Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th June 1837.
Reference Number: t18370612
Reference Number: f18370612

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

SESSIONS PAPER.

KELLY, MAYOR.

EIGHTH SESSION, HELD JUNE 12, 1837.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE.

Taken in Short-hand,

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

WILLIAM TYLER, PRINTER, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

1837.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the King's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY,

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

Before the Right Honourable THOMAS KELLY , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Parke, Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Patteson, Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Thomas Coltman, Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; George Scholey, Esq.; Samuel Birch, Esq.; Matthew Wood, Esq.; William Venables, Esq.; Sir John Key, Bart.; and Henry Winchester, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City of London; the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City; John Cowan, Esq.; Sir Chapman Marshall, Knt.; James Harmer, Esq.; Thomas Johnson, Esq.; John Lainson, Esq.; and John Humphery, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City of London; John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

John Strickland

George Wade

Thomas Maskey

Jaames Parker

Frederick Godman Simpson

Nicholas Seller

Theophilus Saville

Frederick Willoughby

Joseph Shepherd

Theophilus Atkinson

John Simmons

Second Jury.

George Steel

William Stevens

William Symonds

Andrew Smith

John Tarbour

Francis Young

George White

John Teale

Richard Taylor

Thomas Fish Taylor

William Joseph Sears

Henry Elwood

Third Jury

William Johnston

John Pearson

James Gutteridge

Thomas Alfred Horwood

James Venables

Henry Webley

Alfred Henry Morgar

Daniel Griffin

John Moore

Benjamin Weller

Andrew Shear

William Walter

Fourth Jury.

Henry Skipper

John Norris

Nicholas Orchard

James Morley

William Tassey

Charles Sankey

Richerd Hudson Telfer

John Theaker

John Thomas

John Thomas Thompson

John Barker

William Webb

Fifth Jury

James Kinlock Walter

Simson Smith

William Luke Woodman

Charles Stevenson

Henry Simpson

Edward Taylor

Robert Glover

William Sherborn

Griffith Taylor

Henry Morley

John Simmonds

George Smallbone

Sixth Jury.

Thomas Smith

Charles Matthews

Robert Thomas Wells

James Sanson

Timothy Smith

John Scott

Douglas Thompson

John Harries

William Walker

John Shenstone

Walter Tiffin

Henry Kirsch

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

KELLY, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSIONS.

A star (*) denotes that the prisoner has been previously in custody—An obelisk (†), that the prisoner is known to be the associate of bad characters.

CAPITAL CONVICTIONS.

First Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

Reference Number: t18370612-1388

1388. ANTHONY KEDGE and THOMAS STEVENS were in indicted for a robbery upon James Thorpe, on the 28th of May, at Hillingdon, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 bag, value 1d.; and 1 shilling, 1 penny, and 1 halfpenny; his goods and monies.

JAMES THORPE . On Sunday, the 28th of May, I was at the Jolly Ostlers, at Uxbridge—I went there about half-past ten o'clock—I did not stay half an hour—I came out before eleven o'clock—there were plenty of people there, but they were all strangers to me—the two prisoners were there all the time I was—I had only one pint of beer—when I came out, the two prisoners and another came out after me immediately—the other, who if not taken, came up, and seized this medal, which was hanging on my side, with a ribbon—(I have been in the Queen of Spain's service, under General Evans)—he asked me if it was silver—I told him it was not, it was composition—he drew out his hand, hit me in the mouth, and knocked me down—Stevens then came up to me, while I was on the ground, put one foot on my stomach, and another on my throat, and with his hand he unbuttoned my coat, and took from me a bag, containing a shilling, a penny, and a half-penny—he then went away—the other prisoner stood about ten yards from me, and called, "Fogle, hunt the b——! the medal! the medal" but he never came near me—they then all ran away—they were all strangers to me—I never saw them before—I laid on the ground about ten minutes, and then got up to look for the watchman, and gave him information about two o'clock the same morning.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You were quite a stranger to Uxbridge? A. Yes, I had only been there that night—the medal is a mark of distinction from General Evans—I was attacked soon after leaving the public-house—I left the house at ten minutes before eleven o'clock—I was going to look for a lodging—the watchman had directed me to several places—I had asked for a lodging at the Jolly Ostlers, and they told me they could not provide me with one—I only had one pint of beer, except a pint which I had in the middle of the day—I was not above thirty yards from the public-house when I was attacked—I was not much hurt nor bruised—I was very frightened—I made an alarm directly they went away—I went back to the Jolly Ostlers, but it was shut—I knocked once or twice, but no answer was made, and I cried out "Watch" as loud as I could—I saw the watchman about two o'clock close by the market place at Uxbridge.

Q. Could you not find him between eleven o'clock and two? A. I had been to him several times to ask for a lodging—I troubled him

so very often, and he spoke to me so very cross, I thought it not worth while to tell him, but I told the under-watchman the moment I saw him—I do not suppose there is any one here who saw me with the shilling and bag—I was not begging while I was at Uxbridge—I did not beg of a gentleman in a chaise that afternoon—I did not ask alms in Uxbridge—I did, coming into Uxbridge—I saw Kedge next morning, when he was taken into custody—I knew him directly I saw him—I said at once, "That is one of the men"—I asked him to speak before I swore to him—I did not at once swear he was the man, because he had not the coat on which he had at the time—I said to the constable, "That is the man; but I should be more positive if he spoke," because he had a long coat on that night; by his speaking I should identify him better.

EBENEZER WARD . I keep the Jolly Ostlers. On this Sunday the prosecutor came to my house for a lodging—he was sober—I did not perceive that he was in liquor—the prisoners were in the house all the time he was then—he came first for a lodging, and afterwards came and had one pint of beer—he was sober when he went away—I did not see any drunk him—they all went away together about eleven o'clock, as the house was cleared—he did not come back again that night—I shut up the house directly they were gone—I did not hear any body knock at the door afterwards, and do not believe any one did—I went to bed—I think if there had been a knock at the door I should have heard it—I sleep in the front of the house, and generally hear if any body knocks—the prosecutor had medal hanging to his coat.

Cross-examined. Q. At ten minutes or a quarter after eleven o'clock you could scarcely have been in bed? A. I could not have been in many minutes—I dare say it was a quarter or twenty minutes after, or it might be half-past when I went to bed—more likely so than not, as I generally take something to drink after the company are gone.

CHARLES JAMES MURRAY . I am a constable, I was called by the watchman about four o'clock—I got up soon after six o'clock—I told the prosecutor to wait at the market-house, and I would come to him—I went, and met him in the market and went to the Jolly Ostlers—I then went down to Kedge's house—I know him before—he lived at Uxbridge—I found at his lodging between seven and eight o'clock, and Stevens was there too—Kedge was in bed, and Stevens lay on the floor—the prosecutor was not with me—apprehended Stevens at home, but Kedge left—I did not tell Stevens what apprehended him for—I went with him to the Jolly Ostlers, and the prosecutor recognised him at once—he said, "That is the man that put his ✗ on my breast, and took my bag from me"—Stevens heard that—as I was taking him to the cage he said, "I know what you want me for, you want me for the highway robbery."

JAMES DARVILL . I am a constable of Uxbridge. I apprehended Kedge about eight o'clock on Monday morning, the 29th, at his own house—he was at breakfast—I took him to my house—the prosecutor came there, and said, "That is one of the men, but he has not the same coat on as he had last night; but if he was to speak I should be more positive—he did speak, and then he said, "That is one of the men, but he did not meddle with me."

JURY to EBENEZER WARD. Q. What money did Thorpe tender for the pint of beer? A. He paid 2d. in copper for one pint—he did not pay me, but my wife—I never saw any bag—I did not see him pay the money—I heard him hallooing about the town about twelve o'clock—I thought he

was calling "Ward" to awaken me—I said, "There is somebody calling Ward; I would give him in charge, if I was down stairs"—I did not know who it was—but next morning he said it was him, and he was calling "Watch."

KEDGE— GUILTY — DEATH . Aged 20.

STEVENS— GUILTY — DEATH . Aged 21.

Second Jury, before Mr. Baron Parke.

Reference Number: t18370612-1389

1389. WILLIAM KEEGAN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling house of John Hamilton, about the hour of one in the night of the 29th of May, at St. Pancras, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 23 spoons, value 4s.; 1 necklace, value 6d.; 4 knives, value 2s.; 2 candlesticks, value 1s.; 2 pairs of spectacles, value 2s.; 24 cigars, value 4s.; 1 toothpick, value 1s.; 1 ink-glass, value 6d.; 1 key, value 6d.; 2 castors, value 3s.; 1 pair of boots, value 10s.; 1 pair shoes, value 7s.; 1 shilling, 3 sixpences, 4 fourpences, 67 pence, 148 halfpence, and 57 farthings; his goods and monies.

JOHN HAMILTON . I keep the Bagnigge-wells Tavern, and I live there; it is in the parish of St. Pancras. On the night of the 29th of May, I went to bed at half-past twelve o'clock—I saw that all the doors and windows were fastened—the house had been open, and company in it till half-past twelve o'clock—about two o'clock the following morning I was alarmed by the policeman—I got up and came down—I found two inner doors broken open by some instrument, and saw a poker there—they had broken out of the kitchen into the bar-parlour, and then into the bar—the drawers in the bar-parlour were lying about empty in a great measure—I consider that somebody had concealed themselves in the kitchen before I went to bed—I did not see any marks of violence outside the house—I believe no glass was broken.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me on the premises that night? A. No; I never saw him to my knowledge till I saw him in custody of the two policemen.

THOMAS HAND . I am a policeman. I was on duty on Tuesday morning, the 30th of May, in the neighbourhood of Bagnigge-wells Tavern, and heard a noise inside the tavern—I went to the back of the house, looked over the fence, and saw a man getting out of the lower part of the window, which was open—it is a ✗ window—a wooden pane in the window opens large enough for a man to come through—he was coming through that place—I pursued him, and took him about twenty yards from the place—I found all this property on him (producing it)—also a brooch and a box of lucifer-matches—I examined the outside of the house, but saw no marks of violence on it—I could not ascertain in what way he had got in—he might have got in at the same wooden pane he got out at—it was open.

Prisoner. Q. When you went to the window did you try to raise it up? A. Yes, and could not—I saw no part of it broken—I saw him coming out of the wooden pane.

JOHN HAMILTON re-examined. I saw the wooden pane the night before—it was fastened—I saw no marks of violence on it—it could be opened from the outside—it was fastened with a brass button, which I have never seen since—that brass button could be forced open from the outside—this is my property—(looking at it)—here is "J.H." on this paper of halfpence, and on another—here is a knife which I know, it belonged to my father fifty years—I saw that in my desk the day before the robbery, and the

halfpence also—these spoons are mine, and these candlesticks I had seen the day before—I had cigars like these.

Prisoner 's Defence. I am a joiner, and have been in a state of destination—I could not get work—I met two men in my business who I asked for a job—they told me to go to the public-house and they would meet me there—they did so, and gave me drink till between eleven and twelve o'clock—one gave me 1s. and the other 6d. in silver, and 2d.—they said if I went along with them to another place, they would give me they sent me to get a bundle that was in a stone-yard, and said if I breaking that they would give me more money, but I know nothing about breaking into the house—I had no instrument at all—and the poker produced by the prosecutor he said belonged to him.

GUILTY — DEATH . Aged 36.

First Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson

Reference Number: t18370612-1390

1390. ROBERT LOBB was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Pritchard, about the hour of ten in the night of the 4th of June, at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 7 tobacco boxes, value 2s. 3d., his goods.

JOHN PRITCHARD . I am a carpenter, and keep a tobacconist's shop in Church-street, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. On Sunday night, the 4th of June, at a quarter to ten o'clock, I was in the shop and heard a scuffle outside—I went out, and found the prisoner scuffling with a gentleman, who had hold of him, and three tobacco boxes were on pavement under his feet—I immediately asked the prisoner whether he had got say—he said no, he had not, but that a boy had run down the street—I pulled his coat open, and saw two projecting from his pocket—I did not take them out but sent for a policeman, and detained him—I examined my window, and found a piece of glass had been taken out, large enough to admit a man's hand—I missed seven tobacco boxes, which I had seen ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before, when I left that part of the window—they were quite close to the pane—it was not broken then—it was a piece that had been broken and puttied in three weeks before—the putty was quite hard—it was quite safe ten minutes before—there was no hole whatever I am sure—the piece of glass was taken entirely away, but not the whole piece—I could find no pieces—a person could put his hand through the hole and reach the boxes—the policeman took two boxes from the prisoner in my presence—they are all mine—(looking at them).

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you hear the crash of glass? A. No.—There was no sign of glass whatever inside or outside—no place could be found—I was in the shop at the time of the scuffle—I had been in my room for ten minutes before—only five boxes were found—I missed seven—the gentleman who had the prisoner is not here—St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, is the parish I pay rates for.

JAMES EAVES . I am a policeman. I was passing by at the time, and the prisoner was given into my charge—I took these two tobacco boxes from him—one fell from the left leg of his trowsers, and the other he took but of his left pocket himself—I have them here—it was dark at the time ✗ parish is St., Matthew, Bethnal-green—I examined the window and ✗ a piece glass taken out of the middle of the square sufficient to get a box of cigars out—I found no glass anywhere.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see another boy? A. I did no—I found the prisoner in the prosecutor's custody—I thoroughly searched the prisoner—that was all I found on him.

ELIZABETH RALPH . I was in the prosecutor's back parlour which opens into the shop, at the time this happened—I heard a gentleman come in and a scuffle—I went out, and saw the prisoner, with the articles secreted—he was in he shop, and the prosecutor had hold of him—I saw the gentleman money from bring him into the shop—he staid, I suppose, seven or eight minutes, till the prosecutor could secure him, and then went away.

(Edward Wood, a smith, of Fleet-street, Bethnal-green, and William Wright, of Bacon-street, Brick-lane, deposed to the prisoner's good cha-racter.)

GUILTY — DEATH . Aged 17.—Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his good character.

Reference Number: t18370612-1391

1391. WILLIAM FISHER was indicted for a rape.

GUILTY — DEATH .

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX LARCENIES, &C.

OLD COURT.—Monday, June 12th, 1837.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370612-1392

1392. WILLIAM CAMPLIN was indicted for larceny. Upon the evidence of of Mr. Macmurdo, surgeon of the gaol and Mr. Cope, the governor, the Jury found the prisoner of unsound mind.

Reference Number: t18370612-1393

1393. CARLTON WILLIAM CAMPLIN was indicted for embezzlement.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM SPENCER JOHNSON . I am a printer, and live in Nassau-street, Soho. The prisoner was a lawyer's clerk—I had only known him a short time—he caled on me the latter end of last August, and said that he was out of employ, that his friends were respectable, and that he had an uncle in Ireland who had befriended him often, but that he, had displeased and he would not do any thing more for him—he asked me to take him in for three weeks, he expected to receive a remittance from his uncle—that he had correspondence with him, and they were quite reconciled—he asked me to give him board and lodging—I received him into my house and himlodging, food, and every thing, for about three months—Aemanpt get a situation which he said he was looking for; and one evening I said to him, "Roche, your uncle does not appear to come forward, and while I am employed in-doors, perhaps you will collect some sums of money which are due to me, as it is necessary you should do something if you can to assist me, you being an additional expense," the time I had consented to take him in being expired—he replied, that he should see his uncle the following week, and he had no doubt his uncle would discharge the debt, meaning the sums of money I had lent him—he said he would collect and do any thing for me in the interim, till such time as his uncle got him a situation and he did so until the month of March—he brought me several sums of money correctly, which he had received from my customers—from this time up to the time I discovered something wrong, this arrangement con-tinued—I told him on the 12th or 13th of March to call for 8l. 11s. at the Queen's Theatre, on Mr. Salter on Saturday—I gave him an invoice with the amount—he Continued after this till thee 14th of March and then left—I did not see him again till the discovery was Roberts and Mr. Mori were customers of mine—I had directed him to receive money from

them—he never accounted to me for 22s. received from Roberts, nor 30s. from Mori—in consequence pf suspicions I entertained, I made inquiry of Mr. Salter touching the 8l. 11s., and then caused search to be made for the prisoner—I was present on the 13th of March, when he was taken custody at the Bedford Hotel by Keys, who found 3l. 7s. on him, said that was all he had left from the 8l. 11s.

Prisoner. Q. Was there an agreement by which I engaged to become your clerk, or by which or by which you engaged to give me any stipulated salary? A. No.; there was no such agreement—I certainly considered you as my clerk I or servant—the remuneration you had was clothing, board, and lodging.

COURT. Q. In how many instances did he bring you money collected from your customers? A. About twenty—he did so regularly and daily—he handed me the money—I always furnished him with a bill of parcels—I employed no other person in that capacity—during the time he has lected, under 40l.—I lent him money from time to time, altogether about 7l.—it was previous to was previpus to his collecting money that I lent him money or sup-plied him with clothes—I supplied him with a pair of Wellington afterwards—I paid for them—he collected money every day for several months.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a schoolmaster. I was a customer of Mr. Johnson's—I received this bill, and the prisoner called on me for payment—I on the 21st of October I paid him 7s. on account of it, and on the January 3s., on the 30th 3s., on the 13th February 2s. 6d., on the 2s. 6d., on the 7th of March 2s. 6d., and on the 13th 1s. 6d., making 1l. 2s.—he wrote the amount on the bill, and put his initials to each payment.

WILLIAM HART OLIVIA . I am in the service of Messrs. Mori, music-sellers, Bond-street, who are customers of Mr. Johnson, On the 14th of March I paid the prisoner 7l. on Mr. Johnson's account—I paid him on I the 4th of March 5l., and on the 7th of March 7l.—these payments are I contained in the account—J have no stamp receipt.

MR. JOHNSON. On the 7th of March the prisoner accounted; to me for 5l. 10s. out of the 7l. received on the 4th. FREDERICK SALTER. I live in Cromer-street, Brunswick-square, and am a theatrical performer. On the 16th of March I paid the prisoner 8l. 11s. and took a stamp receipt for it—(read.)

FRANCIS KEYS . I am officer of Bow-street. I appregebded the prisoner, on the 18th of March, at an hotel in Covent-garden. 1 searched I him—Mr. Johnson had previously given me a sovereign and 3s., which I he said he had taken from him, and the prisoner said that was all the money he had got; but I found a purse in his coat pocket with I three, sovereigns and is. more—he then said it was part of the money, and I he begged Mr. Johnson would forgive him—I said, "You, had better hold your tongue; you must go before the Magistrate."

Prisoner's Defence. It is not my intention to dispute the moral turp I tude of the offence—I admit, to the full extent, the kindness I have received; but with respect to the agreement between us, I received no wages; and, with deferece to your lordship I submit that the indictment I cannot be sustained.

COURT to MR. JOHNSON. Q. If he had declined to collect the money, should I you have still gone on keeping him? A. I do not thing.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1394

1394. MARY MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, 9th of April, 1 pail, 18d., the goods of John Perring.

SARAH WILKINS . I live in Long's-buildings, Whitecross-street. On the evening of the 9th of April I was going into my house, and the prisoner coming from the yard door, with a pail in her hand belonging to John Perring, my lodger—I said, "You have a pail which does not belong you"—she dropped it—I went after her, and said to her Take it back"—she took it up, and took it back to the yard—I called Perring, who kept hera short time in the yard, and then let her out—she was brought back directly by the policeman—she said she hoped they would not hurt her.

JOHN PERRING . I live in Long's-buildings. On Sunday, the 9th of April, I left my pail in the yard—Sarah Wilkins called me, and I saw the prisoner there with the pail—I bolted her in the yard, intending to keep her there a little time, and when I let her out I told her not to come rob poor people—in a minute or two the policeman brought her back, and demanded the pail—she had unbolted the back door to get it.

GEORGE GLADWELL (Police-constable G 9.) I heard of this, and took the prisoner within twenty yards of the prosecutor's; told her she was charged with stealing a pail—she said she knew nothing of it.

Prisoner's Defence. It was snowing—'I went into the passage for shelter. and turned the pail upside-down to sit upon, upon Mrs. Wilkins came and charged me with to take it away, which I did not intend to do—they sent me about my business.

SARAH WILKINS . She took it about seven yards from the passage—she was not sitting on it—it did not snow till after she Was taken—she was thirty or forty yards from the yard—a man told me she had taken the pail—I followed her, and she said it was not her; but I took her back.

GUILTY . Aged 50.— Confined One Week.

Reference Number: t18370612-1395

1395. THOMAS NEWMAN COCHRANE, HENRY FAULKENER , and WILLIAM HAMMOND , were indicted for a misdemeanor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1396

1396. JOHN MACNAMARA was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Johnson, from his person.

THOMAS JOHNSON . I live in Nelson-square, Blackfriars-road. I was on Blackfriars-bridge about half-past ten o'clock at night on the 6th of' I June—I felt some one at my pocket, and turned round instantly, and caught hold of the prisoner, who bad got my handkerchief in his hand—I he dropped it—I picked it up, and gave him to the police-constable—no I one was within five yards of me, except the prisoner.

Prisoner. I was walking over the bridge, and saw three or four men walking first before the gentleman, and then behind him—they got round I him, 'and one of them threw the handkerchief at my feet—the gentleman I seized me, and said I had got his handkerchief—he brought another I gentleman with him to Union-hall, who said there were four or five more, and he could not say which took it. Witness. No, there were no persons near enough to take it—I saw it in his hand.

MICHAEL ROWLEY (police-constable M 105.) I took charge of the prisoner, and produce the handkerchief.

GUILTY Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1397

1397. JOHN BRAGG was indicted for embezzlement.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY HOWARD . I am a salesman in Newgate-market I took the prisoner into my employ on the 19th of December—on the 2nd of January I was taken suddenly ill, and confined to my bed for six weeks, and then went into the country—it was the prisoner's duty, in my absence, to taball the money, and pay every farthing—there was a book called the sale-book—it was his duty to sum up all the items of the pages of the sale-book and to transfer the amount into the cash-book—on my return from the country I found they were deficient—I asked him to give me an account, but he gave me none—I have since looked for the cash-book, and cannot find it anywhere—I discharged him, in consequence of detection these sums in the indictment, and asked him to explain them—he could not—I sent for an officer—then he said he would explain it to me—that he had spent the money in gay company—here is the cash-book of the date previous to the one that was missing—I showed him the deficiencies in the sale-book—on the 4th of March I find he debits himself with 33l. 4s. 7d.—I have summed up the items, and find it ought to be 35l. 3s. 7d., which is a deficiency of 1l. 19s.—on the 9th of March there is 17l. 4s. 9d.; at the bottom—I have summed up the items, and it ought to be 17l. 18s. 9d.; —ttal is a deficiency of 14s.—on the 11th of March he makes 41l. 2s. 5d., that should be 42l. 17s. 5d.—that is 1l. 15s. deficient—I did not call his attention to these three—I did not find it out till he had left me—I charged him with taking money previous to all this—it was before he said he had spent the money in gay company that I discovered these three deficiencies—my brother's clerk, Joseph Boyd; summed up the books in my presence.

COURT. Q. Has he in any instance paid over to you a larger sum than that mentioned as the total of the column? A. No—I do not know that I pointed his attention to these three—I told him there were many instances in which the book was untruly cast.

Prisoner. These charges were not laid against roe till I was taken into custody—I might have made some errors in casting, and there may be some instances where they are against myself—I made two or three offen to the prosecutor to give over the books. Witness No, he never said word about it.

JOSEPH BOYD . I am in the employ of Mr. Ebenezer Howard. I went over the sale-book by myself, and afterwards with the prosecutor—I have heard his evidence with respect to the amounts of deficiencies, it is correct—here is 1l. 19s. on the 4th of March—on the 9th of March he has charged himself with 17l. 4s. 9d.—the right amount is 17l. 18s. 9d., which is 14s. deficient—on the 11th he debits himself 41l. 2s. 5d.—it should have been 42l. 17s. 5d., which is 1l. 15s. deficient—I was present when master requested him to explain how these deficiencies occurred in his books—he took them, and endeavoured to explain, but could not—an officer was sent for——hesaid if Mr. Howard would forego and forgive him, he would tell him how he spent his money—Mr. Howard said, what he had to say he should reserve—he then said he had been keeping gay company for three or four months, and he had wished to come to speak to Mr. Howard, but something prevented him, and if he pleased he would work himself to his fingers' bones to make atonement.

GUILTY . Aged 29— Transported for Ten Years.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, June 13th, 1837.

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370612-1398

1398. WILLIAM PRIME was indicted for embezzlement.

DAVID EGGLETON . I live in Leader-street, Chelsea, and am a publican. The prisoner was my potman, employed by me to take out beer, and receive the money for it—he did not Jive in the house—he came about seven o'clock in the morning—Mr. Reynolds is a customer of mine, and he house, has booked to Mr. Reynolds 1l. 2s. 11d., but I have not brought the book—he did not account to me for any money received from Reynolds after the 25th of March.

MARY ANN REYNOLDS . I am the daughter of Mr. Reynolds, of Great College-street, Chelsea. I paid the prisoner 6s. myself on Tuesday, the 13th of May, for beer supplied by Mr. Eggleton—he gave me no receipt—I do not know the quantity of beer.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Was not this part payment of a bill of larger amount? A. There was 1s. left due—the account amounted toll, or more, originally, and was paid by instalments—I have paid him two or three times before—nothing was said as to when I was to pay the shilling.

MR. EGGLETON re-examined. The prisoner did not inform me he had received the money—I did not find it out till He was committed on another charge—I have not seen him since he left me, on the 19th of May—he was always to account to me every night for the beer for which he did not bring the money—when he paid me money it would be entered in the book—he was to pay the instalment, and not wait till he received the whole.

MR. DOANE. Q. Was it hot usual to allow him to take out beer on his own credit? A. He did some—there were certain customers he did not book the beer for, and he was answerable for that, but not for what he booked—when he was apprehended, in a public-house on Friday, he was not sober—he always booked what beer he took out—I have not his book here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1399

1399. WILLIAM PRIME was again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May, 4 shillings, 2 sixpences, and 120 halfpence, the monies of David Eggleton, his master.

DAVID EGGLETON . The prisoner was ray potman. I sent him to Mr. Wilkins, on the, 19th of May, with 5s. worth of halfpence, four shilling?, and two sixpences, desiring him to procure some white lead, oil, and turpentine—he got them, but I found he did not return with it—I sent after him, and got the things, which came to 9s; 3d.—the prisoner did not return to me at all—I went to Wilkins, and got information—I followed him, and found him drinking at the Bell and Horns, and gave him into custody within two hours of his leaving my house.

JOHN THOMAS WILKINS . On the 10th of May the prisoner came to me for white lead, oil, and turpentine, which I supplied him with—he brought a written list of the articles, saying he wanted a bill of them, and no doubt Mr. Eggleton would send the money in the course of the day—I. gave him the articles, with a bill made out to Mr. Eggleton—it was between nine and ten o'clock—he was sober—he paid me nothing.

Cross-examined. Q. He said he had no doubt Mr. Eggleton would send

the money in the course of the day?A. Yes—I knew he was Mr. Eggleton's servant—I did not notice sufficiently to say he whether he had been drinking, but he did not appear the worse for liquor.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I apprehended the prisoner about ten o'clock—there was 7s. 1d. on the tap-room table—I did not search him till he got to the station-house—I then found half-a-crown and sixpence on him, but I saw that given to him on the road by a man who went down with us—that made up what his master gave him—he had been drinking—Mr. Eggleton had been with him some time, waiting for a constable, and he was counting the money over on the table.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there not other persons with him who ✗ appeared drinking with? A. There was one.

MR. EGGLETON re-examined. When I met him at the public-house, that other man asked him for all the money he had in his pocket—he threw 7s. 1d. down—the other man said to me, "Here is 7s. 1d., that is all he has left—book the 2s. 11d. to me, and I will pay you on the Saturday night"—he spent some of the money while I was there with him, and asked me to drink with him—he was rather the worse for drink then, but he was quite sober when he left me, about nine o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1400

1400. WILLIAM FRIEND and WILLIAM RIDGWAY were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May, 4lbs. weight of ham, value 2s., the goods of Charles Clement James.

CHARLES CLEMENT JAMES . I am a grocer, and live at Uxbridge. On the night of the 26th of May the prisoners came to my shop in company together—Friend purchased a small piece of bacon and half an ounce of tobacco, which came to 7 1/2 d.—Ridgway said nothing—I gave Friend change for a shilling—while I was doing so, I saw Ridgway stoop and take a piece of ham and leave the shop with it—they both went out together—I sent my young man after them.

Ridgway. Q. You say you saw me take the ham? Witness. A. Yes, I never offered to sell it; you were close to the door, and were out in a minute.

HENRY HADEN . I am shop-boy to Mr. James. I recollect the prisoners coming to my master's shop—Friend bought something—I saw them leave the shop—master told me to follow them—as I followed them I saw the end of the ham under Friend's jacket—they then went towards the King's Arms public-house—when I got there I charged Friend with taking the ham, and asked him to give it to me—he said nothing, but Ridgway went and stood over against the gate of the public-house, and Friend stood against him—the ham was passed from him to Ridgway, and it was found under the gateway.

Friend. I never had the ham. Witness. Friend was carrying it under his jacket.

Ridgway. We were going into the King's Arms to have a pint of beer—he accused me of taking the ham—I never had it in my possession. Witness. Ridgway had taken the ham up several times in the shop while master was serving it, and asked me the price of it, but I did not see him take it out.

JOHN BIRCH . I am a constable. I took them into custody.

FRIEND— GUILTY . Aged 20.

RIDGWAY— GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined one month.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370612-1401

1401. JAMES KEEFE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May, 2lbs. weight of beef, the goods of Thomas Dare and others, his masters.

THOMAS DARE . I am a wharfinger, and have partners. We had some ¦beef in casks, in Carpenter and Smith's wharf—the prisoner was one of Hour regular men, but he had nothing to do in that particular warehouse that day—we are responsible for the beef—in consequence of suspi-Hcion, I set Taylor to watch—some beef was afterwards shown to me, which I have no doubt was ours—the prisoner had been about twelve ¦months in our service, and had 18s. a week, and two pints of beer every day.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am in Mr. Dare's employ; he desired me to watch the casks. On the 19th of May, a few minutes after eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come in, after the men had left work, and go to the beef, take it off the casks, and cut it into several pieces—he put one piece into a handkerchief in his hat, and concealed the others between the tierces—the piece he cut up weighed from six to eight pounds—he wiped the knife, put it away where he found it, and walked out—I was going after him—he closed the door, but hearing me moving he came back—I charged him with it, he said he had not got it—I took his bat off, took it out, then he took and threw it away, and wanted me to say nothing about it.

JAMES WHOWALL . I took the prisoner into custody, and have the beef—Taylor produced two other pieces of beef to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I work at the cooper's, and belong to the premises. On this evening I went in early, and saw some casks of beef open—they were in the habit of giving me beef several times, after work was done—I used to leave my hat inside the warehouse, and work in my cap all day—as I took my hat I found something in it, I put it on, and came back to the warehouse, before he spoke to me about the beef—he must know I took it out of ray hat before he mentioned a, word to me.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1402

1402. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May, clock-case, value 3l., the goods of Joseph Coventry; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JOSEPH COVENTRY . I am a clock-case maker, and live at No. 60, Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell. On the 13th of May I gave Drury a clock-case to take to Mr. Payne, of Bond-street—he returned soon after, and gave me information—on the following Wednesday the prisoner was brought to my premises in custody, I sent for a policeman, and he was taken to the station-house—I appeared at Hatton-garden in the evening, and on my entering the office he called me aside, and asked the price of the clock—I case which was lost—I said 3l. or three guineas—he said, "If you and the policeman will walk with me, I will get you the three guineas"—I declined that.

EDWARD DRURY . I am an apprentice of the prosecutor's. My master gave me a clock-case to take to Mr. Payne, in Bond-street—before I got there a man came and spoke to me in Liquorpond-street, Clerkenwell—he asked me where I was going, because I should get that wet—I was

standing up out of the rain—I told him I was going to take it to Mr. Payne's, in Bond-street—he then left me—I went towards Bond-street; and in Compton-street the prisoner came up to me—I had never seen him before—he said to me, "I have come from Mr. Payne, you are to give me that case to take to him, and you had better go back to your master"—I believed that—he took the case from me, and walked on—I walked by his side a little way—I watched him into Regent-street, and then I parted with him—he was a stranger to me—he did not run—I saw him in Clerkenwell on Wednesday, and asked him if he was not the man who took the clock-case from me in Compton-street—he said, "lam no such thing," and ran away—he was secured.

WILLIAM GRAY . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner into custody—at the office he asked Mr. Coventry what the damage of the case was—he said three guineas—he said, "If you will go with me and the policeman, you shall have the money."

Prisoner. I never saw the boy in my life before.

HENRY THURSTON . I am a policeman. I have a copy of the certificate of the prisoner's former conviction (read)—he is the same person—I was a witness at the trial.

GUILTY Aged 19.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1403

1403. JOSEPH EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June, 1 looking-glass and frame, value 3l., the goods of John Flask.

JOHN FLASK . I have kept a beer-shop for about six years. The looking-glass was lost from a house of mine in Hadlow-street, which I let furnished twelve months ago to Mrs. Morgan—the prisoner was an intimate acquaintance of her's—I let the looking-glass with the house—I missed it I on the 29th of January—I went into the house, and it was stripped of all the furniture—Mrs. Morgan owed me 20l. rent—the prisoner was not responsible for the rent—he has made excuses for its not being paid, and paid me two months of rent for Mrs. Morgan—I have seen him in the house several times—Mrs. Morgan was occupying it at the time—the looking-glass was found at a pawnbroker's—the prisoner told me he had I married Mrs. Morgan's daughter.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What kind of house do you keep now? A. I keep a house to myself—I have no lodgers, and have had none ever since they left—it is between four and five months since they left—I did not know Mrs. Morgan very well, or I should not hare trusted her—I do not know exactly what kind of house she kept—I heard she let rooms to two or three women of the town—I heard that about two months before she left—I have not been able to find Mrs. Morgan—I know nothing of a robbery on Mr. Reynolds, the Judge's clerk—I know there was a robbery committed in that house—1 was not here during the trial.

SAMUEL BAKER . I am a brass-finisher, and have known the prisoner some time. He came to me with a duplicate of a looking-glass on the 16th of January, and asked me if I would like to buy it—he said, "I have got it to sell for a friend who is rather in distress"—he went with me to the pawnbroker's, and paid the interest for me to take it out.

RICHARD BAYLIS . I apprehended the prisoner, and charged him with stealing the things from the house in Hadlow-street—he said he knew nothing of it.

WILLIAM BROWN . I live with a pawnbroker, in John's-row, St. Luke's. The prisoner pawned this glass. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1404

1404. GEORGE GODDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 1 pair of trowsers, value 12s., the goods of Samuel Ellis.

SAMUEL ELLIS . I am a tailor, and live at No. 41, Aldermanbury. On the 31st of May, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in the back part of the shop—my apprentice gave me information—I went out to the corner, but saw nobody running—I returned—I lost my trowsers altogether—they had hung over a brass rail by the door.

OWEN JONES . I am an apprentice to the prosecutor. On the 3rd of May, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner take the trowsers off the rail, and put them under his arm—he ran off—I ran after him, but he got away—I am sure he is the same person.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. How far were you from the railing?A. About six yards—I was making a waistcoat—I saw him again three days afterwards—he was dressed as he is now—he was not a minute taking them—he stood looking at me while he took them, to see if I was looking at him.

THOMAS PARSONS . I keep a stall under the prosecutor's shop window. On the 31st of May I saw a person in a blue coat and apron opposite the shop, looking over—he stood over opposite me, and in a few minutes I saw him come by with some clothes under his arm, as it appeared—the prisoner is not that man—I only saw one.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1405

1405. JAMES WORLEY and JAMES HEARNE were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May, 1 crow-bar, value 5s. the goods of Thomas Granger.

GEORGE COLLEY . I drive a team with timber, for Thomas Granger, of Uxbridge. On the 29th of May I was carrying some timber, and something broke in my wagon, just over Uxbridge bridge, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening—I was obliged to leave the timber there on the carriage, I left a crow-bar with it, and the next morning when I went, it was missing—it was found on Smith's premises afterwards—the prisoners live at Denham—this is the crow-bar.

THOMAS BUTLER . I live at Uxbridge. I was at work on the road, and Worley passed me, with the crow-bar, by Uxbridge mill, between five and six o'clock, on Tuesday evening, the 2nd of June—I knew him before—the other prisoner was just before him, both were going the same way.

WILLIAM SMITH . I live at Uxbridge, and am a brewer. On Friday morning, about half-past nine o'clock, the prisoners came to my house, and asked if my son did not buy old iron—I said he did not—he was not at home—they said they had some to sell, and wanted 18d.—Hearne said it was his own, and he had had it a considerable time—I paid Hearne 1s. 4d. and a pot of beer for it—they each had part of the beer—when the constable came about it I gave him the crow-bar.

JOHN BURT . I am a constable of Uxbridge. I apprehended both the prisoners—I went to Smith's house, and found the crow-bar which has been produced—the prisoners told me they had sold the bar to Smith.

Worley's Defence, I found it going along the road.

WORLEY— GUILTY . Aged 45.

HEARNE— GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1406

1406. JOSEPH BUCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Smith, from his person.

JOHN SMITH . I am a coachmaker. On the 23rd of May I was between

Fleet-street and Ludgate-hill, about eleven o'clock—I felt a slight touch at my pocket, and saw the prisoner cross from behind me—I suspected him, by seeing him shuffling something about him—I followed him till I came to the watchman—I said I thought he had my handkerchief, and he found it on him—it was safe a few minutes before.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Was this at night? A. Yes—there were other persons going along at the time—I have not any mark on it, it being a new one—I will venture to swear it is mine—the hemming of it is done so particularly well, which I had noticed—I had felt it safe a few minutes before—the prisoner had got about twenty yards when he was taken.

CHARLES HUGHES . I am a watchman of St. Bride's. I was on duty in Fleet-street—the prosecutor came behind me, and said, "Take charge of that man, I think he has my handkerchief"—I took him, and found it down in his trowsers by his thigh—it was not in his pocket.

(William Lawson, malt-factor, of Chapman-street, St. George's in the East; and Thomas Dartman, of No.5, Dock-street, Rosemary-lane; gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1407

1407. DANIEL RYAN and EDWARD HOWES were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May, 19lbs. weight of leaden pipe, the goods of Daniel Farrow, and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

SAMUEL FRANCIS . I am a policeman. I was directed to watch the house, No. 1, Deer's-place, Somers-town on the 19th of May—I went there every half hour, and between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, while passing the back premises, I heard a noise in the front—(I had examined the house at half-past eleven o'clock, and it was all safe)—I found the door ajar, the windows open, and part of the brick wall knocked down—I entered the premises, and heard a knocking in front—I went away to call my brother-officer—we returned in five minutes, and met the two prisoners about twenty yards from the premises—I stopped them, and took them into custody, and afterwards Howes made his escape—I left Ryan in my brother constable's custody, and found a crow-bar in his hand—I followed Howes, and saw him throw something away, and after returning and searching the place, I found it was the key of the house—he was stopped in my sight by a policeman—on taking the prisoners to the station-house I found a knife on Howes—I went back to the house directly, and found they had got in at the windows at the back—there were marks up the wall—I found this lead within two or three yards of where we first stopped the prisoners—I am quite certain, when last at that place, there was no lead there, nor when I went to call my brother officer—on examination, I found the lead had been cut from the area, and along the passage into the back kitchen—it was pipe—here is part that was left on the premises—it tallied in all respects—it appeared to be cut by a knife.

SAMUEL TREVELTHAM . I have known Mr. Farrow's house many years—the leaden pipe ran from the area into the back kitchen—I have compared the pipe with the place—it tallied exactly.

DANIEL FARROW . I am a hair-dresser. This house belongs to me—I desired the policeman to watch it, as the tenants had run away without paying the rent.

Ryan's Defence. Coming home at a late hour, I met this man in a line with the house—I had a small trowel which I had been working with, and

I asked this man where he was going—he said he was going to sleep in that house, as he had the key given him by the person who had left the house—I said, "Have you not got a lodging in Weston-street?"—he said yes, but he owed a good deal for his lodging, and was ashamed to go home—I said he had better go home, and he might get work next week—so he came along with me, and the policeman came running round Brewer-street, and laid hold of me—I asked what it was for—he said, "No matter, come on"—Howes knows I was not in the house.

Howes's Defence. I met this man, he asked where I had been all day—I told him I had helped the people to move in the morning from the house, and that they gave me the key till they returned.

SAMUEL FRANCIS . A crow-bar was found when Ryan was stopped—I took it out of his hand myself, and there are marks between the door and door-post which the crow-bar fitted—it is the back gate, not the street door, and a key which fitted the front door was found.

RYAN— GUILTY . Aged 40.

HOWES— GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1408

1408. PRINGLE SPENCE was indicted for embezzlement.

JOHN PRICE . I am a bookbinder. The prisoner was my errandboy, and had been so two or three months—I sent him to Mr. Davis to receive 19s. 3d., which was owing to me—he never brought it me, but absconded that morning, and never returned.

GEORGE KING PEARSON . I am footman to Mr. Thomas Davis. On the 9th of May the prisoner came for a bill of Mr. Price's—I gave him a sovereign—he went out to get change—he returned afterward, but I did not see him.

JOSHUA PARKER . I am butler to Mr. Davis. On the 9th of May the prisoner came for the bill—Pearson gave him a sovereign to get changed—he came back and gave me 1s. change, with a receipt, and I gave him 3d.—he went away with 19s. 3d.

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1409

1409. PRINGLE SPENCE was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May, 2 coats, value 25s.; 2 pairs of trowsers, value 8s.; 2 waistcoats, value 5s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 6s; 2 pairs of boots, value 5s.; and 5 collars, value 1s., the goods of John Price, his master: 1 bag, value 10s., the goods of Thomas Price.

JOHN PRICE . I am a bookbinder, and live in Craven-buildings, Drury-lane; the prisoner was my errand-boy. I sent him to my brother's with a carpet bag, containing clothes, on the 9th of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning—the clothes were my brother's, but he had given them to me, and he gave me the key of the bag they were locked in—the prisoner never returned—I heard he was apprehended at Hull.

THOMAS PRICE . I am the prosecutor's brother, and live in Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square. I had given my brother these clothes and the key of the carpet bag, which was mine—this is part of the contents of the bag, and this is the bag.

MARY FULLER . I am servant to Mrs. Pettinger, who lives in Mortimer-street. Thomas Price lodged there—on the morning of the 9th of May I gave the prisoner the carpet bag as it was left.

HENRY POOLE . I am steward of a steamer to Waterford, which laid in St. Katharine's Wharf. On the 9th of May the prisoner came on board, dressed differently from what he is, and the next day he brought a carpet bag on board—he came on Tuesday, paid the fare, and went down with us

to Hull—I asked why he was dressed differently to what he was before—he said he had a carpet bag belonging to his father, with his father's clothes, which he had put on—and seeing the lock of the carpet bag broken, I suspected him, and had him secured—he confessed he had stolen them from Mr. Price—I took the bag from him previous to arriving at Hull, and gave him into custody on arriving there.

ABRAHAM FLETCHER . I have produced the bag and property.

GUILTY. Aged 16; of stealing the bag only.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1410

1410. GEORGE BAZE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May 6lbs. weight of pork, value 3s., the goods of John Hodson and another.

JOHN HODSON . I live in Church-street, St. Marylebone. On the 13th of May, about half-past ten o'clock, Mr. Hempson brought the pork into my shop, and said, "Here is the man that stole your pork; now you have got him do what you like with him"—Hempson had the pork in his hand—it was dirty, as if it had been dropped—the prisoner said he would wash it for me—I looked towards my window, and missed a piece of pork exactly like it—I believe it to be mine.

Prisoner. Two lads ran by, and knocked it down against my legs.

JOHN NATHANIEL HEMPSON . I am a neighbour of the prosecutor's. There was a great many people in and out of the shop—I thought I perceived something taken off the prosecutor's board, and shortly after I saw another come and take something, and turn the corner Burn-street—I overtook the prisoner, and collared him, and thought I saw something fall from him—I turned round and picked up the two pieces of pork at his heels✗—I brought him back and gave him charge.

JOHN MANNING . I am a policeman. About a quarter past eleven o'clock on Saturday night I took the prisoner into custody, and found 8s. 2d. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home from my work down Chapple-street, and turned into Burn-street; this gentleman came and took me into custody, I know nothing of it.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined One Month.

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, June 13th,1837.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370612-1411

1411. GEORGE BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June, 37 handkerchiefs, value 1l. 7s. 6d.; and 30 yards of gingham, value 1l. 5s. 6d.; the goods of James Marsh.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of William Leaf and others; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 54.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1412

1412. WILLIAM LINDSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May, 1 bill-case, value 2s., the goods of Charles Shipley; and that he had been convicted of felony, to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1413

1413. SARAH SMITH, MARIA PEARSON , and JANE SAWYER , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May, 12 pieces of Tuscan strawplait, value 7l. 10s., the goods of John Holloway.

JOHN HOLLOWAY I live in New Bridge-street, Blackfriars. On the 24th of May I lost some Tuscan straw-plait—this is it—I have seen the prisoner, Pearson, repeatedly in my warehouse, and Sawyer many times, coming to buy.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When you were examined before the Magistrate, did you say one word about seeing either of the prisoners? A. I did; I said I believed I had seen Sawyer, and now I recollect the other positively—my belief is, that I have seen them all three—my deposition was read over to me—there was not a word in it about my having seen them before—I did not state it to the Magistrate's clerk—he was writing, but it was not put down—I cannot state when I have seen them, as we have so many people—it was perhaps about a week before—I recollect Sawyer coming and looking at some remnants of Tuscan, and she bought six pennyworth or a shilling's worth—she asked George Holloway, my young man, the price—he was at Guildhall, but they did not take his deposition—there were several other people in the warehouse—whether they were connected with her or not I cannot say—I have no recollection of two of my young men saying they had not seen the females before—they had tome slight recollection of them—they are not here.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am porter to Mr. Briggs, of Blue Boar-court, Friday-street. About five o'clock in the evening on the 25th of May, I saw the three prisoners at the corner of Bridge-street, Blackfriars—I did not know them before—they formed themselves into a triangle position—I saw Smith pull up her clothes, and take some plait from under her gown—she drew it under her shawl—I saw two policemen near, and told them—as soon as they saw the policemen, Smith gave the plait to Sawyer, and she retreated back again—I was not near enough to tell the policemen—I took hold of her, and said, "What have you got here?—you did not come by this rightly"—I took it from her, and held it up to the policemen—I told them to take the other two, and said where I thought they had got it from—they were not more than twenty yards from the prosecutor's shop—we took them into the shop, and there was a box of the same sort standing on the end of the counter—I did not see them walking from the shop—they might have met each other near the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Were you walking along the street? A. Yes—there were a good many people about—I had hold of Sawyer—the other two had only got three or four yards—they turned to go up Fleet-street, and Sawyer was coming back to Bridge-street—I think I have seen Smith before in the street, but not to know her—they were not together above two or three minutes—there was no one between me and them—I had just passed the policeman on the same side of the way.

JOHN ANDREWS . I am a policeman. I was Called, and took the prisoners—I do not know them.

SMITH— GUILTY Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

PEARSON and SAWYER— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1414

1414. JOHN LLOYD and CHARLES KENNEY were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Andrew Belsham, from his person; and that Lloyd had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN ANDREW BELSHAM . I live in Little Pulteney-street, Westminster. On the 5th of June I was at a picture shop at the corner of Cursitor-street, Chancery-lane—I felt a tug at my pocket, turned round, and saw the two prisoners—I seized them both, and said, "Which of you has picked my pocket?"—I cast my eyes on the ground, and there was handkerchief—Lloyd was standing over it—I had a gentleman with me—we each took one, and took them to Fleet-street, and delivered them to an officer—this is my handkerchief—Lloyd was nearest to me—they were both behind me, and no other person near me—they disclaimed any acquaintance with each other.

Lloyd. Three lads followed us down, and said they did not see us touch his handkerchief—he said he worked at the chambers in Chancery lane. Witness. A lad followed them to the watch-house, but no one was near them at the time.

THOMAS HASBERUY . I was with Mr. Belsham—he turned round, and I seized the two after he spoke to them—I took hold of Lloyd—the handkerchief was under Lloyd's feet.

THOMAS LIOHTFOOT . I am a policeman. The prisoners were brought to me, and I took them and the handkerchief.

Lloyd's Defence. I was returning from my brother-in-law's, and stood at the side of this gentleman—when I turned he had this other lad by the collar—I never saw him before.

Kermey's Defence. The gentleman turned and caught hold of me—the handkerchief was lying down, and some boy ran away.

WILLIAM POCOCK . I produce a certificate of Lloyd's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office (read)—the prisoner is the person.

LLOYD— GUILTY Aged 19.

KENNEY— GUILTY Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years.

Third Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370612-1415

1415. ANN REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 2 sovereigns, 1 crown, 2 half-crowns, 7 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 3 pence in copper, the monies of Charles Bond, from the person of Thomas Brooks.

THOMAS BROOKS . I am eleven years old, and am in the service of Mr. Charles Bond, of Welbeck-street. The prisoner was his housemaid—she left, and came to lodge with my mother—on the 31st of May I had directions to call on Mr. Vallance, 20. Essex-street, Strand, to receive some money—I called and received two sovereigns, one crown-piece, two half-crowns, 7s. 6d., and 3d.—I was to take it to Mr. Bond—I met the prisoner at my mother's—she stopped outside while I went to Mr. Vallance and received the money—she was going to Whitechapel, and asked me to show her the way—I had to go to Trinity-square, Aldgate—when we got to Leadenhall-street she took me into a public-house and made me tipsy—she had some gin and gave me some—I did not drink much of that, and then she sent for some ale, and that made me go to sleep—my money was safe when I went to sleep—she was by me and knew I had the money—I had shown it to her—I felt her putting her hand into my jacket pocket where it was, as I was going to sleep, and when I awoke I thought the money was lost—she was still by my side—she said that two men had

come in, and she went into the back parlour—l did not give any alarm—she came into the tap-room twice, but did not say any thing till we came out—she then told me to say that two little boys saw me go and receive the money in Essex-street, and followed me till they came to a crowd and took the money out of my pocket; and not to tell my master, my mistress, nor my mother that she had taken me into a public-house.

SOPHIA NOBLE . I live at Marylebone-lane station-house, I searched the prisoner, when she was brought there the same evening, and found one sovereign, one crown-piece, two half-crowns, five shillings, and 3d., in copper on her.

WILLIAM WIGGINS . I am a police inspector. I was at the station house when the prisoner was brought in with two females, and the witness—the boy spoke rather low—I asked the prisoner if she heard what was said?—she said "It is all wrong, I never had his money"—I said, "Did you hear what was found on you?"—she said, "Yes, it was part of my wages"—I then desired a constable to go and get her boxes—she wanted to go with him—I would not allow it—as soon as the constable was gone, she said, "If you had allowed me to go with him I could have got the money"—I said, "I thought you said you had not seen it"—she replied, "Oh, I took it out of his pocket to take care of for him till he got round, and put it into my box"—I said, "What box?"—she said, "There are two boxes, it is, on one and under the other"—the box was found at 26, Cabinet buildings—the purse and money found there was shown to me—there was 1l., 4s.6ld. in it, and 1l. 15s. 3d. on her.

ANN TEACHY . I saw this purse on the box at the prisoner's lodging—I gave it to the policeman.

JOHN FLAGAN . I went to this house and saw Tracey playing with this purse—I took it from her and placed it on the mantel-piece, and when her father came in I told him it was there.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been going after a situation, and this lad was going with a dress—we went together—I took him some refreshment—he asked me for more drink—I said, "You must not have anymore"—he put his hand into his pocket and dropped the money on the boards—I took it up and said, "I am taking your money for safety"—I went and saw the dress delivered for safety, and then went to get some refreshment—I did not know what to do with the, money, and in going home down Oxford-street I was taken.

THOMAS BROOKS re-examined. I lost my money between one and two o'clock, and she was taken about six—my pockets are very little—she got her hand in.

MICHAEL TRACEY . I am Tracey's father. I saw the prisoner in her own room about six o'clock that evening.

GUILTY. Aged 24.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18370612-1416

1416. JOHN DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May. 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Samuel Sadler from his person.

SAMUEL SADLER . I live in Watling-street. On the, 15th of May I was going up Fleet-street and felt a motion at my pocket—I put my hand round, and my handkerchief was gone—I turned and saw a person following the prisoner—I followed, and after escaping from him to of this times be captured him—this is my handkerchief.

GEORGE EDIS EVANS (City police-constable No. 21.) I saw the prisoner with another man, who picked the prosecutors pocket, and handed the handkerchief

to the prisoner—he was doubling it up—when I seized him he turned and strack me in the breast—I pursued, and took him—he got from me again, went oil, and threw the handkerchief down in the middle of the raad—I still followed, and retook him—a person picked up the handkerchief and gave it to me—I never lost sight of the prisoner, away from me several times.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to deliver some letters for a friend and was seen ✗ by a female with whom I had some acquaintances—we had some refreshment, and she was joined by other acquaintances—I was going on when the policeman seized me, and said I was his prisoner, and asked what I had done with the handkerchief—he forced his hand into my pockety and took out none—during that time a man brought up this handkerchief—the presecutor said it was his, and I was taken.

