Old Bailey Proceedings, 28th February 1842.
Reference Number: t18420228
Reference Number: f18420228

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

SESSIONS PAPER.

PIRIE, MAYOR.

FIFTH SESSION, HELD FEBRUARY 28TH, 1842.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

Taken in Short-hand

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

WILLIAM TYLER, PRINTER, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET

1842.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

Held on Monday, February 28th, 1842, and following Days.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN PIRIE, LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Right Honourable Sir Nicholas Conyngham Tindal, Knt., Lord Chief Justice of Her Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Thomas Coltman, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Anthony Brown, Esq.; Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq.; Charles Farebrother, Esq.; William Taylor Copeland, Esq.; Thomas Kelly, Esq.; Samuel Wilson, Esq.; Sir Chapman Marshall, Knt.; and Thomas Johnson, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City: Thomas Wood, Esq.; John Lainson, Esq.; John Humphery, Esq.: John Johnson, Esq.; Sir George Carroll, Knt.; John Kinnersley Hooper, Esq.; and Sir James Duke, Knt.; Aldermen of the said City: John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and Edward Bullock, Esq.; Judge of the Sheriff's Court; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

James Rolls

Joseph G. Stone

John Woodward

Henry James Compton

Thomas Alderton Adams

Charles Coles

Richard Parry

Thomas Thurlow

William Newnham

Joseph Shaw

Paul Biddle

Thomas White

Second Jury.

Nathaniel Bourchier

Alexander Beck

James Johnston

John Abbott

James Bradbury

John Shutt

John Collis Nesbit

Ellis David Ellis

James Boreman

Joseph Burgess

John T. Kinniball

George Frederick Barnett

Third Jury.

Robert Champ

Robert William Allyatt

Richard Beasley

John Bartholomew

Richard Walters

Thomas Smith

Robert Bullock

Robert Apse

James Clare

John Brunning

Daniel Clark

Thomas P. Clements

Fourth Jury.

Joseph Beardwell

William Bolton

James Smith

John Smith

Jonathan Abbott

Isaac Clifton

Thomas Austin

Henry Thomas Harris

Alexander Innes Burgess

John Alexander

William Butler

William Hinckley

Fifth Jury.

John Barton

Samuel Bates

Mitchell William Roberts

Sapphires Lowe

Richard Ballard

Edward Corne

James Charliss

Joseph Cramp

William Cook

Thomas Bold Cutbush

Robert Cripps

Samuel Jones

Sixth Jury.

Thomas Blakeman

George Hills

John Daniel

Joseph Crane

Ralph Titchcourt

William Speechley

William Bragg

Henry Cox

George Bentley

William Angell

William Bigg

James Angell

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

PIRIE, MAYOR. FIFTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—Two stars (**), that they have been more than once in custody—An obeliskthat a prisoner is known to be the associate of bad characters.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, February 28th, 1842.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420228-856

856. WILLIAM HENRY TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Ann Witherfield.

ANN LOVETT . I am single, and live in Brunswick-square, Commercial-road. On Saturday night, the 29th of January, about ten o'clock, Ann Witherfield came to my house with a gentleman—her real name was Ann, but as that was also my name she was called Charlotte—the prisoner and his wife lodged in the house—Mrs. Taylor sent me to the Red Lion public-house, to fetch the prisoner home—Ann Witherfield went with me—I did not find him there, but about half-past eleven he came in, and said, "I understand you have been to the b—y public-house for me?"—I said, "Yes"—he said he supposed I came after my rent—I said no, I looked to his wife for that, and not to him—he was intoxicated, I was perfectly sober—he said he bad plenty of money about him, about 22., but would not pay me a farthing—he used rather rough language—I said I did not want the rent, but he bad much better pay a trifle out of 17s. 6d. which his wife owed—he then struck me on the mouth, and made it bleed—his wife said, "Oh! William, don't strike Ann like that"—he immediately struck his wife—Ann Witherfield then said, "Oh, you wretch, to strike a woman like that! you ought to be ashamed of yourself"—he asked what business it was of hers, and struck her about the head, and on the right side of her cheek—she received a bruise on the right jaw, and another bruise—he struck her with his doubled fist—he had nothing in his hand—I immediately called out for the police—three policemen came directly, and I gave him in charge for beating us all three—Witherfield was rather poorly before this happened—she mostly suffered from rheumatism—there was nothing the matter with her head or face before—the prisoner asked his wife to go with him, but she would not, saying he would ill-use her if she did—I said she need not go, but out of the house he should go—he left with the policemen—I went out afterwards to get some vegetables with Witherfield—we returned about a quarter or half-past one, and heard the prisoner

up stairs—I went up, and said he should not stop there—he said he would—I took the bed-clothes off, and shyed them down stairs—he was not on the bed—he said, "You mean that, do you?" and said he would kick me down if I did not go down—he attempted to strike me, and Witherfield ran up stairs, as I had called out—she said, "Ann is not capable of taking her own part, you shan't strike her"—she got between us—he immediately said, "Oh, you b—y wretch, if you do not go out of this room, I will kick you down!"—he immediately struck her violently with his fist, about the head and temple, from the ear to the lower part of the throat—she fell against the washhand-stand, and bled violently at the mouth—I ran down stairs, and before I could get the street-door open she came down—I thought it was the prisoner—I ran into the parlour, and it was her—she said, "Oh, Ann, I fear he has murdered me!"—I had no time to answer her before the prisoner came into the parlour—I said if he offered to strike either of us again, I would cut him down with a candlestick—I took it up, and do not know whether I struck him or not in my flurry—we had a scuffle for the candlestick, and he took it from me—he went to strike me over the head with it—Witherfield held up her right hand to prevent him, and received two cuts across the knuckles of her right hand, and a bruise on the back of that hand—we both went to bed together about a quarter to two—I looked over her head, but saw no cuts—I found a bruise on the left temple, and a swelling from the ear to the throat—she wanted vinegar, as she said she could scarcely turn her head—I said I had none, but would get some in the morning—there was no cut except in the mouth—she complained of her poor head all night, and continued to get worse till she died, which was about a quarter-past eight on Monday morning—she had been drinking that night with a gentleman, and bad a little too much, but not so as not to know what she was about—she was rather tipsy—I was sober—she had a bruise on the right side of her cheek, her right jaw, and on the left side of the temple—she had none of these appearances before he struck her.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What situation do yon fill? A. I am unfortunate, and see different gentlemen—I keep a lodging-house for people who do the same—Witherfield did not lodge with me, nor use my house one time in a thousand—she brought a gentleman there that night—the prisoner was intoxicated—I had not been drinking—I might have had a glass or two of gin, not three—Witherfield received two sovereigns from the gentleman—I did not get one of them—I swear I had nothing to do with the money, nor did I claim it, nor fight with her about it—Mrs. Taylor had 1s. for the room—Mrs. Taylor did not say to me, "You see what a state he is in, don't irritate him; if be was not drunk he would not go on so"—there was not time to say so before the blow was given—she did not say, "I don't want to leave my husband, he is drunk or he would not go on so"—he had not a cut over his forehead—he had a scratch which I observed first on Monday night—I was determined be should not stop in the house—I told the Magistrate that Witherfield said, "Good God, Ann, I think he has murdered me"—my deposition was read over to me—I saw no marks of blows on the right side of her head, but she complained of it—I went to a doctor in the morning—she would not let me go that night.

JOSEPH SULTAN . I am a surgeon, and live in Battye-street, Commercial-road. I saw the deceased about a quarter before one o'clock on the

Sunday night—I found her complaining of violent pains in the face, head, and neck—I examined her head, and found many contusions about the forehead, temple, and face—I attended her again about six on Monday morning—I then found her in a state of stupor—I applied external applications only on the first visit, not apprehending them so dangerous as they appeared afterwards—on the second occasion I used no applications—I found the patient sinking very fast—I did not see her when she died—I saw her after death, about nine in the morning—Mr. Guraey and myself made a post mortem examination—on opening the head, under the membrane of the brain I found a large quantity, about four ounces, of congratulated blood on the surface of the brain, on the right side—I separated the hemisphere of the brain, and in the ventricle of the brain J found a portion of serum—a larger portion than usual—my opinion is, that rupture of the vessels of the brain was the immediate cause of death—the contusions were chiefly on the right side of the head—there were some on the left side, but they were comparatively slight—judging from the external marks of contusion, and the internal state of the head and brain, I have no doubt what was the cause of death—there was quite sufficient to account for death.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a member of the College of Surgeons? A. Yes—it must have been a very severe blow to produce such appearances as I found—this was the result of rupture of the blood-vessels of the brain—it does not follow that she would die immediately upon that rupture—I have opened a body before—if she had been bled immediately after receiving the injury she probably might have done well, bat I cannot distinctly state that—I should say the neglect that followed in a great measure caused her death—if immediate remedies had been applied she would probably have recovered—there may be some doubt about that—it would be presumptuous to say so positively, but it might have been the case if four or five ounces of blood had been taken from her arm, or if leeches had been applied to the temples immediately—I am aware that the body will exhibit sympathetic injuries from blows inflicted on opposite sides—her cheek-bone was broken, and the jaw bruised, but that had nothing to do with the cause of death—I had seen her occasionally before—she bad not been a patient of mine—she came to my shop for trifling things which she required—I have heard that she was subject to rheumatic pains in her head—indeed she had been in a delicate state of health for twelve months, to my knowledge—I could not judge from examining the body whether she had been subject to rheumatic pains of her head—she, an unfortunate girl, and I have heard, of a violent disposition, but I never saw her in any row—great personal excitement would account for much of what I saw, and if she was drunk it would rather have contributed to it—I should say blows inflicted by a fist on the head was the cause of what I saw, no other violence being used—I think it probable that the congratulated blood was accumulating for twenty-four or twenty-five hours from the time the injury was received—if it had followed immediately, she would have lost all consciousness at once—if assistance had been rendered to her within three or four hours, I think the great probability is that she would have recovered.

JOHN GURNEY . I am a surgeon, and live in Backchurch-lane. I assisted Mr. Sultan in making the post mortem examination—I observed severe contusions or bruises on the right and left side of the temples, and

contusions on the integuments covering the lower jaw—the fingers of the right hand were lacerated, and there were bruises on the shins—on removing the skull I found the external membrane of the brain in a very vascular state, of a deep colour; and immediately under that, on the right side, was a large quantity of coagulated blood, from three to four ounces—I consider the pressure of blood on the brain caused death.

Cross-examined. Q. From what you saw, and hearing that this arose from a row on the Saturday night, do not you think, if assistance had been rendered to her, and blood taken from her within a reasonable time after, she would have recovered? A. I think free bleeding would have relieved her considerably—I conceive the blood was gradually extravatated—I have no doubt a number of small blood-vessels were ruptured—at the time Mr. Sultan saw her I do not think relief could have been rendered, at she was then in a state of stupor—I have no doubt at that period there was a perfect collapse, and bleeding would then have done injury—if assistance had been rendered soon after the blows were inflicted, I think she would have recovered—there was great determination of blood to the head in consequence of the blows—inflammation of the brain took place, and I think free bleeding might have relieved her considerably at the commencement, and perhaps have prevented the fatal consequences.

COURT. Q. Were the contusions evidence to you of the application of violent external force? A. Yes, not of an ordinary blow, but followed up with considerable violence.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-857

857. RICHARD FAGE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Thomas, on the 18th of February, at St. Andrew, Undershaft, and stealing therein 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 1l. 6s.; 5 spoons, value 1l. 5s.; 3 rings, value 2l. 14s.; 1 brooch, value 2l. 10s.; 3 seals, value 2l.; 1 watch-key, value 2s.; and 1 watch-chain, value 5s.; his property.

JAMES THOMAS . I am clerk to the Anti-Dry-rot Company, and reside in a house belonging to the Company, in Lime-street. The secretary of the company pays the rent and taxes of the house—I occupy it merely as a servant. On the 18th of February, about half-past two o'clock I found the private door leading to the upper part of the house, ajar—knowing my next door neighbour had been robbed, I went up stairs to my bed-room—I found no one there, and returned to the office—in about three minutes after I heard the private door shut—I immediately looked out at the office window, and saw the prisoner go down the steps of the house—I made inquiries of the servant, and immediately went out and followed the prisoner down the square, through Lime-street, till he came to the comer—he then ran across from Lime-street into St. Mary Axe—I there saw him just about to converse with another boy who I had seen playing about in the square—I beckoned to my porter, who I saw just by, to catch hold of him—he did so, and brought him back to the office—he denied having been into the house, and said I must be mistaken—I sent one of the clerks for a policeman, and whilst he was gone, the prisoner of his own accord, said, "I may as well show you what I have got"—he took out of his pocket the articles stated in the indictment, which are

worth about 10l. altogether—they are what I lost—when the policeman came, he found a loaded pistol in the prisoner's pocket.

Prisoner. Another lad went up—I waited against the door—he gave me the things, and ran off. Witness. I did not see two persons.

DANIEL TOMKINS . I am a porter in Mr. Thomas's service, and live in Brown's-buildings, St. Mary Axe. I was standing in St. Mary Axe when he passed me—he beckoned to me there, and I laid hold of the prisoner and took him back to the office—he there pulled out this property—I told him to lay it down on the stairs—he afterwards pulled out the loaded pistol, and kept it in his hand till the policeman came.

JOHN SUMMERFIELD (City police-constable, No. 533.) I took the pistol from the prisoner—he had it in his right-band, with the muzzle pointed towards the door—he told me he had the pistol to play with—he said he had given up all the property, which was lying on the stair—I then searched him further, and found 4s. in silver about him—I took him to the station, examined the pistol, and it was loaded with a hard wad of paper, but not with ball—it bad a cap on it.

Primer's Defence. I had the things of the other boy; I asked where he got them, he made no answer, but ran off, and left me; I had been at work for my mother, who is a worsted-binder, and had only come out that day; I had the pistol to play with.

JAMES THOMAS re-examined. This chain, ring, and brooch were taken from the dressing-room adjoining the bed-room, and the silver spoons from the bed-room cupboard, where they had been placed only a quarter of an hour before—I expect the prisoner was in the house while the other boy was playing opposite the house—it attracted my attention, seeing so big a boy playing marbles, and immediately I saws the prisoner go up to the boy, I recognised him—I did not allow a word hardly to pass between them, although I did not know I had lost any thing then.

GUILTY† of Larceny only. Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

NEW COURT.—Monday, February 28th, 1842.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18420228-858

858. ALFRED ROBERT BLISS was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-859

859. WILLIAM FERRISS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February, 24 shirts, value 2l. 16s., the goods of Benjamin Bradley Ward, and others; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-860

860. HENRY MAY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February. 12 bags, value 24s.; and 7 wrappers, value 6s.; the goods of Benjamin Bradley Ward, and others; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-861

861. JOHN TISLEY and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for stealing. on the 24th of February, 1 ream of paper, value 12s., the goods of Richard Knight, and another.

RICHARD KNIOHT . I am a wholesale stationer, and live in Budge-row I have only one partner. This ream of paper which is now here, belongs, to us—I am quite sure we had not sold it.

WILLIAM GRIFFIN . I live in Park-street, Camden-town. On the 24th of February, about two o'clock I was in Budge-row—I saw the two pri soners, and Mr. Knight's carman struggling with them—Tisley had this paper on his shoulder—he gave it to Jones, and ran away—I am sure the prisoners are the persons.

FRANCIS LONG . I am carman to Messrs. Knights, Budge-row. On the 24th of February, about two o'clock, I was returning from dinner, to my employers warehouse—I saw the two prisoners and another looking about the windows—I went in and hid myself from their view, and in a minute or two Tisley walked into the warehouse and took this ream of paper-Jones was then at the door—Tisley walked out a little distance, and then put the paper on Jones's shoulder—I went and seized them—they threw the ream of paper off their shoulders, and struggled with me a little, and the other got away—I am quite sure they are the two persons.

TISLEY**— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

JONES- GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-862

862. JAMES HOLDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, 1 bottle, value 2s.; and 4 gallons of brandy, value 6l.; the goods of William Barker and another, in their dwelling-house.

WILLIAM BARKER . I am a wine and spirit merchant, and live in Bishopsgate-street; my son, George Barker, is in partnership with me. On the 12th of February, my attention was called to my servant following the prisoner, who had carried away this bottle—he brought him back with the bottle—it contained four gallons of French brandy, which had just been taken out of a hogshead for convenience, and the remainder is there now—I can swear to the bottle, it has my name on it, and I have no doubt about the brandy—it would be worth about 5l.—it had remained in the docks for some years, and the duty would by that means be diminished.

THOMAS BIGGS . I am cellarman to Mr. Barker. Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening of the 12th of February, I saw the prisoner come towards this bottle, which was on my master's premises—he took it up, and walked out at the door with it—it contained four gallons of pale brandy—I am certain it was my master's property—I took the prisoner back.

Prisoner. I had had something to drink, and do not recollect any thing about it. Witness. He appeared rather in liquor, but I should think he was sensible enough to know what he was doing.

GUILTY of Stealing only. Aged 28.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-863

863. EDWARD ROWBOTHAM and ROBERT PENFOLD were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 5 jackets, value 3s. each 5 waistcoats, value 1s. 6d. each; and 5 pairs of trowsers, value 3s. 6d. each; the goods of Alexander Lamb.—2nd COUNT, stating the property to belong to different persons.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES LOCKLEY . I am in the West London Union workhouse, and am going on for sixteen years of age—the two prisoners were in that workhouse. On Sunday evening, the 20th of February, between eight and nine o'clock,

I was in bed with Stanton—Rowbotham came to Stanton, and whispered something—I could not hear what—I am certain it was Rowbotham—I got up, and put my jacket, waistcoat, and trowsers between the sacking and the mattress—between five and six the next morning I saw Rowbotham come and whisper to Stanton again—I did not hear what he said—I saw him go to the beds, lift up the pillows, and take Stanton'a and Claxson's clothes from under the pillows, and go out of the room with them under his arm—I am certain it was Rowbotham, because he came and spoke to me, and said, "Who is this?"—I said, "Lockey"—after he left the room, I awoke Claxson, who looked under his pillow, and his clothes were gone—I did not see Penfold during that time.

BENJAMIN STANTON . I shall be fifteen years old in September; I am in the workhouse. On that Sunday night when I went to bed I put my jacket, trowsers, and waistcoat under my pillow—after I had gone to bed Rowbotham came to my bed-side, and asked me whether I would let him have my clothes in the morning—he said he was going to run away—I told him he might not have them—they were the clothes which were supplied to me in the workhouse—on the Monday morning he came to my bed-side, and asked me again for my clothes—I told him no—he then lifted up my pillow, took the clothes out, and instantly went out of the room—I did not owe him a halfpenny, but after he had got my clothes he said out loud, "Pay me the halfpenny in the morning"—I did not see Penfold in the room.

Rowbotham. I asked for them, and you told me I might have them. Witness. No, I did not—he asked me whether I would get him any clothes beside—I said yes, but I did not get him any—he came and asked me if he should have mine, and I said, "No."

JAMES CLAXSON . I am in the West Union workhouse. On the Sunday in question I placed my jacket, trowsers, and waistcoat by the side of ray bed—Lockley spoke to me, and I found they were gone—I saw Penfold with a jacket over his head, and a bundle of clothes under his arm—he went out of the room with them—I did not see him again till he was in custody.

Penfold. I had my own apron over my head, and my jacket under my arm. Witness. He had a bundle of clothes, such as the boys use in the workhouse.

ALEXANDER LAMB . I am master of the West London Union work-house, When boys or paupers are brought in they are clothed—I have the charge of the clothes—the boys have no right to take them away—when, they leave, the clothes are handed back to me—on the Monday morning I went to the beds and found five boys were naked—I found three persons had made their escape that morning, and the prisoners were two of them—persons frequently make their escape that way—I have endeavoured in vain to discover how they have disposed of the clothes—I found the box of the lock of the door leading to the sleeping-room was broken off, and some bricks broken out, and that was where they had escaped—I gave information, and the prisoners were caught in Drury-lane—the third Person was caught, but he got away—I have taken him since.

Penfotd. When I went down stairs Homer came and said, "I think you are acting a foolish part if you are going with nothing"—I said, "I have got nothing but a pair of stockings," and I gave them to him—he saw me go over the wall—I took nothing but what I stand up in.

Rowbotham. I got up, and Thomas Horner said to me, "Are you going to run away?" I said, "Yes, as they would not let me out last Thurs day"—he said, "Very well, I don't mind if you have got none of the boys' things"—he searched me, and I said, "Good bye"—I got over the wall, and went away—about seven o'clock at night I met this other boy—we were taken, but what for I do not know.

JAMES WILLIAM NEWTON (City police-constable, No. 217.) I took the prisoners—they did not say any thing about Horner having seen them.

ROWBOTHAM— GUILTY . Aged 22.

PENFOLD- GUILTY. Aged 18. Judgement Respited.

Reference Number: t18420228-864

864. JOHN SHEEY and THOMAS SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January, 23 bags, value 23s.; and 4592lbs. weight of rags, value 38l.; the goods of William Louis Moinier Leschallas.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM SPALL . I was, up to last Monday, a carman, in the employ of Mr. John Reilly, of Maidstone-wharf—I live in Walker-street, Longacre. On Monday afternoon, the 31st of January, between three and four o'clock, I was at Brook's-wharf-lane, Upper Thames-street, loading a cart' as I was about to leave, I found I was stopped by a cart which was loading at Mr. Leschallas' warehouse, in Brook-wharf-lane—before I noticed the cart standing there, I saw Smith come down the lane with the key, and another man with him—Smith unlocked the door of Mr. Leschallas' warehouse, and went in—after that I saw both the prisoners inside the warehouse—I knew Sheey as being then in the employ of Mr. Leschallas, and Smith as having been in his employ—Sheey was then delivering the goods from the loophole of the warehouse to another man in the cart—it was the man who accompanied Smith to the warehouse—there were four persons there in all—they continued to load the cart till it was overloaded, and it broke the wanty,—the horse was hung up by the collar, and I took hold of the cart to prevent it—Sheey gave me a small piece of rope to make the horse seem (he appeared rather tipsy)—I told him the rope was not strong enough, and I heard Smith speaking to him, as if reproaching him for not exerting himself to get another rope—another man, a brewer, then came up, and wanted to get by—he held the horse, and I ran to my own stable, and got a piece of rope—another man and the brewer made it fast, and it was drawn out—I did not stop to see the prisoners fasten up the warehouse.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You saw Smith and another go into the warehouse? A. I saw Smith unlock the warehouse and go in—I did not see whether the other man followed him in or not—I saw six or eight yards from the warehouse—I saw Smith open the warehouse with the key—I should think another man could not have gone in without my seeing him while I was there—Sheey appeared to me to be tipsy he was in a working dress—I thought he was tipsy, because when I asked for a rope, he appeared not to exert himself," and I should have thought when an accident like that occurred, he would—it was between half-past three and four o'clock.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you know Sheey before? A. Yes one of the men with the cart asked me to have something to drink.

DANIEL TAYLOR . I am in the service of Truman and Hanbury, the brewers—I was in Brook's-wharf-lane, Thames-street, on the 21st of

January—there were two other carts, and I could not get by—the fore-most cart was loaded with rags—I went up, and the horse was hanging—I laid hold of the shafts to keep them down—I assisted Spall to get it right—when the wanty was mended, and the horse was secure, one of the men in the rag cart asked me to lend him a horse to get out, and I did so—I did not see the prisoners there.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you think you would know the other men if you were to see them? A. There were four men—the prisoners are not the two men who were with the cart—I did not see them there I am positive.

COURT. Q. How many men did you see? A. Two—I did not see any other men near the cart.

JOHN POTTON . I am waiter at the White-horse public-house in Cloakline, near Budge-row. On the 31st of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw Sheey into the tap-room—Smith afterwards came in, and asked for John Sheey—he asked me to go into the tap-room, and tell him that be wanted to speak to him—I went and told Sheey, and he said he did not want him, and he looked as if he did not want him—he spoke in an angry tone—I went back and told Smith that he did not want him—Smith seemed rather agitated and confused—he walked to the tap-room door, and looked over the glass at the top of the door—I had occasion to gain to the parlour, and when I returned in about three or five minutes, I lost tight of them both.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had Sheey been in the house? A. I think about five minutes—I did not notice if he took anything to drink—he seemed to me to be sober.

WILLIAM DAY . I am foreman in the rag department of the warehouse of Mr. William Louis Moinier Leschallas—one of his warehouses is in Brook-wharf-lane—Sheey has been in his service several years as a weekly labourer—Smith has been in my employer's service as carman till within the last nine months—on the 31st of January I was employed at the ware-house in Size-lane, and Sheey was there—the keys of the warehouse in Brooks'-wharf-lane were hung up in the floor of the warehouse in Size-lane, where Sheey was employed—the key of the water-closet hung on the same nail—Sheey was absent that day from about five minutes before two o'clock till about a quarter before four—when I noticed the absence of Sheey about five minutes before two, I noticed that the keys of Brooks'-wharf-lane warehouse were gone—Sheey had the opportunity of taking them—on the day following I had occasion to send Sheey and two other labourers to the warehouse in Brooks'-wharf-lane—up to that time I had' no knowledge that the warehouse had been robbed—in consequence of information that one of them brought, I went to the warehouse between five and six, and I discovered the loss of twenty-three bags of rags, weighing about 41 cwt., worth about 38l.—on the Tuesday evening, about nine, Sheey came in—I asked him how he accounted for having the keys of Brook-wharf warehouse in his possession on the previous afternoon—he acknowledged having them, but said he had taken them by mistake, and he had gone to Queenhithe, meaning a place for public accommodation—he had no right whatever to take the keys of the warehouse for any purpose that day—inquiries were made, and we discovered the witnesses who ad seen this, and Spall came and picked out Sheey from among the men, as having been at the warehouse that afternoon.

Cross-examined. Q. Though he had no right to take the keys of the warehouse, there was no objection to his taking the key of the water. closet? A. No—I saw Sheey return on the Monday, at a quarter before four o'clock—he appeared to have been drinking—he was not insensibly drunk—I am not aware that I ever said he was sober on that occasion—he went to work the next day.

SHEEY— GUILTY . Aged 28.)

SMITH- GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, March 1st, 1842.

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder,

Reference Number: t18420228-865

865. LOUIS PHILIP ETHERINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November, 1 pair of leathern fronts for boots, value 4s.; and 1 pair of leathern half-fronts for boots, value 3s.; the goods of John Davenport, his master: and WILLIAM JORDAN , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

(THOMAS HOMEWOOD, a witness in this case, being neither a Quaker nor Separatist, refused to be sworn. MR. PAYNE, on the part of the prosecution, stated, that without this witness's evidence he could not proceed with the case, his evidence being material. The witness, persisting in his refusal, was committed.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-866

866. LOUIS PHILIP ETHERINGTON was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December, 2 leathern backs for boots, value 1s.6d.; 21 yards of webbing, value 7s. 6d.; 8 lasts, value 1s. 6d.; 7 1/2 lbs. of leather, value 8s. 6d.; the goods of John Davenport, his master.

JOHN DAVENPORT . I am a boot and shoemaker, and live in Wood-street, Cheapside—the prisoner was my shopman for two years or two years and a half—I have missed leather and boots, within a few months back—in consequence of what I heard, I kept a watch on the prisoner, and at the latter end of January I searched him—I found nothing on his person—I and a policeman went with him to his house in Blue Heart-court, Bell-alley—he pointed the place out as his residence—we found two pieces of leather, called "boot-backs," in a bag under his bedstead, and a quantity of pieces of leather in the same bag, which are mine, some boot-webbing and other webbing, also six or seven old lasts in a cupboard.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-867

867. GEORGE CLARKE and JAMES BRYANT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Speedy, about two o'clock on the night of the 11th of February, at St. Pancras, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 cask, value 5s., and 25 quarts of rum, value 3l., his goods.

HENRY SPEEDY . I keep the Boot public-house, Cromer-street, Bruns-wick-square, in the parish of St. Pancras. I have seen a cask of rum in the possession of the policeman, and know it to be mine by the quantity and quality marked on it in ray own hand—(examining it)—it contains rum, which cost me 3l. 5s. 8d. without the cask. On Saturday morning,

the 12th of February, about seven o'clock, when the policeman gave me information, I examined, and found the bolts of the cellar-flap withdrawn, and the chain off, which would enable a person to get down into the cellar from the outside—the cellar is part of the dwelling-house—the cask bad been delivered at my house on Thursday, the 10th—the brewer's men generally fasten the flap when they come—I think I had seen it fattened on the Thursday—I found four or five bottles of wine broken in the cellar, one with the neck broken off and empty, as if it had been drank out of—three or four had the corks knocked in, and were drank from—two gallons of shrub were moved from the beer to the wine-cellar—the cellar flap was down on Friday—the brick-work from the flap into the cellar slopes, and there is a sort of wet slimy mould on it—there was the impression of corded trowsers on that—I found two or three phosphorus matches in the cellar, which are things I do not use—the prisoner Clarke had corded trowsers on—I should say the impressions were such as those trowsers would make—I first noticed the impressions at seven in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. Was this British rum? A. Yes—I have had casks from the same persons before, but not the same quantity—those casks had my name on them, the same as this—I am not certain the flap was fastened the last time the brewers came—I never had a cask so small as this before—I have not compared the trowsers with the impressions—I cannot say whether brewer's men wear corded trowsers.

ANDREW WILLIAM SPALDING . I am a bricklayer, and live at No. 3, Brunswick-street. On Saturday morning, the 12th of February, between two and three o'clock, I was disturbed, and thinking it might be time to get up I got a light, and finding I was before my time, which is five, I went outside, and there was a cab standing in the street—I came in again, and, a considerable time after, heard the cab drive off—my street leads from Cromer-street into the New-road—the prosecutor's house is several doors round the corner—the prisoner Bryant drove the cab—it stood nearly a dozen doors from Speedy's, as I thought, at the corner of Brunswick-street—it was certainly before four that I saw it.

Bryant. The cab was not in the street ten minutes; he is wrong in the time.

HENRY RUSSELL (police-constable M 112.) I was on duty in King-street, Southwark, about five minutes to four o'clock, on Saturday morning, the 12th of February, I saw the prisoner Bryant driving down King-street—the cab stopped at No. 15, King-street—I saw a man stand ing at the door of the house—he saw me, and got into the cab, and told the prisoner to drive off—I hallooed to Bryant to stop—I do not know when there he heard me—he drove on—I sprained my ankle in running after him, and did not run further—I saw it go down Union-street, and turn round into Friar-street—I went back a contrary way, and saw the cab in Green-street, and Clarke standing with it—the policeman, No. 218, came over, and then Clarke ran away—No. 213 followed him down Friar-street, and stopped him—after stopping the cab I leaned inside it, and saw this cask—Bryant was with the cab—Clarke is not the man I saw standing at the street-door—I took them both to the station—Clarke had corded trowsers on.

Cross-examined. Q. You first saw Clarke in custody? A. No—I saw him at the cab-door, and saw him run away from the cab—I then stopped the cab, looked inside, and the cask was in it—there was room for a man as well as the cask.

Q. I Have you ever said before that you saw Clarke standing near the cab? A. I stated it at Union-hall—I do not know whether it was taken down—my deposition was read over, and I signed it—this is it—(the deposition being read, omitted to state that Clarke was by the cab)—I saw him run from the cab.

JOHN WOOLF (police-constable M 213.) I was on duty in Friar-street, Southwark, about four o'clock in the morning, and saw a hackney cab draw up in Green-street—I went up to Bryant, the driver, and asked him what was the matter, as Clarke and two others were very busy about the cab-one of them said, "Drive on cab man, there is no fare for you"—Bryat drove on—when he was stopped, I found the cask of rum in it—I pursed Clarke and the other two, sprang my rattle, another policeman stopped Clarke, and I took him—I cannot tell what trowsers he had on.

Bryant's Defence. I was going up the New-road, towards the railroad, about ten minutes past three o'clock, I met a gentleman at the corner of a street, who said, "Are you hired;" I said, "No;" he said, "Can you carry this, come round here;" he sat on the box, and took me round; his two friends came and got into the cab; he said, "Drive over the water, and over Blackfriars-bridge;" he directed me up Gravel-lane to Green-street; I stopped there; he opened the door, let his friends out, and said, "Go on;" I said, "Where?" he said, "Go into the Borough-road, I will show you;" he said, "Can you get any gin?" I said, not at that time; he said, "Go on, go on;" he opened the door, got out, and said, "When are you going?" a policeman came and followed him; he ran away; the policeman said, "Stop," and I stopped momentarily; Clarke was running, and the policeman caught him, but I never saw him till he was in custody.

(Bryant received a good character.)

CLARKE— NOT GUILTY .

BRYANT— GUILTY of Stealing only. Aged 38.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-868

868. BARNARD JOSEPHS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December, 18301bs. weight of metal, value 47l., the goods of William Raybould.

MR. JONES conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM RAYBOULD . I am a brass-founder, and live in St. James's-walk, Clerkenwell. I have known the prisoner from three to four years—I have had transactions with him in business, and have been in the habit of selling him refuse metal out of my shop, and generally took copper from him in exchange—if my metal came to more than the copper, he gave me the difference in cash, and if his copper came to more than my metal, I gave him the difference in cash, at the scale, at the time the metal was sold—I never trusted him—I do not believe he ever asked me to do so, because he knew I should not have done it—on the 29th of December, I had some ingot metal to dispose of, and I sent my man Day with a message the prisoner—I wanted copper at that time—the prisoner called on new said he would give me a certain price for it—6 1/4 d. per lb. was the price agreed on, which was the ready money market price at that moment—he was to pay as he always paid—he did not say anything about paying for it—be had sent word by my servant—he afterwards came again, and brought his horse and cart, and man—the metal was then weighed and delivered to him—my servant and his I believe put it into the cart—I did not it

driven away—I then went into my counting-house, and he followed me, as I thought, for the purpose of paying me—he said he wanted a bill of parcels of what it came to, as agreed—he made out the account, and gave it to me to receipt it—I have not got it with me—I have not looked for it, lately—he began to examine his pockets for the money, and then declared he had left his money at home, and if I would give him leave he would go home and fetch it, if I would let my servant go with him—I told him my servant should go, but on no condition to give the money to my servant, bat to bring it to roe positively—he said he would bring it, and I said I would give him the bill of parcels and receipt—he then went away with my servant—he came back again and said, "Oh, Lord, I have lost my pocket-book"—I was so confused at the moment, that I do not know when-there I said anything to him—I do not think I did—he went away—I saw him again next day—I sent my servant to him, and he came—he said he wished I would take 20l. that evening, and on the Tuesday following, on his honour, he would pay me the rest—I told him I would have no more to do with him—I insisted on having my metal back—he declared he could not let me have it back, for he had actually sold it to pay a bill of 49l., and he produced a bill to me—he did not say to whom he had sold it—he said he had sold it before he had bought it—he then went away—I saw nothing more of him until I applied to have him taken in custody—I never intended to give him any credit for the metal.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How many times did you see the prisoner after he had the metal? A. I saw him twice on the 29th of December, and once on the 30th—I cannot say how long I saw him on the 30th—I had dealings with him before, to the amount of 100l., more or less—I took no account what the sums were-—I had the money at the scale, and did not particularly enter it, either in my memory or my book—when he told me he had lost his pocket-book, I had no idea of not getting my money at that moment, indeed the surprise was on me a long while—I ordered my servant to wait on him in the morning, before he came to my shop, to insist on his sending my goods back—the prisoner then lived at No. 50, Middlesex-street, Aldgate, but at that time I did not know where he lived—my servant knew—as soon as I could arrange the knowledge which, in my ignorant state, I was in possession of, I went to a Magistrate, and he told me he thought he could not rightly assist me—I applied to my solicitor, who applied to the Magistrate to grant a warrant to apprehend him for felony—the Magistrate did not like to grant a warrant for felony, but condescended with a good deal of pleasantness to grant a summons—I rather think the prisoner attended the summons—I do not know how long he waited—we waited for two hours—I had no idea that he waited at all—I did not see him there—I believe he was there, but I do not think he was there seven minutes—they looked after him, and could not discover him—I afterwards preferred a bill against him without going before a Magistrate again—I believe he applied to one of the Judges to be admitted to bail—I made an affidavit on that occasion—he was bailed after that.

MR. JONES. Q. In your former dealings with the prisoner, when he had to pay you money, did he pay you directly on the spot? A. Yes—I never trusted him, or he me—I did not see the prisoner at the Police-court—I took pains to find him, but could not do so—I found him at last in white cross-street prison, for debt.

WILLIAM DAY . In December last, I was in Mr. Raybould's service.

On the 29th he sent me with a message to the prisoner—I saw him, and told him master had got half a ton of ingot metal, if he had copper in exchange—he said he had got very little copper, but master could have money, that he would give master money—he said he would come down and speak to master about it, and agree as to the price—he afterwards came down, and spoke to master about it, but not in my presence—he came down for the metal at six o'clock in the evening, with a horse and cart—the metal was weighed—I assisted in weighing it—it was then put into the cart by the prisoner's man, and my shopmate—after it was put into the cart, the prisoner told his man to go—my master was not present then—he was against the counting-house—the prisoner then came into the parlour, and was reckoning up on a piece of paper the price it came to—he then kept searching his pockets for the money, and said he had lost his pocket-book, perhaps he might have left it at home—master sent me with him to his place—he then said he had not left it at home—I said he bad better come down to master—he did so, and said he had lost his pocket-book and money, and would call next day on master—I do not remember what master said to him—master told me to call on him the first thing in the morning, before I came to work—I did so, and told him master insisted on having the metal back again—he said he could not, that it was sold, but be would come down to master—be did so—I did not hear what he said to master.

JAMES REED . I am a brass-founder, and live in Brownlow-street—I know the prisoner, and have had some transactions with him—I know hi cart, and the man who was in his service in December last—on the Wednesday evening following Christmas-day, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw his horse and cart in High Holborn, with some ingot metal in it, standing at the door of a Jew clothes saleman, named Benjamin, who is the prisoner's father-in-law—he answered me to that purpose—I did not hear so from the prisoner—I never saw them together.

Cross-examined. Q. I dare say he owes you some money? A. He robbed me of my goods—he has not paid me, and never will, I dare say.

MR. JONES. Q. What sort of goods? A. Metal dust—he took it away from my house on "Boxing-day."

COURT to WILLIAM DAY. Q. Had you often seen the prisoner exchange metal with your master? A. Yes, often—he always fetched it away in his cart, and, after the cart was gone, settled with my master.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18420228-869

869. CHARLES BENSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Riarch, about the hour of one in the night of the 4th of February, with intent to steal, and stealing there in, 34 gross of hair pencils, value 7l.; 10 boxes, value 5s.; 48 bottles of perfume, value 2l. 10s.; 5lbs. weight of tea, value 1l. 3s.; 150 cigars, value 1l.; the goods of James Riarch and others.

JAMES RIARCH . I live at No. 7, West-street, Finsbury-circus, and keep the whole house, part of which consists of an office, below stairs On the morning of the 5th of February, between eight and nine o'clock, I discovered the office had been broken, and missed a quantity of camel-hair pencils, some bottles of perfume, some tea, and 150 cigars—on the 15th of February, in consequence of a message from Mr. Reeves, of Cheapside, I went to his shop—he is an artist's colourman—I remained there about half-an-hour—the prisoner entered the shop while I was there—Mr. Reeves

produced some camel-hair pencils to me, which I recognised as my own, and part of what I had lost—the prisoner was standing in the shop, and the pencils were lying on the counter when I first saw them—Mr. Reeves, after I was introduced to the prisoner, asked his name, and after giving his name, he asked where he got them from—after some hesitation, he said he got them from a person named Smith—he said he had got about thirty-five gross—I told him they were mine—he said he had bought them of this person; that he wanted to make a commission on them; and if I would go along with him, he would take me to that person—I declined going—he was then given in charge to a policeman, and was taken to the station—a policeman accompanied him, myself, and some other persons, to an eating-house, kept by a man named Puttock—he there pointed out one of the boxes, where the witness Davis and myself went with a candle, and picked up three pencils similar to those I had lost—the prisoner had mentioned the name of Harry Puttock to me when we got to the corner, of St. John-street, Smithfield—no Harry Puttock has been found—he is gone.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You asked him his name and address? A. Mr. Reeves did, and he gave it—I did not take the trouble of finding out whether he gave his right name and address—when we went to the eating-house, I heard him ask the landlord where Harry was, and he answered that he had not been there for some hours—the prisoner pointed out the box, and said that was the box the hair pencils were taken from, and there I saw some picked up—I never saw the prisoner before, and know nothing of him.

ROBERT DAVIS . I am shopman to Mr. Reeves, of Cheapside. On the morning of the 15th of February a man came to the shop, and brought I with him one camel-hair pencil—he asked if I would purchase any of that pattern—I asked him the price—he said 1s. per gross—I took the pencil to Mr. Reeves, and told him the circumstance—he came out, spoke to the man, and five o'clock was appointed for him to bring the bulk—instead of his coming at five, the prisoner came with a bundle of camel-hair pencils, tied up in a pocket handkerchief—he asked me if the stout gentleman was in the way who spoke to a person about some hair pencils in the morning, meaning Mr. Reeves—I pointed down to the bottom of the shop, and said, "There he is"—the prisoner went towards him, and I went for a policeman—I had had instructions, as soon as he came, to go for an officer—the prisoner said at the station that he was standing outside the door when the other man came in, and that he saw the gentleman cut the quill of the pencil—I went to the eating-house, and picked up these three pencils in the place pointed out by the prisoner—some were under the seat, and some under the table.

RICHARD FRINNEBY . I am a manufacturer of painting brushes and artist's colours, and live in Coppice-row, Clerkenwell. I sell large quantities of these camel-hair pencils to the prosecutor, 1000 gross a year—these three appear to me to be part of those I sold him, and also those found on the prisoner.

EWARD HAUOHTON . I work for Mr. Frinneby, and not for any body else. These pencils are all my make, and were made on purpose for Mr. Freinneby.

ROBERT GENTRY (City police-constable, No. 418.) The prisoner was given into my custody at Mr. Reeve's shop—I took possession of these pencils, which were lying on the counter—I afterwards went with the prosecutor

and Davis to an eating-house in Smithfield, and then took the prisoner to the Compter.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know this Harry, as he is called? A. No—I heard the landlord tell the prisoner that he had not been at home for some hours—I afterwards went to see if I could find him, but he has absconded—I believe there is such a man—I have gone to different places to see if I could find him, but could not.

MR. RIARCH re-examined. I have every reason to believe that the rob bery took place between one and three o'clock in the morning, became it was about one before I retired to bed, having some friends in the house, and at three o'clock in the morning the gate of the livery stable was found unbolted, not by me, but by the officer on the beat—he is not here—the prisoner gave his own name and address, as Charles Benson, No. 8, Little Russell-street, Co vent-garden—I did not go there—he first told me Smith, of Southampton-row, was the man he had the pencils of, and afterwards he gave the name of Puttock—we did not search the eating-house—we had an officer, who did not know much about it—I was ignorant of flat to do, and we made a bungling business of it.

ROBERT GENTRY re-examined. I went to the prisoner's residence—I found it was his right address—I found his wife and family there—I looked about for goods, but found none.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, March 1st, 1842.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18420228-870

870. CHRISTOPHER MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February, 1 hat, value 4s., the goods of James Hutchinson; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 15.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-871

871. JOHN DAVEY and WILLIAM MUNROE were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February, 2 boxes, value 1s.; 60 bottles, valued and 4 1/2 gallons of oil, value 2l.; the goods of James Houghton, the master of Davey.

FREDERICK RUSSELL (City police-constable. No. 503.) About three o'clock in the afternoon of the 7th of February, I was in Lower Thames street, and saw a wagon in Upper Thames-street, loaded with boxes—I went towards it, and saw Munroe about ten or fifteen yards from the wagon, carrying away two boxes, one in each hand—I did not see him take them from the wagon—they were the same sort of boxes as were on it—I have since discovered that they contain prepared oil—he went up Miles's-lane—I followed him, and Grove, the other policeman, was before me—I stopped Munroe with the two boxes, and asked where he was going with them—he said it was all right, he was going to take then to the White Lion cellar in Gracechurch-street, to book them—I asked where he brought them from—he could not answer—I took him into custody—he said he had had them given him by some man.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was this in Upper or Lower Thames-street? A. In Upper Thames-street—I was under the dry arch about thirty yards from the wagon—Miles's-lane is close by, on the right

hand, about opposite where the horses were—Munroe was ten or fifteen yards from the wagon, walking as fast as he could—Davey was at the tail of the wagon, looking "towards the other prisoner—I took Munroe at the top of Miles's-lane, which is sixty or seventy yards long—I followed him immediately—I then pursued Davey—the street was not crowded at the time—Lower Thames-street is crowded, but not Upper.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When you stopped Munroe, did he tell you he had been hired to carry these things? A. Yes, he was carrying them openly.

COURT. Q. Did he say by whom? A. By a man he did not know.

CALEB GROVES (City police-constable, No. 522.) I was in company with Russell, and saw Munroe taken into custody—I followed him up Miles's-lane—when he was stopped, he was about to go into a beer-shop with the boxes—I asked where he was going—he said, "It is all right—it is all right"—I let Russell go on with Munroe, while I went back to take the address of the wagon—I found Davey, who was the driver of the wagon, stopping close against the Black Bull public-house in Upper Thames-street—I took the address of' the wagon, and asked Davey what he was waiting for—he said, "To get half-a-pint of beer"—I asked where he came from—he said, "From Lower Thames-street," and mentioned the name of Alley—I said, did they belong to any of the wharfs—he said, "Yes, Cox's Quay"—I asked how many boxes he had got—he said, "Fifty"—I said, "Are you sure there are fifty?"—he said, "There to be fifty, or else I have had two stolen"—I had not said any to him about two—I allowed him to go on—I went to the station to know what to do about taking Davey—the sergeant and I had orders to go and stop the wagon—we stopped it in Bartholomew-close—the cases were counted, and there were but forty-eight.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. When you came up to Davey, where was he? A. On the footway—I was in the road, taking the address on the wagon—I know Miles's-lane—I am on that beat—the cart was some distance from Miles's-lane—when I went to Davey the first words I said to him, were, "What are you waiting fort" and I asked him how many boxes he had—I did not tell him I had taken another man, or about any being lost—I said I was afraid it was not all right—he said if he had lost any, they had been stolen—Upper Thames-street is not to much crowded as Lower—I could see how this cart was loaded, and see what it was loaded with—I should say it was fifty or sixty yards from Miles's-lane—it was under the archway, which is fifty or sixty yards from. Miles's-lane—I am certain it was not opposite Miles's-lane—my brother officer came up to me after I had passed the wagon—I was behind the wagon when he spoke to me.

COURT. Q. What do you say Davey said to you when you spoke to him? A. I asked him after I took the address, what he was stopping for—he said, "To have half-a-pint of beer"—I asked where he came from—he said, "From Alley's."

HENRY JAMES HOUGHTON . I am clerk to my father, James Houghton, in Bartholomew-close. Between three and four o'clock, on the 7th of February, the policeman came with a wagon, which I had sent Davey that morning for, to Saunders's, for a load of goods—he ought to have received fifty boxes, the property of my father—he came back, and there were only forty-eight.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Did not Davey deliver a ticket with "fifty" on it? A. Yes.

(Munroe received a good character.)

DAVEY— NOT GUILTY .

MUNROE— GUILTY . Aged 45.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-872

872. GEORGE BAYLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February, 1 box, value 1d.; and 86 cigars, value 12s.; the goods of Charles William Stephen Paget; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

CHARLOTTE PAGET . I am the wife of Charles William Stephen Paget, a tobacconist in Fetter-lane. About half-past three o'clock, on the 18th of February, I heard a noise in the shop—I looked up, and saw the prisoner in the shop—he had opened the guard, and taken out a box containing eighty-six cigars—I saw the box in his hand, and saw him put it into a basket—I followed him across the road—he turned round and saw me coming—I called out, "Stop thief"—he ran up Greystoke-place—a person coming down prevented him going up—he threw the box of cigars into an area—they were picked up and given to me.

RICHARD ROWELL (police-constable F 114.) I received the prisoner, and the cigars.

ISAAC NOBLE (City police-constable, No. 318.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 12.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420228-873

873. HENRY CORNELL was indicted for embezzling 4s., the monies of Thomas Pearce, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-874

874. ANN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February, 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s. 6d.; 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 sovereign, 3 half-crowns, and 3 shillings, the property of William Cluff, from his person.

WILLIAM CLUFF . I am a silk-manufacturer, living in Steward-street, Old Artillery-ground. About eleven or twelve o'clock at night, on the 1st of February, I was coming over London-bridge—the prisoner laid hold of my arm, and asked me to treat her—I said I had no money, and begged her to let go of my arm—she kept walking on, and said, "Oh yes, you have"—I said, "I am not going to give you any"—I begged her to let go my arm—we walked to the corner of Gracechurch-street—I felt my watch then—when we got as far as Leadenhall-market, she pulled me down one of the turnings—(I had been drinking in the course of the evening)—we walked through the market, and came to Leadenhall-street—finding I was out of my road, I felt in my pocket, and found my watch ribbon had been cut, and my watch, and a sovereign, three half-crows. and some silver gone from my waistcoat-pocket, and my handkerchief from my great coat pocket—I charged her with stealing my watch—a man came up, and said, "Friend, you must be mistaken, this woman never robbed you"—I said, "Stand off"'—the policeman came up, and I gave her into custody—a knife was found in her hand, and one sovereign three half-crowns, and three shillings, were found on her—no watch was

found—the man had been quite close to her—part of the ribbon was hanging round my neck when the policeman came up—this is the handkerchief I lost.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How much had you been drinking? A. Three or four glasses of sherry, and four or five glasses of punch—I was rather cloudy—I had been dining with a few friends—I left there about a quarter-past twelve o'clock—I spoke to no person but the prisoner on my way home—I had my gold and silver loose in my waistcoat-pocket, and my watch.

LOUISA PRATT . I searched the prisoner—she gave me a sovereign, three half-crowns, and three shillings—she did not appear sober.

GEORGE CROWNERS (City Police-constable, No. 559.) I took the prisoner, and found three half-crowns, three shillings, a sovereign, and this knife in her hand—it was shunt—I saw this ribbon, which was cut, attached to the prosecutor's neck.

JOHN HORTON (City Police-constable, No. 533.) I found this handkerchief in Leadenhall-market.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-875

875. EDWARD CHANDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February, 1 windlass, value 1s.; and 4 half-crowns; the property of John Lake; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

HARRIETT LAKE . I am the wife of john Lake—I had six half-crowns, six shillings, two sovereigns, and a watch—about half-past five o'clock in the evenings of the 2nd of February, I put them into a cupboard in the boat we were in, and missed four half-crowns about the prisoner, and found him with four half-crowns on him—we had employed him that day—he said he had no money, and not a bit of victuals.

RICHARD THOMPSON . I found the prisoner in Mr. Cooper's hovel at the lime-kilns the same evening—he said he had not got the money—I searched him, and could not find it at first—I afterwards found it in his hat—I found this windlass on the bank, where he had thrown it.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he would deliver me if I gave up the money.

JOHN ATKINS . I am an officer. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Anthony Tindal, Clerk of the Peace for the county of Bucks—(read)—the prisoner is the person who was then tried and convicted.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Transported for Seven Years—ship.

Reference Number: t18420228-876

876. JAMES HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Andrew Stewart, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ANDREW STEWART . I keep a coffee-shop in High-Street, Wapping. On the 5th of February I was standing at the print-shop at Cornhill—I had a handkerchief in my pocket just before—I had seen it less than five minutes before—I received information from Parcell—I turned round and seized the prisoner, and accused him of picking my pocket—he pulled out my handkerchief and gave it to me, and begged I would let him go.

THOMAS PARCELL . I am a newsvender—I was at this shop, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket—I gave

information—the prosecutor turned round and caught the prisoner—he denied having it at first, but after that pulled it out, gave it to the gentleman, and said it was his handkerchief.

WILLIAM MONTGOMERY (police-sergeant F 4.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY .* Aged 24.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-877

877. JAMES VINE was indicted for embezzlement.

MR. JONES conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM WILLIS . I am in partnership with my father and brother—we are officers to the Sheriff of Middlesex. About the 3rd of February I received a warrant in the case of Manter against Lewis, to levy 10l., 18s.—in consequence I made the levy the following day, and left the prisoner in possession of the property—on the 25th he came and said he was very sorry that be had got drunk and lost the money, and wanted to know if he could arrange anything—I said, "Sit there"—I fetched a policeman, and gave him into custody—he had been employed in a similar situation, and received small sums like these.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you authorize him to receive this money? A. No—I did not owe him any money—my father, brother, and myself were the brokers put in by the Sheriffs—our names were inserted in the warrant—I do not believe I owe the prisoner 1l. for being at the Earl of Uxbridge, nor 1l. 6s. for being at Mr. Nicholls' farm—I would not like to swear it.

MR. JONES. Q. Did he ever claim any money of you? A. No—I did not tell him not to take this money.

JOHN LEWIS . I was the defendant in this case—the prisoner came into my house on the 3rd of February, and remained till the 21st—I went down stairs and told him to make out his account—be made it on this piece of paper—I asked if it would make any difference paying him or paying Mr. Willis—he said, "Not the least"—I paid him 18l. 12s.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you promised him anything for his kindness? A. No—when he was asked whether he was authorized to receive the money, he did not say "I do not know."

JOHN JEFFRYS (City police-constable, No. 256.) I took the prisoner, and found these papers on him.

Cross-examined. Q. He told you he had received the money and lost it? A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, March 2nd, 1842.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-878

878. ALFRED DAVIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Hanf, on the 16th of February, at St. Stephen, Coleman-street, and stealing therein 1 muff, value 3l., his property.

JAMES LOCKYER . I am in the service of Mr. Hanf, furrier, of London-wall. On the 16th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was standing in the shop with master, and heard a noise at the window—

I looked, and saw a muff was gone from the window (the window was cracked across before, but there was no hole)—it was a sable muff, worth 3l—I went out and saw the prisoner—I followed him till we came to a policeman—he ran across the road—I saw him throw the muff over the railing of a house, and saw him secured—he ran on after throwing it over—I took it up from the railing of No. 3, West-street, close by Fins-bury-circus—that now produced is it.

SAMUEL HANF . I am a furrier, and live at No. 105, London-wall, in the parish of St. Stephen, Coleman-street. On the 16th of February, I was in the shop with Lockyer—I did not see anything done—I had seen, the window safe that evening—I heard a rush at the window, and sent the boy out—I ran after him, found a large hole in the window, and the muff gone—there was no hole in the window before that—this is my muff—it is worth 3l.

PITER EGAN . I am a City policeman. About a quarter-past eight o'clock, on the 16th of February, the prisoner was given into my charge by two witnesses—I saw one of them take the muff from inside the railing.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a pattern designer, and live in Holland-street, Blackfriars. On the evening of the 16th of February I saw the prisoner running in Finsbury-circus, he threw something by me at the corner of West-street, near the rails of a house—I stopped him, and gave him in charge—Lockyer picked the muff up.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down London-wall; a lad ran by me, and chucked this muff by me, and said, "Here." I took it up, walked on, and chucked it away again; but as to stealing it, I am innocent.

GUILTY of Stealing only. Aged 30.— Confined Six Months.

Before Lord Chief Justice Tindal.

Reference Number: t18420228-879

879. JOHN HASKEW was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering a certain transfer of a share and interest of 110l. in the Long Annuities, standing in the names of Robert Bamford, senior, and James Berriman Tibbetts, since deceased, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.—Other COUNTS, varying the manner of stating the charge: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 46.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Justice Coltman.

Reference Number: t18420228-880

880. JOHN MAPP was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January, at St. Botolph Without Aldgate, in the dwelling-house of John Richardby Bousfield, 2 bags, value 6d.; 15 sovereigns, 20 half-sovereigns, 40 crowns, 80 half-crowns, 200 shillings, 200 sixpences, and 15l. Bank note; the monies of John Richardby Bousfield and others, his masters.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

MATTHEW HENRY MASON . I am clerk in the service of Messrs. Bous-field and Co., of Houndsditch—there are two counting-houses on the ground-floor—there was an iron safe in the back counting-house, in which I had a drawer for my own use, for the money I was entrusted with. On the 13th of January I locked that drawer when I left the premises, a few minutes before eight o'clock—I left in it twenty-five sovereigns, a half-sovereign, about 35l. in silver, and a 5l. Bank-note—the gold and note were in one bag, and the silver in another bag—I took the key of the

drawer with me—I returned at nine next morning—my usual hour of going was six—it was an accidental circumstance my not coming till nine—I then found the drawer unlocked, and the whole of the money gone, with the bags that contained it—I had received the 5l. note on the 12th from Mr. Sergeant Smith, who is now dead—he was the managing man in the business.

JOHN RICHARDBY BOUSPIELD . I have two partners—the dwelling-house is leased to the firm, and the firm pay the rent—I consider it be longs to the firm—Mr. Sergeant Smith lived in it as the servant of the firm, and took care of it for the firm.

GEORGE FORDASS . I am in the prosecutors' employ. On the 13th of January I left about ten minutes after Mr. Mason—I locked the outer door of the iron safe, and gave the keys to Mr. Palmer, another clerk in the employment—the keys of the outer door of the safe were usually left on the premises.

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I product a 5l. note from the Bank—it came in on the 10th of February.

GEORGE WHELDON HEPWORTH . I am a clerk in the New Three-and-half per cent. Office, Bank of England. On the 11th of January last I gave a party named Sergeant Smith a dividend-warrant, and he signed the name of "Sergeant Smith" in my presence.

