Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th August 1836.
Reference Number: t18360815
Reference Number: f18360815

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT

SESSIONS PAPER.

COPELAND, MAYOR.

TENTH SESSION, HELD AUGUST 15, 1836.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

Taken in Short-hand,

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

WILLIAM TYLER, PRINTER, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

1836.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the King's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY,

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM TAYLOR COPELAND , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Gurney, Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Williams, Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; William Venables, Esq.; Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq.; and Sir John Key, Bart; Aldermen of the said City of London; the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City; Thomas Kelly, Esq.; John Cowan, Esq.; Samuel Wilson, Esq.; Sir Chapman Marshall, Knt.; Thomas Johnson, Esq; and Thomas Wood, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City of London; John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

John Pritchard

George Lamden

William Henry Kelyer

William Henry Reading

Joseph Reynolds

Joel Parry

John Rutcliffe

Thomas Robinson

Jeremiah Humphries

William Wardell

George Ranken

George Mills

Second Jury.

Charles Pace

Joseph Morton

William Nicholas

Thomas Riddick

James Walworth

William Harvey

William Parker

Robert Wallit

Peter Mumford

Robert William Pearce

John Heasler

Samuel Ray

Third Jury.

John Pound

Robert Robinson

George Rudd

Solomon Rich

Henry Court

William Prior

George Richardson

Thomas Cole

Robert Masey

Joseph Colbatch

Edward William Turner

William Roberts

Fourth Jury.

Robert Foster

James Riddle

Nathaniel Oakey

Joseph Hughes

John Radley

George Truelove

David Sleemaker

William Everett

James Pavey

William George Parrott

James Robinson

William Hewitt

Fifth Jury.

James Parish

William Head

David Ray

William Redwood

Thomas Spencer Hall

James Burrows

George Griffith

Charles Hemsley

John Hall

Robert Stimpson

Alfred Griffith Raystrick

James Smith

Sixth Jury.

George Richardson

John Ray

Thomas Davies

Luke Anderson

Joseph Rivers

Matthew Rowe

James Poole

John Morris

Edward Hanson

Jacob Mason

Henry Rawlinson

William Cottle

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

COPELAND, MAYOR. TENTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that the prisoner has been previously in custody—An obelisk (†) that the prisoner is known to be the associate of bad characters.

CAPITAL CONVICTIONS.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1759

1759. HENRY GEORGE THOMAS was indicted for that he, on the 20th of July, at St. John, at Hackney, in and upon Mary Ann Thomas, unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did make an assault, and unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did cut and wound her upon her head, with intent feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder her.—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to maim and disable her.—3rd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do her some grievous bodily harm.

MARY ANN THOMAS . I live at Hackney-wick, Homerton. The prisoner is my husband—we have been married eighteen years—he is a day-labourer—we have lived together in the same house all long—this happened last Wednesday month, from nine o'clock, when I left my work, to eleven—I do not remember the day of the month—it began in the last field, going home—my husband had been to the Spread Eagle public-house that afternoon—I saw him there the first time at bout a quarter after nine o'clock at night, when I left my work—I went to him, and asked him if he was coming home—he said, "No, when I please"—I said, "Will you stop here, till I come back from the butcher's to buy you some meat for your supper?"—he said nothing to that—I went to the butcher's and bought a beef-steak for his supper—I came back, and met him in the road—he was going in a direction from his home—I said, "Turn home, and come home along with me, and I will cook your supper"—he said, "I will," and we walked together, side by side, across three fields, going home to Hackney-wick—when we got into the last field, he hit me on the right side of my head with his first, and almost knocked me down, but not quite—he said."Go home, and I will let you see when you get home what I will do"—I said, "What do you mean, do not go to hit me, pray do not knock me about, you have hurt the side of my head, I will go in, and sit down, and I will cook your supper"—he used expressions not fit to mention—he said, "Bloody into you, I will have your life, or you shall have mine"—we were close to our house at that time—I said nothing to it—I went in doors, and he came in after me, and locked the door after him, locking me in—he then turned round with a broom, and hit me on the head—no harder than the broom could go on my head—the broom was behind the door—I saw him take it—he hit me with the top, the end you sweep with—he hit me across the head with it, and every blow he hit fetched blood—he hit me with it four or five times, and used many very wicked

words—he said, "B----y into you, I will have your life, it is no use your thinking of any thing else, for I will have it"—I fell once from the blows he hit me with the brook-stick—I got up again, and he hit me again with the broom, and after he had done that, he put his two thumbs to my throat, and squeezed them as hard as he could to my throat, against the front of my neck, in the middle of my neck—he then left go, and put a rope of my neck, which was in the house—it was his garden rope—it was on the drawers, he reached it from the drawers—it was nearly as thick as my arm—it was a good thickness—he put it round my neck, and made a loop knot, and said he would draw it tight, but he did not, for I put my two hands to prevent its tightening, and he swung me with the rope against the door, and kicked me on the ribs—he then directly up with the hatchet, threw it across his shoulder and said, "I will have your b----y life, as I have split this table"—the table was split in halves—he got the hatchet from against the door where it always stands—he did not touch me with it—he put it down and went to the door—he said, "Ten b----y policemen shall not hinder me, for I will have your life, "and while he was gone to the door I got our of the little window, over the pales, out of the back gate, and met the policeman on his duty—I made complaint to him—he was very near the house when I got out of the back-gate—I begged of him to take me to the station-house, and after leaving me at the station-house, he went and came back with the prisoner in about half an hour—a surgeon dressed my wounds, at the station-house.

Q. Was the prisoner sober at this time? A. He was not so very drunk but he well knew what he was doing—he was not sober, but knew what he was about—I had not seen him that day since a little before nine o'clock in the morning—we had breakfasted together—we parted friendly then, but not altogether friendly—we did not part in malice—we had no quarrel at breakfast, nor in the course of the morning.

Prisoner. She has taken every thing from me that would fetch 2d—I never hit her, nor nothing—I have done no such thing to her—it is all false what she has been swearing.

COURT. to Witness. Q. Then you have not been on very good terms? A. No; I have suffered a martyrdom by him—we had no quarrel that morning—some time ago we had, and then my eyes were closed—I could not see across the room—that was done with his fist—nobody lived in the house with us—no children, nor any body else.

Q. During the whole of this time, did you do any thing but what you have described—did you touch him at all? A. No; it was more than I dared—I did not, not from first to last—it was a common sort of hatchet that he had—it had a wooden handle—it is here—he would have used that against me if I had not got out of the window—I was close to him at the time he took it up.

JONATHAN YOUNG . I am a policeman. On Wednesday, the 20th of July, I met the prosecutrix in my rounds—the blood was running from her head in a desperate state—she complained to me of having been ill used, and begged me to take her to the station, for fear her husband would murder her if I did not so—it was near twelve o'clock at night when I got her there—it was between eleven and twelve o'clock when she met me—after leaving her there, I and my brother officer went after the prisoner, and found him in the house, lying on his bed, dressed—my brother officer spoke first—he said, "Come, we want you to go along with us"—he said, "Wait a bit—go on; I will come presently"—we told him

he must go directly—he said, "Wait while I put some other clothes on"—(he had his labouring clothes on)—we allowed him to do so—he said, "What have you done with my wife?"—I said I had taken her to the station—there was blood on the table and on the floor—I pointed to the blood, and said, "What have you been doing?"—he said, "I only gave my wife a spat on the nose"—I said, "Are you aware that you have very nearly killed her?"—he said, "A b----b----, I hope I am quite, and then I shall be hung for it"—he went very quietly to the station-house with us; and on the road he said, "If I get over this here, I will buy a gun, and I will blow her brains out with it"—we then took him to the station-house.

JOHN MATE . I am a policeman. I was with Young on this occasion—we went into the house together—the account he has given is true—I asked the prisoner, when he had put on fresh clothes, where the rope was—he said, "What rope?"—I told him, the rope he was going to hang his wife with—he said it was not a rope, it was only a garden line—he then looked down, and picked it up—he said, "This is it, "and put it into his pocket—I took it from him—there was blood on it (producing it)—it was several times doubled—we have since rolled it up to tie it in the bundle—it was in a straggling state, lying about the house—I have the broom here—it is a hair broom—it was broken in this manner then (producing it, with the head broken off, and the handle split in two)—there was blood on it, but very trifling—there is none to be seen now—I found it on the floor in the house—here is the cap the prosecutrix had on, and her gown and shift (producing themthese articles were all in a bloody state)—here is the hatchet—in flinging it up it had cut the ceiling twice; and I found the table with the centre board broken right in two.

Prisoner. I went quietly with him. Witness. Yes, he went quietly to the station-house.

COURT? Q. How did he seem as to drink? A. He was perfectly sober When I entered the house

FREDERICK EVANS TEUISH . I am a surgeon. I was called in, on Wednesday, the 20th of July, to see the prosecutrix, at near twelve o'clock at night, at the station-house—she had on the clothes produced when I saw her—I examined her, and found a wound in the head, in the upper and back part of the head—it was very severe contused, lacerated wound—it was so irregular in its shape there is scarcely any applying dimensions to it—it was very severe, on account of its being so much lacerated—it was not a clean cut, but a lacerated, contused wound, with many angles in it, and went to the bone—there was another slighter wound near it, but not near so severe—it was the same description of wound, but very much smaller indeed—it was very near the former one—I did not examine further then—I found no other severe wound externally—we conveyed her home—an examination then took place, and I found there were two ribs fractured—there were several bruises on the arm on the left side—I do not remember any more appearances of injury—the blood on the clothes produced was all from the two wounds on the head—I imagine it was done by driving a comb into the scalp, because part of a comb was taken out of the wound—the comb had been forced in by a blow—I thought there was very great danger at the time—I feared erysipelas might supervene, and there was danger from her extremely exhausted state, from loss of blood—I did not see the prisoner that night.

Prisoner Defence. This is the way the woman has served me—every thing worth twopence she takes, and sells away from me, and pawns them.

JOHN MATE re-examined. The cord lay doubled up in several lengths on the floor.

MARY ANN THOMAS . re-examined. Q. When he used the cord to you what state was it in? A. He put it round my neck in this manner (double)—I am quite sure of it.

Q. What do you mean by saying it was as thick as your wrist? A. I was so very insensible, I did not know to a certainly, but I know this is the rope, and this is the way it was on my neck, and then drawed it—I did not think this was it when I said it was the thickness of my wrist, I thought it was the other one, which was in the house, but this is it—I never attempted to put boiling lead, or any thing into my husband's ears—I tried to comfort him all I could always—I never attempted to do any thing of the sort to him.

GUILTY— DEATH . Aged 43.

Second Jury before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1760

1760. EDWARD BOWEN was indicted for that he, on the 26th of July, at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, in and upon Eliza Hawes, unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did make an assault, and unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did cut and wound her in and upon her neck and throat, with intent, in so doing, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder her.—2nd COUNT stating his intent to be to disable her.—3rd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do her some grievous bodily harm.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

ELIZA HAWES . I live with my father, in James-street. I am between fifteen and sixteen years of age—I have now come from the hospital—I have known the prisoner between six and seven months, he lived near me—he wanted me to keep his company (that was on the night I first became acquainted with him)—I told him that my father and mother thought I was too young—On Tuesday night, the 26th of July, I was at a friend's house in Granby-row, which is at the back of our house—I was leaning over some palings, looking into a pig-stye at some little pigs—I had seen the prisoner three or four minutes before, up at the corner, drinking some beer—he came to me, put his arm round my throat, and drew a knife across my throat, and when he did that he threw me down—the knife cut my throat—he then threw me down, knelt on me, and cut my chest while he was kneeling on me—I screamed out—he said, "I hope I have done enough for you"—two boys caught him, and then the policeman came up and took him in charge—I bled a good deal—Mary Gogay lifted me up—I was taken to Mr. Butler's surgeon—he put a bit of strapping on my wound, and I was taken to St. Bartholomew's Hospital, where I have been ever since—I have suffered a good deal.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not appear very much excited, as if he had drank something? A. No—we had been on very good terms—he had been in the habit of seeing me every now and then, and talking with me familiarly—I did not observe him attempt to cut his own throat.

COURT. Q. You said you saw him drinking by the corner; was he talking to any men or boys at that time? A. Yes—I heard him tell some boys that he was going to sea the next morning.

LYDIA GOGAY . I am the daughter of Samuel Gogay, of Granby-row. On Tuesday night, the 26th, the prosecutrix came to our house to

play with me—I was standing at my father's door, and saw her looking over the palings to see if she could see the young pigs—I saw the prisoner come up to her and cut her, but I could not see what with—she fell down, and he was like kneeling over her, as if he was cutting her, and he said, "Now I hope I have done enough for you"—I saw something in his hand, but could not tell what it was—I went away to tell her mother of it.

MARY GOGAY . On the 26th of July, I was standing about three yards from Eliza Hawes, between nine and ten o'clock, and saw the prisoner talking to some boys—I saw him come towards the prosecutrix, with both his hands up, but I took no notice of it—I turned my head, and heard her scream—I looked round and saw her on the ground, and he kneeling over her, as if he was cutting her—I picked her up—I looked round afterwards, and saw him struggling with two or three boys—I took her into the house—I saw a large gash in her throat—it bled a good deal—a neighbour helped me to take her to the doctor's—I afterwards went with her to the hospital.

DANIEL DURANT . I am a policeman. Between nine and ten o'clock at night, on the 26th of July, I heard a female scream—I ran to the spot as quick as I could, and saw the prisoner with two boys—I then heard he had cut a girl's throat—one of the boys said to him."Edward, you have done wrong"—I believe that was his brother, but I am not positive—I took him into custody—I received a knife from a strange boy—I cannot say who it was—I received it at the time I had the prisoner in custody—I had told of him at the time—it was the same boy that said, "Edward, you have done wrong, "that gave me the knife; and he said, "This is the knife he stabbed the girl with"—the prisoner made no answer to that—I went with him to the doctor's behind the prosecutrix—he said, in going along, "Don't hold me by the collar, to disgrace me"—I said, "You have disgraced yourself"?—then he said, almost directly, "I did not think of going to the station-house; I meant to kill her and myself too"—I had not said any thing to him to induce him to say any thing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe whether any thing had happened to his own throat. A. No; I did not look to see.

WILLIAM BRADFORD . I live at No. 4, James-street, Bethnal-green. I know the prisoner—I have seen him working at a shop, in Brick-lane—I saw him on the night before the girl was wounded, about nine o'clock, sharpening his knife under our gas lamp, by the side of our door—I heard of this injury about half an hour afterwards.

EDWARD JEPSON . I am a surgeon of St. Bartholomew's Hospital. I saw the girl first at the hospital—I found her with a wound on the left side of the throat, about four inches in length—it was evidently made by a knife—it was not a wound of a serious nature in itself—it was on the left side of the neck, about mid-way between the head and the shoulder—it was about an inch in depth—it was directly over the carotid artery—it was very nearly exposed—I could see its pulsation—if that he had been divided, it would have been fatal—I do not recollect any other wound—I have not continued to attend her—I went into the country the day after.

Cross-examined. Q. That is an artery known to medical men as to an incision being fatal, but the boy could not know it? A. Oh, no—it is not necessary it should be fatal from the wound—I have seen the girl to-day—she is in the progress of recovery—there is no danger of losing her life.

ARTHUR SQUIRE . I am one of the house-surgeons of St. Bartholomew's

Hospital. I first saw the girl on the 10th of August—the wound was then healing—I have heard Mr. Jepson's statement of the nature of the wound, and agree with it, from what I can judge of the present appearance—she is not dismissed from the hospital—she is still weak.

Cross-examined. Q. There is no danger from her coming here? A. No—she came in a coach.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening we had the piece of work I was very much aggravated—I was in liquor at the time I did the deed, and was very much aggravated indeed—I am very sorry for what I have done.

GUILTY— DEATH . Aged 17.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1761

1761. MARY WOOD was indicted for that she, on the 16th of August, at St. Paul, Shadwell, upon Timothy Donovan, unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did make an assault, and unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did stab and wound him in and upon his left hand, with intent in so doing, feloniously, wilfully, and of her malice aforethought, to kill and murder him—2nd COUNT, stating her intent to be in maim and disable him.—3rd COUNT, stating her intent to be do him some grievous bodily harm.

TIMOTHY DONOVAN . I live in Elbow-lane, Shadwell. I have known the prisoner eight or nine years—she attends the markets—she is single—she sells fish and fruit, and all things that are in season, and that is my employment also—last Tuesday I employed a porter to carry some oysters for me to the Duke of York public-house, Ratcliffe-highway—I went to the place where I had appointed to meet him—he had come with the oysters, and had them on the pitching block—it was between five and six o'clock in the evening—I had seen the prisoner about nine or ten o'clock that morning, by the Duke of York door, at the same place—I had not seen her between that time and five or six o'clock—I had no difference or words with her at all between nine and ten o'clock—in the evening, as I was coming out of the Duke of York, I saw the prisoner sitting down by the side of the door—she got up off the seat—before she got up, she said, "You have most likely taken part with your mother"—(my mother was not there then—I had not seen my mother since the morning)—I said to the prisoner, "You had better leave my mother alone"—I was walking away from her, and she followed me with an oyster knife—she was not selling oysters then—she was sitting there with red herrings, but she had the oyster knife in her hand as she sat there—she said she would stab the one eye out my head—I did not say any thing—my face was to her then—I put up my hand to save my eye, and I received the wound from the knife in the thick part of my hand—she had followed me about two yards, and got me close up against the pump, with the knife in her hand—my back was to the pump—she was quite close to me when I received the cut in my hand—she had followed me up as close as she could, and I went up against the pump, as she jobbed the knife into me—she was not half a yard from me.

Q. Could you tell by her motion to what part of you the knife was coming? A. It was coming to my eye—when she had done it, she went and sat down on the same seat she got up from, and said nothing—I did not say any thing—I went to the station-house and complained, and the

prisoner was taken—Mr. Croucher, a surgeon in Ratcliffe-highway, near where it happened, saw me—he is not here.

Prisoner. He was with his mother in the morning, drinking at the Duke of York, about one o'clock. Witness. I was not, nor between nine and ten o'clock in the morning—I was not out of bed then—I was ill.

Prisoner. He will deny it—this is a spite they have owed me about five years—I have been totally ruined by them—my things broken and smashed in the street by him and his sister. Witness. Her things were not smashed, she had them all packed up—they were not out of sale at all—I have not smashed any of her things, nor did my mother, in my presence.

Prisoner. He is sure to deny it, and is capable of swearing to it—his oath is not to be taken, he would swear any thing it is well known—he lives in so many places, where he lives to-day he will not live to-morrow—a young woman was tried last night, in the New Court, through his sister—they make a practice of bringing people here. Witness. I have lived in Elbow-lane six months with my sister—she was a witness here yesterday, in the New Court, I believe, about a robbery of blankets and sheets.

CAROLINE MURPHY . I am a widow, and live at No. 36, Angel-gardens. Last Tuesday the prosecutor was taken very ill, and asked me to follow the porter home with the oysters, and I followed the porter to the Duke of York, with the oysters—I was there when Donovan came there—the prisoner was sitting down by the Duke of York, alongside some redherrings—I do not know whether they were hers—they were for sale—Donovan went into the Duke of York to get change for 6d., to pay the porter—I saw him come out to pay the porter—I heard the prisoner say "I suppose you mean to take up your mother's cause?"—she was sitting down—he said, "You had better leave my mother alone"—she instantly got up, and followed him with the knife in her hand—she said she would job the other eye out of his head—he put up his hand to save his eye—he was drawing himself back—his face was towards the prisoner—he went back a very little distance—he was close against the pump, and the prisoner followed with the knife—he put up his hand to save his eyes, and received the blow in his hand—I saw the blow made—it seemed to be aimed at his eye—I could see that—she was very close against him—I was so frightened I could not stop to see any more—she sat herself down again after striking the blow—his hand was bleeding terribly after she made the blow.

Prisoner. She was not there at the time at all—she is evidence against me because he could not get any body else—she lives with him. Witness. I do not—I am sure of that—I never lived with him.

Prisoner. She has lived with him for twelve months off and on, and it can be proved—all the neighbourhood know it. Witness. It is false—I never lived with him in my life—I was there at the time.

Prisoner. Q. Were you there at the time he came out and struck me? Witness. A. I never saw a blow made—I was there at the time he came out.

Q. Did he not strike me, and say, by the b----y H—y G—t, he would punch my face for me? A. I heard nothing of the kind—he said nothing at all but what I have mentioned, I am very sure—I did not see her opening oysters—I saw no oysters by her—nothing but herrings—she occasionally sells oysters—I did not see her opening any oysters—she said at the office that she had some oysters at the Duke of York, and I said I saw a woman of the name of Gilbert take them away from the pitching-block—the

prisoner was sitting where the herrings were, about two yards from the oysters—I do not know whose oysters they were—I did not say before the Magistrate that they were her's—I said Gilbert had taken some away—I do not know whose they were—I did not see any one take the knife from her—she sat down with the knife in her hand.

JOSEPH COCKINGS . I am a policeman. On Tuesday afternoon, between five and six o'clock, Donovan came to the station-house for me—it is three or four hundred yards from the Duke of York—he was bleeding very much at the left hand—it appeared to have had a severe stab in what I believe is called the ball of the thumb—in consequence of what he said I went to the Duke of York—the prisoner was sitting by the door—I told her I was come to take her into custody for stabbing Donovan—she said it was as much his fault as it was hers, and with that she said she stabbed him with the knife—she had no knife with her—I took her to the station-house—I then returned and found an oyster-knife lying in a basket on the top of some oysters in a tub on the pitching-block about two yards from where she was sitting—she was apparently perfectly sober—quite so.

Prisoner Defence. Last Tuesday, at half-past twelve o'clock, I came from market with a peck of oysters and some herrings, and I sat at the corner of the Duke of York—this chap has got a wheelbarrow, and sits out in the street—his mother came up to me about half-past one o'clock in the day, and began to blackguard me—(I happened to be in a little trouble by the family about five months ago, and then she was constantly blaming me about my poor old soul of a mother who is dead)—I made her no answer, and put up with a great deal from her—her expressions were unbearable—the son came there at a little after one o'clock and the sister, and began to abuse me—I made them no answer, but moved my things from them for quietness—there were some stones in the way, and I was obliged to move back again, and I put the things on the pitch—he came there about four o'clock with the witness, with a peck of oysters, and he put them down on the pitch—there was no porter at all—I was sitting down mending my apron—his mother came and struck me across the face—I said nothing, but he got up and walked away, as I did not wish to be injured by him—I have been hurt by them for the last five years, and constantly abused—a woman came up and asked me to open pennyworth of oysters, which I did—my back was turned to him as he came out at the door of the Duke of York—it is not my knife which has been produced—he came out and made a blow across my face—I put my hand up with the knife in it to save my face, and whether the knife cut him or not I did not know at the time—it was not with the intention of cutting him on injuring him—it never entered my head—I should be very sorry to do it—the person standing by was a stranger, and I can not find her out, or she could prove it—I have no witness—nobody knows what has become of me—these people have such sly arts, they have let nobody know what has become of me.

GUILTY— DEATH . Aged 47.

Recommended to mercy, considering she was under great excitement.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX LARCENIES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, August 15th, 1836.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18360815-2762

2762. WILLIAM MARTIN, CHARLES PISTER, JAMES CARMICHAEL, THOMAS WHITEHEAD, ROBERT KENDAL , and ROBERT ELLIOTT were indicted for a misdemeanor.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, August 16th, 1836.

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18360815-1763

1763. JOHN WAUDE was indicted for stealing on the 15th of July, 1 ham, value 15s., the goods of John Wilkinson.

WILLIAM COLEMAN . I am under-porter at the King's Arms, in Philip-lane, Addle-street. On the 15th of July, I was at the Plasterers' Arms, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner come up the kitchen-stairs with the ham under his arm, in a sack—I watched, and he put it into a truck which stood in the hall-yard, and went away with it—I followed him to East-road, New North-road, and he went into a shop there, but did not take if off the truck—I went into the shop directly he came out—I did not hear him offer it for sale—I followed him to Popham-street, Popham-terrace—I then missed the basket the ham was in, off the truck, for about half an hour—I did not recover the ham—I suffered him to take it away—I did not like to stop him without my master's leave.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. When he came up the stairs, how far were you from him? A. I was on the steps, at the hall-door about as far from him as I am now—I saw the knuckle of the ham poking out under his arm—I know that he kept pits, and he had sold one very shortly before—he took the joints to his master, Mr. Lake's cellar, in Aldermanbury—he had a room on these premises—the prisoners had no business in the kitchen—the hams were kept there—the cellars are in Aldermanbury—he had no business down these stairs.

THOMAS M'LELLAN . I am an officer of Cripplegate. I took the prisoner into custody, about eight o'clock the same day—I made him no promise or threat—I took him near his master's in Aldermanbury, coming home with the truck—I said, "Why, John, I have been looking all day for you"—he said, "I suppose you have"—I said, "I want you to go along with me"—he said, "Very well—wait till I take my truck in, and take the dog out"—I took him over to the watch-house, and just before he got there, he said he had stolen the ham on purpose to get transported, and he said so at the Compter also—he said he offered it, for sale in the East-road, but afterwards finding the boy was following him, he threw it over the canal-bridge, as he thought no one should be blamed with him, for what he had done—that he was tired of living with his wife, as they had quarrelled, and he did it on purpose to be transported, as he was quite tried of his life.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he drunk or sober? A. Not sober—he was not very tipsy—he told me had been drinking all day—he appeared drunk, but I should say he was quite capable of knowing what he was about—he did not say he had thrown it into the river to be boiled in cold water—I know Coleman—I have not sent for him to examine him on the business—I have seen him many times—I have not talked to him about this charge—I have seen him every day—I have not spoken to him half a dozen times, nor three times, I might twice—I did not tell him to get his story all right—there might be conversation pass about it—I might have said, "All you have to do is to speak the truth"—I did not say, "All you have to do is to stick to it".

JOHN WILKINSON . I live in Plasterer's-hall. The prisoner was in my employ once—he left me about twelve months ago and went into the employment of a person who occupied a room in Plasterer's-hall—I could not swear that I lost a ham, as I cannot tell how many I had—I kept a quantity there—they nearly all run from 24lbs. to 28lbs.—they were Yorkshire hams, and were worth 9d. a lb.—the prisoner had no business down the kitchen stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. Mr. Lake, his master, had a room on the same premises? A. Yes—he had no cellars below at that time—the prisoner was cellarman and porter at Mr. Lake's—Mr. Lake had no bottles down the staircase, to my knowledge—he had no right to have any—he kept bottled ale and stout in his room—the prisoner lived about three years in my service—he went into Mr. Lake's service immediately after, and has been there up to the time of this charge.

WILLIAM COLEMAN re-examined. I have seen M'Lellan since the prisoner has been in custody two or three times a day—he has asked me how I was—I have not talked to him about this man's case—he told me to speak the truth—nobody has spoken to me since I have been out of court—he did not say, "Mind you have your story all right, "nor any thing of the kind.

(The prisoner received a good character, and his master promised to take him back.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.—Recommended to mercy— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18360815-1764

1764. WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 snuff-box, value 2l. 5s.; the goods of Thomas Terah Ventom from his person.

THOMAS TERAH VENTOM . I am an auctioneer, and live in Angel-court, Througmorton-street. On Saturday, the 16th of July, I was in Queen-street, Cheapside, at half-past three o'clock—I felt my coat flap fall—I immediately placed my hand on my pocket, and missed my snuff-box, which I had taken out not half a minute before, and had put it in my pocket—I saw a person on my right—I turned round and saw the prisoner soner—I collared him, and said, "You rascal, you have stolen my box"—he denied it—I again accused him three or four times—he so strongly denied it that I was thinking of leaving him and taking the other, but finding him change colour, I said, "You have it"—he said, "I have not, "and I knocked him down—while he was on the ground, I said, "You scoundrel, I am confident you have it; you have been dodging me about, you and another, for half an hour."and he immediately put his hand behind him, and said, "There is your box, Sir," and delivered it to me—he got on his legs, and said, "What do you hold me for?"—I said, "Because you took my box"—he said, "I have not got it" I said, "You had it, "

and I took him down Cheapside till I found an officer, and gave him into custody.

WILLIAM COURTNAY . I am an officer. I received the prisoner into custody with the box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Queen-street to look for work, walking behind two young men—I saw them drop something—it was the box—I picked it up—the gentleman turned round directly and accused me of having it—I said it was not his, and I would not give it up, because I saw two young men drop it—he knocked me down, and I said, "If this is your snuff-box, here it is, Sir."

MR. VENTOM. No such conversation ever took place.

(Fletcher Young, a baker, of Long-alley, Finsbury, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY *— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1765

1765. THOMAS CHARTRES and JAMES BARON were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Henry Willett, from his person.

THOMAS JOHNSON WILLIAMS . I live in West-Smithfield. On the 1st of August, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw Chartres take a handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to Baron, who was behind him when he took it—they both ran away—I caught hold of Baron, and my father took hold of the other one—I brought Baron back towards my father, and he dropped the handkerchief—a gentleman picked it up and gave it to me—I am certain it was the same he dropped—I gave it to my father.

EBENEZER WILLIAMS . I produce the handkerchief, which I received from my son—I saw Chartres take the handkerchief, and give it to Baron, who put it under his jacket—they parted—Baron went to the left, and Chartres to the right—I saw Baron drop the handkerchief as I went to secure Chartres.

HENRY WILLETT . I am a tailor, and live in Aldermanbury. The handkerchief produced is mine—I lost it in Smithfield, on the 1st of August, about eleven o'clock in the morning—I felt a tug at my pocket I looked round, and saw the two prisoners in custody, and saw Baron drop the handkerchief.

Chartres' Defence. I was going along, and some gentleman laid hold of me, and said I picked that gentleman's pocket—I said it was false—I was going for my master, to the Docks.

Baron's Defence. I saw a handkerchief. It was thrown behind me.

EBENEZER WILLIAMS re-examined. I found two more handkerchiefs in Baron's cap, but none on the other prisoner.

Baron. I did not wear a cap, but a hat. Witness. I think it was a cap, but it was taken out of what he wore.

(Mary Pearce, of Milton-street, Cripplegate; and Margaret Burgess, gave Baron a good character: and James Chartres, of Baker's-row, Clerkenwell, gave Chartres a good character.)

CHARTRES— GUILTY . Aged 16.

BARON— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1766

1766. ANN CHESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July, 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 ribbon, value 1s.; and 1 watch-key, value 2s.; the goods of John Perkins, from his person.

JOHN PERKINS . I am a journeyman cooper, and live in New North-street, Theobalds-road. On the 30th of July, I had been to an annual dinner, and was going to see a mate part of the way home, who lived in the New-cut, Blackfriars-road—on my return back, coming up Bridge-street, I turned up Bride-lane, and the prisoner accosted me, wishing me to go with her—I gave her no encourgement whatever to think that I would go with her, and on coming to the passage in Fleet-street, I parted with her—she went round the church—I turned into Fleet-street—on looking at the clock, I felt for my watch, and found it was gone—I pursued her down the passage—I saw a watchman, and asked if he had seen a woman run that way—he said he had seen two—he sprang his rattle, and on crossing Fleet-street to go the Shoe-lane, the prisoner was brought back; and on going to the station-house the watch was found in her hand, as if she was going to drop it—I took it out of her hand, and kept it till we got to the station-house, and delivered it into the constable's hands.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was any body present when you took the watch out of her hands? A. The watchman saw me take it from her—the annual dinner was at Messrs. Day and Martin's firm—I work in the concern as a cooper—the dinner was over between two and three o'clock in the afternoon—I was not drunk—I was a little fresh—I was on my way home—I was not so far gone but I had my recollection about me—I had been to see a mate who was worse than myself part of the way home, I had walked from Chalk-farm to see my mate home—I could not be very drunk to do that—I did nothing to the prisoner—she laid hold of me by the arm, pressing me to go with her—I was not with her two minutes altogether—I saw no other woman, but the watchman said he saw two women pass that way—I took no indecent liberties with the prisoner—I am married—my friend is a young man, who, when he is in liquor, is in the habit of sitting down on the steps in the street, and, as he had got a tidy hat on, and was genteely dressed he was likely to lose his things in the street, and I went to see him part of the way home.

SAMUEL SMITHBONE . I am a watchman of St. Brides, I stopped the prisoner in Shoe-lane, running away from the prosecutor—another watchman was going after her calling to me to stop her—I was conveying her down to the station house—she endeavoured with her right hand to take the watch out of her bosom, and I saw the prosecutor take it out of her hand

(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1767

1767. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July, 1 necklace, value 4s., the goods of James Burns, from the person of Ann Burns.

MARY ANN M'ADAMS . I am single, and am servant to Mr. James Burns of Hyde-street, Museum-street, Bloomsbury. On Thursday the 7th of July, I was nursing the child, Ann Burns—I went into the potato-shop in Broad-street, St. Giles's—in coming out I was looking into my basket, I turned my head round and saw the prisoner's hand on the child's neck—she had a necklace of five rows of coral on—I saw it in the prisoner's hand—he ran up Lascelles-place with it—a policeman was coming along, he ran after him, and stopped him without my losing sight of him.

JAMES RICHARD CLARK . I am a policeman. I live in Pickett-place, Strand—I stopped the prisoner about a dozen yards beyond No. 12, Lascelles-court—he

had passed that house in running—I found the necklace down the area of No.12—it was picked up in my presence.

FANNY BURNS . I am the wife of James Burns, and live in Hyde-street, Bloomsbury—he drives a cab—this necklace is what my child wore—her name is Ann.

Prisoner's Defence. I came out about a quarter to ten o'clock and as I was running in Broad-street, the policeman came and stopped me, I asked what he wanted—he said, the girl gave me in charge for stealing the necklace, and at Bow-street, she said I took them at ten o'clock, and the policeman said afterwards that she gave me in charge at half-past nine o'clock—she said at the office she did not see my hands on the child's neck.

MARY ANN M'ADAMS (re-examined) It happened at ten o'clock—I saw his hand on the child's neck, and the necklace in his hand.

GUILTY . † Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1768

1768. JOHN ALFRED MUCKLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 1 spoon, value 10s., the goods of Thomas George Cox.

THOMAS GEORGE COX . I am a boot and shoe maker, and live in Old Brentford. I knew the prisoner when we were boys together, but had not seen him for about fourteen years, till last January—I saw him on Thursday, the 21st of July—he came to my house on Wednesday, and said till Friday morning—I then missed the silver spoon.

EDWARD STOW . I am shopman to Mr. Grant, a pawnbroker in London-wall. I produce a spoon which was pawned by the prisoner for 8s. on the 22nd of July, in the name of John Harris, for Margaret Harris.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE CHIDGZEY . I took the prisoner into custody on the 23rd of July, at Holborn-bridge—I understood he had acknowledged taking the spoon and asked him where he had pawned it—he said in London-wall—I went there with the prosecutor and he identified it.

(The prisoner put in a written defence pleading poverty.)

THOMAS GEORGE COX (re-examined.) I took him into my house till I went to his friends to see what I could get for him—I treated him like my own brother, thought I had not seen him for fourteen years—I gave him clothes.

GUILTY . Aged 35.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1769

1769. JOHANNA SCANBURY and MARY GEORGE were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August, 1 bag, value 6d.; and 17 sovereigns; the goods and monies of John Wardle, from his person.

JOHN WARDLE . I am a seaman. On the 9th of August, I was at the tap-room of the Commercial Tavern, Poplar—the prisoners came in while I was sitting there, at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon—I went to the privy in the yard there—they both followed me into the privy—I was a little the worse for liquor—not a good deal—they pulled me about I felt a hand in my pocket, and missed my purse, containing seventeen sovereigns—I told them to let me alone, and not pull me about—after I missed my purse, I told them—I was robbed—they were both close together—I think Scanbury took the purse and gave it to the other—Richardson came to the door—my money was in a bag.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I was in the skittle-ground at the public-house—I heard voices proceeding from the privy—I went and opened the door,

and George came out—she was in a hurry to run away—I laid hold of her—she kicked me, scratched me, and tried to bite me; and she threw down a bag, with seventeen sovereigns in it, which I now produce—the prosecutor claimed it—I sent for a policeman—I kept the prisoners in the tap-room about ten minutes, and then left them there—I gave a description of them, and they were afterwards taken—I am certain of both the prisoners being the women who came out of the privy—I am barman at the house.

THOMAS CONNOR . I am a policeman. I apprehended Scanbury on the 9th of August—I was on duty in Commercial-road—a boy came and said I was wanted at the Commercial Coffee-house—I went, and found the robberry had been committed, and the prisoners absconded—I did not find the prisoner till nine o'clock that evening, when I apprehended her in the same house before the bar.

JAMES HENRY ANDREWS . I am a policeman. I apprehended George on the 11th of August, at a brothel, in bed with a man—I told her I wanted her for robbing a man of 17l., and to get up and dress—she did so—she then took hold of the man round his neck, kissed him, and told him it would be the last time she should sleep with him, and it was all up with her.

WILLIAM WARDLE re-examined. I know the bag—I had mentioned what money was in it before it was produced—Scanbury was on the side where the purse was—they were both busy about my pockets.

Scanbury's Defence. The man has sworn falsely.

George's Defence. The man was in liquor—when I came into the house, this woman, and two men intoxicated were fighting—I had a tub of oysters on my head, and set them on the table—the man asked me for 2s. worth oysters, which I opened—he went down the lawn, and called me down, and tore my cap—this woman went with me—I would not go down without her—he was very intoxicated—he said he would give me a soverreign to drink a pint of rum quite off, and he gave me the money.

WILLIAM WARDLE re-examined. They asked me for some oysters, which I gave them—I paid for them with silver—George was not selling the oysters—it was another man.

SCANBURY— GUILTY . Aged 29.

GEORGE— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1770

1770. HENRY WALTERS was indicted for feloniously receiving of a certain evil-disposed person, on the 27th of July, 16lbs. of wool, value 2l., the goods of Henry Peach Buckler and another; well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN BEARD . I am warehouseman to Lovegrove and Co., Cloak-lane. On the 27th of July I was standing at the door where I live, in Basinghall-street, and saw a lad, named Collis, come out of Buckler and Buxton premises, about half-past seven or twenty minutes before eight o'clock in the morning—he had a bag on his shoulder—knowing he did not belong to the firm I suspected all was not right, and followed him to Aldermanbury—I overtook him, and asked him what he had got—he said, "Nothing, "and then he said it was wool, but it was not his—I returned, and just after, Billings followed him—he joined him, and I thought it my duty to follow them—they went up Golden-lane to Baltic-street, St. Luke's—I saw them go into a house in Baltic-street—I followed them in just after, and found the prisoner there, in bed—I told him I thought the boys coming there,

was doing wrong, and asked him where they were—he made no exact reply—I went into the back yard, and found the boys hid in the water-closet—they came out with me and went into the room where the prisoner and his wife were—I told the prisoner I considered he was doing very wrong by taking the bag of wool in there—he said he did not intend to keep it—and then the boys and me came away together—we came little way, and I sent Billings back to fetch the bag of wool, and he brought a bag with wool—I did not see him go in—I went back to the house after the boys were in custody, and said to the prisoner, "Walter, Billings confesses you have bought some of him before"—he replied, "Never but once, and that was nothing but pickings or sweepings, but not so good at this"—the wool had not been produced in my presence—I should not think there was time for it to have been shown to him, from the time the boys went into the time I entered, but the wool was left behind, and he had time to look at it—then he said he meant to have sent it away if the boy did not fetch it—the boys both saw me just before they entered the door—they did not take the wool there by my directions.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was not the prisoner actually ill and confined to his bed? A. I do not know whether he was ill—he was in bed—there was no wool in the bed-room that I saw, nor any appearance of any being brought there—I cannot say whether the prisoner's clothes were off—his wife was standing by the fire—she was dressed—it was about eight o'clock when I first went into his house—I returned with the officer, about a quarter or twenty minutes after eight o'clock—he was in bed then—I had not seen the wool between the time of going with the boys and going with the officer—I had seen the bag on Billings's shouldder—I do not know whether the prisoner ever saw it.

EDWARD M'DOWALL (City-policeman No. 78) On the morning of the 27th of July, at a quarter after eight o'clock, Beard gave Collis and Billings into my custody, in Golden-lane—Billings had a bag on his shoulder—I took them to the station-house and examined the bag—it contained wool—it weighed 18lbs. with the bag I went to Baltic-street—I saw the prisoner in bed, and asked him if he knew about two boys being there this morning—he said, "Yes"—I asked if he knew about any wool—he said, "Yes", he did not see the wool—he said he was in bed—that he had seen the two boys, and he would have nothing at all to do with the wool—I asked him if he had ever bought any wool before of them—he said yes, he had, but it was what they called tares—I asked him what price he gave for it—he said, "Oh! very trifling"—I asked him who he bought it of, and he said of Billings.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you happen to know that tares is not wool, but the outside wrapper—the refuse? A. Yes; he said he understood the boys had been there, but he would have nothing to do with it—he appeared to be ill in bed—he said he never saw it—I asked him to come to Guild-hall, the same day—he said no, it was not possible to come, as he had a bad leg—he was confined to his bed all day—I believe he has been ill ever since, and in the infirmary—Collis was not bound over as a witness, but discharged.

THOMAS WILLIAM BILLINGS . I am in the employ of Messrs. Buckler and Buxton, I am fifteen years of age. On the 17th of July I took some wool from my master's ware house and took it to the prisoner's house, in company with Collis—the door was open when I got there, but I knocked, as I did not like to take the liberty of walking into the room—the passage

communicates with the room the prisoner was in—his wife came to the door, and I took the wool into the room and put it on a chair—I have not said that I threw it down in the passage—I put it down in a chair in the room—the street-door does not open into the room—there is a little passage, and then there is turning into the door—I did not throw the wool down in the passage to my knowledge, I believe I carried it right into the room—I am certain I took it into the room—I saw the prisoner and his wife—I believe she put it into a closet under the stairs—he told us to go into the back-yard—I saw his wife shut the closet-door, and told her to put it away—that was after I went into his room—it was a front parlour—I told Walters that John, Beard was following us, and he told his wife to put the wool away directly, and told his wife to ask us to go into the back-yard—we went into the water-closet, and Beard came to us—the prisoner gave me the bag in which I carried the wool—I had told him the evening before that I was going to bring him some wool next morning, and wanted a bag—he said, "Wait till my wife comes home, she will give it you," and he asked her for the clothes-bag—she said, "I am not going to have that lost"—he said, "No, you will have it again," and she brought it—he said, "There, it is a nice-sized bag, and will not show what you have got in it—I had taken wool to the prisoner before, at from 2s. 6d. to 3s. a pound—he paid me 7s. for the whole of it—I never said he paid me 7s. a pound—I became acquainted with the prisoner soon after I first went to my situation in February, 1835, from meeting him at the public-house opposite, in Basinghall-street, where I used to go and get my lunch—no particular conversation took place there, he was generally at his dinner there—one morning, at about eight o'clock, I was standing at master's door, and he had a bag over his shoulder—I asked him what he had got, he said, "Wool," and he told me, if I would get some from my master he would buy it of me—I said I would try and get him some—and after that I furnished him with some wool.

Cross-examined. Q. When was this morning? A. I do not remember the time, it is about three months and three weeks ago, very nearly four months, or it might be longer or shorter—I cannot tell what month it was in—I sometimes go to the public-house to get beer and to air the newspaper, and to get change—I never used to go there to gamble for beer—I used to toss for beer sometimes—Beard did not lend me money when I had lost all I had—on one occasion he lent me money, not to toss with, but to pay my debts—Beard and I have been acquainted ever since I have been at my situation—I used to go down to his master's warehouse to weigh off wool—I know what tares are, that is not wool—I never had any thing to do with the prisoner with it—I used to take it to Leek and Son, in Coleman-street, and sell on my own account—I used to sell waste paper in Basinghall-street, Beard used to go with me—I took nothing else—I swear that—I have been told to tell every thing I know—my father and mother told me so in prison—my friends have been to see me in prison, but not my master nor Beard—I have been in jail ever since this—I had a companion named Collis—I employed him—I believe he is sixteen years old—I told him I had bought the wool on my own account—I never told the prisoner so—I told Collis I had a job for him—I told him to call for me at my father's house at Hoxton, and walk with me into the City—I did not talk to him about how I should do; it—before I got to the prisoner soner's house, he told me Beard, had stopped him, and asked him what he had got, and he said, "Wool"—I followed after Collis, and met Beard as if he was coming home.

Q. On your oath, did not you state before the Magistrate that the prisoner soner was ill in bed; that you knocked at the door, went into the house, and threw the wool down in the passage? A. I did—that is the truth—I believe I said I took the wool into the room where the prisoner was—I recollect that I did—I do not know that I said I put it on a chair, but I said I put it down in the room—I believe that part was read over to me, and I heard it—I know that the prisoner was confined to his bed for days before with a bad leg—he told me the was not able to come out of his bed—I was never in a situation before I was employed by the prosecutors—I had just left school—I have been in gaol three weeks to-morrow—a person named Parker came to see me in gaol—I believe he is a solicitor—he lived in the same street as we did, and I believe he came to get the job of defending me—Mr. Jackson came to see me, and his daughter—she came with my mother—the policeman has occasionally called to see me, just to know how I did—nobody else called to see me—I know what head-ends, of cloth are—I never sold any—I have taken some—I did not know Collis before I went to my situation—I met him one evening in Finsbury-square—I did not talk to him—I passed by him—he was saying something to some boy who was going along, and struck him, and I said it was a shame of him—I might have seen him before that—I will swear I never spoke to him before that—that was in the month I went to my situation, in 1835—I sometimes employed him to do jobs for me—I do not know that I ever paid him or promised to pay him—I never drank give at the public-house, to my knowledge, or brandy—I have not drank brandy, gin or rum at the public-house with Beard or any body—I do not know that the prisoner's wife locked the cupboard she shut it—I was told the cupboard had no lock—I said she locked the cupboard door, but I did not know there was not a lock—I saw her shut it, and turn a handle or something.

HENRY PEACH BUCKLER . I am in partnership with Edward Buxton—I value the wool at 2l.—it is worth 2s. 6d. a pound—I do not swear the wool is mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know what is meant by head-endings of cloth? A. Yes—I cannot say I have not given the boy some—it is a thing we very seldom have—I do not think I have had twenty during the twenty years I have been in business—it is a ferril of cloth, and is used as an ornament in drapers' shops, and in manufacturing cloth.

W. T. BILLINGS re-examined. I am certain that wool came from my employer's stock.

MR. BUCKLER. I do not place entire confidence in what this boy says—I believe the prisoner is a most respectable man.

WILLIAM BEARD re-examined. Q. Have you ever been present when Billings has been tossing for beer? A. On my oath, I was never on the premises tossing for beer, and never saw him toss—he asked me, one day, When I came into the house, to lend him a shilling, which I did.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the wool, and had nothing to do with it.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT—Tuesday, August 16, 1836.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18360815-1771

1771. MARY FIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July,3 bed-gowns, value 5s.; 1 petticoat, value 4s.; 1 frock, value 8d.; 2 shifts, value 1s.; 1 flannel jacket, value 8d.; and 1 flat-iron, value 4d.; the goods of Charles Holmes Fidler; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 49.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1772

1772. WILLIAM WILDE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August, 1 watch, value 3l., the goods of William Marlborough, his master; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM MARLBOROUGH . I live in Plumber-street, City-road. The prisoner was in my employ eight years, on and off—my watch hung on a nail, in my workshop on the 5th of August—I went out a little while, and when I returned the prisoner and the watch were gone—I met the prisoner in the afternoon, and charged him with stealing the watch—he said it was not pawned, but the party it was with had made away with it; and if I had not acted as I had done I might have had it again.

JAMES REDWOOD . I am an officer, The prisoner was given to me in charge—his master asked him what he had done with the watch, whether he had pawned it or not—he said he had not pawned it, but made away with it altogether.

JOHN BENTLEY . I saw the watch hanging in the prosecutor's shop—the prisoner went out, and in ten minutes the watch was gone—no one came into the shop but him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out to tea at a quarter before four o'clock, and my master came and met me in Long-lane, and laid hold of me—I said, "Don't choak me, I don't know any thing about the watch"—he said, if I would give him the watch, or tell him where it was, he would not hurt me.

GUILTY . Aged 19—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1773

1773. THOMAS BROWN and HENRY WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 1 purse, value 2s.; 15 sovereigns, 3 half-sovereigns, 2 shillings, and 2 sixpences; the goods and monies of David Davies, from the person of Mary Davies.

MARY DAVIES . I am the wife of David Davies. I have been lately staying at No. 24, Salisbury-street, Strand, and reside at Crickhowel, near Brecon—about a quarter before twelve o'clock on Friday, the 8th of July, I was going down the Strand, near Bedford-street, towards Charing-cross, in company with Mrs. Stevens—I had a purse, with fifteen sovereigns and other money in my pocket—I felt a little pressure at my side, by my right hand pocket I instantly put my hand into my pocket, and said, "I have lost my purse"—the prisoner Brown was close by me, on the side where the purse had been—a great number of persons were round—I did not see any thing of Williams—my pocket was not cut—the person must have put his hand in, and taken it out—I saw my purse at Bow-street—I believe Brown was seized by my female friend, but I was very much agitated—this is my purse; and the money, I believe, is right.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were there not a great many persons about? A. Yes.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You never saw Williams till he was in custody? A. No.

WILLIAM HOLDER . I reside in Hatton-garden. I was in the Strand, walking towards Charing-cross—I saw the prisoner Brown, and several others connected with him—they were hustling the prosecutrix—I took

one of them by the shoulder, and put him out of the way, and saw Brown just taking his hand out of the lady's pocket—I took hold of him, and the purse was in his hand—it was taken from him by some of his companions. I suppose—he put his hands behind him—I tried to get it from him, but his friends took it away—I have seen some of those persons before—I cansay I know Williams.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean that you ever saw Brown before? A. I think I have—I might have seen him in London or in Birmingham—I am frequently down there—I cannot name where I have seen him—I don't know how many persons were looking in at the window—I saw them surround the lady—it is impossible to say how many there were, there were more than three—I cannot swear that there was twenty nor thirty—there generally are many persons about the Strand—there was no crowd about the window—I said before the magistrate that I saw a purse taken by Brown—I said there was something dark in his hand—that was the purse—I used the word purse—my evidence was read to me, and I was asked if it was correct, whether I had any thing to add—I dare say I used the word purse—certainly I did—(deposition read)"I saw he had something of a dark colour in his hand". Witness. But the brown something he drew from the lady's pocket was the purse, and I thought the word purse was taken down—I believed it to be so, but a single word may be left out.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The purse was handed behind him? A. Yes—I cannot say who received it—the person was not behind a coach, he was on the pavement.

THOMAS FREEMAN . I reside in Watling-street, and am a warehouse-man. I was coming up the Strand about twelve o'clock—I observed Mrs. Davies on the pavement, and Brown near her—she had hold of one side of him and Mr. Holder the other—I saw him put his hand behind him and give something to a young man who was behind him—I could not see what it was—I might know that young man again if I saw him, but he is not here—he gave it to Williams, who ran up Bedford-street—I ran after him, he turned up Maiden-lane, and I there caught him—the policeman was walking the same way—I tapped him on the shoulder, and we seized him together—we were taking him back, and he escaped from us, back, towards the Strand—he ran about ten yards, and we overtook him again—we took him into the door-keeper's room in the Adelphi Theatre, where a person named Shaw, the policeman and myself searched him, and found the purse in the leg of his trowsers—it slipped down at the bottom on the floor—the money was in it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you see the person who originally received the purse? A. I saw the person who I suppose received it of Brown—there was a hackney coach—I saw both the prisoners the whole time—the person who received the purse from Brown walked on towards Temple-bar—he walked to Williams and gave it to him, and they walked in front of two horses—they walked round, and I followed them—the person did not drop it in front of the coach—Williams said, at the Adelphi Theatre, that he picked it up behind a coach, and was going to the person whom he supposed had dropped it—I said he had not—he said he was going to the young man who had got the purse—at the public-house he stated he had picked it up in the Strand—he did not say he was going after the person who had dropped it—he invited as to go with him to the public-house—I had not hold of him at all when he ran away—we had both let him go—he did not say before the purse was found,

that he would not deliver it up to me or the policeman, nor that he would give it to the lady—he wanted to know what he was to have for finding it—the policeman asked him for the lady's purse, and the policeman might say he would have a reward—I did not hear him say he would give it to the lady himself, and have the reward—he might say so—the policeman said, "You shall not go any further till we search you"—the prisoner said he would take us to the person who had got it—he said he had not got it himself, but he was going to the young man who had got it—we charged him with having it in his possession—I said I was sure what the lady had lost he had got.

WILLIAM MASON (police-constable F 112.) I saw Williams run away—Freeman came to me, and we followed and overtook the prisoner in Maiden-lane, I tapped him on the shoulder, and said, "Halloo, have you not got something that don't belong to you?"—he said, "No"—I said, "Have you not got a purse belonging to a lady?"—he said, "No, if you will come with me to that public-house, I will take you to a person who has got it"—I said, "No, never mind, you will do"—I brought him back along Maiden-lane—he said, "Let go of me, I will walk quietly"—the witness said, "You had better hold him, he will run away"—and immediately he did so, we caught him, and Shaw came before him and stopped him—I clapped my hand to his side and felt a lump—I took him to the passage of the Theatre—he then put his hand into the pocket and pulled it out again—I put my hand into the pocket—I could find nothing, and wondered what was become of the purse—while I was searching him I saw the purse fall down from his trowsers.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate he said, "Let me go, I will walk quietly?" A. Yes; I did not say, if he would give me the purse he would get the reward—when I took it from the at the theatre, he said, "I will get the reward for it"—I said, "Come with me, I will get you the reward".

