smith, who I understood lived there; I saw no person, came out again, and walked towards Drury-lane; the man came after me; if I had had any thing of the kind, I should have tried to make my escape; he accused me of having this collet; I said I had not; he put his hand info my pocket, and took it out; he must have had it in his hand.

JAMES ALFRED HAY re-examined. I am certain I felt it in his pocket—I kept my eye upon him from the time I was told of it—I saw his pocket swinging about—I saw nothing in Watts's hand previous to his going up to the prisoner.

JOHN WATTS re-examined. He had this in his hand when I first saw him—seeing him go back, I suspected him, having missed things before from the factory—he is not known in the shop, nor is there any man named Smith there.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2342

2342. GEORGE PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 23 yards of woollen cloth, value 8l. 10s.; the goods of Soen Samuel Palm; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 37.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2343

2343. JAMES DOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 2 reams of paper, value 17s. 6d.; the goods of William Smith and another.

JOHN COULSON . I am in the employ of Mr. William Smith and Alfred Robins, printers and stationers, of Queen-street, Seven-dials. On the 26th of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, a man, who I believe to be the prisoner, came to the shop—I do not swear to him—he asked the price of paper—I told him—he asked to look at some letter-paper—I showed him some, and told him the price was 11s. a ream—he said it was too dear—I agreed to let him have it for 10l., he being a dealer—he agreed to that—he selected a ream of whitey-brown, and then another, bundle of whitey-brown—he was to pay, I think 9s. 6d. for one, and 7s. 6d. for the other—they were ordered to be put up separately, as he wanted them to go to different places—he said the lad was to accompany him, and bring the money back—I made out a bill to him, which be had—the boy went with him—he was directed not to let him have the paper without the money—the prisoner did not leave his address—the 9s. 6d. bundle was left at the public-house where the boy took the paper, and was brought back to us—I believe the prisoner had the bill of parcels—I cannot say whether I wrote a receipt or not.

EDWARD THOMAS BROWN AMBROSE . I am in the prosecutor's employment—I went with the prisoner, with tome packages of paper, to Newport-market—he took some of the paper from me, and left me with one bundle—he said he should want me to go to another place with that—he went into a public-house—I waited two or three minutes for him, then went into the house, and found him gone—the landlady told me something—there is a thoroughfare through the house, and a back way out—he paid me no money—I was ordered to look after the money, and not to leave the paper without it.

Prisoner. Q. How long did yon wait? A. Two or three minutes—you took the paper from my shoulder—I permitted you to do so—I did not ask you for any money for it then.

ROBERT TAYLOR . I am a policeman—on the 3rd of August, in consequence of information, I took the prisoner into custody, in the Strand—I was in private clothes—he asked me who I was—I said a constable—he asked what I took him for—I told him—he said it was only a debt—at Marlborough-street he denied having any paper at all from the shop. Prisoner's Defence. I did buy the paper; I deal in paper, the parties know that; I had an order for the paper; I came to meet a customer at this public-house; he was gone; I went up to Long Acre, but could not find the person out; I did not come back for half-an-hour, and then the boy was gone; I met my eldest son coming up St. Martin's lane; he told me that my second son had met with a very serious accident, in Villiers-street; I live in Buckingham-street; I went home, and took him to Charing-cross hospital, and consequently I had to sell the paper; I spent part of the money, and had not the means of going back again; but

when the policeman met me, I offered money for it. I own I owe for the paper, and will pay for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2344

2344. JAMES DOYLE was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 2 reams of paper, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of Joseph Haydon Starie.

JOSEPH HAYDON STARIE . I am a stationer, and live in High Holborn. On the 28th of July, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, looked at some letter paper, and selected two reams—he then selected a ream of double small-hand—he wished me to send it with our young man, who was to bring the money back again—I an not positive that was said—but I had previously sent our young man with him, and he had brought the money back—I called the young man down, and told him to take the paper with the prisoner and to bring me the money back—I had no intention of parting with the property without the money.

Prisoner. Q. What bill did you make out? A. You asked me to make out a bill of the articles at an advanced price—you offered me payment at the station, but I said it was out of my jurisdiction then—that was about a week afterwards, when you was apprehended—you had not been to me in the mean time—you had always paid me at the time—I never gave you credit—I may have known you two years—you may have dealt with me three or four times.

GEORGE BURNS . I am apprentice to Mr. Starie. On the evening of the 28th of July I went with the prisoner, with two reams of letter paper and something else—he took me first to a public-house in Long Acre—he wished me to sit there—I said I had rather not—we then went to a public-house in Newport Market—he there took the paper from me—he did not say any thing, but went into the public-house—I let him have it under the idea that he was going to show it to a customer—I waited a minute, and then went in and made inquiries—he was gone—there was a back door to the house—I never saw him again till he was in custody.

Prisoner. Q. What hour was it? A. Before eight o'clock—you said, "Give me the paper," and left me at the door—I waited five minutes at the public-house and a minute at the door—I went at nine o'clock to inquire if you had been there, and you had not—I never saw you at my master's house before—you asked me for the paper at the door—you did not force it from me.

Prisoner's Defence. I offered the man payment; I intend still to pay. both of them.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2345

2345. LEONARD WORRALL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November, 4 portmanteaus, value 41l. the goods of John James, his master.

JOHN JAMES . I am a trunk and portmanteau-maker, and live in John-street, Oxford-street; the prisoner lived with me as errand-boy for three years, and left me last November. On a Saturday, about a week previous to the 20th of July, I went by the shop of a Mr. Jacobson, in Oxford-street, and saw a portmanteau at the door, which I thought I knew—I went home first, then made some inquiries of Mr. Jacobson, in consequence of which I went

to the shop of Mr. Collins, in Oxford-street, and waited till the prisoner came in—I told him I wanted him to go a little way with me—he went with me Mr. Jacobson, who, when he saw the prisoner, said, "That is him, that is to the person I bought the portmanteaus of"—I then went back with the prisoner towards Mr. Collins's—Mr. Jacobson's roan came after him, and asked him if he had received a letter concerning the making of some portmanteaus—I do not recollect whether the prisoner said anything—I said to him, "Stop a bit, I have not done with him yet"—I went back to Mr. Collins's—the prisoner put on his coat, and we turned down Shep-herd-street together from Mr. Collins's shop—going down Shepherd-street, be said, "Master, or sir, it is no use your going any further, I did rob you of five or six portmanteaus"—I had said nothing to him before that—be said he had sold them to Mr. Jacobson.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. The prisoner, when he left you, wrote a letter telling you he was going to leave? A. That he had left me—I had given him a week's warning, and he went—when I saw the first portmanteau at Mr. Jacobson's, he did not tell me about any others that he had bought—when I went back he took me up stairs, and I saw fire of my portmanteaus—two were at the door—the prisoner told me he had sold them all to Mr. Jacobson within the last fortnight—these are my property—(produced)—I know them by the work—I should say they are worth 18s. or 1l. a piece, on the average.

ISAAC JACOBSON . I am a general dealer, and live at No. 322, Oxford-street. Eight or nine months ago the prisoner came with a portmanteau—he said he was out of employment—I was full then, but took his address down, and in the course of a fortnight he came again with the portmanteau—I bought it of him—we pay to much per inch, and I paid him for twenty-four inches instead of twenty—on Saturday evening I found my mistake, and went down to him at his father's house, and he came and paid me back the 4s.—I do not recollect what I gave for that one—I cannot swear to these three, I have to many men that make for me—I showed those I bought of the prisoner to Mr. James—one was outside the door—he said it belonged to him, and I invited him up stairs, and showed him all the portmanteaus that were on my premises.

Cross-examined. Q. How many did you buy of the prisoner altogether? A. I should say ten or twelve, or it might be fifteen, within nine months—my place is about six or seven minutes walk from Mr. James's—I never saw the prisoner at Mr. James's—I gave the prisoner 1s. per inch for solid leather, 6d. for the others, when I ordered them, and 3d. when I had the ware-house full—I first saw the prisoner at my place—I did not meet him in the street with a portmanteau that he was going to show to a customer, and persuade him to sell it me—after be sold me the first he came again frequently and asked if we wanted any thing—if we did, be brought the article we ordered; if not, he sold them somewhere else—I did not tell him, if he did not supply me with more, I would inform against him, or that I would tell his master if he did not get some more—I did not know where he worked—I never inquired till Mr. James came and asked me, and then I identified the prisoner directly he brought him to my place.

MR. JAMES re-examined. These are my portmanteaus—the price at 6d. per inch would be 12s. 6d.—the value of one is 22s., the others 24s.—they

are both extra size, and are a little more money than common ones—the prisoner behaved very well while he was in my employ.

ROBERT LISTER . I am a policeman. I received charge of the prisoner from Mr. James, with these three portmanteaus.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2346

2346. ROBERT BRYANT and WILLIAM LAY were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July, 15lbs. weight of bacon, value 8s. 8d., the goods of James Hay.

JAMES WHARF . I am a policeman. On the night of the 31st of July, between ten and eleven o'clock, I saw the two prisoners and another boy in King-street, St. George's, opposite the prosecutor's shop—Bryant went into the shop, and brought the bacon out—Lay waited outside, close to the door—Bryant ran down the court with the bacon in his hand, and I after him—he ran into another court, and into a privy, about a hundred yards from the shop—I found him there, and never lost sight of him—the other two boys separated from him—I asked Bryant what he had done with the bacon—he said he never had it—I told him I had seen him come out with it—I went to Mr. Hay's and acquainted him of it—I got the bacon afterwards out of the privy into which I had pursued Bryant—he had thrown it down—I took it to Mr. Hay's—Lay was taken by a brother-constable—I am sure he is one of the boys who were with Bryant.

JAMES HAY . I am a grocer and cheesemonger, in King-street. This is my piece of bacon—I did not miss it till the officer brought Bryant to the shop—it had been lying between the counter and the door, on a machine—there were three pieces—when I came back there was but two—I do not know any thing of the prisoners.

Bryant's Defence. As I came down the court I met this boy coming with a bundle of clothes on his arm, from his ship; the policeman took me to the station, then went and fetched two more boys up, and the bacon in his band; he let one boy go, and locked me up.

Lay's Defence. I came from my ship with dirty clothes; going across the road, I saw the policeman running the opposite way; I ran after him, to see what was the matter; I saw him coming along with this, boy; I followed him to Mr. Hay's house, and heard him making a complaint about the bacon—I stopped, speaking to Mr. Hayes, and he came back and took me.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

BRYANT†— GUILTY. Aged 14.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Six Months.

LAY— NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Friday, August 26th, 1842.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18420822-2347

2347. HENRY TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July, 2 5l. Bank-notes, the property of William Moore, in the dwelling-house of John Shepherd; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2348

2348. JEREMIAH BRYANT was indicted for uttering counterfeit coin; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2349

2349. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for a like offence; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2350

2350. HENRY BROWN was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MR. ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

SARAH MITCHELL . I am the daughter of Samuel Mitchell, who keeps the Crown public-house, in Broad-street, Golden-square. The prisoner came on the 6th of August, between four and five o'clock—I served him with half-a-pint of beer—he gave me a shilling, which I showed to my brother—I then went for my father—when I came back the prisoner was on the step of the door—he ran down the street when he saw me, and across the road.

WILLIAM MITCHELL, JUNIOR . On the 6th of August my sister gave me a shilling—I marked it, in the prisoner's presence—he said, "Don't mark it"—he said he would take it to a baker's in Wardour-street—he wanted to got and wanted it back—I would not give it him—he went to the door, and stood there—when he saw my father crossing the road he ran away—I followed him to the top of Berwick-street—I met Beresford—we joined in pursuing—before he was stopped he put something down Mrs. Lowe's area—I afterwards saw it was a bag, with six bad shillings in it.

ANN MARGARET LOWE . I am the wife of John Lowe, a cabinet-maker, in Berwick-street. On the 6th of August I was in the front kitchen—I heard something fall in the area—I picked it up—it was a linen bag, containing some silver—I gave it to Beresford.

HENRY BERESFORD . I am a police inspector. I assisted in pursuing the prisoner—a soldier stopped him—I received from Mrs. Lowe this bag and six shillings, and from Mitchell this shilling.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint. These are all counterfeit, and all from the same mould.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the money in Middlesex-street; not knowing it was bad, I went to change one, and then I threw the bag away.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Baron Rolfe.

Reference Number: t18420822-2351

2351. ELLEN REASON, alias Ellen Gwynn , was indicted for uttering counterfeit coin, she having been before convicted of a like offence.

MESSRS. BODKIN and ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant-solicitor to Her Majesty's Mint. I produce an examined copy of the record of the conviction of Ellen Reason at this Court in the November Sessions, 1841—I have myself compared it with the original record—(read.)

ROBERT HORNE (police-sergeant S 14.) I know the prisoner—she is the person who is mentioned in this certificate—I was present at her trial.

GEORGE THORNE . I am nephew to Thomas Thorp, a linen-draper, in

the clapham-road. On Saturday, the 16th of July, the prisoner came to my uncle's shop, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning—she purchased half-a-yard of linen, which came to 9d., and gave me a five-shilling piece—I saw it was bad—I showed it to my uncle—she after that went and spoke to my uncle, and went away—I followed her to the Devonshire-road, and then gave her in custody to Biggs.

THOMAS THORP . I saw the prisoner in my shop on the 16th of July—my nephew brought me a bad crown-piece—I was at the opposite side of the shop—the prisoner came over to me, and side she was not aware that it was bad—I asked her her name, e—she would not tell me—she said she lived about five minutes' walk from our house, but she did not know where—I asked where she got the crown—she said she did not know—my nephew gave it to the policeman.

Prisoner. The gentleman punished me five days for the five-shilling piece; I was remanded five days for it, and was turned up by the Magistrate. Witness. she went up on Monday, and remanded five days, and then discharged.

JOSEPH BIGG (police-sergeant V 8.) I was on duty in Devonshire-road on the 16th of July—the prisoner was given in charge to me by George Thorne—I received from Thorp this crown-piece—the prisoner was taken before the Magistrate on Monday, the 18th, remanded till the Friday following, and then discharged.

THOMAS WOOTTEN . My father keeps the Queen's Head, Little Pulteney-street. On the 23rd of July the prisoner came there for half-a-pint of beer, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the forenoon—it came to 1d.—she gave me a bad shilling in payment—I bit it, and told her it was bad—she said she did not know it, and did not know where she got it—I then called in the policeman, and gave her into custody, with the shilling.

Prisoner. You put it into the till with more silver, and then took it out, bit it, and gave me the change. Witness. I put it into the till, but there was no other shilling there, only sixpences—I afterwards bit it.

JOHN M'LOCKLIN (police-constable C 152.) I put it into the till, but received this shilling from Wootten—I afterwards cut it with a bit it.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint—this crownpiece and shilling are both counterfeit.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2352

2352. THOMAS COOPER was indicted for uttering counterfeit coin. he having been before convicted of a like offence.

MESSRS. BODKIN and ESPINASSE Conducted the prosecution.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant solicitor to the Royal mint—I produce an examined copy of the record of the conviction of Thomas. Cooper at this Court, at the October Sessions, 1836—I have examined it with the original—it is correct—(read.)

THOMAS GREEN . I am now in the service of Mr. Rawling, of Noble-street. I was in the police in 1836, and was present at the trial of the prisoner—I took him into custody on that occasion, and I came here to prove a conviction against him in 1838, in the Old Court.

PETER HENDERSON . I keep a chandler's shop in Fox-court, Gray's Inn-lane. Between seven and eight to o'clock in the evening, on the 7th of July,

the prisoner came to buy 1d. worth of bread and 1d. worth of cheese—he gave me a bad shilling in payment—I gave him change before I saw it was bad, and put the shilling on a shelf under a bottle—at last I nailed it to the counter—on the 19th he came again—my wife was in the shop and served him—I said, "That is the man who gave me a bad shilling some time ago, look what he has given you"—he then ran away—I ran after him, and caught him—he bad got about twenty yards before I was out of the shop—I took him about 200 yards off—I said he was the man who gave me a bad shilling—he said I must be mistaken, I could not mean him—he opened his hand and the crown piece was in it—he said he had only been in the shop once.

