Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th April 1834.
Reference Number: 18340410
Reference Number: f18340410-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE CHARLES FAREBROTHER, MAYOR,

FOURTH SESSION HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, On THURSDAY, THE 10th DAY OF APRIL, 1834, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) BY HENRY BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY WILLIAM TYLER, IVY LANE, AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERTS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1834.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHARLES FAREBROTHER , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Vaughan , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Elias Taunton , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; John Ansley , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.: William Venables , Esq.; Sir John Key , Bart., Aldermen of the City of London; The Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City; Henry Winchester , Esq.; and John Cowan , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; John Mirehouse , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First.

John Harling

John Wrightson

James Barnes

Joel Ray

Benjamin Field

Samuel Canning

Francis Wilson

Alexander Straiton

William White

John Nixon

Dennis Sullivan

James Smith

Second.

Charles Hodson

Joseph Prime

Philip Sancton

George Hawkings

Joshua Bower

Thomas Jolliffe

John Hood

William Smith

Charles Hood

George Powell

John Payne

Thomas Crofton

Third.

Thomas Dickins

Pearce Barnard

Thomas Smith

Henry Jerrard

Thomas Martin

John Robertson

Thomas Hood

George Bishop

James Holford

Joseph Stevenson

Edmund Bennett

William Phillips

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First.

James Bell

Charles Barrett

Joseph Ayliffe

Samuel Andrews

Edmund Adams

William Allan

Richard Adams

Joseph Aley

Benjamin Allen

Edward Adley

William Angus

Second.

William Davis

Thomas Deane

John Dann

George Dicksey

Joseph Dickinson

Samuel Doer

Joseph Doggett

Daniel De Castro

Henry Dean

Robert Dick

William Doggett

Henry Dunckley

Third.

Edward Capps

George Camp

John Campbell

William Carr

William Capon

William Ayling

William Davey

William Davis

Thomas Dean

John Dann

Joseph Dowden

Thomas Dyke

Fourth.

William Bland

Daniel Brandon

Richard Brown

John Brunett

Edwin Butterworth

John Castel

John Chapman

William Chandley

George Ed. Cooper

Hugh Welch Cooper

Haden Chapman

William Donovan

Fifth.

John Comber

Henry Taylor Root

William Brown

James Brown

Francis Paul Becker

William Booth

John Bruce

John Bird

Edward Buckingham

William Rutlin

Roberty Wm. Bass

Henry Benison

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 10, 1834.

FAREBROTHER, MAYOR. - FOURTH SESSION.

*A star placed against the verdict denotes that the prisoner has been previously in custody.

Reference Number: t18340410-1

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

525. WILLIAM PEARSON was indicted for burglarously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Howard , on the 28th of March , at St. Mary at Hill with intent to steal the goods, chattels, and monies therein, and stealing therein 90 pence, 180 half-pence, and 24 farthings, the monies of the said John Howard; and 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 watch ribbon, value 2d.; and 1 watch-key, value 6d., the goods of Ann King .

JOHN HOWARD. I keep the Newcastle coffee-house , in the parish of St. Mary at Hill, in the City - I keep the whole house - I and my family live on the premises. On the morning of the 29th of March I came down stairs early- I am the first person who is down in the morning, and always light the tap-room fire, as I have to provide early breakfast - I found the tap-room window open at twenty minutes before four o'clock - it was quite dark at that time - I could not by the light of day discern the features of a man - the tap-room window was wide open - it is eight or ten feet high from the ground, or it may be more - I then went into the bar, to the till - the till was left with about twenty farthings in it; and at a quarter past eleven o'clock the night before, when I went to bed, I saw 15s. or 16s. in copper money in it - Ann King was up last - the house was all fastened up at that time - the door the windows were closed - the prisoner had lived with me as servant, about a year and a quarter ago, in the same house - after leaving the bar, I found the back door open - it was unbolted - it was bolted at a quarter after eleven o'clock at night - the house appeared to have been entered at the tap-room window - I went to the Crown, St. Dunstan's-passage, in two or three hours, after hearing that the prisoner was there, and found him there - I looked through the door - I saw him sitting in the tap-room, drinking rum and milk - he was searched in my presence, and a watch found on him which has been claimed by my bar-maid, Ann King, and on the tap-room table, there was between 6s. and 7s. in copper, and some farthings.

ANN KING. I am bar-maid to the prosecutor. I was up last on the 28th of March - I went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock - I went round and saw the doors fast, and the window was shut down - I did not examine to see if it was fast - I was at the till last - there was about 15s. or 16s. in copper, and a great many farthings among it - I had a metal watch which I left on the bar mantel-pieces - I do not know what it was worth - the window which was found open was shut overnight, as usual - I have since seen my watch in possession of Charlton, the officer - (looking at it) - I know this to be mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE . Q. How do you know it? A. I am quite sure of it; I have had it in my possession a long time; the maker's name is Wicks - I saw it that night after the doors were fast - I left it on the mantelpiece; and I saw it there - I myself did not fasten the back door, but I held the lad a light, and saw him fasten it - the tap-room window is about ten feet from the ground - it opens into a court.

Q. Is the bottom of it ten feet from the ground? A. Yes, where it slips down - the prisoner lived with Mr. Howard, since I have been there, for four or five months - I never saw anything wrong in him - I have not opened the watch since the officer had it - I knew the maker's name, before the officer produced it.

JOHN CHARLTON . I am a constable of Billingsgate ward - I apprehended the prisoner about nine o'clock in the morning of the 29th of March, at the Crown public-house, sitting before the tap-room fire - a parcel of coppers

were before him in this dirty cloth, which laid on the table - here is 6s. 9 1/2d. in copper - I found the watch, which I have produced, in his right hand trowsers' pocket, and twenty-four farthings in the same pocket; and he gave me 4s. 6d. in silver from one of his pockets - he did not account for the possession of the property - he would not own to the coppers; and when I said I wanted the watch as well, he said he had not got it; but I searched and found it on him.

Cross-examined. Q. He said he knew nothing about the half-pence? A. Not the half-pence on the table - there was no other person in the room when I went in - he was sitting at the table before the fire - it was about nine o'clock in the morning - he had some rum and milk in a glass - the Crown is very near the prosecutor's - it is only a short street, and a few yards to the left from it.

COURT. Q. What sort of a public-house is the Crown? A. I never heard anything about it - they do a good deal of business.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday morning, the 29th of March, I was at Billingsgate Market - I put down my basket, and went to the water-closet which is for the public at the back of Mr. Howard's house, and on opening the door, I saw a watch and bundle lying on the seat - I stopped a quarter of an hour, thinking somebody had gone away in a hurry and forgot it - as nobody came, I took the watch up and put it in my fob-pocket - I looked at the bundle, and found it contained money - I saw it was halfpence - I took it in my hand, after waiting a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes, as nobody came - I came down the passage, passed Mr. Howard's house, and took the bundle in my hand - I would not go to work any more that morning, thinking I might lose the watch, or get it broken - I went to the Crown to wait till the busy time of the market was over, thinking I might then hear who had lost anything. I called for some coffee - they had none, and I called for ale - I sat down and blew the fire by desire of the young woman, and then had some milk and rum - I sat there until eight o'clock - a milkman came - I told him if he would find milk, I would find rum - he said it was too soon to drink, and he left me; and it appears he went down to Mr. Howard, and told him I was drinking there, and offering to treat everybody who came in - in about half an hour Charlton and Howard came in and took me, with the watch in my pocket, and the halfpence on the table - he asked if the half-pence belonged to me - I said "No" - he took 4s. 6d. and a knife from me, and some farthings - they took me to the Mansion-house - Howard said it was a gold watch - the Lord Mayor examined it, and found it to be a metal one - I never heard anything about his being robbed, or I should have taken it to him.

ANN KING re-examined. I do not think the prisoner ever saw the watch while he lived there - I had it at that time, and was in the habit of using it but very seldom - I brought it down on Good Friday to wind it up - I had not used it for a long time before.

MR. HOWARD. He lived with me the last time about three months, and before that he lived with me about six months - I think his conduct was good the first time - there is a public privy at the Anchor, near me, for the benefit of the market - the Anchor was my house about twelve months ago - the prisoner has no father - his mother has been supporting him; not he supporting her - I am quite sure it was dark when I came down - I always come down at that time and light the gas - I am certain it was not light - I went to the door, and it was dark - it was not light enough to see the features of a man, I should say; but I did not take particular notice, being flurried - I am sure it was exactly twenty minutes to four o'clock - I can swear to that - I looked at the clock in the bar.(Robert Norman, the prisoner's uncle, gave him a good character.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18340410-2

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

526. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Ann Jones , on the 20th of March , at St. Luke , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, 1 gown, value 2l.; 12 yards of silk, value 36s.; 3 yards of trimmings, value 10s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Charles Nice Davies .

MARY ANN JONES. I was eleven years old last November - I am servant to Charles Nice Davies, who is a minister , and keeps a library in Blomfield-street, Finsbury - I don't know the name of the parish - last Thursday fortnight I was going with Grace Davies , my mistress, about seven, or half-past seven in the evening, to carry home a dress - another lady was with her - I had a bundle on my arm containing a black silk dress, and some silk besides, and some trimming for the dress - I was going along Chiswell-street - the prisoner was standing at the corner of Bunhill-row - he came suddenly and nearly snatched the bundle out of my arm, but I had the presence of mind to keep hold of one corner with both my hands, but he pulled it with such vengeance that he pulled me round the corner of Bunhill-row - I still held the bundle, but he struck me on the head with his hand, and then I let go - he struck me on the forehead - I let go of it, and he went to make off with it - he got three or four doors with it, and then Samuel Thomas stopped him - I cried "Stop thief" - I did not see him laid hold of myself - I was rather alarmed.

GRACE DAVIES. I was with Jones about seven o'clock, in Chiswell-street - she had a parcel containing the dress, and some silk not made up, which was worth about 36s. - I did not observe what happened to her - she was following us - I heard her scream, and turned round and found the parcel had been taken from her - I did not see the prisoner till he was at the station-house - the parcel belonged to me- I am the wife of Charles Nice Davies, who is librarian at the Congregational Library - I found the parcel in the little girl's hand - I did not see who had delivered it to her again.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you made any inquiry about this man? A. No; I have not had an opportunity, but I have heard he is subject to fits.

SAMUEL THOMAS . On the 20th of March I was coming down Bunhill-row, towards Chiswell-street, in the parish of St. Luke, and observed the prisoner dragging the bundle from the child round the corner - he had hold of it, and she was resisting him - as soon as he got the bundle in his pos

session I ran up and collared him - some person gave the bundle to the child, and I took the prisoner to the station-house - on our way I met the policeman G 68, and sent him to fetch the girl to the station-house - she came there with the bundle - when I told him I should take him to the station-house, he said he would go.

JAMES ESSEX (policeman). I was called on and took the prisoner into custody - I observed nothing particular about him - I did not know him before - he said nothing.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not been right in my mind two days before, and I believe witnesses are to come up who will tell to that purpose.

EDWARD PAINTER , jun. I have known the prisoner nine years - I boarded and lodged him for nearly eight years- since the death of his mother, which is five years ago, I have known him vary very much in his mind; several times while at dinner he has upset the table and broken the things, and ran out of the room like a madman - the night before this accident happened, he jumped out of his bed-room window, which was about ten feet from the ground; that was between one and two in the morning - he said there were people pursuing him, and coming in to rob and murder him - he jumped out of window, broke into the cellar, and got into my father's room - there was no pretence for his saying there were thieves in the house - two policemen saw him jump out of window - it was mere fancy on his part - he appeared to me not right in his mind - I did not see him myself that night - I saw him next morning - my father is ill, and cannot come here - I believe on that night he travelled to Highgate-tunnel and chucked his tools away.

COURT. Q. Tell us anything you yourself know of his not being in his right mind. A. I have seen him at times, while he boarded with me out of his mind - he is a cabinet-maker - he has been in constant employ, and was in very good circumstances - not in any distress at the time - he was working at his trade at the time - he was not hurt by his fall from the window - he fell on some mould in the garden - he was not much given to drink - he was in the habit now and then of having a little drop - I have seen him out of his mind without being in liquor - I do not think that he knew right from wrong at the time.

MR. PHILLIPS . Q. Independent of those fits, did he behave honestly in the house, and bear a good character? A. He never at any time behaved wrong, nor was he ever in custody, to my knowledge - he is a single man.

JAMES JONES . I am a master chair-stuffer - I have known the prisoner for the last four or five years - he worked for me - I have observed something strange in the state of his mind for the last four or five months - sometimes he has come in completely raving and gone out the same - he has brought work into my place to do, and asked if there was any other work for him.

Q. What do you mean by raving? A. Knocking the work about, and swearing; he did not know what he was doing - I had no conversation with him about what he had done with his tools - he continued working up to the day before this happened - he worked just as it took his fancy - he always bore an honest character - I do not consider him always in his right mind.

COURT. Q. Had you seen him the day this took place? A. No; I saw him the day before - he seemed to me three parts intoxicated at that time - I believe this raving was generally brought on by liquor.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you think he was drunk when this happened? A. No; because he was at work the day before.

COURT. Q. You do not know how he conducted himself the day it happened? A. No; he had taken liquor at times when he was in these ravings.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you seen him in a raving state when he was sober? A. No.

REBECCA HENDERSON . My husband is a brass-founder. I have known the prisoner about four years - one morning I was alarmed from my sleep by his jumping out of the window - that was the night before this occurrence - I was awoke from my sleep by a loud talking - I opened my eyes and saw the reflection of a light - I jumped out of bed - I saw two policemen in the yard, and saw the prisoner in the act of jumping down into the cellar. The policeman said to him,"What have you lost?" he said, "I have lost nothing, but there are thieves and robbers in the house - they have come to murder me" he jumped down the cellar from the yard - he had jumped out of the window into the yard - when he said there were thieves in the house, he used an oath, and said,"I am not joking."

COURT. Q. Do you know whether he had been drinking that afternoon? A. No; he had been solid at work all the day long - it was not brought on by liquor - he had been at work all the day long - because I live next door, and could hear him at work - he was not in distress at all- he had plenty of work.

JURY to SAMUEL THOMAS . Q. Did you observe anything particular when you seized him? A. There was a wildness about him - I said I would take him to the station-house - he said he would go - he never spoke afterwards, except answering to his name at the station-house - I think he had been drinking - he was not so drunk but what he was aware what he was doing - it struck me he had been drinking, but capable of distinguishing right from wrong - he was not at all communicative - he never spoke a word - he appeared flushed like a man who had been drinking - I have not been used to persons who have lost their reason.

JAMES ESSEX re-examined. I perceived nothing particular at all in him except that he appeared in a melancholy mood, quite dejected - he made no observation - he was taken immediately before the magistrate - I was present at the examination - he said nothing there, because he was immediately remanded - I cannot say whether he was in liquor - he appeared quite dejected - not violent or raving.

Mr. COPE , (Governor of Newgate.) The prisoner is a very quiet man - he walks about the prison, and don't seem to speak to any of the prisoners - he is very orderly in his conduct.( Robert Hennessy , a mahogany and timber-merchant, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . - Death . Aged 38. - Recommended to mercy on account of his previous good character.

Reference Number: t18340410-3

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

527. THOMAS WATKINS was indicted for feloniously

assaulting Margaret, the wife of James McNiell, on the 6th of March , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, one shilling and eight pence, the monies of James McNiell .

MARGARET McNIELL . I am the wife of James McNiell, and live at No. 2, Spicer-street, Brick-lane. I have lived there a fortnight - I formerly lived in Bennett's-court - on the 6th of March, I was coming home; as I turned down Carter-street , the clock struck three quarters after eight o'clock - I was going home to Bennett's-court, Great George-street - I had not got half way down the street, where there is a small court, and I was surrounded by three men; one took hold of my right, hand, another put his arm round my waist, and pressed my chest - the prisoner was in front of me, and untied the double knot of a cotton handkerchief round my throat - it was tied loosely in a double knot - he untied that, and tied it singly as tight as he possibly could round my throat - while he was doing that, I put my hand into his collar, and said, "Watkins, do not hurt me," and in an instant I saw the bag my money was in his hand - it had been in my pocket - he put my money into his waistcoat-pocket, and threw the bag into the gutter - I do not know how he got it into his hand; but I saw it in his hand, and he threw the bag down - I only had the use of one hand, and I collared him with it - and to make me loose my hold of him, he tore the flesh from the back of my hand; the marks are on my hand still - finding I would not let him go, (my gown opened in front,) he thrust his hand into that, and tore that as well - I then let him go, from the suffocation of the handkerchief round my throat, and the pain in my bosom, where he tore the skin and flesh from me - it was here and there as if a cat had clawed me - I went to untie my handkerchief, and found something coming from my ear, and found it was blood - and instead of untying my handkerchief, I untied my bonnet - he struck me a blow on the top of my head, which I shall feel as long as I live, and my nose then spirted out bleeding - he then said to his two palls, who were with him,"By God, I have done for her" - and they said at the same instant, "Never mind, Tom, we'll swear;" and what the end of it was I do not know, but they said something about the end of the town - he took the handkerchief from my throat, and with the assistance of the other two, went to throw me into the passage; but I did not fall; it was a small passage in Carter-street - I saw no more of them after that, they all left me - the blood came from my nose in such torrents, and I was so injured with the blow, it was as much as I could do to stand with my back against the wall - it was all done in as little time as three minutes - I knew Watkins well; he lived near where I lived, and has been the terror of me for many weeks, and he threatened to do so - there was 1s. and eight penny pieces in the bag, which was all I had in the world - there were three duplicates; but I got an affidavit, and recovered those things - I never got back my money - I picked the bag up in the gutter - I went home, and my landlord persuaded me, with his assistance, to go to the station-house as the policemen were being changed; there was none fixed when I got to the police-office - the clock struck nine - I gave information to Sergeant Scott - Scott came for me at twelve o'clock, but my nose was bleeding, so I did not go - this was Thursday evening - I went next morning to the police-station - the prisoner was there at the time - I am quite sure he is the person who robbed me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You said he said something to his two palls, what do you mean? A. Why, those he was in the habit of keeping company with, men equally as bad as himself, who assisted him as well - my husband is not here - I believe him to be at Manchester at this time - I saw him last, two years ago last March - he failed in business, took the benefit of the Act, and went to Manchaester to work at his business, and as soon as he is better off, I doubt not he will make us comfortable - I have not heard from him for two years last August - I have no doubt, as soon as he has provision for me and my children, we shall hear from him - there is a reason for his not writing - his letters are always good, and he is a good husband; but a friend wrote to threaten to send the parish-officers after him, if he did not support his family, and that is the reason I do not hear from him - I get my living by needle-work as a milliner - I have no other occupation - I work for several respectable persons round me.

Q. Are not you a fortune-teller? A. I never get any money by that; if any person chooses to ask my advice, and chooses to give me any money, I take it; but am I to be knocked down for that? - I can tell a good many people's fortune without any cards, with half-an-hour's conversation with them - I never made any charge for it in my life - I never know the names of any persons who come to me for advice - I know James Parker - I have told his fortune in the way you call it fortunes, but he never happened to pay me anything.

Q. Did you ask James Parker, since the prisoner was committed, to come and say he had heard the prisoner say he would have revenge on you? A. No, nothing of the kind - I never said so, on my oath - there was no duplicate of a gown among the duplicates I lost - I never stated that there was - the duplicate for the gown was not lost - I never stated it at any police-office - I had a duplicate for a gown at the time - I have lived in Paradise-row, Bethnal-green, that is eight or nine years ago - I have lived in Bennett's-court, about eight months, it is close by - this was on Thursday evening, the 6th of March - as I came down Carter-street, the clock struck three quarters past eight - that was the time the attack was made on me.

ABRAHAM SCOTT . I am a serjeant of the police, at Spitalfields station - I received information from the prosecutrix, on Thursday night, the 6th of March, about nine o'clock - the clock was on the strike, or chiming, I cannot tell which - I gave information to Henry Huddy , the officer on that beat - I have a bag which I got from the prosecutrix that evening at her lodging - it has been in my possession ever since - she was not able to attend that night - at twelve o'clock, when the prisoner was taken into custody, she sent her apron and handkerchief for me to show to the inspector - here is the apron she had about her (producing one very bloody) - the prosecutrix said, "The man's name is Thomas Watkins " - I knew him before.

HENRY HUDDY. I am a policeman - I received information from Scott about the robbery on Thursday night, the 6th of March, I was directed to look for Thomas

Watkins, and I found him at his own door, a little before twelve o'clock, in Great George-street, and took him - he was then in company with others - it is a very bye place, but when I got into Brick-lane I told him what I took him for - he said he had not robbed anybody - I took him to the station-house - he was remanded first, and committed afterwards.

WILLIAM KINGDOM examined by MR. PHILLIPS. I am foreman to T. P. Smith , a dry-salter - I live at No. 9, East-street, Hoxton Old Town - I know the prisoner - I was in his company on Thursday evening, the 6th of March, sitting along-side of him, at the Dyers' Arms, Brick-lane, Spitalfields, kept by Foulsham - I left work at eight o'clock, and got there about five minutes after eight o'clock- I stayed there until ten o'clock, when they closed the house - the prisoner was there all that time, except one half-hour - he left about half-past eight o'clock - he came back again - I did not observe anything particular about him at all - when I came away at ten o'clock, he was there.

COURT. Q. Did anybody come in to fetch him out? A. Yes, one person - they called him by the name of Thomas Watkins - he called him out and said, "Thomas Watkins, I want to speak to you" - that was all that passed - three or four people did not come in - I only saw one - the person did not call him George.

Q. Did you not swear before the magistrate that you had not been sitting long, before three or four men came in, and called him George? A. No, I did not - I said he was not out more than four minutes - he was not out five minutes - it was not five minutes before he came back, and found his chair as he left it.

Q. How came you to swear just now that it was half an hour? A. No. I said he went out at half-past eight o'clock - he stopped out about five minutes - what I said was, "It wanted five minutes of the half-hour" - I can read(looking at his deposition) - this name William Kingdom, is my writing - the prisoner was sitting down with three or four, but there was but one man came in, and called him out - I did not swear before the magistrate that three or four men came in and called him George, and he got up, and went out - I do not recollect whether my deposition was read over to me or not - they did not swear me at first - I swear there was but one man came and called him out, whose name is Clark - I only saw him called out once - that is my writing - I told the clerk that took the evidence that he had made a mistake in one place - I was not aware that he had not altered it when I signed it - when I came in at five minutes after eight o'clock, I drank part of my beer, and at half-past eight o'clock he went out, and he was not wanting more than five minutes - he did not leave the chair for more than five minutes - Mr. Smith is my master - he keeps a large drysalter's warehouse, at No. 5, Princes-street.

STEPHEN FOULSHAM , sen. I keep the Dyers' Arms, - I know the prisoner very well - I remember Thursday, the 6th of March - he was in my house that evening - I saw him first within a few minutes over or under half-past six o'clock in the evening - I let him out about five minutes after ten o'clock - I was backwards and forwards several times - I had two or three rooms full of people - My son was occasionally attending - Kingdom was there.

COURT. Q. You let him out about ten o'clock? A. About eleven or twelve minutes after ten o'clock - I will not undertake to swear he was not out during that time - I cannot say how often he was out, but to the best of my knowledge I only missed him once; but being backwards and forwards, I might be mistaken.

STEPHEN FOULSHAM, jun. I am going on for thirteen years old - I am the son of the last witness - I know the prisoner - he was at my father's house on Thursday evening, the 6th of March - I saw him first about a quarter before seven o'clock - I attended backwards and forwards with beer - I saw him go away about five or ten minutes past ten o'clock - I did not see anything particular about him - I found him in the room when I went into the room - I never saw him away.

COURT. Q. You know, I suppose, that it is wicked to swear false? A. Yes - I cannot swear that he was not out of my father's house from the time I first saw him to when he went away at ten o'clock.

BENJAMIN TOWNDROW . I am a dyer, and live at No. 41, Booth-street, Brick-lane. On the 6th of March, I was at the Dyers' Arms - I have known the prisoner three or four years - he was there that night, sitting at the next table to me - I observed him first at eight o'clock - he left about five minutes after ten o'clock - he was very drunk, and shook hands with me at parting, and spilled some of my ale in doing so - I observed nothing particular about him.

COURT. Q. You cannot swear he was never out of the room from eight to ten o'clock? A. No; I think he went out once, about five minutes to nine; but I think I could swear he was not out more than five minutes during the whole time I was there - he was very drunk - I did not go till eight o'clock, and only had two pints of ale, I was not so very drunk - I was quite as sober as I am at the present moment.

STEPHEN FOULSHAM, sen., re-examined. The Dyers' Arms is in Brick-lane, that is between two and three hundred yards from Carter-street, but I cannot justly say.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it - I am as innocent as you that sit there, my Lord - I am as innocent as a lamb.

JAMES PARKER. I am a confectioner. I know the prosecutrix - I have had my fortune told by her - she said to me that I should be well paid for my trouble, if I would come and say, I heard the prisoner say he would have his revenge on her - she has told my fortune three or four times - I live next door to her.

COURT. Q. Do you keep a shop, or are you a servant? A. I make all my own goods - I have known the prosecutrix nearly twelve months - I am very intimate with her - the prisoner lives in the same court as I do - he used to work at an iron-founder's, in George-street - she called me in one day, when I was at my work, and said, if I was to come up and say Watkins said he would have his revenge, I should be well paid for my trouble - I answered, I heard him say no such thing, and would not come up and say it - this was about a week after the prisoner was taken - she did not mention at the time that he was the man who robbed her - it was after she had been robbed - I knew she had been robbed, from what she said herself - that was all that passed between us - I named this to my mother the very same day - it was after I was before the magistrate.

ESTHER BACON . I am single. I know nothing of the prosecutrix, only by her telling my fortune - she has told me my fortune three times, different things - I paid her 2d. for each fortune - I knew her to tell several others - I do not know whether she was paid for them - she asked 2d. for telling the fortune - I paid her before she told it.

COURT. Q. Did she demand 2d., or did you ask how much you had to pay? A. I asked her, and she said 2d.

MARGARET McNIELL re-examined. This is my bag - the handkerchief and apron are mine - there is blood on them - they are covered with blood - I told Esther Bacon her fortune - they come to me frequently; but I never made any charge: I dare not - she never asked me what she was to pay - she never paid me beforehand - nobody pays beforehand - I cannot say whether she has paid me three, or four, or five times - she did pay me, but voluntarily.

JURY. Q. How do you account for the blood being on the handkerchief and apron? A. I had them on - the blood was the consequence of the assault - that is not one-fourth or one-tenth part of it - the blood still comes out of my ear a little, and from the pain in my head I am not able to work.

[The deposition of WILLIAM KINGDOM, being read, was as follows: "Last Thursday evening, at eight o'clock, I went to the Dyers' Arms, and called for some liquor - I saw the prisoner sitting at my left side - I had not sat there long before three or four men came and called out 'George' - he got up and left the house; I would swear for not four minutes - he came and sat down again, and was there until ten o'clock."]

WILLIAM KINGDOM re-examined. Q. What was the mistake you say you pointed out in that deposition? A. What I have sworn here is the truth, and nothing else - when it was read over to me, they said, I had said he went out at half-past eight o'clock - I said, "He went out at half-past eight o'clock, and was not away five minutes" - they said, I said half an hour - he was sitting in company with a young man they call George.

JURY. Q. Could the prisoner be out of the room half an hour without your knowing it? A. No, he could not, nor a quarter of an hour - he was not out above five minutes from eight to ten o'clock, for his chair remained as he had left it - he came back and threw himself down in it - nobody had occupied it - I was not in company with him: in fact, he was a stranger - I did not know his name before - he was very intoxicated, and his wife sat opposite him - I had a pint of beer and a pipe of tobacco; and I know the time could not be longer than that - I never knew his name except as Thomas; but he was quite a stranger to me - I swear he was not absent more than four or five minutes - I am still foreman to Mr. Smith - I have lived with him going on for two years.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18340410-4

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

528. MARY SLATER was indicted, for that she on the 17th of March , at St. Giles in the Fields , in and upon Johanna, the wife of Timothy Moriarty, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously, did make an assault, and with a sharp instrument, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously, did strike and cut her, in and upon the left side of her head, with intent feloniously, wilfully, and of her malice aforesaid, to kill and murder her, against the Statute .

2nd COUNT. With intent to disable.

3rd COUNT. With intent to do her some grievous bodily harm.

JOHANNA MORIARTY . I live at No. 131, Drury-lane. My husband is a fruit salesman, at Covent-garden market; his name is Timothy Moriarty - I have known the prisoner several years, as a basket woman , in Covent-garden market - on the 17th of March, between six and seven o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming through Orange-court, Drury-lane , which leads to the house I live in, in company with Mary Bland - I saw the prisoner coming in at the same side of the court as me, from Drury-lane - she was on my left - whether it was a knife or a sharp instrument, I cannot say; but she stabbed me in the head with something she had in her hand, and then went on - I put my hand up to my head, and the blood came running down - I had said nothing to her, nor had she spoken to me at that time.

Q. When had you spoken to her last? A. I saw her that day in Mary Tews ' room, in the same house I live in, but I did not speak to her all that day, but she repeatedly abused me, using very bad language - she did not threaten me with anything at that time - we had no quarrel whatever - I believe it was Mrs. Tew, who is now out on bail, put her up to abuse me - that was from about half-past one o'clock until the time I got the cut from her.

Q. Well, you were coming up the court into Drury-lane, where was it she struck you? A. Here on the temple,(pointing to the left hand side of her temple,) and she struck me after that with a poker - the blood came down in a most dreadful way - and, after I put my hand up, I said, "Mary, Mary, that woman has stabbed me" - Bland looked, round, but could not see where she was gone to - I went to the doctor's shop, to have my head dressed; and it was about nine or ten o'clock, when she struck me with the poker - the doctor's shop is in the same house where I lived - I got my wound dressed, and between nine and ten o'clock I was taken to the station-house - when I came to go up to my own place, she met me with a poker, and struck me - she said nothing to me - she knocked me down - I immediately fell.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This was Saint Patrick's day? A. Yes; I had not been drinking that day - I had drank no spirits except one glass of liquor in the morning with my husband, about ten or eleven o'clock- I had not been in any company with this party at all - I drank nothing else till I came home to my own place, between ten and eleven o'clock, and when I got to bed I had a glass of ale - I had only one glass of spirits all day - I was not at all tipsy - my husband did not use the poker - he never took it up - I do not know Mr. and Mrs. Mills , nor Mr. Wren - I believe a person of that name lodges in the same house - I know nothing of them - I saw her that evening, and I believe she was the woman who took the poker from the prisoner when I was knocked down - there is a chap here who lives at the butter shop next door, and he asked me a good many questions who gave me the cut - I knew the prisoner chared at the same house as he lived at, and I knew if he knew the prisoner had done it, she would not be taken; and I said to him that it was a person in the Strand, named Mc'Carthy, as I knew if I told who she was, the

prisoner would not be found - I did not mention M'Carthy in connexion with my husband - I did not say it was my husband's bunter in the Strand - I mentioned my husband, but I said it was a person named M'Carthy - I did not use the word w - e, I said a fancy woman of my husband's, out of a lark - I said so because I knew the prisoner would not be taken - my husband had not a fancy woman - I said so, but he has not.

COURT. Q. Did you mean a woman your husband had taken a fancy to? A. That was what I meant by a fancy woman - I do not know what a fancy woman is - I am quite sure the prisoner is the person who did it.

MARY BLAND. I lived in the same house with the prosecutrix, and was walking with her on the afternoon of the 17th, between six and seven o'clock, from Drury-lane into Orange-court - there was nobody with us - as we were passing on the left hand side of the way, Mrs. Slater came past on the left side of Mrs. Moriarty - Mrs. Moriarty cried to me, "Oh Mary, Mary, I am stabbed by that person," - I had not seen the prisoner do anything till Mrs. Moriarty cried out that she was stabbed by Mrs. Slater - she said it was by Mrs. Slater - I immediately ran to see where Mrs. Slater went, but could not observe at the time - I lost sight of her through the court - I am quite sure it was her - it was getting towards dusk - there was light enough to enable me to see distinctly who it was - I swear it was Mrs. Slater - she had been annoying Moriarty during the day, and me likewise, going in and out from her own residence - I cannot say what they had been quarrelling about - she had not a room in the house - she was visiting Mrs. Tew, who lodges in the same house - Mrs. Moriarty had not done anything to provoke her to give this blow during the time I was with her, I am sure - they did not exchange any words until the blow was given at that time - she bled, and was taken to the surgeon - I have not said she annoyed me.

Cross-examined. Q. I warn you to be very careful of answering - on your oath, did you not say, "She was annoying Mrs. Moriarty during the day, and me likewise?" A. I did not - Mrs. Moriarty during the day was annoyed - I do not know that I have said, "She had been annoying Mrs. Moriarty and me likewise" - I did not say so.

COURT. Q. Had she, in point of fact, annoyed you during the day? A. No; she had not any words with me at all.

MILES HUNT . I am medical assistant to Mr. Bradford, of 216, Tottenham-court-road, and who keeps the shop at No. 131, Drury-lane, which I attend to - the prosecutrix was brought into the shop accompanied by two women, about five minutes before seven o'clock; her face was all covered over with blood - I asked her what was the matter with her- she said she had got a cut in the face. I examined her - there was a cut on her left temple, inflicted with some sharp instrument, it was an incised wound - I examined the wound - the woman seemed excited, and was talking a great deal - there was great hemorrhage from the wound, and great excitement - I told her if she talked so much, she must go to another shop - I examined the wound, and found it was cut in as far as the bone, and it was about an inch and a quarter in length - she lost a great deal of blood, and was in a very weak state; she could scarcely stand - she was greatly excited - I recommended her to go home and go to bed, and go to Bow-street next morning - she was sober - she appeared as if she had taken a little drink - she wanted to tell me the person who had done it, and mentioned the name of the prisoner - the wound was very near the temporal artery - I suppose it was cut within a quarter of an inch of it.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not mean to say there was danger from the wound? A. Not immediate danger - I certainly mean to say there was danger - I am not a surgeon - I am a member of Apothecaries'-hall - the prosecutrix was greatly excited, but perfectly sober - I told her to go home, but she would persist in going after her husband, who, she said, was at some public-house - I saw her afterwards between nine and ten o'clock, when there was a general row, in the same house, 131 Drury-lane - she had not gone to bed, she was dressed except her bonnet.

COURT. Q. What people had collected about? A. A great number of persons - a great number of Irish people had come there assisting Tew's party, and there was a number of people on both sides - the prosecutrix got a stroke inflicted on her forehead in the second row by some blunt instrument - I saw the prisoner there then - she came to the door, and I met Rose, a policeman, and told him the prisoner was knocking at the door, as I was afraid of the mob - when the prisoner was knocking at the door, I asked her what she wanted - she appeared to be in liquor, and asked for Mrs. Moriarty - I told her to go and look for her, but I would not have the shop knocked about in that kind of way - I had not seen her exactly in the second row - I did not see her doing anything, nor did I see her at all in the row - came and knocked at the door repeatedly, and kicked at the shop door - the bell rang - I came out and said to the prisoner, "My good woman, what do you want?" - she was very tipsy, and another woman with her very drunk - I said, "What are you knocking at the door for?" - she said, "We want to get Mrs. Moriarty," and I think she said, she wanted to pitch into her.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as you are.

HENRY BUCKLER (Shorthand-writer to the Court). I have taken a shorthand note of Mary Bland's evidence - she said, "She had been annoying Mrs. Moriarty during the day, and me likewise."

MARY ANN BROWN . On the night in question, Mr. Moriarty came to my door - he and his wife live in the same house with me, No. 131, Drury-lane - I only saw Mrs. Moriarty once that day; that was about dinner-time, between one and two o'clock - she requested a neighbour of mine to have something to drink - there was a row in the house, about eight or half-past eight o'clock in the evening - I did not see Mrs. Moriarty at that time - I kept my door shut - Mrs. Moriarty was dead in liquor - I heard her voice - I did not hear what words she used; but I thought by her language she must be in liquor - I did not see her.

COURT. Q. Do you lodge at that chemist's? A. Yes; Hunt is servant in the shop.

MARY MILLS . My husband is a brass-founder - I lodge in this house - there are four rooms on a floor - I live on the

third floor - there are nine separate families in the house - on St. Patrick's-day, I saw Mr. and Mrs. Moriarty at ten o'clock at night, when the row began - Mrs. Moriarty was in the row that night - her husband was there - he was armed with a poker - Mrs. Moriarty struck twice with the poker - she struck Mr. Slater (prisoner's husband) twice.

Q. Did she appear to be so weak as to be hardly able to stand, or take her own part? A. She took her part as well as I could - she fought among them - she was not quite sober.

MICHAEL TEW . I saw the prosecutrix on St. Patrick's-day, about a quarter past nine o'clock in the evening - I was going up to my own room, and Mrs. Moriarty came out at the door and wanted me to drink - I said, "I do not want any drink" - she said, "I like you very well, but I do not like your wife" - there was no row nor fight in the house afterwards - I did not see a poker used by anybody.

ALICE WHITAKER . I am a single woman - I know the prisoner, and was with her on St. Patrick's-day, from three o'clock in the afternoon until six o'clock in the evening - she parted company with me at six o'clock - Mr. Remnant's house is in the next court to mine.

JAMES REMNANT . I am a licensed victualler - I know the prisoner - she was in my house, with her husband, from a quarter before six o'clock until eight o'clock - I am sure of that, and she was not out of it to my knowledge - St. Patrick's-day is a day that the Irish get very much excited with drink.

COURT. Q. Did she never leave your house at all? A. I was in front of the bar all the time, and do not believe she left - there was no other company standing at the bar at the time - others came in, but not standing at the bar constantly - there is only one house from the court where the blow was given to my house - I have known the prisoner four years - I always heard a very good character of her.( Mary Hodsden , widow, 4, Grange-court; Charles Hensall , cheesemonger, 130, Drury-lane; Thomas Creswell , shopman to Mr. Hensall; Mary Tew , and Joseph Hodson , carpenter, 4, Orange-court, gave the prisoner a good character.)

CATHERINE WREN . I saw Mrs. Moriarty between nine and ten o'clock on the night in question - she was in the row with the rest, and had a poker in her hand.

JOANNAH MORIARTY. My bonnet was cut through - here is where it was cut, and here is the blood inside.

GUILTY . - DEATH . - Recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of her previous good character, and the excitement of the day.

Second Middlesex Jury, Before Mr. Justice Taunton.

Reference Number: t18340410-5

530. THOMAS RICHARDSON, alias Thomas Morris , CHARLES THACKER , JAMES COSTER , and RICHARD COSTER , were indicted, for feloniously and sacrilegiously breaking and entering a chapel, called St. Philip's Chapel , on the 5th of March , at St. James's, Clerkenwell , and stealing therein 11 brass gas burners and 54 pieces of brass gas fittings, value 10l.; and 4 lamps, value 4l.; the goods of the parishioners of St. James's, Clerkenwell , and then fixed to the said chapel, 1 altar cloth, value 3l.; 1 looking-glass, value 6s.; 6 bottles of wine, value 1l.; and 1 lock, value 6d.; the goods of the said parishioners; 1 thermometer, value 5s.; and 2 candlesticks, value 5s.; the property of John Lee ; 1 Bible, value 2s.; and 2 Prayer Books, value 3s.; the property of James Lane ; 2 Bibles, value 10s.; and 3 Prayer Books, value 10s.; the goods of Thomas Jarman .

2nd COUNT like the first, only stating the goods printed in italics to be the goods of Edwin Hills and another.

3rd COUNT like the first, only stating all the goods printed in italics to be the goods of Edwin Hills and others.

4th COUNT like the first, only stating all the goods to be the goods of Edwin Hills and another, and not stating any of the goods to be fixed to the chapel; and THOMAS ELMER was indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods and fixtures, he well knowing them to have been feloniously and sacrilegiously stolen, as aforesaid, against the Statute .

5th COUNT for feloniously receiving 11 brass gas burners and 54 pieces of brass gas fittings, value 10l.; 4 lamps, value 4l.; 1 altar cloth, value 3l.; 1 looking-glass, value 6s.; 2 bottles of wine, value 8s.; 1 thermometer, value 5s.; 2 candlesticks, value 5s.; 3 Bibles, value 10s.; and 5 Prayer Books, value 10s.; the goods of Edwin Hills and another well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen by an evil-disposed person, against the Statue.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

EDWIN HILLS. I am one of the wardens of St. Philip's Chapel , which is a chapel of ease, within the district of St. Mark, in the parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell. St. Mark is a district marked out for ecclesiastical purposes - it is a chapel in which divine service is performed according to the rites of the Church of England - in consequence of information which I received, I, in company with Mr. Milne, examined some property which was found by the officers - I examined the chapel on the morning on which the robbery had been committed overnight - I examined the window over the vestry-room; part of it was out; sufficient had been removed to admit the person of a man - I went into the chapel, which had been furnished with gas fittings - I missed some gas burners, and a great quantity of the gas fittings, brass fittings, and burners; and some gas lamps were removed, and the oil lamps of the reading desk and pulpit - the gas burners, lamps, and fittings had been fixed to the chapel - the altar cloth was gone - I did not examine respecting the wine - there was a box in the vestry-room secured by a lock, and I subsequently missed that lock - some Bibles and Prayer Books were taken belonging to the parishioners - the gas fittings, burners, alter cloth, and looking-glass, have since been shown to me by the officers - they are articles some of which were affixed to the chapel, and others which were there; in my opinion they are the same as I had seen in the chapel - I had seen them I think on the Sunday previous to the robbery; there was nothing missing then, that I am aware of; the furniture was complete to my knowledge then.

COURT. Q. Do you recollect what day you missed the things? A. I cannot charge my memory with it.

JOHN WILLIAM HIGGINS . I lived at No. 3, St. John's-

street, on the 6th of March, but do not now. On the morning of the 5th of March, about half-past six o'clock, I was coming along by the corner of Jerusalem-passage to go to where I worked, at the Northumberland Arms, Clerkenwell-green - Jerusalem-passage is in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell, about a quarter of a mile from St. Philip's Chapel - I saw eight or nine men conversing together at the corner of Aylesbury-street, and Jerusalem-passage, standing at the public-house at the corner - four of them had bundles, and one had a large copper - I saw the prisoner Richardson among them - I noticed him more distinctly than the rest, because he turned round - he had a bag on his shoulder, closed up at the neck - I could not observe what was in it, but as he jerked it on his shoulder it jumbled together, and I thought it was candlesticks, brass work - I did not see any of it - they went in a direction from St. Philip's Chapel towards Golden-lane - as Richardson passed by me, he said to me, "Halloo, cad, we have got a swag now, and if you like, you can come it on us, but what - you must expect afterwards."

Q. Did you notice the person of any of the others? A. From the size and dress of James Coster - I could not properly swear to him, but a person of his size and dress was among them - when they went along, one of them hallooed out, "We are going to Fatty's, in Golden-lane" - Elmer went by the name of Fatty - I knew him before, and knew who they meant - some of them went on one side of the way, and some on the other - I watched them across St. John-square, and saw them proceeding from Albemarle-street, which is in a direction towards Golden-lane - I immediately ran up to the station-house, in Spa-fields, and informed them of what I had seen - Pryor and three other policemen accompanied me - I went with them to Golden-lane, and after stopping a few minutes at the corner of Play-house-yard, where Elmer lived, Richardson came along, and was about turning up the yard, but seeing the policeman standing there, he immediately walked along straight - he had then the same bag with him as he had before - I pointed him out to the police, and then proceeded to my work.

Prisoner Richardson. I want to know how he knew I had the same things in Golden-lane, as I had in Aylesbury-street? Witness. It was a bag like the other, and the bundle was the same size, and he carried it in the same position.

COURT. Q. Had he both a bag and a bundle? A. No; I consider the bag was the bundle - it was a bag - I cannot swear to anybody but Richardson - it was half-past six o'clock in the morning when I met them - it was light at the time - it is a public street, and a great throughfare - but there was nobody passing much at the time - it is a very great thoroughfare in the daytime.

THOMAS SHADDICK (police-constable G 97). On the morning of the 5th of March, I was at the Rosoman-street station-house, Spa-fields, about a quarter to seven o'clock- Higgins came there and gave information - in consequence of which I and other policemen accompanied him to Golden-lane - Playhouse-yard leads into Golden-lane - Elmer's shop is No. 16, Playhouse-yard, the second house from Golden-lane - when I got into Golden-lane, I saw Richardson - Higgins pointed him out to me - he had a bundle on his left shoulder, and was going towards Barbican - Higgins observed him first and pointed him out - I overtook him - he was by himself at that time - I asked him what he had there in the bag - he said he had some old brass - I asked where he brought it from - he said from No. 16, Islington-green- I asked him who from there - he said from his father - I asked him if his father was anything in the brass line - he said he was, and that he was carrying it to Whitechapel, to sell it - I asked if he was in the line himself - he said he was either a brass finisher or polisher - I cannot recollect which - William Cuthbert , who was with me, took the bag from his shoulder, examined it, and found it was gas fittings almost new - he had before said it was old brass work - I produce what was found in the bag - Cuthbert said they were almost new, and were gas work - the prisoner made no reply - I took him to the station-house in Bunhill-row - there were fifty-three pieces of tubes and fittings all together, and there was one box lock in the bag, party made of brass and partly of iron - I searched Richardson's person, and found a book in his coat pocket, with the name of Charles Thacker printed on it, and one piece of gas fitting, and one knife with "Hatton, carver," on it - the piece of gas fitting is a brass rim.

WILLIAM CUTHBERT. I am a policeman - I was at the station-house, in Rosoman-street, on the morning of the 6th of March, when Higgins came - I accompanied Shaddick and other officer to Golden-lane - I produce a box lock, which was taken from the bag Richardson had.

SAMUEL HATTON . I was taken into custody on this charge, on the 6th of March, the day after the robbery, in consequence of a knife being found - I was discharged the same night, and next morning I saw the prisoner Thacker by Bounds', in Ray-street, near Clerkenwell-green - I think it was between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning - he said he had had a rare blow out of wine - I asked him where he got it from - he said that was his business - I asked him again, and he said he got it down the road - I asked him where about there - he said, "At the church, in the field, to be sure" - he said down the road, by which I understood Bagnigge-wells-road - I asked him how he got into the church; he said that was his business - I asked him again, and he said he got in at the window, where the piece had been cut out - I asked him what he cut it out with; he said, with a knife which he bought of me - he had bought this knife of me (looking at it) - it has the name of"Hatton, carver," on it - I am a carver by business - he then began telling me about the wine, that he got some wine, and got into the pulpit, and had a rare game.

Q. Did he say he was alone, or in company? A. He said, "We had a load of wine, and had a rare game in the pulpit" - I know where Elmer lives now - he goes by the name of Old Fatty, and lives the second door out of Golden-lane, on the right hand side as you go up - he keeps a marine-store shop - I asked Thacker what he got at the church - he said they got some brass and books, and things at the chapel, and that they had taken them down to Old Fatty's.

Prisoner Thacker. I wish to ask whether he has ever been in custody on any other charge? Witness. Yes, I have been taken up, but never but what I have been innocent - I have been taken up twice, but not more - the third time was about the knife - one charge was about some boxes which

had been stolen, and the other about a ham - I do not know that that had been stolen, but I was taken up for it - I have left my father twice - I have always had sufficient money when I went away from home - I had saved it up from what my father allows me - the last time I left my father was about three months ago - I think it was on the 8th or 9th of last months, when I sold him the knife.

Richardson. He said at Hatton-garden, three weeks ago, that it was five weeks before. Witness. I sold it to him in Holborn - it was down a turning in Holborn - I forget the name of the street - it is where they sell boots and shoes, and things.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You have been in custody twice, were you an acquaintance of Thacker? A. No - I have often spoken to him - I have not known him a great while - I knew him before I was in custody.

BENJAMIN PRYOR (policeman, G 226). On the 6th of March I took the witness, Samuel Hatton, into custody - he was taken to the office and afterwards discharged - on the 11th of March I was passing by where he lives, which is on my beat - I went into his house in Ray-street, at eleven o'clock at night - I was then in possession of the knife produced, and offered the knife to Hatton - he said it was not his - he gave me an account of what he had done with it - I had some conversation with him, and in consequence of that conversation I apprehended Thacker the following day, the 12th, at No. 1, Coppice-row, close by, at 10 o'clock in the morning - he was in bed - I told him I took him concerning robbing the church; and before he said anything to me, I told him the property had been found in Playhouse-yard - he said, "D-n that Old Fatty, if it had not been for him I should not have got into this" - I then took him to the station-house, and as we went along, in Bowling-green-lane, I said to him, "There was a note found in the church, do you know anything of it?" - he said,"I did not write it" - I said, "You cannot write, can you?" - he said, "I can write enough for that" - he said,"The old rascal has not paid us for it yet" - I said, "What, have you been down, since you carried the things down?" - he said, "Me and Dick have been down once." - On the morning of the robbery of the 5th of March, I was on Clerkenwell-green myself, about eight o'clock - I saw Thacker there drunk, and when I was in the yard, at Hatton-garden office, I told him I had seen him on Clerkenwell-green on the morning of the robbery, and said, "I did not know at that time that you had been doing what you have done," and told him he was drunk at the time - he said, "I know I was rather fresh by drinking too much wine at the church" - I accompanied the officers on the 12th of March to search the premises of Elmer - he was at home in his shop - he said he had been searched before, and he thought we were giving him a good deal of trouble - I had searched the house on the Wednesday previous, and found nothing - Findlay, Busain, and others, were with me on the 12th- Findlay said something to him - I cannot be positive what it was - Elmer expressed himself quite willing to be searched, and only complained of the number of men that came - we searched about the house for a long time without effect - at last we went into the cellar, which is enclosed from the street by a wall, which passes between the grating outside, and the shop window - the inside of the wall forms part of the enclosure of the cellar itself - I sounded the cellar walls with an iron rod, and when I came to the part between the grating and the shop window, it sounded hollow - I commenced opening the wall in front, it had been recently compoed over inside - I began to break the compo away - Findlay told me not to do so, but to look at the top - we looked at the top and found a quantity of dirt, which struck my attention - I pulled the dirt off the top, and found a lid, and there was a box or bin made with boards in the wall - we opened the lid, and there found the property which I produce, a looking-glass, altar-cloth, four Prayer Books, thermometer, Bibles, four oil lamps, two candlesticks, some ornamental brass work, and two bottles full of what appears to be wine - Elmer was in the cellar when we searched there, and went away directly we found these things - as soon as we found out this secret-place he went away directly.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I think you said he made no objection to your searching the place? A. None at all - he offered every facility - he desired his wife to bring down some instrument for the purpose of examining various places - he did not make any objection to my searching - he helped us going about the various places.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What was the instrument he sent for? A. The iron rod, which I sounded the wall with- he did not point out the secret place in the wall - on our finding it out he went away.

Thacker. He says it was ten o'clock when he took me in bed - I wish to know whether it was sooner or later. -

Witness. It was as near ten as possible - it did not strike a quarter after nine as we went up Bowling-green-lane - I was at breakfast at nine o'clock at home.

JOHN BUSAIN (policeman). I went with the other officers to the house in Golden-lane, on Wednesday, the 12th of March - it is a marine-store shop - I saw Elmer in the shop when I went there - I went in, in company with Findlay - Elmer asked what we came there for - Findlay replied that he had come again about the church property, that he (Findlay) had been thereabout before last week - I told him I had every reason to believe it was then in his possesion - he most strenuously denied all knowledge of it- he said he knew nothing whatever of it - he had not got it - it was not in his house - I asked him, not having a search warrant, if he would allow me the privilege of going over his premises to see if I could find it - he granted me permission - we searched the house and premises - I and Pryor and Findlay - we went into the cellar - we examined the floor of the cellar first, and while we were examining the floor Elmer stood very quiet, but his wife appeared very uneasy - after examining the floor, Pryor and Findlay were knocking against the wall - Elmer remained in the cellar until a part in the wall sounded hollow, and I directed the dirt to be removed, saying I was confident the property was there - when I opened the bin, and the property produced was found, I turned round to secure Elmer, and found he was gone - I ran up stairs and directed Hull to go after him - he took him in the street, and brought him back into the shop - these articles produced are what we found in the bin, which was part of the wall covered over with a lid, and then covered with dirt - it is like a locker on board a vessel - it opened at the top like a

locker - I have a list of the things found - there was an altar-cloth, thermometer, looking-glass, five Prayer Books, two Bibles, four oil lamps, two brass candlesticks, twelve other pieces of brass, an inkstand, towel, and two bottles, which I believe contained Tent wine - after Elmer was brought back, I proceeded with him to the station-house and when I got to the station-house, he said, the things were brought to him by two men - I neither threatened nor made him any promise - on my opening the things, he said voluntarily at the station-house, that the things had been brought to his house by two men, that he had not bought them, and that he had never seen so much of them before as he saw then at the station-house - among other things, found at his house, I found an account-book - I have it here - I asked him if it was his account-book - he said it was - it contains accounts of things purchased by him - I have had it ever since - I have examined it, and it contains no account of these lamps, and the articles I found in the wall.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. He told you he had not bought them, and had not seen so much of them as he did then? A. Yes; there are divers entries of things bought - he furnished every facility for searching the house, and remained with us till we discovered the bin - I have had the property in my custody ever since.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the place in the wall a very easy place to discover? A. It was a very difficult place to discover - it was the last place I should have thought of examining - the iron instrument was fetched to try the floor - it was a common pricker used to try the ground.

GEORGE FINDLAY . I was present at the station-house in Rosoman-street, on the 5th of March, when Higgins gave information, and was present at the search at Elmer's on the 12th of March - on the morning of the 5th of March, between eight and nine o'clock, I went to St. Philip's Chapel, and found it had been broken into by removing a window at the communion above the vestry - I went in at that window myself - I went into the vestry-room, and found a small deal box, in which the sacramental wine is kept - the lock was gone from it; this brass and iron lock,(produced by Cuthbert,) belongs to that box - it fits it - the upper part, where the hasp would be, was wrenched off, and the hasp is now in the lock - the box had been wrenched open, and the hasp given away - a paper was produced at the office, which was found on the communion-table, and which has been sealed up at the office.