Brown's Defence. I am innocent. My father lives in Bull-street, Birmingham—I never was in London in my life before—I was only here three days.

BROWN— GUILTY . Aged 17.

WILLIAMS— GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported For Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1774

1774. WILLIAM TWEED was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August, 1 handkerchief, value 7s., the goods of Samuel Unwin, from his person.

SAMUEL UNWIN . I am a hosier, living in Ironmonger-lane. I was going from Cateaton-street, down Cheapside, with my wife, on the 2nd of August, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening—I got near the top of Cheapside, and heard some voice calling to me—I turned, and saw the patrol, who had my handkerchief in one hand, and the prisoner in the other—this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. You did not see it taken? A. No, I might have dropped it.

JAMES NOTT . I saw the prisoner and another young man and two girls, following the prosecutor and his wife up the lane—I went through a passage leading into Ironmonger-lane—the prisoner was returning by himself—I detained him, and found the handkerchief concealed under his waistcoat.

Cross-examined. Q. He might have picked it up? A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1775

1775. JOHN MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July, 20 lbs. weight of leaden pipe, value 5s., the goods of James Simms, and fixed to a certain building, against the Statute, &c., and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ELIZABETH COLE . I am the wife of William Cole, of Beaumont's-building, Aldersgate-street. About seven o'clock in the evening of the 12th of July I met the prisoner coming out of my cellar—he had no business there—I opened the cellar door, and asked what he wanted—he said he had been down in the cellar, as he was taken bad in his bowels—I asked why he did not go to a public-house—while I was talking to him I saw he had something round his waist—I asked what it was—he said his tools—I took hold of him, and said I would not let him go, and he threw down several pieces of lead in the passage.

JOSEPH SHAW . (police-constable G 3.) I was called, and the lead was given to me—I compared it with the leaden pipe on the premises—this part was over the cistern—I searched the cellar, and found this knife in the copper, were there where some suds.

Prisoner. This officer found more of the lead, he says, at a marinestore-shop. Witness. He threw this piece away in Bartholomew-close, a boy picked it up, and sold it at a marine store-shop.

WILLIAM DREW . (police-constable 88.) I produce the certificate of the prisoner's former conviction (read)—he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken very bad, I never saw the lead, nor had any thing on my person.

ELIZABETH COLE . I saw him throw it down—he had left some on the sairs.

JAMES SIMMS . It is my house, I let it to Mr. Cole.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1776

1776. WILLIAM PARRYING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Jacob Israel Brandon, from his person.

JACOB ISRAEL BRANDON . I live in Bishopsgate-street, without. I was walking down Broad-street on the 28th of July, with a gentleman, who told me something that induced me to search my pockets, and my handkerchief was gone—I looked about, and saw the prisoner putting it in his pocket—I followed him, he threw it down—I stopped to pick it up, and fell down—he turned round, and said he hoped I was not hurt, could he assist, me—I collared him and gave him in charge of the policeman—this is my handkerchief.

Prisoner. I never had it in my possession—I saw two lads come up a turning, and this gentleman was running after them, with a stick in one hand and a handkerchief in the other—he fell down just as he got close to me—I assisted to take him up. Witness. I was running after him—he was the person I was running after.

GUILTY . Aged 20— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1777

1777. FREDERICK HADDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 5 shillings, the monies of Samuel Garcia and another.

SAMUEL GARCIA . The prisoner was in the employment of me and my partner as errand-boy, for a twelvemonth—I repeatedly missed money from the till—I marked fourteen single shillings and two half-crowns—on the 18th of July, at about five o'clock, I left the prisoner in charge of the

shop, with my sister—I returned in an hour, and missed five shillings—I asked him about it, he said he had not been to the till—I asked what money he had about him—he pulled out five shillings, which he said was his own—I said, "Do you know the money you have has the same mark that I have in my pocket?"—he said, what did I mean—I said, "You will see each shillings has a cross on it, under the chin, and so has mine—I marked fourteen shillings and missed five from the till—he then burst out crying, put it down, and said he would never do so any more, if I would forgive him.

JOHN SMITHSON . I am an officer. The prosecutor gave me these five shillings, and this other shilling—the five shillings were lying in a box by the side of the Prisoner.

Prisoner. I had occasion to move some bottles of ginger-beer, and found five shillings—my master always locked the till—he had the key in his pocket—I had no intention of keeping the money.

SAMUEL GARCIA re-examined. The till was not locked—my sister was in the shop at the time, which I thought was precaution sufficient—she is not here.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18360815-1778

1778. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 1 piece of timber, value 1s., the goods of Robert Webb and others.

JOHN PRACY . At half-past seven o'clock, on the evening of the 20th of July, I saw the prisoner take a piece of timber from a new building in Gracechurch-street—the next morning I informed the foreman, the next day I saw the prisoner with two pieces of wood, after the foreman had given him in charge to the officer.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am foreman to Mr. Robert Webb, who is in partnership with his brothers—I received information from Pracy—I saw the prisoner go into the building take a bit of quartering out, and put it on some stones—he brought out another piece, and was taking them both off when I took him with them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Is the first piece here? A. No—the other pieces are—I did not see the first piece.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1779

1779. HENRY WILLIAMS was again indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 2 pieces of timber, value 1s., the goods of Robert Webb and others.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I received information and watched, and saw the prisoner go under the floor of the house and take the piece of quartering—he brought it out, and put it on the stone heap—then he went in again, and brought out the other—he took them both under his arm, and walked up Gracechurch-street—I followed, and gave charge of him—these are the pieces of the wood—it is new timber.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Was any one looking after the premises? A. I was—it was inside the curb-stone, but these were inside the building—this was the following night.

Prisoner. These two pieces I had on me—I did not know what to do with them—I was in liquor when I took them.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . He was not in liquor—he said he did it through

want—he said at the watch-house, that he had disposed of the first piece for something to eat and a night's lodging.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 55.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Confined Two days.

Reference Number: t18360815-1780

1780. DANIEL BURNS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July, 40 lb. weight of leather, value 1l.; 18 bits of woollen cloth, value 10s.; and 50 yards of coach-lace, value 10s.; the goods of Isaac Isaacs.

ISAAC ISAACS . I live at Mile-end, Old Town. On the 11th of July I had a chariot-lining to carry to a gentleman—the prisoner was to carry it—he had carried loads for me—I told him to go to my house to fetch it, and to meet me in Holborn—I stopped there two hours—he did not come—I was alarmed—I went home, and from what my daughter told me, I went to Holborn again, and told a policeman what sort of a man he was.

MARIA ISAACS . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I gave the prisoner these things between twelve and one o'clock, to take them to my father, and never saw him again till he was apprehended—he said he gave them to a man to carry to Holborn, and did not know what became of him—they have never been found.

Prisoner. I met a man I had not seen for some time, and he gave me a little to drink—a man was passing, I asked him to carry if for me, and I saw no more of him.

WILLIAM TORPIE . I live in Boar's-head-yard, Petticoat-lane. On the 11th of July, between five and six o'clock, I saw Daniel Murphy in Whitechapel, with a bag of leather—I did not see the prisoner with him—I saw the prisoner very tipsy, soon after, going up Petticoat-lane with Daniel Murphy, who still had the bag—Murphy was taken, and discharged.

GUILTY . Aged 30— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1781

1781. DENNIS CONNOR . was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of George Berkeley Harrison, from his person.

GEORGE BERKELEY HARRISON . I live at Stoke Newington. On the 8th of August, I was passing down Gracechurch-street—I felt some intimation at my pocket—I felt, and my handkerchief was safe, but the prisoner was close to me—I went on to the Flower Pot—I again felt something—I turned and saw the prisoner close to me, and missed my handkerchief—he threw it down—I took it up, and took him.

Prisoner. It was not me picked his pocket—I was going to pick it up to give it him—there were two more boys there. Witness. There was no one near me but him that could have taken it.

SALLY HALL . I saw the prisoner have the handkerchief—he threw it down by me—I saw this gentleman take him and the handkerchief.

GUILTY .*Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1782

1782. JOHN SLATER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 1 pair of half-boots, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Ganning, from the person of George Ganning.

EBENEZER WILLIAMS . I am an officer. On the 19th of July, about ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner with a child, in the pens of Smith-field—he was sitting down on the ground, and the prisoner was unlacing the child's half-boots—the child tried to get over the pens—he took the child down—he took the half-boots from his feet, and put them under his jacket—he tried first to get the child's pinafore off, but could not—I afterwards found it was in a knot.

Prisoner. I was going to take the child home. Witness. He had got further than the distance of this Court away from the child—it was looking after him and laughing, and I suppose thought he would come back.

THOMAS GANNING . I am the child's father, its name is John. These are my child's boots—they were on then—the officer brought him to where I was at work without the half-boots.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18360815-1783

1783. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June, 1 sovereign, the monies of Edmund Pontifex, and others, his masters, to which he pleaded.

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1784

1784. JOSEPH WINTER was indicted for stealing a pistol, the goods of Thomas Capps.

The Witnesses did not appear

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1785

1785. CATHARINE CALLAGHAN and THOMAS BAGLEY were indicated for stealing, on the 30th of July, 4 handkerchiefs, value 8s.; and 3/4 of a yard of velvet, value 4s.; the goods of Asher Isaacs, his master of Catharine Callaghan.

JUDITH ISAACS . I am the wife of Asher Isaacs. I engaged Allah as my servant, about nine weeks ago—the following day I went to Dublin, and returned on Thursday, the 30th of July—I had been away two months—Allah came to me on the Saturday morning, and asked for the key of the hall-door—I asked what it was for—she said it was to take the milk in—about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was apprised that a man in a flannel jacket had knocked at the door, and that she went away with him for an hour and a quarter—I then rang the drawing-room bell, and asked her who it was that had been at my door—she said, "Those who were welcome"—she was very impudent, and said she would go away that moment—she went up-stairs—my daughter called me up, and said that she was very impudent, and said that she would go away—I said that she should not, if she was saucy, I would send for an officer, and did so—I then went to the door, and saw the prisoner, Bagley, at the corner of Cutler-street—the officer took him, and brought him to my door—he took something from his pocket—he threw it into the dark part of the passage, and we found that it was this piece of velvet—the velvet found in the passage was the same as that drawn from his pocket—I was not present when these handkerchiefs were taken from him—these are all mine—I saw the of them on the Thursday before they were taken.

Callaghan. You had not been at home—you cannot swear to them—let who will come into your service, you will swear against them—you had Roach every day in you house, bribing her, and giving her drink to come against me—Mrs. Isaacs always bears that character, if they are but one day in her service, she will say they steal something, she transported one

girl for fourteen, and one for life. Witness. I prosecuted one girl here last sessions, she had been robbing me for some time, and used to have a man coming to the house to take things away.

Bagley. I could not throw that away, as there were four of them surrounding me, and they never saw me.

JAMES MARTIN (City police-constable No. 94) I went after Bagley, and brought him to the Hall-door—he made a word to the female—they stood close together—he drew something from this pocket, and threw it into a dark part of the passage, where we found this velvet—I took him to the station, but I could not search him so close as I would, because there were two females there—in an hour afterwards Roach was brought in, being intoxicated—I saw Bagley undo the waist-band of his trowsers, draw up his shirt, and draw out six handkerchiefs—Roach took two, and put them to her bosom under her arm; and Callaghan tucked the other two down the back.

MARGARET ROACH . being called on her recognizance, did not appear.

(Properly produced and sworn to.)

CALLAGHAN— GUILTY . Aged 23.

BAGLEY— GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1786

1786. CHARLES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 4 umbrellas, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Hargrave and another his masters; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1787

1787. JOSEPH BENGE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April, 12 glass bottles, value 3s.; and 2 gallons of whiskey, value 1l. 16s.; the goods of William Hugh Powell Prosser; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM HUGH POWELL PROSSER . I am a wine and spirit-merchant, in Mitre-court, Milk-street. In April last the prisoner was my porter—on the 9th of April, my cellarman gave the prisoner two gallons of whiskey, to take to Mr. Clemson, in Kent-road, in twelve glass bottles—he did not return that Saturday night—he came on Monday, and said he had delivered them right—on Monday evening, when he came home, he said he wanted some bottles—I gave him some money—he went away, and never returned—he had 18s. a week.

SAMUEL LECOURT . I am in the prosecutor's employ. On the 9th of April, I gave the prisoner the bottles of whiskey of deliver to Mr. Clemson, and the permit—I did not see him again till the Monday—he then told me he had delivered to.

Prisoner. He was not in the place when I had them. Witness. Yes—I gave them to you myself.

EDWARD CLEMSON . I live in James'-road, Old Kent-road. I ordered this whiskey, but did not receive it, nor did I see the prisoner at all.

BENJAMIN CATMULL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner—he said he knew what he was taken for, and he was very sorry, that it was concerning Mr. Prosser.

TIMOTHY FISHER HODGSON (City police-constable No. 34) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—the prisoner is the same person.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he could not find Mr.

Clemon's house; and having fallen and broken the bottles, he did not return, fearing the prosecutors's anger.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1788

1788. HENRY HANSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August, 1 coat, value 2l. 10s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 1l.; 1 pair of boots, value 15s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 7s.; 1 hat, value 5s.; and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; the goods of Edward Deeks, from his person; and WILLIAM PARISH , for feloniously receiving the same, well-knowing them to have been stolen, &c., against the Statute.

THOMAS EDWARD DEEKS . I am a pig-dealer. I was at Edgeware fair on Friday, the 5th of August, and met some strangers—some gentlemen asked me to drink some brandy and water; soon after I became giddy—I fell asleep and awoke nearly naked; all my things were taken from me but my shirts and braces—these things are all mine.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Have you got them all again? A. Yes.

JOHN MALKIN . I am a constable. I went to the Harp, in the Edgeware-road, on the 6th—I found Hanson there with a bundle, containing one pair of trowsers, one pair of stockings, one knife, two thimbles, one half-crown, and two shillings—these have been shown to the prosecutor—I took Hanson into custody—he went about a mile on the road, and then he said, it was no use going any further; if I would go to Bill Parish's, I should find the remaining part of the things, which Parish bought for 5s. the night before—I put him into the cage, and went to Parish, who keeps a booth in the fair—I there found the coat, waistcoat, boots, hat, and two silk handkerchiefs; I said, "There is another handkerchief, "he directly gave the other constable the other handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. What did Parish say? A. He said he had had it of a man the night before, and had advanced 5s—I have frequently known coats and other things left in booths, but I have never seen money lent on them—it is common, when people are hard-pressed for money, to get 5s. from a booth-keeper, and leave their little bundle for security, if they know them—I have known Parish fourteen years attending fairs—I know no harm of him—he voluntarily went to a public-house to search for the man who left the bundle, and could have run away if he had liked.

(Hanson put in a written defence, stating that he had purchased the articles of a man at the Boot public-house, at Edgeware.)

HANSON— GUILTY .*Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

PARISH— NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT. Wednesday, August 17th.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18360815-1789

1789. JOSEPH CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing a letter, and a half-sovereign, to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18360815-1790

1790. ELIZABETH MARTIN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Collins, on the 14th of July, at Christchurch, and stealing therein 1 shawl, value 3s.; 6 napkins, value 1s. 6d.; 1 bed-gown, value 1s. 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 1s6d.; and 1 shirt, value 6d., his goods to which she pleaded.

GUILTY *— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1791

1791. THOMAS BURCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 3s. of a certain man, whose name is unknown, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JANE LIMAN . I live in Jane-street, Commercial-road. On the 10th of August, I was just by Aldgate, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening—I saw a gentleman and lady walking together—the prisoner followed them—he put his hand into the gentleman's pocket, and took this handkerchief out—he put it into his coat-pocket, and went after another gentleman, and turned his pocket inside out—the gentleman went on, as he did not miss his handkerchief—I do not know his name—my sister was with me.

ANN LIMAN . I was with my sister, and saw the prisoner following a lady and gentleman—he took this silk-handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket—he saw the patrol watching him, and run away afterwards, and the patrol caught him in the Minories.

BENJAMIN RICHARDSON . I am evening patrol and watchman of the ward. I saw the prisoner following a lady and gentleman—the two witnesses gave me information, and I went after him—he ran away from one and lost him—a few minutes afterwards, the girls came and said what they had seen since—I went after him, and took him—I found the handkerchief on him, and asked him if there was any mark on it—he said there was not—we found C. W, on it—the girls told me the colour of the handkerchief before it was found.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in April last—I produce a certificate of his former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office (read) I was present at his trial—he is the person who was convicted by the name of James Henry—I have seen him about since.

Prisoner's Defence. I purchased a handkerchief of a Jewess for 2s. 9d. and had not had it ten minutes in my possession before the officer came and took me—he asked me If I had any thing about me—I put my hand in my hat, took the handkerchief out, and gave it to him—he asked if there was any mark on it—I said no, but he never asked if there was a mark on the silk handkerchief—the girls never saw me have the handkerchief.

GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Transported For Fourteen Years.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1792

1792. ELIZA FOY, JANE REDDY and MARY FLEMING were indicated for a robbery on Elizabeth Thomas, on the 11th of July, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 pair of gloves, value 1s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 12s.; 4lbs. of lamb, value 2s.; 2 oz. of tea, value 9d.; 1lb. of sugar, value 7d.; 1 half-crown, and 1 shilling; her goods and monies.

ELIZABETH THOMAS . I am single, and live in Wych-street. On Monday, the 11th of July, about ten minutes before five o'clock, in the afternoon, I was coming from Silver-street, Golden-square into Berwick-street, Soho—I came through Maidenhead-passage, which was my nearest way—I had a bundle containing these articles—I was seized by Mary

Fleming by my right arm, forcibly dragged into a house, knocked down, and held in the passage, while Reddy stamped on my stomach, and she kept her foot in that position till I was robbed—they treated me very ill—I have been under the doctor's hands ever since—Foy took the bundle from me, and handed it across my head to Fleming, who took it into a back room—I saw no more of her till I was allowed to leave the house—they then gave me my empty handkerchief, containing nothing but a bone or so—it had contained 2oz. of tea, and 4 1/2 lbs. of lamb—they gave me my empty handkerchief back and used very bad language, and said, "Now do not go and say we have robbed you"—I said, "Pray let me go, I will not say a word about it," and after using a great deal of bad language, they let me go—this all occurred in the passage—I went to St. Ann's station-house, and gave information—a policeman was sent with me immediately, and within a quarter of an hour after I was released from the house, two of the prisoners were taken, but Fleming, who had my property, was not taken till the Thursday following—I never got my things again.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you known Foy before? A. I never saw either of them before in my life—I was so frightened that I am now so agitated, I hardly know what I do—I am in pain now, in my chest—I do not remember one of the persons having a red gown on—there was no crowd—there was not a single person there, after I was ill-used.

COURT. Q. Had either of the women a child in her arms? A. The one who has now, Fleming—it was her who dragged me into the house—she pulled me by arm—the other two backed me in—they were all three together—it was done momentarily, in an instant, and for that reason I cannot account what each of them did.

JOHN BALDWIN . I am a policeman. On the day in question, I was applied to by the prosecutrix, at the station—I immediately went with her—she pointed out Foy and Reddy, standing at the door of a bread-shop opposite—she gave them in charge for robbing her, and I took them to the station-house—they said, in going along, that they had nothing to do with it, and that it was another who was concerned in it—I believe it was Reddy who said so—Foy said she would not go, but I said she must go, and she went with me quietly—I took Fleming in Adam and Eve-court, on the Thursday morning—she had deserted our division—she said she was sorry she was in the concern.

Reddy's Defence. I had been out scouring a room, and came home—I had occasion to go down the court to get a half-quartern loaf—I saw an immense crowd—one of them said it was Mrs. Cline's husband beating her—I saw the people go down the court, but did not know the occasion of it—I never saw the prosecutrix till she brought the policeman down, and said I was one of them—I said I was innocent.

Fleming's Defence. My husband sent me out at the corner of Maidenhead passage for a 1d. worth of pin-points—I saw this woman, and a lot of boys hooting her, and beating her—she seemed tipsy and she did something in the passage, which I should be ashamed to mention—I have witnesses to prove that I had not been out ten minutes.

MARY ANN THISTLE . I am a single. On Monday, the 11th of July, I was at the Maidenhead public-house, as near as I can say, about five or half-past five o'clock—Foy was there, in my company, having a little to drink, and dancing with me—I went out of the public-house with her, and she was stopped by Reddy—I went away, and left them talking—there was no crowd about at the time—I went away for a little bread and cheese—I

was away about half an hour, and when I came back I was told Foy was taken—she was about three hours with me in the public-house—we left it about half-past five o'clock.

COURT. Q. Where did you leave her? A. In Maidenhead-passage—she lodged in Hopkins-street, St. James's, then, which is not above ten yards from Maidenhead-passage.

ELEANOR STUCKIN . I am grand-daughter to Mrs. Lee, who keeps the Maidenhead public-house. I saw Foy there with Thistle—they had been dancing—I remember them going out—I had heard of the woman being robbed—Foy had not left till after I heard of the robbery—I am quite sure of it—she had a red merino gown on—I did not look out at all—Foy came to the house about eleven o'clock in the morning, and I did not see her go out till about half-past five o'clock—there was not much alarm given about the robbery, only our back door was pushed in violently, and I saw Rosa Clines, and her sister, who is the prisoner Fleming, pushed in—I knew Clines before—she lives opposite—I have not seen her since the robbery—I do not know what has become of her—she had on a red cotton gown.

COURT. Q. Did you see any crowd at all? A. No, our back-door is in Maidenhead passage—Foy was in the house at the time Rosa Clines and her sister came in at the back door—I heard of the robbery a few minutes afterwards, when somebody came into our house—Foy was there then.

JURY. Q. What time was it that Clines and other came in? A. About five o'clock—they stopped in our passage about ten minutes.

COURT. Q. I suppose you had no particular reason for knowing the time? A. No.

BRIDGET CHURCHILL . I am married. On the day in question I was at Mrs. Lee's, and heard of this at the time it took place—I saw Foy coming out with Thistle—she came into the court—Reddy met her and spoke to her in the court, and I saw the woman come and give her in charge.

THOMAS BEDFORD . I am a baker, and live in Maidenhead-passage. On the day in question I was at my door, and saw Eliza Foy come out of Mr. Lee's back-door, and come and stand against my door-post—I afterwards saw a woman come and bring a policeman, and she gave charge of Reddy and Foy—I am acquainted with Foy.

COURT. Q. I suppose you had not heard of the robbery before? A. Yes, it was that made me stand at my door.

ELIZABETH THOMAS re-examined. I was robbed about twenty minutes before five o'clock—I know that by the time I was detained in the house, and the time I went to the station-house to give information.

JOHN BALDWIN re-examined. It might be a quarter or ten minutes before five o'clock that I received the information—I am sure it was before five o'clock—I had not been in the station-house above five minutes.

NOT GUILTY

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1793

1793. CHARLES HENSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Dowling, on the 9th of July, at Hopper's-row, St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 10s., his goods.

REBECCA DOWLING . I am the wife of James Dowling, and at the time of the robbery lived at Hopper's-row, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, next door to the prisoner. On the 9th of July, I went out

at about half-past nine o'clock in the morning—I left my house safe—I bolted the back, and locked the front door—every one of the windows were fast—I did not leave any body in the house—I returned at five o'clock in the afternoon—as soon as I entered the front door, I found the back door, which I had bolted inside, wide open—somebody must have got inside to have done that—I immediately went up-stairs, and found a window pushed right out, and the glass broken—they had forced the window right out of the brick-wall—I went to a box and missed my husband's coat—I immediately went to Hackney-road to search the pawnbrokers, and met the prisoner—I called after him, but he ran off, and in about twenty minutes I lost sight of him—about twenty minutes to nine o'clock he came near his own house—I went and laid hold of him—he said, "Do let me off, Mrs. Dowling?"—I said, "I cannot do that"—he said, "It was not me, it was my sister that did it"—I gave him to the policeman, and at the station-house to gave me a pawnbroker's ticket, and said, would I let him off—I said I could not—he said he got into the house himself by pushing the window out, and then he dropped in, and he unbolted the back door, let his sister Maria in, and she came up and took the coat—I gave the pawnbroker's ticket to the policeman.

WILLIAM ADAMS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a coat, which was pawned on the 9th of July by the prisoner for 3s.—I gave him this ticket.

JAMES PRICE . I am a policeman. Mrs. Dowling gave the prisoner into my charge, and gave me the ticket in the cell, at the time he delivered it to her with another.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.—Recommended to Mercy— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1794

1794. JOSEPH TRIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July, 1 watch, value 5l. 5s., the goods of Nathaniel Garland, in his dwelling-house.

JANE HARDING . I am cook to Nathaniel Garland, Esq., who occupies the dwelling-house, No. 5, Upper Berkeley-street. At the latter end of June or beginning of July, my master lent me a watch for the use of the kitchen—on Tuesday, the 5th of July, it was hanging on a hook in the kitchen-shelf, two shelves above the dresser, not so much as a yard and a half high—it was a gold watch, but the outside was a green case—it was very old fashioned—between ten and half-past ten o'clock that morning, I had been cleaning my kitchen, and went from the kitchen to the back part of the premises, and when I came in, I saw the prisoner in the middle of the kitchen—he was a stranger to me—I asked him what he wanted—he said, "Are there any orders for the green-grocer?"—I said, "You do not come from our green-grocer's"as I knew their people, they had served us for upwards of six months—he made no answer, but ran out of the door very much confused, and ran up the area steps—I turned my head, and missed the watch instantly—I ran after him—he slammed the area-gate in my face as I was going to take him—when I got to the top of the steps, to open the gate, I saw him turn the corner by the public-house, and saw no more of him—I gave a description of him, and he was taken a few days after—I am quite sure he is the same

person—I had never seen him before—master values the watch at five guineas, but I do not understand these sort of things—my master is not here—the watch has not been found.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. I think I understood you to say the person who came in was pursued by you till he got round the corner? A. Yes—I then lost sight of him—there was another person taken into custody on my information, who was found in the street at the time I was running after the man—I gave that man into custody, because I thought he belonged to the party—it was the first person that looked similar to him—that person has been discharged—he was not the man that took the watch—he was similar to him, but not quite the features of the man—when I took him I did not believe him to be the person who was in the kitchen, but to be a companion—eight or nine days, I think, elapsed before I saw the prisoner—I have not made a mistake, certainly—I was not particularly flurried—I was positive as to the person—he was in custody when I saw him.

COURT. Q. How far were you from him in the kitchen? A. About two yards—not more—we have a very good light in the kitchen-the sun sets towards it—he was looking at me and I at him—he had a hat on—nobody comes without ringing or knocking, and that made me notice him the more.

RICHARD BRADSHAW . I am a policeman. On Thursday, the 7th of July, I saw the prisoner in Montague-square, about ten o'clock in the morning, with one Newland, who is about nineteen years old, and three or four inches taller than the prisoner—I knew the prisoner before—I took him into custody—the girl saw him on Saturday, the 9th of July—I took Newland up who was with him first—they were in company together when I first saw them—the prisoner waited at the post, looking out at the corner of the square—he had his back towards me, and I came up and secured him.

Cross-examined. Q. After you took Newland, did not the prisoner come up and ask what you took him for? A. No—nothing of the kind passed—he did not see me till I secured him—I was in plain clothes—no officer was with me.

Prisoner's Defence. This man has taken a false oath—as he took Newland, I walked up, and asked him what he took him for—he said, "I want you also"—Newland got away—he took me to the station-house, and said nothing to the Magistrate about me—I was remanded till Thursday—on Saturday, he caught Newland again, and we were remanded again—the Magistrates gave Newland six weeks.

JANE HARDING re-examined. I am sure the watch hung on the shelf when I left the kitchen—I looked to see the time—the gate had not been unlocked half an hour—I saw no other stranger in the house.

GUILTY of Stealing under the value of 5l. Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18360815-1795

1795. JOSEPH TRIGGS was again indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June, 1 watch, value 18l., and 1 watch-stand, value 10s.; the goods of Mary Wardle, in her dwelling-house.

MARY WARDLE . I occupy No. 16, Seymour-street, Portman-square, as a lodging-house. About eleven o'clock, on the 30th of June, I saw my watch safe in the housekeeper's room, in front of the house, down-stairs, in a stand on the chimney-piece—it was a gold watch, with a rose-wood case, let in with mother-of-pearl—it is worth 18l.—I am sure it is worth

10l.—I have had it eleven or twelve years—before half past eleven o'clock—the prisoner came down the area steps, along the passage to the kitchen—I do not know which of us spoke first, but he said, "Any orders for the green-grocer?" and I ordered carrots and other things of him—I did not know him before—I knew he was not in our green-grocer's service, and looked at him—the watch was ten or twelve yards from where I saw him—it was the length of the passage—he was talking to me four or five minutes—I am positive he is the person—in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after he was gone I found the door wide open, and the watch gone, and have not seen it since—the green-grocer's woman came in about five minutes after he left—she had no opportunity to take it—I saw her in and out—I did not see any other creature about the premises that morning who I did not know—I have a family living at my house, and servants—none of the family were in the housekeeper's room—none of them went away—I saw the prisoner on the Saturday week following at the Mary-lebone office—I am quite positive he is the person I gave the orders to—I did not see him come in or go out—he had to pass the door of the room to come in and go out; I saw no stranger but the prisoner, and think it impossible any could have come in, for I stood facing the door all the time—Mr. Lemesure's family and servants lodge at my house—there is a parlour-maid, house-maid, and groom—they were in the kitchen with me from the time I saw the watch till I missed it, and were never out of it—the green-grocer's woman is the person who always calls—there was no other person sent from the green-grocer's.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How long had you been in the kitchen when the man came down? A. Not five minutes—I could not see the watch from the kitchen—I had that instant put the watch on the chimney-piece, and then went into the kitchen—nobody could pass along the passage while I was in the kitchen without my assistance because I was facing the door—the kitchen door is in a line with the passage door—I stood looking down the passage all the time—there was nothing to prevent my seeing the prisoner walk out, if I was looking out—but after he received my orders I turned my head to the table, to attend to some meat, and I suspect he went into the room then—I could not see the area steps—the mother-of-pearl is in the watch-stand—the outside case of the watch is gold—it came from Geneva—it went on diamonds—the person who had it to put a new gold case on said it was cheap at 18l.—it was very—I am positive it is worth what I have stated—I have a lease of the house.

COURT. Q. You say from the kitchen where you were you could see the door and past the room in question? A. Yes—I had not my eye looking down the passage when the prisoner entered, and might have gone into the room then without my seeing him, and he might have gone in after I gave the order without my seeing him—I am positive he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported For Life.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1796

1796. JAMES DUNN and MARGARET DEAN were indicted for feloniously, falsely making and counterfeiting 2 pieces of coin, resembling and apparently intended to resemble sixpences, on the 6th of July, at St. Luke.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DOANE conducted the Prosecution. WILLIAM REYNOLDS. I am an officer. In consequence of information,

on the 6th of July, in company with Duke and Ashton, I proceeded to a house in Williams'-buildings, French-alley, Goswell-street, about three o'clock in the afternoon—I found the street-door open—the parlour door was fast inside—I forced it open, and saw the male prisoner sitting by the side of the fire, on a chair, and the female sitting on a stool by the table, in front—on the right-hand-side, the male prisoner's wife and child laid in bed—I laid hold of the male prisoner, and caught him in my arms—he immediately stooped, put his right-hand down, and seized a poker—I said, "James, it is of no use, you may as well put it down'—at the same time, from his left hand he dropped something white, which he was breaking with his feet—it turned out afterwards to be a plaster-of-Paris mould—took up part of the mould, which was quite hot at the time—also a counterfeit sixpence, which was very hot, among the plaster-of-Paris.

Dunn. The door was not fast, it was nearly off its hinges. Witness I was obliged to use the crow-bar to get it open—the man's hands were dirty as if with working with metal over the fire—I produce the sixpence.

WILLIAM BAKER ASHTON . I am a police-sergeant. I accompanied Reynolds and the others to the house—I saw Reynolds force the door open with his shoulder—when I got into the room I found the man standing up, and Reynolds having hold of him—the female was sitting on a stool close to the table, facing the man—I saw a counterfeit sixpence, found on the floor by Reynolds—it was near the man, and about two feet from the woman—I found on the fire a ladle with metal in it, in a melted state—on searching the room, I found a tin band with plaster-of-Paris adhering to it, in a tub of water; and another band with plaster-of-Paris to it, on a chest of drawers—I found this holder for the mould—I saw Duke find some metal on the table, and some on the floor near where they were sitting—I remained there till they were taken into custody—the man's right-hand was very dirty—the first and second fingers were very black as if he had been working over the fire, and had plaster-of-Paris round the nails as if he had been working with it.

ROBERT DUKE . I accompanied the witnesses to the place—I searched the room, and on the table in front of the fire, found a counterfeit sixpence in an unfinished state, and on the same table some pieces of metal and a file, with white metal and plaster-of-Paris in the teeth of it—a pair of scissors with plaster-of-Paris on them—this piece of rag with a quantity of plaster-of-Paris on it, and this piece of ribbon which exactly fits the tin-band as if it had tied it—I found a bowl with a quantity of plaster-of-Paris in it, and under the fire-place part of a mould among some wet ashes—I went with them to Hatton Garden office—I did not hear the male prisoner say any thing—his hands were very dirty, and his breeches were stained in several places with plaster-of-Paris.

WILLIAM HALL . I accompanied the other officers—when I got into the room I took charge of the prisoners—I produce the mould, which I saw Reynolds pick up.

Dunn. Q. I should like to know what money you let Duke have that morning? A. None; nor did I see him have any.

MARY ANN NEWMAN . I am a widow, and live in Williams'-buildings. I was employed by Mr. Bruce to let the rooms where the prisoners were—I let the room in question to the male prisoner and his wife, on or about the 6th of July, about nine days before the officers came there—I never

saw the female prisoner living with them—I never saw her there before to my recollection—I live next door.

l Dunn. It was not me that took the room, it was my wife; and she took it of a gentleman. Witness. I showed both of them the room—I referred them to the rent gatherer, and Dunn came to me afterwards for the key, which I gave him.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin to the Mint. I have examined both these sixpences—they are both counterfeit, and have been cast in the same mould—I have carefully examined the two sixpences, with part of this mould, and am of opinion they were produced from it—I have no doubt of it, as it has the impression of the reverse side of a sixpence, corresponding in all respects with the two counterfeit sixpences—the sixpences require a portion of the metal to be removed by a file—the metal in the ladle is of a similar sort to the counterfeit sixpences, and the metal in the paper is the same—the bands are what are generally used for making plaster-of-Paris moulds—one appears to have been made in this band—the plaster-of-Paris is the same as the moulds are made with.

Dunn. The woman had not been three minutes in the place—she came to give my mistress a drop of something to drink.

DUNN— GUILTY . Aged 40— Transported For Life.

DEAN— NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1797

1797. MARY ATTERWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, 2 handkerchiefs, value 7s., the goods of Richard Hall and another.

JOSEPH BLOXSOME . I am shopman to Richard Hall and Philip Freeman. On the 15th of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner soner came to our shop, and asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs—I showed her several patterns, some single, and some in pieces—she bought one for 3s. 4d—she had a shawl over her shoulders—while I was serving her, I saw her draw something off the counter, and conceal it under her shawl—I suspected it was a silk handkerchief—I saw the corner of it under the shawl soon after—after she decided on having a handkerchief, I told Mr. Wilson, the head shopman, of it; and he told me to go on serving her, and leave it to him—she paid for the one she bought, and left the counter—she did not go out of the shop—I saw her afterwards going towards the counting-house, away from the street—I did not see any thing taken from her.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You had your eye on her? A. Yes—I believe there was no one in the counting-house, but I can't say—I saw the corner of a silk handkerchief under the shawl—she had not then got the one she bought—we had handkerchiefs cheaper than the one she bought—I saw this about two minutes before she paid the 3s. 4d.

JAMES WILSON . I am in the service of Hall and Freeman. Bloxsome gave me information—I saw the prisoner standing at the counter—after paying for what she purchased, on her attempting to leave the shop I told a young man to call her into the counting-house, and heard him do so—she came—I did not go in with her, but I kept my eye on her; and while she was going round the counter to the counting-house, just before she

entered the door, I saw her draw two silk handkerchiefs from under her shawl, and deposit them on the shelf—I said to Mr. Hall, in her hearing, "These handkerchiefs I saw her draw from under her shawl"—I immediately took them up, and sent for an officer—Mr. Hall took her into the counting-house, and examined the handkerchiefs—they appeared to have been opened to be shown, and taken from the counter without being folded up—they are my employers' property, and have a private mark on them.

Cross-examined. Q. How close were you to her when you saw her take them from under her shawl? A. The counter was between us, that is all—I was looking at her, suspecting her—she could not see me, because her back was turned towards me—the counting-house is at the end of the counter—I was in the middle of the shop, nearly opposite to her—the handkerchief she bought would not have a private mark on it, as we invariably take it off when we sell them.

COURT. Q. Was there any body near her at the time she put the handkerchiefs down? A. Near her, but before her—they could not see her—there was nobody near enough to have done it but her.

GUILTY .* Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1798

1798. MATTHEW LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 1 necklace, value 10s., the goods of William Austin, from the person of Caroline Margaret Austin.

CAROLINE MARGARET AUSTIN . I am ten years old, and live with my father in Drury-lane. I was going from school one day, and a man took the beads off my neck at the corner of a court in Drury-lane—I did not see the man do it—I saw him running with the beads in his hand.

MARGARET AUSTIN . I am the wife of William Austin, a gold lacemaker. On Monday, the 18th of July, my little girl went out, to go to school in Brownlow-street, at two o'clock, and had her necklace on—she was brought back by the policeman, about a quarter or half-past five o'clock, without her necklace.

GEORGE ASHTON . I live in Pitt's-place, Drury-lane. I was in Drury-lane that afternoon, and saw the prisoner snatch the necklace off this little girl's neck—I saw it in his hand—he ran down Wild's-passage—I ran after him, calling, "Stop thief", and did not lose sight of him till he was apprehended-when I got up to him, he was in custody of the policeman stopped by another man.

WILLIAM POCOCK . I am a policeman. I was in Chapel-place, Duke-street, near Wild's passage, and heard the cry of "Stop thief"—I found the prisoner in the hands of another man—I took charge of him, and took him to the station-house—Ashton came up immediately on my taking charge of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming across Drury-lane, to go after a place in Cutler-street, Houndsditch—I heard the call of "Stop thief", and was stopped, but no necklace was found on me—the little girl said she did not know whether it was me that look it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1799

1799. WILLIAM PASLEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Clark, on the 9th of July, at St. Luke, Chelsea, and stealing therein 4 pairs of boots, value 2l.; and 2 pairs of shoes, value 16s.; his goods; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ANN CLARK . I am the wife of Joseph Clark, a boot-maker in South-street, in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea. I went to bed on a Friday night above five weeks ago—I was the last person up—I secured the house—I fastened down the window, closed the kitchen shutters, and bolted the door—to the best of my recollection I bolted the shutters, and am not sure—I am sure I put the window down—the boots and shoes were all safe, at eleven o'clock, in the kitchen—in the morning, four pairs of Wellington boots, and two pairs of shoes, were missing—one pair was taken and the other pair dropped in the area—they were all new—the prisoner was a journeyman of my husband's about three months previous—I saw the things at Queen-square on the Tuesday following.

GEORGE FOSTER . I am the policeman. I was present last March in the New Court, when the prisoner was tried—I have certificate of his conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office (read)—he is the same person.

THOMAS TUNSTALL . I am a policeman. I met the prisoner on Saturday morning, the 9th of July, in Little Cadogan Place, about a quarter-past four o'clock about a mile from Mr. Clark's, with a bundle—I asked him what he had got in his bundle—he said some boots and shoes, which he was taking for his employer—I asked him where he brought them from—he said from North-end, Fulham, and was taking them to Monmouth-street for his employer, who had purchased them the previous evening—I took him to the station-house, and have the property.

JOSEPH CLARK . I went to bed about twelve o'clock on Friday, the 8th, but was not in the kitchen that night—I got up about seven o'clock on Saturday morning, and missed four pairs of boots and two pairs of shoes—I know all these to be my property by the workmanship—the shoes are new, but the boots are all new fronted—one pair was taken off the trees—it is Pennett's work.

JOHN PENNETT . I was working for Mr. Clark at the time in question—I remember coming one Saturday morning about six o'clock, and when I came down I found the kitchen window open and the kitchen door ajar—the two bolts of it were not fastened—I found a pair of shoes in the area—I brought them in—I had made them myself, and know them—I made all the shoes produced, and know them to be my work—I had seen them the day before in the kitchen.

ANN CLARK re-examined. The door leading to the area was closed when I left it, and both bolts bolted—I fastened the window, which was found open—I closed the shutters, and I believe, bolted the window, but sometimes the catch springs back—by throwing the window up the spring would go back.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported For Life.

Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18360815-1800

1800. CHARLES HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th July, 9 spoons, value 6l.; 4 forks, value 3l.; and 1 butter knife, value 15s. the goods of Catherine Piercy, his mistress.

CATHERINE PIERCY . I am a window, and keep the Hanover Hotel, Hanover-square. The prisoner lived with me as waiter about for twelve months, and had charge of the plate—he was about to leave me at the en

of July or beginning of August, on a Friday, I think it was the 29th of July—and I required of him an account of the plate and glass intrusted to his care—he left my service between eight and nine o'clock in the evening without giving me that account—in consequence of his not coming back I had him apprehended—I have since seen some silver spoons, forks, and a butter-knife belonging to me—they are worth about 18l. together—as he did not return that evening, I looked for them, and missed them—I have since received a letter purporting to he signed "Charles Hughes"—I am acquainted with the prisoner's handwriting, and I believe it to be his—I have seen him write frequently.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. When he entered your service, was there not a stipulation between you that he was to be accountable for all deficiencies? A. Yes—I believe he has a wife and family—I had no conversation with him about the property—I wished to have the account of my plate, but he hesitated, and I said several times, "Do, pray give it to me"—he always had an inventory, but I desired him to count it over with me, and he would not do it—I believe he was taken into custody near my house—I had a very good character with him, the first time he was with me, from Mrs. Lovegrove, a part of the family who keep the London Coffee-house.

WILLIAM THOMAS BARTON . I produce seven silver spoons, four silver forks, and silver butter-knife—they were pawned at different time between the 27th of November and the 5th of July, at my employer's shop, in Oxford-street—some of them have been pawned and taken out again at different times—I do not know which—9l. 17s. was advanced on them—they were pledged by the prisoner, in the name of "Hughes, 21, Norfolk-street"—I took in three of the table-spoons and the butter-knife—articles of the same description had been pawned before—I cannot to their being the same spoons.

Cross-examined. Q. You took from him spoons of the pattern, which were redeemed afterwards by him? A. Yes, and pawned again—he came over and over again—there was no concealment about his name and address.

JAMES DUPERE (police-constable C 90.) I apprehended the prisoner in Tottenham-street about half-past eleven o'clock on Sunday night, the 31st of July—I told him it was for stealing a quantity of plate from his late mistress—he made no answer, but directed his conversation to the prosecutrix's brother, who was with me—I searched him, and found some duplicates, which I produce, and I found some napkins in his coat pocket—I ascertained that his wife lived at No. 21, Norfolk-street, which is on the duplicate.

WILLIAM THOMAS BARTON re-examined These duplicates correspond with the articles.

CATHERINE PIERCEY re-examined These are my property, and were intrusted to the prisoner as my servant.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you aware that he had fallen into some dietress? A. He was in no distress, decidedly—I should think he got a very handsome income—he had all that was given—he was the principal waiter—a boy acted under him—the hotel is well frequented—I should say he had double and three times 6s. a week but I would not wish to swear about it—I suppose he paid the boy 6s., a week.

COURT. Q. In your judgment, could he receive so little as to he in indigent circumstances? A. Certainly not—my house is generally pretty

full, and it was the season to have families—it was full this reason—I had perhaps nine or ten customers in the house at a time—what the waiter receives depends altogether on the persons' generosity.

MR. PHILLIPS Q. Was he not obliged to allow a boy ten shillings a week? A. I should think not—If he paid it, he received double—why did he stay if it did not answer?—it could not fail to pay him very well (letter read)—"Madam, I hope, on my examination to-morrow, I shall be able to meet the amount required of me, to enable me to refund to the pawnbroker the money advanced on your plate—relying on your forbearance and kindness not to press the case against me; and trusting I may not be disappointed in you clemency towards me, I will wait on you to return you my sincere thanks, and make up whatever loss my inventory may be deficient in. Charles Hughes".

(The prisoner, in his defence, stated that he received very few perquisites in his situation, and had been compelled to pledge the plate in consequence of his difficulties to maintain his family; and being suddenly discharged from his place, he had not the means of redeeming it, which he intended to have done—he received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.—Recommended to mercy.

Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1801

1801. THOMAS GURRY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 2 pairs of boots, value 27s., and 2 pairs of shoes, value 16s.; the goods of Jonas Bateman.

JOHN NICHOLS . I am in the service of Jonas Bateman, a shoe-maker in Broad-street. On Friday, the 8th of July, the prisoner came to the shop about half-past eleven o'clock, and requested me to take some boots and shoes to Great Russell-street for a gentleman to try on—I took two pairs of boots and two pairs of shoes and went with him—he took me to a pastry-cook's shop in Great Russell-street,—he took the bag from me and went in—he then came out and requested me to go back and fetch two pairs more of pumps, which he had quire forgotten—I went, and when I returned he was gone off with the bag—I had delivered them to him thinking he was going to take them to the gentleman—he did not mention the gentleman's name—the pastry-cook knew nothing of the prisoner—the goods were worth 1l. 15s.—I merely intended to leave them while I fetched the pumps—I have since seen them at the pawnbroker's.

Prisoner. Q. You stated before the Magistrate that I selected the boots and shoes? A. No, I did not, I selected them myself.

CORNELIUS FAULKNER . I am a policeman. On Tuesday, the 12th of August I took the prisoner in Tottenham-court-road—he declared himself an innocent man, and said he was in great distress; but on getting further he admitted it was the first time, wishing to know what I thought the sentence of the Court might be, if he was convicted—I produce some duplicates which I found in his watch-fob; one is for shoes pawned on the 9th of July.

GEORGE CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker, in London-street, St. Pancras. On the 9th of July, the prisoner brought a pair of shoes to my shop, which I produce—I advanced 3s. on them—this is the counterpart of the duplicate I gave him—he pawned them in the name of "John Gurney"—I had seen him in the shop on other occasions—I am certain he pawned the boots.

WILLIAM COWDEROY . I am in the service of Mr. Baxter, a pawnbroker, in Norfolk-street, Marylebone. I produce a pair of Wellington boots, which were pawned on the 8th of July, I believe by the prisoner, but I should not like to swear it—the counterpart of the duplicate has been produced by the officer—it is in my handwriting.

Prisoner. Q. In what part of your shop did I go? A. Into the bottom box—I do not recollect what you said—you are the person that pawned them, I believe—I do not know what dress you had on—I recollect you—I was at the office only two or three days afterwards, and recognised you.

HENRY ARCHBOLD . I am servant to Mr. Bicknell, a pawnbroker, in Tottenham-court-road. I have a pair of boots which were pawned on the 8th July, for 4s—the duplicate given for them has been produced by the officer—I recollect seeing the prisoner in the shop, but I cannot say he pawned these.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at a house of call for gentleman's servants, in North Audley-street, and met a butler, who was also out of a situation—we went together to make inquiries for situations—I gave him two duplicates of coats to dispose of for me, and met him by appointment next day, in Tottenham-court-road—he said, "I have a job to valet a gentleman a few mornings, will you do me the favour to go to Bateman's, in Broad-street, and order a few boots and shoes, and bring them to the pastry cooks in Great Russell-street?"—I ordered them and two pair of pumps, and took the shopman with them to the pastry-cooks—I asked if Mr. Thompson lived there; they said, "No"—I left the goods there, expecting he would come for them—I told the shopman to fetch the pumps which he had forgotten, and I would wait till Thompson came—he came in about five minutes and requested me to fetch them out the shop, saying it would appear singular for him to fetch them, as he had not left them—I brought them out to him and walked with him—he left me suddenly in Union-street, and I did not see him again till Monday, July 11—I then asked if he had disposed of my duplicates—he said, "No; here they are, and three more in this bag; I was coming to ask you to take care of them for me, as I have been drinking"—on looking at them I found he had pawned the shoes in my name—he said, "Never mind, I shall have money to-morrow to pay for them"—I have been made a dupe of by him.

GUILTY . Aged 48.— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, August 17, 1836.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18360815-1802

1802. OCTAVIUS HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July, 4oz. 10dwts. of gold lace, value 2l.; and 8oz. 17dwts. of silver lace, value 4l.; the goods of Robert Rogers and another, his master; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1803

1803. THOMAS CURRY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June, 1 frock, value 4s.; 1 pair of half-boots, value 2s.; 1 quilt value 1s.; the goods of Daniel Harradine; and also, on the 6th of July, 1 bedcover, value 2s.; 1 blanket, value 18d., 1 sheet, value 18d., the goods of the said Daniel Harradine; and that he had been before convicted of felony: to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Transported For Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1804

1804. JOSEPH SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the monies of John Scorah to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Fourteen Days.

Reference Number: t18360815-1805

1805. JOHN WILDEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 1l.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; and 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; the goods of Thomas Buckley.

THOMAS BUCKLEY . I am in the employ of Mr. Tilley, a cowkeeper. I sleep in the shed—about ten o'clock in the morning of the 18th of July I was called up-stairs to my room—I found the prisoner on the top of the landing—I asked what he wanted there—he said, "Nothing"—I saw my coat, trowsers, waistcoat, and handkerchief lying on the stairs alongside of him.—I had left them hanging on a line in the bed-room—he ran down stairs—I ran after him, and charged him with this—he said he had not stolen them.

Prisoner. I went to a milk-shop in York-street, where I used to have some curds and whey—there was no one there—I went up-stairs, as I thought they might sell them there—I never touched these things—I saw them there.

JANE TRADER . I live in this place. I saw the prisoner in the prosecutor's room—he came out, and the things were then on the stairs by him—I did not see him drop them, but I know they were in the prosecutor's room five minutes before—I went down my stairs, and the prisoner went down the cow-shed stairs.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON (police-sergeant D 4.) I took the prisoner, and found this handkerchief, which is the prosecutor's, in his pocket.

Prisoner. I took it up on the stairs and put it into my pocket as I ran down stairs, when the prosecutor hit me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1806

1806. JOHN DRIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July, 1 sack, value 2s.; 1 bushel of oats, value 3s.; 1 bushel of oats and chaff; mixed together, value 1s.; and 50lbs. of tares, value 6d.; the goods of Williams Hobbs, his master.

WILLIAMS HOBBS . The prisoner was in my employ, at Enfield-highway, as a carter, for three of four months—on the 26th of July, I found about a bushel of oats in a sack, under a manger, in one of my stables—it was covered up and tied over very curiously, to be carried away, as I thought—I cut a few bits of paper, and put them in, that I might be sure of it—I then told the constable, and watched, and between eleven and twelve o'clock that night the prisoner went into the stable and fetched the sack out—he put it into his own stable, where his horses stood for a little while, and then he put it on a load of potatoes, which he was going to take to London—he then went back and fetched a bundle of tares form his loft, over his stable, and put them on his cart—he then tied up the sleeves and collar of his smock frock, and put a parcel of mixed corn in it, and put that on his cart, and then he took, besides that, his horses's allowance, his nose-bags, and his bottle-truss—he then turned his cart round and went on to London—I told the officer, who followed him and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had you any light when you saw

this? A. It was moonlight—I was about eight yards from him, and saw him distinctly—I allow so much for my horses every day—the prisoner baited them with part of it, this mixed corn—the tares, and oats were not for his horses—I allowed my horses victuals enough to make them look well—I do not think he gave them all that I allowed for them—I found the pieces of paper in the sack when it was brought back—I had known the prisoner all his life—this property is worth about 6s.6d.

JOHN GUIVER . I am a officer. I took the prisoner with this property on his cart, which the prosecutor claims.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you find it? A. When he stopped with his cart, at the Two Brewers, at Ponder's-end—I asked how he came to do so—he acknowledged taking the tares and what was in the smock frock—he said he knew nothing about what was in the sack—he said he took it for his horses, but he had his nose-bags full, and his bottle of hay besides.

Prisoner's Defence. I had nothing but what I wanted for my horses. (The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy by the Jury— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1807

1807. PHŒBE ADAMS was indicted for feloniously receiving and harbouring, on the 5th of July, a female child, of the age of seven months, the daughter of John Clatworthy and Diana his wife, with intent to deprive them of the possession of the said child.

JOHN CLATWORTHY . I am the father of this child—it is now here—I am quite satisfied it is mine.

DIANA CLATWORTHY . I am the mother of this child—I was delivered of it on the 9th of December, it is a female child—on Tuesday, the 5th of July, I gave her to Eliza Souter to take it into the air, she did not bring it back—she stood in the road, crying—I saw the child again on the 23rd, it had the same cap and shift on as when I gave it to Souter—I am quite sure this is my child.

ELIZA SOUTER . I am nine years old—I know I shall go to hell if I don't tell the truth—I remember Mrs. Clatworthy giving me her child on the day the balloon went up—some woman came up to me, I was standing by an apple-stall, and she spoke to me about the child—she took the child from me and told me to go to a house and ask for Caroline, I went and came back and the woman and child were gone—this is the child.