GUILTY.† Aged 26.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18370612-1417

1417. EDWARD LINCOLN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April, 1 writing-desk, value 20s.; and 1 promissory note for ✗115; the goods and property of Sir Culling Eardly Smith, Bart.

SIR CULLING EARDLY SMITH, BART . I live in Grosvenor-place. On the 3rd of April I called a cab in Tottenham-court-road, and ordered it to drive to my house—I saw my desk and umbrella put in—there was a promissory note for the payment of ✗115 in the desk—this was not cut open when I left it—the promissory note has been returned to me by the officer—I have no recollrction of who drove the cab—the note was not endorsed—I have not brought it here—it was not drawn by me.

(The note not being produced, an the jury being of opinion that the article was a writing case, and not a desk, the prisoner was on this indictment)

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18370612-1418

1418. SARAH TURNER was indicted for stealing on the 20th of May, 2 pewter pots, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Fletcher; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 43.— Confined One Month.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, June 14th,1837

Third Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370612-1419

1419. THOMAS LINDDON was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1420

1420. EDWARD THORN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June, at Allhallows-on-the-wall, 2 yards of woollen cloth, value 1l. ✗; and 55 yards of kerseymere, value 18l.; the goods of John Sutton, in his dwelling-house.

JOHN SUTTON . I am a tailor, and live in Little Bell-alley, in the parish of ✗, London wall. On the 7th of June about a quarter pass four o'clock, I was in an adjoining room, speaking to a gentleman, andheard something from fall from a shelf—I went into the shop, and—saw of cotton roll had fallen down, but did not think to look if anything had been

taken—I thought nothing about it then, but in about half an hour policean came and asked if I had lost any cloth—I found I had—✗, with a roll of kerseymere and cloth which are mine—here are forty-two yards of kerseymere, worth about 15/., and this cloth is worth about 5l.—they are both my property—I know nothing of the prisoner.

RICHARD SAVAGE . I am a City police-constable. On the day in ques-tion I saw the prisoner come out of Great Bell-alley, about twenty yards from the prosecutor's, carrying a large piece of cloth, and a small twenty yards from the prosecutor's, carrying a large piece of cloth, and a small piece of ✗—I suspected him, and followed him to the side of ✗ by the Catholic Chapel—I saw two men get before him, who saw me, and ech dropped a small piece of the goods, and ran away—they made their escape, one down Long-alley, and the other down a passage—I secured the prisoner.

JOHN HANSFORD . I am the City toll-collector. I was in Liverpool-street, and saw the policeman secure the prisoner—I took the large roll of cloth, and a small piece, off his shoulder.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along; out of work, by King William-street, and two men tapped me on the shoulder, and asked if I wanted a job—I said, "Yes"—they said, "Follow us"—we came down Bell-alley—they told me to wait at the butcher's shop, and in about five minutes they brought the cloth down and said, if I would carry it to the first cab stand, they would give me a shilling—when I got there they said, "It was not worth while to have a cab; we are so near home, cary it on, and we will give you 6d. more"—when the policeman tapped me on the shoulder they ran away.

GUILTY . aged 22.— Transported for Life.

Before Mr. Justice Pattesm.

Reference Number: t18370612-1421

1421. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May, 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. the goods of John Merchant.✗.

JAMES MERCHANT . I am the son of John Merchant, and live in John's court, Marylebone-lane; he keeps a shoe-shop. The prisoner came to the shop one day last month, and asked me to show her a pair of shoes—I showed her a pair—she fitted them on, and said they would not do—I was going to give her another pair, and saw her rise from her seat and go to the window-board, which was inside the shop—I fetched another pair—she fitted them on, and said they would fit her, and asked the price—I said 1s. 3d.—she said, "If I go and fetch the money I may have them"—I said, "Yes," and as she went out I whispered to my mother who was in the shop, and she stoped her, and asked her if she had any thing to sell—she said, "No,"—she asked how she came by the shoes—she said, "Oh, I bought them, they not yours."

Prisoner. Q.. Were they not a pair of old boots? A. They were second hand Bluchers—I am sure I fitted a pair on you.

ELIZABETH MARCHANT . On the 15th of May, the prisenor came into our shop, and the little boy gave her the shoes—I saw him fit them on—as she went out the boy called to me, and said she had a pair under her cloak—I took them out—I asked if she had them to sell—she said, "No,"—I said "How came you by them?"—she said, They are mine and not yours"—I know them to be my husband's.

Prisoner. Had I not them in my hand, and not under my cloak? Witness. They were under her arm under her cloak.

WILLIAM ECKETT . I am a policeman. I have the shoes—I received them from Mrs. Marchant on the 18th of May—the prisoner was ✗ at the time.

Prisoner. This is the first time I was ever accused of any thing hope you will have mercy on me.

GUILTY .—Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Baron Park.

Reference Number: t18370612-1422

1422. WILLIAM NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 4 half-crowns, the monies of Moses James Barwick.

MOSES JAMES BARWICK . 1 am a hosier, in Whitechapel-road. On the 17th of May I left my shop about a quarter to seven o'clock, and left for half-crowns and six shillings in the till—I saw them there about ten minutes before I left—I left the shop in charge of my wife.

ELIZA CATHERINE BARWICK . I am the prosecutor's wife. About seven o'clock on the evening of the 17th of May I saw the prisoner in the shop, about a quarter of an hour after my husband left—nobody had been near the till after my husband left, nor shortly before—I saw the prisoner reaching over the counter with his hand in the till—I was in the parlor behind the shop—I went into the shop—when he saw me he shut the till, and asked me if I had got any men's belts to sell—I said yes, but he ran out of the shop immediately—White brought him back in about two minutes—I examined the till, and there was six shillings in it, but ✗ half-crowns.

Prisoner. I believe she said at the office that she took a half-crown in her husband's absence. Witness. No—I said I had taken a number of half-crowns the morning before.

WILLIAM WHITE . I was near the prosecutor's shop on the evening of the 17th of May, and saw the prisoner rushing out of the shop—he nearly knocked Mrs. Barwick down—she ran after him, calling, "Stop thief"—heran against another man, who took him—hegot from him and then ran against me—I stopped him, and went back with him to the shop-when I stopped him he put his hand into his pocket, and I heared money jink in his pocket—it was the noise of silver—when he got into the shop he pulled out three half-crowns from his pocket.

JOHN DONEGAN . I am a policeman. On the 17th of May I received charge of the prisoner at the shop, and saw him produce three half-crowns, and on searching him afterwards found 2d. on him in copper—he said the money was his own.

Prisoner's Defence. If I had stolen the money, should I carry it in my handdown to the station-house, when I had the means of throwing it away—I showed what money I had, and put it on the counter—I went in to buy a belt—directly I got to the counter, I knocked, and the woman came oat to me—I asked if she had men's belts—she asked me for the money I took out of the till—I said, "What money?"—I said, "I will return with a policeman"—I walked out—that man stopped me, and brought me back—I took the money out and showed it—1 was not searched till I got to the station-house.

GUILTY . Aged 21. Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18370612-1423

1423. JOHN KIRSHAW was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering an order for the payment of £50, with intent to defraud John Drewett and another.

JOHN GRAHAM . I am cashier to John Drewett and Thomas Fowler, bankers in Princes-street, Mansion House. On the 24th of May the prisoner presented this cheque at our counter, signed "Emanuel Cooper," who keeps an account with us, and trades under the firm of "E. Cooper and Co.;" but he is the only person, I believe—I asked the prisoner who he brought it from—said, "From Mr. Oldham, Mr. Cooper's clerk"—I immediately took him to the partners, and told them it was an attempt at forgery—I knew immediately it had not any resemblance to the usual signature of the firm we sent for Mr. Cooper, who came over, and gave him into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. It does not bear any resemblance whatever to the signature of the firm? A. Not the slightest—nor to the mode of their drawing cheques.

EMANUEL COOPER . I trade under the firm of "Emanuel Copper and Co.," this not my signature—I never authorised any body to sign & cheque for me—it is not at all like my hand-writing—the prisoner was in my service as carman at the time—it was his duty to sweep the counting-house out in the morning—sometimes the cheque-book is about, and sometimes looked up—on the 23rd of May I was sent for to Drewett's, in consequence of which I examined my cheque-book, and found this cheque fitted to the end of the cheque-book, where two have been taken out without my knowledge—I found four torn out at the end, two of which I was aware of and two I was not, and it tallies with one of them.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons are there in your employ?A. Forty or fifty—about six or eight have access to the counting-house—the prisoner's business would only call him into the counting-house on a morning—he had nothing to do with the books—when I was sent for so Drewett's I asked him to write his name—he did so—I am of opinion the cheque is not his handwriting—I had never seen him write before—it not appear to be the same writing as his.

WILLIAM OLDHAM . I never saw this cheque till I was at the Mansions House—it is not Mr. Cooper's signature—I did Send the prisoner with it—I know nothing at all about it.

JOHN FORRESTER . I apprehended the prisoner, and have produced the cheque—(read.)

MR. BODKIN to EMANUEL COOPER. Q. What did the prisoner say to you? A. Forrester said he had said Mr. Oldham sent him with it he said "Yes, I did say so, but it was not so; I picked it up near Mr. Cooper's counting-house"—he had only been with me two on three weeks—it was not his business to go to the banker's—I think he had no means of knowing my handwriting.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18370612-1424

1424. JACOB JERRED was indicted for stealing 1 spoon, value 5s., the goods of Jeremiah Manning; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1425

1425. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing some kerseymere and nankeens, the goods of George Bousfield and others; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1426

1426. EDMOND ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May, 5 rings, value 37l.; 2 breast-pins and chain, value 1l. 10s.; 2 buttons, value 10s.; 4 watch keys, value 8s.; 1 towel, value 5s.; 1 scent-bottle, value 10s.; and 1 locket, value 5s.; the goods of the Hon. Gerald Valerian Wellesley, clerk, in his dwelling house.

LADY EMILY MARY WELLESLEY . I am the wife of the Hon. Gerald Valerian Wellesley, of Cleveland-row, St. James's. On Tuesday, the 9th of May, the next house to us was burnt to the ground—I was alarmed about two o'clock in the morning, got up, and found the next house in flames—there was a knocking at the door, and a policeman and soldiers were at the door—I called all my family up, and rushed down stairs and got out of the house—on the doors being opened some soldiers and policemen entered—I left the articles stated in the first-floor room—there was a diamond ring amongst them—we went home between eight and nine in the morning—I found a small box on my dressing-table, and in that all these articles had been—there were some Maltese gold buttons among them—the value of my articles was from 37l. to 40l.—the diamond ring alone was valued at twenty-five guineas by Rundle.

CHARLES LANE . I belong to the second battalion of Coldstress Guards. Early on the morning of the 9th of May I was in Clevelandrow—the prisoner was also on duty—I entered the house of Lady Wellesley—the prisoner was with me—I went into the first-floor back room and brought two or three trunks out of the house—the prisoner was up stairs.

Prisoner. I had the property, but am innocent of taking it out of the house—there were thirty or forty of us in the house—did you see me in the room the things were taken from? Witness. I saw you in the first-floor back room—you assisted me down with a trunk.

LADY WELLESLEY . The property was in the adjoining room to the one the witness describes.

HENRY GIBSON . I am an assistant to Mr. Jones, a pawnbroker a Tothill-street, Westminster. On the afternoon of the 9th of May, the prisoner came and offered me a brooch—I thought it of no value, and returned it to him—he then offered me this diamond ring for 2s.—I valued it at two guineas—I sent for a constable and gave him into custody—he told me a person who was waiting in a public-house adjacent had sent him to pawn them.

THOMAS MENTOR (police-constable B 130.) On the afternoon of the 9th of May, I was called into Mr. Jones's shop by Gibson, and looked at the ring—the prisoner said he had it from a person in a public-house close by and that person knew it was all right—he said he would go and fetch him but I prevented him—he stepped round an opening in the shop, and ran out at the side door into Darton-street—I caught him at the entrance of Queen-street, and took him back—I returned to where I had stopped him and found a gold chain and finger-ring which I had seen in his hand at the pawnbroker's—I afterwards went to the station-house, and in conesquence of something I sent for a nightman, who produced from the of the privy of the station-house six duplicates, a copper foreign coin, a Maltese button, a gold locket and brooch—he said the duplicates and brooch had fallen out of his pocket, but he knew nothing of the others—he afterwards said he had them from a comrade sleeping in the next bed, and afterwards that he found them at the Duke of York's monument, wrapped in a piece of rag—he said he knew nothing of the foreign coin, the button, gold locket

and watch-key—it was the ring, and brooch, and the duplicate he said he had from the person in the next bed.

Prisoner. I never said any thing about a comrade giving them to me Witness. I heard him say so.

RICHARD COOLER (police-constable B 110.) On the afternoon of the 9th of May, after five o'clock, I was in Tothill-street, and saw the prisoner running up Dartmouth-street—I assisted in taking him to station-house—he wished to step aside for a short time, but I refused to allow him till we got to the station-house—he was then allowed to go to the cell where these things were afterwards found—I searched him, and found a snuff-box, a watch-key, a bracelet, a Maltese button, and 14s., 5d., on him.

WILLIAM STUBBINGS . I am shopman Mr. Harding, a pawnbroker of York-street, Westminster. I produce a gold ring pawned on the 9th of May, about twelve o'clock, and another ring pawned for 1s. a gold brooch, two gold rings, and another ring; all pawned by the prisoner, one in the name of John Johnson, the rest in the name of Adams—five of the duplicates produced by the officer are counterparts of mine—the prisoner said he wanted a little money as he and his comrade were ones spree together—four of the articles, I consider, with the twelve month's interest and principal, are in for as much as they are worth—when I took them in they were worth as much again—they are gold, and worth 8s.—I do not know how much more they are worth: I should not like to give much more.

Prisoner. He asked me what my name was—I said "James Adams.Witness. He said "Johnson".

COURT. Q. Are they articles a lady would wear, or a man? A. One is a man's ring, and the brooch is a man's, and the small ring he said belonged to his wife.

GEORGE ELSTON . I am drill-sergeant of the second battalion of the May in consequence of an application, I examined the prisoner's pallet and found three pairs of scissors, a towel, a scent-box, and watch-key among his things—the scissors were in the folds of his knapsack and one pair in his housewife—the other articles were by his bed—I found a coat with the lining ripped so as to make a breast pocket.

LADY WELLESLY re-examined. All these articles are mine—one pair of scissors belongs to my daughter—they were all in my house—this diamond ring, pawned for 8s., was in the box with the rest of the things it is worth twenty-five guineas, and the ruby diamond ring only produced eleven or twelve guineas.

WILLIAM STUBBINGS re-examined. I spoke of four articles—the diamond ring was among the things pawned—I let 3s. on that.

LADY WELLESLY . I find all the five rings here—the two breast-pins, brooches, rings, two buttons and four watch-keys—they are all mine—every thing was in the room except the copper money. I know nothing of that.

WILLIAM STUBBINGS re-examined. Five articles were pawned with me—the diamond ring was the fifth, (not the diamond and ruby ring.) I lent 3s. on it—I did not mean the diamond ring when I said they were worth no more than I lent on them—I look it for a paste ring.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them wrapped up in a towel together when I was on duty at the Duke of York's pillar.

GUILTY. Aged 24.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18370612-1427

1427. MARY PATERNOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; and 8 pairs of shoes, value 30s.; the goods of Edward Dingley, from the person of Elizabeth Maria Wilsher: and JAMES TUCK for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing then to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.—2nd COUNT, for receiving them of an evil-disposed person.

ELIZABETH MARIA WILSHER . I am eight years old, and live at No. 10, Princess-street, Barbican, with my mother, who is now the wife of Edward Dingley, a gold and silver wire-drawer. On the 28th of April my mother gave me some things to take to Mr. Hemmings, No. 6, Artillery-court—I got to Lamb's-passage a little before seven o'clock, and the prisoner came up and asked me what my mother's name was—I said, "Dingley"—she said, "Do you not remember I promised your mother to give you a doll when you were old enough to take care of it?"—I said, "No"—she said, yes she did, and if I would come with her she would give it to me, or would I rather come to-morrow morning at ten o'clock—I said, "I would rather come to-morrow morning at ten o'clock"—she said she would shore me where she lived, and try and get it to-night, if I would come to-morrow morning—she said her name was Susan Clipsy—she took me to Finsbury-market, and pointed out where she lived, next to a public-house by Finsbury-market—I had a bundle—she then said she would ask her mother to give her a basket to put her aunt's bundle into; and she would put the doll on the top of it—she then took me to the iron gate, and took the eight pairs of shoes from me; as she was a long time gone, I went to where she said she lived, but could not find her there—I then came home and informed my mother.

ELIZABETH DINGLEY . I am the wife of Edward Dingley, and bind shoes for Mr. Hemmings. I sent my little girl with some on the 28th of April, at five minutes after seven o'clock, to go to Lamb's-court—she came home at five minutes after eight o'clock without them—I have since seen some the shoes at Worship-street—I know them by a mark on them, and by my own work—I have paid 1l. 10s. for them, having lost them—they went tied in a handkerchief.

THOMAS BESLEE (police-constable H 84.) On Saturday, the 29th an April, in consequence of information, I went to Mr. Dexter, the pawnbroker's, in Union-street, and found the male prisoner standing at the counter, offering some shoes for pledge—I asked him how he came by then—he said he had bought them overnight in Petticoat-lane, for 5s. 6d.—I asked if he should know the man again if he saw him—he said she should not—the pawnbroker took the shoes, and I took the prisoner to the station-house—he said he lived at No. 14, Wheeler-street, Spitalfields—I found no such person living there—he afterwards said he lived at No. 14 Nesbit's-court, Fashion-street—I found that was correct—he said her sister bought the shoes overnight at eight o'clock, and was to make money of them for rent—I asked him how he came to tell me he bought then in Petticoat-lane—he said he was in a flurry, and did not know what he said—I found the female prisoner at the lodging, sitting with the other prisoner's wife—I found no duplicates there, and told him I could not find them—he said he must have them in his watch-fob, and he pulled on three dublicates, and said he had pawned two himself, one his sister pawned—the silk-weaving business was carried on there.

JOHN KNIBB . I am shopman to Mr. Dexfer, a pawnbroker of Union-street.

I produce a pair of shoes which the policeman, desired me to detain—Tuck had offered them in pawn—he said he got them in Petticoat-lane.

JAMES MARLOW . I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, of Brick-lane, I produce a pair of shoes pawned on the 28th of April, in the name of Evans—I believe the prisoner Tuck to be the man—one of the duplicates produced was what I gave for them—but there has been an erasure on it.

Tuck. It rained as I came along, and I put it into my pocket before it was dry—that might cause the alteration.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I am shopman to John Savage, of Whitechapel-road. I have a pair of shoes pawned by Tuck on the 29tn of April—one of the duplicates produced was what I gave him.

JOHN DERRIDGE . I produce a pair of shoes pawned on the 28th of April by the female prisoner, in the name of Ann Davis. I find the counterpart of the duplicate produced by the officer—I am certain her person.

ELIZABETH DINGLEY re-examined. These are the shoes I sent out by my girl that night.

ELIZABETH MARIA WILSHER re-examined. The prisoner took the bundle off my arm—I did not deliver it to her.

Tuck's Defence. The other prisoner came to me on the 28th of April, while I was at work, with four pairs of boots, and asked me to take them to pawn for her—she said she had bought them—I was quite unconscious of doing wrong—being confused, I gave the officer wrong directions, but after recovering I corrected my mistake.

(Tuck received a good character.)

TUCK— GUILTY . Aged 20. Confined One year.

PATERNOSTER GUILTY . Aged 24

Reference Number: t18370612-1428

1428. MARY PATERNOSTER was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February, 1 bag, value 1s.; 1 jacket, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 waistcoat, value 14s.; the goods of Thomas Wilkinson, from the person of Elizabeth Churchman.

THOMAS WILKINSON . I live in Selby-street, Waterloo Town, and am a tailor. In February, I recollect giving my niece, Elizabeth Churchman, a blue bag, containing a black waistcoat, and jacket, to Mr. Freeman, Commercial-road, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon—she returned about five o'clock without them, and her apron was gone—she was led home by a person, quite insensible—I gave information of the robbery—she gave me a description which corresponded with the prisoner.

ELIZABETH CHURCHMAN . I am thirteen years old, my father's name is John Churchman, he is a baker. The prosecutor gave me a bag to take to Mr. Freeman's—I was in Whitechapel, and the prisoner came up to me and said, "Little girl, what is your name?"—I said, "Elizabeth Churchman"—she said "I knew you when you were three or four years old," and said, "I am going to your mother's. I will take you with me to my sister's, and then I will take you home and go and see your mother"—she said, "Come along with me three doors from the butcher's, that is my aunt's, I will go home and get my mother's basket, and put your things into it, and put a doll on the top of it"—I said "I cannot go, my uncle's work is wanted"—she took it out of my hand and looked at it, and did not give it me again—she said, "Oh, it is four o'clock on it, and we shall be back before that a good deal"—she said, "Where those petticoats are hanging out is my house, if you will stay three doors

from the baker's; when you see me running you stand still"—she ran away—a policeman came up, and I told him all about it.

Prisoner. I never saw the child in my life—my sister was put to bed on the 16th of February, and I was there all day on Thursday, the 18th. Witness. I am quite sure she is the person—I know her by her face.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1429

1429. MARY PATERNOSTER was again indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March, 1 cloak, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Pilkington; and 2 sheets, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Child; from the person of Ann Pilkington, the younger.

ANN PILKINGTON . I am eleven years of age, and am the daughter of Thomas Pilkington, of No. 28, Alfred-street, Stepney, a brewer. My mother sent me to Mr. Child's, at the Hay-field, for a pair of sheets to be washed—the bar-maid gave them to me—I had a cloak on to put them under—I know Hemmingway, in the Mile-end-road—I saw the prisoner there—she tapped me on the shoulder, and asked me what my name was—I said, Pilkington—she said she had known me ever since I was three years old, and when she was a little girl my mother bought her a great wax doll, and she would give it to me; she asked if I had a pinafore on—I said no—she said, "Come with me; I will give it you; my mother just now bought a clothes-basket, and I will put the sheets on the bottom, and the doll on the top of the sheets, and the cloak over them"—she took the sheets away from me, and the cloak off my back, and said she would run down to the woman's house, and I was to stay—she ran away, and I ran home and told my mother.

ANN PILKINOTON , sen. I am the wife of Thomas Pilkington, and the mother of Ann Pilkington. I sent the child out about the middle of March—she came back, crying, without her cloak, and gave the account she has now. MARY ALLAN. I live with Thomas Child, at the Hayfield public-house, Mile-end. The little girl came to me in March—I gave her a pair of sheets—she came back afterwards with her mother without them—they belong to Mr. Child, and were sent to be washed.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of that.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

(There were other indictments against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18370612-1430

1430. ANN COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May, 1 pair of boots value 10s. 6d. the goods of Ralph Wilcoxon.

SAMUEL WILLS . I am foreman to Ralph Wilcoxon, of Tottenham-court-road, a shoemaker. On the night of the 30th of May, about seven o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop window, and took a pair of boots that hung on the frame outside, placed one under each arm, threw her shawl over them, and walked away with them—I went out, and stopped her with them—she said she did it from distress.

ROBERT ROGERS (police-constable E 64.) I took the prisoner into custody in the prosecutor's shop, and have the boots which I received from Wills—she said she did it from distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. As I was coming along the boots laid there on the pavement and I took them up.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Month.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, June 14th, 1887.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370612-1431

1431. HENRY BAYLIS and ALFRED BAYLIS were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of June, 2 bottles, value 6d.; 3 pints of wine, value 6s.; 1 plane, value 3s.; 1 hat-brush, value 6d.; and 1 umbrella, value 2s.; the goods of John Warman, their master.

WILLIAM COLLY ER (City police-constable No. 89.) I heard the cry of "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner Henry running down Trinity-lane, and Mr. Warman after him—he gave him in charge for stealing two bottles of wine—he said he had not got it, but he had taken one, and was very sorry, and I should find the empty bottle at his lodging—I went there, and found an empty bottle, and the other things, which the prosecutor owned, but he is not here.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did not the prosecutor tell him it was no use to deny it? A. I did not hear it—I cannot swear he didnot.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1432

1432. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. the goods of Charles Alexander M' Intosh, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

CHARLES ALEXANDER M'INTOSH . I live in Great New-street, Gough-square, On the evening of the 23rd of May, I was in Fleet-street—I felt a tug, turned, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand—I could not catch hold of him, but I did not lose flight of him till he was secured.

ALEXANDER M'INTOSH . I was with the prosecutps, and saw the handkerchief in the prisoner's hand—I saw it taken from him—he ran away—Ipursued and saw him taken.

GEORGE BUCKLEY . I am a patrol of St. Bride's—the prisoner was running owards me and I caught him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES ANDREWS (police-constable M 45.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office—office(read)—he is the man that was tried.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1433

1433. WILLIAM KIRK was indicted for feloniously receiving, of a ertain evil disposed person, 1 truss of hay, value 2s. 6d. the goods of James Horne, well knowing the same to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JAMES HORNE . Robert Hampton was in my service for about six months on the 26th of April I sent him to Waltham Abbey with a load of hay I did not give him directions to take more than one load—I received Information from Perry.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You did not tell Hanpton to go to Perry? A. No.

ROBERT HAMPTON . I am labourer to Mr. Horne. On the 26th of April I drove the cart with a load of hay to come to London—I took one truss more, and put it on the top of the cart—I took it to the White Hart, at Ponder's End, where Kirk is ostler—I took my horse out, and Kirk came and asked whether I had got a truss—I said there was One on the tart—I baited my horse with bran and chaff which I brought from my master's—I do not know whether Kirk took the hay off or not—when I

was coming away he gave me 2d. and said, "I owe you 1s."—I had told Perry to bind a truss of hay and put it on the top of the cart, to be left at Rapley's, for my master to take home next day to cut into chaff.

WILLIAM PERRY . I bound this truss of hay—Hampton took it up the ladder, and put it on the top.

ANN RAPLEY . I am sister to Mr. Horne's wife—Hampton told Perry he was going to leave this hay at my house, but he did not—I saw it pass by on the top of the cart.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1434

1434. ELIZABETH ROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May, 11 spoons, value 4l.; and 1 pair of sugar tongs, value 8s., the goods of Thomas Croome, her master.

THOMAS CROOME . I live in Craven-buildings, City-road. The prisoner was in my service—I lost some spoons and a pair of sugar tongs—these are them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you remember the chimney sweeps coming? A. Yes—I have no recollection of her lighting the wrong fire—my wife and her had no particular misunderstanding; she turned sulky—I saw her sister, but I have no recollection of sending her with a message to the prisoner—Mary Mills came to my house, and I told her the spoons were gone, and the prisoner had refused to tell me anything except that they were not out of the house—I did not ask Mills to go to her and tell her if she would tell what she had done with the spoons would not injure her—I have no recollection of it, because I knew she was in the hands of the law—I swear I did not say so—the spoons were found in the water-butt, on Friday the 12th of May.

ELIZABETH CROOME . I am the prosecutor's wife. I missed three spoons down stairs, and told the prisoner I was fearful she had left the street door open—I went up stairs, and found the cupboard door broken open and all the spoons gone—I came down and said to her, "Mary, where are the spoons? the cupboard door is broken open"—I got no answer—I called again and got no answer—I did not quarrel with her about the chimney sweeps—she showed her airs to me very much, and I was quite afraid of her.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not light a fire in the wrong place the day the sweeps came? A. I told her not to light one in the kitchen till it was all cleaned, and she did do so—I told her she should not have done so—she answered in an impertinent way, and turned sulky.

JOHN COULSON . I am headborough of St. Luke's. I was sent for to the prosecutor's about six o'clock—Mrs. Croome asked me whether I thought any thieves had got in at the front place—I said, "No, they could not"—I went and saw the cupboard which was broken open—I came down and asked the prisoner what she had done with the spoons—she would not give me any answer—about nine o'clock she said, "Here is a shilling for your goodness to my sister"—I said I did not want it—she then told me she had broken open the cupboard with a hatchet, and would have broken two or three more if she had not found the property—she would not tell what she had done with them—she said she wished to be transported.

SUSAN JAY . I was at Mrs. Croome's—the prisoner's sister came there and told me the spoons were in the water-butt in the coal cellar—I went there with a candle, and they were there—the prisoner was taken on the Friday, and these were found on the Wednesday after.

ANN COLLINGHAM . I was going to search the prisoner—she said

You are going to search me for the plate"—I said, "I don't know"—she said, "I have no ticket—I have not put it away, but I won't tell them where it is without they promise to transport me"—I found 7s. on her—she would not tell me where the property was.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe she said she should never do any good for herself in this country? A. Yes, she did.

MR. CROOME re-examined. There was water in the butt—it was always in use—she could not get the spoons out with her hand—I was obliged to use the tongs.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1435

1435. ELIZA SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., 6d., the goods of Henry Frederick Francis Adair Barrington, from his person.

HENRY FREDERICK FRANCIS ADAIR BARRINGTON . I was walking In the Strand on the 13th of May, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning—the prisoner came up with some flowers in a basket, and asked for some money, which I refused, and walked on—I felt the basket rubbing against me, and I turned, and desired her to go away—she slunk away—I had occasion soon after for my handkerchief, and missed it, and soon after Mr. Jeffreys, who was with me, missed his—this is mine—it was safe about a quarter of an hour before.

MARRMADUKE ROBERT JEFFREYS . I was with the prosecutor—a person came up, but I cannot swear to the prisoner—when my friend missed his handkerchief, I missed mine.

EDWARD OWEN SIMONS (police-constable F 54.) I was on duty on that morning—the prosecutor gave me information, and I took the prisoner into custody—I found ten handkerchiefs on her—one of them is the prosecutor's.

Prisoner. I was very much in liquor. Witness. No, she was not—I found seven in her breast, two under her left arm, and one more.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man and woman, and got so intoxicated, I was not able to walk—I sat down on the step of a door, and the woman forced these handkerchiefs into my bosom—I had no flowers or basket with me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18370612-1436

1436. ELIZA SMITH was again indicated for stealing, on the 13th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods Marmaduke Robert Jeffreys, from his person.

MARMADUKE ROBERT JEFFREYS . I was in the strand, and missed my handkerchief—I had felt it safe within an hour—this is it.

Prisoner. There was a man followed you with a stick and nightcap. Witness. That was, much earlier in the evening, we were annoyed by a man begging, but he did not touch me; but on this occasion, some woman came behind and touched me.

EDWARD OWEN SIMONS . I am a policeman, I found this handkerchief on the prisoner with the others—she was sober, and could, walk well.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for seven years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1437

1437. EMMA HOLLINGSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 1 scent-bottle, value 3d.; 1 grain weight of gold, value 2d.; and 2s. 11/2 d.; the goods and monies of Edward Smith Marshall, her master.

EDWARD SMITH MARSHALL . I am a gold-beater and live in Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner was my servant—having missed money, on Tuesday, the 30th of May, about half-past two o'clock, I marked one penny, ten halfpence, two half-crowns, five shillings, and one sixpence, and put them into my cash-box in the bureau in the back parlour—the box was occasionally locked—they were safe between eleven and twelve o'clock at night—on going to bed I locked the bureau, to the best of my knowledge—the key turned in the usual manner—in the morning I missed one shilling and two halfpence—I then marked two shillings and one sixpence, and added them to the number which I had previously placed there—I went out about two o'clock in the afternoon, and left them safe—I returned before five o'clock, and found 2s. 2 1/2 d. had been abstracted—I sent for a policeman, and asked the prisoner if she would consent to be searched—she did so, and we found in her pocket a piece of gold, which I had missed about three weeks before—not finding the marked money on her, I asked if she would consent to have her box searched—she said yes—on getting into her room, she said, "If I confess the truth, will you forgive me?"—I said, "Open your box"—she did, and I saw a bag—she said, "I have taken 3s. 1 1/2 d. out of the box, and no more"—we only discovered two shillings and three halfpence marked, which I recognised and a scent-bottle, which she afterwards said she had taken from the kitchen.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I believe you did not know to whom she belonged? A. No further than her own report. I believe she is the daughter of a tradesman of considerable respectability, who has now left off business.

ISAAC MARSH (police-constable E 41.) I took the prisoner, and the found the money in her box.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury. Confined Two Days.

Reference Number: t18370612-1438

1438. JOHN BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May, 432 cap peaks, value 4l. 5s., the goods of John Rawlings and others.

GEORGE CLARK . I am errand boy to John Rawlings, a currier, in Houndsditch. On Saturday morning the 20th of May, I was going over Tower-hill with my master's truck behind me, with 432 cap peaks—I looked round, and found the rope had been cut and the parcel taken off—I put the truck down, ran back, and found the prisoner with it under his arm—I called "Stop thief"—he dropped it in the kennel, and ran up Rosemary-lane—I ran past the parcel after him—I then thought I should lose it—I came back and found the policeman with it—while I was putting it on the truck again, the prisoner and another came up—the other said, "I wanted a piece of rope—I said, "You are the person that cut it."

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Are you quite sure the truck was behind you? A. Yes—I did say it was before me, but I made a mistake—I am not mistaken in the prisoner's person—I was close behind him, and the gas was lighted—I did not see him take it—I went about forty yards before I saw him with it—his back was towards me—I did not lay hold of him—he threw down the parcel before I sang out—when the prisoner and the other came back to the truck, I told them they

were the party that cut it—I will take my oath of that—this deposition was read over to me at Lambeth-street—(read)—(" I said,' You are the party as just cut it'—the prisoner directly ran away—the policeman went after him and brought him back")—I said "They were the party that cut it"—I suppose they made a mistake in putting it down—it was read over to me—I did not tell them it was incorrect—I only saw one person running, but two came back.

COURT. Q. Are you sure he is the person? A. I am most sure he is—I did not see his face at any time except in turning a corner.

MICHAEL MADDER . I am a policeman. I heard the cry of" Stop thief"—I made towards the place—the prisoner was passing by, and the boy gave him in charge.

HENRY SINGER . I am a policeman. I saw Clark running—I picked up the bundle.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1439

1439. HARRIETT STEVENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th May, 2 printed books, value 3s.; 2 shawls, value 4s.; 2 frocks, value 2s.; 1 tippet, value 6d.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d.; 1 box, value 6d.; and 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; the goods of Joshua Crockford, her master.

SUSANNAH CROCKFORD . I am the wife of Joshua Crockford, and live in Litchfield-street, Soho. The prisoner came into our service on the 17th of May—on the 24th I had suspicions, and on moving her bundle I discovered some books, which led me to open it, and there I found the greater part of these things, and the others in her box—I had given her notice, and she was going away—she said she was sorry she had taken them.

WILLIUM ELLIS (police-constable C 91.) I took the prisoner—in going to the station, she said she did not know what beneath'd her to take the things.

Prisoner's Defence. I was cleaning the back room and took those things out—the prosecutrix called me down to go to Tottenham Court-road—I went into my bed room and took the things in my hand, and forgot where I laid them—there was nothing else that I know of in the bundle—she desired to see my box—but there was nothing there.

MRS. CROCKFORD. Yes; there was one shawl and the gloves in the box.

Prisoner. I took the shawls off the bed, and forgot where I laid them—I merely took the books to read—they were not in the bundle—I took them into my room when I went to change my gown, and had no idea of taking them out of the house—I did not know I was going to leave—she said I was not strong enough to do her work. Witness. The, shawls were tied up in her gown, and the books were in the bundle with some of her things.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1440

1440. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May, 2 pewter pots, value 2s., 4d., the goods of Francis Ward: and 2 pewter pots, value 2s., 4d. the goods of Edward Whatmore.

FEANCIS WARD . I keep a public-house in Edgware-road. I have lost a great many pots—two of these are mine.

ANN WHATMORE . I am the wife of Edward Whatmore—we keepthe New Inn, Edgware-road. Two of these pots are ours.

GEORGE FELTHAM . I am a police-inspector of the E division, I met the prisoner, about four o'clock in the morning on the 29th of May, in Conant-square,

with these pots, one in the crown of his hat, two in his jacket pocket, and one in his other pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1441

1441. JOHN HOOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May, 2 pewter pots, value 4s., the goods of John Brown; and 2 pewter pots value 4s., the goods of James Phillips.

JAMES PHILLIPS . I keep the Dun Cow, in the Kent-road. Two of these pots are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. What do you know them by? A. By the marks on the handle—it must be since the 20th of March I lost them, for I purchased them then—I do not know the prisoner.

JOHN BROWN . I keep the Green Man, Kent-road. I have lost twentythree dozen of pots this year—these two are mine.

JOHN HALL . I am a pewterer. These pots came from the shop where I work—I marked them for Mr. Brown and Mr. Phillips.

EDWARD M'CARTHY (police-constable H 96.) I was in Bethnal-green on the 25th of May, at three o'clock in the morning, and met the prisoner with a sack on his shoulder—I asked him what he had—he said three or four sacks, and he had come from Epsom Races—(he is in the habit going to fairs and races to assist publicans)—he said, "I live in Cattle-street, opposite the Feathers"—I went round there, met my brother officer and went to No. 64, Castle-street—the prisoner laid down his sack—my brother officer felt it—there were four pots in it, and four other sacks—the names are erased from the fronts of the pots.

Cross-examined. Q. Does the prisoner keep a shop? A. Yes, a little fruit-shop—there was a half-pint pot in the sack that had his own name on it—he said he used it to measure his nuts in.

MR. BALLANTINE called

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I have known the prisoner about fourteen years—he is a pewterer, and has worked for my father—he lives in Castle-street—I went with him to Epsom Races on Wednesday morning about four o'clock, and remained till half-past one on Thursday morning—we took three barrels of ale and porter with us, and four or five pots, which if we brought back on Thursday morning.

JAMES PHILLIPS re-examined. I heard the prisoner say that he scraped out the name in front of the pots—Mr. Brown was there at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370612-1442

1442. EDWARD LINCOLN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April, 1 writing-case, value 20s.; 1 umbrella, value 10s.; 1 key, value 6d.; and 1 ink-stand, value 1s.; the goods of Sir Culling Eardley Smith Bart.—2nd COUNT, for stealing a paper case.—3rd COUNT, stating it to be a portfolio.—4th Count, stating it to be a sofflet.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

SIR CULLING EARDLEY SMITH, BART . I live in Grosvenor-place. On the 3rd of April, I took a ca in Oxford-street, at the corner of Tottenham-court-road, to go to my residence—I had this writing-case with me, and the inkstand and key in it, and an umbrella—my name is in full length on the case—I was driven to my residence—I did not take my things in with me, but forgot them—I had various papers and letters in the case—it was

not cut open then—it was locked up—I have not recovered my umbrella.

Cross-examined by MR. PRICE. Q. Is this the key of the case? A. No, it was in the case—the prisoner was indicted yesterday for stealing this Lame article under another name—the things produced were in the case—I never saw the case again till it was produced by the policeman some con-siderable time after.

SAMUEL HUGHES . I am a police-inspector. In consequence of information, I went to No. 2, Crown-court, Liquorpond-street, on Saturday morning, the 12th of May—I waited, and saw the prisoner at half-past two o'clock—I called him by name, and said, "Do you remember taking up a fare at the corner of Tottenham-court-road and Oxford-street, which you set down at No. 35, Grosvenor-place?"—he said, "No"—I then said, "I want you for stealing a writing-desk and umbrella which was left in the cab on that occasion"—he shook his head, and said, "No"—I asked him for the key of the room—he produced it, and unlocked the door—I went up stairs with him to his room—he produced a box, which he said was his; and in it I found this case cut as it is now—there were about twenty letters and memorandums in it, which I returned to Sir Culling—after taking the case out I said, "Where is the umbrella?"—he said he did not know—he said there was an old one in the cupboard on the stairs—but I could not find one—he then said, that after he set down Sir Culling he took another gentleman to Pimlico, who said, "Here are these things in the cab"—the prisoner said, "Yes, there is an umbrella too;" and the gentleman said, "No, there is only this one, which is mine."

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prisoner drank or sober? A. He had been drinking, but he was not drunk—I consider he was perfectly sober—I said to him first, "I want you for stealing a writing-desk and umbrella which was left in your cab"—I mentioned Sir Culling Smith's name, but I think not more than once—he then said, "Well, it is there."

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he in any way account to you for having it cut open? A. Yes—he asked me what I thought he should get, I said, I did not know, it was a foolish thing for him not to take it to the Stamp office—he said, he could not take it to the Stamp office after cutting it—those were the very words he used.

RICHARD DAVIS . I am a cab proprietor. The prisoner was in my employ for seven or eight months, up to the time he was taken—he was driving for me on the 3rd of April.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1443

1443. GEORGE BISSEL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, 1 watch, value 1l; 3 brooches, value 9s.; 1 ring, value 2s.; 2 ear-rings, value 3s.; 2 scent bottles, value 1s.; 1 stud, value 6d.; 2 waistcoats, value 3s.; and 1 pair of trowsers, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of John Goffe; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN GOFFE . I am a plush weaver, and live at Hook Norton, in Oxfordshire. On the 18th of April I left my house at eight o'clock in the morning—I returned about eight o'clock in the evening—I found the house broken open, and missed these things and some others—the thieves must have got in at the window—the prisoner was at work in my shop when left in the morning, and absconded.

CHARLES JAMES MURRAY . I am a constable of Uxbridge. I saw this

property advertised in the Hue and Cry—I was passing up Uxbridge as the 14th of May, and met the prisoner, and recognised him directly—I stopped him and asked what his name was—after some hesitation he said "Bissel"—I said, "You are the man I want, you are advertised in the Hue and Cry"—I took him to a public-house, and found on him a pass from the House of Correction, and his name to it—I then asked where the goods were—he said, he gave Mr. Gillet, of Friday-street, two duplicates, one for the watch, and one for the brooch and trinkets—I went to Mr. Gillet, who gave me the duplicate, and got the watch out and gave it to me.

JOHN KEYES . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this watch on the 28th of April.

EDWARD GILLET . I am a wine merchant in Friday-street. The prisoner has been employed by my brother in the country—he called on me about the 9th of May, stating that he had had nothing to eat all day, and had no money to get a night's lodging—I had just returned from the country, and had heard of the robbery—I said, I had a great mind to send for a policeman, and give him in charge—he said, he did not care—I the asked where the property was—he said he had pawned it—I asked for the duplicates, and he gave them me—I said, I should detain them, and sent him about his business, giving him a shilling—I gave the duplicates to my porter to get the things out.

GEORGE ELLCOCK . I am porter to Mr. Gillet. I got this watch out of pawn.

WILLIAM HENRY NEAGLE . I am a pawnbroker in Jermyn-street. On the 6th of May I received these three brooches and trinkets from the prisoner.

CHARLES PHILLIPS . I am a clothes salesman. The prisoner brought a pair of trowsers and two waistcoats, and offered them for sale for 6s.—I gave him 5s.—the trowsers are sold again, but the waistcoats are here.

JOHN BIRCH . I am a constable of Uxbridge. I went to Mr. Giilet's porter—he gave me the duplicate for these rings and brooches—I went and found them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am the superintendent of the Banbury police. I got this certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from the clerk of the peace for Banbury—(read)—I was a witness on the trial—the prisoner is the person who was convicted.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Transported for Life.

Reference Number: t18370612-1444

1444. NATHANIEL SMITH was indicted for embezzlement.

ABRAHAM PHILIP BROMWICH . I keep the Red Lion, at Shad well. The prisoner was my potman—he took out beer, and received money on my account, which he should pay to me whenever he received it—I never gave him trust for a day or two.

GEORGE FOWLER . I live in Elm-row, Shadwell. On the 4th of October I paid the prisoner 10s. 3d., on account of his master—he gave me a receipt, but I destroyed it—on the 17th I paid him 2s., and on the 14th of November 7s. 6d.

JOEL CHEENEY (police-constable C 59.) I took the prisoner into custody.

ABRAHAM PHILIPS BROMWICH re-examined. I never received these sums from the prisoner—I did not discover any thing about this till the 19th of December—I had asked him what was the reason the bills were not paid—he said Mr. Fowler had not had time to look over the bills—on the 19th I spoke to him rather sharply about it, and said I must speak to Mr. Fowler about it—he went down the street, and came up again about three o'clock, and said Mr. Fowler had looked over the bills, and if I would send change for a £5 note, he would settle it—I gave him the change to go and get it, but did not receive it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never committed any thing of the kind before.

GUILTY .—Aged 47.

Reference Number: t18370612-1445

1445. NATHANIEL SMITH was again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December, 4 sovereigns, 4 half-crowns, 8 shillings, and 4 sixpences, the monies of Abraham Philips Bromwich, his master.

ABRAHAM PHILIPS BROMWICH . On the 19th of December the prisoner asked me for change for a £5 note, to take to Mr. Fowler—I gave him four sovereigns, four half-crowns, eight shillings, and four sixpences—he never returned to me again.

GEORGE FOWLER . I did not tell the prisoner to bring me change for a £5 note—he brought me a bill of his master's on the 14th of November, which I paid him, and have his receipt for it—I never saw him after that.

GUILTY . Aged 47.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1446

1446. EDWARD POINTER, alias Brazier, was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May, 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 9d.; and 1 pair of boots, value 8s. 9d.; the goods of Nicholas Westlake, his master.

NICHOLAS WESTLAKE . I am a shoemaker, and live in Wellington-square, Gray's Inn-road. The prisoner worked for me, and lodged in my house for three or four weeks—on the 16th of May I went out about two o'clock, and returned about six o'clock—I missed six pairs of boots and shoes, and some of our tools—I found a duplicate for a pair of boots on the prisoner's seat, but could not find him—I took him next morning in my own house—he said he had taken one pair of boots, and one pair of shoes, but not the others—the duplicate of a pair of shoes was found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Will you say, on your oath, that the prisoner worked for you? A. Yes—I procured work for him of a person named Clark—he never told me that he had pledged a pair of boots of mine, nor shoes—I did not give him these boots to pledge—he did not say a word about the shoes till he came to the station-house, when the policeman found the duplicate on him, and then he said he had pledged them, but not the other five; that Adam Sawyer had taken them, a pal of his, as he called him—I never gave him leave to pawn a pair of boots or shoes—three men and two women came to me to make it up—they said they would employ a counsellor, and get the better of me—1 did not say if they gave me any thing I would forego this—I should know the people again.

CHARLES JAMES MERCER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I produce a pair of boots—I cannot say who pawned them—I did not take them in—they were pledged in the name of William Pointer.

HENRY WILDING . I am in the employ of Mr. Loveday, a pawnbroker. 1 have a pair of shoes pawned in the name of Edward Pointer—I do not know by whom.

MR. ALLEY called

JOHN BLACKLOCK . I went to the prosecutor—he said he would make a flaw in the indictment, provided the money was made up for the goods that were pawned—I went again with the prisoner's sister, and he told the same story then that he did to me.

COURT. Q. How came you to go to the prosecutor? A. The sitter came up, and I had a letter from the prisoner—the prosecutor did not send for me—I did not go on the part of the prisoner.

JOHN FENLOCK . I went to the prosecutor's house, hearing he wanted 30s., to ask him if he could not take less—he said he could not—he sat down and wrote, and then said 2l. 12s. 6d.—I told him I could not do it; I must write to his friends.

GUILTY. Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1447

1447. JOSEPH KERRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March, 336lbs. weight of lead, value 2l. 5s., the goods of Robert Leverington; and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

CHARLOTTE CLEVELEY . I live in Charles-square. On the 10th of March the prisoner came, and said he came from Mr. Leverington, the landlord, to repair the roof—he was quite a stranger—he inquired wat part wanted most repairing—I said I would inquire—he went away, and came again in about an hour—he asked me to close the shutters of the first floor back window, as he was afraid of breaking it—he went on the roof—I saw some lead, brought down from the top of the house, in a barrow—it was wheeled away—there was another man stood by the barrow—I cannot say whether he went on the roof—I inquired of the prisoner, while he was on the roof, what he was doing—he said he was taking the old lead away by Mr. Leverington's orders, and going to put new on—I never saw him again till he was at the police-office—I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What time did he come? A. About nine o'clock in the morning.

ROBERT LEVERINGTON . This house is mine—on the evening of the 10th of March I was informed of this—I went there, and saw that the rain came in—I went on the roof next day, and half the lead had been takes away—I should think 336lbs. were gone—I do not know the prisoner—I did not employ him, or any one, to go and strip the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any person ordered to repair any other house of yours? A. Yes, but not this house—I am the householder.

JAMES MILLER (police-constable N 164.) I apprehended the prisoner in Elizabeth-street, Hackney-road—I did not know any thing of this case at that time.

(James Miller, of George-gardens, Bethnal-green; James Ballinger, silk-weaver, Elizabeth-street, Hackney-road; and Mills, Hare-street, Spitalfields, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1448

1448. JOSEPH KERRISON was again indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April, 21 glazed window-sashes, value 9l.; and 561bs. weight of lead, value 10s.; the goods of John Tanner; and fixed to a certain build-ing; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN TANNER . I am the owner of thirteen houses in Mills's-court, Curtain-road. The sashes were taken from nearly all the houses—I had

not seen them for about two months before—the houses were empty—there was some lead cut away from the gutter between Nos. 1 and 2.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Were these all empty houses? A. I do not know that they were all empty—I was the sole lessee at that time—I have a person named Tiffin in my employ, but I bad not at that time.

CHARLES JONATHAN PARSONS . I am a cordwainer, and live at No. 19, Mills-court. The prisoner came to me, and asked which were Mr. Tanner's houses—I pointed them out to him, and said, "Has Mr. Tanner sent you?"—he said, "Yes—have you seen Mr. Tanner this morning?"—I said, "No"—he said, "He has given me one key to go in, and was to meet me here"—I said, "He must have been an old fool to give you only one key to go into thirteen houses"—next day I saw him again, and asked him if he worked for Mr. Tanner—he told me again that he worked for him—at another time he told me Mr. Tanner was gone to Lambeth to buy some scaffolding poles—one morning I came down and opened my window, and saw him with a half-sash on his shoulder—he went into No. 16, and said he was to take them all there till he saw Mr. Tanner—I then went and told Mr. Tanner, and next morning I went and tried the doors, and they were fast.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner come there again? A. Yes, but he was not taken up—he was taken for another robbery—it was about the 30th of April I saw him take the sashes into No. 16—I saw him about for a fortnight—there were no workmen about the premises at that time.

ELIZABETH ANN PARSONS . I saw the prisoner in April, as I was standing at our door—he said, "Can you tell me which are Mr. Tanner's houses?" I said, "Yes"—he said he came to take-out the sashes till the houses were let—I said, "If so, I will not stop in our house; it will look a pretty beggarly place; I will go away."

MR. TANNER re-examined. The prisoner was a total stranger to me—I never directed him to go and take out the sashes, nor to take away the lead.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Transported for Seven Years more.

(There were three other indictments against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18370612-1449

1449. WILLIAM WHILES and RICHARD ROBERTS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May, 8lbs. weight of copper, value 4s., the goods of Henry Spring; and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

EDWARD KIRBY DARLINGTON (police-constable C 11.) On the 26th of May I apprehended the prisoners, from information I had received—I found Whiles at his mother's—I said I wanted him respecting the robbery in Hoxton-square on the 4th of May—he said he knew nothing at all about it—after I got him to the station-house, he asked how long I was going to keep him there—I said, "I don't know; if you know any thing about Roberts, you had better tell me"—he said, "I think you will find him at a beershop, and if it had not been for him I should not have done it"—I went and found Roberts.

RICHARD HAWKES . I am a policeman. On the 4th of May I was in Hoxton-square, at a quarter before six o'clock in the morning—I saw the two prisoners near Mr. Spring's house—I went up to them—a person gave a whistle—the two prisoners, and another named Hitchins, joined—they all went to Hoxton, and there Hitchins threw the bag away—Roberts looked round, but they made their escape—on the 27th I

was sent for to the Mansion-house, and saw the prisoners, and knew them—I took up the bag, which contained sheet copper—Hitchins was convicted here last Session, and it was produced on his trial, and returned to the prosecutor.

Whiles. This witness said he could swear to Roberts, but when he came again he swore to me. Witness. No I did not—I stated the same as I have now—I swear they are the two men that were with Hitchins—they were close to the rails of Mr. Spring's house—I think it was Roberts who whistled—he was nearest to me.

GEORGE BALL . I am a policeman. On the morning of the 4th of May I saw two persons running—my brother officer called to me—I stopped Hitchins, and Whiles ran close by me at the time, but I did not see Roberts—he had separated from them.

HINRY SPRING . The house, 12, Hoxton-square, is mine—the policeman came in the morning and produced this copper—it is mine, and was taken from over the window of the kitchen—the officer fitted it to the place—it had been safe the night before.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

WHILES— GUILTY . Aged 19. ROBERTS— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months.

OLD COURT.—Thursday, June 15th, 1837.

