Old Bailey Proceedings, 8th May 1837.
Reference Number: t18370508
Reference Number: f18370508

KELLY, MAYOR.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE.

Taken in Short hand,

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

VOLUME VI.

SESSION VII. TO SESSION XII.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

WILLIAM TYLER, PRINTER, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

1837.

WILLIAM TYLER,

PRINTER,

BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT

SESSIONS PAPER.

KELLY, MAYOR.

SEVENTH SESSION, HELD MAY 8, 1837.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE.

Taken in Short-hand,

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

WILLIAM TYLER, PRINTER, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

1837.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the King's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY,

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

Before the Right Honourable THOMAS KELLY , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park, Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Joseph Littledale, Kat, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart.; George Scholey, Esq.; William Heygate, Esq.; William Thompson, Esq.; Sir Peter Laurie, Knt; and Henry Winchester, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City of London; the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City; Sir Chapman Marshall, Knt; James Harmer, Esq.; John Pirie, Esq.; and John Lainson, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City of London; John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

John Nichol

William Trail

William Cameron Smith

James Whitsides

Thomas Wintle

James Moore

Thomas Vivian

Thomas Bird

Joseph Vexey

Bartholomew Snowden

Samuel Mercer

John Tringham

Second Jury.

John Prentice

John Thomas Cox

Charles Buchanan

Hesketh Davis Wells

Henry Woolwich

Frederick Wells Strugnell

George Streether

Evan Thomas

William Southall

Henry Sargant

Charles Bailey

Miles Charles Seaton

Third Jury.

Henry Kilvington

Richard Forge

Charles Wilkinson

William Giesler

Joshua Latimer Lloyd

William Neale

Webster Flockton

John Saunders

Edmund Yates

Anthony Thatcher

Abraham Battye

John Wilson

Fourth Jury

Frederick Spicer

Thomas Moore

James Newman

George Tippet

John Turner

William Norrey

Edward Benning

Robert Shaw

Henry Bagot Morris

James Trower

Robert Simpson

James Sadd

Fifth Jury.

John Morley

George Wiffin

William Oliver

Thomas Williams

William Weston

Richard Westlake

Thomas Conway

Robert Walker

James Wetherley

John Street

William Moore

Alexander Ackworth

Sixth Jury.

Benjamin Young

Isaac Loader

James Withers

John Castle

William Powell

Huxley Smallman

John Vince

William Taylor

William Francis Wyler

Thomas Taylor

William Mack

Edward Sutor

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURET.

KELLY, MAYOR. SEVENTH SESSION.

A star denotes that the prisoner has been previously in custody—An obelisk†that the prisoner is know to be the Associate if bad characters.

CAPITAL CONVICTIONS.

Third Jury. before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18370508-1158

1158. THOMAS CORNELL was indicted for that be on the 11th of April, at West Ham, in and upon Mary Ann Austin, unlawfully, maliciously, feloniously did make an assault, and unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did cut and wound her in and upon her in and upon her neck and throat, with intant in to doing, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder her.—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable her.—3rd COUNT sating his intent to be to do her some grievous bodily harm.

MARY ANN AUSTIN I live at Stratford, near Bow, and am single. I have known the prisoner for years—he lives near the Three Pigeons at Stratford, in a house of his own—nobody lodges or lives with him—he is carpenter—I went to his house, on a Monday in April—I do not recollect the day of the month—I think it was the beginning of April—I think it was between seven and tight o'clock in the morning when I went—I went to clean his house—he came for me—I was there all day—he asked me to lay there—I told him I did not mind stopping of a day for him, and doing for him, and answering the gate, but I did not like to stop all night—me asked me to stop all night—he said I should not go back again—this passed between six and seven o'clock in the evening, when I wanted to to home—1 had dined with him between twelve and one o'clock—he had been out in the afternoon—he was tipsy when he came home, but not very tipsy—he insisted on my staying, and I staid all night, and slept, with him—he got up about six o'clock on Tuesday morning, and went to his work—his work was out of doors—he came in about eight o'clock to breakfast—he did not say any thing till dinner time—I told him then that I wanted to go home to see how my father was—he said I should not go home—he Liked about taking medicine is the afternoon—he did not do any thing to be that day—I staid Monday night and Tuesday night with him—on the Tuesday night, between eleven and twelve o'clock, he said he was going own the yard—he went down stairs, and came back directly after—I said him, "You have not been down the yard"—he said, "No, it was too cold"—he said nothing more to me, but he cut my throat—I did not see my thing in his hand—this was between twelve and one o'clock in the right, between Tuesday and Wednesday—I was in bed—there was no light the room—I had not been asleep—he cut my throat across the front.

Q. Had you said any thing to provoke him, or said more than asking if had been down the yard? A. Nothing else, I am quite sure—he was sober that day—he had not been out after two o'clock that day—when I bund myself cut, I got up and went to the chamber window—I could not pen it, but I called out murder—I got down stairs, but I do not know how I got out—I got into the road, and met the patrol, and William Greenhill

the watchman, who took me home—I had been doing or the prisoner before, and had slept with him before—I am twenty three years old—Mr. Davis the Magistrate came to me, I was at home at my parents—they are labouring people—Mr. Davis came and wrote down what I said, a day or two after this happened.

WILLIAM HOGG . I am a police horse-patrol. I was at Stratford-green on the night between Tuesday and Wednesday—it was between twelve and one o'clock in the morning of the 12th—I heard a person screaming, and went towards the place—I met the watchman, and proceeded towards the sound, and met the prosecutrix in her shift—she was bleeding from the neck—I took her back with me to Cornell's house—she told me about this—there was no light in the house, but we procured one—I went up and saw the prisoner—he was on the bed in his shirt, not under the clothes—his face was downwards on the bed—I asked him what he had been doing—he made no answer—I turned him over on his back, and found that his throat was cut in front—I found a razor lying on the floor—it was bloody—my partner went for Doctor Vallance—the prisoner did not appear to be drank.

WILLIAM GRKENHILL . I am a watchman. I have heard Hogg's evidence, and agree with him as to finding the woman in the road, and the prisoner in the way he has stated.

JAMES THOMAS VALLANCE . I am a surgeon living at Stratford. I was called on Wednesday, about one o'clock in the morning, by a horse-patrol—I found the prosecutrix in one corner of the room leaning against the wall—the blood was trickling from her throat down her fingers—I went towards her, and the watchman appeared to think she had done it herself—I saw, from the nature of the cut, that she did not do it herself—the prisoner was laying on the bed with his throat cut—his was the worst cut of the two—his windpipe was considerably divided, nearly half of it—he was not able to speak, but fearing he might die, I questioned him—I had the prosecutrix removed to her mother's residence, and attended her there—she is not in any danger now—I attended her nineteen days—I also attended the prisoner till he was capable of being removed to Ilford prison, which was also nineteen days—I did not see any symptoms of insanity in his conduct—I observed that he was not drunk on that night, and made the remark to the constable—I did not sew up his wound—it was sewn subsequently, in consequence of his tearing it, but at that time I only approximated it by means of pillows—he separated it on the Sunday, and it was then sewn up, and I had a strait-waistcoat put on him, to prevent his doing further mischief—I did not do that under the impression of his being insane—he had been from the Wednesday to the Sunday before he pulled the wound open—when he was able to articulate I did not observe any symptoms of madness in his conversation.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no knowledge of the crime; I had no malice against any one.

JURY to MR. VALLANCE. Q. Could you see whether he had inflicted the wound on himself from the appearance of it? A. Yes.

GUILTY— DEATH . Aged 40.—On the Third Count.

Third Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18370508-1159

1159. JAMES YOUNG was indicted for feloniously assaulting Anne Bowyer, on the 27th of March, at Clapham, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 reticule, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pair of scissors, value 6d.; 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 eye-glass, value 1l.; 1 watch, value 6l.; 1 seal, value 1l.; 1 ring, value 10s.; and 2 watch-keys, value 6d., her goods; and JOHN WHITTLE for feloniously receiving, on the same day, 1 watch, part of the said goods so as aforesaid feloniously stolen, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.—2nd COUNT, for feloniously receiving of a certain evil-disposed person.

ANNE BOWYER . I live at Greenwich. On Easter Monday, the 27th of March, I was going through Clapham New Park, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, and a man came running to me with a heavy step—he met me—he seized me by the left arm, and seized my bag, but did not take it—I resisted—I had the bag on my left arm, it was a reticule bag—he put his other arm round me and held me tight, and said, "I want your money"—(I had said nothing more to him than, "What do you mean"?)—I said, "I have no money"—he said, "No money"? most emphatically—he came round behind me and clasped me with both arms—he felt round me for my pockets, and felt my watch, in a little pocket, fastened to my stays, under my dress—he put his hand under my dress, and found the pocket-hole—he tore the watch off by main force, upon which I uttered a shrill shriek—he tore the pocket and all off my stays—it was stitched on—it was a plain gold watch, which I have worn for many years—when I tried to shriek, he said, "Ah, do that again, and I will do for you"—and he brought an instrument round to my throat, and held it there for the space of a moment—I saw him afterwards suspend the watch for a moment in his hand—I saw the left side of his face for that instant—I did not minutely observe it, but his dress and person were remarkable—I had not seen his face before that time, for I was carrying a parasol before me, which prevented my seeing it at first—he had examined my glass before I felt him pull it out of my girdle—he returned, cut the string off my neck with the instrument he held to my throat, I suppose, and took off the glass—he came and took my bag after all, then touched my left shoulder, and said, "Now you may go on, don't make a noise"—he stopped for a moment to look forward, as if to see if any body was coming, and I saw the other side of his face completely—he had his hat on—he was in a dark coat, fastened in front, and drab-coloured trowsers—that is the man (pointing to the prisoner Young)—I have since seen the watch at Turner's the pawnbroker's—I had no opportunity of observing his front-face—I am positive he is the man who robbed me—I was calm, because I did not understand it at first—I have felt very much more since it happened, and have been very unwell—I felt some alarm and fright, and I felt much distressed about the man—I did not feel uncertain about his being the man—I had never seen him before—he was brought to me on the Saturday following by a policeman—I was then certain of him, but I felt such dreadful terror at identifying a man, and he perhaps being hanged through it—I was in a dreadful nervous state, and fetched out of my bed to see him—I felt dreadfully nervous, and 1 therefore declined saying he was the man—I said I was afraid 1 could not say he was the man—I did not decidedly say he was not the man—it was not a taller man than him—that is the man who robbed me (looking at him)—he was brought again at my request, for I was extremely angry with myself at saying I could not say he was the man, when I found it would not be a hanging matter, and I went to the station-house in Scotland-yard, when he was taken a second time—I saw him before the Magistrate, and identified him the first time—that was

last Wednesday fortnight, the 26th of April; but on the Saturday after the robbery I said I was afraid 1 could not identify him—I went to the Hall again last Wednesday, and knew him then perfectly—he is certainly the man—I did not see his front-face till he was brought to me—he is the man, I am positive of it.

Young. The first word she spoke was wrong—she said it was between one and two o'clock at Union-hall, and now she says between two and three o'clock. Witness. I could not have said between one and two o'clock—I always said it was between two and three o'clock—I never said between one and two o'clock.

Young. When I was taken up by the policeman, she said it was between one and two o'clock, and I told her I did not go out till between two and three—to-day she says it was between two and three o'clock—I was fetched out of the hospital, and brought to the lady, and she said I was not the man; that it was a young man about twenty years of age, rather taller than me, and no whiskers. Witness. I said I dared not identify him—I guessed his age to be about twenty—I said nothing about his height—as to his whiskers, the hat might conceal them—I described his person at the request of the police, and said he was a middle size, rather short than tall—I did not see his whiskers—he was rather pallid, and I said I supposed he had not any whiskers.

Young. She said I was not the man, and her sister gave me a shilling. Witness. I did not say it decidedly, it is impossible—I did not say he was not the man—I did not give him a shilling, or desire any body to give him one—it was unknown to me—I did not see any shilling given him.

Young. The lady went to bed when she said I was not the person, and the policeman said, "I cannot detain him, then," and she said, "Oh, no, don't detain him." Witness. No, I did not—the policeman had sent me word that ha could not detain him, before I came down stairs—I said nothing about his detention—I did not tell the policeman he need not detain him—I was informed he could not be detained unless I identified him.

JOSEPH TURNER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Crown-row, Wal-worth. I have a watch which was pawned by the prisoner Whittle on the 27th of March, at eight o'clock in the evening, in the name of Riddle—I advanced 2l. on it—he wanted 3l.—I believe he said nothing about the watch—I had no idea it was wrong.

JOHN POTTER . I am a policeman. I apprehended Young on Saturday, the 1st of April, in Easter week—I told him I wanted him to accompany me to Brixton—he said, "No," and afterwards he said, "Yes"—I took him to Brixton station-house, and took him up to the prosecutrix's house on the same day—she was ill in bed—it was about half-past twelve o'clock—she came down, and saw the prisoner, and said he answered the description—he said he was innocent—she told him no, it could not be, for He was the man who had robbed her on Easter Monday—she asked him to turn side-face—he did so, and then she asked him to turn the other side-face—he did so—then she asked him to turn round with his back to her—he did so—then she said he was the man; but from the hesitation and fright, she said she should not like positively to swear to him, as she was so ill, and asked me if I could detain him—I said no, I had orders from the Superintendent that unless she could identify the man, not to detain him—he again said he was innocent—the lady said she hoped he was, but she doubted it, for he answered the description in every point; and she said if there was any

charge I could detain him on, she hoped in a few days she should be able to identify him—nothing more was said, and I discharged him—one of the ladies of the house gave him a shilling, but which of them I cannot say—the other lady was Mrs. Morgan—I believe she is a relation of Mist Bowyer's—Miss Bowyer was gone back to her bedroom when the shilling was given—I did not see the prisoner again till the 24th of April, when I apprehended him—I asked him if he had been to Mist Bowyer's since the Saturday he went there with me—he said he had—I asked him for what purpose—he said he had been there to ask her for some recompense for damaging his character, and the lady gave him a shillings—he did not my which lady—I asked him if he had been more than once—he laid yes, he had been a second time, but he did not say whether he received any thing.

Prisoner. I only went once. Witness. He told me he west a second time, I am certain.

COURT. Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate, when you took him second time, you asked him if he had been to Miss Bowyer's for some money, and he said he had, and the niece had given him a shilling? A. No, I did not say that before the Magistrate—(looking at his deposition)—that is correct there—I told the Magistrate that he said he had been a second time—it is not put down, but that is their neglect, not mine.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am a policeman. I apprehended Whittle on the 26th of April, in St. James's Park—I did not know him before—he gave me the name of Young—I asked him if it was James Young—he said no, it was George—I took him to the station-house, handcuffed him, and then Book him to Brixton station—he there gave the name of John Whittle.

Whittle. It was another man took me, and he said he did not think I was the man. Witness. I apprehended him—there was another constable with me, whom I directed to go up and stop him, and I came up within half a minute, and put several questions to the prisoner—he said he was a native of Cornwall—I was in plain clothes.

THOMAS MITCHELL HAMMOND . I am a surgeon, and live at Brixton, about a mile from Clapham New Park. I know the prisoner Young—he came to consult me the week before Easter—he is about twenty-two or twenty-three yean old—he came again on Easter Monday—I saw him at my own house between one and three o'clock in the afternoon—he came again on Easter Tuesday, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and I gave him a recommendatory letter to Guy's Hospital.

MISS BOWYER re-examined. This is my watch—I have had it ever since 1806, when I purchased it—I know the name on it, but the number cannot trace—it is the watch which was taken from me on Easter Monday.

Young's Defence. I know nothing of the robbery.

Whittle's Defence. I was going up to Mr. Turner's on Easter Monday, at a quarter before eight o'clock, to fetch a shirt out of pawn, and inside he door a man came in, and asked if I was going in—I said, "Yes"—he asked if I would take a watch in for him—I said I did not mind—he said he would give me 5s. if I would take it in to pawn—I asked what I was to get for it—he said 3l., if I could—I took it in, and Mr. Turner sod he would lend 2l., and no more—I said, "I do not think that will do; I will go out and see"—I went outside, and told the man he would not give more than 2l.—he said that would do, I was to take the 2l.—I went back, land told Mr. Turner I was to take 2l., and he gave it me—he asked if he

was to take for the shirt out of the money, and I said, "No"—I pulled the money out, and gave it him, and I gave the man the 2l.

MARTHA GREGORY . I lived in White-square at the time in question—that is about a mile from Clapham New Park. Young rented a room in my house nearly twelve months—he generally drives a fly about Brixton-hill when he is in work—on the day of the robbery he went from my house about two o'clock—I am sure I cannot exactly say what day it was—he was at home in bed ill on Easter Monday in the morning—he went out from my house about two o'clock—I did not go with him—he returned about half-past three o'clock.

Whittle to JOSEPH TURNER. Q. When I came in, did I give you a duplicate? A. I forget—you asked how much I would lend on the watch—I said 2l.—you wanted 3l.—he did go outside, and came in, and had money on the watch.

YOUNG— GUILTY .

DEATH .—Aged 25.

WHITTLE— GUILTY . Aged 25.

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18370508-1160

1160. JOHN WHITTLE was again indicted for feloniously assaulting Susanna Barber the elder, on the 2nd of December, at St. Mary, Lambeth, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 reticule, value 1s.; 1 pocket-book, value 2s. 6d.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 1l. 4s.; 1 spectacle-case, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pair of scissors, value 1s.; 1 key, value 6d.; 1 watch-key, value 4s.; 1 collar, value 1s.; and 1 pencil, value 5s.; her goods.

SUSANNA BARBER . I am a widow—I live in Acre-lane, Brixton. On Friday, the 2nd of December, I was walking with my daughter, between five and six o'clock in the evening, coming home from London; and as we were passing a field very near our house, a man came behind my daughter, and took hold of both her hands—I gave the man a push, and told him to go along—I had no idea of his being a robber at all—he then caught hold of my boa, and pulled it, but I put up my hand, which had a bag on it, to prevent his taking it—he then took hold of the bag—I still resisted—he then took something from under his coat, and presented it, first at me, and Chen at my daughter—my daughter said, "Give it him, mamma," or "Let him have it," and on that he took it from me—he had said, "Give it me," meaning the bag—he took it from me forcibly, and then ran off—it contained a pocket-book, a silver pencil-case, a pair of scissors, a pair of silver-mounted spectacles, a pocket-handkerchief, a gold watch-key, and a lace collar—I think I have seen the pencil-case since at Mr. Turner's, the pawnbroker's—there were several other trifling things in the bag which I cannot recollect—I did not take notice of the person of the man—I could not, except that he was a tall man, and the make answers to the prisoner; but his countenance I cannot speak about, I was so alarmed at the time.

Prisoner. Q. Were there any lamps lighted? A. The lamps were lighted on one side of the way—they are not gas lamps, but they are very good lights.

SUSANNA BARBER, JUNIOR . I am the daughter of last witness—I remember being with my mother on the evening of the 2nd of December, between five and half-past five o'clock, returning home—I did not hear any thing, till a very tall man pushed by me, and started before me—the pathway is a little raised from the road—I was walking on the edge, and he jumped from the road on to the path—it was the prisoner—I have not

any doubt of him—I never saw him before that—it was sufficiently light—the lamps on the opposite side were lighted, and we were very nearly Apposite one—the road is not very wide—he seized both my hands, and after he let go of me he took hold of my mother's boa, but she held it tight, and he did not get that—he took hold of her reticule bag, and pulled at it—she resisted—he pat his hand into the breast of his coat, and Book out what I believe was a pistol, and presented it first at my mamma, and then at me—he first said, before he presented the pistol, "Won't you?—then here"—and then I said, "Pray, mamma, give it to him"—he then took it—I screamed, and he then ran away towards Clapham, the way He were walking—I could see his countenance distinctly, and I have not any doubt about his being the man at all—I saw him again at Union hall last Wednesday, and knew him again, though I expected to see him in the Hock among the other prisoners, but he was not there—the moment I saw Him, I said, "That is the man"—he was standing on the outside—my Knottier had a pencil-case, which I have seen at Mr. Turner's, and know it to be hers.

Prisoner. Before the Magistrate she said there were gas lamps in the lane—the Magistrate asked if she had seen me before—she said no, but she had kept me in her eye ever since the robbery was committed—the Magistrate said, "You mean in your mind," and she said, "Yes." Witness. I did not say there were gas lamps in the lane—I said his countenance had been present to my mind since, so that the moment I saw him I recognised him.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am a policeman. I apprehended (he prisoner on the 26th of April, in St. James's Park—he gave me the name of Young, native of Cornwall—I asked him if it was "James young—he said, "No, George"—I took him to the station-house at Brixton, and there he gave me the name of John Whittle—I traced the pencil-case to Mr. Turner's.

Prisoner. I was not taken up for this case. Witness, I apprehended him on the charge of four highway robberies.

Prisoner. He said going along that He would do for me if he could. Witness. I did not—I can explain every word that passed.

Prisoner. I was remanded for a week, and he went all round to the several robberies that were committed, and brought them all up against me, six or eight I think, and he said I did them all.

JOSEPH TURNER . I am a pawnbroker. I have known the prisoner tax years by the name of Riddle—I have a pencil-case and pen which was pawned, with me on the 24th of January, in the name of John Riddle—did not take it in myself.

MRS. BARBER re-examined. I have no doubt of this being mine—there is a little mark at the top—it was in a pocket-book in my bag.

MISS BARBER. I have no doubt of this being mamma's.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it—I did not pawn the pencil-case—nobody can say I did.

GUILTY. DEATH .—Aged 25. (There were two other indictments against the prisoner.)

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18370508-1161

1161. JAMES BANNER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Paul Plant, about the hour of nine in. the night on the 6th of May, at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 copper, value 20s., his property, and fixed in the said building.

ELIZABETH THOMAS . I am a widow, and lodge in the house of Mr. Paul Plant, in the parish of Bethnal-green—I do not know the name of the parish further than that. On Saturday night, the 6th of May, about nine o'clock, or a quarter past, I was going into the wash-house for a pail of water, and the prisoner was coming out—there is no door out of the wash-house into the open air—when I opened the wash-house door, the prisoner bad got the copper in his hands—it had been set in bricks before, and he must have loosened it—I took hold of him, and called out, "The copper, the copper"—I had a candle on the table—he pushed me back, and ran out—the witness seized him, and a policeman was sent for, who took him in charge—it was quite dark at the time—the family were all up in the parlour; Mr. Plant, his wife, a little boy, and a man-servant—the wash-house door had been bolted—it is an inner door—it is a public-house, and the street door was open—I suppose he had opened the wash-house door—it bolts inside a passage in the house—any body coming in at the street door could unbolt it—it was not locked.

Prisoner. Q. How could you lay hold of me if you did not put down your pail and light? A. had an empty pail, but I put that down.

JAMES HARPER . I was in the tap-room of the public-house that night—I went into the yard, and heard Mrs. Thomas call out—I looked round, and saw her fall back, and the prisoner running away—I stopped him—he said, "Let me go, let me go," but I gave him up to the landlord.

PAUL PLANT . I keep the house. I was serving in the bar, and beard an alarm—I rushed out into the yard, and found the prisoner in Harper's custody—I took him into the parlour till a policeman came, and then gave him into custody—the copper had been fixed in the wash-house—I had used it that morning to boil some pots—I was at the wash-house half an hour previous—the door was then bolted—the house is in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal Green—this is my copper, I am certain.

MILES DARLING . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner with the copper—he said nothing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming through the public-house—it is a public thoroughfare from one street to the other—the passage is so narrow two persons cannot pass—the woman was coming in with a pail and light—I stood in the doorway of the passage for her to pass—the wash-house was open—I let her pass, and she seized hold of me, and halloed out to Plant, and they seized me directly.

ELIZABETH THOMAS re-examined. I found him in the wash-house, not in the doorway—I had not been in the wash-house between the time Mr. Plant saw the door fastened and then.

PAUL PLANT re-examined. I have one child, seven years old—he was up stairs—my wife was in my view for an hour before—I am sure she could not have opened the door—I have a man-servant, but he was not there—he was up at the tap-house—that belongs to the same house.

GUILTY— DEATH . Aged 21.

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18370508-1162

1162. JOHN THEODORE and DANIEL BRANDON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Roach, about the hour of nine, in the night of the 18th of April, at St. Luke, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 45 yards of horse-hair cloths, value 5l. 10s. his property.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

BENJAMIN ROACH . I am a horsehair manufacturer, and live at No. 3, Cupid's-court, Golden-lane, in the parish of St. Luke, Middlesex. It is my own house—I occupy it—I keep my horse-hair in the lower room, on the ground floor. On the 18th of April two persons came to me—as near as I can speak, it was about half-past eight o'clock at night—it was dark then—I had a candle alight—they asked me if I had any nineteen-inch seating—I know one of the men perfectly well to be the prisoner Brand, and the other prisoner I know, though I will not take my oath to his features, but I will to his stature—I had not known Brandon before—they said, "Let us see what you have got"—I unlocked the room door, and shewed them a piece of seventeen inch, and twenty-four inch—I had no nineteen inch, and told them so—I kept my horsehair locked in a book-case in the room—I unlocked the book-case, and took it out before them—they both looked at it—Theodore said he had got a set of chairs to do, but they came to so much money, he would not have them done—they did not buy any thing of me—it was finally arranged that he was to call for the twenty-four inch in the morning, to have that instead of the nineteen-inch—I had an opportunity of seeing the persona of both the men—I stood alongside of Theodore, and had no opportunity of seeing his features; but the other was a good deal in the passage, and I thought be might be inclined to go up stairs, and I had a better opportunity of seeing him than the other—I swear to the height of Theodore, being every way the same—I will take my oath Brandon is the same man—after thy they went away—I lighted them down the court, and bolted my street-door, and went in and tried all the fastenings—the window, the book-case, and the escrutoire in this room Were all secure—the window-shutters were bolted inside—I cannot say whether the window-sash was fastened, but the shutters were bolted—I am certain the sash-window was down—I have a mode of sticking a piece, of wood in to fasten it, but whether that was in or not I do not know—I went up two Pairs of stairs after locking the room door, to go to my work—it then Wanted exactly a quarter to nine by my clock, and I think it was as nearly right as possible, it might be five minutes too slow—I was alarmed in about five minutes by a ring at the bell, and came down—I went to the street-door, unbolted it, and found several neighbours there, who gave the alarm of robbery—I did not see any body running away—in consequence of what I heard, unlocked my lower room door, and found my book-case forced open, the shutters were forced open, and the bottom sash thrown up—I found a piece of the twenty-four inch cloth standing up inside the room, underneath the ledge of the window that was worth 2l. 10s.—that was one of the pieces I had been showing to the two men, and which I had locked up in the book-case—two chisels Bare picked up, and a bag, which did not belong to me, but I had seen it before—a man named Abbott, who works forme, used to bring that hag, and take his work home in it—he had lost it, and I was obliged to lend him one—it was not in the room at the time I was there before—I looked into the book-case, and missed a piece of twenty-six inch, about twenty-five or twenty-six yards long—there was a remnant with it, standing up by the side of it—It was lot rolled up with it—the remnant was also gone—the twenty-six inch piece was brought to me that night by Sarah Jennings, my daughter, in about a quarter of an hour—I have never seen the remnant since—the twenty-four inch and the twenty-six inch pieces were worth, as near as I can

say, about 5l. 10s.—the remnant was not worth above 4s. or 4s. 6d.—it was about a yard—nothing more passed that night—the persons were to come in the morning for the twenty-four inch—they did not come—it was dark at the time I was alarmed by the bell ringing.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Is not the parish called St. Luke, Old-street? A. Yes—I have heard of St. Luke's, Chelsea—I had lighted the candle before the persons came to me, and was at work with it—the shutters were secure before they came, and I did not open them afterwards—I am certain of it—I have no doubt at all of that—no one could go into the room besides me—I had the key in my pocket—I never saw either of the men before, not to know them—it was about half-past eight o'clock when I came down to them, and it wanted a quarter to nine o'clock when I secured the doors—I should think they were nearly ten minutes in the house—I cannot swear to whether it was five or ten minutes—they were full five minutes there—Brandon never spoke a word to me—the other man; spoke—that did not give me a better opportunity of seeing him than the other—I did not see his features—he stood close at the side of me—I was not facing him—being deaf, my attention was paid to what be said—the other man stood farther from me—I should think he must have been a yard or two from me—it was not above five minutes after the men left that the bell rang, and I came down—the window is about four feet from the ground—the short man (Theodore) was dressed in a brown coat, not a great coat—I did not notice his trowsers—it appeared a cloth coat—the other was dressed in a dark blue or black body-coat—he was very shabby—the first time I saw the two prisoners after the robbery was at the station-house, on the Friday night following—I cannot tell bow many days that was afterwards, but it was the night they were apprehended, and I was called out of my bed to look at them—I did not say I could not swear to either of them—I was not asked the question—1 did not say any thing of the kind—the inspector asked me if I chose to detain them, and I said I did not know; I would consider of it—there was a great alteration in their dress—they were dressed much the same as they are now.

Q. When you said you would consider of it, were you not doubtful as to whether they were the men? A. To the features of the men I may, but to the stature I would swear it then, as I do now—I gave them in charge then—I did not doubt in a great measure that they were the people, but there was such a strange alteration in their dress, but not in their persons at all—one of the police-officers told me that if I let them go, whatever might transpire afterwards, I could not take them up again—the policeman is present who told me so—it was after he told me so that I ordered them to be detained—the inspector told me it would be much better to let them go before the Magistrate, and I agreed to it—I did not say I did not wish to charge them that night—perhaps I might not have given them in charge if the police-man had not said that; but when I considered that they could not be taken up again, I considered it best to have it examined into—I attended before the Magistrate at two examinations, and the commitment—I was examined the first and second time, and my evidence was taken down the third time—I suppose it was taken down in writing the first time, but not to my know ledge—I cannot tell whether any clerk took down what I said, nor whether any thing was taken down before the Magistrate before the 8th of May.

Q. How long before the robbery had Abbott been to you with the bag A. I cannot tell—he had not been there with it for some considerable time—he had been there within a week—I do not think I had seen the bag within

three months—it had been loft, because the man was obliged to borrow a bag of me—it must have been at least three months before the robbery since I had teen the bag—I cannot say whether I had seen it within five months or six months—I cannot swear it—only my youngest daughter lives in the house with me, and my married daughter lives opposite in the same court.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. I do not understand you to say you saw any of the men go away after committing the robbery? A. No—the inspector Baked if I meant to detain the men—I laid I did not know—he said, "Recollect, if any thing should occur, these men cannot be taken up again"—I said "Then I wish to go before the Magistrate"—their dress was altered, according to my judgment—I was much more convinced of Brandon from his features and his face—I could not identify the other's features—it is the stature that I go by with him.

SARAH JENNINGS . I am the daughter of the prosecutor—I live at No. 9, Cupid's-court, immediately opposite my father's, which is No. 3 On the 18th of April I saw two persons go to my father's house about half-past eight o'clock—I saw them at the door ringing the bell—I did not see my father with them—toe door was opened—I did not take much notice of the men, it being dark—I saw them again the same evening, when Goodall gave an alarm—that was about a quarter of an hour after I had Keen them ringing the bell—I got up, and ran to the door—I saw the prisoner Brandon outside the window with a roll of horsehair cloth under his arm, and I saw Theodore (as I suppose him to be, but I did not see much of him) nearly out of the entrance of the court—I and Mrs. Goodall called out, "Stop thief," and Brandon ran, and threw the roll down, and we ran after him—the other was nearly out of the entrance of the court, with a small remnant in his hand—I could see that quite plain by the gas-light—I could tell it was a remnant by its being in such a small compass—Brandon threw the roll of horsehair cloth at our feet, which prevented us from catching him—we were within two yards of him at the time he threw it—Theodore is exactly the same height, size, and look as the other man had seen at my father's door, from what little notice I took of him—he resembles the man in stature, appearance, and features—I could not see hit features in the court, because his back was to me—I observed his features when they were ringing at the bell—one of them had a brown snuff-coloured coat on, and the other had a dark frock-coat—I had an opportunity of noticing Brandon at the time I saw him with the roll of cloth—he is the man—I know him by hit person and features—I took the cloth up, and took it into my house, and afterwards gave it to my father—I looked at my father's premises when I saw the men outside—the shutters were wide open, and the bottom sash was put up, and I could see the book-case doors wide open—I could see that outside, as it is by the side of the window—Theodore is exactly the same stature and thickness as the man—Good-all is now lying in.

Cross-examined. Q. Am I to understand you, the first time you saw the two men was when they rang your father's bell? A. Yes, at half-past eight o'clock—my window-shutters were not shut then—the window was shut down—there was a small curtain—I could see over the bottom pane—my shutters were not closed when they rang the bell—I closed them about a quarter to nine o'clock—they were closed when Mrs. Goodall came to me—my window is about four yards from my father's—I cannot lay which of the men rang at the bell—they were both at the door—the tallest was the closest to the door—I heard the bell ring, but I do not know which of them rang it—both their backs were to me, but they

turned round to come against my window, to look up to the second floor window, where the light was, to see if he was at home, I suppose—they turned round to come from the door—I had no light in my room when they were at the door—there is a gas-light over my door, I was very near it—I never saw either of them before—they were in my sight about five minutes, I suppose—they were waiting five minutes to be let in, ringing at the bell, and knocking as well—I was not with my father when he first went to the police station on the Friday night—I saw him at home that night, and heard him say he had seen the men—he did not tell me he was doubtful about them, and did not wish to detain them—he said their dress was quite different—he said he would detain them—he did not tell me whether the policeman said any thing to him—he did not say he did not like to give them in charge, nor any thing of the kind—I was examined before the Magistrate, and what I said was taken down and read over to me—this is my mark—I did not notice whether the Magistrate signed it—(the witness's deposition being ready stated in reference to having seen the parties previous to the alarm—"I had seen the men talking to my father before the alarm, but did not take any notice of them—the prisoner Brandon, when I saw him outside the window, had on a dark frock coat, and the other had a snuff-coloured coat")—I heard my deposition read over to me at Worship-street—I cannot say whether it was before I put my mark to it—I forget—I told the Magistrate I first saw the two men at my father's door at half-past eight o'clock—I swear that—I do not think I said they were ringing the bell—I might not have thought of that—I was asked so many questions I could not think of every thing—I might have forgotten it—I forget whether I said it or not—I said I saw them at the door.

Q. Did you tell any one before you went before the Magistrate, that you had seen one of these men ringing the bell at half-past eight o'clock? A. Yes, I told my sister of it the same night—I told her I saw the two men I at the door, and heard the bell ring—I did not say I saw them ring it—I do not think I told the Magistrate that the men came from my father's door towards me, and looked up at his window—they asked me so many questions I could not think of every thing—I told the Magistrate I did not take much notice of them.

COURT. Q. Do you mean you did not take much notice of Theodore's features, or both of them? A. Of Theodore.

MR. JONES. Q. You have sworn you observed Theodore's features a little, while the men were ringing at the bell? A. When they turned round and came to my window—I cannot recollect whether I told that to the Magistrate or not—I will not swear one way or the other about it—I cannot say whether I told any one that I observed Theodore's features while he was turning round, before I went to the Magistrate.

MARY ANN ROACH . I am the prosecutor's daughter, and live with him. On the 18th of April, I saw two men go up the court from Golden-lane, at half-past eight o'clock—I was standing at the end of the court, talking to a neighbour—I observed both of them—I saw the same men again in five or ten minutes come down the court—I saw the features of one more than the other, of Theodore, the short man—I saw the other, but did not set his face so well—Theodore was dressed in a brown coat and trowsers, and no apron—the other man had a dark coat, blue or black, and dark trowsers, and no apron—I saw them the first time turn to my father's door, but I did not see my father—when they returned they passed me—the entrance of Cupid's-court is about a yard wide—it is wider inside, but not very wide.

—about five yards wide—I observed them when they returned—I observed Theodore most, because he was by the side of me—I still remained talking there—they turned up Playhouse-yard; but when they came down the court the first time I heard them talking—I thought they had been bar-gaining with my father for hair cloth, which made me notice them—Play-house-yard is higher up than our court, and on the opposite side, but they kept on the same side of the way as our court, and then returned and went up our court—I was still standing in the same place when they went up the court again—I saw them still, but Theodore was always nearest to me, and I could see his features better than the tall one—every time they pasted Theodore was nearest to me—there is a public-house facing the end of the court, which has a gaff-lamp—I did not notice what they did when they went up the court the last time—I stood there till I heard the cry of "Stop thief"—I then saw Theodore with a small remnant in his hand—he turned round to his fellow prisoner—he stood at the bottom of the court, and hallooed "hoy" to his fellow prisoner, who was up the entrance of the court with a large bundle of hair cloth in his hand—he ran up Playhouse-yard, and I pursued him, and lost sight of him in Payne's-buildings, that is opposite playhouse-yard—he had to cross White Cross-street—I pursued him 200 or 300 yards, with a small remnant in his hand—I saw Baker, the police-man, in White Cross-street, and I told him my father had been robbed—I afterwards saw the prisoners at the station-house, and pointed out Theodore then, but I am not positive to Brandon—I swear to his stature—I can undertake to say that Theodore is the man—I will not swear to the other—I will swear to the stature of the man—he is the same height, and the figure is the same.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see either of the men before? A. Never—they were in my sight while they turned up the court—I noticed them all the way up—I do not think it was so long as two minutes—I first saw them passing along—they walked very slow—I did not see more of their backs than their faces at first—I saw their faces more—I saw their foes as much as their backs—I just saw them about half a minute before they came up, and saw them turn up the court—their backs were to me then—when they came up to me they had their side faces to me—I watched them all the way up the court to my father's house the first time—that took them about a minute—I did not see them do any thing when they got to the door—I turned and talked to my neighbour again—I observed them before they came up to me, when they came down again—I observed them about half a minute before they came up to me the second time—this was about half-past eight—it was rather dark—they did not walk so slow the second time as they did the first—neither of them bad aprons on—I saw them again on Friday, the 21st—I went with my father and Mrs. Goodall to the station-house—I am quite positive about Theodore—I did not hear my father say he should not like to swear to them—I was certain of Theodore, and pointed him out at the station-house—I went there to know if they were the men—I went for the purpose of seeing them—I was not told these were the two men—they were not shown to me—I pointed out one—I cannot recollect whether my father said he was sure of the other or not—he said the tall man was the man, and I said the little one was the man—I bad no conversation with my sister about the men before I went to the Magistrate—I am quite rare of that—I never said a word to her about the men, between the time of the robbery and my going before the Magistrate—I know Abbott—he works for my father—I cannot tell how long before the robbery he was at our house

—I do not work at home—I saw him at my father's—it may be a week or fortnight before the robbery—it might be more or less—I had not seen him with his bag—he had a new bag—I do not know it—I had seen him with one at my father's, bringing home work, and taking it away—I cannot tell how long before the robbery I had seen him with it—I never saw him with more than one bag, what he brought my father's work in—I do not know the bag at all—I know the bag I picked up in the room—Abbott's bag was a black one, and a largish one—I do not think it had a string to it—I have only seen it on his back—I should not know it again—I have seen him with one bag a good many times—I do not know the bags apart, the one he brought the work in and the one found in the room—(looking at her deposition)—this is my mark—(read)—"Mary Ann Roach, daughter of the Prosecutor, says, on Tuesday, the 18th of April, about half-past eight o'clock, I was standing at the bottom of Cupid's court, when two men passed me and went up the court—one of them was he prisoner Theodore—I cannot swear to the prisoner Brandon, but he answers to the size of the man who went up with the prisoner Theodore. They went to my father's door—after that they returned down the court, past me, and went into Playhouse-yard—they came back instantly, and went of the court—in about ten minutes, I heard the cry of 'Stop thief when the prisoner Theodore, and the other man ran down the court past me—the prisoner Theodore had a small remnant in his hand, and he halloed 'hoy,' and the other man followed him up Playhouse-yard—I ran after the prisoner Theodore, but he ran up Payne's-buildings, and I lost sight of him—I came back with the policeman to my father's house, and I found a small chisel on the window ledge, and a large one on the table—I found also a bag on the floor underneath the window next morning—my father gave the chisels to the policeman—the prisoner Theodore had on a brown coat, and the other man had on a dark one—they both had on dark trowsers, but no aprons. The mark X of Mary Ann Roach."

Q. Now, did you tell the Magistrate you knew Theodore by his features? A. Yes, when he turned round the end of the court, and halloed "hoy," I had a good look at him—I do not recollect whether I told the Magistrate that I knew him by his features or not—I did not tell the Magistrate that the moment I saw Theodore at the station-house, I pointed him out as the man—I was frightened.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you find a bag in the room, and chisel, and other things, did you give them to your father? A. Yes—the bag was under the window ledge.

BENJAMIN BAKER . I am a policeman. On the 18th of April I met Mary Ann Roach in Playhouse-yard—she gave me information, and I accompanied her to her father's house—he delivered me two chisels, and I received a bag on Friday the 21st, at the top of Golden-lane, from the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. What colour do you call it? A. A brown; a dirty black, or something—I took Theodore into custody—I told him I wanted him to accompany me to the station-house—he said he was very willing to go, and he did go—this was on Friday night, the 21st of April—I am positive I did not tell the prosecutor if he let the men to go he could not take them up again—nor did I hear any other person at the station-house say so—my brother officer was there and the inspector, and several men who were standing round—I was not in the room where the charge was taken all the time—I did not hear any policeman say so to him—he looked at the men—I did not hear him say he was doubtful about their being the men

—I cannot say he did not say so—I did not hear him say he did not know whether he would give them in charge or not, and he would consider of it—I went before the Magistrate on the first examination—the men were remanded—I do not know on what account—all the witnesses were there that are here today and they were remanded a second time—no fresh evidence was given after the second time—only the depositions taken—I think no fresh evidence was given after the first examination, but I do not recollect—the first examination was on the 22nd of April, and the next the Saturday following.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Is it the custom at police-offices to commit after a rat examination? A. They are generally remanded till the second—the Magistrate either orders the depositions to be taken then, or fixes a third day for it—there are generally two examinations, and sometimes three—at She station-house the prosecutor said he believed them to be the men, but they were altered in dress.

MARY ANN ROACH re-examined. This is the bag I picked up on the floor, and gave it to my father who was in the room—I found it under the Sedge of the window.

MR. JONES. Q. Is that like the bag you describe as being brought by Abbott to your father's house? A. No—the one he brought seemed a new one—it was not like this in colour—it was quite black—this is not the bag I have seen Abbott with latterly.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Do you ever remember seeing Abbott with that bag? A. No.

BENJAMIN ROACH re-examined. This is the bag my daughter delivered to me, and I gave it to the policeman—it is the bag I have seen Abbott have, and it is the one he lost—he had it some time ago; but shortly before the robbery he had a new bag.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you tell me that he had another bag, and was so distressed that you had lent him one? A. The bag was lost at Purkis's, in Old-street, and could not be found—he was obliged to get a new one—of course he had no other till he set up a new one—this is the sort of bag generally used in our trade, if they wish to appear genteel.

THOMAS ABBOTT . I am a horsehair weaver. This is my bag—I lost it about nine or ten months ago, at another master's I work for—Mr. Purkis, in Old-street—I know the prisoners—they were in Mr. Purkis's employ at the time I lost my bag—I left it at Mr. Purkis's, for work to take the next day; and when I went the next day it was missing—I never saw it again till the prosecutor showed it to me—my master gave me 18d. towards a new one, and I bought a new one.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any mark on it? A. Yes; I have sewn Sit up here, and there are several iron-moulds—the two prisoners and four boys, I believe, worked for Mr. Purkis, and three weavers do out-door work—they were going backwards and forwards—I have known Theodora about four years, and the other about two years—they both worked for Mr. Purkis all the time I knew them, up to the time of their being taken up on this charge—as far as I ever heard, they have borne the character of honest men.

MR. PRSNDEROAST. Q. Have you never heard any thing against either of them? A. Nothing.

THOMAS MALIN . I am a policeman. I apprehended Brandon—I have a piece of horsehair cloth, which was delivered to me by the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell Brandon the charge you took him on? A. Yes—he went willingly—he said he knew nothing at all about it—I should think Shoreditch church is nearly half a mile from Golden-lane

—I do not think it is a mile—Golden-lane is a little higher up than St. Luke's, Old-street—I know Collingwood-street, Bethnal-green—it it pretty nearly a mile from Golden-lane—it lies at the back of Shoreditch church.

(MR. JONES called the following witnesses for the defence,)

WILLIAM STOREY . I live at No. 4, Branch's-buildings, Tabernacle-walk, Finsbury. On the evening of the 18th of April I was at the Lon-don Apprentice, in Old-street-road—I keep a stall outside there, and have done so for the last eight years—I know the prisoner Brandon—I saw him that evening at the London Apprentice at a little after seven o'clock—I was away during the time he was there about ten minutes, and returned again—he went away with Mrs. Norton towards Shoreditch church—the bell was then leaving off eight o'clock—it Was very little after seven o'clock when I first saw him—he was doing nothing—he came to me and spoke to me—he staid with me till nearly the eight o'clock bell leaving off, which I consider is a quarter after eight within a few minutes—it rings at eight o'clock, and continues nearly a quarter of an hour—he was with me from a little after seven o'clock till that time—he went away with Mrs. Norton from the door—my wife was with me at the time.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You were all that time together? A. Yes; I went away for about ten minutes, hut my wife was there all the time—when I went on my little errand, it was not half-past seven o'clock—I did not see him after he left with Mrs. Norton—I keep an old iron stall outside the door—he was not at the stall all the time; we were inside the public-house—my boy was along with me, and he was outside doing my business while I was in the public-house along with the prisoner—I was in and out, but the prisoner was inside from seven to eight o'clock—I will swear he was in the house, for my wife was inside the whole time—I was inside the whole time within very little—I might be called out now and then—I will say I was not out a quarter of an hour altogether—my wife was inside, in front of the house—it is a bar—I was in front of the bar on a bench with my wife—the prisoner was on the bench too—the publican is not here, nor his wife—she was there in and out—there is no pot-boy—there is no beer taken out, I believe, there—the master waits on the customers—there is a maid-servant—she does not carry beer about—there is a waiter behind the bar, but not to take out beer—he was there that night—he is not here—I was before the Magistrate, but was not called in—we were there in readiness, in case we might be called in—I did not apply to go in, we were only there in case we were wanted—I drank with the prisoner—when he came in, he said, "I have got twopence"—I put twopence to it, and we had a quartern of gin between him and me and my wife, and afterwards we had one pint of porter—I only went a little way up the road when 1 went out—sometimes I take A wall round to see if there may be any thing that may suit me—I buy odds and ends—I generally do so—I am in the habit of going when I have my wife or boy there—I take a walk round—I merely went out to see if there was Any thing lying about the shops to suit me—I only go down Old-street-road—I do not walk down the whole road, no further than the end of Pit-field-street—I did not go 100 yards down the road—I went to see what I could find.

MR. JONES. Q. Can you undertake to swear the prisoner was not out of your sight more than ten minutes or A quarter of an hour during that time? A. I can.

COURT. Q. Could Brandon have left the public-house without your seeing him? A. No, he could not.

JURY. Q. How do you know it was the 18th of April? A. I know it exceedingly well—I am well aware how the days go on—I am well aware it was on this day which is represented—I generally keep an account Of the days of the month, and I know it was on this Tuesday—I am perfectly sure it was on that day.

COURT. Q. On what day did you go to the Police-office? A. On the Saturday following—ray attention was then called to its having been the Tuesday before.

SARAH STOREY . I am the wife of the last witness; he keeps a stall near the London Apprentice. On the 18th of April I saw Brandon at the London Apprentice, a little after seven o'clock in the evening—he is not acquainted with my husband but he knew him—I saw him that evening, from a little after seven o'clock till the bell had done going eight, and then he went away with a strange woman—he was in our company till then—the woman went away with him about quarter past eight o'clock, when the Shoreditch bell had done going—I saw him all the time, from a little after seven till a quarter past eight o'clock, at the London Apprentice—I went to take my husband a tea there, and somebody called me in to have a drink of beer—I was having the beer when Brandon came in and spoke to me—he drank—he paid 2d. for a quartern of gin, and my husband put the rest to it—he did not go out at all—we came out at the door together, as the bell was going eight, and we remained there till the bell had done going eight.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Do you mean that your husband and him remained there? A. Yes—we were outside the door after we had done drinking the gin, and remained outside till the bell had done going—we staid outside, altogether, about a quarter of-an hour, for my husband's things were outside the door—I was inside, from a little after seven, until the bell was going eight o'clock—it was a little after seven o'clock when I went in—I remember looking at the Clock, and saying, "Oh my God, it is after seven"—I had two little boys at home which made me look at the clock—my husband went outside, when he was wanted at his stall—he was away when I first went there with his tea-but when he came back he did net leave the stall at all.

Q. Then from the time you went in, which was a little after seven, up to the time you left, which was a quarter past eight o'clock, your husband only went out to his stall? A. No, he was only away from the house to go to his stall—I cannot say whether he went away from his stall, for I was inside—he was out no time at all hardly—only while he served a customer—he is a porter, and goes on errands—when I want there with his tea, at a quarter to seven o'clock, he was not there—I put his tea down—somebody called me into the house to have a drink of beer, and in the mean time my husband came back, and during this time Brandon came in and looked in at the door—my husband had Come back then, and was taking his tea—Brandon looked in, and he could not drink the beer—my husband put 2d. to his 2d. and had gin—my husband then remained in our company only, when he was called out to serve anybody—he might be out for five minutes, but he was not away from his stall, except coming in and out.

MR. JONES. Q. When he went out of the public-house, could you see him outside? A. I did not get up to look—when I opened the door he was out—he was no sooner out than he was in again—I could not see him

while he was out—he is not in the habit of walking about, buying things, unless he buys at shops, or goes to an iron yard—that is where be buys his things—he does not go about to buy things—people who have got lob to sell, sell them to him—he does not buy any where else, except it is any one who knows him, and he goes to look at a house—he might have been absent five minutes at a time, but not longer.

JURY. Q. What part of the public-house did you sit in? A. There is but one place to sit, there is but a form—the house has been pulled down and rebuilt—Brandon had on a fustian coat and white apron—that is the coat he has on now.

ELIZABETH NORTON . I am married. My husband is a horse hair getter up, and lives at No. 2, Collingwood-street—I know Brandon—I saw him on the 18th of April, about a quarter after eight o'clock in the evening, at the London Apprentice, and walked as far as Shoreditch church with him—I saw Mr. and Mrs. Storey talking to him—I left Brandon at Shoreditch church, at about twenty minutes after eight o'clock—he had a fustian coat on, his apron, and his working dress, as I have seen him for these eighteen months—he was in the same dress as he is now.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did it take that time to walk to Shoreditch church? A. I think so—five minutes—I forget the name of the place where he lives—it is down in Shoreditch—I live at the back of Shoreditch church—I really forget the name of the place where he lives—oh! it is Black Horse-yard—we live about five minutes' walk from each other—he went straight down Shoreditch, past the church, towards Bishopsgate-street—I did not go before the Magistrate, nor to the police-office.

WILLIAM CHIVERS . I live at No. 20, Swan-yard, Shoreditch; it runs out of the main street—the prisoner Brandon lodged in my house. On the 18th of April, he left my house about seven o'clock in the evening, or a few minutes past—I remained at home after he left—he returned at about twenty or twenty-five minutes after eight o'clock—my wife was out at that time—she came in afterwards—Brandon called me and my wife up stairs, and showed us some shelves which he had put up that day—Brandon had borrowed 4d. of me in the afternoon, and he had not been in five minutes before be sent the 4d. down—I wrote a letter for a friend that day, which enables me to remember the day—after looking at the shelves, I came down—this was about a quarter before nine o'clock, as near as possible—my little daughter was in the house at the time—Brandon did not leave my house again that night—he occupied the front room—I have but one floor—he could not have gone out without my seeing him, for the foot of the stairs comes into the room we sit in, which is the back parlour—I remained in the house till I went to bed, which was about ten o'clock—I went out about nine o'clock—it was three minutes after nine by the Spotted Horse public-house clock, in Shoreditch, when I went out—I returned with some mutton chops, at twelve minutes after nine o'clock—the prisoner was at home when I returned—I did not see him, but I have every reason to believe he was at home—I did not see him go out after that—I did not find him there next morning—I closed the street door that night—he had on the same dress that night as he has now.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You went before the Magistrate, I believe? A. Yes, and gave evidence there—I told the truth there, to the best of my recollection—my recollection is better now than it was then—it is three weeks last Saturday—I have since that had time to refresh my memory—I cannot tell whether what I said was taken down in writing.

BENJAMIN BAKER . I am a policeman. I saw this witness before the

Magistrate—I cannot say whether what he said was taken down—it was written down, I think, by the Magistrate, but not put into the deposition; and I think it was written down by our inspector.

JOHN BRUNDLEY . I am a police inspector of the G division. I was present at the examination of the prisoners before Mr. Grove—I saw Chivers, the witness, there—he was called as a witness—I took a note in writing of what he said, but I have not got it with me—I believe the Magistrate did not take it, nor the clerk—the Magistrate requested me to do it—I took it down, and took it away with me—I did not give it to the Magistrate—the Magistrate did not tell me to take it down for him—he merely asked me to take a note of the witness's evidence, in case I should be called on at that office, I presume—I have got it at home now.

