Old Bailey Proceedings, 2nd March 1840.
Reference Number: t18400302
Reference Number: f18400302

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

SESSIONS PAPER.

MARSHALL, MAYOR.

FIFTH SESSION, HELD MARCH 2ND, 1840.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

Taken in Short-hand

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

WILLIAM TYLER, PRINTER, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

1840.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

Held on Monday, March 2nd, 1840, and following Days.

Before the Right Honourable Sir CHAPMAN MARSHALL, Knt.; LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Parke, Knt., one of the Barons of her Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Edward Hall Alderson, Knt., one other of the Barons of Her Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Williams, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart.; Sir William Heygate, Bart.; William Thompson, Esq.; William Taylor Copeland, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City: Thomas Johnson, Esq.; John Lainson, Esq.; James White, Esq.; Michael Gibbs, Esq.; John Johnson, Esq.; George Carroll, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

John Bousley

Alexander Fenn

Thomas Merry

Peter Gentle

Daniel Gibson

Charles Felgate

John Millidge

Henry Austin

John Nott

Joseph Harris

John Allingham

William John Hewitson

Second Jury.

Thomas Helme

William Hart

William Hudson

William Ellis Goold

Robert Ovenden

Joseph Harris

Alfred Hempstead

Charles Ambridge

John Wilson Newall

William Good

Third Jury.

Seth Johnson

John Jackson

William Pay

Robert Vallance

Peter Kevan

Edward King

Benjamin Baber

Henry Parke

James Lester

James Mash

John Devonish

Edward William Lilley

Fourth Jury.

Robert Hewitt

Richard Hutchinson

Joseph Peake

Joseph Hillen

John Toswell

Owen Eyles

John Payne

Joseph Luff

William Beckett

Edward James

Thomas Roberts

Thomas Ebditch

Fifth Jury.

John Moore

Richard Howard

Jeremiah Clarke

Joseph James Assender

James Leach

W. Hodson Griffin

John Charles Edkins

Thomas Greenwood

John Leonard Matthews

John Hopkins

John Hawkes

William Evans

Sixth Jury.

William Fielder

Joseph Fennell

John Owen

Henry Lovelock

John Sutton

Charles Mayne

Richard Tuack

Joseph Gibbons

George Green

Thomas Guest

William Mortes

Isaac Jocelyne

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

MARSHALL, MAYOR. FIFTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—Two stars (**), that they have been more than once in custody—An obelisk (†) that a prisoner is known to be the associate of bad characters.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, March 2nd, 1840.

First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18400302-783

783. JOHN MATTHEWS was indicted for assaulting a girl under ten years of age, with intent, &c—2nd COUNT, for a common assault; the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY to 2nd COURT . Aged 31.— Confined Six Months in the Penitentiary.

(MR. CLARKSON, for the Prosecution, offered no evidence en the First COUNT.)

Reference Number: t18400302-784

784. JOHN NOYES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January, 1 coat, value 42s., the goods of Donald Robertson.

DONALD ROBERTSON . I live in Francis-place, Westminster, with my mother, who is a laundress. On Saturday morning, the 25th of January, I was driving my mother's cart, in Broad-street, City, delivering linen at the City of London Club-house—I was absent from the cart about ten minutes, and my atteption was called to my coat, which I left in the cart—Sarah Knight was there, and asked me, in the prisoner's presence, if I missed my coat—I said, "Yes"—she said, "That is the young man that took it"—he said he had never seen it—he was given into custody.

SARAH KNIGHT . I live in Camomile-street, with my husband. On the evening of the 25th of January I was in Broad-street, about twelve yards from the club-house—I noticed a cart at the door, and saw the prisoner get up on the step, and take the coat off the seat—it was rolled up—he ran across the road, and gave it to another lad—I went after him—he was apprehended without my losing sight of him—he turned up Winchester-street, and asked me if that was Winchester-street—I followed him to Long-alley, and he then asked me what I was following him for—I said he had taken a coat off a cart in Broad-street—he said he had never been in Broad-street, and did not know where it was, and he would go back with me, which he did—I waited by the cart about ten minutes—Robertson came out, and I asked if he had lost his coat—he went to the cart to look for it, where I had teen it taken from—I am certain the prisoner is the person who took it.

HENRY WILSON (City police-constable, No. 34.) Robertson gave the prisoner into my charge—I was fetched out of Threadneedle-street to take him, by the porter of the club-house.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, declaring his innocence, and stating that the witness must be mistaken, in supposing him to be the person; that he was proceeding to Winchester-street in search of a situation when he was stopped.)

GUILTY .† Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-785

785. RICHARD BUTTERFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Thomas Hilliard; and 1 pewter pot, value 2s., the goods of James Law; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-786

786. JAMES WHITAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Clarke, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-787

787. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February, 76 yards of carpet, value 12l., the goods of Richard Perkins, in his, dwelling-house.

RICHARD PERKINS . I am an upholsterer, and live in Upper-street, Islington. On the morning of the 14th of February, my lad gave me information—I went to the station-house, and found a roll of carpet—this is it—(looking at it)—it is mine.

SAMUEL REEVES . I am in the prosecutor's service. On the morning of the 14th of February, about nine o'clock, I was coming down stairs, and saw two men in the lobby of the shop—one man lifted up a roll of carpet on the shoulder of the prisoner—their backs were towards me—they went out together, the prisoner carrying the carpet—I came up to him three doors off—the other man went away—I followed, and saw the prisoner stopped by a policeman, about twenty doors off, without losing sight of him—the lobby is within the outer door of the shop—the carpet was about six feet within the outer door.

EMUND CHICHELEY (police-constable N 199.) I stopped the prisoner about twenty doors from the shop—I saw the carpet lying down—Reeves was pursuing him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in distress, and labouring under disease at the time, which threw me out of employ; I was obliged to resort to something, as I could not get into an hospital.

GUILTY of Larceny only. Aged 21.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-788

788. MARY NATHAN and MARY NORRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February, 1 purse, value 1s.; 4 half-crowns, and 5 shillings; the property of Patrick Dooley, from the person of Grace Dooley.

GRACE DOOLEY . I am the wife of Patrick Dooley, and live in Golden-lane. On the night of the 1st of February I went to a butcher's shop in White cross-street and bought a leg of mutton, which came to 5s.—I changed a sovereign, and got 15s. change—I put the money into my purse, and put it into my pocket—I then went to a green-stall—the prisoners were standing there, close by my side—I purchased a bundle of turnips there and paid 1 1/2 d., which I had in my pocket—I took the 1 1/2 d. out of my pocket—the purse and money were in my pocket then—I then bought some parsnips, and when I came to pay for them I missed my purse—I said,

and took him into custody—the prosecutor had given me a description of "My G—d, I am robbed of my purse and money"—the prisoners ran away directly I said so—I went down to Whitecross-street, but could not see them—I afterwards returned to the green-stall, and requested the green-grocer's wife to go along with me—I afterwards saw the prisoners in Whitecross-street, and they were taken into custody by an officer—it was a long silk purse that I lost—it contained four halt-crowns, and five shillings.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You have not seen the purse since, have you? A. No; it has not been found—I was away about half an hour from the green-stall—I got Mrs. Teagle to go with me—the prisoners were taken into custody about the middle of Whitecross-street—the green-stall was at the top of Whitecross-street, near Old-street—the prisoners were standing up behind two women when the officer took them—I am quite sure when I put my hand into my pocket for the 1 1/2 d. to pay for the turnips, that my purse and money were there—when I was dealing for the parsnips Mr. Teagle was on my right-hand, and his wife and the two prisoners on my left—MRS. Morris, a friend of mine, was along with me—during the half-hour I went away, I did my best to find them—I did not go to the butcher's shop then, I did afterwards—the policeman took me there to see whether they had given me the money or not—there were not many people about that night—it was Saturday night, and about half-past ten o'clock—I did not accuse any body else of having taken my money.

MARGARET TEAGLE . I am the wife of William Teagle, of No. 4, Turk's Head-court, Golden-lane. We keep a green-stall—on Saturday night the 1st of February, between ten and eleven o'clock, Mrs. Dooley bought a bundle of turnips of us—she paid my husband 1 1/2 d.—she took the money from her right-hand pocket—when she paid for them she asked for some parsnips—at the time she was bargaining for them she kept her gown up in her left-hand—I saw the two prisoners—Norris was bargaining with my husband for some broccoli sprouts—Nathan stood next to Mrs. Dooley, and Norris next—I saw Nathan's hands in the prosecutrix's pocket, and when she went to pay for the parsnips she exclaimed, "Good G—d! I am robbed"—the prisoners went away directly without purchasing the brocoli sprouts—I did not go with Mrs. Dooley the first time—she went by herself first—she came back and insisted on my going with her, which I did—we went to the bottom of Whitecross-street, and as we came back again we saw the two prisoners behind two women—I pointed them out to the officer—Nathan said, "See, I am done," and Norris said" Good G—d! my child."

Cross-examined. Q. Had he taken them into custody at the time she said that? A. No—he was in the road close to them, going to take them—I had never seen them before—I am sure they are the same persons—I never took my eyes off Nathan—I saw her band in the pocket—I could not put my hand on her because I was on the other ride of the stall—I did not tell Mrs. Dooley of it till they went away—my husband was standing at the other end of the stall, attending to one of the prisoners—I could not get across the place to tell him—they went away the moment the prosecutrix said she was robbed—I am sure Nathan said, "See, I am done,"—I cannot be mistaken in the words—MRS. Dooley came back in about half-an-hour to the best of my opinion—when the prisoners were

taken they were about the middle of Whitecross-street—my stall was at the top, just upon Old-street—they had been and purchased some things—they had nothing with them when at my stall.

CHARLES BEAUMONT . I am a policeman. On the night of the 1st of February, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was on duty in Whitecross-street—MRS. Teagle gave me some information, in consequence of which I went with her and Dooley into Whitecross-street—when we got into Play-house-yard Mrs. Dooley pointed out the two prisoners to me, both together—I went up to them, and seized them both by the arms—I had said nothing at that moment—Nathan said, "We are done, see"—Norris said, "Oh my child!"—I then told them what they were charged with, and they denied it—Norris had a basket with her, containing various small articles of grocery.

HARRIET HAYWOOD . I am female searcher at the station-house, and the wife of John Haywood. On Saturday, the 1st of February, the prisoners were brought in custody to Featherstone-street station-house—I searched them, and found two half-crowns and 2 1/2 d. in Nome's bosom, and 2 1/2 d. in Nathan's bosom—she said that was all she had—on searching further she dropped a shilling—she said "There is another shilling"—I then told her I wished to look into her hand—she said she had got no more—I said, "I must see," and she had a half-crown in her left hand—she said a gentleman gave it to her.

NATHAN— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

NORRIS— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-789

789. JOHN BOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Frederick Simmonds, from his person.

FREDERICK SIMMONDS . I am a porter, and live in Green-street, Leicester-square. On the night of the 16th of February I was in Beech-lane, Barbican—I felt something at my pocket, turned round, and saw three persons behind me—the prisoner was one—he was nearest to me—he was going to step off the gutter into the street, when I turned round and charged him with stealing my handkerchief—he said he bad not—I renewed the charge, and he then drew it from his pocket and gave it to me—this it—(locking at it)—I told him I would give him in charge—he then ran away up a court—I followed him nearly to the door—as he was going up the court he hallooed for his father several times, and he was let into a house—there are only two houses in the court—I gave information to the policeman, who went to the first house—there were only two children there—he then went to the other house, and found the prisoner sitting upstairs with his jacket and cap off—when he put them on I knew him again—it was a velveteen jacket—I am sure he is the same person.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had you ever seen him before? A. No—I could not have sworn to him without his jacket and cap—when he put them on I knew him to be the same person—it was on Sunday evening, about ten o'clock—there were several people passing—I was coming from Finsbury-square to Smithfield—I am quite sure this is my handkerchief—here is my name on it—I have no doubt at all of the prisoner.

THOMAS FOWLES (City police-constable, No. 306.) The prosecutor called my attention to a house in Foundry-court—I went to one house, and only found two little girls there—I went to the other, found the prisoner,

his dress—he put his jacket on—there was a man and woman in the room with him, who I do not know.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-790

790. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 8s., the goods of Abraham Hort, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-791

791. HENRY MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March, 1839, 1021bs. weight of gold dust, value 5000l.; 2 wooden boxes, value 2s.; and 2 tin boxes, value 2s.; the property of James Hartley and others; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 42.— Confined One Day.

(There were other Counts varying the manner of stating the charge.)

Reference Number: t18400302-792

792. GEORGE SAMS and GEORGE CANNON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February, 3 shirts, value 3s.; 4 yards of flannel, value 6s.; and 1 shawl, value 1s.; the goods of Ann Sidell.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Thomas William Gent.

ANN SIDELL . I am a widow, and keep a lodging-house in Friday-street, Cheapside. The prisoners lodged with me at different times for about two months—in the room where Cannon slept there was a box belonging to Mr. Thomas William Gent, containing clothes and books—it was left in my care—on the 13th of February the prisoner Sams was in Cannon's room in the evening for two hours—the box was kept in the room Cannon slept in—I heard a noise of knocking, as if with a hammer, while they were in the room—Noble, a policeman, lodges in the same room with Cannon—he came home on the 14th—in consequence of what he told me I went up stairs into Cannon's room, and Noble lifted up the lid of the chest—a gimlet and hammer laid there, the hammer belonged to me, the gimlet to Sams—I keep the hammer generally in the skullery, at the back of the kitchen—I directed my daughter to mark some shirts, shawls, flannels, and a handkerchief, which were still in the box—shortly afterwards the prisoner Sams went up into that room—he stopped there about half-an-hour—when be came down I desired my daughter to go up stairs to see if anything was gone—these are part of the articles—(looking at them.)

Sams. I took the hammer up to knock a pannel in the wainscoting of the room, which I was obliged to take out, to get Cannon from one bed into another, and the gimlet I had to put the nails into the piece of wood again.

JOHN ORBELL . I am shopman to Daniel Reeve, a pawnbroker, in Redcross-street On the 16th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner Cannon in the shop, in company with Sams, who stood behind him—Cannon pledged these three flannel shirts, in the name of John Gent, for 6s.—this is the counterpart of the duplicate I gave.

ELIZA ANN SIDELL . I live with my mother. These articles are the same I marked in Mr. Gent's chest, on the morning of the 14th—I missed them about five minutes after Sams went out—I had seen Cannon about five minutes before Sams went out, in the kitchen—he was not out when I marked the things.

JAMES STOCKFORD (City police-constable, No. 326.) On the 14th of February I was sent for to Mrs. Sidell's house, and in consequence of what she said I waited in the kitchen for the return of the prisoners—they came in together, about a quarter past five o'clock—I told Mrs. Sidell to tax them

with this, in consequence of what I had seen in the box—she did so—they denied it—I searched Sams, and in his watch-fob I found these four duplicates, one of the shirts now produced, and the flannels—I then went with Mrs. Sidell's daughter to different pawnbrokers, and found the things produced—I found a key on Sams—I searched his box, and found a screw-driver and a lock, which appeared to have been taken off Mr. Gent's box—another lock was placed on—this is the key of the lock now placed on the chest.

SAMS— GUILTY . Aged 19.

CANNON— GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Monday, March 2nd, 1840.

Fifth Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18400302-793

793. DANIEL IVES was indicted for embezzlement.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

RICHARD JOHN ROWAN . I am clerk to Messrs. Arrowsmiths, upholsterers, of New Bond-street. On the 3rd of August the prisoner called, and I paid him 6l. 12s. on account of his master, Mr. Whittingham—he wrote a receipt for it in my presence.

ROBINSON JACKSON . I am an upholsterer, and live in New Bond-street. On the 10th of August I paid the prisoner 11l. 6s. on account of Mr. Whittingham—he gave me a memorandum for it—on the 9th of November he came again, and I paid him by a cheque 6l. 11s. 6d. for his master.

JOSEPH WHITTINGHAM . I am a lace and fringe manufacturer, and live in West-street, Long-acre. The prisoner was in my service nearly two years—it was his duty to collect money and pay it to me—he has not accounted to me for either of the sums mentioned by the two witnesses—he never gave any account of them till I found he had received them, which was in consequence of information I received by a letter in January.

COURT. Q. What was his mode of accounting to you? A. As soon as he came home, if it was in the middle of the day—I had never spoken to him about either of these sums, except about two months before January I told him to go to Bailey and Jackson's, and he said it would be more to my advantage to let the account go a twelvemonth, than pushing it at a short time, as they were beginners.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How long have you been in business? A. About eleven or twelve years—the prisoner had been in my employ nearly two years—he has not been the means of adding to my business, quite different—I had commenced another branch of business before he came to me, but I had him to superintend that business—I had thirty or forty persons in my employ—none of them were in a superior situation to the prisoner—he was the head of the fringe department—he had the giving out orders—my wife is not here—she had a subpoena from the prisoner to attend here last Sessions, but she was unable to attend, and the trial was put off—she has not had a subpoena this Sessions—she is not well—I expect she will be confined before I get home—she was up when I came out, and down stairs—I came out about nine o'clock—she had break-fasted in bed, and came down afterwards—it was the prisoner's duty, on all occasions, to account to me, unless, by chance, he might give it to Mrs. Whittingham—he has at times given money to her—I have not complained of his doing so—I considered him justified in doing it—I went into Yorkshire on the 7th or 8th of August last—I had thirty or forty persons in my

employ at that time—they all received wages on Saturday night—I said I might be gone a fortnight, but I was gone nearly three weeks—during the time I was gone no one received any accounts from my customers but the prisoner, and it was his duty to account to Mrs. Whittingbam—my servants received about 20l. a week wages—I had left funds for the payment of wages in Mrs. Whittingham's hands—I think I left about 100l. in her hands for wages, and for payment of a bill of about 22l.—I do not recollect any thing else that was to be paid—it was the prisoner's place, as well as mine, to keep the books, and especially during the last year, on account of my illness—I was a good deal confined to my bed, and during that time my wife acted more than usual—I did keep the books during the year—when money is paid I bring it into another column in my ledger, and in the day-book I put "paid" to it, to save me from entering it in the ledger, when there is no running account—I have not omitted to put "paid" or "settled" to an account for three months—perhaps when I have been in bed I have entered it in a memorandum-book—I remember there was a running account in the name of Piggott, but I am not aware of any mistake about that—I entered that account in the cash-book—MR. Jackson's was a running account—I had a conversation with the prisoner about that account.

MR. DOANE. Q. Were you in Yorkshire on the 3rd of August, or the 9th of November? A. No—after I had ascertained about these sums, I said to the prisoner, "I want those two sums you received of Messrs. Jackson"—he said, "I have been going to speak to you about them"—I said, "I want the money"—he said, "I will pay you 10s. a week"—I said, "Nothing will do but the money," and I walked out of the shop—he did not say he had paid it, he said he would pay it—MR. Wynsall was present.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Did you keep a cash-book till this year? A. Not a regular cash-book—I kept a memorandum-book, in which I used to enter things till I entered them in my ledger—I have not my memorandum-book here, but my cash-book and my ledger—the prisoner ought to have entered these sums in the ledger, and he has not.

JOSEPH WYNSALL . I was present when the prisoner said he would pay 10s. a week—I heard the whole of the conversation—the two sums of money received from Bayley and Jackson were what the prosecutor asked for—the other accounts were not known of then.

(George Phipps, a silk and worsted dealer, of St. Martin's-lane; Joseph Lee, of Newgate-street; Joseph Hoby, a fringe-manufacturer, of Skinner-street; John Stanton, of Great Charles-street; and William Grammott, a silk-manufacturer, of Weymouth, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18400302-794

794. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Thomas William Kennedy, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-795

795. MICHAEL ROURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February, 1 purse, value 2s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 2 sovereigns, and 1 shilling, the property of Edward James Ingleby Fleming, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-796

796. WILLIAM NORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, 43 lbs. weight of lead, value 6s., the goods of the Governor and Company of the New River, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Conaned Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-797

797. CHARLES REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 pair of shoes, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 shirt, value 3s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 7s.; 2 half-crowns, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Peter Devine: 1 shirt, value 3s., the goods of John Cox; and 1 coat, value 30s., the goods of Patrick Graney.

PETER DEVINE . I am a coal-whipper. I lived in Lower Shadwell—the prisoner lodged in the same house and slept in the same bed with me—I had known him about a month—he worked in the same employ as I did—he was learning the business—on the 1st of August I got up about the same time as he did, and we were both down stairs together—I had a trunk in my room, which I know was locked—it contained the property stated, and I had put the key of it in a waistcoat in the room—I went out to work—I returned about four o'clock, and went up to my room—I saw the key lying under the bed—I opened the trunk, and found the things all upside down—the articles stated were gone—I have never seen any of them since—the coat was in the room, but that belonged to Peter Graney—the prisoner did not return—he was not seen at the house from about two o'clock that day till he was brought back from the county of Leitrim, in Ireland—on the 11th of February, I saw him at the Thames police-office—three or four persons lodged in the room.

ELEANOR CLARK . I am landlady of the house. The prisoner and De-laney, and three others, lodged in that room—on the morning of the 1st of August they all went out to work about eight o'clock, as usual—the prisoner returned about nine o'clock, as I was taking my breakfast—I asked him to take some coffee—he said he would; then he went up stairs, and came down again—he was in the house during the day, and as I was cleaning the room, he said, could he assist me to move the beds, or do any thing—I said he could not, I could do what I had to do myself—he was in and out several times, and I saw he had Graney's coat on his back—he could hare had the opportunity of opening the box while I was not in the room—he went away about two o'clock that day—he had given me no notice—he asked me for a needle and thread to mend his own old coat, and I thought he had only slipped Graney's coat on while he did it—he left his own old coat behind.

PATRICK GRANEY . I am a coal-whipper. I lodged in the room—I came there the day before—I lost my coat, and have never seen it since—it was a blue coat with gilt buttons, and had a tear in the sleeve.

Prisoner. Q. Had you not got an outsidecoat on that? A. Yes—MRS. Clark was up when I went to work next morning.

MRS. CLARK re-examined. The coat the prisoner had on of Graney's was a blue coat with gilt buttons.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent—I was working at the coal-work, and my hands got so sore I was not able to work—I expected some money from my friends in Ireland to take me home—I went and got it—I should not have had enough to have taken me home if I had gone back and paid my lodging—I had no coat on when I left, only a jacket.

GUILTY.* Aged 35.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-798

798. GEORGE ETHERINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, 1 tea-pot, value 6s.; and 1 pair of bellows, value 1s. 3d.; the goods of Abraham Norden.

ABRAHAM NORDEN . I am a broker, and live at Hammersmith. I have known the prisoner some time—he was backwards and forward in my shop on the 12th of February a good many times—after he was gone I missed a tea-pot—it was close to the front of the door, just entering in—this is it—(looking at it)—I do not know how the prisoner gets his living—he is a tailor by trade—these bellows are mine—(looking at them)—I lost them.

RICHARD COLLIS . I live at Hammersmith, and am an appraiser. I have known the prisoner four or five years—I met him, on the 12th of February, at a few minutes after two o'clock, close* to Angel-lane, Hammersmith—he beckoned me, and asked if I could lend him a shilling, as he wanted it particularly—I said I had no objection to lend him a shilling if I had some security—he had this tea-pot in his hand, and I had it to hold till the next day—the next morning I heard he was taken, and I went to his residence, and found the officer there—I stated this, and gave up the tea-pot.

GEORGE LOW (police-constable T 50.) I took the prisoner from information—I told him what he was charged with—he denied having the tea-pot in his possession—another officer found these bellows the next day.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a person in the street selling these articles—I bought them of him a few yards from where the prosecutor lives—I had sold the bellows, but not the tea-pot.

GUILTY.* Aged 49.— Transported for Seven Years.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, March 3rd, 1840.

Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18400302-799

799. GEORGE PUCKERIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January, a 10l. Bank note, and a pocket-book, value 2s., the property of Theophilus Dower Lloyd, in his dwelling-house; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18400302-800

800. GEORGE CLEAVER and JOHN COX were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Blundell, about the hour of twelve o'clock in the night of the 16th of February, at St. Botolph without, Bishopsgate, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 towel, value 1s.; 1 pair of stays, value 1s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 1s. 6 1/2 d.; 7 yards of printed cotton, value 3s.; 20 yards of linen cloth, value 16s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 counterpane, value 5s.; 1 coverlet, value 8s. 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 6d.; 3 sheets, value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1d.; 1 coat, value 3s.; 1 brass plate, value 1s.; 1 clock, value 5s.; 1 time-piece, value 10s.; and 1 dredger, value 1s., his property: to which

CLEAVER pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Twelve Months.

ANN BLUNDELL . I am the wife of Thomas Blundell, a French-polisher, and live at No. 12, Rose-and-Crown-court—we keep the house. On Sunday night, the 16th of February, we were disturbed between twelve and one o'clock by the policeman, and on going down stairs I missed the property

stated, from the two parlours, which are in the lower part of the house and join each other—they only entered the lower part of the house—the value of all the property taken is about 2l.—the street door was open when we came down—it had been shut the night before, but not bolted—it was left on the latch, as a young man who lodged with us had not come home—it could not be opened without a key or a hook nail—I was the last person up.

EDWARD EXTON (City police-constable, No. 287.) I was on duty on the night in question about a quarter-past one o'clock, and stopped the prisoner Cleaver about three minutes walk from the prosecutor's house going from it, and at the same time I saw a person, who I believe to be Cox, carrying a bundle on the opposite side of the way—he threw it down—I went and picked it up—i secured Cleaver, and laid hold of the bundle at the same time, and took him to the station-house—I saw the bundle opened at the station-house—it contained these things, which Mr. Blundell claimed—I am not certain Cox is the person I saw—Cleaver made some communication to me at the station-house.

JOHN FISHER (City police-constable, No. 68.) In consequence of what Cleaver said at the station-house, I went after Cox about half-past one the same night, and found him in a house in Half-moon-passage—I knocked, and he opened the door to me in his shirt—I told him I wanted him—he said, "What for"—I said I would tell him when I got him to the station-house—as soon as he came there Cleaver said, "Come and sit down, John, you are the man that helped me in the robbery"—he made no answer—he heard what Cleaver said—he was close to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Cox's Defence. I am innocent—I do not know Cleaver—he is quite a stranger to me.

COX— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-801

801. MARGARET STAPLETON was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously assaulting James MacNamara, on the 30th of January, and casting and throwing 2 ounces of a certain corrosive fluid, called sulphuric acid, upon and over his neck and face, with intent to burn, him, and whereby he was burnt. 2nd COUNT, stating her intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JAMES MAC NAMARA . I am a labourer—I live in Hayes-court, Rosemary-lane. I have been married about nine months—I have known the prisoner about two years and a half—we lived together as man and wife, but had ceased to do so about twelve months before I was married—I had one child by her—it is dead now—it was alive at the time in question, and was at my house—I had taken it out of St. George's workhouse about nine weeks—the prisoner came to trouble me very often after we parted, and annoyed me in the streets with all sorts of abuse, and throwing mud in my face. On the 30th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I went to the Pewter-platter public-house—I had not been there above half-an-hour when she came into the tap-room, where I was standing, waiting for employment at coal work—it is the place where we go to get employment in that line—I went to see if the landlord was in the bar to turn her out, because she had been a great annoyance there before—(she had not said or done any thing at that time,) she followed me, and drew her right hand from under her shawl with a cup in it, and threw this vitriol in my face saying, "You would not let me see my child, and take that for a

cure for your eyes"—it went right down my note, on my; neck, and on my clothes—here are the clothes that I wore, (showing them much burnt,) she said nothing else—I went to the doctor's and then to St. George's hospital, where I was sixteen days, and then was discharged as well—I had seen the prisoner before this happened, between six and seven o'clock, at my place—she said she came to see her child—she had been abusing my wife, and when I came home I turned her out civilly, and as I did so, she haved a stone in at the door—I went for a policeman, but he would not take her in charge, and she hit me in the face before him—he then got her away—my neck and face was burnt, and pained me very much for four days—I thought my neck would be burnt right out—it was like fire itself—none went into my eyes—the child lived for about a week after this happened.

Prisoner. The half that he swears against me is false, is is not a word what I said—he is not married to the woman he lives with, he only picked up with her—she is a bad character—let him tell who married him—when I went in after him to the Pewter Platter public-house, I asked him if he would not let me see my child. Witness. She did not—she said, "You would not let me see my child," and threw this over me—MR. Doyle, a a Catholic priest, married me in St. George's-in-the-fields.

JOHN HILTON (police-constable K 184.) On the 30th of January, about half-past eight o'clock, I saw the prosecutor in Cock-lane, Ratcliffe, about twenty yards from the Pewter Platter public-house—his face appeared all in a burning state—he pointed out the prisoner to me on the opposite side of the street and gave her into my custody—I took her to the station-house, and she took this cup out of her pocket—it was rather wet in the middle—I did not observe whether it had affected her clothes—I put it into my handkerchief to take it home, and it burnt a bole in it large enough to get my thumb through—I asked her what she was going to do with the cup—she said she was going to get some castor-oil for her child—when I took her I said she was given into ray custody by the prosecutor—she told me she did not care, for he deserved all he had got.

Prisoner. Q. When the cup was taken from me where was it put? A. On the mantel-shelf in the station-house till about nine o'clock—the inspector then gave it to me to take care of—I observed a small drop of liquid in the bottom of it, but not enough to pour out—I noticed that at the time I gave it into the inspector's hands.

Prisoner. The prosecutor did not give me in charge, he was in the doctor's shop at the time—it was another man, a friend of his. Witness. The prosecutor was at the door of the doctor's shop—he pointed out the prisoner to me himself—there was a mob round—nobody but the prosecutor gave me any directions to take her.

JANE KAY . I am a widow, and live at Lower Shadwell. I was in the bar of the Pewter Platter public-house on the evening in question—the prisoner came down the passage with the prosecutor—I heard her say to him, "She bounced about the room, and would not let me see my child"—I directly turned, and saw her lift her hand, and directly run out of the passage—I did not see whether she had any thing in her hand—I heard the prosecutor halloo very loudly—I went up to him, and asked what was the matter—he said she had blinded him with vitriol—his face was all streaming down—I assisted him in undoing his handkerchief, and he was led away to the doctor's—his face was quite black, and he complained very much.

Prisoner. I never saw this woman at all—she could not see me. Witness. I could see her, and the prosecutor also.

CHARLES HOVELL . I am a pupil at the London Hospital. The prosecutor was brought there on the 30th of January, about eight or nine o'clock in the evening—he was labouring under the effects of sulphuric acid having been thrown upon him—the skin was destroyed, and he was suffering violent pain—his face and neck were affected, the neck principally—the collar of his coat was burnt—if he had not been attended to immediately it would have run to high inflammation; but in consequence of that he was greatly relieved—he was under my care fifteen or sixteen days—I am confident it was sulphuric acid, because the remedies I applied would not answer to any other—he told me it was vitriol, therefore I applied the remedies proper in vitriol, which is sulphuric acid, and they answered—it is of a very inflammatory nature—I should say, from the state his clothes were in, that an ounce and a half, or two ounces, had been thrown on him—if it had gone into his eyes it would most probably have destroyed the sight—we could not have applied the remedies in sufficient time to save it if he had not been brought when he was—his life was in no danger—if it had not been attended to it would have been much worse, but still it would not have killed him—at all events it would have taken some time to have done it—it would subject, him to very severe inflammation, but I do not think it would have caused death.

(The prisoner in her defence stated, that the prosecutor would not suffer her to see her child, which was in a dying state from his ill usage; that she took it some castor oil in a cap, when his wife abused her, and he dragged the child out of her arms, and turned her out of doors. She afterwards went with a friend to the Pewter Platter public-house to have something to drink, and finding him there, she said, "So, you want to hinder me from seeing my child, and it is dying: there is a God above who will reward you. "She further stated, that she had bought the vitriol to clean some copper, and by his knocking her about and ill-using her he knocked it over himself; that she was the fourth woman he had seduced, and turned his back upon, and he had shamefully treated and ill-used her.)

GUILTY. Aged 26.—Recommended to mercy, on account of her previous ill-treatment. — Confined Twelve Months.

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, March 7th, 1840.

Sixth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18400302-802

802. JOHN CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February, one handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Pierrepoint Lavie, from his person.

JOHN PIERREPOINT LAVIE . I live in Maddox-street, Regent-street. I was in Birchin-lane on the 17th of February, and had a handkerchief in my pocket, which I had seen an hour before—in consequence of information I looked in my pocket, and missed my handkerchief—this is it—(looking at it)—it has my marks on it.

WILLIAM CHILDS . I am a constable of the ward of Tower. On the 17th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going up Lombard-street, and saw the prisoner and another walking behind the prosecutor—I got behind a cart and watched them—I saw the prisoner put

his band into the gentleman's right-hand pocket and take out a silk hand-kerchief—he came across the way and saw me, and ran down Nicholas-lane—I punned and caught him in Cannon-street—I saw the handkerchief taken from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Lombard-street, and saw the handkerchief on the ground—I took it up, and was going across the road,—he saw me, and said, "Drop it"—I ran away with it—I am innocent.

GUILTY .† Aged 23.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-803

803. BENJAMIN LUMPKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May, 7 1/2 yards of silk serge, value 3l., the goods of James Dickens Saltmer: and 1 philister plane, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Turner.

RICHARD EVANS . I am warehouseman to James Dickens Saltmer, of St. Paul's churchyard. The prisoner is a carpenter, and was employed there by Mr. Lawrence at the time my master had his premises altered—he was there about the 10th of May, and about that time we lost seven yards and a half of silk serge—in consequence of circumstances in February I went to the prisoner's lodging—this silk serge was found by the policeman at the pawnbroker's—this is it—(examining it)—it is what we lost in May last.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You have no particular mark on it? A. No—it is a very particular sort—it is the only piece we ever had, and we got it from Lyons—I saw it last in the warehouse in the beginning of last May—I know that because I cut a part of it off, and gave the rest to a traveller in the country—we kept it in the back part of the warehouse—there are three men in my master's employ, whose duty it was to take care of the serge—the prisoner had not the care of it.

COURT. Q. Are you able to say that this is part of what you had? A. Yes—when the part was given to the traveller in May there was seven yards and a half left.

THOMAS TURNER . I am a carpenter, living in Providence-row, Finsbury. I was employed in May with the prisoner at the prosecutor's premises—I lost a philister plane—this is it—(examining one)—it has my name on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not tools get mixed sometimes? A. Yes—we were working at Mr. Saltmer's, and next door—I was ill, and absent three weeks at that time.

MARY ANN LUMPKIN . I am the prisoner's daughter, and live in Three Tun-court. I pawned these articles—my lather gave them-to me to pawn.

JOHN HORBLE . I am assistant to Robert Reeves. I bare produced tome silk serge and a plane, which were pawned by Mary Ann Lumpkin on the 10th of May.

HENRY CAMPER . I am a pawnbroker in Barbican. One length of the silk serge was pawned by the prisoner's daughter.

(Esther Maynard, the wife of a carpenter, of Little Winyett-street, Camden-town; and Rebecca Budd, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18400302-804

804. JOHN AGAR was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Abraham Hart, from his person.

ABRAHAM HART . I live in Chapel-street, Russell-square. About twelve o'clock on the the 22nd of February, I was in Holborn—a young man

turned round and asked me if a pocket-handkerchief that he had in his hand was mine—I said, "Yes"—this is it—(examining it)—I had seen it when I left home—it has my mark on it.

GEORGE TREW (police-constable H 125.) I was going up Holborn in plain clothes, and saw the prisoner with two other lads, bigger than himself—I turned and followed them—I saw the prisoner touch the prosecutor's pocket, and then speak to the other two—he then followed and took the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket with his right hand—I took him, and the handkerchief.

Prisoner. I never was in prison before.

GUILTY. Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Three Days.

Reference Number: t18400302-805

805. MARY ANN HART was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February, 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 half-crown, 4 shillings, and 2 groats; the property of Julia Nelthorp, from her person; and JOHN COOPER , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen, against the Statute, &c.

JULIA NELTHORP . I live in Norway-place, Limehouse. About half-past two o'clock, on the 24th of February, I was in Leadenhall-street with a lady and the witness Larkin—there was a crowd round an omnibus—I felt a hand in the right-hand pocket of my dress, which contained a green silk purse, with one half-crown, four shillings, and two fourpenny pieces—I endeavoured to lay hold of the hand, which belonged to the prisoner Hart—I am sure of that—she dragged her hand away with the purse—I turned round, and laid hold of her cloak; she thought I was alone, and began abusing me—when Larkin spoke to her, she turned round and walked away—I am quite sure it was her hand that was in my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you always said you were sure it was her hand? A. Yes, I am sure of that—I said before the Magistrate that I felt a hand in the pocket of my dress—I said it was the prisoner's hand—there was a slight crowd there, through which my friends were endeavouring to make their way—I taxed her with taking my purse, and she said she knew nothing about it—I have no idea how many people were there—there was a considerable number—I had not been in the omnibus—I am unmarried.

HENRY LARKIN . I live with my father, in Norway-place, I was with the prosecutrix—I heard her say to Hart, "You have picked my pocket, you have taken my purse," and Hart called her an impudent hussy for saying so—Hart went way—I followed her, and told her the young lady accused her of taking her purse, and desired her to return—she refused to do so—Cooper came up, took his hand out of his pocket, and put his hand to Hart, and she passed the purse to him directly—I could not see the colour of the purse, it was passed so quickly—a gentleman took hold of Cooper—he knocked him away, and ran away directly.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What did you say to Hart when you first came up to her? A. I told her the young lady accused her of taking her purse, and asked her to return—there is no mistake about that—she refused at first, till Cooper came up and she had passed the purse—then she said she would go back with me—I stopped with her till the policeman came up and took her to the station-house—I went with her—I was rather flurried—there was a considerable crowd about—I was two or three feet from Hart—it was daylight—I believe I have always told this

story in the same way—I do not recollect telling any other—I believe I have told the same story as I did before the Lord Mayor—I will swear that I first said to Hart, "Come back with me"—I think that was the first thing—when I accused her of taking the purse, she refused to go back—I told her she must—I told the Magistrate that—then Cooper came up, and Hart said to him, "This youth accuses me of taking a lady's purse"—she did not do any thing before Copper came up—I never represented that she did—she remained talking with me till Cooper came up—I have always said so—I said she walked off before thin—I spoke to her in the crowd, and she walked off—I never said that when I accused her of taking the purse, she said no the had not, and walked away—I do not recollect the precise words I said before the Magistrate—Cooper came up, he took his hand out of his pocket, and put it to Hart, and she put a purse into his hand directly—that is what I saw, and all that took place—I swear that—I do not know that Cooper said any thing—I was close to them—Hart did not run.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What were you doing there? A. I was walking home—I am in my father's office, he is a brewer—it is true that Cooper came up, put out his hand, and she put the purse into his hand, and he then ran away—I have never given another account of this—my statement was read over to me at the office—I was asked if it was correct, and whether I had any thing to add—(reading his deposition)—"Cooper then came up; Hart said to him, 'This youth accuses me of having taken a young lady's purse; he then came close up to her. I saw her slip a purse into his band; a gentleman seized Cooper, but he forced himself away"—I told the Magistrate that Cooper held out his hand—Hart had gone twenty or thirty yards before Cooper came up—the gentleman who seized Cooper is not here—I recollect Hart speaking to Cooper—I should not have noticed what Cooper said if he answered—I did not see the colour of the purse, it was done so quickly—though I was looking out for a purse—no purse has been found.

CHARLES WYKES (police-constable K 259.) I was on duty—some person told me, in the hearing of Cooper, that he saw him with the purse in his hand, and told me to take him into custody—Cooper said he had not got the purse.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Cooper denied it? A. Yes.

MICHAEL RICHARD HOUGHTON . I keep a furrier's shop in Whitechapel-road. I was passing near this crowd with my daughter, about half-past one o'clock—I saw a green purse pass from Hart's hand to Cooper's—I was within about three feet of them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who caused you to come here? A. I was subpoenaed—I went to the station-house, and stated what I saw—I did not go before the Lord Mayor, because I had business to attend to—I came here of my own free will—I was subpoenaed after I came here by a policeman—he did not say, "Remember, if you are asked how you came here, say you were subpoenaed"—I do not think any thing passed—the subpoena was handed to me, with 1s. in the outer court—I was not aware of the purport of the 1s.—the father of the witness Larkin, and another gentleman, called on me, I think on Friday last, to know if I would attend here, but I should have attended without that—I got the subpoena yesterday, and went before the Grand, Jury.

HART— GUILTY . Aged 19.

COOPER.†— GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-806

806. JOHN HOLLINGSHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November, 3 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, 200 shillings, 48 half-crowns, 60 pence, and 1 5l. note; the monies of Abraham Redon: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-807

807. THOMAS CROSS and WILLIAM CROSS were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February, 2 sheets, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Johnson; to which they pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-808

808. JOSEPH DUEL was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18400302-809

809. JOSEPH FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, 6 lbs. 10 oz. weight of tea, value 1l. 19s., the goods of the East and West India Dock Company, his masters.

MR. Clarkson conducted the Prosecution.

ISAAC COLNETT . I am the principal foreman of the East India Import Dock—by the Act of 1 William IV. the East and West India Docks were united as the East and West India Dock Company—the prisoner was employed on the 15th of February, on the second floor in the East India Import Dock, in lowering some iron work from the crane—I went up stairs, and saw him close to where the tea-chests were, on the right hand side of the room—he had no business there—I went up to him directly, and asked what he did there—he walked off to the other side and said he was looking for a rope—I told him there were no ropes there and that he knew—I saw a protection under his smock-frock, and said, "You have tea, Foster,"—he said, "Yes. I have"—Tiplady, another fore-man, was coming up stairs—this tea was taken from tae prisoner—there was 4 lbs. 10 oz. of gunpowder tea—he was going off with it—a man took him to the Dock station, where I left him—I went to the pile of chests and found one open, and 12 lbs. short of the weight—I compared the tea with that in the chest.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Are you a judge of tea? A. Partly so—I can speak to the weight of this chest by the mark cut on it, and the entry in the books—I am sure the prisoner was at work there for the Company at the time.

GEORGE COOK TIPLADY . I am a foreman in the East and West India Docks. On Saturday the 15th of February I had occasion to go on the second floor of the East India Import arehouse, and was called by Colnett to search the prisoner—I lifted up his smock-frock, and under it I found a handkerchief of tea under his belt—just as I took it he said, "I have some tea"—I took it from him—I went to the station and saw 1 lb. 14 oz. of tea found in his hat.

ALEXANDER LUKE . I am a constable in the Dock—I took charge of the prisoner, and found 2 lbs. of gunpowder tea on him—I have compared it with the tea produced, and cannot tell the one from the other—I asked the prisoner where he got it from, he said, out of a box in the warehouse.

Cross-examined. Q. You asked him if he broke the box open? A. Yes, and he said it was open before he went.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress—I had two children living,

and had just buried one—I was foolish enough to take it—I never touched any thing before.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-810

810. THOMAS BARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January, 1 watch, value 152. 10s., the property of Bernard Maze and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Nine Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18400302-811

811. RICHARD DAVIES was indicted for bigamy, to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Confined Ten Days.

Reference Number: t18400302-812

812. JOSEPH JONES was indicted for stealing, of the 24th of February, 1 coat, value 2l. 10s., the goods of John Stafford.

GEORGE LYALL . I am in the employ of John Stafford, a tailor in Holborn. On the 26th of February I missed a coat, about seven o'clock in the evening—it was brought back about five minutes after by Bassett—this is it—(looking at it)—it is my master's—it was hanging just inside the door.

Prisoner. You stated that a woman was standing at the corner of Field-lane with it, and you took it from her, that she said she did not see me drop it, and now you say that Bassett brought it to the house. Witness. No, he brought it to me—I pursued you up Fetter-lane—the woman had the coat.

JAMES BASSETT . I am in the employ of Mr. Scott, of Water-lane. I was coming up Holborn and heard the cry of "Stop thief"—I saw the prisoner with the coat trying to put it on—he saw me and dropped it—I picked it up, and gave it to a lady, and pursued him—I got the coat again, and gave it to Lyall.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry of "Stop thief," and turned up Fetter-lane—after a time I found I was the pursuer, and being pursued—I was not trying to put it on.

GUILTY .† Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-813

813. WILLIAM NEWSOM was indicted for feloniously forging, a re-quest for the delivery of goods.—2nd COUNT, for uttering the same.

GEORGE WILLIAM ANSELL . I am foreman to Mr. Hay ward Taylor, a brassfounder, in Cripplegate. On the 21st February the prisoner came and presented this order to me for a dozen of bib cocks—(read)—"Feb. 21, 1840. Please let the bearer have half-a-dozen of 3/4 bib cocks, and half-a-dozen of inch, for Mr. Crosbie."—MR. Crosbie deals with us—I know his writing—this is not his—I detained the prisoner—he said he was sent by Mr. Crosbie for the goods.

Prisoner. I said I was sent by a man who worked for Mr. Crosbie.

Witness. You said so afterward, but first you said you were sent by Mr. Crosbie.

JAMES CROSBIE . I am a plumber, living in Elton-street, Moorfields—this is not my writing—I never saw the prisoner, nor sent him.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man who said, "I have got an order that I want to send to Mr. Taylor"—he asked me to take it for him, as he did not like to go to the shop, as he had been drinking—he went with me and, showed me the shop—I gave it to Ansell, and said, "Here

is an order—it comes from Mr. Crosbie's—one of His men gave it me." He said, "Is this Mr. Crosbie's writing?" I said, "I do not know.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-814

814. WILLIAM DAVIS and DAVID GILLIS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Steel, on the 7th of February, at St. George the Martyr, and stealing therein 1 table cloth, value 1s., the goods of the said George Steel: and 1 writing-desk, value 10s.; 2 pocket-book a, value 1s.; and 1 pencil case, value 1s.; the goods of Elizabeth Robinson.

GEORGE STEEL . I lire at No. 25, Great Ormond-street, in the parish of St. George the Martyr, Middlesex—it is my dwelling-house. On Friday the 7th of February, I was sitting in my back parlour—I heard the street door open, which I had come in at, and shut about five minutes before—thinking it was the servant gone out, I did not take notice of it, but hearing it creak afterwards, I went to see who it was—I looked out, and saw a crowd—I went into the parlour, and missed a desk, but did not miss the table-cloth till the next morning—it has not been found—it was mine—the desk was Mrs. Robinson's.

ELIZABETH ROBINSON . I am a widow, and have apartments in the prosecutor's house—I left my writing-desk, two pocket-books and a pencil-case in it, in the front parlour—I shut the door about six in the evening—I afterwards missed my desk—this is it—(examining it.)

GEORGE PIPER (police-constable E 75) I was in Great Ormond-street at a quarter-past seven o'clock that evening, and saw the two prisoners in company with another—Davis went to the door of an empty house, and then to four or five others, and then to the prosecutor's—I lost sight of them for two minutes—I then saw them come from the door, and Davis had this desk—as soon as he saw me, he dropped it and ran off, I pursued and took him—in going along he dropped something down an area—I knocked and asked the servant, and found it—it was this latch-key, which opens the prosecutor's door—Gillie and the desk were then gone—he was taken by another officer in Holbom, a few minutes after, with the desk.

HENRY GRISS (police-constable F 1.) I took Gillis about twenty minutes to eight o'clock that evening—I met him with another in Holborn—he was carrying this desk—the other got away—he said the other gave it him to carry.

Davis's Defence. I own to having the desk in my possession, but did not drop the key.

Gillis's Defence. I know nothing about the robbery.

GILLIS*— GUILTY . Aged 19.

DAVIS*— GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for ten Years.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, 4th March, 1840.

Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18400302-815

815. THOMAS ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously uttering counterfeit coin, well knowing the same to be counterfeit; having been previously convicted of a like offence: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-816

816. THOMAS MATTHEWS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Kirby, on the 15th of February at St. Olave, Hart-street, and stealing therein, 7 yards of woolen cloth, called doe-skin, value 32s.; and 7-8ths of a yard of velvet, value 18s.; his goods.

THOMAS KIRBY . I lire in Silver-street, in the parish of St. Olave—it is my dwelling-house. On Saturday, the 15th of February, I was at home—about seven o'clock in the evening a square of glass, which had been put in that day, was broken at one corner, and taken out—this seven yards of cloth and this velvet, which are mine, were takes out of the window.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. When did you first observe this? A. I heard a cry of "Stop thief," came down, and found the glass taken out, and the things gone—the whole property is worth 50s.

JOHN THOMAS LEE . I am a porter. I was opposite Mr. Kirby's house about seven o'clock, and saw two persons at the window—they pushed the square of glass in—I could see the arm of one, but I do not know who did it, but the prisoner hurried up the street with the cloth—the other walked a few yards behind—my brother hallooed something, and the prisoner dropped the cloth—I believe him to be the person—I did not see his face.

Cross-examined. Q. You merely speak to him from his sire and dress? A. That is all—he was taken within two or three minutes—I was then of opinion that he was the person.

HENRY LEE . I was with my brother, and saw the persons shove the pane of glass in, put their bands in, and take the cloth out—one ran off, and the other walked slowly—the prisoner dropped the cloth.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see his face, did you? A. No—f was across the road—I cannot say which put his hand in the window.

SAMUEL HALL . I am a policeman. I was on duty, and saw the prisoner in Silver-street—he ran from behind a cart, across the street, towards Falcon-square—I endeavoured to take him, but missed my hold—I caught hold of his hat, and knocked the crown of it in—I then pursued him down into Castle-street, and there took him—as I was taking him to the Computer he slipped out of the handcuffs, and ran across Smithfield—I secured him at the corner of Hosier-lane.

Cross-examined. Q. What became of the other man? A. He was taken into custody, and discharged by the Magistrate.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Alderson.

Reference Number: t18400302-817

817. JANE BLINKFORD, alias Mary Williams, was indicted for feloniously and knowingly uttering a counterfeit shilling, to John Apple Englehart, tin the 13th of February; having been previously convicted of uttering counterfeit coin.

THE HON. MR. SCARLETT and MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant-solicitor to her Majesty's Mint. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Jane Blinkford for uttering counterfeit coin—I have examined it with the original record in this Court—it is a true copy—(read.)

ROBERT BARBER (police-constable C 168.) I was here in June, 1839, When the prisoner was tried for uttering a bad half-crown, on the 23rd of May, to Jane Evans—she pleaded guilty, and was confined six months.

JOHN APPLE ENGLEHART, JUN . I am the son of John Englehart, who keeps a pork-shop, in St. Martin's-le-grand. On the 13th of February the prisoner came to the shop for a saveloy, which came to 1 1/2 d.—I served her—she offered me a shilling—I looked at it, and told her it was a bad one—my

father was in the shop—I gave it to him, and went for a policeman—I saw my father mark the shilling.

JOHN ENGLEHART . On the 13th of February I saw the prisoner in my shop—she gave my son a shilling, which he gave me to look at—I marked it, and afterwards gave it to the constable—the prisoner attempted to leave the shop—I ran after her, and she was secured outside—this is the shilling—(looking at it)—she was going to leave the shop two or three times—I said she had better wait for the change—she knew my son was gone for an officer—I told her to wait for the change—I kept the shilling in my hand, and gave it to the officer.

EEWARD COGHLIN . I was in the police on the 13th of February, and took the prisoner into custody at the prosecutor's shop—he gave me this shilling, which I have had ever since—I was going to search the prisoner at the station-house—she refused to be searched by a man—I said, "Produce what property you have got, and I will not search you"—after some hesitation she produced a bad half-crown, and I did not search her—she gave the name of Mary Williams—we asked her residence—she said she lived where she could.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint. I have examined the half-crown and shilling produced—they are both counterfeited in every respect.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-818

818. WINIFRED DWYER, MARY LANGLEY , and ANN STYLES , were indicted for feloniously making, on the 12th of February, 3 pieces of counterfeit coin, resembling, and apparently intended to resemble and pass for 3 of the Queen's current coin, called sixpences.

THE HON. MR. SCARLETT and MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM STANNARD (police-sergeant G.) On the 12th of February, at a quarter past three o'clock in the afternoon, I went to No. 4, Old Nicholl-street, Shoreditch, accompanied by Redman and Fink—Fink was left outside—we went to the first floor front room—we found the door fastened inside—I could see through a crack in the door into the room—we could not see the fire-place, but saw the three prisoners sitting on stools, apparently before the fire—two had their backs to us, and Styles was sitting sideways—I could see she had a piece of money in her left hand, and was doing something to it with her right hand—the other two sat very close to her—I could not see whether they were doing any thing—I noticed them for about a minute, and then burst the door open—it gave way, and I fell down inside the room—Dwyer and Langley went towards the window—Styles remained on the stool, apparently in a fainting state—we gave her some water—after securing the three prisoners, I searched the room, and under a stool where Styles sat I found two counterfeit sixpences, which I produce—in another part of the room, by the side of where Dwyer stood, I found a pair of scissors, and two counterfeit sixpences behind a bedstead, one of which has the get attached to it—that one was quite cold—there was a fire-place close to where they had been sitting—I searched about the grate, and on the left-hand hob I found a piece of tin called a band—there was apparently plaster-of-Paris sticking to it—on the table I found a teacup, a piece of metal spoon, and some plaster-of-Paris in a damp state; and on a shelf, over the table, was a bag containing plaster-of-Paris in a dry state—I merely felt the prisoners'

clothes—2 3/4 d. was found on Dwyer, but nothing on the others—all their hands were very dirty, and Styles's particularly smelt of metal and antimony—the three prisoners were the only persons in the room—I asked who the room belonged to—Styles answered, "It belongs to. Mrs. Cannon," and Dwyer said, "Yes, it belongs to me."

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How did you find the outer door of the house? A. Open—the room-door was fastened with a staple and hasp inside—nobody went in at first but I and Redman—Fink came up about four minutes after—I found the sixpence and scissors behind the bedstead, which is near the window—they went towards the window on my tumbling into the room—I think Shannon was the person's name whom Styles said the room belonged to.

Styles. Q. Had not I my bonnet and shawl? A. Yes—the others had not.

COURT. Q. Was the window open or shut when they went to it? A. I do not know—I did not observe whether it was open or shut.

HENRY REDMAN . I accompanied Stannard to the room—I entered the room with him, and saw Dwyer and Langley go to the window—I ran after them, but, before I could get to them, Langley opened the window and threw some white substance out—I laid hold of her and Dwyer—Standard brought Styles from the fire, and we handcuffed them—I searched the room, and took this pipe from the fire, with the bowl red hot, and some fluid metal in it—I found a pot on the hob with a piece of white metal in it, and on the hearth, near where Langley and Dwyer went from, I found three counterfeit sixpences—I found no good sixpence—there was a small bit of a spoon in the pot with the other metal.

Cross-examined. Q. About what size is the room? A. About ten feet square—there is only one window—there was a bedstead and table, and the stool they sat upon—I did not observe any chairs.

Langley. I did not throw any thing out of window—it was never opened at all.

JOHN FINK . I am a policeman. I accompanied Standard and Redman to the house in question—I remained in the middle of the road while they went up—I saw Langley come to the window, open it, and throw this mould out into the road—it was quite hot at the time—it had been sticking together, but it separated into two pieces in falling—there was nothing in it—I took it up, and then went up stairs—I took charge of the prisoners, and on the floor I found this piece of metal.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin to the Mint. Here are seven sixpences, all counterfeit, and all cast in the same mould—this is a plaster-of-Paris mould in which they have been cast—this one with the get tallies with the mould as well as the rest—here are two more gets, which also fit the mould—here is a tobacco-pipe with metal in it similar to the sixpences—the metal in the spoon is of a similar kind—it is Britannia metal, which is a mixture of tin and antimony, which has a smell about it—this is plaster-of-Paris in powder—this piece of tin is used to make the mould, to confine the pitster-of-Paris into a shape—the scissors would be used to nip off the gets—they generally make the impression in the mould with a good sixpence.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What would require to be done to these sixpences before they were circulated? A. Six of them have surplus metal round the edge, which should be removed with a file; but one appears to have been filed, and would be in a state for circulation.

Langley's Defence. I met Dwyer in Shoreditch at a quarter-past two o'clock, and asked where she had been—she said with her husband's dinner—I asked her to have a pint of beer—we both went into a public-house, and had a pint of porter each—directly afterwards she asked me to go home with her to have a cup of tea, and I went up stairs with her—any transaction of coining I know nothing about.

Styles's Defence—(written.)—"I beg to inform you, my Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, that I am an unfortunate young woman, and became acquainted with a young woman named Mary Shannon, the daughter of Mrs. Dwyer, the prisoner at the bar with me. This acquaintance originated in consequence of my mother and myself residing very near to them in the same street; and having lent this young woman an apron during the week, I stood much in need of it. I had been on an errand for my mother into Bishopsgate-street, and on my returning home, having to pass by their door, I ran up stairs and inquired for her daughter, Mary Shannon, and was answered she was not within, but expected her home in a few minutes. I had my bonnet and shawl on me at the time; and as she was expected to return in a few minutes, I waited there. I most solemnly declare to you my Lord, and the Gentlemen of the Jury, I had not been in the room more than ten minutes when the officers came in and took me into custody, together with the other two female prisoners now at the bar with me. I humbly beg leave to state, that the officers who took me into custody, if required by your Lordship, can declare upon oath I had those articles upon me at the time they took me into custody. I therefore humbly hope this circumstance will convince you that I had not the smallest connexion, or was in any way interested in the business my fellow prisoners was then carrying on; and the circumstance that led me to their room was no other than what I have before described, to get an apron from her daughter that belonged to me."

(Two witnesses deposed to Styles's good character.)

DEYER— GUILTY . Aged 42.

LAMGLEY— GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Ten Years.

STYLES— GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-819

819. ROBERT LEMON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Good, about the hour of twelve in the night of the 20th of February, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, with intent to steal the goods, chattels, and monies therein being; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Three Years in the Penitentiary.

(The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor.)

Reference Number: t18400302-820

820. HENRY MORRIS and HENRY HULL were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Grove, on the 5th of February, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, about the hour of two in the night, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 2 boxes, value 5s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 5s.; 1 desk, value 5s.; 10 shirts, value 35s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 yard of flannel, value 1s.; I brush, value 1s.; 1 necklace, value 1s.; 1 snap, value 1s.; 1 medal, value 1s.; 2 yards of cotton, value 2s. 6d.; 1 ivory box, value 1s.; 4 frocks, value 10s.; 2 yards of cotton, value 1s. 6d.; 1 cloak, value 5s.; 9 pillow-cases, value 10s.; 12 towels, value 12s.; 6 napkins, value 6s.; 1 pair of socks, value 1s.; 5 table-cloths, value 10s.; 10 sheets, value 2l. 10s.; 6 aprons, value 3s.; 6d.; 9 printed books, value 10s.; 1 bag, value 6d.; and 18 foreign copper coins, value 1s.; the property of the said William Grove.

WILLIAM GROVE . I live at Nos. 1 and 2, Horse-and-Groom-yard, Curtain-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch; there is an internal communication from No. 1 to No. 2. I sleep in No. 1. On the 5th of February I went to bed about eleven o'clock, every thing was safe then—MRS. Grove was up a quarter of an hour after me, but did not go into No. 2, at all—I had seen No. 2 quite safe—I was the last up, except my wife, and I did not go to sleep till she came to bed—I was called up between three and four o'clock in the morning, and went into the house No. 2—it appeared as it was left, except that a small portion of the parlour-window was open—the sash was lifted up a little—it was down the night before, but not fastened—a young man named David Bower slept in that room—I found him asleep still—he is not here—I missed two boxes from the back part of that room—the window had been closed the night before by a little servant-girl—she is not here, but I came home about eight or nine o'clock in the evening, and if that window had been up I must have perceived it—somebody must have lifted it much higher to get the boxes out—they contained a large quantity of linen, a variety of children's clothes, some printed books, and a tea-caddy—the boxes belong to my daughter—the value of all the property in the boxes is about 9l., at a low calculation—when I was called up, I found the two prisoners and another man in custody, at the station-house, with all the property that was missed—I had seen it safe the afternoon before.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. If this your property? A. A portion belongs to myself, part to my son, part to my daughter, and a larger part to my wife's sister, but it has been in my possession three or four years—it was left in my care, and I was answerable for it—I am sure I have not over-valued it—my son is apprenticed to a watchmaker, but comes home on Saturday nights—I have known Morris about five years—I never knew any thing wrong in him—I have been a sergeant of the police some years, and am now gaoler of the police-court, Worship-street.