SARAH HENDERSON . I am the witness's wife. On the 19th of August, the prisoner came into our shop, and asked for a bottle of blacking—I handed him one of Day and Martin's 6d. bottles—he gave me a crown piece—I gave him a half-crown, and two shillings—it was good money—I noticed the half-crown was a new one, one of the present Queen's reign—upon my giving it him he said, did I charge 6d. for a bottle, of blacking?—I said, "Yes," and told him there were no smaller ones of Day and Martin's—he said he thought there were threepenny bottles—I said there were threepenny ones of Russell and Warren's—he said he did not know what he should do about it—I said, "If you don't like it you can leave it"—he said it was for a friend of his—he hesitated about taking it, and went as far as the door, then turned back, and said, "Well, I won't here it"—he said, "Give me my crown-piece back again, and I will give you the change"—he gave me a bad half-crown, and two shillings back—my husband said, "Sarah, look what money he has given you, that it the man who gave me a bad shilling last Sunday week"—he then ran away, and my husband jumped over the ceunter after him—I looked at the half-crown—I afterwards gave it to the policeman—this is it—it is of the reign of George the Third.

CHARLES ELLIOTT (police-constable G 132.) On the 19th of August, I was called to Mr. Henderson's—he pointed out this shilling nailed on the counter—I took it up—I also produce this half-crown—I took the prisoner—he said the next morning it was a pity he should be transported for another man's crime—I found on him a crown-piece, and 4d. in half-pence—he said he never was there before Friday evening.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint—this shilling and half-crown are both counterfeit.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2353

2353. CHARLES WALKER was indicted for uttering, on the 25th of February, a bill of exchange for 20l., with a forged acceptance; well knowing it to have been forged, with intent to defraud James Wallwork.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES WALLWORK . I live on my property in Walnut Tree-walk, Lambeth. The prisoner came to me on the 24th of February—he asked me to discount him this bill for 20l.—I asked him whose acceptance it was—he said his brother's, and drawn as he always drew his bills, at Alchin Wharf, Pimlico, which is the prisoner's own wharf—I understand his brother is a bricklayer, but I did not know him at that time—I asked the prisoner what he could afford to give me—he said 1s. 6d. in the pound—I said I would consider of it, and call on him the next day—he said he

wanted the money very much, as he had got a contract to clean the parish, and he wanted to buy two horses—I called on him the next day, and saw him at Alchin's wharf—I paid him the money, and took the bill, deducting the 1s. 6d. in the pound—I paid him eighteen sovereigns and a half—it was a two months' bill—when it became due I presented it at Alchin's wharf, and the wharf was closed—the prisoner had left it, and gone away—there was another person or two there, but not of his family—the apartments which he had occupied appeared to me to be shut up—I then ascertained he was to be found at No. 5, Warwick-place, Vauxhall-road—I went there, and saw his daughter—I then went to Mr. William Walker's, the acceptor of the bill, at No. 20, New-road—I called a number of times, but could not get the money—I then proceeded to this prosecution.

(Bill read.)—"February 24tb, 1842. Two months after date, pay to me or my order the sum of Twenty Pounds, value received. CHARLES WALKER." "To Mr. William Walker, Alchin's Wharf, Pimlico." "Accepted, WILLIAM WALKER."

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a bricklayer, and live at No. 20, New-road—the prisoner is my brother—the name on this bill is not my writing—I don't know it—I never could write at all.

COURT. Q. Could you never sign your name? A. No—I never had this bill in my hand but once, which was when the gentleman came to me.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Your brother carried on business at Alchin's wharf? A. Yes, he has done so about four years—he became a bankrupt two or three years ago, but he still continued to carry on business at the same place—he carried on business about half a year—I sent him a cart with my name on it—I suppose my name was on all the carts that he used, but I had nothing to do with it—his name was not painted out from the gate of the wharf, and mine painted in its stead.

Q. Do you mean to swear that "Charles Walker" was not painted out and" William Walker" put in its stead, and did not he carry on business in your name? A. No, sir, he did not—I did not allow him to carry it on to the world in my name—I did not carry it on in my name.

Q. Do you remember once asking him why he had not taken up a bill that bad been accepted in your name? A. Never—he did not on that occasion tell me that he had taken it up—I did not go on another occasion to him and say that one of the bills had been presented at my private house—I remember a contract he had with a Mr. Vesevy for doing some work—that contract was taken for the benefit of my brother—they took it in my name, I believe—I never went myself to Mr. Vesevy's—I never sent my nephew down to Mr. Vesevy's to sign my name to the receipts for the contracts but once—that was a contract in the business of my brother, but I never made use of it—I do not remember telling my nephew, after he had been down to Mr. Vesevy, that there was no occasion for him to go any more and sign the receipts, as Charles would sign the receipts as well as he.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is this nephew of yours the prisoner's son? A. No—I had nothing to do with this contract of Vesevy's and its being taken in my name—it was for my brother's benefit.

RICHARD GLOAG (City police-constable C 113.) I took the prisoner—the prosecutor came in at the time, and gave him in custody for

forgery—the prisoner said nothing then, hut in going to the station-house he said the bill was no forgery, that he had done the same thing for the last two or three years, and his brother had authorized him to do it.

MR. BODKIN called

JOHN CATTERMOLE . I am clerk at the Pimlico Slate Works—I have for the last four years resided at Alchin's wharf—I married the prisoner's daughter about two years ago—I have seen William Walker at Alchin's wharf during the last three or four years—I remember about 1839 hearing him ask the prisoner why he had not taken up a bill which had become due and was not paid—it was a bill for 20l., but I never saw it to my knowledge—the prisoner answered that he had taken it up in the course of the day—I remember some time in 1840 William Walker coming about a bill that had been presented at his private house—be asked the prisoner why he had not taken it up—the amount of that was 20l.—he stated it had been accepted at his private house—the prisoner made answer that he should take it up in the course of the day—I most likely saw these two bills afterwards—I was frequently sent to pay bills—I have taken up bills on two or three occasions by the prisoner's desire—I kept the bills generally after they were taken up.

Q. Look at this bundle of bills?—(handing them) A. These have all passed through my hands, and they are all accepted, in the name of William Walker—the name of William Walker was on all the carts that were used in the prisoner's concern—I went to reside at the wharf about two years after the prisoner was a bankrupt—the name of William Walker was then over the gate of the wharf—that name continued on the gate and on the carts till within the last three weeks—William Walker was in the habit of coming there frequently—but I have not seen him, as I was out on business.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You do not know when your father-in-law was a bankrupt? A. No, only from papers which I have seen—I have seen William Walker at the wharf three times within four years—that was all to my knowledge, and twice it was to say that a bill had been presented at his house—I did not hear him say that he would not pay them—he appears very weak and feeble—I know that he cannot write—I do not know whether he can read—I never saw or heard him read—he could not help seeing the carts—I asked him whether the first cart that came was his, and he said it was—he was also aware that his name was on it, and his address was painted out, and "Alchin's wharf" put on it.

HENRY WALKER . I am the prosecutor's and the prisoner's nephew—my father is dead—I work for the prosecutor as a bricklayer—I know that William Walker's name was up at Alchin's wharf, and on the carts—I have seen it—I have never seen William Walker at Alchin's wharf—I remember a contract being taken with Vesevy, for the benefit of the prisoner—William Walker never went there with me about it, and I never saw him there.

Q. Did you ever go there by desire of William Walker? A. Yes, I think the business of the prisoner's bankruptcy was not settled, and Mr. Vesevy would not allow him to take the contract in his own name—I went there by desire of William Walker to sign the paper in his name, the contract being, in fact, the contract of Charles Walker, I believe, but I cannot charge my memory with it—I do not remember going

there more than once—I remember I signed one or two papers at William Walker's house, and then it was discontinued, but I do not know why—I do not remember his telling me there was no occasion for my going any more, as Charles could sign his name as well as me.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You did not say any thing to William Walker about his name being on the carts? A. No, I did not want to make a quarrel with them—I signed my name to this contract—I do not know what it was, hardly—I believe it was a contract.

COURT. Q. Where does William Walker live? A. In the New-road, at the back of Sloane-street, about half-a-mile or three-quarters from Alchin's wharf.

WILLIAM BURTON . I deal in coals—I occupy a part of Alchin's wharf—I remember, about six years ago, the letter C over the gate being put out, and the letter W put up—I have seen William Walker at the wharf several times after the name was altered, I should think five or six times—I took the premises which I occupy there of Charles Walker, in his brother's name—the business, as far as I could judge, was carried on in the name of William Walker—I remember the cart coming, with the name and address of William Walker on it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You know nothing of William Walker but by seeing him? A. No—I never saw him interfere in the business, and whether he read what names were up I do not know.

THOMAS JOHNSON . I am a dealer in corn, hay, and straw—I supplied those articles to Alchin's wharf, in the name of William Walker—the business appeared to me to be carried on in his name—the prisoner was an uncertificated bankrupt—I would not have trusted him.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever see William Walker on the matter? A. No, I sent goods in his name, and had the money.

JOHN CLARK . I am an omnibus proprietor—I sometimes sell horses, when they are too slow for my work—I used to rent part of the premises at Alchin's wharf, and I have sold horses there, in the name of William Walker—I said to the prisoner, "You are an uncertificated bankrupt, your name won't do for me"—he said, "I am acting for my brother William."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2354

2354. THOMAS CASEY was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Mary Casey.

ELLEN CASEY . I am the prisoner's mother, and live in Little Tun-court, Whitechapel—he married his cousin—she was about twenty-three, and he was twenty-two—they agreed well together sometimes—the prisoner is a journeyman dyer—he has been out of work a long time—I never saw any blows pass between him and his wife, only disagreements—on the Tuesday fortnight before she died the prisoner came home tipsy about four o'clock in the morning—he asked her to give the child to him—she would not—they had some words, then he turned from her, and went down stairs to the public-house to drink again—I was absent all day—when I came home I met the wife in the street speaking to one of my daughters—I saw a little mark on her nose—it was rather darkish—I could hardly notice it—it looked like a bruise—it was a mark as if they had quarrelled—it was rather red—I went to bed when I went home—the next morning I went out, and when I came home they were very sociable

—she complained on the Saturday morning before she died of a sore mouth—I gave her a cup of tea—she said she could not drink it, she bad a sore mouth—she said, "Look at it"—I looked at it, and found it was screwed up a good deal—she could not swallow—I told her to go to the doctor's as soon as possible—she went directly—he gave her some pills and medicine—I held her head back, and made her swallow the two pills—she took no food all daylong—I saw her again that evening—she was worse—she came out in the street to the prisoner, and told him she was going to leave him, and wished him good bye for ever—she came to me at the same time, and wished me the same—I came home with her, and put her to bed—she remained very bad all night, but still she had a good sleep in the course of the night—on Sunday morning I thought she was much better, but towards evening she got very bad again—the prisoner paid every attention to her all day long—on Sunday night she got much worse—I went for the parish doctor, and he came directly—the prisoner was in the bed-room with her when the doctor came—I asked what was the matter with her—he said she was lock jawed, and I had better send her to the hospital directly—she walked to the hospital between me and her husband quite heartily—she said she did not ail anything all over her body, only her throat and mouth—she remained at the hospital, and died on the Tuesday after.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. From the time you first observed that red spot on her nose till she got these pills from the doctor, was she walking about as usual? A. As well as I could—the prisoner was very attentive and kind to her—I never heard a word between them during the time—he seemed grieved when she was obliged to go to the hospital.

JOHN MILLER . I am a parish surgeon. About the 7th of July the deceased came to me about a contusion on the none—I gave her some medicine, and she called again in a day or two afterwards—I did not see her again till Sunday, the 17th, when I saw her at her own house—she was suffering from lock jaw at the time—I recommended her to go to the London Hospital directly—I examined the wound on the nose to see whether that was sufficient to cause lockjaw, when she came to me at first, and it was sufficient.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you apprehend anything like lockjaw when you saw her first? A. No—I gave her some aperient medicine, and a lotion for her nose—I saw her twice before the 17th—I had desired her to call on me in the meantime—she did not call—I do not know if she had called, and I had treated her as I should, that this might have been avoided—it might have given her a much better chance—there was an interval of seven or eight days from the time she last called on me and the 17th, when I ordered her to go to the hospital.

COURT. Q. In some states of the body, if lockjaw comes on, is there anything can be done to prevent it? A. I am not aware of anything—I gave her some medicine the second time, and told her to come again if her nose troubled her.

MARY LANCELY . I lived at the London Hospital—I have left there now—about three o'clock on the 5th of July, I was going up Cannon-street, and saw the prisoner there—he struck his wife in the eye—she went a little way across the road, and he followed her—she stood against the wall—he went up to her, and said, "Will you follow me?"—she said, "Yes, I will"—I held the child while she tied her bonnet—I persuaded

her to go home, but she insisted on following him—I then went home—on the 19th she was brought to the hospital—I knew her again—the prisoner, the mother, and the little child were with her—I said, "Dear me, you are the man that struck this woman a fortnight ago"—he made answer, that he did not know—the mother said he had kicked her a week ago—he made no reply—I said, "Do you suppose that has caused the lockjaw?"—he said he did not know, it might have done—he looked very sorry—he could scarcely speak.

Cross-examined. Q. What did he say when the mother said lie had kicked her on the nose? A. Nothing—I will swear that—I have been examined before—this is my signature to this deposition—I do not know why I left the London Hospital—I believe it is out of spite—I have been dismissed for no cause whatever.

CHARLES HILL DUCK . I am a medical student. I was house-surgeon at the London Hospital. On Sunday, the 17th of July, the deceased was brought there between ten and eleven o'clock, and died of lockjaw on the Tuesday following—I attributed the cause of the lockjaw to the bruise on the nose—it was sufficient to have caused a lockjaw.

THOMAS' BLIZARD CURLING . I am a surgeon at the London Hospital. I saw the deceased shortly after she was admitted—I observed she had a lockjaw, and there was a small wound at the root of the nose—it was an old wound—there was a post-mortem examination—I found nothing to account for the lockjaw, except the wound at the root of the nose.

Cross-examined. Q. Suppose there is a complaint that may lead to lockjaw, is it not possible by skill and attention to avert it by the use of proper medicines? A. Yes—this wound on the nose ought not to have been neglected from the 9th to the 17th.

COURT. Q. If a person gets a blow on the nose in that way, the proper way would be to take a dose of opening medicine, and a lotion? A. Yet—it is such a wound as many persons would do nothing to—after symptoms of lockjaw have begun, it is generally too late to apply medicines—we have sometimes saved life—a very slight thing will occasion lockjaw sometimes, and sometimes a very severe thing will not.

SOPHIA HELPS . I live next door to the prisoner. I heard a great noise in the room up stairs when I was in bed—it was between seven and eight on the day the blow on the nose was given, I saw the blood running down the deceased's nose, and side of the face—I heard the cry of, "Murder," and went to the window, and she was sitting by the side of the window, with the baby in her arms—the little girl opened the door—I said to the prisoner, "You good-for-nothing rascal, what have you been doing?"—he shut the door, and told roe to mind my own business—he was using harsh words at the time.

WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM (police-constable H 57.) I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, in Whitechapel-road—I told him I was going to take him into custody for causing the death of his wife—he said he was very willing to come, and he was very willing to suffer for it, if he had caused her death, that he was very tipsy at the time, and did not know what he was doing.

GUILTY. Aged 21.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury .

Confined One Month in the Penitentiary.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18420822-2355

2355. JOHN BROOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August, 1 pair of trowsers, value 125.; and 2 waistcoats, value 10s.; the goods of William Lidstone, his master; and that he had been before convicted of felony: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Transported for Ten Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18420822-2356

2356. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 1 pair of scales, value 5S., the goods of John Barnard, and that be had been before convicted; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2357

2357. JAMES POTTS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 1 knife, value 2d., the goods of Charles Thomas; and 1 pair of boots, value 4s.; the goods of Henry Smith, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2358

2358. GEORGE ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 brush, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of James Munting; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Ten Days, and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18420822-2359

2359. SARAH GOBBY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August, 1 pewter pot, value 6d., the goods of William Pardy:—also, on the 22nd of August, 1 pair of shoes, value 1s., the goods of George Frederick Lambert; to both which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2360

2360. MARY BRESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August, 3lbs. weight of feathers, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Henry Aitken; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2361

2361. JOHN MACK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 1 bridle, value 20s.; and 1 brush, value 1s.; the goods of Charles Henry Bloxan; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2362

2362. CORNELIUS KNILL was indicted for embezzlement.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM BOURCHIER . I am a fur-manufacturer, and live in William-street, West Strand. The prisoner was my errand-boy—I sent him in June, to Mr. Shipley, of Regent-street, for 18s.—when he returned, I asked him for it—he said Mr. Shipley would call and pay—he has never paid it to me—on the 23rd of July I sent him to Mr. Johnson for 2l.—he has never paid me that—I believe the answer he brought back, was, that he would call.