MARTHA CHIVERS . I am the wife of William Chivers. Brandon lodged in our house—I remember the 18th of April perfectly well—I went out about a quarter after seven o'clock that evening—Brandon was out then—my daughter, who is about eleven years old, went out with me—I returned at half-past eight o'clock myself, but I sent my little girl home about ten minutes before me—Brandon was at home when I got home, and my husband also—we went up stairs, about a quarter of an hour after I came home, into Brandon's room, and saw some shelves there—I remained there about five minutes—my husband went down first, and I went down within a minute or two of him—I left Brandon in the room, with his nightcap on—he is a married man—his wife lives with him, and they have got a little girl—he appeared to be about going to bed—the little girl went down to get the supper beer after that—I did not go out of the house after half-past eight o'clock—I was in our sitting room after leaving Brandon's room—I went to bed about a quarter past ten o'clock—our room is immediately below Brandon's—he could not pass without my seeing him—he did not leave his room that night—he was dressed in the same clothes as he is now, except his nightcap.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. He put his nightcap on, with all his other clothes on, did he? A. Yes—he was sitting down with his nightcap on when I saw him—his wife was in the room—I came down stairs when I saw him sitting like that—I was not before the Magistrate—I know the time my husband went out, but not exactly—he saw the dock—I stopped in the room till he returned with the chops—I had a particular reason for observing the time that night—I looked at the clock, and it was half-past eight when I came in, and I said to my little girl, "You have left me ten minutes, and I have not been long"—this was on the 18th of April—there was nothing particular in that night more than other nights, but in the middle of the day I went to my little girl's, and received her month's wages, at the west end of the town—I was not called to the police-office to give evidence—I knew he was taken up—I knew my husband went there—I could not recollect for the moment that the prisoner was at home at half-past eight o'clock—I had to call it to my mind—I think it was the next Tuesday or Wednesday that I recollected it—it was brought to my recollection after my husband was taken to the office to speak to Mr. Brandon—I was ill in bed at that time—the policeman knows that.

JURY. Q. Does Brandon wear some other dress at times? A. I never saw him in any other dress but that—but once, I think about four months ago, I saw him with a black frock-coat—at least it was a close-bodied coat, that wraps all round—it was about nine o'clock in the evening about four months ago, when he was going to the play—he has no

there clothes in his possession to my knowledge, nor ever had—he is dressed on Sunday the same as he is now, except a clean handkerchief.

ELIZA CHIVERS . I am eleven years old; I am the daughter of William Chivers and his wife. The prisoner Brandon lives in our house—I used to work at the braid work—I have two sisters who have got places now—on Tuesday, the 18th of April, I remember going out with my mother, about a quarter after seven o'clock, I think, to buy a bonnet-shape—I went home first to take the bonnet-shape home, and then I went back again to my mother—I met her at the corner of Swan-yard, where we live, and we went together, to get her bonnet back again, which she had taken before, and she said she would not have it done—we went into Curtain-road, and then went home together—it was half-past by the Swan and Horse clock when we got home—when we got home I heard Mr. Brandon call out to my father and mother—he was up stairs—they went up—I am sure it was Brandon's voice I heard call to them, and I heard him cough—they remained up stairs about five minutes—my father came down first—my mother stayed up about a minute longer, and then she came down after him—my father did not go out after that, while I was up, but I went to bed soon after my mother came down from Brandon—I should think it was about a quarter to nine o'clock when I went to bed—I slept in the next room to Brandon—the head of my bed was next to his room—I did not see him when I went up to bed.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. When was it you told all this long account first of what took place? A. I did not tell it to any body that night—it was on Saturday night I went to a gentleman in Hatton-garden—the Saturday night before last—up to that time I had not told it to any body at all—I had told it to my mother—I told her the same night I went to the gentle-man, but I had not told her before—she did not say any thing to me about it before that night—that is about a fortnight or three weeks ago—I am sure I cannot tell the day of the month—I do not know what day of the month last Sunday was, or the Saturday night that I went to the gentleman in Hatton-garden.

JURY. Q. Did you see Brandon in any other coat than that he has on? A. Only on one occasion, the night be went to the playhouse with Mrs. Brandon's brother—I think it was a black coat—I have never seen it since—he has not got that coat at home—he does not wear it on Sundays—he wears no other dress but that I see him go to work in—it is a frock-coat he goes to work in—I am sure I do not know what sort of a coat the black one is—it not like the one he goes to work in—that is the one he has on now.

MR. JONES. Q. Do you know what month this is? A. May.

THOMAS HUBBARD . I am a watchmaker, and live at No. 19, Colling-wood-street. I know the prisoner Therefore—on the evening of the 18th of April I saw him at the Ship public-house, kept by Mr. Turner in Old Cock-lane, at the back of Shoreditch Church—I went in a few minutes before seven o'clock and remained there till half-past ten o'clock, but Theodore left a few minutes either before or after nine o'clock—I cannot positively say whether he went out of the room while I was there, but not for above a minute or so, at any rate not for a longer time—he was not out of ray sight three or four minutes—as near as I can recollect he went away at nine o'clock—it was not many minutes from nine o'clock either before or after—I should say not more than ten minutes at the most, either way—I know Golden-lane—I should say it is three-quarters of a mile from the Ship—Theodore wore the same dress that night as he has now, I never in fact saw him in any other—I have known him nearly twelve months—he is married—I am not aware that he has any children—I did not know the name

of the person he worked for till the other day, but I know the shop where he worked.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Do you often spend your evenings at the Ship? A. Yes, generally—what makes me recollect that night particularly is, that I began a job in my business on Monday morning, which took me to about five o'clock on Tuesday—I was not in the Ship that week from the Tuesday night till the Saturday, and by that time I had completed another job—I went to the Ship about seven o'clock—I finished my work at five, but I took tea after that and sat a while, reading a book—I believe Theodore bid me good night, when he went out, he said "Good night, gentlemen," or Something of that sort—I can't positively say he did wish me good night—there were a dozen people there at least, I imagine—there is a publican, and an elderly woman serves in the bar—they are not here—a nephew of the woman attends there—he is not here.

JONES. Q. Do you know any of the persons who were in the room that night besides Theodore? A. Yes; in fact very few go there but what do know—I know them in as much as they meet there of an evening—I Know where some of them live.

MR. PRENDEROAST. Q. Did you go before the Magistrate? A. I went with Mr. Turner, but I was told by an officer to wait in an outer room, and was not called at all—I went with the intention of proving that he was in Mr. Turner's house—Mr. Turner attended there the day after they were taken—on the Friday—he is afflicted with gout—Collingwood-street is only across Cock-lane—the Ship is directly opposite the end of Collingwood-street, I should say not more than five or six yards.

MARTHA MILLER . I live in the same house with Theodore, he married my aunt—I know the Ship public-house in Cock-lane—he uses it I believe—on the 18th of April I saw him between fire and six o'clock in the evening when I was at tea—I do not know what time he went out, I was not at home—I was at work at Mr. Abbott's, in Great Anchor-street, Shoreditch—I got home at a quarter-past nine o'clock and saw Theodore in bed—I sat and had my supper in the room where he was in bed, and then went to bed myself—he was in bed when I got home—he has been at work in Mr. Purkis's employ for seven or eight years, to the best of my recollection up to the time of this happening.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How do you know that? A. My master works for Mr. Purkis—I got home at a quarter past nine o'clock—I heard Shore-ditch chimes strike the quarter just as I got to the baker's—I am sure it was not a quarter after ten o'clock—I was at the solicitor's at Hatton-garden, but not before the Magistrate—Theodore does not have a bag that I know of—he works at horsehair-curling—he does not have a bag to carry it home in—he always works at Mr. Purkis's—I did not see any bag at all—I am quite sure of the day—I do not know the day of the month—I do not know what day of the month last Sunday was, nor Easter Monday or Sunday—I can only tell the 18th of April.

MR. JONES. Q. Do you remember your uncle being taken up? A. Yes—my attention was not called to the Tuesday at that time—I was in the room at the time he was taken—I was told what it was for, but I did not pay any attention—I did not know what the policeman came on—I afterwards heard it was for breaking a house open on Tuesday night.

(The witnesses Storey, Chivers, and Hubbard; Edward Orsley, a silk-weaver, Cock-lane; and James Harris, carpenter, Long-alley, Bishops-gate; deposed to the prisoner Brandon's good character.)

THEODORE— GUILTY. DEATH .—Aged 36.

BRANDON— GUILTY. DEATH . Aged 33.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX LARCENIES,&c.

OLD COURT.—Monday, May 8th, 1837.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370508-1163

1163. LOUISA IVORY was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, May the 9th, 1837.

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370508-1164

1164. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Charles James Joseph Roberts, from his person: also, for stealing, on the same day, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Octavius Unwin, from his person—to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1165

1165. JOHN WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, 1 pair of trowsers, value 7s., the goods of Samuel Farrar Stephens;to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Three Months; Fourteen Days Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1166

1166. GEORGE MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Edwin Parkes, from his person.

EDWIN PARKES . I live in Essex-street, Strand, and am in a merchant's counting-house. On the evening of the 14th of April, I was in Fleet-street, between six and seven o'clock, and felt something at my pocket—I turned round, and caught the prisoner, with my handkerchief in his hand, putting it into his pocket—I accused him of it—he denied it, and threw the handkerchief down—a person who was passing took it up, and gave it to me—this is it.

Prisoner. I did not have it on me at all—two young men who were walking by my side took it, and threw it down—I merely touched the gentleman on the shoulder, and he caught hold of me. Witness. I was not. touched on the shoulder—I felt him pull at my pocket—there was another with him, much taller than him, who ran away.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am street-keeper of St. Dunstan's. I took charge of the prisoner, and received the handkerchief from the prosecutor—I found nothing on him. (Frederick Johns, bootmaker, Little George-street, Hampstead-road, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY .†Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.—Recommended to the Penitentiary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1167

1167. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Hilary John Bauerman, from his person.

GEORGE CUTHBERT . I am a warehouseman, and live in Talbot-court, Gracechurch-street. On the afternoon of the 21st of April I was coming out of the court, and saw the prisoner and another following the prosecutor,

towards London-bridge, through Little East Cheap—I saw the prisoner take from the prosecutor's pocket a yellow silk handkerchief—I went up to him—he came towards me, and I laid hold of his collar—he chucked the handkerchief out of his hand directly he saw me—I dragged him to where he threw the handkerchief, and took it up—I gave it to the policeman—the prisoner told me if I did not let go of him he would job me in the mouth.

HILARY JOHN BAUERMAN . I am a merchant, and live in Tooley-street. On the 21st of April I was walking through Little East Cheap—somebody came behind me, and said my pocket had been picked—I missed my handKerchief—I went back, and saw the prisoner in custody—Cuthbert produced the handkerchief—it is mine.

WILLIAM BRATTON (City police-constable, 90.) I received the prisoner in charge—he was trying to get away from me, but I took him and the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.—Recommended to the Penitentiary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1168

1168. HARRIETT SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April, 2 half-crowns, 2 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the monies of Horatio Jones Horrence, from his person.

HORATIO JONES HORRENCE . I am a manufacturing stationer, In Fleet-street. On the night of the 28th of April I was going through Temple—her—the prisoner met me close to my own house—she asked me to accompany her, which I declined, and requested her to leave me; but she still continued walking with me, and managed to extract from my pocket two half-crowns, two shillings, and two sixpences—I charged her with it, and begged her to return me my money, and go about her business—she said she had not taken any money, but I was certain she had—I felt her hand about my person, and when she was about leaving me her hand was clenched—I said, "What have you in your hand?"—she said, "Nothing," and put it to her bosom—I said she had robbed me, and insisted on her giving me my money—I kept her in sight, and gave her in charge.

Prisoner. When I spoke to the gentleman he was along with a young woman. Witness. I was not—a woman spoke to me as I passed, but I was in company with no one but the prisoner.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am a constable of St. Dunstan's in the West. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house—I searched her, and found half-a-crown in her bosom and two sixpences in her pocket—I took her down to the cell—the prosecutor said he was positive she had his money—I went to her, and told her to unlace herself, and let her petticoat and pocket drop on the floor—she loosened herself, and the other half-crown fell to the ground—in all I found 8s. on her—she had said she had no money at all about her.

Prisoner. I had the money when I came from home—I had three half-Browns, and changed one.

H. JONES HORRENCE re-examined. I lost two half-crowns, two shillings, and three sixpences, but one sixpence must have dropped—she took her Band from my side, and it was clenched—that made me suspect her, and I said, "You have got my money in your hand"—she said she had not, and but it into her bosom—I had felt her touch my pocket—it was about twelve o'clock at night.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined, Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1169

1169. EDWARD JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Arthur Gurney, from his person.

ARTHUR GURNEY . I am a wine-merchant, and live in Bryanston-street, Portman-square. On the 3rd of May, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I was walking up Holborn-hill, and felt my coat-pocket move—I turned round, and saw the prisoner close behind me—he ran down the hill, and missing my handkerchief, I ran after him, calling "Stop thief"—as I came up to him I picked up my handkerchief close behind him, in the middle of the road—I had not been in that spot myself before—there was nobody near me but the prisoner—he was four or five yards from me when I turned round—he ran as soon as he saw my motions—this is my handkerchief.

Prisoner. There were four or five men behind the gentleman—I saw one of them drop something—I took it up, the gentleman called "Stop thief," and I threw it down again. Witness. There was nobody near me besides him—it happened about Hatton-garden, and he ran to the bottom of the hill, about 100 yards—the handkerchief was close by him when he was stopped.

JOSEPH TURNER (police-constable G 69.) On the 3rd of May I was on Holborn-hill, and heard a cry of "Stop thief"—I turned round, and saw the prisoner running down the hill—I pursued, and saw him throw the handkerchief down just before he was stopped—the prosecutor took it up.

Prisoner. I did not drop it. Witness. He ran about 100 yards—it was taken up within three or four yards of where he was stopped. (The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1170

1170. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, 12 frying-pans, value 18s., the goods of John Follet Pugsley.

LEWIS DURRANT . I am in the employ of John Follet Pugsley, ironmonger, Upper Thames-street. On the afternoon of the 8th of April I saw the prisoner come into my master's shop—he took a dozen frying-pans, put them on his shoulder, and went away with them from inside the shop—I pursued and stopped him—he said a man had put them on his shoulder, and asked him to carry them.

WILLIAM COLLIER (City policeman. No, 89.) I took charge of the prisoner, and have the frying-pans.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370508-1171

1171. SAMUEL CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 40 yards of cotton cloth, value 3l., the goods of George Hodson.

FREDERICK KINGCOME . I am servant to Mr. George Hodson, woollen-draper, Farringdon-street. On the evening of the 21st of April I received information, in consequence of which I went into Sharp's-alley, 300 or 400 yards from our house, and met the prisoner going through the alley, with this piece of goods on his shoulder—he threw it down, and ran away—my fellow-servant picked it up—I secured him—I am quite sure he is the man—I had seen the cloth safe about five minutes before—I know it by our private mark.

Prisoner. I saw a young man running, and he dropped this on a dust-hole—I picked it up, and seeing the young man come running, I gave it

to him, and was given into custody—I put it into bra arms. Witness. He did not give it to me—he threw it down and ran away—it was inside the lobby, not in the street.

LOUIS WHITMORE . I am in the prosecutor's employ. I went with Kingcome into Sharp's-alley, and saw the prisoner going along with the goods on his shoulder, which he threw down and ran away—I picked it up—I am quite sure he is the person—he was taken into custody in less than five minutes.

FREDERICK MURRAY . I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre's. I heard the alarm given, and ran after the prisoner down john's-court into West-street; I took him at the bottom of the steps out of breath.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1172

1172. JAMES BLACK and CHARLES BLACK were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of George Hyde, from his person.

GEORGE HYDE . I am in the service of Mr. Rogers, of Woburn-place Shortly after eleven o'clock in the morning, on the 9th of April, I was in Sheffield-street, Clare-market, and observed three young men following me—I felt a tug at my pocket—I went a few yards further, and felt another tug—I looked round, and saw my handkerchief in the hands of the prisoner James Black—they were all three behind me together—I saw him fold the handkerchief up, and put it into his pocket—I asked him to give me my handkerchief—he said, "What handkerchief?"—I went to take hold of him, and they all three ran away—Charles Black was one of them—I pur-sued them through Sheffield-street into Clement's-lane, back into Sheffield-street, and Charles Black threw the handkerchief at me—I am sure it was him—they had changed it from one to the other—I picked it up—they sepa-rated in Clare-market, and Charles went a contrary road—I followed James into a house, where I stopped till a policeman came, and took him out—I delivered the handkerchief to the constable—it was a silk one—next day I was attending at Bow-street, and saw Charles come to the office, and he was put to the bar—I am sure he was one of the two who were close to me, and who threw my handkerchief down—James was the one that threw it, he had it in his hand after Charles—I had seen them shift it behind them.

James Black. Charles was not with me at all. Witness. I am certain of him.

HENRY CURTIS (police-constable F 100.) I was on duty in Clare-market, and saw James Black and another running in a direction for Clement's-lane, and the prosecutor following them—I followed after a third, who was in their company—I saw the prosecutor stop at a door, and he said one had gone in there—I found James behind the door in the back parlour, and the pro-secutor pointed him out as one of them—I asked him what he ran. away for, and he said he ran because the others ran.

James Black. I am innocent, and Charles bad nothing to do with it at all.

J. BLACK— GUILTY . Aged 19.

C. BLACK— GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1173

1173. CHARLES BLACK was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Henry Butterworth, from his person.

HENRY BUTTERWORTH, ESQ . On the 9th of April, I was walking up Warwick-court, Gray's-inn, between twelve and one o'clock, and was desired to stop—I turned round, and heard a cry of "Stop thief"—at the same instant I saw my pocket handkerchief on the ground, about a yard from me—I had used it just previously, and put it into my right hand pocket—I saw three persons running away, but I lost sight of them—I followed the crowd down Chancery-lane—a policeman stated that the prisoner was apprehended, and taken to Bow-street—I went there, and before the Magistrate, and the prisoner was committed—this is my handkerchief.

ALFRED SWEET . I am sixteen years old, and live in Leather-lane. I saw the prosecutor in Chancery-lane on the 9th of April—the prisoner and another were following him—he went into Warwick-court, and I saw one of them take the handkerchief out of his right hand pocket, and give it to the other—I gave an alarm, and they directly passed me, and threw the handkerchief down at my side—I pursued, and never lost sight of the prisoner till he was taken—I am certain of him.

JOHN RUDDICK . I am a policeman. I was on duty in Holborn, and saw a crowd in Chancery-lane—the prisoner was detained by the crowd, I took him to Bow-street, and received from the prosecutor the handkerchief produced.

GUILTY .—Aged 19.

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, May 9th, 1837.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370508-1174

1174. CATHERINE FORDHAM was indicted ft* stealing, on the 5th of April, 2 shawls, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 cap, value 6d.; and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; the goods of Thomas Foot Piper, her master.

MARY PIPER . My husband's name is Thomas Foot Piper. The prisoner lived with me a month, and then left—I missed a shawl about a week after—I went after her to Long-alley, and found my crape handkerchief on her neck—she was living there—she said I had given it to her, and then said the handkerchief was not mine—I was almost certain of it—I went borne, and mine was not at home—I went back in the evening—I said it. was mine at first; but she said so positively it was not mine, that I did not like to be too positive—I found my stockings on her feet, and the pocket-handkerchief in her pocket—this is my shawl and handkerchief—she hat picked out the marks.

JURY. Q. Have you any private mark on the shawl? A. It was torn, and she has mended it—the stockings are both marked.

Prisoner. She told me I might the wear shawl, and then she gave it to me. Witness. I gave her liberty to wear it, but never gave it her, only when she went out with the child.

SUSAN DENT . The prisoner came to London, and I got her a situation at Mrs. Piper's, Mrs. Piper lent her the shawl to wear, and she left her with it on.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1175

1175. WILLIAM CRASK was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May, 521bs. weight of bacon, value 1l. 10s.; the goods of Henry Curtis Payne.

SAMUEL BATES . I live in Houndsditch, nearly opposite Mr. Payne, who

is a cheesemonger. On the 5th of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was standing at my door—I saw the prisoner go to the truck at Mr. Payne's door, take a side of bacon out, and run away with it 'down a passage by the side of my house—he could not get out—he turned into a passage of a house, threw it down, and came out—I collared him—he said, "Let me go, I have done nothing"—I would not, and then he began to show fight, and abused me, but I took him into the shop.

HENRY CURTIS PAYNE . This is my bacon—it was in the truck at my door.

JAMES ACKERS . I took life prisoner—he made great resistance.

Prisoner. I was tipsy, and did not know any thing about it. GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1176

1176. WILLIAM SMITH, alias William Siddle , was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, one tub, value 6d., and 49lbs. weight of butter, value 2l., the goods of Thomas Davidge.

ROBERT SMITH . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Davidge, a cheesemonger in the Minories. Between seven and eight o'clock on the evening of the 20th of April, a cart with tubs of butter came—they were unloaded and put under the window, while we made room for them in the shop—I had seen the prisoner about five minutes before, reading a play bill—an alarm was given—I ran out, and saw him about twenty yards off, carrying a tub of butter—I ran after him—he put it down and walked off—I pur-sued and took him—I never lost sight of him—this is the tub.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1177

1177. ABRAHAM SAMUELS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May, one coat, value 2l., and one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of George Davenport; and that be bad been, before convicted of felony.

GEORGE DAVENPORT , Esq. On the 5th of May I was in Ellis's shop at Ludgate Hill, and went to my carriage in St. Paul's Church Yard, to tell the footman to return there for a parcel—I found my carriage drawn up, and my coat had been taken off the carriage seat.

WILLIAM NIGHTINGALE . I work for Mr. Clark, of Oxford-street I was on the top of an omnibus, and saw the carriage coming along gently—the prisoner went to the side of it, took the coat, and went to a young man who had a bag, and they put the coat into the bag—I sung out "Stop thief," the other dropped the bag and went off—I ran after the coachman, and they had got the prisoner back.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you saw me run round the corner with it? A. No, the other did.

EDWIN BLUNDEN , (City policeman No. 2.) I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner. I heard a cry of "Stop thief, and some carman caught me, and threw me down, and punched me on the head till the officer took me.

WILLIAM BARRY , (police-constable H 59.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read.)—he is the man that was tried.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1178

1178. LEWIS LEO was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, one pair of trowsers, value 7s., the goods of Samuel Ferrer Stephens, and that he had been before convicted of felony.

SAMUEL FERRER STEPHENS . I live at the corner of Lawrence-lane, Cheapside, and am a hosier. On the 22nd of April, I was standing at

my shop-door, and was told the prisoner had taken a pair of trowsers—I missed a pair, he was taken, and they were found—these are mine.

WILLIAM ADAMS . I was on duty in Lawrence-lane on the night of the 22nd of April—I heard the cry of "Stop thief"—the prisoner was running towards me—I secured him in King-street, and he dropped these trowsers—I took them and him.

WILLIAM BARRY , (police-constable H 59.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office, (read)—the prisoner is the same person.

Prisoner. I did it out of deep distress—I had no food to eat, and no lodging.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1179

1179. HENRY MORLEY and GEORGE COPE were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March, 120 stereotype plates, value 20l., the goods of Daniel Beckham, their master.—2nd COUNT, for stealing 80lbs. weight of stereotype metal, value 20l.

MR. RATIIBONE conducted the Prosecution.

DANIEL BECKHAM . I have a stereotype foundry—I missed some plates, and made inquiry of the prisoners and the other men, and the reply was, "Did I suppose they were thieves"—I said, "No," I have missed plates two or three years, but more particularly since January last—on the 1st of April I drove to town, and got out of ray chaise at the comer of the court—the police said they had found some metal, and asked if it was my property—I said yes, and sent for a proof of the plate, and we compared it word for word, to show that it was mine.

WILLIAM STREW . I was the prosecutor's apprentice. In March, I was taken with the prisoner Morley, with 241lbs. of type metal, by two policemen—we got the metal from the prosecutor's picking and lathe room, with the intention to see Mr. Cope, for him to sell it—we took it to a beer-shop that he uses, as we had taken others to him before—some of it was good and some bad—some of it was in the plates—I should say it was about three months ago that I first began taking metal—only Morley was present when I took this—Cope used to sell it for us.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You had been robbing for three months? A. I have been about two years with my master—twelve or fourteen weeks ago was the first time I took metal from him—I don't know that I ever took any before—I took a sovereign and a pair of pistols, and then this metal—I was seventeen years old last February—some of the metal was standing on the bench—I did not take it—I took it out of the picking-room—Morley was with me—Cope was not there—it was taken out of the house at night—I walked away with it when I left work—I was taken before the magistrate—he did not object to my being a witness—I do not believe that giving testimony against these men will benefit me.

MR. RATHBONE. Q. You are an apprentice with Morley? A. Yes, and have been so about two years—there was another with me when the sovereign and pistols were taken.

THOMAS COTTON . I am foreman to Mr. Simmons. The prisoner Cope came to my place to sell metal—he first came at the beginning of February.

WILLIAM HODGE (police-constable N 97.) On the 31st of March I was in the Kingsland-road. I saw Morley and the witness—I suspected them—Morley had got this bundle of metal on his shoulder—I asked what he

had got—he said, "Metal"—I asked where he brought it from—he said, "West-street, Smithfield," and was going to take it to Kingsland—on getting to the end of Fleming-street he threw it down, and ran off—the sergeant went after him—I took Strew, and took the property.

THOMAS MOTHERSELL (police-sergeant N 12.) Morley passed me at the corner of Macclesfield-street with this bundle on his right shoulder—I gave information to Hodge to stop them—on the bridge at the corner of Fleming-street, he threw it down, and ran down Fleming-street—I pursued and took him—he said he did it through not having enough—he said they were both apprentices—Cope was taken a few days afterwards in Bethnal-green.

DANIEL BECKHAM re-examined. This is my metal—it corresponds with our first proof, which I have.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How long have you been in busi-ness? A. About nine months, I conducted the business fourteen years.

MORLEY— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

COPE— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1180

1180. HENRY MORLEY and GEORGE COPE were again indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March, 12 stereotype plates, value 8l., the goods of Daniel Beckham, their master.

MR. RATHBONE conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS COTTON . I am in the employ of Mr. Simmons; he makes the accompaniments to the type. Here is a sort of cash-book, kept by me—I put down here the money received and paid, and what for—here is an entry on the 1st of April, of 601lbs. of metal—15s. was paid for it—I recollect on that day Cope calling at my master's place, and he sold this—he had brought metal for two months before that, to the amount of about 8l. 12s. 6d., from the beginning of February—it has been paid by me generally, not always—he was treated the same as a printer or dealer in metal—my employer knew him, but I did not at all—I have heard him state he was with a printer of the name of Molyneux, who was gone abroad—1 believe this on the 1st of April was old metal.

WILLIAM STREW . On the 1st of April I was in the prosecutor's employ. I broke up some metal on that day for the purpose of selling it—Morley and Cope were present—Cope sold it to Cotton—I followed and went with him—it was my master's property.

Morley. We were in custody then—we were taken on the 31st of March.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1181

1181. GEORGE KIDDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November, 1836, 1 sovereign, the monies of Daniel Beckham, His master. (No evidence was offered.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1182

1182. WILLIAM WITHERS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November, 1836,1 pair of Pistols, value 5l., the goods of Daniel Beckham, his master. (No evidence was offered.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1183

1183. SAMUEL KING was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March, 5 sovereigns, 4 crowns, 32 half-crowns, 30 shillings, and 20 six pences; the monies of Thomas Hormwood, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1184

1184. MARY ANN CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April, 1 pair of ear-rings, value 14s., the goods of William Thomas Henry Usherwood;to which she pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1185

1185. THOMAS RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously forging a request for the delivery of 4 yards of calico and 4 yards of flannel, with intent to defraud John Danford, against the Statute, &c.—2nd COUNT, for uttering the same with like intent.— And also for stealing, on the 21st of March, 1 sovereign, the money of Abraham Toulmin, his master;to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1186

1186. FRANCIS LEDGER was indicted for embezzlement.

JOHN NICHOLAS HUBE . I am a newsvender. The prisoner had been five or six months in my employ—he was accustomed to receive monies for me, and ought to have accounted the same day—he never delivered this money to me from Stewart.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What was the date of this embezzlement? A. I cannot exactly say—it was in 1836—my quarterly bills go in in June, and it must have been shortly after that—1 have no books here—I never saw him from the time he went out till I took him into custody—he was then in the employ of my aunt, in the same business.

DANIEL STEWART . On the 6th of July I paid a lad 2s. 6d., and he gave me a receipt—I think it was the prisoner, but cannot swear it, as the prosecutor has several boys.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1187

1187. W. JEFFERSON was indicted for embezzlement.

THOMAS WILSON . I am a stationer, and live in Cheapside. The prisoner was my carman to deliver goods, and receive money, which he should account for every night—he never accounted to me for sums of money received from Clayton, White, and Bridges.

WILLIAM CLAYTON . On the 16th of September I paid the prisoner 17s. 10d.

RICHARD WHITE . I am a customer of Mr. Wilson's—I paid the prisoner 1l. 1s. and 11s. 3d. on the 21st of September.

BENJAMIN BRIDGES . I paid the prisoner 9s. on the 23rd of September.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined Six Months.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, May 16th, 1837.

Third Jury, before Mr. Sergeant A robin.

Reference Number: t18370508-1188

1188. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering a bill of exchange for 96l. 10s., with intent to defraud David Bevan and others.—Other COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Life.

(John Keeley, colonial-broker, Mincing-lane; John Mitchell, No. 33, Great Winchester-street; Paul Miller, wholesale grocer, Little East-cheap; John Wyles, coffee-dealer, Cannon-street; and Robert Halls, coffee-dealer, Mincing-lane; deposed to the prisoner's good character.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18370508-1189

1189. MARGARET BENTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April, at St. Stephen, Coleman-street, 1 £50 bank note, the property of William Pledger, her master, in his dwelling-house.

WILLIAM PLEDGER . I live in Blomfield-street, London-wall, in the parish of St. Stephen, Coleman-street,—I occupy the house myself, and reside there. The prisoner was in my service for twelve days—she came on Saturday, and on the Tuesday week, the 25th of April, this robber) was committed—I only keep one servant—I had a £50 bank note that day which I had received from Mr. Bailey the night before—I had it in my hand at eleven o'clock that morning, and put it into my cash-box, which I put into an iron safe in a small back room, where she had no business to go—the safe was locked, but the key was left in it—the keys of the cash-box laid in a book-case in the same room—about half past four o'clock in the afternoon, I went to the cash-box to take the note out to take it to the banker's, and could not find it—I had paid a person two £10 notes about eleven o'clock that morning—I could not tell what had become of it—I got the number, went to the Bank of England, and stopped it next morning—on Thursday morning, about eleven o'clock, I received notice from the Bank of England—the prisoner would not do any thing, and it struck me that she wanted me to discharge her—I got an officer and searched her, but did not find the note, and I discharged her—it was produced by the bank-clerk on Saturday at Guildhall—she was apprehended on the Friday.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a draper and live in Aldgate. On Thursday, the 27th of April, the prisoner came to my shop at half-past four o'clock in the afternoon—I never saw her before—she bought goods which came to 11l. 5s., and gave me a £50 note—I told her I could not change it—she said her uncle would change it—I sent my young man opposite to Mr. Mobby, the grocer, to see if he could change it—it was not changed—(I did not expect he would change it)—I then took it myself, and west out under the pretence of getting it changed, but not intending to change it—I returned, and said I could not get it changed, but if she particularly wished any money, I would give her the difference, and make it 20l., provided she left the note, which she did, and took the change, and went away—she said she lodged somewhere in Hackney-road—she gave her address, and the goods were sent there—next morning I sent my apprentice to the Bank of England with the note—I did not see it again till the following Saturday, when it was before the Magistrate at Guildhall.

JOSHUA FREEMAN . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I have a £50 note which I received from the cashier at the Bank, on the 29th of April, to produce at Guildhall before the Magistrate—I marked it with my initials and delivered it to the cashier, and he delivered it to me again—this is the same note.

THOMAS BOONE . I am clerk to Messrs Hanbury & Co., bankers, Lombard-street. I paid a note of the same number and date as this on Saturday the 22nd of April, for a draft of John Back and Co.—I cannot tell to whom—the draft was payable to Mr. Bailey.

JOHN BAILEY . I keep a tavern in Aldermanbury. I received this note myself, at Hanbury's, the bankers, in Lombard-street, on Saturday, the 22nd of April, from Mr. Boone—I paid it to Mr. Pledger on Monday the 24th of April, I received two £50 notes from him—I know nothing more of it than that it was one of those I handed over to Mr. Pledger—I know nothing of the number.

JOHN ROE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner with the property she had purchased at the linen draper's, on Friday the 28th, on Saffronhill

—she was carrying the property in the street—I searched her, and found five sovereigns, and 18s. 1d. on her, with the bill of the goods, and a pair of new gold ear-rings in a box.

MR. PLEDGER re-examined. I believe this to be the note I lost—I did not make any mark on it—I had but one £50 note—I do not know the number. I received it from Mr. Bailey on the Monday morning.

GEORGE WILLIAMS re-examined. This is the note the prisoner brought me—I kept the number of it in my recollection, before I sent it to the Bank—I did not write it down, but I recollect it—when I sent my apprentice with it I directed him to get it changed—I can swear this is the note—it is number 16028—I am certain of it—I did not look at the date—the prisoner was to call at two o'clock for the balance, but she did not—she was apprehended between two and three o'clock.

JOSHUA FREEMAN re-examined. The number is 16028—we have another note no doubt of the same number, but not of the same date—there may be twenty of this number but all different dates—I cannot tell what day this was paid in at the Bank—it is dated the 30th of March, 1837.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the note off the floor—I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

MR. PLEDGER. The book-case Was not locked—I did not notice that the keys were in a different lace—I am sure I did not drop the note.

GUILTY . Age 32.— Transported for Life.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18370508-1190

1190. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Robert Hansell, from his person to which he pleaded

GUILTY . 15 Aged.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1191

1191. JAMES FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Joseph Young, from his person.

JOSEPH YOUNG . I live in Middleton buildings, Foley-place, Marylelebone. On the 14th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Drury-lane, and heard a scuffle behind me—I turned round, and saw a policeman raise the prisoner from the ground, and saw my handkerchief underneath him—I had it safe half an hour before, and had put it into my coat pocket—this is it.

THOMAS CARTER (police-constable F 37). I saw the prisoner go up to Mr. Young, and take the handkerchief from his right hand coat pocket—I crossed the road, and followed him—he fell down on the ground, with the handkerchief in his hand.

GUILTY .* Aged 16.— Confined for Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1192

1192. HENRY THORNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April, 1 pair of steps, value 8s., the goods of Thomas Thornton.

THOMAS CARTER (police-constable F 37.) On Friday afternoon, the 7th of April, I was on duty in Seven-dials, and saw the prisoner carrying some steps—I followed him—he took them to two different places, and offered them for sale—he then took them to Monmouth street, and offered them for sale—I walked up, and asked him what he wanted for them—he said 4s.—I told him there was a name on them—he said his name was Thornton, (which name was on the steps,) and he lived in Benjamin-street, Clerkenwell—I went there, but found it was false.

GEORGE DEE . I am journeyman to Thomas Thornton, a painter, of Great Carter-lane—these steps belong to him—I do not know the prisoner—he is no relation of the prosecutor's—the steps are kept in the shop—they may have been left at some job—I cannot say when they were missed—I have the brand iron that I marked them with.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1193

1193. WILLIAM WORRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May, one jacket, value 5s.; one pair of shoes, value 5s.; the goods of Robert Ledsham; and one pair of shoes, value 6s.; the goods of Robert Brown Lee, in a certain vessel, on the navigable river Thames.

ROBERT LEDSHAH . I am a seaman of the brig Jane, of Newcastle, which laid off the Tower, in the Thames—the prisoner was apprenticed from the Marine Society, and came on board on Easter Monday—he look the boat and ran away on the 1st of May—I afterwards missed a pair of shoes and jacket of my own, and a pair of shoes belonging to another per-son—I went to the station-house and gave information—I found the prisoner in custody, and the shoes at the pawnbroker's.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am assistant to Mr. Thompson, pawnbroker, Grosvenor-row, Pimlico. I have a pair of shoes, pawned on the 2nd of May,—in the name of William Tool, but not by the prisoner. ROBERT BROWN LEE. I am a sailor on board the Jane. I misted a pair of shoes, which Johnson has produced.

MATTHEW KILLINGWORTH . I am assistant to Mr. Perkins, a pawnbroker, at Chelsea. I produce a pair of shoes, pawned on the fad Of May—I do not know who by.

JAMES HOLMES (police-constable B 111.) I saw the prisoner in Lower Sloane-street, on Thursday, the 4th of May—I told him I wanted him—he' raid, "I know you do, you want me for running away from the Jane" and, in going along, he said, "One of the pairs of shoes is pawned there," pointing to Mr. Thompson's, "and the others were pawned in King's-road"—that he had given a boy 1d. to pawn each pair, and the duplicates were given to a companion of his—in the way to the office next morning, he said he sold the jacket to a Jew in Paradise-row for 18d.—he did not ay what jacket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY* of Larceny. Aged 17.— Confined Twelve Months, and whipped.

Reference Number: t18370508-1194

1194. ANDREW KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 1 coat, value 6l., the goods of Thomas Goodgame; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1195

1195. JOSEPH COLLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May, handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of George Hutchinson, from his person.

GEOROE HUTCHINSON . I live in Shoreditch. On the night of the 7th May I was in Holborn, and felt something at my pocket—I turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand—he ran Toss to Farringdon-street, and tried to conceal it under his coat—I caught hold of him, and called "Police," an officer came up, and he dropped the handkerchief—a lady took it up, and gave it to the officer.

Prisoner. Q. Were you drunk or sober? A. Sober—not perfectly sober, but I knew what I was about—I never lost sight of you—I did not see you drop the handkerchief—it dropped from under your coat—you did not throw it away—I saw the lady pick it up at your feet, and had seen it before in your hand—I have been a prosecutor in this Court four or five times, not about picking pockets, but shoplifting—I am a shopman—you were going towards Snow-hill at the time you were stopped—I was never refused my expenses in this Court—I am not an amateur thief-taker—I came to swear to property stolen—I do not go out to look after thieves—I was not reeling about and insulting persons on that day—I did not lose sight of you—I did not say, at the station-house, there were two men behind me—the female who picked up the handkerchief could not have taken it—there was no omnibus or cab passing at the time you were stopped.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to a religious meeting, and was going to Queenhithe to meet my sister—on Snow-hill I heard the cry of "Stop thief"—I walked quickly to the corner of. Farringdon-street—the prosecutor collared me, and said, "You have stolen my handkerchief"—I said, "I will walk quietly with you; if I stole it, it must be in my possession" I went with him to the station, and in about ten minutes after it was brought there, and he identified it—I had my own handkerchief in my hand at the time.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1196

1196. ELIZA GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, 2 sheets, value 2s., the goods of Honora Foley.

HONORA FOLEY, JUN . I am the daughter of Honora Foley; she is a widow, and lives in Tindal's-buildings, Gray's-inn-lane. Between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, on the 8th of April, I was in Pheasant-court, and saw the prisoner by Fox-court, with the sheets in her apron-directly she saw me she ran into a rag-shop—I ran after her, up some stairs, and asked her for the sheets—she would not give them to me—a policeman came by, and I gave her in charge—I missed the sheets from Spread Eagle-court—the door was shut—she must have come through the cellar to get them, as she used to visit a woman up stairs—one of the sheets is torn all to pieces.

JOHN BULLOCK (police-constable G 116.) I was standing at the station-house door, and saw Foley with the prisoner—I took the sheets from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.—Recommended to the Penitentiary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1197

1197. ANN CAPON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March, 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 5s.; 1 jacket, value 5s.; and 1 bonnet, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of Thomas Daley.

THOMAS DALEY . On the evening of the 29th of March, I saw the prisoner in Drury-lane, standing by a cookshop—I said, "You seem very cold"—she said, "I am cold and hungry too"—I said, "Well, step with me, I have got an old gown I will give you to wear"—she went to my house—I looked out an old gown and shift, and while she was putting those things on, I went to the cupboard, and cut her a slice of bread—I told her to sit by the fire, and warm herself; and while she was eating the bread, I said, "You can go and get yourself something to drink,"—I gave her a shilling to

get some gin, and while she was gone I went into the next room, and heard a footstep come into the other room—she said something, and I said, "I will be out directly"—I came out almost directly, and found the room door and street door open, and nobody there—I looked round, and missed my boy's clothes and watch, and a woman's bonnet—I am sure I did not give them to her.

WILLIAM SPICER . I keep the Two Brewers in Little St. Andrew-street, Seven-dials. On Thursday morning, the 30th of March, the prisoner came to my house, and came to the bar with her bosom quite open, and seemed tipsy—I said, "What do you do with your bosom open, why don't you pin it up?"—I reached across the bar, and took this watch from her bosom, and said, "How came you by this?"—she said, "My grandmother gave it to me, and she lives in Marylebone-lane"—I did not believe her, and gave her into custody.

DAVID FARROW . I am shopman to Thomas Hodges, a pawnbroker, in Drury-lane. On the morning of the 30th of March, the prisoner pawned a boy's dress with me—I am certain of her person.

JOHN WOODYEATT (police-constable F 84.) I received this watch from Mr. Spicer on the 30th of March.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor in Drury-lane, about twelve o'clock—he asked me to go home with him—I said, I did not know how far he had to go—he said, "Not far"—he took me to his house, and gave me gin and water, and cut me a slice of ham and bread—while in conversation, I certainly happened to say I had been very much distressed latterly, it being a severe winter; and from that, it appears, he has taken my words from me, and made it out charity—but before I went home with him, nothing passed about being distressed—when I told him that, he gave me a gown, but nothing else—he said he thought "it would look better than the one I had on, and I had it on at Bow-street—he said he was a working man, and had a little money, but he should want that—that he had to go out next morning, and would trust the watch with me, and I was to bring it to him at ten o'clock the following morning—accordingly I did not part with it—after being in his company nearly an hour, he gave me a shilling to fetch gin—I could not get it, and returned—he said he was shutting the back parlour—I said, "I did not know whether I was right or not"—I sat down full a quarter of an hour, and as he did not come out, I thought he had somebody particular there, so I got up, and went home.

THOMAS DALEY re-examined. It is false—I never lent her the clothes, the bonnet, nor the watch—I never saw her from the time I gave her the shilling till I saw her at Bow-street—I did not take her there for any improper purpose, but took charity on her—I had no other view in it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, May 10th 1837.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18370508-1198

1198. SARAH FISHER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 1 purse, value 6d.; 4 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and 3 shillings; the goods and monies of Thomas Grenville Cholmondley, from his person.

THOMAS GRENVILLE CHOLMONDLEY . I live in Cleveland-square. I was at the Royal Academy on the 6th of May, from three to four o'clock

in the evening—I had in my purse four sovereigns and one half-sovereign in gold, and about three shillings in silver—I received information, and felt, and my purse was gone from my right-hand coat-pocket—the purge was afterwards produced to me—this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You were spoken to by somebody? A. Yes—Davis, the constable, produced the purse—a vast number of people were there—it was in the middle room—the officer was not in uniform—I saw him pick up the purse, not a yard off—I think there were no persons between me and the prisoner—I think she was the next person behind me—the officer had got her in custody when I first saw her.

GEORGE DAVIS . I am an officer of the Royal Academy. I saw the prisoner; and perceiving she was rather differently dressed to the other people, I watched her for an hour—there was a man with her, who shortly after left—she went from one room to another, apparently looking at the pictures, when, all at once, she made a dead set on the prosecutor—wherever he moved she moved with him—she attempted several times to put her hand into his coat-pocket—in the middle room I saw her put her hand into his pocket, and then take from it a purse—she put her hand into his left pocket first, and then took the purse from the right—she was about to move away—I said, "What have you taken from that gentle man?"—she said, "Nothing"—I moved her round, and saw the purse at her feet—I said to the gentleman, "You are robbed, Sir"—he said, "Yes, I hare lost my purse"—this is the purse—the first place I saw it was in her hand, when she drew it from his pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. And having seen her take it from his pocket, you asked the gentleman if he was robbed? A. I did—I merely said it to put him on his guard—I said, "Are you robbed?" or, "You are robbed," to let him know that he was robbed—I had been watching her for an hour—I told the Magistrate so, I think I did—I said that when he moved, she moved, and that she made a dead set—I signed my deposition, and this is my handwriting—I do not think I told the Magistrate that where he moved she moved, but I told him she made a dead set, and it was taken down, and I signed it—I do not know whether the clerk put it down—the deposition was read over to me—I do not recollect whether that was in it—I forget whether I told the Magistrate what room this was in—I told him she put her hand into his left pocket first, and then the right—I am constable of the Royal Academy—I have lately left Bow Street—I was assistant jailor there—Sir Frederick Roe dismissed me for committing an error, as a tradesman was sent down for bail, I had the Magistrate's order, and went and got the man out of Clerkenwell prison—the Magistrate signed the order—I did not get it surreptitiously—I said nothing to the Magistrate—it was put before him, and he signed it—the Magistrate dismissed me because I did that out of mistake—I got no money for that—I have done it before—it was my duty—I was dismissed for bringing him up in the evening instead of the morning—I had been there about seven or eight months—I have been employed at the Stamp Office, with the other officers of Bow Street, in apprehending persons with the unstamped newspapers—Ballard, of Bow Street, engaged me—I quitted it when the new act came into force—I was paid 9s. a day at the Stamp Office, I was there two or three months—I got between 20l. and 30l.—it was near 30l.—it was as much as 25l.—before I went to the Stamp Office, I lived with my father—he is

A hackneyman, and keeps a livery stable—I used to drive—I was servan to Mr. Oliver, of Devonshire-place, for five years—about forty or fifty persons were in the middle room—there were about six or seven persons round the place where the gentleman was robbed—there is nobody here who saw it—no persons followed me, that I recollect, when I took her out—there was another officer there, Samuel Lack—he is rather a short, elderly man—I told him, and he said he had better be down stain to notice persons as they came in.

THOMAS GRENVILLE CHOLMONDLEY re-examined. The first thing I saw was this woman in the arms of the policeman—he asked me, "Are you robbed, Sir?"—I felt my pocket, and said, "I am," and I saw him pick up this purse from the ground—I did not hear it drop—there were about twenty or thirty persons round, in the immediate corner where it was done—I do not think he said any thing else.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1199

1199. SARAH HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November, 1 ring, value 5l., the goods of Benjamin Sayer, her master.

ELIZABETH SAYER . I live in Clare-street, Clare-market, and am the wife of Benjamin Sayer. The prisoner was in my service, and left in November—I missed a diamond ring—this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long ago is this? A. In 1834—she lived with me about two months—I did not miss it till she had left—I saw it about a fortnight before—I saw it again in the following December—I have had it ever since, till within these two or three days—it was about two months ago that I was first called to appear as a witness—there is a discoloured pearl in it—my husband keeps the Sun public-house.

RICHARD CASTLE (police-sergeant A 10.) On the 22nd of November, 1834, I saw the prisoner in the shop of Mr. Baker, a jeweller—I followed her out, and found this ring on her—I took her to Bow Street, and she was remanded for a week—no owner was found for the ring—it was detained for a month—Mrs. Sayer came to the station-house—I next saw the prisoner on the 11th of March last, at the Palace, at the time of relieving guard—I am sure she is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you keep the ring? A. No—it was kept at the Magistrate's office—I am sure it is the same—I put a little scratch upon it—it was given up at the office—I had not seen the prisoner before she was at Baker's shop, to ray recollection—I did not see her for two years after she was released.

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a jeweller, living in Long Acre. In the month of November, 1834, a young woman resembling the prisoner came into my shop, and asked me to be kind enough to tell her the value of a ring—it was similar to this.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any thing particular about that ring? A. No—I see many rings—there is a discoloured pearl and a slight flaw in it.

GUILTY. Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1200

1200. WILLIAM GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 1 iron bracket, value 3d.; and 13 iron screw-bolts, value 5s. 9d.; the goods of the Great Western Railway Company.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES FISHER (police-constable T 93.) On the 21st of April. I was in

the farm-yard of the Great Western Railway Company, at Acton, and found the prisoner under some hay—I pulled him out, and threatened to lock him up—he produced these eight screw-bolts from under his jacket—I said, "You have been robbing the Company"—he tried to pass them from him, from the left side of his jacket—he said he had not—I said, "I saw you pass them from under your jacket"—he strongly denied it—I took him to the station—I took off his hat, and found these five iron short bolts, and one bracket beside—I am sure I saw him take these long ones from under his jacket.

CHARLES THIRKETTLE . I am foreman, carpenter, and superintendent of the Great Western Railway—the company have such property as this in their farm-yard—I can swear these belong to the Company—the prisoner was not in their employ—he had no business there.

Prisoner. I am very sorry—I had got no friends, and no where to lie.

GUILTY .* Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1201

1201. DIANA MORLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 20th of April, 1836, of an evil disposed person, 13 punches, value 1l. 5s.; 2 files, value 1s.; 1 hammer, value 6d.; and 7 chisels, value 3s.; the goods of Daniel Beckham, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. RATHBONE conducted the Prosecution.

DANIEL BECKHAM . I am a stereotype founder. I missed various things from my foundry to a very serious amount—I found in one person's house 690lbs. weight—in consequence of something, I searched the prisoner's house with the officer, about five o'clock in the afternoon—I saw Mrs. Morley and some children—we searched the drawers, and after turning over some property, we found a small box containing these punches, chisels, and files—I know them by using them—there is no particular mark on them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You were there all the time yourself? A. Yes—I have stated what paused—these dice are not mine—the policeman was present.

COURT. Q. Did you say any thing? A. When we first went, I asked the prisoner whether she had any metal or things belonging to us, as we had a search-warrant—she said "No."

WILLIAM HODGE (police-constable N 97.) On the 15th of April I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's house, and found the property—The prisoner said they belonged to her late husband—we found these files in the kitchen, close by the copper, in a part of some skeleton drawers—in the first pair front room we found these medallions.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it true the prosecutor was with you? A. Yes.—the whole of the time.

THOMAS MOTHERSELL (police-sergeant N 12.) I was with William Hodge—the prisoner said the files belonged to her late husband, who was a shoemaker, and she could not tell how the other property came there, whether her son had brought them or not.

MR. BECKHAM. These are my files—I have not the least doubt of them—I cannot tell when I last saw them, there is such a variety of them—I can remember the soldering-iron being made for me—a man made twenty-seven, and he put but one rivet in them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1202

1202. JOHN MORLEY was indicted for felonious receiving, on the 20th of April, 1833, 2 medallions, value 10s., the goods of Daniel Beckham, well knowing the same to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

(No evidence was offered.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1203

1203. EDGAR ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March, 4 hooks, value 1l., the goods of the trustees of the British Museum.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Sir Henry Ellis, Knight.—3rd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of our Sovereign Lord the King.— Also on the 1st of February, 3 books, value 6l., the goods of the trustees of the British Museum.— Also on the 16th of March, 6 books, value 2l., the goods of the trustees of the British Museum.— Also on the 3rd of April, 8 books, value 2l., the goods of the trustees of the British Museum; to all of which indictments he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1204

1204. ELIZA MARCHANT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 6 handkerchiefs, value 3l., the goods of Sophia Matilda French.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

SOPHIA MATILDA FRENCH . I live in Portman-place, Edgeware-road. The prisoner was my servant for a fortnight—I knew her before—she was very much distressed—I missed 2 handkerchiefs on the 13th of April, and 6 in all—I told the prisoner that it would be better to tell about them—she pretended that she had not seen them—I afterwards gave her into custody—the handkerchiefs were taken from the pawnbroker's—these are them—I know them by marks of my own making.

JOHN ROBERTS (police-constable T 91.) On the night of the 17th of April, I received information of this robbery—I went to Mitchell-street, Edgeware-road, and apprehended the prisoner, but she was not detained that night—the next morning I traced 2 handkerchiefs to a pawnbroker's, and the next morning I again took her—she said she hoped Miss French would forgive her, that she had taken them, and given them to a person who had pawned them for her, of the name of Flower—I took Flower, but the bill against her has been thrown out.

GEORGE SPELLER . I live with Mr. Wallis, a pawnbroker—these 2 handkerchiefs were pawned with me on Monday the 17th of April—but not by the prisoner—they are very good and very valuable ones.

Prisoner. I was just out of my illness, and was in great distress.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 26.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18370508-1205

1205. JOHN WILDEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, I watch, value 15s.; 1 seal, value 2s.; 2 watch keys, value 2s.; and 1 watch ribbon, value 1d.; the goods of Thomas Miller.

THOMAS MILLER . I live in Prospect-terrace, St. Pancras, and am a shoemaker. About nine o'clock at night, on the 8th of April, I saw the prisoner walking out of my front room, and he had got my watch under a lack that he had in his hand—he had not got out—this is the watch—it had been on the mantel-piece in the front room—he said he hoped I should not be hard with him—I was in the back parlour at work when he came in—I gave him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up to Gray's Inn-road, and a man asked me to do a little job—he showed me this watch, and told me to go and fetch it for him—I refused, but he gave me some drink—I went in, and did it—I told the prosecutor the man was outside, but he would not go after him.

GUILTY. Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Six Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1206

1206. JOHN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 1 dressing-glass, value 20s., the goods of George Tyrrell.