JOHN MASTERS . I am a policeman. On the morning of the 6th of February, about half-past two o'clock, I was on duty near the prosecutor's louse, and coming by Horse-and-Groom-yard I saw a man, not in custody, standing on the pavement opposite the yard—when I got near the yard, I saw the two prisoner's come out of the yard—they all three joined together, and went up Curtain-road—one said to the other, "I have gave him twelve shillings, and the b——is not satisfied with that, he wanted the other two"—I turned down Horse-and-Groom-yard—there is a mews to the right—I turned my light on near the bottom, and saw two boxes, a teacaddy, a writing-desk, and some wet sheets—in a few minutes Sergeant Kidney came up—I told him, he accompanied me down there, and in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes a cab drove up to Horse-and-Groom yard—Hull and another not in custody came running down the yard—Sergeant Kidney and I were there, and as soon as they saw as they returned and made a run—I pursued, and took Hull into custody—the other made his escape altogether—I saw a cab standing at the entrance into the yard—Morris was sitting on the box, and the door of the cab was open—it was the cab that had driven up—Sergeant Kidney came up and ordered the cab- man to stop—he put the boxes into the cab, and ordered him to drive to the station-house—Morris remained on the box till they got to the

station-house—he was not the driver—I asked Hull what he was coming down the yard for—he said to ease himself.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you standing at the time you say you saw the prisoners come out of the yard, before you heard the conversation? A. Down the yard near the boxes—the conversation was in the Curtain-road—I was opposite Horse-and-Groom-yard on the same side of the way, about three yards from them—they went towards Old-street-road, and I went on behind them—I was about three yards behind when I heard the conversation—I did not expect any thing wrong then—I knew Morris by sight before, seeing him about town selling ginger-beer in the summer time.

ABRAHAM AVIS . I am a licensed cab- driver. On the morning of the 6th of February, just before three o'clock, I was on the stand at the Mad-house rank, in Old-street-road—Morris came up to me there and engaged my cab—I did not know him before—he told me he had fallen out with his landlady that night, and wanted my cab to move his two boxes from the Curtain-road to Aldermanbury—he asked me what I would do it for, and before I could answer he said he would give me 1s. 6d.—I said I would take him—he afterwards said I need not be afraid of the money, and gave me 18d. before I went—he got on the box, and a friend of his came up—he said his friend was going to the Curtain-road, and I let him into the cab—I do not know that person—I was going to get on my box to drive away, and the prisoner Hull came up—he let himself into the cab, and said he was going down the Curtain-road—I got on my box and drove to the Curtain-road with the three—I asked Morris where I was to stop, and just opposite Horse-and-Groom-yard he told me to stop—just before I pulled up, the two got out, and went down the yard—Morris remained on the box with me—a policeman hunted the two out of the yard—they took one, and the other got away—the boxes were put into my cab, and I drove to the station-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you taken into custody at all? A. I was detained that night, and taken the next day before the Magistrate, where I stated this.

Hull. Q. Which side of the cab did you ride on? A. On the driving side—Morris sat on the near side—it was just before three o'clock—you jumped out of the near side of the cab, and ran down the gateway with the other man—I saw you run down the gateway—I never saw you before nor ever drank with you—I use the rank by King's-road sometimes, but do not drink at any public-house there—I have a brother who keeps cabs—I have not been drunk lately—I did not meet you five years ago when I was drunk, and beat you with a broomstick.

HENRY KIDNEY . I am a police-sergeant. I came down Horse-and-Groom-yard about a quarter before three o'clock—Masters told me he had found the boxes—while I was there with him, about five minutes before three o'clock, two men ran down the yard—Hull is one of them—they turned back directly they saw us, and ran away—we pursued them—Masters caught Hull—I ran out and stopped the cab—Morris was on the cab with the driver.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask the cab- driver where he brought the property from? A. Yes—he seemed quite confused, and never answered my question—he did not give any account of it till he went before the Magistrate next day—I was at the examination—what the prisoner said was

taken down—I did not see the Magistrate sign it, and do not know his handwriting.

THOMAS MALIN . I am a policeman. I know the two prisoners—I saw them together about two o'clock in the morning of the 6th of February, coming from a public-house at the back of Shoreditch church, leading into Hackney-road, in company with three men and a female—they were in Castle-street, which is seven or eight minutes'walk from the prosecutor's.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did you see them? A. Near two o'clock—it was not half-past two o'clock—I am the constable on the beat, and hare to report to the sergeant the time the public-houses close—I heard the clock strike shortly before, I have every reason to believe, but their disorderly conduct took my attention—I will say the clock had not struck half-an-hour—they were making a noise, and being disorderly—one in their company was very drunk, but the prisoners were not drunk—they were not a mile from the prosecutor's—I went before the Magistrate at the second examination—I was there on another charge, and was asked if I had seen them.

MORRIS— GUILTY . Aged 22.

HULL— GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of Stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of Burglary.

Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-821

821. JOHN SHEAY and JAMES KELLY were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 1 pair of trowsers, value 7s., the goods of Robert Giles; to which they pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-822

822. LUCY PATRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January, 1 shirt, value 3s.; 1 bed-gown, value 2s. 6d.; 1 flannel petticoat, value 4s.; and 1 sheet, value 5s.; the goods of Jones Shyer: 4 shifts, value 20s.; 1 sheet, value 5s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 4s.; 6 towels, value 5s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 1 collar, value 4s.; 2 flat-irons, value 1s.; and 2 table-cloths, value 4s.; the goods of Francis Halifax, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 82.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-823

823. LEONARD BOWTELL was indicted for feloniously embezzling, on the 19th of February, the sum of 3s., which he had received on account of Henry Ward, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 14.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Eight Days, and delivered to his master.

Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18400302-824

824. JOHN MILLER, EDWARD CARTER , and ALEXANDER TOWNSEND , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Bohag, on the 13th of February, and stealing therein, 22 printed books, value 2s. 6d.; and 2 prints, value 6d.; the goods of said Charles Bohag.

SUSANNAH BOGAG . I am the wife of Charles Bohag, and keep a shop in Sumner-street, Chelsea—it is our dwelling-house, and is in the parish of St. Luke. On Thursday evening, the 13th of February, about half-past six o'clock, I heard a noise at the window, and drove some boys away from the window—it was the prisoners, I am certain—I never saw them before, but I saw them through the window, and told them to go away—the constable

about five minutes afterwards came and gave me information, and I missed about twenty-four books from the show-board inside the window, which was shut—I had seen it shut half-an-hour before they came to the window—I heard the window crack before I sent them away, but heard nothing afterwards—these books are ours—(looking at them)—they were safe that evening.

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I live in Yeoman's-row, Brompton. On Thursday evening, the 13th of February, about half-past six o'clock, I was along with the prisoners, near the prosecutor's—they said they were going somewhere, and asked me if I would go with them—I said I would, and we went to Mr. Bohag's, opened the window, and took the books—we all took some—we put them into a bag, went round into King's-road, and divided them—I took my share home, and they took theirs home—they gave me a valentine, and my little brother a "Red Rover"—Townsend gave me that as a share, and I went home—one of them came to me, and told me they had been crabbed, which means they were caught at it—when we took the books we went round to Mr. Haines's, in King's-road, and a little boy took out some balls of worsted.

JAMES BRADLEY (police-constable B 134.) I went and took the prisoners into custody—I found a valentine on Austin, another on Carter, and one on Austin's younger brother.

JAMES SMITH (police-constable B 50.) I searched Miller's house, and found under the bed a blue bag, containing some books and 22 prints—I went to Carter's, but found nothing there, or at Townsend's.

Miller's Defence. I bought some of the books in King's-road.

Carter's Defence. All that Austin has said is false—the others know I was not at the window at all—Austin took the books.

MILLER— GUILTY . Aged 11.

CARTER— GUILTY . Aged 11.

TOWNSEND*— GUILTY. Aged 13. of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years.—Isle of Wight.

Reference Number: t18400302-825

825. GEORGE BEDFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February, 1 box, value 1s. 6d.; 21 brass cocks, value 1l. 5s. 6d.; and 120 brass fender feet, value 2l. 4s. 6d.; the goods of George Furby; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Three Months.

(The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor.)

Reference Number: t18400302-826

826. MARY ANN FREELAND was indicted for stealing on the 12th of February, 28 yards of printed cotton, value 14s., the goods of James Davey.

LEWIS LEWIS . I am shopman to James Davey, a linen-draper, in Whitechapel-road. About two o'clock in the afternoon of the 12th of February, I received information, in consequence of which I jumped over the counter, ran out, and saw the prisoner running, and part of the cotton hanging from her shawl—I overtook her, and she handed the print to me, said she never would do any thing of the kind again, and began crying—I brought her back to the house, and gave her in charge—the print is the property of my employer—I had seen it half-an-hour before in the lobby of the door.

WILLIAM LAPWORTH . I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. It laid down by the door, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Transported for Seven Years.—Penitentiary.

Reference Number: t18400302-827

827. GEORGE CHIFMAN APLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 1 sheet, value 3s., the goods of John Buckwell.

JOHN BUCKWELL . I live at Hanwell. On the 24th of February the prisoner took a lodging of me—he got up in the morning, paid for it, and left—when he was gone I missed a sheet off the bed—this is it (looking at it)—I set off after him, overtook him, and brought him to the policeman at Staines, who searched his bundle, and found the sheet in it in my presence.

Prisoner. I did not steal it—I found it in my bundle after I got out—I did not put it there.

ROBERT TAYLOR . I am a police-sergeant The prisoner was brought to the station-house, and the sheet was found in his bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. The ostler slept with me—I am certain I did not put it there.

JOHN BUCKWELL re-examined. The ostler had been with me about three months, and bore a very good character—the prisoner acknowledged to me in coming back that he had got the sheet, and wanted me to let him go.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-828

828. GEORGE RICE was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Harrison Thompson, from his person.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer of the Post Office. On the 2nd of March, about ten minutes after six o'clock in the evening, I was on duty, and observed the prisoner very busy among the gentlemen, who were paying letters—there was an immense crowd—I saw the prisoner had no letter, and watched him—I saw him take the gentleman's coat flap up, and take the handkerchief out—I took it out of his hand before he could dispose of it—I searched him, and found two silk handkerchiefs on him—I asked him if they were marked—he said, "No"—I found one was marked—MR. Thompson claimed the one I saw him take—I asked him where he lived—he said, "No. 1, Nottingham-court, King-street, Long Acre," and worked with his father, who was a shoemaker, but in his pocket I found a card, with "John Kittle, Newspaper Agent, High Holborn," on it—I went there, and found he had gone into that employ that very day—he had been sent with newspapers to the Office, and his master was surprised he had not returned.

Prisoner. The handkerchief was hanging out of the gentleman's pocket. Witness. It was not—it was an inside pocket he had—he said he had brought a letter to the post wrapped up in one of the handkerchiefs.

HARRISON THOMPSON . I live in St. Paul's Church-yard—this is my handkerchief—(looking at it)—I lost it that evening.

Prisoner. His pocket was ripped right open, and the handkerchief was out. Witness. My pocket was torn a little across.

GUILTY .† Aged 14.— Transported for Ten Years.—Isle of Wight.

Reference Number: t18400302-829

829. SARAH MAHER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February, 1 purse, value 3d.; 6 sovereigns, and 1 half sovereign, the property of John Williams, from his person.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a wine-cooper, and live in George-street, Oxford-street. On Wednesdsy, the 19th of February, I got a cheque for 8l. cashed, and had seven sovereigns and a half in gold, and 10s. in silver—I got drunk, and was out all night—I met the prisoner about four o'clock in the morning, and went with her to the Feathers public-house, Oxford-street—we got drinking together at the bar, and sat down before the bar on a seat—I know I then had six sovereigns and a half and some loose silver in my right-hand pocket, in a small brown bag, which I have now—I am sure it was safe then—she contrived to get it out of my pocket—I did not see her do it, only a person asked if I had any money about me—I said, what was that to him—he said, "Search your pockets," which I did, and missed my bag and money—he took the bag off the floor before that, and produced it to me, and I claimed it—the prisoner was present—I said, "Where is my money?"—he said, "That woman has robbed you"—I immediately took hold of her, held her till a policeman came, and gave her in charge—she was taken to the station-house, and six sovereigns found on her—I had seen her pay for something at the bar.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You were very drunk, were you not? A. I could not be perfectly sober—I was not so very drunk but I counted my money while I was there—I charged a man with taking my money—I gave both him and the prisoner in charge, but he was let go before the Magistrate—I thought he was concerned with the prisoner—it was not him that told me I was robbed—it was another man—the waterman, Woodford, was present besides the prisoner and the other man—I gave Spooner into custody—(looking at his deposition,) this is my signature—it was Woodford asked me if I had lost any thing—Spooner might have asked me, as he saw the money taken—(The witness's deposition being read, stated,—"The prisoner, Spooner, and myself were the only persons there, except the person serving in the bar.")—I mean the only persons drinking, but the waterman was coming in and out—persons were coming backwards and forwards—Spooner was examined as a witness before the Magistrate—I cannot tell what I had drank that day—it was spirits—Woodford is the man that gave me my bag—not Spooner—I am a Welchman.

COURT. Q. Are you sure you had your money when you went to the house? A. I am—I received information in the prisoner's presence that I had been robbed—I searched my pocket, and found my money gone, and the waterman picked up the bag.

JOHN SPOONER . I am a servant out of place, and live in Hunter's-mews, Brunswick-square. I was at the public-house, as the waterman was unwell, and at half-past four o'clock in the morning I rang the bell at the Feathers public-house as usual, and they came down—I took down the shutters—I saw the prisoner and prosecutor come up the street, and they went in to have some drink—when the waterman came I sat down in the house, and saw them drinking gin and beer together—I sat on the seat by the side of them; but before that they were standing against the bar, and I saw the prisoner take the brown purse from the prosecutor's right-hand pocket, but what was in it I did not see—they sat down after that, and the prosecutor fell asleep—when the waterman came in I told him what I had seen—I did not know but the prisoner was his wife.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you, when he awoke, ask him if he had lost any thing? A. I did not—I mentioned it to the waterman, and the water-man

did, and he felt in his pockets, and said he had lost all his money—he accused me and the prisoner of taking it, and gave me into custody—I was taken to the station-house—I was a little the worse for liquor, I was not very drunk—I heard the policeman tell the Magistrate that I was very drunk, and I denied it—I saw all that was going on—I thought they were man and wife—they seemed very familiar together.

JOHN MURRAY . I am a policeman. I was called to the Feathers public-house, and found the prisoner, Spooner, and the prosecutor—the prisoner and Spooner were charged with robbery—she said she had 2s. 2 1/2 d. about her—she pulled some money out of her pocket—I did not notice what it was—she called the prosecutor an old vagabond, and wanted to get at him to fight him—she said she had 2s. 2 1/2 d. and a key, and no more—I took them to the station-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Spooner very drunk? A. He was drunk—the prosecutor was not so drunk but he knew what he was about—Spooner was very drunk, the prosecutor was not very drunk—(looking at his deposition)—this is my signature—it was read over to me—the prosecutor and Spooner were drunk, and if you wish to have it so, very drunk.

JOHN SPOONER re-examined. My deposition was read over to me before the Magistrate, and I made my mark to it.—(The witness's deposition being read stated, "When he awoke up I asked him if he had lost any thing, and he said he had lost all his money.")

Q. After having heard that, do you mean to swear you did not ask him whether he had lost any thing? A. Not till after I had mentioned it to the waterman—I did ask him if he had lost any thing.

MART ECKETT . I am a searcher at the station-house. I searched the prisoner when she was brought there—as I was going to take her down stairs to search her she pulled two half-crowns, a sixpence, and a key out of her pocket, and declared it was all she had about her, and I need not take the trouble of searching her clothes—when I took her down she wanted to pull off her shoes and stockings—I said, "That it not the usual way, you must take off your gown"—she said, "You need not undo me further, I have nothing about me"—I said, "I must do my duty"—I unloosed her stays, and she kept her arm quite tight—I heard something rattle, put my hand into her bosom, and took out six sovereigns—she said, "Oh! don't split, and I will give you one"—she then said she would gift me two—I went to count them, and she said, "There are six, and I will give you three, which is half, if you will not say any thing about it."

Cross-examined. Q. Was she drunk? A. She was, but not so drunk but what she knew what she was about—she tried to conceal it all is her power.

WILLIAM WOODFORD . I was at the Feathers public-house on this morning, about ten minutes past six o'clock, and saw the prisoner and prosecutor there—they seemed rather in liquor, and very comfortable together—I went out to water the horses, and in about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes came in again—I saw the purse lying down by the side of the counter—I picked it up, and said, "Here is the purse, but there is not a fraction in it"—I turned it upside down for the bar-man to see, and went out again—the prosecutor was asleep on the bench then.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you in the public-house altogether? A. Not above ten minutes—I was in and out—Spooner and I went in together, and there was one or two others there—I awoke the prosecutor

up, and asked him if he had lost any thing—I do not know whether Spooner did or not—I did not go before the Magistrate—if I had been sent for I could have gone.

GUILTY . Aged 38.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-830

830. GEORGE WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 1 pistol, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Richard Carpenter.

HENRY LAURENCE . I am shopman to Richard Carpenter. On the 25th of February I saw this pistol on the stall outside—I missed it afterwards, and shortly after found it thrown inside a broker's shop—this is it—(looking at it.)

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Whereabouts is the broker's shop? A. At the corner of Angel-gardens, just turning the corner of the Back-road—it was about two o'clock when I found it—I had seen it safe that day—I know it by it being broken here.

AMELIA ROBINSON . I live in Philip-street, St. George's in the East I was going by the prosecutor's shop, between twelve and one o'clock, and saw the pistol lying on the board—the prisoner was looking at the window—a dog laid in the way, which caused me to stumble—the prisoner passed me at the time, took up the pistol, went several steps, and then put it into his pocket—I went and told Mr. Carpenter, and then came and followed him—I saw him run into Angel-gardens—he passed the broker's shop where it was found, but I did not see him throw it in—he ran till he came to the broker's shop, and then he walked.

Cross-examined. Q. Perhaps your stumble over the dog confused you a little? A. No; I did not fall, but that made me stop at Mr. Carpenter's door—I was coming out of the shop—I did not lose sight of the prisoner.

RICHARD CARPENTER . I followed the prisoner, but did not see him throw the pistol away—he passed the broker's shop, and I took him afterwards—I had seen the pistol safe ten minutes before.

JOSEPH HARROW . I am a policeman. I have the pistol.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY Aged 24.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined One Month.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, March 4th, 1840.

Fifth Jury, before. Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18400302-831

831. WILLIAM METCALF was indicted for forging three separate requests for the delivery of goods; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Two Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-832

832. HENRY SNOWDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 1 hat, value 20s., the goods of Joseph James Maberley.

EDWIN RUSSELL . I am one of the ushers of the Master of the Rolls. On the 26th of February I was on duty in that Court, between twelve and one o'clock—I saw the prisoner, and watched him for some time—I saw him place his hat down in a recess of the window—I looked into the hat before he put it down, so that I should know it again—he then went and stood by the bar of the Queen's Counsel, between the two windows, and was watching about—he then walked towards the other window, looked at a hat once or twice, and came back again; then he went to that

place again, and went out very quickly—I was on the other side of the Court—I followed him outside the swing-doors—I stopped him, and asked about the hat—he said it was a mistake, he had a hat of his own—there was no resemblance in the quality between his hat and the one he took—they are both here—this is the one he put down, and this the one he stole—(producing them)—they have the names of the makers in them, but are not the same—I brought him back.

Prisoner. I was not outside Witness. You were outside the Court-door, but not in the street—you said you were very sorry you had made a mistake, and that it was the first time—your hat was on the floor, and Mr. Maberley's on the form.

COURT. Q. What did the prisoner appear to be doing there? A. To be looking at his Lordship and the Counsel, and Mr. Maberley was attending to a judgment his Lordship was giving—the Court was crowded.

JOSEPH JAMES MABERLEY . I live in Harley-street, Cavendish-square, I was in the Rolls Court on the 26th of February—I placed my hat on the form between two windows—I afterwards saw the prisoner in custody, and my hat in possession of the usher of the Court—I delivered it up to the constable—it was nearly a new hat—I was engaged in a case there—this is my hat—(looking at one.)

ISAAC SLADE (police-constable F 63.) I was called to the Rolls Court, in Chancery-lane, on the 26th of February, and took the prisoner—I produce the hat—it is the same—the prisoner had no money on him then.

(The prisoner, in a long address, stated, that he had been for some time subject to an overflow of blood to the head, which occasioned a giddiness and stupefaction, and in that state he had taken the prosecutor's hat by mistake; but when he got into the street he should have perceived his error, and have returned it.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-833

833. CHARLES BELCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February, 1 carpet, value 18s.; and 1 jacket, value 4s.; the goods of Francis Wiggs.

KEZIAH WIGGS . I am the wife of Francis Wiggs, who keeps a clothes-shop in High-street, Poplar. On Saturday, the 8th of February, the prisoner came to my house about twenty minutes past ten o'clock, and asked for a halfpenny-worth of hooks and eyes—I showed him some out of the window—he said they would do—I cut them off—he took them and went out—after he was gone I missed a carpet and a flannel jacket—the carpet had been sold, and done up in a small compass to go home, and the jacket was on the counter—I saw the prisoner run up the street—I informed the police—while he was running I noticed a flannel jacket under his arm—Hale-street is near our house—I have since seen some hooks and eyes, which the policeman has got—they are exactly the same as I sold the prisoner—my carpet was a light one, with a little green, a little red, and a drab corner.

HENRY HUNT . I am a sawyer, and lire in Mary-street, Bromley. On the 8th of February I was in Hale-street, and the prisoner passed me—he was running towards the East India-road, with a carpet and flannel jacket under his arm—he took the direction towards Bow-common—he came from the direction of High-street, Poptar, and I gave information to Mrs. Wiggs.

CHARLES SCOTNEY . I am a milkman, living in Wades-place, Mile-end-road. On the 8th of February I met the prisoner in Bow-common-lane—he had a carpet rolled round some flannel.

RICHARD BRINKNER (police-constable K 227.) On the 8th of February I went in search of the prisoner, and found him at his sister's lodging in Bridge-street, Stepney—when I went to the house, they said no such person lived there—I went in and saw him with his hat and coat off, before the fire—I asked if there was a person named Belcher lived there—the prisoner said no—I looked about for the carpet—the prisoner got up—I saw his face, and recognised him as the person I had seen in High-street, Poplar, that morning, and took him in charge—I went back to the lodging in the evening, and found this piece of card on the mantel-piece, and these two hooks and eyes in a little ornament on the mantel-piece, close by where the prisoner had been sitting.

Prisoner. Q. What did you ask for? A. If Charles Belcher lived there.

KEZIAH WIGGS re-examined. These hooks and eyes are exactly like what I sold the prisoner, and this bit of card exactly fits the card I cut it off of.

GUILTY.* Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-834

834. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 3s. 6d., the goods of John Lambert, from his person.

JOHN LAMBERT . I live at Carter and Co's., in Aldermanbury. On the night of the 10th of February, I was between St. Giles's church and Day and Martin's, in Holborn, between ten and eleven o'clock—I missed a handkerchief from my pocket, which I had occasion to use about two minutes before the witness spoke to me—I went back, and saw the prisoner in the hands of an officer—he was searched in my presence, and my hand-kerchief found on him—this is it—(looking at one)—the pavement was very wet and dirty, if the handkerchief had fallen, it would have been soiled, but it was not.

JOHN CAPON . I live in Union-row, Kingsland. About eleven o'clock at night, on the 10th of February, I was going from St. Giles's church towards the City—I saw the prisoner, and two other persons about his size, together—I saw one of the three take a handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket—I pointed out the three persons to the officer—I ran after the prosecutor, and brought him back to where the prisoner was in hold—I am quite sure he was one of the three who were in company together when the pocket was picked—the pavement was very muddy—I did not see any handkerchief on the ground.

HENRY HALL (police-constable E 66.) I was in Broad-street, St. Giles's, on the 10th of February—Capon pointed out three persons to me, the prisoner was one of them, and I took him—the others ran off, one to Drury-lane, and the other up Museum-street—I found this handkerchief in the prisoner's coat pocket—there was no mud on it—the prisoner said he picked it off the curb.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out that night looking at the illumination—I was returning home, three or four persons were before me—I saw something white on the curb—I took it up—it was this handkerchief—it was rather damp, but had no mud on it—I had it in my hand five minutes before the officer took me—he brought me back, and the gentleman said he

had lost a handkerchief—I took it out of my pocket, and said I had picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-835

835. JANE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February, 3 sheets, value 5s., the goods of Harriet Milberry.

ELLEN DONOVAN . I live in George-street, St. Giles's—I have the care of a house belonging to Harriet Milberry—it is a house to which men and women are admitted. The prisoner applied for a lodging there on the 3rd of February—a young man came with her, who went away the next morning, at seven o'clock—the prisoner came down between nine and ten o'clock—she said she was very late from her work—she appeared stout—I went up stairs before I would let her go out, and on going into the next room to where she had been, I missed two sheets off one bed, and one off another—I came down, and met her going up—she said she had left some money under the pillow—I said I had missed three sheets, she said she had not got them—I searched her, and found two under her petticoat, and one under her shawl.

Prisoner. A young woman who slept in the next room to me, gave me the sheets. Witness. There was a young woman slept in the next room, but I did not see her.

JERMIAH CAMPBELL (police-constable E 121.) I received the prisoner and the sheets in charge—the prisoner told the inspector she took the sheets because she had no money, and she wanted to get to her father in the country—she had no money on her.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Fourteen Days, and to be delivered to her father, who promised to provide for her.

Reference Number: t18400302-836

836. FRANCIS SKINNER was indicted for stealing on the 8th of February, 1 half-crown, and 1 shilling, the monies of James Fowler, from the person of Joseph Gale.

JOSEPH GALE . I am nine years old—I know the necessity of speaking the truth—I live with my cousin, Emma Fowler, in Grove-court, Lady Lake's-grove. On Saturday morning, the 8th of February, I went to a pawnbroker's to get a frock out of pledge—I had a half-crown and a shilling in my right hand—I met the prisoner in Lady Lake's-grove—he asked where I was going—I said, no where particular—I had the money in my right hand, and the edge of the half-crown was out of my hand—the prisoner stooped down as if he was talking to me—he knocked my hand, and the money fell on the ground—he picked up the half-crown and then the shilling, and ran up Greenwood-street, which leads to Mile-end-road—a lady at the bottom of the street cried, "Stop thief," and a gentleman ran out of Roper's public-house, and caught the prisoner—I saw the money on the ground after he chucked it down, but I did not see him chuck it down—I am sure he is the boy who knocked the money out of my hand.

EMMA FOWLER . I am the wife of James Fowler. The witness Gale lived with me and my sister—I gave him a half-crown and a shilling to go to the pawnbroker, and the duplicate—I afterwards saw a crowd at Mr. Avila's, the pawnbroker's—the half-crown and shilling laid down, and the prisoner was in custody.

JAMES BENTON . I live in Devonshire-street east, and am a cork-cutter. On the 8th of February I was in Mile-end-road—I heard the little boy call

"Stop thief"—I saw the prisoner run across the road—he threw a half-crown and a shilling down the area next door to Mr. Avila's.

SIMON WILSON (police-constable, 280 K.) I saw the prisoner in Mile-end-road, and heard the alarm—I took the prisoner, and received this half-crown and shilling from the servant of the house next door to Mr. Avila's—these are them.

Prisoner's Defence. The little boy opened his hand and showed me the money, and offered it to me—he dropped it, and I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-837

837. SARAH ANN PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February, 1 sleeve, value 7s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 pair of garters, value 8d.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 11s.; and 1 shirt, value 4s.; the property of Philip Robert Newman.

PHILIP ROBERT NEWMAN . I am a hosier and tailor, and live in Regent-quadrant. The prisoner was in my service for about seventeen days, up to the 13th of February, when in consequence of something I called her into the parlour, and stated that some things were missing—she denied taking any, and offered that her boxes should be searched—I went up stairs with her—she turned the things out of her box—I found nothing but some handkerchiefs which I then thought to be mine, and which I now know to be mine—I then searched her bed, and found a number of these articles made up like a pillow on one side, and the bolster was doubled, and made a sort of pillow on the other side, and being covered with the pillow-cases it appeared a well made bed—I found this pair of garters which I suppose she took from the shop—the other things were wrapped up in the blanket—this lambswool waistcoat I can identify, having marked it myself, and it had got soiled in the shop—this lace sleeve belongs to my wife—I know these handkerchiefs, as I had been serving a customer with some a few days before, and showed him the parcel in which these were—when I found these, I sent down to one of the shopmen to bring up the parcel, and it could not be found—in a parcel behind the prisoner's room door I found this other handkerchief which had been taken from the same parcel—I sent for an officer, and gave the prisoner in custody—I have since then missed nearly 20l. worth of property.

THOMAS MARCHMONT (police-constable C 49.) I was sent for to take the prisoner—I searched her box—I found these stockings and mits there—I searched the kitchen, and found a shirt, which she admitted taking as a pattern—she admitted taking the things found in her bed, and begged forgiveness, and fell on her knees.

(The prisoner received a good character; and James Andrews, a licensed victualler, of Chelsea, promised to employ her.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-838

838. JOHN DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February, 181bs. weight of lead, value 2s., the goods of Francis Bramah and others, his masters.

JONATHAN HAGGIS . I am a fitter's labourer to Mr. Francis Bramah and his partners. The prisoner was in their employ as a bricklayer—I was at work at a club-house in St. Jamess-street, and the prisoner was employed on the same job—I was using this lead on the 11th of February, and left it in the area—I know one of these pieces of lead in particular—they are the property of my masters, and are worth about 2s.—I had left one of them in a ladle.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What time did you leave it? A. I had done using it at one o'clock, but I saw it at four o'clock, when I left the premises—it had been there from the Saturday before—I have been three years in the prosecutors' employ—I have been in the police, but have left it nine years—I can swear to one of these pieces of lead, which has a chisel mark on it—(examining it.)

HENRY HUGHES (police-constable B 145.) On the night of the 11th of February I saw the prisoner in Brewer's-green—he had a sack, which contained this lead—I asked what he had got—he said, "Some tools"—I opened the sack, and found this lead, but no tools—he told me the plumber where he had been at work, in St. James's-street, Piccadilly, gave him the pieces of lead.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 40.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-839

839. JOHN STANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February, 1 piece, containing 7 handkerchiefs, value 30s., the goods of William Ward.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be 6 yards of silk.

ELIZA BALLARD . I live in Bishopsgate-street, and am assistant to Mr. William Ward, a hosier. On Saturday evening, the 8th of February, I was in the shop—the prisoner opened the shop-door, and took a piece of silk-handkerchiefs from the counter—he ran off—I called to Mr. Ward, and he ran after him—this is the piece of handkerchiefs—(examining it)—it contains seven handkerchiefs, which are not divided.

WILLIAM WARD . I was in my shop on the 8th of February, about five o'clock in the evening—I ran out, and took the prisoner in Throgmorton-street—he had this piece of silk handkerchiefs on him, which are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress, and had no meant of supporting myself.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-840

840. LOUISA SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 1 watch-key, value 1d.; 1 key, value 6d.; 1 half-sovereign, 2 half-crowns, 1 shilling, 1 sixpence, 4 halfpence, and 1 farthing; the property of Ernest Leverett Foster, from his person.

ERNEST LEVERETT FOSTER . I am a chaser, and live in Bateman's-buildings, Soho-square. Early in the morning of the 25th of February I met the prisoner in Sutton-street, and went with her to a house in Crown-street—I had my money in my pocket when I went into the room—after I had been there a short time I missed my money, and charged her with taking it—she used very bad language, and I was obliged to call the policeman—I then saw him take the money off the top of the bed—I had not been on the bed—I was sober at the time.

CHARLES POCOCK (police-constable F 116.) I was on duty between one and two o'clock in the morning of the 25th of February, in Crown-street—I beard a call for the police, and I went to the house—the prosecutor accused the prisoner of robbing him of a half-sovereign, a shilling, and two half-crowns—I took, her into the room on the first floor—she went to the bed, laid hold of the bed-clothes, and said, "This is the bed the gentleman was on with me"—she dropped the money from her hand on the bed, and pulled the counterpane over it—I found a half-sovereign, a half-crown, a shilling, a sixpence, 2 1/4 d., and two keys—these are them—(producing them)—I told

the prisoner she had dropped it on the bed—she denied it, and said it must have got out of the prosecutor's pocket on the bed—when we got to the street one half-crown fell from the prisoner's person—the prosecutor took it up, and gave it to me—I had previously asked her where the two half-crowns were, and she said she had not got them—she pretended to be intoxicated, and when we got to another street she fell down on a grating, and I heard two distinct pieces of money fall down.

Prisoner's Defence. That which fell from me was my latch-key, and a shilling which the gentleman gave me for going with him—the half-crown that fell from my bosom was one of my own.

MR. FOSTER re-examined. I had given her a shilling, but not a half-crown.

GUILTY.* Aged 26.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-841

841. JAMES HARES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February, 2 boots, value 15s., the goods of John Born.

JOHN BORN . I am a shoemaker, and live in Duke-street, Grosvenor-square. I employed the prisoner to whitewash and colour my kitchen—he left about five o'clock on the 20th of February, and I missed two boots from the shop window when he was gone—these are them—(examining them.)

JOHN LEOMIN . I am shopman to Mr. Gofton, a pawnbroker. These boots were pawned by the prisoner on the 20th of February, in the name of John Hares.

Prisoner. I had been out of work twelve weeks through the frost—I was distressed.

GUILTY. Aged 28.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. — Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-842

842. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 1 pair of trowsers, value 1s.; 2 shirts, value 2s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d., and 1 frock, value 1s.; the goods of Francis John, in a certain vessel, in a port of entry and discharge.

FRANCIS JOHN . I belong to the brig Enterprize, which was lying in the south quay of the London Dock, which is within the port of London. I was in the cabin on the 22nd of February—the mate called my attention, and I saw the prisoner on the quay of the dock with a bundle—I went on shore after him, and asked him where he got that bundle—he gave it to me, and it contained my flannel shirts, my drawers, smock-frock, stockings, and trowsers—they were all mine—in a few minutes the prisoner was brought on board by an officer, and I delivered him the things which I had taken from the prisoner—they had been kept in a chest in the forecastle which was broken open.

Prisoner. At the time you took the things from me, were there other persons there? Witness. There were plenty of people about the quay, but I did not see an officer to give you in charge, and I could not leave my ship—I did not see Fitzpatrick.

DANIEL VALDER . I am a constable of the London Dock. I saw the prisoner there on the 22nd of February—he ran over the bridge past me—I stopped him, and told him he was accused of robbing a vessel in the south quay—I took him on board the Enterprize—he said he did it from starvation—I produce these articles.

Prisoner. The prosecutor had sold some things to Fitzpatrick, and he

gave me these things—when the prosecutor took me, I gave him these things—he struck me two or three times, which he cannot deny—I stood along side his vessel after he went on hoard.

FRANCIS JOHN re-examined. I had not sold any thing that day—the prisoner was about ten yards from the stern of the vessel when I saw him—he was walking away, and looking at the stern of the ship.

GUILTY.* Aged 40.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18400302-843

843. WILLIAM HUTCHINSON and JOHN GRIFFITHS were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February, 1lb. weight of tea, value 6s., the goods of George May.

JOHN MILES (police-constable N 110.) I saw the prisoners on the 19th of February, in the Chalk road which leads from King's Cross to Holloway—they were in conversation—as soon as they saw me, they ran—I pursued them, and saw a parcel under the tail of Hutchinson's coat, and he threw it into a field—I called to a man to stop the prisoners, which he did, and I took them—a man got the parcel, and gave it to me—it contained a pound of green tea—I took them to the station, then went and made inquiries—I found on Griffiths three or four figs in a paper—I went to Mr. May's, and spoke to the shopman—this is the parcel which had been under the tail of Hutchinson's coat—(producing it)—Hutchinson told me be took it from a boy who was asleep by a wall in a field, and Griffiths said, "If you like, you can come with me, I dare say you will find him there now."

Griffiths. I went and bought a pennyworth of figs—I never said any thing about the tea—I know nothing about it.

HENRY WILD TAYLOR . I am apprentice to Mr. George May, a grocer, at King's Cross, which is about fifty yards from the Chalk road. On the 19th of February I saw the two prisoners at the shop, between ten and eleven o'clock—Griffiths paid me for a pennyworth of figs—as soon as they were gone, I missed a pound of green tea, which had been on the counter done up with several other parcels—the prisoners were close to them—I had not put a mark of the price outside the parcel, but I can tell this is it by the tea, and by the manner in which the parcel is done up—I did it up myself—the tea is worth 6s.—Griffiths came a little way from Hutchinson when he paid for the figs, but before that they were standing close together—they were nearest to the tea when they were standing together—MR. May has no partner.

(George Ringland, a type-founder; and Jane Bantly, of White Horse-court, gave Hutchinson a good character. Elizabeth Woolmer gave Griffiths a good character.)

HUTCHINSON— GUILTY . Aged 14.

GRIFFITHS— GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18400302-844

844. PATRICK DESMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February, 1 tub, value 4s.; and 65lbs. weight of butter, value 2l. 8s., the goods of George Perry and another; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN HORTON (City police-constable, No. 103.) On the night of the 28th of February I was on duty in King William-street, near Scarlett's ham-and-beef-shop—I saw the prisoner following a cart in the street—he took a cask out of the cart, as it turned round towards the Bank—the prisoner turned towards Gracechurch-street, and a person told the carman he had lost a cask—he jumped out of the cart, and he and I followed the prisoner—he had got the cask on his shoulder, and I took him with it.

Prisoner. Q. Why did you not come and take me when I took it? A. I did not know you had stolen it then—I thought you might have had permission to put it into the cart to carry over the bridge, as is often the case.

NICHOLAS HENRY MEARS . I am carman to Mr. George Perry and Francis Gill, they are wholesale cheesemongers, and live on Dowgate-hill. On the 28th of February, when I came to the rise of King William-street, I heard of a cask of butter being stolen—I jumped out and ran with the officer—I took the prisoner with it on his shoulder—it was my master's.

Prisoner. A man asked me to carry it to Bishopsgate-street, and said he would give me a shilling.

JAMES TUGWELL (City police-constable, No. 144.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, from Mr. Clark's office—I was present at his trial twelve months ago—I know he is the person—(read.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-845

845. EDWARD JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, 2 watches, value 2l.; 1 guard-chain, value 4s.; 1 pencil-case, value 3s.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 3 breast-pins, value 3s.; 1 brooch, value 4s.; 8 toothpicks, value 2s.; 1 pair of pistols, value 25s.; 3 printed books, value 6s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 2 half-crowns, 5 shillings, 2 sixpences, 1 groat, 1 penny, and 12 halfpence; the property of Jacob Russell, his master.

JACOB RUSSELL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoreditch. the prisoner was my errand-boy from about October till February—his friends live in the Old Kent-road—the prisoner was very much distressed, and they used to pawn at a shop of mine in the Kent-road—his mother told me a distressing tale, in consequence of which I said I would get her elder boy to another pawnbroker, and I took the prisoner—on the 12th of February, in consequence of some suspicion, I called the prisoner into the kitchen, and directed him to turn out his pockets—he took out some things, but very trifling, but I saw that some of them had belonged to my warehouse—I said, "You have more than one pocket"—he said he had not, but I felt, and took from his pocket this pair of pistols, and the duplicate with them—I then put my hand into his pocket again, and found 12s. in silver—he said he had taken that on the Monday before, and 3s. 6d. more—I found two silk handkerchiefs on him—I had kept money in a cupboard below—I had not given the prisoner any wages, but generally on a Sunday I gave him a sixpence or a shilling—I went up stairs, and in his trowsers I found this watch, and then this other watch and this jewellery—he said they were all mine, and he had taken them from the warehouse—as we were going up stairs from the kitchen, he went into a corner of the shop, by the fire-place, and said, "Stop a minute"—he put his hands together, and appeared to be in prayer—I did not disturb him—we then went up stairs—I found amongst his things up stairs, a bible, a hymn-book, and another book—he said he had taken them from me, and destroyed the duplicates—I found his cloak and trowsers under the sofa, and in the trowsers I found these watches and other things—the whole of the property is worth 4l. or 5l.—this handkerchief was produced from a drawer—when I asked him what he had done with the 3s. 6d. more which he said he taken from the cupboard, he stated that he had sent half-a-crown to his mother in his stockings, and that he had sent her half-a-crown or 3s. 6d. a week—I can

identify this pair of pistols and this seal, which were found on him, as being mine.

CHARLOTTE LEAFE . I am in the prosecutor's service. I saw the prisoner in the shop on the 10th of February, the day the shop was closed, owing to the marriage of her Majesty—the prisoner was at the till—I put some question to him, and he said he wanted the key of the cupboard, to get a book in the name of Beck with—I told my master of it, and saw my master find the articles up stairs, Under the sofa.

MARTIN ROOTS (police-constable H 170.) I was called to the prosecutor's and took the prisoner, and have this property—the prisoner pointed to a cupboard, and said he had taken the silver from there, and he had taken some from there twice before.

Prisoner. I said I had only taken it once before.

GUILTY . Aged 11.— Transported for Seven Years.—Isle of Wight.

Reference Number: t18400302-846

846. EDWARD DEAVES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February, 1 pair of boots, value 6s., the goods of Peter Hayes.

PETER HAYES . I am a shoemaker, and live in High-street, Shadwell. I was in my parlour on the 20th of February—there is only a glass partition between that and the shop—I can see every part of the shop—about a quarter-past one o'clock I saw the prisoner go out of the shop, and his hands were closed up to his person—he crossed the way, and I went after him—I missed a pair of boots—he turned towards Shadwell-market, and from thence to the wooden bridge—I then collared him, and accused him of stealing the boots—he gave them to me, and said, "Take them, I have plenty of money to buy more"—I look him back and sent for a policeman, and gave him the prisoner and the boots—these are them—(examining them)—they are not saleable, as they are not finished—the prisoner was searched, but he made a desperate resistance—it took three officers to search him—there was 8s. 6d. found on him, 2 1/2 d. in copper, and nine duplicates—he said he had bought the boots.

Prisoner. I had been drinking with three or four men, and a man in the street said, "Will you have a pair of boots?"—I said I did not want them—he said, "You shall have them a bargain"—he wanted 9s. for them—I said I would give him 6s.—he said, "No," and I went away—he came after me, and let me have them for 6s.—I got drinking again, and I cannot give the least account of what I did. Witness. I discovered the boots were gone before I followed the prisoner—I had put them down half-an-hour before—I had a suspicion from seeing his arms closed—he said he had bought them for 6s.—he ran as well as I could, and did not seem the worse for liquor.

JOHN LAIRD (police-constable K 294.) I took the prisoner to the station-house—he said he bought the boots in East Smithfield, for 7s. 6d.—I found 3s. 6d. in silver on him, and 2d. in copper.

Prisoner. I had a half-sovereign in the same pocket. Witness. No, there was not.

ROBERT HARWOOD VALENTINE . I am an inspector of the K division of police. I was at the station-house when the prisoner was given in charge—he said he bought the boots in East Smithfield, of a man, opposite St. Katherine's Docks—he did not appear in liquor—I sent him to the Police Court half an hour afterwards, and followed behind him—he afterwards assumed the appearance of being intoxicated, and they did not examine him till the next day.

Prisoner. I lost a jacket and a pair of trowsers—I cannot tell what I was doing. Witness. He was without a jacket.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-847

847. GEORGE SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 3 handkerchiefs, value 10s. 6d., the goods of James Cuff Pearce.

ALFRED GILBERT . I am in the employ of Mr. James Cuff Pearce, a hosier in Oxford-street. On the 21st of February, shortly before one o'clock, the prisoner came and wanted a pair of woollen gloves—I showed him some—they were too small—I then showed him some leather ones—he said they were too large, and asked if I had any others—I said, "No"—he then said he would leave 2d. on a pair of leather ones, as he had not sufficient to pay for them—he gave me a sixpence—I went to the till, and told him I had no change—he said he would leave the sixpence, and call again—I noticed he was putting some silk handkerchiefs by the side of him—he asked me the price of them—I made him no answer—he left the sixpence, and as he was going away I went before him, and said I thought he had more than he ought to have—he proceeded to the counter again, and took off his hat, and took three silk handkerchiefs out of it, and laid them on the counter with some others—I struck the floor with my foot, and my master came up—I told him what had happened—the prisoner denied it—an officer was sent for—these handkerchiefs are worth 10s. 6d.

JOHN GREEN (police-constable E 74.) I was called, and received the prisoner and these handkerchiefs—he denied that he had taken them.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did not he say it was his own handkerchief that he took out of his hat? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Did you find any handkerchiefs on him? A. Yes—he had one with the portrait of Jack Shepperd in the middle, and a red border, but I do not think that could be mistaken for one of these.

ALFRED GILBERT re-examined. I can swear it was these three handkerchiefs that the prisoner took out of his hat—he had his own handkerchief in his breast pocket—here is the mark on these handkerchiefs. I was not more than two yards from him when he took them from his hat.

GUILTY.* Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-848

848. WILLIAM HOLLINGSWORTH BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February, 1 oz. weight of cotton, value 3d.; 4 oz. weight of thread, value 9d.; 18 yards of tape, value 9d.; and 12 balls of cotton, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Key; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS KEY . I live in Pared-street, Paddington, and am a labourer—my wife keeps a toy-shop, and sells cottons. I recollect about the 1st of February, hearing some glass falling in the street, (that was the first time the glass was cut)—I saw some boys in the street, and the prisoner was one of them—in consequence of that, I put some pasteboard up against the window. On the 14th of February I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner in the street—he plunged his hand into the broken pane, and I saw him extract sundry articles from the window—I ran out, and saw him drop the cotton just by the window—I pursued him, and in about half a minute he was taken is Market-street—when I stopped him, he fell on his knees and said, "Pray let me go; I have taken nothing, but I will discover to you the other parties who have taken your goods away"—I took him back to my shop, and gave him in charge—I know this cotton which I picked up

to be mine—I bought it in Coventry-street—I lost some other cotton from the window, which I had bought at the same place—I lost some thread also—the prisoner dropped this cotton, that I should stop and take it up, but I did not, and when I came back Mrs. Starling gave me the cotton which she had picked up—I am sure it is mine, and that the prisoner dropped it—I had been serving some of it not two minutes before.

GEORGE MERRETT (police-constable D 198.) I was on duty in Praed-street on the 14th of February—I went up to the prosecutor's shop, and the prisoner was given to me—the prosecutor gave me this cotton—I found on the prisoner this knife, the point of which is ground in the shape of a putty knife, and this piece of wire, which is made into a hook to hook things out.

Prisoner. I was walking home—this gentleman came and took me—my father used this knife to put up putty with. Witness. He told me it was for cleaning bricks, and he said at the station it was for cleaning tools.

ALFRED BLUNDELL (police-sergeant T 9.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office (read)—the prisoner is the person who was tried.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-849

849. THOMAS NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February, 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 half-crown, 13 shillings, 19 sixpences, 2 groats, 2 pence, and 2 halfpence; the property of James Leather, from the person of Mary Leather.

MARY LEATHER . I live at Cranford, and am the wife of James Leather. The prisoner and his mother came to our house, on the 17th of February, and had a pint of ale—they were there about an hour—while they were there I had occasion to give change for sixpence—I pulled out my purse, and put the sixpence in it—I returned the purse into my pocket—I had a half-crown in my purse, and some shillings and sixpences, upwards of 25s. in all—the prisoner had first sat on my left-hand, and then he removed to my right-hand side, which brought him next to my pocket—I had a child in my lap, and noticed the prisoner several times to lay his head against my pocket—he and his mother afterwards went away, and when they had been gone half-an-hour I missed my purse—I went to the prisoner's house, and asked if he had seen my purse and money—he said he had not—his father made him get out of bed and bring his clothes down, and they were searched—he declared he had never seen the purse—my son, who was with me, heard some money rattle as the prisoner was getting out of bed, his father then desired that the policeman might be sent for, and he found the purse and money between the mattress and the bed, on which the prisoner had lain—this is my purse—(examining it.)

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a policeman. I went to the prisoner's father's house—I searched the prisoner and his clothes—I found this purse between the bed and the mattress—it contained the money stated in the indictment—here is twenty-six shillings and one penny—the prisoner denied knowing any thing of it till I found it, and then he said he picked it up.

Prisoner. I was coming out of the door and kicked against the parse.

GUILTY . Aged 10.— Transported for Ten Years.—Isle of Wight.

Sixth Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabia.

Reference Number: t18400302-850

850. PETER THORPE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 1 decanter, value 2s.; 2 drinking glasses, value 1s., and 4 sheets, value 2l.; the goods of William Guiver; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-851

851. HENRY HART was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February, 4 oz. weight of tobacco, value 1s.; and 1 jar, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of Edward Coleman; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-852

852. HENRY GRIGGS Was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February, 21bs. 3oz. weight of brass, value 7s., the goods of Thomas Hemsley, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-853

853. MARY MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February, 4 sheets, value 2l.; 1 table-cloth, value 7s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 4 curtains, value 1l.; 6 napkins, value 3s.; and 3 silver spoons, value 1s.; the goods of William Lancelot Loat, her master.

WILLIAM LANCELOT LOAT . I am a builder and decorator, and live in Little Ormond-street, Queen-square. The prisoner was a servant of mine, and would have been twelve months with me if she had remained till this month—she left without my paying her, and when she had been gone half-an-hour I missed the spoon—I then went to my wardrobe, and missed the rest of the articles stated—I found them all at last—these are mine—(examining the articles.)

JAMES GODDARD (police-constable G 191.) I was told of this, and found the prisoner at Greenwich—I found on her nineteen duplicates—she told me they were of her master's property—that led me to find the property, and part of it is here.

DAVID ALDRIDGE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce two sheets, a shirt, and some napkins, which were pawned by the prisoner.

THOMAS ALDRIDGE . I am a pawnbroker. I have three handkerchiefs, three tea-spoons, two curtains, and some other things, pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM NEWBY . I am a pawnbroker. I have two shirts, a sheet, and a table-cloth, pawned by the prisoner—I took in two of them.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 23.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. — Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-854

854. WILLIAM BLAKE and WILLIAM HERRING were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, 6 pairs of stockings, value 9s., the goods of John Wills and another.

WILLIAM ATWOOD (police-constable E 88.) On the 15th of February I was on duty, and saw the two prisoners coming down George-street, St. Giles's, in company—Blake had this bundle under his arm—it was about ten o'clock in the morning—I went over and asked Blake what he had got—he made no answer—I took it, and found in it these stockings—I took the prisoners to the station-house, and asked where they had got them—Blake said he picked them up—I asked where they had slept the night before—they said, at the straw-yard, in Whitecross-street—I said, "I suppose you came down Long-lane and up Holborn"—"No," said Blake, "we came down Cheap side"—I said, "I suppose you picked them up there"—Blake said, "Yes, nearly opposite the Old Jewry"—I went and

made inquiry, and found Mr. Wills in the Poultry had lost them—these are the stockings—the shop mark is on them—(producing them.)

JOSEPH CARPENTER . I am assistant to Mr. John Wills and another—I know these stockings to be their property—they were inside the door of the shop—they have the mark on them now—we do not sell them with the mark on them—we missed them when our attention was drawn to it.

Blake's Defence. I met this prisoner coming down Holborn.

BLAKE*— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

HERRING— GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-855

855. WILLIAM MINALL was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, I saw, value 5s.; and 1 rule, value 6d.; the goods of Henry Freeman; and 2 saws, value 9s., the goods of Charles Brown.

HENRY FREEMAN . I am a carpenter, and was at work on the 22nd of February in some new buildings, in Warwick-square, Kensington. I left the whole of my tools there on the 22nd, at twelve o'clock, when I went to dinner—they were in the first floor—the front-door was fastened in the usual way—we were absent about an hour—when I returned I missed a saw and a rule—they were afterwards found at the pawnbroker's—these are them—(looking at them.)

JOSEPH HENRY SYMES . I am assistant to Mr. Wells, a pawnbroker. This saw was pawned by the prisoner.

CHARLES BROWN . I was at work at the same place as Freeman was—I lost two saws—one of them is that produced by Symes.

GEORGE HAWKINS . I am a pawnbroker. I have produced a saw pawned by the prisoner.

(Elizabeth Seager, a mangier, in Wood-street, Westminster, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY.* Aged 37.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18400302-856

856. STEPHEN POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February, 1 bridle, value 15s.; the goods of Edward West; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS BRUNT . I am a policeman. About eight o'clock on the 28th of February, I and another officer were at Leighton, in Essex—I saw the prisoner pass me with something bulky in his pocket—I asked what he had got—he said, what was that to me—I desired the other officer to search him, and he found this bridle in his pocket—(producing it)—he said he bought it of a man for 3s.—I found the owner, Mr. West, of Church-street, Hackney.

EDWARD WEST . I live in Church-street, Hackney. This bridle is mine—it was taken from my stable at the back of my house.

JAMES LAVER . I know this bridle belongs to my master—it was in the stable—I had locked it in—the stable was broken open about five o'clock that evening, and the bridle taken.

Prisoner. I was going home, and a man by Hackney gate offered the bridle for sale for 3s.—I gave him that for it—he said he was a harness-maker, and lived at Hackney—I was going through Leighton, and called at a public-house—I had half-a-pint of beer, and then the policeman stopped me.

THOMAS POCOCK (police-sergeant F 13.) I produce a certificate of the

prisoner's former conviction, from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person who was tried.

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-857

857. MARY WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February, 1 bag, value Id.; 7 sovereigns, and 4 half-sovereigns; the property of Thomas Whinfield, from his person.

THOMAS WHINGIELD . I am a boatman, and live in Derbyshire. On the 27th of February I came to town on business, by the boat—I was in Edgware-road, about ten o'clock at night, with Smith, one of my boatmen—the prisoner came up to us as we were standing—she asked me where I was going—I said, where my mate was, as I was a stranger—she wanted us to go home with her and sit down by the fire, and be comfortable—I went—I spent sixpence, and had some beer, and then came out—I went to a beer-shop and had a pot of beer—Smith was with me, and a woman—we then went to another shop, and had two quarterns of rum—we then came out—the prisoner still kept pulling me, and persuading me to go home with her, and at last I went with her to an up-stairs room—I did not give her any money—I laid on the bed with her for a few minutes—I had at that time a canvas purse with seven sovereigns and four half-sove-in it, in my right-hand trowsers'-pocket—I felt the prisoner draw the purse out while I was on the bed-side—she had just got off the bed—I accused her of it, and tried to get it from her—there was no light in the room then—she had put out the candle—she had the purse in her hand, and she put it out of one hand into the other—I did not see it in her hand, as it was dark, but I felt it in her hand—I made a noise, and Smith and the other woman came up—the woman brought a light with her—the prisoner was then standing by the fire, and my purse was at her feet—the woman picked up one sovereign and one half-sovereign—I picked up one sovereign—my purse was not tied, it was only twisted—I lost three sovereign sand two half-sovereigns—I was quite sober.

Cross-examined by MR. THOMPSON. Q. You were walking in the road when you met the prisoner? A. I was standing—I had left my boat perhaps an hour—I had not been in any public-house—I went to the prisoner's to warm myself by her fire—Smith was not with me then—I and the prisoner were alone—I then sent for some beer, after that I went out to a Jerry-shop to look for Smith, and there we had a quart of ale—I was not willing to go back with the prisoner after that, but I was overcome by her persuasion—I did not make any bargain with her—I concluded I was to pay her something—I was not on the bed many minutes—I did not hear the purse fall from the prisoner's hand on the floor—I was on the bed, and she was gone to the fire-place—I called Smith and the woman up, to bring a light—they came and found the purse and some of the money on the floor—after the purse and money was found, I went down irs—I gave the prisoner a shilling, though I believed she had robbed me of four sovereigns—she said if it was on the floor, she would get it against I came up again—I said I should be up again on the Saturday, and I should call and see if she had got it, and if not, I should see further into it—I gave her the shilling, thinking perhaps she might let me have it then—I did not drink with her—there was some drink got, but I did not drink any—we then parted—I went back to her on the Saturday, and

took a policeman with me—she had not found the money, and I gate her in charge—no one persuaded me to give her in charge—I do not know that the policeman asked me to give her in charge—he asked me three or four times if I would give her in charge.

COURT. Q. You are certain that when you went on the bed you had your purse with seven sovereigns and four half-sovereigns in it? A. Yes, I had it on the bed—I felt her hand in my pocket, and taking the purse—I tried to get it, and she shifted it from one hand to the other—in the scuffle some of the money fell on the floor.

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a boatman. I came up with Captain Whinfleld—I fell in with another woman—she and I were in a room under the room the captain was in—I heard the money drop on the floor—I did not know what the captain had got—I went up, and saw some money picked up.

MARY SMITH . I have known Samuel Smith for some years, but he is from Derby, and I am from Cheshire—I was going out that evening, and met Smith—he asked me to have something to drink—we went and had a pot of beer, and the prisoner and the prosecutor came in—we went to have some rum, and the prisoner then persuaded the captain to go home with her, and he did—Smith said, "I won't leave my mate"—I went with Smith, and we sat down in a chair by the fire in the lower room—I heard the money fall, and ran up stairs with a light—the purse laid by the prisoner's feet, and there were two sovereigns in it—I picked up a sovereign and a half from under the bed.

CAROLINE BAKER . About half-past twelve o'clock that night I called at the prisoner's to ask for a young man—she said he was drinking at a public-house—she sent for some gin—she offered some to Whinfield—he would not drink it—I was going out, when the prisoner called me back, and said, "Don't go, I will treat you to a glass of the best that any house can afford," and she showed me three sovereigns in her hand—Whinfield then said to her, "Be as good as your word, I shall call on Saturday, and if you don't I will put you somewhere else"—I then went away.

Cross-examined. Q. You were a lodger of hers? A. Yes, till I would not pawn my shawl to pay her rent; but we parted good friends.

JAMES BENNETT (police-constable D 59.) The prosecutor came to me and said he had been robbed by Welch—I went with him to her house, and knocked—the prisoner came and said, "What do you want?"—I said, "I believe it is you I want about the four sovereigns your robbed the boatman of"—she said, "I know nothing about them"—I called in the prosecutor, and he said, "Now about these four sovereigns, do you intend to give them up?"—she said she knew nothing about them, and he gave her in charge.

GUILTY.* Aged 25.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-858

858. TIMOTHY BRYANT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 1 coat, value 10s., the goods of George Baldwin.

GEORGE BALDWIN . I work for my father, who is a green-grocer. We have a horse and cart—on the 21st of February I was driving down Lisle-street, Soho—I had a coat in the cart—I was walking by the side of the horses—I did not see who took the coat—I saw the prisoner at the station-house

soon after—which is about half a mile from where I lost my coat this is it—(looking at it.)

HENRY CALEY . I am a labouring man. I saw the prisoner take the coat from the cart, as it was going on—I was close behind him—the prosecutor was walking by the side of the horses—when the prisoner had got the coat, he hung it over his arm, and walked about forty yards—he saw roe running after him, and then he threw the coat on the pavement and ran off—I took it up and hallooed, "Stop thief," and the policeman took him—I am sure he is the same man.

WILLIAM KENT (police-constable.) About eight o'clock that evening I heard the cry of "Stop thief "—I ran, and got to Castle-street, and saw the prisoner surrounded by a number of people, who said he had stolen a coat—he said he had no intention of stealing it, but pulled it down by accident—I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. The cart was coming along, and I jumped to get on the copse, and the coat came down—I was going to chuck it up, but had not time to do it—I had no intention of stealing it.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-859

859. HENRY HOWE and JEREMIAH DACEY were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February, 1 handkerchief, the goods of a man unknown, from his person.