CHARLOTTE STEDMAN . I am a weaveress—I am married and have a family. In consequence of what I heard I went to No.2, Bull's Head-court, Fenchurch-street, I knocked at a room on the second floor of the house—the prisoner opened the door, I walked in and her mother was sitting with the child on her lap, washing it—the prisoner called her, mother—the woman lifted up the head of the child, and I said, "That is not your child"—she said, "It is my daughter's child"—the prisoner was present—I then turned to the prisoner, and said, "It is not your child, I know the distressed parents of it, I live nearly opposite them"—the prisoner said, "It is my child, and I have got twins, and this is one, the other is a boy"—I then said it was not hers, and I would have a policeman—her mother said "If you say it is not my daughter's child I will knock you down"—in the court of a minute or two there were two or three persons came up from below stairs—they still persisted that it was the prisoner's child—I said I would not leave the room—the prisoner turned to her aunt who went with me to show me the place, and said to her "Aunty Mary, you have done this," the

prisoner then said, "I will take you to the place where I was put to bed, and they you shall have satisfaction that it is my child"—I went with her above two miles beyond St. George's Church—she went to a house and asked for a gentleman of the name of Poole; a lady put her head out, and said there was no such person there—I had the child with me—I asked her where she meant to take me to—she said, to the father of the baby, and that his mother kept the other baby—I still walked with her to the half-way house at Greenwich—I then began to murmur—she said it was only the third turning further—I went on with her to Greenwich—I then began to murmur, she then said it was the third turning past the Park—I went on to the main road that led to Woolwich—I then began to murmur, and said I would take the child home to its parents—she said if I took her child away she would punish me as far as the law would allow—I said I would take the child home, and if it was not the woman's child I would bring it back and beg her pardon—I then left her and came back to Greenwich—I got a cup of tea and came back by the steamer and brought the child to its mother—her joy was such that I thought she would have fainted away every moment.

MARY MATTHEWS . I went with Charlotte Stedman to the place—I found the child there—she said, "It is not your child"—the prisoner's mother said, "It is my daughter's child"—I have known the prisoner from her birth—she has had no child—I went first into the room—I knew where the child was by my son seeing the bill, and that gave a description of the child—that is all I know—I am her mother's sister.

Prisoner's Defence. A person named Eliza, was in the family-way at the same time I was—I had a child to nurse in the same way, and when I went from nursing Mrs. Castor's child, my mother would not let me in without I brought a child, as she knew I had one; and Eliza told me she would get me a child—I knew that she and a young man lived near Black-heath—this is the child that Eliza gave me—I know she had another one a little boy exactly like it.

JOHN CLATWORTHY re-examined. They disguised the child by letting it have a boy's cap on—we have searched for this Eliza but cannot find her—there was an Eliza, a common girl, in Whitechapel, but she has left that part for two years—an officer went to inquire after her—we went to inquire for Mr. Poole, there was no such person known there.

GUILTY .—Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1808

1808. JAMES POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July, 1 bag, value 6d.; 1 piece of paper, value 1/2 d.; 1 promissary note, value 5l.; and 1 bill of Exchange, value 100l. the goods and property of Benjamin Lewis Davis.

BENJAMIN LEWIS DAVIS . I am a cattle-dealer, and live in Cardigan-shire. I went to the Sun Inn, at Addington in Northamptonshire—I went to bed—the prisoner was to sleep in the same room—I had a pocket-book which contained the bag with 6d. in it and the notes state, which were for cattle I had sold—I put the property under my pillow—I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock, and got up at a little past six—I was out for two nights before—when I got up all my property was gone, but 4 1/2d.; no one else was in the room—my silver watch was gone, and a knife was found in the window where I had left my watch—I had gone there looking after a horse that was taken in the pond, and the prisoner spoke to me in the street and went with me—this is the bill of exchange that was in my hook, I took it of George Jolly.

Prisoner. Q. Was not I asleep when you came to bed? A. I don't know, I left you at half-past twelve o'clock at the bar—I never was tipsy but once in my life, that was years before—I drank no rum and water that I recollect.

Prisoner. It was half-past twelve o'clock when I went to bed, and the landlord proved that he brought him to bed at one o'clock—I slept there the night before—if there was any knife in the room, it was not mine.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I keep the Sun Inn, at Addington. The prisoner came to my house on the 26th of June—the prosecutor came on the 27th—they slept in the same room—the prosecutor went to bed first—I never saw the prisoner again till I came here—he owned me no money for reckoning—I saw Davis the next morning—I called him at half-past five o'clock—he did not get up—I called him again at six o'clock—he did not get up till seven o'clock—he then proclaimed his loss, and we went to Ball the officer—the prisoner saw me give Davis, on the night before, 13l. all but half a crown.

Prisoner. Q. What time did I go to bed? A. About one o'clock.

COURT. to B. L. DAVIS. Q. What did you do with this 13l. all but half a crown? A. I put it in a bag—I had nearly 500l. in all—I had it inside my small clothes, and put it under my pillow—all the money was taken out 4 1/2d—I was obliged to borrow 5s. of Mr. Taylor, as soon as I got to Northampton.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not have a man taken at Hertford, of the name of William Powell? A. Yes; you told me your name was William Powell.

DANIEL BRANBURG . I am clerk to Barclay and Co., bankers, Lombard-street. I produce a bill for£100, drawn at twenty-one days after date—the prisoner brought it to me for payment three days before it was due—I told him it was not due—he then asked if we could discount it—I refused, not knowing the party.

THOMAS MORLEY . I live at No. 19, King-street, Smithfield. The prisoner showed a £100 bill, on the 1st of July—it was signed "Fincham Diss"—he asked me where the banking-house was—I referred to an almanack, and told him—he talked about going to get it cased on the 1st of July, but it was too late—it was quarter past three o'clock—I saw no more of him till the next day—I then asked him whether he had got cash for his bill—he said it was all right—nothing was said about discount—I never saw him afterwards, till he was in custody.

Prisoner. Yes; I slept at your house. Witness. Yes, on Thursday; but I did not see you—you was in bed before I came home, and the next morning you was gone—you asked me for change for a £5 note—I said I should be short of change—I let you have 2s., and you went away with a young woman.

CHARLES WALLER . I am a City police-constable. The prisoner came to the station-house on Saturday, the 16th of July, and said he had been knocked down and robbed at Kilburn, of £300 or £400; that his pocket-book was inside his coat—I asked where he was the last night—he said in Westminster, drinking in a public-house—I asked if he could tell the parties that knocked him down—he said yes, he could swear to the one who knocked him down—that they took him to a public-house, where there was a woman, who took him to Kilburn, and four or five men followed him—we took a woman and one man before the Magistrate—he then said he should go into the country, as he could not speak to the men—I

said, "They are only remanded for a few days, tell me the No. of the bill you speak of as having lost, or the particulars or I shall lock you up"—he then went with me to the bankers—I told the clerk that he said he had been robbed to a great amount, and I should detain him—I then took him to Guildhall—I searched him and found this bag on him—I found one £5 Bank-note on him, a tobacco pouch, and a duplicate for a saddle and bridle pledged in July.

BENJAMIN LEWIS DAVIS re-examined. I know this bag—it is the bag I lost—it had the sovereigns and notes in it—this£5 note I bought for 25s. of a neighbour of mine after the bank had stopped, as I knew the partners of the bank.

Prisoner. Q. Is there any name or mark on that bat, I have had it three years? A. There is a parting in it, and it has been sewn up by me once or twice—I know the woman that made it.

Prisoner. He was forsworn himself three times—he says he was not drunk—he was as drunk as a man could be—we won 2s. or 3s. worth of rum and water of the landlord in tossing—I was drinking there all day.

WILLIAM TAYLOR re-examined. Davis was not drunk.

GUILTY . Aged 36.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1809

1809. FREDERICK WOODCRAFT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 1 shilling, the money of George Tickell, his master.

GEORGE TICKELL . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Bread-street, Golden-square. The prisoner was in my service—I had suspicion, and put some marked money in my till at eight o'clock at night, on the 18th of July—I examined it at ten o'clock, and one shilling was missing—I sent for a constable, and searched the prisoner's box, and the shilling was found in it—it is one I marked.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where was the box? A. In his bed-room—no one else slept there—I marked the money at tea time, on Monday—I searched the box on Wednesday night—I left the till open—my wife, myself and the prisoner, were the only persons in the shop—either my wife or myself are always at home—the prisoner gave the police-man the key to open his box—I counted the money that was in the till on Tuesday, and put 8s. in then—I am almost sure it was 8s—I put 10s. marked money in on Monday—there were only four sixpences not marked—that I swear—on Tuesday there was eight shillings marked—I do not know how much more—we carry on a pretty fair trade—I am sure there was some gone.

WILLIAM METCALFE (police-constable C 133.) I was present when this shilling was found in the prisoner's box—he gave up the key to me.

MR. PHILLIPS to GEORGE TICKELL. Q. Was there not 4s. or 5s. found on the prisoner's person? A. We found 2s. 6d., and 3d. in halfpence, on his person, but none marked—in his box were two sixpences, and this one shilling, and another shilling—I put 10s. marked money into the till, on Wednesday—I then went out to give him a opportunity to take some out, and left the till open—I do not know how much unmarked money there was on Wednesday—there was a good deal of silver in sixpences and shillings—I could not swear about half-crowns—a crown or half-crown may have been put in, and some shillings taken out—while I was out he changed a sovereign, but there was none of the marked money left.

COURT. Q. Supposing that any body had come in, and given him a

crown or half a crown, might be not have changed it with his own money? A. Not in my shop—he was never allowed—I never told him so, but he knew he was not allowed to do it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1810

1810. JOHN SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of William Kendle, from his person.

WILLIAM KENDLE . I live in Cheapside, and am a laceman. At half past eleven o'clock or the 19th of July, I was walking down St. Giles towards Oxford-street—I felt something at my pocket—I turned and saw my handkerchief on the ground—the prisoner passed me at the time—I saw no one else, but Thomas Diver, who said, "That is him"—the prisoner ran away—we ran, and caught him in Compton-street—I cannot tell whether any one else could have taken it.

THOMAS DIVER . I live in Penton-street, Pentonville. I was standing speaking to a friend and I saw the prosecutor—when he came close to me I observed a handkerchief moving, and part of it in the prisoner's hand and part of the prosecutors's pocket, the prosecutor turned round, and the prisoner dropped it—I pointed him out, and he ran away.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY .— Confined One Month

Reference Number: t18360815-1811

1811. JOSEPH ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June, 1 coat, value 15s., the goods of George William Bentley.

GEORGE WILLIAM BENTLEY . I am a lighterman, living in Great Hermitage-street. On the 19th of July, I was in the Sugar-loaf public-house, with my brother-in-law, Slater—I came out at a quarter past ten o'clock—I went in again—Slater had hold of the prisoner, and my coat which I had left there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe there had been some other sea-faring men there? A. Yes—we had been drinking nothing more than common—I was playing with my brother at bagatelle—there might have been a dozen persona there—I know nothing of the prisoner.

CHARLES SLATER . I saw the prisoner going out with the coat, and stopped him—there had been other people there who had coats very similar to this.

Cross-examined. Q. He went out with it before all the people? A. Yes—he might have thought it belonged to other people.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1812

1812. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 1 coat, value 2l., the goods of George Triggs.

GEORGE TRIGGS . I keep a tailor's shop in Cullum-street. I placed a coat on a bust outside the door, at ten o'clock in the morning, on the 10th and missed it about two o'clock—I ran out, and caught the prisoner in Leadenhall-street—nothing was found on him—this is my coat.

---- ----. I was standing in my master's shop in Leadenhall-market—I heard a cry of "Stop thief"—I saw the prisoner running and drop this coat—I picked it up, and gave it to the officer.

Prisoner. I never was in Leadenhall-market at all—I was coming along Leadenhall-street, about two o'clock, and slipped down, a man passed

me and dropped the coat. Witness. I saw him drop the coat in the Skin-market, and carrying it before he dropped it.

WILLIAM HIND . I am the officer—I was called in, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1813

1813. WILLIAM HORN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. 6d., the goods of Charles Wilford, his master.

CHARLES WILFORD . I engaged the prisoner as shopman, on the 13th of July. In consequence of some circumstance, I discharged him the same day—I missed a pair of shoes—these are them—I had not sold them.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Do you manufacture them yourself? A. No; I had them from Mr. Heath, of the Minories—he supplies the trade—these are made in Northampton—I know them by the "C" on the heel and on the waist—the manufacturers generally put their own initials on them—no other manufacturer uses the same name—Mr. Heath is a very large manufacturer—he supplies many thousands of shoes—the shop where I engaged the prisoner, is at Whitechapel—I had opened it that day—I had three other shops—I was at the shop in Whitechapel from nine o'clock in the morning till one o'clock in the day—other people were in the shop—not one pair was sold that day—there was not a single customer—the shoes I had at my other shops were supplied by Mr. Heath—I took fifty-one pairs in my cart to my shop at Whitechapel—I had been selling shoes at the other shops in Gracechurch-street and King William-street, and at the Commercial-road—I know these were not sold, because when we sell shoes, we punch them and clean them up, and these are not—I swear that these were in the shop at Whitechapel—I discharged the prisoner for getting drunk.

COURT. Q. Are you able to state that that is one of the fifty-one pair you took to the shop where the prisoner was? A. Yes; because I counted them and had never sold one—there was one pair missing from there.

STEPHEN HOBSON . I was going down Gracechurch-street, and saw the prisoner in the passage of a public-house—these shoes were by him—he was showing them to another man.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say he knew nothing about them? A. When I first saw him he had them in his hand—he was beastly drunk, and was drinking at the time—a few minutes elapsed between my first seeing him and seeing him again—I went up the street and came back—he was still there—he was taken into custody in about twenty minutes.

GUILTY . Aged 30.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18360815-1814

1814. PERIAH FROST was indicted for stealing 8lbs. of ham, value 5s., the goods of John Walker.

(The prisoner did not plead to the indictment; and on the evidence of Mr. Gilbert M'Murdo, surgeon of the gaol, the Jury found him of unsound mind.)

Reference Number: t18360815-1815

1815. JOHN CROW was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 1 handkerchief, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Martyn, from his person.

THOMAS MARTYN . Between ten and eleven o'clock on Saturday night, the 23rd of July, I was near Aldgate, and had occasion to use my handkerchief—I took it out and put it back again—soon after I missed it—I turned, and saw the prisoner near me—I walked up and accused him of stealing it, and found it in the crown of his hat—this is it.

Prisoner. I had been to my uncle's, and as I came to Aldgate Church, two young men went past—they threw the handkerchief on the ground—I took it up, and the gentleman came and said, had I seen any body take his handkerchief—I said I had picked one up.

THOMAS MARTYN . No, he denied having it—I saw no other person there.

GUILTY .

*— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1816

1816. RICHARD JOHN RANGER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 3 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Jonathan Sharp.

ELIZABETH SHARP . The prisoner is my son. On the 9th of July, at about eight o'clock, I put 19s. 4d. in a drawer in my chest, there were three half-crowns and three shillings and one sixpence—I went out about three o'clock in the afternoon and locked the prisoner in the house—on my return, in ten minutes, he was gone and the money also.

JOHN BETTS . I am a neighbour of the prosecutor. I met the prisoner on the Sunday following—I asked him what he had done with the money, he said he had spent it in Oxford-street in sweet-stuff—I took him to the station-house.

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE (police-constable F 60.) I took the prisoner—he said he took the money out of a drawer in the chest of drawers, that these small articles which I produce he had bought with part of the money, the rest he had spent.

GUILTY . Aged 10.— Confined One Month; The First And Last Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18360815-1817

1817. WILLIAM WILLSHER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 1 necklace, value 5s., the goods of George Bolton, from the person of Sarah Ann Bolton.

GEORGE BOLTON . I am a baker, living in Minster-street. I have a little child called Sarah Ann Bolton. On the 8th of July, before I went out, I saw her with a coral necklace on—when I returned, I saw a crowd about the door, with the prisoner—he said he had not taken it—he afterwards acknowledged it.

CHARLES MASON . I live at the prosecutor's house. I was looking out of window, and saw the child with the necklace—I saw two boys there—the prisoner was one—he took the necklace off and gave it to the other boy, who went off—I called "Stop thief"—the prisoner was taken and brought back—the necklace has not been found.

Prisoner. I never had it, I never took it off at all.

JOHN HAYDON (police-constable 162.) I heard a cry of "Stop thief"—the prisoner was taken—he was running as fast as he could—he denied having taken it, and then he said he had taken it off.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1818

1818. MARGARET NEVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July, 1 table-cloth, value 12s. the goods of Theresa Langdon.

THERESA LANGDON . I am a washer-woman. The prisoner washed for me on the 14th July, and I missed a table-cloth—this is it.

JOHN LONERGAN (police-constable D 49.) I went after the prisoner,

and found this table-cloth in her apron, and some ham, on the 18th of July.

Prisoner. I was very much in distress, and took the table-cloth, which I left for 2s.—I took a frock and got the table-cloth out, and had it in my apron, to leave at home. Witness. She said she was going to take it back when I took her.

GUILTY . Aged 46.—Recommended to mercy.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1819

1819. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, I looking-glass and stand, value 1l. 15s. the goods of John Mearing.

(The witnesses were called on their recognizances, and did not answer.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1820

1820. THOMAS WALTER MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 8 yards of printed cotton, value 4s., the goods of Joseph Kaye.

FREDERICK SAMSON . I am shopman to Joseph Kaye, linen-draper, of Tottenham-court-road. On the 9th of July the prisoner came to the shop—I had reasons for desiring to examine his apron—after a long conversation I did so, and found this printed cotton—it is my master's—I had not sold it to him—I let him go to his master's house—I went after him, and asked him what he did it for—he said he did not do it—he then said he did not do it intentionally.

Cross-examined by MR. PHLILIPS. Q. Then after you searched him you let him go? A. Yes—because I knew where he lived, and I mentioned it to my master—my master scolded me about this, and then I said he had taken it; but I did not know he was a thief, till I found this on him—I got scolded about keeping his company after I found he was a thief—I knew I could find him at any time—he had been in the habit of visiting me in the shop—I had known him about three weeks before he entered the shop—about nine weeks altogether—Mark Stump was in the shop—he is not here—I did not prefer another indictment against him—we indicted the prisoner for stealing handkerchiefs—I do not know that the bill was ignored—he was not larking in the shop with this cloth—he did not throw it at my head—I had never been very intimate with him—I did not go to bed sometimes till four o'clock in the morning, owing to my going to the public-house all night, and going to balls with the prisoner—he seduced me—I am twenty years old and he is sixteen—I have been out at four o'clock in the morning for three nights—when we were not at the ball-room we were merely walking about amusing ourselves in the street—I cannot recollect going into but one public-house—I never went out but on Monday nights with him—that was three times—I have been out with the other young man, but not the prisoner—I went once to a young woman's of the name of Scott, whom Morris introduced to us at the ball-room—I always returned home with Mark Stump and no one else—we slept in the little parlour adjoining the shop with a male companion—no young women have slept there since I came, nor remained there all night—I have been out with the two master's shop, but not with his knowledge—it was drank in the shop—this print was taken on Saturday, the 9th of July, and the prisoner was taken up at half-past three o'clock the Sunday following—he did not take

it before my face—I said, "What have you got in the bag?"—he said only a dirty shawl which he had got to be cleaned—I pressed him two or three times—he took me to the end of she shop, and said he hoped I would never mention it—it was a piece of print he had taken—Mark Stump could not hear him, he spoke so low—Stump did not see it—I did not call him, because the prisoner begged so hard, and almost cried—I told my master, as I thought it was my duty—it was my own money I spent at the ball-room—I spent only 8d. with the young woman.

COURT. Q. What was it you observed? A. I was at the and of the shop lighting the gas—a young woman called me, and said he had something—I charged him and he said it was a shawl of his master's he was going to take to be cleaned.

JOSEPH CLEMENTS (police-constable E 102.) I went to Windmill-street after the prisoner—he said he had done this, but it was the first time; he saw the print in the last witness's hand.

Cross-examined. Q. What had you said to him? A. Nothing at all, only that he was my prisoner.

Prisoner. What Samson stated about his not having young ladies in the back parlour is not true, I could prove it—they might have been in the shop, and taken that gown-piece—I flung it at Mark's head—I am innocent.

MR. PHILLIPS to JOSEPH CLEMENTS. Q. Did you search Mr. boxes? A. Yes—we got the keys from him, but found nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1821

1821. JOHN WILLIAMS and RICHARD BRYANT were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of John Hill Powell, from his person.

JOHN HILL POWELL . On the 13th of July, I was standing at the gate of St. Giles's church, at half-past two o'clock—my attention was attracted by seeing the the prisoner Bryant in custody of the constable, who had my handkerchief in his hand—I had had it a short time before in my pocket—this is it.

MARY JAMES . I was standing at shop of Mr. Langley, in St. Giles's, and I saw two gentlemen walking along—the two prisoners and another person were behind them—Williams took the handkerchief, and handed it to Bryant—I went to turn round to tell the policeman, and he had got the prisoner Bryant.

Cross-examined. MR. PHILLIPS Q. Did you see Bryant throw it down? A. Yes, he did—they were together when they followed the gentleman.

Williams. She said she saw me through the window, and now she says she saw me follow the gentleman. Witness. I was inside the shop, and saw them following them—I did not see them far.

JAMES TURNER (police-constable D 68.) I was in the shop with James, and saw the two prisoners with a third person—they walked very close to each other, elbow to elbow—I saw Williams go in front of the other two—he drew the handkerchief, and gave it to Bryant—I took Bryant, and then he threw it down.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not hear the young lady say that he threw it on the ground? A. He did so, but not till I got hold of him—I never lost sight of it—he did not attempt to get rid of it before I seized him.

MARY JAMES . The handkerchief was taken by Williams, and handed to Bryant—he threw it down immediately the constable took him.

Bryant. I was walking along, and saw the handkerchief thrown on me—I threw it down.

Williams. The policeman stated that he was looking at some shoes, and now he says he was in the shop with her.

(The prisoner Bryant received a good character.)

WILLIAMS— GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Transported For Fourteen Years.

BRYANT— GUILTY . Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1822

1822. JOSEPH KISLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July, 17 lbs. weight of iron, value 1s., the goods of John Mallcott and another, his masters.

THOMAS PLOWS . I live at King's Arms-yard, and am foreman to John Mallcott and another. The prisoner was in their employ for ten years—I saw him go out on the evening of the 13th of July, and followed and gave him in charge—I asked him what he had under his hat—he said old iron—this iron was found—it is my masters'.

JOSEPH STEPHENS (police-constable G 184.)I found this iron in the prisoner's hat—there is 17 lbs.

Prisoner. I hope you will have mercy on me, for the sake of my wife and family.

GUILTY . Aged 39.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1823

1823. WILLIAM STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June, 1 coat, value 15s., the goods of James Barrett.

JAMES BARRETT . I live at the Waterloo Arms, Marylebone, and am a servant out of place. On the 28th of June, I hung up my coat in the skittle-ground, and was absent five minutes—I found it was gone.

JOHN WILLIS . I was at the skittle-ground and I saw the witness go out—I saw the prisoner take his coat from the nail—he went out of the ground with it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Were any other persons there at the time? A. Yes; five, six or seven—I get my living at ground-work—I had no employment at the time—I won what I had—the prosecutor lost one pot, and he paid for it.

FREDERICK OHLSON . I am shopman to Mr. Morrison, a pawnbroker, of Upper York-street. On the 28th of June, this coat was pawned by the prisoner, I believe, but I cannot positively swear to him.

Cross-examined. Q. What name was it in? A. "William Stephens, No. 6, Charles-street."

HENRY LOVETT , (police-constable F 179.)The prisoner was given to me on the 9th of July—he lives at No. 19, Praed-street.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18360815-1824

1824. CATHERINE CLASHBY was indicted for a misdemeanour.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

CATHERINE CALLAGHAN . My husband keeps a cook's-shop, in Bainbridge-street, On the 4th of July, the prisoner came for 2d. worth of pig's cheek, and 1/2d. worth of cabbage—she gave me a shilling—I gave her 9 1/2d.

in change—I wrapped the shilling up in a bit of paper, and put it into my pocket, because I had only copper in that pocket—she came again in about ten minutes, and asked for the same thing again—she gave me another shilling—I gave her 9 1/2d., and laid the shilling on the table—I gave Sullivan, who lives in the same house, the shilling in my pocket—she brought it back, bit in two, and said it was bad—I then took up the other, and gave them both to the policeman.

MARY SULLIVAN . Callaghan gave me the shilling to get change—the person I took it to, bit it in two—I returned her the same shilling.

EDWARD GREENING (police-constable E 99.) On the 4th of July, I received the two shillings from Callaghan—I went to the prisoner's lodgings—she was not at home—I went again, and found her—I told her what I wanted her for—she never spoke till we got to the station-house, she then said, she was not aware they were bad shillings—nothing was found on her.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to His Majesty's Mint. These shillings are both counterfeit, and cast in the same mould.

Prisoner's Defence. My lodger sent me for 2d. worth of pig's cheek, and said he would make me go—he then sent me for some more, and I asked him for the halfpence, he said he would not give them to me, but gave me another shilling.

EDWARD GREENING . I found her in bed with a young man—she said nothing to me then—she told me that her lodger gave them to her, that he had been in the habit of passing had money, and he gave it her to do so.

GUILTY . Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1825

1825. CHARLES NEWLAND was indicted for a misdemeanour.

ANN MILLER . I reside with my uncle, Mr. Lee, of Old Mint. He keeps a chandler's-shop, and we sell beer—on the 16th of July, Sulley came and had a pot of beer—it came 1 1/2d—he laid a shilling on the counter—I said, "Whose is this?"—he said "Mine"—I said, "What do you want"—he said, "A pot of beer"—I felt the shilling, and thought it was not good—I showed it to my uncle.

Cross-examined by MR. DUNBAR. Q. This is within the tower? A. Yes—I knew Sulley by coming to the shop, and a great many soldiers resort there—he said some other soldier gave it him—my uncle took this shilling, and Sulley said it was not his—it was in my uncle's hands, and he did not give it back to Sulley.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Are you sure that the same shilling you took from Sulley, you gave to your uncle? A. Yes, I did.

JAMES LEE . I am the witness's uncle. I received a bad shilling from her, on the 16th of July—I have kept it ever since—I have two—one was taken on the Friday preceding—one of these two is what I took from my niece—in consequence of what Sulley told me, I went to the barracks, and made a communication to corporal Andrews—the prisoner was there sitting on a form, and the corporal spoke to him—Sulley said it was a bad shilling that he gave him to take to my shop—I do not know whether New-land made any answer—they were both of them taken to the Sergeant Major.

Cross-examined. Q. He seemed quite confused? A. I did not take notice of him—these are the two shillings—I took the shilling from my

niece's hands—I did not mark it—it was one of these two—I cannot tell which—there are a good many Brimingham men in the tower.

JOHN SULLEY . I am in the second Battalion of Coldstream Guards—the prisoner is a comrade. I remember going to Lee's shop for some beer, and gave the shilling to take for a pot of beer—Lee refused it, and said it was bad—I received the shilling of Charles Newman—he told me to go and fetch a pot of beer, which came to 1 1/2d.—when I was asked about it. I told Lee it was not mine, and gave an account of it—the went with me up to the Barracks—we went Corporal Andrews, who went with us—I told Corporal Andrews the same I did at the shop—we found the prisoner at the bottom of the stairs—Lee said he had sent me for beer with bad money—Andrews said he should take us both down to the Sergeant Major—we were both confined all night—the prisoner said he had got seven more in his knapsack, and there was no doubt he was done through that—he was afraid he was done—I did not know before that of his having bad money in his knapsack—I told the Adjutant of the Battalion the next day—we were then confined in the guard-room the next day, and searched.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been in the regiment? A. Not two years—the prisoner was in the regiment before—we have not been intimate—when he asked me to get a beer I was sitting on my bed—no one else was there—we were friends for any thing I know—we were not bed-fellows—I had only 2 1/2d.—I had nothing to do with paying for his beer—he gave me the money for the beer between six and seven o'clock—he was sober—I had about a hundred yards to go to the beer-shop—I had been once or twice to Mr. Lee's—the Sergeant Major did not say he thought this was a trick of mine—it was his duty to lock me up—he could not release me till I had been before the officer—I cannot say how many knapsacks hung up in the room—I never saw them locked up—there has been as many as twenty in that room.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you very intimate with him? A. I was not—I was on the same terms with him as the other soldiers—I had no quarrel with him—I had not time, (from the time I returned from the beer-shop,) to go to the room where the knapsacks were.

SAMUEL CHURCH . I am a sergeant in the same regiment. I had orders from Major Lee to the search prisoner's knapsack—I found in it a small bad containing seven counterfeit shillings—I showed it to the Sergeant Major—he ordered me to keep it in possession—the bag was not tied up, but folded up.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? A. About two years—he was not a very good soldier—there are about forty men it that room, when complete—twenty of thirty sleep there—any soldier may go up—these knapsacks are merely fastened with a strap and buckle—I know where every man's knapsack is—I knew it was the prisoner soner's knapsack, I found them in it about seven o'clock in the evening—he never told me he put them there, and that he was done for.

MR. DOANE Q. Can any person have access to this place but the soldiers? A. No; there is a sentry at the bottom of the stairs.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you search it in consequence of directions to search the knapsacks? A. Yes; I sent a corporal to search of Sulley's and searched the prisoner's myself—the money was inside the first fold within reach—I had not seen the prisoner in the room the previous evening, to my knowledge.

COURT. Q. Could he or Sulley have gone there from the moment he was taken? A. No; they could not have communicated with the other soldiers from the time they were taken till I went—I directly they were confined, before I received the order—I went immediately to search.

CAPTAIN CHRISTOPHER WILMOT HORTON . I am Captain and Adjutant. This was reported to me on Sunday morning on parade—I gave directions for Sulley to be brought before me, and ordered them to be confined in separate places—on Monday morning I received the bag containing seven counterfeit shillings—I delivered them to Mr. Morrison of the Mint, on Monday, when the bag was handed to me.

WILLIAM HAMPSON MORRISON . I received the bag to counterfeit shillings—I gave it to the Mint messenger, Mr. Collinson.

WILLIAM COLLINSON . I received the bag and its contents sealed up, from Mr. Morrison—I gave the same to Bradley, a messenger of the Mint.

GEORGE ROBERT BRADLEY . I produce this bag and counterfeit shillings, which I received from Mr. Collinson—they are sealed up.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know what that is, except that it is a parcel? A. I know it contains seven counterfeit shillings—I saw them before they were sealed up—I saw Mr. Powell, sen., and Mr. Powell, jun., looking at them—I should think they are not such as any person would take.

JOHN FIELD . These two first shillings produced are both counterfeit, and cast in one mould—the last seven are counterfeit, and all cast in the same mould with the other two.

Cross-examined. Q. This one is yellow, is it not? A. It is an apperance which they often have, but they undergo a process to remove that.

GUILTY .— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18360815-1826

1826. SOPHIA ELIZABETH BOYD was indicted for a misdemeanour.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLOTTE KIMBER . I live at Chapel-street, Mayfair. On the 9th of July last, I saw the prisoner on Oxford-street—I bargained for a fowl—I was to give 1s. 6d. for it—I gave her a half-crown—she said the could not give me change, she would go and get change—she returned in half a minute, and said she could not get it changed—she then put a half-crown in my had—I saw directly it was not the one I gave her—I said it was a bad one, and refused to take it—she said it was the one I gave to her, she had not another about her—she insulted me very much, and I gave her in charge—I saw her throw some money in her basket—I saw the officer take the basket, and take something from it—to the best of my belief the half-crown I gave her was a good one—the one she returned was not the one I gave her.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a policeman. I was on duty in Oxford-street—Kimber gave the prisoner into my charge—she had a basket on the ground—I took two shillings in bad money from it—I kept them in my possession, and have them now—the prosecutrix said she gave her in charge for giving her a bad half-crown for a good one—I told the prisoner to give her back the good one—she said she had not another half-crown about her—she pulled some shillings out of her pocket and showed me—before I took the two shillings I observed her throw something in the basket, and then I took the two shillings—they were not hid—I took her to the station-house,

and she was searched by a woman—this is the bad half-crown I received from Kimber.

Prisoner. I never took any shillings out of my pocket till I got to the station-house. Witness. She certainly did, to show she had no half-crown.

JAMES BURRIDGE . I am a policeman. I was at the station, and saw the prisoner standing by the bar, leaning her hand on it—after she was removed I found on the bar this shilling and counterfeit half-crown, as near where her hand had been as I could tell.

JANE HAINES . I searched the prisoner—I found four half-crowns and some small silver, all good, in her pocket—I gave them to the inspector.

JOHN FIELD . This half-crown is counterfeit—the other half-crown and shillings are counterfeit—the shillings are cast in the same mould, and so are the half-crowns.

Prisoner. I went the night before to get something for supper, and met some people—I got drinking, and gave my money to a person to hold—after I went out on Saturday morning, I left 7s. at home—I took the other money with me—when the prosecutrix gave me the half-crown, I went to get change—they could not give it—I brought it out, and she said it was bad.

GUILTY Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1827

1827. ALEXANDER BOYD was indicted for a misdemeanor.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Thursday August 18th.

Second Jury, before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18360815-1828

1828. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 2 1/2 lbs. of pork, value 1s., the goods of James Procter.

SAMUEL TEBBUTT . I am in the employ of James Procter, a cheesemonger, in Lisson-street. On the 26th of July, at one o'clock, I was going behind the counter, and saw the prisoner come up to the window and reach the pork out—I said, "Put it down;" but he ran out with it—I ran after him, calling, "Stop thief," and Stewart stopped him, with the pork in him, at the top of Charles-street.

JAMES STEWART . I am a constable of Wilsden. I was coming down Bell-street—the prisoner ran by me, and Tebbutt calling, "Stop thief"—I pursued him, and at the top of the street caught hold of him—he dropped the pork at his feet—I took him back to the shop—he kicked the witness while I had hold of him.

Prisoner. I never had the pork.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Weeks.

Reference Number: t18360815-1829

1829. ABRAHAM FONTAINE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th if July, 1/2 lb. of silk, value 10s., the goods of Sarah Reynolds and another, his employers.

GEORGE HARVEY . I am a silk-dyer in the service of Sarah Reynolds and her partner. The prisoner was a labourer there, and prepared the silk for dyeing—on the 6th of July, I saw him in the skeining-room with a small quantity of silk in his hand, contrary to the mode of working, which raised my suspicions, and I informed Williams the foreman.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am foreman at the factory. I was in the dye-house when I received the information—I watched the prisoner, and saw him break the thread of the skein, and take about one-sixth from the skein, and then tie it again—I then went to him, and said, "You are a long

while about that work; make haste and finish it"—and directly he had done I took hold of his hat, which was on his head when I first entered the room—it had a blue handkerchief in it, and under that were three knots of silk—he had taken his hat off, and put it by his side, before I spoke to him—I said, "What have you in your hat?—he said, "For God's sake, don't mention it; it is the first thing I ever did of the kind"—I kept the silk till my master came.

GEORGE HICKSON . I manage the skeining-room—three skeins were found on the prisoner—his employer was going to let him go—he went and got his coat, and as he crossed the yard to go out I put my hand to his pocket, which projected, and said, "What have you got here?"—I took him back, and found five skeins more in his coat-pocket—he had been there three weeks, and had 16s. a week—there was about half a pound of silk altogether.

JOHN KERSEY , I am a policeman. I received him in charge, and have the silk.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot account for the silk being in my coat, unless it was put there to injure me—I am not the only one who has been served so.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1830

1830. THOMAS GRANGER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, 1 truck, value 30s., the goods of Solomon Cohen.

NATHAN SOLOMON . I work at Solomon Cohen's, a pencil-maker, in Prescott-street. He had a truck, which was left, on the 19th of July, on an open space of ground next to his warehouse—I saw it there myself about half-past eight o'clock, and about twenty minutes to nine I met the prisoner with it, about a hundred are forty or a hundred and fifty yards from the premises, drawing it—I asked him where he was going with it—he said he was waiting for a gentleman who had hired him to take it, and was to wait at the corner of Prescott-street for him—I went and called Mr. Cohen, who gave him in charge—he had then gone round to the Tenter-ground to take it back.

Prisoner. I was facing the door the truck belonged to. Witness. He was in Prescott-street with it, and it was taken from the Tenter-ground—when he saw me knock at my master's door, he took it back—that was after I had spoken to him.

CHARLES SCOTT . I am a policeman. I received the prisoner in charge at the Tenter-ground—he said a gentleman had hired him, and he was to wait for him at the corner of Prescott-street; but there was nobody there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the back of the gentleman's house, in the Tenter-ground—there was a fight there—a young man came up and asked me what I was doing—said I was doing nothing—he said, "Bring that truck round the court"—I did so—the witness came up and said, "Who are you looking for?"—I said, "A young man in a white apron"—he went away—I stopped there about ten minutes, and seeing nobody, I thought I would take the truck back: which I did, and the gentelman belonging to it came up, and said, "What are you going to do with that truck?"—I said, "I was hired to take it round the corner, "and he gave me in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1831

1831. AMELIA SHEPPARD was indicted for concealing the birth of her child.

GUILTY . Aged 22.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1832

1832. CHARLES COOK was indicted for feloniously forging a certain order for the payment of 3l. 10s., on the 25th of July, at St. George's Middlesex, with intent of defraud Michael Henry Hart.—2nd COUNT, for uttering, disposing of, and putting off the same with a like intent. Other COUNTS stating his intent to be to defraud Henry Dalton.

MICHAEL HENRY HART . I am a clothier, and live in Ratcliff-highway. On the 25th of July I went out, and when I returned I understood an advance note had been offered at my shop—when I was at home in the afternoon, the prisoner came in, and said, "I have now come, Mr. Hart, and have brought a friend with me who knows me;" he told me he had an order from Captain Bull, of the Tobago, for a month's advance, and that he had brought a friend with him who was to be responsible that the order was correct—Mr. Dalton was the person—I did not know him before—I consented to take the note—he took 2l. 6s. in clothes, and I gave him 1l. 4s. in money, and he went away—I sent my young man with them, with the goods, to Mr. Dalton's, to see that it was correct—I gave my young man the goods and money—he is not here—I gave the note to Evans, the officer.

HENRY DALTON . I knew the prisoner about ten months ago—he applied to me in July to accompany him to Mr. Hart's, to say that he was respectably connected—I had heard that he was so, but I certainly never knew any of his friends—I understood he was highly respectable—he showed me shipping order for 3l. 10s., and said he had received it from the Tobago, Captain Bull commander, and asked me to go down to Hart's—I asked him why he could not go to some other friend—he said his friend was too far, and he must sail next morning to the West Indies in the Tobago—I went with him, and the goods and money were advanced on my responsibility—the man brought the clothes and money to my house, and delivered them to the prisoner in my house, and he took them away with him—the man gave the money and goods into his hands.

Prisoner Q. Have you not entered into an arrangement with Mr. Hart to pay him 10s. every fortnight? Witness. A. I have—that was after you were taken—I did not receive 5s. from you when the goods were brought to my house—you offered it to me, and I told you to keep it for the sailors for grog—you told me you wrote the note yourself—I do not recollect telling a person that I had entered into am arrangement with you, and the thing was settled—I said you had offered to arrange the matter—I said it was likely to be settled—I was partly persuaded to prosecute, and did it partly for my own sake afterwards.

THOMAS BULL . I am not a seaman now—I have been to sea many years, but not lately—the prisoner resided at my house with his father for about two or three months.—I have a brother named Richard, he is captain of the Tobago—she in the West India trade—I know my brother's handwriting well—one evening the prisoner said he was desirous of going to sea—I said my brother had just returned, and he might want an officer, and I would ask the question—I told him that he commanded the Tobago—that was probably a week before the transaction in question—none of

this (looking at the note) is my brother Richard's handwriting—not a letter of it, I am sure—I have seen the prisoner write once of twice—the filling up of the note is so different to his signature at the back that I cannot positively swear it is his writing, but I believe the whole of it is his handwriting—it is disguised, but by closely scrutinizing if you will see there is an analogy—I believe it is his writing.

JAMES CHRISTOPHER EVANS . I received this note from Mr. Hart, and have had it ever since—I took the prisoner in charge at Mr. Bull's house on Monday morning, the 1st of August—I told him it was about the advance note—Mr. Dalton was with me at the time—he said, "I suppose what it is about," and he said to Dalton, "I did not think you would have brought it to this, Mr. Dalton; I thought you promised you would settle it in another way."—(not read)

£3 10s.—London, July 25, 1836.—Advance.—Three days after the ship Tobago has sailed from Gravesend, pay to Charles Cook, or bearer, the sum of 3l. 10s. (provided the said Charles Cook has sailed in the above vessel,) being a part of his wages in advance on an intended voyage to Tobago, or any other port, as per agreement, which your obedient servant, Thomas Bull, commander. Payable a Charles Thomas Richardson's 72, Cornhill."

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday, the 25th of July, 1 went to Mr. Dalton, and requested him, as my friend, to go with me to be answerable for a bill or advance note, and it was on his responsibility and indorsement that Mr. Hart cashed it—two days after Dalton charged me before the police-inspector with forging the note, and the case was dismissed, as he could not make the charge good against me—as soon as I was discharged I offered to arrange the matter with Dalton—he said he did not wish to hurt me, and would do all in his power to serve me; that I had nothing to fear, all should be settled amicably—of the money I received, I gave Dalton 5s. and paid for some refreshment—we met by agreement twice, and it was not till the following Monday that I was taken a second time—I did not tell him I wrote the bill myself, but he tried to obtain the acknowledgement from me—I have since had abundant reasons to believe that his friendly professions were merely to gain time to bring his plans and charges against me to maturity—far from wishing to defraud Hart or Dalton, my intention was, when I discovered the note to be a forgery, to transfer my wages over to Mr. Dalton as soon as I got a ship, which I expected to do in a day or two, and which happened the day I was arrested the second time.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported For Life.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1833

1833. CHARLES WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 1 purse, value 1s.; 9 sovereigns, 4 half-crowns, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the goods and monies of Richard Bourke, from his person.

RICHARD BOURKE . On the evening of the 26th of July I was in the dress-boxes of the Haymarket theatre, and between nine and ten o'clock I missed my purse from my coat-pocket—I had felt in my pocket about a quarter of an hour before—there were nine sovereigns and 17s. 6d. in silver in it—I know nothing of the prisoner.

JAMES HACKWELL . I am a constable. On the evening of the 2nd of August, I was on duty at the Haymarket theatre, and the prisoner was delivered over to me by the box-keeper—I searched him, and found on him this purse containing six sovereigns, two half-crowns, and one shilling—I

asked him about the purse—he said it was his own property—he did not say how long he had had it.

RICHARD BOURKE re-examined. This is my purse.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. It was found more than a week after you lost it? A. Yes—I know it from the colour—from its being knit, and having lost the two tassels at each end, but at one end the ring which attached the tassel remains—I have not the slightest doubt it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. My mother left me the purse when she died—when I was married I gave it to my wife to take care of, and it lay in a box for about twelve months, not used at all, and about three months ago I took it to wear in my own pocket, and put my money into it.

JAMES HACKWELL re-examined. He was brought to me from the street—I had seen him in the theatre previously, and was looking after him for two hours—he had been there previous to that night—I have seen him in the dress-circle.

(Henry Wood, organ-builder, King-street, Drury-lane, and Sarah M'Brian, the wife of a painter in Stacey-street, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18360815-1834

1834. CHARLES WATSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August, 1 purse, value 6d.; 14 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, 2 half-crowns, one shilling, and 1 sixpence, the goods and monies of Robert John Benjamin Chambers, from his person.

ROBERT JOHN BENJAMIN CHAMBERS . On the evening of the 2nd of this month I was in the dress-circle of the Haymarket theatre—in consequence of information I felt in my pocket for my purse, and missed it about nine or ten o'clock—it contained fourteen sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and an odd shilling—I had felt it safe a quarter of an-hour or ten minutes before.

EDWARD GREEN . I am free-list taker at the Haymarket theatre. On the evening of the 2nd of August I saw the prisoner at the theatre—I saw him go into several boxes in the dress-circle, which made me watch him—at last I saw him take a purse from Mr. Chambers' pocket—I was looking through the glass in the door—he immediately rose up, put his gloves on, and left the theatre—I followed him—he went down the Hay-market among the coaches, hearing footsteps behind him—I said, "You have robbed a gentleman in the theatre, I insist on your coming back and delivering up the property"—he put his hand into his pocket and gave me this purse from it with all the money in it—I took him back to the theatre and gave him to the constable, who found the property stated in the last trial on him.

JAMES HACKWELL . The prisoner was given into my charge with the purse.

(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The man says he saw me through the glass window of the box, and yet let me go into the street, why not detain me?

EDWARD GREEN . I did not like to disturb the audience.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported For Life.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1835

1835. DANIEL HORRIGAN and CHARLES ZUGG were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown, from his person.

JOHN THOMAS FORBES . I am between thirteen and fourteen years old. On the 19th of July I saw the two prisoners in Covent-garden-market, at about eleven or twelve o'clock—I saw Horrigan put his hand into the gentelman's pocket, take out a handkerchief, and give it to the other one, who went away—I followed them and told a policeman—before that, I had seen them following a good many gentleman about the market, and trying to pick their pockets—Horrigan put his hand into one gentleman's pocket, but did not get it out, because the gentleman turned round—the other prisoner was close behind him at the time—that was about a quarter of an hour before I saw him take the handkerchief—I gave information to a policeman, and he took them—I followed close behind them, and they were not out of my sight.

Zugg. It was between five and six o'clock in the morning. Witness. It was about ten or eleven o'clock in the morning—I cannot recollect whether I said before the Justice that it was between five and six o'clock in the morning—I had not had my breakfast—I was waiting for my father—I generally breakfast at about nine o'clock, but I had none that day—I do not know what time it was, for I was waiting all the morning for my father—I went into the market at half-past four o'clock.

THOMAS PERRING . I am a policeman. Forbes gave me information, on Tuesday, the 19th of July, at about half-past six o'clock in the morning, and I took the prisoners into custody—I found the handkerchief under Zugg's arm, under his clothes—the other prisoner was close to him—I asked Zugg where he got the handkerchief—he said he did not take it, that the other took in from a gentleman's pocket, and gave it to him—I am sure he said so—the gentleman was gone—it is a silk handkerchief.

Horrigan's Defence. I picked it up.

Zugg's Defence. It was picked up under the Piazza, and he gave it to me—but the boy was against us, and wanted to have his part of it, and we would not give him any part of it.

(Zugg received a good character.)

HORRIGAN— GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

ZUGG— GUILTY . Aged 16.— Whipped and discharged.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1836

1836. WILLIAM GEORGE SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July, 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s., the goods of John Tuck.

JOHN TUCK . I am a labourer. I met the prisoner at Paddington, on the 11th of July, I was hay-making for Mr. Howarth, on the Harrow-road—after that, I went to the Flying Horse in Oxford-street, and met him there—I had been to the pawnbroker's, and pawned something to keep it safe, and took them out on the Monday—I returned to the Flying Horse, and paid for a pint of beer—I asked the landlord if I might leave my bundle in his place—I had a pair of trowsers which were too big for me, and the prisoner said he would sell them for me for 8s.—I gave them into his hands to sell them, but he was so long about it, I took them from him, and put them under my coat, and said I would not sell them—he said you had better not put them under your coat, or it will be supposed you stole them—the took them from me to carry them for me on the road, and ran away from me with them—I found him again at seven o'clock that night—the

trowsers were then gone—he told the constable he had sold them for three half-crowns to Jew in the street.

Prisoner. You gave them to me to sell. Witness. I did not the last time, I did the first—I said I would not have them sold.

CHARLES MAINWARING . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner in charge—I asked what he had done with the trowsers—he said he had sold them, and given the money to a man he did not know.

Prisoner. I sold the trowsers.

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Confined One Month.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1837

1837. GEORGE BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July, 1 pint and a half of wine, value 4s., and 1 bottle, value 2d. the goods of Thomas Ainge, his master.

THOMAS AINGE . I keep the George public-house, at Islington; the prisoner was in my service fifteen or eighteen months. On Sunday morning, the 24th of July, I was in my kitchen, making some coffee for some people out of the country, and the prisoner said, "Shall I go down to fine the beer"—I said, "Yes"—he went into the cellar, and after doing that, between eight and nine o'clock, I found he was gone down into the cellar again—I saw the wine in a bottle, in the possession of Woodrofe, I sent for a policeman, and the prisoner was taken.

JOSEPH WOODROFE . I am in Mr. Ainge's service. On Wednesday, the 24th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock, I went to get my apron out of the drawer, and saw the prisoner come out of the cellar with a bottle of wine in his hand—I said, "George, what have you got there?"—he said, "A bottle of wine"—he immediately gave it to me—I said, "You had better go back with it, or your master will find you out"—he put some in a pint pot, and gave it to me to taste—it was a full bottle then—he drew the cork before me, and drank himself, and poured some out—I just tasted it, to see that it was wine—he then went and hid it between the rafters of the privy—I went up to my young mistress and told her soon after it happened—I got the wine from where it was put, and gave it to her—she is not here—I told master of it, and he immediately went into the tap-room, and sent for a policeman—my young mistress gave my master the wine—it was port.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I come into the yard to you, and wash my hands, and you came into the kitchen, and took the wine off the dresser? A. No—you gave it into my hand—he hid it in the copper—that was about ten minutes before the cork was drawn—I did not fetch the pint-pot—it was in the wash-house—he got it, and poured out the wine—I was unlocking the gates at the time.

WILLIAM HORNSBY . I am a policeman. I was sent for to the George, on Wednesday, the 24th of July, and the prisoner was given into my charge for stealing the bottle of wine—it was about three-fourths full—as we were going to the station, he said, "What do you think they will give me for this?"—I told him I should ask him no questions, and he did not say a word afterwards that I recollect—Mr. Ainge gave me the bottle.

THOMAS AINGE (re-examined.) I know this to be my property by the cork, which has the name of Webb on it.

GUILTY . Aged 31.— Confined Two Months.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1838

1838. JOHN WILLIAMS alias Henry Payne , was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of June, 1 pair of spectacles, value 5s., the goods of John Morgan.

MARGARET MORGAN . I am the wife of John Morgan, and live in Greville-street, Hatton-garden. I have known the prisoner twelve months—on the 22nd of June, he called on me about three o'clock, and staid about half an hour—about ten minutes after he was gone, I missed the spectacles from the top of the drawers—I had seen them nearly an hour before he came in—there was no other person in the room—he used to come to the house very often and write for me—I gave information, and he was not taken till the 7th of July.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you observe whether he had been drinking? A. Yes, he had, or I do not believe he would have taken them—he had always borne a good character—I knew him by the name of Payne—I found the spectacles the same evening at a pawnbroker's.

HENRY WILLIAM HAMPSTEAD . I am servant to Mr. Mitchell, a pawnbroker, in Gray's-inn-lane. I have a pair of spectacles, which were pawned by the prisoner, on the 22nd of June, in the name of John Williams.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before? A. I have known him pawn articles—he always fetched them out again.

JOSEPH GINGER . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 7th of July—I told him what I took him for—he said he should not deny it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It would be foolish to deny my guilt, but I was in an insensible state of intoxication—I went to redeem them, but I heard that she had been there.

(The prisoner received an excellent character.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1839

1839. MARY CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 gown, value 5s., the goods of Daniel Henry Strachan, and CATHERINE HEALEY for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen; against the Statute, &c.

AUGUSTA SOPHIA STRACHAN . I am the wife of Daniel Henry Strachan, a bookbinder, in Tyler's-court, Carnaby-market. On the 1st of August, I was sitting in the parlour adjoining the shop—the prisoner Connor came in and asked if I had a Roman Catholic Prayer-book I said I had not got one to give her—she advanced into the shop further, and then told me any other book would do—I asked her if she meant a Protestant Prayer-book—she said that would do—she then came into the parlour, I told her to walk out—she I did not understand her, that she had borrowed a box of linen of a lady and had lost the book, and wanted another—I said I had none to give her—she asked if she should call next day—I told her not to trouble herself to call, for I had none for her—she then turned round, swept her hand across the table in the room and went out—the moment she was gone out I missed from the table a black silk dress—I could not leave the shop, and rang the bell for my husband to come down and go after her: she

got out of the shop and turned down West-row, and in about a quarter of an hour after my husband brought in Healey in his custody, and the gown I missed—I had seen Healey before pass my door twice alone, about two minutes before Connor came in, once towards Regent-street, and next, towards Craven Chapel.

DANIEL HENRY STRACHAN . My wife rang the bell and gave me information—I went out and saw both the prisoners about twenty yards off—they were about a yard apart, one before the other—I saw my wife's gown under Healey's arm—I took hold of her and said, "This is my wife's gown; you have just stolen it"—she said, "I did not steal it, I bought it of this woman for 1s., "pointing to Connor—I took her back to our shop, and sent for an officer—the gown was open just under her arm—I could see it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time of day was it? A. Between four and five o'clock in the evening—it was broad day-night—the gown was folded up—the cotton lining was all that could be seen—Connor fell on her knees when I took her back, and said, "How could I do it? oh dear, how could I do it?"

Connor's Defence. I do not know how I came by it, or who gave it me—I was intoxicated—I did know any thing of it till I awoke and found myself in the station-house.

(The prisoners received a good character.)

CONNOR— GUILTY . Aged 32.

HEALEY— GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1840

1840. MARGARET SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July, 1 bag, value 1d.; 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 watch-chain, value 3d.; 1 watch-key, value 3d.; and 2 shillings; the goods and monies of William Sibley, from his person.

WILLIAM SIBLEY . I live at Colney, near St. Albans. On the 7th of July, I was on my road, between Mimms and Barnett, about five o'clock in the evening—I saw the prisoner and another woman—the prisoner caught hold of me and began to ask me questions—I said I did not want them—she asked me to go with her—I refused—she than began to get my frock up, and get her hands into my pockets, I suppose—I felt her hands about that part of my person—she left me for two or three minutes—I felt for my watch and missed it—I went after them—the prisoner joined the other girl—I got up to them, and said to the prisoner, "You have got my watch"—she denied it two or three times—I said I knew she had it—she said she had picked up one, if that was mine, I was very welcome to it, and gave it to me out of her bosom—it was mine—I also missed two shillings and a purse—a policeman came up and took her—I gave him my watch—the other girl did not come close enough to me to take it.