GEORGE TYRRELL . I keep a carver and gilder's shop in Chancery-lane. I was going into the shop on the 11th of April, and met the prisoner with a dressing-glass—he seemed confused—I turned to look at him—he put down the glass, and ran away—I pursued, and took him—this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person? A. Yes—I did not lose sight of him—I took him in Gray's Inn-square—he turned the corner of the square—I lost sight of him, but he was still running, and had a long white apron on—I swear positively to him—there is an inner door to my shop—he was between the two doors—the inner door was open—I was outside between him and the street—I was not aware that he had stolen the glass till he ran away—he put it down on the step of the door.

MARIA TYRRELL . I am the daughter of George Tyrrell. I heard a sound from the street, that appeared as if the door was open—I had seen it shut before—I went down, and saw the dressing-glass on the step.

JOHN PETTIT (police-constable E 125.) The prisoner was given to me—I have the glass.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there a crowd in Gray's Inn-square"? A. There might be forty or fifty people.

MR. PHILLIPS to GEORGE TYRRELL. Q. Did you stop the prisoner? A. No—I do not know who did—I dare say there was forty or fifty persons—I was not mistaken in him—if I lost sight of him, it was not above a yard or two—he crossed the road from Holborn, and turned a corner—I did lose sight of him, but not so as not to know him again—those who took him brought him to my shop—I went along with them to see if the glass was there.

GUILTY .* Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1207

1207. THOMAS AINSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April, 1 coat and cape, value 5l., the goods of Robert Harvey George.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

ROBERT HARVEY GEORGE . I reside at Ilford, and am on auctioneer. I came to town on the 6th of April—I got to Grove-street, Commercial-road, and there being no accommodation for my horse and chaise, a friend took it for me—I went to go back about four o'clock, and found my great coat was gone, which had been in the chaise.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You left it in the chaise? A. Yes.—I left it with Mr. Harvey—he is not here—I saw him start front there with the coat, between twelve and one o'clock.

WILLIAM BIRD . I am shopman to Mr. Dexter, a pawnbroker, in Whitechapel-road. On Thursday, the 6th of April, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner pawned this coat for 1l.

EDWARD BLAYNEY (police-constable H 91.) I took the prisoner on the Monday afterwards—he said a person gave him the coat to pawn, and he dare say he could point him out, as he was at Sinclair's—when we went there, he pointed out a person—he said the first time that that was the person who gave him the coat, and on the second he said he was not the person—Jones was the name of the person we took up, who was afterward discharged.

Cross-examined. Q. Upon your oath, did not one of the two persons he pointed out run away? A. There were three or four persons in the place;

cannot say that any one ran away—he never gave the name—I never heard of the name of Levick—there was a woman of the name of Chase taken up—she was examined as the person who saw the offence committed—a person was brought forward who saw the coat taken, and she if not here—on the last examination she was not present—on the second examination the woman said that the prisoner was not the man who stole it—she was a respectable, decent woman—she gave an account of a man wearing a cap, and a youngish man—I found the man, but he had changed his dress—in the afternoon we found the jacket and cap, and put them on the man, and then she said she could not be certain, and he was discharged—the woman was brought forward by me.

MR. DOANE. Q. How did you come to find her? A. In making inquiries—she described a person who took the coat—I took the person the prisoner pointed out, and it proved to be the same person that she had seen, but she would not swear to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1208

1208. ROBERT YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April, 1 pair of scales, value 6s., the goods of Stephen Jacobs; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

STEPHEN JACOBS . I live in North-place, Hampstead-road, and keep a chandler's shop. I missed a pair of scales off the counter, about half-past four o'clock—these are mice—I know them by the chains and the crack where the wires go in.

JOHN EATON . I was in Tottenham Court-road, on the 3rd of April, at twenty minutes before three o'clock—I saw the prisoner, and took him from information—I found these scales on him.

Prisoner. I picked them up in Hampstead-road, tied with a piece of twine.

JAMES ROGERS (police-sergeant S 7.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's for conviction (read)—I know the prisoner is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1209

1209. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April, 12lbs. weight of pickled tripe, value 5s.; and 1 jar, value 2l.; the goods of Slaney Jones.

SLANEY JONES . I live in Portland-place, Commercial-road, and am a cheesemonger. I missed a jar of pickled tripe, on the 18th of April—this is it, to the best of my knowledge—it was cured by Bennett, in Bishops-gate-street—it was outside my door.

MICHAEL KELLY (police-constable K 141.) I apprehended the prisoner between nine and ten o'clock that evening, with this jar—he told me he had a jar of beer.

Prisoner. I did not say it was beer. Witness. He said he had some beer belonging to his master in the City.

Prisoner. I went down a dark street, and kicked the basket—I did not know who was the owner.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1210

1210. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April, 1 pair of half-boots, value 10s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 8s.; 3 ounces of leather, value 1s.; and 4 pairs of trowser-straps, value 1s.; the goods of John MacLaren, his master.

JOHN MACLAREN . I live in Cornhill. The prisoner was my errand boy—I missed various articles—on the evening of the 1st of April, I stopped

him as he was going away, and desired him to take off his coat, and I found in it this piece of leather, which is mine—this pair of boots and shoes were found at his lodgings—the leather corresponds with the piece it was cut from.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is the value of it? A. More than 2s.—I have no private mark on it.

GEORGE BAKER . I am an officer. I was sent to the prisoner's lodging—the prisoner told me where it was—I went, and was admitted to his bedroom—I found these boots and shoes on his bed—Mr. MacLaren owned them.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any body with you? A. Yes, young Mr. MacLaren.

MR. PHILLIPS to MR. MACLAREN. Q. Do these boots appear to have been worn? A. They have, and so have the shoes—they were made on purpose for an individual—there is a number and a name on them—I saw them within two days in my shop—I swear they are mine—I might have seen them within a week—I will not swear that I saw them within two months—I will within a year—I will not fix any later date—the boots had been sold and came back again—the shoes were not sold out of my premises—I took stock at Christmas—these articles have not been sold, I am certain—I have every particle of stock through my bands.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 16; of stealing the leather only.— Confined Three Months; One Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1211

1211. ANN SUSANNAH BUSHER was indicted for bigamy.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY TUSON . I am parish clerk of St. Ann's, Limehouse. I have the register of marriages—under the date of October 3rd, 1819, I find an entry of the marriage of Joseph Busher to Ann Susannah Ayres, in the presence of Edward Wells and Letitia Ayres.

JAMES WELLS . I live in Lower John-street, St. George's, and an brother of the late Edward Wells. The signature to the register is his writing.

MARY RICHARDS . I reside in Gloucester-street. Hoxton. I knew a Letitia Ayres, she is dead—I cannot say whether this name in the book is her writing—I' never saw her write—I was present at her funeral.

SUSANNAH BOWERS . I reside in Thomas-street, Hackney-road. I first knew the prisoner in 1819, she was single—I knew a person of the name of Busher, he was a boot and shoemaker—I know he paid his addresses to the prisoner—the prisoner took a house from me in 1819—in a few weeks after she was married to Mr. Busher—I was not present at the marriage—I have had conversation with her about her husband—I remember their living together in the house after October 1819—two or three years after that I met her in Hackney-road, and she invited me to call to see her—she was then residing in Ropemaker-street, Finsbury—I told her I met Busher a few weeks before, and he was looking very ill—she said she was not living with Busher, 1 was to inquire for the name of Allport—she said Mr. Busher was not of age at the time she married him—that is all I recollect.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Will you swear that that man and woman lived together for two days? A. I cannot swear it—they were living much longer than that—I did not live in the house—I

was not before the Magistrate—I have lived in the Hackney-road twenty-two years—the officer called on me—I had no conversation With Mr. Glen previous to this case—I met him here the day before yesterday—I belive not before—I cannot swear I never saw or spoke to him before Monday—I came up from the country on Saturday—I think I saw him once before—perhaps I might have spoken to him—I did not know him personally before Monday last—I have not sworn that Monday was the first time saw him—I have spoken to him half-a-dozen times before Monday.

HANNAH MASTERS . I was in the prisoner's service when she lived in the Hackney-road, I think that is fourteen years ago—I knew a person of the name of Busher—I have seen him come down early in the morning, half-dressed, to wash, and have left him there in the evening—I was in the employ of Miss Ayres about three months—I saw her and Basher living together for some weeks—I have no doubt they slept in the same room—he was at that time an apprentice—he used to go out to work in the morning, and come home in the evening regularly—I have no doubt they lived together as man and wife.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your husband alive? A. Yes—he is not here—I never saw Mr. Glen till Monday—I am sure of that—my husband had no opportunity of seeing this person at that time—I was about fourteen years old—Mrs. Ross, "Mrs. Busher's sister, was living in the house at the time, and Mrs. Wilt—I never noticed the number of the house—I was in the employ of Mrs. Bowers in the same house, nearly twelve months, and I was three months with the prisoner—I feel positive was there in 1819—it might have been the latter end of 1818 that I went there—Mrs. Bowers's was the first service I ever was in—I think it was summer-time—I cannot say whether it was in 1817—it was not in 1816—I will fix on 1819—I feel persuaded I wag in Miss Ayres's service in 1819—but I cannot say when I first went to that house—I will swear to the latter end of 1818—I will not be positive—I think Mrs. Bowers mentioned my name to the officer—I have no reason to know that she is an acquaintance of Mr. Glen's—I am living in Hoxton Town—I have not known any thing of Mrs. Bowers lately—I think it must be tea years since I have seen her—I have been married three years.

MR. CLARK SON . Q. Have you ever had any quarrel with the prisoner? A. Nothing particular; she owed me money, but 1 passed it off—I have not the least interest in coming here—my husband is a carpenter and builder—he lived there two years before I was married.

MARY GLEN . I am the sister of John Glen. I was not present at his marriage with the prisoner, but my mother was—I knew the prisoner at the time she was married to my brother, which is about ten years ago—I have frequently seen her write—the signature of Ann Susanna Busher in this book, and this signature of Ann Susanna Ayres in this other register, are the prisoner's writing.

Cross-examined. Q. How long is it since you saw her write? A. About two years ago—I saw a letter that came from her to my brother—I have not seen her write for these seven years—the writing of one of these is paler than the other, but I consider the handwriting of the two signatures very much alike—I am not acquainted with Mrs. Bowers—I spoke to her yesterday.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Take these two books, and tell me whether the Christian name of the prisoner is Ann Susannah? A. Yes, as I always

understood it; but in each of these books it is written "Susannah"—I hate no doubt they are both the prisoner's writing.

RICHARD JEUNE . I am parish-clerk of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate. I find an entry of the marriage of John Glen with Ann Susannah Busher, on the 1st of October, 1827.

WILLIAM WEBB . I live in Hackney-road, and am a tailor. I know Busher—I saw him about a fortnight ago—his Christian name is Joseph, I believe—I am not certain—I know his father and mother—I knew him when he was an apprentice—I knew the prisoner when she lived in the Hackney-road—I do not recollect having seen Mrs. Masters—I never knew the prisoner to live with Busher—I knew they were married—it was pretty well known in the neighbourhood.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you were present at the marriage? A. I was not.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were they spoken of in the neighbourhood as being man and wife? A. I cannot answer that—I knew the prisoner at the time I was acquainted with Busher—I cannot say that I ever saw them together—the prisoner worked at her needle, I believe—the number of the house was 67—I lived then at No. 72—I might have seen him come from that house, but I cannot swear—it is sixteen or seventeen years ago—it was known that they were married—Busher was then an apprentice—I have known him about twenty-two years.

RICHARD BAYLIS . I am a constable of Hatton Garden. I apprehended the prisoner on the 6th of last April, in Mary-street, Whitechapel-road—I told her I took her for bigamy—she said before she was last married, she had not seen Busher for eight years all but two days, and she had taken legal advice before she was married.

JOHN GLEN . I live in Liverpool Terrace, and am a builder. I married the prisoner in October, 1827, in Bishopsgate Church, as a widow—this signature is the prisoner's—John Harding and my mother were present at the marriage—I can prove my mother's signature—I cannot speak to Harding's—I have no doubt that this signature of Ann Suannah Ayres is the prisoner's writing—we lived together for two years—she quitted me in my absence, and sold every thing, and left—I have never lived with her since—I directed her to be taken into custody on the 6th of April.

Cross-examined. Q. She sold all your furniture? A. There was somethings left—she had no property whatever when I married her—I was a publican at the time—I think I continued so for twelve months after we were married—the house belonged to my uncle; and he, seeing my wife's conduct, wished me to leave—she was constantly drunk, and staying out at night—not all night—I treated her kindly—I knew a woman of the name of Bontain—I paid her husband some money, because he accused me of going to see his wife, previous to my marriage—he required 5l. of me as a compensation, and, being poor and ill at that time, I gave it him—I never recollect a Dr. Newington attending my wife—I think I may swear it positively—I do not recollect that he ever attended her—a girl lived with us of the name of Guyer—I do not remember her taking a shirt up into my room, and then making a complaint—I mean to swear that—when I gave up this house I began my own business, as a plasterer—I worked as a journeyman—I never threatened the prisoner that I would bring my mistress, or her mistress to live in the house—I have known Mrs. Bowers since we have been searching for witnesses to prove this marriage—I did not hear her examined—I first knew her within this fortnight—

it was on the 10th or 13th of April that the prisoner was examined, and it was since her examination at Hatton-garden, that I first saw Mrs. Bowers—it was about a fortnight ago, I should think—it was a week, at all events—I saw her at Hatton-garden first—I spoke to her on this business—that was the first time I ever saw her—I saw her about a week after, in the Hackney-road, at Mr. Webb's—I was in the house—I talked with her then for about a quarter of an hour over this business—I text saw her on Monday last—on these two occasions I spoke to her on this business—she might come to town on Saturday last, but she was in town before—I should think we were about twenty minutes in Hatton-garden—she let me know she was going into the country—I think it was to Reading, in Berkshire.

SARAH HASLAW . My husband is a sawyer, and lives in Skinner-street, Bishopsgate. I am one of Mr. Glen's sisters—the prisoner separated from him in 1829—I have seen her since—as near as I can tell, it is between four and five years since I had any conversation with her about Busher—that was in Devonshire-buildings, where she came to live, within a few doors of me—she said if my brother would not trouble her she would not trouble him, as she had no claim upon him—she had given him to understand that Busher was living, and why should he wish to know where Busher was.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was present at this conversation? A. No one except my children, who are very little—she was living for two or three months near me.

GUILTY.* Aged 37.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury . Confined Six Months.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370508-1212

1212. JOHN SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October, 1836, 3 watches, value 15l., the goods of William Broad Rowlands and another, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1213

1213. HENRY JACQUES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March, 241lbs. weight of rope, value 5l., the goods of John Morse; to which be pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1214

1214. GEORGE GODFREY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April, 1 sovereign, the monies of Ann Howard.

ANN HOWARD . I am servant to Mrs. Milligan, of Bond-street. The prisoner was servant there, to do what was wanting, and to go out on errands—I put three sovereigns into my pocket on Thursday—I met with an accident, and broke my pocket-string, and put the pocket into the kitchen I drawer, on Saturday morning—I missed one sovereign on Sunday morning—I charged the prisoner with taking it, and he denied it at first—he owned it in the course of the Sunday, and said he meant to put it back again—he said he had bought a pair of shoes with it.

GEORGE TOWNSEND (police-constable C 26.) I took the prisoner—when I was taking him to the station, he said he had taken the sovereign, and bought a pair of boots for 12s., and Ann Howard took the change from him on the Sunday.

ANN HOWARD re-examined. He was to leave on the Tuesday week following,

and the reason he took the sovereign, he said, was that he wanted a pair of shoes, and he had 30s. coming to him from his mistress—when I accused him of it, he abused me shamefully, and said he would have me taken up for accusing him falsely.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1215

1215. RICHARD EDWARDS was indicted for stealing; on the 10th of April, 112lbs. weight of lead, value 18s., the goods of Edward Walker, and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

THOMAS ZINZAN (police-constable N 67.) On the 10th of April, I was in Regent-street, City-road, at a quarter past nine o'clock at night—I saw the prisoner carrying something bulky on his shoulders, in a bag—I stopped him, and asked what it was—he said a piece of coal—I found it was lead—I asked where he brought it from—he said from Davies Wharf, out of a canal boat—I said what was the name of the boat, or the master—he did not know either—he said he was going to sell it, to get a little money—I went to the wharf, and found it had been taken from the roof—I compared it—it fitted exactly—here is 112lbs. of it.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you a man asked me to carry It, and said he would give me 6d., and if you would go back, I would take you to where I had it from? A. No.

MARY ANN NEWRY . I had the care of the premises—it is a whitening factory, on the Macclesfield Wharf, belonging to Mr. Edward Walker—I had seen it safe 10 days before—I was showing it to a gentleman—it was very good, and there was not a tile moved—the policeman came to me on Tuesday, and I saw every tile had been moved, and this lead was taken from the top—I have seen it fitted, and am confident it is the same.

Prisoner. A man called me by name, and said if I would carry it to the end of Regent-street, he would give me 6d.—I did not know whether it was coal or lead.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1216

1216. SARAH ISLES was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April, 3 shifts, value 11s.; 1 spoon, value 2s.; and 1 plane, value 3s. 6d.; the goods of John Brooks, her master.

JOHN BROOKS . I live in Queen-street, Edgeware-road. The prisons came and stopped with a lodger of mine, for about three weeks—my wife employed her to char—I missed some things—and desired the policeman to take her.

JOHN RYAN (police-constable D 2.) The prisoner was given into my custody for stealing one plane, a silve spoon, and 3 shifts—she denied knowing any thing of them—nineteen duplicates were found on her—the next morning she said she had taken the things, and was sorry for it.

JOHN WHITE DENNING . I am a pawnbroker. I have two shifts, pledged by the prisoner.

ROBERT MITCHELL . I am a pawnbroker. I have a plane I took in, in the name of Ellen Gray—this is the duplicate I gave of it.

JAMES HINWOOD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shift pledged by a woman—I do not know who.

SAMUEL BARNETT . I am a pawnbroker. I have a spoon—I cannot say that it was pawned by the prisoner—but I believe it was—this is the duplicate given of it.

ELLEN GRAY . The prisoner employed me to go and pawn this plane—and I pawned a gown for her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1217

1217. ELIZA HACKNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April, 36 yards of printed cotton, value 16s., the goods of Frederick Millett.

FREDERICK MILLETT . I am a linen-draper, and live in Limehouse-causeway. On the 3rd of April the prisoner came for some trifling goods to a small amount—she paid me, and went out—after she was gone, I missed some cotton—she had been near the cottons—this is my property—she had not quitted five minutes before I missed them—there is nine yards in three lengths—I had four parcels of cottons of this description, and I have others the same as one of them now.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long before she came into your shop had you seen them? A. I had seen them the day previous—she had often been in my shop—I knew her very well—I did not know where she lived—I never sell goods upon tally—she never has had any on tally.

HENRY GRIMES (police-constable K 242.) I apprehended the prisoner—the prosecutor pointed her out in the street—she started off—I had to run to see where she went—that she was much affected, and offered to make any recompense.

ROBERT PURSE . I live in Limehouse-causeway, and am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged these things at my house.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known her before, and where she lived? A. Yes—my shop is about 200 yards from the prosecutor's—her husband is in the docks—they have a large family—she hat always borne a good character—she said the goods were her own.; that she bought them at a shop in the neighbourhood.

GUILTY. Aged 37.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1218

1218. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April, 1 till, value 1s.; 1 shilling, 2 sixpences, 8 pence, and 20 halfpence; the goods and monies of James Cochrane.

ELIZA PRESTON . I live with Mr. Cochrane, who keeps a baker's shop in Frances-street, Tottenham-court-road. On the 18th of April I was in the parlour, and heard the rattling of the till, which was kept behind the counter—I looked, and saw the prisoner on his knees pulling the till out—I did not call out, because I did not know who it was—we have a boy, (Martin Cochrane,) and he had a playmate now and then—I believed the prisoner might be at play there, but he was not—I saw him go out of the shop—William made an alarm, and I found the till on the floor behind the counter—the prisoner was pursued, and brought back—I had seen the till all secure two or three minutes before—I am positive the prisoner is the boy.

THOMAS GREENHAM (police-constable F 27) About ten minutes after eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner running fast through Cleveland-street, pursued by some butchers, and brought back—I went to the door, and found he had taken a till—I took him into the shop, and found the till behind the counter—Eliza Preston said she heard the money rattle, and saw the prisoner on his knees, drawing the till from the counter, and somebody came in—William said, "That boy is a thief"—

the prisoner then ran away—we found in the till eight penny pieces, and ten pence in halfpence, two sixpences, and one shilling.

JAMES COCHRANE . I was not at home when this happened, but this is my till—the prisoner is a perfect stranger to me—he is not a playmate of my son.

Prisoner. I was going up Cleveland-street, and a boy saw me, and told a butcher to bring me back—I knew nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1219

1219. GEORGE TWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April, 4 3/4 yards of kerseymere, value 1l. 18s., the goods of Horace M'Dermot and another.

DANIEL GEORGE REEVES . I am clerk to Mary Grant and Horace M'Dermott—they are drapers in Great Russell-street, Covent-garden—the prisoner was their shopman, and had 26l. per annum—he had been there a year and a half—some information was given me that all was not right—I went to Mr. Sweitzer, a tailor, No. 16, Rosaman-street, and found a piece of kersey-mere, which I was persuaded was a part of ours—I desired him to bring it to our house, and he did—the prisoner was called into the counting-house—I asked him how he obtained it—he said his father gave it him—I said it was useless for him to say that, I was certain it was part of the piece then on the table—he then fell on his knees, and begged to be forgiven—I found two yards and a half at the pawnbroker's, and he said he had taken that.

WILLIAM SWEITZER . I am a tailor, and live in Upper Rosaman-street I have two yards and a quarter of black kerseymere, which the prisoner brought to me on the 10th of last month—he said it was given to him, and asked if it was better than I had seen at his master's—he wished me to make it into a pair of trowsers for him—I knew him before—I did not cut it up—the witness came to me, and I showed him the same cloth—I took it to the prosecutor's, and then the prisoner was given into custody.

DANIEL SUTHERLAND (police-constable F 45.) I was brought from the station to apprehend the prisoner—I found a duplicate on the prisoner, of a piece of drugget, and of some other kerseymere—he fell on his knees and implored mercy—he did not say in my presence where he got it.

DAVID FARRON . I am in the service of a pawnbroker, in Drury-lane. I have a piece of kerseymere taken in from a person of the name of Hagan.

MARTIN HAGAN . I have known the prisoner about a year and a half—he asked me to do little jobs for him—I never pawned any thing for him except this—I gave the money to him—I took it to a pawnbroker in Drury-lane.

DANIEL GEORGE REEVES . This is my employer's property.

(The prisoner received a good character, and Mr. Vicat, a draper, engaged to employ him.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Confined Three Days.

Reference Number: t18370508-1220

1220. JOHN MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April, 1 bridle, value 5s.; and 1 pair of reins, value 2s.; the goods of Edward Walton.

GEORGE WATERMAN . I am a policeman. I met the prisoner in Wentworth-street, about a quarter part one o'clock in the morning of the 6th of April, carrying a bundle—I stopped him—he had these things in a

blue pocket-handkerchief—I asked what he had got—he said, Harness, to he sure"—I asked what he was going to do with it—he said, "To take it home, to be sure"—I asked whose it was—"My own," he said, to be sure"—an officer came up—I told him to take him to the station—he then threw down this harness, and ran away—I stopped behind—the officer pursued, and took him.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any one with me? Witness. Not at that time—there was somebody fifteen or twenty yards ahead of him, but he had nothing.

RICHARD COOPER . I am a policeman. I was with Waterman—what he has stated is correct—I saw the prisoner throw down this bundle, and run away—I ran and took him.

Prisoner. I did not run away—I stood my ground. Witness. He ran about thirty yards.

JAMES WALTON . This is my farther Edward Walton's harness—it Was taken from my horse's head, at the corner of Goulston-street—I had left it from three to five minutes, at a door.

Prisoner, He said at the office, that he had left it five or ten minutes—the young man with me asked me to recommend him A lodging, and he gave me this bridle to hold, and walked on.

GUILTY †. Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1221

1221. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April, 1 table-cloth, value 18s.; and 4 napkins, value 12s.; the goods of John Wilson Patten.

JOHN WOOD . I am a policeman. I was in Queen-street, May-fair, on the 13th of April, about half-past ten o'clock, and saw the prisoner carrying a bundle—I asked what he had got, and what he was going to do with it—he seemed rather confused, and made no answer—I then asked where he got it from—he wished me to go to Little Pulteney-street—he said a man gave it him to carry, but he did not know where to—I took him to the station, and found in the bundle a table-cloth, and four napkins—made inquiries, and found whose it was.

ELIZABETH PERKINS . I am housekeeper to Mr. John Wilson Patten, of Hill-street, Berkeley-square. This is my master's property—it was taken out of the housekeeper's room—I missed it at half-past four o'clock—a stranger could only get to that room, by going down the area—the gate was unlocked.

Prisoner's Defence, I was standing at the bar of a public-house, in South-street, drinking a glass of ale, a man came in with a bundle, and called for some beer—we got into conversation, and he asked me, when we came out, to hold his bundle—I walked on, and was taken on suspicion of stealing it.

COURT to JOHN WOOD. Q. Did the prisoner tell you that a man, who was just behind, had just given him it? A. No—he said he did not know the man, nor where he was.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

OLD COURT.—Thursday, May 11th, 1837.

Second Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370508-1222

1222. HENRY NARGATE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May, 1 rein, value 3s., the goods of John Withers.

JAMES BRITNELL . I keep a beer-shop at Cranford-bridge. These reins were left in my care, by John Withers, and hung in the stable—they were taken from the rest of the harness—the prisoner had come into my house on Sunday morning, and asked for a pint of beer—I said it was eleven o'clock, and I could not draw him any—I followed him out, and missed the rein—I went for the patrol, and he was taken into custody about dinner-time that day—this is the rein.

HENRY SELWOOD . I live at Cranford-bridge. I saw the prisoner stand against the prosecutor's stable, and take something from the harness, put it into his pocket, and walk away—I told the landlord, and the prisoner was apprehended at his own house.

Prisoner. It was drawn out of the harness, and laid on the foot-path—I picked it up.

THOMAS BRAY . I am a policeman. I found the prisoner at Cranford, and found the rein in the cupboard—he denied having it at first, and then said, if he found it, would it be all right.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 27.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370508-1223

1223. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April, 6 brushes, value 12s. f the goods of Thomas Anderson.

WILLIAM MARCH . I am in the employ of Thomas Anderson, of South ampton-street. On the 18th of April, about half-past six o'clock, I was at the back of the shop, and saw the prisoner reach his hand up and take down the brushes—they hung outside the door—I went out and stopped him with them, about twenty yards off—I asked what he was going to do with them—he said, to sell them to get a night's lodging.

Prisoner. I had no intention to steal them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370508-1224

1224. JANE GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February, 1 shawl, value 5s., the goods of John Elliott.

ELIZABETH ELLIOTT . I am the wife of John Elliott. On the 15th of February I went to see Mrs. Jackson, the prisoner's aunt, who lives in Lisson-grove—the prisoner came in in about two hours—I put my child down on the bed, with the shawl over it—the prisoner said she wished me to leave the room, as she wanted to say something to her aunt—I was absent about a quarter of an hour, and when I came back, the prisoner was gone—she went out with a basket, and I found the shawl gone off my child—I heard nothing of it till she was apprehended—this is it—I have had it two years.

Prisoner. Q. What did I do when I first came in? A. I do not know—there was a drop of beer on the table—I asked you to drink—you said you would rather have gin—you went three times for gin—I know nothing of half-a-crown being changed.

Prisoner. Milford stopped there after me—whether she took the shawl, or not, I do not know.

MARY MILFORD . I lodged with the prisoner for three months—I live on the town—the prisoner locked me in her room, and came home drunk at nine o'clock at night; and three days afterwards she sent me to pawn this shawl for her—I thought it was her own property—she asked me to pawn it at a quarter to eight o'clock at night—I brought her 2s. 6d. for it—she said. "You may keep the ticket yourself"—I said, "No, I will not have it"—

I gave her 6d. for the shawl—she said, "You can't wear that shawl till you take the border off"—I said, "Why am I to take it off, I can wear it as it is?" and then she took the ticket from me.

Prisoner. Q. Is not your name Catherine Driscol? A. No.

JURY. Q. Were you in the house the day the shawl was lost? A. No—I was locked up in the prisoner's house till nine o'clock at night.

WILLIAM HENRY LUMLEY . I am in the service of Mr. Bromley, of Museum-street. The shawl was pawned with me—I cannot say who by.

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX . I am a policeman. Milford brought me a declaration she had made, to prevent the prisoner getting the shawl out of pawn.

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18370508-1225

1225. JOSEPH ENEVER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, 1 mare, price 25l., the property of Francis Henry Beall; and JOHN LEE , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS WARNER . I am a farmer, and live at Alborough hatch, near Ilford, Essex. A mare belonging to Mr. Beall, was brought to me, about the 22nd of November—I saw it last on the 16th of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and directed it to be driven into Epping Forest—George Hale had charge of it on the forest—I have seen Mr. Beall several times since—he has not paid me for the keep of the horse—I have not yet delivered him any bill—his servant it here—I saw the mare again on the 7th of April, in custody of the police—is was the same mare that was taken away on the 16th of March—I had received it from Devonish—it had a very particular head and countenance.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How long prior to the 16th of March was she turned out on the forest? A. It was turned out that morning, and had been there about a fortnight, but was brought home at night.

FRANCIS HENRY BEALL . I have a bay mare, which I sent to Mr. Warner, the first week in December, or last week in November—it has a remarkable forehead and face, what I call rather a sour countenance—I saw her again on the 8th of April, at Brick-lane station-house—I am quite certain it was the same mare—she was in a wretched condition then—when in condition, she was worth full 30l.—there was a scar made on her forehead, which was not there when I sent her—I think it had been produced with caustic—it had not destroyed the cuticle, but had taken off the hair.

GEORGE HALE . I am eleven years old. I was in Mr. Warner's employ in March last—I took the mare to Epping Forest—she had not been there above three or four hours, when a man came and took her away—I told him it was not his mare, but he never made me any answer—he put a halter on her, and was very quick—he jumped on her back and rode her away—he had no saddle—I had no one to help me—I went home and told master—I should know the man again—I am quite sure the prisoner Enever is the man—I had seen him before—I did not know his name, but I knew him by sight—I had seen him on the Forest—I saw the mare again at the station-house—I had her in my care some time.

Cross-examined. Q. You were looking after the horse? A. Yes, it was along with our colts—there was no other horse there—I am quite certain of the prisoner—it was between three and four o'clock in the afternoon

—I cannot state the time nearer than that—he had on a kind of blue coat, like he has on now—I saw the boy King when I went back to my master's, and I told him.

THOMAS DEVONISH I am servant to Mr. Beall. I have groomed the mare for two years—I took it to Mr. Warner's—I have seen her since at the station-house—there was a great deal of difference in her there, but I have not the least doubt of her being master's—she was very plain and awkward about her head, and had a very sour countenance—she had a very particular mark on her near hind leg, in her fetlock joint—a white and black mark.

JOHN DOUGLAS . I am a policeman. About twelve o'clock at night, on the 18th of March, I was on duty in Lamb's-gardens, Bethnal-green—the prisoner Lee is a housekeeper there—I do not know what he is—a woman of the town was making a noise in front of his house, and he gave charge of her—she was taken to the station-house by two other police-men—she complained of ill usage from him—he had refused to admit her, and she broke his window—she said to him, "If you serve me out, I will serve you out; go and bring that stolen horse out of your stable, at the back of your house"—I had refused before that to take her, unless he went to give charge of her—he then said he would go and press the charge at the station-house—when they proceeded a little way, I left them with two others, and turned back—I knocked at the door of Lee's house, and Enever opened the door—I said, "Oh, Enever, I am surprised to see you here; I did not expect to see you here"—he said, "Why?"—I said the officers were after him a few days before, I heard, in a case of felony, and I said, "What is this about the horse?"—he made no answer to that—I said, "Let us see him?"—he took the light off the table, and opened a door at the back of the room which led into a stable—I there saw a bay mare—I asked him who it belonged to—"Oh," he said, "It is Lee's mare, which his brother lent him to work with"—I examined the mare particularly, so that I might look over the list of stolen horses in the "Hue and Cry," and then went to the station-house—I overtook the woman before they got there, but Lee was gone—after the woman was charged, I went back again to Lee's house, and knocked at the door—nobody opened it—I remained there about twenty minutes—I then went round to the back of the house, where the stable is—looked through a little window in the stable, and the mare was gone—I have seen her since, but she was in different condition to what she was then—when I saw her in the stable, she looked as if she had not been groomed for some time, but I am certain it is the same one I have seen since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know of the prisoners being brought to the police-office? A. I did not—I first heard of it nine or ten days ago—I think they had then been finally committed—I did not go to the office to give evidence—Enever was called by the name of Joe—Lee gave the woman in charge for breaking his window—I did not know him living there before.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Who was in the house besides Lee? A. Two females.

COURT. Q. Why not take Enever into custody at first, when you knew the police were after him? A. That was only hearsay.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know of any reward being offered about the horse? A. I heard of it about nine days ago—I gave this information before that—directly I heard they were taken, Power, the

policeman, told me they were in custody—I told him what had happened—that was before I heard of the reward—I had given information before that to different constables, but not to Power—I do not know whether the prisoners were committed at that time.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. When did you give information of what you had observed about the mare? A. Immediately—I informed the inspector on duty—at the time I saw Power, the prisoners had been in custody some time, and the horse was found—I do not expect any of the reward.

THOMAS CUMMING . I am a policeman. In consequence of information, on the 4th of April I went to a chandler's shop in Weymouth-terrace, Hackney-road, and went from there to a stable, where I found a mare—I did not Hake her away at first—I watched there, and at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon I heard a noise in the stable—Power and Clements went into the stable, and I went in at another door—I saw the prisoner Lee there—power said, "You are my prisoner, on suspicion of stealing this mare"—he said, "(I did not steal the mare, it belongs to my master"—I took the mare out of the stable, and the constable took Lee—I asked who his master was—he said, "I don't know him, he is a tall man"—I asked where he lived—he said he did not know—I said, it was very strange he Should have a master, and not know where he lived—he said, "I don't Know"—I took the mare to the station-house, and put it into Leach's stable in Brick-lane—I and some other constables went about half-past four o'clock to Lamb's-buildings, and took Enever within about 200 yards from there, coming down a court—I said "You are my prisoner"—he said, "What for?'—I said, "For stealing that mare you have got"—he said, "I know no mare, I have got no mare"—I took him to the station-house, searched him, and found a small padlock-key on him—I tried it to the lock we took off the stable-door in Weymouth-street, and it locked and unlocked it—when he heard us say that it did so, he said it belonged to his lodging, and he said, "I have no mare"—he said Power knew how he got his living.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was Power present at the time you had the conversation with Lee? A. He was—I did not hear Lee say he was in company with his master when the stable was taken for the mare—he might have said so to Power, and I not hear it.

DENNIS POWER . I am a policeman. I went to the stable in Weymouth-terrace, on the 4th of April, with Cumming—after watching some time, I saw Lee there—he was about to supply the horse with food—the account Cumming has given of the conversation with Lee, is correct—I was the first that entered the stable—I told Lee he was my prisoner, on suspicion. of stealing, the mare—he then stated, that he got a pot of beer and 1s. a week occasionally, from his master, for looking after this mare—I asked him, was he in company with his master at the time he took the stable—the said he was on the first occasion—I told him not to say any thing to criminate himself—I received some information from Douglas—the reward was offered immediately after the horse was stolen—we had got the mare and the parties were committed to Newgate before I saw Douglas.

EDWARD CLEMENTS . I am a policeman. I was present with Cumming and Power at the stable, in Weymouth-terrace—I have heard their evidence, and agree with it—this padlock came from the stable, and this key, found on Enever, locked and unlocked it.

ALEXINA FLETCHER . 1 am the wife of Ephraim Fletcher, and live at the corner of Weymouth-terrace. The stable the horse was found in belongs

to my husband—both the prisoners came to hire it, on the 20th of March between twelve and one o'clock—my husband was not there then—Lee asked me what the rent was—Enever told me they wanted to put a hone in, which they must take in from grass—in about twenty minutes Enever came alone, and asked me if my husband had come in—I said no, he would be in between one and two o'clock—nothing more passed—he came again between one and two o'clock, and made a bargain with my husband for the stable—I have often seen Enever—he was generally dressed in a jacket and sleeves—on one occasion I saw him in a blue body coat, and I think boots.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At the last meeting did he not, say the horse had been out to grass, and the reason he took it from grass was, that the man wanted the land for arable land? A. Yes—I do not think I was ever asked before whether Lee asked me about the rent—I think I have said before that he did—I am certain it was Lee.

EPHRAIM FLETCHER . The stable belongs to me—I and Enever were in the stable—he said he wished to see me, to make the bargain that there should be no dispute about the rent afterwards—we came to an agreement—he was to pay 2s. a week, and he paid me 1s. deposit—I did not see Lee myself, till about Easter Monday, the 27th of March—Lee fed the horse, and Enever swept the stable up.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not let it to Enever? A. Yes—it is a close stable—he paid me the 1s. deposit himself.

(George Colegay, farmer, Marshgate, Essex; and James Scotchman, hairdresser, Stratford, gave the prisoner Enever a good character.)

ENEVER— GUILTY . Aged 29.— Transported for Life.

LEE— NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18370508-1226

1226. JOHN BROKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March, 2 bags, value 1d.; 55 sovereigns, 20 half-sovereigns, 8 crowns, 48 half crowns, 35 shillings, and 10 sixpences; the goods and monies of Samuel Benjamin Biss, his master, in his dwelling-house.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

SAMUEL BENJAMIN BISS . I am an earthen ware and glass dealer, and live in Farringdon-street, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn. The prisoner was in my service in 1835—I had no other person in my service, either male or female at that time—I had to attend a funeral on the 11th of March that year—on the evening before, I examined the state of my money—I kept it in a looking-glass drawer in my bed room on the second floor—I had 75/. there, 55 sovereigns, 20 half-sovereigns, and the rest in silver—I examined the money after ten o'clock at night, after I had closed the shop—I locked the drawer, and put the key into a drawer underneath that, which I left unlocked—my wife, and my wife's mother were in the house that night—I have since lost my wife—the prisoner did not sleep in the house—he left about ten o'clock that night—I told him I had to go to a funeral at Hampstead, the next morning, and requested him to come earlier than usual, as I should be obliged to leave home about seven o'clock, and that I should return about one o'clock—he was generally in the shop, and has seen me go up stairs for money—I am not aware that he knew where I went to for it, but he knew I went up stairs for it—I ordered him to pack up some things during my absence, which were on the second floor—I left on the following morning, leaving the prisoner in charge of the shop—I returned about one

o'clock—I did not find him there, and he never returned—he boarded in the house, but did not sleep there—I never saw him afterwards till I took him into custody—I had not dismissed him—half a week's wages were due to him, he had 6s. 6d. a week—I had not refused to raise his wages—he never asked me to do so—I remained at home the rest of the day, but had no occasion to go to my cash—on the following morning a woman named Cobb called on me, and in consequence of what she said, I immediately went and searched for my money—I found the drawer locked and could not find the key—I forced the drawer open with a small screw-driver, and missed the two bags containing my money—I made a commu-nication to the police, and published handbills, offering 20l. reward for his apprehension, but saw nothing of him—in consequence of information, on the 25th of last month I went to the Angel, public-house, Farringdon-street, which is two doors from my own house—I found the prisoner there—before I spoke to him he said, "How do you do?"—I said, "You scoundrel, you have robbed me, and I will give you all the law will allow"—he made no answer—I gave him in charge—I afterwards went with him before the Alderman—I heard the Magistrate ask him why he went away—I believe his answer was not written down—he was remanded for a week—I do not think that any of the evidence on the first occasion was taken down—it was on the 26th—he had been about three months in my service.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Was it the day after he left that you went to your cash-box? A. Yes—I paid him weekly—it was not my habit to look at my cash every evening before I went to bed—but I am certain I looked at it that night.

SARAH OATES . I am the mother of the late Mrs. Bias. I was residing with the prosecutor at the time in question—I remember on the morning of the 11th of March the prosecutor going to a funeral at seven o'clock—the prisoner was in the house then—after his master was gone, he was packing up some goods in the shop—he had occasion to go up stairs to fetch them—I do not exactly know what part of the house he fetched them from—I was in the shop—he did not go up above once—he and I were the only persons in the house—he went out of the shop while I was there, about eleven o'clock—I considered he was coming back—he never spoke to me, nor asked my leave to go—persons must come through the shop to get up stairs—nobody came between the time of Mr. Biss leaving in the morning and the prisoner's going away, nor afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in the shop all the time? A. Yes—till Mrs. Biss came in, which was about a quarter of an hour after the prisoner left, and she minded the shop then, till her husband came home—what took place in the shop after that, I cannot tell, but I was up stairs in the kitchen, and nobody could go up without my knowledge, and nobody did go up—they must pass the kitchen door—nobody could go up without my seeing them—I was at needle-work, sitting in view of the door, which was open the whole time, I swear that positively—the shop shuts up between nine and ten o'clock—we had our meals on the first floor, in the kitchen—I dined by myself that day—my daughter dined in the shop, because the prisoner was gone—I did not go out of doors all that day—I was in the house the next morning—in the kitchen and in the dining room.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Has the kitchen door panes of glass in it? A. No—but it is always open—there is a door at the foot of the stairs—he left the goods behind him which he had packed up.

FRANCES COBB . I now live in service. In 1835 I was living with the

prisoner—I had a child by him—we were living in Upper Ground-street Blackfriars, about ten minutes' walk from Mr. Biss's—on Wednesday the 11th of March, 1835, became to the lodging about a quarter before twelve o'clock—he had slept there the night before—when he left in the morning, he said nothing about coming home in the middle of the day—I never saw him in the middle of the day before—when he came, he said he was going after a situation, and he should return at night, but 1 saw nothing more of him afterwards.

BENJAMIN CATMULL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody on this charge—? I told him I wanted him for the robbery at Mr. Biss's, and he must go with me—he said he would not—I then entreated of him to come out—he sat on a table—I moved the table, and told him to come out—he would not, and I took hold of him—he struggled very much—I at last se-cured him—he said nothing about the charge.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose he had been drinking? A. I cannot say NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18370508-1227

1227. JOHN BROKIN was again indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March, 1 goblet, value 1s.; and 1 ale glass, value 6d.; the goods of Samuel Benjamin Biss, his master.

SAMUEL BENJAMIN BISS . The prisoner was in my service in March, 1835—he absconded on the 11th—in consequence of information from Cobb, I went over to his lodging in Upper Ground-street, and found, among other things of mine, this goblet and glass—I never sold or gave them to the prisoner—I had two dozen of these glasses made on purpose for a tavern—it is an unusual size—I supplied one dozen, and kept the other in stock, and on examination I found I had only eleven remaining—I am quite sure I had twelve before—I compared this with the eleven—I have not a doubt of it—I had such an ale glass as this in my stock.

FRANCES COBB . I lived with the prisoner—I remember his bringing some glasses to the lodging, which Mr. Biss claimed when he came—the prisoner said he had bought them of his master.

MR. BISS. I am quite sure I never sold, nor gave him any thing of the kind.

Prisoner. I do not know any thing about the glasses.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18370508-1228

1228. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse of Charles Jones and others, his masters, on the 26th of April, at St. Mary-le-bow, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 20 sovereigns, the monies of the said Charles Jones; 1 cash-box, value 9s.; 9 sovereigns, 8 half-crowns, 5 shillings; 1 bill of exchange, of the value of 1202l. 11s.; 1 of 323l. 11s. 6d.; 1 of 220l.; 1 of 95l. 10s.; 1 of 50l.; and 1 of 19l. 12s.; the goods and monies of Charles Jones and others, his masters.

CHARLES JONES . I am agent to Messrs. Haddon and Sons, of Aberdeen—I have six partners altogether—our warehouse is in Bow-churchyard, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bow—myself and partners occupy the warehouse—it is not a dwelling-house—the prisoner was in our employ about nine weeks—he had the charge of the worsted department—On the 26th of April, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought down the books from the private counting-house, which I had been using

that day, and placed them in the iron safe in the warehouse—I had brought the cash-box down myself, previous to his going up for the books—it was always kept in the safe, and I placed it in the safe myself, on the top of some books which were there previous to his bringing the other books down—I then told him he might lock up the safe, and asked him if the cash-box was there—he said, "Yes, here it is, Sir," and put his hand up, as if towards the box—the safe is high up—I then walked towards the front door to speak to one of the young men, and in about ten minutes the prisoner brought me the keys, and said, "Here are your keys, Sir," and gave me the keys of the safe—I then saw the warehouse locked up, and the keys of the warehouse were taken to Mr. Haddon's housekeeper, who has a bouse next door—next morning I went to the warehouse, and gave the keys of the safe to one of our porters to get but the books—I saw him open the safe—I was not more than a yard from him—I asked the man if the cash-box was in the safe—he put his hand in, and said, "No, it is not here"—I looked myself, and it was not there—the safe is very small—I could see in a moment that it was not there—the prisoner did not come to the warehouse that morning—he never absented himself before, to my knowledge—I saw him at the Mansion-house in custody, about a week after, I think—I have not seen the cash-box since—it contained 30l. 5s. in gold and silver—twenty sovereigns belonged to myself, and nine sovereigns, eight half-crowns, and five shillings belonged to the firm—I have an account of the bills that were in the cash-box—here is a paper which I had printed to send to the different bankers, in case any of them should be negotiated—I cannot recollect very well what the bills were without this—I had a memorandum of the sums, but I have not got that here—I got the bills again on the Friday morning, by the twopenny post, in this envelope, which I am sure is in the prisoner's hand-writing—there is nothing written inside—there were six bills—I have not got any of them here—part of them have been paid since—I have had the envelope ever since.

ANN NEAL . 1 am housekeeper to Mr. Haddon, who lives next door to Messrs. Jones and Co. The key of their warehouse is usually left in my keeping for the night. On Wednesday night, the 26th of April, it was left with me, and at half-past eight o'clock, the prisoner came and asked me for the loan of the keys, as he had forgotten to take out a parcel to take to one of the gentlemen—I went up stairs and brought him down the keys—he asked me to lend him a light, as he did not know justly where it was—I gave him a light—he returned in the course of five minutes, and brought me the keys and the candle—he bid me good night, and left his umbrella in my passage—I called after him, and said, "Sir, you have left your umbrella," and perceived a brown paper parcel under his arm—I cannot tell what it contained—it was about the size of a quartern loaf or a quartern brick—I did not take particular notice—it was more the shape of a brick than a loaf—he said he would leave his umbrella and call for it again—I saw no more of him till he was at the Mansion-house, on Friday last.

PHILIP WOODLAND . I am porter to the prosecutor. I was present when the prisoner was apprehended at Brighton, last Tuesday week, the 2nd of May, by Forrester the officer—I made him no promise or threat—I asked how he came to go away with the cash-box in the way that he did—he said he did not know what possessed him to do so—he asked me then what Mr. Jones said about it—I told him 1 thought Mr. Jones would prosecute him—he said he could not help it, he had done it, and he was very sorry for

it—I asked him what he broke the cash-box open with—he told me with a small crowbar which he kept in the warehouse—I asked him what he had done with the box after he had taken out the contents—he said he threw it into the road—that he had taken a coach at the Elephant and Castle the following morning, at a quarter past eight o'clock, and he got to Brighton at two o'clock, that he was not in Brighton more than five minutes before he folded up the bills, and sent them back to London by one of the Brighton coachmen, to put into the twopenny post—that was all that passed between us.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable of the Mansion-house. In consequence of information received from Brighton, I went down there with Woodland—I went to the Town-hall, as the prisoner was in custody before I got there—Woodland was in the room with him alone, and I did not hear the conversation between them—I cautioned him not to say any thing to me, as I was bound to make use of it against him.

Prisoners Defence. I am not Mr. Jones's servant—I was engaged by Mr. Haddon, and was paid by him, and Mr. Haddon discharged me on Monday, the 24th of April.

MR. JONES. We took the business of Mr. Haddon and sobs m March last—the engagement was that the servants should remain with us, he paying them up to the 24th—he was in our employ—I have never seen any of the money since.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Life.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370508-1229

1229. ELIZABETH HYAM was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 9 1/2 yards of printed cotton, value 5s. 9d. the goods of George Rolfe.

MARY ANN ROLFE . I am the wife of George Rolfe, a linen-draper, in Brighton-place, Hackney-road. On the afternoon of the 24th of April the prisoner came into the shop in company with two other women—SHE ASKED to look at some print dresses, which my husband showed her—was in the parlour, and had a view of the shop—in consequence of what I observed I came into the shop—the prisoner said she would have a dress, and pay 6d. on it, and leave it till the following Wednesday—the others bought some calico, and all three left the shop—I spoke to my husband, and he brought them back, and said to the prisoner, "I think you have something that does not belong to you"—she denied it—he said, "I think you have a print dress"—I took her into the parlour to search her, and she dropped the dress on the floor—a policeman was sent for, and she was taken into custody—I gave him the dress—it has our shop mark on it.

CHARLES BEAUMONT . (police-constable G 144.) On the 24th of April I was sent for to Mr. Rolfe's shop, and took the three women to the station-house—I received from Mrs. Rolfe the printed cotton—the prisoner said she would not have taken it, but she had had no work since Easter.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370508-1230

1230. JAMES HARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 1 watch, value 11l. 11s., the goods of Thomas Clements Thitchener.

THOMAS CLEMENTS THITCHENER . I keep a shop in Park-side, Knights bridge. On the 31st of May the prisoner came there at near three o'clock—he asked me if I had got a double-bottomed ladies' gold watch—I said "No"—he said, "show me what you have got"—I showed him the watch in

question—he said that is not the one that will suit the lady—she wants a double-bottomed one; but if I would allow him to have it for ten days or a fortnight, merely to show the lady that he had not forgotten her, he would show it her, and return it to me, and give me an order for a double-bottomed one—he asked me the price of this watch—I told him eleven guineas, and thirteen guineas for a double-bottomed one—he engaged to show the watch to the lady—I gave it him in a bag, he took it away, and I never saw him afterwards—he never returned it—I gave him no authority to sell or dispose of it, only to show it to the lady—I had had transactions with him to a small amount before—when he did not return in the fortnight, I got uneasy, and waited a month—I went to his lodging, and he was gone—I went round to different pawnbrokers, and among the rest, to Mr. Kimber's, at Knightsbridge, and found it there—I took it out of pawn in November last—this is the watch (looking at it)—I have a number on it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you make a memorandum of the number of the watch? A. Yes—I know it—it is the only gold watch I have of this sort—I had had trivial dealings with the prisoner before, Amounting to about 18s.—he did not enter into particulars about those transaction*—he did about the watch—I should not have taken the money if he had brought it, unless there had been a fresh arrangement—this watch was not fit for delivery when I gave it to him, and if he had come back and said he would have had it, I should have had to make it fit for delivery—it had been standing a long time, and required fresh oiling—I should not have lot him have the watch if he had brought the eleven guineas—not under the old agreement—he did not pay me at the time, in the former transactions, he called, and said he was going down to the Bank, and if I would nail till he came back, he would pay me the money, but I did not give him credit—he was to have the watch to see if. it suited the lady—when I gave him credit before, he has called in and paid me—I told the pawnbroker the particulars, and he let me have the watch.

CHARLES BOND . On the 31st of May, the prisoner came to my employer's shop, at Knightsbridge, towards four o'clock, and offered me the watch—I Lent him 5l. on it—I asked him if it was his own, seeing it was quite new—he said it was—three weeks after the prosecutor called—he afterwards paid the money, and took it out of pawn—I live about a dozen doors from him—I know it was about four or five o'clock that the prisoner brought it.

Cross-examined. Q. It is not unusual to ask people if property belongs to them? A. Certainly not—I took the number of the watch—I wrote it down before he came away—I recollect the number—the prisoner called about a month or six weeks ago for it—I was not there at the time he came, and cannot say to a month when he did call, but it was after Mr. Thitchener had it out of pawn.

(The prisoner requested permission to address the Jury, instead of his Counsel, and in a long address stated, that he wanted the watch for the pur-pose he had represented, and the prosecutor told him if he did not call in a fort-night should conclude that he intended to keep it, and that he would call and pay for it—that on the same day he received a letter, stating that his mother was confined by illness, upon which, being short of money, he pledged the watch that evening, to procure money for the purpose of going to see her—and while in the country he was confined to his bed for four months—immediately on his return he called on the pawnbroker to redeem the watch, and found

the-prosecutor had got it, and that the lady for whom he wanted it had left for Paris.)

MR. THITCHENER re-examined. I did not, in any way, lead the prisoner to suppose that if he did not return the watch in a limited period, I should consider him the purchaser—he said he took it merely to show the lady, and would return it in ten days or a fortnight—I did not at all contemplate his becoming the purchaser of it—that watch was quite out of the question—a double bottomed watch was what he asked for—I did not sell him this—I never intended to part with it except for the purpose of being shown.

GUILTY .* Aged 31.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1231

1231. SARAH GREENWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April, at St. Andrew, Holborn, 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value, 5l.; 1 scarf, value 1s. 6d.; 5 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 1 half-sovereign, 1 half-crown, and one shilling; the goods and monies of James Barton, her master, in his dwelling house.