THOMAS STILWELL . I have examined the gas fittings produced - I am beadle of St. Philip's Chapel - the minister of the chapel is the Rev. Thomas Watson - these gas fittings are part of the fittings belonging to the chapel; and the four oil lamps are part of the porperty taken from the chapel - the altar-cloth also, and the looking-glass, thermometer, and two candlesticks - the thermometer and candlesticks are the property of Mr. John Lee, who attends St. Philip's and St. Mark's - he is a servant to both churches - a Bible and three Prayer Books belong to Mr. James Lane - two Bibles and three Prayer Books belong to Mr. Thomas Jarman - there were eight half-pint bottles of Sherry wine missing from the box, and six bottles of Tent were taken from the vestry cupboard - this wine is the same as we have for the sacrament: it is Tent wine - on the evening before the robbery, at twenty minutes before eight o'clock, (Tuesday evening, the 4th of March,) I had myself secured the chapel - the gas fittings, oil lamps, and things were safely fixed there then - on the following morning I accompanied Findlay and the officers, and found them gone - this lock belongs to the box, and has been wrenched off.

COURT. Q. Put your hand on any one article, and tell us if you can swear to it positively? A. This candlestick I know by having no screw at the bottom - I know this to be either the reading desk or pulpit lamp - I can swear to it by the worm inside - I have examined all the fittings: they correspond with the works in the chapel - I believe them all to be what were taken away - they appear to fit the place from which they have been taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you take them there to try them? A. We took part of them to try.

JOHN HULL. I am a policeman. On the morning of the 12th of March, I accompanied the other officers to examine Elmer's house - in consequence of directions from Pryor, I went in pursuit of Elmer - I found him in Golden-lane - he had got two or three hundred yards; and at the station-house he stated that if it had not been for hiding these things away, it would have been all right - I had said nothing to him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He did not say who hid them? A. No; nor that he knew of their being hid.

Thacker's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I stand before you in a very awful situation; not having the power to procure legal assistance, which if I had, no doubt the evidence might have been rendered of no avail. Hatton has been several times in custody, and was taken for this charge, by reason of a knife being found with his name on it, which he says he sold to me. Now it must appear to you, how easy it will be for him to say he sold the knife to me, to exculpate himself. With regard to the evidence of Pryor - he took me in custody in bed; he showed me the knife; and I said I knew nothing of it, which I did not. In going to the station-house, he said,"Charles, I have known you and your father some time: this is a capital charge; it will be either life or death for you: if you will tell all you know, I give you my word as a man, all shall be right." And I said, "I know nothing of the robbery." As to the book found on Richardson, I own the book is mine; I lent it him two or three months ago, and that was the last time I saw him, till I saw him in custody. I hope you will take my case into your consideration. I wish to submit to the Jury how unlikely it is, if I was concerned in the robbery, I should have trusted myself in the hands of Hatton, by stating to him what he states.

Elmer's Defence. I am totally innocent of purchasing the articles, they were brought to my shop by two men - I never bought them nor agreed to buy them. When I heard there was a noise about the things, I certainly concealed them away.

RICHARDSON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

THACKER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

JAMES COSTER - NOT GUILTY .

RICHARD COSTER - NOT GUILTY .

ELMER - GUILTY . Aged 54. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-6

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

528. JOHN STEVENS was indicted for that he, on the 13th of March , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , in and upon George Avery , unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did make an assault, and feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did wound him, by biting off the end of the second finger of his left hand, with intent to main him, against the Statute, &c .

2nd COUNT like the first, only omitting the assault, and stating the intent to be to disable.

3rd COUNT like the second, only with intent to do some grievous bodily harm.

4th COUNT like the second, only with intent to resist and prevent his lawful apprehension and detention by the said George Avery, for a certain offence, for assaulting and kicking the said George Avery, then being one of the constables of the Country of Middlesex, in the due execution of his duty; for which the said John Stevens was liable by law to be apprehended and detained.

5th COUNT like the second, only with intent to resist and prevent his lawful apprehension and detention by the said George Avery, one of the constables of the county aforesaid, for a certain offence, viz. for making and causing a great disturbance, noise, and tumult, in breach of the peace, in a public street and common highway, in the presence and hearing of the said George Avery, then being such constable as aforesaid - and refusing to go away and desist from making and causing such disturbance as aforesaid, upon being requested by the said George Avery to do so; for which he was liable by law to be apprehended and detained.

6th COUNT like the second, only with intent to resist and prevent his lawful apprehension and detention, for an assault and battery, committed by him in and upon the said George Avery; for which he was liable by law to be apprehended and detained by the said George Avery.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE AVERY (police-constable G 175). On the 13th of March I was on duty in Featherstone-street, Finsbury, Middlesex - I saw a disturbance, which called my attention - I saw the prisoner there - he was one of the party in the disturbance - he and another were quarrelling and wrangling about a basket - they were disturbing the public peace - I went to him and told him, "If that is your basket, take it up and go about your business" - he said, "I will go when I like, and not before" - he did not appear at all deaf - he was in liquor - he took half-a-crown out of his pocket and said, "I will bet you half-a-crown I am better known than you, and have a better character" - I told him I did not carry money to bet with; I only wanted him to go about his business - his companion then took up the basket, and I took the prisoner by the arm, and said, "Come this way, that is a good fellow" - I took him along nearly to the corner of Bunhill-row - when he got there I said, "Now, Stevens, I have no wish to lock you up: you have got a chance; now go home, there is a good fellow" - I knew him before - he said, "You are a b-y good fellow, and I will go home" - I left him, and returned back towards the City-road, where the row had been - the mob had dispersed - there had been a mob caused by the squabble; and in a minute or two I looked back and saw the prisoner close at my heels, following me - he commenced a volley of abuse, using very low language to me - the mob again collected, and the prisoner said something about fighting anybody, that he could fight anybody - I took him by the arm and told him, if he still presisted in making a row, I would take him to the station-house - he said, "Take me then" - I took him by the arm and led him towards the station-house - he walked very quietly with me about forty or fifty yards - his companion, whom he had been wrangling with before, walked behind and said, "Do not go with him, Stevens" - the prisoner immediately kicked me inside the ankle of my left leg - I was near falling, but caught the prisoner by the collar - we got into the middle of the street, and both fell down together - he kicked me several times in the leg before we got down - at that time my brother officer, Whitehead, who had left me, returned to my assistance - we got the prisoner on his legs, and he said,"If you will take me to the station-house, you shall have a b-y deal of trouble first" - he then threw himself down on his back - we both then let go of him - he began kicking and plunging to keep every one from him - I went to take him by the collar with my left hand, as he lay on the ground kicking, and he immediately seized my left hand with both his hands, rose his head up to my hand, and in a moment I found the end of my finger gone - he had got the second finger of my left hand into his mouth between his teeth, and bit the end of it off - my finger bled most profusely - the part between the nail and the joint was gone entirely - the nail was gone, and the greatest part of the flesh from the joint - I caught the prisoner by the hair of his head, and said, "Drop that part of my finger" - he used a bad expression, and I saw no more of it - I have every reason to believe he swallowed it - I went to a surgeon, and am still under his care, and have been so ever since - I had not in any way assaulted the man, or produced my truncheon, or shown any design to hurt or injure him.

COURT. Q. Did he know you to be an officer? A. Yes; I was in my uniform.

Prisoner. Q. When you first saw me there, can you state on your oath that I was quarrelling with the man? A. You appeared to be wrangling with him - there was a mob collected round them, and he and his companion were using very bad expression towards each other - I did not know the way he was going, nor which way he lived - he was intoxicated - they were wrangling and quarrelling together when I came up.

STEPHEN WHITEHEAD . I am a police-officer. I came up with Avery at the beginning of this - there was sufficient to call a mob together, and it occasioned a disturbance and a mob before a shopkeeper's house sufficient for him to complain about - as Avery was endeavouring to take him, I followed him and saw the prisoner kick Avery to trip him up, as I suppose - a scuffle ensued, which made me go forward - Avery attempted to seize him by the collar, and they went down in the street - I ran up and saw him bite Avery's finger, and saw the blood run - I received a great portion of the blood over my clothes - no violence was used towards him by Avery - he used persuasion - I myself told him if he had been my own brother I should give him the same advice as he had done.

Prisoner. Q. Can you state on your oath that neither

you nor Avery took me up by the collar? I do not say you had the truncheon with you; but did you not take me up by the collar, and throw me down several times on the ground like a dog? I don't know myself (being intoxicated), but I am told so. A. No. no violence was used further than was necessary to secure you - I received several kicks myself, and my eye was very much swollen - he was very violent indeed, and I received several kicks, one on the cheek bone - Spring came and secured his legs.

COURT. Q. Did he appear to hear without any difficulty then? A. Decidedly so - I was in conversation with him some time next day.

I have known him for years - he is troubled with a slight deafness when he catches cold.

HUGH SPRING . I keep the Feathers public-house, in Featherstone-street. On the 13th of March I heard a noise - I went to the door and saw a mob - I went up to the mob, which was two doors from my house - I saw the prisoner lying on his back kicking the policemen who were on each side of him; they had hold of him on each side by the shoulders, and he was struggling - the mob was very much excited against the police - they used no more violence than was necessary to take him, and I said they ought to be protected - the mob took part against the police, and I, to assist in securing the prisoner, took hold of his feet - I did not see him do anything to Avery's finger, but he hallooed out, and said his finger was off - I then let go of the prisoner's feet - I saw the policeman's finger bleeding, and I went directly to the station-house for assistance - there was not one atom of violence used to the prisoner; they did nothing more than was necessary to secure him - he laid on his back five or six minutes without their holding him.

JOHN LEESON . I am a surgeon, and live at No. 31, Chiswell-street. On the 13th of March, Avery came to my house - he had a lacerated wound of the second finger of his left hand - the wound was dressed, and he went away - the bone of the first joint was denuded of the muscles, and left completely bare, and the nail was gone - no part of the bone was gone - he came again the following morning, and complained of spasmodic twitchings in the jaw - there was danger of a locked jaw - he is not yet well, but is getting better progressively - it was a dangerous wound.

JOHN EVANS . I was present on the occasion.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me insult anybody? A. I saw you drunk and riotous.

Prisoner's Defence. I humbly crave your kind attention on this unfortunate occasion - I respectfully assure you, I had no malice or guilty intention towards the prosecutor - it is with sincere regret and shame I confess that I was very much intoxicated, and have not the slightest recollection of anything that happened - I have been round the neighbourhood several years daily selling shell-fish - I do not suppose there is anybody in the neighbourhood but what knows me well - seeing me intoxicated would excite their attention, as I am not in the habit of being so - I challenge anybody living, ever to say they saw me intoxicated - I received a very severe injury in my head when a boy, which caused me to be deaf, and I have been under Dr. Curtis, the ear-doctor - having suffered that injury, I always find a very small portion of liquor takes effect, which always keeps me on my guard from being intoxicated; and had I wished to drink, my humble occupation would not allow me to do so - I have a wife and child - the money I earned would not allow it - I never insulted an individual in the street - I challenge every individual living to say they ever knew me act wrong in my life - had I been sober, I am the last man that would have done it - I am an honest man - I have had several situations, all of which I have left with a good character - nobody could suffer more pain and anguish than I have in Newgate - I have been in the Infirmary - I have had three blisters on my chest, and through over-excitement of mind, the blisters have turned to ulcers: and my wife has been confined to her bed, and subject to fits through fretting about this - I hope, as I had no malicious intention towards the prosecutor, you will take my case into your consideration - I had no guilty intention towards the man, and have no recollection of what happened - it is evident, had I been guilty, and wished to rescue myself, that it is not likely I should lie down on my back and kick - I had met an acquaintance that afternoon, who persuaded me to accompany him to drink - we had some home-brewed ale, and a quartern of gin afterwards, and it soon overpowered me - I should think you cannot call a man malicious in doing an act, when he is so overpowered, and has not the right use of his reason - drunkenness is next to craziness - I have always been respected, though I say it myself - I keep a small shop in Wheeler-street - the last situation I lived in, was at Mr. Weller 's, a druggist - he died - I lived nearly two years with Mr. Naggs , druggist, Piccadilly - I defy anybody to say I was ever guilty of a dishonest action - I throw myself entirely on your mercy - if you restore me to my wife and child, my prayers shall be offered up for you, my Lord, and the jury - I was totally intoxicated: it is all against me - if the amputation of a hand would restore me to my wife and child, I would willingly submit to it - when a man is drunk, as to giving him advice, it is like throwing pearls before swine - it is useless to give advice to a drunken man.

GEO. AVERY re-examined. I have known him about the street these two years - the first I knew of him was, when he was committed from Hatton-garden for violent conduct.

GUILTY. Aged 22. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18340410-7

OLD COURT, Thursday, April 10th, 1834.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

532. ELIZABETH EVERY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , at St. Martin-in-the-Fields , 1 watch, value 5l.; and 1 watch-chain, value 3l., the goods of Abraham Harrison Dry , her master, in his dwelling-house ; to which she pleaded GUILTY . Aged 48. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18340410-8

533. PETER BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 gelding, value 12l. , the goods of Samuel Eastman .

MR. DAWSON conducted the Prosecution.

SAMUEL EASTMAN. I live at Battersea. On the 13th of September, I ordered my gelding to be turned out in the fields in Battersea Marsh - I ordered him to be

fetched up on Sunday, the 15th of September, and he could not be found - I went to look for him the same evening, and could not find him - I sent different people in search of him; and on Sunday, the 16th of February, I received information, and found it - I had advertised it, and had bills distributed all over the country - I went to the White Lion, Paddington, and found him in the possession of Joseph Evans - I saw the prisoner next morning - he said nothing to me.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. You ordered it to be turned out in the field on the 13th of September? A. Yes; I did not myself go to look for it between the 13th and 15th - I cannot say when it was taken - I sent it to the field about five or six o'clock in the evening of the 13th.

WILLIAM WELLER . I am servant to Mr. Eastman. On the 13th of September he ordered me to turn the gelding in the field between five and six o'clock - I did so - I went there again at eleven in the morning, and it was still there - I saw it there about twelve o'clock on the 14th- I went there again on Sunday, the 15th, and it was gone - I saw a horse in the possession of Evans afterwards - that was master's horse which I had turned out.

Cross-examined. A. Were you present at any examination at the police-office? A. Yes: I do not know when the prisoner was apprehended - I cannot say whether he was ever discharged.

JOSEPH EVANS. The horse in question was in my possession on the 15th of February - I am a bargeman - I cannot tell justly when the horse came into my possession - I had him twenty-two weeks - I bought it in the morning - it was either the 16th or 15th of November - I cannot recollect the day - I do not remember when the prosecutor claimed it - I know I had it twenty-two weeks in my possession - the officer took it out of my possession - I do not know his name - they fetched me out of my boat as I was going to bed - I bought the horse of the prisoner - I found out it was twenty-two weeks ago, because I used to take a load of hay to London every week - I cannot justly say that I brought a load every week - I cannot say on what day it was I saw the prisoner with the horse - I took no notice - I bought it at the White Lion, either on Monday or Tuesday - I saw the prisoner there about eleven or twelve o'clock - I bought the horse of him there - I cannot say whether I have ever said what day I bought it - he asked me 9l. for it, he said he had a horse to sell - I wanted one, and thought that would be too little - I gave him eight sovereigns for it - if the horse turned out well, I was to give him 10s. more, when he came up again; and he followed me to Paddington, stops about a month after, and asked me for the 10s. - I told him I would give it him when I came up again, as I was rather short of money - I do not know on what day of the week, or in what month that was - it might be November, but I will not be sure - I was driving along the canal from Paddington - I was not taking any hay for my master about that time - I do not recollect how many loads of hay I took about that time, - I had so many masters - I work for anybody - I am sure I had the gelding twenty-two weeks.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you buy the horse at the White Lion, at Paddington? A. Yes; I always put up there - many boatmen put up there - I never saw the prisoner before that - I saw him, I think, about the next week or fortnight - I saw him every time I came to town, but I had not 10s. - other persons were present when I bought the horse - my father was present - I paid for it just as I went into the room - I tried the horse along the river side before I bought it - everything was done publicly; there was no attempt at concealment - I used the horse to tow my barge - I thought it was a bad bargain - I frequently saw the prisoner afterwards at the White Lion, and about Paddington.

MR. DAWSON. Q. Your father was present? A. Yes; he bargained for the horse, and I paid the money - the prisoner said he bought the horse in Smithfield market, to run in an omnibus, and it was too small for him.

COURT. Q. Where were you when he said he had the horse to sell? A. Against the White Lion - I went to look at it in the stables - I did not look at it before he said he had a horse to sell - I never paid him the 10s. - he came after me for it, and I should have given it him if I had had it - my father is in Staffordshire.

JAMES DOUGLAS . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner at 127, Edgware-road, on the 16th of February - I went up stairs - I found him standing in the room, and said, "Well, Peter, is this you?" - he said, "Yes" - I said, "You must accompany me to the station-house" - he came with me directly, and on our way I told him I took him on suspicion of horse-stealing - he made no reply, but on arriving at the station-house, I confronted him with Evans, who was there in custody, and who immediately said he was the person who sold him the horse; at the same time saying to him, "This is a pretty hobble you have brought me into, about this horse" - Bradley replied, "I cannot help it; I bought the horse in the market" - he said he sold it to Evans - he did not say at what time he bought it; nor did he then say at what market.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know if he has been in custody on this charge before? A. He was - I do not know by what officer; he was taken before the magistrate at Union-hall - I believe the same prosecutor appeared against him - I was not there - it was on the 14th of January - he was remanded until the 21st, and again, I think, until the 24th - I am acquainted with him by seeing him about the Edgeware-road - I cannot say what business he followed - I cannot say whether he returned to his residence in the Edgeware-road - I found him there a month afterwards - I do not suppose he absconded.

COURT. Q. Was Evans before the magistrate on the first occasion? A. No; the property could not be found on the first occasion - I believe that was the cause of his being discharged.

JURY. Q. Were you present at the examination? A. Not at Union-hall - I do not know myself of his being at Union-hall.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am second clerk at the police-office, Union-hall. I heard a deposition read over to the prisoner, by Mr. Edwin, the chief clerk - this is Mr. Edwin's handwriting - (looking at it) - this is the magistrate's signature.

COURT. Q. Why has not the prisoner himself signed it? A. The prisoner seldom or ever signs his own state

ment; it has never been a custom - he was not asked to sign it - Mr. Edwin took it down - the magistrate was on the bench - he told the prisoner he need not say anything unless he pleased - I was in the office when Mr. Edwin took it down - I was near enough to hear what the prisoner said, but not to see that Mr. Edwin took it down correctly - I cannot undertake to say he took it correctly - the prisoner said he bought the horse in Smithfield market of a tall thin young man; he did not know who it was.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the horse in Smithfield market.

WILLIAM JAMES BOWSER . I am a stable-keeper, and live with Mr. Smith, at the Royal Oak, Back-hill, Hatton-garden - I am in the habit of attending Smithfield market regularly - to the best of my recollection I was there on Friday, the 13th of September - I saw the prisoner buy an old horse there - I do not know the person he bought it of- it was a brown poor horse; a middling sized horse - I saw it walked myself - I bid the man 6l. for it - the prisoner bought it for 8l. - I saw him pay the man the money - I generally ask the name of persons I buy of - they give a name - I have repeatedly bought horses of persons who are strangers - I walked with the prisoner - he said he would give him 8l. for it, if it was a good worker in a town cart - I stood by till the horse was put into a cart and taken out again - he said to me, "Brown, will you go and take anything to drink? I think I shall get 1l. or 2l. by this horse"- he offered 8l., and I went with him into the Bull's Head, and he paid him what I supposed to be 8l., but I did not count the money - the Bull's Head is at the corner of St. John-street - I think it was between three and four o'clock - it was an open sale; there was no concealment whatever - I offered the money myself for it - they did not close the bargain until it was tried in harness, and the man said, "If you try it, you must pay the expense of trying it, whether you buy him or no" - I afterwards saw the prisoner pay the money to the same man; he was a tall thin man - it was more than I would give for it - he asked 10l. for it - I was not in the prisoner's company after that day - I did not leave him directly - I have seen the horse he is accused of stealing - it is decidedly the same horse, but it was in a deal better condition; the marks and the colour are the same.

COURT. Q. On what day was this? A. On the Friday; to the best of my recollection it was the 13th - it was in the week after Barnet fair, which makes me recollect the time - Barnet fair is on the 4th of September - I saw the horse the prosecutor claims to-day.

SAMUEL EASTMAN. The horse is over at the New Inn - I do not know whether he has seen it - I value it at 12l.

W. J. BOWSER. The hostler was dressing it at the New Inn-yard.

MR. DAWSON. Q. Are you aware whether it is usual to keep a book at Smithfield to enter the names of people who sell horses? A. It is, if people will go to that expense, but it is not done once in a hundred times, if persons appear respectable.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. You saw the hostler dressing the horse in the New Inn: was it pointed out to you, or did you know it yourself? A. I knew it myself; at a distance I said that was the horse.

COURT. Q. How did you know it was at the New Inn? A. Some of the witness said, "Come along, let us go and see the horse," and before I got down the yard I recognised it.

JURY. Q. Are you positive as to the day of the month on which you saw the horse sold? A. I am not - it was on a Friday: it must be either the 12th or 19th - I do not know what day of the week Barnet fair was - it was in September.

HENRY HOARE . I am hostler at the White Lion stables, Edgeware road - I know the prisoner - I do not know how he gets his living - I have seen him about there a good many times - there are stables with room enough for sixty horses - it is open to any person who chooses to bring horses there - I have seen the prosecutor's horse this morning - that horse was at the White Lion four or five nights - the prisoner brought it there - I do not know the day of the month - I should think it was about six months ago, as near as I can guess - I could swear to the horse - he rode it about ever so many different times - he made no concealment; he offered him for sale to three or four - he asked 10l. for him, but he made 8l. or 8l. 10s. of him - I was present when he sold it in the yard, and know he did sell it to a man named Evans, who paid him the money in the house - I know Evans very well; he used our house - I have been there six years - he offered it to Mr. Franks, Mr. Pitcher, and, I think, to Mr. Ambrose, and different people besides.

MR. DAWSON. Q. Just try and recollect when it was he brought the horse to your stables; do you know the month, at all? A. No: I cannot tell - it was about six months as near as I can tell - I cannot tell whether is was five or four months ago - I will not swear anything at all about it - I am quite sure he had it there, and am quite sure he sold it there - I do not know whether Evans knew the prisoner before - I should think it was nearly five months ago - I am no friend of the prisoner's - I have seen him repeatedly, and heard many people call him by his name - I think he was five nights there with the horse - he told me he had bought it at Smithfield - I did not see any advertisement - I heard Webster say there was an advertisement - I did not tell the prisoner of it - I am sure he sold it to Evans.

JURY. Q. Are you in the habit of making an entry when a horse is taken in by you? A. Yes; I always settle with mistress once a week - I cannot tell the day of the month - I dare say I could tell if I had my book here - the horse was taken to the stable on Friday night - I saw the horse about an hour ago over the way - it was the same horse as I saw Evans buy of the prisoner.

DANIEL FRANKS . I am a hay salesman, at No. 3 Wharf, Paddington. I only know the prisoner by seeing him walking backwards and forwards - he offered me a horse for sale - I cannot justly tell when - it is the same horse which is at the New Inn; but I do not know justly the time, as I did not take particular notice - he sold it to Evans about a week after he offered it to me - I thought it would not suit me - he asked me £9 for it - I did not see the prisoner use the horse at all - I went with him to look at it.

Mr. DAWSON. Q. He sold it to Evans about a week after

he had offered it to you? A. Yes; Evans being a neighbour of mine, came and asked if I knew who had a horse to sell, and I recommended Evans to him to buy it - he did not tell me how long had he had it, or where he bought it - I saw no hand-bills respecting it - I cannot recollect in what month he offered it to me - I took no particular notice of it- it was the latter end of the summer, I believe.

Q. Are you sure it was not in the winter? A. I cannot tell - I do not notice such things - I could tell if I was to look back in my business, because I recollect, I had a horse died about that time, and I wanted to replace him - I have not brought my book with me - I do not know that I can recollect justly the month my horse died.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-9

534. GEORGE WARREN and GEORGE SPENCER were indicted for feloniously and sacrilegiously breaking and entering a certain chapel, on the 16th of February , and stealing therein 1 box, value 1d.; and 49 books, value 4s.; the goods of John Robinson and others .

2nd COUNT. Stating them to be the goods of James Cauldwell .

THOMAS SLATER . I live in Britannia-terrace, City-road. I am a teacher to the Sunday-school at Hoxton Chapel - in consequence of suspicion of the chapel being robbed, I kept watch on Sunday, the 16th of February - I placed myself in the gallery in the school - at a quarter to five o'clock in the afternoon, I heard one of the windows open under the gallery - I saw nobody until after they had opened the cupboard - I then saw the prisoner Warren and the witness John Spencer, endeavouring to open a cupboard inside the chapel - I jumped over the gallery and laid hold of Warren - Spencer made his escape through the window - one box was removed from the cupboard containing small penny books, and was placed on the sill of the window - the cupboard was still locked, after they had opened it - the bolt of the lock was not thrown back - it had been forced open and the door was wide open - the books are worth between 3s. and 4s. - I gave Warren to Holland, a policeman - John Robinson is the treasurer to the school - James Cauldwell has the charge of the books, and is superintendent of the school - Warren was in the habit of coming to school at the time - he is eleven years old - it was a quarter before five o'clock in the afternoon - John Spencer did not attend the school - he is the prisoner's brother.

JOHN SPENCER , aged nine years old, upon being questioned, did not understand the nature of an oath, and was not examined.

JAMES CAULDWELL. I am superintendent of the Sunday school - I was at the school on that day, but not when the boy was taken - there was a box in another cupboard which had books in it - on a former Sunday, the 2nd of February, I had put 4s. or 5s. into a box in the cupboard, and that money was taken - the cupboard was locked, but not the box - on the following Sunday I found the door unfastened, and all the money gone from the box, it was half-pence and silver - on Sunday, the 9th, I placed some copper in another cupboard; I put it in the same box - it was three or four shillings in half-pence; and on Wednesday evening I was at school - I found that cupboard door forced open, and the money all gone - the school is licensed, and it is a chapel used for religious worship occasionally, in the winter season - it is an independent place of worship - Warren had been in the school nearly two years.

WILLIAM HOLLAND . I am a policeman. On the 16th of February, I heard a noise in Hoxton Town about 5 o'clock in the afternoon - I was in doors - I went out, Warren and the witness Slater were struggling together - I asked Slater what was the matter, - he said something about a robbery, and I took the boy into the school-room, which is called the chapel, and there Slater stated in his presence, that they had been robbed on two previous Sundays, that he had secreted himself in the singing gallery, and heard the window open, and two persons enter - that he afterwards heard the cupboards opened - he jumped down and took Warren, and Spencer escaped - I took Warren to the station-house, and on the way there, he said to me, "You are not going to fetch the two Spencers - they were with me, they live at the china shop in Hoxton Town" - after taking him to the station-house, I told him to come to the light of the gas, for I thought I knew him, and I recognised him as having seen him with the two Spencers on two previous Sundays, with money in their possession in a coffee-shop - Warren had said in the coffee-shop there, "Flare up! we won't have a penny egg, bring me a three-half-penny one" - and he admitted that before the magistrate - I went in search of the Spencers - I found them at their father's house - he is a very respectable man - I took them into custody - the youngest Spencer was admitted as evidence for the Crown, on account of his youth - all their parents are very respectable, and I do not think anybody could say a word against either of the boys previous to this transaction - their parents have lived at Hoxton for thirty years, and bore an excellent character in every respect.

THOMAS SLATER re-examined. The window was shut before I heard it open, I am certain - I observed before that all the windows were fastened - the window under the gallery was fastened - when I got down, it was wide open - it fastens by a piece of wood falling - it is a sliding window, and when it is closed, the wood fastens it, and keeps the frame from sliding back - the window is nearly four feet from the ground - there is a railing before the window - it was opened by putting a hand through a pane of glass which was broken the week previous, and lifting up the latch inside - I am certain the window was latched with the wooden latch - I had examined the windows to see they were fast.

THOMAS SLATER. I never heard anything amiss of Warren - it was far from the wish of the school to prosecute the children.

JAMES CAULDWELL. Warren always conducted himself with the greatest propriety - he was the last boy I should have thought would have been guilty of such a crime - it was not our wish to prosecute; but Mr. Broughton compelled us, (after remanding them for a week,) much against our wish - I hoped he would have inflicted some punishment on them on the Monday morning.

(Several witnesses deposed to the prisoners' good characters.) NOT GUILTY .

(There were two other indictments against the prisoners for the previous robberies, upon which no evidence was given.)

Reference Number: t18340410-10

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

535. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 1 cloak, value 5s., and 2 printed books, value 5s., the goods of Prosper Charles Devaux , to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 52. - Confined for Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-11

336. MARY SIBLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 1 ladle, value 10s., the goods of Robert Johnston , her master .

FRANCIS HERBERT . I am assistant to Mr. Niblet , pawnbroker, Farringdon-street. On the 18th of March, the prisoner came and produced a silver sauce-ladle, broken in halves - I asked if it was her own - she said it was - I doubted it; but she still said it was, and equivocated very much - I suspected her, and asked where she lived - she refused to tell me - I threatened to give her in charge if she did not, and then she attempted to run away - she would not tell where she lived - I took her to the station-house - the value of the ladle is 10s., in the broken state, as old silver.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There was something about her manner made you suspect all was not right? A. Yes: she seemed agitated, confused, and unwell.

THOMAS DAVEY . I was serjeant of police at the time in question - I took the prisoner into custody, and produce the ladle.

MRS. ANN IVERSON JOHNSTON . I am the wife of Robert Johnston, and live at No. 10, Upper Thames-street . The prisoner was my house-maid - this ladle is our property, and has our initials on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had she been long in your employ? A. Nearly three years - I had a most excellent character with her.

COURT. Q. Did she appear in any distress? A. Not at all - I had a good opinion of her.

Prisoner's Defence (written)."My mistress's plate, which was not in common use, was kept in a drawer of a press - I was putting the drawer in order, to do which I had taken out some of the articles which lay on the top, and put them on the ground, and amongst them was the ladle in question - the drawer is exceedingly heavy - I drew it too far out, and it fell on its edge upon the handle of the ladle, by which accident the ladle was bent up and bruised - I attempted to straighten the ladle, but in doing so I broke it - I became alarmed, and in my fright put it in the fire, but instantly took it out again; and the next morning I thought, if I could sell it, I could, with the money, and a sovereign which my excellent mistress had given me some time before, buy a new ladle, and prevent discovery - I went to the shop to sell it; and upon being questioned, I was still afraid of the accident I had had being discovered, and told an untruth about my residence; but when I was taken to the watch-house, I said what my name was, and where I lived - when before the Justice, I was anxious to speak to my mistress, and explain to her; but the persons there said I could not; and I was unable, when I found myself standing as a criminal at the bar of justice, to say anything - although my mistress is a witness against me, it would be ungrateful if I did not acknowledge that she has been the most kind and tender mistress possible."

ROBERT JOHNSTON. I have plate much more valuable than this ladle - it appears bent, certainly - it was kept in a drawer in the upper part of the house - my wife has been rather delicate in her health - I do not know of anything else being missed - Mrs. Johnston had made the prisoner a present of a sovereign, in addition to her wages, about a month before - when she paid her her wages, she gave her a sovereign for her good conduct.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-12

537. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 2 reams of paper, value 30s. , the goods of Joseph Bonsor .

HENRY LAMB . I am an assistant to Joseph Bonsor, who is a stationer , and lives in Salisbury-square . On the 20th of March, about one o'clock in the day, I was in the warehouse in conversation with Mr. Bonsor - I saw the prisoner with a bundle of paper in his possession at the top of the warehouse - he was a stranger - he was going out into the street with it - I ran up to him - he immediately put it down, and asked if it belonged to us, and said he had taken it from a boy in the street - it had been on the counter before, in that warehouse - his statement could not be true - I saw him take it from the counter.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see it in my hand at all? A. I did; you walked very fast out of the counting-house, and then ran - I saw you drawing the paper from the counter - you had it in your hands, and immediately put it down by another pile of paper - it was on two other bundles on the counter - this is the paper.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman never saw it in my hand - I went into an apothecary's shop, and asked if they wanted an errand boy - they advised me to go into this shop - I went, and saw a boy run from the door, and the paper lying down - the gentleman came up - I asked him if it was his, and he collared me.

HENRY LAMB. It could not have laid at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-13

538. EDWARD LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Keeling , from his person .

THOMAS KEELING. I was on Ludgate-hill on the 5th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening - I felt somebody at my coat pocket - I turned instantly and saw my handkerchief in the hands of the prisoner - he ran away instantly across Ludgate-hill, St. Paul's churchyard, and under the archway at Doctors' Commons - I lost sight of him for an instant, and when I caught sight of him again I could not see the handkerchief - it was picked up by a person - I have not a doubt he is the boy in whose hands I saw it.

THOMAS BEALL . I am a printer, and live in Webb-street, Southwark. On the night of the 5th of March I was passing through St. Paul's Church-yard, and saw the prosecutor stop the prisoner - he told him he had picked his pocket of his handkerchief - the prisoner said he had not, and attempted to run away - I saw the handkerchief drop close at the prisoner at his feet - I took it up.

CHARLES GODWIN . I am an officer of Castle Baynard ward - the prisoner was given into my custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was resting on the step of a door when he was charged with the offence, of which he was innocent.)

GUILTY .* Aged 17.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, believing his parents had set him a bad example. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-14

539. JOSEPH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Jose Pinheiro Vizeu , from his person .

JOSE PINHEIRO VIZEU. On the 12th of March, I was going home, from Abchurch-lane to Harper-street, and in Skinner-street I felt a touch at my pocket - I turned round, and saw the prisoner cross from my side of the way to the opposite side - I crossed over, and came up to him near Bowtell's shop window; and, seeing no officer, I said to him, "Are you a countryman?" - he said, "What do you want with me?" - I said, "I think you have stolen my handkerchief" - he said, "You may search me, if you please" - he had his hand in his trowsers pocket - I said,"What have you there?" - he took his hand out and showed it to me; and I saw the corner of my handkerchief hanging out of his pocket, it being red - I said, "There is my pocket-handkerchief" - he threw it down, and started off down Holborn - I ran, singing out, "Stop thief;" and he was stopped, before I came to Shoe-lane, by the officer - I cannot say exactly that I saw the officer catch him, but he is the same person, I have not a doubt - I picked up my handkerchief - it has my initials on it - he was stopped very near the poulterer's shop in Shoe-lane - it was just the width of the street; there were so many people about the officer, I could not see him stopped.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where is Bowtell's? A. On the left hand side, opposite Farringdon-street - he was taken far from me - he was stopped by Shoe-lane, I believe - I did not see him stopped, for I remained by Bowtell's shop - I could not run as fast as he did - I do not know what the prisoner said - I saw him throw the handkerchief down - he did not tell me he had picked it up.

JAMES BEMAN . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner - I took him close to Shoe-lane - I was coming down Holborn-hill, and met him running up the hill - Mr. Vizeu gave me the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Skinner-street, on the right hand side, from Newgate-street. I saw, on the other side of the way, something which I thought was a handkerchief. I crossed over and picked it up. I was returning with the handkerchief - I had just got to the other side of the way, when Mr. Vizeu came up, and asked if I was a countryman. I said I was not. He then said,"I have lost my handkerchief, and believe you have taken it;" but he hesitated before he said he believed I had it. Several people having seen me pick it up, I hesitated before I gave it to him; at last I did, and it fell in giving it to him. I was walking on, and he called, "Stop thief." I ran, and was stopped, by the poulterer's shop, by a policeman - several people were there - one came into the watch-house to establish my innocence, but was not allowed to be heard - several saw me pick it up, and some are in Court now.

JANE REED . My husband is a copper-plate engraver, and lives at No. 2, Hertford-street, King's-road - on Wednesday evening, the 12th of March, near six o'clock, I was passing down Skinner-street, on the right hand side by the church - I saw the prisoner some distance before me - nearly half the length of Skinner-street - I saw a handkerchief lying on the pavement - to the best of my knowledge it was a red handkerchief, but I was on the opposite side of the way - it was near the dusk of the evening - I saw the prisoner cross from the side of Farringdon-street - it was a few steps from Farringdon-street where he picked it up- I saw him do it - the prosecutor came up and asked if he was a countryman - he said no, he was not - he said he had lost his handkerchief, and hesitated - the young man was giving him the handkerchief, and it dropped - (I was in Court while the prosecutor was giving evidence) - the prisoner then walked away; I lost sight of him entirely and was walking on, when the gentleman called "Stop thief"- immediately afterwards I saw the policeman bring back the prisoner - I followed them to the watch-house, and attempted to go in - a gentleman attempted to go in, but the gentleman who had lost the handkerchief said he required nobody to speak, he could speak sufficiently for himself - a man told me he said so - I tried to go in to state what I saw, and was refused - I never saw the prisoner except on the evening in question - I gave my address to his mother and sister, who came up to the watch-house door in tears - I gave them the back of a letter which I had in my pocket.

COURT. Q. You live with your husband? A. Yes - this was near six o'clock in the evening - it was very near dusk - I was coming from the City from St. Martin's le Grand - I had been to see a servant who had come out for a day's holiday - I was to meet him, but I did not, and was returning home - I did not see the prosecutor till he crossed over to the prisoner, who had crossed back to the side of the way I was on - the prisoner crossed to pick up the handkerchief, and then crossed back - I did not see how the handkerchief came on the pavement - I believe the prisoner pulled it out of his pocket, and dropped it - he walked away; the prosecutor said, "I have lost my handkerchief" - I did not hear what was said next - it fell on the pavement - I did not see the prosecutor at the time it was taken from him - I did not see him till he crossed the road to where I was - he crossed from the side where I had seen the handkerchief lying, and was following the prisoner, who was quite close to him - he crossed the road before he spoke to the prisoner - a great many people collected.

MR. VIZEU re-examined. I declare on my oath that this woman never was near me - there was no person near me when the man threw the handkerchief on the ground; I immediately picked it up, and he immediately ran off - I felt the touch at my pocket, and instantly crossed, as I saw the person slide away - he threw the handkerchief down and ran away - there was no time for it to be drawn from my pocket, and thrown down, and picked up, for I turned round instantly - there was light enough for me to see.

MR. PHILLIPS to MRS. REED. Q. On the solemn oath

you have taken, did you see what you have described? A. I am on my oath, and am willing to take another oath.( Jane Isaacs , of 25, George-street, Old-street Road; - Smith , coach-maker, of 21, High-street, Bloomsbury; gave the prisoner a good character.

MARGARET WILLIAMS . I am the prisoner's sister - I live with him at No. 2, Pemberton-row, near Gough-square; one part runs into Fetter-lane - my brother and I work together - we are partners in the feather business - we work for Morrison, in Fore-street, and Solomons, in Cheapside, and support a large family by our industry at artificial flower making - my brother has been an honest character, and very industrious indeed - we have worked from seven o'clock in the morning till nine or ten o'clock at night.

COURT. Q. How far is Pemberton-row from Skinner-street, where this happened? A. I should not think above five minutes' walk - my brother was going to fetch some stamps home, and somebody came and said he was taken to the watch-house - my mother and I ran to the watch-house, and met Mrs. Reed; and a working man wanted to get into the watch-house to state what he saw, and they would not admit him - my mother and I were in tears - Reed told us what she saw - we asked her to state what she saw, and she gave us the back of a letter - we wrote to here to come here yesterday - we never saw her before this occurred.

GUILTY of Stealing, but not from the Person . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18340410-15

540. GEORGE PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 3 seals, value 2l. 9s., and 1 split ring, value 3s. , the goods of Henry Wright , from his person.

JOHN BENNINGFIELD . I keep the Three Nuns, at Aldgate. On Tuesday evening, the 11th of February, a person came there - I believe his name was Henry Wright - when I first saw him he showed slight symptoms of insanity - he appeared strange - he went out from my house after having had his place booked by a coach - he waited impatiently, and said he would go home by a post chaise - I tried to prevail on him to stay till the following day, but he went out, and I understand got into a cab - I had requested a witness to take all the care of him he could, and he did so, but he eventually left our house in a cab.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether his name is Henry Wright you do not know? A. No.

JOHN STEPHEN ASHTON . I live at Romford. On the evening of the 12th of February, I recollect a cab coming to my house at Romford; a person named Charles Wright was there - he gave me that name himself - I saw the prisoner there - he asked for payment of the cab for driving him from town - Wright said he had given him two sovereigns - he had sent for me into the room, and when I went in he appeared very strange - I told him the cabman was waiting to be paid - he said, "Oh, I have given him two sovereigns - he can't want more; but, however, you go and pay him, and lend me £5." - he took tea there and left again in the cab - I told the prisoner to take all care of him, and take him to the Three Nuns, Aldgate, where he would find people to take care of him - he left with him in the cab - the prisoner said he would take him back - when I had first seen Wright, I said to the prisoner, "You have brought a deranged man here" - he said, "Yes; I know I have" - I said, "How came you to bring a deranged man here?" - he said, "I did not know it until the driver of the Braintree coach told me he was deranged" - I said, "Why not take him back?" - he said he would not go back.

WILLIAM COOK . I live at the White Hart, at Romford. When White was there I saw him produce two watches, one from his right hand pocket, and the other from his fob - the prisoner came in while he was there - Wright paid his reckoning, four shillings, and he had a little silver in his purse - I canged him a sovereign - I saw there were some seals to his watch - I do not know how many - there was more than one - I saw him set off to return to the cab.

JOSEPH BEASLEY . I live at No. 137, Whitechapel. On the evening of the 12th of February, a person came into my shop, in a peculiar state of dress and manner, about twenty minutes after nine - his right sleeve was torn, and his clothes muddy - he seemed as if he had been thrown down - in consequence of that, and what he said, I examined his pocket - he had 30s. 4d. and a pen-knife, but no watch - I ascertained that a place had been booked for him at the Bull, and sent him there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say how he came in that state? A. He said he had been down into Essex in a cab; and when he came in he begged I would take care of him, for he was afraid of being murdered - he seemed in a state of great excitement - I never knew him before.

THOMAS BLISSET . I live at No. 51, Wood-street, Cheapside. I never saw Wright before the 12th of February when I booked his place at the Bull, Aldgate - I was with him at the Three Nuns - I received a letter from his master, at Brighton, requesting me to go to the Three Nuns to look after him - he had discharged him in a disordered state of mind - I went at half-past eleven, as soon as the post came in, and found him at the Three Nuns - at that time he had ten or twelve sovereigns, I should think, from what I saw - he had a silver watch, a silver guard, and a bunch of seals attached to it - his mind seemed very much disordered.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did you book the place? A. About twelve o'clock in the day.

RICHARD WILLIAM PARKER . I apprehended the prisoner - I found three seals and a ring on him, also 7s. 9d. in money, and the duplicate of a watch - the Lord Mayor told me to give up the duplicate to his father, as it had been pawned a month before - I produce the money and three seals.

Cross-examined. Q. In what pocket did you find the seals? A. In his left hand waistcoat pocket - I took him about eleven or twelve o'clock at night, on the 13th of February.

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I am the brother of Henry Wright - he is afflicted in his mind - I know these seals and ring to be his property - I had seen them in his possession last September, at Aylesbury, at my father's - he wore them on his watch-guard.

JOSEPH DURHAM . I know the seals produced - they are gold - I sold them to Henry Wright four years ago next June or July - he gave me a sovereign and a silver watch

for them - the ring was attached to them - it is a split ring.

WILLIAM LAKE . I live at Roydon, in Essex - I was at the Three Nuns on the 12th of February - I saw Wright taking some coffee - he appeared out of his mind - I saw him go out of the room about ten o'clock in the morning - he walked away into Aldgate to the stand, and got into a cab which the prisoner drove - I told the prisoner not to take him away, for he appeared out of his mind - the prisoner drove him away - I had seen him pull out a silk purse, and it laid sideways on the table - I looked through the holes of the purse, and there was a good many sovereigns, and he had got a watch and seals.

Cross-examined. Q. That was not in the prisoner's presence? A. No, another cabman drove him first, but I brought him back into the yard with the first cabman - he went away, and I followed him to the prisoner's cab - he had got into a coach before he got into the cab.

COURT. Q. The prisoner was the person you told not to drive him off, but he did? A. Yes, I told him not to drive him away - I said the gentleman was out of his mind - he said, "Oh, I do not mind!" and drove off.

Prisoner's Defence (written)."I was taken from the stand, at Aldgate, by a gentleman who caught hold of my reins, and bid me drive off towards Romford - no person came to me and desired me not to drive - I accordingly went, and on the way to Romford the gentleman behaved very strangely, and wanted to get out - I accordingly did drive him on, and then I had to drive him back again, fully intending to take him back to the Three Nuns - in the way home I had much difficulty in preventing him getting out- but he did at last get out near Whitechapel church, at the street leading into the Commercial-road, and ran off - it was late at night, and, after a short time (in carrying another fare who engaged me) I went home to my master's stables - the cab remained in the yard all night - the next morning I went to the stables to clean the cab, and, in pulling out the straw to replace it with fresh, the seals fell out - this was seen by my master and another person - I was recommended to keep the seals for two or three days in case they might be owned, and if nothing was heard, to take them to Somerset-house - I therefore had them in my pocket when the officer came to take me."

WILLIAM LAKE re-examined. The seals were attached to a ring which hung in front of him - I do not know how it was fixed, but I saw it under his waistcoat, and could see the guard round his neck.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to say that a madman, in a fit of insanity, might not seize them and tear the guard off? A. I do not know - I saw him pull his watch out once or twice to look what was o'clock.

COURT. Q. How were the seals attached then? A. I did not take particular notice of that - they did not fall - there was a guard round his neck - I could see that shine under his waistcoat.

JOHN BENNINGFIELD re-examined. I did not notice the seals.

THOMAS BLISSET . The seals hung as most gentlemen's seals do - the guard passing through the split ring.

Cross-examined. Q. What sort of guard was it? A. A silver guard - I should not think it was weak, but tough.

WILLIAM COOK re-examined. The ring was attached to the chain - the seals appeared safe - they could not fall off unless broken, but they might have been broken.

FREDERICK ELLIS . I am a waterman at the Turk's Head, Aldgate, No. 84 - I am appointed by the Commissioners of Stamps - on the 12th of February I remember seeing a tall thin man get into a dark cab, No. 1,729 - that is not the prisoner's - the prisoner's is No. 1,407 - that was the second cab heg ot into - he got into a coach before he got into the prisoner's cab - he got in at one door and out at the other - then ran along the rank and got into the prisoner's cab, took hold of the reins himself, and told him to drive down the road - I did not see anybody come up, and tell the prisoner not to drive him - I saw them go up to the other cabman.

Q. When he got into the coach, was the waiter at the door of the coach? A. No, there was a country looking gentleman with a brown coat on - that person did not go up to the prisoner's cab, and tell him anything.

COURT. Q. You generally get a gratuity from the cabmen, don't you? A. I get a penny from each - I got a penny from the first one, but I had not time to take one of the prisoner - the gentleman got hold of the reins himself so quick - Lake is the gentleman who spoke to the first man - I swear he did not speak to the prisoner - he spoke to the coachman and the first cabman, but let the man drive off.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was he near at the time he got into the prisoner's cab? A. No, he was not.

WILLIAM LAKE re-examined. Q. Is that correct? A. No; the gentleman got out at the same door as he got in at, on the same side of the way - while I was telling the coachman not to drive him away, saying he was out of his mind, a cabman drove up to the door, he got into the cab, and I said to the cabman, "Don't drive him away, he is out of his mind" - that was the prisoner.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Then the man did not get in at one door, and out at the other? A. No; he did not go through the coach, I do not know whether it was the cabman or the gentleman, that turned the horse round and drove away - he got into the coach, and the cabman drove the horse round - he did not produce a watch or seals or money to the cabman - the moment he was in, the horse was turned round for Romford - I got into the first cab, and made the man drive him back into the Inn yard - the prisoner drove up to the coach door without being called, and I said, "Don't drive away: the gentleman is out of his mind."

F. ELLIS re-examined. Q. Is what you swore true? A. Yes; the man got in at the left hand side, and out at the right - Parry was five or six lengths down the rank - the man went to him to get into the cab - the prisoner was cleaning his cab, and the gentleman jumped in.

COURT. Q. How was he cleaning his cab? A. Rubbing the brass work in front - the gentleman jumped in - the prisoner turned round, took his seat, and they drove off together.

COURT. Q. Which way was the horse's head turned? A. Towards Aldgate church, which is the general way of the rank - they turned round to go towards Romford - I heard no directions given which way to drive - I had heard

Lake interfere with the first cab and the coach - I could not get near him - I was shutting the door of the coach, and he jumped out at the other side - the third cab was next to the Boar, four or five cabs off - I was taking directions at the coach door - the person did not speak to the cabman, for the gentleman was speaking to the coachman at the same time as he jumped into the cab.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who was speaking to the coachman? A. The witness who was last up here; and at that time the gentleman bolted away, and went to the cab four cabs off - it was not the gentleman who was speaking to the coachman, but the witness - when I opened the door for the gentleman to get in, Legg went to the coachman, and told him not to drive him away - he was near me until the gentleman got in, and went round to the cab.

JEREMIAH UNDERWOOD . I keep the Mitre livery-stables in Mitre-street. The prisoner stands at my stable - on the morning of the 13th of January, between half-past ten and eleven o'clock, I saw him cleaning his cab - I saw him take the straw out of the bottom - I was called away; but I saw a little bunch of seals fall from the straw - I saw the prisoner pick them up, and put them into his pocket - his master stood by the side of me at the time.

COURT. Q. Had the cab been out that day? A. Not that morning - I was standing on the near side of the cab; and the prisoner pulled it out at the off-side, on the same side as the driver sits - there was no straw in the place where the driver sits; but he was pulling it out at that side - he did not call my attention to it - I was called away to a gentleman - it was a little bunch with two or three seals - they were not shown to me - he goes out of a morning, sometimes about half-past ten o'clock, sometimes not till twelve o'clock - Swain has at times only one horse to work with the cab.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was he pulling out the straw in the usual way on that side? A. Pulling it out to put fresh straw in - on the 12th of February he drove the cab home about twelve o'clock at night - he was solid and sober then.

JOHN SWAIN . The prisoner is a cab-driver in my employment, and has been so nine months - I put up my cab at Underwood's stables - I was present on the morning of the 13th of February, while the prisoner was cleaning out his cab - I saw him draw out the straw - I saw three seals and a ring fall out of the cab - Underwood was standing by at the time - he was called away to a gentleman who came into the yard - I told the prisoner, he had better keep them a short time to see if they were owned, and if not, to take them to Somerset-house, which is the regular thing - I should know the seals again - (looking at them) these are them.

COURT. Q. Was Underwood by when the seals were seen? A. Yes; he saw them drop out of the cab - he was pulling the straw out of the cab - he was at the driver's side, I think; he pulled the straw out and threw it on the ground, and the seals shook through on the ground - he told me he had taken a gentleman to Romford the day before - before he found the seals, he did not say any thing about the gentleman he took to Romford; only he gave me the duty-ticket of the gate - it was when he gave me the duty-ticket that he told me he had been to Romford - the seals were found on the 13th of February - he was taken into custody on Saturday afternoon, I believe - the 13th of February was on Thursday - he mentioned about driving the gentleman to Romford on the Thursday; but it was on Wednesday he drove him - he said nothing about a man out of his mind - he told me that morning, he had come home about nine or half-past eight o'clock the evening previous - I had not seen him overnight - I do not sleep on the premises - my cab does not go out at any particular time in the morning - I have only one horse to it; and when it does well, and comes home in the afternoon, the horse has rest - the prisoner gave me the day's work; he paid me 14s. for the day's work - he gave it me in silver.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Does he live with you at night? A. No; he gives me the money the following morning; but I have let it go a week or fortnight - I do not expect him to bring me the money at night.

COURT. Q. Does he pay you one sum whatever he does? A. When he does well, he pays me more - if he goes twenty-four miles, I consider it a very hard day's work, and give him more rest in the morning - half-past ten o'clock would be none too early to go out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-16

NEW COURT. - Thursday, April 10th.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

541. NICHOLAS AUGUSTE LOUIS LEMOYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 12 yards of velvet, value 12l. , the goods of Antoine Leroux - and for stealing, on the 13th of March , 1 silver spoon, value 10s. , the goods of Samuel Bird , to which indictments he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-17

542. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 24 yards of printed cotton, value 15s. , the goods of Thomas Hall .

THOMAS HALL. I am a linen-draper , and live in Bishopsgate Without . On the 24th of February, the policeman brought this piece of goods to me - it has my private mark on it - I am quite positive it is mine; but I had not missed it - we had not sold this, nor any other whole piece, when this was brought back - the goods were examined, and this was then missing - I had seen the prisoner before, but do not know her.

JOHN ROCKWELL . I am in the service of Mr. Sampson, of Shoreditch. On the 24th of February the prisoner came there between six and seven o'clock - she bought a cup and saucer - she came again, and asked to look at a basin - I turned to get it, and saw she had a plate in her bosom - I took it from her, and found this cotton in her lap - I gave her in charge.

WILLIAM WEBB . I am a police-officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner and the cotton - she told me that her sister bought it and gave it to her; and her sister lived in Fenchurch-street - I said I would go to her - she then

said she lived at Camberwell - she said before the magistrate that she had picked it up - there was some dirt on it.

JURY to MR. HALL. Q. Where had this piece been? A. Behind the counter they are kept, but on this day some prints had been shown to a customer.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, it was covered with mud.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-18

543. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Richard Greening , from his person .