WILLIAM BAWTREE I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I paid this dividend-warrant on the 11th of January—this 5l. note was paid by me in part payment of it to Sergeant Smith.

MR. BOUSFIELD re-examined. Mr. Smith was a relative of mine—I know of his receiving money at the Bank for years—this signature is his handwriting—he has since died.

JAMES BRODIE . I keep a public-house in Foster-lane. On the 14th of January the prisoner came to my house about three or four o'clock in the afternoon, and changed this 5l. note—I asked where it came from—he, said, "From Bousfield and Co., Houndsditch," and I wrote that on the back at the time—I gave him change in gold.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner on the 14th of January, at his lodging—I asked him where the money was, and the bags—after some little hesitation he took a little snuff-box out, which contained 26l. 10s. in sovereigns and half-sovereigns—in a minute or two afterwards I observed something in his hand, and took from it a small bag containing 23l. 10s. in gold, and 27s. 4d. in silver—I observed him try to put something on one side, and from his hand I took these two keys, one of which opens the drawer in which the money was—it seems a skeleton key.

GUILTY of Larceny only. Aged 29— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-881

881. THOMAS DRAPER, alias Hamlin, was indicted for stealing on the 9th of February, 1 gelding, price 15l., the property of William Smith.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a tailor, and live at Turnham-green, in the parish of Chiswick. I had a pony gelding, about thirteen hands which I saw safe in my stable about eleven or twelve o'clock in the day on the 8th of February—I missed it about nine or ten next morning—the stable is in the corner of a garden, and you have to go through a field, then through the garden, and through a chaise-house, to get to it—the field gate was locked, the stable was not—my boy attends to my pony—I did not examine the gate myself—I saw the pony again at the station in Smith

field about two that afternoon—I am sure it was the same I lost—it was worth about 15l., but I would not take 50l. for it—it is twenty-seven years old—the prisoner was then in custody—I never saw him before in my life to my knowledge.

GEORGE RUSSELL (City police-constable, No. 284.) On Wednesday, the 19th of February, I was in Smithfield—the prisoner was brought to me by a man who said he had bought the pony of him for 3l. 10s.—the pony was with them—he came to me that I might see he had bought it fairly—that is not an uncommon thing in Smithfield—I asked the prisoner where he got the pony from, thinking it was a very low price—he said his master had sent him with it—I asked who his master was—he said, "Mr. Draper, of Turnham-green, opposite the White Hart"—I told him I must take him to the station—he said, "Very well"—I took him there, and the pony was left at the Greyhound-yard stables, near the station—I then proceeded to Turnham-green—I found a Mr. Draper there, but he knew nothing of the prisoner—as I was taking the prisoner next morning before the Magistrate, he said he should not have taken it without the prosecutor's son had asked him to do it, and showed him how to undo the stable-door; that he was to take it to London and sell it, bring back the money, and he would give the prisoner part of it.

EDWIN SMITH . I am fifteen years old, and am the prosecutor's son. I have known the prisoner for three or four months—he lived at Turnham-green, and used to work with his father, who is a carpenter—he is older than me—I used to look after my father's pony—I never desired the prisoner to take it to London and sell it—the field-gate was locked—I found it the same as I had left it—the staple could be drawn, and driven in again—I did not find the gate broken—I never had any talk with the prisoner about this pony, or about selling it.

Prisoner. You know very well you told me to take it and sell it; to bring the money back, and you would give me half of it; and you showed me how to draw the staple. Witness. I did not.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-882

882. RICHARD HAWKINS was indicted for a rape.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420228-883

883. FREDERICK SARGEANT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February, 1 pewter-pot, value 18d., the goods of Joseph Hatwell :— also 1 pewter-pot, value 1s., the goods of Thomas William Axford :— also 1 pewter-pot, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Adams :—also, 1 pewter-pot, value 1s., the goods of James Jones: to all of which indictments he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 37.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-884

884. BRYAN BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February, 4lbs. weight of mutton, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Swannell; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-885

885. THOMAS NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Jeremiah Carter, from his person.

JEREMIAH CARTER . I am a warehouseman, and live in Coleman-street, On Wednesday afternoon, the 23rd of February, I was in Great Queen, street, Lincoln's-inn-fields, under the portico at the end of the street—I felt a lift at my pocket—I immediately clapped my hand upon it, turned round, and caught hold of the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand—he did not try to get away—he said he did not take it—another boy was on his left, close behind me, and I seized him too—I was immediately surrounded by a number apparently of the same class—I dragged the prisoner on towards Lincoln's Inn-fields, but could not find any officer—a gentleman allowed me to take him into a house, and he got an officer, who came and took him—I had used my handkerchief a short time before—I am quite certain it was in the prisoner's hand—I saw it quite distinctly.

Prisoner. I did not take it.

HENRY NEWMAN (police-constable F 8.) The prisoner was given into my custody—I produce the handkerchief.

MR. CARTER re-examined. This is it—my initials are upon it—he said at the time he was not the boy who took it—in consequence of that I laid hold of the other, and a crowd of boys immediately gathered round.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through the archway, and saw two persons at the back of the gentleman, they tried to put something into my hand; I did not know what it was, he turned round, and laid hold of me, accused me of picking his pocket, which I denied; he took me a hundred yards and odd from the place, a gentleman came by and gave him the handkerchief, and said he picked it up in the dirt; I never had it in my hand; I had my hand in my pocket at the time.

MR. CARTER re-examined Immediately I turned round he had the handkerchief just by his side quite open—he had not time to get it away before I turned round and caught him—I cannot swear who took it out of my pocket—there was another very near him.

Prisoner. There were two more boys there—I turned back—he turned round, and I was at the side of him, when he laid hold of me—I had no handkerchief in my hand at the time, or else he would have taken it from me. Witness. I had two to take charge of, and he threw the handkerchief down—another person came forwards and brought it me—I did not see the prisoner drop it, but I saw it in his hand.

Prisoner. He did not have hold of any body, at the time he had hold of me.

GUILTY ,† Aged 17.— Transported for Ten Years.'—Recommended to be imprisoned in the Boys' Ship for One Year.

Reference Number: t18420228-886

886. WILLIAM GABLE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peter Smith, on the 30th of January, at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, and stealing therein, 10 gowns, value 4l. 15s.; 8 yards of printed cotton, value 13s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief value 6d.; 2 towels, value 2s.; 1 yard of serge, value 1s.; 2 yards of calico, value 1s.; 2 shawls, value 5s.; 2 shifts, value 8s.; 1 pair of earrings, value 1l.; 2 pencil-cases, value 2s.; part of a strainer, value 1s.; 1 vice, value 6d.; 8 pieces of foreign silver coin, value 4s.; 2 shillings, 1 sixpence, 1 token, and 10 pence; the property of Rebecca Smith: 2 coats, value 2l. 10s.; 2 pairs of trowsers, value 30s.; 1 pair of boots, value 8s.; 1 stock, value 7s.; 1 breast-pin, value 10s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; the goods of the said Peter Smith.

REBECCA SMITH . I am a widow, and live with my son at No. 9 King-street.

Tyson-street, St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, at times, but on the 30th of January I was at my own house—I had moved my box to his house for safety—it contained a quantity of cotton dresses and the other articles stated in the indictment—I have seen most of them since in the hands of the policeman K 118—seven dresses, some print, shifts, and a silk dress are still missing—my son keeps the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you put the things into the box yourself? A. Yes—I left it at his house four or five months ago—I had the key, and saw the articles safe three weeks before.

PETER SMITH . I keep the house No. 9, King-street, and am a corkcutter—I let the upper part of the house out. On Sunday evening, the 50th of January, I left home with both my lodgers, about a quarter-past six o'clock as near as I can guess—I double locked the street-door, and took the key with me—when I got a little way from the house one of my lodgers called my attention to a man who was going towards my house, the man appeared the make of the prisoner—I returned home about a quarter after eight o'clock, put the key into the door, and it only turned once—I had double locked it—on opening it I found all the drawers turned out, and the things chucked into the middle of the room—the locks of the drawers were all broken—I went up stairs, and saw my mother's hair trunk drawn from under the bed, broken open, and the things which were left chucked about the room—it was locked before—I missed two coats, two pairs of trowsers, a satin stock, a gold pin, a silk handkerchief from the drawers below, and a pair of boots from the staircase—I have seen my own things in the possession of Mountford.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where was you when your lodger called your attention to the man? A. In Tyson-street, which King-street leads into—the person's back was about the same size as the prisoner's.

THOMAS PRETTY . I am a cork-cutter, and lodge with the prosecutor, I went out with him on Sunday evening, and in Tyson-street met the prisoner going towards King-street—I had seen him before—we were about sixty yards from the house—I had a good view of him when he was coming, and after he got by us I told Smith of it—I lost a stock—I only saw the prisoner once that night—he went right past us—I saw his face coming towards us and passing us, and when he got a few yards from us I turned round and looked at him—I knew him before.

Cross-examined. Q. How soon after you left the house did you leave the prosecutor? A. I left him at eight o'clock, and did not get home till half-past ten—we went to Billingsgate, to see a young fellow we knew, and remained together till we came back to Brown's-lane, leading to Brick-lane—he had about ten minutes' walk to get home then.

MARY LUCAS . I am the wife of William Lucas, No. 1, King-street, Bethnal-green, eleven doors from the prosecutor's, and in the same line. On Sunday evening, the 30th of January, I went to my door, about twenty minutes after seven o'clock, and saw a female and two men talking in the street—one of the men was the prisoner—he went towards the prosecutor's house—I did not see his face, but he is so much like him—he made a stumble, and his hat fell before he went many steps, and then I saw the back part of him and his head, and he was very much like the prisoner—I afterwards saw a woman come by on the other side of the way—the same woman who had been talking to the prisoner—she came back about twenty minutes after with some things in her hand.

Cross-examined. Q. This is the first time you have said it was the prisoner? A. I said the same as I say now—I said he appeared in stature about the size of the prisoner—I told the Magistrate he had very long hair at the side, just like the prisoner—I did not see his face—I saw the long hair at the side of his face, but not exactly his face—the last witness has long hair, but it is very different to that—I never saw the prisoner before that.

HENRY MANNING . I am twelve years old, and live at No. 5, King-street. On Sunday night, the 30th of January, I was playing opposite Mr. Smith's house—I saw a man standing at the corner of a court near the house—the prisoner is that man—I observed his face—there was a gas-light right opposite—he had a bundle—it was about half-past seven o'clock—be went up the court, and when he got a little way, he pretended to pick up a stone, and hallooed out, "Bill!"—one of the boys hallooed out, "Father, let us stop a little longer"—I am sure he is the man—I saw his face plainly—the court is two or three yards from Mr. Smith's house.

Cross-examined. Q. What were you about? A. Playing—I had not been to church that night, I went in the morning and afternoon—I never saw the prisoner before—one of my companions called out, "There goes Mr. Smith, he is going to play music at this time of night"—he thought it was Smith, who plays the cornopian—the prisoner pretended to pick up a stone to throw at him—I had the prisoner in view not quite five minutes, it was more than two minutes—my father is a pewterer—I was playing with seven or eight boys—I and two more saw the prisoner—I did not see any other people there.

CHARLES YARWOOD . I am twelve years old, and live with my sister, at No. 20, King-street. I was playing with Manning, opposite Smith's house—I saw two men come out with a bundle—the prisoner was one of them—I saw the side of his face—the other man was shorter than the prisoner—there is a court at the corner of Mr. Smith's house—both went down the court, turned back, and one of them hallooed out, "Bill," and took up a stone to heave at us.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. My father is traveller for Mr. Parsons—it was I called out, "There goes Mr. Smith to play his music"—I had never seen the prisoner before—I saw his side-face—I had been to church that day.

COURT. Q. Have you any doubt the prisoner is the man? A. I am quite sure of it.

JOHN AYRES . I am twelve years old, and live in Virginia-row Bethsal-green. I was playing with Manning and Yarwood opposite Mr. Smith's—I saw two men come out of the house—one came out first—the other shut the door after him, and they went up the court—they both had a bundle—the prisoner was one of them—he had a bundle—it was him pulled the door to—I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been sure of him? A. Since the night he done it—I told the Magistrate it was a man dressed like the prisoner—I said he was the man—I said it was him—I cannot write—I used to go to school and read "ab" on a card, that is all I learned—I told the Magistrate it was the prisoner, and said he was dressed just like him also—my deposition was read over to me—I did not see his face.

COURT. Q. How were you standing? A. I can tell him by his size and make.

GEORGE MOUNTFORD (police-constable K 118.) On Sunday evening, the 30th of January, I was on duty in Pollard's-row, Bethnal-green—I saw two men, with each a bundle under their arms—they turned round by the Hope public-house—I walked after them—they then walked rather fast, and seeing me walk faster they then began to run, and, about 150 yards further, threw their bundles over into the square—I ran against a post, and fell backward—the prisoner is about the same size as one of them—I could not see his face—the other was shorter—I got the bundle—this was eight or nine minutes' walk from the prosecutor's.

WILLIAM ALDERMAN (police-constable H 7.) I was called to the prosecutor's house on the Sunday evening, and next day, at twelve o'clock, I went to a brothel in Bell-court, Princes-street, Mile-end, and found the prisoner in bed—I told him he was charged with breaking into the house of Mr. Smith—he said he knew nothing of the robbery.

PITER SMITH re-examined. The articles in these bundles are part nine and part my mother's—all the property has not been found.

MR. PAYNE called the following witnesses.

WILLIAM GABLE . I am the prisoner's father, and live at No. 17, Old Castle-street, which is about a quarter of a mile from King-street—the prisoner lodged at my house—on Sunday evening, the 30th of January, he was at home from half-past six o'clock till half-past nine—there was nobody there but his mother and himself—he was taken into custody on the Monday morning about twelve.

COURT. Q. What time did you dine that day? A. We dined at four, at least had tea—I did not go to any place of worship that day—we supped about half-past nine—we all live in one room, and work in it—the clock hangs over the bed in the room—it does not strike, it goes, and keeps time—I remember looking at it at half-past six—my son called my attention to it—he said, "Now, father, I am going down, take notice of the dock"—I do not know that my wife said any thing to that—"Bill" says I, "it is half-past nine."

Q. But we are talking of half-past six? A. That is the time he came home—I took notice of the clock at half-past six when he came in, it was when he went down at half-past nine that he called my attention to the clock—he stopped in my room and had supper—he called my attention to the clock at half-past six, and I told him the time—I cannot say particularly how he called my attention to it, nor say his reason—I told him it was just half-past six—the clock goes fourteen hours—I wind it up every night—it is a Dutch clock, with brass wheels, and a pendulum—my son had been at home till about one in the day, then went out till half-past six—the evening had quite set in—I sat on the left-hand side of the fire, and could see the clock where I sit—my wife sat on the right-hand—she could see the clock—he did not particularly call my attention to the clock at half-past nine, because I told him the time myself when he was going down,—he said he was going out to take a walk or something—he did not come back that night at all—he lodged at my house some nights in the week, but he was out of my jurisdiction as regards that—he sometimes sleeps at my house, and sometimes not—he slept there on Saturday and Friday, not on Thursday—he did not tell me where he was going on Sunday—I did not ask him—we had a little beef for supper—he eat pretty fairly—supper began about a quarter to nine—he waited to get supper—nobody fetched any beer—we had none—we could not have any.

Q. How came you to tell him it was half-past nine, you did not wish to hurry him away? A. No, I saw it was half-past nine, and said, "Bill, it is half-past nine, if, you are going down"—he had said, "Father, I am going down"—he did not say where or when he was going—I mentioned the time—he jumped up, got a wet cloth, and wiped his face, and went down—he got a glass of liquor below as he went out—we lodge at the Feathers public-house—I have lived there twelve months.

MR. PAYNE. Q. What is your business? A. In the weaving branch, which is very bad just now, and I cannot afford beer for supper.

MARY GABLE . I am the prisoner's mother, and remember the Sunday before the Monday he was taken into custody—he came home that evening, I think about half-past six o'clock, and remained till half-past nine, when he went out—I am sure he was at home all that time.

COURT. Q. What makes you recollect the time? A. Because my little girl, who is ten years old, was going to Shoreditch church that evening—the went at half-past six, and came in about half-past eight—we supped about nine, as near as I can guess—my husband, son, and two children, the girl who had been to church, and a son thirteen years old, sat down to supper with me—the little boy was not at home all the evening—I think he came in about eight—he had gone out about half-past six or seven—the prisoner was there when he went out—we all five sat down to supper together—I cannot remember what meat we had for supper, I think it was boiled beef, fresh—we had a pot of beer with the supper, which I fetched from below myself—I noticed it was half-past six, because my little girl said, "Mother, it is time to go to church"—I looked at the clock, and said, "Yes, church has begun"—the clock is almost by the door—the bed is in the back part of the room—the clock is right at the side of the bed against the doorway, not over the bed—my husband winds it up—my son said it was half-past six, and time for my daughter to go to church—no farther observation was made about the clock that evening that I recollect—I looked at the clock at half-past nine as we were talking about going to bed then—my husband generally goes to bed early on Sundays—my husband looked at the clock, and said it was half-past nine—the prisoner slept at our house on Saturday—I cannot recollect where he slept on Thursday—he slept at home on Friday—he sometimes sleeps at our house, and sometimes not—our beef was cold—we had tea about four—we generally dine at one—the prisoner had left before dinner—nobody called between half-past six and half-past nine to my recollection—neither the boy nor girl are here.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Where is your girl? A. At home in bed, and the boy is at home.

COURT. Q. Is the publican here? A. No, I do not know why.

(William Gaffee, of Wilks-street, weaver; James Baker, of Pearl-street, Spitalfields; and Thomas Ryan, weaver, of Half Nicol-street, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY.* Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, March 2nd, 1842.

First Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant,

Reference Number: t18420228-887

887. SAMUEL CROUCH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, 8lbs. weight of bacon, value 5s., the goods of Richard Baker; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-888

888. HENRY BRYERLY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February, 1 handkerchief, value 3d., the goods of William Bunce, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-889

889. HENRY FRIEND was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Robert Dadd, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Ten Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420228-890

890. JOHN BUDGELL was indicted for embezzling 20l. 1s. 6d., the monies of William Whitby, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Confined One Year.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Reference Number: t18420228-891

891. JOHN EDWARDS, GEORGE HALE, GEORGE BALLARD , and MATTHEW JENNINGS , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January, 1 keg, value 1s.; and 261bs. weight of pickled fish, called anchovies, value 24s.; the goods of John Ismay Nicholson, and others,

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution,

WILLIAM HOLDEN CHISLEY . I am the wharf clerk to John Ismay Nicholson and others. On Saturday, the 29th of January, we received 400 kegs of anchovies in the morning—they were landed on the wharf, and placed very near to my box, where I sit to give tickets to the men—in consequence of information I counted them on the Monday morning—there were then but 399 kegs—Hale, Ballard, and Jennings were at work at the wharf on the Saturday—I gave them tickets for pay.

HENRY WALTER SMITH . I have been a casual labourer at Nicholson and Cot's wharf. On Saturday, the 29th of last January, about six o'clock, I saw Hale with an apron—he was about a yard from the anchovies—I saw him take his apron off, and give it to Ballard, who took a keg of anchovies from the pile, and wrapped them up in the apron—Hale was standing by, I was standing close to him—Ballard asked me to take it, and give it to Jennings, who stood outside the partition where the box stood—I refused—he then took it himself, and handed it to Jennings—I waited to be paid—immediately after I had received my pay, I and Edwards went to the Queen's Head public-house, and in a few minutes Jennings came in—some secret conversation transpired between him and Edwards—I then heard Jennings ask Edwards if he knew where it might be put away—I understood it to mean where it could be sold—Edwards said he did—they then, went away together—I staid at the house, and

about a quarter before nine o'clock Jennings, Ballard, and Edwards returned, without Hale—Edwards said, when he came in, he was dissatisfied as all he had received for his trouble was 10d.—some time after that he said he had received 1s. (Ballard and Jennings were by at the time) he said the first place they went to they were offered 9s. for it, and the second place they went to they had sold it for 10s. and a quarters of gin—he said Ballard had 4s., Jennings 4s., and Hale 1s.—I did not hear Ballard or Jennings say what they had received—two pots of beer were called for—I remarked, that as I had not received any of the money for it, nor had any share in taking it, I should not bear any blame of it—Mr. Beesley spoke to me on the following Wednesday.

Jennings. Q. If you knew it on Saturday, why did not you tell till Thursday? A. I was fearful.

WILLIAM DUNCE . I am a labourer in Thames-street. About five or six o'clock on Saturday evening, I was in the tap-room of the Queen's Head public-house—Jennings came in, and asked me to lend him a basket or bag—I said I had no bag, but would lend him a basket—he said it was to carry a keg of anchovies—he took the basket away, and came back between eight and nine, with Ballard and Edwards—he said he had brought the basket back—Smith sat there the whole time—Edwards said they had only got 10s. for it, that Ballard got 4s., Jennings 4s., and the man who carried it had only 1s., but no name was mentioned—he seemed to dispute about the payment—Jennings went away, and did not stay above five minutes.

JAMES HALDEN . I am pot-boy at the Queen's Head. I was attending to the customers on Saturday evening, the 29th of January—Jennings, Edwards, and Ballard were at the house that evening—I remember Edwards saying, in the presence of Ballard and Jennings, that he had only got 1s.—Jennings asked me to lend him the coal-basket, and said it was to carry fish in—I would not lend it him unless he asked my master.

JOHN PETTIFORD . I am clerk to the solicitors to this prosecution, The partners names are John Ismay Nicholson, and there are two others.

(Jennings received a good character.)

HALE— GUILTY .—Aged 42.

BALLARD— GUILTY .—Aged 25.

JENNINGS— GUILTY .—Aged 24.

Confined Three Months.

EDWARDS— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-892

892. WILLIAM DALTON and ROSCIUS CASTLETON were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February, 1 dog's-collar, value 3s. 6d., the goods of George Salter.

GEORGE SALTER . I keep livery-stables in Hobart-place, Eaton-square, Pimlico. I had a greyhound and a collar—on the 16th of February I lost them both—this is the collar—it was locked on the dog's neck—the dog and collar were safe between nine and ten o'clock in the morning of the 16th, and it was found about twelve the same day.

WILLIAM COOPER (City police-constable, No. 264.) I stopped the two prisoners in King-street, Smithfield, between eleven and twelve o'clock—Castleton was leading the dog by his collar with his left hand, and the other prisoner was patting the dog with his right—I asked Castleton where he got the dog from—he said, "It is not mine, it is his, "pointing to Dalton—I said to Dalton, "Where did you get it?"—Dalton said

be bought it of a gentleman, and had brought it out for a little exercise—I said that story would not do for me—I told them to come with me to the station—Dalton said, "I will soon go with you, and let you see whose dog that is"—he walked by my side till we got near to the station, and then bolted off—I pushed Castleton into the station, and the dog—I ran after Dalton, and took him in King-street—he said, "I was only going to tell the person whose the dog was."

Dalton's Defence. I was in Chancery-lane, and had a little dog: I whistled my dog, and both mine and this other came; when the policeman came I did not say I bought it; I asked three or four persons where I should take it to, they said to the station; I was going there when the officer took me; I said so.

WILLIAM COOPER re-examined. He did not say he was going to take it to the station.

DALTON— GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Four Months. CASTLETON— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-893

893. THOMAS WALKER and GEORGE WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February, 1 tea-chest, value 6d.; and 25lbs. weight of tea, value 5l.; the goods of William Pain; and that Williams had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM PAIN . I live in Fore-street, Cripplegate, and am a grocer. I lost a small chest on the 5th of February, containing 25lbs. of tea—this was my tea and chest.

WILLIAM CHAMBERS . I am in the employ of Mr. Stafford, in Fore-street. At twenty minutes past seven o'clock in the morning of the 5th of February I was passing Mr. Pain's shop, and saw the two prisoners dodging about by the shop—I went to my work, And in ten minutes after, I saw Williams walk away with the chest on his shoulder, and Walker was walking by his side.

William. Q. Can you swear it was me? A. Yes—I cannot swear it was the same chest that is here now.

GERRARD GRIFFIN (City police-constable, No. 165.) At twenty-five minutes after seven o'clock I was on duty in Milton-street, and saw the two prisoners turn down Butler's-alley—Walker then had the chest, and Williams ran away—I asked Walker what he was going to do with it—he dropped it on my toes, and ran—I followed, and secured him.

Williams. Q. Can you swear it was me? A. Yes—I knew you both.

JOHN GORRIDGE . I am a police-constable attached to the railroad. I produce a certificate of Williams's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—he is the person.

WALKER— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

WILLIAMS— GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-894

894. GEORGE MASON was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-895

895. JOSEPH WORRALL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February, 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s., the goods of Alexander Munn; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

Sixth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-896

896. JANE FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February, 1 bag, value 1d.; 1 half-crown, 2 pence, and 4 halfpence; the property of Thomas Sewell, from his person; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS SEWELL . I am a wine-porter, and live in Nottingham-place, Kingsland-road. Between twelve and one o'clock, on the night of the 10th of February, I was going home along Chiswell-street—the prisoner came up to me—she asked if I would go home with her—I told her, "No"—she made rather free with me, and caught hold of my arm—I walked half-way across Finsbury-square—she wished me good night, and walked away—I had a half-crown, some halfpence, a purse, and a key, in my left. hand trowsers pocket—I had it safe about four minutes before I saw her—directly she left me, I put my hand into my pocket, and found it was gone—I overtook her, and accused her of taking it—she said she had not—I called the policeman, and saw him take the purse from under her arm—he asked if it was mine—I said, "Yes"—it is the same I had in my pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me the purse at the corner, to go home with me? A. No, I did not.

SAMUEL CHIVERS (police-constable G 201.) I heard the cry of "Police"—I ran up, and the prosecutor gave the prisoner in charge, for stealing his purse—I saw her put it under her arm—I took it from her—this is it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the 10th of February I went to some wine vaults to have a glass of ale; the prosecutor came in with another, and called for a quarters of gin; he gave me part; we went to the corner; he made me a present of the bag; we were going towards my home; he stopped, and asked me to give it him back; I refused; he called a policeman, and said I had robbed him of it.

HENRY GIBBS (police-constable G 75.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was present at the trial—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 31.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-897

897. WILLIAM HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February, 2 brushes, value 7s., the goods of Joseph Brading.

JOSEPH BRADING . I am an oilman, and live in the Kingsland-road. On Saturday, the 5th of February, I was crossing from Shoreditch church in the direction of my shop—I saw the prisoner go into my shop, and come out again, with two white-wash brushes under his coat—I ran across, and met him, three yards from the door, and said, "What have you got there?"—he said, "I have just picked them up"—I said, "You have just thrown them down"—he had thrown them on the flap of the next house—he said he hoped I would forgive him.

TIMOTHY M'CARTHY (police-constable H 75.) I was on duty near the church—I was called by the prosecutor—he gave the prisoner in charge—the prisoner said he picked the brushes up.

{Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had them in my hand, nor saw them till the prosecutor took me, and showed them to me; he said they were hanging on a nail outside.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-898

898. JOHN FRITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October, 1 warrant for the delivery of a cask of coffee, value 12l., the property of John Richmond.—2nd COUNT, stating it to belong to Henry Clark.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN RICHMOND . I am a merchant, in Lime-street. In October last I paid for a warrant for the transfer of a cask of coffee—my head clerk bought it for me—in consequence of information, I went to Mr. Henry Clark's counting-house—something passed between him and me—I reaired information from him, in consequence of which I had the warrant advertised, as lost or mislaid—it was an East and West India Dock warrant for t cask of coffee—I was not able to recover it, and I applied to the Dock Company for the purpose of getting another—I gave them an indemnity for the amount, and they issued me another warrant.

HENRY FISHER . I produce a warrant for a cask of coffee, "No. 30l.," weight 6cwt 1qr. 22lbs., in the Cameron, imported from Berbice, mark "BD," diamond "B"—I got it from Mr. King.

HENRY CLARK . I remember selling this warrant to Mr. Richmond—afterwards, in consequence of something, it was brought back to me, but I never saw it afterwards—the prisoner had no authority to take it out of my possession.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There had been a good many dealings between you and the prisoner? A. No—he never was in my office—he came occasionally on business—our dealings were very trifling, I believe four dozen of small bottles of cayenne, which he borrowed of me—that has been the only transaction in the way of business—there have been other transactions between us as long ago as 1818—it continued till 1838, and from that time I did not see him for more than eighteen months—he has owed me money for a considerable time, and has paid me in bills of exchange at different times—I have not got him to get bills of exchange accepted for me—there have been several bills brought me by him, perhaps eight or ten—he has had goods from me at different times, and money lent, since 1837—when I said the cayenne pepper was the only transaction, I thought you meant a recent transaction—the bills were for a greater amount than he owed me—I do not know what an accommodation bill is—he owed me 110l.—very likely accepted bills passed between us to the amount of 524l., but not at once.

Q. How many bills, to your knowledge, that you promised to provide for, has he been sued on? A. I do not think he has been sued on a single bill that I promised to provide for—I have no recollection of having done so—I may have said, "If this bill becomes due, and you are not provided, I will take the bill up"—I do not know whether I did so—I know a person named Dunnat—he told me he was a hop merchant—I heard he was an certificated bankrupt after I took the first bill—I do not think I took ft second bill after that

Q. Will you swear you did not take a second acceptance after you knew he was an uncertificated bankrupt? A. No—they were the same sort of

bills as the others—if a person owes me a bill, and brings me another bill, I may take it—I cannot admit that it is an accommodation bill so long as a person owes me money—I do not know what was the amount of the greatest bill the prisoner got accepted for me, nor whether it was 100l.—the prisoner was sued on one bill—I do not know that I had promised to provide for it, nor whether he has been sued on more than one—I have no recollection of it.

Q. Will you swear he has not been sued on half-a-dozen? A. I should say not, certainly—I will not swear that he has not been sued on half-a-dozen bills that I got him to get accepted—I do not know how many I got him to get accepted—I should think I have not got twenty bills accepted through him—I will not swear how many.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. The prisoner, in fact, owed you money? A. Yes, upwards of 100l.—there have been a great number of bills passed between him and me—I do not think there were bills out at one time to the amount of 500l.

WILLIAM HOLFORD CLARK . I act as clerk to my father, who is a coffee-dealer in Mincing-lane. In October last I received a coffee warrant back from Mr. Richmond's clerk—I put it into the safe-drawer in the counting-house directly I received it—the safe-drawer is kept locked at night, but not in the day—the prisoner was in the habit of coming to the counting-house—the warrant was missed a few days after—I was before the Magistrate, but I do not think the warrant was produced to me—I did not take any notice of the warrant—I do not know whether this is it.

HENRY FISHER re-examined. I produce this warrant—I purchased it of Mr. King, at the Commercial Sale-room—I remember Dunn, Mr. Richmond's clerk, giving the prisoner into custody—he said in the prisoner's hearing, "I give this man in charge for stealing a warrant for a cask of coffee, the property of my employer, Mr. Richmond"—the prisoner made no remark then; but down at the station, when the charge was being booked, the policeman who took the charge was about to inquire the nature of it, he said, "I will save you the trouble; I acknowledge taking it."

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say to the prisoner, "I understand you have got a warrant, are you going to give it up?" A. No, nor any words to that effect—we had called the night before—we had a policeman in attendance—the prisoner was not at home—I called next morning, and found him—what took place between him and me was to this effect; "Frith, you gave Mr. Peacock a warrant for a cask of coffee; that warrant was stolen; where did you get it?"—he said, "From old Clark, or "old Clark's"—I said, "Very well, you must go with us to him"—he said, "Wait till I am dressed"—I had the warrant in my pocket at the time—he did not tell me old Clark had his bills, and he had got the warrant, and two other small warrants, and he would hold them till the bills were taken up—he produced a list of all the bills that were outstanding against him accepted by Clark's request—Dunn was present at the conversation.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you produce the warrant at the time? A. I do not think I did—I will not swear to it—it was produced at the station afterwards—I cannot swear whether the prisoner saw it there—I was showing it to the policeman—I had it from Mr. King.

GEORGE KING . I am clerk to my brother, James King. On the 22nd of January I paid some money to Mr. Peacock, in consequence of which I

got a warrant from him—I afterwards sold that warrant to Mr. Fisher—this is the warrant.

JAMES GREEN PEACOCK . I sold a warrant to Mr. James King—I could not swear to the warrant—this warrant seems to be for the same weight as the one I parted with to King—I bought it of the prisoner for 34s. per cwt.—I am certain he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he deposit it with you? A. No—nor two others at the same time—that I swear—I am a general merchant—my counting-house is in Allhallows-lane—I deal in any thing that comes to hand—I am not an accepter of any bills, not one—I never accepted any at the prisoner's suggestion—I know a man named Daniel Johnson—he never was a holder of any acceptances of mine—I believe he is a hopmerchant—I never accepted a bill at all which Mr. Johnson held—I knew the prisoner six or eight years before this—he has been an agent—I did not know him when he was in the Stationery Office—I never met him at Clark's—I have called for him at Clark's when I required any business to be done, when be had any thing to sell for me or to me—he has done business for me up to within two or three months—I do not know that I have ever seen him writing at Clark's—he was very intimate with old Clark.

SAMUEL DUNN . I am clerk to Mr. Richmond. In consequence of some information from Mr. Peacock, I went to the prisoner's house, and then went to Mr. Fisher's counting-house with the prisoner and Mr. Fisher—Mr. Fisher asked him where he got the warrant—he said Mr. Clark gave it him—I said Mr. Clark denied it; he must go with us; which he did—I said to Mr. Clark, "Frith says you gave him the warrant"—he said, "I did not"—the prisoner then wanted to speak with Clark in a private room—he said, "No, I won't; what you have to say, say aloud"—he said, "I acknowledge taking it."

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say nothing about bills outstanding? A. No, he attempted it once or twice—I said, "I have nothing to do with that"—we stopped him at the time of the conversation about the warrants—he was going to bring out a list of securities or bills—I said, "I have nothing to say about it"—he got out his pocket-book—I would not look at the things—I would not give him an opportunity of explaining.

WILLIAM ARGENT (police-constable H 126.) I took the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Thursday, March, 3rd, 1842.

Second Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-899

899. JOHN THURSTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Smith Rainer, about the hour of one o'clock in the night of the 25th of February, at St. George, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 5 pence and 29 halfpence, his property; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.—Strongly recommended to mercy— Confined Six Months.

(The prisoner received a good character, and a witness engaged to employ him.)

Reference Number: t18420228-900

900. DAVID CONNOR was indicted for forging and uttering, on the 2nd of February, 2 requests for the delivery of 3lbs. weight of cheese, and 31lbs, weight of sugar, and 3lbs. weight of coffee, with intent to defraud John Price; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Two Years.

Before Lord Chief Justice Tindal.

Reference Number: t18420228-901

901. JAMES ROBERTS was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Reed.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE FRANCIS CROW . I am a butcher, and live at No. 54, York-street, Westminster. I had known the deceased nine years—her name was Mary Reed—on Monday, the 14th of February, about ten minutes before seven o'clock in the evening, she called on me, and asked whether my child was out—I saw the prisoner after that—he is a knife-grinder, I believe—when I first saw him he had a grindstone in his right hand, and two kettles in the left—he was then at the further end of the Crown public-house, in York-street, on the pavement—he was standing quarrelling with two women, using very bad language, making threats, and shoring them off the pavement—one of the women complained to me of his behaviour—Mary Reed came by just afterwards, and the prisoner said, "Here is another b—old gin-drinker"—she had said nothing to him—she had no appearance of being in liquor—he then shoved her several times, and as she went by my shop I said to him, "Don't use the poor old woman like that"—he was following her—she had not done any thing to him in the least—she said afterwards, "You would not serve me so if my husband was here"—there is a green-grocer's shop beyond mine in the way she was going to her home, and when she got opposite the window of that shop the prisoner shoved her again—she had a pair of shoes in her hand, and she put up the shoes in his face—she hoisted them up in her hand in his face—I do not know whether it was to guard off the blow or not—I cannot swear whether they touched his face—he then struck her with the kettle on the hand in which she held the shoes—she directly ran into the Fortune of War beer-shop which is to the left of my place, and over which she lodges—it is next door to the green-grocer's—the Crown is next door to me, on the right, the green-grocer's on the left, and the Fortune of War next to that—after she had gone into the beer-shop I said to the prisoner, "Go on, that's a good fellow"—he said, "I will serve you in the same way"—he stood at the beer-shop door on the edge of the pavement—a young person then came up with his knife-grinder's barrow, I cannot say whether it was his daughter or who it was, and he told her to go on with it home—he said he would beat the old b—y b—brains out before he went away—he said that while he was waiting there—the deceased was an elderly woman—I should say she was in the beer-shop more than three minutes—there are two little folding-doors out of the beer-shop, and when she came out the prisoner took the grindstone, and struck her with it over the left side of her head—he had hold of the buff-end—there is a little wheel at one end, the buff, as it is called, on which they brighten the knife, and at the other end is the little stone—this now produced is it—he held it between the two wheels—this buff end is made of wood, and lined with leather—he struck her with the

stone end, on the head, and she fell backwards right into the beer-shop—I sent a boy for a policeman—the prisoner was going to walk off, but the policeman came running across the road, and Mr. Reed, the deceased's husband, came down stairs, and he was taken into custody—the prisoner appeared to have been drinking, but was not to say drunk—the deceased was perfectly sober—she was fifty-five years of age.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Were you on terms of great intimacy with her? A. No, only so far that she used to be fond of one of my children, and used to fetch the child—she was not in my employ—I never visited her, or any thing of that sort—her husband is a stone-mason—I did not know the prisoner before—the deceased called on me about ten minutes before seven o'clock, and it was about ten minutes or a quarter-past seven when she and the prisoner met at the further end of the Crown—she did not come into my house when she called—I was sitting outside my shop-board—I was sitting on my shop-board when I saw them meet, and I should say fifteen yards off—I heard him using very vile language—I was near enough to hear what was said by them—I was not able to hear what the deceased said—I can swear she was not using vile language—I cannot say whether she was speaking or not.

Q. Then what did you mean by swearing she never used bad language? A. Because I never heard a bad word out of her lips—I know she was a religions woman—the prisoner was the worse for liquor—he was not exceedingly drunk—when I first saw him he was quarrelling with two women—I did not see him walking before that—he had some kettles in one hand, and the grindstone in the other—he was not calling out "Kettles to mend," or any thing of that kind—I can swear that.

Q. Was not the first of the affair this, that the kettles he held in his left-hand knocked against her in passing? A. No—I can undertake to swear it was not so, for she passed inside close against the wall—she always walked close against the wall—he was outside of the pavement—she was very infirm, and she kept close against the wall—I saw her coming along close against the wall—he was standing still then, where I first saw him with the two women—she did not turn round, and say something to him on his rubbing the kettles against her, for that did not happen—I cannot swear whether she hit him with one of the shoes in her hand—she put up her hand, I think, to guard the blow from the kettle—at that time no blow had been struck, only his shoving her—on my oath she did not upon that strike him a violent blow in the face with the shoes—I would not swear they did not touch his face—they were a pair of heavy men's shoes—there is an alley between the green-grocer's and the beer-shop, and she used to go that way home—it was her way home—she did not run up the alley after patting the shoes up in his face—she ran into the beer-shop—she did not go up the alley at all at any period—she ran to the beer-shop—she was standing I should say three yards from the beer-shop when she was struck with the saucepan—she did not run up the alley, and return with one shoe in each hand, strike the prisoner a blow on the breast with either shoe, and then run into the Fortune of War—I never saw a blow—I can swear such a thing did not occur that I saw—she was above three minutes in the Fortune of War—I did not take out my watch to look, but I am clearly of opinion it was three minutes—while she was in there, the prisoner said to me that he would serve me the same—that was all he said to me—he held the

grindstone up in his hand waving it about—he did not shake it in my fact and he was doing the same with the saucepans—it was just about that time the deceased came out—I would not say to a minute—she did not come out at the time he was waving the saucepans and things about, for I walked back to my shop before she came out of the public-house—I returned again that very moment—he was still waving about the saucepans—I did not go inside my shop—I sat on the outside board—I was not at all out of sight of the man—it was after he had used the expression about beating her brains out, that I went and sat at my shop-board.

ELIZABETH RUTTER . I am a widow, and live at No. 1, York-terrace, York-street, Westminster; I am a lacemaker, and keep a stall. On the night of the 14th of February I saw the prisoner in York-street—my attention was first drawn to him by his using very improper language to two females, who were passing by—after those women had passed by, I saw Mrs. Reed, and he said the same language to Mrs. Reed as he had to the others—he called her an old b—, and asked if she was going to the gin-shop—she said, "Go along"—she was against a side door of the beer-shop, where she goes up stairs—she lives over the beer-shop—the side door is in the main street, not in the alley—after using this improper language to her, he kept still standing with her—she wanted to try to get away from him—she was going the opposite way from her own home, up the street, with a pair of shoes in her hand—she was coming out of her home when I saw her first, walking towards Mr. Crow's, and when the prisoner spoke of her in this insulting manner, and followed her, she turned round to go home again—he turned round to follow her, and stood in the doorway of the private door of the beer-shop, where she lived, so that she could not get in either one way or other—there is a public door to the beer-shop, for the people to go in at, and a private door for the lodgers—both doors are in the main street—she strove to get past him, he would not let her pass, and he up with the saucepans which he had in his left hand, and struck her a blow on the left hand—Mrs. Reed then turned, and went into the beer-shop—the prisoner said, "You need not go in there for protection, I will wait for thee till thee comes out, be as long as thee like"—he said nothing more that I heard—she staid in the beer-shop about three minutes, or it might be four—he had this grindstone in one hand, and the saucepans in the other—as she came out of the beer-shop door, he lifted up his right hand, and struck her with the grindstone, as she was coming out at the door—she had not said or done any thing to him at that time—it occurred as soon as Mrs. Reed appeared—it was the stone part that struck her head—she fell back into the shop—while she was in the beer-shop the prisoner waited outside—he was not grinding or doing any thing, but merely waiting at the door, and he said he would give her a topper whenever she came out, I did not hear him say any thing after—I did not know him before—he was rather in liquor, but not to say very much intoxicated—he had been drinking.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you a friend of Mrs. Reed? A. No particular friend, only by knowing her—I had known her for about fifteen years, but was not acquainted with her more than other people—I was examined before the Coroner—what I said was taken down and read over to me—I am sure it was the stone end he struck her with—that I swear—I have no doubt of it—I never doubted which end it was he struck her with—I did not hear Mr. Crow's evidence to-day, or at the inquest—I

have seen him since the occurrence, of course—I stand opposite to where he lives—I do not visit him—I have not talked with him about this stone since, nor about which end the deceased was struck with—I have not talked with Mr. Crow about the matter at all—I have been to his shop to buy a bit of meat, but not to talk about this affair, nor did I talk about it—I never alluded to it in any way—he never spoke to me about it, nor I to him, not any thing concerning the stone, nor yet what had happened—I have certainly mentioned Mrs. Reed's name, and said I knew her for fifteen years—I made a mark to my deposition, after it was read over to me before the Coroner.

Q. Is this true, then—(reads)—" He instantly struck her on the head; I don't know whether it was with the grindstone or the buff?" A. I said the grindstone was at one end, and the buff at the other—I said he had the spindle in his hand, and struck her with the grindstone—I put my mark to what was read over to me, by which I meant that it was true—she came out of the public door of the beer-shop, when the blow was struck, and the prisoner was close to the doorway when she came out—I saw Mr. Crow there, he was nearer to the prisoner than he was to me—he very likely might have heard what the prisoner said—I did not see Mrs. Reed put a pair of shoes into the prisoner's face—I saw her lift up her hands to defend herself, but not to strike him—I could not say whether the shoes were in her right or left hand, but I saw the shoes in her hand—I cannot say whether they were in the hand which she lifted up to defend herself—the lifted up both hands together—I did not see her strike him with the shoes—I did not see her run up the alley—she was against the alley when I saw him strike her, against the private door—she was not in the alley, but standing against the side door—there is a passage close by the side door—she did not go up the passage after he struck her, or before—she went into the beer-shop after he struck her—she had come out of the alley with the shoes—I had seen her several times that evening—I saw the prisoner insult her, and ask her if she was going to the gin-shop—she did not go up the passage after that, only against the doorway—I did not see her strike him on the breast with the shoes.

WILUAM ALFRED KEAN . I live at No. 84, Castle-lane, York-street, and am agent to my father, who is a bacon-factor, in a small way, and is not able to attend to business himself. On the evening of the 14th of February, I was in the Fortune-of-War beer-shop, about seven o'clock, when the deceased came in—she went into the tap-room door and called some men out to drive a man away, who she was afraid was going to strike her—nobody went on her call—they did not take any notice—she spoke to a young man who was asleep, and he took no notice—she then went to the door again, and took one door in each hand—they are double doors—she had been in the beer-shop from three to five minutes—she did not get quite outside the door before I heard a blow, and saw her stagger back on to a settle—she said the roan had knocked her down with a grindstone—seeing the woman bleed, I went to the door with her, and the prisoner said it served her right, he would do it again; and if she was drunk, he was not—I had not spoken to him—he could see her when she and I came to the door together—the deceased was not drunk, or at all in liquor—the prisoner was a little the worse for liquor, but not so bad as not to know what he was about.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known the woman before? A. I had

about two years—I have not heard the other witnesses examined here, or at the inquest—I believe they stated that the deceased was about three or five minutes in the beer-shop—I have no doubt that was their evidence—I did not take out my watch to see how long she remained in—I suppose it was that time—when nobody would assist her, she went out immediately—she was quite sober—I have been outside the Court, and hare not heard the other witnesses examined.

WILLIAM HENRY POST (police-constable B 58.) The prisoner was given into my custody—the first thing next morning, he asked me where the woman was—I told him she was not able to attend to give her eviddence—he made answer, directly, "G—d b—r her eyes, I wish I had killed her quite; if I had known she was going to give me such a could berth as she did, I would have knocked her down, and jumped on her, and killed her quite"—he said that entirely of his own accord—I new put a question to him.

REGINALD JAMES . I am a house-surgeon, at Westminster-hospital. The deceased was admitted into the hospital on the 14th of February—she had a starred wound on the upper part of the head, a little on the left side—it was cut in two or three directions—it did not appear to bare been done by a sharp instrument—she lived two days—she was not insensible but in a very stupid state—she was not sensible, except when roused—she had lost a good deal of blood at the time of the accident I think, been fore she was brought—she died from concussion of the brain, which the wound would occasion—I attended the inquiry before the Coroner, and there was a view of the body—I did not see the Jury view it, but the body was there—it was the body of the same person that was brought to the hospital.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did you first see her? A. I think about half-past seven o'clock—at that time she had the appearance of haveing lost a great deal of blood, and the wound was then bleeding-no proper steps had been taken to stop the blood—that would occasion great weakness, and I should say would render recovery less probable.

(Witnesses for the Defence.)

THOMAS CHANDLER . I am a smith, and live at No. 6, Union-place, Castle-lane, near York-street. I never saw the prisoner or deceased before this occurrence, to my knowledge—I was crossing from Castle-lane into York-street, opposite the Fortune-of-War beer-shop, and saw the prisoner walking in the same direction I was, towards the Fortune-of-War—he had two kettles in his left hand, and a grindstone in his right—he was calling, "Pots and kettles to mend"—he appeared to be drunk—I saw Mrs. Reed close behind him, going in the same direction as he was, and she passed him just before she got to the green-grocer's shop—I was then about eight or nine yards from them—she passed him on the side where the kettles were, between him and the wall, and I saw the kettles go against her gown—the kettles might have struck her as she passed—he was hallooing out, "Kettles to mend" in a careless manner—as she passed him, she said something to him—I did not hear what—I was not close enough to hear, and then she struck him on the left-hand with two shoes which she had in her right hand—he did not do any thing to her after that—she hastened towards the alley, and went up the alley—she remained up the alley about a minute—she then came down again with one shoe in

each band, said something to him again, and hit him on the breast, or upper part of the body with one shoe after the other—up to that time the prisoner had not struck her any blow at all—after she had struck him on the breast with the shoes, she ran into the Fortune-of-War—he said something to her, I cannot say the words, and followed her to the door—she remained in the beer-shop about a minute, or it might be a little longer, but I think it was about a minute—I saw the blow struck—the prisoner appeared very much excited after he had been struck.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where were you going to at the time? A. To take a walk down Westminster, merely for recreation—my hours of business were over—the whole of this only took about five or six minutes—I cannot say exactly to a minute—when there is a case of this kind going on, it is not likely I should pass on and take no notice—the woman was in a great passion—she used words, but I cannot say what they were, and the prisoner also—I saw them wrangling with each other—I was not waiting there, I was advancing towards them—I did not stand in the middle of the road all the time—I did not walk very quickly—William Duggan was waiting for my coming up—he had come from the same place with me—I had occasion to stop in Castle-lane, and he waited while I came up—it was five or six minutes before the policeman came up—I waited till the policeman came up, and the prisoner was given into custody—I did not speak to the policeman—I went to the station, but they would not let us in—I went to the door, and Duggan and another man, who I do not know, went in, but were turned out—the blood ran down from the woman's head pretty fast—I did not say anything to the prisoner when he struck her—there were so many people round I could not get near—I did not hear of the Coroner's inquest until after it was over—I was at work at the time—I work for Mr. Thompson.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You went to the station at the very time? A. Yes, with Duggan—I have left my work now to come here and give evidence—I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM DUGGAN . I am a stonemason, and work for Mr. Eyres. Chandler lodges with my mother—I came with him on the evening in question down Castle-lane into York-street—he left me at the Stag public-house, Castle-lane, to go to a place of convenience, and he crossed the road to me afterwards—I waited for him on the curb on the opposite side of the road—as Chandler was crossing the road towards me I turned my head to go where we were going to have a drop of beer together, and I saw the deceased and the prisoner in contact together—I had never seen either of them before—he had two large saucepans in hit left hand, and a grindstone in his right—by what I could see, I think they were both going one way—they were close together, with the exception of the saucepans being between them—I did not see any blow struck with the saucepans—he was swinging them about carelessly, singing, out, "Old tin kettles to mend," in a jovial sort of way—the saucepans rubbed against her as she passed, and the went into a little bit of a court between, a greengrocer's shop and the beer shop—before that she struck him on the left arm with a pair of shoes which she had in her hand—I cannot say to within two or three inches of where she hit him, but it was somewhere about there—they were jawing each other, talking very loud—she struck him once before she went into the passage, and twice after she came out—she could not have gone far up the passage—there is a bright light at the entrance of the passage—she

came down with a shoe in each hand, and kept jawing the prisoner—they kept jawing each other all the time—she struck the prisoner with the shoes about the arm or shoulder, and once on the breast, and they both called each other names—after striking him she ran into the beer-shop—she was not in there above a minute or a little more, I cannot exactly judge, and when she came out the blow was struck by the prisoner—I should think he was a little fresh—he had had a little, but not knowing his ways I could not exactly tell.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you and Chandler come out of your mother's house together? A. Yes—we were going to have a pint or pot of beer—he was in work, and I was out, and he of course asked me to hare a drop of beer—that was what we went out for, not for a walk—we had to go to the Cock public-house, in Tothill-street, which is about a quarter of mile from our house—I saw plenty of other women in the street, but did not see the prisoner interfere with them—I had my back to them, and did not hear any thing particular going on—I did not see him interfere with then—I did not say any thing to him when he and the deceased were jawing each other—I never like to interfere with other people's business; in fact, I rather supposed they were man and wife—she first struck him with one shoe, then went into the alley, came out with a shoe in each hand, jawed him, and struck him again—he stopped at the door, and he said if she came out he would give her something for herself for striking him, and he staid there till she did come out—I should not think it was above a minute, or a little more—I cannot say it was two minutes—it was a very short time—I was waiting there for Chandler to come over to me, and of come, seeing a row, I stopped like anybody else—Chandler had joined me before she came out of the beer-shop—I went to the station—I was let in, but was turned out again—they would not allow me to stay—I did not make any statement—I did not go before the Coroner—I was looking for work that day—I was not aware that she was dead, or that there was a jury it panelled—I was not aware of her death till after the inquest—I am no acquaintance of the prisoner's—his wife found me out—I went next morning to Queen-square, to give evidence for the prisoner, to tell the rights of it, but there was no examination there.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You say you made no statement at the station, did you go there for that purpose? A. Yes—I would have made the statement I have now if they had given me the opportunity—I went to Queen-square to do so, but found there was no examination there—the prisoner appeared very much excited after the blows were struck, and in a great deal of passion, which did not appear to have subsided before she came out—he seemed to be quite jolly before the quarrel took place—he seemed to be swinging the kettles about quite jolly like.

JOHN WHITLEY . I am a shoemaker, and work with my father in palmer's village, Westminster—I am not acquainted with Duggan or Chandler, or with the prisoner, nor did I ever see Mrs. Reed before the night in question—I was passing down York-street, and saw the prisoner and the deceased against the Crown public-house—they were not very close together then—the prisoner had the grindstone in his right-hand, and some kettles in his left, and they touched against the deceased's gown against the Crown, upon which she hit him on the left hand, I believe with the shoes—she then went on, and went up the passage next to the green grocer's—she did not remain there above a minute—she then came down

again with a shoe in each hand—she called the prisoner an insulting vagabond—I was near enough to hear what she said—he made use of a bad word to her, and then she hit him on the arm and on the breast with the shoes she held in each hand—she then went into the Fortune-of-war—he waited outside, and said if she was to come out to abuse him again he would bit her with the grindstone—he had it in his right hand at the time—he appeared quite calm when he said that—he was going away just as she came out—I do not think she was a minute in before she came out—when I first saw him he was singing "Pots to mend, kettles to mend, nobody helps poor Jack the tinker"—I was standing against the Crown when the deceased struck him the blow on the left hand—he went on singing, after that, past Mr. Crow's—she went up the alley, came down again, and struck him again with both shoes—I believe she struck him in earnest—the called him an insulting vagabond, and he used a coarse expression to her in earnest, and on that she struck him again—she struck him with one shoe in two places, and she then ran into the beer-shop—they were abusing each other.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where were you when you first saw either of these parties? A. I was going past the Crown public-house, and I stopped, bearing this singing—I did not see any other women near him—the deceased and he were going the same way—I think he was a little before—she attempted to pass him inside, nearest the wall—he did not say anything then—I saw Mr. Crow sitting on his board, after she had hit the prisoner first—I do not think I heard Mr. Crow say anything—I think the deceased remained in the passage about a minute—I do not think she stopped so long as that in the Fortune-of-war—I cannot say how far up the alley she went—I did not go to the alley to see—she came out with a shoe in each hand—she had both in one hand before—she struck him twice with one hand—once on the arm, and once on the breast, not in the face at all—he used the expression to her, and told her to go into the gin-shop, it was all she was fit for—she up with the shoe on that, and then went into the Fortune-of-war—he said if she came out again he would hit her—he did not say anything about waiting for her—he seemed as if he was going on when she came out, and then when she came out he hit her with the grindstone, not with the stone part, but the other part—I am sure of that—he lifted up his hand, and struck down at her—he held it in the middle, with the stone part at the back, then lifted it up and struck—she made back, and I believe she fell down—I cannot say whether she fell down or slipped down—she did not fall with the blow—he hit her at the door, she went inside and fell—I did not go in to see what was the matter—I went to the station, but they would not let me in—the deceased was bleeding as she went along—I heard of the inquest before it was held, but did not appear there.

Q. How came you here to-day? A. His wife took my name down, I think it was a day or two after it was done, or when he was committed here to Newgate—another grinder knew a boy who is outside, and he told the prisoner's wife where I lived.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. The prisoner's wife searched you out and brought you here? A. Yes—the prisoner had the grindstone in his hand at the time this happened, and was swinging it backwards and forwards.

MICHAEL STEWART . I am a labourer, and live in King's-head-buildings James-street, Westminster, which is close to York-street I was

passing by York-street, and saw the prisoner walking by the Crown public-house—I did not know him or Mrs. Reed before—he had the grindstone in one hand and some kettles in the other, crying "Potsto mend"—I then saw Mrs. Reed passing him, and the kettles touched her, upon which she struck him on the hand with a pair of shoes which she had in her hand—she then went up the court and remained there about a minute, I should say—she came down again with a shoe in each hand, having had both in one hand previously, hit him on the breast and on the arm, and called him an insulting vagabond—that was close to the Fortune-of-war-after striking him, she went into the Fortune-of-war, and remained there, I think, about half-a-minute—I do not think it was more, and when she came out he struck her this blow—before she struck him with the shoes he appeared to be in a good humour—he was going along singing "Pots to mend, kettles to mend, nobody will help poor Jack the tinker"—he had the kettles by his side—he said one bad word to Mrs. Reed that I heard—that was just before she went into the public-house—he did not appear to be very angry at that time—he was standing outside—I do not think be was sober.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. But sober enough to be singing and crying his trade? A. He was hallooing those words—I first saw him walking by the Crown public-house—I saw no women there—I did not see him speak to any women, except the deceased—she walked up the alley—she was coming towards the Fortune-of-war public-house when I first saw her—I staid till the police came, and went to the station, but was not let in.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Did you come here at the request of the prisoner's wife? A. Yes.

GUILTY of Manslaughter. Aged 39.— Transported for Life.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420228-902

902. RICHARD LINTOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 22lbs. weight of beef, value 18s., the goods of Charles Price; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Two Months.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Reference Number: t18420228-903

903. SAMUEL LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February, 1 half-crown, the monies of George Leicester Hillas, his master; also, on the 12th of February, 3 shillings, the monies of George Leicester Hillas, his master; to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY.** Aged 12.— Transported for Seven Years.—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420228-904

904. HENRY FRAMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, 1 coat, value 10s.; the goods of James Russell: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . † Aged 29.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-905

905. SARAH WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February, at St. George's, Bloomsbury, 3 sovereigns, 8 half-sovereigns, 4 half-crowns, 18 shillings, 9 sixpences, and 5 groats, the monies of James Hopkinson, in his dwelling-house.