Second Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370612-1450

1450. MARY HARTNELL. alias Lewis, was indicted for feloniously uttering a counterfeit half-crown to Emanuel Passmore, she having been previously convicted as a common utterer; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1451

1451. SAMUEL PARCEL was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 1 coat, value 2l., the goods of George Smith Thornton; and 1 coat, value 2l., the goods of Charles Snell Paris.

ANN FISHER . I am servant to Mr. Abraham, at No. 18, Bruton-street, Berkeley-square. Mr. Thornton lives in the house with us—on the 23rd of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner called at the house; he was quite a stranger, and asked me if Mr. Paris was at home—he was a gentleman living in the house—I said no, he was not—he said he came for an answer to a note which was left that day—he said a note was to be left in the drawing-room—I went up to look for it, and was hardly a minute gone when I heard the door open and shut—I ran down, and saw him cross the road with the coats on his shoulder—he was brought back with them soon after.

GEORGE HOPKINS . I am servant to Mr. Cook. I was in Bruton-street, and observed the prisoner cross the road with the great coats, from No. 18—a young man came out and ran after him, and just opposite me he dropped the coats and ran away—I took them up and took them back to the house—he is the man.

GEORGE KIMPTON . I am shopman to Mr. Abraham. I saw the prisoner go into the house and come out with the coats—I am certain he is the person.

THOMAS SCOTT . I am a policeman. I heard the cry of "Stop thief,"

and saw the prisoner running—he was crying "Stop thief"—I pursued and overtook him in Cork-street—I produce the coats.

CHARLES SNELL PARIS . I lodge at this house—this coat belongs to me, and I know that the other belongs to Mr. George Smith Thornton.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1452

1452. DAVID MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May, 3 shillings, the monies of Robert Read.

ROBERT READ . I keep a beer-shop in Upper Bryanstone-street. The prisoner lodged in my house for two months, and slept in the same room with five other persons—complaint was made to me by some of them that they had been robbed of clothes—I slept in that room myself on Friday and Saturday, the 27th and 28th of May—I had previously marked six shillings and six sixpences—I put them into my smallclothes pocket, and put my trowsers on the table in the room, near the foot of my bed" I awoke about five o'clock in the morning and laid awake till seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner standing at the foot of my bed with my trowsers in his hand—I pretended to be asleep—he put them down—I got up, dressed myself, and went down, and found three of the shillings gone from my pocket—the prisoner came down in half-an-hour, and I said, "Morgan, you have taken three shillings from my pocket; give me up the money, and tell me where the other things are that have been missing, and I do not wish to hurt you"—he denied all knowledge of it—I called in a policeman, who searched him in my presence, and found the three marked shillings on him—these are them.

WILLIAM DICKINSON . I am a policeman. I found three marked shillings on the prisoner.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 40.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Baron Parke.

Reference Number: t18370612-1453

1453. JOHN MASSEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Smith, about the hour of one, in the night of the 6th of November, at Hanwell, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 breast-pin, value 30s.; and 1 pair of boots, value 5s.; the goods of William Smith; and 1 desk, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 1l. 10s.; 1 work-box, value 1l.; 1 tea-caddy, value 1l.; 11 knives, value 10s.; 4 napkins, value 3s.; 1 pair of snuffers and stand, value 1l.; 9 printed books, value 1l.; and 1 snuff-box, value 10s.; the goods of the said John Smith; and CHARLOTTE HILL , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against; the Statute, &c.—2nd COUNT, for receiving them of an evil disposed person.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN SMITH . I am a linen-draper, and live at Hanwell, in Middlesex; I reside in the house, it is in the parish of Hanwell. On the 6th of November I had a brother staying with me in the house—he had spent the Sunday with me—I retired to rest about eleven o'clock—I examined the premises before I went to bed, and found them all secure—I always take the keys of the doors up stairs with me to my bed-room—my brother called me up about seven o'clock—I Went down and examined the premises,

and found the iron grating forced out of the wall, it led into the cellar—the grating gave light into the cellar from the garden—it was secured by being fixed into the wall—I found it had been forcibly taken out, which would allow a person to enter—another grating had been attempted, but without success—I had seen the grating safe the night before—I missed a great many articles—I printed a list of them and circulated it about—I missed the articles stated, with many others—they were worth about 35l.

WILLIAM SMITH . I live in Connaught-square, Paddington, and am a linen-draper, and brother to the prosecutor. On the 6th of November I was at his house at Hanwell—I stopped there that night, and had a great coat, a black cravat, with a diamond pin in it, and a pair of boots—they were safe in the house on the night of the 6th—I took them there with me—the servants got up first in the morning—I was up before my brother, and found the grating removed, and called my brother—I missed all the three articles I have mentioned—I got up at seven o'clock, it was then twilight—it may have been half-past seven o'clock before I came down stairs—the servants were up probably half an hour before me—the value of the article I lost is 5l.

GEORGE COLLIER . I am a policeman. I went to No. 1, New North-street, Red-lion-square, where the male prisoner was lodging on the 12th of May—I saw some boxes there—I found nobody but the landlady—I found nine duplicates in the boxes, referring to this case—and this work-box I received from the landlady, Amy Parry—I found there four books, a snuffbox, some knives and forks, and various articles, which Mr. Smith claims, also a pair of boots, and various articles which I produce.

AMY PARRY . I live at No. 1, New North-street, Red-lion-square. The prisoners lived there for upwards of twelve months—they left on the 10th of May and left the things behind them, which Collier took possession of—I did not see the contents of the boxes till Collier came—the female prisoner gave me this work-box on the 10th of May, when she was going away.

COURT. Q. Were you at home in November? A. Yes; I cannot say whether or not the prisoners were out on the night of the 6th—I think the male prisoner was out at times, but I cannot speak to any time in particular.

GEORGE WILLIAM BILSON . I am shopman to Mr. Barker, of High-Hoiborn. I produce a tea-caddy, pawned at our shop on the 12th of November, in the name of John Smith—I do not remember the person—this is the duplicate I gave for it.

JAMES KING . I am a pawnbroker in High-Holborn. This book was pawned with me on the 5th of January, in the name of John Massey, and a seal, on the 14th of March, in the name of John Mercy—I do not remember the person.

WILLIAM RICHARD TUCKWOOD . I am shopman to Mrs. Aldridge, pawnbroker, in Orange-street. I produce a book, pawned on the 19th of November, in the name of John Massey, and two books, pawned in the name of John Mercy, on the 4th of January—I do not remember who pawned either of them.

HENRY WILLIAM HAMPSTEAD . I am shopman to Mrs. Nicholls, pawnbroker, in Gray's-inn-lane. I produce a desk, pawned on the 12th of November, by the male prisoner, in the name of John Smith—I am positive of his person.

THOMAS ANDREWS . I am shopman to Mr. Boyce, of Theobald's-road, a pawnbroker. I produce a coat pawned on the 24th of December, by the

male prisoner, in the name of John Massey; and a diamond ring, pawned on the 17th of December, by him, in the name of John Massey.

GEORGE JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Walters, of High Holborn. I produce four napkins pawned on the 17th of November, in the name of John Smith—I do not know the person.

GEORGE COLLIER . I found the corresponding duplicates for all these articles, which have been produced in the prisoner's boxes.

JAMES ISAACS . I am a policeman. I took the female prisoner into custody on this charge, on the 12th of May, at No. 1, New North-street, Theobald's-road—she at first said she was married—the male prisoner was not present, but Parry said to her, "Is that your husband?"—she said, He is"—she said, "Tell the truth, if he is not"—she said, "Well, he is not; the truth is, the banns were published, but we were not married"—I said, "You are aware there are a number of boxes here"—she said, "Yes, but I don't know what they contain, except one which I packed, and that contains my wearing apparel"—she did not point it out—it was at the station-house at the time, and the male prisoner was then in custody—on the 19th I went to the prison to fetch her, and I said, "In your box there were some books, covered with white paper, and a snuffer-tray"—she said "I know there is; I have had them a long, long time"—she did not say how long—she said, "There is one volume of the History of the Wars," and another volume that don't belong to this case—I did not mention to her that she was charged with the robbery in November—I said, "You must consider yourself in my custody on a charge of a felony."

GEORGE COLLIER . I searched the box containing the female's apparel, and found in it four books and the snuffer-tray referring to this robbery.

JOHN SMITH . I have examined all the articles—they are my property, and were in my house on the night in question—the snuffer-tray I do not think belongs to me—the books I am certain of—the articles produced by the pawnbrokers are mine.

WILLIAM SMITH . I would not swear to the boots, but I believe them to be mine—the diamond pin is mine, and this coat.

Massey's Defence. The books in the box I gave the female prisoner—she is quite innocent.

MASSEY.—Aged 25.— GUILTY of stealing above the value 5l., and of breaking, but not burglariously.— Transported for Life.

HILL— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1454

1454. JOHN MASSEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March, 1 ring, value 1l., the goods of Henry Wood, Esq.: and 1 cloak, value 4l. 10s.; 1 necklace, value 5l.; 3 rings, value 3l.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 2l.; 1 buckle, value 12s.; 1 inkstand, value 8s.; 1 desk, value 1l; 10s.; 1 boa, value 3l.; 3 collars, value 1l. 10s.; 1 card-case, value 6s.; 1 paper-knife, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 box and 4 counters, value 5s.; the goods of Clara Joynes: and CHARLOTTE HILL , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.—2nd COUNT, for receiving them of an evil disposed person.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

CLARA JOYNES . I live at Langley, in Buckinghamshire. On the 18th March some articles were stolen from my house—I saw them safe within two days before.

JAMES COKER . I keep a beer-shop at Gerrard's Cross, about a quarter of a mile from Mrs. Joynes's. I remember hearing of a robbery—I saw Massey at my house before the evening before that—he staid till a little

after nine o'clock, and then went away—he said he was going to London, and that he was looking after three transports that had got away—I am certain he is the man.

Massey. Q. What had I on? A. Plaid trowsers, white and red, cloth shoes, and a black surtout coat—I am certain it was you.

MR. BOOKIN. Q. How long was he in your view? A. From five o'clock till after nine o'clock—there were not many people in the house—some servants were there, who said he was the man that was found in the rick-yard the night before, and he said he was intoxicated.

WILLIAM HENRY LUMLEY . I am shopman to Messrs. Bromley, pawnbrokers in Museum-street, Bloomsbury. 1 produce a cloak pawned on the 20th of March, by the prisoner, in the name of John Massey.

THOMAS ADAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Archbutt, of Bridge-road Lambeth. I produce a desk pawned on the 20th of March, in the name of Massey—I believe the prisoner to be the person—he took away both duplicates with him, as I could not find mine when he was gone.

JOHN BENNETT . I am shopman to Mr. Walker, of Mount-street, Lambeth. I produce two rings, a pair of ear-rings, and a buckle, pawned on the 18th of March, in the name of John Massey, by a man, but not the prisoner.

HORACE PECKOVER . I am shopman to Mr. Franklin, of Tottenham-court-road. I produce a necklace pawned on the 22nd of March, (I believe, by the prisoner, but am not certain,) in the name of John Massey—I gave him a duplicate—I afterwards received information about this robbery—in April the prisoner Massey came and pawned more property, and on the 12th of May he came to pawn more, and I gave him in charge.

AMY PARRY . I live at No. 1, New North-street, Red-lion-square. The two prisoners lodged at my house for about twelve months—they left on the 10th of May, and left some boxes and baskets behind, which Collier afterwards took possession of—the female prisoner gave me some articles on the 10th, when she left—among them was a box for whist counters—it was in the work-box—she gave me also a broken ring—these are them—I have seen the male prisoner wear plaid trowsers, and sometimes a black frock coat.

Massey. I never wore plaid trowsers—I had a striped pair.

GEORGE COLLIER . I am a policeman. I went to Mrs. Parry's house on the 12th of May, and took possession of this box; among other things 1 found in it some collars, a pocket-book, and five duplicates referring to this robbery—I have the corresponding duplicates for all the articles produced by the pawnbrokers, and two for the desk.

JOHN ISAACS . I am a policeman—I took the female prisoner into custody at North-street—she said at first that she was married to the male prisoner, and afterwards, that the banns had been published, but they were not married—the inspector said, "You have a pair of ear-rings—how did you get them?"—she said, "I had them before I knew him—I bought them when I lived servant in Bolton-street, Piccadilly"—she said she had known Massey about fifteen months—the ear-rings were in her ears—she had a boa on her nock on the 19th, when she was re-examined, and it was identified at the office.

CLARA JOYNES re-examined. These ear-rings are mine—I am positive they were among the property 1 lost on the 18th—this boa is mine, and was in the same room—the cloak is mine, and the desk—they were all lost on the 18th of March, between twelve and one o'clock—the necklace is mine.

Massey's Defence. I gave the female prisoner the boa—she asked how I came by it—I told her I bought it.

Hill's Defence. The ear-rings are not the prosecutrix's—I can bring witnesses to prove I have had them two years—there is a mark of sealingwax, which I put on them myself. Witness, I know they are mine—I put them into the trunk when I went into mourning—I have worn them several times—I have no particular mark, but I cannot be mistaken in them.

GEORGIA WOOD . I live in the same house at Mrs. Joynes—these are her ear-rings—I saw them put away into the box two days before—I know them by the particular manner in which they are cut—I have not the least doubt they are hers.

JURY. Q. There is a crack in the top of them? A. That has been done since—I particularly remarked them.

MRS. PARRY re-examined. I cannot say whether the female prisoner wore coral rings like these before March—I did net observe them—I observed her wearing ear-rings—I cannot say what sort.

MASSEY— GUILTY . Aged 22. Confined One Year.

HILL— GUILTY . Aged 22. Confined One Year.

(There were fourteen other indictments against the male prisoner.)

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

Reference Number: t18370612-1455

1455. GEORGE WALLS and HANNAH WALLS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; 1 table-cloth, value 5s.; and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; the goods of Henry Cook: 1 and coat, value 1s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 watch-key, value 7s.; 1 pair of gloves, valve 1s. 6d.; and 1 set of studs, value 7s.; the goods of William Cook, the Younger.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS ROWLEY . I am in partnership with Mr. William Cook, a coach manufacturer, carrying on business in King-street, St. James's premises are very extensive—the male prisoner was our gate-keeper—after after the workmen leave at night he has charge of the entire premises, and has two apartments over—the back gateway for himself and his wife—I live out of town, and so does my partner—I have a sitting-room on the premises Mr. Cook has two sons, who are my nephews—they occupy another room in the factory—they leave on Saturday night, to go to their father's, and return on Monday—Mrs. Walls generally looked after my room for me—she had nothing to do with Messrs. Cook's room—my sitting-room was next to the prisoners' rooms—Mr. Cooks' room is on the same floor—there is a staircase from the counting-house to Mr. Cook's room, at one end of the building—it was usual to have a taper candlestick kept in the counting-house—we invariably burnt wax in it—on Saturday afternoon, the 6th of May, I was in the counting-house as late as half-past four o'clock, and much later—I sealed a letter with the taper at half-past four o'clock—the candlestick contained about an inch and a half of wax candle—this is the candlestick—I left the premises at near seven o'clock, and returned as usual on the Monday—in the afternoon of Monday I saw the taper placed on the mantel-shelf in the counting-house, where it usually where it usually stands—Mr. cook, Sen., was there at the time—we sent for the male prisoner, and questioned him—the man who cleans the candlestick had brought it back—the prisoner was asked why this candlestick was so dirty—(I had not seen it dirty myself)—he said he took the candlestick when he broke the room door

open, to light him, for his lamp fell out—on Monday, at one o'clock, my little boy gave me a table-cloth—it was not mine—in consequence of what my son said, I showed it to Mr. Cook, and afterwards placed it under the sofa in my room, and left it there—on the Tuesday morning I went and looked for it, and it was gone.

THOMAS HENRY ROWLEY . I am the son of Thomas Rowley. On Monday morning, the 8th of May, I went into my father's sitting-room and saw under the sofa a tablecloth—I picked it up and put it into the cupboard, and at one o'clock in the afternoon gave it to my father, and told him where I found it—I looked for it the next morning, and it was gone.

WILLIAM COOK . I am the son of Mr. Cook, who is in partnership with Mr. Rowley. My father has two rooms in the factory for his own private purposes—my brother and I use one of them as a sleeping room—there is a chest of drawers in that room where we keep our wearing apparel and linen, and we leave them unlocked usually—my brother and myself sleep in that room during the week days generally—when we were away the key was given to the boy, Alfred Lloyd—Mrs. Walls had nothing to do with cleaning or taking charge of our sleeping-room—another woman was employed for that purpose—I was in that sleeping-room at half-past four o'clock at the 6th of May—the drawers were at that time safe—there was a coat and black velvet waistcoat, and a towel among the articles in this drawer—there were also gloves, a cloak, silk scarf, handkerchief and stockings; and a tablecloth in that drawer—when I left there was no fire in the grate, nor in the other room—the two rooms 1 ead one into another—I left the premises to go out of town about a quarter before five o'clock on that Saturday—I returned on Monday morning a little after ten o'clock—I then found the drawers burnt very much indeed, and moved from the recess when they stood on Saturday, and some of the linen clothes that had been in then in the room were very wet and partly burnt—water had been applied to the drawers—I had a desk in the outer room—there were some gold studs in that desk—on my return on Monday I missed them—I had seen them on the Saturday—they have never been found—the desk was not left open—I sent for the male prisoner, and told him I missed the studs, and asked him if he knew anything about them—he said he did not—I caused information to be given at Bow-street—Ballard came on the Tuesday—he showed me a coat, part of a velvet waistcoat, and other things—they were mine.

HENRY COOK . On the Saturday in question I had two scarf handkerchiefs, two pairs of gloves, and a pair of stockings, in one of my father's rooms in the factory—I saw them safe before I went away on the Saturday in a drawer in the chest—I also saw a tablecloth in the next drawer about eight o'clock in the morning—on Monday morning Mr. Rowley showed me the tablecloth—it is my property.

ALFRED LLOYD . I am twelve years old, and live with my mother, at No. 8, Cross-street, Carnaby market, and am in the employ of Messrs. Cook✗ I sometimes have the care of Mr. Cook's room—I remember Saturday, the 6th of May—a little before five o'clock that afternoon I went to Mr. Cook's room to see if the fire was out—the door was not locked—the key was in the door—the fire was out—I saw the inner room, and the drawers there—they were quite safe—there was a little dog in the room—I left the room at five o'clock, and left the key as I found it; and left the dog in the room—I went again a little before six o'clock—the rooms were then safe, and the dog there still—I came down then, and locked the door,

and brought the key away—every thing wag then safe—I kept the key in my pocket till Monday morning—I did not part with it to any one—I left the premises on Saturday, about half-past seven o'clock—I do not know whether there was any light in Mr. Cook's room at that time—I was not round that way—I was to have taken the dog home, but I forgot it—on Sunday morning I went to the premises, having forgotten the dog, and saw the male prisoner; and he said he should not let me in—he asked what I wanted—I said I wanted to go in to get the dog—he said he should not let me in—he mentioned nothing about a fire—as he would not let me in, I came away.

JANE LLOYD . I am the mother of Alfred Lloyd. I serve the prosecutors' men with coffee—I was waiting at the gate of the premises on Satnrday night, the 6th of May—in the course of that evening I saw the male prisoner—he was very little away that evening—much less than he usually is—he often leaves me in charge of the gate, but he was more attentive to the gate than usual—about half-past eight o'clock, as near as I can guess, (for I left at a quarter to nine o'clock) I asked him if the puppy was there, and I would take it away, as the boy was gone without it—he said it was not, for he saw the boy James put it into the cab with his master—I said, "Then there must have been fresh orders about it, as I was to have had it home"—he asked his wife if she did not see it in the cab—she said she could not recollect—he ran round toward Mr. Cook's apartment to see about it—I said, "It is no use going, for I do not think the key is there,"—he returned, and said the door was locked, and if the puppy was there he was very quiet—I went away after that.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was sent for to the prosecutors' premises, and went there on Tuesday, the 9th of May, about eleven or twelve o'clock—I saw in Mr. Cook's inner room, a quantity of things spread about, partly burnt and wet, and a cheat of drawers very considerably burnt by fire, the top long drawer was very much burnt, and the drawers upward from that, having the appearance as if a light had been put in about the centre of the right hand part of the drawer—the drawers had a lining to separate one drawer from another, and immediately over the centre of the right hand part the fire had nearly got through, showing that the fire was in that part of the drawer, and had burned there more than other parts—in that part the fire was spread, and had burnt through the front, and burnt upwards—none of the drawers were burnt below that one—it bad burned completely through the back part of the drawers—there was nothing burnt in the room but the, drawer and the things that were in it—the fire had just reached the ceiling but not burnt it, only blacked it, but in five minutes more I should think the place must have been on fire—I then looked at the door, leading from, top of the stairs into the outer room—that is the door opening from the counting-house—there was grease against the front of the door, as if a tallow candle had been accidentally pushed against it outside, and on the right hand side of the jamb the candle had also been against it, and I saw the fastening of the door was broken quite to pieces—it was a common, catch, and there was also a piece of the door jamb broken out, as if by an instrument—this was inside the door, immediately under the fastening, and I saw that could not be done by breaking the door open from without—I put the door to, in order to show the effect of it, and it was impossible to get a straw in where the piece was broken out of the door post—it is an iron box, which the door lock shoots into, and it was under that that the

pieces were broken out of the door post inside, and that could not have been done while the door was, shut, it must have been done afterwards—the effect of forcing the door would have bulged out the iron in the centre, and made the door faster—there were marks inside of something have been put in to force it out—it was utterly impossible to get a straw in outside✗—the poker was shown to me, but it had then been straightened—I have no doubt the marks inside the door had been made with a poker, because it was a sort of three cornered mark—if there was an inch, or an inch and a half of wax candle in this taper stand, it could produce the fire—on the front edge of the drawer there were marks of wax, and one or two ✗ of wax in the drawer—I called Mr. Rowley's attention to this afterwards—I did not observe the spatters at first—I asked for the male prisoner to be sent for—he was brought to me, and I told him I was an officer of Bow-street, and had come to inquire respecting the fire, and then I asked him✗ what called his attention first to the fire—he said he was sitting up stairs with his wife, and that she went down stairs for the purpose of getting some water, and returned and told him she smelt fire—that he took his✗ lantern and went down, and proceeded up the yard as far as the pump, (which I found was about thirty-six yards from the door which enters the house stairs,) and that on turning his head round he saw fire, and sparks of fire lying before the window of Mr. Cook's room, and he immediately went and burst the door open with his foot, and in doing so his lantern fell down and the light went out, that he then went down stairs into the counting house, and got the wax taper, or candlestick, from there—I said "That had wax in it, had you no tallow candle?"—he said, he had not, that✗ they did not use tallow candle at all, they had none in the house, that they always burnt oil—I said, "Do you mean to say you have no tallow candle in the house at all?"—he said, that he had not—I then left him with Mr. Cook, and went to the female prisoner in her room, and asked her the same questions as to what called her attention to the fire on the Saturday night—she said she went down stairs to get water, and smelt fire, and returned and called her husband; that he went down for the purpose of putting out the fire, "she went to the public-house and called Davis, who came and assisted—I then commenced searching the prisoners' room—one part of the room is partitioned off, and forms a closet, and in the joist at the side I found the gloves—I afterwards searched the prisoners' bed✗ room, and found this coat among some things at the side of the bed, and at a subsequent search I found this scarf among the bed things—I had another scarf which I found there, but am afraid I have lost it—I returned to the male prisoner, and after putting some other questions to him he said, "I hope you do not suspect me?"—I told him that I did, and that I was satisfied he had broken off the fastenings from inside the door, and put on an appearance—here is also some address cards of Mr. Cook's, with an engraved plate, which I found in the prisoners' room—none of the articles I found in the prisoners' room were either burnt, scorched, wet, or damp, (except that I found part of a pair of stockings in a tub of dirty water, after the male prisoner was taken into custody) the articles I found in the drawers were all more or less scorched or wet—I took the male prisoner to Bow-street office, leaving a person to take care of the female prisoner—I returned immediately, and went to the room where the female prisoner was with her children, and observed that the fire had been fresh made, there were fresh coals on it, and bits of wood sticking out in front, and I observed a cotton glove burning on the top of the fire—

—I said, "What is this for?"—she said she did not know, she supposed the children had put it there—I said, "That cannot be, for I saw that glove on the shelf in the cupboard, and they could not get at it as it was above their reach"—I took up the poker and began to poke the fire out, and at the back part of the bottom of the grate I found this part of a velvet waistcoat and the tops of a pair of stockings with the initials H. C. on them, and I found the leg of this stocking afterwards in a tub of dirty water, the tops have been cut off; I also picked this watch key out of the fire—I showed her the things and said, "What can you say to this?"—she made no answer—I said, "Now, after this, what have you done with the table cloth?"—she said she knew nothing about it, she had never seen it—I made diligent search but found no shirt studs—the clothes I found in the closet of the room could not have been in the drawer where the fire was while the fire was in it, and present the appearance they did, for they were perfectly dry and had not the least smell of fire—tile other things all smelt strongly of fire.

JURY. Q. Was the top of the drawers burnt in front? A. No, it had burned up backwards—I took the woman into custody.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you proceed to make further search? A. Yes, after she was in custody—there was a coal box about half full of cinders, and in that I found this key, which turned out to be the key of Mr. Rowley's room, and it locked and unlocked Mr. Cook's door—I tried it myself—Mr. Cook's door opened inwards—the box of the lock was inside the door post, and the door shut flush with the inside of the door post—if it was broken from without it would not injure the door post inside—I burst the door open myself afterwards, and it strained the box of the lock in the centre but did not affect it—the female prisoner said she had taken the things on Sunday morning, and her husband knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you told there was a suspicion that this had been a pretended fire? A. They had that suspicion.

THOMAS DAVIES . I am a coachsmith, in the employ of Rowley and Cook. I remember when the fire was supposed to have happened—I left the premises about eight o'clock that night, and went to the Welsh Harp public-house; the female prisoner came to me a long time afterwards—it might be about nine o'clock—she called, "Davies," and I went with her; and when I went into the passage leading to our yard, she told me Mr. Cook's room was on fire—1 went into the premises, and went to the counting-house stairs, leading to Mr. Cook's room, and saw the male prisoner in the room—the upper part of the drawers were on fire then—I turned round, and went down as quick as I could, as George Wall called out for water, and I did not see what he was doing—there are two pumps in the yard, and there are pails kept by the pump for the use of the workmen—it is the custom to keep the pails about there—Walls knew that very well—I went and found a pail at the pump, and went part of the way up the yard—I fell over a ladder, and spilt the water—I went to another pump, filled the pail, took the water up to the room, and then the male prisoner was not there—he was down at the pump, with a square box, with a bit broken from the side of it—the box would not hold water to carry up stairs—it would not hold it long enough—I do not know whether he had that box in Mr. Cook's room—I assisted in putting out the fire—when the fire was out I asked him how it happened—he said, God Almighty knew, for he did not—he told me he had burst the room door open with his knee—he

showed me how he did it—I asked for a light when I fell over the ladder, and the female brought a tallow candle—I am certain it was tallow.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen the man that evening at the Harp? A. No.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long had you been there before the female prisoner came to you? A. I was in and out for an hour—I was at the bar most of the time, but went away to another public-house to change a sovereign—I was in the tap when she called me—I had been there abut ten minutes or a quarter of an hour—I had been there before, settling with my mates.

HENRY THOMPSON . I live at No. 35, Portpool-lane. I was in the prosecutors' employ at this time. On Saturday night, the 6th of May, I left the premises about a quarter after eight o'clock—I saw a light as if of a candle in Mr. Cook's sitting-room, as I went down the yard to go out, and the male prisoner was at the gate.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not look at any clock, I suppose? A. I went by my watch, which was right by the clock.

JOB MORRIS . I am a shopman in the employ of the prosecutors. On the Monday morning after the fire the prisoner gave me that taper stand, Bear upon ten o'clock—I am not certain whether he said I was to clean it, but he told me the extinguisher was lost up stairs—the top part of it was very black with smoke—the lower part had a great deal of wax about it, apparently as if the wax had run down, being melted, as if it had burnt down in the socket, and melted down on the bottom—I cleaned it with boiling hot water.

HENRY COOK re-examined. When the premises are left on Saturday night nobody has charge of them except the male prisoner—it is his duty to lock, the outer gate at eight o'clock—this is my coat—it was in the first long drawer, where the principal part of the fire had been—these stockings are my brother's—that is the remnant of my velvet waistcoat—on Saturday night it was perfectly whole and safe, and nearly new—that was in the first long drawer also—the gloves are mine, and they were quite new—they were in the drawer above the first long drawer, the short half-drawer—the watchkey is mine—it was in the outer room I believe—I cannot be certain—the tablecloth has never been found.

JURY. Q. Do you keep a phosphorus box in your room? A. I do not.

WILLIAM COOK re-examined. These two scarfs and tops of stockings are mine—there were stockings in the drawer marked like these, but whether these were there I cannot say—these scarfs were in the half-drawer abovethe first long one—these gloves are mine, and so was the tablecloth whichis missing.

GEOROE MARRIOTT . I am assistant gaoler at the public office, Bow street. I saw the male prisoner when he was brought into custody, on Tues-day the 9th of May—I went into the lock-up room and saw him there—asked him how he came there, (as he had been put there in my absence)—he told me it was something about his wife, but he should be all right if it was not for his wife splitting on him—those are exactly the words he used.

Q. Repeat them? A. He said it was something about his wife, and if it was not for his wife splitting on him, or if she had not split on him—I cannot say which of those expressions it was.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it part of your duty to question persons in your charge? A. I did not know it was contrary to my duty—if a prisoner is

brought in in my absence, when I go in I ask who brought them there—I do not recollect whether any body was present—I went there alone, and opened the door myself—I came out of the cell and inquired who was the officer in the case of that prisoner?—I ascertained that it was Ballard—I mentioned this to him that evening—I believe I said, that he said he was there for something concerning his wife, and he should be all right if she had not split on him—I believe I said those were his exact words—I will swear it was to that effect—I will not be positive whether he said, "If she had not split" or, "If it was not for her splitting"—I have been there ever since October—I was an officer before for seven years—I do not recollect that any one else was present—I mentioned this to Ballard that evening"—I will not be positive to the exact words the prisoner used.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1456

1456. HANNAH WALLS was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June, 1 spoon, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Rowley.

THOMAS ROWLEY . I am in partnership with William Cook, a coachmaker—we carry on business in King-street, St. James's. Three or four months ago I missed a spoon from my room—the prisoner was in the habit of cleaning the room—this is the spoon—it has the initials "H. H. W" by which I know it.

RICHARD HAYWOOD . I am in the service of Mr. Tate, a pawnbroker, in Cambridge-street, Golden-square. This tea-spoon was pawned at our shop on the 19th of January, by the prisoner.

MR. BODKIN to THOMAS ROWLEY.Q. Was the prisoner's husband in your employ at the time the spoon was lost? A. He was.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the prisoner asked anything about the spoon? A. I asked the husband some time ago if he had seen it, as I had seen it—he went up to his wife to inquire, came back, and told me she knew nothing about it—it was about three weeks before this transaction.

(The prisoner received a good chaacter.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Baron Parke.

Reference Number: t18370612-1457

1457. AGNES HAMILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 1 watch, value 8l.; 1 watch-guard, value 1s.; and 1 watch-key, value 1s; the goods of Augustus Esch, in the dwelling-house of Daniel Chatterton.

AUGUSTUS ESCH . I am a travelling servant. I was in service on the 16th of May—on the night of that day I met with the prisoner in the street, and went with her to a house in Off-alley about, half-pas twelve o'clock—I went up stairs with her on the second floor, and the door was fastened inside—after we had been in the room she went down stairs and, returned again—when she came in the second time the door was fastened—it fastened with a spring—I went to bed there—I had a gold watch with me at the time—I wound it up before I went to bed, and put it in to my hat on the table—the prisoner came to bed to me—there was then a light burning in the room—this was about half-an-hour after—I went into the room about one o'clock—I went to sleep, and the woman of the house came and made a noise, and called me to look about for my things—I looked for my watch directly, and it was gone—the prisoner was also gone——I saw her again on the next Wednesday, the 23rd, I think, at Bow-street station-house

—as soon as I awoke I sent a man after her to offer her 1l., to bring back the watch—at Bow-street I said I would give her 1l. to bring back the watch—I asked her where it was—she said she had left it with Mrs. White, in Crown-court, Fleet-street.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not state I had never seen your watch, and knew nothing about it? Witness. She confessed in a separate room that she left the watch at Mrs. White's—while the constable was there she denied it—the watch is worth 8l. at least—I had it repaired in Paris for thirty francs.

MARY SMITH . I am servant to Daniel Chatterton, who keeps a house in Off-alley, Strand. On the 16th of May I recollect the prosecutor coming to master's house with the prisoner between eleven and twelve o'clock—I think nearer twelve—I showed them into a room—I went in, and got the bed ready for them, and received the money—I did not go in after that—I heard no one go out of the house—master said he heard someone come down, and on that 1 went up to the room, and knocked at the door—the door was then ajar—I think it was then half-past twelve o'clock, but I could not exactly say—the woman was not in the room then—I awoke the prosecutor, and asked him if he knew that the woman was gone—he said, "No"—I saw him get up, and look for his watch—he said his clothes were all right—he went to his hat, and said his watch was gone.

DANIEL CHATTERTON . I keep this house in Of-alley—it is in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-fields. I remember the prisoner and prosecutor coming to my house that night, and they went to bed—in about half an hour after, she came down to order a pint of beer—I told her it was too late, no porter could be got—she bid me good night, and went up stairs again—in about three-quarters of an hour I heard the street-door open and shut very gently—I called to Smith to know who went out—she said she did not know any one had gone out—I sent her up stairs to awake the prosecutor.

Prisoner. He stood at the door when I went out. Witness. No, 1 did not—I was not trying to turn out a drunken man who had been making a noise.

THOMAS POCOCK (police-constable F 38.) I went in pursuit of the prisoner on the 17th—I received a description of her person on the morning of the robbery from the inspector on duty—I found her in Buckridge-street, 8t. Giles's, in bed, about twelve o'clock in the day—there were three other women sleeping in the same room—she said "D—the Frenchman, I never saw his watch"—I had not then told her what she was charged with—she said, "I know what you are and who you are; he never gave me any money, and that was the reason I left him"—on the road to the station-house she told me that she had had the prosecutor's watch in her possession, and the gold chain round her neck, but that she gave him the watch back again before she left the room—the watch has not been found—I got a warrant and searched Mrs. White's house, but did not find it there.

Prisoner.Q. Did not the prosecutor offer me money in your presence? A. He did, and I said, "You will not do that in my presence; it is more than my situation is worth"—in the mean time I was called into the office by the gaoler—the prosecutor did not follow me at the moment—in two or three minutes after he came out and said, "Officer, I know where my watch is; it is at Mrs. White's, in Crown-court, Fleet-street; the prisoner told me so"—he told the Magistrates so, and they granted the warrant.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor gave her no money, but offered her a ring, which the refused—that she was awoke by a party quarrelling in the next room, who broke open the door, and she went down stairs, passed the witness Smith, and went out.)

MARY SMITH re-examined. I was not at the door when she went out—I heard nobody breaking into the room—I dare say I have known the prisoner twelve years—the master of the house has no wife—he has a housekeeper.

AUGUSTUS ESCH re-examined. I did not give her any money—I had been to the theatre, and did not know my way home—I saw the prisoner and an old woman—they asked me to go with them—I refused—they took me by the arm—I said, "Let go; I do not want to stay with you"—I could not find my way home, and at last thought I could stay there till morning—I had my ring in my hand, and offered it to her, but she would not take it—I never offered her the watch—she did not tell me she would not stop with me—nobody broke open the door.

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Transported for Life.

Reference Number: t18370612-1458

1458. ANN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, I frock, value 4s.; 2 sheets, value 14s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; and 1 pair of shoes, value 1s.; the goods of Anthony Tagioli.

JOSEPH TAGIOLI . I am the prosecutor's brother, and live in Great Warner-street, Clerkenwell. On the afternoon of the 24th of May I was going up stairs, and met the prisoner with a bundle under her cloak—I went up stairs afterwards to make inquiry if any thing was missing, and then ran after her—I overtook her about a hundred yards off with the bundle—she dropped it when my brother came up—I fetched a constable, who took her into custody.

ANTHONY TAOIOLI . I live with my brother—he came and asked me about a strange woman—I went down stairs, and found the prisoner in his custody with these articles, which are mine—I had seen them five minutes before.

GUILTY Aged 30.— Transported for Seven Years.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370612-1459

1459. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June, 1 pocket book, value 13s. 6d., the goods of George East, to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 44.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1460

1460. JOHN ASHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June, 1 pair of trowsers, value 2s., the goods of Charles Marks and another, to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 49.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1461

1461. WILLIAM BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June, 28 yards of printed cotton, value 20s., the goods of Griffith Humphreys.

GRIFFITH HUMPHREYS . I am a draper, and live in Oxford-street. On the 11th of June my shop was full of customers—I was alarmed—I went to the door and found some prints had been disturbed—I ran round the corner of the next street, and in Henrietta-street three pieces of printed

cotton were delivered to me, which had been in the shop just before, on the pile which was disturbed—the prisoner was afterwards brought in by a policeman—he said, "What have I done?—I have done nothing."

DAVID APPLEFORD (police-constable D 32.) On the 11th of June I saw the prisoner running up Bond-street into Henrietta-street, where he threw these prints away, and ran into Gray-street, where I overtook him without losing sight of him—he asked what, he bad done, and said he had done nothing—I asked him what goods those were he had thrown away in Henrietta-street—he said he had thrown nothing away—some persons said he had stolen some prints from the prosecutor's shop, and I took him there—I am quite sure he is the person who threw them down—I did not see them taken up—the person who took them up was not bound over, and is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1462

1462. MARY SANFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June, 2 yards of printed cotton, value 1s. 4d., the goods of Thomas Read and another.

MARY ANN GOOZEE . I am the wife of John Charles Goozee, and live in Arbour-square. I was in Commercial-road on the afternoon of the 10th of June between three and four o'clock, and saw the prisoner unpin a piece of print from the rail of Mr. Read's shop window, put it under her shawl and walk away with it—I went and told Mr. Read, who went and took it from under her shawl—I saw her take two pins out of it, before she got it.

THOMAS SIMPSON . I am shopman to Thomas Read and another. I went after the prisoner and found her turning the corner of Exmouth-strert—she had two yards of print under her shawl with our shop mark on it—she came back with me immediately, and after Mr. Read gave her in charge she begged she might be let go.

JOSIAH CHAPLIN (police-constable H 124.) I took the prisoner in charge. (Property produced and sworn to.) Prisoner's Defence. I did not unpin it—I picked it up off the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 50.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1463

1463. HANNAH CHAMBERLAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June, 28 yards of printed cotton, value 12s., the goods of Charles Hawkins and another.

JOHN WETWAND . I am in the service of Charles Hawkins and another, linen drapers, Tottenham Court-road. On the night of the 13th of June, in consequence of information, I came up with the prisoner about forty yards from the shop—I saw her drop a piece of print, and took it up—she said, "You can't prove I stole it"—I took her to the shop, and gave her in charge—it had been inside the door.

GEORGE GOOD . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner, and have the print.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it on my soul—he picked it up in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1464

1464. WILLIAM ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Alexander Cowleson, from his person.

ALEXANDER COWIESON . I am footman to Mr. Ogleby, of Gower-street, Bedford-square. On the 4th of June I was on the London and Birmingham railway, on the way to Primrose Hill, and lost my handkerchief which I had safe five minutes before—the prisoner was pointed out to me—I took hold of him, and asked if he had not got my handkerchief—he said he had not—I desired him to unbutton his coat, and show me what he had in his pocket—he produced a cotton handkerchief which was not mine, and then either my friend or the policeman put his hand into his pocket and took out my handkerchief, which was a silk one.

Prisoner. It was hanging out. Witness. I do not believe it was.

GEORGE DAVIES . I am a smith, and live in East-street, Marylebone. I was on the railway on the 4th of June, and saw the prisoner and another walking behind the prosecutor, who was with a young woman—the prisoner took a handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and put it into his own left-hand pocket—he took one out of his own right-hand coat pocket, and placed over it—I told the prosecutor, who secured him—I did not see his handkerchief hanging out.

JAMES WATT (police-constable F 81.) I took the prisoner into custody, and the prosecutor delivered me the handkerchief—the prisoner said he found it in a hole—there was an older boy with him.

Prisoner's Defence. It was through hunger—the other boys enticed me to take it.

GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1465

1465. WILLIAM ASHBY and THOMAS SUTTON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June, 4 petticoats, value 8s.; 1 cloth, value 3s.; and 1 canvass bag, value 6d.; the goods of Charles Sims.

ANN SWAIN . I am servant to Mr. Charles Sims, of New Brentford. On the 13th of June I was washing some articles, which were safe on the line between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and between five and six o'clock I missed some.

EDWARD JAMBS LEVY (police-sergeant T 18.) About 10 o'clock on the evening of the 13th of June, Mr. Sims came to the station, and gave information of the robbery—I went out and made inquiry, and ascertained that two boys had been seen with canvass bags—I went to Ashby's house, knocked, and after some time they came down and opened the door—there was no light—I entered the room, and heard the window drawn back—I stepped back, and the prisoner Ashby was in the act of getting out of the first-floor window—I procured a light, went up stain, and found he had escaped—I went out into the street, and met Sutton in his trowsers and shirt—I took him into custody, and took him to the station—his father accompanied me there, and asked his son what he had been doing—he said, "It was not me, it was Bill took the things, and handed them over the wall to me, and I carried them to Ackerman's new beer shop"—I went there, and got a bag containing two petticoats—I saw Vincent there, who I took with me—he gave me information, and I went back again and found two more petticoats under a bench in Ackerman's shop—about four o'clock, I went to Maddox's house—a little after four o'clock in the morning I saw Ashby at the end of a passage—I went in pursuit of him, and found him concealed behind a water-butt there—I took him into custody, and told him the charge—he said distress made him do it, and that he had frequently been without food—I am not quite certain he

is the person that got out of the window, but when I took him he had no shoes nor cap on, and they were left behind in the house.

JAMES VINCENT . I am in the service of Mr. Ackerman, who keeps a cook-shop in Brentford. On the 13th of June, about eight o'clock, I saw Ashby go into our parlour, and throw the petticoats under a chair—Sutton was with him, but did not say any thing—they sold a table-cloth to Maddox, who took it away—Ashby took one petticoat out under his jacket, and left the others in a bag under the chair—he said he would come back after them, but he did not—Sutton had brought the things in under his jacket, and Ashby took them from him.

Ashby. Q. Did you see me take the things out of Sutton's hand? A. He did not take them out of the bag—he took them into the corner against the fire-place, took them from him, and emptied them out of the bag—I did not take the things out—he bought some bread and bacon of matter.

GEORGE MADDOX . I am a drover at Brentford. I was at Ackerman's having my supper, when the prisoners came in with a bundle of clothes in a bag—they put them down, and said, "I have got something to sell you" I said, "What is it?"—they said, "A table-cloth"—I said, "What do you want?"—they said, "18d."—they shot it out into the corner, and showed it to me—I gave Ashby 18d. for it, and put it under my jacket, and took it home.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Ashby's Defence. This boy and me were walking round the water-side, and saw a boy on the prosecutor's premises untying the strings of the petticoats, and putting them into a bag—I said, "That is never Mr. Sims's boy"—I got on the top of the wall, and said, "I will go and tell Mr. Sims of you"—he said, "No, don't," and threw the bag over—this boy took it up, and walked on—I said, "Where are you going?"—he said, "To Ackerman's"—I said, "You must take them to Mr. Sims"—he said, "Stop a bit, I am only going to do a job"—he went on to Ackerman's, and we never saw him afterwards—I know the boy well—he comes from the same place as I do.

Sutton's Defence. I picked the bag up, and took it to Ackerman's.

ASHBY*— GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined Six Months, and Whipped.

SUTTON*— GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1466

1466. EDWIN COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May, 1 watch, value 1l.; and 1 watch-chain, value 6d.; the goods of Ellis Casper, his master.

ELLIS CASPER . I am a watch and clock manufacturer, and live is Finsbury-place. The prisoner was my errand-boy for about three months, and left me on the 20th of May, between nine and ten o'clock at night, when in consequence of suspicions that he had committed a trifling fraud, I said "I think you have in your pocket what I accuse you of," and in putting my hand into his pocket, I found a key—I said, "What is that?"—he said, "Only a brass key"—I pulled it up, and found a chain attached to it, he resisted my pulling it out, but I did, and found a watch to it, which had been in my care to repair, and which I had missed a few days before—he begged me to forgive him, and he would not be guilty of the like again.

Prisoner. It was not my intention to keep it—I took it to show some boys I was in the habit of playing with, and had no opportunity of putting it back. Witness. He owned he had had the watch four days—he had no opportunity

of putting it back—he was in the habit of coming for half an hour on Sunday morning, but I discharged him on Saturday—he took it from the parlour, and he had no business there—he did not say at the station-house that he took it to show any one—the last day, at the Magistrate's, he said he took it to show to some person, and he used to put it into the dost-hole at night.

Prisoner. He did not give me any warning till he tool the watch from me. Witness. I had given him a week's notice—he was to leave on the Saturday night he knew well he was to leave—I do not think he took the watch to show to his companions—I had missed it some days—he had plenty of opportunity to have sold or pawned it, as he had been out several times.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1467

1467. JAMES ASHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Deykes, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

WILLAM DAVIS . I am nearly fifteen years old, and live in Churchpassage, New Compton-street. On the 10th of June, between nine and ten o'clock, I was in Newport Market, and saw the, prisoner put his hand into a gentleman's coat pocket, take out a handkerchief, put it into his bosom, and run away with another who was with him, up, Hayes-court—I told the gentleman, and he went with me, and we went to several pawnbrokers to look for it—next morning I saw the prisoner and some other boys, in Church-street—I am quite certain he is the boy I saw take the handkerchief—I had seen him often before about the Seven Dials, and I saw him following the gentleman for about a quarter of an hour.

Prisoner. He has a spite against me—we had a fight together. Witness. I never fought him in my life—I have no spite against him.

JOHN FLETOHER . I am sixteen years, old, and live at the corner of Nassau-street, at a baker's. I know the prisoner by seeing him when I am going my errands—I was in Newport Market with Davis and another little boy—the prisoner and another one came and tried to throw me down—we thought they were after something, and watched them—I saw him go behind the gentleman, take the handkerchief and shove it into his breast pocket.

WILLIAM DEYKES . I am an attorney, but am not in practice—I live in Gerrard-street. On Saturday night, the 10th of June, I was in Newport Market, and in consequence of notice being given, me I missed my handkerchief, which was safe just before—I have not seen it since.

BENJAMIN GAHAN (police-constable F 136.) The prisoner was pointed out to me next day by Davis, with several others—I took him, and (found a duplicate on him, and an affidavit for another pledge.

Prisoner. The boy has been telling falsehoods.

RICHARD GOODE (police-constable F 99.), I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was present at the trial—he is the person.

GUILTY Transported for Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1468

1468. LUCY HIGGINS was indicted for Stealing, on the 20th of May, 1 spoon, value 5s., the goods of James Greig, her master.

CHARLES TIJOU . I am shopman to Mr. Drew, a pawnbroker, in

Clark's-place, Islington. On the 20th of May, about ten minutes to nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came with a teaspoon to pawn—I asked how she became possessed of it—she refused to tell me, and I detained her.

JAMES GREIG . I am a baker, and live in Cornwall-place, Islington, The prisoner was in my service one week, and quitted on the 20th of May—she asked to go out for half an hour, and did not return—the policeman came to me, and I missed this spoon—Drew's is about a mile and a quarter from my house—I found the prisoner at the station-house.

JOSEPH SEMONS . (police-constable N 228.) The prisoner was given into my custody—she said she had taken the spoon to get a gown out of pawn—I found the duplicates of two or three gowns on her, and one silver spoon.

Prisoner. I was in distress, and had been out of place some time.

GUILTY . Aged 48.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1469

1469. MARGARET DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May, 1 pair of boots, value 3s., the goods of Robert Watt.

WILLIAM HENRY KELL . I Am shopman to Robert Watt, a pawnbroker, in Exmouth-street, Clerkenwell. On the 27th of May, about five o'clock, I saw the prisoner near the stall at our door—she took a pair of women's boots, concealed them under her apron, and went away—I went after her, and caught her two doors off—she let them fall—I took them up, I gave her into custody.

Prisoner. I went to buy the boots—I asked the young man at the door the price—he said 3s., and if they fitted me I should have them for 2s. 6d.—I stepped round to a step to put them on—a girl came out of the door in a hurry, knocked against me, and knocked my bonnet off—blew a little way, I went after it, and this young man came out of the shop, and said, "Mistress, you are going away with these, I must take you to the station-house," and he gave me in charge. Witness. I did not see anybody speak to her—we have a person in charge outside—he came in for change, and then I saw her take the boots—she did not say she intended to buy them—I am certain she had no conversation with our shopman—her bonnet was not blown off, nor did she try the boots on—she had got fifteen or twenty yards when I spoke to her, and had them under her apron—I saw her take them, and walk away without examining them.

RICHARD BAYLIS . I took the prisoner in charge about twenty yards from the shop, walking with Kell—she said she was not going to steal them, but was going to try them on—I have known her three or four years—her husband is a printer—I never heard any thing against her before.

GUILTY . Aged 36.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1470

1470. ANN JOHNSON and ELIZABETH SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May, 1 pair of boots, value 5s., the goodsof Richard Riley.

MARY RILEY . I am the wife of Richard Riley, a shoemaker in High-street, Shoreditch. On Monday the 22nd of May, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came into my shop—Johnson asked to try on a pair of Adelaide boots, and while I was looking for a pair, I turned round and kept my eye on them, but before I could reach a pair, I saw a vacancy in the window—they immediately rose from their seats, and said they were going a little further, and would call as they came back

—I said, "Stop, let me see what you have got"—I saw Smith patting something under her shawl—I pulled one boot from under her shawl—they both immediately rushed to the door—I laid hold of them, and Smith left her shawl in my hand—they both got away—I called "Stop thief," and Johnson was brought back—I am quite certain of them both—I found the other boot under a chair near the door, where Smith would pass to go out.

Smith. Johnson took a pair of boots, but I did not know she intended to tike them. Witness. I took the boot from Smith herself—Johnson could not have reached them—Smith was next to the window.

JAMES COCKLIN . I am a shoemaker; and live in Perring's-court, Hack-ney-road. I was passing Mr. Riley's shop, and saw Johnson scuffling with Mrs. Riley; and saw Smith running towards Shoredhch Church from the shop—I saw Johnson take a boot from her arm, and throw it into the shop—I pursued, and gave her into custody—I afterwards saw Smith waiting about the office when Johnson went to be examined, and took her in charge.

WILLIAM LOVETT . I am a policeman. I took Johnson, and received the boots from Mrs. Riley.

MRS. RILEY. They sat close together, so that one could hand the boot to the other.

JOHN SAYER . I am a policeman. I was attending at Worship-street—Cocklin pointed Smith out to me—she immediately rose from where she was sitting, and ran away—I followed, and took her, and said I wanted her for a case of felony—she replied that she did not take the boots, but the other one did.

Johnson's Defence. Smith asked me to go with her to boy a pair of boots—I went into the shop, and saw a pair of boots lying on a chair—I took them up to look at, but did not intend to steal them.

Smith's Defence. I went to pay off 6d. on a pair—Johnson took a pair, off the chair to look at—Mrs. Riley said she wanted to thieve them, and gave her in charge.

(The prisoner, Johnson, received a good character.)

JOHNSON GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined One Month.

SMITH GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

NEW COURT.—Thursday, June 15th,1837.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant,

Reference Number: t18370612-1471

1471. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 1 tea-caddy, value 5s., the goods of Edward Wareing; also, on the 17th of May, 4 pairs of boots, value 18s., the goods of Ralph Wilcoxon: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 43.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1472

1472. JOHN BENTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, 1 trunk, value 3l., the goods of John Levy; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 44.— Confined One Month, one Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1473

1473. ROBERT MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May, 51b. 14oz. weight of beef, value 4s.; 1 loaf of bread, value 9d.; 1/2 lb. of butter, value 6d.; 3/4 lb. of cheese, value 6d.; and 2oz. of ✗ value 3d.; the goods of John Wright: to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined One Month, one Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1474

1474. JOHN CLEMMANS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May, 1 saw, value 4s., the goods of John Pheby, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1475

1475. JAMES CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd May, 3 handkerchiefs, value 12s., the goods of John Wills.

JOHN WILLS . I am a hosier, and live in Oxford-street. On the 23rd of May, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop—my shopman showed him some silk handkerchiefs—1 saw him put three into his pocket—I detained him in conversation while I sent for a policeman, who searched him, and found these three in his coat pocket-they have my own handwriting on them.

Prisoner. I took out my own handkerchief, and it dropped on the counter—I took up these with it without knowing that I had them. Witness. My shopman gave me information, and I stood at my counting-housedoor, and saw him take his handkerchief, and lay it over my goods—1 then held up another, and blinded my shopman; and then took his own up, and these three with it.

WILLIAM PICKFORD (police-constable E 25.) I found these handkechiefs in the prisoner's great coat pocket with this other one.