JOSEPH DAVIES LEATHART . I am a house-decorator. On the 1st of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the two prisoners together between Crown-street and Charles-street—I thought all was not right—I watched, and saw an old gentleman walking along—he stopped at one or two shops—the two prisoners passed on behind him—he stopped and they stopped—he went on, and they followed—the gentleman stopped at a tailor's shop, then went on again, and Dacey took the bottom of his coat pocket with his left hand, and put his other hand in, he pulled the handkerchief nearly out—Howe then went up and pulled it out, and passed it to Dacey, who put it into his pocket—Howe passed ahead of the gentleman, and Dacey kept behind—I then crossed, went up to Dacey, and caught him, and Howe crossed the road then—I said to Dacey, "What have you got?"—he said, "Nothing"—I said, "Yes, you have"—he then pulled out an old handkerchief—I said, "Not that; what have you else?"—he would not take his other hand out of his pocket—I took it out, and this handkerchief was in it—he said, "Don't, don't, you may have it"—I took him across the road, and missed the gentleman; and as I got near Meux's brewhouse I saw Howe coming, running very fast, to run to the rookery—I called out, "Stop him"—I gave Dacey to an officer, and pursued Howe to Bedford-square, and on through Percy-street, where he was stopped—I said, "You have given me a pretty good run"—he looked up and said, "Should you have known me if I had not come after you?"—I said, "Yes"—I then went to see for the gentleman, but could not find him—I do not know his name.

Cross-examined by MR. THOMPSON. Q. Have you tried to get into the police? A. I could have done it long ago—I could not get to the gentleman, because Dacey would not go very quietly, when I was first going towards the gentleman, but when I came the other way he came more quietly—when I saw Howe at the end of Tottenham-court-road I turned round, and he cut

off, and I ran after him—I hallooed, "Stop thief," and there was a man very near him then—I had seen Howe before.

Dacey. I did not say, "You may have it." Witness. You did, and then said the handkerchief was yours.

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX . I am a policeman. I heard the cry of "Stop thief," and took Dacey from Mr. Leathart—while taking him to the station-house he said he did not take it out of the gentleman's pocket, it was down by his feet, and, pointing to Leathart, he said, "He took it out of my pocket"—I found 3s. 4d. on him.

JAMES PORTER . (police-sergeant E 1.) About four o'clock in the afternoon I took Howe from Leathart—he asked me what punishment he was liable to—I said, "From ten to fifteen years, transportation"—he said if he got over this he would be careful of himself, and had he known that Leathart had not been one of us he would have given him something for himself.

(John Wright, of Fetter-lane, gave Howe a good character. Edward Miers, King's Arms-court; Mary Johnson, New Inn-yard; Ellen Brady, Crown-street; and Mary King, Tottenham Court-road; gave Dacey a good character.)

HOWE*— GUILTY . Aged 18.

DACEY*— GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Ten Years.

OLD COURT.—Thursday, March 5th, 1840.

Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18400302-860

860. JAMES CREADY was indicted for feloniously being at large within her Majesty's dominions before the expiration of the term for which he had been ordered to be transported; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 31.— Transported for Life.

(The prisoner had been previously convicted of a like offence.)

Reference Number: t18400302-861

861. JOHN RILEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Lassie, on the 11th of February, at St. Pancreas, and stealing therein, I copper, value 20s., his goods, then being fixed in the said dwelling-house; against the Statute, &c.; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-862

862. GEORGE LEWIS was indicted for feloniously uttering, on the 11th of February, a certain forged order for the payment of 1l. 5s., knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud George Henry; also, for feloniously uttering, on the 14th of February, a forged order for the payment of 2l. 10s., knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud Henry Adams Newman; to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 52.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-863

863. JONATHAN HARRIS and CHARLES TURNBULL were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Jennings, at St. James's, Clerkenwell, on the 11th of February, and stealing therein, 12 cakes, value 3d., his goods; to which

TURNBULL pleaded GUILTY . Aged 14.

ROBERT JENNINGS . I am a milkman, and live in Bowling Green-lane, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell. On the 11th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was at home, and heard the window

crack, which was quite safe five minutes before, and these cakes were there—I got up, went into the shop, and saw the two prisoners standing at the window outside—I opened the door, went out, and took them both—Harris drew his hand from the window as I took them—the cakes were found on the ground—I had seen one of their hands in the window with a cake in it.

JOHN VOLLER . I am a policeman. I heard "Police" called—I went up and took them in charge.

HARRIS— GUILTY . Aged 14.—Both Confined Three Months;

One Week Solitary.

Before Mr. Baron Parke.

Reference Number: t18400302-864

864. THOMAS MORRIS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 11th of December, of a certain evil-disposed person, 9 pieces of paper, value 2s., the goods of John Bentley and others.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Richard Johnson.

MESSRS. PHILLIPS, CLARKSON, and BODKIN, conducted the Prosecution.

RICHARD JOHNSON . I am one the coal-meters appointed by the Committee of Coal Factors and Merchants. On the 19th of November I was in the discharge of my duty on board the Union, of Whit by, lying at Stone-stairs tier, in the river—it is usual for me to have a certificate-book—(looking at a book)—this is the book I had on that occasion—it is a certificate-book, which we receive out of the coal-meter's office when we go on board ships—they are certificates which we give to different merchants—they are not signed as they are in the book—there are blanks left for the name of the ship from which the coals are delivered, the quantity, the barge, the number of it, the lighter man, and to whose account they are delivered, and the date of the delivery—it is signed by the meter—I should think there were upwards of from thirty to forty certificates in the book that morning—I went into the captain's cabin several times that morning—my book was down in the cabin on the locker—I left it there the first thing in the morning when I went on board, till I left the ship in the afternoon—a man named Venables came on board between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning—I did not know Mr. Morris, the defendant—I believe Venables was in his service—I remained on board the brig from a quarter past seven o'clock till half-past four o'clock in the afternoon—Venables was on board about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour—he came down into the cabin while I was sitting there along with the captain—I left the cabin while Venables was there—the captain was there at that time—there were several barges there, and the Lark among them, coming towards the brig—Venables had the management of three or four of them—MR. Stewart, the mate, was on board—Venables drank with him down in the cabin—I did not notice that any thing had happened to my meter's book while I was on board the brig—when I got home in the evening I found there were several sheets torn out—I can undertake to say that it was perfectly sound that morning—there appears to be nine certificates torn out—there is a margin to the certificates, to enable me to keep a check of the contents of the body of the certificate—the margins were torn away as well as the bodies—the book was lying on the locker when Venables was in the cabin.

JURY. Q. Was the book out of your possession between the time of your leaving the vessel and getting home? A. Never—no other person could have access to it, except down in the cabin.

COURT. Q. Did you examine the both the moment you got home? A. Yes, and found the loss directly—I did not part with the possession of it till I found the loss.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you any papers at the end of it, which you were in the habit of referring to in the evening? A. Yes, orders—it is my practice to refer to them almost every evening—when I got home that evening I referred to the end of the book, and then missed the certificates—(looking at a certificate produced by Ledley)—this is one of the nine certificates—all the written part of it is forged—it is not my hand-writing, any part of it—it does not bear my name, but the name of Robert Johnson—there is no official coal-meter named Robert Johnson—there is one named John Johnson—this certificate bears my printed stamp on the back of it—it is, "R. Johnson, 5—1839"—the 5 at the back means the number of the book, which is the number of the one I have in ray hand.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Why do you call yourself an official coal-meter? A. I am sure I do not know why the committee should call us official meters—we are weighers, or meters—I consider meter implies both weigher and measurer—we weigh the coals now—we are not appointed by the Lord Mayor, but by a committee of nine merchants and nine factors—we give these certificates gratuitously to the lightermen—we do not receive any thing for them—every paper in this book would be stamped, "No. 5"—the "1839"denotes the year—I am sure this is one of the nine certificates I lost, because I have lost no others but the nine—I have issued more, but I can account for every one—those I have given away I have filled up—the margins of these nine have been taken away.

COURT. Q. Do you fill up all you give away with your hand-writing? A. Certainly—the particulars of all the others are in the margins—I have not compared the particulars of this certificate with the margins, to see if it agrees with any of them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who was on board the vessel besides Venables? A. There was no lighterman on board—the captain, Mr. Stewart, and I, were down in the cabin, having some ale at the table, which is not more than a yard from the locker—I left the cabin for about ten minutes, while Venables was there—I will swear that—he was on board ten minutes or a quarter of an hour altogether—I drank one glass of ale—there was a bottle drunk—I left the Captain with Venables in the cabin—I met them on the deck coming out of the cabin, I think, about ten minutes after I had been on deck—I cannot say exactly—I will swear I was more than five minutes out of the cabin before Venables came up—you go up a few stairs from the cabin to the deck—MR. Stewart followed me out of the cabin—he left Venables in the cabin, perhaps a few minutes—I will not swear it was one minute—I did not meet them coming out of the cabin together—they followed one another.

COURT. Q. Are you sure that Stewart ever left him in the cabin alone? A. He must have done, because he followed me out—I went on deck first—MR. Stewart followed me afterwards, and must have left Venables there.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How soon afterwards? A. Perhaps five minutes—I do not swear he left Venables below five minutes—he came up about five minutes after me, alone—it was about five minutes after I had left the cabin that I saw Mr. Stewart and Venables, one following the other—MR. Stewart came up alone, and Venables followed him in a very little time—he

might be about two or three yards behind him—they were never apart, except the time it would take Stewart to get on the deck before Venables.

Q. Was there any means or opportunity for Venables to take the papers without Mr. Stewart seeing him? A. I cannot tell that—I only know that Venables was Mr. Morris's servant from his bringing barges from Mr. Morris's wharf, I considered him Mr. Morris's lighterman—I never saw him and Mr. Morris together—I had never seen Mr. Morris but once—I knew he was a coal-merchant and in a very large way of business—he has not got his name on the barges—Capel's and Slaughter's name is on them—the prisoner kept a wharf called Sun wharf—I never saw his name on a barge—Venables might be Capel and Slaughter's servant, but I considered him Mr. Morris's—I was subpoenaed as a witness here to-day—I have seen no one as the prosecutor, but the solicitor and his clerk—I believe Mr. Bentley is a factor—I do not know him—he has given me no orders to come here—no one has spoken to me upon it except the solicitor—I know Mr. Gammon, a merchant—he has not given me any instructions about this prosecution, or about my appearance at the police office—I was examined several times at the police-office on a charge against Mr. Morris of having forged this certificate, or uttering it knowing it to be forged.

Q. Not having stolen it, or received it, knowing it to be stolen? A. I do not know what the charge was—I told captain Stewart the next morning, about a quarter-past seven o'clock, that I had the certificates—I did not sec Venables that day—I cannot say whether he was working on board the brig that day and the following day—he might be—he came there every day and brought barge to the ship—he brought barges while I was delivering the ship—I never charged Venables nor any body with having taken these papers—I merely mentioned to Mr. Stewart that I had lost them and to two of my brother meters, Yates and Rix—I mentioned it to them next morning—Yates is one—I forget the others name—(looking in a book)—I was going to see if I could recollect the meters name—I thought I might have a list of the meters in my pocket—it appears by this book, which is in my writing, that Venables was on board working on the 21st of November—I never mentioned to him about the loss of my certificates—I did not make it public—I only told two meters, Yates, and I think Rix is the name of the other—it begins with Ri—I take the certificate book on shore when I go at night—I went home on the night of the 19th of November—I am almost sure I did not go to any ale-house, or any place before I went home—I am quite sure I did not—I went home—it was quite dark—I have never, on any occasion, gone to any ale-house or other place and lost my book—I never lost it and had it returned by any body—I have not seen Mr. Gammon this morning.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You have been asked whether you ever charged Venables with having stolen the certificates; were you aware on the 19th, 20th, or 21st who had taken the certificates? A. No; I was not—I had no suspicion that Mr. Morris had any of them in his possession—all the certificates in the book No. 5 are accounted for by the margins, except the nine which were torn out—I can account for every one, numbers and everything.

JURY. Q. When you supposed Venables to be Mr. Morris's agent, had you any order from Mr. Morris to deliver coals to him on Mr. Morris's account? A. No—not on board the Union.

COURT. Q. But at any former time have you had orders from Mr. Morris

to deliver coats to Venables? A. No—MR. Morris is in the habit of drawing his coals by means of Capel and Slaughter, from the wharf—I have seen the wagons loaded with coals from Capel and Slaughter's barges, which have gone to Morris's wharf—I saw Venables at the police-office—the mate was on deck while Venables was in the cabin—when I first went on board, for two or three days I considered Stewart to be the mate, but afterwards he was appointed captain—the mate I speak of is another person—there was a mate on board besides Stewart, and another man and two boys.

JAMES M'CREA . I am a weaver, and live in Manchester-street, Bethnal-green. I was secretary to a club held at the Greyhound public-house, for the purpose of purchasing coals—it is an association of working people to purchase large quantities of coals, and by that means getting them cheaper—on the 25th of November I received, as secretary to the club, a tender from Mr. Morris, to supply coal—this is it—(The tender was here ready signed "Thomas Morris" proposing to supply the members of the coal-club with sundry coals, and amongst others with Belmont, at 26s. per ton)—the club agreed with Mr. Morris to supply some Belmont coals—this is the memorandum of the contract—("This being read, was an agreement to deliver to the members of the Greyhound coal-club, 45 to 60 tons of Belmont coals, and for the merchant to produce the ship's certificate.") On the 11th of December I attended at the defendant's wharf to see the coals worked—my attention was directed to two barges, one, the Mouse, laid by the shore, and another laid off the shore—that was the Edward, as Mr. Morris represented—I saw him there—he said those barges contained the coals we were to have—three rooms of the Mouse had coals in them—MR. Chapman was with me—he was appointed by the club to go down with me to witness the delivery—MR. Morris said, "They are ready now for you to go to work"—I asked him for the ship's certificate—he said, "Come along with me"—I walked with him up the wharf to his counting-house, and went in with him—he handed a file to me, which I supposed to be certificates—I said, "This is it at the top"—I said so because he banded me the file—I did not know whether it might be the one at the top—I said, "This is it at the top," and Mr. Morris said, "Yes"—I saw the word "Mouse" on it—he was standing alongside of me when he said yes—I do not know that he looked at it—alter I looked at it, I took it off the file myself in his presence—this is the certificate—(looking at it)—my name is written on the back of it—it is in the same state now as when I received it, except having my name on the back—(This was the certificate identified by Johnson as having been taken from his book; it was headed, "Ship-meter's Certificate from the Coal-meter's Office" "I Robert Johnson certify that I have delivered from the Mary Anne, Robert Jones, master, from the port of Sunder land, with Belmont coals, 21 tons, delivered into the Mouse, No. 1055, on account of Capel and Slaughter, for Mr. Morris. ROBERT JOHNSON, official meter." 10th December, 1839.)—the inspection of that, satisfied me of the quality of the coals—the vendors' tickets were prepared—these are three of them—the coals were to be delivered at the residence of each of the members of the club—(One of these being here read, described the coals as half a ton, in five sacks of Belmont)—the carman then proceeded—I left the wharf a little after two o'clock in the afternoon—next day I was at the wharf of Mr. Gammon, a coal-merchant at Wapping, about half or three quarters of a mile from Morris—I went to Gammon's to superintend the delivery for another club,

of 61 1/2 tons—while there, a person came in and asked for Belmont coals,—in consequence of what Mr. Gammon said to him, he took another quality—in consequence of that, and the observation made by Mr. Gammon, I produced this certificate to him which I had received from the prisoner the day before—MR. Gammon made some observations on my producing it, in consequence of which, I thought it my duty to go to the coal-meter's office—Chapman called on me the same evening—on Saturday morning, the 14th of December, I went with the certificate to the coal-meter's office in Thames-street, and showed it to the parties in attendance—I was not well on that Saturday—James Macey, a member of the club, came to me in the evening, and I communicated to him what had transpired about the certificate, and on the Monday I gave him directions to go to Mr. Morris—I am not secretary to the club now—MR. Chapman is—I believe he is a friend of Mr. Morris—the Articles of the club say that a fresh secretary shall be appointed at the commencement of every club—while I was at the wharf on the 11th I saw a man, who I have since ascertained to be Venables—he was in the counting-house two or three times while I was there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What is meant by the commencement of a club? A. It was at the expiration of a club, which is about four times a year, that I ceased to be secretary—I am not aware that I was turned out for misconduct—I did not receive notice that I was not to be secretary any more—I knew another was appointed in my place—this was the first club that was ever held at that house—at the first meeting of the second club I ceased to be secretary—I am a silk-weaver—I have no other occupation—I am secretary to another club.

Q. You have mentioned Mr. Gammon—how came you to communicate with him on the subject? A. I was ill, and I sent 101 directions to Mr. Gammon, as I could not attend to the delivery myself—he could not find them out, and had to call on me in the evening to put them to rights—Mr. Gammon is a coal-merchant, and one of those who proposed for the contract when Mr. Morris got it—he had nothing to do with Mr. Morris's coals—he had the contract for another club—I was three times at the Thames police-office about this business—I attended there by desire of Mr. Ballard, one of Mr. Harmer's clerks, and a police-officer—I do not know who set the inquiry on foot—I do not know whether it was Mr. Gammon—some hand-bills and placards were published—one was sent to my house from the public-house directly opposite—I cannot call to mind who brought it—I do not know that Mr. Gammon caused them to be published, stating something to the prejudice of the prisoner—I never distributed any of them—I have not spoken to Mr. Gammon since the second time I was at the police-office—I have spoken to him—I dare say I may have spoken to him about this in the course of business—nobody paid me for attending at the police-office—I received 2s. from Mr. Gammon to pay for a cab—(looking at a file) I cannot say whether it was such a file as this that the prisoner took the paper off of—it was taken off a file—I cannot swear whether it was round or straight at the top—I think it was straight—it was a wire like this—I cannot say whether it was thick or thin—the papers were stuck through—there was a gentleman on the other side Mr. Morris when it was produced—I do not know who he is—MR. Morris handed me down the file—I took the top paper off, took it in my hand, and read it to Mr. Chapman—that I swear—there was nobody but Chapman present, that I am aware of—the prisoner was not present—I read it to Chapman as

we walked down the wharf—I did not hear Chapman ask Venables whether there were any Belmonts at the wharf that morning—the bargeman did not tell me there were no Belmonts—that I swear positively—I did not give this certificate to the club—I was too ill to attend—I was at the wharf that day, but I left about two o'clock, because I was ill—I was very ill—I never attended the club again—I did not go out of doors for three weeks—I was never spoken to by any of the club to commence proceedings against Mr. Morris—I am not aware that I made a charge against Mr. Morris, further than going to the Coal-exchange and discovering that there was no such ship as the Mary Anne, laden with Belmont coals, during 1839—I do not know what the charge was at the police-office—MR. Gammon came to my house on the 12th of December—that was the day I had been to the wharf—he came to me before I made the discovery about the paper—I made the discovery on the 14th—I saw him that day about twelve o'clock at noon—I saw him again that evening—being ill, he presented me with a ticket for the dispensary—I saw him once at my house after that—I went out with him on the 14th, when I went to the Coal-exchange, never after—I cannot say who filled up the vendor's tickets—I was in the counting-house, and saw Mr. Morris's clerk fill them up—they said his name was Baldwin, but I never saw him before—I cannot swear to his writing—the word "Belmont" was not put in by my direction, that I know of—I expected to receive Belmont coals.

Q. Did not the clerk ask you what name he was to fill up in the certificate, and you say, "Belmont?" A. I do not know—I cannot say that I said, "Belmont"—we contracted for Belmont—I have no knowledge of saying any thing to the clerk about it—I will not swear I did not—I have no knowledge of saying anything to him about the coals—I directed him where they were to go to—I cannot say whether I told him Belmont or no.

MR. BODKIN. Q. If you did direct Belmont to be put in the vendor's ticket, did you do so before or after you examined the ship's certificate? A. If I did, it must have been after—MR. Gammon came to my house on the 12th, after I had heard the conversation between him and the stranger about Belmont coals at his wharf—Chapman was examined as a witness before the Magistrate—I do not recollect by whom he was called.

JAMES MACEY . I am a silk-weaver. M'Crea made a communication to me on the subject of Mr. Morris's Belmont coals—I am a member of the Greyhound Club—I was there on Monday night when Mr. Morris came about the coals—he came in when it was announced for him to be paid—he was paid, and gave a receipt—a reduction of 3d. per ton was made in his bill, at his own desire—before I went to the club that night I had got possession of some documents on the subject of these coals, and alter he bad been paid I told him I had a charge to make against him for not supplying us with the coals which he had agreed, and that I had documents to prove he had not supplied us with the coals—I then produced the docu-ments, one of which I had received from Mr. Pearsall's office—this is it—(looking at it)—I also produced these two in support of the charge—they were read to him in presence of several members.—(These documents being ready one was a certificate signed by J. Pearsall, clerk and registrar of the coal-market, that no ship named Mary Anne, Robert Jones, master, laden with Belmont coals, had been entered in the office during the whole of the year 1839. Another, signed W. Vale, shipping clerk, stated that the barge Mouse was laden on the 10th of December, from on board the Witham, with twenty-one tons of Evenwood, Wallsend. And another from the meter's

office, Coal-exchange, stating that the ship's certificate in question was forged.)

Q. After these documents were read in the presence of Mr. Morris, did you ask him any question? A. I merely made the charge against him, as I before stated, that he had not supplied us with Belmont coals, but had given us some others instead—after the documents were read, he said he must admit that he had practised a little deception, but he had supplied them with a coal which he believed was as good, and at a little cheaper rate, and he had made the reduction accordingly—I believe that was all that passed—on the part of the club itself there was no charge made against him—I had not seen him after I made the discovery, before I went to the club—I went to his wharf before I made the discovery, to make inquiry about half a ton of coal, about which there had been some mistake.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you hear Mr. Morris's bill read at the club that night? A. I did, and heard the word "Even-wood" read in it—that was before these documents were read—I read all these documents there aloud—there were eighteen or twenty persons there—MR. Banks was in the chair—I delivered the documents to him, but he could not read them, and handed them to me to read myself—all the members that were present said they were perfectly satisfied, at least no person dissented—I heard no person say they were satisfied—I did not hear them say any thing—I did not hear the chairman express any particular opinion—nothing was done, that I am aware of, after I made the charge—the chairman put the question, and it went by show of bands, but no question was asked.

Q. Those who were in favour of Mr. Morris held up their hands, and those who were against him? A. Something of that sort—a great number held up their hands in his favour—no hands were held up on the other side, that I saw—I did not hear the question put to me whether I was satisfied—I did not hear Mr. Banks ask me if I was satisfied—there was a noise in the room—I did not express any dissatisfaction—I did not put up my hand against the resolution—the show of hands was before the docu-ments were read—the question was put by the chairman, whether they were satisfied with the coals they had received from Mr. Morris, before the documents were read—it was before the bill was read—I believe the question was not put again after the bill was read—none of the members expressed any dissatisfaction after the bill was read—the question was not put by the chairman after I read the documents—there was a little talking, but I did not attend to every word that was said—I did not hear the members say they were satisfied—I did not hear the chairman put any question after the charge—I did not hear any body express dissatisfaction—his bill was ordered to be paid that night, after it was read—the chairman put the question about the payment of the bill—he said, "Those who are in favour of the bill being paid, hold up their hands"—it was carried—no hands were held up against it—there was no show of hands taken more than once.

COURT. Q. Was it before or after the bill was read? A. Before.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Have you not sworn just now, the show was taken after the bill was read, whether it should be paid? A. I told you the show of hands was taken whether it should be paid or not, after it was read—it was certainly after it was read—there was no show of hands taken before the bill was read—the show of hands was before the documents were read—there are two members here besides myself as witnesses for the prosecution, Benton and Gross—I apprehend they have subpoenas on the part

of the prosecution—I know Mr. Gammon—I have never seen him except at the Thames police.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Was the bill for the coals brought there that evening by Mr. Morris? A. I do not know who brought it—it was produced that evening—I do not know when it was delivered—I saw nothing of it before that night—the bill was read and paid Before Mr. Morris said he had practised some little deception—I made my charge, and he gave that explanation.

JAMES TORRINGTON . I am in the employ of Capel and Slaughter, coal-merchants, London—they lighter coals for Mr. Morris. On the 10th of December I superintended the lightering of some coals into the Mouse barge—this is the book in which I make a memorandum of my daily transactions—(producing it)—the entry on the 10th of December is, "Mouse, 21 tons, Even wood, Sun-wharf, from the Witham"—the number of the barge is not put—the meaning of that entry is, that the coals went to Sunwharf that day by the Mouse—there was, no doubt, a certificate given for them in the course of business—that certificate would be sent to Mr. Morris—I did not see the ship's certificate—I did not see any Belmont coals in the river on the 10th.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You do not know whether there were any or not? A. No—I have known Mr. Morris about three years, or three years and a half—he has been doing business in a respectable way as a merchant, as far as I know—I never heard any thing against him—I have known him transact a great deal of business—I believe he always bore the character of an honest, respectable man—MR. Capel has been employed by him a good deal—I have not had any promise made me with respect to my evidence—this book is my own private memorandum—MR. Morris knew nothing about it.

ALFRED HANCOCK . I am one of the meters appointed by the Coal Committee. On the 10th of December last the Mouse and Edward barges were laden with Even wood Wallsend coals out of the Witham—I gave certificates to that effect to the lighterman, on being applied to—I gave one certificate with each barge—these are them—(looking at them)—I gave them to the lighterman who took the craft.

WILLIAM VALR . I am a clerk in the Coal-meter's office, Coal Exchange—a committee of coal-factors and merchants have the management of the office—MR. John Bentley is one of the committee—there are seventeen others—they provide books, with engraved forms of certificates, to be given to the meters whom they appoint.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Has Mr. Bentley been one of the committee long? A. Ever since the committee was established—he has not given any directions about this prosecution that I am aware of—I understand the prosecution is conducted by our office, but who gave the instructions I do not know—there have been meetings of the committee, but I have not been present, and do not know what they did—I am not aware that these certificates are given by other sellers—each book containing ninety-three of these certificates costs 3s. 4d.

GEORGE LOCKETT . I am clerk to Edward Wood, a coal-merchant at Kentish-town-wharf. On the 9th of December Even wood coals were 21s. 3d. in the market—that is the price I bought them at—I tried to get them as cheap as I could—Belmont coals were not in the market that day—Even wood are about 2s. 6d. a ton inferior to Belmont.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know whether there is not a sort of union or combination of coal-factors and merchants, by which certain coals are preferred in the market? A. I never heard of coal-factors and merchants conspiring together—I have heard of such things as owners and factors agreeing together, but have not known of it—I do not know that Even wood coals are not in the pits they control—I know nothing of it—(looking at a book)—this is not a book made out by the authority of the trade in general, it is made by George Biggs—it does not denote the price of coals day by day—I look at the list, and when I see coals are sold at that price I believe it, but never without—I do not know that Evenwood are sold at a lower rate than Belmont, in consequence of not going through the committee of factors—we never imported any Evenwood coals—we buy coals without going through the market, and have bought Evenwood—Belmonts go through the market.

GEORGE BENTON . I live in North-place, Globe-fields, Bethnal-green-road. I was a member of the Greyhound club—I was present on a Monday when Macey called Mr. Morris to account on the subject of the coals—I heard Mr. Morris say he admitted having used a little deception with regard to the name of the article—I had half a ton of the coals delivered to me—I had a vendor's ticket with it—this is it—(looking at it)—I gave it to Macey.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you hear Mr. Morris's bill read at the club? A. I cannot positively say—I heard the chairman ask if any one had any reason to say why Mr. Morris should not be paid, and there was no opposition to it—it was put to a show of hands—those who were in favour of his being paid held up their hands—none were held up to the contrary, and he was paid—Macey produced some documents, and said he had a charge against Mr. Morris for not supplying the coals contracted for; that he had supplied an inferior coal, which he understood was 2s. a ton lower than those contracted for—MR. Morris in his defence said, that he had supplied them with a coal equal to the coal he had contracted for, and he had deducted 3d. a ton, which was the difference in the market price—I heard the chairman read some documents, I heard no one else read any—the chairman would not allow any body else to read the documents—after he had them in his hand, he said he could not read one of them, and returned it to Macey, and requested him to read it as he could not understand it, and Macey read that—that is the only one he read to my recollection—he read one, I am not positive that he read more—I do not remember Mr. Morris's bill being read—the question was put whether any one had any thing to say why Mr. Morris should not be paid—Macey then introduced the documents, but it was decided from the chair that he could not do so after it was decided that Mr. Morris was to be paid—I do not recollect that any question was put by the chairman after Macey read the document—there was some discussion entered into on the subject, and Mr. Morris made his defence—some of the members said they were satisfied, and some were silent—I cannot positively say how many were silent—I do not think they all said they were satisfied—it was decided, I consider, by a show of hands—some were silent—the show of hands was not taken after the documents were read—several persons said they were quite satisfied after the documents were read, and that the name of the article was a matter of indifference—I do not recollect that any body said no to that—I did not fall in with that, but I did not make any opposition—I was at the club when the contract was made—I was not there on the

20th of January—I left the club at the conclusion, when Morris was paid—I am not a member of it now—I was subpoenaed to come here—M'Crea did not ask me to come, nor apply to me to tie a witness—he is no acquaintance of mine—I did not know him till I entered the club—I left the club because I was dissatisfied—I believe it still exists—I cannot say whether it consists of the same persons, with the exception of myself and one or two others.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you satisfied with the quality of your coals? A. Yes, but they were not so good as I expected to receive from what was said of the Belmont coals on the night the contract was entered into.

CHARLES GREEN . I am a coal-merchant, and am one of the committee of management of the coal-meters. Johnson is a meter employed by the committee—this prosecution is conducted by direction of the committee.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Upon whose application? A. We did it on public ground—we set the inquiry on foot when the certificate was produced to me by Mr. Gammon and M'Crea—that was on a Saturday—I forget the date—I have been in Court daring the trial, but I had no idea of being called as a witness—MR. Bentley is one of the committee—he assented to the prosecution—he was present when it was determined on—that was before the examination at the police-office—immediately on the discovery I attended at the police-office.

Q. The charge was uttering the certificate knowing it to be forged, was it not? A. There were a variety of charges—it was put into the hands of a solicitor, and he conducted the matter—I was there when Mr. Ballantine ordered the prisoner to enter into recognizance.

Q. Did he not enter into recognizance to appear on the charge of misdemeanor? A. I know nothing about it, because I left before it was over—(looking at a book)—I know this book published by Mr. Biggs—it is from that a person gets the price of coals in a general way—it is relied on by those in the trade who know no better—those who buy coals know of course what price they give for them—the trade do not subscribe to the making of this book—it is published by Mr. Biggs—I believe it is taken in by the principal part of the trade, to guide their judgment in the price, in a general way.

Q. Do you know why Belmont coals are a higher price than other coals? A. As far as I know, from the quality of them—I am not aware it is from the mode of conducting the trade by the factors—I have no recollection of the price of Belmont coals between the 19th of November and the 11th of December—I never buy Belmont coals, nor Even wood either—I beg to state with respect to the prosecution being carried on by the committee, that property nearly to the amount of two millions per annum changes hands upon these certificates, and the committee seeing a case which they thought so clear, did not think it right it should pass unnoticed.

EBENEZER GROSS . I live in Charlotte-street, Bethnal-green. I was a member of the club—I was present the evening Mr. Morris's bill was paid—after the payment I heard Macey find fault with regard to the coals being the wrong name, and he produced some documents, which were read—after that I heard Mr. Morris say he admitted he had practiced a deception as regarded the name of the coal, and he had taken off something per ton tantamount to make that level—I was taking his part, thinking at the time he had taken off sufficient, but afterwards I found he had not—he

had taken off 3d. a ton—I thought at that time that was the actual difference in value.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You were one of those that were satisfied? A. So far as I thought the money was taken off, and that was all that could be done—Macey made his complaint after the bill was agreed to be paid—we were waiting for a stamp—I think the bill was read previous to my going there—it is usual to read a bill before it is ordered to be paid—MR. Morris admitted that he had sent the wrong name in, but he had taken off something per ton—I heard some documents read—the chairman read part, and Macey read part—after that it was put to a show of hands.

Q. After Macey had brought his charge, and the documents were read, it was put to a show of hands whether the people were satisfied or not? A. It was put previous to that, not afterwards—it was agreed he should he paid before the documents were read—it was not put to a show of hands after they were read—the greatest part of the meeting were' favourable to Mr. Morris—my reason was because he had taken off 3d. per ton—I had half a ton.

GEORGE LEDLEY . I am second clerk at the Thames police-court. I received charge of the different documents produced, by direction of the Magistrate—there were three examinations, I think—MR. Bodkin attended at the second examination—I remember the examination being referred to to see whether any statement alleged to be made by the defendant was taken down—MR. Bodkin applied to the Magistrate to take down a statement made by Mr. Morris at the first examination, which was omitted in the deposition—the counsel on the other side objected to that—on the minutes of the first examination being read, Mr. Bodkin said there was an omission on the face of them—I was desired to read them, and I made this minute of what afterwards transpired—it was not taken down by the Magistrate—(reads)—" Mr. Bodkin states an expression uttered by the defendant—the Magistrate said he does not recollect the expression—the defendant said, "I have said it, and I will say it again"—when Mr. Morris was under examination as to the identity of the certificate, it was said Mr. Morris said he never saw that certificate before—it was that which Mr. Morris said he had said, and would say it again—the charge of forging and uttering the certificate, and receiving it, knowing it to be forged, were both mentioned.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. And I believe the Magistrate said there was not the least pretence for receiving, and he should require bail for uttering? A. The Magistrate said he should enter into his own recognizance for uttering the certificate—no notice was taken of the other charge—I have the receipt for the coals, the bill of them, and the auditor's account—(producing them)—I have the minutes of examination—Mr. Stewart, the mate of the vessel, was examined on the part of the prosecution, and Mr. Chapman was called by the Court, and examined.

HENRY BAINES . I am a stationer and printer. I supply these books of blank certificates to the coal-committee—there are ninety-six in each book—I charge 3s. 4d. for the ninety-six—that is rather more than a farthing and a quarter a-piece, including the cover—I should take off about a farthing for the cover.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. That is what you charge for them printed and made as they are? A. Yes, they are printed from lithography

—there are four leaves to a sheet—one certificate is a quarter of a sheet—the paper is 28s. a ream—a ream is 480 sheets.

Witnesses for the Defence.

ROBERT STEWART . I was mate, and am now captain of the brig Union—I recollect Venables and Johnson being on board, but I cannot tell the day—it was on a Tuesday, some time in November, I believe—the ship was delivering coals—Johnson attended in his capacity of coal-weigher—he, and I, and Venables were below in the cabin—Johnson did not go away at any time, and leave me and Venables in the cabin—I never was alone, nor were Venables and I together in the cabin, and Johnson away.

Q. Do you remember how you came up? A. Yes, there was a lighterman at the ship—I went up to see what it was, and left them both in the cabin, and as I came aft, I met Johnson, and Venables behind him, coming in a direction from the cabin, as if they had just come up—I am quite sure I left Johnson and Venables together—I was at the Thames Police-office once—I do not know on which side I was examined—you (MR. Prendergast) examined me—nobody spoke to me but you—I do not recollect any other gentleman speaking to me first.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I believe between the second and third examinations, you ran away, vessel and all? A. The second time I was sent for, the ship was hove out of the tier, under weigh, and the sails set, and I could not stop—I had been three weeks in the river—I arrived at Gravesend from my last voyage, on Monday—the ship is there yet—I came to London last Tuesday, went down again, and came up last night again—I was not in London long on Tuesday—I knew Venables before this time—he was a lighter man under Mr. Dyer, when I was in one of Mr. Dyer's ships, and he used to be frequently on board,—I have seen him here to-day—I have not been with him further than just at the door here—I did not come with him—I frequently saw the meter's book on the table while I was in the cabin—I cannot speak of this day, but I think every day of the delivery of the ship it was there—Venables, I, and Johnson drank together that day—we were all there drinking, when some one hailed the ship, and Venables said it was his lighterman going inside with a barge—I knew Venables was servant to Mr. Morris—I went out of the cabin first on the vessel being hailed—she was twice hailed—Johnson and I remained the first time in the cabin, and Venables went on deck—he came down, and said it was his man, and asked if I could let him have a couple of hands—Johnson followed me up when I went up.

Q. Now recollect what you have said before—on your oath, did not Johnson follow you up, leaving Venables in the cabin? A. I do not know, for they both followed me up when I went—I know I met them both, but which was first I cannot say—they were both on deck when I came aft—I could not say that Johnson followed me up, leaving Venables in the cabin, because I do not know which of them was left—I have never said that to my recollection—I cannot swear it—I might have said something about it—I do not know that I ever said so to Ballard, the officer—I cannot swear I did not—I did not tell him that I was followed by Johnson up the companion, leaving Venables in the cabin alone for about four minutes—he asked me how long it might be that I was out of the cabin before I met Venables—and I said, "It might be four minutes"—he was on board, and I showed him where I met Venables on the deck—I cannot swear I did not tell him that I left Venables in the cabin about four minutes.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You say you left Venables and Johnson in the cabin, bow long might it be before you saw them again? A. About four minutes—I walked the length of the ship, and as I returned, I met them—they must have followed me up—it was four minutes between my walking to the end of the ship and coming back and meeting them—my acquaintance with Venables has been no further than speaking as I pass—I was brought to the police-office by a policeman, who came down to Gravesend with a summons for me.

BENJAMIN VENABLES . I am lighterman to Mr. Morris, and was so in November last. On the 19th of November I was on board the Union for the delivery of the coals, and for four days afterwards—I went down into the cabin with Johnson and Stewart to drink—I was never left alone in the cabin the whole of that day, not for one single moment—I did not see any thing of the certificate-book to my knowledge—there were plenty of books about, but I did not know one from the other—we drank two bottles of ale among three—to the best of my recollection, Stewart went out of the cabin first, and Johnson and I were left together—I recollect Stewart saying somebody hailed the ship—I said, "I dare say it is my apprentice"—Stewart went on deck to see what it was, and Johnson and I followed directly, one after the other, and met Stewart coming aft—I went on board next day, about seven or eight o'clock—I saw Johnson there that day—he did not say a word to me about the certificates being lost—he gave me a certificate for the barge called the Wood—I brought the coals to the wharf on the night of the 11th of December—next morning I saw two secretaries belonging to the club—I believe one was M'Crea and the other Chapman—Chapman asked me what coals we had—I said, "We have several sorts"—he said, "Have you any Belmont?"—I said, "We have got loads of coals of all sorts except Belmont, and of them we have none"—M'Crea heard that—he was alongside of him—this certificate was not shown to me at that time—I never saw it before—I saw it at the Thames police-office—I went to the Thames police-office voluntarily—I do not recollect who called me as a witness, but I was examined by Mr. Phillips, and I stated then the same as I have now—I was only examined once at the office—I was not called the second time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you in the employment of Mr. Morris when you went to the Thames police-office? A. Yes, I was his servant—I was not called on behalf of my master, to my knowledge—MR. Morris did not call me—T did not know his attorney from any body else—I know I was called and examined by you, and I was asked questions by a gentleman on this side—a gentleman on the bench spoke, but nobody examined me, to my recollection, but you—I swear that that gentleman (MR. Prendergast) examined me first, and you finished it—I was only asked a question or two by him—I do not call it being examined—ft was only three or four words—I do not know the use of this certificate-book—I know every lighterman has a ticket—I did not see that book in the cabin that day to my knowledge—I will swear that I did not see it that day—if I had, I should not have touched it—as an honest man, I do not think I ought to have touched it.

Q. Were you ever accused of stealing any thing before this? A. Yes—twenty years ago, come next August—I was accused of highway robbery—I was tried at Kingston Assizes, and was imprisoned in Guildford gaol twelve months—I have never had a blemish in my character since—I always

worked for my living—I think Johnson and I were in the cabin two minutes after Stewart—we drank our glasses up and followed—I think Johnson went first, but I was on his heels—we were both up together—I never said to any body after my examination at the Thames Police Office, "What a d——d row your people make about this b——certificate"—nor any thing to that effect.

Q. Did you say, "Why, you fools, not ten minutes ago I gave Mr. Morris a whole handful of the blank certificates, as he came out of court; so help me G—d, I did?" A. Yes, I did—I did give him the certificates, but did not say "So help me G—d I did," to my recollection—I swear I never said so to a man named Upton—I did not say, "So help me G—d"—it is true that I did give him a handful of blank certificates before he went into the Court—I got them from Mr. Capel's servant—they were Mr. Dyer's blank certificates—MR. Morris draws for Capel and Slaughter—he draws his coals from San wharf—MR. Dyer is a gentleman coal-merchant, and ship owner—I believe a man named Ferrington gave me the blank certificates—MR. Dyer gave them to Torrington to give to me to produce at the Thames Police Office, to show there were more certificates than one—(looking at one)—this is the same sort of certificate which I gave Mr. Morris—I do not know how many I got—they were wrapped in paper—I was told they were certificates—I did not know they were tickets when they were given to me—Torrington told me they were blank tickets from Mr. Dyer—I did not tell the solicitor and Mr. Morris that I had them—I delivered them to Mr. Morris—I did not see any produced before the Magistrate—there was a counsel attending for Mr. Morris—I am the man that lightered the Mouse from the Witham—I got a meter's certificate—I put it on Mr. Morris's desk—this is it—(looking at it)—I put it on the desk about seven o'clock in the morning, on the 11th—MR. Morris is sometimes there earlier than that—sometimes at six, seven, eight, or nine o'clock—generally before nine o'clock—he has clerks—it Is my plan to put the certificates on his desk or the clerk's—MR. Morris lives at the wharf—I think I saw him about one or two o'clock that day—I had no conversation with him about the Mouse to my recollection—I did not tell him about the certificate—I did not know he was going to supply the club—I do not know whether he knew I was coming with the Mouse—I go away with one barge, and bring another at rimes—he never inquires till night what business I have been doing—I tell him at night—I go in and book my work in a small book, with my name on it—I keep the book—it was delivered here—I did not see Mr. Morris that night—I put the certificate on the desk for him to examine, but I do not recollect speaking to him—I spoke to him in the middle of the day, about one o'clock—he asked me what I had been doing—I told him I had got a load of craft loaded and coming down—I did not tell him any thing about putting the certificate on his desk, because it was not in his business—I did not tell him I had lightered the Mouse from the Witham, and left the certificate on his desk—I do not recollect seeing him that night.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is it your practice to tell him at night of every thing you have done, such as putting the certificate on the desk? A. I put it in the book, and he examines it—I went to the police-office voluntarily—I have got my living by hard labour for the last eighteen years—I worked for Mr. Green five or six years—I left him through getting tipsy, and neglecting my duty, and was ashamed to go back again—that is the truth—since that I have worked for Mr. Kelly—I was never discharged for

dishonesty—I have worked for Mr. Morris three years—I was told by Ferrington that the papers I gave him were blank certificates—they may have said "What have you there?"—I said blank certificates—Upton is one of the coal weighers.

JOHN BOREHAM . I am a member of the Greyhound coal club. On the evening of the 10th of December I was there—it was the evening before the delivery took place—the prisoner called there to make us acquainted that he could not serve the coals—I was there by myself—I take an active part in the club—I have filled the station of chairman occasionally—the defendant came and told me he could not deliver the coals he had contracted for, as there was no Belmont in the market—I told him if he could not supply the club with Belmont he must work some other coal as near the quality as he could, as the members would be all disappointed unless he supplied them the next day as it was appointed—I was in the house Before Mr. Morris came.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What were you doing there that night, as it was not club night? A. I was frequently at the house.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Were you at the club meeting on Monday the 16th? A. Yes—I heard the defendant's bill read—the bill was delivered on the Monday evening—it was in the club-room on Monday evening—that was the first meeting of the club after the delivery of the coals—I heard the bill read—I heard Even wood coals read, and saw it on the bill—I do not think there was any thing particular said about it that evening—Macey got up, and said he did not make any objection to the coal, only he had a charge to bring against Mr. Morris—he made his charge, and produced papers—I do not recollect the question put to the club about Mr. Morris's conduct—I do not recollect any thing of the sort—we were all satisfied about the quality of the coals—I never wish to burn better—the bill was ordered to be paid—I have known Mr. Morris eight or nine years—I always understood him to bear the character of an honest man.

COURT. Q. You have heard what his character is, have you? A. I have heard of his general character, not only as a coal-merchant, but in parochial affairs.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Have you known a great many people who know him? A. Yes—that is the character he bore among them all—this is the bill and receipt—(read)—"Members of the Greyhound club—50 1/2 tons of Even wood Wall send coals, 65l. 0s. 1d." Receipt for the same.,

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Pray what day was it you saw Mr. Morris at the Greyhound? A. On the evening previous to the delivery taking place—the delivery commenced on the 11th—nobody was present but Mr. Morris and myself—MR. Morris asked me first when the delivery took place—I told him the secretary and his attendant would be down there to work the coals to-morrow morning—he said it was a very unfortunate thing for him he had not got those coals, as he had no such in the market, the Belmont—he said he had another club to serve, and he must work the two clubs that day—he did not say he could not deliver the Belmont because he had another club to serve—he said it was an unfortunate thing he could not supply us with Belmont coals, and he had another club to supply at the same time—he said there was no Belmont in the market—I told him he must not disappoint us, if he had no Belmont to send some of as good quality—he said, "If so, I must go and arrange it as well as I can"—I went to M'Crea on the Monday evening before I went to the club—I did not say any thing to him about Mr. Morris having told me he could not get Belmont coals.

Q. Did not M'Crea on that occasion produce to you the false certificate, and tell you there was something wrong in it? A. He showed me two or three papers—I rather think he did say there was something wrong in it—I never gave it a thought to say any thing to him about my conversation with Mr. Morris, I thought it of much more importance with regard to the coals—MR. Morris might have said at the meeting that he had practiced a little deception—I do not know that I heard him say so—I might not un-derstand what he said exactly—I will not swear he did not say so, because I might not recollect it—I heard somebody say that Mr. Morris did say so—I never thought of telling M'Crea of what passed between Mr. Morris and me—it must have slipped my memory.

Q. Then it was not because you did not think it of any importance, but because it slipped your memory? A. I thought, in the first instance, when Mr. Morris spoke to me about changing the coals, that it was of very little importance, if the members had good coals—I did not think of telling M'Crea about it—I never gave it a thought.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. When you went to M'Crea's house, was he ill or not? A. Ill in bed—he sent for me, hearing I was over at the other club-house—we had a very short conversation—M'Crea was secretary to the club at that time—he was discharged the next Monday night.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am a plumber and glazier. I am secretary to the Greyhound coal-club—I went with M'Crea, on the 11th of September, to Sun Wharf, Ratcliff, to see the coals supplied—I asked the lighterman whether he had got Belmont coals on board, and he said no, he thought there was everything else but Belmont—I cannot say that M'Crea heard it—he was standing close by, near enough to hear it, I should suppose—I turned round to him and said, "I think we have done for to-day," meaning the supply would not take place that morning—he made no remark—I cannot say that there was any further conversation either from Venables, M'Crea, or myself—we waited, expecting that the coals—at least, that we should commence operations.

COURT. Q. If there were no coals to be delivered, how came you to wait after you said your business was over? A. Really, if I was to say anything more about anything, I should be committing myself—I cannot say who gave the order for the coals to be worked, or any thing of the sort; it was not my business—I went to see the coals weighed, to see justice done between the merchant and the members—we were deputed by the club to be there in attendance—if we had had direct orders from the house that we should have no coals worked that day, I certainly should have left the wharf, but we were waiting of course expecting that Mr. Morris would commence supplying the members with coals.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did M'Crea, at any time in the course of that morning, show you any certificate whatever? A. He showed me a certificate certainly, which of course I have said on my former examination.

COURT. Q. Did you go into the counting-house and see the certificate taken from the file? A. Decidedly not—I did not go into the counting-house at all—I cannot say whether M'Crea did—he advanced towards me from that direction, but I did not see him come out of the counting-house, or go in.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When he showed you the certificate, did you

read it and see what it was? A. No; I cannot say that I could tell one single word of it, if it was put into my hands—I looked at it, and returned it to him, as that was his particular duty—I do not think he read any part of it to me—I cannot say whether he did or not—I have no recollection that he did—all the certificates I ever saw were in one form—I saw Mr. Morris on the following morning, and I think I asked him for a certificate—he said he would bring the certificate to the society when he came to receive the money on the following night, and, I believe, he did produce two certificates on the following night—the chairman, Mr. Banks, had them—(looking at two)—I suspect these are the same—I preside as secretary to the club that night—all the members were satisfied with the article they had received from Mr. Morris—MR. Morris gave some explanation why he had deviated from the terms of the contract, but what he said I cannot say—the thing has gone by so long I have pretty well lost all recollection on the subject—MR. M'Crea was never a member of the club—I cannot say why he has ceased to be secretary—I believe one of the articles of the club is, that the secretary shall be chosen at the commencement of every club—that is the only reason that I know of—any member can be appointed secretary, and I was elected—MR. M'Crea's name was not put up.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Is it one of the rules of the society that the secretary should keep himself sober? A. I should expect that would be becoming to every man.

BENJAMIN BANKS . I was chairman of the Greyhound coal club on the night of the 16th of December—MR. Morris's bill was delivered in and read, and these two certificates were given in—they are for Evenwood coals—I cannot charge my memory whether the bill said "Evenwood coals"—this is the bill and receipt—(looking at them)—I do not remember anything being said about Evenwood coals being delivered, and Belmont being contracted for—it was moved and seconded that the merchant should he paid—I then addressed the company, and said, "Gentlemen, it is usual in these cases to know whether there is any objection to the payment; does anybody object to the merchant being paid?"—there was not a dissenting voice except Macey's, who said he had a complaint to make—I said, "You must wait a while"—I said, "There is one individual in the company, which is you, Mr. Macey; I wish most particularly to ask you whether you are satisfied with the coals?"—he said, "Yes, quite with the coals, but I have a complaint to make"—he was then about producing some documents—I said, "Anything you have to say must emanate through the chair"—he made his complaint, and Mr. Morris was beginning to say something, but left off—he said something, but I did not notice it particularly—I was out of the room once or twice—I did not hear him say any thing about Evenwood coals being used instead of Belmont—I do not recollect his precise words—he said he had not been able to supply us with the coal contracted for, but he had sent as good a coal, and no doubt the club would be perfectly satisfied, and he had charged the difference in the price, he had not charged for Belmont—I will not be positive whether he said that before or after Macey made his charge—I have only been chairman of this club twice—M'Crea has ceased to be secretary, I should say, in consequence of what we considered his misconduct, in not attending as he ought to have done at the time appointed—he said he was extremely ill, and sent Mr. Macey down to say so, and if there was any difficulty in the accounts, or anything of that sort, he would explain it—it was considered,

I believe, generally, that he did not act well, and I consider that was the reason of his not being re-elected.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you know there is an article in the club that a secretary shall be elected every club? A. Yes—I do not recollect Mr. Morris saying at the club, "I admit having practised a little deception"—he may have said so, I did not pay particular attention—it is possible ft might have been said and I not hear it, but I think if it had been said I must have heard it—I will not swear he did not say so—I do not recollect it—he said something previous to Macey making his charge, but I cannot say the precise words—I heard him say previous to going up into the club-room that he had not sent the coals—I produced some documents at the police-office—I was not compelled to produce them—I did not refuse to produce them—I held them till I was told I must produce them—I was only asked once to give them up—MR. Ballantine said, "Produce the documents," and I did so—I said, "Am I to give them up?" and looked at Mr. Horry, to ask if I was to give them up, and he said, "Yes"—I have not the least recollection of refusing to produce them—the Magistrate desired me to give them up, and I left them there.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Are these the certificates and the bill? A. There were several documents—I cannot say whether these are them—they were put in with some copies of certificates—they were written documents—I received them at the meeting of the club, after it was moved and seconded that the bill should be paid—I merely passed them through my hands to the secretary—I did not keep them myself—I have known Mr. Morris three or four years, and I consider he possesses that upright, honest, manly principle, that he is incapable of a dishonorable act, even to take the least advantage of an enemy.

GEORGE BIGGS . I am the publisher of the prices of coals—(producing a book)—this book contains from day to day the price of coals in the market—on the 1st of November, 1839, Belmont coals were 28s. 6d. a ton, and Evenwood 23s. 3d.—on the 9th of December there were Evenwood in the market, but no Belmont that day.

COURT. Q. What is the usual difference between Evenwood and Belmont? A. That is a question it is scarcely possible to answer, because the relative prices of coals depends so much upon circumstances; one day a demand may arise for one particular sort, and another day for another sort—Evenwood is a coal that has never been up—there were only two ships of Evenwood the whole of the year 1889—on the 9th of December Evenwood sold for 22s. a ton, and on the 11th Belmont was 24s. a ton—there were no Evenwood on the 11th.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When these Belmont coals came in, could they have been got at, to deliver that very day? A. That is a question I can-not answer—it is not in my department—Evenwood is a new coal—I believe there have been only three ships of it altogether.

Q. Is there any combination of brokers, and factors, and so on, in the river, to make one coal dearer than another? A. I apprehend not—my book is what people generally go by in their dealings in coals—it regulates the deference.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How do you get the prices in the book? A. The factors give me the prices—I believe the first cargo of Evenwood was on the 1st of November—the price of a new coal soon finds its level—Evenwood has fallen a good deal since—not so much as 5s. or 6s. a ton—it has

been discovered that it is not of that quality which it was first supposed to possess.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you brought here as a witness for the prosecution? A. had a subpoena for the prosecution—the price of coals is marked on the day on which it is sold—it could not have been known that Evenwood coal would fall unless it was proved, and its value ascertained.

---- BALDWIN. I am clerk to Mr. Morrs. I remember M'Crea coming to our wharf—I filled up the vendor's tickets—these are them—(looking at them)—the coals are described as Belmont coals—I filled them up from M'Crea's instructions—he came to the wharf after the first wagon was loaded—I began to fill up the tickets, and did not know what the coals were, nor what quantity was to be delivered—I said, "I don't know what these coals are, I must see Mr. Morris, and hear what he says," and M'Crea said, "They are Belmont coals"—I said, "Oh, are they?"—I did not know even the barge they were in, or the quality—it was between six and seven o'clock in the morning, or from six to eight o'clock, about seven o'clock, I suppose—I generally fill up the tickets from the instructions I receive from the lighterman—(looking at a file of papers)—this is the file we use in Mr. Morris's office—there is no other file for certificates but this—all that are filed are put on this file—there are sometimes a few lying about—I never saw the certificate in question till I saw it at the Thames Police Office—I have access to all the files and papers in Mr. Morris's office, and have an opportunity of seeing every thing there.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. That is the file on which it is usual to put certificates? A. Yes—I should say a certificate would, in the ordinary course of business, be put on that file—I went to the office before seven o'clock on the morning in question—I saw Yenables there on the barge—he did not hand me the certificate—I did not see the certificate on the desk—I did not look for it.

Q. Why not look for it before you prepared the vendor's ticket? A. Because I had no doubt of the coals—I did not give the certificate a thought—the certificate is a proof of the quality and description of the coals—it is for the purpose of protecting the consumer against fraud—I did not refer to it at all for the purpose of ascertaining what to put in the vendor's ticket—I filled it up in my master's office.

Q. On your oath, was not that certificate of Evenwood coals lying on the office desk? A. It might have been—I did not see it—I was in the office when M'Crea called—I was there, I think, before him—there was another gentleman with him who I believe was Chapman—I did not see M'Crea go into the office with my master—I think M'Crea came into the office first by himself—I was there—I do not know where my master was—I do not think he was on the wharf at the time—I had not seen him—I do not know that M'Crea saw my master—I went out before M'Crea left—I went about the wharf—it was about seven o'clock that M'Crea came—I do not know where Mr. Morris was when I left the counting-house—he was not in the office—I swear that—he may have been in the house—the office is underneath the house—it is the custom for the file to hang up by the desk in the counting-house—we have two counting-houses—we have only one file—it is sometimes in one office and sometimes in the other—it was in the other counting-house that morning—I do not think I went into

that counting-house before breakfast—I do not know whether Mr. Morris was there or not.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. In which counting-house was the file? A. In the other, not in mine—it was kept in mine some few months back, but lately it has been put into the other—it was in Mr. Morris's office that morning—one counting-house is on one side of the wharf, and the other on the other side—MR. Morris uses the upper one—that is the place where the file was—my office is by the water-side—if M'Crea had gone into Mr. Morris's office, I should not have seen him—I fill up the tickets in my own office—I had no access to the file at that time—it was in the other office—I frequently fill up tickets from the report of the lighterman—I was aware at the time that M'Crea had come there to see the coals delivered—I had no reason to doubt the information I received from him as to the quality of the coals.

WILLIAM BULLOCK . I am landlord of the Greyhound public-house, where this club is held. I remember Mr. Morris coming to present his bill on Monday evening, the 16th of December, about half-past six o'clock—it was club night—he presented two certificates with the bill, which were afterwards given to Mr. Banks, the chairman—MR. Morris declared they were Evenwood coals—I heard no complaint made about them before that—I had three tons of the coals, and they were very excellent—I made no complaint, nor did I hear any complaint from any member of the dub—I was in and out of the room that evening in my usual capacity—the club meet at seven o'clock—I heard something said about the payment of the bill.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You say you had heard no complaint about these coals till Mr. Morris came to you that evening; just recollect whether that is so? A. I do positively assert it as a fact, that I never heard a word of complaint about these coals till Mr. Morris's bill was paid.

Q. Then you had not heard that there was any irregularity, or substituting one coal for another? A. I heard from Mr. Macey—in fact I have a note in ray pocket now—I did not hear it till after Mr. Morris was in the house—I received a note from M'Crea on Monday, after sit o'clock, just Before Mr. Morris arrived—MR. Morris was at my house twice that evening—he brought in the bill, and was obliged to go somewhere else afterwards—he came first about half-past sit o'clock, and saw me and Mr. Banks—we were then arranging the accounts—we did not talk about the change of coals—I did not know of it then—this is the note I received from M'Crea—I will read it, to convince you that it explains nothing—(reads)—"Monday evening, December 16. Mr. Bullock—I shall be very glad to see you if you will call on me in the course of an hour or two at the latest, as I have something of importance to communicate to you. I remain, &c., J. M'Crea."—I showed that note to Mr. Morris when he first came, and then he went away—he was gone about half-an-hour—I saw him when be returned—he did not bring the bill and certificate then—he brought them when he first came—I received them when he first came in—he left them with me, and I delivered them to Mr. Banks—MR. Banks did not go out of the house after Mr. Morris had been the first time—he remained there—I am sure Mr. Morris did not take the bill away with him, for I was with Mr. Banks arranging the accounts.

COURT. Q. Did you look at the certificates to see they were for Evenwood coals the first time he came? A. The bill and certificate expressed Evenwood coal—I saw it the first time he came.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you known Mr. Morris? A.

very nearly six years—he has borne a remarkably good character, so far as I ever heard from those who know him.

COURT. to BALDWIN. Q. Just look at that paper, (the certificate) and see if there is any hand-writing you know on it? A. There is not, no part of it whatever—I should say no part of it is Mr. Morris's hand-writing—it is not at all like his—I do not believe any part of it to be his handwriting—it is not the hand-writing of any clerk in his office—there is none of my writing on it.

---- DYER. I am a ship-owner and coal-merchant. I have known Mr. Morris about a dozen years—he has borne a very good character—I gave some certificates to Torrington for the purpose of taking to the police-office, and which he gave to Venables—those certificates were issued by weighers of my own—I am not connected with the association—many merchants have their own weighers—this is one of my certificates—(producing one)—it is similar to those I gave Torrington.

(Several other witnesses deposed to the prisoner's good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Thursday, March 5th, 1840.

Fifth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18400302-865

865. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February, 3 sixpences, the monies of Thomas Hall; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined Three Months, and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18400302-866

866. GEORGE WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 6d., the goods of William Sheppard; and 1 pewter pot, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Charles Franklin; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18400302-867

867. WILLIAM LINKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February, 1 tart, value 1d., the goods of George Kingsford; to which he pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 15.— Confined Three Months, and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18400302-868

868. WILLIAM BALDWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February, 1 printed book, value 6d., the goods of Henry Webb; to which he pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 11.— Transported for Seven Years.—Isle of Wight.