JOHN SHIPLEY . This bill—(looking at one)—is one my father owed to the prosecutor—I paid it to the prisoner on the 21st of June—he signed this receipt to it for 18s.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I paid the prisoner this bill of 2l. on the 23rd of July—he signed this receipt to it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2363

2363. JAMES HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July, 1 rule, value 2s., the goods of Philip Geoghagan.

PHILIP GEOGHAOAN . On the 22nd of July I and the prisoner were at work at a house at Maida-hill, and I missed my rule—this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Yon told the prisoner if he would find it, you would forgive him, and he said he would get it in the morning? A. Yes, he did—I should not have prosecuted him if I had not been knocked about here, and lost my time—he bears a good character—I think it was through his master not paying him, and he wanted a dinner.

WILLIAM FAIRLAM LOPTS . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this rule of the prisoner for 9d.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Ten Days.

Reference Number: t18420822-2364

2364. ANN SANDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August, 3 pairs of shoes, value 12s. 6d., the goods of Eliza Featherstone.

ELIZA FEATHERSTONE . I am housekeeper to Mrs. Poole, of Wimpole-street. A little before twelve o'clock last Sunday morning, I found the prisoner in my room, where she had no business—I asked what she did there, and she threw these three pairs of shoes of mine out of her apron—I sent for an officer and gave her into custody—I never knew her before—she had come down the area steps, and got in.

Prisoner. I met a female in Wimpole-street; she asked me to go to No. 26, for a person named Jane; I went; I saw two doors open; I waited till I saw the housekeeper, and she accused me of stealing three pairs of shoes—I had no shoes in my possession, but I saw them where she had left them. Witness. We had a person named Jane in our house—the prisoner had the shoes in her apron, and when I asked what she had, she threw them on the chair.

GUILTY . Aged 49.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2365

2365. EMMA RIDOUT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June, 2 spoons, value. 8s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; the goods of John Bennett, her master.

JOHN BENNETT . I live in Hoxton Old Town—the prisoner was my servant. On the 18th of June I missed two spoons and a handkerchief—these now produced are them.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How do you know the handkerchief? A. It is torn, and I have worn it a long time—she had been with me a month.

RICHARD GODWIN (police-constable N 217.) I took the prisoner for taking these spoons—she said they were in pledge, and then she said she would say no more about them.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did this conversation take place? A. At the corner of Pimlico-walk, in Hoxton—I said I took her for stealing a handkerchief and two spoons—she first said she knew nothing of the spoons, and then she said they were pawned, and refused to tell me where.

SUSAN HOLMES . I am the wife of Richard Holmes. I was washing at the prosecutor's, and the prisoner said to me, "Mrs. Washerwoman you have a very dirty handkerchief on"—she said she had a great many old clothes, and she would give me some—she gave me this handkerchief, and told me to wash and mend it, and wear it under my gown.

THOMAS DURANT . I am a pawnbroker. I have a spoon—I cannot tell who pawned it.

EBENEZER LBEBRICHT . I am a pawnbroker. I have a spoon pawned by a woman—I cannot tell who.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2366

2366. PATRICK CONNER and JOHN BENSON were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August, 4 iron cramps, value 3l., the property of George Thompson; to which

CONNER pleaded GUILTY .

GEORGE THOMPSON . I live in Marchmont-street, Somers Town, and am a chairmaker—Conner was my fellow-workman—missed these four iron cramps on the 7th of August.

JOHN CHARLES CUTHBERT . I produce these four cramps—Benson pawned them at my employer's for 17s. 6d.

JOHN BURGESS (police-constable E 75.) I saw the prisoners on the evening of the 7th of August, and Conner had the cramps then.

Benson. Conner gave them to me to pawn, and was in the pawnbroker's with me.

BENSON— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2367

2367. PATRICK CONNER was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August, 1 counterpane, value 4s.; 1 saw, value 1s.; and 1 screwdriver, value 1s.; the goods of Charles Marlborough, his master: to which be pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18420822-2368

2368. MARY WYNNE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 2 shawls, value 7s.; and 6 shillings; the property of George Smith, her master.

SARAH SMITH . I am the wife of George Smith, the prisoner's master; she came on the 23rd of July, and went to the drawer for something—I soon after missed these two shawls.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Is not your name Thompson? A. No, I am known by that name—ours is a house of ill fame—the prisoner, was only with me one night—I put eight shillings in the drawer the night before, and in the morning my husband went out to work at half-past seven o'clock—he took one shilling out of the drawer—I got out of bed, and saw there were seven shillings left—I went to bed again—the drawer was left half open—I sent the prisoner to the drawer for a shilling to get some wood—I got up again about half-past eight, and I missed the money—the prisoner went to bed between ten and eleven the night before—this shawl was on the foot of the bed—the bed-room door was open—it is the kitchen—I always lock the street-door, but my husband going out that morning it was not locked—the prisoner went out of the house after she had taken the shilling—I do not recollect having any conversation with her about a gentleman—I will not swear, it did not take place.

JOHN JAMES COOK . I am shopman to Mr. Gideon, a pawnbroker. I

produce a shawl, pawned on the 23rd of July for 2s., in the name of Mary Wynne, No. 7, Charles-street, Lisson-grove—I cannot tell who by.

JOHN MANNING (police-constable D 44.) I took the prisoner at the corner of the New-road, Edgeware-road—I told her I wanted her, I believed she knew what for—she said she did not—I said for robbing her mistress, in York-square, of two shawls and seven shillings—she said it was very true she took the shawls, but not the money, and she pawned one at the pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined. Q. She told you where to go and find the other? A. Yes, at Mrs. Groves.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420822-2369

2369. JOHN FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August, 2 pairs of shoes, value 11s., the goods of Alexander Wilson and others.

WILLIAM BOREHAM . I am shopman to Alexander Wilson and others, shoemakers, in Crawford-street. On the 3rd of August, I lost these shoes—in consequence of information, I went to Bryanston-square, and saw the prisoner running with the shoes before him.

HENRY MITCHELL . I was in the balcony of the shop—I saw the prisoner and two others—one of them took the shoes while the prisoner was on the pavement close by—he took them from him.

Prisoner. It is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2370

2370. THOMAS M'DANIELS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd August, 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Richard Shearing, from his person.

RICHARD SHEARING . I am a plumber, and work with my father, in Rupert-street. About one o'clock in the morning of the 2nd of August I was in Drury-lane—I felt some one at my pocket, I turned, and saw the prisoner with this handkerchief in his hand—he threw it on the ground.

GEORGE GAITER (police-constable L 23.) I saw the handkerchief at the prisoner's feet—the prosecutor charged him with it—he said, "I did not do it"—he then said, "If I knew you were going to charge me with this, I would have done something else."

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it; it was two or three yards from me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2371

2371. THOMAS MOORE , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, one metal cock, value 4s., the goods of John Fowler.

WILLIAM RHODEN . I am servant to John Fowler, a blacksmith—I lost this metal cock from Pewter-platter Yard, St. John-street—it is Mr. Fowler's property.

CHARLES BARKER (police-constable.) I saw the prisoner on the 10th of August pull this tap out of the water-butt, at the Pewter-platter-yard,—I followed him—he threw it down, and I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 67.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2372

2372. MATILDA STYGLE was indicted for stealing on the 4th of August, 3 1/2 lbs. weight of sugar, value 3s.; 12 cakes value 1s. 4d.; 4 pots, value 6d.; and 3lbs. weight of jam, value 6s.; the goods of George Willsher, her master.

GEORGE WILLS HER . I keep a confectioner's shop in Oxford-street, and at Paddington—the prisoner was my servant, and was about to leave me—She had sent her boxes away—I desired to search them—I found them at Cambridge-terrace—I went with an officer and found this property in them—it is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINI. Q. What was she living with you as? A. A servant of all work—She occasionally sold things in the shop—the jam is worth 6s.—I know it by the tie of the cover on the jars—the prisoner and I tied them together—I could not swear there was any missing—it is strawberry-jam—I made some hundreds of jars of it—these are common penny sponge cakes, and this lump-sugar I cannot point out any mark on, nor say I have missed any.

LAWRENCE ANDERSON (police-constable.) I was present at the searching of the boxes, and found these things.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you made inquiries about her? A. As far as I have heard her character has been very good.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2373

2373. JOHN FOX was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August, 8 1/2 lbs. weight of copper, value 8s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Soames.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Henry West; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN M'FARLANE . I am chief officer of a vessel lying in the Poplar Docks—She belongs to Joseph Soames—I was coppering her—I missed some sheets of copper on the 5th of August—these now produced are them—they were taken from the stage—they had been milled in the cabin that morning—that is what I know them by.

WILLIAM CROUCHER . I am employed at the Poplar Docks—I suspected something and went to the gate-keeper, and he stopped the prisoner—I had seen him come off the stage where this copper was—he had no business there.

SAMUEL COLE . I am the gate keeper—I stopped the prisoner—he went back on the stage, took this copper from his person, and put it on the stage again.

Prisoner, I Went into he clocks and was taken with a pain in my stomach; I was going across the dock and happened to drop my handkerchief, that was all; I had no copper.

THOMAS YEOMAN (Thames police-constable, No. 18.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the man

. GUILTY . Aged 35.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2374

2374. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 1 umbrella, value 14s., the goods of Robert Debenham and another.

JOHN WICKS . I live at Lambeth, and am porter to Robert Debenham and another, auctioneers in Co vent-garden. On the 23rd of July, about eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner come into their sale-room—I saw him go up to the counter, snatch up the umbrella, and put it under his coat—in a few minutes he walked out—I went after him, collared him, and took

him back—I asked him to give it me—he gave it me, and said, "If you will forgive me I will never come into the auction-rooms any more."

Prisoner. I am in that state that I am not master of my own actions—I had a wound in my head and don't know what I am about six days in the week.

Witness. He did not appear so then.

GUILTY . Aged 65.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2375

2375. RICHARD CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 2 quarts of ale, value 2s. the goods of James Reeve Wyatt,—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of James Reeve Wyatt, and another.

EDWARD STONE . I am cellerman to James Reeve Wyatt, of Bowl-yard—he has a store-cellar in Carlton-mews—I missed property from there and placed a policeman in the cellar.

JONATHAN WHICHER (police-constable, A No. 27.) I was in the prosecutor's cellar on the 21st of July—I saw two little boys come down—one had a candle, the other a bottle—they went to a cask and drew a quantity of ale—I took them—they made a statement to me—the prisoner is employed in a stable over the store-cellar—when I went up he was in the stable—there was a hole in the cellar—the prisoner said he knew nothing about it.

THOMAS CLYNCH . I live in John-street, Han way-street. On the 21st of July I was playing in Carlton-mews, the prisoner called me and Youlton—he said, "Tom and Sam, I want you"—we went into the stable—he said, "You go up there, there is a bottle, and you go into the cellar, there is a tub of ale there, and my master says I may have some every night"—we said we had no candle—he called Dick in to get a candle—the prisoner let us down, and said, "There is a tub over there with the cock in it"—he told us to fill the bottle and carry it up to him—he wanted us to take the key of the stable-door—he said, "You had better put it under the door."

Prisoner. Q. Where did you first see me? A. Up against Tavistock-street—I have been in trouble, because a boy went and got some money in a shop.

SAMUEL YOULTON . I was playing with Clynch—the prisoner said, "Sam and Tom, I want you, you go into the next stable, and get a bottle out of the hay bin"—the prisoner helped us down the hole—he 'told another boy to go and get a candle and a rope—I went down—the prisoner was to have the beer.

JAMES JONES . The prisoner told me to go and get a candle.

Prisoner's Defence. I had to go to Mr. Bransdon's yard; I was going to lead my horse out; the policemen came in and said I must go with them.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2376

2376. LUIGI SCOLA was indicted for embezzlement.

ANDEA MOLIMARI . I live in Leather-lane—the prisoner was my servant—it was his duty to pay me the money he received—if he received 2l. from Mrs. Davies ho has not paid me.

Prisoner. Q. Have I not done business for you nine or ten years? A. Yes-a few months ago we went down to Guildford—you was my

man then—they were my goods—I paid you for what you were doing—I never promised you that every order you got you should have half the profits.

HBNRY AUGUSTUS MACPHIN . I am clerk to Mrs. Davis, of Houndsditch—the prisoner brought some looking-glasses on the 29th of July—I paid him 2l. for Mr. Molinari—this is the receipt he wrote.

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Confined Three Months.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, August 21th, 1842.

Second Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420822-2377

2377. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August, 3 reams of paper, value 2l. 0s. 6d.; the goods of Henry Pouncy and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined. Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2378

2378. WILLIAM BAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 1 shirt, value 5s.; the goods of Timothy Greenwood.

BRIDGET GREENWOOD . I am the wife of Timothy Greenwood, and live at Hackney-wick. This shirt was sent to me to wash on the 5th of August—I hung it out on a line, with three more—some boys came to the house about half-past twelve o'clock and bought a biscuit—they went away, returned again, and bought another—I then looked and missed the third'; this now produced is it.

GEORGE BLAND . I am waiter at the White Lion, at Hackney-wick. On the 12th of August, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I was cleaning the windows and heard something—I looked round and saw some boys running up the lane—there was a cry of "Stop him"—I saw the prisoner throw something over a bank into the field—I got over and picked up this shirt—the prisoner was secured by my young master—I am sure he is the boy, for there was no other boy but him in shirt sleeves.

Prisoner. He accuses me wrongfully; there were five more at the bar with me.

JOHN YEO . I am a policeman. I produce the shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost my jacket and waistcoat; I saw three or four boys running, and saw one throw the shirt away.

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy ."— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2379

2379. JAMES FINLAYSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August, 2 pairs of trousers, value 8s.; and 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; the goods of Francis Thompson.

FRANCIS THOMPSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Hare-street. On the morning of the 24th of August I was in my shop, and heard a noise against the shop front—I ran out, and missed two pairs of trousers and a waistcoat, from an iron bar before the windows—I saw the prisoner nearly at the top of the hill, running very fast—I followed, and got up to him—as soon as I touched him he dropped the goods from under his coat—I secured him, and took them up—h ebegan to feel about his cap, and I found he was tearing some hair, which was attached to each side of his cap.

Prisoner. They were dropped at my feet, by a boy. Did not you see a boy running by my side? Witness. There was another boy running, or walking, but he dropped them—the boy was not near him then.

HENRY WESTBOURN . I saw the prisoner take the trousers off the bar and put them under his coat.

DANIEL HUMPHREYS . I am a policeman. The prisoner was given into my custody with the trousers.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2380

2380. HENRY MANSFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August, 1 coat, value 1l.; the goods of William Henry Bodkin, Esq.; and 2 pairs of shoes, value 15s.; 1 coat, value 2. 1l.; 1 jacket, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 hat, value 6d.; the goods of Frederick Shults.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

FREDERICK SHULTS . I am coachman to William Henry Bodkin, Esq of Hampstead. On the 5th of August, about a quarter to five o'clock, I missed from the harness room two coats, two pairs of shoes, a hat, and a brown holland jacket, which I had seen safe about three o'clock—I gave information to the police—I have seen the prisoner about Hampstead—he always went by the name of Cameron—he sold fruit and fish.

JAMES SMITH . I am in the service of Mr. Jones, a pawnbroker, in Holborn. On the 5th of August, the prisoner pawned these shoes with me, in the name of Henry Mansel—he came again on the 8th—I had then received information, and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Are you certain it was on the 5th? A. Yes, about five o'clock in the afternoon—I never saw him before to my knowledge.

JAMES BRIOGS . I was a policeman. The prisoner was given into my charge—he said he had bought the shoes of a man coming down Tottenham-court-road—he did not know who he was.

JOHN LILLIITONE . I am a policeman. On the 5th of August, I saw the prisoner in High-street, Hampstead, between one and two o'clock, in company with a woman—I traced the shoes to the pawnbroker's, and gave them notice to stop him—I know this to be the Magistrate's hand-writing—(read)—"The prisoner says, on the day in question I was not further than Camden-town; on my way back I met a stranger in Tottenham-court-road, who offered me the shoes for 8s.; I offered him 6s. for them, and took them home, and next day I pawned them. I was not at Hampstead at all that day."