GUILTY . Aged 38.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1476

1476. MARY ANN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May, 2 waistcoats, value 8s., the goods of Richard Henry Ashford.

JAMES CHAMPION . I am shopman to Richard Henry Ashford, pawnbroker, Bethnal-green-road. Some waistcoats hung outside our shop on the 18th of May—I saw them safe at twelve o'clock—I did not miss them till the following morning—these are them.

THOMAS CORNISH (police-constable H 171.) On the 18th of May about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming down Church-street with a bundle—She went into a pawnbroker's—I went and spoke to the pawnbroker, and apprehended her as she came out with them—she had offered to pawn them, but they did not take them.

Prisoner's Defence. Two females stopped me, and asked me to pawn them; if I was asked where I got them, I was to say my mother sent me—the pawnbroker said that would not do—I was coming out, and the officer stopped me—I told him the two females had given them to me. Witness. No—she did not say a word about it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1477

1477. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June 1 crown, 1 half-crown, and 2 shillings, the monies of John Saunders, from the person of Jemima Saunders.

JEMIMA SAUNDERS . I am the wife of John Saunders, and live in Dogrow. On Saturday, the 10th of June, I went to the Butcher's-row, to boy some meat—I put my hand into my pocket, to get my money, and it was

gone—I had had a crown, a half-crown, and two shillings—the witness told me something, and I went after the prisoner—I caught her at the corner of Red Lion-street—I caught another taller woman, who was with her—the prisoner ran away, and my husband ran, and caught her in the road.

ELI ELIAS . I am employed at Mr. Grindlay's, a butcher. At half-past ten o'clock that night I saw the prisoner and another come to Mrs. Saunders—the prisoner took up her gown to pick her pocket—I turned my head round, and she dropped the gown—I looked at her again—she took it up a second time, and then went out with the other—I told the prosecutrix, and went down Whitechapel, and pointed them both out to her.

WILLIAM WALKER . I saw the prisoner and another in Whitechapel, near the shop—the prisoner said, "What are you looking at?" and she gave me a slap on the face—I saw her lift up the woman's shawl when she was outside, and when the meat was being weighed I saw her lift up the gown again, and pull out something in brown paper—she then went out and stood at the corner of Red Lion-street.

MRS. SAUNDERS, (re-examined.) My money was in brown paper. ELIZABETH BACKHOUSE. I examined the prisoner at the station-house—I found a half-crown and two shillings in her mouth.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to buy something, and had 4s. 6d., which I put into my mouth—I stood talking to some young women at the corner of Red Lion-street, when the prosecutrix and her husband came up, and asked what I had done with the money—I said I had no money, I knew nothing of it—I had but just come out of doors.

GUILTY Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1478

1478. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May, 73lbs. weight of lead, value 5s.; and 2 metal cocks, value 1s., the goods of Isaac Cranfield, and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

ISAAC CRANHELD . I live in Hare-street, Bethnal-Green. I have a house in Middlesex-street, Hackney-road—I missed some lead pipe, and two cocks from it on the 27th of May—I believe these to be them.

JAMES COOK (police-constable H 7.) On the 27th of May, in the middle of the night, I met the prisoner in Hackney-road with this lead—I found this ball left on the premises, and it exactly fits this part where it has been broken from—I had seen this lead all correct at the house three quarters of an hour before.

Prisoner. I was coming home, and saw this in a short street leading out of the road—I took it up.

GUILTY Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1479

1479. THOMAS GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May, 20 feet of lead pipe, value 1l. 5s., the goods of Joseph Mead, and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

JOSEPH MEAD . I live in Old-street. I had twenty feet of lead pipe fixed to my building—I saw it safe on Sunday night, the 14th of May, at eight o'clock—I know this brass tap—I am a farrier, and here is a hone-shoe nail which I put into it myself.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you fit it to your premises? A. No, we could not, because it was bent off—I can swear to this

piece—I drove the nail in two years ago, to keep the ball-cock on—it was found on the prisoner.

THOMAS HARDWICK (police-constable H 170.) On Sunday evening, at a quarter past ten o'clock, I was by the Loggerhead public-house, Virginia-row, Bethnal-green—the prisoner passed me at the corner—I saw this piece of lead in his apron—I followed him, and asked what he had got—he said, some piping—I asked where he brought it from—he said, from home, and that he was going to a girl he was acquainted with—I took him down the street, and in going along he said, "So help me God I found it is Cooper's-gardens, and I have got some more"—he then produced some more.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he take it out of his apron himself? A. No, he assisted me in taking it out—this is my signature to this deposition—(read—"I took from him one of the pieces of lead pipe which he had taken from his apron ")—I helped him to take it from his apron—he certainly did unroll it out of his apron—it was about half a mile from the prosecutor's.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined One Month—One Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1480

1480. PATRICK PHILLIPS, JOHN TYGH , and BRIDGET PHILLIPS were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June, 1 bag, value 5s.; 2 printed books, value 1l.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 shaving case, value 5s.; 2 razors, value 5s.; 1 brush, value 1s.; and 1 razor strop, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Henry Whipham, Esq.

THOMAS HENRY WHIPHAM, ESQ . I am a barrister. On Saturday afternoon, the 10th of June, I went by the Windsor coach to Miss Bedford's, at Longford, in the parish of Harmondsworth—I left this bag there containing two printed books and the other things.

ELIZABETH JARVIS . I am servant to Miss Bedford. I saw the carpetbag in the passage at five o'clock last Saturday afternoon—about an hour and a half after, the two male prisoners came to the door of the passage where the bag was, and asked me for a pint of beer—I asked them to go Into the tap room—they said, they were not going to stop, they would drink it there—while I turned to draw it Tygh went away—Phillips stopped and drank the beer, and about five minutes after he left I missed the bag—I am not able to say that I saw it after Tygh left.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see Phillips go away? A. Yes—I did not see that he had any thing with him.

JOHN CLEMENTS . I am the horsekeeper. I saw Tygh go off the step of the door with a carpet bag about seven o'clock—I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM WILLIS . I am ostler at the King's Head at Longford. I was in the yard about seven o'clock in the evening, and heard that the bag was taken away—I ran up the road and passed Patrick Phillips—I saw him make a sign to the others, which made me think they had it—I went on to those two, and asked where the bag was—they said they did not know, they had nothing but what belonged to them—I said, "You appear to have something under your cloak"—I drew back the woman's cloak, and found this bag.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were Tygh and the woman from the house when you saw them first?A. Nearly a quarter of a mile—I passed

Phillips about a hundred yards before I came to them they were not walking quick.

COURT. Q. When you saw Phillips make the sign, were they looking round? A. Tygh was, but not the woman—I did not knock the woman down—I think Phillips went back of his own accord—a constable took his wife—I took Tygh.

Tygh's Defence. I know nothing about it, I never saw the bag.

(Tygh received a good character.)

PHILLIPS— GUILTY . Aged 25.

TYGH— GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined six months; three weeks solitary.

B. PHILLIPS— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1481

1481. JAMES COT and JOHN BEARD were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May, 1919lbs. weight of cheese, value 13s., the goods of Frances Gates.

FRANCES GATES . I am a widow, and keep a chandler's shop in Williamstreet, Margaret-street, Clerkenwell. Between eleven and twelve o'clock on Saturday, I was in the little room behind the shop—I missed some cheese, when Elizabeth Farr gave me information—I asked her to go and stop the young men—they were taken to the station-house—I saw the cheese there—it was the one I lost—the policeman has it, he is not here—I saw it a quarter of an hour after I lost it.

ELIZABETH FARR . I am a widow and live in Margaret-street. About eleven or twelve o'clock on Saturday I was at the window of No. 49, Margaret-street, and saw the prisoner Beard with the cheese in his hand—Cot waited at the corner of William-street, and Beard came up and put it into his lap—I gave information, and they were taken, and the cheese was produced to Mrs. Gates at the station-house.

Cross-examtned by MR. PAYNE. Q. Were you present when they were taken? A. Yes, in Middleton-street, a very little way from the station-house—I went into Mrs. Gates's shop before I went to the station-house—the cheese was found in an apron Cot had on—Mrs. Gates asked me to run and see if I could get them stopped, which I did—I did not see Cot in William-street—he was standing in Margaret-street, at the corner of William-street.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

COT— GUILTY . Aged 19.

BEARD— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month; One Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1482

1482. DANIEL DUNCAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 701bs. weight of iron pipe, value 4s., the goods of the Independent Gas-light and Coke Company.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an inspector to the Independent Gas-light and Coke Company. I have not brought the Act of Parliament by which the company is incorporated.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1483

1483. DANIEL DUNCAN was again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 1 horn, value 6s., the goods of James Augustus Whiskard.

(The prosecutor having a partner, the prisoner was)

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18370612-1484

1484. JOSEPH THOMASON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May, 7 pairs of lasts, value 1s. 9d.; 4 other lasts, value 3d.; 1 umbrella value 1s.; 61bs. weight of beef, value 3s.; and 1 roastingjack, value 6d. the goods of Frederick Thomas Rowland; and that he had been be convicted of felony.

FREDERICK THOMAS ROWLAND . I live in Cross-street, Shoreditch, and deal in grindery. I missed about a dozen pairs of lasts from my wash-house on Sunday morning, the 14th of May—I saw them again at station the same morning—one pair have my mark on them, and this umbrella is mine.

Prisoner. Q. What can you swear to the umbrella by? A. By the border, and by its being worn in the manner it is—I know these lasts by its piece of leather nailed on the side.

EDMUND M'CARTHY . On Sunday morning, about four o'clock, I was coming up Sherwood-place, and saw the prisoner, with a bag on his shoulder, with another man—I followed them—they went into No. 49, Nelson street, but the prisoner turned back, and asked what I wanted—I said who was with him—he said, "Jim," and he went out backwards—I sprang my rattle, and got three officers, but we could not find the other man—we found thirteen lasts under the bed in the house, and this bag on the bed—I cannot say it was the bag I had seen the prisoner carrying—I did not follow them into the house—being at a distance, I could not swear to it but it looks like it—a woman and two or three children were in the room.

THOMAS HARDWICK (police-constable H 170.) I was called in to No.49, Nelson-street, to assist M'Carthy—I found seven lasts under the bed, and a bag—I found this umbrella in the yard, placed against the water-butt—I went over several gardens, and found five lasts on the dust-hole, which brought in—the prisoner said he knew nothing about them—I could not find the other man.

GEORGE STEVENS (police-constable H 132.) At half-past three o'clock that morning I was in New Nicoll-street, and saw the prisoner and another—the prisoner had a bag on his shoulder—I asked him what he had got—he said, "Shoemaker's lasts"—I desired him to take them off his back and found nine pairs of lasts—I took one pair in my band, tied together with a slip of leather—I asked if they were marked—he said no, he knew them by the number—I asked him what number this was—hesaid, "Women's, 6"✗—this is the pair—I asked what he did with them so early in the morning——hesaid he was moving—he said he was a cordwainer—I asked to look at his hands to see that he was, and he was so—I did not detain him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you count the lasts? A. Yes—I turned them outthere were eight or nine pairs—you did not tell me you were going home to No. 49, Nelson-street—I examined every thing that was in the bag—the other man had nothing in his hand—they had no umbrella then—they were three or four hundred feet from the prosecutor's.

Prisoner's Defence I was at work till half-past six o'clock on Saturday evening, and bought six pairs of lasts, to make my children some shoe ✗ then went to the Crown, in Wheeler-street, and stopped till half-past twelve o'clock at night—I then went to Mr. Hutchin, in Webb-square, who ✗ me a small pair of lasts, to make my child a pair of boots on—the lasts the policeman found in my room were put into a handkerchief—the other policeman put what he found into a bag—on the second examination they were all put together, and they brought another policeman up, who swore to these with the leather, which I know nothing of—can any man swear to

these lasts, when three pairs out of four have stocks on the sole of them?—this pair of two's are mine, but the others are not, and those with the stocks on were found three yards from my premises.

EDMUND M'CARTHY . I found six pairs and a half in the room.

THOMAS BESLOE (police-constable H 84.) I produce a certificate the prisoner's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office,—(read)—the prisoner is the man.

GUILTY. Aged 27.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1485

1485. GEORGE BOLTON was indicted for embezzlement.

GEORGE JAMES BRAIN . I an a cabinet-maker and live in Wbrtmore-road. The prisoner is my apprentice—I received 3l. with him from the parish—on the 15th of May, I sent him with a flute to pawn at Mr. Leach's in Hoxton, for 2s. 6d.—it was just to finish some work I had in hand—he did not return—I found him next morning in the Lower-road, Islington, looking at some boys playing at pitch-halfpenny—I asked him for two half-crown—he said if I went to his sister perhaps she would pay me; but I took him into custody.

CHARLES CLIFT I am apprentice to Mr. Leach, a pawnbroker. On the 15th of May, the prisoner pawned a flute for his master for 2s. 6d—I knew him before.

JOHN KERSHAW (police-aonstable G 123.) I took the prisoner, and found the duplicate on him.

Prisoner. My master ill-used me, and did not give me half enough victuals.

GUILTY Aged 15.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1486

1486. FREDERICK BOX was indicted for stealing, on the 24th 0f April, 1 cloak, value 2l; 2 coats, value 15s.; and 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; the goods of Robert Blake.

ROBBRT BLAKE . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Stephen-street, Tottenham-court-road. I saw my cloak, two coats, and pocket-book safe about twelve o'clock on the 24th of April—my own coat I pulled off in the back parlour and left there, with the pocket-book in it—the cloak I believe was in the front parlour—between four and five o'clock in the afternoon the officer came, and I missed them—these are them—the cloak is my wife's, and one coat is my son's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ever say you thought the person who took the things must hare been well acquainted with the premises? A. I do not recollect—I might have said such a thing—my opinion now is, that he had some knowledge of the premises—I know nothing of the prisoner.

STEPHEN THORNTON (police-constable E 53.) I was passing down Crown-street, Soho, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's, between three and four o'clock, and saw the prisoner running before me with a bundle—I ran after him through several streets to No. 28, Qneen-street, Seven-dials, and as I was at the foot of the stain, I heard a door shut above—I went up and knocked, but they would not let me in—I said I would break the door—they then let me in, and I found the prisoner and two girls in bed with their clothes on, and another girl in the room wattong—1 found this bundle under the ebed on the sacking—they had denied that it was there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say the bundle was given him to carry by a man? A. Yes, after I took him.

(John Barnes, hair-dresser, Turnmill-street, Ckerkenwell, gave the pri-soner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 19— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1487

1487. SARAH CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 2 blankets, value 12s., and 1 pillow, value 3s., the goods of Joseph Anderson.

MARIA ANDERSON . I am the wife of Joseph Anderson, and live is Howards-place, Bowling-green-lane, Clerkenwell. The prisoner lodged at our house—on the 17th of May I saw her leave with a bundle in the apron—she came home drunk in the evening—I went into her room with the policeman, and missed two blankets, and a pillow—these are them.

THOMAS WELLS . I am a pawnbroker and live in Rosoman-street. This property was pledged by the prisoner on the 17th of May.

ALFRED THURSTON . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner and found this duplicate on her.

Prisoner. I intended to bring them back on Saturday night.

GUILTY. Aged 25.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined One Month; One Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1488

1488. THOMAS COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of, May, 1 sovereign, the money of Ann Bird.

ANN BIRD . I am in service in Woburn-place, Russell-square—the prisoner was also a servant there. On Saturday afternoon, the 25th of May, about three o'clock, I missed a sovereign from my box, which was kept in the prisoner's room—I had seen it safe on Thursday—the box was locked, but it was not a secure one—on Saturday he showed me a pair of shoes which exited my suspiction—my master charged him with taking the sovereign—he went on his knees and begged me to forgive him, but my master would not allow me.

EDWARD GREENING (police-constable E 99) I was seen for and took the prisoner—I heard him confess that he took the money.

Prisoner. I was half starved—I had only twelve ounces of bread a day allowed me.

GUILTY.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Two Months; Two Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1489

1489. RICHARD WILLIAMS . was indicted for stealing on the 29th of May, 1 coat, value 1l. 10s., the goods of Samuel Carter Huish.

SAMUEL CARTER HUISH . I am a paper hanger, and live in Mount-place, Whitechapel road. On the 29th of May, I left my gig at my own door for about two minutes, with two coats in it—I heard my dog bark in the chaise, and returned and missed my great coat—I saw the prisoner about twenty yards off in the road, with it, and he was taken—he was is liquor, and said he took it out of lark—I understand he bears a very good character.

SAMUEL FREDERICK CHIVERS . I live in Devonshire-street. I saw the prisoner take the coat from the chaise—I collared him—he was very much in liquor, and he said he did it out of a lark—he was walking quite slow.

Prisoner's Defence. I had received some money and got in liquor—do not know how I came to do it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1490

1490. ANN WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May, shawl, value 16s.; and 1 gown, value 8s.; the goods of Ann Sutton the younger: and 1 gown, value 4s., the goods of Samuel Sutton.

ANN SUTTON, JUN . I am the daughter of Samuel Sutton, and live in Corbet's-court, Spitalfields. On the 18th of May I was going up to my mother's room, the prisoner was in the passage, and inquired for a dressmaker—I looked out of the window and saw her go out of the street door about a quarter of an hour after I saw her outside the door with my shawl laing behind her—I told my mother, and went and found her with my shawl.

ANN SUTTON, SEN . I am the wife of Samuel Sutton. I lost two shawl and a shawl from my bed-room on the second floor—I found the gown lying in the passage, and the shawl the prisoner had outside the door—she begged to be let go.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1491

1491. SARAH WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May, 68 yards of lace, value 1l., the goods of Joseph Sowerby and another.

HENRY THOMPSON . I am shopman to Joseph Sowerby and John Williams, hosiers and haberdashers, of Oxford-street. On the 22nd of May, about five o'colck in the afternoon, the prisoner and another came to out snop and bought some ribbon—they then asked to look at some lace—I counted the pieces, and while I stooped to pick up one card, I thought I saw the prisoner put two pieces under her shawl into her packet—she then bought 4 yard of lace, and I gave her change for 1s.,—they went out—I brought prisoner back, and she dropped these two pieces of lace from tmder shawl, behind some ladies who were in the shop—I had not sold them to her.

HENRY UPTON . I live In Twister's-alley, Bunhill-row. I was in Oxford-street—I saw the witness bring back the prisoner, and saw her drop the two pieces of lace.

JOHN CAVEY . I was a policeman and received the prisoner in custody.

GUILTY Aged 21.— Confined Six Months; three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1492

1492. JAMES GUMMER, JAMES MAYBREY , and EDWARD ROXBERRY , were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May, 1 necklace value 6s., the goods of Joseph Hutton, from the person of Charlotte Hutton.

ELIZA HUTTON . I am the wife of Joseph Hutton, and live in City-gardens. My little girl, whose name is Charlotte, was playing at my door on the 9th of May, with the necklace on her neck—she came in and told me it was gone.

JAMES LAXTON . I am ten years old, and live in City-gardens. On the 19th of May I was playing there, and saw this little girl playing with a good many others—I saw Roxberry take the necklace off her neck and give it to Maybrey, who gave it to Gummer and said, "Put it in your shoe,—Oh what a bite"—I knew them before—they used to come past the house with wood—I am sure they are the three—they ran across the City-road—I went and told my mother.

JOHN WHITE . I am eight year old. I saw Boxberry take the ✗ of the little girl's neck and give them to Maybrey—he said to Gummer

"Let us put them in our shoes"—and he said, "What a bite"—they did not put them into their shoes but ran across the road—I had seen them before.

JAMES DEAR . I am a policeman. The prisoners were given to me—they said they were there when the beads were taken off, but they were not the parties who took them.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

GUMMER— GUILTY . Aged 12.

MAYBREY— GUILTY . Aged 12.

ROXBERRY— GUILTY . Aged 15.

Recommended to mercy.

Confined Five Days and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18370612-1493

1493. LAVINIA MILLS and HENRY RUSSELL SOLOMON were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April, 3 sheets, value 6s.; and I blanket, value 1s.; the goods of Stephen Noad.

(The prosecutor's name being Noads the prisoners were ACQUITTED .)

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370612-1494

1494. THOMAS GOODFELLOW was indicted for stealing, on 11th of June, 1 pair of shoes, value 11 s., the goods of Henry Knight; and 1 round frock, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 half-sovereign, and 1 farthing; the goods and monies of Stephen Martin; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1495

1495. JAMES PRIEST was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May, 91b weight of copper, value 7s., the goods of John Seward and others.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM FREDERICK HAMMOND . I am clerk to John Seward and others, engineers, at Millwall—the prisoner was in their service. In consequence of losing property, I placed myself, on the 26th of May, on the roof of the brass factory, and at twelve o'clock, just as the men left, I saw the prisoner close the door, and secrete some pieces of copper about his person—I was down in time to see him leave—I sent the gate-keeper to bring him back—I sent for a policeman, and these four pieces of copper were found on his person.

WILLIAM LOW (police-constable K 261.) I was sent for, and found twfe pieces of metal on the prisoner.

JOHN SYMONDS . I am a police-inspector. The prisoner was brought to the station-house at Poplar—he said he had found the copper by the West India Docks' wall, on his way home to dinner—I said it was very extraordinary, when so many people were passing at that time of the day—b& hesitated a little, and then said, "It is no use to deny it—I took a from my master's premises.

GUILTY . Aged 33.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1496

1496. MARIA BEGWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May, 1 shawl, value 3s., and 1 gown, value 5s.; the goods of Mary Loveday.

MARY LOVEDAY . I am a widow, and live in Bruton-street, St. Pancras. The prisoner lodged and slept with me—on the 16th of May, I went out between four and five o'clock in the evening, leaving her in care of the place—I returned in about an hour, and she was gone—I found my box broken open, and the gown and shawl gone—these are my property.

HENRY WILDING . I am shopman to Mr. Loveday, a pawnbroker I took in these things from the prisoner on the 16th of May.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1497

1497. THOMAS BELL and WALTER MARCHANT were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, 2 half-crowns, the monies of John Woodward, from his person.

JOHN WOODWARD . I am a nightman. On the 24th of May I went to the Bells public-house, opposite Whitechapel church, about nine or ten o'clock—the prisoners were there, and I treated them with two or three pots of beer, or five or six—I knew them by sight—I came out at eleven o'clock, when they shut up—I had paid my reckoning, and had two. half-crowns, one shilling, and one halfpenny when I came out—I was sober, and went to work the same night—I got to a gateway, and stopped there, and I directly grabb'd Bell, who had taken my money from my pocket, and given it to Marchant, and he took it away—I called a policeman, and he took Bell.

WILLIAM ARGENT . I am a policeman. I saw the prosecutor having hold of Bell—he said he had robbed him of two half-crowns, and that Marchant had taken them from him—I took Marchant two days after, and told him I wanted the two half-crowns—he said he knew nothing about them.

STEPHEN HARTLEY . I am barman at the Two Bells. I served the prisoners with half a pint of rum, which the prosecutor paid 6d. towards—I saw them scrambling on the floor for some coppers which the prosecutor said he had dropped—I got the house cleared, and sergeant Dickman brought Bell inside, and searched him, and a shilling dropped from his hat.

WILLIAM DICKMAN . I am a policeman. I took Bell into the house, and a shilling fell from his hat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1498

1498. JAMES HEATH and JOHN ADAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May, 1 bag, value 6d.; 9 shillings, 1 sixpence, 2 penny pieces, and 3 halfpence; the goods and monies of James Burgess, from his person.

JAMES BURGESS . I am a shepherd, and lived with Mr. Merrick, at Stanmore. On the 22nd of May I went to the sheep-fair at Hounslow, and went into a booth about ten o'clock—I had 9s. 6d. in silver, two penny-pieces, and three halfpence in a bag, under the lining of my hat—I did not have any thing to drink in the booth then—the prisoners were there—Heath asked me to stand something to drink—I had never seen him before—I told him I had not got any money—he got up, and felt my pockets in front—another young man beat my hat off, and it fell down before me—Adams sat at the right hand of him—Heath picked my money up before me—I took up my hat, and said to him, "Give me my money—he said he had not got any money, and put up his fist before my face and said he would cut my b——head off—he and the man who knocked my hat off were then going out—I told him he was not going off like that with my money—I took Heath back, and sent for a policeman—the other man went off entirely.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What are you now? A. I work at Mr. Sherman's, at burning turf—I was never a fighting man—I never lived at Winchester—I know Challis who lives there—I never saw, him

fight—I never said I saw him fight and that I was his second—I never was at a fight—I went to the fair at eleven o'clock on this day—I had a pint of beer in the booth Vit was a beer shop—there were a number of people in it—I was not there eight times—I did not swear before the justice that I had 10s. beside the halfpence.

Q. (Reading the witness's deposition)—"My bag contained 10s. and some halfpence," is that true of false? A. If that is there, it is their mistake—I will take my oath I never said there was 10s.—I did not hear it read over to me—I cannot say whether they read it to me—I signed it—I swear both these men were in the booth when I went in at ten o'clock—I was not treated to drink by and one—Adams's wife was there when I went in—there were not two women there—I did not one on my knee that night—in the afternoon I had—I went out with two females, but that was before ten o'clock—there was no female there then but Adams's wife, when my hat was knocked off—I do not know how many people were in the booth at the time—the person who knocked my hat off was a stranger—as soon as he knocked it off he sat down—I said I had not got a farthing of money in my pocket—I did not tell them I had money in my hat—I did not offer to fight any body—the constable came about an hour after this—Heath was in the booth still—he went out at first, and I went and stopped him.

DAVID MONDAY . I am a labourer. I was just going into the booth, and saw the man come and knock Burgess's hat off—the bag fell before Heath and he put it round to Adams with his left hand—I and another young man went to find a constable.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you give us any idea how many persons were in the booth? A. No, they were in an uproar, all drinking, and some drunk—I think there were not so many as forty there—it was not full—when this money was down, Heath and the other man were trying to get it—I only was one women there, and she was Adams's wife—I am quite sure I saw the bag go to Adams's hand—I told Heath that he had got it—I cannot tell where Adems put it—I left Adams and Heath in the booth—I lost 2s. myself in trying to get out.

HENRY POWNALL . I am a constable. Some young man came and told me of this, and I took the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you take Adams? A. In the booth—I searched them—I found 6 1/2d. on Heath, and nothing on Adams.

HEATH— GUILTY . Aged 25.

ADAMS— GUILTY . Aged 50

Recommended to mercy.

Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1499

1499. ELIZABETH RALEY was indicted for bigamy.

HENRY CRUTCHFIELD . I have know the prisoner from the birth—I remember her being married to James Raley, at Rotherfield, Peppard church, on the 16th of July, 1798—I was at the wedding—he was a farmer's servant, and she was a poor women—I was him last Sunday at Pepard Church.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Are you a cousin of this women? A. Not that I know of—they lived together as man and wife—I cannot say justly how long ago; she may have left him from twenty-five to thirty years ago—Raley has continued to live at Peppard ever since—I have never seen the prisoner there since she left—Raley is a working man now—the prisoner is fifty-nine years old—Peppard is forty miles from London.

GEOROE SMITH (police-constable L 119,) I produce a certificate of the marriage of James Raley and the prisoner—I compared it with the register—read.) HENRY ARIES. I married the prisoner in July, 1830, by banns—here is my certificate—I examined it with the register and it is correct—she stated herself to be a widow—I lived with her, on and off, about four years, and then she parted from me—I am a pork-butcher—she did or the lodgers the same as before—she had a private house—I did not marry her to get the house—it turned out a very bad home—when I had good situations I could not keep them.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you in business on your own account? A. Not now, but I was two or three years ago, since I married her—I found her living in Commercial-road, Lambeth, in a house of her own partly furnished—I am thirty years old—I was twenty-three when I married her, and she was fifty-two—I did not agree to part with her in 1833—an agreement was drawn up by a lodger of hers—1 was to allow her so, much a week—I did not sign any agreement—this is my name, (looking at a paper,) but not my signing—I have seen this agreement many times before, but not the signature to it—I do not know who drew it up—I agreed to allow her 7s., a week if she would keep away from me—I never had this read to me—it was made out without my knowledge—it was shown to me—t did not agree to the terms—I allowed her 7s. a week about three years ago—I discovered she was married a few days before she went away from me—I had known her about six months before I married her—I lodged in her house—I owed her a little money, but not much—I did not marry her to wipe off the debt—I have been out of place now a considerable time—I have been living at Kidlington, in Oxfordshire, with my friends—I worked at Oxford, selling things—I have been to the house of the prisoner's husband—I was there last Christmas twelve-month—I did not see him, but the housekeeper—I have never gone by the name of Thomas—the prisoner's daughter was present at our marriage—I have not seen her this year and a half I should think—we were not at intimate—I never wanted her to come and live with me as my wife—I never proposed any thing of the kind.

GEORGE SMITH (police-constable L 119)I apprehended the prisoner in Granby-street, Waterloo-road.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1500

1500. GEORGE KING was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May, 1 bonnet; value 5s.; 2 sheets, value 4s.; and 2 pillow-cases, value 1s.; the goods of Susannah King; and that he had beat before convicted of felony.

SUSANNAH KING . I am a widow, The prisoner is my son—I loat the property stated from my own room last month—the prisoner came to me about three o'clock in the afternoon, and asked for the key of my door—I said I could not think of doing that; what had become of my bonnet—he said he knew nothing of it—I said there was no one else in the room, and that left him in bed when I went to work—this is my property.

MARY GARDNER . I am a general dealer. I bought these two pillowcases and bonnet of the prisoner for 10d. a day or two after they were lost—I did not know him before.

GEORGE ALLEN . I am assistant to a pawnbroker. I problem a sheet which pledged by the prisoner for 1s. 6d.

RICHMOND MOORE (police-constable S 47.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was a witness at the time—he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1501

1501. WILLIAM YOUNG was indicated for stealing on the 20th of May, 1 firkin, value 3d.; and 59lbs. Weight of butter, calue 2l. 5s.; the goods of Joseph Johnson and another.—2nd COURT, stating them to be the goods of George Brewer.

WILLIAM DEANE . I am a carman. I was going up Farringdon-street about half-past five o'clock in the evening, on the 20th of May, and saw a carrier's cart standing—I saw the prisoner take out a firkin of butter, put it on his right shoulder and run away—I am sure he is the person—I went and gave information.

GEORGE BREWER . I am carman to Joseph Johnson and Son, carriers, at Uxbridge. On the 20th of May I came up to Saffron-hill with a load—I then went to Mr. Weight's and received six casks of butter, some cheese, and bacon—the cart was standing in Farringdon-street—I stopped opposite a gateway there for about three minutes to get the horse a pail of water—my attention was directed to the cart, and I missed the butter directly—the prisoner had offered to help me up with a boiler which came, but I said if I wanted any help I would go up the yard and get it—the butter is quite lost—I ran up Stonecutter-street, but could not hear of it.

Prisoner. I had been there helping to load two wagons, and asked him if I should help him; but I never touched the butter.

THOMAS WEIGHT . I am a cheesemonger. I delivered four large firkins and two small ones to Deane—the one lost was a large one, ane contained 59lb. or 60lb.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1502

1502. JOHN ARNOLD was indicted for stealing on the 21st of May, 1 saw, value 5s.; and 1 tap and box, value 5s.; the goods of John Jaques, his master.

JOHN JAQUES . I am an ivory-turner. The prisoner was in my employ on and off for about two years—he has been a very irregular man—he was in the habit of coming early, before the other men, and leaving for breakfast—I know these articles to be mine.

FREDERICK THOMPSON . I am in the prosecutor's employ. I know these things—the prisoner acknowledged he took them, and took me and the policeman to Mr. Quartick's, a turner, on Back-hill, where they were.

GEORGE QUARTICK . I bought these tools of the prisoner on the 29th and 31st of May—I knew him before, and understood he was respectable man.

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Transported for Seven Years.

(The prosecutor stated that the prisoner had previously robbed him, and had been forgiven.)

OLD COURT.—Friday, June 16th, 1837.

First Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370612-1503

1503. ELIZA HERRIOTT was indicated for stealing on the 16th of May, 1 pair of ear-rings, value 30l.; 1 brooch, value 2l.; and 1 vinaigrette, values 5s.; the goods of Laura Russell, in the dwelling-house of the Duke of Cleveland.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

MISS LAURA RUSSELL . I am niece to the Duke of Cleveland—I was staying at his house in St. James's-square in May. On the afternoon of the 9th of May I missed a pair of ear-rings, set with torquoise and diamonds, from my dressing-case in the room I slept in—a short time afterwards I missed a gold brooch, set with turquoise, from the same room—the prisoner was in the service of His Grace, as housemaid, at the time—and had access to the rooms—I had seen the ear-rings on the 13th of April—Ballard, the officer, has since produced the ear-rings, brooch, and vinaigrette—these are them—(looking at them) and they are the articles I lost.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE.Q. You missed the articles at different times? A. Yes; they may have been taken at different times, but I cannot say they were—I do not know whether the vinaigrette and other things were safe when I missed the ear-rings—the ear-rings are worth 30l.,—the dressing-case was on a table in the room.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer of Bow-street. In consequence, of information, on the 13th of June, I went down to Reigate, and apprehended the prisoner in the service of a chemist there—the Duke's groom was with me, and asked her if she knew him—she said, "Yes"—I said I was an officer, and had come down to inquire about property lost while she was in the Duke's house—I said I suspected she had sold the things, and purchased a watch with the money—she said she had not, and she had not taken them at all—I said, under the circumstances, I should feel it my duty to take her to London with me, and I wished to search her box—she said it was at Dorking—I asked if she had no box at Reigate—she said, "No"—I said, "You must have something here, and I must go up and see what you have got"—I went up, and found the vinaigrette in a pocket, tied up with other things—she said it was her pocket—I, asked where she got that—she said it was her own, and had been given to her by a friend who was a long way off—next morning we went to Dorking—the persons there refused to let me see the box unless she was present—she after-wards went with me to the house, and a box was produced which she said was hers—I unlocked it with the key which I found in her pocket at Reigate, and found the ear-rings and brooch—she said nothing about them—the Duke's house is in the parish of St. James, Westminster.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Life.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutrix, the Duchess of Cleveland having received a good character with her.

Reference Number: t18370612-1504

1504. EDWARD JONES, alias Roots, was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 1 coat, value 1l.; and 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; the goods of John Whitaker.

JOHN WHITAKER . I live in Fulham-fields. On the 6th of May I left my coat and trowsers at the King's Head, in James-street, as I went to market, at four o'clock in the morning, and when I came back they were gone—I did not send the prisoner for them.

JANE WALTHO . I keep the King's Head. The prisoner came early in the morning, and asked for Mr. Whitaker's great coat—I gave it to him, and I understand the trowsers were in the pocket.

WILLIAM DAY . I am a pawnbroker, in Drury-lane. These trowsers were pawned by the prisoner on the 6th of May.

FRANCIS GILES . I live with Mr. Russell, a pawnbroker, in Holborn. I have a coat, which I believe was pawned by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I helped to unload Mr. Whitaker's cart that morning—he went round the market, and when he came back I was gone, and he charged me with the robbery—it is false about my going for the coat.

MRS. WALTHO. I swear he is the man.

GUILTY Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1505

1505. JANE CRIPPEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June, 61bs. weight of bacon, value 2s. 10d., the goods of John Gladsden.

ROBERT WILLIAM CARRUTHERS . I am shopman to Mr. John Gladsden, cheesemonger, Tottenham-court-road. On Saturday night, the 10th of June, I was in the shop, and missed 6lbs. of bacon, which I had seen safe three minutes before—the prisoner was in the shop—Brooks told me something, and I found it in the prisoner's basket—it had not been sold to her—she said she had paid for it—I asked who she paid for it—she said neither of us—there was another shopman—I gave her in charge—I cannot positively swear to the bacon, but I believe it to be my master's—I missed a piece similar to it—there were a number of customers there—the other shopman is not here—it had been in the window.

Prisoner. It was in my basket—it was at the top of it—I intended to buy it, and asked them to weigh it two or three times—I always use the shop. Witness. She has dealt there a long time—I cannot tell what she might say to the other shopman—it was on the top of her basket—the lid was over it, and it was under her cloak.

JOHN SWANSON BROOKS . I am a jeweller. I was outside the shop, and saw the bacon lying on the window board—I saw the prisoner reach towards it, pull it towards her, and put it under her cloak to secrete it—she then reached towards another piece, looked at it, turned round, and saw me watching her, and laid it down—she then stooped down, put the first piece into her basket, and pulled her cloak round it to conceal it—I was in the doorway—I went into the shop, and told the shopman—the prisoner asked no questions.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no intention of taking it—I went down to the bottom of the shop for butter and eggs, and when I came back they accused me of stealing it. Witness. She moved to another part of the shop with it, but not to the bottom—she did not ask anybody to weigh it.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Parke.

Reference Number: t18370612-1506

1506. JOHN MANSFIELD, alias Shugra, was indicted for killing and slaying William Redrup.

JOSHUA MULLINS . I am a surgeon, and live in Leather-lane. On Sunday, the 28th of May, about one o'clock in the night, the prisoner came and said there was a man stabbed in Dorrington-street, and pressed me to come immediately—he was crying—I went with him, and found a man at No. 5, Dorrington-street—he was dying—he was wounded in the thigh—there was a great quantity of blood—it was a stap of the same

width as a knife that I saw in the place, which the officer produced to me, and which was bloody.

JAMES EDMONDSON . I am a surgeon. I heard of this accident, and was requested to go there by the officer on duty, a little after three o'clock in the morning—I found the deceased quite dead, lying on a sack of straw in the kitchen—he was a young man about twenty-four or twenty-five years of age—I examined his wound, it was in the lower part of his thigh, partly in the front—it had cut one of the arteries—I examined it with my finger, and found it was about three inches deep—it had divided the femoral✗ artery, vein accompanying it—I have not a doubt of that being the cause of his death—there was also an unimportant wound on the palm of his hand—it was a cut which such a knife as this would certainly occasion—the knife is bloody now.

ALEXANDER SMITH . I live at No. 25, Dorrington-street. The prisoner and deceased were lodgers of mine—on Saturday night, about half-past eleven o'clock, the prisoner, the deceased, and the other witness, left me in Laystall-street, they went and bought two pounds of steaks for their supper, and went home to my place to cook them—I returned home, and found the witness cooking them—the prisoner and deceased were then sitting quite comfortably in the kitchen—the deceased paid me 18d. for one week's rent, and required the prisoner to pay me 6d. which he owed me, and did so—I went up and paid my landlord, and when I came down I found the prisoner and the deceased quarrelling—the prisoner the deceased he had no business to order him to pay me—the deceased struck him three or four blows over his face, and sat down—they were hard blows—the prisoner told him to keep his hands to himself—he said, "Why?"—the prisoner said, "Because, if you hit me again, I will knife you"—the deceased got up and struck him, while he sat in his chair at table, having his supper—the prisoner then snatched a knife out of the plate, and got up—the deceased followed him, till he got him up in the corner of the room, and then hit him a blow and knocked him down—the prisoner had retreated—I asked the deceased to come away—he said, "No, I won't; d—his eyes, he has subbed me in the hand"—I immediately went to his assistance, when be turned round, and exclaimed that he was stabbed in the thigh, and asked me to fetch a doctor, for he was a dead man—the prisoner immediately said, "I will fetch a doctor," and ran out to fetch one—I went out, and saw a policeman in Brook-street—hecame with me to the door, and we found the prisoner and the doctor at the door—the deceased was a powerful man—he was about five feet six inches high, and twenty years of age.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he had quarrelled with tne deceased about some money—that he used very provoking language to him, and struck him—on his retreating to the corner, with the knife inhis hand deceased knocked him down, and knelt on his chest—that he continued beating him; and, in struggling for the kinfe, the wound had accidentally occurred.) ALEXANDER SMITH re-examined. After the deceased was stabbed, he said, "Put the kinfe down"—the prisoner said, "No, I won't," and then the deceased struck him, and he said, "I am stabbed in the thigh"—the prisoner was on the floor at that time, and the deceased standing over him—I cannot tell by accident or on purpose—I do not think the prisoner took the knife up with the intent of using it, if the deceased had not followed him, for he backed

from the deceased—the prisoner was a very quiet boy, and they were like two brothers, so very friendly—I did not see the deceased fall towards the ground before he received the wound—the prisoner was holding the knife up as he fell on the ground—I think at the time he snatched at the knife his hand might have gone against the point of it—the deceased fell of me when he was stabbed, fainting from the loss of blood.

Prisoner. Q. After he received the wound in the hand, did I not tell him to leave me alone, and did not he say, "No, you b——, I will kill you before I have done?" Witness. I did not hear that—the prisoner was very much ill-used by the deceased.

JURY. Q. Might not the deceased have run against the knife, the prisoner holding it underhanded? A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Parke.

Reference Number: t18370612-1507

1507. THOMAS LANE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering a building within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of Samuel Cox, on the 22nd of May, at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 rat-trap, value 1s.; 4 feet of lead pipe, value 4s.; and 1 metal cock, value 5s.; the goods of Samuel Cox; the said metal pipe and cock being fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

GEORGE ALLEN . I am servant to Samuel Cox, who keeps the Hock of Gibraltar public-house, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. Then is a wash-house which joins the public-house by an open passage—on the 22nd of May I locked the wash-house up at eight o'clock in the evening, and fastened the window—the rat-trap and leaden pipe were then safe—1 went there again at ten o'clock, and found the window broken open—there was a hole large enough for a man to go through, about five feet from the ground—I missed the rat-trap, and the pipe which was fixed there for the water—next morning I saw the prisoner in Church-street—my wife was with him, and had the rat-trap, which I knew, I gave him in charge.

SARAH ANN ALLEN . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw the prisoner in Wheeler-street next morning with the rat-trap, and he offered it to me for 4d.—I took it from him, and told him to come with me—I sent for my husband who took him.

MICHAEL COTTER . I am a policeman. I searched the prisoner at the station-house, and found the lead pipe and brass cock on him—I asked where he got the rat-trap, he said, he bought it at nine o'clock that morning—it was not nine o'clock then—I had not then found the pipe—when I found that he said he would not tell where he got it, but as 1 took him before the Magistrate he said he took it from the prosecutor's the night before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined One Month.

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

Reference Number: t18370612-1508

1508. DANIEL HORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June, at St. John, Hampstead, 1 medal, value 1d.; 5 sovereign, 3 half-sovereigns, 1 half-crown, 2 sixpences, and 2 pence; the goods and monies of James Smith, his master, in his dwelling-house.

JAMES SMITH . I keep the Coach and Horses at Hampstead, in the parish of St. John—the prisoner was in my service. About a fortnight ago 1 went to bed about a quarter past eleven o'clock, and had 5 sovereigns, as far as I can recollect, 2 half-sovereigns, a half-crown, and some silver loose

in my pocket when I went to bed—I placed my trowsers upon a chair at the side of the bed—I left the door unlocked, and my wife up in the house—there was a foreign coin among my money—my wife awoke me when she came to bed, and my trowsers were then lying in the middle of the room, and there was not a farthing in any of the pockets, which were pulled right out.

Prisoner. He was tipsy all day on the Monday. Witness. I was not tipsy—I will not say I was exactly sober, because I had two or three glasses of ale and a pipe with a few friends, but I was not drunk.

ELIZA SMITH . I am the prosecutor's wife. He went to bed about a quarter past eleven o'clock—he was quite collected—I went to bed about half past twelve o'clock, and saw his trowsers lying in the middle of the room, as if they had been thrown down, and the pockets empty—one pocket was turned inside out—I awoke him—the prisoner slept in the attic—he went to bed after my husband, but before me—he would pass our bedroom door to go to bed—I had noticed the day before that he had a rag about his finger, having a whitlow—I am confident this it the rag I saw him with the day before—(looking at it.) RICHARD NEELD. I am a policeman. I was called into the prosecutor's house on the morning of the 13th of June, about half past four o'clock—I went to the prisoner's room about half past five o'clock—we found him alone in the room dressing—I told him there had been a robbery in the house in the course of the night—he said he knew nothing about it—I found a half-crown and two sixpences about him after he had dressed, but nothing else—I took him to the station-house, and returned to the room immediately—I found six sovereigns, two half sovereigns, a coin, and two fourpenny pieces, underneath the webbing of the bottom of a horse-hair chair, which stood alongside of his bed, wrapped up in this piece of rag—I went back to the station-house and showed to the prisoner the rag—he said he knew nothing about it—I saw that he had then a very small piece of rag on his finger, which he was holding on with hit left hand.

JAMES SMITH re-examined. This brass coin I know by the number 5 on it—I have had it about twenty years—it was among the sovereigns on the night in question—we had two soldiers in the house—one was ill and went to bed about three or four o'clock, and the other went to bed about eight o'clock—nobody slept in the prisoner's room—I left two or three people in the parlour when I went to bed.

MRS. SMITH re-examined. There was nobody up when I went to bed—when my husband went to bed two lodgers were in the parlour, bat they went to bed before me—they slept on the same floor as my husband—we have no female servant—I know this rag by the tie of it—I have seen the prisoner wash it out and tie it on again.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Life.

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

Reference Number: t18370612-1509

1509. HENRY KING was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February, 1 gelding, price 1l. 1s., the property of John Langridge.

JOHN LANGRIDGE . I am a cab proprietor, and live in Harper's-mews, Theobald's-road—the prisoner was in my service as horse-keeper. On the 23rd of February I sent him with a horse which was glandered to Mr. Watts, King's-cross, a horse-slaughterer, to sell her for what he could get, and he did not return—about two months afterwards I saw him in custody

in Harper's-mews, close to my stable—he said, "They have caught me at last"—I said, "A good job too" he said, "You may as well come and appear against me now, that I may have it all at once."

Prisoner. You said in the yard of Hatton-garden that you would compromise the matter, provided I had a friend present. Witness. Atcbelor, who bought the horse, spoke to him on the subject, and I said I did not wish to prosecute if I could get what I lost.

JOHN ATCHELOR . I am a horse-slaughterer, and live in Sharp's-alley, Cow-cross. On Thursday, the 23rd of February, I bought a glandered horse of the prisoner for a guinea—he told me it was his own, and gave me the name of King, and said he was a cab-man, and lived in Harper's-mews—the prosecutor afterwards came to me to go to Hatton-garden, and he said if he could get his money he would not go before the Magistrate—I know Watts—I have nothing to do with him in businesshe lives a mile from me.

PATRICK LANDERS . I went with the prosecutor to Watts the next morning and made inquiry—he could not find the horse, and then went to Atchelor's.

WILLIAM BELTON . I am a policeman. The prisoner was given in my charge, on the 22nd of April.

JOHN LANGRIDGE re-examined. I had had no communication with Watts about the horse—I had never dealt with him, but my brother advised me to send it to him—I am certain I told the prisoner to take it to Watts—I did not name anybody else.

Prisoner. I was tried last Sessions for embezzlement, this very saw case. He told me to sell it anywhere without reserve. Witness. It is quite wrong—when I sent him with the horse, I sent Landers with him to receive the money—the prisoner was only to take the horse there, not to receive the money—they left my premises together with it.

PATRICK LANDERS re-examined. I went with the prisoner to Watts, but he was not at home—I then went home and left the prisoner at King's Cross—he was to take the horse home as I supposed, he was not to wait there for Watts—he asked me to go with him, but I would not.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Transported for Life.

Before Mr. Baron Parke.

Reference Number: t18370612-1510

1510. JOSEPH BLACKSON and GEORGE WALKER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Harris, on the 15th of May, at St. Marylebone, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 4 spoons, value 1l. 12s.; 1 watch, value 1l. 10s.; 1 handkerchief value 1s.; 7 sovereigns, 1 shilling, 1 sixpence, 18 fourpences, and 1 £5 Bank Note, the goods, monies, and property of Sarah Harris; and Rose Chambers, as an accessory before and after the fact.

SARAH HARRIS . I am a laundress—I live at No. 8, Caplin-street, Lisson-grove, in the parish of St. Marylebone—I rent the house and have lodgers. I occupy the front room second floor myself, or 1 may say the whole floor—Roberts keeps a shop on my ground floor, and Fry the sheep✗ on the other side—it is a double house—Mrs. Hooper occupies two rooms on the first floor, Salmon the front room, and Roberts the otherroom—the female prisoner lodged in my house for nearly two years, and was in the habit of coining into the room I occupied—I kept my money in the right hand drawer in the room which I keep as a sitting room and bedroom—she has✗ the opportunity of seeing me put money into the drawer, and I have taken✗

money out of it to lend her before now—she left me just before May, and took all her things away—she left a tea-pot behind her, and came for it on the 1st of May—she had not paid me her last week's rent—she paid me then, and said, "I have left a tea-pot here, and a knife and fork"—I said, "Yes, I know you have, and when you have made good what things you have destroyed here, you should have them"—she said, "Oh you b—old b—we will have a b-lark over this tea-pot, and you shall lose a rare lot of time," and as she went down stairs she said it should cause me to lose a deal of time—on the 15th of May, I left my house a little before two o'clock, with my daughter, to get in my linen—I returned a little after three o'clock, and found two or three policemen in my room, and my son and daughter—I found the drawer which my money was in open—I had locked it and had the key in my pocket—I missed a £5 note, and as near as I can guess seven sovereigns—six sovereigns were with the note, and one with some fourpenny-pieces, a few shillings, and sixpences—I had looked into the drawer just before I started, and saw the money safe—I missed a watch which hung on the mantel-piece, and four silver teaspoons from the drawer, and a silk handkerchief I missed next day—I had put it on as I was going out, but I thought it would be too hot, and threw it carelessly on the table—I always went out from half-past one to two o'clock on Monday, and the female prisoner knew that—I did so at the time she lodged with me—I sometimes leave somebody behind in my room, and sometimes not—sometimes I was about an hour and a half out, and sometimes about two hours—I had an old lady in my room for six weeks before the prisoner left, but after that I had nobody to leave in the room.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not some of your lodgers leave you about a week before the prisoner left?A. No, no person left the house that I had had a quarrel with—I swear that is the truth—some persons named Jones occupied the shop on the left hand side—they left about a fortnight or three weeks before the prisoner—I had no quarrel with them before they left—we parted on good terms so far at making up matters—we had no quarrel, but they asked me to take the fixtures towards my quarter's rent, as they were not able to stop—I was not at all angry with them because they could not pay their rent—a person named Walker was not in the habit of coming to my house—I never called Chambers an ill name while she was with me, but gave her good advice—all my lodgers are good old standers—I never had one for only a day—I swear that I did not call the prisoner a w—, nor any ill name—all I said to her was, "I think you are forgetting yourself'—my daughter is about twenty-six yean old—I left her behind—she might have staid in the room if she chose, but the had her own business to attend to—she used to visit me while the prisoner lodged in my house—she hardly ever staid in my room while I went out—she was there about five minutes that day—that was the only time I ever left her to lock the door—I should not have done it then, only the cart came up in a hurry the was never left in the room except that day—she was there sometimes with me, but I never left her behind me except that day—the lodgers all knew that Monday was my usual day for going out—I betters I had about five lodgers at that time in the house—a young man named Herbert lodged in the house, but he went out in the morning, and is not at home in the lay time—he went into the City that day—I went into his attic not five minutes before I went out—I saw him about nine o'clock in the even-ing when he returned from hit sister's—neither Mrs. Hooper nor Mrs. Salmon

have any family—I had no mark on the note, it was a new one—the prisoner had left some things for me to wash, and came on Monday to fetch them, and pay the rent—I never left my door unlocked except when she was there, and I have said to her, "Rose, I wish you would look to my door," as I thought I could depend on her—I used to put the key on a stool outside the door, and sometimes under a water pitcher, when I was out, as I did not like to trouble her to give it me when I came up stairs again.

MARY ANN FOX . I am the prosecutrix's daughter. I was at her house at the time she went out—she left me behind, as the cart came to the door for her to go out—she said "Will you lock the door Mary?"—I did so, and came out of the room—I locked the door, and went to see that Herbert's room was locked,—I locked his door and put the key of his door on my mother's drawers, and brought my mother's key over to my own place—my mother's drawers were safe then and the door locked—I did not lock the street door—it is always open—in about half an hour afterwards I received information from Mrs. Roberts, and went over to my mother's—I went up stairs and found the door open—I saw no marks of violence on it—the lock appeared to have been unlocked with a key—I went and tried the drawer which I knew my mother kept her money in, and it was forced open—there was a piece of the drawer lying on the floor, and the mark of a chisel on the drawers, as if it had been used to prize it open—the box my mother's money was in was gone, and her watch and tea spoons.