Reference Number: t18400302-869

869. WILLIAM SKEGGS and WILLIAM HILL were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February, 7 1/2 lbs. weight of ham, value 7s., the goods of Miles Linton; to which Skeggs pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

EDWARD ELFORD . I am shopman to Miles Linton. He bad half a ham safe in the shop about nine o'clock on the evening of the 11th of February, when Skeggs came in alone and took the ham off the basket—he went out, I followed him—he went about sixty yards, and passed it to Hill—I first saw Hill at the Wagon-and-Horses, about one hundred yards from our house—he was in sight of our house—Skeggs ran from him—I pursued and took him—I did not see Hill nearer than sixty yards off—he did not run away.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Where were you when this happened? A. In the parlour—when Skeggs ran away he ran across the road—I saw the wagon there—Hill was driving—it was an open wagon.

THOMAS HALLINGHAM (police-constable N 306.) I took charge of the prisoners.

HILL— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-870

870. ANN KEATON and CHARLES KEATON were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February, 2 1/2 pounds weight of sugar, value 1s. 5d.; the goods of Thomas Craddock; and GRACE FITZGERALD , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

THOMAS CRADDOCK . I am a grocer, at No. 52, Cable-street, St. George's-in-the-East. On the evening of the 7th of February, at half-past Four o'clock, the two Keatons, and a younger one who is discharged, came to my shop, and asked for a halfpenny-worth of treacle—I gave the cup to a boy to get it, and give it to them—I had four or five customers in the shop at the time, and when the two Keatons were gone I missed a parcel of sugar, that I had done up on the counter—a witness came and said something, and my boy went and brought them back—I said I would give them in charge—the prisoner Ann cried, and said, if the officer would go with her, she would show him an apple-woman, to whom she gave it—the officer went and got it, and took them all to the station-house—I went and saw it, in the same paper that I had done it up in—this is it—(examining it.)

WILLIAM EGLINTON . I live with my father, in Cable-street. I remember these two Keatons going out of the shop—the prisoner Charles was standing on the threshold of the door—the girl was inside—the younger one, who is not in custody, came out, and I saw something in its pinafore, and they went off with it—about ten doors down, Charles Keaton took it out of the child's lap, and went up Church-lane—I went and gave information to the prosecutor.

JAMES GEORGE (police-sergeant H 10.) I received information, and took the Keatons in the prosecutor's shop—I went with them up Back-church-lane, and there saw Fitzgerald—I asked her where the sugar was—she asked, "What sugar?"—Charles Keaton said, "Give up the sugar you gave me 6d. for"—she stooped down under her stall, took it out of a sack, and said she thought there was no harm in buying it—there was nothing in the sack besides this—there is 2 1/2 lbs. weight of sugar, at 1d. a pound.

Fitzgerald's Defence. I sell fruit in the street. On Friday evening the boy came, and asked me whether I would buy a pound and a half of sugar. I asked where he got it, he said he picked it up in the street. I asked where he lived, he said, in White Lion-street. He asked me 6d. for the sugar, which I gave him; I did not know of its being stolen.

ANN KEATON— GUILTY . Aged 10.— Confined Ten Days.

CHARLES KEATON— GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Ten Days. and Whipped.

FITZGERALD— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-871

871. ANN POPE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February, 2 pieces of carpet, containing 9 yards, value 3s.; the goods of John Warrener.

JOHN WARRENER . I am a carpenter, living in Southwood-lane, High-gate. On the 20th of February I lost two pieces of carpet—they were

under the fence, at the back-door of my premises, in a back yard—(property produced)—these are mine, and are worth 3s.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What do you know them by? A. y their being familiar to me—I have had them seven years—there is no mark on them—I had not seen them put into the back yard myself, and cannot say when I saw them last.

SUSANNAH REED . I am housekeeper to the prosecutor. On the 20th of February I put this carpeting out to be shook or beat, but the yard being full of clothes, that could not be done—I saw them at five o'clock, but not after.

Cross-examined. Q. What do you know them by? A. I was with the prosecutor when they were bought, and know it from its general appearance and the age of it—there is another yard to pass through before you get to the street—there is no difficulty to get at it—it was rather exposed.

JOHN HANSELL . I am a dealer in marine-stores. The prisoner brought this carpet to my house, and asked me to buy it—she said she had it from a gentleman's house where she had been washing, and asked me if I could afford her 9d. for it—I told her the utmost I could get for it would be 1s., as it is threadbare, and has holes in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Then you gave 1d. a yard for it? A. Yes—she asked me if I could allow her 9d. for it—my house is next to the Belland-Horns public-house at High gate—I do not know the prosecutor's house—I have been a marine-store dealer eight years—I had never seen the prisoner before—I have only been there two months—I am quite sure she said it was given to her at a gentleman's where she had been washing—she was not there more than two minutes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-872

872. THOMAS DUDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January, one bookbinder's tool, called a holing-machine, value 8s., the goods of Eliza Aitkin.

ELIZA AITKIN . My husband died on the 13th of January, he was a bookbinder. I did not see this tool till I saw it at Bow-street—I have taken possession of all my husband's goods—I have taken no administration—I cannot say whether this was on my premises since my husband's death.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. The prisoner had been a long time in your husband's employ? A. Yes, all the tools were in his care.

GEORGE MANVILL . I live at No. 141, Hoi born. I worked for Mr. William Aitkin—I have known the prisoner some years—I know this machine by using it—I saw it last on the 13th, the day Mr. Aitkin died.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner has been a man of good character? A. Yes—I had a friend of the name of Baynton, who worked in the business with the prisoner and me—he was discharged, in consequence of not being a man of the trade—I believe the prisoner told Mr. Aitkin that he was not brought up to it—I was very angry at it, when I was out of temper, and said I would not be friendly with the prisoner—I remember pawning two of my master's prayer-books, and the prisoner told my master of it—I only know this machine by using it, and by the string slipping off—there are two or three holes about it—I know it was in the shop—whether it was given to the prisoner by Mr. Aitkin I cannot tell—I will not swear I saw it after the 13th of January.

RALPH PRESTON . I bought this machine of the prisoner—I cannot exactly say when—it was about five weeks ago, while he was working with me—he was at work with me Before Mr. Aitkin's death—I gave him 5s.—I should have given him 5l. if he had wanted to borrow it.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe 5s. is the value of it? A. It might be worth more to use—I have known the prisoner many years—he might have gone and got gold out of my box when he pleased.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-873

873. ANN DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of February, 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-crown, and 1 sixpence; the property of Charles Webb, from his person.

CHARLES WEBB . On the 18th of February I went to the Horse Guards, and went to the Canteen public-house, and had something to drink—some time after, I met the prisoner, who asked me to treat her—I, being tipsy, treated her with some wine—she seemed to know a good many soldiers whom I treated—when I was leaving she asked me to allow her to get into my chaise as far as she was going—I said she might, and we stopped at various public-houses on the way—I had some money, I think about 3l.—I had one sovereign, one half-crown, and some shillings—I do not know that I had any other money—it was in a brown purse, which I should know again—this is it—(examining one)—I saw it safe at the Horse Guards, where I paid for what 1 had, and put it into my pocket—I took it out, and paid at several other public-houses, and then we came to an eating-house by the side of Temple-bar—we stopped, but not long—when I got out of the house I found I bad lost my purse—I thought the prisoner must have it—I rode just through Temple-bar, saw a policeman, and told him of it, and the prisoner was taken to the station-house—my purse contained one sovereign, one half-crown, and one sixpence.

WILLIAM SYKES (City police-constable, No. 122.) I was on duty In Fleet-street, about one o'clock on Saturday morning last, and saw a one-horse chaise come driving down with three people in it, the prisoner, and a man named Clarke, and the prosecutor—as soon as I got opposite the chaise the prosecutor called out to me—I crossed, and he told me to take Clarke and the prisoner into custody, for he had lost his purse containing 15l.—I told him to lead his horse down to the station-house—I walked along side the chaise till we got to the Black Horse public-house—I then told the prisoner and Clarke to get out, and took them to the station-house, and desired the prosecutor to go back to the chaise—we did, and searched and found nothing—we returned to the station-house, and the charge was taken—I searched the prisoner, and found this purse, containing one sovereign, one half-crown, and one sixpence in the stocking of her right leg—previous to her being searched she said she had not a farthing about her—after it was found, she said it was hers, that her mother knew it, and knew it well—after that she said she had it given to her at the Horse Guards by a soldier that night—the inspector went up next day, and made inquiries, and found a soldier who she described was on duty—Clarke was discharged, not having any thing.

CHARLES WEBB re-examined. Q. Where did you pick up Clarke? A. When I got to the eating-house he spoke to this woman, and then he got into the chaise, and I thought he might know something about it as well as her—I do not recollect any person putting their hand into my pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-874

874. THOMAS PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 1d., the goods of George Edward Noone, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

GEORGE EDWARD NOONE . I am an engineer, living in Silver-street, Bloomsbury. I was in Holborn on the 24th of February—a person called to me—I turned, and found it was a policeman, who showed me this handkerchief, which is mine—(looking at it)—I had seen it safe an hour before—I know it is mine, as I had used it with a chemical process, it being of no value.

JOHN LEWIS ASHAM (police-constable F 119.) About eight o'clock at night, on the 24th of February, I was on duty, and saw the prisoner, with two others, attempt the prosecutor's pockets twice, then the prisoner took the handkerchief out, looked at it, and then threw it in the crossing of the street—I took it up, followed him, and called to the gentleman.

Prisoner. There were two young men before roe, one of them picked the pocket, and the policeman ran after me. Witness. I saw you take it, and no one else.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Holborn, when this policeman, dressed as a sailor, laid hold of me and accused me of this—he said I ran after the other two, but they chucked it down, and then he said at the office that I took it, but I had not.

JOHN PIPER (police-constable F 105.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY .—Aged 20.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-875

875. JOHN PETER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January, jacket, value 2s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; the goods of Thomas M'Carthy, in a vessel in a port of entry and discharge.

THOMAS M'CARTHY . I am a labourer in the West India Docks. On the 12th of January I was on board the ship Urgent in the export-dock—I left my jacket and handkerchief on the deck about the middle of the day—I was leaving work about four o'clock, and missed them—the prisoner was sitting on the deck—from information I received on the 17th, I went with the policeman to search the prisoner's place on board the London—I found this handkerchief on board.

Prisoner. You took my drawers and a pair of top boots away. Witness. No; your drawers were missing two or three days before.

STEPHEN LAURENCE . I am cabin-boy on board the Wandsworth, which belongs to the same owner as the Urgent—I gave the prisoner a shirt, and he gave me this jacket on the Friday, before I went to the police-office, I gave it to the officer.

THOMAS HOY . I am an officer. I went on board the London, on the 17th, and found this handkerchief in the prisoner's bag of clothes, in the forecastle of the ship—the prisoner was then on board—he had been on board the Urgent before, but had gone to the London—he told me he gave 8d. for the handkerchief.

Prisoners Defence. I bought the handkerchief for 6d.—I took the jacket because I could not find my drawers.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-876

876. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February, 3 printed books, value 8s., the goods of Susan Mason.

WILLIAM MASON . I am the brother of Susan Mason, who keeps a book-shop in St. Giles's. I was in the shop on the 18th of February—the prisoner came in and asked for a print—he put down a shilling, and wanted change—I gave him 6d., and just stepped to the door to speak to a friend, and missed three books—I charged him with it—he pulled out one, and then another, and then the other—he said it was poverty drove him to do it—these are all my sister's books—(looking at them.)

GUILTY.* Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18400302-877

877. ROBERT ROUTLEDGE was indicted for embezzlement.

ELLEN LYNDE . I am wife of James Lynde, and am a milliner in the Lowther Arcade. The prisoner supplied me with goods from his masters, Staggs and Mantle, to the amount of 1l. 10s. and 1l. 0s. 6d.—I paid him 1l. 10s. on the 1st of January, 1l. 0s. 6d. on the 4th of January, and 4l. in different payments—the last was on the 14th of February—I am sure I paid him all these sums.

Cross-examined by MR. ROWE. Q. Had you previously bought any articles of the prisoner? A. No—the 1l. 10s. was the first bill.

JOHN KERSEY . I am cashier to Messrs. George Staggs and his partner. The prisoner was in their employ up to the 14th of February—he has not accounted for either of these sums, which he ought to have done at the time they were paid him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prisoner do much in collecting? A. Not a great deal—not 50l. in a month—they were chiefly small sums—I do not know his salary—I do not know that half his salary was to be laid by on every Saturday night, for him to receive it at the end of six months—I am not aware that he was in any pecuniary difficulties—he never told me he had a writ served on him—he left my master's service in February—it was a week before he was sent for by my master.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 21.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-878

878. WILLIAM WINTLE was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 7th of February, of a certain evil-disposed person, 2 frocks, value 1s. 6d.; 2 petticoats, value 1s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 1s. 6d.; 1 jacket, value 1s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 2s.; 4 shirts, value 4s.; 2 aprons, value 6d.; 1 pair of socks, value 1s.; and 4 handkerchiefs, value 1s. 9d.; the goods of Mary Ann Tillett; well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

MARY ANN TILLETT . I am a widow, living in Collingwood-street, Bethnal-green. On the 7th of February I missed four shirts, two petticoats, two frocks, one pair of trowsers, a fustian jacket, a shift, a night-gown, a pair of socks, and various things of the child's; also two coarse aprons, a neck-handkerchief, and several other handkerchiefs, from a dirty clothes-bag—there are some children living in my house—I called them to me—a child named Grove, whose father and mother lived in a room of mine, in the same house, told me something, in consequence of which, I and my brother-in-law, and Grove, went to the shop of a man named Rakley, a

marine-store dealer in Old Cock-lane—I saw the prisoner there, standing at the counter—he appeared as a servant—I asked him if he knew the boy Grove—he said he did not—I told him that the boy said he was the person who bought the things of him—he said I must look in in the morning, when Mr. Rakley would be in the way, he knew nothing about it—I do not know that the boy made any answer—the next morning Mr. Rakley came and fetched me to his shop—we did not find any thing of mine—we went into another shop—a man turned up two bundles of things, and there was nothing of mine—by that time Mr. Rakley was in the shop, and in coming out of the other shop; a man brought me this handkerchief—I do not know the name of the man—I knew the handkerchief—it was mine—in the course of that day I got three boy's shirts from Mr. Rakley—they were mine—they were dirty when they were taken from me, but clean when they were brought back—this was on the Saturday morning—there is a young woman named Uestie living with me—I went on Monday to Rakley's shop again with Grove, and saw the prisoner there—the prisoner said he had no knowledge of Grove, he might have been there, and he asked the boy if he had sold the frock there—he said he had, that he was the man he had sold it to, and he had given him 1d. for it—the prisoner said he knew nothing about it—these are some of the articles I missed—(looking at them)—I have not found the others.

Cross-examined by MR. CHAMBERS. Q. What were the other things? A. Two boy's frocks—they were not torn to pieces, if they were torn up they would be rags—there was a pair of trowsers—they would make rags if they were torn up, as they were duck, and a fustian jacket—I did not find that, nor a shift, night-gown, two petticoats, one flannel one, and one cotton one, two aprons, children's stockings, and socks, and pinafores—Grove said he got 1 1/2 d. for the shirts, and 1d. for the frock—I have not found the other things—I do not know that they were all taken together—they were left off on the 2nd of February, and on the 7th, when I went to wash up my clothes, they were gone—the shirts and frocks were rolled up together—Grove is between ten and eleven years old—there were only my own children and him in the house—I never sold things in a rag-shop—when I went, the prisoner was in one shop, and there were two men in the other—the other man produced the handkerchief, and Mr. Rakley gave me the shirts—Grove denied all about it till I spoke to his mother—Rakley has lived there many years—I never knew the prisoner before—I knew his brother, who is a respectable man—I was not aware that the prisoner was in Mr. Rakley's service.

MARTH UESTIE . I am single, and live with Mrs. Tillett. On the 2nd of February I recollect changing my gown in the prosecutrix's back room—it was a light-blue colour, with green and red flowers—I put it into a box, or a bag, in the prosecutrix's room—I missed it—I saw the boy Grove—in consequence of something he told me I went with him to Rakley's, and saw the prisoner there, standing behind the counter—Grove said he had sold the frock there, and that the prisoner gave him a penny for it—the prisoner said he had no knowledge of the boy; the frock was not there; and if I would call in the morning, if it was there, he would return it to me; but he was quite certain it was not—I then got a policeman, and went with him—Grove then said to the prisoner that he was the man—he was then taken into custody—he asked me what my frock was worth, and said,

sooner than there should be any bother about it, he would pay for it out of his own pocket—I said it was too late.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you lived in this house? A. About eleven months I used to put my things in this clothes-bag.

EDWARD GROVE . I am ten years old—I live with my father and mother, in the prosecutrix's house—I used to play with her children sometimes—we used to go up stairs into her room—two or three days before I was taken by a policeman I took some things—the first time I took the shirts from the room, and the second time Uestie's gown, from the bag—I took them to Mr. Rakley's rag-shop twice—I took the shirts the first time—I saw the prisoner, and he told me to put them in the scale—he gave me 1 1/2 d. for them, and threw them into a large basket—he did not say any thing else to me—I did not say any thing about these things—I was afterwards spoken to by Mrs. Tillett—I told her something—I went to Mr. Rakley's with her, and saw him and the prisoner there—MRS. Tillett asked him if he knew me, and he said, no, he had no knowledge of me—I said that was the man that bought them of me, and I showed the basket where he had chucked them into—he said he would rather pay it out of hit own pocket than have any bother about it.

Cross-examined. Q. What was it he was talking about when he said he would rather pay it out of his pocket? A. It was not about the shirts, they were found—it was about the gown—I had mentioned about the 1 1/2 d.—I knew there was linen in that bag, because I had seen Mrs. Tillett put things into it—there was a fustian jacket, some trowsers, and some other things—what they were I do not know—I took all these things, but the gown the first time—I got 1 1/2 d. for all these things—it was in the mi idle of the day—this clothes-bag was up stairs in the back room, hanging up—MRS. Tillett's children did not see me take them—no one was there—it did not feel heavy to me—the children were out at play in the street—I knew I was doing wrong, and that I should go to hell, when I took them—no one has been telling me to make that answer to some other questions—I learnt at school to say, that if I was asked if I knew the nature of an oath, I was to say if I told a lie I should go to hell—no one told me to say so—I learned it before I stole these things—I know I shall go to hell if I tell a lie—MRS. Tillett asked me about these things—I do not know why I did not tell the truth then—I stole an apron three months ago—I cannot remember the first thing I stole—I do not know what it was—I began to take things a good bit ago—I have lived with Mrs. Tillett almost a year—I had stolen nothing before I went there—I began there—my mother is a shoe-binder, and my father a weaver—I had been at a charity school, but not long—when I went into the rag-shop I saw the prisoner there—MRS. Tillett asked me if that was the man, and I said, "Yes"—I cannot say the Lord's Prayer—I only saw one man in the rag-shop.

WILLIAM PAYNE (police-constable H 22.) On the 10th of February, in consequence of information, I went with Grove to Rakley's shop, and found the prisoner—I asked him if he had any knowledge of the boy—he said he had not—I asked if he recollected buying a frock, or any thing else, of him—he said, "No"—he said he would search and see, and if I would call the next morning he would give it me, and if not he would pay for it out of his own pocket—I said it was too late then, and asked Grove if he was the man—he said, "Yes."

WILLIAM ALDERMAN (police-sergeant H 7.) On the 10th of February

Grove was brought to the station-house—from what he said, I went to Rakley's shop, and saw the prisoner there—I told him he was charged with receiving stolen goods, and named some things to him—he said he had no knowledge of the boy or the property, and he would rather settle it than have any bother about it.

COURT. Q. What is the value of rags? A. 3 1/2 d. a lb.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? A. No—I knew his brother—he was very respectable—Rakley's is a marine-store shop—there is a large board over the shop, with "Dealer in marine stores" on it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-879

879. WILLIAM WINTLE was again indicted for receiving 1 frock, value 4s., the goods of Martha Uestie.

MR. ESPINASSE offered no evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-880

880. JOHN DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of James Tooley, from his person.

JAMES TOOLEY . I am a footman. Between eight and nine o'clock in the evening of the 20th of February, I was walking along Pull Mall—I observed the prisoner and his companion following me—when I got to Waterloo-place, the prisoner took up the tail of my coat twice, and he came on my heels—he stopped back a little while, and then he and his companion followed me again—the prisoner took the handkerchief out of my pocket—I turned and collared him—he gave it to his companion who went away with it—I am quite sure I saw the handkerchief in the prisoner's hand, and be passed it to his companion—it was like my handkerchief, and it was mine—the prisoner was not a yard from we when I turned and collared him.

Prisoner. When he turned, I was ten yards away from him, and he said, "You have got my handkerchief"—I said, "I have not, I have not seen it "—he said I had thrown it behind the railing—I said I had not—he kept me, and gathered a mob—he was looking behind the railing for the handkerchief—there was no policeman came for a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes—I told him he detained me wrongfully.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-881

881. WILLIAM STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February, 1 hat, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Robert Brodis; and 1 coat, value 12s., the goods of Edwin Lock.

ROBERT BRODIS . I am a recruit, belonging to the 24th Regiment. I was staying at the William the Fourth beer-shop in Gardener's-lane, West-minster, for about a fortnight—I was there on the 29th of February—Edwin Lock and the prisoner were there—they were in one bed—I had this hat there, and Lock's coat was there safe on the Friday night, the 28th of February—next morning I awoke about a quarter-past seven o'clock—my hat and Lock's coat were missing, and the prisoner was gone—Lock and I got up, we ran down and found the prisoner with the hat and coat on him—we asked him what he did with the coat—he said merely to keep himself warm—we asked what he did with the hat—he made no answer.

EDWIN LOCK . I slept in this room—I had this coat there, and missed it—I found the prisoner on the lower flight of stairs with the coat on—I

asked what he did with it—he said, merely to keep himself warm—this hat was on his head, his own hat was up-stairs, and it was worse than this.

GUILTY.* Aged 55.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-882

882. GEORGE GILES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 2 1/2 lbs. weight of mutton, value 1s., the goods of John Walker.

JOHN WALKER . I live in Theobald's-road, and am a butcher. On the 25th of February, I was in the parlour at the back of my shop about eight o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoner take a piece of mutton off the front board—he ran away—I ran after him, and overtook him—he gave the mutton to one of two boys who were with him, and they got away, but I kept the prisoner.

Prisoner. I never took it at all—I was just coming from the play where I had sold my bills. Witness. I am positive I saw him take it, and his mother came to offer to pay me for it.

GUILTY.* Aged 15.— Transported for Seven Years.—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18400302-883

883. SAMUEL STRAND was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 2 drinking-glasses, value 1s. 6d. the goods of William Bull.

SARAH BULL . I am the wife of William Bull, who keeps the Black Bull public-house, at Kingsland—the prisoner is horse-keeper to Mr. Spinks who occupies the yard of our house. On the 25th of February I accused him of having a glass in his possession belonging to me, which he denied—I said if he would give it up, I would freely forgive him—he still persisted that he had not, and I gave him into custody—these two glasses here produced were found in the prisoner's box—one of them I am certain is ours—it has our name on it—the other I could not swear to, but I have every reason to believe it is ours.

Cross-examined by MR. ESPINASSE. Q. You have nothing particular to know the other glass by? A. No; but our taps are very low, and we are apt to have the top of the glasses chipped as this is.

PRUDENCE CHASE . The prisoner lodged with my husband and me—the officer came and opened the prisoner's box, and found these glasses.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know it was his box? A. I know it was what he brought in as his box—it was a common deal box, and locked—a man named Hawkins lodged in the same room—he had been there longer than the prisoner had—Hawkins goes with the busses, and jobs about—he is not married—no woman lives with him—the prisoner and him were on good terms for any thing I know—I do not know that I ever heard the prisoner and others jeering, and making fun of Hawkins—the prisoner did not bring the box to my lodging for a good bit after he came there—I never saw him unlock it or make use of it—Hawkins had brought a box before the prisoner brought this one.

WILLIAM SMITH (police-constable N 272.) I went to the room and broke open the box—I found these glasses in it—the prisoner what at the station-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask him for the key? A. Yes, before I left the station-house—he said his brother had the key—I waited till his brother came, and he said he had not got it.

(The prisoner received a good character, and his master promised to employ him.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Eight Days.

Reference Number: t18400302-884

884. MARY PITKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February, 1 bonnet, value 3s.; 1 shawl, value 2s.; 1 apron, value 2d.; and 5 shillings, the property of William Green.

ANN GREEN . I am the wife of William Green. I took the prisoner in out of the street—she was with me about a fortnight. On the 11th of February my room door was locked, when I went to bed—the prisoner was in the same room—my husband got up at four o'clock in the morning, and went to work—he returned soon after, and asked if I had taken any money out of his pocket—I said I had not—the 5s. were taken out of his pocket—the prisoner was missing, also my bonnet, shawl, and apron—she was found with my bonnet and apron on—these are them—(looking at them.)

HENRY LANGHAM . I produce this shawl, which was pawned at my master's shop, but I cannot say by whom—this is the duplicate given.

DANNIS DALEY (City police-constable, No. 397.) The prisoner was given into my charge on the 14th of February—I found this bonnet and apron on her, and the duplicate of the shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-885

885. JOHN HART and THOMAS SPICER were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January, 1 loaf of bread, value 1s. 5d., the goods of Thomas Deacon Main; and that Hart had been before convicted of felony; to which

HART* pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15.— Transported for Seven Years to the Convict Ship.

THOMAS DEACON MAIN . I am a baker, and live in Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea. On the 29th of January, I missed a loaf of bread from my window, worth 1s. 5d.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I am in the employ of Mr. Stacey. a shoemaker, in Pimlico. On the 29th of January, about four o'clock, I was near the prosecutor's shop—I saw the two prisoners at the window—I saw Hart go in and take a loaf, and give it to Spicer, and they ran away down a court.

JAMES BRADLEY (police-constable P 134.) I took Hart first, and then I took Spicer—he said he had part of the loaf, but he did not steal it.

SPICER†— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18400302-886

886. FRANCIS TUBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 1 steel wheel bit, value 9d.; 1 screw, value 2d.; and 1 cramp, value 4d., the goods of the Great Western Railway Company; to which he pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 31.— Confined Six Months.

(There were three other indictments against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18400302-887

887. JOSHUA FURNESS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February, 151bs. weight of iron, value 6s., the goods of the company of proprietors of the Regent's Canal.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of David Lewis.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES WRIGHT . I keep the White Hart public-house, in Queen-street, Ratcliffe. On the 4th of February, about twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the end of Noah's Ark-alley, which is opposite my house—he had this piece of iron in his hand—MR. Jones was in my house at the time—he went up to the prisoner—the iron was then out of the prisoner's hand, but was close by him—Jones laid hold of the iron and of the prisoner—

there was some conversation between them—I saw the prisoner get away from Jones.

CHARLES JONES . I am a constable in the employ of the Regent's Canal Company. On the 4th of February, I was at the White Hart public-house—I saw the prisoner in Noah's Ark-alley—this iron was against the wall, within a foot or two of the prisoner—I recognized the iron—it is a shifting iron for a pile-driving engine, and the engine without it would be of no use—I went to the prisoner and asked where he got it—he said, "It don't belong to you, Jones"—I said it did—I asked him again where he got it—he said, from a place by the water-side—I said I disbelieved him—I took hold of the iron and of him, and said he must come with me—he over-powered me, and got away—he was taken again on the evening of the 26th.

JAMES GREEN WARD . I am a constable in the employ of the Regent's Canal Company. I know this iron perfectly well—it belongs to a machine of theirs—I had seen it safe two or three days before the 4th of February—I had taken it to their blacksmith to be repaired—I fetched it home and deposited it on the north side of the Regent's Canal Dock, on their premises.

DAVID LEWIS . I am dock master to the Regent's Canal Company, and have the care of their articles—I had this iron on the 4th of February.

WILLIAM YEOMAN (police-constable K 57.) I apprehended the prisoner on the evening of the 26th of February—I told him what it was for—he said he knew nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 31.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-888

888. ALFRED ELGER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January, 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 chain, value 2s.; and 1 seal, value 3s.; the goods of Thomas Miller, his master.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Kingsland-road. On the 16th of January I took the prisoner into my service, and discharged him on the 27th, as he was not sufficient for me—on the 8th of February, I missed a watch—it was subsequently found at Mrs. Avila's—this is it—(looking at one)—I have no doubt of it whatever—the last time it Was pledged with me was on the 17th of October, 1838, and on the 8th of February when the party came to renew it, I went to my plate chest, and missed it.

Cross-examined by MR. JERNINGHAM. Q. Had you a good character with the prisoner? A. Yes, for honesty and sobriety.

CHARLES SELLS . I am in the service of Mr. Miller. I remember this watch, chain, key, and seal being brought to my master's, in October, 1838—I took it in—it went to the plate-chest—I did not look for it before the 8th of February, I then missed it from the plate-chest—my master went to Mrs. Avila's on the Thursday following, and on Sunday the 16th I went to the prisoner's residence, in North-street, Mile-end—I found him there, and the officer who was with me took him.

JAMES HAMMETT . I am in the service of Sarah Avila, a pawnbroker, in Mile-end-road. The prisoner pawned this watch there on the 29th of January, for 10s.—he said it was his own, and gave his name as John Adams.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you clear as to the identity of the prisoner? A. Yes.

GEORGE KEMP (police-constable N 82.) I went to the prisoner's house, he asked to go and clean himself, which he did, and jumped out at the one-pair back-window—I took him—I searched his box, and found two duplicates in the name of John Adams.

GUILTY. Aged 18.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18400302-889

889. THOMAS STONEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February, 1 saddle, value 2l. 10s.; and 2 bridles, value 10s.; the goods of Frederick Mattam.—2nd COUNT, for stealing 1 saddle, value 2l. 10s., the goods of Francis Henry Dyke: 1 bridle, value 5s., the goods of Alexander Gordon: and 1 bridle, value 5s. the goods of Frederick Mattam.

FREADERICK MATTAM . I am a livery-stable keeper, in Brook-street, Piccadilly. A saddle of Mr. Francis Henry Dykes, and a bridle of Mr. Alexander Gordon's, were left in my charge—about the 18th of February I missed the saddle, and on the 22nd I was told there was a saddle and two bridles at a certain place—I went home, and missed my own bridle, but I did not miss Mr. Gordon's bridle till I saw it—these are the articles—(examining them)—I can identify them all—I know the prisoner—he was coachman to Sir Frederick French, who kept his horses with me at livery.

WILLIAM SPENDLOVE . I am a saddler and harness-maker. On a Wednesday, (I believe, the 12th of February,) the prisoner came to me about seven o'clock in the evening—he said, "Is your name Old John?"—I said, "There is no Old John here, my name is William"—I shut the door in his face—in about five minutes he came again, and said, "Don't you buy bridles and saddles?"—I said, "Why?"—he said, "I was recommended to you by Mr. Thomas's ostler"—I said, "I know Mr. Thomas's ostler, but I shan't buy any thing of you to-night"—I afterwards saw Mr. Thomas's ostler, and I asked him if he had sent any body to me, he said, "Yes"—the prisoner came to me again, and I bought these two bridles of him for 10s.—(the bits of them are worth the money)—he then said, "I have got a saddle to sell, but I lent it to a person, and I will bring it on Saturday"—on the Saturday he came, and brought this saddle—I asked what he wanted for it—he said, "2l. 5s."—I said, "How came you by these things?"—he said, "They were given to me by my late master, I live at No. 39, Adam-street"—I sent my daughter to see it was right, and I gave him the 2l. 5s.—on the Wednesday after he came to me again, and said, "That saddle and two bridles were in pawn for 30s., and the man is not satisfied with the money you gave me"—I said, "You told me they were your own, bring me my 2l. 15s., and take them away"—he said, "I am going with ray master to the levee, and I will come in the evening"—he came in the evening, and said, "The young dog is satisfied"—but as I was not satisfied myself, I took the saddle to a saddle-maker's, who told me it was made for Mr. Dyke—I left the saddle and bridles with him—on the Saturday following I went in search of the prisoner—I found him at home—I said to him, "Those bridles and the saddle are not right, they are stolen," and off he went, I never could set eyes on him till the Friday following, when he was taken.

JOHN NIBBS (police-constable D 145.) I apprehended the prisoner in his own house—I said I wanted him on suspicion of stealing two bridles and a saddle from Mr. Mattam—he made no answer.

JOHN CAZALEATIS . I am ostler to Mr. Mattam. I know the prisoner—I never lent him this saddle, nor bridles, nor authorized him to take them—one of the bridles was not locked up, the other was—I have given the prisoner the key to get any thing that was wanted.

Prisoner. Did you not lend me a bridle? Witness. No, nonsense, it is a likely thing I should lend him a gentleman's bridle—I did not.

Prisoner. Yes, he did, I bad but one, that was dirty, and he lent me one to go and exercise a horse—I had been in great distress, and sold every thing I bad—I had a wife and two children to keep—though I was in Sir Frederick French's service it was only for a fortnight—I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 33.— Transported for Seven Years.

Fifth Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18400302-890

890. ROBERT GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 1 purse, value 3d.; 1 half-sovereign, 10 shillings, and 1 six-pence, the property of Edward Parr, from the person of Mary Parr.

EDWARD PARR . I am a French polisher, and live in Union-street, Middlesex Hospital. On Saturday night, the 22nd of February, I was walking with my wife, about ten minutes before twelve o'clock, in the Commercial-road—my wife had hold of my arm—I felt a pressure behind me—I looked round, and there were four men, the prisoner was one of them—I saw him shove something into his pocket, and he stooped down to do something to the strap of his boot—I said to my wife, "Is your purse safe?"—she felt, and said, "It is gone"—I turned back, and on the other side of the road I saw the prisoner—t went and said, "I want that purse you took from my wife, give me that purse"—he said, "What purse?"—I took hold of his collar—he tripped me up in a moment, but I jumped up on my feet, and threw him, and tore his coat—at that moment he took the purse from his pocket, got it between his legs, and tried to get it down a grating—I put my hand between his legs, and took the purse from him—my wife said, "That is my purse, I will swear to if—this is the purse—(looking at it)—the money stated was in it, but that was allowed to me at the office.

MARY PARR . I am wife of Edward Parr. What he has stated is true—this is the purse I had in my pocket, it contained a half-sovereign and 10s. 6d.,—it was in my pocket on ray right side.

RALPH THOMAS . I am a bargeman. I was going down to Limehouse, and saw the prosecutor and the prisoner, thinking the prisoner would get from him, I lent a hand to hold him—I saw the prisoner get the purse from his right hand pocket, and try to drop it from him through his legs, but the prosecutor got it from him.

JOHN ADAMS . (police-constable K 124.) I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the road, and picked up the purse; this man came and said, "You have got my wife's purse." I said, "No, here is a purse I have just picked up; "I gave it into his hands, and he tore my coat.

GUILTY. Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. — Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-891

891. HENRY WALTHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 3 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 2 half-crowns, 1 groat, and 1 half-penny, the monies of George Tickell, his master.

GEORGE TICKELL . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Broad-street, Groevenor-square. The prisoner was errand-boy to me for about ten days—I sent him, on the 18th of July, to the collector of the assessed taxes at Charing-cross—I gave him three sovereigns, one half-sovereign, two half-crowns, a groat, and a halfpenny, to pay on my account—he went out, and never returned—I was looking for him till November, when he was taken on another charge—he was taken on this charge from Clerkenwell prison, on the 24th of February.

Prisoner. You say I was in your employ on the 18th of July, that is false; I never was in your employ in July, it was June; and I never was trusted with the money either. Witness. I will swear I gave you the money, and at that time.

BARTHOLOMEW ROSSELLOTY . I am the collector of taxes. The prisoner never paid me any money—I received the money from the prosecutor, on the 20th of July.

Prisoner's Defence. In November last, I was convicted from here, and had three months, and Mr. Tickell said he should have his wish now, and if his own charge was not enough, my former conviction would assist him; I wrote to him to know if he had any charge against me, and he said that was his business, not mine.

GUILTY.* Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-892

892. ANSELM JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 28 lbs. weight of iron, value 3s., the goods of John Bond.

WILLIAM DODD BOND . I live at Old Brentford, in the parish of Ealing. This iron was on a wharf belonging to my father, John Bond—it is a tie, which keeps the land up from the water—it was secure on the 25th of February, and I missed it on the 26th—I made inquiries, and on Monday last I received information, and went to a marine-store dealer's, where I found it, this is it—(looking at it)—there are 281bs. weight of it—I have seen the prisoner many times, he lived not far from where the iron was lost.

Prisoner. Q. Have you any mark on it? A. I could swear to it from a thousand pieces; I had examined it particularly on the 25th, it was fixed in the ground, I tried to see if it was loose, if it had been I should have put it into the shed.

MARY MARTIN . I keep a marine-store shop. I bought this iron of the prisoner.

Prisoner. I was walking by the river, and drew a post out of the water, which had this iron attached to it.

GUILTY . Aged 50.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18400302-893

893. THOMAS ALLUM and HENRY RUSH were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 25 yards of merino, value 1l. 16s., the goods of John Hollick.

JOHN KARBY . I live next door to Mr. Hollick, in High-street, Poplar. On the 26th of February I saw the prisoner Allum run away from his shop, with the merino under his arm—when he had run about twenty yards, he joined Rush, who was at the corner of a turning, and tried to conceal the property under his apron—Rush could see the prosecutor's shop from where he stood—as soon as they saw me they ran away up different passages, and up Bow-lane—I then found Allum in a passage, I

put my hand on his shoulder, and he dropped the merino at my feet, and ran into the arms of my neighbour, who was with me—Rush ran off, but was brought to the station-house in about five minutes—this is the merino—(looking at it.)

SUTTON EDWARD CROW . I ant in the service of Mr. John Hollick—I saw this merino safe at the shop, on the top step, about twelve o'clock that day—I did not see the prisoner take it.

JOSEPH BARK . I was at my top-room window, which is next door but one to the prosecutor's—I saw Rush stand at a distance, and give a nod to Allum—I went down stairs, and just as I got into my shop, I saw Karby run past—I ran with him, and took Allum—I took him to the station-house, and as there was no policeman there, my son went out and took Rush, who had been watching Allum going to the station-house.

Rush. Q. Had you your window open, that you could see me nod at him? A. My window was not open, but I saw you quite distinctly; you were on the other side, and you tried to put your apron over the property.

Rush's Defence. I was' going to the East India Docks, a man came and said he wanted me, and I walked with him to the station-house.

ALLUM*— GUILTY . Aged 19.

RUSH*— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years.—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18400302-894

894. MARGARET HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February, 1 watch, value 2l. 6s.; 1 watch-chain, value 6d.; 1 seal, value 6d.; and 1 watch-key, value 3s., the goods of Richard Reeder; and ELEANOR ATKINS , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

RICHARD REEDER . I am a smith. On the 18th of February I was in company with one of my shopmates, Thomas Morrell—we were in Vinegar-lane, St. George's, about one o'clock in the morning—the two prisoners were standing at the door of their house—my shopmate knew one of them, and we went in—they began asking for something to drink—we told them we had no money, but I said they might go to Mrs. Dodd's, at the Ship public-house, and ask for some beer in my name—Hall went, and they would not let her have any—I went myself and fetched some beer—we drank—I and Hall then went up stairs—I had some money in my pocket, but she did not know that—I had my watch—I drew that out of my pocket, and laid it on the window sill—Hall was in the room at the time—I began to pull off some of my clothes—she took up the watch, and ran down stairs—I put my clothes on as quickly as I could, and hastened down after her—when I got down, the two prisoners and several more, men and women, were in the room—I asked for my watch, and said if they would give it me I would say no more about it—Hall would not give it up, and I called the police—they began pushing me about and scratching me, and wanted to get me out—the policeman came, and I gave Hall into custody—I saw the officer draw the watch from Atkins's bosom, and she said it was left with her for 5s. by Hall.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How far from this house do you live? A. This happened at No. 20, and I live at No. 29—I had a wife waiting for me at home—I got some beer and some rum at the public-house—we all drank of it—when Hall took the watch I said to her, "You are not going to have that," and she said she should not be long before she

came back—when I went down I said, "You have robbed me of my watch, give it me back"—Hall said, "I have got it, and I mean to keep it"—I heard that Atkins was married that day—my wife heard me calling for the police, and she came and found me in the house.

SAMUEL GREGORY (police-constable K 139.) About one o'clock in the morning of the 18th of February, I was on duty in the Commercial-road, a person came and said there was a man at No. 20, Vinegar-lane, setting fire to the house—I went, and found the prosecutor and an officer there—I asked Hall where the watch was—she said, "I have got it"—I searched her, and she had not—Atkins went out of the room—I followed her, and at the bottom of the stairs a woman said, "I think that is the person who has got the watch"—I searched Atkins's bosom, and found the watch—she did not deny having it, but said it was given her for 5s.

ROBERT WHITTLETON (police-constable K 152.) I heard the prosecutor calling "Police"—I went to the house, and asked Hall for the watch—she said she had got it, but would not give it up till he had paid her 5s. for the room.

Hall's Defence. When the prosecutor came to the house, he said he should stop with me—he said he had no money—I took the watch, and he set the bed clothes on fire, and a woman called the police.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-895

895. ANN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February, 2 yards of worked muslin, value 6d.; 1 night-gown, value 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 4d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 5 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 2 yards of silk, value 3s.; and 1 shirt, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Delves, her master.

ELIZABETH CHESTER DELVES . I am the wife of Thomas Delves, we live in the New-road. The prisoner chared for me, and occasionally lived with me and took care of the children—she had done so for six years—she had been in my house for six months—I have been missing articles for the last five years—I spoke to the prisoner about it, but I never suspected her—my little boy told me of something, and I found some of my property hid—I spoke to the prisoner about it, and she said she would down on her knees to beg my pardon if I would not tell my husband—I then insisted on searching her box, and found some of these articles—she begged forgiveness—I was present when her lodgings were searched—five pairs of stockings and a shirt of my husband's, and some other things were found there—these are the things—(examining them)—they are all mine.

THOMAS PRICE . I was present when the prisoner's box was searched, and my property was found—she begged forgiveness.

JOSEPH PRICE (police-constable H 133.) I was present on the 29th of February when the prisoner's box was searched.

Prisoner. The stockings were given me by her sister in April last, and the other things she gave me herself—I have been seven years in her house, and nursed her when she was out of her mind, and with six children—they took several things out of my box which was not theirs.

MRS. DELVES re-examined. I never gave her any of these things—there were some of my sister-in-law's stockings in her box, but those stockings are mine.

THOMAS DELVES re-examined. My wife has been ill with the brain fever and typhus fever, but as to saying that she gave the prisoner these things it is

ridiculous—a great number of other things were found that we did not charge the prisoner with, such as raisins and currants, and other things.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 56.— Confined Four Months.

(There was another indictment against the' prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18400302-896

896. HENRY JAMES and MARGARET BARRY were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 1 coat, value 15s., the goods of George Walmsley and others.

THOMAS ODELL THOMPKINS . I am in the service of Mr. George Walmsley and others—they are pawnbrokers, and live in Drury Jane. On the 26th of February, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I missed a coat, which had been hanging just inside the door, as I was taking the goods in—I had seen it safe half an hour before—this is the coat—(looking at it)—it is my employers'—I do not know the prisoner.

GEORGE TREW (police-constable H 125.) On the 'evening of the 26th of February I was on duty in plain clothes at Drury-lane theatre—I saw the prisoner James come running down with this coat, and doubling it up, and putting it in a handkerchief—I suspected him, and followed him round the yard, and saw him put the coat into the female prisoner's apron—I went and asked her what she had got—she would not tell me—she was not in Drury-lane.

JOHN EATON (police-constable S 193.) I was on duty in plain clothes—I saw James come running down Vinegar-yard with the coat—he could not get through, and he turned back, and put the coat into Barry's apron—my brother officer took her, and I took James—I asked him where he got the coat—he said he knew nothing of the coat, nor the woman either.

James' Defence. The coat was given me to pawn—I met this young woman, and asked her to pawn it—she chucked it on the ground, and the officer came and took us.

JAMES*— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

BARRY— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-897

897. SUSAN PIKE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 1 table-cloth, value 1s. 6d.; 1 shift, value 9d.; 1 bed-gown, value 9d.; 1 watch, value 10s.; 1 watch-ribbon, value 1d.; and 1 watch-key, value 1d.; the goods of James Steward.

ANN STEWARD . I am the wife of James Steward; we live in Cottage-buildings, St. Pancras. On the 20th of February the prisoner came and asked for a lodging—I had a room empty, and I took her in—(I take in servants out of place)—I said I would charge her 2s. a week—she gave me 6d. earnest, and said she would return in a short time, and when she brought her box she would pay me the other 1s. 6d.—she came back, I was sitting alone, making up caps, and she offered to make up one for me—I thanked her, but did not accept of her offer—my husband came home, and we had supper—the prisoner said she had had her supper—she then went to bed—the next morning she came down, and I asked if she would take breakfast—she said no, she could not take breakfast till she had done some work—after I had done breakfast I asked her if she was going out—she said no—I said, "I must go out to get something for dinner"—she said she would not go out till I returned—I came back in about a quarter of an hour, and found my door ajar—I missed my watch and table-cloth, which I had taken

off the table after breakfast—I then missed the other things—the prisoner was gone—I went to give an alarm—I did not see her again till she was in custody—the property has been found—it is mine—(looking at it.)

MARY ANN HOUSEDEN . I keep a shop in Monmouth-street. I bought this table-cloth and these other things of the prisoner for 1s. 8d.—she said they were her own.

GEORGE PORTSMOUTH (police-constable E 117.) On the 21st of February I received information of this, and found the prisoner in Museum-street—I took her to the station-house, and this watch was found in her hand.

GUILTY.* Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-898

898. ANN ROBINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February, 1 union breast-pin, value 5s.; 1 sovereign, and 1 half-sovereign; the property of Abraham Hale, from the person of Sarah Hale.

SARAH HALE . I am the wife of Abraham Hale, a soldier: I get my living by washing, and live in Deane-street. I was passing through St. Giles's on the 24th of February—I had been to draw a little money—I had a union breast-pin, a sovereign, and a half-sovereign—I had been drinking, and got a little intoxicated—I fell down in a passage, and the prisoner picked me up—I said I was very much obliged to her, and I would treat her, and we drank together—about eleven o'clock, as I was going home, I missed my pin—I do not know when I lost it—the prisoner told me to take care of my money—she said she would take care of it, and lock it up—she put it into my bosom, as I thought, but I found three farthings instead of the sovereign and a half—the policeman has got the pin, but I have not seen the money—I came from Hull.

ELEANOR JONES . I live in St. Giles's. I saw the prosecutrix and the prisoner together, at the corner of Lawrence-street, St. Giles's—they were standing talking rather loud together—I was quite a stranger to them—I stood to listen—I saw the prisoner put her hand to the prosecutrix's bosom and then to her own—the prosecutrix pulled open her cloak, seized the prisoner's bosom, and took out a pin, and showed it to me—the policeman came up, and said, "What is the matter?"—the prosecutrix said, "Nothing now," that she had got her pin, and she did not want to have any more to do with her—they were both in liquor.

ABRAHAM HALE . I am husband of the prosecutrix, and belong to the 3rd Regiment of Guards. My wife went to get this pin out of pledge—I know this to be her pin, and that she had some money.

RICHARD ETHRIDGE (police-constable E 165.) About a quarter-past eleven o'clock in the evening of the 24th I was passing up High-street—I saw the prisoner and prosecutrix at the corner—the prosecutrix had her cloak off—I asked what was the matter—she said, nothing, as she had got her property—the prisoner went on a little way—I took the prisoner, and the prosecutrix identified the piece of rag that the three farthings were wrapped in as being the piece the sovereign and the half were wrapped in.

( The prisoner, in a very long address, stated, that she and the prosecutrix had been drinking in several public-houses, and when they were about to part, the 'prosecutrix suddenly accused her of robbing her of her pin, but she found it in her own bosom.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-899

899. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Gerrard Ellis, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

GERRARD ELLIS . I am a carpenter. On the 28th of February, the night the Queen went to Covent-garden theatre, I went to see her come out—I felt a press against me, and saw the prisoner behind me—I felt my handkerchief safe then—my little brother was with me—I lifted him up to see the Queen pass—I felt a press behind me at that time, and the policeman asked me if I had lost any thing—I said, "Yes, my handkerchief—the prisoner had then gone from the place where he had been standing before—I told the policeman I thought the man with the short pipe, (meaning the prisoner,) had got the handkerchief—he went and took him—the handkerchief has not been found.

ROBERT BURR . I am an officer. I was on duty in St. James's-street, and saw the prisoner and another try several pockets, then go behind the prosecutor, and feel his pocket—I saw the prisoner put his right hand into the prosecutor's pocket, take out the handkerchief, and give it to the other, who went off—I then spoke to the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. The mob was dispersed before the officer took me, he said I had robbed the gentleman, and I said I had not.

FREDERICK TULL (police-constable A 183.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-900

900. JOHN LITTLEWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 2 knives, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Wells.

GEORGE TENNANT . I live at the Lord High Admiral public-house, in Marylebone; my master's name is Thomas Wells. The prisoner came to our house on the 25th of February—he went into the tap-room—I had seen him before—I had some suspicion, and watched him—I saw him put a knife up his sleeve, and told my master—lie went into the tap-room, and said, "One of you, gentlemen, have got some of my property"—I pointed out the prisoner, and he found on him two knives.

EDWARD KELL (police-constable S 103.) I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I took up these two knives merely to keep them till a friend came in to breakfast—I had no intention of stealing them.

GUILTY . Aged 60.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-901

901. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February, 2 1/2 yards of oil-cloth, value 3s., the goods of James Edward Watts.

JOHN GODFREY . I am shopman to James Edward Watts, a pawn-broker, in Angel-terrace, Hammersmith. This oil-cloth was on the step of the door—I was serving in the shop, about half-past twelve o'clock, and a young man told me something—I missed this oil-cloth—I followed the prisoner, and overtook her in the Broadway, with this under her arm—it is worth 3s.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up on the stairs.

GUILTY . Aged 52.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18400302-902

902. MARTIN GAVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Theodore Day, from his person.

JOHN SHUTE (police-constable G 219.) About a quarter before five o'clock last Tuesday afternoon, I was passing Moorgate-street—I saw a crowd round a horse that had fallen—I saw the prisoner, and another boy, try several pockets, and the prisoner partly drew out the prosecutor's handkerchief—the prosecutor moved; then he came back, and the prisoner drew the handkerchief from his pocket, and was rolling it up—I seized him with it in his hand—the other boy kept close to him.

THEODORE DAY . I was looking at a horse that had fallen—this is my handkerchief—(examining it)—I lost it.

Prisoner's Defence. Another boy took it and chucked it down—I could not do it with one hand—I have one bad hand.

GUILTY.* Aged 11.— Transported for Ten Years.—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18400302-903

903. JOSEPH HENRY SHOULTS was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Weeks.

OLD COURT.—Friday, March 6th, 1840.

First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18400302-904

904. JOHN STRADLING was indicted for stealing 7 planes, the goods of Josiah Lewis; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-905

905. MATTHEW FOWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 1 pair of stockings, 1 handkerchief, 7 sovereigns, and other articles, the property of Robert George Clark, in the dwelling-house of Joseph' Connell.

ROBERT GEORGE CLARK . I am a labourer at the West India Docks, and live in Marmont-street. Joseph Connell is the landlord, and lives in the house—the prisoner lodges in the house, and occupied the same room with me—he came on Tuesday the 25th of February—he called himself a shoemaker—he lodged only one day with us—I keep my money in a box close to the bed—there were seven sovereigns, and 2l. in silver—I had a handkerchief in the box—I keep the key in my waist-coat pocket—I got up and missed the key of my box, and told him I had lost the key—there were four penny-pieces in my pocket with the key—he pretended that he was not well—I left him in bed, and went to breakfast—I went up again to look for the key, and met him coming down stairs—he had left his jacket and waistcoat on the chest—I asked him why he did not take his clothes down, that I might lock the door—he said nothing, and I took his things down, locked the room-door, and thought every thing was safe, till I came home in the evening, and he was not there—he never returned to his lodging at all—I got a smith to open the box, and missed seven sovereigns and 2l. in silver, in another purse, a waistcoat, and a pair of stockings—nobody but him had been in the room—I locked the door inside when I went to bed.

JAMES EAVES . I am a policeman. The prisoner was given into my custody, on Wednesday the 26th of February, between seven and eight o'clock—I took him to Spitalfields station-house—I found a watch round his neck, and these ear-rings in his pocket, a new coat on his back, and a new waistcoat—I asked him where he got them—he said he bought them

that he gave 10s. for his coat in exchange for his jacket, and 3s. or 4s. for his waistcoat, and 3s. for the ear-rings—I found a handkerchief in his coat pocket, and a pair of stockings on his feet, which Clark identified—the house is in the parish St. George's-in-the-East—I found 3s. 6d. on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-906

906. MICHAEL ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, at St. James, Clerkenwell, 2 coats, value 3l., and 12 pairs of trowsers, value 4l., the goods of Edward Willis, in his dwelling house: and that he bad been before convicted of felony.

EDWARD WILLIS . I keep a sale-shop on Clerkenwell-green, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell. On the 12th of February, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, this coat and trowsers were in my shop—my wife gave me information that a man had gone out with some goods—I went out with Chipperfield, down Back-hill—we both went, and took the prisoner at the bottom of the hill, with the clothes on his shoulder—they are well worth 7l.—I brought him back, and went for a policeman—the prisoner was a stranger to me.

JOHN CHIPPERFIELD . I am a neighbour of the prosecutor's. I saw the prisoner come from the shop with the clothes across his shoulder—I ran out with the prosecutor, and pursued him—I took him myself with the property on him, about one hundred yards from the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Clerken well-green, a man asked me to carry the clothes, he said he would give me some money, I thought it a good opportunity to get money as I wanted some—he walked by my side with them, and this man came and caught me.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was a witness against him—he is the same person—he was sentenced to transportation.

Prisoner. I was guilty of that, but that is no reason why I should be guilty of this.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-907

907. ELLEN PRENDERGAST was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March, 1 pair of shoes, value 3s., the goods of Henry Yelf.

HENRY YELF . I am a boot and shoe-maker, and live in Goswell-street. Yesterday morning, about half-past nine o'clock, a neighbour gave me information—I ran out immediately, and overtook the prisoner, with these shoes under her shawl, and which had been taken out of my shop—I had seen them there shortly before—I called, "Stop thief," and she began to run.

Prisoner. Q. Was not I close to your shop when you came up to me? A. You were about one hundred and fifty yards off, in the middle of Old-street, across the road.

ELIZA ANN GANDY . I am single. I was passing the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner looking at the boots—when I came up she looked at me, took the shoes, put them under her shawl, and went off—I went and told the prosecutor.

(The prisoner pleaded poverty.)

GUILTY.*— Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18400302-908

908. WILLIAM GALE was indicted for unlawfully inciting and endeavouring to persuade Charles Henry Thompson, to personate one Henry Neal, in order to endeavour to transfer 30l. 3 per cent, consols, part of 100/. standing in the name of the said Henry Neal; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 49.— Confined Six Months in Giltspur-street Compter.

Reference Number: t18400302-909

909. LEWIN CASPAR was indicted , for that one Henry Moss was convicted of stealing, on the 25th March, 1839, 1021bs. weight of gold dust, value 5000l.; 2 wooden boxes, value 2s.; and 2 tin boxes, value 2s.; the goods of James Hartley and others; and that the said Lewin Caspar feloniously did incite, &c. the said Henry Moss, the said felony to do and commit.

MESSRS. CLARKSON, BODKIN, and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM CARNE . I am in partnership with my brother Edward Clifton Carne, as merchants at Falmouth; we are agents to the Brazilian Company. On the 18th of March last year, the Sea Gull packet arrived at Falmouth from the Brazils—two boxes of gold dust were consigned to us by that packet—I never saw the contents—I saw the boxes, they were marked B. C. 18, B. C. 19—they were seventeen or eighteen inches square, and made of wood, fastened together with nails—there was no cord round them—they were sealed with red wax—I observed that they were nailed, which is not a usual thing with the Brazil boxes—they were always screwed previous to that—those two boxes were shipped on board the City of Limerick steamer, for London, by my directions—(looking at the paper marked No. 1)—this is the bill of lading, referring to them—they were consigned to the Brazilian Company, at the Bank of England—Messrs. Hartley and Co. are the agents for the steam packet company that the City of Limerick belongs to—we transmitted in the usual course of business a copy of the ship's manifest of the City of Limerick to Messrs. Hartley and Co.—this is it (looking at No. 2)—I forwarded it by post on the 23rd of March—it would arrive in London on Monday morning, the 25th—the postage from Falmouth was 1s. at that time—it is addressed to James Hartley and Co., John-street, Crutchedfrairs, and bears the London post-mark of 25th March—(The following extract was read from the manifest.—"Consignees, Brazilian Company—where for—Bank of England, B. C. 18, 19—Goods; two boxes of gold dust, value 4640l.; freight 6l. 3s. 9d.")—the effect of that would be, to transmit these boxes to the Bank of England on account of the Brazilian Company—this letter (No. 3) is not my handwriting, nor the hand-writing of any person in our firm—it was not written by our authority—it is altogether a forgery—this letter (No. 4) is also a forgery in all its parts—this (No. 6)—is a genuine letter, written by a clerk in our office, and transmitted to London on the day it hears date.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Is your clerk here? A. No; his name is Hugoe—I think he invariably writes these letters—I received the boxes from the commander of the Sea Gull—on his bringing them to our counting-house I put them in a place of security at my own private house—I did not leave it to Hugoe to transmit them to London—Jordan was the person who took them on board the steamer—I did not go with him—I had not had any communication with the prisoner previous to this transaction—I had seen him occasionally at the office in London—I had not sufficient communication with him to enable me to judge whether he was a person well skilled in mercantile affairs—I had seen very little of him.

Q. Who usually signs the letters you write to Messrs. Hartley? A.

When the manifest has been sent, the signature has been, "for W. and E. C. Came and Co.—GEORGE HUGOE." Sometimes one partner writes letters and sometimes another; but the manifests are often made up at a very late hour at night, and and we very rarely sign them—I never put my name to them myself.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are the letters you pronounce forgeries, of the band-writing of Hugoe or any clerk, or any partner.? A. Nothing like it—not any one of them.

ROBERT JORDAN . I am clerk to Messrs. Came of Falmouth—on the 22nd of March I shipped on board the Limerick two boxes, which came by the Sea Gull—marked, "B C" 18; "BC" 19.

Cross-examined. Q. To whom did you deliver them? A. To Capt. Moffett.

JOHN MOFFETT . I am captain of the City of Limerick—I was on board when she came from Falmouth on the 22nd of March—I remember receiving on board from Messrs. Carne, two boxes, brought by Jordan—they were kept in the money room, under the cabin—the Limerick arrived in London on Sunday, the 24th, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon—the boxes were landed on Monday morning, about ten o'clock—they were the boxes referred to in the bill of lading which I brought up with me in the ship's box—this is it—(looking at No. 1)—I took the boxes on shore myself at the Iron Gate wharf, and put them into Messrs. Hartley and Co.'s office, on the wharf, as near as I can calculate about ten o'clock—the wharf is close to the Tower—between the Tower and St. Katherine's dock—I then went to the counting-house of Hartley and Co, in John-street, and saw the prisoner attending there as Mr. Hartley's clerk—I told him I had landed the boxes of specie at the wharf—he said he would go down and attend to it himself—the boxes were in the same state when I took them there as when I received them—they were marked "B C 18 and 19."