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before that day? A. Yes—I often saw him before.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18420822-2381

2381. SARAH PATERSON was indicted for a misdemeanor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2382

2382. HENRY THOMAS COOPER was indicted for a rape.

GUILTY of an Assault. Confined Twelve Months, the first and last Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18420822-2383

2383. JAMES MORRISON was indicted for b—g—y.

GUILTY . DEATH Recorded.

Reference Number: t18420822-2384

2384. ANN WATSON, ELLEN SHEEN , and ANN RAGAN ,were indicted for feloniously assaulting George Haines, on the 19th of August, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 watch-chain, value 3d.; 1 seal, value 4d.; 1 key, value 2d.; 2 sovereigns, 5 half-sovereigns, 2 half-crowns, 4 shillings, and 3 sixpences; his property; and immediately before, at the time of, and after the said robbery, beating, striking, and using other personal violence to him.

GEORGE HAINES . I am a green-grocer, and five in Wellington-street, Waterloo-town. On Saturday morning, the 20th of August, just about one o'clock, I was coming home from Ratcliff-highway, where I had been to order some coals, at Smith and Sharp's wharf, which is about a mile from my own house—when I got to the corner of Osborne-street, Brick-lane, not a quarter of a mile from my house, the prisoner Watson came up to me and hustled me—She caught hold of me to rifle my pockets—Sheen and Ragan came round me directly, both together—they were all round me, hustling and feeling about my pockets, and a man crossed the road and knocked me down directly with his fist—I was senseless for a moment—when I came to myself, Sheen had got hold of my throat, so that I could not make any noise or get assistance—I found them with their hands in my pocket, trying to cut my pocket out—I had hold of my watch-pocket to save it, and they cut my hand—they got my watch-chain, but not my watch—they were all three round me—Watson got ray property from me—She had my pocket in her hand—I held her fast, with her hand in my pocket—I lost two sovereigns, five half-sovereigns, and from 12s. to 14s. in silver, my silver watch, the chain, seals, and key—as soon as they heard the policeman coming, the man ran off with Sheen and Ragan—I held Watson fast, and the policeman came up and took her—the watch, chain, seals, and silver, were found on her—Sheen and Ragan were taken next morning, at Worship-street, while Watson was being examined—I could not make any outcry because I was throttled—I called out "Police" very faintly, just as the policeman was close to me—I had seen my money just before in High-street, Whitechapel—I was feeling in my pocket, to feel if it was all right, as I knew a very bad set walk there—I never saw the prisoners before—I am certain they are the women—I did not purpose speaking to either of them—I had had a share of two pots of half-and-half with two shipmates—that was all I took after dinner—I dined about half-past one—I cannot exactly say I was sober, nor was I intoxicated—it was between eight and nine that I fell in with my shipmates—I had finished drinking a little after twelve.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What did you have to drink at dinner? A. Nothing—I have been in Her Majesty's service seven years—Watson came up first, took hold of me, and began to shake me, and shook my pockets—the others came up and surrounded me—I once charged a woman before the Magistrate—it did not turn out that I charged the wrong person—She brought two false witnesses—if I had had money I could have prosecuted her—the Magistrate discharged her because I had no witness—I am not in the habit of going to public-houses a good deal, nor of keeping company with women of the town—the woman I charged before was a woman of the town—She came up and caught hold of me the same as the prisoners did—I was not sober then, and that was the way she got over it—I never had any other case—the silver was found on Watson—I cannot say it was exactly the coin I lost—I do not exactly know How much was found on her—She popped the watch into my hand directly the policeman

came up, and the chain and seals were in the pocket she tore out of my trowsers—I swear positively to all the three prisoners.

Sheen. I was not there.

Ragan. He said at the station that Sheen was not the person. Witness. It was very dark at the station—I was very much agitated, and could not see her face—I said I could not say exactly whether it was her or not.

ROBERT WALLACE . I am a policeman. About one o'clock, on Saturday morning, the 20th of August, as I was going along Osborne-street, I saw Watson go towards the prosecutor, and directly saw two other females come up—I saw a wrestling between them all—there was a man crossing the road—I ran up that instant, and directly I got up the prosecutor sungout "Police"—I saw them all three down on the ground—I did not see what the man who crossed the road did—they seemed to be all confused, as if they were all wrestling down on the ground—the prosecutor was standing up—directly I ran up, the women and the man ran away—the prosecutor was down—when the man crossed I saw the prosecutor fall down, and the women were down upon him—I did not say that the prosecutor was standing up—when the man crossed the road I saw them all five fall down, the prosecutor, the three females, and the other man—I had heard the prosecutor call "Police" in a very low voice just before I got up—two of the females and the man then ran away, leaving Watson behind—I asked the prosecutor if he had lost any thing—he said he was robbed of his watch—I asked where it was—he said, "Here is the watch, which she has just put into my hand"—I asked if he had lost any thing—he said he had lost a chain, but never mind that, and be gave her into custody—I took her to the station—She was searched, and she gave me 12s.—I could not tell, from their manner, whether they were tumbling all together in fun, or whether one party was robbing the other, for it was so very quiet till I happened to come up—I thought they were fighting—the prosecutor had been drinking a little, but was collected, and knew what he was doing.

HENRY COTTON . I am a policeman. I was on duty in Fashion-street near Osborne-street, on the morning in question—I joined Wallace, and saw the prosecutor walking behind Watson, who was in Wallace's custody, going towards the station—She had something in her hands, under the end of her shawl—Wallace said something, and dragged the shawl off her left arm, and she, then threw something down from her right hand—I saw Wallace pick it up—it was a steel chain, a metal seal, a key, and the prosecutor's pocket—I had hold of her arm at the time—the pocket was on the chain—the other two prisoners were taken next morning—when the prosecutor first saw Sheen he did not know her—it was rather dark in the station at the time—there was a gas-light at the lower part of the room—I took her, and asked if he knew her—he said not—next morning he saw her by daylight, in the open street, and said that she was one of the party—he appeared to have been drinking, but was quite collected.

Cross-examined. Q. I thought Sheen and Ragan were taken next morning? A. When Watson was locked up, I saw Sheen outside the door—knowing she was her companion, I took her in, and asked the prosecutor if he knew her—he said "No," and she was let go, and taken again next morning.

GEORGE HAINES re-examined. This is my watch, chain and seal, and this is my pocket, which was torn out with the money in it.

Ragan's Defence. On Saturday morning Watson's brother asked me to

take his sister's breakfast to the station, and I did; and seeing me outside with her brother, they took me.

WATSON— GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Two Years.

SHEEN and RAGAN— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2385

2385. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously assaulting John Brown, on the 10th of July, and cutting and wounding him on the left side of the forehead, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN BROWN . I am a seaman, and live at Shadwell—I am not related to the prisoner—I have no vessel at present—I did belong to the Symmetry, of Scarborough, which is gone to Ceylon On Sunday night, the 10th of July, she was lying in the West India Docks, going to sail on the Tuesday following—I was coming down the Match-walk—the prisoner was at his own house, which is a brothel—I was saying something to a young woman, and he and another took her cause up, and beat and ill-used me—I was not quarrelling with the girl, I was a little in liquor, and said something out of the way to her—he took her part—I was knocked down, beaten, and kicked by the prisoner, and, I believe, somebody else—I am certain he is the man—I went away and went into a house, and in about an hour came back again to the Match-walk, to seek recompense for being insulted, to find the prisoner again, to see if he would fight me—he was standing inside his door—he called me to him—I was more sober then, but not exactly sober—he said, "Come in, come in"—I went to put my foot in, and he struck me on the head with a poker, which he had in his hand at the time—it laid my head open—I fell senseless, and was taken away quite insensible to the London Hospital.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you cross over to my house, force the door open, and come in? A. It is false—I had pulled my shirt off the first time—it was torn off me at the first commencement of it—I might have said, "Come out, you b—son of a b—," but the door was open—I stood in the road, and you called me to you—I did not step inside the door with ten or a dozen more following me—you said, "I will give it to the b—if he comes near me, I will put him past ever going in a ship"—I had no comrades with me—there might have been people looking on, but they were no acquaintances of mine—I saw no one enter the house before I was struck with the poker.

WILLIAM SWADLING . I live in the Match-walk. I was potman at the Albion public-house at the time in question-about six o'clock in the evening I came up the street, saw a mob of people, and saw the prosecutor in the street with his shirt almost torn off him, and his nose bleeding "—I saw him again at near eight o'clock, standing in the road, and a mob of people round—the prisoner was beckoning to him to come in—the prosecutor was very much in liquor—he was in a passion—he made a step in, and as soon as he got one step in, the prisoner rose the poker from behind him, and struck him right on the head—he stood for about a minute, and then fell down—I carried him to the doctor—the people thought he was dead—he could not hold his head up—he had no life in him.

Prisoner. Q. Was not you one that followed him into my house? A. No—I had no acquaintance with the prosecutor.

JAMES MALIN . I am a policeman. I was called for between eight and nine o'clock on Sunday night, the 10th of July, to Match-walk—I

found the prisoner standing on the stairs—two or three people said, "That is the man who struck him with the poker"—I asked the prisoner How he came to strike the man with the poker—he replied, "I had a row with him a little while ago, he came back to my house again, and I did strike him with the poker"—I took him into custody, searched the room, and found this poker—the prisoner said, "That is the poker that I struck him with"—I saw the prosecutor afterwards at the station bleeding very much from a wound in the head—he appeared almost in a state of stupidity from loss of blood—he was sent to the hospital.

Prisoner. Q. Did not a man named Taylor come from my house for assistance to clear the mob away? A. I was called to the house by several people.

JOHN JONES DA VIES . I am a licentiate of the Apothecaries' Company, About nine or ten o'clock on the night in question, I saw the prosecutor at the London Hospital—he was bleeding from the effects of a contused wound, on the left side of the forehead, an inch long and a quarter of an inch deep—he was tolerably sensible then—the wound was caused by considerable violence I should think—this poker might have produced it—it was not attended with any immediate danger-dangerous consequences might have come on—I should not call it a dangerous wound.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor had insulted his housekeeper, who stood at the door, and that an affray afterwards took place, as would be proved by his witnesses.)

SARAH POOL . I am single. I keep the prisoner's house—On Sunday evening, between seven and eight o'clock, I was sitting outside the door, the prosecutor came up, shook his fist at me, made use of very ill language, and told me to take his "smock" off—I did not make any answer—the prisoner asked him who he meant—he said, "You, if you think proper"—he crossed to the prisoner, threw his jacket off, and threw it through the square of glass of a neighbour's window—he then came across again to the prisoner, and struck at him—I cannot say whether he hit him or not—the prisoner returned the blow—a policeman was passing, and took the prosecutor home—he remained at home nearly three-quarters of an hour—I shut up the shop, and the prisoner shut the door—we both remained inside—the prosecutor came again, rapped at the shutters, and a mob with him thrust the door open—I stood at the door endeavouring to keep it to, but they pushed me back into the passage, and kept me there while they went to the prisoner within the shop door—they had pushed the outer door then, and were inside—there were eight or nine or more—whit passed then I could not swear—I was not near enough to see—I did not see the prosecutor struck, but I saw him go away—he went away by himself—the prisoner sent for the police, and they took him instead of the prosecutor.

MARY BENNETT . I lodge in the prisoner's house. I was in the house on the night in question-about six or seven o'clock, the prosecutor and prisoner came to blows about a young woman—the prosecutor was then taken home—he returned in about half an hour, and a great many with him—they came into the passage of the prisoner's house, and just inside the shop door—I did not see the prosecutor inside—I should say about twenty people came in, if not more—I cannot tell what happened—as soon as the mob came in I went out.

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Twelve Months.

Third Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420822-2386

2386. JANE BROWNJOHN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, at St. Clement Danes, 2 trunks, value 1l. 12s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 7s.; 1 parasol, value 8s.; 1 pail, value 5s.; 4 shawls, value 3l. 10s.; 1 pair of stays, value 9s.; 3 aprons, value 3s.; 1 scarf, value 15s.; 2 petticoats, value 6s.; 1 bedgown, value 4s.; 1 table-cloth, value 4s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 2 towels, value 1s.; 6 gowns, value 3l.; 29 yards of mouslin de laine, value 15s.; 10 handkerchiefs, value 9s.; 14 pairs of stockings, value 18s.; 4 caps, value 10s.; 1 bonnet, value 1l.; 19 yards of lace, value 1l.; 1 watch, value 4l., and 1 sovereign, the property of Mary Webb.

MARY WEBB . I live in Stanhope-street, Clare-market. The prisoner lodged with me—On the 19th of July, I went out leaving her in charge of my house—On returning at seven o'clock in the evening she was gone, and I missed from my room every article of wearing apparel—I consider my loss above 20l.—I have seen it since at Bow-street.

HARRIET CROFT . I am fourteen years old, and life in Cabel-yard, opposite Clare-market. I am servant to a person who lodged in the same house as Mrs. Webb—as I was going down the stairs, I saw the prisoner by the side of the boxes, near the kitchen stairs in the passage—She carried the black box, and a man carried the other two out, corded up.

WILLIAM KETTLE . I am in the service of George Renton, a pawn-broker, in Holborn. On the 19th of July, the prisoner pawned six gowns, one shawl, and a remnant of mouslin de laine for 1l. 7s. 6d.

JOHN HARRIS . I was in the service of Mr. Venn, of Stanhope-street—I produce a parcel of goods—the person who took them in has left.

CHARLES WALKER . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner at a house in Turnstile, Holborn, about eight o'clock, on the evening of the 19th of July; I found two trunks in her rooms containing wearing apparel.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe you found a considerable quantity of the property safe? A. Yes, and some articles of the prisoner's—She said she was very sorry.

MRS. WEBB re-examined. All these articles are mine.

(The prisoner's father stated, that she had been seduced and afterwards deserted.)

GUILTY.—Strongly recommended to mercy .— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2387

2387. DANIEL HARRIGAN was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously assaulting Ellen Harrigan, on the 26th of July, and cutting and wounding her in and upon the head and forehead, with intent to do her some grievous bodily harm.

HANNAH WHYNESS . I Knew the prisoner's wife, Ellen Harrigan—they lived together at No. 16, Sophia-street—She lived with me six weeks before this happened, but not at the time—She is not here.

HONORAH DUIG . On Tuesday the 26th of July, at half-past six o'clock, the prisoner came home to 16, Sophia-street, where I live—his wife was at Mr. Baron's house over the way, which is a bad house—She was rather drunk—I went and called her over to give him his tea—She seemed to use very bad language to him—She asked if he would have his tea—he said he would take his tea when he wanted it—She knocked the things about, and he got his tea himself—he went with his pipe to the street door, and she went over to Baron's again, till half-past ten o'clock—I fetched

her home—She came back and used very bad language to him—She said she had had no tea or supper—he said, "You can have some"—he put the meat and bread down to her—She said, "Cut me some"—he said, "Cut it yourself"—She said, "I don't want any of this stuff"—She had a knife in her hand—She used very provoking language to him, not fit to be used—he said, "Do you mean what you say?"—She said, "Yet, I do you b—s—t"—he took the meat off the table—took the chair and struck her violently—I went out—I did not see him use the poker—Baron's is a bad house—She was constantly going there.

HANNAH WHYNESS re-examined. I saw the prisoner's wife after the prisoner had left the house—She was bleeding a little from the head, but not in a very bad state—I did not see him do any thing to her.

JOHN BRENCHLEY . I am a policeman. I saw the prisoner's wife, and went after the prisoner, who had escaped—Dr. Tatham came and dressed his wife's wound—I took the prisoner into custody afterwards—he jumped up, and struck me in the mouth, and threatened me several times, but I kept him off till the inspector came to assist me.

Prisoner. He laid hold of my collar; I pulled myself away from him, but never struck him, to my knowledge, but told him to let me go quietly.

FREDERICK DONALD HOWELL . I am a pupil at the London Hospital. The prosecutrix was brought there, with two severe contused wounds on her head, such as a blunt instrument would produce—the leg of a chair might make them—that would not produce immediate danger—they were not very severe—they were each about an inch long, and penetrated to the bone of the head—one was on the forehead, and the other on the back part of the head—there was no blood when she was brought in—they had been dressed—She was in the hospital a week, which was necessary.

Prisoner. I do not know that I used the chair at all; she fell down; I never struck her.