JOHN AXTELL . I am in the service of James Hopkinson, grocer, No. 18. Broad-street, Bloomsbury. On the evening of the 8th of February the prisoner came into the shop for an ounce of cocoa—I served her, and Mr.

Hopkinson inquired about a paper parcel, which was on the counter when she came in—she had placed herself opposite where it was—I had not missed it till it was inquired after—the prisoner then removed herself to the farther end of the counter—Mr. Hopkinson spoke to her about it—she said she bad seen nothing of it, and denied it several times—I then lifted up her shawl, felt round her arm, and there was something under her gown—I took this paper parcel from under her gown, about her waist-band—she then said somebody had placed it there—there were two shopmen, and two female customers, besides her, in the shop—the parcel was opened, and contained 7l. in gold, and 1l. 14s. 2d. in silver—it was the money which had been taken in the shop the day before, and was tied up like papers of halfpence—it was my employer's.

FRANCIS MORRIS (police-constable E 78.) The prisoner was given into my charge—Mr. Hopkinson gave me the money, tied in a paper parcel—it was opened in my presence—I counted 82.14s. 2d. in gold and silver, and a memorandum specifying the amount—I asked where she lodged—she said in George-street, and got her living by selling lucifer matches—she was charged with begging a fortnight before, and sent to the workhouse, but was turned out of there, she says.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18420228-906

906. HENRY COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January, 1 gelding, price 1l. 15s., the property of Benjamin Buckle.

BENJAMIN BUCKLE . I am a butcher, and live at Hampstead—I had a grey pony gelding turned out on Hampstead heath on the afternoon of the 28th of January, and missed it about six o'clock that day—I found it at Mrs. Paramenter's, a horse slaughterer, in Maiden-lane, Battle Bridge—it was returned to me on the 31st, by Watts—it is now at the livery stable over the way—I gave 35s. for it—I have seen the prisoner about Hampstead with a basket.

GEORGE WATTS . I live with Mrs. Parmenter, a horse slaughterer, in Maiden-lane. On the 28th of January the prisoner brought a horse there, which I bought of him, for 16s., and returned it to Buckle—the prisoner asked 25s. for it—when I had bought it, I said, "Who am I to put it down to?"—he said, "To Mr. Buckle, of Hampstead"—we enter every horse we tray, in a book—I did not ask the prisoner his name—we buy of persons whose names we do not know—Mr. Buckle came himself about an hour afterwards, and claimed the pony—I delivered it to him on the following Monday.

GEORGE PARKER (police-constable S 191.) I saw the prisoner at Hampstead on the 24th of February—I followed him to very near the Bell public-house at Hendon, where I overtook him—I said he was just the man I wanted—he asked what for—I said, "For stealing Mr. Buckle's horse, at Hampstead"—he said; "Very good, I know nothing about the horse, I never saw it"—I had been on the look-out for him, after hearing that the horse was stolen.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18420228-907

907. THOMAS KIRW1N was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Chappell Batchelor, from his person.

CHAPELL BATCHELOR . I am now staying at the Royal Academy of Music, in Tenterden-street, Hanover-square. On the 10th of February, I

was in company with Mr. Latter, in King-street, Covent-garden—he left me suddenly, and ran after a person—I afterwards saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand—he threw it down immediately—I took it up—Mr. Latter pursued, and caught him.

RICHARD LATTER . I was with the prosecutor, in King-street, about half-past six in the evening, walking arm-in-arm—I caught a glimpse of somebody behind, looked round, and saw the prisoner pulling a handkerchief out of Mr. Batchelor's pocket—I turned round, and ran after him—he threw it down behind him—I caught him about fifty yards off, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS MILLS (police-constable F 93). The prisoner was given into my charge with the handkerchief.

Property produced and sworn to.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in King-street—two boys who were on before me, ran up, picked the gentleman's pocket, and hove the handkerchief down at my feet—the gentleman came, and took me.

MR. BATCHELOR. I saw him throw it down out of his hand.

(Michael Shelly, of Belton-street, Long-acre; and Peter Coakley, of Eagle-street, Red Lion-square; gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY.** Aged 16.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-908

908. ANN DOWLING was indicted for feloniously assaulting Michael O'Neal, and cutting and wounding him in the left wrist and right hand, with intent to maim and disable him.—2nd COUNT, stating her intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MICHAEL O'NEAL . I live in Church-street, St. Giles's, and sell fruit in the street. On the 1st of February, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I went into the prisoner's shop, in Buckeridge-street—she keeps an eating-house—Holland was with me—I had some bread and meat which Holland paid for—after we had done eating, I went inside the counter, being invited by a young man named Odell—there were three or four of them sitting by the fire—he tossed a young man for a pot of been he lost it, and asked me to come inside, and have part of it, which I did—I sat down—the prisoner immediately turned round, and called me a thief—I said I was as good a character as any in the house, and then she shoved me, and I shoved her back—she said, "Will you go out of my place, you thief," putting her two hands up, and shoving me away—she then seized a knife off a dish on the counter—I directly ran outside, and said "Are you going to take a knife to me?"—she said, yes—she followed me out from behind the counter—she went to hide the knife under her apron till I saw it—she then followed me outside, and made a blow at me, which I received on my right finger, then closed towards me, and I thought to get the knife away, but received another blow inside on my left wrist.

Q. Was not your hand cut by endeavouring to get the knife away? A. No, we both fell when we closed in the struggle—I was not wounded in the struggle, but before—she rushed on me before we struggled—while we were struggling, she held the knife out from behind her, and told a person to take it from her—she was then down, and me uppermost—Fits-gerald took it from her.

Q. Was there any thing to prevent her stabbing you during the scuffle if disposed to do so? A. I called out when we were down, and he took the knife from her—she might have injured me if she chose—I am sure I did not receive the cuts in the struggle—my hand was stretched out

towards her at the time I received the cut on my finger—I did not run my hand against the knife—I got my wrist cut in coming towards her.

Q. If you had gone out, you would not have got either cut? A. I was aggravated directly she called me a thief, and went towards her, and the shoved me—the cuts could not be accidental—she followed me out from behind the counter—I thought if I had ran away, she would have given it me in my back—I closed on her with the knife—I never had a word with her before.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Had you never been in her house before? A. Yes, I do not know when—I do not know whether her till it near the fire where I was—I do not know where she kept her money—she did not tell me she had been robbed several times—I went there to get a little supper, and a drop of something—I had been home at twelve o'clock with my things, but did not go to bed—I sell fruit at the playhouse—I went to a public-house for a couple of hours, then went to another—I sometimes get up at four to go to market—she never ordered me out of her house before that I know of—the knife was not in her hand when she pushed me I am certain—we were down for five seconds—I never told her I would put her whole carcase behind the fire—I struck her in the mouth, but did not hurt her—it was just a slap with my open hand, after she shoved me—I threw no beer over her—I certainly squirted some out of my mouth over her before we went near the fire, but that was dropped before I went behind the counter—I had the beer in my mouth when she shoved me, and squirted it in her face—this was when I was behind the counter.

WILLIAM FITZGERALD . I live in Ivy-street, St. Giles's. I went into the prisoner's shop between four and five in the morning, and had some soup—the prosecutor came in with another man—there were two men and a female behind the counter—they were tossing for beer, and a witness won two pots—the challenger asked O'Neal to go inside the counter, and drink tone with him—he went in, and the prisoner accused him of being a thief—he said he was as good a character as any there—she pushed him, and he pushed her—she turned round, seized the carving-knife off a dish, and made several attempts to chop him—she was close to him.

Q. Then what prevented her doing it? A. I cannot say—she was flourishing the knife about, trying to hit him if she could, and when he got her down, she said, "Take the knife out of my hand"—O'Neal said he was cut, and I took the knife from her hand—O'Neal had refused to go out of the place, and resisted—he pushed her, and she pushed him—he kept within the counter till she got the knife—he was obstinate about going out, and would not be pushed—he refused to go out, and returned her push—she fell in the struggle underneath him, and at that time he said he was cut—that was the time he complained, but I do not know when he received the injury—I did not see him try to get hold of the knife—his hands went up, but that might be to save his face—(looking at his deposition)—it is down here—that "He tried several times to get hold of the knife, and his hands went up"—I do not know that I said those words—it was before the struggle—it was after she called out to have the knife taken from her, that he said, "I am cut"—she held it out for me to take it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he strike her? A. I did not see him—I was close by him—I did not see him squirt beer over her—I was not by the fire—it might be done without my seeing it—I sell fruit in the street

—I was never in Cold Bath-fields prison—I was at Hatton-garden about taking a dog, but was acquitted—I had been out on this day to Bankside to see my brother.

THOMAS JONES . I am a basket-maker, and live in Lawrence-lane, St. Giles. O'Neal came into this house—I tossed with a man who invited the prosecutor to come to the fire, and when he had sat there a little while, the prisoner said, "I allow no thieves inside my counter"—he said he was no thief—she said, "Come, instantly get out of my place"—he got up—she pushed him, and he pushed her—she immediately caught hold of the carving-knife in her right hand, and pushed him with her left-hand—when he got near the door, he rushed on her, and they both fell—he was undermost, and she uppermost—O'Neal hallooed "Take the knife away, I am cut by this woman"—that was the first I heard of his being cut—the prisoner held the knife out, and called to somebody to take it, and she said it was Fitzgerald had cut the man with the knife in taking it away—I do not know how he got cut—he did not complain of being cut till he rushed upon her.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know whether he might not he cut by Fitzgerald's taking it away? A. No—I saw no blood come from his hand—I did not see O'Neal uppermost at all.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Thursday, March 3rd, 1842.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant,

Reference Number: t18420228-909

909. WILLIAM HENRY COUSINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January, 8 waistcoats, value 2l. 12s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 3s .: also, on the 27th of January, 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; and 1 frock, value 1l .: also, on the 7th of February, 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 1 purse, value 6d.; and 1 box, value 2d.; the goods of Edward Penn, his master: to all of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-910

910. HENRY SELL and WILLIAM BELL were indicted for stealing, on the. 17th of February, 1 basket, value 1s.; and 112lbs. weight of lard, value 3l.; the goods of Thomas Acocks.

WILLIAM SUTTON . I am a carman—I was in the service of Thomas Acocks, a cheesemonger—this is his lard—he trades under the name of Yates and Acock—I was standing at the corner of Old Fish-street, near Mr. Acocks' warehouse, between two and three o'clock on the 17th of February—I saw the prisoners, who were in Mr. Acocks' service, loading a cart, and after they had finished, Bell turned to go away with the cart up Bread-street—I overtook him in Bread-street—Sell came up at the same time with another man, they went into a public-house, and had some beer and ale—Bell seemed in a great hurry—he drank, cut away immediately, and drove the cart off—I drank with them, and after we had finished the beer, I went after him, and met him in St. Paul's Churchyard—he was standing there, and was very busy tying on the lid of the hamper—I asked if I should go along with him, as I had nothing to do—he said I could not, he was in a hurry, he had to go to the West-end, and had his governor to meet—he went on, I went down Farringdon-street—he stopped the cart, and took

a hamper, and took it into a baker's shop at the cornet of Farringdon-market—he came back, and turned to go up Fleet-street—I passed by the receiving-house, and saw the hamper was directed to Sell—I thought it was not all right, so I went and acquainted Mr. Pollard—I saw Bell and Sell loading the cart, but I did not see what they put in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You never did anything of this sort? A. No—nor attempted to do anything—I never asked any one to help me to a cheese—I am not in the employ of Mr. Acocks now—I left for driving against a truck—I swear that was all to the best of my belief—I was not discharged for dishonesty—I have not asked for a character from Mr. Acocks—I have not required it since—he told me he would give me a character—I did not ask him whether it was a good one—I have been discharged two years—I have been in a place since—Mr. Acocks did not give a character because the parties knew my character—I have been oat of employ a month—Mr. Addington, of the White Horse public-house, Friday-street, was my last employer—I know nothing about blankets—I Direr was charged or suspected of anything of the kind—I expected Mr. Acocks would give me a good character—I have been in London twelve years.

SAMUEL HICKS POLLARD . This lard is the property of Thomas Acocks. who trade under the firm of Yates and Acocks—Mr. Yates died five years ago—I am clerk in the service of Mr. Acocks—Bell and Sell were in his service—Bell was occasionally carman—between three and four o'clock, on the 17th of February, I received a communication from Sutton, and went to Farringdon-street—I there found this hamper, containing line bladders of lard—we have got these sort of things at our warehouse—to the best of my belief these bladders came from Mr. Acocks' warehouse—we opened a cask of lard and found one deficient—the hamper was directed in Bell's handwriting, to "Henry Sell, 4, Little Cambridge-place, Cambridge-street, Hackney-road"—Sell had no right to sell any—Sell was called down and asked what goods he had sent out by Bell—he mentioned certain articles, and then Mr. Acocks asked if he had not sent out a basket of lard directed—he said. "No, he was certain"—Mr. Acocks said, "Have you not sent out a basket of lard, directed by yourself, to your own house?"—he then said, "I had better not say any more."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has the one bladder you missed been looked for? A. Yes—to the best of my belief; Sell's expression was, "I had better not say any more"—I do not remember whether Mt. Acocks used the words "Did you not send anything else"—I might mis-recollect it—Mr. Acocks was not in a passion.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long had Bell been in his employ? A. Twelve or thirteen years.

ELIAS MILLER ( City police-constable, No. 408.) I west to Mr. Acocks—Sell was sent for—Mr. Acocks asked him what he had seat out in the better say nothing about it"

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he say, "If that is the case?" A. Yes, he made use of the words I have said—this is my handwriting—(looking at his deposition)—it was read over to me, and I attended to it—to

the best of my belief he said, "I had better say nothing"—Mr. Acocks appeared to be in a passion.

JOHN STOREY (City police-constable, No. 414.) At a quarter before eight o'clock in the evening I waited for the arrival of Bell—Mr. Acocks asked him where he had been—he said, "To the West end"—he asked what he had done with the parcel he had taken to Farringdon-street—he said he had taken no parcel there, and afterwards said a man gave him the parcel in Old Change—he was a little in liquor at the time, and that was all that passed.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

SELL— GUILTY . Aged 25.

BELL— GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months

Reference Number: t18420228-911

911. ELIZA HOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December, 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 3d.:—also, on the 11th of February, 9 yards of printed cotton, value 5s.; the goods of William Ballisat; to which she pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 26.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-912

912. MARY FULBROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 3 yards of printed cotton, value 3s.; and 7 sovereigns; the property of Jane St. John Mildmay.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

LADY JANE ST. JOHN MILDMAY . I am widow of the late St. John Mildmay, and live in Belgrave-square. The prisoner had been in my employ—I had her brought up, and paid for her education—I left my purse in a reticule in my drawer in my bed-room—I am not always in the habit of counting my money, but I thought I had left more money into it than I found in it—in consequence of that, on the 8th of February I counted five sovereigns, and put them in the purse, and put the purse into a bag in the drawer as usual—when I came home I missed two sovereigns—the next day I marked five, and put them in the purse—there were none but them—I examined the purse the same evening, and missed one—on Monday morning I marked four more, and put them into the purse with the four others—I came home at night, and missed two—on Tuesday I desired the boxes of all the servants to be searched—the prisoner was called up, and my daughter said, "Mary, we will look into your box"—she said, "Oh, there is nothing there but rags; I have not a sixpence in the world"—my housekeeper's name is Phillis Martin—she produced ten sovereigns to me that day—among them I found these two marked sovereigns, which I had put into the purse on Monday—a handkercheif was found, which was my property—I was present at the examination of the prisoner's box, and saw the sovereigns produced from it.

PHILLIS MARTIN . I am housekeeper to Lady Mildmay. In consequence of hearing that my mistress had missed her money, on Tuesday morning I submitted my box to be examined—after that I went to where the prisoner was—I said, "Mary, has your box been looked into?"—Miss Mildmay said, "No, poor girl, she says she has not a 6d. in the world"—her ladyship said, "Poor girl, she can't find the key"—I said, "Mary, you must look for the key, your box must be opened; if you can't find the key, you must go down stairs for the chopper"—she went down for the

chopper, and then found the key, and brought it into the room—I unlocked the box, and took out two or three things at the top—I then found a cotton dress, on which laid two sovereigns—I searched farther, and found eight more sovereigns—I handed the whole to her ladyship—I left the room—a handkerchief has been produced to me—I saw some bed-furniture, some wax candles, and some soap found—the prisoner said at first she brought the sovereigns from home; after that she said her uncle gave them to her; she afterwards told me that three weeks before she had taken two sovereigns out of her ladyship's purse, and after that took one at another time; that in a week she took two more, and then took another one after that

Prisoner. You said, if I would confess the truth, Lady Mildmay would do nothing to me. Witness. I said, "Mary, you had better speak the truth, it will be much better for you"—her ladyship was present at the time—the money was found in the box.

Prisoner's Defence. Her ladyship said she would send me home by the next train.

GUILTY . Aged 16.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18420228-913

913. HENRY TREW was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January, 86lbs. weight of lead, value 12s., the goods of William Rhodes, and fixed to a building:—2nd COUNT, stating it not to be fixed.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM EDWARD BALL (police-constable N 365.) About seven o'clock, on the 19th of January, I was passing Haggerstone-lane, in the parish of Shoreditch—I was in plain clothes—I saw the prisoner and two others coming towards town—I stopped the prisoner, and asked him what he had got—(he had a bundle under his arm)—he said, "Nothing"—be made violent resistance, and I called out for assistance—one of the other men then struck me, and they both ran off—one of them had a bundle, which he dropped—a man named Harold came up—I sent him in search of the other two—I went with the prisoner to a public-house, and examined his bundle—it contained two pieces of lead, rolled up as it is now—Harrow picked up the other bundle, which also contained lead—as I was taking the prisoner to the station, I asked him where he got it—he said he met a man in Kingsland-road, who gave it him to carry—I took, the lead to some cottages in Hertford-place, Haggerstone, 200 or 300 yards from where I saw the three men—I examined the gutters of the cottages—the lead was entirely gone from one gutter—I afterwards compared the lead With the gutter—it is a very particular sort of gutter, and at the end is a mark where the lead had been battered down—it agreed in more places than one.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was the lead the prisoner was carrying in the state it is now? A. Yes, it was in an old white bag—the prisoner did not say "It was given me by two men, and these are the two men that gave it me"—upon my oath he did not point out those two men as the men who gave it him—Brett was with me.

JESSE HARROW . I live in James-street, Haggerstone. I was at the George the Fourth public-house on Wednesday evening, the 19th of January—I heard some one call for assistance—I looked out of the door, and saw the prisoner and Ball struggling together—there was something lying

at his feet—I went up, and Ball sent me up the road—I found a parcel up the lane—I delivered it to Ball.

JAMES BOSTON . I am clerk and manager to Mr. William Rhodes, of Layton—I live at the tile-kilns in the Hackney-road. I know his five cottages—I went to No. 12, and found the leaden gutter had been stolen—the officer produced two pieces of lead to me—I fitted them to the gutter—in my judgment they came from the gutter—it fitted in more places than one.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know of any such lead being on the roof? A. No—I never was on the roof before—Mr. Rhodes is alive—the house from which the lead was taken is unoccupied—it is without windows—I went in the back way—there is no door.

WILLIAM HILL . I am a chandler, and live at Hertford-place, Haggerstone. About seven o'clock in the evening of the 5th of January I was standing at my shop—I saw a man on the opposite side of the way, between six and seven, walking backwards and forwards, as if on the watch—he, then went across the road to four empty houses adjoining mine, and gave a whistle—I afterwards saw some one else—I watched them away, and went behind No. 9, and saw the prisoner looking over the wall—he passed by me—on the following day I went on to the not of No. 12—I afterwards went on the roof on the 12th of January, and the lead was there—I went on the 20th, and it was then gone.

Cross-examined. Q. What made you travel about these houses? A. I went to see to my own roof, which is adjoining—my attention was more directed to my own roof—the officer came on the 20th, as some lead had been found on a person, and he wished to know if I had lost any.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-914

914. ELIZABETH SPALL , was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February, 1 pair of ear-rings, value 1l., the goods of Robert Steven Cafflin.

CHARLES MEDCALF . I am in the service of Robert Steven Caffiin, a jeweller, at Islington. On the 3rd of February, about nine o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop and asked to look at some ear-rings—I showed her several pairs—I missed a pair of coral ear-rings—I told her so, and followed her out of the shop, laid hold of her, and called a policeman—these now produced are my master's ear-rings.

JAMES WYATT (police-constable N 128.) Metcalf gave the prisoner into custody—she denied having any thing of the sort about her—on the way to the station she was trying to get rid of something—I secured her hand, and when I got to the station, I forced it open, and found these earrings, with the card attached to them.

Prisoner's Defence. Metcalf wanted me to buy quite a different to what I asked for; he forced me to have them.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-915

915. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 1 pair of trowsers, value 5s., the goods of George Everingham.

JOHN OVERHALL . I am shopman to George Everingham of Leadenhall—On the 25th of February we had some trowsers hanging on the door-post—I received information, ran out, and saw the prisoner throw the trowsers down—a stranger picked them up, and gave them to me—

these are them—I am sure the prisoner is the person who threw them down—be was stopped and given in charge.

THOMAS MURLEY . I am an errand-boy, and live in Crown-court, Seething-lane. At a quarter-past eight o'clock that evening I was coming out of Lime-street, and saw two boys—the prisoner, who was one, was standing at the comer of King's Arm's-yard—the other, who escaped, took the trowsers from the shop, and walked about five minutes, and gave them to the prisoner, who walked up a court, and put them under his jacket—I gave information—I had watched them for a quarter-of-an-hour—the prisoner could tee the prosecutor's shop.

Prisoner. I saw him throw down a pair of trowsers, I picked them up and was going to give them to the policeman.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-916

916. DANIEL LEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February, 18lbs. weight of lead, value 5s., the goods of Charles Smith; and fixed to a building.—2nd COUNT, not stating it to be fixed; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

CHARLES SMITH . I keep the Britannia public-house in Brown-street, Bryanatone-square. I have a stable and coach-house adjoining Mr. Sewell's, in Lisson-grove—I have compared the lead produced, with the roof of my stable, and it completely fits—I have no doubt of its being mine.

GEORGE EDWARD SEWELL . About five o'clock in the evening of the 9th of February, I came out of my work-shop—I saw two boys on the top of the coach-house—the prisoner was one of them—one was carrying a piece of lead into a loft—directly they saw me they ran down the steps—I ran and overtook the prisoner in Devonshire-street—the other had left the lead in the loft—the prisoner was pulling up the gutter—this is the getter of Charles Smith.

GEORGE ROGERS (police-sergeant D 1.) I produce the lead, which I found in the loft adjoining Mr. Smith's—I have fitted it—it corresponds both ways.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me.

JOSEPH WALKER (police-sergeant D 5.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420228-917

917. ELLEN DILLON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January, 1 bed-gown, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; and 3 aprons, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of John Murray: and 17 towels, value 8s.; 6 pillow-cases, value 4s.; 4 napkins, value 3s.; 2 table-covers, value 3s.; and 1 bolster-case, value 6d.; the goods of Jonathan Birch: and 1 shift, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 bed-gown, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of Maria Backcaller; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Judgment Respited.

(Michael M'Carthy, fishmonger; Mary M'Carthy, his wife; Eleanor Reddy, wife of a labourer, Compton-street; Jane Coolly, Ann Heretic, and Mary Regan, gave the prisoner a good character.)

Reference Number: t18420228-918

918. WILLIAM HARDY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February, 4 mahogany boards, value 3l., the goods of Hugh Riley.

HUGH RILEY . I live in Whitmore-road, Hoxton. On the 5th of February, at six o'clock, I missed from my yard four mahogany boards, worth 2l. 16s.—they were safe at five o'clock—these now produced are the boards—I saw two of them at Mr. Marters's.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What length were the boards you lost? A. Nine feet four inches—those found at Mr. Chambers' were not cut at all—those at Mr. Marters's were cut, but I swear to them because there is a stain which corresponds exactly with those I had in my yard.

JAMES CHAMBERS . I live in Charlotte-street, Old-street. I bought one of these boards on the 6th of February, of the prisoner, and one on the 7th.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you give for them? A. Ten shillings each—I went to a house in Boot-street, Hoxton-market—I looked at them, and told him to take them to my place—he did not say be had them to sell for some other person—he said he had sold his bench—a young man I had worked with came with him.

JAMES MARTERS . I bought two of these boards of the prisoner on the 7th of February, and a parcel of veneers.

Cross-examined. Q. Who came to you first? A. The prisoner's uncle sent his son to my shop—I was not at home, and then the said, at his house, in the prisoner's presence, "This is the young man that has the wood for sale."

WILLIAM EDWARD BALL (police-constable N 365.) I saw the prisoner about half-past five o'clock, at the top of Emsworth-street, near the premises of the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you passing? A. Down Hoxton-town—I was not in my police dress—I passed close by the prisoner—no one was with him—he was about twenty yards from the prosecutor's premises.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Eight Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18420228-919

919. SARAH NORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February, 1 spoon, value 10s., the goods of William Woodroofe.

WILLIAM WOODROOFE . I live in Cuthbert-street, Paddington. The prisoner was employed by my wife as an ironer—between nine and ten o'clock in the morning of the 9th of November I placed a silver tablespoon in the wash-house—I saw it safe between twelve and one o'clock—I missed it between four and five—I charged the prisoner with it the next day, and gave her in charge—she dropped on her knees, and said, "Oh forgive me"—at the station she said she hoped I would not be hard with her, for the sake of her poor children—she said, "I have pledged it in your name and my own."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She has a large family? A. One or two small children, I believe.

CHARLES BALL . I am a pawnbroker. I have this spoon—it was pledged by the prisoner for 5s., on the 9th of February.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 44.—Recommended to mercy by the jury .— Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18420228-920

920. GEORGE WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February, 2 pewter pots, value 2s.; the goods of Edward Banter; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

EDWARD BANTER . I keep the Cape of Good Hope public-house in Devonshire-mews East, Marylebone. I lost two pots—these produced are mine.

GEORGE SPIERS (police-constable D 142.) I saw the prisoner pick up two of these pots in Queen Ann-street, and at the station I found the other two on him, fastened round his body, flattened, as they are now—he came in the direction from the prosecutor's house.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in the street in the state you now see them.

CHARLES HENRY BAGNALL (police-constable T 31.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 46.— Confined Eighteen Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18420228-921

921. ISAAC RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February, 6 tame ducks, price 10s., the property of James Hayday.

WILLIAM PYLE . I am gardener to James Hayday, of England-lane, Hampstead. I had some ducks of his safe on Sunday evening, and missed them on Monday morning from the duck-house—the prisoner was working next to our yard—these produced are them.

GEORGE PARKER (police-constable S 191.) Between twelve and one o'clock, on the night of the 14th of February, I met the prisoner in Bell Size-fields, with a bag in his hand—I asked what he had there—he said, "Nothing"—I said, "Let me see," and took it—he then said, "I have four ducks I have bought for 15s."—the prosecutor identified them.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-922

922. EDWIN COX was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January, 1 cap, value 1l., the goods of William Stedolph :—also, on the 2nd of February, 1 coat, value 4l., the goods of Joseph Snow : and 1 cloak, value 3l., the goods of William Dawbeny :—also, on the 14th of February, 1 coat, value 20s., the goods of Edward Marlbry Fitzgerald ; to all which he pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 30.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-923

923. WILLIAM FROOME was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, the carcase of a pig, value 30s., the goods of Thomas Hollis.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be 56lbs. weight of pork; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-924

924. ROBERT BASSETT was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February, 4lbs. weight of leaden pipe, value 1s.; and 1 ferule, value 6d.; the goods of John Lawrence; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

First Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-925

925. JAMES CARLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February, 145 pence, and 430 halfpence, the monies of George Hearn,—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the monies of Samuel Creswick.

SAMUEL CRESWICK . I am carman to George Hearn, a soap-manufacturer. I was driving his cart about one o'clock on the 17th of February in Short's-gardens, Long-acre—I had nine papers of halfpence in the cart in 5s. packets—I had taken three from a person named Kemp, in Queen-street, in payment of some soap, and six from Mr. Evans in Dury-lane—in consequence of information, I saw the prisoner running along with his cap under his arm—I suspected him—I had seen the halfpence in my cart not above a quarter of an hour before—I pursued, but did not overtake him—I called, "Stop thief!" and he then chucked the cap down, and the halfpence in it—I picked them up—the papers were broken, and the halfpence scattered about—I know the papers again—they were the same that had been in my cart—I went to my cart, and found six packed gone.

Prisoner. Q. How could you tell they were the same papers? A. They were done up in white sugar-paper.

CHARLES HORNE . I am a tinman, and lire in Short's-gardens, Dury-lane. On the 17th of February I saw the prisoner get down from the cart with the cap in his hand—I spoke to the carman, and he ran after him.

JOHN RUSSELL TAYLOR . I was a policeman at this time—I was on duty in Drory-lane—I heard the cry of "Stop thief"—the prisoner ran don Brownlow-street, into Charles-street, Drury-lane—I joined with the rest in running—he was stopped by some one in Holborn—I took charge of him—the prosecutor bad taken up the property—it was afterwards delivered to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.) GUILTY.* Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-926

926. JOHN EVANS and SARAH STEVENS were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January, 1 rug, value 2s., the goods of John Smith.

JOHN SMITH . I live in Vine-street, Hatton-garden. I let a furnished room to Evans, in the early part of January—he was in the room three weeks—Stevens lived with him as his wife—on Monday morning, the 31st of January, we found the bed, bolster, blankets, and pillows gone—we traced the prisoners, and found they had taken a room in Fox-court, Brook-street, and furnished it with the goods they had taken from my room—Stevens was in bed—Evans got up to open the door—I found this rug in pawn, at Mr. Symonds's, in Baldwin's-gardens—I knew it to be mine—this now produced is my rug.

Evans. Q. How often was this young woman there? A. About twice I saw her.

HEERY HALL . I am assistant to Mr. Symonds, a pawnbroker in, Baldwin's-gardens—Stevens pawned this rug on the 22nd of January.

Evans. Stevens had nothing at all to do with it—I have always bone a good character up to this time—when the officer took me I had not ever a coat—I had parted with all my things.

EVANS— GUILTY . Aged 23.

STEVENS— GUILTY . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18420228-927

927. JOHN EVANS and SARAH STEVENS were again indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January, 1 set of fire-irons, value 3s.; 1 picture and frame, value 1s. 6d.; 1 kettle, value 1s. 6d.; 1 coffee-pot, value 1s.; 1 candlestick, value 1s.; 1 flat-iron, value 1s.; 1 bed, value 12l.; 1 bolster, value 2s.; 3 blankets, value 6s.; 1 looking-glass and frame, value 1s.; 2 quilts, value 2s.; 1 pillow, value 2s.; and 1 box, value 3s.; the goods of John Smith; to which

EVANS pleaded GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

JOHN SMITH . I let the prisoners a room—I have lost the articles stated from Vine-street—Evans took the room in the morning, and said his wife would come in the evening—Stevens was there with him—I missed these things on the 31st of January—I afterwards found them in a room they had taken, in Fox-court, where both the prisoners were—I know all these articles produced to be mine, they are worth about 50s.—at the time I missed these things I missed a rug, which I found afterwards at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM CLARK (police-constable E 104.) I took the prisoners in a house in Fox-court—I found there one bed, one bolster, two sheets, one blanket, one looking-glass, a shovel, a poker, and a patchwork quilt—Evans said he did it through want—Stevens said she knew nothing about it—I found twenty-nine duplicates in the room.

STEVENS-GUILTY. Aged 24.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-928

928. THOMAS PUGH, alias Gilbert, and ISRAEL WOODCOCK , were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 6 1/2 1bs, weight of cane, value the goods of Samuel Crowder, the master of Pugh.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE CROWDER . I am the son of Samuel Crowder, a dealer in cane, who lives in Sun-street, Bishopsgate. Pugh was in our service, and had been so five or six years—it was his duty to be at the house at seven o'clock—the others did not come till half-past seven, or later—we have lost a great quantity of sticks, from time to time—I and my brother agreed to watch and on the 22nd of February I placed myself at the first-window floor, a little before seven—I saw Woodcock come down the street—he stepped into our shop, and then immediately ran out with this bundle of cane, which corresponds in every respect with the cane at my father's—I have missed such cane as this—Pugh had no right to tie up any cane—I ran down into the street immediately, laid hold of Woodcock, and charged him with stealing cane out of my father's shop—he said, "Oh, no! you are quite as wrong as ever you were right; I bought it of Ward, a cane-dealer, in Gilbert-street, Borough"—I took him back to the shop—my father came, and a policeman was sent for—I think Pugh was in the shop when I came back—when the policeman came, my father said to Pugh, "You are about as great a thief as ever came into a man's house; you are found out at last"—Pugh said, "No, sir, I am not," or something like that.

Pugh. Q. Where were you? A. In the first-floor front room—I do not think you were in the shop when I came down.

Woodcock. Q. Did you not shut the door? A. I dare say I did—I went up stairs, I left you in the shop—the cane was tied up when I brought it back—it was not when my father came down; you had undone it—it was tied at one end with a small piece of string—when I came down there were three parcels of cane on the counter.

MR. DOANE. Q. Supposing Pugh had been in the shop, was there time enough for him to have got out of the shop, during the time of your seeing Woodcock come in, and your going down? A. Yes.

THOMAS CROWDER . I am the brother of George Crowder. I was watching outside the house on this morning—I went out about twenty minutes to seven o'clock—I saw Woodcock with another man, who is not in custody—I saw the other man, who was parading by our house once or twice, make at one time a false entry, as if to go in, but he turned back, as if some one told him not to go in—then the other man entered the shop, and in two or three seconds walked out with a large bundle of cane under his arm—Woodcock was at this time three or four doors from our house—I had seen them standing together—Woodcock had nothing with him—I pursued the other man, and could not catch him.

JAMES WILKINS (City police-constable, No. 612.) I was called in by the prosecutor—I took both the prisoners—the cane was lying on the table when I went in—it was given me by Mr. Crowder.

Pugh. Q. Was the cane tied up? A. It was tied up, and put in the scale directly I came in.

Pugh's Defence. On the morning I went to my work as usual; On opening the shop, I went back, took off my coat, and put on my cap; while I was doing that, I heard the staircase door squeak; I could not see any thing; I looked into the shop, and saw the heels of some one going out; before I could get to the street door, Mr. Crowder was back with this man, with the cane in his arms; there was time enough for him, or any one else, to take the cane while I was where I was.

Woodcock's Defence. I went to Mr. Ward, in Gilbert-street; I got to Sun-street; this man ran after me, and accused me of stealing cane; I went back; he let me go, went up stairs, and called his father; they tied up some cane on the counter, and accused me of stealing it.

PUGH— NOT GUILTY .

WOODCOCK— GUILTY .— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-929

929. THOMAS PUGH was again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December, 3 stick-handles, value 1s.; and 3 ferrules, value 2d.; the goods of Samuel Crowder, his master.

(No evidence.) NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-930

930. RICHARD KATES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, 6 cwt. of coals, value 6s., the goods of Edmund Lucas, in a barge on the navigable river Thames.

WILLIAM BEDELL . I am watchman to Mr. Lucas, who has a coal wharf in Milbank-street. About six o'clock in the morning of the 15th of February, I saw three men come from Lambeth in two boats, and go to Mr. Edmund Lucas's barge, called the Augusta, and take, I suppose, half-a-ton of coals—it was about a hundred feet from the wharf—I could see well—I could not discern the men till I rowed after them—they picked the big coals out with their hands, and then shovelled them out into the boats—I pursued them to Lambeth—the prisoner was in one of the boats, by himself—he was brought to me by a Thames policeman—I gave a description of him—my boat was touching his boat, when he jumped out, and the water splashed up my side—I was near enough to see his face—I got the boats,

and brought them both back to my master's—there was about 4 cwt. of coals in the prisoner's boat.

Prisoner. Q. Which boat was I in? A. The little one—I swear you were the man.

GEORGE MADDOX . I am a Thames Police inspector. I received information, and apprehended the prisoner—Bedell gave me a description of him—I took him and his brother to Mr. Lucas's, and Bedell immediately pointed out the prisoner—I asked if he knew any thing respecting the coals in the boat—he said, "I don't know anything of it; I was at home, having my breakfast, at the time;" I had two boats given me, with about 6 cwt of coals in them.

EDMUND LUCAS . I am a coal-merchant. I had a barge called the Augusta, lying at the wharf, with some coals belonging to me—I saw the coals which were found on the morning of the 15th, and believe them to be part of the same as were in my barge.

Prisoner's Defence (written.)"William Bedell falsely swore to my person before the committing Magistrate. At the same time, the two parties who committed the felony were in the police-office, and ready to give themselves into custody, knowing at the same time they alone were the guilty parties; I being at home and in bed at the time; not having arisen to go to my work; but when I came out from home, I met James Kates and James May, who are the two parties guilty of the offence; for they had not long before told me of the whole transaction, when three of the Thames Police came to where I reside, and took me."

NOAH GARLAND . I live in Lower Fore-street, Lambeth—the prisoner lodged with me about twelve months. On the morning of the 15th of February he got up about six o'clock, lit his fire, came down stairs, and said to me, "What is it o'clock"—I said, "Ten minutes to seven—I heard him get his breakfast—he went out on to the shore—I followed him down on the shore to go to my labour, and saw him talking to James May—that is all I saw—I know it was the 15th—some person said there was a lighterman came across the water and took two boats away—the street-door was fastened by a chain and a bolt—I undid it myself—the key of the house lies on the shelf in my bed-room.

JAMES KATES . I am a fisherman—I know that my brother is innocent of this, because I did it myself—he was at home that morning, because I called him when I went away—the coals in the boat are not Mr. Lucas's—I took them from the Augusta—I have nothing more to say—(the witness was committed.)

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18420228-931

931. JOHN CRIPPS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February, 1 box, value 1d.; 16 pence, and 48 halfpence; the property of John wright

ELIZABETH WRIGHT . I am the wife of John Wright, a beer-shop keeper, living in Rufford's-buildings, Islington. On the 17th of February I was sitting in my room even with my bar—between three and four o'clock in the afternoon I saw the prisoner leaning over the counter in my shop—as I advanced to the door, I saw he was opening the till, which was kept inside the bar—I saw him take the box of coppers out—there were sixteen Pence and forty-eight halfpence—I had seen the box in the till three or

four minutes before—I called my husband—the prisoner left the coppers on the counter and ran away—my husband followed him.

Prisoner. Q. How do you know it was me? A. You had a greenbaize under your arm, and I did not lose sight of you.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am the witness's husband—I keep a beer-shop. On Thursday afternoon, the 17th of February, I was sitting in a room at the back, with my wife and a gentleman—my wife called to me, and pointed out the prisoner—I took him, and gave him in charge—I had seen the money in my till about three minutes before, when I was at the till—there were pence and halfpence kept in the box—I knew the box when I saw it again.

WILLIAM HORNSBY (police-constable N 124.) I took the prisoner from Mr. Wright on the 17th of February—the prisoner had this green-baize under his arm when I took him.

(Box produced and sworn to,)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the baize, and was running across the road, the Witness came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-932

932. ELIZA CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February, 2 breast-pins and chain, value 10s. 6d., the goods of Richard Budge, from his person.

RICHARD BUDGE . I live in Medway-street. About twelve o'clock in the night of the 20th of February, I was going along Tothill-street, walking with two friends—I was in the middle, and at the head of New Tothill-street there were two girls standing—as we got there the prisoner walked in front of us and got before us—when I pressed forwards to get along, she put her hand in my bosom, and my friend said, "She has got your pins"—I had two pins fastened together by a little chain in my cravat—I caught the prisoner's hand—one pin was in her hand, and the other was out of her hand—she said she had pulled them out with the rags of the sleeve of her gown—they are worth 10s.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not try to pull my petticoats up, and did not your pins catch in my sleeve, and did not your friends say, "Pooh, nonsense, you see it is not done willingly?" A. No.

JOHN BUTLER . I live in Medway-street. I was with the prosecutor on this evening, walking in Tothill-street—the prisoner was with another female—she came from the other, and began using some very loving words, and particularly to the prosecutor, who was in the middle—he said, "Go on"—she stopped us—I saw her pass her hand to the prosecutors's bosom—I saw that his pins were gone, and told him—I caught her hand—he felt and missed the pins—he took hold of her hand, and took the pins out of it.

GEORGE BEST (police-constable B 42.) I took the prisoner—she said the pins were hanging in the rags of her sleeve—these are the pins.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. About a quarter-past one o'clock I was standing talking to a female, the three gentlemen came along arm-in-arm; one said, if a house had been open he would give me a glass of ale; and another said, "Pooh, nonsense, come on, she is Irish;" one of them seized my petticoats, and attempted to pull them up; I went to strike one of them,

and one said, "You have lost your pins;" another said, "Pooh, nonsense, come on, it is not done wilfully"—I did not know that the pins were there till they spoke about them; I would not mend my gown that the rags might be seen now.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-933

933. WILLIAM PARAMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January, 1 sovereign, 1 half-crown, and 1 shilling, the monies of Robert Allsop, his master.

ROBERT ALLSOP . I am a master-carrier, living at Hornchurch, in Essex—I have employed the prisoner between six and seven years occasionally, to take care of my cart—I have employed him for three days at a time. On the 4th of January I gave him one sovereign, a half-crown, and a shilling, to pay for half-a-ton of salt—he was to go with another man to Bridge-wharf, City-road, to buy the salt—I do not know what became of him till the 15th of February, when I saw him at Lambeth-street—I do not know what became of the money—the man knowing who the salt was for, sent it by the other man who I sent with the cart.

Prisoner. I lost the money, and offered to pay him at so much a-week. Witness. His father said if I would consent to it he would pay me so much a week till it was paid.

WILLIAM KERR . I am a labouring man. On the 4th of January I had orders from the prosecutor to go with the prisoner to get half-a-ton of salt—I saw the prosecutor give the prisoner a sovereign, half-a-crown, and a shilling to pay for the salt—I and the prisoner set off with the cart—he told me he was going to get half-a-pint of coffee, and said he would follow me down to the wharf—I went down to the wharf, and loaded the salt—I went on—he did not follow me—I did not see him again that day—I got the salt, and took it home—I did not pay the money.

JOHN THORNETT . I am warehouseman to Clay and Newman, salt-manufacturers, in the City-road. I remember Kerr coming for half-a-ton of salt—he did not pay for it—he staid nearly three hours—he was waiting for some one, but no one came—I knew the cart and the man, and the salt was sent without being paid for.

SAMUEL TAYLOR . I am street-keeper in Whitechapel. I received information, and took the prisoner in High-street, Whitechapel, on the 12th of February—I told him I wanted him for absconding with his master's money—he wished me to let him go, and said he would meet his master on the following Tuesday—I said I must take him to the Magistrate—we walked a few paces—he turned round, and bolted from me—I ran, and took—him to Lambeth-street.

GUILTY . Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-934

934. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, 3 half-crowns, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the monies of William Parry, from his person.

WILLIAM PARRY . I am a file-cutter, and manage my father's business, in Chenies-mews. About half-past twelve o'clock at night, on the 12th of February, I was in North-crescent, Cheynies-street—I saw the prisoner—she came up, and accosted me—I told her to go away—she came up again, and put her hand into my coat-pocket—I had three half-crowns and 2s. 6d.

—it was there three minutes before—I missed three half-crowns and 1s. 61.—the moment she had got it I accused her of it, she struck me in the cheek, and said she would call a policeman—the policeman came, and I gave her in charge—she did not say any thing, and the officer took her to the station—I had two old half-crowns and one new one.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me the money? A. No—I did not say it was my father's money.

JOHN BLADSON (police-constable E 132.) I was on duty in Alfred-place, Tottenham-court-road—I heard the cry, went, and found the prosecutor and the prisoner—he accused her of robbing him of three half-crowns and 1s. 6d.—I took her to the station, and the money was produced from her bosom—the prosecutor knew the money—the prisoner said the prosecutor gave her one shilling of it, only one shilling was her money.

Prisoner. I said one shilling was what I had before he gave me the other money. Witness. No, you said one shilling the prosecutor gave you.

Prisoner's Defence. It don't stand feasible that I could walk alongside of him and take that money out of his breast-coat pocket without his seeing or feeling me; he gave me the money.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-935

935. JANE BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February, 1 petticoat, value 3s. the goods of John Crayden.

JULIAN DUNN . I am servant to Mr. John Crayden, living in Wright's-passage, Westminster—the prisoner lived in the house two months. On Thursday, the 10th of February, she was spending the evening there—she left the house about a quarter after eleven o'clock—about ten minutes after she left the room I missed a petticoat—I had seen it a quarter of an hour before—it belonged to my master's wife—I saw it again at the pawnbroker's the following evening—I gave the prisoner in charge—she denied having the petticoat.

Prisoner. Q. Had I not left a petticoat in your care? A. No, you had left the duplicate of a petticoat.

ELIZABETH OWEN . I am a widow, living in New-way, Westminster. The prisoner came to me about a quarter after eleven o'clock on the 10th of February, brought this petticoat in her hand, and asked me to hang it up, which I did—she went out again, and brought in 3d.—next morning asked me to pledge the petticoat for her, which I did at Williams's, in Smith-street.

WILLIAM JUDSON (police-constable B 165.) I took the prisoner into custody on the evening of the 11th of February—I told her what it was about—she denied it at first, and at the station she said she had taken it, and it was pledged, if I went to New-way, to Mrs. Owen, I should find the duplicate—I took the duplicate, and got the petticoat.

Prisoner's Defence. She said she would not lock me up if I gave her the ticket—I left my own petticoat in Mrs. Crayden's care.

GUILTY . Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Confined Three Months.

OLD COURT.—Friday, March 4th, 1842.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-936

936. DANIEL CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, at St. Pancras, 14 spoons, value 12l., and 8 forks, value 9l.; the goods of Charles Granville Stuart Menteath, in his dwelling-house; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-937

937. JOHN CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February, 3 printed books, value 2s. 6d. the goods of John Branch.

JOHN BRANCH . I am a bookseller, and live in Theobald's-road; I have an open window, with books in it. On the 5th of February the policeman brought the prisoner into the shop, with one of my books in kit hand—he took two others out of his pocket—they are all three mine.

WILLIAM PILES . I am a policeman. On Saturday night last I saw the prisoner loitering about the prosecutor's shop, and watched him—I saw him take one book, put it under his coat, and walk away—I secured him, with a book in his hand—he said he had two more, which he produced in the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Justice Coltman.

Reference Number: t18420228-938

938. JANE MOORE was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering, on the 14th of December, an order for the payment of 2l., with intent to defraud William Masterman and others.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a clerk in the banking-house of William Masterman and others. On the 12th of December we had advice from Wigney and Co., of Brighton, to pay 21, to Elizabeth Hodges, on account of Mr. Adnum—we were Wigney's London correspondents—I produce the letter of advice—(extract read)—"Please pay, on application, W. Hodges, 2l. on account of Adnum"—the effect of this would be, in the course of business, to make out a cheque for Hodges to sign—on the 14th of December cheque now produced was prepared at our house, and a female came and applied for the money, saying her name was Hodges—she signed this cheque, on which, I sent her to the counter with it, to receive the 2l.—I cannot swear the prisoner is the person—I do not know her.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. The authority on which you paid this, was the letter you received from your correspondent? A. Yes, we should not without that, pay a cheque, unless it was drawn by a correspondent—we should not pay it without advice—we retain the cheque as a voucher against our correspondents—it would not be a proper discharge for having paid the money, without the signature of the party living the money—there would be a letter written to the party to apply the money—that letter is not left with us—in such a trifling sum as this we should not ask any questions, on the party showing their letter—the money was not paid before she signed the cheque, for I saw her sign it, and it is not paid without my marking it with my initials.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you pay large sums in the same way? A. Yes, all the country accounts—the party producing their letter does not always certify their identity, "but that is the object—I should not authorize the

other clerk to pay the money, unless the cheque was signed—I put my marl to it after it is signed—the cheque so signed and marked by me becomes the authority to the clerk to pay—my initials intimate that I have examined and find it correct—another clerk fills the cheque up—I then look at h, and put my initials to it after the party has signed it in my presence—after I mark it the party takes it to the counter to receive the money.

GEORGE ADNUM . I am an auctioneer, and carry on business at Brighton, and have an account with Wigney's bank there. On the 11th of December I authorized them to pay 2l. to Mrs. Elizabeth Hodges, through Masterman's, their London correspondent, and wrote a letter the same night, advising Mrs. Hodges of it—I had received a letter from her a few days previous, asking assistance, and was directed to address my answer to King-street, Snow-hill, which I did.

CHARLES STEWART HOGG . I am a clerk at Masterman's—the cheque produced appears to have been paid in due course, but not by me—Vantin, who was in our service, has left—it is cancelled, by which I infer it was paid—it was returned to Wigney and Co.—On the 16th of February the prisoner came to our banking-house, and presented the letter now produced—I asked her if her name was Hodges, she said, "Yes"—I asked her again, and she said, "Hodges, Elizabeth"—I asked if she had ever received any money at our house before—she said, "Yes, 2l."—another clerk desired her to walk into another office—an officer was sent for, who took her into custody—(letter read)—" To Mrs. Hodges, 2, King-street, Snow-hill; Mr. Adnum begs to inform Mrs. Hodges she can receive the sum of 2l., on application at Masterman and Co/s, on Wednesday morning, on producing this letter. Mr. Adnum is sorry to hear of Mrs. Hodge*1 distressed circumstances; she must not make any further application to him.—Brighton, 14th February, 1842."

WILLIAM FARLEY . I am a letter-carrier at the General Post-office, In December last, King-street, Snow-hill was in my district—I remember, some time before Christmas, delivering a letter at No. 2—I remember it more particularly, as the house had been closed for about six weeks, which made me particular, in inquiring if Mrs. Hodges lived there when I delivered it—it was about a fortnight or three weeks before Christmas—I did not notice the post-mark.

ELIZABETH HODGES . I live at No. 29, Russell-court, Drury-lane, and am the wife of David Hodges—I formerly lived at No. 2, King-street, Snowhill—I ceased to live there a fortnight before Christmas—the prisoner was living in the house when I left, and I asked her if any letters came to take care of them for me—I did not leave word where I was gone to live, but I went repeatedly to inquire if any letters had come for me—I went myself once, and sent my two sons—I went myself about ten days before Christmas, and saw the prisoner—she said there were two letters, but not the one from Brighton which I expected—she gave me the two, but none from Brighton—I sent both my sons after that—I had written to Mr. Adnum, at Brighton, before I left—the signature to this cheque is notify handwriting—I did not authorize the prisoner or any body to receive we money for me, or to sign my name for it—the 2l. never reached me by that means. f

Cross-examined. Q. Can you tell the exact day you left the house? A. I cannot recollect, nor when I called myself for the letters—the first I heard of this was on the 2nd of January—my husband being in difficulties,

I did not wish it to be known where I was gone, my husband being in difficulties—I had told the prisoner I expected some money from Brighton—I had not authorized her to receive the money, on my oath—I did not tell her to send me the money, nor that I should not like to go to the banker's on account of my husband, nothing of the kind—I do not recollect whether I told her it would be an order—I did not tell her it would be on Masterman's—she was landlady of the house—I had lodged there about three weeks—I left in December, and went from there to Drury-court—I remained there a few days, then went to Arthur-place, Drury-lane, for about three weeks or a month, and then to where I now lodge.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Was your husband formerly in the silk trade rather largely? A. Yes, we were in a good deal of distress at this time—I do not remember on what day I went to inquire about the Brighton letter—I wrote to Mr. Adnum on the 11th or 12th of December, and went to inquire a few days after—it was after the 12th of December, I am certain.

MR. ADNUM re-examined. I received the letter on the 11th, and answered it the same day.

JOHN BEALES . I am a letter-carrier at the Post-office. I delivered the letter produced, at No. 2, King-street, Snow-hill, on Tuesday, the 15th of February, about ten minutes past four.

MRS. HODGES. On the 2nd of January, I had a communication from Mr. Adnum.

Cross-examined. Q. Up to the time you left King-street, was your husband there? A. No, he only came there once—he was aware I had written to Mr. Adnum.

DAVID HODGES . Q. I am the husband of Mrs. Hodges. I never authorised the prisoner to receive a cheque of 2l. or any thing of the kind.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure of it? A. Yes, I had no conversation with her about it—I knew my wife had written to Mr. Adnum while we were in King-street, and that some money was expected front Brighton—I was at King-street till about a fortnight or three weeks before my wife left—I left in December—I cannot exactly say what time—I left a week or ten days before her—the prisoner owed me money, and could not pay, and therefore I could not pay her rent—she had been lodging with me about a month in Kingsland-road, before we went to King-street, and owed me three guineas for that with board and money advanced—she was mistress of the house in King-street—I left before my wife, because tradesmen were troublesome, but for no other reason—I took a room in Kingsland-road by myself—the prisoner had offered if I brought my goods to King-street I should pay no rent till Christmas—she owes me money still.

COURT. Q. How long did you leave your wife in King-street? A. About three weeks or a month—I called once after I left, while my wife was there, I recollect.

JOHN ROE . I am a City officer. I was sent for to Masterman's on the day this happened, and the prisoner was given into my custody—she said voluntarily, "Mr. Roe, I wish to tell you the truth"—she said Mrs. Hodges had given her the letter to get the money, and it was all right—were was no letter produced then.

GUILTY . Aged 58.— Confined Two Years.

Before Lord Chief Justice Tindal.

Reference Number: t18420228-939

939. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Baber, after the hour of nine in the night of the 12th of February, at St. Marylebone, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 6 combs, value 8s.; and 10 pieces of wood, value 4d.; his goods.

GEORGE BABER . I live with my brother, John Baber, who keeps a hair-dresser's shop, in John-street, Oxford-street, in the parish of St. Marylebone. On Saturday, the 12th of February, about a quarter past nine o'clock, a policeman came in with the prisoner, and asked if I knew that the shop had been robbed—I said, "No"—he told me to look into the window—I did so, and missed six combs and four pieces of wood, done up in paper, to represent soap—one pane of glass was broken at the corner—I do not know how long it had been broken—I think it had not been broken that morning, or I should have seen it.

JAMES KINDON . I am a clicker, and live in Foley-street. I was passing through John-street on the evening of the 12th of February, and saw the prisoner with two others—I distinctly saw one of the others in the act of breaking the window, and the prisoner and the other were standing before him, to hide him—I did not see either of them take any thing out—I then proceeded to fetch a policeman, and when I came back the prisoner was two or three yards from the window—I pointed him out to the policeman as one of the three—he then ran away—the policeman ran after him, and he was taken in Oxford-market—as he was running he threw away a piece of wood, done up in white paper, which was an imitation of soap—I saw a stranger pick it up, and give it to the policeman.

Prisoner. He says he saw it picked up, he was the full length of a street off when the gentleman picked it up, and it was full two minutes before he came up after the policeman collared me. Witness. I should think one minute had not elapsed—I was close behind the policeman.

THOMAS WALLIS (police-constable E 130.) I took the prisoner into custody at a quarter past nine o'clock—he saw me, and ran away, across John-street, into Oxford-market—I pursued, and caught him there—I saw him throw something down, done up in white paper, which was afterwards found to be a piece of wood—this now produced is it—I searched the prisoner at the station, and found in his pocket this other piece of wood, done up as an imitation of soap—as we were going to the station I heard something drop on the pavement—I looked, but could not find any thing then—after taking him to the station, I returned to look at the window, and this brad-awl was given to me by Mr. John Baber—it is such an instrument as is used by thieves to break a window—I have seen similar things used by thieves.

GEORGE BABER re-examined. I did not see my brother find the bradawl—he is not here—these pieces of wood have my brother's name and address on them, and were in the window at the time—one piece is marked with blood, and the prisoner's hand was cut by putting it into the window—none of the combs have been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I was proceeding along Oxford-street, and met a young man and boy, who I partly knew by sight; they asked me to buy two packages of soap: I agreed to give them 4d., and a pint of beer; we went to a public-house near the prosecutor's, and had it; I saw the gentleman standing by all the while we drank the beer; when I came out I examined the packets underneath the window, and then put them into my pocket without opening them; the gentleman came up, and pointed me

out as one of the thieves; I was frightened, and ran away; how could I have the awl, and throw it away, if one of the others b the window? the window? GUILTY . Aged 14.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

NEW COURT.—Friday, March 4th, 1842.

First Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18420228-940

940. MARY ANN MORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December, 1 gown, value 15s.; 1 shawl, value 3l. 10s.; 1 cap, value 1l. 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 2 pairs of stays, value 1l. 16s.; and 1 basket, value 7s.; the goods of Sophia Salmon; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months,

Reference Number: t18420228-941

941. JAMES GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January, 1 bag, value 1d.; and 53lbs weight of coffee, value 3l. 19s.; the goods of Robert William Barnfield and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-942

942. THOMAS GRANGER was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MESSR. BODKIN, PAYNE, and LUCAS conducted the Prosecution.