RICHARD GREENING. I was walking in Drury-lane on the 28th of February, at half-past ten o'clock in the morning - I had occasion to use my handkerchief, and put it into my pocket again at the corner of the coal-yard - I walked about twenty yards, when I was asked if I had lost anything - I felt, and missed my handkerchief - this is it - it is a new one; I had only put it into my pocket that day - it was produced to me in less than three minutes by the officer - I have no doubt it is mine - I had taken snuff, and some is on it now.

FRANCIS LITTLE (police-constable F 158). I was in Drury-lane - I saw the prisoner slip from behind the prosecutor with something in his hand - I knew him, and followed him down Charles-street - I called, "Stop thief!" - he then ran as fast as he could - his cap fell off - he did not stop to take it up, but ran on - he went into No. 8 - I followed him; and when he got to the foot of the stairs, I saw him throw down this handkerchief - I took it up, and followed him up stairs - I took him back to the prosecutor, who had been stopping in the street - the prisoner said he had not seen the handkerchief at all.

Prisoner. When he came into the room where I was, he said, "Come along, it is no use." Witness. Yes; I did - I was glad to get him out, as there was a bad set there.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the handkerchief under a gateway; I put it in my pocket, and did not run till he called "Stop thief" - I then threw it down.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-19

544. SARAH WICK was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 2 rings, value 10s., the goods of Elizabeth Estall , from her person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-20

545. JAMES BENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 watch-chain, value 1s. 6d.; 2 seals, value 20s.; and 3 watch-keys, value 8s., the goods of John Walton , from his person .

JOHN WALTON. I am servant at the Gloucester Coffee-house, Piccadilly. On the 15th of February I was walking across Whitehall-yard with my wife, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening - the prisoner and another came up to us just against Privy-garden - they were arm in arm, and came rushing up against us - I had my hand in my pocket on my watch - the prisoner made a snatch at my chain and seals with his right hand - the chain broke from the watch - I turned, and seized him - the other man walked off - I suspected that he had got the chain and seals - I did not see him have them - I held him till the officer came - I had not seen him before.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me touch your watch-chain? A. I saw your right hand go against it - I felt the watch move immediately - I then caught hold of you, and had you taken - my wife called the policeman - I do not know what you did with the chain and seals - when you came up facing me, I took a step to the right - you stepped the same way, and snatched my chain and seals.

JURY. Q. Are you quite positive it was the prisoner's hand that went to your chain? A. Yes; the prisoner had a smock frock on; but the other had a coat on - I should not know the other man again.

SARAH WALTON . I am the prosecutor's wife - I was with him in Whitehall a little after ten o'clock at night - the prisoner and another man came up to us, linked arm in arm together - my husband laid hold of the prisoner, because he was fully satisfied he was the man who had snatched at his watch - I did not see the transaction - the other man slipped round my arm, and got away - I can swear that the prisoner was there at the time, and my husband seized him - he had a smock frock on - the other man was dressed more genteelly.

Prisoner. Q. When you husband caught hold of me, did I not deny it? A. Yes: I did not see you speak to the other man; but you had your arms linked together - we could not get by you - there was room to have passed, if you would have let us.

JURY. Q. Were there other persons going by? - A. There was one other, who is a witness.

WILLIAM JUDGE . I was passing through Whitehall on my way to Compton-street - I saw the other man with his back to the rails - I saw the prisoner standing not far from him - the other man went up to the prisoner, took him by the hand, and whispered to him - I passed on about four paces, when I turned round out of curiosity, seeing a respectable man speaking to the prisoner - I saw them hustling the prosecutor on the pavement - the prosecutor took him by the collar, and called the policeman.

ROBERT TAYLOR (police-constable A 93). I heard the cry of "Police," and took the prisoner - there was nothing found on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing by the prosecutor, when he caught hold of me, and said I had robbed him of his watch - I do not know whether my hand had touched him or not.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18340410-21

546. WILLIAM FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 2 candlesticks, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Ovendon .

ARCHER LEE (police-constable N 170). I saw the prisoner on the 25th of March, by the canal in Kingsland-road - I asked him what he had got in his bundle - he said two candlesticks which he got of his sister, pointing towards Haggerstone, but he did not know the street - I took him to the station - he there pulled out another candlestick from his bosom - he then said his sister lived in the New North-road - I took him there - I found a person there of his name, but no relation - I made inquiry, and

found these two candlesticks had been taken from the prosecutor at Haggerstone.

ELIZABETH OVENDON . I am the wife of Robert Ovendon. These candlesticks are his property - on the 25th of March they were put on a board exposed for sale - I did not miss them till the officer came.

Prisoner. I found the two candlesticks by the canal side - I took them up, and the officer stopped me - the other one I bought.

GUILTY. Aged 16. - Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor . - Confined for One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-22

545. JOHN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 time-piece, value 2l. , the goods of James Nicholls .

ANN NICHOLLS . I am the wife of James Nicholls, of Queen's Head-court ; he keeps a coffee-shop . On the 24th of March the prisoner came in at a quarter before nine o'clock - he called for a cup of coffee, and sat down near the mantle-piece, where the time-piece was - he called for the Times newspaper, which I gave him - he then called for the Dispatch - he sat there at ten o'clock, when I went and put too the shutter - I then saw the time-piece was safe - the prisoner sat there till half-past ten o'clock - I then went to the door, and as I stood with the door in my hand, he got up, came past me, paid me 1d. for the cup of coffee, and said, "Good night" - I turned my head, and missed the time-piece - I pursued him - he had not got out of my sight - I followed him into Craven-court - he then ran, and the policeman took him - he took the timepiece from under his right arm, and threw it on the ground - I took it up.

ROBERT OSSITT (police-constable C 161). I took the prisoner - he had this time-piece under his arm - he dropped it as soon as he saw the witness come up.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a piece of work - I stopped a minute or two - I was then going off, and the officer took me.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-23

546. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 1 carpet, value 9s. , the goods of Thomas Smith and another.

FREDERICK GILES . I am assistant to Mr. Thomas Smith and another, of Pitfield-street , pawnbrokers . I was in the shop on the 12th of March - the lad told me something - I went out at the private door, and saw the prisoner with this carpet under his arm - he was in company with another person - I pursued him across the road - he dropped the carpet - I kept the prisoner in sight, and took him - this is the carpet.

JAMES ARTIS . I am in the service of Messrs. Smith. On the 12th of March I looked out at the window, at the back of the house - I saw the prisoner go up to the carpet, which was hanging outside the door - he pulled it down from the nail it hung on, and broke the cord in two - he put it under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. The carpet was lying under the wall - I took it up, and the man came after me.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-24

547. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 30th of August , 18 spoons, value 7l. 10s.; 3 sauce-ladles, value 1l. 15s.; 1 fish-slice, value 1l. 14s.; 1 wine-strainer, value 14s.; 1 pair of tongs, value 7s., the goods of Thomas Jarvis , well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS JARVIS. I am a solicitor , and live in Gower-street, Bedford-square . Ann Develing was in my service from February 1833, and while she was there I have frequently seen the prisoner come there - I have made some objection to her coming there - I afterwards had the prisoner and Develing taken up - they were tried here - Develing was convicted, and the prisoner was ordered to be detained - I missed these eighteen spoons, one fish-slice, one pair of tongs, and other articles - I know them to be mine - they were marked J - they are worth about 12l.

THOMAS ANDREWS . I am in the service of a pawnbroker in Theobald's-road. The prisoner frequently came to the shop - between August and October she pawned the gravy-spoon, this fish-slice, and some other things, with me - here is the letter J. on the articles, and she gave the name of James - she appeared very respectable, and said she was a lodging-house keeper - she redeemed the property, and pawned it again.

WM. RAMSEY . I am in the service of Mr. Lowther, a pawnbroker, in Tottenham Court-road - the prisoner came to his shop - between August and October she pawned six tea-spoons, a pair of tongs, and some other things, in the name of Mary Ann Jones - she redeemed them, and pawned them again and again.

W. JAMES . I am clerk to the prosecutor. Develing was in his service, and was convicted last session - I have seen the prisoner frequently with Develing - these articles were produced last session, when Develing was convicted.

JAMES BAKER (police-constable E 115). I took the prisoner into custody at a pastry-cook's shop, where she was in the habit of visiting the servant girl - I told the prisoner Mr. Jarvis wanted to speak to her - she said she knew nothing of Mr. Jarvis, but in going to the office she said she thought they could not do much to her - that she certainly did pawn the plate, but had given all the money to Develing.

MR. JARVIS. This is my plate; it had been kept in a cupboard in the butler's pantry - the prisoner could not get it without receiving the key from Develing; unless Develing had left the key in the lock - the plate was in the care of Develing - I found the duplicates in the plate chest.

JURY. Q. Did you ever authorize any one to pawn it? A. No; I believe the money was spent in drink by Develing and the prisoner.(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she was not aware the plate she had pledged for Develing, was without her master's knowledge.)

GUILTY .* - Aged 42. Confined One Year .(See Third Session, p. 238.)

Reference Number: t18340410-25

548. JAMES WANDSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 6d. ; the goods of John Saunders .

JAMES DARLING (police constable C 156). On the 29th of March, I saw the prisoner in Burlington-street, on the step of a gentleman's door; he looked round two or three times - I saw he was in the act of doubling up a pot - he

then left the steps, and came through Vigo-street into Regent-street - I followed, and stopped him at the corner of Swallow-street - he made some resistance, but my brother officer came up, and we got him to the watch-house - we found on him these three quart pots, and three pint pots, two in each pocket, and two in his hat - I asked him how he came by them? - he made no answer.

JOHN SAUNDERS. I keep the Hertford Arms public-house - this quart and pint pot, are mine; they are worth 1s. 6d. - I missed them on the morning of the 29th of March - they had been at some gentleman's house in Grosvenor Mews.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them on a dunghill in Berkley-street.

GUILTY . Aged 41. - Transported for Seven Years .(There were two other indictments against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18340410-26

549. WILLIAM HART was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. DAWSON conducted the Prosecution.

ALEXANDER STEELE . I am a baker . The prisoner was in my service; it was his duty to take out bread; to receive money of my customers; to enter it in this day book the same day, and to hand it to me - he left me on the 8th of March - on the 19th of February , there is an entry in the book of 7s. received from Mrs. Speaight; on the same day, 4s. 6d., received from Ann Edey ; and on the 3rd of March , 6s. from Eliza Edey - these are the amounts he accounted for to me.

ANN SPEAIGHT . On Monday, the 16th of February, the prisoner called on me, and I paid him 8s. - he gave me this receipt for it.

Prisoner. You sent the little girl with the money? Witness. Yes, I sent it by her.

COURT. Q. Did you see her pay it to the prisoner? A. No, I did not, but I am sure she paid it - she came back to me with the bill in her hand, with this 8s. written on it - I know it is the prisoner's writing.

ELIZA EDEY . The prisoner came to my father on the 3rd of March - my mother was ill in bed, and I paid him two half-crowns, and two shillings - he wrote this receipt.

Prisoner's Defence (written). As respects the charge of embezzlement of £1. 2s. 10d., on the 8th of March last, that sum was received by me on that day, on my master's account, and was in my possession at the time I was taken by a policeman, and taken from me on the same day, the 8th of March, by him, which prevented my paying it over to my master - at the time I was taken, my master owed me 16s. for a week's wages, and my clothes, worth between two and three pounds, were in his possession - as to the other charges, many of the figures are written in pencil, as is usual in the trade, and from the lapse of time, I cannot speak to the particular facts, but throw myself on your merciful consideration.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-27

550. WILLIAM HART was again indicted for embezzlement .

ALEXANDER STEELE . The prisoner was in my service - it was his duty to receive money , to enter it in this book, and pay it to me - he left me on the 8th of March - on the 18th of January , he has entered in this book, Mrs. Brown, 4s. 6d.; on the 4th of January, Mr. Shepherd, 9s.; and on the 8th of March, Mrs. Speaight, 14s.; here is no entry of 10s.

Prisoner. I had finished my customers on the 8th of March about half-past five o'clock - I then went out, and he gave me into custody in about twenty minutes - I had not given him my money, nor taken the book into the shop - I had about two hours' work to do, but he did not give me time to return.

Witness. He had put down the 14s. on that day - he had left my service, but left his book behind him.

MARY ANN BROWN . During the month of January I made several payments to the prisoner, and he gave me receipts for them, which I have lost; but I can swear that the lowest sum I paid him in that month was 5s.

Prisoner. She sent her daughter with 4s. 6d. - she hardly ever came to the door herself. Witness. I never sent my daughter to him above twice in three months - I myself paid him during the whole of January, as my daughter was then out on a visit.

ANN SPEAIGHT . On the 8th of March I paid the prisoner 15s. myself - I saw him write this receipt up against the door-post.

FELIX SHEPHERD . I live in St. Luke's - I paid the prisoner 10s. in the month of January - I cannot tell on what day, but I saw he had put down only 9s. in my book - I told him of it - he said it was his mistake, and he paid me the 1s. back at the end of the week - I have paid him 4s., 5s., and 10s., but never 9s. at any time.

MR. STEELE. Here is no sum of 10s. entered to Shepherd on the 4th of January, nor 5s. to Brown, nor 15s. to Speaight, on the 8th of March.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-28

551. JAMES HABBERFIELD and JOSEPH HABBERFIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 live tame fowl, value 2s. , the goods of Ebenezer Jewsbury .

JOHN JEWSBURY . I live with my uncle Ebenezer Jewsbury - I was in his shop on the 24th of February - I heard a fowl scream - I ran out, and saw Joseph Habberfield with a fowl in his hand, which he said belonged to his mother - I ran after him, and took him - he threw the fowl down, and some men persuaded me to let him go, which I did - the fowl was my uncle's.

Cross-examined by MR. ARNOLD. Q. Have you a sister? A. Yes - the fowl was not hers, but my uncle's - there was no person with Joseph Habberfield when I saw him.

JOHN CHISHOLM . I live in Hampstead-road - I was coming down Little Brook-street , and saw James Habberfield inside the prosecutor's railings, shoving this fowl through to Joseph Habberfield, who took it and ran away with it - I told John Jewsbury to pursue him, as he had got one of the fowls.

WM. FLETCHER . I live in Little Brook-street - I saw Joseph Habberfield running - I asked him where he got that fowl from - he said it was his mother's - I took it from him.

James Habberfield. A boy met me, and said he would

give me 1d. to get a fowl for him, and he then threw my hat down the area, and when I went to get it, he said if I did not give him that hen through, I should not come up again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-29

552. JAMES HABBERFIELD and JOSEPH HABBERFIELD were again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 live tame fowl, value 2s. , the goods of William Stark .

WM. STARK. On the 24th of February I was out all the evening; and the next morning, as I was not called by the cock as usual, I looked and missed this cock and two hens, one of which had been sitting on twelve eggs - I found this cock at the station - it is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ARNOLD. Q. How do you know it? A. I reared it, and know it by every mark on it - I cut its comb - I heard him crow every morning.

JOSEPH TOMLINSON (police-serjeant, S 11.) This cock was given to me by Chisholm.

JOHN CHISHOLM . I took this cock from Joseph Habberfield on the 24th of February, about ten minutes before eight o'clock in the evening - he had thrown down the hen before - he had this cock in his pinafore, and I took it from him.

WM. FLETCHER . I saw him with this cock in his pinafore - he said he found it in the fields.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-30

553. GEORGE ABEL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 2 bushels of oats, value 6s. , the goods of William Thomas East .

WILLIAM THOMAS EAST. I am a stage-coach master , and live at Hornsey - the prisoner was my horse-keeper , and it was his duty to take care of my corn - I missed corn occasionally, but did not know how it went - on the 1st of February I went home, and one of my other men had given information - I called the prisoner into the room, with Hadgell the other man - Hadgell then said, before the prisoner, that he had sent away about two bushels of oats by the carter who came for the dung - the prisoner said he was very sorry for what he had done, but as it was only the sweepings of the stable, he hoped I would not be hard with him - I said I thought it was very hard to be robbed by him when I placed so much confidence in him - he generally had the cutting of the chaff, and mixing it with the corn.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE . Q. He said it was the sweepings; and that may be correct for what you know? A. Yes; but I don't allow any to be taken away - the corn was worth about 6s.

WM. HADGELL . I work for the prosecutor - the prisoner sent away two bushels of oats, as he told me - he said he had measured it, and he gave it me to put on the cart, which I did - I was obliged to put it where he told me - I saw a little of it - it was clean corn.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the corn put in? A. No; but he told me it was clean corn - I had a quarrel with the prisoner after this transaction - he struck me because I told him I would tell master - I am a day labourer - I look after horses, or anything else - I have never been in trouble above once or twice - I was only put into the station - I never was tried - I never was at Brixton - I never was transported - I never ill-treated a gamekeeper, and was never punished for it.

THOMAS MUNCY . I was there when this witness and the prisoner quarrelled - the witness said to him, "You boast and brag of your money, and well you may, when you go and sell your master's property" - and then the prisoner struck him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? A. In the stable, at work - I went and parted them from fighting.

GEORGE CHAMBERS . I am an officer - I was sent for, and took the prisoner - he said he was very sorry, and that the man who received it had absconded.

Prisoner's Defence. Hadgell was scandalizing me in the stable - I gave him two black eyes, and then he said he would tell my master that I sent two bushels of corn away; but I did not - he gave the bit of stuff away himself three weeks before we quarrelled.

GUILTY. Aged 36. - Recommended to mercy by the Jury . - Confined one year .

Reference Number: t18340410-31

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

554. WILLIAM HOBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 2 pillows, value 8s., and 1 bolster, value 5s. , the goods of Ann Roberts .

EVAN DAVID JONES (police-constable N 180). On the 26th of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Kingsland-road - I saw the prisoner carrying this sack - he had a female with him - I went up to him, and asked what he had got - he said two pillows and a bolster, which belonged to that young woman who was removing from the Derby-road - I then went to the young woman, and asked if she was removing - she said "No" - I then took them to the watch-house.

ANN ROBERTS. I am a widow . I at that time lodged in Little West-place - these are my property, and were taken out of my room; but I do not know how - the prisoner at that time lodged in the same house - I do not know how he got his living - the young woman who was with him lived in the next house - the lock of my door was hampered; but I do not know who did it.

GUILTY. Aged 21. Recommended to mercy by the Jury . - Confined for Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18340410-32

555. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 whip, value 1s. , the goods of William Wade .

WILLIAM WADE. I am a cab-driver , and live in Crown-court. I lost a whip out of Mr. Davies's stable, in Carey-street, Lincoln's-Inn-fields - I left it safe in the morning, on the 7th of March, and in the evening it was gone.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not in the same service as you were? A. No; you had left before I went there.

WALTER CAMPBELL (police-constable E 95). I took the prisoner on another charge - he had this whip in his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Mr. Davies's service - I left my whip in the bottom of the stable the night before, and when I went that morning, it was gone - I thought the

prosecutor had taken mine, and I took this, but with no intention of keeping it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-33

556. MARY JANES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 2 gowns, value 4s.; 3 petticoats, value 2s.; 4 aprons, value 2s.; 13 stockings, value 4s.; 12 cups, value 4s.; 7 yards of lace, value 2s.; and 1 sheet, value 2s. ; the goods of William Price .

JANE PRICE . I am the wife of William Price, a painter , who lives in Gray's-Inn-lane; he was painting Mr. Swinburn 's chambers, and I had the care of them - this property is mine, and was at the chambers - I went to see my husband's sister in the country; while I was there, Mr. Swinburn came home, and he put the prisoner into my place in his chambers, at No. 6, South-square - I came home in October last, and then missed this property, which I had left packed up in bundles and boxes - I had not known the prisoner before - no one but her had access to it.

ALFRED COLE . I am in the service of a pawnbroker in Gray's-Inn-lane. I have a sheet pawned by a woman in the name of Smith - I do not know who it was.

JAMES PERKINS . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Shoe-lane. I have a petticoat, a cap, and a remnant of lace, pawned by a woman in the name of Smith.

JOSEPH WILLIAM CLARK . I am a pawnbroker. I have a frock pawned by a woman on the 23d of January.

RICHARD BAYLIS (police-serjeant G 5). I took the prisoner - I found these articles in her room - I asked how she came by them - she said she bought them of an old Jewess.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I waited on Mr. Swinburn for sixteen months - I never saw the prosecutor there at all, nor ever saw any of these things - I had two rooms where I lodged, in Greystoke-place, with a woman named Smith - these things were found in Smith's room, but they did not belong to me - I had one of these caps on, which Smith had lent me.

GUILTY. Aged 40. - Recommended to mercy by the Jury . - Confined for Six Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-34

557. RICHARD TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Charles Henry Gray , from his person .

2nd COUNT. Stating it to be the goods of Frederick Clement Gray .

FREDERICK CLEMENT GRAY. On Good Friday evening I was walking in Regent-street with my brother, Charles Henry Gray - my handkerchief was in my brother's pocket - I saw the prisoner take it out of his pocket - there were five or six persons with the prisoner - he ran off, and I pursued him into the Haymarket, crying, "Stop thief," till he was taken by the officer - this handkerchief was dropped in the way he ran - I did not see it drop; but I can swear I saw him take it from my brother's pocket - this is it.

WM. PLUME (police-constable C 12). Between 8 and 9 o'clock on that evening I was in Regent-street - I saw the prisoner running - I pursued him till he got to the Opera House, where I took him - this handkerchief was brought to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at work all day, and in the evening was going to my uncle's - I heard a cry of "Stop thief," and ran, as well as others, and the policeman took me - the gentleman said it was me; as they were taking me to the station house - some one brought the handkerchief, and they said this was it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-35

THOMAS COLLISON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 counterpane, value 7s.; 1 hearth rug, value 6s.; 2 gowns, value 5s.; 2 pair of candlesticks, value 2s.; 1 cheese tray, value 2s.; 1 blanket, value 3s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; and 1 bottle, value 2s. ; the goods of Benjamin Marlow .

ELEANOR MARLOW . I am the wife of Benjamin Marlow, of New Compton Street - the prisoner and his mother and father-in-law lodged in our house - his father is porter at a tobacco shop - I missed the property from the 27th of December for some time - I then gave them notice to leave my house, which they did - they paid their rent - after they were gone, the person to whose house they went gave me some information - I went to the station and found the prisoner - I asked him about my goods - he said they were at the pawnbroker's - I have found part of my things.

JOHN BIDWORTHY . I am in the service of Mr. Lowther , a pawnbroker, in Tottenham-court-road - I have a counterpane, two gowns, a shift, and a pair of candlesticks, pawned by the prisoner at different times.

RICHARD BAYFIELD . I am servant to a pawnbroker in High-street, Bloomsbury - I have a water-bottle, a hearthrug, and some other things, pawned by a woman.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was induced to do it by a boy, named Smith - he pawned the things, and we divided the money.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-36

559. MARTHA CALLIAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 pair of boots, value 4s. , the goods of David Davies .

DAVID DAVIES. I am a haberdasher , and live at Paddington . On the 26th of March the prisoner came to my shop, and asked to look at some shoes - there were none to suit her - she bought a handkerchief, and then took this pair of boots in her pocket, and went out of the shop - I called her back - I found the boots in her pocket - I had known her before.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE . Q. She did buy a handkerchief of you? A. Yes - I had no shoes that would fit her.

GEORGE BISHOP (police-constable, D 30). I was called in, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought a handkerchief of him, and when I was gone he called me back, and said I had taken something - I said I had not - he then gave me in charge.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-37

560. HENRY EATON was indicted for breaking and

and entering, on the 9th of March , a building within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of Frances Jefkins , and stealing 1 copper lid, value 1s.; 1 saucepan, value 1s.; and 1 copper, value 7s., and fixed to the same building .

FRANCES JEFKINS. I am a widow , and live at Chaseside, Winchmore Hill . On the 9th of March I went to bed at half-past ten o'clock - my place was all safe then - at five o'clock the next morning my servant called me, and said she heard some person in the shed - I went down to see, and found the staple of a lean-too shed was drawn - it is in my yard, which has palings all round, and adjoins my dwelling-house - I went in the shed, and missed a copper which had been taken out of the brick work, also the lid of the copper - the prisoner lived about 200 yards from me.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE . Q Is your house by itself? A. No; there are others by it.

SOPHIA SLEIGHT . I am servant to the prosecutor. On the 9th of March I went to bed at half-past ten o'clock - there was a lean-too shed in our yard which had this copper in it - I fastened that down with a padlock, and in the morning the staple had been drawn, and this copper, the lid, and the saucepan were gone - I know the copper - I had been trying to clean it on the Friday, and this happened on Monday.

JOHN TINGAY . I am a carter, and live in that neighbourhood. I heard of this loss - I went with Mr. George, and we traced this copper through a hedge - we found it under tree covered with mould, about twenty yards from the prisoner's house.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you say it is not more than twenty yards? A. It might be thirty.

JAMES GEORGE . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 10th of March I went with a warrant between nine and ten o'clock, to the prisoner - I found him at work - his trowsers were in a terrible black state - I searched his house, but did not find the copper - I asked the prisoner how his trowsers became so black - he said the chimney had been on fire the day before - I went and looked about - I found some soot on a gap in a hedge, and some soot on the grass on which some one had been kneeling, and the marks on the soot exactly corresponded with the corduroy breeches which the prisoner wore.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner say that his landlord's chimney had been on fire the day before, and he assisted to extinguish the fire? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I dirtied my trowsers by the chimney being on fire the day before - I did not get up till six o'clock in the morning on the day the copper was lost.

BETSY DALLAR . I am daughter of Edward Dallar. The prisoner lodged at our house - on the 9th of March, our chimney was on fire - I gave the prisoner the broom to put it out - he made his trowsers black.

COURT. Q. Did you see him go into the garden? A. Yes; after he had put out the fire - I did not see the copper found - the gap in the hedge had been made a long time before - we used frequently to go through it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-38

561. CATHARINE KENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 gown, value 10s. 6d. , the goods of Mary Ann Jessy Haile .

MARY ANN JESSY HAILE. I am single - I keep a shop in Shouldham-street . On the 15th of March, I had finished this gown to go home, and laid it on the counter in my shop - the prisoner came in to buy a stay-lace - I served her - I did not then miss the gown, but went into the parlour to finish the band - I missed the gown in about three-quarters of an hour - I went to Mr. Tomlinson, who had taken it in for 4s.

WILLIAM BENHAM TOMLINSON . I took this gown in pledge from the prisoner - she had pawned things for her mother before.( Elizabeth Dunn and Dennis Tayley gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 14. - Recommended to mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18340410-39

562. MARIA PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and 1 pillow-case, value 6d. , the goods of Amy Ann Hong .

AMY ANN HONG. I take in washing . The prisoner assisted me for about ten months - I missed a handkerchief and pillow-case about the 13th February.

WM. JOHNSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Providence-row. I have the handkerchief and pillow-case pawned by the prisoner.

GEORGE AVERY (police-constable G 175). On the 3rd of March I was called to take the prisoner, who was then in a pawnbroker's shop - she said, "How foolish it is for you to take me into custody, when, if you will give me time, I will get the things out" - I went to her lodgings, and found the two duplicates, which led me to the pawnbroker's where these things were - I was laid up at the time, or I could have produced several other charges against her - I have a handkerchief in my pocket now, belonging to a gentleman, who discharged a servant in consequence of it.

GUILTY . Aged 43. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-40

563. JAMES MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th February , 11 sacks, value 1l. 5s., the goods of Charles Batley , his master .

WM. GOLLICK (police-constable H 85). On the 27th of February, I was on duty, and saw the prisoner in Essex-street, Whitechapel, about eleven o'clock - he had a load on his back - I followed him till he came to a court - I then stopped him, and asked what he had in his bundle - he said he was shifting his lodging, and he had clothes in it - I said I should like to see what he had got, and he wished me to follow him to his lodgings - he went to one house and looked at it, and said, "They are not up" - he then crossed and went into another house, and threw his bundle down - I found these sacks in it - I then took him.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did he not tell you where to find his master? A. Yes.

CHARLES BATLEY . I keep a booking office in Whitechapel. The prisoner was in my service as ostler , and to take out goods for two years - these sacks were in my care - I have had to pay for them - I had lost a great deal of property, and told the prisoner to look after the things.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you buy these sacks? A. No; they were sent to my place to be booked three or four months ago - I have paid for them - I saw them in my

warehouse about a fortnight before they were lost - they were to be left till called for.

Prisoner's Defence. I had them given into my care sixteen months ago in my room - they are mine till I can find an owner for them.( John Sullivan , of weaver, Newcastle-street; Timothy Duggin , 22, Austin-street; John Lyon , Newcastle-street; Timothy Connor , - Dennis Donovan , - and Patrick Connolly , gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-41

564. ELIZABETH THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 1 £10 bank note , the property of Sarah Brown .

JOSEPH EVANS . I am servant to Miss Brown, of Hackney - on the 12th of March she gave me a £10 bank note to get changed - I put it in my pocket, and lost it - I was told to go to the station, which I did, and was directed to where I found the prisoner at work, washing - she said she had found a note, but would not give it me, as others might have lost a note as well as me - I went home and told my mistress, and she went with me to the prisoner, but she said she would not give up the note, let the consequence be what it might - she was taken into custody.

Prisoner. He told me he did not know the number, neither did Miss Brown.

SARAH BROWN. The note was mine - my sister gave it to Evans to get changed - I had no mark on it - Evans said he had lost it - I went with him to the prisoner - she refused to give it up, as I could not tell the number - I said,"Very well, be it so," but I would find the number, and then I supposed she would give it up - I went home, and my sister knowing that we had had but two £10 notes in the cash-box, I went to Esdaile's, and got the number - I then went to the prisoner with Mr. Bedford, the officer, and said, "Now I suppose you will give me the note, as I know the number, it is 49?" - the prisoner said, "That is not the number" - Mr. Bedford said, "Yes, it is" - this was in the evening of the same day as the note was lost, which was about eleven o'clock in the morning.

JOHN BEDFORD . I am a police-officer. On the 12th of March I was at a house where the prisoner was - I understood she had picked up a note - I sent for her, and asked her to let me look at it; she did, and I put down the number in my pocket-book - I then went to the station, and told the police-constable - in about half an hour Evans came to me and said he had lost a note - I gave him a direction where to find the prisoner - the prisoner afterwards called on me, and asked me what she was to do - I said, as it had been lost by a servant, she could not expect the same compensation from him as from another - I went to the prisoner in the evening with Miss Brown - she then said she had sent to town and cashed the note, and must abide by all the consequences, and she told the magistrate so the next morning - the bank clerk described the person who got change for the note, and he answered the description of the prisoner's husband.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-42

565. MARY LEMON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 hearth-rug, value 5s.; 1 blanket, value 3s.; 2 sheets, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 2s.; 2 petticoats, value 1s. 6d.; 1 apron, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 shirt, value 1s. , the goods of James Sare .

ELIZABETH SARE . I am the wife of James Sare - we live in Bridport-place, Hoxton - the prisoner occupied a room in our house - she came in October - I missed some of these articles, and asked her about them - she said she had lent the hearth-rug to a friend to make one like it, and the blankets she said she had washed.

MATTHEW PANTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have this hearth-rug, these blankets, and other things, which were pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take these things to steal them - I have had a heavy struggle to get through these last six years.

GUILTY. Aged 35. - Recommended to mercy by the Jury . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-43

566. JOSEPH LEBERGE and WILLIAM CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Jenkins , from his person .

WILLIAM JENKINS. I am a plumber . On the 24th of February I was in Osborn-street , and had my pocket picked of my handkerchief - I felt a slight pull at my pocket - I made a sudden stop, and saw the prisoners running from me - they turned down the first turning - I saw a man standing opposite - I asked him if he knew them - he said yes, he saw them every day - the prisoners were taken about three days afterwards - I never got my handkerchief again, but the prisoners are the boys who were running from me the moment after my pocket was picked.

JAMES WEARING . I am a bedstead-maker. On the 24th of February I was coming down Osborn-street - I saw the two prisoners follow the prosecutor - I saw Clark lift up his pocket, take his handkerchief, and give it to Leberge.

JOHN STACKWELL . On the 24th of February I was standing at the shop door where I work - I saw the two prisoners run past me - Leberge turned down a court, and waited till Clark came up - the prosecutor then asked me if I had seen them - I said, "Yes, I know them" - we went after them but lost them - they were taken on the Thursday afterwards.

JAMES THOMPSON (police-constable, K 178). I took the prisoners - when we took them to the station Clark said,"What, is this for the handkerchief?" - I found in Leberge's hat this handkerchief, and this other one strapped on his sleeve - they have not been identified.

Leberge. They are my own handkerchiefs.( Charles Hewitt and Jane Rook gave the prisoner Leberge a good character.)

LEBERGE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor. -

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-44

567. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 pair of clogs, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Cotton .

HENRY COTTON. I keep a turner's shop - on the 17th

of March, the prisoner and another person came to my shop for some butter prints - the other person kept me in conversation, and a person in the street called out that I had lost a pair of clogs - I ran out, and saw the prisoner in the street - he struck my witness, and was going to strike him again, but I prevented it, and gave the prisoner to the officer.

JOHN WAITE . I keep a chandler's shop. I was in Tottenham Court Road , and saw the prisoner snatch a pair of clogs from the prosecutor's shop - I said, "You have robbed the man of these clogs" - he put them back, and struck me, called me and old informer, and told the people I got my living by informing - the prisoner took the clogs from inside - the shop, and brought them half was past the next shop - he then put them back, and struck me.

Prisoner. Did you see me take them? Witness, Yes.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that he was intoxicated, and went into the shop to look at the clogs, when he was charged with stealing them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-45

OLD COURT. Friday, April 11, 1834.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

571. GEORGE COPAS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Old , on the 16th of March , at St. Matthew, Bethnal Green , and stealing therein 1 coat, value 2l. 10s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 1l.; 1 pocket-book, value 8d., his goods .

CAROLINE GEORGE . I am servant to William Old, who lives in Warren-place, Hackney Road . On Sunday evening, the 16th of March, I went out about seven o'clock, and took the key in my pocket - it is a common spring lock - the windows and all were secure, and the door fastened - I returned about half-past eight o'clock, and found the door shut as I had left it - I opened it with the key, and went in and saw the prisoner in the passage - I heard a noise on the stairs as I opened the door, and said,"Mr. Old, is that you?" and then I found it was the prisoner - I had never seen him before - I had no opportunity of seeing his face distinctly - I said nothing to him - a gentleman was going by, and I said I was afraid somebody had broken into the house - the prisoner went towards the back door, and got out over the garden fence - the back door had been fastened before - at the bottom of the garden there is a pond, and a person could not get out without going through the pond - the prisoner was taken in three or four minutes in a public-house close by - he was wet up to his knees - I recognised him to be the same man immediately - I am certain he is the man I saw in the passage - I am positive the property was all secure when I went out- on examination I found a pair of trowsers in the passage, which were in a drawer up stairs when I went out - I went up stairs, and found all the drawers open, and one had been broken open, a pocket-book was taken from one drawer, a coat was taken out and found in the passage, with the trowsers.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you say, "Is that you, Mr. Old" or Old? A. I cannot say - I am his housekeeper - he is not married - I was very frightened - I ran into the street to give the alarm as fast as I could - I did not enter the house until the prisoner got away - he was in my view about two minutes or a minute - he was not in custody in the public-house - he was standing with about forty persons - a person must go through the pond at the bottom of the garden - he could get out at the side without going through the pond - there is no pond at the side of the garden - I cannot say what coloured handkerchief the prisoner had on - he had a black hat on, I am positive - two men were taken up for this, but I swore to only one.

JOSEPH HOGARTH . I am a grocer, and live in Kingsland-road. I was about 250 yards from Mr. Old's house - two persons came running towards me - they had no hats on - the first that came up to me I caught at, and missed; but the prisoner I caught by the collar, and held him - he said, "Let me go: I have done nothing" - I took him to the Bakers' Arms - as I went along, I heard something drop like iron - I stopped him; and a person following behind picked up a small crow-bar, which I afterwards saw tried to the drawers - it tallied exactly with the marks on the drawer - when I took the prisoner, he was up to the knees in dirty water, as if he had gone through a pond.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not mean to swear he dropped the instrument? A. No; I cannot swear it - there were two more persons; one who was assisting me to take him along, and one who was behind.

THOMAS FOREMAN . I am an officer. About half-past eight o'clock I found the prisoner in custody in the Bakers' Arms - I received a crow-bar, which I fitted to the drawers - it tallied exactly, and corresponded in all respects - one corner of it was broken off, and that mark was in the impression - the prisoner was wet up to the knees - he had no hat on when taken - there was no part of the house broken.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search him? A. I did - I found no picklock-key, or any thing, on him.

MR. PHILLIPS to CAROLINE GEORGE. Q. Has Mr. Old any servants? A. None but myself - I left nobody in the house - the up-stairs rooms were all fastened when I went out - I am satisfied all the doors and windows were fastened.

GEORGE KEMP . I am a policeman. I went to the house - the crow-bar tallied with the drawers - I went down stairs, and traced footsteps towards the pond - the beds up stairs were all turned over - I traced the footsteps down the garden to the pond - the pailing had been broken, and fallen into the pond, where he got over - the house is in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green.

WILLIAM OLD. This is my property - I know nothing of these hats which were found.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any other Christian name? A. No: it is my dwelling-house.

JOSEPH WILLIAM GREEN . I live next door to the prosecutor - I picked up these two hats in the garden at the back of the house - a pond is at the bottom.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18340410-46

572. LEWIS HORNIBLEW was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Anthony Horni

blew , on the 13th of March , and stealing therein 1 coat, value 3s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 2s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 6d., his goods .

ANTHONY HORNIBLEW. I am a labourer , and live in Spring-place, Kentish Town, St. Pancras . On Wednesday, the 19th of March, I went out about two o'clock in the afternoon, leaving my wife in the house - she is not here - I was sent for about five o'clock, and found my wife at home - I found the house had been opened, and my clothes taken away - the back-door was opened and the bed-room - whether my wife fastened the house up when she went out, I cannot tell - I missed the articles stated in the indictment - I had seen the coat a day or two before in my box - I had seen the silk handkerchief on the Sunday - the trowsers I had not worn for several weeks - I cannot say they were all in the house that day - I have every reason to believe they were - I had not seen them for a day or two, as the chest was locked up - the prisoner is my son.

Prisoner. Q. Can you state positively that I took them? A. No, I did not see him take them.

JOHN WILLIAM CASSELL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Warren place, Camden-Town. On the 19th of March, the prisoner brought a coat and trowsers wrapped in a handkerchief - I knew him before - he pawned them for 5s. in the name of John Horniblew, about four o'clock in the afternoon - he said they belonged to his father, who had sent him to pawn them - I did not know his name was not John - I recollect his coming to our shop about three times before - I am quite certain of him.

WILLIAM COLLEY (police-constable S 118). I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday evening, the 23d of March, by his father's orders - he said he had made it all right with his father.

ANTHONY HORNIBLEW re-examined. I know these things to be mine - I have had the coat about six months - I did not give him directions to pawn them - the trowsers are mine - I know the handkerchief by a hole in it - my son has not lived with me for some time - he has been a good deal out of employ - I did not turn him out of the house.

Prisoner. When I sat in-doors, my father and mother were eating their meals; they used to see me sit there, and not give me a mouthful; and so, when he went out, my mother said, "You had better take these things and go and pawn them - and that will learn your father to give you victuals another time."

ANTHONY HORNIBLEW re-examined. I did not turn him out of doors - I do not recollect his stating this before the magistrate - my wife had nothing to do with it - she went out after I did, and while she was gone it was done.

Prisoner. It was but a few months ago that his wife took the things and pawned them, and kept away from him for three months - he did not exactly turn me out, but he said I should not come into his house - there are seven brothers of us, and two girls, and he hates me the worst of the lot - he told me to go and get my living where I could - he has told everybody not to come near me.

ANTHONY HORNIBLEW. My present wife is not his mother - it is all false; I have half kept him for months, and have sent him things to the prison, and this morning, I gave him all the money I had but 1s. - I am sorry I am obliged to appear here.

GUILTY (of Larceny only.) Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-47

572. JAMES LEPPARD and JAMES SMITH were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Wirgman , on the 25th of March , at St. Marylebone , and stealing therein, 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 candlestick, value 1l.; 2 spoons, value 10s.; 1 gown, value 15s.; 1 coat, value 1l.; 2 pieces of stuff, value 1l.; 3 pair of breeches, value 15s.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; 4 pair of leggings, value 15s.; 1 legging, 2s.; and 1 razor, value 6d., his goods .

Mr. THOMAS WIRGMAN. I live at No. 1, Park-road, Regent's-park , St. Marylebone. I am not in any business. I went to bed between one and two o'clock, on the morning of the 25th of March - my family consist of myself and my housekeeper - I have no other servant - I had removed in that evening, and had not engaged a servant - I do not know who fastened the house up that night - I was disturbed at a quarter before four o'clock - I heard a rustling by my bed-side, and hallooed out, "Who is there?" - I raised myself up in bed, and perceived something dark move by my bed-side - I repeated the question, "Who is there?" rather loudly, as this thing moved by my bed-side, and it passed round with some rapidity to the door; and then I saw something drop from it at the door - I immediately jumped out of bed, to seize what I thought was a man crouched down - I got out to the door, and observed him going down stairs very rapidly - I went down, hallooing,"Thieves," and "Murder;" and I said, "Give me my pistols and I will shoot him" - I went to the top of the bannisters - I knocked at the housekeeper's door, and said,"Come out, Mrs. Phipps, for I shall be murdered;" instead of which, in her fright to unlock the door, she appeared to double-lock it - I went, and threw up the sash, and called out, "Police" - the policeman came in a very short period - I am satisfied there was a man in the house, whom I saw running down stairs - I cannot tell whether the door was open - I did not look - I was not at all frightened - the policeman came up into my room.

MARY ANN PHIPPS . I am housekeeper to Mr. Wirgman. On the 25th of March, I went to bed between twelve and one o'clock - I fastened the doors myself, and the windows - every thing was carefully fastened - Mr. Wirgman was in bed half an hour before me - I was alarmed in the night by his screaming, "Murder," and knocking at my door with all his force - I ran to unlock the door, which was bolted underneath; and I found I could not let myself out, not remembering that I had bolted it - I then flew to the window, threw it up, and screamed, "Murder" - while I was looking out of the window, one man ran out, in a dark coat - he jumped over the gate in front of the house, and ran away to the right; and then a man in a white jacket followed him, and jumped on the rails, and rather to the wall - I know both the prisoners - Leppard is the one in the white jacket - the police caught him before he got

over - Smith's father had been employed to remove the goods into the house, and he himself had moved one load - when the policeman took Leppard, I said, "That is him; stop him: that is one of them" - I never lost sight of him - the policeman sprung his rattle, and another policeman brought up Smith directly afterwards - the policeman came into the house, and burst open my door - we went down stairs, and found the things produced.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What height is the wall they got over? A. He got over the rails, and from the rails on to the wall - the wall is about eight feet high - I never lost sight of Leppard - I could not distinguish his features - I saw the policeman catch him getting off the wall - he was off the wall when I saw him taken - the wall did not conceal him, because I was considerably higher than it, and could see over - I was very near them - I ran into master's bed-room, and missed his gold watch off the mantel-piece, and the silver spoon out of the kitchen.

JOHN HULL . I am a policeman. On the morning of the 25th of March I was on duty in Park-road, Regent's-park - I heard a female cry, "Murder - Stop thief" - I immediately ran to the house, No. 1, Park-road, and saw the prisoner Leppard, just getting off the wall - I immediately took him - then sprung my rattle - Serjeant Tate came up- I gave the prisoner to him - the housekeeper still remained at the window, wishing some one to come inside - I got over the rails; and on my way up to the house, I found this hat in the garden - on getting nearer to the house, I found the kitchen window broken in - it appeared to be burst in, and forced from the outside - I found the prisoner, Smith's, shoes inside the window - he owned them at the station-house - I went up to the housekeeper's room, and then she missed the gold watch - I came down, unbolted and unlocked the street door, came out and took Leppard, whom I had left in custody of Tate - on taking him to the station-house he behaved in a most disorderly manner, ill-using me - he bit me through the thumb to the bone, at the same time laying hold of my *** - I was laid up two days in consequence of the ill-usage I received from him - Smith was taken by some other officer - Smith acknowledged the shoes to be his at the station-house, but afterwards said,"They are not my shoes" - one of the shoes, he said, was not his, but belonged to Leppard - I found in the passage a piece of green stuff, a green shooting-jacket, 3 pair of breeches, a pair of white trousers, four pair of gaiters and an odd one, and a dressing-gown; and ofter locking them up at the station-house, the gold watch was found by another officer.

SAMUEL TATE (police-sergeant). I was in the Park-road in consequence of the cry of "Murder," I went to the prosecutor's, and found the prisoner Leppard and Hull struggling at the gate - I seized hold of him, searched him, and found the handle of a plated candlestick, and a knife in his right hand pocket - Smith was directly brought up by two other constables, who had secured his hands - he had neither hat nor shoes on - I searched, and found in his coat pocket a razor with the prosecutor's name on it - I examined the kitchen window, found the sash forced out of the frame by some instrument; but the brick-work of the sash was rather rotten - I could not make it correspond with an instrument we afterwards found - the sash stood up against the wall inside the kitchen.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Leppard intoxicated? A. He appeared to have been drinking - he was not insensible.

CHARLES BOAT . I am a policeman. On the 25th of March, I was on duty in Boston-street - about a quarter before four o'clock I was alarmed by a female calling "Stop thief!" and directly after I heard a rattle spring - I heard somebody come running down the road, and directly turned round the corner - it was Smith - I told him to stop - he took no notice of me - I shoved him against the pales, and stopped him - I then saw his hand go as if he threw something away - I asked what he had been doing - he said,"What is that to you?" - I took him back to the prosecutor's house, and there he was searched by Tate - when we took him to the station-house I returned to the house to inquire what was lost; and I went directly back to the spot where I took Smith, and found a spoon and a gold watch - I found them about four yards from Boston-street - he had thrown them over a place into a private ground - that was where I saw him throw something away - he had neither hat nor shoes on.

PATRICK CONNOLLY . I am a policeman. On the 25th of March I was in Park-road - I heard a female scream, and a window crash as if it was broken - I ran towards No. 1, and saw Smith jump over the wall - I sprung my rattle immediately, and he ran in the direction of Boston-street - I continued springing my rattle, and never lost sight of him until he was stopped by Boat - we brought him back to the house, and Leppard was there in custody - we took Smith to the station-house - I found a crow-bar in the road just where Smith had jumped over the wall - the Kitchen window had been wrenched by some instrument.

THOMAS WIRGMAN re-examined. This is my watch - it laid on the mantel-shelf in my bed-room - this razor has my own name written on it with my own hand - this plated candlestick and the handle belonging to it is mine - this silver spoon was lent me by my landlord, as we had not unpacked any thing that evening - I value the gold watch at 5l. - I have had it more than twenty years - this is my own shooting jacket, and white breeches and gaiters; and this dressing-gown is mine - the whole property is of more than 5l. value.

Smith's Defence. I was at work for Mr. Wirgman till eleven o'clock at night, and that razor fell out in the van; I picked it up when I got home; the shoes and hat are not mine.

LEPPARD - GUILTY . Aged 27.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

Reference Number: t18340410-48

JAMES HUNT , ISABELLA SHIPLEY , JOHN MILLER , and JOHN PEAPALL , were indicted for that they on the 21st of February , at St. Margaret, Westminster , feloniously did falsely make and counterfeit four pieces of false and counterfeit coin, resembling, and apparently intended to resemble and pass for four pieces of the King's current silver coin, called half-crowns, against the Statute , &c.

MESSRS. SCARLET and ELLIS conducted the Prosecution.

ROBERT GOOSE . I am a policeman. I went to No. 10, Pye-street, Westminster , on the 21st of February, with Clifton, Elliott, and Booth, police-constables - I found the street door open - I went up stairs to the first floor back room - I went first, and found the door fast - I burst it open with my shoulder, and found Peapall against the door - I almost knocked him down with the force - I found Miller standing on the left hand side of the fire place, looking towards the fire-place - as soon as I entered the room, he turned round and looked at me, and I saw something drop from his hand - it fell into the ashes - I then told my brother officer to lay hold of him - I took it up: it was a file - I went up to Hunt as he sat on the right hand side of the fire-place in his shirt sleeves, which were tucked up- I saw him pass something to Shipley, who stood on his left hand side, about a yard from him, at the table; it was wrapped up in a bit of rag - she dropped it the moment he gave it to her; and, as she dropped it, I saw some white metal, in a liquid state, fall from it on the table - I then picked it up, and feeling it hot, I dropped it - I picked it up again, and put it into my hat - it was a mould with half-a-crown in it - these are the same - I told my brother officer to secure Shipley - I had then got Hunt against the fire-place, in the chair - I told him not to move - when he saw me turn my head towards the woman, he struck a pipkin which was on the fire, containing white metal in a liquid state - some of the metal, when he struck it, went through the cinders in the fire-place - I took up some of that metal, and what remained in the pipkin is there now- they had got a middling fire - on the hob on the right hand side, I found a pipe with white metal in the bowl; and on the same hob I found half a metal spoon, which had been melted - on the mantel shelf I found a perfect spoon of the same metal - on the table I found a good half-crown - the prisoners were handcuffed - I found part of another mould at the back of the fire-place - Hunt said it was all up with them - I had said nothing to him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS . Q. Have you told us every thing you saw? A. I believe so, as far as I recollect - I had a pistol, and told them all, if they resisted, I would shoot them - it was loaded - what Hunt handed to Shipley was hot - I believe he dropped it - Peapall tried to make his escape directly I got into the room - he did not touch any of the implements - I was once in St. Catherine's Dock, and left because it did not suit me - I was not dismissed - there was never any charge made against me for stealing brandy, nor of stealing a donkey: except by people of this sort - there is no charge in the least against me in the police - I was never accused in my life of making false charges against any body.

Q. Are you not now under suspicion, and only allowed to wear your uniform till this trial is over? A. I am not - I was three years in St. Catherine's Docks - I went from there to Mr. Freeman's stone-wharf, Millbank, and left him on purpose to join the police - Miller had a file in his hand - that was all I saw him do - I have seen Hunt go backwards and forwards there night and day - I know he lived there - I had seen Peapall in the street about an hour or half an hour before - it was more than half an hour - I had been watching the house for a good while - I saw Peapall at the end of the street with a good many more - I did not continue watching - sometimes I had other business - I was not watching the house all that day - I was watching it for twenty minutes before I went in - in the course of that twenty minutes I saw some women go in - it is a kind of lodging-house - Peapall was not one of those persons - I do not know the name of any body who went in - it is a general house for these kind of people - three or four different families lodge there.

WILLIAM CLIFTON . I am a policeman. I went with Goose and the other constable - I followed them into the room - as soon as I got in, I laid hold of Peapall - I have heard the evidence of Goose - I have nothing to add to it - I saw every thing he has stated - this bottle, containing plaster of Paris, I found standing on a chair in the room, and this tin band was in a cupboard.

MICHAEL ELLIOTT . I am a policeman. I assisted in apprehending the prisoners - I have heard the evidence of the last two witnesses, and agree to what they state, as far as I was present - I found two bad half-crowns; one on the table, and one on the floor - I stopped Peapall, who was making his escape; and when I took Hunt, I searched him, and found three good shillings on him - when I entered the room, Miller dropped something - Goose picked it up - it proved to be a file; and I saw him heave away half-a-crown, which Booth took up - I took Peapall to the station-house - they met Bill Ballard - we were all close together in Orchard-street - Ballard wanted to know what was the matter; and I think it was Hunt said, "It is all up" - Peapall said nothing.

JOHN BOOTH . I went with the other officers - I saw Miller throw half-a-crown down - I picked it up - I confirm the evidence of Elliott.

MARY ANN WARD . I am the wife of William Ward , of No. 7, New-street, Pye-street. He works at Hammersmith - Shipley came to me for a lodging about two months before she was taken - she came to me at No. 7, New-street, Pye-street - she looked at the second floor back room in No. 10 - she returned, and gave 1s. earnest for the room, at 3s. 6d. per week - she called herself a single woman, and paid the rent until she was taken - I went to the room once and saw Hunt there, and only him and Shipley.

Cross-examined. Q. At that time did you observe any thing wrong? A. Not in the least - Hunt was washing himself there.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin to his Majesty's mint. I have been experienced in coin several years - this is a plaster of Paris mould for casting a half-crown - it has the impression of the obverse and reverse side of a half-crown, and appears to have been used - here is a good half-crown, and the mould appears to have been made with this good half-crown - this is a counterfeit half-crown which has been made in the mould - it agrees in date and every thing - it is the half-crown found in the mould - these two half-crowns produced by a witness are both counterfeit, and the same in all respects as the other - they were cast in this mould; and the one found on Miller is the same - this file has white metal in the teeth of it, such as would be used to remove the surplus metal from the edge - these spoons are the same metal as the base coin,

and here is a pipkin with white metal of a similar description in it, and this tin hand appears to have been used in forming the mould, to keep it together while the plaster of Paris was in a liquid state - this tobacco-pipe has some white metal in the bowl, and might be used to ladle the metal out of the pipkin - this is plaster of Paris in the bottle.

Hunt's Defence. I went up to No. 10, Pye-street, as I knew this girl as a friend, and had something to drink with her - I left word at the public-house that Peapall was to call there for his tobacco-box - he came, and was going out, when the policeman broke the door open, and swore he would blow my b - y brains out if I stirred.

Shipley's Defence. Hunt came into my room about half an hour previous - he sent me out for six pennyworth of rum - I went and fetched it - I had occasion to go to two or three different places - I was not gone more than half an hour - I returned - we drank the liquor, and when I returned the other two prisoners were in the room - I returned with a bottle which I had borrowed at the inn; and keeping on my bonnet and shawl, I came down stairs a second time - I threw my shawl on the chair immediately, went to the bed, and put my bonnet inside the bed, and was returning from the bed, having occasion to go out again, when the policemen surprised me by the sudden entrance - the first policeman who entered, to the best of my knowledge, was Goose - he flew to Hunt - two others flew to the others, and the fourth stationed himself with his back towards the door - they bid me stand in the same position as I was in when they entered, which I did - when they searched the other prisoners a policeman came and searched me - then he left me in care of another while he took the three prisoners to the station-house - then came back and took me.