Prisoner. The other girl was with him first. Witness. No, it was the prisoner caught hold of me first.

GEORGE WARDEL . I am a policeman. I was on the spot, and saw the prosecutor and two girls—only one went close to him, from what I observed—I watched, and saw the prisoner stop him—I saw her hand under his smock frock, and in three or four minutes she ran away from him—I saw him feeling in his pockets, then turn back and follow her—he caught her, and when I got up I asked him what was the matter—he said he had been robbed by the prisoner—I followed and caught her—I asked her if she

had any money—she said she had not—I afterwards searched her, and found a shillings in her bosom and two shillings and sixpence in her mouth—I asked her what she had done with his bag—she said he had not got it—I afterwards found it in a ditch, which she had gone within a yard of—this was in Middlesex.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from St. Albans to Barnet, and met the old gentleman—he stopped talking to the young woman—I happened to be talking to him also—he said he only wanted one of us, and said he would give me sixpence—I said an old man like him ought to be ashamed of himself—he asked me to put my hand to his small clothes, and I did—I refused to go to the field with him, and, as I left him afterwards I saw the bag and watch—I said,—"What is this?"—the woman said it was a purse and watch—I said, it must be his—I went after him, and asked if he had not lost one—he said no, and I left—he afterwards called after me, and said he had lost his watch—I took it out of my bosom and said "If this is yours you shall have it"—the constable came and asked him what was the matter—he said he had lost his watch, but he could not say whether I took it out of his fob, or whether he had dropped it—the constable asked him to give it to him and he would make a job of it—I did not deny having it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported For Fourteen Years.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1841

1841. WILLIAM HAMILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd if August, a coat, value 2l. 5s., the goods of William Henry Boswell.

JOHN HORNE . On the 3rd of August, I was delivering newspapers in King William Street, Strand, and observed the prisoner looking over the blind in at a tailor's shop window, with a companion, and, as I came out of the house opposite, the prisoner walked out of the shop with a coat under his arm—I had watched him go into the shop—I went after him, and brought him back with the coat on his arm—the other man ran off as soon as he saw me cross over.

WILLIAM HENRY BOSWELL . I am a tailor, and live in King William-street. The prisoner was brought to my shop with a coat, by Horne—on looking round I missed a coat which had been on a figure at the door—I had seen in safe fifteen minutes before—I was in the parlour at the back of the shop, and I left nobody in the shop.

JOHN MILLS . I am a policeman. I received this coat from Mr. Boswell, and I have had it ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1842

1842. ELIZABETH WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 5s.; the goods of George Postan, from his person.

GEORGE POSTAN . I am a stage coachman, and live in Coram-street, Russell-square. On the 8th of July, I was returning home from Marylebone about two o'clock in the morning, and met the prisoner in William-street, Lisson-grove—she asked me to give her a glass of something to drink—we went to get into a public-house, but it was closed—I walked with her about half a quarter of a mile, and on my returning home by the

Yorkshire Stingo, I had occasion to pass Devonshire-court, and on turning round I found she was gone with my handkerchief—we had walked together from the public-house—I did not bid her good night—I merely turned round, and in turning back I found her gone with my handkerchief—we had been talking together on the road—I walked to the end of the street, I met a policeman and complained to him—we found the prisoner in King William-street, at a lodging, and I got my handkerchief again the same morning—I had not given her any money—she had not asked me for any—I had some in my pocket.

Prisoner. He told me to meet him next day at twelve o'clock, and I was to receive 2s. from him. Witness. Nothing of the kind passed between us—I merely went to the public-house to give her a glass in a friendly way.

Prisoner. He gave me the handkerchief, and told me to meet him next day at twelve o'clock—we went into a passage together. Witness. I did not—I was not in any passage—I walked with her, as it was in my way home.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a policeman. I saw the prosecutor about a quarter before two o'clock, standing at the corner of Devonshire-place, in company with the prisoner—I went away for about two minutes and a half, and when I came back the prosecutor asked me if I had seen a woman going away—I had not seen them together above a minute—in consequence of what he said I went in search of her—I found her in bed at a pork-shop in William-street—she appeared to be asleep—I awoke her, and asked if she knew me—she said, "No"—I asked if she knew the prosecutor, who was in the room—she said, "No"—I told her to get up and dress—she said she could not dress before me: and seeing only her gown hanging up, I said, "You are not undressed"—I lifted the clothes, and she had every thing on but her gown—I asked her for the handkerchief—she said she had not seen it—she got out of bed and put her gown on—she denied having the handkerchief—she was going to be searched at the station-house by a woman, and I said, "Leave your shawl here," and in taking her shawl off I perceived the prosecutor had given it to her in lien of money—the prosecutor denied giving it to her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the handkerchief instead of money.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1843

1843. RICHARD HOLLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June, 3 coats, value 2l. 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s., the goods of James Hollis; and 1 pair of half-boots, value 5s., the goods of Mary Hollis; and JOHN CAIN and ROBERT DUNNETT were indicted for feloniously receiving 3 coats and 1 waistcoat, part of the said goods, well knowing them to be stolen, against the Statute, &c.; to which HOLLIS pleaded

GUILTY — Confined for Three Months.

MARY HOLLIS . I am a widow. The prisoner, Richard Hollis, is my son—I have two other sons, (James and Charles)—they all three lived in my house—on Monday morning, the 27th of June, I went out about eleven o'clock—I left my son Richard in the house, and left the key of the door with him—I returned home at eleven o'clock at night, and found the door locked—I got in by another key which I had—when I entered my room I

found the things disturbed—I missed three coats and a waistcoat belonging to my son James, and a pair of boots of my own—they were all safe when I went out.

CHARLES HOLLIS . On Monday evening, the 27th of June, I was coming from school, about five o'clock, and saw all the three prisoners crossing the road by Strutton-ground, about two minutes' walk from my mother's house—Cain bad a bundle wrapped in a white rag—it was large enough to be clothes; they went away together—I spoke to my brother—he said he was going home, but he was going down Peter-street, away from home—I did not see him after that till he was taken.

JAMES HOLLIS . I live with my mother, in Rochester-row. On Monday morning I went out at seven o'clock, and I came home at eleven o'clock at night—I missed three coats and a waistcoat, and a pair of my mother's boots—next day I saw the three prisoners together, just by Westminster-bridge, going into a public-house, about a quarter past twelve o'clock at night—I turned back, and saw a policeman just by Astley's theatre, and he took them up.

JAMES WATSON . I am servant to Mr. Lloyd, a pawnbroker in Strutton-ground, Westminster, I have a pair of woman's boots which were pawned by Richard Hollis, to the best of my belief, on the 27th of June, in the middle of the day, in the name of Richard Hollis, for his mother—I lent him 2s. 6d. on them.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Great Smith-street. I have two coats, which were pawned for 8s., by Cain, on the 27th of June, in the name of John Cain, No. 2, Union-place, for John Taylor.

Cain. When I pawned the things he asked if they belonged to me—I said, "No;" I pawned them for James Hollis, and that he put on the duplicate. Witness. He gave me the name of Taylor—my lad wrote the ticket, but I took them of him, and that was the name he gave.

WILLIAM COCKERELL . I am a policeman. James Hollis took me to the public-house, and I apprehended the prisoners, but found nothing on them—at the police-office, the following morning, I found a waistcoat on Hollis.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Cain's Defence. I was in my lodging about half-past four o'clock that afternoon—Hollis came to me, and asked me to go and pawn something for him—I did so—I said they did not belong to me, but to James Hollis—I brought Hollis the money—he gave me a drop of beer, and I parted with him—on Tuesday night, about nine o'clock, I met Dunnett—and asked him to walk with me a little way to a man who owed me money, and as we came over Westminster-bridge we met Hollis—he asked us to have a drop of beer—we went into the Red Lion public-house, and were just going for a pint of beer, when his brother and the policeman came in and took us.

CAIN— GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

DUNNETT— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1844

1844. RICHARD HOLLIS, JOHN CAIN , and ROBERT DUNNETT , were again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June, 1 hat, value 7s.; 1 hatbox, value 6d.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 3 waistcoats, value 2s.; 1 stock, value 6d.; and 1 breast-pin, value 6d.; the goods of James Hollis; to which Hollis pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months Longer.

JAMES HOLLIS . On Tuesday morning I went out at seven o'clock—I got home at half-past twelve at night, and missed the property stated from my room.

MARY HOLLIS . I left the house about nine o'clock on Tuesday morning, and came back at a little after nine o'clock in the evening—I missed my son James's hat-box, shirt, pin, one stock, and a waistcoat—the house had not been broken open—Richard had a key.

JAMES CORBRIDGE . I am a pawnbroker's servant. A hat was pawned with me for 2s., on the 28th of June, by Cain, in the name of Thomas Bowen, No.2, Union-place.

JAMES HOLLIS . This is my hat.

WILLIAM COCKERELL . I apprehended the prisoners on Tuesday night—I found the shirt on Cain on the Wednesday.

MARY HOLLIS . I cannot swear to this shirt, nor can my son.

Cain's Defence. The shirt belongs to me—I am quite innocent of pawning the hat.

CAIN and DUNNETT— NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1845

1845. WILLIAM HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Middleditch, on the 27th of July, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 3l., his goods.

DANIEL HALL . I am a cooper, and live in Upper East-Smithfield. On the 27h of July I was going along Ratcliff-highway, at a quarter past six o'clock in the evening—I saw the prisoner deliberately break the window of Mr. Middleditch's shop, with the back of his hand, and take the watch out—I was not above two yards from him—I collared him, and took it out of his hand, and gave him in charge of a policeman, as I could not hold him myself—I took him to the station-house—he was never out of my sight—he had not run a yard when I caught him.

JULIA ANN MIDDLEDITCH . I am the wife of John Middleditch. I was in the room adjoining the shop—I heard the smash at the window, and missed a watch—I saw the prisoner take it, and saw it in his hand—Mr. Hall brought it back and gave it to me—this is it, it is my husband's property—it hung in the window on a wire.

GUILTY . Aged 36.— Confined One Year.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1846

1846. CHARLES PRIOR and JOHN SMITH, alias Riley , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the shop of John Gould, on the 18th of July, and stealing therein 2 aprons, value 2s., the goods of William Bailey: 12 salmon, value 2l., 10s.; and 1 turbot, value 10s.; the goods of the said John Gould; to which PRIOR pleaded

GUILTY .

WILLIAM BAILEY . I was in the service of John Gould, a fishmonger, in Hungerford-market. Prior has been in his employ, and was dismissed the day before the robbery, on Monday, the 18th of July—he was there on the Monday morning, but did not work—on Monday night I left twelve salmon, ten small and two large ones, down in the ice in the cellars—I saw the shop shut up that night, and in the morning, when I came, I found all the salmon gone, and two aprons—they were worth 3l. 10s. altogether—I was not the first person at the shop.

THOMAS COX . I took the salmon down on Monday night, between nine and ten o'clock, and put it on the ice with the turbot—I came to work next morning at half-past six o'clock—I opened the shop-door, and found the shutters had been opened and the window flung up—I went down stairs, and found all the salmon gone, and one turbot.

THOMAS POOLE . I keep the White Hart, Clement's-lane, Strand. Prior lodged at my house—on the Monday night in question, Smith and him were there together until one o'clock in the morning, and both went out together—I saw them again, as near as I can recollect, at eight o'clock on Tuesday morning—Smith had a basket—I saw a turbot, three small salmon, and two lobsters in it—they stopped some time, and had a pint of ale—they offered the salmon to me for sale, but I objected to purchasing any—they offered an apron for sale, which I bought for 1s.—there was a dispute about which should receive the money, but I believe Smith was the one who took it off the counter—they both told me they were setting up on their own account to sell fish, and I promised them, the next time they brought any fish, to purchase some.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had you seen Smith before at your house? A. Yes, many times—I am quite sure he was there until one o'clock at night—I keep my house open as late as that—not the doors open, but I had people in the house—I have seen Smith with his brother in Clare-market, I believe he is a fishmonger—this is the apron I bought (looking at it)—I made a mark on it before I gave it to the policeman.

JOHN KIRKMAN . I am a policeman. I went in search of Prior, and found him at the Nelson, in Clement's-inn-passage, about ten o'clock at night, in company with Smith and another—I took Prior into custody, and another young man in his company—in consequence of what was said to me, I sent Johnson to fetch Smith.

WILLIAM BAILEY re-examined. This apron is mine, and was lost that night from the shop—here are stains of fish on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Are the stains peculiar? A. There are stains of white-bait on it—to the best of my knowledge it is my apron—I have been two years and three months in the prosecutor's employ—his name is over his shop front, "John Gould"—I do not know him by any other name—the fish were in the cellar under the shop, in an ice-box.

Smith's Defence. I met Prior, on Tuesday morning, in the Strand, with a basket on his shoulder—asked him what he had in it—he said fish, and he was going to set up for himself—he asked me to go with him, which I did, to the White Hart—he told me, if I could, to sell some of the fish—I sold a crab for 6d., and the apron for 1s.—I gave the money to Prior, and he gave me 3d. out of it—I told him I must go to a job which I had—I returned in about three quarters of an hour, and asked what he had done with the fish—he said he did not know—I said, "Have you sold it"?—he said, "No, but very likely the Jew boy will take it"—I asked him to go with me to Smithfield, which he did—I expected a job there, but the gentleman was out—in Farringdon-street, he hailed a cab man, who drove us to the White Hart, and there I parted with him; and just before I was taken, I met him again at the Nelson public-house.

(Henry Powell, a china and glass dealer, of Drury-lane, gave Smith good character.)

SMITH— GUILTY .—Both Confined One Year.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1847

1847. JAMES WOOD was indicted for stealing a quantity of brass mountings, the goods of James Davey; to which he pleaded

GUILTY Aged 12.— Confined Three Months.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18360815-1848

1848. JOHN PILGRIM was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Joseph Steffenoni, from his person.

JOSEPH STEFFENONI . I am an upholsterer, and live in Holborn-bars. On the afternoon of the 12th of August, I was walking in Smithfield-market, and perceived a lad taking my handkerchief from my pocket—I turned round, and caught the thief with the handkerchief in his hand—the prisoner was then standing by the side of me—a crowd got round me soon after I got hold of the thief—the prisoner wanted me to let the lad I had hold of go—he was rather violent at first; and he pinched me, and threatened to mill me, and floor me—he pinched me very much about my arms—he threw me down at last—I had hold of the who had the handkerchief about ten minutes, and then he got away, in consequence of the interference of the crowd and the prisoner—who was very active.

Prisoner. I was coming up Smithfield with my master, and hearing the cry, "Let him loose, "I went up, and asked what was the matter—I heard the others say, "Let the poor boy go," and I said so innocently, not knowing what it was, the same as the rest—the gentleman laid hold of me, and tore my button off—he would not let me go, and I laid hold of his collar—that was all I did—I did not know who stole the handkerchief, what boy it was, or any thing about it, till I saw the crowd, and asked what was the matter. Witness. The prisoner was close to my elbow at the time I turned round, and found the handkerchief in the lad's possession—the lad stood right at my back—when I turned round, the handkerchief flew—I took hold of part of it, and the thief the other, and I snatched it off—the prisoner wanted me to let the boy go, but I would not—he tried all he could to raise a mob, and then called on them to floor me—the lad caught hold of my stick, and I was obliged to let go, and the officer came up—if the prisoner had not interfered, I should have secured the boy who took my handkerchief.

JOHN HAM . I am a ward beadle of Farringdon Without. I was in Smithfield at the time this happened—I heard a cry for an officer, and went up—the prosecutor had hold of a about eighteen or twenty years of age—the handkerchief was in the prosecutor's hand—nobody else had hold of it at the time I came up—I asked him if he called for an officer—he said, "Yes, this lad has stolen my handkerchief"—I said, "Have you recovered it?"—he said, "Yes, this is it"—I then said to the lad, "You must go with me"—the prisoner came up and said, "What have you to do with this?"—he was a foot or two from me—(he came round to me—he was standing at my back)—I told him that was my business, I was an officer—he said, "Oh, leave the lad alone, "or something of that sort—I said, "I shall do nothing of the kind"—I went to take hold of the lad, and the prisoner seized me by the collar—I then laid hold of him in my own defence, and was engaged with him for upwards of five minutes—my shirt was torn from my back by his violent conduct, and he completely succeeded in rescuing the lad from my custody, and I lost him—the mob made a great cry of "Tread him down, knock him down"—they backed the horses against me, and the prisoner excited the mob—he said, "Run him down"—I had three horses backed against me at one time—there were between thirty and forty persons round me—several tried to trip me up, but I would not let him go—some persons came to my assistance—the prisoner was on the spot when the boy was struggling with the prosecutor, and he was the means of my not taking hold of the thief.

Prisoner. I deny touching the man at all—he laid hold of my collar, to drag me to the Computer. Witness. When he laid hold of me, laid hold of him—he laid hold of me first.

CHARLES METCHAM . I live in Euston-street, Westminster. I was passing in Smithfield when this occurred—I saw Ham come up and endeavour to take the boy—this prisoner was endeavouring to press the prosecutor down, and rescue the boy—I watched him several minutes—he followed the prosecutor, who had the boy by the collar, and endeavoured to rescue him, but he held fast, and refused to let the boy go—the prisoner endeavoured to persuade him, and when he found he would not, they tried to rescue him—the prisoner was the fore-leader of them—he was at the back of the prosecutor almost all the time—he said, "Down with him, down with him, run the horses over him"—the prosecutor called for an officer, and they secured him, and called me to their assistance in the King's name.

Prisoner. I deny saying any thing about the horses at all—I was not near them—I was just by the mob—I heard them, and went as I have stated. Witness. I followed down the market, and found they were resolved to give the boy into custody—Ham had all the vigilance an officer could have, or I do not know what would have happened.

(James Long, farrier, of Great Ormond-yard; John Hayworth, coachman, of Rathbone-place; and—Hale, livery-stable-keeper, the prisoner's master, gave him a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Transported For Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1849

1849. ANN PRESSWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 1 printed book, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Isaac Wilbraham.

ISAAC WILBRAHAM . I live in Britannia-terrace, City-road, and am a schoolmaster. The prisoner has been a charwoman some time at my house—she was there on the 23rd of July—I missed a Testament from the library, in the parlour.

CHARLES WILBRAHAM . I am thirteen years of age, and am the prosecutor's son. On Saturday, the 23rd of July, I saw the prisoner go to Mr. Cassell's, the pawnbroker, and told my father of it.

JAMES COPRET . I am shopman to Mr. Cassell, a pawnbroker, in Church-street. I produce a Testament which was pledged by the prisoner on the 23rd of July, for 1s.

ISAAC GUDGEON . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner in the prosecutor's kitchen—I told her she was charged with stealing a pocket Testament—she denied it—I told her she must go with me to the station-house—on her way there she stated she had pledged it through distress at Mr. Cassell's—I asked if she had the duplicate—she said she had, and gave it to me—her apartment was very destitute—there was not an article of furniture in it of any description—only hay—there was the appearance of great want.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(The prisoner pleaded poverty, and received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 53.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Week.

Reference Number: t18360815-1850

1850. SARAH ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August, 1 breast-pin, value 5s., the goods of William Body, from his person.

WILLIAM BODY . I am a tailor, and live at the Temple Coffee-house, New Walk, White-friars. On the 2nd of August, I was walking in Drury-lane, between one and two o'clock in the morning, before day-break, and met the prisoner—a few words passed between us—I cannot recollect what they were—I believe it was either, "Where are you going?" or, "Will you go with me?"—no sooner had she spoken the words than she drew the breast-pin from my shirt—I turned round directly, and saw a policeman within few yards, and gave her in charge—it was not above two minutes from the pin being taken, and my giving her to the policeman.

Prisoner. You said you had no money—you gave me the pin, and we went up the court together, and were there above ten minutes. Witness. It is entirely false, not a word of the kind was uttered by me—I was not in any court with her—I was sober—I had been to my brother's, and staid out later than usual—I had a pint and a half of ale, but was not at all intoxicated.

---- WHITE (police-constable F 88.) I was on duty about two o'clock in the morning on the 2nd of August, in Drury-lane—the prisoner was given into my custody by the prosecutor—as we were going to the station-house. I observed her doing something to the lower part of her gown—I immediately put my hand there, and found the gold pin sticking into the lower part of her gown—she had been charged with stealing it, but said she had not got it, and had not taken it—she then said the prosecutor gave it to her, and afterwards told me that she had taken it from his breast.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the pin—I would not allow him what he wished, and he swore he would give me in charge.

JURY to WHITE. Q. Was the prosecutor sober or tipsy? A. He had been drinking, but appeared quite capable of knowing what he was doing—he was not at all tipsy—there are two or three courts hard by, but whether he went into any or not I cannot say—I did not see him there—the prisoner did not say he had falsely charged her because she would not let him do as he wished, till after I had found the pin, and then she did".

WILLIAM BODY re-examined. I certainly had been drinking, but it was a glass or two of ale—I do not know what the policeman means, to say there was anything in my manner to make him suppose I had been drinking—I had not been in any court with the prisoner—I was stopped abruptly by her, and the pin was drawn from me—Drury-lane was in my direct way home—I was coming from my brother's, the Royal Oak, in Earl-street, Seven Dials, to my own home, at the bottom of Bouverie-street, Fleet-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1851

1851. THOMAS HOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 12 ounces of tea, value 2s., the goods of the St. Katherine Dock Company, his employers.

DAVID MARTIN . I am a foreman to the St. Katherine Dock Company. I was passing along the floor of the warehouse letter C on the 9th July, and saw the prisoner rise from a stooping position between two tea-chests—I passed along the floor, and saw a chest of tea disturbed, which had been previously opened, but took very little notice of that; however, I followed him—he ran to the staircase to get some hoops—he returned again, and then I saw the chest was disturbed—I reported it to Bull, the warehouse-keeper, who took him on one side—Bull said, "I suspect you have tea about you"—he said, "I have"—Taylor, the superintendent, came and searched him, and found a bag containing twelve ounces of tea concealed between his legs—I compared the tea with the chest near which I saw him stooping—it appeared to correspond in quality.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. There were several chests of tea there? A. Yes—there were none of them there to be repaired—they were laid down to show—there were some chests about the place requiring repairing—the prisoner was employed to repair chests, among other things.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am a superintendent of the police in the Dock. I requested the prisoner to deliver up the tea he had about him—he undid his small-clothes and drawers—I saw a string fastened to his waistband, and pulled out the bag containing the tea—I asked him how he could be guilty of such an act—he refused to answer me—I compared the tea with that in the chest—it was the same, in my judgment.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1852

1852. ELEANOR MUNYARD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June, 2 pillows, value 3s., 6d.; 2 blankets, value 5s. 6d., 1 flat-iron, value 6d.; 1 curtain, value 1s. 6d.; 1 carpet, value 4s.; and 1 bolster, value 3s.; the goods of Clara Sewell.

CLARA SEWELL . I am a widow, and live in Gray's-inn-lane. The prisoner occupied a furnished room in my house for about eighteen weeks, with her daughter—on the 6th of August, I missed the articles stated in the indictment—I missed part from one room, and part from the other—I was going up to ask her when she meant to leave, and I missed the carpet—I told her of it—she said, "Come in"—I then missed the other things, and she said she had got the tickets—I have since seen them all at the pawnbroker's—the prisoner is a widow, and had the care of chambers in Gray's-inn-lane, as a laundress—she has a daughter sixteen years of age.

Prisoner. She knows I intended to redeem them—I had 1l. coming to me that day—I told her I would go and redeem them immediately. Witness. She did not offer to redeem them—she said she had no friend to send to, that she expected to receive a sovereign, but would not let me go about it, or send—her daughter then said she had not any chambers, but I understood she had—I had understood the articles were missing before, but I would not go into the room, in order to give her an opportunity of restoring them—I told her a fortnight before that I wished her to leave me, to pay me my rent, and leave every thing right in my apartment.

JOHN CLARIDGE . I am shopman to Mr. King, a pawnbroker, of High Holborn. I produce a pillow and blanket, which were pawned in April last, and several other articles, in the name of Ann Munyard—they were pawned by the prisoner, to the best of my belief—I am not in the habit of taking in of any body in that name but her—I should not like to swear it was the prisoner—I have no recollection of the person—I am in the habit of taking in pledges of her—the duplicates have the address as

living in Southampton-buildings—the earliest was in April, and the last in June—she came two or three times a day at times, and we took the address for granted sometimes.

CHARLES PALMER (police-constable G 17.) I received the prisoner in charge—she gave me the duplicates of the articles produced—she said she had pawned the articles, and intended to get them out the next day.

(The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating it was her intention to redeem the articles, having only pledged them under a temporary difficulty, and that she left property of her own in the room.)

CLARA SEWELL re-examined. There was not 2s. worth of property left—she appeared in distress, but that was in consequence of drink—I understand she bore an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 55.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18360815-1853

1853. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Joseph Peile, from his person.

JOSEPH PEILE . I am a clerk, and live in Cornwall-place, Holloway. On the 20th of July, at ten minutes after nine o'clock in the evening, I was in High-street, St. Giles's—my attention was called by somebody, and I missed my handkerchief, which was safe twenty minutes before—I saw it in the policeman's hand.

WILLIAM LAST . I live in Charlotte-street, Bloomsbury. On the evening of the 20th of July I was in High-street, St. Giles's and saw the prisoner, in company with another one, older than himself, following this gentleman and two ladies, and in passing by Lawrence-lane, Bainbridge-street, I saw the prisoner draw the handkerchief from Peile's pocket, and I secured him directly till the constable came up—he put it inside his jacket and dropped it behind him; the policeman came up directly and picked it up.

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX (police-constable E 49.) About ten minutes to nine o'clock I saw the prisoner and a taller one—I followed a little distance from them—I saw them close in behind the prosecutor and two ladies—Mr. Last caught hold of his arm, and I saw the handkerchief fall down from his hand behind—a hatter took it up, and gave it to me—I am certain the prisoner dropped it.

Prisoner. The hatter picked it up fourteen or fifteen yards from the policeman. Witness. It was not so—Last pinioned him, and the handkerchief fell behind him—I pointed it out to the hatter, and he picked it up—Last had hold of the prisoner—I had seen him following the prosecutor from Tottenham-court-road to St. Giles's—the handkerchief was not hanging out—I think it was about ten minutes to nine o'clock when I first saw him. GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1854

1854. SARAH ASH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July, 2 sovereigns, the monies of John Humphries, her master.

JOHN HUMPHRIES . I am a licensed-victualler, and live in Old Compton-street. The prisoner was in my service for eighteen months—I marked nine sovereigns on Saturday evening, the 30th of July, and put them in a drawer in my bed-room, in a box—the drawer was locked—I opened it on Sunday morning, about half-past ten o'clock, and missed two sovereigns—I

went to the station-house, and brought two officers—I ordered the prisoner and three other servants into the room—the prisoner came into the room with a towel or duster in her hand—two other servants were in the room—the policeman was not in her sight when she first came in, but when she saw the policeman, I saw her drop the two sovereigns from her hand—she had come from up-stairs, where our kitchen is—I took up one sovereign, and the officer took up the other—I examined them, and found them both marked—I had marked money on the Saturday for the first time—I had not gone to the box after I locked it up till Sunday morning—I had taken no money out—the prisoner was the housemaid, and has nothing to do with the money—she would have to clean the room—I asked her where she got the sovereigns from—she said they were her own—I said, they were mine, and she had robbed me to a great extent—she did not say how she got them—I have not stated that she said they were paid her by her mistress for wages—(looking at his deposition) this is my handwriting—it was read over to me—I am certain she said they were her own, but I am not certain of her saying more than that—her boxes were searched in my presence, and in the first box we found two sovereigns, a crown-piece, and three half-crowns, and in another box of hers was a small box with many sovereigns—I do not know how many—I have lost a great many sovereigns at different times—a key was found in her box which would open my cash-box—she told the policeman that the boxes were hers.

GEORGE STONE (police-constable C 2.) I went, in company with M'Donald, to the prosecutor's house, about eleven o'clock in the morning—M'Donald went into the room—I stopped on the staircase—the servants were all called into the room, as the prisoner went in I heard something fall, and I picked up a sovereign, and Mr. Humphries took up an other—I asked her if she had any more money in her boxes—she said, "No," several times—she said the two sovereigns were paid her by her mistress for wages—I took her up-stairs—she pointed out her boxes herself—in one box I found two sovereigns, three half-crowns, and a crown—in the other box eleven sovereigns in a little box—she sat down in a chair for some time, and Mr. Humphries went out of the room—I said nothing to induce her to give any account—she said she would tell the truth above it, and that the money found in the boxes was Mr. Humphries', she had stolen them from him, except 30s. which was her wages—I questioned her about her fellow-servants having seen her with jewellery and rings—she said she had bought those things out of the money taken from her master, and had sold them to a Jew in the street—I went to a Mr. Pine, of Isleworth, who she said was her uncle, and he gave me up some jewellery.

Prisoner's Defence. The property was my own which was found in the box—the key belongs to a box I had, which I gave away, and I did not know it fitted master's box till he tried it.

JOHN HUMPHRIES re-examined. These are two of the sovereigns I marked—the prisoner had ten guineas a-year—I had a good character with her from Mr. Limpus, of Isleworth.

GUILTY .— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1855

1855. MARY BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, 2 spoons, value 5s., 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; 1 box, value 1s. 6d.; 1 thimble, value 3d.; and 1 pair of gloves, value 3d.; the goods of Robert Scargill, her master.

THERESA SCARGILL . I am the daughter of Robert Scargill, and keep his house for him at Somers-town-terrace. The prisoner was an occasional servant—she did not sleep in the house—on the 15th of July, the policeman came and desired me to look over the tea-spoons—the prisoner was then in custody—the policeman produced some spoons, a small silver box, and a table-cloth—the spoons and table-cloth were my father's, and the box was my own—my father had given it to me—I recognised a pair of gloves at the station-house.

GEORGE SANDS (police-constable E 35.) The prisoner was given into my charge by Mr. Crush, a pawnbroker, who gave me two tea-spoons—I learnt from the prisoner that she had been servant to Mr. Scargill—I found on her a small silver box, a silver thimble, a pair of gloves, and the duplicate of a table-cloth—I asked her whose property they were—she gave me two or three different addresses, and then said she took them from her master's, where she had been at work.

Prisoner. The duplicate was found on the other girl. Witness. It was found on the prisoner—there were two others found on the other girl.

WILLIAM HENRY LUMLEY . I am in the service of Bromley and Crush, pawnbrokers, in Museum-street. On the 15th of July the prisoner brought two tea-spoons to pawn—I detained her, and gave her into custody.

Prisoner Q. Was it not another girl offered them in pledge A. Another girl was with her, but she offered them—the other girl was older than her, the magistrate discharged her.

JOHN JOSEPH REARDON . I am in the service of John Griffiths, a pawnbroker, in Ossulton-street, Somerstown. I produce a table-cloth which was pawned on the 15th of July, in the name of Ann Bailey, by two females—I cannot swear to the prisoner—the duplicate produced corresponds with the counterpart.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Nothing was found on me but the spoons—all the things were in the other girl's pocket, and the gentleman at the station-house took them out of the woman's hand who searched her—a woman searched me and found nothing on me.

GEORGE SANDS re-examined. I found all these things before the woman searched her—they were taken from her pocket, in my presence, by the inspector.

THERESA SCARGILL re-examined. The other girl was never inside our door; but she was in the habit of coming to call for the prisoner, she did so that afternoon; and said her master was ill and wanted her, which I found was false. GUILTY . Aged 14.—Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix, believing the other girl had seduced her.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18360815-1856

1856. ELIZABETH COLLINGWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July, 1 tumbler-glass, value 2s., the goods of Samuel Bromfield.

THOMAS BURD . I am assistant to Samuel Bromfield, a chemist, in Tottenham-court-road. On the evening of the 29th of July, the prisoner came to the shop for a pennyworth of ointment—I observed her fumbling a glass under her apron—she placed it on the counter with her apron over it—I missed a soda-water-glass from a table—she was going out, and I went and took it from under her apron—she denied its being ours at first, but at last said it was ours—it could not have got under her apron by mistake—she

had gone a dozen yards with it—she said she was very sorry for what she had done, and begged me to let her off

GUILTY .* Aged 61.— Confined Six Months.

NEW COURT.—Thursday, August 18th, 1836.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18360815-1857

1857. EDWARD MAULE was indicted for a misdemeanour.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1858

1858. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for a misdemeanour.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS PIPER . I keep the Six Bells public-house. On the 11th of August, the prisoner came in, about seven o'clock in the evening—a person named Andrews was there, rather intoxicated—he had been in and out all day—the prisoner sat down by the side of him—after some conversation they called for a pot of beer—I brought it, and Andrews gave me a shilling—I looked at it, and saw it was a new one—I put it into my pocket, with other silver—just afterwards I pulled the money out to give change—I took this new shilling in my hand—I bit it, and it proved to be bad—it resembled that I had received from Andrews—I had no other bright shilling in my pocket—soon after that, my son Charles made a communication to me, after he had served them with the next pot of beer—I saw the policeman—he was waiting at the door till Brown went out—I wrapped up the shilling which I took—this is it.

CHARLES PIPER . I am the son of Thomas Piper. Andrews was at the house—he is a man known in the neighbourhood—he was tipsy—I do not remember the prisoner coming in, but he was sitting with Andrews, and drinking with him—my father had made a communication to me about a shilling—after that Andrews called for another pot, and gave me a bad shilling—they drank the second pot—I told him it was bad, and Andrews said a woman who had been there gave it him—I gave it to him back—he gave it to the woman, and gave a good one for it—I afterwards got that shilling from the woman,—I had bit it before I returned it—the officers were not told to come in, they were to remain at the door—Andrews left the house in company with his mother, and then the prisoner was about to leave, and Spiers, the officer, stopped him at the door—(the woman was Mrs. Baker, whom Andrews had been employed by)—the policeman searched the prisoner, and I saw three bad shillings taken from his pocket—he said nothing—he seemed very much frightened.

WILLIAM SPIERS (police-sergeant T 85.) I was directed to wait at the door, when I saw the prisoner leaving the house, Mr. Piper said he had suspicion of his having bad money—he immediately put both his hands to his pockets—I seized on his left hand, and said, "Let your pockets alone; keep your hands out"—I took his hand, and found in it three bad shillings—we took him to the station-house, and found three more in the same pocket.

THOMAS BROWN (police-constable T 98.) I assisted in taking the prisoner and I saw Spiers find the six shillings.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint. These shillings are all counterfeit, and from the same mould.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was intoxicated, and received the money in exchange for half a sovereign in the street.)

WILLIAM SPIERS . He did not tell me he had received change for half a sovereign. GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18360815-1859

1859. THOMAS ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 3lbs. weight of soap, value 1s. 3d., the goods of James Soames and another.

JAMES JOHN FOSTER . I am foreman to William and James Soames, of Spitalfields, soap manufacturers. The prisoner was in their employ—he, with two other men, were at work with me on the 16th of July—I received information, and the prisoner asked me if he might go to breakfast—I said "Yes, but I must search you first"—I found on him this bar of soap.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Is your master here? A. No. The prisoner had been in their employ about four years—I have been fifteen years there—when I said I must search him, he said, "I have nothing about me;" but when I found it, he never uttered a word—it is usual to leave a piece of soap for the men to wash with, but not bars of soap—it was concealed in his frock.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he had found the soap: he received a good character, and the prosecutor engaged to continue him in his employ.) GUILTY . Aged 30.—Recommended to mercy.

Confined Six Days.

Reference Number: t18360815-1860

1860. HENRY HAYESMAN and JOHN REEVES were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July, 1 shawl, value 9s. 6d., the goods of William Butland.

WILLIAM BUTLAND . I keep a pawnbroker's-shop in Whitechapel-road, at the corner of Black Lion-yard. On Thursday evening, the 7th of July, about six o'clock, a boy gave me information—I examined my shawls and missed a reddish one—it has not been found.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. When did you miss it? A. About seven o'clock in the evening—I had seen it about one o'clock in the day.

JOHN MOSES . I sell cherries. On Thursday night, the 7th of July, about six o'clock, I was at the corner of Black Lion-yard, and I saw the two prisoners—I only know by sight—I am sure these are the two—Hayesman came and stood by my stall, while Reeves took the shawl—but before that Hayesman said to me, if they took a shawl from Mr. Butland's shop, would I say any thing—I said, what they did was nothing to me—Reeves then took the shawl and went away—Hayesman came to me, and told me he would give me 2d. the next time he saw me—I went and told Mr. Butland—he sent a boy after them—they were taken the next day.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen them before that night? A. No; it was between five and seven o'clock—they were about half an hour with me—there were policemen on duty—I did not tell Mr. Butland the moment they took the shawl, because Hayesman stood close by me—I never kept bad company—I could not prevent the robbery—I did not try to get 2d. from Mr. Butland—I did not wait a minute for the 2d.—I was frightened, never seeing such a thing done before—as soon as they went from my basket, I went in and told—I did not see them again till thy were at the office on the Saturday—it was not dark—I swear Hayesman was the man

by the side of me at the time the shawl was taken—I told the magistrate about the 2d. I will swear, and I told Mr. Butland—I live with my parents—my father is an optician—I never said one of them held me.

MARIA HATTON . I am the wife of Thomas Hatton, a baker—I live near Black Lion-yard. I saw both the prisoners there about a quarter to six o'clock that evening.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see them talking to that little boy? A. No; he was there, about 100 yards off, and Reeves came backwards and forwards to Hayesman, they made motions with their hands.

Hayesman's Defence.—I was not near the place—I went away at four o'clock in the evening to walk to Clapton—I was not back till ten o'clock at night—I never saw Reeves before—the boy told the magistrate I was there five minutes, and the woman said it was three quarters of an hour.

WILLIAM ARGENT . (police-constable H 126.) I took the two prisoners the following night—Hayesman said, if Mr. Butland would tell him the value of the shawl he would pay him.

JOHN MOSES re-examined. He might have been there from a quarter to half an hour—I have the slightest doubt of them.

MARIA HATTON re-examined. I saw him from a little after five till a quarter to six o'clock—I am sure these are lads.

(The prisoner Hayesman received a good character.)

HAYESMAN— GUILTY . Aged 20.

REEVES— GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months, the Last week solitary.

Reference Number: t18360815-1861

1861. JOHN OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 7 handkerchiefs, value 1l. 14s., the goods of John Stear; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1862

1862. SARAH OLDHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 tobacco-pouch, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-sovereign, 7 shillings, and 3d. in copper, the goods and monies of Detlef Wolffe.

DETLEF WOLFFE . I am a seaman, living in Edward-street, Limet-housefields. On the 18th of July, I went with the prisoner to a house—I paid her 4s. for a lodging, and went home with her—she asked for 4s., which I gave her, and gave her another shilling for beer, which she fetched, and gave me the change—I pulled off my clothes, and put them on the table—I had these things and money in a silk handkerchief—I put them in my hat, and put them on the table—she took the hat and put it under the bed, and took the silk handkerchief out, and went out—I went out, but could not catch her—I had no clothes on.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You were very sober? A. Yes—I dined about one o'clock, and went down to a ship at two o'clock at St. Katherine's-docks—I drank nothing at all—I was at a public-house—I got some beer there—I do not know whether that was the Pavior's Arms—I did not drink at that public-house, nor treat a lot of girls—I was in no public-houses before I met the prisoner—I went to one with her, and no more—I do not know where the White Hart is—I cannot tell where I was—I drank beer, nothing else—I drank no rum—I swear that—it was at the public-house I agreed to go home with the girl—I got to the public-house at half-past ten o'clock—I was on board the ship till about eight o'clock—it did not take me from eight till half-past ten o'clock

to walk to Ratcliffe-highway—I went home first to my lodgings—I was perfectly sober—I never went to bed with her at all—I drank part of the beer she went for—it was all drank—I did not take hold of her, because I was stripped—I put on my clothes, and went into the kitchen—I saw the landlord and landlady—I did not say a word to them about being robbed—I did not say at the police-office that I saw this girl after I left the lodgings, in a public-house very drunk—I did not see her that night—I went straight home—I never told any thing about it till the next day—I was in company with no other girls—I do not know whether there were others about me in the public-house—I did not tell Mrs. Carr, the landlady, that I never would have come here at all, only the policeman made me, and that I pitied the girl—I will not swear I did not—I did not say I was sorry for what I had done, and wished it had not happened, and offer Mrs. Carr money to go and help her—that is a story.

COURT. Q. Where did you go? A. I went home to sleep—I saw two or three persons there—I did not tell them I had been robbed—I did not like to tell the landlord, because I liked to catch her.

GEORGE GRAVE (police-constable K 233.) About ten o'clock in the morning the prosecutor came to me, he had got the prisoner in custody—he said, "I give this girl in charge for robbing me of 1l. 18s., or there-abouts"—she denied all knowledge of ever seeing him in her life before—she told me she was carried home drunk at one o'clock in the morning—the prosecutor said he was robbed at eleven o'clock at night—she was carried to her lodgings, and denied all knowledge of the man.

MRS. CARR. I am the prisoner's landlady. The prosecutor came home with her—I remember his coming out, and seeing me and my husband in the kitchen—he did not say one word about being robbed—he had a glass of beer with us in the kitchen—this girl went out before he did—she was brought home at one o'clock—I saw him the day after the prisoner was committed—he said he was very sorry for what he had done—he would not have done it but for the policeman urging him on—he said, "I wish I could give her some money"—he was drunk that night—I know a man named Simpson—he brought her home that night drunk about one o'clock—he did not sleep with her in my house.

Prisoner.—I do not recollect ever seeing the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1863

1863. JOHN GRADY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 1 sieve, value 5s. and I server, value 6d.; the goods of George Webb.

GEORGE WEBB . I live in Eagle-street, Holborn. On the 20th of July I was in my parlour, and saw the prisoner coming up from my cellar under the parlour—he got out with a sieve and a server—I took him, and he said a man had sent him to get them from my cellar—I asked where was the man—he said, "At the top of the street"—I went there, and there was no man but a policeman—I gave him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man at the corner of Red Lion-street—he told me to go and get them, and he would give me 1d., but he went away when he saw this man coming up.

GUILTY .* Aged 15.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1864

1864. DENNIS HENNIGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 3 pewter pots, value 2s.; the goods of Oliver Foster: and 1 pot, value 1s., the goods of John Tapp.

OLIVER FOSTER .—I keep a public-house, at the corner of Wellclose-square. In consequence of information from my son, I went into the tap-room on the morning of the 4th of August, and found the prisoner, I found two quart pots and two pints in his bosom, and one in his hat—they were mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. He had not been there all night? A. No; we opened at six o'clock—this was between seven and eight o'clock—he appeared sober—there was a woman with him—I do not know her name.

OLIVER FOSTER , jun. I am the prosecutor's son—I took hold of the prisoner.

Cros-examined. Q. Did you see the woman there? A. Yes—I cannot say whether the prisoner was sober—I saw him put something in his bosom—they were not quarrelling—he could not see me—I was behind the door-post—he had had one pint of beer—he used to come to the house in a morning.

Prisoner. I met this woman—she asked me to go with her—I called for a pot of beer and a quartern of rum, and gave her a glass—I had been a little tipsy the night before—she followed me to this gentleman's house, and as soon as we got inside she began quarrelling and jawing me—this man said, "Is she your wife?—I said, "No"—she began quarrrelling and jawing me, and she took hold of my breast and put the quart-pot in my shirt—I put it under my arm—she took another pot, and said she would knock my brains out—I took that and put it under my other arm—she then took up a pint-pot, and threw it at me, it hit the wall, and bounded back again into my hat, and then that boy took hold of me.

OLIVER FOSTER . jun., re-examined. I saw no squabble—I saw him put something in his breast—the woman was then gone—they did not come in together.

MR. PHILLIPS Q. Was his pint of beer split? A. Not that I know of—I did not took on the ground.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18360815-1865

1865. JAMES ASHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July, 1 wooden bowl, value 2d.; 2 pence, and 8 halfpence, the goods and monies of Francis Badrick.

WILLIAM FRANCIS BADRICK . I live with my father, Francis Badrick, a milkman, in the Strand. On the 24th of July he left me in care of the shop—I went into the back-parlour—there was a bowl there containing 8 1/2; d.—the prisoner was brought back by the policeman, but not with the bowl—about a quarter of an hour elapsed between my going out and his coming in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Had you a view of the shop from where you were? A. I could have had—I was cutting a piece of bread and butter—no one could come into the shop and I not know it.

RICHARD GOODE (police-constable F 99.) I was on duty, and saw the prisoner go into the shop, put his hand over the counter, and take the bowl of the box—he ran along the street—I ran after him—he threw the bowl and halfpence away—I took him, and got a light—I found one penny

piece and 8 1/2d.—I could not find the bowl—it was about half past nine or a quarter to ten o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. There were a great many persons in the Strand? A. Not a great many—I was about ten yards from the door till he went in, and then I went nearer—I did not know at first but that he was the son of the milkman, and when I took him he said he was.

Prisoner. I went in for a halfpenny worth of milk, and no one was there—I came out, and went on—he came and took me.

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1866

1866. ISAAC LEFEVRE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Benjamin Humphery, from his person.

BENJAMIN HUMPHREY . I went to the Two Bells, in Whitechapel-road, about twelve o'clock, on the 6th of July—my nephew told me something, and I looked in my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone—the prisoner was in the room—he did not go.

MARK COMPTON . I am nephew to Benjamin Humphery. He took me into this house at twelve o'clock that night—I saw the prisoner put his hand in my uncle's pocket, take his handkerchief up, and give it to another one—the other said, "I am going outside a moment," and he went away—I am sure I saw the prisoner put his hand in my uncle's pocket.

Prisoner. I was standing at the bar, drinking with a young woman—the witness turned round, and said, "This young man has picked your pocket"—he took me, and searched me, and could find nothing—then he said, "Uncle, I saw him give it to another one"—there was no one went out. Witness There were two boys and two girls there—the young woman went out.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1867

1867. JOHN HATWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 6s., the goods of John Simley, from his person.

JOHN SIMLEY . I live in Gloucester-terrace. I was in the Commercial-road on the 9th of July, about eight o'clock, and felt something at my coat-pocket—I turned, and missed my handkerchief—the prisoner was immediately behind me in a crowd of persons, and I saw him drop it—I picked it up, and then I seized him—he resisted slightly—another young man assisted me in holding him till a policeman came up—he was the person nearest to me—I am sure I saw any handkerchief drop from his hand.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. How many persons were about you? A. Fifty—he denied that he ever had my handkerchief—I did not say at the police-office there were 300 or 400 people.

Prisoner. I am perfectly innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1868

1868. RICHARD HAGLEY was indicted for embezzlement.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I live in Ivy-lane, and am a butcher. The prisoner was my journeyman—he did not pay me 12s. 3 1/2d. on the 20th of April, or 16s. on the 27th, or 9s. 8d. on the 13th of May.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. You and he had been very intimate? A. Yes, we were fellow-workmen in the same house two years—he has borne an excellent character—I have two boys—he has never paid

money to them in my absence, to my knowledge—I cannot say whether he has—the boys are not here, nor is my wife.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1869

1869. WILLIAM PENNYCAD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July, 1 watch, value 7s.; 1 watch-chain, value 2d.; 3 watch-keys, value 3d.; and 1 thimble, value 6d.; the goods of Peter Pennycad: and 1 thimble, value 6d.; the goods of Caroline Pennycad.

PETER PENNYCAD . I live in Little Camden-street, Camden-town. On the 27th of July the prisoner called on me; he is a relation—I had not seen him for some time—I missed my watch after he was gone—this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. He is a cousin of yours? A. Yes, he had been drinking when he called on me, he was the worse for liquor, and might not know exactly what he was doing.

Q. Did you not say he was welcome to any thing you had? A. Something of that sort, I did not wish to pursue this—I wanted the watch, and I thought he would give it me back.

CAROLINE PENNYCAD . I am the prosecutor's sister. I had not seen the prisoner for four years—I missed my thimble and the watch.

GEORGE LEE . I am shopman to Mr. Button, a pawnbroker of Battle-bridge—this watch was brought in by the prisoner, on the evening of the 28th of July—having received information, I stopped the prisoner and sent for an officer.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1870

1870. JOHN GULLING and THOMAS SHEARS were indicted for stealing, 1 gown, value 14s., the goods of John Kelday.

JANE DAVIES . I keep a shop, just opposite Mr. Kelday, the pawnbroker, in Hackney-road. On the 6th of August I saw the prisoner Shears, unpin a gown at Kelday's door—he dropped it, picked it up, wrapped it up roughly, and handed it to Gulling—they walked away—I ran over, and gate information—I am sure the prisoners are the men.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Were you at the police-office when one Lockwood was examined? A. No; I was present when the depositions were taken—he swore that Gulling was the man who took it down, and I said the contrary—Lockwood was here not ten minutes ago—I did not tell him not to come for fear he would contradict me—he is just gone to dinner.

SAMUEL MILLHOUSE (police-constable N 142.) I have the gown which was picked up by Munton, and given to me at the station-house.

THOMAS MUNTON . There was a hue and cry—the prisoners were walking away—I pursued them—I saw Gulling drop the gown.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. One handed it to the other? A. Gulling had it—he gave it to Shears, and he gave it back again—Mr. Kelday's name is John—he has no partner—it was outside—there is a pent-house that comes from the shop.

(The prisoner Gulling received a good character.)

JOHN GULING— GUILTY . Aged. 19.

THOMAS SHEARS— GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1871

1871. ELIZA MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July, 1 pair of trowsers, value 4s.; and 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; the goods of Joseph Donovan: 1 pair of trowsers, value 7s.; the goods of John Donovan: and 1 waistcoat, value 5s., the goods of Timothy Holland.

JOHN DONOVAN . I am a coal-whipper, living with my father, Joseph Donovan. I missed a pair of fustain trowsers on the 10th of July—these are them.

JOSEPH DONOVAN . I am the father John Donovan. These black trowsers and waistcoat are mine—I missed them on the 10th of July from my house.

TIMOTHY HOLLAND . I am a coal-whipper, Joseph Donovan is my father-in-law. I lost a waistcoat—this is it.

JOHN BUSH . I am a carpenter, and live in Joseph-street. I was in the Highway, and met the prisoner—she asked me where I was going—I said to take a walk—she asked me to go with her—I said I did not want any thing to do with her, I had a wife and two children—I saw her go into this man's house, and come out with these things—I followed her, and then gave information to the policeman.

JOSEPH HAMMOND (police-constable K 20.) I received information, and took the prisoner in Catherine-street—she had not got the bundle then—a woman told me she saw her come out of the back of Crown-place, and deposit a bundle—I went there and found this bundle—this was between four and five o'clock in the morning.

Prisoner. I was going home with some things that I had been up all night to finish—then this man spoke to me on the bridge—he behaved very rude—I met a man who said he knew my husband when he was a superintendent of police, he gave me a bundle to hold, and then there was a cry of "Stop thief"—he said, "Give me the bundle"—this man says that the door was open; is it consistent that three or four persons would go to bed and leave their door open?—the policeman saw a man take the bundle from me.

JOHN DONOVAN re-examined. I do not know whether the door was open—I was in bed—my things were hanging up about the room on the ground floor.

JOHN BUSH re-examined. There was no man with her when I saw her go into the house—there was a man her afterwards—I was perfectly sober—it was Sunday morning.

DANIEL MENDOZA . I live in Caroline-place, Mile End New Town. I have known the prisoner above ten years—I never knew any thing against her—her husband was a baker—and then he got a situation as superintendent of the City Police—I have known the witness Bush ten years, he is a bad character—I will not be sure, but I really think he has been convicted at Lambeth-street office.

JOHN BUSH re-examined. Q. Were you ever convicted? A. No; I was at Worship-street office, six years ago, for being intoxicated, but was discharged—I am a carpenter, and worked for Mr. Carman, in Great Hermitage-street.

DANIEL MENDOZA . I have been up early at markets, and seen him rolling about with the worst of characters—I have seen him several times in the company of reputed thieves.

JOHN HAMMOND re-examined. She had no bundle when I saw her—she went up to Crown-place, and I saw her walk sharply up to Johnson-street—I took her—a person said, "I saw that woman put a bundle there"—I went up and found the bundle there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1872

1872. CHARLES SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July, 1 half-crown, and 1 shilling the monies of John Roberts, his master.

JOHN ROBERTS . I live in Woodward's-rents, Wheler-street, Spitalfields, and am a shoemaker—the prisoner was my servant. On the 11th of July, I went out about three o'clock, and left him at home—when I came back, he was gone—I missed a shilling and a half-crown—I met him again on the Saturday following—I asked him what made him go away with the money—he said he did not know, but he lost the money in going over London-bridge, running after a coach.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months, The Last Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18360815-1873

1873. JAMES FAIRBAIRN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 half-crown, the monies of John Saunders, his master.

JOHN SAUNDERS . I live in America-terrace, King's-road. The prisoner was my servant—I took seven half-crowns to John Payne, and marked them in his presence, and delivered them to him—he ought to have spent them in my shop the following morning—I looked into the till when I returned from market that morning, and there were only six of the half-crowns—I spoke to Payne, and then accused the prisoner—he was searched in my presence, and the marked half-crown found, with other silver, and gold, and halfpence.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long was it from the time you missed the half-crown and your speaking to him A. It was between nine and ten o'clock in the morning—when I came home I asked if he had sold any thing—he said he had sold a ham—the seven half-crowns were given for that—I think it was about one o'clock when I accused the prisoner soner; I let it remain till I ascertained that the seven half-crowns had been paid—I do not know what customers came I shortly after the ham was sold—I was not there—2l. 4s. 9 1/2d. was found on him, in all—he had 16l. a year—he came to me as a single man—this is one of the half-crowns—I made a particular mark on it, and took the dates of each as well.