ELIZA BARTON . I am the wife of James Barton, who lives in Kirby-street, Hatton-garden. The prisoner entered my service on Tuesday,' the 4th of April, as servant of all work—she left on the 19th, without notice, and in about an hour after, I missed a small steel purse, containing one sovereign, one half-sovereign, one half-crown, and one shilling—and I lost a shawl, a scarf, and some handkerchiefs—I had left my purse in a table drawer—-1 had seen it on the Saturday, and she left on Monday—I had seen the scarf in the course of the day on which she quitted me—the five handkerchiefs were in a drawer in another room—the shawl was worth 5l.; and a great deal more—it is a Canton Chinese crape—it was a light slate or dove colour—it would now cost 10l. or 12l.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How long had you had it? A. Three years—I had worn it but once—Mr. Barton was in the house the. evening that the prisoner left—it is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn.

JAMBS SCOTT . I am shopman to Messrs. Moate and Appleford, pawn-brokers, Little Warner-street I produce the duplicate of a French white crape shawl, pawned with me, on the 10th of April, I believe, by the prisoner, in the name of Sarah Greenwood, about the middle of the day, I think—it was a kind of French white, I believe—it was silk—it has been redeemed—I should say it was not a slate colour.

WILIIAM ROBERTS . I am shopman to Mr. Cordell, of No. 31, Ex mouth-street. I have five handkerchiefs pawned by the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you say she is the person? A. I have no doubt of it—I took the pledge in myself, and she said the brought them for her aunt.

JOHN FURNISS (police-constable G 117.) The prisoner came up to me in Hatton-wall, on Sunday evening, the 16th of April, and asked if I knew Mr. Barton, of Kirby-street—I said I did not, but I believed she was the servant that had lived with them, and robbed them so much—she said, she was, and wished to give herself up—I asked where she had pawned the things—she said she could not tell where she pawned the shawl, but she would take me to the place—she took me to Little Warner-street, showed me Mr. Moates,' and said that was where she had pawned the shawl—she told me where she had pawned the handkerchiefs—I asked

where the purse was—the said it was lost—I got from her a ticket of these handkerchiefs, which corresponds with the one the pawnbroker has.

MR. BARTON. These are the handkerchiefs I lost The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 16.—Of stealing under the value of £5.Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1232

1232. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April, 1 bag, value 1s.; 7lbs. weight of raisins, value 2s.; 1 loaf of bread, value 3d., 11/2 lb. weight of bacon, value 1s.; 11/2lb. weight of mustard, value 1s.; 11/2 lb. weight of allspice, value 4d.; 11/2lb. weight of currants, value 1s.; 1 oz. weight of nutmegs, value 1s.; 1 oz. weight of pepper, value 3d.; and 4 tin boxes, value 6d.; the goods of William Parrett.

WILLIAM PARRETT . I live in Mint-street, Southwark. On the 7th of April I was at Mr. Russell's, No. 3, Cow-cross-street. I had a blue bag with grocery in it—I placed it on a cask in the shop at the door—when I had been in a short time and was coming out I missed my bag—it contained the articles stated in the indictment—the cask was inside the shop, not near the door—I got information from a boy, and went down Cowcross-street, and the prisoner was taken in a public-house, about a stone's throw off—the value of the contents of the bag was 8s.—I have not seen it since.

FREDERICK PETER EDINBURGH . I live with my father in Peter and Key-court, Peter-lane, Cow-cross. On Friday, the 7th. of April, I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Russell's shop, with along coat down, on to his knees, and no bag—he came out with a blue bag in his hand, and the string in his mouth—he ran into Three Horse-Shoe-court, went into a house, and came down again with another coat on, and had left the bag—he returned in about five minutes—I did not speak to him—he came down and caught hold of a boy by the nose, and turned him round—we were all standing together, about four yards from Mr. Russell's shop—he then went down Cow-cross, and then I saw Mr. Parrett look at the door—I said, "Have you lost anything?"—he said, "Yes"—I said, "There is the boy"—the prisoner ran through Sharp's-alley, into a public-house in West-street—I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Were you alone when you saw the prisoner go in? A. No; there were three or four more lads, with me, standing at Mr. Russell's shop—I had just left work—I work for my father, who is a shoemaker—I had occasionally lived with Mr. Russell—I knew the prisoner by sight—I did not know where he lived—Thomas and Edward Hives were with me, with Mr. Russell's lad, who had just come out—Edward Hives was the boy the prisoner took by the nose—it was about half-past ten o'clock at night—the shop was not shut—when the prisoner came back, he kept looking at Mr. Russell's shop—I said so before the Magistrate—he went down Cow-cross—I signed my name before the Magistrate—I think I said the man looked at the shop—I am not sure of it, but he kept looking at the shop—the man that came out with the bag held his head down—it seemed very weighty—he ran as fast as he could, and I was talking with these boys.

ROBERT GLETSON . I am fourteen years old—I live with my parents, at No. 4, Peter and Key-court I was at Mr. Russell's when the prisoner came in for an ounce of tea—he had no bag when he came in—I came out, and saw him come out with a blue bag—he went to Three Horse-shoe-court

—he came back again—he had no bag with him then, and he had another coat on—I afterwards saw him in West-street in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen the bag in Mr. Russell's shop? A. Yes—I saw Mr. Parrett put it there—I did not stop the man who came out with the bag—when I saw Mr. Parrett looking I told him—I was not sure it was his bag till I saw him looking for it—the man had no bag when he went in—I had shut the shutters up, but had not shut the door—Mr. Russell and his wife were serving in the shop—neither of them ate here.

GEORGEK NOTT ( police-constable G 99.) On the 7th of April I was on duty in Cow-cross-street—I heard a cry of "Stop thief"—I went to the Crown public-house—which is nearly a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's—I found the prisoner there, on the second-floor staircase—I had seen him running, and lost sight of him at the corner, and then found him in the house—he was coming down quite softly from the second-floor staircase, in the dark, as if he belonged to the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know where the prisoner lived? A. I do not—when he was brought to Hatton-garden, he told me; but previous to that he said he lived in Ray-street—I found his house, and searched it—among other things was the duplicate of a coat. of the description of the one he had on when he stole the bag—it was one of the rough coats that come down to the knees—I do not mean to say that the man I saw coming down the stairs was the man I had seen running along.

ROBERT GLETSON re-examined. The shutters were up, but Mr. Williams, the publican's, is opposite our house, where there is a strong light—we cannot see persons very well by that light—the prisoner passed about three yards from me, but I saw him in the shop buying some tea—my mistress was serving him—there was nobody in the shop but the prisoner and Mr. Parrett, my master and mistress—no one but the prisoner and Parrett left the shop—after I came out the bag was brought out.

MR. PAYNE. Q. What were you doing when the prisoner came in? A. I was screwing up the bolt.

GEORGE KNOTT re-examined. I found this duplicate in his lodgings, and found a coat at the pawnbroker's of the description the boy gave.

Prisoner. When I was accused of the robbery, I went back to the shop, and said to Mr. Russell, "I am accused of robbing your shop"—the answer was, "No, we have not seen you." Witness. I took him back to the shop, and there I met the prosecutor, and the two witnesses—I asked Mr. Russell if the man had been in there—Mrs. Russell said, "I served him with the tea," and she had seen him before.

WILLIAM PAREETT re-examined. I was in the shop when the prisoner was brought back—Mrs. Russell said she recollected seeing him in the shop, and served him with an ounce of tea—the bag was very heavy.

(James Hoare, of Compton-street, Clerkenwell, a carpenter; William Seward, of Hatfield-street, jeweller; and Thomas Young, cabinet-maker, of Ray-street; gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Thursday, May 11th, 1837.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370508-1233

1233. CHARLES FARRANT and MARY ANN FARRANT were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April, 91bs. weight of type metal, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Vincent Figgins, the younger, and another, the masters of the said Charles Farrant.

VINCENT FIGGINS, JUN . I live in West-street, Smithfield, and am partner with James Figgins. Charles Farrant was my servant—I could not tell that we lost any metal.

JOHN TUDOR . I am in the service of the prosecutor. On Friday evening, the 14th of April, at half-past eight o'clock, I was standing at the door of my house—I walked by, and saw the metal on the counter of Mr. Coulson, No. 84, Great Saffron-hill—the prisoners were in the shop, apparently selling it—it was in the scale—I thought it looked like my employer's—I went to Mutton-hill and got a policeman, and when I came back they were gone—this is the metal.

WILLIAM ZIER BRASER . I am in the service of Messrs. Figgins On Friday, the 14th of April, I had this piece of metal in my possession—I know it by the rough state which it is in, and the marks were it has been hit to be broken—I had it in my hand on Friday afternoon, I to see if it was fit for ray work—it would not do, and I put it back again, JAMES COULSON. I keep a marine-store-shop. This metal was offered to my housekeeper by the prisoner Charles—I was in the back parlour—she brought it in to me—I came out, and said I could not purchase any thing of that kind of boys—I said, "Send your mother or father"—he said he would bring his mother—in about ten minutes the mother and the boy brought it again—I asked where she got it—she said it was all right, and she had sold 16s. worth to a printer—I detained it.

Mary Ann Farrant, When I went there you were on the bed—the woman said she could give but 11/2d. a pound, and the boy said he was glad of that, as he should be able to pay it back again—you got up, and appeared to have been inebriated—I never said that ever sold such a thing in my life. Witness. You would have sold it if I would have bought it—I did not buy any of him before—my housekeeper bought a piece the night before, and I blamed her for it.

Mary Ann Farrant. My son came home and said, "Mother, I have found a little piece of metal, and went to sell it, bat they do hot like to buy it without you"—I said, "For God's sake do not tell me you found it if you did not"—I went to the shop—the man said, "I shall give but 11/2d. a pound"—as soon as I saw how large it was, I said, "You have told me a story, you never found that."

JOHN TUDOR . The mother had no access to the place.

C. FARRANT— GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Three Months.

M. A. FARRANT— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1234

1234. HENRY WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 1/2lb. weight of sewing silk value 12s., the goods of Henry Bardwell and others.

MARTIN GEORGE . I am shopman to Henry Bardwell and others. On the 12th of April the prisoner came to the shop, he talked about some silk and other things, and then went away—a few yards from the shop I saw him drop some silk, and put the rest into his pocket—this is it—it is my master's—I have no doubt of it.

WILLIAM DROBBLE (police-constable C 21.) I searched the prisoner, and found these five skeins of silk in his pocket.

MARTIN GEORGE . This is my master's. I know it—this other, small lot is what the prisoner bought.

Prisoner. I had some silk in my pocket, and wanted some cotton matched—I wanted some silk finer than what I had got in my pocket—I do not know what there was besides—I had been on business and taken part of several glasses of brandy and water, and when I am in that way do not know what I do—I have been handcuffed to my bed ever since I have been here—I was confined once before—my friends live in the country—I am a tailor, and live at Chelsea—I have been better for some time than I was, but a little refreshment produces excitement in me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1235

1235. HENRY ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April; 1 stove, value 5s., the goods of Joseph Sweet, and fixed to a certain building; and 1 copper, value 5s.; the goods of the said Joseph Sweet.

JOSEPH SWEET . I have a freehold house in High-street, Homerton—I had a stove fixed there, and a copper which was up in the garret, to catch the water that came from the roof—they are here—the copper I am sure I mine—the stove I cannot be positive to—the copper was there on the Saturday previous—I can only say I think the copper is mine—I have no mark on it—I know it—I lost it fourteen years ago, and bought it back again, and it had water in it part of the way up.

ALFRED PAINE . On the 11th of April, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner let this copper down from the top of the house to the bottom—he put it over the parapet, and lowered it down in front of the house—I live next door—I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner. Q. What was attached to the copper? A. I cannot say whether it was thrown down or lowered down—I believe it was throw down—you are the man who did it—I saw you bring it out of the empty house window—you went up our house to get the ropes—I know the stove—I saw it in the house when it was set.

Prisoner. Q. How long is it since it was set? A. I cannot say—I saw it before and after it was set—there are four rivets and five holes in it, and a patch—I am sure it is the same—he came to my mother's and asked for some ropes—I went up with him to let him have them—he got out at the top of the house, and said he was going to put some tiles on—I thought it was strange at that time of night, and went down—I went out and saw him go along the parapet of the window where these things were, and he went in.

JOHN BEDFORD . I am a police-inspector. Two days after the prisoner was apprehended, 1 went to Francis Lambert's, and found the stove—the copper was taken into the house of the next door neighbour, (Alfred Paine)—his mother has the charge of both the houses.

FRANCIS LAMBERT . I live in Bridge-street, Homerton, and am a broker—I bought this stove of the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not offer you, six weeks previous, a stove like this for sale? A. You talked about one, but I never saw it—I have know the prisoner seven years—he lived opposite me—as far as I know he has borne an excellent character—if he was charged with any thing, I might not have known it.

SOPHIA MORTON . The prisoner came to put a chimney-pot on one my house Monday, and in the evening he came to ask me to let him have a rope, tha the said he had left in my attic—I told Paine, my son-in-law, to go and give it him—I know this copper was in the next house—it was brought into my

house when it came down—I know it by this piece in the side—I have, used. it many years, as I lodged in that house.

ALFRED PAINE re-examined. I saw it come down in front of the house—I took it up and took it into my mother's—when the prisoner came down to take it, it was gone—he did not see me take it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to repair the chimney—I then went with a soldier to the Adam and Eve—Palmer came in and I asked him to assist me in taking away the ropes and scaffold—he did so—I had no money, and sold this stove to pay him, which was my own—I then went to the house for a cord that I thought I had left there—but the copper I never had—the stove is my own—I had offered it for sale six weeks before.

GUILTY .* Aged 55.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1236

1236. MARY ANN OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March, 2 petticoats, value 1s. 6d.; half-a-yard of printed cotton, value 3d.; 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 gown, value 2s.; and 2 cloaks, value 7s.; the goods of John Mehans.

MARGARET MEHANS . I am the wife of John Mehans, of Henry-street, Hampstead-road. On the 25th of February the prisoner came to lodge with me from the hospital, and left me that day three weeks—I missed one article the day before she left, and asked about it—she said she had pawned it, and would bring it back, but she started the next morning, and then I missed these other things out of my drawer.

JOSEPH BAKER . I am a pawnbroker, and alive in Tottenham-court-road. I have the sheet, the shirt, two petticoats, and a piece of cotton, which were pledged by a female in the name of Brown, but I do not know the prisoner—these are the duplicates I gave.

JOHN HENHAM . I produce this duplicate, which I found in the prisoner's pocket when I took her—I have some other duplicates.

WILLIAM WALTER WILMIN . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a cloak pledged by a female, who I believe is the prisoner—I have a duplicate which corresponds with the one found by the officer.

WILLIAM LANCE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce this gown and other articles pledged, I believe, by the prisoner—two of these duplicates are what I gave for them.

(The prisoner pleaded poverty.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.

Confined Four Days; being far advanced in pregnancy.

Reference Number: t18370508-1237

1237. RICHARD ROWE was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 6th of May, 4 fowls, value 6s.; and 2 tame rabbits, value 3s.; the property of Frederick Freame; well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

FREDERICK FREAME . I live at Finchley. On Friday night last I had six rabbits and ten fowls, in two barns—they were locked up, about one hundred yards from my house—the next morning I found my barns had been broken, and the rabbits and fowls were gone—some of them are here—I can swear to two rabbits, and two of the fowls.

JOHN SMITH . I am a horse-patrol. In consequence of information, I Went to the prisoner's house on Saturday morning—he lives on Finchley-common, nearly two miles from the prosecutor's, and carries fish about the country—I told him I came to search his house, on suspicion of stealing

this poultry—he did not answer me, but in bringing him away he said the saddle should be on the right horse—I found four fowls and two dead rabbits in the house.

WILLIAM PRINCE . I am a constable of Finchley-common. I went to Smith's, and went to Howe's house; saw the property, and knew it—I went after Woodward and Collins, from information I received from Mitchell.

ANN MITCHELL . I live on Finchley-common with the prisoner. George Collins and William Woodward brought these things to our house on Friday morning—it might be between four and five o'clock—I was not at home—they were there before I was—I had met a friend, a wagoner, and had stopped at the Bull, as I was very much intoxicated, and I laid down on the bed and fell asleep directly I came home—Collins brought these fowls and rabbits, and he had four others to go out with that morning—he got in by our leaving the key in the water-closet, and I do not think Howe 'knew any thing about their being there—I do not know how Collins and Woodward got in—I did not let them in—Mary Anthony was in the house—she has not long left her husband—she was sleeping that night with me down at the Bull—she came home with me on this night—she has a bed to herself—I do not know whether she got up to let them in—I do not know how these things got there, but I did not get them there—none of the fowls were cooked that I know of.

JOHN SMITH re-examined. I found one of the fowls had been cooled and partly eaten before ten o'clock, when I got there.

JAMES JOSHUA BLAGG . I live at Finchley. On Monday, the 6th of May, at half-past four o'clock, I saw Woodward and two other men near the prosecutor's barn—I do not know who the other two were—one of them had a jacket on, and a large black dog with him.

Prisoner. Woodward and Collins brought them about ten minutes before three o'clock in the morning, and asked me to let them leave them there till they called—I never asked what they were, nor opened the basket.

JOHN SMITH re-examined. The feathers had been pulled off the fowls in the house, and one of them was cooked.

FREDERICK FREAME re-examined. These are the feathers, which I believe were on my fowls.

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1238

1238. GEORGE NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 5 yards of calico, value 7s., the goods of James Crickett and another.

ELIZA CRICKETT . I live with my uncle, James Crickett, a linen-draper, in Cable-street. About a quarter before eleven o'clock in the morning of the 24th of April prisoner came and took the calico from the door—I saw him put it under his arm and go away—I told Shaw, who went after him and took him—this is it—it is the property of James Crickett and another.

Prisoner. Through misfortune and sickness I was so reduced that life and liberty I valued not—I was determined to do something to send me out of the country, and seeing the rolls of calico outside, I seized the opportunity and cut the string and took it.

GUILTY . Aged 63.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1239

1239. MARGARET MARTIN and ELIZABETH MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 28 yards of printed cotton, value 14s., the goods of James Brown.

DAVID JONES . I was shopman to James Brown, of Shad well High-street. I hung this printed cotton outside the door, and missed it between three and four o'clock in the afternoon on the 12th of April—I went to Harris's, the pawnbroker, and saw the prisoner Moore there, and this cotton—I took her and sent for the policeman—I then went to No. 9, Union-street, and found Martin—the was in bed at Moore's house, and had a basket by the side of the bed, in which the officer found these other nine yards of printed cotton, which is ours—she said she bought it of me, but I had not sold it—it is the only piece I had of that pattern—it was all in one piece when we had it, and they had cut it.

Martin. I bought it of you, and gave you 5s. for it. Witness. No, you did not—I do not recollect seeing you at all.

Moore. I took him home to my house, and told him that Martin was there. Witness. Yes, you did, and you told me you had it from Martin.

THOMAS WARD . I am in the employ of Mr. Upsall, a pawnbroker. I have three other small pieces of the same sort of print, which were pledged by Moore for 1s., 6d., on the 12th of April, between three and four o'clock, in the name of Ann Smith, which was the name she usually pledged in—she said it was her own.

GEORGE HUNT (police-constable K 136.) I took Moore at the pawn-broker's—she said she had been sent to pledge them by Martin—I went and found Martin between the bed clothes, with her clothes on, and nine yards in the basket by her side—I told her what Moore had said—she denied it at first, and their admitted it.

Moore's Defence. I have known Martin sixteen years—on the Wednesday she came to me, and brought with her some cotton, of which I knew nothing.

Martin's Defence. I bought it, and sent Moore to pawn it.

MARTIN— GUILTY . Aged 53.— Confined Three Months.

MOORE— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1240

1240. JAMES WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April, 3 pewter pots, value 2s., the. goods of Nathaniel Tarr.

NATHANIEL TARR . I keep the Regent's Arms public-house, at York-terrace, Marylebone. At a quarter-past three o'clock in the afternoon of Sunday, the 23rd of April, a rap came to the door—I went—Martin had got the prisoner and these pewter pots—I sent for an officer, and another pint pot was found on him; and at the station-house another quart pot was found on him, beat up and flattened—the three are mine, but not the pint.

THOMAS MARTIN . About a quarter-past three o'clock I was looking out of my window, and saw the prisoner take a pint and quart pot out of a staircase which goes up to the Mews—I ran out after him, and took him back with the two pots, which I had seen him take, and then two others were found on him.

FRANCIS THORNTON . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner—this pint pot was found in his pocket, and this quart pot in his side-pocket, bent up.

GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1241

1241. GEORGE GREEN was indicted for stealing on the 28th of April, 2 pewter pots, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Amos; and 2 pewter pots, value 3s.; the goods of Thomas Fletcher.

THOMAS AMOS . I keep the Bell public-house, Mount-street, Grosvenorsquare.

This pint pot is mine, and has ray name on it—one of the quarts 1 believe to be mine, but it is bent up and broken.

THOMAS FLETCHER . I keep the Carpenter's Arms, Adam—street. There other two pots are mine.

JAMES MAYCROFT TURNAGE (police—constable T 116.) At half—past nine o'clock in the evening of the 28th of April, I saw the prisoner in the Ux. bridge—road, knocking something against the railing—I went and asked what he had got—he said nothing—I took him, and found under his apron these pots, all bent up, but one of them.

Prisoner. They were placed on the coving, and as the policeman came up 1 was kicking them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1242

1242. GEORGE VINCENT was indicted for embezzlement.

ESTHER BARTON . I am a widow and a grocer, and live in Little Maryle—Done—street. The prisoner was employed by me—it was his business to carry out coke—he was authorised to receive money if people gave it him—he left me on the 27th of March—he has never accounted to me for 14s. received from Mr. Green.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am in the employ of Charles Verry, of Regent—street. I paid the prisoner 14s. for Mrs. Barton.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Six Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1243

1243. MARY SEYMOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, 12 napkins, value 6s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; and two bedgowns, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of John Vincent, her master.

JANE VINCENT . I am the wife of John Vincent, of John—street, Com—mercial-road—the prisoner came to nurse me—I had a box of linen from was right—the linen was marked with the Society's name—I missed some of the napkins, and these other things on the Monday morning—I asked the prisoner where they were—she said, At the mangle"—I gave her the money to get them 1—she took the money, and went away—I did not see her till the next night, when she was taken—these are the things—I know them.

WILLIAM FOSTER I am a pawnbroker, in Ratcliffe—highway. I produce two napkins and an apron, pledged on the 6th of April, by the prisoner.

FRANCIS RAWLINS . I am in the employ of Mr. Carpenter, a pawnbroker. I have three napkins pawned by the prisoner. part of them, I was there fortnight, at 3s. a week and my board—I took part of them, but meant to replace them—I returned and gave Mrs. Vincent out when she settled with me.

JANE VINCENT . She did not return me the ticket till she was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 44.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1244

1244. THOMAS FRANCOIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April, 1 coat, value 10s; 1 pair of trowsers, value 5 s; 1 shirt, value 1 s; and 1 pair of braces, value 2 d.; the goods of Anthony Farringdon. ANTHONY FARRINDON. I was a shoemaker, but am now in the Life Guards. I lodged at the Union public—house, Oxford—street—I went bed on the night of the 17th of April, in the front attic—the next morning, at half-past six o'clock, I got up, and missed a coat, trowsers, and shirt, and braces—two or three more persons were in the room when I awoke—this shirt has been mine, but I lost one once before, and I cannot say whether it was that.

JAMES TODD . I keep the public-house. At half-past nine that evening the prosecutor went to bed—the prisoner came afterwards, and wanted half a bed—he had a pint of beer, and was then shown up to the bedroom where the prosecutor was—he remained there about ten minutes, and came down in his shirt-sleeves—I said, "Have you come down again?"—he said, "Yes, I want to go into the yard"—I pointed to it, and said, "Have you brought your clothes down?" as he had some things with him—he said, "No, only my shoes"—he had got the shoes in his hand—he did not return from the yard—I went to see, and he was gone away over a ten feet wall, and the prosecutor's things were gone—I did not awake him—the next morning the prisoner passed—I sent my waiter and the prosecutor after him, and the shirt was found on him.

DANIEL LONEGAN (police-constable D 137.) The prisoner was given into my custody—the prosecutor said his shirt was on him, and we took this one off him.

Prisoner's Defence, I bought it at a rag shop.

GUILTY. Aged 27.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1245

1245. MARIA VICK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April, I half-crown, the monies of Henry Walker, her master.

FRANCIS WALKER . I am the wife of Henry Walker, a weaver, of Cam-den-street. I hired the prisoner on the 18th of April—I sent her out at night for some oil, and gave her half-a-crown—she Went away on the Fri-day—I went to her mother's, and she opened the door to me her-self—I said, "You are here"—she said, "I am here"—I said, "How came you to take the half-crown from me?"—she said she did not know—I said, "You were aware I could not afford to lose it"—she said she did not know—I said she was aware I could give her in charge—she said I might if I could, but she understood the law—I then gave her in charge.

DENNIS POWER (police-constable H 93.) I took the prisoner—she said she had been out all night and spent the half-crown, and broken the bottle which was given to her.

GUILTY . *Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1246

1246. MARY DWYER and ANNE OAKES were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April, 3 sovereigns, 5 shillings, and 1£10 note, the property of Thomas Hadland.

THOMAS HADLAND . I live in Portland-terrace, Globe-road, Mile-end. On the 1st of April I met the two prisoners—they asked me three or four times for something to drink—at last I said I would let them have something, and then they took me home—I went to their house—I was then collecting carman for the London Docks—when I got as far as the door, they asked me to enter—I was then struck by a man—I wanted to return, but the two prisoners, with the assistance of the man, put me up a flight of stairs—when I got to the top, the man got me by the arm, drew me into a room, and locked the door on me—Dwyer then asked me for some money—I asked what she should want—she said 2s.—I gave it her—they sent for something to drink, and both drank with me there—the

man was outside on the landing—I did not see him all the time, but I heard his footsteps—I had not taken the liquor more than ten minutes before I was drowned in sleep, and on awaking in the morning I found myself robbed of a—10 note, three sovereigns, and five shillings, and not a person in the house—I had pulled my clothes off, when I found I was so overtaken by sleep that I could not get further—Dwyer assisted—she got into bed too in the morning—I could not find any body in the house—the doors were open—I laid down all alone, as it was too early to go home, and went to sleep again—I got up about half-past nine or a quarter to ten o'clock and called, but could find no one in the house—I took some of the bed clothes, rolled them up, and went down to the door—and there I stood with them—the person at the next house said, what was I going to do with them—I said, not to take them away—she said it was her property—I have not traced the—10 note.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it the sheets or blanked you bundled up? A. There were no blankets to the bed—lawyer drank some gin, but I cannot say that the other did—she left the room—I found seven sovereigns in my purse the next morning—I did not say I was rob-bed of every farthing—the three sovereigns were rolled up in the note—I had seven sovereigns, three half-sovereigns, and three shillings in silver, left—I had 8l. 13s.—no more—I did not mention before the Magistrate that I had 11l. 7s. left—I signed this, and it was read over to me—(read)—"I had about 11l. 7s. left"—I had not that money left—I was sober before the Magistrate—I went before him on the Wednesday after the Sunday I was robbed—i was not able to leave my bed before, I was to ill.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1247

1247. CHARLOTTE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April, 2 handkerchiefs value 20s., the goods of Charles Christian Wiltz.

SARAH WILTZ . I am a washerwoman, and live in Richmond-street, Liston-grove. The prisoner was in my employ for three months last summer—I went to Lord Mordaunt's, and brought home nine lawn handkerchiefs—the prisoner was there, and when she was gone I missed two of them—I was not at home when the linen arrived on the 10th—I waited till the 22nd to tee the ladies' maid—I missed two handkerchiefs—these are them—my husband's name is Charles Christian Wiltz.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you want the prisoner to stay with you, and she refused? A. No—I had not quarrelled with her—I was never in the habit of pawning any thing—she never saw me do any thing of the kind—I cannot deny that I ever pawned any thing—I never pledged any thing of Lady Mordaunt's—it is a very long time since I authorised the pawning of any of my customers' things—it was when a gentleman was out of town, and I was in want of money.

WILLIAM ISAAC (police-constable S 174.) On the 22nd of April, the prosecutor called at the station—I apprehended the prisoner—she said she knew nothing of this.

SSARAH FRANCES WILTZ . I am the prosecutor's daughter. The prisoner came there on the 10th—my father brought in a bundle of linen—I counted them, they were all right, and the next morning there were two handkerchiefs missing—we supposed that the prisoner had pledged them, because we did not find them on her—I went to Mr. Loveday's,

and found them there, pledged for 1s. 6d.—I had never directed her to pawn at any time.

Cross-examined. Q. Of course your mother has pawned nothing? A. I don't know what she has done—I am not at home at all times—I (pure been at home four months—I went to the pawnbroker's by accident—I never had been in that shop before.

THOMAS FISH . I am a pawnbroker, in St. Alban's-place. These two handkerchiefs were pledged by the prisoner on the 10th of April, for 1s. 6d., in the name of Charlotte Robinson—I think I have seen Mrs. Wiltz before—she has pledged with me before—they were some of her own things, I suppose.

Cross-examined. Q. How often have you seen her before? A. I don't Know—I may have seen Mrs. Wiltz before—I would not swear I have not seen her twenty times—she has not pawned in my shop for the last three weeks or a month—I cannot say whether they were washable articles, nor how often I have seen the daughter in the shop—I would not swear I have Lot seen her ten times—I have seen her before the 24th—it is impossible to say how often—I have seen her four times—she had pawned with me, but the prisoner pawned these.

SARAH FRANCIS WILTZ . I never was in his shop till that day—if I were to die this moment before God, I never pawned any thing there—I don't suppose I have been in a pawn-shop twenty times in the whole course of my life, nor yet five times, and never went to that shop at all.

SARAH WILTZ re-examined. I have very seldom pledged at Fish's shop—I have not sent other people to pledge.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you ever sent your daughter to pledge? A. No—if she did go five times, it was without my knowledge—she has been in Mr. Loveday's with me to buy a pair of stockings and a pair of boots—I decline to answer how many persons' things I have pledged.

THOMAS FISH re-examined. I put down in my books the names, of per-sons who pledge—I have put the prisoner's name in the books.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1248

1248. MATTHEW FLANNAGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November, 1 pair of trowsers, value 1l.; 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 stock and 30 bits, value 1l.; 2 planes, value 1l. 4s.; 2 saws, value 6s.; 1 basket, value 6d.; and 2 yards of baize, value 1s.; the goods of George Lakeman, his master.

GEORGE LAKEMAN . I live in Booth-street, Spitalfields, and am a cabinet-maker. The prisoner was in my service—I left him at work a few minutes before eight o'clock in the evening, to go to the polisher's, and then I missed these things—these trowsers are mine—they are all that has been found, but I lost all the other things the same night—I afterwards, saw, him, and took the officer to him.

DANIEL COTTELL (police-constable H 121.) I took the prisoner a fortnight ago, and found these trowsers on him—the prosecutor took me to a public-house where I found him.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Six Months; Three Weeks solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1249

1249. MARY JONES and SARAH LAWRENCE were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 1 coat, value 3l.; 1 umbrella, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 watch-chain, value 1s. 2 seals, value 2s.; 1 half-crown, and 3 shillings; the goods and monies of William Burke.

WILLIAM BURKE . I live in New-street, Golden-square, and am a Frenchpolisher. On the 24th of April I was in Oxford-street till between one and two o'clock in the morning—I went to see the railroad the evening before, and I met a friend—we went and had some beer—then I came to St. Giles's and had more drink—I stopped there till one o'clock—I was drunk—when I got to Oxford-street I met the two prisoners—Jones came and spoke to me—I went home with her, and then the other prisoner came up—I gave them some money, and they all got drunk—I then took my things off, and went to bed with Jones—Lawrence went out—my watch was in my trowsers pocket—I did not take them off—only Jones was in the room when I went to bed—I did not see Lawrence come in again—I awoke about six o'clock in the morning, and then Jones was gone, and my watch also—that has not been found—the great coat was gone.

Lawrence. He said if I would come with him, he would give me the coat—he pulled it off, and gave it me, and said I might pawn it in the morning.

Jones. When we got home he had got but one shilling, and that he spent for drink, and pulled off the great coat to give us—we both slept with him—in the morning we took the coat to Lawrence's mother.

WILLIAM ADAMS (police-constable G 119.) I met the two prisoners between five and six o'clock in the morning, walking towards Holbrook-court—Jones had got somethingbulky, and Lawrence had this umbrella—I followed them—they threw this coat behind them, I took it up—then they threw down the umbrella and ran away—I found 4s. 9d. on them.

Lawrence's Defence. I was going to my mother's with the coat, as it was too soon to pawn it.

JONES GUILTY Aged 18.

LAWRENCE- GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1250

1250. ELIZA BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April, 7 knives, value 5s.; 2 pictures, framed and glazed, value 1s.; 2 pairs of gloves, value 2s.; 1 purse value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pack of playing cards, value 2s.; 1 brush, value 6d.; and 1 yard of linen cloth, value 7d.; the goods of Ann Canham, her mistress.

HARRIET COOK . I am niece to Ann Carham—she keeps the Captain Cook in Commercial-road—the prisoner was servant there—I missed the articles stated—I searched the prisoner's room, and found all these articles between the bed and sacking.

JAMES DAVIDSON (police constable H 146.) I was sent for, and took the prisoner—she had been crying, and said she wished to be forgiven, and that it was the first time.

SARAH COX . I searched the prisoner, and found on her a piece of.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress's niece was in the habit of lying down on my bed every day—she had all her things in my room—the door was never locked—I am perfectly innocent—I had picked up the purse in the passage, and thought it might have been one of the customers.

HARRIET COOK re-examined. I never put any of this property there.

I have access to the room—we had a very good character with her—my aunt has been in bed for some months, and I have had to attend on her, and; when 1 have got her quietly composed, I hare gone to the prisoner's room to lie down for an hour or two.

GUILTY. Aged 21,—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370508-1251

1251. ELLEN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April, 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Collier.

JOHN COLLIER . I live in the Kingsland-road, and am a linen-draper. I sell shoes. On Saturday, the 6th of April, at half-past nine-o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the shop, and was looking at some shoes—she went out, I followed, and told her to come tack, as I Suspected she had stolen a pair of shoes—she said she had not—I brought her back, and found these shoes in her apron—she said she bad bought them below—I know they are mine—I had not sold them—I said I should send for a policeman—she said, "Good man, let me go, I will pay you for them,"

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You are quite sure about the expression, that she had bought them below? A. Yes—she bought a hall of cotton—I was standing behind one counter, and the shoes were on the other—she went towards them and pulled them about—I went to her and asked if she wanted to buy a pair of shoes—she said no, there was none that would fit her—I have no mark on them—it is the only sort we keep—she might have bought them, but she asked for forgiveness.

WILLIAM HOUSE (police-constable N 57.) I took the prisoner—she had got her apron full of bread—her husband came for the bread.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 26.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370508-1252

1252. JOSEPH YOUNG was indicted for embezzlement.

EDWARD COLLINS . I keep a butcher's shop in Leather-lane. The prisoner was my apprentice—it was his duty to take oat goods and receive money—if he has received 8s. 5d. from Mrs. Roberts, I have not had it—he did not abscond—I said nothing to him about it, but I sent in the bill, and then found it was paid.

ANN SMITH . I am in the service of Martha Roberts. The prisoner brought some meat—the bill came to 8s. 5d.—I paid it him either on Wednesday or Thursday—I was applied to for it about three weeks afterwards—he has receipted the bill—I saw him write the receipt and gave him the pen.

DANIEL HUMPHREYS . I took the prisoner, I have the bill and the receipt with it.

EDWARD COLLINS . This bill is receipted by the prisoner, but not in his own name—he has written the name of my other apprenticed.

Prisoner. The meat was ordered on one day, and it was sent from the other shop by the other apprentice, the next day—the receipt is not my writing. Witness. This is the prisoner's writing. I gave him the beef to take from my shop in Leather-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Six Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1253

1253. RICHARD JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, 1 oven door, value 5s., the goods of Abraham Ransom.

ABRAHAM RANSOM . I live at the sign of the Blue Bell, Ratcliffe-highway. I had an oven door at my house—it was safe on the 20th of April, I did not miss it till the policeman came and said he had found it.

CATHERINE FISHER . The prisoner came to my house in March, and I purchased of him a stove—I put it at the door, and an officer claimed it—on the 30th of April about half-past ten he came again, and I detained him.

WILLIAM SHEEN (police-constable II 117.) I was called, and found the prisoner with this oven door under his frock—I asked him where he got it—he made no answer.

GUILTY .*Aged 23.— Confined Six Months; Three Weeks solitary.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370508-1254

1254. MARY BOLTWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March, 2 pair of trowsers, value 3l.; 2 waistcoats, value 1l.; 1 shirt, value 8s.; 1 cloak, value 2l.; 6 spoons, value 1l. 5s.; 1. castor top, value 2s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 8s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; and 4 half-crowns; the goods and monies of Joseph Hewett, her master; and CAROLINE FELL for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stole; against the Statute, &c.

CAROLINE HEWETT . I live with Mr. Joseph Hewett, as his wife, in Earl-street—he has been a coach proprietor, and now drives an omnibus—Boltwood came to help to move—I took her as a servant, and she left after four days—I went out in the evening, and returned and missed these things two drawers had been broken open—I had left her in care of the place.

Boltwood. The drawers were left open, and the spoons outside. Witness. No, they were not—they were broken open, and the front very much damaged.

SAMUEL WATSON . I am assistant to Mr. Graygoose, of Crawford-street, Marylebone. These spoons were not pawned by either of the prisoners—I have no doubt that they were pawned by Mary Pritchard, who was discharged.

THOMAS FISHER . I am a pawnbroker, and live at the back of the Elephant and Castle. This cloak was pawned with me by Boltwood—there were two persons in the shop—I cannot say which pawned it—I believe Boltwood pawned it, while the other person was dealing with my young man for some frocks, but I had not sufficient sight of her to say whether it was the other prisoner.

CHARLES HARRISON . I am assistant to a pawnbroker, in St. George's Circus. I produce the trowsers and waistcoat, a pair of boots and a hand-kerchief, which were pawned in the name of Ann Lowe, 45, Earl-street—it was by a woman, but I do not know who.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS LOWCOCK (police-constable D 134.) On the 25th of April, I was on search after Boltwood—I went first to No. 3, Edward-place—be-cause I knew that Farron had lived at that part when Boltwood did—I went to Fell's father's—he opened the door—I asked him for his daughter, and the prisoner came forward and said, "Do you want me respecting the robbery of Boltwood?"—she said, "I did not steal the things, but I pawned some spoons for her"—I went with her over the water, and she told me the spoons were pawned, and said at the back of the Elephant and Castle there was a cloak—she took me to a street in the London-road, and pointed to a house, where she said Boltwood lived, but we could not get in—I took Fell to the station, and in the evening I went again and saw Bolt wood coming out of a public-house—I asked her if she knew me—she said yes—I told her I wanted her for robbing Mr. Hewett—she said she knew him, and she had done it because she wanted to be transported.

Boltwood. He did not say any thing about my knowing him—I am very sorry, but we are both guilty.

Fell, I am quite innocent—I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

BOLTWOOD— GUILTY . Aged 16. Transported for Fourteen Years.

FELL— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1255

1255. WILLIAM SHAW was indicted for embezzlement.

JOHN HALL WHEELER . I am a baker, and live at Hoxton. The prisoner was in my service about four months—he was intrusted to receive monies for me, and ought to account for it to me immediately on my return—I charge him with embezzling 7l. 10s.—he had received 9l. of Mr. Jeffry's, and had left 30s., in halfpence at home—I went the next morning and found it had been paid—he left my service immediately on taking this money—he had accounted for money received from Mr. Jeffry many times before, and he accounted for the 30s. that day—the 7l. 10s. he never accounted for—I paid him 6s. a week and his board—he slept in the stable.

JOHN ISAAC JEFFRY . I deal with the prosecutor—on the 31st of January I paid the prisoner 9l., and took this receipt for it—he could not write, but made his mark.

MATILDA WHEELER . I am the prosecutor's wife. The prisoner gave me 80s., and said Mr. Jeffry would call at night to settle the account.

JAMES SIMMONS (police-constable G 159.) I took the prisoner into custody just by the Tabernacle—he has been long looked for, but we could not find him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1256

1256. GEORGE WICKS and HENRY EDWARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April, 1 printed book, value 1s. 6d. the goods of Sophia Elvin.

SOPHIA ELVIN . I keep a book shop in Tabernacle-square. I saw the two prisoners and a smaller boy loitering about my shop about half-past eleven, o'clock in the day—they stood handling the books—I told them to go on, as I thought they were thieves—I did not perceive that they had got any books—they went away, and the policeman came in three quarters of an hour, and brought me this book, which has my mark in it—I saw the prisoners in custody the same day—I know them to be the boys I had seen.

WILLIAM COX (police-constable N 201.) On the 25th of April, I was on duty in East-road—I saw the two prisoners and a smaller boy—Wicks had this book and was looking at it—I asked him where he got it—he said he bought it for 3d., and showed me 3d., in his hand, which he said he had received in change for 6d.—I took him, and the other two ran away—Sayer took the other prisoner.

JOHN SAYER (police-constable N 84.) I apprehended Edwards while Cox was gone to the station with Wicks—I asked him where he got the book, he said he had bought it of a Jew.

WICKS— GUILTY .*Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

EDWARDS— GUILTY . Aged 13.— Whipped and discharged.

Reference Number: t18370508-1257

1257. MAURICE HEELAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 961bs. weight of lead, value 15s., the goods of Jacob Hansler; and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

WILLIAM HENRY PATTENDEN . I live in Tottenham-place, Tottenham-court-road

—the prisoner lived exactly at the back of my premises—I am a boot and shoemaker. On Saturday night, the 22nd of April, I went to bed, about twelve o'clock, and got up about half-past eight o'clock—I ob-served my shop had been stripped of the lead, about nine o'clock—it was a work-shop that runs from the back of my shop to a house that a wake was held in on that Saturday night, in which house the prisoner was—there were marks on the bricks from my premises to the back of the premises that the prisoner lives in—the wash-house which is opposite his parlour window is tiled, and there were two tiles broken, which had fallen into the back yard—I thought the lead had been taken that way, and we went into the prisoner's back parlour, and found the lead under the bed—that was at No. 7, Southampton-row—he was apprehended that Sunday morning, about one o'clock—the lead was fitted to my roof—I am quite positive it is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. What time did you go to the prisoner's house? A. About ten minutes before nine o'clock—I saw the lead safe at twelve o'clock the night before—I took the whole of the lead to compare—there was a great deal of lead left—the shape of the piece taken off matches to the shape of the cement that was left—we found about 961bs. on the prisoner's premises.

EDWARD RAMSHIRE (police-constable E 58.) I went with the prosecutor, and saw the marks of where the lead had been carried, apparently—that led us to the prisoner's house, and in the back parlour we found the lead concealed under the bed—I found the prisoner playing at cards, with seven or eight more—I brought him part of the way, and wanted him to go up Southampton-row—he would not, and collared me—I then took him towards the station, and met the inspector and an officer, who took him—I have fitted the lead—it exactly corresponds to the roof.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You went between nine and ten o'clock to the prisoner's house? A. Yes—the room door was not fastened up, only shut to—anybody might open it—no one was in the room.

JOHN O'BRYAN . I let the back parlour, at No. 7, Southampton-row, to the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You are not the landlord of the house? A. No—my landlord and I live there, and no other man—there is no door from my room to the prisoner's—I never used that room—he slept there, and his wife, but he did not on this night—he came in about three o'clock in the morning—his wife opened the door—I heard him—there is a small partition between my room and his—it is thin—I heard the door open, but I did not hear the lead put down—I know he was out form ten o'clock at night till four in the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1258

1258. MARY EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April, 1 spoon, value 3s.; 2 towels, value 1s.; and I loaf of bread, value 9d.; the goods of Sir Henry Halford, her master.

WILLIAM HOOKER . I am a policeman. On the 25th of April, about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in Oxford-road, very drunk, and leaning against a box—a man was standing by her—I took her to the station-house, and charged her with being drunk—the inspector asked her if she had any property to give up—as she was going to be locked up, I happened to turn round, and saw her taking something out of her pocket, which she placed into the other hand, fumbling it about—I thought there was something wrong—I put my hand into her pocket, and found this spoon—I said, "Whose spoon is this?"—she said, "My

own, to be sure"—at that time one of the constables said, "Her box is here, "pointing to a box—I took her keys out of her hand, opened the box, and she said, "These things are mine; hang me, if you can"—I took out the towels, and was looking to see if there war any mark on them—the inspector said, "Who do you live with?"—she said, "With Sir Henry Halford"—I then took out this loaf of bread, and other articles—there were three towels, but only two have been identified.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe she gave you Sir Henry Halford's direction? A. She did—she was very drunk, and did not know what she was about—there was a man supporting her, and he assisted me with her to the station-house—he is not here.

WILLIAM STOWTON . I am butler to Sir Henry Halford The prisoner lived there a month as kitchen-maid—she left on the 25th of April—she had a month's warning to quit the day before, but was intoxicated on the 25th and I had the area gate opened, and turned her out—I paid her three shillings, and told her to come again the next morning, and receive the remainder—I did not miss any articles till the policeman came—these two towels are the property of my master, and the spoon also.

Cross-examined. Q. What was she to have a year? A. Twenty-seven guineas—if she had come back the next day, I should have paid her two guineas—there were no spoons allowed in the kitchen but iron ones.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1259

1259. WILLIAM GINN was indicted fo stealing, on the 27th of April, 1lbs. oz. weight of leather, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Warne, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 36.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18370508-1260

1260. EDWARD BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April, 1 cloak, value 3s.; 2 gowns, value 3s. 6d.; 1 pair of half-boots, value 2s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; and 2 coats, value 12s.; the goods of Stephen Bennett;to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1261

1261. JOSEPH ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April, 1lbs. weight of leather, value 2s.; the goods of Thomas Warne, his master.

THOMAS WARNE . I am a currier, and live in the Strand. The prisoner was in my employ for about six weeks as cutter—on the 26th of April, as he was going to dinner, I called him into the counting-house, having some suspicion, and said, "Andrews, you have some property about you belong ing to me, have you not?"—he admitted it, and produced one piece of leather from between his stocking and his leg—I said, "You have some more, "and he then produced another piece—I gave him into custody—he had no right to have the property about him—he had so much per thousand. for what he did—he was employed in cutting out convicts' shoes—I had a large contract for the government.

HENRY HANCOCK . I am a policeman. I was sent for, and took the prisoner—he acknowledged that it was Mr. Warne's leather before we came out of the counting-house.

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18370508-1262

1262. CATHERINE STOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March, 1 pair of half-boots, value 3s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 6d.; and 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; the goods of Ann Sheen, her mistress.

ANN SHEEN . I am a widow. The prisoner lived with me as servant, from a fortnight before Christmas till the 1st of March—I sent her to clean out the room, and make the bed, and these things were taken out of the room—I did not see her again, till another woman took her up at the station-house—I have not got my property—no one could have taken it but her—I did not wish to prosecute her, but the magistrate said as I had behaved so kindly to her, it ought not to go, and ordered me to do so.

WILLIAM SHAW . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of April, in White's Gardens, Bethnal-green—I found she had this shawl on her over another one.

(Shawl produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18370508-1263

1263. CATHERINE STOKES was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April, 1 shawl, 1 value 6d.; 3 yards of edging, value 2d.; 3 yards of carpet, value 1s.; 1 coat, value 2s.; and 1 frock, value 6d.; the goods of John Henry Cherry.

WILLIAM SHAW . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of April, and found this shawl on her under the other—I found nothing else on her.

SARAH CHERRY . I am the wife of John Henry Cherry, a weaver, in Manchester-street, Bethnal-green. The prisoner lives in our neighbourhood—on the 18th of April I had to go to the hospital, and left her in care of my place—when I came back, she was gone, and I missed these things—this is my shawl—I have never seen the other things since.

GUILTY .— Transported for Seven Years.Recommended to the Penitentiary

OLD COURT.—Friday, May 12th, 1837.

Third Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370508-1264

1264. JOHN HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Richard Ingram, clerk, from his person.

REV. JOHN RICHARD INGRAM . On the 1st of May, I was in Bloomsbury-square, at near five o'clock in the afternoon—a boy turned round, and asked me if my pocket had been picked—on putting my hand to my pocket I missed my handkerchief—I believe this to be mine.

EDWARD RAMSHIRE . I am a policeman. I was in plain clothes, and saw the prisoner walking before the prosecutor up Southampton-street, he stopped there about half-way up, while the gentleman was talking with another one—he then went on, and passed by the prisoner, who followed him up Bloomsbury-square, he there snatched at his pocket, and ran away—I followed, and took this handkerchief from under his arm—he said, "Let me go, and I will beg the gentleman's pardon"—I sent a young man to tell the prosecutor his pocket was picked, and he came to the station-house.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1265

1265. CHARLES HALL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Mitchell and another, on the 2nd of May, at St. Giles in the Fields, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 10s., their goods.

JAMES HALL . I am in the service of Mr. George Mitchell and Mr. John Julph, executors for the late Mr. Samuel Julph—they carry on the business for the benefit of the children in Broad-street, in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields—the executors hold a lease of the house, and I occupy it as their servant. On Tuesday evening, the 2nd of May, I heard a blow at the glass—I immediately ran out, but before I got out, I heard a second blow, and the glass falling—when I got out, the prisoner was in the act of withdrawing his hand with a gold watch in it—I seized him by the arm, and with some little difficulty got him into the shop—he would not give the watch up to me—I took his side-arms from him, and threw them behind the counter—when the constable came, he took the watch from his hand—he was a perfect stranger—he was dressed as one of the third regiment of Scotch Fusileer Guards, in full uniform, and had his bayonet on—he appeared perfectly sober—I went to the station-house—we could not get him to say much for himself, but ultimately he turned round, and said, "I know I stole your watch, "and also before the Magistrate he said, "I am guilty, I stole the watch"—this is it.

THOMAS GORDON . I am a policeman. I was sent for to the shop, and found the prisoner there, and found the watch in his hand.

Prisoner. I picked the watch up in the street.

JOSEPH LAURIE . I am a colour-sergeant in the Scotch Fusileers, and am pay-sergeant to the regiment the prisoner is in—he has been eleven months in the regiment, and I have known him seven months—his character has been that of an honest, sober man at all times—I hear he has been a man who has been in good circumstances—he almost ruined his father in money matters, which has preyed on his mind and rendered him totally unfit to perform his duty as a soldier—he has only been twice outside the barracks (though never confined for punishment)—the first time be attempted to drown himself, and the second, this has happened—before going out this very morning he asked the easiest way to get transported—At men told him to break a pane of glass—I only heard this, and cannot speak to it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1266

1266. CHARLES HAWES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Curtis, from his person.

JOHN CURTIS . I am in the employ of Mr. Walker, a bookseller and stationer, in Hospital-road, Chelsea. On the evening of the 9th of May I was walking with my sister in Aldgate High-street—a little boy asked me if I had lost my handkerchief, and a policeman afterwards asked me—I said no I had not, but I put my hand into my pocket directly afterwards, and found it was gone—I went with a policeman to the station-house, gave a description of the handkerchief, and it was shown to me—I am sure it was mine—this is it.

LEONARD MAGNUS . I am errand-boy to Mr. Lloyd, a surgeon, in Basinghall-street. I was in Aldgate on Tuesday evening last between eight and nine o'clock—the prosecutor was walking with his sister—I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief out of his pocket, and put it into his own coat pocket—he then crossed over, and walked on the other side of the way—I am sure he is the man—I went and told the watchman of it, and he told the prosecutor—he at first said he had not lost it, but when he went

to the station-house with the policeman, he said he had—he described the handkerchief, and claimed it.

WILLIAM POOLE . I am a tailor, and live in Peter's-alley, Cornhill. I was in Aldgate High-street, and saw the prisoner cross the road in custody of the policeman, and in crossing he dropped the handkerchief from his lefthand coat pocket—I picked it up, and gave it up.

BENJAMIN RICHARDSON . I am a watchman of Portsoken ward. From information from Magnus I took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

1 Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18370508-1267

1267. LEWIS PHILLIPS was indicted for b—g—y.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18370508-1268

1268. THOMAS BERESFORD, alias Lee , and ANN BERESFORD, alias Mary Lee , were indicted for that they, on the 18th of April, at St. Andrew, Holborn, feloniously did falsely make and counterfeit 3 pieces of counterfeit coin, resembling and apparently intended to resemble and pass for 3 current sixpences.

MESSRS. ELLIS and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

ROBERT DUNKETT (police-constable E 96.) On the 18th of April I was in Holborn, and received information which induced me to go to No. 5, Rose-alley, Eagle-street, Red Lion-square—the outer door of the house was open—I observed the ground floor window was covered with an apron and coarse towel, but they left a small space through which I could see—I looked through, and saw the male prisoner sitting by the fire, with something in his hand which had the appearance of a small mould—I observed him take a spoon from the fire, and pour the contents into what he had in hit hand, and which I supposed to be a mould—I tried the window gently, and found it was fast—I also tried the door—I procured the assistance of Thornton, another officer, and we returned to the place—I knocked at the parlour door, and then heard a noise like a window sliding backwards and forwards, and then the female prisoner, Lee, opened the door, and we both went in—the male prisoner was still in the room, sitting where I had previously seen him, near the fire—I saw a towel in his lap—I took it from him, and in it was rolled up the bowl of a metal spoon—I found an iron spoon on the fire, and some white melted metal in it—in the bowl of the spoon was the same description of metal—on my taking the spoon off the fire, the male prisoner attempted to throw a large kettle of water over me—it was cold as if it had been just put on the fire—he succeeded in throwing an iron spoon over—I afterwards collected the metal from the fireplace—I asked him what he was doing with the spoon on the fire—he said, "Making the fire up"—I found a paper up the chimney, containing plaster-of-Paris, and afterwards found a small file, some sand, and some spoons of the same white metal as was being melted—while I was searching about, the male prisoner said, "You may search about, but you will not find any thing"—I saw a mould which Thornton found outside the window—the male prisoner said, "Never mind, that was not on the premises."