Miller's Defence. I came up to the room knocking at the door - the prisoner, Shipley, let me in - I went for a clean shirt she had of mine, and in five or ten minutes Goose arrived - he immediately rushed to Hunt, put the pistol to his head, and said, he would blow his b - y brains out if he moved - he could not see me, for I was behind him, and he took a false oath that it was I dropped the file - I had nothing to do with it - a policeman laid hold of me, and took an oath I had thrown one across the room, but I had nothing in my hand - when Clifton went to give his evidence, Goose was behind him putting the words into his mouth.

Peapall's Defence. I live at No. 4, New Peter-street. I was returning home - I called on Hunt for a tobacco-box I had given him the night before and forgotten, and was not in the room three minutes when Goose rushed in - I was taken to the station-house - Goose came and said, "Peapall, I am sorry for you, for I saw you go in not five minutes before, myself" - a soldier was in the place, and heard it, and they would not allow him to give his evidence - he is in the 15th Hussars, and is gone to Ireland, or he could take his oath I had not been there five minutes.

( William Sampson , tinman, of No. 16, Silver-street, Golden-square; John Garrett , coal-dealer, of No. 12, Lancaster-court, New Bond-street; Christopher Hartland , porter; and William Reynolds , porter, of No. 5, Lancaster-court, gave the prisoner Peapall a good character. John Watkins , publican, of Leicester-street, Regent-street; Martha Bowen , of No. 7, Wallis-place, Pimlico; and S. Aclin , of Great Guildford-street, gave the prisoner Miller a good character. Valentine Barnes , of No. 13, Sackville-place, Mile End-road, gave the prisoner Shipley a good character.)

HUNT - GUILTY . Aged 20.

SHIPLEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

PEAPALL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-49

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

574. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 1 teapot, value 4l. , the goods of Richard Brook and another.

2nd COUNT stating it to be the goods of Robert George Lewis , clerk .

Mr. RICHARD JOSEPH BROOK . On the 27th of February, I was in our shop, in the Poultry , about twelve o'clock- the business is the property of Mr. Richard Brook and myself - the shop door being open, the prisoner walked in and took a silver teapot off the counter - he turned round, and ran up Cheapside, and was followed by the next witness, and secured by him - I followed, and caught hold of him too - the property was in his hand - the witness took it from him - I took the prisoner, and took him to the bottom of the Poultry, and gave him in custody.

GEORGE ALLWRIGHT . I am shopman to Messrs. Brook and Son, who are goldsmiths . About eleven o'clock, on the 27th of February, I was in the shop - I saw the prisoner walk in the shop, and take the silver teapot off the counter - I ran after him up Cheapside, and secured him - Bates has the property - this is it.

JAMES BATES . I am an officer of the City. I received charge of the prisoner, and produce the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress, and in a state of starvation. I had no employment for half a year.

( Charles Bowler , of No. 19, King-street, Deptford; William Bellamy , of Deptford; Samuel Stringer , of Tooley-street; Joseph Ward , of No. 6, Orange-place, Rotherhithe; and - Darvell , boot and shoe-maker, Lower-road, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 22. - Strongly recommended to mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-50

575. ESAU HEMENS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 9 lbs. of nails, value 3s. 6d.; 3 choppers, value 5s.; 6 pokers, value 3s.; and 7 pair of tongs, value 4s., the goods of Edward Cureton , his master .

EDWARD CURETON. I am a wholesale ironmonger , living at No. 49, Bread-street . The prisoner was my porter . On the 6th of March, a little before one o'clock, he took a candle, and went down into the nail cellar - he very soon came out, and went out to go to his dinner - observing his pocket stick out, I went after him, and desired him to come back - I met an officer, and we all went into a smith's shop, in Westbury-street - I found two papers of nails on him - I afterwards went to his lodging, and found six pictures, seven pair of tongs, three cleavers, and a great many nails and screws - I know them to be mine by the mark on them - he lodged at the corner of Lawrence-lane

- he was allowed to lodge there rent free, on my recommendation - (articles produced) - the papers have my mark on them, made by my young man; and many of the articles at his lodging had my mark on them - the greater part of them are marked.

Cross-examined by MR. STAMMERS . Q. Is your young man in your employ now? A. Yes; some of the things found at his lodging have my mark - there were other goods with them which did not belong to me- he has not been in the habit of purchasing ironmongery on his own account, not to my knowledge - if I had known it, I certainly should not have kept him - he lodged in an empty house - I found the goods in a closet, between the room he sat in, and the kitchen.

THOMAS COSTER . I am a police officer. I took charge of the prisoner; in company with Cureton - I saw the two packets of nails taken from the prisoner - I saw these three hatchets and other things found at his lodging.( William Higgs and Thomas Mann gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-51

576. THOMAS GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of John Wood .

JOHN WOOD. I attend the coal market at Billingsgate . On the 14th of March, I left my chaise cart just by the dry arch of London Bridge with a great coat in it, in the care of a boy, who is not here.

DAVID ROBERTS . On the morning of the 14th of March, I saw the prisoner take the coat from behind the cart, run into Miles'-lane, and there put it on - I followed him until I saw a policeman, and gave him in charge.

JONAS CLAPHAM . I am an officer. I apprehended him with the coat on his back.

JOHN WOOD re-examined. This is my coat - I believe it to be mine - I know it from the appearance - I have had it about five years - it is the same colour and cloth, and I believe the same size (trying it on) - it is my coat - I left it safe about ten minutes before two o'clock.

DAVID ROBERTS re-examined. I was about thirteen yards from him - I followed him to the top of Gracechurch-street - he took it from a cart - it laid on the back part of a chaise cart - it was at two o'clock in the afternoon.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my own coat - I bought it and paid for it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-52

577. JOHN BULL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of John Twizell Wawn , from his person .

JOHN TWIZELL WAWN. I live at No. 1, Marine-place, Commercial Road. On the afternoon of the 7th of April, I was coming from the Coal Exchange, and was going through St. Mary-at-Hill - I had got across the next street when a witness came up, and pointed out the prisoner - I ran after him, and took him - before I said any thing to him, he said, "I have not got your handkerchief" - I had not told him what I took him for - nothing was found on him.

Prisoner. You said, "You have picked my pocket" - I said, "I have not." Witness. I did not.

CHARLES PAILTHORPE . I was near St. Mary-at-Hill, on the 7th of April - at the corner of Cross-lane, there were six or seven boys - the prisoner and another, (a kind of a sailor boy) left them, and went through Church-passage - they winked at one another, and when they came to the prosecutor and a gentleman walking with him, the prisoner pulled out a handkerchief from his pocket, and gave it to the sailor boy, who went on by the gentlemen - I went and told the gentleman that the prisoner had picked his pocket - he pursued them - I am quite certain I saw him do it - he said, "I have not got your handkerchief," before any charge was made against him.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-53

578. GEORGE KELLY, alias George Thompson , was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 66 yards and a half of linen cloth, value 2l. 10s. , the goods of Mark Capper and another.

JOHN DARTER . I am an officer of Bread-street. Between six and seven o'clock on the evening of the 21st of February, I saw the prisoner in Friday-street in company with four men, who were standing close along with him - I saw a cart there - the prisoner went to the cart, put his foot on the wheel, and lifted this parcel from the top of the cart - he went away with it - I stopped him, and in the scuffle the parcel fell down - it was picked up and given to me on the spot.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS . Q. Did not you say at one time that you did not see him drop it? A. Never: the man who drove the cart is not here - the cart stood still - I did not see any body at the horse's head - there was plenty of gas-light - the lamp might be three or four yards from me - I detained the prisoner - I am a chair manufacturer - I have been a witness once before in this Court, about a year and a half ago - I was not a witness in the other Court, nor at Clerkenwell - nobody said it was impossible he could get the parcel out of the cart in the way I stated.

MARK CAPPER. I live in Ironmonger-lane. I am a linen factor - I sent a cart into Friday-street on the day in question - it was to go through Bread-street - this parcel is the property of myself and Gabriel Manley - I had sent it out that day to be delivered to a customer.

Prisoner's Defence. The carman came to the station-house, and said the parcel was taken from a different place to what Darter spoke of.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-54

579. JOSEPH PIPER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 8d., the goods of William Keith, the younger , from his person .

WILLIAM KEITH, jun. I live in Nassau-street, Marylebone - I was in Fleet-street on Friday, the 13th of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon - I was proceeding to cross the street - I felt a push against me - I turned round, and saw the prisoner drop my handkerchief out of his hand - I picked it up, secured him, and gave him into custody - my initials are on the handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS . Q. Are you sure

you saw him drop it? A. Yes; there were a great many persons passing - it was not raining at the time.

THOMAS BETTS . I was near the spot - I live in Kennedy-court - I saw the prisoner drop the handkerchief - the prosecutor took it up.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? A. Opposite Child's banking-house, about two yards and a half from Temple-bar - there were people passing - it did not rain.

CHARLES BURGESS (policeman, No. 25). I brought the handkerchief here to-day - I took the prisoner into custody from Mr. Keith's in Fleet-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty - I was running at the time - the handkerchief was not in my hand - I felt a push against me under Temple-bar - I was taking my clean linen home.

CHARLES BURGESS re-examined. He had a clean shirt in a handkerchief, and sixpence half-penny in money.

( Francis Hicks , cheesemonger, Holloway; and James William Fouch , a book-keeper, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-55

580. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 7 combs, value 29s. , the goods of William Gillingwater .

HANNAH HEELEY . I live at No. 85, Long-lane, Smithfield . On the afternoon of the 29th of March I was in the parlour at the back of the shop - I saw the prisoner and another boy come into the shop - the prisoner asked for a pocket-comb - I showed him several - they bought nothing, but went out of the shop; and in about five minutes came back again - the prisoners stood very close to the counter, in front of it - one of them said, "I want one of these combs" - I went into the shop to serve him, and saw the prisoner going out of the shop with some combs in his hand - I followed him, crying, "Stop thief!" till he dropped them - I took them up, and the police pursued after him - I am sure he is the boy - he dropped seven combs, which had been in the glass case before I came in the shop - they are the property of William Gillingwater - I am his sister-in-law.

JAMES JOHN EAMES (policeman G 164). I received the combs from Heeley, and have them - I saw the prisoner running, and sent my brother officer after him - I saw him brought back to the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-56

581. JOHN WOODHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 102 yards of muslin, value 5l. 7s.; and 4 veils, value 15s. ; the goods of Joseph Penrice and another.

2d COUNT. Stating them to be the goods of Joseph Brown .

WILLIAM ANDREW . I am a warehouseman. I live at No. 50, Old-change. I identify this property as belonging to Joseph Penrice, and his partner.

JAMES HOLT . I am in the employ of Mr. Joseph Brown, who keeps the Red Lion, in Aldersgate-street - he had a cart standing in Watling-street on the 26th of March- there was a parcel in it, which I should know if I saw it again - I saw the prisoner near the cart - he took the parcel off the rails of the cart while I was tying the tail-board, and he ran down Old-change - I ran after him, and said,"Hoy, what do you want with that?" - he turned round, knocked me down, and ran through Watling-street into St. Paul's churchyard - I took it up, and ran down the street, hallooing, "Stop thief," two or three times -(looking at a parcel) - this is it - it is directed to Messrs. Penrice and Andrew, No. 50, Old-change.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS . Q. Had you known the prisoner before? A. No; my father was not at the cart all the time - he was gone down Old-change with a large bundle on his back - it was between twelve and one o'clock in the day - there were not many people walking about - there was a woman selling apples, and she saw it - I saw the prisoner again in about half an hour - the cart was then led away up Old-change - I am not mistaken in him - I took particular notice of him - I was frightened when I was knocked down.

Q. You were quite speechless? A. Yes - he dropped the parcel on the pavement when I got up again - he put it down as I walked towards him - he chucked it down, and broke the string - I took the parcel up while I was on my knees - I was almost up when he threw it down - I was in the road - he ran away, not taking any thing with him - the parcel is not very heavy.

WILLIAM SAYER . I live at No. 111, Cheapside. I was present, and saw Holt on the ground with the parcel in his hand - I saw the prisoner running - the boy was on his knees calling out, "Stop thief" - I did not see him get off his knees - I followed the prisoner through St. Paul's churchyard - he ran along the back of St. Paul's into Newgate-street - then left off running, and walked down Butcherhall-lane - I saw the policeman take him - I never lost sight of him, and am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not turn a corner? A. Yes, he turned two corners - I saw round both corners - I cannot see through a house; but I saw him turn the corner - I was following after him, within a dozen yards - I did not turn the corner at the same time; but I did not lose sight of him - I was not so close to him, when he turned the corner, as I was before, and of course lost sight of him - I knew him again the moment I got my eye on him - the boy cried, "Stop thief," as loud as he could bawl - he was not running when he was calling"Stop thief."

GEORGE ARDEN WHITE (City policeman, No. 36). I took the prisoner into custody in Bartholomew-close - he had been previously stopped by a crowd who followed him - I do not recollect seeing Sayer till we came to the top of Butcherhall-lane - I took him at the corner of Old Change, and the boy was there with the cart - that was about three hundred yards from where I took him - there is one turning into St. Paul's Church-yard, another into Newgate-street, a third into Butcherhall-lane, and a fourth into Bartholomew-close.

Cross-examined. Q. How near was Sayer to the prisoner when you took him? A. I cannot say, but to the best of my recollection the first time I saw him was near the corner of Butcherhall-lane - there is a turning between where I saw Sayer, and where I took him - Sayer certainly might have had me in sight when I took the prisoner - I

do not mean to say he was not present - he might be in the crowd - there was a cry of "Stop thief" - Sayer was standing with the rest of the crowd when I saw him, and appeared to have been running - I should think it is above one hundred yards from where I took him to where I saw Sayer standing.

MR. ANDREW . I belong to the firm of James Penrice and another, and the parcel was directed to our house - we had no advice of the arrival of it - I have opened it, and can identify the goods by a private mark - they are goods which were being returned to us from a customer at Wisbeach - we had no notice that they were coming back - I have the bill of parcels.

G. A. WHITE . I took that invoice from the parcel.

JAMES HOLT re-examined. I picked up the parcel the man threw down - put it in the cart, and soon after my father came - my father brought it to Guildhall-yard, and I took it into Guildhall - my father was outside - there were two other parcels in the cart - my father took to Guildhall the same parcel as the prisoner took from the cart.

RICHARD HOLT . My master's name is Joseph Brown - this parcel was in my care, in my master's cart - I took it out of the cart, and took it to Guildhall - it was put into the cart before I came back - my employer is an inn-keeper - the parcel came up in the waggon - I am sure it is the same that was taken to Guildhall.(Property produced and sworn to).

GUITLY . Aged 32. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-57

582. WILLIAM CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 1 coat, value 4s.; 1 rule, value 6d.; 1 hammer, value 3d.; and 1 knife, value 3d., the goods of John Gargery , and that he had before been convicted of felony .

MICHAEL DEVINE . I am a labourer, and live in Paradise-court, Cow-cross. I was at work, on the 11th of March, at Mr. Fenton's, in Smithfield - I saw the prisoner come into the warehouse, and take this coat off a crate at the end of the warehouse, and go out - I followed and took him - I asked what he wanted with the coat - he said a man who belonged to it had sent him in for it - I asked a him where the man was - he said he was in a public-house, having a pint of beer - I said, "I shall not let you go till I see the man" - I went into the stables, where two plumbers were at work that day - it was not theirs - they sent for the owner of the coat, who is a painter.

Prisoner. Q. Was this Mr. Fenton's warehouse? A. Yes; there were men at work there.

Prisoner. I went there to inquire for work - I picked the coat up, and threw it on a large package. Witness. He did not; nobody was about the place - I was down in the cellar - I saw him take it off the crate, and he was putting it on his back when I detected him; he was putting one arm into the sleeve - he asked me to let him go.

JOHN GARGERY. I live at No. 27, Bond-street, Borough-road. This is my coat - I did not send the prisoner for it- I was in Mr. Fenton's employ, as a painter - I left my coat on a crate at the back of the warehouse folded up - there was a hammer, knife, and rule in the pocket - I found them still in it, when the prisoner was detained.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I am constable of St. Sepulchre. I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner to M. DEVINE. You were down in the cellar, and the coat was a long way behind, and as I came out, as I could not see the foreman to ask him for a job, I saw the coat, took it up, and put it on the crate? Witness. I saw him go to the crate - I am not mistaken about his being about to put it on - he had one of his arms at the sleeve of the coat - I asked what he was going to do with it - he said the man belonging to the coat had sent him for it - I asked where he was - he said, "At the public-house drinking a pint of beer" - I went next door, where there were two plumbers at work - they fetched the prosecutor, who identified it.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you ask me if I worked there? A. No.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS. Devine said, he asked the man if he worked there; and he said, not - that was when he came for me, but not when he was stopped with the coat.

M. DEVINE. I did not ask if he worked there, to my recollection.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS re-examined. He came to my house, and said I must come to the station-house, to take a man into custody - he asked the prisoner if he worked on the premises, and Devine said, "No" - Devine asked the man if he worked on the premises - I was not present - I am sober - he told me he had asked if he worked there.

JOHN KING . I am a policeman. I was present in this court, on the 14th of February, 1833, when the prisoner was tried - I produce a certificate of his conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - I know he is the man mentioned in the certificate. (Read.)

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-58

583. JOHN DENNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Pyke , from his person .

JOHN PYKE. I like in Charles-street, Sloane-terrace, Chelsea. On the 26th of March, I lost my handkerchief - I was not aware of it till I received information.

FREDERICK PYNE ANDREWS . I live at No. 5, Milman-place, Bedford-row. On the 26th of March, I was in Fleet-street , about half-past three o'clock, and saw the prisoner in the act of taking a handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket - he was giving it to another boy, but I collared him immediately, and took it from him, and detained him - I told the prosecutor, and gave the handkerchief to him - he delivered it to the officer.

Prisoner. I am disabled of both my arms, and cannot put my hands into my pocket without assistance. Witness. He put his hand into Mr. Pyke's pocket - I did not notice in what way he put it in - I saw him take the handkerchief out of the pocket, and put it in his left hand, and was giving it to the other boy when I took it out of his hand myself, (out of the prisoner's left hand) - it was half out of the prosecutor's pocket when I first saw it - I saw him drawing it from the prosecutor's pocket.

WILLIAM CURTIS . I am a policeman. I have the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent - I am disabled in both hands, and cannot use them without assistance.

(The prisoner appeared to have an infirmity in his right hand, but not in the left.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-59

NEW COURT, Friday, April 11th, 1834.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

584. CORNELIA MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 2 yards of silk, value 7s.; 2 yards of linen, value 6s.; 5 pair of gloves, value 5s.; 1 thimble, value 1s.; the goods of Sarah Nepecker ; and 1 handkerchief, value 6s.; 1 pencil-case, value 1s.; 3 yards of lace, value 3s. , the goods of Ann Nepecker , to which she pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-60

585. MARY BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 5 yards of cotton, value 3s.; 1 cloak, value 5s.; 1 bonnet, value 3s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 3s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 1 table-cloth, value 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 9d.; and 4s. , the goods of Francis Keffia , to which she pleaded GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-61

586. DAVID EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 watch, value 30s., the goods of James Bass , from his person .

WILLIAM BENHAM TOMLINSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in George-street, Marylebone. On the 17th of March, the prisoner came to pawn this watch - I asked what he wanted on it - he said 12s. - I asked where he got it - he said he bought it of his brother at Uxbridge, and had had it some time - I detained him, and sent for an officer - there was a woman at the door - he went and spoke to her.

JOHN MANNING (police-constable D 44). I took the prisoner, and have the watch.

JAMES BASS. I am a carver and gilder ; I live in Little Hertford-street. On the 15th of March, I had the watch, but I got tipsy that night and lost it - I cannot say where - I am told there were some women with me, but I do not know.

Prisoner's Defence. I received it from my brother, who owed me some money. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-62

587. THOMAS COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 4 sovereigns, and 2 half-sovereigns, the monies of William Waite , his master .

WILLIAM WAITE, JUN. I am a boot and shoe-maker , and live in Shoreditch . The prisoner lived with me about six months - on the 19th of September, I made up a parcel to go to my father - it contained a shirt, a pair of trowsers, four sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and a letter - it was directed to Mr. Waite, Duke-street, Reading, Berkshire - I brought it into the shop, sewed it in a basket, and gave it to the prisoner to take to the waggon-office, and if he was too late for the waggon, to take it to the coach-office - he took it out and I saw him no more, till he was in custody.

WILLIAM WAITE, SEN . I received the parcel on the 21st of September - it contained a shirt, a pair of trowsers, and a note, but no money.

GEORGE AVERY (police-constable, G. 175.) I received information, and took the prisoner in the House of Correction - I said, "I suppose you know what I take you for"- he said, "Yes; I know all about it - I had a good master, and I should have been more grateful" - he said, "I suppose I shall be transported; but I am a good scholar, I shall do better there than here."

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-63

588. EDWARD JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 2 candlesticks, value 2l.; 1 snuffer-stand, value 12s.; and 2 cups, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Stevens Aldersey .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-64

589. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 coat, value 3l. , the goods of William Bracey Kent .

WILLIAM ORTON . I am coachman to Mr. William Bracey Kent. On the 6th of March, I was waiting with the carriage, in Great Marlborough-street , for my master - this great coat was on the coach box - I got down to attend to my horses, and saw the coat go off the box - I ran round the carriage, and saw the prisoner with it under his arm - I pursued him all down James-street - when he got to the bottom, he turned and saw me close to him - he dropped the coat - I jumped over the coat, and caught him by the flap of his coat - he threw his arms round, got me down, and struck me on the arm; but I kept him till the officer came up.

JAMES VINE (police-constable F 61). I saw the prisoner, about a quarter before twelve o'clock, running down James-street, with the coat, and the coachman after him - I took up the coat, and took the prisoner, who had got the coachman down in the road.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of "Stop thief" - I went under the coaches, and the coachman said I had had a coat - I said I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-65

590. JAMES BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 3 reams of paper, value 2l., the goods of John Hawkes , from the person of Joseph Collett .

2nd. COUNT. Stating it to be the goods of Thomas Hunt and another.

JOSEPH COLLETT. I am twelve years old - I know the nature of an oath - I am shop-boy to Mr. Hunt - he sent me with three reams of paper to Mr. Hawkes's, in Shoreditch - when I got to the end of South-street, a boy came up, and asked if he should help me up with the paper - I said yes, if he pleased - he then asked where - I was going - I said, "To Mr. Hawkes's" - he went away, and came to me again, and asked if I came from Mr. Hunt's - I said,"Yes" - he then went away - I went on to Shoreditch - I there saw the prisoner - he said me, "You came from Mr. Hunt's, did not you?" - I said, "Yes" - he said,"Here is 2d. for you;" but he only gave me 1 1/2d. - he said, "I will carry the paper; and tell your master to send two reams more to-morrow, as soon as he can" - the boy, who had spoken to me before, then touched me on the elbow, and wanted me to come back; but I said I would see where my paper went; and I saw the prisoner turn the wrong way to go to Mr. Hawkes's - he turned down

Magpie-alley - I followed, and cried, "Stop thief," and he was taken.

WILLIAM DYSON . I was in Magpie-alley - I saw the prisoner running with the paper on his arm - I ran after him - he dropped it on the step of a door - I took hold of him, and asked him where he got the paper - he said three boys had dropped it - that he took it up, and he was running to see where the persons were who were crying,"Stop thief" - he wished me to let him go - I kept him till the boy came up, who said he had taken the paper from him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say it was given me to carry? A. No; you said three boys dropped it.

JOHN JAMES DRAPER . I was coming out of Magpie-alley - the prisoner passed me, and went into the alley - I went into Norton Falgate, and saw a man had got hold of the boy - I told him to let him go - he ran into Magpie-alley, and called, "Stop thief."

JOHN HAWKES. This is my paper - I had sent it to Mr. Hunt's to be ruled.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through Magpie-alley; a young man asked me to carry the paper, and he would pay me - I took it about a dozen yards, and this man stopped me - I put it down, and asked the lad if it was his.

GUILTY . - Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-66

591. WILLIAM CURTIS and DENNIS CAIN were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 dressing box, value 2s.; and 2 work boxes, value 8s.; the goods of Henry Pavitt , from the person of Sarah Lilley .

SARAH LILLY. I am a widow , and live with Henry Pavitt, in Eden-street, Hampstead Road. On the 25th of February, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I was in Belton-street , near the Bowl-yard - Henry Pavitt and Frederick Allen were with me; but they were a few yards before me - I had two ladies' work boxes tied in a handkerchief, and they were inside a ladies' dressing box, which was tied round with a double tape, and hung on my arm - Curtis came up to me, struck me a violent blow in the face, made use of a vile expression, and told me to drop the things - I called to Allen and Pavitt for help, but they were prevented by some other persons from coming to my assistance - Curtis got the property from me - he put his knee on it, and broke it - he then walked away pretty fast - it was dark, but the gas enabled me to see him - I pursued him, and called the police - when he found the police were coming, he dropped the boxes, and I gave him into custody - I did not see any one with him whom I could swear to; but there were both men and women with him - I called out murder - from the blows I received, I had a black eye, and my cheek was cut open.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you a widow? A. Yes; Mr. Lilly has been dead three years - he was transported - I heard he was dead from a sailor who came from there - I was once tried here, but I was brought here innocently - there was another tried with me - I believe she was transported - it was for some wearing apparel - I now live with Henry Pavitt - he is married, and has three children - he pays for them - his wife and children do not live with him - I do not know what prevents them - this was about a quarter to four o'clock in the morning - we were going home - we had been out spending the evening with a party of friends, of Pavitt's, in Shoreditch - I had some beer with my supper - we had taken these boxes out in the evening to sell them; and we had one ordered by a lady in Holywell-street, Strand - I cannot tell how we got to St. Giles's to go from Shoreditch to Hampstead Road - I do not know that end of the town - Curtis was taken in about five or ten minutes.

HENRY PAVITT. I am a box maker , and live in Eden-street. On the morning of the 25th of February, I was coming along the Bowl-yard with Allen, and Lilly was ten or twelve yards behind us - she called out Harry, and we turned, and saw some one ill-using her - before we got to her, we were surrounded - Allen was knocked down, and kicked severely - some more tried to get me down, and very ill-used me - I did not see Lilly until she came to me again - she had had two work boxes, and a lady's dressing box, tied with a tape, on her arm - there might be a dozen persons there, but I could not swear to any one - I was so beat about, I half lost my senses.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE . Q. Were they all men? A. I believe one or two were women - I make boxes, and hawk them - I have no houses in Eden-street - I am a lodger of Frederick Allen's - I do not live with my wife - I live with Lilly - we had been that night to Shoreditch with a party of friends; and on returning home, we went through the Bowl-yard - we had been round Covent-garden to try to get something to drink, as it was market morning; but we did not get any thing - we had been four or five hours with our friends - we had some porter - I had no gin - I was not drunk - there was no gin drank in my presence, nor to my knowledge - I had been hawking those boxes round Spitalfields, and other places, that evening - we were not in Westminster to my knowledge.

FREDERICK ALLEN. I live in Eden-street, Hampstead-road. I was with the prosecutor and Lilly, going home, at half-past three, or twenty minutes to four o'clock - I heard Lilly cry out, and went back to her assistance - I was assailed by Cain and several others, who began beating me, and prevented my going to Lilly - I was knocked down; but I got up again, and followed Cain across the road - we had a bit of a scuffle - I was thrown down and kicked on the head - Cain then ran off, and the officer took him.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How came you to walk away from Lilly? A. Pavitt and I had some talk which we did not wish her to hear - I am a carpenter, but it is nearly three years since I was in work - I have been supported by my father and mother, who live in the country - I am the landlord of the house I live in, but I do not rent any other - I sometimes receive the rent of the next house (No. 11) for my father - it is let to a female - I do not know what she is.

Q. Upon your oath, is it not a brothel? A. It is - I have nothing to do with any other brothel - I do not choose to tell where my father lives, nor what he allows me.

THOMAS CHANDLER . I live at the King's-Head public-house in Broad-street, St. Giles's. I was at the door, and heard a woman scream "Murder" and "Police" - I ran

out and saw Pavett against the shutter of a house; being held by a man about the size of Curtis - Cain then came up - he jumped up to Pavett, and struck him in the face - Pavett then tried to take Cain; and I saw Cain and Pavett in the kennel - some person came up and kicked Pavett in the face - the officer then came and took Cain.

JOHN STARR (police-constable F 78). I was on duty, and heard the alarm - I ran to the spot - I saw Lilly with her mouth cut, and this box on her arm - she said she had been attacked by some one - I saw Curtis making out of the crowd - I took him, and brought him back to Lilly - she said that was the man who knocked her down: she would swear to him.

FILMER KEENE (police-constable F 57). I was on duty, and saw the two prisoners talking to a party of five or six persons, about ten minutes before; I heard the cry of"Police" and "Murder" - I ran up and saw Lilly with a box on her arm - she said, "For God's sake protect me"- she said she had been knocked down by Curtis, who was then walking from the crowd.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You saw them talking with some other persons? A. Yes: I was about 100 yards off when I heard the cry - I got up in about a minute - Lilly could not have got any distance before I got up; and when I got up, the box was on her arm.

Curtis's Defence. I had been with some friends about ten minutes before I was taken - I am quite innocent - Lilly was tipsy.

Cain's Defence. I had been to see my aunt, who was very ill - I was going home, and was knocked down - I called the police.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-67

592. HENRY HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 60 pence , the monies of Thomas Pollett .

SAMUEL POLLETT . I am assistant to my father, Thomas Pollett: he lives in Cromer-street . On the 10th of March, I was in the kitchen having my breakfast - I saw the prisoner come into the shop - he stopped about half a minute - he put his hand towards some half-pence, which were tied up in five-shilling papers - he ran out, and I after him - he went into a house - I ran into the passage, and waited about five minutes - I then got an officer, and went and took the prisoner in the kitchen - he had dropped these half-pence in Burton-street, and Jones picked them up - one of the papers of copper was missing from our shop.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You were in the kitchen? A. Yes; it is in a line with the shop; but there is a little parlour between them - there is a door from the shop to the parlour, and a window from the parlour to the kitchen - I could see into the shop distinctly - there was no one in the shop when the prisoner was - my mother was with me - I am sure I saw the prisoner in the shop - I did not say at the station that I was in the cellar - I ran out immediately, and saw the prisoner in the street - I did not see him do any thing; but he got round a corner before me, and dropped the half-pence before I saw him again.

JAMES JONES . I live in Cromer-street. I was standing at the corner, the prisoner ran by me, and the prosecutor after him - the prisoner dropped this paper of halfpence - I took them up and gave them to Pollett.

GUILTY. Aged 19. - Recommended to mercy by the Jury . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-68

593. CAROLINE JONES and ANN TURNER were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 1 watch, value 30s.; and 1 watch-key, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Samuel Carter .

CHARLES SAMUEL CARTER. I live in Throgmorton-street. I had been out to spend the evening on the 11th of March, and was returning home about twelve o'clock, or a little after - I was accosted by the two prisoners, and went with them to their residence near Finsbury - I have an impression on my mind that I had my watch when I went in there - I had some money, but I do not know how much - they requested something to drink - Jones was absent a short time to get it, and it is possible that my watch might be taken while she was gone - I was not quite sober - I missed my watch, and asked for it - they said they had not seen it; and I think Jones attempted to call for the police - the policeman came, and found the watch between the bed and the mattress.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you recollect doing any thing at all with the watch? A. No; I might have put it between the bed and mattress; there is nothing impossible.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-69

594. GEORGE BROOM was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 1 fender, value 12s. , the goods of David Perry and another.

GEORGE KEMP (police-constable N 82). I saw the prisoner and another in the City-road on the 20th of February - I watched them for three quarters of an hour - I then saw the prisoner's companion take this fender from the prosecutor's shop - he walked towards the prisoner - I went towards the man, and the prisoner tripped my heels, and said to the man with the fender, "Sam, give it him" - the man then threw the fender at me - it cut my hand and smashed all my nails - I heard the prisoner and him in conversation; and one of them said they would go up Paul-street with it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me with that man? Witness. Yes: you had been with him nearly an hour - he then left you, and went across the road and took the fender - I went into the box in a public-house ground; but there is a board out, and I had a full view of you, and heard you - I had known you before - you put out your foot, and tripped my heels as I was going to him.

DAVID PERRY. I have one partner - we are pawnbroker s - this is our fender - I missed it a few minutes before eight o'clock - it is worth ten or eleven shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to meet my master - I heard a cry of "Stop thief!" and saw a man running with a fender on his shoulder - he threw the fender at the policeman - I was walking on - the officer came and took me, and said I was in company with him.

( William Lawrence , a shoemaker, the prisoner's master, engaged to take him into his service again.)

GUILTY. Aged 22. - Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury . - Confined Two Days .

Reference Number: t18340410-70

595. ELIZABETH CASEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 4 sovereigns and 2 shillings, the monies of George Pratt , from his person .

GEORGE PRATT. On the morning of the 23d of February, I was going from Blackwall to Limehouse - I turned into Canton-place , and the prisoner came up to me - I pushed her away, and told her to be off about her business, I felt her hand drawn across my person - I felt my pocket in a minute, and missed my money - I got an officer, and we found the prisoner at three o'clock in the morning, intoxicated - in going to the station-house, she said if I would let her go she would give me the money.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where were you walking to? A. Up the East India Road - I turned into the fields, but not with the prisoner - she came after me - I had had two or three glasses of grog, but I was sober - she thrust her hand into my trowsers pocket - I did not catch hold of her, as I had not missed my money - I said I did not know how much I had lost till I got home - I did not say I had lost six sovereigns - I did not know whether it was six or four - I told the policeman so - I did not say that if she would confess that she was the girl who robbed me, and give me half the money, I would forgive her - it was done in a moment almost - it is a place where there are a great many women of the town - I saw her searched - some silver was found on her, but no sovereigns - when she thrust her hand into my trowsers I heard something jingle; I thought it was my watch - I was not sure that she put her hand into my pocket - I forget whether I told the magistrate that I heard something jingle - I hardly know what was taken down - I believe I signed it - as we were going to the station-house, she said if I would let her go she would give me the money - she then said if I would go to her sister she would give it me, or make it up to me - she pointed to a street, and said she lived a little way down there - I do not recollect that she gave three addresses as to where her sister lived - she did not say that she lived in Salmon's-lane.

COURT. Q. When you went into the fields, was there any communication between you and her? A. No; not the slightest.

JOHN MITCHELL (police-constable K 202). I went after the prisoner, and found her about half-past two o'clock, rather in liquor - she asked to speak to the gentleman - I told her to speak out - she said, "If you will allow me to go to my sister, I will make the money good, that I have taken from you" - I found 6s. 4d. on her.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask where her sister lived? A. No; I did not, because she told so many different stories, without my asking her - she was in conversation with the prosecutor - she at first said her sister lived in Salmon-lane - she then said her sister lived at the back of Mr. Belton's, close to the East India Docks - she then said her sister lived near the Royal Duke - she stated these three different places to the prosecutor - I cannot tell what he said - I did not tell the magistrate that she stated these three different places - I thought it was not worth while.

ROBERT JENKINS (police-sergeant K 10). I was on duty, when the prisoner was brought in, in custody, about three o'clock that morning - the prosecutor charged her with stealing some sovereigns; he thought four; but he could not say - she said she had never seen him - he was sober, but she was intoxicated - I think she might be able to pick a pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she so intoxicated that a sober man might have prevented her from putting her hand into his pocket? A. I should think so - it was about three o'clock when I saw her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-71

596. WILLIAM JURY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 waistcoat, value 10s. , the goods of William Finn .

MARTHA FINN . I am the wife of William Finn; we live in Castle-street, Marylebone . On the 17th of March, I let a friend out of our house, and soon afterwards I heard the rustling of some brown paper on the shop floor - I went into the shop, and saw the door a little way open - I went out, and saw a man standing on the step of the door - he saw me, and began to run - I followed, and cried, "Stop thief" - I lost sight of him as he turned the corner - I got sight of him again, and followed him up East-street, into Paddington-street - he crossed, and went down Baker street, and the officer took him - it was the prisoner - he was brought back - as we came back, we met a boy with these trowsers and waistcoat, which are my husband's, and had been in the shop a quarter of an hour before - I had seen the prisoner before, he had called for work as a tailor.

WILLIAM HENRY STUPART . I am turned of twelve years old. I know the necessity of speaking the truth - I was going down East-street, and saw the prisoner running - he dropped these clothes, when he saw me - I picked them up, and gave them to Mrs. Finn - I saw the prisoner brought back by the officer - he is the man who dropped these clothes.

NICHOLAS MANNE (police-constable D 98). I heard the cry, and saw the prisoner running - I called to him to stop several times - he stopped against a wall - I came up to him and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the house, and saw some persons running. I ran to see what was the matter.

GUILTY. Aged 49. - Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor . - Confined for Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-72

597. JOHN BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 2,000 nails, value 5s. , the goods of William Sowter .

WILLIAM OLDHAM . I am servant to Mr. Sowter. I know the prisoner - he has been employed by Mr. Jay, Mr. Sowter's foreman - on the 8th of March, he came to me, and asked for some nails for Mr. Jay, to go to Aldersgate-street - I gave him about 2,000, believing he came from Mr. Jay.

Cross-examined by MR. STAMMERS. Q. You do not know that the nails were not used in Mr. Sowter's business? A. No.

NELSON CHALCROFT . I am in the employ of Mr. Jay. On the 8th of March, I met the prisoner coming out of the yard, with half a basket of nails, at half-past six o'clock in the morning - I recollected he had been discharged a fortnight before - I told Mr. Jay of it.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know he had been discharged? A. He came into the room where the men were, and said so - I do not know that he had not been taken back - if he had been in the service, there would be nothing unusual in his coming away with a basket of nails - it was a common carpenter's basket.

JOHN JAY . The prisoner had been in my employ, but had been discharged ten or twelve days before the 8th of March - I did not employ him to go to Mr. Oldham, after that.

FREDERICK JOHN MUNTON . I took the prisoner - I told him the charge - he said he supposed he must go.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-73

597. JOHN NEWEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 1 book, value 30s. the goods of John Wildy .

HENRY REES . I am servant to Mr. John Wildy, bookseller , Brownlow-street, Holborn . On the 7th of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at the shop - he took one volume of Deacon and Chitty's reports, which was on the board outside the window - he ran off - I ran after him, and he threw it down - this is it.

RICHARD MARKS . I heard the cry, and saw the prisoner turn from Brownlow-street, towards Bedford-row. I pursued him - he threw down this book - I saw him stopped.(Property produced and sworn to.)( James Mason , shoemaker, Upper Dorset-street, Bryanston-square, gave the prisoner a good character, and engaged to employ him.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined One Day .

Reference Number: t18340410-74

598. JOHN DOWLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 hat, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Knapp .

CHARLES KNAPP. I live in James-street, Lisson-grove . I am a salesman - I have a rail goes round my house, and a hat-board is tied to the rail - on the 17th of March, I received information - I turned down a street, and saw the prisoner drop this hat, which is mine - I followed him - he ran into a house in Little Exeter-street - I ran in, but the house being of bad character, they turned me out, and would not let me search for the prisoner - I went to the station-house and gave information, and he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. STAMMERS. Q. Was this hat tied to the hat-board? A. Yes, with a string round it - there were about six hats on the board - it could not be knocked off with a stick - the board was about five feet from the threshold of the door, and round the corner from the shop window - the prisoner had got about twenty doors down the street, when I first saw him - it was half-past ten o'clock in the morning - I saw his face as he turned a court, and he then stumbled - it looked like a bad house that he went into - he was found in the gutter of the house.

PATRICK TIERNEY (police-constable D 136). I took the prisoner in the gutter.( Robert Knight , a shoemaker, 40, Hill-street, and John Cross , shoemaker, 6, Henrietta-street, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined for One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-75

599. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 73 penknives, value 50s. , the goods of George Barrett .

MARIA HARFORD . I am the wife of John Harford . On the 13th March, I was in Mr. Barrett's shop in Charles-street, Hatton-garden - the prisoner and another man came in together to exchange an old metal tea-pot, and to buy some other goods - the other man was bargaining, and I saw the prisoner come to the top of the shop, and take a parcel off the counter, which he put on the right hand side of his jacket - I told Mr. Barrett, but before he could get over the counter, the prisoner had got out of the shop - this is the parcel - it has a knife tied outside of it.

GEORGE BARRETT. This parcel is mine - I followed the prisoner and took him with it - I believe he was tipsy.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work - I fell in with women who gave me some drink, and made me tipsy - I did not know where I was till I was in the station-house.

GUILTY. Aged 26. - Recommended to mercy by the Jury . - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18340410-76

600. MARGARET BANKS and MARY SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 3 handkerchiefs, value 7s.; 1 pair of stays, value 2s.; 2 gowns, value 5s.; and 2 caps, value 2s. , the goods of Joseph Massingham .

2nd COUNT. Stating them to belong to Sarah Ackely .

JAMES ROOK (police-constable 245). On the 6th of March, about ten o'clock, I found the prisoners in bed in New Gravel-lane - their stays were on the bed, and their caps in the room - my brother officer asked if they belonged to the institution at Hackney - they said they did, and they had taken some things in a mistake.

JOHN MURRAY (police-constable K 178). On the 6th of March, I assisted in taking the prisoners - I found three duplicates.

SARAH ACKELY. I am matron of the Maritime Female Refuge . The prisoners were inmates there - they absconded on the 17th of January, and took a basket of linen with them - Banks had asked me about an hour before they left, to inspect a basket of linen which was going home, and I did so - we had a lecture that night, and she requested to stay below to iron the things, which she did - these are the articles which were found - I had them in my care - this gown belonged to a young woman, named Poyson, who has left the place - this handkerchief belonged to a gentleman we wash for.

SARAH HAYS MASSINGHAM . I am the wife of Joseph Massingham . These two caps are mine.

ANN SMITH . I am an inmate of the institution. This shawl is mine.

EDWARD EDMUND CHILD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shawl and cap which I took in of Banks, to the best of my belief.

JOSEPH PARKER . I have two silk handkerchiefs which I took in pawn, but not from either of the prisoners.

Banks's Defence. We took them thinking they were our own clothes.

SARAH ACKELY. We take their own dress from them when they come to the Refuge, and when they leave we give them back to them, or give them better.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-77

601. CATHERINE BONHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 3 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, and 4 quarter rupees, value 1l. 10s. , the monies of George Frederick Bult .

GEORGE FREDERICK BULT. On the 26th of March, I was returning home through John-street , about one o'clock in the morning, and the prisoner came to me and wished me to accompany her home, which I declined - she continued to press me, and walked by my side for some time - she then left me suddenly, and I missed my purse from my breeches pocket, which contained three sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and four quater rupees, worth 1l. 10s., and some silver - I accused her of having stolen my purse - she denied it, and pointed to my purse on the ground - I took it up, and found one end was empty, and when I got to the station-house I found it was the end in which the gold had been - there was no conversation took place between us.

Prisoner. He gave me the money, and then he came after me, and said, he had given me gold instead of silver. Witness. I did not give her any thing, nor intend it - she had no reason to expect any thing from me.

JOHN ROBINSON (police-constable G 57). I took the prisoner - the prosecutor accused her of robbing him of 4l. - she denied it - I said she must go to the station-house, and when she got half-way up the street, I saw her put her hand into her bosom - I took her hand, and found in it these two sovereigns, this half-sovereign, and two quarter rupees, and in the scuffle of taking them from her hand I thought I heard something fall - I took her to the station-house, and came back to the spot, but could find nothing there - I went again at daylight, and found this other quarter of a rupee - the prisoner said, "You have lagged my Jem, and now I will go after him."

Prisoner's Defence. It was not this officer who took me - it was Mr. Davis - he told me to ding the money into his hand - I was with the prosecutor a quarter of an hour, and he gave them to me.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-78

602. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 bag, value 1s.; and 112lbs. of currants, value 4l. , the goods of Thomas Jackson .

2nd. COUNT. Stating them to be the goods of Paul Millard .

JOHN BANKS . I live in Long-alley. On the 26th of March I was in Norton Falgate - I saw the prisoner go to the tail of a cart, and move a heavy bag - he did so three times - he then took it on his shoulder, and went down Spital-square - I watched him as far as there - I then turned back and saw the carman come out of Mr. Boxall's - I told him what I had seen, and we went after the prisoner - he was secured with this bag on his shoulder.

THOMAS JACKSON . I am carman to Mr. Paul Millard - he lives in Bishopsgate-street. On the 26th of March, I had this bag in my cart, in Norton Falgate - I left the cart while I went to get shaved - Banks told me a bag was lost- I went with him down Spital-square, and took the prisoner with this bag of currants on his shoulder - I have paid for them.

WILLIAM SHAW (police-constable H 112). I took the prisoner, and have had the bag ever since.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-79

603. DAVID FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 3 blankets, value 2l., and 1 pillow-case, value 6d. , the goods of James Adkins .

HARRIET ADKINS . I am the wife of James Adkins, of No. 2, Silver-street, Stepney . On the Saturday before Shrove Tuesday, the prisoner hired a lodging of us - he said it was for himself and his partner, but his partner never came - the prisoner slept there that night, and continued to do so till he went away at seven o'clock in the morning of Shrove Tuesday - he had not paid any rent - I then missed these articles - I have never seen them since.

JURY. Q. Did you shut the door after him when he came in? A. Yes; his own room, and the street door too.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw this woman in my life.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

604. DAVID FIELD was again indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; 1 shuttle, value 1s.; 1 pair of shears, value 6d.; and 10 caps, value 1s. 6d. ; the goods of Elizabeth Newlan .

ELIZABETH NEWLAN. The prisoner came to my house to work, on the 26th of March - he remained three or four hours, and then said he was going home to tea - I then missed the articles stated.

JOHN POCOCK (police-constable K 135). I took the prisoner - I found this handkerchief on his neck, and this in his pocket - I found the duplicate of this shuttle and pair of shears on him - he at first said his wife had got the caps, and then he said he had sold them in Petticoat-lane - I had heard of Mrs. Adkins's robbery - I informed her, she came to the station-house, and identified him.

Prisoner. I am guilty.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-80

Third London Jury, before, Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

605. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; the goods of Matthew Wood , from his person .

MATTHEW WOOD. I am a grocer . On the 28th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Cheapside - a young gentleman told me something - I did not see the prisoner then, but I had seen him follow me for about a quarter of an hour - he was afterwards taken, and I know him to be the same man who had followed me - I lost my handkerchief, and have not seen it since.

JOHN SMITH . I am under-beadle of the Ward of Cheap - I was coming, out of Bird-in-hand-court - the prisoner ran by, and hit me in the face - I knocked him down, and took him to the watch-house.

THOMAS OSBORNE HENDERSON . I am in my brother's employ - I saw the prosecutor in Cheapside, and the prisoner took the handkerchief from his pocket - he crossed the road - he saw me looking at him; and he smiled at me, which I thought was to convey an impression that it was

only a joke - he then went up King-street - I went and told the prosecutor, we went up King-street, but could not see the prisoner - we returned to the corner of the street, and the prosecutor was telling the police of it - I saw the prisoner coming, along, and I said, "That is him" - he then ran off, and was taken by the beadle.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry, and ran, but I did not know they were going to take me.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-81

604. JOHN McCORMICK was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of a man unknown , from his person .

CHARLES CORNISH . I am a baker, and live in Fenchurch-street . On the 21st of February, I saw the prisoner pick a gentleman's pocket, opposite my house, of his handkerchief, which he put into his breast - I crossed over, and took him, and took the handkerchief from him - this is it - the gentleman went on, and I could not find him.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy pick a gentleman's pocket; he threw the handkerchief down, and I took it up to give to the gentleman.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-82

605. SAMUEL HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 yard and a quarter of silk, value 8s.; the goods of Roger Dawson and another, his masters .

WILLIAM WHITFORD . I am clerk to Roger Dawson and Thomas Williams - they are woollen-draper s - the prisoner was in their employ, as a card-maker - on the 24th of February, he was desired to take one piece of silk out of the box under my desk - I saw him take two out - he gave one to the shopman as he had been desired, and the other I believe he took up stairs, which excited the shopman's suspicion - he brought the piece back immediately, and went out with a parcel to Holborn - I followed him, but missed him at the corner of Holborn-hill - I went to Mr. Fleming's, the pawnbroker's, and saw him coming out - I went home, and told my master - he desired me to take a pattern of the silk which the prisoner had taken out - I took the pattern to Mr. Fleming's, and they said this piece of silk had been pawned there.

THOMAS LINSCOTT . I am in the service of Mr. Fleming. This piece of silk the prisoner pawned on the 24th of February, for four shillings.

WILLIAM WHITFORD. This is my master's silk - I have brought the piece it was cut from.

Prisoner. Was that piece of silk in the warehouse before you came to live there? Witness. I do not know- about three quarters of a yard may be used from a piece to make patterns - I do not know how many pattern cards were made - I have found mistakes in the books - I do not know that there are many pieces of this pattern silk in the trade - I did not see you cut the silk.

Prisoner's Defence. This is the first time I ever was in such a situation. I have a wife and two children.

GUILTY. Aged 32. - Recommended to mercy by the Jury . - Confined for Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-83

606. WILLIAM ROCHE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 £10 bank note, the property of Richard Lake , his master , to which indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY. Aged 20. - Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18340410-84

607. ALFRED CONNEW was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of John Penn and another.

WILLIAM COOK . I am shopman to Mr. John Penn and another, of Holborn-bars . They sell shoes . On the 26th of March, I heard some person had taken a pair of shoes - I ran out, and saw the prisoner - I asked where the shoes were - he said he knew nothing of them - I laid hold of him - he had these shoes in his apron - they are my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Brook-street - two boys met me, and told me to put these shoes into my pocket, and go with them to Smithfield.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-85

608. JOSEPH DUNKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 6 fowls, value 12s. 6d. , the goods of Ebenezer William Howard .

JOHN JACOBS . I am in the service of Mr. Ebenezer William Howard, a salesman in Leadenhall market . On the 1st of March, the prisoner came and bought six rabbits of my master - I had placed five fowls on the board, inside the shop, at six o'clock in the morning - I missed them about half-past seven or eight o'clock - I went to the Shoulder of Mutton fields, about one o'clock that day, and saw the prisoner - he keeps a little poulterer's shop opposite the Shoulder of Mutton - I saw five fowls there, but they were not what my master lost.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You are sure they were not your master's? A. Yes.

JOHN JACOBS, Jun. I saw the prisoner come to my master's, on the 1st of March - he bought some rabbits, and put them into his basket - he came round again, and put the five fowls into his basket, one by one, and the rabbits on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure of this? A. Yes; it was the prisoner took the fowls - I had not seen him till that Saturday morning, when he bought the rabbits.

Q. Did not a gentleman, at Worship-street, say to you, "Suppose I had bought six rabbits, would you have said I took the fowls," and did you not say, "Yes?" A. No; I said, "Yes, if I had seen him take the fowls" - I did not point out any other man as the person who stole the fowls.

RICHARD INGLEDEW (police-constable N 220). I was on duty at the Cat and Mutton fields - I took the prisoner - he said he was innocent.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

WILLIAM HERITAGE . I am the son of the chief clerk at Worship-street. When the prisoner was there, I asked this boy, Jacobs, if any other persons bought rabbits that morning - he said, "Yes, a great many" - I said, "Suppose I had bought six rabbits, would you have said I stole the fowls?" - he said, "Yes" - he made no addition to it whatever.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-86

609. WILLIAM SWINDLER and FREDERICK JONAS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 6s., the goods of Henry Brewer , from his person .

HENRY BREWER. On Sunday last, I was on Holborn-hill - I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief - I turned, and saw Swindler taking it from my pocket, and giving it to Jones - I took Swindler by the collar - he dropped my handkerchief on the pavement, and said he had not taken it - this is it.

BENJAMIN CATMULL . I took the prisoner Swindler into custody.

Swindler's Defence. I went to church at half-past six o'clock, and as I was going home, I saw a mob - I went to the spot, and the gentleman took me.

SWINDLER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

JONAS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-87

610. MARY WHOLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 3 spoons, value 10s.; 1 coat, value 7s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 2s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s.; 1 flute, value 25s.; 3 printed books, value 19s.; and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of William Charles Goode .

WILLIAM CHARLES GOODE. I live at Woodford, and have a counting-house in Houndsditch - the prisoner lived as housekeeper there - she left me on the 20th of February - she had had notice - I afterwards missed this property.

HENRY COTTAM . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this flute, these books, this umbrella, this carpet, and other things from the prisoner, in the name of Gould.(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she had been compelled to pledge the articles, not being supplied with sufficient cash for housekeeping.)

WILLIAM CHARLES GOODE re-examined. Q. How did the prisoner pay for what she wanted? A. I expect my man paid her what she wanted - she never made any complaint to me - I never was in arrear with her to my knowledge - I settled with her before she went - I paid her 7l. 12s. 2d. - she did not then tell me she had pawned any goods - she pawned these spoons after she left my service.

GUILTY. Aged 45. - Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-88

611. HENRY WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Pyrke , from his person .

THOMAS PYRKE. I was in Fleet-street about nine o'clock on Monday evening last - I felt a pull at my pocket - I put my hand down, and my handkerchief was gone - some one told me the prisoner was the man who had it - I seized him, and a gentleman said, "It is in his hat" - this is it.

JOHN WARWICKER . I am an accountant - I was walking down Fleet-street, about nine o'clock that evening - I heard the prosecutor challenge the prisoner with having his handkerchief - he denied it - he collared him, and some one behind said, "It is in his hat" - the prosecutor took his hat off - the handkerchief was in it - I said, "If it is yours, be particular and keep him," and he did.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-89

612. GEORGE BOULTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 45lbs. of lead, value 7s., the goods of David Pool Nickinson , and fixed to a building .