ELIZA LOUISA ROBERTS . I am the wife of Joseph Roberts, who keeps a hair-dresser's shop in the prosecutrix's house. On Whit Monday, rather before two o'clock, I was standing at the shop door—I did not know whether Mrs. Harris was gone out then, but I noticed the prisoner Blackson and another walking about—I do not know the other sufficiently to swear to him, but he was exactly the same sort of person as the prisoner Walker—(looking at the prisoners)—yes, they were the two men—they were walking very slowly backwards and forwards—they afterwards separated, and Blackson went to the corner of Nightingale-street—the other was standing just beyond Nightingale-street, waiting as if for Blackson to come up him—Blackson was looking at me as I stood at the door with my baby in my arms my arms—I afterwards went from the street-door into my shop, pushed my shop door to, and went into my parlour—I heard the footsteps of one person, not more, going up stairs—the street door was open at that time, and the middle door of the passage was a-jar—I went and found it ajar after I heard the footsteps, and closed it—I cannot say whether it had been ajar before—it was easy to open it—it opens with a string, and was not fastened at all—I went up stairs to my bed-room on the first floor for a jug at that time—I came down again, put the jug on the table, went to the door instantly, and met Blackson coming through the passage, as if from up stairs—I asked him his business, whether it was with Mrs. Harris—he said it was—I asked him if I should tell her when she came home—he said no, the business was with her herself—I said, "If you have any message I will tell her when she comes home"—he said, "Then you can tell her I came from Mr. Dalston, (or Dalton,) a tailor"—I saw no more of him, but I suspected something was wrong, from his agitated appearance, and I went over to Mrs. Harris's daughter to tell her—she came over immediately after me—we went up and found her mother's door open, and the drawer broken open—I am sure it was Blackson I saw—he had on a dark frock coat, but I did not notice any other part of his dress—I did not see any body else go into the house.

Cross-examined. Q. You crossed the street very soon after to Mrs. Fox? A. Yes, Blackson was then gone—I saw nobody on crossing the street—I could see up and down a considerable distance—Walker was the person saw walking with him in the street, but I did not see him after Blackson came out of the house—I have never sworn that the middle door was shut—Mrs. Harris has left her key in my shop once or twice when she went out—(looking at her deposition)—here is my mark to this—(the deposition being read contained the following sentence—"There is a middle door in the passage, but it was shut.")

JOHN MATTHEWS . I live at No. 6, Caplin-street, two doors from Mrs. Harris. On Whit Monday, a little after two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoners, Walker and Blackson, walking backwards and forwards for a full half hour, which made me take particular notice of them—they were exactly opposite my house at the corner of Nightingale-street—I saw Blackson leave Walker, cross over the road, and enter into Mrs. Harris's passage door, but I could not see him go up stairs—I had seen Mrs. Harris go away with her cart before that—she was not gone when they were first walking about, but after she was gone he crossed to the door—Walker walked a little farther off towards Church-street—I did not notice whether he turned the corner or not—Blackson was dressed in a dark frock coat—it appeared to me like a dark bottle-green.

Cross-examined. Q. As long as you saw Walker after Blackson parted from him, was he not walking? A. He was walking gently on.

COURT. Q. How far did he go? A. I did not notice particularly, as I went into my shop—he was about twenty yards from the house when I saw him last.

WILLIAM SEYMOUR . I am a shoemaker, and live in Caplin-street, directly opposite Mrs. Harris. On Whit Monday I was at work in my shop, and saw Blackson go into Mrs. Harris's house—it was near upon three o'clock when he came out—I cannot say the time exactly—I had seen Mrs. Harris go away before he went in—I did not see anybody with Blackson—I saw him go in, push the door open in the passage, and turn round towards the stairs, and the door shut afterwards—I saw him come down and open the door, and he came and spoke to Mrs. Roberts—he pulled out a piece of something white while he was speaking to her—he had a dark frock coat on—I saw Mrs. Harris come home afterwards—I had seen nobody go into the house from the time Mrs. Harris went away to the time Mrs. Roberts went to tell Mrs. Fox, besides Blackson.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see Blackson go up to Mrs. Roberts at the street door about three o'clock? A. He came up to the door, and she was then at the door, but he did not speak to her—he was walking about—he turned back, and went towards Church-street after that, but he came by my shop and went over into Mrs. Harris's house—I saw him go in slyly—I was a short space of time observing him—I was not noticing the time—I had no suspicion of him—I do not know how long I had been observing him—it might be ten minutes.

LYDIA REEVES . I am the wife of Thomas Reeves of Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove. I know the female prisoner—I have seen her frequently at the time she lived at Mrs. Harris's, and she afterwards lived for a fortnight at No. 5, Charles-street—I understand she lived there with Blackson—she sent for me about half-past one o'clock on Whit Monday, to know if I would wash for her on the Tuesday—Walker lived in the front room, first floor of of the same house—he is married—Chambers lived in the back room—I

swept her room out that day, and the front room, and while I was sweeping she said she had some thoughts of going to Greenwich if she had any luck—while I was in the back room with Chambers, Blackson and Walker came in—it was a little after three o'clock—they ran up stairs together, and went into the front room, which is Walker's, and Chambers went into the room to them—I heard them talking and laughing together, but did not hear what they said—they did not stay there many minutes—I saw them go down again—I am sure it was them—a few minutes afterwards I was in Walker's room, and Blackson came up again and changed a coat—he took off a large dark frock coat—Chambers went to her own room—Blackson followed her, and staid there about five minutes, and then went away—I did not look at the clock when he went—I looked at it when I left there and got home—it was then near four o'clock—I went to Chambers next day to wash—I went into Walker's room for some soap, and heard Walker's wife tell him he had no business to tell Rose how much money they had, for she was a b——deceitful b—and there was no bottom to her—he said, he could buy them at any time for a quartern of gin, fourpence would buy them—I heard this at the door—I knocked at the door then, and Walker's wife gave me the money to get the soap—after this Mrs. Walker came down and asked me to go up to tea with her and her husband, which I did—Rose and Blackson came in and sat down to tea with us—I saw some new trowsers and a new gown piece in Chambers's room—it was a pink plaid.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you always said you saw the trowsers? A. That was what I saw—they were not quite finished, and they were unmade dresses—I told Rose that I should not have had tea there, but she took my bonnet and shawl, and locked them in—Walker's wife was trimming a bonnet—I did not mention that before the Magistrate, as I was not asked about it—I looked at Rose's clock when the prisoners went away—I cannot exactly say the time—it was near four o'clock—about half-past three o'clock—I cannot say whether I ever said it was a little after three o'clock.

(The witness's deposition being read, stated it to be a little after three o'clock when Blackson left, and contained nothing of having observed the trowsers.)

THOMAS LEE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Walker, a linen-draper, in Oxford-street. On Whit Monday, between five and six o'clock in the evening, Blackson and Walker came to our shop, and bought two cotton dresses—one was a pink plaid—they each changed a sovereign, and received change.

WILLIAM CUMMING . I am a policeman. On the afternoon of Whit Monday I was called into Mrs. Harris's house, when the alarm was given—I saw the drawer, and examined the door—there were no marks of violence on the door—I went on the Wednesday with Mrs. Harris and Mrs. Roberts to No. 5, Charles-street, Lisson-grove, which is about a quarter of a mile from Mrs. Harris's—in the first-floor front room I found the prisoners, Blackson and Walker, and two young women—I asked Mrs. Roberts, which was the young man she had seen in the house that day—she pointed Blakson out, and I took him into custody, and told him he was my prisoner—he asked what for—I said, about stealing a £5 note, seven sovereigns, and other articles—he said he never heard tell of such a thing in his life—I saw a pair of quite new boots there, and asked whose they were—Blackson said they were his—I found none of the stolen property—Walker was also taken—I afterwards took Chambers, and found 1l. 10s. in gold, and 16s. 6d. in silver, in a small box in her room, and 3d.

in a table drawer in the room where she was, (the first-floor back room)—I also found a key which had been newly filed—I applied it to Mrs. Harris's door, and found it opened and locked it—on the Friday night following I went into the same room, and found this gown piece in a box belonging to Chambers—I had searched the same box before, and she then said it was her box—Davey was with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you not Chambers in custody at the time you found it? A. I had—I searched the box the day I took her, but I was not looking for a gown then, but a silver tea-spoon and watch—the gown-piece might have been there and I not notice it, as there were sheets and different things in a lump together.

COURT. Q. Did you try the key of the door to Chamber's room? A. Yes—it unlocked her door—I found a black frock coat on the Saturday night in Chambers's bed.

WILLIAM DAVEY . I am a policeman. I went on the 17th to No. 5, Charles-street, with Cumming, and took Walker into custody—I searched the room, and found two chisels, two files, part of a centre-bit, a hand-vice, a screw-driver, ten duplicates, and a pick-lock key, in a small box, in Walker's room—I applied the chisels to the marks in the drawers which I found at Mrs. Harris's, and they corresponded exactly—one chisel was smaller than the other, and there were marks of both.

THOMAS LEE re-examined. This is the gown-piece I sold.

MRS. REEVES. This is the gown-piece I saw.

(Matthew Wilcox, carpenter, Frederick-place, Hampstead-road; William Burrows, carpenter, Stanhope-street, Regent's-park; John Egley, poulterer, Henry-street; John Weddenstall, tailor, Tottenham-place; Thomas Want, builder, Anne-street, Regent's-park; Thomas Payne, fishmonger, King's Cross; John Robinson, butcher, Henry-street, Hampstead-road; Thomas Slocombe, tailor, Henry-street, Hampstead-road; and William Smith, milkman, Clarence-gardens; deposed to the prisoner Blackson's good character.)

BLACKSON— GUILTY . Aged 20.

WALKER— GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Month, and then Transported for Life.

CHAMBERS— NOT GUILTY .

Third Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370612-1511

1511. SARAH WENTWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May, 14 balls of cotton, value 7d.; 12 reels of cotton, value 6d.; 1lb. of candles, value 6d.; 1/4 lb. of tea, value 1s.; 1/4 lb. of sugar, value 2d.; 1/4 lb. of soap, value 2d.; 2 oz. of starch, value 1d.; 1 piece of tape, value 1d.; 1 apron, value 4d.; 7 yards of net, value 3s. 4d.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 6d.; 1 shirt, value 3d.; 2 caps, value 8d.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; 1 napkin, value 4d.; 1 pillow-case, value 3d.; and 3 yards of calico, value 1s.; the goods of Sarah Hobson, her mistress.

SARAH HOBSON . I live in Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury-square. The prisoner lived with me, as cook—she gave me warning, but left before the time expired—there was a dispute about something she had done, and she said she would leave that morning—I said she might, and she went up stairs to take her things away—I went up, and insisted on seeing her box—she said I should not, unless I had an officer—I sent down to send for one, and then she said, "You may see my box, and I have something of

yours"—she unlocked it, and in it were these articles—the officer had not come at that time—I took them out, and gave them to the officer afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Had you a character with her? A. Yes, a very good one—she was with me about three months—I let her go away, and take her box with her—I said I would forgive her, and she might go about her business—three months' wages were due to her—I did not pay her—I was to give her 14l. a year—the articles are valued at 10s.—I said I should not pay her her wages, she might take her box and go—she said, "I will go quietly, if you will not send for an officer"—it was two hours after that I had her taken into custody, at the house of her uncle and aunt—she had not said she was going there, but I supposed so—I took her on another charge for breaking a box open—I could not prove that before the Magistrate, because I could not find the young lady the box belonged to—the Magistrate wished me to find her, but I could not, and he committed the prisoner on my charge—I do not know where the young lady is whose box was in my custody.

Q. The prisoner gave you warning?A. I found her not worth 14l. a year, and said she might consider whether she would not stop for 11l., for I could not give her more—she did not decline that until the morning she left.

ELIZA AUGUSTA ROACH . I am an apprentice to the prosecutrix. I was present when she opened the prisoner's box in the prisoner's presence, and saw the things found.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear the arrangement between them? A. I did not—Miss Barwick is the young person whose box was broken open—she was not an apprentice—she had left about three months—the prisoner's box was locked.

JOHN PIPER (police-constable E 14.) On Tuesday, the 6th of May, I was called to Fisher-street, Red Lion-square, to take the prisoner—I afterwards received this property from Mrs. Hobson.

MRS. HOBSON re-examined. These are my things—I made the prisoner no promise before I found the property—she acknowledged it was mine—I would rather have forgiven her and let her go, than been had away from my business—it was suspecting her of another transaction, and missing more things afterwards, which made me have her taken up.

MR. JONES. Q. Was the young lady you cannot find any relation of yours? A. No—she did not run away—I do not know where her friends live—she had been in my house about three months—she was not a lodger—she came to London till she got a situation—I had known her about a year and a half—she came from Stamford—I have written to a lady there who she lived with, but I cannot recollect her name at the moment—I have not seen her since she left, nor ascertained where she is—she was not a guest at my house, nor a servant, nor a friend—she came to London to get a situation as a milliner—I do not know where she went to, but I believe she has got one—she had answered an advertisement of mine, and was to remain with me till she got a situation.

COURT. Q. Do you mean really that you do not know what has become of her? A. Do not—she left me rather abruptly—she did not tell me she was going—she would remain away a day or two, and then come back for a day or two, and at last she left—she left me in debt—her box was found broken open, and nothing but a cape and a carpet-bag is in it now—she left two boxes—I was engaged with an apprentice when she came to town

but she remained with me till Bhe could get a situation—she worked very little while with me—she went out when she pleased—I wrote to Stamford about a fortnight ago, and directed the letter to Miss Stanley—I have had no answer, nor has my letter been returned—I have carried on business as a milliner about three years—I am a housekeeper, and have eight apprentices—I let my first floor to a lady and gentleman—I discovered the box to be broken open two hours after the prisoner left—it was in the top room—I found a band among the prisoner's things, which made me examine the box belonging to the young lady—the bracelets were left in the box—I have no reason to know where the young lady is—she came to me without answering the advertisement by letter—she was to pay me for her board—she has not paid me—she owes me 4l. 16s.,—I have not seen her since she left, but I sent the bill to a cousin of hers, in the Whitechapel-road, two or three days before she left.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1512

1512. CHARLES PEARSON was indicted for embezzlement.

JAMES HUBERT COOK . I am a poulterer, and live in Holborn-bridge. The prisoner was in my employ from the 24th of October—he managed a shop which I had in Red Lion-street, and received money on my account, which he accounted to me for nearly every evening—he has never accounted to me for 15s. 6d. from Mr. Reynolds.

Prisoner.Q. Do you keep any books? A. Yes—I have his books in Court, which will show he did not account for this sum—he accounted to me in writing every evening—the 15s. 6d. is put in the book, but it was never handed over to me—he has entered the things as sold, and he ought to have put paid against it, and entered the money also in this other book—by looking at this book I should conclude the things were not paid for—he ought to have entered it on the 18th as cash received—he has entered other money as received that day, but the 15s. 6d. is not entered at all.

Prisoner. Sometimes I am without the cash-book for three or four days, and I sometimes put the day's account on a sheet of paper. Witness. He sometimes neglected to take the book to the shop—it may have been left a day or two—he has paid me money without entering it in the book—I can swear he has never paid me this 15s. 6d., and never told me of the receipt of it—he sometimes accounted for money on sheets of paper, but we always entered it from them, and then destroyed the paper—I have never destroyed a loose paper before the entry was made in the cash-book, to my knowledge—he might have paid me money on one or two occasions without entering it in the book, or on paper, but I will swear he did not on this occasion—he left me on the 24th of April, ill.

MARY ANN WYATT . I am cook in the service of Mr. Reynolds, in Guildford-street, Russell-square. On the 18th of April I paid the prisoner 15s. 6d.—the bill was delivered on the 17th—he wrote the receipt in my presence.

MR. COOK re-examined. The last entry is the 23rd of April—we made up the books on the 24th—he was ill previous to that, and had been to his friends for a week or fortnight—on the 24th we settled accounts, and he told me he had been doing wrong—that he had been receiving money for two or three bills, and mentioned this—I asked him if there was any more—he said not—I said, "Well, if there is not, I shall certainly not trouble you, but if I find more I shall"—he said he had been at some expense, and was very sorry for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1513

1513. ANN CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of James Haxell, from his, person.

JAMES HAXELL . I am book-keeper at the Bull inn, Aldgate. Between nine and ten o'clock, on the 13th of January, I was in Aldgate with a friend—I felt a jerk at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner running off—I caught hold of her, and told her she had my handkerchief—she said she had not, and said I was ill-treating her—she then threw it on the ground, and I gave her in charge—I am certain I saw it in her hand—she was very abusive, or I should have let her go.

HENRY MARTYN . I was walking with the prosecutor—he left my arm, and followed the prisoner, who crossed the road—he touched her on the shoulder, and I saw her drop the handkerchief—he took it up, and she was taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I never saw it till he picked it off the road.

GUILTY Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1514

1514. SARAH ANN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June, 5 handkerchiefs value 5s., the goods of James Parsons.

MARTHA PARSONS . I am the wife of James Parsons, and lire in Spencer-place, Somers-town—I am a laundress. On the night of the 6th of June, between eight and nine o'clock, I met the prisoner in my passage, and asked who she wanted—she said Mrs. somebody—I cannot recollect what name—I asked what she did—she said she went out washing—I said there was a person next door who went out washing—she turned to go out of the street door, and I saw a silk handkerchief dragging on the floor under her gown—I took it up, and found it was one of my own, which had been hanging on the banisters—I followed the prisoner, and asked her to give me the things she had taken—I held her by her gown—she dropped herself down, and five handkerchiefs rolled from her gown—my street door hid been left open.

Prisoner. I asked her for the name of Cooper—she followed me into the next-door passage, and said I had got her handkerchiefs—a bundle of handkerchiefs laid in the passage, and she said I had dropped them. Witness They were not in the passage—I saw her drop them.

JOHN LOADER HAMILTON . I am a policeman. I received the prisoner in custody, with the five handkerchiefs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 53.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370612-1515

1515. JOHN VEIL and JOHN BAKER were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 2 glazed window-sashes, value 1l. 5s., the goods of George Hadden; and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN STEDALL . I live in Bridport-place, Hoxton. I am an agent, and have the care of a house in Chequer-alley, Whitecross-street—George Hadden is the owner—on the 15th of May I saw the sashes of the window safe—they were glazed and fixed—I received information on the 17th, and missed them afterwards.

HENRY SYMONDS . I am a carpenter, and live in Jewin-street, Cripple-Cripplegate. I was employed to let Mr. Hadden's house in Chequer-Chequeralley—1 went to the station-house to measure some sashes there, and they corresponded

with the window, which I had measured before—one square of glass was broken before it was taken from the house—I am satisfied they came from this window.

MARY ANN DAMMERHAM . I am the wife of William Dammerham, a broker, in White's-alley, Cow-cross. On the 17th of May the prisoners came to my door, each carrying a sash, and asked if I would buy them for 7s., and I might have them for 6s.—I told them they did not suit me—have since seen these at the station-house, and believe them to be the same.

JOHN WARD . I am a policeman. Mrs. Dammerham gave me information on the 17th of May, and I followed the prisoners—I found them in Ray-street, about a quarter of a mile from her house, each with a sash—I asked where they brought them from—they said they had them of their master, Mr. Simmons, of Golden-lane, to sell, to get them some beer.

Veil's Defence. On the 17th of May I was at work at the premises, in Gloster-court, Whitecross-street, with my fellow prisoner—the master bricklayer pointed out the sashes, and said to us, "Take them, and sell them, that we may have some beer"—we did not know but they belonged to the master.

Baker's Defence. I was called to assist Veil with me sashes—I asked where he got them—he said he had received them from the foreman, and was going to take them to his uncle, instead of which he went and offered them for sale—I had no idea but he was taking them to his uncle.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

VEIL— GUILTY . Aged 18.

BAKER— GUILTY . Aged 36.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370612-1516

1516. ROBERT ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June, 17 loaves of bread, value 6s. 6d.; 1 basket, value 5s.; and 1 yard of baize, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of James Lee.—2nd COURT, stating them to be the goods of John Gregory Vaters.

JOHN GREGORY VATERS . I am in the employ of James Lee, a baker, in Drury-lane. On the morning of the 7th of June I put down my basket of bread at the corner of Alfred-place, Store-street—when I gt some distance I saw the prisoner take the basket up like a baker would, put it on the top of his back, and carry it into Tottenham-co«rt-road—he was just crossing the road when I collared him, and told him he had no business with that—he said he hoped I should not give him in charge, as he was a baker out of work about six months, and had had nothing to eat that day.

EDWARD CAMPION . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner into custody, with the bread.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Six Months.

NEW COURT.—Friday, June 16th 1837.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370612-1517

1517. JOHN KING was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1518

1518. JOSEPH RANDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd June, 1 hat, value 9s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Bentley ; also on the 3rd of June, 1 pair of boots, value 9s., the goods of Joseph Johnson ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1519

1519. JAMES NEWETT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June 1 printed book, value 7s. 6d., the goods of John Howe Poynton; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1520

1520. GEORGE WRIGHT was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MESSRS. SCARLETT and ELLIS conducted the Prosecution.

MARY LEMON . I am the wife of Thomas Lemon, of Adelaide-place, Stepney-green. On the 8th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came for half an ounce of tobacco, which was 1 1/2 d.—he offered me half a crown—I told him it was bad, and I should keep it; and it was the third he had brought me—he said I was mistaken in the person—I said I was not, I knew him well—he said he would fetch the gentleman he took it from—he went out, and did not return—I put the half-crown on a ledge behind the counter, where it remained till the Friday following, when I marked it, and gave it to the policeman.

MARY SAVILLE . I am sister to Mr. Lemon. I saw the prisoner on the 8th of May—he asked for half an ounce of tobacco, and offered half a crown—my sister said it was bad, and it was the third he had brought her—she would not give it him back—he said he would fetch the man he took it of—she said if he did she would give it him—she put it on the ledge, and gave it to the policeman after.

WILLIAM CLAY (police constable K 278.) I got this half-crown on the 12th of May from Mrs. Lemon—she took it from the ledge, and marked it.

ELIZABETH ILLINGWORTH . I am the daughter of George Illingworth, a baker in High-street, Stratford. On the 8th of May, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner came for 1d. loaf, and gave me a shilling—I put it into the till—there was one shilling in the other part of the till that my mother had left me—I put his into the corner—just as he went out, Mr. Goodchild came in—I showed him the shilling—he said it was bad—he ran over the road, and brought the prisoner back, and charged him with uttering a bad shilling—I was standing at the door with the shilling in my hand—the prisoner snatched it out of my hand, and tried to swallow it, but it fell down—Mr. Gentry picked it up, and gave it to the policeman.

JOHN GENTRY . The last witness gave me the shilling, and I saw it was bad—I was handing it over to her when the prisoner was brought back he made a snatch at it—there was a scuffle—the shilling dropped—I took it up, bent it, and gave it to Mr. Garde.

ROBERT GOODCHILD . The prisoner had offered me a bad half-crown, which induced me to watch him—I saw him come out of the baker's shop—I went and asked the young lady what he had given her—she said a shilling—I said it was bad—I crossed, and took him by the collar, and took him to the shop—he snatched the shilling, and I thought he was going to put it into his mouth—I grasped him round, and he dropped it.

WILLIAM ROBERT GARDE . I am a police-inspector. I went into the shop, and Gentry gave me this shilling.

EDWARD BARBER . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner, and found 11d. on him and 1d. loaf.

JOHH NUNN . I am shopboy to Mr. Hickman, a grocer at Clapton. On the 9th of May the prisoner came for a quarter of an ounce of tobacco and gave me a shilling—I told him it was bad—he said it was not—I gate to Mr. Morren.

JOSIAH MORREN . Nunn gave me the shilling—I went to the shop and found the prisoner there—I asked how he came by it—he said he had changed half a crown of a man in Thames-street who he lodged with—I gave it to Hunt.

JOHN HUNT . I am a policeman. I got this shilling, and took the prisoner—nothing was found on him.

JOHN FIELD . I am Inspector of coin to the Mint. This half-crown is counterfeit, and also the 2 shillings—they have been cast in the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Two Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1521

1521. JOSEPH SMALL was indicted for a misdemeanor.

WILLIAM CROMER . I am shopman to Charles Brandon, an oilman in Marchmont-street. On the 4th of May the prisoner came for a bottle of blacking, which came to 6d—he gave me half a crown—I took it next door to Mr. Wenlace, as I had not change, and left it there—1 gave the prisoner 2s.—Mr. Ball afterwards brought in the half-crown—I looked, and saw it was bad—I kept it by itself, and gave it to the policeman on the 9th.

Cross-examined by MR. PRICE. Q. Did you not give it to a boy? A. No.

WILLIAM WENLACE . Cromer came, and laid the half-crown on my counter, and I gave him 2s. 6d.—directly I took it off the counter I sent it back by Ball, my boy—I am sure it was the same.

WILLIAM BALL . I got a bad half-crown from Mr. Wenlace, and took it in to Cromer.

Cross-examined. Q. How old are you? A. Fourteen—I know a good half crown from a bad one—I was in the shop when Mr. Cromer gave it to my master.

JAMES HORLOCK (police-constable E 24.) I received this half-crown from Mr. Cromer——hemarked it.

WILLIAM COOK . I am in the general line, and live in Chad's-place. On the 11th of May, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came for a 2lb. loaf, which would be 3 1/2 d., and gave me a bad half-crown—I sent for a policeman, and gave him into custody—I marked the half-crown, and gave it to the policeman.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I was a policeman. I took the prisoner into custody on the 11th of May, at Cook's shop—he gave me this half-crown—I found one good shilling on the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you now? A. A painter—I was six months in the police, and resigned.

MR. FIELD. These are both counterfeit.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1522

1522. JOSEPH SMALL was again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April, 3lbs. 6oz. of cheese value 2s. 10d.;2 shillings, and 2 pence; the goods and monies of Robert Langdon.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution. JAM ES GEORGE MAYOR. I am in the service of Mr. Robert; Langdon

Who keeps a cheesemonger's shop in Calthorpe-place. On the 27th of April, about ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came and order about 3lbs. Of Cheshire cheese, to go to No. 46, Regent-square, to a person of the name of Edmonds—I said was it to go to-night—he said it was to be taken up directly, as they wanted it for supper, and I was to take change of a crownpiece with it—with it—I told him we did not serve Edmonds—he said no, but they had told him to call and order the cheese as he passed by—he then left—I told my master, who cut the cheese, which came to 2s. 10d., and gave me 2s. 2d. change for the crown-piece—I went with it towards Regent-square, and had got to the corner near the church when the prisoner met me—he said, "Oh, you have got the cheese?"—I said, "Yes"—he said, "I forgot to order 6d. worth of eggs, if you will give me the change and the cheese I will pay you"—he gave me a crown-piece, and I went back for the eggs—I gave mistress the master, and he said it was a bad one—I and my master went to the house, and he was gone—I delivered the crown-piece to the constable Underwood about eleven o'clock—I gave it to my master first—when I took the crown-piece of him I believed it to be good.

Cross-examined by MR. PRICE. Q. If you had gone to Edmond's, you probably would have left the things there? A. Yes, but I should not have left the change without the money—my master was not in the shop when the prisoner came in—I have been with my master eight months—I can tell good from bad money—I was satisfied with it—master and I went to the house to change the crown-piece, not to get back the goods—we did not change it.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Had you a discretion to serve customers without they paid you, unless you master gave you leave? A. Not without he knew them—I had no authourity to part with these goods unless I received the five-shilling piece.

ROBERT LANGDON . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Calthorpe-place; I do not serve a family of the name of Edmonds. On the 27th of April Mayor told me of an order—I weighed as much cheese as came to 2s. 10d.—I gave it him, and 2s. 2d. in money, to take to the house and bring back a five-shilling piece—he had no authority to part with the cheese or the money, except in exchange for a crown-piece—he returned in about five minutes and gave me a five-shilling piece—I found it a counterfeit, and gave it to the officer.

COURT. Q. Of course you gave him no authority to part with it for a counterfeit 5s. My directions were, to take it to the house and there receive the 5s.

Cross-examined. Q. Your intention was to sell the goods? A. Yes; and if I received the crown I should be obliged to furnish the difference—I never expected the goods back again—he had no authority to part with the change nor the goods without payment—it was certainly and attempt to pass a bad piece of money—I saw the prisoner some time after in the custody of a policeman.

MATTHEW UNDERWOOD (Police-constable E 93.) I produce the crown which I received from the prosecutor.

JOHN FIELD . I am Inspector of coin to the Mint. This crown is counterfeit in all respects.

ELIZA HILL SMITH EDMONDS . I live at No.46, Regent-square. The name of Edmonds is on the door—on the 27th of April we wanted no cheese for supper—I did not send the prisoner for any—we did not afterwards want any eggs.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at home? A. Yes, and my husband, and the servant—there are not two Nos. 46, that I am aware of.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years from the expiration of his former sentence.

Reference Number: t18370612-1523

1523. JOHN LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May, I music-stool, value 30s., the goods of Thomas Ames; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Five Days.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Reference Number: t18370612-1524

1524. ROBERT M'EWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Charles Thomas, from his person.

WILLIAM CHARLES THOMAS . On the 12th of June I was in St. Martin's-court, a little after twelve o'clock in the daytime. I felt a tug at my pocket—I turned round instantly, and saw the prisoner walking away from me—there was another person between him and me, but I was confident that the prisoner took it, and followed him—he turned into St. Martin's-lane, and ran 100 yards, I then saw him throw the handkerchief down—he was taken in about ten minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How far were you from him when he threw it down? A. Perhaps fifty yards—there was no one to obstruct my view—he was in the middle of the road—he continued to run after the handkerchief was thrown down.

JAMES REYNOLDS . I am a messenger. I was in St. Martin's-court—the gentleman cried, "Stop thief"—1 instantly followed the prisoner, and continued following him—I was the nearest to him—I saw him throw away a handkerchief, which I picked up—I was not near him when he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. The person was running at first, was he? No, walking, till the cry of "Stop thief"—I lost sight of him before he was taken—he ran up several courts, and got into a house of ill-fame, from there to another, and was taken in the dust-hole.

WILLIAM CARLE (police-constable F 77.) I took the prisoner—this is the handkerchief.

(William Bedford, a sawyer, of George-street, Battle-bridge, and Sarah Jefferson, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1525

1525. JOHN BURLISON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May, 1 wine-label and chain, value 8s., the goods of the Honourable Haariet Grimstone.

JAMES DREW . I am butler to the Honourable Harriet Grimstone, who lives in Upper Grosvenor-street. On the 20th of May this wine label and chain hung on a nail in the pantry, down stairs—I lost a pocket handkerchief, which was safe in the pantry at one o'clock—I did not miss the label till past ten o'clock, when I was putting the plate away; and a pair of plated sugar-tongs were taken out of the housekeeper's closet.

HENRY HARWOOD . I am footman to the Honourable Harriet Grjmstonc I remember, on the 20th of May, seeing the prisoner come down the area steps, about twenty minutes past one o'clock—he was dressed as. he is now—I thought he was one of the trades-people that serve the house

he was in the house for three or four minutes—I saw him go out again very deliberately—I took no further notice of it—I am sure he was the same person—he had a white apron on, tucked up at one corner.

Cross-examined. Q. What were you about? A. Sitting at the dinner-table—there were ten or twelve people there—I was not talking with any of the others—I was looking at the window—I saw the prisoner open the gate, and come down very deliberately, as one of the trades-people—I saw him again in three or four minutes, going back up the area steps—this was on Saturday, and I saw him again on the following Tuesday.

WILLIAM HORSFORD . I am constable to the Mendicity Society. I saw the prisoner that day, about a quarter to two o'clock, go down the area, No. 1, Seymour-street—he was dressed in this white apron, with the corner drawn on one side—he was not gone an instant—he then came up, and went to No. 10, and went down—I followed directly, and went and called to the servants, we went to the pantry, and there found the prisoner—I searched him, and found this label and other things on him—this was concealed in the belt he had on—this spoon was bent, and fixed in the belt, and this silver watch in his fob—he said he would get me 20. if I would let him go.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he begin to cry? A. He did—I took 6s. 6d. from him—I have found no owner for the watch.

JAMES DREW . This is the label I missed that day.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any mark upon it? A. No—it is a claret label—there were four, and the claret one was missing—I know it by having it through my hands so many times—I have been there these eight years—I saw it at one o'clock—the lady's name is the Honourable Miss Harriet Grimstone—she signs my book in that name.

(Thomas Anderson, a green-grocer, and Sarah Tidmarsh, of Kensington Gravel-pits, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1526

1526. JAMES GLOSTER and THOMAS JACKSON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June, 2 baskets, value 2s.; and 60 dead fish, called mackerel, value 13s.; the goods of William Young.

WILLIAM YOUNG . On the 13th of June I was at Billingsgate—I bought sixty mackerel, and placed them in two baskets, on my dog-cart—I went down into the market again to buy some eels, and when I returned, I heard the basket, and mackerel, and all were gone; the man that minds the carts had run after the thieves, but did not take them.

ALFRED KNIGHT . I clean my master, Mr. Neeve's, boots and shoes, and go to Billingsgate school. On the 13th of June I was standing at the corner of a lane near Billingsgate, and saw the two baskets of mackerel standing—I saw the two prisoners come down St. Mary Hill, and go up Cross-lane, and then they came and stood by the baskets—Jackson looked to see if any one was coming, and then went and put the basket of mackerel on Gloster's head—he went up Idol-lane, and the other went up St. Mary Hill—I am quite sure they are the same two—I had seen them about the market—I found them the next morning, and pointed them out to the officer.

WILLIAM BROWNUTT . I am a constable of the market—I took the two prisoners the next morning—I know they are often in the market.

Gloster. I was at Billingsgate, and then at Spitalfields, and then I went home—I never saw any mackerel.

Jackson. I went and bought some fish, and went home—the next morning I was there again, and was taken.

GLOSTER— GUILTY .

JACKSON*— GUILTY .

Transported for seven years.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370612-1527

1527. JOHN DONOGHUE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June, 1lb. 9oz. of copper, value 1s.1d., the goods of William Talbot, his master.

WILLIAM TALBOT . I live in Great Titchfield-street—the prisoner worked with me. In consequence of information, on the 5th of June, I charged him with having taken some pieces of copper—he said he had not got any—I said he must be searched by the constable—he then said it was up stairs in the workshop—I said, "You must go up with me and the policeman, and show us where it is"—we went up stairs, and when we got to the last flight of stairs he stopped and said, "Here it is," and took it from under his jacket—this is it—it is worth about 1s. 1d.—he bad no business with it whatever.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. You are a coppersmith, are you not? A. No, an iron plate worker—the prisoner was a tinner, he never had any new copper—he had been in my service for twelve months.

COURT. Q. Had he any business to put the copper in his waistcoat? A. No.

FREDERICK WOODWARD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Talbot. I saw the prisoner in the cellar bending the copper up—he put it into his apron—he was sent down for spirits and coke at that time—I gave information to my master.

GEORGE GRACE (police-constable E 39.) I was sent for—the prosecutor asked the prisoner if he had any copper—he said he had not, but afterwards he produced this.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he appear to be drunk? A. He did not—he was perfectly sober.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370612-1528

1528. JOHN SMITH and ROBERT GARLICK were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of June, 1 3/4 lbs. weight of cheese, value 9d.; 2 1/2 lbs. weight of beef, value 1s.; 1lb. weight of bread, value 2d.; 1/4 lb. weight of butter, value 3d.; and 6 eggs, value 3d.; the goods of Thomas Johns.

SAMUEL PEGLER . I am a policeman. About twenty minutes past six o'clock on the morning of the 2nd of June, I saw the two prisoners standing in Aberdeen-place, Edgware-road—each of them had a sack—soon after, Rebecca Moyses opened the shutters of Mr. Johns's house, in Cunningham-place—I spoke to her, and I found Smith just inside the cellar of Mr. Johns' house, and the other outside—I asked Smith what he did there—he said he came to get some grub—Moyses then missed a piece of beef out of the safe—I asked him what he had done with the beef—he said he threw it into the next area—I looked into the next area, and saw this handkerchief with this cheese and other things—Garlick was gone off—Smith had some eggs in his jacket pocket—he said he took them out of the larder—he had no shoes on—he said he had thrown them away—I went to William-street where I knew they slept, and on returning I saw Garlick

with two sacks—lie ran off—I pursued and took him with the sacks, and in one of them I found a pair of shoes—I took them to Smith, and he said they were his.

Garlick. Smith gave me the sacks to take home—I did not know the shoes were in it.

REBECCA MOYSES . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Johns. At ten minutes past six o'clock I opened the kitchen shutters, and missed the beef, bread, eggs, and cheese from the area—Smith was there without his shoes.

Smith I asked this young man to carry the sacks home, he did not know what I was going to do.

SMITH†— GUILTY . Aged 18.

GARLICK†— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1529

1529. GEORGE WEIR was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May 1 pair of trowsers, value 1l.; 1 coat, value 21. 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 7s. 6d.; and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of John Cotter.

JOHN COTTER . I lodge in Union-yard, St. Pancras. On Tuesday week I went to bed, at ten or eleven o'clock at night—the prisoner slept in the same room—when I got up my things were gone, and the prisoner too—he was in bed when I went to bed—John Curtis and three more slept in the room.

JOHN CURTIS . I lodge in this room. I remember the prosecutor coming, to bed—he put his clothes on the roof of the bed—the prisoner was in bed—I was awake about four o'clock, and saw the prisoner get up, take the coat on his arm, and turn out of the bed-room, and I did not see him again till he was at the office—I did not tell the prosecutor, as the prisoner had; bowel complaint, and I thought he was going to the water-closet—I saw him take nothing but the coat.

Prisoner. He said he thought a young man put the clothes in his box for safety. Witness. No, I never did.

MARY CURTIS . I am the wife of James Curtis. The prisoner lodged at my house between six and seven months—he left that morning without notice, and never came back—he owed no rent.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor and witnesses might have heard me say I was going out to see a friend who was going abroad, which I did, and stopped a long while, for the vessel did not sail till Thursday morning-1 knew nothing about it.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Three Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1530

1530. ANN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 1 tub, value 4d.; and 23lbs. weight of butter, value 1l.; the goods of John Fotheringham.

JOHN FOTHERINGHAM . I live in Old Compton-street, and am a baker. I lost a tub of butter on the 17th of May—I do not know the prisoner—I cannot swear to the tub.

JOSEPH PYFINCH (police-constable F 58.) I was on duty in Seven Dials about four o'clock, on the 17th of May, near the prosecutor's, and took the prisoner with a tub of butter, on my own suspicion—I gave the butter to Mr. Fotheringham by permission of the Magistrate—I asked the prisoner how she came by it—she said she had it given her by a boy at No. 2, Crown-street.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where did you find her? A. In the Crown public-house in Seven dials—she had been drinking—she was not perfectly sober—she was asleep.

HENRY TIPSON . I am in the employ of Mr. James Clark, a provision-merchant. This is a half-tub—I cut the tub in two, and the prosecutor had this one—I know it.

Cross-examined. Q. What mark is there on this? A. None; but there is on the upper part, which we have at our house—I have not seen them together—I have only compared them by my eye.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1531

1531. ANN DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March, I watch, value 30s.; I watch-key, value 2d.; I seal, value 2s.; and I watch-ribbon, value 2d.; the goods of John Thomas Coulson.

MARGARET COULSON . I am the wife of John Thomas Conlson, and am a nurse at St. George's hospital, Hyde Park-corner. This is my husband's watch.

EDMUND SIMPSON . I am an apprentice of Mr. Flinton, a saddler, of St. Martin's-lane. John Thomas Coulson gave me the ticket of a watch to pay the interest—I paid it, and put the ticket into my pocket—I lost it, and the paper it had been in was left in my pocket—the prisoner was servant to my master.

JOHN ANDREW SIMPSON . I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, of Long-acre. On the 20th of February, 1836, this watch was pledged at our shop for 1l.—on the 22nd of last month Simpson came and paid the interest, and got another duplicate—on the 23rd, a person of the name of Hoiett came, and took it out.

MARY ANN HOIETT . I am the wife of Edward Hoiett, a porter in, Covent Garden-market. I went on the 23rd to pledge my boots—I met the prisoner, who asked me to go and get the watch out—she gave me a sovereign and four penny pieces—I got it and gave it her—she said she would give me something, but did not.

Prisoner. I found the ticket behind the door—I asked this woman what it was for—she said, a watch, and I asked her to go and get it—I gave her 1l. 5s. to do it—she gave it me.

THOMAS CANNON (police-constable F 34.) I went after the prisonert and found this watch in her shoe.

EDMUND SIMPSON re-examined. I lost this ticket after nine o'clock at night—the servant was in the habit of coming down before I was up—she knew I had been about this ticket—I went to the pawnbroker's to stop the witch, but it was taken out.

GUILTY. Aged 16.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370612-1532

1532. ALICE LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May, 1 bolster, value 5s.; 1 pillow, value 3s.; 2 blankets, value 7s.; 2 pillowcases, value 2s.; 2 glass tumblers, value 2s.; 1 candlestick, value 1s. Sd.; and 1 brush, value 9d.; the goods of Thomas Benson, and that she had been before convicted of felony.

MARY BENSON . I am the wife of Thomas Benson, of Back-lane. The prisoner lodged at our house—she came home drunk on the 6th of June—I then went into her room to fasten up the place, and missed all these things—they are all here—they were all let to her with the room.

JOHN WARRINGTON . I am shopman to Mr. Andrews of Cannon-street

Road. I have a blanket and two pillow-cases, pawned, I believe, by the prisoner.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have two glass tumblers and other articles pawned by the prisoner on the 19th of May.

THOMAS WARD . I have a bolster pledged on the 12th of May by the prisoner.

DANIEL DERRIG (police-sergeant K 72.) I took the prisoner, and found some duplicates which correspond with these articles.

Prisoner. I was taking the things out when the policeman came and took me, though 1 had the money in my hand to redeem them—I redeemd one pillow and paid for it.

MICHAEL COSTELLO , (police-constable K 94.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1533

1533. MARY ANN CANNON and MARY M'CARTHY were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June, 1 tobacco pouch, value 2d.;✗ shillings, 1 sixpence, 1 penny, and 2 halfpence; the goods and monies of John Johnson, from his person.

JOHN JOHNSON . I belong to the schooner Fame, in the London Docks I was in Mr. Blay's public-house in Shadwell on the 6th of June, leaning my head on the table—I had a tobacco pouch containing six shillings, ✗ sixpence, and some coppers—I fell asleep a little—M'Carthy sat near me—I awoke when I felt my pouch going—I saw M'Carthy with it—boll the prisoners struck me, and they and another girl ran away.

Cannon. Q. Was I in the public-house at all when you was fighting with a parcel of girls? A. Yes, you first came to me.

EDWARD KENNEDY (police-constable K 228.) I was called to this public-house—I found both the prisoners there—the prosecutor said he had been robbed—1 came up at the moment Cannon was there—I took the prisoners in custody—Douglas gave me some money.

MARY DOUGLAS . I am the wife of John Douglas, a policeman. I searched the prisoners, and found two shillings, one sixpence, and some halfpence in M'Carthy's stocking—I found nothing on Cannon.

JOHN BURK . I live in Back-lane. I saw the prosecutor come into the public-house with Cannon—she had hold of his arm—I heard the prosecutor had been robbed after I had been sitting in front of the bar a little while—I went out—Cannon came past me, and she said, "Only 4s.1 1/2 d. by G—"—I turned and saw M'Carthy, whom she was speaking to—I went into the house and saw the prosecutor and some persons striking him.

Cannon. It is false—this prisoner was standing at the bar with me—1 went in with her, and the prosecutor was scuffling with a parcel of women—there were about half a hundred round him.

M'Carthy. I went in to have a pint of beer, but I did not have his money.

JOHN BURK re-examined. I was in the front of the bar, and while I was there, Johnson and Cannon came in, and went in the direction of the tap-room.

CANNON*— GUILTY . Aged 21.

M'CARTHY*— GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for seven years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1534

1534. EDWARD HARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May, 11 lbs. weight of beef, value 6s. 6d., the goods of William Horspool.

WILIAM HORSPOOL . I live in Feathrstone-buildings, and am a butcher. On the 30th of May I was standing with my back to the stall—some one called out, and I saw the prisoner going off with a piece of beef—he dropped it and ran off—I secured him.

ROBERT THACKRAY . I am a policeman. The beef was picked up and given to me.

GUILTY. Aged 15.—Recommended to mercy.

Confined Six Days and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18370612-1535

1535. JOHN MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 1 looking-glass and stand, value 2l., the goods of William Barker.

FRANCES BARKER . I am the wife of William Barker, of Middlesex Terrace, Hackney Road. On the 31st of May, about two o'clock, the prisoner and another person passed my shop—one of them pointed to the glass which we had in our shop—I kept my eye on it—the prisoner came in and took it, and ran away—the servant ran after him, and it was brought back.

HANNAH BEFFELL . I am servant to Mr. Barker. I ran after the prisoner, and cried, "Stop thief"—he was secured, and the glass was taken from him in my presence by the policeman.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1536

1536. JOHN LIZARD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May, 1 pair of trowsers, value 12s., the goods of James Henderson Watherston.

GEORGE COCKSEDGE . I am an assistant to James Henderson Wather-ston. He had a pair of trowsers in his custody—I received information and found they were gone—I looked out and saw the prisoner running—I saw him taken—he threw them away—these are them.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Who were you servant to?—A. Mr. Cassell a pawnbroker—he died in April—these trowsers were lost on the 29th of May—I lived in Mr. Cassell's house then—Mr. Watherston did not—Mr. Cassell made a will—the probate of it is here—Mr. Watherston had no personal possession of these—he was there now and then—he was executor—I had seen these about half an hour before I missed them—I did not see them in the possession of the prisoner.

COURT. A. Had Mr. Watherston the management of the whole place, and all that was there? A. Yes. HANNAH BAKER. I live in Church-street, opposite Mr. Wathers tns. I saw the prisoner go to the shop, and pull a pair of trowsers down—the witness came and ran after him—I did not see them thrown down.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you standing? A. In my father's shop—two of the shutters were shut—I was looking through them—there were a good many people passing and repassing.

DANIEL COOPER . I live in Half Nichol-street, and am a weaver. I was in New Nichol-street, and saw the prisoner running, and saw him throw something away—I did not pick it up.

HENRY TREADWAY . I live in Quaker-street. I was in Nicholl-street, and saw the prisoner running with a pair of trowsers under his arm, which 1 saw him chuck up a court.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in employment at the time? A. No, my master had not any work that day—Mr. Cassell's is in Church-street,

about forty yards from Nicholl-street—I did not pick them up—1 followed the prisoner, and saw the policeman take him—I saw his back.

GUILTY Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1537

1537. GRACE BERRYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February, 3 spoons, value 10s.; 2 blankets, value 12s.; 1 sheet, value 2s.; 3 flat irons, value 2s.; 1 umbrella, value 8s.; and 1 shawl, value 5s.: the goods of Charles Jonas Frazier, her master.

ANN BARNES FRAZIER . I am the wife of Charles Jonas Frazier. The prisoner lived in my service, and left in February—after that I missed three silver spoons, and the other things stated—the property is here—it is all mine.

Prisoner. My mistress lent me the umbrella and shawl, and the other things it was my intention to get out—I had a little money left me—I had been to receive it the day I was taken, and meant to send it to my mistress.

JAMES HAMMETT . I have one spoon which was pawned by the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 49.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1538

1538. ELLEN GORDON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th May, 1 gown, value 4s.; the goods of James Franklin.

EDWARD RAMSHIRE (police-constable E 58.) On the 27th of May, at eight o'clock, I was in the shop of Mr. Franklin—a young man said something, I ran down Hanway-street, and overtook the prisoner with this gown under her left arm.

HORACE PECKOVER . I am in the service of Mr. James Franklin. This is his gown—I missed it that evening—I had seen it twenty minutes before.

Prisoner. I picked up the gown at the door.

EDWARD RAMSHIRE . She was walking off 'with it, and went down on her knees to beg pardon, and said she would not do so any more.

GUILTY Aged 49.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18370612-1539

1539. ELIZABETH BATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June, 1 cap, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 coverlid, value 1s.; 1 sheet, value 6d.; 1 towel, value 2d.; and 1 pair of scissors, value 6d.; the goods of Elizabeth Gibbs.

ELIZABETH GIBBS . I live in Match-walk, and am a widow. The pi soner lodged with me—on the 27th of May I left her at home—when I returned she was gone, and I missed a handkerchief—I met her, and charged her with it—she had a bundle with a sheet and towel—these are mine—I also lost a coverlid and a pair of scissors.

Prisoner. The old sheet she knew I pinned round me as a substitute for a petticoat—I had received a pension, and took more, than I ought to do, and I thought I might take the liberty of pledging the quilt, as I had known her many years. Witness. I have known her five years and upwards, and thought her honest, but never allowed her to pawn anything.

HUGH HENRY CAMPION . I have a quilt, pledged by the prisoner on the 8th of June.

GUILTY. Aged 50.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutrix .— Confined One Week.

Reference Number: t18370612-1540

1540. WILLIAM FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, 1 pair of gloves, value 6d., the goods of William Grisdale, from his person.

WILLIAM GRISDALE . Esq. I live in Gloucestershire. I was walking in St. James-street on the 24th of May, and missed a pair of gloves and a letter—they were together in my coat pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Was this the illumination night? A. Yes—there were vast crowds out—I felt no tug at my coat—I missed them directly I was informed of it by some person—I had had them safe within a quarter of an hour.

RICHARD BRADSHAW (police-constable D 102.) I was on duty, and saw the prisoner that evening with another person—I watched him, and saw him attempt to pick pockets in Bond-street—I took him into custody—he endeavoured to get away, and the other constable came up.

HENRY WILLIAMS (police-constable D 51.) I took the prisoner from Bradshaw, and found these gloves and this letter in his pocket—the letter enabled me to find the prosecutor.

GUILTY .† Aged 18.— Confined Three Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1541

1541. JAMES EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May, 2 axle-trees, value 2l. 10s.; 1 scale-beam, value 15s.; and 1 vice, value 1l. 1s.; the goods of John Winch.

JOHN WINCH . I am a coach-smith, and live in Regent-street, Mile-end. I lost three axle-trees, a beam, and a vice—one axle-tree has been found—all the others are lost—I did not miss it till the 23rd of May.

WILLIAM MERCHANT . I gave this axle-tree to the officer—I bought it of the prisoner some time in May—I said to him, between twelve and one o'clock, when he came, that I thought he had not got it honestly—I gave him 1s. 3d. for it—he said he was wanting a bit of bread.

Prisoner. I bought it honestly, and wanted to dispose of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1542

1542. JAMES HOLMES and SAMUEL GIBBS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June, 4 pairs of shoes, value 1l. 4s., the goods of John Williams; to which HOLMES pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I live in Church-lane, Whitechapel, and am a boot and shoemaker. On the 5th of June Gibbs came into my shop, and asked for the name of Blackley, I think, if he worked for me—I said "No, nor never did"—I tried to look at the door-post, where my shoes hung, but he kept before me, and shifted his body so that I could not see it—I soon after heard that Holmes had stolen some shoes—I said to Gibbs, "You rogue, I know you are a pal of his"—I kept him in the shop till the shoes were brought back, and then I gave charge of them.

Gibbs. I was informed a person worked for the prosecutor, and I went to inquire for him—I know nothing of Holmes. Witness. When they were searched, some duplicates with Gibbs's name on them were found in Holmes's pockets.

GIBBS— GUILTY . Aged 32.—Both Confined Three Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, June 17th,1837.

Second Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370612-1543

1543. ELIZABETH FARRELL was indicted for stealing 1 coat, 1 waistcoat, and other articles, value 40s., the goods of William Rawlinshall, to which she pleaded

GUILTY Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1544

1544. MARY ANN BIGWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of June, 2 sovereigns, 2 shillings, and 1 £10 Bank note, the monies and property of Henry Hall, her master, in his dwelling-house.

HENRY HALL, ESQ . I live in Langham-place, in the parish of Saint Mary-lebone—the prisoner was my under housemaid for two months. On Wednesday, the 31st of May, I placed a purse, containing a £10 note, a £5 note, two or three sovereigns, and some silver, on my dressing-table in my bed-room previous to going to bed—I missed a £10 note on Friday morning when I left my bed-room and came to my dressing-room to dress—the prisoner had access to that room in the course of her duty—I first missed the £10 note, and afterwards the sovereigns and silver, finding only the £5 note remaining—I had received the note from Hammersleys, my bankers, on the 30th.

RICHARD ACOTT . I am butler to Mr. Hall. On Friday, the 2nd of June, my master told me of his loss—I mentioned, when the servants were altogether, and the prisoner was present, that master had lost a £10 note out of his purse in his dressing-room—they all denied all knowledge of it—the prisoner made no observation at all—on the Saturday evening, about seven o'clock, she came to me in the pantry, and asked me if master had found his money—I said he had not—she was in her working dress then—I saw her again about half past ten o'clock dressed in her best clothes—I let her into the house, I did not know she had been out—on the Sunday, while she was at church, I went up stairs to her drawer with the housekeeper, and found a good many new clothes, and among them some bills of different tradesmen, and one from Mr. Gotobed.

JOHN CANE . I am shopman to Mr. Gotobed, of Great Marylebone-street On Saturday night, the 3rd of June, between nine and ten o'clock, the prisoner came and purchased some goods—she tendered a £10 note—I saw the change given to her—this is the bill I gave her—it amounts to 21. 12s. 9d.; —I put the note into the till—it was taken out on Monday morning, and handed over to the policeman—there was no other £10 note there—it must have been the one she gave me.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a policeman. I produce the note, and the new things which were found in the prisoner's drawers, also a purse, four sovereigns, two sixpences, and 1s. 3d. in copper.

MARMADUKE PYBUS . I am a clerk in the house of Hammersley. Mr. Hall keeps cash there—on Tuesday, the 30th of May, I paid this note to him.