Cross-examined. Q. What time did you arrive in the river? A. Between three and four o'clock, as near as I can calculate, on the Sunday—I knew Francis Allen, a clerk in Messrs. Hartley's office—he came on board our vessel on the Sunday, about ten or twenty minutes after we arrived—no other person came on board from Messrs. Hartley's office—he did not come to me with a message from Mr. Hartley—he had no business on board as clerk to Messrs. Hartley—he could have none on Sunday—he merely came on board to see me, I suppose—he frequently came on board ship on our arrival—I knew him very well—I did not know him better than any of Messrs. Hartley's clerks—I was on a friendly footing with most of them—the other clerks were in the habit of frequently coming on board when the ship arrived—he did not make any inquiry as to what I had on board—to the best of my knowledge I did not tell him—I might have said I had specie on board, but I think not—he came into the cabin to me—the boxes were in the room under the cabin—I never mentioned any thing to him about the specie, to the best of my knowledge—I might have said I had specie on board, but I cannot charge my memory—he might have remained down in the cabin twenty minutes—I was taking refreshment—he came down, and might have stopped twenty minutes, bid me good day, and went away—I did not see him alter he went on deck—he was the only person connected with Messrs. Hartley's establishment who came on board on

Sunday—I did not tell him I was going on shore with the specie in the morning—I had no conversation with him respecting the cargo, of any description—I might have said I should he coming on shore in the morning, and might perhaps have said I should be at the wharf in the morning, but I cannot charge my memory.

Q. Do you believe you told him you were going to take the specie on shore in the morning? A. No—I really believe, to the best of my knowledge, I never mentioned to him, in any way, about specie being on board—I believe I did not mention any thing about the boxes—I cannot swear it—the first time I saw the prisoner on the subject, was on Monday morning at the office in Crutched-friars—I have not seen Allen lately—I believe the last time I saw him was the latter part of April—it was the second voyage after the robbery—I saw him in the office at John-street, and have never seen him since—I have heard that he left Mr. Hartley's employment very suddenly.

Q. Do not you know that he left the employment immediately on Moss being in custody? A. I was not in London then—I went to Dublin—I believe Moss had not been taken before I went to Dublin—I do not know that Allen went to America immediately after leaving Mr. Hartley's service—I know nothing about him.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What time did he go on shore after coming to see you? A. He left me between four and five o'clock—about four o'clock—I did not see him on board any more that day—I found the boxes perfectly safe next morning—he had no opportunity of getting to the ship's papers to know what the cargo was—the boxes were kept in a strong room under the cabin-floor, which was locked, and I found it locked.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a lighterman. I remember The City of Limerick steamer coming in on the 24th of March, and on the next day I took the ship's box containing the papers, to the Dublin Steam-wharf, Iron-gate—I took it there about seven o'clock in the morning, or a little after, and left it there.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you recollect who you saw there? A. The foreman.

JOHN VINCE . I was a labourer at Iron-gate-wharf, in March last. On the 25th of March I remember seeing the ship's box of The City of Limerick steamer, and took it to Mr. Hartley's office in John-street, about eight o'clock in the morning, and put it on a wash-hand-stand there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you receive it from Martin? A. No—Mr. Kingston had the care of it.

HENRY MOSS . I am of the Jewish persuasion. I know the prisoner very well indeed—I worked for his father—I have known the prisoner I think about seventeen or eighteen years—I was foreman to his father, and left him on being married—I was a watch-maker by trade, and after I was married, the prisoner for a short time came to me to learn the watchmaking business of me—for about six months before the 25th of March last, I was in the habit of seeing him often—I did not exactly know what service he was in—I knew he had a certain engagement connected with the Steam-company—I remember going to Ellis Caspar's house in Finsbury-pavement, about the October previous to the 25th of March last—I was invited by Mr. Caspar to call there—we went to the synagogue together—while there the prisoner came in, and we all three left the synagogue together—Ellis Caspar asked me in the prisoner's presence, to come and see

him, saying that he wanted me—I said I should call at some opportunity—at that time I was living at No. 12, New-street, Mile-end—Ellis Caspar knew where I lived, and on the Sunday following I found him at my house when I got there—the prisoner was not with him—he made a communication to me, in consequence of which I afterwards met him at Williams's coffee-house, in St. Martin's-le-Grand—we ultimately went to Charing-cross together to a coffee-room there—the prisoner came there—there were two or three strangers in the room—the prisoner said he wanted to speak to me, but not in the presence of strangers—we walked out together into St. James's Park—it was then dark—Ellis Caspar was with us, and he said to the prisoner "Lewin, I have brought Moss; I have not told him any thing what you wanted with him, now tell him the business"—the prisoner said he wanted me to do him a favour, that was to call at his office, and bring a letter which his father would give me, and he would give me a box, which I was to take away and give it to his father—I asked him what the box was to contain—he said he did not know, it was to oblige a friend of his in the country—he said probably stones, but it would make no difference, I should be satisfied for the trouble and loss of time I might sustain—I made some objection, and he said it was such business a ticket porter might do, only he did not want his father to be seen in the business—he told me there could be no blame, if any, all the blame he would take on himself—the prisoner told me I was to meet his father at a coffee-house opposite the Monument the following morning—he said it in his father's presence, so that he could hear it—I was to go there about ten o'clock—I went, and met Ellis Caspar—he said when I met him that he would go and see Lewin—he left me to go and see for him—he returned in a very few minutes, and brought the prisoner with him—Ellis Caspar had a paper in his hand—the prisoner said the ship he expected the box to come by to him had not yet arrived, and he desired me, as I had lost so much time, to go home and call again in the afternoon—I went again in the afternoon to the same place opposite the Monument—I saw Ellis Caspar first, and he went and fetched the prisoner, who said the ship had arrived, but two of their ships had come in collision, and there was a great deal of damage done to them, and the ship could not be unloaded, the box which was for him was at the bottom of the ship, and could not be unloaded till next morning—we met next morning at the same place—the prisoner said he thought his friend had made a fool of him, for the box his friend had sent was too heavy for any person to carry—I asked him if it could not be fetched in a coach—he said, "No," he did not wish it to be fetched in that way, as he was afraid the coachman might know his father, and he did not wish his father to be known in the business—he gave me half-a-sovereign on that occasion, and before we separated he asked me where I could be found when he wanted me—he and his father walked a little way, then turned to me, and said they should not want me then, and asked me where I was to be found—I said I was always to be found at my employer's—I was then in the service of Mr. Joshua Hyams, a watchmaker, whose service I have been in ten years—I am not now in his house, but I work for him—the prisoner objected to send there for me, and asked, if I was not at home, whether I should be found if he directed a note for me, and he told me he should direct a note, not in his own name—we then parted—we afterwards met in Finsbury-square, very shortly after, a few days, perhaps a day or two after—the prisoner came to that meeting, and Ellis Caspar too—we met in the

square—I do not precisely recollect what passed, but I recollect it was not on the business of taking away the box—it was some other business—we had several meetings of no importance—at one time of meeting the prisoner asked me what kind of hand I wrote—that was at least four months before the 25th of March—I wrote my name and address on a piece of paper that the prisoner had in his pocket, and handed it to him—he said that would do admirably, and asked me if I would write for him two forms of letters that he would give me—I was to copy two forms, and give them to him—he lent me a letter, and said that hand-writing I was to imitate as nearly as possible—he lent me the letter for that purpose—I recollect the contents of that letter perfectly—I did not return the letter to him immediately I had done what he requested—I kept it by me till the day before the 25th of March, when the prisoner came to my house, I then gave it to him—this is the letter—(looking at No 6)—I mentioned my recollection of the contents of it before the Magistrate, before the. letter was shown to me—I had a recollection of the contents of the letter, before it was shown to me before the Magistrate—after that letter was given to me, two forms were given to me by the prisoner—I cannot exactly recollect when, but it was a considerable time before the transaction took place, some months—I copied them, and returned them to the prisoner, with the forms—I made two copies, because the first he said the ink was too pale, and the paper would not do—he destroyed them in my presence—there were spaces left to be filled up—I wrote a second copy for him—these two letters (Nos. 3 and 4) are two of them—I wrote those two forms, but the date was not there when I wrote them, and several other words have been inserted, where I left blanks—they now read as perfect letters—they were mere skeletons at first—the date was not in, nor the words "William Marsh, Esq., agent to the Brazilian Mining Co., or order, freight and charges paid, two boxes, B.C. 18 and 19"—the initials and subscription—the date was not in the second letter, (No. 4) nor "William Marsh, Esq., or order, Secretary to the Brazilian Mining Company"—that is not my writing, nor the word "Limerick"—I wrote "City of"—I rather think that is my writing—no it is not—"City of Limerick" is not my writing—"on board" is my writing—"W. and E. C. Carne" is not mine, nor "boxes shipped by us marked B. C. 18 and 19"—"Mr. Bristow, please deliver above, Messrs. Carne have advised me about them.—L. CASPAR," is not my writing—there is no address to this letter—when I gave it to him it was directed to L. Caspar—here is part of the "er" on it now, where it has been torn—I directed it to Lewin Caspar—I should think it was more than a month before Christmas that I did this—(looking at No. 3)—this is a letter directed "Hartley and Co., 16, John-street, Crutched Friars, London"—hat is my writing—I wrote that according to the form—I directed the other (No. 4) to Lewin Caspar himself, by his own desire.

Q. After this did you see any thing of Lewin or Ellis Caspar again, before the 24th of March? A. Yes—I only saw Lewin—I did not see him more than twice I should think between that period and the 24th of March—on the 24th of March I met Ellis and Lewin Caspar in Turner-street, Commercial-road—they were coming to my house—Lewin desired me to knock at the door, as he did not wish my servant to see him, and he stood on one side while the servant opened it—that was where I lived in New-street—he went there with me—I knocked at the door, and let them both in—Lewin then said he should want me to-morrow—(this was

Sunday, the 24th of March)—I told him I had business I Was obliged to transact that morning, and did not think it would be convenient for me to come—Ellis Caspar said it would be a very good excuse to me to be out, at I told him I had out-door business to do, and he said the business would not occupy many minutes—I agreed to meet them I think in Mark-lane—I was to meet both I supposed—I went to Mark-lane, about ten o'clock next morning, and met Ellis and Lewin Caspar together, I think in Fenchurch-street—as I was going along, Lewin Caspar left his father, and Ellis Caspar came up to me, and said something to me, and we went together into a house in Mark-lane I think—he gave me a letter there, and a blue bag at the same time—the letter was folded at that time, and the address was torn off as it is now—I went the same day with that letter in a cab, to Mr. Hartley's office, in John-street, and delivered it to the prisoner there—this receipt, which is written across the letter, is my hand-writing—I wrote that on it at the wharf, when I went there for the boxes, after I had been in the City about my own business—I was asked to write a receipt on the letter—I had to deliver an order for my employer for twelve lever watches, and I received 50l. on account—this is the cheque I received that morning—(looking at No. 9.)—I signed my name across it as an acknowledgment of it—when I received the letter from Ellis Caspar be told me what to do with it—I took it to Mr. Hartley's office in John-street, in consequence of what he told me, and inquired for Mr. Hartley—Lewin Caspar was sent out to me—I was in the cab then—I handed him the letter—he went into the office, leaving me in the cab—he came out again with the letter I had given him, and another one which he compared together—he put his hand inside the cab with the two letters, one in each band, and examined them.

JURY. Q. How long was he before he came out? A. Not above a minute or two.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did he say any thing on comparing the two letters? A. He said there was a mistake, and asked me to step out into his office, and he would correct it—I got out and went through the front office into the back office on the left hand side—there was nobody there besides me and him—I observed clerks in the outer office which I passed through—when we got into the inner-room, the prisoner made some alteration, in one of the letters—I cannot say which, nor what the alteration was—the words at the bottom of this letter, "Mr. Bristow, please deliver above. Messrs. Carne have advised me about them.—L. CASPAR," was written by the prisoner while I was in the room—this is the letter, part of which I had previously written at his request—he then gave me the letter to go to the wharf—he wrote the direction of the wharf I think on another part of the letter—here it is on the back, "Inquire for Mr. Bristow, Dublin Steam Wharf, Irongate"—he told me to go to the wharf, and get these things, and he should be there as soon as me—he told me I should have to give an acknowledgment on the letter, and told me not to write my own name, and told me some name that I was to write, but which I forgot in the interval while I had been about my own business—it was in Bread-street that I was to deliver my master's goods—I went there, and from there to the wharf—I got into another cab to go there—I discharged the first cab somewhere by the Globe Insurance Office—I cannot precisely recollect where I took the other, but it was close on the same spot—I went to the wharf, and inquired for Mr. Hartley—I think one of the porters came to me, or somebody about the office—I afterwards saw Mr. Bristow.

Q. Why did you inquire for Mr. Hartley? A. I thought probably he might be at that place, though not at the other, as the clerk who first came out at John-street, said, "Mr. Hartley is not here, but the agent is"—I was in the cab when Mr. Bristow came out to me—I gave him the order the prisoner had given me—MR. Bristow desired me to come into the office—I went in and saw two boxes there—MR. Bristow said, "These are the boxes, will you take them with you?"—the porter placed them in the cab I came by, by Mr. Bristow's desire, and I gave him 1s.—I then wrote this receipt on the letter, and left the letter with Mr. Bristow—I put one of the boxes into the blue bag, which Ellis Caspar had given me—it was not large enough to hold both—I was desired to meet Ellis Caspar in Wood-street—I went there in the cab, but he was not there when I got there—I went to the Cross Keys public-house, Wood-street—the boxes were taken out of the cab by one of the porters there, without being directed to do so, and put on the counter, supposing I was going by one of the coaches—not finding Ellis Caspar there, I wanted to get a cord to tie the boxes together to carry them, but could not get one—I got another cab, put them in, and drove to my own home near the London Hospital with them—I drove to the London Hospital, Mile End-road, near the corner of Turner-street—the man by mistake drove me past the turning at which I intended to get out, which was the corner of Turner-street, and took me to the next street, which is at the corner of the hospital—I then took out one of the boxes, and went home with it to No. 12, New-street, and left the other one in the cab—I put it in my bed-room—I came out with intent to fetch the other, and met Ellis Caspar in the street—I told what I had done with one box, and where the other was—in consequence of what he said to me, I got into the cab again, and was driven to the Commercial-road, merely to delay the time—that was in a direction from my house—it was to avoid my own house—the box was still in the cab then—I ultimately took the second box to my house—I had at that time a servant named Jane Bradley—I got out of the cab at the end of Commercial-road, discharged the man, and returned by the omnibus—I got home about eight or half-past eight o'clock—I had tea, and went to the Earl St. Vincent public-house, which is in the neighbourhood—Jane Bradley fetched me from there—on going home I found Ellis Caspar waiting in the front parlour for me—I had a conversation with Ellis Caspar about the boxes, and he then told me what they contained—the servant did not sleep at the house—she went home after some time—it was very late before Ellis Caspar went—I sent the girl home some hours before he went away, rather before the usual time, by Ellis Caspar's desire—I desired my wife to send her away—there was a fire in my back parlour—I went up into my bed-room with Ellis Caspar, and showed him the boxes—they were taken down stairs to the back parlour—there were seals on all four sides of each of the boxes—Ellis Caspar put the lid of one box on the fire—I lent him a chisel to get the cover off, that was the wooden cover, they were secured by nails merely as a packingcase—after that box was opened there was a tin box enclosed—there was a quantity of hay between the wood and the tin.

Q. What was the box broken for at first? A. It was by desire of Ellis Caspar to divide the contents into smaller portions—the tin box was considerably smaller than the wooden one—upon finding that, the contents were not divided—there seemed then to be no necessity for it—the other box was opened in the same way—the outside cases of both were burnt, every morsel,

and the hay Ellis Caspar took away in his handkerchief—he went away before the boxes were quite burnt, and after he was gone 1 took the tin boxes up into my bed-room again—as near as I can recollect, they were about as large as three of those octavo books, (pointing to them) and about six' or eight inches long—I opened one of the tin boxes—it contained lumps of apparently ore of various colours—they had no appearance of gold—I had never seen gold in that state before—the sizes varied very much, some were larger than others—the largest was not larger than a child's fist, or a moderate sized orange—I placed the boxes in my bed-room that night, put them in brown paper, and tied them round with packthread, to make them appear as parcels—next morning I put them into separate trunks, one into a black leather trunk of my own, and the other into a wooden trunk of my daughter's which had no lock on it—I corded it—the following morning I seat my wife to hire apartments—that was in consequence of what passed between me and Ellis Caspar.

Q. Well, where were the tin boxes with the ere in them afterwards taken to? A. To Mansel-street, by my directions, and from thence by my sister—they were afterwards taken, I believe, to Petticoat-lane, and from thence the ore was brought to me at Oxendon-street, where I was then concealed—I had not the boxes at Oxendon-street—the ore was taken out of the boxes before it was brought to me—the last time I saw the tin boxes was at my place in Mansel-street—it was to Davis's house in Oxendon-street that I went.

Q. What became of you after this? A. I went to Brentford for two days, and afterwards to Peckham, to Fishwick's—I never saw the prisoner after that—I remained at Fishwick's a fortnight, and then surrendered to the officer—I supplied myself with the lodging at Fishwick's—I saw nothing of the prisoner at Davis's house—I did not take the ore to Davis's—it was brought to me out of the boxes—I desired Davis to go for it to my sister's, in Petticoat-lane—I told him they were there, and he said he should fetch them—I delivered up some money to the officers when I surrendered—I received that money from Davis—it was notes—I. think it was 140l.

COURT.—Q. Do you know of your own knowledge what became of the ore? A. Only what I was informed of—I never saw it after it was taken from Oxendon-street—I did not receive the 140l. till nearly a fortnight after—it was given to me by Davis in the coach as I was coming here to surrender myself—I do not know what has become of Davis—I saw him once at the office.

JURY.—Q. Did Davis know you were coming to surrender? A. Yes, when he gave me the 140l. he came with me—I came here for that purpose—I have been in that dock" and was afterwards discharged—I do not exactly know what may be termed a discharges—it was last Monday—I was discharged on the same day.

Mr. CLARKSON.—Q. Do you know Fiestel's coffee-house, in Tower-street? A. Yes—I was there with the prisoner, it night be a month before this transaction—I cannot state exactly—I left a handkerchief there—(looking at a handkerchief produced by Roe)—this is the one.

Mr. JONES to Mr. CLARKSON.—Q. Have you known it happen that there have been mistakes in the manifests, the bills of lading, and letters written at your house? A. I never knew such an instance—I have no recollection of letters having been written to correct errors which have been made.

Q. Was your receipt of these boxes from the captain of the sea Gull

the first intimation you had of it? A. We received letters the day before with the bill of lading.

HENRY MOSS Cross-examined. Q. Had you worked for the prisoner's father in his house? A. Yes—I did not board there—I had ceased to work for him for some time before this subject was mentioned to me—I had done nothing for him for many years—when I used to meet any of the family we recognised each other—we were very seldom in the habit of visiting each other.

Q. For how long before the subject was mentioned had you visited at Caspar's house? A. I cannot say—I sometimes called in at his shop, perhaps it might be a year before, I cannot exactly remember—I know at one time Mr. Caspar asked me to do a job for him, when I met him by accident.

Q. While you were in his service did you ever have to write? A. No, I had no occasion to write—I never had to make out invoices, or enter in any books, nothing of the kind.

Q. Do you mean to swear up to the time you mention, Lewin Caspar did not know what sort of hand you wrote? A. I do not think he possibly could have known—he might have seen me writing at his father's—I might have made some little marks—I cannot tell what he knew, I only know he asked me to show him what sort of hand I wrote—I am perfectly persuaded he could not know what sort of hand I wrote—he was very young when I was in his father's house, and might forget what hand I wrote, if I did write there—I will swear that I do not know he knew what hand I wrote—I might occasionally have sent in accounts to Ellis Caspar in my own hand-writing—I have no recollection of having written a letter to him since I left him, but I will not swear it.

Q. How many different statements have you made as to the part you took in this transaction? A. I never made but one myself—the statement made before was made for me, and not by me—the first statement, which was false, was suggested to me by Davis and Mrs. Abrahams, when they visited me at Peckham—that statement was taken down in writing—I wrote part of it myself, and gave it to Davis—I had some conversation with Davis while I was writing it—Davis dictated to me what I should write—Lewin Caspar's name must have been mentioned in the course of that conversation.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you write what Davis dictated? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Had you any conversation which was not reduced to writing? A. I do not know what the conversation was precisely—I only know that by his dictation I wrote down what I did—I have no hesitation in saying Lewin Caspar's name must have been mentioned.

MR. JONES. Q. You had conversations with Davis on the whole subject? A. Yes—I have no doubt the prisoner's name was mentioned in those conversations—I have no hesitation in swearing it—it is impossible to swear exactly, but I believe it was—I will swear, in conversation with Davis, I did mention the prisoner, at that conversation when I was writing my statement—I was never asked that question before to-day—I gave that statement to Davis, or Mrs. Abrahams—they were both together—Davis is my wife's father-in-law—he married her mother—I do not like to own him myself, he is not quite so respectable as I could wish—he keeps a good many b——y houses—I never lived in any of them—I have been in one of them—that was in Coventry-court—I had never been there before—I have no doubt

that was a house of that sort—I went from Coventry-court to Oxendon-street, a house I had never been in before—I went to Coventry-court on Thursday morning, and left there the following Tuesday morning—I have not seen Davis since I saw him at the police-office—he has left the country—I believe he was afraid of being taken in custody for this—I was in custody myself for several months—I made a statement to Mr. De Mole when I surrendered myself, at the inn over the way—that Was the first statement I made myself—that was besides the one 1 wrote at Davis's dictation—I made a third statement while I was in prison—the second statement I made, as near as I can recollect, corresponded with the first, and was equally false—the third was truth, and nothing but the truth, that I know of—I believe it contained what I have sworn to-day—it was in Writing—I do not believe I read it over after I Wrote it—my sister, Mrs. Levy, and my wife, were also taken into custody on this charge—nobody else connected with me, I am quite certain.

Q. Now, when the prisoner told you he wanted you to do him a favour, did you ask him what it was about, to know if it was right or wrong? A. I did.

Q. You would not Have done what was wrong? A. If I was to assert that I should not be believed, in my present situation—I thought I was not doing wrong, but I scarcely expect that to be believed—when I went to the office I did not think I was going to steal 5000l. worth of gold-dust, or I certainly would not have done it.

Q. I suppose you have been very much surprised to find you committed a felony by it? A. It was a surprise at first—I have not got over it now, I shall never get over it, my feelings are too much hurt by it—I wore the same coat I Have on now when I went to the office—I was dressed very similar to what I am now—my whiskers were in just the same state—I never saw the prisoner after that day that I saw him at the office, except in custody.

Q. What have you been doing with yourself since the last trial? A. Employed at my business—I live now at No. 126, Cornwall-road, Lambeth—my business is carried on there—I work in the front room—it is a private house, with railings in front—I am a housekeeper there—I set up housekeeping the quarter before last—I had no communication with Mr. Hartley's solicitor, till after I heard the result of the investigation which took place after the last trial—I then read it in the newspaper—I have had a communication with Mr. Hartley's solicitor, since the last trial—I was desired to go to know if I should be wanted, and told them where to find me—(looking at No. 3)—I do not know in whose hand-writing this "W. Marsh, Esq." is—it is not mine—all my family have been liberated as well as myself—my object in giving my last statement was certainly to effect that purpose.

Q. Did you know Allen, a clerk at! Messrs. Hartley's? A. No, I never saw him to my knowledge—I never had any acquaintance with any body of that name—I have no recollection of any such person living in my neighbourhood—I will swear I have no acquaintance of that name—I do not know a person named Mitchell—I have heard the name—I never had any acquaintance of that name—the hay that was found in the boxes was taken away by Ellis Caspar in his pocket-handkerchief, and the wooden boxes were burnt—he did not appear to take great care of the hay.

Q. Why not suggest to him it would be better to burn it? A. The

blaze might have set the chimney on fire—I do not know that that reason was assigned, but it would have that effect—there was a good large pocket-handkerchief full—no means were attempted to burn it—it might have been burnt certainly.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You have been asked whether you wrote the direction of No. 3, "William Marsh, Esq."—did you know there was such a person in existence? A. I never heard of such a name—I never heard of a person named Allen living near me—I had not the most distant idea that Mr. Hartley had a servant or clerk of that name—I did not know any of the clerks or servants except the prisoner—I read in the newspaper the decision of the judges on the last trial—I went to Mr. Hartley in consequence of his sending his porter—MR. Hartley told me to call on Mr. De Mole, to see if he wanted me—he sent me to Mr. Humphreys, who said he would send me a subpoena when I was wanted—I have always been willing since the last trial to state what I knew of the transaction—I do not know whether Ellis Caspar took away all the hay which was in the boxes, some might have been left—I was never charged with any offence in my life until this circumstance—I conducted Mr. Hyam's whole business for more than ten years, and am in his service now—Davis is one of the persons indicted as Isaac Isaacs—he has run away.

Q. You have made a statement respecting the ore at his house in Oxenden-street, was that part of the statement you were prepared to make before Davis ran away? A. Certainly not—I was to have screened him—it was at his dictation I made the statement, to screen him, and when he found I made the statement before the magistrate which I did, he ran away.

Q. What time on Sunday, the 24th of March, was it that the two Caspars came to your house? A. I have no doubt it was between one and two o'clock—that was the usual time I used to go home to dinner, and I met them in the street—none of my family were ever brought to trial—I remember Ellis Caspar being in difficulties—I proved under his bankruptcy as a creditor—I have the bill now in my pocket—I dare say I had a dozen meetings with the Caspars before the proposition to copy these forma was made to me—there were several meetings at different times—the original proposition was about another parcel called stones.

COURT. Q. You say you thought you were not doing wrong when you went to the office, when did you first have reason to know you were doing wrong? A. The same evening Ellis Caspar came to my house, and told me the nature of the business I had been engaged in—he then told me there was gold in it—I knew it was something intended to be kept secret, but I had no knowledge of it being a robbery—I knew false papers were made out, and that I obtained the articles' in a false name—it was given to me by the prisoner's direction—I knew I was lending myself to something not entirely correct, but supposing the prisoner to be a respectable young man, and knowing his father, I did not suppose a robbery was committed.

Q. When you were shifting cabs, and taking things in an omnibus, and by false letters getting goods by false names, did not you know you were lending yourself to a false transaction? A. I did not get the letters Milled up—I carried a letter which was originally written by myself, but I had not read it—it was folded, and I never opened it.

Q. He came to the cab with you, and compared the letters, said there

was something wrong, showed the paper to you, told you to assume a false name, and to go and get the goods? A. I was not aware of it being a theft, however strange the circumstance may appear—I mean to assert that—the prisoner told me I might depend on him, he would take all the blame if any body could blame him, as he was the principal in the concern, and I had nothing to fear—I thought it was samething of smuggling, I admit, but further than that I did not think—I knew it was gold the same night, Ellis Caspar told me so.

JURY. Q. You knew it was valuable property before? A. I never was given to understand so.

Q. Why put it in your bed-room? A. Because I had no mote convenient place—it was a very snail place I lived in, and the back parlour used by my wife was very small—I had no motive in carrying it up stairs but putting it out of the way—I have not said it was for security.

COURT. Q. When you burnt the lid what did you think? A. Then I knew all about it, I had been told—I have sot charged any person who had no share with me in the transaction—my false statement were only to screen the guilty—that was Mrs. Abrahams and Davis—I have not falsely charged any one with the crime—I never made any but the present statement on oath.

HENRY MITCHELL . I am a messenger at Mr. Hartley's office is John-street. On the 25th of March I saw the witness John Vince with the city of Limerick's ship's box, containing the papers—I saw him lay it on the wash-band-stand—I saw the prisoner that morning about eight o'clock—he just walked through the warehouse into his own office as I supposed, and went out again, saying he would be in in a short time—I received the ship's box while he was out—he came back and opened the box as it stood there, and took papers out—he generally came to the office about nine o'clock, but this morning he came about eight—it might be a few minutes sooner or later—I went for the letters that morning to a receiving house in the Minorie s, and got the letters, which I brought to the office and delivered to the clerk, William Blundell, who took an account of them, about twenty minutes or a quarter to ten o'clock—he remained in the office, and took an account of the letters—the prisoner was standing at his desk at the same time, and took part of the letters out of Blundell's hands—I then went to breakfast—both the prisoner and Blundell stretched out their hands at the same time to receive the letters, but I gave then to Blundell, and he opened them—they were tied in a string—he was commencing to take the account, and while he was doing so, the prisoner took part of them—I went to breakfast, leaving Blundell taking the account—I returned at near ten o'clock, and met the prisoner coming down stairs—he sent me down to the wharf with a letter to give to Mr. Bristow, the wharfinger, and told me to tell Mr. Bristow, or any of the clerks there, not to let any of the specie off the wharf till he himself came down—I went to the wharf but did not see Mr. Bristow—I saw Feltham and the foreman of the wharf, and delivered the message—I then returned to the prisoner—I was sent down to the wharf again—I then saw Mr. Bristow at the wharf, and delivered the former message to him—I then returned to the prisoner, and found Moss—(looking at him)—with him in the prisoner's office, which was the back room—they did not remain many minutes after I came in—they both walked out of the back office through the warehouse, and went out—Moss got into a cab—the prisoner remained behind, shut the door, and went to his room.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not a common thing to send you down to the

wharf with a message? A. Yes, every day—I am there for the purpose—I am not aware that he ever sent me with such a message before, not to let things go till he came—his orders were generally in writing, sometimes verbal—he has not sent me with such messages before to my knowledge—I will not swear he has not—he was there about eight o'clock that morning, a few minutes before or after—it was before I had any thing but the office open and the floor sprinkled to be swept—seven o'clock is the hour it opens—I will swear he was there before nine o'clock that morning—there is a time-piece in the office.

Q. What is the earliest hour you have known him at the office? A. I have seen him between seven and eight o'clock when a vessel has been sailing at six o'clock, but that was very seldom—I believe he has sometimes slept on board a vessel on such occasions, as I have taken notes to his mother's house on those occasions—I cannot say he slept on board—I have heard so—he had his breakfast at the office those mornings—he might have had his breakfast at the office on other mornings besides those on which vessels sailed; but put it altogether I do not suppose I have brought him half a dozen breakfasts since I have been there—I cannot say whether they were all shipping mornings—I have been nearly eight years in the employ—I should say the prisoner has been in the office between two and three years, but at the time he joined the concern I belonged to the west-end office—I should say we have both been in the same office about two years—I am not aware that—he has breakfasted there with Mr. Hartley—he might—MR. Hartley did sleep there sometimes—I have not teen the prisoner breakfast with him.

Q. Who else was at the office that morning at eight o'clock? A. The next clerk that came was Allen—he came about half-past eight, as near as I can say—and another came, I should say, at nine o'clock—I believe that was Mr. Blundell, but I had gone for the letters about a quarter before nine, as there was a clerk in the place—it was a grocer's shop where I went to for the letters—the people generally meet there to get their letters—Moss is the person who came to the office that morning—I persist in swearing that—I gave a description of the person on the last trial—I dare say I stated-then that the man had sandy whiskers—I did—I said large bushy whiskers.

Q. Do you call Moss a person with large bushy sandy whiskers? A. Undoubtedly not at present—his whiskers are not in the same state as they were when he came to the office—I believe I described his whiskers as meeting close to the chin—to the best of my opinion they were false—they were never the natural growth of his face—they were sandy at that time, to the best of my opinion—I am not aware that I gave that description to Roe and Lea—when brought to Lambeth-street I described them as I have now—I do not call them sandy now—I am not aware that I gave a description of the man to Roe and Lea—I will not swear that I did—I did not, to my knowledge, swear on the last trial that I had given a description to one of the officers—to the best of my opinion, I did not—I am not aware that I gave that description to one of the officers, but I will not swear to any thing I am not conscious of—I did not, to my knowledge, give any such description either to Roe or Lea—I cannot answer in any other way—I cannot say what age the man who came to the office appeared to be—he seemed to me to be a middle-aged man, a man that had a halt in his walk—as he walked out of the warehouse he

appeared lame—he walked in that way—I might have said, he appeared to be a man about sixty years of age—I do not think I said sixty on the last trial—it is so long ago I might be wrong if I swore I did not—to the best of my opinion, I did not—I never, to my knowledge, described the man as appearing about sixty years of age—I only swear to the best of my opinion.

Q. Did he appear about sixty? A. He walked with his bead down—it is hard to describe what age he might be—I took him to be in the middle age of life—I should say fifty was nearer the mark—when a man is sixty he is going down hill—I did not take notice whether Allen was in the office or not at the time the man came.

Q. How soon after the robbery did Allen leave Mr. Hartley's office? A. To the best of my opinion, he left on Whit-Monday, seven weeks after the robbery—I might have said on the last trial that he left a fortnight or three weeks after the robbery, but I have found out since if I did say so I have said wrong—I remember seeing Moss in custody at Lambeth-street—I do not know when Moss was first taken, but I know Allen was in Mr. Hartley's employ, and left about Whit-Monday—I should say Moss had been examined before that—Allen did live in Commercial-road, but I rather think, about the time of the robbery he lived in a street opposite the wharf, Burr-street or something—I cannot say when he moved there—I do not know what has become of him—I have not heard whether he is living or dead—I should say he left the office very suddenly—he was at business the Saturday before, and did not make his appearance on Monday—I have stated that he eloped—those were the words I made use of—I did not notice whether the man who came to the office had a velvet collar to his coat or not, at the time I saw Moss first he was leaning both his arms on the desk—I had only a side-glance at him—I have not described him as having a velvet collar, to my knowledge—the prisoner superintended the business when Mr. Hartley was out of town—as far as I have seen, he appeared very zealous and industrious—I described the man as between five feet eight and nine—I never described him as six feet high.

MR. DOANE. Q. On the mornings when the prisoner occasionally came before nine o'clock, it was when vessels were to sail early? A. Those mornings in particular—no vessel sailed early on the morning in question—there was no reason, that I know of, for his coming before nine o'clock.

Q. You are not sure whether Allen was in the office when Most came; can you say whether you are sure that Most was with Allen or with the prisoner? A. I swear the prisoner and Moss were both together, and Moss took the cab, and the prisoner waved, his hand to him—I am positive Moss is the man.

WILLIAM BLUNDELL . On the 25th of March I was a clerk in Mr. Hartley's office—I was in the counting-house that morning, when the General Post letters were delivered—the prisoner was there—I received the letters a little before ten o'clock from Mitchell—I keep a book, in which I enter the account of postage—I have it with me now—I made an entry that morning in the book, and altered it after I made it—the first entry was one Falmouth, two Plymouth, and four Dublin letters, which, according to my reckoning, came to 7s. 10d.—the prisoner took part of the letters from me, opened them, and returned them to me, and when he returned them to me there were two Falmouth letters—the postage of a

letter from Falmouth, at that time, was 1s.—it was the custom of the postman to put the amount of the letters on the back of one of them, and he had done so that morning—there was 1s. difference between his amount and mine—that would be the difference of one Falmouth letter—I put down the amount of the letters in my book, after I received them from Lewin Caspar, and my account was 1s. more than the postman's—the postman's entry on the letters was 1s. 10d.—it if our custom to settle with the General postman once a week—when I paid him that week I paid him for one Falmouth letter—the letters were taken into the office that morning by Lewin Caspar—about eleven o'clock that morning I was called out to see somebody—I went out, and saw a cab and a man in it—(looking at the witness Moss)—that is the man—he asked for Mr. Hartley—I told him that Mr. Hartley was not in town, but that Mr. Caspar, his agent, would see him—I went in and called the prisoner—he went out to the cab, and they both came through the outer office, and went into the inner office—they remained there a few minutes—they both came out together, Caspar opening the door for Moss—but before they came out the prisoner came from the inner office to me, and asked me Whether there were two boxes of gold dust marked "B. C. 18 and 19," consigned to the Brazilian a Company—I told him there was—I looked into the book to examine before I told him—Moss went away in the cab—the prisoner went out of the office into the street with him—I saw the prisoner again at two o'clock that day, and he told me that a robbery had been committed—he said nothing else that I am aware of, nothing about the letters that I am aware of—I cannot say that the word "forgery" was mentioned.

Cross-examined. Q. it would be Caspar's duty to open all letters that came there in the absence of Mr. Hartley? A. Yes—I received the letters from Mitchell—I entered part of them in the book immediately—I bad entered part of them when Caspar took some of them up—I entered them all before he took them away into the back office—it was not after his return from the back office that I discovered there was an extra letter, it was while he was standing at the desk—I was entering them when he took them—I had entered one Falmouth letter before he took them from me—I suppose he saw me do it—he was standing at the desk at the time, close to me—he knew it was my custom to enter letters in the book as soon as they came.

Q. When you received the letters back from Caspar, and saw two Falmouth letters instead of one, did you mention it to him? A. I told him there was 1s. difference in the postage—I did not make any observation about the difference in the letters—I did not tell him there was one Falmouth letter more than I had given to him—I did not think it was requisite—I immediately made the alteration—he did not say any thing particular when I told him there was 1s. difference in the letters—he had nothing to do with the payment of the pottage, any more than to see that it was correct—I went to the office at nine o'clock that morning—several of the clerks were there when I got there—I believe Francis Allen was there—Mitchell had gone for the letters—I paid the postman, at the end of the week, 25s. 6d., and 1s. 10d. for that morning.

Q. Now you say Moss is the person who came there; did he present the same appearance then that he does now? A. No, he had large black whiskers, not unusually large—they were large whiskers—they were so large that they attracted my particular attention—very different

from what he appears now—I did not observe what age he appeared to be exactly—I am not aware that I have ever said he was a man of fifty or sixty years of age—I do not remember that I said on the last trial, he was a man between fifty and sixty years of age—I might have said so, but I cannot say, it is so long since—I think I heard Mitchell say he was about sixty—I cannot say whether I swore that at the last trial or not—I believe I did—the person stooped as he walked, I should say, from infirmity or age—I think I said, last time, that he was from five to six feet high, leaving plenty of room for guessing—I did not say he was about five feet seven inches—Caspar was not at the office when I got there at nine o'clock—it was after nine o'clock when I first saw him that morning—I cannot say whether it was as late as half-past—I should say it was between nine and half-past nine o'clock—nine o'clock was my usual time for going to the office—I believe Caspar very often went earlier than that—it was necessary for business—I have seen nothing of Moss since' the last trial, only about here the last day or two—not at the office, or anywhere else—I am not aware of any mistakes in letters from correspondents at Falmouth with regard to goods consigned—mistakes have happened—goods have been entered on the manifest, and have not arrived, and letters hare occasionally been written to correct the errors—I have known letters from Messrs. Carne correcting errors made in previous communications—that has sometimes happened—I do not know that it has not frequently happened—I have not been in the habit of reading the letters—I have heard of such things in the office—I think Allen was in the office when I got there that morning—I cannot say positively—he remained in the office six or seven weeks I think afterwards—I do not exactly remember the time Moss was taken into custody—I do not know that Allen went off very suddenly—I know it was talked of that be ran away, that be went away—I think Moss was taken about four or five weeks afterwards—I do not remember whether it was about the same time that Allen left—I believe it was—I do not know that Allen has run away to America—I do not know whether he it living or dead—I have not heard.

Q. Were the papers in the office open as much to Allen and the other clerks as they were to Caspar? A. No, not private letters—letters of any importance were not open to any one who liked to read them.

Q. But could not any other clerk in the office, if so disposed, read any of them? A. No, because they were always looked up, I believe—I dare say I could have read them if they were lying about—I cannot say where the keys were kept, unless Caspar kept them—I am not aware that they hung up in the office—I never knew of their being kept in the office—Allen was collecting clerk—he was occasionally in the habit of going on board steam-vessels, and to the wharf—there are two cupboards in the office, in which boxes of letters were kept—letters received in the morning from correspondents would be put in the cupboard—it was not locked'—I believe any clerk in the office could have gone and looked at them—I have no doubt of it.

Q. Was it not matter of public talk and notoriety that Allen had run away? A. Not that I am aware of—it was talked of in the office that he had gone away, and had not been seen since, but not that he had run away—I am not aware that any inquiries have been made about him—I have never seen him since.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Whose business was it to take care of letters and

superintend the business of the office in the absence of Mr. Hartley? A. Caspar's—it was his duty to take charge of letters, to read, and answer them—no other person in the office had any right to read private communications made to Mr. Hartley but the prisoner—I believe I was asked nearly all these questions about Allen on the former trial—there have been letters from Messrs. Came correcting communications of the delivery of goods—Caspar would know that, and would know how the absence of goods might be accounted for—I did not get to the office till nine o'clock—whether Caspar was there before that, or what he had been doing between eight and nine o'clock, I do not know—at the time I spoke to Caspar about the postage, I had no idea that one of those letters was a forgery, nor that the post-mark had been forged, or that any fraud had been committed or contemplated—I supposed it was a mistake of my own, and altered it—Allen went away about six or seven weeks after this transaction—I do not know when Moss was taken.

JURY. Q. On the 25th, when the letters arrived, was it possible that any one besides the prisoner could have seen them previous to the arrival of Moss? A. If they were laid on the desk, and no one was in the office, any one could walk in and see them—they did not lay there that I know of.

Q. From the time you received the letters from Mitchell till you saw Moss there, was it possible for any one but the prisoner to see those letters? A. No.

COURT. Q. What time did you see Moss come? A. Nearly eleven o'clock, and the post arrived about a quarter before ten—the prisoner was present when Mitchell delivered the letters to me—I delivered over to the prisoner all the letters I received—several other clerks were in the office when Mitchell delivered the letters to me, but nobody handled them but I and the prisoner—he had taken some letters from me before I made the entry complete in the book.

THOMAS KINGSTON . I am foreman at Iron-gate-wharf. On the 25th of March, I remember a person coming there in a cab, about twelve o'clock—(looking at Moss)—that is the man—he asked me if the agent was in—I told him he was not in town, but the wharfinger was at home—he mentioned Mr. Bristow by name, and desired me to call him out—I called him out, and he came out to him, went to the cab, and they spoke together—Moss then came out of the cab into the counting-house with Mr. Bristow—he was there about two minutes, and came out—I brought out one box and another man another, by Mr. Bristow's desire—MR. Bristow told me to put those boxes into the cab, which I did—they were marked "B. C. 18 and 19"—Moss gave me a shilling and drove away in the cab with the two boxes—I had seen the prisoner in the counting-house that morning, about an hour before Moss came.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure Moss is the man? A. I am I have no doubt of it whatever—I never said I had a doubt—he had larger whiskers then, and he looks fatter now than he did then, in my opinion—his whiskers were a size larger than now, as large as mine—I call mine larger than his, middling sized—they were black, I am certain, quite black—I saw him next at Lambeth-street, about three weeks or a month afterwards, and I knew him at once—I knew Allen very well—I did not see him in the course of that day, to my recollection—he ran away from Mr. Hartley's—every body knew that—he ran away,

I believe, about the beginning of May—the' first time I saw Moss at Lambeth-street was about April, I think—I cannot say whether it was about the same time as Allen ran away—it was not a great while.

EDWARD BRISTOW . I am chief clerk at Iron-gate-wharf. On the 25th of March last I remember seeing the prisoner at the wharf, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning—I was in the counting-house—he brought a letter with him—(looking at No. 3)—this is it—he threw it on the desk, and said he had received it that morning from Messrs. Carne, to deliver two boxes, marked "B C 18 & 19," to a gentleman who would produce a letter from them—he said he had given an order at the foot of the letter for me to give them to him.

(No. 3, read, addressed,) "Messrs. James Hartley, and Co., 16, Crutched Friars, London." Falmouth post-mark, 23rd of March. London post-mark, 25th of March. "Falmouth, 23rd of March, 1839. 'Gents. We write to beg you will correct our error in this day's list, by delivering under-mentioned to the firm at foot instead of Bank. We will write to Mr. Haggard on the subject, and trusting to your attention, We are, gentlemen, your obedient servants, W. and E.C. CARNE. Wm. Marsh, Esq., Agent to the Brazilian Mining Company, or order, freight, and charges paid, 2 boxes, marked 'B C No. 18 & 19." "To Messrs, James Hartley, and Co., 16, John-street, Crutched Friars, London."

EDWARD BRISTON —(continued)—I was at that time copying the manifest of the City of Limerick—after he had shown me the letter, he told me to deliver them to the gentleman on the production of the order—I asked him bow long he thought the gentleman would be before he came—he said he expected he would have been there before him—I wished him to stay and see them delivered—I was aware they contained large property, by the statement on the manifest, which made me wish him to stop—he said he would stay—he remained about half an hour—he then went away with other packages, which he had, to the Bank of England—the expected gentleman came, I should think, rather more than half-an-hour after the prisoner left—Kingston, the foreman, informed me of his arrival—I went out, found a cab there, and a person in it—it was Moss—I saw the letter in his hand, with the order of the prisoner at the foot—he showed it to me—this is it—(looking at No. 4)—I believe the order at the bottom to be in the hand-writing of the prisoner, and also this memorandum endorsed upon it—I have often seen him write.

No. 4, read, (the back of which was torn off)—Falmouth post-mark, "23rd March"—London post-mark, "25th March." "Falmouth, 23rd March, 1839. Messrs. Wm. Marsh, Esq., or order, Secy. to Brazn. Mining Co. Gentlemen, Confirming your favour of the 16th inst., we have this day shipped on board City of Limerick to your address as under, which will be delivered to you on steamer's arrival, per Messrs. Hartley's, the agents, 16, John-street, Crutched-friars. Assuring ourselves of your future commands, we are, Gents., your obt. servants, W. & E.C. CARNE. Two boxes shipped by us, marked 'B. C. 18 and 19.'

"Mr. Bristow, please to deliver above,—Messrs. Carne have advised me about them, L. CASPAR." Endorsement on back, "Enquire for Mr. Bristwo, Dublin steam-wharf, Irongate."

Q. Upon this being shown to you by Moss, did you do what the prisoner told you, deliver the boxes? A. Yes—I got a receipt for them

which Moss wrote across the letter—this is it, "Recd. the above, J, H. Dean, per Marsh, Esq."—he drove away with the boxes.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prisoner, in the absence of Mr. Hartley, generally very much engaged in business? A. Yes—I do not consider that he had any time to throw away—I did not consider it extraordinary that he should go away after waiting half-an-hour—he had the whole business to attend to in Mr. Hartley's absence—I first heard there had been a robbery about two o'clock in the afternoon—the prisoner was not the first person to tell me—Kingston did—I saw the prisoner about three o'clock in the afternoon, he then told me of it—I was examined at Lambeth-street.

Q. From first to last did not the prisoner evince every anxiety to exert himself to the utmost to discover the perpetrators of the robbery? A. He certainly appeared very much excited about it—he expressed himself anxious that the perpetrators should be brought to justice—he never absented himself from the office to my knowledge—I have known him about four years—I never heard any thing but the highest character of him—he was always considered clever in business—I do not know that mistakes were occasionally made at the office—my duty is at the wharf—I have known some packages over, which were not in the manifest, and some packages in the manifest, not in the vessel.

Q. In different matters were there not mistakes occurring almost every day of some sort or other? A. There might be slight errors—I never heard of any serious ones—I was shown this letter (No. 4) by the prisoner, in Lea's presence, on the afternoon the robbery was committed—I believed the signature of Messrs. Came to it, to be genuine—I have seen Messrs. Carne's signature occasionally, and believed it to be genuine.

Q. Have you known the prisoner very often at the wharf early of a morning? A. No, not very early—I have seen him there at eight o'clock when he had occasion to go on board a vessel that was going to sail, but not on other occasions—I never recollect it—I will undertake to say I never did see him unless a vessel was sailing—I have seen him at the office as early as eight o'clock.

Q. Is that the sort of direction the prisoner would write as an order to deliver goods? A. Yes, when he had occasion to do so—I should have delivered a package without the order under it, but not such valuable property—if I saw the letter, believing it to be' signed by Messrs. Carne, I should have delivered it—believing it to be genuine, I should have delivered the goods—I knew Allen—I did not see him at the wharf that day, I am certain—he might be at the wharf once or twice a week—I remember his leaving suddenly—I do not know why he left, nor whether he is living or dead—I have never seen him since—I have never had any doubt about Moss being the person who came to the wharf—I did not hear Mitchell describe him—I remember bills being put up advertising the robbery—communications from Falmouth of consignments would be by post advising of them.

Q. Did such advice generally arrive the day before the goods? A. It depended on the passage the vessel had—this vessel left, I think, in time to be up on Sunday, but the letters could not be delivered until Monday—nobody in Mr. Hartley's establishment could know that the gold was coming—the writing of this letter, (No. 4,) is different to any writing I ever saw from Messrs. Carne's office, except the signature—it is very different to the prisoner's hand-writing—I should not consider any part of it like his, except the order and endorsement.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You remember the prisoner at the wharf at eight o'clock, when vessels have been starting—were any starting this morning? A. No—these boxes corresponded in every respect with the manifest.

WILLIAM DEBONNAIRE HAGGARD . I am chief clerk in the Bullion-office at the Bank of England. On the 25th of March I did not receive two boxes of gold dust—I expected two, from a letter I received from Falmouth for the Brazilian Company.

JAMES PEAT . I am accountant to the Brazilian Company. I went to the office of the Company on the 25th of March, about ten o'clock—no boxes of gold dust marked B C 18 and 19 arrived at the office—we expected such boxes—William March is our secretary—he came to the office about eleven o'clock—in consequence of a communication from him, I sent Carthew to the Dublin Steam-packet wharf—I was at the Bullion-office in the Bank about one o'clock, when the prisoner came there—I went to inquire if the boxes had arrived, and saw the prisoner there—I asked him what had become of oar two boxes of gold dust, marked B C 18 and 19—he said, "They have been delivered at your house"—I said, "How is that, when they are consigned by the bill of lading to the Bank of England?"—he said, "We have this morning received a letter from Messrs. Carne, stating, that in consequence of an error in the manifest, they were not to be delivered at the Bank of England, but to the agent of the Brazilian Company"—I asked him the name of the agent—he said he could not recollect, but if I would go with him to the office, in Crutched-friars, he would tell me the name—I asked him if the name was March—he said, "That, I think, is the name"—I then left the Bank, and left him—I went to our office, and ascertained that the boxes were not delivered there—I then went to the office in Crutched-friars, and saw the prisoner in the outer office—I said, "These boxes have not been delivered at our office, where are they?"—he said, "If you will walk into the inner office, I will tell you what has become of them"—he produced two letters to me—(looking at Nos. 3 and 4)—these are then—No. 4 was exactly in the same state then as it is now, with the address torn off—I asked him, "What has become of the outside of this letter, the address?"—he said, "I don't know whether it was torn off when it was first delivered into my hands, or whether it was torn off since"—he did not tell me whether he knew who it had been addressed to—he asked me if I thought the signatures of Messrs. Carne were genuine—I told him I thought not—he said, "Are they not like Messrs. Carnes' writing?"—I said, "Certainly, I think they are like it, but I think they are not genuine; I think they are forged"—I asked him if the body of the letter was written in a similar hand to any body in Messrs. Carnes' house that he was in the habit of seeing—if it was similar to any writing he had seen coming from Messrs. Carnes' house—he said, certainly it was, he had seen such writing often—he did not tell me whose writing it was.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask him if the boxes had been delivered? A. He told roe they had been delivered that morning to a gentlemanly looking man, either representing himself as coming from William March, or William March himself, he could not tell which—he said he thought the letters genuine, and he had seen similar writing from Carnes' house—I am acquainted with Messrs. Carnes' writing—it is in some degree similar—I mean the signature, but, in my opinion, easily detected to be a forgery.

Q. Suppose a person received it in the hurry of business, do not you think he might be deceived by it? A. It is possible—(looking at No. 3)—

there is nothing particularly extraordinary in this letter—I should say, on looking at it, it is not what I consider exactly a mercantile letter—in the first place, it is addressed at foot "W. Marsh, Esq., agent to the Brazilian Mining Company, or order;" now Mr. March's name is spelt wrong, and he is not agent, but secretary to the company—(looking at No. 4)—this is decidedly much more unmercantile than the other, because it is addressed "Messrs. W. Marsh, Esqr."—the signature is somewhat similar to Messrs. Carnes'—it is a signature I would not act on.

Q. But a person reading it over once may very likely not be able to distinguish it from a genuine signature? A. It is possible, I cannot say it is probable I confess—I am not at all acquainted with the hand-writing of the prisoner—I should say the note at the bottom of No. 8, is a different hand-writing from the body, and the date also, "23rd of March, 1839" I should say was different—all the rest appears to be one hand-writing, except the note at the bottom, and the signature—I do not think the date is a similar hand-writing to the body, generally—I think it is a different hand-writing—I think the date of No. 4, and "Messrs. W. Marsh, Esq., Secretary to the Brazilian Mining Company, or order," is different to the body.

Q. In your judgment, could such an error as that be made by a person competent to conduct Mr. Hartley's business? A. Certainly not—nor any person in the habit of corresponding—"Messrs." is in the same line with the name, and appears in the same hand-writing as the rest of the address, and it appears to be squeezed into a place not large enough.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Look at the words, "City of Limerick" tell me whether that is the same hand-writing as the body? A. I think not—I think the "18 and 19" appear the same kind of figures as the date "1839."

Q. Can you perceive any difference in the writing and ink of the word "Messrs.," in the corner, and the name which follows? A. It appears to me it is all written with the same ink—the word "Messrs." is written rather larger than the rest of the name—it is the same as "W. Marsh, &c." in my opinion.

WILLIAM MARCH . I am secretary to the Brazilian Company. Mr. George Haythorn is one of the proprietors of that company—there are other proprietors besides him—on the 20th of March we had advice of the arrival of some gold dust from the Brazils, by a letter from Messrs. Carne, of Falmouth—it was advice of two boxes of gold dust, "18 and 19," weighing 102 lbs. 10oz. 11 dwts., by the Sea Gull, they were forwarded by the City of Limerick steam-packet.

Q. When would it be known in London among persons conversant with shipping, that the Sea Gull had arrived? A. On the 20th, the day we received the advice—on the 25th of March I received further advice of their being shipped, by the City of Limerick steamer—a bill of lading was enclosed with the advice, which I thought I had here, but I find I have made a mistake, and brought the wrong one—I never authorised Moss, or any other person to go to Iron-gate-wharf, to receive those boxes—I had no idea of such a proceeding being taken.

"No. 1," being read, was the bill of lading of the City of Limerick, in which was "Two boxes of gold dust, marked B. C. 18 and 19," containing together 1021bs. 10oz. 11 dwts. troy, consigned to the Brazilian Company at the Bank of England.

No. 2. was the extract from the manifest of the City of Limerick, (as in page 686.)

No. 6, (read)—"Messrs. Jas. Hartley and Co., 16 John-street, Crutched-friars. Falmouth, Oct. 8, 1838, Gentlemen,—We are in receipt of your note of the 6th instant, and in reply, we beg to say the turtle it for Mr. Haggard, at the Bullion-office, Bank of England—The Duke of Cambridge arrived at noon—all well. We are, gentlemen, your obedient servants, W. and E.C. CARNE. Per Geo. Hugoe. P.S. We wrote you last night, per box, informing you we received the chest of tea, which shall be returned.

"Mr. Bristow, please attend to this.—L. CASPAR."

WILLIAM MARCH continued. I never saw this letter (No. 4,) till after the robbery was effected—that is not written at all in a mercantile style, quite unbusiness-like.

Q. Would you, as a man of business, act on the receipt of that letter? A. Certainly not, not purporting to come from a respectable house like Carnes'—this letter (No. 3,) is not, in my judgment, a mercantile business-like letter—a person conversant with mercantile affairs would not act on such a letter, I should say—it is not quite so informal as the other, but my name is improperly spelt, and the firm it mentioned in the body of the letter, and at the bottom it says, "W. Marsh, Esq., agent"—Messrs. Carne are aware of the way to spell my name, and are constantly in the habit of writing to me, and they know I am not agent to the Company, but secretary.

Cross-examined. Q. You received the first intimation of the consignment of gold dust on the 20th of March? A. Yes—I did not make that communication public—it does not go beyond the directors of our own Company, and persons connected with the Company—I might mention It to them—I had no communication with the prisoner on the subject, nor with any body in Mr. Hartley's office.

Q. Although it would be known to shipping-people on the 20th, that the Sea Gull had arrived, would it be known to them what the cargo consisted of? A. It is very likely—it is often mentioned in the newspaper if there is specie on board.

Q. In your judgment, would any one conversant with mercantile matters, intending to commit a fraud, write such letters as these? A. It is difficult to say; a person well acquainted with business, I should say, hardly would—I did not know the prisoner before this.

(The record of the conviction of Moss was here produced and read.)

(Adjourned.)

Saturday, March 7th, 1840.

JAMES HARTLEY . I carry on the business of a wharfinger and proprietor of steam vessels, with others, under the firm of James Hartley and Co.; I am the prosecutor of this indictment. On the 25th of March I was in Dublin—I came to London on the night of the 28th—the prisoner was in my service, and had at the rate of 150l. a-year—in February, last year, he applied to me for an increase of salary, which I declined—on the 21st of March, last year, I had occasion to write to the prisoner—this is the letter I wrote to him (No. 7)—this letter of the 26th of March (No. 5) is in the prisoner's hand-writing—that letter was never sent—Allen was in my employ—he quitted my employ on the 13th of May last—Moss was taken into custody about the middle of April—I have not the most remote reason to believe that Allen was concerned in this transaction.

Cross-examined. Q. He was a clerk in your employ, the same as the prisoner, but in a subordinate situation? A. Yes—he had a salary as the rest—I had no notice whatever of his going away—the last I saw of him was on Saturday evening, when I sent him to the Bank with lodgments—I have not seen him since—I have heard from his brother that he went to Montreal, and is dead—I did not learn when he went—I could have his brother here in a few minutes—I had the highest opinion of the prisoner's integrity, or I would not have left my business in his hands—a good deal of specie came to the Bank, which he had to superintend the delivery of.

Q. There was at one time 90,000, at another 10,000 guineas in one parcel? A. I do not recollect that, but very large sums passed through his hands—Moss surrendered himself in April—Allen lodged in Burr-street, Lower East Smithfield, the latter part of the time he was with me—I do not know whether he lived in Commercial-road before that—I do not know whether the prisoner was in the habit of sleeping on board vessels at times—I have seen him at my office early on shipping mornings, between seven and eight o'clock—I think he might be there on other mornings sometimes as early as eight o'clock.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Allen filled quite a subordinate situation to the prisoner? A. Yes—he had nothing to do with the letters or giving orders about bills of lading, or any thing, till they had gone through the prisoner's hands.

GEORGE CARTHEW . I am in the service of the Brazilian Company. On the 25th of March, last year, I was sent to Mr. Hartley's office, in John-street, and saw a clerk there—I believe the prisoner to be the person, but I cannot swear to him—I inquired if two boxes of gold dust had arrived by their vessel, from Falmouth, on the Brazilian Company's account—he answered, "Yes"—this was about eleven o'clock in the morning—MR. Peat had sent me—I should think it was rather after eleven o'clock than before—I think I might be certain it was before twelve o'clock—I asked if two boxes bad arrived marked "B. C," and I think the numbers were "18 and 19"—I mentioned that to him—he said they had arrived—I then asked him if he could inform me what time they would arrive as the Bank of England—he said, "They are about arriving there at this time"—I believe there was a second person there—the porter, who waited in the office when the clerks were not there—it was not Kingston—I have seen him here to-day—I think it was Mitchell.

Cross-examined. Q. You were examined on the last trial? A. Yes—to the best of my knowledge, the prisoner is the person I saw—I do not swear he is the person.

Q. Will you swear that you believe he is the man? A. No.

COURT. Q. Do you understand the question you have said you believed you saw the prisoner; do you mean you do not mean to represent your belief that he is the man? A. I believe he is the man, but I cannot swear it.

MR. JONES. Q. Do you mean to swear you believe he is the man? A. Yes. that is my belief—I cannot swear positively—I swear I believe he is the man—I remember being examined on the last trial upon this point.

Q. Did you not swear on that occasion that you did not see any one in Court that you saw on that occasion, looking at the prisoner? A. I had

not caught sight of him then—I did swear that, but it was before I had seen the prisoner—never having been in a Court before, I looked all round and did not see the prisoner—I said on the last trial that I would not undertake to swear to him by any means.

Q. Did you say a word on the last trial about asking the person you saw there when the boxes would be taken to the Bank of England? A. Yes, that I did—I swear that.