RICHARD HAWKES (police-constable N 40). I met the prisoner in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate , at half-past six o'clock in the morning, on the 13th of March - there was another person with him - they were both heavily laden with lead covered with a black cloth - I stopped them and asked what they had got - the prisoner said what was that to me, and they threw down the lead and ran away - I pursued them as far as Long-alley - they them separated - I followed the prisoner, who turned up a court - I saw two brewer's servants in front, and called to them to stop him, but they let him go past, and I lost him - I took charge of the lead, and went in the direction in which the prisoner had come, and found some new houses - I told the workmen I had found some lead, and we missed some lead from a gutter - I gave direction at the Bunhill-row station, and the prisoner was taken in about a week - I am positive he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. STAMMERS. Q. How do you know he is the man? A. I tapped him on the shoulder, and looked him full in the face - he gave me a push on the breast, and threw the lead down at my feet - that staggered me, and I could not take him then - I was with him about a minute - I never saw him before - I pursued him eight or nine hundred yards - I saw his face before he came to me - I met him - it was as near half-past six o'clock as could be, and in Angel-alley.

WM. McDONOUGH . My father lives in Skinner-street - I work in Long-alley - I know Angel-alley - I was there that morning at half-past six o'clock - I saw the prisoner and another man - they threw down the lead, and ran away - I had known the prisoner before - I have seen him for three months before - sometimes two or three times a day, when he worked in Christopher-square - I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM BARTON . I am a carpenter. This lead was brought to me as I was at work, at Mr. Nickinson's houses in Angel-alley - I compared it, and it had been cut from the gutter.

DAVID POOL NICKINSON. These houses were mine - I know nothing of the lead.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in bed at the time.

WILLIAM SEMAINE . I live at No. 20, Christopher-square, Long-alley. I am a turner - the prisoner is in my employ - he lived in my house, and slept in an adjoining room - on the morning of the 13th of March, I am confident he was not out of bed till past seven o'clock - my wife went to light the fire, and she said to him, "George, get up" - I saw him in bed, and heard his voice - he said, "I am coming" - I do not remember Mr. McDonald calling on me that morning - the prisoner has been an honest, sober man - I never knew him to associate with bad characters.

COURT. Q. How far is your house from Angel-alley? A. About one hundred yards - I cannot tell how long it would take a man to run that distance, and jump into bed - my house is full of lodgers - they are all honest people, and keep good hours - the prisoner turns the wheel for me - he seldom gets up before seven o'clock.

CATHERINE SEMAINE . I am wife of this witness. The prisoner lived in our house - we take our meals in the room he sleeps in - on the morning of the 13th of March, I made the fire in the room where he was in bed - I remember Mr. McDonald calling that morning for a pair of pillars.

COURT. Q. What time do you go to bed? A. Sometimes about ten o'clock, sometimes later - the prisoner gets up about half-past seven o'clock; and when I awake him, he gets up at seven o'clock - I know Angel-alley and Long-alley - they are not far off - it is a large house, and many lodgers in it - the door is not often open - it makes a great noise when it is opened - I do not sleep very sound - I had gone to bed about eleven o'clock the night before - we had supped all together, and the prisoner went to bed - I did not hear the door open after that time - I did not hear any of the lodgers come in after I was in bed - they could not come in after the door was fastened, as it makes a great noise - when lodgers come home, I am obliged to get up to let them in - there is no key to the lock - there are ten rooms, and all are full of lodgers and children.

JAMES McDONALD . I am a bedstead-maker, and live in Tyson-street, Bethnal-green. Semaine turns for me - on the 13th of March I called at his house, at half-past six o'clock, for some bed-pillars - I know the prisoner - he has been employed there these nine months - the work-shop was not open - I knocked at the prisoner's door, and told him I wanted the pillars the first thing, and he said they should be done - I knew his voice.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-90

613. HENRY SYCAMORE and JAMES PAINE were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Cozens , from his person .

JOHN COZENS. I was in Fleet-street at half-past twelve o'clock in the morning, on the 7th of March - a gentleman asked me if. I had lost any thing - I then missed my handkerchief - the officer took it from Sycamore's bosom - this is it.

HENRY JEBBETT (police-constable C 38). I was on duty, and saw Paine pick the prosecutor's pocket, and hand the handkerchief to Sycamore, who put it into his breast pocket - they then ran up St. Bride's avenue - Sycamore then turned towards Bride-lane - I collared him, and took the handkerchief from him.

Sycamore's Defence. I was coming down Fleet-street from Covent-garden market - I picked up this handkerchief, and put it into my pocket - I turned down the passage, and the officer took me - there had been no one with me - as we were going to Guildhall, another person came up with Paine.

Paine's Defence. I had been to see my sister, and in going down Fleet-street, a gentleman touched me on the shoulder, and said he wanted me for picking a gentleman's pocket - I said it was a falsity, but I would go with him.

SYCAMORE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

PAINE - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-91

614. JOHN DUPEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of George Harrison , from his person .

GEORGE HARRISON. I am a stationer . I was in Cheapside on the 17th of March, between eight and nine o'clock - a person told me I had had my pocket picked - I turned, and found my handkerchief in possession of the officer who had the prisoner in custody.

JOHN PALMER . About nine o'clock in the evening of the 17th of March, I was standing at the corner of Friday-street - I saw the prosecutor and another gentleman walking arm in arm - the prisoner walked close behind them, and took the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and put it into his own - I seized him, and he dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-92

615. JOHN MORETON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Abel Simner , from his person .

ABEL SIMNER. I felt my pocket picked on Saturday night last in Cheapside - I turned, and saw the prisoner in the act of taking his hand from my pocket - he ran down Lawrence-lane, and I pursued him - I saw him run with my handkerchief in his hand - he fell down, and I took him myself - I brought him up the Poultry, and gave him in charge - when he gave me the handkerchief back, he asked me to let him go; but I said he had better wait for the officer - the handkerchief was dropped at the corner of King-street, and lost.

GUILTY .* Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-93

616. WILLIAM SHIELDS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 pair of boots, value 14s. , the goods of Thomas Lewis .

GEORGE JOSEPH FORD . I keep a shoe-shop at the corner of Field-lane, Holborn. On the 31st of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and offered to sell me some boots - my shopman brought them up to me - I went down and saw the prisoner - he asked 9s. for them - I said I knew they were stolen, and took him to the watch-house - he appeared very much distressed indeed.

THOMAS LEWIS. I live in Marchant-street , and am a boot and shoemaker . These are my boots, and were in front of my shop - they were taken away on Monday evening, the 31st of March - they are worth 14s. - I tried them on a customer on Saturday morning - they are made in the country to my order.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sitting by the fire at my lodging, and John Ready brought the boots in, and asked me to go and sell them for him - he told me to ask 9s. for them, and said he would give me a shilling for myself.

MR. FORD. He told me the same story - he said he knew they were stolen, but he did not steal them.

GUILTY .* Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-94

617. ROBERT DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 14lbs. of beef, value 6s. , the goods of George Hiscock .

GEORGE GRIFFITHS . I know Mr. Hiscock's shop in

Beech-street - I saw the prisoner at a quarter before ten o'clock on the morning of the 26th February, with another lad, go to the shop - the other took a piece of beef, and put it into the prisoner's apron - I stopped the prisoner with it.

GEORGE HISCOCK. I am a butcher - that piece of beef was mine - I had cut it off an hour before.

GUILTY. Aged 16. - Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18340410-95

618. JOHN GRIFFIN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , 34lbs. of paper, value 6s.; and 5 yards of linen cloth, value 2s., the goods of George Benn and another, his masters .

JAMES TONKIN . I am a patrol of Cripplegate. On the 4th of March I saw the prisoner in Aldermanbury at twenty minutes after seven o'clock - he stopped at No. 32, then went on and stopped at No. 36, he then came back to No. 34 - he had this parcel with him on a knott - I spoke to him - he said it was all right, that it was some wrappers which his master allowed him - I said I did not know that it was all right - I took him to the watch-house, and he tried to make his escape.

GEORGE BENN. I am a woollen-manufacturer , and live in Smithfield - the prisoner had been in my employ four years - this is my property - I did not allow him to take it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. These are old things? A. They are papers which have come round cloths from the country - they certainly are not new - I do not know that it is the custom of the trade to give them as perquisites - there are five months' wages due to the prisoner, at 25l. a-year - he had given me warning on the Friday before, but he had not left me.

Prisoner's Defence. I thought the perquisites belonged to me, as is usual in the trade.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-96

OLD COURT. - Saturday, April 12th.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

619. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , at St. James, Westminster , 30 yards of carpet, value 8l., the goods of George Diack , in the dwelling-house of George Hanwell .

JAMES BARROW . I am porter to Mr. George Diack, of Regent-street, he is a carpet-maker and upholsterer . On the 24th of February I took twelve pieces of carpeting to Mr. George Hanwell's, the Waterloo Hotel, Jermyn-street - I left three pieces there, and fetched away nine, at twelve o'clock - I returned at half-past twelve o'clock; and in my way there, four or five doors from the hotel, I met the prisoner carrying a bundle of carpet, and suspecting it was master's, I went to the hotel, and missed a piece - I returned and went up to the prisoner, and asked where he got that - he said from the Waterloo Hotel - I asked where he was going to take it to - he said, to Regent-street - I asked who authorized him to fetch it away from there - and he said his master - I never knew him before - I detained him - here is the carpet.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know your master did not send him for it? A. He said his master sent him for it - I asked his master's name - he could not tell me.

JAMES COPEMAN . I am a policeman. The prisoner was given into my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. After the witness stopped me, we went and had a pint of porter together in York-street, St. James's, and passed several policemen - I had the carpet on my shoulder - we went to Jermyn-street - I was carrying it to the hotel, and he turned suddenly round and gave me into custody.

JAMES BARROW re-examined. I met him in Church-passage with it, and stopped him, telling him to come back with me to where he took it from - he said, "There is a person over at the public-house in York-street; and as we are both at work together at the hotel, I will go there with you" - we went in, and he dropped the carpet outside the door - he was going a contrary road when I stopped him - he dropped the carpet before he went into the public-house - I took it up, and put it on my shoulder, because I thought he would make his escape - he called for a pint of beer, and I went into the tap-room with him - I certainly put my lips to the pot - he paid for it - we passed three policemen before I went into the public-house - but as he saw the other persons at the public-house, I did not mention it to them - I did not think it necessary to state this - I told the policeman there were three pieces of carpet stolen - I suspected so at first.(John Andrews, boot-maker, Monument-street; Thomas Andrews Barnsley, coachman, No. 8, Bird-street; James Avery, broker, 41, Great Wild-street; Isaac Rayner, Jeweller, 48, Wych-street, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY - of Stealing, but not in the dwelling-house . -

Aged 27. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-97

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

520. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted that he, on the 14th of February , at Harmonds-worth , unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously, did set fire to a certain stable there, belonging to Isaac Cane, the elder, with intent to injure the said Isaac Cane , against the Statute.

Five other COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. PHILLIPS, on the part of the prosecution, stated that he should be unable to show that the prisoner had been nearer than within two hundred yards of the fire, and feeling the evidence was not sufficient to substantiate the charge, he begged to decline offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-98

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

621. THOMAS NEALE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , at Edgeware , 1 mare, value 30l. , the goods of Thomas Chambers .

GEORGE ALLCOCK . I am servant to Thomas Chambers, who lives at Blixley, in Northamptonshire . He had a chesnut mare - on the 7th of March, I saw it between eight and nine o'clock in the evening in the stables - it was a nag mare - I went to the stables about half-past five next morning, and it was gone - the stable door was shut at night, but not locked - it was latched and pinned, and there is a double door - it could not get out - I traced the mare through three gates, and gave my master information - I have known the prisoner about four years and a half -

I had seen him about a fortnight or three weeks before, at Blixley - he does not belong to that neighbourhood.

Cross-examined by MR. STAMMERS. Q. I suppose, when you went to the stables in the evening, it was not very light? A. No; I had a lanthorn - my master had no other horse in that stable - I latched the stable myself, and pinned it.

JOHN GOODMAN . On the 8th of March, I drove the Birmingham Celerity coach, and saw the prisoner, about a quarter or twenty minutes to two o'clock in the morning, on horseback, in Towcester town, about four miles from Blixley - I met him on a chesnut mare - I turned round, and he rode by my side, 15 or 16 miles, alongside of my lamp - I noticed it as being a particularly fast trotter - it kept up with my coach - I lost the prisoner at Dropshot - it was a dark night, but I had two pair of lamps - I imagined he had stolen the mare, because he got through the turnpike gates without paying them, except one, where I winked at the turnpike man - I lost him near Brickhill-hill - one of the roads where I left him would lead to Edgeware - I afterwards saw him and the mare at Edgeware, and I am certain he is the man, and it was the same mare - that was on Wednesday, the 20th.

Cross-examined. Q. How many days afterwards? A. Twelve days - it may be fifteen miles from Brickhill to Edgeware - I do not know the distance at all - I took particular notice of the mare and the colour of it - I thought it singular he should ride so many miles with me, and his slipping through the gates - he went from one side of the coach to the other; sometimes on one side and sometimes on the other - I altered my pace, and beat him, and sometimes he beat me.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you, in consequence of his shifting from one side to the other, observe him more particularly? A. I did.

THOMAS CHAMBERS. I live at Blixley, in Northamptonshire. In consequence of information from my servant, I went in search of my mare, on the 8th of March; and in consequence of inquiry, I got to Edgeware - I went to the White Lion, and saw the ostler; and, in consequence of what he told me, I went into the house, and found the prisoner there - several persons were there - he sat in the window - I said, "Young man, you have got a useful mare at the door here" - (I had seen the mare then; it was mine) - he got up, and came across the room; and when I came to the door, I asked the ostler, in his hearing, if he was the young man who brought the mare there - he said he was - the prisoner directly ran away, and crossed over the turnpike, and ran across the fields - I followed him on horseback, and overtook him - I told him I should take him - he said he hoped I should be as favourable as I could with him - I told him it was not likely I should be very favourable in the way he had served me - I afterwards took possession of the mare, and am quite certain it is the one I had lost - it is worth between 30l. and 40l.

Cross-examined. Q. When you took him, did you charge him with stealing it? A. Yes; he confessed it to me on the spot.

JAMES SCAGELL . I am an ostler. I saw the prisoner standing by the mare, at the White Lion, at Edgeware - I saw him ride up with the mare, and give it some hay - I am sure he is the person who brought it to the house - he rode there on it.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18340410-99

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

THOMAS CASTLES and JAMES BRADLEY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joshua Bouchard , on the 25th of February , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , and stealing therein two watch chains, value 8d.; 1 seal, value 2d.; and 2 ear-rings, value 6d., his property .

JOSHUA BOUCHARD. I live at No. 127, Brick-lane , in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. I am a tobacconist - my windows were cut by some instrument outside, and the property taken - the upper part of the window was cracked - I was not at home when it was done.

JOHN DORSET . I live in Grey Eagle-street, Spitalfields. I know the prisoners - I saw them on the 25th of February, at half-past ten o'clock at night, at the prosecutor's shop window - Bradley was nearest to the window - I saw him with his hand, as if he was screwing something out of the window - Castles was walking backwards and forwards to another person, who stood on the pavement, and who is not taken into custody - I passed on, and walked up Brick-lane again, and saw a policeman, and gave him information - I walked by them again, and turned my head round - they saw me look at them, and both walked away together - and the policeman took them into custody - I do not know what became of the third man.

CHARLES EAST . I am a police-constable. On the 25th of February, Dorset gave me information - I was on duty in Church-street, Bethnal Green - at the top of Brick-lane - I walked down until I came within two doors of the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner Bradley stooping down to the window, and Castles walking backwards and forwards, about a yard each way - Bradley was stooping down with his hands to the window; but, what he was doing, I could not see - I crossed over, and both the prisoners then came from the window, and came towards me - I immediately seized them both, and took them into Mr. Harper's, the baker's shop, in Brick-lane - I searched Bradley, and found on him a steel chain, a metal seal, and a pair of ear-rings - but, on Castles, I found nothing belonging to the prosecutor - I took them to the station-house, with the assistance of my brother officer - I afterwards went back to the prosecutors, and saw a pane of glass broken - the putty seemed as if a sharp instrument had been put in, to break the window - I do not consider sufficient of the glass was gone, for a man to put his hand through - the prosecutor's daughter gave me a piece of wire, crooked at the end - I have it here.

PATRICK HENNESSY . I am a policeman. I was present when East had the prisoners in custody - I searched Castles - I took him to the station-house, and found on him two seals and a chain, concealed under the waistband of his trowsers, close to the small of his back - the seals were on the chain.

MARIA BOUCHARD . I am the daughter of the prosecutor - this steel chain is my father's, and this seal I know - they were in the window on the 12th of February - I know this metal chain was my father's - the two seals on it are

not my father's - Mr. Harper's lad gave me this wire, and I gave it to my father - East was not present - I know the steel chains - I had seen them in the window on the Saturday, they were taken on Tuesday - the window was cracked before - the policeman alarmed me about half-past ten o'clock, and I found the window broken.

THOMAS HARPER . I live in Brick-lane. I was in my shop - the constable brought the prisoner in, and I saw them searched - in about a quarter of an hour after they were gone, I found a piece of wire on the floor - before they came in I had not noticed the floor for some hours - I gave it to Thomas Smeaton, desiring him to take care of it, in case it might be wanted.

THOMAS SMEATON . I received the wire from my master- I saw him pick it up - it remained in my possession till next morning; I then gave it to Miss Bouchard - I had swept the floor half an hour before the prisoners came in- the wire was not there then - a great many other persons had been in the shop.

CHARLES EAST. I saw nothing of the wire, I had not dropped it there.

PATRICK HENNESSY. I saw nothing of the wire - I did not leave it there - the metal chain was found on Castles.

JOSHUA BOUCHARD re-examined. This steel chain belongs to me - this seal, and these two ear-rings, and this metal chain, belong to me - I went out about a quarter after nine o'clock that day, and was returning home, when I met the policeman - the window was safe when I went out - I looked at it when I came home - if the glass had been out, they could not have put a hand in, as I have a guard, but this wire could reach all the things out - this metal chain found on Castles is mine.

Castles. When I was taken into the shop I had the metal chain and two seals tied to my fob, and the policeman never took them from me.

PATRICK HENNESSY re-examined. I took it from him with the two seals attached to it.

Castles' Defence. He said the young girl gave him the wire, and she denies it. I bought the chain.

C. EAST. The girl gave me the wire herself.

MARIA BOUCHARD. I gave it to my father.

JOSHUA BOUCHARD. My daughter gave me the wire. I was going out on business - I told my daughter I would leave it on a book on my desk, and if the policeman came, to give it to him - the policeman called for it, and either Smeaton or my daughter gave it to him.

FRANCES ROSEE . I live at No. 88, Hare-street, Bethnal-green - I deal in clothes, and sometimes other things, in Petticoat-lane - about ten weeks ago, I sold Castles a chain like that, but there are so many hundreds alike, it is impossible to say this is it - as far as I can take my oath, it was exactly like this, there was no seals to it - he put two seals on it - a woman brought me to the dock to see if I could identify him as the man, and I could - I know him because he asked me to give him a stoutish pin, I gave him one, and he pinned the chain to his fob - I thought it strange to buy a chain without a watch, which made me notice him - this happened at my stall in Petticoat-lane.

Castles. The seals belong to my father - the prosecutor would have sworn to them before the magistrate, if I had not said so.

JOSHUA BOUCHARD re-examined. I said I thought one of the seals was like what was in my window, but I did not like to swear to it - a great many more things were missing from my window - I do not swear to the seals.

WILLIAM CASTLES. I am the brother of the prisoner - I can take my oath I saw that chain in my brother's fob before he was taken, and the two seals belong to my father - he had the chain in his possession a fortnight before he was taken - I did not see him buy it - he has worn the seals ten years - my father is alive, but is not here.

Castles. Dorset went to my mother and said, if she would pay him his expenses he would not come against me.

JOHN DORSET re-examined. I did not do so - ever since they have been in custody their friends have come backwards and forwards to me to bribe me not to come, but I would not listen to it - they have threatened me even in the yard - I belonged to the Hampshire militia - Mr. Alderman Wood was the colonel - I was out four days, and Castles' friends charge me with being a deserter.

CASTLES* - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BRADLEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of Stealing only. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-100

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

623. THOMAS SEWELL was indicted for that he, on the 6th of March , at St. Luke, Chelsea , feloniously did forge a certain order for payment of money, to wit, for payment of 21l. 8s., with intent to defraud John Betts , against the Statute, &c.

2nd COUNT, for feloniously uttering a like forged order for payment of money, well knowing it to be forged, with a like intent.

3rd COUNT, for feloniously disposing of, and putting off a like forged order, with like intent.

Three other Counts, like the three former, only setting out the forged order, as follows: -

"No. 165. London, March 5th, 1834.

"Messrs. Glyn, Halifax, Mills, and Co., pay to Mr. Stevens or bearer 21l. 8s."Thomas Jones."

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BETTS. I am a butcher - I live in Beaufort-terrace, King's-road, Chelsea . I have known the prisoner many years - he is an out pensioner of Chelsea , and sweeps a crossing next door but one to Mr. Stevens's house, which is about a quarter of a mile from my house - on the 6th of March, about a quarter before one o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop and gave me a sealed note, which I opened - this is it - it contained a cheque, which is now inside it - I looked at it, and asked him where he came from - I do not know whether he said Mr. or Mrs. Stevens - I did not mention any name to him, but I am sure he said Mr. or Mrs. Stevens - I said, "Do you come from Mr. or Mrs. Stevens?" he said "Yes" - I asked him who he came from - he said Mr. or Mrs. Stevens - he said one or the other - I said, "Wait a minute" - I did not mention the name of Stevens to him till after he mentioned it to me - I am quite sure he mentioned the name of Stevens to me first - my man Ford was in the shop, and heard what passed - I told him to wait a minute till I got the money- I was about ten minutes getting the money - I counted

it out on the board before the prisoner, 21l. 8s., and paid it to him; and told my sister to give him one penny to apologize to Mr. Stevens for keeping him so long - the prisoner said, "I will make that all right, I will tell them your shop was full of customers" - he then went away - there were two or three people in my shop at the time - it is a good-sized shop - in four or five minutes afterwards a person came into my shop dressed in slate-coloured trowsers and a surtout coat - I did not observe his face myself - Ford was there - the persons asked a question and then left the shop, and in four or five minutes after that, the prisoner returned, and asked where a gentleman was - my man said, "What gentleman?" - he replied, "That gentleman in your parlour" - he said there was no gentleman in the parlour - my man called me directly - I came out of the back room and said, "What are you after?" - he said, "Here is John has been fool enough to give that money to a gentleman in the street" - I said to him, "Did not you give it to Mr. Stevens?" - he replied, "No" - I directly ran to Mr. Stevens - I know that the prisoner knew where Stevens lived - he sweeps the crossing near his door - in consequence of what Stevens told me, I had the prisoner taken into custody.

Prisoner. Q. When I delivered the letter to you, you said, "Who is this from?" I said, "A gentleman like came to me at the corner, and told me to bring it." A. I did not, nor did he say so - he did not say a word about a Captain Pavior.

CAIN FORD . I am shopman to Mr. Betts - I was in his shop on the 6th of March, when the prisoner came in with the letter, and gave it to my master, who opened it, and said, "Did Mr. Stevens give you this letter?" - he said,"Yes" - master went about and got him the change for the cheque - there were one or two customers in the shop - mistress gave him one penny and said, "You will apologize to Mr. Stevens for keeping you so long" - he said,"Yes, I will; I will tell him the shop was full of people"- after he went away, a man about five feet six or eight high, in a round frock coat and dark trowsers, came in - he had large whiskers - he asked his way to Fulham - I directed him, and he left - the prisoner came up to the shop door in three or four minutes, and I said, "Halloo, Jack, what are you after?" - he said, "Is he gone?" - I said, "Who?" - he said, "That gentleman that came in here just this minute" - I said, "There is no gentleman in here" - he said, "Yes, he is; he is gone into your parlour" - I asked him if he had lost the money - he said, "No, I gave it to that gentleman that is in your parlour now" - master hearing that, came out of the parlour and said to him, "Who gave you that note?" - he said, "I don't know; some man in the street" - then master went off to Mr. Stevens's- the prisoner did not say a word about Captain Pavior - he said nothing about being sent on an errand, nor a word about being intrusted with a letter by a man in the street.

SIMON STEVENS . I am a carpenter, and live at No. 59, South-street, Sloane-square - I have known the prisoner about a year and a half - on the 6th of March I saw him in the Rose and Crown public-house, where I was taking my dinner - it is at the corner of Church-lane, King's-road, at the corner where he sweeps - it was twenty-five minutes after twelve o'clock when he came in - he had a strange man with him, very respectably dressed - they sat down together and drank together - I left them there - to the best of my belief the man had slate-coloured trowsers on - they drank together, and seemed conversing together - the man was about five feet seven inches and a half high, rather stouter than I am - the Rose is nearly a quarter of a mile from Betts's shop - it is close to where the prisoner sweeps, and within a hundred yards of Mr. Stevens's house.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I tell the man it was a long time since I have seen him at Northampton, and did not you go out to move a barrow? A. I never went out while you was in there; I left you there, nor did you mention about Northampton.

WILLIAM MOORE . On the 6th of March I was pot-boy at the Rose and Crown - I know the prisoner, and saw him there that day - a stranger was with him - it was a dark man, with large bushy whiskers, a frock coat, and slatecoloured trowsers - he looked respectable - he and the prisoner were drinking together for about ten minutes - the man went out and left the prisoner behind him - the prisoner asked him if he would have any more of the ale, he said, "No, drink it," and then went out - then the prisoner told me he had had many a good glass of ale at that man's mother's - the prisoner then went after him - they seemed familiar together.

JOHN STEVENS . I am clerk to Cox and Co., formerly Cox and Greenwood - I live in Church-street, Chelsea - I know the prisoner perfectly well, he having swept the crossing there many years - this cheque and letter I know nothing about - neither of them are in my handwriting - I have been a customer of Mr. Betts some time - I never trusted the letter and cheque to the prisoner, nor are either of them my wife's writing - Betts would not know my handwriting - it does not bear the least resemblance to Mrs. Stevens's handwriting.

JOHN LUCKIE . I am clerk to Messrs. Glyn, Halifax, and Co. - we have no account with Mr. Stevens - this cheque was presented at our banking-house by Betts - I refused it - it purports to be drawn by Thomas Jones - we have no such customer. (Cheque read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of the street - the man came over the way and beckoned to me, and said, "Will you go to Mr. Betts's with this letter from Mr. so and so, and you will be paid when you come back again - I said, "Well, I will, for I am very hungry" - as I came back, the man met me, and I gave him the money - he put his hand into his pocket and gave me sixpence for my trouble - I had never seen him before; I went to Mr. Betts, and asked him for six pennyworth of meat.

JOHN BETTS re-examined. He did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-101

Before Mr. Justice Taunton.

624. MARY LUCAS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Edward Butler , on the 22d of February , at St. Marylebone , and stealing therein 1 tray, value 1s. 6d.; 6 rings, value 3l. 18s.; and 1 eye-glass, value 30s.; his goods .

JANE BUTLER . I am the wife of James Edward Butler, jeweller , of Crawford-street , in the parish of Marylebone. On Saturday evening, the 22nd of February, I

heard a noise at a quarter past nine o'clock - I was serving a customer at the time, and heard a noise like a blow at the glass, and then heard the glass break - I immediately turned round and saw a woman's hand through the window taking out this tray, containing forty-nine gold rings - the gold eye-glass hung on a wire over it, and fell into the tray with the breaking of the glass - a vinegaret and other things were lost through the glass being broken - I opened the shop-door directly, and perceived a great number of persons had collected together - I saw the prisoner, and caught her with the tray in her hand, at the middle of the road, crossing the street - there were five gold rings and a double gold eye-glass in the tray when I stopped her with it - I called a number of persons to my assistance, and detained her - Edward Sherriff came, took her from me, and gave the tray into my hands - she was taken to the shop and asked why she broke the glass - she said, "To get at the rings" - these are the rings - they are worth 5l.: that is the selling price - the tray is worth 1s. 6d. - there were forty-nine rings on the tray when it was removed, and they were found in the bed of the window afterwards.

EDWARD SHERRIFF . I am shopman to Nalder and Smith , who live next door to Mr. Butler's. I was in the shop on Saturday evening, the 22nd of February, and heard the smashing of glass - I walked to the shop door, and saw Mrs. Butler calling for assistance - she had hold of the prisoner - I went up and laid hold of the prisoner, and took the tray from her, with five rings and a gold eyeglass in it - I took her into the shop.

HENRY SAUNDERS . I am a policeman. On Saturday night, the 22nd of February, about a quarter past nine o'clock, I was in Crawford-street, and was called by Mrs. Butler - I went into her shop - the prisoner was there - I neither threatened nor made her any promise - I went down into the area and found one ring - the prisoner said, in going to the station-house, that this was not the shop she intended to rob; for she had marked out a watch or two in another shop higher up; but through being lazy, and drinking with another man, she was too late, and the shop was shut up - she thought she must have something, so broke this window.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, and did not know what I was about - as for breaking the window, I have no recollection of it, nor how they ever came into my hand at all.

HENRY SAUNDERS. She had been drinking, but not so as not to know what she was about.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18340410-102

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

625. WILLIAM ATKINSON was indicted for feloniously forging a certain order for payment of 124l. 10s., with intent to defraud Isaac Currie and others .

Ten other Counts, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. LEE, on the part of prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-103

626. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted, for that he having in his custody and possession, a Bill of Exchange, for the payment of 30l., (setting it forth at three months after date, drawn by William Harris upon William Dobson, Albany-street, Camberwell); afterwards, on the same day, feloniously did forge thereon, an acceptance thereof, with intent to defraud William Dobson .

2nd COUNT. For feloniously uttering the like forged acceptance with like intent.

Two other Counts, stating his intent to defraud Robert Disher .

Four other Counts, omitting to set out the forged instrument.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

WALTER CHARLES VENNING . I am an attorney. I had to recover a sum of money on a Bill of Exchange on the prisoner and one Gee - I sued Gee upon it for Robert Disher of Edinburgh - the prisoner called on me in consequence, and proposed to me to take his own warrant of attorney, and the acceptance of a Mr. William Dobson, for the amount, as security for the demand - he stated that Dobson lived at No. 18, Albany-road, Camberwell, and to be in the service of his Majesty's Excise, and also to be his own brother-in-law - he referred me to a Mr. Carpenter Smith , a solicitor in the Borough, and to Mr. Scully , a soap-manufacturer at Bermondsey, as to the stability of Dobson - the Bill of Exchange was to be given for 30l. - he stated Dobson to be in the receipt of about 140l. a-year - after four or five days, during which I had made inquiry, he called on me again - I drew this bill, addressing it to William Dobson,(producing it) and handed it him to procure the acceptance of Dobson - he came to me about four days afterwards, and handed me the bill in its present state, apparently accepted by William Dobson - he said nothing more about Dobson - other persons were with him, and the person who was negotiating the business for him came with him to execute the warrant, and handed over the bill - a warrant of attorney was executed, and the bill delivered by the prisoner, and he endorsed it - upon that proceedings in the action were stayed - the bill became due on the 12th of February - it had been handed to my client - it is now in my hand unpaid - two sums of 6l. each have been paid on account of the warrant of attorney.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How much is there unpaid? A. 18l.; the sums were paid to me - I do not know whether I gave any receipt for them - we commonly write the amount off on the instrument - I always give a receipt when requested - the warrant was filed in the proper office - I do not know whether I wrote the sums off on the warrant - I presume I did - I may be wrong - I did not know it was material, and am not able to say - I recollect that 12l. was paid.

COURT. Q. You have stated that he paid two sums of 6l., how is it that you recollect that, as you do not recollect giving any receipt? A. I know those two sums were paid to me at my office.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was anybody present? A. I do not know - these sums are entered in my book - I have not my books here - I am constantly referring to them - I have not looked at them to satisfy myself about these two sums- the first sum was paid the latter end of November or beginning of December - the second, I think, two or three weeks afterwards.

Q. Are you not in the habit of giving vouchers for sums paid you? A. Yes; I usually write sums off on a warrant of attorney, but do not recollect whether we did so in this case - I have not looked at it to ascertain - there was 18l. due - the bill was for 30l. - I do not know Dobson - I never spoke to him - the warrant of attorney is field in the office at the Court of King's Bench - it has been out of my possession since December or January.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You field the warrant in December? A. Yes; there is an Act of Parliament, obliging me to file a warrant of attorney - I had not any idea that the bill was forged, at the time it was given to me.

THOMAS RICHARDSON TRAPPS . I am a drysalter, living in Leadenhall-street - I was at Mr. Venning's at the time the bill was given by the prisoner - the prisoner and Mr. Gee wrote on the warrant of attorney - the prisoner told me an action had been brought against him and Mr. Gee, by Venning and Co. - and, as I knew Messrs. Venning, he asked me if I would go and stop the action - I went and spoke to Mr. Venning - the prisoner said, if I could stop the action, he would give the acceptance of his brother-in-law, Mr. Dobson - and it was in consequence of that, the bill was given - I was present when the bill was drawn, and when it was given to Mr. Venning, as being accepted (looking at it) - I have known Mr. Dobson about fifteen months, and have seen him write several times - I have endorsed this bill myself; but, at the time, did not look at the acceptance - I have seen Dobson write repeatedly; and on close examination, I do not believe it to be his handwriting.

Cross-examined. Q. You endorsed it without seeing whether it was accepted? A. Yes; I knew I was rendering myself liable - I saw it was accepted, but did not scrutinize the acceptance - I looked at the name - I endorsed the bill to oblige the prisoner - as Mr. Venning said if I endorsed it, he would take it - I read the name in which it was accepted - I never satisfied myself whether it was a genuine signature, or not - I was merely doing a friendly action to serve the prisoner - I knew the prisoner and Dobson were related - I did not know they were intimate - I had not known Dobson's handwriting particularly well - but I have seen him write several times since that, and before.

COURT. Q. Has he been writing in your presence, and called your attention to his writing since, desiring you to look at his writing? A. I have seen him write since - I do not know that he has written in my presence, and called my attention to it since this - I have seen him write two or three times since - I will swear I have seen him write three times.

Q. Did he write for the very purpose of your seeing his handwriting? A. He has certainly.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did the prisoner produce the Bill of Exchange? A. Yes - it did not enter into my mind that it was a forgery - I believed it was a genuine bill, and put my name on it without examining it particularly - I am now of opinion it is not Dobson's handwriting - he wrote several times in my presence, before the bill was in existence - he has since written in my presence, that I might be able to prove it hereafter, (within these two months) - if he had not done that, I should have given the same evidence exactly as I do now - that I do not believe it to be his handwriting, having seen him write previously.

JOHN GEE . I was a party to a Bill of Exchange, and was in some trouble concerning it - I am a party to the bill in question, also, as an endorser - I do not know the handwriting of Dobson.

WILLIAM DOBSON. This Bill of Exchange is not my handwriting - I never accepted this bill, nor authorized or empowered the prisoner to accept it - I knew nothing of it till it was presented to me and refused payment.

Cross-examined. Q. What line of life are you in? A. An officer of Excise, and have been so thirty-three years- I am not always in want of money - at one time I was not- I am at present, and have been so of late years rather - I have been a party to Bills of Exchange, but only for my brother-in-law; on no other occasion - I certainly accepted some Bills of Exchange for him, but not latterly - I never made a trade of accepting bills - I began to accept Bills of Exchange, I suppose, about three years ago or four years, between three and four - I will swear I did not begin so long as five years ago - I have accepted small bills, you may say twenty years ago - I do not suppose I have accepted two bills for twenty years till four years ago - can I recollect twenty years ago? - I swear to the best of my recollection I have not accepted ten bills, but I will not say positively - the two acceptances were small ones - I do not recollect the sums - I do not recollect these things after they are past - I have accepted about eight or nine bills for the last five years - it is not fifteen or twenty - it is not much more than half fifteen - I cannot swear to any number I have accepted - the prisoner is the only person I have accepted for - I do not mean the only person in the world - I have accepted for four or five more, I should suppose, besides him - they were bills for 5l. or 6l., for tradesmen - that would not distress me to pay - my salary in the Excise is 120l. a year - I am a married man, and have one child - I have accepted bills, where I have received no value, a great many times, rather too many times for me - I was obliged to pay them - I have accepted them out of friendship, where I have got no value, five or six times, chiefly for my brother-in-law - I have accepted none for the last half-year.

Q. Did you not tell me, that within the last five years, you accepted five or six bills for persons; not your brother-in-law? A. No; for people in trade who I dealt with - the largest sum I have accepted for, I may say, was about 10l. or 11l., not 20l. - I have accepted a bill for Mr. Collins, a cheesemonger, within the last twelve months - I dealt with him - I owed him money, and gave him that bill - I never accepted bills, where I did not own money, except for my brother-in-law - I have accepted about twelve bills for my brother-in-law - I do not mean to swear positively I have not accepted more than that, but to the best of my recollection, 50l., was the largest sum I ever accepted for him, and for which I got no value - I have stood accountable for the bills, and given security for them - I have mortgaged some land for it which I have at Merton, in Surrey - I have about half an acre there, and a house upon it.

Q. Have the kindness to tell me whether you did not very lately accept a 40l. bill? A. I do not recollect that I

did - I paid a bill to the butcher nearly a year ago - the prisoner was a party to that bill - I was not the accepter - I think Gee was - there have been bill transactions between the prisoner and Gee - I have not seen my wife here tonight.

COURT. Q. You say you have had bill transactions with Gee? A. Yes: I suppose he has seen me write - he has received bills of me, and acted on them.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. A good many; six or eight? A. No - he must have seen some, of course - he saw the one the prisoner was sued on, no doubt, as he was the accepter - I should think Gee has held about two bills to which I have been a party, or three at the farthest - he did not discount any of my bills at any time - I cannot tell whether he endorsed any - he only accepted the one I have talked of - the prisoner had drawn the bill - Gee accepted it, and I endorsed it - we were all upon that bill - we were not together when it was drawn - he saw Harris afterwards- the bill was produced, and of course he saw my handwriting on it - there was one or two more bills with my handwriting, which he saw, and which I conversed with him about - I do not think he had more than one or two(we will say three, at a guess) on which my handwriting was, and to which Gee was a party - he might have been drawer or endorser, for what I remember - I cannot mention the amount of the bills - I was liable for them - I mortgaged the land at Merton for 200l.; but there have been mortgages on it since - I suppose the whole mortgages are about 450l. - I made the last mortgage about two months ago, before this transaction arose - I had accounts to make up, which made me mortgage - I had one bill out for 50l. - I had bills I was answerable for for the prisoner - I had accepted them - I think the last bill I accepted for him was about May or June - it was about 25l., I believe.

Q. Was your wife ever present at a conversation about bills? A. Not that I remember - there was a 30l. bill offered last June, and she persuaded me not to accept it; and I never accepted one since - she might have been present at conversations between the prisoner and myself about Bills of Exchange, but not lately - she has been present at times, but not for six months - she might formerly.

Q. Have you not in her presence, before the last six months, given the prisoner permission to use your name - on your solemn oath? A. No, I never did, or why should I refuse that Bill of Exchange? - I have never given him authority to accept bills for me to any amount, not to my knowledge or belief - I will swear I did not - I do not recollect any thing of the kind - I should be quite beside myself to do so - I swear I did not authorize any person - I never gave the prisoner authority to sign my name as acceptor or party to a bill - I never knew of his doing so- my wife never did it in my presence with my consent - I am not at present living with my wife - we have been separated a few weeks probably - I have come here from Horsemonger-lane Gaol, where I am on account of his bills and one thing or another - I have not been separated from my wife through any disagreement.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The prisoner is your wife's brother? A. Yes - I have accepted bills for him when I have had no consideration for them - it is about four years ago since I began accepting bills for his accommodation - I could pay my way well before that; but since that I have become less able to pay my way, and do justice to my creditors - I have been responsible for this man - in June last I determined to accept no more bills for him - I was then obliged to mortgage my property to cover the different securities I had engaged in for him - I had had that property six or eight years - before I got involved in bill transactions for him, I did not think of mortgaging it - I lived within my income until then - I have lived apart from my wife merely on account of being in prison; that is the only reason - we still, I hope, agree - she has interfered, on the prisoner's behalf, with me, since this happened - she came to me about it - it is natural enough - she has done so.

Q. Now, I ask you again, though she is capable of being called, did you ever, in her presence, in any way, give this man leave to write your name in any way whatever? A. I did not - I never heard or knew of this bill till it was presented for payment.

WILLIAM FIDLER . I am clerk to Messrs. Ridley and Osmond, attornies - I know Dobson - I have seen him write very often - I am well acquainted with his handwriting, (looking at the acceptance) - I do not believe that to be his handwriting - I have seen him write for upwards of three years, very often.

MR. VENNING re-examined. I received the bill from the prisoner at my office, No. 2, Bucklersbury, in the City.

Prisoner's Defence (written)."Mr. Dobson, the principal witness against me, has been on terms of the greatest intimacy with me for years; and even, placed in the situation I am, I envy him not his feelings, after appearing here, and giving the evidence he has done this day."

HARRIETT FLEMING DOBSON . I am the prosecutor's wife. I have known my husband and my brother to be concerned in bill transactions - drawing, accepting, and endorsing bills - it is about twelve months ago, since I first remember their being first concerned in bill transactions - I have been married to Mr. Dobson about five years - my brother kept a public-house in Rosemary-lane for about a twelvemonth - I have been present several times when my husband and my brother have been talking about Bills of Exchange - they were very friendly and intimate together, and about last August twelvemonth, my brother came to ask my husband the favour of putting his name to a bill; and he gave his consent for him to do so for him - he asked him to put his name to a bill - I cannot exactly say his words - he gave his word that he would - he promised to accept the bill for him - I do not know whether the bill was produced - the prisoner asked him to accept the bill - my husband told him to do it himself, and that would answer the same purpose.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. This man is your brother? A. Yes; he asked my husband to accept a bill - my husband told him to accept it himself, for that would do as well - this passed last August twelvemonths, at No. 18, Albany-road - my husband has been sued, and brought to considerable difficulties since that, by accepting bills for my brother - he is not ruined.

Q. Have you been to him in prison to beg him to vary his evidence, and not to hurt your brother? I have.

COURT. Q. Do you know of your husband having accepted other bills to which the prisoner was not a party? A. Yes; I do not know that my husband refused to accept any more bills for my brother - I do not recollect my brother applying, and my husband refusing to accept any more bills for him - my husband has not, to my knowledge, refused to accept bills for the prisoner - I swear I never heard him refuse - I know nothing about it any further - it is very seldom I have been present when my husband has been asked to accept bills for him - I have not heard him refuse to accept bills for him - it may be four or five months ago since I last saw the prisoner in my husband's presence - I cannot tell whether they have been in company for the last four, five, or six months - I was living with my husband till he went to prison, about a month since - I have not seen the prisoner at our house for five months, but he has been, I believe- I have heard of his being there - I never asked my husband not to accept a bill for the prisoner - I will swear that.

( Edward Smith Weddle , bookseller and engraver, 114, Prospect-row; Thomas Fairhead , bricklayer and builder, No. 5, Bear-yard, Lincolns-inn-fields; Mary Musgrave , widow, No. 5, Holborn; Mary Ann Fleet ; William Bristow Sterry , sail-maker, Bermondsey, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 39. - Strongly recommended to mercy on account of his previous good character . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18340410-104

625. WILLIAM HART was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Mortimer , on the 3d of March , at St. Thomas-the-Apostle , and stealing therein 1 coat, value 20s., the goods of Bartholomew Norden Hindes .

2nd COUNT. Stating it to be the dwelling-house of Bartholomew Norden Hindes and another.

WILLIAM RORKE . I am servant to Lee and Co., who live at Nos. 14 and 15, St. Thomas-the-Apostle. On the morning of the 3d of March I was cleaning the window of master's house, and saw the prisoner standing by the side of Mr. Mortimer's house at Mr. Hindes' door - I do not know the number - I saw another man go into the house, bring a coat out under his arm, and give it to the prisoner, - I followed the prisoner, and saw him put it on - he went up the steps of the house, and came down again without going in - the door was closed - the other man walked up to the door and opened it - I do not know how - I followed them as far as the foot of London-bridge - the prisoner was secured - I gave information to the officers, who took him.

Prisoner. He said before the Lord Mayor, that I was at the corner of the street, twenty yards from the house, and never went near the house. Witness. He was about a yard from the door when the other came out and gave him the coat - he had been walking up and down the street - it was the shop door his companion opened.

BARTHOLOMEW NORDEN HINDES. I live at No. 8, Great St. Thomas-the-Apostle - Mr. George Mortimer keeps the house - I am a lodger - he pays the rent and taxes - I do not exactly know the name of the parish - I had a coat hanging up at the end of the shop, by the side of the kitchen door - the outer door, I understand, was open, but the shop door was shut - my coat was within the shop door - it must be opened to get at it - I cannot be positive that the shop door was closed.

MARY ANN GULLICK . I live in this house, and was at home when the coat was taken - I know the shop door was shut - nobody could get to the kitchen without going through the shop door - I had shut the shop door myself ten minutes before - it was not locked - the street door was open - I was up stairs.

THOMAS COWLES (policeman No. 40). I know this house is in the parish of St. Thomas-the-Apostle - I took the prisoner in charge - when he got to the station-house I asked where he got the coat - he said he bought it the week before in Petticoat-lane - he had it on.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met the other man in the street, and bought the coat of him. I was not within twenty yards of the house.

GUILTY of Stealing only . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-105

626. JOHN ROSE and ISAAC STOKES were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hunt , about the hour of ten o'clock in the night, on the 22d of March , at the precinct of Whitefriars , and burglariously stealing therein 2 fowls, value 3s., his goods .

2nd COUNT. Stating it to be the dwelling-house of Wm. Hunt and others.

WILLIAM HUNT. I live at No. 14, Lombard-street, Fleet-street . On the 22nd of March, I heard a noise in the yard, against the area window - I keep fowls in the cellar of my house - I looked out of the window, and saw the prisoners pulling up a stone in the yard - I thought at first it was one of my lodgers, and suspected nothing - I let it be for ten minutes - I then heard the fowls making a noise- I ran down the yard with a light, and called to the prisoners to come up, seeing them both down in the cellar - I called an officer, and they came out of the cellar, which they had broken into - it had been fastened before - they had entered it, by pulling off two iron bars, which run under the stone - they had lifted the stone - the bars secured and fenced in the area - nobody could have entered without breaking the bars - as long as the bars and stone were undisturbed, nobody could enter - they were lifted up and removed; when I called the prisoners up they came up the same way as they went down - I ran to the front door and shut them in - I kept them in the passage, and got an officer to take them - I found two fowls killed; one had his head nearly pulled off, and the other was kicking, dying - they must have been taken from the roost - the house is let out in different tenements - the landlord does not live on the premises - each person has their apartment - there is one common access from the street - there is no way of getting from my apartment to the cellar, without coming down the common staircase - the cellar is entirely in my own occupation - I have a lock and key to it; but it has no internal communication with my lodging room - I go down the common staircase to it - it is below the parlour floor - the doorway is opposite the staircase - I keep tools in the cellar belonging to my business

- the ground floor is between my part and the cellar, without any internal communication - the cellar is under the bulk-head of the staircase - the yard is common to all the house - the cellar is below the ground floor room - I found two of my fowls lying in the cellar - they were perfectly safe, an hour previously, at roost - the house is in the precinct of Whitefriars.

Rose. Q. Where were you when you saw me in the cellar? A. In the yard - I held the candle down, and saw both of you - I saw your faces; and saw you both come up out of the cellar - you had no light, but I had a light in my hand.

COURT. Q. What time was it? A. About half-past ten at night, when I first heard the noise - I found them there about ten minutes after.

Stokes. Q. Do you say you saw me in the cellar? A. Yes, I did; I saw you sitting in a chair by the cellar window - I told you to come up, and you looked up at me; and seeing two of you, I called to my wife to call for assistance, thinking you too much for me - I went and held the front door, and called for assistance - the officer came and took you both in the passage - I was down in the cellar two minutes afterwards, and saw an Irishman collar you- I saw you both there, and when I got to the watch-house with the fowls, you were both there in custody.

GEORGE SHARPE . I am an officer. I heard a cry of"Watch," and ran to No. 14, Lombard-street - I entered the passage, and saw the prosecutor struggling with the prisoner - I collared Rose and took him to the watch-house- Stokes was brought to the watch-house by an Irishman,(I believe,) whose master would not allow him to give evidence - I afterwards went into the cellar - I do not know exactly who it was took the other prisoner - I am sure I found both the prisoners struggling in the passage with the prosecutor - when I got into the cellar, the two fowls laid there - one was dead - they were both warm - the dead one had been very recently killed - I know this house - Hunt lives on the one-pair, and has a flight of stairs to come down, and contiguous to the yard door, (at the further end of the passage, quite away from the street door,) is the cellar door- he turns to his right hand, and the cellar door is right under the stairs - that door leads nowhere but to his cellar- I found this poker in the cellar, and this bag - I found a tinder-box on Rose, and some matches on Stokes.

Rose's Defence. I had been out drinking, and was rather intoxicated - the street door being opened, as I suppose, I must have fallen into the passage - all I recollect is falling into the door.

Stokes's Defence. I was coming up the street between ten and eleven o'clock - I saw people going towards the watch-house - I walked down, and walked into the watch-house - the watch-house keeper asked what business I had there - I said, "I do not know, I have come in to see the man" - one or two said, "Oh, I suppose you know him." I said, "I have no knowledge of him" - the watch-house keeper said,"I shall take and search you" - I had bought one half-penny worth of matches that evening, and when I came home I took them out, but one or two might have fallen out in my pocket from the bundle.

GEORGE SHARPE re-examined. The street door was shut, and the prosecutor holding it with one hand, and scuffling with the prisoner - I do not know who brought Stoke"- I did not see Stokes in custody till I saw him at the watch-house - how he got there I do not know, but I am positive he was one of the men in the passage, and whom the prosecutor was keeping in - I did not know him at first sight, when I first went in with Rose my attention being taken from him - my attention was not taken off him in the passage, it was afterwards - I am positive he was one of the two men in the passage.

WILLIAM HUNT re-examined. The bars were secured by being underneath the stone.

JURY. Q. Was the passage door closed or open at the time? Witness. I cannot answer the question myself.

COURT. Q. Which way did they come out of the cellar? A. Through the hole they had made to go down - there are stairs leading down within the cellar door, into the cellar - they did not come out that way, but out of the hole they had made, which is outside the house - they came out into the yard, not into the passage - they came into the passage at the yard door - the yard is at the back of the house - they got through the bars in the yard, but before they got into the yard, they must have come in at the front door through the house to get to the bars - they must have come out of the yard, into the passage from the cellar to get out, but I secured them by shutting the street door - the street door is generally shut on the latch.

ROSE - GUILTY . Aged 23.

STOKES - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-106

NEW COURT. - Saturday, April 12th.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

627. ELIZA BARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 4 gowns, value 7s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 6 caps, value 18d.; 3 yards of lace, value 3s.; 2 pair of stockings, value 8d.; 1 shawl, value 6d.; 1 pair of stays, value 6d.; 1 pair of boots, value 6d.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 1 habit shirt, value 6d.; 1 book, value 1s.; and 1 box, value 6d.; the goods of Margaret Rough , her mistress, and that she had been before convicted of felony .

MARGARET ROUGH. I live with my mother, Mary Rough , in Weymouth-terrace, Hackney . The prisoner was my servant - on the 5th of March, which was our washing morning, I saw her about six o'clock - she afterwards left us without notice - I missed some of these articles that day, and the others I missed afterwards - these are the articles- they are mine - some of them had been in the bed-room, and some in the kitchen, ready to wash - I did not see her again until she was taken - I owe her a trifle of wages.

MARY WALKER . I live in Pelham-street. I know the prisoner - she came to me on the 6th of March, and asked me to let her lodge with me - she stayed that night, and in the morning she went out and brought in these articles - here is a gown, a pair of boots, a shawl, a pair of stays, and some stockings - she asked me to take care of them - I put them into my bottom drawer, and gave them to the officer when he came.

ELIZABETH JENKINS . I live in Pelham-street. On

the 6th of March, the prisoner brought me these three caps - she told me to wash them for her - I washed and ironed them - I gave them to the officer.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and received these articles.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES EAST (police-constable H 33). I produce the certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark - I know the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-107

628. SARAH BONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 60 pence, the monies of William Morland , from his person .

WILLIAM MORLAND. I lodge in Gray's-inn-lane. On the 5th of April, I was at the corner of Portpool-lane , about four o'clock in the afternoon - the prisoner came up to me, and snatched a 5s. paper of copper out of my jacket pocket - she tore them open, and shook them into her apron - another woman, who was with her, took a handful, and put them into her bosom, and she ran off - I seized the prisoner's apron, and did not let it go until the officer took her - I was sober, but I think she was tipsy.

Prisoner. Q. Do you know the woman who was giving you vinegar to drink? A. I had no vinegar - I was not talking to any woman.

WILLIAM CRAMPTON (police-constable G 86). I took the prisoner from the prosecutor - I found some pence in her apron - the prosecutor said she had robbed him of 5s. worth of copper - the prisoner said, "Here it is" - I said,"Give it me" - she untied her apron, and gave it me - the prisoner did not deny it at the time, but when she got to the station-house, she said it was part of the change of two bad half-crowns she had passed that day.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that as she was passing, the prosecutor accused a woman with robbing him, who run on to a public-house; and he seized her by mistake.)

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-108

629. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 watch, value 5l., the goods of William Batchelor , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM BATCHELOR. I live with my father at Hounslow . The prisoner worked for him - on the morning of the 26th of March, I left him in the workshop, where my watch was hanging on a nail - he came down soon after, and said he had the head-ache, and would go and take a walk - I afterwards missed my watch - this is it - I gave six guineas for it.

JOHN EMMERSON . I am a police-constable. I took the prisoner at Windsor - he said he had pawned the watch for 30s., and sold the duplicate for 6s.; he showed me where it was.

GEORGE RANDNOR . I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned by the prisoner for 30s., it is worth about 3l.