JOHN PAYNE . I am a grocer, and live at Chelsea. Mr. Saunders marked seven half-crowns in my presence—I passed them at his shop the next morning—this is one of them—I can swear to it—I saw the mark made.

MR. PAYNE. Have the goodness to select it from these. Witness. This is it—I paid them for a ham—I keep a retail shop—if a shopman had small change, I do not know whether he could give out of his own pocket.

JOHN SAUNDERS re-examined. He did not tell me he had taken the money out of his own pocket.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Do you mean to swear that at the time you accused him of having one of these half-crowns? A. I did not accuse him of the half-crown—I said I had missed money—there was not money in the till, nor goods sold, to the amount of half a crown—there was no money at all in the till when I went out—when I came home there ten half-crowns, two shillings, and two sixpences, in silver—I had no other shopman—the others were porters.

(The prisoner put in a written defence stating that he had given change from his own pocket, and in that way must have taken the half-crown.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1874

1874. THOMAS COLLINGWOOD was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1875

1875. JOHN JOSEPH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 50 yards of woollen cloth, value 15l. the goods of John Chalmers, and another.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN CHALMERS . I carry on business with Richard Saunders, in Leadenhall-street, as drapers. On the 4th of August, we sent out five pieces of cloth by a person named Brogden—one of them measured fifty yards—it was a merino, three-quarters wide—we had it in the shop from the 30th of July—we then purchased it of Martin—it was given to Brogden about one or two o'clock in the day,—(we had nothing to do with Mr. Manning—he called there on business of his own) he came back, and said there was a piece missing—we sent round to the different pawnbrokers—a person named Barnes came with the prisoner and this piece of cloth—here is four yards and a half of it—the piece of cloth we sent out corresponds with this—fifty yards were sent out.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Are you quite positive that this is a part of it? A. I will swear to it without the least shadow of doubt—we have only got a small pattern of cloth similar to it—this is from a pattern card—we got this at Mr. Martin's—I sent the policeman for it—we sent for the pattern for the purpose of comparing it with ours—I do not say that my opinion is founded on this piece of cloth and the pattern—we sent for it after we had examined it, and came to the conclusion that it was the piece—we sent for this for the colour—there was only the colour that remained—I had not a doubt but it was to convince those who were there that I sent for this piece, to remove every shade of doubt—they are yard wides, something between seconds and superfine—I should sell it as plain cloth—there is not a great quantity of this made—they keep making them as fast as they are demanded.

Q. What is there particular in the make? A. The substance, the closeness of the texture, and the fineness of the quality depend on the make—there is something in the make of this which is different from all we have in the warehouse—I am certain it is the same piece of cloth.

MR. DOANE. Q. I understand this corresponds in every respect with the piece you lost two hours before? A. Yes.

HENRY BROGDEN . I received five pieces of cloth from the prosecutor's shop—I stopped at Mr. Manning's, and left the truck outside, and on returning, there was one piece gone—I started from Mr. Manning's about two o'clock—I went back to Mr. Chalmer's about three o'clock—I do not know whether this piece corresponds with what I had.

WILLIAM BARNES . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Union-street. On the 14th of August, I received information from the prosecutor, that a piece of cloth had been lost, and about half-past four o'clock, the prisoner came to pawn this piece of cloth—I took him into custody, and took him to the prosecutor—he said he was willing to go.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner came to pawn it? A. Yes—there were persons in the shop—he had no other cloth—he might have left my shop before the policeman came, when I told him such cloth had been lost.

Q. Was it brought open? A. It was wrapped up in a handkerchief.

JOHN JACOBS . I am warehouseman to Mr. John Martin. We are wholesale dealers in cloth—we supplied the prosecutors with cloth on the 16th of July, and on the 30th—I have no doubt on my mind that this is a portion of the piece of 50 yards that we sold to them.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there not hundreds of pieces made of the same sort and colour? A. I will not say a hundred—there may be two or three—I saw it the day it was sent out—I may have opened it a dozen times—I opened all the patterns we had on the 16th of July—we had only two pieces of this sort—we sold them both to the prosecutor.

JOHN BELL (police-constable H 136.) On the afternoon of the 4th of August I took the prisoner into custody, and on going towards the prosecutor's he said he had this in his possession three weeks—that he had bought it of a man in the lane, and gave 35s. for it—I asked where he lived—he said his brother lived in Goulston-street, and he lived in Petticoat-lane, but he did not know the number, nor the name of the party.

Cross-examined. Q. When he said the party lived in Petticoat-lane, was he not speaking of the man that sold the cloth? A. No—he said he did not know the number of the house, and I found his brother—I have been on duty two or three years in that neighbourhood—cloths of that kind are bought and sold in Petticoat-lane, for exportation—he said he was perfectly willing to go to the prosecutor.

JURY to JOHN JACOBS. Q. Was the pattern cut off from this piece of cloth? A. The two pieces being precisely the same colour, the pattern was cut from one—I cannot say which—this is an olive colour—there was a great demand for olives in broad-cloths two years ago, but not in plains—in narrow-cloths they cannot make many pieces together, and if they make another piece, it is a thousand chances to one if they hit the colour.

Prisoner's Defence. I purchased that cloth three weeks before, for my own use—I ran rather short, and went to pawn it, where I had been to pawn things.

WILLIAM BARNES . I have seen him once or twice there—he is not a regular customer.

HYAMS. I am a tailor, and live in Gun-square, Houndsditch. I have known the prisoner two or three years—I worked for him—he brought me four yards and a half of cloth in July, which in colour and quality exactly resembled this piece—I believe it was this, but I would not swear to it—I did not make it up, because there was not enough to make a surtout coat and a pair of trowsers—it is worth about 5s. 6d. or 6s. a yard.

MR. DOANE. Q. Do you remember what time in July it was? A. No—I will not swear whether it was the first week or the last—it was between two and three weeks ago, about four o'clock in the afternoon—it was folded up under his arm, not in paper—I have been his tailor two or three years—he told me he bought this by chance, to have a coat and trowsers made of it, and it was too little, and too much for a coat.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How long have you lived where you live now? A. Two years and a half—I occupy a first floor—I have been in a larger way than I am now—I have lived in that neighbourhood eight years—it would require about a yard more cloth to make a coat and trowsers.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1876

1876. SAMUEL PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Ward, from his person.

JOHN WARD . I lodge at the Swan inn, Holborn-bridge. On the 24th of July I was in St. John-street—I received information—I felt my pocket and missed my handkerchief—this is it—it was safe in my pocket that evening.

REES THOMAS . I was in St. John-street, between seven and eight o'clock at night, on the 24th of July—I saw the prisoner walk behind the prosecutor, and take his handkerchief out of his pocket—I told the prosecutor—the prisoner ran, and let the handkerchief fall on the step of a door—the prosecutor took it up and took hold of him—he was taken directly—he ran about half a dozen yards, then he stood still, when the prosecutor took him.

Prisoner. I did not run a step.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1877

1877. WILLIAM HURST was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of George Bayley, from his person.

GEORGE BAYLEY . On the 6th of August, in the morning, I was turning the corner from Convent-garden-market into King-street. Some one called me—I turned, and found a man with my handkerchief and the prisoner—this is my handkerchief.

JOSEPH STACE . I am an officer. I was on duty at Covent-garden—I saw the prisoner following the prosecutor—just as he turned the corner he took this handkerchief from his pocket—I seized him, and he threw it on the ground.

Prisoner. I had a whip in my hand, and was at a horse's head. Witness. No; he and another had been following this gentleman through Covent-garden.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18360815-1878

1878. FREDERICK BALDWIN SCHOPPE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June, 4 shirts, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 1 night-gown, value 2s. 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 1s. 6d.; 2 towels, value 1s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; and 1 pair of razors, value 3s.; the goods of Elizabeth. Pryor: and 1 pair of boots, value 16s., the goods of John Henry Sproull.

(The prisoner being a foreigner, the evidence was explained to him by an interpreter.)

ELIZABETH PRYOR . I keep the North American Coffee-house, in the Minories. The prisoner came to lodge with me on the 17th of June—he brought me a paper, saying he came from the Danish Consul; that he was to get board and lodging for eight or nine days, and then they were to get him a ship to send him to his own country—another young man lodged with him who could not speak English—the prisoner paid nothing—he was to give me 5s. a-week for lodging, and board, as he had—he continued to lodge from the 17th of the 21st—he left on Tuesday, and said he was going to the Danish Consul for money—he came back and said, "You are to go with me to-morrow"—I said, "Very well"—I gave them their tea—they sat down and drank it till nine o'clock, and then went to bed, as I thought—a person came to see me—I went up-stairs and found my drawers had been opened—I then came down and received information—we went

up-stairs, and I missed the articles, the property of John Henry Sproull, who is now confined to his bed, with an inflammation on his lungs—the prisoner left his boots at the foot of his bed and took the others away—he never paid me any thing, and went away without notice—I thought they were in bed—they left my house about nine o'clock in the evening.

ANN M'CARTHY . I live as servant with Mrs. Pryor. I remember the prisoner and another man lodging there—they went away—I afterwards found a pair of the prisoner's boots in the room—Mr. Sproull's boots had been in that room at half-past four that evening—I met the prisoner at Aldgate, at a quarter before two, on the 13th of July—I caught hold of him till the policeman came up—he had no boots on—he owned every thing that they had taken—I had cleaned Mr. Sproull's boots five times and the prisoner's once—I know them well.

RICHARD WILLIAM CARTER . (City police constable, No. 92) I was in Aldgate, and M'Carthy had got fast hold of the prisoner—when first I came up he said he knew nothing of it, I took him to the station-house—the prosecutrix's house in the Minories is not in the City, and I was desired to take him down to another station—he there said, "It was not me took them, we took them to get money to go to Boulogne"—I found 1s. 10 1/2d. on him, and a foreign passport.

ELIZABETH PRYOR (re-examined.) Q. You had two other lodgers? A. Yes, they were old lodgers, one has lived in the house four years, the other has been there ten months—the prisoner told me and the officer that he took the sheets, as he had his passport to go to Boulogne, that they had no money, and the other said, "We will go up-stairs and take something," and they took the sheets and put them round them.

Prisoner. All that the witness says is not true—it was not me stole the things.

HENRY BONTARD . I am in the service of Danish Consul. The prisoner arrived a month or five weeks ago—he applied to the Consul for relief, we gave him temporary relief—he said he was a non-commissioned officer—he had been in the army, and was not discharged for any bad conduct—I know nothing of him.

GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18360815-1879

1879. NORAH GRADY was indicted for stealing, On the 19th of August, 1 brooch, value 9s.; 3 waistbands, value 9d.; and 1 apron, value 3d.; the goods of Sarah Jones: 3 seals, value 16s.; 3 knives, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 9d.; 1 handkerchief, value 3d.; and 2 waistbands, value 3d.; the goods of Thomas Marshall, her master.

SARAH MARSHALL . I am the wife of Thomas Marshall, licensed victualler, of St. George's-terrace. The prisoner lived servant of all-work with me for eleven months—I had reason to suspect her, having lost a great many things—on the 19th of July I missed three seals, and told her, that having lost so many things I had reason to suspect her—I asked her if she was willing I should look into her box, otherwise I should send for an officer—she wished to go and fetch her boxes down herself, I would not allow that—I sent another servant for them—he brought them to my parlour—they were both locked—she took the keys from her side and opened them—she then told me I should find the seals, but that my son had put them there—I first found a brooch belonging to the bar-maid, and various other things—bands, 3 seals, and three knives, a pair of shoes, and

a handkerchief, &c., they were my property—I said, if my son had put them there she should have said so in the first instance, and not have denied it—but I was convinced to the contrary—my son is twelve years of age, and had come from school—I gave charge of her—this is my property.

SARAH JONES . I live as bar-maid there. I was present when the prisoner's boxes where brought down by the boy—the prisoner opened one with a key she had by her side—I saw the property found—the brooch is mine—these three waist-bands and apron had been in my bed-room—my things are worth about ten shillings.

WILLIAM MORLEY . (police-sergeant, C 18.) I took the prisoner and have the things.

Prisoner. My master's son gave me these things and put them in my box—he told me to keep them till he came back in a fortnight, that his mother might not see them; and the apron the bar-maid gave me.

SARAH MARSHALL . She denied all knowledge of the things till they were found.

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1880

1880. SUSANNAH MOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July, 2 sheets, value 10s., the goods of Charlotte Dean: and 1 shawl, value 2l. 2s., the goods of James Goodwin.

MARIA GOODWIN . I am the wife of James Goodwin. I work at my needle—my husband works on the railway—the prisoner lodged in the same house—my shawl laid among my clothes—we had no box in the place, our things being burnt some time before—on the 21st of July the prisoner assisted me in folding up my shawl—she said it was a d----d good shawl—I laid it among my clothes in her presence—she asked me how much the shawl would pledge for—I said I did not know, and hoped I never should—she stayed and had tea with us—the next morning I went with my husband's breakfast—when I came back the prisoner came up to assist me—I told her I would rather she went down and got her own place comfortable before her husband came—she said no, she would be d----d if she did—she sat down on my bed—I went down for about ten minutes, I came back—the prisoner was ill, and she asked me for some water—I gave her some tea—she stayed till she considered it was twelve o'clock—she then desired me to go with her husband's dinner—she went away about five minutes before me—I missed my shawl about five minutes after she left the house, on Friday, the 22nd of July—no other person could have taken it but the prisoner—she was in my room from the time we folded it up till I missed it—I gave her in charge at Kingston on the Monday following—I lost it from Hanwell—she had not given up her lodging—when she went out, she said she was going to gather wood—I have never seen my shawl since.

CHARLOTTE DEAN . I am mistress of the house where they lodge—their husbands both work on the Grand Western Railway—they took the lodging by the week—the prisoner's husband went away on Thursday morning—he was not at work that week—their work ended on the Monday—the prisoner went away without giving notice—she had not paid me—after I missed her I missed a pair of sheets off the drawers—I have never found them since, and we have made all the inquiry we could for them.

EDWARD JAMES LEVY (police-constable I 18.) I took the prisoner at Kingston—on the way she said, "What do you think they will do to

me?"—I said, "I do not know"—she said."I do not think they can hurt me if they cannot find the property"—they will have some trouble to do that.

Prisoner. My husband was out of work—I had neither money nor victuals—the prosecutrix said she would give me food if I would come and do needle-work for her, which I did for two or three days—where she went to take her husband's dinner I went with her, to see if I could find my husband.

GUILTY . Aged 22.—Recommended to mercy by the prosecutrix.

Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1881

1881. FRANCIS ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, 5 dram bottles, value 9s., the goods of William Charles Heditch his master.

WILLIAM CHARLES HEDITCH . I am a portmanteau-maker, and live in Charles-street, Hatton-garden. The prisoner was my errand boy—the came on the 8th. and I discharged him on the 18th of July—I missed from one to two dozen of dram bottles.

JAMES BARTLETT . I live in Houndsditch, and am assistant to a pawnbroker. I took in these five bottles of the prisoner.

Prisoner. I did not pawn them. Witness. I am quite positive of his person.

WILLIAM MURDOCK . I am an assistant to pawnbroker. I took in two bottles of the prisoner—I am positive it was him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did not take them, nor pawn them—I did not know any thing about them till Mr. Heditch called me down into the shop, and told me about them.

MR. HEDITCH. I called him down, and asked him about it—he denied it—I discharged him, and then I found this out.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1882

1882. GEORGE ALLBERRY was indicted for embezzlement.

JOHN COLES . I am the son of Barbara Coles, who keeps a butter and cheese warehouse, in Wigmore-street. The prisoner was her servant—it was his duty to receive monies in his rounds—we settled with him every night regularly—he took butter out to different customers, and if they paid him, he was to account for the same every evening—he was to receive weekly bills, if they were paid—I carried on the business—what he received he should have accounted to me for.

ESTHER ELIZA DURANT . I was cook to Mr. George Bishop. I paid the prisoner on the 29th of June, 1l. 5s.—he gave me a receipt—this is Mr. Cole's bill, and he receipted it—I paid him on the 6th of July, 1l. 4s. 9d.—both they bills receipted by him.

JOHN COLES re-examined. He did not account to me for the receipt of these—this lady changed her cook, the new cook came to the shop and brought the money for other bills that she had, and then this was discovered, and I had the prisoner taken—he had not left my service—I asked him if these were his receipts—he said, "Yes"—I asked him what he had done with the money—he said he had lost it—I told him I did not believe it—he then said he had taken it to pay his mother's funeral expenses—he has been in our service two years, his father died

soon after he came, and his mother about three weeks after his father—he had 17s. a-week.

JOHN NASH . I am a police-constable. I took the prisoner—he said on his way to the station-house, "I am very sorry I did take it to pay for burying my mother"—I found 1l. 10s. on him—he said he should have returned it—he had left two sovereigns at the prosecutor's before I went there.

GUILTY . Aged 22.—Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor.

Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1883

1883. SUSAN DENTON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, 2 spoons, value 7s.; 3 blankets, value 12s.; 4 pillow-cases, value 5s.; 2 pillows, value 6s.; 1 bolster, value 5s.; 1 sheet, value 5s.; and 1 napkin, value 1s.; the goods of Richard Billett Chavell, her master.

RICHARD BILLETT CHAVELL . I am employed by the Mendicity Society. The prisoner was my servant of all work—she had been with me three months—I am married—I missed this property on the 19th of July—I had information—I called her into the parlour, and asked her whether she had not taken some clothing out to pledge—she was confused, and I saw she had a parcel in her hand—I snatched it out of her hand, and found twenty-four duplicates of my own things, and some others.

THOMAS ANDREWS . I am in the employ of a pawnbroker in Theorbald's-road. I have some blankets, sheets, tea-spoons, and pillows, pawned by the prisoner in the name of Rising.

WILLIAM OSBORN . I am a police-sergeant. I took the prisoner—she confessed to taking the things—the duplicates were delivered over to me—I found fourteen duplicates at her lodgings, I believe, of her own things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. If he had given me time, I would have got them out.

GUILTY . Aged 41.—Recommended to mercy By the Prosecutor.

Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1884

1884. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Luccock, from his person.

JOHN LUCCOCK . I live in Caroline-street, Whitechapel, and am a seafaring man. On the 30th of July, I was in Whitechapel, about a quarter past four o'clock, and this young rascal made a snatch at my pocket—my mistress said, "There is some one at your pocket"—I said, "It is a piece of nonsense"—I went on till I came opposite Mr. May's—I then felt something at my pocket—I turned, and caught the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand.

WILLIAM HOMER . I am a police-constable. I was called to take the prisoner and the handkerchief—in taking him to the station-house, he was rescued from me by a gang of thirty or forty—I took one of them to Spitalfields station-house.

GUILTY . Aged 13.— Transported For Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1885

1885. WILLIAM HARVEY and MARY JAMES were indicted of stealing, on the 27th of July, 2 shirts, value 3s.; the goods of Charles Digby: and 1 shirt, value 2s.; the goods of David Eady.

DAVID EADY . I live at Hampton. I lost this property from Teddington—I am a labourer at Mr. Day's—I never saw either of the prisoners till the day I was at Brentford—Charles Digby is a carter—he is in the service of Mr. Webb—I had one shirt which I took there to be washed.

MARTHA EADY . I am sister to David Eady. I wash for him and Digby—I had two shirts for Digby, and one for my brother—I washed them on the 27th of July, and hung them out on a hedge at three o'clock in the afterrnoon, not in the road—it was on Mr. Webb's farm—I missed them about four o'clock—these are them.

THOMAS CHESTERMAN . I was present when the prisoner was taken by Stewart the patrol.

ROBERT STEWART . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 27th of July, Digby came to my house, and stated his washer-woman had lost three shirts—he told me which road to go—I went, and found the two prisoners at Hounslow, about six o'clock in the evening—I found two shirts on the man, and one on the woman—they had been at a public-house a few minutes before, but had just left it—they were going towards Teddington—Chesterman assisted me in taking them.

CHARLES DIGBY . Two of these shirts are mine—I saw the two prisoners on the premises where they were drying, close by where these things were taken from, they hung on a hedge against the farm, not near the footpath—I am sure the two prisoners were there, and there was another man and woman—I have seen the prisoners before at Twickenham—I had known them five or six years.

HARVEY— GUILTY .* Aged 17.

JAMES— GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1886

1886. CHARLES PIKE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August, 2 planes, value 4s.; 1 hammer, value 1s.; the goods of John Mardon: 1 basket, value 1s.; and 2 gimblets, value 6d.; the goods of Henry Perks.

HENRY PERKS . I am a carpenter. On the 3rd of August, I left my tools at Mr. Berkley's shop, in Gray's-inn-lane, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, under the bench against the window, in the front shop.

THOMAS BANFIELD . I live in that house, and am a tailor. About ten minutes past eight o'clock I was in the back place, and saw the prisoner through the slit of the door, he made a dart into the shop, and fetched out a basket of tools as light as he could—I made after him, and took him in Liquorpond-street—I said, "Is this your property?"—he said, "No;" and dropped it, and took to his heels—I caught him and brought him back to the basket—I did not know him before.

THOMAS SAVORY . I am a police-constable. I took the prisoner, and have the property.

HENRY PERKS . These gimblets are mine—the other tools are my master's, Mr. John Mardon's.

(The prisoner pleaded poverty, and received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 49.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Confined Five Days.

Reference Number: t18360815-1887

1887. JOHN THOMAS and IRELAND PITTS BELL were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August, 3 stone bottles, value 1s.; 1 gallon of turpentine, value 6s.; and 1 1/2 gallons of oil, value 5s.; the goods of George Urling Clark and another.

HENRY JOSEPH DURIEN . I am in the service of George Urling Clark and Frederick Clark, oilmen, in Holywell-street, Shoreditch. On the 11th of August, I had been serving a customer with the articles stated in the indictment—the porter placed them at the door—I was making out the invoice, and then I missed them—Thomas had come to the house with a waggon loaded with brimstone, under the pretence of assisting the waggoner to unload—he loitered about, and then I missed the goods—I told the policeman to look for him—I went myself to Norton Falgate, and there I found Bell, with the bottles standing at his feet—Thomas went and lifted them on his shoulder, and they went on towards Bishopsgate-street—I told the policeman, whom I met coming back, saying he could not find them; and we took them, with the property, about twenty-five minutes after I missed it.

Bell. Q. Did you see me near the house at all? A. No; you were 150 or 200 yards from the shop, with the bottles at your feet, when I first saw you.

JAMES HAYWARD . I am a policeman. I have heard what the witness has stated—it is true.

Bell's Defence. I was going towards White Lion-street—I met this young man, with the three bottles on his shoulder—he asked me to take care of them while he went a little way—I did so—in about twenty minutes he returned, and found me there with them—I had not staid two minutes longer before the policeman came up with this gentleman, and took us both into custody.

Thomas's Defence. I was desired to assist the waggoner, and after leaving the shop, a man asked me to help him up with the bottles, and I was directly taken.

THOMAS— GUILTY . Aged 24.

BELL— GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1888

1888. EDMUND KELL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 seal, value 1l.; 1 watch-key, value 15s.; 1 spilt-ring, value 4s.; and 1 watch-ribbon, value 6d.; the goods of Joseph Heath, from his person.

JOSEPH HEATH . I am not in any business. I live in Baker-street, Pentonville. On the 4th of August, just after twelve o'clock at night, I was in Gray's-inn-lane—a man ran against me—I thought it was the effect of an accident, but almost immediately found I had lost my watch and its appendages—the next morning I went to the different pawnbrokers, and at one I heard the seal had been offered to know if it was gold—I gave information.

JAMES BLAND . I live with Mr. Jones, a pawnbroker in Holborn. I produce the watch, pledged on the 5th of August, for 2l. 16s.—it was not by the prisoner—it was a stouter man than he was.

WILLIAM HUBBARD . I am a waiter and messenger to Mr. Stone, of the Cobham's Head, at the corner of Coppice-row. I know the prisoner—on the Friday morning, 5th of August, I saw the prisoner, five minutes before eight o'clock—he said, "I thought I had found a prize, but I am afraid it is not"—I said, "What is it?"—he said, "I picked up a seal, but I don't think it is gold; I will sell it for 1s."—I gave him 1s. for it—I cleaned it up, and took it over to Mr. Cordell—he said,

"There has been a gentleman robbed last evening or early this morning", and he asked me to go to the station-house—I went, and gave up the seal—they wanted to detain me—I said they had no occasion, as I could find the man in two minutes, which I did, and took the prisoner.

THOMAS HODGE . I am a policeman. I took the seal and ring from the pawnbroker—I then detained Hubbard till he produced the man that he said he had it of—he brought the prisoner—I took him to the station-house, searched him, and found the duplicate of the watch in his watch-pocket, and 2l. 3s. 7 1/4d.—this is the duplicate of the watch, which was pledged in Holborn—the ribbon, which the prosecutor swears to, was in the prisoner's coat pocket—when I came to his watch-pocket, he said, "Now, old man, you have got it; I had the watch".

JOSEPH HEATH . This is my seal and my watch—there was a gold key, but that has disappeared—the ribbon I believe is mine.

Prisoner to WM. HUBBARD. Q. Had you not a club supper at your house that night? A. Yes—I cannot say the time when I came out of the tap-room, nor whether you stood there till a quarter to one o'clock—we had not less than 120 people to wait on—I was running up and down—it was impossible for me to know who was in the parlour, or who at the door, or in the tap-room.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday morning, between the hours of four and five, I was passing along the fields leading from Calthorpe-street to Bagwells road, by the wall of the House of Correction; and in a corner where there is a water-course, I saw the watch. I picked it up, and at the time thought I was committing no crime in so doing. I afterwards went to the Cobham's Head, to clean some knives and forks for the pot-boy. I informed him that I had found a seal, he then asked me if I wished to sell it, and what I wanted for it; I said I would leave the price with him: and I solemnly declare at that time, I thought it was only metal—he offered me a shilling for it, saying it was as much as he could afford—I let him have it. At the time I found the watch, I was in the deepest distress, having been out of work for twelve months, and having a wife and seven children entirely dependent on me. I did, I must confess, pledge the watch for 2l. 16s.

GUILTY . Aged 46.— Transported For Fourteen Years.

OLD COURT. Friday, August 19th.

Third Jury, before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18360815-1889

1889. GEORGE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 brooch, value 2s. 6d.; 2 collars, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 1 towel, value 2d.; and 1 yard of cotton, value 6d., the goods of Charles Daniel Loveday.

AUGUSTUS FISK . I am assistant to Charles Daniel Loveday, a pawnbroker in St. Alban's-place, Edgeware-road. On the 5th of August, the prisoner came to the shop to pledge book for 18d.—I would only advance 1s., and he would not take it—he went away and somebody came and said he had taken a handkerchief—I went out and overtook him about twenty yards off, carrying a bag—I asked him to open his bag, he refused—a young man came out of our shop, and then he gave the handkerchief up to me—we let him go, and on returning we missed two parcels which were afterwards found in his bag.

Prisoner. I was at that time in a state of insanity.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am assistant to Mr. Loveday. On the 5th of August, the prisoner brought a book to the shop to pawn—I went after him, and he gave me up the handkerchief—when I returned to the shop, I missed an article, and went after him again—I said, he had something more—he said he had nothing but his own—I gave him in charge, and the policeman found two of our parcels in his bag—I had no reason to suppose him insane.

DANIEL DAVIS . I am a policeman. The prisoner was given into my custody, and I found the two parcels of property in his bag.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. While I was there they abused me in a most shameful manner—a young fellow of the shop threw the parcels at me, because I refused to leave the book for 1s.—I had witnesses here yesterday to prove I was mad.

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Transported for Seven Years.

There were two other indictments against the prisoner

Reference Number: t18360815-1890

1890. JAMES ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing on the 18th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Claude Nicholas Olivier, from his person.

CLAUDE NICHOLAS OLIVIER . I am an accountant. On Saturday, 18th of August, I was passing through St. James's-square about a quarter past one o'clock, towards Pall-Mall, on the south side—I felt something pull at my pocket—my handkerchief was in my pocket, and a newspaper folded upon the handkerchief—feeling the pull at my pocket, I turned round and saw the prisoner about a pace or two from me, just turning and going—I immediately turned and went after him—I overtook him a few yards further on and secured him, and he immediately produced my handkerchief—I took it from him—he said he had done nothing; I said, "Why you have taken my handkerchief out of my pocket"—he said he had never seen my handkerchief, and had never given it to me—he hung by the rails and would not move—I sent for a policeman, and gave him in charge—there was nobody else near me.

Prisoner. Q. Was not your handkerchief laying down by the rails? A. No—the newspaper did not come out—it was the obstruction made me feel the handkerchief taken.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported For Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1891

1891. JOHN LOCK was indicted for embezzlement, to which he pleaded

GUILTY Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1892

1892. RICHARD HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 1 pig, value 3l., the property of Elizabeth Bowling.

ELIZABETH BOWLING . I am a widow, and live in London-street, Ratcliff. I turned a pig out, on the 4th of August, in an open field at the back of my house, at near eight o'clock in the morning, and about two o'clock the policeman brought it to me—I knew it to be mine by marks on it.

PETER THOMPSON . I live in London-street. This pig weighed about twenty stone—I was coming from White Horse-street, and saw the prisoner going up Commercial-road, driving the pig before him—he had a string in his hand, and was throwing stones at it, and whipping it with the string—I

watched him, knowing it was not his own, and followed him till I met a policeman—I told him, and he followed him—he stopped him, and asked if it belonged to him—he said no, a man had given him a pint of beer to drive it to the bottom of the street—he was 600 or 700 yards from the prosecutrix's house.

JOHN FRESHWATER . I am a policeman. Thompson pointed the prisoner out to me—I spoke to him, and he said a man gave him a pot of beer to drive it to the bottom of the street—I asked if he could point the man out—he said, "No, he could not"—I saw the Magistrate's clerk write down what the prisoner said—no threat or promise was held out to him—I know Mr. Broderip's signature—I believe this to be his writing (read) "The prisoner says what the policeman says is true—coming along Commercial-road, just beyond the turnpike, a man called me off the pavement, and asked me to earn a pint of beer, and said, Just drive the pig down any of those turnings by the wooden palings, and wait till I come".

Prisoner's Defence. I told them the truth. I work at the West India Docks—coming along the road I saw a man who gave me a drop of beer to take the pig down the turning beyond the turnpike—I said I would—I asked him what I was to drive it with—he said, "Pick up a few stones and chuck at it, and she will go along".

GUILTY . Aged 42.— Confined Six Months.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1893

1893. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying John Murnan.

GEORGE PHILIP GILL . I am a surgeon, and live at Uxbridge. On Friday, the 15th of July, at about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was called on, to see the person of John Murnan, at his lodging, at about ten minutes after a scuffle had occurred—I found him perfectly dead—on the Monday following I examined the body—I opened it, and examined every part of it carefully—I found he had an enormously enlarged heart, which subjected him, at any time, from violent excitement, to sudden death—the conclusion I arrived at was, that the man died most certainly from the violence used.

Q. Supposing he had been in a struggle with another man, and thereby became excited, would that produce what you found? A. No, that was the result of previous long-standing disease—the heart was between three or four times its natural size—that is a very advanced state of disease, so much so, that I believe, in only one instance, has a heart been seen of larger growth—he would be very liable, in the least state of excitement, to die suddenly—he died suddenly of excitement, coupled with the violence of pressing on his chest—I did not see any external marks of violence on the chest.

CHARLOTTE MURNAN . I am the widow of John Murnan. He died on the 15th of July—I live in Tollit's-court, Uxbridge—my husband used to attend the markets—when he came home that day, I went with him to the prisoner, who stood by the side of the cart—he used to attend the market—my husband offered him 1s. 6d., and 2s. was what he charged—he refused to take 1s. 6d.—my husband asked me if I had 6d., and I gave him 1s.—he paid Brown the 2s.—he afterwards went on the pavement and asked for his goods out of the cart—Brown gave him the pictures out of the cart, and we took a box out of the back part of the cart, and directly afterwards he came up to my husband on the pavement, and struck him in the face.

Q. Had there been any words before that? A. He kept calling him a blackguard, and said he was no man, and kept swearing at him—my husband said, "I have often been with you before to-night, and never had an angry word before, and do not let us have words now"—my husband did not use any angry words to him till after he was struck—I was persuading him to go home, and not say any thing to him, and the prisoner struck me a blow on the forehead—I cannot say whether it was intended for me—directly afterwards he struck him another blow, and knocked him into the road, and he was endeavouring to get up—I do not know who fell first—they were both down, and Brown knelt on him—as soon as began kneeling on him, my husband gave a scream, and directly afterwards he cried out, and said, "Do not bite me," and directly afterwards, he cried out, "He is biting me"—he gave another scream and that was all I heard—somebody came and tried to pull Brown off—I cannot say who pulled him off, but Norton was the first gentleman I took notice of, coming and and asking me what was the matter—my husband was carried home, which was not many yards off—he was dead when he was taken up to the house—I never saw him move or speak after he gave the scream, but they kept me from him as much as they could.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Are you quite sure that you saw the transaction between your husband and Brown? A. Yes—I came down to help him with the goods—there were several persons present, but I did not notice them—one rode home with him in a cart from Brentford—I did not see my husband take a stick to strike Brown—he never had one in his hand—there was a man named Codon standing behind him with a stick—I did not see my husband try to take it from him—my husband and the prisoner had been acquainted about eight or nine months, being in the market together—the worst my husband said to him was, "This will be the last time I shall ride with you, for it does not answer me to be out and to be drinking", and he said he could go better and cheaper—the prisoner blustered and swore about it, and said he did not care—my husband had often been in Brown's cart—they used to go every Friday—I was looking at them at the time they were on the ground—I was close to them, and I endeavoured to get Brown off—Brown had got his face close to my husband's—I could not see whether he was biting him or not—I could not lift the prisoner—he was still on him—my husband had been poorly but was recovering.

HENRY NORTON . I found the deceased on the ground, dead—I heard the screams—I was about thirty yards off when I heard the first scream—I ran to the spot, hearing another scream, and the first thing I saw was the deceased lying on the ground—I attempted to lift him up, and called for assistance—I sent him home, and finding he was evidently insensible, I took the prisoner into custody—I saw nothing of the quarrel.

JAMES TAVENDOR . I saw the Brown walk up to the deceased, and strike him once in the face, and as they struggled both together, they fell down in the road—Brown was undermost, but being strong and powerful, he got from under the deceased, and knelt upon his body with both knees—and beat him about the head with both his fists while the deceased was on the ground, on his back—and after a little time, I heard the deceased cry out, "Oh, he bites me"—at that time, Brown's mouth was down on the man's face—he then cried out again, "He bites me," and after that he gave a scream, and I heard no more.

Cross-examined. Q. How far off were you? A. About three yards—I live about thirty yards from the deceased—we were only neighbours together, not acquaintances—I heard Brown say, "I will give it to him", and he went up and gave him a smack in the face, but that did not hit him down—they struggled together and fell down—I am a shoemaker—I was examined before the Coroner.

COURT. Q. Was the deceased older or younger than the prisoner? A. I cannot tell—Brown was the strongest man by a good deal.

JAMES MESSER . I was sitting in the Falcon, public-house, close to the window—a cart drove up facing the window, and I saw the prisoner and the deceased get out—they had a few words together—I did not particularly notice what they were—I saw the prisoner strike the deceased a blow in the face—the deceased had left the cart before that, but did not have to go away any distance—his house was about fifty yards off—after the prisoner struck him, they struggled, and both rolled in the road together—I saw the deceased struggling very hard to get up—I ran out of the house to assist him, and when I got there the prisoner was kneeling on him—I assisted in getting him off the deceased—I took the deceased off the ground, and he appeared to be lifeless—as I was carrying him home, he gave a very severe struggle and expired.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw the beginning of it? A. Yes—I saw him get out of the cart—there were three persons in the cart.

JAMES HAYWARD . I saw the men standing at the Falcon door, having words about a sixpence, I believe—Brown then struck at the deceased on the pavement, and followed him into the road—they closed, and both fell together in the road—Brown being much stronger, he got the deceased underneath him—the other said, "He is pinching me," or "bitting me," I do not know which—the prisoner then got away from him, and went towards the cart, which stood at the Falcon door—Mr. Norton said somebody must go for a constable, for the man was dead, and the prisoner was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. How near were you to them? A. Close to them—Brown did not knock him down with a blow—they seemed as if they had been drinking—Brown was very much in drink, more so than the other—I cannot say whether the deceased was in liquor—they were abusive on both sides about their country—they were both Irishmen—I believe one called the other a Munster man.

JAMES CONLON . I went with them that morning in the cart to market—we got wet in the afternoon, and we got into Beaconsfield and drank—by the time we arrived at Uxbridge, Brown was very fresh indeed—the deceased had taken part of the beer all day, but was not so far gone as Brown—I heard the commencement of the quarrel—the deceased tendered 18d. to Brown—he refused it—the deceased said he would pay him the other 6d., and it would be the last time he would ride in his cart again, for he never was satisfied—he said he could ride for a good deal less round the market than he paid Brown—Brown said, "You can't; with whom? you can't ride round the market for what I charge you"—he said, "With a neighbour, a man down the hill"—Brown said, "Well, you may ride with whom you like; you are only a Munster man"—the deceased replied, "A Munster man is as good as a Dublin jackeen"—Brown repeated the word that he would not take a Munster man again—I was between them, and begged them to drop the conversation, and the deceased took hold of my stick—he slipped it out of my hand, and I took it away from him—he did

not strike with it—he gave it me back again—a few words occurred again, and Brown repeated that he would not carry any Munster man again in his cart, and deceased made a second attempt to get the stick—his goods were lying on the curb, and his wife was standing by at the time—I begged of them to go home peaceably—I got hold of one of his bundles, and said, "Come, let us go home;" and I said to his wife, "Bring John home"—I turned away about four yards, and when I turned round they were in a scuffle in the street, but I saw no blows struck—that is all I know—I picked up his property, which was scattered about.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him die? A. I followed him to his house, and kept the goods there—I took the stick from the deceased the first time—he gave it back to me willingly—he had slipped it out of my hand—that was while they were disputing and casting up about the country—Brown said, "Are you going strike me, John?"—"Bill, "said he, "if I was man enough for you, I would"—I took the stick away, and begged them to go home peaceably—they had been good friends before—I did not know any body so friendly—the prisoner has a wife and family—he was always considered a peaceable man if he had not a drop of beer—no man is more respected in the market then he is.

GEORGE PHILIP GILL re-examined. Q. You have heard the account given of death—that the two man were struggling on the ground, and that the prisoner knelt on the body of the deceased—dose that lead you to any conclusion respecting the cause of his death? A. The excitement, coupled with the weight of the man kneeling on him, would certainly produce death, I should say—I could not distinguish between his own passion and excitement, and the mischief produced—his death might be produced by either cause—at first there would be a too rapid circulation of the blood, and then a stoppage—I found no rupture of the vessel—there was a slight rupture of the membrane of the brain, but not of sufficient extent to cause death—I found no other cause of death than the stoppage of blood at the heart.

Cross-examined. Q. Would not the excitement, being in a passion and quarrelling with another, produce the rapid circulation of blood which in such a state would end in death? A. Most probably—the excitement of passion alone might cause his death.

COURT Q. It might be produced either by the excitement from passion or the violence? A. Yes—I cannot say which—when I first saw him he had a mark on the right eye, which appeared to arise from a blow—there were no marks on the chest.

ROBERT NORTON . I am a surgeon. I examined the body with Mr. Gill—he had an enlargement of the heart, which disorder was very likely, on any sudden excitement, to cause death—it is quite impossible to say whether the excitement producing his death was from his own struggle, exertion, and passion, or from violence used by the other, either would do it.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1894

1894. EDWARD SPITTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July, at St. Marylebone, 21 spoons, value 13l.; 12 forks, value 8l.; 1 tea-pot, value 12l.; 1 cream jug, value 4l. 10s.; 1 butter-knife, value 1l.; 5s.; 1 pair of sugar tongs, value 1l. 5s.; 2 salt-cellars, value 4l.; 1 fruit knife, value 5s.; and 2 seals, value 10s.; the goods of Juliana Stratford Mariana Eyre, his mistress, in her dwelling-house.

HON. JULIANA STRATFORD MARIANA EYRE . I live at No. 34, Cumberland-street, Bryanston-square. The prisoner came into my employ as footman on the 16th of May—on the morning of the 17th I put my place in his care, and gave him a list of it, which I have here—it consisted of the property stated in the indictment—in consequence of something which occurred he gave me warning on the 9th of July to leave me in a month—on the morning of the 14th I came down to breakfast, with my watch in my hand, at a quarter before eleven o'clock—there were no breakfast things set, only table-cloth was on the table, and on inquiry I found he had left—I went down to his pantry with my landlord, who happened to be in the house—I found the door locked, and the window fast—I caused the door to be opened, and every thing was gone except the plated articles.

Prisoner. I was told by my fellow-servants I should be discharged as soon as she came down to breakfast—I wish to know whether she had not a key of the pantry as well as myself? Witness. I had not a key of the pantry—my landlord tried the key of the housekeeper's room, and that opened it, but I did not know it would do so before—I did not see the prisoner again till he was in custody—I found his list on the dresser when he was gone, and he has indorsed on the back of it the date on which he gave me warning.

ELLEN CASAY . I am cook to Miss Eyre. The last time I saw the prisoner was about nine o'clock in the morning—he went out, and said he was going to get a bill receipted at the fishmonger's, to give mistress—he did not say he was going away—the pantry door was locked—he never went up to answer the street door without locking his pantry—none of the plate was left in the house.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not told in your presence that I should be discharged as soon as my mistress came down to breakfast? Witness. A. you were not—I never heard it—I did not hear the lady's maid say so—you asked me about a laundress, and said you might as well take some things to be washed, as you were going out.

GEORGE FINDLAY . I am policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of August, but found nothing on him—the plate has never been found.

Prisoner's Defence. The lady's maid told me I should be discharged.

MISS EYRE re-examined. The tea-pot was worth much more than 5l.—I could not replace it for 15l.

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Transported For Life.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1895

1895. JAMES SLATER, CHARLOTTE SLATER , and ELIZABETH FARRELL were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Langan, on the 10th of July, at St. Ann's, Westminster, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 2s. 6d.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 6d.; 1 waistcoat, value 4d.; 1 pair of braces, value 2d.; 1 shirt, value 1s. 6d.; 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence; the goods and monies of James Rooney, since deceased: and 1 coat, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Brooks.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a policeman. On Sunday, the 10th of July, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Broad-street, going towards Edward-street, and saw the three prisoners coming towards me—I had seen the man before—Charlotte Slater had something

in her apron—I stopped her, and the other two passed me—I opened the apron, and asked what she had there—she said her husband's clothes, pointing towards Slater—I laid hold of the coat, and said it was impossible it could be his coat, it was too large, and I called to a man to take take care of her while I went after the other two, and at the bottom of Edward-street I saw James Slater turn to the left, and the female to the right, down Berwick-street—I sent Farrant after Slater while I went after Farrell and took her—I asked her what she had in her bundle, which was paper, she had in her hand—she said, "A bit of calico"—I asked her how many yards—she said, "Two and a half"—I asked her where she got it—she said, "From home"—she afterwards said she bought it at Sewell and Cross's—I asked what she gave for it—she said, "9d. a yard"—I found at the station-house that it was a made-up shirt—she had two latch-keys, which I have tried to the prosecutor's street-door, and one of them will open it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did not Farrell tell you she had received what she had from the other girl? A. Not when I took her—she did afterwards at the station.

THOMAS FARRANT . I am a policeman. I was in company with Hobbs—I went after James Slater—I came up to him, and told him he must go back with me—he asked what for—I said I would take him to where the females were who had the clothes—he said he knew nothing about the clothes or them, and he would break my head if I touched him—I took him to Edward-street, and from there to the station-house—I found a large key of a street door on him, which I found was the key of his lodging—I told him the females were stopped with the clothes, and I would take him to them—he said knew nothing about any young women, and he had not been in Edward-street—at the station-house he spoke to the prisoner Slater, and after that she said the clothes had been given to her by a man who owed her some money—he had told her to hold her tongue—I then asked her how she became possessed of the clothes—she said a man owed her 5s., and had given her the clothes till he could pay her, and she gave the other girl the shirt.

Cross-examined. Q. Of course you considered that material? A. I thought it right to be known—I stated it before the Magistrate on the first hearing, but I am not certain wether it was down in the deposition—I signed my deposition—I will swear I mentioned it—I do not know that it was not in my deposition.

THOMAS BROOKS . At the time of the robbery, I lived in King-street, Soho. I was very late on Saturday night when I came in—the man belonging to the things was very much addicted to liquor, and I did not like him to have the key—when I came home, I did not lock the door, but merely shut it to—I went to bed immediately, and deceased man in another bed—I went to sleep, and never awoke till the man awoke me in a state of distraction—I put on some of my clothes—I looked about and found my coat was gone—I had no other to put on—I went into the street in my shirt-sleeves—I saw my coat again at Marlborough-street—I never saw the prisoners till they were at the office—this is my coat—it happened on Sunday morning, the 10th of July, before two o'clock in morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the house you live in a common lodging-house? A. It is a cook's-shop, and they take in lodgers—there is only one room for lodgers.

THOMAS HOBBS re-examined. The place where I met the prisoners was I suppose 300 or 400 yards from King-street, Soho.

Slater's Defence. I had been out with a very old acquaintance, and was proceeding up Drury-lane and met the two females—both of them had a parcel—I was going with one of them—I was about four yards before Slater, when the policeman passed me, and at the end of Old Compton-street, he came to me and asked me if I had been with two girls—I said I had, and he said I must go the station-house—I was asked if Slater was not my wife, and I said she was not.

(The prisoners Charlotte Slater and Farrell received a good character.)

SLATER— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

SLATER— GUILTY . Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

FARRELL— GUILTY Aged 19.— Confined Two Months.

Of Stealing only.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1896

1896. ALFRED LOFTY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Adam Lodge, at the Middle Temple, on the 9th of July, and stealing therein, 1 watch, value 20l.; 1 guard-chain, value 5l.; and 1 watch-key, value 2s.; his goods.

ADAM LODGE, ESQ . I am barrister, and have chambers in Brick-court, Middle Temple. I lost one of the keys of my chamber-door about ten weeks ago—there were only two in the chambers instead of three—on Friday, the 8th of July, when I got up in the morning, I missed my purse which I thought I had left on my sitting-room table first—next morning the 9th of July, when I awoke I missed my watch, generally hung in my bed room—if I do not put it there, I leave it on the table in my sitting room—there was a guard-chain to it—the watch cost 35 guineas—the chain is worth about 5l. The prisoner was in the service of Mr. Ombler, on the same floor—the door of my chambers and his are opposite—in consequence of suspicions, I went into Mr. Ombler's chambers with a constable about half-past ten o'clock—we met Mr. Ombler on the stairs, and stated the circumstance—we knocked at the door—the prisoner opened it, and Mr. Ombler said, "Do you know of Mr. Lodge having lost any thing?"—he said knew nothing about it—Mr. Ombler said, "I shall think it necessary to search you, have the goodness to walk into your room"—we walked there—he continued to protest he knew nothing about it—I do not think it was mentioned what I had lost—Mr. Ombler searched his person all over, and I saw a box in the corner of the room, into which I looked—the very first thing that met my eye was the watch, with the face turned down, and the dial-plate quite black with the marks of dirty fingers—close to that I found my watch-key, and the key of my chambers, which I had lost about three weeks before—when I held up the watch before the prisoner, he said, "I found it on the staircase near your door."

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Were the three keys to your door similar in appearance? A. Yes—I cannot tell which key I missed—I was the last person that went into my chambers the night before, and am positive I fastened the outer door—I am quite certain I left my watch on the sitting room table—the sitting room joins the bed room, and I slept with my

bed room door open—it remained open till I got up in the morning—there were marks of fingers on the door—I had not been disturbed at all.

ANN MARTIN . I am laundress to Mr. Lodge. I went to his chambers at eight o'clock this morning—the outer door was fast, I opened it with my key—the bed-room door was open, it was always left open—I did not see the watch.

EDWARD OMBLER, ESQ . I am a barrister. The prisoner was in my service about eighteen months—I have heard Mr. Lodge's evidence, it is correct.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am a policeman. I was sent for to take the prisoner in charge, and have the watch and guard-chain.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.— Transported For Life.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1897

1897. HENRY SMITH and ANN SMITH were indicted of feloniously receiving, of a certain evil-disposed person, on the 8th of February, 1835, 19 shirts, value 8l. 10s.; 4 cravats, 20 collars, value 10s.; 3 petticoats, value 3s. 6d.; 3 shifts, value 6s.; 20 pairs of stockings, value 20s.; 6 caps, 6s.; 2 night-gowns, value 4s. 3 table-cloths, value 12s. 20 napkins, value 20s.; 2 habit-shirts, value 6s.; 1 shirt-front, value 1s.; and 1 collar, value 3s.; the goods of Ann Ireland, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

ANN IRELAND . I am a laundress, and live in Clerkenwell. On the 17th of February, 1835, I left some linen, which was intrusted to me to wash, safe—and on the morning of the 18th, when I got up, it was gone—all the best articles were taken—the value of the whole was about 13l.—one shirt was discovered, pawned in Whitecross-street, about a fortnight or three weeks after the robbery—I have only recovered a few trifling articles—I have discovered some of them within this month or five weeks—the prisoners lived next door but one to me at the time of the robbery, and did not remain a month after—I believe I mentioned that before the Justice—I do not know whether they are man and wife.

WILLIAM WEST . I am in the employment of William Smith, a pawnbroker in Lower-street, Islington. I know the prisoners as customers to our shop—I have a pair of stockings, which were pawned on the 17th of August, 1835, a shift and bed-gown on the 22nd of September, another shift and bed-gown on the 23rd—a table-cloth on the 15th of November—a table-cloth on the 31st of December, and two shifts on the 31st of May, 1836—I cannot positively say who they were pawned by—I took part of them in myself—I cannot say from whom, it is so long since—I have the tickets—some of them are pawned in the name of Ann Bayley—I have a strong belief it was the prisoners—but I could not positively swear it—they have been in the habit of pawning things at our house during that period.

Ann Smith. The pawnbroker makes a mistake in the name of the ticket—Baylis it should be—that is my proper name—I bought the tickets of the things pawned in the name of Baylis. Witness. We have a customer named Baylis—I have all the articles here.

HENRY WARDE . I was in the service of Mr. Goodburn, High-street, Islington. I know the prisoners by sight—on the 15th of March last a shirt was pawned for 2s. 6d., in the name of Ann Smith; and on the 4th of July, a petticoat, frock, and apron, in the same name—I cannot positively

swear it was the female prisoner who pawned them—I have a very strong belief of it on account of the name—I believe she is the woman, but I cannot swear it—the articles pawned on the 4th of July were by Ann Smith, for her mother.

HENRY ALLEN . I am a policeman. I took the male prisoner into custody on the 21st of July—I told him it was for robbing Mrs. Ireland, a laundress, in Clerkenwell, at the time he lived two doors from her—he was very agitated, and said, "It was not me that committed the robbery; It was a lodger of mine at the time; he told me of it the next morning, but I was afraid to give information"—I took him the station-house, and returned to the house—I found Brown searching the house—this petticoat was found in the adjoining house to the one we took him in, but which belongs to him—both houses are his, but he lived in the one I took him from—his goods were in the other, but nobody was living in it—in going to the station-house I said, I understood he had two houses—he said, yes, he had one he lived in, and the other he kept his goods in; and that made me search both houses—I do not know whether the female prisoner is his wife—when petticoat and another was produced in the adjoining house, the female prisoner was asked to account for the possession of them—she said they were given to her by a lodger, who lodged in the house at the time.

HENRY BROWN . I am a constable of Islington. I went with the policeman to one of the prisoner's houses, and searched the drawers—I found a small petticoat, which I produce—the prosecutrix claimed it—the male prisoner was gone to the station-house at the time, but the woman was in the room—I asked her how she could account for the possession of the petticoat which the daughter claimed—she said, a single man lodger gave it to her—I then found a great quantity of pawnbroker's duplicates in the drawers, in pocket-books—I asked the female prisoner whose the duplicates were—she said they were all hers—there was about eighty-four of them—I have been to the different pawnbrokers with them—we traced five—they were for linen articles—I heard the male prisoner say he knew of the robbery the next morning—I asked why he did not make himself an honest man by giving information—he said he was afraid.

Henry Smith. I do not recollect saying I knew of the robbery next morning, because it was in the evening that my wife informed me of it. Witness. He said he knew of the robbery—on going up-stairs I found two caps on the mantel-piece, which the prosecutrix's daughter identified.

ANN IRELAND, JUN . I am the prosecutrix's daughter. I lost variety of things on the 18th of February, 1835—I went with the constable to search the prisoner's house—I saw this petticoat found down stairs, in the room to goods were in, not in the house he was taken in—the petticoat was in the same drawer, and the caps were up-stairs—they were part of the things that were missing on the morning of the 18th—the two caps are my own—I made them myself—I asked the female prisoner how she came by those caps—she said, "I don't know, but we all wear them"—I can swear to some of these articles, but not to the whole of them—the marks of some of them are picked out, but I can trace them—this shift was marked "J C"—it belonged to Jane Carter.