(Amelia Newland the prisoner's aunt; and George Greenhill, an artist, gave her prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Life.—(Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury in consequence of the temptation, and her previous good character.)

Reference Number: t18370612-1545

1545. WILLIAM DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June, 2 chisels, value 6d.; the goods of James Leitch: I saw, value 1s. 3d.; and 1 hammer, value 8d.; the goods of David Harris: and 1 rule, value 7d., the goods of William Ramage, his master.

JOSEPH COLLARD . I am a constable. I had a warrant on the 1st June to search the prisoner's apartment—Mr. Ramage went with me—we met the prisoner on our road—1 told him I had unpleasant business with him I had a warrant to search his apartment—he took me to the front kitchen of No. 4, Rebecca-court, Well-street, and in a box, on a shelf in the kitchen, 1 found this rule, which the prosecutor identified—I also fouad a saw, two chisels, and a hammer, among other tools which were not identified—the prisoner said the saw had fallen out of a carpet which he brought from his master's to beat—he said nothing about the other tools, except that he had them about two years, and brought them from Camadentown, where he had previously lived.

WILLIAM RAMAQE . I am a builder. The prisoner was above two years in my service—I took out a search-warrant and accompanied the witness and found the articles—this rule is all I can identify as mine.

JAMES LEITCH . I am a carpenter, and work for Mr. Ramage. Here are two chisels belonging to me, which I lost above twelve months ago from the workshop-my name is stamped on them.

DAVID ALLEN . I work at the prosecutor's shop. This saw and hammer are very much like what I have lost—I lost the hammer two years ago, and the saw fourteen months—I never lent them to the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the rule in a carpet which I had to beat—I did not notice the name on it as I cannot read—I found the two chisels in the shavings, both broken—I ground a point to one and took it home—the saw and hammer I have had a long time—my father left them to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1546

1546. WILLIAM HALLAM was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Margaret Crawley, on the 17th of February, at St. Giles-in-the-Fields, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 eye-glass, value 5s.; 1 toothpick, value 6d.; 1 thimble-case, value 1s.; 3 pairs of ear-rings, value 15s.; 4 brooches, value 8s.; 1 watch-chain, value 1s.; 2 breast-pins, value 4s.; 1 watch, value 21. 4s.; 1 seal, value 2s.; 1 watch-key, value 5s.; and 1 spoon, value 1s.; the goods of the said Margaret Crawley.

MARGARET CRAWLEY . I am a widow, and live at No. 15, Crown-street, St. Giles's. On Friday, the 17th of February, I left home at four o'clock in the afternoon, leaving my lodgers in the house, but nobody in my own apartments—I occupy the two parlours and let out the rest—I locked them both up when I went out—the street door is always shut—it was on the latch, and cannot be opened outside without a latch-key—I returned about ten o'clock, and went to bed without noticing any thing—about twelve o'clock next morning I had occasion to go to my drawers in the back room, and missed two boxes—(one of which had jewellery in it,) and my watch which laid by the side of it—the other box contained an eye-glass, a certificate of my marriage, and memorandums—I had seen the boxes not five minutes before I went out the day before, when I took two rings out of one—I also lost a silver tea-spoon off the mantel-piece in the same room, which I had seen about twelve o'clock the day before—I had not been out of the house between twelve and four o'clock—I might have been down

stairs—the window was shut down when I went out, and secured by a catch✗ on the 18th or 19th of May I was fetched by the policeman, and saw pair of ear-rings, and the chain of my watch, which had been in the box which was missing—I know the watch-chain by its being broken, and I had tied it with a bit of string to the snap—it was attached to the watch at the time it was taken—it laid by the boxes in the drawers—1 had the keys of the drawers and of the door in my pocket—I noticed no marks of violence on the door—I cannot say whether my drawers were locked or not—I put the key in as usual next day, and did not notice that they were open—I slept in the back room, and locked the door when I went to bed—1 should think nobody could have gone into that room while I was there that morning, and take the things without my perceiving them—I did not go out before I discovered my loss—I did not know the prisoner before now, but I have seen him pass before, as his mother lodged in my house—he came his to his mother several times before the robbery—I knew he was her son.

COURT. Q. Before the Magistrate you stated that when you went to your drawers at twelve o'clock, you found them locked? A. I cannot say to be certain, whether they were or not—I thought so at the time—I have said 5l. was the amount of the property lost, but it is much more to me—the watch is worth 2l.—it is a gold watch capped, but not jewelled—the earrings and other things are worth 35s. together.

Prisoner. Q. Have you a spring bolt to your lock? Witness. No the door shuts with a catch, and then I lock it—the catch can be turned outside by the handle—I have a door between the two parlours—they open from one into the other, and each have a door into the passage—the front door also has a handle the same as the other lock—I cannot say whether I shut the door between the front and back rooms when I went out—in the afternoon I went to the top of the stairs, and said to his mother, "Mrs. Cotmore, I am going out—will you be so good as to answer the door, and put my front shutters to?"—I am certain I locked the door after me—the shutters were put to tight outside—they will stick together without any fastening—they cannot be fastened without going into the room—the window in the front parlour was secure, as well as the back, when I went out.

MARGARET COTMORE . I am the prisoner's mother. Mrs. Crawley told me of the robbery next day—I remember her going out on the Friday—she told me to answer the door if any body called—that was between four and five o'clock—I believe my son was at my place at that time—I occupy the front kitchen—we were both in the kitchen together when she called out—I went out about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after, leaving my son in the house—when I returned he was gone—I had told him to stop till I came back, and he said he would—when I returned, I found an old lady who lodged in the house named Madden—my son returned in a very few minutes, and I asked what made him go out—he said a young man who knew he was there knocked at the railing, and called him out, and he went and spoke to him—he soon went away—he is a whitesmith by trade.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me go outside the door when I was going away? Witness. Yes, I saw him going away the last time.

ANN BROCKLEY . I have known the prisoner twelve years. On Friday the 17th of February, I went out to tea with a friend, and on returning home between eight and nine o'clock at night, I met the prisoner with a small basket, and a box in it—he asked me to have something to drink with him—which I did—I met him again on Saturday morning, about nine o'clock, by St. Giles's church—he remained with me all day, and in the

evening he gave me the basket with the box in it—I cannot say what sized box it was—he gave me a chain before Christmas—he gave me a pair of brass ear-rings, which I gave to my niece, Amelia Baker with the chain—my husband is a night watchman, at Drury-lane theatre—I have been in custody here for three weeks to give evidence for want of bail—I have not been living with my husband for two years—I go out to work, and have been living with my sister off and on nearly fifteen months—I was with my mother before that—I go out cleaning since my husband has left me and he allows me 4s. a week.

ELIZABETH BEACON . I am the wife of George Beacon, and live in Castle-street, Longacre. On the 18th of February, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, Ann Brockley came to my house, and made my little girl a present of a pair of ear-rings—she had a basket on her arm, and a little box in it—she had been drinking a little—I saw an eye-glass, a silver toothpick, a silver teaspoon, a quantity of old fashioned pearl buttons, a little china box with the words, "Forget me not "at the top, and looking-glass in the lid of it, and in that little box was a pair of ear-rings—I do not know whether they were gold—they were yellow, and set with little white stones—she threw a marriage certificate into the fire—I took it off while it was burning—it was burnt, but I was able to see that it was a certificate of marriage—the names on it were Margaret Pearson and John Crawley, married at St. George's, Hanover-square—she placed the all things I mentioned on the table in the box, and asked me to take care of them till next day—she took the basket away and left the box with me—it was four or five inches long, and about three inches wide—on the Sunday morning, during my absence, she came and got it away.

Prisoner. Q. If the certificate was burnt, how could you read it? A. I took it off and read the names while it was burning—the box was either cedar or mahogany.

JURY. Q. Was the certificate entirely consumed? A. Yes; I threw it down on the fire, as it burnt my fingers.

MRS. CRAWLEY re-examined. My husband's name was John Crawley—my maiden name was Margaret Pearson—I was married at St. George's Hanover-square—I lost two boxes, one was about three inches wide—I lost a silver toothpick, and a string of pearl buttons; a china box, with "Forget me not" written on it, and there was a looking-glass in it.

Prisoner. Q. Are not these forget-me-not boxes sold very commonly in china shops? A. I cannot say; I never bought one.

ANN BROCKLEY re-examined. I went to Mrs. Beacon's on the Saturday night, between ten and eleven o'clock, when the prisoner gave me the box—I had the basket with me—the prisoner had given it to me—I took it there, with the things in it which the prisoner gave me—I did not take them out at Mrs. Beacon's—that is false—there was a box in the basket, but I did not take it out—I left the basket and box there—1 have heard her evidence—the things were never taken out by me—I gave them to the prisoner again on the Sunday morning—I did not see any marriage lines✗—I saw a piece of paper in the basket, and I threw it into the fire, but I did not know what it was—Mrs. Beacon did not take it out of the fire and read it in my presence—I left—I did not see the reading—I had no motive for putting it into the fire—I did not know what it was till I heard it at Bow-street—1 am sure I did not look into the box at Mrs. Beacon's—I have been examined before.

Q. Do not you recollect, when, you were examined before the Magistrate, saying, "I cannot recollect whether I looked into the box or not at Mrs.

Beacon's? A. I do not remember saying that—I cannot rightly say whether I said so or not—I was a long time there—I never did look into the box—I went next day for the box and basket, and gave it to the prisoner—I saw no more of it.

Prisoner. Q. Where did you give me the box? Witness. At my sister's on Sunday, between one and two o'clock, I believe.

JURY. Q. How long were you in Mrs. Beacon's room on Saturday? A. I do not suppose I was there above five minutes—I do not suppose I stopped two minutes after throwing the paper into the fire—I had to go the play-house for my money—I had been drinking in the day time, but was perfectly correct then—I cannot say whether the paper was entirely consumed before I left—I had no motive in burning it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you and your sister go to market on the Sunday morning? Witness. Yes—I cannot tell at what time—I did not look at the clock—I left you at my sister's, and you were there when we came back.

CATHERINE MARSHALL . I purchased a pawnbroker's duplicate of Maris✗ Baker, for 6d.—I cannot exactly say when—I sent my son Charles to redeem the articles—he brought me back a pair of Cornelian ear-rings—I pledged them again the same day, at the same place, Mr. Hawes's—I sent Mary Rutherford to pawn them for me.

CHARLES GEORGE MARSHALL . I received a pawnbroker's ticket from my mother, and went to redeem the articles at Mr. Hawes's, the pawnbroker's—I gave them to my mother.

MARIA BAKER . I am the sister of Ann Brockley. I sold the duplicate to Mrs. Marshall—I cannot say when it was—I have known the prisoner about nine months—he has been backwards and forwards for some time after my sister—he called at my house one Friday night (in March, I think, but I am not sure,) with a basket—I did not know what was in the basket then—he went away with my sister and the basket—they came again about half-past nine o'clock next morning, and were at my house most of the day—he gave my sister the basket while I was in the room—they were both very much in liquor at the time—I saw a small old-fashioned tea-spoon, an eye-glass, and the top of a parasol, as I thought, in the basket; and there was a small box, and these things were in the box—I found a pair of ear-rings on my bed a day or two after, or the next day—Mrs. Offer lodged in the house—she was there, and saw the things—I found a pair of Cornelian ear-rings on my bed, in the room they had been sitting in—my sister had laid down on the Saturday afternoon—I do not know whether I found them on Sunday or Monday, but I had them in my possession three or four days, if not a week, and then I pawned them, for 2s., at Mr. Hawes's—I sold the duplicate to Mrs. Marshall, for 6d.—I have since seen it at Bow-street—my daughter had a neck-chain—I do not know when I first saw it—I think it was on a Monday, about a week or more after the prisoner had been at my place with the basket—I put the chain on a gold locket of my daughter's; and being in want, I pawned it for 1s.—I saw it afterwards at Bow-street office, with the duplicate—it was the same as I had pawned.

Prisoner. Q. Was the box open when you saw it? Witness. I cannot say for certainty—I cannot say whether it was open when it was first produced, but it was open when I saw the things—Mrs. Offer was present when I saw the box—it was taken out of the basket—I or Mrs. Offer opened the box—we were thunderstruck at the time, to see what was in it.

MARGARET OFFER . I lived at No. 8, Stacey-street, at the time the

robbery was committed, in the same house as Mrs. Baker—on a Saturday afternoon, to the best of my recollection, between four and five monthe ago, I saw the prisoner and Brockley together—I was in my own room, and Mrs. Baker called me out—I went into her room, and she took the basket off her sister's arm—she opened it, and there was a lot of little jewellery in it—and a watch which Mrs. Brockley wore round her neck with a chain—in the box was an eye-glass, a tobacco stopper, and a silver teaspoon—the watch was on her neck when she came in—I did not see it taken outof the basket—there were some brooches, but I cannot say how many, and a pair of cornelian ear-rings in the little box—I went into my own apartment.

Prisoner. Q. Did you take the box out of the basket with Mrs. Baker at all? Witness. I did not—I do not know who opened the box—I do not know whether it was broken on one side.

COURT. Q. Are you a married woman? A. Yes—my husband is a coachmaker's labourer, in the employ of Black and Co., Oxford-street,—he has worked for them about seven years—I have been married to him six years, and live with him—the box was mahogany colour, and four at five inches long.

EMMA AMELIA BAKER . I am the daughter of Mrs. Baker, and live with her—she gets her living by washing and needle-work, or anything she can get to do—I work at book-folding. On Tuesday, (the 21st of February, I believe,) I received a chain from my aunt—I was at home on the Saturday morning when she came with the prisoner, but I did not see the basket, as I went away—I was not at home all day—I was out from nine o'clock in the morning till half past seven o'clock in the evening—I kept the chain some time, but one morning I missed it, and my mother told me she had pawned it—I have since seen it at Bow-street, when I was examined—the snap and locket attached to it are mine—I put it on the chain, and it was on when I saw it last—I did not take it off—I took the snap off which was on the chain when it was given to me, as it was broken, and I put on one of my own—I gave the one I took off to Soper, the officer, on the 27th, when he asked me for it—I do not remember seeing my mother with any ear-rings. GEORGE CURTIS. I am shopman to Mr. How, a pawnbroker. I have a pair of ear-rings which were pawned on the 22nd of February at our shop, with a pin, by Brockley or her sister, in the name of Baker—they were redeemed on the 27th of March, and the ear-rings pledged alone the same day, for 2s.—I have a chain and locket which were pawned on the 30th of March, for 1s.—here are the duplicates.

Prisoner. Q. Is it possible anybody could swear to the ear-rings? Witness. I should think they might—I should not think they could swear to the chain.

THOMAS SOPER . I am a policeman. I have a snap which I received from Emma Baker.

MRS. CBAWLEY re-examined. These are my earrings—they are particularly short, and the drops are such as are not made now—I have had them about thirty years—I have on particular mark on them, but I know them from the general appearance—the chain is mine—it was broken from the snap when I lost it, and I tied it together with a piece of cotton—the snap and locket are not mine—I was in the habit of wearing the chain and watch together—this is part of the snap I lost—this is not the same thread as I tied it with—I have had it for years—I know it from its being broken—the catch of it was broken.

EMMA AMELIA BAKER re-examined. The catch of the snap was broken✗ when I had the chain, and would not fasten—that was why I took it off—it was fastened to the chain with thread—I threw the catch away, being useless.

MRS. BAKER re-examined. These are the ear-rings and chain I pawned, and these are the duplicates for them.

THOMAS POCOCK . I am a policeman. I took Mrs. Baker into custody, and found the duplicate of a chain pawned for 1s.

ANN BROCKLEY re-examined. I never saw these ear-rings till I saw them at Bow-street—when he gave me the chain, the catch of the snap was broken, but whether there was a thread to it I cannot say—he gave me the chain before Christmas.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of going backwards and forwards to see my mother—I happened to go there that Friday, and Mrs. Crawley called out to my mother on the top of the stairs—my mother asked me to stop in doors while she went out—I said I would, but I was called out by a young man to go to a situation in Oxford-street—I went after it, and was not gone above a quarter of an hour—when I came back my mother was at home, and let me in—I went down stairs, and stopped five or ten minutes longer—while I was down stairs she was called up to the door by a young female, and stood talking to her against the door—I came up and went out while she was at the door, and never went back till the Tuesday in the week following—my mother then said that she had given Mrs. Crawley warning to leave her place on the Saturday week; but she was rather poorly, and I helped her to move I think on the Tuesday or Wednesday in the next week, and from that Mrs. Crawley gave it out that she suspected me of committing the robbery, which I am innocent of, so help me God.

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1547

1547. SAMUEL FLETCHER, JOHN WILLIAM BICKERS , and WILLIAM NORRIS , were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May, at St. Mary, Islington, 2 leaden cisterns, value 10l.; 2 coppers, value 5l.; 1 leaden sink, value 2l.; 1 dresser, value 2l.; 1 pump, value 5l.; 100 feet of leaden pipe, value 5l.; 10 leaden gutters, value 5l.; 20 locks, value 2l.; 20 glazed window-sashes, value 20l.; 50 leaden sash-weights, value 2l.; and 10 wooden doors, value 5l.; the goods of, and belonging to, Edward Rowland Pickering; and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.—2nd COUNT, for ripping, cutting, and breaking, with intent to steal.✗—3rd COUNT, for larceny, at common law.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BODKIN conducted the Prosecution. MR. EDWARD ROWLAND PICKERING. I reside at Clapham, and am the owner of Fisher-house, Islington—it is my copyhold of inheritance—a relative of mine named Hayes purchased it. I produce the deed of covenant, dated the 17th of May, 1780, between Sir William Halton, Bart., and James Hayes, of Aldersgate-street, in consideration of 2000/-✗covenanting to surrender to James Hayes six messuages✗ or tenements, lately five, &c. &c. I have also the admission of Hayes, on the 2nd of June, 1786, by the Court of Prebend, and my own admission to the property, on the 22nd of May, 1827, as devisee under the will of Hayes.

COURT. Q. Did you, by that admission, come into possession of Fisher-house? A. I did—I was in possession of it before, in 1821, on Mr. Hayes's death.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Have you an old lease which has a plan of the estate?

A. I have—it is dated the 29th of September, 1795, and is between James Hayes and Ann Holmes, widow of Richard Holmes-that demises the property, and recites articles of agreement between James Hayes and Richard Holmes—here is the plan of the premises, and here is Fisher-house on it—here is a deed of covenant, dated the 18th of August, 1803, between James Hayes, with Dr. Samuel Ford Simmons, and Richard Simmons this recites the one from Hayes to Holmes, and covenants to grant Dr. Simmons a lease for twenty-one years, it describes the property by referring to the former lease to Holmes, and recites that it was done with the licence of the Lord of the Manor-here is a lease, dated the 1st of February, 1816, between James Hayes and Dr. Sutherland—I have not the attesing witness here, but I see I am one myself—it was before I came into possession of the premises-mat lease expired at Lady-day, 1835-l received the rent from Dr. Sutherland from the time of Mr. Hayes's death, in 1821, until Lady-day, 1835, when the lease expired-after that I agreed with Dr. Sutherland to continue as a tenant for one year, at 250l. rent—hepaid me that year's rent, and quitted at Lady-day, 1836—the six houses on the estate are mine, and the land, which has now about sixty houses built on it—I have no copyhold property in that manor, except what I claim under that admission-when Dr. Sutherland left, I left the premises in care of the witness Swain, who receives my rents—I have subsequently seen Wilkinson in the house, taking care of it—I n consequence of information, I went to the premises, accompanied by an officer, on Monday the 29th of May-(I think) I did not see the prisoner Fletcher there—as I and the officer approached the gate, four or five men inside locked the gate, and laughed at us—the officer got over the railing at my desire, and I went round to the back part—I saw the premises on Monday, the 5th of June, and missed two leaden cisterns, two coppers, and one sink, a dresser was pulled down, and removed from where it stood; the shelves were all gone, and the force-pump; a quantity of leaden pipe and gutter lead was gone, and some coiled up ready for removal—the locks were most of them pulled off and gone, and the window-sashes taken out-scarcely any were left in the back part of the house-they were taken down, and some were lying about—the house looked like a deserted piece—the doors were removed, and the closet doors taken away-according to what I have experienced in repairing, I should say 300l. would not replace the damage done.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How many indictments have you caused to be preferred? A. Four, according to the advice of counsel, three are for felony-they are all for acts done of a similar kind, and one for a conspiracy, comprehending these same acts without right or title to possess themselves of the estate-Dr. Sutherland did not leave on account of a dispute between Fletcher and me about the right to the house—henever assigned that reason to me.

Q. How long has Fletcher, according to your notion of it, been affecting to claim a right to the property? A. He has annoyed my tenants, I believe, with notices not to pay rent to me, for three years-they have shown me the notices sometimes—I know Jeremiah Simpson very well—I do not know of his claiming any part of this estate-Mr. Hayes made a will—I have got the probate of it, but not with me—I have seen the original—I never heard of a person named Hammond, as connected with my estate—I have heard the name, but not as connected with my property—allow me to produce to you a paper which will save trouble—I believe this will satisfy you that the property is perfectly distinct-Hammond was one of the

homage when Sir William Halton suffered a recovery, in the year 1768—I have the deed of covenant from Sir William Halton to Mr. Hayes in my possession.

Q. Is there no other instrument by which he held his title, except the deed you have produced? A. The deed of covenant, and the admission on✗ the court-roll—I believe the court-roll is here—I have no objection to produce it—I have not been in correspondence with Fletcher—I may have written to him a note-that might be, I think, in 1833—I once met him at my tenant Hutchinson's—I understand he has claimed this property, by the tenants producing the notices—I do not know from himself that he has always claimed this estate—I only saw him once, and on that occasion he never named Fisher-house—I do not know that he has claimed it for some years-only lately—hegave notice, I believe, to Dr. Sutherland, before he left—I have seen notices in the hands of my tenants a few weeks back—I think I have seen them as far back as 1833—I have had communication with various tenants on the subject of Fletcher's claim to the property, and have treated it with contempt—I was advised to indict them for conspiring to get the estate—I left it in the hands of my counsel, and they did what they thought proper—I have only had one interview with Fletcher that was in 1833 or 1834, when I met him at Hutchinson's; and now you bring it to my recollection, I remember his saying he expected he had an interest in the adjoining property, and I said, "Put yourself in respectable hands, and you will be well advised "—I have never seen Esther Joburne✗—I believe she was once the possessor of the adjoining property, but not of my property—it is separated by a high wall-perfectly divided—I do not know John Joburns—I have heard of such a person—I have heard he is dead since the prisoner was committed—I never saw Esther Joburns—I never heard of a person of the name of Nott, nor a female named Aldridge—the bottom part of the property, about which I had the conversation with the prisoner, joins Fisher-house—it is called Angler's gardens.

Q. Pray, when you went to the property on the 29th of May, was Fletcher, and the rest of these persons, secretly conveying away the property, or had he a cart and horse ready to take it away? A. I saw neither one or the other-there were many people on the premises—it was broad daylight, and they had a flag up—I had not learnt from Fletcher before that it was his intention to do that—I did not apply to a Magistrate till the Monday morning-an application had been made on the previous Saturday—I do not know by whom—I have never put the estate up for sale nor endeavoured to sell it yet—I have had Mr. Alderman Farebrother to look over it, to see what I should do to it-that was last December I think-part of the estate is in a very dilapidated state, and a great part of it untenanted-part of it is almost in a state of ruin-not half of it-one house has tumbled down—I do not recollect how long it was since I was at the estate before the 29th of May, it is not a year—I took possession from Dr. Sutherland in 1836—I never occupied it myself—I have not had any tenant in it since he left, because I understood there was to be a general enfranchisement act, and I have been waiting for that—I believe he estate about which Simpson and Fletcher had the discussion is in the same manor—I have heard that Fletcher is very distantly related to a person named Hammond, but I do not know it-1 have not heard it from any relation of the family.

Q. Did it happen that any body was in attendance from you at Islington church on any particular day, a year or two ago? A. Not from me—

I have known a person named Tomlins within these two or three days—I believe he is in Court now—I have not caused any communication to be made to the prisoners since they have been in custody—I should have thought it a disgrace to do so—my only object is to have quiet possession of my own property—I thought it my duty to do what 1 have done—I have been at a great expense to do it.

Q. From the opportunity you have had of seeing Fletcher, is he a man of education, or a poor ignorant creature? A. I do not know—I do not know whether Bickers is a broker—he never claimed possession of the estate that I know of—nor Norris that I know of—I have not caused any inquiries to be made after Esther Joburns—I have reason to believe she is alive—I have never seen her.

COURT. Q. Is she the owner or tenant of the adjoining property? A. I believe she is the owner—I do not know when the property was first called Fisher-house in any deed—I believe it has never been so—it was occupied by Sir Richard Fischer, in 1679.

HANNAH WILKINSON . I am the wife of John Wilkinson. My husband and I were put in possession of Fisher-house, Lower-street, Islington, a few months ago, by Mr. Swain, who is a broker, I believe—he put me in to take care of it—I was there on Thursday, the 25th of May, when the prisoners Bickers and Norris came—(my husband and I had a little property there of our own)—they asked if I had got a bed and bedstead—I told them I had, and Bickers left this paper with me—Norris and another were left in possession all night—(" The paper being read was a warrant of distress authorising Bickers to seize goods in the possession of Willkinson, for 20l. rent, due at Lady-day last; signed S. Fletcher, Landlord, attested by Norris")—there was no property in the house but ours—on the following day Mr. Fletcher came and looked over the house—he said it was his—I understood it was his, and they ordered us to go out—my husband was at home in the evening, and stopped to move the things out—Bickers left word with the man in possession that he had orders from the attorney to turn us out, they let us carry away our goods, and helped us out with them—when I left, every thing was in its proper situation—I have seen the house since, and a great many things have been taken away.

ROBERT ROOTS . I am a broker. On Thursday, the 25th of May, my attention was called to Fisher-house, and I saw the three prisoners there, attempting to levy for rent—on the Friday I saw them going in and out of the premises, and I saw other parties under their directions pulling down the cisterns and other fixtures—on the Saturday I saw some of the sashes taken out—the prisoners were on the premises at the time—on Saturday evening I saw a cart being loaded at the house—they were putting in doors, and I went away for the police—Norris was assisting in loading the cart—I had seen them all about the premises that day—I gave Norris, and four other persons who were employed there, in charge, and they were taken to Hatton-garden on Saturday evening—Mr. Pickering was not present, nor his attorney, I think, and Mr. Laing discharged them—after they were discharged, Bickers (who was there, though he was not given in charge,) said as he had said before, that he would soon have all the premises down, that we had no right to it—Norris was very abusive, and said I wanted to transport him—Fletcher was not there—I have had a deal of conversation with him—he has said he would have all the house down, and if he could not get into the house I was in possession of, that he would get in—if he could not get into possession of the bottom of the house where I was, he would have the roof off, and get in that way, and he

said, "If we are guilty of anything, we are guilty of felony, we know✗ what we are about"—I saw Norris in front of the premises on Saturday about twelve o'clock—hewas tipsy and shaking money in his hand, and saying, "Now, you see we have got plenty of money, we shall not stand✗ still, now, here is some of the produce of the estate."

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you acquainted with John Minter Hart? A. I knew him very well—hewas not an acquaintance of mine—I know Sergeants' Inn—I have belonged to the Marshal✗ Court some time, and have been there—I do not know that I was ever there on any other subject—I have put in bail several times-not as on✗ much a job-when I have been bail for any body it has been at the request of an officer—I have never been hired and paid for becoming bail—I have never justified bail-for certain purposes I have been paid for my trouble on renders and such things—I have been paid by parties for whom I became bail—I have received my 2s. 6d.—I have had the render money.

Q. Did you ever get Mr. Fletcher out of any other property on this estate? A. Never—I know a house next door but two to Fisher-house—I turned him out of that property on Whit-Tuesday-Mr. Pickering✗ hired me to do so, and Mr. Pownall, Mr. Pickering's solicitor, paid me for doing it—the expenses altogether came to 15l.—I kept possession of the property, and have never given it up to this day—I went in on Tuesday, and got 4l. on account on the following Saturday, and about 5l. on the following Saturday—I cannot tell when I received the last sum—I have five or six men on the premises ever since, almost, to see that property is not removed off the premises-Fletcher threatened he would come and take it-Thursday, the 25th, was the first time they attempted to enter the property—I heard them threaten to get possession when I went there on Whit-Tuesday, the 15th-that was the first time I went on the estate—I do not recollect having put in bail for some months—I think the last was rendering a man for 300l.—I did not know the man—I went with the sheriff's officer for the purpose of rendering him—I broke open the door of the adjoining house on Whit-Tuesday, but I could not get in—I could not get the chain off—I got in at the window-Mr. Pownall instructed me to apply to the Magistrate on the Saturday-Saturday morning was the first time I knew of any thing going—I did not myself see any thing taken away by the defendants—I received information then, and went to the Justice on the Saturday afternoon, when they were taken into custody—I missed several doors, a dresser, two water-closets, and other things—I saw them in Conquest's premises, I think, at Islington—that was the subject-matter of my complaint to the Magistrate on Saturday-they were discharged, and went back again to the property, and began again the same night—I was watching outside the premises all night—I saw part of it done-there were a great many persons there at various times-when they came home from the police-office there were about 400 people-they came back decorated with blue ribbons, several of them—I saw Norris with some—I saw him go into the shop and buy them—I heard them say directly they came out of the police-office, that the place was theirs, and they would pull it down—I was at the police-office when Fletcher was examined on this charge on Monday—I did not hear him tell the Magistrate that the property was his, and he would do what he liked with it—I do not recollect it—I do not believe he did say it—hesaid, that if he was guilty of any thing, he was guilty of felony.

MR. ADOLPJIUS. Q. Now, with respect to this bail story, did you ever

justify bail in your life for any sum of money? A. Some years ago I did, for a friend of mine, but never but once—I only went to assist my friend—I never received a shilling for doing so—the defendant cannot be surrendered unless bail be put in, that must be complied with, and that was the occasion on which I received the half-crown, for my trouble in going to the Judge's chambers—if I had been asked to go to Westminster, and swear I was worth any sum of money, I would certainly not have done it—what I did was to get a person into the custody of the Marshal, as we are obliged to do, or else the bail would be fixed—I think Bickers was present on the Monday when Fletcher was before the Magistrate—I do not recollect whether Norris was or not—I do not think he was in the office—I saw him in the neighbourhood.

BENJAMIN BRADLEY . I live in Barley-mow gardens. On Friday, the 26th of May, I was employed by Fletcher to pull down some fixtures in the kitchen at Fisher-house—drawers, shelves, and cupboards.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe he told you he wanted you to go and take down part of Fisher-house? A. Yes, and I went according to his orders.

WILLIAM MARSHAM . I live in Cross-street, Islington. On Saturday, the 27th of May, I was hired to carry some things from Fisher-house—some pieces of old iron, lead, copper, and a pump, were put into my cart—Norris was present, and went with me, with the cart, to the Angel, to a plumber's shop—he helped to unload the cart there, and the things were left there—Norris paid me for the hire of the cart.

GEORGE ALFRED BARLINTER . I am foreman to Messrs. Andrews, plumbers, near the Angel. On Saturday, the 27th of May, a cart was brought with metal, and Norris came with it, and proposed to sell them to me—they were brought in and weighed—I have an entry in my book—they were sold as old metal—there was 5 cwts. 2 quarters of lead, 167lbs. of copper, an old lift pump, and 28lbs. of lead attached to the copper—it amounted to 11l. 7s., which I paid him, and he gave me a receipt—I asked him whose property it was, and he said it belonged to Mr. Jones, No. 7, King-street, Lower-road, Islington—I have a minute here of who they were purchased for.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know person named Jones in King-street? A. I do not—I was examined before the Magistrate—I made out two bills, a separate one for the copper, which amounts to 4l. 8s., and that for the lead 6l. 19s.—I made it out to William Jones by Norris's direction—I did not think of purchasing the copper at first, as he objected to my price, but afterwards said he would leave it.

(The account for the copper being read, was in the name of William Jones, on which was written. "Received. Wm. Norris.") FRANCES NEWELL. I live at No. 7, King-street, Lower-road, Islington, and have kept the house for five years. No person named Jones ever lived there during that time—I have no knowledge of Norris whatever.

BENJAMIN BRADLEY re-examined. I was at the premises on the Saturday evening—the lead was taken from the cistern, the pipes, and the pump—the gutters were taken off a building that was pulled down, I believe, but I was not employed on that part—I was only there one night—I think that was Saturday, and there was lead left in the house then, which had been removed—there were some gutters and pipes, which had not been taken down.

EDWARD CONQUEST . I am a builder, and live in Haman's-row, Holloway.✗ I went to Fisher-house on the Friday evening, and saw Bickers and Norris there—I was only in the yard—I saw different kinds of materials✗ which had been recently pulled down—there were about five doors and two basons of water-closets, with 30 or 40lbs. of lead attached to these✗—I bought them of Bickers, and gave a 5l. note for the whole, which by his desire I paid to Norris.

Cross-examined yb MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you help to take some of the things down? A. Yes.

EDMUND WRAY . I am a policeman. On Monday, the 29th of May, by the Magistrate's directions, I accompanied Mr. Pickering to Fisher-house—I found the gate fastened—I got over the railing, and saw Fletcher✗ in the house through the window—I asked him to go along with me—he said what for?—I told him I wished him to go with me to Hatton-garden—he asked what for?—I said "You are charged by Mr. Pickering with felony"—he said "Very well, I will come directly"—I requested him to come out at the front door—he said he would—I waited some considerable time, but he did not come; and I saw him in the custody of Inspector Miller, about ten minutes after—on Sunday the 11th of June, I went after Norris, and found him in Vinegar-yard, Old-street—he ran away—I followed him some distance—Brook and Hanson were with me—I did not tell him what I took him for—he said he would go with me—I found this letter and some papers in his hat at the station-house, which I produce—

(Letter read)—

" Dear Friend,—I grieve for your situation, most particularly for your family; but I trust you will have fortitude enough to go through your trouble, and keep your spirits up, as nothing shall be wanting on my part to serve you and the cause, we have gone hand in hand together, and believe me, I will not desert you. It is a most fortunate affair I was not taken as well as yourself. I am obliged to be from home; nevertheless, I am hard at work for you, and I feel well satisfied you will come off triumphant, as every thing is being done for you to meet your enemies. One thing you must do is, to make over your property as soon as possible, in case of accident. I understand there is about forty witnesses against you, such as they are. Myself and Mr. Cockerill have been to the Registeroffice, and found a lease granted to Mr. Hammond, in 1756 adjoining, and all round Fisher-house, besides other property Mr. Hammond was possessed of on that estate; and up to the two houses Weaver's, and the other Pickering has got possession of, I have spoken to Mr. Rogers, who is ready and willing to conduct your case, which I hope will meet your approbation and I do expect you will be well supported by counsel—there are two questions at issue, the production of Miss Joburns, and the title of Mr. Pickering to Fisher-house, and they must both be produced, or you must be acquitted, that is the question."

JAMES MILLER (police-inspector N.) On Monday, the 29th of May, I went with the officers to Fisher-house—they went to the front, and I to the back—I saw Fletcher come out at the back door, and took him into custody—I told him I took him for felony—he said (speaking of Fisher-house) that it was not the property of Mr. Pickering; if it was, he certainly had committed felony.

MR. PICKERING re-examined. Q. You have been asked, whether some other houses were not in a falling-down condition—was this house in a

falling-down condition? A. Not at all—it had been just repaired Dr. Sutherland, and did not require taking down.

FLETCHER— GUILTY . Aged 66.— Transported for Seven Year.

BICKERS and NORRIS— NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370612-1548

1548. ABRAHAM ALLEN was indicted for feloniously forging uttering an acceptance to a certain bill of exchange, with intent to defraud Charles Isaacs.

(Mr. Payne, who held the brief for another gentleman, requested permission to withdraw from the prosecution, understanding he should not be able to prove the forgery, but stated that he was unacquainted with the nature of the evidence. The following witness was examined.)

MARK SAMUEL . Q. Since you went before the magistrate have you any reason to think you are mistaken in the charge you have made against the prisoner? A. I might be mistaken—my counsel are not here—I live in King-street, St. James's-place, Aldgate, and am an orange merchant—the acceptance to this bill is not my writing—I once put into the prisoner's hand a bill of £20—this is not it—the prisoner is related to my wife—I was arrested on this bill—I owed the prisoner 20l. on my own account twelve months ago—I never owed him 50l.—I gave no instructions to my attorney to withdraw from this prosecution—I said nothing about being mistaken in my charge—I do not know the prisoner's hand-writing—I have been here all day—I did not intend the trial to be put off.

CHARLES ISAACS being called did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1549

1549. SARAH ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April, 1 cloak, value 4l., the goods of Mary Ann Cooper; and 1 muff, value 2l., the goods of Sarah Thompson, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Mitchell.

MR. JERNINGHAM conducted the Prosecution.

MARY ANN COOPER . I am a milliner and dress-maker, and live in South Molton-street. On Friday, the 14th of April, I was sitting in my front room, and a woman came in—I cannot swear to the prisoner—she was very much like her—she asked me if I wanted an apprentice—I told her I did not—she said she had a friend who wished to place a daughter out, and she would send her next morning—she staid with me about ten minutes and then went away—some time after I went into my back room, and missed a cloal, a cape, and muff—this is my cloak—I have some of the silk it was made from—the cape is not here—I saw the prisoner again, on the 31st of May, at Marl borough-street.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. You had not seen the person between the 14th of April and the 31st of May? A. No.

SARAH THOMPSON . I live in Orchard-street, and was in the employ of Miss Cooper—On the 14th of April 1 was sitting in her room, when the person came in—she was much like the prisoner, but I cannot say it was her—she staid about ten minutes—shortly after she went away I missed a muff from the bedroom on the same floor as we sat—this is it—I know it by having sewn the seam up.

JAMES TRAIL . I am assistant to Mr. Crouch, a pawnbroker in Grafton-street cast. On the 14th of April, this cloak and muff were pawned with us for one guinea, by a woman in the name of Mary Williams—I cannot positively swear to the prisoner—I have seen her in the shop—this is the duplicate I gave.

WILLIAM ELLIS . I am a policeman. The prisoner was brought to the station-house on another charge on the 25th of May, and had a bundle concealed under her cloak—I took it from her—Mrs. Spindelow searched her in the cell, and produced these duplicates—one of them relates to muff and cloak.

SUSAN SPINDELOW . I live at St. Ann's watchhouse. I searched the prisoner, and found fourteen duplicates on her among other things, which I gave to Ellis.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1550

1550. SARAH ALLEN was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May, 1 purse, value 1s. 6d.; 8 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 5 half-crowns, 7 shillings, 3 sixpences, and a £5 promissory note; the property of George William Hoyle, in the dwelling-house of William Bartelot.

ELIZABETH HOYLE . I am the wife of George William Hoyle—I am a milliner and dressmaker, and live in Regent-street, in the house of William Bartelot. On Tuesday, the 9th of May, about three o'clock in the afternoon I was sitting in the front drawing-room with Miss Marsh—I saw the prisoner coming up stairs, and sent Miss Marsh to speak to her in the back room I overheard her use the word "apprentice"—Miss Marsh came to me—the prisoner put her head into the room I was in, and said, "If you are engaged Mrs. Bee, I will call some other day" (my maiden name was Bee)—I went into the back room to her, and she said she had come about an apprentice—I asked her who recommended her—she replied the lady would know; she had only come to inquire about the terms—she was so flurried she scarcely gave herself time to speak—she inquired about my terms for three years and before I had time to reply she said, "Sixty guineas, I suppose?"—I said no, my terms were forty—she said they would no doubt suit the lady, and would I call on her—I hesitated, and she said should the lady call on me—I said, that would be better, and she appointed for her to call next day, between twelve and one o'clock—she then left—about half an hour after I went into the back room to get my purse, which I had left in a bag about ten minutes before she came in, and missed it—it contained a £3 Colchester note, eight sovereigns, one half-sovereign, and about 2 0s. is silver—it was a brown silk purse—nobody but the prisoner, myself, and Miss Marsh had been in the room from the time I placed the bag there till I missed the purse—all the doors were open—the rooms communicate by folding doors, and one folding-door was open—this is my purse, I am certain—I know the ring, which I put on it about three months ago.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. How long have you lived in Regent street? A. I think four years—Mr. Bartelot is a hair dresser—there is a door which leads to his ground floor, which is kept locked during the day—the name of Bartelot is over the door, but not his Christian name—I believe he has two Christian names—only one of the folding-doors was open—Miss Marsh went through that—there was another young lady with me in the same room—the prisoner could see that—the door remained open all the time she was there—not two minutes elapsed between Miss Marsh leaving the back room and my going into it—the table was in the corner at the back room by the side of the fire-place—I could not see it from the front room—I found the prisoner standing almost at the other end of the room from the table, but it is a small room—Miss Marsh was absent from her about three minutes before I went to her—my bag had a string to it, and no clasp—I had never seen her before—she was full five minutes in my sight, and more, and I saw her again about a fortnight after.

MARY ANN MARSH . I was sitting with Mrs. Hoyle when the prisoner came up stairs—I am confident she is the person—she went into the back room and asked me if Mrs. Hoyle was in want of an apprentice—I said Mrs. Hoyle was engaged, but I would go to her if she would take a chair—I gave her one, and she sat down near the fire-place—the table was very near the fire place—I went to Mrs. Hoyle, who was engaged a short time, the prisoner looked in between the two doors, and said, "If you are engaged, I will call next day"—the folding door was only partly open—after she was gone, Mrs. Hoyle complained of losing her purse—nobody went into the room but Mrs. Hoyle and myself, from the time the prisoner left till it was missed—I have seen Mrs. Hoyle with a purse, and believe this to be the same—the bag was put on the table when we came from dinner—the prisoner did not call next day, nor did any one about an apprentice.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the table near the fire-place or window? A. Near both, it stood between the two—Mrs. Hoyle has a servant, and Mrs. Bartelot also—there are no lodgers in the house—a person could not come in there without our knowledge—I could not see the table from the front room, but we could see the door, and could see every body go in, as the side door of the room was also open which commands a view of the stairs—the prisoner was there five or seven minutes—I saw her go out—Mr. Bartelot's Christian names are William Augustus.

WILLIAM ELLIS (police-constable C 91.) I had the prisoner searched at the station-house, and received a purse from Mrs. Spindelow.

SUSAN SPINDELOW . I searched the prisoner on the 25th of May, and found this purse in her hand, with two sovereigns and eight shillings in it—she was taking it from her bosom—I also found on her a black lace veil, but no bank note.

GUILTY Aged 27.—Of larceny only.— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Saturday, June 17th, 1837

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370612-1551

1551. JOHN STURSMAN was indicted for stealing on the 20th of May, 9oz. 8dwts. of silver, value 21. 7s., the goods of Charles Fox, his master, to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 16.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Six, Months; Six Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1552

1552. ROBERT REASON was indicted for stealing on the 13th of April, 1 pig, price 8s., the property of Thomas South.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD EMMINGTON . I am servant to Thomas South, a farmer, at Staines. He had some pigs in the sty in the farm-yard on the 13th of April—one was stolen from the farm on that day—I have seen James Burchett, the blacksmith, since this—I did not know him before—I afterwards saw my master's pig at the Angel and Crown yard, at Staines—the officer had it then—it was the same pig, I am sure.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did your master breed the pig? A. No, it had got two or three marks; one between his ears, one on his tail, and two little sandy spots on its head—I should have known him 100

miles off—my master had eight—I lost this on the 13th of April, and two more the night following—1 know this was not one of the two, became they have all different marks.

COURT Q. Did the pig know his sty? A. Yes.

WILLIAM WRAY (police-sergeant A 13.) On Saturday the 13th of May, I went to the prisoner and took him into custody—I understood there were. four pigs lost, and said I took him for four—he said he could clear himself, that he bought them two of a man named Beldham, a tailor, in Church-street, Staines, he gave a guinea for one and fifteen shillings for the other—I asked where he got the other two—he said he bought them of a man named Mylon, a horse-keeper, at Staines—he gave ten shillings for one, and fifteen shillings for the other—I asked him what he had done with them—he said, "I sold them"—I asked him, "Who to?"—he said he did not know, he believed it was to a man from Hounslow, a pig-jobber—I understood he had sold two to him, and I asked him who he had sold the two others to—he said he could not say, he did not know—I asked him how long it was since he bought them—he said he did not know—I said, "Was it six months?"—he said, "Not so long as that"—I said, "Was it six weeks?"—he said he could not say—I asked him when he sold them—he said he did not know—after that I went to the house of James Burchett, and I found one of the pigs in a sty of his—I went to the house of Mr. Chandler, and there a white pig that Mr. South had lost.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know that this man was in Lord Lucan's service? A. I was given to understand so—I found him on his land.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you with Mr. South when he went to Hicks? A. No—he came to Burchett's while I was there, and identified the pigs which 1 found there.

JOHN HICKS . I am a butcher. The prisoner came to my house, and asked if I wanted to buy any pigs—I looked at them, and asked what he wanted for them—he said, 17s. for one and 15s. for the other—I afterwards asked where they came from—he said from Sheperton-green, from his brother-in-law—I bought them, and sold one to William Chandler—I do not know whether it was the same that the officer took away—1 believe it was.

Cross-examined. Q. You would not take upon your conscience to say that it was? A. No; I would not swear to any pig without I marked it—it was a white one I sold to Chandler—there were no sandy marks behind his ears, or on his poll, as I saw—I never was in trouble about pigs—I have been in custody on suspicion of somebody stealing a beast—I never saw it, nor heard what kind of beast it was—it was not my brother-in-law's—it was not for a pig, it was cows that were alleged to be the property of Lord Lucan—I never was committed for pig-stealing.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the prisoner in Lord Lucan's service at the time the beast was lost? A. Yes—one pig I thought was white, and one spotted.

JAMES BURCHETT . I am a blacksmith, living at Nailham. On the 16th of April the prisoner asked me how the pigs went on that I bought of him which he had bought of Mr. Beldham—I had bought these pigs on the 7th—on the 17th I bought a little black and white spotted one—he said he bought it of his kinsman, at Sheperton-green—Beldham lived in Church-street, Staines—he did not tell me where he bought it—I looked at it on the 15th, and bought it on the 17th—that one was taken away by the officer and shown to Mr. South—he and several other people came to the

sty, and weighed it—I gave 8s. 6d. and a pot of beer for it—it was a very little one—I weighed it in a basket the next morning, and it weighed 17lbs. basket and all.

Cross-examined. Q. Did they take that from you? A. Yes—they wanted to take the other, but that he proved he bought of Mr. Beldham. EDWARD EMMINGTON re-examined. I saw the pig—that was the one that I knew by the marks.

WILLIAM WRAY . That was the pig I found.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner for stealing two pigs.)

Reference Number: t18370612-1553

1553. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 half-crown, 16 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the goods and monies of Frederick Coates, from the person of Mary Coates.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

MARY COATES . I am the wife of Frederick Coates. On the 12th of June I went into the City by an omnibus—I got in in the Strand—I had 19s. 6d. in silver, and 21/2d. in copper in my pocket—the 19s. 6d. was rolled up in my handkerchief in my right hand pocket—when I got in, the prisoner was sitting next to me, on my right side, in a cloak, and a man Sitting opposite me, who stared at me very hard in the face—the prisoner was fidgeting about in his cloak—he sat close beside me—the omnibus stopped at the corner of Farringdon-street, and the prisoner got out—before he got out I discovered I had lost my money and handkerchief, and said, "You have robbed me, Sir"—I addressed that to him, but he took no notice—he proceeded to get out—I then attempted to get out, but the person who sat opposite me was paying the conductor, and held the door and prevented me—I said, "That man has robbed me," and as I went to run over Fleet-street, as the prisoner had run across the road, the man's arm came across my neck, and hindered me from following him immediately—I went after the prisoner, and went across the road up a court—I accused him of having robbed me—he said he had not—while I was charging him, Mr. Greenland came out of a public-house, and asked me what was the matter—I said, "This man has robbed me"—he said, "If he has robbed you, we will have an officer"—this was in the hearing of the prisoner—he stood close by—while they were gone for the officer he dropped my hand-kerchief between his cloak and the right side of his person, I saw that—19s. 6d. was in it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you any conversation with him up the court? A. Nothing more than what I stated—after I took up the money he followed me into the public house, and said "I know you don't wish to proceed against me," I said, "You know you deserve it"—that was after he was in custody, while the officer was present—there was nothing else said—I perfectly recollect that—I do not remember the prisoner saying, when I said he had robbed me, that if I had been robbed that was the person, who had robbed me, pointing to a man—it was dropped from underneath his cloak, on the right hand side—I am sure.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Was there any other man there? A. A man came up after the money was dropped, and said something to him afterwards, and that was the man who had sat opposite me in the omnibus—I said to him, "You are the man that tried to stop me"—the policeman was a short distance from me—it is a small place.

JAMES GREENLAND . I keep the King's Head, at Knightsbridge. I was in a public house in Crown-court—I heard a noise and came out—I found the prisoner and prosecutrix there—there were people at the end of the court—it opens into Fleet-street, and it is thirty or forty yards long—the woman said the prisoner had robbed her of some money, and a white pocket handkerchief in the omnibus—I said I would send for an officer, and have him searched—the prisoner dropped the money from under his arm—he had his arm under his cloak, and he opened his arm and the money dropped—I saw the woman pick it up—several persons came from the coffee-room and likewise up the court—the prisoner said he hoped she would forgive him—I said I would not suffer him to go unpunished—the officer came and I gave him in charge.

SAMUEL DAVIES . I am a constable and keeper of the watch house, of Farringdom ward. I was sent for to take the prisoner—the prosecutrix told me what she had lost—I produce the handkerchief—it contains 16s., a half-crown, and a sixpence—I searched the prisoner and found As, and 41/2d.—he had this cloak on.

GUILTY Aged 33.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1554

1554. SARAH RIDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 1 gown, value 15s.; 1 shirt, value 5s.; the goods of William Augustus Wilby; and 1 pair of sugar tongs, value 7s.; 6 sheets, value 2l.; and 1 decanter, value 4s.; the goods of Francis Ambrose Augustus Tiger de Rouffiguy, her master.

WILLIAM AUGUSTUS WILBY . I lost a shirt on the 12th of April—this is it—the prisoner lived with the Abbe de Rouffigny as servant—I lodged there—he was my wife's uncle and guardian.

ELOISE WILBY . I am the wife of William Augustus Wilby. I live at my uncle's house, No. 1, Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury—the prisoner was there as servant of all work—she left without notice—I missed a pair of sugar tongs and some other articles, the property of my uncle—these are his sheets and decanter.

THOMAS JAMES WOODS . I live with my mother, in High-street, Blooms bury, and am a pawnbroker—this dress was pledged with us—I cannot say by whom.

WILLIAM HENRY LUMLEY . I am a shopman to a pawnbroker, and live in Museum-street. I have a sheet—I cannot say who pawned it.

JOHN JAMES MORRIS . I am shopman to Mr. Jones, of High Holborn, a pawnbroker. I have a sheet pledged by the prisoner.

JAMES GOLDEN . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Tottenham-court-road. I have a shirt pledged with us—I do not know by whom.

JAMES HITCOCK . I am shopman to Mr. Townsend, a pawnbroker. I have the sugar-tongs—I do not know by whom pledged.

MARY BROWN . The prisoner gave me a lot of duplicates—I gave them to the officer—they corresponded with these articles which have been produced.

Prisoner. She took the things and pledged them and the gown. Witness. I pledged two articles which the prisoner told me were her own.

MRS. WILBY re-examined. Brown came to my house while the prisoner lived there—she had an opportunity of taking the things—they were both our servants at the same time—I saw these things safe when I delivered the sheets to the prisoner to be washed, before Brown came—I cannot say when that was—she came to be a char-woman, and then we kept her three or four weeks—she was not there on the 12th of April.

MARY BROWN re-examined. After I had been in the house a fortnight I knew the things were the Abbe's—I did not give information.

Prisoner. I did pledge one sheet, but it was to support this woman.

EDMUND BROWN . The prisoner pledged two sheets with me.

GUILTY. Aged 44.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutors.

Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1555

1555. WILLIAM MARSHAM and WILLIAM DICKMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May, 3 bushels of oats, beans, and chaff, mixed together, value 8s., the goods of William Freeman and another, their masters; and GEORGE CLARKE for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.; to which they all pleaded

GUILTY .

MARSHAM and DICKMAN— Confined Three Months.

CLARKE— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1556

1556. JOHN DIXX was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June, I bolster, value 6s.; and 2 sheets, value 4s.; the goods of Richard Eleon; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ELIZABETH ELEON . I am the wife of Richard Eleon, who keeps the White Horse, in Little Britain. On the 9th of June, at half-past ten o'clock at night the prisoner came and asked for a lodging—he paid eightpence for it and went to bed—the next morning he came down at half-past eight o'clock with a large bundle-that caused my suspicions, and I sent after him-these sheets and bolster are mine—they were on the bed that night.

EDWARD GADSBY . I live in Jewin-street. I stopped the prisoner in Falcon-square on the 9th of June—he dropped this bundle—I gave him in charge with it.