Thomas Beresford. The policeman knocked at the door, and it was opened instantly for him. Witness. It was not.

GEORGE THORNTON (police-constable E 91.) I accompanied Dunkett to the house in Rose-alley. When the door was knocked at it was not

opened for about two minutes—I heard a noise resembling a window opening and shutting—the male prisoner was sitting by the fire-place with this cloth in his lap, and this bowl of a spoon wrapped in it—this iron spoon was on the fire—Dunkett took it off—there was white metal in ft in a liquid state—the male prisoner took hold of a saucepan half full of water, and bit Dunkett on the arm with it—some of the water went over him, and the contents of the spoon were upset in the fire—some of it was afterwards collected together—I examined the grate, and found this knife on the hob—it has white metal sticking to the point of it—the male prisoner said, while I was searching, "It is no use for you to look, you will find nothing"—from the noise I heard while outside the door, I opened the window—it was not fastened—while I was going to it the male prisoner said to the female, "Turn down the bedstead, he can look in there, "but I said, "I will look here first"—I opened the window, and on the sill I found this mould, quite hot, with a counterfeit sixpence in it—the male prisoner followed me to the window—I said to him, "What do you call this?"—he said, "Never mind, it was not found on the premises"—on the mantel-shelf I found a file with white metal in the teeth of it, and an open penknife with marks of plaster of Paris—I searched the male prisoner, and found a purse containing three good shillings and a good sixpence—both the prisoners were conveyed to the station-house.

ALICE LAST . I am a widow, and live in Charlotte-street, Bloomsbury. I searched the female prisoner at the station-house, and found two counterfeit sixpences in her mouth—I have had them ever since.

MARY KNIGHT . I am the wife of William Knight, a tailor, in French-horn-yard, Holborn; he is owner of the house-No. 5, Rose-alley. On the 1st of April the female prisoner came to me, and took the parlour on the ground floor, at 2s. 6d. a week—she paid the first week's rent, and the next afternoon they were apprehended—I never saw the man in the house myself, as I never went to the room after giving the woman the key on the 1st of April—she brought the rent to me—she only took one room—I have found a bedstead and a straw bed in the room since they have been gone.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to his Majesty's Mint, and have been so many years. This is a plaster of Paris mould for casting counterfeit sixpences—it has been used for that purpose, and has a counterfeit sixpence now in it, made of Britannia metal—a mould of this size would retain heat five or six minutes after it has been used, and if the coin remained in the mould, it would of course retain the heat considerably longer—the two sixpences produced by Dunkett are both counterfeit, and have been cast in the mould—neither of the three are complete—there is a roughness on the edge which should be removed with a file—the files produced would answer that purpose—they have white metal in them—here are two ladles and two broken spoons of a similar metal to the coin, and an iron spoon which appears to have been used to melt white metal—it has some now adhering to it—here is some plaster of Paris in powder, which is the material of which the moulds are made.

Thomas Beresford's Defence. A knock came at the door—it was opened instantly, and the two policemen came in—I was sitting at the table—they caught hold of me and asked what I had about me—I stood up—one of them searched me, and opened my coat and waistcoat, but found nothing on me—the policeman took but the iron spoon and shoved it in between the two bars, and left it in the fire to burn—there are four windows of a blacksmith's shop look over our window—he got a chair and

reached out as far as he could before he could get the mould—he then said, "I have got what I want"—I had not been ten minutes in the house when they came in—I deny all knowledge of any thing of the kind.

Ann Beresford's Defence. I never saw any thing of the kind, nor did my husband—the two sixpences the policeman dropped in the room, and I picked them up—he has not spoken the truth—the usage he gave me was most scandalous.

THOMAS BERESFORD— GUILTY .*Aged 64.

ANN BERESFORD— GUILTY .*Aged 52. Transported for life.

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18370508-1269

1269. GEORGE SEAGER and JAMES SENIOR were indicted for a robbery on William watson, on the 19th of April, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one half-crown, his monies.

WILLIAM WATSON . I am a hackney-coachman, and live in Duck's-row, Whitechapel. On the 19th of April, a few minutes after eleven o'clock at a women—I knew Seager before by sight, but never saw the others before, to my knowledge—I went before them on meeting them; and when I got close to them, Seager said something to me—I do not know what it was—I turned round, and, by some means or other, my legs went from under in—something struck against my legs, but what I cannot say—I fall down, and Seager was down with me—a scuffle ensued between us—I caught hold of him by his companion—I let go of Seager, and when I got up he made off—somebody stopped him—I went and caught hold of him, till a policeman came and took him—in going to the station-house some one asked me if they had robbed me—I put my hand to my left-hand trowsers pocket, where I had three half-crowns when I left George-yard, Aldermanbury, and I found only two in my pocket then; but whether I lost one in the scuffle, or whether they took it, I am not able to say—my pocket was torn, and I felt him have hold of my trowsers by the pocket, by some means, but whether his hand was in it when he got up I cannot say—whether he had one finger or three in, or one thumb, I cannot say—whether it was torn in the scuffle, or he put his hand in intentionally to get my money out, I cannot tell—that is all I know—the policeman came up afterwards—there is no one to speak to the fact but me.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18370508-1270

1270. JOHN CURTIN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin Jones, on the 21st of April, Putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will. 1 umbrella, value 5s., his goods.

BENJAMIN JONES . I am servant to Mrs. Annett, a baker, in Hops-street, Spitalfields. On Sunday, the 21st of April, about half-past five O'clock in the evening, I went out to see a funeral, and being wet, I get my mistress's umbrella—as I came back, across Black Eagle-street, I say about a dozen and a half of boys playing at ball—one of them said to the Prisoner. "There is B for baker, with his umbrella"—they all came up to me—the Prisoner sparred up to me and hit me in the face—I had know him before—the Blow knocked me down—I had the umbrella in my hand

and when I jumped up I hit him with it over his back—he forced it from me, and ran away with it, in the presence of all the boys—I ran after him but he got away, and I have not seen the umbrella since—he was fake up on the 27th, at a beer-shop in Fashion-street—I did not break the umbrella in striking him—I did not hit him so hard as to break it.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18370508-1271

1271. ANN GRAY was indicted far that she, on the 26th of April, in and upon Elizabeth Allen, unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did make an assault, and did cut and wound her in and upon her head, with in-tent to maim and disable her.—2nd COUNT, stating her intent to be to do her some grievous bodily harm.

ELIZABETH ALLEN . I live in Angel-gardens, Shadwell. Oh the 26th of April, in the morning, I went with the prisoner as far as the hospital and drank with her once going, and once coming back—we lived in the same house—we got home about two o'clock in the afternoon—she went out again, and returned about three o'clock, and went up to bed—I set about cleaning the hearth—while I was doing it she came down stain sat down by the fire, and began talking, but I never noticed what she was saying; and instantly she up with the fire-shovel, and struck me on the head with it twice—she took it from the fire—I fell down, and was quit senseless for some minutes—I was just getting up when I was coming too when she struck me the second blow—that was after I recovered my senses—I had not had any words with her, when we were drinking together—she was not ill, but in liquor—I was not so—I did not drink as much as she did—the went out afterwards—while I was out I drank at much at her—she appeared more in liquor when she came in after going out—Eliza Coleman was in the room at the time—the prisoner lets out rooms—I never saw her do any work—I go out washing and cleaning, when I can get it-some blood came from my head, but not a great deal.

ELIZA COLEMAN . I live in the same house. I was in the room when the prisoner and prosecutrix returned home—I was there when this happened—the prisoner was very much in liquor—Allen was not, that I know of—she was cleaning the hearth—Gray was sitting down—she had some words with Allen, but Allen took no notice of her—she told Gray to get out of the way while she cleaned the hearth—Gray said she would not—she took the shovel up, and struck her on the head twice—I saw the blood come—I cannot say whether there was much, for she went out to get her head dressed—there was five minutes between the first blow and the second—Allen fell down after the first blow.

Prisoner. She was apt in the room. Witness. I was sitting by the fire all the time.

RICHARD BARBER . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 26th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon—she appeared to be very stupid, as if she had been drinking a good deal, and had just got out of sleep—I asked her how she could think of using the woman in the way alp had done—she said, "I did it, and will do it again; I will have herb—life"—she got up, and made a rush at her, but I pulled her back, and prevented her—she was very drunk at the time.

JOHN HOULDSWORTH BROWN . I am a surgeon of the London Hospital. On Thursday morning, the 27th of April, I examined Allen's head, and found two very slight bruises, which appeared to have been done with some

blunt instrument—the skin was broken—this shovel might probably inflict wounds that wound produce death.

Prisoner's Defence. She and I were very much in liquor—she struck me in my own place, and I struck her again—she pitched her head against the fender, and that is the way she cut it.

ELIZABETH ALLEN re-examined. I did not struck her at all.

NOT GUILTY

Fourth jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370508-1272

1272. JOHN TONG was indicted for stealing, on the 13h of April half a bushel of peas, value 3d., the goods charles Benwick Curtis and others, his masters.

LESTER HARVEY . I am the manager of the gunpowder-mills at Hounslow Health—they belong to charles Benwick curtis and other—there are three partner—they farm some land there, and, among them, a field sown with peas—the prisoner was originally their watchman; but, at his own request, was employed as a labourer, to drill peas. In consequence of information. I went along the road on the 13th of April, a little before six o'clock in the evening, and overtook the prisoner with a bag, about half a mile from our gate—I said, "No I have not, sir"—I put my hand on the bag and said, "I am sorry for what I have done; I have; I have done wrong: I only took a few peas to boil"—I said, "You have got a good many for that"—he requested me to look over it—I said could not, he must return with me—the pass were compared with those in the bin and corresponded.

Cross-examained by MR. DONANE. Q. Did he say he was sorry he had been such a fool? A. Yes. I have examined the bulk—I should reluctantly swear to them—they were given out to him to sow.

JAMES MAJOR . On the 13th of April, I was walking round the field and saw a bag in the ditch with peas in it—I was directed to watch it, and I afterwards saw the prisoner take it up, and go over the fence with it—I told master, and he was stopped and brought back.

Cross-examined. Q. How long has he lived with your master? A. Between two and three years.

WILLIAM HOLLOWAY . I belong to the Twickenham police. The prisoner was given into my charge—I told him he was charged with stealing peas, the property of the prosecutor—he said "It is true, it is no use to deny it, I am sorry for it, for I have had a good place."

GUILTY. Aged 28.—Recommended to mercy. Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370508-1273

1273. JOHN BATHURST BROWN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the shop of jean Francois Isidore Caplin, on the 17th of April, at St. Mary Abbott, Kensington, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, I handkerchief, value 2s. and I pair of trowsers, value 15s.; the goods of jean Francois Delacour.

JEAN FRANCOIS DELACOUR . I live in the employ of Mr. Caplin, a bonnet-shape manufacturer, at Notting-hill, Kensington. The prisoner was his apprentice, and left on the Saturday—I fastened up the workshop on the Monday following, and afterwards found the window of the room where I work, open, the stable door open, and the lock my room and my drawers were broken open—I missed a pair trowsers, and a silk hand-kerchief.

HENRY MITCHELL . I am errand boy to Mr. Caplin. On Tuesday

morning, the 17th of April, I met the prisoner at the corner of Gee's-court, Henrietta-street, and told him his mistress wanted to speak to him—he wanted to run away, but I took him by the jacket, and would not let him go—he asked what his mistress wanted—I said I believed to speak to him, and told him to come home—he said he would not, because he knew he should go to the House of Correction—I asked him if he had done any thing wrong—he said "No"—I got him as far as Regent-street, and then sent for master, who came, and X went for a policeman.

JAMES WEST (police-constable E 80.) The prisoner was given into my custody by Mitchell—I asked him whether he had done this—he said he had broken open the factory, and stolen the things belonging to Delacour, that he had pawned the trowsers at Kensington, and the handkerchief at Thomas's—I went to Notting-hill, and met Caplin, who gave me a duplicate for a silk handkerchief—I found the house at Notting-hill broken open, and saw blood on the plank and the doors also—I found the prisoner's hand cut—I said, "Was this the cut you got when you broke open the place?"—he said it was, and said the trowsers were in pawn for eight shillings—I found them where he stated—the house is in the parish of St. Mary Abbott's, Kensington.

GEORGE HAWKINS . I am in the employ of Mr. Webb, a pawnbroker in High-street, Kensington. I produce a pair of trowsers which were pawned by the prisoner, on the 17th of April—I asked where he lived—he said, "8, Ladbrook-terrace"—he gave the name of Gustavus Forster, and said he had brought them for John Delacour.

GEORGE HENRY THOMAS . I am in the employ of Mr. Wood, of High-street, Bloomsbury. I produce a silk handkerchief which was pawned on the 18th of April, for 1s., in the name of Samuel Wilson, and another m the name of John Brown, on the 18th of October—I believe the prisoner pawned them both.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JEAN FRANCOIS ISIDORE CAPLIN . I am a bonnet-shape manufacturer, at Notting-hill. The prisoner was my apprentice—he left on the 15th—on the Tuesday afterwards I found he had been detained by my errand boy—I took him to my shop in Great Portland-street, and asked what he had done with the things which he took before—he said he had pawned them—I sent for a policeman, who came and took him—the shop which was broken open is at Notting-hill.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18370508-1274

1274. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April, 2 pewter pots, value 2s., the goods of John Chater; and 1 pewter pot, value 1s. 3d., the goods of John William Reeves.

HENRY M'DONALD . I am a licensed victualler, and live in Milton-street, St. Luke's. On Friday, the 28th of April, I saw the prisoner passing on the other side of the way—I went up to him and charged him with having stolen twelve or fourteen pots of mine the week before.—I took hold of him, brought him over, and sent for the police—he said he never stole a pot of mine in his life—the officer found three pewter pots about him, worth about 3s.—two belonging to Mr. Chater, and one to Mr. Reeve.

THOMAS MOTHERSELL (police-constable N 12.) On the 28th of April, I went to the Crispin, in Milton-street, and found the prisoner there—I found

two pots secreted in his pockets, one under his arm in a handkerchief, and one in his hat—he said he found them in Newgate market—the owners' names are on them.

WILLIAM HODGE . I am a policeman. I saw the pots found on the prisoner—he said he picked them up in the market.

JOHN WILLIAM REEVES . One of these pots is mine—I keep the Bell, in Newgate market.

JOHN CHATER . I keep the Rainbow, in Newgate-street. Two of these pots are mine—I do not know the prisoner.

Prisoner. I never took a pot from M' Donald in my life—I picked up these in the market, and meant to carry them to the owners.

GUILTY . Aged 55.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1275

1275. JAMES ABBERFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April, 23/8 yards of cantoon, value 7s., the goods of Philip Speyer and another.

THOMAS CARTER (police-constable F 37.) I was on duty in Holborn, on Saturday the 29th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening—I saw the prisoner pass and repass the prosecutor's door, two or three times—he then put his hand inside the doorway, and took away this cantoon—he walked about thirty yards—I then stopped him and took him back to the shop.

Prisoner, I saw it lying down on the step of the door, and took it up.

Witness. It hung inside the door—he went in and felt it, and after-wards took it down.

PHILIP SPEYER . I am a tailor in High Holborn. I was in my shop on the 29th of April, when the prisoner was brought in with the cantoon—I missed two pieces—the one produced is my property, and was taken from within two feet of the door—I have one partner.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Friday, May 12th, 1837.

Reference Number: t18370508-1276

1276. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February, 2 salt cellars, value 10s.; 2 pickle dishes, value 7s.; 2 finger glasses, value 7s.; 2 breast pins, value 2l. 13s.; 1 sheet, value 6s.; 1 napkin, value 2s.; 1 decanter, value 6s.; 1 other sheet, value 5s.; 1 brooch, value 1l. 10s.; 1 flask, value 8l.; 1 coat, value 3l.; 3 printed books, value 15s. 1 seal, value 1l.; 12 knives, value 15s.; 12 forks, value 12s.; and 1 watch, value 3l. 10s.: also, on the 27th of March, 1 pen-holder, value 8s.; and 9 printed books, value 15s.; the goods of William Hunter, his master; to both of which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Six Months; One Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1277

1277. HENRY DENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, 1 writing desk, value 1l., the goods of William Barker;to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months; Two Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1278

1278. MICHAEL SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 4 loaves of bread, value 2s. 3d., the goods of George Sim;to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370508-1279

1279. WILLIAM NEVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 8 pairs of slippers, value 12s., the goods of William Burchett; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1280

1280. JOHN HOGAN was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN EDWARDS . I am in the service of Messrs. Leaf and Co. of Old Change. Mr. Harvey, of Sloane-street, was one of our customers—on the 18th of March the prisoner came for tone merino to match, as he said, and brought this paper—he produced a pattern—I inquired for whom it was—he said it was for Harvey, of Knights-bridge. I looked out one as near the pattern as I could—I gave him a pattern, and told him to go home and see if it would do—he re-turned in about six hours, and said it would do—I looked for the piece I cut the pattern from, but could not find it—I suppose it had been sold—I then took another piece near the colour to Mr. Gibbins, and he entered it—the value of it was above 9l.—there were twenty-six yards and a half of it.

FRANCIS MILES GIBBINS . I am in the service of Leaf and Co. Mr. Edwards delivered to me a piece of merino—I entered it, and asked the prisoner his name—he said Hogan—I gave him the merino, and he went away.

JOHN BEALE . I am in the service of Mr. Harvey, of Sloane-street. The prisoner was in his service, and left about two months before the 18th of March, I think—on this order is written, "Merino, to match pattern, French"—I believe it is the prisoner's writing—he had no authority to go and get goods in Mr. Harvey's name after he left—a statement of the account was sent in to Mr. Harvey, but we had not received the goods.

BENJAMIN HARVEY . I am a linen-draper in Sloane-street. The prisoner was not in my employ on the 18th of March—he had no authority to get this.

Prisoner. I produced the bill, but they did not ask me who I came from.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1281

1281. ANN ANDERSON the younger, was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 1 cloak, value 14s.; 1 bonnet, value 6s.; 1 gown, value 8s.; and 2 caps, value 2s.; the goods of Charles Turner: and 1 coat, value 10s. the goods of Charles Turner, the younger.

BRIDGET TURNER . I am the wife of Charles Turner, of Ashby-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner came to my house to do some needle-work on Tuesday, the 11th of April—I went out, and when I came home she was gone—I missed these articles.

Prisoner. She lent me the things, and went on the Monday night to a pawnbroker's—I was with her—they made the ticket, and she said, "Don't call out my name, as there are women here that know me. "Witness. I deny it—I did not go with her to a pawnbroker's at any time—I have since, lent her a shawl.

JANE DAVIS . I am the wife of William Davis, of Ashby-street, On Tuesday, the 11th of April, I saw the prisoner coming down, and mistook her for Mrs. Turner—I said, "Mrs. Turner," and she said, "It is not her, she is out"—she had a coat in her arms and the bonnet.

FRANCIS BEST . I am shopman to Mr. Burgess, of Chichester-place Gray's Inn-road. I have the coat, which was pledged at out shop on the 11th of April, in the name of "Ann Turner, No. 13, Ashby-street"—I cannot swear to the prisoner—this is the duplicate that I gave of it.

WILLIAM GEORGE STEWART . I am shopman to Mr. Flower, of st. Giles's a pawnbroker. I have a cloak pawned of the 11th of April by a female, in the name of "Ann Anderson"—I cannot swear to the prisoner—this is the duplicate.

JAMES BRADDICK (police-constable E 47.) I produced these two duplicates—I went to the prisoner's room, she was in bed with another women and two men—they were all four in one bed—I asked the prisoner for the duplicates, and she said the old woman belonging to the room had got them, and the old woman delivered them to me—I found this gown in the room.

MICHAEL MOLLOY . I live in Bull-yard, st. Luke's I went to be lodgings in st. Giles's, and found the prisoner in bed, and found this bonnet on the bed.

Prisoner. These thing I borrowed—I own to the cloak, the gown, the bonnet, and cap. A man came into the room and said. "How was it you left the house yesterday?—I owe you an old grudge, and will have you taken"—he fetched the officer—my brother was there.

GUILTY. Aged 25.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1282

1282. JOHN DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April, 105 lbs. Weight of lead, value 12s., the goods of james morgan; and fixed to a certain building; against the status, &c.

MR. HORRY conducted the prosecution

THOMAS COOPER (police-constable H 82) I live in white Lion-street Norton Falgate. I was in George-yard, Whitechapel, on the 17th of April at a quarter before nine o'clock, and observed the prisoner with a quantity of lead on his back—turned round to see what it was—he instantly shot it from his head and ran away—I pursued him to a house eighty yards from the spot—I was almost catching him when he turned into the house—I stepped into the kennel, and it threw me against the oppo-site house, and he got into the house—I sent for another officer—we knocked door—we sent in and found several woman in the house, both above and below—we went up stair and saw the prisoner standing by the side of the bed at the top of the stairs—cotton caught him by the arm and turned him round—I knew him instantly—his hat and coat were all over the stuff off the lead which he been carrying—this cord which is on the lead went round his head like a knot.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Is there a passage near this house that leads into another court? A. Yes, close to it—I am certain he did not run up the passage—I knew him before.

HENRY COTTON (police-constable H 60.) I was sent for—I knocked a docen time—I got admittance and went up stairs—I found the prisoner—the other constable followed me up—I said. "Look round"—he said, "That is the man"—I turned the prisoner round and said, "Notice his back, here is the dirt or dust on his back, apparently from the lead."

Cross-examined. Q. You did not take the prisoner's coat away? A. No.

ROBERT KEATS . I am an appraiser, and agent to james morgan, whose

house is in George-yard, Whitechapel, where this lead came from—I saw this lead fitted to the house—every mark corresponded with it—it looked as if it had been lately cut—I saw it about seven o'clock, two hears before it was found.

MR. PAYNE called

TIMOTHY DONOVAN . I am the prisoner's uncle. He lodges in the house No. 22, New-court, George-yard—he was at home the night he was apprehended—I worked till seven o'clock and then went home between seven and eight o'clock—he was at home, and was never out of the house till the policeman took him.

MR. HORRY. Q. What time did you get home? A. I dare say it into twenty minutes past seven o'clock—I worked till seven o'clock for Mr. Bridger of Aldgate—Mr. Morgan's house is about 200 yards off.

COURT. Q. Who opened the door for you? A. It was open—I sat by the fireside and had my supper—I do not know whether it wit fish, or potato—we were in the little kitchen—my wife and daughter, and this young man and his mother and sister were at supper with me—we had two little tables—this was about ten minutes after I came in—the prisoner sat by the fire and left his seat for me to sit down—he sat down close by me—I drank nothing—I only walked upstairs to bed—there are three rooms in the house—there are two beds in my room—my daughter and another little girl sleep in the front room, his mother and sister sleep in the back room—he sleeps in the same room as a son of mine, but my son was not at home at the time—I went to bed between eight and nine o'clock—I had only stripped when the knock came to the door—I do not think I had been at home an hour and a half—the prisoner walked up one minute after me—all the others were down stairs getting the things ready to go to bed—I do not know whether the women were out or not—we had some of the soup that was given away in Spitalfields, but we had no liquor—I was in bed when the knock came—I am sure of that—I dare say I had not been in bed five minutes—I never dressed myself—I did not move out of my bed only when the woman opened the door—the prisoner was up stairs taking his shoes off.

WILLIAM DEXTER . I was close by my gate inside my own yard—I live in the stable-yard, about 100 yards from the prisoner's—I saw a lad running on before the policemen—that was not the prisoner—whether the prisoner was running at the same time I cannot say.

MR. HORRY. Q. Do you know what tort of a neighbourhood this is? A. Very queer—it is likely the policemen were running after more people than one—that might be about nine or ten o'clock—it was a man who I once prosecuted.

COURT. Q. Where do you live? A. In George-yard, and am a horse dealer—I have a yard there—I heard of this robbery that night—I stopped by the lead with Messrs. Crackling and Brown till the policemen came back—I did not hear that Donovan was charged, for a week—he lives at No. 22—the person that was running was named Grace—I live 150 yards from Donovan—I said to the policeman "I know the prisoner very well"—he said, "So do I"—I do not recollect, but I believe I told him so that night.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Was any name mentioned when the policeman said he knew him very well? A. No.

THOMAS COOPER re-examined. Q. Did you see Dexter that night? A. Yes, and asked him if he would stand by the lead a minute—he said, "Have you lost him?"—I said "Yes, but I know where he is gone"—I know Grace was once prosecuted—I am positive it was not him that was carrying

this—he is an associate of the prisoner's—I know Grace, and was the instigation of his being found out before—it was not Grace who had this.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Dexter was the prosecutor of Grace? A. Yes—his yard is not quite 100 or 150 yards from this house, the name was not mentioned that night—he and I were talking one day afterwards about it, and he said that the persons in his yard said that I had got the wrong ma—Grace is not like this man—he is not so stout.

JURY. Q. How near were you to him? A. So near as almost to put my hand on him when he entered the door—had I not trod in the kennel I should have had him—it was near a lamp—he was coming to meet me—it was near ten o'clock—I made a stop, and then he threw it down and ran off—there is in side-door to the house—there is the post, and then the passage.

COURT. Q. Could he, by possibility, have gone down the passage, or could you be mistaken? A. I could not—it was in the house that be went—some persons put their heads out of the window.

TIMOTHY CARTHY . I am a watchman for Mr. Bridges, of Aldgate. I was going on duty at twenty minutes to nine o'clock—I saw nothing of the prisoner, but I saw two chaps running through the court, and the policeman after them—one of them went into a waste piece of ground in the court, and another ran into his mother's, up stairs—I do not know his name—I should know him if I was to see him—it is not the prisoner—I stopped I At my door a few minutes, and saw the policeman going up the waste ground—then the policeman came and knocked at Donovan's door.

COURT. Q. Did you tell the policeman that was not the house? A. No—I was afraid if I said any thing about it, that the chaps would kill me—one ran into his mother's house, No. 15, I think—I did not tell the officer that—I have been seven weeks at Mr. Barclay's brewhouse—I heard that Donovan was taken the next morning—I did not go to the Magistrate—I went the second time, but we were not called in—I was at the last examination, but did not go in—there was an attorney there for him—I had told him what I had seen, and I told Donovan's uncle—1 do not know whether he told the Magistrate.

ELLEN DEMPSTER . I live New-court. I know nothing of the prisoner; but on the night of the 17th of April I saw a young man run up our court, and the policeman after him, at a quarter or twenty minutes to nine o'clock—I was standing at the door—he ran into the ruins—that was not the prisoner.

COURT. Q. How far up the court did the policeman run? A. He ran right through the archway into the court, and then on into the alley—this is the policeman—I work at the silk business, and am married to a man of the name of Mahoney—I do not live with him at present—I left him about seven o'clock this morning—he left me to go to work—Dempster is my maiden name—that is the name they call me, because I was brought up there—my husband is a porter, and works with Mr. Sykes.

JURY. Q. Did you see the policeman make a stumble as he turned? A. No.

MR. HORRY. Q. How far were you from the place? A. I cannot tell—it was more than one, or two, or three yards.

THOMAS COOPER re-examined. When the lead was thrown down, I ran through this arch to see where the lead was, to secure it, and I found Dexter standing by the lead—no one was running before me—the prisoner was gone into the house.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Were you examined on the 18th before the Magis-trate? A. Yes, Cotton was there—there was no evidence taken on the 20th—we had given our evidence before, and the depositions were taken then.

JOHANNA DONOVAN . I am the prisoner's cousin, and live in the house No. 22. I was at home the night he was taken, and had been all day—he was not out from between six and seven o'clock till he was taken.

COURT. Q. What was he doing? A. He was doing nothing—the old man came home between seven and eight o'clock—he sat by the fire till he had his supper, and went to bed before the prisoner—then the prisoner went up, and was taking his shoes off when he was taken—Timothy came home between seven and eight o'clock—I am not certain what he had for supper—I believe it was potatoes and meat—nobody else had supper but my mother and I—there was his mother, and sister, and brother Jeremiah—I cannot tell where he was sitting—I do not think he was gone to bed—Timothy's wife was there—there was Timothy, his wife, and this man, and his mother, and sister, and brother, and I, seven in all—Timothy was not gone to bed many minutes before the knocking at the door came—I sleep in the room that Timothy sleeps in, and the prisoner's sister with me—the prisoner sleeps in another little room, in a bed facing the stairs—there are two rooms up stairs—one to the left—his mother, and sister, and brother slept in that that night—the old man slept in his own room—the prisoner slept in the same room with my father that night—when the officers came up, he was sitting on the bed, taking his boots off, in the room my father sleeps in, and he was in the room when the rapping at the door came—there is no mistake about that—I ran up stairs, when the rapping came—I was one of the girls that put my head out of window in the room where my father was—I saw my father in bed—the prisoner was pulling off his shoes on the bed—not the bed my father was in, but the one he was going to sleep in, in the same room.

MR. PAYNE. Q. When the policeman came up, he had got out of hit room on the landing? A. Yes.

HANNAH DONOVAN . I am the wife of Timothy Donovan. I was at home on the night that the prisoner was taken—I remember my husband coming home about seven o'clock—the prisoner was in the house then, and he did not go till he was taken.

COURT. Q. What were you doing that night? A. Nothing, but sitting in-doors, getting supper ready—I had a bit of meat, I think, and potatoes—my husband did nothing—he supped that night—he sat at the left-hand side of the fire—the prisoner supped—the supper was not long in going on—after that, they went up stairs to go to bed—my husband went to bed not ten minutes after supper, and had been in bed half an hour before the officers came—the prisoner was up stairs, taking off his shoes and stockings, in the same room as my husband, but in another bed—he had a bed to himself—he was in-doors, doing nothing, from seven to nine o'clock—we had nothing to drink, that I know of—my husband and my daughter, and two more women, and the young man, were there; but no one else.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1283

1283. ANN KIERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, cloak, value 55., the goods of John Philipe.

ELIZABETH JOHNSON . I keep a school in Camden-street, Islington. The prisoner was in my house on the 24th of April—she came to ask for a small

debt that was due to a laundress, and I refused to give it, not having seen her before—I had some cloaks hanging up, and missed one—this is it, it belongs to Mr. Philipe.

ELIZABETH BRIEZE . I lived with my mother, Ann Brieze, in Windsor-street. The prisoner gave me that cloak to pawn on the 24th of April—I took it to Mr. Drew, the pawnbroker.

Prisoner. She sent me for it—she said she had lived with a person that was a laundress, she took it, and ran with it directly, and had half the money. Witness. Yes, I had half the money.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.—Recommended to mercy .— Confined Five Days.

Reference Number: t18370508-1284

1284. CHARLES SPICKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of April, 1 fowl, value 4s., the property of William Matthewson.

WILLIAM MATTHEWSON . I live in Plummer-street, On the 23rd of April I fed my fowls at four o'clock—I soon after missed one—this is it.

EDWARD FIELD (police-constable N 84.) At a quarter past four o'clock, on the 23rd of April I saw the prisoner and two others—the prisoner had this fowl under his apron, in the City-road—I took him with it.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370508-1285

1285. CHARLES CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April, 2 coach glasses and frames, value 2l.; and 4 cushions, value 20s.; the goods of Samuel Fisher; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

DAVID GIBSON . I live in High-street, Hampstead, and am a broker. On the 12th of April, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, my son was getting up, and opening the shop—the prisoner asked if I would buy two plated glasses and four cushions—I was putting on my stockings, and I called out, "Yes, I will; where are they?"—my son brought the glasses, and I said, "Where are the cushions?"—the prisoner said, "I have not brought them"—I said, "Bring them; if I buy one I will buy all"—he said he wanted 15s. for them—I said, "Fetch the cushions"—he said, "You had better pay me 6s. for the glasses"—I said, "No; I shall keep them; fetch the cushions"—he went away—I made haste, and went to the policeman, and told him I had got some glasses, and the prisoner was gone to fetch the cushions—I saw the prisoner coming down High-street with the cushions—he saw me going to speak to the policeman, and went away—in ten minutes the policeman brought the cushions to me, and said, "Are these them?"—I said, "I suspect so"—the prisoner afterwards came to me for the 6s. for the glasses—I said he must go with me to the station—he made some objection, but at last he said that he had been sent by a person—I went with him to that person, who denied it altogether—I took him to the cock.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a policeman. On the 22nd I was fetched to the Cock, and took the prisoner—in going along the prisoner said he had got a person to say were his—I asked who it was—he said, "Nash, Robert-mews"—I got the goods from the witness's shop.

SAMUEL FISHER, JUN . I am the son of Samuel Fisher, a hackneyman, at Chapel-mews, Duke-street, Portland-place. On the 11th of April, between eight and eleven o'clock, I lost these glasses and cushions from two coaches in the yard, which is no thoroughfare—the prisoner has been about coach ranks, and such things, about Portland-road.

Prisoner. A man came up to me on the previous evening, and said he had got these to sell, and told me to ask any body to buy them—I met a man named Nash—he said he knew a man that would bay them, and he tent me to Gibson's.

WILLIAM FULLER (police-constable F 190.) I produce the certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office—(ready)—the prisoner is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 23,— Transported for Fourteen Years.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370508-1286

1286. THOMAS DORMER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May, 11/2 bushel of oats, value 5s.; half a bushel of split beans, value 2s. 6d.; 1 truss of hay, value 2s. 6d.; 1 sack, value 1s. 9d.; and 1 dead duck, value 2s.; the goods of Daniel Gregory, his master; and WILLIAM SHACKLE for feloniously receiving, 11/2 bushel of oats, value 5s.; 1/2 bushel of split beans, value 2s. 6d.; 1 truss of hay, value 2s. 6d.; and 1 sack, value 1s. 9d.; part and parcel of the aforesaid goods, well knowing them, to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.;to which Dormer pleaded.

GUILTY. Aged 20,—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

DANIEL GREGORY . I live at Hillingdon. Dormer was in my service—I observed a duck and some oats in my granary, in my loft, on the 2nd of May, I gave no authority to put it there—Dormer was going to town on Tuesday, but he did not go till Wednesday, about twelve o'clock—Shackle lives at the Coach and Horses at Ealing—he is ostler there—that is in the way to London—I followed the wagon—I did not see it draw up there, but it was there when I went up, and then this corn and trust of hay was lying by the aide of the stable—Thomas Smith was with me—when I got up, I said to Dormer, "You have made a mistake, and called at the wrong place"—I said nothing to Shackle—I have seen this sack—it contains my property—the duck was on the cart in another sack—it was the same corn that I had observed in the loft.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a gardener, and live not far from Mr. Gregory. He gave me information on Wednesday morning, and I watched the cart—I went to the Coach and Horses—the carman drove to the water-trough and watered his horses, he then backed his cart opposite the stable-door, got a ladder and placed it against the load, and threw down an, old sack that contained some food for his horses—he put some out of the sack into a trough—then he closed the mouth of the sack, put it on the load again and came down, took the ladder away and went into the house—I watched for some time—when he came out he put the ladder against the load again, and went up on it—I then turned my head, and heard something fall apparently from the load—I turned round, and by the wagon I saw a new sack thrown from the top of the load, Shackle took it up and carried it into the stable—the other prisoner threw the new sack off—I went to Shackle and said, "I believe that to be Mr. Gregory's," and he put it down—he said he did not know it was stolen—I had observed the load before, and this sack was on the hind part—I could see part of it—I could not see all over it, it was partly in between the straw—this was about half-past four o'clock in the morning.

COURT. Q. When did you first see Shackle? A. When the cart went up, he was there feeding his horses, and while the other prisoner was taking

the sack out and putting some food into the trough, I saw the horses eat that—I opened the new sack, and saw beans and oats in it.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw the sack fall from the cart? A. Yes—I saw it before it fell, it was in the hind part—part of it was concealed—I saw the contents, it was beans and oats, proper food for horses—this is a house at which carters and wagoners stop to feed.

JOHN POOL (police-constable T 152.) I was passing by the door and was called—the prosecutor then charged Dormer with stealing corn, and Shackle with receiving the property—Shackle said he believed it was for the horses, but on his way to the station he said he did not know what it was for.

DANIEL GREGORY re-examined. This is my sack—here is a sample of beans and oats that I had in my loft, and it was this sack that I saw in my loft, but Dormer had some food to feed his horses—I never allowed him to take that on the cart—there was about two bushels of oats and beans—the truss of hay was by the side of the cart—it was the same sort as I had.

Cross-examined. Q. This is a house where carters are accustomed to leave food for horses? A. Yes—but I did not authorise them to do it—I allowed a truss of hay for the horses, but he ought not to have left it.

WILLIAM CARTER . I was at the Coach and Horses—I saw the sack pushed from the cart by Dormer, Shackle took the hay which was thrown down first into the stable, and then came and took the bag—I told Shackle it was Mr. Gregory's, and he had better put it out, and he put it out of the stable directly.

(Shackle received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 58.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1287

1287. CATHERINE SHARPE and JANE ANN SHARPE were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March, 1 bed, value 2l. 10s.; 2 pillows, value 6s.; 1 bolster, value 8s.; 2 blankets, value 15s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 3 curtains, value 3s.; 1 set of fire-irons, value 4s.; 3 yards of carpet, value 4s.; 1 counterpane, value 3s.; and 1 flat iron, value 6d.; the goods of Joseph Wadsworth.

MARIA WADSWORTII . I am the wife of Joseph Wadsworth, of Wellington-place, Back-road, St. George's—he is a fishmonger. I let the prisoners a furnished room—they came on the 12th of March, 1836, and left on the 20th of March, 1837, without notice—I missed the articles stated.

BENJAMIN HARRIS (police-sergeant K 19.) On the 18th of March, I received information, and took the prisoners in St. George's workhouse—Catherine said she was very sorry, but she thought to get the things out again—I received some duplicates from the prisoners, and found this property—the other prisoner said it was not her fault.

ABRAHAM POWELL . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Shad well. I produce a pillow pledged by J. A. Sharpe, and another pillow and bed, pawned by her, I believe.

THOMAS GEORGE SIZER . I am shopman to Lawrence Kennedy, a pawnbroker. I have one sheet and three pillows pledged with me—I cannot say who by—I know both the prisoners as pledging there, but I cannot say that they pawned these—these are the duplicates.

JOHN HOPE . I am shopman to Mr. Carpenter, a pawnbroker. I have three curtains, pledged on the 1st of August in the name of Ann Sharpe—I do not know by whom.

WILLIAM CASON . I live with a pawnbroker. I have a flat-iron and sheet.

THOMAS SPOONER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have two pillows—I cannot tell who pawned them.

BENJAMIN HARRIS (police-constable K 19.) I have the duplicates which were given me by the prosecutrix—they correspond with those the pawnbrokers have.

MARIA WADS WORTH . I found the duplicates in the room.

(Catherine Sharpe pleaded poverty.)

CATHERINE SHARPE— GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months.

JANE ANN SHARPE— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1288

1288. WILLIAM BURRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February, 2 nose-bags, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Flight.

JAMES OLLETT . I am in the service of Thomas Flight, a cow-keeper, at Islington. I had my horses at Edgeware a little after Christmas—while I went to get my dinner two of my nose-bags were taken off—these are them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you tell what month it was you lost the nose-bags? A. I cannot—it was, as near as I can guest, a week after Christmas—I cannot say whether it was in October or September—I cannot say whether October is before Christmas or after it.

COURT. Q. What did you do at Christmas that makes you mark that time? A. Nothing, but it was about a week after Christmas—there was no drinking—I very seldom go to church—there was a little snow about that time—the days were short.

JOHN HALL . I am a farmer, at Little Stanmore. I bought this note-bag of the prisoner in January.

Cross-examined. Q. Used a man of the name of Horrod to come to your place? A. Yes, I believe he slept there, but I never gave him permission—the prisoner told me he used to sleep there.

MARTIN BURTON . I took the prisoner, and he told me that a man of the name of Horrod stole them, and brought the bags to him—I have got that man now.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate that? A. Yes—part of what I said was taken down in writing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1289

1289. GEORGE M'KENZIE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 1 pair of boots, value 11s., the goods of John Burt.

JOHN, BURTON . I am shopman to John Burt, of the Commercial-road, a boot and shoemaker. On Saturday night I ran out of the shop, and the prisoner was pointed out to me—I overtook him with these boots, which had been hanging inside the door.

GEORGE CASTLETON (police-constable K 236.) I heard a cry of "Stop thief" and saw the prisoner running, and the witness after him—I saw this pair of boots found on him.

Prisoner. I picked them up.

JOHN BARTON . I saw them safe about three minutes before.

Prisoner. I had them in my possession five or ten minutes.

GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Confined Three Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1290

1290. CATHERINE MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 1 table-cloth, value 2l., the goods of the Bishop of Exeter.

MARY BROWN . I am housemaid to the Bishop of Exeter, in Hanoversquare. I put a table-cloth and a bundle of linen into a drawer in the kitchen on the 24th of April—I missed the table-cloth the same evening—this is it.

ELIZABETH DENBURY . I am the kitchen maid. The prisoner used to come with vegetables—she was in the passage close to the kitchen that day.

WILLIAM HENRY LUMLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Crush, a pawnbroker. The prisoner came to offer this cloth to pledge on the 24th of April, and I detained her.

Prisoner. It was given me by a young woman in the area—I do not know her name.

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Confined Six Months; Six Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1291

1291. JAMES WHEELER alias Jarman , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April, 1 fowl, value 2s., the property of Frederick Young.

FREDERICK YOUNG . I live in White-conduit-terrace. My fowl was safe at two o'clock on Monday last, and it was gone at six o'clock—this is it—it has but one eye.

THOMAS HOBBS KING (police-constable N 24.) I was at Battle-bridge, and saw the prisoner with this fowl in his apron—there were two others with him—he said it was his own, and he was going to sell it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was residing with my father, a boot and shoemaker, in the Liverpool-road—he sent me on an errand—I met Evans—he asked me to go to Sermon-lane, to see another boy, named Storer—he said he had a fowl in the loft—he asked me and Evans to go with him to sell it—Storer carried it in a sack—he took it out, and gave it to me—I was taken with it.

THOMAS HOBBS KING re-examined. The other two boys ran away—I took the prisoner, and he told me that the fowl belonged to himself, and he was going to sell it, because it had been fighting, and had but one eye.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.—Recommended to mercy.

Confined Six Days, and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18370508-1292

1292. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 2 handkerchiefs, value 7s., the goods of Thomas Boyle.

THOMAS BOYLE . I live in St. James's-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner and another came to my shop between eight and nine o'clock on Saturday evening—my wife said something, and upon that the prisoner ran off, and I after him—I caught him in Northampton-street.

GEORGE MILLS . At a quarter to nine o'clock I heard an alarm, and saw the prisoner running down Northampton-street, he threw these handkerchiefs down the area of No. 10, and I took them up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months; Six Weeks Solitary.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370508-1293

1293. JOHN STACEY was indicted for embezzlement; and SAMUEL GODWIN as an accessory after the fact, and that he had been been before convicted of felony.

Stacey pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

MARGARST NEAVE . I am the wife of James Neave; he keeps a public-house. Stacey lived with us as pot-boy—I sent him to get change for a £10 note on the 3rd of May—he never returned it to me—I know nothing of God win.

FRANCES REDIT . I am niece to Mr. Carpenter. Stacey came to me for change for a £10 note—I gave him a £5 note and five sovereigns.

JAMES NEAVE . When I came home, about eleven o'clock, I was told the boy had had the £10 note, and not returned—I gave notice to the policeman.

JOHN KINGHAM . I am a publican. On the 3rd of May Stacey came to me in the evening, after he had run away, at half-past eleven o'clock, for half a pint of rum, and got change for a sovereign—I have collected the rent for the room which Godwin lives in for two years—I never saw Stacey till that night, to my knowledge—the next day they came into my house together, at half-past six o'clock, and they were both intoxicated—they went into the tap-room, and came out, and had some gin, Stacey ordered some tea; and then he called me into my kitchen, and said, "I have taken a liberty with you, I hope you will excuse it; I have been working very hard for a long time to get a sovereign or two into your hands, as my father-in-law wants to go to Bristol"—I took the sovereign—he said, "Take your reckoning out of that"—they then left my house to go to the coach-office—I knew no more till Mr. Neave came to me, about nine o'clock—we got two officers, and found both the prisoners in bed—I never knew any thing of Godwin but as an honest, hard-working old man—Stacey stated that he rigged the old man out—I certainly saw the old man altered in his appearance, from a poor man to half a gentleman, with a new suit of clothes and a new hat on.

EDWARD WILD . I am a policeman. At a quarter past nine o'clock Mr. Neave came to the station—I went, and found Stacey in bed, very much intoxicated—I asked if he had got any property—he said he did not know—he pulled out 51/4d., a comb and knife—I saw there was some more money in his pocket—I took out four sovereigns and two half-sovereigns—I did not see Godwin till he was taken into custody—he was not in the same house—he did not say any thing to me.

JOHN WOODHOBSK (police-sergeant M 13.) On Thursday, the 4th of May, I went to Lowman Pond, and found Godwin in bed, drunk—I said, "Do you know any thing of your son stealing a £10 note?"—he said, "No"—I said he must go with me—he said he would not—I said, "Get your clothes, and put them on"—he looked about, and said, "Where are my clothes? I suppose they have taken them away again"—I said, "What clothes?"—he said what his son had bought him; and he said, "I suppose the old b—has taken them away," meaning his wife—he said, "Do the best you can, you can only make a breach of trust of it"

Godwin. I do not recollect that I said such a thing—as to the money, I know nothing about it—the boy bought a couple of coats, and gave me one of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1294

1294. ROBERT GIBBINS, alias Meadows , was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May, 1 gown, value 8s., the goods of Charles Knapp.

CHARLES CLARKE (police-constable D 117.) Last Monday night, at half-past ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner carrying something in Lissongrove—I went after him—he took to his heels, and ran—I followed him about 150 yards, and just before I got to him he dropped something—I

pursued and took him—I brought him back, and took up this gown, and asked him where he got it—he said, "You are not going to get any thing out of me; I did not get it at this end of the town"—I took him to the station.

CHARLES KNAPP . I am a pawnbroker. This is my gown—I saw it safe in my house on Monday morning—it has my private mark on it now—I did not miss it till the officer came—I know the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1295

1295. JAMES DENCH, THOMAS WYATT , and JOHN WILLIAMS , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May, 1 bag, value 2s.; 5 planes, value 3l. 4s.; and 6 saws, value 1s.; the goods of Joseph Shorley: 4 planes, value 2l. 10s.; and 6 saws, value 3l.; the goods of Isaac Weller: and 7 planes, value 3l.; 2 saws, value 1l. 5s.; and 1 bevil, value 3s.; the goods of John Green.

JOSEPH SHORLEY . I am a cabinet maker. I lost some tools from a workshop in Little Titchfield-street, Marylebone—I saw them safe about half past six or seven o'clock in the evening on Tuesday last—they were gone in the morning—the padlock had been broken, and some boards and another part of the shop at the side.

JOHN WILLIAM HAWKINS (police-constable F 101.) On Tuesday night last, at twenty minutes to eleven o'clock, I saw Dench and Wyatt crossing the Seven Dials—Dench had got this carpet bag, and some articles in it—and Wyatt was carrying a drugget with some more things in it—I stopped them, not giving a satisfactory account, and I took them to the station-house—on searching Dench, I found this lot of tools—on searching Wyatt, I found some other tools in the drugget, and this small saw, which comes to pieces, he had in his hand.

ISAAC WELLER . I was at work in these premises as journeyman. This plough plane, and other things, are mine.

JOHN GREEN . I am a cabinet-maker. I was at work at this place—part of these tools are mine, and some I lost, which have not yet been found.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long Acre. I About half-past ten o'clock in the morning of the 10th of May, Williams offered two planes with the marks on, which we had received an account of—I detained him and gave him in charge.

ISAAC WELLER . One of these is mine—the other is Green's.

RICHARD GABRIEL GABB (police-sergeant F 14.) I was sent for, and took Williams.

CHARLES HENRY BAGNALL (police-constable F 31.) About eleven o'clock on the 10th of May, I was in Long Acre, and saw some tools tied up on a pitching block—I kept my eye on them—I asked a man about them—he gave me information, and I went into the public house, but could not find any one—I then kept watching it for three-quarters of an hour—and then I took them and found it was four planes.

Dench's Defence. A man met Wyatt and me, and said he would give us 6d. to take the bag to the Seven Dials, and wait for him—we were going along, and the policeman stopped us.

Wyatt's Defence. I was coming home, and a man asked us to carry these two parcels for him.

Williams's Defence. I met a young man whom I had seen before, and

he had a basket and a bundle—he gave me two planes, and said if I would pledge them he would give me 6d.—I know nothing of them.

DENCH— GUILTY . Aged 17.

WYATT— GUILTY . Aged 17.

WILLIAMS— GUILTY .* Aged 19. Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1296

1296. JOSEPH WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of April, 84 lbs. weight of hay, value 4s., the goods of George Coell.

GEORGE COELL . I am a farmer, at En field. The prisoner is a straw carter, and lives about three quarters of a mile from me—on Sunday evening the 23rd of April, between the hours of eight and eleven o'clock I missed some hay from the stack which had been cut up—I had a man watching all night—the next morning I observed some marks—there was nearly two trusses and a half of hay missing—I traced footmarks across my field towards Turkey-street, where the prisoner lived—I traced them up to the back of his premises—the hay was carried, across four or five fields, and over two or three hedges—I traced the hay where he had pot it over the hedges, and the constables found some hay—it is very like ours—I cannot swear to it—it agrees with mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You would not venture to swear that it is yours? A. No—hay is much alike—there is nothing very remarkable in it—there are a great many houses in Turkey-street—I do not know his cottage exactly—I stated before the Magistrate that I traced it over three or four fields, and Turkey-street is five or six fields off—I traced it three or four fields, and then sent for the constable, and traced it all the way—I saw the prisoner's shoes fitted to some marks—the constable called me to look at the marks in the road, and then he put the shoe down in the mark—it was not a very remarkable shoe—it had a tip off, and some of the sparables were out—it is pretty much the same description of shoes as the villagers wear on Sunday—I will swear this hay was very much like mine—there was none like it in the country.

JOHN STARR . I am servant to Mr. Coell. On Sunday night, the 23rd of April, I had cut the hay and left it there—it was not tied in trusses—it was on the stump of the stack—there were five cuts began, and my master told me to watch it—I came down in the evening, between seven and eight o'clock, and then my master told me I might go back till half-past ten o'clock, as he should not be in bed before eleven o'clock—I came back a few minutes before eleven o'clock—I looked at the stack, and saw the hay was gone off—I went through the gate, and could not see any hay about the ground—I went and told Mr. Coell—he came with me, and found it was gone—I remained there the rest of the night—in the morning, about five o'clock, I traced it down the lane, from the stack to the first little gate, and across four fields, where there was no footpath—I came back and called Mr. Coell—he went with me, and saw where it had been carried, and chucked over the gate—he sent me for the constable.

Cross-examined. Q. How many houses are there near the prisoner's? A. There are above twenty houses in Turkey-street; between twenty and forty—there is a sample of hay here—I am a farmer's man—it is a common hay about the country—there were the footsteps of two different persons—the prisoner's father does not live far distant—the stable where the horse stands, I believe, belongs to his father.

JOHN MEED . I am a constable. I was sent for on Monday morning, the 24th—I and Watkins traced the hay over the fence, out of the stack-yard,

a little way down the road, then over a gate across some fields, direct away to the prisoner's back door—I found three parts of a truss in the prisoner's cart-shed—I believe it is—I never knew to the contrary—his cart and horse were there—I have been constable of Enfield about eighteen years—I know of his occupying this stable—I traced some footmarks from out of the road across the fields—when I took the prisoner, he wanted to change his shoes—I took them when he pulled them off his feet, and I fitted them to the marks in the fields, in thirty or forty places—they tallied in all respects—they are rights and lefts—the right-footed shoe has got half the tip off on one side, and the left is whole—these are the marks I traced, and they corresponded in all respects in fifty places, I may say—I compared the hay with that in the stack—my opinion is that it came from the stack.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1297

1297. CHARLES HITCHINS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May, 81bs. weight of copper, value 4s., the goods of Henry Spring, and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

RICHARD HAWKES (police-constable N 40.) On the 4th of May, at a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, I was in Hoxton-square. I saw two persons standing near Mr. Spring's house, on the opposite side of the square—I went towards them—I heard a whistle, and saw the prisoner run from the fore court of Mr. Spring's house, and join the other two—they all ran into High-street, Hoxton—I followed them to opposite the Crooked Billet, where the prisoner dropped a bag containing this copper—I saw Ball and called to him—he took the prisoner—the other two escaped—I took the copper back and matched it to the flanch over Mr. Spring's kitchen window—it fitted exactly.

GEORGE BALL (police-constable N 70.) I saw the prisoner running, and saw him throw down the bag which contained this sheet-copper. I ran and took him.