Henry Smith's Defence. At that time I lived in Garden-walk—on the night of the robbery I came home to supper, and about ten o'clock went to bed—I had two lodgers, but did not sit up for them—I went to work next morning at seven o'clock, and when I came home in the

evening my wife informed me of the robbery, and that the officers had been and searched my place—I did not see my lodger for four or five days afterwards—I asked them where they had been—one said he had been with his father, making a pig-sty—I knew his father kept pigs—I asked him concerning the robbery—he said he knew nothing about it—about eleven months ago my lodger left me—he left me his tools in a box, and put a small quantity of duplicates in the box—he told me when he returned he would pay me my rent—I have not seen him since—some months ago my children were playing, and his box accidentally got broken, and they brought some me of the tickets—that is the way they came to my place—I have a witness to prove some of the property belongs to me.

Ann Smith's Defence. I can say no more than my husband—I know nothing about it.

ANN IRELAND re-examined. I only knew the prisoners by sight—they had children living with them—they lived there as man and wife—there is no doubt of that.

CHARLOTTE BAYLIS . These two day-shifts, this table-cloth, and these two night-shifts. I sold Mrs. Smith the duplicate of, for 3s., about two months ago, as near as I can recollect—they were given to me by Mrs. Fenning, of No. 4, Rufford's-row, where I work—the shifts were given me last July twelvemonth—they were got out when I sold the tickets—the mark has been cut out, and a piece put in, since I parted with them—they were run in the back—they are the day-shifts I know, and that is the table-cloth—this is another shift—I can only speak to the table-cloth and two shifts—the others are not the same—they are stouter calico a good deal—the prisoners lived next door to us—they lived together as man and wife, and have five children.

ANN IRELAND, JUN ., re-examined. I do not know the articles pointed out by Baylis—I do not know the sheet—we did not lost one—I went to the pawnbrokers with the duplicates found, and recognised this shirt at Goodburns—that is one of the nineteen we lost, and a shift pawned at Smith's—here is where the mark has been picked out—I know this petticoat, which was pawned at Goodburns.

MRS. IRELAND re-examined. I know this petticoat belongs to Mrs. Beck, in Oxford-street—I washed for her—I have repeatedly washed it—it was missing on the 18th of February—I know it by the vandyke.

(The prisoners received a good character.)

HENRY SMITH— GUILTY of receiving one shirt, two caps, one shift, and three petticoats.— Confined Six Months.

ANN SMITH— NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1898

1898. STANHOPE ARMFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June, 1 canvas bag, value 6d.; 8 crowns, 16 half-crowns, 100 shillings, and 40 sixpences; the goods and monies of Thomas Kenrick.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS KENRICK . I am stable-keeper and farmer: I keep Oxgate farm; my place of business is No. 297, Oxford-street. On the 29th of June, I came to town, and received 10l. worth of silver, from Ransoms my bankers—I called the first cab on the stand by the bankers, and the prisoner came—I got into the cab, and kept the bag of money in my hand on the seat—I was directing him which way to go home—he said, "I know you Mr. Kenrick before, I will take you to your yard"—he drove me to my place—I was standing up in the cab to get 1s. to pay him, and he said, "Mind

how you get out;" which took my attention from my bag rather, he was so very polite, which made me notice him—I got out of the cab, and went down to my counting-house—I immediately recollected my bag of silver, and ran out to look for the cab man, but he was gone—I caught sight of him—he went like lightning round Woodstock-street—I got into a cab after making inquiry, but did not overtake him—I drove about for three hours, and went to Somerset-house twice.

Cross-examined by MR. FRENCH. Q. Are you a horse-dealer? A. Yes, I am—I noticed the horse he was driving, very particularly—it was a grey horse—I noticed the prisoner, and his face—I did not observe him do any thing when he drove down Woodstock-street, for I could scarcely see him—another man was taken up, who turned out not to be the man—I did not say he was the man—I said he was not—he was drunk, and threatened to kill me and the policeman, and that was why he was detained—I did not charge him with felony—I did not call at different places of ask if they knew any thing of this circumstance—I did not call at the prisoner's landlord's—I do not know where he lived—I do not know whether my son called—he might—I saw Mr. Lewis at Marylebone-street—I never saw him before—that was the only time I saw him, except seeing him here.

Q. When you entered the station-house, were you not obliged to tell your son to point the prisoner out to you? A. Yes; because I could not see his face, he had his back to me—I said, "Well, are you going to have this fellow up?"—I desired him to turn round, and then I knew him—my son did not tell me which was the man—he did not point him out to me—he said, "He is up here"—I went and looked in his face, and said, "O, you are the man"—but he has had his great whiskers shaved off since—I did not speak to any reporter after the investigation before the Magistrate—I do not know any of them—I went to no stable—I never charged any other man with this offence.

MR. PAYNE. Q. About what time in the day did you hire the cab? A. About a quarter before two o'clock—I arrived at my own place a minute or two before two o'clock, I believe, as near as I can say.

JAMES STILES . I am an accountant, and live in the neighbourhood of Oxford-street. On the 29th of June I was in Woodstock-street, about two o'clock, or thereabouts—I saw the prisoner driving a cab with a white horse in it, very fast indeed, which caused me to take notice of him—I observed him putting his hand back, and he had something in his hand like a bag—I am positive he is the person—I have seen him before and since.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you appear at the station-house? A. Yes—I did not describe myself as any thing but an accountant there, or before the Magistrate—I have never been in any other business—I should think he was driving at the rate of ten or twelve miles an hour—I do not particularly describe the bag—I could not help noticing the man in the cab, on account of the velocity with which he was driving, for I expected something would happen as he came into Bond-street—I have seen him driving a cab before—I swear he is the man—I lost sight of him—he had nobody in his cab—I have transacted some business for the prosecutor in my professional capacity—I had been transacting business for him on the day in question, and on arriving at his gate he seemed agitated—I asked what was the matter, and heard of this.

JAMES BROWN . I am a tailor, and live in Edward-street, Dorset-square, I know the prisoner, he lodges opposite me—I saw him in the street on the

29th of June, about half-past two o'clock, as near as I can say, with his cab—it stood at his door from that time till between five or six o'clock, and he then went away with it.

Cross-examined. Q. What was the origin of your acquaintance with Mr. Kenrick? A. I was going down the street one Sunday morning, and saw the driver of a cab, who knew me—he stopped me, and called Mr. Kenrick's son, who asked if I had seen a horse and cab in the street on the 29th of June—I believe that was about two Sundays after—he did not go into my house—he asked me to take a glass of something, as I had been going about with him, and it was a wet morning, and I had been ill—I recollect the day; for the young man came to me two days afterwards, and I was saying I thought the prisoner was out of work, as I had not seen him with his cab for two days—he made the observation to me—no, I think I made it to him.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Who is the person you had the conversation with? A. Cardwell.

WILLIAM ECKETT . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner into custody twice—he was discharged the first time, for want of evidence, as Mr. Kenrick was not there—I took him again on the 5th of August, which was about a fortnight after—he was in bed when I went up-stairs, and said, "What do you want?"—I said, "I want you for the same thing as I had you for before"—he said, in the way to the station-house, that he did not know Mr. Kenrick, nor did he ever drive him—I said I thought he worked for Mr. Kenrick—he said, "No, I never knew him"—he said nothing else—he did not say any thing about Mr. Kenrick or his yard—he said he never knew him, and never drove him.

Cross-examined. Q. When you went the first time to the prisoner's house, did you examine it? A. No; they did not request me—he disclaimed all knowledge of Mr. Kenrick—he said nothing about him the first time.

THOMAS CARDWELL . I am a cab-driver. On the 29th of June, I saw a cab standing in Dorset-street, opposite No. 40—it had a grey horse in it—it was there from about half-past two or three o'clock till about half-past six o'clock in the evening.

Cross-examined. Q. From what place did you see the horse and cab? A. Standing with the head towards where there was no thoroughfare—I was at the corner of the street—I saw the horse—I did not see Mr. Kenrick for a fortnight after—the very day it occurred, I was going along Quebec-street, and old Mr. Kenrick said, "Have not you a grey horse and cab goes out of your yard?"—I said yes, but it would not be at home till night—he said, "It is of no consequence, but I have left a bag in the cab"—he was then in pursuit of the cab—I could not swear to the horse.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you observe what state the horse was in? A. No; I do not know the prisoner.

JAMES CLARK . I am a cab-driver, and live in Taunton-mews. I was in Dorset-street, on the 29th of June, and saw a cab in Edward-street, with a grey horse in it—it sweated very much—it was about half-past two o'clock—I saw it in the same place about three hours after.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you, in Edward-street or Park-street? A. Park-street, but I went down to the horse—I saw Mr. Kenrick the same day—he asked if I knew of any horse of that description—I said yes, we had one in our yard—he did not say he should want me as a witness—I

recollect the day, for I had a summons to Guildhall the same day, and it was while I went to dinner—I have not met Mr. Kenrick and the witnesses at any public-house, to drink—I have not drank with Mr. Kenrick or his son—I did not know the horse before.

THOMAS MANSEL . I am shopman to James Porter, a pawnbroker, in Upper Park-place, Dorset-square, about a hundred yards from Edward-street. The prisoner and his wife were in the habit of pawning things with us—on the 29th of June the prisoner came to our shop between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and brought 2l. 10s. in silver, and asked me to give him two sovereigns and a half for it, which I did—his wife had before that, brought 2l. 10s. worth of silver as well—it contained half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences—I gave her gold for it—that was very near four o'clock—a few days afterwards, a female came and took some things out of pawn—she is the prisoner's wife, I believe—I cannot say the amount she paid, as I did not deliver them myself.

Cross-examined. Q. Should you know the woman if you saw her with two or three more? A. I think I should—I believe she is the prisoner's wife—she was in the habit of pawning things at our house—I recollect the circumstances very well, for the following morning a person in our shop mentioned about some silver being lost—the woman came first—I am positive of the man—a subpœna was sent to me in the name of Mr. Porter, and he was in the country, and I gave them my name—I had no communication with the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at home, and in bed at the time, through an accident from a cab wheel, at the bottom of St. James's-street—I broke my ribs, and hurt my spine and leg.

JOHN LEWIS . I have been subpœnaed for the prosecution. I employed the prisoner about four months ago, to drive for me—he came home one night, and told me he had fallen from his cab, and hurt his side and leg, and did not think he should be able to work—I do not know the date—a girl came to our house, and said he could not come—he did not come to work for about a month after that—I did not see him confined to his bed—I cannot swear whether he drove for me on the 29th of June—I think he left me some time in June, but what day, I could not swear—I have no book by which I can tell—I should say it was from the 20th to the 30th, but I cannot swear within a few days—I know old and young Mr. Kenrich—was at the office the first time the prisoner was examined, but not the last—Mr. Kenrick has not called on me.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Do you remember about the latter end of June, the prisoner complaining about the scarcity of money? A. Not particularly then—he has complained several times—when I have asked if he could not pay any more money, he has said money was very scarce—I should say that continued up to the time in question—to the best of my knowledge, he never mentioned it to me for a week or two before the accident happened—not any time in June, that I am aware of—the highest money he ever paid, was 8s. or 9s.—he was only a morning man.

COURT. Q. What was the colour of the house he drove? A. It was a gray horse. when he drove for me.

RICHARD GOLLIN . I live in Edward-street, Dorset-square, and am a carpenter and joiner. I am the prisoner's landlord—I know he was at home on the 25th of June, ill—his wife came to pay my rent on the 25th, and he was at home for several days after—I saw him at home on the 29th

of June, and for several days after that I can say he was at home ill, and did not go out at the front door for several days, that I could see—he might go out at the back door—he did not go out till a fortnight after the 25th—I saw him about the middle of the day, from twelve to one o'clock, on the 29th—he could not go out—he had a stick, and was almost double and leaning on the bannisters of the stairs—he complained of pain across his loins—Mr. Kenrick's son has called on me.

MR. PAYNE. Q. You say he began to stay at home on the 25th? A. He was at home on the 25th—that was the day he came home ill—I can tell that by the rent-book—his wife paid me the rent that day, and he always used to pay it himself—he could not have brought the cab there on the 29th, for he was ill—I never knew it there so many hours as is stated, in my life—I swear his illness began before the 29th—I do not know Mr. Brown—I was not at home all day on the 29th—I was at home at my meals—the prisoner occupied one upper room in my house, at 3s. per week—he paid his rent regularly every week—the 25th is the only time his wife ever paid it—he always paid it before—I was at home four times on the 29th—I was at home at five o'clock, but not between half-past two and five o'clock—I never saw him with a new suit clothes—I saw no fresh clothes on him at all.

COURT. Q. Who was the medical man that attended him? A. I cannot say that he had any one—I was only at home on the 29th, at breakfast, watering time, dinner and tea-time—the prisoner always wore whiskers till he was ill—I do not know when he shaved them off.

BENJAMIN WETHERALL . On the 24th of June I repaired a pair of shoes for the prisoner, which he called for about eight o'clock in the evening and paid me 3s., instead of 3s. 6d., saying it was all he had got, but as soon as he could he would pay the other 6d.

WILLIAM CARRINGTON . I was taken up for this robbery by Mr. Kenrick—I have a grey horse—when I went home I found him and the policeman in my place—directly I went in, the prosecutor said "You know me?"—I said, "Me know you?"—he said "Yes, I have known you for years, and you know me"—I told him I did not, and wanted to know what business they had—my wife said I was accused of robbing him of 10l.—they had no warrant, and I was going to put them out, and I was charged by the policeman at the station-house—they turned every thing topsyturvy—I was taken to the station-house—I am not able to swear to the charge, whether it was felony—the prosecutor brought a man to identify me at Queen-square, and said, "Is that the man?"

MR. PAYNE. Q. How long have you been a cab-driver? A. Eight years—and more—I was never in trouble—I never had any charge made against me that I know of—not for any thing dishonest—Mr. Kenrick did not say I was not the man, when he saw me—he said I was the man—I might have threatened him and the policeman; what business had they there?

COURT. Q. Were you taken to the station-house on a charge of felony, or on a charge of riot? A. I don't know—directly I went in doors, I was dragged away—Mr. Kenrick did not say, in my hearing, that I was the man who robbed him of the 10l.

WILLIAM ARMFIELD . I am the prisoner's brother. On the 24th of June, he came to my house, walking very lame and stating he was incapable of work from a fall from the dickey of his cab, and borrowed money to support himself in his sickness—I called on him several times during his sickness—I

went on the 27th, and saw him very ill and unfit for work—I did not see him after the 27th—I left him money them, to help to maintain him in his sickness.

COURT. Q. What time of the day did he call on you? A. In the evening, just against dusk—he said he had hurt his spine—I did not lend him money then, but on the 27th, when I went to his house.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined One Year.

Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18360815-1899

1899. JOHN CRIPPEN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, 2 printed books, value 8s., the goods of Edward Yerlett.

EDWARD YERLETT, JUN . I am the son of Edward Yerlett, who keeps a chandler's shop in Britannia-street, St. Pancras. On the 19th of July, I met the prisoner in the New-road reading a book, and I saw, when the shut it up and put it under his arm, that is was my father's book—I spoke to him, and when I got home I asked my father where his receipt-book was—he could not find it, and I mentioned what I had seen—the prisoner was in the habit of frequenting our house—it was a family receipt-book—on the evening of the same day the prisoner came to the shop while I was in the parlour, and waited about twenty minutes, and just as he went out we missed a "Sacred Biography" from a shelf which he could reach—I followed him and found it under his coat.

ELIZA WINTER . I live in Britannia-row, St. Pancras. I was at Mr. Yerlett's shop the evening the prisoner came—I saw the book under his coat, and he left the shop with it.

MICHAEL LANE . I am a bookseller, and have a stand at No. 20, in the New-road. I bought a receipt-book of the prisoner on the 19th of July, for 2s., knowing he was a bookseller, and in the habit of selling books—it was not very cheap, as if was imperfect.

THOMAS HEWETT (police-constable E 159.) I produce a "Sacred Biography," which was delivered to me.

EDWARD YERLETT . I know these books to be mine—I never authorized the prisoner to take them.

Prisoner. Q. Have not I many times moved books from your shelves, and sold them, and returned you the money three or four days afterwards? A. Not within this twelvemonth—I have had no quarrel with him about a license—he never travelled with my license—a person, about two years ago, who was in the book-way, that I travelled for, he and I together travelled with that person's license, but not with mine—I never had a license in my own name, to my knowledge, since I have known the prisoner—it is nine or ten years ago—I travelled for a man named Curtis, who had the license in his own name—I let the prisoner have that—he was out with me some time—when one person employs another, and they take out a license in their own name, by indorsing it, it entitles them to travel in that name, and it was indorsed by Curtis.

Prisoner. Several days we travelled together, and many days I travelled by myself, till a policeman asked me to look at my license—he said, "Is your name Crippen?"—I said, "Yes"—he said, "Show me your license"—it had Curtis' name on it—when I said Curtis was not my employer, the policeman said, "Don't continue to travel under the license; you are liable to a fine;" and then I gave it up—I was held in degradation by both of them—it is all spite against me—he lent me his license to go out several

times by myself, from morning to night. Witness. Yes, he has been out alone, but it has nothing to do with the case—I am not prejudiced against him—he has been several times to eat and drink at my house, but he has not sold books for me for the last twelvemonth—he merely came backwards and forwards out of friendship—I had forbidden him to sell for me, and he went away altogether into Devonshire.

GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18360815-1900

1900. WILLIAM LOUTH was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August, 1 hat, value 6s., the goods of John Piddington.

JOHN PIDDINGTON . I am a labourer to Mr. John Parker, of Hampstead, On the 2nd of August, I was at the Cock and Hoop, until nearly ten o'clock—I pulled off my coat and hat, to play at bowls, and missed them when I was going away—I had seen the prisoner in the bowling-green.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Had you been drinking at the public-house? A. Yes; I was there between two and three o'clock in the afternoon until after ten o'clock—I did not drink a great deal—I had not gone out into the road at all till I left—I will swear I did not drop my but in the road—I do not swear I was quite sober—I will not positively swear it might not drop outside.

JAMES THOMAS . I am a policeman. Hearing this hat was taken, I met the prisoner, about half past one o'clock, in Westend-lane, Hampstead, with he hat tied in a handkerchief under his arm—I asked him what he had got—he said, "A hat"—I said, "Where did you get it?"—he said he found it on the side of the road—I asked him where he had been since eleven o'clock at night, when I had seen him—he said he was lying asleep on the side of the road—but I know that was false, as I had gone down the road six times—on the way to the station-house he asked me to let him ease himself, which he did; and when the buttoned his breeches up, he made a start and ran away—I ran and caught him, and he tried to slip out of his jacket to get off again—I then knocked him down, and had him secured—I found him about a hundred and fifty yards from the public-house—he had a hat on his head besides.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been playing at bowls, and got a good deal of beer—I sat down to rest, and fell asleep on the road side, when I awoke I was very cold, and thought I would go to the house and ask for a bed for the night—the publican was in bed, and as I came back again, the hat was on the road side—I took it up, and met the policeman, who asked what I had there—I said, "I found it on the road side."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1901

1901. ELIZABETH JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July, 1 ring, value 14s., the goods of John Webb, from his person.

JOHN WEBB . I am a tool-maker, and live in Goswell-street. On Sunday morning, the 31st of July, about half-past three o'clock, I was at the corner of Old-street, in Goswell-street, in company with a male friend—the prisoner came and caught hold of my hand, and I felt my ring go off my finger—she held my finger tight—I said, "Be off woman," and felt my ring go—I accused her of it directly—she laughed, and said she had not got it—I said I would give her half a crown to give it to me, for I did not want a piece of work—the policeman came up, and I gave her in charge—she was taken to the station-house, and I heard her telling the policeman

she had thrown it into the road—I and the policeman went back and found it.

Prisoner. The young man took hold of me as I passed him, but I do not recollect any thing of the ring.

JOHN BONYTHON POPE (police-constable G 60.) I received charge of the prisoner—as I went to the station-house, she said voluntarily that she had taken the ring off his finger, and thrown it across the road—I went and found it two or three yards from where they were standing—she seemed sober—the prosecutor had evidently been drinking, but was quite capable of transacting business.

JOHN WEBB re-examined. She did not attempt to pick the ring up—this is it—it was dark—I cannot say whether she could see the ring—it did not come off by her touching my hand in a playful manner, for she grasped my hand some time—I felt her take it off—I never saw her till she caught hold of my hand—there was no lamp near.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1902

1902. JOHN WOOLLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August, 29lbs. of solder, value 20s.; 1/4 lb. of copper, value 1s.; and the top of a mould, value 1s.; the goods of William Quincey, his master.

(MR. PRICE conducted the Prosecution.)

THOMAS MOSLEY . I am a broker's man who go into possession. On the 7th of August, I went to the White Lion public-house, in Old-street, St. Luke's, between one and two o'clock in the day—the prisoner was there when I went into the room with two other persons—I sat down, and called for a pint of porter—he sat at the same table, and entered into conversation with me, and in about ten minutes he said he had a quantity of metal solder to sell, would I become a purchaser—I asked him the weight—he said about 20lbs., and I had better come home to his lodging and see—he asked me if I was a right man—I said, "Yes"—I understood him to mean with respect to buying the metal at a fair valuation—I asked how he became in possession of it—he said he worked for Howard, of Old-street, the tin-plate workers—I suspected him, and went to his lodging—I sat there an hour or two, and then he produced six pieces of metal—his mother and another woman were in the same room—until he produced the metal—they were then ordered out of the room—he produced it from a cupboard in the room—I do not know whether it was locked—the women left the room before the metal was produced at his request—I was to have purchased it for 7s.—it was solder in ingots—I took it away with me—I went to the station-house in a cab, and then came back with Palmer the constable and took him—he made use of very bad language, he said he would knock me down, and said I had sold him like a bullock—he had told me that he got the metal from his employers—that he brought it away a piece at a time as he could get it, and he would give me a supply every week if I liked to take it at a price.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You had never seen him before this Wednesday? A. No; I have been in the employ of Mr. Colton, of Weston-place, King's-cross, for seven or eight years—I am in no employ at present—I live in Thomas-street, Lloyd's-row—I went to the public-house for a walk—all the conversation was in the tap-room.

CHARLES PALMER (police-constable G 17.) On the 7th of August, I was fetched by Mosley to the prisoner's house—I produce the metal—it is solder, I believe—the prisoner shook his hands in Mosley's face, and said

he had sold him like a bullock—I searched his house, and found a copper mould top.

JOHN HESLOP . I live in Boswell-place, and am foreman of the tinners at Howard and Co.—the firm belongs to William Quincey—it is in Old-street, St. Luke—I have been in their employ about six years in that situation and twenty-two years on the premises—the prisoner worked there about ten years—this copper mould was on the premises—we have other like it on the premises—the solder is such as we use—the prisoner had access to it—it weighs 29lbs., and is worth 8d. or 10d. a pound—the copper metal is worth about 1s.—7s. would be a very disproportionate price for the solder—it is worth 1l.—it was cast in this shape by the workmen—I believe this iron pan to be my master's—it was found under the prisoner's forge—it was not taken off the premises—the solder fits it—it was cast in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any body in the firm now named Howard? A. I believe not—I have no other master than Mr. Quincey—he is not here.

JOHN BARROW . I am in the employ of Mr. Quincey—he is the sole proprietor of the business—I know of nobody else—I know this solder is the same quality as master's and, I believe, it came off the premises, also this copper mould.

SAMUEL POSSELWHITE . I am book-keeper to Mr. Quincey. He is the sole proprietor of the business, and has been so since the lst of January, 1834.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not say I would supply him every week—I was intoxicated at the time, and he told me if I would send my wife out to get a pot of beer, she would not see any thing of it—he said he was a hawker going about the country, and would but any thing, he did not care what is was.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1903

1903. THOMAS SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August, 1 printed book, value 4s. 6d., the goods of Augustus Austin Burt.

DANIEL CALLAGHAN . I am errand boy to Mr. Miller, a bookseller, in Oxford-street. On the 2nd of August, I was standing at master's shop door, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon—I saw a man at Mr. Burt's window, hanging about, and presently saw him came by walking very fast, and put a book under his coat—he went towards Dean-street—I went into the shop, and found they had lost a book—we went into Dean-street, and found the man delivering the book into the prisoner's hands—I sung out, "Stop thief"—he dropped it down, the area on seeing us—he was about six doors down Dean-street—the prisoner could not see the shop where the book was—I had frequently seen the man hanging about our window—the prisoner must have been about twelve doors from the shop—there is a corner—he took the book from the man—he was taken into custody by Mr. George—the man had just given the book into his hands when I cried, "Stop thief"—I did not hear them speak—I was two doors off—I cannot say this is the book which was in the area.

AUGUSTUS AUSTIN BURT . I am a bookseller, in Oxford-street. This book is mine, and was taken from my shop window—I was not at home at the time—I had seen it about half an hour before, and within to minutes

of its being lost—I saw it in the possession of a man named George, who was not bound over to appear.

DAVID CALLAGHAN re-examined. I saw the book down the area—I did not see it taken, out, and cannot say this is it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1904

1904. CHARLES COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Havers, from his person.

THOMAS HAVERS . I live in York-place, Pentonville. I was walking on the pavement in Hamilton-place, New-road, with a lady, a last night about nine o'clock and felt hand at my pocket—I turned round, and saw the prisoner in the act of taking his hand off a pocket-handkerchief, which was stuffed through the iron rails into a hedge which grows there—I saw his hand on it—I instantly seized him, and said, "You have stolen my handkerchief "—he said, "I have not done any thing at all"—I said, "There was no body near you; you have taken the handkerchief"—there was not a soul within twenty yards of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM NICHOLSON NAGGS (police constable E 4.) I received the prisoner in charge, with the handkerchief in his hand.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy. GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1905

1905. ANN HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August, two pillows, value 5s.; 1 bolster, value 4s.; 2 blankets value 5s.; 1 kettle, value 7s.; 6 plates, value 1s. 6d.; 1 shift, value 2s. 6d.; 2 bed-gowns, value 5s. 2 pairs of stockings, value 4s.; 1 printed book, value 9d.; 2 towels, value 4d.; 4 collars, value 1s.; 4 yards of ribbon, value 16d.; 1 busk, value 1d.; 1 cap, value 1d.; 1 pillow-case, value 4d.; and 1 apron, value 4d.; the goods of Mary Richardson.

MARY RICHARDSON . I am single, and lodge in Moor-street, Marylebone. I went to Gravesend, and left the key of my room with Mr. Thorigan—the prisoner lodged in the front parlour, and was the only person in the house when I left—I came back on the 8th of August, but did not sleep there that night—on the 9th I missed the articles stated in the indictement—I met the prisoner in the passage the evening I came home—she asked if I was come home so early—I said, "Yes"—she then left the house, and I did not see her again till I saw her in the street, and gave her into custody—she then had on one of my aprons—she said she had not robbed me—I said, "This is some of my property"—she made no answer, but afterwards said she bought it at a shop—I said, "I am certain it is mine;" I have the fellow one to match it; I made it myself.

Prisoner. The night she came home, I was told I could not sleep there—I bought the apron of Mrs. Richardson, the landlady—the woman who was in charge of the house brought a man to sleep there, and the landlady would not let him come again. Witness. I left the apron in my room on the 19th of July, and left my key with a woman whom is not have—the Magistrate said she need not come—I went to the prisoner's lodging—she gave us three different directions—I found some things at No. 20, Little Exeter-street—the policeman was with me—she gave us that direction,

and I found her little girl there—a Prayer-book, four collars, one child's cap, and some bits of lace were found there.

Prisoner. The Prayer-book belonged to Ellen Moran, who came out of the hospital, and the prosecutrix said she lost a Prayer-book with the names of her children in it—she left her own husband, to go to Gravesend with another man—she has not a blanket to cover her—they are all in pawn—these bits of things are my own—there is a collar sixteen years old, I brought it from Wales—she has done this out of spite—her sister robbed me of 5s., and gave me a black eye. Witness. My sister never saw the prisoner—there is no name in the book—it was given to me by Colonel Newbury—I did not go to Gravesend with a man—I have lost two blankets but have not pawned any—two of the collars are my own work, and the other one I bought—this ribbon and busk I bought, and all these little things—I have not found the blanket—I never quarrelled with her, nor had any spite—she always professed great kindness, and promised to get me work.

JOSEPH OCKLEY (police-constable D83.) I went with the prosecutrix last Monday night about half-past seven o'clock, and found the prisoner sitting near an apple-stall—the prosecutrix said, "I give her in charge for robbing me"—I asked her of what—she mentioned various articles—I said, "You must go with me to the station-house," and on the way the prosecutrix said, "She has got my apron on now"—I did not hear the prisoner's reply, but in going to the office she said she had bought the apron at a shop, and afterwards that she bought it of a woman living in the same street—I asked her where she lived—she said, "No. 18, Little Exeter-street," and then she said it was No. 20—I found her lodging at No. 20.

Prisoner. I told the Magistrate I bought the apron of a woman who came before the Justice. Witness. A woman in a black gown, who she said she bought it of, was at the office, but she denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. That was the woman she left minding the house—I wore it the night the prosecutrix came home—all the things are my own—she has done this for the sake of the money.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1906

1906. JOHN DONOHUE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August, 4lbs. of beef, value 2s., the goods of Mary Ann Musgrove.

MARY ANN MUSGROVE . I am single, and keep a butcher's shop in Limehouse. On the 11th of August I was behind the counter, and heard my shop window broken—a little boy brought in a piece of beef weighing about four pounds—I could not swear to its being mine—I had such a piece in the shop, near the broken pane.

CHARLES WHITE . I am a policeman. I was in Salmon's-lane, Lime-house, about ten minutes to nine o'clock, and saw the prisoner break the prosecutrix's window, take the beef out, and run away—I ran after him—he threw it down—I pursued and brought him back, and a little boy had taken the beef into the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it—it was the people I was with.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Weeks.

Reference Number: t18360815-1907

1907. THOMAS BLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 1 hat, value 8s., the goods of Thomas Baker.

THOMAS BAKER . I am servant to druggist, in Great Russell-street. On the 17th of July I left my hat in the corner of the kitchen, and missed it on Tuesday—the prisoner's mother lodged in the house, and he lives with her.

FREDERICK JOHN JOHNSON (police-constable F 50.) On the 20th of July I took the prisoner into custody—I said, "Where is the hat pawned?"—he said, "Over the water, and here is the duplicate of it," giving it to me out of his stocking—he said he had been driven to it by distress—that he was turned out of his mother's house, and she would not give him any thing to eat.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Charlotte-street, New Cut. I have a hat, which was pawned for 4s., in the name of T. Baker—the duplicate produced is my writing—I made it out—I do not swear to the prisoner.

THOMAS BAKER re-examined. His mother had not forbidden him the house—this is my hat—my name is in it—he had not left the house—his father is an embosser, but is very ill, and not expected to live—he was obliged to go into the country for his health, and I believe the prisoner was out of work—his mother is not very well off.

GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy.— Whipped, and Discharged.

NEW COURT.—Friday, August 19, 1836.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common-Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18360815-1908

1908. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July, 1 metal cock, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Prindiville; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 64.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1909

1909. SARAH COX was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August, 1 parasol, value 5s., the goods of Ann Cooper, from her person: to which she pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Ten Days.

Reference Number: t18360815-1910

1910. WALTER POOLE was indicted for stealing 1 table-cloth, value 3s., the goods of Samuel Burley, his master; to which he pleade

GUILTY . Aged 15.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Five Days.

Reference Number: t18360815-1911

1911. WILLIAM BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August, 204 stocks, value 7l., the goods of William Blenkiron, his master.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM BLENKIRON . I am a hosier, and live in Wood-street, Cheapside. We deal in stocks and a variety of other things—we make stocks—the prisoner came into our employ about the 7th or 9th of last April—he was warehouseman to attend to the manufacture of stocks—his wife was employed in making stocks—he had been in the trade before; there was a stipulation made that he was not to sell stocks, or do any business of that kind, except on my account—he had a few stock-grounds and about half a dozen stocks, I told him I would take them of him, which I did, and paid him for them—I have got the invoice that he made of them—I

received some information from Mr. Prior last Thursday week—Mr. Prior has been a customer of mine, but he has not had any thing of me for some time—he requested me to call at his house as he had some goods—I called there the following morning, about nine o'clock and he brought up these four boxes of stocks—none of these have any mark of mine upon them—I believe they are mine—I have no doubt of it—the prisoner was taken into custody on the Monday morning—some of them are lined with buff—we had a special order from one house to make some lined with buff, and we made them—that is very uncommon colour to line them with.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. I dare say you never stocks limed with buff before? A. Yes, I have—I cannot tell how often—we bought stocks from the prisoner to the amount of 8l. 12s., the finish of his stock.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he affected to sell you any thing but the materials? A. Yes, half a dozen stocks—this is the invoice of it—here charge of work done—I have been in his house—he was not in a considerable line of business—I have known Mr. Prior about two years, and had a communication with him before he bought these—I requested Mr. Prior to ask the prisoner to abate 5l. per cent, (because he had at first refused to take them at the price he left them at,) because the prisoner should not take them away again—he had asked a fair price—I did not have the prisoner asked to abate the price that he might appear the thief, but that I might secure the goods—there were about 7l. or 8l. worth altogether Mr. Prior would have put 5s., or 6s. into his pocket by the abatement—I had known brought me no connexion—we were not mutually dealing with eminent houses in the city—I deal with Leaf and Co., and so did he—that is an eminent house—I understood you to mean, did he deal with them while he was in my employ—I dealt with them before he came—I do not know that the prisoner ever dealt with Leaf, Smith, and Co., but I believe he did—I deal with J. P. and J. Neville, and I think perhaps the prisoner, did, before he came into our service—I believe he did—I deal with Rawson and Co., and he dealt there—by your question I understood you to mean that Mr. Bishop and I were connected together in dealings with these houses, something amounting to partnership—I deal with two or three other houses with which he dealt before he came to me, but which he cannot deal with now—there is Nevilles and Foster, Samur and Ball, and Morrison—I do with his wife several times since he was taken up—I mentioned to her that I had taken away some things from the house which I believed did not belong to us—there was a gentleman, named Relf, present at the examination, on my behalf—I believe he is here now—he was not subpœnaed by me—I did not think him of any service—I thought him a man of honesty and truth before the magistrate, and I think so still—we did not differ as to the value of these stocks—there was a part of the goods I thought he could identify, he being the manufacturer of the silk, and he could not—the time at which it was made, according to his account, did not differ from the time I stated by eight or nine months—by three or four—it would not be the slightest inconvenience to me if the prisoner was to set up in business—I should not care about it—my business increased after he came to me—he

brought no connexion to me—he did a great deal of business, or I should not allow him the handsome salary I did of 150l. a year—he did not board at my house—he was to do work at his house, as well as at my warehouse—there were immense quantities of work to be done at his own house—his wife was engaged in work, but she was paid for it—the materials were sent to his own house cut out, to be made up—I think there is no private mark on any of these stocks—I have not minutely examined them—I have examined them, but not to see if there was any mark—if I had I must have gone through every stock—I cannot say how many hundreds of stocks I have seen with buff linings—the other stocks are as common as dirt—hundreds and thousands are made—I will not swear that there are not many thousands made with buff linings—I do not think there are—I think there are hundreds.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you line stocks with buff? A. Not generally; the houses I have spoken of are wholesale houses, the prisoner was in the trade before he came to me, in a small way—persons in that way, deal with almost all these houses—it was a stipulation that he should not trade on his own account, and he represented that he gave up the whole of his stock when he came into my service—the half-dozen stocks were the very last of his stock—there was about twenty-two yards of silk and stocks partly manufactured, taken away from his house—I claim them—I took away one stock half worn, which I thought was mine, but it was not.

COURT. Q. Had you not bought these stocks of him two months before he came into your service, though you did not pay for them till afterwards? A. No; not before he came into my service—I have not brought the stock-book into which these were entered—there was not a stock on his neck, to which I was ready to swear—one that had been worn in his house, I did claim.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What did his wife receive for work which she did? A. I should think she earned 3l. or 3l. 10s. a-week.

MR. PHILLIPS Q. Did she not employ eight or ten people under her? A. Yes; I should think from thirty to forty; but she would clear that from the work she had.

COURT. Q. Had you all the work that these thirty or forty people did? A. Yes; it was for me alone they worked, and with my materials—she did not work for other people.

EDWARD PRIOR . I am a hosier, and live near Finsbury-square. The prisoner proposed to sell me some stocks several times at different periods, when at Mr. Blenkiron's warehouse—he said he would sell me some odds and ends of his own that he had at home—I said I should buy them if I liked them—they were to be sent to my warehouse—he called last Thursday morning, and said the stocks would come in the course of the day, and these four boxes came—they are not what would be called odds and ends—that was the reason of my going to Mr. Blenkiron—I made a communication to him—the prisoner had named a price at first—nine dozen, at 7s. five dozen, at 8s. 6d., and three dozen, at 9s. 6d.—I thought them very cheap—I did not agree to buy them at once—I wanted to see if he would take any less, and in the mean time to see Mr. Blenkiron, conceiving that, such a quantity could not be made out of odds and ends—after that, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Blenkiron's warehouse—he gave me an invoice, and said he should call for the balance—this is it—he said this would he the lowest price—I said "Very well"—nothing further passed about discount—the prices in the invoice are the same as he told me previously—whilst

I was talking Mr. Blenkiron came in—I had the invoice in my hand, and the prisoner told me to put it into my pocket—he did not say why—I had before communicated my suspicions to Mr. Benkiron.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long had you known this man? A. About two years—I believe he has been in business for him-self—he brought stocks to me—I have purchased some five or ten of him—I have bought half a dozen at a time—by odds and ends, I understood that they were made up of odds and ends of silk—my wife never sold stocks to the prisoner, only one for his wearing—I told the prosecutor I thought the price was low, I thought them too cheap—I never said I thought then too high—after I had made a representation to Mr. Blenkiron, he did not tell me to prevail on him to sell them lower—I asked him to take off 5l. per cent. for cash—he said no, it would be the lowest price—Mr. Blenkiron did not tell me to ask him to abate 5l. per cent—I do not remember that I told Mr. Blenkiron that I would ask him to take off 5l. per cent—I did not—he came into the passage, and we talked about a grey horse—this scheme was not got up for the purpose of making out the man a thief—I usually get an abatement of 5l. per cent., buy at what price I will—I did not know this man had lost his business—I always get as much as I can off for ready money—we were alone in Blenkiron's ware-house—the prisoner knew that I was acquainted with his master.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You understood odds and ends to be odd bits of silk? A. Yes, two or three of one sort and two or three of another—these did not appear to be so made.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1912

1912. WILLIAM BISHOP was again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August, 22 yards of silk, value 6l., the goods of William Blenkiron.

WILLIAM BLENKIRON . It was the prisoner's duty to give out silk to be made by his wife into stocks—they were to be cut out before it left my place—he had not authority to send out pieces of silk uncut—I asked him if he had got any property, or any stocks, or any silk (I believe it was Roe the officer asked him) he said he had not got a dozen of stocks or a yard of silk in his house—after that, we proceeded to search his house—we found twenty-two yards of silk and a quantity of stocks, partly manufactured—we had such silk in our warehouse, for the purpose of manufacturing stocks, the same colour and quality—there is no mark of mine on it that will enable me to swear to it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Had there been any message sent to Bishop's house to hurry the making of stocks? A. There was a message to have them home by Saturday night—the answer was, they would be in by that time—he did not state they were in a great hurry—I have stated the conversation between me and the prisoner accurately—I swear that that was the conversation—I did not instruct my attorney to say that I had asked him how much more he had robbed me of—I do not recollect ever saying so, if I had I should have remembered it—I do not recollect ever stating so to the Magistrate—I did not use the words "from beginning to end"—I told him he had robbed me—I will not take my oath these things were ever on my premises—I have not measured this silk, and I cannot tell whether it is an entire piece.

MR. BODKIN. Q. When was it you told him he had robbed you? A. On Monday morning.

CHARLES CURTIS . I used to take the stocks, and sometimes pieces of silk with them, from Mr. Blenkiron's house to the prisoner's—not whole pieces—I do know that I ever took a piece as large as that—the prisoner said it was to cut the stocks off—he used to measure it with his hands—I never took a roll of silk—I do not think I ever took a piece so large as that, or any thing like so large—Bishop used to measure it on the counter—he used not to spread it out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1913

1913. GEORGE NEWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June, 1 watch, value 3l. 10s.; 2 seals, value 18d.; 2 watch-keys, value 4d.; and 1 watch-ribbon, value 2d.; the goods of Thomas Tritton, his master.

THOMAS TRITTON . The prisoner was my errand-boy. On the 29th of June, I missed my watch from my bed-room, at the top of the house—I accused the prisoner—he denied it.

THOMAS COFFY . I am a light porter. I know the prisoner by sight—I met him on Saturday night, previous to his being taken, he asked me if I knew any body who wanted to buy a watch—I said I knew a young man in the shop I worked in—he asked me to try and sell this watch for him, and I took it to try.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the witness Coffy had persuaded him to commit the offence.)

THOMAS COFFY re-examined. Q. How long have you known him? A. About twelve months, but no to associate with him—I used to rest there sometimes—I talked about the watch—a young man who works in the same shop told me he wanted a watch—I did not tell the prisoner I thought he might as well get me one.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1914

1914. THOMAS DEVINE and MARY DEVINE were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd August, 1 set of fire-irons, value 3s.; 1 counter-pane, value 3s.; 2 pillows, value 2s.; 1 pillow-case, value 6d.; 2 blankets, value 3s.; and 2 sheets, value 18d.; the goods of John Shaw.

JOHN SHAW . I live at Old Brentford. I let the two prisoners a furnished lodging—they left on the Thursday morning—the policeman gave us notice—we examined the place, and these articles were all gone.

MARY SHAW . I remember these people going away—I received information, and searched the room in an hour afterwards, and these things were gone—no one else had been there.

Thomas Devine. We were all tipsy together—I fetched the porter from right opposite. Witness. It is not true—I did not drink any gin that morning, not one drop.

HUGH SANDILANDS (police-constable T 80.) On the Thursday morning, at half-past six o'clock, I was on duty in Old Brentford, and saw the two prisoners leave Mr. Shaw's in a suspicious manner—I went to Mr. Shaw's, and they were not up—they got up, broke the room door open, and missed the things—another officer went to the pawnbroker's—the pawnbroker is too ill to attend.

MARY SHAW . I went to the pawnbroker—he is ill—I saw the property there.

Mary Devine. She was in liquor on the Tuesday night, and again on the Wednesday—my husband spent the money with them.

SUSAN HUGHES . The male prisoner brought these fire-irons to me, and I bought them of him on Wednesday.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS DEVINE— GUILTY . Aged 31.— Confined Nine Months.

MARY DEVINE— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1915

1915. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 1 shawl, value 10s., the goods of Robert Hanson: and 1 key, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Hanson.

ALICE HANSON . I am the wife of Robert Hanson, of East-road, Shoreditch. I went for the dinner beer on the 28th of July—I left my shawl on the table and the door ajar—as I came back I met the prisoner with it under his arm, and took him back.

Prisoner. I met the lady ten or fifteen yards from the door—I had picked up the shawl outside, and gave it to her when she stopped me.

Witness. He begged to be let off—he took the key of the front door as well.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1916

1916. JAMES GODFREY and WILLIAM SHELTON were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 1 tame fowl, value 6s., the property of Simon Williams.

SIMON WILLIAMS . I keep the Queen's Head, York-square, Commercial Road. I had a tame cock—I saw it safe in the stable about seven o'clock on the 25th of July, and missed it the next morning—the prisoners were in my yard playing at skittles on the evening of the 25th—the policeman found the fowl—it was mine—the wings of it are here.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had you employed the prisoners to remove a table? A. Yes—I gave them some beer—they staid playing at skittles the whole of the evening, from five or six o'clock till about eleven o'clock—the fowl-house is alongside of the skittle-ground—when they left the house they were not the worse for liquor.

WILLIAM ISAACS (police-constable K 223.) At four o'clock in the morning, I was passing by an unoccupied house in Limehouse-fields—I heard a noise—I called my brother-officer, and we found the two prisoners sleeping, with this fowl by their side—these are the wings—it was dead, but not cold.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the prisoners asleep? A. They were, or else pretending it—it was their snoring that caused me to go in—this fowl was close by them—I got over the boarded fence, about five feet and a half high—I found six fowls and a saucepan by them, but no fire.

GODFREY— GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

SHELTON— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

(There were two other indictments against the prisoners.)

Reference Number: t18360815-1917

1917. SAMUEL PULLING was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August, one pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Dell.

MARY DELL . I am the wife of Joseph Dell, and live in Long-alley. At half past nine o'clock, on the morning of the 7th of August, I was in a little room at the back of my shop, and I heard something move—I looked, and saw the prisoner go out with a pair of shoes under his arm—I called

my husband, who is a shoemaker, pursued, and took him—he said he had not got the shoes—I had seen him stop at a turning, and I thought he might have dropped them—I went back, and saw a boy going away with them—I followed, and asked him for them—he said he had picked them up.

JOSEPH DELL . I had seen these shoes about a quarter of an hour before in my shop—the prisoner was brought back—my wife went up a court, and saw a boy going away with them.

GUILTY . Aged 50.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1918

1918. JOHN HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Bainbridge, from his person.

JOHN BAINBRIDGE . I live at Cheyne-walk, Chelsea. I was in Russell-street on the 7th of July, and felt a twitch, I turned round, and saw two or three persons standing—I saw the prisoner run away towards Bloomsbury-square—my handkerchief was picked up in Bloomsbury-square, and brought back by the policeman.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Did you observe the prisoner do any thing? A. No—I saw him run away.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN . I am a hair-dresser, living in Harvey's Buildings, Strand. I was in Russell-square—I saw the prisoner run away, and observed him throw the handkerchief away—I picked it up, and gave it to the policeman.

JAMES BAKER (police-constable E 23.) This handkerchief was given to me by Chamberlain—I took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1919

1919. DANIEL DONOVAN and STEPHEN BEEDHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 46 yards of printed cotton, value 1l.6s., the goods of James West.

JOSHUA GEORGE . I am assistant to Mr. James West, of Shoreditch, a linen-draper. On the 20th of July, about twelve o'clock in the day, I observed the prisoners looking in at the shop-window—I am sure they are the persons—I saw Donovan come into the lobby of the shop-door, and take four lengths of print, take them to the corner of the window, and put them into Beedham's apron—I went out—they saw me, and one ran one way, and the other the other—I pursued Beedham—he threw it down—I saw a young man pick it up—this is it—the prisoners were secured.

Donovan. I was at home, going to bed—this gentleman came and told me I must get up, which I did.

Beedham. I was going home—that gentleman came and took me, and said that he saw me drop this property.

DONOVAN— GUILTY .* Aged 12.

BEEDHAM— GUILTY .* Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1920

1920. JAMES LOCKYER was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July, 1 half-crown, the monies of Charles Armstrong.

RICHARD AMES . I am in the employ of Mr. Charles Armstrong, and live at Stepney-heath. The prisoner used to hang about the shop, and

when he saw my master come into the shop, he would go away—on the 22nd of July I was cleaning the windows—he came and asked me for a bit of tobacco—I said we had got none—he waited, and saw me serve a customer, and then he asked me again for a bit—I gave him a bit—he still hung about there—I got up into window, and he reached over and took a half-crown from the till.

Prisoner. I met him going along the road one day with a truck—he said, "You come with me, I will give you something"—I went, and he said, "You come to-morrow morning, I will give you some tobacco"—I did, and he said, "Come again, and I will give you some more," and I went, but I did not take any thing—I stopped in the shop full ten minutes while he went and fetched his master out, a man came in for a gallon of ale, and he told him.

RICHARD AMES . I know the took a half-crown—I had given 8s. in payment before, and there was a half-crown and sixpence left—the sixpence was left in the till.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1921

1921. WILLIAM OTTER was indicted for embezzlement: to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 17. Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1922

1922. JOHN LONGSHAW and WILLIAM CONSTABLE were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 2 live fish, called pike, value 1s.; and 12 live fish, called perch, value 2s. 6d.; the property of James Clark, in a boat on a certain navigable river called the Thames.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES CLARK . I am a fishmonger, and live at Sunbury—I have got some fishing-boats. On the 8th of July, at night, I had some fish in a well under my boat—I had some perch in the well—I marked them—I missed them at half-past five o'clock in the morning—we had intelligence of the prisoners going to Hampton—we followed them, and traced them to Mr. Ruff's where I found my fish—we found the prisoners at the Jolly Coopers, at Hampton—they were having a jollification Mr. Miller was with them—they were my perch.

Constable. He swore before to seven out of the twelve. Witness, Yes, I did; there were but seven marked fish.

Longshaw Q. Did you not see me fishing, and ask what sport I had had? A. I might, I do not know—I know them about the neighbourhood—I had mistrust of them a long time.

JOHN MILLER . On the morning of the 8th of July, the prisoner Constable brought these fish into the Jolly Coopers, and asked whether there was any body that would buy them—I said, "No," we sat about ten minutes, and then Constable said, a likely place to sell them was Mr. Ruff's—Longshaw was not in then, but he came in and asked Constable whether the fish were sold—I said "No"—Constable then said, "If you take them to Mr. Ruff's you are sure to sell them"—Longshaw was by his side—I got up and took them across—I turned back, and said, "Who shall I say sent them?"—Longshaw told me the name of Jack Dobbins which is a nick-name he goes by—I did not know but that that was his right name, till afterwards—I took the fish to Ruff's and got 1s., 6d. for them—I returned to the public-house with the 1s. 6d.—I put it on the

table, and Constable took it up—we had four pots of beer, and then the officer came in and took me.

HENRY RUFF . I am a fishmonger. John Miller brought me the fish—I gave him 1s. 6d., for them—I showed them to Mr. Clark—they were the perch I bought of Miller—I knew them by the mark.

Constable's Defence. We had no fish in our possession, nor knew any thing about it.

Longshaw's Defence. What fish I had, I caught.

LONGSHAW— GUILTY .* Aged 45.— Transported for Seven Years.

CONSTABLE— GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1923

1923. SARAH BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1lb. of bacon, value 6d.; and 6lb of pork, value 3s. 6d.; the goods of John Hutley.

WILLIAM CHAMANT . I am in the service of John Hutley, a cheesemonger, in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. On Saturday night, the 10th of July, about ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner take a piece of bacon—I was going to take her, when my fellow-servant saw her take two pieces of pork, which she dropped at her feet, and we were obliged to push her away to get them—we took her in the shop, and found the bacon in her apron.

Prisoner. This piece of bacon my daughter bought, and gave it to me in my apron. Witness. Her daughter came to my master, and said it was hers, but I saw her take it.

CHARLES PULLING . I was outside the shop—my master had such a piece of bacon as this—I believe it to be his—I saw the prisoner take the pork, and she stood over it—I did not see her take the bacon.

GUILTY .* Aged 48.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1924

1924. JOHN DENNIS and THOMAS BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 2 tame ducks, value 5s., the property of William White.

WILLIAM WHITE . I live at Hounslow. On the morning of the 23rd of July, I saw my ducks safe—I missed one pair of ducks when I came home in the evening.

WILLIAM WHITE , Jun. I saw the ducks about 100 yards from the house, and the two prisoners were sitting on an archway—I went in and sat down, and heard the ducks make a noise—I then went out, and could not see them—I am sure the two prisoners were the men—Smith told me something.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. What o'clock was this? A. Between eleven and twelve o'clock—I had seen Dennis before.

ELIZABETH SMITH . As I was going to the top of the road, I saw the prisoners going down the Bath road—one of them said, "We will not go this way"—they turned into Wellington-lane—I saw the ducks' legs out of Brown's smock-frock—he made a stumble, and the ducks began to cry.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was this? A. Half-past eleven o'clock—Dennis lived in Hounslow, and he spoke to me that day—I know a duck's foot from a goose's—I have been living with a man of the name of Smith, but my name is Jeffreys.

WILLIAM COOK . I am a Bow-street patrol. I took Dennis, and Brown came and gave himself up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say, as he was with Dennis all day,

and knew himself innocent, he would give himself up? A. He did not say he was innocent.

Brown's Defence. We came along there at one o'clock—we had been round there for work, and could not get it—we never had the ducks.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I saw Dennis on Saturday, the 23rd of July, coming up Workhouse-lane—I was at the top of Wellington-lane—it is in the parish of Heston, not far from where Smith saw them—it wanted not more than a quarter to one o'clock—they came close by me, and spoke to her—they met her about thirty yards after he went by me—I did not see any ducks about them—I asked Smith if she would have some peas.

ELIZA SMITH . He did speak to me about peas.

(The prisoner Dennis received a good character.)

DENNIS— GUILTY . Aged 20.

BROWN— GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18360815-1925

1925. ELIZA WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July, 7 counters, value 1s., and 3 sovereigns; the goods and monies of Eliza Fearn Smith.

ELIZA FEARN SMITH . I live in Penton-street, Hanover-square. A little after five o'clock, on the evening of the 6th of July, I left my house in care of Hannah Barrett—I had left in the tea-caddy, nine sovereigns, and I had 55 counters—when I returned, three of the sovereigns were gone, and seven of the counters—these are my counters—I have the box they were taken from, and the other counters.

Cross-examined. Q. You know how many there were? A. Yes, fifty-four or fifty-five—they were kept on a small side-board in the room—my house is for the accommodation of the gentleman of the Oriental Club—I opened the caddy in case any gentlemen should come home to tea—I told my servant, "Don't let any one go into the parlour, I have left nine sovereigns in the caddy, and locked the parlour door"—my servant knew the caddy was open—I did not go to the caddy till eleven o'clock at night—I did not count the counters till the next morning when they were brought to me—when I found some of the money was gone, I immediately accused my servant of taking them—I was not aware any one else had been there—I knew the prisoner, and I thought her a respectable child—she had lived with me.