ANN OSBORN . I am the wife of Robert Osborn, who keeps a chandler's shop in New Gravel-lane. On the 7th of February, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came, and asked for a half-penny bundle of wood—he gave me a shilling—I gave him 11 1/2 d. change, and he left—my daughter came in, I showed her the shilling, and found it was bad—I am sure it was the same—I marked It, and put it aside from the other money—on Sunday, the 20th, he came again for a halfpenny bundle of wood and half-an-ounce of tobacco—I knew him again, and served him—he paid me with a bad shilling—my husband came into the shop, and said he would send for a constable, as he had taken several bad shillings of him—I put the shilling on the counter, the prisoner took it up, and offered to give me a good sixpence—he said his mistress had given him the shilling, and he would throw it away—I saw his hand go—a policeman came and took him—I gave him the shilling I had taken of the prisoner on the 7th of February.

HARRIETT HILL . I am assistant to Mrs. Agnew, who keeps a chandler's shop in King Edward-street, Wapping. On the 12th of February, a person very like the prisoner, but I cannot swear to him, came and asked for a quartern loaf and a penny candle, which came to 9d.—there was put little girl in the shop, named Whittomore—I served the prisoner—he put down a five-shilling piece—I put it into the till—there was no other crown there—I afterwards gave it to Mary Ragan, who took it to Mr. Stocker—I do not think she was gone three minutes—she brought it back with her—I laid it on the chimney-piece in the parlour—I took it up next morning, and put it in a drawer into a little box by itself—I am certain no person saw it till the policeman had it.

MARY RAGAN . I am servant to Mr. Stocker, a baker, he lives near Mrs. Agnew. I went to Mrs. Agnew's, to receive some money for bread-Harriet Hill paid me a five-shilling piece, I took it to my mistress directly, who said it was bad—I ran to Mrs. Hill directly, and gave it her—I am sure I took back the one she gave me.

REBECCA WHITTOMORE . I live at Mrs. Agnew's. I remember a man coming in on Saturday night, the 12th of February, for a penny candle, and a loaf—I am sure that man was the prisoner—he put down a crown. piece.

Prisoner. In the Thames Police-office you said you believed I was the man, and did not the policeman say, "That is the man," and drag you away; you said "No" for nearly ten minutes. Witness, I knew him at once—the policeman said nothing at all to me.

GEORGE JOSEPH BROWNE (police-constable H 164.) On the 28th of February I received this crown-piece from Mrs. Hill—I have had it in my possession ever since—I said nothing to Whittomore to induce her to swear to the man.

MARTHA DOUBLE . I am the wife of William Double, who keeps the Bull's Head public-house, St. Katherine's Dock. About seven o'clock is the evening of the 18th of February, a person came and asked for a quartern of gin and a pipe—I served him—he put down a five-shilling piece, I took it up, and discovered it was bad—I told him so—he said, "Oh, keep the gin, I will fetch my governor"—he left the bar—I gave the crown to my husband, who was standing by me at the time—he took it, and made a hole in it.

WILLIAM DOUBLE . I am the witness's husband. The prisoner came for a quartern of gin—he gave a counterfeit five-shilling piece—I took it, and made a hole in it—my wife told him it was a bad one—he said be would go and fetch his governor, and would leave the gin—the next morning I screwed the piece up in the bar—I afterwards gave it to the policeman.

WILLIAM GOLDWIN (police-constable K 82.) On the 20th of February, I was sent for to Mr. Osborn's shop in New Gravel-lane—the prisoner was given into my custody for passing a bad shilling—Mrs. Osborn said she put it down, and he took it up again—I asked him where it was—he said he flung it away—I searched him, and found 4d. in copper, a half-penny bundle of wood, and half-an-ounce of tobacco—I was notable to find the shilling—Mrs. Osborn gave me a shilling in the prisoner's presence—she said, "Here is the shilling I took of him last Monday week"—he said nothing then—at the station he turned to Mrs. Osborn, and said, "If you will not give me in charge, I will give you a good shilling for the one the policeman has got."

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint. This shilling is counterfeit, and so are these two crowns—I believe them to be both from the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 31.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-943

943. JOHN SMITH and JAMES COOK were indicted for a misdemeanor.

MESSRS. PAYNE and LUCAS conducted the Prosecution.

ANN UNDERHILL . I am the wife of Edward Underbill, who keep a beer-shop at Chelsea. On the 23rd of February, after nine o'clock, the two prisoners came in—one of them called for a pint of beer, and Smith gave a shilling—the beer came to 2d.—my husband's mother served the beer—I was about to go out, and put the shilling into the till—there was only small change in the till, and no other shilling—I then took the shilling

out to purchase some supper—when I got to the shop, a person there said "You have a bad shilling"—I said, "I see I have, but I know who I took it of"—I returned home, and put the shilling into a desk—there was some good money in a bag there, but I put this shilling into a drawer by itself, not mixed with any other money—I kept it till Saturday morning, and then gave it to the policeman—on the Friday following, the prisoners came again, and called for a pint of beer—Cook gave me a good shilling in payment—I looked at it particularly, as I knew them to be the men that came before—Cook said, "Stop, I have no need to change, I have got half-pence enough"—I said, "Have you, air?"—I returned him the shilling—he felt in his pocket, and said, "I have not enough, I must change now"—he gave me, as I thought, the same shilling, and I gave him the change—as they were leaving the door, my husband's mother said, "They are the men that gave you the bad shilling"—I said, "Yes, but they have given me a good one now"—I looked at it to show her, and it was a bad one—I pursued, and gave them in charge—I marked the shilling with my teeth.

COURT. Q. How came you not to state to them that they were the men? A. Because I wanted to see if they would give me a good one then or not—I have not the least doubt about them.

CATHERINE BRADLEY . I am the wife of William Bradley, a beer-seller, in Graham-street, Pimlico. On the evening of the 23rd of February, the prisoners came to my house—Cook called for a pint of porter, and gave me a bad shilling—I bit it, returned it to him, and told him it was bad—he said he had taken it in change from Mr. Mellon, who keeps the Coach and Horses public-house, in Hospital-row, which is about two streets off me—Smith paid me 2d. for the porter—they then left together—I am quite sure Cook gave me the bad shilling.

DARIUS ALEXANDER MORGAN (police-constable B 141.) On the 25th of February I was in Queen-street, not on duty—I saw Smith running——there was a cry of "Stop thief"—I ran and collared him, took him to the station, and found on him five good shillings, 3d. in copper, and five bad shillings—I have had them in my possession ever since.

Smith. You took out fire good shillings, and 3d., and then you stepped about a yard, and said, "What have I got here?" and it was five shillings, wrapped in two papers, and the outside paper was covered with mad; I know nothing of it. Witness, I found them in his pocket—they were in paper, not muddy.

THOMAS WORTELL (police-constable B 136.) On the 25th of February I was on duty, and saw Cook stopped by a crowd—I took him, and found 5d. and a knife on him—I saw Morgan secure Smith, and take from his left trowsers pocket five bad shillings, in a piece of paper; I have two shillings, which I received from Mr. Underhill; that night, or next morning, Smith said the bad shillings were not taken from his pocket, but I saw that they were.

MR. JOHN FIELD . These five shillings are all counterfeit, and all from the same mould; and the other two are both counterfeit, and one of them was cast in the same mould as the five shillings.

Smith. I have not seen Cook the last month, and at the time she says I was in the shop I was in a theatre.

Cook's Defence. I was not in the house till the Friday evening, when she says I tendered a good shilling; and if I had been there on the Wednesday,

would she not give us in charge? I said I thought I had halfpence enough, but I had not; I threw the shilling down again; she gave change.

Witness for the Defence,

ELLEN CLANCER . I live with my father and mother, in New-court, Orchard-street, Duck-lane, Westminster. Between three and four o'clock. on Wednesday, 23rd February, I was going up Tothill-street—I met Smith—he asked where I was going—I said, "Nowhere particular"—he said "Will you have any thing to drink?"—I said, "I don't mind"—we went, and had two pints of porter and a quartern of gin—he said, "Will you come to the play?"—I said I had no money—he said, "Never mind, I have got money," and we went to the Victoria—the play was, "Miss Smith," or "Miss Wright"—he was in my company till eight o'clock the next morning—it was one o'clock when we came to Westminster-bridge—we went into a night-house—he was rather tipsy—we remained there till about five o'clock, and then we went into a coffee-shop.

MR. PAYNE. Q. How long have you known him? A. About twelve months—I am no relation of his—I can swear that I first met him in a singing-room in Drury-lane—I always speak to him when I see him—I went to the play with him two or three times in the summer—I am as ironer, and work up at Mrs. Cheseley's, in the Bayswater-road—I believe Smith is something of a carpenter by trade—I never saw him at work—I never saw him with Cook.

SMITH— GUILTY . Aged 20. Confined Six Months. COOK— GUILTY . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18420228-944

944. ALEXANDER DUBOWSKI, alias Sakalon Sargey, was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February, 1 watch, value 35l.; 1 chain, value 6l.; 2 seals, value 5l. 5s.; and 1 key, value 10s.; the goods of William Took, in his dwelling-house; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

(The prisoner being a foreigner, had the evidence communicated to him by an interpreter.)

WILLIAM TOOKE . I have chambers at No. 39, Bedford-row—my servant sleeps there—it is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn. About half-past twelve o'clock, on the 4th of February, I left my room, and left my watch, chain, and seals, on the mantel-piece—I returned in about twelve minutes, and they were gone—these produced are mine.

WILLIAM HAMMOND . I was at No. 39, Bedford-row, at half-past twelve o'clock that day—the prisoner called, and asked for Mr. Tooke—I directed him into Mr. Took's room, where he had the opportunity of seeing his watch, if it were there.

BENJAMIN AVILA . I am a pawnbroker. I produce the watch, which was pledged by the prisoner on the 5th of February.

GEORGE STEVENS . I produce a seal—the prisoner pawned it, on the 4th of February.

Prisoner's Defence. A person named Crawden gave them me to pawn.

BARNABAS FLACK (police-constable C 28.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(real)—the prisoner is the man who was then convicted.

GUILTY . Aged 46.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-945

945. EDWARD WOOD and MICHAEL CONWAY were indicted for a misdemeanor.

MESSRS. PAYNE and LUCAS conducted the Prosecution.

ELIZABETH LYNN . I am a widow, and keep a coffee-shop, in Union-street, Spitalfields. On the 25th of February Wood came to our house, and had some coffee—he gave me a sixpence—I thought it was bad, and gave it to a gentleman to look at—he told me it was bad—I told the prisoner it was a bad one—he said he was not aware he bad a bad one, but he would give me another—he did not do so—a person there said he had better make his retreat, and he hastened out—two policemen came in soon after—in consequence of what they said, I marked the sixpence, wrapped it in a piece of paper, and kept it separate, till Saturday—when the policemen came I gave it them.

ROBERT AVERY . I am a carpenter, living in Union-street, Bishopsgate. On Friday morning, the 25th of February, I was in the coffee-shop—I saw Wood there—he called for a cup of coffee—I did not see him give any money, but Mrs. Lynn came and asked me if it was a good sixpence—I bent it, and it was bad—I heard her tell Wood it was bad—he said he was not aware of it, he would give another—a person told him he had better be off; and he went off—I followed him, but did not see an officer, or I would have given him into custody.

ANTHONY HURREN . I keep a coffee-shop in Sun-street. On the morning of the 26th of February Wood came in, and called for a cup of coffee—be gave me a sixpence—before I had looked at it the officer came in, and asked if it was a good one—I said I thought it was—he told me to try, which I did—it was bad, and the officer took him—I told the prisoner it was bad—he said he was not aware he had one—I marked it, and save it to the officer, and about two minutes after Conway was brought in.

GEORGE TEAKLE (police-constable H 8.) In-consequence of information, I went with Trew at a few minutes past six o'clock on the morning of Friday, the 25th of February, to a lodging-house in Wentworth-street—after waiting a short time, I saw both the prisoners come out together—we followed them, but lost sight of them on the way—on the morning of the 26th of February, we went to the same lodging-house, and saw both the prisoners come out about half-past six—they went to Mr. Hurren's shop, in Sun-street—Wood went in—Conway stood outside on the opposite side—they had walked together in conversation more than a quarter of mile—I looked through a glass door in Hurren's shop—I saw a cup of coffee brought to Wood, and saw him give something in payment—I went and asked Mr. Hurren what he had got—he said, "A sixpence"—I told him to examine it—he did—I told him to keep it—I told Wood he should remain there till his companion was brought in—he said he had no companion—I said I had been watching him and his companion so many mornings, that I knew he had, and he should stop there—I found on him one good sixpence and a penny—I went to Mrs. Lynn's the same morning, and got a sixpence from her—while I was at Mr. Hurren's, Trew brought in Conway, and the prisoners were taken to the station.

GEORGE TREW (police-constable H 125.) I went with Teakle on Friday, the 25th—I saw the two prisoners come out together—we traced them as far as Rose-lane, and there lost them—on Saturday, the 26th, we followed them again—I saw Conway at the end of Sun-street, about twenty yards from Mr. Hurren's shop—Teakle was in the shop—I went up to Conway and seized his throat, suspecting he was going to swallow something—he fell down, and I saw his hand was closed—I got it open,

and found a sixpence in it—we had a desperate struggle—the sixpence fell from his hand, and I picked it up—another sixpence was picked up in the crowd, and brought to me—they were both bad—the prisoners positively denied any knowledge of each other.

MR. JOHN FIELD . These sixpences are all counterfeit, and three of them are from one mould.

Conway. I picked up one as I was going down Sun-street, and the policeman took it out of my hand.

WOOD— GUILTY . Aged 18. Confined Six Months. CONWAY— GUILTY . Aged 45.

Reference Number: t18420228-946

946. MARY ANN PAGE was indicted for a misdemeanor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-947

947. TIMOTHY DONOVAN, JOHN RENN , and RICHARD HAYES , were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, 1 apron, value 2s., the goods of Edward Rawles and others.

EDWARD RAWLES, JUN . I am in partnership with William and Edward Rawles, senior—we live in Drury-lane. On the 12th of February, about half-past two o'clock, I missed a white leather apron from the door—I had seen it safe a quarter of an hour before—it has never been found.

GEORGE GILLETT . I am a brickmaker. Between two and three o'clock on the 12th of February, I was in Drury-lane—I saw three prisoners together, about three doors from Mr. Rawles's shop—they went to the shop, and one of them, but I cannot say which, pulled down the apron—they ran down Pitt's-court—when they had got to Wild's-court, I saw Renn had the apron in his possession—I told an officer—he went and found Donovan and Hayes in a house—they ran out of one house while he was in the other.

WILLIAM WEST (police-constable F 106.) I took the three prisoner together, in Wild-street, about half-past twelve o'clock, on the 16th of February—I took them from the description of Gillett—I had known them before—they are always together.

Renn. I was at the hospital with my little brother from half-past two o'clock till four that day.

---- RENN. I am the mother of the prisoner Renn—I live in Clement's lane, Temple-bar—he has been to the Dispensary for me twice a day with a little infant I have, who is crippled—on the Saturday before the Tuesday he was taken, I sent him to Bennet's-court, Lincoln's-inn-fields, with the child, who is three years and a half old, with a letter—I have not brought the letter here—he left me about one o'clock to go there, and he returned about two, and took a gallipot to go to the Dispensary for some stuff for the child's foot.

(The prisoners received good characters.) DONOVAN— GUILTY . Aged 17. RENN— GUILTY . Aged 15. Confined Nine Months. HAYES— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18420228-948

948. WILLIAM DANCE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 81bs. of ham, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Wright.

THOMAS WRIGHT . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Blackmore-street, Clare-market. On the 22nd of February, I received information, and a ham which hung in my shop was gone—this now produced is it—

of the place where I hung it up a few minutes before—T ran after the prisoner, collared him, and he dropped it at my feet.

CHARLES ADAMS . I am a tailor. About seven o'clock in the evening of the 22nd, I was passing down Black more-street, I saw the prisoner take the ham from the prosecutor's window, and walk away with it—he had a female with him—we went after them—the ham was dropped between them—I cannot say who by, but the prisoner took it

Prisoner. I was tipsy—a woman met me, and asked me to have a little to drink—I said I had no money—she said, "Come along, I will give you some"—she ran off, and left me.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-949

949. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February, 1 shawl, value 3s., the goods of William Gaygin.

SARAH GAYGIN . I am the wife of William Gaygin. On the 7th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I went to the Royal Stand and Saloon, in Shoreditch—I had a shawl on, and missed it—the prisoner sat next to me—I asked him if he had seen it—he said he had not—after the performance, I asked him again—he said he had not seen it—in coming out of the gate, I said I knew he had it in his possession, but I did not with to take any further trouble about it—this is my shawl.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Was Harding with the prisoner? A. Yes, he supplied the prisoner with some drink—Harding was before the Magistrate—the prisoner appeared intoxicated when we left—I did not tee how my shawl went.

JOHN NEWMAN (police-constable N 181.) I was on duty on the evening of the 7th of February—I saw the prisoner going along—Harding came to me, and in consequence of what he said, I seized the prisoner, and told him it was for robbing some female of a shawl—he said he was quite willing to go with me where I wished to take him—he took this shawl from inside his coat, and chucked it over some iron railings.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-950

950. JOHN CHRISTIAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February, 25 dollars, value 5l. 4s., the monies of Lewis Holland Thomas, in a certain vessel in a port of entry and discharge.

LEWIS HOLLAND THOMAS . I am master of the brig Lauriene—we arrived from South Peru in February last—I had a bag of dollars on board—the prisoner, who was on board, had access to them—on my arrival, I went to the bank with the dollars, and missed twenty-five—I asked the prisoner if he knew any thing of them—he replied he did not—I told him he had been seen with dollars on the day of the vessel's arrival—he accounted for his having eight, and said he exchanged them at a public-house in East smithfield or Ratcliffe-highway, but he could not tell me the place—I went to the Anchor and Hope public-house, and heard that a coloured man had on the night of the vessel's arrival, which was on the 13th of February, exchanged twelve dollars there—I took the prisoner to the Thames-police—the superintendent sent an officer with him and me to make further inquiries—we met the landlord with whom the prisoner had lodged—he said he had seen him with a quantity of dollars, twenty or more, on the evening he

arrived, and he had passed some for some clothes at a shop in the neighbourhood.

JOHN ADAMS (Thames police-constable.) I took the prisoner, and went with the captain to different houses—the prisoner said he did not take twenty-five dollars, he only took five, and that was off the side-board where the glasses were.

MORRIS JONES . When the prisoner received his advance, he asked me to lend him four dollars to pay for some clothes, which I did—that was at Valparaiso—we were in South Peru between six and seven weeks, and during that time he received two dollars more to my knowledge, that is all.

Prisoner. Q. You remember the three dollars you gave me? A. I had them back again—I did not give you a dollar and a halfbesides.

JACOB COHEN . I am a slop-seller. On the 13th of February the prisoner bought some clothes, and paid me five dollars—he had fifteen or sixteen more.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-951

951. WILLIAM BEASLEY and GEORGE CRABB were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February, 23lbs. weight of cheese, value 15s., the goods of Nathaniel Bowdler; and that Beasley had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS REED . I am pot-boy at the Nag's Head public-house at Poplar, it is kept by Nathaniel Bowdler—he had a piece of cheese in the bar on the 10th of February, and I saw it put into the cupboard—the two prisoner were there in the tap-room when I was shutting the house up—I missed the cheese—this is it—it is my master's, I am sure.

Beasley. Q. When was it put into the cupboard? A. In the afternoon, and you left between twenty minutes and half-past eleven o'clock—you had been there all the evening with some friends—I had been taking a little liquor, but I was not the worse for it.

Crabb. You asked me to lend you a hand to clean the chaise and pony and harness, and I did; if you had not I should not have been near the house that afternoon; and then you said, "You may as well stop and have something," and we went; there were three or four glasses of liquor on the table, and some half-and-half—we were all the worse for liquor.

HENRY VERNON PARKER (police-sergeant K 5.) About half-past eleven o'clock that night I went to a brothel in High-street, Poplar—I found the two prisoners in one bed—I awoke them, and the officer who was with me lifted the cheese from under Beasley's head, tied up in a cloth—Crabb said, "I own I am concerned in it, but Beasley put me up to it"—Beasley said, "I know nothing about it, I was asked here to sleep by Crabb."

HENRY HUTTON (police-constable K 60.) I took the cheese from under the head of Beasley.

CHARLES HAGOER (police-constable K 217.) I produce a certificate of Beasley's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office—(read) he is the man who was then tried and convicted.

BEASLEY— GU1LTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

CRABB— GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-952

952. NATHANIEL WILMSHURST was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February, 13lbs. weight of tin, value 13s., the goods of William Pitcher, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-953

953. ELIZA POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January, 10 yards of lace, value 10s., the goods of Richard Tappin Claridge.

RICHARD TAPPIN CLARIDGE . I lodge in Weymouth-street—the prisoner was cook at the house—we had missed some lace when we arrived from the Continent and unpacked the luggage—it is my wife's lace—I am sure we had it in England—this now produced is part of it—I believe it to be Dresden lace.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. When did you arrive? A. In November—I was at an hotel in Thames-street for a few days, till we got a lodging—we missed the lace the day after we went to the lodging—my wife is not here, nor my daughter—I know the lace—I have been a great many years on the Continent with them, and know the things—my wife and daughter had a great deal of lace—I do not put any mark on their dresses, and can only judge of it by having seen it before—the moment I saw it, I said, "That is our lace"—I first saw it when the officer came to me a few days ago—it was lost in November, and there was a great to-do about it—I have a footman—a steward of mine recommended him to me two days after my arrival—I did not know any thing of my footman's previous character—he has been living with me in Weymouth-street all the time I have been there—I said it was very strange, and he must know of some things that were missing.

COURT. Q. When did the prisoner leave the house? A. About eight days ago—nothing has been missed since she left.

MR. DOANE. Q. How soon after was she taken? A. She was taken at the house—there were complaints made of my footman about some cigars, which a friend had taken out of his pocket—I accused the footman of them—I could not conceive any body but a man could want them—I never saw him smoke them—he never told me he had taken them—my wife dropped her purse in her apron pocket—she was not certain where she dropped it—I said to him, "It is very strange, now we have lost our money and our purse as you came into the room—you must have taken the purse, I do not know who else to accuse of it—he said, "You seem to suspect me, I am perfectly innocent, and if I am to labour under this impression in your mind, I had better leave"—I said, "I think so too."

CAROLINE STEVENS . I am a dress-maker, and live in King-street, Grosvenor-square—I have made dresses for the prisoner—I was lodging in North-umberland-street—she gave this lace to me about Christmas time—I was to keep it till she gave me orders to make it up into collars and caps—I was working at Mrs. West's—I afterwards met the prisoner in the street—she seemed agitated—I asked if any thing was wrong about the lace—she did not tell me—I said if there was and she did not take it away, I should go to Mrs. Vickery next morning, and tell her—next morning I went to Mrs. Vickery and told her what I had got—I told the prisoner I should take it to Mrs. Vickery—she said no, I should not, nor let Mrs. Vickers know it—Tedman came and took the lace.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you lived where you do? A. About six weeks—I was living:, at the time the lace was brought, in Northumberland-street—not at Mrs. West's—I have known Mrs. West between two and three months—the prisoner did not tell me she had given the lace to her—Mrs. West is the mother of Mr. Claridge's footman—the prisoner was living with Mrs. Vickery—I have seen Mrs. West's son, when I have been backwards and forwards—I went to the servants about work—I never heard that there had been charges made against the footman till this was found out—he told me he was suspected about some money—I told his mother of it.

JOHN TEDMAN (police-inspector.) I went to King-street, Grosrvenor-square, searched the box, and found this lace—I then went to Weymouth-street, and saw the prisoner—I said, "This lace has been found in King. street, in a box of Miss Stevens's, and she said you gave it her"—I told her she need not say any thing, and she did not.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to go to this house? A. From information I had received from Mrs. West.

BENJAMIN WEST . I am footman in this establishment—I never saw this lace before it was produced by the police officer—I never gave it to the prisoner—Miss Claridge never gave me the lace.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-954

954. ELIZA POWELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February, 1 sheet, value 3s.; 1 tablecloth, value 1s.; and 3 napkins, value 5s.; the goods of Richard Tappin Claridge.

RICHARD TAPPIN CLARIDGE . Among other things, I lost a sheet, tablecloth, and three napkins—these now produced are mine—they are all marked with my name on them—I have no doubt about them.

CAROLINE STEVENS . The prisoner brought me one duplicate for all these things, and asked me to keep it for her—I said she had better keep it herself—she said, "Oh, no, they are things I don't want; when my quarter is out, I shall take them out again"—I was not present when the duplicate was found in my box—I am sure the duplicate produced is the same.

Prisoner. Q. Where did I give it you? A. In the room—I left it on the table—she took it up, and we went out—she gave it me again in Ormond-street—Emma West was present.

EMMA WEST . I saw the prisoner slip the duplicate into Stevens's hand in the street.

JOAN NYMAN . I am a pawnbroker, in Guildford-street, Grosvenor-square—I have a sheet, table-cloth and napkin, pawned on the 14th of February, in the name of Ann Evans, No. 4, King-street—I could not swear who by.

JOHN TEDMAN . I found the duplicate in this box.

No evidence. NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18420228-955

955. RUTH PEAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 2 miniatures and frames, value 15s.; and 1 medallion and frame value 5s.; the goods of Richard Tappin Claridge.

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-956

956. GEORGE TURNER, FELICIA TURNER , and JOSEPH MOTT, were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January, 2 coats, value 1l. 8s.; 2 pairs of trowsers, value 16s.; 3 pelisses, value 16s.; 12 yards of mouslin de laine, value 13s.; 9 yards of printed cambric, value 5s.; 2 yards of ribbon, value 2s.; 2 belts, value 8d.; 1 bag, value 9d.; 3 yards of lace, value 5s.; 8 yards of printed cotton, value 5s.; 1 frock, value 3s.; 1 bedgown, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pinafore, value 1s. 6d.; 1 frock body, value 2s.; 6 habit shirts, value 3s.; 6 collars, value 10s.; and 2 cap crowns, value 18d.; the goods of John Hill.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the property of the Sheriff of Middlesex .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN BISS . I am clerk to Mr. Price, an auctioneer, in Chancery-lane. I know George and Felicia Turner—I have reason to believe they are man and wife—I have known them living together as such.

JOHN HILL . I kept a ready-made baby-linen warehouse in Commercial-place, City-road, up to the 24th of January—at that time I had a considerable stock of property on my premises—I had an execution levied on my goods—Mott, and a witness who is here, came into possession, and George Turner was Price's man, and was employed as broker's porter—I left the house on Wednesday evening, the 26th of January—on the following morning, I went there about twelve o'clock—while there, Felicia Turner knocked at the door, it was opened by George Turner, and she was admitted—she said she wanted to look at the goods which were for sale—they were to be sold by auction on the succeeding day—in consequence of suspicion, I desired Mott to keep a sharp eye upon her, as I thought she might take something—he nodded assent—I left, and the same evening I returned again about six, and when I entered the shop, she was sitting by the fire with Mott—George Turner was behind the counter—I had no idea that they were acquainted till that evening—it excited my suspicion—I went to the station in Featherstone-street, and obtained the assistance of Brannan—I staid at the corner of Featherstone-street—Brannan went to the door of the house, and looked through the shatters—after watching a short time, Felicia Turner came out about half-past six—she was taken into custody at the corner of Featherstone-street—she had two parcels under her cloak—the officer took possession of one of the bundles, and we went to the station—I saw some of the goods in the bundles—I have no doubt they were some of the goods left on my premises when the execution was levied—she was searched by the female searcher, and she produced to me other articles—I know there were three cards of lace, a piece of cambric, and other things—there is about 4l. or 5l. worth—I afterwards accompanied the officer and George Turner to his lodging—I there saw some of my goods, and some bad my marks on them.

Cross-examined by MR. LUCAS. Q. How do you know this handkerchief to be yours? A. From its being the pattern we used—there are many hundreds of the same pattern—I have no doubt of this being mine—I had property exactly resembling all that is here.

JAMES BRANNAN (police-sergeant G 20.) I was called by Hill to assist in watching his premises—I accompanied him to the house in Commercial-place, City-road—I waited there from seven to ten minutes, when I saw Felicia Turner come out with a large bulk under her cloak—I secured her at the corner of Featherstone-street—I told her I was a sergeant

of police, and asked her what she had got—she said, "Nothing"—I pulled her cloak aside, and saw two bundles—I took one, and another officer took the other—she dropped a card of lace, and stamped on it—I took her to the station, and the property was identified—I went back to the house, and knocked at the door—it was opened by Mott—I said I was a sergeant of police, and he must consider himself in custody for being concerned with Turner and his wife in taking the articles on the premises—he said he be. longed to the Sheriff, he was there keeping possession, and I should not be there—he seized me by the collar, and endeavoured to put me out—further assistance came, and I secured him—he said, "You have robbed me of my pocket-book"—I had not touched it—he then put hand to his pocket behind, and took out what I believe was this piece of red game I handkerchiefs, and threw it behind the counter—Hayward, who had come to my assistance, went to pick the property up, and Mott put out the gaslight—I immediately procured a light—Hayward and I picked up this habit-shirt, cap, handkerchief, and other things, behind the counter—I afterwards went with Turner to his lodging, and found other property.

EVAN DAVIES (police-constable G 43.) I took George Turner on the 27th of January—he was about a dozen yards from the prosecutor's home in Commercial-place—I found on him several things, which Mr. Hill identified—I asked if he did not see a female come out of the premises just before—he said, "I did some time ago"—I cautioned him not to say any thing unless he liked—I said, "Who let her out?"—he said, "It was me"—it was then a little after seven o'clock.

JAMES HAYWARD (police-constable G 212.) I went to the prosecutor's house and saw Mott conducting himself very violently—Brannan had spoken to him before I went in, and he challenged Brannan with robbing him of his pocket-book—Mott then went behind the counter, stooped down, and said, "No, you have not"—he took something from his pocket and threw it behind the counter—it turned out to be something red at one end, and paper at the other—I got across the counter, and Mott turned the gas out and blew out the candle—a light was got—Brannan came on the other side of the counter, and we picked up these things behind the counter.

Cross-examined. Q. Mott behaved violently? A. Yes, he carried himself very high—he did not say he was answerable for every article there, and if any thing was lost he should have to make it good—he said he was the Sheriffs officer, and that we being policemen had no business there.

HARRIET HAYWARD . I am the female searcher at the station. I searched Felicia Turner, and found on her some articles which are here produced—she said before I searched her, "I have got a few articles about me, I hope you will take no notice of it."

JOHN HILL re-examined. These articles are mine, and amongst them is this little frock front, which has my mark on it.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am an officer to the Sheriff of Middlesex. I produce the warrant on which this levy was made—the whole amount is 83l. 0s. 4d.—Mott was employed under me, and George Turner was servant to the auctioneer—it was the duty of Mott to remain on the Premises for me, and the duty of George Turner was to remain to lot the for sale.

COURT. Q. What was the value of the stock? A. About 50l.—any thing it had fetched above 83l. would have been the property of Mr. Hill after paying the rent.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known Mott some time? A. Yes, I never knew any thing against him.

(Charles Robert Eyres, an architect; and John Stebbing, a tailor; gave G. Turer a good character: Charles Dean, a shoemaker;—Reynolds, a shoemaker; Charles Brown, a chinaman; Thomas Vincent, and William Lyne, gave Mott a good character.)

GEORGE TURNER— GUILTY . Aged 37. Transported for Seven MOTT— GUILTY . Aged 28. years.

FELICIA TURNER— NOT GUILTY .

(There were three other indictments against the prisoners G. Turner land Mott.)

Reference Number: t18420228-957

957. JOSEPH HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February, 1 box, value 6d.; and 69 cigars, value 4s. 6d.; the goods of William Taplin.

MARY TAPLIN . I am the wife of William Taplin, we keep a tobacconist's shop in Mile End-road. In the afternoon of the 24th of February, I received information, and missed a box of cigars out of my window—I had seen it safe three minutes before—this is it—our name is on it.

JANE BULPIT . I live with my father. About three o'clock that afternoon, I saw the prisoner and two other boys lurking about, and looking in at the prosecutor's window for about half an hour—I then missed the prisoner, and saw him come out of Mr. Taplin's with a box of cigars—the other two boys were outside—I gave information.

THOMAS BARTLETT (police-constable K 286) I saw the prisoner turn into Newton-street—he dropped the box and cigars—I took him back, and the prosecutrix identified the box and cigars.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY.* Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Sixth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-958

958. WILLIAM PETERS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February, 1/2 lb. weight of flour, value 1 1/2 d., the goods of Thomas Kemp; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . (The prisoner received a good character.)— Confined One Week.

Reference Number: t18420228-959

959. MARY ANN STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February, 1 looking-glass and frame, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Wilson; to which she pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-960

960. EDWARD JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February, 1 pewter-pot, value 1s., the goods of Edward Findley; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-961

961. MARY ANN HICKMAN, the younger, was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February, 1 gown, value 3s.; 2 flat-irons, value 1s.; 2 shawls, value 3s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 veil, value 3s.; 1 brooch, value 2s.; 1 plate, value 2d.; 1 dish, value 3d.; 1 tea-pot, value 2d. I knife. value 2d.; 1 fork, value 1d.; and 1 half-sovereign; the property of Comfort Hickman ; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420228-962

962. JAMES KATES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, 6 cwt. of coals, value 6s., the goods of Edmund Lucas; to which he pleaded

(See p. 756.) GUILTY .— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-963

963. MARY NELSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February, 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. to the goods of George Moir.

MARY ANN MOIR . I am the wife of George Moir, we keep a haberdasher's and shoe shop at Islington. On Thursday night, the 17th of February, I was in the shop, and the prisoner came in to be fitted with a pair of shoes—I fitted her—she then said she wanted some cap ribbon out of the window—I turned to get it, and when I turned again she was gone, and the shoes also—I had put the shoes on her feet, but she took them off and held them in her hand while I went to get the ribbon—they were a pair of leather slippers—I saw them at the pawnbroker's the next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Are you quite certain that a pair of shoes were taken from your shop? A. Yes, I have ascertained that a pair was missing.

MARY BOLAM . I live in Popham-street, Islington. On the 18th of February, about six o'clock in the morning, the prisoner asked me if I would pawn a pair of shoes for her—she gave me the shoes, and said she had bought them—she did not tell me where to take them to—I took then to Mr. Smith's, in Lower-street, and pawned them for 1s.—she told me to bring in some breakfast with the money, and I did so—these are the shoes.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. I live in service in general, but I have been out of place for six months—I only knew the prisoner two days before this—she rang the bell at my house, said she had been out all night, and asked me to be kind enough to get her some breakfast—I got 1s. for the shoes—I did not spend the whole of it—I took her back a few halfpence.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420228-964

964. JOHN CORDWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February, 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. the goods of William Warne.

WILLIAM WARNE . I live in Bell-street, Marylebone, and have shoemaker's shop there. On a Saturday evening in February, I was in the parlour behind the shop, and saw the prisoner go from the door—I followed and saw a pair of shoes under his arm, which I knew were mine—he saw me coming, and threw them down in the street—I took them up—I took him and the shoes back—I gave him in charge—these are the shoes.

WILLIAM CROUCHER (police-constable D 97.) On that Saturday night, about seven o'clock, I was called, and took the prisoner and the shoes—on the road to the station he said, "I am not the boy that stole the shoes, it was another boy."

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two boys running with the shoes, they threw them down and this gentleman came and took me. I and my brother had been running a race, my brother beat me, and I was running after him.

GUILTY . Aged 12.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-965

965. JOHN OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January, 1 plane, value 3s. 6d., the goods of James Valentine.

JAMES VALENTINE . I live about half-a-mile on the other tide of Highgate. I am a carpenter, and was working at Mr. Thompson's, in the Commercial-road, in December last—the prisoner worked in the same shop, and was in fall work—I had a plane there on the 10th of December—I was then at home ill for nine days, and on the 20th I missed my plane—the prisoner had been to the cupboard where my planes were, after another, plane—I challenged him with taking my smoothing plane—he denied it—I went to Worship-street on the 8th of February, and saw my plane there.

WILLIAM CROUCHER . I am in the service of a pawnbroker. This plane was pawned at our shop on the 1st of January for 1s.—I do not know who by, but I have a slight idea of the prisoner, and I believe he was the person—I gave this duplicate for it.

THOMAS FEW (police-constable G 154.) I took the prisoner and found on him fourteen duplicates—one of them is for this plane.

GUILTY . Aged 21.—

Reference Number: t18420228-966

966. JOHN OLIVER was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December, 1 watch-guard, value 9s., the goods of Henry Scott.

HENRY SCOTT . I live in Old-street, St. Luke's, and am a looking-glass maker. The prisoner lodged at my sister's—I left a writing-desk at my sister's about two years ago, and on the 3rd of December I placed this watch-guard in the desk, which was not locked—the guard is worth about 9s. 6d.—I missed it on the 24th of December—the policeman came to me afterwards and said he had found the duplicate on the prisoner—I went to the pawnbroker's and found the guard—this now produced is it.

JOHN THOMAS LEACH . I am in the employ of Mr. Walker, a pawnbroker, in the Commercial-road. This silver watch-guard was pawned with me on the 16th of December, in the name of John Oliver—the prisoner's person is familiar to me—he has pawned a great many things—this is the duplicate I gave for it.

THOMAS FEW . I took the prisoner on the 3rd of February—I found a number of duplicates on him—this is one of them.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-967

967. ANN LETWICH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August 1 bolster, value 6s.; 1 pillow, value 4s.; 2 sheets, value 6s.; 2 blankets, value 6s.; and 1 counterpane, value 3s.; the goods of Sarah Knowles.

SARAH KNOWLES . I am a widow, and live in Cross-street, Coventgarden. I let the prisoner a furnished lodging in August last—she did not stay more than a month or five weeks—she went away leaving her loom locked, and kept the key for a fortnight—she then sent it back—I

entered the room and missed a bolster, a pillow, and the other article stated in the indictment—I had not been in the room while the prisoner occupied it, but I saw these things there when she took the room—these now produced are the articles—they are worth 1l. I should think.

JAMES SMELLIE . I am shopman to Mr. Clark, a pawnbroker, in Long. acre. I have produced a pillow, bolster, counterpane, and other things, which I took in of the prisoner in August and September—I know her, and know it was her who pawned them—these are the duplicates I gave for them.

JOSEPH THOMPSON (police-constable F 39.) I took the prisoner—I told her what for—she said she was very sorry for it—I asked if she had any duplicates, and she told her landlady to give me her tickets—she gave me eight duplicates, and five of them related to this property.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy. I pledged them when my husband was out of work, with the intention of redeeming them. He left London to seek for work. I have been in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-968

968. JAMES BRIDGMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February, 1 saw, value 4s.; and 1 plane, value 1s.; the goods of John Collins: and 1 saw, value 2s. 6d.; and 2 planes, value 4s.; the goods of Thomas Stephens.

THOMAS STEPHENS . I am a carpenter, and live in Gill-street, Limehouse. I was at work at a building in Payne-street, Poplar, on the 11th of February, the prisoner came to me, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, for a bag of shavings—he remained there till I went to dinner, at twelve o'clock, and he went away with me—I left a trying plane, two smoothing planes, and two saws there—he walked with me about five minutes—he then left me, and said he was going home—I returned about one o'clock, and found the door burst open, and the tools gone—it had been fastened when I went away.

JOHN COLLINS . I am a carpenter, and work at the same buildings with Stephens. The prisoner was there half-an-hour before we went to dinner, at twelve o'clock, on the 11th of February—I left a saw and aplane—I missed them—I went away with Stevens and the prisoner—the front-door was buttoned inside, and we went out a back way—when we came back the button was forced off.

SAMUEL JOHNSON . I am assistant to Mr. Hawkins, a pawnbroker, at Limehouse. These planes and saws were pawned on the 11th of February, after twelve o'clock—to the best of my recollection, the prisoner pawned the saws—the planes were pawned about two o'clock, by an elderly man.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Did you receive many pledge that day? A. Yes—I might remember every person who brought each pledge if I saw them—we had about 200 pledges that day—the man who pawned the planes had pawned with me at other times—the planes and saws were pawned at different times—the policeman and the prosecutor came the same night.

ROBERT AYLIFE (police-constable K 210.) In consequence of information, I went in search of the prisoner on the 11th of February, and found him in Whitechapel—I found on him five duplicates, which lead to these things.

SAMUEL JOHNSON re-examined. I gave the prisoner these duplicates, which are for two saws, 4s. 6d.; a smoothing plane, 9d.; a trying plane,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(The prisoner received a good charater.)

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-969

969. JAMES BR1DGMAN was again indicted , for stealing, on the 2nd of December, 1 square, value 2s. the goods of George Morris.

GEORGE MORRIS . I am a builder, living in Russell-street, Blackwall. On the 2nd of December I was out on business—I have since missed a square from my bench in my shop—the prisoner has been in my employ, bat was not at that time—he was in the habit of coming to my shop—I have seen the square again at the Thames police-office.

THOMAS SLAUGHTER . I am in the employ of William Nathan, a pawnbroker, in Colt-street, Limehouse. I produce a square pledged with me—I cannot swear to the party, but this is the duplicate I gave.

ROBERT AYLIFFE (police-constable K 270.) I apprehended the prisoner on the 11th of February—among other duplicates found on him was one for this square.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-970

970. MICHAEL M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of John Antlett, from his person.

JOHN ANTLETT . I am lodging in King-street, Holborn. On the 13th of February I was in High-street, St. Giles, between twelve and one o'clock. in the night—Mr. Telford was with me—I saw the prisoner coming out of a public-house—my friend and I went along—I felt something at my pocket—I thought it was not right—I turned, and caught hold of my handkerchief at one end, and the prisoner had hold of the other end of it—I turned round, and told him he ought to do things a little cleverer than that if he was about that business—my friend accused him of it—he turned', struck him, and knocked his hat off—I picked it up, and said, "We had better not have any of that"—the prisoner then struck me—this is my handkerchief, and the one I had in my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. It had not got out of your pocket when you laid hold of it? A. Yes—it would have left my pocket if I had not caught hold of it—I am a porter—we had not been drinking at all—I had been to see a friend—we did not stop there three minutes—we had then been walking about—Telford is a draper—he does not keep a shop—he had lodged with me about seven weeks—there was no quarrel between me and Telford—I swear that the prisoner did not pull me by the coat-tail, to keep me from fighting with Telford—I do not know a person named Connolly.

THOMAS TELFORD . I lodge with the prosecutor. I was walking with torn in Broad-street, St. Giles—three or four persons came out of a house—I turned, and saw the prisoner had the handkerchief in his hand by one end—my friend turned, and caught the handkerchief—I accused the prisoner of picking his pocket—he struck me in the right eye—I kept him off. and my friend called a policeman, and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A commission salesman—I was a salesman to a linen-draper in Whitechapel for two months—I left

because we had a few words—the prosecutor and I live together, and sleep together.

ROBERT HILL (police-constable F 35.) I took the prisoner, and had this handkerchief delivered to me.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-971

971. MICHAEL GRIFFIN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 1 sackfull of wood shavings, value 2d., the goods of James Wyburn and another.

SAMUEL HOARE . I am shopman to James Wyburn and another, coach-makers in Long-acre—Mr. Strube is in the habit of dealing for shavings as my masters'—the prisoner came to our shop about Christmas, and said he came for shavings for Mr. Strube—I asked if he lived with Mr. Strube—I directed him where to get the shavings—he took a sack of shavings that day—on the 26th of February I saw him, and, as I had received some information, I followed him when he went away—he had a sack of shavings that day—he untied his sack in Mr. Strobe's shop, or cellar, in Little St. Andrew's-street, Seven-dials—when he came out again, I asked why he came in the manner he did, knowing he was getting them under false pretences; for Mr. Strobe was in the habit of having shavings, and I used to call on him and take the money when it amounted to 10s. or so—I delivered the prisoner these shavings, meaning to part with them for Mr. Strube—he had nothing to do with Mr. Strobe—I had authority from my master to deliver shavings for Mr. Strube.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-972

972. MICHAEL GRIFFIN was again indicted for a misdemeanor,

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-973

973. WILLIAM DELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February, 1 jacket, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief value 2s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; and 2 collars, value 1s.; the goods of Joseph Fuller.

ELIZABETH MEDLEY . I live in the service of Mr. Joseph Fuller of Steward's-grove, Chelsea. On the 7th of February I placed a blue bag in the kitchen—it contained a jacket, a pair of boots, a shirt, and two collars—I tied the bag up—I left it with my fellow-servant, to give to the porter when he called—it was Mr. Joseph Fuller's property—it was for his son, who is about fifteen years old—he is an apprentice in town, and comes home on Saturday.

JAMES TEDMARSH . I am in the service of Mr. Fuller. I received a bag from the cook—I took it from her in the kitchen, and gave it to the carman—I saw it put into the cart—I went with the cart—I was in North-street, Chelsea, for about half-an-hour, and some one took the bundle while we were there—I did not miss it till we got to Brewer-street, about half-past seven o'clock—I had seen it safe about two hours before.

WILLIAM BUTLER (police-constable B 139.) On Monday, the 7th of February, I met the prisoner in Castle-lane, Westminster—I said to him, "You have got back again, what have you got in that bag?"—he was carrying the bag over his shoulder—he made some reply, and ran away—I pursued, and took him with the bag—I asked where he brought it from—he said he found it in Belgrave-square—I asked if he knew what was

in it—he said, "No"—the bag was untied at the time—I said if he picked it up in Belgrave-square there must have been some mud on it, and there was not a bit of dirt on it—I found this jacket, shirt, two collars, and a pair of boots in the bag.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES TEDMARSH re-examined. The cart did not go through Belgrave-square.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my father's, I saw the things lying in Belgrave-square, and took them up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Six Months.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, March 5th, 1842.

Second Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-974

974. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March, 3 pairs of trowsers, value 9s.; and 1 coat, value 5l. 11s.; the goods of Robert Leach, in his dwelling-house; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-975

975. MARIA JEFFORD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Austin, on the 27th of February, at St. James's, Duke's-place, and stealing therein 1 pair of shoes, value 2s., 6d.; 2 pockets, value 1s.; 7 spoons, value 1l. 4s.; 1 pair of sugartongs, value 12s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 1l.; 12 gowns, value 14l.; 4 shawls, value 3l.; 5 table-cloths, value 14s.; 4 shirts, value 1l.; 5 petticoats, value 12s.; 1 bed-gown, value 2s. 4 sheets, value 1l.; 1 pair of stays, value 9s.; 3 pillow-cases, value 7s.; 10 sovereigns, 1 sixpence, 1 silver penny, and 1 penny; the property of Lyon Benjamin :—also, for stealing, on the 27th of December, 30 spoons, value 2l. 5s.; the goods of Samuel Austin :—also, on the 26th of January, 6 spoons, value 1l. 10s.; the goods of Samuel Austin :—also, on the 8th of January, 1 ring, value 20s.; the goods of Samuel Austin ; to all which indictments she pleaded

GUILTY .— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420228-976

976. JAMES LAINCHBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February, at St. Mary-le-bone, 130l. and 110l. Bank-notes, the property of Osgood, Hanbury, and others, his masters, in their dwelling-house.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM ADAMS . I am clerk to Messrs. Hanburys and Co., bankers, Lombard-street. On the 1st of February I collected for the house the money received for country notes—this 10l. note, No. 27841, dated 10th December, 1841, is one which I collected—I have written the word "Price, 1—2" on it—I got it from Messrs. Price's banking-house—on the same day I received this 30l. note, No. 32427, dated the 8th of October, 1841—I marked that "L. & W., 1—2," meaning London and Westminster Bank, where I received it—I delivered these two notes that day to Mr. Berry, the clearing clerk.

GEORGE DUVAL BERRY . I am clearing-clerk at Hanburys' every alternate week. On the 1st of February I received from Adams the notes and money of his collection of that day—I counted the notes, and gave what

I received from him to Mr. Boone, the cashier—I ascertain the sum to be correct, but do not take the numbers and dates.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You could not speak to any specific notes, as you did not take the numbers? A. No.

THOMAS BOONE . I was the cashier in charge at Hanburys' on the 1st of February—it was part of my duty to receive from Berry that evening the notes which had been collected that day—I receive the whole of the notes—I received what he delivered to me—I sorted them, with other notes, and placed them in my drawer, which was not locked—I kept them there till they were locked up at night—they are constantly used in the course of the day.

COURT. Q. if you wanted cash for a draft, you would apply yourself to that drawer? A. Yes.

MR. DOANE. Q. Did you place them in the drawer in the evening? A. Yes, all that was left, except what we send into the bank—we make up a parcel of such notes as we do not intend to keep, to send into the bank next morning—I receive no notes from Berry—the prisoner receives all the notes which come into the house, and I receive them from him—I do not receive the notes collected from the country from any one—the general collections merge into one, and the prisoner enters every thing—sometimes in a whole day I may not take any portion of what he receives in the day, but at night I take what we require to keep, and the rest are tied up to be sent to the bank—they are all locked up in a safe at the close of the day—all the cash remaining in the house is locked up—they are brought out in the morning and deposited in my till—I pay them to any body who brings a draft or anything.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You never attended before any Magistrate to give evidence against the prisoner? A. Never—the cashier takes from the drawer promiscuously what notes he wants to pay at the counter—I am the only cashier while I am at the bank, but in my absence it is Mr. Robertson generally—the partners may occasionally pay at the counter, if they see a friend there, but very seldom.

GEORGE DUVAL BERRY re-examined. I paid these notes with other money to Boone—I am not certain what lime of day—it was between five and six o'clock, or perhaps after six—it was after business closed—we clear the notes about five—the notes I delivered to Boone would, in the course of business, be locked up in the safe—there would be no call on that fund till next morning, I think.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you able to swear this took place after the bank closed? A. I will not swear that—it was between five and seven o'clock certainly—it was after the usual business hours, but I cannot swear no cheques were paid at the counter after that—I think occasionally cheques are paid after business hours, which is five o'clock—I was not examined before the Magistrate.

JOHN BEWICKE . I am a clerk at Messrs. Hanburys', and have been so better than thirty years. On the 1st of February if Adams collected notes and handed them to the clearing clerk, who gave them to Boone, they would be locked up—they would be handed to the prisoner next morning for him to enter the particulars of the notes in a book which he kept called "The goldsmiths' receivable book"—these notes would not form part of the assets of the bank nor be paid out to the public, till they were entered in this book—they would not be paid away the day they are received, nor till they had passed through the prisoner's hands and were entered in this

book—notes received by Adams in this way are never paid away the same day, but are locked up and entered next morning—they are never paid away before that—Berry would not make up his clearing till after five o'clock—the notes would go into Boone's hands late that evening—he would lock them up, and in the morning they would be entered before they were paid away the next day—notes brought by Adams would not go into Boone's hands till business hours were over—this entry of the "2nd February," in the goldsmiths' receivable book is in the prisoner's writing—here is an entry of three 10l. notes—one is "No. 27,341," dated 10th Dec. 1840—the notes are entered in order, according to their amounts—this is the last of the tens—the following entry is, "30l., No. 32427, dated 8th of October, 1841," and there is-another 30l. note entered next to it—the prisoner makes these entries at a desk in the front, near the window—another clerk sits next to him at the time—as the prisoner enters the notes, which are placed with their faces to him, he turns them down with his left-hand—they are sorted according to their amounts—here is an entry some pages on, under the same date, of 10l.—(reads)—"27347 Port., 10th of December, 10l."—the only difference between that and the other is the word "Port." and the figure "7"—Port. meant the Portsmouth branch of the Bank of England, but if the word is "Post," I should read it, "Bank Post, bill"—I was present at five o'clock, balancing the account of the bank on the 2nd of February, and late in the evening, we were found to be 20l. short—I and the clerks went through the books to trace it if we could, and after that went through it again to look through the notes received, and missed a 30l. note—we ascertained the number and date of it—the prisoner stood close at hand assisting in tracing the deficiency—it was announced that a 30l. note of such a number and date was missed, and shortly after the prisoner left the spot where he was, and returned with that 30l. note in his hand, and produced it—it was of the number and date missing—I did not see where be brought it from—he said he had brought it out of his desk, he supposed it bad got in there with some papers he had before him during the day—his desk is at the end of the shop—that is not the desk at which he was in the habit of making the entries—very great surprise was expressed at what he said—I told him I thought it was rather improbable (as soon as he bad entered the notes in the morning, it was his duty to turn them down with his left hand, and either put them before the cashier, or the cashier would take them himself—he had no authority to do any thing else with them—if Boone wanted any notes which lay before him, he would take them away; in any event, the prisoner would not carry them from his desk to Boone at the counter—they were close together—the desk he spoke of is his private desk, and is quite at the further end of the shop—not near Boone—he had no authority whatever to change any of these notes, nor to get cash for them) the production of the 30l. note did not set the account straight—we were then 10l. over, having missed only 20l—we tried, but could not find out how it was that night—I have what we call the "daily ticket" of the 2nd of February, which is in the prisoner's hand—we ultimately found that we had got the first 10l. note but none corresponding with the second entry, "Port." or "Post"—we paid we first 10l. note into the Bank of England afterwards—these "daily tickets" are in the prisoner's handwriting, and are prepared by him—they represent a certain, sun of money to be included in the calculations of the day—the total

amount of that ticket is 1,939l. 12s. 8d.—that represents cheques which we were not able to clear that day, and bills not due—it would be calculated as cash, though not converted into money—we take it for granted that ticket is accurate, on the confidence of the party preparing it—there is a item in this ticket of 120l.—I have gone through the whole of the securities mentioned in the ticket, and find securities corresponding with every item but that 120l.—this ticket, of the 1st of February, is also in the prisoner's handwriting—the amount of this is 2,490l.—it includes one item of 100l.—I have searched through the securities mentioned in that ticket, and find them all there except that of 100l.—if the prisoner had taken, on the 2nd of February, two 10l. notes, the account of the bank would be balanced in the evening, as the 20l. addition to the 100/. the day before, would cover that sum—if he had only taken two 10l. notes, the general account of the house would be balanced—I have a memorandum, partly in the prisoner's handwriting, which was found among his papers after be was in custody—this paper with—(reads)— "27 34 T (or 7) Post, 10th December" on it, is in his handwriting

JURY. Q. Is it usual to enter post bills in the same book as cash note? A. Yes, we enter every thing we receive as cash

MR. BODKIN. Q. I believe you felt it your duty to make a communication to the principal of the house? A. Yes—Mr. Osgood Hanbury is one of the partners—there are others—the house is in the parish of St. Edmund, the King and Martyr—I sleep in the house

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Doyou pay any rent? A. No—my evidence respecting the 30l. note and the tickets was mentioned in substance before the Magistrate—I have a doubt whether the entry in the book is "Post or Port."—we only enter one letter of bank post bills—they have two letters—we only enter the lower one, which is known to the Bank, and by which we can trace them—this has more the appearance of the letter T than the figure 7—the top is too thick to correspond with the other figures—he need not have put it so high—I should not think it likely for clerks to make memorandums of what they do after notes are entered—the tickets of the day sometimes contain the particulars of cash for bills, which bills we have received some days before—the prisoner has been twenty years in the house

MR. BODKIN. Q. A ticket of the 2nd of February may contain items which also appear on the 1st? A. Yes, but there should be a security corresponding with the entry of each day, or it would not balance—I found no security corresponding with this entry, whether it is "Bank post bill" or "Portsmouth."

CHARLES BROWNING . I am clerk to Messrs. Hanbury. On the 2nd of February I collected what is called the City or Bank-walk—I returned to the bank about half-past eleven or twelve o'clock in the morning, and be fore I balanced my book I gave the prisoner cash for a 10l. note—I do not know the number, but can identify it—the 10l. note (No. 27341) produced is it—I have written the prisoner's name on it—this was before I delivered in my account, and the note would come into the banker's as if it was part of what I collected—about a quarter of an hour after I came in I handed my collection over to the prisoner to be entered in the goldsmith receiver's book—it included the note I had received from the prisoner.

HAROLD WILLIAM FISHER . I am a clerk in the Bank of England there was no such Bank post bill in existence as No. 2734 T on the 10th

December—on the 2nd of February there was no such bank post bill in existence—I have examined the books, and there was no such Portsmonths branch bank note in existence—there was no such bill or note never issued.

OSGOOD HANBURY, ESQ. I am one of the firm—a communication was he to me of the inaccuracies in the balance, of the 2nd of February—I directed inquiry to be made, and on to 5th I saw the prisoner on the subject, and again on Friday the 11th—I called him in and said, "How about this 10l. note?"

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not tell him it would much better to tell the truth? A. My brother, who is one of the partner did—I have been in the firm nearly thirty years—the prisoner's father lived with us many years before I came—his conduct induced us to take his son, as we always do with our clerks—the prisoner conducted himself well, except falling into embarrassments

MR. BODKIN. Q. I believe you relieved him from, those embarrassments two or three times? A. Yes—we behaved with great kindness to him

PHILIP HANBURY, ESQ . On the 11th of February I was with my brother, when the prisoner was called into the private room—I said it would be better for him to explain or tell the truth about this matter—he did not say any thing on this charge before that—before I said that, I merely mentioned about the ticket of a bill sent to Ipswich, and he said he was 101. short, that is all—upon that I said it would be better for him to tell me all—I had seen him on the 8th or 9th—I did not then use any expression at to its being better for him to explain—I asked him to explain bow the 30l. note got into his desk—he said it got it with some letters of his—I asked him to show me the letters, and he brought me some quite small letter and besides that, there was a piece of brown paper covering a book belonging to a customer, which he had by him—I attended before the lord Mayor—I believe the 30l. note was not produced or mentioned there.

James Bush, architect and surveyor, Hayes-place, Lesson-grove; Charles Walker, tailor, Saukville-street; John Arthur Barton, clerk in the Bank of England; Mr. Wilkins, ship insurance broker, Hackney; and John Hollyer, his clerk, deposed to the prisoner's previous good character.