HENRY SPRING . I live in Hoxton-square. This copper is mine—it was taken from the top of my kitchen window—I have not seen it fitted, but I have seen the copper—here is eight pounds of it.

Prisoner. I had nothing at all to do with it.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY.* Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1298

1298. JOHN HUTCHINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April, 1 cloak, value 8s., the goods of William Perry;to which be pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1299

1299. ADAM TODD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May, 31bs. 14oz. weight of bacon, value 2s. 7d.; the goods of Samuel Watson; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1300

1300. RICHARD TOWN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April, 1 ring, value 10s.; and 1 sovereign; the goods and monies of Elizabeth M'Carron; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Six Months.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, May 13th, 1837.

Second Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabia.

Reference Number: t18370508-1301

1301. JOHN MARRIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April, at St. Luke, 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 waistcoat, value 7s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 1l.; 5 gowns, value 1l. 10s.; 4 petticoats, value 8s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 1 pair of stays, value 5s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 2 shawls, value 1l.; 5 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 3 towels, value 2s.; collars, value 4s.; 1 box, value 2s.; 2 half-sovereigns, 1 crows, and half-crowns; the goods and monies of Edward Flannagan, in his dwelling-house.

EDWARD FLANNAGAN . I am a labourer, and live in City Garden-row, St. Luke. I occupy the second floor—the landlord does not live in the house—on the 27th of April I went out to work in the morning—when I came home, I found I was robbed of the articles stated in the indictment—the prisoner had lived in the house, and left about four months ago—all the property was in a box except my clothes, which were in another box, which was broken open, and my clothes taken out and taken away—the money and my wife's clothes were in another box, which was earned away—a pair of stockings were found in the prisoner's pocket, which I know to be mine—they had been in my wife's box—I gave charge of two men named Green and Yates, but they were discharged.

JOHANNA FLANNAOAN . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 27th of April I left the two boxes secure, when I went out at a quarter to twelve o'clock in the day—I locked the door, and put the key into my pocket, leaving all the property secure—I returned at a quarter past five o'clock—I found my door wide open, one trunk taken away, and the other broken open—there were two half-sovereigns, five half-crowns, and five shillings in my box, which was taken away—I have recovered nothing but a pair of stockings, which I know to be my husband's—he had had them fix months—I know them perfectly well.

HENRY YATES . I am a bricklayer's labourer. I was taken up on this charge and discharged—the prisoner came to where I live on the morning of the 27th of April, and said he had been to his master's to see if he could get any work—he told me, when I was in custody at Hatton-garden, that he had the box and clothes, and that he had a cab waiting at the top of the street for him—I said to him, "John, it is very hard I and Green should be taken innocently," and he laughed at me.

Prisoner. When I lived where your mother did, you left the key for me to go into the place, and because I had not time to bring you half the money the things fetched, you told the policeman all this. Witness. It is false.

JOHN FLYNN . I am ten years old, and live with my lather, who is a watch finisher, opposite Mr. Flannagan. I was standing at the door a little before tea—I did not notice what time it was—I heard a rattling, and went to the door and saw the prisoner come down the stairs, carrying a box.

WILLIAM CHING . I am a policeman. About half-past ten o'clock, on the 27th of April, I apprehended the prisoner, and found a pair of stockings in his coat pocket, also one sovereign, one half sovereign, four half-crowns, two shillings, and 6 l/2d. in copper—at the office, when the prosecutrix was examined, the prisoner interrupted her, when she said there were five half-crowns in the box, he said, "There were not five, there were only two."

MRS. FLANNAGAN. These stockings are my husband's—the things were worth above 5l.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Life.

Reference Number: t18370508-1302

1302. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May, 1 tongue, value 4s.; 5 pints of wine, value 7s.; 3 glass bottles, value 6d.; 8 lbs. weight of bread, value 1s. 3d.; and 1 sack, value 1s. 9d.; the goods of William Cook.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Elizabeth Cook.

ELIZABETH COOK . I am the wife of William Cook, who is a shipmaster, and lives in Myddleton-square. On the 4th of May the policeman called at five o'clock in the morning—I got up and went into the area—the area door is generally kept locked, but it was not so that night—on looking at the safe I missed the property stated, which I had seen safe the afternoon before—the safe was not locked that night—I know nothing of the prisoner—I know this sack by a direction card which is on it.

THOMAS MARTIN . I am a policeman. On the 4tb of May, at half-past four o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner, carrying a sack—he turned out of the square, down Arlington-street, and got over a wall adjoining Sadler's Wells Theatre—he handed the sack to a man who was with him when he was on the top of the wall—I secured the prisoner, and the other escaped.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Chad well-street, and met two men, who asked me to carry the sack, which I did—I was not getting over the wall.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1303

1303. ANN GREEN was indicted for stealing, 1 purse, value 6d. 5 half-crowns, and 2s.; the goods and monies of George Grigg.

(The prosecutor did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370508-1304

1304. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Upsall, on the 8th of May, at St. George, and stealing therein, 1 watch, value 1l. 10s., his goods; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 38.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18370508-1305

1305. FRANCIS CAVANNAH, MATTHEW PEARSON , and MARGARET PEARSON , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Bryant Collins, on the 23rd of April, at the Liberty of the Rolls, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 gown, value 8s.; 1 quilt, value 1s.; 1 frock, value 6d.; 1 cape, value 6d.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 1 pair of half boots, value 4s.; and 1 counterpane, value 6s.; his goods.

ABIGAIL COLLINS . I am the wife of Bryant Collins, and live in White's-alley, Chancery-lane, in the Liberty of the Rolls. I do not know whether it is in the parish of St. Dunstan's—he keeps the house—on Sunday night, the 23rd of April, I left my own house between one and two o'clock, I locked the door, and went to No. 9—I was fetched between four and five o'clock in the morning by Pike, the policeman—it was day-break—I found the lock of my room forced, and missed the articles stated—I had left the street door open, but my own room door locked—I had come back between

two and three o'clock, but the street door was shut and I could not get in, so I went to No. 9.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Yours is a marine store shop, is it not? A. Yes—the lodgers were in the house when I went back, but they were asleep—there was an elderly man and his wife—they seemed all asleep—I do not know that there was a drunken man there.

THOMAS PIKE (police-constable F 126.) On the 23rd of April, about five or ten minutes before four o'clock in the morning, I saw Cavannah and Matthew Pearson standing in White's-alley, within a yard of No. 6—about ten minutes afterwards I saw Cavannah come out of the next door with a bundle under his arm—there is a passage leading to the back of No. 6, and he came out of that passage—he saw me and threw down the things, and made his escape—I had frequently seen him loitering about the same spot, and know him to be the man—I returned, and took up the articles he bad thrown down—I afterwards went to fetch Mrs. Collins from another house, and she went with me to No. 6—the street door was fastened and we could not get in—we got in in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, by pulling down the shutter—I went to the room on the first floor and found the lock broken right off—in the course of the morning I saw Margaret Pearson coming out of her lodging in a court close by—she had got a gown under her apron—I followed and took her into custody—I had seen her hand a gown to her mother in Little White's-alley—on the 25th I apprehended Matthew Pearson at Scott's coffee-house, but found nothing on him—on the 1st of May I apprehended Cavannah in Gray's Inn-lane—I have the bundle which I had seen him drop—I have seen the prisoners in company several times, and knew them to be acquainted—Pearson lives about one hundred and fifty yards from the prosecutor—I had teen nothing of Margaret Pearson that night—it was about half-past twelve o'clock when I saw her give the gown to her mother.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw Pearson there, and he lives near there? A. Not in the same court—the courts are all leading one into another—I do not know where Cavannah lives—I did not stop to see them go away—I believe the White Lion was open at the time—that is nearly opposite the prosecutor's house—they were talking almost close to her door—it was about five or ten minutes before four o'clock in the morning—I am not certain that the public-house was open—I have no reason to believe it was, but I saw it open a little while before—the two Pearsons live together as man and wife—Mrs. Pearson told me the gown was left with her by Cavannah—she did not tell me where it was going—I saw her hand it to her mother, who was standing at a door in Little White's-alley, and I directly took her—it was not her mother's house, because she was going to run off home—she told the constable who took her that she did not live there, and begged him to let her go home to her own house—when I went to the prosecutrix's house, I found her husband lying drunk on the first floor—she went up stairs with me—I found nothing on Matthew Pearson—his house was fastened up, and we did not search it.

ABIGAIL COLLINS re-examined. My husband and I came back together—I went out between one and two o'clock in search of him, and when we came back the street door was fast, and we could not get in—I cannot say when he got in—he must have found it open afterwards and got in—he was very drunk—I had left him outside, and went to sit with Mrs. Bed wood he came there afterwards and sat some time, and then went back again

—these things are my property—they were safe in the bed room when I locked the door between one and two o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you received money to settle this? A. No—I was pressed very hard to do so—a man pressed me to take 2d. for a pint of beer, and that was all I got—I don't know who it was, but it was a man very much like him that sits next to you—I assure you I could not get rid of the man—that man is a good deal like him—whether it is him I don't know.

Cavannah's Defence. I was locked out of my lodging, which caused me to be at the public-house—when I came out 1 picked up the gown by a barber's door, in the same alley where the prosecutrix lives—I knocked at Pearson's door—the female answered—I asked her to let it remain then till the morning, saying it was my sister's, and that I had taken it out of pledge, I did not like to tell her I had found it.

THOMAS KEARNEY . I act as beadle of the Liberty of the Rolls, and have been so twenty-five years—I am a constable—we give out our notices in St. Dunstan's church—we support our own poor—St. Dunstan's is in the City of London, and we are in Middlesex—we had fourteen or fifteen pews in the old church which I attended—the whole of the Liberty is counted in the parish—the parish is in the County and City too—we had two trials about poor-rates there—it is admitted that we are in the parish of St. Dunstan—my children are christened in St. Dunstan's church—I have had seven or eight christened there—I know White's-alley, it leads into Chancery-lane—it is in Middlesex, and within the Liberty of the Rolls.

CAVANNAH— GUILTY. Aged 19—of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years.

MATTHEW and MARGARET PEARSON— NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Saturday, May 13th, 1837.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370508-1306

1306. ANN BIRMINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March, 2 rings, value 2l. 10s., the goods of Ann Holmes, her mistress.

ANN HOLMES . I live at Islington. The prisoner was about five months in my service, and left about the 18th of March—I had missed a ring, and before that another—I questioned her—she said she could not find them.

CHARLES TIJON . I live with Mr. Drew, a pawnbroker, at Islington. The prisoner came and offered to pledge this diamond ring, and I stopped her.

MARY HARRIS . I searched the prisoner, and found this paste ring in her bosom.

Prisoner. The ring was lost, I borrowed a sieve and sifted the dust and found it, I said I should go and pawn the ring to pay the price of my day; and in finding that I found this other ring, which I know nothing about.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18370508-1307

1307. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 11 handkerchiefs, value 2l. 14s., the goods of John Williams and another.

JOHN SOWERBY . I am a silk mercer, and live in Marylebone. The prisoner was my servant—I am in partnership with John Williams—I had suspicion, and sent for Avis—I was not present when he searched the prisoner—these handkerchiefs are mine, and have my marks on them.

GEORGE AVIS . I was sent for—I searched the prisoner, and found a green purse in his trowsers' pocket, and two duplicates—I then told him I was going to search his room, and asked if he had any property of his master's there—he said he had one black handkerchief; this is it.

THOMAS ANDREWS . I am a pawnbroker. These handkerchiefs were pawned by the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 22.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1308

1308. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May, 1 shawl, value 2s. 6d.; 1 gown, value 5s.; 1 shirt, value 6s.; and 1 unmade shirt, value 2s.; the goods of John Hughes.

SUSAN HUGHES . I am the wife of John Hughes, of Bond's-buildings, Chancery-lane. I went out at half-past two o'clock, on the 1st of May, these things were then safe, and when I came back they were gone—from information I went after the prisoner—he gave me the shawl, and said that was all he had got—I pulled his coat aside, and he dropped the other things—I took them, and pursued him till he was taken.

HENRY EVANS . I live in Bonds-buildings. The prisoner came to my house first—I watched, and saw him go into the prosecutor's house, and come out with the clothes—I alarmed the people, and saw him drop the things.

Prisoner. I was in search of a tailor—I never had these things at all.

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1309

1309. ELLEN BOTTOMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 1 apron, value 4s.; 5 pillow-cases, value 7s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 8s.; 2 cravats, value 3s.; 9 towels, value fit.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 sheet, value 4s.; 5 knives, value 3s.; 3 forks, value 1s.; 1 coverlid, value 2s.; 2lbs. weight of candles, value 1s.; 1lb. weight of stone blue, value 1s. 6d.; 1lb. weight of powder blue, value 4s.; and 2 table-cloths, value 10s.; the goods of John Smith, her master; and ELIZABETH BOTTOMLEY for feloniously receiving the tame, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

ANN SMITH , I am the wife of John Smith, a surgeon, of Goswell-street. The prisoner Ellen was in my employment for nearly two years—I had very great confidence in her—she left about February, as she told me she was going to be married to a farmer in Yorkshire—I had missed an innumerable quantity of things for a year and a half—I spoke to her about the house-maid, and asked her if she thought she was honest—she said, "I don't think the does the thing that is right;" and I parted with her, when she had lived with me about nine weeks—she did not go to Yorkshire—the other prisoner who is her mother lived in Featherstone-street, not far from our house—I heard that the mother had removed, and in consequence of some suspicions, I went to a house in Somers Town, with a policeman—the prisoner, Ellen was there, and the mother came in while we were there—we searched, and I found a pillow-case, this apron, two pocket-handkerchiefs, nine towels, and other things—I have no doubt they are mine—Elizabeth said, before they were found, that they had nothing but what was their own, and I was welcome to search—when the things were found, she told me the sheet and the dimity were hers—I have not the least doubt that they are mine—they are almost all my own work—she said they were not mine.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Have you any of your work on the sheet and dimity? A. Yes; mending which I believe is peculiar to myself—I cannot say when I last saw any of the things—I have not mused any so long as years ago—I could not swear that I have seen the sheet within eleven months—I took way some cravats, and two towels, and a handkerchief, which I returned, because I could not swear to them—some of these things have now the mark of I. E. B. on them, and mine is cut out—the 22 is left, but the name is cut out, and darned over.

JAMES BEANNAN (police-constable G 206.) I went with the prosecutrix and her son to Denton-street, Somers Town—I took the prisoners—in going to the station-house, Ellen asked what I thought the result would be—I said, "I think you have got yourselves into a sad mess—you deserve no pity"—she said, "I know I am guilty, but I hope they will have mercy on my poor mother"—while I was searching the house, I heard the mother say to Mrs. Smith, "Pray don't prosecute us—have mercy on us."

ANNA COLLINGHAM . I am the female-searcher at the station-house in Featherstone-street. On Saturday, the 22nd of April, the two prisoners were brought there—Elizabeth had something in her hand—I asked what she bad got in her hand—she said it was a little money—I said, "Put it down on the table"—she put down this little box—when I had done searching her, she asked me for the box—I said it was more than my duty to give the box back again—she said, "Oh, we are done"—she asked me what I thought would be done to them—I said I did not know—nine duplicates were in the box—after I had searched Ellen, she said she knew she bad acted wrong, and she knew she deserved punishment; she was sure she should be transported, but she hoped they would have mercy on her mother.

ARTHUR JOHN NORTH . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a table-cloth, pledged on the 8th of April by the prisoner Ellen.

ELLEN BOTTOMLEY— GUILTY . Aged 28.

ELIZABETH BOTTOMLEY— GUILTY . Aged 65. Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1310

1310. ELIZABETH CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 3 spoons, value 1l. 10s.; 1 table-cloth, value 1s. 6d.; 1 shin; value 2s.; 4 sheets, value 7s.; 1 glass dish, value 10s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 1 ring, value 10s.; and 1 shawl, value 4s.; the goods of John Baty, her master; and HANNAH FREWIN for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.—2nd COUNT, for receiving them of an evil-disposed person.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN BATY . I am a tailor, and live in Thanet-place, Temple-bar, and have lived there upwards of forty years. Clarke lived in my service—in consequence of what a policeman named Matthews said, I bad her taken into custody—I looked over my property, and missed, among other things, the articles stated in the indictment.

SAMUEL MATTHEWS (police-constable F 29.) I took Clarke into custody at Mr. Baty's house—she said the duplicates were in the little old woman's room, at No. 9, Ship-yard, on the first floor—I went to the old woman's room, which was the prisoner Frewin's, and asked her for the duplicates that were inclosed in the red purse in the glass, on the mantelpiece (as Clarke had told me)—she went, and pulled out from under the bed this purse with the duplicates, and said her boy had picked them up under the table in sweeping up the room in the morning—that was all she

said—I then took her to the station—house, and kept the duplicates—these are them.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You saw Clarke at Mr. Baty's first? A. Yes—she was in great distress, and cried.

Cross-examined by MR. PRICE. Q. Have you examined the duplicates? A. I have—they are not all in the name of Frewin, but a good many are—there were two bedsteads, one chair, and a table in the room—she is married, and her husband is living there.

WILLIAM TROWBRIDGE . I am shopman to Joseph Wassel, a pawnbroker in Pickett—street, Strand. Here is one duplicate of ours for a pair of half-boots, one for three spoons, one for a table—cloth, one for a shirt, one for a shift, and one for a shawl—the spoons were pawned in the name of "Frewin, for Mrs. Smith, Thanet—place;" the table—cloth the same; the shirt, "Ann Frewin, Ship—yard," only; the shawl, "Ann Frewin, Ship—yard"—I am quite sure Frewin is the woman who pawned all these things—the earliest date is the 3rd of January, and the last the 18th of April—I know Clarke by sight—I have seen her about the place sometimes, looking into the window, and sometimes standing at the door while Frewin was pledging.

Cross-examined by MR. PRICE. Q. Did you know Frewin? A. Yes, very well, and where she lived—we do not lend more money when article are pledged by good customers—my master lends as much as they are worth—we have more confidence in old customers than in strangers—Frewin once said to me, "If you don't think it right, you can go over, and inquire at No. 1, Thanet—place"—I asked her who she came from—she said Mrs. Smith's, Thanet—place, and if I liked I might go over and inquire—I went there three times—that is Mr. Baty's house—I saw a tall, fresh—coloured, elderly woman there, who Said it was all right, I had no occasion to be afraid.

MR. DOANE. Q. Was that Mrs. Baty? A. There is no such person—I cannot say whether it was a lady living in the house—I never saw the person before.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is Miss Baty here? A. yes—I would not swear that it was or was not her—I have said so all along——if it was her, she was painted, and had curls.

COURT. Q. Have you any reason to believe she ever painted? A. There is a person here named Reed who said that she knew that Miss Baty painted.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Will you venture to swear that you believe that she was the person? A. No, I would not—I do not know that she is not—I cannot tell her age—I do not think Miss Baty is the person—I did not ask the person her name—I should not know the person's voice.

Q. Show me the duplicates in which Frewin's name alone is inserted? A. These are them (reads)—"Ann Frewin, 18, Ship—yard"—"Ann Frewin, 18, Ship—yard, pair of half—boots, 1s."—I did not take that down from her lips—when I know the customers, I do not always ask their direction—I knew she lived in Ship—yard—no one desired me to put "8" or "18" down—I put it myself—here is "Ann Smith, housekeeper, 1, Thanet-place, by Ann Frewin, 9, Ship—yard"—I do not know how I came to put a different address.

MR. PRICE. Q. You knew perfectly well where the woman lived? A. Yes—it is close by—I am not quite certain that Miss Baty was not the person I saw—I think the person was taller.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you go to the other address in Ship—yard?

A. No—she told me she worked at Thanet—place, and Mrs. Smith sent her—she lives at No. 9, Ship—yard—I have seen the house since—I do not recollect that I ever asked her where she lived—I knew she lived in Ship—yard—I lent 15s. on these silver spoons—she did not want more—she said it was to make up the rent, or she could have had more—it did not strike me to look at the initial of "B" on these spoons—it is plain enough-they were all pledged together.

MR. PRICE. Q. What are these spoons worth? A. We could have lent 30s. on them, but she asked 15s.

COURT. Q. If two had been left you would have lent 15s.? A. Yes—it excited my suspicions, and I went over and inquired, (and the person said it was all right,) not because she was a stranger, but because I thought a person like her could not have three silver spoons—the had pledged trifling things hundreds of times, I suppose.

COURT. Q. You say you did not give more than 15s. for these spoons, because the prisoner did not want more; how came you to lend 6s. the same day on a cut glass? A. That was before the spoons.

JOHN BATY . These are my spoons—I believe the other things are mine—this cut—glass decanter is mine, and this shirt is mine-this shift is my daughter's—it has "H. B., No. 3" on it-there are two small sheets, which I believe are mine.

MR. PRICE. Q. Will you tell us the value of these large spoons? A. One cost me a guinea and a half—I think these others cost about 6l. the half dozen.

MR. DOANE. Q. Had you employed Clarke to pawn any thing? A. Never in my life—she has never done it with my knowledge.

JURY to WILLIAM TROWBRIDGE. Q. Who said there was 15s. wanted? A. Frewin said that Mrs. Smith wanted 15s. to pay the rent.

MR. BATY. I have no person of the name of Smith in my house.

MRS. REED. I made one pair of these sheets for Mr. Baty.

(—Brown No. 22, Boswell—street, law writer, and Walter vans, Ship—yard, gave Frewin a good character.)

CLARKE— GUILTY . Aged 19.

FREWIN— GUILTY . Aged 46. Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1311

1311. ELIZABETH CLARKE was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March, 1 pair of boots, value 3s. 6d.; 2 table—cloths, value 4s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; and 1 bottle, value 3s. 6d.; the goods of John Baty, her master; and REBECCA BAXTER for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.; to which Clarke pleaded.

GUILTY .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN BATY . I am a tailor, and live in Thanet—place. Clarke was in my employ—I missed a pair of boots, two table—cloths, a shirt, and a bottle—I have since seen them at the pawnbroker's—I never saw Baxter.

WILLIAM TROWBRIDGE . I know the prisoner Baxter—here are duplicates for a shirt, two table—cloths, and a glass bottle, in the name of "Ann Baxter, No. 12, Shire—lane;" a table—cloth, 9d., "Ann Baxter, No. 18, Shire—lane;" and one bottle, 1s.—I am in the habit of asking people where they live the first time—I may have asked the prisoner, but I do not recollect when—she had been a constant customer—I suppose she gave me her address, but I do not recollect—I put down this address because I knew her, and thought she lived there—the other addresses are, "No. 16, Shire—lane," "No. 12, Shire—lane," and "No. 9, Ship—yard"-Baxter

pawned these things with me—I did not ask her whose they were—I did not take in the bottle without asking some questions, nor the other things—I saw Clarke outside the door several times while Baxter was pawning.

MRS. REED. I am married, and know the prisoners Clarke and Baxter—I have seen them together in Mr. Baty's kitchen—I spoke to Clarke about Baxter after she was gone—they went up stairs together—Mrs. Baxter was standing in the middle of the kitchen, with something in her apron—I said, "There you are, Mrs. Baxter"—I believe she said, "Good morning"—she went up stairs, and went away.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What are you? A. I go out to work—I went to Mr. Baty's to wash.

EDWARD CALVER . I am an assistant to Mr. Barton, a pawnbroker, in the Strand. I have a pair of Wellington boots, pawned by Baxter on the 7th of April, 1837, in the name of "Ann Baxter, lodger, No. 6, Ship-yard"—I have no doubt but I asked her some questions about them—I knew her before by coming in to pledge now and then.

JOHN BATY . These boots are mine, and this bottle and linen articles.

(Stephen Evans, Portugal-street; William Harris, livery-stable keeper, Eagle-street, Red Lion-square; Mary Barnet, of Plough-court, Carey-street; and Harriett Duffin, of No. 17, Ship-yard, gave the prisoner Baxter a good character.)

BAXTER— GUILTY . Aged 40.— Transported for Seven Tears.

Reference Number: t18370508-1312

1312. LEVI KINSEY was indicted for embezzlement.

(The witnesses did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1313

1313. JOHN JONES and JOHN NICHOLAS SPENCER were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April, 1 truck, value 2l., the goods of William Cameron; and that Spencer had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM CAMERON . I missed my truck out of my premises on the 1st of April—I went to the station-house, and there found it—it is mine.

JAMES ROOKE . I am a policeman. On the 1st of April, I was called and saw the truck—Spencer was with it, and had some lead in it—this was after Perry had given me some information—I took the truck, but I did not take him, as I understood two men had been with it.

Spencer. Q. What had I on? A. A short fustian jacket, with pockets in the sides—I have no doubt of his being the man—I bad seen him on the Thursday previous.

JANE PERRY . On the 1st of April, at ten minutes past six o'clock, I saw Jones and another with a truck—they waited from five to six o'clock, and then drew it to some stables, and loaded it with something which seemed heavy, in a mat—I had known both the prisoners a long time down that stable—I went for the policeman.

ALEXANDER KENNEDY (police-constable H 155.) I was on duty on the 22nd of April, and took Jones on another charge.

JAMES FOGG . On the 1st of April, I saw the two prisoners, and one other, who is not in custody, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night—I took Spencer.

WILLIAM SAFFORD BOBBETT . I produce the certificate of Spencer's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner if the person.

JONES*— GUILTY . Aged 20.

SPENCER*— GUILTY Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1314

1314. EMMA BUCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March, 1 sheet, value 2s., the goods of Barney Jacobs.

SOPHIA JACOBS . I am the wife of Barney Jacobs, tailor, Shepherd's place, White Row. The prisoner took a furnished room at my house, at 4s. 6d. a week—she left in a fortnight—I missed a sheet, and I found this paper on my table when she went away—I do not particularly knot whose writing it is, but the prisoner borrowed the pen and ink of me, and in about two or three minutes after she had it, she went away—the ink was rather wet (read.) "Mrs. Jacobs, I am very sorry to think: was obliged to leave your place in the manner I did, but my husband being obliged to go into the country to a place, he was disappointed of his money, that I could not pay you—your sheet was in pawn—I have taken it to a friend's house, and I will bring it and some money on Saturday."

GUILTY. Aged 43.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Confined One Year.

(There were three other indictments against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18370508-1315

1315. HENRY RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March, 6 shifts, value 6s.; and 1 shilling, the goods and monies of Henry Heath.

HENRY HEATH . I am a labourer, and lodge in a room in Carlile-street, Lisson Grove. The prisoner slept in the same bed about three weeks—I missed a half crown, and one shilling, and some other things—on the 26th of April, I marked a shilling, and went to bed—in the morning, when I got up at half-past four o'clock, the prisoner was there—I looked into my breeches pocket, and missed the shilling—I went out at half-past four o'clock, and returned with the policeman, who found one shilling in his pocket, and the duplicate of the six shifts which I had lost a fortnight after he came to me—these are the shifts.

RICHARD WAYLETT . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Lisson Grove. I have six shifts which were pawned by the prisoner.

THOMAS LEWCOCK (police-constable D 134.) I found this shilling in the prisoner's pocket, and this duplicate in his box.

(The prisoner pleaded poverty).

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Confined Three Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1316

1316. THOMAS DORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 42lbs. weight of lead, value 12s., the goods of John Perkins, aril fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

WILLIAM FYSH . I keep the Jolly Farmers public house, near the cattle market, at Islington. On the 6th of May I went out, on receiving information, and saw the prisoner and another man running—I followed, and saw the prisoner throw this lead from him—I passed on, and took him into custody—-Nicholls took the lead up—it belongs to John Perkins—I made the model for it, and it passed through my hands—it was the trap of the water closet.

GEORGE TIMS . I live in Francis-street, Hoxton. On this Saturday, I saw the prisoner take this piece of lead from his trowsers—he was trying to run with it, and he ran after he got rid of it—Fysh was after him—there were two nails in it when I picked it up.

Prisoner. It is impossible you could see me throw that from me Witness. Yes, I saw you unbutton your trowsers, and throw it into the ditch.

JOHN NICHOLLS . I saw the prisoner in the privy near Mr. Perkin's house—this lead was taken from the privy—I spoke to him—as soon as he was gone I went into the privy, and found the boards ripped up, and the lead gone.

Prisoner. On this day week I was coming along the road—I overtook a man who had this and some more—he said, would I lend him a hand to carry it to town, and he would give me a shilling.

Witness. I had seen the lead safe half an hour before, and while he went in I waited, and went in directly and missed it—there were three taken before.

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1317

1317. HENRY KING was indicted for embezzlement.

JOHN LANGRIDGE . I am a cabriolet proprietor, and live in a mews in Theobald's-road. The prisoner was in my service, and left without notice on the 23rd of February—I did not authorise him to receive money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1318

1318. MARY OAKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April, 1 blanket, value 4s.; and 1 bolster, value 4s.; the goods of Edmund Conroy; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

ELLEN CONROY . I am the wife of Edmund Conroy, of High-street, St. Giles's. The prisoner lodged in one of my rooms—I missed a blanket and bolster on the 27th of April—I asked the prisoner about them—she said she had pawned them, and the duplicate was found in her pocket.

GEORGE CURTIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, Bloomsbury. I have a blanket and bolster which were pawned by the prisoner on the 27th of April.

Prisoner. I heard that my son had been killed in the Queen of Spain's service, and was in great anxiety—I wanted some money, and meant to get them out.

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY .* Aged 43.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18370508-1319

1319. JOHN BRYAN and ELLEN REYNOLDS were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April, 1 shawl, value 1s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 12s.; 2 shirts, value 6s.; 4 table-cloths, value 7s.; 2 towels, value 1s.; 2 flat-irons, value 1s. 6d.; 1 waistcoat, value 6d.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 4d.; and 1 cushion cover, value 2d.; the goods of Richard Noughton;to which Bryan pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

ELLEN NOUGHTON . I am the wife of Richard Noughton, of Hampshire Hog-yard, St. Giles's. I went to bed on the 27th of April, leaving all these things safe—next morning they were gone from the drawers—the male prisoner worked for me—I do not know the woman.

RICHARD ETHERIDGE (police-constable E 163.) I went to Great George-street, St. Giles's, and saw the two prisoners in a room, about eight o'clock in the morning, on the 29th, with all this property there—when I turned up the bed things and saw the bundle, I asked the female prisoner whose they were—she said she did not know.

JOHN HYDE . I live in George-street, St. Giles's. I let the room to

the female prisoner—she had slept there on the night of the 28th-themale prisoner slept there most nights.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1320

1320. RICHARD PURCELL was indicted for embezzlement.

EDWARD ASHTON . I keep a cheesemonger's shop in St. John-street-road. The prisoner was in my service many years—I deal with Ann Taylor and Mr. Squires—I sent the prisoner out with goods—it was his duty to receive money and pay it to me the same day—he has not given me 5s. 7d. from Squires, nor 4s. 7d. from Taylor—I charged him with this—he said he had received it and spent it.

SARAH JARVIS . I am in the service of Mr. Squires of Brunswick-terrace. The prisoner came with goods on the 17th of March, and I paid him 5s. 7d.—he gave me a bill and receipt.

ANN TAYLOR . I am the wife of James Taylor. I paid the prisoner 4s. 7d. on the 25th of April, I think.

(The prisoner pleaded poverty.)

GUILTY. Aged 40.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Ten Days.

Reference Number: t18370508-1321

1321. RICHARD PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March, 1 feather bed, value 3l., the goods of Ann Agnes Doyle.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Richard Attenborough and another.

ANN AGNES DOYLE . My father and mother are both dead. I had a feather bed at No. 2, Providence-place, Half-moon-street—I gave it to the prisoner to pledge, on the 14th of February—he is no relation of mine—it was worth 3l.—I was not in distress, but I was going to a situation, and wanted to keep it safe—he took it, and brought me back the duplicate and the money—this is the duplicate.

JAMES MILLS . I live with Mr. Richard Attenborough. I have a counter duplicate to this one—on the 27th of March the prisoner came to me for a blank declaration—he got it filled up, and came and had the bed away—it was pledged in the name of William Doyle, for 15s.—when he made the declaration he gave the name of Richard Doyle.

Prisoner. I did not take the bed out—he stated at the office that another party came with me and pledged his clothes to the bed out. Witness. There was a party came half an hour before, and pledged some clothes for 16s., and then he came again with the prisoner, and the prisoner had the bed and took it away—I gave it him myself.

PATRICK DOYLE . I am the prosecutrix's uncle. On the 17th of April I gave the prisoner into custody—I said, "what did you do with the bed?" he said he knew nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 19— Confined One Year; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1322

1322. MARY WHITE was indicated for stealing, on the 11th of April, 3 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and 1 sixpence; the monies of John Rumford, from his person.

JOHN FINSON . I am waiter at the Shakspeare's Head. John Rumford was sitting by my side asleep, on the evening of the 11th of April—I saw the prisoner come, put her hand into his pocket, and take out some money—I saw it in her hand, and she put it into her bosom—I sent for the policeman—Rumford is gone to sea.

RICHARD BARBER (police-constable K 50.) I went and found the sailor fast asleep on the table, and asked him in the prisoner's presence if he

had lost any money—he said he did not know—I said, "What money should you have?"—he said, "Three half-crowns, three shillings, and a sixpence"—he found it was all gone—on the way, the prisoner said she took one half-crown—I did not search her.

JAMES SHEPHERD (police-sergeant K 22.) I searched the prisoner, and found one half-crown and three shillings—she said the three shillings were hers, and the half-crown she took from the sailor.

Prisoner's Defence. I had four shillings in my pocket—I met the prosecutor—I knew him before by drinking in his company—he asked me to give him something to drink, as he had no money—I took him to the Crooked Billet, and called for a pint of porter—I gave a shilling, and they gave me 10d. out—he gave me half a crown to get some mutton chops—that was all I had of him.

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1323

1323. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 1 pewter pot, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Minton; and 1 pewter pot, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Hitchcock.

JOHN MINTON . I keep the Shepherd and Flock, High-street, Marylebone. I lost a pewter pot—this is it.

THOMAS HITCHCOCK . I keep the Cleveland Arms. This is my quart pot.

RICHARD BRADSHAW (police-constable D 102.) At half-past nine o'clock, on Saturday, I was in George-street, Bryanstone-square—I saw the prisoner, and, knowing her, I stopped her, I put my hand under her shawl, and found this pot—she said she picked it up, to buy some bread—I saw something bulky on her right side, and found this other pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 44.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1324

1324. JAMES DUNHILL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April, 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value is.; I apron, value 1s.; and 1 curtain, value 1s.; the goods of William Bailey Fox.

MARY FOX . I am the wife of William Bailey Fox, and lodge in Grafton-street East, Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner is an apprentice there—I missed a petticoat, shirt, apron—these are them.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am in the service of a pawnbroker, Grafton-street East. I have a child's shirt, which I took in pledge of the prisoner, on the 14th of April.

JOSEPH BAKER . I am in the service of Mr. Wadmore, a pawnbroker. I have a petticoat, apron, and curtain, which I took of the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month; One Week Solitary.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabia.

Reference Number: t18370508-1325

1325. ELLEN COLLINS, alias Smith , ELLEN WILLIAMS , and JANE STEWART , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April, 5 sovereigns, and 14 shillings, the monies of John Smith.

JOHN SMITH . I am a sailor, and have lodged in Dean-street, Shadwell, for two years. On the night of the 25th of April I slept with the prisoner Collins—I went to bed about two o'clock—I had five sovereigns in my left-hand jacket pocket, and fourteen shillings in my right—I put my things on the top of a chest—Collins awoke me—she was up, and said

Stewart had taken a sovereign out of my pocket—Stewart was not there then—while I was dressing Williams came in, and, after her, Stewart; and then Collins said Stewart had money belonging to me, and told her to give it back—I said I did not want to have any thing to do with it just then, and I went out of the room—I had lost all my money—I went home—Stewart came following me down—I met two policemen, and I made them stop her from coming—I went home to a young man, as I thought perhaps he had taken my money—he said he had not, and I came out and gave Stewart in charge—a small foreign coin that I had in my pocket was found on Williams—I lost five sovereigns, fourteen shillings, and the foreign Coin.

THOMAS WHITE . I am a cooper, and lodge with the prosecutor. I was in the room where he was that night, for about an hour; and after he took off his things, and was gone to bed, 1 took his waistcoat, and was going to take the money out, to take care of, but Collins said, "Come, come, I will have nothing of that in my room"—she took it from me, and took the money out—Stewart was there at that time—he had five sove-reigns, and fourteen shillings in silver—I did not know that he had the foreign coin—I went home, and left Collins and Stewart with him.

Collins. When I came up with the bottle, you took up his waistcost, and took something out, and put it into your pocket—I went to the bed, and acquainted my prosecutor, and he said it was all right; I asked what he had to give me, he gave me 5s., and then you walked down and left me. Witness. That is false.

GEORGE WILLIAM GRAVE (police-constable K 233.) On Tuesday morning, the 25th of April, the prosecutor gave Collins into my custody, I took Williams on suspicion, and then they said that I ought to have taken the right person—I asked who that was—they said, Stewart—they accused one another at the station, and on Williams I found this foreign coin.

JOHN SMITH re-examined. This is my foreign coin—I was a little in liquor—I did not give her any money for liquor, that 1 know of—I did not see any liquor in the house.

Williams. I gave the officer that piece out of my pocket, and asked him if it Was not an American piece.

GEORGE WILLIAM GRAVE . It was taken out of her pocket by a woman at the station—she told me she did not know any thing about it, she had not been in the room—I asked her what she did in the house—she said she had as much right there as any one, she paid half the rent the day before.

JOSIAH CHAPLIN . On the 27th of April, from information, I apprehended the prisoner Stewart, and she was identified by the prosecutor.

Collins's Defence. About half-past two o'clock, on Tuesday morning, I was in the Coach and Horses—my prosecutor and the witness came, and the prosecutor called for half a pint of rum—he asked me to drink—I did—he asked me where I lived—I said, "Very near"—we all went home together, and he gave me some money to get something to drink; and when I came in White was searching the prosecutor's pocket—I said, "Come, come, I will have nothing of this," I took the clothes out of his hand, and threw them to the prosecutor, I asked him if he had got money to give me, and he gave me 5s., and then White went away.

Williams's Defence. I was not in the room till eight o'clock, when I called, and found this coin on the floor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1326

1326. FREDERICK HEWETT was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 22nd of March, a certain order for the payment of 6l. 7s., with intent to defraud Edward Pritchett and another.—2nd Count, for uttering the same with the like intent.

EDWARD PRITCHETT . I live in the Strand, and am a hosier, I have known the prisoner two or three years—he has had dealings with us. On the 22nd of March he was indebted to us 1l. 4s. 6d.—it had been standing about six months—he called, and apologised for not having paid; it before, and said he would do so then if I could give him change for a small cheque—I asked what it was—he said it was 6l. 7s. 6d.—I said I would take it if he thought it would be paid—he said he had had many of the same party, and they were always paid, and he had no doubt this would—this is the cheque—I gave him the difference, and a receipt—I presented it the next morning at Sir John William Lubbock's—it purports to be drawn by William Johnson (read)—they said they had no such account.

THOMAS BRIGGS . I am clerk in the house of Messrs, Lubbock. We know no such person as the drawer of this—we never saw the prisoner before—I wrote on it at the time it was presented, "No account,"

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18370508-1327

1327. FREDERICK HEWETT was again indicted for feloniously forging, on the 13th of April, an order for the payment of 6l. 7s., with intent to defraud Henry Fownes and others.—2nd COUNT, for uttering the sme with like intent.

JAMES NUTTALL . I am in the employ of Messrs. Henry Fownes and others, glovers, Taviatock-street, Covent-garden. I have known the prisoner some years—-On the 13th of April he came to our shop, and asked if Mr. Fownes could change him a small cheque of 6l.—I sent him into the counting-house—he went in and got the change—it was paid into the bankers, and returned as having no effects.

ARABELLA FOWNES . On the 13th of April the prisoner came to our shop—I gave him 6l. 7s. for a cheque—this is it—I made no inquiry of him.

THOMAS BRIGGS . I am clerk to Lubbock and Co. This cheque was presented—it purports to be drawn by William Edmonson—we have no such person keeps cash there—I wrote on it, and returned it.

WILLIAM BOSTON . I am a City officer. I took the prisoner up from information, and detained him—on searching him, I found another cheque, with seven duplicates—after detaining him half an hour, the witness Not-all came to the watch-house, and produced this cheque, which, he said, the prisoner gave to Messrs. Fownes to change (read.)

HENRY FOWNES . Our firm is, "Henry Fownes and others"—-there are two others.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Life.

Reference Number: t18370508-1328

1328. JOHN M'KANNICK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May, 1 hat, value 4s. 6d., the goods of William James Stevenson.

DANIEL REEVES . I am in the service of Mr. William James Stevenson, who fives in Ratcliffe-high way. I heard a jerk at the door, like the cutting or breaking of a string—I looked, and saw the prisoner with this bat in his hand—I jumped over the counter, and said, "Holloa, what are you about?"—I stopped him, pushed him into the shop, and gave charge of him.

Cross-examined by MR. JERNINGHAM. Q. What time was this? A.

About half-past nine o'clock, there were no persons within ten or fifteen yards of the door—there is my mark in this hat—it was tied round with a string, and then tied to a nail.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Weeks.

Reference Number: t18370508-1329

1329. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May, 10 yards of woollen cloth, value 6l.; and 1 wooden stand, value 6d.; the goods of Frederick William Lee.

JAMES SQUIRE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Frederick William Lee, of Holborn, a tailor and draper. On the 12th of May, I tied this woollen cloth to the stand—I put it at the door—about a quarter after eight o'clock in the morning I was in the shop—a man came in and asked for some patterns for trowsers—he bought nothing—a person directly came in and said we had lost a piece of cloth from the door, and the man had run away—I went to the door, and saw the prisoner walking across the road with it under his arm—I called, "Stop thief"—he threw it down, and ran off—I pursued him down Southampton-buildings till he was caught—I gave charge of him—I only lost sight of him just at the turn of the corner, and then I was close behind him—this is my master's property.

Prisoner. He said before he did not see me throw it down.

MARY LANGMAN . I saw the prisoner standing at Mr. Lee's door, looking into the shop—I was within two yards of the door when the prisoner tool this cloth and stand, and went off with it—Mr. Lee's man came out, and he threw it down into the gutter—I caught it, and kept it till Mr. Lee's man came back—I had seen the prisoner fire minutes before he took it.

Prisoner. You said you only saw me throw it down, and now you say you saw me take it. Witness. I did see you take it.

WILLIAM LAPWORTH . I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner. I saw a man going across the road—he had this under his arm—he threw it down, and this woman caught it—it was a man with a blue coat on.

GUILTY . † Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1330

1330. ROBERT ABRAHAM was indicated for embezzlement.

MR. JERNINGHAM conducted the Prosecution.

ROBERT DUNCAN . I am clerk to Messrs. John and Alfred Blyth, engineers, of Fore-street, Limehouse. I have known the prisoner thirteen months—he has been employed by Messrs. Blyth to go on errands, and clean the office—on Saturday last, the 6th of May, I desired him to go to Mr. Stronger for 2l. worth of copper—we are in the habit, on Saturday of sending there for 50l.—he always went for it—I desired him to say, that in the course of a short time I should send over the cheque, and for him to bring the rest—the prisoner brought in the copper, and said in half an hour the rest of the change would be ready—I did not see him again that day—I inquired for him about the time that he had said he was to have gone for the rest of the change, and he had absconded.

MARY ANN HEWITT . I attended to the bar at Mr. Stronger's, the David and Harp, in Fore-street, Limehouse. On Saturday, the 6th of May, the prisoner came to our house about ten minutes before three o'clock—he had been in the habit of coming for change—he said he wanted 2l. worth of coppers—I gave them to him, and told him to come in a short time and the other change would be ready—he came again, and I gave him 48l.—I asked him for the cheque—he said Mr. Blyth was not in the way, but as

soon as he was the cheque would be sent—he did not bring the cheque—I did not see him afterwards—they sent another lad as he was not in the way.

COURT. Q. Did he want this 48l. on account of his master, Mr. Blyth? A. Yes, and I parted with it under that supposition, as he usually had it before.

WILLIAM CLEAVER (police-sergeant A 3.) I was on duty at Astley's Theatre on Monday night, the 8th of May—in consequence of a handbill I arserted the prisoner in the pit—he had another boy with him, and two prostitutes—I fixed on the prisoner from his haying lost his arm, which he attempted to conceal, and at the end of the first act I went and asked him his name—he would not tell me—I found on him a blue bag with twenty-two sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, two shillings, and two silk handkerchiefs—I asked him where the rest of the money was—he told me he did not know, at some one had nailed it from him—I asked him his name again in the station-house—he said I should know it in the morning, what was the odds about his name.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1331

1331. EDWARD WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April, 3 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, 6 half-crowns, 15 shillings, and 20 sixpences; the monies of John Walker.

JOHN WALKER . I am a cheesemonger, and deal in Newgate-market. I have known the prisoner there as a porter—I bought three pigs of Mr. Deadman on the morning of the 1st of April—the prisoner used to bring home my pigs for four months—he came to me that morning, and brought eight which I had bought, and he said that three were not paid for—he said Mr. Deadman had put the three by for me—I said "Take the money back to your master, tell him to pay Mr. Deadman and send me the change—he went back with the horse and cart—I gave him four sovereigns, and 2l. in silver—I saw no more of him till I apprehended him on the 27th of April.

JOSEPH DEADMAN . I am a salesman in Newgate-market. On the 1st of April, I put by three pigs for Mr. Walker—the prisoner never brought the money—I did not see him till he was taken.

RICHARD COOPER . I am a carrier. I went to Mr. Deadman for these pigs—they were not paid for—I sent the prisoner to tell Mr. Walker to send the money—he came back, and said Mr. Walker would come and pay for them in a few minutes—I saw no more of him.

WILLIAM PENNY . I took the prisoner—he told me he absconded be-cause he had lost a sovereign, and that he came back into the neighbourhood to be apprehended.

Prisoner. That is the truth—I lost part of the money—I brought back the horse and cart, and went away.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1332

1332. WILLIAM DOUGHTY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April, 1 gun, value 4l. 10s.; and 1 gun case, value 10s.; the goods of John Goodwill.

JOHN GRAY (police-constable C 164.) On the 18th of April, at half-past ten o'clock at night, I was in New-street, St. James's, and saw the prisoner come out of the Cock public-house—he proceeded on, and I followed him—he returned—I stopped him, and asked what he had got—I laid my hand on the end of this gun, and he threw it down and ran away—I pursued and took him—I asked him what he was going to do with this—he said to take it to Wardour-street—he then said a gentleman gave him a shilling to carry it.

JOHN GOODWILL . I live in Wardour-street, and am an engraver. This is my gun—it was safe in my shop on the 11th of April—I do not know when it was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1333

1333. ISAIAH LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April, 720 yards of india rubber web, value 7l. 10s.; 7 leaden weights, value 2s.; 6 wooden quills, value 9d.; and 11 bobbins, value 1s. 11d. the goods of Daniel Truste, his master.

DANIEL TRUSTE . I am a brace and belt maker. I hired the prisoner as a weaver—he came and said he wanted work—he called again, and I set him to work—I gave him half-a-crown a day, I gave him 18lbs. of india rubber and cotton to weave for me—he returned me 11lbs.—then I gave him 16lbs. more, and when I went to his place, he bad cut it all out and taken it away—I lost 720 yards of india rubber web, seven weights, eleven bobbins, and two quills.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a policeman. I received information from a man named Cottrell—I went to a shop in Brook-street, Holborn, and the master of the shop gave me this web and this cotton.

JOHN COTTRELL . I am an india rubber web Weaver. On the 10th of April, Mr. Truste called and told me he had been robbed—I went to the workshop, and found the warps, ready-made work, add raw materials were all taken away—we went to the prisoner's father, but could not find him—on the 22nd of April, I went to Mr. Godby's, in Holborn, and saw this, which I believe is the prosecutor's property.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see the loom in a right state? Witness. yes, ten days before—you had ten leads at work then, and there were three when I went with Mr. Truste.

JOHN PAGE . I went to the prisoner's house on the 9th of April—he said he was going to move the next morning to Ratcliffe-highway—he said he had got some web to sell for five shillings—I said it was worth a guinea—he said he was going to take the loom away the next morning.

THOMAS GODBY . I live in Holborn, and am a brace manufacturer. This property was brought to my house by the prisoner—I bought it of him—I did not buy the raw materials—he had applied about three weeks before, to ask me if I would buy some web, as he was going to make some, and I bought some, but I told him he had spoiled it in making.

DANIEL TRUSTE . I found this at Mr. Godby's—it is my property—I sent the prisoner three weeks before to Mr. Godby with some other web, different to this, and he brought that back—I never saw this, only in the loom.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not make this work at a contract price? A. You said you would make it for ten shillings, and you drew thirteen—you had the odd money, because you said you would let me have 820 yards—I hired the loom for him to work, the value of the loom was 4l. or 5l.; he took that and all away.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by the prosecutor to purchase some materials, and was to weave it into brace web—there were 10lbs. of warp, 3lbs. of shute, and 3lbs. of india rubber—I applied for an advance of money which was refused me, and I certainly did sell the articles, but it did not weigh so much as I am indicted for.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1334

1334. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March, I watch-key, value 15s., the goods of Noah Deacon, from his person.

NOAH DEACON . I am servant at the Northumberland Arms, Bittlebridge. On the 10th of March I was sitting at the table making out my bills—the prisoner was sitting near me—I had a gold key attached to my watch, on a ring sewn to a ribbon—it was cut from the ribbon—I missed it in the course of a few minutes—there were many other persons there, but the prisoner was the only one near me—I spoke to him, and one or two others, but could get no information of it—I saw him again nearly every day after—he came to me a fortnight ago, and said if I would give him 10s., he would return the property to me—I told the policeman, and he took him, and found the duplicate of the key on him—this is my key.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Is this tavern well frequented? Yes—on that afternoon there might be a dozen or more there—I was at my books ten minutes or a quarter of an hour—I missed the key directly I got up—part of the time my fellow-servant was on the opposite side—the prisoner was the nearest to me—I said I had lost the key, and the prisoner went away almost directly—he said if I would give 10s. he would return the key to me again—that was rather better than a fortnight ago—I had no suspicions of any body at first—I afterwards suspected him—I do not think any one went in and out while 1 sat there—I cannot be certain there was no woman—I was at Foster's house last Sunday morning—I told them no more than 1 have said here—I did not tell any body I did not believe the prisoner was the man.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am a policeman, I was called in to take the prisoner, and found this duplicate on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he go quietly with you? A. Yes—he has been about the neighbourhood.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Exmouth-street. This key was pawned by a woman, and then the interest was paid by some man on the 29th of April—I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not—this is the duplicate given for it.

MR. HORRY called

THOMAS FOSTER . I live in Weston-street, Pentonville, I never spoke to the prosecutor till last Sunday morning—when I asked him about the transaction of William Smith, whether he thought he was the person who cut it off—he said no, he did not think he was, because he was not the only person that cat beside him, and he should have been the last person, that he suspected had had it, or even the ticket, if he had not said, If you will give me 10s., I will return it"—he said he had got his fellow-servant to go out to see if he could see William Smith, to tell him him to keep out of the way, as his master intended to have him taken up—he said he had the key cut off, by whom he could pretty well guess, but he did not think it was William Smith.

COURT. Q. What are you? A. A brass, steel, and ivory-turner—I have worked for Mr. Bailey, of Fleet-street—the prisoner is related to me by marriage—I introduced myself to the prosecutor, and then he told me this of his own accord—all the information I got was from questions put to him.

MRS. FOSTER. I am the wife of Thomas Foster. I saw Noah Deacon on Sunday morning—he said he did not think that William Smith took the key, but he thought he knew who did take it, and he did not wish to do any thing to William Smith.

JAMES LAWRENCE . I am a carpenter, living in Penton-place. The prisoner has been in my employ for sixteen or seventeen years at different times—last Sunday fortnight or three weeks, I went into the Northumber land Arms to get half-a-pint of ale, and Mrs. Greenwood, the landlady, was fretting about something—she said the pot-boy had lost his gold key—the prosecutor was there—he said he had lost it, and did not know how.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Three Months.

OLD COURT.—Monday, May 15th 1837.

Third Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370508-1335

1335. EDWARD SKINNER and GEORGE YOUNG were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Usher, on the 8th of May, at St. Luke, Chelsea, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 pair of boots, value 5s., his goods.

ALFRED USHER . I am nine years old, and live with my mother, who keeps a shop in Chelsea-market—my father does not live in the house. On the 8th of May, about three o'clock, I went into the shop from the parlour—I saw the two prisoners outside the window, which was open—I had seen it shut about half-past two o'clock—I did not see them open it—when I first saw them, they had got one boot out, and were trying to get another, but could not—they had it half way out—I went to the door and they ran away—I told my mother, and she came out—Skinner was brought in in about half an hour—I have known the prisoners for about a year.

SARAH USHER . I am the wife of Joseph Usher—I keep a shoemaker's shop in Chelsea-market, in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea. I heard my son call out, and went to the shop—I found the window half open—I had seen it shut a very few minutes before—it is a double-sash window, and can be opened from the outside—it was lifted about a foot and a half—I missed one woman's boot from the window—the fellow one was on the ledge, halfway out—I had seen the boots in front of the window about a quarter of an hour before—the second boot was entirely removed from where it was before.