GUILTY, value 99s. Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-109

630. ROBERT FIDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 2 shirts, value 3s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. ; the goods of Henry Johnson .

HENRY JOHNSON. I was on board the Dreadnought Hospital-ship, at Greenwich - I went there on the 10th of February - the prisoner was there then - he left there on the last of February - I did not authorize him on the 3d of March to go to my mother to get any thing for me, nor did I ever receive any of these things.

MARY JOHNSON . I am the mother of this witness. On the 3rd of March, the prisoner came to me, and said my son was getting better, and he wanted some clean things - I gave him two shirts, and the other articles stated, for my son.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy. I could have a ship now, if I were permitted to go to Scotland. I have a wife and two children.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18340410-110

631. ANN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 10 candlesticks, value 15s.; and 13 books, value 40s. , the goods of George Futvoye and others.

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of George Futvoye only.

GEORGE FUTVOYE. I am one of the trustees of Artillery-street Chapel, in the Old Artillery Ground - the prisoner was employed there - we missed ten brass candlesticks from the chapel, and several books - one of them was my own, and was a valuable one - I asked the prisoner about that, and told her, if she could find it, I would give her a reward - she said she had not seen it - I afterwards received some duplicates of some books, but not the one I spoke to her particularly about - I can identify some of these books - here is one of my own - it has my name in it - this one belongs to the trustees of the chapel - the candlesticks have not been found.

JAMES BAKER . I live in King's-head-court, Kingsland-road - I had the care of the chapel - I found these duplicates on the mantel-piece of the room where the prisoner lives - I informed the trustees.

JOHN LINSCOTT . I live with Mr. Aldridge, a pawnbroker, in Brown's-lane - I took this book in pledge from the prisoner for sixpence.

JAMES MASTERS HOWIE - I am a pawnbroker - I took in this book from the prisoner for 1s. 6d.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

632. ANN GREEN was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 1 apron, value 8d.; 1 flat-iron, value 4d.; and 1 handkerchief, value 8d. , the goods of Thomas Rudd .

MARY RUDD . I am the wife of Thomas Rudd. The prisoner washed for me for five or six months - I asked her to come and do a little for me at the time of my confinement - she came on the 11th of February, the day I was confined - she took my apron that day, but I did not miss it till the 13th - I afterwards missed a flat-iron; and on the 20th I missed a handkerchief - I asked the prisoner about the things - she said it was very odd.

JOHN LINSCOTT . I have a handkerchief which was pawned by the prisoner for 4d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-111

633. JANE JOHNSON and EDWARD JOHNSON

were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Roger Hinde , from his person .

ROGER HINDE. I live in Norris-street, Hoxton - at half-past one o'clock in the morning of the 2d of April, Jane Johnson took hold of me, and I went down an alley with her - I went up a few stairs into a room where she took me - I was not there five minutes before she forced my handkerchief off my neck and ran off - I pursued her, and when I got to the top of the alley I overtook her - I said I would have my handkerchief again, but the male prisoner came up and rescued her from me - they went back, and I thought it was not safe to go after them - I went for the policeman.

Prisoner E. Johnson. Q. Did not you say it was lost in the lane? A. No: I did not.

COURT. Q. Did not you say that it was taken when you got a few steps in the passage? A. It was in the room, which is only a few steps up - the man did not use any force, but if I had gone back, perhaps he might - I had not hold of the woman when the man came up.

THOMAS PRINDIVILLE (police-constable G 140). I received information of this, and went to the prisoners' lodgings - I asked Jane Johnson for this handkerchief - she said she had not got it - I took her to the station-house - on the way she said she had got it, but would not give it to me - it was taken from her pocket at the station-house - the male prisoner did not say any thing.

WILLIAM BARTLETT (police-constable G 94). I took the male prisoner.

ROGER HINDE. This is my handkerchief - I had about 1s. 9d. in my pocket.

COURT. Q. Did not she say that that was not enough, and you must leave your handkerchief? A. No: I did not say so before the magistrate.

Jane Johnson's Defence. I met him, and he asked to go home with me, which he did: he then said he had no money, but he would leave his handkerchief.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-112

634. MARIA LEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 2 shirts, value 6s.; 3 books, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 towel, value 6d. ; the goods of Alexander Urquhart .

SARAH URQUHART . I am the wife of Alexander Urquhart - the prisoner lived in our service, and was discharged - I afterwards went to her lodging and searched her boxes - I found these articles, which are ours.

Prisoner. I called on you in the morning, gave you my address, and told you I would bring you every thing. Witness. Yes; you did.

HENRY GARRETT (police-constable D 148). I went to the prisoner's lodging with her mistress - she said to her,"Do you want to hurt my feelings again?" as they had taken her up the day before, but let her go again.

Prisoner's Defence. I always put my things in her drawers, and when I went away I took these things with mine. I intended to return them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-113

635. WILLIAM LOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 6 live tame rabbits, value 10s. , the goods of William Willcock .

WILLIAM WILLCOCK. I have a stable in Wilmington-street , which was broken open on the 14th of March, and I lost a saddle, a whip, two bridles, and six live tame rabbits - I had seen the rabbits safe about ten minutes before eight o'clock: and about a quarter before nine o'clock, a deaf and dumb man came and made me understand that something was wrong - I ran with the policeman and found the door broken open, and missed the property - here is one of the rabbits - the prisoner had been working opposite my stable for two or three days.

JOHN HULL (police-constable G 220). I found this rabbit in Hazle's place, in Taylor's house.

MARTHA TAYLOR . I live in Robin Hood-court, Shoe-lane. I was working at the Robin Hood public-house - the prisoner came and asked me to take care of this rabbit for him - I said, if he would sell it, I would buy it of him- he said, no, it was to be raffled for - I let it run about the public-house for two days, and then took it home.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in Holborn - Hazle came off the rank, and had a drop of gin with the man I bought it of - Hazle then told me to take it to his place, which I did - he said he would get it raffled for me, as he could get more members than I could.

GEORGE HAZLE . I drive a cab. I was on the rank in Holborn, and the prisoner said he had bought this rabbit, and could I raffle it for him, to get him a little money as a deposit for a situation - I said I would try - I took it home to my place.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-114

636. ISAAC LOCKWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 cloak, value 1l., and part of a printed book, called the Bible, value 15s. , the goods of Elizabeth Lockwood .

ELIZABETH LOCKWOOD . I am a widow . The prisoner is my son. On the 24th of February, I lost my cloak and part of a Bible - these are the articles.

RICHARD HALL . I am a pawnbroker. This cloak was pawned with me, by the prisoner, on the 24th of February.

THOMAS PLATTS . I am a pawnbroker. I produce these numbers of a Bible which were pawned by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been out of employ a good deal since the death of my father - I took these things, meaning to get them out again when I was in employ.

GUILTY. Aged 19. - Recommended to mercy by the prosecutrix . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-115

637. PHILIP COLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 2 £5 bank notes , the monies of William Dunn .

WILLIAM DUNN. I live in Tooley-street, and am a seaman . On Thursday evening, the 20th of March, I was at the Lion and Lamb at Hoxton - I was in liquor - I walked away towards Bishopsgate-street - I and my shipmate had a quarrel at the corner of Ashford-street - I walked away from him - a man came up to me, tapped me on the shoulder, and asked me about some vessel - he walked with me, and we had something to drink in Pitfield-street - we then

went on towards Norton Falgate, went into another public-house, and had a pint of half-and-half - I had two £5 notes and some silver in my pocket - I had been paid that day - the man looked to me like a dyer - I do not see him here - he was with me about an hour, I should think: when we came out of that house the air took effect on me, as I had been smoking - I got to Bishopsgate-street, and then missed my two £5 notes, which must have been taken out of my pocket - they could not have got out - these are them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know them? A. By taking the number of them - I was tipsy, and do not know the man who was in my company for an hour - the notes were in my inside waistcoat pocket, which was buttoned - I had not lost them when I was in the public-house - I was not so overcome then as I was when I got out - I felt them as I came out; and when I missed them my waistcoat was unbuttoned - I think I met the man about nine o'clock in the evening - I should think I was with him an hour - I quitted him a little after ten o'clock - whoever the man was, he must have been with me between half-past five and half-past ten o'clock.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I have a £5 note, No. 9915, which was paid into the Bank by Prescott and Co.

GEORGE HOLLIS . I received this note from Thomas.

EDWARD THOMAS . I am a carpenter. I paid this note to Hollis.

JOHN CARTER . I paid this note to Thomas - I received it from Hill.

HENRY HILL . I received the note from Tourill.

JAMES TOURILL . I paid this note to Hill - I got it from the prisoner - he called on me on the morning of the 21st of March - he owed me a few shillings; and said, if I would get him change, he would pay me - I got it changed by Mr. Hill - the prisoner is my brother-in-law - he had owed me some money for board and lodging.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer. I received this other £5 note (No. 9914) from Mr. Leschallas.

WILLIAM LESCHALLAS . I received this note from Tourill - I gave him five sovereigns for it.

JAMES TOURILL. I received this note also from the prisoner on the evening of the 21st of March - when I returned home at eight or half-past eight o'clock, I found him at my house - he asked if I would get him change for another £5 note - I said I could not that night; he had better go to the Bank in the morning and get it changed - he said it would be doing him a great favour, and I got it changed at Mr. Leschallas.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did he not tell you he had found these notes? A. Yes, in a street nearly opposite Shoreditch Church.

GEORGE AYLWYN . I am a friend of the prosecutor's, and saw the notes in his possession that night.

Prisoner's Defence. On that evening I went to see my father and sister in Margaret-street - I got there at half-past eight o'clock - I stopped there till late - I then went to the Antelope, and had a pint of beer - I returned home about one o'clock - I came along Hackney-road and Shoreditch - I stopped in William-street, and saw something on the ground - I took it up and put it into my pocket, and the next morning I found it was two half-crowns and two £5 notes - I got my brother-in-law to change the notes - the prosecutor said that the man who was with him was a stout man.

WILLIAM DUNN. I said I thought it was a stouter man; but the prisoner might have been with me afterwards - the prisoner said at Worship-street that there was nothing in the notes, and now he says there were two half-crowns.

EDWARD FILANG (police-constable H 87). I took the prisoner - he said he picked up the notes - the prosecutor asked him if there was any thing else, as he had lost a cigar-case, a handkerchief, and two half-crowns - the prisoner said that he found nothing but the two notes.

SUSAN COLSON . I reside with my father at No. 44, Margaret-street, Haggerstone . On Thursday night, the 20th of March, the prisoner came there a little after eight o'clock, and he stayed till half-past eleven, or near twelve o'clock - he lives in Bethnal-green-road - my sister Mary Burgess was there, and my father; Mr. Sewell was there, when the prisoner came - Mr. Page also called, but he is out of town - I am sure the prisoner stayed there the whole evening.

COURT. Q. How do you happen to recollect so exactly about the hours that night? A. By the time-piece - we were all comfortable together - we had supper about nine o'clock - I believe we had bread and cheese - we supped in our own apartment - I cannot say what my sister had - Mr. Sewell supped with us - the prisoner was in my sister's apartment - I cannot say how long - he might be an hour, or not so long - my sister is married, and lives with her husband - I live with my father - the prisoner had nothing to eat with me - we had supper while the prisoner was in my sister's apartment - he might have been there half an hour - he and my sister then came in together, or a few minutes after one another - Mr. Sewell was in our room - we were playing at cards from about half-past nine till near twelve o'clock - Mr. Sewell and I played at all-fours - the prisoner and my sister were in and out of the room all the evening - they saw us play - my father was in bed - my aunt and uncle were there; but they did not see the prisoner in our room - their names are Hearn - they live in the house - my brother went into their apartment on the ground-floor, and then came up to our room - I heard the prisoner say he went to the Antelope, and the landlord recollects him being there; but he is not here - we had some porter after supper - there might have been a pot or three pints drank - my sister fetched some, and Mr. Sewell the rest - Mr. Sewell left at half-past eleven o'clock, and left the prisoner there - I recollect the clock striking twleve soon after the prisoner left.

WILLIAM SEWELL . I am a dyer. I went to Susan Colson's that evening about half-past six o'clock - the prisoner came in between eight and half-past eight o'clock - I stayed there till half-past eleven o'clock - I left the prisoner there - I cannot recollect whether I had any thing to eat - I believe I had a drop of porter - I did not fetch any porter - I am quite sure of that - a person of the name of Page was there - I have known the prisoner twleve months- he bore an honest character - I believe he is a weaver by trade.

COURT. Q. What did the prisoner do when he came? A. He shook hands all round, and sat down - he remained in that room till I went away - there were eight persons in that room, the prisoner and I, Susan Colson, Mr. Burgess and Mrs. Burgess, Mr. and Mrs. Hearn, and Mr. Page - they were all there all the time I was there - I did not stop to supper - if there was any supper, it must have been after half-past eleven o'clock - there was porter drank, it went round - I am sure I fetched none - there were no cards - I did not play at cards.

( - Hunt , a weaver, in Slater-street; Philip Moody , a silk-dyer, Goldsmith's-grove, Hackney-road; and Thomas Ball , silk-manufacturer, Anchor-street, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-116

637. JOHN CHATTERTON was indicted for embezzlement .

ELIZABETH LONG . I am the wife of William Long . He keeps the Green Man public-house, at Shacklewell - the prisoner was in his service - my daughter delivered him a bill to take to Mrs. Erwood - the prisoner settled with my husband till he was taken ill, soon after Christmas, and since then with my daughter.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your husband here? A. No - what the prisoner received was entered in this book by my daughter.

ALICE LONG . We supplied Mrs. Erwood with porter - I sent her bill by the prisoner, on the 3rd of February , but I did not send him for the money - I did not expect him to bring it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-117

638. JOHN SOUTER HAMPTON and MARK DANCEY were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 portmanteau, value 1l.; 4 coats, value 6l.; 7 waistcoats, value 3l.; 2 pair of trowsers, value 1l.; 1 opera-glass, value 1l.; 1 dirk, value 10s.; and 2 dressing-gowns, value 1l. , the goods of Henry Stuart Burton .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY STUART BURTON. In the month of November last I was going to Gloucester - these articles and some others were packed up for me in my portmanteau, which had a brass plate on it, with my name on, and there were some letters inside which had addresses on them - the portmanteau was locked - I went from the Golden Cross, Charing-cross - I did not see the portmanteau put on the stage, but when I got to Gloucester it was missing - I gave notice to the proprietor - some bills were printed and given to the guard.

Cross-examined by MR. STAMMERS. Q. Had you any address of yours on the outside of this portmanteau? A. I believe only my name.

ISAAC SHELL . I am guard of the Regulator coach, from London to Gloucester - I go with the coach to High Wycomb - I remember taking the prosecutor, another gentleman, and a servant, to go by that coach - they had a good deal of luggage - there was a portmanteau, which was fastened to the iron behind the coach - it was quite safe at High Wycomb, when I left the coach - it goes without a guard the rest of the way - on the following evening the coach returned - I heard the portmanteau was missing - my employers sent me to get some bills printed, one of which I have now in my pocket - I distributed some of them at every public-house along the road at which the coach stops - I know Gerrard's Cross - I left a bill at the French Horn, and one at the Bull, at Gerrard's Cross - I know Mr. Shackell - he keeps a beer-shop exactly opposite one of the houses I left the bills at - I went down with the bills within five miles of Oxford.

HENRY LIVERMORE . I am in the employ of Mr. Cotterell , a pawnbroker, in Oxford-street. On the 10th of February, the prisoner Hampton came to our shop - he brought a coat, three pair of trowsers, and three waistcoats to pawn - he asked 1l. 12s. on them (we should have advanced 4l. or 5l. on them) - I inquired who they belonged to - he said part of them were made for him at Windsor, when he was better off, and the others he bought of a gentleman's servant in Buckinghamshire - I then observed Dancey by the side of a waggon, on the opposite side of the way: and Hampton said that the man over the way knew all about it - I told him to call him, and he did - I then asked him about them - he said, "We have found them" - Hampton then said, "I have told the gentleman that part of them were made for me" - I told them I would look over our bills, and see if we had an account of any thing lost, and not finding any, I sent for the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Dancey said at once, "We found them?" A. Yes.

JOHN CRAWLEY LITTLE (police-constable D 74). I was sent for to the shop, and took the prisoner - I received these articles - Hampton said the great coat, one pair of trowsers, and one waistcoat, were made for him when he was better off - when we got to the station I asked him which pair of trowsers were made for him - he said he did not know - he said he bought the rest of them of a gentleman's butler in Buckinghamshire - in going to the office Dancey said to Hampton, "You have got me into this trouble by telling these lies" - I had heard something, and I asked Dancey for the direction where the portmanteau was, and I received from them a direction on a paper - the prisoners were both together at the time, and I do not think any one else was with them - the direction on the paper was, " Thomas Shackell , Tom and Jerry shop, Gerrard's Cross" - I went there and found this portmanteau - the lock is broken open- I found in it a dirk, five waistcoats, and a number of other things - there were a number of letters in it, which have been returned to the prosecutor - some of them were directed to Mr. Burton's mother at Hastings, and some to his attorney - I went to Gerrard's Cross again, and found in a flat basket three coats, five pair of trowsers, and three pairs of drawers.

Cross-examined. Q. You asked Dancey for his place of residence, and some person gave you a paper with writing on it? A. Yes; Dancey is a waggoner and an illiterate man, I believe; the writing was very bad - I believe there were no letters in the portmanteau addressed to the prosecutor himself.

THOMAS SHACKELL. I keep a beer-shop at Gerrard's Cross - Dancey lodged with me about half a year - he was there before the 10th of November - he drove a waggon from Circencester to London - this portmanteau was found in his room, but I did not see him bring it there,

nor hear him say any thing about it - when the officer came, I took it from under Dancey's bed, and gave it to him - in an hour's time another waggoner who was going down brought in this basket, and said he did not know what to do with it - I said, "Leave it here, I will take charge of it."(Property produced and sworn to.)

HAMPTON - GUILTY . Aged 25.

DANCEY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined for Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-118

639. MARY YOUNG and JOHN YOUNG were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 1 watch, value 3l. 10s. , the goods of John Bricheno .

JOHN BRICHENO. I live in Finsbury-square. On the 11th of March, I went to a shop in Chiswell-street - I pulled out my watch there, and asked Howard to tell me the time - I then put it into my pocket again, and when I got home I missed it - this is it - I have had it forty-two years - I bought it new.

Cross-examined by MR. STAMMERS. Q. How do you know it? A. By the knob by which it opens - I have not had my sight these six years - I know the ribbon and the key which I always wind it up by - I never dropped it when I was putting it into my pocket - I think I did not drop it that day.

ROBERT HOWARD . I went out with Mr. Bricheno - he pulled out his watch, and I told him the time - I know this is his watch.

JAMES TURNER . I keep a general sale shop, at No. 95, Whitecross-street. On the morning of the 12th of March, the prisoner John Young came to me with another man - Young said, "Turner, would you like to earn 1l.?" - I said,"Certainly, in a fair way" - he then said, "You must come with us" - I said, "Come inside, and let me know the particulars before I engage" - he came in and produced a duplicate of a gold watch, and asked if I would buy it - I asked where he got it - he said his wife and the other man's wife picked it up yesterday - I said the proper persons to go with me to look at the watch, would be the women, as they could give more information - I then said I would meet him in half an hour, and I went to the station-house and made inquiries - they said there had been no information - I said I was to meet two women, and go with them to a pawnbroker's - the two men then went with me part of the way - they then left me, and said they could not find the women - I went with the men to the pawnbroker's, and while we were there the officers came in, and stopped the duplicate.

HENRY GARDINER . This watch was pawned at our shop in Whitechapel-road, on the 11th of March, by Mary Young, for 1l. 15s. - it is worth 3l. 10s.

HENRY BERESFORD (police-sergeant G 8). I went to the pawnbroker's shop - the prisoner John Young and a man named Jackson came in - the pawnbroker gave me a signal - I stepped up, and this duplicate was on the counter- Young seized it, but I took it - this is the watch - Young said it was his mother's - he afterwards said that his wife and another woman found it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-119

640. JOHN HENRY PASCOE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Harris , from his person .

WILLIAM HARRIS. I am a journeyman baker , and live in Henry-street, Cumberland market. On Sunday night, the 30th of March, I was going along the New-road , about half-past eight o'clock - I lost this handkerchief - it has my initials on it.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer of Marylebone - on the following Monday I saw the prisoner - I followed him to a house in Short's-gardens - I put my hand to his pocket, and said, "What have you got here?" - he said, "A dirty shirt, and I will show it you" - he put his hand to his pocket, pulled out these four handkerchiefs, and threw them through the window into the yard, in a moment - I seized him by the collar, and asked some men who were at work in the yard to give me the handkerchiefs, but they took no notice of it - the prisoner then began to make some resistance - I took out my staff and said I was an officer, and if he made any resistance, I would make a hole in him - I then called to the men again to give me the handkerchiefs, but one of them took them up and threw them into a hole which they were digging - I said, "Is there not one honest man among you? - mind, I know you all, and if you do not give them to me, I will have you up" - at last one man took them out, and another man gave them to me - I then brought the prisoner out - he made great resistance in the street, and some women pulled my arm and some men ill used me - one of them bit my thumb, and I was very ill used - if a policeman had not come up, I must have lost the prisoner.

STEPHEN READER (police-constable F 149). I came up and assisted the witness.

Prisoner. A young man asked me to carry them - the officer came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-120

641. MARK RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 17 squares of glass, value 20s., the goods of Thomas Herridge , and fixed to a building .

JAMES JOYCE (police-constable N 192). I stopped the prisoner on the night of the 24th of March, with this bundle under his arm, which contained thirteen squares of glass, and four or five broken ones - I asked what he had got - he said some glass he had brought from Kingsland-road, and that it belonged to his master, Mr. Hoare - I took him to the watch-house - he made the same statement, and the serjeant detained him.

THOMAS HERRIDGE. I am a builder , at No. 4, Liverpool-road . I have a house unoccupied - I left it all safe on the evening of the 24th of March, and the next morning I missed the glass from the frame - this glass has been fitted to the frame, and appears to fit exactly - the sashes were hung in the usual way - some of the bits of glass remain in the sashes - I have not a doubt this glass came from them.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-121

Third London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

642. JAMES BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd March , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas William Gregory , from his person .

THOMAS WILLIAM GREGORY. I was in Cheapside , on

the 23rd of March, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening - I felt a pull at my pocket, and missed my handkerchief - I turned and saw the prisoner with it in his hand - I seized him, and took it from him - this is it - I gave him in charge.

GUILTY .* Aged 12. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-122

643. THOMAS HEATON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of a man called Chandler , from his person .

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of a man unknown.

JAMES WILD (police-constable R 141). On the 7th of April, I was coming over London-bridge , I saw the prisoner and another sounding several gentlemen's pockets - the prisoner at last drew this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket - I went and took him - I asked the gentleman his name - he said Chandler, and that he lived in Kent - he told me to go on with the prisoner, and he would follow me, but he did not.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-123

644. WILLIAM BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of Henry Creaton .

HENRY CREATON. I am a carpenter . On the 20th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, my coat was in a cart belonging to Mr. Higginbotham - I left the cart, and stopped out four or five minutes - I then heard an alarm - I returned and saw the policeman who had my coat, and the prisoner - this is it.

JAMES WILD (police-constable R 141). I was going along and saw the prisoner and another go and look into the cart - the prisoner then took this coat out of the cart - he ran down Northumberland-alley - I pursued - he dropped the coat - I took him and the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-124

645. RICHARD HOPE was indicted for embezzling .

THOMAS GOULD . I am a whalebone-cutter . The prisoner was in my employ, but was not employed to receive money - it was not his duty to receive any.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-125

646. JAMES PROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of a man unknown , from his person .

JAMES WEST . On the 1st of March I was passing through Beech-street - I saw the prisoner and another lad following a gentleman - I knew the prisoner, and watched them till they came to Mr. Frank's - I then saw the prisoner put his hand into the gentleman's pocket, and take out a handkerchief - he put it behind him to give it to the other lad, but the other saw me and ran away - I seized the prisoner and the handkerchief.

EDWARD McDONALL . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner struggling to get away from this witness - I took him - this is the handkerchief - the gentleman went away.(Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character).

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18340410-126

647. CHARLES POTTINGER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 bushel of shrimps, value 17s., and 1 basket, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Hearne .

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

EDWARD INGRAM . I am a private watchman in the employ of Mr. Joseph Hearne, of Holborn-bridge. He is a waggoner and coach proprietor . On the 14th of March, I had six pads of shrimps left in my care, which came by the Boston coach - they were marked "J. G., Boston," which signified Mr. Glass - on the 15th, five more pads came by the coach, which made eleven - I put them all into the errand-cart to go to Billingsgate - I gave them into William Maberly's care to take to Mr. Glass, jun. - I saw the eleven pads safe in the cart at half-past four o'clock that morning.

WILLIAM MABERLY . I am carman to Mr. Hearne. I received the eleven pads of shrimps from Ingram - when I got to Billingsgate I had only ten.

EDWARD RENTMORE . I am a watchman of St. Andrew's, Holborn. I was on duty on the 15th of March, at a quarter before five o'clock in the morning - I saw the prisoner walking a few yards from a man of the name of Brown - I knew them both - the prisoner had a coat on his arm, which I knew belonged to Brown : and Brown had this pad on his shoulder - I stopped Brown, and asked what he had got - he said it was his master's, and he was going home - I said he must go to the watch-house - he then called out, "Bill" - the prisoner turned round and came towards us - Brown then threw this pad on my arm, which broke my hold, and they both ran off - I sprung my rattle, but they escaped - this is the pad - I found a note inside it- it is marked "J. G., Boston." I found the prisoner in St. Bride's watch-house on the 22nd.

EDWARD GILBERT . I am clerk to Mr. Joseph Hearne, he has no partner.

JAMES GLASS, jun. I am a salesman at Billingsgate - I am in the habit of receiving shrimps from my father, who lives at Boston. On the 15th of March I ought to have received eleven pads of shrimps - I only received ten - I saw this pad afterwards - it has my father's mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in bed till half-past seven o'clock that morning.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-127

648. MARY COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , one shilling , the property of Thomas John Collins .

THOMAS JOHN COLLINS. I am in the service of Mr. Cook , who keeps an eating-house in Wood-street - the prisoner was cook there - I had missed money from time to time, and on the 8th of March, I marked three shillings and four sixpences - on the Monday morning following I put two of the marked shillings, and two of the sixpences in my trowsers'-pocket, which I left in the chair by my bedside - (I should have put those trowsers on about twelve o'clock, when I went to clean myself) - soon after I left them the prisoner went up to make the bed - I went up when she came down, and missed one of the shillings - I told my master and mistress - they called the prisoner, and asked her if she had taken any - she denied it - she pulled some things out of her pocket, and this shilling was among them - I believe she had no more money - Mr. Cook told her she had better pack up her clothes, and go about her business; but she insisted upon having the shilling, and said she would not go without it - the

officer was then sent for, and took her - this is the shilling - it is marked on the head with a W.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. She made no attempt to conceal this shilling? A. No. I had not had any words with her that morning - I had quarrelled with her on the Saturday evening - when I charged her with taking this shilling she was exceedingly indignant, and said she would complain to a Justice - my mistress saw me mark the money.

ELIZA COOK . I saw the prosecutor mark three shillings and four sixpences on the head - this is one of the shillings.

GUILTY. Aged 23. - Recommended to mercy by the Jury . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-128

649. WILLIAM GREIG was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Green , on the 23rd of March , and stealing therein 1 gown, value 2s. 6d.; 4 aprons, value 4s.; 1 frock, value 1s.; 2 yards of calico, value 8d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 3 brushes, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 2 caps, value 1s.; 2 collars, value 1s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 1s. 6d.; 1 table-cloth, value 6d.; and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. his goods .

WILLIAM GREEN. I live in Chapel-street, Milton-square , in the parish of St. Giles' Without, Cripplegate - I only rent the second-floor front room - the house belongs to Mr. Harwood, a builder, in Bush-lane, Cannon-street - the prisoner lodged in the same house, and an old woman-lodges there - there is only one door to the house - the landlord does not live in it - on the 24th of March I went out at a quarter past three o'clock in the afternoon, and fastened my door; I returned between ten and eleven o'clock, when I found the door had been opened, and a fork stuck outside, and a bit of cotton - I missed these articles - this pair of trowsers, which are mine, were found on the prisoner when he was taken - the prisoner lodged in the next room to me for about a fortnight - he was at home when I went out that day - I told him I was going out, and if any one came, to give an answer.

JOHN HILL . I am inspector of the watch of Cripplegate Without. I was called that night about half-past ten o'clock- I found the box of the lock of the prosecutor's room broken off - this is part of it - they stated that the prisoner lodged in an adjoining room, and I thought him a very likely person to have done it - I forced his room door open, and found this plate, this piece of soap, this bit of carpet, and some bread and butter - I put a lock on the prisoner's door, and a notice that if any one wanted to go in, they might apply to me - I heard no more of it, but when the prisoner was in custody I gave the landlord possession of the room.

DENNIS HUDE . I took the prisoner on the 29th of March - he had these trowsers on - he said, "I know what you want me for; I am guilty, quite guilty."

WILLIAM GREEN. These are my trowsers, and these other things are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress, or I should not have done it.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-129

650. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 1 shirt, value 3s. ; the goods of David Isaacs .

DAVID ISAACS. I live in West-street, Smithfield . On the 29th of March, I was at my door, and saw my servant letting the prisoner out - she said, "There is a shirt gone from the back-kitchen" - I stopped the prisoner, and got an officer - the prisoner had lodged in my house about a fortnight - the shirt had been taken from the back-kitchen where he went to wash - he said, "For God's sake forgive me, I will tell you of all I have taken" - I had missed several things before - this is the shirt which I found on him.

Prisoner. I took it thinking it was my own.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18340410-130

651. GEORGE SHOUTER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 2 1/2 lbs. of rope, value 1s. 9d. , the goods of William Everton .

WILLIAM EVERTON. I am servant to Mr. William Everton - on the 5th of April, in the evening, I was drawing a truck which had four parcels in it, and some cord in a paper tied on one of the parcels - I was going down Houndsditch , and the rope was cut off, and taken away - this is it.

CHARLES BOLTON . I was standing inside my shop in Houndsditch, and saw this truck going down - the prisoner and another were going along the pavement; they looked very hard at the truck - I opened the door and saw the prisoner step off the pavement, and go to the back of the truck - he seemed to do something to it - he then came on the pavement again, then went to the truck, then came on the pavement again, and so he kept on for some distance - he then went to the truck, took out this paper parcel, and came back as far as Church-row - the patrol was there - I stepped to the patrol, and told him to take him - the prisoner then turned up Church-row, and ran as fast as he could - when he got near the end, he threw this parcel over the church wall; he was then taken.

JOHN FORRESTER . I was called and took the prisoner to the Compter - this is the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and was accused of robbing some man's cart.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined for Six Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-131

652. RICHARD JACKSON HUNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 2 razors, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Henry Peach Buckler , his master .

HENRY PEACH BUCKLER. I am a wool-broker - the prisoner has been in my employ three or four years, to sweep out the counting-house, clean boots and shoes , and so on - I had dismissed him two or three weeks - I afterwards had my place unlocked, and a great many things stolen - then made inquiries, and found these razors at a pawnbroker's.

HENRY FREAKS . I live at Mr. Smith's, a pawnbroker, in Old-street Road - I have two razors which were pawned by a woman in the name of Mary Hunter - I have seen the prisoner, but he did not pawn them.

WALTER MABERLY CURTIS . I am clerk to the prosecutor - about the last week in January the prisoner told

me he was ordered to fetch the razors from the cutler's - I gave him the money - he brought it back and said they were not done.

H. P. BUCKLER. These are my razors - I gave them to the prisoner to take to the cutler.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-132

653. RICHARD JACKSON HUNTER was again indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 umbrella, value 20s., the goods of Henry Peach Buckler , his master .

HENRY PEACH BUCKLER. The prisoner was in my service - I missed several articles, and among the rest this umbrella, which I found at the pawnbroker's - it was pawned by the prisoner's mother.

HENRY FREAKS . I have an umbrella pawned by a woman.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-133

654. THOMAS ASHMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 1 coat, value 3l., and 1 cap, value 3s. ; the goods of Charles Gunning ; and GEORGE BONNOR was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen , against the Statute, &c.

CHARLES GUNNING. On Monday last I arrived from Bath by Cooper's coach, which stopped at the corner of Farringdon-street and Fleet-street - I had never been in London before, and I asked the guard how far it was to the Angel Inn, St. Clement's, that I might know how much to give the cab-man - I called a cab, of which Ashman, the prisoner, was the driver - I asked him his fare, he said 3s. - I said I would not give it - he then said 2s; but previously to this I had thrown my great coat into his cab - I then called a second cab, and had turned the corner, when I thought of my coat - I said I would get my coat which I left in the other cab - I turned round the corner, but Ashman and his cab were gone - I went in the second cab to St. Clement Danes - I then went to the station-house, and gave information - the prisoner Ashman was taken - I am positive he is the man in whose cab I left my coat.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Had you ever seen Ashman before? A. No; I did not see him for two minutes - I had travelled all night, and was fatigued - I am positive he is the man - this was as near eight o'clock as possible by my watch: it was not quite eight.

EDWARD ABINGDON . I saw the prosecutor arrive at Farringdon-street - I saw him hail a cab, but I was not near enough to hear what he said - I saw they could not agree, and another cab was called - I saw a great coat in the first cab he called, and Ashman, who was the driver of it, turned his cab and galloped off - the prosecutor came back, and he was off the stand - in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, Ashman came back to the stand - I told the policeman, and while I was talking to him, Ashman got a fare, and went off - I had taken the number of his cab, it was No. 901 - I was sent for to the watch-house about one o'clock, and found Ashman there.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite positive Ashman is the man you saw the first time? A. Yes; he is the driver of the first cab that the coat was put into - I do not think I can be deceived - I swear he is the man.

HENRY JEBBETT (City police-constable, No. 38). At a quarter past nine o'clock on Monday morning Mr. Abingdon told me of this, and said, "That is the man," pointing to Ashman, on the stand - I said, "Be careful what you say; are you positive as to the identity of the man?"- he said, "Yes" - Ashman then drove away; but I took him about one o'clock, in Fleet-street, as he was plying for hire.

WILLIAM WILSON (police-sergeant E 12). Yesterday morning, a waterman came and told me a cab-man was wanted, for stealing a coat and cap, and he would point him out to me - I waited till he came in, and he pointed out Bonnor - he said, there was a man in Newgate to be tried, who was innocent, and Bonnor was the man - I spoke to Bonnor about it - he said, "I have the coat and cap, which were thrown into my cab, they are at my lodging" - I went with him, and got them - these are them.

EDWARD ABINGTON. Bonnor is not the cabman.

CHARLES GUNNING. Bonnor is not the cabman.

Bonner. Q. Did you not say to me, when I said I would take you for 2s. 6d., "No, no, old boy, you are not going to play your London tricks with me?" Witness. No; I never saw you before.

Bonnor's Defence. I was the first cab on the rank, and the prosecutor called me, but we could not agree for price, and he called another cab and went off - I then got into my cab, and found the coat and cap in it - I took them home, and yesterday morning, when the policeman came, I gave them to him - there were plenty of people who knew I had them.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am waterman on the stand in Farringdon-street. I was there last Monday morning - I saw the prosecutor call a cab, which was driven by the prisoner Bonnor - it was not Ashman - he was not there for twenty minutes afterwards.

COURT. Q. What time was this? A. About ten minutes before eight o'clock - the prosecutor called the cab that Bonnor drove first, and in two or three minutes he complained of losing his coat - I did not tell the gentleman that the driver was a red haired man - I said I knew the man very well, but I did not know his name or number - I know Ashman, by seeing him on the stand, but I will swear that Ashman was not on the stand that morning, till after Bonnor had gone off with the coat - Bonnor had a black horse - I never noticed the colour of Ashman's horse - they both had yellow cabs, but not from the same yard - one lives at Walworth, and the other in Theobald's Road - I have been two days and nights looking for Bonnor.

JAMES PARRINGER . I am a cabman. I was on the stand in Farringdon-street, on Monday morning - the prosecutor called Bonnor's cab - there was no other cab there, but Bonnor's and mine, and one coach - Ashman was not there - I drove the prosecutor to St. Clement's.

JAMES LEE . I am a cabman. I was standing on the stand - I saw the prosecutor call Bonnor's cab - Ashman was not there.

THOMAS CLARK . I am fellow-servant with Ashman. On Monday morning last, I was in our yard with him at Bronti Mews, East-place, Walworth - I had been out with the cab all night, and got home at half-past seven o'clock - I then took off my clothes, washed the cab, put the horse

to, and started Ashman out of the yard, at ten minutes before eight - I looked at the clock - Bonnor's cab is No. 1097.

ASHMAN - GUILTY . Aged 28.

BONNOR - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-134

655. WILLIAM FIGGINS , THOMAS SOOKIN , and FREDERICK RASON were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Edward Davies , from his person .

EDWARD DAVIES. I was going down Bridge-street , on the 1st of April, near half-past eleven o'clock at night - I had a handkerchief in my pocket - when I got on the bridge, a gentleman told me that three fellows had been following me from the corner of Bridge-street - I felt, and missed my handkerchief - he said, if I chose, he would go with me and point them out - we ran on to Rowland Hill's chapel, but could not find them - we turned back and met with them - this is my handkerchief.

JOHN POCOCK . I saw the three prisoners in company, and following this gentleman - I did not see them do any thing, but I assisted in taking them - I found this handkerchief in Figgins's breast pocket.

JOHN DRINKWATER . I am a watchman of Blackfriars'-bridge - the prosecutor told me he had been robbed - we crossed over the bridge, and took these prisoners at the corner of Chapel-street.

THOMAS FRANCIS BROWN . I was night officer - the prisoners were brought into the watch-house - I found this handkerchief in Figgins's pocket.

Figgins's Defence. I was returning from the Surrey theatre - I found this handkerchief, and took it up - I came on and was taken.

Sookin's Defence. I had been out with Rason from two o'clock - we were coming over the water, and a man came and took us.

FIGGINS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

SOOKIN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

RASON - GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-135

OLD COURT. - Monday, April 14th.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

656. JANE BURK was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 7 sovereigns, the monies of Henry Benjamin Wright , in his dwelling-house .

HENRY BENJAMIN WRIGHT. I live in Tooley-street . I employed the prisoner - on the 29th of March, she came early in the morning to clean my rooms - I left her between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, in the bed-room up stairs - I had seven sovereigns and a half in that bed-room, in the top drawer of a chest - I had seen it that morning - the drawer was not locked - when I had finished breakfast, I went up stairs to get some money; and, on going to the drawer, I missed seven sovereigns - she was not in the room then, but had gone out about five minutes- my purse was not gone - I immediately went down stairs, went in search of a policeman, and went with him to where she lived - I found her concealed in a neighbour's house; in a hole, at the bottom of the house, under the stairs - the policeman took her out, and four sovereigns were found near a water butt near the hole - we went to her lodging, and found three sovereigns loose in her bed - nobody but the prisoner had any opportunity of going to my apartment that morning - I have two rooms in the house - the door was not locked - somebody might have gone in, but, being in the room underneath, I think I must have heard them - I heard nobody go in but her - my half-sovereign was left in the purse.

WILLIAM METCALF . I am an officer. I went in search of the prisoner, and found her concealed in a cellar hole, underneath the house, No. 7, Oxford-buildings - she was given into my charge - I said nothing to induce her to make a confession - she said, "What am I taken into custody for?"- I said, "For taking ten sovereigns, I believe, from the gentleman's house you work at" - she said, "It is a falsity" - I said, "The gentleman informs me nobody but you have been in the apartment, and you are accused of it" - she seemed much confused, and said, "I have taken only four" - we went on to the office - I said, "You have acknowledged to four, and you will be condemned of the other six" - she said, "I only took these four" - I said,"It appears very black against you" - she said, "Very well, I did take three more, which makes seven; and, so help me God, that is all I did take."

EDMUND COX . I was present when the prisoner was taken - I gave her to a brother officer; and returned to search - I found four sovereigns under the water butt, near where she was concealed - I saw three sovereigns found in the bed she and her sister slept in - the prisoner herself said it was her bed.

WILLIAM MORLEY . I was with the officer when the three sovereigns were found - I produce them.

Prisoner. It is the first time I have ever been charged - I am very sorry for being here.

GUILTY of stealing, not in the dwelling-house . Aged 17. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-136

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

657. LOUIS JOSEPH JOHN NOEL, alias John Noel , was indicted for that he, on the 1st of November, (1st William IV.,) at Westminster , having in his custody and possession a certain Bill of Exchange, bearing date the 2nd of June, 1830, and drawn by the said Louis Joseph John Noel, alias John Noel, upon Lionel Goldsmid ; and whereby the said Louis Joseph John Noel, alias John Noel, requested the said Lionel Goldsmid, six months after the date thereof, to pay the said Louis Joseph John Noel, alias John Noel's order £30, and endorsed by the said Louis Joseph John Noel alias John Noel - feloniously did forge on the back of the said Bill of Exchange an endorsement thereof, which is as follows, "W. Nesbett," with intent to defraud the said William Nesbett , against the Statute, &c.

2nd COUNT, for offering, uttering, disposing of, and putting off, a like forged endorsement of a like Bill of Exchange, with the like intent, well knowing it to be forged.

MR. ALLEY conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN IRELAND . I am clerk to Daniel Richardson - I have a Bill of Exchange (producing it).

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How came that

Bill in the possession of Mr. Richardson? A. It was given to him by Mr. Crook to sue the parties - Crook is an auctioneer in Skinner-street - we were to sue the acceptor and endorser, not the drawer - I think it was placed in our hands for that purpose in the beginning of 1831 - I believe shortly after it arrived at maturity - Mr. Crook held the bill from Radford, a sheriff's officer - I called on him several times about it - proceedings were taken, and afterwards stayed, on an arrangement between the parties - Mr. Noel signed a cognovit - he was a party to the arrangement by which these proceedings were stayed - I never saw Mr. Nesbett, the endorser, in my life, till this indictment was found - I do not know how the bill came to remain in our office for three or four years - I suppose it was by mere oversight.

WILLIAM NESBETT. I am a coal merchant . In 1830 I was acquainted with the prisoner - I knew him for a great many years - he has acted as my solicitor occasionally - this bill is drawn by a Mr. Goldsmid for £30 - the endorsement on it is not my handwriting - I never authorized the prisoner or anybody else to put that name on the bill - Mr. Noel has copied my hand repeatedly, and said, "See, I can do what I like with you, Nesbett" - I never signed this, nor authorized him to do it - I always told him never to do such a thing - I think this indictment was preferred last Session.

Q. As upwards of three years have elapsed, give an explanation why this prosecution did not commence sooner? A. I was taken out of my bed on an execution of the cognovit - when the cognovit came due I had a letter sent to me- I was sent to prison, and continued in prison twenty-two months - I was compelled to take the benefit of the Insolvent Act - those are the causes why proceedings were not sooner instituted.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You speak of being a coal merchant, how lately were you a coal merchant? A. I believe it is ever since I was taken into custody - I could not do business - I believe that is three years ago next July - I have only dealt in a few chaldrons since I have been out of business - I dealt in coals until I went to prison - since I have been out of prison I have been supported by a young gentleman, named McBeath, who is a godson of mine - no gentleman, named Bond, has helped to support me - I know two persons named Bond - I never was in Bond's house knowingly - I was never in a house where he carried on a gaming-table, to my knowledge - I do not know that ever he did keep a house that I was in - I was never in a house where gaming was going on, and where Mr. Bond was present at the time: that I am certain of- I know the Bonds by knowing their mother about thirty years ago - I have heard one of them is named Ephraim, and believe the other is Joseph - I saw them last, three, four, or five months ago - I met them.

Q. Do you happen to know whether Mr. Noel has been prosecuting these gentlemen for keeping a gaming-house? A. I know nothing of it, Sir.

Q. Look at this, and tell me if that acceptance is your handwriting? (handing him a paper No. 1). A. Why, really it may be, but I cannot swear positively to it, for I do not know that I ever wrote so bad as this - I do not mean to say that this is not my handwriting - I rather think this one is something like it (No. 2) - on my oath I cannot swear whether it is my handwriting or not - I am doubtful of it, because the N is not like mine, and the W, but it probably may be - I know my own handwriting - it may be mine; most likely it is - on my oath I cannot tell whether it is my handwriting - it may be; but I am doubtful of it - this one (No. 3) is like that - it is doubtful - it is not like my handwriting at all; but it may be - I rather think the W looks like mine, and it may probably be my handwriting; but it is not like my handwriting, which I always generally write - the W is something like mine, but the s is not mine to my knowledge - I never made such an S as this in my life, to my knowledge - but probably it may be - (looking at a paper, No. 4) - this is my handwriting, and yet there is an alteration in the s; but yet I believe it is my handwriting - (looking at a paper, No. 5) - yes; that is my handwriting, and you will see it is not like the rest - this is my handwriting - (No. 6) - the endorsement on the bill in question, is not my handwriting - I never did such a thing - it was through this bill, that I took the benefit of the Insolvent Act - I think it was in last September, six months ago, that I was discharged - I think it was in September that I appeared in the Insolvent Court - I never knew of Mr. Crook, nor heard of him till I was taken in execution by him through the cognovit, which the prisoner signed - I was taken out of bed through the cognovit; before that I had a letter sent to me - I never signed any cognovit - I never signed that cognovit.

COURT. Q. The question was, did you ever sign any cognovit? A. I don't recollect that I ever did.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you sign that cognovit on which you were taken in execution? A. I never knew of it - I never signed it - I never knew of the action till I was taken out of my bed.

Q. Do you mean to tell me you were taken in execution and carried to prison at the suit of Mr. Crook on this cognovit? A. Yes, I was certainly - I never was released, and when I took the benefit of the Act, that was against me - I certainly was detained on that at the time I took the benefit of the Act - I don't know to the contrary - I don't know that it was settled in any way before - I had no other bill transactions in any way whatever, in which Mr. Crook could be a creditor of mine, except that Bill of Exchange - I don't believe the writing on these sheets of parchment to be mine (looking at some) - they are not like it - I could swear they are not (looking at one of them) - I think I could swear positively this is not my handwriting - the second is my handwriting - the first is not - I don't believe the third is - here is another, which I rather think is my handwriting - I cannot give you an opinion - there is a great deal of difference in it - there is a great appearance of mine - the top of this, I have in my hand, appears like my writing, but I don't believe the second is, at the bottom - I went into the Insolvent Debtors' Court, and was discharged- I then swore to my schedule.

WILLIAM JOHN McBEATH . I am a solicitor - I have known Mr. Nesbett as long as I can remember - I don't believe the name Nesbett on the back of this bill to be like Nesbett's handwriting.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Are you acquainted with a gentlemen named Bond? A. Yes - I have known them as long as I can remember, only as neighbours

- I don't follow the same calling as they do - I don't know what they profess to be - they lived in Norfolk-street, Strand- I lived there - they also lived in St. James's-street - I have been in the habit of visiting them in St. James's-street for the last three years - I can't say whether they keep the house there or lodge there - it is a private house - the house in Norfolk-street is a private house now, and was so when they lived in it - they did not live in St. James's-street and Norfolk-street at the same time - they lived with their mother in Norfolk-street.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Noel acts as solicitor against those persons for keeping a gambling-house? A. I have heard so - I have not said it was for keeping a gambling-house - I never saw the indictment - I have been on intimate terms with Nesbett - I am not the person who introduced him to the Bonds - he has been there with me - I cannot exactly remember when I last saw the Bonds, but it was within a week - we have spoken of this prosecution certainly - it has been a general conversation amongst all the acquaintance - Mr. Nesbett has been present at the conversation - I have been with his solicitor, but cannot say whether he has, when Bonds were present.

Q. On your oath, do not you appear as a witness at the instigation of the Bonds? A. No; Mr. Storvill is the attorney, who conducts this prosecution - I do not know whether he is an acquaintance of Bonds - I did not say I had seen them together - I said, it was a general subject of conversation - I never saw Mr. Storvill in the presence of the Bonds - I am very well acquainted with the handwriting of Nesbett - I think he generally writes alike in his signatures, or I could not swear to his handwriting - I could name two or three peculiarities in the endorsement of the bill in question - the W is not like his at the commencement - it is not made like his W - it wants the curl at the commencement - it is not upright enough, nor round enough, nor thick enough - the whole of the signature is not thick enough - it is something like his handwriting - the last "bett" is like it, if it was thicker - he cannot write so fine as this.

Q. Does not the fineness or thickness of a man's writing depend on how he chooses to lean on his pen? A. I should think so; or the pen itself - I cannot swear he could not write so fine, if he tried - he does not generally write so fine - any person intimately acquainted with his handwriting would say this is not his.

Q. Now look at that (No. 3:) do you believe that acceptance to be in his handwriting? A. The W does not look like it, but I think the "Nesbett" is his handwriting- you see it is crossed over, but I cannot give so correct an opinion on this, as the other, because this is not crossed- I should say the "Nesbett" is his handwriting, but I do not think the W is - it has not the curl - I think the"Nesbett" is his handwriting, and the W not - I will not swear to it as the N is like his writing - he is in the habit of signing "Wm." - the m is not always legible (looking at No. 2), I believe this to be his handwriting this (No. 1) is the most like his handwriting of any - I have no doubt at all about it - (looking at No. 4) I have my doubts about this - I think it is his, but I have my doubts - I should say it was his handwriting.

Q. Now, look at the signatures on these parchments: what do you say to those sheets? A. This is decidedly - so is this - so is this; and so is the other - the two signatures on the last page of the parchment are exactly like his- I find two W's with the commencing loop - here are six signatures all together; five on the parchment, and one on the paper - all the signatures are his - the fifth parchment has two signatures - here are more than two W's with loops; for I see two are signed on both sides of the parchment - (looking at a deed of composition) - this signature is the handwriting of Mr. Nesbett.

JURY. Q. Were you in the habit of seeing the prosecutor write seven years ago? A. Yes, frequently - perhaps infirmity may have made him write more tremulous now - I should think there was no difference in his hand - I cannot speak positively, because men do not always write alike - I have not observed any difference, unless it is more tremulous.

JOSEPH LAYBURN . I am a stable-keeper, and live in New-road, Chelsea - I know Mr. Nesbett, and have seen him write several times - I do not believe his name on the back of this bill to be his handwriting.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Why do you believe it not to be his? A. I have seen bills I have paid him, and bills he paid me - his writing is more likely to be written with a grimey stick than this - it is stronger - the W turns differently altogether - the beginning of the W is different in the turn - this has got no turn at all - he makes an open turn, a turn like that - (writing the letter W on a piece of paper) - I consider it altogether not like his - I consider his W is as open as that I have made - he always writes the W so; and that one letter in particular not being written so, I do not believe it to be his.

Q. Look at the acceptance on this bill (No. 1) - tell me if you believe that to be Nesbett's handwriting? A. No, I do not think this is. - (Looking at No. 2) - I do not think this is his handwriting, according to my knowledge - I do not consider this (No. 3) is his; nor this (No. 4) - I do not believe the W. Nesbett on this first parchment to be his handwriting (looking at the parchment) - I do not believe the second sheet to be his handwriting; nor the third, to my knowledge - I do not believe it is - I do not believe the fourth to be his, not according to my knowledge of his handwriting; nor the fifth.

Q. You do not believe any one signature on these parchments to be his? A. Not to my knowledge of his writing - I know Joseph Bond, who lives in Salisbury-street - he never lived in St. James's-street to my knowledge - he lodged in Norfolk-street, and kept a house in Salisbury-street, I believe - I never had any thing to do with his brother Ephraim - there is such a person certainly; but I know nothing of him - I have no connexion with him - I have lent his brother Joseph horses and chaises - I know Mr. McBeath very well, and I know his mother - I am bail for him - I do not know whether it is in a civil case for a debt, or for a prosecution - I entered into the bail at the Judge's chambers.

Q. On your oath, do not you know it is for keeping a gaming-house? A. I never was told so - I am bail for him for 40l.

FOSTER EDWARD CHELL . I am an attorney. My father was clerk to Mr. Justice James Parke, but he is

dead - I do not believe the endorsement on this bill, in the name of Nesbett, is the prosecutor's signature - I have seen him write frequently.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Who applied to you to give an opinion on this? A. I was applied to last Saturday by Mr. McBeath, who has been an acquaintance of mine for the last eight or nine years - I sometimes do business for him as agent - I know Layburn - I have seen him here this morning - I was never in any matter concerned for McBeath in which Layburn became bail for him - I should say it is five months ago since I saw Nesbett write - I think I can form a tolerable opinion of his handwriting by the character of the W - his handwriting is stiffer than that signature, and I do not think he writes so well.

Q. Look at the signature to that bill (No. 1), do you believe that to be his handwriting or not? A. I do, in consequence of the curl at the commencement of the W - this one (No. 2) is something like it - I believe it to be his handwriting - there is a thick mark, and a slight curl, but not particularly round. - (Looking at No. 3) - I never saw him write in this way before - I believe "Nesbett" to be his handwriting, but not the W. - this looks like his handwriting(No. 4) - I believe it to be his - I believe all the signatures on these five skins of parchment to be his handwriting - (looking at the deed of composition) the character of the W is like his handwriting, but the N is not - it is in the style of his handwriting - I believe it to be his.

MR. ALLEY. Q. These things have all been shown to you to-day for the first time? A. I never saw them before; and this bill I never saw till half-past nine o'clock this morning.

WILLIAM JOHN McBEATH re-examined. Q. The witness says he was bail for you, what was it for? A. Keeping a gaming-house - I have not been concerned in keeping a gaming-house - the charge is brought to invalidate my testimony in this case - Mr. Noel, I believe, is the attorney in that prosecution - I know he applied for the certificate of the indictment, and offered the officer a guinea to do it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You heard that, did you? A. Yes: I was not present.