COURT. Q. You are not asked whether the fact passed, but whether you stated on the former trial that you put the question to the prisoner what time they would arrive at the Bank of England? A. I certainly gave that statement here, I am confident.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Do you mean to swear you said so on the last trial? A. I believe I repeated it as near as possible in the same words I have now—I certainly answered the question, and in the same words I think as I have stated now—I asked him if he could inform me what time they would arrive at the Bank, and he said, "They are arriving about this time"—I stated that at the last trial—I will swear that—I believe I gave that in a confused way, and I was stopped—I was giving the two sentences together and I was stopped, and whether I gave it a second time or not I cannot swear—I should think it was as early at one o'clock in the afternoon that I went there—I will not be positive whether it was or not—I know it was about the middle of the day.

JURY. Q. Had you ever been to Mr. Hartley's office before the 25th of March? A. Many times—I do not recollect ever seeing the prisoner there on the different occasions.

HENRY MOSS re-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I forgot to ask you yesterday whether in the course of your conversations with the prisoner any thing passed on the subject of a letter received from Mr. Hartley? A. On Sunday, the 24th of March, the prisoner was at my house with his father, and the prisoner showed me a letter he had received from Dublin—I mentioned that at the police-office before the letter was shown to me—the subject of that letter was a complaint of his not having acknowledged the receipt of 300l.—I have no doubt this is the letter (No. 7.)

(This letter being read in part, was dated Dublin, 21st March, and was as follows:)—"Dear Sir, This day week I sent you an order for 300l., to be lodged on my credit at Williams and Co.'s, and you have not to this day acknowledged the receipt," &c.

JURY. Q. In the different statements you have made concerning this transaction, did you always make the same statement with respect to the share, the prisoner had in the transaction? A. Precisely to—I have always attributed to him the same share in the transaction.

Cross-examined. Q. I think you say you made three different statements? A. I think 1 did—I am confident I mentioned the prisoner's name in the first statement—I gave that statement to Davis, who took it from me and took it somewhere—I am quite confident I have always mentioned the prisoner to be in the situation I have placed him at the present time—I swear his name was mentioned in the statement Davis took away—it must have been after nine o'clock, or about nine o'clock, that I saw Ellis Caspar in my parlour on Monday night, the 25th of March—rather after than before—I was fetched from the public-house to him by my servant—I could not have sworn on the last trial that it was eight o'clock.

Q. Perhaps you have found out since that Lea swore he did not leave Ellis Caspar till nine o'clock? A. No.

JOHN ROE . I am an officer of the City. My assistance was called in on the 26th of March last respecting this—after being at the office of Mr. Hartley, I went to St. Paul's coffee-house, and saw the prisoner there—he came while I was there—I asked him if he had the two letters with him, the one purporting to come from Falmouth, and the other from Marsh and Co. of Broad-street—his answer was, yes, he had, and be then produced them to me—these are them (Nos. 3 and 4)—No. 4 was just in the same state as it is now, with the back torn off, but the letters "er" left—I said "I suppose you know to whom this was addressed?"—he said "No, I do not"—I said, "Was it in that state when it was delivered to you by the gentleman?"—he said he could not say whether it was torn off before or since, all he had to look at was to see whether the signature was a genuine one, and which he believed it was—on the 1st of April following, in consequence of information I received, I went to New-street, Whitechapel-road—I found a house there without any body in it—I went from there to Mansel-street to the witness Moss—I had not communicated to either of the Caspars that I was going to Mansel-street—as far as I know they had no means of knowing what I was about—while I was in Mansel-street I saw the prisoner and his father both within thirty or forty yards of the house—they were merely coming down the street when I first saw them, and they immediately turned round again and went away—Mr. Hartley was with me—we overtook them, and Mr. Hartley asked the prisoner what he did there—(at that time we knew nothing against old Caspar)—his answer was he understood we had searched a house and found the gold, and he had come there to satisfy himself—he did not say who told him so, nor point out the house—he said he understood we had searched.

COURT. Q. He did not describe what street, or what place? A. No, but gave that as his reason for being in that street.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner and having conversation with him about his knowledge of Moss? A. Yes, that was the next day—I had not found any thing at that time—I had searched Moss's lodging on the morning I saw him in Mansel-street, but found nothing—on the following afternoon, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner in John-street, and asked him if he knew a person of the name of Moss—he said, "Yes, I do, two or three; one was my father's foreman once"—I said, "Where does he live?"—he said, "I don't know"—I said, "When did you see him last?"—he said, "About seven months ago"—I said, "What was your business with him then?"—he said, "I merely met him by accident, and asked him how he did"—upon his giving that account, Mr. Hartley gave him into my custody—that was on the 2nd of April—Moss surrendered himself to me about the middle of April—I have possession of a handkerchief, which I produced yesterday—I got it from a man named Fiestell.

JONAS COUTER . I am a letter-carrier in the General Post-office—Mr. Hartley's office, in John-street, is in my delivery, and was so in March last year—I have an account of letters delivered for Mr. Hartley on the 25th of March—the amount of the letters delivered that day was 7s. 10d.—I only keep an account of the unpaid letters.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there any paid letters, do you know? A. I cannot recollect, there might have been—I have been in the habit of delivering letters at Mr. Hartley's office nearly five years—there have some-times

been disputes and mistakes, but I always stuck to my book—I was right and they wrong.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you ever had complaints that you made a mistake against yourself, in not having charged enough? A. No, I think not—this would be against myself.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am an inland messenger of the General Post-office. There is a circular stamp kept at the General Post-office, with which all unpaid letters are stamped—the bags, on the 25th of March, were divided into eight divisions—each division was stamped with a particular letter—there were four stamps for each of the seven divisions, and one for the eighth, which is an auxiliary division—(looking at the post-mark on letter No. 3)—this stamp I do not consider the office-stamp—it is not the genuine stamp of the office—it is the London mark "E. M. R. 25,—39")—from the appearance of that stamp, that letter could not have come through the General Post-office—(looking at No. 4)—this is not the genuine London stamp—that could not have come through the General Post-office—it would not get such a stamp by coming through the post—(looking at No. 2)—this is the genuine London post-stamp—the form of the letters and the figures on the stamps on Nos. 3 and 4 have been imitated—I have the genuine stamp with me, but there has been an alteration as regards the date, from "39" to "40"—we change them yearly—the circle of the letter "E" is the same—the genuine stamp of the day and year was produced on the last trial, but since that the "39" has been altered to "40"—the letter "E" is a fixture, and the figures "18" in the circle—the same type is used for M. R. this year as in 39—here is an impression, taken in a book on that day before the duty commences—(producing it)—all, the genuine impressions would exactly correspond with this.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you stamp letters on the 25th of March? A. I did not—the book is signed by Atkinson—I should think these stamps would be calculated to deceive an ordinary eye, but would be detected by the experienced eye of a Post-office clerk.

JANE BRADLEY . On the 25th of March, last year, I lived with the witness Moss as his servant, and had done to about two years—he lived in New-street, just by the London Hospital, all the time I was with him—he went out in a working-dress when he went to work in a morning—that was generally the case, except on Sundays—on Monday, the 25th of March, he went out about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, as near as I can recollect—he was dressed in his best clothes—he returned between one and two o'clock, as dear as I can recollect—I heard a knock at the door—it was one knock—he usually gave a double knock—mistress opened the door to him—I heard him say when he was let in, "Where is the girl?"—he usually dined between one and two o'clock—he did not stop to dinner that day—he did not remain long before he went out again, I think, about half-an-hour, as near as I can recollect, but I cannot recollect—he came back again directly, and asked for his handkerchief—mistress brought him down two handkerchiefs, and I gave them to him—one was a kind of red one, I forget the colour of the other—he came back in the evening, I think, about eight o'clock, as near as I can guess, and had his tea—he then washed himself, put on his common coat, the coat he went to work in, and went out—I cannot say at what time he went out—while he was out, Ellis Caspar called at my master's house, and I went to the Earl St. Vincent public-house to fetch my master—I knew I should find

him there—he came back with me—Ellis Caspar was still there—I did not sleep in the house—I think I left about eleven o'clock that night—Ellis Caspar was there still in the house with master—I returned next morning, I think, about half-past six o'clock—it was my duty to light the fire—the fire-place looked very dirty, and was all over white ashes—it seemed to be the ashes of wood—there were some nails mixed with them, and the hob had red sealing-wax on it—my master was in bed when I got there—my mistress went out directly after I got there—my master came down soon after, about half-an-hour after mistress went out, between seven and eight o'clock, I believe—he went out after dinner—he dined about one o'clock—I do not recollect that he went out from seven o'clock in the morning till one o'clock—he went out about half-an-hour or an hour after dinner—I found lodgings were taken in Mansel-street, which is about a mile from New-street—I packed up, to take the things away—there was a box, secured with a rope—it was Mr. Moss's daughter's box—it appeared very heavy—I saw it taken away in a truck—we went to the new lodging in Mansel-street on the Tuesday night.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you taken up on this matter? A. Yes—I was kept under Lea's care, at the Flying Horse public-house—I do not live with Moss now—I have learnt a business—I was at home on Sunday, the 24th of March, at Moss's house, all day—I had my meals there—they dined about one o'clock on Sundays—that was the usual hour, sometimes later—it might be a little after one o'clock, because he came home from work—he used to work on Sunday—he went out to work that Sunday, about nine o'clock, and came home about one o'clock, or a little after—he came home by himself—I did not see any body with him—nobody came to dinner that day—Ellis Caspar came while they were having dinner—he was in the front parlour—I did not see any more persons come that day—I did not see him come with my master—I think he came while he was at dinner, and went into the parlour—then Moss went and spoke to him, and then he went home, and Moss went to his work—I do not recollect whether I opened the door to him—I saw him there—I think he remained about half-an-hour—I was in the back parlour.

Q. And he in the front parlour, with your master and mistress? A. Mistress was not there—I opened the room door, I think, and let him in—I told master Mr. Caspar wanted him, and Ellis Caspar went into the front parlour—I do not recollect going into that parlour while he remained there.

Q. Can you tell whether any body except your master and Ellis Caspar was in the parlour? A. No, I cannot, but there was somebody else there at night—I do not recollect any body else being there between one and two o'clock—I did not see them, but I was about my work—I did not let any body else in—I did not see Ellis Caspar go away, but I heard the door shut—somebody was there on Sunday night, but I did not see them—I left the house that night, I dare say, between nine and ten o'clock—my master came home about eight o'clock on the Monday evening, washed, and went out—he had gone, it might be about half-an-hour, when Ellis Caspar came—the Earl St. Vincent public-house is not a great way from the house—it would take me five or ten minutes to walk there—my master came with me, and found Ellis Caspar at his house when we got there.

Q. Did you notice what time Ellis Caspar came to your master's house that night? A. I think it was about nine o'clock, or a little after—I think

it was as much as that, but I cannot exactly say—I think it was about nine o'clock—the Earl St. Vincent public-house is not within three or four doors of the house—it is not in the same street; you turn down a street, and then down another street—it is at the back of the hospital.

Q. Do you remember at any time, after this business, being in a hackney-coach? A. Yes, I got into it, I think, in Whitecbapel—Roe and Lea were with me—nobody else came into the coach while I was in it, that I know of—there was no person there who I did not know—I do not know where I went in the coach—I got out at a place I think was an office—it was not Lambeth-street—I do not know where it was—I was not in a hackney-coach with them at any other time.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You do not recollect, positively, whether you opened the door or not yourself on Sunday? A. No, I remember seeing Ellis Caspar—whether there was any body else, I do not know.

COURT. Q. Where was Mrs. Moss at dinner on Sunday? A. She was there—we dined in the back parlour, but they were in the front parlour.

THOMAS HARLAND . On the 25th of March last, I was the driver of a cab—I was on the stand at Cornhill—about twelve o'clock that day, Moss got into my cab, and desired me to drive him to Iron-gate-wharf, which I did—one of the porters came out—(looking at Kingston)—that is the man—he came to the cab door—Moss remained in the cab some time—the porter fetched a gentleman—(looking at Mr. Bristow)—that is the gentle-man—Moss showed him a bill or letter—he then went out of the cab into the wharf—he was followed out of the wharf by a man who put two boxes into the cab—there was some red wax on then—Moss had a blue bag—I gave one of the porters a four-penny piece, by his direction—I do not recollect whether he gave the porter any thing—I think he gave Kingston a shilling—I drove him to the Cross Keys public-house, Wood-street—he told me to drive fast—the boxes were taken out there, and put into the office, and I was dismissed.

JOHN MACBETH . I am a cab-driver. On the 25th of March last, I was in Cheapside—Moss hired me, and told me to drive to the Cross Keys, Wood-street—one box, in a blue bag, and another not in a bag, were put into the cab—he told me to drive him to the London Hospital—I was going to drive into the Hospital, but he called out, and got out at the corner of the hospital, that is no great distance from New-street—he took one box out with him, which was in the bag, and told me to take care of the other—he came back, with a blue bag empty in about three-quarters of an hour, and told me to drive him to the Iron-bridge—the remaining box was still in the cab—I went down Commercial-road, but he pulled me up just beyond Limehouse church, on the left hand—he got out, put the box on the pavement, and put it into the bag—I assisted him, as the box was heavy—there were seals and pink tape round it—this was about one o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see-any one else with him at the London Hospital? A. No one at all—Moss had rather mare whiskers then than he has to-day—they were black whiskers—and he had a blue rough frock-coat, not the sort of coat he has on now—to the best of my knowledge, it was a blueish coat, and a frock-coat—I believe, I am positive of its being a frock-coat, and a blue one.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you any recollection of his dress at all—can you undertake to swear what his dress, was? A. No.

GEORGE CARTHEW re-examined. Q. Is Mitchell the man you saw? A. He is not—it was a much taller man, and older—I do not think he is the man.

MR. JONES. Q. Look at that young gentleman (Blundell) will you undertake to say he is not the person you saw at the office when you asked about the boxes of gold? A. I have no recollection of ever seeing Mr. Blundell at that office—I do not know that I could swear, he might not be the man, but my recollection carries me that the prisoner is the person I speak of.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You have no recollection of ever having seen Blundell at the office at all? A. Not up to that time—I have since.

WILLIAM BLUNDELL re-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Do you know Carthew? A. No, I never saw him before, that I am aware of—I might have seen him standing about here—I do not remember having any conversation with him at the office about the specie.

COURT. Q. Did you ever tell any man, on the 25th of March, that the specie would be about that time at the Bank of England—did any body ask you if you could inform him what time they would arrive at the Bank of England? A. I believe there was a man called—I believe he asked me that question—I believe it was while the prisoner was absent—I cannot undertake to swear that person was not Carthew—I do not know who he was—I do not remember whether the man stated that he came from the Brazilian Company.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You do not recollect seeing Carthew? A. No, I do not recollect the person of the man who called, or whether he was young or old.

COURT. Q. Was the question put to you at Mr. Hartley's office, whether two boxes of gold dust had arrived, marked "B. C. 18 and 19," by any vessel from Falmouth? A. I believe something to that effect—it was put to me—I believe I answered, "Yes"—the same person asked if I could inform him what time they would arrive at the Bank, and I think the answer I gave was, "They are there by this time."

Q. How did you know any thing about it? A. I knew they would be landed about ten o'clock, and by that time they would arrive at the Bank of England—I knew they were expected by the manifest-book—I had copied the manifest into the book.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were there several inquiries made about the boxes? A. No, I believe not.

GEORGE SHEEN . I helped to move Moss's goods from New-street to Mansel-street—a box was produced to me upon the last trial—that was very much like one of the boxes I moved upon that occasion—I know Mrs. Levy, Moss's sister—she was there assisting.

GEORGE READ . I am a tailor, and live in Northumberland-place, Commercial-road. I had a house in New-street, No. 12. On the 26th March, Moss lived there—he went away on the 27th.

JOSEPH JEPSON . I live in Mansel-street. In March last year Mrs. Moss engaged apartments at my house—the goods came in on the 26th and 27th.

EDWARD HENRY . I live in Bread-street, Cheapside, and am a merchant. I knew Moss in the service of Mr. Hyams, who I had dealings

with. On the 25th of March, Moss came to my house—I gave him a cheque that morning before ten o'clock—I do not exactly recollect the hour—this is the cheque, (No. 9.)

LUCY MARSHALL . I am a widow. I lived opposite Moss's house in New-street—I knew his person well. On Monday, the 25th of March last, I saw him go into his house, about three o'clock, or between three and four o'clock—I observed he had something very weighty with him—he used to have a plate with his name on the door, and next morning I observed that the plate was taken off—I saw the goods being moved away that day—a box; was shown to me at the last trial—I saw a box like that moved out.

ADOLPHUS FIELDSTELL . In March last, and before that, I kept a coffee-shop in Great Tower-street. I have known the prisoner a long time—I was not acquainted with Moss at that time—I remember the prisoner coming to my coffee-shop—it must have been before March—I think in January, at the end of January—there was a gentleman with him, but I cannot recollect him—they had coffee there—after they were gone I found a pocket handkerchief—(looking at the one produced by Roe)—I believe this is the handkerchief—I had known the prisoner a very long time—he had never been to my coffee-shop before, to my knowledge—I am certain of his having been there on that occasion—I believe this to be the handkerchief, but I gave it directly to my wife, and did not examine it so accurately—I had it back from her afterwards, and delivered it up at the police-office, to Lea or Roe—(looking at Roe)—that is the gentleman—I gave him the same handkerchief as I picked up that day.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner at your shop before? A. Not to my knowledge—I have known him from a child—I did not know Moss at all—I cannot swear to his person—he might have been at my coffee-shop—there may be a hundred people in my house at a time—I swear I do not recollect Moss—I have never seen him at my coffee-house since to my knowledge, and I do not swear it was him with the prisoner—I found the handkerchief, and gave it to my wile instantly—I do not believe any one was in the room when I found it, because it was about six o'clock, when they went away, and I went up stairs to see if any body had left any thing, and found the handkerchief—I took it down to my wife instantly—it was about half-past six or seven o'clock in the evening when I found it, to the best of my recollection—I had a waiter at that time who was my wife's brother—I solemnly declare he was not present when I found it—I knew where the prisoner's father lived at that time—I found the handkerchief in the place where the prisoner and the other had sat.

Q. Did you take any pains to inform the prisoner you had found it? A. I did not see him afterwards, but I left it, saying, should Mr. Caspar call, for the handkerchief to be returned—I did not send to him, because I did not know who had lost it, the prisoner or his companion—I believed one of them had, but many other people came to the house.

Q. Why not send to the prisoner to say you had it? A. I did not know whether the prisoner would not come back to ask for it—I should not have kept it if it had not been inquired for—it is in possession of the officer—I kept it five, six, or seven weeks—I did not know where the prisoner lived, and if I had, I expected he might have called again, and that might have been another 1s. in my pocket—I have never had any communication with Moss since that time.

Q. Do you mean to swear you saw that handkerchief for the first time on the day the prisoner was at your shop? A. I can swear positively, I believe it is the handkerchief I found at the time the prisoner was at my house, but I will not positively swear it is the handkerchief until my wife identifies it.

COURT. Q. The question is, whether you found it on the day the prisoner was at your house? A. Yes, I did.

MR. JONES. Q. Do you know Davis? A. A little Jew has called at my house, I believe, once—I swear solemnly that I did not know he was Moss's stepfather—I heard afterwards that he was—I saw Davis—I do not know where he lived—he did not tell me—he came with another person—I have not received 15l. from Davis since this transaction—I received 2l. from him at the time he came to my house with a person named Mrs. Abrahams—I mean the Mrs. Abrahams who was tried—they came to my shop a few days after the prisoners were taken up—the handkerchief was produced to them—they did not ask for it—they came while I was out, and applied to my wife, and she showed it to them—I saw them when I came home.

Q. What did you receive the 2l. for? A. I did not know Davi's at all, but Mrs. Abrahams came to me, and said, "Do you know Caspar?"—I said, "Yes"—she said, "How long is it since you have seen him?"—I said, "About two months ago."

Q. On what account did you receive the 2l.? A. I must tell you what for—he did not owe me any money—I did not know him—he gave me the money—he made me a present of it—I had seen Davis before, but not known him—I never had any previous transaction with him.

Q. Now, why did he give it you? A. Mrs. Abrahams called on me with him, and I knew Mrs. Abrahams very well—she said, "Mr. Fiestell, do you know the name of Caspar?"—I said, "Yes"—she said, "Do you know the gentleman who was with him? can you recollect him?"—I said, "No"—she said, "Don't you know Mr. Moss?"—I said I did not—she said, "Suppose I tell you how he looks, so and so"—I said, "Tell me what you like, I can't recollect him"—she said, "I shall describe him to you"—I said, "If I take descriptions of people who come to my house I must have a very good memory, but, perhaps, if you show him to me I may recollect him"—at that time there was 500l. reward against Moss, and it appeared to me they would not let me see him—David made me a present of 2l. to induce me to say I knew him, but I would not.

Q. But you took the 2l.? A. Certainly, why should not I? but when I came to the office he was pointed out to me, and I said, "No, I can't swear to him," and I would not swear to him.

Q. It was given to you to swear Moss had been at your coffee-house with Caspar? A. He made me a present of it—the handkerchief was shown by my wife, but not in my presence—I believe I did not see it—I might have seen it, or I might not—I believe I did not, because it was shown to them before—they had called twice.

Q. Was it not mentioned in that conversation that you should swear that handkerchief was left when the prisoner was at your house? A. I cannot recollect it.

Q. Do you mean to swear you cannot recollect? A. I cannot recollect that the handkerchief was shown.

Q. That is not the question—Will you swear you cannot recollect whether

the 2l. was given to you to swear you found it there on a day when the prisoner bad been at your shop? A. I do not recollect—I do not know what they gave me the 2l. for.

COURT. Q. Did they suggest to you that you should prove the handkerchief was left when the prisoner was there, at the time you had the 2l.? A. The 2l. was given to me to swear I knew Moss, to identify him—there was no talk about the handkerchief, to my recollection.

MR. JONES. Q. Now, were you not asked, in the course of conversation, to swear the handkerchief was left there on a day when the prisoner was there? A. It might be so—I will not swear to what I cannot recollect—you will not make me swear what I do not recollect—it might have been said so.

COURT. Q. Were you not asked, "Cannot you prove this handkerchief was left at the time Caspar was at your house?" A. Yes, that was the case—it was left—that was the point, that I should identify Moss, which I would not do.

MR. JONES. Q. Did not Davis bring a handkerchief with him on that occasion? A. He did not—nor did Mrs. Abrahams, neither of them—no handkerchief was produced but this one, which I believe to be the handkerchief I found.

COURT. Q. Did either of them state to you that they were in a condition to prove the handkerchief left with you belonged to Moss? A. Yes, Mrs. Abrahams said so.

MR. JONES. Q. Can you tell how either Davis or Mrs. Abrahams knew that the handkerchief was left there? A. I told Mrs. Abrahams and Mr. Davis there was a handkerchief left by those people, by Mr. Caspar, here it is; and I showed it to them—they had not said a word about a handkerchief before I did—I will swear that they never mentioned a single word till I showed it—they then asked whether I recollected Caspar calling, with another gentleman with him, Mr. Moss—I said, "I don't know him, I knew Caspar from a child"—they said, "Do you know what has happened?"—I said, "I have heard there is some robbery"—they said, "You, remember he came to have some coffee"—I said, "Yes, Caspar came with another person, but I don't know him"—MRS. Abrahams described him, and said that he had whiskers before, and that he took the whiskers off—I said, "I can say nothing about it till you show me the man"—Davis gave me 2l.—I said, "Very well, I will receive this as a gift, but I must see the man before I swear to him—I did not return the money when I could not swear to him.

COURT. Q. Did you show them the handkerchief and say, "I cannot swear to the man until I have seen him, but I have a handkerchief that one of them I believe left?" A. No—they had been several times, but the; first time they came I was out, and I understood my wife had shown it to them—she looked at it and at last found a mark—Mrs. Abrahams said, "Oh, I believe he has lost a handkerchief"—Davis then gave me the 2l. to swear positively to Moss that I knew him, but I said, "I will go to the police-office;" but when I got there I did not know him, and would not swear to him—they asked me to swear that I saw him.

MR. JONES. Q. Did they ask you to swear Caspar was there? A. Yes, they did of course—I do not know whether it was before or after they asked me to swear that, that they gave me the 2l.—I could not deny Caspar being there, as I knew him—they asked me to state Caspar was there—I cannot say whether it was after that that they gave me

the 2l.—that is the only sum I have received from any person—if they had offered me 100l. it would be the same as 2l.—I was quite satisfied, I would not swear to any thing I did not know—I did not ask them for any more—they did not promise me any more—they promised me if I wished to do so that they would give me a 20l. note if I would identify Caspar, I mean Moss, but I would not.

Q. I ask you if they did not offer you a 20l. note to swear Caspar was there? A. I told you they, in the plural, they both were there—they did not ask me particularly to swear that the prisoner was there, but that both he and Moss were there—that was after Moss was taken up—I have never seen Davis since—I did not see him at Lambeth-street office—the only time I saw him was at my house, twice he called—I knew him from seeing him, but had not any particular knowledge of him—I will not swear I had not spoken to him before, but I never had any business with him, nor did I know what he was—I did not know he lived in Coventry-court till afterwards—I never went there—I kept the coffee-shop ten or eleven months—I was also an agent for foreign wines—my counting-house is 84, Lower Tower-street—I am still an agent for foreign wines—I do commissions—I am a general agent—before I went to Tower-street I kept a fancy toy-shop in Lowther Arcade—I was there eighteen months—I was always the same trade, a foreign agent in the wine trade, and so I am now.

Q. What do you mean? A. Suppose a foreigner comes over, having wines to sell, I have customers, and sell them, and my commission is five per cent—I have been a bankrupt, to my misfortune, only once, and obtained my certificate in 1824—I have twice taken the benefit of the Insolvent Act—the last time is three years and a-half ago—I believe the first time was about seven years ago—I was discharged the first time—I was remanded once I believe six or seven months, but I did not stop all the time out, because I settled with the detaining creditor—I was detained for defending an action without grounds—I have never been in the habit of becoming bail for people.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Can you tell how the prisoner, or any body belonging to him, knew any thing about Davis and Mrs. Abrahams coming to your house? A. I do not know—I was examined on the former trial when Mrs. Abrahams was charged—I was not then asked a word about the 2l.—I have heard that Davis is indicted with the rest—I never had any doubt that the prisoner was one of the persons who came to my house—I never attempted to swear Moss was the other man—they offered me 20l. to swear it—I did not know, at the time Davis and Mrs. Abrahams came to my house, that Mrs. Abrahams had had the gold dust through her hands—I never knew that either she or Davis had had any thing to do with it.

JAMES LEA . I was an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 25th of March I remember the prisoner coming to the office and seeing Mr. Hardwicke, the Magistrate, about half-past two o'clock—he produced these two letters—(Nos. 3 and 4)—he said a serious robbery had taken place that morning, at Irongate Wharf, and that a person had come in a cab from Mr. March—he gave me a description of the mode in which it had been effected, that he had given it to a person who came in the name of Mr. March—I afterwards went to Irongate Wharf—he staid some few minutes with me at the wharf—he then left me, and said he could be of no further use to me—I staid some time, and then went to the office in John-street, and saw the prisoner—he opened a drawer, and produced

three or four letters of Messrs. Carries', and asked my opinion as to the writing, whether it did not correspond with the two letters I had before seen—he said he considered himself they were one and the same writing—I said, "No, they appear to me quite a different writing"—he then particularly drew my attention to Messrs. Carne's signature—I said that appeared to correspond with the others very much—he said it was principally on the faith of the signature he had given the order to the person for the boxes—I asked him at that time the description of the person who had been to receive the order—he said he was a man shorter than himself, grey whiskers, it appeared as if he had been a traveller, that he had a weather-beaten countenance—if I recollect right, he said he appeared to be about sixty years of age, and had grey hair—he laid he did not know him—he said he supposed, from what he stated, that he had come from Mr. March, and he did not know whether it was Mr. March or not—about eight o'clock that night I was at the Swan-with-two-Necks, making inquiry about the Falmouth coach, and while there, the prisoner and his father came in—he inquired about the Falmouth mail, and said he was going by the Falmouth mail—I made inquiry, and found the mail had been gone about a quarter of an hour before they came in—I told the prisoner I thought if he had a wish to go, be might overtake the mail at the Southampton rail-road—I went with them in a coach, but the mail had been gone about ten minutes I think—the mail goes by the rail-road—I do not think he had stated to me before, any intention of going to Falmouth—I have no recollection of it—he called at two or three coach-offices coming back, and said he should go next morning—as we returned, Ellis Caspar left the coach—I am not quite positive where he left it—I thought it was at Charing-cross, but it was between Charing-cross and St. Paul's—the prisoner said there would be hand-bills out next day, and 500l. reward offered—he said Mr. Allen, and Mr. De Mole were to have them printed—I expressed a wish to see Mr. De Mole before they were printed, and the prisoner requested his father to go immediately to prevent their being printed—I had been to the St. Paul's Coffee-house in the morning, and found three persons were putting up there from the Falmouth mail that day, and I went to see them—I called there again in the evening with the prisoner, after his father left—I gave a description of the person as the prisoner had given me, grey hair, and whiskers, a person, shorter than him, and about sixty years of age—he never contradicted me, or said that was not the person—there was a description given then, that such a person had been there—one of the three who had come by the mail—I think the waiter gave me that description, and the prisoner said that appeared the sort of description of the person—that person was described as about sixty years of age, with grey hair and whiskers—the prisoner also said he thought I could not do better than to pursue the inquiry there, and stick to the person at that house—he also told me the same thing, two days afterwards.

Q. How long afterwards did you trace the cab to New-street? A. The first cab I traced, when the prisoner was with me, in the Minories—I afterwards traced a cab to the neighbourhood of New-street, and went to a house in New-street, which had no tenant, and where a plate had been taken off the door—I have since ascertained that to be Moss's house—I found a quantity of nails in the grate, and some under the grate, and some in the dust-hole.

Q. Could you judge what had been burning in the fire-place? A. It appeared to me to be white wood ashes—there were several pieces of wood, and about sixty nails, which I produced at the last trial—some of the wood was partly consumed—I left them here at the last trial—I went to New-street three or four days after the robbery—I did not notice any sealing-wax—I afterwards went with Mr. Hartley to Mansel-street, and saw the prisoner, about five o'clock in the evening, with his father, nearly opposite Moss's house, in Mansel-street—I had some conversation with the prisoner afterwards—I took Mrs. Moss and Mrs. Levy into custody—I afterwards produced a box, found in a small room adjoining the bed-room—I ultimately produced five gold bars.

Cross-examined. Q. From what you saw of the prisoner, did not he appear anxious to afford you every assistance to find out the thieves? A. He appeared very uneasy when he came to the office about It—I should say he expressed great anxiety to find out the thieves for the first half hour—I saw very little of him after the first day—he did on the first day—he went with me to the wharf, and to the coffee-house—he was the first person I received information from of the jobbery—he did not describe the man as rather taller than himself, I understood him shorter—as far as my recollection serves me, I think he said shorter—I will not be positive—I stated on the last trial, that that was the description he gave—I obtained from the cat-men a description of the man who went to the wharf—that description did not correspond with the one given me by the prisoner—neither of them—Harland described him as a tall man, in black, and dark whiskers—I do not recollect Macbeth's description—he said nothing to me about grey hair—he did not describe him as about sixty years of age—I received a description from Blundell—he said he was a tall person with dark hair, and whiskers—the first cab-man I saw was Harland—I saw three altogether, but the first I have not mentioned, as I could not find his address—the prisoner went with me, when I saw that cab-man, who said he had been with a person to the office, in John-street, and put a person down at the Bank—I asked that person for a description of him, and he described him as a tall man, in black, and dark hair, and he thought he had the appearance of a Jew—he did not describe him as a man with grey hair, and whiskers, and that cab-man identified the prisoner as having come to our office in his cab—I said, "It is strange you should come here in the same cab"—it was not through the information I received from the prisoner that I traced the cabs—he said the man came in a yellow cab with four wheels—that was the only description of it—I never could find that cab-man out afterwards—the other two cab-men were examined at the office—neither of them stated, on seeing Moss, that he was not the man—the first cab-man was not examined, for I took his number down, and I expect I made a mistake in one of the figures, for I could not trace him out—the first cab-man did not see Moss in my presence.

COURT. Q. What time did the prisoner come to you in that cab said to be the same? A. About half-past two or three o'clock.

Prisoner. The first cab-man was examined, and said he could not recognise Moss, and so his deposition was not taken. Witness. I do not recollect any thing of that kind.

Prisoner. He lived in Gray's-inn-road. Witness. Yes, he gave me his direction, but I could trace no such person out.

MR. JONES. Q. Are you quite positive he was never examined at Lambeth-street? A. I do not recollect seeing him—I cannot say that he did not state Moss was not the man—I know nothing of it—I received the gold bars from Dean, Solomon's shopman, on the 17th of April—I left the Swan-with-Two-Necks in a coach, in company with the two Caspars, I think from ten minutes to a quarter after eight o'clock, and went to the Southampton railway at Queen's Elms—we got there in about half-an-hour, staid there about five minutes and then came back—we called at two booking offices in the Circus, St. James's-street, and another in Piccadilly—I think it must have been somewhere about nine o'clock when Ellis Caspar left the coach—it might be a quarter-past—it might be half-past, I will not pretend to say—we drove fast back—we went up Waterloo-place—we made no stay there—the prisoner got out and inquired about the coach—Ellis Caspar was not with me in St. Paul's church-yard I know—I cannot recollect precisely where he got out—I rather think it was between Charing Cross and St. Paul's church-yard.

Q. Supposing he got out at Charing Cross, how far is that from Moss's house, in New-street? A. Two miles and a half, I think—I do not think it is three miles—about two and a half—I think it is under three miles—we made no stop at either place coming back—we left the station at about twenty minutes before nine o'clock—it would take the best part of a quarter of an hour to get to Charing Cross—it is about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes' drive from Charing Cross to Queen's Elms—I am sure it was not ten o'clock when Ellis Caspar left us.

Q. Will you swear it was not a quarter to ten? A. I cannot swear to a quarter of an hour.

JOHN HOWARD . I was employed by Lea, in March last, to watch some people about this robbery—I remember Good Friday—I do not know the day of the month—on that day I saw the prisoner with his father—I first of all followed the prisoner from Mr. Hartley's office in John-street to his own house in Finsbury-pavement—he went into the house and waited some time—shortly after, his father came out with him, and I followed them down to the office in John-street together—on the Monday following the 1st of April, I saw the prisoner with his father in Mansel-street about five o'clock—I know Moss's house in Mansel-street—they were about as far from Moss's house as I am from the door of this Court—I observed Ellis Caspar put his hand up, pointing to what appeared to me the apartments where Moss was living, lolling his head towards the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you been in the habit of being employed in that way? A. On one occasion—I am now employed in the London Dock—I watched the prisoner's house on one occasion, but saw nothing—I was directed to follow him—I followed him to Finsbury-pavement, and on the door was written "Caspar"—I waited a considerable time and saw nothing—I have never said I watched their house from morning till night—I stated on the last trial that I watched the prisoners all 1 could, but never said about watching their house.

JAMES LEA re-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Did you make inquiry at Mr. Hartley's office of the different clerks there, as to the description of the man who went in the cab? A. I did—they did not all agree in the description—one of them differed—none of them described the man as having grey whiskers—I believe Mitchell gave a different description of him.

Q. Did you not swear on the last trial that Blundell described the man

precisely in the same way as the prisoner had? A. No, I do not recollect—one of Mr. Hartley's servants gave a different description of him—some said he was taller than the other, and different to what the other described him—it is possible one of them might have said something about grey whiskers—one of them, I do not recollect which, said he thought he had grey hairs in his whiskers—I do not recollect stating on the last trial that Blundell's description corresponded with the prisoners as to the whiskers—as near as I can recollect, I think it was Mitchell stated something about it—I remember one of them said he had grey hairs in his whiskers—I might have said Blundell's description corresponded with the prisoner's as to having grey hairs in his whiskers.

No 5. (read.) "London, 23rd March, 1839.—Messrs. W. and E. C. Came,—Dear Sirs, A most diabolical robbery has been committed here through the means of forging your signatures to two letters. On the other side I send a copy of them, and I beg that you will use your utmost exertions towards discovering the perpetrator. The impression is that it must have been done by persons who have had access to your office or knew of all the particulars as early as yourselves. The letters were posted at Falmouth on the 23rd, and arrived with this morning's manifest. Shortly after a gentleman called, requesting the delivery of two boxes marked "B C 18 and 19;" he showed me a letter which purported to be Mr. March's, or from him, I had not the slightest suspicion, and referred him to the wharf, writing an order for their delivery; unfortunately they were handed to him, and it only remains to use every exertion to obtain a clue. Let me beg and entreat of you to show your usual zeal in this matter. Believe me, dear Sirs, I am almost heart-broken. Yours very truly, L. CASPER. The man who called at my office appeared about fifty or sixty years of age, grey whiskers, middling stature, very dark complexion, swarthy, or very sunburnt, as an old traveller would appear, has a country dialect, as if from your parts. I think he was lame, as he walked very slow, or perhaps limped."

JAMES HANDS (police-constable K 248.) I was at Lambeth-street office on the 14th of June I think—I do not exactly recollect the date—the prisoner, Ellis Caspar, Mrs. Abrahams, and Moses were all four in confinement in one cell in the office—I heard the prisoner conversing with Moses—they were talking loud—I was not in a situation to see as well as hear—I heard the prisoner say to Moses, "Do you intend to let me have any money, I want 40l. or 50l. to prepare for my defence"—Moses answered, "No, I want four or five fifties to pay or prepare for my own"—the prisoner said, "Had I have had the 1400l. or 1200l. as you promised me, things might have been different"—Moses said "You are a b——rogue, you did not give him even what you had"—he did not mention who he meant by him—there was something said then which I did not hear, and I heard Moses say, "Did you ever give him 5l.?"

Cross-examined. Q. Were there any other persons than those you have mentioned confined in the cell? A. No, none but the four—there was not a drunken woman confined as well—there was no drunken woman in custody then, nor any woman—there was a drunken woman in the yard, but that was some time afterwards—the cell-door was shut when I heard this conversation—there were only those two talking—I did not hear the others speak—I was in the yard—I cannot exactly say how long—it might be a quarter of an hour, or five minutes more or less—my attention was taken by hearing them talk, and I went to the door to listen—I did

not go backwards and forwards while they were talking—I kept by the door—I cannot exactly say how long I was listening.

Q. When was the first time you told of this conversation? A. I communicated it in part within a few minutes after, to Cook, the gaoler, at Lambeth-street—he heard part of it himself, I believe—I stated that at the last trial, and at Lambeth-street, it might be an hour or two hours after I heard it—I had seen the prisoner before that day—I had been in the habit of standing, while he was under examination before the Magistrate, close to him—I had heard him speak before—I believe, with the exception of one examination, I heard him every time, which was, I think, six times—I heard him speak while his case was being heard—he was in conversation with his solicitor and others—I have never said there was so much confusion in the yard that I could not hear exactly what was said—I said I lost part of the conversation in consequence of an old man coming to draw water from a tap in the yard—I did not hear the prisoner ask Moses to lend him 5l., or that he had promised to lend him 5l.—that did not pass in my hearing.

Q. Did not you state on the last occasion that he said, "If I had got the 1200l. or 1400l., as you have, I would not have denied you?" A. The prisoner said that before the Magistrate—when I made the statement before the Magistrate, he admitted the conversation, but said he had said, had he got the 1200l. or 1400l., as he, Moses was said to have had, he should not have objected to let him have 5l.—that was the substance of the explanation he gave.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the prisoner's explanation a correct account of what passed, or was the account you have given on oath? A. The account I have given on oath.

ADOLPHUS FIESTELL re-examined by MR. JONES. My brother-in-law, Callaway, who was my waiter, appeared as a witness on the last trial—I was not present when he was examined—he was waiting on the day the prisoner and the other persons were at my coffee-house—he waited on them—I do not know where he is—I cannot find him—he left me nine months ago—I have not seen him since the last trial—I have not seen him about the Court to-day, nor since the trial—I have not spoken to, or seen him.

JAMES LEA re-examined. I have made every inquiry to discover Callaway, to bring him here—I have been to all his relations in London—none of them know where he is—they said he was at Brighton, but did not know where there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to Brighton? A. No; I did not know what part to go to, nor have I sent after him—I inquired of Fiestell where he was—he said he did not know—I did not hear Callaway examined at the last trial—I am sure I was not in Court when he was examined—I do not think I was in Court at the time.

WILLIAM BLUNDELL re-examined. Q. Did you ever, and if so, at what time, inform the prisoner you had heard some of the gold dust had been found in Mansel-street? A. No.

Q. Did not you tell him Mr. Hartley was waiting at house in Mansel-street, or some such street, where he expected to find the thief, or some of the property? and did not you tell him you were going to take some letters to Mr. Hartley at a house in Mansel-street, where be expected to find some gold? A. I was going to the Green Man public-house, Mansel-street,

and told the prisoner I was going there, and that I expected to see Moss there—I told him that, when I went for the letters to the office—I cannot say when it was.

COURT. Q. How long after the 25th of March was that? A. Some few days, I think—I cannot remember—it might be a fortnight—somewhere thereabouts—I was going with letters to the Green Man public-house—I expected to find Mr. Hartley there, but he was not—Moss was to have been brought there, I understood—I did not see any thing of the gold—I did not describe to the prisoner who Moss was—whether they said Moss or the man whom they suspected had stolen the dust, I do not know.

Q. Who are they? A. The person by whom I was sent—somebody in the office—I believe it was the conversation in the office that Mr. Hartley was gone to the Green Man public-house, and they expected to find the thief there—whether I mentioned Moss by name, I do not know—I cannot say when I first heard the name of Moss in the transaction—it was in the afternoon that I told this to the prisoner—I was going to take the general-post letters which came that morning by the second delivery.

Q. Cannot you tell nearer than that it might be a fortnight after the 25th? A. I cannot say—I cannot say whether it might be longer or shorter—I cannot say whether it was the next day—I cannot say whether it was a week, or how long it was after—I believe nobody was present when I said this to the prisoner—it was in the back office—I went for the letters in the back office, and received the letters from him—I believe one of the clerks in the office told me they expected to find the man, and to take him to the Green Man public-house—I was examined on the former trial—I was not asked these questions then that I am aware of—I left the Court at six o'clock yesterday, and went to the office—I left there at eight o'clock, and went home—I have not given information since yesterday that I could prove this conversation with the prisoner—I have never given information about this to any body since the robbery—this is the first time I have been asked it—It have not told any one that I could prove it—I arrived here at nine o'clock this morning—I came by myself—I never communicated to the prisoner that I could prove this conversation, before he was taken into custody—he was in the office when I told him this, doing the duty of a clerk—I am not aware that I had any conversation with the prisoner in the evening of that day—I believe he had been in the office the whole of the morning on which I told him this—I think it was nearly three o'clock in the afternoon when I told him—I told him the letters I had in my hand I was about to take to the Green Man public-house, to Mr. Hartley, expecting the thief would be brought there that afternoon—I have never spoken or written to the prisoner since he was committed, nor seen his attorney or any body—I have-not spoken to the attorney to-day or yesterday.

Q. Did you ever tell Lea that the person who called in John-street on the 25th of March had grey hairs in his whiskers? A. No—I gave him a description of the person who called, the same as I gave this morning or yesterday, large black whiskers, and stooped as he walked—about fifty, I think, was the age I gave—I did not say he was lame, or that he appeared infirm from age—I said he stooped as he walked.

MR. JONES. Q. Did you describe the man to Lea as having grey whiskers?

A. I did not, nor grey hairs in his whiskers—I did not pet the prisoner at Mansel-street when I went there.

MR. JONES called the following witnesses for the Defence:

EDWARD CASPAR . I am the prisoner's brother. I remember Sunday, the 24th of March, last year—my brother was at home that day—we all lived together at my father's house—he was in the habit of lying in bed rather late on Sunday mornings—he got up that Sunday morning from half-past ten to twelve o'clock—I think about eleven o'clock—he break-fasted after he got up—he dined at home that day—I think we dined about three or four o'clock—we usually dined about that hour on Sunday—generally on Sunday we dined later—I remember Mr. Wilson, a clock-case maker, calling to see my brother, about half-past twelve o'clock, and he staid till about three o'clock, or it might be later—my brother went out about four o'clock or half-past, between four and five—I would undertake to say he was in my father's house between one and two o'clock that day—I am quite certain of it—I am quite certain he did not go out from the time he got up till between four and fire o'clock—I was standing by his side nearly the whole of that time, looking over Mr. Wilson, who was teaching him drawing—he is a designer and draughtsman—my brother was in the habit of visiting Mrs. Manley, a friend—I cannot tell exactly what time he returned that evening—I do not know—he did not return very late—I always slept with him—we did not go to bed together that night, I went before him—I cannot tell what time he came to bed—I awoke between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and found him there—I got up tome time between seven and eight o'clock that morning, and left him in bed—I had to go up several times to call him that morning before he got up—I remember Mr. Riddington's man coming that morning, about a pair of boots—he came about ten minutes to nine o'clock—I did not go up and call my brother at that time—he came down to speak to the man within a few minutes to nine o'clock—he came down entirely in deshabille, in his slippers, and his coat across his arm—I cannot tell whether he had his breakfast after seeing Riddington's man, for I went out shortly after nine, o'clock—I left my brother at home then.

COURT. Q. Where do you live? A. At No, 29, Finsbury-place—that is about twenty minutes, or half-an-hour's walk from Mr. Hartley's.

MR. JONES. Q. Were you in the habit occasionally of taking a sandwich to your brother? A. Every day I took it, from eleven to one o'clock, about one o'clock—I remember taking a sandwich to him at the office that Monday morning, I think, about half-past eleven or twelve o'clock, perhaps later, I did not notice the time—I saw him there—I saw a cab at the door, and thinking it might be my brother, I went up to it, and found it was a stranger—the cab-man grazed my leg against the step of the cab on his jumping down from the cab.

Q. Did you look into the cab, to be able to see the person in it? A. I looked particularly close, to see if it was my brother—I know Moss perfectly well.

Q. Was he the person in that cab? A. No—I am quite certain he was not—it was a yellow-bodied cab, with a black top, I believe, but I would not say that positively.

COURT. Q. The cab-man, getting down, grazed your leg; did you complain of the injury? A. Yes, I went into the office crying—I saw my brother, and then Mr. Hickey—I told them what was the matter—Mr. Hickey

asked me, and I told him the cab-man kicked me—I do not know whether Mr. Hickey is here.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where were you when your brother was tried before? A. I was about here the first day—the rest of the time I was at home—I was not in the best of health on the 24th, 25th, and 26th of last June—I was not confined to my bed—there was nothing the matter with my leg then—I knew Moss before this transaction, from taking him jobs.

Q. Are you the little boy who was in here yesterday and the day before, communicating with the prisoner? A. I was in a short time, and Mr. Robinson told me to go out—I only spoke to my brother once or twice at the utmost—I do not think I talked to him four or five times—I should not like to swear it—I have known Moss a very long time—he was not in the habit of coming to my father's house—he has not been often at my father's house—I might have seen him there once or twice, but merely as a workman in the shop—I do not know that he was ever in my father's employ at all—my father gave him jobs, which, I believe, he did in his leisure hours—I do not recollect seeing him for a long time before this Sunday, not for about two years, at our house—I am fifteen years old next month.

Q. Where was your father on this Sunday? A. He was at home also—I knew my father was being tried in June last for sharing this offence—and I knew he was at home all day that Sunday.

Q. Although you knew he was charged with being at Moss's? A. Yes—I did not come forward as a witness—I may have seen Moss occasionally at his house in New-street, Whitechapel—I do not know the number—I know the house, by being sent there by my father—I cannot tell whether his name was on the door, I did not notice—yes, I think it was—I cannot tell whether it was on a brass plate, it might or might not—I do not know whether it was or not—I might not have noticed his name at all, or I might have noticed it—I did not notice it—I do not know whether it was on the door or not—I had been there several times—the last time was, I dare say, about eighteen months or two years ago, I think eighteen months—I cannot tell how long I had known Moss living in New-street—I remember him for a long time—I do not remember ever going to any other house to him—I have known him at that house three or four years, or it may be longer—I have two brothers and six sisters—the prisoner is my eldest brother—two of my sisters are here, but not any brother—my younger brother is nine years of age—my sisters are older than me—my mother is living—she is not here—she dined at home with my father and brother that Sunday—she is at home, and she is distracted, poor creature.

Q. Now describe the dress of the man in the cab? A. I cannot tell his dress—he was not at all like Moss—I did not notice his dress—I think he had a great-coat on—I do not think he had a Macintosh over it—he had a hat—I cannot tell whether it was a light great-coat he had—I noticed his countenance more—I should not like to swear he had any great-coat—I did not notice his dress, but his countenance—I did not see him get out—I think it was about half-past eleven or half-past twelve o'clock—I generally went to my brother from eleven to one o'clock, before we dined—I will swear it was before one o'clock—I will not swear it was before twelve o'clock—it might have been half-past twelve o'clock—I am certain it was not one o'clock, because we generally dined about one o'clock, and I got

home some time before we had dinner—my leg was not injured, but hurt, by being kicked against—the man in the cab was a far older man than Moss—he seemed about sixty, I should think—I cannot tell what hair he had—he had grey whiskers—I did not notice that he stooped particularly—I did not hear his voice—I did not hear any thing he said—I did not see any body come out to him—the cab drove off as I went into the office—I did not go before the Magistrate—I was at home with my mother when my brother and father were charged before the Magistrate—the cab drove to the Minories.

COURT. Q. How came the man to get off the box when he was driving off? A. The cab was at the office door, and as I walked into the office it drove away.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. But the man would step on, instead of off; to drive away? A. The man was on the step of the cab talking to the person in the cab—he jumped down from the step of the cab, not off the box—I could not look inside the cab from the street, but I had a good view of the man—there was only one man, I am certain—I could see all inside the cab—the step was at the door of the cab—it was a low four-wheeled cab—I did not notice any boxes in it—I am quite sure there were no boxes in it—I cannot say whether the gentleman had a letter—my brother did not come out with him—he was in the office when I went in—the man was sitting in the cab—I think I should know the cab-man if I saw him—I was not before the Magistrates at all—the cab-man was a great big fellow, with red in his face—(looking at the witness Moss)—that is the man I know as Moss—he is well known to our family, and has been for some years—I should not take him for sixty years of age—I should say he is about thirty—my father was out on Monday night—I do not know what time he came home—I go to bed about eight o'clock, or between eight and nine.

Q. Do you know a man named Davis? A. Davis? no—I know several gentlemen of the name of Davis—I do not know Davis who lived in Coventry-court, and Oxendon-street—I do not know Mrs. Abrahams—I saw her when I went into Newgate to see my poor father—I went into Newgate to see my father the day he was committed—I knew the day he was tried—I did not come forward as a witness—I do not know why.

Q. Who brought you here to-day? A. I came myself—I have not had a subpoena—MR. Robinson told me to come—MR. Robinson did not examine me before I came here—nobody examined me before I came here—I told Mr. Robinson as nearly as possible what I had to say, a few days since—I think Monday week—that was the first time Mr. Robinson knew it—I did not tell him—I had told my brother previously, and it was written down—I do not know who wrote it down—I believe it was enclosed in the brief—MR. Robinson read it to me, and asked me if I knew every part of that.

Q. When, for the first time, did you tell this to Mr. Robinson? A. I mentioned about the cab directly I got home—I believe it is in the brief—I think I first told Mr. Robinson on Monday week—that was the first time I saw Mr. Robinson about it—I cannot say it was Monday week—it was one day in the last week—that was the first time I saw Mr. Robinson—MR. Yates was my father's attorney at the last trial—he knew it—I did not tell him.

Q. How do you know he knew it? A. The circumstance of the cab I ed when I got home, every body knew it.

Q. How do you know Mr. Yates knew the circumstances you have come to tell today? A. I have told him—I have been to Mr. Yates's—I did

not tell him formally all I bad to say, but I told him about the cab—I told him it was not Moss who came in the cab—that was before my father was tried—I did not see him take it down in writing—I went to Mr. Yates with my mother and sisters—my mother went to consult him and take him money for counsel—I was not brought here when my father was tried.

Q. Now, consider. A. I was here—I was in the yard the first day—I think I was not here the second day—I am afraid of swearing it—swearing is an awful thing for a boy like me—I might have been here on the second day—I think I was, on an errand to Mr. Yates—I was here on messages to Mr. Yates often—I do not think I was here the third day—I was not here every day of the trial—I was away two or three days—the third, fourth, and fifth days, I think, but when I was here I only came on an errand to Mr. Yates.

Q. On your solemn oath, were you not here waiting to be called as a witness? A. No, I was not—I never gave my evidence ready to be examined as a witness—I was not desired to be here.

MR. JONES. Q. Had you stated to Mr. Yates what you had said to your brother about his being at home? A. I merely stated the circumstance, and have said how cruel it was to say so and so about my brother, when I knew the contrary.

Q. Were you willing to come forward as a witness on the last trial, to state this if asked to do it? A. A place like this I was almost afraid of coming to, but on it being represented it was useful to my brother, I could not refuse to come.

Q. On your solemn oath, is what you have said about your brother being at home, true or false? A. Most certainly it is true—I would not swear a falsity—my poor mother is not in a state to come forward—MR. Robinson has very recently been engaged as attorney for my brother, instead of Mr. Yates—we have a servant named Sarah Cox—she and my sisters were all at home on the Sunday and Monday, at the time I have mentioned.

Q. Do you happen to know whether it was left to counsel on the last trial, whether they thought right to call witnesses or not? A. It was left to counsel entirely—my brother wished me to be called on the last trial, and now he has insisted on it.

ELLEN CASPAR . I am the prisoner's sister. I remember Sunday the 24th of March last—my brother was in the habit of getting up late on Sunday mornings, sometimes at ten, and sometimes ten or eleven o'clock—on Sunday, the 24th of March, he got up between eleven and twelve o'clock—I remember his coming down stairs that morning about that time—he breakfasted after he came down—I remember a man named Wilson, a clock-case maker, calling that day to see my brother—I think he called before twelve o'clock—it was after my brother came down—he had some conversation with my brother—I do not recollect upon what subject—he left about three o'clock—the dinner cloth was being laid while he staid there—dinner was brought up while he was there, I think—he did not dine with us—he went away before dinner—the servant I remember, in laying the cloth, had to ask him to move, in talking to my brother, to enable her to lay the cloth—my brother dined with the rest of the family that day—he went out in the evening, about five o'clock—I can undertake to say he did not leave the house earlier than between four and five o'clock, and that he was there from one to two or three o'clock—he was not out

till between four and five o'clock in the evening—my brother Edward and he slept together—the prisoner had supper at home that Sunday night—we usually supped between eleven and twelve o'clock, about eleven—he came home early—I remarked his coming home particularly early that evening, but I do not know the hour—we went to bed at the usual hour that night—next morning, Monday, the 25th, he came down stairs a few minutes before nine o'clock.

Q. Do you remember whether there was any thing particular to require his coining down stairs? A. Yes, his boot-maker called that morning, and was waiting for him to have an answer about his boots, which he had brought home on Saturday night—when he came down he spoke to the boot-maker—he said he had not time to wait a moment—he came down with his coat over his arm, and his slippers on—he breakfasted at home that morning—he went out just about nine o'clock.

COURT. Q. Then he only came down a few minutes before nine o'clock? A. He came down just before nine o'clock, but very often he used to take a cup of coffee and run away—he did so that morning—he went away in a great hurry—it might be a few minutes before nine o'clock when he left, but it was on the stroke of nine—my brother Edward was in the habit of taking him a lunch every morning—he generally took it about ten or eleven o'clock, but sometimes it was not so exact—I remember my father coming home on Monday evening perfectly well—he came home from eleven to half-past eleven o'clock, but not later—I am quite sure of that—he went to bed with the rest of the family—I was ready on the last trial to state what I have now—I had stated it to Mr. Yates, my brother's attorney.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you here in attendance during the trial? A. No, not on any of the days—I was at home—my father was at home with my brother on the Sunday, talking to the said Mr. Wilson—I did not know that my father was said to be in another place on that Sunday—I knew he was described to be at Moss's house on Sunday—I knew he was at home.

Q. Why was it you did not come here to state it in the last case? A. Because the counsellors did not think it necessary witnesses should be called, I understood—MR. Riddington is the master boot-maker's name—I do not know where my brother Edward was when the man called from Mr. Riddington—the man waited in the parlour—my sister showed him in—I was there—I called my brother for him—I went and told my brother that Riddington's man was waiting for him—he came down on that, and went into the parlour to the man—that is the room he used to take his breakfast in—he did not talk to the man while he was having his break-fast.

Q. Did he take any breakfast? A. He took a cup of coffee, as well as I can recollect, but he was very late that morning—he merely swallowed a cup of coffee and went out almost as soon as he got in the parlour—he told the man he could not wait to try them on that morning, and then left the house I think while the man was there—I did not see my brother Edward go out with the lunch that morning—I did not give him the lunch—we sometimes breakfasted before my brother—sometimes we breakfasted earlier than he rose—on that morning we were breakfasting when he came down—the family were sitting at breakfast when he came down—myself, my mother, and Edward—we were having breakfast together—being late that morning, breakfast

was nearly done when Riddington's man came—Edward and all the family were sitting at breakfast when I went up stairs to call my brother—I left them at the breakfast-table, but I must name to you, that we did not break-fast in the parlour where Riddington's man came in, but in another parlour.

MR. JONES. Q. Was Edward at breakfast with you and the family that morning? A. Yes—I did not take any notice of what passed between my brother and Riddington's man—at least I do not think he satisfied the man, he had not time to answer him—I was not at home in the middle of the day on Monday—I saw my father on Monday morning—the latest time I saw him on Monday morning was between ten and eleven o'clock, I think—he was in the habit of attending to the shop throughout the day, unless he had occasion to go out.

COURT. Q. What is his shop? A. A clock and watch manufactory—my brother sometimes has a sandwich for his lunch, or sometimes bread and cheese, any thing there was—he did not take it with him—Edward used to take it to him—he very seldom took it himself—he used to say he would do without any, but we nearly always used to send him lunch, and we used to send it as early as we could to him—John-street is about twenty minutes or a quarter-of-an-hour's walk—we sent every day—he never took it himself—it was sent wrapped up in paper.

MR. JONES. Q. Was the lunch generally sent by his direction, or through the anxiety of your mother? A. Through the anxiety of my mother, for fear he should be faint—he said there was no occasion for it, and that was the reason he did not take it himself.

GRACE CASPAR . I am the sister of Ellen Caspar. I remember Sunday, the 24th of March—my brother got up about eleven o'clock, or a little after—he and Edward slept together—he breakfasted when he came down that morning—while he was there Mr. Wilson called to see him—he is a draughtsman, and a clock-case maker—it was between twelve and one o'clock, about half-past twelve o'clock I think, when Mr. Wilson called—he remained till the dinner cloth was laid, which was between three and four o'clock—he went away before we dined—from eleven till three o'clock, when Mr. Wilson left, my brother did not leave the house—he was not dressed to leave home till after—he dined with us that day, and waited till five o'clock—he agreed to wait for Mr. Wilson till five o'clock, and if he did not call about five o'clock, he was to go out without him—it must have have been after five o'clock when he went out—I cannot recollect his coming home that evening—I do not remember having supper that night—I went to bed before supper—my brother might have returned before I went to bed—he generally supped with us—my father got up the same time as usual on Sunday morning—he breakfasted with us—we breakfasted at eight o'clock that morning—my father did not go out before dinner that day—he was also engaged with Mr. Wilson—I will undertake to say positively my father was at home between one and two o'clock that day—I do not remember any body calling to see my brother on Monday morning, but the shoemaker, who lives opposite—the man's name is Allen—the master is Mr. Riddington—Allen called about nine o'clock, a few minutes before or after nine o'clock—my brother came down to see him—he had his slippers on when he came down, and his coat thrown over his arm—he spoke to the man, and tried the boots on—I cannot say whether they fitted him, because I went out of the room—I came into the room a few minutes after—I saw him with the boots, whether

he did try them on I cannot say—he spoke to the man about them—the man did not remain long—my brother breakfasted after he had done with the man—he went out as near as I can recollect, at a quarter after nine o'clock, a few minutes more or less—it was past nine o'clock I am positive—his usual time for breakfast was a quarter before nine o'clock—he used to tell the trades people not to call after nine o'clock—he was rather later than usual that morning.