HANNAH BARRETT . I am the prosecutrix's servant. The prisoner and Ann Deeley came to visit me—I showed them up-stairs, and then into the room where these sovereigns were—they then went away, and when my mistress came home, these sovereigns were missed.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you looked into the caddy? A. No, my mistress told me she had left some sovereigns there, and not to let any body in but those I knew—I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found her in bed—I and her landlady went up-stairs together—upon searching her, we found nothing—I did not tell the policeman to stay down while I went up-stairs to the prisoner, but he did stay down.

ANN DEELEY . I and the prisoner called on Hannah Barrett on this day—we went into the front parlour, and then into the bed-room—we came down again—while Barrett was absent I went up-stairs for my gloyes, and the prisoner was left alone in the parlour—the prisoner and I left together—we parted at the corner of Bear-street—I was taken at half-past twelve o'clock that night, and in the morning the policeman came, and said the money was

found at her lodgings—I said to her, "How could you think of keeping me all night and not own to it?"—when we were at Marlborough-street Office, she said she had taken seven counters.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she say that before the Magistrate? A. No, I mentioned it, she said it to me when we were alone—I told the Magistrate of it—I am a servant at Mr. Marsh's, in St. Martin's-court.

ANN WEBB . The prisoner lodged at my house for four or five nights before this occurred—I remember her being taken to the station-house—I searched the room, and found two sovereigns and the counters and some silver wrapped up in an apron under a knife-box.

Cross-examined. Q. Had Barrett been at your house? A. Yes, when she brought the policeman in the night—the policeman did not go upstairs—we both searched about, but not in the cupboard—Barrett had not an opportunity of putting this money where it was found, if she has chosen—we were in the room from five to ten minutes—it would not have taken a minute scarcely to put it under that box—she stood against the table in the middle of the room—the prisoner sat up against the cupboard door, where I found the property—Barrett went down-stairs first—I did not direct the policeman not to come up-stairs—the prisoner came home that night at half-past ten o'clock, and went up to bed—I undressed myself with her—she had been out of service from the Tuesday before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1926

1926. JOHN NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Alexander Francis Baillie Nicholson, from his person.

ALEXANDER FRANCIS BAILLIE NICHOLSON . I keep the Cock and Crown, in Little Britain. About five minutes before nine o'clock on the evening of the 26th of July, I was in Holborn, and felt a twitch at my pocket—I turned, missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoner with it in his hand—he was in company with two more—I laid hold of him—one of the others took my handkerchief—I am sure it was mine—I held him a few minutes, and the officer came.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not come and accuse me of picking your pocket? A. Yes; and asked you to walk up Holborn with me—I said I saw you pass it to another—you were the first person near me when I lost it—it was not dark—it was just about dusk at the time.

BENJAMIN CATMULL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner—it was not dark.

GUILTY .* Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1927

1927. CATHERINE KENNEDY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August, 1 canvass bag, value 4d.; 4 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 4 half-crowns, 10 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 1 £5 Bank-note; the goods, and monies of William Adamson.

WILLIAM ADAMSON . I am clerk at Margaret Chapel, May-fair. On the 3rd of August, I went to a stall kept by the prisoner, opposite Middlesex Hospital, to buy some oranges—I had a bag containing the property stated—I took it out, and laid it down on the stall while I took 6d. out of my pocket to pay for the oranges—the prisoner tied them up—I went home with them, and I then recollected that I had left my bag on the stall—I went back—the prisoner was gone, and her husband was there—here is

the bag that I lost—here is 3l.; 14s.; of the money—I can swear to this bag—my wife made it herself.

WILLIAM THOMAS BEAVER (police-constable E 39.) I found the prisoner the same night at the corner of Union-street, quite drunk—I picked her up, and found in her hand this bag, with 1l. 13s. 6d., in it—I got a little distance, when a lad came, and brought me two sovereigns, which he said he found—I also found 6d., which makes 3l. 14s.—the next morning she said she had pawned two of her rings for 1l. 7s., which was part of the money, and the other she had before.

Prisoner. I got drunk—I lost my own money and my shoes—I know nothing about the bag.

GUILTY . Aged 75.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1928

1928. GEORGE GANGE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Richard Wilcox Fairlam.

FREDERICK LEIGHTON . I am an apprentice to Richard Wilcox Fairlam, a pawnbroker, in Lisson-grove. On the 3rd of August, at a quarter before nine o'clock, I was in the warehouse, and saw the prisoner and two others—the prisoner took up a handkerchief, and looked at it—the other two were looking to see that all was right—the prisoner then took down a handkerchief—he went out—I went after him—he saw me, threw it down, and ran off—I pursued, and caught him in a court—he said if I did not let him go, he would hit me—a young man was looking out for him—he caught him, and brought him to Devonshire-street, and the policeman took him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Where were you when he took it? A. I was looking out of a window two pair of stairs high—I had known this man before—he came about with things to sell—these handkerchiefs were hanging at the doorway outside, where I could see them—he ran down Lisson-grove.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18360815-1929

1929. SARAH HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August, 1 bag, value 1d.; and 3 shillings; the goods and monies of William Carter, from his person.

WILLIAM CARTER . I live at Tottenham. On the 15th of August, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner in West-street, Smithfield—I was at the oyster-stall—she asked me to give her some oysters—I gave her one—I paid for them, and I was going on to Saffron-hill—I had not got half the length of this court, when she came and tapped me on the shoulder, and said she wanted to speak to me—I told her to speak on—she put her hand into my pocket, and took out my bag, put it in her bosom—I asked her for the bag—she said she had got none, and none she would give me—I held her till the officer came and took her.

GEORGE CRAWLEY (City-police-constable No. 61.) I took this prisoner, and found this bag under her arm-pit—I had a great deal of difficulty to get it.

GUILTY .* Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1930

1930. CATHERINE MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 table-cloth, value 4s.; 1 shirt, value 4s.; and 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; the goods of Thomas Kagan.

MARY KAGAN . I am the wife of Thomas Kagan, and live in Duke's-row, Pimlico. The prisoner came to my place on the 15th of July, and remained till twelve o'clock on Saturday, the 16th—when she was gone, I missed these things—I have known her some time, but she never was in my house working till that time—on Sunday morning she came to my place—I accused her of this—she denied it—on Monday I took her up.

THOMAS MOTHERSELL (police-sergeant R 9.) I found the property stated at Dods' house—it had been sold to her.

MARGARET MARY DODS . These things were found at my mother's house—she bought the bed—there was a hole on each side of the bed, and my mother told me to get the straw out—I got half out, and found these things in it—the bed was bought of Mr. Wilcox, the prisoner's landlord—the prisoner worked for my mother.

MARY KAGAN re-examined. I have seen Wilcox—he was never at our house—it was the prisoner's bed that was bought of him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1931

1931. CATHERINE MILLER was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July, 1 shirt, value 5s., the goods of John Sheen.—2nd COUNT, Stating it to belong to Richard Gilbert.

SARAH SHEEN . I am the wife of John Sheen, of Commercial-road, and am a laundress. I have known the prisoner since December last—she worked for me several weeks—on the 13th of July I gave her a basket of linen to take to Mr. Gilbert, of Park Cottage, Waltham-green—it contained various shirts and other things—in return she was to have brought a parcel of dirty things home—she brought back some of the things, and said they were all right—on the 18th Mrs. Kagan called, and told me what she had lost—I then went to the pawnbroker's, where I found one shirt—this is it—it is one I have washed many times—it belongs to Richard Gilbert.

Prisoner. Mrs. Kagan's daughter pawned the shirt.

RICHARD BLAND . I am assistant to Mr. Debenham, a pawnbroker. I took in this shirt of Kagan.

ELIZA KAGAN . Mrs. Miller came to my mother's place, and asked her to allow me to go to pledge this shirt, which I did.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1932

1932. DAVID WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June, 19 printed books, value 2l. 8s., the goods of John Soper, his master.

JOHN SOPER . I live in Greville-street, Hatton-garden, and am a book-binder. The prisoner was in my service—I have lately missed a great many books—here are nineteen which are mine—they were all intrusted to my care, and were in my shop, with a great number more that were sent to me to bind—he had 2l. 4s. or 2l. 10s. a week.

WILLIAM NEWTON . I am shopman to Mr. Walter, of High Holborn, a pawnbroker. I produce these books—they were pledged with me by the prisoner for 8s., all at one time.

(John Field gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Transported for Seven Years.

There were two other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18360815-1933

1933. JANE CARR was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 1 waistcoat, value 4s., the goods of John Carr; to which she pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months, The Last Week Solitary.

Reference Number: t18360815-1934

1934. GEORGE COATES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July, 1 necklace, value 4s., the goods of Fanny Collins, from her person.

FANNY COLLINS . I live with my father a hatter, in Crown-street, Soho. About half-past ten o'clock at night, on the 30th of July, I was in St. Giles's, and felt some person pull the beads off my neck—I am certain the prisoner was the person—I told my mother, who called "Stop thief," and ran after him—the policeman caught him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me before you felt the beads pulled off? A. No; but I turned round immediately, and saw you.

PRISCILLA COLLINS . I was with my daughter—I saw the prisoner run across the way—there was no one else but him who could take the beads—I cried "Stop thief," and he was taken—I saw him drop the beads—a man picked them up, and gave them to me.

Prisoner. I was going along the ruins, and a policeman stopped me—I said I was going to my brother.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1935

1935. JOHANNAH DALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July, 1 watch, value 30s., the goods of Patrick Murphy, from his person.

PATRICK MURPHY . I lodge in George-street, St. Giles's. On Saturday night, the 30th of July, I was coming home, and met the prisoner in the street—I asked her the way to George-street, St. Giles's—she told me the would take me there—as she was going on my right hand side, she took my watch from my right-hand waistcoat pocket—she ran off, and I after her—there were some persons who struck me—I have got the marks now—I went home and told the policeman, and he found her in about two hour—there were three men knocking me about—I should not know the men—the watch has not been found.

Prisoner. He is taking me for another female—the officer knows the same.

THOMAS FULEER (police-constable G 155.) I received information from Patrick Murphy, about ten o'clock that night—he described the prisoner's person, and I took her at half-past twelve o'clock—she was with another person, a most notorious character—I went and took the prosecutor, and he pointed her out instantly—he said he pursued her, and just as he was getting hold of her, he was knocked down—I knew the prisoner from the description he gave me—I had known her for years.

Prisoner. The prosecutor was in liquor. Witness. No, he was not in the least.

Prisoner. There was another female taken with me, he did not know which it was. Witness. No, he did not at all hesitate.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported For Fourteen Years.

Fifth Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18360815-1936

1936. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August, 8ozs. weight of indigo, value 3s., the goods of the London Dock Company, his masters; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1937

1937. JOHN BAINES was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 28.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1938

1938. JAMES KING. alias John Brown , was indicted for a misdemeanour.

MESERS. PHILLIPS and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

ABEL KIMBER . I am a pork-butcher, and live in King-street Terrace, Lower-road, Islington. On Monday evening last, I was in Compton-street, and saw the prisoner and another person talking together—I followed them—they turned into Northampton-street—the prisoner gave the other man something, which appeared to be money—the man went into a public-house, and came out—they joined again, and went on, the prisoner pulled out something which appeared like silver money, and looked it over—the man went into a public-house, and staid about a minute, he came out, and they went on to the end of Aylesbury-street—the prisoner gave the man something—he went to a pork-shop, and then came out again—I saw the policeman, and gave him information—they went to a tobacconist's shop, and then I went away.

JOHN JAMES BARNARD (police-constable G 110.) I was in St. John's-street, at a quarter past ten o'clock—I saw the prisoner in company with another—I followed them down St. John's-street, and saw the other go into a tobacconist's shop—the prisoner remained outside—I stood by the tobacconist's shop—the prisoner went to pass by me—I collared, and took him into the shop—I had information from Kimber—I put my hand in the prisoner's right hand pocket, and took out 2s. 3 3/4d. in good money—he put his hand into his left hand pocket—I seized his hand, and found is it seven counterfeit shillings, and one fell out, and I picked it up immediately—I kept him in custody.

THOMAS SHEPPARD . (police-constable G 28.) I saw Barnard and the prisoner struggling together—I saw the prisoner's hand clenched first—Barnard took something from it—I heard something fall—the officer took it up, and I found it was money—I went back to the spot, and found this other shilling.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint. These shillings are all nine counterfeit, and all from the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1939

1939. ABRAHAM LAKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August, 1 pair of boots, value 5s. 6d., the goods of John Samuel Crispin, his master.

THOMAS WHITAKER . I superintend the business of Mr. John Samuel Crispin. He is a shoemaker, and lives at St. Pancras—the prisoner had been servant there four or five months—he was going out of the shop on Sunday morning, the 7th of August, and I observed his pocket projecting—I passed into the passage after him, and requested him to sweep the door-way—after he had done that I requested him to come in, and said I thought he had something in his pockets which he ought not to have—he drew out this pair of boots—they are my master's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. You have your private marks upon them? A. Yes—the prisoner was at liberty to take a pair of boots, and pay for them by instalments, if he had asked me—I cannot say when my master had been on the premises—he might have been within three

days—he does not reside there—I am positive he could not have asked Mr. Crispin's permission to have them—he never told me he had allowed the prisoner to have them—when I was out my wife old the business—she has sold goods—Mr. Crispin has sold in my absence once.

COURT. Q. How came the prisoner there on Sunday morning? A. We always open the shop on the Sunday morning, till eleven o'clock.

WILLIAM TIBBS (police-constable E 94.) I was standing in Tottenham-court-road—a little boy told me I was wanted—I took the prisoner from Whitaker, and these boots—Mr. Crispin, and some other persons were there.

Prisoner. I took these boots, on purpose to ask my master, on the following Monday morning, to let me have them at so much a-week.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1940

1940. MARIA ELIZABETH LANGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March, 2 pillows, value 4s. 6d.; 1 candlestick, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pillow-case, value 6d.; 1 bolster, value 5s.; 2 curtains, value 3s.; 1 quilt, value 2s.; and 1 dressing-glass, value 8s.; the goods of Sophia Ledbrook.

SOPHIA LEDBROOK . The prisoner lodged with me, in Dorset-crescent, nearly six months—she sometimes went out nursing—I missed this property when I went into the room with the officer, who came to me with the duplicates—I never permitted her to pawn them—she was in distress at times, and neglected by her husband.

GEORGE HANSON . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a blanket, a swing-glass, a counterpane and curtain—the counterpane and curtain were pawned by the prisoner—the others I did not take in.

GEORGE THOMSON . I am a journeyman pawnbroker—I produce a pillow—I do not know whether the prisoner pawned it, but I know her.

JOHN LOVICK . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pillow pawned in March, in the name of Ann Adams—I do not know who by.

CHARLES PALMER (police-sergeant G 19.) I took the prisoner on another charge—I went to the prosecutrix's house, and she missed this property—I found the duplicates of all the property on the prisoner.

Prisoner. I was in distress through my husband's leaving me destitute at home—it was my full intention to have restored every thing.

SOPHIA LEDBROOK . I was in the country for a month, and when I came home I missed these things—her husband did not live there.

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1941

1941. MARIA ELIZABETH LANGLEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th day of July, 3 flat-irons, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 1 blanket, value 1s. 6d.; 1 shirt, value 4s.; 1 bag, value 6d.; and 1 cap, value 6d.; the goods of Zachariah Wilson.

ELIZA WILSON . I am the wife of Zachariah Wilson, of Upper Smith-street—we left the prisoner in the house to take care of it when the

painters came into it—I have only known her one mouth—she lodged in the next house, and I paid her half a crown a week to sleep in my house—I was away three weeks—on the Saturday after I returned I missed these things—she told me she took the sheets.

CHARLES PALMER . The duplicates of these articles were found upon her.

GEORGE WILLIS . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have two sheets and two irons pledged by the prisoner in July.

WILLIAM BRITTAIN . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket and waistcoat pawned by the prisoner on the 18th of July.

GUILTY . Aged 27.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Weeks.

Reference Number: t18360815-1942

1942. JOHN SADLER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 6 shillings, the monies of John Mason, his master, to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Weeks.

Reference Number: t18360815-1943

1943. WILLIAM ABBOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 2 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 1 tea-spoon, value 2s.; 1 butter-knife, value 8s.; 4 smelling-bottles, value 20s.; and 1 printed book, value 20s.; the goods of Robert Davis, his master: and JAMES HILL RATTENBOROUGH and PHILIP JONES for feloniously receiving part of the said goods, well knowing the same to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.: to which ABBOTTpleaded.

GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Weeks.

ROBERT DAVIS . I am an apothecary, and live in the City-road. Richard Abbott was my errand-boy—whilst he was with me I missed a variety of articles—Rattenborough lived at the Duke of Wellington public-house, Cross-street—I saw him on the 10th of August, at his mother's at Hoxton—the tea-spoon he delivered to me in presence of the policeman; the book was found in his hat, when he was not present—Jones was brought to my premises, and represented as Abbott's brother—I know nothing of Moore.

WILLIAM MOORE . I live at Hoxton New Town. I work at home with my father, who is a watch-maker—I have known Rattenborough three months—he told me that any thing I could get, or steal, or thieve, he would purchase—Abbott gave me a book—he told me he found it—I took it to Rattenborough—he told me it was not worth any thing, because it was Latin—he gave me 6d. for it—I spent the 6d.—Jones gave me a large bottle which I took home to my mother—she said she would not have such a thing in the house—Jones was outside at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. How old are you? A. Fourteen—there was no one present when Rattenborough said what I represent—he is a pot-boy—I did not tell my mother of it—I never stole any thing up to this day—I did not steal the spoon nor the bottle—I do not know that any body stole thing—I have two brothers—they have been in prison.

MARY ANN MOORE . I am the witness's mother. About a fortnight ago, or rather better, he brought a smelling-bottle, and asked what seent might be put into it—I said I would not have it in the house, because I did not know where it came from—I asked him where he got it; he pointed to Jones outside—I called Jones in, and he gave it to him.

ANN CUNDEY . I keep the Duke of Wellington. Rattenborough was my servant—I saw him with a silver butter-knife—he wanted to sell it—I gave it him again.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had he been in your service? A. Eleven months—I received a character with him, and he has borne a good character—I would take him again.

JOSEPH STANNARD . I am a policeman. on the 10th of August, Mr. Davis sent to tell me he had lost two silk handkerchiefs, and suspected Abbott—I took him—he said he had taken them and the silver spoon, and had sold the spoon to Rattenborough for 6d., and the handkerchiefs he did not know what for—I then took Rattenborough—he said he bought a spoon of a lad for 6d., and would fetch it—he did so—I then asked him about the handkerchief—he said he never bought any handkerchiefs of Abbott, but he had two of Moore—I then went and took him—he said he had sold none, but Jones had sold a butter-knife—the prosecutor did not know he had lost a butter-knife, but he found he had—I went and searched Abbott, and found the key of his box, but found no property in it; but in his, hat, in the hat-box, I found the book which he said he bought of Moore for 6d., and he might have it again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1944

1944. JOSEPH ENGLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 square, value 2s.; 1 gauge, value 1s. 3d.; and 1 screwdriver, value 18d.; the goods of Edward Earl.

EDWARD EARL . I am a cabinet-maker, and work for Mr. Hankins, of Lisson-grove. The prisoner worked there one week, as an errand-boy—about the 3rd or 4th of August I missed my tools—the prisoner was discharged and had gone away—the square was found at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM GEORGE BROWN . I live in Stafford-street, Lisson-grove. I have a square pledged for 9d. on the 1st on August, by the prisoner.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1945

1945. ELLEN HERRING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 1 pair of trowsers, value 4s., the goods of Ambrose Bradley.

DENNIS LANE . I live near the shop of Mr. Ambrose Bradley, a pawnbroker in Castle-street—I saw the prisoner up the court opposite, with a man and woman—I saw the man put a pair of trowsers into a basket which he had himself—they walked away with it to where Mr. Bradley's shop is—the prisoner took down the trowsers from Mr. Bradley's—she put them under her shawl, and ran away—I went and told the apprentice—he went in pursuit of her—she was taken soon after, with the trowsers in her possession—I am sure the prisoner is the person who took them—I had a good opportunity of seeing her when up the court—I noticed them when the first pair were brought there—they must have taken the other pair from some other shop.

Prisoner. He said he thought I was enough to pay for all, or he could have taken the man and the other woman.

GEORGE CARR . I am a police-constable. The prisoner was given into my custody with the trowsers which I produce.

THOMAS JONES . I am in the prosecutor's employ. These are his trowsers—I ran and took the prisoner in Pennington-street—as she was taking.

the trowsers from under her shawl to show them to two persons she had with her—I took her with them.

Prisoner. I had not had them five minutes, when he came and took me with them—I said I had just picked them up, which I had—he called me a thieving wretch.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1946

1946. ELIZABETH JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 shawl, value 2s.; 1 scarf, value 2s.; and 1 waistcoat, value 8s.; the goods of Charles Knapp.

BENJAMIN CUTHBERT . I live with Mr. Charles Knapp, a salesman in Great James-street, Lisson-grove. On the 1st of August about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner put a part of this scarf into a basket—she took it from the side of the door—I told the policeman, who brought her back to the shop with the shawl and her basket—we keep two lads outside to watch the goods.

RICHARD ROADNIGHT . I am a police-constable. I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and asked what she had got—she said nothing—I then took her back, and the shawl was identified which was on her shoulders, and this scarf was in her basket, and this waistcoat was found on her by a female at the station-house.

Prisoner. I picked them up—I did not steal them—his things lay about—I bought the shawl for 1s. Witness. She said she had the shawl many years.

GUILTY . Aged 54.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1947

1947. GEORGE BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 2 pairs of boots, value 8s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 apron, value 4d.; the goods of Peter Newlyn, his master.

PETER NEWLYN . I am a shoemaker and live at Waterloo-street, St. Luke's. On the 4th of August I had a bill in my window for a lad—the prisoner came and offered himself—I agreed to give him 6s. a week, and, if he suited, 7s., 6d., and to teach him the trade for nothing—he came about ten o'clock in the morning, and stayed till a quarter past three in the afternoon—he then left, and next day, which was Friday, I missed a pair of Wellington boots, a pair of Clarence boots, and an apron—I informed the police, and found some of my property at Mr. Clark's the pawnbroker's on the Saturday—he was taken into custody on the Saturday following.

JOHN BENNETT . I live at Mr. Clark's, a pawnbroker, in Old-street. I have a pair of Clarence boots pawned, I believe, by the prisoner, on the morning of the 6th of August, in the name of Smith.

JAMES BRENNAN . I am a policeman. I made inquiries and found these boots—I then took the prisoner in Old-street, at the corner of Golden-lane, at a quarter to seven o'clock in the evening—I took him to the station-house, and found only the duplicate of these boots on him—the rest of the things we cannot find.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1948

1948. ANN HURLEY, alias Mary Hurley , was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of July, 1 petticoat, value 2s., the goods of Cornelius Donovan.

JULIA DONOVAN . I am the wife of Cornelius Donovan, and live in Gravel-lane. The prisoner and her husband lodged about eighteen months

with me—they occupied a kitchen—I get my living in the streets—the petticoat was hanging out to dry—I saw it there about four o'clock on Saturday.

ELLEN CRAWLEY . I live in the house. I remember the petticoat being hung up to dry—I missed it between eight and nine o'clock—I saw the prisoner out in the back alley, and asked her if she knew any thing of it—she said she did not, and I took it from between her knees—she was standing up at the time—I am quite sure she denied having it.

Prisoner. She came down to my place on the Friday, and asked me if she could wash the things in my place—on Saturday night, because we had no rent, she locked my husband up—I went down to my place, and was so vexed that I took all the things off my line in the kitchen, and said, "They sha'nt be there," and I hung them in my yard, and this girl came down and said I wanted to steal the petticoat—Donovan and her man knocked me down, and gave me two black eyes.

HENRY PARKER . I am a police-constable. I took the prisoner—the prosecutrix charged her with stealing the petticoat—the prisoner said it was done out of spite, and nothing else.

JULIA HURLEY . At ten o'clock, on the 3rd of July, Saturday night, I met the prisoner with a pair of black eyes, and in a shameful situation—I was moving, and I came and took her things away from the prosecutrix; and when I came down I saw Crawley with the petticoat in her hands—she thanked the prisoner for it, and said, if it had been lost she should have been blamed—when the prosecutrix came home, she said the prisoner had been robbing her, and took a pot and threw it over her.

DANIEL HURLEY . This petticoat was given to a policeman in my presence—Crawley washed in my wife's room.

JULIA DONOVAN re-examined. I had no quarrel with her—she came in with her gown all filth—I told her to leave my place—they own me 3l., odd—I did not come home till between twelve and one o'clock at night.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1949

1949. JOHN PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August, 1 basket, value 2s.; 4 shirts, value 15s.; 5 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 collar, value 6d.; 1 flannel waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 1s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; and 3 towels, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of Elizabeth Tombleson.

ELIZABETH TOMBLESON . I wash for different people, and William White takes home the articles—on the 3rd of August I sent home a basket of clothes, containing the articles stated—he was to take them to Maddox-street, and to call at No. 10, Bedford-row—I afterwards saw the things, and the prisoner was then in custody.

WILLIAM WHITE . I had a cart with a horse in it, and was to take this basket to Maddox-street—I called in Bedford-row about three o'clock, and while I was delivering a basket there, I left my cart outside—when I came out, I missed the basket from the cart, containing the clothes stated in the indictment—I saw no one—I found them at Bow-street the same evening—I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM BARRIMORE . I am a sadler. I had been to work near Lincoln's-inn-fields, and was crossing the end of Bedford-row—I saw the prisoner and another—the prisoner had the basket on his shoulder—the other beckoned him with the hand to come on—I had not seen my cart—I

thought by their looks that they had stolen them—I was determined to follow them, which I did down Brownlow-street, till I saw a policeman at the corner of Cursitor-street—I told him what I suspected—he pursued the prisoner—he turned and saw us—he threw down the basket, and ran away, but was taken, and the basket—the other got away.

Prisoner. Q. Did you lose sight of me? A. I did for a moment, while I spoke to the policeman—I have no doubt he is the man.

DANIEL MULLINS . I am a police-constable. The witness met me in Chancery-lane—I saw the prisoner carrying the basket—I followed him—he threw it down, and attempted to escape—I am certain he was carrying it.

DANIEL EDMUNDS . I am a police-sergeant. Here is the basket—it contained the articles stated.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, August 20.

Second Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18360815-1950

1950. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August, 3 pewter pots, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Rebecca Jeff: 1 power pot, value 8d., the goods of John Begbie; and 2 pewter pots, value 2s. 10d., the goods of Thomas Jekyll: to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1951

1951. GEORGE TETMORE was indicted for stealing on the 2nd of August, 1 pair of boots, value 12s.; and 6 other pairs of boots, value 2l. 10s.; the goods of Michael Myers, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy.

Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1952

1952. WILLIAM OWEN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Thomas Willey, on the 16th of August, at St. Pancras, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 15s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 2s.; 1 shirt, value 5s.; and 1 hat, value 1s.; his goods.

ANN WILLEY . I am the wife of John Thomas Willey, a professor of music, in Alderman-terrace, St. Pancars. On the 16th of August, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, I was called up by a policeman—I know when I went to bed the parlour window was down, but not fastened—the blind was down—the shutters were not closed—I went down, and found the prisoner in custody—the policeman had the property stated in the indictment—it had been safe in the parlour the night before—I found the things removed—the prisoner was quite a stranger.

SHADRICK VARNEY . I am carman to Mr. Martin, and live in Cromer-street. I went to the stable at five o'clock in the morning, and went with the cart to Battle-bridge, and saw the prisoner standing opposite the prosecutor's house—I returned to the stable with the cart, and at a quarter-past six o'clock, I saw him standing where he was before—I passed by three doors, and saw a young man come out of the prosecutor's street-door with a

bundle under his arm—he pulled the door to, crossed over, and gave the bundle to the prisoner—I saw the parlour window half-open—this was at quarter before seven o'clock—the prisoner put the bundle under his right arm, and they both ran up a street almost opposite—I saw them looking after me, as I was going along with the cart—I saw a man, and gave him information to go to the policeman—I got out of my cart, and kept sight of the prisoner—the policeman went one way, and I went her other, and met them together by St. Pancras Church—the prisoner had the bundle then under his arm—I said, "Stop, that don't belong to you; you got it from Alderman-terrace"—he said no; he picked it up out of a garden—I said, "I saw you bring it from a house"—he threw it down, and both ran away—the other made his escape, and I never lost sight of the prisoner till the policeman took him.

DANIEL DONOVAN . I have heard Varney's evidence; it is correct—I saw the prisoner running before him—he had the bundle in his hand—I am sure he is the boy.

CHARLES GRINHAM . I was at the station-house about seven o'clock, when the prisoner was brought in, the said he lived at Spread Eagle-court Gray's-inn-lane—I went there within an hour of the robbery, but could not find the other lad; but in the room I found this hat, which is Part of the property stolen.

ANN WILLEY re-examined. I left the property all secure when I went to bed, about half-past twelve o'clock—I am certain the window was down when I went to bed, but not fastened—we have a maid-servant, but she was not up, and could not have opened the window—this hat was in the parlour—it is my husband's.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to work, and this boy came—I met him with the bundle under his arm—he threw it over a garden—I afterwards went and got it, and brought it along—he met the carman and threw it down, as he was afraid of him—I was going straight on to my work.

GUILTY .* Aged 13.— Transported For Fourteen Years.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1953

1953. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, at Ealing, alias Zealing , I gelding, price 7l. 7s., the property of Joseph Ankins.

JOSEPH ANKINS . I live at Hanwell. I had a grey gelding last July, in the meadows at Drayton-green, in the parish of Ealing about a mile from my house—I missed it on Thursday, the 28th of July—I had seen in the day before—I went and examined the meadow after my servant had been—the gate was never locked—I found a gap in the hedge—the prisoner had been employed by me the Saturday before, and might have been so to this day if he had liked—I had not discharged him—he was been in my service as a carpenter lately, and sometimes as a hay-maker—I am a builder as well as a farmer—he had not been dismissed, but never came to work after the Saturday.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. You say he never came again to work; did he come at all to you to speak to you? A. I met him in the road on the Wednesday—the horse night have got over the gap and started away—I have never recovered it.

MARY ANN BLATCH . I live at Drayton-green, adjoining the field where Mr. Ankins kept his horse. On Thursday, the 28th of July, just after breakfast, I saw the prisoner—I knew him before, by working for Mr. Ankins—he had a grey horse with him, and he led it by the mane—he said

he had found his master's horse at the hay-rick—he asked me to give him a bit of cord—I did not do so, and he went away from my gate, leading the horse away by the mane.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know his master very well? A. Yes; the prisoner was aware of that—he called it his master's horse to me—I was in the habit constantly of seeing his master.

COURT. Q. Have you always said he said it was his master's horse? A. Yes; he said the horse had been eating his master's hay, instead of our cow—I am quite he said it was his master's horse.

JOSEPH HUNT . I hold a little land at Greenford, about two miles from Hanwell. On Thursday, the 28th of July, I was coming out of my field, along the road, about the middle of the day, and met the prisoner, on a grey horse, sitting on one side of the saddle—I looked at him, and he stopped—I said nothing to him, but he said he had been looking after his master's horse all day, for his master wanted him to go to London—I then asked him who his master was; but he spoke so very hoarse I did not understand what name he mentioned—I asked him where he came from—I understood him to say from Norwood-green—I did not ask him any more questions—I saw Mr. Ankins a day or two afterwards—he made inquiry of me, and I told him what I had seen.

ROBERT MANN . I am a policeman. I received information of this, and searched for the prisoner—I met him, on the 11th of August, in Old Brentford—I had only received information that day—I told him to come to the station-house, and he should be told the charge, and before I got him there he said, "I know what it is for, but my mother has been up there and has settled it"—nothing farther transpired till he came to the station-house. when the sergeant on duty told him he was brought on a charge of horse stealing—he said he was innocent—I then went to fetch Mr. Ankins, and the prisoner said, "I have just parted from Mr. Ankins, and have made it. up with him, "or settled it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the sergeant here what you have said? A. I suppose he did—I am sure he used the language I have stated—in bringing him up to town, he said to me, "Your evidence did me more mischief than any thing else"—I said, "You are aware I stated nothing but the truth"—he said, "Yes, I am aware of that"—I had given evidence before the Magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. (written.) I solemnly declare my innocence of the charge, being at home at the time the horse was lost was lost—I hope you will take into consideration that my wife is far gone in pregnancy.

GUILTY . Aged 35.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor, Having borne a good character.— Transported For Life.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1954

1954. JOHN DENNIS was indicted for that he, on the 5th of April, having in his possession a certain bill of exchange for the sum of £70, feloniously did forge thereon an acceptance thereof, with intent to defraud William, Higgs.—2nd COUNT, For feloniously uttering, disposing of, and putting off a like forged acceptance with a like intent—other COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud James Wright.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES WRIGHT . I am the holder of a bill of exchange, which I produce—I received it from Mr. Dalrymple—it became due on the 20th of

June—I saw the prisoner on the 21st—he asked if I had applied to the parties for payment of the bill—I said I had written the letters, but they had not gone to the post—he said, "I wish you would not let Mr. Higgs's letter go; "that he should see Mr. Higgs in town that day, and the bill would then be taken up—I complied with that, and the letter did not go to the Post-office—the bill was not taken up—I have had it ever since—Higgs purports to be the acceptor.

EDWARD BOWRING . I am a silk-manufacturer in Lawrence-lane. The prisoner brought this bill to me to discount—I don't know when this was—I took it to Mr. Dalrymple, and left it with him—I afterwards introduced the prisoner to him, and he left references with him.

WILLIAM HIGGS . I am a surveyor of the roads, and reside at South Mimms. This is not my acceptance—the prisoner is my brother-in-law—I believe this acceptance was written with my authority—some time before this Mr. Dennis came to me with a bill of £140 for me to accept—I did so—he came to town, and tried to get it discounted, but could not—he came back to me, and told me he could not get it discounted; it must be a smaller amount; had I any objection? and I said "No, certainly not"—this was drawn in part of the larger acceptance, two for? 70 instead of the other—I did not object to his making out another bill and accepting it in my name.

COURT. Q. You authorized him to accept it? A. He told me he could not get the large bill discounted, and he wanted smaller bills on that occasion, and I told him I had no objection.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1955

1955. JOHN EUSTACE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Eustace, on the 9th of August, at St. Matthew, Benthal-green, and stealing therein 1 ring, value 5s.; 1 breast-pin, value 2s. 6d.; 8 yards of calico, value 4s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 8s.; 1 coat, value 50s.; and 1 half-crown; the goods and monies of John Owen Meen.

JOHN OWEN MEEN . I live in Pollard's-row, Bethnal-green-road, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, in the house of Thomas Eustace, the prisoner's father. The prisoner lodged in the same house—I occupied the first floor—on Tuesday, the 9th of August, I left my lodging, at about three o'clock in the afternoon—I locked my room door, and put the key behind a chest on the landing-place—I came home at about ten o'clock in the evening—I found the door shut, and the key safe—I went into the room, and missed my ring, a pin off a glass work-box on the table, and eight yards of calico—next morning I went to my chest for a pair of trowsers, and found they were gone—on the Friday morning I missed a great-coat from the chest—I did not look for it when I went to the chest on Wednesday.

JOHN UFSALL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Commercial-road. I have a great-coat, which was pawned with me on the 9th of August by the prisoner, for 10s. here is the duplicate.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I am servant to Mr. Harris, a pawnbroker in the Minories—I have a pair of trowsers which were pawned on the 9th of August, for 2s., by a young man who I believe to be the prisoner.

HENRY FOWLER . I am in the service of Mr. Watt, of Commercial-road. I have eight yards of calico, which were pawned on the 9th of

August, by the prisoner, for 2s. 3d., in the name of John Mills, No.29, plumber's-row.

WILLIAM HENRY ENGLISH . I am a policeman. On Friday evening, the 9th, I was in Featherstone buildings, Holborn, and I saw the prisoner—I believe he observed me looking at him, and after I returned to look at him a second time, he came to me and said, "I suppose you are looking for me, as I hear the police are after me"—I said "Yes"—he was about taking these duplicates from his pocket, and I put out my hand and received them from him—I then asked him if he put out got any thing else, he said "No"—I asked him what they were for, he said he had stolen some things from his father's lodger, No.29, Pollard's-row, and pawned them—I look him to the station-house, and then to his father's—the duplicate I found are for a coat, a pair of trowsers, and eight yards of calico—I also found a ring in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported For Life.

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1956

1956. JAMES GRIGGS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Stone, on the 30th of July, and stealing therein 1 box, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, 3 half-crowns, 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence; his goods and monies.

SUSANNAH STONE . I am the wife of Richard Stone, who keeps a beer-shop in Shadwell. The prisoner lodged at our house for two or three months before this affair—other people slept in the same room with him, sometimes one and sometimes two—a lodger whom the prisoner recommended left us without notice, and on his going I missed two sheets belonging to other lodgers—I told the prisoner I suspected his partner had taken those things which I had lost, and I should go and look after him—he said, "Do, mistress, go down to the West India Docks, and you will find him at the wood-side of the dock"—this was at about two o'clock in the afternoon—I went away at about three o'clock—the prisoner was out then—I left a box, with some money in it, on a chest of drawers in my bed room—I locked my room door, and put the key on the next room table—when I went out of the room about three o'clock the box was safely locked, and I had the key with me—there was a sovereign and 12s. in silver and copper in it—I had seen it five minutes before—I came back at about five o'clock or later, and went into the room about three minutes after—I found the box moved up to the two-pair of stairs, broken open, and a carving-fork laid by it—it was not in the room the prisoner lodged in—the lock was forced, and the money all gone—the prisoner was not there—I went to look after him, and gave information to a policeman, who brought the prisoner to our house in about half an hour—I told him I considered his partner and him were agreed, and that I was sent away on purpose, while this was committed—he said he knew nothing about it, that he was innocent—he was detained—he said he received his week's pay at the West India Docks at two o'clock that afternoon; and before I went away he said he had been paid at two o'clock, but had not time to settle with me.

SARAH ANGEL . I am the prosecutrix's sister. I remember her going, about three o'clock, to look for the lodger who had gone away—the prisoner came in about four o'clock, or after—it was before she returned; he asked me where my sister was gone—I said I believed down to Wapping—he

said no, he thought she was gone down to the West India Docks, to look after his mate—I said, if she was, I knew she would find it out—he asked me for a pint beer, which I drew for him—he said his leg was very bad, and he was very tired, and he should sit down and rest—this was at the bar—he sat down outside the bar about five minutes, and then tole me he was going up-stairs to rub his leg—he went through the tap-room, and opened the door to go up—he was out of my sight about ten minutes—he then came down and stood at the bar two or three minutes, talking—he then went out, and said he was going to his sister's to have a cup of tea—he was gone when my sister came back—no one went up-stairs but him, I am quite positive—two or three men went into the tap-room but they did not stop above two or three minutes—I saw them come in and go out—a sailor lodged there, and he came in as the prisoner was going cut, and sat down in the bar till my sister returned—I never lost sight of him—I had not been out of the bar at all—I am sure the men who came in could not have gone up-stairs—they were north country sailors—I am quite sure there was no one in the house while my sister was away but the sailors, and the man who came and sat in the bar—the lodger came in after the prisoner came down, I am certain.

Prisoner. I went to rub my leg at the fire in the back room—I never went up-stairs at all. Witness. I never knew him go to the fire to rub it—the door led to a room with a fire in it, but he had not to pass through that room—the door both led to the kitchen and up-stairs—he opened the door as if he was going up-stairs—he need not have opended the door to get to the fire—when the tap-room door is open there are the stairs—he closed the door as if he was going up-stairs—he need not have done so to go to she fire—I could see the door he opened from where I sat—if I could not see his face I could see the door open.

Prisoner. According to the place where she sat, there is a chimney which projects and hides part of the door, and during my sitting by the fire, rubbing my leg, William the lodger went up-stairs and did not return before I left. Witness. The chimney does not hide the door in the least—William did not go up-stairs at all—I am positive he never went up till my sister returned—he was sitting by me all the time—he has gone to sea now.

GEORGE WILLIAM GRAVE . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner in High-street, Shadwell, between six and seven o'clock in the evening—I told him Mrs. Stone charged him with stealing 1l. 12s. from a box—he denied all knowledge of it—I told him he must go back with me to Mrs. Stone's, and she gave him into custody—I searched him, and found 14s. 10d. on his person—I had asked him if he had any money, and he said "Yes"—when I found the money I asked him how he came by it—he said he had been at work all the week at the West India Docks, and got 15s. for his week's pay—I am quite positive of that—I asked him what time he got paid—he said at two o'clock—I told him I knew they were not in the habit of paying at two o'clock at the docks, and he could not have received 15s.—he said it was in afternoon—I have the box which Mrs. Stone gave me, and the fork—the lock is broken off.

JOHN KING . I am deputy at the West India Docks. The prisoner was occasionally employed as an extra man—inquiry was made of me on Monday, the 1st of August—the prisoner had not received any pay of me on the Saturday—he was employed on the Tuesday and Wednesday, the 26th and 27th, and received 5s., on the Wednesday morning—he did not earn any

more that week there, to my knowledge—I did not see Mr. Mayhew or any M. P., come to ask for him—an extra man may be paid up to the time he leaves, but not without permission.

SUSANNAH STONE re-examined. This is the box and the fork—I found the door locked, and the key in the place where I had left it—any body could get it.

Prisoner's Defence. The money found on me was what I worked for, and that was 5s., as Mr. King has stated—sometimes I was at the Export Dock—Mr. King pays at No. 3 and 4—now on the Monday I was working at No. 1 and 2—on Tuesday and Wednesday I was under Mr. King, and on Thursday and Friday I was at No. 9 and 10—that constitutes my money except for the odd Saturday.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1957

1957. ELIZABETH MURRELL and SARAH MURDOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of June, at St. Luke's, 1 pocket-book, value 3s.; 1 sovereign, 2 half-sovereigns, and 3 £5 Bank-notes, the goods and monies, of Lewis Findley, in the dwelling-house of Sophia Diana Jolland.

ISABELLA FINDLEY . I am the wife of Lewis Findley, and occupy a single room in Miss Jolland's house in Old-street, St. Luke's. I had a pocket-book, with three £5 notes, a sovereign, and two half-sovereigns—I missed it in the afternoon of the 22nd of June—I had seen it in the morning of the 21st—the prisoners occupied the second floor back room in the house—my room is the third floor front—we found out the notes by the numbers, at the Bank.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate that it was on the 13th you saw them safe? A. No; they were in the pocket-book—it was Monday, the 21st—I did say the 13th before the Magistrate—I got this hurt on my face by falling down—I have dropped things down-stairs, such as a towel and such things—I have not been frequently carried home drunk by strangers, to my knowledge—I may have been tipsy in the street—I know the bar-maid at the White Hart in Old-street—I do not know her name—I told her I had lost these notes, and gave her my address, in case she should find them—I am sure she did not know my address before—I do not remember looking round the floor there to see if I could find them—I might have so and forgot it—I did not say I dropped my pocket-book—I do not remember saying I must have lost it between the White Hart and my own home—I remember talking to the bar-maid—I might have had a drop of gin at the time—I do not lose things in the street.

Q. Are you in the habit of getting tipsy—is it so? A. I cannot say, but it is a little so, not every day—I cannot stand much drink at any time.

COURT. Q. Had you received the notes from a banker's? A. Yes; about the 16th or 17th of May—I put them into my pocket-book, and into a drawer—I took them out occasionally—I did so about a fortnight before I missed them—I am sure I put them back—I saw them the day before I lost them—it was owing to a duplicate of a watch I had pawned which made me say the 13th before the Magistrate—I was up and down stairs the day I missed it, and the day before—I went out it the evening of the day I

missed it, and might have been out about an hour—that was before I missed them—the pocket-book was in the drawer when I looked at it on the 21st of June—the notes and gold were then in it—the drawer was not locked, and when I left the room the door was not locked.

LEWIS FINDLEY . I am the husband of the witness. On the 21st of June, I saw the pocket-book in the top long drawer—I saw a pawnbroker's duplicate in it at the same time—there were there £5 notes, one sovereign, and two half-sovereigns in it—there might be more gold—after losing them, I observed several new things on both the prisoners—it was through a pair of ear-rings that I had suspicion, and I went with the policeman into their room—they were both present—I told them I had lost three £5 notes, a sovereign, and two half-sovereigns, I had a strong suspicion, and it would please all the parties to have the place searched—they said I had liberty to search their room, I should find nothing.

JAMES HAYWARD . I am a policeman. I was called in by the prosecutor to search the prisoners' room—they were both present—I told Murrell I was about to take them into custody for stealing three £5 notes, one sovereign, and two half-sovereigns—Murrell said, "Oh dear me, I never had so much in all my life"—I called the prosecutor, and searched the room in his presence, with my brother officer—I found three new dresses, one piece of new bed-ticking, two pairs of new boots, one piece of new flannel, and a gold finger-ring—they both had ear-rings in their ears—I found 19s. 6d. in Murrell's box—on the way to the office, I told Murrell I had not taken the gold ring from the room, and should go back and fetch it—she said, "Have you not? then I will tell the whole truth if I get hung for it"—I did not make her any promise or threat—she said she found the money in a brown paper parcel leading to the passage-door, and being a bye place, she supposed some gentleman had come into it and dropped it—she said no more.

JOHN BURLEY . I am a policeman. I was with Hayward when he searched the room, and found the things—I took one prisoner, and he the other.

JOSIAH PEARCE . I am a jeweller and silversmith, and live at Lambeth. (Looking at a small box) I have seen this box before—it has been in my house, and has my mark on it—it has contained black ear-rings—I received a £5 note on the 20th of June from a female—I cannot say whether it was for ear-rings—I do not recollect whether there were two females—only one name is one it—I marked the note, and paid it into Spooner's bank—this is it (looking at it)—I cannot tell who the person was that had this box.

JAMES BRANNAN . I am a policeman. On the evening of the 14th of July, I had occasion to pass the cell-door at Bunhill-row station-house, and Murrell spoke to me—I turned back and said, "Halloo, who would have thought of seeing you here?" she said, "We are here through a drunken Scotch woman, who came to our house; we had a difficult job to get rid of her; she dropped a brown paper parcel on our landing, which contained three £5 notes, a sovereign, and two half-sovereigns"—I said, "There, there, tell me no more about it, I wish you had not told me so much"—she said, "I have not told them, I do not mind telling you, but I intend to tell the Magistrate all about it, "and she said, "What do you think will become of us?"—I said, "I do not know, I am afraid you will go to Newgate."

Cross-examined. Q. Were you examined before the Magistrate? A. Yes.

JAMES BARNES . I am clerk to Barclay and Co., bankers. I made a payment on the 16th of May—it was for a country order, signed "Isabella Munroe," for 44l. 3s. 7d.—I paid four £5 notes, and 24l. 7s. 3d. in cash—one of the notes was No. 35, 988, dated March 19—I do not know to whom I paid it.

ISABELLA FINDLEY re-examined. I received that order at Barclay's bank—Isabella Munroe was my maiden name—the three notes in the pocket-book were three of the notes I received.

Cross-examined. Q. What became of the other note? A. I changed it at Clark's, at the corner of Bunhill-row—I pawned the watch on the 15th of June, for 17s., as I did not wish to break in upon my money—some of it was in half-sovereigns.

Murrell's Defence. I picked up a brown paper parcel outside our door which leads to the street, and it contained three £5 notes, and two sovereigns

ELIZA COWLEY . I am bar-maid at the White Hart, in Old-street, Mrs. Findley comes there at times—I remember her complaining of losing her pocket-book—she looked round the floor—she did not say that she must have dropped it between our house and her home—she said she had lost it, and that was all—I cannot tell month this was in.

COURT. Q. Can you say whether it was within two months? A. I think it was—whether it was before or after the 21st of June, I cannot tell—she said there was money in the pocket-book—she looked round the floor—she did not say she was looking for it.

(Murrell received a good character.)

MURRELL— GUILTY . Aged 30.—Recommended to mercy.

Confined Four Months.

MURDOCK— NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Williams.

Reference Number: t18360815-1958

1958. GEORGE WHITHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 5 spoons, value 1l. 18s. 6d., the goods of Edward Lamb; and SUSANNAH GARDINER for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JAMES HARKER . I am clerk to Mr. Edward Lamb, a jeweller, on Ludgate-hill. The prisoner Whithead was employed by him as a French-polisher on Friday and Saturday in the last week—a person named Wright was employed with him—they were in the shop—on Saturday, about noon, I missed five tea-spoons—I saw four of them again on Sunday, and the other at the police-office last Tuesday.

THOMAS WRIGHT . I am a journeyman French-polisher. I went to work with Whitehead at Mr. Lamb's on Friday last—I worked there till seven o'clock on Friday evening—a man named Spalding works for Mr. Mears, who occasionally employs me—I parted with Whitehead on Friday afternoon at the corner of Primrose-street—Spalding was with him.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Who is the prisoner's master? A. Mr. Mears—we were both sent to Mr. Lamb's to work by Mr. Mears.

JAMES SPALDING . I am a French-polisher, and live in Hackney-road-crescent. I was at work last Friday week—Whitehead and Wright came to me at seven o'clock, when all the men left off, and I went out with them—I left Wright at the corner of Primrose-street, and I Whitehead went on together—it was in my way home—as I went along, he showed me a tea-spoon, and said he had four in his fob—he said, "I have taken five spoons from Mr. Lamb's, on Ludgate-hill"—I said, "You have

done very wrong, and I would not do such a thing for a hundred guineas"—I thought he would have taken them back next morning, so I did not say any thing—I told him to take them back next morning—he said, "Oh, they will never he found out"—I left him at the corner of Church-street, and went home—that was all that passed.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long have you worked with Mr. Mears? A. About twelve months—I have known Whitehead eleven years—he told me about the spoons without any thing further taking place—I told about it on the Saturday evening—he showed them to me in Shoreditch—I told my wife about it when I got home—she is not here—I should not know the spoons again—he showed them to me in his hand—that was the first time I had seen him that day—I know his father and mother—I saw him next morning—he was going to work at Mr. Lamb's again—I believe he did go there again—I told him he had better take them back again—I did not say I would give information against him if he did not—I was rather timid—I had been to Mr. Lamb's about a month before that, but not within three weeks.

COURT. Q. Did you tell Mr. Mears or Mr. Lamb of it? A. Mr. Mears.

JOHN MEARS . I am in the habit of employing Wright, Spalding, and Whitehead—I sent Wright and Whitehead to Mr. Lamb's, to work—Spalding never gave me any information at all—about any spoons—Wright did, but not in Spalding's presence—he was with a person named Motley, and he told me of it when I was paying him, but Spalding never told me till after he was taken into custody, which was on Saturday evening, and then he did tell the policeman and me.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had you been told by other persons before he told you? A. Yes—Wright has been with me eight years. Spalding has worked with me three different times—I suppose about two years altogether.

WILLIAM BARRYMORE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Golden-lane, St. Luke's. Last Saturday night, between five and six o'clock, Whitehead came to me with a tea-spoon to pledge—it had a crest on it—I stopped it—I asked him where he got it—he said his mother sent him, and he wanted 3s. on it—it is worth 6s.—I had nobody in the shop but myself, and he went out—I asked him where his mother got it—he said she had bought that and four more of a Jew, three years ago—I told him he must send his mother—he said if he sent his mother, would I let her have the spoon back?—I said, "Yes"—I went in search of a policeman, and took the spoon to the station-house—I marked it, and left it in Eyre's possession—Whitehead was taken the same night, I believe—I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Had you ever seen him before? A. Yes; I knew him before, and knew his name, but could not recollect it at the time—he used to live at the back of my father's house.

JOHN JAMES EYRE . I am a police-constable. I produce a silver tea-spoon which I had from Barrymore—I have had it ever since.

WILLIAM BRUFF . I am a police-constable. Last Saturday night, about half-past eleven o'clock, Mr. Mears called me into the house, and gave Whitehead in charge.

HARRIET BOARDS . I am the wife of John Boards, a pawnbroker, in Shoreditch. I know the female prisoner. On Saturday afternoon, between five and six o'clock, she came and produced four tea-spoons, wishing to know the value, and whether they were silver—I took them into

my hand, and asked her how she came by them—she said she was about buying them of a young man who kept company with her daughter—I asked her how the young man got his living—she said, by selling china, and he had taken these spoons in exchange—I told her I believed they were stolen, for a person who could afford to give silver spoons, could afford to give money, and I sent for a policeman—she said nothing—the policeman heard the last part of what I said—he took her and the spoons—she did not offer to sell or pawn them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. She merely asked you the value? A. Yes—I have seen her in my shop before, and she has pawned things.

ROBERT M'GOVERN . I am a policeman. I came into Board's shop while the female prisoner was there—I produce the four spoons which I took out of her hand—I said I thought they must be stolen property—she asked me to go with her to show me the person who gave them to her—previous to getting to the pawnbroker's, I had seen Whitehead talking to a young woman at the corner of Webb-square; and as I passed, something was said about a policeman—the female prisoner said he was talking to her daughter at the corner of Webb-square—I went there with her, and when I got there, he was gone, and the daughter also—I turned down a court, and met the daughter, but did not see Whitehead—I am quite sure he is the person I saw standing at the corner—it is thirty or forty yards from the pawnbroker's—that was hardly a minute before I went to the pawnbroker's—when the female prisoner found he was gone, she said they must have been improperly come by, because he had run away, and she was very sorry she had been taken in my such a person.

Cross-examined by MR. PA YNE. Q. Did you know Primrose-street? A. Yes; that is not a quarter of a mile from where I saw Whitehead—Board's is between that and Primrose-street—he was standing about a mile from Golden-lane.