GUILTY of an Assault. Aged 30.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2388

2388. JOHN NORMAN and LOUISA MIDDLETON were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Bunn, on the 14th of August, putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person, and against his will, 3 shillings and 3 sixpences, his monies; and immediately before, at the time of, and after the said robbery, feloniously beating, striking, and using other personal violence towards him.

JAMES BUNN . I live at No. 8, Raven-row, Mile-end Turnpike. On the afternoon of the 14th of August I was crossing up Vinegar-lane, coming home, with my coat over my arm—I saw the prisoner Middleton and another woman—the female with her asked if I would stand some gin—before I had time to speak, Middleton shoved me into the house where they live—I was seized by the throat by Norman, who pushed me down, put his hand to my throat, and grasped it so that I could hardly speak, and took from my right-hand pocket 4s. 6d.—he said if I said a word he would cut my throat—as soon as I got from him I was shoved out into the street on the pavement, and my hat was thrown out after me—my neck was very much scratched.

Norman. Q. Can you positively swear you met me in the passage when you entered the house? A. I was shoved down into the passage by the women—I did not see you till you laid hold of my throat—I did not see you in the passage.

Norman. Nobody could have pushed him; Middleton was in the kitchen, and I ran up stairs when I heard the noise.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What are you? A. A newsvender—I was coming home from ray work—there were two women—it is a thoroughfare—I was pushed into the house—I never saw either of the prisoners before—I did not go into any house with a girl—I did not offer any girl any money to go up stairs with roe—I did not go up stairs with one—(looking at Elizabeth Wilson)—I never saw her before, to my knowledge—I will swear I did not see her on that occasion—I did not see her standing at a window that day, nor did I say I would give her sixpence to go up stairs with me—(looking at Jane Conley)—that girl was close by the door—it was not her that pushed me down—I did not go anywhere with her, I swear that—(looking at Martha Brown)—that is the woman who asked me to stand treat—she was by the window—I had had a share of two or three pints of beer that day—I was not the worse for it—I was as sober as I am now.

CHARLES POTTER (police-constable K 212.) I accompanied that prosecutor and Pavitt to the prisoners' house in Vinegar-lane—it is a brothel—Middleton keeps it—I went into the back yard, and another constable stood looking over—I got into the garden—I found Norman in the next garden, with this dinner knife—I asked why he raft away—he said he did not know—I took him into custody—the prosecutor charged him with robbing him of three shillings and three sixpences—he said he knew nothing of it, that the man had been up stairs with a young woman, that they had been fighting up there, and broken some of the chairs—I went up stairs—there were no chairs broken—there was a little grace on the wall—I cannot say whether that was fresh done.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say he had been scraping potatoes with the knife? A. Yes—2d. was found on him.

GEORGE PAVITT . I am a policeman. I went with Potter and the prosecutor to the prisoner's house—I went to the Two Markers, in the lane. and found Middleton—she said she would come with me—it was about three o'clock—the prosecutor had been drinking, but was not drunk.

Cross-examined. Q. They said at the time he had been in the house with a girl, and offered sixpence? A. Yes—Middleton said before she saw the man, that the prosecutor had been up is a room with a girl, and offered her sixpence, that she came down to her with the sixpence, and that Middleton told her she bad better go up and get the man down out of the house.

Norman's Defence. I was up stairs, lying down, and he entered the room with Jane Conley; I heard footsteps coming up stairs, but did not see them, and did not meddle with them; after entering the room, he presented sixpence to the female to go with him; she would not comply with his wishes, and he commenced abusing her; when I heard the expressions, I came forward—I stood at the door, and said, "Halloo, shipmate, what is all this?" I entered the room; he immediately got off his chair, struck me, and said, "I will knock your d—black head off;" I said, "That is impossible;" I struck him; he struck me again, and, in my own defence, I collared him, and no doubt scratched him in doing to; after I got him out of the door to the top of the stairs, I said, "Be off, you have no business in the house;" he walked down stairs, and in the passage he met Middleton's son Tom, struck him in the temple, and knocked him down; he walked out at the door; he was not thrown out; I never touched a farthing of his money.

JAMES BUNN re-examined. I did not go up stairs—I was not on a chair—I did not strike him, nor did I offer a woman sixpence—I was shoved out

into the street—I saw Tom, as they call him, with some people, the other day, when they came and offered me 5l. not to come here—Middleton's mother was with them—the prisoner struck me three or four times in the face, and it was swollen.

ELIZABETH WILSON . I live next door to Mrs. Middleton. Between one and two o'clock on the day in question I was standing at Mrs. Middleton's window, when the prosecutor came up—he said to me, "I will give you sixpence if you will go in doors with me"—I said, "Young man, you are not aware that I am a married woman"—he said, "Will you take any thing to drink?"—I said, "No, Sir, I thank you, I drink with no mankind but my husband"—I was in the street at the time, standing against Mrs. Middleton's window—Jane Conley was sitting outside on the window ledge—he then offered her sixpence to go in-doors, and he went in to Mrs. Middleton's house with her—Mrs. Middleton was in her own kitchen at the time, providing for her dinner—I could see her from the passage—I afterwards heard a noise, but saw nothing happen—Mrs. Middleton was still down stairs in the kitchen.

COURT. Q. Did you hear the prosecutor offer Conley sixpence? A. Yes, and he told me he had no more than sixpence about him—I walked into the passage after Conley, and the prosecutor went up stairs, and any body can see into the kitchen from the passage—Mrs. Middleton was cutting up some meat—she had a mug of beer, and asked me if I would drink a drop—I thought it no harm to drink with her as a neighbour—I heard a noise up stairs, I did not wait to see the end of it—I did not see Norman—Middleton never came out of the kitchen while I was there—the prosecutor was there, I dare say nearly half-an-hour.

JANE CONLEY . I live at home with my father. I was sitting on Mrs. Middleton's window-ledge—the prosecutor asked me if I would take any thing to drink—I said, "No; I see you are intoxicated, so I won't"—I walked off the window-ledge, and said no more—he followed me up stairs, and when we got up stairs, he gave a sixpence into my hand—he staid up stairs a quarter of an hour, as near as I can recollect—he sat on the chair a good bit talking to me—he kicked up a terrible piece of work, and knocked the things about—Mrs. Middleton bearing the noise, came up stairs—he made use of very bad language, and offered to strike her, because she ordered him out of the room—Norman, hearing the piece of work, came, in, and went to part them—he up with his fist, and struck Norman three times—Norman never returned it till he was struck three times—he then struck him again.

COURT. Q. What was the quarrel about? A. About the sixpence—I refused to be with him, and then he wanted to strike me, and began knocking the things about—he said he would not go out till he had broken every thing in the house—he did not break any thing, but he would have done it, if they had not come and hindered him.

MARTHA BROWN . I remember the prosecutor coming to Mrs. Middleton's house, she was sitting in the kitchen, cutting up some meat for dinner—he followed Jane Conley in—I was in the kitchen—I had come in to hang out some things to air—I am servant to Mrs. Middleton—Wilson came in, and drank some beer—I afterwards heard a disturbance, and went up stairs with Mrs. Middleton—we found the prosecutor, Conley, and Norman there—the prosecutor struck Norman three times, and then there was a great scuffling between them—Middleton did not take a farthing

of the prosecutor's money, nor did she hold him down while any was taken from him—she did not push him into the house—she was in the kitchen.

COURT. Q. What became of Wilson? A. She went out directly she had drunk the beer—Mrs. Middleton gave it to her in the kitchen—this is a respectable house, girls and men lodge there—it is a common brothel.

JAMES BUNN re-examined. I work for my father, and carry out papers—I had 7s. in my waistcoat pocket—Norman only took 4s. 6d. out—I saved the remainder, by pulling my arm up to my pocket—it was all in one pocket—my pocket was torn—I was going home, after having delivered livered ray papers, and this was money I had received—I do not usually go down Vinegar-lane, but I had forgotten a paper at one place, and Vinegar-lane was a near cut for me—the witness Brown is the woman that assisted Middleton in pushing me into the house.

MARTHA BROWN re-examined. I was not near the door of the house, I was in the kitchen—he asked me How I was—I told him I was quite well, and thanked him—he did not know me—I went into the kitchen for some pins, which I had left on the kitchen-table—I was at the back-yard-door when the prosecutor came in, and asked me How I did—he came in and asked me How I did—he came into the kitchen.

NORMAN— GUILTY . Aged 41.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

MIDDLETON†— GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined Three Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2389

2389. JANE COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 13s., and 1 10l. Bank-note, the property of John Lumsden, from his person; and JOHN COLE , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN LUMSDEN . I am a gardener, and live at Twickenham. On the 1st of August I went to Orleans-house, at Twickenham, to see Mr. Kinghorn—it is a gentleman's house—he paid me a 10l. Bank of England note, and afterwards went with me to the Rising Sun, near Sandcome-lane, about six o'clock in the evening—I had refreshment there, and remained till about nine—I paid for what I had by changing a sovereign—I left my friend there—I had occasion to go out—I met the female prisoner near the house, and walked up Sandcome-lane with her, and * * * * * I had the 10l. note and the silver which I had received in change in my left-hand breeches' pocket—I was not on the ground—the prisoner said, "There is a policeman" and ran away—I lost sight of her—when I afterwards went to pay for something further at the public-house, I missed my silver, and the 10l. note—I gave information of my loss to the person I was with, and also to the police—I had noticed the name of Symonds on the note, and "1-7-42" written along the middle—I am sure the female prisoner is the woman I was with—she did not stay to make any demand for any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Is Mr. Kinghorn here? A. He is here, but not as a witness—he was not bound over—I suppose he has come to hear the trial—I received the 10l. note from him as a loan—I received nothing but the note—I never said that I received a sovereign besides the note from him—I merely staid at Mr. Kinghorn's while he prepared himself to take a walk with me—I did not drink anything' there—his house is about a quarter of a mile from the Rising Sun—I was perfectly sober—I was there three hours in the house and in the gardens—I drank a little ale, nothing else—I came out of the house to obey a call of

nature, and then went with this girl—I am not in the habit of doing such things—I am single—I had not known her before—I did not agree to give her anything—my silver was loose, in the same pocket with my note—it was safe when I left the house—I felt it in my pocket as I adjusted my dress—if it had fallen out of my pocket while I was with the girl, I should have heard the silver—I did not bear or feel it taken—my trowsers were not down—I noticed the marks on the note when I received it—I amused myself by reading the note while he prepared himself to go out—I saw the name of "Symonds," and "1-7-42" written lengthways along the middle of the note—I swear that I noticed those figures then—I told the Magistrate that—I saw the note produced at Brentford, before the Magistrate—I said I believed it was mine—I wrote down the description of it, and gave it to the officer.

KINGSTON MARK . I am a police-sergeant. I was on duty at the Rising Sun—the prosecutor came and stated what had occurred, and gave me a paper, showing what was on the note he had lost—he said he was with a girl, but did not describe her—he did not know her, but one of my met had seen her, and I handed the paper over to sergeant Allaway, with directions to take the girl—I saw her when she was taken—she denied knowing the man, but on the road to Brentford she told me she knew the man, and she acknowledged that she had been with him that night.

WILLIAM ALLAWAY (police-sergeant V 34.) I went to the Eight Bells at Twickenham, about one o'clock in the morning, and found the female prisoner in the tap-room with her brother—the male prisoner is her father—I took her into the bar, and told her I wanted her about a 10l. note that she had stolen from a man in Sandcome-lane that night—she opened her hand, showed me 18d., and said, "That is all the money I have got, I pawned a gown to-day for 2s.; I spent 6d., and there is the remainder, and I have not been home this evening"—as I was taking her to the station, we passed within 200 or 300 yards of the place where the robbery happened, and she said, "I have not been this far for this month past"—we met Hill, the policeman, on the beat, and he identified her as having been with the prosecutor that night—she said, "Who did you see with me?"—he said, "There was nobody with you when I first saw you, but I afterwards saw you with Mr. Lumsden"—she then said, "I know I was there"—she was searched at the station, but nothing found on her—I took the brother into custody, but there was no evidence against him, and he was discharged—I took the male prisoner on the following Thursday.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever say before to-day, that she said she had not been in that part for a month? A. I did—I said it before the Magistrate on two examinations—her father is a basket-maker at Twickenham.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am a clothes-dealer, and live in Webb's-lane, Hammersmith. The male prisoner came to my house on Tuesday morning between ten and eleven, to buy a coat—he gave me a 10l. note—I went over to Mr. Rimell's, and got it changed—he told me he had come from Mr. Phillips, of Turnham-green, and I knew Mr. Phillips to be a very respectable man—our place is about six miles from where the prisoner lives—I wrote my name on the note he gave me—this now produced is it—here is my writing on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Hammersmith on the road to Twickenham? A. On the road to Brentford—you can go through Brentford to Twickenham

—I asked him his address—he said he lived at the foot of Twickenham-bridge—that is not where he lives—he lives down by the water-side—I do not know the place—he gave his right name.

MARTHA RIMELL . I changed this note for Martin.

JOHN LUMSDEN re-examined. This is the note—I know it by the name, "Symonds," and the figures "1-7-42" on it, and it it signed "Stoke"—this is the paper I gave Marks—the number is not on it—I did not pay attention to the number, but I remembered the name, the date, and the banker's clerk's name at the bottom—the "1-7-42" is on it—that signifies the date—I swear positively this is my note—when it was first shown to me, I said I believed it to be mine—I said I should not like to swear to it, not knowing the number—they said that was of no consequence, if I could identify it by the signature.

HENRY HILL . I am a policeman. I saw the prosecutor and prisoner speaking together on this evening, near the public-house—I did not notice the way they went.

NOT GUILTY .

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18420822-2390

2390. ELIZABETH CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July, 1 watch, value 9l. 9s.; and 1 watch-hook, value 5s.; the goods of Sarah Robinson Stallybrass, from her person; and SUSAN LEE , for feloniously receiving the some, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

SARAH ROBINSON STALLTBRASS . I am the daughter of Edward Stallybrass. On the 27th of July I went from Denmark-street, Cannon-street-road, to my house in Stepney—I had a watch at my side, annexed to a guard-chain—when I arrived at home it was gone—how it went I cannot tell—I could not have dropped it—the chain was out—this is the watch and guard—(produced)—I had a hook, which was taken with it—it must have been unhooked as well as cut.

EDWARD STALLYBRASS . I am the witness's father. I remember her coming home without her watch—a person named M'Carthy came to me, and in consequence of what she said, I went with Prout on the 29th to the prisoner Lee's house, in Rosemary-lane, and taw her—we said we bad come about a watch which had been lost, and which we understood was there—she said, "I know nothing about a watch, no watch has come here"—we told her we had evidence that it was there, and it was vain for her to deny it, would she produce it?—she turned pale, immediately went up stairs, and in a very short time brought it down—she said two women had brought it, one of whom had given it to her, and had received 30s. for it, with a promise of more in case the owner should not appear.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you say one word before the Magistrate about two women bringing it? A. That was the case, whether I did or not—I cannot say whether she said "in case the owner should not be found," instead of "not appearing"—I swore before the Magistrate that those were her words, to the best of my recollection—(looking at his deposition)—This is my writing—(reads)—"If the watch should not be inquired after, or the owner not found"—that is the purport of what I now say—there may be a verbal difference, I do not recollect the exact words.

EBENEZER PROUT . I am the brother-in-law of last witness. I examined the guard very shortly after Miss Stallybrass came home—it had

the appearance of having been cut—I afterwards went to Lee's house—I said, "We are come respecting a watch that you bought yesterday," or words to that purport—I think her expression was "Watch," or "what watch? I know nothing of any watch"—I said, "It is of no use for you to deny it, because we have evidence that you have bought a watch"—she again denied it very strongly—I again said, in rather a stern tone, "Now it is no use denying it, we have evidence to prove that you have got a watch"—she immediately changed colour, and said, "The women told me that they had found the watch"—I said, "Never mind what they told you, the watch is stolen, and you must produce it"—she then went up stairs, and brought it down—she said she gave 30s. for it—her husband keeps the house—he came in some time afterwards.

JAMES EALES (police-constable H 14.) I went with Mr. Prout and Mr. Stallybrass to Lee's house, and took her into custody—it is a marinestore shop—there are no watches or jewellery in the window—Connor said before the Magistrate that she found the watch.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not she say that she had picked it up in the Commercial-road? A. Yes—Lee said that two women had come with the watch—I asked her who they were—she said one was a washerwoman, and the younger one, that came with her, said it was her aunt, and that the had picked it up.