JAMES BRADLEY (police-constable B 134.) On the afternoon of the 8th of May I was in Jew's-row, Chelsea—I apprehended Skinner, and took him to the prosecutrix, and her son said he was the boy—I took Young after-wards—I told him it was for stealing the boots from Chelsea market—he denied it—(1 had met him previously, but did not take him)—when we got to the station-house he said the boot was hid in Chelsea College field, covered over with tin—I went there and found it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SKINNER*— GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Year in the Penitentiary, and then Transported for Seven Years.

YOUNG— GUILTY . Aged 13.

Reference Number: t18370508-1336

1336. JOHN BOARD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May, at St. Mary, Matfelon, alias Whitechapel, 1 mare, price 1s.; 1 cabriolet, value 10l.; and 1 set of harness, value 1l.; the property of Benjamin Whitehead.

JEREMIAH RASHBROOK . I am a cab driver, in the employ of Benjamin

Whitehead, of Holywell-lane, Shoreditch. On Sunday night, the 30th of April, about twenty minutes to twelve o'clock, I left my cab on the stand, with the mare in the shafts, in Whitechapel—I went to get something to drink at a public-house opposite, and was absent about ten minutes—on my return the mare and cab were gone—I went on Monday to Flying Horse-yard, Lambeth-street, which is a very little way from Whitechapel, and found the cab there—I went the same morning, with the policeman, to the Green-yard, Colchester-street, and found the mare there, about 300 yards from the stand—the policeman found the bridle—my cab is marked M.

CHARLES BANNISTER . I live in York-row, Hackney. I was waterman on the Whitechapel coach stand on the 30th of April, and heard a cab drive off—I applied for my halfpenny to the man who was in the cab—he said he had got none, and drove off—I thought he was the regular driver—I know nothing of the prisoner.

ROBERT KEWTON . I am in the employ of Benjamin Whitehead, I know the rein belongs to this cab and horse—I have it here—it is different to any other we have in the house.

JOSEPH RIPON . I am a cab driver and live in Lambeth-street, Whitechapel. On the night of the 30th of April I was with my cab on the Whitechapel rank—the prisoner came up, and I asked him what he was doing there—he said he was out buck for letter M—that means a man who goes out with the cab while the regular driver rests—I asked him which cab, and he pointed out letter M—I saw him drive that cab off—it was about half-past twelve o'clock as near as I can recollect—it is regular to drive away without a fare sometimes.

JOHN MANTLE (police-constable H 72.) Early on Monday morning, the 1st of May, I saw the prisoner in Phoenix-street, Brick-lane, with a set of harness, a cushion, and nose bag—he had the collar round his neck, and the rest in his arms dragging along the ground—I went up to him and asked where he was going—he appeared much intoxicated, and said he was going to York-street, and asked me to help them on his shoulder—I did so, and again asked where he was going—he said to Whitechapel, and then said to Commercial-road—I said he must go to the station-house with me—I asked him where the cab and horse were—he said he did not know—I asked him where the cobman was—he said he was drunk and had given him the cab to mind, that he had taken off the harness, and was going to take it home to take care of it—when he found I was going to take him, he dropped them on the ground.

Prisoner. At the first examination he said I said I lived in York-street—he has added two addresses since.

GIBBS LEEDS (police-constable H 100.) Early en Monday morning the 1st of May, I saw a horse coming down Little Harris-street, without any harness—I took it to the Green-yard in Colchester-street—I afterwards went to the Flying Horse-yard and found a cab—Rashbrook claimed the horse and cab.

JOHN RASHBROOK re-examined. This harness was on the horse—I know nothing of the prisoner—I was not drunk, and gave nobody my cab to take care of.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated, and was going home, when a man met me with a set of harness and accosted me—we walked together some way—we drank together, and he asked me to carry the

harness a little way while he stopped for a particular purpose—I walked on unthinkingly, and the policeman took me.

GUILTY of larceny only. Aged 23.— Transported for Seven, Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1338

1338. JOHN LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April, 12 spoons, value 2l.; 1 pair of sugar tongs, value 7s.; 2 rings, value 15s.; 3 yards of woollen cloth, value 9s.; 1 waist buckle, value 1s.; 1 trunk, value 1s.; 1 book, value 6d.; and 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; the goods of Thomas Smail.—3 other COUNTS, stating them to belong to various persons; to which he pleaded.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 43.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Ten Days.

Reference Number: t18370508-1339

1339. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1340

1340. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for an assault with intent to ravish.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be a common assault.

GUILTY on the Second Count. Aged 49.— Confined Nine Months.

NEW COURT.—Monday, May 15th, 1837.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370508-1341

1341. THOMAS HOPE was indicted for a misdemeanor.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18370508-1342

1342. ANN DUKES was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

ELIZA HOCHER . I am barmaid to Mr. Bradford, who keeps the William the Fourth, in Beauchamp-street, Leather-lane. On the 17th of April, about half-past two o'clock, the prisoner came for half a pint of beer—I served her—it came to 1d.—she offered me a bad sixpence—I took it into the parlour and bit it in halves—I told her it was bad, and gave it to Mr. Bradford—he told her, if he was well enough, he would give her in charge, as he knew that she had passed bad money before, and she had swallowed two bad shillings about a fortnight before—she said nothing, but appeared confused—she gave me a good shilling.

JOHN BRADFORD . Eliza Hocher came to me about a six pence—she put it on the counter—I took it up myself—I bit one half in two again, and then put them on the shelf, where the casks were standing—when I came in and saw the prisoner I recollected her as passing a bad shilling at my house, and I then watched her to another, and she swallowed two shillings at that time—I told her of it—she seemed confused, and said she was not the person—Ayres, who was there, followed her by my desire.

ANN WILLIS . I am the wife of Mr. Willis, who keeps the White Swan, in Farringdon-street. On the 17th of April, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came with another woman—she called for a pint of beer, which came to 2d.—she gave me a bad sixpence—I broke it, and threw the pieces on the counter—she then gave me a good sixpence—Moss, Ayres, and another man came in, and took possession of the broken sixpence—my husband marked it—she was taken into custody—I had seen her about a fortnight or three weeks before.

WILLIAM AYRES . I live in Baldwin's-place. I was at Mr. Bradford's—

he desired me to follow the prisoner—she went down Leather-lane and Brook-street, and then joined another woman—they crossed the road, and went down Castle-street, Chancery-lane, and to Farringdon-street—I saw the prisoner go into the house of Ann Willis and offer a sixpence—Stace, the constable, and Moss were with me—we all went in, Stace took the sixpence and the prisoner, and the other woman was taken, but she was discharged.

JAMES STACE . I am a constable. On the 17th of April I saw the prisoner in Chichester-rents, Chancery-lane, about three o'clock, with another woman—Ayres was following them—I them joined, and went to Mr. Willis—on my entering, the prisoner put something into hermouth, which, on my trying to get out, appeared to me to be a sixpence—she bit me, and I could not get it from her.

ROBERT MOSS (City police-constable 16.) I have these pieces of a sixpence, which I got from Bradford.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint. These are both counterfeit, and from the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18370508-1343

1343. RICHARD JEFFERYS and GEORGE DARRAH were indicted for a misdemeanor.

MR. ELLIS conducted the Prosecution.

MARY ANN HANSON . I live with my brother, John Hanson; he keeps the King's Head, King-street, Old-street-road. On the 12th of April, about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock, Darrah came in and called for a glass of rum, and while I was serving him a knock came at the door, and Jefferys and a female came in—Darrah asked the female what she would take to drink—she said, "A drop of rum"—I served her with 11/2d. worth, for which Jefferys offered a crown-piece—our man Richard nodded to me—I gave him the crown and sent him with it to my brother to get change—he went to my brother in my presence—Darrah then said there was not the least occasion to change a crown-piece, as he had got a shilling—he gave me a good shilling, and I gave him change—Richard came back and brought the crown-piece, which Jeffery took, put into his pocket, and took away.

EDWARD MORRIS . I keep the Marquis of Cornwallis, Curtain-road. My wife is dangerously ill. On the 12th of April the prisoners came into our house—I followed them, from what I heard from my wife, and a female who was with them, to Mr. Golding, the Jacob's Well, New-inn-yard, about half a quarter of a mile—this was about a quarter to twelve o'clock—I saw Mrs. Golding putting a crown into the till—I cautioned her—she took it out of the till, and said, "This is a bad one"—one of them took it and instantly changed it for another—I called the landlord, and he said, "This is a good crown," and one of them said, "Show it to that gentleman"—I said it was a Very good one, and he let them go.

MARY GOLDING . My husband keeps the Jacob's Well. I saw both the prisoners there on the 12th of April, about ten minutes before twelve o'clock—the two prisoners came in first, and a woman after they ware in—they called for some gin—I do not know which of them—they had three small glasses at one penny each—I do not know which offered payment—one of the prisoners put down a crown-piece—it was a good one, and the other said he would pay for it, he had a sixpence—he put down half-a-sovereign, the other said it was not worth changing his half-sovereign, he would change his crown-piece, and then he put down a bad

one—I put that crown into the till—Morris came at that time to the side-door, and pointed to the till—I then took the crown out of the till, and told them it was bad—I am sure it was the one they gave—the other one put down three penny-pieces, and produced a good crown—he asked my husband to look at it, and they went away.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What day was this? A. Wednesday, the 12th of April—it is a month ago—it was ten minutes before twelve o'clock—we were shutting up.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Were you examined before the Justice? A. Yes—I gave both the crowns back—they both went to the same person.

MR. ELLIS. Q. Was that the person who offered them in the first instance? A. Yes.

MARY HUNTER . I am the wife of James William Hunter, of Longalley, Moorfields; he keeps the Dial. On the 12th of April, I saw both the prisoners—Jefferys first came to the bar for 11/2d. worth of gin—I served him—he paid me a crown-piece, which was good—I did not see the other till I was giving change, then Darrah asked for a small glass of gin—I served him—it came to a penny—I tried the crown, and am confident it was good—I was getting the change, when Jefferys said he had sufficient to pay me—I handed over the good crown to him, and he gave me back a bad one, saying he had not sufficient change to pay—he said he would give me another—I handed it to my husband, and desired him to cut it in two—Jefferys said he would not have it done—it was handed to Plume.

WILLIAM PLUME . I am a plumber. I saw the prisoners on the 12th of April, about a quarter or twenty minutes past twelve o'clock, at Hunter's house—Jefferys called for a glass of gin, and tendered a crownpiece—Mrs. Hunter had not sufficient change in the till) and was about to put her hand into her pocket—he said, "Never mind, I have some change"—she gave him the crown-piece back, and he said, "I have not got change"—he then gave her another crown, which she handed to her husband, who passed it to me—I marked it—Lucking was there—I passed it into his hands—at that time the other prisoner passed between me and Jefferys, and I suppose the good crown was passed to the other prisoner—he took the second crown from his right-hand pocket, and placed the other in his left-hand pocket—I showed it to Lucking, but I had marked it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. He placed the good one in his left-hand pocket? A. Yes, after he took it back, and then he produced the other from his right pocket—the bad one was kept—I was standing at the bar with a few friends—I have been foreman to Mr. Garner for four-teen years—I have been a witness once before at Bury St. Edmunds, in a case similar to this—I was then about 13 or 14 years old—that was the only time—it is 18 or 19 years ago.

THOMAS LUCKING . I was at the Dials, and I got a crown-piece—I took it into the parlour, and marked it, and gave it back to Plume—it was the one I got from him.

WILLIAM PLUME re-examined. I gave it to the policeman at the station-house.

JOHN LANE (police-constable G 212.) I was called in on the 12th of April, and took the prisoner—I got this crown-piece from Mr. Hunter—I marked it, and gave it him again; and when I got to the station I received it from Plume—I found on Jefferys 6s. 3d., all good; on Darrah 7s. 1d.—I did not find a good crown—Darrah gave the name of White at the station—I cannot positively say what name the other gave.

MR. FIELD. This is a counterfeit crown.

COURT to WILLIAM PLUME. Q. Where was the women? A. She followed them all the way to the station—they were searched in the station, not in the room.

JEFFERYS— GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined One Year.

DARRAH— GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Six Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1344

1344. WILLIAM RIDLEY was indicted for a misdemeanor.

ELIZABETH MARY TANSLEY . I am eleven years old; my father is a shoemaker. On the 26th of April the prisoner came to our shop for twopenny worth of eggs—I told him he could have three for 2 1/4d.—he took them, and offered me a shilling—I said I could not give him change—he said he would go to the public-house and get it—he came back almost directly, and said he could not get change, and he would have more eggs—he took nine in all, and a halfpenny-worth of milk, and I gave him 4 3/4d. change out of the shilling—I put the shilling into the till—I am sure the prisoner is the person.

AMELIA TANSLEY . I am mother of the last witness. I got a shilling from her, which I gave the officer—I saw the prisoner on the 30th of April; when he came for 4d. worth of eggs, and offered me a sixpence—I said it was bad, and gave him into custody—I said I thought he was the same man—he said he was not.

ALEXANDER CONINGSBY (police-constable B 150.) On the 30th of April I took the prisoner—I found nothing on him—I asked him if he knew any thing of the shilling—he said he recollected going there on the Wednesday or Thursday, but he did not know the shilling was bad, he knew the sixpence was bad, and he had the two pieces from his brother.

MR. FIELD. These are both counterfeit.

GUILTY .* Aged 15.— Confined Six Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1345

1345. THOMAS OLIVER, JAMES BIRCH , and HARRIET WOOD , were indicted for a misdemeanor.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a constable of St. Ann's, Westminster. On the 24th of April I went to No. 34, St. Ann-street, Westminster, a little after twelve o'clock—Hall, Duke, and Ashton were with me—the streetdoor being open, I proceeded up stairs to the first floor, followed by Ashton and Hall—I found the room door fastened, and I tried to open it, but could not—Ashton broke the pannel of the door; and, with the assistance of Hall, we broke the door open—I found the bedstead placed against the door, and I saw Oliver shoving against the bedstead—I saw Birch run from a table to the fire-place, and with his left hand he put something into a pipkin on the fire, there being a brisk fire at the time; he had in his right hand this hammer, which he put into the pot, and it has now some white metal on it—at that instant I secured Birch, and put him into one corner of the room—after the other officers had secured the other prisoners, I and Ashton began searching the premises—I took off the fire a pipkin nearly full of metal, in a fluid state—that was the pipkin that I saw Birch put something into a cupboard by the side of the fire—I found part of a mould, the impression being scraped off—I took a knife off the table which I have left at home—the prisoners were taken to the office in a coach—Ashton was inside the coach with me—Birch began a conversation with me, he said "Mr. Powell knows us very well, but he never had us

for smashing," meaning passing counterfeit coin—I said, "You are engaged in a very bad business"—his answer to that was "Yes, it is no use our denying it to you, it is our living. I had rather such men as you came, than the Broadway people, for we shall have the truth from you"—while we were in the room, 1 saw Ashton turn some dirty water out of a pail, and in the pail he found three crown-pieces, with some small pieces of plaster of Paris mould—they were put on the hob to dry, being in a wet state—on one of the pieces I saw the date of 1818.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where were you when you saw Birch do something? A. Getting in at the room door—the door was broken all to pieces—the bedstead was shoved away—we went to the room from information we had received.

WILLIAM BAKER ASHTON (police-sergeant G 11.) I accompanied Reynolds, and followed him up stairs—we attempted the door several times, and found we could not get in—I burst one of the pannels in, and got my head and arm in—I saw the bedstead against the door—Oliver had got his back against the bedstead, and his feet against the table, which was against the wall on the other side, pushing against it. I saw the prisoner Wood in a stooping position before the fire, trampling hard on something—I saw Birch take a quantity of crown-pieces and smaller coin from the table, and put it into a pipkin on the fire—I Found we could not get in,—I asked Reynolds to lend me his pistol, Which he did, and 1 said to the person inside, "I see what you are doing; if you do not desist this instant, I will blow your brains out"—the woman said, "It is too late, you are too late"—and Birch said, "Now let the b——s in, Tom, it is all right"—the door and frame and all then gave way, and we all got in headlong—the prisoners were secured—on a chest of drawers in the corner of the room, I found these four metal spoons, and on the hob these two small files, apparently with white metal in the teeth of them—there was a pail containing dirty water, tea leaves, and other filth, which I poured into a tub, and found in the pail these three crown-pieces in an unfinished state, and these three pieces of mould in a very wet state—I saw some letters on them, the letter G in particular—I placed them on the hob to dry, and while so engaged, with my back to the prisoners, Birch made a rush, though he was handcuffed, and, got the three pieces of mould and put them in his mouth—as soon as he had spat some of it out, he said, "It is all right, that has saved the bellowsing, "meaning transportation for life—when we were in the coach, a person in the street called out "What have they got you for?"—Oliver answered, "Only for four bulls; it is that b——y old Ross put them upon us—I had an order for 3l. to go into the country."

Cross-examined. Q. Was Reynolds in the coach with you? A. Yes—I do not know that I stated before that Oliver said, "Let the b——s in"—if we had stated all the language they made use of, it would fill eight or ten foolscap sheets.

WILLIAM HALL . I have heard the evidence—it is correct—Oliver said it was his room, and his landlord was at the chandler's shop next door.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer. I have heard the evidence, it is correct—I followed into the room, and secured Oliver with his coat and waistcoat oil", and his shirt-sleeves turned up—Oliver first accused Birch of bringing us to the house—Birch turned, and said to me, "Have you ever seen me before?"—I said, "No, certainly not"—when the crowns were found, Oliver said to Birch, "I thought you had put every thing away"—

Birch said, "I thought I had; I put 3l. into the pot; and it is my fault, for I told you to let them in"—Birch then spat something out of his mouth, and asked leave to wash his mouth, which was granted, and he said, "Now, Tom, have not I done my part? I did not wish to be transported"—I found some metal, and some moulds.

RICHARD WOODWARD , I am agent to the landlord of the house. I always received the rent from Wood—I have seen Birch there.

MR. FIELD. These three crowns are counterfeit, cast in white metal, in the same mould and in an unfinished state—they appear to have been suddenly cooled when hot, by being thrown into water—these spoons are of the same metal as the crowns—these are all implements applicable to coining.

Cross-examined. Q. I apprehend these crowns are not in a state in which any person would take them? A. No. they require some further operation—they are just in the state in which they came out of the mould, and have some metal which should be removed with a file.

COURT. Q. Do they resemble, or apparently resemble, the King's current coin? A. They do; the mould in which they were cast has been made by a good crown-piece.

Oliver's Defence. I had not been in the house half an hour, and Birch had not been there two minutes—I bad nothing to do with the room.

OLIVER— GUILTY .

BIRCH— GUILTY .

WOOD— GUILTY .

Confined Three Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1346

1346. JOHN SMITH was indicted for perjury.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1347

1347. JANE REYNOLDS was indicted for perjury.

(No evidence was offered.)

NOT GUILTY .

ESSEX LARCENIES, &c.

Before Mr. Recorder

THOMAS CORNELL was attainted of feloniously assaulting Mary Ann Austin, with intent to do her some grievous bodily harm—see page 1.

Reference Number: t18370508-1348

1348. PETER SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, 1 sack, value 2s.; and 1 1/2 bushel of oats, value 5s.; the goods of James Butler, his master.

JOSEPH HOUSE . I am foreman to Mr. James Butler, of Aldborough Hatch, Essex. The prisoner was also in his employ—on the morning of the 8th of April I saw him come out of master's granary with a sack partly full of oats—he placed it under a truss of straw, which was going in a cart to market—he had no business to take it—he had the allowance for bid horses in the nose-bags—I saw master, and told him what had happened.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What time of day was he to go to town with the straw? A. In the morning, about six o'clock—I was up—I had given him directions to take the straw over night—I did not speak to him in the morning—I was moving about the yard—I do not know whether he knew I was up—we were both in the yard—I have no doubt he saw me—I examined the nose-bags over night not in the morning.

JAMES BUTLER . I am a farmer, living at Aldborough Hatch, Essex. House gave me information—I went and was the cart on the road,

before it got to Ilford—the prisoner was with it—I told him he had got something on the cart which he ought not to have, and to get up and throw it down—he got up, but would not look for it—I got up, and threw down the sack, with about a bushel and a half of oats in it—he had no business with it—he had the nose-bags and a bundle of hay for the horses.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you look into the nose-bags? A. I did not—I let him go on his journey to town, because I had not another man to send—he returned very late in the evening, very tipsy, and was taken into custody—I thought him a very steady man when he was at another farm of mine, but then he had no means of robbing me—we never allow our men to take a sack with clean oats—there were three horses, and there was a nose-bag for each horse—I live about nine miles from town.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a constable of Barking. On the 13th of April I went to a public-house, and took the prisoner into custody—I told him Mr. Butler had given information of his robbing him on the 8th of April—he said it was a bad job, he must make the best he could of it.

MR. BUTLER. The oats in the granary are of the same description as those found in the sack.

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1349

1349. CHRISTOPHER WHITE LANDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April, 1 collar, value 12s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 1l. 3s.; 7 scarfs, value 8s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 7s.; 17 3/4 yards of lace, value 12s.; 28 yards of ribbon, value 1l. 6s.; 19 yards of printed cotton, value 16s.; 4 1/2 yards of muslin de laine, value 9s.; 8 yards of printed muslin, value 1l. 5s.; and 34 yards of silk, value 6l. 2s.; the goods of William Turner and another, his masters;to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370508-1350

1350. THOMAS BURLEY and WILLIAM PERRY were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April, 20lbs. weight of potatoes, value 1s. 2d.; and 3 eggs, value '3d.; the goods of Charles Burrell, their master.

JOHN PEGRUM . I am in the service of Mr. Charles Burrell, at Low Hill farm, Walthamstow. The prisoners were his labourers, and lived in Marsh-street, close by—On Sunday morning, the 30th of April, they had been down to feed the cattle—I saw them coming out of the yard, with each a basket full—I suspected something was wrong, as they did not come the usual way from the yard, but jumped over the hedge—I went round and met them, and asked what they had in the baskets—they did not give me a satisfactory answer—I stopped Perry, and found some potatoes and three eggs in his basket—Burley walked on—I called after him, and found he had got potatoes in his basket—I am certain they were my master's—they had been in a shed which was locked up, and there was a board which was taken down—they had 20lbs. of potatoes, as near as can be—they are a sort of blue potatoes—I saw them come out of the yard, from the shed.

BURLEY— GUILTY . Aged 30.

PERRY— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1351

1351. DANIEL HARDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, 1 bushel of oats, value 3s., the goods of Richard Payze, his master; and JAMES SPARKS for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

RICHARD PAYZE . I am a corn-factor and farmer, residing at Layton-stone, in Essex. The prisoner Harden was in my employ—I observed that my horses looked particularly thin in April, and searched my corn bin, with my son, on Thursday morning, April 20th, about eleven o'clock—it has a division—one part was empty, the other had a sack in it—there are two keys to it, one kept by Harden, and one by myself—about a bushel of oats was in the sack, some white and some black—I measured them—I marked the sack, with a pencil, with two crosses on the letter "P"—the bin was locked up again, leaving the sack in it, as it was before—next morning we found a part of the white oats that had been given for the horses on the evening before by my son, but the sack was gone—I went to Harden, and asked what he had done with the oats that were in the sack the morning before—he said he bad shot them into the bin with the others, and part he had given to his horses—when I saw these oats the second time in the bin, I did not find any black oats there—we went to Hudson's—we did not find any thing there—we went to Sparks's with a search warrant, knowing they were intimate—the constable found about the same quantity of oats as I had lost, and exactly the same sort, in a corn bin in Sparks's stable—he was in the yard—the constable asked if he would allow him to look over his premises, as Mr. Payze had lost something—he said, "Yes"—when he found the oats, he asked if they were mine—I said they were—he then said to Sparks, "This is a bad job; how did yap come by these?"—he said, "I don't know; I have not bought any"—he said he hoped Mr. Payze would not hurt him, but look over it—I have since seen the sack—I observed the same description of oats sticking to the sack as those found at Sparks's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many horses have you? A. Ten—we have no stint for hay, they have what they please, and each horse has two bushels of corn in the week—the oats are here—it is not common with me to have them mixed in the way they are—I never see them so—I cannot say how often I have seen them mixed together.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When you went to the house of Sparks, you had no search warrant? A. No, and he readily gave us leave to search—he said he did not know how the oats came there, and he had not purchased any—he said he hoped Mr. Payze would look over it, and would not hurt him—he did not say "if they were his oats," nor any thing like it—there were nearly a bushel—he lives from two hundred and fifty to three hundred yards from me—they were white Irish oats, with a few black ones—I do not know that they were mixed—they were about one quality—the black oats were English—I do not know that all the white oats were bought by me as Irish—the Irish oats are rather of a different colour—that is the whole distinction, as far as I know of—I do not know that there is any difference in the size—I believe there is not—I did not mix the oats at all—they had been shot into the bin; first black, and then white—we had sometime previously been feeding with black ones, and the white were shot on the top of them—they were not mixed on purpose—in the sample I have brought there is a very small proportion of black.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not say, when you saw them first at Mr. Sparks's, that they were like your oats? A. I said they were like my oats and I added, "and they are my oats."

MR. PAYNE. Q. How many horses are under the care of Harden? A.

Three—the bushel of oats I saw in the bin would be more than enough for the noon meal of these horses—when oats are sold mixed, there is generally a larger proportion of black than in those I found.

RICHARD PAYZE, JUN . I am the prosecutor's son. On the 20th of last month I examined the corn-bin, about eleven o'clock in the morning—I found about a bushel of oats in a sack, and the other part of the bin had nothing at all—I measured the oats—there was about a bushel—they were white oats, with a few black ones—Lingard, my boy, came to me about twelve o'clock, for some corn for his horses—I sent about two pints of beans to Harden by him, and told him I would give him the rest of the corn in the evening—he came to me himself in the evening—I gave him two bushels of white oats, for the rest of the week, for his three horses—I had seen the bushel of white and black in the bin at eleven o'clock, and he sent the boy at twelve o'clock—that bushel was sufficient for the noon meal of these three horses—the next morning, between eight and nine o'clock, I examined the bin, and found in it a part of the two bushels I had given him the night before, but the bushel of oats that was in the sack was gone—I should think from two to three pecks of the two bushels were gone—there was no stint of the hay and chaff—they had as much as they pleased—about a peck of oats a day is given to each horse—they feed them when they please—the quantity that was gone of those oats that I sent in the evening, together with the beans, would be sufficient for the horses' food from that noon to the Friday morning, and it was rather more than we generally give—my father did something to the sack in the bin—it was found afterwards concealed behind the bin—I was present with my father at Sparks's, and saw some oats found there—they corresponded in appearance with those I saw in the sack at my father's bin—they were the same sort—he said he did not know how they came there, he had not bought any, and he hoped Mr. Payze would not hurt him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many servants has your father? A. Three horse-keepers for the farm, and one for the corn business—we have ten horses—two bushels a week is allowed to each horse—Lingard was examined before the Magistrate, and what he said was taken down—I do not know that he was sworn.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know the stable where your father said the oats were found? A. Yes—the three horse-keepers use it.

JAMES LINGARD . I was in the employ of the prosecutor. On the 20th of April, Harden told me to ask young Mr. Payze for some corn, as he had not a morsel—I told him that, and he gave me half a bushel of beans to take to him—he said he would give him the rest at night—I took the beans to Harden.

JOSEPH ROOT . I am a constable. On Friday, the 21st, I went to Harden, but found nothing—I went to Sparks's yard, and asked leave to search his premises, which he gave me willingly—I went into the stable where his horses stand—I opened the bin, and found about a bushel of oats—I asked Mr. Payze if they were his—he said, "Yes"—I then said to Sparks, "Where did you get these?"—he said, "I do not know any thing about them, I have not bought them"—I sent for a sack, and took them—Sparks said, "Mr. Payze, I hope you will forgive me, and think nothing of it," or something similar to that.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Upon your oath was not the expression Payze made use of this, that the oats were like his? A. I do not think he did say so—I can read a little—this is my handwriting—it

says, "he said they were like his, and he believed they were his"—he owned the oats—he might say they were like his—I will not deny, it—I think it was very likely.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Look at the latter part of this paper (read it to yourself)—was not what Sparks said, that he hoped Mr. Payze would overlook it, if the oats were his? A. He did not say so—I do not recollect.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370508-1352

1352. CHARLES HOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February, 50lbs. weight of lead, value 7s. 6d., the goods of Robert Fenton, and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

ROBERT FENTON . I live at Barking side. On the 7th of February, I missed the lead from the gutter of my house—I do not know that I have seen it since.

JOHN WRIGHT . I keep the Ferry-bridge, in the parish pf Woolwich. On the 6th of March, I saw the prisoner and another sitting on a bag, waiting for a boat—I saw something in the bag—I came back into the barn—I then saw them move towards the water—I saw the name of Mann on the bag—I said you have got something here that does not belong to you—I took the bag and shot it out, and found this lead—they were both taken, and broke out of the cage at Woolwich.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Where is this Ferry-bridge house? A. Six miles from the prosecutor's—I cannot swear what day it was—I delivered the lead to the constable the same day.

GEORGE HALLOWAY . I am a constable of West Ham. On the 6th of March, Wright gave me this lead, I and Othen went-and fitted it on the prosecutor's house—it corresponded as far as I could see—there are marks on it.

Cross-examined. Q. You have examined the house since? A. Yes; the lead is cut all to pieces—it did not fit to the piece that was left to the house, but it fitted to the gutter—none, of what I have here matched it in the cut.

JAMES OTHEN . I went and fitted the lead to the gutter, it fitted exactly.

NOT GUILTY .

KENT LARCENIES, &c.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370508-1353

1353. STEPHEN HEARD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April, 1 iron bomb-shell, value 4s. 6d.; and 1 iron truck, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of our Lord the King.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of the principal officers of his Majesty's Ordnance.—3rd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of William Stace, Esq.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES M'KINNINGS . I am a gunner in the Royal Artillery stationed at Woolwich. On the 25th of last month I was on guard near the practice ground, which is about 1200 yards by 700 broad—it is fenced in, and no one is allowed to come in but those who have business there—between one and two o'clock I went my rounds, and met the prisoner near the centre of the grounds—I asked him what he wanted—he said he was looking after some old iron—I told him to go out of the premises, he had

no business there—he then went back a few paces, and took up a sack, which I observed lying in some reeds, and said it was his—he lifted the sack, and from it came a truck and a shell as he lifted it—he shot it out of his own accord—I then took him into custody, and gave him in charge to Serjeant Anson—the prisoner said he thought there was no harm in taking them away—this is the truck and shell—(looking at them)—there were some gun-carriages near where the sack was—I afterwards examined them with the serjeant, and found that one of the trucks had been taken off—I fitted this truck to it, and it corresponded—the truck had not been wheeled along—there were marks of its having been taken off of late, but no track of a wheel—it must have been carried away—these things are the property of the King, and have the broad arrow on them.

Prisoner. Q. When you came to me what was I doing? A. Walking at a very few yards from where you took the sack up—I did not see the sack at the time I first stopped him—I asked him was the sack his—he said yes, it was, and he brought it down along with me under his arm—I am certain these things came out of the sack—they were not out of my sight.

Prisoner. The ball was in the sack, but the wheel was not. Witness. They were both in the sack—he refused to carry the shell, only the sack, first of all—there was only myself there then, but when be went back and put the shell in again, there was three or four of us—I am sure I saw the truck come out of the bag.

WILLIAM CAMPION . I am a constable of Woolwich. I got the truck from M'Kinnings—I took it down into the arsenal, and there found the mark of the broad arrow—I took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1354

1354. SARAH FLETCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April, 5 plates, value 2d.; 1 towel, value 1d.; 1 bason, value 1d.; I broom, value 1s.; and 1 dish, value 3d.; the goods of William Perhouse.

ELIZABETH TOZER . I am servant to William Perhouse, a cow-keeper, in Trafalgar-row, Greenwich. On Friday, the 7th of April, at eight o'clock, I saw these articles in master's wash-house—I afterwards saw the prisoner go out of the wash-house with them—I called to one of the men in the yard to stop her, and he did so—I have since seen the articles—I know the plate and towels—the wash-house door was left open—this bason and towel I can swear to.

HENRY BOWIE . I am a labourer in the prosecutor's employ. I saw the prisoner coming out of the wash-house between nine and ten o'clock—I stopped her with five plates, a dish, a bason, towel, and bread—master sent for a policeman, and she was taken into custody.

Prisoner. I was angry from the ill-usage to me—the prosecutor dragged me into the kitchen. Witness. No he did not—there was no squabble before the policeman came.

STEPHEN MATTHEWS (police-constable R 142.) The prisoner was given into my charge by Bowie, for stealing these things—the prisoner said it was a female with a boa and a shawl had been in the place, and given them to her, and if I would let her go for five minutes, she would bring her back to me—I did not know her before, but I understand she is not very right in her mind—I have heard one of our men say so.

(The prisoner pleaded intoxication.)

(William Norris, of Greenwich, deposed to the prisoner's good character, and stated that she was not quite right in her mind.)

GUILTY. Aged 48.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Week.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370508-1355

1355. THOMAS RIGHT and THOMAS NEAT were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April, 1 boot, value 13s., the goods of George Carpenter and another;to which Right pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

GEORGE CARPENTER . I am in partnership with my father, a boot and shoemaker in London-street, Greenwich. On the 10th of April, the policeman brought a boot to our shop, which I identified—I had missed it.

GEORGE HARRIS (police-constable R 158.) On the 10th of April, met both the prisoners in London-street—I saw Neat with the boot in his right hand—I said "Halloo, where did you get that from?"—he said "He gave it to me," pointing to Right—Right said "Yes, I gate it to him, I took it off that nail," pointing to the prosecutor's shop.

Neat. Right gave me the boot, and asked me to hold it—I did not see him take it.

NEAT— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1356

1356. SARAH HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, 1 shawl, value 9d.; 1 gown, value 2s. 6d.; 1 cap, value 10d.; and 1 bed-gown, value 1s. 3d.; the goods of Sarah Adamson.

SARAH ADAMSON . I am single, and live in Bull-fields, Woolwich. On the morning of Saturday, the 8th of April, I went to my mother's, and left the prisoner in my house—on my return she was gone, and I missed these articles—I tried to find the prisoner, and saw her on the 10th of April—she had got my things on—I asked her for the child's frock—she said she had pledged it at Mr. Davison's—I asked for the ticket, and she said she had torn it up—she had on my frock, and shawl, and cap—I was not in the habit of lending her clothes—she had been with me a week.

Prisoner. She lent me the frock on Friday night, while my own was drying. Witness. The frock was dry, and fit to wear—I had not lent her one while she washed, she went without.

MARY ANN FEASER . I am single, and live in Hare-street, Woolwich. I was at the prosecutrix's house on the Saturday morning, about eight o'clock—the prisoner was there—she went up stairs and put on the prosecutrix's frock, as she wanted to wash her own—I told her not to put it on—she said she would not be long, she was only going to her sister to get some money for breakfast.

DONALD STEWART I am a policeman. I was on duty in Greenwich—the prisoner was given to me—she said she had part of the things upon her, and the child's bed-gown she had pledged for 3d.—I found it at Mr. Davison's, the pawnbroker, in Woolwich—this is it.

SARAH ADAMSON . These are my things—I did not know she was going away with them—she had paid no rent—she was to pay 1s. a week—I do not know how she gets her living.

Prisoner. She does the same as I do, she goes into the street.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18370508-1357

1357. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May, 1 dressing-glass, value 13s., the goods of John Oakley,to which he pleaded.

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1358

1358. JAMES WILLIAMS was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January, 2 tea-chests, value 4l., the goods of Jabez Harris.

JABEZ HARRIS . I am a cabinet-maker and live in South-street, Greenwich. On the 18th of May I lost two tea-chests, hich I have not found—the prisoner is a stranger to me.

AMELIA JUDD . I am fifteen years old, and live at Greenwich work-house. I saw the prisoner on a Wednesday, some months ago, (but I do not know the day of the month,) in South-street, between one and two o'clock—I saw him open Mrs. Harris's door, go in and take out the two tea-chests, which stood on a table—he brought them out, and tied them up in a blue handkerchief—there was nobody in the shop—I gave information directly they inquired about it, to the pot-boy outside the window.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you when you saw me enter the shop? A. At Mrs. Ashdown's—that is on the same side of the way—I was standing at the door—I was outside the door when I saw you, for about a minute.

COURT. Q. How could you see the table inside the shop? A. Harris said they stood on a table—he stood at the door about half a minute to wrap them up, and then walked away quickly—I have no doubt of his being the man.

JOHN OLIVER HANDON (police-constable R 270.) I took the prisoner into custody on another charge, and Judd identified him.

JABEZ HARRIS re-examined. I was sitting at dinner below the shop, and heard a footstep—I went up, and heard the door shut—I went into the shop, and missed the two tea-chests which stood near the door—I ran out, and saw the witness, who said she saw a man go by a moment before—she said she had seen him go into the shop, and directed me after him.

Prisoner. Q. When did you miss the two tea-chests? A. Within two or three minutes after hearing the door shut—it must have been nearly two minutes before I went out—the witness's mistress lives seven doors off—she could see a person come out of my house.

Prisoner's Defence. When taken before the Magistrate, I had a chair in the middle of the room, and there were four policemen in their police dresses, two standing on each side of me, and Mr. Harris—the girl was then introduced, and asked if I was the person—she looked round—there was nobody in plain clothes but myself, Mr. Harris, and two Greenwich constables, and of course I was the only stranger to her in the office—I was to have a fair chance of being identified, and that was the chance I had, being placed between six or seven officers—the girl might have seen me at the end of January or beginning of February go up and down that street, as I called in at Mr. Harris's about the 26th of January or the 2nd or 3rd of February—she stated before the Magistrate that I walked two or three times before the door before I entered the shop, and I certainly did so at that time—I saw nobody in the shop, and rang the bell, and Mr. Harris and his son came to me—Mr. Harris told the Magistrate that he had no recollection of my calling, and when I did call, he told me he was not in want of anybody—I asked him the nearest way to Deptford, and he directed me—the officer took me to Mr. Harris's son—he said he certainly had a slight recollection of me, but could not identify me as the person who called for employment.

MR. HARRIS re-examined. Several people have called for work—I do not know the prisoner, but my son has since said, "I think you said something to a man who called, and I told him to go down the lane"—

that is quite another way to the way the man ran who the girl saw—the tea-chests had been gone nearly a month then.

AMELIA JUDGE re-examined. I saw him walk backwards and forwards before he went into the shop—he passed me when he was coming away, and bad the things under the handkerchief—I told the prosecutor which way he had run.

GUILTY . Aged— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370508-1359

1359. JOHN TILBY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of April, 112lbs. weight of coals, value 2s.; and 1 bag, value 2d.; the goods of Isaac Parry.

WILLIAM FORD . I am in the emloy of Mr. Isaac Parry, a master potter. The prisoner formerly worked for me—I met him on the 23rd of April, carrying this bag, with some coals in it, in Church-street, Deptford—I called to him to stop—he did not—I followed him—he was not above thirty-five yards from my master's—the coals were taken from the back of the pottery—these were the larger coals, picked from the others.

JOHN DAVIS . I saw the prisoner come out of the pottery gates with this bag on his back, full of something—I cannot say what it was.

Prisoner. A man asked me to carry them, and told me to follow him—when he saw the gentleman he ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1360

1360. ANN M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April, 1 flannel shirt, value 7s., the goods of Jonas Perry; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

ELIZABETH NEWNHAM . I live with my grandmother, in Black Horseplace, Deptford. On the 27th of April, the prisoner, who was quite a stranger, came and I asked me to let her go backwards, which the did—I saw her take the flannel shirt from the line—she gave me a penny, and said if she came back that way again, would I let her go again—I said, "Yes"—I called my grandmother, who took her into custody—I saw her find the shirt on her.

JANE PERRY . I am the wife of Jonas Perry. I found my flannel shirt under the prisoner's cloak—she was quite a stranger to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning to London—I had occasion to go to the water closet—1 could not close the door, on account of the line; but I did not take the shirt—I have eight children, and am a widow—I had got some distance from the house when the little girl ran after me, and said I had got the shirt, which I had not jane perry. She had got a few yards off the premises.

BENJAMIN LOVELL (police-sergeant R 15.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, from Maidstone—(read)—the prisoner is the same person.

GUILTY . Aged 44.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1361

1361. MARY M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April, 1 gown, value 10s.; 3 shirts, value 8s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 2 frocks, value 1s.; 5 caps, value 3s.; and 1 shawl, value 7s.; the goods of Dennis Gallavin: 1 shirt, value 5s., the goods of Richard Williams: 1 gown, value 10s.; 1 petticoat, value 3s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; and 1 pair of shoes, value 2s.; the goods of Mary Cavanah.

JAMES PARRY . I am a constable. At half-past nine o'clock, on the evening of the 17th of April, I fell in with the prisoner, in Church-street, Dept-ford, with a large bundle in her apron—I asked what she had got—she said, nothing but her own—I asked where she was going to—she said to her friends in Greenwich, but she did not know the name of the street—I asked where she brought them from—she said, from the Spanish Legion Office, Cornhill—I took her to the station—the prosecutor came and claimed it, and said it had been lost about twenty minutes.

MARY GALLAVIN . I am the wife of Daniel Gallavin—I have a lodger in my house named Cavanah. My next-door neighbour brought the prisoner in on Sunday night, and asked me to give her a night's lodging, which I did; and on Monday she pretended to be very bad, and kept her bed all day, all but two or three hours—my husband came home, and thought she was very bad, and got her some gin and water—she went away between nine and ten o'clock at night—I missed her, and then missed these things, which are all mine and my lodger's.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1362

1362. WILLIAM HALEY, alias Midmer , and JOSEPH KILMAN , were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April, 51lbs. weight of lead, value 12s. 6d., the goods of William Suter; and that William Haley had been before convicted of felony.

ROBERT BLYTH . Mr. William Suter is building a Urge house at Greenwich—there is a yard there—there had been some lead there—when the officer came I missed some of it—I was satisfied that it was part of Mr. Suter's when I compared it—I do not know the prisoners.

GEORGE BROOMFIELD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Coxhead. I saw the two prisoners on the Friday evening near the Nursery at Greenwich, close to where I reside—I cannot positively swear that the prisoners were the two I saw come up, but I saw two persons—I have no doubt they were the two—I saw them lodge some lead on the wall—I came out and lifted the lead down—I do not know what became of them—I went and got a policeman, who took the lead.

Haley. Q. Can you swear it was me? Witness, I cannot positively, but you have the same dress on—I first saw you pass the George tavern.

STEPHEN MATTHEWS . I am a policeman. I went and found the lead, and we stood up there about two hours—we did not take the prisoners till about half-past five o'clock in the morning—I did not see the prisoners come up—I found a knife on one of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE M'MILLAN . I am a policeman. In the morning, between twelve and one o'clock, I had information that a quantity of lead had been stolen by two young men—I stopped about till about daylight—the prisoner Kilman came in the morning, and was searching about Walker's court, where this lead had been found—I took him and asked him what he was doing—he said, "Nothing"—I said, "Where is your partner?"—he said he was in bed, and was anxious to go and call him—I said, "No"—4 gave him to my brother officer, and I went to the room, where I found Haley in bed, asleep—I awoke him—he got up and asked who sent me to him—I said, "Never mind, it's all right"—he then said that his companion, naming him, had snitched upon him—he then said, "Has he told you of the three pieces of lead that he threw into the cellar?"—I said, "He has told

me a good deal about you"—I went to the cellar, and found these three pieces of lead.

Haley's Defence, I was going past the George and saw Broomfield—I bad not seen him since he went to Maidstone, but I did not touch the lead—I only went to see where he went to—I then turned out and went to East-lane—I went home and went to bed—at half-past five o'clock the officer came and took me.

Kilman's Defence. I went to call on Mrs. Rose to go to work, and the officer came up the steps and startled me—he said, "How did you fly the pigeons last night?"—I said I had not done so for two years—he said, "Blue pigeons"—I did not know what he meant.

JAMES ALLEN . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner Haley's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office (read),—the prisoner is the person.

HALEY*— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

KILMAN— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370508-1363

1363. JOHN STANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May, 1 necklace, value 8s., the goods of John William Beaver, from the person of Susannah Beaver, Junior.

SUSANNAH BEAVER . I am the wife of John William Beaver, a fisherman, of Greenwich. On the 3rd of May, I was in London-street, Greenwich—the prisoner came up and began to play with my little girl, who is sixteen months old—she had a coral necklace on—I put her down because she made my arms ache, and told her to walk or the boy would take her away—in a few minutes he ran off, and I missed the necklace off her neck—this is it.

JAMS MORRISON . I am conductor of an omnibus—I saw the woman run after the prisoner—he ran behind a cart and threw something away—my fellow-servant went and picked it up.

ROBERT SPOONER, I saw the prisoner throw away these beads—I went and took them up.

WILLIAM TODD (police-sergeant R 1.) I heard a cry of "Stop thief," and the prisoner was given to me with the necklace.

(Property produced and sworn to,)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and the woman told me to play with the child—there were three ladies who knew I did not take the beads, and they said so.

GUILTY . Aged 11.— Confined One Month and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18370508-1364

1364. THOMAS MANNS was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MESSRS. BODKIN and SHEA conducted the Prosecution.

ANN HODGES . I live at my brother-in-law's, which is called the Clock House, Deptford-bridge, On the 8th of April, between six add seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner cane and asked for some beer, or ale, or porter—he gave me a bad sixpence—I bit it very nearly in two, and threw it on the counter—he took it up and threw it into the fire-place—he gave me a good shilling—I gave him change—I immediately looked for the sixpence, but could not find it then—we found it afterwards—Parsons the policeman came in afterwards, and it was given to him.

CHARLOTTE PASSMORE . My father keeps the Clock House, I was attending there about ten or eleven o'clock at night, on the 8th of

April—the witness Jones came to me for a pint of beer, and offered a bad shilling—I told him it was bad—I noticed the prisoner with his back against the counter—he was near enough to hear what was passing between me and Jones—I called my brother Thomas and gave him the shilling to take to my father—he brought my father—a policeman was then sent for—I gave the shilling to my brother Thomas—Jones said he got it from the prisoner.

THOMAS PASSMORE . On the 8th of April, about ten or eleven o'clock, I received a shilling from my sister—I took it to my father, who told me to fetch a policeman, and he detained the prisoner during my absence—the policeman came about half an hour afterwards—I searched behind the store and found about half a sixpence—I showed it to my father, and he gave it to the policeman.

Prisoner. I had a shilling and a half-sovereign when I came to your house, and you changed the half-sovereign after I had spent the shilling. Witness, I don't recollect it.

EMANUEL PASSMORE . I am the father of Thomas Passmore. On the 8th of April, William Jones was in my house, and the prisoner—I said to my son, "Where did you get this bad shilling?"—he said he had it from Jones, and Jones said he got it from the prisoner—I asked him whether he gave Jones that shilling—he said he did—I said "Come inside the bar"—I sent for the policeman and gave it to him.

JOSEPH COLLISON (police-constable R 136.) I was fetched to the Clod: House, and found the prisoner—I found on him one bad shilling, and 4s. 6d. in good money, and this bad sixpence afterwards was discovered among the good money by the Inspector—this shilling was in hit trowsers pocket—I found a bad sixpence amongst the good money in his waistcoat pocket—the bad shilling was with one good one in his trowsers pocket—here is another bad shilling that I received from Mr. Passmore—I knew Jones, I had seen him about—I found 2 1/2d. on him—after I search-ed him, I received from Mr. Passmore a part of a sixpence.

JAMES STUART . I am an inspector of police. On the 8th of April the, prisoner was brought to the station—Mr. Passmore put down a shilling, and it was given to the constable in my presence—Collson delivered 4s. 6d. to me, which I locked up in a press—the next morning I unlocked it, took the money out, and gave it to the officer—I then discovered a sixpence to be bad.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a labourer, and work in Aylesbury-walk, Deptford. I have seen the prisoner twice—the first time was at the Clod House, on the 1st of April—he gave me some halfpence far singing—I saw him again on the 8th, between six and seven o'clock—I had then been singing a song, and he and several others asked me to drink—after that, about ten o'clock, he was standing at the bar, and I was going through to the tap-room to bid some young men good night—the prisoner was there, and hid me good night, he told me to get a pot of beer—I told him it did not lie in my power to pay for it—he said he did not ask me to pay for it myself—he put his hand into his trowsers pocket, and gave me a shilling—he stood with his back against the bar, and when he gave me the shilling I put it on the bar—Miss Passmore said it was bad, and asked me who gave it me—I said, "This good man, here"—she said, "This is not the first or second time he has offered bad money here to-night; I shall send to my father"—the prisoner made no answer—I cannot say whether he heard it—he was about half a yard off.

COURT. Q. Did he then say that he had change for a half-sovereign?

A. No—in the first part of the evening he said he had been to get a pot of beer, and he had a bad fix pence, which he chucked into the fire, and changed a half-sovereign.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect the first money I gave you? A. Yes, it was a shilling—you did not give me a half-crown—there was no girl with me—I had been living with a girl three weeks, but had left her three or four days.

Prisoner. I think that this man changed my money with this girl. Witness. I was sitting there all the time—the first time I saw him with one pot, and then a pint of fourpenny ale, and then he had a pint of ale or porter, and then he sent me with the shilling—I did not see him pay for other people.

JOHN FIELD . I am Inspector of coin to his Majesty's Mint. I have examined these—they are counterfeit—the two shillings are from the same mould, and the sixpence and half sixpence are from one mould.

Prisoner. I am quite innocent, not knowing that I had any bad money at all.

EMANUEL PASSMORE . I am certain that no bad money was given by our own people, because they know bad money in a minute—I had found bad money in my till before, but I dare say it was six months ago—If the prisoner is innocent, I think it must have been Jones's girl.

GUILTY . Aged 37.— Confined Six Months; Three Weeks Solitary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1365

1365. WILLIAM SEABORN was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MESSRS. BODKIN and SHEA conducted the Prosecution.

REBECCA ANN NICHOLLS . The prisoner came to my baker's shop, it Lewisham, in March, at ten minutes past six o'clock one Friday evening, for 1d. worth of bread—he put down a shilling, softly, on the counter—I told him it was bad—he said my eyes were bad—I told him if he could get it changed so much the better—he asked me where he could get change—I said, "Next door"—I saw him go into Bird's.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. It was rather dark? A. It was rather dusk, but I judged of it from the sound.

MARIA BIRD . I live at Lewisham; my son-in-law keeps a baker's shop. On Friday, the 10th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came—I am certain of him—he asked for a penny roll—I gave it him, and he gave me a shilling—I gave him change, and put the shilling into the till—there was no other shilling there I am quite sure—in the evening my son and daughter came home, and I went to the till—my son said it was bad—there was no other shilling in the till—there was a fourpenny piece, a sixpence, and a halfpenny—I kept the shilling apart from all the other money till the next morning, and then gave it to Mumford.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you serve anybody else that evening? A. I never changed any thing in silver—my son and daughter came home between nine and ten o'clock—I can swear that no customer came in after my son and daughter came in—neither of them served any one the next morning.

JANE GRIGG . I live with my father, William Grigg, who keeps the Plough, at Lewisham. About eight o'clock in the evening of the 10th of March the prisoner came for half a pint of beer—he paid me 1s.—I gave him 11d. in change—after he was gone I put the shilling into the till—there was one sixpence there—we had just given change—in about a quarter of an hour another man came in for three halfpenny worth of gin—he offered we a bad shilling, which I returned—I then discovered that the first shilling

was bad was paid for the gin—after I discovered that the shilling was bad he gave me a good one—I then put that good one into the till—I had taken the other out of the till—I gave it to the policeman—when the last one offered me a bad shilling I thought they belonged to one another, and I sent my brother for a policeman—the prisoner came at eight o'clock, and the other man at a quarter past.

Cross-examined. Q. You put the shilling into the till? A. After I discovered it was bad—I did not put the other in before I took this one out 9—I kept it in my hand till the policeman had it—I have always been certain that the prisoner was the man.

MR. BODKIN. Q. When did you next see him? A. Before the Magistrate—he had neither hat nor cap on then—he had an old cap in his hand—he had exactly the same dress—the Magistrate desired that he should put the cap on, and I had no doubt of him, and have none now.

HENRY MUMFORD (police-sergeant L 3.) I was on duty near the Plough about nine o'clock that evening, and I saw the prisoner with a man of the name of Watson, whom I knew—they were coming in a direction from the Plough—they passed me—I am sure the prisoner was one—about two minutes after, Miss Grigg complained of having taken bad money—I followed them—I took Watson, and received this shilling from Miss Grigg, and another from Mrs. Bird.

JOHN CULLINGHAM (police constable P 170.) I went, on the 13th of April, to the Brixton House of Correction, where the prisoner was detained on some other charge, and told him I wanted him for passing bad money on the 10th of March, at Lewisham—he said he knew nothing about it, he had never been there—I told him it was along with Watson—he said he did not know him—I am certain he knew Watson—I have seen him in his company several times—Watson is a common utterer of base coin.

JANE GRIGG re-examined. Q. Do you remember the policeman coming back with a man of the name of Watson? A. Yes—he was the person who tendered the bad shilling, and then changed it for a good one.

JOHN FIELD . These are both counterfeit, and from the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined One Year.

SURREY LARCENIES, &c.

JAMES YOUNG was attainted of robbery. See page 2.

JOHN WHITTLE was attainted of robbery. See page 6.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370508-1366

1366. RUSSELL CHARLES TYERMAN was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.—Recommended the Penitentiary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1367

1367. JOSEPH MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March, 1 coat, value 1l. 1s., the goods of Richard Moser, his master: also, on the 15th of March, 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 towel, value 6d.; and 1 pair of boots, value 8s.; the goods of Richard Moser, his master; to both of which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.—Recommended to the Penitentiary.