Q. On the Sunday, do you remember whether your father was at home? A. Yes, he was at home—he did not go out at all on Sunday—he was at home on the Monday, except going to his work-shop, which is a few doors off—he was only absent a few minutes—he did not go out for any length of time in the day time—he was at home as late as twelve or one o'clock—he had not gone out before that on Monday—Sarah Cox was our servant at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you the same servant now? A. Yes, she is here—I was ready to be called as a witness for my father when he was tried—I have known Moss by sight a long while—I cannot say how long—six or seven years, as long as I can recollect—I do not know where he used to live—I might have been at his house—I am not sure—I might have taken a job there for my father—I have not been often—I have not been six or seven times, nor four or five—I think I have been once or twice—it was in New-street, Whitechapel—it is somewhere about two years ago that I went there—my father was at home all Sunday—he did not go out at all on Sunday—not in the evening—I knew that when he was being tried, and I knew he was charged with being at Moss's house on Sunday.

Q. You never came forward? A. We expected we should have to come, but were not called—it was about nine o'clock when my brother got up on Monday—that was later than usual—we breakfasted at the usual time that morning, eight o'clock—we breakfasted down stairs in the kitchen that morning, not in the back or front-room—we breakfasted between eight and nine o'clock—Riddington's man came about nine o'clock, after we had breakfasted.

Q. After the breakfast things were all done? A. Yes, they might have been—it was after we had done breakfast—the things were gone—he was shown into the parlour even with the shop—he did not wait many minutes—I told my sister, and she called my brother—I told her as soon as Allen came, and she went and called him—he came with a very few minutes—our breakfast was over at the time I sent my sister to call him, but he did not breakfast with us—when he came down he went to Allen—I staid in the back-room a little time, while he was talking with the man about the boots—I cannot say where my brother had his breakfast—if he had it it must have been after Allen was gone—he breakfasted I know—he usually had toast and coffee—he might have had that that morning—I believe he did breakfast that morning—it was there for him, and he sat down to breakfast—I do not know how long he was at breakfast—I suppose about a quarter of an hour, he might have been—he was in his slippers when he came down stairs—he went out in boots—he put on his boots in the parlour—I cannot say whether that was before or after breakfast—I saw him try on his new boots—he was talking to the man about them about ten minutes—he went and had his breakfast after that in the kitchen—he was called down to Riddington's man—if he had been down at his usual

time we should not have had to call him—my father breakfasted with us that morning in the kitchen—MR. Wilson merely came in casually, and while there he drew some patterns of clock-cases—he agreed to come to my brother at five o'clock—I do not know what for.

MR. JONES. Q. Did you happen to see your brother take breakfast? A. His breakfast was there, I am not sure he took it—I believe he did—I opened the door, and told my sister to call him—I do not know that anybody went up stairs to call him—we called at the stairs to him, and he came down—Edward might be there—very likely he was, he was in the house.

SARAH COX . I live with Mrs. Caspar, and have done so fifteen months—I was there in March last year—the prisoner was in the habit of getting up very late on Sunday mornings, between eleven and twelve o'clock in general—I remember Sunday, the 24th of March, he got up about eleven o'clock that morning—he had his breakfast at home—he breakfasted when he came down stairs by himself—Edward slept with him—I remember Mr. Wilson, a clock-case maker, calling to teach him drawing in the clock-cases—he called about half-past twelve o'clock—he remained till between three and four o'clock, the time I was going to lay the dinner-cloth—I am quite certain the prisoner had not left the house that morning up to that time—I cannot recollect whether his father had—he was there while Mr. Wilson was there—I do not know whether he went out Before Mr. Wilson left—I was in all parts of the house—the kitchen was my place—they were in the parlour—MR. Caspar was at home when Mr. Wilson called, and when he went away—he dined at home that day—the prisoner went out at five o'clock—I remember his coming home—I do not exactly know the time—he supped at home, and went to bed at the usual time—I do not remember any one calling to see him next morning—he came down at nine o'clock, or a few minutes to nine.

Q. Did he speak to any body when he came down? A. He spoke to the bootmaker—the bootmaker called to see him—I thought you meant a gentleman—the bootmaker's journeyman called about nine or ten minutes to nine o'clock,—the prisoner came down, with his coat hanging over his arm, and his slippers on—he spoke to the boot maker in the parlour for a few minutes, and the boot maker went away—the prisoner led the house after breakfast—after the bootmaker was gone he had breakfast, and left the house—I should say it was half-past nine o'clock when he left—I am sure it was after nine o'clock'—he generally used to go a little after nine o'clock—he went about the usual time that morning—on Tuesday and Friday mornings he used to go out early—when vessels were going off he went about seven o'clock—I remember seeing Mr. Caspar, my master, that morning—I do not remember whether he went out at all that morning—I saw him there at breakfast, between eight and nine o'clock, and I saw him there after breakfast—he dined at home—he was at home from breakfast to dinner-time—they dined about two o'clock—I am sure he did not go out from breakfast to dinner-time—he went out in the evening, I cannot say the exact time, it was getting candle-light—he came home between eleven and twelve o'clock in the evening—he had supper at home that night, and went to bed—it was some time between eleven and twelve o'clock when he came home—we were all up stairs and in bed at twelve o'clock—the clock struck twelve as I was going up stairs.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Where did the family usually breakfast? A. In the kitchen—the door is not one which people come to without knocking—I did not answer the door when the bootmaker's man came—one of the family did—I was in the passage sweeping—some of the family were in the parlour, and some in the kitchen—I do not know what those in the parlour were doing—they had breakfast in the kitchen—the bootmaker came while I was in the passage—he was asked into the parlour by the person who let him in—I do not recollect who let him in, I believe it was one of the daughters—I did not go up stairs to tell the prisoner the bootman was come—one of the daughters did—he came down directly—his coat was hanging over his arm—he had slippers on—I was in the passage when he came down—I undid the parlour door—I went into the parlour—he tried on the boots, and spoke to the man about them—I do not know what he said—the bootmaker's man went away—I do not remember who let him out—I recollect the prisoner then going to breakfast in the kitchen—he had coffee—he took his breakfast, I know—that occupied about a quarter of an hour, and then he went out.

ALFRED WILSON . I am a clock-case maker, and live at No. 19, King, street, Clerkenwell—I am not a housekeeper, but a lodger—I have lived there two years and better. I knew the elder and younger Mr. Caspar—I remember calling at Mr. Caspar's house on the 24th of March last—I was there about ten minutes after twelve o'clock—I saw the elder Caspar and the younger one, and the young son and the daughters—I had some conversation with them—I was there till after three o'clock, till their table was laid for dinner, and then I left.

Q. What were you doing from twelve till three o'clock? A. I was drawing clock-cases, little patterns in a book, for the elder Mr. Caspar to use as a pattern-book, and for the instruction of young Edward Caspar—when I first went the elder Mr. Caspar was in the shop, doing something to a watch—I went into the back parlour behind the shop, told him my watch was bad, and I had called, agreeable to promise, to give his son a lesson in drawing—I staid there I dare say three quarters of an hour, and while I was waiting there the prisoner came down, and made some remarks on my drawings, and pointed out something I should correct in them——I had not seen the prisoner till then—he was not dressed, he had his coat off—it must have been past half-past twelve when I first saw him that morning—I left about three o'clock.

Q. Were you in company with him from the time you first saw him till you went away? A. I was in company with him when he came down first, then he went up stairs again, and came down and staid with us nearly an hour before I came away—I can swear he was in the house from one to two o'clock that day—I cannot say whether he had any breakfast after he came down—the elder Mr. Caspar was with me all the time I was there, and was repairing my watch—I can swear that he was in the house from one to two o'clock—the prisoner very much pressed me to come at five o'clock, and he would wait at home for me, and I was to finish a drawing, and take it with me—he has often purchased clock-cases of me, and paid me for them—I cannot say whether he learned the watch trade or not—I had called at the house on other Sundays—I have seen the prisoner very much about the same time on several Sundays when I have been there, and I have seen him up very early on Sunday also.

——RIDDINGTON. I am a bootmaker, and live at No. 15, Finsbury-place North, very nearly opposite Mr. Caspar. I made the prisoner two pairs of boots—I remember Saturday, the 23rd of March last, I have it down in my book—I sent him some boots that day—I sent Allen to the prisoner about them on Monday morning, from half-past eight to nine o'clock—he returned to me with a message between half-past eight and nine o'clock—I am positive as to the time.

---- ALLEN. In March last I was in the employ of Mr. Riddington. I remember taking a pair of boots home to the prisoner on Saturday, the 23rd of March—I went to him on Monday morning—it was within a few minutes of nine o'clock—I saw his two sisters, and afterwards saw the prisoner come down stairs—he had on a pair of dark trowsers, and was in his shirt sleeves, and a pair of morning slippers—I had a little conversation with him about the boots, for to the best of my recollection the boots did not fit him—to the best of my recollection I took them away, and returned to my master's shop—I suppose I remained in the house about five or six minutes—I was shown into the parlour at the back of the shop.

COURT. Q. What makes you recollect the 25th of March in particular? A. It was the morning the robbery was committed—I cannot exactly say how soon after I heard of it—I do not know that I heard of it the same day, but very soon after.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you here as a witness at the trial of Ellis Caspar? A. No, I was called on by the Caspar family—I did not refuse to come, but I was not subpoenaed, so I did not come—I know of no other reason why I did not come.

MR. CLARKSON to MR. RIDDINGTON. Q. Were you here on the last trial? A. No, I was not subpoenaed—I was not asked to come—I had not given my evidence to any body—I had not seen Mr. Yates, the attorney—I would have come if I had been called on to come.

MR. JONES to ALLEN. Q. Would you have come if you had been asked to come? A. Yes—I was requested to go to Mr. Yates before the last trial, and stated what I have to him.

Q. Do you know of your master having made an entry in his book of the time the goods were sent? A. Master says he put it down in his book, but I recollect very well the day of the month.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Friday, March 6th, 1840.

Sixth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18400302-910

910. RICHARD NUTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March, 2 pairs of trowsers, value 3s.; 1 pair of boots, value 6d.; 6lbs. weight of soap, value 3s.; 4lbs. weight of sugar, value 2s.; and 1lb. weight of candles, value 6d.; the goods of William Crosby, in a vessel, in a port of entry and discharge; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 64.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-911

911. MARGARET BURNS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February, 1 cloak, value 12s., the goods of Frederick Lindner; to which she pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 46.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-912

912. ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March, 1 pair of boots, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Nathaniel Blake; to which she pleaded

GUILTY.** Aged 69.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-913

913. EDWARD FRANCIS DELLER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February, 6 deal planks, value 1l. 6s., the goods of William Haden; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-914

914. JONATHAN FULLILOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February, 46 stereotype plates, value 7l. 10s., the goods of Thomas Stanley; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Five Days.

(The prosecutor engaged to take him into his service.)

Reference Number: t18400302-915

915. WILLIAM BUTLER was indicted for uttering counterfeit coin; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-916

916. MICHAEL MULLINS and PATRICK WALSH were indicted for a misdemeanor.

THE HON. MR. SCARLETT and MR. ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS OLLEY . I am a dairyman, living in Bryanstone-street, Marylebone. On the 25th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner Mulling came into my shop—my wife served him—after he came into the shop my wife brought me a bad sixpence—I went into the shop—the prisoner was still there—I said it was a bad sixpence, taking it out of my hand, and giving it to him—I said, "Are you not going to take the butter?"—he said, "No, I have no more money about me or upon me"—he went away—I followed him—he turned round into Quebec-street, and then into Oxford-street—soon after he joined a second person, who was similar to Walsh—I could not swear to him, I only saw his back—they went down Oxford-street, through Portman-street, on to Lower Seymour-street—there I saw Mullins go into Conrath's shop, and purchase some bread—he gave some money, but what I do not know—he took something like change—Walsh walked down the street—Mullins came out, went after him, and joined him—they went through a court into Marylebone-lane, and walked up and down each side of the street, sometimes together and sometimes separate—the other man went into a public-house in High-street, Marylebone, and Mullins went into a baker's shop, purchased some bread, and took something like change—he then went into the public-house where the other man had gone—I went to Mrs. Daw's, the baker's—she showed me a bad sixpence—I took it into my hand, and returned it to Mrs. Daw—I saw a policeman, and went into the public-house where I had seen the two prisoners go in—I found them there together—I saw them searched, and in Walsh's cap were eleven sixpences, which the policeman took.

CATHERINE CONRATH . I am the wife of Henry Conrath, a baker, in Lower Seymour-street. On the 25th of February, Mullins came into my shop and asked for a penny loaf—I served him, and he gave me 6d.—before I gave him change I noticed its being very smooth, and having a black spot on the edge—I gave him change, and put the 6d. in the till—almost directly after he was gone, Olley came in, from what he said I was induced

to open the till, and found the sixpence, which I knew again—it was lying on two shillings—there were other sixpences underneath it, but they were very different from that—that is the one I received from the prisoner—I am quite sure Mullins is the man, but he had a red handkerchief on then.

HANNAH DAW . I am the wife of George Daw, a baker, in Great Marylebone-street. On the 25th of February, the prisoner Mullins came to my shop between seven and eight o'clock—he asked for a two penny loaf of bread, which I gave him—he gave me a sixpence in payment—I gave him change—I put the sixpence on the edge of the till—there was another sixpence at the far end of the till—after the prisoner left the shop, I saw Olley, and I gave him the sixpence that I had taken from Mullins—he returned it to me, and I kept it in my hand till I showed it to my husband.

ANDREW JOHNSTON (police-constable D 108.) I was on duty on the 25th of February—I saw Olley, and from what he said went to a public-house called the York Arms—I saw the two prisoners sitting in the tap-room at a table, one on each side—they had a pot of beer and some victuals before them—I said to Walsh, "How about the sixpences?"—he said, "What sixpences? I have got no sixpences"—I said, "I think you have, and I think some of them are bad"—he said, "No, indeed, I have no money at all about me"—I said, "Stand up, let me look"—he hesitated a little, and then stood up—I found eleven counterfeit sixpences in his cap—these are them—(producing them)—I have kept them ever since—I searched the other prisoner, and found this small piece of metal on him—I took them to the station-house—on the way Walsh made a struggle to escape—I received this bad sixpence from Mrs. Daw.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Royal Mint—these sixpences are all counterfeit, and all cast in one mould—this piece of metal is similar to what the sixpences are made of.

Mullins's Defence. I was coming home from work, and Walsh picked this money up—I asked him for it, and he gave me one—I went in this man's shop, and he would not have it—I did not know it was bad—I never had one in my life before.

Walsh's Defence. In coming down the street I picked up this money in a cloth—Mullins was after me—he said "What is that?"—he took one of the sixpences, and said he would get it changed.

MULLINS— GUILTY . Aged 26.

WALSH— GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-917

917. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for a misdemeanor.

THE HON. MR. SCARLETT and MR. ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

ORLANDO EVANS . I am clerk to Mr. Gawtress, a printer, in Fleet-street. On the 7th of February the prisoner came to our shop, and purchased a "Watchman" newspaper—I served him—he gave me half-a-crown—I gave him change—he went away—I put the half-crown into my desk, and kept it there until the 22nd, when I gave it to Baylis—I am quite certain, the one I gave to him was the one I received of the prisoner—on the 22nd of February, the prisoner came again for a "Watchman" newspaper—I served him—he gave me a bad half-crown—I then called a person of the name of Cubitt—I showed it him, and gave it into his hands—he returned it to me—I showed it to the prisoner, and asked him if he recollected the half-crown he had given me on the 7th of February—he

said he did not—I asked him if he knew the one he had just given me—he said he did not—I showed it him—he did not say any thing to that—I went for a policeman, and gave him into custody—I gave both the half-crowns to Baylis, and marked them in his presence.

RICHARD JOHN VICARS CUBITT . I am shopman to Thomas Riley, who lives in Fleet-street. On the 22nd of February, I heard Mr. Gawtress's office bell—I went down, and saw the prisoner—I had seen him before on Friday the 7th—I could swear to him—I received a half-crown from Evans—I looked at it, and returned it to him again—I charged the prisoner with being there before—he denied it.

THOMAS BAYLIS (City police-constable, No. 177.) I produce two half-crowns, which I got from Evans—these are them.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of coin to the Royal Mint. These are both counterfeit, but not cast in the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-918

918. ANN BROWN was indicted for a misdemeanor.

THE HON. MR. SCARLETT and MR. ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

STEPHEN DIXON . I am servant to Mr. Smith, a butcher in Fenchurch-street. On the 26th of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and purchased a small piece of meat which came to 4d.—she gave me a bad half-crown—I asked her if she had another—she said, "No"—I gave her into custody to Wreford—I gave him the half-crown—it had not been out of my possession.

WILLIAM WREFORD (City police-constable, No. 153.) Dixon called me to his master's shop—I took the prisoner into custody, and got this bad half-crown from Dixon—I took the prisoner to the station-house—in going there, we passed through Mincing-lane, and I heard something like the jingle of money falling down a gentleman's area—I taxed her with it—she denied it—I marked the place, and took her to the station-house—I went back to the place, rang the bell, and saw Mrs. Thompson—I told her something, and she brought me this half-crown, which I saw her pick up—the prisoner gave her residence at No. 7, Church-street, Bethnal-green—I made inquiries, and no such person lived there.

MART ANN THOMPSON . I am servant to Dr. Hunter, in Mincing-lane. On the 26th of February, Wreford came to the house, and in consequence of something he said, I went into the area, and found a bad half-crown—I gave it to him.

MR. JOHN FIELD . These are both counterfeit, and both cast in one mould.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-919

919. HANNAH CROWLEY was indicted for a misdemeanor.

THE HON MR. SCARLETT and MR. ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

RICHARD BEASLEY . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Lisle-street, Leicester-square. On the morning of the 29th of February, the prisoner came to my shop about ten o'clock, and asked for some bacon—it was 6d. a lb.—she offered 5d.—I did not accept it—she went away and came again afterwards, and said she would take it at 6d.—I sold her three quarters of a pound, which came to 4 1/2 d.—she gave me half-a-crown—I gave her 2s. 1 1/2 d. change—I then bit the half-crown, and put it into my pocket, where there was no other money—I kept it there till night—I gave it to the officer—I am quite sure it was the same—she came again about ten o'clock at night,

and purchased four eggs at 1/2 d. each—she offered me her hand, which had one penny and one shilling in it—I fastened her hand, knowing her to be the same person, and gave her into custody.

THOMAS HARDWICK (police-constable C 96.) I took the prisoner, and received this half-crown from Mr. Beasley—I asked the prisoner to open her mouth—she refused—I tried to open it with the handle of a spoon, but could not succeed—I took her to the station-house, and saw her pass her hand from her mouth—I seized her arm, and the Inspector opened her hand, and found a shilling.

HENRY BERESFORD . I am a police Inspector. The prisoner was brought to the station-house, about ten o'clock at night—I searched her, and endeavoured to open her mouth—she put up her hands, and opened her mouth—I seized her hand, and found this shilling.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am Inspector of coin to the Royal Mint. These are both counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the shilling of a woman in Leicester-square.

GUILTY . Aged 52.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-920

920. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 2 shirts, value 14s., the goods of James Beane, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Six Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18400302-921

921. JOHN LEFEVRE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February, 3 saws, value 11s.; 8 screw-drivers, value 4s. 6d.; 1 pair of dividers, value 2s. 6d.; 2 pairs of pincers, value 3s.; 2 oil-stones, value 4s. 6d.; 1 plane, value 3s.; 2 chisels, value 3s. 6d.; and 1 bit, value 1s.; the goods of Thomas Daniel Legg Goozee: 1 oil-stone, value 3s.; 1 square, value 1s. 6d.; 1 spoke-shave, value 1s.; 2 gimlets, value 8d.; 3 bradawls, value 6d.; 7 chisels, value 5s.; 1 pair of compasses, value 6d.; 1 punch, value 4d.; 1 hammer, value 1s.; 2 screw-drivers, value 4s.; and 1 basket, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of Joseph James: 2 saws, value 8s. 6d.; 1 plane, value 5s. 6d.; 1 stock, value 2s. 6d.; 1 screwdriver, value 4s. 6d.; 1 hammer, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of pincers, value 1s.; 1 pair of compasses, value 9d.; 1 square, value 1s. 6d.; 4 chisels, value 4s.; and 1 basket, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of Nicholas James Johnson: and WILLIAM SEMONS , for feloniously receiving, on the 12th of February, 1 plane, part of the said goods, the property of Thomas Daniel Legg Goozee, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

THOMAS DANIEL LEGG GOOZEE . I am a carpenter and machine maker, in Brrown's-lane, Spitalfields. I had a lot of tools at Mr. Duffs, in Fore-street—they were safe on Saturday, the 8th of February, and on Monday morning two of my men came to me and said they were taken away—I found they were gone—this plane and screw-driver are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where had you left these tools? A. On a bench at No. 16, Fore-street—I allow the men to work with a great many of my tools—I had used them myself on the Friday.

NICHOLAS JAMES JOHNSON . I was at work at No. 16, Fore-street—I left there on Saturday, the 8th of February—I did not lock the door—all my tools were then safe in a basket—none of them are found.

JOSEPH JAMES . I was at work at this place—I saw my tools safe on

the 8th of February—I left them on the bench—on Monday all my tools were gone—only a hammer has been found.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. When had you seen these tools safe? A. Five minutes past eight o'clock on the Saturday evening—I can swear to this hammer from the face and head, and my having used it—I am quite certain it is mine.

MARY ANN GILES . I am the wife of John Giles, and live in Church-street, Mile-end, New Town. I let a furnished lodging to the prisoner Lefevre on the 7th of February—none of this property was there when I let the lodging—he staid about five days—I do not know the other prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. He was taken into custody on the 11th? A. Yes—I let the room to him himself—I do not live in the house myself—there were several other people living there—hit wife lived with him in the same room.

GEORGE TEAKLE , (police-sergeant H. 8) From information I went on the 12th of February to Well-street, where the prisoner Lefevre lived—I found him in the back room, on the ground floor, sitting with two men and a female—I said I was come to apprehend him—I looked about, and underneath the bed I found fourteen skeleton keys and two common door keys, in a bag—I then took him to the station-house—on the way he said, "Do not show them, if you do they will give me a drag"—I went back to the room, and in the same box where the bag was I found this screw driver; and in a table drawer this hammer; and in the cupboard this carpenter's basket—in consequence of further information, I went on the evening of the 12th to Semon's house, in King-street, Brick-lane; he keeps a marine store shop—he was in the parlour in company with his wife—I said I had received information that he had a quantity of tools in his house which were stolen—he said, "I have no tools whatever"—I said, "If you have, produce them at once," and I asked him if he had any objection to my looking in his shop—he said, "No"—I looked in a bin in the shop, and found this plane—MR. Goozee, who was with me, said, "That is mine, I can swear to it"—Semons said, "No, it is mine, I have had it for months—I can swear to it"—the prosecutor pointed to his name on the plane and said, "What do you call that? I have the stamp of it at home;" to that Semons made no reply—his wife then came forward and said, "No, that is a plane a boy brought in last night, it is not his," and some words were said about his calling again, but what I cannot say—I found no more tools—I then took him to the station-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know Semons yourself? A. Yes; I know no harm of him—he has not been there long.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Was it after Lefevre had been locked up that you found the tools in his room? A. Yes; I found the keys when I took him.

LEFEVRE— GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

SEMONS— NOT GUILTY .

(There was another indictment against Lefevre.)

Reference Number: t18400302-922

922. JOHN WILES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March, one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Abraham Wilde Robarts, from his person.

ABRAHAM WILDE ROBARTS , Esq. I was passing through the Strand about half-past eleven o'clock yesterday morning—I had occasion to use my handkerchief, and I then put it into my great-coat pocket—almost immediately

after the prisoner brushed by me very sharply—I put my hand to my pocket and missed my handkerchief—the prisoner crossed the street and I ran after him, and never lost sight of him—he got some distance from me and I called out "Stop that boy"—a postman who was turning a street stopped him—when I came up the postman had got my handkerchief in his hand—this is it—(looking at it)—it has my mark on it.

THOMAS BAILY . I am a letter carrier. I heard a cry from Mr. Robarts yesterday morning, and I turned and saw the prisoner running towards me—I stopped him—he begged me to let him go, and partly pulled this handkerchief out of his bosom and tried to throw it down—I took it and kept it till Mr. Robarts came up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Ten Years.—Penitentiary.

Reference Number: t18400302-923

923. JOHN STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February, one handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Allen, from his person.

THOMAS ALLEN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Lower-street, Islington. On the 9th of February I was going over Blackfriars-bridge, from the City, and just as I got towards the Surrey side I felt a jerk, and my pocket was lightened—I felt and missed my handkerchief—before I could turn, a lad came across the road and asked me if I had not lost a handkerchief—I said I had—he told me he had seen the thief take the handkerchief from my pocket—I turned back and the prisoner was pointed out to me—I collared him—a person ran and told the policeman—the prisoner threw the handkerchief over the bridge, but it was found—this is it, it is mine—(examining it.)

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me? A. I saw you after I turned round—I cannot say I saw you take it—I was told you took it.

THOMAS BARNES (City police-constable No. 96.) On the 9th of February I was on duty, and a person named Griffiths came and told me something—I came and took the prisoner, and as he was crossing the road, he threw the handkerchief over the bridge—I called to a waterman to pick it up, and bring it to me—this is it—(producing it.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from taking a walk—I saw three little boys—they looked very hard at me, and one of them threw down a handkerchief—a young man said to me, "There is a handkerchief—I took it up—he said, "You are not going to have it"—I said I had as much right to it as he had, and I would heave it away, and I threw it over—I had an opportunity of running away if I had thought proper—I am not guilty of the charge—the lad Griffiths, who was against me, there is no doubt that he committed the robbery—he was afraid of coming forward, as he thought he should be accused of it.

GUILTY .† Aged 20.— Transported for Ten Years.

Sixth Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18400302-924

924. SIPPER ALI was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March, 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 10s.; 1 key, value 2s.; and 1 ring, value 2s.; the goods of William Cracroft.

(The prisoner, being a foreigner, had the evidence communicated to him by an interpreter.)

WILLIAM CRACROFT , Esq. I live in Norfolk-street. I was in a judicial situation in India under the East India Company, from which I have retired—I met the prisoner in the street about two months ago—he applied to me as being in great distress, I let him follow me home, I sent him into

my kitchen, and gave him some refreshment—he called on me on Sunday last—I then had my watch and seal and chain safe—I gave him half-a-crown—I went up stairs to wash my hands, and he went away—I missed these articles the next morning, and sent my servant to see for the prisoner—soon after, the prisoner called on me, and said he had taken these things by mistake, and he had left them at a shop where they would not return them to him—I went to the shop, and saw the property—the prisoner came to me again in the evening, and was taken—this is my property—(locking at it.)

LOUIS KYEZOR . I am a clock and watch manufacturer, and live in Tottenham Court-road. Last Monday evening the prisoner came to me and said, "Mr. Kyezor, I want to sell this," handing me this gold chain and seal and key—I have known him three years—I said, "Where did you get this?"—he said he had brought them from Bombay with him—he said he wanted 7l. for them—I said, "Have you not a watch?"—he said, "No, I sold that five years ago, and the chain has been in pawn several times, and I have taken it out to-day"—he said they had lent him 5l. on it—I was going to weigh it, and he said it weighed two ounces and a half, which I found it did—I said, "The pawnbroker has given you the full value for it"—he said, "If I pawn it again, will you give me to-morrow 1l. on the ticket?"—I said, "No"—he came to me the next day, and said he would take 5l. for it—I said I would go to the pawnbroker with him, and if they would now lend him 5l. on it I would buy it—he then hesitated, and I said to him, "Now, I am convinced you stole it, and if you don't tell me the truth, I will give you in charge"—he then said, "I will tell you the truth, it belongs to Judge Cracroft"—I said if he did not go and fetch him I would give him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not give them to the shopkeeper—I took them to him to know if they were gold—does the prosecutor think I took them to steal, or by mistake?

GUILTY. Aged 28.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. — Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-925

925. THOMAS WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December, 24 files, value 1l. 1s.; the goods of John Morant Hervey, his master: and ANN COOK , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM REEVE . I am a mill-wright, and live in Craven-street, City-road—I am foreman to Mr. John Morant Hervey—he is an iron-founder and smith, and lives in Brick-lane, St. Luke's. The prisoner Watson has been in his employ about three years—we have a great number of files, which pass through my hands to examine them and see if they are correct—I have lately missed a great number of them—the room in which Watson worked joined to the office in which the files are kept, and he had access to them if he thought proper—on the 20th of February the policeman came with Kellett, and Watson, whom I had seen there not three minutes before, made his escape out of the premises over a wall, and through some adjoining premises—I then went to a shop kept by Cowan, in Goswell-street, within five minutes' walk of the prosecutor's—Cowan calls himself a general dealer—he deals in files and all sorts of things—I found eighty-two files there—I looked at them, and these two I can identify—I know they

are my master's, and I believe the whole of them are his, and in addition to these eighty-two, Bee produced three more files which I believe to be my master's—I cannot tell which of these the prisoner stole on the 20th of December—I knew the female prisoner by her bringing Watson's dinner every day in a basket.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. They passed as man and wife, did they not? A. I believe they did.

Cross-examined by MR. THOMPSON. Q. What is there particular in these two files? A. One has been broken, and the point has been drawn up in a clumsy way—these have not been worked with since they have been re-cut—this one was used previous to being re-cut—it is not the habit of workmen to break off the end of a file—the tongue of this file has been broken off since it was re-cut—we never sell any files.

SOLOMON COWAN . I live in Goswell-street, St. Luke's. I remember the prisoner Watson coming to my house—I had some files exposed for sale at my door, and he came and said, "Are you in the habit of buying files?"—I said, "Yes, sometimes"—he said he was a file-cutter, and he was in the habit of having a great many at times—I said I would buy them if they suited me—about two days after, on the 3rd of December, he came, and brought two dozen of files with him—he asked 15s. a dozen for them—I said I could not give that, as they were re-cut; I could not give more than 10s. a dozen and I gave him 1l. for the two dozen—he gave me the name of "Cook, No. 12, Memel-street, St. Luke's"—I have no doubt the files now produced are part of what he brought—some time afterwards the female prisoner came, and brought two dozen of files of the same sort—she stated she came from her husband, and asked me to buy them, and I bought the two dozen of her for 18s.—I think that was about a fortnight after I had bought these of the male prisoner—she afterwards came again, and I bought two dozen more of her—she came again, and said she had some more, but I said I was full, and did not buy any more of her—I put them on the shelf, and on the 20th of February I was applied to—I gave up the files I received of the prisoners to the prosecutor and the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. THOMPSON. Q. When were these identical files sold? A. I cannot tell—I bought once of the man, and twice of the woman—I cannot identify any of them—it is probable some of the files now before me were sold on the 3rd of December.

JULIA COWAN . I am sister to Solomon Cowan. I remember the female prisoner coming with two dozen of files to my brother's—I paid her 18s. for them in my brother's presence—I had seen the male prisoner there about a fortnight before the woman came—he brought two dozen.

THOMAS KELLETT . I live in Noble-street, and work for Mr. John Morant Hervey, in file-cutting. In consequence of information, I went to Mr. Cowan's on the 19th of February, as I had lost some files—I found some that had my master's private mark on them—I picked out six or seven—I then got a policeman, and told him to take care of them—these are them—I have not the least doubt that they are my master's files—they were old ones, and cut at my place—I afterwards went to the prisoner's house—I saw the female prisoner there, and three files were on the table, which the policeman took possession of—I knew they were Mr. Hervey's.

Cross-examined by MR. THOMPSON. Q. How do you know that these files were taken from you? A. I was two dozen files short, and I sent

two dozen out of my own cupboard to make up Mr. Hervey's, and these are some of them.

DAVID PEARSON . I work for Mr. Hervey. I saw the policeman come into the yard, and Watson said, "For God's sake, where shall I hide? It is on a warrant;" he then got away over the wall.

WATSON— GUILTY . Aged 40.— Transported for Ten Years.

COOK— NOT GUILTY .

(There were two other indictments against Watson.)

Reference Number: t18400302-926

926. ANN COOK was again indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January, 24 files, value 1l. 7s., the goods of John Morant Hervey.

M. DOANE offered no evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Saturday, March 7th, 1840.

Sixth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18400302-927

927. JAMES DODDS was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously assaulting, cutting, and wounding George Martin in and upon the left side of his head and the left arm, on the 26th of February, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, with intent feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder him.—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to maim, disfigure, and disable him.—3rd COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

GEORGE MARTIN . I am a coffee-house keeper, living in Church-street, Shoreditch. The prisoner lodged with me for about eighteen months—he came home to my house on Tuesday, the 25th of February—I served him with his tea about four o'clock—I went to bed about eleven o'clock that night, and my wife came shortly afterwards—I am not in the habit of locking my room door, and did not lock it that night—I never lock it, on account of my son coming in in the morning to get the key to open the place—at a quarter before three o'clock on the Wednesday morning the prisoner came to my door, and awoke me by opening the door—he came in with a lighted candle in his left hand—as soon as he got in he closed the door, and rose his hand to me with a blow with a hammer which he had in his hand—before I could get time to speak to him, he struck the blow, which catched me on my head—I held up my hand to save my head—if it had not been for my hand, no doubt it would have caused my death instantly.

Q. Had you had any quarrel? A. Never had a word with him in my life—in striking the blow the candle went out, and I scuffled in my own defence, and in the scuffle we lost hold of each other—he then commenced beating my wife in bed with the hammer-handle—the top of the hammer had come off then.

Q. Was he in his right senses? A. I never knew any thing to the contrary, not the least symptom of it whatever—he struck my left arm—while he was in the attitude of striking my wife, I was feeling about for him I got hold of the hammer-handle, and struck him on the nose in my own defence—he then immediately seized the candlestick, and began to beat my wife, pulled the clothes all to pieces, and the child fell on the floor—my wife said, "Who is ill-using us in this manner?"—I said "Dodds"—he used some words, and immediately made his escape to the door, and ran down stairs—as soon as I could, I made to the window, threw it up, and sung out, "Murder," and then I fell down

insensible, and was found insensible—I had some money in this room—we had three or four clubs in the house, and the money was in this room—the prisoner knew it well, as I wanted him to be secretary to these clubs—there was nearly 8l. altogether—I am quite positive it was the prisoner who did it—I was not alarmed in the first instance, because I expected my son, and I thought it was him—I happened to lay with my face towards the door, or nothing could have saved my life—I had sold a clock that Tuesday evening, end got 3l. for it—the prisoner knew I had sold it, but did not see the money paid—he was in the kitchen at the time the gentleman came in.

MARY MARTIN . I am the wife of George Martin. I retired to bed about twelve o'clock that evening—I was awoke early the following morning by the cries of my husband, crying out, "O Lord, I am murdered"—then the prisoner commenced beating me, with something that I could not see, but I supposed a hammer-handle and the brass candlestick, he tore me out of bed by my right arm, which I cannot use now—I screamed out, "Who is this?" and my husband said, "Dodds"—the moment the prisoner heard the name he opened the door, and ran through the club-room, as if his feet did not touch the ground, and flew down the stairs, and out of the street door—I screamed out for my son and the other lodgers—he called for Dodds, and I said it was Dodds as did it—I saw my husband's head, which had had a violent blow, and his arm also—I put up my hand to cover my head, and my hands and arms were covered with blows and bruises, and black.

THOMAS MARTIN . I am the son of the prosecutor. I was at home on this evening of the 25th of February—I saw the prisoner go to bed about half-past nine o'clock—I saw him take some lucifer-matches off the mantel-shelf that night, which I had never observed before—about three o'clock I was awoke by a noise down stairs—I could not tell what it was—I laid about five minutes, and then my mother came out of the club-room door, and called out to us—the other lodger was calling Dodds, and I said he was not there—my mother was calling out it was Dodds as did it.

BENJAMIN BRIGHT (police-constable K 324.) I was on duty on that occasion—about five minutes past three o'clock I was going past Mr. Martin's door, and saw three or four people—a brother officer came out, and said he was going for a doctor—I went into Mr. Martin's room—he was bleeding greatly on the left side of his head—he seemed quite stupid—I found the handle of the hammer by the side of the bed, and a slipper—a short time after I called in again to see how Mr. Martin was, and received this hammer-head from him—(producing it.)

THOMAS FOSTER (police-constable N 202.) I was on duty in the Kingsland-road, and met the prisoner, about a quarter-past three o'clock, on Wednesday morning, the 26th of February—I saw him start out of a door-way—he had neither stockings, nor hat, nor shoes on—I asked what he was doing there—he made answer, that he wanted to go to Smithfield—I asked him what he did for a living—he said, "Ballad-singing"—I asked him where his hat, and shoes, and stockings were—he said he had not any, he was destitute, and he wanted the Refuge for the Destitute—with that I told him I would find him a lodging, and took him to the station-house—on searching him, I found two keys, resembling skeleton keys, on him—I afterwards went to a cupboard in Mr. Martin's house, and there found another key resembling the first two.

BERNARD KIERMAN . I lodge at the prosecutor's. I was awoke a little after three o'clock, by the cry of "Murder"—I called out, "Dodds"—he was not in the room—he slept in the same room as me, and in the next bed—I called "Dodds" again, and then Thomas Martin said he was down stairs—I went down, and saw Mrs. Martin, calling, "Murder."

Prisoner's Defence. Thomas Martin says I took some lucifer-matches the previous night—there was nothing uncommon in that—I have often done so—I always have my own candle—I am not aware that I did strike the prosecutor.

GEORGE MARTIN re-examined. This slipper is the prisoner's—I found the head of the hammer in my room, and the officer found the handle—this hammer was in my bar the night before, and he must have gone down two pair of stairs to get it, and come through the club-room to get to my room.

GUILTY on the 1st Count. Aged 27.— DEATH .

Reference Number: t18400302-928

928. ELIZA STONER and JAMES LEONARD were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, at St. Marylebone, 1 writing-desk, value 10s.; 1 card-case, value 6d.; 5 seals, value 13s.; 1 necklace, value 3l.; 2 pencil-cases, value 5s.; 1 knife, value 7s.; 2 books, value 4s.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-sovereign, and 10 shillings; the goods of Madeline Gordon, in the dwelling-house of George Rust.

MADELINE GORDON . I am lady's-maid in the dwelling-house of Mr. George Rust, of Portman-square, in the parish of St. Marylebone. I had this desk and other things, which I saw safe at nine o'clock in the morning of the 22nd of February, on a table in the housekeeper's room—I missed them at ten o'clock—the desk was produced at the station-house the following Monday, the 24th—I have no doubt about this being my desk—the card-case, and seals, and other things, were in it when I lost it, but they have not been found—only the desk and a few papers are found.

MARY LUCAS . I am the wife of William Lucas, a tailor, in Monmouth-street, St. Giles's. I bought this desk of the prisoner Stoner, on Saturday evening, the 22nd of February, and gave 3s. for it—there was nothing in it.

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX (police-constable E 49.) In consequence of information, I made search after the female prisoner, but not on account of this charge—I followed her to a place called Rat's-castle, in St. Giles's—I asked her what she had done with the desk—she said she had sold it to Mrs. Lucas—I went there, and found it—she gave it up to me—it had been broken open, as it is now—I took the prisoner Stoner into custody, and made search after Leonard—I found him at another house, and in a hat-box, which he owned as his, I found this card-case, pen-wiper, and pen—he said they did not belong to him—this was on Saturday, the 22nd—they were owned by Mr. Rust's servant.

Leonard. You took me on the following Friday? Witness. I believe it was so—it was on the 24th 1 apprehended Stoner.

WILLIAM HEMP . I am a Sheriff's officer. Portman-square is in the parish of Marylebone.

Stoner's Defence. I was going down George-street at a quarter-past eight o'clock on Saturday evening, and met a strange man, who asked me to sell the desk for him, if I could I should have half-a-crown—I went and offered it, and the person did not want it—I shook the desk, and shook the pen out, with a piece of paper, and a pen-wiper—I put them into Leonard's hat-box, and then took it to Mrs. Lucas, and she gave me 3s. for it.

Leonard's Defence. I know nothing about the things being in my box—I had not been home till three or four o'clock—when I was at the watch-house he brought these things against me.

STONER— GUILTY.* Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

LEONARD— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-929

929. JOHN COWDEROY was indicted for forging an order for the payment of money, as follows:—"Jany. 18, 1840. Three days after the ship Ludlow has sailed from Portsmouth, pay to James Young, or bearer, the sum of 10l., provided the said James Young has sailed in the above vessel; being part of his wages in advance on an intended voyage to Mauritius; as per agreement with your obedient servant, THOMAS WILLIAMS. Payable at Mr. T. Waddell's, 1, Lime-street:" with intent to defraud William James Cambers.—2nd COUNT, for uttering a like forged order, with a like intent.—3rd and 4th COUNT, like 1st and 2nd, only stating it to be with intent to defraud James Waddell.

MR. ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM JAMES CAMBERS . I am a corn-chandler, living in Ratcliff-highway. I have known the prisoner two months—he was in the habit of dealing at my shop—at the latter end of last January I had an account against him of 3l. 9s. 9d.—on the evening of the 25th of January the prisoner came about nine o'clock—he asked me to cash this note for him—he asked for his account—I told him the amount—he said, "I can't pay you unless you cash this note for me"—(producing one)—I said I would not do it, for I had two of his notes by me at the time—I made inquiries of him whether it was a good one—he told me it was—I asked if he knew this man James Young—he said, "Yes, perfectly well"—he said, "Do you think I should put my hand to a note if it was not a good one?"—he said he knew Young very well, that he was a ship carpenter, and he had taken the note of the ship carpenter's wife—I then discounted it for him, and deducted the amount of my own bill—I was to have 1s. 6d. in the pound for discounting it, and he promised if he had the money to bring it on the following Thursday, and take the note back and pay the discount, which was 15s.—I gave him 5l. 15s. 6d.—on the following Tuesday, in consequence of something, I went to No. 1, Lime-street, and inquired for Mr. Waddell—I did not find him, he did not live there—I afterwards went to Mr. Graham's—he is the owner of the Ludlow—I afterwards saw the prisoner—I sent over for him to my house, and told him it was a forgery—he said, "How do you know it is a forgery?"—I told him I had seen the ship owner—he said he must see about it, he must get some money and let me have.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. If he had got the money you would have taken it of him? A. Yes, but he did not give it me—I had two notes of his by me—they are paid—I have only had three other dealings with him before—I have been there two years—he was there before I came—the bill was for 10l.—he owed me 3l. 9s. 9d.—I charged him 15s. for discount, that made 4l. 4s. 9d., and there was 5l. 15s. 6d. left—he has seamen lodging with him—he put his name on the back of this bill, and on the others too—I would not have taken either of them without his name being on the back of them—I know nothing about Young, or Williams or Waddle—about a month after I found it was a forgery I went before the Magistrate.

COURT. Q. How was it you waited so long? A. I was very busy in the seed-market.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not see him almost every day? A. No, about twice a week—I then went before the Magistrate—I got a summons, and served it on him—he went before the Magistrate on a summons, and then the Magistrate admitted him to bail—I lived about a hundred yards from him—I am not partner with my brother—he is my shopman—he does not share the profits of the business.

MR. ESPINASSE. Q. What is the prisoner? A. They call him a crimp—he is a man that supplies ships with sailors—he is a cab-master, and has two cabs and four horses—I took this note on his representation.

ROBERT CAMBERS . I am brother of the last witness, and am in his employment. The prisoner came into my brother's shop on the 25th of January to settle his account—I saw this note produced—he said he had taken it of the ship carpenter's wife—my brother had before asked him if it was a good one, and whether he knew the parties—he said he knew the parties very well, he knew it was a good note, and he had taken it of the carpenter's wife—he said it was a ship-carpenter of the name of Young—I saw my brother discount the note for him—he gave him 5l. 15s.—about the first week in February the prisoner called at my brother's shop again—I saw him—he said he had been looking over the list of the shipping, and could not see the name, but that the ship had gone out, but he knew it was all right, as he had seen the ship-carpenter's wife, and she had had a letter from her husband.

Cross-examined. Q. You live just by the prisoner, do you not? A. Yes—I am sure that at the first interview he said he had it from the shipcarpenter's wife—I am quite sure he said so, when he brought the bill—he came to me about three days before, and said he had taken a 10l. note of a ship's carpenter—I saw him four or five times after the bill was found to be a forgery—he called on the Thursday and on the Saturday—he had corn after he brought the note—he had corn on credit up to the time he went before the Magistrate.

JOHN GRAHAM . I am a merchant, living in St. Thomas's-square, Hackney. I am part owner of the ship Ludlow—she left the river about the 20th of last January, and left Portsmouth for Marseilles and the Mauritius on the 17th of February—there was a carpenter on board of the name of Crudsden—the captain's name was Brunton—I never had a captain named Williams commanding the Ludlow—we had not a person named James Young on board this voyage—I do not believe that there is another ship called the Ludlow.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you a carpenter of the name of Young? A. No, not at any time on board the Ludlow—I do not ship the hands—I pay them myself—here is the advance note to the carpenter of the Ludlow, this is a different name and all.

MR. ESPINASSE. Q. Look at this document, is it a genuine one? A. I cannot tell, it is not as far as I am concerned.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Will you swear that there is no other ship Ludlow? A. Yes, from Lloyd's register.

JAMES WADDELL . I carry on the business of a ship-broker. I had an office in Lime-street previous to January last—I do not know a Captain Williams—I know the ship Ludlow—there is no other ship Ludlow of the port of London that I am aware of—I do not know this note—I gave no

authority to any one to address it to me—I had nothing to do with the ship Ludlow belonging to Mr. Graham.

Cross-examined. Q. Does not that look like a genuine instrument? A. It is in the usual form, it is quite like a regular instrument—I left Lime-street in November.

MR. ESPINASSE. Q. Were you in November, before you left Lime-street, concerned for the ship Ludlow? A. No.

MR. PRENDERGAST called

DANIEL LANE . I am a labourer. I know the prisoner, he is what they call a crimp—he keeps a lodging-house for sailors—I remember a person named Young lodging there—he lodged there the last time about three weeks—he was a ship-carpenter, and I understood him to be going on board the Ludlow—he told me that from his own mouth—I know Mrs. Schwepster—the prisoner manages the house for her principally—I know this advance-note well—(looking at it)—I saw this note delivered to Mrs. Schwepster by James Young, who was, according to his own representation, a ship-carpenter—the last time I saw him there was about three weeks before he went way, but I had been laid up for two months—I had not been there longer—I went before the Magistrate to give evidence, about five weeks after I had seen Young give the note to Mrs. Schwepster personally—I know it is the same note, because I read it—I happened to go in there at the time he was paying Mrs. Schwepster—he brought in the note, and said he was shipped on hoard the Ludlow, and gave her this note—I read it, and asked him if he was going in it, and he told me he was—I do not know what he paid—there might be money pass after I went out of the room—I heard about Young buying some tools, but he did not say any thing to me about them.

M. ESPINASSE. Q. When were you last employed as a labourer? A. I have not been able to do any thing for some time—I work in any employ I can get—I was last employed by the prisoner to see men on board ships with their things—that was in September last—I have had nothing to do since, I have been laid up almost all the time—the first time I saw Young must be near upon two years ago—I do not know whether he had a wife—he was a foreigner—he might have a wife in a foreign country—I never saw any wife there.

ELIZABETH SCHWEPSTER . I keep a lodging house—the concern is mine, and the prisoner manages matters there—he keeps the men in order, and gets them ships, but the lodging-house is mine—I remember having a person of the name of Young in my house—he lodged there the last time somewhere about four or five weeks—he was a carpenter—I know that by his doing trifling things for me—he had clothes and tools bought for him for the voyage—I know this advance-note—I received it from James Young—I had it in my possession three days, and then gave it to Cowderoy.

MR. ESPINASSE. Q. What are you? A. A lodging-house keeper—I do not live with the prisoner—I keep the house and he lives in it—I never saw any one in particular as Young's wife—there were several women came after him—they all call themselves wives when they come there.

---- UPSALL. I am a pawnbroker. About five or six weeks ago, a man, whose name I do not know, came with the prisoner to my house, and looked at some tools—he said they would not suit him, and went away.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY of Uttering the Order, knowing it to be forged. Aged Confined Two Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-930

930. JOHN HAYES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Daniel Bryant, on the 27th of December, and wounding him on the right cheek, with intent to maim, disfigure, and disable him.—2nd COUNT, stating his intention to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

DANIEL BRYANT . I lived in Jane Shore-court, Shoreditch, for some time, but on the 27th of December I lived in George-street, Spitalfields—I cannot say when I left Jane Shore-court, but I lived in George-street at the time of this accident happening. On the 26th of December, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was going from Mike Collins's room in George-street, where the prisoner lived, to my own house—I had got to the foot of the stairs and was groping for the latch, to go out, when the prisoner came out of his own room, and said, "Who is this?"—I said, "A friend"—"What makes you here," says he, "so late?"—I said, "I have been up to Mike Collins's room here"—he said, "Very well, I will open the door for you"—"Thank you," says I, "I am much obliged to you"—after I got into the street he said, "If I catch you here so late any more, you will get something for it"—I turned and said, "You may catch me here later or earlier, but no harm"—"Very well," says he, "I must know more about you"—so he ran out in the street after me—"You have no occasion," says I, "to come out"—I turned back—he went to Mike Collins's room and called, and he made him an answer—he said, "What man is this I caught in your passage?"—Collins said, "No man, but one going home to his lodgings"—"Yes, Mike" says I, "I am here"—with that the prisoner up with his left hand and took my collar—I, with my right hand, took his collar—I said, "What do you mean to do, what do you collar me for?"—with that he up with his hand with a knife in it, and made a rush with the knife at my belly—it missed me—he said, "You wretch," or, "you vagabond, I will run this through your guts"—I took my hand out of his collar, and took hold of the knife, which was open—I called out to Collins, who was in bed, that he had got a knife and was going to murder me with it—so he got up and laid hold of Hayes, and said, "Jack Hayes, that is my cousin; don't strike him in my house, if you do I'll strike you"—I put myself away from him, and was going away, and he got the opportunity of striking me with the knife in the cheek—it went through on the right side, and the teeth on the other side stopped it—he dropped the knife then—Mike Collins's wife was after lighting the candle, and she seeing him drop the knife, said, "Jack Hayes, it is too late to drop the knife, now you have struck the man," and out Collins's wife went to fetch the policeman, and I kept the knife till the policeman came—the blow injured me—I have been ill a long time, and could do nothing for myself afterwards—I consider in my own mind the man must have made a mistake—I am informed since that he has got a drunken wife, and that might be the cause of his making a mistake in me, for they behaved very kind to me afterwards—they gave me some money during the time that I was ill—it was God's will that I got over it, and I would not like to hurt the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You think, because he had a drunken wife, he might have mistaken you for somebody else? A. Yes, exactly—I consider it was a mistake—I think be made a mistake, because never seeing me before he could owe me no sort of hatred, nor I to him—MRS. Collins is not here—the clerk at Lambeth-street objected to having her go on there—I told him she was present—I am particular

about an oath—I would not swear any thing that was not right, so far as I am in my sober senses.

Q. Tell us where you were living on the first day of the examination in Lambeth-street? A. I had got no settled place to live in—I only pay for my lodging where I get it cheapest—I lodged the night before in the station-house.

Q. Did you say you lived in Jane Shore-court? A. I do not know when I lived there—I do not know the name of any months, unless I heard another man say it—I do not know the name of the first month in the year, nor the last, nor what month New Year's-day is in—I do not know what month Christmas-day is in—I know Sunday is the day they go to mass—I do not think it is in the middle of the week—I do not know how old I am—I believe I am thirty-five—I had been in England about four months before this accident happened—I do not know what month St. Patrick's day is in—I hear there are twelve months in the year, but I do not know.

Q. When you had the prisoner first up, did you not charge him with an assault, and was he not fined 5l., or to go to gaol for two months? A. I do not know what he was fined, or whether he was fined or not—I heard he was fined—I cannot tell how long it was from the day I made the charge till the prisoner was sent to gaol—I got 23s. 6d. from the prisoner's wife, and they provided lodging for me for nine or ten days—they acted as kind to me as they could—I caught hold of his collar when he caught hold of me—there was no struggling together—I had never been in the prisoner's room—I knew Collins sixteen years ago in Ireland.

COURT. Q. Are you sure that the prisoner struck the knife through your cheek, in the way you have described? A. Yes, my Lord.

MICHAEL COLLINS . I am a labourer. I live in New-court, George-yard, Whitechapel—the prisoner lived in the same house—we have got no landlord—we pay no rent to any body—I remember, one night in December, hearing a cry out, it was between twelve and one o'clock in the night—Bryant had been visiting me that day—Hayes called out to me, "What man is this in my passage?"—I said my friend was going home to his lodging, and then they both came into my room—there was a good fire, but no candle—they were talking to one another, and then Bryant hallooed out to me, and I told Hayes to let that man alone, he was no harm to him—then directly Bryant hallooed out to me that he was going to murder him with a knife, I jumped out of bed, and caught hold of Hayes by the collar—I said, "Don't hit my cousin, else I will hit you"—before I had the word out of my mouth my mistress lighted the candle, and the prisoner up with his hand, and stabbed Bryant on the right cheek, and the blood flowed on my shoulder, just the same as you would let a water-cock go—the prisoner dropped the knife, my wife took it up, and said, "It is too late to drop it now"—I opened my door, and sent for the policeman—Bryan's cheek was cut right through.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you say it was a friend of yours who had come to see you? A. Yes, I am sure of that—Bryant is a first cousin of mine—I saw him in London about a month or two after Michaelmas—the first month of the year is New Year's-day, and I suppose the last month is Christmas-day—I know the last month of the year, but I do not know the name of it—I came to this country to get my living, the same as others—I have been here twenty-five years—I was never accused of any thing in my country—I have been accused in England.

Q. What was the first thing you were accused of? A. That I cannot tell—I was not taken up for any thing—I was accused of breaking into a house and taking the things out, but they did not find it—I was at the Old Bailey for that, but they did not follow it up—they sent me to this jail and I was here till the Sessions came on—I do not know how long it was—I was in jail above a week—it is twelve months ago or so—I was not tried, they did not follow me—I have not tried to get any money from the prisoner's friends, nor asked for any.

Q. Did you send word to the prisoner's wife that you would not appear if they gave you a 1l.? A. No; she sent a woman to me, but I do not know her name—I do not know Hannah Sullivan—I may know Ellen Harley, but I do not know that I do—I was at the Magistrate's office on the second examination—Bryant then lived in George-street—the prisoner was fined 5l. the assault, or to go to jail for two months if he could not pay it.

ALLEN PIPE (police-constable H 51.) I was on duty on the morning of the 27th of December—I was called to No. 16, New-court, George-street—I found Byrant on the first-floor front room, he was bleeding from a wound in the cheek—it was a wound about an inch and three-quarters long, quite through the cheek, and there was a great deal of blood on the floor—I went to the bottom room after Hayes, but I did not find him—I received this knife (producing it) which was quite wet with blood—I took Byrant to the London Hospital, and in about two hours and a half I took the prisoner—MR. Norton fined him 5s., or two months' imprisonment, but he afterwards recalled it, and said it was a more serious case, and he sent him here.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you interfered Before Mr. Norton changed his mind? A. Yes, sir—the prisoner was committed on the 8th of February—I was present when Byrant was examined—on the 28th of December, he gave some place of residence, but I do not recollect it—it was after he and Collins were examined that Mr. Norton fined the prisoner 5l.—MRS. Collins was examined, but she is not here.

GUILTY of a Common Assault. Aged 44.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-931

931. RICHARD THOMPSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Christian Hinrich Fruchtnicht, on the 11th of February, at St. Anne, and stealing therein one scarf, value 1s. 6d.; four petticoats, value 1s.; five frocks, value 3s.; and six pairs of stockings, value 2s., his property.

MARGARET FRUCHTNICHT . I am the daughter of Christian Hinrich Fruchtnicht—he lives in Catherine-street, Limehouse. I was returning home about eight o'clock at night, on the 11th of February-just before I got home I saw three boys standing at the corner—I heard one of them say, "Don't be a fool;" and then the prisoner, who was one of them, and had a flannel jacket on, went to our window, and I saw his hand on the window-frame—I went in and told my mother, and when we came out they were gone—I am sure that the prisoner is the person who had his hand on the window-frame—I watched him five or ten minutes, and that enables me to speak to his face.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How far were you from your father's shop when you heard one say, "Don't be a fool? A. They were standing at the opposite corner, and I was passing by—I watched them about five or ten minutes before I saw the one with the flannel

jacket at the window, he crossed over to go to the window, and the other two stood at the other corner—I then went in—I saw the one with a flannel jacket again a short time after—I did not see what he was doing at the window, but I saw his hand on the frame—I had never seen him before—I went before the Magistrate the next day, and the prisoner was remanded—it was nearly a fortnight after that I was sworn—I am quite sure I am not mistaken as to the prisoner's person—it was about eight o'clock at night, and was dark.

ELIZABETH FRUCHTNICHT . I am the wife of Christian Hinrich Fruchtnicht—he lives at No. 2, Catherine-street, in the parish of St. Anne, it is our dwelling-house. On the night of the 11th of February, my little girl told me something and I went out into the street—I saw no one, but I saw that some of the things had been taken from the shop window, and that the whole of the pane of glass had been taken out—the window was all in confusion—I had seen the scarf and the other articles mentioned safe about a quarter of an hour before, and the window was then safe—I sent a person round the corner and she came running back and fetched me—I went out and went round to a cart, which was round the corner in James's-street, two doors from our house—I found in the cart this scarf, these four petticoats, five frocks, and six pairs of stockings—(examining them)—they are all new, and are the property of my husband, they had been safe in the shop a quarter of an hour before the child came in—when I was in the street I saw the prisoner pass the turning, and Mr. Baker, who was with me, went up to him and said, "Is it you who can't keep your hands to yourself?"—the prisoner said, "I have not been doing any thing to-night"—MR. Baker brought him to the shop and sent for a policeman—while the prisoner was in the shop he leaned up against the counter, and the next morning when I was patting the shop to rights I found this knife (looking at it) under the gowns on the counter where he had leaned—the knife does not belong to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Had your window been broken before? A. Yes, a small piece out, and there was some paper behind it which was cut through with the knife—I had not been in my shop all the afternoon, but I served a gentleman with something not a quarter of an hour before—I was not in the shop during the remainder of the quarter of an hour—I did not see the prisoner till I saw him pass the end of the turning—he was not with the cart at that time—the cart was round the turning in a byplace.

MARY ANN GOLDSMITH . I was in the prosecutor's shop when the little girl came in—I ran into the street, and saw the window was out—MRS. Fruchtnicht told me to go round the corner, which I did, and saw the prisoner, who had a flannel jacket on, in the act of putting things into the cart—I swear he is the person—I have no doubt of him—I walked up to him, and passed him, and looked in his face that I might know him again, but I could not take him, being by myself—he ran away from the cart, and I went after him—he did not see me when he put the things into the cart, but he did when he came from the cart—I afterwards took the things out of the cart, and gave them to Mrs. Fruchtnicht—they were her property—I had seen them before—I told what I had seen, and Mr. Baker went with us, and while we were in the public-house I heard a whistle—we came out, and saw the prisoner pass, and he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he run? A. Yes, he ran past the top of the

street—when he first came from the cart he ran, or walked sharply—when he was putting the things into the cart he was on the shafts or on the wheel, he was not in the cart—he did not see me then—he got down, and went towards the public-house at the corner of the street—I went after him, got past him, and looked at him—I had never seen him before—the paper in the window was hanging to the frame.