PIERCE DRISCOLL (police-constable, H 24.) I took Connor into custody—she was drunk—she said she knew nothing of a watch, and was not in Rosemary-lane that day—next day she said that she found it—Lee was admitted to bail.

MR. PHILLIPS called.

ELIZABETH LEE . I am the prisoner's daughter. I remember two persons coming to my mother's house—I knew one of them, because I have a servant living with us who knew her—she is not here—they brought the watch, and said they had picked it up, and asked if mother would lend 30s., and keep it till a reward was offered—and my mother kept it—if the owner was found, she was to give it up for the reward.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2391

2391. WILLIAM DAVIS and BENJAMIN RAYBOULD were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August, 22lbs. weight of silk, value 32l. the goods of John Henry Machu, their master.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN HENRY MACHU . I live at Lower Tulse-hill, Brixton, and carry on the business of a silk trimming-manufacturer in Twister's-alley, Bunhill-row. The two prisoners were apprenticed to me from the parish—I had 5l. premium with each—their time was very nearly out—they slept in the warehouse, for the protection of the place—in consequence of suspicions I entertained, I desired my foreman to obtain officers to watch them—some silk was afterwards produced to me, which I identified—it is worth 31l. odd.

JAMES CARTER . I am foreman to Mr. Machu. In consequence of directions I received, I spoke to the police on the 6th of August, and on Sunday, the 7th, I met two policemen in Bunhill-row, and took them into the private house attached to the warehouse of the manufactory, to wait—at six o'clock in the morning I concealed myself with them, and about eight

I saw the two prisoners come from the warehouse passage—they went directly into the street, and shut the door after them—one policeman followed each, and took them—the silk produced is my master's.

JAMES HAYWARD (police-constable G 212.) I was one of the officers on the prosecutor's premises on this Sunday morning, I followed Davis, took him, and told him he was an apprentice of Mr. Machu—he said, "I am"—I said, "I am an officer, I suspect you have stolen property in your possession"—he said, "What, me?"—I said, "Yes, I must take you to the station"—I took him there, searched him, and found a quantity of silk concealed next to his skin, some in his pocket, and some in his hat—I found a skeleton key in his waistcoat-pocket, which I tried to the warehouse-door, and it opened it freely.

ROBERT COLE (police-constable G 193.) I went to Mr. Macho's premises, and took Raybould—I asked him whether he was an apprentice of Mr. Machu's—he said yes—I told him I was a policeman, and in consequence of information I had received, I suspected he had stolen property in his possession, and he must come to the station—he said, "For God's sake don't take me, if you do I am afraid I shall be sent out of the country; I have been led into it by others', but I ought to have known better; it serves me right"—I found some property concealed inside his trousers, rolled round his thighs, and some in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAVIS— GUILTY . Aged 20.

RAYBOULD— GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2392

2392. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 1 pair of boots, value 2s. 6d.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 knife, value 6d.; the goods of Charles Sermon; and 30 printed cards, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of William Emslie, his master.

WILLIAM EMSLIE . I am a copper-plate printer, and live in Cloth Fair, Smithfield—the prisoner was my apprentice. On the 26th of July, a little before seven o'clock, he got up, and left my house—he had no business to go—the waistcoat and boots belong to my lad, and I missed the cards—the officer brought him to me—they are mine.

CHARLES SERMON . These boots and waistcoat are mine—I lost them from Mr. Emslie's house, on the morning of the 26th.

JAMES DORMAN . I am a policeman. I found the prisoner on the night of the 27th of July, lying down on the step of a door in Old-street-road, with these articles on him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2393

2393. HENRY ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 2 beds, value 5l.; 2 bolsters, value 10s.; 4 pillows, value 12s.; 9 blankets, value 18s.; 2 counterpanes, value 10s.; and 4 sheets, value 6s.; the goods of Edward Edwards Sides.

EDWARD EDWARDS SYDES . I live in William-street, Cannon-street-road. On the 16th of July I lived in York-street, Commercial-road. I had occasion to move, and employed a man named William Lemon to move my things—among them were two feather beds, two bolsters, six pillows, and nine blankets, which I have missed—the two beds are here—I can speak positively to their being part of the things removed—I never sent the prisoner to move the things.

Prisoner. Q. Do not you recollect my bringing up a French bedstead to your house? A. You did—I let you into the house I was removing to—I kept a house in a street near Burton-crescent—I never had a half-penny reward offered for my apprehension—I did not abscond or go out of London for three years—I did not abscond from my bail—you came to Clerkenwell to see me—I was indicted—I had gay ladies lodgers, and the whole neighbourhood was indicted—that is three years ago—I have known you a long time.

WILLIAM LEMON . I assisted in carrying these things. The prisoner came up to me, and said, "I am sent by Mr. Sides to move the things"—I said, "Very well"—he said it would be best to have two trucks, it would not take so many journeys—I said, "Very well"—we got one truck, and rolled up the bed, sheet, blanket, and such like things, and took a load away as far as William-street, where I had to get another truck—he said, "By the time you are bringing another load I shall bring back the empty truck"—I never saw him again till at the office.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not at the house all night? A. Yes, you slept there—I do not recollect your taking part of a bedstead.

JOHN DENNIS . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner. I told him he was taken for robbery—when he got to Bow-street, he said it was his own property—I went to the pawnbroker's, and found these beds.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2394

2394. HENRY MILLER was indicted for embezzlement.

JAMES RICKMAN . I am a grocer, in Newcastle-place, Edgeware-road. The prisoner was one of my porters—it was his duty to receive money, and pay it to me—if he received 7s. 10d. from Lucy Lenere, on the 27th of July, he has not paid me—he ought to have done so.

Cross-examined by MR. LUCAS. Q. Did you ask him to account for it? A. I was not aware of it till the next week—he never told me he had received it—he ought to have paid it the same day, and entered it in the cash-book when he came home—he always did so when he received money—he once received two small bills before, and did not enter it, but when the parties were applied to for the money it was found out, and he accounted for that—it was his place to put the money down in the book—he ought to give the money to me or Mrs. Rickman, after he puts it in the cash-book—he does not put it into the drawer.

LUCY LENERE . I am servant to Mrs. Corton, of Shepherd's-bush. On the 27th of July I paid the prisoner 7s. 10d. for the prosecutor—I have the bill.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2395

2395. WILLIAM WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July, 10lbs. weight of lead, value 2s.; and 1 metal cock, value 4s.; the goods of William Bell, and fixed to a building.

WILLIAM BELL . I am a builder, and live in Warren-street, Pimlico. On the 31st of July I missed 10lbs. of lead and a metal cock—I believe these now produced to be mine—they fit.

BENJAMIN BOLTON (police-constable D 7.) I was at the station when the prisoner was brought in—he was sitting on a form—while the constable

turned his back he took the lead from under his flannel jacket, and put it behind the shutter, where I found it.

JAMES CRAMP . I am a policeman. On the 31st of July I found the prisoner in Denby-street, Pimlico—I found this cock in his pocket.

Prisoner. I went into the building for a particular purpose, and as I came out I found the cock and the lead.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2396

2396. ELIZA JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August, 1 half-crown, the monies of William Percy, from his person.

WILLIAM PERCY , I am a smith, and live in Windsor-street, Bishopsgate-street. On the night of the 21st of August I came out of a public-house in Chiswell-street—the prisoner came up to me, and took a half-sovereign out of my pocket—I seized her hand, took it from her, and gave her into custody—I did not owe her any money, nor promise to give her any.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. She came up and had a little talk with you? A. She said something too indelicate to repeat—I told her to keep off—I did not feel her hand in my pocket, but saw it come out—it was my right-hand waistcoat pocket—she had only just got the half-sovereign in her hand—it was hardly out of my pocket—she gave it up very quietly—she said she had dons no such thing, she did not intend to rob me, and told the policeman so.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2397

2397. THOMAS COX was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August, 2lbs. weight of tin, value 1s., the goods of George Simpson and another, his masters.

GEORGE SIMPSON . I am a tin foil and pewter manufacturer, and have one partner—I live in Union-buildings, Leather-lane, Holborn. The prisoner was in my employment—I watched him, went in pursuit of him to Old-street, and found hint in a snap in Branston-street—I went with a policeman, searched him, and found these six pieces of tin on him, which are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. He has been a long time in your employment? A. Between five and six years—I had no reason to suspect him before—these are pieces used for his work—they are not perquisites—they have no pretence for considering it so—they would not be wrapped up in this way in the business—he most have wrapped them up so—they are the cuttings off of the work, and worth 10d. a pound—there are two pounds of it.

THOMAS PHILPOT . I am a policeman. I saw the tin found on the prisoner.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 45.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2398

2398. WILLIAM SHIRLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August, 1 coat, value 1l. 10s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of William Baker.

WILLIAM BAKER . I live in Allen-street, Clerkenwell—the prisoner was my father's apprentice. On Thursday, August the 18th, I lost my coat and handkerchief from my bed-room—these now produced are them.

SAMUEL GORDON . I am shopman to Mr. Walker, a pawnbroker, of St. John-street. The coat was pledged by the prisoner on the 18th.

Prisoners Defence. I took it because I had not enough to eat, and he told me to go out of his house.

WILLIAM BAKER re-examined. He had sufficient—he never complained.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2399

2399. RICHARD WAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August, 1 pair of gloves, value 2s. 9d.; 1 pair of socks, value 1s. 6d.; and 13 collars, value 7s. 6d.; the goods of Luke Cherry and another, his masters.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

LUKE CHERRY . I am in partnership with Ebenezer Cherry, as linen-drapers, in Goswell-road. The prisoner bad been our shopman about twelve months—he first had 35l. a year, and afterwards 40l. and his board—on Friday evening, the 19th of August, he had permission to go out, and was to return at eleven o'clock—he did not return that night or the next—in consequence of suspicions, while he was absent I examined some clothes of his in his bed-room, and in the coat pocket I found a letter, a duplicate, and these two pairs of gloves—one pair is ours—the prisoner purchased things in the shop, and bad an account kept—I found two pairs of socks in a closet in his room, one pair of which I believe to be ours—I have the prisoner's account here—neither the gloves or socks appear in that—he came home about nine o'clock on Sunday morning, but I did not see him till between twelve and one on Monday—he then presented his account—I said, "Did not you have a pair of drab silk gloves on Saturday night week?"—he said, "No, they were lavender," that the drab pair he had of his friend, who was waiting outside—these are the drab pair—he went to speak to the person at the door, who afterwards came in—I do not remember that he mentioned his name—I requested him to leave the shop, which he ultimately did—I went with the prisoner to the station, and gave him in charge, and this person followed us there—he was also waiting at the police-office when we went in, but when I came out he was gone—the Magistrate inquired in the prisoner's presence who that person was—the prisoner did not say what his name was—I afterwards went with the prisoner to his father's house, in Collier-street, Pentonville, and asked the father to show us the prisoner's box, which he did, and in it we found thirteen collars, a shirt front, and a pair of trowsers—he said the collars were his before he came into our service—there is nothing in his account for collars—some of the collars had been washed, but there was one which had not been washed—it had been worn—this is it—I have not the least doubt it is my property—here is our private mark on it "D V" and two strokes, which signify a halfpenny—there are two other collars of the same pattern—I purchased a dozen of these collars of Brettel and Co., in Wood-street, last week—I have examined my stock, and find three of those collars gone—the three found in the prisoner's box account for the dozen.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was the prisoner let go on his own recognizance on the first examination, to come up again? A. Yes—he made out his account, making himself 2l. 3s. 9d. in debt to us.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2400

2400. SARAH HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August, 2 boxes, value 1s.; loz. weight of sealing-wax, value 1d.; 1/2 lb. weight of sugar, value 3d.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-sovereign, 5 shillings, 6 sixpences, 1 groat, and 12 pence; the property of John Goulston: and ANN ELIZABETH GARDINER , and CAROLINE BAKER , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

FRANCES GOULSTON . I am the wife of John Goulston, a sealing-wax maker, in Penton-street, Commercial-road—Hill was my servant. On the afternoon of the 14th of August she went away—I missed the property stated—among the money found there is one fourpenny-piece which I am able to swear is mine, and this is my box.

JOHN GOULSTON . I can speak to the fourpenny-piece, the box, and the sealing-wax.

JAMES COOPER (City police-constable, No 627.) I took Hill and Gardiner into custody—Hill said she had taken the box, and given it to Gardiner, and Gardiner said she had given it to Baker—Baker was not present—this box was given to me by one of the inmates of the workhouse, of which Baker and Gardiner were both inhabitants—the sealing-wax was found on Baker.

Gardiner's Defence. I went out with Hill for a holiday; she had the box under her arm when I met her; we went to Barbican, opened it, and it contained one shilling, two sixpences, and 4d. in halfpence—we met Baker, and Hill told me to give the money to her, which I did, and left; we are all to blame alike.

Baker's Defence. Hill gave me the sealing-wax.

HILL— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

GARDINER— GUILTY. Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Ten Days.

BAKER— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2401

2401. ROBERT FIELDING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August, 1 wooden bowl, value 1d.; 2 shillings, 2 sixpences, 1 groat, 2 pence, 4 halfpence, and 1 farthing; the property of James Price.

SUSANNAH PRICE . I am the wife of James Price, of Holloway-road, About eleven o'clock in the morning of the 17th of August, I was at the back of the house—I came into the shop, and there found the prisoner—I looked at the till—the bowl and silver were gone from it, and the empty bowl was under the counter—I had seen it shortly before—it contained some silver, I cannot say what, and there were some halfpence in the till.

Prisoner. The lady says she lost 4s. 6d. or 5s., and there was only 3s. 4d. in the till.

WILLIAM NATHAN . I was going into the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner lying across the counter, with his hand in the till—I saw him take his hand from the till, and shut it—he said he had been knocking some time, and could not make any body hear—I said, "You must wait till we do make somebody hear now"—he dropped the bowl—I went for a policeman.

Prisoner. I had no bowl in my hand; I was only leaning over the counter, knocking, as nobody came; I went in to buy some bread and cheese; I did not have my hand in the till. Witness. I am sure he had, and the bowl was in his right hand.

EDWARD PRICE . I was sent for—I found two shillings, two sixpences, and 4 1/2 d. on the prisoner.

GUILTY .** Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2402

2402. RICHARD HENRY GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August, 2 shillings; the monies of George Barritt, his master.

DAVID MONCRIEFFE . I am assistant to my uncle, George Barritt—the prisoner was in his service. In consequence of suspicions, I marked some shillings, and left them in the till—Mr. Barritt's daughter brought me a cigar-box, which contained two of the marked shillings I had put into the till.

MART ANN ROBERTSON . I am Mr. Barritt's daughter-in-law. I opened the till about twenty minutes past seven o'clock in the morning—there were five shillings and five sixpences in it, all marked—I then left the bar, leaving the prisoner in it—I saw him take his hand from the till—I did not see him take the money, but I missed the money five minute afterwards—no one had been in the bar besides the prisoner.

THOMAS SANDYS . I am a policeman. I got this cigar-box from a female who came into the bar—I do not know where she found it, but I believe she brought it from the kitchen.

DAVID MONCRIEFFE re-examined. The female is Mr. Barritt's daughter—she is not here.

MARY ANN ROBERTSON re-examined. The prisoner did go into the kitchen after he put his hand into the till.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2403

2403. JOSEPH DANIELS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July, 1 shilling and 1 sixpence, the monies of James Holden, from the person of Ann Holden; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ANN HOLDEN . I am the wife of James Holden. I was at a fishmonger's, in Thames-street, on the 30th of July—I had 1s. 6d. in my pocket—I received information, and missed it—I saw the prisoner running down a gateway, and ran after him—I did not lose sight of him.

GEORGE ROBERT WINCH . I am assistant to Mr. Chaplin, a fishmonger, in Lower Thames-street. I saw the prisoner take his hand out of the prosecutrix's pocket—I told her of it.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where were you standing? At the shop-door—I had never seen the prisoner before—he was there a very short time—he ran down Nicholson's Wharf—there were other persons running as well—he had on black trowsers and a blouse, and a black silk handkerchief—I am positive he is the man—I ran after him, and never lost sight of him.

PHILIP COOK . I am a smith. I heard a cry of "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner running—I saw him throw something away, and picked it up—it was a shilling and sixpence.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person? A. Yes—I did not lose sight of him—I was up to him almost directly he was stopped—there were a great many persons running after him—I have been six months in the employ of Mr. Pillington, of Earl-street, Black-friars.