Reference Number: t18370508-1368

1368. HENRY SUMNER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April, 1 snuff-box, value U., the goods of Richard Lawrence; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN HILL . I live with Richard Lawrence, a general dealer, in Charcroft's terrace, New Cut, Lambeth. On Friday, the 7th of April, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the shop, and inquired of my sister the price of a snuff-box, and while she turned to ask me the price, he must have put this snuff-box into his pocket—he said the one he asked the price of was too much, and put it down, and went away.

JAMES BROOKS (police-constable L 118.) On the afternoon of the 7th of April I was in company with Goff in the New Cut, and saw the prisoner—Goff said, "He has got something, and has put it into his pocket"—he ran off as hard as he could—I ran after him for half a mile, and when about six yards from him I saw him take this box from his pocket, and throw it into the road.

CHARLES BURGESS GOFF (police-constable L 31.) I was with Brooks, and saw the prisoner, in front of the prosecutor's shop, hand something to a young girl inside, and as she walked away into the shop He look something, and put it into his right-hand pocket—he followed her into the shop, and came out directly—I told Brooks he had got something—we followed, and at last secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BROWN (police-constable L 9.) I know the prisoner. I was at Horsemonger-lane, in October last, when he was tried—I had apprehended him, and was a witness on his trial—I produce a certificate of his conviction, which I got from the Clerk of the Peace for Surrey (read)—he is the person who was convicted.

GUILTY .* Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1369

1369. MARY TINGEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April, 1 scarf; value 1l.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s.; 1 waistband, value 1s.; 10 card counters, value 1s.; and 3 1/2 yards of silk, value 10s.; the goods of Elizabeth Flude, her mistress; and 2 waistbands, value 2s., the goods of Henrietta Boileau Flude.

ELIZABETH FLUDE . I am a widow, and live in Park-place, Peckham, The prisoner was in my service for five weeks—I hired her on the 23rd of February—I missed some silk from a chest of drawers, three or four weeks after, which belonged to Mrs. Webb, who was living there—I was answerable for it—I missed the property stated, which I afterwards saw in the possession of the policeman, and identified it—my initials are on a pair of stockings.

CHARLES WHITE (police-constable P 57.) I went to No. 4, Park-road, Peckham, where the prisoner was residing with her father and mother—I saw her there, and said we were came to search the house for property stolen from Mrs. Flude—the prisoner said she was innocent—we searched, and found the property which I produce—Miss Flude was with me, and identified them in the prisoner's presence—she afterwards said, "I know I have taken them"—she said she took them from Mrs. Flude's—Miss Flude was in the room—I do not know whether she heard it.

HENRIETTA BOILBAU FLUDE . I live with my mother. I went to the house of the prisoner's father and mother with the policeman, when be found the things—I identified them—these counters were among them—I know them to be my mother's, and this scarf, also this silk bonnet and

stockings—when the policeman asked her about the things, she said she was innocent—I did not hear her say any thing afterwards.

SUSAN ALLENDER . I know the prisoner—I lived at No. 5, Parkrow—about five or six weeks ago she asked me to go down the Kent-rod with her, and when we got near Mr. Phillimore's, she asked me to take this scarf to pledge—I pawned it for 1s. and gave her the money—I afterwards took it out of pawn for her, and gave it to her—she gave it to one of her relations to get it sold afterwards.

Prisoner. I did not ask any of my friends to sell it. Witness. She said she was going to take it to her sister Betsey's, to sell it for 3s. 6d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1370

1370. MAURICE ADAMS, alias Herring , JOHN MALONEY , and JAMES LANGHAM , were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May, 29 tram-rails, value 7l., the goods of Hugh M'Intosh, the master of the said James Langham.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution

CHRISTOPHER PETERS . I am in the employ of Messrs. Pennington, the owners of Neckinger Mills. The Greenwich railway runs through their premises—on the 3rd of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, my attention was drawn to a donkey-cart, standing not far from the gate, on the side of the arch, on the premises of the railway—I saw the prisoners, Maloney and Langham, in a hurried manner, throwing iron into the donkey cart—I stood some time and saw them loading it—Adams was standing at the top, watching to see if any body saw them—they looked at me at the time—I stood some minutes looking at them—when the cart was loaded, Adams came down and assisted in shoving the donkey off with the cart—all three gave a heave to shove the cart into the road—I followed them, and when I had got a little distance the cart stopped, and they appeared to be throwing something over the cart—an old basket and cloth was thrown over the iron—in consequence of this I gave information to Crook to follow and watch them—Langham returned after some time, and I gave him into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. They appeared to put more into the cart than the donkey could bear? A. Yes—they were obliged to shove it on—I have always said the third man appeared to be watching.

WILLIAM CROOK . I am in the employ of Messrs. Pennington. Peter? desired me to follow the donkey cart—I saw the men loading, and observed one watching—while they were loading the cart, one of them seemed to wish to leave off and have no more, and another said, "cut away" or words to that effect—Maloney and Langham were loading the cart, and they did it in a great hurry—I went a short way after the cart—I overtook Fowler, the policeman, and told him which way the cart had gone.

JAMES M'INTOSH . I am superintendent of the works on the Greenwich railway. The prisoner Langham has been in Mr. M'Intosh's employ about three years, and was so on that day—the tram-rails of a temporary railway were put into an arch of the railway—the sleepers and various things were put in there belonging to Mr. M'Intosh—he furnishes the whole of the materials himself—the arch was boarded up to protect it, and there was watchman there at night, but not in the day—Before the 3rd of May it was necessary to remove some sleepers from the arch, and Langham was

ordered to get them out—he knew the tram-rails were in arch—I never gave him any authority to take any away—I saw the property at the office, and it was Mr. M'Intosh's—there was about 18cwt. in all—it was tram-rails, which were to be used again.

Cross-examined. Q. What is Mr. M'Intosh's Christian name? A. Hugh—I knew nothing of Langham before he came into our employ—I had no reason to complain of him—the other two men are not employed there.

JOHN FOWLER (police-constable R 88.) On the 3rd of May I was in Grange-road, Bermondsey, and saw a donkey-art—Maloney was driving it, and Adams was walking by the side—I asked them what they had got there—they said some old iron that they had brought from the railroad—I asked them where they got it—they said from some of the men who worked for Mr. M'Intosh on the railroad, and were going to take it to the foot of London-bridge, where he was to meet them—I took them to the station, and found twenty-nine pieces of tram-rails in the cart—Maloney's name was on the cart—Maloney said he was going to draw It for Langham to the, foot of London-bridge, and he was to have half-a-crown for his trouble—I returned with them to the railroad, and took Langham.

Cross-examined. Q. Does part of the railroad come up to Londonbridge? A. Yes, nearly so.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Does the railroad come over arches, or the road the donkey-cart came? A. Over arches.

JURY. Q. When you stopped them was the iron covered over? A. Yes, with a sack and baskets—it completely covered the top.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

ADAMS— GUILTY . Aged 56.

MALONEY— GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Six Months.

LANGHAM— GUILTY . Aged 38.— Confined Twelve Months.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18370508-1371

1371. MARY ANN WINTER was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April, 1 shawl, value 8l., the goods of Robert Stevens, in his dwelling-house; to which she pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Transported for Life.

Reference Number: t18370508-1372

1372. ALEXANDER HALL was indicted for embezzlement.

JAMES NEWTON . I am a wharfinger, in partnership with my father. The prisoner has been two or three years in our service—we discharged) him for being tipsy on the 18th of February, and afterwards discovered this money had been received by him—I have never received these sums from him, nor any portion of them.

MARTIN BODDY . I paid the prisoner on account of hit master, 9s. on the 11th of February, and 1s. before that—I have his receipt for it.

MR. NEWTON. He never paid me 9s.—he acknowledged that he had received it.

(The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating thai the prosecutor's accounts were confused, and the turn which he paid were often omitted to be entered.)

MR. NEWTON. There never was any mistake in the money I received—there is no truth in his statement.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18370508-1373

1373. JOHN ROBERT WHITBY and JOHN LOVELOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April, 1 shawl, Value 10s., of Frances Price, from her person.

FRANCES PRICE . On the 4th of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I went into the Dundee Arms, Southward, with friend—Whitby came in after my friend went away, and after that Lovelock came in, and I treated them with some porter and bread and cheer—Lovelock's brother lives close by me—Whitby I had no knowledge of before, but I treated him because he said he was out of work—I left the public-house about half-past seven o'clock, and walked down by the arch of the railroad—Whitby was walking by the side of me, and took my shawl from my back—he had said he was going to his, sister's, who lives about 300 yards from me, and said we would walk together-Lovelock kept on the other side of the arches, but when Whitby took my property he went on the other side of the arches' to Lovelock, and they both ran off with my property—I was quite sober, and ran back to the public-house and told the publican—the policemen took them into custody on the Friday—Whitby was taken at his sister's his mother's—I went with the policeman to both places—Whitby sad he had taken my shawl off my back and pawned it, and he gave the policeman the duplicate—this is it.

WILLIAM BYRNE . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoners—Whitby gave me the duplicate of the shawl—he said he was very sorry it, but it was done and he could not help it, and that his mother was going to take it out the same day.

JOSEPH ROSIER . I am a pawnbroker. This shawl was pawned with me in the name of John Wigley—this is the duplicate I gave.

(The prisoner Whitby put in a written Defence, stating that he had been drinking all day with the prosecutrix at several public-houses, and the shawl was pawned to obtain more liquor.)

WHITEBY. GUILTY . Aged 19

LOVELOCK. GUILTY . Aged 19

Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18370508-1374

1374. ANN MAY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April at St. Mary, Lambeth, 1 watch, value 20l.; 5 rings; value 16l.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 2l.; 1 brooch, value 1l.; 1 ladle, value 2l.; 1 fish slice, value 3l.; 10 spoons, value 4l.; 1 cream pot, value 2l.; 1 fork, value 10s.; 2 shawls, value 1l.; 6 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and two £5 bank-notes; the property of Mary Onion, her mistress, in her dwelling-house.

MR. PAYNE conducted the prosecution.

MARY ONION . I live at Camberwell, in the parish of St. Mary, Lambeth. I keep the house—the prisoner was my servant for about fifteen months, and was so on the 16th of April—there was nobody but her and myself living in the house—on that day I ordered tea, and when the brought up the kettle, I said "I hope Ann you have well rinsed the kettle:—she said she had and the water boiled—I said "Very well"—I then put some water into the tea-pot and rinsed it out—I looked to see that there were no old tea leaves in—I then made my tea, and after pouring out the first cup and drinking part of it, I thought there was something very disagreeable in it—I put a little more milk to it, and then eat two bits of toast—I then drank the remainder of the cup of tea—I end not drink any more—I was taken with a fluttering and throbbing

accompanied with a burning sensation in my stomach—I poured out another cup, but put it back and rang for the servant—she came up, and, I ordered her to take the tea away—I did not suspect any thing was the matter with the tea, but I thought I was taken suddenly ill—I went up stairs, and stopped some time before I went to bed—it was more than an hour or perhaps two, before I saw the prisoner again—I began to find myself exceedingly ill—I rang the bell, and said "Ann, I am taken very ill, I think I am taken for death," and I wished her to assist me to bed—I found my head grow very heavy, I could not hold it up, I could not support it—I found I could hardly articulate a word when I went to speak, and when I attempted to get up off my chair I staggered very much, but I did not fall—I held by the table and went into the passage—I asked her if the back door was bolted—she said it was, top and bottom, and she ran and examined it—I then told her to see that the bolt of the front door was done, and desired her to lock it as well—I went and examined it and found it Was locked—I asked her to look at the clock, and she said it was nearly nine o'clock, about nine—I then told her, as I was so ill, she might as well retire early too, and put out the kitchen and parlour fires—I asked her to bring me up a few coals in the warming pan—we were then at the foot of the stairs, and I said might I depend on her to see that all was safe and then come to bed—she said I might—I then put my foot on the first stair, and nearly fell backwards—I screamed out, and said "Oh! 1 shall fall down and break my back"—she said "Oh no, you sha'nt, I will pot my hand to your back"—I then went up stairs, and as soon at she brought up the coals I shut my bed-room door, bolted it, and wound up my watch, and hung it in its place over the mantel shelf—I then got into bed with all speed, and after a few uneasy sensations I got into a profound sleep or swoon, and did not awake all night—I am gene-rally very wakeful—I awoke before six o'clock in the morning—1 was hardly sensible at first—my eyes were swollen, but in a few minutes I came to myself, and then found a small, green painted trunk, which usually stood under the bed, was standing by the bed side, partly from under the bed—it was not in that position when I went to bed—it had been under the bed—I got out of bed, and found the swing-glass on the floor, and my dressing-table removed from its place—I went round my bed, and found all the drawers, one above another, forced open—the bed-room door had been forced open—my dressing-table was standing outside the door on the landing—the drawer of it had been forced open and was out—it had been locked overnight—I lost two £5 notes, six sovereigns and a half, two half crowns, and two or three shillings, from that drawer—I then called to my servant as loud as I could, "Thieves, thieves! Ann, my house is broken open!"—I got no answer—I then called again, and said, "You can hear fast enough at another time, if you won't answer now"—I then went round-to the side of my bed, and partly dressed myself—I came back, and called to her again—she was then coming down the stairs, and had got very little on but her under things—I told her to go back and put her clothes on—we then proceeded down stairs together—I told her to run and see if all the doors were safe, and 1 went with her—she said they were all safe, and said, "I will be on my oath I fastened them"—I said, "I saw you fasten them"—they were still fastened—we went to the back door, and found both the top and bottom bolts as I had seen them the night before—we went to the front door, and found it locked and bolted—I came along the passage, and pushed open the parlour door—I found all safe there—

we then went down stairs into the kitchen, and found all safe there—the window and window shutters were fastened—I then looked into the wash. house—the window and shutters there were safe—we then proceeded up stairs again to the back parlour, and she exclaimed, "Oh! this is the way they got in"—the parlour shutter slides back both ways, and I found it about 2 foot open—the sash was down—the catch was undone, and the pane of glass had a small piece out, but not big enough to admit a man's hand—it was about an inch long—I did not see any glass lying about in the parlour—it was outside on the sill—it was a dry morning, and I think it was dry overnight—I saw nothing but the splinters of glass which had fallen down on the outside of the window—a large leathern trunk, which had been under my bed the night before, was standing on a small table in the back parlour—they had taken all the cold provisions out, and turned all my pickles out—they were swimming about the table—a lantern was there, which was extinguished—the leathern trunk had been opened with a wrong key—I kept part of my plate in it, and some of my best clothes—I missed from it a silver soup-ladle, a fish-slice and fork, and a silver milk1 pot—I also missed two large table-spoons from one of my drawers in my bed room—I lost four, but they were not all four there—I missed a knife,! a thimble, and a table-spoon from my dressing-table drawer, besides the money—from the drawers in my bedroom I missed four tea-spoons, a pair of silver tea-tongs, two plated butter-ladles; and from a little mahogany cupboard, in the back parlour, a table-spoon; a purple and white silk shawl from the drawer, and a purple and white one which was rolled up in a silk handkerchief in the leathern trunk—I saw the gold safe in the table drawer the last thing before I went to bed—I was sensible, though I was ill—I had folded up two £5 notes, and put 2l. 10s. with them, in tit expectation of paying my landlord next morning—I also missed six rings, two pairs of diamond ear-rings, and a gold double-case watch—I was as well before I had tea that day as I am now.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. On the evening in question did you go to see the shutters, as to whether they were safe or not? A. The parlour shutters were shut up before I went to tea, and the curtains drawn—it was fastened as much as it had ever been fastened since I have been in the house—it comes together with two rings—the bolt seldom acted—it was always safe—the shutters close in a groove—they shut together—you can open them from the inside, but they are more than seven feet from the ground outside—I caused it to be measured—there are two water-butts outside the window—they are not under the window—one is up in the corner a good way, and the other is laced to it by a pipe—it is about three feet from the window—I do not think a person could reach from the water-butt to the centre of the window, but when they could get in at the door they would hardly trouble themselves to get in at the window—I made ray own tea on this day—after I had examined the pot and rinsed it out—it is not the first time I have had the old leaves in it—I have been subject to ill health ever since August last, but I was as well that night as I usually am—I am often complaining about my health, and am awake most hours of the night—I was not talking of sending for a doctor the day before—I am not subject to giddiness in the head—I have never complained of it—I am rheumatic, which draws up my limbs—I told the prisoner that thieves had been in the house, and expressed great astonishment that she had not heard the noise—she appeared very greatly surprised, and said it must have been some of the wicked people out of

Bowyer-lane who had done it—I had her from her aunt, who said she knew her from her infancy, and I knew her two years.

RICHARD WALTERS . I am a police-inspector. On the morning of Monday, the 17th of April last, I went to the prosecutrix's house, between seven and eight o'clock—I examined the back parlour window, and found the shutters partly opened, about six or eight inches slid back—the center pane of the top sash was broken—it was a very small hole, about an inch wide—a hand could not be got in, and scarcely a finger—it was not large enough for a person to get part of their hand in and undo the fastening—I found some pieces of glass outside, but none within—I examined the window sill, and there was some dust on the outside, and on the water-butt also—there were no marks whatever, either of foot or hand prints—I took particular notice of that—none of the outer fastenings of the premises appeared to have been broken—they were all perfect—I examined the whole of them—I went down the garden with the prisoner, and she pointed to the back garden gate—which opens into a passage which leads into the fields, some distance from the house—she said, "This is the way they must have come, for the locks are forced off"—I saw a padlock lying on the ground—she pointed it out to me—I examined it, and found it perfect—there was no breaking as I could perceive then—the hasp was open, but it did not appear to me to be at all forced—there Was a door lock oh the same door—that was unlocked, but not injured—there was no force on the wards—I afterwards got the keys, and tried both the locks, add found them perfect—here is the padlock.

Cross-examined. Q. Are not these common locks? A. Yes—many keys that housebreakers use would very easily open them—the hole in the glass presented a rough appearance—it was starred—it was merely a hole punched through, either from within or without, I will not be positive which—one finger might be put through the hole, but I should say, if they put two through, they must have been cut—I should say there was not room for two—a person might put their finger through and get hold of the catch, but not without great difficulty—the hole Was directly opposite the hasp, in the centre of the pane—they could move the catch, and then lift up the window—there would then be nothing to prevent the shutters being opened—they might get out the same way—I saw no injury to the fastening at all.

COURT. Q. Though you found the padlock and lock open of the garden door, you did not find any breakage of the back door of the house? A. None whatever—it was closed and bolted within—if the window had been punched through from without, I should say the glass would have fallen inside—that is the impression on my mind—there was not any within.

WILLIAM ROY . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner on Monday, the 17th of April—1 told her she must consider herself in my custody—she asked what for—I told her on suspicion of being concerned in the robbery that had been committed in the house—she began to cry, and said it was a bad job—I gave her a caution not to say any thing in my presence, because I must give it in evidence—she then asked me whether a man named Clark was taken into custody—I told her I could not say, but that officers were out after him—she said she could tell her mistress a great deal respecting the concern—I told her she might say what she thought proper to her mistress, but desired her to say nothing in my hearing—I

saw the mark in the window, and do not suppose I could get my two fingers into the hole.

ROBERT ABRAHAMS . I work at South-place, Camberwell New-road next door to Mrs. Onion. On the Sunday evening in question I passed her door three times in the course of ten minutes, about ten minutes to ten o'clock—the door was about half open, and the prisoner was standing with her back against the door, as if she was looking out—I knew her before—I know a man named Clark—I have seen him come out of the house a half-past six o'clock of a morning, and have seen him go in several times—the prisoner was standing holding the door and looking out—I could not observe any thing but herself—the last time I passed the door Kennington church clock struck ten.

CATHERINE BAKER . I keep a china shop in Camberwell New-road. A fortnight before the robbery the prisoner came into my shop to buy a small pan, and she stated to me that there was a man came and knocked at the street door, and the garden gate was locked—my house if almost opposite Mrs. Onion's—it has a garden in front of the house—she said the man called to ask for some woman, that he jumped over the garden gate, and ran up stairs, and her mistress said, "Ann, there i. somebody gone up stairs," and she said, "No, there has not"—her mistress said the was sure of it, and they went up stairs and found a man under the bed—I asked her if she knew the man—she said she did not—I told her to be cautious, and not to let people know that there was only herself and her mistress in the house, or certainly they would be robbed—she said, "Our gate comes down into Bowyer-lane, and since Greenacre's affair we are very much alarmed."

ANN CHEESEMAN . I live in James-street, Camberwell-road, about three minutes' walk from the prosecutrix's. I can see her back window from my door—I know Clark very well—I have noticed him going in and out of Mrs. Onion's house ever since September last—the prisoner let him in art out—I never saw him come out—I have seen him go in at half-past twelve o-'clock at night and one o'clock in the morning—the prisoner used to let him in—I have no doubt of that.

Cross-examined. Q. About how long ago was the first time?A. September the first time, and until the time in question I frequently saw him going in.

EDWARD JOHN . I am the prosecutrix's son. I have examined the windows—I should say the aperture of the glass is from an inch to an inch and a quarter in the widest part—on Friday, the 14th, I called on my mother at three o'clock—she had been to the Bank—the prisoner was in and out of the room during our conversations and I, am certain she must have heard it—my mother stated that she had been to the Bank and received her dividend, and came home in an omnibus to prevent being robbed.

MRS. ONION re-examined. Q. Did a man named Clark come therewith your knowledge or authority at any time? A. I had not the slightest idea of such a thing.

(Sarah Ann Rye, milliner and dress-maker, Broad-street, Golden-square, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy, believing her to be the dupe of another person. Transported for Life .

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370508-1375

1375. THOMAS BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th ofJanuary, 2801bs. weight of lead, value 2l. 10s., the goods of Thomas Bingham Richards, and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

THOMAS BUSH . On the 24th of January, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner standing by the side of a cart, look-ing at some other persons putting lead into it, at the end of Marsh-lane, Battersea, about thirty yards from the prosecutor's house—I gave information to the police—the lead has never been found—Beale and Deane the other two, were taken immediately—I found the lead stripped from the roof and hips of the house—it had rained in the morning, but ceased in the afternoon—the parts were dry—if it had been long done they would have been wet.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. All you saw was the prisoner standing by the cart? A. Yes—Beale took the articles that he had, and handed them into the cart—I did not then know that it was lead—I was not within many yards of the cart.

THOMAS WELLER . I live with my father-in-law, at Battersea. A little after nine o'clock, on the 14th of January, I saw some persons carrying laud away from Mr. Richards's house, and putting it into a donkey-cart the prisoner stood outside, by the donkey-cart, in the lane, not on the premises—when they had put the lead in, he and another went away with the cart towards Battersea-bridge—the prisoner followed it, and the other man. drove—the prisoner asked me if I had any bones or iron to sell, and I said I had not enough yet, I was going to sell a good lot—I looked into the cart, and saw a shovel and basket—he stood talking to me white the other man drove the cart on—Beale then came up, and they went away together—I knew the prisoner before, and had sold him bones.

THOMAS HALL . I take toll at Battersea-bridge. On the 24th of January, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, a cart went over the bridge towards Chelsea—the prisoner and another person were with it—the prisoner paid the toll—it was rather a large-sized, white-coloured donkey—-about a quarter of an hour after that, Bush came to make inquiry of me.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was the man driving the cart? A. I could not swear to him—he was on the other side from me—the cart went on, and the prisoner remained behind to pay the toll.

ROBERT CULVER (police-constable V 175.) I apprehended the prisoner on the 18th of April, in Crab-tree-walk, and said he was wanted—he said he understood so, but said, "Why don't you take Weller?"—I said, "Who do you mean?"—he said "Plumridge," and described to me where I could find him, and I apprehended him—going along he told me about their absconding from the parish, hearing they were wanted, and said he went to world at Bermondsey, with Plumridge, and spent 8s., which he had borrowed, and then wished to sell a dog which the prisoner had; but not getting enough for it, they applied to sell Plumridge's donkey, which I saw—it was light, and very large.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you caution him not to say any thing? A. Yes; but he said it could not do any harm his talking to me, because he had known me a long time—Plumridge is the person supposed to have driven the cart—I took him, but the Grand Jury have thrown out the bill.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18370508-1376

1376. FREDERICK LAND was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April, at St. George the Martyr, Southwark, 36 watches, value 70l.; 5 seals, value 3l.; 10 watch-keys, value 3l.; 20 brooches, Value 10l.; 15 pairs of ear-rings, value 7l.; and 11 rings, value 3l.; the goods of Thomas Gotsell, his master, in his dwelling-house.

THOMAS GOTSELL . I am a watch-maker and jeweller, and live in Frederick-place, Old Kent-road, in the parish of St. George the Martyr, Surrey. I occupy the house—I and my family sleep there now, but did not at the time of the robbery—we moved in the next day—at that time we slept in Coburgh-place, Old Kent-road—the prisoner was my errand-boy since October, but I had known him four years—he is nineteen years old I—I had no other man-servant—he slept in the shop to take care of tile I property—it is part of the house, and communicates with it—all my stock I in trade was moved into the house then—the house was being repaired, and I had moved my family to the other place while it was done, and meant to return the following morning to Frederick-place with my family, which I did—on the 3rd of April I left the house, about ten minutes after nine I o'clock in the evening, and the prisoner promised me that he would go to bed I within ten minutes after I left—the doors were all locked when I left, except the private door, which I came out at, and left him to secure—I sent the prisoner round the house to see that all was safe before I left, and I locked all my watches up in a box—I had a key made to toe street door I by Benn, who lives nearly opposite—he only made one key for me—I gave no orders for a second key, and did not know about it till after the robbery—I received information, about eleven o'clock that night, from two neighbours, and went to Frederick-place—I found two or three policemen with the prisoner in the shop, and several neighbours, who were questioning the prisoner how he had spent the evening—I heard him declare that I he had not been out at all—I missed all the watches which had been put I into the box, and all that had been in the window, except one, and all the valuable jewellery was taken out of the shop window, consisting of brooches rings, ear-rings, watch-keys, and seals—there were about three doses watches, worth about 2l. each, averaging one with the other—the other articles were worth at least 40l.—the prisoner said that directly after I left he considered that the men had concealed themselves in the house—that he heard men walking in the passage, and one of them came into the shop and seized him, and threw him on his back by the mat at the shop door, while the two others took away the property—he said they threatened they would make away with him if he made the least noise or resistance—that two of them had large smock-frocks on, with large pockets underneath, into which they put the property—I asked him if he had left the shop at all that night—he said he was just going to make his bed when on came and seized him, and he considered they were in the house before I left said I thought that very strange, when he had looked over the house—he said he did not look at the three pair of stairs—I never slept at that house till the day following—I occupied a house lower down, as this house was not ready for me—I took it at Christmas—the prisoner slept their daily from that time—when he mentioned about being thrown on his back, Mr. Gardiner, a neighbour, asked him to turn round to show his back—he said so, and there was no appearance of dirt on it—Mr. Gardiner then desired him to lay down, and get up, and show his back—he did so, and then it was covered with dirt—this was inside the shop, by the door—there was a mat at that door, and there is always a great deal of dirt from people's feet—the policemen then took him to the station-house—I had locked the box the watches were in, before I went away, and hung the key on a nail in the

shop—I found the box still locked, but quite empty—the lock was not forced—I have not found any of my property—I paid the prisoner 7s. a week—he did not board with me, but slept there always from the, time, I took him.

JOSIAH BENN . I am a blacksmith, and live opposite Mr. Gotsell I made a key for him about Christmas to lock the street door—I afterwards made another by the prisoner's order—three weeks before the robbery I was over there putting a grating down, and he said he wanted a key to the door to go in and out of an evening, just as be liked—after making it, I asked him for payment—he told me to call next day and he would pay me—I called next day, and he said his master was going to pay me—I then thought it was right, and did not call again for a week fox the money—I have since seen the key I made for the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Which house did you make the key for master? A. For the house he lives, in now—I did not say I would make your key for an old pewter pot and some old pieces of lead—I said I would give you 3d. for the old pewter pot.

Prisoner. There was only one key made to the shop door—I told master there was none and I got this one made. Witness. I made two, one for the master, and one for him.

COURT. Q. Did not You. think it right to tell the master of this? A. Yea, but when he said his master would pay or it, I thought it all right.

RICHARD LARTER , I am pot-boy at the Castle, public-house, which is about two hundred yards from Mr. Gotsell's. On Monday evening, the 3rd of April, about ten minutes or a quarter past nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner drinking a pint of ale at our bar with a cab man—they stopped about ten minutes or, a quarter of an hour—I did not see them go away, as I was sent out, but I saw them there for that time—I had seen the cap man once before, and the prisoner often before, but not at our house—know the time by going out with my beer.

JOHN POCOCK I am a policeman. In consequence of information on the 3rd of April, I went to Mr. Gotsell's house, about eleven o'clock—the private door was open—I saw the prisoner in the shop, and several gentlemen there, with Mr. Gotsell and two or three policemen—I asked the prisoner, distinctly, who he had spoken to outside the house after his master left—he said he bad spoken to no one, nor opened the door after bolting it when his master left—he said he had bolted up all the doors and secured the house immediately that his master left—I pointed out to him the impossibility of any person going into the house without his knowledge—I observed that there were no marks of violence in any part or the house—he said they might have been concealed in the house—Mr. Gotsell heard part of this conversation, but there were a good many people about—I told him to be careful, and said, "You are not obliged to answer these questions, but you had better tell the truth"—Mr. Gotsell was asking hint how the thieves got into the house, and I wished to know, that I might detect the robbers—I did not know who the parties were—1 had-not taken him into custody then—I had not my police dress on, but he knew who I was—I came in with the sergeant—(looking at the examinations)—I know the Magistrate's handwriting to this—I saw the prisoner sign it—the Magistrate cautioned him not to say any thing to criminate himself—Mr. Wedgwood and Mr. Trail both sat as Magistrates—the prisoner's examination was taken down in writing, and read over

to him before the Magistrate signed it—(read)—"The prisoner says, about ten minutes after nine o'clock last night, I double-locked my master's door and went to get some supper. I met Brooks—he asked me if I would have some ale—we went to the Castle and had a pint of ale—I did not stop more than five minutes, and Brooks said he was going down East-lane—I went with him to the Rising Sun, in East-lane, where we had another pint of ale—after stopping there some time, I said it was getting late, and I must get towards home—as we walked along, Brooks told me to stop and he went away—he came back to me in about three minutes—we parted near the Deaf and Dumb Asylum, and I went home—I found the door single-locked, the gas was burning, but it was suddenly turned of and I was seized and dragged over the counter, and was held by one of them, while the other two packed up the goods and took them away—they turned the gas on before they went—I think they remained in the house about half an hour—when they went out they locked the door after them and I remained about ten minutes before I gave the alarm.

Prisoner's Defence, I know nothing about the robbery whatever—I am entirely innocent.

MR. GOTSELL re-examined. Q. Did you allow, him, after your going away at night, to go to a public-house to supper? A. No—I did not allow him to go out at all after I left, and he always told me he never did go out.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Life.

Reference Number: t18370508-1377

1377. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted embezzlement; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY .— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1378

1378. JOHN PRITCHARD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the counting-house of Frederick Haywood and another, on the 26th of April, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 11 sovereigns 8 half-crowns, and 8 shillings, their monies.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

DANIEL HAYWOOD . I am a floor-cloth manufacturer in Newingtoncause. way—I have one partner named Frederick Hay wood—we have a counting house on our premises. On the 26th of April, I left the counting-house five o'clock, or near it—I have a desk there, which I left locked, and 12l. 8d. in it—there was eleven sovereigns, and the rest in silver—it was in a case box—I took the key of the desk away with me—I left the foreman, Wisterflood, behind—I went again at nine o'clock next morning, and found the desk had been broken open, and the cash-box gone—the box had not been locked—I have seen such a knife as this in the possession of the prisoner but I do not swear to it—he was in our employ two or three years off and on—he bad left us ten days before this, of his own accord—he had not been discharged.

THOMAS WINTERFLOOD . I am foreman to Messrs. Haywood. I was the last person in the counting-house on the 26th of April—I left at twenty minutes after eight o'clock, and left all safe—the door was locked, and I took the key with me—on the next morning I went again, at six o'clock, to let the men in, and found the door wrenched open, and the lock broken—I examined master's desk, and found it forced open by great

violence, the lock broken, and the cash-box empty—nobody had been there before me—there is a side window, which was never fastened, and by that a person could have got in—I did not examine that that morning—inconsequence of directions from my master, I went with the policeman in search of the prisoner—Roche and I went to the Rose, at Twig-folly, near Bow, adjoining the Regent's-canal—we met the prisoner's brother, and while I was speaking to him, the prisoner came out of the taproom—I said to him, "Who would have thought of seeing you here, John". what are you at?"—he made no reply—I said I was ordered by master to get a new man in his place, if he did not come back to work—he mumbled something, I could not tell what—I had something to drink with his brother—I called Roche in—the prisoner was then standing in front of me, opposite the bar, and his brother prevailed on us to go into the parlour—he took part of a pot of beer—I wanted him to come out to go a little way with me—he came out, and wished to go to speak to his brother's wife—he wend in to speak to her, and went right through the house—it is two or three door from the public-house—I followed him—he went to the bottom of the yard, and got over the pales into a rope and twine ground—I went through the house again to call Roche, and when I got back, he had got over the pales—we followed him—he ran hard as he could run, and got mile or more before Roche secured him when I got up, he asked me what the matter—I told him he should know by and by—we Whitechapel, and gate him to a policeman I had heard the dog bark in the course of the night.

REDMOND ROCHE . I am in the employ of the prosecutors. On the 26th of April, I went to the premises directly after six o'clock—I found a dark lantern and small crow on the premises the lantern had been burning—it had a part of a candle in it, and part of the cloth which covered the lantern was burnt—I found it on one of the scaffolds where the floorcloth hung—I went with Winterflood in search of the prisoner, and found him at the Rose—I went into his brother's house afterwards—I ran round the house, and saw him getting over the palings at the further end of the rope ground—I followed—he was running as fast he could—he crossed the canal bridge, and as he crossed the bridge I observed him put his hang into his bosom, and throw something in the shape of coin into the water—it might be seven or eight pieces—I could not exactly say whether it was gold, silver, or copper—I overtook him about a mile and a half from the public-house, and told him he must consider himself my prisoner—I said "John, what did you give us this unnecessary start for?"—I do not think he made any reply—he asked what I took him for—I said "You will know when you go to Mr. Hay wood"—after he was put into a hackney coach, the policeman asked him where he slept last night—I do not think he made any reply—he asked him a second time, and he said he slept at his mother's, I think, but I am not sure—the policeman afterwards asked him if he did sleep at his mother's, and he said he had no mother, his mother was dead.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I was in the employ of the prosecutor. On Thursday, the 27th of April, I went there at six o'clock, and found a Knife near the counting-house door"—I looked at the door, and it had been cut with a knife close by the lock—the knife was open when I found it—I gave it to Winterflood—this is it—I had never sees it before.

JOHN LAST . I am a carman in the employ of Messrs. Haywood. I Know this Knife, it has been lent to me by the Prisoner—I have seen him

use it to cut a chalk line which is used in the business—I have not the least doubt of its being the knife—he lent it to me nearly two months before the robbery.

WILLIAM CHICHESTER REYNOLDS , I am a policeman. In consequence of information, I went to Messrs. Haywood's premises on Thursday morning the 27th of April, about eight o'clock, and examined them—the wood went of the counting-house door close by the lock had been cut away, by some small instrument like a knife, to make way for a larger instrument similar to this crow—I compared this crow-bar and it fitted exactly—it was a very strong lock—great violence had been used to it—it was broken right in two—I found the crow-bar exactly fitted the marks on the desk—I afterwards went in search of the prisoner—he was brought to me, and the first question I asked him was where he slept over night—and after a few minutes, he said he slept at his mother's, but would not tell me when that was—I told him the nature of the charge directly I took him—he said his mother could prove an alibi for him, and state where he slept last night—I searched him immediately on the spot, and found 8s. 6d. in silver in three separate pockets—he gave his mother's address at Union-hall.

JANS PRITCHARD . I live in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields. I went before the Magistrate on Thursday—my son did not sleep at home on the Wednesday night before—he sleeps in my room when he is at home, and my daughter also—he slept in my room on the Tuesday—I saw him on the Wednesday morning, but he did not sleep at home on Wednesday night.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent—I was not near the place—the knife shown was never in my possession—I had one similar to it, has that is not the one—I had lost it upwards of six weeks.

NOT GUILTY

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18370508-1379

1379. JAMES PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April, 1 mare, price 6l., the property of Joseph Baddiley, the elder.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

JOSEPH BADDILEY . I am a gardener, and live in Trafalgar-place, Shacklewell. On Friday, the 7th of April, I saw my horse safe in the field adjoining my garden, which joins the Red Cow—when I went after it, on Saturday morning at six o'clock, it was gone—I saw it again on Sunday, the 9th,. in Mr. Winkley's-yard, Wellington-street, Blackfriars-road—I have no doubt of its being miner—I had had it about two years—it is now over the way.

JOSEPH BADDILEY , JUN. I am the prosecutor's son. I saw my father horse in the field at half-past seven o'clock on Friday evening—it was gone in the morning—it is now over the way—I know it to be my father's.

THOMAS WINKLEY . I am a horse-slaughterer, in Green-street, Wellington-street, Blackfriars-road. On Saturday, the 8th of April, the prisoner came to me between nine and ten o'clock—I knew him well before—he brought a brown mare, and I bought it of him for 28s.—it was worth no more—it was fit for nothing but slaughtering—the skin was worth 6s. or 7s.—it was not fit for cat's meat, it would hardly make stock—the horse was good for nothing else than killing—I suppose it could draw, but I never saw it walk—it was broken down in the fore feet and very poor—I showed it to the prosecutor, and he claimed it—I said to the prisoner, "I saw you in the market yesterday?"—he said, "Yes"—I said, "Where did

you buy this?"—he said in Long-lane, after the market was over—the market is over at six o'clock.

Prisoner. I deal in old horses—I bought her in Long-lane between sewn and eight o'clock—I took her home and tied her to a post before my door—she slipped her head out and started—I went to look for her, and met a policeman, who said he had not seen her—I found her afterwards at the Green-yard at Stepney. Witness, I have bought two or three horses of him for slaughtering—he gave me his address as West-road, St. George's fields, and mentioned some place which I cannot recollect.

MR. BADDILEY. I have been offered 6l. for the horse, but In the witness's business, the horse being out of condition, I should have bought it as he did, but it is worth more to me to keep alive to work.

JOHN BRUNDLEY . I am a police-inspector. I went with the prosecutor to Winkley's merely to secure the horse's being produced at the office.

THOMAS JOHN RICHARDSON . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner at No. 9, Goldsmith's-square, Hackney-road.

JOSEPH BADDILEY, JUN . re-examined. I had seen the horse safe at half-past seven o'clock in the evening—Long-lane is about three miles from our place—he horse could get out between the posts—it could be made to go ten miles an hour.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought this mare in Long-lane, about half-past eight o'clock, for 23s.—If I had known I should have been brought up to day. I could have proved buying the mare.

THOMAS WINKLEY re-examined. I saw him in the market on Friday, from three to four o'clock—it is not usual to bring horses into the market after dark—in April, at six o'clock, the horses are turned out; but after the market is cleared, in the little back streets, such as Long-lane, there is business done—I suppose in the Greyhound-yard business is done till eight or nine o'clock—they are horses which have been in the market—the prisoner brought, the horse to me about nine or ten o'clock on Saturday morning.

JOSEPH BADDILEY re-examined. It was not dusk when I saw has safe—it was nearer eight than seven o'clock—I had heard it strike seven and believe it was more than half-past seven o'clock.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18370508-1380

1380. JAMES PRICE was again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, at St. Luke, 1 mare, price 7l., the property of John Soanes and another.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

STEBBON PORTER . I was in the service of John Soanes and son, ropemakers, Bow-common, Stepney. I saw the mare safe on the 6th of April in the field adjoining master's ground, about two miles from town—I did not see it again till I saw it at the Greyhound, in Smithfield—a policeman went there with me—I saw it over the way in Pickford's presence—it is the same as I saw at the Greyhound, and the one master lost—I have known it about three years—I think it worth 7l., but am not much of a judge—it has not worked this winter—it used to run in a chaise—it was missed on the 11th—it was a black mare.

JAMES PICKFORD . I am a horse slaughterer—I carry on business in Cock-court, Sharp's-alley, and live in Whitecross-street. On Wednesday, the 12th of April, about dark, I saw the prisoner in Milton-street, where Sweetman, my partner, lives—a horse was standing at the door, and the

prisoner close by it—he offered it for tale for 30s.—I gave him 1l. 5s. for it, and 1s. to the boy for showing him my partner's house, and 6d. to drink—the prisoner said he bought it of a man at Enfield—I cannot reach, lect when be said he bought it—I sent it to the slaughter-house from there, but on examining it I thought it too good to slaughter, and I immediately sent it to the Greyhound, in Smithfield—I then went to the station house, and laid information—the horse is now over the way—the prosecutor went with me to the Greyhound, and saw and claimed it.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not give you my address? A. Yes—I wrote it down, as I always do—it was not exactly a correct address, but I (mil him close by there—he gave me Goldsmith's-place, and he lives in the square.

THOMAS JOHN ROBINSON . I am a policeman. I had information on Wednesday night, the 12th of April, from Pickford, and apprehended the prisoner in Goldsmith-square, Hackney-road—I told him I took him on suspicion of horse-stealing—he said very well, and that he bought the horse of a man named Hemmings, at a beer-shop door, in Enfield-town—I went to Enfield, and made inquiry at every beer-shop and public-house I could find, but could find no tidings of such a man or transactions—I do not exactly recollect when he said he bought it—he gave a description of the man—that he wore a smock frock, and coat and hat—I could hear nothing of any such man having been seen.

GRORGE TEAKLE . I am a policeman. I received information about the horse—Porter went with me to the stable, and claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Monday I was down at Enfield, and saw the mare standing at a beer-shop door, and a lad with it—I asked him if it was for sale, and a middle-aged man, with a smock-frock and straw hat, came out—I asked him the price—he asked 2l. for it—I told him it would not fetch that in town, nor half—however I bought it of him for a guinea—I brought it home, and sold it on Wednesday to Pickford—I did not suspect any thing wrong—I often buy horses in the open street without suspicion—she looked to me very much strained indeed behind—her fetlock touched the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Life.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin

Reference Number: t18370508-1383

1383. JOHN HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May, 1 pair of boots, value 1s., the goods of Edward Taylor; and 1 shilling, the monies of Joseph Bolton, his master.

EDWARD TAYLOR . I am shopman to Joseph Bolton, a chemist and druggist, at Walworth. The prisoner was our errand-boy for about three weeks—we missed money twice, and Mr. Bolton requested me to mart 3 shilling, which I did on the 11th of May, and left it on the counter between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and in three quarters of an hour it was gone—the prisoner left work about ten o'clock in the morning—Mr. Bolton called him into the parlour, and searched him, but found nothing—I then searched him, and at the bottom of his fob I found the marked shilling, which I knew to be the same—I gave it to the policeman, who has lost it, but I am certain it was the one I marked—in his breast on each side, under his shirt, I found a pair of ladies' boots, which had been seat to me, among other old things, to give to some poor person—he must have gone up stairs to get them.

JOHN CALLINGHAM . I am a policeman. The prisoner was given into

my charge—I have the boots but I lost the shilling while I was at the Grand Jury-room, I suppose—it was marked with an "a" on the Head.

Prisoner's Defence. The shilling did not belong to the prosecuter—I had pawned my watch for 15s.—I gave my father 14s. out of it, and this was the other—I did not put the boots next my skin—the servant gave them to me, and said, "Put them under your coat, that master does not see them"—they were not under my shirt.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1381

1381. GEORGE GREEN was indicted for embezzlement.

HUGH EDWARD HOPKINS . I am a die manufacturer. The prisoner was in my service, and received monies on my account—I sent to Mr. Broad for this money, and found it had been paid—I had sent the prisoner to deliver goods to Mr. Pope, of Greenwich, and receive 12s.—he said they had not paid him—he was to deliver goods to Mr. Griffiths, of the Old Kent-road, but did not account to me for that.

STEPHEN BROAD . On the 28th of March I paid the prisoner 1l. 4s. 10d., and on the 3rd of April his balance, which amounted to 1l. 9s.—he receipted this bill for me.

THOMAS POPE . I paid the prisoner 12s. on the 4th of April—he brought a bill receipted from Mr. Hopkins, which I have here.

JAMES WHITNKY GRIFFITHS . I paid the prisoner 7s. on the 4th of April for his master, Mr. Hopkins.

JOHN EDWARD HOPKINS . I delivered the goods and bills to the prisoner—he never paid me these sums—I wag in the prosecutor's service at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 18— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1382

1382. ALFRED HACKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 1 iron pot, value 7s., the goods of Nancy Clementson, and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c.

STEPHEN TOWHIG (police-sergeant M 1.)On the 21st of April I saw the prisoner crossing the Southwark-bridge road with this kettle, between five and six o'clock in the morning—he saw me, threw it down, and ran away—I followed, calling, "Stop thief"—Wright came up to him—he let him go—I gave information at the station-house, and the next night one of our officers took him in a penny play—I am sure be is the person.

EDWARD MATTHEWS (police-constable M 68.) I took the prisoner from the description I received.

JOSEPH WRIGHT . I saw the prisoner run down the street, and the policeman calling after him—I could have stopped him, but knowing him. I did not—he is the person—I have known him for years.

NICHOLAS WHITE . I had the care of the property—it belong to a lady of the name of Nancy Clementson—1 had seen it safe a day or two before I saw it in the station-house—I then went to the house, and missed it.

WILLIAM ROSE . I was at work in this house on the 20th of April—at six o'clock I Locked the place, bolted the doors, and fastened the windows—this iron pot was secure then, I am sure it was fixed in brickwork.

Prisoner. I was hired by a man to carry it—I saw the policeman coming, and ran away.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1383a

1383. SAMUEL BOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of December, 4 3/4lbs. weight of mutton, value 2s., the goods of John Hewett; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18370508-1384

1384. ELIZABETH JACKSON, alias Smith, and JOHN COLEMAN , were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, 8 yards of silk, value 3l. 4s.; 11 shawls, value 10l.; 2 pieces of handkerchiefs, value 1l. 15s.; and 8 yards of challi, value 1l.; the goods of Edward Gribbin, from his person.

EDWARD GRIBBIN . I am a licensed hawker. I was stopping at the Two Brewers, London-wall, on the 20th of April—I left there that morning with a bundle of eight yards of silk, eleven shawls, and the handkerchiefs and cloth stated in the indictment—I went about my business, and after that as I was coming from Camberwell I went into the Alfred's Head. and saw the two prisoners there, and other persons—Jackson asked me if I would treat her, which I did, to a glass of rum—I was going home, and she followed me outside the door, and asked me if I would go Home with her—my bundle, containing these things, was on my arm—I laid I would not, and directly afterwards Coleman and two others came, and Coleman struck at me, and Jackson snatched the bundle off my arm—Coleman and others prevented me from apprehending her—I am sure he is the man—the bundle contained eleven shawls, two pieces of handkerchiefs, and the other things—I have only found two of the handkerchiefs, which were in pawn—they were on a piece, and have been cut off—they are damaged goods, and have holes in them.

Jackson. I am not the person that took the bundle. Witness. You are the person—the man did not touch it, I am sure of it.

Coleman. Q. Did you see me in the London-road, and ask my wife to have some half-and-half? Witness. A. That was on Saturday morning—I saw the man, and his wife told me where Jackson lived.

COURT. Q. Had you charged him with robbing you? A. No—I wanted to get the woman—it was her that took it, but he assisted her in getting away with it—I am quite sure of both of them.

THOMAS ABURROW . I saw the woman in the Alfred's Head, drinking with the prosecutor—I saw Coleman there, but did not see him speak to them—I saw the two prisoners in the London-road afterward, but did not see Coleman with the prosecutor.

HENRY CRICK . I am a pawnbroker, in Robert's-place, Dover-road I took in these two handkerchiefs of Coleman, on the 21st of April.

HENRY KIDNEY (police-constable L 86.)From information I received, I went and took the female prisoner at her residence.

JACKSON. I met him on the Thursday morning—he had been sleeping with a female—he asked me to have something to drink, and there was a dozen more—he was treating every one—I stopped with him two hours—he went to another public-house, and there we stopped till four o'clock in the afternoon—he asked me to go and sleep with him—I said no, I wished to go home.

Coleman's Defence, I and my wife were going to buy some meat—the prosecutor called us, and asked us to go into the Prince of Wales, and have some half-and-half—he asked my wife if she could tell him the girl that had been with him—she gave him no answer—he followed us on towards home, and called my wife to have some rum—I would not let her go—the then told him the house where they took the girl into custody—some days after, I was taken—the Inspector said he could not commit me, and then the pawnbroker was applied to, who said that I had pawned two handkerchiefs.

(The prisoner Coleman received a good character.)

JACKSON*— GUILTY . Aged 24.

COLEMAN- GUILTY . AGED 26.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18370508-1385

1385. SARAH SOPHIA SHAW was indicted for stealing, on, the 4th of May, 3 tumblers, value 2s. 6d.; 1 mustard-pot, value 2s.; 1 jug, value 4d.; 1 plate, value 1s.; 2 flower-vase stands, value 1s.; 1/2lb. weight of soap, value 3d.; and 1lb. weight of sugar, value 3d.; the goads of Rebecca Lockhead, her mistress.

REBECCA LOCKHEAD . The prisoner was my servant—in consequence, of what I heard I had her apprehended—all the articles produced are mine.

Prisoner. There are some blue plates of mine among them—my mistress promised she would forgive me for my kind services to my master in laying him out. Witness. No, I did not.

THOMAS AYLESBURY (police-constable L 136.) I went to a house in James-street, New Cut, at half-past seven o'clock, on the 1st of May—I believe it belongs to the prisoner, her children live there, and, found this property there, but some of them I stopped the prisoner's son with in the morning—there was a cancelled £10 check—I have it here—it was found in a box there.

Prisoner. That was thrown into the fire place, and I took it—I told the constable that I had got two or three basons at home belonging to my mistress that had had dripping—my mistress gave all the dripping to me as my perquisite—I took home the jugs, but they are damaged.

REBECCA LOCKHEAD . I gave her the dripping, but did not allow her to take the basons—I had promised her a few articles of earthenware, but I did not permit her to take any of these things.

JURY. Q. Did you ever give her authority to take these things away? A. No, never.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18370508-1386

1386. SARAH SOPHIA SHAW was again indicted for stealing on the 1st of May, 7 jugs, value 4s.; 7 saucers, value 2s.; 8 cups, Value 2s.; 3 egg cups, value 1s.; 5 plates, value 1s.; 6 dishes, value 6s.; 2 butter-boats, value 1s.; 2 flower-pots, value 1s. 6d.; 1 soap-dish, value 2s.; 1 pair of scissors, value 3d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s.; 1 belt, value 6d.; and 1 spoon, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of Rebecca Lockhead, her mistress.

REBECCA LOCKHEAD . This other property is mine—I know these shoes and saucers to be mine, and this spoon, and two plates, and other things.

Prisoner. I asked her to give me a pair of old slippers, and she said I might take a pair—I took the scissors because she did not return mine.

THOMAS AYLESBURY . I found these things in a box, under the bed, at her lodgings—these saucers, spoons, shoes, and this plate.

REBECCA LOCKHEAD . She left her scissors at my house, but I never borrowed them—her son worked at my house as well as her.

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18370508-1387

1387. EDWARD TROY was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MESSRS. CHAMBERS and SHEA conducted the Prosecution.

SUSANNAH EVERILL . I am the wife of Edward Everill, of Clarence place, Lambeth, a hosier. About four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 13th of April, the prisoner came for a skein of silk—he gave me half-a-crown—I gave him 2s. 5d. change, and put the half-crown into the till—there was no other there—I soon after looked at it, and found it bad—I took it out, and put it into my bed-room cupboard—it remained there till the Monday following—I delivered it to the policeman on the Tuesday morning—I did not take it out on Monday—I did not mix it with any other money—I am certain it was the same—on Monday, the 17th, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came again for a skein of thread—I served him—he gave me a bad shilling—the policeman passed my shop—I called him, and he took the bad shilling—I had never lost sight of it—on the next morning I gave him the half-crown—I am quite certain the prisoner is the person that came for the silk on the Thursday, and the thread on the Monday.

Prisoner. She said she never saw me in her life before. Witness, Yes, I have, two or three times—the policeman did not tell me to say that the prisoner gave me the half-crown—I did not say at the station-house I had never seen him before—I did not say, "I think you are the man"—I did not put the shilling into the till, and lock it—I put it in for a minute, but did not mix it—I have three divisions in my drawer—I sent for the officer before I knew the shilling was bad or good, because I knew him.

GEORGE WATMOUGH . I am a policeman. I was called into the shop on the 17th—the prisoner was there—he said, "You may search me, for you will find no more upon me"—I searched, and found nothing—I received a bad shilling, and the next day a bad half-crown.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin. These are both counterfeit.

Prisoner. I am quite innocent.

GUILTY.* Aged 19.— Confined One Year.

ADJOURNED TO MONDAY, JUNE 12TH.


View as XML