GUILTY of Stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.—Aged 38.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his character.

Transported for Seven Years

Reference Number: t18420228-977

977. ANN PEMBERY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December, 1 tablecloth, value 4s.; 5 napkins, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 spoon, value 5s.; and 1 ring, value 10s.; the goods of George Hammond Whalley.

FRANCES MITCHELL . I attend the chambers of different gentlemen in the Temple as laundress. I employed the prisoner to assist me—the had access to the different chambers—after this robbery, she accompanied meto Newcastle-street, to a person who buys old gold—that person is not here—the ring was melted down—what the prisoner told me was upon the threat of a policeman being sent for, and my undertaking to redeem the things.

WILLIAM HENRY COOPER . I am clerk to George Hammond Whalley

Esq., of No. 3, Fig Tree-court, Temple. I have missed the articles stated from his chambers—I have since seen three napkins at Mr. Walmseley's, and three at Mr. Kirkham's—one I can swear to by a mark, and three others which had been marked in ink with my master's name in full—I can swear to one handkerchief—it had my master's name in full on it—it has been partly erased—the W is left—the napkins which have the names cut off are exactly the same in quality and appearance as those my master lost—I have also seen a spoon which I know to be his.

GEORGE JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Kirkham, a pawnbroker, No. 313, Strand—I produce a tablecloth, three napkins, and a handkerchief, pledged on the 27th of December, by the prisoner, for 3s. 6d.—she said she pledged them for her mother—the policeman has the duplicate I gave her.

CHARLES WORLEY . I am shop man to Messrs. Walmsley, pawnbroker in Drury-lane. I produce two napkins, one of which has been spoken to by Cooper—they were pledged by a female, but I am not able to speak to the prisoner—the policeman has the duplicate I gave to the person who pledged them.

JOHN DENNIS (police-constable F 46.) I produce a broken silver teaspoon, and two duplicates, which I got from Cooper.

W. H. COOPER re-examined. I got the silver tea-spoon and duplicates from Mrs. Mitchell.

MRS. MITCHELL re-examined. I got them from the prisoner at her there's house—Mr. Whalley's was one of the sets of chambers to which the prisoner bad access.

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Of Stealing all the articles but the ring.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-978

978. DAVID COLEMAN and PHILIP SMITH were indicted for feloniously forging and uttering, on the 29th of January, an acquittance and receipt for 3l. 3s. 6d., with intent to defraud George Talbot, Lord Dynevor and others.—Other COUNTS charging Coleman with forging and attrite and Smith as an accessory.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE THOMAS LEE . I am cashier in the Provident Institution for savings in St. Martin's-place, established by an Act of Parliament, which I produce. Lord Dynevor is president and one of the trustees—there are several others—Lord Dynevor is not aware of this prosecution, but several of the trustees are, and the managers generally have sanctioned and authorized it—on Saturday, the 29th of January, Coleman came to the bank, represented himself to be Philip Smith, a depositor in the institution, and applied for payment of 3l. 3s. 6d.—when I called out "Philip Smith," Cole man stood before me, and answered to that name—it is necessary, in order for depositors to get out their money, to produce their book at the bankhere is the genuine book of Philip Smith—Coleman produced it, and when I saw it, I called out the name of "Philip Smith," to identify the portly with whom I had to transact the business, and Coleman answered to that name—I filled up a receipt for the money to be paid, and handed it to Coleman to sign—he first signed "Smith" only—I told him it was necessary to sign both names, and returned it to him, requesting him to add Philip to it—he then signed "Philip," and returned it to me signed "Philip smith"

—I compared that signature with the original signature of Philip Smith, which be had given in to our institution when he deposited the money—I have that book here—on making the comparison, I was not satisfied with the identity of the handwriting, and I asked him if his name was Philip Smith—he replied that it was—I felt satisfied that he was not Philip Smith—I then cautioned him, told him my suspicions, and that if he persisted in stating that he was Philip Smith, and it turned out he was not, he would get himself into trouble, at the same time I said, "What is your name?"—he replied, "Philip Smith"—I said, "And the money belongs to you?"—he said, "Yes"—I spoke to Mr. Boodle, the comptroller, my superior, then took the receipt, and requested the prisoner to accompany me to Mr. Boodle, who was in an adjoining room—I stated my suspicions to him, but perhaps Coleman might not have heard me—I produce the book which has Philip Smith's writing in it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you ever see two handwritings more unlike than these two? A. It was that which excited my suspicions—I find that the prisoner Smith has lived with Mr. Drummond, the banker, and I believe with Mr. Biddulph, and also with a Mr. Seaton, in the Adelphi—I did not see Smith outside the institution—he was not taken into custody—he was committed from the police-court—Mr. Twyford, the Magistrate, considered him as a party concerned, and committed him accordingly—I should say it was the act of the Magistrate more than any thing—the interest is paid, as a matter of course—Coleman did not ask for it—he asked at persons usually do—he said nothing, but answered to the name of Philip Smith, and produced the book—I understand the prisoners are brothers—they were said to be brothers at first, because Coleman gave his name as George Smith, and passed himself off as such, and I rather think be was committed under that name—I believe, he represented himself as George Smith—I did not hear him—I think the Magistrate committed the prisoners for forgery—it might be for conspiracy—I cannot tell which it was—when money is all taken out of the Bank, we generally return the books to the depositors—many leave their books behind them—this book was never asked for back again, as the money was not paid.

Q. If the book had not been returned to him, supposing you had paid him, could you ever have lost any thing? A. Yes, parties losing their books can obtain a duplicate—I thought it right to keep the book under the circumstances—if I had paid Coleman, Smith could have applied again for another book, which we should have given him, and we might have had to pay the money twice.

EDWARD BOODLE . I am comptroller of this Bank. This is a depositor's book, issued from our institution—this is a genuine entry made at the time the deposit was paid—in the front of the book are the rules respecting the mode in which money can be drawn out after it is first deposited—I was at the institution on the 29th of January—Mr. Lee came in with Coleman to the room where I was—he said he was not satisfied that the person applying for the money was the right depositor—I looked at the signature-book, and found it varied from that very much—I asked Coleman what he was—he described himself as a servant it corresponded so far, but the place of abode did not—I then asked with whom he lived—he did not give any answer at that time—I asked where he lived, but he did not give the right description—I asked his

name—he said his name was Philip Smith—I put that question to him two or three times distinctly—I did not call his attention to the original signature-book—I merely called his attention to the place of residence out of it—I said the writing was very dissimilar, and his answers were very unsatisfactory, I certainly should not feel justified in ordering the money to be paid to him, unless some respectable person could identify him as being the true depositor—I asked whom he knew in the neighbourhood—he said, "Mr. Drummond"—I asked what Mr. Drummond, whether it was one of the firm at Charing-cross—he said, "Yes, Mr. George Drummond"—he said he had lived with him—knowing where Mr. Drummond lived, I asked where it was—he said he could not tell me, he did not know, he only remained with him one night—I then asked him whether it was in a street or a square—he could not give any answer to that—I said I did not wish to delay him, if he was the right depositor, in the receipt of the money, but I should feel it necessary to send him to Mr. Drummond, to see if he could identify him—I sent John Martin, our constable, with him for that purpose—they returned in a very short time, and Martin told me, in his presence, that he had confessed that he was not Philip Smith, and that he did not live with Mr. Drummond—I said, "Is that the case?—Coleman said, "Yes"—I said, "Am I to understand, then, that you are not the depositor?"—he said he was not, but his brother was—I asked him what his name was—he said, "George Smith"—I said, under all the circumstances, I must send him to the police-office to account for it—be then said his brother had sent him, and his brother was outside—Martin then went away with him—he came back again very soon after, accompanied by the prisoner Smith, and said he had brought the brother back—I asked Smith if Coleman was his brother—he said, yes, that he had sent him in to receive the money—I asked Smith why he did not come in to receive it himself—he said he did not like—he gave me no other reason, than that—he said he was not aware he was doing any harm—the money had been deposited very nearly two years—I then said he had got his brother into a very serious scrape, that I should send him in charge for the forgery, and that he might attend at Bow-street, to explain the matter as he could—I did not give Smith into custody—he was not given into custody at all—the Magistrate called on them both to find bail, but not on the first occasion—there was only one prisoner at first, and that was Coleman—he was remanded from Saturday till the Wednesday following—he was brought up on the Wednesday—Smith then attended voluntarily—it was on a subsequent occasion that the Magistrate called on him to find bail.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it necessary according to the regulations of your establishment, that a man shall give a week's notice that he is going to withdraw his money? A. Yes—that week's notice was given on the Saturday previous—I have not got it here—it is at the bank—it was entered by one of the clerks—I did not direct any one to take Smith into custody—I was not a party to giving him into custody, otherwise than being present—no one on the part of the institution applied to the Magistrate to give Smith into custody—it was the act of the Magistrate—we made no charge against Smith except on the Magistrate's recommendation—the charge then made against him, was a conspiracy to defraud the Institution—we made no other charge, and not that, until the third

remand—between the first and third remands I made inquiries to see whether Smith was the party whom Coleman represented him to be—I beard a very good character of him from Mr. Drummond, for the short time he lived with him—I also inquired of Mr. Biddulph, but did not find his character so satisfactory there—I should say it was not good—Mr. Biddulph only said he did not feel satisfied with him—he did not enter into particulars—he made no complaint against his honesty—it did not seem to amount to that—he said he was a boy of bad temper—I inquired of Mr. Seaton, and found his character was good there—I told the Magistrate that Coleman gave the name of George Smith—I believe information was given against him, as George Smith, and the depositions were taken against him in that name—he went by that name on the two first occasions, and on the third occasion, I found out that his name was Coleman—I have the letter in my pocket, which first informed me that his name was Coleman—the Magistrate recommended me to charge Smith with conspiring with Coleman to defraud the institution-r-Smith was dressed much the same as be is now—I cannot tell whether he had on the same clothes—be was certainly not in a tagged state—it has been the opinion of some persons that this proceeding arose more out of the ignorance of the prisoners than any thing else, but I can hardly reconcile that in my own mind.

COURT. Q. Do you know whether Coleman was the person who gave the notice for withdrawing the money the week before? A. There is no means of saying that for certain—the notice must have been given—Smith said he had employed Coleman to give the notice, and that he thought the same man was to go and receive the money.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did Coleman represent his name to be George Smith the first time he was before the Magistrate? A. Yes, he did—that was in Smith's hearing, and he said so the second time.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a constable, belonging to the Institution. On Saturday, the 29th of January, Mr. Boodle called me into his room, and directed me to take Coleman to Mr. George Drummond, at Charing-cross—when we got outside, Coleman wanted to stop about, and said that his brother was waiting for him—I told him we could not wait there, we must go on to Mr. Drummond's—we proceeded as far as St. Martinis-church-steps, which is close by the Institution, when Coleman said, "It is no use my going down to Mr. Drummond's with you, for I am not the person that lived with him, it was my brother"—I took him back to Mr. Boodle, and told him what Coleman had said, and afterwards, by Mr. Boodle's direction, I took Coleman to Bow-street—I was in my uniform—as we were crossing the road to Chandos-street, the prisoner Smith came running from the corner of St. Martin's-lane—Coleman said, "Here is my brother"—Smith said, "Halloo where are they going to take you to?"—Coleman said, "They are going to take me to Bow-street all through your money"—Smith said, "Oh, I will soon settle that, I have plenty of witnesses to prove that I put the money there"—I then returned with both the prisoners to Mr. Boodle—he asked Smith why he did not come in for his money, as he was waiting outside—he said he did not like—I then took Coleman to Bow-street—he gave the name of George Smith there—the prisoner Smith was not present at that time—he was Present at the second examination—Coleman gave the name of George Smith then.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear that he gave any name on the second occasion? A. Yes, the Magistrate asked his name and I swear he gave his name George Smith—I will not swear the Magistrate asked hit name the second or third time.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you present the last time when both prisoner were held to bail? A. Yes—the depositions were then taken down in writing and signed—Coleman's right name was then known—he went by the name of George Smith on the two first examinations.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-979

979. DAVID COLEMAN and PHILIP SMITH were again indicated for a conspiracy.

MR. BODKIN on the part of the prosecution offered no evidence.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18420228-980

980. JULES VICTOR FARGES was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering, on the 2nd of November, an order for the payment of 24l. with interest, with intent to defraud John Capel and others.—other COUNTS stating his intent to be to defraud Jean Baptiste Roret.

MESSRS. PHILLIPS and CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

JEAN BAPTISTE RORET (through an interpreter). I am an artificial florist, and live at No. 2, Drury-lane—in the year 1840 I had 24l. in the savings-bank—in July, that year, my wife was in a bad state of health, and in consequence of medical advice I found it necessary to separate from her, and went and took a situation as French teacher at Mr. Mummery's school at Homerton—in February, 1840, I sent a blank piece of paper with ray signature to it, for a person named Clavery, at Paris, to settle a business—I addressed it to my wife in Paris—that blank signature had no reference to any monies I had in the savings-bank—I became acquainted with the prisoner in June, 1840, at my house—he was introduced to me by Madame Saving, an artificial flower maker, where my wife superintended the work, and where she was taken ill—the prisoner told me he was cashier at Savin's—I was in the habit of coming from Homerton to see my wife about once in every ten days—she was lodging at 29, Firth-street, Soho—the prisoner knew very well that I had 40l. in one bank, and 33l. in another, and that it was for the purpose of paying different tradesmen, washerwomen, doctors and other things for my wife's use—he used to come and ask how my wife was going on—while I was at Homerton I had occasion to look for my savings-bank book and it was missing—at that time I had 24/. in the savings-bank—I inquired of my wife about it—I had no idea at that time that my 24l. was taken out of the bank—I had never given authority to my wife, or any one else to take the money out of the bank—I first ascertained that it was gone out of the bank in December, 1840—my wife said she had taken the money and distributed it—I inquired of her what she had done with it—she cried and made no answer—after a long time she made a disclosure affecting here self and the prisoner—it was in July last—the prisoner was not then arrested for debt—I consulted an attorney, and afterwards took the advice of Counsel—I told Mr. Lewis, my solicitor, to take him into custody, but he arrested him on his own account—he was afterwards in Whitecross-street—I had no reason to believe, until July last, that the prisoner had misconducted himself

towards me, although there were some circumstances which created some suspicion.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. When did you first come over from Paris here? A. In 1889—I never ran away from Paris—I did not owe toy thing when I left—I owed, but I had something to meet my debts—my creditors were more than paid, because I left sufficient to cover my debts, and my business was settled there—I did not change my name when I first came over—my wife changed her name, in order not to be known working at anybody's house—I cannot remember whether I went by the name of Lefevre when I first came to this country—(looking at a letter)—this it my handwriting—I do not say that I did not change my name, but I do not remember—now I have seen that letter I recollect that I did change my name, because I wrote that—very probably I did go by the name of Lefevre—I changed my condition altogether—my wife went by the same name, Lefevre—I did not represent myself as an unmarried man when I went to the school at Homerton—they did not ask me the question, and I never said any thing—I never knew that my wife had a child before 1 married her—I never said so to any person—I knew her when she was only fourteen years of age—I never accused her of having been improperly intimate with two or three other persons besides the prisoner—I do not know a gentleman named Chard.

Q. Did you ever propose going into partnership with the prisoner? A. It was he who said, "Let us go into partnership"—perhaps I might have said so, because the prisoner told me he was about marrying his landlord's sitter, who would bring him about 600l.—I never said I could procure 500l. or 600l. to go into partnership with him—he came to me several times while I was at Homerton, and said he had job goods to buy, by which 80l. profit could be made—I partly consented to advance the 80l.—I did agree to advance it—I paid 80l., and the prisoner gave me bills for it—I did not advance 50l. first—I advanced 80l. all in one sum—I bought the goods for 80l., and sold them to the prisoner for 110l., and he gave me bills of long dates in payment.

Q. Was not the 24l. received by the prisoner on your authority as part payment of that 80l.? A. Never—I never told the prisoner that he had already had 24l. from my wife from the savings-bank, part of the 80l.—it lever made any part of the 80l.—I paid the 80l.—I swear that—(looking at a letter)—this is my handwriting.

Q. Now, having admitted this to be your handwriting, do you mean to wear you did not account to the prisoner about the 80l., and include in it this 24l. that your wife received from the savings-bank? A. No—they made me some account, and I answered by this letter—(this letter being read, the first part was in English, as follows:—"London, 17th November, 1840. Bought of Mr. Roret, by Mr. Farges, 350, 72, 230, 177, 617, B.F. flowers. 110l.—I received the bills, namely, 25l. one month after date, 30th instant; 35l.; 2—50l.; 3—110l., which paid, shall quit the present transaction. London, 30th November, 1840. RORET."—The following was in French, and was translated thus:—"My dear Mr. Jules, I have sent you the invoice which you asked me, and I am qjuite sorry that I have not had the advantage of seeing you on Saturday last, as it was necessary to be on another affair, whereby I should, doubtless, have spared you the trouble of the 1s. stamp that you spoke of. I should have as well taken your acceptance on blank paper, such is the

confidence I place in you. M.F. must have taken the book of the 24l. in addition to 1l. that she has received for the pay of Mrs. Sutton; therefore, 25l., and 25l. which you have received, makes 50l. I was about receiving, on Saturday, 30l., which will complete the 80l. I give you notice that I shall not give you credit to any person, that you may pay it in person. RORET.")

Q. Are you prepared now to swear that you paid the whole 80l. in one sum? A. I paid to Mr. Savin 75l., and 6l. afterwards, which makes 81l., and Mr. Savin will tell you so.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You say the prisoner gave you bills; have those bills ever been paid? A. No—when I found the book was missed I asked my wife what had become of it—she said she had gone and received the money.

Q. Is the 24l. you refer to in that letter, the 24l. you had in the savings bank, and which was obtained by forging your name? A. I believe it was this 24l., but I did not believe she was obliged to make a forgery to get it.

Q. Supposing your wife had got the 24l. out of the Bank by any means short of forgery, did you then refer him to her to get the 24l., and the 1l., to make up the 80l.? A. I do not know—they made some story, and I answered them—I cannot recollect whether I got the bills for 110l. from the prisoner after I wrote this letter—when I wrote this letter I knew ay wife had got the money from the savings-bank, but I was not aware the had committed a forgery to get it, or that the prisoner had aided her in committing it—the bills for 110l. are in the hands of Mr. Lewis, the solicitor—I gave the prisoner 40l. besides that referred to in the letter, as consideration for the bills for 110l.—I cannot recollect when—it was after I wrote this letter—it was on the guarantee of a person named Rufel—I have had other transactions with the prisoner besides that of the 110l.—we have dealt together—the bills for 110l. were renewed when they became due, and on their being renewed I delivered the old ones up to the prisoner—he never paid one farthing on the renewed bills.

Q. Did you oppose the prisoner's discharge under the Insolvent act? A. I did what my solicitor advised me to do, and it was him did it—it was as the holder of the renewed bills for 110l., and others.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you oppose the discharge of the prisoner in the Insolvent Court on the ground of the 24l. obtained from the savings bank? A. No, I opposed him for the amount of the bills I had in my hand—I do not know whether I was examined about this 24l. in that Court.

Q. Why was not Madame Bailey examined on that occasion on the same subject? A. I believe she might have been examined—I do not know the laws of England, but it appeared that the Court declared itself incompetent—I preferred the bill before the Grand Jury the first Session after that—Mr. Lewis did all the proceedings—I did not stay till the last day of the Session before I took out a warrant—I do not know—I believe the prisoner was to have been arrested the very same day the warrant was issued.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What did you mean by these words in your letter. "Ma femme a touch la livre?" A. My wife had before told me that she had received the 24l., and therefore I sent him word of it.

COURT to AUGUSTUS GOUGENHEIM (the interpreter). A. Give us an exact translation of those words? A. It is bad French, but I should

conclude it meant "My wife must have touched a book," or "have caught hold of a book"—the whole sentence is, "My wife must have got hold of a book of 24l."

MR. BODKIN to MR. RORET. Q. Did you mean to convey, by that expression, that your wife bad possessed herself of the money without your authority—that she ought to have received it—or that she must hive received it? A. They had written a parcel of stories, and I was told that the money had been taken, and I used to answer the letters.

COURT. Q. Did you intend to refer the prisoner to your wife for that 24l., to make up the 80l., at the time of writing that letter? A. I cannot recollect what passed.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At the time you wrote this letter, did you believe that your wife had got the 24l. out of the savings' bank? A. I do not know—I cannot recollect what I meant by referring to the book of 24l., and the 1l. which would make up 25l.

Q. What other 24l., except the 24l. in the savings' bank, could this have referred to? A. I had several bills to receive, and I bad about 200l. in different savings' banks.

CHARLES SAVIN . I am an artificial-flower-maker, and live in South Andley-street, Grosvenor-square. The prisoner was in my employ in 1840, in Berner-street, and Madame Roret also—Madame Roret went home ill in June, 1840—about October, 1841, I had a conversation with the prisoner about Madame Roret—he never showed me 24l.—he told me he had received 24l. from Madame Roret—some time before that he told me Madame Roret held the book of the savings' bank, and that he would have the money—he said she had got the book from her husband, and that he would make her draw out the money from the bank—I asked him how he could do so—he said he would make her sign for her husband—I told him she could not do so without putting herself into trouble—he said, "Never mind, I must have it"—this was not a conversation about making up the sum of 80l.—that was before—he said that Mr. Roret was a man of money, and had 200l. or 300l., and perhaps more, and he would have it all—I spoke in French to him—I told him, by Madame Roret signing her husband's name, she would get into trouble, meaning that she would be injured, and it would go against her, put her into prison, or anything, by the French laws—the expression I used was, that if it came to the knowledge of the bank they would proceed against her.

COURT. Q. Had you any thing to do with the transaction of the 80l.? A. Yes—the goods had been bought from me—I think some was paid in cash, and some by a bill for a week, but I do not recollect exactly—the amount altogether was 80l.—the prisoner paid me part first, and part afterwards—he paid me all—no part was paid by the prosecutor.

WHILHEMINE EMILIE RORET (through an interpreter.) Q. If questions are put to you by which you may be criminated, and brought to trial, you are not bound to answer, you may do as you like? A. I do not believe I am guilty—I do not know whether I should refuse to answer if my answers proved me guilty—I found my husband's savings' bank book in the chest of drawers—I can only say one thing, that I wrote the forgery with the prisoner—that was without my husband's knowledge—the prisoner knew it was without my husband's knowledge, because he forced me to do it—(looking at a paper produced by Mr. Bell)— this is the true writing of my husband—this paper was sent to me at Paris, by my husband, with only the signature to it, to

send to a person in Paris—the witness Turner wrote what is on the top of it, by my direction—the prisoner knew it—he was not present when Turner wrote it—I took this paper, with my husband's true signature, to the bank the first time—the prisoner did not go with me the first time—the people at the bank gave me another paper, to be signed by my husband—this is the paper they gave me, with red ink on it—(produced)—I wrote the name of "Jean Baptiste Roret" on it, in the prisoner's presence, and by his desire—I took it to the bank eight days afterwards—the nurse accompanied me, because I was too ill to go there by myself—nobody else accompanied me to the bank—the prisoner waited for me in a street—I do not know the name of it—it was not far from the bank—I got the money the second time—I came immediately from the bank, and saw the prisoner, I believe, in the same street where the savings' bank is—I gave the money to him—I believe the nurse saw me give it him, but I did not give her any account of what I did—before I wrote the second paper, and before I got Turner to write the first, the prisoner told me that he did not know the form necessary to get the money, and he told me to go to Mr. Turner—I do not exactly recollect the day on which I received the money at the bank, but I know it was on a Saturday evening.

COURT. Q. Where was the name of Jean Baptiste Roret written? A. In my own room, at 29, Frith-street, not in a sitting-room but my bedroom—the prisoner was there when it was written.

EDWARD TURNER . I live at 27, Coventry-street, Haymarket—I know Madame Roret—In October, 1840, she came to me with a piece of paper with Roret's name on it—the rest of the paper was blank—I filled it up for her—this is it—(read)—"I authorise the bearer, my wife, to receive the amount of money standing in my name in the savings' bank, Montague-street, amounting to 24l. "Jean Baptiste Roret."—I wrote all except the signature.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. She came and asked you to be good enough to fill it up for her? A. Yes—I know Dr. Begi—he had a claim on her for money about that time, and he recommended her to come to me to have this filled up—she came a few days afterwards with a printed form, and I put in that second paper the words, "of Manchester," by her desire, as the place at which she said her husband was living at the time—I merely put the words "of Manchester," and "Frith-street, Soho," is that second paper—she told me the first paper was informal, that they would not pay on it—she came first of all, by desire of Dr. Begi, to know how she should get the money from the savings' bank—she came with her nurse—I told her she had better write down to her husband, or send the book to him and let him write up to the office—she then left me—I believe I saw her two or three days after—she then had the small piece of paper—I which I first saw—I saw the red one, the second, a week after the first—I wrote on that "7, Piccadilly, Manchester," and "29, Frith-street, Soho,—that was all I put on it, and she then came and requested me to make an alteration in this, which I did at her request—I paid very little attention to the second paper, and do not recollect whether the signature was to it or not—it was stated to me that Dr. Begi was paid out of the money—he is here.

COURT. Q. Who suggested to you that Piccadilly, Manchester, was Rort's place of residence? A. His wife.

EMILIE BAILEY . I was the nurse in attendence on Madame Roret in 1840—she was visited by the prisoner—he was in the habit of going into her bed-room—she had but one room—I went with Madame Roret to the savings' bank, but I do not know what time it was—she was poorly at the time, convalescent—nobody was with me but Madame Roret on the first occasion—I went a second time, eight days afterwards—I have often seen her and the prisoner with paper before them, but I do not know what they were doing—Madame Roret had always pen and ink on her table—I went to the bank with Madame Roret on the second occasion—she produced the red ink paper which was given to her on the first occasion—after producing that paper she received 24l. 9s.—we then came away from the bank together, and when we got outside we met the prisoner in a street—I cannot recollect the name of the street—I do not know how near it was to the savings' bank—it was not in the same street as the bank, but several streets off—he was waiting in the street—I cannot recollect whether he was standing still or walking on—Madame Roret gave him the money and he went away—I cannot recollect whether he went away directly, it is two years ago—I cannot say whether I had seen the prisoner that day before we went to the bank—I used to see him two or three times a-day—I do not recollect whether Madame Roret had seen him that morning before we went to the savings bank—he used to come every morning to breakfast with Madame Roret.

ALEXANDER BELL . I am clerk at the savings' bank in Montague-place, Bloomsbury—this order was presented to 'me by a female, but I do not know who—I did not pay upon this—I gave her this other paper, and that same day week she came again with it filled up—I am not the cashier—it is my duty merely to pass the receipts into the depositor's hands—I gave the receipt to the person who presented this paper—I did not see the money actually given—this second paper was presented by the female to me—it appeared to me irregular, and I passed it to the actuary of the bank, who desired me to pass the receipt to the depositor or person who presented this paper—its irregularity chiefly consists in its not being witnessed or dated, but by order of the actuary I gave the receipt, and got it signed by the woman—I did not see the money paid, but it must have been paid by the possession of this receipt.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you know whether the money was paid on the order, or on the paper which was first produced? A. On the paper which was first presented.

COURT. Q. This second paper is a document on which you refused payment, is that so? A. It is, for want of its being witnessed and dated.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Saturday, March 5th, 1842.

Sixth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18420228-981

981. WILLIAM LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February, 1 celery glass, value 10s. 6d., the goods of James Killick and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-982

982. HENRY CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February, 2 pewter pots, value 2s., the goods of James Glaze ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-983

983. JAMES FURLONG was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February, 1 gown, value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 pair of gloves, value 2d.; and 1 other shawl, value 2s.; the goods of Delia Goodliff: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-984

984. JAMES ANSLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 1 box, value 1s.; 3 shillings, 1 sixpence, 4 pence, 3 halfpence, and 15 farthings; the monies of Charles Wilks Williamson; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-985

985. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 1 knife, value 3d.; and 1 dart tube, value 4s. 9d.; the goods of Samuel Finch; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 47.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-986

986. JAMES FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February, 1 saw, value 4s., the goods of Jonathan Hunt; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-987

987. HENRY PRITCHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February, 1 gas-bracket, value 12s., the goods of the Mayor, Commonalty, and Citizens of the City of London.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Sir Matthew Wood, Bart., and others.—3rd COUNT, calling it 1 gas branch and burner.

MR. GURNEY conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM HOBBS . I am under beadle at the coal market. On the 24th of February, I was in a room at the end of the passage, and my attention was attracted to the passage—on coming out of my room, I looked up and missed the gas-bracket—I saw the prisoner at a little distance from my room—I asked him who he wanted—he said, "Mr. Russell" I went with him to Mr. Russell's room—when he got there he went into the room—I was outside—he came out of the room—I said, "You said you wanted Mr. Russell"—he said, "Yes, I did," and then he said be wanted two coal merchants—I then put my hand to his coat pocket, and felt something, which I believe was the rack—he turned, and I heard something put down on a wooden stand—I put my hand down and it was this gas-rack—I said, "This is what you had in your pocket"—I had not noticed it in its place that morning—I had seen it the day before.

Prisoner. I have only this side-pocket—it is impossible I could put it into this. Witness. It was down in the lower part of your pocket.

ISAAC FLORY (City police-constable No. 547.) The prisoner was given into my charge—I took him to the station, and found on him this small screw, by which the burner had been fixed to the apparatus—he said it must have dropped into his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot account for the screw at all, how it came into my pocket; this thing was on the stain, and he said, "You have come to steal this;" he had it in his hand, and the screw might come off; I had another piece of brass in my pocket—when the witness spoke to me; I said, "This is what I had," this other piece I never had in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 63.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-988

988. JOHN DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February, 1 shawl, value 3s., the goods of Rebecca Brooks; and 1 cap, value 6d., the goods of John Watson.

REBECCA BROOKS . Between twelve and one o'clock on the morning of the 18th of February, I was at the Duke's Head public-house—the landlady was taken ill—I assisted to carry her up stairs—I had the shawl now produced there, which I missed—it was brought afterwards by the constable.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where did you put the shawl? A. On the table—I have worn it for many years—I know it by its general appearance.

HENRY BRAND . I was at the public-house that night—I lodge there—the prisoner was there.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see any thing done with the shawl?

A. No.

WILLIAM LAYLAND (police-constable F 100) I stopped the prisoner with the shawl in his pocket, between twelve and one o'clock

Cross-examined. Q. You saw him walking along Castle-street? A. Yes, about 150 yards from the public-house, which is in Mercer-street—I asked what he had in his pocket—he said, "A shawl and a cap"—I asked him where he got them—he said he picked them up in Mercer-street. (The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-989

989. EDWARD HOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 1 shovel, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Gardner.

THOMAS GARDNER . On the 22nd of February, I was at work at the back of the New Prison, at Islington—I lost two shovels and a spade—this shovel is mine.

ALFRED BEZANT . I am apprentice to a pawnbroker—this shovel was pawned on the 22nd of February, by the prisoner, in the name of John Holt.

ROBERT EVANS . Last Tuesday week, I was in the road and saw the prisoner with the shovel under his arm, and go into the pawnbroker's shop with it—I knew him before, and worked with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was ill in bed at the time of the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 21— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-990

990. WALTER BENJAMIN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 1 coat, value 1l. 10s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; and 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; the goods of John Cann.

JOHN CANN . I keep an eating-house in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. On the evening of the 25th of February, I was at the Brown Bear public-house, in Princes'-street—I had a coat, two handkerchiefs, and a pair of gloves—I left my coat on the seat—I missed it and the other things some time after.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not there all the day? A. No—you might have seen me in the skittle-ground betting in the afternoon, not in the morning—I did not pass my glass to you—it is possible I was drunk—I do not recollect—I never played a game of cards in the house.

THOMAS HOLBROOK . I was at the Brown Bear public-house—the prisoner was there—I saw the prosecutor's coat—shortly afterwards the prisoner was gone, and the coat also.

Prisoner. Q. What time did you leave the parlour? A. I should think after eleven o'clock—we had been talking together—I had been playing at skittles and betting with the prosecutor—I did not see the prosecutor give you any wine and water—I was away for a quarter of an hour, and left you alone in the room.

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX (police-constable E 49.) I produce this coat, handkerchief, and gloves, which I found at the prisoner's apartment, in Greville-street, Hatton-garden—I called him out first—I said, "I suppose you know what I have come about, it is about Mr. Cann's coat?"—he said, "Yes, hush, I don't want my wife to know anything about it"—he went and got the key, and went into the room, and there was the coat—he said, "I only did it for a lark, I thought it was old Tabor's"—there is a man named Tabor, who uses that public-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not knock at the second-floor room? A. Yes, because I did not know which was the right room—your wife opened the door—she saw me, and closed it again—then you opened it—you opened the other room door, and went in—you put on part of your clothes in the bed-room, and part in the other room—I asked you what had become of the papers, because the prosecutor told me they were of some consequence—you said you had not examined the pockets, what was there was there still.

Q. When you had examined the pockets, you said, "Mr. Cann must have made a mistake, for the papers are not here," and the boy said, "I don't think he has examined the pockets, for the things are correct" A. No, he did not, for the papers were deficient—I said, "Mr. Cann must have lost the papers"—I searched the place partly—I did not go into the bed-room.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the public-house with Mr. Tabor, and when he had left, I saw this coat, which I thought was his; I took it, intending to return it him in the morning, and have a lark with him.

JOHN TABOR . I was there that evening—I had a parcel with me containing cloth for a pair of trowsers—I took it away with me—the prisoner is a friend of mine, and bore a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-991

991. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, 61bs. weight of leather, value 8s.; and 1lb. 12oz. weight of canvas, value 6s.; the goods of John Meredith, in a vessel, in a port of entry and discharge.

JOHN MEREDITH . I am mate of the brig Bathurst, lying at Blackwall,—the prisoner was employed on board. On the 12th of February I found the cabin broken open, and I missed some canvas and some leather—I had left it locked the night before—this is the canvas and the leather—I had charge of the ship and all that was in it—the cabin had been broken open on the 10th, and again on the 12th.

THOMAS JONES (Thames police-constable No. 39.) I stopped the prisoner coming round the West India Dock-gates, about half-past seven o'clock, on Saturday evening, the 12th of February, with this property.

Prisoner. Q. You asked me what I had got? and I said some oakum and things. A. You had half-a-hundred weight of rope, and a sack belonging to a corn-lighterman, at Horsleydown.

JOHN MEREDITH re-examined. On the Thursday I lost between 30lbs. and 40lbs. weight of canvas, and a large piece of leather—the property now produced was in the cabin. On Saturday, the 12th, I left it there when I left the ship at five o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up by the gate.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-992

992. HENRY MUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January, 3 shirts, value 12s.; 4 collars, value 2s.; 2 pairs of socks, value 1s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; the goods of Daniel Ruston Renatus Johnson.

DANIEL RUSTON RENATUS JOHNSON . I live in Edward-street, Portman-square. On the 27th of January the prisoner called at my house—. he said he called from my laundress for my washing—(my laundress's name is Mary Firth)—I gave him three shirts, four collars, two pairs of socks, and a handkerchief—I am sure he is the person—I have never seen the things since.

MARY FIRTH . I did not send the prisoner for the linen from Mr. Johnson—he is a neighbour's child—I did not authorize him to get this linen, and he never brought it to me.

GUILTY .** Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years. (There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18420228-993

993. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February, 1 horse-cloth, value 2s., the goods of William Bartrop.

WILLIAM WARRADD . I live in Duke-street, Portman-square, and am in the service of Mr. William Bartrop. On the 16th of February I lent this horse-cloth to John Cridland.

JOHN CRIDLAND . I had this horse-cloth across my horse on the 18th of February while I was in at a tallow-chandler's at the comer of East-street—I was not in there above ten minutes, before the policeman called me out, and he had got it.

EBENEZER BOWER (police-constable D 143.) I took this cloth from the prisoner—he had it under his arm in Marylebone-lane.

THOMAS WRIGHT . I saw the prisoner take this cloth off the horse's back that evening—I followed him to Marylebone-lane, told the officer, and he took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down East-street, Manchester-square—just as I turned the corner I saw this cloth on the pavement, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-994

994. THOMAS TOBITT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 6 newspapers, value 2s.; and 1 printed book, value 1s.; the goods of Hannah Beaumont.

EMMA BEAUMONT . I am single, and live with my mother, Hannah

Beaumont, who keeps a coffee-shop in Long-acre. On the 26th of February, about two o'clock, the prisoner came in and called for a cup of coffee—he had a blue bag—I had seen him there before—I got on the dresser in the bar and watched—I observed him place the bag on the table, he then took off his coat, and placed it over the settle—he then got up, went round the room, and gathered up two newspapers—he sat down, folded then and placed them by the side of his bag—he then went round the room again, and gathered three more papers—they were the papers of the day before—he then rose again and reached an Odd Fellow, which is a small publication, and put that by the side of his bag—he rose, put on his coat, buttoned it up, and put the five papers within the breast of his coat—he then called to pay for his cup of coffee, and my sister went in to take the money—I went into the coffee-room—a gentleman said to me, "Is your brother within?"—I said, "No, I shall do just as well"—he said, "Search that man's bag"—I said, "I intend so to do"—I said to the prisoner, "Will you allow me to look in your bag?"—he said, "For what?"—I said, "My newspapers"—he said, "My good lady I have not got your newspapers"—I said, "You have"—he shrunk from me—I said, "You may just as well let me look in it at first as at last, as I will before you leave the room."

Q. Did you not say you saw him put them under his coat? A. Yes, five, but I did not know but there might be some in the bag—I told my sister to send for a policeman—the prisoner said, "For God's sake, don't give me in charge," and he let me search his bag, but there were no papers in it—I then said, "I must search you"—he said, "Don't give me in charge, I have a wife and family"—he said, "I am guilty"—I said, "I know you are"—he opened his coat, and there were my papers—the officer arrived—I said, "I give this man in charge"—in going to the office the prisoner offered me his watch and his purse—at the station they searched his bag and he begged of me not to press the charge—one of these papers has my mark on it.

NATHANIEL OAKEY (police-constable T 41.) When I arrived I saw Emma Beaumont standing by the side of the prisoner with the papers is her hand—she gave him into custody for stealing six newspapers—he begged very hard, and said he hoped she would not give him in charge as he had a wife and family, and it would be the ruin of him—he put his watch and purse in her sister's hand.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What was in his bag? A. Some books, papers, a pencil-case, and a catalogue of books.

MR. CLARKSON called

FREDERICK HALL . I am one of the keepers at Mr. Cooper's establishment for insane persons, at Old Brompton. I had the prisoner in my care from the 26th of March till the 9th or 10th of April last—he was brought there by his friends—he was very melancholy, and moped about—if I asked him what was the matter, he would say, "I wish I was out of the world"—he used to pick up shoe-brushes and combs and dirty collars, and never own that he had them; and he would fold up the newspaper, and put it into his pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-995

995. ISAAC GARDINER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February, 1 pair of stockings, value 2s.; 4 yards of cotton cloth, value 1s.;and 1 pair of mittens, value 6d.; the goods of John Hull and another, his masters.

JOHN HULL . I live in Dalston-road, and am a linendraper—I have one partner. The prisoner was our shopman—I got one of my servants to watch him, and, on the 1st of February, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I got an intimation that he had something belonging to me—there were some customers in the shop—when they were gone, I said to the prisoner, "I will thank you to let me see what you have in your pocket," and to my surprise, instead of taking out money, he took out this pair of stockings—he said, "Sir, I took them as a sample, thinking no harm"—we then got the officer, who found the remnants of calico and a pair of mitts on him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had he been a master tradesman before he came to you? A. Yes—be had been unfortunate—the person who gave me the information is not here, nor the person who appeared before the Magistrate—I was asked by the Magistrate whether I had observed any thing odd about the prisoner—I said "No"—I have never observed any thing odd about his eyes—I have heard he has been in a lunatic asylum, but I have no reason to believe it—the price of these stockings is 2s. 4d.—the prisoner had been in my service seven months.

Q. Do you know that the persons whom you produced before the Magistrate, with respect to the calico and mitts, would not swear that they had not been sold? A. They would not—I learned from the prisoner's brother, who came up to me from Cambridge, that he had been in confinement—I have no reason to believe it, nor to disbelieve it—I never saw that there was a remarkable wildness displayed in his eyes at times, nor anything of the sort—I am not at all angry with him—I rather feel for him than otherwise.

MR. CLARKSON called

JOHN GARDINER . I am the prisoner's brother, and am a banker's clerk, at Cambridge. My brother was in business on his own account at Dudley, about two years ago, but was unfortunate—he has since then been in service—he did not continue in business more than twelve months—his friends interfered, and compromised hit matters—he has never been capable of conducting his affairs with discretion since he was afflicted in his mind, which was just after his father's decease in 1822—his affliction continued some months—he has been with two private physicians, and in one asylum at Bedford, where two men were obliged to sit up with him day and night—I did not see him at that time, but I have seen him when he has been under the malady—he was quite insane, quite raving, when he was at the physician's, so much so, that they were unable to keep him, as the physician's wife was unable to hear the noise he made by getting out of bed continually, and raving—he has not been in confinement since he left the asylum—a short time ago I sent him 10l., and he applied the greater part of it in buying birds.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-996

996. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 53lbs. weight of hay, value 2s., the goods of William John Watson, his master.

WILLIAM JOHN WATSON . I have a stable which adjoins the Archway Tavern, at Holloway—the prisoner was my carman. On the 26th of

February he had to take some hay from my stable in Red Cap-lane to the other by the Archway Tavern—it was not a truss of hay, it was 53lbs—I have seen the hay since, and have no doubt it is mine.

DAVID STEDDART . I am in the service of Mr. Watson, About seven o'clock in the evening of the 26th of February, I gave the prisoner the hay to go to the stable at the back of the Archway Tavern—he was to take it from one stable to the other.

JOHN BUTTERFIELD . I belong to the stable at the Archway Taven, The prisoner came there about a quarter past seven o'clock that evening, and staid till about five minutes to eight—he brought no hay with him—I did not see any—I had lent him a truss of hay for his horses two days before—he did not bring this truss of hay to my stable at all.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. From about a quarter put seven o'clock he was in your stable, doing his horse up? A. Yes—there was some hay there for his horse, which I had lent him—he was to bring hay to the stable that night, and he did not.

WILLIAM GROUNDS (police-constable S 44.) I was on duty on the evening of the 26th February in the Archway Tavern yard—I saw a man come in with something bulky on his back—I did not know what it was—he threw it down under one of the sheds and went away—when he got to the light he turned round and I saw it was the prisoner—I went after him but missed him—I stated what I had seen to another constable—we went back to watch, and the prisoner came back and engaged in backing a cart in—he saw us and went away—I went and asked where he brought that hay from—he said from Red Cap-lane—I asked whose it was—he said, Mr. Watson's, he had brought it for the horse, and he had put it down there—I asked where the stable was, and he said round the corner.

GEORGE FOREY (police-constable S 241.) About half-past seven o'clock that evening I saw Grounds near the Archway Tavern—I accompained him to the yard, and found in the corner this truss, of hay—I remained there till eight or nearly eight o'clock—a man came in with a horse and cart, and began to take the horse out—the prisoner came and assisted and backed the cart in the corner where we were—he discovered us, and we were obliged to move—he said, "What do you want here?"—I said "Taking a smoke"—he went out, and Grounds went after him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-997

997. WILLIAM GRABO was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February, 9oz. weight of horse-hair, value 5d., the goods of Thomas Nickals White; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 25.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420228-998

998. JAMES GILL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 13 cigars, value 2s.; 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the property of Thomas Vinning.

THOMAS VINNING . I live in Oxford-street, and am a tobacconist, On the 25th of February, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I was sitting in my parlour, and saw the prisoner with his hand over the counter in the till—I ran into the shop, and he went out—I called, "Stop thief!" and saw the policeman after him—in two minutes he was brought back—I missed 1s. 6d. from the till—I have missed some cigars since—I know these cigars are mine.

Prisoner. I acknowledge taking the money, but the cigars I did not take. I bought them. Witness. I had a glass case on the counter with ten divisions, and different cigars in them—when I returned there were not any left in those divisions—I know these are mine.

THOMAS COLLIS . I live at Mr. Bradley's, in South Audley-street. I was going down Oxford-street that morning, and saw a mob—I ran up and saw the prisoner drop 1s. 6d. from his pocket—I took it up and gave it to the witness.

JOSEPH WHEELER (police-constable E 39.) I took the prisoner—I found these cigars in his coat, between the pocket and the lining.

Prisoner. I had holes in my pocket where they went through. I was going to the Docks to a gentleman who was going to send me to sea. I went into this shop for some tobacco and knocked; no person came; the till was nearly half out. I saw the money, and as no person came, I took it.

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18420228-999

999. JAMES ELKINS and RICHARD HERMITAGE were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February, 1 shovel, value 2s., the goods of Edward Gann: and 1 shovel, value 2s., the goods of George Bishop.

EDWARD GANN . I am a gardener, in the service of a nurseryman at Kensington. On the 28th of February, I left my spade there when I went to dinner—I returned in three quarters of an hour, and it was gone—it was a spade—I have lost no shovel.

GEORGE BISHOP . I was at work there. I went away for about an hour, and left my spade at the work, when I returned it was gone—these were not shovels, they were spades.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1000

1000. ALEXANDER RAMSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 34lbs. weight of coals, value 4d., the goods of Hamilton Megary and another.

JOSEPH JOHNSON . I am a lighterman, in the employ of Hamilton and John Megary, of Love-lane. The barge Jane belongs to them—I did not miss any coals on the 26th of February—I have seen some coals—it is impossible for any one to say that they are like my employers—they are the same colour—coals are black.

Q. What did you tell the Magistrate? A. I told the Magistrate that the coals in the barge were Wyeland coals—I do not know whether these are Wyeland coals that are here—I only said that these were like them, from being black—I have been a lighterman since I was fourteen years of age, and you may load a barge with coals to-day and it may rain, and the next day you may not know the coals.

HAMMOND JOHN GRIFFIN (Thames police-constable, No. 33.) At half-past six o'clock last Saturday evening, I saw the prisoner standing on the head room of coals in Mr. Megary's barge, the Jane—he stood there about five minutes—I saw him pick up a piece of coal and then come across the Trinity boats—I walked down the steps to meet him—he saw me and ran away—he had got 341bs. of coals.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. They are worth 4d. are they? A. believe they are—I was at the top of the stairs, about seven yards firm

the barge—he could not see me—I saw him take the coal, and he put it in the bundle—he lifted up a bundle.

Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate you saw him stoop once to pick up something in the head-room of the barge, then saw him lift up a bundle, and now you say you saw him pick up coals, how do you reconcile that?

A. I saw the coals in the bundle.

COURT. Q. Was there any thing he could pick up but the coals? A. No, I observed holes where the coals had been taken from—it was between six and seven o'clock.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1001

1001. ELIZABETH MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, 4 saucepans, value 4s.; I pail, value 1s.; I fryingpan, value 1s.; 2 candlesticks, value 2s.; and 1 coffee-pot, value 6d.; the goods of William Morgan.

ELIZABETH MORGAN . I am the wife of William Morgan, who lives in Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's. About six o'clock in the evening on the 12th of February, I missed these articles from a cupboard on the landling—it was looked, but the key left in it—I have found part of the things since—I do not know the prisoner.

FRANCES GLIBBERY . I keep a broker's shop. I produce a saucepan, pail, and fryingpan, which I bought of the prisoner for 1s. 9d., on the 12th of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal them—a young man gave them to me, and said all I got over 1s. 6d. I might have for myself.

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1002

1002. JOHN WATTS and JOSEPH MEAD were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 42lbs. of rope, value 1l.; and 1 sail, value 2l.; the goods of Rachael Smith, in a barge on the navigable river Thames.

RACHAEL SMITH . I am a widow, and live at Rochester. I am owner of the barge Britannia—the prisoner Watts was sailing-master for me—he was to have half the profit, and the other half was to be paid to me—I had a quantity of rope and sails on board the barge—I had marks on the sails—this sail which is here has marks on it by which I am enabled to swear that it is mine—Watts had no right to part with the sails—he was merely to have the use of the vessel, and for his labour he was to have half the profit.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You have marks on the sail by which you know it? A. No particular marks, but the maker's name—be is a very extensive sailmaker—there could be hundreds of sails found about Rochester with his name on them.

COURT. Q. I suppose you have not been on board the barge lately? A. I have seen the barge since the sail has been lost—this is the misensail, and the mizen-sail of my vessel is missing—I saw the sail set a fort night ago, and now it is gone—the sail I saw set corresponded with what is missing, and with this that is here.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you in the habit of going on board this barge? A. I have been in the habit of going on board, but had not been on board for two years—I saw the sail there a fortnight ago, when I saw

the barge sail from Chatham with the mizen-sail set at the stern—it was a steam-boat formerly—it was made a barge by putting sailing rigging into her, and taking the boilers out.

JOHN HALLETT . I am an outfitter, and live in Broad-street, Ratcliffe. In the morning of Friday week, Mead came to me, and said be was discharging a barge of sand at the wharf—(this barge was lying at a wharf nearly adjoining my house)—he said one of the people had got locked up, and was fined 5s., would I lend him 5s. on a sail, to prevent the man being sent away in the van—I said I would do it for him—he left, and in about fire minutes he returned with Watts and this sail—I was about giving him 5s.—he said, "Lend me another 1s., we shall want a pot of beer when we get the man"—I lent him 6s., and this is the sail he left.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known Mead? A. Yes, for about six months, from his coming backwards and forwards to the wharf which nearly adjoins my house—he sometimes frequented my house—I did not know where to find him.

EDWARD FRANCIS BRAITHWAITE . I remember the barge lying at Ashley's wharf that day—there was no cargo with her—I helped to shove her oat to anchor to save her from getting injury—I had heard previous to that of the sail going out of her, and I was blamed for taking charge of her—I was afterwards sitting in a public-house, smoking my pipe—a man came, and gave me information that so and so was taken out of the barge—I went, and saw Mead in a marine-store shop with the rope—I did not see where he took it from—I had seen such rope on board the barge, and lent a hand to put part of it down into the hold—this is the rope—a man in the marine-store shop said to me, "Have you anything to do with it?"—I said, "It is stolen property, don't you buy it"—Mead went out, and Watts came in—he said, "I am master of that barge, the rope is mine"—I said, "You nor nobody shall have it till I get an officer," because I took charge of the barge.

Watts. Mrs. Smith orders roe to go where I like with the barge, and to do as I like—she is servant under me.

MRS. SMITH re-examined. The barge is entirely my own—I have no part owner.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When the barge is away, who has the conduct of it? A. Watts had, and of course be had a right to do what be could for my benefit when he was on board.

COURT. Q. The barge was entirely yours, the sails and every thing? A. Yes, and Watts for his labour has half the profit—he did not tell me he was coming to London—he was going to Sea-reach, and to ballast the ships as they came up the river.

JOHN SAMUEL SWASEY . I am a waterman. On Saturday evening, the 26th of February, a few minutes before nine o'clock, I saw the prisoners come up the stairs together—Mead had a rope on his right shoulder, representing a small warp (a rope used for navigating vessels)—a few minutes afterwards I went up the alley into-Bird-street, and saw Mead with the rope in the marine-store dealer's shop—Braithwaite pushed the door open—I went on a little further, and saw Watts standing three or four doors from the marine-store shop.

THOMAS YEOMAN (Thames police-constable, No. 18.) I went to the marine-store dealer's shop, and found the rope—I then took the prisoners,

and went to Mr. Hallett's, and found the sail there—I charged Mead, and he said something, but Watts was not present—when I took Watts, I said I came to take him into custody for the rope he had given to Mead to sell—he said he had not done so, and he hoped if any body had taken it out of the barge they would be transported—I said I should take him to the station to Mead—when I got him there I asked him about the sail—he said "That is my own property; can't I do what I like with my own?"—I said "That is not the case; Mrs. Smith is the owner of it"—he said, "I work the barge, and find all the tackle for my half share."

MRS. SMITH. I pay for all the expenses of the vessel.

Watts's Defence. We did not take the sail out, nor yet the rope.

Mead's Defence. Watts took the sail himself; he asked me to carry the rope to the house for him, as he wanted to get a load of sand, as his mate had run off with the money; I did not know but that it was Watt's property, and that the barge belonged to him; he said if I would go with him he would pay me.

(Watts received a good character.)

WATTS— GUILTY . Aged 41.

MEAD— GUILTY . Aged 40

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1003

1003. MICHAEL BRUSNIN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 1 shovel, value 1s., the goods of George Thomas Jones.

GEORGE THOMAS JONES . I live in Upper Garden-street, Westminster. At ten minutes before eight o'clock, on the 26th of February, I went to breakfast, and left my shovel at my work in Willow-walk, Pimlico—this is it.

GEORGE CARTER . I was working with Jones—I saw the prisoner coming out of the field where we were working, with the shovel under his arm—I asked where he was going with it—he said, "To Mr. Smith's" (who is foreman to Mr. Cubitt, whom we were at work for)—he then stopped, and dropped the shovel—he saw a policeman, and ran off—I ran after him—he had taken it a hundred yards.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked for seven years in the same firm myself and took the shovel in my hand to meet the foreman, as my shovel was mile from me: I did not run away; a boy said he would give me in charge, and I gave him up the shovel.

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1004

1004. ELICK DITAN was indicted for embezzlement.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I live in Great James-street—the prisoner was in the employ of my father, William Thompson, a baker. It was the prisoner's duty to account every evening for money received throughout the day—if he received 1s. 6d. on the 26th of February, and 55. 6d. on the 1st of March, and 10s. on the 1st of March, he has not accounted to me for it—he was to account to me, not to my father.

JOHN BASSETT . The prisoner told me that he had left his place, and asked me to go and have some beer—he called for a pint of beer, and said, "Jem, all I have got I mean to keep;" he came out, and said "When are we to meet one another again?"—I went home, and told my master.

Prisoner. I went away not with the intention of absconding; I was

to borrow 7s. 6d. that I was deficient of; it was five o'clock in the evening. Witness. It was in the afternoon; you shook hands with me, and wished me good bye, and said you should keep all you had got.

ELIZA BURGESS . I am the wife of George Burgess, and live in Bowling-green-buildings. I have my bread from the prosecutor—on the 26th of February I paid the prisoner 7s. 6d. for his master, and on the 1st of March 5s. 6l.

ELIZA EMBERSON . On the 1st of March I paid the prisoner 10s. for his master.

Prisoner's Defence. On last Saturday Burgess paid me 7s. 6d.; I had a coat on, which I am not in the habit of wearing; I put the money into the pocket, and lost it; on the Tuesday evening the prosecutor and I had a few words; I was to leave him; I went out to borrow the 7s. 6d.; while I was out he got an officer, and took me.

WILLIAM THOMPSON re-examined. When Bassett came in I lost no time in getting a constable, and went and took the prisoner—he had only an old coat at our house.

Prisoner. Q. Was it not a general rule with me not to pay my money in till eight or nine o'clock at night, and sometimes the next morning? A. I called him up at five o'clock—he booked his bread, and entered Emberson having paid him 10s., and he ought to have paid me, but he went down, came up again, with his night-cap on his head, and went off.

MATTHEW RIEORDAN (police-constable D 135.) I found the prisoner that evening at a house of ill fame—I told him he was my prisoner—I brought him out, and he said to his master, "I am sorry for what I have done, I hope you will be as lenient as possible"—on the way he said, "I know I have done wrong, I don't care"—there were two females with him.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1005

1005. CAROLINE LAURENCE and MARY ANN LAURENCE Were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February, 9 yards of printed cotton, value 5s. 6d., the goods of John Frederick Ullitz ; to which Mary Ann Laurence pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Days.

WILLIAM PARRATT . I am apprentice to John Frederick Ullitz, a linendraper, in Broad street, Ratcliff. About half-past ten o'clock on the 24th of February, the prisoners came to the shop—Caroline asked to look at some dresses—I showed them some, and they selected one each—Caroline asked me to lay them by, they would pay for them by instalments—she paid me 4d. and said she would call in the evening and take one of them—I then went to the end of the shop to write down their name and address—when I came back, I missed one of the dresses—I rang for assistance—I went round the counter, caught Mary Ann, and accused her of stealing it—I lifted up her shawl, and the dress was there—Caroline said she hoped we would not press the charge, it was her first offence—Mary Ann said the same, and then they said it was distress had driven them to it.

Caroline Laurence's Defence. I had no idea that my sister would do such a thing, it was quite unknown to me, till he lifted up my sister's shawl and saw the dress.

WILLIAM ADAMS (police-constable R 53.) I have been to their house—there was apparently great distress indeed there.

CAROLINE LAURENCE— GUILTY . Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Days.

Reference Number: t18420228-1006

1006. EDWARD SEYMOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 1lb. 2oz. weight of cheese, value 1s., the goods of James Tate and another, his masters.

JAMES TATE . I am in partnership with Ebenezer Ballinger—the prisoner was our carman—I suspected him of robbing me. On the 26th of February I saw him go out about eight o'clock in the morning, to his breakfast—he was brought back to my counting-house—I said I suspected him—he said he had never taken anything—I said he had better see if he had anything then about him—he put his hand to his pocket, and took this piece of stilton-cheese out—I sent for a constable—he said if I would forgive him he would do so no more.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. He cried, did he not? A. Yes—he was married about six months ago—he had 18s. a week.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420228-1007

1007. MARY ANN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, 1 blanket, value 5s., the goods of Amy Arthur.

AMY ARTHUR . I am a widow, living in Phoenix-alley, Long-acre. The prisoner hired a ready furnished room of me on the 7th of February, and remained till the 24th—I went into the room that day, and found the blanket gone, and some other things—I begged of her to tell me where the blanket was—she would not tell me—this is my blanket.