DAVID EVANS . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read)—he is the person.

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420822-2404

2404. THOMAS BRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August, 1 coat, value 10s., the goods of Joseph Deamer.

JOSEPH DEAMER . I am potman at a public-house in Maiden-lane. About eleven o'clock, on the 9th of August, I misted my coat—in consequence of information, I went to the water-closet to watch, and saw the prisoner come out of the water-closet, with my coat under his smockfrock.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Was he sober? A. Rather the worse for liquor—he had been in the habit of frequenting the house for some time.

GEORGE BOCKLEY . I am a policeman. I searched the prisoner, and found the coat strapped round him under hit frock.

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2405

2405. WILLIAM WICKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July, 2 watches, value 2l. 10s.; 2 guards, value 1s.; 1 seal, value 3d.; and 2 keys, value 8d.; the goods of Matthew Stephenson.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Thomas Dodds.

CAROLINE STEPHENSON . I am the wife of Matthew Stephenson, a sailor, and live in Emmett-street, Poplar—the prisoner is a sailor, and lodged with me in July. I had some things to keep for him, and when he came back from sea I took him up to my box, and showed him that they were safe—I had two watches, two watch-guards, and a seal, in the same box, which he had an opportunity of seeing, and no one but him—I gave him his watch out of that box—he left me on the 22nd—I then missed my things—I suspected him, and looked after him—I afterwards saw him, and said, "You have taken the watches, if you will come with me quietly I won't charge you"—he would not come—he afterwards told me he had them, told me where they were pledged, and there we found them—we got the ticket at the Swedish Flag—these are the watches.

Prisoner. One is my own, my brother left it. Witness. Your brother's watch is a different watch, and is now at home.

CHARLES ANDERSON . I am a labourer. I saw the prisoner with two watches on Saturday, the 23rd of July.

EDWARD CHILD . I took a watch in pledge of a man named Pattison, who has gone to sea.

WILLIAM SLADDEN . I am a policeman. The prisoner's own watch is pledged at Mr. Telfer's, in Ratcliffe Highway.

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2406

2406. DENNIS HERREN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August, 1 printed book, value 7s. 6d. the goods of Henry Griffin.

HENRY GRIFFIN . I am a tobacconist, and live in East-street, Maryle-bone. The prisoner was in my shop on the 13th of August—I lost a book of Shakspeare's Plays that day from my shop-window—this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Was there a gentleman in the shop about the time you lost it? A. Yes—I was serving him, and the prisoner came in and stood behind him—a woman and a boy made a communication

to me, in consequence of which I went to the door—the prisoner had hardly quitted the shop when the woman spoke to me—the other person had gone—I saw the prisoner shifting something under his dress—I told the Magistrate that—the prisoner ran away—the other man did not—I was having a dispute with the gentleman about his refusing to pay for a cigar at the time the woman gave me the information—this was on Saturday night, about twelve o'clock—there was a gas-light in the shop—I know the woman who spoke to me—she was not before the Magistrate.

STEPHEN PERDRIAN . I am a policeman. I heard a cry of "Stop thief," received information, and ran after the prisoner—I saw him throw away the book and a waistcoat—the book was picked up in my presence—this is it—when I took him, he said it was the first time he was had.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not what he said, that it was the first time he had been at a station-house? A. No—that I swear—I know him very well, having seen him loitering about with bad characters, and I have cautioned him several times—he said the waistcoat was his own—I did not hear him say, "I saw the book thrown away"—he said, "I picked it up, and threw it down again in the same place"—when I first saw the prisoner, he was going up the street with a bundle under his arm, walking very fast—there was no one near him—I saw a woman in the prosecutor's shop that night, who told me something—I requested her to attend at the office, but she did not—I know where she lives—I did not fetch her.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY .* Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2407

2407. ALFRED NORMAN WILDMAN and GEORGE PLATT were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August, at St. Pancras, 75 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Thomas Dunster, in his dwelling-house.

THOMAS DUNSTER . I deal in ale and spirits, and live in Londonmews, St. Pancras. The prisoner Wildman is my wife's nephew—I had made arrangements for sending him to sea—on the 15th of August I had a cash-box containing seventy-five sovereigns, half-a-sovereign, and 4s. 6d.—about half-past six o'clock on the morning of the 16th, I missed it—it was afterwards brought back to me by my servant—I afterwards saw the two prisoners in custody—I asked Wildman where he got the clothes which he had on—he said he had bought them in Monmouth-street, and likewise a suit for the other boy, and that he had given 10l. for them—I know he had not 10l. of his own to give—he had also a watch and seals worth 3l. or 4l., which he had purchased somewhere—I know nothing of Platt—Wildman used to come now and then to my house—his mother lives close by.

ELLEN DUNSTER . I am the prosecutor's wife. About three o'clock on the afternoon of the 15th of August, Wildman came to our house—I asked him to drink tea—I had occasion to go up stairs, and left him in the room with the cash-box—next day he was gone, and the cash-box also.

ALFRED SIDEE . I live in Marchmont-place, Coram-street. On the morning of the 16th of August, I went into Mr. Dunster's stable, and found the cash-box in a bran-tub against the manger, with this chisel—it was broken open.

THOMAS LOCOCK . I am a constable of Skipton, in Yorkshire. I saw a description in the "Hue and Cry," and went to Cartham, four miles from Skipton—I there saw the two prisoners in bed together—I told Wildman he was charged with stealing seventy-five sovereigns—he made no answer—I told him to get up and let me look at his clothes—I found in them twenty-five sovereigns, a comb, and a knife—I took to a Public-house, and the landlord gave me five sovereigns, which Wildman had paid for a dog—I took them to Skipton, made inquiry, and found he had left a watch at a watchmaker's—I also went to a tailor's at Cartharm, and found a quantity of clothes, which he had ordered.

FRANCIS FRYER . I am a police-sergeant. I saw the prisoners at the station—Wildman had on a new shooting-jacket, a waistcoat, and trowsers, and Platt had new clothes—I told them they could answer any question or not as they pleased-Wildman said, "God knows what possessed me to do it, for I never gave it a thought, but an hour previous to its being done; it was all done in an hour."—Platt said nothing.

Wildman's Defence. My uncle is mistaken in saying I gave 10l. for the clothes—I gave 9l.—I found the money.

Platt's Defence. I was standing in Tottenham-street, and Wildman came up, and said he had got some money.

WILDMAN— GUILTY. Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor .— Transported for Ten Years.—Recommended to the Penitentiary.

PLATT— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2408

2408. EMMA ONION and MARY WATSON were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 1 counterpane, value 11s.; 5 blankets, value 1l. 5s.; 12 pillow-cases, value 12s.; 14 sheets, value 3l. 16s.; 11 towels, value 6s.; 7 table-cloths, value 2l.; 36 napkins, value 1l. 16s., 2 petticoats, value 2s.; 2 pairs of drawers, Value 2s.; 2 bed-gowns, value 4s.; 6 aprons, value 3s.; 1 cloak, value 1l.; 2 passes, value 14s.; 5 frocks, value 10s.; 2 tumblers, value 4s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 12s.; the goods of James Crow, in his dwelling-house.

JAMES CROW . I am a baker, and live in Warwick-row Pimlico, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square; it is my dwelling-house—the prisoner Onion and her father lodged with me—in consequence of information I went to Mr. Walters, the pawnbroker's, and found a tippet and two counterpanes of mine—I went to Queen-square on the 18th of July. Onion there informed me that my box was broken open, and on my return I found that it was broken open.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you take her with you to the pawnbroker's, to see if she knew any of the things? A. No—there was a tippet that I partly identified—her father was there, and he identified some things belonging to him—he went for her, and when she came she said, "That tippet belongs to Mr. Crow"—I did not take her to Queen-square as a witness—she went with me—I was charging no one then—her father charged Watson, and I went to hear about my own property—it was while I was waiting in the yard that Onion told me my box was broken open.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Onion's father charged watson with some offence? A. Yes—after that was investigated, she and onion were both remanded, and afterwards committed-Watson was admitted to bail.

MATILDA CROW . I am the prosecutor's wife. I was sent for home from Richmond, on the 14th of July, and found that my large box in the back-room second floor was broken open, and the articles stated gone—I had left them safe on the 1st of July, when I went to Richmond—after I came back, I saw the prisoner Onion come down in the morning with some dirty linen, and put it into a washing-tub in the wash-house—I afterwards examined that tub, and found this pair of drawers, which had been locked in the box—I afterwards went with an officer to Onion's apartment, and found a night-gown, which had also been in the box, a baby's long petticoat, and a white frock—I employed Watson to mangle.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time in the morning was it that you saw Onion bring down the things? A. About nine o'clock—there was nothing in the tub before she put the things there—she threw a number of things in, and the drawers among them—they are my own drawers—I had not seen Watson about the house lately—Onion lived in her father's apartments—she had no separate apartment—they occupy two rooms on the first floor—he is a widower—I found the things in the sitting-room, where she slept—the night gown was in a drawer unlocked, and the other things were lying on her bed.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long had Watson been employed by you? A. A year and half, on and off—I always found her honest—she had nothing to do at the house—I never saw her there.

ELIZA COTTER . I am the wife of William Cotter, and live in Warwick-row, next door to Mr. Crow—after Mrs. Crow went to Richmond I frequently observed Watson coming to the house—I asked Onion several times why Watson came to and fro so much—the first time she said she came to clean for her—she came every day after that, and her little girl came very often—I told Onion if Watson came backwards and forwards so much, she (Onion) must not come to me, nor I to her, for I was afraid there would be something wrong—one morning, about a fortnight before the depositions were taken, I saw Onion leave the house with a bundle—the next time I saw her I said, "What was that bundle you went out with this morning?"—she said, "I was taking some washing to Mrs. Watson, I told you I was going to have my things washed"—she had said before that she intended Mrs. Watson to wash all her counterpanes, blankets, and things, as she was going to wash them very reasonably—on the Thursday before Watson was taken, I was looking out of my window, in the middle of the day, and saw Watson go from Onion's house with a large bundle, and go to Princes-row—I had some suspicion, and waited and saw her return—instead of coming back to Onion's house, she waited at the milk shop, at the corner of Princes-row—I saw no motion made, but in a minute or two Onion came out, met Watson, and they went away together.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were the times at which you say you saw bundles removed by Onion and Watson, different times? A. Yes—some days apart—it was on Thursday, the 14th of July, that I saw Watson with the bundle—I cannot tell what day it was I saw Onion—Onion went to Queen-square on Monday—she came home that day, and was taken next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you known Onion? A. From the first day of her coming to Mrs. Crow's—I was intimate

with Mrs. Crow—Onion has drank tea with me while Mrs. Crow was out of town, not before—we have gone out together several times—I always went out in my proper dress, and so did she, except once, when she made up her mind to have a joke with her brother's clothes—I do not know where she got them—she had several times asked me to go out with her, just for a lark, and I had refused, but at length I did—I am thirty years of age—I did it innocently—she was not discovered and hooted through the street—I was never with her at any house where she met a gentleman, not one in particular—I am not a character of that description—my husband is a surgical instrument maker—I never went to a fortuneteller's with her, nor ever went to look for one, I believe Watson did—I have been to the Gun Tavern with her once or twice—I cannot say How often, exactly—it is very near us—there are gardens there—respectable people are in the habit of walking there—we did not go and meet any gentleman there—I was not at Queen-square when Onion first went there—she asked me to go down with her—she was going against Watson, I believe—Mrs. Watson is no acquaintance of mine—I have only known her since this affair.

JAMES HATES . I am shopman to Mr. Walter, a pawnbroker, in Victoria-road, Pimlico. I produce a blanket pledged on the 8th of July, for 3s.; eight towels, on the 13th, for 2s. 6d.; and a counterpane for 4s., all by Watson, the blanket in her own name; and a tippet on the 16th of July, by Mrs. Cooper, for 4s., in the name of Ann Hall.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you known Watson? A. Fifteen months—she has been in the habit of pawning her own things with me—she is a respectable woman—the things she pawned on the 13th of July, are in the name of Osborn, who, she said, the property belonged to.

RICHARD BIRCH . I am shopman to Mr. Debenham, a pawnbroker, in Queen's-row, Pimlico. I produce a blanket pledged on the 8th of July, and another on the 9th, by Watson, and in her own name.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you know her? A. Yes, for a long time.

MARY ANN COOPER . I pledged this fur tippet by Watson's directions.

GEORGE MESSENGER FOSTER . I am a policeman. On Sunday evening, the 17th of July, I went with Mr. Onion to Watson's house—I asked if she would allow me to search the house—she said she had no objection—after introducing her to Mr. Onion, she said she suspected what I came about, it was respecting pledging some things of a Miss Osborn, of No. 3, Warwick-row, Pimlico—she produced fifty-six duplicates, six of which she said related to property which Miss Onion employed her to pledge—I afterwards went to Onion's room, but found nothing but this shawl and these drawers.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you remember Onion being at Queen-square, to give evidence against Watson? A. Yes, on a Monday morning—it was about some property of Mr. Onion's—he charged Watson—Onion was taken on Tuesday morning, through what I discovered at the pawnbroker's, and afterwards at Mr. Crow's—there is nothing stated in this indictment which has been found on Onion, and traced to her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2409

2409. EMMA ONION was again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July, 1 pair of drawers, value 18d.; 1 shawl, value 4s.; 1 handkerchief value 1s.; and 1 bed-gown, value 2s.; the goods of James Crow.

MATILDA CROW . I returned from Richmond on the 14th of July. These drawers are mine—I found them in the tub which I saw Onion go to—they had been in the box, and also this torn handkerchief, and this nightgown—this shawl was in the parlour—they are all mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you sure these things were in your chest at the time you went out of town? A. Yes—I had been out of town a fortnight and three days—I know the handkerchief, because my brother sent it me from India, and there is a mark on it.

ELIZA COTTER . On the 14th of July I saw this handkerchief on the drawers in Onion's apartment—Mrs. Crow's sister was there, and said it was her sister's handkerchief—Onion said it was not—she said it was very like it—Onion said, was there only one handkerchief of a sort to be bought, and it dropped—she afterwards came over to my place with the handkerchief on her neck—in the course of the afternoon she all of a sudden snatched it off her neck, and tore the border off—she said she did not like the colour of it—she gave it to me, and wished me to burn it—before she went to Queen-square she asked if I would give up the handkerchief, and also when she returned, and would I say that I had lent her different sums of money, and say nothing about the keys—this was in the presence of Mr. Onion's son—she winked at me, and said, "You know, Mrs. Cotter, you lent me 5s., so-and-so, and 4s., so-and-so"—I said, "I did nothing of the kind"—she always seemed to have plenty of money—she told me that Mr. Onion was her guardian, not her father—that her father allowed Mr. Onion 2l. a week for her, and she went in the name of Osborn.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When was this conversation about giving up the handkerchief? A. On the Monday morning—when I found Watson was in custody, I asked Onion what was the matter—she said the woman had been robbing her—I knew nothing of Watson till she came to char for Onion, which was on the Friday after Mrs. Crow went away—I did not think there was anything wrong when she tore the handkerchief—I said, "How can you tear such a beautiful little handkerchief as this?"—this was on the Thursday as Mrs. Watson was taken, on the Sunday—my husband told me to take care of the handkerchief—she did not give me the handkerchief, but left it on the table, saying, "When you have a fire, burn it, or destroy it."

GEORGE MESSENGER FOSTER . I am a policeman. I found this shawl on the stairs, outside the prisoner's room door—this bed-gown was in one of the drawers in the bed-room—all the articles in that drawer were of female apparel—I received this torn handkerchief from Mrs. Cotter.

GUILTY. Aged 15.—Recommended to mercy.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18420822-2410

2410. EMMA ONION was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, 1 tippet, value 15s., the goods of James Crow : and MARY WATSON, for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MATILDA CROW . Among other things, I lost a fur tippet from the box—this now produced is it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. I believe Onion was a very good girl? A. Yes—she had our good opinion.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Does the tippet bear any mark by which a stranger would know it to be yours? A. No—Watson has seen me wear it in the winter.

MARY ANN COOPER . I pledged this tippet for Watson on the 17th of July, I think for 4s.—I gave her the money and ticket.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where did she give it you? A. At her own house, in the middle of the day—she did not tell me whose it was, or where it came from—I did not ask her—she was very busy mangling at the time, and asked if I would take it for her, as she had no time—she did not tell me where to take it to—I have known her twelve months as a laundress—I generally pledged in the name of Hall.