JOHN WADE , (City police-constable, 24.) I received this bolster and one sheet were in it.

WILLIAM THOMAS , (City police-constable, 35.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Seven years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18370612-1557

1557. ROBERT LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June, 1 sheet, value 5s. 6d. to the goods of Mark Ward.

MARK WARD I live with my brother. On Sunday-morning I missed a sheet from the room where the prisoner lodged, in the same house—this is it.

WILLIAM SNELLING . I am shopman to Mr. Budden, a pawnbroker. This sheet was pledged by Richard Lewis as the duplicate states, on the 10th of June—I cannot swear to the prisoner, but to the beat of my belief he is the man.

GEORGE BLAKE (police constable S 161.) I took the prisoner on the 14th of June, and I found the duplicate on him.

Prisoner I bought the ticket of a person of the name of Lewis—he told me he was going to leave town the next day.

GUILTY .—Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18370612-1558

1558. ROBERT LEVY was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June, 1 printed book, Value 1l., the goods of John Ward.

JOHN WARD . I live in Perry-street, Somer's-town, and am a tailor The prisoner lodged there—I missed a bible from the back room, when he lodged—this is it.

JAMES TRAIL . I am in the employ of Mr. Coombs, pawnbroker, of Grafton-street—this Bible was pawned by the prisoner.

Prisoner. I met Lewis with the Bible and he asked me to pawn it—he called on me, found the door open, and went in my room.

JOHN WARD . Lewis did not lodge in my house.

GUILTY. Aged 34.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor .— Confined Three Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1558a

1558. JOSEPH NEWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June, I watch, value 7s. the goods of William Barnes.

WILLIAM BARNES . I lodge at Mr. Newell's, the prisoner's father's at Heston. I kept my watch in a little bag over the head of my bed—on Monday night, while I was making my bed, I observed my watch was gone—I kept my bed-room locked—when I returned home on Thursday, I found great difficulty in getting into the room—I tried the key, and could not turn it—sometimes the prisoner comes home, and sometimes he does not—this is the watch.

PHILLIP HUMPHREY . I am a pawnbroker and live at Isle worth. This watch was pawned by the prisoner on Friday the 9th of June.

Prisoner. I do not know where the pawnbroker's shop is—I was at Drayton at the time. Witness. I do not think it is possible for me to be mistaken—I described him, and the person took him from the description—his voice agrees as well as his face.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined One Year; Six Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1559

1559. GEORGE BLISS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June, 2 live fowls, price 3s.; I live duck, price 1s. 6d.; and I live drake, price 1s. 6d.; the property of John William Smith.

JOHN WILLIAM SMITH I am a dyer, and live at Eagle House, Mile-end-road. I had two live fowls, a live duck and drake, on the 11th of June, in my poultry-yard—I lost them and saw them again before the Magistrate—these are parts of the wings which have been preserved.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What are the marks by which you know them? A. Only by the colour—my premises are surrounded by a high wall—I have watchmen and large dogs—I cannot say when I saw them safe—I should think they must have got out before they could be stolen—I have inquired about the prisoner—his friends are very respectable—I speak to the birds from their general appearance.

SAMUEL POPE (police-constable K 24.) At a quarter before two, on the morning of the 11th of June, I saw the prisoner at the bottom of Norfolk-street, not a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's—he had a bulky appearance, and seeing me approach him he made off as fast as he could—just before I caught him he dropped two dead fowls—when I caught him he said, "Don't ill use me, I have a duck in my pocket"—I pulled out a drake, and searched the other pocket, and found a duck-they were dead, but quite hot.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he in liquor? A. He was.

(Robert Dixon, undertaker, of Stepney-green, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTYRecommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. .*— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1560

1560. JAMES KELLY and WILLIAM CAUSE were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of June, 1 truck, value 3/., and 2 baskets, value 10s.; the goods of Ralph Rossi.

JAMES ANDREWS . I am porter to Ralph Rossi, a wine-merchant. On the 23rd of May I went with a truck and two baskets, the property of Mr. Rossi, to several places—I left my truck at No. 35, Coleman-street, and went into the house—when I came out the truck and baskets were gone—I afterwards went with Reed, and saw the axle-tree and wheels of the truck in Duke's-place—one basket was found in Mitre-court, Cheapside. and one in Tabernacle-row, Hoxton—they were my master's baskets.

WILLIAM HUDSON . On the 31st of May the prisoner, Kelly, came to me with a truck—this is part of it—I asked where he got it from—he said it was no business of mine—I sold it for him.

GEOEGE WINTER . On the 1st of June Cause came to me—he said a friend of his had got two dozen of wine baskets to sell, and the next morning the two prisoners came together, and Cause said, "This is my friend, who has brought these two baskets"—Kelly acquiesced in it—these are the two baskets I bought of them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Cause said they were not his? Yes he did, and he brought the other as his friend.

JOHN SMITH (police-constable G 171.) On the 3rd of June I saw Kelly, and he ran away—I asked him where he got the truck—he said he bought it of Brown, a farrier in Petticoat-lane, or near there—I questioned him, in going to the station-house, and he said he bought the wheels and axis tree of this man, and the body he made himself—I said, "Have you carpenter's tools"—he said, "Yes."

Kelly. All he said was, "About the truck?-"—I said, "What truck?"—he said, "The truck—I said it was my own.

ROBERT REED (police-constable G 19.) On the 5th of June I found the baskets—on the 6th of June I went to Duke's-place, and found the truck—I took Cause on the 5th, and said we were going about the baskets—he said, "I know nothing about them"—I took him to Winter, and he said, "I don't deny bringing the baskets, with another man who I believe lives in Whitechapel"—he could not tell me where.

Cross-examined. Did he go about with you to find the man of whom he bought them? A. Not with me, he did with Winter.

Kelly. I have no knowledge of the truck—the wheels I bought of a person named Brown. KELLY— GUILTY .— Confined Three Months; Three Weeks solitary.

CAUSE— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1561

1561. CHARLES JOHNSON was indicted for an assault, wih intent to ravish.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18370612-1562

1562. CHARLES BLAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Henry Carter, from his person.

HENRY CARTER . I am a woollen-draper, and live in Regent-street. About eight o'clock in the evening of the 14th of June, I felt a tug at my pocket—I turned and saw the prisoner—I missed my handkerchief, and laid hold of the prisoner—I asked what he had in his pocket—he said, "Nothing"

that it was another boy that he had seen run away—I said I should keep him—hedropped this handkerchief from his hand—it is mine.

Prisoner. It was another boy that threw it down. Witness. No, it was the prisoner, I saw it in his hand.

HENRY BERESFORD . I am a police inspector. I was in Portland-street, and heard the cry of "Stop him, stop him"—I went down another street, and met the prisoner running away, and took him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1563

1563. SARAH MOULD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May, 1 coat, value 21. 10s., the goods of Thomas Duncan.

THOMAS DUNCAN . I am a tailor, living in Carnaby-street, Golden-square On the 29th of May, at four o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner's St. Giles's—I went with her to No. 3, Salutation-court—I went to bed with her, and took all my clothes off-when I awoke she was gone, and my con also—she came back—I asked her where the coat was—she said she had pledged it for 3s.—I told her to go and get it—I had given her a half.-crown and a shilling to get something to drink—she went, but did not come back, and I waited till four o'clock the next morning—I had to write to a friend.

Prisoner. When I met him he had but a half-crown, and that was spent in liquor with his friend—he said, if I would let him have the bed, he would pawn his coat, and stop all day with me, and give me 5s.; and as soon as the shops were open I took it—he breakfasted with me, and stopped all day on Monday and Tuesday. Witness. I did not breakfast with her—I was forced to stay at the house till the Tuesday morning—I never authorised her to pawn it—I did not get up and light the fire—it was her own apartment—I do not think 1 was sober when I went there.

Prisoner. He wrote a note, I took it and put it into the Post myself. Witness. Yes, she did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1564

1564. JAMES WHITROW was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, 7-8ths of a yard of silk, value 6s.; 12 handkerchiefs, value 2l.; 6 pain of stockings, value 9s.; 12 pairs of gloves, value 15s.; 1 1/2 yard of linen cloth, value 3s.; and 1 scarf, value 4s.; the goods of George Drake Sewell, and another, his masters.

WILLIAM EVANS . I am in the employ of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross, of Old Compton-street, and Greek-street. The prisoner was their shopman—he was discharged on the 25th of May—he called on the Monday following for something—I sent for an officer, who took him, and found two pairs of silk stockings on him, and some duplicates torn to pieces—I then went with the officer to a public-house at Kensington, where he said be lodged—hegave us a key—it opened the trunks at his lodgings—we found seven-eighths of a yard of silk, the gloves, and scarf, and other things.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You do not swear to the property? A. No.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I was sent for and took the prisoner.

JOHN SPINES . I have the management of the Emporium at No. 41, Greek-street. I have looked at the property—here is seven-eighths of a yard of silk, the same as stocks are made of—it is called armozine—it is the property of my employers, Messrs. Sewell and Cross.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any private mark upon it? A. I have cut a strip off the piece, which matches with it—there is no private mark—I know it by the cut—I have a piece which will match the cut—it is not perfectly straight—here is a handkerchief of a pattern which he bought one of us, and they found three at his lodgings of the same pattern—I believe these things are my employers'.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1565

1565. WILLIAM HONEYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June, 1 snuff-box, value 3s., the goods of Charles Ward.

JOHN JAMES . I am shopman to Charles Ward, of Great Russell-street, Covent-garden, a tobacconist. The prisoner came there on the 15th of June, and asked for cigars—I heard a rattle of snuff-boxes on the trays, and I looked, and one was gone—I charged him with it—he said he had not got it—I told him there was one gone and I could not let him go till I was certain—I was going round the counter, and he gave me the snuff-box—this snuff-box had been removed, and he gave it me from somewhere behind him—he took it from his left hand—he was standing with his side to the counter, and his left hand behind him—there was a counter behind him, and he could have reached it at the time he gave it me.

Cross-examined by MR. PRICE. Q. Was he alone? A. No, a young man was with him—I could not catch him, as he made off when I called out "Police"—the prisoner was given into custody in the street—he attempted to go—he was not drunk—I have seen him before, and he seemed to act in the way he always does—this was at a quarter past six o'clock—I was not drunk—we shut up at twelve o'clock.

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner go out? A. Yes, both of them.

Prisoner. You pushed me out. Witness. I was trying to catch hold of him, and a lot of cigars fell out of his hand, which I have not brought against him—I pushed his friend out, and I was getting him to the door to call the policeman—I did not push him out—he went out, and was taken in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1566

1566. DAVID MACDONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April, I waistcoat, value 1/., the goods of John George Keston.

JOHN GEORGE KESTON . Between four and five o'clock on the afternoon of the first of April the prisoner came to my house, and asked for charity—I gave him 6d.—he said he had worked next door—he returned the 6d., and said if I could give him a left-off waistcoat, it would be of more use—I went up stairs, and left him in the parlour, where the clothes were exposed; and when I came down he and the waistcoat were gone—no one else was in the place, or could take it.

GEORGE CURTIS . I am a pawnbroker. This waistcoat was pledged with me by a woman, but the prisoner was with her—he offered it first—I took it of the woman.

Prisoner. I had it not in my possession at all.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.— Confined Six Months.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin

Reference Number: t18370612-1567

1567. FRANCIS FLANNAGAN was indicted for stealing, on tie 14th of June, 2 pairs of boots, value 10s.; and 1 pair of shoes, value 8s; the goods of Richard Riley.

RICHARD RILEY . I am a shoemaker, and live in High-street, Shoreditch. On the 14th of June I was in the room behind the shop from in to eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner going out pretty briskly—he was a stranger—he ran away—I pursued him when I missed the boots and shoes from the window—he was running briskly, and when I got nearly up to him, he turned his head and saw me, and dropped the goods on the pavement—I took them up—I believe he is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. What part of his person was it you first saw? A. His back—I saw his side face, but not much—I did not see him come in—I should say he was ten yards from me in the street when I first got out of the door—he might be a hundred or a hundred and fifty yards afterwars—I completely lost sight of him before he was taken, but I am positive he is the person.

GEORGE PAYNE (police-constable H 46.) I saw the prisoner, on the 14th of June, running in the middle of Shoreditch—I heard the alarm—he went across the Curtain-road—I called, "Stop thief," and a man laid hold of him—I did not see the property in his possession.

Cross-examined. Q. How soon after did you see Mr. Riley? A. I should think in five minutes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1568

1568. FREDERICK TAYLOR was indicted for an assault, with intent to ravish.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1569

1569. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for a like offence.

GUILTY . Aged 33.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18370612-1570

1570. HENRY BLENKA was indicted for an indecent assault.

GUILTY . Aged 42.— Confined Two Years.

OLD COURT.—Monday, June 19th, 1837.

First Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370612-1571

1571. JAMES ROBERT MUFFET was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May, 2 sovereigns and 1 half-crown, the monies of James Homer.

JAMES HORNER . I am a sailor belonging to the George the Fourth, which laid in the Thames. The prisoner was an apprentice on board-on the 26th of May I went on shore to get provisions for the ship—I went to my chest and took my purse out, meaning to change a sovereign at shore—I did not look inside my purse—I did not spend any money, and came back without taking my purse out of my pocket till I went to pot it into my box—I then looked into it and missed two sovereigns and a half-crown—when the prisoner was accused of it he called me, and said if I would go on shore with him, he would make up the rest of the money which he had hove overboard—I had put my purse in my waistcoat pocket the money must have been taken before I took the purse out of the chest to take it on shore.

JOSHUA HALL . I am mate of the vessel. Horner complained that he had been robbed of two sovereigns and a half-crown—I went and inquired and said all the men should be searched—the prisoner then went forward to the forecastle, down into a dark corner—I followed him, and asked

what he was doing there—he said he was going to get his hammock to be I searched—I said "Come out," and in a crevice of the beam in the dark place he went into 1 found a sovereign.

JOHN GASKIN . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge, I and I found 4s. 6d. on him—I asked what he had done with the rest, and told him what he said would be taken against him, and he need not say any thing unless he chose—he said, "As the worst has come to the worst, by G—d I have taken it, and chucked a sovereign and a half-crown overboard."

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1572

1572. MARY VIZARD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June, 2 gowns, value 2s.; 1 coat, value 10s.; and 1 snuff-box, value 6d.; the goods of Charles Jones.

SARAH JONES . I am the wife of Charles Jones, a plasterer, in Upper Charlton-street, Fitzroy-square. I let lodgings, and occupy the parlour myself—on the 14th of June, about four o'clock, my lodger went out and left the street door ajar while she went across the road—I was in the wash-house which faces the street-door, and saw a person come in—I thought it was the lodger, but she went into my room—I waited a bit, and then went to the foot of the stairs, and called to know who was in my room—I saw the prisoner come out and go away—I followed her, and saw her throw away this property—she had them in her apron—she was a stranger.

EDWARD STRETCH . I saw the prisoner running round the corner of Cirencester-place—there was an alarm of stop-thief, and I saw her stopped—I did not see her throw away the property.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I washed last winter for a young man wbo lived at Mrs. Jones's, and I went there, but not with any intent to take anything—I knocked but nobody answered—I looked into the room and there was nobody there—what I did was through distress.

GUILTY>. Aged 29.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1573

1573. ALFRED PURDIE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June, 4 trowels, value 5s., the goods of William Dobney; and 2 trowels, value 3s., the goods of Edward Peasgood.

JOHN JONES . I am a policeman. On the 14th of June I met the prisoner in Frederick-street, Portland-town, at ten o'clock at night—I suspected him and took him in charge—I found six trowels on him—he said he had been working at a building and had finished his job, and was taking them home—he did not say where he worked.

EDWARD PEASGOOD . Some of these trowels are mine—I left them in a building in Frederick-street on the 14th—the prisoner did not work there—he is a stranger—I had fastened the building—I found the staple drawn.

WILLIAM DOBNEY . I was at work at the same building—these trowels are mine.

Prisoner. I did not break open the place.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1574

1574. HESTER EMERY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June, 1 watch, value 2l.; and 1 handkerchief, value 3d.; the goods of Abel Ewer, from his person.

ABEL EWER . I am an under-gardener, and live at Denham. On Monday, the 12th of June, I was at Uxbridge, about eleven o'clock at night—I was sober—I saw the prisoner at the Gardeners' Arms, where I was—I had seen her before—we got into conversation, and went up the yard together—my watch was then in my fob, and my handkerchief in my hat—I paid her 1s.—we were there a very little while—my hat fell off, but I did not miss my handkerchief then, but missed my watch—I stepped back and charged her with robbing me—she denied it, and I told the watchman—this is my handkerchief—I know it by its having a piece on it of a different colour—I have never seen the watch since.

JAMES DARVILL . I am a constable of Uxbridge. The prosecutor complained to me of being robbed of his watch and handkerchief about twelve o'clock on Monday night—he described the woman to me, and in consequence I apprehended the prisoner next morning—I told her the charge, and found this handkerchief on her—she said she took it out of his hat—she said she had not got the watch, that a person who went with a man named Gowl had got it, and was gone to the races, and if I went there I should find it—I said I was bound to be here next morning and could not go.

Prisoner. I never had the watch, nor ever saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1575

1575. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June, 1 watch, value 71.; 1 watch-chain, value 21.; and 2 seals, value 1/.; the goods of Charles Surgett, from his person; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

CHARLES SURGETT . I am an optician. On the 12th of June, I met the prisoner in Holborn—she got into conversation with me, and asked me to give her something to drink, as she was very dry—I treated her with two pints of half-and-half—when we left the public-house we went up Hatton-garden, and turned round Bleeding Heart-yard—in bidding her good night I put my hand into my fob, and missed my watch—I said, she deserved to be charged with the police, and if there was one near I would do so—she began to give me very abusive language, which caused a policeman to come forward, and I gave her in charge—I took the watch out of her right hand—nothing improper had passed between us.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am a policeman. I heard the prisoner abusing the prosecutor very grossly—I went up, and he charged her with taking his watch which he had in his hand—I asked him in what manner she had taken it, and he told me.

Prisoner's Defence. He took me up the court, and said he had not a shilling in the world about him—I said I did not choose to stop with him he took the watch out of his pocket, and walked a little way up with me, and gave me in charge.

WILLIAM HENRY ENGLISH . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was in court when she was tried—she is the person.

GUILTY .— Transported for Life.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370612-1576

1576. WILLIAM ENGLAND and THOMAS WAY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering a building within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of Robert Martin, on the 12th of April, with intent to steal, and stealing there in, 2 planes, value 4s.; 1 pair of compasses, value 2d.; 1 file, value 2d.; and 1 gouge, value 2d.; his goods.

MR. ROBERT MARTIN . I am a surgeon, and live in Cross-street, Islington. I have a garden and tool-house at the back of my house, which is enclosed by a brick wall—I found it broken open on the 12th of April, about the middle of the day, and missed the articles stated, with many more—I have since seen some which are my property.

WILLIAM CHING (police-constable N 61.) I apprehended the prisoners in Duddy's-rents, Islington, in a room with four other persons—I found nothing on the prisoners—they denied the charge—I found these two duplicates in the room.

THOMAS HOBBS KING (police-constable N 248.) I was with Ching, and found a gouge and pair of compasses in the room, in a box with other tools, by the side of the window.

CHARLES GRANT . I live in Battle Bridge-road. The prisoner Way occupied a tenement of mine in Duddy's-rents, opposite the end of the prosecutor's garden—it was the room he was apprehended in—he has lived there some months—his father and mother lived there also, but they are lately dead.

JAMES ASHLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Coley, a pawnbroker, in Lower-road. I produce two planes which were pawned on the 24th of April, in the name of John Way—I have no recollection of the person—the two duplicates produced are counterparts of those on the planes.

JOSEPH CARRINGTON . I live in Norfolk-street, Islington. I pawned two planes at Mr. Coley's shop for the prisoner Way's brother James—he gave them to me in Duddy's-rents, close to the prisoner's room door—all the family live there—I gave the money to James Way—he lives in the room also.

JAMES WAY . I live with my brother in Duddy's-rents. England gave me these two planes, and asked me to pawn them for him; which I did—no one was in the room when he gave them to me—he lives in the same room with my brother.

England's Defence. I wish to clear the innocent person—this is the innocent prisoner, and the witness is the guilty one along with mysetf—I did not give them to him to pawn, but he and I stole them together, and he gave them to the witness to pawn while I was out at work.

ENGLAND*— GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

WAY— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1577

1577. WILLIAM ENGLAND and THOMAS WAY were again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering a building within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of Robert Martin, on the 6th of June, with intent to steal, and stealing there in 1 spoke-shave, value 6d., his goods, and 1 waistcoat, value 6d., the goods of Charles Maddock.

MR. ROBERT MARTIN . On the 6th of June, I found my tool-house broken open, and missed a spoke-shave and other property, and a waistcoat belonging to Charles Maddock—the house had been closed—the door was shut, and left on the latch—it is always shut at night, but I cannot swear it was shut that night.

THOMAS HOBBS KING (police-constable N 248.) I found this jacket on Way's back, at the station-house, and the spoke-shave in the room in Duddy's-rents—Way said he had bought the jacket three months ago, in Petticoat-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES MADDOCK . I am a carpenter, and work for Mr. Martin. This jacket is mine—there is paint and grease on it, and I have worn it two years—I wore it on the 5th of June, and missed it on the 6th.

Way. I have had it five years—I bought it in Petticoat-lane for 18d.

WAY*— GUILTY of stealing only.— Transported for Seven Years.

ENGLAND— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1578

1578. THOMAS GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 12 of June, at St. Luke, Chelsea, 8 sovereigns, 3 half-sovereigns, and 6 half-crowns, the monies of Edward Wenman Allison, his master, in the dwelling-house of William Lewin.

EDWARD WENMAN ALLISON . I am a shoemaker, and live in Arthur-street, in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea—it is the house of William Lewis—the prisoner is my apprentice. On the 12th of June, I and my wife went out, leaving the prisoner in the room at work—I returned between six and seven o'clock in the evening and he was gone—I missed from a drawer in my room, eight sovereigns, three half-sovereigns, and six half-; crowns, which were safe the day before—I went to Southampton, and found the prisoner on board the Atalanta steam-boat—the officer produced a watch and some clothes—I did not make him any promise or threaten him—he took me to where he had bought the watch for 3l. 7s. at a Jew's—it was not worth more than 1l.—Lewin lives in the house.

MARY ANN ALLISON . I am the prosecutor' wife. I saw the money safe last Monday morning, the 12th of June, about eleven o'clock, about two hours before we went out; there was nine sovereigns, three half-sovereigns, and six half-crowns.

WILLIAM TERRY . I am an officer of Southampton. On Tuesday last Mr. Allison came to me—we went on board the steam-boat and found the prisoner—I found on him four sovereigns and a half, a silver watch in a bag, and a new suit of clothes—I asked him how he became possessed of the money—he said, "I took it out of my master's drawer" I asked how much he took—he said, "Eight sovereigns, five half-sovereigns, and about 1l. in silver"—I said, "How did you get the money?"—he said, the key was left in the drawer, and he left one sovereign behind—he took me' to a little bazaar at the end of the pier, and said he gave 3l. 10s. there for the watch—he took me to where he bought the clothes; they were given up and the money returned—Solomon Solomons is the man who sold him the watch, but he refused to give it up—I believe the watch is not worth 1l.—the Atalanta was about to sail for Guernsey—he gave every assistance to try to get the property back, by telling me where he laid out the money.

MR. ALLISON re-examined. He has been my apprentice since last February, and was with me twelve months before—he was a very good lad—I believe this was a sudden temptation—the key was either in the drawer or on it—I left him in care of a little boy about two years and a half old—he has since said he meant to go to sea—his friends live at Jersey—he left one sovereign behind.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Canfined One Year in the Peniteniary, and then Transported for Life.—(Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of the sudden temptation, and his being anxious to deliver up the property.)

Reference Number: t18370612-1579

1579. WILLIAM GASKIN and MARY DOWLING were indicted for that they, on the ( 6th of June, did, with menaces, feloniously demand of and from Catherine Crawfurd 10 sovereigns, the monies of Alexander Crawfurd, with intent to steal the same; against the Statute, &c.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution. CATHERINE CRAWFURD. I am the wife of Alexander Crawfurd, who keeps the Hutchinson Arms, Davenport-street, Ratcliffe. On the 6th of June, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was in the bar (my husband was not at home, he always goes to the counting-house in Crown-court, on a Tuesday)—my servant, Mary Coleman, was at home—I saw the prisoners come in together with another female—they looked into the taproom, the parlour, and skittle ground, and walked out again—there was nobody in any of those places—they did not take any thing—about five minutes afterwards, the male prisoner entered and called for a pint of beer, which he paid for—hethen asked me if I was Mrs. Crawfurd—I said, "Yes"—he said, "I demand of you £10"—I said, "My good man, what for?"—he said, "If you do not give it to me, it will be the worst day's work you ever did, for 1 will serve you as Greenacre served Mr. Brown"—I am quite sure he used that expression—he repeated several times about Greenacre, and I was very much alarmed—I said I was not to be frightened out of £10, or ten pence, and he then left the house—I sent for Mrs. Richardson, a neighbour, who came—she went into the bar parlour, and I was telling her the circumstance, when the female prisoner entered the house—I had seen her once before, about six or eight week ago, and my servant Coleman and myself had our fortunes told by her then—(she could not see Mrs. Richardson)—she then asked me for a glass of gin and peppermint—I gave her gin only, which she paid for—she then said, "You had better give me that teji sovereigns which if demanded of you,"—I said I was not to be frightened out of ten pounds or ten pence—I am sure I said that to her—she said if I did not, she would 11 Greenacre" me; she would serve me as Greenacre served Mrs. Brown; but if I would give it to her she would makeit all right; that Mr. Crawfurd had set her to watch my actions; that Crawfurd had another wife, and that I should be turned into the street—with that Mr. Richardson whom I had sent for came in, and Mrs. Richardson came out of the parlour and said to the prisoner. "Are vou not ashamed to stand and abuse a respectable female?"—Mr. Richardson said it was only an attempt to extort money, and he would kick her out if she did not get out—she made use of a very dreadful expression, which I cannot repeat—she said Mr. Richardson was one of our confederates, meaning of me and the girl—the servant girl heard the whole of it—the psisoner then left, and on the step she took a very dreadful oath, and said I had better give her the money, or it would be the worse for me—she did not say any thine else that I remember.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Am I to understand that your servant, Mary Coleman, was present at all this? A. Yes; she was in the shop the whole time—she was laying the dinner in the bar-parlour—about six or eight weeks ago the prisoner told my fortune—that was the only time I had seen her—I am quite sure of that—I never saw her more than once and the day this occurred—my husband was out when I saw her before—he is about thirty-six years old—I am twenty-one—a Mr. Smith was present when my fortune was told—I do not know any body in School-house-lane—I did not produce a bottle to the prisoner, nor a bit of my husband's hair, nor any portion of his wearing apparel—I did not tell her any thing about some houses my husband had, nor that he wanted

a tenant for one of them—I swear that positively—I did not pay her any thing—Mr. Smith treated her to some ale—he is a broker employed at the estate of Squire Hutchinson, which my husband is collector for—I know him—he is not often at our house, only when he is sent for—he was not sent for then—he is a married man—he was present when the fortune was told—he did not have any conversation with the prisoner before, that I am aware of—he might have had, for they were in the tap-room together—I did not say any thing about getting a tenant for the house—nothing was said about my becoming a widow in three months—she told me I should be a widow in twelve months—I gave her no money for telling my fortune—I never promised her 10l.—I did not pay her five sovereigns on that occasion, nor did any body in my presence—I never promised to pay her by instalments of a sovereign a week—I deny the whole of it—Mrs. Richardson✗ was not present when the fortune was told—she knew nothing about it—Mr. Smith lives in Sidney-street, about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes' walk from us—I was very much frightened and alarmed on this occasion, but did not give her any thing.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Do you happen to know on what day of the week it was the prisoner told your fortune? A. It was on a Tuesday likewise—nothing was then said about where my husband was—I did not give her any thing after she promised I should be a widow in twelve months—I had no wish to be one.

MR. DOANE. Q. Did you ever say to the prisoner that since you had seen her, you had had a regular fortune-teller or gipsy woman? A. No—I never had one.

MARY COLEMAN . I remember the prisoners coming to my mistress's house last Tuesday week—I had seen the woman before, and had my fortune told—I do not remember any thing particular that they said—they looked in at the tap-room, parlour, and skittle-ground, and went out again—there was nobody there but me and my mistress—about five minutes after, the man came in by himself, and had a pint of beer—he asked mistress if she was Mrs. Crawfurd—she said, "Yes"—he said, "I demand of you 10l., and that pretty quickly"—mistress said, "What for?"—he said, "You had better give it to me, or it will be the worse for you, for I will serve you as Greenacre served Mrs. Brown"—he said that two or three times over—Mrs. Crawfurd said she was not to be frightened out of 10l. nor 10d.—I was laying the cloth at the time, and stood there while he was speaking to mistress—I did not go out, or interfere, but stood at the parlour door—the (boy who came home from an errand) was sent for Mrs. Richardson, who came over, and mistress told her the story—she advised her to send for Mr. Richardson, and I went over for him—when I came back the female prisoner was standing at the bar—I did not hear what she said at first, but I heard her say that mistress was not master's wife, and she would be turned out of doors into the street, and master's lawful wife was coming home—I did not hear her say any thing further—as she left the step of the door she said she would Greenacre her—I did not hear any thing else, but I was so confused—she said she had been long employed to watch the house—mistress said she had better stop till master came home, as he would be in between four and five o'clock—she said that was not his time—he would not be home then, but she was then going to him—I did not hear any thing further—before I went for Mr. Richardson, mistress appeared in great trouble, and drew a glass of water from the filterer which stood at the bar—I was about five minutes gone for Mr.

Richardson, and when I came back the woman was at the bar—I heard her say, while she was on the step, that she would Greenacre her—she then left the house, and Mr. Richardson followed her.

Cross-examined. Q. How many times had you seen the woman at your mistress's? A. Never but once—that was about eight or nine weeks ago—mistress told me that she had told Mr. Crawfurd about our having our fortunes—he was not angry about it—he asked what the woman told her—she said she told her he was going to die—he was not angry at that—I did not tell him I had had mine told—mistress told him that I and her had our fortunes told—I had never seen another fortune-teller there—I did not pay—Mr. Smith, I believe, gave her 1s. for mistress, and 6d. for me—he forced mistress to have hers told—he was not in the habit of seeing my mistress often—master employs him—it was done out of a joke—I saw no hair produced, nor any thing belonging to my master—not to any woman—I do not remember any of my master's hair being cut off—I went before the Justice about this on the Thursday, two or three days after.

SARAH RICHARDSON . I am the wife of William Richardson, and live in Bath-street, about a hundred yards from the prosecutrix's. On the 6th of June the boy came for me, and I went over, went into the bar parlour, and sat on the sofa—I found Mrs. Crawfurd unable to speak, and so was the servant, from agitation—while I was in the parlour the female prisoner came in, and called for a glass of gin and peppermint—Mrs. Crawfurd served her with gin—I came in to the bar, and the prisoner said, "Will you give me what I have asked for? if you don't, it shall be far worse for you"—I looked at her, and she said to me, "You are one of her confederates"—she then said to Mrs. Crawfurd, "Are you going to give me that ten sovereigns?"—she said she did not know what she meant by it—then she said, "I will serve you as Greenacre served Hannah Brown," and went towards the door—my husband stepped to the door as she went away, calling Mrs. Crawfurd a very ill name—I cannot express the very bad names, she used both to me and Mrs. Crawfurd—they are not fit for any woman to exoress.

Cross-examined. Q. You had come from your hiding-place when she said she came for the ten sovereigns, and would serve her as Greenacre had served Mrs. Brown? A. Yes.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I am the last witness's husband. I was sent for, and found the female prisoner at the prosecutrix's house—she left on my coming in—I did not follow her—I did not see what became of her, for I did not go out—I do not know whether she walked away or ran—she called my wife as big a strumpet as Mrs. Crawfurd, and said she had compounded a felony with her—I threatened to kick her out—she had made use of very low expressions.

TIMOTHY CASEY (police-constable K 184.) I took the prisoners into custody together, on the 6th of June, about a quarter past ten o'clock, going along Back-road, St. George's—they denied knowing Mrs. Crawfurd or her husband, or where she resided, and all knowledge of them—I understand the prisoners live in Morton-court, Morton-street, Borough—they gave their address at another place, and both gave the same address.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to where they said they lived? A. I endeavoured to find it at Motto-court, where they said they lived, but could find no such place. Gaskin. I gave the lady a letter—she opened it—I asked if there was

an answer required—she said, no, and said, "Send the person who sent you with it"—the boy came in at the same time—she told the boy not to stand there, but to put the knives he had down before the bar—I asked the boy about that before the Magistrate, but he was afraid to answer—all that passed between us was to have an answer to that letter, which my wile had sent her.

MRS. CRAWFURD re-examined. He did not give me any letter—did not receive any—the boy was never before the Magistrate at all.

MR. DOANE. Q. What was the fortune you were told? A. I cannot tell you—I recollect her saying I should be a widow in twelve months, and when Mr. Crawfurd came home I told him the circumstance—I merely laughed at her, and did not stand to hear much she had to say, for I had business to attend to—nothing was said about a fair man or a dark man, nor about a clerk—I never promised her any money—my husband has the collecting from four or five hundred houses—I never suggested to her to get one of the tenants to adminster something to my husband, and she said nothing of the kind to me.

COURT. Q. Was any means suggested by which you should be a widow in less than a year? A. No—I have no wish to be a widow—I have too good a husband—I have been married three years, and have never had a word—Mr. Smith asked me to have my fortune told—I objected—he said, "Do, just out of a lark, I will pay for you"—I said it was not for the object of the money; and I did have it told—I swear positively no letter came to me—Mr. Smith knows of this trial—Mr. Crawfurd wrote him a note—I do not know his Christian name—I understand from Mr. Crawfurd that he has two or three names, and I believe one is George.

GASKIN to MARY COLEMAN. Q. Did you not stoop to read the bottom of the letter while your mistress read the top, as the boy came in? A. No—the boy was out—I cannot read at all, and I saw no letter.

JAMES SHEPHERD (police-constable K 22.) I have endeavoured to find Mr. Smith, but have not succeeded—I have called three different times at his house in Sidney-street, but could not find him—I said I had a subpoena for him, and wished, to serve him with it myself—I was at the station-house when the prisoners were brought there by Casey—Mrs. Crawfurd came there, and stated that they had come there, and made a demand on her for ten sovereigns—Gaskin said, "What have you done with that letter I gave you;" but before that, he and the woman whispered together—I asked Mrs. Crawfurd if she knew any thing about a letter—she said no, it was the first she had ever heard of it—Gaskin gave me his address, "No. 3, Motto-court, Motto-street, Borough"—I asked him what was the purport of the letter—he said she knew well enough, and she had better have given him the ten sovereigns, for it would be the worse for her—I asked him where he brought the letter from—he said from over the water; that the female prisoner gave it to him—I asked him if she was related to him in any way—he said no, she was only a near neighbour of his—the female prisoner said, "Don't tell him any more," and he did not.

Cross-examined. Q. Then, after they were in custody, the man repeated that she had better have given him the 10l.? A. Yes. Gaskin. He did not hear me say any thing about 10l.; it is all imagination. Witness. I am quite certain he did, in answer to my questions the female refused to answer any questions.

Dowling. I have been there twenty times—it is most dreadful to know

what she wanted me to do to her husband, because he was an old man, and she wanted to have the clerk—they have turned the pot-boy away who could prove it—his name is Jack—here are Mr. Crawford's drawers, which she gave me out of the bar one day—(producing them)—she told me he wore them all the winter.

MRS. CRAWFURD re-examine. I never saw these drawers before—they are not like my husband's at all.

MARY COLEMAN re-examined. Q. On your solemn oath, did you ever see the prisoner there except when she told the fortune? A. Never—the pot-boy has been discharged—we have had two boys lately—the boy's name was John who was with us when this happened—he left of his own accord—he said the place did not suit him, and he was going to sea—I do not know of any drawers being given to the prisoner—I had the care of the linen—Mr. Crawfurd did not wear such drawers as these—I never saw such a pair.

Dowling. What I say is true—all is lies, from beginning to end, what she has said—she had me in the little back parlour, and in the kitchen also—she has had me there for two or three hours together—there is not a more dreadful woman—she has not told a word of truth except that I had a glass of gin and peppermint—she said in the policeman's presence that she never saw me in her life, and then she acknowledged that she had seen me once—I have been there twenty times.

TIMOTHY CASEY re-examined. Mrs. Crawfurd did not deny having seen her in my presence.

(Witnesses for the Defence.)

ANN BURN . My husband is a lamp-lighter, in Devonshire-place, Kennington-road. I have known the female prisoner about twenty-four years—I never knew any harm of her in my life—she is a hard-working, honest woman, and the man the same—I knew them before they were married—I was at their wedding—they were lawfully married at Waterloo church, Waterloo-road, thirteen years ago—they lived together some time before they were married, and as they began to have children, I persuaded them to be married, and I went with them to be married.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Then it is not the case that they were merely neighbours, and not man and wife? A. They lived together at first.

SUSAN GASKIN . The prisoners are my father and mother. I am seventeen years old—I have lived with them ail my life-time—they have lived together ever since I can recollect—I got a certificate at the Waterloo-road church—the gentleman gave it me in the church—he wrote it out of a great book.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Have you been living with your mother for the last twelve or thirteen years? A. I have been outcleaning at different places—I was at Mrs. Burn's when my mother was taken into custody—I was not taken into custody with them—I did not know Casey the policeman—I know my mother is married—I do not recollect the marriage occurring.

MRS. BURN. I cannot say how long it is since they were married—I cannot bring it to my mind at present—I never went but once to the church—a young girl named Ann Bruce was the bridesmaid.

MRS. CRAWFORD. re-examined. Q. What interval occurred between the male prisoner going out and the woman coming in? A. About ten minutes, from five to ten minutes—I did not see where the woman came from.

DOWLING— GUILTY. Aged 45.— Judgment Respited.

GASKIN— NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Monday, June 19th,1837.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant,

Reference Number: t18370612-1580

1580. GEORGE YOUNG was indicted for an assault with intent to ravish.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1581

1581. JAMES TYE was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES FITZPATRICK . I am a messenger at Worship-street police-office. I remember, on the 29th of April, the prisoner coming before the magistrate—he was sworn—a summons had been taken out for Mr. Bray—I took down the prisoner' evidence in writing—(reads)—"James Tye, of Spring. street, Clerkenwell, says, On Sunday, the 2nd of April instant, I was going past the defendant's house, about six or seven minutes past four o'clock. I saw a woman come out of the defendant's house, with beer in a pewter quart pot—I did not see her go in—I saw a girl go in with a blue jug, and come out with beer in the jug—I afterwards went to St. Leonard Shoreditch church—service was then on—I got there twenty minutes after four o'clock—it was the front door that was open—they came out at that door—the defendant's house is the White Swan, Long-alley, Shoreditch."

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you make this entry? A. Yes—I cannot tell who applied for the summons—this is it—it has the signatare of Mr. Codd, who is one of the Magistrates—I saw the defendant sworn-his daughter, Sarah Bray, John Smith a police constable, and John Trench, also appeared on that information on the 29th—it had been adjourned twice—the Magistrate's name is Robert Edward Broughton.

JOHN SMITH , (police-constable G 171.) On Sunday, the 2nd of April last, I saw the prisoner at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon in Milton-street, St. Luke's—after we had been together sometime, he asked me what time it was, as he said he would not lose the last half-hour—that is the time the persons are praying in church—I believe the church is open at St. Luke's at that time—1 pulled out my watch, and told him it was eight minutes past four o'clock—he had been with me then about half an hour—I am sure it could not have been less than a quarter of an hour—he left me after I told him—my watch was right by St. Luke's clock and the brewhouse clock—I should say it was very nearly a mile from where I was to Mr. Bray's public-house—it might be more or less—I did not know what he meant by losing the last half-hour.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you with him altogether? A. About half an hour—I will swear it was not ten minutes or eight minutes before four o'clock—when I looked at my watch there was nobody within two or three yards of me—there were no girls—there were not two prostitutes in my company—I know Mr. M'Donald's public-house—I was not in that public-house that afternoon—I cannot say that I saw Mr. M'Donald nor any one connected with that house—another policeman was sent for from the Featherstone station, to state he saw us in the same street that afternoon—he came afterwards, but he did not recollect the day.

Prisoner Q. Do you recollect the first time you met me that day? A. About half-past three o'clock in Milton-street—there was no person with us then—we went to a public-house and had a pint of half-and-half—you paid for it—that was not the first time you treated me—the last time I asked you to treat me you said you had no money—I said I was the same—I do not know Tucker—I do not recollect his being fined 30s.—the Magistrate asked

me why I did not come, when Tucker's case was heard—I said I was not called in—the Magistrate said he wondered how a person could stand the office and hear false evidence given—I recollect this 2nd of April, from taking a boy into custody for breaking a square of glass, between two and three o'clock—Bray told me you were to give evidence in his case—I have not been to any solicitor's office with the other witness—I was on night duty—I got up, as near as 1 can guess, at twelve o'clock—I might go to the station-house before I went to bed—I do not recollect that I was in any particular place before twelve o'clock—I set my watch about half-past twelve o'clock—I went down Whitecross-street, and passed the brew house—I was at St. Luke's a few minutes before I was at the brewhout—you can go in a few minutes from there to Bray's—it is much further than from M'Donald's to Bray's—I have been in London very nearly two years, and have known Mr. Bray very nearly all the time—I sometimes drink there—I was detected drinking there while on duty—Bray is not the only person that would serve me—I have never asked you to lay informations against any houses because they would not serve me, nor against Mr. Gold's in Old-street.

JOHN FRENCH . I live at No. 8, Angel-square, and am a sawyer. I remember going to Mr. Bray's, on the 2nd of April, as the clock was striking four—I knocked at the door—I did not get admittance—Sarah Bray came to the window—I went and sat on the bench right facing the house, at the marine store shop, till the house opened—I sat there till the clock went the quarter, and it was after that the house was opened—I did not see any one come into the house—if they had I should have gone in myself—I was the first person that went in, when it had just turned the twenty minutes after four o'clock.

Prisoner. Q. How do you know that particular day? A. The day before was my father's birthday—I have conversed with the witnesses at the office, but not about this case—we did not tell one another what we were going to say—Mr. Bray never gave me a farthing for coming here, nor promised me any thing—they told me Mr. Bray was ill in bed—Mrs. Bray was down in the parlour.

SARAH BRAY . I am the daughter of Mr. Bray. On Sunday, the 2nd of April, I was at home in the afternoon and evening, during the hours of Divine service—in the afternoon I sat in the parlour, behind the bar, with George James—he took out his watch at twenty minutes past four o'clock, and told me to open the door—I got up and opened it—while I was sitting John French came—I saw him through the window—I did not let him in—he was the first person that came in when the doors were opened—not one person from three o'clock till a quarter past four o'clock entered the house—no woman went out with a jug—they could not without my seeing it—my father was ill in bed all that day, and my mother was sitting at the fire asleep.

Prisoner. Q. What time did French knock at the door? A. At four o'clock—our clock does not strike—I could not hear the church clock in doors—it would be possible to hear it at the door—I did not leave the parlour from three o'clock till a quarter past four o'clock to go out of the house—I do not recollect that I stated I never left the parlour at all—(deposition read)—"I was sitting in the parlour from four o'clock till twenty minutes past."

Prisoner. Q. Have you had any conversation with the witnesses? A. Not at any time, no more than I heard what they said at the office—I did

not tell them what I said—neither of the witnesses told me what they said—they heard the depositions read—I think my father had the summons on the 6th—I cannot tell what day it was heard—it was decided on Saturday—the offence was alleged to have been committed on the 2nd of April—my mother came down stairs about three o'clock—when she was in the parlour any body could see her head if they came to the bar—French was the first person that came in—no one has told me what to say—I cannot tell how many weeks it is ago.

GEORGE JAMES . I was in the parlour of the White Swan on Sunday, the 2nd of April, in the room they use for their own domestic purpose—Miss Bray and her mother were with me—I took my watch out at four o'clock, while a person was knocking—I took it out again from a quarter to twenty minutes past four o'clock—for half an hour before that no one had come in or gone out.

Prisoner. Q. What time was it opened? A. At twenty minutes past four o'clock.

WILLIAM BRAY . I received a summons. I was ill in bed on the 1st and 2nd of April, and was not down till the 3rd.

Prisoner. Q. When was the first time you saw Smith after the 2nd April? A. The first time he mentioned about this was on the 8th when he appeared with my daughter and others—Mr. Broughton put it off till the following Saturday, as I was not able to attend—he put it off till the 29th, and that was the day we met together at Worship-street—I spoke to Smith about the case from my own door—I do not recollect the day of the month—my wife gave me information, and I went and spoke to him—he said that on the day you stated a person came out of my house with beer he was in Milton-street, and he took out his watch, and it was four o'clock—this was before the 29th—I knew it soon after I had the summons, which was on the 6th—I came upon the following Saturday—I knew it then—I took out a summons for Smith on the 29th, the day before he told my wife where you were, at eight minutes past four o'clock, and then I questioned him about it myself, in Long-alley when he was on duty—he sometimes drinks at my house, when off duty—the inspector came round once, when he was taking half a pint at the door—I took out a summons when I was able to attend—on the 28th of April my wife went and got a summons, and on the 29th I appeared—Smith told my wife on Saturday, the 9th or the 8th of April, as near as I can guess, that he knew where you were—I do not know why I did not have the summons on the second examination—Smith came up of his own accord—he was summoned, when I appeared.

Prisoner to SMITH. Q. How came Mr. Bray to summon you? A. He saw me at Worship-street, and told me what he was about, and I told him what I saw—I do not know how he knew it—I told him I saw you at such a place at such and such a time—this was almost a week after I saw you—my inspector wished Mr. Bray to get a summons for me—I cannot say when was the first time I went to Bray's after the 2nd of April—I told Mr. Bray of it—I did not tell Mrs. Bray.

Prisoner's Defence. I can only say I never took a false oath in my life—it is a thing that I utterly abhor—I was spoken to by a person in January, that had an action, who said, "Persons of your class are not particularlar, I will give you 10l. if you will say that you was at such a place"—it was about a bar of silver—I made up my mind what to do—I went to the King's Bench and told the whole truth—there is one very singular

thing which I never thought of, that is, I never saw Smith with a watch, and there may be a variation in clocks and watches.

MR. PHILLIPS to SMITH. Q. Was not the same allegation made against you at the office? A. Yes, and the inspector was asked if I had a watch—he said I had a very good one—here it is.

Witness for the defence.

COLLINGS. The prisoner was called by the plaintiff's counsel, in an action which I brought, and he said he was a common informer's witness, and he came there to expose the roguery and villany of the Jews—he was subpœnaed there to take a false oath against me, to prove that he was in my shop at the time of the sale of a bar of metal—I bought the bar of metal of Mr. Joseph, and the prisoner was to swear he was in my shop at the time of the sale.

COURT. Q. What was the action for? A. To get the balance of the money for the bar—I sued him for 11/. on account of the fraud—I bought the bar, but I sued him for 11l., the deficiency—I paid Mr. Joseph 21l. for the bar, and sued him for the balance, the deficiency—it did not turn out so good as it should be, and the prisoner was subpœnaed, with another informer, to say he was in my shop at the time of the tale—before Lord Denman he wanted to prove it was not the same bar I bought of him—I never saw him before.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You have never seen him since? A. Yes, once or twice since, in Wilderness-row—he asked me whether I meant to bring the Jew forward—I think I saw him last about three months ago—I have not seen him since last Saturday, when I saw him here—I was subpœnaed—I should think he knew where I lived—he has been about twice in my house—he came to know whether I meant to bring the Jew up—I told him I thought I should—I have never done it—I should think he would have been the principal witness—I have spoken to Mr. Savage, my attorney about it—I believe he has not preferred an indictment.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18370612-1582

1582. JOSEPH BARR was indicted for obtaining, by false pretences, of Orange Lemon, 1 pair of pistols, value 30s.; 1 percussion gun, value 4l.; 1 powder-flask, value 5s.; 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 watch-chain, value 6s.; and 2 seals, value 30s.; his goods.

ORANGE LEMON . I am a gunsmith. On the 10th of May the prisoner came to my shop, at Hampton-wick—he said he came from Teddington for a brace of pistols for Mr. Strachan's son—I knew Mr. Strachan, and said, "Has Mr. Strachan got a son big enough to use pistols?"—he said, "Yes"—I said, "I don't like to send pistols without his father knew of if—he said his father was present when he gave the order—the value of them was about 305.—I gave him a pair—he came the next day, about seven o'clock in the evening—the first word I said was, "How about the pistols?"—he said, "You will know all about that to-morrow; I want a percussion gun: they are going to shoot: my young master has thrown down his watch, and put his foot upon it, and he wants a watch to go to the dinner table"—I said, "What sort of a watch was it?"—he said, "Like that," pointing to one—I said, "Take it"—he had the powder-flask and the other things stated, as I thought he was Mr. Strachan'a groom—he was dressed like a groom.

JAMES MORGAN STRACHAN , Esq. I live at Teddington. I do not know the prisoner—he was never in my service—I have no son—I never sent the prisoner for these articles.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1583

1583. GEORGE WINTER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June, 18 handkerchiefs, value 1l., 15s., the goods of William Smith.

RICHARD SAMPSON . I am shopman to Mr. William Smith, a hosier, of High Holborn. The prisoner came there at eight o'clock in the morning on the 7th of June—I went into the back shop, and left him by himself—when I came out with the silk he asked for, I missed these handkerchiefs from the window—he wanted to buy the things I went for; and it he was going out I saw these handkerchiefs under his cloak—he ran into Fulwood's-rents, and I after him—he went into a door, and put these things down—he was taken as he came out—I am sure these are my master's property—I saw them ten minutes before he came in.

Prisoner. I went to the shop to ask for some sewing silk for a waistcoat, as the buttons were in holes, and as soon as I came outside, he came and hallooed, "Stop thief—I ran after the people—a man took hold of me, and said I had had some handkerchiefs, and then he went up the court, and picked up the handkerchiefs—there were many persons had them in their hands—I did not see them in the shop at all—there were more on the counter.

WILLIAM HELM . I lodge in Fulwood's-rents. I was standing at my door, about eight o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner running down the court with a bundle under his coat—he went into a private doorway—I saw him come out, and this bundle was picked up inside the door, and carried up to the shop.

Prisoner. He took me five minutes after the handkerchiefs were found.Witness. It was not more than two minutes, I took him at the corner of the court—I am sure he is the man that ran down.

JOHN SHELMARDINE . I live in Fulwood's-rents. I heard a cry of "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner run up a private passage—I looked and found this handkerchief, which I took to the shop.

Prisoner. When I was taken, six or eight all went to see if there wt» anything in the passage. Witness. There was no one went in but me—I was so close to him that he had hardly time to come out.

GUILTY Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1584

1584. MICHAEL TOOMEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 1 pair of shoes, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Clark, his master.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a shoe-maker, and live in Lamb's Conduit-street I employed the prisoner for three weeks as an errand boy—I did not order him to dispose of these shoes—they are mine.

JOHN WILLS . I am a policeman. I was called into a pawnbroker's shop on the 23rd of May—the prisoner was there—he had these shoes in b» hand to pledge—I took them and him.

Prisoner. My father was out of work.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined One Month; One Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1585

1585. HARRIETT RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June, 1 coat, value 3l., the goods of Thomas Greenaway.

MARY ANN GREENAWAY . I live in Vere-street, Clare-market my husband's name is Thomas—he is a porter. The prisoner came to me on the 5th of June—my husband's coat was there then—I got some beer—she drank with me, and wished me good morning—in half an hour I missed the coat—this is it.

JAMES GOLDER . I am a pawnbroker. The coat was pawned by the prisoner, on the 5th of June.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370612-1586

1586. JANE MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May, 1 coat, value 14s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2d.; and 1 snuff box, value 10d.; the goods of Patrick Peter MacNolty.

PATRICK PETER MACNOLTY . I live in Houlton-street. On the 28th of May I met the prisoner, and went home with her to bed—I pulled off my clothes—my coat and waistcoat—I had three or four shillings, a handkerchief, and a snuff box—it was early in the morning—I was rather sleepy—I rather think I was not drunk—it appears she left me in bed—I do not recollect whether she was in bed—she was found to be the occupier of the room at the time—I was not perfectly sober—I will swear this is my coat—there is no name about it—this portion of the lining was a little mutilated, and I got it repaired.

JOSEPH CLEMENTS (police-constable E 103.) I was on duty on Sunday morning, about half past seven o'clock—I met Marshall and another female coming out of a lodging-house in Church-lane—the prisoner had this basket in her hand—they saw me, and turned back—the prisoner went back to the stair-case, and threw the basket out of her hand—I said "What have you got there?"—she said, the other women knew nothing of it—I found this coat and the other things, in the basket, and one of the shoes on the prisoner's foot—I went and searched the rooms, and found the prosecutor fast asleep—I awoke him, and he. said they were his property.