JABEZ THOMAS RICHARDSON . I am a pawnbroker, and produce the blanket which was pledged with us on the 15th of February by the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Judgment Respited.

First Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-1008

1008. EDMUND TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February, 4lbs. 10oz. weight of mutton, value 1s. 11d., the goods of John Johnson; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

EDWARD HENRY FOX . I am servant to John Johnson, who lives in Strutton-ground, Westminster. On the 4th of February I was at the shop-door—I saw the prisoner take up two breasts of mutton from the board, put them under his coat, and run away—he went to Mr. Wallis's public-house in Strutton-ground—I went, and found him there—I collared him—he made his escape from me—there were some other persons there—my master came in—the mutton was given to several young men—I saw him taken—the mutton was my master's.

Prisoner. Q. How many persons were in your shop? A. Three—I did not see you give the mutton to the person—it was dropped.

EDWARD WALLIS . I deal in shoes, and live in Horseferry-road. I was in Mr. Walker's public-house, at near ten o'clock, on the day stated—I saw the prisoner come in with two pieces of mutton in his hand—he was in a very flurried state—he gave it to another man in the house, and he put it under his coat—I saw Fox come in—I said, "There is the man that stole your meat, and this man that stands here has got it now"—the other man

immediately dropped it on the saw-dust, and they made their escape out of the door.

JOHN CUTLIFFE (police-constable P 153.) On the 4th of February I was on duty in Rochester-row—I heard the cry of "Stop thief"—I saw the prisoner running, and Fox after him—I then followed them—the prisoner saw me coming, and went into a chandler's-shop, and Fox after him—just as I got to the door, the prisoner was coming out of the door again—Fox said, "That is the man"—I took him to Mr. Johnson—he fell on both knees, asked Mr. Johnson's pardon, and said he would pay him for the meat if he would forgive him—which he refused.

Prisoner. Q. Did not he say he would have nothing to do with it?

A. He said he did not see it taken.

Prisoner's Defence. The boy was serving a woman, I passed by, and there were three persons in the shop—he made inquiries, and some persons said, "He is gone in at that door"—he came and collared me—I got from him, and went out—the master would have let me go, only the policeman charged me.

THOMAS IRONS (police-constable E 158.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from the clerk of the Peace of Westminster—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1009

1009. CHARLES EVANS, HENRY LAWRENCE , and THOMAS STRATFORD , were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Sarah Elizabeth Shine; to which

EVANS pleaded GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Three Months.

SARAH ELIZABETH SHINE . I am a widow, and keep a clothes and shoe-shop in High-street, Poplar. On Saturday afternoon, the 26th of February, Stratford and Evans came into the shop, and Lawrence staid outside the window—I knew Stratford before—he asked if I had an old cap I could sell cheap, that would fit Evans—I handed him one, and said. I could sell him that cheap—he tried it on Evans, and said it would not fit—I said I had no other for less than 1s.—he told me to show it him—I reached it to give it to Stratford to try on Evans—he tried it, and said it would not do, he would buy one at the corner of North-street—they all went away—I put the caps back into the window where I took them from, and in a few minutes I missed a pair of shoes—Evans had his back to the counter, and Stratford stood facing him—they did not ask for any shoes—Lawrence had a bundle like a chimney-sweeper's machine—he is a chimney-sweeper—I gave information, and saw the shoes at the station.

CHARLES AGAR (police-constable K 271.) In consequence of information I went in search of the prisoners—I looked up a little turning and saw Evans and Lawrence—up the turning I saw Evans hand a shoe to Lawrence, and Lawrence held it in his hand—I walked up and took it out of Lawrence's hand, took hold of Evans, and where he got that shoe—he said he picked them up at the corner—as we were going to the station he said he bought them of a boy for 1s. 3d.—I took Lawrence and Evans to the station—Stratford came there soon after—he said he went to the shop to buy a cap, but he knew nothing about the shoes.

THOMAS SMITH . I am nine years old—I live with Mrs. Shine, my

mother. On Saturday afternoon, the 27th of February, she sent me out to a shop, a little farther up—I could see from that shop across to my mother's shop—I saw Stratford come out of the shop and go on first—I saw Evans had the shoes under his arm.

Lawrence's Defence. Evans came out with the shoes under his arm and said he had bought them—I took one, and just as I got out, the policeman took me.

Stratford's Defence. My brother took Evans as a servant, and I went to buy him a cap—he must have taken the shoes—I went to the station to see if I could bail them out.

LAWRENCE and STRATFORD— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1010

1010. SAMUEL FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 1 saw, value 5s., the goods of William Pickett.

WILLIAM PICKETT . I am a trunnell-maker, living in Silver-street, Rotherhithe. I was at work at trunnell-making at Mr. Hammond's yard in Mill-wall—I went to Mr. Liver's beer-shop about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 21st of February, and saw the prisoner come in—he had the things which he sharpens his saws with, in a basket—he sharpened a bow—saw for Mr. Liver—I sent a boy for my saw from Mr. Hammond's, and I gave it to the prisoner to look at—he gave it me back, and then I put it behind the settle—I looked for it the next morning as soon as the house was open and it was gone—there were two spots of pitch on on the handle about two inches apart—I have never seen it since.

FRANCES LIVER . I am the wife of Mr. Liver, who keeps a beer-shop. On the 21st of February the prisoner was in the tap-room towards evening—I saw the saw standing behind the settle, and saw the prisoner take it up.

WILLIAM WELLER . I am a sawyer. I was at the beer-shop in Salmon-lane that evening between eight and nine o'clock—the prisoner brought's saw there and offered it for sale for 2s.—I looked at it—I saw two spots of pitch or tar on the side of the handle, about two inches apart—he took it away.

DANIEL HAGGERTY (police-constable K 201.) I took the prisoner on the 22nd of February—I told him he was charged with stealing a saw—he said there must be some mistake, he knew nothing about it—on the following morning I asked what saw he had offered for sale—he said a saw he had had by him some time, that he got it in exchange from a baker—I said, "As you have had it so long, did you observe any marks on it?"—he said he did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I sharpened the prosecutor's saw and gave it him—where he put it I do not know—I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1011

1011. MARTHA KELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February, 2 sovereigns, the monies of Sakhingham.—2nd COUNT, stating them to belong to a man whose name is unknown.

SAKHINGHAM (through an interpreter.) On Tuesday the 8th of February. I was in Shadwell, about eight o'clock at night, and saw the prisoner—she asked me to go home, and took hold of me by the arm—I went home with her—I had a handkerchief, and two sovereigns tied up in it—I sat by the side of the bed, and put my handkerchief with the two sovereigns in it under the pillow, and one corner was hanging out—I gave her and 1s. to get something to drink—I did not stop more than four or five

minutes—when I gave her the money she laid hold of the corner of the handkerchief and ran off—I ran after her—I could not see anything of her when I got to the door—when I gave her the 3s. I untied the corner of the handkerchief and saw my two sovereigns in it—I tied it up again—she then went to the bed to take the handkerchief—I called out to her as she was going out of the door—I told her there were two sovereigns there, what business had she to run away with them.

MEER JAN (through an interpreter.) I am boatswain's mate of the Forte William. The prosecutor is a seaman on board—I saw the captain give the prosecutor 3 sovereigns and 12 shillings on Tuesday—I afterwards heard that he had been robbed.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not come on Friday night and strike me in the house? A. No.

GEORGE TICKNER (police-constable K 89.) I remember the prosecutor speaking to me about this—I could not understand him—he went in pursuit of the prisoner—I followed him to a house in Twine-court—the door was shut—he pointed out the house—I rapped and they opened the door—the prosecutor pointed out the prisoner—I told her the prosecutor charged her with stealing 2l.—she said she knew nothing about it, it was a spite he had towards her.

Prisoner's Defence. On that day I slept with a man of the name of Amber—I went home with him at seven o'clock—I was not out of his company till the next morning—the prosecutor charged a Lascar with taking some money from him, and several more men—the man is now confined, and when the prosecutor could not get any money from him he would have his revenge on me—I never saw him.

(Witnesses for the Defence.)

AMBER (through an interpreter.) I am a sailor belonging to the Francis Smith, belonging to the West India Docks—I am a native of Mascat—she is bound for Jamaica—the prisoner belongs to me—I have been living at her house the last month—I slept with the prisoner the night these things were taken, and frequently before—it was four weeks come next Tuesday—I worked on board my vessel till six o'clock in the evening that dry—I left and went home to the prisoner's house to sleep—I found her at home—I had nothing to eat before I went to bed—I had slept at her house for about a fortnight—neither I nor the prisoner came out from the time of my going there till I went to bed.

SEIK DENOK (through an interpreter.) I am a sailor, and belong to the Francis Smith. The prisoner and I both came on shore together, and went to her house about seven o'clock—I went to my own house, not hers—I saw her at my house at seven o'clock on the 8th of February—after nine she said she was going home to bed—Amber was with her.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1012

1012. REBECCA LUCAS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March, 1 table-cloth, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Catherine Harris.

JAMES SPURLING . I am pot-boy to Mrs. Catherine Harris, who keeps the Robarts Arms public-house in Devonport-street. On the 1st of March I went into a room at the back of the house—I saw the prisoner take a table-cloth off the line about five minutes after eight in the evening, I asked what she had got—she said, nothing she was ashamed of—I said,

"It is getting dark, mistress"—she said, "Yes, it is"—I though it was the washerwoman till she spoke—I took her and the table-cloth back into the parlour, and the policeman took her.

ANN BEVAN . I was washing for Mrs. Harris on Tuesday last—I washed six table-cloths, four less than this, and one bigger—I had hung them out on the line—I saw them there about six o'clock—I heard one was taken—I saw the prisoner brought back, and saw the table-cloth in the policeman's hand—I can swear it is Mrs. Catherine Harris's.

MARGARET BROWN . I wait in Mrs. Harris's bar. On the evening of the 28th of February, the prisoner came to the house with a gentleman—they were in the parlour—they had two glasses of gin-and-water—she left the parlour after the gentleman—I saw her brought back by the potman with this table-cloth—it is Mrs. Harris's.

WILLIAM SOUTER (police-constable K 68.) On Tuesday last I took the prisoner—this table-cloth was delivered to me—the prisoner said she had done nothing wrong, and was not afraid to go.

Prisoner's Defence. I admit taking it; it was distress drove me to it; it is my first offence.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1013

1013. HENRY HAWTHORN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 5 1/2 lbs, weight of beef, value 3s., the goods of AnnGoswell.

LOUISA ANN MORRISS . I am the wife of Thomas Morriss, and live in Eaton-place, Eaton-square. On Saturday, the 26th of February, I was in Mrs. Goswell's shop, in Sloane-square—the prisoner reached his hand in at the window, and took a piece of meat from the shop-board—he ran away—I gave information, and ran out—I saw him running down the square, towards George-street—I called "Stop thief!" several times—Mr. Marchant brought him back—he had not got the meat then, but I saw grease on his sleeve, and on the hip of his coat—it was fresh grease—Mrs. Goswell said if he would bring back the meat she would forgive him—he said he would get it.

HUGH MARCHANT . I am a greengrocer, living in Westburn-street. On Saturday night, the 26th of February, I saw the prisoner running in George-street—Morris directed my attention to him—while I was pursuing him he turned down a turning leading to a main sewer—he went through there, and I lost sight of him till he got to the other side, and he said "Catch me if you can"—I went through the water, thinking I should catch him, but I could not—I afterwards took him to the prosecutrix—the meat was found the following morning, down an area.

BENJAMIN POOL (police-constable B 143.) The next morning, about half-past six o'clock, I was looking down the areas in Sloane-square, and saw a piece of beef—I made inquiries, and found it did not belong to that house—I took it to the station, and found the prosecutrix had lost a piece.

JAMES BRADLY (police-constable B 134.) I took the prisoner on the Sunday night—he denied the charge—I made him no promise or threat but after being taken to the station he said he had taken the meat, that Buck was with him, and he did not see why he should suffer alone.

THOMAS BOTTRILL . I am foreman to Mrs. Ann Goswell. I saw a

piece of beef on the stall-board that Saturday night, when I left, about a quarter before nine o'clock—I saw it afterwards—it was my mistress's, and was worth about 3s.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took it; and never saw any thing of it.

GUILTY .** Aged 13.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420228-1014

1014. JOSEPHINE FISHER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February, 1 watch, value 1l. 10s., the goods of Thomas Stillman.

SUSANNAH STILLMAN . I am the wife of Thomas Stillman, a boot-maker, and live in Little Windmill-street, Haymarket. On the 1st of February the prisoner came and lodged at my house, and remained one week—on the 8th of February I left the house about ten o'clock in the day, and left two children and the prisoner at home—I was not out more than four minutes—when I returned she bad on her bonnet and shawl—she said, "Good morning ma'am, I shall be back in a few minutes"—she did not return—about five minutes after she was gone I missed the watch from the drawer where I had seen it safe five minutes before—the drawer was not locked—I saw her again at the police-office.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am shopman to Mr. Neate, a pawnbroker, in Duke-street, Manchester-square. I produce a watch pledged by the prisoner on the 8th of February, for 10s., in the name of Eliza Watson.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH NIFTON (police-constable D 128.) I went to the pawnbroker's and found the watch—the prisoner was in custody then.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Twelve Months.

There was another indictment against the prisoner for stealing twelve sovereigns, to which she pleadedGUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1015

1015. MARGARET CUNNINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 1 pair of drawers, value 2s. 6d.; and 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s. 3d.; the goods of Alfred James Crawley.

WILLIAM WARD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. About twelve o'clock, on the 22nd of February, I was in High-street, Shadwell—I saw the prisoner with another female—the prisoner was standing close by the door of Mr. Crawley's, a pawnbroker's-shop—I saw her take a pair of drawers and two pairs of stockings down from the door—she threw them away when the young man ran after her—she was given into custody—I spoke to Allan.

Prisoner. Q. Why did you not take me directly, if you saw me take these things? A. I went into the shop.

THOMAS ALLAN . I am in the service of Alfred James Crawley, a pawnbroker in High-street, Shadwell. On the 22nd of February Ward gave me information, in consequence of which I went to the door—he pointed out the prisoner—I followed, she turned and saw me, and threw these articles away inside the shop-door—I took her and picked them up—she had not got above a rod past the place—these are our articles, and have our private mark on them—I had seen them safe hanging in the shop about half-an-hour before.

RICHARD AMOS (police-sergeant K 390.) I took the prisoner—I received these things from Allan.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

OLD COURT.—Monday, March 7th, 1842.

Fifth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-1016

1016. JOHN PARTRIDGE was indicted for breaking and entering dwelling-house of John Furniss, on the 29th of January, at St. Anne, and stealing therein, 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 watch-key, value 2d.; 5 spoons, value 1l. 10s.; 6 pairs of stockings, value 6s.; 1 necklace, value 10s.; 1 ring, value 5s.; 1 brooch, value 2s.; 3 sheets, value 1l.; 1 table-cloth value 18d.; and 1 handkerchief, value 5s.; his property; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

SARAH FURNISS . I am the wife of John Furniss, a labourer, of London-street, Ratcliffe-cross. On the 29th of January I lived at No. 35, London-street, in the house of Mr. Flight, who occupied half the home, and a man named Taplin the other—the landlord did not occupy any put—my apartments were separated from Taplin's—On Saturday, the 29th of January, I lost three sheets off the table, between the two parlour windows—I had seen them the night before—I missed them when I got up in the morning, between six and seven o'clock—I had locked the parlour door before I went to bed—my husband was up first, and went out to work—I also missed the other articles stated—the sheets produced are our property, and were on the table the night before—the policeman produced them is the Monday—I have not found the other things.

JOHN FURNISS . I am the husband of last witness. I lived in London. street, in the parish of St. Anne, Limehouse. On the 29th of January, at half-past five o'clock, I went to my parlour, and found it locked—I came out, locked the door again, and went out—I came back again a little before seven o'clock, and found both the street and parlour doors open—I bad seen the sheets on the table the night before—I know them to be my property.

GEORGE TEAKLE . I am a policeman. On Saturday morning, the 29th of January, I was in company with Trew, an officer, in Montague-street, Whitechapel, and saw the prisoner, in company with two men, about the middle of the street, about a mile and a half from London-street—the prisoner had a bundle—the other two separated from him, and crossed over—I stopped the prisoner, and asked what he had got in the bundle—k said it was dirty things he was going to take to have washed—I asked where—he said, "A little lower down"—I examined the bundle—it contained three clean sheets, rough dried—he said he had brought them from on board a ship which lay at Limehouse-hole—I asked the captain's name—he said, "Kirk"—I asked the ship's name—he said, "Goldsmith"—I took him to the station—the prosecutor claimed the sheets.

GEORGE TREW . I was with Teakle, and assisted in taking the prisoner to the station—he said it was no use going down to Limehouse, that the two men gave him the bundle to carry, as they met him at the end of the street—as we were going to the station he pulled out 18d., and said, "Here"—I said, "What, do you want any thing to eat?"—he said, "No, take it; here is 6s., that will be 3s. each, to square it"—I found five shillings in his shoe, and one shilling in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. Two men gave me the bundle to carry.

CHARLES BURGESS GOFF (police-constable L 31.) I produce a certificate

of the prisoner's former conviction, from the Clerk of the Peace of Surrey—(read)—I was present at the trial—he is the person.

GUILTY, but not of Breaking and Entering.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420228-1017

1017. SAMUEL HASLAM was indicted for embezzling the sum of 27l., which he had received on account of John Ord, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1018

1018. SAMUEL HASLAM was again indicted, with JAMES FERNLEY , and WILLIAM HENRY FERNLEY , for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Rawlings, about the hour of four in the night of the 4th of December, at St. George, with intent to steal and stealing therein, 1 hat, value 3s.; 1 pair of boots, value 5s.; 2 rings, value 12s.; 2 candlesticks, value 1s. 6d.; 2 cups, value 2s.; 2 saucers, value 1s.; 4 jars, value 2s.; 20 thimbles, value 1l.; 4 pencil-cases, value 1l.; 1 brooch, value 5s.; 1 cloak, value 1l.; 2 coats, value 2l.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 1 miniature-case, value 1s.; 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; and 19 spoons, value 2l. 16s.; his goods: and GEORGE FERNLEY and ELIZABETH ANN FERNLEY , for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen: and ABIGAIL DE SOIZA , for feloniously receiving 1 table-cloth, part of the said goods, knowing it to be stolen.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

MARY RAWLINS . I live with my father, Joseph Rawlins, at No. 19, Collet-place, Commercial-road, in the parish of St. George—he is a cloth factor. On the night of the 4th of December I went to bed at eleven o'clock—I cannot recollect who was last up—the house was quite safe then—the back-parlour window was safe, and fastened, and the panes of glass were all correct—I came down at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, and found a pane of glass taken out—the window was not open then—it was fastened—a person might have got in by means of a ladder, which was about the house—it was a large pane of glass—a person as large as any of the prisoners could get through, for my brother tried, and he put his shoulders through the open space—I missed the articles stated in the indictment from different parts of the house—I keep a school—the thimbles belong to the children.

ANN AUSTIN . I live in Lamb-row, Three Colt-lane, Bethnal-green. I know Elizabeth Fernley—I remember her coming to me about the beginning of December, with the prisoner Haslam—Elizabeth Fernley said, "We want a three-roomed house"—I had none to let, but Mr. Bache, my landlord, had—I said he would be by presently, and I would ask if he had a house to let—they stopped, and saw Bache in my presence—they took a house in Lamb's-gardens—I went and saw them in possession of the house afterwards—I saw James Fernley and De Soiza there the very same evening as they went—I cannot say whether I saw any of the others there.

RICHARD BACHE . I live at No. 14, Wilmot-square, Bethnal-green. I let a cottage, on the 6th of December, to Haslam and Elizabeth Fernley—I did not see them myself, but I let it through Mrs. Austin—I afterwards went to the cottage, and saw them there—on the 20th of December I went, and saw, I

believe, Elizabeth Fernley and Haslam there—they were passing by the name of Bennett, as man and wife—I saw De Soiza there, either on the 20th 27th—I called weekly for my rent—I have seen them all three there more than once—I have not seen any of the other prisoners there—I have received the rent from Elizabeth Fernley, and also from Haslam—De Soiza has answered me, saying he was not within.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. She has opened the door as a servant would, and said they were not within? A. Exactly so.

WILLIAM WAGG . I am shopman to Mr. Dexter, a pawnbroker in Union-street, Spitalfields. I produce a pencil-case, two thimbles, and one ring, pawned on the 9th of December, in the name of Elizabeth Fernley—I cannot be positive, but I believe the prisoner, Elizabeth Fernley, was the person—she gave her address, "No. 11, Tyson-street."

Elizabeth Fernley. I have been in the habit of pawning things at his shop when I lived in Tyton-street which is the reason I gave that address. Witness. I believe that is the direction she used to give—I do not knot that she ever lived there.

WILLIAM THOMAS TAYLOR . I assist my father, a pawnbroker, in Beltnal-green-road. I produce a brooch and gold ring, pawned on the 15th of December, in the name of "Ann Bennett, Three Colt-lane" by the prisoner, Elizabeth Fernley.

Elizabeth Fernley. I did pawn them; I gave the name of Bennett in all cases, and gave the same address, the other address being a very long one. As to the name, "Ann Bennett," the pawnbrokers do not ask your christian-name; it is the greatest chance in the world. Witness. I put the name that was given me.

EDWARD RUBERRY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bethnal-green-road, I produce two china ornaments, pawned on the 18th of January, in the name of "Mary Bennett, Three Colt-lane," by the prisoner, Elizabeth Ann Fernley—my shop is about six minutes' walk from the prosecutor's.

WILLIAM ROLAND DANIEL . I am shopman to Mr. Hawes, a pawnbroker, in Whitechapel-road. I produce a ring, pawned on the 5th of January, in the name of "Ann Bennett, No. 14, Three Colt-lane," I before it was by the prisoner, Elizabeth Ann Fernley.

JOSEPH FREDERICK DUVAL . I am shopman to Mr. Ashford, a pawnbroker, in Bethnal-green-road. I produce a pair of boots, pawned on tie 18th of December, in the name of "Ann Bennett, No. 6, Three Colt-lane," by the prisoner Elizabeth Fernley.

Elizabeth Fernley. He never asked the christian-name. Witness. I put down the name given me.

JOSIAH BENJAMIN AVILA . I assist my mother, a pawnbroker, in the Mile-end-road. I produce a table-cloth, pawned on the 29th of January, in the name of "Ann Phillips, No. 3, Lamb's-gardens"—I before the prisoner, De Soiza, to be the person.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You are not quite certain of her? A. Not quite.

ROBERT GEE (police-constable K 179.) On the 3rd of February, the prisoner, Elizabeth Fernley, was in custody—in consequence of which, went to a house in Lamb's-gardens, Bethnal-green—there was no number on the door—I there found the prisoners, James Fernley, William Henry Fernley, and De Soiza—while I was there George Fernley came in—there are two rooms in the cottage, and a little back-kitchen without a fire-place

—they are all on the ground-floor—I searched the house, and found two china candlesticks, two small cups and saucers, four china jars, two stands, and a miniature-case—on the 8th I again went to the house, and found Haslam, going by the name of "Bennett"—he was lying on the bed—it was between one and two o'clock in the day—I said, "Halloo, what do you do here?"—he said, "My name is Bennett; I know you want me; I saw my name in the paper"—he was in the first room as I entered from outside—he was taken to the station.

Haslam. Q. Did not I say any thing else besides "My name is Bennett?" A. Yes, that you knew I wanted you.

James Fernley. You have said you found me at the cottage—when I first saw you with your fellow-policeman; I was standing, leaning over the gate; you came up to us, and said, "Is this Fernley's cottage?" Witness. I saw him leaning over the gate—I might have said "Is this Fernley's cottage?" but they were all in the garden together—I did not speak to him—William Henry Fernley and De Soiza were also in the garden, and William Henry Fernley said, "No, my father does not live here."

James Fernley. I say the others were in the cottage at the time the policeman asked me "Is this Fernley's cottage?"—I said, "The name of Fernley is here, what is the matter?" Witness. He said, "My name is Fernley, what is the matter?"—I asked if it was Fernley's cottage—it was very dark at the time—I said, "Why did you send me next door?" as a person bad spoken to us at the gate when we asked for Fernley.

Jones Fernley. I immediately said, "I have but this momental most come to the gate, it cannot be me." Witness. Yes, he did say so.

James Fernley. I had not been there five minutes, and my reason for going was, I understood my sister had been gone some time and was waiting tea for me.

WILLIAM NICOL (police-constable K 177.) I remember Haslam being brought to the station by Gee on the 8th of February—he had a hat on, I took it off and asked him were he bought it—he said, "I bought it in Petticoat-lane, I don't know the shop, but it was a Jew's"—on the 6th of December I had received from the prosecutor a hat and a pair of boots—I asked Haslam to put those boots and hat on—he did so, and they fitted him.

Haslam. I said I bought it in Petticoat-lane—I did not mention any stop. Witness. I swear he did—he said he did not know the shop, but it was a Jew's.

FRANCIS GOWRAN . I am a policeman. I went with Gee to the house in Lamb's-gardens, when he took the Fernleys in custody—I saw De Soiza there—I said in her hearing that we had come there to make a search in consequence of Elizabeth Fernley being in custody for robbery—I said so to her and to James and William Fernley—I said so to all of them—the Prisoner, James Fernley, appeared confused—De Soiza said she was innocent, she was only a lodger and knew nothing about it.

James Fernley. You asked at the gate where I lived, and I gave you my card of my trade out of my pocket—you said you should not feel justified in detaining me unless I went into the cottage—I said I would not go in, as I did not wish to be detained, but although I was not guilty of anything wrong, I should like to see my sisters righted and would not run away. Witness. You made some such remark, but I prevented your

going away or you would have gone—you gave my brother constable a card.

JOSEPH RAWLINS . I am the prosecutor—I went to bed about a quarter to twelve that night, and locked the doors—my daughter was the first per. son up—we have no servant in the house at night—I should think it would take a person an hour and a half or two hours to remove the things I know these articles produced to he mine—I found a pair of boots and a hat on the premises after the robbery, which did not belong to me—I gave them to the policeman—the hat produced by the officer as found on Haslam is mine, and these boots, said to be pawned by Elizabeth Fernley, are mine—I had them in wear at the time of the robbery—here is some cotton whish I got my daughter to put in the hat—I am positive it is mine—this table-cloth has got my name on it, and this ring I gave my wife thirty years ago—I know all the ornaments—here is a broken one left behind which will match those taken—the value of the property lost is nearly 30l.

MISS RAWLINS re-examined. I can swear to all the property produced—we lost it all that night.

Haslams Defence. I am entirely innocent of the burglary—it is true the things were found in the house, but I know nothing of the burglary.

SAMUEL HASLAM— GUILTY . Aged 21.

E. A. FERNLEY— GUILTY . Aged 23.

JAMES FERNLEY, WILLIAM HENRY FERNLEY, GEORGE FERNLEY and ABIGAIL DE SOIZA— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1019

1019. SAMUEL HASLAM and WILLIAM HENRY FERNLEY were again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Oliver, about 1 o'clock in the night of the 28th of January, at St. George, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 1l. 10s.; 2 table-cloths, value 3s.; 24 knives, value 1l.; 24 forks, value 1l.; 18 shells, value 3s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; 10 spoons, value 20s.; 2 salt-cellars, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 2 towels, value 1s.; his property: and 1 pair of boots, value 1s., of John David Oliver;—and GEORGE FERNLEY and ELIZABETH ANN FERNLEY , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the statute, &c.;—and ABIGAIL DESOIZA , for feloniously receiving 2 table-cloths, part of the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen; against the statute, &c.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLOTTE OLIVER . I am the wife of John Oliver, of No. 31, Collet-place Commercial-road, in the parish of St. George's. On Friday night, the 28th January, I went to bed about eleven o'clock—I was the last person up—the house was safe—the back parlour shutter was not shut, because we could not shut it, the hinge being broken—it was an outside shutter—the window was down but not fastened—about six o'clock in the morning (barely six o'clock I heard the front door slam, and my husband hastened down—as soon as could get something on I went down and found the back parlour window open—there are gardens which run all along the backs of the houses-knew was a ladder at the back parlour window, which had been brought from the next house but one—I missed Mr. Oliver's great coat, a dozen table and dessert knives and forks, some shells, six silver spoons, a pair of sugartongs, a pair of boots, and two table-cloths—worth about 10l. altogether.

WILLIAM ROWLAND DANIEL . I am shopman to Mr. Hawes, a pawnbroker in the Whitechapel-road—I produce six dessert knives and forks, pawned on the 29th of January, about twelve o'clock, in the name of Ann Bennett, by, I believe, the prisoner, Elizabeth Fernley—I have some idea Of seeing her at the shop, but have no recollection of taking these things of her—I have seen her frequently at the shop.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I live with Mr. Dexter, a pawnbroker, in Whitechapel-road—I produce six table-knives and forks, pawned on the 29th of January, about five o'clock, in the name of Elizabeth Bennett, No. 14, Dog-row—I cannot say who by.

EDWARD RUBERRY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Bethnal-green-road—I produce two table-cloths, pawned on the 2nd of February, in the name oi Ann Bennett, for 2s.—I think it was by the prisoner De Soiza.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You are not sure of her? A. Not Exactly.

COURT. Q. Do you think it was her, from recollection of her person? A. Yes—I would not exactly swear to her.

ROBERT GEE (police-constable K 179.) On the 3rd of February I went to a house in Lamb's-gardens, and found De Soiza and the Fernleys in the house—George Fernley came in while I was there—I found in the house some shawls, two saltcellars, a shift, pillow-case, and two towels—they were on the sideboard, in the first room—I have a pair of boots, which I took off William Henry Fernley's feet—he said he had them given to him by Charles Bennett—I asked how they accounted for the property being in the house—De Soiza said a young roan named Bennett, who kept company with a young woman named Fernley, brought these things home towards house keeping—on—the 8th of February, I took Haslam at this very house—I found him on the bed—he said ha knew I wanted him—I found a pair of boots on his feet—I took them to the gardens at the back of Collet-place that day, and found foot-marks at the back of No. 25, which corresponded with the marks made by the boots I took off his feet—there are two rows of nails, which have been worn since the impressions were made—I made fresh marks with the boots to see that the impression was correct—in consequence of something Mary Douglas, the female searcher at the station, said to me, I went with Gowran to No. 7. Old Castle-street, which is at the bottom of Wentworth-street—I there found a box locked—Mrs. Thomas gave me the key—I opened the box, and found in it a great coat which I produce.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Were there other articles in the box? A. Yes—I afterwards went again, and found a pencil-case, belonging to another person—Elizabeth Fernley was in custody before the 8th—she was taken on the 3rd.

Haslam. At the examination he swore that the nails in the boots corresponded with the marks in the garden—I do not think there are any nails in the boots—(the boots being examined, had a quantity of nails in them.)

MARY DOUGLAS . I am the wife of Robert Douglas, a policeman of the K division—the prisoner, Elizabeth Fernley, was brought to the station on the 3rd of February—I searched her, but found nothing relating to this inquiry—while I was searching her she said she would give me half-a-crown if I would go to Castle-street, at the bottom of Wentworth-street,

and tell her father to send the coat, silk handkerchief, and two shawls out of the house—she said, "What I brought there"—she said her father was a fellowship-porter—she did not know the number of the house—she said nothing about a key.

Elizabeth Fernley. I said I had taken the coat to my father's on the previous week—I did not wish him to get into trouble, as the things had come wrong, and to avoid danger, I wished her to go—she tried what else she could get from me.

MARY THOMAS . I am a widow, and live at No. 7, Old Castle-street, Whitechapel. On the 8th of February, the policeman came to my house, and went into the room which George Fernley rented of me—the key of the box was left on the shelf, where I found it and gave it to the officer—it was George Fernley's box—I saw the policeman find the great coat in it.

COURT. Q. Had you seen Elizabeth Fernley go there? A. She never was inside that house—she never came there to see her father—she has sent the boy to see her father, but I never saw her there.

CHARLOTTE OLIVER re-examined. These boots—(looking at those found on William Henry Fernley)—are my son's boots—his name is John David Oliver—they were lost on the night in question—this great coat is my husband's—I had mended it just before—the two table-cloths produced by Ruberry are ours, and have our name on them—the rest of the property belongs to us—the knives, forks, and shawls, and towels—I have not recovered all the property.

Haslams Defence. It was intimated in the last case, that I and Elizabeth Fernley lived together as man and wife, it is false; I had been acquainted with her for some months, and the property brought into the cottage, I brought there; she placed the greatest confidence in. me, and thought I came by it honestly; we were short of money at times, and I told her to pawn the things; I took the cottage myself, with the idea of our being married, but the rooms being small, and not liking it, we said we would wait some time, and take another; the coat was among some property brought to the cottage; I said it was no use, and told her to sell it; she took it to her father, and thinking she came by it honestly, he said he would purchase it; the boots Williams had on, I gave him, as he was in want of a place, and friendless; I took him to the cottage, and said I would always be a friend to him, if he was a good boy; he did not know how the property came there.

William Henry Fernley's Defence. Haslam gave me the boots on Sunday.

HASLAM— GUILTY . Aged 21.

E. A. FERNLEY— GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life

WILLIAM HENRY FERNLEY, GEORGE FERNLEY, JAMES FERNLEY, and DE SOIZA— NOT GUILTY .

(There were four other indictments against the prisoners.)

Reference Number: t18420228-1020

1020. FREDERICK JONES was indicted for killing and slaying Richard Simmonds; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months, without Hard Labour, and Fined Twenty-five Pounds.

Reference Number: t18420228-1021

1021. PELAGRIAS MAESTAI and GUISEPPE MAESTAI were indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Coleman, on the 24th of February, and cutting and wounding him in, and upon the upper lid of the left eye, with intent to maim and disable him.—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

EDWARD COLEMAN . I am a hair-dresser, and live at No. 28, Saffronhill. On Thursday night, the 24th of February, I went to the Coopers' Anna public-house, which is opposite my place—the prisoners and several persons were drinking in front of the bar—I put out my hand to one of the prisoners, and said, "Shake hands with me in friendship"—he spat on my hand—I asked what he meant by that, and he hit me in the eye with hit hand—I asked what he meant by that, and he struck me in the mouth—then there was a scrummage with the quart-pots, during which I received a blow on the left eye, where there is now a scar—I did not see how that was inflicted—a doctor was sent for.

COURT. Q. Which prisoner was it struck you? A. Pelagrias—the quart pots were flying about in all directions—I am not aware that Guiseppe did anything to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not you give your watch to somebody to hold? A. No—I went out of the house to see if I could find a policeman—one was at the door, and I said, "For God's sake come in, we shall some of us be killed"—there was a great row—I had never seen the prisoners before, that I know of, but I offered to shake hands with them in friendship—I did not go out of the house, and return with any friends before the fight took place.

CAROLINE BARTOLI . I am the wife of Laurence Bartoli, of Saffron-hill. On the night of the 24th of February, I went to the Coopers' Arms for a pint of beer—I saw my father, Jonathan Cherry and Mr. Coleman there—Coleman was very quiet—he had not been struck then—I saw the prisoner Pelagrias strike him with a knife, after my father was struck—there were not several persons quarrelling at that time—there were a good many people there after the row commenced—my attention was attracted to my father—I am not mistaken about the knife—I dragged my father to a butt—Pelagrias Maestai then took the knife out of his pocket with a row of Catholic beads on it, and he ran at Coleman, and struck him on the eye with it—the knife was open, and the beads were entangled with it—he struck him right on the eye—I saw no other blow struck—I held my father till the police came, and I said, "For God's sake lock them up."

Cross-examined. Q. Who was it called you into this public-house? A. I went in for a pint of beer—a Mrs. Smith did not come and tell me that my husband was fighting in the public-house—I swear that—the two prisoners were beating my father with the pots—no one was fighting but them—I know Thomas Robinson, a shoe-maker—he lives next door to me—I never said to him, or in his presence, that I would get 3s. 6d., at we Old Bailey, and have a flare-up.

JOHN DENTON . I sell poultry. I went into the Coopers' Arms a little before eight o'clock on the 24th of February—while there the two prisoners and four or five more came in—Coleman went to shake hands with Guiseppe in a familiar kind of manner—he did not appear to

be insulting him, but in a laughing, jocular kind of way—the prisoner Guiseppe spat in his hand, pushed it away disdainfully, and gave him a slight blow in the face—something then took place with Cherry, and Guiseppe struck Coleman several times in the face—a scuffle ensued, and be got knocked down by one of the two—I cannot say which—I did not see him use a knife.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there pewter-pots flying about in all directions? A. Yes, three or four persons besides the prisoners were engaged in it—they seemed all to be of one party—five or six Italians came in together, and all contended against Coleman—Coleman's roan was then—the whole set did not divide themselves into two parties, and hare a regular fight—there was no particular conflict took place—the Italians were striking at anybody—Coleman's man had a little bit of a scuffle with them, merely to defend himself—I did not see anybody helping Coleman except his man, who shaves for him—he is not here—I did not see any one else strike at the Italians—I did not see his man take up a pewter-pot—he might have done it in the scuffle, there were so many people there—I saw no one take Coleman's part, but his man—Coleman went out after the spitting in his hand, to get a policeman—I did not see him bring any body back—his man came back with him—then a fight took place, and the pots were thrown about—I do not know what brought Coleman and his man back—when they came back, there was a regular attack made on the Italians—I cannot exactly say who was the attacking party—the fight began very shortly after Coleman and his man came back—I did not see Coleman give his watch to any one to hold—Mrs. Bartoli came in when her father was bleeding—her husband was there—he was concerned in it—he took his father-in-law's part, keeping the Italians away from him, struggling as well as he could—I do not know whether he was striking—he in attempting to push them away from Cherry.

JOHN FINK (police-constable G 47.) I went into the Coopers' Arms, and found Cherry, Coleman, and the two prisoners there—I took the prisoners into custody—they resisted violently—Guiseppe kicked me several times on the legs, he put his legs between mine, and attempted to throw me down.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons did you find in the home? A. From thirty to forty—there appeared to have been a regular row—they were all pushing and shoving about—Coleman fetched me.

MICHAEL BARTLETT . I am a surgeon, and live in Hatton-garden. I saw the prosecutor at the office next day—he pointed out to me a wound on the eye, which might have been done with any sharp instrument, a knife, or probably a pewter-pot, if the edge was sharp enough—it was an incised wound, with contusion round it—it was a very trifling wound.

(Witnesses for the Defence.)

MARY HOLDING . I am single, and lived in Great Saffron-hill, but have moved since this disturbance—I was standing at the door of the Coopers' Arms, on the night in question, and saw Coleman come in—he went up to the prisoner Guiseppe, and asked him to drink—he said in his language that he would not—he then asked him to shake hands with him, and he spat in his hand—Coleman then put himself in an attitude of fighting, and the prisoner shoved him—Coleman went outside and in five minutes returned, bringing from fifteen to thirty men with

him—be went up to the prisoners again, and asked Guiseppe to drink—he said in his own language he would not—he asked him to shake hands with him, and he then spat in his band again—he said to some men, "Hold my watch"—be again put himself in a fighting attitude with Guiseppe, and he Shoved him—Coleman asked him if he meant that, and with that all the men that Coleman brought with him rushed in on the prisoners, and ill-used them—there were pewter-pots flying about on both sides, but no one could tell who used them—there was no knife used—I saw Mr. Bartoli fighting as well as the rest—the prisoner Pelagrias never interfered till they ill-used his brother—I had seen them before, but not to know them.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You Know some of these Italians? A. A great many, but not the prisoners—I go out charing—I lived in Mr. Cherry's house, but since that disturbance I have been in danger of my life, and forced to move—Coleman went down to Mr. Dix's public-house, to get these fifteen or thirty men—I did not follow him—I remained outside till he came back—he was very much in liquor—I was there from the beginning to the end—I had the door in my hand—Mr. Cherry was much in liquor—I did not see him covered with blood—I did after the policeman came—I did not see that his eye was cut—no one could say who cut his eye—Mrs. Bartoli was not there till the policeman had the prisoners in custody.

JURY. Q. Could you see from the Coopers' Arms to Dix's? A. Yes—it was not above half-a-dozen houses down—I am sure I could see from one to the other.

ANN LARGE . I went to the Coopers' Arms on the 24th of February, between seven and eight o'clock, with a friend to have part of a pint of beer, and saw Coleman and Cherry drinking at the bar, and three or four young men standing by the side of a butt. Coleman asked them to drink—they refused—he asked them to shake hands—they refused, pushed him away, and spit in his hand—Coleman put himself in an attitude to, fight—one of the young men pushed him away, or as I might say, hit him—Coleman said, "Do you mean that," and went out—he returned in four or five minutes, and asked him to shake hands again—he would not—he asked him to drink again—he would not—he then put himself in an attitude to fight, and they resented it, and hit him—Coleman said to a man, "Take my watch"—he gave his watch to a man that stood beside him at the bar—I do not know who the man was—it was not his man, but a man that was drinking at the bar—Coleman then put himself in a fighting attitude, and the young man hit him, when in came about thirty Irishmen—they took up pots, and the Italians took up pots, and no one could tell who hit them—I had a blow on my head, but I could not swear who did it—I have a large bump on it now—I could not get out, there was such confusion.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. What are you? A. I sell fruit in the street, and go out charing—I am the last witness's mother—I never go to Coleman's shop—I do not dislike the man—the thirty Irishmen were just outside the door—Coleman fetched them out of Dix's.

PELAGRIAS MAESTAI— GUILTY

GUISEPPE MAESTAI— GUILTY

Of an Assult.

Reference Number: t18420228-1022

1022. PELAGRIAS MAESTAI and GUISEPPE MAESTAI were again indicted for feloniously assaulting Jonathan Cherry on the 24th of February, and cutting and wounding him in and upon the head, with intent to maim and disable him.—2nd COUNT, stating their intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

JONATHAN CHERRY . I was at the Coopers' Arms public-house between eight and nine o'clock on Thursday night the 24th of February—I believe the prisoners were there when I went in—I called for a pint of beer, and while drinking it a row occurred with Coleman and Guiseppe Maestai, who threw a pot at me, which struck me on the hat—I had done nothing to provoke him—I believe it was levelled at me, and Pelagrias struck me down with a quart pot—I became insensible with the blows—I had several pots about my shoulders—when I recovered I was taken outside the door, and taken to a surgeon's—I had not done anything to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you been drinking? A. A little—I had had a pint of beer in the Coopers' Arms—I had not been into any other public-house that day—I had been into the Coopers' Arms two or three times that day, and had had a pint or two of beer there before—I drank nothing but beer all day—I was perfectly sober—I cannot recollect how much I had drank—I have been once in custody of the police, and only once—it was for interfering with what did not belong to me in the street—it was not for taking a policeman's lantern or anything belonging to it—I was in custody ten days—it was about a woman who was taken to the station—I merely said she was tipsy—they took her away indecently, and I said it was a shame—him said I had no concern with it—I do not think I touched the policeman, but he said I did, and I did—I was taken to Hatton-garden, and then to prison—I was never at Hatton-garden in custody except at that time—my wife gift me into custody about four years ago—I was never there charged with buying certain articles for a penny that were worth 2s. 6d.—my wife, I believe, bought a little thing belonging to a neighbour, but it was given up when asked for—she had a summons to go to Hatton-garden to rectify it—I never said I did not know who struck me—a man named Robinson took me to the doctor's—I was insensible—I never said to Robinson that I did not know who struck me.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You have never been convicted or charged with any dishonest act at all? A. Not in the least—my head still aches sometimes with my talking.

CAROLINE BARTOLI . I went to the Coopers' Arms, and found my father and the two prisoners beating him with the pots, one with a quart, and the other with a pint—I took him round the waist dragged him to the butt, and said, "Oh, my father, my father is killed"—I held him till the policeman came, and said, "For G—'s sake take them in charge!"—while I was dragging him away, the prisoners followed him with pots in their hands, and kept striking him over his shoulders and where they could—at that time he was quite insensible—I had a hard matter to keep him up at all.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he appear to you to have drunk any thing? A. I believe he had had hardly any thing—I know Robinson, who took my father to the doctor's—I never said to him, or in his presence, that I would have a flare-up with the money I got from the prisoners, nor any thing of the kind.

JOHN DENTON . I was in the house when the prosecutor came in, and saw Guiseppe Maestai throw a pot on him—it seemed to stun him—he got up again, and Pelagrias struck him with a quart pot, that stunned him—his daughter came in and took him away—the blood flew down his coat intorrents—he was doing nothing to offend the prisoners—he was standing quite quiet—he had drunk a little, but nothing particularly out of the way.

MICHAEL BAETLETT . I am a surgeon, and live in Hatton-garden. I examined Cherry's head—I found a cut of an inch and a half long, such as might have been occasioned by a pot—I attended him for about a week—he did not suffer much after that time—he had a little headache come on, two or three days after—it must have been a blow of considerable violence to produce the wound.

Cross-examined. Q. There was only one wound? A. Only one—I did not examine further—he only mentioned one wound, and that was at the back part of the head—if there had been any other I should have seen it—I did not examine his body—if he had complained to me I should have done so—he appeared to me to have been drinking—I suspected he had been drinking, and I put the question next day, and he said he had—I aw him about twenty minutes after the accident—he was not stunned when he came to me—he had lost probably two or three ounces of blood.

MR. PHILLIPS called

JAMES ROBINSON . I am a shoemaker, and live on Great Saffron-hill, next door to Mr. Cherry's—I assisted Cherry to the doctor's—he appeared to me very much in liquor—I know Mrs. Bartoli, his daughter—I was sitting at work, and saw her pass with her father as they came from the police-office—I heard her say to him, "Won't we have a flare-up with the money we get from the prisoners?"

MRS. BARTOLI re-examined. I never said any such thing—it is false.

JONATHAN CHERRY re-examined. My daughter never uttered a syllable of the kind to me.

PELAGRIAS MAESTAI— GUILTY of an Assault. Aged 21.

Confined Three Months.

GUISEPPE MAESTAI— GUILTY of an Assault. Aged 21. Confined Two Months, and to find two Sureties in 10l. each, and be bound himself in 40l. for good behaviour for twelve months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1023

1023. JOHN OLIVERA MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February, at St. Andrew, Holborn, 6 bottles, value 1s. 6d.; 6 pints of brandy, value 1l.; 3 pints of wine, value 8s.; 1 key, value 64.; 3 bags, value 3d.; 73 sovereigns, 34 half-sovereigns, 6 crowns, 98 half-crowns, 287 shillings, 9 sixpences, 2 pence, 4 halfpence, 8 10l. Bank notes, and 3 5l. Bank notes; the property of William Salmon, his master, in his dwelling-house.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am a linendraper, and live in Red Lion-street, Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, above Bars—the prisoner has been my apprentice for three years—I also had an apprentice named Thomas Jones. On the morning of the 10th of February I missed them both and missed about 350l.—the money was kept in an iron safe, in three cash-boxes, which were also gone—I have only indicted him for the

money found on him—I did not see the prisoner again until Sunday the 13th, when a policeman brought him up from Portsmouth—as he went to the station I told him of his impropriety—he did not make me any answear—I missed some wine and brandy also.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. He had come from school to you? A. I believe so, from Guildford—he was then about fourteen years old—my business is partly connected with the tally trade—it was partly his duty to go to different houses to collect money from persons who I trusted—I am not aware that some of my customers are of the very lowest order—I would not serve the lowest order—some of them are in very humble life—I do not know that he went round to collect sixpences of them—he might collect shillings.

Q. Has he ever had occasion, among other places, to go to houses of ill fame to get money? A. No, not that I am aware of—I never sent him to houses of ill fame, to my knowledge—I have always gone myself or sent my foreman.

Q. Have you had occasion, for the purpose of collecting your debts, to go to b—y houses? A. I do not know what you mean—I go to my customers, of course—I do not go to the persons themselves, I go to the person who keeps the house—I do not see any body else—I have not been in the constant habit of going to houses of ill fame to collect money from prostitutes, only from the housekeepers—I give the credit to the person who keeps the house—my foreman goes and collects also—I did not, before the prisoner was fifteen years old, send him to b—y houses to collect shillings and sixpences—I always avoided sending him to those houses—I will swear I have not sent him repeatedly—I would not positively swear he has never been—he has not been in the habit of collecting large sums for me—he has had as much as 16l. or 17l. to collect in stable-rents at the back of my house—some weekly, and some quarterly—I have left it in his hands for a quarter of a year, when the quarterly accounts were paid—I placed great confidence in him at a very early age—I never suffered him to have so much as 20l. by him—17l. was the outside, and be had the ground-rent to pay out of that—we balanced the book every quarter.

COURT. Q. Do you happen to know, whether intentionally or not on your part, that his employment has got him into bad company? A. Not at all—I have always avoided it.

HENRY FOWLER (police-constable E 111.) I apprehended the prisoner at Portsmouth on the 12th of February, at the Globe booking-office—I took from his pockets eight 10l. Bank of England notes, three 5l. notes, and 90l. in gold—when I was about to search him, he told me that was all the money, except 3l. or 4l.—I got some boxes at the Globe inn—I showed the prisoner a printed bill of a reward—he said that Mr. Salmon was just 150l. out.

WILLIAM SALMON re-examined. The prisoner invariably spent his Sundays with his mother, but when he was apprenticed to me, she called herself his aunt, and she signed his indentures as his aunt, as Mrs. Olivera and John Olivera Martin was the name in which he came to me—it was very seldom his duty to go on errands—he went out about once a fortnight, or once a month—the other apprentice was younger than the prisoner, and he looked after the horse—I never suspected the prisoner before this, either of dishonesty or bad morals—I was always very cautions

of sending him anywhere where his morals were likely to be corrupted—I had about three houses of ill fame where I had to collect money—I trusted the woman of the house, not the girls—she mostly had the things in her own name—I never saw the girls—the prisoner never collected more than 2l., 3l., or 4l. a day—he might have to go to a great many places for that—he accounted to me at the end of the day—his mother, who called herself bis aunt, told me she always kept him with her on Sunday, and I always saw him into bed at night—I always looked after his morals when with me, and his mother assured me she had him under her care the whole Sunday—he was not out more than once a fortnight on the outside, and sometimes once a month—he was to be brought up as a shopman.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.—Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of the very improper employment assigned him by his master,

Reference Number: t18420228-1024

1024. JOHN OLIVERA MARTIN was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February, 22 handkerchiefs, value 4l. 9s.; 33 pairs of stockings, value 4l. 6s.; 7 night-caps, value 3s. 6d.; 22 pairs of gloves, value 2l. 2s.; 15 pairs of half-hose, value 1l. 3s. 6d.; 11 socks, value 1l. 11s. 11 pairs of cuffs, value 1s.; 3 waistcoats, value 2l. 12s.; 2 purses, value 1s. 6d.; 1 hat, value 1l.; 1 carat, value 10d.; 7 1/2 yards of flannel, value 10s.; 11 yards of kerseymere, value 4l. 3s.; 8 yards of woollen cloth, value 7l. 10s.; 2 1/2 yards tweed, value 14s.; 2 yards of doeskin, value 13s.; 2 1/2 yards of satin, value 1l.; 2 yards of huckaback, value 2s.; 2 yards of linen cloth, value 3l.; 1 1/2 yard of Valencia, value 14s.; 36 yards of calico, value 12s.; 4 1/2 yards of serge, value 1l. 1s.; 4 dozen of buttons, value 4s.; 5 1/2 yards of twilled cotton, value 4s. 2d.; 1/2 yard of velvet, value 4s.; 1 bottle, value 3d.; and 1 pint of wine, value 4s.; the goods of William Salmon, his master.

HENRY FOWLER (police-constable E 111.) I went down to Portsmouth, and found the prisoner there—I found two boxes at the Globe inn there, with cards and directions on them—Leach, the prosecutor's foreman, was with me—I took the prisoner into the Globe, to Leach—the boxes were not shown to the prisoner till we arrived at the station in London—they were then opened in his presence, and he said there was a brown coat of his in them, which we gave him—nothing was said about the other apprentice, Jones, by me, or in my presence, that I recollect.

THOMAS LEACH . I have been in the prosecutor's service about nine years and a half. I accompanied the policeman to Portsmouth, and saw the prisoner at the Globe inn—I saw the boxes, with directions on them, in his handwriting—I asked him where Jones was—he said he did not know—I asked him again about an hour after, and he then said he did not know—I said, "Why, you must know"—he said he would see me d—before he would answer me any more questions, and I did not ask him any more about it—a printed bill was shown him, and he said Mr. Salmon was 150l. out—I took from his pocket a pistol and a pair of whiskers.

Cross-examined. Q. How many b—y houses have you been into within the last six months for Mr. Salmon? A. I do not know—I never inquire whether it is a b—y house, or another house, and have no business to know—I am quite certain the prisoner has never gone to collect money at such places—when there has been a parcel to go to such a place, Mr. Salmon has sent me, on purpose that he should not corrupt the morals

of the boys—I cannot say that he has not been, but I can say that Mr. Salmon has fetched me away from other business that I should go to there and that he should not—I cannot say whether he has been sent to Mrs. Cecil's b—y house, in Hart-street, Covent-garden; or to Mrs. Wilson's in Paris-street, Standgate; or to Mrs. Castle's, of Long-acre; or to Mrs. Jones, of York-square; or to Mrs. Williams, of Clarence-place, Judd-street—I have not been to every one of those places—I have been to two or three—the last b—y house I went to for my master was not many days since—I will swear I was in none yesterday, and I do not think I was on Friday—I will not swear I was not—I swear I was not in two—my master's customers do not lay very much in that line—we have about haft-a dozen—ours is a tally shop, and we have to collect so much a week from mechanics and others—I will swear I was not in a b—y house yesterday—I am not in the habit of going to such places on Sundays—I cannot swear I was not in three on Friday—I could tell if I had my book here—we have not above six or eight such houses altogether, and to those either Mr. Salmon or myself have gone.

WILLIAM SALMON . I lost a quantity of goods as well as money—these articles found in the boxes produced by the policeman have my mark on them, and are worth about 40l.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you deal with Mrs. Cecil of Hart-street? A. I do—she keeps a house there—it may be a house for women of the town for aught I know, but J do not see any thing when I go—she pays me money, mostly for herself in her own name, and she mostly comes for the goods—I do not know who comes when she does not—the responsibility lies on her.

Q. Do you mean to say you do not know this woman is a keeper of prostitutes? A. She keeps a house there, certainly—I do not know about her keeping girls there—I do not know who she keeps.

Q. Will you swear the girls themselves have not been repeatedly to your house to give orders? A. They might come, and she comes with them—I am married, and have six children—I have conducted my business for twenty-one years without any stain on my character—I do not know Mrs. Wilson, of Paris-street, Standgate—I cannot swear that I have a customer of that name, I may or may not—I have never been there—I will swear that—the prisoner used to go round Standgate—I am not aware that Mrs. Wilson keeps a b—y-house—I inquire of persons who recommend them—I do not know who recommended Mrs. Wilson—it was not Mrs. Cecil—I never sent the prisoner to Mrs. Cecil or to Mrs. Wilson—I do not know Mrs. Cecil, who she is, or any thing about her—I do not know a customer named Orchard—my apprentices slept next to my parlour—they could go in and out of a night without my knowledge, If going out the back way through the stable—that is the way they went at last—my apprentices have slept in that same place for the last twenty years.

THOMAS LEACH re-examined. These women are not common prostitutes, they are what we term "kept ladies"—Mrs. Wilson was not recommend by Mrs. Cecil, and I do not know by whom.

GUILTY . Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Two Years.

NEW COURT.—Monday, March 7th, 1842.

First Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18420228-1025

1025. HENRY RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March, 1 pot of anchovy-paste, value 1s. 6d.; and 4 brushes, value 6s. 6d. the goods of Charles Young; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1026

1026. JOHN HORNER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February, 1 coat, value 5s., the goods of James Theobald Brown.

JAMES THEOBALD BROWN . I live in Upper North-place, Gray's-inn-road—I left my coat in Mr. Butler's premises on the 17th of February—I lost it between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

WILLIAM BENNETT BUTLER . I live at Islington—the prosecutor was at my house on the 17th of February—a cab was sent for in the evening to take home a lady, who was staying with me—when I went down, the prisoner was standing inside the hall, just on the door steps—there is a court before the house—a little boy accused him of taking the coat—I asked him if he had—he said, "No"—I said, "This boy would not have said to if you had not"—he said he had not—he was the cab-man, and he was waiting for his fare—I sent for a policeman, and he not coming, I did not detain the prisoner—I allowed him to take his fare—I did not wish to detain the lady.

JAMES CATLIN . I live in Dyer-street, Blackfriars-road—I was at Mr. Batler's—I went to fetch a cab, and rode with the prisoner on the box—he and another man were talking—I saw the man. riding behind—the prisoner asked me if I could jump off the box on to the pavement, and laid, "You go and ask if there is any luggage"—I went and knocked at the door—the prisoner followed me up—he then went and lifted the other roan off from behind the cab, and called him by his Christian name—I went to the top of the kitchen stairs, and heard the prisoner walk across the hall with his heavy boots—I then heard the Macintosh rattle—before I could get up to the prisoner again, he bad given the coat to the other man, who went off across the field—the prisoner then said, "Is there any luggage?"—I said, "Whether there is luggage or no you must bring that Macintosh back"—he said, "You must be mistaken"—I said "No, I am not, you took it, and no one else, and gave it to that other man who is gone off."