WILLIAM RATFORD . I am a sheriff's officer. I received this bill from Mr. Noel - Mr. Nesbett's name was on it at that time - I cashed it for him.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Had you known Mr. Noel before that transaction? A. Yes; a great many years - I also knew Mr. Nesbett - I knew there were a good many cash and bill transactions between them - I have heard Nesbett say he has endorsed and cashed bills for Noel - I gave this bill to Mr. Crook - it was not paid when it came due - I saw Mr. Nesbett a good many times on it before procedings were taken at all - he said it was an accommodation - he has never denied but what it was his endorsement - only he said it was accommodation to serve Noel - I should not have gone to law with him if I had thought it had been any thing else - he always informed me that it was an accommodation; that I must go to Mr. Noel for the money, for he had accommodated Mr. Noel with it.

Q. For what purpose did he come to you? A. He was afraid I would proceed against him, because I threatened I would, as the endorser of the bill - I was in the habit of meeting him at Mr. Noel's office a good many times - perhaps ten times - it was a long while after he was arrested - I do not think I saw him at my house - after proceedings were taken, the action was stayed on an arrangement.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Were you present when the arrangement was made? A. I was obliged to consent to it - I believe Nesbett was not present.

MR. BODKIN. Q. After proceedings were taken, did you see Nesbett on the subject? A. I cannot say that I did - I received the acceptance of other persons, on account of the bill - Nesbett was the endorser of the bill I received- I have one of the bills here - this is one of the bills I received in exchange for this - Nesbett is the drawer of that bill - I believe it is the same hand - no doubt the prosecutor is the person who called on me about the bill.

MR. ALLEY. Q. At the time you had a conversation with the prosecutor about the bill, the bill, I believe, was in the hands of Crook? A. It was.

COURT. Q. Did the prosecutor expressly admit the endorsement was his signature, or that he had authorized anybody to sign it for him? A. He has admitted it is his handwriting, because he said, "I did it for accommodating Mr. Noel - I accommodated him with my name to serve him" - those were the very words he used - I swear positively that the prosecutor made that admission that it was his handwriting, and he did it to accommodate Noel - I do not think there was any body present, I cannot say; when I was talking to Nesbett he was speaking of the indorsement of the bill - I had not got the bill - I had no other bill on his endorsement to which it could apply.(Mr. Alley here withdrew from the prosecution.)

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18340410-137

658. JAMES WHEATLEY and JAMES TAYLOR were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of James Farnell , from his person .

JAMES FARNELL. I am a schoolmaster . On the 2nd of July last, I was on Westminster-bridge , about five o'clock in the afternoon - I am a stranger in London, and was on a visit - I did not feel any tug myself at my pocket; but somebody informed me my pocket was picked - that person is here - I turned round, but I did not see the prisoners till I had gone back a few yards - they were four or five yards behind me - they were pointed out to me as having picked my pocket - I saw my handkerchief, in five minutes, in possession of Taylor - I saw my brother take it from him - they were taken into custody directly - I have had the handkerchief ever since - this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. PARKER. Q. Has it not been mixed with others? A. Yes; I have sent it to the wash since.

THOMAS FARNEL . I was with my brother - a person said his pocket had been picked - we went back, and I saw both the prisoners about a yard or two from each other - I took my brother's handkerchief from Taylor, and they were secured.

Cross-examined. Q. Wheatley was a yard or two from Taylor? A. Yes; there was not a great crowd; persons were passing as usual.

RICHARD GARDNER . I am a policeman. I received charge of the prisoners.

SAMUEL POPE . I am a coal-merchant. On the 2nd of July, (the opening of the new Hungerford market,) I was riding over Westminster-bridge - I observed the prisoners pressing rather close upon the prosecutor's heels - I suspected them, turned my horse round, and watched them - they followed him up one side of the bridge, and crossed over when he did - and directly he got over, I saw Wheatley distinctly take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to Taylor - I rode on and told the prosecutor - I got off my horse, and took both the prisoners - a crowd assembled, and the handkerchief was taken from Taylor's trowsers pocket - he said he had picked it up.

Cross-examined. Q. There was a crowd of persons? A. Yes; more persons than usual were on the bridge - I can positively swear to them - I cannot be mistaken - there were a number of persons on the bridge looking at the ceremony of the market being opened.

Taylor's Defence. I never saw Wheatley in my life before I was taken - I picked up the handkerchief.

JURY to MR. POPE. Q. You say there was a considerable crowd on the bridge when you observed them pick the pocket - do you think it was possible for you during the time you got off your horse, to lose sight of the prisoners so long as not to be able to be certain of them again? A. I was watching them from one end of the bridge to the other- I have not a doubt of them.

WHEATLEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-138

*** The indictments, in the cases No. 659 to 665 inclusive, were found by the Grand Jury at the last September Sessions, when the prisoners stated that they had been previously convicted at the Middlesex Sessions at Hicks' Hall, but were unable to produce a copy of the record. The Court granted time for an application to the Court of King's Bench for a mandamus, calling upon the Court to furnish the said copy. Upon Bowman being brought up at the last Session, he put a plea of autre-fois convict, and a copy of the record; the Court granted till the present Sessions, for the Crown to reply; and they having now put in a replication of nul tiel record the Court decided, on the production of the original record by the proper officer from Clerkenwell, that the said replication was good. The prisoner then pleaded, "Not guilty." The other prisoners, having agreed to rest their cases upon the decision in the above case, also pleaded, "Not guilty."

659. JAMES BOWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of June , 2 towels, value 2s.; 1 habit-shirt, value 6d.; 1 cap, value 6d.; 3 stockings, value 6d., the goods of George Scott : 1 shift, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 2 aprons, value 1s.; and 1 cap, value 6d. , the goods of Sarah Helen .

THOMAS GRANT . I live with Mr. Scott, of Conduit-street, Bond-street . About nine o'clock in the morning of the 22nd June, I saw the prisoner running out of the back kitchen - I followed him up the area steps - he appeared very bulky - I ran and collared him - he was running away - I brought him back - he was a perfect stranger - the policeman took some of these articles from him, and some he took himself - the area gate was left on the latch, I believe.

JOHN BALDWIN . I am a policeman. I was called and took him into custody - I found his hat full of things - I have not got them now.

SARAH HELEN. I live with Mr. Scott. Part of the property was mine, and part Mr. Scott's - two towels, a habit shirt, cap, and three stockings, belong to him - they are not here - I saw them when the prisoner was taken into custody - none of the property is here - I have left Mr. Scott since, and did not keep the things - they were produced at Clerkenwell, and I identified them - they were mine and my master's property.

GUILTY . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-139

660. FRANCIS POWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of John Willmott , from his person .

JOHN WILLMOTT. I am prompter at Drury-lane Theatre . On the 30th June, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Drury-lane - I had just used my handkerchief, and put it in my outside coat pocket - I almost instantly felt a twitch - I turned round and saw the prisoner, and said, "You have my pocket handkerchief" - he instantly ran across the road - a gentleman caught him, and said, "What has he done?" - the gentleman put his hand to his side pocket, and drew it out - I gave him in charge - I had the handkerchief, but it is worn out now - I am certain it was mine.

ROBERT DRIVER . I am a policeman. I received him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Drury-lane just by Leg-alley - I saw a handkerchief on the ground - I picked it up - nobody owned it, and I put it into my pocket.

GUILTY. Aged 12. - Recommended to mercy on account of his youth . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-140

661. WILLIAM ABLE and CHARLES REDDING were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 25lbs. weight of fat, value 5s. , the goods of Francis Brewer .

WILLIAM GRANT . On the 29th of June, I lived with Francis Brewer, a grocer and cheesemonger , in Grayhound-row, Kensington gravel-pits - about eleven o'clock at night I was in the coal-shed, and heard a noise - it was something falling off the wall - I came out, and saw the shed where we keep the kitchen stuff, which is about five yards from the house, broken open - the lock of the door was broken - I saw the prisoner Able jump over the wall - I knew him before by seeing him in the neighbourhood - it was a moonlight night - the policeman came down to the back gate and asked if we had lost any kitchen-stuff - I said, "Yes"- the prisoners had been taken with it on their backs - I went to the station-house, and saw about 25lbs. of fat, which appeared like master's - I went to the shed and missed half a tub of fat, which was safe half an hour before - it would weigh about 25 lbs.

JOHN BELTON . I am a policeman. I was on duty about 150 yards from the prosecutor's house, and met the prisoners - Redding was carrying a bag of fat on his back- I did not stop them then; but afterwards hearing a noise at the back of Mr. Brewer's premises, I made inquiry - I then went in the direction they had gone, and met the prisoners in about twenty-five minutes coming from a brick-field, where they had hid the fat - they were wiping their hands on dry straw, and they were all over fat; their hands and faces also - I took them both in custody; and found the fat in the brick-field which they were

coming from, concealed under some straw - they did not work in the brick-field - there was about 25lbs.

ABLE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

REDDING - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined for One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-141

662. JOHN POPLE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Peppin , from his person .

THOMAS PEPPIN. On the 29th of June, I was in Whitechapel about five o'clock in the afternoon - I felt something at my back - I turned round, and a young man named Templeman told me my pocket was picked, and gave the prisoner into my charge - I collared him - the policeman came up and said, "There is the handkerchief"- I looked down at my side, and there it laid - the handkerchief has been mixed with others - I knew it before the magistrate, and at Clerkenwell - I was certain of it.

THOMAS TEMPLEMAN . I was watering the pavement, and saw a young man pick the prosecutor's pocket, and hand the handkerchief to the prisoner, who received it - I collared him - he was close to the other man - he put it into his right hand pocket - I gave him to the prosecutor, then went and took the other, but we struggled, and he got away.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined for One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-142

663. JOSEPH TIPLING was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN HAMLIN . I am a basket and chair-maker . On the 2nd of March , last year, the prisoner was my apprentice , and had been so about six months - I employed him to receive money at times - it was his duty to do so - I commissioned him to receive this bill - I do not recollect that he had ever received money for me before - Dunkley owed me 1l. 18s. 6d.

WILLIAM DUNKLEY . I am a chair-maker. I owed Hamlin 1l. 18s. 6d. - on the 2nd of March I was present, when my father paid the prisoner one sovereign - I entered it in this book, and took his receipt for it, which I have mislaid - I am sure he was paid 1l. on account - he wrote the whole receipt himself.

Prisoner. He paid me 20s. in silver. Witness. It was a sovereign, to the best of my knowledge.

JOHN HAMLIN re-examined. I do not recollect his having received money before for me - he ought to have accounted for it - on the Sunday morning he gave me 15s., and said that was all he had received from Dunkley - he has shown a great deal of contrition; and I should not object to try him again - he has suffered a great deal - he may make a bright man yet.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will consider it is a very hard case - I have been nine months in suspense and great anxiety of mind - I have been sent on board the hulks, and to a ship, to be taken to my destination; then back to the hulks, and remained there five weeks, and then sent here, and brought up for the last six Sessions and put back.

GUILTY. Aged 19. - Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, believing it his first offence . - Confined for Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18340410-143

664. NEVILLE BAXTER , THOMAS HANKS , and WILLIAM HARBORD , were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Austen , from his person .

THOMAS TIPPER . I am a policeman. I was on duty on the 2nd of July at the opening of Hungerford market - I observed the three prisoners in company - I watched them some time - I saw them go round the market several times, and go behind Mr. Austen, who was looking at a balloon being filled with gas - I saw Austen examined at the office, and in court at Clerkenwell - he gave his name as Austen - I do not know the Christian name - I got the Christian name from a subpoena - I cannot tell it myself - he is in Devonshire. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-144

665. ANDREW CLANSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of John Gordon .

THOMAS RAY . I know Mr. John Gordon - he is a sailor , and lodged in Rosemary-lane - I was a policeman on duty in the lane on the 28th of June - he came to me and said he had been robbed of a pair of shoes in his lodging - I asked if he suspected anybody - he said yes, a man who was in the house - I went with him and took the prisoner, and found the shoes in pawn - I found an affidavit of the duplicate on him - it was delivered up when I got the shoes from the pawnbroker.

JAMES FINCH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in East Smithfield - on the 28th or 29th of June, the prisoner pawned the shoes - they were delivered to the prosecutor at Hicks's Hall - he is gone to the South Seas.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-145

666. DENNIS SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Abraham Ellis , on the 14th of January , at St. George's, and stealing therein, 1 carpet, value 10s.; 2 chairs, value 6s.; 1 hearthrug, value 3s.; and 3 yards of baize, value 4s.; his goods .(See 3rd Session, page 262.)

ELIZABETH LEE . I am the daughter-in-law of Abraham Ellis, who is a tailor , and lives in St. George's-court, William-street, Cannon-street-road - he rents the house, and lives in it - on Tuesday, the 14th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I closed the parlour-shutters; every thing was secure - I went into the parlour to fetch my bonnet and shawl - every thing was safe then. I went out at six o'clock, leaving Mr. Ellis and my sister in the house- I returned at eight o'clock - I did not go into the parlour - I went into the back room, and between nine and ten o'clock I went into the parlour, and missed these articles- I have recovered every thing - the parlour window was shut, but whether the catch was fast or not, I cannot tell; but I am sure the window was shut - the shutters were closed, but not bolted - they had entered through the window, which I found wide open, and the shutters.

CAROLINE HILL . I live at No. 24, London-terrace, Commercial-road - on Monday, the 13th of January, I had a furnished parlour to let - a woman named Bennet came and took it of me, and in the evening she brought a man who she said was her husband - his name is Thomas Pearson - they both came on the 13th, and did not go out till the next afternoon - they invited the prisoner to tea with them on the 14th - he came, and between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, Sullivan and Pearson went out

together, and were gone about a quarter of an hour - they brought in a small bundle, containing some wet linen, and four chairs; they went out again, and Pearson came home with a large bundle, which appeared to be the carpet-rug, and two pieces of baize - that was directly after he brought the chairs - I went out for a candle - I was not gone above two or three minutes, and met Sullivan in the court with two more chairs - he took them into the lodgers'-room - he went out again, and fetched another chair, which made seven chairs - he was gone hardly a minute - my sister bought the last three chairs, which Sullivan brought in next morning, and paid Bennet for them - Bennet asked me to let the other chairs remain in my kitchen, and there they remained till the constable found them - Bennet opened the bundle containing wet things, and dried them before the fire.

Prisoner. Q. In what way do you get your living? A. By my husband's industry; he worked then at Spencer and Wood's, Goswell-street.

JAMES THOMPSON . I am a policeman. On taking the prisoner from the New Court, after being tried last Sessions, to the Compter, he said to me, "I am sure to be done this time, it is about the chairs in the Commercial-road"- Hill lives about two minutes' walk from the prosecutor.

ANN GOSS . I am the wife of John Goss . My sister(Hill) came to me on Wednesday, the 15th - I live in Plumber's-row - I bought three chairs of Elizabeth Bennet - my sister was present - the officer has got them - the prisoner laid in bed at the time I bought them.

WILLIAM DICKINSON . I am a policeman. Bennet was tried and convicted last Sessions - I returned all the property to the prosecutor last Sessions - the prisoner was not in custody at that time - I showed the chairs and property stated in the indictment to the prosecutor - they had been in my custody.

ELIZABETH LEE re-examined. I saw the chairs and carpets and things in the custody of the officer in the other court - I swear they belonged to my father-in-law, Abraham Ellis - I am quite sure of it.

Prisoner's Defence. On the night of the robbery, a young man and woman (the man had lived at my father's house) went and took a room at Hill's, and invited me to tea - they said the lodgings were furnished by themselves - that they had some property at a house, which they were going to remove that night to the lodging - they kept me till five o'clock in the afternoon - I went out with Pearson - he told me to wait at the top of London-terrace, while he brought the property to me - he gave me two chairs to carry, which I brought to the witness's house, and saw nothing of it since - I cannot say who the chairs belonged to - Hill is not to be believed; she lives in a state of prostitution, and has been twice in the House of Correction for robbing her lodgings.

CAROLINE HILL re-examined. I live with my husband.

JAMES THOMPSON . When I stopped Pearson, (who was tried,) the prisoner was with him, and ran away - I am certain of him, I knew him well before.

GUILTY .* Aged 19. - Transported for Life . - There were two other indictments against the prisoner for housebreaking.

Reference Number: t18340410-146

667. WILLIAM GOODLAD and CHARLES CANNON were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Hill , on the 26th of March , at St. Marylebone , and stealing therein 1 pair of cloth trowsers, value 3s.; 1 looking-glass, value 2s.; 1 writing-desk, value 5s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 4s.; 1 bookcase, value 6d.; and 1 pocket-book, value 2d., his goods .

EDWARD HILL. I live No. 6, Nightingale-street, Lissongrove , in the parish of St. Marylebone. My house consists of four rooms, two on the ground-floor, which I occupy - I am a single man, and Mr. and Mrs. Goldsmith occupy the second floor and two single men, Fife and Johnson - they are two distinct families - I went out between eight and nine o'clock in the evening of the 26th of March, and left Mrs. Goldsmith and her tenant up stairs - I shut the street door after me - I did not lock it, it shuts on the latch - I pulled it too - I am sure it was fastened, because I tried it - I left my room door shut but unlocked - I returned between nine and ten o'clock at night - I got into the house with a latch key, and found the front parlour door open; these trowsers were removed, and this book-case, looking-glass, tea-caddy, and other things - they were removed onto a table in front in the room, and some were moved on the dresser - nothing was carried out of that room - on going into the bed-room I saw the two prisoners standing behind the bed curtains at the foot of the bed - I knew Cannon before - the other was a stranger to me - Cannon was not a friend of mine - the bed-room door was left ajar when I went out - I got hold of Goodlad and said,"I have got you" - he made no answer - I brought them into the front parlour and sat them in a chair - I only knew Cannon by seeing him about - I found my property moved from where I had left it - some things which were in the drawer before, I found then on the table - I sent for a policeman - I found a dark lanthorn and crow-bar there, and some picklock keys on a drawer - I had not left them there - I could not ascertain how the prisoners got in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. They might have been under the bed when you went out? A. No; there is no room under the bed - it is about eight inches from the ground - they could not creep under it, for there was an iron machine under it which would prevent their getting under it - it is a machine for an hospital bed - nobody lives in the rooms below stairs but myself - it is my dwelling-house - I did not go up to Mrs. Goldsmith - they might have been there, for what I knew - I am certain I did not leave my parlour door ajar - I lost nothing - nothing was removed except what I have mentioned - a portfolio was removed - I call it a book-case - I used to carry my primer in it when I used to go to school.

ELIZABETH GOLDSMITH . I and my children occupy a room in the prosecutor's house - I recollect Hill going out on the 26th of March, between eight and nine o'clock - I heard him shut the street door - I went out afterwards myself, a little before nine o'clock - when I went out I shut the street door close after me, and I locked Hill's parlour-door myself - the bed-room door has no lock on it - I returned in three or four minutes, found the street door and the parlour door secure as I had left them - I went up stairs, and went to bed - I am quite sure the street-door was shut - the other lodgers were not at home at that time - I have seen Cannon.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the name of the lodgers? A. Fife and Johnson - they had a room of their own - I

did not go into their room - I cannot be certain they were not at home - I am pretty sure they did not go down stairs and open the door.

COURT. Q. What time did you go to bed? A. A little after nine o'clock - my room and Fife's are close together.

DAVID LYNCH . I am a policeman. On the night of the 26th of March, I was on duty in Nightingale-street, and was informed I was wanted immediately - I went to the prosecutor's house and found the two prisoners both in the parlour sitting down - Hill went into the room, and brought out the crow-bar and dark lanthorn, and behind the bed he found the picklock-keys - I fitted the crow-bar with the mark on this desk - it seems to answer as near as can be- I took them into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. It was a door any body could open? A. A common latch key would open it - there is a latch key here which will not open it - but one of the skeleton keys will open the street-door when it is locked - there is no key that would unlatch it.

Goodlad's Defence. I was coming down the street with Cannon, and saw three men come out - Cannon knowing Mr. Hill, said, "Those men don't lodge there, let us go over and see what is the matter;" we went over, and just as we came to the parlour-door, the street-door blew to; we heard the street door opening; and he said, "I dare say here is the three men coming in again;" but Hill came in and accused us of the robbery.

EDWARD HILL re-examined. My parlour door had been opened in my absence - I found it ajar when I came in.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You left the street door latched? A. Yes; the lodgers had latch keys by which they could let themselves in.

MRS. GOLDSMITH re-examined. I had been into the prosecutor's room, and locked it after me, while he was out.

(William Gibson, a tailor; and George Mannington, of No. 15, Winchester-row, gave Goodlad a good character.)

GOODLAD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CANNON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18340410-147

664. WILLIAM WHAITE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 2 coats, value 42s.; 5 pair of trowsers, value 30s.; 5 waistcoats, value 20s.; 3 shirts, value 3s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of boots, value 5s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 4s.; 1 telescope, value 1s.; 1 book, value 4s.; 1 razor, value 2s.; 1 penknife, value 1s.; 1 set of fire-irons, value 18d.; 1 brass footman, value 2s.; 1 pair of candlesticks, value 2s.; 1 pair of snuffers and tray, value 6d.; and 1 tea-kettle, value 3s., the goods of Richard Kibley , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD KIBLEY. I live at No. 11, Little Queen-street, Edgeware-road , in the parish of St. Marylebone . The prisoner, his wife, and three children lodged with me for sixteen or eighteen months, and left on Sunday, the 30th of March, without notice - on going into my bed-room I missed the property stated in the indictment, which were worth about 5l. 6s. - some of them were left in his room, and others in my bed-room - I missed them all at one time - I missed two tea-spoons at the same time as the other things from the bed-room - I said before the magistrate that they were worth about 6l.

Prisoner. Some things he has mentioned were never in my room, which the inventory he gave me will prove. Witness. I gave him in his rent-book an inventory of the articles in the room - they were all included in the inventory - I rent the whole house.

GEORGE TURNER . I produce a pair of sugar-tongs and two tea-spoons - I am servant to John Thomas Bartram, pawnbroker, No. 26, Princess-street, Soho - I do not know who pawned them - it was a man.

JOHN EDWARD NEEDS . I live with Chaffers and Mills, pawnbrokers, Greek-street, Soho. I produce a coat, waistcoat, and trowsers pawned by the prisoner on the 31st of March - I have a waistcoat, another pair of trowsers, a book, and telescope - they were all pawned by him on the 31st of March, except the telescope, which was pledged on the 1st of April, in the name of William Brown.

JOHN MAY . I apprehended the prisoner on the 3rd of April, at the Robin Hood, Windmill-street, and found six duplicates on him - the prosecutor identified the clothes he was wearing - three of the duplicates led me to Chaffer's - and one to Bartram, for a pair of sugar-tongs and two tea-spoons.

GEORGE TURNER re-examined. I know this duplicate is in my handwriting, it was delivered to the person who pawned the tongs and tea-spoons.

RICHARD KIBLEY. These articles are mine; and the clothes he had on are mine.(The prisoner pleaded extreme poverty.)

RICHARD KIBLEY re-examined. He was perfectly sober - I never had the least occasion to complain of his dishonesty before - he appeared in distress - he behaved extremely well before - he has three children and a wife - he never had any employment while in my house, to my knowledge - he told me he had independant property, when he came to lodge with me - I have not recovered the blankets, nor any furniture, except the bolster and two pillows - I had other lodgers in the house.

GUILTY of stealing, to the value of 99s. Aged 49. - Confined for Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-148

669. JOHN SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Valentine James Ridler , about the hour of two in the night, on the 6th of April , at St. Andrew, Holborn , and burglariously stealing therein 3 pints of brandy, value 12s.; 1 bottle, value 6d.; 4 coats, value 5l.; 3 table-cloths, value 10s.; 2 towels, value 6d.; 1 shawl, value 3s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 10s.; 1 frock, value 2s.; 1 yard of linen cloth, value 9d.; 1 bag, value 1d.; and 76 farthings; the goods of John Smith .

VALENTINE JAMES RIDLER. I am proprietor of the Bell and Crown Tavern, Holborn , in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn. I keep the house - I am owner of it - I pay the rent and taxes - on the 6th of April, I was called up about five o'clock - it was twilight - I could see the features of a man, by the light of the day, I think - I found the things in the house very much disturbed - I went into the tap-room, and found the cupboard where the coats are kept broken open, and the coats removed - there of them were tied up, ready to be carried off - they were removed from their proper place, and tied up - I found the half-sash

of the bar thrown up, and another sash of the bar thrown up also - these sashes look into the bar, not into the street, but into what we call the tap kitchen - I imagine the parties had got in throgh a sash in the yard, which was found open - it opens into the yard - that would enable a person to get into the tap-room, which communicates with the tap kitchen, and then to the bar - the lower sash fastens, but the upper one which does not was drawn down - in that way he got into the tap-room from the yard, which communicates with the tap-room - he could then get to the tap kitchen, and into the bar - nothing was taken off the premises, but these coats were removed, and packed up.

ABRAHAM PACK . I am horse-keeper at the Bell and Crown. On the morning of the 6th of April, I was in the yard - I saw a man look out of the tap-room window - he lifted it open - it opens into the yard - I said to my fellow-servant, "There is a man looking out of the tap-room" - I looked into the room, and saw the cupboard-door open, and likewise the bar - the man went back - he was taken in the tap-room.

THOMAS JAMES . I am porter at the Bell and Crown. I slept in the house on the night of the 5th of April, and came down about five minutes after five o'clock, in consequence of an alarm, and pulled the sash down which was up - I looked in, and saw a man lying down in the tap-room - the light was clear enough to discern a man without the gas - I called master, and got the keys of the tap - I unlocked the tap door, and found the prisoner in the tap-room - I asked what brought him there - he said he had had a drop too much overnight, and fallen asleep - I found the cupboard door forced open - I observed some coats and a poker on the table - I did not move any thing until the watchman came - the value of the coats is 4l. or 5l., at least - I think they are worth 5l., but I am not certain.

JAMES EDGINGTON . I am porter at the Bell and Crown. I locked up the cupboard overnight, when I put the last coats in at half-past seven o'clock - it is the tap cupboard - I locked the tap up at half-past eleven o'clock- there was nobody in the tap when I locked it up - there were seven or eight coats in the cupboard - I have had the key in my pocket ever since - I took the key of the tap-room to my master at the bar - next morning the cupboard appeared to be broken, by forcing out a screw staple, which fastens the hasp in - it must have been done by great force - a hand could not do it - it would require some instrument to do it - a poker would do it - the poker was in the fire-place, when I left at night.

Q. In what way is it possible to get into the place from the yard? A. By pulling down the top sash of the window, looking into the yard - the yard is not accessible till the horse-keepers and people begin to be about in the morning - it is open before five o'clock - anybody getting in might pull the sash down and get through the tap-room and break open the cupboard - it could not have been done in any other way.

JOHN BEAN . I am a watchman of St. Andrew's, Holborn - a little after five o'clock, on the morning of the 6th of April, I was called, and found the prisoner in the tap-room - I took him to the watch-house - I found on him a towel and 1s. 7 1/2d., all in farthings, in an old leathern bag, three keys, and a piece of soap - this is the padlock which was wrenched off the coat-closet - I found this poker on the table, just against the cupboard - three coats were moved out of the back place into the front, ready to be taken away, and some table-linen, which our inspector has got (produced) - the three coats I have got were tied up in a bundle ready to be taken away - the bag of farthings was in his hat, which was on his head - every thing except the padlock was in his hat, when I searched him at the watch-house.

GEORGE CORBY . I am inspector of the watch. I went to the Bell and Crown with the watchmen, and examined a bundle in the tap-room, containing three table-cloths, two towels, one bottle of brandy, a tea-caddy, and a wrapper.

EDWARD RENTMORE . I am a watchman. I found a coat under the tap-room table, which I produce.

MARIA BROWN . I superintend the tap in the day time. I know this tea-caddy and linen belong to Mr. Ridler - they were left in the bar - there is a window between the bar and tap-room - one pane of glass in it was broken - it is a sliding window: that would enable any body to get to the screw to open it, by moving a slate which was placed against it - I locked the bar myself overnight, and fastened the screw of the window - this bag of farthings was left in the table drawer - I believe there were seventy-two farthings, but I am not quite sure about that - they amounted to 1s. 7d. - this linen is worth 10s. or 12s.

VALENTINE JAMES RIDLER re-examined. When I first went into the room, I found this bundle of linen, and other things - the coats are worth from 3l. to 5l.; the tea-caddy from 7s. to 9s.; the brandy 10s.; and the linen from 7s. to 10s.; the articles exceed 5l. in value all together - they are coachman's coats which cost from 6l. to 7l. when new.

GUILTY - Of stealing in a dwelling-house, but not of Burglary . Aged 26. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18340410-149

670. GEORGE DREW and MARTHA, the wife of THOMAS PICKARD , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Clark , about the hour of eight in the night of the 14th of March , at St. Botolph Without, Aldgate , and burglariously stealing therein 16 unmade waistcoats, value 2l., his goods ; and MARY, the wife of CHARLES ELLIOTT , for feloniously receiving, on the 18th of March , at the same parish, 5 unmade waistcoats, value 10s., part of the said goods, well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen , against the Statute.

2nd COUNT. For feloniously receiving from an evil-disposed person.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE MARCHANT . I am in the employ of Mr. John Clark, of Union-row, Sparrow-corner, Tower-hill , who is a slopseller in a very large way. On the 14th of March, we had a very large quantity of waistcoats in the shop, in the progress of being made - they were tied in parcel of eight each - they were cut out, but not sewed - they were tied with a string, but not wrapped in paper - I cannot say what parish the house is in - we had a pane of glass broken - it was broken the day before, and was unmended - on the 14th of March, the hole in it was large enough to admit a person's hand, when I saw it - it was not large enough to allow one of the parcels of waist

coats to be taken out - when I saw the glass on the Saturday, (which was the following morning) - I had occasion to put a large book before the window, the hole being much enlarged - I could not discover, whether any of the stock was taken away, by merely looking, but I could by examining the books - we never sell goods in an unfinished state.

COURT. Q. Was there any appearance of broken glass about the hole? A. I did not see any, because underneath the window is an area - I saw no glass that had fallen inside - the hole was very considerably enlarged - the book I put before it was a large folio, perhaps eighteen inches by twelve - I placed that against the open part of the glass.

Drew. He said at the office the window was out altogether, and he put a piece of square paper up. Witness. I never mentioned paper.

HENRY WARE . I am going on for fifteen years old. I live at No. 1, Ingram's-buildings, Willow-gardens, Curtain-road. My father is a cabinet-maker - I have been used to work with him - I know the prisoners - on the night of the 14th of March, I went with Mrs. Pickard and Drew from Pickard's house, No. 19, Mill's Court, Curtain-road - I had known Mrs. Pickard about two years, and Drew about two months - I do not know where he lived; but he came from over the water - I used to see him at Mrs. Pickard's - Drew and Pickard asked me to go along with them - they did not say where - I went as far as the corner of Rosemary-lane by the watch-house - it is called Sparrow-corner - we got there about eight o'clock in the evening - we saw a broken window in a clothes-shop - we all three looked at it - Mrs. Pickard crossed over the road, and stood on the other side, and Drew put his hand in and took a bundle of waistcoats - there was a great wire against the hole in the window - it was hard to shove away - it was a very thick wire indeed - Drew shoved it away, and was forced to hold it while he took out the waistcoats, which were tied together, and lay about a foot away from the hole - I heard a lot of glass drop when he took the second bundle - the first were tied together in a bundle - I heard no noise the first bundle which he took - he gave the first waistcoats to me, and I crossed over the road, and took them to Mrs. Pickard, who was near enough to see where we got them, I should think - when I gave them to her, I crossed over, and Drew had another bundle out just as I got to the pavement - I heard a lot of glass fall on the pavement - I heard the noise just as he was drawing it out - it happened by his pulling his hand out - the parcels were both of one size - I crossed over and gave that parcel to Mrs. Pickard, and she said, "Come on" - I crossed over directly to Drew; and just as I got across the road, there was a bundle hanging half-way out of the window - Drew said he heard the man running across the shop, and he left that bundle there - we then went to Mrs. Pickard's house - when we got there we opened the bundles, and found it was some unfinished waistcoats - I did not know how many there ware at the time; but in the morning, a young chap named Morris came and divided them - there was eight in each parcel - Mrs. Pickard agreed in the morning to give Drew 3s. for his part, and me 3s. - I did not see her give Drew any money; but when I came, an hour afterwards, she said the waistcoats were not worth the money; and on Sunday morning she gave me five waistcoats for my share - I went and sold them to Mrs. Elliott for 2s. 6d. - she did not ask me how I got them, or any questions - she lives, I think, at No. 7, Wright's-buildings, Bath-street - they were open - she examined them one by one, and saw they were unfinished - I only asked her if she would buy them, and asked her 2s. 6d. - she immediately gave me half-a-crown - I did not tell her how I got them - she knew I got my living by going out with my father - she knew me - I left the waistcoats on the table; Pickard put the waistcoats which she got into a drawer up stairs - I saw her do so - I was afterwards taken up, and soon told about this transaction - Holland the policeman went to Mrs. Pickard's - I have seen some waistcoats in Attfield's possession since - they appear the same as I had dealt with.

Drew. Q. Did I go with you that night and get them, or did you not bring them to Pickard's house yourself? A. No; he was the party who took them.

COURT. Q. Did not you put your hand through the window? A. No.

Pickard . He brought them to my house, and said, a young man had sent them, and would I take care of them. Witness. I did not say so at all.

Elliott . Q. Did not you bring the waistcoats to me, and ask me to make them up? A. No; you were not to have a shilling a piece for making them.

WILLIAM HOLLAND (police-constable N 146). In consequence of information from Ware, I went to Pickard's house, and told her I had come in consequence of several robberies which had been committed - I said nothing about these waistcoats - after considerable resistance I took her into custody, and took her to the station-house - she said every thing in the house belonged to her - I did not find any unmade waistcoats there myself, Glibbery did- I did not go to Elliott'e.

JAMES GLIBBERY . I am a police-sergeant. I went with Holland on Monday, the 17th, to Mrs. Pickard's house, and in a drawer, in the up-stairs room, found these nine unmade waistcoats, tied up just as they are now - I saw Drew apprehended in the lower room, at Mrs. Pickard's, at the same time we found him there; it was between nine and ten o'clock at night.

Pickard. Q. Were the drawers unlocked? A. Yes; one or two of your drawers were locked, and three unlocked.

COURT. Q. Were there any lodgers in the house that you know of? A. No; it appears that Drew frequents the house - there were two beds, and a kind of bed for the children - I found no clothes which could fit Drew there - there was one bed up stairs, and another down.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am a policeman. I went to Elliott's house on Tuesday, the 18th of March, in the evening, and saw her - I told her I had information that she had some unmade waistcoat-pieces in her possession - she seemed frightened, and could not answer me immediately, but her husband was present, and said in her hearing,"No, we have not;" and in a few seconds she said, she had had them, but she had taken them to a friend's house, in Old-street-road, that afternoon - I do not think she

named the friend, but she said she would go and show me- she took me to Robins's, the doll-maker, in Old-street-road - when she got there, she asked a little boy for the bundle she had left there in the afternoon - the boy handed it out from under the counter, and gave it to her, and I took it from her hands - it contained five waistcoats unmade - I have them here - her house is not above one hundred and fifty yards from Pickard's - the doll-shop is nine hundred yards from Elliott's - she said she had them from a boy, and I think she mentioned some name, but I am not quite sure - I took her to the station-house.

WILLIAM ROBINS . I am the son of Joshua Robins , who is a doll-maker, and lives at No. 83, Old-street-road - I remember Mrs. Elliott coming to our house, on Tuesday, the 18th of March - she brought these waistcoats, and said, "Billy, may I leave these here until I come back, it will save me the trouble of going home?" it being some work she had to do - I put them under the counter - they remained there until Attfield came.

GEORGE MARCHANT re-examined. These are Mr. Clark's property - I can swear to them by marks - also the appearance and the style of work and shape - I have examined them all - the other five are also his - I can match the buttons; in their present state the five are worth at least 12s. 6d., and the nine about 1l. - such waistcoats as these were in the shop window; on the Saturday morning I found a bundle of waistcoats partly sticking out of the window - there is a very strong iron bar before the window, and about three inches space between each bar - the bundle might be got through that space.

Drew's Defence. Ware has brought me into it innocently - he has been convicted here once before, and was here last Session for stealing a gold watch - it is only to clear himself he comes here - he has transported two men, and told two or three people he would soon put some more men away.

Pickard's Defence. I am quite innocent of knowing them to be stolen, or of being out with them - I was at home all night - he brought the waistcoats to me about half-past seven o'clock, and said a young man who lodged with me sent them to me to stop there until he came home, and I put them into the drawer - on Sunday morning he came and asked me for the waistcoats, and said he was going to give them out to be made - I gave him five of them - he is a very bad boy - Hall and Drake were convicted here innocently last Session, and he was the very one who did the crime at Tottenham High-cross - he is the worst of characters.

HENRY WARE re-examined. I was acquitted of stealing the gold watch.(Elliott put in a written defence stating the witness Ware had brought the waistcoats to her to make up at a shilling each.)

DREW. Aged 18. - GUILTY of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

PICKARD - GUILTY . Aged 33.

ELLIOTT - NOT GUILTY .

671. GEORGE RICHARDSON , WILLIAM THOMAS PICKARD , and GEORGE DREW were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Conway Joyce , on the 17th of March , and stealing therein 1 watch, value 50l., his property ; and MARTHA, the wife of Thomas PICKARD, for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the said goods, well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen , against the Statute, &c.

2nd COUNT. For feloniously receiving of an evil-disposed person.

SAMUEL JOYCE . My uncle, Conway Joyce, keeps a watchmaker's shop , No. 38, Lombard-street . On the night of the 17th of March, he had a gold watch, which laid on the flap in front of the window, close to a pane of glass - the pane of glass was cracked, but none of it out - a piece of sticking-plaister was put across the crack to prevent its being pushed in, and near it laid a gold watch - I know the maker's name, and number - I saw it safe that evening, about an hour before I missed it, which was about a quarter or ten minutes to six o'clock in the evening - it was broad daylight - I was absent about five minutes, and when I came down I saw the glass pushed in, and the watch was gone, and I saw a boy going by the window - the door was fastened, and before I had time to unfasten it the boy was gone up a court - I do not know who the boy was.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is the name of your firm? A. It is Mr. Conway Joyce - he is sole owner of the business - it was formerly Samuel and Conway Joyce - his brother has been dead six years, and the name remains on the door - no partner has been taken in his place.

HENRY WARE. On the night of the 17th of March I went out with George Richardson and William Pickard - I called at Mill's-court, and saw them both outside the door - they asked me if I would go with them, as they were going after a lot of gold watches - they were outside Mrs. Pickard's door - I consented to go with them - they said they were going to Lombard-street - I went with them, and when we got as far as there, there was a cracked pane of glass at a watchmaker's window - I do not know the name of the house nor the number - it is in Lombard-street, opposite a little passage.

SAMUEL JOYCE re-examined. That is the situation of my uncle's shop - it is nearly opposite a passage, and the only watchmaker's thereabout.

HENRY WARE re-examined. When I got there, I shoved the cracked pane of glass several times, and so did Richardson, and the last time I shoved it, it went in - Richardson took out a gold watch - he crossed over to William Pickard and gave it to him, and they both went away - I stood by the shop till the young man came to the door - I then walked away, and after I got a little way I ran - I lost sight of them till I got home to 19, Mill's-court - they were outside Mrs. Pickard's door - it was then about five minutes to six o'clock - I should think it wanted ten minutes or a quarter to six o'clock when I was at the shop - it is about half a mile from Mrs. Pickard's - I saw the watch directly I got into the court - Wm. Pickard showed it to me, and said he dare say it would fetch 6l. - I went with him to Wright's-buildings, where William Pickard's wife lived - he gave her the watch and told her to take care of it - while I was there he took it from her again - I do not know what became of it after that - I never saw it again till I was at Worship-street.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you begin to rob first?

A. About a year and a half ago - I was tried here last Sessions with Hall and Blake - I have not been boasting since that, that I got acquitted, and that they got transported for my guilt - I am sure I never said any thing of the kind - I believe I have been taken up before - I am not quite certain - I have been taken up once before - I recollect once; I dare say it is twelve months ago - I had forgotten it - that was on suspicion of stealing some handkerchiefs out of a house in Sun-street - that was the only time I was taken up except last Sessions - I was never before a magistrate, I will swear - nor ever in a watch-house, only when I was taken for the handkerchiefs - I swear that - I was before the Lord Mayor for the handkerchiefs - that is twelve months ago - I was never tried but once and never found guilty - I swear that.

Q. Were you not tried here on another occasion besides with Blake and Hall? A. No; never in my life - I am sure of that - I got acquainted with Pickard about two years ago - Hall had been a companion of mine - I had known Blake I dare say three months, and I began stealing about a year and a half ago - it may be two years.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When did you become acquainted with young Pickard and Mrs. Pickard? A. It may be two years - that was about the time I began thieving - I became acquainted with Elliott by my mother and father living in Mill's-court - Elliott is the son of Mrs. Elliott who was tried just now - he was an acquaintance of Pickard's and his mother.

Q. You have been asked how soon you began thieving - who was the first person you went thieving with, or that set you upon it? A. I think it was Mrs. Pickard - I have not the least doubt of that.

GEORGE KEMP . I am a policeman. On the 17th of March, in consequence of information, I went, in company with my brother officers, to Mrs. Pickard's house, between nine and ten o'clock at night, and took four persons into custody - I returned, and my brother officers and I stayed in the house until half-past one o'clock, when the prisoner Pickard came to his mother's house, and knocked at the door, which we opened, and he was taken into custody directly - his mother was in custody before - he asked what he was taken for? - I told him, on suspicion of stealing a gold watch - he said he was innocent - I did not find the watch then - Mrs. Pickard was committed to the New Prison, Clerkenwell.

SARAH HARRISON . I am a female turnkey of the New Prison, Clerkenwell. Mrs. Pickard came there, and went up for re-examination on Saturday, the 22nd - I think she had come in on the Tuesday - I was informed on the Sunday morning of something, in consequence of which, when she got up in the morning, I called her into my room, and said, "Mrs. Pickard, I must search you" - she said,"What for?" - I said, "You have something wrong about you" - I attempted to search her - she resisted - I said, "I must call the assistance of the male turnkeys" - she took something out of her bosom, and held it in her hands - I said, "That is it, whatever it is" - she said, "Do not take it, my son's life depends on it" - I took it out of her hand - it was a gold watch - I have kept it in my possession ever since, and now produce it.

Richardson. About a quarter to six o'clock, I was playing in Mill's-court, and saw Ware coming down Curtain Road; I said, "Henry, will you play me at marbles?" He said, "No: I have something else to think about; look here, I have cut my hand." I said, "How did you do that?" He said, "I broke a window in Lombard-street, and took out a watch" - he pulled it out, and said, "This is it."

HENRY WARE re-examined. I did not tell Richardson that I had cut my hand by getting a watch out in Lombard-street - I did not show him a watch - I had no conversation with him about marbles.

Richardson. I went into Mr. Pickard's house, and got him a bit of rag to tie up his finger, and picked out a bit of the glass - he said, "It will get well in a day or two."

Witness. I had not cut my finger, nor did he put any rag round it - there was no glass in it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was your finger examined at the police office, to see if it was cut? A. Yes; the same night, at the station-house - I was taken the same night - Mrs. Pickard said, I had cut my finger in the joint of it - but it was not cut there - there is a vein of my finger now there, and she said it was the mark; but it is not a mark - it is the natural appearance of my finger.

Richardson. He said he was waiting for Mrs. Pickard to come home, to give her the watch to put away, and he would then give me 1s. for doing what I had. Witness. I did not.

Richardson. I was going home; I live close by Pickard's, and saw Ware in custody, going towards Pitfield-street. I passed by him, and went home. Witness. He, Martha Pickard, and George Drew, all passed the tailor's shop, when I was taken into custody - they stood at the shop - that was ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after the watch was stolen - I was taken into custody on a charge of removing a pair of trowsers that evening, about ten minutes after the watch was taken - I gave information about the watch half an hour or an hour afterwards - the policeman went and inquired at the pawnbroker's and places where I stated they had lost the things, and found it to be true - I was not charged with stealing the watch at all - I gave information first about eleven gold rings - the watch was the second thing I mentioned.

Martha Pickard. Q. Did not you come to my house about half-past six o'clock that evening, with your forefinger bleeding, and ask me to take care of the watch for you? A. No; I did not.

COURT. Q. Now recollect whatever you have done amiss, you are now under the solemn obligation of an oath, and will add greatly to your crimes, if you do not tell the truth. Did you take the watch to that woman, and give it to her, desiring her to take care of it? A. I did not. I did not know that she had seen the watch, but it was found on her.

GEORGE KEMP re-examined. I examined Ware's finger that night - there was no appearance of a cut or blood about his hand.

Cross-examined. Q. What had he been taken for? A. On suspicion of stealing a pair of trowsers.

WILLIAM HOLLAND . I am a policeman. I took Mrs. Pickard into custody - I took her to the station-house and searched her, but she begged of me not to search her

strictly, as she was not in a fit state to be searched; and I delivered her over, to a woman who usually searches at our place - she found nothing - she was removed to Clerkenwell - on the night of the 14th, when I took the boy into custody, I examined his finger - there was no appearance of a scratch, or blood, or any thing.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you him in custody when he began to make discoveries? A. About half an hour.

SAMUEL JOYCE re-examined. This is my uncle's watch, I am sure, and what was lost on the night of the 17th of March; I value it at fifty guineas or pounds - it is our make - it cost us more than thirty guineas - the number is 1386, I think - it is now quite rusted away, but when it was stolen we should not have sold it for less than fifty pounds - it is on the same principle as a chronometer, and must have had wet on it to rust it.

William Thomas Pickard's Defence. I know nothing about the watch - I was searched twice by the policemen before I saw my mother.

Martha Pickard to Ware. Q. You say you came to my house at ten minutes to six o'clock, was it not half-past six o'clock? A. No; I was not taken so late as seven o'clock - the officers examined my finger, because a great many thieves have mermaids and other things pricked over their hands and arms.

GEORGE KEMP re-examined. That was what I examined his hands for - I always look at the hands of thieves - I looked at their hands again next morning - there was no mark whatever on Ware's - I never had Ware in custody, though I know him to be a bad character.

RICHARDSON - NOT GUILTY .

W. T. PICKARD - NOT GUILTY .

DREW - NOT GUILTY .

MARTHA PICKARD - GUILTY, on the Second Count . - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-150

672. GEORGE DREW was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Jackson , about the hour of eight o'clock, in the night of the 12th of March , at St. Gabriel, Fenchurch , and burglariously stealing therein, 1 pair of shoes, value 10s.; his property - and MARTHA, wife of Thomas PICKARD , and WILLIAM THOMAS PICKARD , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, in the same parish, the said goods, well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

2nd COUNT. For feloniously receiving the same, of an evil-disposed person.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES ORME . I am foreman to Mr. Henry Jackson, who is a shoemaker , and carries on business at No. 133, Fenchurch-street - he has no partner - he rents the house, and sleeps away, but one of his servants sleeps there - it is in the parish of St. Gabriel, Fenchurch-street - he pays the rent and taxes of the house himself - on the evening of the 12th of March, I went out, and returned to the shop a few minutes after eight o'clock - as soon as I entered the shop I received information, and looked at a pane of glass which had been broken, and a piece of paper pasted over it - I found the paper broken, and removed off altogether, and a large piece of glass taken from the window - the paper before quite covered the broken pane, so as to exclude the air - there was a small hole in the window before, about the size of a five-shilling-piece, covered by the paper - I missed one pair of gentleman's shoes - I knew them again when I saw them.

HENRY WARE . On the evening of the 12th of March, I went out with Drew and Martha Pickard, from her house to Fenchurch-street, and saw the shop of Mr. Jackson, the shoemaker - when we got to Fenchurch-street, Martha Pickard was in Gracechurch-street, expecting us to return to her with something; and we did return to her with the shoes - she was, I dare say, a hundred yards from Mr. Jackson's shop, or more - she knew where we were going to get the goods - there was a piece of paper pasted against a hole in the window - it was torn in some parts - I pushed it away more, and took out one shoe, and Drew took the other - the hole in the glass was large enough to get out one shoe at a time - we took the paper off - it was torn in some parts, and pasted on the other, and we took it off altogether - we could not have got the shoes without the paper being removed - I took one shoe, and Drew the other; and Drew received the one from me, and took them round to Mrs. Pickard, who took them from us, and went off home - in the morning, when I came, she said she had pawned them for 3s. 6d., and she gave me 1s. 2d. for my share - this was one of the matters I told the officers of - I did not get my hand into the window before I removed the paper - I had to remove the paper, then put my hand in and took a shoe - I could not get my hand in without tearing the paper - it was a little round hole in the glass - we did not break any glass - the hole was not quite so big as the top of that inkstand - it was rather tightish, but we did get it through without breaking the glass.

MR. ADOLPHUS declined calling any more witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-151

NEW COURT. - Monday, April 14th.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

673. WILLIAM DUNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , one pair of ear-rings, value 2s. , the goods of Luke Searson , to which indictment he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-152

674. FRANCIS FREDERICK MORRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 1 sofa bedstead, value 3l.; 3 horse-hair squabs, value 2l.; 1 bolster value 1l.; 1 chest-of-drawers, value 2l. 10s.; 1 table, value 1l.; 6 chairs, value 30s.; 1 set of fire-irons, value 6s.; 1 fender, value 6s.; 1 tea-kettle, value 5s.; 1 table, value 2s.; 3 chimney ornaments, value 2s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 5s.; 4 wine glasses, value 2s.; 12 plates, value 2s.; 6 cups and saucers, value 3s.; 6 sheets, value 30s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; 1 coat, value 15s.; 1 book, value 1l.; 1 looking-glass, value 5l.; 1 bed, value 10s.; 1 pillow, value 3s.; 1 bolster, value 2s.; 1 sheet, value 5s.; and 1 bed, value 2l. ; the goods of William Wolter .

WILLIAM WOLTER. I am a bookbinder . I live in Drury-lane - I let the prisoner a room gratuitously in a house of mine at No. 14, James-street , for about twelve

months - the articles stated were in a room adjoining the one he occupied - I had all these things safe there about a month before the first week in January, about which time the prisoner left - the room door was locked, but the key was in a drawer in that house, which the prisoner knew of- the prisoner left without any notice - we could not find him till about a fortnight ago.

THOMAS WAKERLY (police-constable F 138). I took the prisoner on the 1st of April - I told him I supposed he knew what I wanted him for - he said he did - I found some duplicates on him.

JOHN JAMES BARTLETT . I am apprentice to Mr. Wood , a pawnbroker, in St. Giles's - I have three sheets and a pair of trowsers, but I cannot say who pawned them - this is the duplicate I gave the person.

WILLIAM TREENAH . I live with Mr. Brickle , a pawnbroker. I have a coat pawned in the name of John Wilkins , 14, James-street - this is the duplicate I gave for it.

JOHN WILLIAM CASSELL . I am a pawnbroker. I have a chimney-glass, a bed, a book, and some other articles pawned by a man - these are the duplicates I gave him.

JOSEPH HINGSTON . I am a broker, and live in Park-street, Camden-town. I bought this table of a man at No. 14, James-street, Camden-town; but I cannot tell whether it was the prisoner - I believe he may be the man.

WILLIAM JOYCE . I am porter to this witness. I received this table from a man at the prosecutor's house, No. 14, James-street - I believe the prisoner to be the man - my master was at home at the time this table came, and he paid for it - I removed goods from the same place three times - some of them have been sold.

COURT to JOSEPH HINGSTON. Q. Did you buy things more than once? A. Yes; I should be sorry to swear that the prisoner is the man, when I have a doubt of him - I bought five or six things, but my man brought them all at once - I recollect buying the things, because I book every thing - the man I bought them of said he was brother-in-law to Mr. Wolter.

JAMES PETHERICK . I lodge in the same house - I saw the prisoner and the broker's man remove the property from the house - they borrowed the truck of me, and removed the goods at twice.

Prisoner. I am guilty of pawning the articles.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-153

Before Mr. Recorder.

675. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for receiving, on the 21st of February , 2 live tame fowls, value 5s., from a certain evil-disposed person , the goods of John Gedge , against the Statute.

JOHN GEDGE. I live in Munster-street, Regent's-park. On the 21st of February, the door of a vault in my area was broken open, and I missed some fowls - I went, the next morning, to the prisoner's shop, in the New-road - I saw two fowls in a basket, which I knew to be mine - I saw the prisoner - I told him they were my property which I had lost the night before - he said he thought they were stolen, and he had called in a man to witness that he actually bought them - I then asked, who he bought them of - he said, of a boy, twelve or fourteen years old, who lived at a coal shed; that he had bought a rabbit of that boy before; he said he would go at five o'clock that evening and find the boy - he said he would keep the fowls - I told him to keep them, or it would be worse for him - he said that I might take them, and he would settle with me afterwards - he said he had given 2s. for them, and I was to pay 2s. if I had them; but he at first said, I was to have them for nothing - I said I did not know how far I was justified in taking them, and I would wait till he pointed out the boy - I saw the prisoner again that evening, and he went to a number of streets to find the boy, but could not - I then went to the prisoner's with another person - the prisoner then said my place was not broken open- I asked how he knew that - he said never mind, he knew all about it, and laughed - I said I should see further into it - I then went and got a search warrant - I had known the prisoner twelve months - he never said he had not got them - he said I should not have them unless he had 5s. - he then said I might go before the magistrate, but I could not swear to them, as I had no private mark on them - he said he did not care for Mr. Rawlinson , for he had worked for him - the prisoner keeps a small bird shop and dog shop , in the New-road - I went with the officer to the prisoner's with the warrant - he was not at home - his wife was there - she refused to let us in, and said the fowls were not there - the officer went in and found the fowls - these are them - I had had them three weeks or a month.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe they are very common fowls? A. No; I never saw any like them - this other one is not the same - I could swear to them, if I saw them running in a field in Yorkshire - Harris was with me when I went to the prisoner's shop, when the prisoner said he knew the fowls were stolen - I have always told the truth on this subject - I saw Anderson after I had been before the magistrate - he is a paper-hanger, in the North-road - I told him that the prisoner was committed to Newgate.