Prisoner. I was coming down to take these things to the man—he was very much in liquor, and I took these things to a person's house to take care of—I was coming down to go to my own room where the man was.

GEORGE THORNTON (police-constable E 91.) I searched the prisoner at the station, and found this snuff box in her pocket.

GUILTY Aged 38.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1587

1587. JOHN PENDRIL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May, 46lbs. weight of lead, value 7s. 8d. to the goods of Robert Leach; and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

ROBERT LEACH . I live in Holborn-hill, and possess premises in West-street. I have lost lead from there—this corresponds exactly with mine.

OWEN REARDON . I live in West-street, Saffron-hill. I had the care of the prosecutor's factory—on the 30th of May, between five and sir o'clock in the morning, I missed some lead, and I told my wife to watch—I saw the prisoner, running with some lead—I took him, he got from me, and was stopped again—I took this lead off his shoulder—I have fitted it to the place.

HONORA REARDON . My husband told me to watch—I saw the prisoner come out of the factory with the lead, and I told my husband—he—ran took him.

BENJAMIN CATMULL . I am street-keeper of Holborn. I was on duty, and received charge of the prisoner and the lead—I saw it fitted—it is part of the factory.

GUILTY Aged 20.— Confined Six Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

ESSEX LARCENIES, &c.

Before Baron Parke.

CHARLES FISHER was attainted of rape.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370612-1588

1588. ROBERT SPICKMAN, ROBERT HARDING , and JAMES FLACK , were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June, 25lbs. weight of potatoes, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Harvey, their master.

JOSEPH SNAZELL . I am in the employ of Thomas Harvey, at Ilford, and I live at Stone Hall, Barking. On the 1st of June, the three prisoner had been employed in threshing Mr. Harvey's wheat in his barn—in consequence of some information I had received, I went up to the men when they quitted the barn—after they had locked the barn door and left it, I told them they had got some potatoes, and they should not carry them away—there is a potato barn adjoining the wheat barn—there is a partition between them, but you can get over it—I unlocked the potatoe barn, and each of the prisoners took and shook the potatoes on the heap—one had them in his basket, another in his hat, and the other under his arm—there were a very few pounds—I found 1/2 of a cwt. removed from the potato barn into the wheat barn, and it was from the wheat barn they came when I stopped them—none of them had any business to remove them—they had been working near the spot where the potatoes were found.

JOSEPH SNAZELL, JUN . I am the son of Joseph Snazell. On Thursday, the 1st of June, I was at Stone Hall—I saw Robert Harding takes basket, and go to the heap, fill it full of potatoes, and give it over the partition to James Flack, into the wheat barn—I was standing in the cow-house adjoining the barn—Spickman was not in the barn then—that was one o'clock—they were stopped in the evening—I did not see the potatoes after they were brought back.

Spickman. I was packing hay in the stack-yard at the time. Witness. Yes, he was in the stack-yard at the time, which is four or five rods from the barn—he could not see what was going on.

Harding. We had half-a-dozen I suppose, that was all we had.

(The prisoner Flack received a good character.)

SPICKMAN— GUILTY.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor. — Confined One Week.

HARDING— GUILTY .

FLACK— GUILTY .

Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370612-1589

1589. EDWARD DOBREE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May, 1 pair of trowsers, value 22s., the goods of Edwin Melvin.

JOHN WEBSTER . I live at Barking, in Essex, and am the owner of a fishing-smack. On Friday, the 5th of May, I got up and called the lads at two o'clock in the morning—the prisoner was on liking as an apprentice—I was going on the coast of Holland—about three o'clock I missed the prisoner, and about eight I missed the trowsers—I have never found them.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Whose trowsers were they? A. Edwin Melvin's, the apprentice—he has been gone to sea about three weeks—he did not attend at the police-office—I took care of the boy's clothes, and

brushed them, and put them away—I saw them when he pulled them off over night—I have not seen them since.

GEORGE WILLIAM RAINBOW . I am a constable of Barking. I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of May, at Romford, in Essex, about six miles from Barking—I asked him if he had been to London, and understood he had not—the next morning before the Magistrate, he at first denied taking the trowsers—it was not taken down—the clerk is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370612-1590

1590. THOMAS BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May, 2 bells, value 15s., the goods of James William Morrison, and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution, JAMES BROOK. I am a watchman at Snaresbrook. About two o'clock, on the morning of the 10th of May, I was on duty—there was an alarm at Mr. Lennox's—I went towards there, and saw two men coming from the place—I stopped the prisoner, who was one of them, and the other ran sway—I found this bell in the prisoner's left hand, and this piece of a gunbarrel in his right—I locked him up, and next morning a sack and six bells were found a little way from where I took him.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the other man come back? Witness. No—he would not let me take hold of him.

RICHARD HAYWARD . I am servant to James William Morrison. We bad some bells fixed at our premises on the night of the 9th of May—I missed two at a quarter past six o'clock next morning, and while the gardener and I were examining the footsteps, Brooks brought seven bells—this is one of them—it had been fixed inside the fence which surrounds the premises—the paling is about eight feet high.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down to Lee Bridge, and saw two men—they told me if I went near them they would knock my brains out—they went away, and there was this bell and piece of gun-barrel—I took them up.

JOHN ROWE . I got this certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, from Mr. Parker, the Clerk of the Peace at Chelmsford—(read)—I was present at the prisoner's trial, and took him on the charge—he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1591

1591. THOMAS KIMBLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June, 1 pair of breeches, value 6s. to the goods of Charles Worley.

JOHN HONEY . I am shopman to Charles Worley, of Stratford. On Saturday morning, the 10th of June, I was in the shop, and heard a cry of "Stop thief"—I ran out, and saw the prisoner making his escape, with this pair of breeches—they have my master's mark on them—he dropped them—I overtook him, and gave him into custody.

Prisoner. I saw them on the path, and took them up. Witness They were out of doors, on a shelf—we keep a boy outside the door, but lie had turned his back—the prisoner was running, and gave me a good run to overtake him.

GUILTY. Aged 13.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined One Month; Seven days Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1592

1592. PETER BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January, I gown, value 15s.; 1 scarf, value 4s.; 1 watch, value 1l. 10s.; jackets, value 1l.; and 2 shirts, value 5s.; the goods of James Stone.

JAMES STONE . I live in Water-works row, Stratford. The prisoner lived with me seven years ago—we were both at work in the West India docks—I sent him home to get a fire, my wife being out at work—I came home at night, and missed the things, and the prisoner too—my two children were locked in-doors—they let me in—I never saw the prisoner again till I saw him in the West India docks, and took him—he had made a voyage to China—he told my wife he would make it good.

WILLIAM PEATLING (police-constable K 264.) I took the prisoner—he said, "I am guilty of the charge of stealing the watch and other things; I sold them at Stratford, and spent the money with a woman."

Prisoner. I said a woman in Stratford had taken them away. Witness. No—you said you took them. Prisoner's Defence. While I lived with the prosecutor there was a female in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to see him—she had to pass as a relation of his, and took a great deal of liberty about the house—she came and took out these things—she asked me to go and partake of some beer and gin, which I did—on that same day I shipped for the East Indies—I was there fifteen months—when I returned I went to the prosecutor's wife—she told me what had happened, and I gave her half-a-crown, to pay for a week's lodging—I promised to call and give her some money, as a compensation for the things, but I got merry-making, lost my money, and was ashamed to go back.

GUILTY . Aged 50.— Confined Six Months.

KENT LARCENIES,&c.

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370612-1593

1593. THOMAS W. RIGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May, 1 coat, value 6s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 5s.; and 1 hat, value 5s.; the goods of Mordecai Bernard.

MORDECAI BERNARD . My father keeps a clothes-shop at Woolwich. On 12th May, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, three artillerymen came into the shop—the prisoner was one of them, and Smith, a soldier, was there—he said nothing, but one of the other two said, "I have brought a soldier who is discharged, and he has got his discharge—he said, "I want a suit of plain clothes for him"—I took up a suit, and said, "This comes to 2l. 10s."—he said he wanted one about 15s., and said he wished to try them on, which he did, and the two soldiers said they would fit him—Smith then said, "I cannot stop here, I shall go into the country to my father and mother"—I said, "If you like the clothes, pay for them; if not, take them off"—he said, "I have not got enough to pay my passage—will you take the regimental clothes in exchange?"—I refused to do so, and he said, "I see you are afraid to take them"—I said "Am I? if you like to go with me to the barracks, and the officer will give me leave, I will take them"—he said he would go with me there—I went with him, and he shook hands with several soldiers by the cage—he went into a public-house with me, and had something to drink—I said, "Now, it is time to go"—in about a quarter of an hour, he said, "No, I shall not go yet—I shall stop here and have a whole"—I said at last, "I will make you go, if you

don't like"—he said, "Come along"—it was nearly dark then—he kept looking about—I said, "What are you looking for?"—he said, "I am looking for two friends more, to shake hands with them"—I said I could not stop any longer—he said, "If you think I am a rogue, go and ask my character at the barracks"—he then ran away with my clothes on—I ran after him, and the prisoner pushed me against the wall, and kept me there while Smith ran away, then he looked in my face, and said, "Go and look for him now"—he kept me against the wall till Smith had run away—I have never seen him since, nor the clothes—my father took the regimental things to the barracks.

Prisoner. Q. Did I run away? Witness. A. No—Smith ran away—I could not take you, there were too many soldiers about—I did not tell the Magistrate that the man left the regimentals in place of the clothes—when I said I should inquire into his character, you said, "You won't find him any more, and you will get into trouble."

ROBERT MARSH . I am sergeant-major of the Royal Artillery. The prisoner was a gunner in that regiment on the 12th of May—I knew Waller Smith, a gunner—he had not obtained his discharge that day—he was absent from parade that day, and the prisoner also, with another man—Smith has deserted—he has not obtained his discharge—the prisoner returned to his barracks at a quarter past seven o'clock that night, and was confined in the barracks; and Mordecai's father came, and brought Smith's regimentals with him—the prisoner was shown to the witness with five others next morning, and he pointed him out as the man who held him against the wall.

Prisoner. He picked me out from only one other—I certainly went out with the man, but he left me at half-past two o'clock.

GUILTY. Aged 20.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18370612-1594

1594. HENRY DOLLARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 1 tobacco-purse, value 8s., the goods of Joseph Roselli.

JOSEPH ROSELLI (through an interpreter.) I live in Soho-square, and am a doctor of law. I was at Greenwich on the 17th of May, at seven o'clock in the afternoon—I had a tobacco-purse in my side-pocket—I felt somebody touch my pocket—I turned round, and saw the prisoner with my purse in his hand—he let it fall on the ground—I collared him, and called the policeman, who took him.

WILLIAM PULLEY . I am an officer. On Wednesday, a little before seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Greenwich fair in private clothes—I saw the prisoner, who was in company with two others, follow the prosecutor and another, and attempt their pockets several times—at last I saw the prisoner extracting the purse from the prosecutor's pocket—he dropped it, and I collared him—the prosecutor came and snatched the purse from me, and called, "Police," not knowing I was a policeman.

Prisoner's Defence. He says I took it out, and dropped it—the prosecutor says he saw it in my hand—I did not pick the gentleman's pocket—my father is head waiter at Green's hotel.

GUILTY . Aged 20— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1595

1595. WILLIAM WARD was indicted for embezzlement.

WILLIAM HOLBECH . I am a milkman. The prisoner carried my milk out, and received money for me—he was to settle with me every night when he was paid.

HANNAH WALKER . I am servant to Mrs. Collins, who took in milk of the prosecutor. On the 16th of May I paid the prisoner 1s. 1d., and on the 7th 1s. 2d.—I do not know whether I paid him any thing on the 1st of May, but every week before the 7th I paid him—he never gave me any bill—I always pay him weekly—he gave me no receipt.

WILLIAM HOLBECH re-examined. I manage my business entirely myself—he did not account to me for these sums at any time—I sent in the bill, and discovered it was paid—he was about four months in my service I gave him 8s. a week, and a trifle besides—he was a very lazy fellow, and I offered to double his wages if he behaved well—I often said to him, "Did so and so pay?"—I never spoke to him about these particular sums.

Prisoner. I worked from half-past four o'clock in the morning till near eleven or twelve o'clock at night, and worked as hard as I could.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1596

1596. WILLIAM WARD was again indicted for embezzlement.

WILLIAM HOLECC . I am a milkman. The prisoner was in my service, and received money on my account—he never paid me this money received from Mr. Walker—I have asked him questions why these sums run so, because they were paid regularly when I used to go myself.

Prisoner. I was never asked any thing at all about it.

HANNAH WALKER . On the 10th of May I paid the prisoner 1s. 2d.; on the 15th, 5s.2d.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1597

1597. THOMAS JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May, two pairs of shoes, value 6s. by the goods of James Oliver.

THOMAS BAYLEY . On the 27th of May I was passing over Deptfordbridge, and saw the prisoner trying to pull the shoes down from James Oliver, the prosecutor's door-post—he took out a knife and cut the string, and put them under his jacket—I ran in and informed the young man, who pursued him, calling "Stop thief," and overtook him—he took them from under his jacket, and threw them into the road.

JOHN AUSTIN . I am in the employ of Mr. Oliver. I went in pursuit of the prisoner—he threw the shoes down—I took them up—these are them.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Six Weeks.

Reference Number: t18370612-1598

1598. DAVID FORBES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May, at Eltham, 1 sheep, price 20s., the property of William Morris.—2nd COUNT, for killing, with intent to steal the carcase.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

RICHARD MORRIS . My father, William Morris, is a farmer, living at Eltham, in Kent. He had a quantity of sheep on his farm—I had the care of them—I counted them on Saturday, the 20th of May, about eleven or twelve o'clock in the morning, and found them all right then—I did not see any more of them till the Monday morning, about eleven o'clock—when I counted them, and missed one—on looking about, I found the skin, breast, neck, and feet in a shed—I took possession of them—Barry, the police man, came to me on the Tuesday, and compared two shoulders, which he brought, to the skin, in my presence—they corresponded entirely—I am satisfied they must belong to the same sheep—the two feet were left in

the skin, and the bone corresponded and fitted—there was blood in the shed in the field, as if it had been killed there—I had no mark on the skin.

JAMES PARRY (police-constable R 8.) On Sunday morning, the 21st of May, I was on duty at Deptford, and saw the prisoner about four o'clock in the morning, carrying a cloth containing two shoulders of mutton—I stopped him, and asked what he had—he said, "Meat"—I asked where he had got it—he said he had bought it, and directly afterwards he said, "My brother bought it for me at Woolwich"—I took him to the station-house—the meat was scarcely cold then, and not cut up as a butcher would; and there was some blood on the knee of his trowsers, which appeared fresh—I went to his brother at Woolwich, in consequence of what he told me, and told him what he said to me—I afterwards went to the prosecutor's house, and took the mutton, and was shown the skin with the feet—I fitted them together—they corresponded, and 1 have not the slightest doubt of their belonging to the same sheep.

CHIISTOPHER SAMUELS . I am a butcher. I saw the mutton in question, and the skin of the sheep—I compared them—they fitted exactly—it is mangled, and cut very badly, and has been cut off as soon it was killed—I have not a doubt of it being the same.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for life.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370612-1599

1599. PETER HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May, 1 pair of shoes, value 2s.; 2 cravats value 2d.; 1 neck-cloth, value 3d.; and 1 pad, value 1/2 d.; the goods of Justin M'Carthy.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

JUSTIN M'CARTHY . I am a pensioner at Greenwich-hospital—the prisoner was also a pensioner there. I missed my shoes on the 25th or 26th of May, in the morning—I had put them close to my bedside the night before with two handkerchiefs and a pad, which hung over a nob at the foot of my bed—I missed them when I got up about five or six o'clock in the morning—the prisoner does not belong to our ward, he slept over our ward, but he could have come down into it.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . On the 26th of May, about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in the chalk-ward where there are some lockers—I saw him go to No. 49 locker, take something out, and put under his coat, and look about, and then go away—in consequence of suspicion I had, I called the firemen, and we went to the locker, and saw two pairs of shoes, and two handkerchiefs, and a pad in it.

Prisoner. I had left some bread and meat in the locker to give to some poor person, and that was what I took out.

COURT. Q. Did he take bread and meat out? A. No; the locker was common to every body—it had no lock on it—I am sure 1 went to the same locker as he took the things out of.

JAMES HUNT . I am a seaman. On the 26th of May I was at the Nelson public-house, Deptford, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon—the prisoner came there and offered a pair of shoes for sale to several persons, who declined buying them—he came to me—I refused to buy them, but he followed me out of the house, and I gave him a shilling for them.

Prisoner. They are not the shoes I sold him—they belonged to myself. Witness. I am sure I gave the officer the same shoes as I bought of him—it was the same evening—I had no other pair—I had only come from sea that morning.

BENJAMIN LOVELL . I am an officer. I produce two black silk handkerchiefs and the shoes, which I received from James Hunt—I took the prisoner into custody at the College that day—he told me all the shoes were found that he had stolen them in consequence of keeping bad company, and he had only sold one pair to a sailor—Bidgood gare me the things.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD re-examined. They are what I found in the locker—I left them in charge of John Hopkins when I found them—this handkerchief has the mark of the man's ward on it—I noticed it at the time, and the pad—we are ordered to take any thing we find to the main-guard, which I did; but before that I sent for M'Carthy, and showed them to him.

Prisoner. That man and I had a row about two months ago, and he said he would be revenged on me; it is a scheme laid to trap me. Witness. On my oath, I never had an angry word with him in my life.

JUSTIN M'CARTHY . I never quarrelled with the man, nor spoke a word to him, till he committed the robbery—I never had a row with him in the Park—this handkerchief and pad are what I lost from the foot of the bed—I have the College mark on this—I remember Bidgood showing me the handkerchief he found in the locker—these are mine, I am certain—there is only a worsted string in one of these shoes, and I drove all these nails in myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I know I am innocent—I sold a pair of shoes of mine to the sailor—I put some bread and meat into the locker No. 42, not 49—it is a trap laid for me—there is a great animosity in the College.

GUILTY . Aged 52.— Confined Twelve Months.

(There were two other indictments against the prisoner.)

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370612-1600

1600. EDWARD ASHTON, THOMAS WALTON , and JOHN BRIGHTON , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May, 24lbs. weight of hay, value 1s. 6d., the goods of George Matthew Hoare and others, their masters.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

BENJAMIN LOVELL (police-constable R 15.) On the 25th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was on duty in New Crotss-road, Deptford, and saw a brewer's dray drawn by three horses—it stopped at the Marquis of Granby—Walton was driving, and Ashton was on the side—when it stopped, Ashton tried to get some hay out from between two butts, and Walton held a butt on one side—Ashton threw the hay into the road, Brighton came and took it up, put it into the stable, and locked it up—brother officer came, and we watched for about half an hour—I saw a man go and speak to Brighton—we went and asked him for the clover which was taken from the dray—he said there was none—I said there was—I took him down the road, and told him to unlock the door, which he did, and I pointed it out, lying on the right hand side—he said it had been there the whole of the day—I sent Walton for Ashton, and asked him if he had any clover on the dray—he said he had—I said, "Do you know where it is?"—he said, "No"—I said, "I am certain you do; you were here when the man took it away"—he then said he thought the man was going to feed the horses with it—the horses remained in the dray, and were not fed with it—I said I should take them into custody—Ashton

asked me if I could not make it up—I said I had only one way of doing my duty, and that was taking them to the station-house, which I did.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. It was quite light? A. Yes—the dray remained there an hour and a half altogether—the horses were eating some rubbish which Walton took up from the ground.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Where was Ashton? A. On the dray—I pointed to the clover when he came out, and he said there was clover, and that was it, and he wanted to seize it to take it away—he had hold of it—after it was thrown down he and Walton went to the front of the public-house and sat down—Ashton said to Brighton, "You have got me into a pretty scrape, I thought you were going to feed the horses."

COURT. Q. Did they see Brighton carry it into the stable? A. They must, for they stood in the path till he took it in and locked the door, and they spoke to him after he came out.

JOHN WALKER (police-constable R 182.) I was with Lovell—I went to the Marquis of Granby, and asked Brighton what he had done with the clover which he took from the dray—he denied all knowledge of it, and said he had taken nothing away—Lovell said, "I will soon show you where it is," and he pointed it out to him in the stable—I went into the tap-room, and saw Ashton and Walton there—I said I wanted them—they said "What for"—I said "Where is the clover that was on the dray"—they both said they had no clover at all—I took them to Lovell, and Ashton begged him to let him have the clover and make it up, and asked what he should give us.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Have you been stationed there long? A. Five weeks—Brighton was only there for that day as ostler.

HENRY WILLIS . I am horse-keeper to George Matthew Hoare, and his partners. On the 25th of May, when Ashton went out, I gave him some clover for the three horses to eat—Walton was occasionally employed by my masters—this is the same sort of clover, but I could not swear to it—the dray was going to Woolwich—Walton was not at work for the firm—I suppose Ashton employed him.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How long has Ashton been in the employ? A. Eight or nine years.

(Brighton received a good character.)

ASHTON— GUILTY . Aged 33. BRIGHTON— GUILTY . Aged 53

Recommended to mercy.

Confined two months.

WALTON— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1601

1601. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 1 teapot, value 1s. 3d.; 2 knives, value 8d.; and 1 fork, value 4d.; the goods of James Preston: 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; and 1 apron, value 4d.; the goods of Elizabeth Taylor . To which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 67.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370612-1602

1602. CATHERINE BRENNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May, 1 spoon, value 7s.; the goods of John Ely, her master.

MARIA ANN ELY . I am the wife of John Ely, a builder, in London-street, Greenwich. The prisoner came into my service on the 15tu of May, and on the 30th I was obliged to put her out on account of getting tipsy and annoying the house—I missed this spoon.

ROBERT HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bermondsey-street. On Wednesday afternoon, the 31st of May, the prisoner pawned this spoon.

Prisoner. My mistress examined my box, and said she would be revenged on me—I went next morning and took my box, and when I opened it the first thing was this spoon—I did not know how it came then—I pledged it, but intended to return it again.

MRS. ELY re-examined. I did not put the spoon into her box.

JOHN GARDINER (police-constable R 63.) The prisoner was given into my custody—I found some duplicates on her.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1603

1603. MARY WILLIAMS and JANE MORRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June, 6 printed books, value 9s.; the goods of Prudence Rock and another.

PRUDENCE ROCK . I am single, and keep a stationer's shop in London-street, Greenwich, in partnership with my sister. Last Tuesday the the prisoners came and asked for a toy for a child—I had these books at the time—I had been showing them—I am sure they are mine—I did not sell them. SARAH WILLIAMS. I am the wife of Charles Williams, a pawnbroker, in Trafalgar-row. On the 6th of June the prisoners offered some books-they were taken into custody, and these books were found on them at tile station-house.

CATHERINE CUNNINGHAM . I searched the prisoners, and found these books on Williams.

WILLIAMS— GUILTY .

MORRIS— GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1604

1604. MARY WILLIAMS and JANE MORRIS were again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June, 1 pair of boots, value 10s.; the goods of James Oliver; and that Williams had been before convicted of felony.

JAMES HOSKINS . I live with James Oliver. On the 6th of June the two prisoners came, but did not buy any thing—when they were gone I missed this pair of boots.

SARAH WILLIAMS . The prisoners offered me these boots in pledge—I had suspicion and stopped them.

JAMES AYTON (police-constable K 22.) I produce a certificate of Wiliams's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark—(read)—she is the person.

WILLIAMS— GUILTY . Aged 17.

MORRIS— GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370612-1605

1605. HENRY HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June, 1 shirt, value 2s.; the goods of Edward Crew; and that he had been, before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM DYKE (police-constable R 100.) On the 8th of June, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, I fell in with the prisoner in Greenwich-road, about five or six yards from the prosecutor's—I searched him and found he had a shirt on over his own—he said he had it given him at Chatham.

ELIZABETH CREW . I am the wife of Edward Crew, a labourer in Greenwich-road. This shirt is my grandson's, and belongs to my husband—I hung it out in the back garden, on Wednesday afternoon, the 7th of June.

MARY SKINNER . I live with Mrs. Crew. I went to take in a gown at eleven o'clock that night, and the shirt was there then.

JOHN STEPHENSON (police-constable R 56.) I saw tire prisoner in London-street, Greenwich, about one o'clock that night, standing in a doorway—I searched him by my sergeant's orders, and he had nothing on him then—he said he had come from Gravesend and had no place to sleep.

Prisoner. I had the shirt given me at Gravesend.

CHARLES DAWSON . I am a watchman of Woolwich. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was a witness on the trial—he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1606

1606. WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June, 25 yards of lining, value, 2s.; the goods of John Jacobs; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1607

1607. RICHARD TABERNACLE was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MESSRS. BODKIN and CHAMBERS, conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES JOHN FLEMING . On the 16th of May I had a toy-stall at Greenwich fair—the prisoner came with another man and two women—she bought two penny trumpets—he paid for one with a penny-piece, and the other he gave half-a-crown for—I saw my wife give him the change—after they were gone from the stall my wife gave me the half-crown, I marked it, and gave it to the policeman—I saw the prisoner the day after when he was taken, and am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Have you always said you received the half-crown from him? A. Yes—I pointed him out at the police-office—I had no other half-crown.

SARAH ANN FLEMING . I am the prosecutor's wife. He served the trumpets—1 did not observe who gave me the half-crown—I was standing with my back to him—I gave the same half-crown to my husband.

GEORGE KEMP (police-constable N 82.) On the 17th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was on duty in Greenwich Park in plain clothes—I observed three women who I knew—I watched them go to the Park-gate and join three men—the prisoner was one—they went into a tea-house in Fish-lane—I told my brother officer to take the prisoner, which he did, and found two bad half-crowns and one good one in his breast-pocket—the other two men made their escape, and I took the three women.

WILLIAM CLAY (police-constable K 278.) I took the prisoner, and found two counterfeit half-crowns, one good one, and a half-sovereign in his watch-fob, and three good shillings, and fivepemce in copper, in his breeches-pocket—1 told him what I took him for—he said he took the money on board a steamer.

JOHN FIELD . I am Inspector of coin to the Mint. These three half-crowns are all counterfeit, and all cast in the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18370612-1608

1608. JAMES FORSTER was indicted for a misdemeanor.

Messrs. CHAMBERS and SHEA conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS HUMPHREY . On the evening of the 22d of May, about six or

seven o'clock, I was at the Golden Lion, at Sydenham—some persons were playing at "knock'em-down"—I was betting with the prisoner and won 10l. at first—he gave me a bad shilling—I did not know it was bad then, and gave him twopence—I put it into my pocket, where I had only one good shilling—I won eightpence the next time, he gave me another bad shilling, and I gave him fourpence—I put that shilling into my pocket with the other—I won twopence more, he gave me another bad shilling, and I gave him ten pence, I put that into the same pocket—I then went over to the Dolphin, pulled out the money, and found it was bad—I went back to the Golden Lion with the constable and took the prisoner.

WILLIAM HALL . I was at the Golden Lion when the prosecutor won the three shillings—I saw the prisoner pay him three shillings in succession, and the prosecutor gave him the change—I am sure he paid him in shillings.

Prisoner. The first I paid him was sixpence.

CHARLES HOBY . Humphrey came to the Dolphin to play at" knock'emdown"—he threw down a shilling, I said it was bad, he took out two others, which were also bad—we then went to the Golden Lion and found the prisoner.

CHARLES ATKINS . I am a constable of Lewisham. I found the prisoner in the parlour at the Golden Lion, with a man named Doyle—I was going to search the prisoner, and observed his hands go to his pocket—he dropped this counterfeit shilling from his hand, which I picked up—I also searched Doyle, and found one good shilling and sixpence, and some coppers on him, and one counterfeit shilling in his trowsers. I received these three shillings from Humphrey—he marked them in my presence before I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner. There were seven or eight people in the parlour—the shilling did not drop from me. Witness. I am certain he dropped it—Hoby saw it as well as me.

MR. FIELD. I have examined these—they are all counterfeit, and all produced from the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1609

1609. BENJAMIN PHILLIPS was indicted for embezzlement.

RACHELL PERSHOUSE . My husband's name is William. He supplies Greenwich and other places with milk—the prisoner was in our employ between three and four years—it was his duty to carry out milk and to sell it—when he received money it was his duty to pay me the same day every time he went out—when he made out bills, he was to receive them.

SARAH MILLER . I live with Mr. Woods, in Stock well-street, Greenwich—I paid the prisoner on the 25th of March—I used to pay him 1s. 2d. a week—I paid him sometimes 3s. 6d., sometimes 2s. 4d., and sometimes weekly; but I never let it go over three weeks—I paid him at different times to the amount of £1 5s.—the last payment was 3s. 6d. on the 5th of March, for three weeks—he then left his place, and never came afterwards.

ELIZABETH TOZER . I am in the prosecutor's service. It was my duty to settle this milk account—I remember the account of Mr. Wood—there was two guineas due—I frequently asked the prisoner about it, and he said it was not paid—he left the service without notice about three weeks ago—he went out on the Sunday evening, and never came back.

THOMAS MUDDAMS . I am servant to Mr. Penhouse. I slept with the prisoner—he used to take the milk out—I have seen him receive money—he always went to Mr. Wood's by himself—he never gave me any money to keep—when I received money for the milk I gave it to the prisoner—he said if I did not give it him there would be a blow up, and I gave it him because he should not get into trouble—he said he would give it me again when he received his wages—I received more money in the same way, one week 1s. 2d. and 2s. 4d. another week; I paid that again, and borrowed 3s. 6d. of the carman.

JAMES MURRAY FRAZER (police-constable R 151.) I took the prisoner, and asked him how this was; had he received the money—he told me had, and that he gave it to Mrs. Pershouse; and afterwards before the Magistrate he confessed he had kept all the money with the exception of a half-crown.

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Confined Three Months.

SURREY LARCENIES, &c.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370612-1610

1610. HENRY MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Orlando Webb, from his person.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

ORLANDO WEBB . I am a solicitor, and live in Upper Stamford-street. I went over London Bridge, at a quarter before four o'clock, on the 17th of May—just before I came to the centre of the bridge I felt some one pull my coat—I turned, put my hand on my pocket, and missed my handkerchief—I looked and saw the prisoner and a companion of his behind me—the companion went away, and I saw the prisoner had something up his back—I said, "Now give me my handkerchief—he put his hand up his back and gave it to me—I gave it to the officer—this it my handkerchief.

FRANCIS MACDONALD (police-constable M 184.) I took the prisoner into custody, by desire of Mr. Webb—he gave me this handkerchief.

Prisoner. The gentleman took the handkerchief away that night, and brought it in the morning again.

ORLANDO WEBB re-examined. I kept it till I went to the officer the next day, and then gave it to the officer—it is the same handkerchief—I had not parted with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to meet a friend, and saw two boys going behind the gentleman, they dropped the handkerchief. I took it up, and was putting it into my pocket, when he took me—I know nothing of the boys or the men either—I have travelled about the country as a broom-hawker.

MR. WEBB re-examined. There was one boy with him—he turned backand went over to the Borough—I turned instantly when I felt the pull at my pocket—there was no one near enough to take it, but the prisoner or his companion.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1611

1611. WILLIAM SKATES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, 88lbs. weight of sugar, value 2l. 10s., the goods of Thomas Bailey, his master.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am carman, in the service of Mr. Thomas Bailey, ✗ carrier; he keeps wagons in Cannon-street. On the 24th of May he directed me to go the West India docks for five hogsheads of sugar, which 1 took to Chamberlain's Wharf, Borough—the prisoner followed my wagen there—he is in the employ of Bailey's house also, and drives a cart—I gave him a hogshead to take to Mr. Clarkson, in the Strand—I saw it put into his cart; it was in a good state—the tin was over the drawing-hole—I saw no tools nor bag in his cart.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you examine the cart before the hogshead was put in? A. Certainly not.

GEORGE CLARK . I am a grocer, and live in Brick-lane, Bethnal-green. On the 24th of May I was over the water, and saw the prisoner with a cart and a hogshead of sugar, and a tarpauling over it—I saw the cart stop in Park-street, and three men with it, the prisoner and two others—they got into the cart—I am sure the prisoner was in the cart—they were shoving the hogshead about—one had hold of one end of it and the other the other,✗ working it to and fro—my suspicions were excited by this—I afterward spoke to a policeman, and came up to the cart in Robert-street—the wagon could get round out of that street into the Blackfriars-road—that is not the regular way to the Strand—the regular way is up Holland-street—when the policeman and I made our appearance the three men ran away.

Cross-examined. Q. Could a man go through Robert-street to go to Waterloo Bridge, coming from the Borough? A. He could—the prisoner was driving with the whip, and stopped in Park-street—it was half an hour before he came to the Golden Lion, in Gravel-lane—I cannot say how long he stopped in Park-street, for I passed on—I am certain the prisoner was one of the three who got into the cart.

JONAS WALSH (police-constable N 211.) On the 24th of May, I was in the Blackfriars road and saw George Clark—I went to Robert-street—it is a thoroughfare, but it is seldom there are any carts there—I saw a cart there, and the prisoner with it—I did not see any body else—as soon as the prisoner saw me he threw down the whip and ran away—I ran after him but was not able to take him—we took the cart to the station-house and found a bag with 88lbs. of sugar in it—I examined the hogshead and found the tin which goes over the drawing hole removed—I saw a piece of hoop, pincers, and other things found by Maynard.

JAMES MAYNARD . I am in the service of Mr. Bailey, the prosecutor. I saw this hogshead of sugar—it was in master's care on the morning of the 25th—I found the hogshead of sugar in the cart with the iron hoop and a pair of pincers—I saw the hogshead weighed—the deficiency was 3qrs. 14lbs.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 24.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Baron Parke.

Reference Number: t18370612-1612

1612. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May, 1 metal cock, value 1s.; 1 press handle, value 3s.; and 8lbs. of brass, value 6s., the goods of Thomas Carle, his master.

THOMAS CARLE . I am a smith and engineer, and live at Lambeth. On Thursday, the 27th of May, I had some old metal cocks and other things—I did not miss them till the policeman came about five o'clock on Sunday afternoon—it was a lot of old brass—it was useful, but was put away

as old, but some of it was new—I had seen it in the shop about the middle of the day on the 27th—the prisoner worked for me—the brass was produced to me by the policeman on Sunday—it is my property.

EDWARD CHARLES COOKE . I am a policeman. I was on duty at Lambeth on the 28th of May at five o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner with a bag containing these articles—I stopped him and asked what he had there—he would not satisfy me—I turned it out, and found it was metal—I asked where he was going with it—he said, "Down there"—I asked where he got it—he said, he brought it from Lambeth.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1613

1613. AMELIA HEDSMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May, 18 sheets, value 4l. 10s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d.; 36 towels, value 18s.; 5 bolster cases, value 10s.; 10 pillow cases, value 10s.; 1 bed cover, value 12s.; 4 toilet covers, value 8s.; 4 table'cloths, value 1l.; 3 night gowns, value 12s.; 12 pairs of socks, value 1l. 4s.; 1 brooch, value 2l.; ring, value 1l.; 1 guard chain, value 10s.; and 1 key, value 1d., the goods of Hector Henderson.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

MARY ANN HENDERSON . I am the daughter of Mrs. Norris, of Unionplace, Lambeth. I was staying with her in May last—the prisoner was her servant—while I was there I lost nine pairs of sheets, twenty-four towels, and a variety of articles, as stated in the indictment—I am the wife of Hector Henderson—the things were kept in my father's room—the prisoner had access to the room—I missed the key of the box where the things were—it was taken off my ring—I saw her searched, and heard something drop from her, and found it was my key.

JAMES WILD . I am a policeman. In consequence of information I took the prisoner into custody at Deptford fair—I told her I took her for robbing her mistress—she said she acknowledged having the linen, but knew nothing of the jewellery—I produce a key of the linen chest which was given to me, and a pair of kid gloves which were taken from her.

JOSEPH PARKER . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a gold brooch pawned at my shop, on the 10th of April, by the prisoner for 8s.—I made particular inquiry whether it was her own—I am certain of her—I have one sheet, pawned by her, which related to another indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written.) "I have a mother in great distress, with five children—my family are respectable, and I always bore a good character—when the prosecutrix accused me of the crime, she promised me forgiveness—I have paid her for part of the things, and my friends have offered to pay her for the rest."

GUILTY Aged 15.— Transported for Seven Years.

(The prosecutrix stated the prisoner had previously robbed her to a large amount, and she had forgiven her.)

Before Mr. Baron Parke.

Reference Number: t18370612-1614

1614. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June, 1 gelding, price 4l., the property of Daniel Lewis.

WILLIAM LEWIN . I am in the employ of Daniel Lewis, a farmer, in the parish of Camberwell. Last Saturday, the 3rd of June, I took his cattle down to a field, and among the rest a horse—the field was enclosed all

round, and the gate locked—there were two cart horses in the field before—I saw them there at six o'clock in the morning—I went to the field again at ten o'clock at night, and found the gate open, and this cart-horse missing—it was a gelding—I saw it again the next day (Sunday) at Gedden's.

JAMES GEDDEN . I am a licensed horse-slaughterer. On the 3rd of June I bought an old horse of Williams, between six and seven o'clock in the evening—it was claimed by the prosecutor's man on Sunday morning.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I was hawking brooms on Saturday, the 3rd of June, at New Cross, about a mile from Camberwell, about a quarter-past five o'clock, and saw the prisoner with a cart-horse—I asked him if he wished to sell it—he said "Yes"—I asked where he brought the horse from—he said, from Mr. Sewell's, of Beckenham—I asked his own name—he said, "Thomas Beck," which I wrote down—he asked 30s. for the horse—I agreed to give him 25s., which I paid him in two half-sovereigns and 5s. in halfpence—I sold it to Geddens the same afternoon—I am sure he said he brought it to sell for Sewell of Beckenham.

JOHN KINGSBURY . I deal in shrubs. I was in Lordship-lane on Saturday afternoon, the 3rd of June, about a quarter before five o'clock, and saw three or four horses in Mr. Lewis's field, and saw the prisoner lead a horse from the field—I saw him in the field, and when 1 got up to the gate, he came out of the gate, leading a brown blind cart-horse—1 asked him if it was going to be killed—he said, "Yes"—I asked him if it was for sale—he said, "Not exactly," it was not his—I am sure he is the man, to the best of my recollection—he went towards Sydenham—you can go to New Cross by the way he went—I saw a man named Giles before the Magistrate, produced by the prisoner—I am certain Giles was not the man who brought the horse out.

WILLIAM LEWIN . The horse was brown and blind—we had no other brown horse in that field that was blind—the prisoner was taken on the Friday following.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the horse from a man of the name of Giles—he met me, and asked if I would sell his horse for him—he said he had bought it, and I went, and took him the money—the clock struck six as I got into the steam-carriage at Deptford.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Life.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

Reference Number: t18370612-1615

1615. SARAH MARY CRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May, 1 blanket, value 4s.; 1 quilt, value 3s.; 2 pillows, value 6s.; and 1 tablecloth, value 2s.; the goods of John Munday.

MARY MUNDAY . I am the wife of John Munday, and keep a lodging-house in Princes-court, Commercial-road. The prisoner and a man lodged with us—the man went away about eight o'clock in the morning on Saturday, the 13th of May, and the prisoner left about eight o'clock in the evening, and never returned—she left the room locked—on Tuesday I opened the door, and missed the things stated—I had seen them there on Saturday, after the man had left.

HENRY BROWN . I am in the service of Mr. Turner, a pawnbroker, at Lambeth. I have two pillow-cases which were pawned, one on the 6th of May, and one on the 12th, and a blanket on the 4th, by Woodley I believe.

HANNAH WOODLEY . I live in Bond-street, Commercial-road. I know the prisoner—I received some duplicates from her two or three weeks before she was taken—I gave them to Fuller the officer—I was with her probably, when the things were pawned at Turner's, as I went several times with her to pawn articles—I did not know but they were her own—I pawned a shawl and gown for her myself—I know nothing about the pillows and blanket, but I may have been with her when they were pledged.

Prisoner. She was with me when I took the room, and knows I was in distress—she pawned the pillows and blanket for me, and 1 did not receive all the money.

HENRY BRITTAIN . I am in the service of Mr. Higginbotham, a pawnbroker. I have a table cloth, pawned by the prisoner, on the 28th of April—I have seen her once or twice before, and have not the slightest doubt of her—this is the duplicate I gave.

Prisoner. I never was in the shop but once, and that was when I pawned the tablecloth.

JAMES LOCKYER . I am a pawnbroker, I have a quilt which was pawned on the 13th of May, I believe by the prisoner, but I am not positive—I never saw her before that to my knowledge—this is the fellowduplicate.

THOMAS FULLER . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner in Clarke's-buildings, Holborn, and found these two duplicates on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(The prisoner put in a written defence stating, that she pledged the articles for food, (her husband having left her,) intending to redeem them next day.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Justice Coltman.

Reference Number: t18370612-1616

1616. CHARLES NEWCOMB , was indicted for feloniously forging, and uttering, on the 19th of May, at St. Saviour, Southwark, a certain bill of exchange for £35 6s. 6d., with intent to defraud Charles Barclay and others.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

(After the case was opened, the prisoner applied to plead guilty to uttering the bill, but the following evidence was called.)

GEORGE CHICKLEY STANLEY . I am clerk to Charles Barclay and others, brewers, carrying on business in Southwark—we have a customer named Malyon, who keeps the Coopers' Arms—on the 19th of May, I was attending at the counting-house—the prisoner delivered me this bill and letter, and a cheque of £35 was given him, which has since been returned as paid, by our bankers.

JOSEPH MALYON . This letter is not my writing, nor was it written by my authority—I know nothing of any application of this sort being made to Messrs. Barclay—I never sent them this bill—the endorsement on it is not mine—the prisoner is not my nephew—(letter read.)

"Coopers' Arms, Mitre-lane.

" Gentlemen,—Having been disappointed in the receipt of some money within the last week, and having very heavy expenses just now, in consequence of having my premises enlarged by throwing two houses into one, I should feel exceedingly obliged to you if you would lend me £25 till Monday next, when it shall be punctually paid, against the enclosed bill, which I send you as a collateral security.

JOSEPH MALYON .

"P. S. Should you be kind enough to grant me this favour, please to give it to my nephew, the bearer hereof."

GUILTY of uttering. Aged 19.— Transported for Life.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370612-1617

1617. THOMAS LOWTHORPE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May, 3 sovereigns, the monies of Joseph Joseph, and others, his masters.

JOSEPH JOSEPH . I am in the firm of Reuben Joseph and Sons, Southwark. The prisoner was in our employ—on the 4th of May I gave him three sovereigns to get three hogsheads—he took a truck but did not come back again.

Prisoner. I lost them, and did not like to come back. I was seized with a pain in my inside—I was lost in mind. Witness. I have heard that he has had fits before, but I did not know it till he was taken into custody—he was found at his mother's—she sent to say that he had come home—he had a good character before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1618

1618. WILLIAM SAMSON was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 26.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined One Year; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1619

1619. MARY HANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, 7 feet of chain, value 5s., the goods of Henry Power, her master.

HENRY POWER . I am a clerk at the Wandsworth Distillery. The prisoner was in my service—I lost some chain—this is part of it—she left about the middle of April.

THOMAS WHEELER (police-constable V 118.) I found the prisoner at Mr. Powell's—she showed me her box, and I found this chain in it.

Prisoner's Defence. My grandmother gave it to me four years ago.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1620

1620. JOHN KIRKUP was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 30.—Recommended to mercy. Confined One Year; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1621

1621. LOUISA SURREY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, 1 blanket, value 10s.; 1 pair of stays, value 2s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 4s.; 1 pair of Wellington boots, value 5s.; 2 thimbles, value 2s.; 1 necklace, value 1s.; the body of a shirt, value 7s.; 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 1 cap, value 4s.; 1 pewter pot, value 3s.; 1 pepper-castor, value 2s.; 1 shawl, value 6s.; 6 shirts, value 15s.; 2 flannel petticoats, value 12s.; 1 flannel shirt, value 6s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d.; 1 bedgown, value 3s.; 2 nightcaps, value 2s.; and 6 towels, value 6s.; the goods of Charles Johnson White, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1622

1622. THOMAS WELLER was indicted for embezzlement.

THOMAS FENWICK . I am a milkman. The prisoner was in my employ for about twenty months—it was his duty to carry out milk and receive the money—he has never paid me 2s. 8d. from Mrs. Baker, nor 1s. 2d.,

7d., nor has he accounted for any snms received from Mrs. Baker for twenty-five weeks.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many people have you in your employment? A. Four—my wife is not here—she never books any of my lad's milk but what is fetched from my house—my daughter keeps the books—she was not at the police-office—I would not swear, that if a lad took out a pint of milk in the morning my wife might not put it down.

MARY ANN BAKER . I deal with the prosecutor. The prisoner brought me milk—on the 15th of May, I paid him 1s. 2d., on the 22nd 7d., and on the 29th 7d.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you get receipts? A. No. I paid every Monday morning—I never had a bill.

MR. FENWICK. I have not received either of these sums.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you send out bills? A. Not to all the customers—we take ready money where we can—the milk is booked every night—I have about two hundred customers—I do not know whether mistakes may not occur.

HANNAH FENWICK . I did not receive any money from the prisoner in May from Mrs. Baker.

Cross-examined. Q. How used you to put down the sums you received? A. I used to put it down in the book every Monday—I always entered the money I received in his presence—the book is here—no one puts any thing down in it but me—my mother never enters it, only when extra milk is fetched from the door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370612-1623

1623. WILLIAM BOWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May, 1 bag, value 3d., and 50lbs. weight of coflee, value 2l. 10s.; the goods of James Thomas.

GEORGE MOORCRAFT . About nine o'clock in the evening, on the 27th of May, I was standing in No. 3, Oak-lane, Southwark, and saw two men come by—the prisoner, who was one, had a bag on his back, which afterwards proved to be coffee—I waited a few minutes, and then followed them with a policeman across Bermondsey-street to the new leather-market—they there dropped it, and we took it up.

Prisoner. I never had any thing to do with it-if he saw me carry the bag, why did not he stop me—I was not taken into custody till twelve o'clock at night, when I went to get something for supper. Witness. He is the man.

ROBERT ELSTON (police-constable M 28.) I had information, and followed the prisoner—he dropped the bag and escaped—I am sure he is the man—I knew him before.

JOHN SIMS (policeman M 164.) I took the prisoner on the Saturday evening, between twelve and one o'clock, from the description—he said he had not been in the neighbourhood, but had just come from Epsom races, and knew nothing of it.

JOSEPH BULL . I am servant to James Thomas. We lost this bag of coffee on the evening of the 27th.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370612-1624

1624. WILLIAM BELLCHAMBERS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May, 48 pails, value 2l. 18s., the goods of William Frederick Coles, his master.

WILLIAM FREDERICK COLES . I live in Crosby-row, Walworth-road—the prisoner is my journeyman. I sent him to Brentford-market with 48 pails—he did not return—I saw him again on the 13th, and gave him into custody.

Prisoner. It was impossible to go and return that day—the shopboy went with me—we went to Clapham, Wandsworth, and Epsom, where I met some friends I had not seen for years, and I lost the money in some way, I cannot account for—I met with an accident, and could not set my foot to the ground for several days—my friends have offered the money, and I am willing to pay it—I was not directed to go to any place, but to go where I liked.

MR. COLES. I sent him to Brentford, and I and my wife sat up for him till twelve o'clock—he sent the truck home by the boy—he could have written to me if any thing had happened.

GUILTY . Aged 49.— Confined Six Months; Six Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370612-1625

1625. ROSA WASHBROOK was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MR. CHAMBERS conducted the Prosecution.

LOUISA HAMMOCK ELLIOTT . On the 8th of May, I was in the shop of Mrs. Heel, a pork-butcher, Waterloo-road, Lambeth—the prisoner came in between five and six o'clock, to purchase two saveloys, which came to 2d.—she tendered a bad shilling—I said, "This will not do for me; the shilling is bad"—she coloured up in the face, and said, "Oh, is it, I will go and change it"—Mrs. Heel came down and took it—the prisoner said she took it at a ribbon shop, and would go and get it changed, and she went away—I kept the shilling.

SARAH HEEL . I came down into the shop while the prisoner was there and received the shilling from Elliott—I put it into my drawer where there was no other money—I afterwards marked it, and gave it to a policeman.

JOSEPH KENT (police-constable L 164.) Mrs. Heel marked this shilling and gave it to me, and I marked it.

GEORGE PRICE . I live in St. George's-circus, Blackfriars-road. On the 9th of May the prisoner came for an ounce of pins, which came to 2d.—she gave me a shilling—I gave her change, and she left—I after wards discovered it was bad—I broke it up, and threw it into the street—on the 16th of May she came again, about seven o'clock in the evening for an ounce of pins, and gave me a half-crown—I saw it was a bad one, and told her so—she said she was not aware of it—I said she bad been there before, and given a bad shilling, and I should keep this till she brought me another—she went out—I called a policeman, who brought her back, and I gave him the half-crown.

JOHN BUTLER (police-constable L 80.) On the 16th of May Price spoke to me, and I took the prisoner—I said had she been to Mr. Cooper's shop—she said she had—1 took her back, and she was identified—1 took the half-crown, and she said that was the half-crown—I asked her if she had been there on the 9th—she said she had, and had an ounce of pins.

Prisoner. Q. Did I tell you I had been there on the 9th with a bad shilling? A. No.

MR. FIELD. I am inspector of coin to the Mint. These are both counterfeit.

Prisoners Defence. I am an unfortunate girl—on Whit-Sunday a gentleman gave me 3s.—I gave the half-crown on the 16th, but did not know it was bad—I know nothing of the shilling.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1626

1626. ALFRED COURTNAY was indicted for a misdemeanor.

JOHN BLOCKEY . I am a grocer, and live in Jennyn-stxeet, St. James's. On Tuesday, the 9th of May, the prisoner came for a quarter of a pound of sugar, which came to 2 1/2 d., and gave me a bad shilling—I said, "This is a bad shilling"—he said, "If it is, let me have it back again"—I said, "No"—I gave him into custody, but he was discharged—I marked the shilling, and gave it to the policeman.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST (police-constable C 15.) I took the prisoner, and found a penny and a short pipe on him—he said his name was Alfred Courtnay, and he lived at No. 17, Mount-street, Borough, in the two-pair back—he was remanded for two days, and then discharged—I got this shilling from Mr. Blockey.

THOMAS HILL . I keep a beer-shop in Lambeth-walk. On the 16th of May the prisoner came and asked me for half a pint of fourpenny ale, and tendered a bad shilling—I took it up, and said, "Where did you get this?"—he said, "My master gave it me"—I said, "Who is your master?"—he hesitated—I said, "What is your business?"—he said, "A chair-maker"—I said "Where does your master live?"—he hesitated—I said, "If you don't tell me I will take you into custody"—he hesitated, and then said, "A gentleman gave it to me for carrying a parcel from the Elephant to the Stag"—I gave him into custody, marked the shilling, and gave it to the officer.

CHARLES HOLLAND (police-constable L 27.) I took the prisoner on the 16th of May—I found nothing on him—he gave the name of "James Hill"—Mr. Hill gave me the shilling after he marked it.

MR. FIELD. These are both counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about, the first charge—I went to the second shop, and asked for half a pint of beer.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1627

1627. WILLIAM COOKE was indicted for a misdemeanor.

JAMES BROOK (police-constable L 118.) On the 6th of May I saw the prisoner in the New Cut, Lambeth—I followed, and taw him join two boys in front of the George public-house, Waterloo-road—he took something out of his mouth, and showed them—he put it into his mouth again, and then walked and ran on to London-road—I then seized him by the throat, and pushed him into a cheesemonger's shop, and he spat four counterfeit shillings out of his mouth, on a piece of bacon—in taking him to the station-house he said, "You have got a case against me."

MR. FIELD. These are all counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the four shillings in a paper, in the New Cut; and having had the misfortune to lose a shilling out of my pocket a week before, I ever since carried my silver in my mouth—I met two persons I knew, and showed them the four shillings—they told me they were bad, and not to throw them away, but to throw them into the fire—I was going home to do that, when I was seized.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18370612-1628

1628. JAMES CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 5th. of June, 1 truck, value 50s., the goods of Thomas Brown.

THOMAS BROWN . I lost a truck, on the 5th of June, from my door—I afterwards found it at Mr. Beeson's house, for sale.

CHARLOTTE BROWN . I am the wife of Thomas Brown, of Isabella-street,

Lambeth. On the 5th of June the prisoner came to me, and hired a truck—he did not come back—the truck that was found at Beeson's was the one I let him—there was a child with him.

JOSEPH BEESON . I bought the truck of John Shepherd—I saw the prisoner when I paid for it, but I had no dealings with him—he was not present when I bargained with Shepherd for it.

JOHN SHEPHERD . I was going to tea, and two of my neighbours asked me the value of this truck—1 said 18s.—they asked me if I would buy it—I said no, and the prisoner went and sold it to Beeson, and he had the money.

Prisoner. They made me spend 6d. of the money—I was led into it, having a drop of drink.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

ADJOURNED TO MONDAY, JULY 3, 1837.


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