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What is your father? A. A tailor, and my mother washes for Mr. Butler, at Islington—I went there to take some things home—there was no light in the hall—the street door was open—it was past ten o'clock—I first saw the man with the Macintosh at the gate—I am quite sure I saw the prisoner take it off the peg and give it to the other man—I followed after him, but could not catch him—I came out against the street door.

MR. PAYNE to MR. BUTLER. Q. How far is the top of your kitchen stairs from the peg where the Macintosh hung? A. About five or six yards—there is a gas-light about two doors down, which shines in at the door—if I were at the top of the kitchen stairs I could discern a person at the pegs quite plainly.

MARY ANN SYFORD . I recollect the boy being sent for the cab—I shut the door, and touched the Macintosh with my shoulder—the door was not opened till the boy came back with the cab, and the Macintosh was then in the hall on one of the pegs.

James Carr, a cab-proprietor, and Charles Brain, of Claremont-news, a glass-coach proprietor, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-1027

1027. THOMAS STICHELL was indicted for embezzlement.

WILLIAM WARREN . I keep the Green Dragon public-house, in High-street, Poplar. The prisoner was my pot-boy—he took his beer out—if he received, on the 10th of February, 6d., or on the 26th of February, 4d., or on the 27th of February, 10d., he has not paid me either of those sums, which it was his duty to do.

SUSAN MILLER . I have beer from the prosecutor—the prisoner brought the beer on the 27th of February—I paid him 10d.—I gave him 1s., he gave me 2d. out.

JANE WILLIAMS . I have beer from the prosecutor. On Monday, the 21st of February, I paid the prisoner 6d., and on the 26th of February, 4d., for his master.

Prisoner. You paid me on the Saturday night. Witness. No, I paid you on the Monday.

GUILTY . Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1028

1028. GEORGE WORTHINGTON and MARY BIRD were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 15th of December, of a certain evil-disposed person, 12lbs. weight of horsehair, value 12s., the goods of Susannah Purkis, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

SUSANNAH PURKIS . I am a widow, living in Crown-street, Shoreditch, and carry on the business of a horsehair manufacturer—Mary William was in my service. On the 5th of February I found her taking some property of mine off my premises—I charged her with it, in consequence of which she made a statement to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you single or married? A. Single.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. Is Mary Williams still in you employ? A. Yes, I have kept her in my house—the statement she made to me was on Saturday, the 5th of February—I did not take any proceedings in consequence of that statement that day—I did on the Tuesday following.

MARY WILLIAMS . I was in the service of Mrs. Purkis—I have been four years and a quarter in her service—I first began to steal her property three weeks before last Christmas—the prisoners live in Leonard-street—I' noticed a writing in their shop-window, which said, "The best price given for long horsehair"—I noticed that about a week before I took my mistress's property there—I went there on the first Tuesday in January-took some horsehair-seating from my mistress—I told the Prisoners my brother made sofas, and that he had that seating from his master—both the prisoners were present then, and on all the occasions that I went there

—on one occasion I took 5lbs. weight of horsehair there—they used to give me 4d. a pound for it—it is sold at 8d., 10d., and so on up to 1s. 4d. a pound, but I had 4d. a pound of them for it all, both best and common—Worthington used to weigh the hair when I took it—they never asked me how I came by it—when I first took it they told me to bring as much as I could, and said they would give 4d. a pound for it.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. The man weighed it? A. Yes, and Bird used to pay me—the name of "Mary Bird" was over the door, and on the bills in the window is "M. Bird"—there was only the two prisoners in the shop—when I made this disclosure to my mistress I was caught in the water-closet—my mistress accused me of robbing her, took me in-doors, and told me to tell her all about it—I told her some of the money in my box was my own property—I said it was all mine at first, and afterwards that it was not mine.

Q. Did you also in your confession give a certain account of this transaction, and after that give another account? A. Yes, on the Tuesday—having given one account of the money, I afterwards I gave another; and having given one account of the disposal of the property, I afterwards gave another—the first account I gave of the money, and of the disposal of the property, was false—I told the prisoners I came from my brother, and that he kept it from his master—that was not true—they asked me if I was married—I told them yes, but I never was—I said nothing about any child—I said I lived as housekeeper with my brother, a sofa and chair-maker; that I came by my brother's direction, and he wanted the money to pay his boys—that was not true.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Bird has only one leg, has she? A. Only one, I believe—I never noticed whether she has a wooden leg—she used her crutches.

JAMES BRANNAN (police-sergeant G 20.) On the 8th of February I went with the inspector to No. 51, Leonard-street—Williams went with us and pointed out the house—it is a marine store shop—I went into the back room and found the two prisoners—I asked whether George was in—Worthington said, "My name is George"—I called in the inspector and another officer—I told Worthington I belonged to the police and asked him if he had bought any horsehair—(the prisoners were both together at that time)—he said no—I turned round and said, "Here is some," pointing to some that laid close to some drawers in the shop—he said, "There is a little, that is all there is, you will find no more"—Bird then said, "I told you George what would be the case"—in, consequence of that I got between the prisoners to prevent their saying anything, as they whispered together—the search was continued, and the inspector and the officer found a large quantity of horsehair, which was claimed by the prosecutrix.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You searched the house? A. Yes partly—the back parlour is the bed-room—there is one bed in it and only one—Bird has only one leg.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. Do you keep a book and enter all these things? A. No, I recollect them perfectly.

WILLIAM BARTON . I am an inspector of the G division of police—I went with Brannan and another officer to the prisoner's house—when I got in Worthington was pointing to some seating by the side of the drawers—he said, "There is a little there, you will find no more"—Bird looked towards him and said, "George, I thought it would come to this"—I continued

to search and found this property—here are twelve pieces of seating containing about 150 yards, and 170lbs. of horse hair—I asked Bird if she kept a book—she said yes,—I asked if this was entered in it—she said no, they did not enter anything in the book but metals.

MRS. PURKIS re-examined. This horsehair is of the same quality and kind as what I had on my premises—it is worth 1s. a lb.—it could be readily sold at that—this horsehair seating is also mine—both the hair and seating correspond with my stock.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. You carry on a large manufactory, and have an immense quantity of these things? A. Yes, but this is my manufacture—this is foreign hair, but our people make it—I sell a great deal of this seating at times to go abroad—I sell some for home consumption, but not much—I sell it to very few persons—I had not missed anything before I detected Williams—I had no suspicion.

MR. BODKIN. Q. When you had detected her did you look and miss quantity? A. Yes, I did.

JOHN WILLIAM MUNDAY . I am agent to the owner of the house, No, 51, Leonard-street—I let it to the prisoner Bird last Lady-day.

The prisoners received good characters.

WORTHINGTON— GUILTY . Aged 46.

BIRD— GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year.

There were three other indictments against the prisoners.

Reference Number: t18420228-1029

1029. ELIZABETH THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February, 4 wine-glasses, value 4s.; 2 bottles, value 5s.; 2 decanters value 7s.; 1 finger-glass, value 2s.; 3 tumblers, value 3s.; 1 liquor-glass, value 1s.; 1 table-cloth, value 10s.; 1 napkin, value 2s.; the goods of Elizabeth Grafton Hall Dare, her mistress; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23. Recommended to mercy.— Confined Eight Days

Reference Number: t18420228-1030

1030. CHRISTOPHER WRAY FRYER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June, 1 table, value 8l.; the property of Anthony Pulbrook.

ANTHONY PULBROOK . I am a boot-maker, and live in Blackfriars-road—I saw this table safe in a house of mine in St. Michael's-alley, Cornhill, nine months ago—the prisoner and his wife were living there, and he had to look after the offices—I missed the table and asked what he bad done with the furniture—he said the chairs were at Long-alley and the table at another place.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How long is it since he came to live in this house? A. Two years and a quarter—there were several tenants there—I had no tenant for the room the table was in, I suppose for twelve months—the prisoner had the key—I have a partner—but he has nothing to do with this house.

JAMES HOWE . I am in the service of a pawnbroker—I took in this table from the prisoner on the 19th of June.

GUILTY . Aged 38.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1031

1031. GEORGE WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December, 3/4 of a yard of Valentia, value 3s., the goods of Edward de Lima Woods, his master.

EDWARD DE LIMA WOODS . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Hammer-smith. The prisoner was in my service—I missed three quarters of a yard

of Valentia from a parcel which I had in pledge—it was found in the prisoner's box in my presence—to the best of my belief this now produced is it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How long had he been in your service? A. He came on the 9th of November; he was to be bound apprentice to me—this was a pledge taken in and delivered again out of my custody to Mrs. Hayes, who pledged it—I did not give it to her—then was tome Valentia of the same description as this pledged at my shop—I cannot swear that this is the same piece—the prisoner's box was not locked nor the room in which it was—I saw this piece sticking out under the lid on the morning of the 23rd of February.

ALFRED BLUNDELL (police-sergeant T 9.) I took the prisoner up to the warehouse, and asked him if he had anything in his box but what belonged to him—he said, "No"—I found this article in his box—he said his cousin gave it to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1032

1032. GEORGE WESTON was again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December, 1 printed book, value 1s.; 1 1/2 yard of linen cloth, value 1s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 2 towels, value 5s.; 1 thimble, value 1s.; land 1 Guernsey-frock, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of Edward de Lima Woods, his master.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

EDWARD DE LIMA WOODS . I am a pawnbroker and live at Hammersmith. The prisoner was in my service from the 9th of November last. On the 23rd of February I procured an officer and gave him into custody—I was present when his box was searched, and there was found into it the articles which the officer now produces—this towel I had in pledge—it was pledged on the 18th of August—it has not been applied for to be redeemed—I know this book—this was in pledge also—I do not know anything of this Guernsey-frock myself—I found some duplicates of ours in his box, And here it one corresponding with the Guernsey-frock—when we take in a pledge we give the person one duplicate and keep another ourselves, which is pinned to the article—he had no right to have these duplicates in his box at all—I have searched to see if I have such a pledge at that referred to in this duplicate, and I cannot find it in the place—I found tea duplicates in his box.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How do you know this towel? A. By this blue edge round it—I recollect taking it in on the 18th of August, and this duplicate was attached to it, which was found in the ware-house near where the pledge ought to have been—I have a distinct recollection of this towel—I had seen it in the warehouse about a fortnight before the prisoner was taken—this book is a Testament which I received in pledge.

ALFRED BLUNDELL (police-sergeant T9.) On the 23rd of February, the prisoner was given into my custody—I told him Mr. Woods gave him in custody on suspicion of robbing him—I took him to the warehouse and asked what he had got in his box—he said, nothing but what belonged to himself—I searched and found this property, and three duplicates of another pawnbroker were found in his pocket, where there were three handkerchiefs

pawned—I found ten other duplicates, some in his pocket and some in his box—I found two lawn handkerchiefs in his pocket—I asked if they were his—he said his mother gave them to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you say anything more to him? A. No—he said his brother gave him this linen and the Testament, and his mother gave him the handkerchiefs—he did not say that anybody else gave him any thing.

ANN ELIZABETH WOOD . I live at Hammersmith, and wash for the prisoner—he did not pay me every time I did his clothes—one day I went there for his linen, he gave me a handkerchief and asked me to be so good as to pawn it for him; and I did, at Mr. Watts's, for 1s. 6d.,—I gave the prisoner the money and the duplicate—this is the duplicate—I received another handkerchief at another time from him, and pawned that for him for 2s. at Mr. Watts's—I gave him the money and the duplicate.

Cross-examined. Q. What! he had no money to pay you? A. I do not know—he paid me 1s. out of the first 1s. 6d., and then gave me the other 2s.

JOHN BUDD . I am assistant to Mr. Watts. Wood pawned these two handkerchiefs with me—I gave her these duplicates.

ELIZABETH RICE . This handkerchief belongs to my husband—it was pawed at Mr. Wood's.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know it? A. By the marks on it—these stains were on it when I bought it—I bought it second-hand.

JANE KNIGHT . This Testament is one I was under the necessity of pawning in July last—it has my name in it.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1033

1033. EDWARD ERRINGTON TURNER was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MR. JONES declined the Prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1034

1034. JOHN TREADAWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 12 bushels, and 1 3/4 peck of oats, value 1l. 15s., the goods of John Stephenson.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN MARSON . I live at New Brentford, and am agent to John Stephenson, a coal-merchant—he has business there, and in Derbyshire, Birmingham, and Nottingham—I purchased some oats for his use on the 18th of February, of Mr. Norton, of Old Brentford—they were all of one sort and sample—they were delivered to me on Saturday the 19th of February, and placed in the warehouse—part of them were taken out of tie place on Tuesday night, the 22nd, as near as I can tell, about twelve bushels and a half out of the five quarters—five quarters is forty bushels—I had seen them in the place some time in the day on the 22nd—here are some now in Court—they agreed with the bulk that belonged to Mr. Stephenson when I saw them at the police-station—I have a sample of Mr. Stephenson's, which were left behind, and of those found by the officer—they so much resemble each other, I could not tell one from

the other—in my opinion they agree in quality—I have measured what is left, and twelve bushels and a half are missing—they are worth 36s.

ROBINSON LAMBERT . I am in the service of Mr. Stephenson. I received five quarters of oats at the warehouse—I remember the night that some of them were missing—to the best of my recollection, it was on Tuesday night—I had shut the yard gate that night, and locked it—my master's premises are secured by a wall six or seven feet high, there was a bit of lock on the stable in which these oats were placed, but there is no key to it—it was not locked—I fed the horses that night, and gave them about a bushel and a half of oats.

EDWARD SCOTNEY (police-constable T 29.) On the night of the 22nd of February, I was on duty at New Brentford—in consequence of information, I went to the prisoner's stable at Ham, near Brentford, with an officer—we found there a barrel of oats, and a sack, and there were two barrels covered with an empty sack—I compared the oats I found in his stable with those that remained at Mr. Stephenson's, and they correspond, in my judgment—there are two large doors to Mr. Stephenson's stable, and one of them was standing open—It was about four o'clock in the morning—it was dark then—I asked his servant for a light, and he gave it us—we took away a few of the oats to compare;—I afterwards took all the oats from the prisoner's stable to the station—on that Tuesday morning I had seen the prisoner go towards Billingsgatemarket as usual, but I did not see him on the Wednesday—there had been something said on Tuesday night about these oats being stolen—I did not see him again till he was before the Magistrate—I measured the oats found at his stable—there was twelve bushels, one peck and three quarters—I was present at the examination before the Justices at New Brentford—the signature to this deposition is Mr. Bailey's hand-writing, and I heard the prisoner make this statement.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been on the beat? A. Two months, but I have been about there for four years, and in the habit of seeing the prisoner go about his business regularly for the last two years—formerly he hawked fruit, and now he carries fish—I do not know that he makes a circle, and goes as far as Windsor—on the Wednesday morning I saw the prisoner's servant come into the town with his horse and cart—the prisoner has two horses—his stable is near to the warehouse from which the prosecutor's oats were stolen—the furthest way it is 100 yards, from it, and the nearest way it is 72 yards—the stable was locked—the prisoner's servant unlocked it, and we went in—we had been watching at a distance—one of the sacks in the stable had the name of Curtis on it.

JOHN HANSLOW (police-constable T 68.) On the night of the 22nd of February, I went with Scotney to the stable at Ham, between three or four o'clock—the servant was putting a harness on the horse—I went in for a light, as my lamp was out—I wanted a light—I saw a herring barrel of oats, and a sack with J, Curtis's name on it—I felt the sack, and it was oats or corn—I saw Scotney take away a handful—we compared them with Mr. Stephenson's bulk, and they corresponded at near as we could judge—the prisoner's cart came home between three and four in the afternoon—he did not come with it—his servant and his sister did—all the oats in the stable were the same as near as we could judge—the prisoner came to Brentford on Saturday, and we took him—he said he knew nothing of it till the night before, or he should have come home—he

had been down to Windsor to sell fish—he told us of his own accord that he had in his stable three tubs of oats, and a quantity in a sack.

DANIEL BECKHAM (police-constable T 49.) On Tuesday evening the 22nd of February, I was on duty at Brentford-end, which is about 150 yards from Mr. Stephenson's warehouse—I saw the prisoner there about half-past eight in the evening—Mr. Stephenson's warehouse, and the prisoner's stable are 60 to 100 yards a part.

EDWARD NORTON . I deal in corn. I sold to Mr. Stephenson, on the 19th of February, five quarters of oats, all out of one sample—the oats which are here have the same appearance—there is a very great difference in the quality and growth of oats—some are mixed with darnel or chaf, and some are clear—ours were free from those defects, but they were Dot the best oats—I have not a large quantity of these oats by me—they are nearly all gone—I never sold any to the prisoner to my recollection—not such a quantity as those that are lost.

Cross-examined. Q. May you not have sold him some? A. I hare not, my people may—there were in the ship in which these came to my knowledge 300 quarters.

(Examination read.)—The prisoner, being cautioned as to what he should say, stated—"When Mr. Curtis was alive, I bought bushels and half. bushels, as I could spare the money, till I had another tub beside the present one, that is the reason I had so much."

THOMAS CHEASLET . I am shopman to Kean and Blake, corn-dealers at Brentford-end. The prisoner came there on the 29th of November, and he has continually dealt with us for oats almost daily—he has sometimes bad half-a-bushel, sometimes a peck—I may have sold him oats from the same country as those which are here, but I believe never any so light as these—they were generally mixed with chaff and split beans, but these that are here are not mixed with anything of that kind—the prisoner's man need to take them away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not have a bushel? A. He may have had a bushel, but they were generally half-bushels—we have not such oats as these at present—we have had such—I would not swear we have not sold him oats of this description—our firm succeeded Mr. Curtis who is dead.

SARAH ANN BOULTER CHEASLEY . I am the daughter of Thomas Chessley—I serve in the shop when he is out—nobody serves in the shop but him and me—I know the prisoner, and have served him with oats—they have been generally mixed—I do not remember serving him with others—on the 22nd of February, I served him with one peck mixed with beans and chaff—he came in the afternoon with the boy, to show the boy how to mixthem up—he paid for them.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose the partners are at home? A. They are not in the house—they never serve out these things.

LEONARD LAWRENCE . I am in the service of Mr. John Stephenson. and live on his premises continually. About eight o'clock in the evening on the 22nd of February, I heard that some one was in the wharf—I and my young man went to see who it was—we saw a man there trying to make his escape—I only saw one man—he was trying to get over the wall to make his escape—he was trying to get over one wall, and as I and the man ran round, he got over another wall—who he was I do not know.

WILLIAM SIMMONS . I was in the service of the late Mr. Curtis for

nine months before his death—he died on the 8th of October—the prisoner dealt with Mr. Curtis sometimes for corn—he used to buy oats——he used to have two or three sorts—sometimes he had them mixed, and sometimes not—he used to deal for bushels and half-bushels—he dealt all the time that I was there, two or three times in a week sometimes—he had oats mixed sometimes, and sometimes unmixed—first he had mixed corn, and then he took to having it mixed sometimes—there was about a fortnight that he had nothing but clear corn—sometimes a bushel, and sometimes half-a-bushel—I cannot say how many bushels he might buy in the course of that fortnight—I was out sometimes—he did not come every day that I was at home—I should think he came five times in the course of that fortnight—I will not swear it was not six—I will not swear to any thing—Mr. Curtis did not make any remark about its being unmixed corn in my hearing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1035

1035. FREDERICK ROFF was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October, 5000 sheets of printed paper, value 10l., the goods of James Henry Paul and another, his masters; and EMMA ROFF , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the statute, &c.: and that Frederick Roff had been before convicted of felony.

MESSRS. CLARKSON AND BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES HENRY PAUL . I have one partner—we live at Nos. 2 and 3, Monmouth-court, Seven Dials, and are printers and publishers. Frederick Roff was in our employ about twenty-two months—he was employed in cutting, sewing, and making up different works—we used to deliver him the paper alter it was printed to take home and finish them—on the 12th of February I received information, and accompanied Williams to Roff's house in Mount-street, Bethnal-green—I had before that day delivered him sheets of this description of paper to the value of 10l., and a great deal more of this and others—it was his duty to have it stitched and returned to me—the greater part of it wag not returned—some of them were religious works, and some other works—I charged him with having robbed me of different works—he said at first he had not, and then he said he had had two or three girls, who had robbed him, and he wanted to accuse his sister of robbing him—I then beckoned Williams, who was at the door, and gave him into custody—I then went round to several shops with Williams—when Frederick Roff was taken his wife was present—she said she had often cautioned him of it, and said, "See what your skittle play has brought your child and me to"—she had a little baby with her two or three months old—we went to John Spratt's, and found some property there—we went to Cauch's and Crew's, and other places, and found some more—these ought all to have been made into books, and returned to me, not sold for waste paper.

JOHN SPRATT . I am a general dealer, and live in Virginia-row, Bethnalgreen. Before Christmas, the prisoner, Emma Roff, came to my shop, and Drought some paper—she called it waste paper, and said it belonged to her brother—I suppose I bought 50 or 60lbs. weight of paper of her—I paid her 2d. per lb. for it—this now produced is some of it—I believe it consists of book-leaves and directions, and Prince Albert's songs torn in pieces.

ROBERT CAUCH . I keep a grocer's shop in Virginia-row. I have bought 30 or 40lbs. weight of paper of Emma Roff at various times—on

the first occasion I asked w here she got it from—she said from her brother—I told her to fetch her brother, instead of that she returned with a female, who she said was her brother's wife, and the paper was misprinted paper that was of no use, and they were their perquisites—I went to the prisoner's residence—I saw them both there.

RICHARD CREW . I keep a cheesemonger's shop in King-street, Bethnal-green—I purchased about 30lbs. weight of paper of Emma Roff during a period of about three months—I asked if her father was a teacher—she said he was—I never saw her and Frederick Roff together.

GEORGE WILLIAMS (police-constable N 44.) On the 12th of February I went to the prisoner's house and received charge of both the prisoners for stealing paper that had been entrusted to Frederick Roff—he denied all knowledge of it, and said he had been robbed by four or five girls before, and he supposed his sister had been doing the same—she made no observation that I heard, but I heard a female who lives with Frederick Roff as his wife, say, "You wretch, how often have I warned you; you see what your skittle-playing has brought you to"—this is some of the paper I found at different shops.

Frederick Roff. Q. Do you think I heard her say that? A. You must have heard her.

Frederick Roff's Defence. I am quite innocent—I have been up at Mr. Paul's all day, and this has been going on while I have been away—I had a very great quantity of it in my possession for a long time.

HENRY WILLIAM DUBOIS (police-constable N 14.) I produce a certificate of Frederick Roff's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—he is the person who was then tried and convicted.

FREDERICK ROFF— GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

EMMA ROFF— NOT GUILTY .

(There were three other indictments against the male prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18420228-1036

1036. HENRY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February, 3 brushes, value 3s., the goods of William Haines.

JANE RULE . I am cook to Mr. William Haines, who lives at Paddington. On the 14th of February the prisoner came down the area between three and four o'clock, and said, "Cook, what orders for the green-grocer?"—I said, "None"—the next morning I missed my master's three shoebrushes—these now produced are them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know them? A. I cannot swear to them by any particular mark—these are like the brushes we had in use.

COURT. Q. Do you clean your shoes? A. Yes—we clean our own shoes, and use the brushes—there is no mark on them.

LAWRENCE ANDERSON (police-constable D 35.) I met the prisoner in Lisson-street just before four o'clock, 14th of February—I found these three brushes in his pocket—I asked him what he had got in his pocket—he said he had nothing—I said, "You have got some brushes there, where did you get them from?"—he said a woman gave them to him to pledge for her—I asked where she was—he said, "At the corner of Lisson-street and Chapel-street "—I said, "You must go with me"—we went, and there was no woman—I said, "Do you know where the woman lives?"—he said he did not.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Four Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18420228-1037

1037. GEORGE WALKER was indicted for embezzlement.

JOB ASHTON . I carry on business as a salt and corn-merchant at Bridge-place, City-road. Mr. Bennet is a customer of mine—the prisoner was in my service, and it was his duty to bring me what he received—if he received 2l. 5s. 6d. from Mr. Bennett he has not paid it to me, and he ought to have done so.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. I believe you have lately lost your wife? A. I lost my wife on the very night I took the prisoner up—when I charged the prisoner with this, he told me he had not received it—he received this on the 17th of January, and about forty more accounts—I did not pay him his wages because he owed me money—his wages amounted to 30s.—they were due on the Saturday night, the day before be left me—that was not the day I gave him in charge.

JAKES BENNETT . I paid the prisoner 2l. 5s. 6d. on the 17th of January, for his master—the officer has the receipt.

WILLIAM WHITE (police-constable G 105.) I took the prisoner—I told him it was for receiving certain sums of money—he said he had received it, and if Mr. Ashton would allow him time he would pay it back again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1038

1038. ANN SMITH and MARY WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February, 1 coat, value 10s., the goods of Charles Marks.

CHARLES MARKS . I am a tailor, living in Tottenham-court-road. About seven o'clock in the evening of the 14th of February, I saw Williams put her hand in, and take a coat—I ran out, and saw the two prisoners standing at the butcher's shop next door—the coat was between them—I took it from them, and gave it to my shopman, I caught hold of the prisoners—Smith said, "Let us alone"—I said, "I shall not till a policeman comes"—she said, "I will soon make you let us go"—she took the busk out of her stays, and struck at me—I was obliged to let her go—she said, "Let my friend go"—I said, "I shall not"—she kept hitting me till I was forced to let them go—they ran away—I followed them to a dark turning, and got hold of them—I kept them till a policeman came.

HENRY KIRKPATRICK . I am shopman to the prosecutor. I followed him out, and saw him pull the coat out from between the prisoners—I am sure they are the persons.

Smith's Defence. I was standing listening to some singing; the prosecutor; ran up to us, and said we stole a coat; I saw no coat at all.

Williams's Defence. He came and examined Smith's stays, and found the busk was not out of her stays.

(The prisoners received a good character.)

SMITH— GUILTY . Aged 19.

WILLIAMS— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.— Confined Three Months.

Sixth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-1039

1039. HONORA SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February, 1 shawl, value 4s., the goods of Maria Holeborn.

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1040

1040. ROBERT JACKERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February, 1 purse, value 2s.; 4 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign; the property of John Hale, from his person.

JACOB LEVY . I am a fishmonger, living in Frying-pan-alley, Middle sex-street, and am waiter at John Lane's coffee-house, in Church-lane, White chapel. About three o'clock in the morning of the 3rd of March, a sailor, named John Hale, came and had some coffee—the prisoner was sitting in the next box—there were three females with him—the prosecutor called for his coffee, and the prisoner came to the box where he was the prosecutor treated him and the girls with coffee—the prosecutor is lame in his right arm—he took out a purse, opened it, gave it to the prisoner to take a sovereign out—he shut it up again, and gave it to the prosecutor, who put the purse into his right-hand waistcoat-pocket—I did not see any money—I saw the prisoner go over the prosecutor's pocket, and take out the purse with his crossed hands—I was called directly—the prosecutor was half asleep and half awake—he had been drinking a little when he came in—the prisoner then went out—I saw him come in again in about's quarter of an hour—the prosecutor scratched his head, and hallooed out, "I am robbed, I am ruined; now I must go begging; I have not got another halfpenny"—the prisoner said, "You don't think I have robbed you, for I have only been out for a necessary purpose"—he was going out Again with the three females—my master touched the prosecutor on his shoulder, and said, "There goes the man that has robbed you"—he went out after him—I followed, saw the policeman, and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you tell the sailor he was robbed before you saw the prisoner come in again? A. No—as soon as I had carried some bread-and-butter I told him—there were a great many persons there—I was sitting down opposite, in the same box, when he took the purse—it was before he came in a second time that the prosecutor said he had been robbed—no money was found on the prisoner—I only know Thompson by her coming to the shop—she is an unfortunate young woman—Smith is the same.

MARY ANN THOMPSON . I live in Norfolk-street. I was in the coffee shop on the 3rd of March—I remember the prosecutor coming in—I was with Mary Ann Smith—the prisoner was there—the prosecutor give as some coffee—I saw the prosecutor take the purse out of his pocket, take out a sovereign, and give it to the master of the coffee-shop, and then he asked the prisoner to put the money into the purse, because he had not his right hand—the prisoner had the purse in his hand, and gave it to the prosecutor back again—he put it into his right-hand waistcoat-pocket—I then saw the prisoner take it out of the prosecutor's waistcoat-pocket, and go out with it—the prosecutor was rather intoxicated—after the prisoner was gone, the prosecutor said he was robbed, he was a ruined man-the prisoner was out about a quarter of an hour—he said he had not got the purse, and went out again—the prosecutor went after him, and they gave him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. No one told the prosecutor of his being robbed? A. No, but half-an-hour after he found he had been robbed—the prisoner had been in a quarter of an hour again before the sailor said that—I was sitting just opposite the sailor's box—there were a good many persons is this coffee-shop—there might be a dozen.

MARY ANN SMITH . I live in Northumberland-street, Betheal green. I was in this coffee-shop on the 3rd of March—the prosecutor

asked the prisoner to put the money into his purse—the prisoner held half of the purse, and the prosecutor half—the prisoner put the money in, and the sailor put it into his right-hand pocket—he sat down, had some coffee, and was treating the prisoner and two or three females—I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief out of the sailor's pocket, and throw it down on one side—I then turned to speak to a friend—I did not see the purse taken—I saw the prisoner go out—he was out about a quarter of an hour—I heard the prosecutor say he had been robbed—he threw himself on the floor—when the prisoner came in again he said, "What is the matter? I hope you don't think I have done it, for I have been out for a necessary purpose"—the prisoner went and sat down with three females—I did not see him taken.

JOHN HALE . I am a sailor, living in Turner-street, Rosemary-lane. I went into a coffee-shop in Church-lane, Whitechapel, on the 3rd of March:—I called for some coffee and bread-and-butter—while I was sitting there the prisoner came along on my left side, and a girl on the other side—I looked at them very hard—I said, "Young man, do you want a cup of coffee?"—he said, "Thank you, I have not a farthing in the world"—I said, "You shan't starve while I have a shot in the locker"—the girl said she had no money—I treated her, and as I had not sufficient change, I hauled out my purse, hauled out a sovereign, and asked for change—the landlord said he bad not got change yet—I asked the prisoner to put the money into my purse again, which he did, and I put the purse into my right-hand pocket—I sat down—he gave me a touch, and said, "Go and get your change"—I said, "Never mind"—I sat still awhile, and he gave me another touch, and said, "Go and ask for your change"—I did to—I afterwards missed the purse, when the prisoner was out—he came in afterwards—I had five sovereigns and a half in the purse—I never saw the purse again.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw him come in? A. Yes, and he staid about-half-an hour, he then went out, and the landlord told me to follow him—the landlord had not given me the change then—when I saw the prisoner in the street, he said, "Will you have some gin?" and while we were talking the policeman came up.

SYLVANUS GILL (police-constable H 58.) On the 3rd of March I was on duty—between three and four o'clock my attention was called to Hale—I saw the prisoner with his back against the settle in the shop—I left the shop, and after I had left, Levy came out and made a communication to me—I saw the prisoner going up Spectacle-alley—I took him—the prosecutor was with him at the time—I searched, and found on him a farthing—he was taken back to the coffee-shop—Levy said he was the man that robbed the prosecutor—he denied it.

JURY to JOHN HALE. Q. Who was sitting by your side in the box? A. The prisoner was on my left side, and no one on my right—the females were in the box right abreast of me—there was no playing or scuffling—I treated Thompson with coffee.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1041

1041. ROBERT AUGUSTUS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January, 1 chaise, value 25l., the goods of Joseph Kempster.

JOSEPH KEMPSTER . I am a coachmaker, living in Leicester-place, Leicester-square. On Sunday, the 16th of January, the prisoner came to

my house, and asked if I had got a gig—he said he had had an accident, that his gig was broken, and he had left it at the Green-yard—he came with a servant and a very fine horse—I went with him to a shop of mine in Warwick-street—I showed him the gigs—he chose one—I assisted him to put the horse in—he and his servant drove away with it—he was to bring it home on the Monday, and to bring his gig to me to repair—he said the axletree was broken—I did not see him again till he was in custody—I found my gig a fortnight after, at Mr. Joseph Bardell's, in Gress-street, Rathbone-place—the prisoner had no authority to sell it or part with it—he was to bring me his gig to repair, and I was to build him a new one.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say, "What do you charge for the week?" A. No, you only took it for one day—you asked me if you should want a gig for a week, what should I charge—I said, "A guinea a week"—you wrote me a letter, but I did not see it—I never sent you any answer.

JOSEPH HENRY BARDELL . I keep a livery-stable in Gress-street, Rathbone-place. About seven o'clock on Friday evening, the 21st of January, the prisoner came to my stable—I saw a chaise in the yard, and a youth with it—the prisoner was there—he asked if I would buy the gig or let him have 5l. on it for a week—I said I did not want to buy it, I had got two or three, but I would lend him 5l. on it, but I would rather he had it at the end of the week, because I had no use for it—I was to have the gig at a price if he did not repay the money, but I was to use it all the time I had it—I had it three weeks or a month—Mr. Kempster claimed it, and it was delivered to him.

Prisoner. You said that I came to you walking, and now you say I came with the horse and chaise—I went home, and the boy brought the gig up afterwards—you was not to use it. Witness. The boy brought it down the yard, and you walked into the yard—you asked me to buy the horse as well.

JOHN BRADDICK (police-constable F 10.) I took the prisoner in charge on the 15th of February.

Prisoner's Defence. I did take it, but not with any felonious intent—several persons asked me whose it was—I said it was not mine—I had a letter from Manchester, that I was to have some money the week following, and then I would have redeemed it.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1042

1042. MARY GREANY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February, 60 pence, the monies of James Henry Machu, her master.

JAMES CARTER . I am servant to James Henry Machu, a silk-trimming manufacturer, in Twister's-alley—the prisoner was warehouse girl in Mr. Machu's employ. On Saturday, the 19th of February, in constquence of something that was said, Mr. Machu asked her where the halfpence were which he had missed from the desk, or if she had any halfpence—she said she had not seen them nor touched them—I then asked her if she had them—she said she had not—I said, "Go into the other room"—which she did, with me and my master.—I then went into another room to fetch a female to search her, and when I came back my master said she had taken the halfpence from her bosom, and laid them on the table—they were tied up in paper—I put a private mark on them—I sent for a policeman, and gave her in charge with them.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. What are you? A. I have been foreman to Mr. Machu some time—the prisoner has been in his employ four or five years.

TAMER LOVELL . I work at Mr. Machu's. On Saturday, the 19th of February, the prisoner was brought in by Mr. Machu—he asked if she had got the halfpence—she said, "No"—Carter was there—he went out, and the prisoner remained—while he was gone, she took the paper out of her bosom, and laid it on the table, and begged for mercy.

THOMAS CORNELIUS COPE . I am clerk to Mr. Machu. On Saturday, the 19th of February, there were eight packets of halfpence on my desk—it two o'clock I went out, and returned in a quarter of an hour, and missed a packet of halfpence—I should not like to swear to the halfpence or the paper.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen any halfpence put into them? A. No—Winter, the warehouseman put them on the desk—I had not had them in my hand—we have them from the public-house.

WILLIAM BROOM CROSS (police-constable G 217) On the 19th of February, I took the prisoner, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon—she was told in my presence it was for stealing a five-shilling packet of halfpence—and going to the station she said she could not think what possessed her—this is the paper, it contains sixty penny pieces.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18420228-1043

1043. DANIEL DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Ridly, from his person.

HENRY SLATER (City police-constable NO. 519.) On the 6th of February I was on London-bridge about five in the afternoon, and saw this handkerchief in the prisoner's hand—I afterwards saw Mr. Ridly—he took the handkerchief from the prisoner—I ran across and asked Mr. Ridly what was the matter—he said the prisoner had taken a handkerchief out of his pocket—I took him into custody—Mr. Ridly went with me to the station, and there delivered the handkerchief up.

WILLIAM RIDLY being called on his recognizances, did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1044

1044. EMMA DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December, 3 blankets, value 3s.; 2 sheets, value 2s.; 1 counterpane, value 1s. 6d.; 1 flat iron, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of John Simmons.

JOHN SIMMONS . I am a watchmaker, and live in King-street, Longacre—on the 18th of December the prisoner came to my house and took one room furnished—she was there a fortnight—she absconded in the morning of the 3rd of January—a letter was left in the shop afterwards by a female—it contained the key of the prisoner's room and five duplicates—on opening the letter I found it came from a person who had lodged in that furnished room—I then went in and missed three blankets, two sheets, a counterpane and flat iron—these are them—they were redeemed by my housekeeper—the prisoner was brought to me by a policeman about a month after she had left my house—she declared in the first instance she had never lodged there, but afterwards she admitted that she lodged there, and that she took the goods.

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX (police-constable E 49.) On the morning of the 11th of February, I saw the prisoner in Buckeridge-street, St. Giles's—in consequence of information I took her into custody—she denied the charge, but after that she said she had taken them and pawned them—the duplicate of the flat iron was found on her by the female searcher.

GEORGE HAINES BEARD . I live with Mr. Birt, a pawnbroker, in Great Queen-street—I produce two blankets pawned at our shop on the 24th and 29th of December, by the prisoner.

Prisoner. You did not take them in. Witness. I was in the shopat the time.

JABEZ THOMAS RICHARDSON . I live with Mr. Newby, a pawnbroker, in Drury-lane—I produce a flat iron, pawned on the 17th of January, I cannot say who by—this is the duplicate I gave.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress caused me to do it—I was two days without food.

GUILTY . Aged 27.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Month.

Reference Number: t18420228-1045

1045. BENJAMIN SANDFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February, 3 shillings, 12 halfpence, and 5 farthings; the monies of Henry Workman.

SARAH WORKMAN . I am the wife of Henry Workman, who keeps greengrocer's shop in Hall-street, Poplar—on the 11th of February I went out about four o'clock in the afternoon, and left three or four of my children in the shop, and about 5s. and some halfpence and farthings in the till—I came back in about half-an-hour—I went to get some money from my till, and there was none there—in consequence of what my children told me I went to the prisoner's—I asked him what business he had in my shop, and what he had done with the money he took out of the till—he at first denied it—his mother put her hand into his pocket and took three shillings and some farthings out, and gave them to me—I asked what he had done with the rest—he said that was all he had taken out of the till.

THOMAS SMITHERS (police-sergeant K 3.) The prisoner was brought to the station at five o'clock in the evening of the 18th of February—I received three shillings and five farthings from the prosecutrix—I asked the prisoner what he had done with the remainder of the money—he said that was all he had taken.

Prisoner's Defence. The woman said I took it at four o'clock, and I was taking my father's tea at that time.

(Sophia Hunter, wife of a cook on board a ship, living in Hall-street; and Mary Jane Dubar, wife of the chief officer of the Thames, East Indiaman; gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Transported for Seven Years.—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18420228-1046

1046. JANE SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February, 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; the goods of Thomas Parkinson.

CAROLINE MARTIN . I am fourteen years old, and am servant to Mr. Thomas Parkinson, of King-street, Seven Dials—the prisoner was at his house about two o'clock on the 14th of February—she brought a pair of trowsers and gave them to me—she said she had brought a pair that she had made for my master, and I was to take them and get the money for her—I took them, and went into the next room—there were trowsers and

suits of clothes in the room in which I left her—I was not away above five minutes—when I came back I saw her put a pair of trowsers into her basket—I gave her the money and she went away with her basket—I informed my mistress—I went after the prisoner, overtook and told her she bad got a pair of trowsers—she said, "I know I have, but they are my own"—I brought her back as far as the passage, and then she went into the backyard to the water-closet—I waited and she did not come out—I went up and told my mistress—she told me to go and push the door open, and while I was doing that, the prisoner came out with the trowsers in her hand—she came up stairs with me, and gave them to my mistress.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I meet you on the stairs as you were coming down, and I was going up? A. No, you did not go up stairs and show them to my mistress, and tell her the reason of your taking them—she did not tell you to go and sew them.

THOMAS PARKINSON . I am a clothier, living in King-street, Sevendials. The prisoner works for me—I pay her when she brings the work home—I know these trowsers, by the ticket on them—they are mine, and were in the shop—the prisoner had no right to take them.

JOSEPH HOILE (police-constable F 95.) I took the prisoner—she said they were her own make, and she had forgotten to sew them up, as they were unript in the hind seam.

Prisoner's Defence. I had four pairs of trowsers from the prosecutor to make on Monday—I took two pairs home about two o'clock, and I saw there was a fault in the trowsers—I took them to sew it up again'—I separated the two pairs, and the one pair I put under my shawl, that I should not make a mistake, and give the wrong pair opt—I did not do it with the intention of wronging them.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1047

1047. JOHN WILKS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February, 1 accordion, value 2s., the goods of James Pocock, from the person of Emma Pocock.

EMMA POCOCK . I am nine years old, and live with my father, James Pocock, in Chapel-street, Curtain-road. On Wednesday night, the 9th of February, I was at the top of Phipps-street, near the Curtain-road, with an accordion in my hand, playing it—the prisoner came up, and said, "Let me have a play?"—I said, "No, you will run away with it"—he snatched it out of my hand, and ran away—I called out, "Stop thief—he ran down Johnson's-place, which is no thoroughfare—Mr. Bradford ran after him, and took the accordion from him—this now produced is it—it belongs to my father.

GEORGE BRADFORD . I am a postman. On Wednesday, the 9th of February, I heard a cry of "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner running—he took a turning which is no thoroughfare—I took hold of him—he said, "For God's sake, let me go"—I took this accordion from him, and gave it to the policeman.

JOHN STRUTT (police-constable G 219.) The prisoner was given to me—he said he only did it for play—I asked why he ran away—he said, because the people were running after him.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it have a play—I took it to the lamp to look at it, and she cried "Stop thief."

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Fourth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-1048

1048. CHARLES MALSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, at St. George, Bloomsbury, 1 watch, value 29l.; 2 seals, value 8s.; 1 watch-key, value 6d.; 1 watch-guard, value 1s.; and 1 purse, value 2d.; the goods of James Reid, in the dwelling-house of Job Hancock.

JAMES REID . I lodge at No. 2, Vernon-place, Bloomsbury, in the house of John Hancock—there are several lodgers in the house, and Mr. Hancock himself resides there. On the 15th of February, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I missed a gold watch, a key, two seals, and a guard, from an inner drawer of a chest of drawers in my bed-room—I had seen them safe about eight that morning—I have seen nothing of them since, but I lost a purse at the same time, from the same room, and this now produced is it.

Prisoner. Q. How can you swear the purse belongs to you; I bought it at Greenwich fair twelve months ago last Whitsuntide? A. I can swear to it by the tassels and the pattern, and I had spilt some lavender-water in my drawer the week before, and the purse smells very strongly of it—I have had it about a year—it was not in use at the time I lost it, but it had been—my watch was worth about 30l.

SARAH COPPING . I am servant to Mr. Hancock, of Vernon-place, Bloomsbury. On the 15th of February, the prisoner was at the house cleaning windows—he was cleaning windows in Mr. Reid's room—I went into the room that day—the prisoner came again on the 16th—he was paid 1s. then—he was to be paid half-a-crown, and was to come next morning for the rest, but he did not come again—no one had access to the room besides me and the prisoner.

JOHN JAMES ALLEN (police-constable E 159.) I took the prisoner into custody—I told him it was for the gold watch in Vernon-place—he said he knew nothing about it—he attempted to get his hand into his pocket—I instantly seized it, gave his hand to another man, and immediately searched him—I found on him this purse, and 22s. in it—the prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury.

Prisoner. My hands were in my pockets when you seized them. Witness. They were not.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the watch—I could bring proof that I bought the purse in Greenwich fair.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Ten Years.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420228-1049

1049. WILLIAM SAINT, WILLIAM CLARKE, JAMES DAVIS, GEORGE LLOYD, ROBERT WILLES , and GEORGE CUNNINGHAM were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the counting-house of Jacob Ruffy, on the 27th of January, at St. Olave, Hart-street, and stealing therein 1 seal, value 1s.; 1 ring, value 1l.; 2 pieces of paper, value 3d.; 1 bill of exchange for 52l. 10s. 7d.; 1 other bill of exchange for 25l. 10s. 7d.; 1 other bill of exchange for 24l. 0s. 2d.; and 1 half of a 5l. Bank-note; his property.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM HENRY FROUTBECK . I have the care of the house No.59, Mark-lane, which is let out in offices—Mr. Ruffy has two rooms on the

second-floor, which he uses for his business—it was my duty to sweep out the rooms, and open the place every morning. On the evening of the 26th of January I left the premises all safe—it is usual to lock the inner-door of the counting-house—sometimes I do so, and sometimes not—when I do, I hang the key up in the place—I locked the outer-door on the 26th, and left it all safe about twenty minutes past seven o'clock in the evening—I went to the premises at a quarter before seven next morning—I found the outer-door perfectly safe, the same as I had left it—I unlocked it, went into the passage, and found it very much deranged, and part of a lantern with some oil lying on the ground, with some pieces of cloth—I am speaking of the passage after opening the door of the house—I went up stairs, but before I came to Mr. Ruffy's door, I ran down stairs immediately, and called over to Alderman Wood's man, who came to the door—I then went to the police-office, and brought a sergeant and some policemen—we then went up stairs to Mr. Ruffy's counting-house, and found the place broken open, and ransacked—the iron safe was broken open, the whole place ransacked, covered with papers, and every place in confusion—I remained till Mr. Ruffy came, which was about ten o'clock.

JACOB RUFFY . I carry on business as a merchant, at No. 69, Mark-lane, in the parish of St. Olave, Hart-street. On Thursday morning, the 27th of January, I went to my premises—I found the police-sergeant, and others there, and the place ransacked—among other property stolen, was three bills of exchange—one for 24l., one for 25l., and one for 52l. 10s. 7d.—this bill (produced by inspector Waller) is the one for 52l. 10s. 7d., which I lost—it is a French bill, drawn at Madeira, and so were the others, drawn by Charles Monro Johnson, Fenchurch-street, London—there was also stolen a half of a £5 Bank of England note, No. 32096, dated 13th of April, 1839, which was remitted to me from Madeira—I have the other half of the note with me—the value of the property I lost was about 120l.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. The other things were of very small value, except the bills and notes? A. Yes, except two cancelled bills, one of 300l., and the other, 335l.—they were of no value, as they were on wrong stamps.

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I produce the half of a 5l. note, No. 32096, which was brought to the Bank on the 15th of February by a man named David Davis—I did not see him—these two halves form one note.

CHARLES PACKER . I recently kept a public-house called the Old Rum Puncheon, in Rose and Crown-court, near Moorfields—I know some of the prisoners. Better than three weeks ago (to the best of my knowledge) saint, Clarke, and Davis came to my house with their wives, and had some eating and drinking together, as much as came to 25s.—Lloyd was not with them—Saint left half a 5l. note with me as security—the others were not present when it was left with me—they were in the house, but in what part I cannot say—it was left as security for the 25s.—it was to remain with me till the evening—Saint said he expected a gentleman down that would pay him the money for the note, and he would give me 25s. out of it—this was between twelve and one o'clock in the day—they remained at my house till the evening—nobody came in the evening, and they all went away one by one, Saint, Clarke, Davis, and their wives—no application was made to me about the note that evening by anybody—about four or five days afterwards, Lloyd, I think, came—it was Lloyd, I

think—I gave the note to Lloyd—he said, "I understand there has been Saint here, and Clarke, and Davis, and run up a score to the amount of 25s., and sooner than you shall be the loser, I will see what I can do—I will take it to a party who will give you the money for it, and get it changed"—upon that I gave it to him—he called on me again a few days afterwards, and said the note was taken to the Bank, and stopped—soon after that inspector Waller came to me—I did not at that time know where Lloyd lived—I went with Waller to No. 9, Willow-walk, Curtain-road, and there found Lloyd—I told Lloyd that I wanted to speak to him respecting the 5l. note—he came out and spoke to me—Waller asked him whether he would go down to his brother-in-law, Cunningham—he said yes, he would go with me—we went, and Waller waited at my place till Lloyd and I returned—Lloyd and I went to Cunningham, and Lloyd, Cunningham, and I returned to Waller—Lloyd and Cunningham were then taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not what Lloyd said, that he would endeavour to find a customer for the half-note, who would pay you the money? A. No, not to my knowledge—I was examined before the Magistrate-Lloyd did say that sooner than I should be a loser, he would find a customer for the half-note, who would pay me the money—when he told me the note was stopped at the Bank, he said it was stopped because it was a stolen note—he took me at once to Cunningham's. his brother-in-law—Waller did not go with us-Lloyd was at liberty to go with me where he liked—he was not in my custody—I told him that Waller would wait at my house for them, and it was after that that Cumningham and Lloyd went with me to Waller at my house—Waller was is his uniform.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What did you do with the note from the time you say Saint gave it to you, till you gave it to Lloyd? A. It was in my possession—I had no other half-note—I put it inside the bar-parlour, in the card-rack over the mantel-piece—no one had access to that, but the lady that keeps the house.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you find it in the same place? A. Yes.

DAVID DAVIS . I keep a clothes-shop in Field-lane. On the 15th of February the prisoner Lloyd came to my shop in company with a person, who I do not know—(looking at the witness Samuel Fletcher)—that is the man—I have known him for many years, living in the, City, as a clothes-salesman—I do not know his name, but his person, and his warehouse where he lived—Lloyd produced this half-note to me, and his child had burnt change for it—I asked how it came burnt—he said his child had burnt it on Saturday night—that he had received it from his employers on the Saturday night—I said I could not think of taking a note of any stranger till I spoke to the Bank of England, and inquired if it was correct—he said, "Very well, I will leave it with you"—and he left it with me—he said he had been to the Bank of England, and they had marked on the note in red ink, "To be paid in fourteen days," and he, wanted the money in his business, as a chair-maker—he said he was a chair-marker—I asked where he received it—he said from his employer in Finsbury-square—I said, "Why not take it back there?"—he said, "I should not like to trouble my master"—he was to leave it with me for examination at the Bank, and was to call between two and three o'clock for an answer—I then went to the Bank, and made inquiries, and on that I returned home—I went to Lloyd, where he gave his address, Long-alley, Moorfields, before the time I appointed for him to come to my house—I went from the Bank to Longalley

—I had asked him his address, and he himself gave it to me—I did not find him there—I then went home, and found him at my house with Fletcher—I told him the note was of no use to me, he must go with me to the Bank—he readily went with me to the Bank—at the Bank they told me they could not place it to my account—I told him the Bank would not pay it without an affidavit, and he must go with me—he, and I, and Fletcher went towards the Bank—when we got near the Bank, Lloyd said his brother-in-law knew more about it, and saw it burnt, and he could make a stronger affidavit than he could—he said, "Wait here for five minutes, while I go down and fetch him"—we were then against the Auction-mart—he went down the steps of the area of the Auction-mart, and never returned—I saw no more of him till he was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you known him long? A. I never saw him in my life before—Fletcher brought him to my house—I have bought of Fletcher cloth and wool of different descriptions for many years—I have lived in Field-lane forty years—my house has never been searched, there could be nothing found if it was.

CHARLES WALLER (City police-inspector.) I went to No. 9, Willowwalk, Curtain-road, on Thursday, the 24th of February—Charles Packer went with me—I found Lloyd there—I told him I wanted to see him, and also asked him if he knew where Cunningham was—he said, "Yes"—I did not say what I wanted to see him for at that time—I asked if he would go with Packer, and meet me at Packer's house, and bring Cunningham with him—he did so—nothing more passed between us—I had not then told him what I wanted him for—when they got to Packer's house I asked Lloyd if he knew anything about the half of a 5l. note which was stolen property—he said "Yes"—I asked him where he received that note from—he said be had received it from Packer—I then asked Cunningham knew anything about the note—he said "No"—I asked Cunningham if he knew anything about the bill for 52l. 10s. 7d. that was also stolen—he said "Yes"—I asked him where he got it from, or from whom he got it—he said a person of the name of Saint; that he (Cunningham) and Lloyd went down to the Auction-mart; that he (Cunningham) gave the bill to Lloyd, and Lloyd gave it to a person named Wood—that was said by Cunningham in Lloyd's presence—I took them both into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe Lloyd and Cunningham gave you all the assistance in their power? A. They did from the first beginning to the end, and gave what clue they could to the detection of the case—Cunningham in particular, and also Willes.

ROBERT HAMBLIN (City police-constable, No. 501.) I took Saint into custody on the 23rd of February, at No. 7, Half Nicol-street, Bethnalgreen—I told him I took him for a burglary at No. 59, Mark-lane—he said he knew nothing at all about it, that others knew more about it than he did.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You searched his place and found nothing? A. Nothing.

MR. RUFFY re-examined. There was no appearance of any burning whatever on the half-note when it was stolen.

CHARLES MONRO JOHNSON . I am a ship-broker, in Fenchurch-street. This bill for 52l. 10s. 7d. was drawn on me and accepted by me—it was due on the 19th of February; on that day a man named Stevens Wood

called on me, and made a communication to me on the subject of that bill in consequence of which I accompanied him to the police-station in Tower-street—I did not desire Wood to be detained—he was detained—he was given into custody in my office.

STEVENS WOOD . I am a discount broker, and live at Rotherhithe—I have transacted business at the Auction-mart in London. On the 11th of February I was there; the prisoner Lloyd was introduced to me that day by a person named Baker—I did not know him before—I knew Baker—Lloyd produced this bill to me to get it discounted—it would be due some days after, on the 19th—I found that it required an endorsement, as it was specially endorsed to Mr. Ruffy, and there was no endorsement by Mr. Ruffy upon it—I said, "The bill is not negotiable in its present state, it must have Mr. Ruffy's endorsement on it before it can be negotiated"—he said he would go and get it done—I told him it was rather late then, and asked how long he would be gone—he said be had to go to the Commercial-road; it would take him nearly an hour—he went any and was gone about an hour—when he came back, Cunningham and Willes came with him—the bill was then endorsed as it is now—I told them I would endeavour to get it discounted, and if they would call not morning, I would give them an answer—they agreed to that; Lloyd at first did not wish to leave the bill with me, but Willes said he had known me some length of time, and he was sure it would be right; if I gave an undertaking to return the bill or the money, it would be perfectly safe in my hands; upon that they agreed to leave it—Lloyd said if he could not come himself, I might give the money, or return the bill to Mr. Cunningham—Cunningham came to me next morning—I told him I had not succeeded in getting the bill discounted—I was to make a further effort that day, and to give an answer on the Monday morning—I did not hear or see anything more of them after that day—on the 19th, the day the bill became due, I went to the house of Mr. Johnson, the acceptor, took the bill with me, and made a communication to him, in consequence of which I was taken into custody.

Willes. He told me at the station, in the inspector's presence, that he had received the bill from a person named Baker. Witness. I never said I received it from Baker—I said I got it through the introduction of Baker.

Willes. I never saw saw him with the bill, till after he got it; he received it from Lloyd and Cunningham; he sent a policeman after me at nine o'clock, on the Saturday night, and when I got to the station he acknowledged that he received it from these parties, and wished me to look after them, which I did, but I never introduced the subject to him, and I never had the bill in my possession five minutes.

ROBERT BAKER . I was at the Auction-mart on the 11th of February—I am acquainted with Mr. Wood—I introduced Fletcher to him that day at the Auction-mart, and a person who I believe to be the prisoner Lloyd—Fletcher introduced Lloyd to me, and I introduced him to Mr. Wood, for the purpose of discounting a foreign bill—I knew Fletcher and Wood, but not Lloyd—I believe the bill was left with Wood—I knew nothing of it afterwards.

SAMUEL FLETCHER . I live at No. 8, Waterloo-street, St. Luke's—I am a cloth-manufacturer by business, but of late years I have been in the rag line—I am not in business at present. I know Lloyd—I went with him to the Auction-mart, for the purpose of getting a bill for 52l. and upwards

discounted—I found Baker there—I knew him, and introduced Lloyd to him, and Baker introduced him to Wood—the bill was left with Wood to get discounted—I did not know Lloyd before Thursday, the 10th of February last, which was the day I went to the Auction-mart—he was introduced to me by Willes, with the 52l., bill—I have known Willes, I believe, upwards of twelve years—when I first knew him he had some paper-mills at High-hill-ferry, bat I had not seen him latterly, perhaps not for a year and a half before the 10th of February—he wished me to call in at the Stirling Castle public-house—he introduced Lloyd to me for the purpose of getting this bill discounted—on Monday, the 14th, there was to be a conclusion about the discount of the 52l. 10l. bill—I went to the Auction-mart that day—I saw Willes and Cunningham there—Cunningham went to get the bill discounted, Mr. Wood said it was specially endorsed, and required an endorsement to be put on it—Cunningham had the bill after it was endorsed, and gave it to Mr. Wood, for the purpose of being discounted—on that Monday Mr. Wood was to give his final answer about discounting the bill—I was at the Auction-mart that Monday—Cunningham was at a house opposite, but became and said, if Wood came with the money or the bill, he was to be called on there—I saw Baker there, but none of the other prisoners, that I am aware of—I saw Mr. Wood that day, and the money was not procured—he came to the Auction-mart, and went over the way to Cunningham—I did not go with him—I saw another person there, whom I have since seen, but not either of the prisoners—when Mr. Wood came back from Cunningham he said something to me; in consequence of which, I went to the Old Rum Puncheon public-house, and there saw Lloyd—Packer gave Lloyd part of a 5l. note—I agreed to go next day with Lloyd to get it changed at Davis's, and we went.