MR. PAYNE to THOMAS WRIGHT. Q. Were you at Mr. Lamb's the same length of time as the prisoner? A. Yes, on the Friday, all day—I was with him on the Saturday until five o'clock—we left together—we were working in the same room, he at one end of the shop, and I at the other.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Gardiner's Defence. My daughter came to me with this young man, and said he had got some spoons to sell, and I think them sliver—I said, "I do not know, I will go and ask Mrs. Boards"—she said, "Stop a little, are you going to buy them?"—I said I did not know, and she sent for a policeman.

HARRIET GARDINER . I am the prisoner's daughter. I know Whitehead by keeping company with a young woman next door—my mother and I met the prisoner as we came out of Church-street—Mrs. Cook and her mother were with us—he said to me, "I have four spoons in my pocket, will you go and pawn them, and I will give you 1s.?"—I said I would not because I did not know the pawnbroker; and my mother said, "I will take them, Mr. Board knows me, and I will see if they are silver or no;" and she went and took them.

(The prisoners received a good character.)

WHITEHEAD— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

GARDINER.— NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1959

1959. CHARLES SKEGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August, 2 sacks, value 4s.; 4 bushels of chaff, value 3s.; and 1 bushel of pollard, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of Isaac Lake, his master; and GEORGE SKELTON for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen, &c. against the Statute.

ISAAC LAKE . I am a farmer living at Barking, in Essex. Skeggs was my carman—on the 17th of August I sent him to London with a load of potatoes, with a cart and one horse—he was taken up before he returned.

GEORGE HENRY SEAFORTH . I am a policeman. On Wednesday morning last, I was in Mile-end-road, and saw the prisoner Skeggs coming over the Globe-bridge with a cart-load of potatoes—he drew up at the Bell and Mackerel public-house—I saw him take something very bulky off the cart—he rang the bell three times very violently; and these keys were thrown out of window by Skelton—Skeggs then went and opened the gate of a shed, deposited two sacks there, and put the keys on a bench—he then came out of the yard with his cart, and proceeded on his journey; I went and stopped him, and asked what he had left behind—he said he had left nothing behind—another officer came up, and I told him to take him unless he told me what he had left behind—he then said he had left some chaff behind—I took the name on his cart, and let him go—I went back to the house, took the keys, unlocked the place, and found the two sacks, one was full of chaff, and the other had a bushel of pollard—I shut the place up, and took the keys with me—I waited till he returned from market, and took him into custody about seven o'clock that morning—it happened about four o'clock—after taking him, I went to the Bell and Mackerell, and took Skelton into custody—I told him it was for being concerned with the other prisoner in robbing his master of the chaff—he said he knew nothing about the chaff, nor about the keys, nor any thing else—nobody in the house would own the keys—I showed them to him—I then went back to the shed, and found the place open, and the sacks empty—they were the same sacks I had seen in the morning—this is a watering-house by the side of the road.

Skelton. Q. Could any man swear to such a thing across the road? Witness. There was light enough for me to see him—I had seen him two or three days previous to this.

ISAAC LAKE re-examined. These are my sacks—one has my name on it, and the other I brought of my brother-in-law—Skeggs had a nose-bag full of pollard and chaff for his horse—he had no business with these two sacks full—they hold about four or five bushels.

Skeggs's Defence. I drew up there in the morning, and left them there till I came back, for my horse—I took a little in my nose-hag for the horse to eat at Covent-garden market while I unloaded.

Skelton's Defence. I never saw any thing of it—I had nothing to do with the keys—I am only under ostler.

GEORGE HENRY SEAFORTH re-examined. He was the under ostler—I saw him throw out the keys, and he remained at the window for about ten minutes, until the keys were deposited.

SKEGGS— GUILTY . Aged 17.—Recommended to mercy.

Whipped and discharged.

SKELTON— GUILTY . Aged 38.— Confined Six Months.

First Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18360815-1960

1960. JOHN HAYTER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August, 1 sovereign, and 1 half-sovereign, the monies of Peter Ross, his master.

ANN ROSS . I am the wife of Peter Ross, he is writer to Mr. Dixon, an architect. The prisoner was in my service—he came about Christmas, and remained with me—my name was then Martin—I have been married since—he was my servant at first, to carry out goods—I keep a glass and chine shop—I paid him 12s. a week—on the 1st of August, I gave him a sovereign and a half to go out to fetch some goods with—the money was not marked—he did not return till next morning—I then sent him to fetch the things from Mr. Phillips.' on Oxford-street, which I had given him money for the day before—(looking at an invoice) this is the bill for the goods I ordered him to get—he never gave me the money back—he was almost tipsy in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You gave him 1l. 10s. to fetch the goods enumerated in this invoice? A. Yes; he brought the goods next day—here is a receipt on the bill for the 30s.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am servant to John Phillips, and been no seven years—I believe the prisoner came to our shop on the 1st or 2nd of August, but I did not serve him myself—this bill has never been paid—the receipt is not my hand-writing—there is no other John Robinson in the house.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know it was never paid? A. I know by the books—I did not see the prisoner at the shop—he has got the goods, and I know the bill has not been paid.

WILLIAM HOOKER . I am a policeman. I took him into custody—I received this bill and receipt from the prosecutrix—Mrs. Ross said the charged him with forging some bills—I searched him, and she said, "I have been robbed to the extent, of 40l."—the prisoner said, "Not quite so much as that;" and in going to the station-house, he said, "Do you think I shall be transported?"—I said I could not tell—he said, "It is all through bad company that had brought me to this."

ANN ROSS re-examined. I received the bill and receipt from the prisoner, with the goods.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported For Fourteen Years.

There were three other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18360815-1961

1961. MARY NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July, 1 pair, of boots, value 7s.; 1 other boot, value 2s.; 1/4 lb. of leather, value 6d.; and 1 bag, value 6d., the goods of John Duggan.

(The Prosecutor did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18360815-1962

1962. JAMES DONOGHUE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 1 jacket, value 6s., the goods of Timothy Sullivan.

NOT GUILTY

(The Prosecutor did not appear.)

Reference Number: t18360815-1963

1963. RACHAEL CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August, 1 blanket, value 4s.; 1 pillow, value 4s.; 2 pairs of bellows, value 3s.; 1 kettle, value 6d.; 1 saucepan, value 1s.; and 1 sheet, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of Peter Burne.

CATHERINE BURNE . I am the wife of Peter Burne, and let ready-furnished

lodgings. in Stepney-causeway. The prisoner and her husband occupied a furnished back room for four or five weeks—they did not pay regularly—the man worked at Barnes, the miller—on the 19th of August, I went into the room, and said, "There is something missing, off the bed"—she said, "No"—she was intoxicated—I went in again sometime afterwards—she said nothing was missing, and if these was, she would make it good—I missed several things—she stripped her child totally naked, and left him there for any one to look after—I never permitted her to pawn my property.

HUGH HENRY CAMPION . I am in the service of Mr. Friar, a pawnbroker, in High-street. I produce a pillow and blanket—I cannot identify the prisoner, but I think it was her that pawned them.

EDWARD KENNEDY . I am a policeman. I did not search her, not did any other policeman—I have a duplicate which her husband gave me.

H. H. CAMPION re-examined. This is the counter-duplicate—it was pawned by a woman.

EDWARD HART . I am a pawnbroker. I produce two pairs of bellows, which the prisoner pawned.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. She says I was drunk when I took the bellow to pawn, and I was not—I told her I could take them out, and was willing to do &c.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Six Weeks.

NEW COURT. Saturday, August 20th.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18360815-1964

1964. MARY CATTERNS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 1 petticoat, value 6d., 1 pocket, 2d.; and the materials for a cap, value 6d.; the goods of John Tuff; to which she pleaded

GUILTY .*— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1965

1965. HENRY ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August, 1 printed book, value 1s. 6d., the goods of George Nodan and another.

(The prisoner did not plead to the indictment, and upon the evidence of Mr. M' Murdo and W. W. Cope, Esq., the Jury found him of unsound mind.)

Reference Number: t18360815-1966

1966. FRANCES RABY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July, 2 chairs, value 20s., the goods of John Potter.

JOHN POTTER . I am a carman, and live in Upper Chapman-street. The prisoner had the care of my house while my wife was away—I missed two chairs on the 30th of July.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. This woman had been living in your service? A. Yes—we lived together as man and wife after the second week—my wife went away for a few weeks—I do not know that the prisoner had been obliged to pledge things for support—I sent her once to pledge a hat—when I earned money I brought it home, and put it down in the house—when the prisoner was going to the station, she told me where the chairs were—my wife had returned, and the prisoner came and abused her in the evening.

Q. Did you not go three times on the same afternoon to where the prisoner was living, telling her to keep up her spirits—that you would

not live with your wife after all—you would have her back again? A. No—I asked her how she came to do it, she said did not know—she was intoxicated—I did not drink with her.

ROBERT YOUNG (police-constable K 126.) I took the prisoner on Sunday, the 31st of July—the prosecutor told me where the chairs were—I went and got them—the prisoner did not say where they were till she got near the station-house, and then she told the prosecutor.

Q. Then it is not true, as you stated before the Magistrate, that you questioned her, and she said she had left the chairs at No. 44, Wellington-street? A. No—she did not tell me so—this is my hand writing to this deposition—it was read over to me—I do not recollect saying so.

SOPHIA FITCH . I am the wife of James Fitch, of Wellington-street. On the 31st of July, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought these two chairs, and said, "Will you be so kind as to take these? I will call for them to-morrow morning;" and, knowing her, I took them in—I have known her seventeen or eighteen years—she had a good character—my house in not two miles from Potters's

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

----HARVEY I am a bricklayer, and live in Phillip-street, near the prosecutor. I know that he and the prisoner were living together—I wrote a note at his desire, for her to come to take care of his two children—I know that they have not had a bit of bread for a day together—the prosecutor has told me so himself, and he has ordered her to pawn every thing, till there was nothing left in the house—he was about taking his wife up—the prisoner came to me and said, that she had seen Potter, and he had told her to take a house, and he would get away his things and come to her, and leave his wife—I have lent the prisoner money to support her.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18360815-1967

1967. MARY ANN FORSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Forster.

LUCY FORSTER . I am the wife of John Forster, we live in Cherrytree-court, Golden-square, The prisoner is my daughter—I missed a red silk handkerchief, on a Monday in May—I had forbidden the prisoner my house, because of the characters she got acquainted with, who were so depraved, that I and her father wished her to keep away from the house altogether.

BENJAMIN MEECHAM . I am shopman to Mr. Walker, a pawnbroker in Aldersgate-street. I have a red silk handkerchief which was pawned by the prisoner on the 9th of May, for 1s. 6d. in the name of Ann Cooke.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did take the handkerchief, but I gave the duplicate to my mother, and told her I would get it out as soon as I got work.

LUCY FORSTER . She gave me one duplicate, but one she lost; and then she went and stopped the handkerchief—she said he would pay me as soon as she got work.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1968

1968. EMMA LUKE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May, 1 veil, value 4l., the goods of Harriet Cuff Maxwell.

HANNAH MARIA SOPHIA SAVAGE . I am a widow. I have a sister

named Harriett Cuff Maxwell—I live with my mother, in Mortimer-street—in May last, I was attending Mr. Smith, the artist, in Pultney-street, to have my portrait taken; and was in the habit of wearing a dress and a veil of my sister's, in which I wished to have my likeness taken—I left the veil and the dress at Mr. Smith's—the prisoner was servant to my mother, and she came to the artist's almost every day when I went there, to assist to dress me, and to walk home with my little boy—when the veil was missed, we had it advertised, and Mr. Baxter, the pawnbroker, produced it.

ELIZABETH MAXWELL . I live with my mother in Mortimer-street. The prisoner was her house-maid—she left on the 23rd of May—I sent her on the 13th of May to fetch away the dress and necklace from the artist's which I had lent to my sister; and she brought them—I did not mention the veil.

GEORGIANA BOSWELL . I live in Rebecca-court, Wells-street, and am twelve years old. I met the prisoner one day in May, she said she would be very much obliged to me, to take a black veil to Mr. Baxter's the pawnbroker, and ask 3s. on it—I took it, and they sent me to tell the prisoner to go in—she went in—they did not lend any thing on it; they kept the veil, but did not detain the prisoner—she was at the corner of Norfolk-street, when I went into the shop—it was on a Friday in May.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. When did you see the prisoner afterwards? A. Sometime afterwards—I said I was not cetrain she was the woman.

GEORGE WINDER . I am foreman to Mr. Baxter, a pawnbroker in Norfolk-street, On the 13th of May, Boswell came to the shop with a black veil—I sent her out to fetch the person who owned it—she brought in a woman who, I believe, was the prisoner, from my recollection of her—the shawl she has on now, I belive in the one she had on then—I asked her if she knew what the value of the veil was—she said, No"—I asked where she got it—she said her sister her sister gave it her, who was then in Wales—I detained the veil till I saw the advertisement—I then gave it to Mr. Baxter—it is a Chantilly veil—it is now worth 3l.—I should think is cost six or seven guineas.

Cross-examined. Q. You had never seen this woman before? A. Not to my recollection—it was in the dusk, between eight and nine o'clock—she had a bonnet on, but I could see her perfectly well—she was ten minutes or a quarter of an hour there—I did not see her again till she was in custody, on the 8th or 9th of August—I verily believe she is the person—I think I am not mistaken.

JOHN CORDY BAXTER . I carried the veil to Mrs. Maxwell's, and asked if it was theirs.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you get it? A. From Winder on Monday fortnight—I cannot tell where it had been from May.

MARY ANN CHRISTY . I was cook to Mrs. Maxwell. The prisoner, a week before she left the service, inquired of me if a pawnbroker had a right to keep back any thing that he had refused to take in, in pledge—I said, "No, unless it was stolen"—she said a friend of hers had taken a veil to pledge, and they would not give her the veil nor lend any thing on it, and that it still remained at the pawnbroker's—she said the pawnbroker had asked if it was hers, and she said it was a friend of hers, and he would not give her the veil, nor the money on it, till her friend came forward.

BENJAMIN TURNER (police-constable D93.) I was called in Gloucester-place to take the prisoner into custody—Miss Max well said if the prisoner would acknowledge she did such a thing she would forgive her.

ELIZABETH MAXWELL . The prisoner was living in Gloucester-place—I gave her a character there—I went there from information.

HARRIET CUFF MAXWELL . The veil in mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not do it—if I was short of money, I could borrow a sovereign or two.

REV. ARTHUR HENRY GLASS . I live at Gloucester-place, and am a clergyman. I have known the prisoner some time—she bore an excellent character—the pawnbroker's man, who has since identified her, declared before me that he could not swear to her; and the little girl said, "That' in not the woman, she was a much thinner woman than her."

GEORGIANA BOSWELL . re-examined. I did express a doubt about her—the person was much thinner than the prisoner is at present.

GEORGE WINDER re-examined. Q. Did you express a doubt about her being the person? A. No; she appeared the same as she is now—I believe her to be the same—the girl did not express a doubt about her when before the Magistrate, it was when she saw her on the grass plot—they were above an hour in the drawing-room, endeavouring to prevail on the prisoner to confess, and they would say no more about it, but send her to her friends—I feel convinced that she is the person, but I would not swear it.

MARY ANN CHRISTY re-examined. Q. Did you and the prisoner part friends? A. Yes; when I heard that the veil had been lost, it brought to my recollection what she had said to me—I had mentioned it before Mr. Baxter brought it.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18360815-1969

1969. ANN MILLS was indicted for stealing on the 8th of July, 2 sheets, value 6s.; 1 pillow, value 2s. 6d.; and 1 pillow-case, value 1s.; the goods of James Holton.

REBECCA HOLTON . I am the wife James Holton. The prisoner same on the Friday to lodge at my house in Rosemary-lane—she left on the Friday following—she had person whom she called her husband threw—she locked up the room, and took away the key—I missed these articles—I did not go into the room for a fortnight—the man came back to the room, but he could not get in, as the prisoner had taken the key with her.

JOHN FARNES (police-constable H 168.) I produce one of the sheets that was in pledge—the prisoner took it out, and gave it to Mrs. Holton.

REBECCA HOLTON . I met the prisoner in Petticoat-lane—I tried to get a policeman to take her up—she said, if I would let her go she would get a sheet—I went with her, and she got it out; and then I took her to the station, where she gave up the duplicates of the rest.

JOHN FARNES . I found two duplicates in her hand, and forty-one at her lodging—three of them relate to this property.

JOHN UNWIN . I am assistant to a pawnbroker. I have a pillow pawned for 1s., and one sheet for 2s.—the prisoner the sheet—these are the duplicates of them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Six Weeks.

Reference Number: t18360815-1970

1970. MARTHA DODD was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of June, 1 counterpane, value 7s., the goods of Sarah Harrison.

SARAH HARRISON . I am single, and live in Leg-alley. The prisoner came to me, and asked me to let her go backwards—I had seen her several times before—I saw her go out afterwards—my servant then went to my first-floor room, and missed the counterpane off the bed—I saw it again

the same day at Mr. Newby's—the prisoner afterwards called, and asked me to give her a trifle—I asked what she had done with the counterpane—she said she had not taken it—I gave her in charge.

HELEN HOLLAND . I am in the prosecutor's service. I recollect the prisoner calling at her house between nine and ten o'clock in the morning—she asked to go backwards—she staid in the yard some time, and then went out—I went up-stairs, and missed the counterpane—no other person had been in the house—I went out into the court, and saw the prisoner, with the counterpane in her arms—I pursued her to the end of the street, when I lost sight of her—I am sure she is the person.

JAMES NEWBY . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Drury-lane. I have a counterpane which was pawned on the 23rd of June for Mr. Carter, in the name of Jones—I have no knowledge of the prisoner.

WILLIAM HOWLETT (police-constable F151.) I apprehended the prisoner—she said she was not guilty—she afterwards said the ticket was torn up, and she had had some gin with part of the money.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor is a common brothel-keeper—I never saw the counterpane—I was not asking for charity when the officer took me, but they give women a few half-pence when they are going out—on the day the counterpane is said to be lost, I was drinking in a public-house I heard two girls talking about a counterpane they had pawned, and they said they could stand a glass of gin out of the money.

*** SARAH HARRISON re-examined. Q. Do unfortunate woman frequent your house? A. Yes; we sometimes give a few half-pence to those who frequent the house—the prisoner called for that purpose.

HELEN HOLLAND re-examined. I saw the prisoner come in—the yard door goes to the left, and the stairs to the right—she could go and take what thought proper.

Prisoner. Q. Why did you not give me in charge? A. I was so agitated—I had not power to halloo—she turned her head about ten yards before she got to the corner of the street—she was well aware that I was after her—she knew me as servant of the house—I saw her come in, and she stopped in the passage and asked for the loan of 2d., and my mistress said she had not got 2d., but she would give her some when she came in the evening.

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1971

1971. MARY ANN STEERS was indicted for a misdemeanour; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Confined Six Weeks.

Reference Number: t18360815-1972

1972. MARY ANN NEWLAND was indicted for a misdemeanour; to which she pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18360815-1973

1973. CAROLINE WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August, 3 spoons, value 12s.; 6 sheets, value 30s.; 3 table-cloths, value 10s.; 4 blankets, value 10s.; 1 tea-kettle, value 10s.; 2 shifts, value 10s.; 4 towels. value 4s.; and 2 candlesticks, value 4s.; the goods of John Jones, her master.

JOHN JONES . I live in Foley-place, Portland Chapel, and am a builder. The prisoner lived servant with me—I missed a table-spoon, two tea-spoons,

and other articles—the prisoner had no authority to pledge any of them—we placed the greatest confidence in her—she had 10l. a-year.

Prisoner. I missed them myself, but I know nothing about them—the spoons I took out at Mr. Mulcaster's I paid for myself out of my wages, and bought two caps and a pair of shoes, and then I lost the remainder of my wages. Witness. She redeemed four spoons, but there are three more.

RACHAEL BARNES . I am the wife of Thomas Barnes, of Stafford-street—the prosecutor is my father. I missed the articles on Wednesday last—I asked the prisoner for the table-linen—she said they were dirty, and then said they were mislaid—I charged her with pawning them—she first denied it, and then said, "I have; will you be so kind as to do as you did before, advance me money?"—I said, "No, never again."

JOHN WOOD (police-constable E 33.) On the 10th of August, the prisoner was given into my custody, charged with taking a table-spoon, tea-spoons, and some other things—there was no promise held out to her—she said she had taken them, and pawned them, and if her master would allow her to live in his service she would get them out again—she said she did not know where the tickets were, but they were found this morning in the coals—she mentioned Mr. Bailey's, and two other places, where she had pawned them.

GEORGE COLLINS . I am shopman to Mr. Bailey, a pawnbroker. I produce four sheets—one of them was pledged by the prisoner on the 4th of March, in the name of Mary Wood—the other I cannot speak to—she had been in the habit of pawning spoons, and redeeming them sometimes the same day—we had no suspicion of her, and did not know that she was in service.

JOSEPH BOWEN . I am shopman to Mr. Chapman, a pawnbroker. I have a table-spoon, a tea-spoon, and a sheet—the sheet, I have every reason to believe, was pledged by the prisoner, but I am not confident—it is in the name of Caroline Wood, Ogle-street—this is the duplicate of it, which the officer has produced.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am not guilty of all they bring against me—there was only one spoon missing.

GUILTY . Aged 55.— Confined Six Weeks.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18360815-1974

1974. JOHN FOSTER and CATHERINE WICKART were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August, 1 pewter pot, value 1s. 6d., the goods or Richard Ford Jenkins; and 1 pewter pot, value 1s., the goods of John Cox.

RICHARD FORD JENKINS . I keep the Catherine Wheel, in Little St. James's-street. This is my quart pot—it was found in Cleveland-row.

RICHARD YOUNG . I saw this pot on the pavement—the female prisoner stooped down upon it, and Foster assisted her to rise—she concealed the pot under her clothes—I gave the alarm—the prisoners were taken, and these two pots were found on the woman.

JOHN COX . I keep the Star and Garter. This pint pot is mine—I know nothing of the prisoners.

Wickart's Defence. I had something to drink, and a man told me

to mind the pots while he went for some more rum—I do not know this prisoner at all.

FOSTER— NOT GUILTY .

WICKART— GUILTY .— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18360815-1975

1975. THOMAS HINKS, JOHN COOMBS , and WILLIAM RICHDALE , were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, 1 work-box, value 7s.; 2 ear-rings, value 1s.; 1 pair of scissors, value 1d. 1 ring, value 1s.; 1 knife, value 3 d.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-sovereigns, to shillings, and fourpenny pieces; the goods and monies of Maria Hillman.

NOT GUILTY

(The prosecutrix did not appear.)

Reference Number: t18360815-1976

1976. CHARLES JAMES FOX and JOHN HENRY BEATTIE were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 2 stereotype plates, value 2s.; 1 galley, value 1s.; 1lb. weight of quadrats, value 1s.; 15lbs. weight of metal type, value 15s.; and 1lb. weight of lead, value 1s.; the goods of Henry Davidson, their master: and THOMAS JONES WEBB for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing the same to have been stolen, against the Statute, &c.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE HENRY DAVIDSON . I am a printer, and carry on business in Tudor-street, Blackfriars. Fox was my apprentice, and Beattie was my warehouseman, and Webb had been in my service till within a short time of this period—on the 19th of July, during Beattie's absence, I went into the warehouse, and found the type of a baker's bill—I could see by the face of it that it had been stereotyped on my premises—Beattie was not a printer—I made no mention of what I discovered, but as there had been a number of sheets belonging to a dictionary missed, I asked Beattie whether he had found them—he said he had not—I told him he must make it his business of find them, as his character depended upon it—he did not say that he intended to leave my service, but he said he did not care, or something of that kind—he left the place, and I never saw him afterwards till last Monday, when he was apprehended at a public-house in Wych-street—there was a week's wages due to him all but one day—in consequence of his leaving, I made further inquiries, and from what I heard I obtained a search-warrant, and searched a penny theatre, in a turning out of the New-Cut—the officer went there with me, and behind the theatre we found some materials for printing—the officer took what I pointed out as my property—we found these leads, these quadrats, and this galley, which I know particularly well—it has been in my possession many years, and is one I worked upon myself when I was learning the business—this type of the job which was found at the warehouse I identify as mine—I afterwards went with the officer to a shop in Brunswick-street—I stood by while the officer took up a drain under a water-butt in the yard at the back of the house, where we found this type, these blocks, and some others—I have no doubt of their being stereotyped from this type—I had never permitted Beattie to take any type or stereotype from my premises—I was not aware that he was in business for himself, or that he was in partnership with Webb—I knew Webb was in business—Webb was taken at the time these were found—the officer said to him, "Now you must go with me to the Magistrate, "and I applied for a warrant for Beattie.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. When you told Beattie that his character depended upon his finding the waste sheets of this dictionary, I suppose you was rather sharp with him? A. Yes—they had been missing a considerable time—I did not know this type had been made up till that afternoon—I never said I did—I have no man of the name of Williams in my employ.

Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate that Beattie might have made use of this type if he had asked for it? A. No, Sir, I did not, nor any thing of the kind—I told the Magistrate there was no excuse for my people doing these things without permission, as I was always ready to grant them leave if they asked it—the Magistrate did not say that the best way to settle this would be for them to make me some slight remuneration—there was no proposition made to remunerate me for the use of my property.

Q. Did you not proceed to say that you would not consent to that, after it had been suggested, because you had no other mode of getting rid of your apprentice, FOX? A. I have no recollection of it—I never said any thing of the kind—all my observations were with a view of saving the apprentice—I did not say I would not receive remuneration for the use of my goods—the Magistrate did not say he had considerable doubts about this matter—he treated it as a very gross case—he admitted the parties to bail—he told me he thought the apprehension of Beattie was essential to the case, and he adjourned the case to try to get him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Webb was before him at that time? A. He was not there the first time—Webb was a witness against me in the Court of Chancery—that was about three weeks before I had him taken—that case was settled most decisively in my favour—I had an injunction against me, which was dissolved—I bore Webb no ill will—the value of things found in the drain is about 4s.—it is a baker's bill, and is complete in itself—it is of use to print this bill.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Are you not also aware that Beattie was a witness against you? A. Yes; when Beattie went away on the Saturday, he did not say he was going to leave—he left his coat and hat in the warehouse.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were these proceedings against you by a man of the name of Knowles? A. Yes; and they were dissolved by the Chancellor on the ground that it was upon a false representation—I had never given Beattie or Fox leave to take my property and bury it in Webb's drain, or to take any to the theatre—I had discovered robberies before I had any proceedings in Chancery against me.

JOHN BELLAMY . I am an officer of Union Hall. I was applied to, in July, to go with a warrant to search Mr. Hamilton's premises, which are used as the Penny Theatre, in the Lower Marsh, Lambeth (Fox was not then in custody)—I searched the shed where they hold the theatre, and Mr. Davidson found this galley, and leads, and other things—I received further information, and went there again—I found, under the stage, this bundle of type, in this handkerchief—I then went to Webb's premises, in Brunswick-street—I saw Webb there—we went into the yard, and I opened a drain under the water-butt, where I found these eight blocks, which have been spoken of by the prosecutor—I made a further search, and took Webb into custody—Mr. Davidson, who was with me, found a small imprint on the printing-press at Webb's—I told Webb I should be obliged to take him to Union Hall; and on the way there he said, "As to the blocks, they

were only put there for a lark"—the drain was closed, and it took me some time to get it up—these blocks were about a foot deep, and about a yard from where I took up the drain—I know nothing of Fox being connected with the Penny Theatre.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Did Webb tell you that he knew who put these things there for a lark, or that he had seen them put there? A. No.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was any body the owner of that yard but Webb? A. No; I found him on the premises—I found this card there, (reads) "Webb and Beattie, Printers, 16, Brunswick-street, Blackfriars-road."

JOHN RIDDELL . I was, in July, an apprentice to Mr. Davidson. I received instructions from Webb and Beattie, about three weeks or a month before Webb left Mr. Davidson to set up a lucifer-match bill—Fox was to assist me in doing it—the bill was to be printed at Mr. Davidson's printing office—here are the words "Lucifer matches, "which were found on the type at the theatre.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it unusual for a young man to have a little bill printed? A. No—I was told to tell no one of this—I was up clandestinely—I thought it was wrong, but I did it to oblige them—if I had thought of the consequences I should not have done it—I have been twice put into Bridewell by Mr. Davidson, but not for any felonious act; it was once for doing a thing in a passion, and once for throwing things in the counting-house.

CHARLES FLOWER . I am in the employ of Mr. Davidson, and have worked his type for a number of years. I know this type to be his—I got up this form of a bill by Beattie's direction.

THOMAS BRADLEY . I was in the employ of Mr. Davidson, as stereotype picker. I know these blocks to be his.

NOT GUILTY .

Fifth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18360815-1977

1977. LEVY BENOIT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 1 diamond, value 3l. 7s., the goods of James Catchpole and another—2nd COUNT, Stating It to be the goods of Elise Hubert Desvignes.

(The prisoner being a foreigner, had the evidence explained to him by an interpreter.)

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I am in partnership with James Catchpole—we are jewellers, and live in Regent-street, We purchased a quantity of jewels of Mr. Desvignes—we had not weighed them, but kept them separate from others—on the 10th of August, I received information, and went to the prisoner's lodgings—I saw him put his hand into his pocket—I put my hand into his pocket, and took out this diamond, rolled up in a piece of paper—I do not know the diamond.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. You understand these things? A. Yes; it is impossible to tell this from any other diamond—there was a person watching in our shop while the prisoner was there—he was desired to keep his eye on the customers—he is not here.

ELISE HUBERT DESVIGNES . I live in Golden-square, and am a diamond merchant. I sold the prosecutors seventy-eight diamonds, which weighed twenty-four carats and a thirty-second—I had this diamond weighed, which—this, put with the other diamonds, makes up exactly the weight of those said to the prosecutors.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not this an ordinary sized diamond? A. Yes; there are thousands of them.

DUNCAN FALCONER . I am shopman to the prosecutors. The prisoner came to look at some diamond pins—I spoke to him in French—I showed him some—he did not appear satisfied—he said he wanted to look at various sizes—I took out a paper which contained a large quantity of diamonds—he put his hands on them, which I requested him not to do—he then spoke about a pair of diamond ear-rings, which he said he would exchange and he wanted to know what I would allow him for them—he said he would look in another day—I showed him the paper of diamonds which we had from Mr. Desvignes—I had not counted them, but I had every reason to believe the paper contained seventy-eight—I do not know of any having been sold—after he was gone, I examined it, and it contined seventy-seven—I did not go after him, but I sent a person to watch where he went to—I saw him in Queen-street, with Mr. Williams—I asked him, in the French language, where the diamond was that he had taken from our shop, and he said Mr. Williams had got it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you know he is a Dutchman? A. Yes; Mr. Williams was present at the time I had this conversation with the prisoner—he might have heard it—I asked where the diamond was he had taken from our shop—I did not tell him who I was—he had produced a pair of diamond-top ear-rings to me—I endeavoured to separate the diamonds into two papers—I put three or four on one side—I did not look on the floor to see if I could find any—I had not counted the diamonds in the paper before the prisoner came into the shop—about five or six person sell in our shop—I cannot swear whether any of them had sold a diamond out of this quantity—they had as much right to sell as I had—the prisoner was in the shop ten minutes or a quarter of a hour—I was the width of the counter from him—about three quarters of a yard—I do not know whether he misunderstood me, or I him—there is a person who watches those who come into our shop—I did not see the prisoner searched—this diamond is of a very ordinary size and water—there is no mark on it by which any body could distinguish it.

CHARLES WILLIAMS re-examined. I did not weigh the diamonds—I only know how many there were from the mark outside the paper—I found this one on the prisoner in about five hours afterwards he had been to our shop.

GEORGE STONE (police-sergeant C 2.) On the 10th of August, I went with Mr. Williams and Mr. Falconer, to a house in Queen-street—we staid there till five o'clock when the prisoner came in—Mr. Williams spoke to him, and said he was the man—I saw endeavour to put his hand into his trowsers pocket—I caught hold of both his hands by his wrists, and told Mr. Williams to see what he had in his pockets—he put in his hand and pulled out this diamond in a paper—I showed it to Mr. Devignes—he weighed it, and returned it to me.

Cross-examined. Q. You made a thorough sweep of the man's property? A. I don't know—I took 7l. 12s. 6d. from him—he was not charged with stealing money—I gave his wife a sovereign back, by the Magistrate's order—I took his watch, which the magistrate told me to keep till to-day, and if I found no owner for it, to give it to his wife—I took the ear-rings—I have made in-quiries to see if they or the watch had been stolen.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop, and asked to see a diamond pin—I

was shown a paper of diamonds—I did not touch them at all—I merely pointed to one with my fingers, and said it was rather too small—it is very easy to mistake a diamond—why should he think I stole one from having one in my possession.

GUILTY . Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18360815-1978

1978. EDWARD CLARKE was indicted for an assault, with an intent to commit b----y.

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Two Years in the house of correction.

Reference Number: t18360815-1979

1979. JOHN SMITH was indicted for a like offence.

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Confined Two Years.

OLD COURT.—Monday, August 22nd 1836.

First Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18360815-1980

1980. FRANCES LOCKWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 gown, value 5s.; and 1 coverlid, value 9d.; the goods of Francis Lockwood; and 1 printed book, value 6s., the goods of John Maltingley, to which she pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18360815-1981

1981. JOSEPH BOWER was indicted for a misdemeanour.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1982

1982. MOSS COWEN, SARAH JOSEPHS , and SOLOMON LEVI , were indicted for a conspiracy.

NOT GUILTY .

ESSEX LARCENIES, &c.

Reference Number: t18360815-1983

1983. JANE PHILIPS was indicted for stealing on the 28th of July, 2 geese, value 6s., the property of William Savill.

ESTHER SAVILL . I am the wife of William Savill. We live at Layton—we had some geese on the forest on the 28th of July—two were missing in the evening—I found them at the patrol's house—they were mine—I know them by a private mark.

RICHARD CLANDENING . I am the patrol. I got information that there was a young woman coming with property supposed to be stolen—I met the prisoner, and found a duck and a drake in her apron—she said she had bought them—I locked her up, and found the owner the next day.

Prisoner. I met a friend or two, and got intoxicated—I don't know what I had. Witness. She was perfectly sober.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Two Months.

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

KENT LARCENIES, &c.

Reference Number: t18360815-1984

1984. THOMAS FOREMAN was indicted for stealing on the 21st of June, 4 handkerchiefs, value 12s.; 1 neck-chain. value 30s.; 1 breast-pin, value 2s.; 1 brooch, value 15s.; 1 garnet drop, value 2s.; 1 pencil-case, value 4s.; 1 comb. value 6d.; 10 sovereigns, 4 half-sovereigns, 6 half-crowns, 18 shillings, 4 sixpence, and 2 fourpences; the goods and monies of Thomas Eyton, in a ship on the navigable river Thomas.

Mr. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

LIEUTENANT THOMAS EYTON . On the 21st of June, I was superintendant of the Marine Society's ship, the lphigena—it was lying in the river Thames, off Greenwich—the prisoner was admitted on board the vessel on the 31st of March, by the Committee in London—after he had been on board the vessel about a month, I selected him as my servant—he was sent on shore every morning in the breakfast boat, at half-past seven o'clock, to get spring water—he went on shore on the 21st of June for that purpose, and did not return to the ship—I returned to the ship at half-past eleven o'clock—I had been absent during the night—on my return, I was informed of the prisoner's absence—I went into my bed cabin to put on my uniform coat, and I observed a screw driver on a chair near a chest of drawers—when I left they contained a cash-box—I unlocked the drawer, and found my cash-box broken open—the drawer was locked—I missed about 4l. out of that box—about 3l. 10s. in gold, a few shillings in silver, and a new fourpenny piece—there was a £10 note in the cash-box, which was not taken, and there was some railway shares left in it—a lady's dressing-case was on the table—my wife opened that in my presence, and missed about nine sovereigns from it, seven or eight half-crowns, a gold-chain, a silver pencil-case, a brooch, and several articles—four silk handkerchiefs were taken from the chest of drawers—I heard of the prisoner the same night, but it was a month afterwards before he was apprehended—on the 24th of July he was brought in custody by a constable—I have since seen the gold chain, a shirt-pin, the garnet drop, and two silk handkerchiefs, which have been pledged—I did not recover any money—the prisoner was brought on board the ship on the 24th of confined on board the vessel one night, taken before the Magistrate next day, and ordered to brought up next day—the witness Ward was taken up, and after some circumstances disclosed by her before the magistrate, he admitted her as a witness.

MARY GIFFEE WARD . I am married. The prisoner came to my brother's in Titchfield-street, close by Portland-place—I cannot exactly say the day—it was in June, and between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day—I knew him before when he lodged at my brother's—I asked where he had been—he said he had been to sea—to the East Indies—I asked him where his ship laid—he said, "At Woolwich"—I asked him when he was going again—he said, "Within a month"—he then laid 6l. 10s. down on the table, and four silk-handkerchiefs—I asked him what he gave a piece for them—he said, 16d.—I asked him how they came to be made he said, "The whole ship's-crew had some made, and one he put on his neck, another in his cap, and two in his pocket"—he then showed me a gold chain and brooch—I asked what he gave for them—he said, "Trifling"—I afterwards pawned a silk-handkerchief, for 2s. at Mr.

Baylis, and two little brooches for 2s., and the gold chain for 10s. at Mr. Attenborough's—he said they were his property—he spent his money very fast—I got him a lodging, and he robbed it—when I found out he had stolen the property, I went to Marylebone station-house, and gave a description of him—I heard of this robbery at the office when I went to describe him, to have him found for the robbery at his lodgings, at Mr. Kew's—my husband was out the whole week looking for him, and took him.

JAMES PETTY . I live in Ogle-mews, Marylebone, and am an apprentice to Mr. Kew. The prisoner came to lodge there on the 22nd of June Mrs. Ward brought him there—about a fortnight after he had been there I bought two silk-handkerchiefs of him, at 14d. a piece—these are then—he sold a brooch to Thomas Payne, Payne, who works in the same shop as I do—I lent him 5s. to pay for it—this is the brooch.

JOHN PAWLEY . I was in Mr. Attenborough's service, he is a pawnbroker, in Charlotte-street. On the 27th of June, I received a gold chain in pledge from Mrs. Ward for 10s., and on the 2nd of July, a brooch and the top of a locket for 2s.—the gold chain is worth 12s. or 14s., not more—it is only fit for breaking.

GEORGE MACKLIN COLLEY . I was in the service of Mr. Baylis, a pawnbroker, in Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square. About the 24th of June, Mrs. Ward offered us the chain—she afterwards pawned it at Attenborough's but I did not take it in—I took in a handkerchief from he on the 30th of June for 2s.

WILLIAM GRINWOOD . I am Mrs. Ward's brother. In consquence of discovering that the prisoner had been doing wrong, I went in pursuit of him—I apprehended him in George-street, Tottenham-court-road—I think it was on the 23rd of July—it was Saturday night—I delivered his to Riley, the constable.

ROBERT FORDHAM . I am a mariner belonging to the vessel. On Saturday morning, the 16th of July, the commander told me to go and look for the prisoner—I searched till between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and found he had been living at Kew's in Ogle-mews.

WILLIAM RILEY . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge on the 23rd of July, in Skinner-street—I produce a comb which I found on his person, and three handkerchiefs, but they are not identified—I asked him if he knew what I apprehended him for—he said, "Yes"—I asked if there was any body concerned with him in he robbery—he said, "No"—these two duplicates were delivered to me by the prosecutor.

JAMES PETTY re-examined. I found under his bed, at Kew's his marine clothes, and in the pockets of them the two duplicates, which I delivered to Mr. Eyton.

LIEUTENANT EYTON re-examined. When he was brought on board the vessel, Petty brought these two duplicates down to me—they refer to this handkerchief and the drop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1985

1985. MARY M'DERMOTT and CATHERINE ROBERTS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 2 mats, value 6s.; the goods of our Lord the king.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of the principal officers of his majesty's ordnance.—3RD COUNT. of sir John webb, Knight.—4th COUNT, of a person or persons unknown.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN WALKER . I am a clerk under Sir John Webb, Director General of the Ordnance Medical Department at Woolwich, which is attached to the Board of Ordnance. These mats were stores used in the office—one laid at my door, and another at the door of a public passage—they were both supplied from the public stores, and so marked—on the 4th of August, about eleven o'clock at night, I heard the noise of a door swinging too which had been propped open by one of the mats, and I heard distinctly female voices—I found the mat was gone, and the other mat from my door—I had seen them three minutes before—I went to see if I could find who had taken them—when I got out I saw nobody, and proceeded to the centre of the gate, about 300 yards—I afterwards saw two women—I overheard some whispering in a privy corner, and presently the prisoners came from that place—this was all within the permises—this was about eight minutes after I missed the mats—the woman had each a cloak on, and they appeared rather large—I stopped them, and said, "What are you doing here?" and at the same time put my hand on the cloak of M'Dermott—I found there was a mat there—she immediately exclaimed, "I did not take it"—the other also said, "I did not take it"—I had then found only one mat, and as I put my hand on it she let it fall; the other prisoner immediately retreated, and I saw a mat fall from her also—they are here, and are both marked "B. O.," and the broad arrow—the prisoners are both strangers to me—they begged very hard to be let go.

CHARLES DAWSON . I am a watchman at Woolwich. On the night of the 4th of August, I took M'Dermott at the Royal Hospital—while I took her to the station-house she said, through being distressed for rent she took the mats to make a bed to lay on—I then went with the superintendent, and found the other prisoner—they were both quite sober.

Mary M'Dermott. My goods were not distrained for rent, and I did not say so. Witness, She did not say her goods—she said all her things were taken from her.

CHARLES STEWART . I am a superintendent of the police at Woolwich. I went with the watchman and apprehended Roberts, and received the two mats at the hospital—I knew M'Dermott before by sight—her honesty—I never saw Roberts before.

M'Dermott's Defence. We went on the Common; as we came back we heard somebody quarrelling by the hospital gate, and as we crossed the park, we fell over the mats, we took them up, and were going to the light to see what they were like—we heard somebody and dropped them—a man stopped us, and he knocked me down and kicked me.

JOHN WALKER re-examined. I did not kick her—she offered no resistance—nobody knocked her down—she laid down herself, and raised a lamentable cry, and mentioned her child to induce me to let her go—they could easily convey them out of the gate—there are many servants in the hospital, and nurses, they pass in and out at all hours under some excuse, and they may take any bundle, saying it is private property—the sentinel does not interfere particularly with them.

M'DERMOTT— GUILTY . Aged 21.

ROBERTS— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy.

Confined One Week.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

Reference Number: t18360815-1986

1986. JAMES SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July, a printed book, value 2s., the goods of William Henry Street.

WILLIAM HENRY STREET . I attend a chapel in Greenwich-road. I missed a small Bible from the chapel, on Sunday, the 10th of July—I saw it last on the 3rd—I left it in a drawer in a pew—the drawer was not locked.

JAMES HAYER . I am servant to Mr. Tighe, a pawnbroker. This Bible was pawned by the prisoner for 8d., on the 1st of July, in the name of "Copping"—I asked him whose property it was—he said his father's.

WILLIAM HENRY STREET re-examined. I missed it about the 3rd of 10th—I could not have seen it on the 3rd—it was the Sunday previous—it is mine—it cost 10s. 6d.—it is now a good book.

WILLIAM DYKE . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of August, in Greenwich—I asked him about taking books from this chapel—he said the books he took from this chapel he had pawned at Mr. Tighe's, at St. Paul's Deptford.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did he say the books which had been taken from the chapel he pawned? A. The books he had taken—that was what he said—a young man named Copping lodged at his father's (Daniel Strain, Broadway, Deptford; Henry Hart, Malden-street, Greenwich; and John Beard, Church-street, Deptford; deposed to the prisoner's good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1987

1987. JAMES SAUNDERS was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 printed book, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Harriet Saunders.

HARRIET SAUNDERS . I attend this chapel. I lost a Bible, which I left in a drawer, unlocked, in my pew, on the 10th of July—I missed it on the 17th—this is it,

JOHN SHEPHERD . I am servant to Mr. Tighe. This Bible was pawned with me by the prisoner, on the 16th of July, in the name of "James Copping"—I lent him 3s. on that and a hymn-book—I asked him whose it was, he said his father's

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .— Transported for Seven Years more.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18360815-1988

1988. WILLIAM M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, 1 spoon, value 2s., the goods of William Edge, his master; and JOHN CALNAN , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen, against the Statute, &c.

MARY DEALEY . I reside with Mr. W. Edge, my relation. The prisoner, William M'Carthy, was in his employ—I have missed a spoon, it is here—I cannot tell whether it is my brother's spoon.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18360815-1989

1989. WILLIAM CHAPMAN, WILLIAM WORTHY, JOHN BRIGGS , and WILLIAM MORRIS , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July, 4 vinagarettes, value 3l. 10s., the goods William Sulman.

MARY WARE . I am twelve years of age. Between four and five o'clock, on the 29th of July, I was at Greenwich, and saw the four prisoners sitting on the ground, near Dr. Barne's house—they were in different dresses—two of them were looking in at the prosecutor's shop-window, they had aprons on—I cannot tell which two they were—I saw those two go into the shop—they came out, and walked very quickly to the two boys that

were sitting down, then put out their hands, and run away, and the other two boys after them.

Chapman. I and Worthy were sitting near the box—we all had aprons on.

Morris. I was sitting by the park-gate, I had not got in—I had an apron on, but it was tucked round me.

JOHN SULMAN . I am shopman to my brother, William Sulman. a toy-dealer in Stockwell-street, Greenwich—I left the shop that afternoon for a little while—I had information and ran out—I saw these four boys in the middle of the Circus—one of them, Morris, ran away—as he ran he threw something shiney away—we lost four vingarettes, worth 8l. 10s. from our shop—it was thrown opposite Mr. Anderson's house—I thought it was in the shrubbery—I took Morris and Briggs to a policeman—I followed Chapman and Worthy, and caught them in George-street—I gave them to a policeman.

ROBERT DUNN (police-sergeant R 9.) I was called for by Mr. Sulman, who had Briggs and Morris—I searched the meadow, near the wall of Mr. Anderson's, and found this vinagarette—I took the prisoners to the station-house; and while I was searching Chapman, I heard Sergeant Collins say, "What is that?"—I looked round, and saw Collins take up some vinagarettes from Briggs's feet.

WILLIAM COLLINS (police-sergeant R18.) I heard something fall—I saw one vinagarette fall on the ground, and these other two then dropped from Briggs.

Briggs. I know nothing at all about them.

CHAPMAN— GUILTY . Aged 14.

WORTHY— GUILTY . Aged 15.

BRIGGS— GUILTY . Aged 12.

MORRIS— GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1990

1990. WILLIAM BELLAMY was indicted for stealing on the 10th of July, 1 coat, value 15s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; the goods of Sarah Ross; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

SARAH ROSS . I am a widow, and live at Sydenham, in Kent, The prisoner was in my service as pot-boy—he left on the 10th of July—I went to look for my son's clothes, to go to church, and missed them—a coat, waistcoat, and a pair of trowsers—this is the property,

JOHN ALLEN . I produce the coat and waistcoat pledged, I believe by the prisoner, on Monday, the 11th of July.

SAMUEL WRIGHT (police-constable P 172.) I took the prisoner, and found these trowsers on him—I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from the Surrey Sessions-house—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1991

1991. MARGARET SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 shawl, value 2s., the goods of John Smith; there was another charge against the prisoner; to both of which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Transported For Fourteen Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1992

1992. ANN LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 1 time-piece, value 10s.; 7 spoons, value 1l. 8s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 6s.; and 1 shell, value 2d.; the goods of John Andrews.

JOHN ANDREWS . I am a pensioner of the Royal Artillery, and live is William-street, Woolwich. I had these articles stolen on the 23rd of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening—I have got the spoons and time-piece in my possession—these are the things—there is a small tea-cannister and a small shell—they stool on the time-piece; but who took the goods, I do not know.

WILLIAM CHITTENDEN . I am an officer. I went to search the prisoner's lodgings—this little caddy was given to me by Muir, who lives is the room below, and it was owned by the prosecutor—the prisoner came from Bath—her friends are respectable—she had been there but five days, and, I believe, fell into bad hands.

MARY MUIR . I gave this caddy and shell to William Chittenden—about a fortnight after the prisoner was taken—they were given to me by her.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Thirteen Days, Ten Solitary.

Reference Number: t18360815-1993

1993. JOSEPH DENCH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August, 5 tame ducks, value 2s., 6d., the property of William Richard Morris,

WILLIAM RICHARD MORRIS . I belong to the water-works, at Deptford, On the 5th of August I lost five tame ducks—I saw them safe the day before—I found, on the 5th the old one killed and left behind, and the four young ones gone.

JULIA ANN COLLINS . The prisoner brought these ducks to me—I bought them for 1s.

Prisoner. An other boy and me were going by, and he said, "Joe, same and take them," and we went.

GUILTY . Aged 12— Confined Four Days, and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18360815-1994

1994. JAMES RAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 1 watch value 20s.; 1 watch-ribbon, value 6d.; and 1 watch-key, value 3d.; the goods of Thomas Browen.

THOMAS BOWEN . I am a retail beer seller at Plumstead-common. The prisoner was drinking in my house, on the 28th of July—I had a silver watch hanging in my back parlour cupboard—he had occasion to go through that parlour to the yard, at intervals—I missed my watch at the o'clock that night—I had seen it safe that morning—this is it.

SAMUEL HAMMOND . I am an officer. From information I received, went to Thomas Benny's house, and got this watch—the prisoner was drunk.

THOMAS BENNY . I am a soldier. The prisoner came to me on the 28th of July, at a quarter before nine o'clock and left me this watch, which I lent him 8s., on, till the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 35—Recommended to mercy— Confined Nine Months.

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder

SURREY LARCENIES

Reference Number: t18360815-1995

1995. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August, 1 bag value 1d.; 4 sovereigns, 3 shillings, 2 sixpences, and 1 fourpenny-piece; the goods and monies of William Chapman, from his person.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am a mariner, and live at Rochford, in Essex. On the night of the 11th of August, I was at the Southwark Arms, in Tooley-street—the prisoner came in there begging—I gave her a halfpenny—she stood against the table for three or four minutes—a young man who was drinking with me, asked her to drink out of our mug—she then sat down, and said she was very much in distress, and had no where to go, and had had no food for several hours—I went with her to a cook's-shop in Tooley-street, and gave her a plate of beef and one pennyworth of pudding—I walked with her towards London-bridge—she then asked me for came halfpence to pay her lodging—I said, "I have none"—she come to my said, and said, "You have got some halfpence here in your pocket"—my purse was in my pocket—she drew my purse out, I expect, then—she did do it then—she shook my pocket—my halfpence remained there, but I felt for my purse, and missed it—it contained four sovereigns and some silver—she ran away, and I followed as fast as I could—she ran up the steps of the bridge, and to the water side—I followed her to the stern of a boat and then she delivered the purse up to me, and I gave her in charge—on looking, at my purse, I missed two sovereigns out of it.

DAVID HASWELL . I am a painter and glazier, and am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the Bridge-ward station-house—the prosecutor delivered me a bag—this is it—it has a fourpenny-piece in it—I gave the two sovereigns to the prosecutor, by the direction of the Alderman—I searched the prisoner, and found on her two sovereigns and a halfpenny in her hand—they were not in her hand when she first came into the station-house, but while I was searching her I found them in her hand, and the halfpenny in her pocket.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN re-examined The two sovereigns in the purse, and the two in her hand, made my money all right.

GUILTY . Aged 29— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18360815-1996

1996. MARGARET GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July, 36 glass bottles, value 6s.; 5 brushes, value 2s.; 6lbs. of paint, value 7s.; 1lb of paper, value 2d.; 3 jar covers value 18d. 2 oz. weight of allspice, value 4d.; 2 oz. of ginger, value 4d.; 1 skin of wash-leather, value 1s.; 2 oz. of bees-wax, value 3d.; and 1 funnel, value 3d.; the goods of Richard Bowden Newsom, her master; and that she had before been convicted of felony.

RICHARD BOWDEN NEWSOM . I am an oilman. The prisoner worked occasionally for me during the last eighteen months—I have lately missed five dozen two-ounce caper bottle—she worked where they were kept—there were no capers in them—they were quite new—I have found three dozen—I lost a paint-brush and some paper—I went to her lodging and found the painting brush and paper there—I can speak to the property.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me the paint? A. No—she said at Union Hall that my shopman gave it to her—I have ascertained that he did not give it to her, but she asked for some paint, and a man in the shop weighed her out some, and I do not press that part of the charge—there were three or four brushes found, and I do not know why he should lend her four brushes—I found a quantity of things besides, which are my property.

THOMAS WILLIAM PIGGOTT . I am a dealer in marine stores. I produce a sample of bottles which the prisoner brought to my shop—suspecting they were stolen, I went to Mr. Newson's, as I knew she worked there—I

made inquiry, and found he had missed bottles—these are two answering to what he had, and I have three dozen at home—she brought them all to me—my wife bought part of them while I was in the country and the rest I bought of her, and my lad bought some—the last time she came I was determined to inquire into the correctness of her possession of them—they are made precisely the same at other shops.

JOHN RODES . I am a policeman. I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's lodging—she was in custody at the time—she acknowledged at the station-house, before the Inspector, that it was her lodging—she said she had nothing there belonging to Mr. Newsom, and we were welcome to go to see—she gave me the key which I opened the room—she had been in custody a quarter of an hour—I found there some paper, bees wax, a funnel, wash leather, paint brushes, tin covers, and other things.

R. BOWDEN NEWSOM re-examined I have not the least doubt these are my bottles—I know the covers—I have missed a great quantity of this paper, which I bought for waste paper—I missed five dozen of the bottles from a package which I had in a few da