JAMES HAYES . I am a pawnbroker. Cooper pledged this tippet in the name of Hall.

(Watson received a good character.)

ONION— NOT GUILTY .

WATSON— GUILTY .— Confined Nine Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoners.)

NEW COURT.—Saturday, August 21th, 1842.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18420822-2411

2411. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July, 1 pair of spectacles, value 1l., the goods of Samuel Balsdon:—also, on the 11th of July, 6 spoons, value 20s., the goods of Mary Ann Cooper; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18420822-2412

2412. ROBERT HASTEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August, 12lb. weight of bacon, value 9d., the goods of Robert Wheeler; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Ten Days.

Reference Number: t18420822-2413

2413. JOHN BOWKER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July, 2 blankets, value 7s.; 2 sheets, value 8s.; and 1 coat, value 15s.; the goods of Peter Sanders; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2414

2414. JAMES HEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August, 1 bed, value 6s.; and 1 ring, value 1s.; the goods of Eleanor Parsons; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2415

2415. THOMAS HART was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 3 pairs of gloves, value 9s., the goods of James Taylor and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420822-2416

2416. HARRIET WARE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August, 1 locket and chain, value 1s.; 1 breast-pin, value 3s.; and I scent-bottle, value 1s.; the goods of Mary Ann Pickett; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Ten Days.

Reference Number: t18420822-2417

2417. JEMIMA BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August, 1 sheet, value 1s. 9d.; and 1 frock, value 9d.; the goods of Robert Watt; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Seven Days.

Reference Number: t18420822-2418

2418. MARGARET KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August, 2 spoons, value 8s., the goods of James Collings; to which she pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Two Months.

Before Mr. Baron Rolfe.

Reference Number: t18420822-2419

2419. SARAH STROUD was indicted for the wilful murder of Harriet Stroud.

MESSRS. PRENDERGAST and THOMAS conducted the Prosecution.

SARAH DEANE . I am nurse in the lying-inn ward at St. Pancras workhouse. I know the prisoner—I recollect her coming into the work-house—I cannot say what day she came—she was in the house a few weeks before she came into my ward—she was confined in my ward of a female child on the 16th of June—the child was baptized in the name of Harriet—it was vaccinated—I recollect the prisoner leaving the workhouse with the child on the 16th of July, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon—I recollect on the same evening the dead body of a child being brought to the workhouse—I did not know the body when I saw it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How long was the prisoner in the workhouse before she was confined? A. I cannot say positively, it was a few weeks—she was in the pregnant ward before she came into my ward—I think I can say I had seen her in the house two weeks before she came to me—I cannot say How many women were in the ward when the prisoner was confined—sometimes there are more, and sometimes less—my attention was not called to one person more than to another on that occasion—the baptism of this child took place on the 16th of July, about twelve or one in the day, and the prisoner went out the same day between three and four in the afternoon.

COURT. Q. The prisoner is not married? A. I am given to understand not—she passed by the name of Sarah Stroud—I have heard her called so in her presence.

PETER GRISS . I am porter at St. Pancras workhouse. On Saturday, the 16th of July, the dead body of a female child was brought to the workhouse by a policeman—I went with the policeman, and placed it in the dead-house—I did not know any thing of the child at the time—it was wrapped up in a piece of coarse cloth—I received some information from Mrs. Edwards, and I went in search of the prisoner to Wellington-street, Camden-town—I did not go into the house there, but Mrs. Edwards did, and the prisoner came out with her—I told the prisoner she must go along with me—she asked me where—I told her to the station-house—she asked what it was for—I said I was very sorry to inform her I was going to charge her with the murder of her child—she seemed very faint, and I asked her to take hold of my arm, and Mrs. Edwards took hold of her other arm—she entered into a conversation with Mrs. Edwards about the child, and said she had taken it away from the workhouse, and had taken it direct to the canal near the York and Albany.

Cross-examined. Q. Before she said this, had you said any thing to the prisoner that it would be better for her to tell the truth? A. I told her over and over not to convict herself, but to let people find evidence against her—Mrs. Edwards had not said any thing that I heard to induce her to tell this, or to confess any thing.

COURT to CAROLINE EDWARDS. Q. You went with Griss to find the prisoner, and you went into the house and brought her out, did you say any thing to her about its being better to tell? A. I did not—I went in and said I wanted Sarah Stroud—she took hold of my hand, and said, "What is the matter?"—I brought her out, and the porter took her.

PETER GRISS re-examined. I did not say it would be better to tell the truth or to confess—she said she had taken the child from the workhouse, and taken it direct to the canal, and she sat on the bank by some trees, undressed the child, pinned a cloth round it, put it into the water, and held her foot on it—Mrs. Edwards asked her if it cried—she said it could not, it struggled and floated away—I then took her to the station, and charged her.

Cross-examined. Q. About How long after the dead body was brought to the workhouse did you have this conversation with the prisoner? A. The body was brought in on Saturday, and I took the prisoner on the Wednesday following about nine o'clock at night—she appeared very faint, and supported herself by me.

CAROLINE EDWARDS re-examined. I live at No. 43, Grove-street, Camden-town—the prisoner lived with me for six weeks, and then went out to go to the workhouse—I cannot tell on what day she left—I think it was the beginning of June—she told me frequently that she had got the dropsy—I told her I did not think it was dropsy, I thought she was in the family-way—she said, "No, I am not in the family-way, I have the dropsy"—I have observed her neck, and told her I thought she was in the family-way—she said, "No, I have had a child, that is five years ago, that it the reason my neck is so"—when she left my house I went after her, but I could not see her—I saw her in the workhouse a few days afterwards—I saw her again on the day she left the workhouse, the 16th of July—she called when I was out, and she came again a little after nine o'clock in the evening—she came down stairs laughing, and my husband said to her, "Well, Sarah, where is your child?"—she turned round and laughed, and said, "Oh, it has kicked the bucket, it has been dead a week; it was three weeks old when it died"—I said, "Well, it would have been no matter if you had done the same, for you are a bad character"—she placed a bundle on the table—I said, "What have you got there?"—she said, "These are my baby's clothes, Mrs. Edwards"—I said, "They never gave you these clothes in the workhouse, if they have buried your baby"—she said, "Yes, they do," and she opened them one by one, and said, "These are the little things"—I said, "I suppose they have given you them against you get another, then"—she said, "I suppose that is a form"—I said, "Then you had-better give them to me against I get one"—she staid but a few minutes, for my husband left the room, because she began telling what she had gone through at the workhouse, and I left and went up stairs to my husband, and told him what she had said—I then came down again, and she was gone—she came again on the Monday morning following, and said she was very faint, and could she have any

thing to drink—I went for a pot of stout, and she drank some—on the Wednesday morning following, I went to Mrs. Parsons, and while I was there the prisoner came in, and I spoke to her—on the same evening I went to fetch her, and found her at No. 1, Wellington-street—she came away with me and Griss—as she came along, when he charged her with murder, she said, "Oh, don't"—I said "Oh, Sarah, How could you drown your poor baby on Saturday?"—she said "I did it because I had no money."

Q. What had Griss said to her? A. He said, "I want you"—she said, "What for?"—he said, "I am obligated to say I am going to charge you with murdering your baby"—he said, "Now, do not talk, if you talk it will hurt yourself"—she kept on talking all the same for that—when I said, "How came you to drown your baby?"—she said, because she had no money—I said, "Why, Sarah, if you had brought your baby to me, and said, Mrs. Edwards, I can, t keep my baby, I can't keep my baby, I would have kept it for you till you got a situation"—she said, "I know you would have done so"—I said, "How could you be so cruel as to strip your baby?" she said, "I did that because the clothes should not betray me, as they were the workhouse things"—I then asked her where she went to strip it—she said, "Under the trees in St. John's Wood-road"—I then asked her if the baby cried—she said no, it could not cry, for she put a cloth round it, and put it into the water, and held her foot on it till it was dead, and when she took her foot off, it floated away, and she tried to get it out again, but could not—she said, "Do you think I shall be hanged?"—I said, "I can't tell"—she said, "I went yesterday morning to see if I could see it, and I thought I saw it floating"—I said, "You could not have seen it floating, for it was taken to the workhouse on Saturday evening"—I said to her, "Sarah, the cloth you pinned round it was the old bag you used to keep your clothes in"—she said, "Mrs. Edwards, I know it was"—she said, "Then you have seen the baby?"—I said, "yes, I have"—she said, "Do you think it was anything like me?"—I said, "Yes, it is very much like you, I think, in the face"—she said, "A great many have told me so"—I had before that been to the workhouse, and seen the baby and the cloth, and I can swear to it as the bag that she used to keep her dirty linen in at my house—this is it—(looking at it)—it was not round the baby when I saw it—it was brought to me by the porter.

Cross-examined. Q. I think you say it was in answer to a question from your husband on the Saturday evening, that the prisoner said the child had "Kicked the bucket?" A. Yes, and some other part of the conversation was in consequence of what my husband said—my husband is a combmaker—I have known the prisoner about three months—she did not lodge in a room of her own—she was a servant girl—she slept in the same room that I and my husband did—we were all in one room—she and I were always very comfortable together—I mean to swear to this cloth—the last time I saw it before Griss brought it to me, it was in the shape of a bag—it has been sewn up at the top as if for a napkin—I have no mark of my own on it, yet I can swear to it as a bag belonging to her—it is a very ordinary piece of cloth, but it did very well for her to keep her dirty clothes in—I am quite sure it was on Saturday night the first conversation took place—I did not know where she was after the Saturday night, till she came on the Monday—I afterwards saw her at Mrs. Parsons'.

MR. THOMAS. Q. Did she leave a box at your house? A. Yes, and it is there now.

JAMES JONES . I know the canal-bridge in Regent's-park—it is near the Zoological-gardens in the Albert-road—it crosses the canal from the York and Albany Tavern, up to St. John's-wood, and is about 150 yards from the York and Albany—I was there selling ginger-beer, on Saturday, the 16th of July, and a gentleman called my attention to something—I went on the bridge, and discovered the feet of a child in the water—I stripped myself, went in, and brought out the body of a female infant—if had been floating there—there was a bag pinned round its waist—this cloth is something like it—I gave it the policeman.

Cross-examined. Q. Is this the first time you have called it a bag? A. Yes, I believe it is—there was no shift on the child when I took it out—it was about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon.

GEORGE CURTIS (police-constable S 43.) On Saturday, the 16th of July, I was on duty near the canal in Regent's-park—I know the bridge—it is near Barrow-hill—a gentleman called to me, and I went and saw the child after it had been got out of the water—Jones was with it—he was stripped, and had just got out of the water—it was about six o'clock in the evening—the child had a cloth answering this description round its body, nothing else—the child was on the bank—I took it up, put it in my handkerchief, took it to the workhouse, and gave it to Griss.

JOHN FOWLER (police-constable S 88.) I produce some baby-linen, which I got from Mrs. Edwards, and I received this cloth from Mrs. Deane, the nurse, on the 21st of July.

MRS. EDWARDS re-examined. I delivered this baby-linen to Fowler, which I got from Mrs. Parsons.

MARY ANN PARSONS . On Saturday, the 16th of July, the prisoner came to my house between nine and ten o'clock in the evening—she said she wanted a room, and she had lived at No. 22, Bayham-terrace, for four months, that she had given her mistress a month's warning, but the new servant was come, and she wanted a lodging for the night—she slept with me that night, and when she undressed, I said, "Why you have had a child"—she said, yes, unfortunately, she had a child five years ago, but it was dead—she did not say when it died—she left these things at my house, and I gave them to Mrs. Edwards on the Wednesday following.

SARAH DEANE . I got this cloth from the clerk of the workhouse—his name, I think, is Bradford—I gave it up at Mary-le-bone Office—I know these other things are baby-linen belonging to the workhouse, and I know I have had them in my possession, but I am in the habit of giving so many out, that I cannot speak to these things.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any mark on them? A. No, none at all.

JOHN HUNTER . I am undertaker to St. Pancras workhouse—I have charge of the dead-house there. This is the cloth that I took off the baby that was brought in on the 16th of July.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you make any mark on the cloth? A. No, it is now in the same state as it was, all but a mark that Mr. Baker, the Coroner, put on it—I know it by this seam on it, which I particularly noticed.

RICHARD DUCK EASTROP . I am surgeon to St. Pancras workhouse. I do not recollect the prisoner coming into the workhouse, but I remember her being there—I believe the first time I saw her was immediately after her confinement—I saw a child with her occasionally—I recollect the dead body of a child being brought to the workhouse—I examined it—I

cannot state whether it was the body of the child I had seen with the prisoner—I examined it both internally and externally—I cannot say that there was that assemblage of positive circumstances which should lead me to conclude that the child died of drowning—the appearances certainly did not lead me to say positively whether it died from drowning, or not.

COURT. Q. Were there any appearances which led you to say it did not die from drowning? A. No, the appearances were such as to lead me to say that probably the child died from drowning—it was a fine child, and a female, and seemed about six weeks old.

GUILTY .— DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18420822-2420

2420. ANTHONY JAMES M'DONALD was indicted for a rape.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2421

2421. JAMES EEDLE was indicted for breaking and entering the shop of Herbert Salmon, on the 22nd of June, and stealing therein 20lbs. weight of cigars, value 12l.; 10lbs. weight of cheroots, value 5l.; 30lbs. of tobacco, value 4l. 10s.; and 10lbs. of snuff, value 35s.; the goods of Herbert Salmon.

HERBERT SALMON . I am a tobacconist, and live in Lisle-street—my shop was at No. 32, Greek-street, but I have since left it—I carried on business there, I think, till the 2nd of July—on the evening of the 21st of June I locked up my shop, in Greek-street, about eleven o'clock—I left all safe—other parties lived in the house, but none belonging to me—I occupied the shop only—on the morning of the 22nd, when I went there about eight o'clock, I found the door locked as I had left it—when I got in I missed snuff, tobacco, and cheroots, nearly all the contents of the shop were gone—only a very small portion of snuff was left—I estimated the value of what I lost at 35l.—I went to the police-office, in consequence of information, about the 18th of July—I saw a small quantity of cheroots there, which I could swear to, from their being my own tying up on the 21st of June—I saw some twist tobacco, and other things which I cannot undertake to swear to.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long was it before you saw these cheroots after you lost them? A. About a month—I know them, because I tied them in small bundles to put in the window—these are tied with a string, and I never saw any other tied with a string—I tied these in small bundles, because they were damaged.

JOSEPH HOILE (police-constable F 95.) I apprehended the prisoner on the 14th of July, but not on this charge—I searched his room, which is the back attic at No. 11, Grafton-street, Soho—I found two bundles of cheroots tied up, and some cigars and tobacco loose in a box—he said he had them from the same person that he had the other goods from—I took them to the station, and Mr. Salmon saw them.

THOMAS WILLIAM CARTER (police-sergeant F 5.) I was with Hoile when he searched the prisoner's place—I found a small bundle of cheroots, and a bundle of mixed cigars, tied in this black handkerchief, and a small crow-bar in the fire-place.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe there was a portion of something that looked like a private still in the room? Q. Yes, the crow-bar appeared to have been used as a poker.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420822-2422

2422. JAMES EEDLE was again indicted for breaking and entering the warehouse of Thomas Crawford and others, on the 13th of July, at St. Marylebone, and stealing therein 2 boxes, value 5s.; 1615 yards of linen cloth, value 203l.; 552 yards of diaper, value 15l.; 201 yards of lawn. value 27l.; 4 yards of canvass, value 10s.; the goods of the said Thomas Crawford and others: and 1 pencil-case, value 7s.; the goods of James Shuter Black.—2nd COUNT, calling it the warehouse of James Shuter Black.

PHCEBE BRADLEY . I am the wife of John Bradley, a butcher, who lives at No. 11, Grafton-street, Soho. The prisoner lived in the same house, in the back attic, at the time of this robbery—I remember his coming into the house at seven o'clock in the morning, on the 14th of July—I was going out to sweep the stairs, and met him coming up stairs with several rolls of linen on his arm—when I got down to the passage, which is on the ground-floor, I saw two boxes in the passage, and two men with them—I went out, and fetched my husband, and told him I thought there was a case of bankruptcy, or robbery, coming into the house—my husband came, and spoke to the two men who were in the passage—the prisoner was at that time up stairs—one of the men fetched him down, and the prisoner told my husband that it was his property, and it was all right—my husb