JOHN FREDERICK COBET . I am a translator of foreign languages, and live in London. On the 10th of February, the prisoners, Willes and Cunningham, came to me—I was ill in bed at the time—they called to know whether I could assist them in getting a couple of bills discounted—Cuningham produced two bills from his pocket, rolled up, and in a crumpled state—I said, "What a pity you should keep them in that negligent, careless kind of way, for if the bills are ever so good, it throws a damper on them in introducing them in a respectable channel"—the remark was made that a hot iron would make it all right—to the best of my belief Willes said that—I copied both the bills, and have the copies here, which I took at the time—it is not a literal translation—the first is (reading) "Madeira, 6th December, 1841, due February 20th, 1842. 30 days sight; first of exchange. Gordon, Duff, and Co. Order, Capt. Thompson, in full of my passage money hence to Demerara, Charles Heath. Drawn on Barton, Hasleham, and Higgins, Liverpool. Accepted, 18th January, 1842. Payable at Dennisons' and Co., London. Signed, Barton, Hasleham, and Higgins, 24l."—the other bill is for 25l. 10s. 4d., dated "Madeira, 8th December, 1841, accepted by James King, Esq., Bristol; due, 20th February, 1842. Accepted 18th January. 30 days sight, and payable at Robarts, Curtis, and Co."—I noticed that the last bill was endorsed to Mr. Ruffy—having examined the bills, I said on the first bill, according to the Continental laws, with which I was acquainted, there was an irregularity—the endorsement of Gordon, Duff, and Co. preceded, instead of followed, the endorsement of Thompson, and I remarked that, according to the Continental laws, that would vitiate the transfer, but I was not sufficiently acquainted with the

laws of England to know whether it would have the same effect in this country, nevertheless I considered it an irregularity—I explained that to them, and I believe Cunningham said, "Well, I thought it was all right, Willes knows enough about bills to say they are all right," and I believe he told me at the time that he himself knew little about bills—I saw nothing wrong in the second bill—I saw it was specially endorsed to J. Ruffy Esq., and asked Cunningham whether his name was Ruffy—he said "No"—I asked whether he was the holder of the bill—he said "Yes"—I said "How does it happen then that that name is deficient?"—I made then remark to both the parties that the endorsement was special, and the name was deficient—Cunningham said it did not matter, it could be got—there was mention made of there being a third bill in existence—I could not take on myself to recollect who said that—they said the amount of the other bill was 50l. odd, I understood, but I have not seen that bill—they said they had such a bill, but not with them—I desired them to let me see the other bill, because from the irregularities I perceived on this bill, I did not like to make my mind up as to the appearance, or the nature of the suspicious circumstance—they then left me—next day, Cunningham came to me alone, and brought the same two bills, but not the third—he asked me either to lend him, or procure him the loan of 2l. on these two bills—I noticed that Mr. Ruffy's signature was still wanting, and made the remark to Cunningham—I said, "Where is that third bill you promised me to look at yesterday?"—he said he could not get it, that Willes would not let him have it—I said, "How does it happen that this bill is in the same state as when you brought it to me before?"—he said, "Well, but is not the other bill, (alluding to the 24l. bill,) where there is no special endowment required, sufficient for the 2l.?"—I said "No, I will tell you what—I don't like the look of the whole of this case, because the third bill does not make its appearance," and then the young man being by himself I said, "I tell you what, I don't like the look of the whole case; how am I certain those bills may not have been found?"—that was a suggestion of mine—Cunningham replied, "Supposing they have"—I said, "That is the reason I will have nothing at all to do with them, nor advise you to do"—previous to that I said, "If I was fool enough to meddle in this transaction, who tells me that these bills may not have been already advertised and stopped"—to which Cunningham answered, "No, I have looked at the paper these nine days"—that opened my eyes sufficiently, and I then addressed him in a manly style, saying, "I am older than to be your father, and I advise you to have nothing at all to do in this case, to meddle with the negociation of this paper—for, in the first instance, you cannot succeed without an attempt at fraud, and in the next without a forgery, and by attempting either, you run the risk of being sent across the water"—he then shook, and said, "Oh, I had better then destroy them"—I said "No, why would you do an innocent owner an injury without doing yourself any benefit or good by it? If you like to be guided by me, the only way in which you can even make an honest something out of it, and with out any danger to yourself, will be this; bring me the third bill yon have got, and I will do like I have done with the other two, make a copy of it and make a public advertisement for you, drawing it in the mildest manner, namely, that they had been found, and I will make an advertisement to that effect for you in the public papers"—I told him he would get a better reward that way than by any other means, and without any risk—that advice he seemed highly to approve of, and promised to follow—he

then left me—before be left me he stated that he should hare tome difficulty in getting the third bill—I said, "No matter, you must insist on having it back, if it is in the hands of your own father"—this was on Friday, the 11th of February—to the best of my recollection in the middle of the day something near that, I cannot recollect exactly the time—I had no clock in my room—he did not leave either of the bills with me—he took them away with him, and I never saw any more of him, and never had a sight of the third bill—when I heard this matter was under inquiry, I went to the office of the solicitor for the prosecution, and told him what I knew of it, as soon as I was able to get out of bed—I did not know anything of it at the time, because I was ill, but I stated the circumstance in my house the very day it occurred.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you always given the same account of this transaction? A. I am sure I never gave any other—I always said that Cunningham said he had been looking at the paper for nine days—that I swear—I am a translator of languages, and a public interpreter—I have received an education like yourself, a classical one—I was formerly a merchant—in 1837, I unfortunately had to come over to attend at the trial of the notorious Kinnear, who robbed me of 3,200l. by forgery, and ever since that occasion I have remained—I have been ruined by Kinnear, and have been under the painful necessity of applying for my insistence to my humble talents—I have had no establishment in London; at least I should tell an untruth if I said I had not, but not since 1827, not a mercantile connexion—I certainly have done some business in London since 1827.

Q. Have you dealt in cigars? A. That is a question which I appeal to his Lordship whether I am bound to answer.

COURT. You had better answer it. Witness. Then yes, I have, from my connexion with foreign captains, and I do not hesitate to say it—if I have had recourse to a trifle by procuring an article which may be susceptible to some fiscal regulations, which you may draw me into, I appeal, under these circumstances, if I am bound to commit myself—this seems to be done out of spite, because I happen to come forward in vindication of a public case, to pick a hole in my coat for doing a thing which, morally considered, is by no means wrong, however much so it may be in another point of view—I have done no moral wrong—it is unconnected with this case—I refuse to answer the question—I do not mean to say that I have been guilty of it, but I refuse it—I refuse to answer whether I have dealt in brandy—I do not recollect it, and if I have, I have done it under circumstances of necessity, because I have laboured under a paralytic affliction, and have not the use of my limbs.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You are acquainted with captains of foreign vessels, and I suppose these questions about cigars and brandy have some reference to some little dealings between you and them? A. It may be so.

Willes. Cunningham wanted to borrow some money on them, being foreign bills—I knew Mr. Cobet was in the way, and went to him—being exceedingly deaf, I said, "This gentleman wants foreign bills discounted; it is useless, my being deaf, to have any thing more to do with it, I will leave you to yourselves," and I sat down at the further end of the room—I only introduced Cunningham to Mr. Cobet, and left them to talk themselves—I never said any thing about a hot iron making it all right—I never looked at the bills—I only took Cunningham there.

JACOB RUFFY re-examined. Among the bills stolen on the night in question there was one for 24l., dated Madeira, 6th of December draws by Charles Heath, of Liverpool, due on the 20th of February, payable at Dennison's; another for 25l. 10s. 4d., dated Madeira, 8th of December 1841, drawn by Thomas Thompson, on James King, payable at Robarts and Curtis's—it was not specially endorsed—I have the seconds and the notices I attached to them—the seconds are identical copies of those that were lost—the notes have never been restored to me—I never indorsed the bill that was specially endorsed to me, or any of the bills.

ZACHARIAH PICKARD . I live at No. 21, Bacon-street, Bethnal-green; I manufacture fringe and lace in the upholstery line. I occasionally go to the Old Rum Puncheon, which used to be kept by Packer—I remember seeing the prisoner Davis there—the first time I saw him there was about six months ago—I never saw him there on this affair at all—he called on me, as near as I can remember, six weeks ago come Wednesday—I cannot fix the date, as I paid so little attention, it having nothing to do with my affairs—he had been once before to my house, but I was not in the way—he left word when I came home to stop, and in consequence of that I saw him—he asked me to read a note for him—I asked if be could not read himself—he said, "No"—he had not got the note with him—I asked him for it, and he asked me if I would step with him and read it—I accompanied him to a house just on the spot, I do not know the name of the street, and there found Saint, Clarke, and Davis—Clarke produced some papers—they appeared to be bills drawn—(looking at the bil for 52l. 10s. 7d.)—I believe this is one of the bills I saw—I read the bills—I do not remember the particulars of any other than this—I read then to them, and laid them down.

Q. What induces you to say that is one of them? A. It being the same amount—I remember the amount of that one bill—I do not remember the amount of any of the others—I read four bills—I cannot pretend to say the amounts of the other bills, but they were under this—they were partly printed, and partly in ink—one was from Liverpool, and I believe one from Madeira—I read them aloud—they told me to read—I read the words Madeira and Liverpool to them—I felt rather surprised at persons like then having these bills, and asked how they came by them—they said they had picked them up—they asked me what they had better do with them—I said to return them to the owner would be the best thing they could do with them, they would be of more use to him than to them—I then left them, and left the bills—they gave me nothing for my trouble, no further than asking me to have something to drink, which I had.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long were you altogether at the house? A. About ten minutes—I did not put any mark on the bill, or make any memorandum of it—in the course of that ten minutes I read four bills—I had seen Clarke before at Packer's—I was not in the habit of using Packer's house—I have been there several times—I suppose I might have been there twenty or thirty times in the course of about eighteen months—I was there about once a-week in that time—I do not call that being in the habit of using the house—I knew Packer by his attending there, nothing more.

Q. What makes you recollect this being six weeks to-morrow? A. I had been out on business, and I returned from business—it was my own business—I had been round with my goods—I do not keep any shop to

expose goods—in my line of business they are not exposed—I deal with many people round the City, with any one that will give me a price for my goods—I deal with Pawsons, of St. Paul's Church-yard—the last time I dealt with them was about eight weeks ago—I was out on my business when Davis first came to me.

Q. I suppose nobody has ever been ill-natured enough to accuse you of any thing dishonest? A. I have never been in any thing of the kind, nor was I ever accused of any thing dishonest in any way—I never lived with a floor-cloth manufacturer in Whitechapel—that I swear—I will take my oath I never worked in a floor-cloth manufactory of any description, either in Whitechapel or the neighbourhood—my wife and I never slept in the house of any manufacturer in Whitechapel—I never was accused of robbing a person in Whitechapel, in whose house I slept—I never slept there—I was never accused of robbing a person in Whitechapel or the neighbourhood—I have been to Greenwich several times to see my father, who is there—I was never accused of any robbery at Greenwich, and know nothing of any thing of the kind—I have never said I thought there was a reward offered for me and my companions for a robbery at Greenwich—I never said I was in a robbery at Greenwich—I have never been in any prison in my life, nor was I ever taken before a Magistrate.

Q. Have you never said you had to cross the water after this robbery at Greenwich, and that you were so closely pursued you had to throw a good deal of the property away? A. No, I never said so—I never said I was closely pursued by the officers, that I stole a considerable sum of money, and in getting away I had to throw part of it away, nor any thing of the kind.

Q. Have you always been working for yourself, were you never employed by any body? A. Up to the last twelve months I was employed as foreman to Mr. Hory, a manufacturer in Spitalfields—Mr. Hory did not discharge me on a charge of robbery, and say he would not prosecute me because of my wife and family—I left on account of an unmanly attempt which be made to reduce my wages, at the time my wife was lying dead—I resented it, as I consider it the duty of a man to do, and I left him the following week without being discharged—nothing was said about my having robbed him, that I swear positively—he knew my wife was lying dead at the time—I had been with him three years and a half—I was the first with him in establishing his factory, and I left him the last—I never had an angry word with him before.

Willes's Defence. On the 10th of February, Cunningham brought there bills of exchange, and I went with him to Mr. Cobet; he said he either wanted to borrow some money on them, or have them discounted. Mr. Cobet and he had some conversation, what it was I do not know, respecting them; I had nothing more to do with the bills, and heard nothing more about them for several days, till I was informed by Mr. Packer, the landlord of the public-house where I met them, that they were put into his tap-room fire, and burnt. Some few days after, that 52l. bill was brought to me, and I mentioned it to Fletcher; I heard nothing of it for several days till I found it was in Mr. Wood's hands, who had it for the purpose of discounting or returning it; that is the whole of the knowledge I had either of the bills or these parties; I never saw them before to my knowledge in my life, and I should not have seen them had I not been

applied to to inform them who would lend money on these bills. I have lived for forty years in the city of London, and borne a good character, and my family before me for sixty years, in the neighbourhood of Londonwall; this is the first time I was ever in difficulty. I was not aware I was offending against the law, in saying such and such parties discount billls or lend money on them; I was not aware I was guilty of any crime in taking them to those parties—they did not tell me how they came by the bills it is not likely they would inform me—I heard no more of it till Mr. Wood was in custody; I was then given in charge, and taken to the station in Tower-street. Mr. Wood there recollected himself, that he did not receive the bill from me; I reminded him of the parties he did receive it of; and Inspector Waller, when I mentioned that, told me if I found the parties, they only wanted the parties who committed the burglary; that I should be taken care of. I was to meet these men on the Sunday night, between ten and eleven o'clock; this was on Saturday. I met them at twelve, two men named Pratt and Patteson, and on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, I met them, till the parties were all in custody; and I believe Mr. Waller will prove, that as far as I was capable, I gave every information, after finding the bills were come by wrongly; on Thursday night I was taken into custody after having relieved Mr. Waller from all difficulty in finding the parties; as far as my information went, I acted as straightforward as any man could act under the circumstances. I had no bills or part of a Bank-note. I believe Packer went with Cunningham to the Bank to get it changed; he gave it to Lloyd, and Lloyd gave it to Fletcher to take to a Jew to get money or clothes, or what they could get for it. I advised Mr. Wood to have nothing to do with the bill, and so did Baker, so they tell me, and Wood was requested to give the bills back to the parties, that there might be an end of it. I have told you the whole truth, and the whole connexion I had with the parties; it is the first I ever had, and I will take care it shall be the last. I only acted in the capacity of an agent between them. Lloyd had all his things distrained on, and as bed to sleep in, and was greatly in want of money, or I should not have exerted myself in the matter. I leave it entirely to the consideration of the Jury whether I am guilty, in going with these two parties to borrow money on the bills, for I had nothing further to do with it.

ZACHARIAH PICKARD re-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. I have known Cunningham for twenty-five years—when I knew him last he was living in Long-alley—that was about a fortnight ago—his character has been that of a steady, industrious young man—for the last four years I have known his character well—three years of that time he was employed under me at Mr. Hory's, in Wilks-street, Spitalfields, and so remarkably steady and attentive to his employ was he that he gained the affection of every one in the factory, and he saved a good bit of money there, which he deposited in the Savings' Bank every week—that I know—since his employer's death he has worked occasionally for me, but I not being capable of employing him altogether, he fell back upon the little money he had saved.

COURT. Q. Did you ever know him in the bill line? A. I never knew anything of that.

CHARLES PACKER re-examined. I have known Lloyd three years—he was always a hard-working, industrious young man, as far as I knew, and a regular customer at my house—he lived in Rose and Crown-court—I have also known Cunningham about three years, and always knew him to

be a hard-working, industrious young man—he used to dine at my house pretty well every day—he got his bread by his industry.

COURT. Q. Was it at your house that he became acquainted with Saint, Clark, and Davis? A. Not that I am aware of—I do not know where he became acquainted with them—he had the opportunity of becoming acquainted with them at my house—they did not use my house so often as Lloyd did—I do not know where Saint, Clark, and Davis lived—it was respecting their dinner that Lloyd spoke to me about the 5l. note.

(Francis Cadman, clerk to Mr. Richardson, solicitor, also deposed to I Lloyd's good character; John Herbert Briggs, toy-manufacturer, No. 33, Greenhill's-rents, Smithfield-bars; and William Price, licensed victualler, No. 9, Webber-row, to that of Cunningham; and Henry Fowlser, vellumbinder, No. 77, London-wall, to that of Willes.)

SAINT— GUILTY . Aged 26.

CLARK*— GUILTY . Aged 32.

DAVIS*— GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Fifteen Years.

WILLES, LLOYD, AND CUNNINGHAM.— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1050

1050. ROBERT WILLES, GEORGE LLOYD , and GEORGE CUNNINGHAM were again indicted, for that they having in their custody and possession a certain Bill of Exchange for the payment of 52l. 10s. 7d. on the 11th of February, feloniously did forge an endorsement upon the said bill with intent to defraud Charles Monro Johnson.—2nd COURT, for uttering the same with like intent.—3rd and 4th COUNTS, stating the intent to be to defraud Stevens Wood.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

JACOB RUFFY . I live in Mark-lane. On the night of the 26th of February, my place was broken into, and I lost some securities, among others this bill, for 52l. 10s. 7d.—the endorsement now on it in my name, is not in my handwriting—I never authorized any one to sign it for me—I never knew of the endorsement being on it till it was shown to me by Mr. Thompson—it was not on it when in my place.

SAMUEL FLETCHER . I live in St. Luke's. On the 11th of February I went with Lloyd to the Auction-mart—he had this bill in his possession at the time—I saw Baker there, and introduced him to him, and he introduced him to Mr. Wood to get the bill discounted—Mr. Wood looked at it, and said it was specially endorsed to Mr. Ruffy, and was not negotiable without Mr. Ruffy's endorsement—I left shortly after that.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You were not before the Justice? A. No—Davis pointed me out.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you go on the Monday with anybody to get an answer about the bill? A. I went on the Friday and Saturday, but this bill was given to Mr. Wood on the Saturday—I went on the Monday—Cunningham waited at a house opposite, and said if Mr. Wood brought the money for the bill he was to be sent for.

STEVENS WOOD . I know a person named Baker—on the 11th of February he introduced the prisoner Lloyd to me at the Auction-mart—Lloyd produced this bill to me for the purpose of my getting it discounted—I said it was specially endorsed to Mr. Ruffy, and was not negotiable in that state—he said he would go and get it endorsed—I do not think anybody

was present when he said so—Baker might have been there—I asked how long he would be—he said he should be gone about an hour that be bad to go to the Commercial-road—in about an hour he returned, and Cunningham and Willes with him—Lloyd produced the bill endorsed as it is now, and said it was endorsed as I had requested it to be—the other two were present, and might have heard that—I should say they did hear it—they were close enough to do so—some further conversation took place about leaving the bill—Lloyd at first hesitated at leaving the bill with me—Willes said he had known me some length of time, and if I gave an undertaking to return the bill, or give the cash for it, it might be left with safety in my hands, and it was so left—Cunningham said nothing—Lloyd said if he could not come next morning I was to give the money or the bill to Mr. Cunningham, the same as I should do to Lloyd—I had bad some transactions with Willes some two years before, and had occasionally met him, but had no communication with him on the subject of any bill—on the following morning Cunningham came—I told him I had not succeeded in getting cash for the bill, and he had better leave it with me until the Monday, and perhaps I might succeed in another quarter—he agreed to that, and promised to come on the Monday, but I saw no more of him or either of the parties—I was in the City on the Monday, and about at various places—I did not go over the way to anybody—I cannot say whether I saw Fletcher that day—I did not see him to speak to him—I do not remember going to a house—I did not see him on Monday the 14th—I made a communication on the subject to Mr. Johnson.

Cross-examined. Q. Who had you been in the habit of discounting bills for in connexion with this bill? A. Not in connexion with that bill—I had been in the habit of doing business with Baker, who is a commission-agent—I never saw Fletcher before to speak to him—Mr. Johnson locked me in his office—I was given in charge in his office on the following Saturday.

Q. When did you first tell anybody that you got the bill from these people? A. When I was taken into custody—they kept me from the Saturday till the Friday following, when I told them where I got it from—I told Mr. Johnson when I took the bill to him that I had a bill of his acceptance left with me for discount, and the parties had left it five or six days without calling for it, and that being the sixth day I did not know what to do with it—I wished to know how to act—I went to him on the Saturday—I expected them to call the Monday before for the bill.

JOHN FREDERICK COBET . On the 10th of February Cunningham and Willes came to my place to get some bills discounted—one of them took the bills out of his pocket—they were both in the room at the time, but a little distance one from the other—the second bill wanted an endorsement, it being specially endorsed to Jacob Ruffy, Esq.—I asked him whether his name was Ruffy—on his saying no, I asked him whether he was the holder—he said he was—on my saying I could not make up my mind about the bills, they said they had got another bill of 50l. odd, which they promised to bring me the next day—I hesitated, feeling suspicious of the matter, and yet not liking to impeach anybody, I suspended my judgment till I saw that bill which they were to bring next day—it was stated that Mr. Ruffy's endorsement could easily be got—I believe they bothe said so—I was ill in bed at the time, and could not exactly state, but I think it was said by both—Willes placed himself more towards the window after

having introduced the other—he took part in a certain portion of the conversation—to the best of my recollection, he said that could easily be got—believe it emanated from him, but I am not certain—I recollect Cunningham saying that he knew little about bills—they left me to return next day with the the third bill, and next day Cunningham came.

COURT. Q. If Willes said so, Cunningham must have heard it? A. All that Willes said Cunningham must have heard, but not the contrary, because Willes happens to be deaf—if it passed the presence of both—Cunningham returned about the middle of the following day, the 11th—he did not bring me the 501. bill—on that occasion I gave him a caution about the bills—when I found the third bill was not forthcoming, I saw there was a backwardness to convince me the bills were honestly got—I let loose my impressions that they were improperly obtained, told him I was old enough to be his father, and said, "Suppose these bills have been found?"—he said, "Well, suppose they have?"—that was enough to raise my suspicion, and for that reason, I said I would have nothing to do with it, and that I would advise him not to have any thing to do with it, for there must be forgery committed before the bill specially endorsed could be negotiated—I said there must be fraud in one case—and forgery in the other—neither of those was the bill in question, I never saw that.

ROBERT BAKER . I am acquainted with Fletcher. I introduced Lloyd, through Fletcher, to Wood, to have the bill discounted—it was about one o'clock, as near as I can say, at the Auction-mart—I took no notice of the conversation.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. An agent, Fletcher is not a friend of mine—I have known him ten or twelve yean—I heard of his being in trouble some time ago—he introduced me to Lloyd—I did not make a bargain about what I was to have for my trouble in the matter—I expected, if any business was done, I should have a commission—I did not stipulate for it—I had a friend in the parlour at the time, and went to him—I have been in the habit of getting bills discounted, but I knew nothing about foreign bills—I did not go to see the parties about the endorsement of the bill—Wood came and said he could not get the bill without giving an undertaking for it—I did not hear the prisoners say thing about the endorsement, as I was not there.

CHARLES WALLER . I am a City police inspector. While I was inquiring into this matter, on the subject of the 521. bill, I saw Willes, on a Saturday, at the station—I said nothing then—I saw him again on a Monday, and he said he knew all about it—I said, "All about what?"—he said he could put me in the way of apprehending the parties that broke into the place, and did it—he said he had bills in his possession—I asked him what bills—he said he had the three bills in his possession—I had the 52l. 10s. bill in my possession at the time, and showed it to him—he said that was one of them—I asked him where the other two were—he said they were burnt—I asked him how he knew that—he said he saw them burnt, that there was a quarrel among them, and that was the reason the other two were burnt

Cross-examined. Q. I believe Cunningham rendered you all the assistance in his power? A. He did. Willes was alone when we had the conversation.

COURT. Q. In what way did Cunningham render you assistance? A. He showed me the residence of Davis, Clarke, and Saint, where to find

them—I mean assistance as to the charge of housebreaking—I had no conversation with Cunningham about the endorsed bill—I took the three into custody by his information—I told Lloyd he was charged with the robbery as well as the forgery—he said he knew nothing about the forgery—this was after the examination before the Magistrate.

Willes. What I said was, that Packer told me he saw the two small bills burnt, and the 52l. bill I only had about five minutes in my possession. Witness. That is not so—he said he had the three bills in his possession, and he saw the two bills burnt, and a lot more papers besides as much as a little basket would hold.

Willes. I said I had heard there had been some papers burnt, but I had not seen them. Witness. You said you saw them burnt, and you had a quantity of papers in your possession, and that even Mr. Ruffy did not know what he had lost yet.

Willes. I said I understood there was a Long Annuity warrant for 500l. they had in their possession, but I had not seen it, you said there was no such thing lost, and I said, "Well, I have heard there was".

MR. RUFFY re-examined. There was in my place a certificate of a Government Annuity of 30l. which had been purchased for my sister—the consideration given for it was about 500l. or 600l.—that was not taken away from my place.

CHARLES MONRO JOHNSON . I am the acceptor of this bill—it was brought to me on the 19th of February, the day it was due, by Wood, who made a communication to me respecting it.

(Bill read.)—"Madeira, 13th December, 1841. At thirty days' sight, pay this first of Exchange—second and third not being paid—to John Taylor, Esq., or order value balance of port charges. To Mr. JohnsonRowland Martin. Payable at the London and Westminster Bank. Endorsed, J. RUFFY."

ROBERT HAMBLIN . I am a City policeman. On the evening of the 23rd, when Clarke, Saint, and Davis were taken into custody, I was going along Bishopsgate-street with Willes—it was raining at the time, and he voluntarily said, pointing to the umbrella I had, "I saw as many papers burnt belonging to Mr. Ruffy, as would fill that umbrella if it was inverted"—he said he had seen two bills burnt over a b—y quarrel between the parties.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you understand the burning took place? A. I do not recollect whether he said where it took place—I do not think I asked him—I have no recollection of it.

Q. Try and recollect yourself. Did you hear any thing about the Rum Puncheon? A. I have heard too much about it, but not at that time.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Where is the Rum Puncheon? A. In Rose and Crown-court, a few yards out of the City.

MR. PAYNE to CHARLES WALLER. Q. Do you remember Willes saying to Lloyd, "I took the bill to a person named Ruffy, to get the name written on the back?" A. There was something said I abort a bill taken to Mr. Ruffy, but I cannot recollect whether Willes said it or not—I did not hear it—I did not give Lloyd a pen and ink to write something down—I will swear I did not—nor a piece of paper—I saw nothing signed by Lloyd or Packer—Willes did not say when it was he knew of the Long Annuity—he said Mr. Ruffy was a foolish man; he did not know what he had lost, for there was as much

burnt as a basket would hold—he did not say when or where it was burnt.

Willes's Defence. As regards the forgery, I know nothing about it. It was taken away either by Lloyd or Cunningham, to get endorsed, and brought back again to the Auction-mart; and Cunningham hesitated to leave it with Wood. I said to Wood, "Give him an undertaking that you will return him the bill or money." I left the place and went to Brixton, where I had business. When I returned, I understood I was wanted, and I gave them every information I could, being in the habit of getting bills discounted. It was not for me to ask them about the bills. I introduced the parties to the party to discount them, and I have nothing more to do. They learn from the parties how to get them. As to the third bill in question, it never went to Cobet, but to Wood. With respect to asking them how they come by the bills, I have nothing to do with that; the party who discounts makes all these inquiries, and takes all the responsibility. I had it not in my possession five minutes. There seems to have been a mistake as to my seeing the papers burnt. I did not. I was told so by the landlord of the house; and it must be a misunderstanding of the officers. I might not have heard distinctly, being deaf. While they were gone to get the bill indorsed I was on business with other people at the Auction-mart; and when they came back, I said, "Leave it with Wood; if be gives you an undertaking to return the bill or the money." I have a character to lose, and I acted in the way I have said. I was not in the secret of the transaction; I only had to introduce the men to get the bill discounted; and it is hard I should be considered a party who stole the bill. It was morally impossible for me to tell how they came by them, and I was not to ask them; that was the business of the party discounting them. They should have gone to Mr. Ruffy, and asked if it was correct. I have not the slightest knowledge who did endorse it, or of the parties who committed the robbery, only from hearsay, from the landlord of the house, and the parties with me. I do not frequent the house. Lloyd came with his brother, and asked if I knew where he could get money on the bills; that he was in distress at the time, having his goods seized for rent. They were introduced to Wood in an indirect manner by me. I thought the thing was straightforward, and acted upon that impression as innocently as possible. While they went to get the bill endorsed, I stopped in the Auction-mart, in the tap-room, with other parties on business. When Wood was in custody I gave every information I was able; but was not aware there was any thing wrong till the policemen sent for me. I was out four or five days with them, till the parties were taken; then they turned round, and I was placed in custody with them. I forwarded every information I was in possession of to the proper quarter. I leave it in the hands of the Jury to decide if I was wrong—I did not know I was doing wrong.

THOMAS BROWN . I am an attorney, and live in No. 37, Cumberland-street, Hackney-road. I have known Willes fifteen years—I know he has been in the habit of getting bills discounted for parties—I have myself handed him thirty or forty bills in that period; some he has returned, not being able to get them discounted, and others he has got done—I know he was in the habit of going to the Auction-mart, to Baker's coffee-house, where a number of agents go—I have seen bills passed across there for the purpose of getting discounted.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How long have you been an attorney? A. I was admitted on the 28th of December, 1833—I have not taken out my certificate for four years, but I have it now—I was clerk to Mr. Atkinson of No. 27, Carey-street.

COURT. Q. Did you ever put in suit any of the bills you had from him? A. None whatever.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you carry on any business in Cumberland-street? A. I do not carry on business at all—I do not go to the Auction-mart except to see a few persons I know—I do no business there, either in discount or otherwise—I only go to see Mr. Spencer, a clerk in the Bank—I have not heard that any of the bills I saw pass there were stolen—it is the Auction. mart coffee-house—I was never there above twenty times—I do not know that it is called the tap—I should say it was the coffee-room—the tables are covered over with tablecloths, and dinner and lunch set out for gentlemen in the mart to come down and dine—it is not where the cads of the omnibuses go—I should say I have given from twenty to thirty bills to Willes—I got them from time to time—I have been in the habit of having bills given me to get discounted, and I gave them to him for that purpose—it is three or four years since I gave him a bill to discount, but I have seen him constantly since—I have known him fifteen years—I hare seen him in London-wall, and at No. 1, Bell-alley, and other places—I have not handed him bills at all those places—I have done so at Pledger's, at the Castle public-house, at Moorgate—they were bills put in my possession by my clients, to get discounted.

WILLES— GUILTY . Aged 42.

LLOYD— GUILTY . Aged 22.

CUNNINGHAM— GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Fifteen Years.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18420228-1051

1051. FREDERICK GERMAINE, GEORGE BRUCE , and SARAH PROBY , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Hunt, on the 9th of February, and stealing therein 1 tablecloth, value 1s. 6d., his property.

WILLIAM CLAY . I am a policeman. On Thursday morning, the 9th of February, I was going up York-street, Bedford-square, Commercial-road; the clock struck seven as I turned out of the square into York-street, it was just day-light—I saw Germaine and Bruce—Germaine had a bundle on his right arm, in a blue handkerchief—they were close together, side by side—I was running up the street—just as they got to the top of the street I laid hold of Germaine—Bruce turned his eye over his left shoulder, and seeing me, ran away—Germaine said, "You have got me at last, you have long wished it; I cannot halloo, I have been very lucky"—I took the bundle, and took him to the station; searched him, and found a skeleton key in his pocket—I charged him with having these things in his possession and not giving a satisfactory account—the bundle contained a counterpane and two sheets—I do not recollect his making any reply—after he was charged I went to search for Bruce—I went to a lodging-house, No. 15, rose-lane, Wentworth-street, Spitalfields—I went up into the top room, occupied by Bruce and Proby, and found him there, with Proby's sister—Bruce took his coat off, hung it across a line, and threw himself on the bed with the remainder of his clothes on, smoking a short pipe—I said "Get up, Bruce, I want you"—I knew him before—he said, "What for?"

—I said, "For being concerned in the robbery with Germaine, that you got away from me this morning"—Proby said, "Oh, George, I would see the b—d—before I would go with him"—he told her not to halloo—I then pot the handcuffs upon him, locked the door, and put the key into my pocket—I then commenced searching the room, and found three files in a cupboard—on searching further I found some duplicates, and asked proby what they were—she said they were all hers—one of them referred to a table-cloth pledged for 1s. 3d., at Mr. Soame's, in Brick-lane—I searched another room, but found nothing—I took Bruce and proby to the station, and charged them with being concerned with Germaine—I could not find any owner of the property that day—the skeleton key that I found on germaine opened the door of Mr. Hunt, no. 6, Alfred-place, Alfred-street, Stepney, who had been robbed of a tablecloth on the 9th.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Have you been drinking to-day? A. I have been in court all day—I told the magistrate that proby made use of the vulgar expressions I have named—my deposition was read over to me, and I swore it was correct; if clerks neglect putting down what is said I cannot help it—I left it to their better judgment—When it was read over they asked if I was content, and whether it was correct—I do not recollect their asking me whether I had anything to add, or correct—I will not swear they did not—(looking at his deposition)—This is my signature—(the witness's deposition being read, did not state any such expression)—I am confident I did tell the magistrate that Proby said so—I found seven duplicates; two have been r turned—I had them all in my hand when I asked Proby if they were hers.

Germaine. he said before, he took nothing but lucifer matches from me, and now he says he took nothing but a skeleton key. Witness. I did take a few lucifer matches both from you and from bruce—I saw you in York-street, with a bundle under your arm, half-a-mile from the house that was robbed, and about two doors from another house that was robbed—One house was opened one morning, and another the next—you had come out of Mrs. Nash's house, I am confident, for I found out next day that Mrs. Nash's house had been robbed, and you were only two house from it when Ki first saw you—I was in plain clothes, watching another party, but both you and bruce knew me.

HARRIET HUNT . I am the wife of John Hunt, of No. 6, Alfred-place, in the parish of Stepney. On Wednesday morning, the 9th of February, I got up about six o'clock, or a little after—I perceived a light on the stair-case before I got up—I had just awoke, and my bed room door was open—I hallooed out, "Hunt, is that you?" thinking at first it was my husband up, but he said, "No, I am here"—I said, "there is a light on the stairs"—we got up, my husband went down first, and I directly after—I found the street-door wide open, which I had locked the night before when I went to bed—i and my husband had gone to bed together about eleven—I missed a table-cloth from a chair in the par lour, which I had folded up and placed there between ten and eleven the night before, after supper—it was there when I went to bed—there was 18d. on the kitchen mantel-piece which was not taken, and a bundle on the stairs—I suppose my hallooing out "Who's that?" directly I saw the light, disturbed them—the street-door could not be opened from the outside without a key—This table-cloth now produced is ours—I know it by the way in which I folded it up and by a pickle stain on it—it is the one I have lost.

Germaine. Q. Is there any private mark on it? A. No, but I know it by the folds and the stain of pickled cabbage, and here are some stains of greens on it, which we had had for dinner—I can swear to it.

WILLIAM PARDOE BIDDLE. I am in the employ of Mr. Soames a pawnbroker, in Brick-lane, Spitalfields—I took this table-cloth in pledge from Proby on the 9th of February, in the name of Ann Carthy—I had seen her before, but not very often—I can swear to her—I took in two pledge at the same time of her—the duplicate I gave her has been produced by the officer.

WILLIAM CLAY re-examined. I found the duplicate of the table-cloth in the room where Proby and Bruce were—the key I found on Germaine opened Mrs. Nash's door and Mrs. Hunt's—it would open almost any door in that street—it opened my door.

Germaine's Defence. I know nothing of the table-cloth; I was never in the house in Rose-lane, and never saw the table-cloth; all they have indicted me for, is for having the key in my possession.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1052

1052. FREDERICK GERMAINE and GEORGE BRUCE were again indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Nash, on the 10th of February, at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias stepney, and stealing therein 1 counterpane, value 5s.; 1 tablecloth, value 2s.; and 2 sheets, value 4s.; her property: and 2 gowns, value 4s., the goods of Mary Raymond; and that Germaine had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM CLAY. I am a policeman. On Thursday, the 10th of February, about seven o'clock, I was going up York-Street, Commercial-road, and saw both the prisoners walking up the street as close together as they could walk—Germaine had a bundle on his right arm—I was running behind them—I overtook them at the top of the street, as they turned the corner—I laid hold of Germaine, bruce looked over his left shoulder, sat me, and ran away—I knew them both, and they knew me—I took germaine to the station, and found the bundle contained a counterpane and two sheets, marked "A. N."—He said somebody had asked him to carry them—I found a few lucifer matches on him, a small pocket knife, and a skeleton key—I afterwards went to where Bruce lodged, and found him there—I found some lucifer matches on him, and three files, a chisel, and crow-bar in the room—I took him to the station, and charged him with being concerned with Germaine—he said he knew nothing at all about it, it was not him—I tried this key to Mrs. Nash's door, which is about two doors from where I had seen the prisoners, and it unlocked the door it is in the parish of stepney.

ANN NASH. I am single, and live at No. 12, york-street, bedford-square, commercial-road. On Thursday morning, the 10th of February, I locked my street-door at pretty near two o'clock, that was before I wend to bed—I was the last person up—my servant got up first in the morning I got up about half-past nine—in consequence of information I received from my servant, I searched the house, and missed the articles stated these now produced are them—my name is on them—they were on the bed in my house the night before—my door could not be opened with out a key from the outside.

MARY RAYMOND . I am the prosecutrix's servant. On Thursday morning, the 10th of February, I got up about nine o'clock, and missed

my two frocks from a chair by my bedside—I missed the table-cloth out of the kitchen, when I went to get breakfast, and the bed-clothes off the bed—these now produced are them.

THOMAS HIGTON (police-constable K 272.) I produce a certificate of Germaine's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—he is the same person—I was present at his trial.

GERMAINE— GUILTY . Aged 19.

BRUCE— GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-1053

1053. WILLIAM HOMER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse of Thomas Clarke and another, on the 24th of February, at St. Botolph without Algate, and stealing therein 60lbs. weight of butter, value 20s., their property.

SAMUEL WAKELING (police-constable H 174.) On the 24th of February I was on duty in Nightingale-lane, Wapping, at eight o'clock in the evening, and met the prisoner there—he had a bag on his back—I asked what he had got in it—he said it was fat that he had got from on board a ship—I told him it was a late hour, he could not have come out of the Dock with it at that time of the night—be then said some chap had told him to meet him there, and he had been waiting for him above an boar—I asked him who he was—he said he did not know—I examined the bag, and it had 631bs. of damaged butter in it.

HENRY NOBLE . I am in the service of Mr. Duncan, a provision-merchant, who had a warehouse at No. 5, Lower East Smithfield—he has moved—on Tuesday, the 24th of February, I was at the warehouse—I locked it up I think about half-past six, or from that to seven o'clock, in the evening—there was a cask of butter, lard, and different things in it—I did not go to the warehouse again till Thursday morning—I then found every thing disturbed—I got in with a key—the door was locked—I missed nothing but the butter—I was shown some by Wakeling on Thursday morning—it was the same sort of butter that was in my master's warehouses—there is a passage out into East Smithfield by going through the warehouse—two windows from the counting-house look into the passage—you must go through the warehouse to get to the counting-house—one window opens with a small sash—a person could get in there—I found the window the same as I had left it, shut down, but there was no fastening to it—I found a little of the crumbs of the butter about the window—I traced the butter the footsteps had gone from the cask to the window, and they had scattered a little about.

JAMES DUNCAN . I live at No. 353, Wapping, and am a provision-agent to Thomas Clarke and another—the warehouse was at No. 5, Lower East Smithfield, in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldgate—it was their warehouse, but I have since given up possession—I saw the cask of butter there a few days before the robbery—it weighed 1cwt. and 7lbs.—the butter the constable has is the same description as was lost—I have weighed the cask since, and there is about 63lbs. deficiency.

Prisoner. I was in distress, and had no work. Witness. He appeared very much distressed, and very poor.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Nine Months.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18420228-1054

1054. JOHN PATTISON was indicted for a misdemeanor.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, March 8th 1842.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18420228-1055

1055. THOMAS BOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 1 watch, value 1l. 15s.; 1 chain, value is.; 1 key, value 6d.; and 2 seals, value 3s.; the goods of Thomas Hartwell, from his person.

THOMAS HARTWELL . I live in Dove-row, Hackney—I was at a public-house near St. John's-street, early in the morning on the 22nd of February—the prisoner came up to me and took the watch out of my pocket—I immediately pursued him, and called out, "Stop thief"—he was taken by a policeman—this is my watch—I am positive he is the man.

THOMAS DEANE (police-constable G 37.) I took the prisoner about a quarter-past one o'clock that morning, with the watch in his hand-be immediately threw it away—Payne, the other officer, took it up in my sight.

Prisoner's Defense. I was coming from the play; I heard three or four cry, "stop thief;" I ran, and the policeman asked me if I had robbed a man of a watch; I said, "What watch?" the gentleman tin came up, he asked if I took the watch from him, and he said he thought so; there was a young man passed that knew me, and he took him as well as me.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1056

1056. JEREMIAH LEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February, 1 handkerchief, value is. 1s. 6d., the goods of Edwin John Stone Kelloway, from his person.

EDWIN JOHN STONE KELLOWAY . I live at Kingsland—I had a handkerchief on the 13th of February—it was safe in the afternoon—I missed it between nine and ten o'clock—it has not been found—it was a yellow one.

WILLIAM PONTON . I am an engineer—I was walking in the stand, about ten o'clock in the evening of the 13th of February—I saw the prosecutor—the prisoner and another lad were walking close behind him—I watched them narrowly—I saw the prisoner step up behind the prosecutor and extract the handkerchief from his pocket—so close was I to him that I told the colour of the handkerchief—he immediately gave it into the possession of another lad—I almost fell over the second lad, but seized this one, and held him till I gave him to the constable—i am sure the prisoner took it, and gave it to another—it was a light handkerchief—i could not say positively that it was yellow.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What were they doing that induced you to suspect them? A. as the prosecutor vended in and out to go away from the people, the prisoner did so likewise, and I saw him reach out his hand once or twice—i did not tell the magistrate that—I

saw him lift the skirts of the coat tail, and immediately take the hahdkerchief out—I was within two feet of him—I did not take hold of him, as be was too quick about it—it might be a yellow one—it was a light handkerchief—my wife was with me—she had not hold of my arm.

JOHN TALBOT (police-constable F 146.) I took the prisoner, and found a white handkerchief on him, and a pair of gloves—he said, "The handkerchief has no mark on it," and it has.

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18420228-1057

1057. WILLIAM COLE and JAMES MARCH were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February, 1 pair of trowsers, value 6s., the goods of Abraham Phillips; and that they had been before convicted of felony.

ABRAHAM PHILLIPS . I am a clothes-salesman, and live in High-street, Shadwell—at half-past eight o'clock on the 18th of February, I missed a pair of trowsers from outside the door—they were safe half-an-hour before—some one gave me information—I ran after cole and brought him back—I said, "have you stolen a pair of throwers?"—he said he had not—I did not find them on him.

EDWARD DEAN . I am shopboy to Mr. Dean, a butcher, opposite the prosecutor's—I saw the prisoners waiting about at the shop, talking to one to other, till about twenty minutes to nine o'clock.

WILLIAM JAMES ADAMS (police-constable K 53.) On the 18th of February, about half-past nine, I was at the station—March came to ask if one mean was locked up—I said yes, and he answering the description that I heard of the person who stole the trowsers, I detained him.

ENEAS McALLEN (police-constable K 95.) At half-past eight Cole was given into my charge for stealing a pair of trowsers—I asked where he lived—be said in Rose-lane, Spitalfields—I inquired, and he did not live there—I found nothing on him.

JOHN CUNNINGHAM . I am shop man to Mr. Bidden, in High-street—at half-past eight that morning, I saw Cole take the trowsers from Mr. Phillips's door, and hand them to March, who ran off with them—I ran over directly to tell Mr. Phillips.

Cole. Q. Which arm did I take them down with? A. I do not know.

Cole's Defence. My right arm has been bad these three months, and I was not able to pull them down.

March's Defence. I was not passing by the place at the time.

WILLIAM EADE . I produce a certificate of march's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office—(read)—he is the person.

WILLIAM KENCHETT (police-constable G 26.) I produce a certificate of Cole's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office—(read)—he is the person.

Cole. I am not the person. Witness. I swear he is.

COLE— GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

MARCH— GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years—convict ship .

Reference Number: t18420228-1058

1058. PRISCILLA O'CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of Februry,7 shawls, value 4l.; 2 gowns, value 18s.; 8 yards of printed cotton, value 1s.; 2 petticotas, value 3s.; 1 clock, value 16s.; 1 bonnet, value 6s.; 1 watch-key, value 4s.; 2 purses, value 4d.; 1 sovereign; 1 half-sovereign; 40 half-crowns; and 100 shillings; the property of Thomas Jones, her master.

MARGARET JONES . I am the wife of Thomas Jones, a milkman who lives in Compton-passage, Clerkenwell—the prisoner was in his service—at a quarter before four o'clock on Sunday afternoon, the 27th of February, I came home, and the prisoner was gone—I missed seven shawls and the other articles stated in the indictment—my box was broken open—some of the things are here—they are mine—I missed 10l. in silver, and 1l. 10s. in gold.

Prisoner. I have never been a servant to her—she asked me to lend her 7l., to furnish two rooms, and on Wednesday I gave her warning that I would leave on Sunday afternoon—the clothes that she has claimed do not fit her. Witness. she had been my servant, she came to me on Monday afternoon and did this on the Sunday—I do not let furnished lodgings—it is not true that she gave me warning to leave—I will take my oath these are my clothes.

JAMES WELLINGTON. I live in Denton-buildings, chapel-street. On Sunday night, the 27th of February, I was driving a cab. no. 211—I was in Pantone-street—a man passed towards my cab—I asked whether he wanted my cab—he said, "Yes"—he opened my door, and got in—he told me to go on—I went on till I came to the corner of Park-street—he then went into the public-house there, and I followed—I saw the prisoner and another female very much in liquor—the bar maid assisted them out—they got into the cab with assistance—the man then ordered me to George-yard, against the Angel-inn—I drove them there—the other female then got out, and the man ordered me to the new-road—I was going there, and he ordered me to drive to the patriots public-house at the bed of the White Conduit house—they did not go in there, but he went on to the third house from there, and told me to get a light, which I did at that house—I then saw a quantity of silver at the bottom of the cab—the prisoner and the man were in the cab—the man picked up the silver—the prisoner held a bag, and the man put the money into it—the prisoner said it was hers—the man of the house then came out, and began to abuse me for knocking at his door and asking for a candle—he snatched it out of my hand—I then told the prisoner if she could not tell me where to go I would take them both to the station—she ordered me to No. 9, Angel-court—I was proceeding towards there, they called to me to stop at the Rodney arms public-house—I did so, the prisoner wanted a glass of the best rum, and I was to get what I liked—I got a drop of gin, and as I thought she had bad quite enough spirits, I got her a glass of vinegar which I thought would sober her—I demanded ray fare—she broke a glass, and wanted me to drive round high gate till she got sober—i would not, but spoke to the policeman.

JAMES M'LACHLAN . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner the man—I found 2l. 6s. in silver, and 1l. 10s. in gold in the cab.

HENRY BERESFORD . I am a police-inspector. The prisoner was brought to the station—I found this bag with 5l. 12s. 2d. in the bosom and she had these clothes on, which the prosecutrix claims—she started she was a lady just come from France.

Prisoner. I told you I lived with a French lady—I lived two year and seven months with her; my mother has been an independent lady; I was told to go to this woman to lodge, and on the Wednesday she asked

me for this money, and said the two rooms up stairs she would let furnished; I took my things on Sunday afternoon out of her house—I never robbed her; if my mistress was here she would not allow me to stand here.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18420228-1059

1059. WILLIAM ASKEW was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February, 1 saw, value 1s. 6d.; 1 stock, value 6s.; 1 bit, value 6d.; 1 plane value 1s. 6d.; and 1 screw-driver, value 6d.; the goods of Peter Spender: and 1 saw, value 6s.; and 1 plane, value 2s.; the goods of John Crawley.

PETER SPENDER. I am a carpenter, and live in London-street. I had a plane, stock, bit, saw, and screw-driver, safe on the 26th of February—I left them on Saturday night, at seven o'clock, in a building where. I was it work at Kensington, and on Monday morning we found the building burst open, and the things gone—they are here—these four are mine, I will swear—we found this iron instrument on the work-bench, which would break the place open.

BENJAMIN WOODWARD . On the 28th of February, the prisoner came to me, represented himself as a carpenter, and asked me to buy these tools—I said I did not care much about them—he said he was going to van Diemen's-land, emigrating, and gave me his address—I gave him 9s. for them.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not show them to you in a public-house? A. No, you came to me at my own door—it was day-light.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a poor man in distress, by the Docks; he said he was a carpenter, and had some tools to sell; he wanted 6s. for them, I gave him 4s.

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1060

1060. GEORGE BIGNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December, 1 coat, value 4l.; 2 waistcoats, value 1l.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 1l.; 1 watch, value 3l.; 2 breast-pins and chain, value 1l.; 1 stock, value 2s.; and 1 shirt, value 1s.; the goods of Henry Pape.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY PAPE . I am a pianoforte-maker, and live in Queen-street, Golden-square. On the 21st of December I missed these articles from a drawer in my apartment—the prisoner lodged in the story below me—in consequence of suspicion, I mentioned it to him two days afterwards, and on the day after I mentioned it, he quitted his lodging—I did not see him any more, till he was in custody at the Post-office at Charing-cross—this watch now produced is my property, and this shirt—my name is on it—Mrs. Clark keeps the house.

JOHN LANGRISH . I am in the employ of Mr. Tate, a pawnbroker. I received this watch in pledge on the 21st of December, from the prisoner, for 5s., in the name of John Hignell, No, 8, Windmill-street—he said it was his own.

JAMES BEASELY (police-constable A 67.) In consequence of information I went to the Post-office at Charing-cross—I found the prisoner, and took him—I searched his lodging, at No. 8, Brewer-street, Pimlico, and found this shirt there.

GUILTY Aged 23.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18420228-1061

1061. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 12 dead fowls, price 1l. 10s., the goods of John Kent Walter.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

FRANCIS TRIGG . I live in White Rose-place, Lower Whitecross street, and am a porter at New gate-market. On the 25th of February, about six o'clock in the morning, I put twelve fowls into a hamper, which I placed on the top of another hamper in Mr. Walter's cart, in Newgate street, at the corner of the Old Bailey—it was just day-break—I had occasion to go away for about a quarter of an hour—on my return I missed the fowls and hamper—I went up and told Mr. Walter directly—among the fowls which I had put in, there were three small ones—I afterwards saw the twelve fowls in the possession of the constable, at worship-street—I am certain they were the same.

JOHN KENT WALKER . I am a poulterer, and live at Pimlico. Trigg assisted me in Newgate-market—on Friday morning I had a cart there—Trigg came and told me he missed twelve fowls—I afterwards saw then in the possession of a constable.

GEORGE TREW . I am a policeman. At a quarter to seven o'clock that morning I saw the prisoner in Rose-lane, Spitalfields, in company with another person—the prisoner had a basket on his shoulder—I asked what he had got—he said twelve fowls, which he had bought in Newgate-market, of a man from Dorking, and gave 15s. for them—I took him—the other was taken, but discharged at the office—I asked the prisoner if be should know the man again—he said, "Yes"—I asked him to go and point the man out—he said it was no use, he was gone—among the twelve fowls, there were three small ones—I showed them to Mr. Walter, and to Trigg, and Trigg identified them.

Prisoner. I get my living by selling poultry; I was in Newgate-market—I went into a coffee-shop, and a man asked if I would buy them—there were several persons about buying them—a man offered him 14s. for them—I offered him 15s.—I put them into my basket, and was going on towards Montague-street.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1062

1062. WILLIAM MILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March, 45lbs. weight of beef, value 1l. 10s., the goods of Benjamin Lasbury.

MR. CLARKSON Conducted the Prosecution,

JAMES PELLATT (police-constable D 173.) At a quarter to nine o'clock on Thursday night last, I was on duty in Phillimore-place, Kensington—I saw the prisoner walking down Phillimore-mews—I followed him down and when he came to a gas-light, I saw he had something on his shoulder—I stopped him, and asked what he had got—he said, "Nothing—he was not drunk—I said I thought he had something that was not right, and he dropped 45lbs. weight of beef from his shoulder—I detained him—the beef was shown to Mr. Lasbury.

BENJAMIN LASBURY . I keep a butcher's shop in Kensington. I saw a piece of beef the next morning—it was part of the rump and loin—it was mine—I had seen it safe between five and six o'clock last Thursday

evening—I missed it when I came home about ten—it is worth about 30s.—I swear it was mine.

Prisoner. I was very drunk at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1063

1063. HENRY REDDING was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July, 3 printed books, value 3l., the goods of Thomas Hague; and 3 printed books, value 3/., the goods of John Prescott Knight.

JOHN HAGUE being called on his recognizances, did not answer.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1064

1064. JOHN M'GANNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March, 1 foot 3 inches of lead pipe, value 6d., the goods of James M'Sparran.

MR. CLARKSON Conducted the Prosecution,

JAMES M'SPARRAN . I am a plumber, living in King Edward-street, Wapping. at twenty minutes past seven o'clock on the 2nd of March, in consequence of something I heard I went to my shop—I saw the window was raised, and immediately after, the prisoner came to the window—I waited a little while, and there was another boy there—the prisoner reached in and took this piece of pipe, which is about fifteen inches long—this is it—I went round the corner, and caught him running away—he threw it from him—he bit me.

Prisoner. Q. What cap had I on? A. I cannot say what sort it was.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the street, and saw two young men in the road; I came up to them, and this man made a rush at one of them; he ran off through the alley, and the prosecutor came and caught me; I never had the pipe; I bit him because he seized me by the handkerchief, and nearly strangled me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1065

1065. ROBERT HIDE and DENNIS M'SWEENEY were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February, 2lbs. weight of sugar, value 1s.; 1/2 lb. weight of coffee, value 1s.; 1/4 lb. weight of tobacco, value 1s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 5d.; the goods of John Allen, in a certain boat upon the navigable river Thames.

HENRY STOTTER . I am "Jack in the water" at Cole's-stairs, Shadwell—I know Hide. At half-past five o'clock on Monday evening, the 14th of February, I saw Mr. Hope's boat come to the stairs—I was in the watch-boat stern—M'Sweeney was half way up the alley—Hide went into the boat stern, and fetched a bundle in a red handkerchief, and put it into a basket, and went up with it to M'Sweeney, who was in the alley.

(the prosecutor did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18420228-1066

1066. JAMES PRITCHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March, 1 gown, value 4d.; 1 petticoat, value 4d.; 3 printed books, value 4d.; the goods of George Ingram: and 1 copper, value 5s., the goods of John Lucas Marks.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution,

JOHN HINE (police-constable F 118.) About three o'clock in the afternoon of the 1st of March I was in short's-gardens—I saw the prisoner carrying a bag under his arm—I went up, and asked what he had there—

he threw it down on my toes, and ran away—I ran after him—I did not lose sight of him—he was caught in Great St. Andrew-street—I took him back to the bundle, and found a person taking care of it—I opened it in his presence—it contained a gown, copper, petticoat, and some books.

MARY ANN INGRAM . I am the wife of George Ingram, a printer, living in Middle-street, Smithfield. On Friday last I went to the station, and saw a copper, which I had missed on the Tuesday before—it was fitted in the kitchen, when it was safe—I lost some books, a gown, a petticoat, and some letters—i found them in the copper—Mrs. Caffrey had left them in my care—my landlord is John Lucas Marks.

ISABELLA CAFFREY . I am the wife of a soldier, and live in Bird-court, London-wall. In consequence of information I went with ingram to the station—I saw the books, a gown, and three letters—they are mine—i had left them in charge of Mrs. Ingram about a fortnight before.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a shipmate in the Strand; he gave me some beer; I turned up short's-gardens; he wished me to carry this for him, which I did; the policeman came up to me; I turned, and the person was making his escape; I thought it was advisable for me to do so.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1067

1067. HARRIET BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January, 2 sheets, value 4s.; 2 blankets, value 8s.; 1 bed-tick, value 6s.; candlestick, value 1s.; 1 tea-kettle, value 1s.; and 1 coffee-not, value 1s.; the goods of Maria Mann.

MR. Clarkson conducted the prosecution.

MARIA MANN . I formerly lived in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell—while I was living there the prisoner had a furnished lodging of me—she had a female companion—they quitted on the 20th of January, without giving at any notice, in the middle of the night—I afterwards missed these things from their room—this sheet is mine.

RICHARD HENRY CLOUD . I am in the service of Mr. Fleming, a pawnbroker, in Farringdon-street. This sheet was pledged, I believe, by the prisoner on the 22nd of February, for 1s. 6d.—this is the duplicate I gave for it.

CHARLES ELLIOTT (police-constable G 132.) I took the prisoner as Monday last—she was taken to the station, and searched—I after wards received a duplicate from the searcher—I returned it to the searcher again.

MARY ANN REDMAN . I am searcher at the Clerkenwell station, I searched the prisoner, and found on her the duplicate of the sheet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18420228-1068

1068. CHARLES CARTWRIGHT and CHARLES CONNOLLY were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Crane on the 22nd of February, at Hendon, and stealing therein, 4 gowns, value 1l. 10s.; 1 gown-skirt, value 1s.; 2 waistcoats, value 1s.; 1 pettcoat, value 1s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 6s.; 1 jacket, value 3s.; 3shawls, value 15s.; 1 coat, value 3s.; 1 tobacco-box, value 9d.; 3lbs. weight of pork, value 1s.; 6lbs. weight of bee