ROBERT EDWARDS (police-constable K 311.) I took the prisoner, and produce the property and this knife.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you told him what you took him for? A. Yes—he said, "Very well," he would go with me—in going along he said he knew nothing about it.

GUILTY.* Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-932

932. JOHN BROWN and WILLIAM STANLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February, 1 purse, value 2s. 6d.; 2 sovereigns, 1 half-crown, 7 shillings, and 7 sixpences; the property of John Benjamin Nevill, from the person of Jane Sarah Nevill.

MR. CHAMBERS conducted the Prosecution.

JAKE SARAH NEVILL . I am the wife of John Benjamin Nevill. On the 24th of February I got into a Holloway omnibus at Moorgate-street—about two minutes before I got in I took my purse out of my pocket to take out a sixpence to pay my fare—I put the sixpence into my glove, and put the purse into my pocket again on my right side—I had done that openly in the street, so that any one might see that I had a purse—when I got into the omnibus I saw the prisoner Brown sitting near the door on the left-hand side—I was wishing to sit between him and the door, but he put his knees towards the door, and that occasioned me to sit on the other side, about three from the door—that brought me to sit next the prisoner Stanley—I feel convinced it was him—he sat on my right-hand, where my pocket and money was—the omnibus started immediately, and Stanley annoyed me by looking under my bonnet very much—when we got to York-place, City-road, a lady got out who had sat between me and the door—I then moved towards the door, and Stanley followed me—when he looked under my bonnet I turned my head from him—I continued in the omnibus till we got just beyond Islington church, when Stanley got out—Brown was then sitting on the opposite side to me, and he said he would get out at the next turning, but he did not stop till he got to the turning—he said, set him down, any where would do—the omnibus did not stop much before it got to the turning—I went on beyond Highbury—I missed my purse before I got there, but I did not discover that my gown was cut till I got out—from the time I got in at Moorgate and my missing my purse, no one, except Stanley, had been sitting on that side of me near enough to get my purse—and after he left no one sat near me—a woman sat on that side, but she was quite up at the other corner—I lost between 2l. and 3l.—I cannot say to a few shillings—I know I had two sovereigns in my purse, and one was an extremely bright one, of the present reign.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You do not swear positively to Stanley? A. I did not at first—I would not, had I not seen him again—I feel confident it was him—I was before the Justice with him for some time, but having said I could not swear to him, I would not do it—Stanley sat on the right side of me, and on the right-hand side of the omnibus—

his left hand was next to my pocket—I believe I stood in the street, waiting for the omnibus, before I got in.

Cross-examined by MR. ESPINASSE. Q. Brown was sitting on the opposite side to you? A. Yes—I did not ask him to let me sit between him and the door, as I thought he had made up his mind that I should not—I did not attempt to sit down there—after some time a lady got out, who sat next to him, and he moved up higher, and got rather beyond where I was sitting—I think there were six persons in the omnibus besides myself—I do not think there was any one beyond Stanley at first, but when he got out there was a lady sitting on the same side, quite in the corner—there was a lady sitting near Brown, who got out at the Angel public-house, and I think there was a gentleman sitting on the same side—I am certain I put my purse into my pocket a minute or two before I got in—it was a bead purse, and opened with a clasp—it was a very good clasp—my purse and all was gone.

MR. CHAMBERS. Q. You think there was a gentleman sitting on the side Brown was; did he sit higher up? A. Yes, nearer to the horses—my pocket was rather behind me, so that when I turned, to avoid Stanley's observation, I suppose that brought my pocket nearer to him—Brown occasionally leaned his head forward, so that his head was between me and the gentleman who sat on the side which he did, but higher up.

JAMES CUTHBERT . I am a ward-officer. On the 24th of February I was in Bread-street, between two and three o'clock—I saw the two prisoners together—I followed them—they went on to Moorgate, still in company, and there Brown left Stanley, and got into a Holloway buss—Stanley walked on, and crossed to the opposite side of the way—the buss moved on a few paces, and then Stanley got in—I followed the buss to beyond Islington church, and there I met Brown coming back towards town, but there being a wind in the road there, I did not see him get out—I said, "I want to speak to you, young fellow"—he made some answer I did not understand—I took him into a cheesemonger's shop, and searched him—I found on him 2l. 13s., one sovereign of which was a very bright one—I found on him a knife and two keys—I took him out, and he said, "Why don't you lay hold of my arm?"—I said, there was no occasion for that—as we walked on I turned my head, and saw Stanley on the other side of the way—I said to Brown, "Why don't you walk on faster?"—he then slackened his pace, and Stanley went across Islington burial-ground—Brown said he was going to Holloway, to see his cousin—I asked him why he did not go on with his journey—he said he had changed his mind.

COURT. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoners together before? A. I cannot say that I had, but I had a slight knowledge of them.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What do you mean by their being together? A. They were walking together, and in some parts they were close together—when one stopped the other did—I did not hear them converse together—I was but a short distance from them—I am not mistaken as to Stanley being one.

Cross-examined by MR. ESPINASSE. Q. What did you find on Brown? A. 1l. 13s. in silver, a sovereign, and 2 1/2 d.

THOMAS ELSOM . I was in the Holloway omnibus when Mrs. Nevill was there—I had got in before her—I sat on the left-hand side, at the top—Brown sat at the commencement of the buss—MRS. Nevill sat on the right-hand side, next to Stanley—he gave way a little for her to come and

sit by him—her right side was towards him—shortly after the omnibus had started I observed that Stanley's hands were under the tails of his coat, and he kept looking at Mrs. Nevill under her bonnet, and occasionally looking round at me very hard—when we got to Islington a lady got out—Brown then moved higher up—he kept looking at the little window, and bobbing his head forward—Stanley got out at Cross-street, Islington, and directly after, Drown said, "Put me down at the next turning;" but before he got to Barnsbury-street he said, "Put me down, this will do"—he got out, and within two minutes Mrs. Nevill said, "That fellow has robbed me of my purse"—no one else could have done it but Stanley—no one else was near her—about the 2nd of March I happened to be in the Strand, returning from the West End of the town—there was an engine there and a mob—I saw Stanley with another person—they crossed the road, and I saw Stanley reading a bill—I said to him, "You are the man that robbed a lady in an omnibus"—he said, "I am not"—I took him by the collar, and in Tavistock-street a policeman took him—he ran off, but was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Are you quite convinced that he is the man who sat in the omnibus? A. I am certain of it—there were seven persons in the omnibus till it got to the Angel Inn, and after that six—I do not know whether there were any Friends there—there was nothing to prevent my seeing what took place till Brown put his head across—when I met Stanley in the Strand I knew him in an instant—I spoke to a policeman, but I do not know whether Stanley saw me—he and his companion then crossed, and Stanley began to read ft bill—I had not seen him before the day he was in the omnibus—I am an agent to the Royal Exchange Office, and am a neighbour of Mrs. Nevill.

WILLIAM HOLDER . I was called by Mr. Elsom to take Stanley—I did not lay hold of him, and he ran some distance, but was taken again.

BROWN— GUILTY . Aged 17.

STANLEY— GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Ten Years.

Fifth Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18400302-933

933. WILLIAM ABBOTT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Winup, on the 19th of February, at Christ Church, Middlesex, and stealing therein, 1 time-piece, value 12s.; 2 gowns, value 10s.; and 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; her goods.

SAAH WINUP . I live in Carter-street, Brick-lane, and am a laundress. I lodge in the lower rooms—the landlord does not live in the house—it is in the parish of Christ Church, Middlesex—the prisoner came to the house two or three years ago to work, and worked there a year or two, but he has not worked there the last two years, and had nothing to do with the house—on the 19th of February I was in the wash-house, which is under ground—I had left my room at twenty minutes past seven o'clock in the evening by the time-piece, which is now in Court—every thing in the room was then safe—I returned to my room about half-past eight o'clock—it was then full of smoke, and the carpet was on fire—it was smouldering through to the boards—I cannot tell whether that was done in getting a light to take these things or not—when I left my room I had locked the door, but I cannot swear that I took the key out—I am in the habit of

putting it in a secret place, which the prisoner knew, as he had lived in the house—when I came hack the key was in the door, and the door wide open—I am sure the door had been shut before, at any rate—the first thing I missed was the time-piece, and on looking further I missed two gowns which I had to wash, and two handkerchiefs—all that I have found is this time-piece and one handkerchief—this is my time-piece and handkerchief—(examining them)—the prisoner knew the way of the house.

THOMAS DURRANT . I am a pawnbroker. I produce this time-piece, which was pawned by a person answering the description of the prisoner—I could not swear it was him, but I believe him to be the man.

SARAH TIMMS . I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane. I did not know the prisoner till about a week before this happened. On the 19th of February he came into my room—he had the time-piece in his hand, and two gowns about his body—he asked a young girl who lived with me to take the time-piece to pawn—she would not, and the next morning he took it out himself—he came back, and said he had pawned it.

SAMUEL BROWN (police-constable G 88.) I took the prisoner—I found the duplicate of this time-piece up his sleeve.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-934

934. MARY M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February, 1 coat, value 3l. 10s.; 2 gowns, value 10s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 30s.; 1 bonnet, value 1l.; 1 shawl, value 2l.; 4 pinafores, value 5s.; 2 petticoats, value 4s.; 3 shifts, value 3s.; 1 night-jacket, value 2s.; frock, value 1s.; and 1 pencil-case, value 9d.; the goods of John Gibbs, her master: and ELIZABETH GRAHAM was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 shawl, 1 gown, 1 pinafore, 2 shifts, 1 petticoat, 1 frock, 1 coat, 1 pair of trowsers, and 1 pencil-case, part of the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN GIBBS . I am a rope-maker, my dwelling-house is No. 164, Old Gravel-lane, St. George's-in-the-East—the prisoner M'Carthy was in my service for a fortnight before this happened. On the 29th of February I and my wife went out about seven o'clock in the evening, leaving M'Carthy in care of the house—she was the only person—as far as we know, we left all my property secure—I returned to the house first, in about two hours, and found two of the trades-people ringing at the bell—they could not get in—I rang once at the bell—it was not answered—I went into the next house, and got over the wall—I found no one in my house, M'Carthy was gone—I went to my cash-box, and found that was safe, and I did not search any further—my wife returned afterwards, and she missed the articles stated—the next day, which was Sunday, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was with a friend, and saw M'Carthy—I told her I was very glad to see her, and I should take her into custody—she said she would confess all she had done, and if I would go to No. 31, Rose-lane, she would give me up what she had stolen, as she had not parted with any—(I had not made her any promise, or threatened her)—I said I would not—I took her to Whitechapel-church, and gave her into custody—we then went to No. 31, Rose-lane, and found various things that are here, and are part of what I lost—the value of what I lost was 10l. at least—Graham was taken afterwards—I know nothing of her, but she was with M'Carthy when I took her—she ran or walked away directly, and I had

no opportunity of saying any thing to her—Graham had my wife's shawl on, and was carrying a bundle—I saw the bundle opened when we got to the house in Rose-lane, and it contained the articles here produced—M'Carthy had my wife's bonnet on.

EDWARD SIMMONDS . I am a policeman. On Sunday afternoon, the 1st of March, the prosecutor gave me charge of M'Carthy—she said if we went to No. 31, Rose-lane, we should find the property—we went here, and found the things now produced.

GEORGE KING (police-constable H 111.) I was at the station-house when M'Carthy was brought in—I went to search the house, No. 31, Rose-lane, and there found the property here produced, with the exception of this gown and bonnet, which M'Carthy had on—I could not find Graham at that time, but I stopped at the house after the others were gone, and in a few minutes Graham came in at the back-door, and I took her—I asked where the shawl was that she had on when she was with M'Carthy—she said she did not know M'Carthy—I said she was with her when she was taken—she then said she was with her, and had borrowed M'Carthy's shawl, and lent her hers—M'Carthy was afterwards brought back to that house, and she asked Graham where the suit of clothes was that had been in the bundle—Graham denied that they had been in it.

ANN O'BRIEN . I am the wife of a policeman. I searched the prisoners—I found on M'Carthy Mr. Gibbs's wife's dress, as she owned it to be, she also owned she had given the various articles to Graham, and wished her to give them up, but she said Graham had parted with the suit of clothes—I found this pencil-case on Graham, and 5s. 5 1/4 d.

Graham's Defence. M'Carthy gave me the things on the Sunday, she had the dress and bonnet on—she said, "Lend me your shawl, and put this on"—I did so, and we went out—she said, "Carry this bundle," which I did—the prosecutor and Another gentleman saw us—I took the things back to the house, and as I was going up stairs with it the pencil-case dropped out—when the officer asked me where the shawl was, I said it was up stairs—I did not deny having it—I know no further.

M'CARTHY— GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Nine Months.

GRAHAM— GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-935

935. WILLIAM WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 1 opera-glass, value 1l., the goods of Edward Clare, from his person.

EDWARD CLARE . I am a professor of music. On the 26th of February I was in the lobby of the pit of Drury-lane theatre—I had an opera-glass in ray left hand coat-pocket—I am quite sure it was there—there were a great many persons there, but I was very late, and was behind them—there were not many people where I was—I felt something go from the pocket in which this glass was—I turned immediately to my left, and the prisoner was standing close by me—I said to him, "What have you done?"—he said something, but I cannot remember what, and at that instant the glass fell—I cannot say from whom, but it certainly did not fall from my pocket—it fell before the prisoner—the officer took it up—this is it—(looking at it)—when I spoke to the prisoner, I thought he was the person who took it.

JOHN JAMES BARNARD . I am a policeman. I was at the theatre on the 26th, the night her Majesty went there—I was in plain clothes—I saw

the prisoner in the lobby—I watched him for twenty minutes or half-an-hour—I saw him sound five different gentlemen's pockets—he worked his way in with the crowd, and I saw him go behind the prosecutor, and get close to him—the prosecutor said something to him, and I saw this glass fill from the prisoner's left hand, on to my feet—I picked it up, and my brother officer took the prisoner—I found on him two silk handkerchiefs, two pairs of gloves, two keys, five duplicates, and one counterfeit shilling, but no good money at all.

JOHN DAVIES WHITE . I am an officer. I was there in plain clothes—I saw the prisoner make several attempts at gentlemen's pockets, by lifting them up—he then went behind the prosecutor, and I saw the opera-glass in his hand—the moment the prosecutor turned, he dropped it, and I took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchiefs and gloves are my own—I was not there two minutes—I got into the crowd, and could not go backwards, nor forwards—I am not guilty of anything of the kind—I never attempted to touch any one.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-936

936. JANE WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February, 3 lbs. weight of pork, value 1s. 10d., the goods of Edward Wilson Collins.

JOHN SABINE . I am in the service of Mr. Edward Wilson Collins, a butcher, in Leather-lane. Last Saturday night, I was standing outside the shop, and a person said, "There goes a lady that has just stolen a piece of pork"—I went after the prisoner, and said, "What have you got?"—she said, "Nothing"—I took her by the arm, and took from her this piece of pork, which is my master's—she was so very drunk I do not think she knew what she did.

Prisoner. I picked it up, and walked away with it—I had had a drop to drink.

THOMAS SHADDICK (police-constable G 15.) I took the prisoner into custody.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 40.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Seven Days.

Reference Number: t18400302-937

937. SARAH CUZER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 3 pewter pots, value 3s., the goods of John Snelling; and that she had been previously convicted of felony.

JOHN SNELLING . I keep the New Red Lion public-house, in the Harrow-road. On the 26th of February, I was standing in my back-parlour—my niece called me, and said a person was taking the pots out of the passage—I went out, and saw the prisoner—she put down a pint pot before I got outside the bar—I asked her what she had been taking—she said, "Nothing"—I said, "You have something in your apron, what it it?"—she then fell on her knees, begged forgiveness, and produced these two half-pint pots, which are mine.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON (police-sergeant D 4.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office—she is the person who was tried—(read.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 57.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-938

938. JOHN BROWN and JAMES JACKSON were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, I sack, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 bushel of beans, value 7s.; the goods of Israel Alexander and another.

SAUNDERS ALEXANDER . I am the son of Israel Alexander, who is in partnership with my sister—they live in Chiswell-street—the prisoner Brown was our stable-man. On the 22nd of February Jackson came to the yard, about nine o'clock, driving a country team, and when he had got his cart about half-full of dung, I walked out, and said, "How long are you going to be?" and I saw him in the act of covering a sack in the dung-hole—it was three parts covered with dung—I turned it over, and saw "J. & H. Alexander" on it—I opened it, and saw the beans in it—Brown was at that time in the loft, and these beans must have come from the loft, as we kept them in no other place—I sent for the policeman who ook both the prisoner.

AARON ALEXANDER . I am brother of this witness—I was in the bed-room dressing at a little after nine o'clock that morning—I looked out of the window, and saw Brown call Jackson from the dung-hole and give him the sack of beans—Jackson took them to the dung-hole, and would have put them on the cart, but my brother went out to him—Brown must have brought the beans from the loft—he gave them to Jackson at the top of the yard—the sack contained about a bushel of beans.

Brown. Mr. Alexander has taken the money for the articles—he stopped it out of my wages.

SAUNDERS ALEXANDER re-examined. There was 12s. due to him—his wife came—I gave her 5s., and the Magistrate said I should keep the rest till this case was decided.

BROWN— GUILTY . Aged 55.— Confined Twelve Months.

JACKSON— GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-939

939. ANN TOPHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March, 1 table-cloth, value 3s., the goods of John Nutt Sayer.

EDWIN TURNER . I am apprentice to John Nutt Sayer, a printer, in East-street, Manchester-square. On the first of March I saw the prisoner on the second floor of the house—she was a stranger and had no business there—I followed her, and she went down the yard—soon after I went out for milk, and as I came out of the milk-shop she passed me—I looked at her and she at me—I went home, and went up to my mistress, and heard the table-cloth was missed—I ran out down Halford-mews, and saw the prisoner—I called her, and said, "If you please, will you give me that table-cloth?"—she went out of the mews, and turned the corner—a man asked me what I wanted with her—I told him, and she went up another mews—the man went and took the table-cloth from her, and I went for the policeman.

HENRY EGERTON (police-constable D 15.) I took the prisoner, and have the cloth.

JOHN NUTT SAYER . This is my table-cloth—it was on the balustrade of the second floor close by our bed-room—the street-door had been left open by a lodger who had gone out early that morning—it was about eight o'clock when the prisoner was taken.

GUILTY.*—Aged 49. Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-940

940. BENJAMIN BRIDGEFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March, 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Wilson.

THOMAS TRIGG (police-constable G 214.) I fell in with the prisoner in Turnmill-street, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, on the 2nd of

March—Bunney told me something—I took the prisoner, and found one of these pots in his hat, and one in his hand under his apron.

WILLIAM BUNNEY . I am a ladies' boot and shoemaker—I saw the prisoner take the pots off a cask in front of the prosecutor's bar—he put one in his hat and the other under his apron in the house—I followed and told the policeman.

THOMAS WILSON . I keep a public-house in St. John-street, Clerkenwell—these pots are mine—I had seen the prisoner in and out of my house.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been out of work ever since Christmas—my wife and two children had nothing to eat—I meant to sell the pots to get a loaf of bread—the officer will state how he found my place.

THOMAS TRIGG re-examined. I found about a hatfull of straw in one corner of the room, but no table, chair, or bedstead—his wife and two children appeared in very great distress.

GUILTY. Aged 38.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. — Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18400302-941

941. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February, 1 pair of shoes, value 5s., the goods of William Hayhow.

JAMES COCHIE . I am foreman to William Hayhow, a boot and shoe-maker, he has a shop in Ratcliff-highway and one in Shadwell. On the 28th of February the prisoner came to the shop in Shadwell, and asked the price of a pair of shoes for a child three years old—I said I could not tell, without I saw the size, had she brought an old shoe?—she said she had not—she then asked the price of a pair of men's boots, which hung over these shoes—I said she could not want them—she said, yes, her father wanted a pair—when she was gone I missed this pair of shoes, and in about half-an-hour I found them at the pawnbroker's—I had seen the prisoner frequently before, and had cautioned her not to handle the shoes at the door.

WILLIAM CASON . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. These shoes were pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Mary Jones.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Eight Days.

Reference Number: t18400302-942

942. HANNAH SEXTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March, 1 blanket, value 2s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s. 6d.; and 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; the goods of Richard Morton, her master.

MARY MORTON . I am the wife of Richard Morton, we live in Spring-street, Marylebone. The prisoner was my servant—she came on the 22nd of February, and had been with me a week and two days—I missed the blanket off her bed, and a table-cloth and handkerchief, on the 2nd of March, and spoke to her about them—she said the things were there when she came, but she had lost the blanket four or five days—I sent for a constable, and then she said she had pawned the blanket for 1s., but she would not tell where the table-cloth was.

MARY ECKETT . I am the searcher at the station-house. I found this handkerchief on the prisoner—she said, "Don't produce that handkerchief, if you do it will do me."

Prisoner. She asked where the blanket was, I said I did not know; I did not say I had pawned it.

MRS. MORTON re-examined. She said she had pawned it, and lost the ticket.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-943

943. GEORGE SHRIMPTON was indicted for embezzling 3l. 4s., 3s. 2d., and 12s., which he had received as a servant to, and on account of Harry Winterbourne and others; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined One Year.

OLD COURT.—Monday, March 9th, 1840.

Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18400302-944

944. JEREMIAH HEALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 1 pair of trowsers, value 15s., the goods of William Parr; and that he had been previously convicted of felony.

WILLIAM PARR, JUN . I live with my father, William Parr, who keeps a general sale-shop in Strutton-ground, Westminster. On the evening of the 26th of February the prisoner ran up to the shop-window, snatched these trowsers and ran off with them—I followed him—he threw them down—I scuffled with him, and brought him back—I had seen him lurking about the neighbourhood before, with two companions.

JAMES DALTON . I am a policeman. I was called to the house, and took him into custody.

JOHN GRIEG . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from the clerk of the peace at Westminster—(read)—I was a witness at the trial—he is the person.

GUILTY.*— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-945

945. SARAH CORNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November, 1 blanket, value 7s., the goods of John Savage.

THOMAS GRAVES . I am servant to John Savage, a pawnbroker, White-chapel-road. On the 3rd of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in the shop—she remained there about two minutes, and was going out without asking for any thing—I kept my eye on her, and saw her take this blanket down, which hung inside the door—she wrapped it round her arm, and was going out with it before her—I secured her before she quite left the shop—she had wrapped it up, and put it under her shawl.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to take it—I was looking at it, and he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Confined 14 Days.

Reference Number: t18400302-946

946. WILLIAM JOHNSON and MARY CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March, 1 candlestick, value 6d.; 1 blanket, value 1s. 6d.; 1 sheet, value 3s.; 1 quilt, value 5s.; and 1 pillow, value 4s.; the goods of William Willis.

AGNES WILLIS . I am the wife of William Willis, and live at No. 15, New-court, Picket-place, it is an accommodation-house. On the 4th of March, after twelve o'clock, the prisoners came in for a night's lodging, which they had—it was furnished with the articles mentioned in the indictment—my servant went up stairs between nine and ten o'clock next morning, and told me something—I went up stairs, and missed the articles stated—the prisoners were in the passage when I sent the servant up—I detained them—they were searched in my presence, and part of the property was found on each of them—this is the property—(looking at it)—the quilt, blanket, and sheet were on the woman, under her clothes—the pillow was between the man's coat and trowsers, and he had the candlesticks.

JOHN MANHOOD . I am a policeman. I was sent for, and found the articles on the prisoners as described.

Clark's Defence. I was willing to return them before the officer was fetched.

JOHNSON— GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Six Months.

CLARK— GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-947

947. JAMES COOMBS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February, 1 thimble, value 6d.; 2 shirt-studs, value 1s. 6d.; 3 shillings and 1 sixpence; the property of George Blackman.

ELIZABETH BLACKMAN . I am the wife of George Blackman—the prisoner is my son—I am a muffin-baker, at Chelsea—my husband is in the poor-house—the prisoner lives at home with me, but frequently goes out. I lost a thimble and two shirt-studs, worth about 3s. 6d., from a caddy in my room—it was not locked—I found the studs afterwards at the pawn-broker's—(looking at them)—I believe them to be the same he took out of the caddy, but there is no mark on them—they may be mine, or may not—there are many thimbles alike—I never wished to come here at all—the policeman brought it here—I would not have prosecuted the child for 1000l.—the studs are his own—he never took any thing before.

JOSEPH NEAL . I am a policeman. The prosecutrix sent for me, and told me if I could find her son to take him—I met him, and took him before a Magistrate, who ordered me to trace the property—I found it pawned in his own name.

LOUISA MARIA TOTTEM . The prisoner came into my shop with two shirt-studs and a silver thimble for sale—I told him I could not purchase them, as my husband was absent, and we never took property from boys or girls—they were afterwards found at the pawnbroker's—I am positive these are the things he offered to me—(looking at them).

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-948

948. HENRY HAGGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January, 10 quarts of beans, value 1s. 6d.; 6 quarts of oats, value 18d.; and 1 quart of chaff, value 3d.; the goods of Charles Burrows and another, his masters: and THOMAS BRETT , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

CHARLES BURROWS . I am a coal-merchant—I am in partnership with Mr. Parker, and carry on business at the City-road basin. The prisoner Haggett drove one of our teams for five or six weeks—I know Brett—we served him with coals for some considerable time—he lives in Clerkenwell—I had frequent dealings with him, and always found him correct—he keeps a coal-shed—Haggett went out on the 22nd of January with coals—there was a nose-bag of beans, clover, and corn for the horses—the provender in the bag belonged to us, and if the horses did not eat it it ought to be returned to us—Brett had been in the habit of carting his own coals from our wharf—we very seldom sent our teams to his place—it is evident on this occasion the horses did go with the coals.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How long have you dealt with him? A. Between seven and the years—I always found him correct in his dealings—he has a family—the first communication I had of this was made by my boy on the 29th of February—Brett was brought into my counting-house in custody—I had not ordered the police to take him—I was much grieved when I saw him in custody—I offered to become bail for him after hearing the charge against him, and brought another gentle-man

to bail him also—I did not wish him to be locked up—I believe he had no felonious intention—he said there was a little corn remained in the bag, which the horses blew upon—he said he had received a little blown meat—he could not have been in the habit of receiving this, as it was very unusual for my horses to go to him.

CHARLES THOMAS . I go out with Mr. Burrows's teams, to unload coals. On the 22nd of January I went to deliver coals at a public-house near Brett's—I did not shoot any coals at Brett's—we shot them at a public-house three or four doors from Brett's—we had two nose-bags—we did not put them on the horses—they were filled with corn and beams, and a little chaff on the top—Haggett sold the contents to Brett for 8d., and a pot of 4d. ale, for both bags—they were full—there was more beans than corn or chaff among it—Haggett backed round the horses to Brett's back-way, and Haggett took the nose-bags, and gave them to Brett, who took them up into his loft—as he went up stairs he asked Haggett how much he was to give for them—he said a shilling—Brett said that was too much—he brought the nose-bags down again empty.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not usual when carmen go with coals to ask for beer from the people they serve? A. Yes—I did not hear Haggett ask the publican to allow him something—Brett asked if the publican had given him any thing, and he said not—Brett gave him 8d. for the beans, and went to the public-house, and stood a pot of 4d. ale—that was in the bargain—we all drank of it—we got it for the corn—I did not sell the corn—I had seen this going on for five weeks as far as Haggett was concerned—I was afraid to tell of it—Haggett said he would kill me if I did—I told my master when I got him in private—I could never tell him before without being heard—my master told me I must not go out with wagons anymore, but stop and cut chaff—it was then I told of it, because I thought that was the fit time when they could not do any thing to me, but I always meant to tell master—I told my master of it on Saturday, the 29th of February—it was three days before that that I went to Brett's—I told the Justice the day this happened—the horses had not had any part of the contents of the bags.

JOHN SAYER . I am a policeman. I received information of this from the boy through the master.

Haggett's Defence. He gave me 8d. and a pot of beer for shooting the coals, because the publican would not give roe any thing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-949

949. HENRY HAGGETT was again indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February, 10 quarts of beans, value 18d.; 6 quarts of oats, value 18d.; and I quart of chaff, value 3d.; the goods of Charles Burrows and another, his masters: and THOMAS BRETT , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

CHARLES BURROWS . I believe this is a mistake in the indictment—there is no second charge against Brett—the evidence in the last case refers to this transaction.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-950

950. HENRY HAGGETT was again indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January, 10 quarts of beans, value 18d.; 6 quarts of oats, value 18d.; and 1 quart of chaff, value 3d.; the goods of Charles Burrows and another, his masters: and BENJAMIN TINGEY , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

CHARLES BURROWS . I am a coal-merchant, and have a partner. Haggett was my carman to take out coals, and deliver them—I sent the nosebags out with corn to feed the horses with—it was his duty if they did not eat it all to return it to me—he was not authorised to part with any of the food—he had no gratuity—he had been about seven months in my employ, and for five or six weeks had had charge of a team—I did not deal with Tingey—I knew nothing of him—about the 20th of January, I believe, from the entry in our books, Haggett went out with coals—Thomas goes to assist occasionally—I believe he went out that day.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Thomas had ceased to go with the wagon about the time he made the communication to you? A. He had—I have inquired about Tingey's character, and have heard a very respectable one up to the present time.

CHARLES THOMAS . I live with Mr. Burrows, and went out with the teams of coals—I went out with coals with Haggett—I do not know what month it was in—it was about six weeks ago and better—the first time we went to the Mother Red Cap public-house, near Highgate, and before he began to unload the coals, a man, like a countryman, stood by—he went up to him, and asked if he would buy the corn—the man said he would, and then Haggett took the nosebags off the wagon, took them over to a shed on the other side of the road, and emptied them into a manger—the man agreed for 8d., and when they were unloaded he said he would give him a quartern of gin instead—Haggett would not take that, and sent me back to take the grub away, but the man afterwards agreed to give him 8d.—the horses had not had any of the food at all—it was oats, chaff, and beans—I know Tingey, by seeing him at a public-house—he had nothing to do with those nosebags—about eight or nine days afterwards we went to George's-place, Holloway—Haggett did not put the nosebags on the horses while he was unloading the coals there—in coming back he pulled out of his way, came to the Pied Bull public-house, and delivered two nosebags of food to Tingey there—I had seen him before that at another place—the nosebags were full when Haggett gave them to him—they were returned empty-Tingey paid Haggett 8d. and a quartern of gin for them—the horses had had none of the corn at all—I do not know whether Tingey keeps the house there—I had seen him once before, when he bought two nosebags, at another place.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. This was six or seven weeks ago? A. It is better than six weeks ago—I did not tell my master of any thing till the 29th of February—Haggett went out of his way to give this corn, he might have turned down a road which was twenty-four or twenty-five yards nearer—there was a public-house near where he shot the coals.

CHARLES BURROWS re-examined. I had my reasons for stopping Thomas from going out with the horses—I had told him not to allow any of the men who went out with the horses to come into the granary, but to let the corn down through a shaft to them, and to remain there—I had not the slightest reason to complain of him, but made him stop at home to take care of the corn.

JOHN SAYER . I apprehended Tingey.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. When you took Tingey, did he not say he knew nothing about it? A. He did.

JURY to CHARLES THOMAS. Q. Where was the corn put? A. He took it into the stable—I saw him pay for it.

(Several witnesses gave Tingey a good character.)

HAGGETT— GUILTY . Aged 38.— Transported for Seven Years.

TINGEY— GUILTY . Aged 36.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-951

951. JOHN EMERY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March, 13 earthen-ware jugs, value 2s. 6d.; 12 eartben-ware basins, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of Richard Evans, in a certain boat, upon a certain navigable canal, called Regent's Canal.

GEORGE COMPTON . I am a policeman. On the 5th of March I was on duty at Paddington, near the Regent's-canal—at two o'clock in the morning I met two women, carrying a parcel of crockery, about two hundred yards from where there was a boat lying—I questioned them—they told me how they got them—I took them to the station-house—I then went and took the prisoner out of the boat the girls mentioned—I found him on board about three o'clock—I charged him with giving the girls the crockery—he said he gave nothing away but what was his own.

SAMUEL BOOTH . I am captain of the boat which laid in the Regent's-canal—it came from Derbyshire—Richard Evans was the owner—I had employed the prisoner on board only two days—I met with him at Tring—the boat had crates of crockery, and some of it was loose—when I heard of this I went to the station-house, and saw the prisoner and the crockery—I could not swear to the crockery—I believe it came out of the boat, which the prisoner was in care of—I missed it from the boat—it was worth about 4s.

JANE PERRY . I am an unfortunate girl. I was coming down Brown-street at night, and met Harriet Cusen—two young men were with her—we went into the Burns' Arms public-house, had something to drink, and then went round to the Phoenix public-house, and had something to drink—we then went to the boat—the prisoner was one of the young men—they wanted us to go with them without pay—we refused—the prisoner asked Hannah Cusen if she had a handkerchief—she said she had not—he said he had some articles to give us—Cusen asked if he had a right to give them to us—he said, "Yes," he was captain of the boat, and he gave us these things into our aprons—I was leaving the boat, and he pulled me back, and would go with me.

HARRIET CUSEN . I was with Perry, and met the prisoner and another—the prisoner gave us the crockery—he said he was the captain, and he was to give the chipped erockery away, but this was not chipped—we told the policeman directly how we got it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never gave them any.

JURY to SAMUEL BOOTH. Q. Could these girls have got to your boat? A. Yes—they had been in the cabin—they could have got at the property.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-952

952. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for unlawfully assaulting George Crab and John Saunders, with intent, &c.; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Two Years in the Penitentiary.

Reference Number: t18400302-953

953. ELIZA BURGESS was indicted for concealing the birth of her child; to which she pleaded

GUILTY.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18400302-954

954. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for breaking the dwelling-house of Henry Wall, on the 15th of February, with intent feloniously to enter the said dwelling-house, and the goods and chattels therein feloniously to steal; against the Statute, &c.

HENRY WALL . I am a tailor, and live in Tabernacle-walk, Finsbury, in the parish of St. Luke—it is my dwelling-house. On the 15th of February, a little after four o'clock in the afternoon, I heard my shop window cracked two or three distinct times, and on going there I observed it had been cracked—I remained there, and saw the prisoner return and break the window in with his hand, or some instrument in his hand—I went to the door, took hold of him, and brought him back to the shop, and while I was waiting for a policeman he assaulted me and a man who I called in to my assistance, and also my wife, by striking us—he kicked me in a certain place, and he struck the person I called in in the face, and gave him a black eye, and he did a good deal of damage in the shop—I had satin waist coating and different articles in the window—we detained him till a policeman arrived.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Was not violence offered to him first? A. No, except I collared him to detain him—I was watching him through the window—there was a curtain to my window—I was looking under the curtain—I saw him deliberately return to the window, and break the glass in.

COLLINS. Wall called me—I went, and found the prisoner, and assisted in detaining him—Wall accused him of breaking the window—he tried to get away, and told me to let go of him, which I did, he then rushed to the door, but was detained—he pulled himself away from me, and struck me in the face.

THOMAS WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a policeman. I took him in charge—the last witness had a black eye—I searched the prisoner, and found on him a piece of wire, which I lost in the scuffle—it would be useful to draw goods through the window.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-955

955. THOMAS KYLE was indicted for a misdemeanor.

THOMAS HORNER . I live in Lincoln's-inn-fields. On the 24th of February, I went into a public-house in Stepney, kept by Joseph Downey, with two friends, to take refreshment—I did not know the prisoner before this—I had some gin and water—the prisoner supplied the liquor, he was the servant—I ordered three sixpenny worths of gin and water—it is customary to pay for it when delivered, and I put down 2s.—I said, "My boy, it must be a mistake, there cannot be six penny worth in each glass"—he said, "Yes, there is, it is what I have paid for at the bar," and I paid him 1s. 6d. for three glasses—my friends took two more glasses afterwards, and I paid 1s. for them—on coming down stairs I inquired of the person at the bar what she charged for it—she said, "Four pence a glass"—I told her what I had paid—a policeman was sent for, who took the prisoner in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you order it of the prisoner? A. Yes—I said, "Give me three sixpenny glasses of gin and water"—I did not taste it before I complained—I complained of the quantity in the glasses when I said, "It must be a mistake"—he said he had not made a mistake, it was what he had paid for at the bar—he said he had paid 6d. for each glass.

SARAH MIDDLETON . I am the bar-maid. I served five glasses of gin and water—the prisoner was the waiter—he pays for what he has before it leaves the bar—these were 4d. a glass—he paid me 1s. 8d., and no more—he had been there nine months.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-956

956. JAMES POULTER was indicted for a misdemeanor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-957

957. THOMAS PRATT was indicted for assaulting Thomas Barry, with intent, &c.

GUILTY .— Confined Two Years in the Penitentiary.

NEW COURT.—Monday, March 9th, 1840.

Fifth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18400302-958

958. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March, 1 waistcoat, value 4s., the goods of Thomas William Bluett.

FRANCIS GODDEN BLUETT . I live in Brewer-street. I saw this waist-cost safe on the 2nd of March, about two o'clock in the afternoon—I was told it was stolen, and I went, by direction of the witness, about ten doors up the street, and overtook the prisoner—I told him he had got a waist-cost of ours—he said he had not, and he opened his coat to show me—I brought him back, and this waistcoat was given out of a shop.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. It is your brother's waistcoat, is is not? A. Yes—his name is Thomas William Bluett—the prisoner came back easily with me—I was nearer to him than the other witness, but I did not see him throw away the waistcoat.

JAMES VENN . I live in Brewer-street, Somers'-town. About a quarter to three o'clock, on the 2nd of March, I was standing at our shop-door, and saw the prisoner and another go to the prosecutor's, which is nearly opposite—the prisoner took the waistcoat, put it under his coat, and went off—I went and told of it—the witness went after him, and just before he got to him I saw the prisoner take the waistcoat from under his coat and throw it into a grocer's shop—I saw that it was a green waistcoat—I am sure the prisoner is the person—the grocer's young man gave the prosecutor the waistcoat.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were you from him when you saw him? A. On the opposite side—the street is about thirty yards wide—the other person who was with the prisoner walked the other way—my master is a clothes-salesman.

ROBERT ECCLES (police-constable S 73.) I took the prisoner, and received the waistcoat from the prosecutor—the prisoner said he knew nothing about it.

GUILTY.* Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18400302-959

959. MARY IRESON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March, 61bs. weight of pork, value 4s., the goods of William Jones.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I live with William Jones, in Great Chapel-street, Westminster; he is a butcher. On Sunday morning last, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, I was cutting up a side of pork—the prisoner came in—I turned, and saw her take a hand of pork and put it under her cloak

—she went to the block, where some other persons were standing—she then went to the front board, and looked at some pieces of beef, and had them weighed—I was at the door—she went out—I let her walk a short distance; I then fetched her back, and found this hand of pork on her—it is my master's.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy for the sake of my child.

GUILTY. Aged 39.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18400302-960

960. ELIZA GODFREY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February, 1 shawl, value 10s.; and 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; the goods of Thomas Allen.

MART ALLEN . I am the wife of Thomas Allen; we live at Saffron-hill. The prisoner lodged with me—she left on the 14th of February, unknown to me—I missed a shawl, a waistcoat, and also a gown which I gave her to wash—she must have gone out at the private door, as I had been up all night whitewashing the shop—this shawl-is mine—(looking at it)—I had not given her this to wash—the waistcoat and gown are not here—this shawl had been in a box in the parlour with the waistcoat, and she must have taken them when she came in to dress the baby.

MART ANN REDMAN . I searched the prisoner at the station-house, and found this shawl on her shoulders, under another.

JOHN ARCHER (police-constable G 150.) I took the prisoner at a house in Black Horse-court, Fleet-street.

Prisoner. I went to live in Black Horse-court, and my mistress lent me this shawl while I washed my own.

MART ALLEN re-examined. I know this is my shawl—I have had it several years, and here is a mark on the flower—it was white when I lost it—it is now dyed another colour.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-961

961. JOHN JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February, 1lb. 14 oz. weight of mutton, value 9d.; and 3 lbs. 8 oz. weight of beef, value 1s. 3d., the goods of Edward Anstee; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM PURSER . I am in the employ of Edward Anstee, a butcher, in Oxford-market. On the 27th of February, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour, and saw the prisoner come and take from the board a breast of mutton and a piece of beef—he ran off—I pursued him to Tichfield-street—he first dropped the beef in the market, and then he threw the mutton over an area—a gentleman stopped him—he was brought back, and the mutton was found.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me drop the beef? A. Yes, and you threw down the mutton—you took the mutton first and then the beef—I did not lose sight of you.

Prisoner. The mutton was taken half-an-hour before the beef, by another boy. Witness. There was another boy with him, but the prisoner took them both.

JOHN BLOOM (police-constable E 98.) I took the prisoner—the meat would not keep, but I have the bone of the beef here—a man living in the market brought back the beef—a boy went in the area and got the mutton—the prisoner said he did not take the mutton, but a boy with him did.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing' at a public-house—a boy named

peter Rogers asked me to go with him on an errand—he had a parcel under his arm, and asked me to carry it, which I did—we then stood for a quarter of an hour hearing the band play—he then went up the market and took the beef, and chucked it at me—it fell at my feet—he ran away, and I ran too—as I ran, the handkerchief that was round the parcel flew open—I saw I had the mutton, and I heaved it away—I ran on and two gentlemen stopped me.

HENRY BACON (police-constable E 61.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from the Sessions-house, Clerkenwell—(read)—the prisoner is the person who was tried.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18400302-962

962. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, 1 coat, value 3l., the goods of Charles Knight, to which he pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18400302-963

963. JAMES BRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February, 2 printed books, value 1s. 9d., the goods of Robert Baker, his master.

RICHARD WOODLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Robert Baker, a bookseller in Chancery-lane—the prisoner was the errand-boy for three or four months—he was to have left on Saturday the 29th of February, but he begged to stop till Sunday morning—on the 29th he begged to go out for a quarter of an hour to see his brother—these two books (looking at them) were safe in the shop on the Saturday morning—I received information, and missed them about seven or eight in the evening—they are my master's.

FREDERICK MUNTING . The prisoner brought these books to my shop, and offered them for sale, on the Saturday evening—he said they were his own.

GUILTY.* Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

Reference Number: t18400302-964

964. ESTHER HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, 1 trunk, value 2s.; 1 cloak, value 1l.; 6 pairs of stockings, value 5s.; 3 gowns, value 1l. 4s.; 1 bonnet, value 15s.; 3 aprons, value 3s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 2s. 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 bed-gown, value 1s. 6d.; 4 yards of linen cloth, value 4s.; 33 yards of lace, value 4s.; 2 caps, value 2s. 6d.; 2 shawls, value 7s.; two printed books, value 7s.; 1 pencil case, value 1s. 6d.; 1 brush, value 6d.; 2 sovereigns, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Catherine Mountjoy, her mistress, in her dwelling-house.

CATHERINE MOUNTJOY . I am a widow, and live in Newton-street, New North-road, Shoreditch—it is my dwelling-house—I carry on the straw business—the prisoner was in my service—I left her on a Sunday evening at home while I went to chapel, and when I returned she had absconded—I don't know the date—I found there was no light, and I was much alarmed—my lodger opened the door to me—I then missed this trunk, the cloak, and the other articles stated—(examining them)—they are mine, and are worth more than 5l.—I gave notice at the station-house, and the prisoner was afterwards taken into custody.

MARY LAWRENCE . I live in Brick-lane, Bethnal-green—the prisoner had lodged with me—about nine o'clock at night, on Sunday, the 23rd of February, she brought two boxes to my house—this trunk (looking at it) is one—she had her mistress's gown and bonnet and cloak on at the time—she said her mistress was gone to Ramsgate to meet the Rev. Mr. Creswell, and

she was to follow her on the Monday, and her mistress had lent her the cloak to keep her warm—I went the next morning and took the boxes to the wharf, but there was no packet went that morning—I afterwards went to her mistress, gave information, and she was taken.

HENRY WILLIAM DUBOIS (police-sergeant N 14.) I went after the prisoner from information, and found her at Stratford—I asked her for her purse, she gave it me, and there was only 5s. in it—I asked her where the two sovereigns were—she did not answer—I found in her purse this ticket of the wharf—I went there and found this trunk containing the property—she had this bonnet and cloak on at the time—she said she was persuaded to commit the robbery by her father, that he was in the house and assisted her to break the cupboard open, and that he was then at Dover—I found on the trunk this direction, "Miss Hawkins, passenger to Ramsgate"—she afterwards told me she had spent the money in buying a number of things which I have here.

GUILTY. Aged 20.—Of Stealing under the value of 5l.—Recommended to mercy. — Transported for Seven Years.— Recommended to be confined One Year in the Penitentiary.

Reference Number: t18400302-965

965. CHARLES STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March, at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias Stepney, sixty-two yards of linen cloth, value 3l. 2s.; forty yards of printed woollen stuff, value 2l.; one table cover, value 1s. 6d.; four pair of mits, value 4s.; three pairs of gloves, value 3s. 6d.; one habit-shirt, value 4s. 6d.; and one yard of calico, value 3d.; the goods of Matthew Henry Strutt, his master, in his dwelling-house.

MATTHEW HENRY STRUTT . I am a linen-draper and live in Portland-place, Commercial-road—the prisoner was my shopman for a week or ten days—on the 3rd of March he told me he had some friends who required goods, and if I could spare him an hour he would go and sell some—he took out some, and amongst them a shawl and a table-cover—he returned and said he had sold the table-cover and the shawl, and he would bring me the money in the evening, when he was to take more goods—he went in the evening and I waited up for him—he did not come—I went to bed, and soon after twelve o'clock I heard a knock, but I did not go to answer it—in the morning one of ray shop men said, "Stone is off with his boxes"—I went out and saw him returning—I took him back to my house—he had left his boxes at the Metropolitan Parcels Delivery Company's Office—I went with a policeman and searched a box there—I found in it this property, (examining it) which is mine, and has my mark on it—it is worth 6l. or 7l.—they were taken from my dwelling-house, which is in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. On the Friday previous had you not let him go out and sell some goods? A. I believe he did—he told me he had some friends who wanted some goods, and he sold a shawl for 12s., he brought me the money and the other goods back—I knew the box in which I found this property—I had seen it in the prisoner's bedroom three or four times—I knew it from its having a large padlock on it—I met him coming back to my house, and collared him—it was a deal box, two feet by two-and-a-half feet perhaps, but I never saw so large a padlock on so small a box before.

GEORGE MATTHEWS . I am in the prosecutor's service—I remember the prisoner coming home on the morning of the 4th of March—he knocked at

the door—one of the shop men told me to go to the door, which I did, and the prisoner came in—I then saw him on the top of a piece of wood in the shop getting down some Irish—I did not see him take them upstairs, but I saw him come down with the box on his shoulder—I followed him out to the Parcels Delivery Company, and then I gave information—he said he was going to sack himself.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he got a Macintosh on? A. Yes—he said he got tipsy the night before, and lost his money—he was coming back with me when my master collared him in the street—he said he had had a legacy of 1400l. left him, and was going to take a public-house—he asked me to go and live with him.

SAMUEL WIGGENS (police-constable K 73.) I saw the box opened, and produce the contents of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you kept them ever since? A. Yes, they were in the box till I came here—there was nothing particular about the box—it had a large padlock.

GEORGE WILLIAM GRAVES (police-sergeant K 11.) I have a table-cover and a shawl, some calico, some silk mitts, and a purse, which I found at Sophia James's.

Cross-examined. Q. Did it appear that the prisoner was under the influence of liquor? A. Yes, he had been drinking a good deal.

SOPHIA JAMES . I live in Dean's-court, Old Bailey. The prisoner used to come backwards and forwards to my house—I bought this shawl of him for 12s. 6d.—he left the table cover and the other things which the officer has produced till he called for them.

Cross-examined. Q. When did he leave them? A. On Sunday morning—this shawl is my own—I would not take my oath to this purse, but there was one like it, and I mended it.

MR. STRUTT re-examined. I believe this table cover to be mine—the prisoner's box was directed to Sophia James, 5, Dean's-court, Old Bailey—the whole of the things found are worth more than 5l.—the value of the things taken the night before, which he did not account for, was about 16s. 9d.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-966

966. WILLIAM WITHERS and HENRY WORMS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February, one shutter-bolt, value 1s.; the goods of Joseph Hawkins.

GEORGE MADDOCKS (police-constable G 40.) About nine or ten o'clock at night on the evening of the 27th of February, I saw the two prisoners—Worms had his hand on a piece of putty on a broken square of glass in Mr. Hawkins's window, and Withers was looking in at the shop—they then went on and went round the corner—I afterwards took them, and found in a bag which Withers had, these two bolts, one belongs to Mr. Hawkins, and one to Mr. Shepherd.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You took them into custody at Mr. Shepherd's, did you not? A. I stopped them in Guildford-street—MR. Hawkins's house is at the corner of Margaret-street, Clerkenwell—I did not see any thing taken by any body—the prisoners did not attempt to escape.

JOSEPH HAWKINS . I lost this bolt from my shop on the evening of the 27th of February.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot swear to this being yours? A.

No—I believe it is mine—I had one safe about seven or eight o'clock that evening—this one is the same length as mine, but it is rather bent now, and would not go in as it is.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-967

967. WILLIAM WITHERS and HENRY WORMS were again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February, 1 shutter-bolt, value 4d., the goods of Theophilus Shepherd.

The prosecutor's name being Theophilus Edward Shepherd, the prisoners were.

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18400302-968

968. GEORGE ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February, 1 coat, value 10s.; the goods of Thomas Vesper and another.

RICHARD RILEY . I am shop-boy to Thomas Vesper and another—their shop is in the Commercial-road. On the 29th of February I hung a coat in front of their window outside, the prisoner came under the ladder I was standing on, and took the coat off the nail, before my eyes—he ran off—I ran down the ladder, and ran after him—he got a little way down Lucas-street, and there he threw down the coat—I still ran after him—he got to the end of Johnson-street, and went into a shop—the officer went in and took him—as he was running he stopped under an archway, and heaved two bricks at me.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you lose sight of him at all? A. No—he only went down one turning—I was about twenty yards from the prisoner when he went into the shop.

EDWARD GEORGE STONE (police-constable K 209.) I heard a cry of "Stop thief"—I saw the prisoner turn the corner of Johnson-street into Lucas-street—he ran into a shop, and I took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was nobody else running in the same direction? A. Not that I saw—Riley was running after him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-969

969. THOMAS PROUT was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March, 7 wooden pails, value 7s.; the goods of William Mills.

WILLIAMS MILLS . I live in Holles-street, Clare Market, and am a tinplate worker. On the 3rd of March I was at work in my cellar—Brown, who was with me, said something—I went out, and saw the prisoner running down the street with seven pails on his shoulder, which had been taken from my door—he dropped some of them—I ran and overtook him with the rest of them—he turned round to me in a frantic manner—I siezed him—he seemed hardly conscious of what he did.

Prisoner. Q. What kind of wood were they? A. I do not know.

THOMAS BRAWN . I heard the pails move, as I was in the cellar with my master—I looked out, and saw the prisoner with them on his shoulder in the street.

(The prisoner in a long address, stated, that he made pails, and carried them about for sale: that on that day he put down three pails in the street while he went into a public-house, and when he came out he had taken up three pails which he supposed were his own, and that he had no more than three.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-970

970. JOSEPH CLEADON and JOHN SAVAGE were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February, 36 bottles, value 3s.; and 6 gallons of wine, value 6l.; the goods of Charles Franklin.

CHARLES FRANKIN . I keep the King William the Fourth public-house, in Exeter-street, Lisson-grove. On the 11th of February I was called into

my tap-room, and told a man had hurt his leg—I found a large hole in the floor—I thought it had been done accidentally—I sent for a carpenter, and had some new flooring put down—in the afternoon, between four and five o'clock, I was called in again, and found the new flooring taken up, and an opening made large enough to admit a man through into my wine-cellar, which is immediately under the tap-room—a witness intimated something to me, and I charged several persons who were in the tap-room with getting into the cellar and taking the wine—I examined the tap-room, and found eight bottles of wine on the floor, close by the hole, which had no business there—I have no doubt it was mine, in consequence of the bin being disturbed, as the wine had been taken out very carelessly—I sent for the officers, and gave charge of the two prisoners, who were there—five or six other persons were there, but they got away—I had seen the prisoners come in in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. About how many persons were in the tap-room when you first went in? A. At one o'clock I think there were twelve or fifteen—I think there had been dancing going on there, but I did not go in till I was called—the tap-room is about twenty feet from the bar—I did not see that the prisoners were not sober—they had been staying there all the morning—I do not know exactly at what time they came; perhaps about ten o'clock, and at one o'clock I perceived the hole near the fire-place, and had it mended—I did not see any bottles then—I went in again between four and five o'clock, and then found the bottles—I think there were about a dozen persons there then.

JAMES SNELLING . I am a plasterer, and live in Carlisle-street. I was at the William the Fourth public-house that day—I saw the two prisoners come in about three o'clock—they were three parts intoxicated—they had not sat long before Savage said, "We will have some more"—I did not know what he meant—I sat about three-quarters of an hour, and Savage again said, "We will have some more at all events; who has got a knife?"—I said I had one—he said, "Let me have it'—I said I would not—he said he would beat my brains out with a gridiron; and then an Irishman who was there went out and brought in a coal-chisel—they wrenched up the boards, and jumped upon them; then Savage went down and handed up two or three bottles—I went out into the grounds, and told what I had seen—I heard Savage say to a man that they had taken fifteen or eighteen at the first going off.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you stand by and see all this? A. No; I was sitting there—I was sober, but the prisoners were not—I have been taken up and tried for an offence, and imprisoned—that is four years ago—I have been getting my living by work ever since—I worked for Mr. Salter all last summer as a plasterer, but I was out of work three weeks or a month, as we had finished the job I was at work at—I was in trouble two years ago last Christmas, but not since then—when I heard the conversation between the prisoners in the tap-room, there was a dozen persons there at least.

COURT. Q. What did Cleadon say? A. He told Savage to be quiet, and leave it alone; he thought they had had enough—what he meant I do not know.

WILLIAM WHITEHEAD . I am waiter at the Champion public-house. I saw Savage and another person come into the Champion tap-room between

twelve and one o'clock that day, and Savage had two bottles, one in each pocket.

DANIEL SHELVEY (police-constable D 102.) About half-past four o'clock I was called in to assist in taking the prisoners.

JAMES CLARKE . I am a plasterer, and have a certificate of the prisoner Savage's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office—(read)—him Savage is the man who was tried—I was an officer then, and I took.

SAVAGE— GUILTY . Aged 26.— Transported for Seven Years.

CLEADON— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18400302-971

971. FREDERICK BUTCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Fox, from his person.

JOHN FOX , I live in Basinghall-street. On the 24th of January, about five o'clock, I was in the Old Jewry. I felt something touch my pocket—I turned, and saw the prisoner close behind me—I was walking arm-in-arm with a gentleman—I saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's left hand—I took him by the collar, and charged him with it—he tried to get away, and struggled—I took the handkerchief from him—this is it—(looking at one)—it has my initials on it—I held him till the policeman took him.

JOHN BARKER (City police-constable, No. 288.) I was called, and took the prisoner—the handkerchief was given to me by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the Old Jewry, and picked it up—I was going after the prosecutor with it.

MR. FOX re-examined. I think it could not have dropped; there was not time for it from the time I felt the touch till I saw it in his hand—it was done all in a moment—he was close to the wall and close to me—it was very dirty at the time, and the handkerchief was not dirty at all—I had not used it for some time.

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Judgment Respited.

ESSEX CASES.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18400302-972

972. ELIZABETH JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February, 2 rings, value 3l., the goods of Edwin Stokes, her master.

EDWIN STOKES . I live at Woodford. The prisoner came to live with me on the 10th of February—I had no character with her—I missed two rings on the 12th from my bed-room—she continued with me till the Saturday—I charged her with it, and she denied it—(looking at a ring)—this is mine.

EDWARD WINTER . I am a pawnbroker, at Epping. This ring was pawned by the prisoner on the 17th of February last.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up under the parlour carpet.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18400302-973

973. JOHN QUY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February, one bushel and a half of wheat in the chaff, value 10s.; and 1 sack, value 1s.; the goods of Richard Adams, his master.

RICHARD ADAMS . I live at East Ham, on the Barking-road. On the 28th of February the prisoner was one of my labourers—some of my men were engaged in threshing—I have some wheat in chaff—I have compared the wheat in chaff found in the sack, which the prisoner is charged, with taking with the bulk in my possession—they correspond in quality and appearance—it was wheat of last year, and had not turned out so good as I thought it would.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Have you any of the wheat here at all? A. The officer has that found in the sack, but here is none from the barn—it is red wheat and white chaff—to the best of my belief it is mine—I have no doubt of it—the prisoner has been my servant six years—he has been in the family fourteen years—he says he cannot read or write—there is gleaning at harvest time in my fields.

PAUL DONAVAN (police-constable K 319.) On the 28th of February I was going my round at East Ham, and met the prisoner in a bye-road which leads to East Ham church—that would lead from the prosecutor's farm to the prisoner's lodgings—he had a sack with him—I asked him what it was—he made some answer which I could not understand—I told him to stop—he threw the sack down and ran sway—I pursued and took him—I took him back to the sack—I then asked him again what it contained—he told me corn, and begged very hard for me to let him go—he said he had a wife and six children, and it was the first thing he ever took—another officer came up—we took the sack to the station-house—I saw Mr. Adams examine it.

Cross-examined. Q. When did he say it was the first time? A. When I had hold of him—he said it repeatedly.

CHARLES COLYER (police-sergeant K 30) When the prisoner was brought to the station-house I went with Donovan to the prosecutor's, who went with us to the barn—I afterwards went to the prisoner's house—I found a box there containing about a bushel and a half of wheat—his wife said that was what she had gleaned in the summer—the sack contained from a bushel and a half to two bushels of wheat in the chaff.

GUILTY. Aged 40.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18400302-974

974. WILLIAM GRIMWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, 1 pair of breeches, value 12s.; 1 jacket, value 4s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s. 6d.; and 4 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; the goods of William Free.

WILLIAM FREE . I am under-ostler at the Castle Inn at Woodford. On the 15th of February, I had my breeches, jacket, stockings, and handkerchief safe in my bed-room over the loft—I missed them that evening—the prisoner lived in that neighbourhood, but I did not know him—he had no right to have my things—I saw him on the 17th, and he had a jacket, a pair of breeches, a pair of stockings, and a handkerchief on, which are mine—these are them—(looking at them)—the rest of the things I have lost.

JOSEPH CRICKS (police-constable K 331.) I took the prisoner with this property on him in Tottenham-court-road.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the things on the Sunday morning between eight and nine o'clock.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18400302-975

975. ROBERT BONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February, 1 jacket, value 18s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; the goods of William Shaw, in a boat, in a creek communicating with the river Thames.

WILLIAM SHAW . I am a fisherman, and live at Barking, in Essex. On the 10th of February, we were going out from Barking town, fishing—our boat was in the creek going to join our vessel in the Thames—the creek is about two miles long—I had my jacket, shirt, and handkerchief in the boat—I left the boat in the creek about half-way between Barking and the vessel—when I came back to the boat these articles were gone—the prisoner was at work at the marshes at the time—these are my articles—(looking at them.)

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You have got all your property? A. Yes—it was not a usual place to leave the boat, but it blew a storm, and we could not get it to the smack—I lost these things on the day the Queen was married—I know there was a dinner given to the men at the work-house to which the prisoner belongs.

JOHN RANSOM (police-constable K 328.) I found this property in the prisoner's possession in his own house—he lives three doors from the station—the Creek is at the end of Woodford-lane, about three-quarters of a mile from the heart of the town; but the boat laid up in the mud, as I was given to understand—the prisoner had got the shirt on his back—the prosecutor said he supposed it was his—the prisoner pulled it off, and gave it to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say "Come, Bob, where are these things? you had better give them up." A. No, sir—they had been asking him for them before, and I was told that he said, if he had known to whom they belonged he would have given them up before—he took the shirt off, went up stairs, and got the other things.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 37.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. — Confined Six Weeks.

KENT CASES.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18400302-976

976. MARY ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 1 hearth-rug, value 8s. 6d., the goods of Lewis Davis; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18400302-977
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