Q. Did you tell him that you should never have done any thing of the kind, if the prisoner had not written a note to you, telling you you should not have the fowls any more? A. No; I did not - I said a message had come to me, by Harris, saying that I should not have the fowls again - he was committed and locked up in my presence - the magistrate said he would bail him, if he could get bail.

Q. Did you not say that it was a very foolish business, and that the prisoner might have settled the whole affair for a shilling? A. I do not recollect that - I frequently said it was a very trifling thing - I might have said that it was only a shilling or two matter - I said it was a foolish thing, but not that he might have settled it for a shilling - I had him taken up on the Monday, two days after the fowls were missed - they were in his custody till the Monday - he might have disposed of them in the time - Mr. Harris is here - the prisoner said, in his presence, he thought the fowls were stolen.

CHARLES STOKES . I am a trunk-maker, and live in Wood-street. I was in the prisoner's shop when he bought two fowls, on the night of the 20th of February, about eight o'clock - I should not like to swear to these fowls, but they look like them - he bought them for 2s. - he asked

the boy where he got them - he said his brother bought them in Newgate market - I bought a pigeon of the prisoner once.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am an officer. On the 22nd of February, the prosecutor came for a warrant to search the prisoner's house - I went down with the warrant - I got the two fowls from the prisoner's wife - I left the message for the prisoner to come to me, which he did - the magistrate was asked if he would take bail - he said yes, if it were good bail; and a gentleman bailed him in the evening.

THOMAS HENMAN . I am attorney to the prisoner. On Monday last, I went to the prosecutor to get the names of some of the witnesses - the prosecutor said it was a foolish business, and the prisoner might have settled it at one time for a shilling.

CHARLES ANDERSON . The prosecutor came to me - he told me the prisoner had been committed to Newgate, and that it was his own fault, as he should have done nothing of the kind, if the prisoner had not sent a note to him, saying he would not return the fowls.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-154

676. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 1 cask, value 7s. , the goods of Leonard Baldry .

LEONARD BALDRY. I keep the Queen's-head public-house, at the corner of Frederick-street, Regent's-park . On the 9th of April, I missed a brandy cask from my rails, in the area of my house - I had seen it safe the night before.

WILLIAM BARNETT (police-constable S 25). On the morning of the 9th of April, about ten minutes before six o'clock, I saw the prisoner rolling a cask in Frederick-street - I went to the prosecutor; he looked and missed the cask - I then ran after the prisoner, and found him in Norton-street - I asked him where he got it - he said, "Out of Henry-street," - I said, he must go and take it back - he said he would not, but I might - I rolled it back, and took him to the station-house - he there said that he did it through want.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Paddington - a man asked me if I wanted a job - I said, "Yes" - he said, "Assist me in rolling this cask, and meet me at the New Church" - when the policeman stopped me, he said, "Will you go back, and take this cask?" - I said, "No; but I will assist you in taking it back" - which I did.

WILLIAM BARNETT. There was no one with him - he was rolling it himself very fast.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Confined for Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-155

677. SAMUEL MASKALL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 3 blankets, value 10s.; 1 cloak, value 1l.; 2 pair of sheets, value 1l.; 2 pillows, value 5s.; 2 pair of pillow-cases, value 5s.; 2 table-cloths, value 6s., and 1 towel, value 1s. ; the goods of James Hart .

JAMES HART. I live in Felton-terrace, Hoxton , and am a baker . The prisoner and his wife lodged in my house - they came some time in November, and had a ready furnished lodging in the front room, on the first floor - they lodged there about three months - I went into their room in their absence - I missed all the bedding, and the other articles stated - this was on a Wednesday or Thursday, about the 19th or 20th of January - the prisoner did not come home till eleven o'clock that night, and as I am out on my business as a journeyman baker, I did not mention it to him till about twelve o'clock on the Friday - I said, I had reason to believe my property was not safe - he begged me not to do any thing with him, but to go with him to his wife's father, on Kennington-common - I went there, but her father was not to be found - he then asked me not to do any thing, and gave me two letters, which he told me to deliver, but I did not - I afterwards heard something, and gave him into custody.

Prisoner. Q. Have you looked into the box which was left at your house? A. Yes; when I received your letter on Saturday evening, I opened the box, and found in it the pillow-cases which are stated in the indictment - the box had been tied up, and had never been off the premises.

MARY ANN HART . I am the prosecutor's wife. I did not examine the prisoner's room till we removed from one house to the other - I saw the pillow-cases safe last Saturday night; all the articles were produced before the magistrate - the cloak which is mentioned in the indictment I lent to the prisoner's wife.

JAMES HART. I believe I moved the box myself from where we did live to our present residence, and no doubt the pillow-cases were in it.

ALEXANDER MOIR . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Commercial-road. I had a blanket pawned on the 24th of December, for 2s. 6d., a table-cloth on the same day for 1s. 3d., and a cloak for 7s., on the 18th of February, two sheets on the 9th of December, for 4s., and some other articles, they were all pawned by a female - these are the duplicates I gave.

MARY ANN HART. I received these duplicates from the prisoner on the Friday night before he was taken - I gave them to the officer.

Prisoner. Mrs. Hart and I were sitting in the parlour, and she said, "I have spoken to Hart, and wished him to take the duplicates from you, and to get the things, and if you will give them to me now, I will endeavour to do so.

MARY ANN HART. I said, "I think it will be the death of me - I will persuade Hart to get the things out, if I can,"- I gave the duplicates to my husband.

FRANCIS GRATRICK (police-constable N 98). I received these duplicates from Mr. Hart.

ALEXANDER MOIR. These are the duplicates I gave - perhaps I ought to state that on Monday last a person called on me, and paid the money for these things.

The prisoner handed in a petition pleading poverty.

JAMES HART. The woman passed for his wife - she absconded a day or two before this charge - her father was represented as an independent gentleman - Mrs. Hart was going with her to him, and in the way she left her - I believe the prisoner was deceived by her.

GUILTY. Aged 33. - Recommended to mercy by the Jury . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18340410-156

678. RICHARD OLIPHANT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 9lbs. of cheese, value 6s. , the goods of Frederick Heavens .

ELIZABETH HEAVENS . I am the wife of Thomas Heavens. We keep the Bridport Arms in the New North Road . On the 20th of March, about half-past ten o'clock

in the evening, I received information from my servant, and missed a piece of cheese from the safe, which I had seen here about half-past six o'clock - I had seen the prisoner in the skittle-ground - and the safe is close by the steps of the skittle-ground - it had a canvass front, which was torn open, and the cheese taken out - I had noticed it particularly, as we had two gentlemen to dine with us that day - and there was a decayed place which they had cut out; I noticed it when it was taken away - I had tasted the cheese.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Are either of those gentlemen here? A. No; I am quite sure it was safe at half-past six o'clock - the prisoner had not left the house at half-past six o'clock - for when he came from the skittle-ground he went into the tap-room, and must have passed close by the safe - a door near the skittle-ground leads into the street - there were two gentlemen in the parlour that evening, and the prisoner and some others in the skittle-ground - I have seen the prisoner frequently in our house.

JOHN HOOPER . I am servant to Mr. Heavens. I saw the prisoner at his house - he had been playing at skittles, and as he came from the skittle-ground he said, "I will be d-d if I won't have that piece of cheese" - the canvass of the safe was a little torn, but not enough to get the cheese out - the prisoner left about seven o'clock that evening, and was in liquor - we missed the cheese at half-past ten o'clock.

ELIZABETH WEBB . I am servant at the Bell, in Hoxton, not far from the prosecutor's. On the evening the prisoner came to our house with a piece of cheese tied up in a black silk handkerchief - there were several persons there, and he gave them some to taste - he said he knew it to be good, for he got it from the right place, from Newgate-street - he was a little in liquor - he was saucy, and challenged my fellow servant to fight him - he wanted to raise money on the cheese - it was weighed, and weighed eight pounds and a half - I live near the prisoner - he bears a good character.

JOHN SMITH . I live in Whitmore-road, Hoxton - I was at the tap-room of the Bell - I saw the prisoner, whom I have known several years - I bought this piece of cheese of him for 1s. 6d. - the other piece was given to the officer.

WILLIAM HAWKINS (police-constable N 95). I took the prisoner, and have the cheese.

GUILTY. Aged 22. - Recommended to mercy by the Jury . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18340410-157

679. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 2 window sashes, glazed, value 20s., the goods of Thomas Newman , and fixed to a building , against the Statute.

THOMAS WHITTLE (police-constable G 200). I saw the prisoner on the morning of the 27th of March, near Merlin's-place, with these two sashes - I stopped him and asked where he was going with them - he said to Laystall-street - that he was a carpenter, and they were his own property - he was half a mile from Mr. Newman's.

THOMAS NEWMAN. I live at No. 18, Elizabeth-terrace Islington. I have a house at No. 4, Russell-place, Sermon-lane , in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell - I let it out in separate tenements - the prisoner hired a room there on the 25th of March - these sashes belonged to that house - I swear to them - I went down on the Friday morning and missed them.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I live in Russell-place, Sermon-lane. I had the key of the room - I let it to the prisoner on the evening of the 26th of March - the sashes were then all safe.(The prisoner pleaded poverty.)

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-158

680. FREDERICK SALTER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 1 cloak, value 2l. , the goods of Thomas Reginald Kemp .

HANNAH HORSNELL . I am servant to Mr. Shakspeare , of Portland-place, New North-road, Islington . Between seven and eight o'clock at night, on the 25th of March, the prisoner came to our door, and asked if Mr. Kemp was at home - I said Yes - he said he wanted to speak to him about a ton of coals which had been ordered - I went into the parlour to deliver the message - the prisoner opened the door, let himself out, and took this cloak with him - I had seen it safe not a minute before; he ran away with it on his arm - I pursued, and saw him throw it down - I had not lost sight of him - this is the property of Mr. Thomas Reginald Kemp.

W. HOLT (police-serjeant N 17). I took the prisoner, and have the cloak - he said it was distress drove him to it.

(Mr. James Lee , enamel painter, 8, Wilmington-square, and Jeremiah Van Curlini , a watchmaker, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 19. - Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and Jury . - Confined for Six Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-159

681. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 2 boys' dresses, value 10s. , the goods of John Dicker .

JOHN DICKER . I am the son of John Dicker, pawnbroker , of Three-colt-street, Limehouse - on the 2nd of April I hung some suits of clothes outside the shop, about seven o'clock in the morning - I was afterwards at breakfast, and heard an alarm - I went into Narrow-street, and saw the prisoner with a bundle under his arm - I followed him into the Ship Aground public-house, and saw him take the dresses from the handkerchief in which they were, and put them on his knee - he was going to take the marks off them - Sliyth, who was with me, collared him, and said he was his prisoner - I went to get a policeman, but could not find one - I then told Sliyth to take the goods, and let him go - but Sliyth said, as we had gone so far, we had better go on, and he was taken.

GEORGE SLYTH . I am servant to the prosecutor. I was hanging some goods out at the shop door - I saw the prisoner come out with something under his coat - I told Mr. Dicker, and we went after him - we found him in the public-house - I told him he was my prisoner, for taking some dresses from the door - he said he had not, but he bought them of a man in the street - he delivered the dresses to me, and was afterwards taken; but before he was taken, while he was in School-house-lane, he threatened to knock us both down, and he took up a large stone and threw it at me - it struck me in the joint of the leg.

THOMAS HAINES (police-constable K 211). I received the prisoner and these dresses - he said he bought them of a

man, but he did not know his name, nor the street he bought them in; and I had taken him wrongfully, as he was taken before, when he had a pair of shoes in his pocket - he made no resistance.

GUILTY .* Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-160

682. ANN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 4 sovereigns, and 2 half-sovereigns, the monies of Charles Sodergren , from his person .

CHARLES SODERGREN. I am a mariner , and belong to the Prince George, free-trader. On the 16th of March, at night, I was on my way home to White-cross-street, where I live - I met the prisoner in the street - she asked me to go home with her - I asked where she lived - she said in White-cross-street; but she took me to No. 7, John's-place - when we got up stairs, I asked her to strike a light - she said she had no candle - I said, "Go and get one" - she said she had no money, and asked for a penny, to get one - I said I had none - she then asked me to give her a shilling - I would not - she pushed me on the bed, and began to feel about me, but she could not get my money - it was in my watchfob - I thought my money was not safe, and I took off my trowers, and laid them by my side on the bed - she jumped up in a moment, and ran off - I then took my trowsers, and missed my money - I lost four sovereigns, and two half-sovereigns - I sung out "Murder! I am robbed!" - I remained in the room till daylight next morning, and then went to the station and gave notice - it was about twelve o'clock when I went to the room - I had been drinking, but knew what I was about.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long did you suspect that she was going to rob you? A. I did not think she was going to rob me, but when I was in bed, she began to feel about my pocket - I took off my trowsers for fear - I meant to stop there, but not all night - she had hold of me all the time - I dare say she had hold of me and the trowsers too - I had no silver, nor copper - I had seen my £5 safe about eleven o'clock in the day - I had been into three public-houses - I had been in company with one of my shipmates - I was with no ladies - I had felt my money safe after the morning - I had another half-sovereign when I went out in the morning - I paid my shipmate 5s., and spent the rest in dinner and drink - I had four or five glasses of gin, and a share of two pots of ale - I was not very tipsy when I took off my trowers - I thought she could not find my money - it was dark in the room, but not in the street - I saw her in the street - we walked under a gas lamp - I saw her the next day in custody - she at first denied knowing any thing about me: but, afterwards she owned that she took me home, but denied as to the money - I searched the bed to see for the money - I waited a long time, and fell asleep - it was safe when I pulled off my trowers.

LEONARD CLARE MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. The prisoner came to my shop on the morning of the 17th of March between ten and eleven o'clock - she redeemed two or three silk handkerchiefs - she gave me a sovereign, and I gave her the change.

MARY WALKER . I live at No. 16, Playhouse-yard. On the 17th of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought to my house a tin box, and asked me to take care of those tickets for her - I was going out at the time, and I left the box on my landlady's counter - when I came back, the box was opened, and three sovereigns and some tickets were found in it.

SARAH HURSTWYATE . I keep a shop in Playhouse-yard. The box was left on my counter - when my husband came home, it was opened, and seven tickets and three sovereigns were in it - the prisoner's sister called for the box and its contents, and had it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you count up the money on those tickets? A. No; I do not know whether the money was the produce of the tickets.

JOHN SHEPHARD (police-serjeant G 9.) I apprehended the prisoner in Chiswell-street - I had before been with the prosecutor to the room in John's-place, and found a bit of ribbon in the room - I took it with me, and in the course of the day I saw three women talking - one of them had a bonnet with ribbons like the bit I found - I took the three women - one of them was the prisoner, but she had not the bonnet trimmed with this ribbon - the other women were discharged.

HENRY BERESFORD (police-serjeant G 8.) I was at the station-house. The prisoner and two other women, one of whom was the witness, Walker, were brought in - I told the prisoner she was charged with talking four sovereigns and two half-sovereigns from a sailor - she said she knew nothing of the sailor nor the money - I said, "I shall send you and Walker before the magistrate" - she said, "It is no use sending her before the magistrate, she knows nothing about it" - I then saw the prisoner had something in her hand - I took her hand, and got 9s. 6d., and 3 1/2d. from her - the prosecutor pointed her out as the woman - she denied it, and said he ought to keep with his wife.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he said he was married? A. Yes; his wife came there with him.

Prisoner's Defence. He had no money when he went with me, and of course I left him. He was quite intoxicated. He lives nearly opposite where I do.

GUILTY of stealing, but not from the person . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-161

683. EDWARD WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 4 live tame rabbits, value 4s.; 1 mole trap, 4d.; 1 chopper, value 1s.; 1 basket, value 2d.; and 2 pecks of oats, value 8d. ; the goods of Edward Harvey .

EDWARD HARVEY. I am a market gardener - I live at Hornsey , and keep rabbits in a tool-house. On the 30th of December, I lost four - I had gone to the house in my dinner hour and fed them - I left the padlock hanging on the door, and went away for about half an hour - I then missed the four rabbits - I have seen three of them alive in Mr. Collier's possession, and one was dead.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you carry on business alone? A. I am in Mr. Adams's service, but these rabbits were my own - this is my basket, and there was half a peck of oats in it - I lost it at the same time with the rabbits.

JOHN COLLIER . I am a gardener. On the 30th of December, Fieldwick came to me about four o'clock, and I sent him to Church-street, Newington - I have a field in

which there are wild rabbits - I went to that field, and saw the prisoner hiding behind some bricks - he hid something, and then ran away by me - I said, "You need not run away, I know you" - I then went to the place where he had been - I found two rabbits, and about a peck of oats in this basket, and a mole trap, all covered over with bricks - I took them home - I had before had one live rabbit and one dead one brought to me - Harvey claimed the rabbits.

GEORGE COLLIER , Jun. On the 30th of December, I was working in my father's garden, and saw my father go to the field with a boy, and go where the prisoner had been - I had seen the prisoner bring the basket and some bricks there, and go back without it - I saw there were two rabbits in it with a mole trap, and a lot of oats.

WILLIAM FIELDWICK . I lived with Mr. Collier. On the 30th of December I was going on an errand for him, and saw a mole-trap on the bricks - I went to it, and saw two rabbits - I took up one and then the other - I took them to my master - I then saw the prisoner and another boy - the prisoner said to me, "Old chap, did you see a man here? - I said, "No" - he said, "I did, and he has run away" - he then said, "Come here, and I will show you some rabbits" - he took me to the place and showed me these two rabbits in this basket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going for some sand for my father's birds - the other prisoner said, "I have got something to show you," and he showed me the rabbits - I saw Mr. Collier knock him down - he then put down the basket and ran away.

JAMES PLAYFORD . I am the officer. There was another boy with him, who has been convicted.

ROBERT MANN FELL . I am a plumber, and live in East-road. The prisoner was in my employ for two years, and I would take him again.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-162

684. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 basket, value 1s. 4d., the goods of Timothy Moriarty ; and 165 oranges , the goods of Jacob Dash .

TIMOTHY MORIARTY. I live at No. 131, Drury-lane, and am a fruit salesman at Covent-garden market . On the 25th of January I sold 165 oranges to Jacob Dash - he had paid for them - the basket of oranges was given to the prisoner to carry to the cart - I did not see the cart, but I heard Mr. Dash say to the prisoner, "Go on to the corner"- I helped the basket on his head - he said he knew where the cart was - he was afterwards taken.

JACOB DASH. I am a fruiterer , and live in Wigmore-street. I purchased the oranges, and gave the prisoner a penny to carry them to the cart, at the corner - he said he knew where it was - I never got the basket nor the oranges.

ELEANOR DOWNEY . I live in Bit-alley, Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell. I and Eliza Foley bought one hundred and twenty oranges of the prisoner three weeks after Christmas - we were to pay him 5s. 6d for them, and paid him 6d. off.

ELIZA FOLEY. We bought the oranges of the prisoner.

RICHARD BAYLIS (police-serjeant G 5). I took the prisoner - I asked what he had done with the oranges he took from Moriarty's stand in Covent-garden-market - he said Foley sold them, and James Crowder returned the basket.

Prisoner. I did not say so. Witness. You did, and Crowder was taken up in consequence.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-163

685. EUGENE HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 160 books, value 80l., of Clement Chapple , his master ; to which indictment he pleaded. GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-164

686. MARY GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , four pair of stockings, value 2s.; 1 frock, value 1s.; 4 caps, value 2s.; 1 piece of cloth, value 1s.; 3 napkins, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 1 piece of lace, value 1s.; one handkerchief, value 5s.; and 1 piece of riband, value 6d.; the goods of Thomas Clark Sidwell , her master .

MARY SIDWELL . I am the wife of Thomas Clark Sidwell. On the 6th of April I missed a pair of black silk stockings with white tops - I afterwards missed a child's frock and four caps, and the other articles stated - the prisoner was my servant.

THOMAS CLARK SIDWELL. I live at Cranford - the prisoner was in my service, and left on the 3d of April - I saw her in her lodging in Brentford, on Tuesday, the 8th of April - and asked her for the property - she said she had none - I said she had, and if she did not give them up I would give her to the officer - I found some of the things at her lodging at Brentford, which I gave to the officer - he received the rest of the things from my wife.

SAMUEL DUNNER . I am horse-patrole. I took the prisoner - I found at her lodgings this piece of linen made up into an apron, a child's frock, and other things - this silk handkerchief was taken from her person.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18. - Recommended to mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18340410-165

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

687. MARY ANN CHADWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 bed, value 2l.; 2 blankets, value 19s.; 2 sheets, value 4s.; 2 pillows, value 3s.; 1 counterpane, value 2s.; 2 flat-irons, value 1s.; and 1 set of bed-furniture, value 1s. , the goods of Edward Gilbert .

SARAH GILBERT . I am the wife of Edward Gilbert - we live in Tavistock-square . On the 12th of January the prisoner hired a furnished lodging of me, at 3s. 6d. per week - she slept there for a few nights - she paid two weeks' rent - I went into her room, and missed the articles stated - these are them - I asked where the bed was gone - she first told me it was in the next room - she then said she had taken it, but promised to get it, as her husband had left her, and she was in trouble.

HENRY BRITAIN . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet, a pillow, and some other articles which I took in pledge from the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress through my husband leaving me.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18340410-166

688. LYDIA DWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 3 sheets, value 4s.; 2 blankets, value 5s.; 2 flat-irons, value 1s.; 1 piece of carpet, value 3s.; 1 candlestick, value 1s. 6d.; 1 window-curtain, value 2s.; 1 tumbler-glass, value 1s.; 2 pillows, value 5s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 6d. , the goods of John Hall .

JOHN ALDRIDGE . I am servant to Ann Aldridge , pawnbroker, of Orange-street. I have a piece of carpet, a blanket, and some other articles which I took in pledge from the prisoner at different times within two months.

SUSAN HALL . I am wife of John Hall - we live in King-street, Holborn . We let a lodging to the prisoner on the 8th of January - these are part of the articles which were let to her with her room - this carpet and tumbler were in another room.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 44. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-167

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

689. THOMAS GRANGER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 1 silver fork, value 15s. ; the goods of Frederic Maitland , Esq .

HENRY DEMPSEY . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. On the 24th or 26th of February, the prisoner brought this part of a fork, and asked if we bought such things - I replied that we sometimes bought old silver - he asked what it was an ounce - I said, "About 4s. 8d." - I showed it to Mr. Law , my master - he asked if I had inquired about the other part - I came and asked the prisoner about it - he said he had lost that, or he could not find it - he then said he had broken it in opening a cellar door, as he had a dish in his hand at the time - I saw a policeman in the back room, whom my master had called in - I went into the shop, and asked the prisoner if he wished to sell it - he said,"Yes" - the officer then came in, and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. STAMMERS. Q. Do you know that the prisoner was then living in General Maitland's family? A. I have heard so since - he did not ask me whether it could be repaired, or whether one could be made like it.

ROBERT SMITH . I am a footman to General Maitland. The prisoner was coachman to Mr. McLean , who lives in the same house - this is General Maitland's fork - the top of it was found on the prisoner when he was taken - we had a party at our house one Saturday, about the middle of February - he had an opportunity of getting at the plate then.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he assist in carrying things up stairs? A. I believe he did on that day, but I was not at home.

WILLIAM JOHNS (police-sergeant D 41). I took the prisoner - he said he merely went to ask what it would cost to get this repaired, or whether he could have one made like it - I asked how they could tell the value of it, without he produced the other part - he said he could not do that for he had lost it; but when we got to the watch-house, I found this other part of it in his waistcoat pocket - he said he did not know he had it - he had before told me whom he lived with.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-168

690. JOHN INGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 bed, value 2l.; 2 shirts, value 3s.; and one blanket, value 2s. ; the goods of James Trevillian .

JAMES TREVILLIAN. I live in New Inn-street, Shoreditch. I employed the prisoner to help to remove some goods from Trimbley-court - I put this bed on his head with two sheets tied up in a blanket - he was to put them on the waggon, to go from the same house - I came down with a bundle - the prisoner and the bed were gone - I went after him for about an hour - I then caught him, and said,"What have you done with my bed?" - he said, "I know nothing about it" - I took him to the waggon and said,"For God's sake tell me where you have put the bed, for I have no other" - he still refused, and I gave him in charge - they found 2s. 6d. in his pocket, and 15s. in his mouth; and this duplicate was found inside the fold of his handkerchief.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say, "I am short of money, you must pawn this bed?" A. No.

HENRY SKINNER . I was a police-serjeant. I took the prisoner - I found half-a-crown and some half-pence in his pocket - the inspector said he had something in his mouth - the officer seized him, and from his mouth he dropped 5s. and a half-a-sovereign.

HENRY BERESFORD (police-serjeant G 8.) I found this duplicate in the prisoner's handkerchief round his neck.

CHARLES WORLEY , I am in the service of Mr. Castle. This bed was pawned by the prisoner for a guinea, in the name of John Smith - I gave him a sovereign and some half-pence.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor employed me and six or seven more to remove some goods, about five or six o'clock, as he was going to leave his wife, unknown to her - between seven and eight o'clock, he was coming downstairs, and said to me, "I am short of money, you must sell this bed or pawn it; and if they stop you, or ask any question, say you are going to leave your wife" - I took it, and when I came back, the landlord said he had gone with the goods - I asked for my hat, and they said he had thrown it into the van - I saw him afterwards, and he said, "What have you done with the bed?" - I said, "You know very well" - he told me to keep the duplicate till he saw me alone.

JAMES TREVILLIAN. I was removing; but I did not give him the bed to pawn.

( William Smee , coal and potatoe-dealer, of Old-street, and Robert Kendall , a broker, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-169

691. JOHN PARKER and HENRY MORRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 1 tea-caddy, value 10s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s.; 4 frocks, value 15s.; 1 flannel wrapper, value 1s.; 2 pinafores, value 1s. 6d.; 2 petticoats, value 1s.; 1 window curtain, value 6d.; 1 cap, value 8d.; and 3 shifts, value 7s. , the goods of Ellis Henry West .

EDWARD JONES (police-serjeant D 16.) I was in Milton-street, New-road, about two o'clock, on the 3d of March, I saw the two prisoners - Morris was carrying the

tea-caddy, and Parker this bundle - they saw me and made a pause at the corner of Quebec-street - I went across the road, and called to Parker, "Jack, I want to speak to you" - they both stopped - I asked what they had got - Parker said he did not know - I asked where he got it - he said he got the bundle at the corner of Lisson-grove, and was engaged to carry it for a woman, who was to give him sixpence - I then asked Morris where. he got the caddy, he would not tell me - I took them to the station-house - the caddy was tied up in a handkerchief, which Morris claimed as his - I gave it him - I then asked Parker whether Morris got the caddy as he got the bundle - he said, "Yes, a woman gave it him to carry."

SARAH WEST . I am the wife of Henry West - we live at Irongate-Wharf, Paddington - on the 3d of March I went out a little after twelve o'clock - I left a person washing in the house - I returned a little after two o'clock - I missed this property in the evening - the caddy had been on the drawers in the parlour, and these other things in the drawers.

Parker's Defence. I met a woman who asked me to carry this bundle and tea-caddy, and she would give us sixpence - the officer asked what we had got - I said I did not know, and he would not turn back with us to see where we were going - it was a short woman, with a cloak on, and a black straw bonnet.

Morris's Defence. I was with Parker, when we met the woman - she gave us these things to carry to Baker-street.

EDWARD JONES . Parker asked me to go to Baker-street, but that was going towards where they lived - I did not think it safe to go further in that direction with the two prisoners and the property.

PARKER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-170

692. GEORGE PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 3 yards of cloth, value 14s. , the goods of Charles Ubsdell .

MARY VEHALL. I am a widow. On the 18th of February I was standing at the corner of Bedford-street, opposite the prosecutor's shop - I saw the prisoner take a piece of cloth from the window, which he put under his coat, and went away - I gave an alarm.

CHARLES UBSDELL . I am the son of Charles Ubsdell, a woollen-draper , who lives at the corner of Dock-street, opposite Bedford-street - I had put this piece of cloth out at half-past nine o'clock in the morning - there were three yards - the witness gave me information - I ran out and saw the prisoner with it under his coat - he nearly let it fall - he doubled it up afresh, and put it under his arm - I followed him to Charles-street - he then turned up Back-lane, and I lost him - I am sure he is the man.

GEORGE CHRISTOPHER . I was at the toll-gate on the 18th of February - I saw the prisoner running with the cloth under his arm - I chased him into Charles-street, where I lost sight of him - I am sure he is the man - he had a fustian coat on.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

ELIZA SMITH . I have known the prisoner from a child - he has had an honest character - I heard Vehall say she could not swear to him, as she only saw him sideways' and she saw a youth at the fair who was the very spit of him, and she thought she must have swooned in her chair.

MARY VEHALL. I saw a person who resembled the prisoner so much, that I had a doubt about him, but that was since he has been in custody.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-171

693. JOHN TYRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 basket, value 2s. , the goods of Alexander Wilkie .

EDWARD GRIFFITH . I am a baker. I lost a basket of bread in September last, in Goswell-street , while I was gone into a house - this is the basket.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Have you any mark on it? A. No; I know it by using it so long - I lost two baskets at that time.

RICHARD BAYLIS (police-serjeant G 5.) I met the prisoner in John-street, on the 5th of March - I asked if he knew any thing respecting any baker-baskets - he said he did not - I asked where he lived - he said, "In Warner-street," and if I would go, he would show me - I went with him, and found this basket - he said a person named Forbes had left it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-172

694. WILLIAM HENRY WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 4 sovereigns; 1 half-sovereign; and 10s. in silver; the property of Joseph Bell , his master .

JOSEPH BELL. I live in High-Holborn . The prisoner was my porter - on the 13th of March, he brought me a £5 note from Mrs. Manning , a customer, who wanted change for it - I gave him 4l. 10s. in gold, and 10s. in silver - I told him to take it to Mrs. Manning, who would pay her bill of 1l. 4s. 6d. - he absconded - I saw no more of him till the 24th, when a person saw him in Hatton-garden, and had him taken - I gave Mrs. Manning £5 for her note the next day, and she paid her bill.

ANN AYLING . I am in the service of Mrs. Manning. I gave the £5 note into the prisoner's hand - Mr. Bell has since paid the money.

JOHN COVER . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner on the 24th of March.

Prisoner's Defence. My master sent me for beer, and he was to have the change ready for me, but I did not go back to have it - he at first gave me in charge for 5l. 3s. 9d.

MR. BELL. I looked over my books on the Monday after he left, and found he had received 3s. 6d. on my account, and 3d. I gave him to fetch a pot of beer.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-173

695. JAMES WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 2 half-crowns, 1 sixpence, and 4 pence, the monies of Thomas Regan ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

THOMAS REGAN. I lodge at Compton-place, Brunswick-square. I was at the Cock public-house, Somers'-town , about five weeks ago - I had two half-crowns, a sixpence, and four-pence in my pocket - I met a friend, and a had a little to drink, and the prisoner stuck to me - I pulled the money

out of my pocket, and put it into my cap for safety - he took it out of my cap - I had paid for one pot of beer - the prisoner said he was going out to get shaved, and would return in a few minutes, but he did not - I was the worse for liquor - I saw no more of him for five weeks, when I met him in the Hampstead-road, I said he was a pretty man to run away with my money - he said he did not, but he put it back into my cap - I said, if he did not give it me, or give me some satisfaction, I would give him in charge, and I did - I am sure he did not put the money back into my cap.

Prisoner. I never saw his money - at half-past two o'clock on the Sunday I went to have a pint of porter - I gave him some - I then said I was going to get shaved - I stopped to have my hair cut, and he came - I did not go back - he charged me with robbing him of this money - he saw me several times afterwards, and did not have me taken. Witness. It was at five o'clock in the morning when he had the pint of porter - that was at the Cock; I had two glasses of rum and milk, and it took effect on me - he saw that and stuck to me.

JOHN NEWMAN . I was at the Cock, and saw the prosecutor and prisoner there at half-past two o'clock - the prosecutor was rather tipsy - I saw 5s. 10d. in his cap, on the tap-room table - the prisoner was close to him - I saw him take the money - he paid for a pot of beer out of it - he then went out with it, and said he was going to be shaved - I made sure he would return, as they seemed very good friends - he went away with the money and the bundle that the money was in, while the prosecutor was asleep.

ROBERT BUGDEN (police-constable S 28). I took the prisoner - the prosecutor charged him with robbing him of two half-crowns, a 6d. and 4d. - the prisoner said, "Why had you not mentioned this when you saw me at the Elephant and Castle at Camden Town?" - the prosecutor said he had never seen him.

EDWARD CAGNEY (police-constable S 169). I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's officer - I know he is the man.

GUILTY .* Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-174

696. JAMES WHITAKER was indicted for embezzlement .

FREDERICK LAWSON . I am an oil and colour-man , and live in Gray's-inn-lane . The prisoner was my servant - on the 12th of March I sent him with a sack of salt to Mr. Restler, in Red Cross-street - I gave him a bill of parcels, which was receipted - the amount was 7s. - he left about two, and returned between five and six o'clock - I asked him for the money - he said Mr. Restler did not pay him - I asked him for the bill, which I desired him to bring back, as it was receipted - he said he forgot it - he was at home for about an hour, and then absconded.

GEORGE RESTLER . On the 12th of March, I received the goods and the bill of parcels by the prisoner - it was 7s., but I paid him 6s. - I said I never gave but 6s. a sack for salt, and if that was not right, I would make it right.

EDWARD MILLS (police-serjeant E 3). I took the prisoner - he said, in going to the station, that he supposed he should go over the water; but that was what he wanted; and he might thank his father for it.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-175

697. WILLIAM TREADWIN WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 piece of cambric, containing in length 7 1/2 yards, value 50s., the goods of Robert Palgrave , his master .

ROBERT PALGRAVE. The prisoner was my apprentice - this cambric is my property - I swear to it by the manufacturer's number - the prisoner had no authority to part with it.

THOMAS WOOD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in St. Giles's. The prisoner offered this cambric in pawn - I detained it- he said it belonged to his mother - I said, "You look to me like a linen-draper's shopman" - he then said he lived with Mr. Verry - I went to Mr. Verry's in the evening, but could not find him - the prisoner was then gone; but I made inquiries, and found him on the Thursday evening afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence. Being in want of money, I was induced to take it, hoping that in a few days I should have been able to restore it - I should not have felt disposed to wrong so good a master - the day before I made a confession of my guilt, he trusted me with 1000l. to take to his banker.

( Stephen Staff , No. 18, Tothill-street, Westminster, a boot-maker, gave him a good character, and promised to take him into his service.)

GUILTY. Aged 19. - Recommended to mercy by the Jury and the Prosecutor . - Confined for Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18340410-176

698. JOHN WRITER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , two shoes, value 2s. ; the goods of John Foreman .

ELIZABETH FOREMAN . I am the wife of John Foreman, of Chapel-street, Somers-town . These shoes are my husband's, and were placed out side the door, on the 9th of April, about half-past three o'clock - they were taken away about four o'clock.

WILLIAM BOWELL (police-constable S 160). I was in Chapel-street, Somer's-town, on the 9th of April - I met the prisoner crossing the road, with this pair of shoes under his arm - I stopped him, and asked where he was taking them to? - he said to his brother, who lived in Judd-street, and he had brought them from his uncle in Mill-place, where they had been repairing - I took him there, but he did not seem inclined to point out where his uncle lived - I then asked him again where he got them? - he said, "Did not I tell you I had them from my brother?" - I took him to the station-house, and then found the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-177

699. HENRY SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; the goods of Jeremiah Sims , from his person .

JEREMIAH SIMS. I am a carpenter , and live in Camperdown-place, Bermondsey. On Sunday afternoon, the 6th of April, I was in the Hampstead-road , looking at a funeral - a person spoke to me - I felt, and missed my handkerchief - I went in pursuit of the person who was pointed out to me - I saw the prisoner in the crowd - I went, and took him by the collar - I said, "I want to speak to you, I believe you have got something belonging to me" - I found

my handkerchief in the bosom of his shirt, and gave him in charge.

Prisoner. I picked it up in the crowd. Witness. I am positive it did not drop.

THOMAS LAKE (police-constable S 50). I received the prisoner - these two handkerchief were found on him.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-178

OLD COURT, Tuesday, April 15th, 1834.

Third Middlesex Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

700. JOHN SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 1 ham, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of John Leighs .

JOHN LEIGHS. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Charlton-street, Somer's-town . On the evening of the 8th of April, I was in the room behind the shop - the servant called out that a ham was taken from the door - I ran out, and found it lying close to the prisoner's feet - he had a bag in his hand - nobody was near him - I had seen it safe a minute before, hanging on the door-post - he denied having taken it - I took him into the shop, and gave him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS BAKER . I am errand-boy to Mr. Allan. I saw the prisoner lift his hand up and take the ham down - he looked into the shop - he then stepped into another shop, when the gentleman came out and dropped the ham at his feet.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took it down at all.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-179

701. JOHN FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 4s. 4 1/2d. in copper monies, the property of Joseph Fraser , from the person of Ann, his wife .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-180

702. JOSEPH PURVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , 1 hammer, value 2s. , the goods of John Anthony Purvis .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-181

Third London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

703. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for fraud , to which he pleaded GUILTY . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-182

704. SARAH GABLE was indicted for a misdemeanor .

THOMAS WYBORN . I am assistant to Messrs. Harris and Brookman, druggists, Gracechurch-street . On the 6th of March , about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in and asked for a quarter of a pound of salts, and a pennyworth of pilacocis, which came to four pence - she laid down half-a-crown - I gave her 2s. 2d. change - I went to Mr. Sinclair's, next door, to get it changed - the prisoner came in again in about half an hour, and asked for one pennyworth of pilacocia - she laid down another half-a-crown - I kept the half-crown, detained her, and sent for an officer - I said, "You were here half an hour before with a bad half-crown, and this is another bad one" - she said she had not been there before - I am certain she is the woman - I got the first half-crown from Sinclair, and delivered it to the officer.

ANN SINCLAIR . I am the daughter of William Sinclair , who is a confectioner , living in Fenchurch-street. I remember Mr. Wyborn's coming to ask me to change half-a-crown - I put the half-crown he gave me into the till - there was no other half-crown there - in about ten minutes my attention was called to the half-crown, and it was returned to Mr. Wyborn by Mansfield, who took it out of the till - nobody had access to the till but myself and her.

ELLEN MANSFIELD . I am assistant to Mr. Sinclair. On Thursday evening, the 6th of March, I had occasion to go to the till between eight and nine o'clock, and found half-a-crown there, and only one - I took it from the till and gave it to Thomas Young , the apprentice, to return to Mr. Wyborn's - nobody had access to the till but me and Miss Sinclair.

THOMAS YOUNG. I am apprentice to Mr. Sinclair. On the 6th of March I received half-a-crown from Mansfield, and took it to Mr. Wyborn - I am sure it was the same.

JAMES PAINE . I am a constable. On the night of the 6th of March I received Gable into custody - I received two half-crowns from Mr. Wyborn, which I produce - I marked them in Wyborn's presence - the prisoner was searched, and nothing found on her but a duplicate.

JOHN FIELD . I am a inspector of coin to the Mint. I have examined these two half-crowns - they are both counterfeit - both cast in the same could, and alike in all respects.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know it was bad - I did not go twice to the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-183

705. JAMES BOYLE was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM ANDREW SHIELDS . I am the son of Mr. Shields, ham and tongue merchant , in Leadenhall-street . On the evening of the 4th of March the prisoner came to the shop about a quarter before nine o'clock, and asked for a three halfpenny saveloy - he gave me a coutnerfeit shilling - I tried it, then took away the saveloy, and said,"This is a bad one" - I called my father - the prisoner said,"There is no occasion for that," and threw another shilling down on the counter - I saw that was a bad one as it lay there - by this time my father came - I said, "This person has offered me a bad shilling, but he has given me another: I will go and get change" - I gave my father the first one, and took the other and went out as if for change, but I brought a watchman - the prisoner denied that that was the shilling he gave me, and asked me where I had been for change - I said I had no intention of getting change - my father returned me the first shilling, and I afterwards gave them both to the watchman - I am quite sure I gave him the same shillings - that is the one my father gave me - I am quite sure of the other.

ANDREW WILLIAM SHIELDS . I am the witness's father. He called me to the shop - the prisoner stood in front of the counter - my son gave me a shilling, which he had bent - he said the prisoner had offered him a bad one, and had given him another, and he would go and get change - I looked into the till, and seeing there was plenty of change, I presumed what he was gone out for - I asked the prisoner how he got the shilling - he said he got it in

the Borough, and had worked hard for it - I asked where he worked - he said, "At the West India Docks" - my son returned with the watchman - I took both the shillings in my hand, and marked them in the presence of my son and the watchman - I am sure they were the same shillings as I received - I returned them to my son.

JOHN MESSENGER . I am a constable. On Tuesday evening, the 4th of March, I found the prisoner in custody at the watch-house - I searched him, and found 2 1/2d. in his pocket - while I was searching him, the watchman came into the watch-house, and I found the two shillings on the table - I produce the same as I took off the table.

THOMAS CUNDICK . I am a watchman of Lime-street. On Tuesday, the 4th of March, I received two counterfeit shillings from young Shields - I put them on the table at the watch-house - Messenger took them up in my presence.

ANDREW WILLIAM SHIELDS re-examined. I have no doubt these are the marks I made.

JOHN FIELD . These two shillings are both counterfeit, and from the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 63. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-184

700. SARAH CROW was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. SCARLET conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT SPENCE . I am a City policeman. On the 20th of March, I was on duty in Long-lane - the prisoner was pointed out to me - I went up to her, and asked if she had any counterfeit coin on her - she said, "No" - her right hand was clenched - I seized hold of it, forced it open, and found three counterfeit shillings, which I have had ever since - I found on her a sixpence and 3d in copper.

WILLIAM SMITH . I was assistant to Mr. Kitchen, a surgeon, in Aldersgate-street . On the 20th of March , about a quarter past three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop, apologised for troubling me, but said, the afternoon before, she had bought an ounce of salts, and in change for half-a-crown, I had given her a bad shilling, which she produced - I said I was certain I had not seen her before; and, on reference to my book, I found no salts entered - I asked her the time - she said,"About half-past three o'clock" - I was then convinced of the falsity, because, at that time, I was engaged very busily in dressing a young man's hand - she put the shilling on the counter - I was certain she had not been there the day before, and would not change it - she went out grumbling, and rather impertinent, saying she would recover it, if it cost her 2s. or 3s. - I sent a boy to follow her, and she got taken into custody eventually - she said her sister came with her when I gave her the bad shilling.

Prisoner. I really took the shillings at his shop the evening before, of Mr. Smith - I received two shillings and fourpence, and two halfpence.

JOHN FIELD . These shillings are counterfeit, and have been cast in the same mould - they are the same date and impression.

ROBERT SPENCE re-examined. I took her about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's shop - she was going along, and was pointed out to me - I took her without any communication with Smith.

GUILTY . Aged 63. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18340410-185

707. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

ANN DONOVAN . I am the wife of Thomas Donovan , who lives at No. 5, Wellington-street, Goswell-road . On the 18th of January , about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my house, and took two parlours, at five shillings a week, which I had to let - he said he would leave one shilling deposit, and would come in on the Wednesday following - he asked me to change him a crown-piece - I went up stairs to my daughter, and asked her to take the four shillings down to him - she went down - I saw her give him the four shillings, and he gave her the five-shillings-piece - I kept the crown-piece till Monday, and then gave it to my landlord.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where did this occur? A. In Wellington-street, in Middlesex. My daughter bit the crown-piece in three places - I kept it from the Saturday I received it, till Monday, the 27th, in the following week, when I showed it to my landlord, and he took it away - I had no other five-shilling-piece - I had put it away by itself - it was of no use to me - I kept it from the 18th to the 27th, quite separate in my work-box, which nobody goes to but myself.

ELIZABETH DONOVAN . I recollect the prisoner coming to the house - I gave him four shillings, and he gave me the crown-piece, which I gave to my mother - I received it back from her on the 3rd of March, when I gave it to Spence - I had bit it in three places, and should know it again (looking at it) - this is the same.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? A. No; I did not see him again till he was before the magistrate on the Saturday - I am quite certain he is the man - I was about ten minutes with him - he never came to occupy the apartment - my mother had given the crown-piece to the landlord, and received it back from him.

GEORGE NURSEY . I am a bookseller. I called on Mrs. Donovan on the 27th of January - she gave me a counterfeit crown, which I kept ten or twelve days, and returned to her again - it was never out of my pocket all the time.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you keep it? A. In my greatcoat pocket - there were marks of teeth on it.

MARY RYAN . I am the wife of John Ryan , who lives at Cow-cross - the prisoner came to my house on the 3rd of February - I had rooms to let, and a bill up - he asked if I had a room to let - I said yes - he looked at the parlour, and liked it very well - he agreed to take it at 2s. 9d. per week - he gave me a five-shilling-piece, saying he would leave a small deposit - I gave him four shillings change - I put the crown on the the mantel-piece for about two hours, when I looked at it, and thought it looked dark - I gave it to my nephew to take to the butter shop, as I did not think it good - he brought it back to me in a minute - I kept it till I gave it to Spence.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? A. No, nor since, till my nephew took him into custody - he was about twenty minutes in company with me - I saw him before the magistrate, on the last day of February.

THOMAS RYAN . I am the nephew of Mary Ryan - I received a counterfeit crown from her, and took it to the butter shop - the shopman said it was not good, and I returned my aunt the same crown-piece - I was present when the prisoner gave it to her - on the 28th, as I was going to

work, I met him at Smithfield-bars - I followed him, till I met Spence, the policeman, and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was he in your presence? A. A quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes - I was sitting at work, and am quite sure of him.

SARAH CANTY . I am the wife of Richard Canty , who lives in Golden-lane - On the 5th of February I had a room to let - there was a bill in my window - the prisoner came and said, "Can I see the room?" - I said "yes" - I lighted a candle, and took him up stairs - he asked the rent - I said 3s. - he looked at the corner where the bedstead was to stand, and said, "It will suit me very well; I will give you a shilling deposit; but come down stairs" - I went down - he pulled out a crown-piece, and said, "I have not got a shilling; can you give me four shillings?" - I did so - he threw the crown-piece on the table, and said, "You see it is a good one" - I took it up; and he said, "To-morrow morning I will send my wife to look at the room" - he went out - I had the crown-piece in my hand, and away he went - something struck me that it was bad, as he was gone in an instant - I went out, and showed the crown to the milkman, who said it was bad - he returned it to me - I gave it to Spence.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you see him again? A. Not till he was at Guildhall - he was not very long with me, but I looked at him particularly, and told Spence what sort of a man he was - I looked at him to see if he was a steady man, and likely to pay me.

RICHARD CANTY. I am the husband of Sarah Canty - on the 5th of February she gave me a bad crown-piece - I put it in a piece of paper, and put it into the drawer - I gave it to her afterwards, and she gave it to Spence.

Cross-examined. Q. Had any body access to the drawer? A. Nobody but myself.

ROBERT SPENCE . I am a policeman. I saw Thomas Ryan on the 28th of February - he pointed out the prisoner to me - I took him - I have three crown-pieces which I received from Ryan, Canty, and Donovan - I have kept them separate from other money - I found sixpence on him.

JOHN FIELD . These are all three counterfeit.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you never mistaken in your estimate of bad money? A. I am not sure I never said money was bad which turned out to be good - I do not mean to say, I have not been deceived - I may have taken bad money, but I have not done so knowingly - these are cast in Britannia-metal, which is tin and antimony - two have been cast in one mould - the other is different.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Confined for One Year; the fourteen first, and the fourteen last Days to be Solitary .

Reference Number: t18340410-186

708. HENRY PHILLIPS and JOHN NORRIS were indicted for unlawfully breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Langman , on the 26th of January , at St. Bridget, alias St. Bride , with intent to steal the goods and monies therein .

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE LANGMAN. I keep the White-bear public-house, in Bride-lane , in the parish of St. Bride's. The prisoner Norris was in my employ as pot-boy , and lived in the house, and Phillips had left me about three weeks - in consequence of what happened, I kept a watch on my premises - on Sunday morning, the 26th of January, I had spoken to Huckle, the officer - he and I sat up together for two nights previous to the Sunday, and on Saturday night we sat up again - Huckle was concealed in the bar, and I was in a bed-room up stairs - Huckle called me, and I saw Phillips standing in the bar, between six and seven o'clock morning - Norris was gone up stairs to his bed-room - I had locked the street door when I went to bed - the house had not been opened for business - I had seen it secure the night before - I had heard Norris come down stairs a little before six, which was some time before the officer called me down - the front door had been opened by somebody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many other servants had you? A. Only one besides the nursery-maid, and they were in bed - I had three servants, but only two slept in the house, two females - I left the key in the street door - I lost nothing that night - I found the door locked when I went down - it was locked or bolted - I think it was locked.

JOHN HUCKLE . I am inspector of the watch. I was in Mr. Langman's house on Sunday morning - I went there at half-past five o'clock - Mr. Langman locked me in the bar- in a few minutes after, I heard somebody come down stairs and making a noise in the tap-room, moving the pots about and sweeping the place - a few minutes before seven o'clock I heard somebody knocking with their hand at the street door - there is no knocker to the street door - I heard the person inside go along the passage and open the door - I then heard the footsteps of two persons come along the passage - I heard a sort of rumbling noise, and one person go up the stairs - I then heard the catch of a window thrown back, and the window, which divides the tap-room from the passage, pushed up - I turned round, and saw Phillips in the bar - he had his hand on the till, which was shut - he saw me directly I turned round - I got up and said, "You have made a bad job of this, young man" - he said, "I am sorry for it" - he had his shoes off - his shoes were outside - I called Mr. Langman, who came down stairs - I left Phillips in his custody, and went up for Norris, who was brought down - he was dressed - I examined the window - a pair of steps had been removed from where I had seen them before, and they would assist the prisoner in putting his arm through a broken pane of glass, and putthing the catch back - there was nobody up stairs but Norris, not dressed.

Cross-examined. Q. This was not a very early hour? A. The house does not close until late - it is a night-house - the till is in a counter, shut up - Phillips's hand was on the counter - the counter is covered with pewter, but he had his hand nearly on the edge - as it appeared to me, attempting to take the till out - the till was not locked - no part of it was opened - I found no property of the prosecutor's in his possession - the steps had been removed from one place to the other.

MR. LANGMAN re-examined. Q. Used you to leave out a knife-tray for the knives to be cleaned? A. Frequently - Phillips never used to come to assist in cleaning the knives - I never saw him after he left - I don't know whether I had left the knife-tray out that night - it was kept in the bar usually.

Q. Suppose Phillips had come to clean the knives, and

you had not left them out, Norris would naturally go to the bar to get the knives? A. No, they were not in that bar, but in a bar behind, not near the window - you have no business in that bar to get to the other: you must go into the bar the knives were in first - the house opens about seven o'clock, but Norris was rather late that morning.

Phillips's Defence. I was out of employ - my fellow prisoner asked me to come and help him on Sunday morning - I knocked at the door, Norris let me in - I swept the passage out, and did two or three things for him - he asked me to clean the knives - I found they were not left out - Norris went up stairs - I immediately opened the window, and got into the bar - not with intent to steal, but to get the dirty knives.

Norris's Defence. I asked him to come and help me, which he did - I let him - in - I left him at work and went up stairs - I heard a noise and came down - I am entirely innocent.

PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

NORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-187

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

709. GEORGE GEORGE was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying John Moulton .

HENRY BODDY . I was pot-boy at the George the Fourth public-house, Duke-street, Lisson-grove . On February 21 , John Moulton was at the public-house - the prisoner was there also - I saw him strike John Moulton under his left ear with his right hand, and he fell - I did not observe what state his legs were in when he fell - he was carried to the hospital - I did not see him afterwards - his leg was broken - at the time the prisoner struck Moulton, Moulton was trying to persuade him to pay for a pot of beer - he was asking him civilly to pay for a pot of beer which he(the prisoner) had called for - the prisoner refused to pay for it; the deceased told me to leave the beer, and he would see it paid - the prisoner told him to come out and have a round - when he said that, they were close together - the prisoner laid hold of Moulton by the collar, and pulled him to the curb stone, and told him to come out and have a round - the deceased did not say a word, but stood there a minute, then walked into the road with his hands in his trowsers' pockets - he took his hands out of his pockets, and had not time to get them up before he received the blow - he was just raising his hands, and was looking down where to put his foot - (he was not aware of it before he received the blow) - then the prisoner hit him a blow which knocked him down and broke his leg.

Q. It appeared to you the deceased was about to protect himself, but was taken by surprise by the blow before he had taken his position? A. Yes: the prisoner, immediately he struck the blow, he stopped and picked up his hat, and ran away - the deceased was the worse for liquor - I did not consider him drunk - he was a good deal affected by liquor; and the prisoner was the worse for liquor a goodish bit - both were a good deal the worse for liquor.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is Mr. McNair, your master, here? A. I have not seen him - I did not see the deceased turn the prisoner out of the house - I had heard talking about it after it was all over - I did not hear him complain of it in the presence of the deceased - I do not know that they had been quarrelling before I saw any thing - this was the first I saw of it.

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH . I live in Stephen-street, Lisson-grove. I was in the public-house, and saw the prisoner and Moulton - they tossed for beer, which was brought - payment was asked for - the prisoner refused to pay for it - he had lost his toss - he refused to pay, and was going away - the deceased stood up and placed his back against the tap-room door, and prevented his going away till he paid for the beer - the prisoner challenged him to fight - he would not fight, but kept his hands in his pockets - the prisoner turned himself round from the deceased to sit himself down, and ordered the beer to be brought; and it was brought in a third time - it had been twice taken away because there was a dispute about paying for it - he drank part of it himself, and the rest the company drank - I cannot say whether the deceased had any - he refused to pay for it again - the prisoner got up and left the tap-room, intending, as I supposed, to go home; and in the about five or ten minutes the deceased, myself, and two or three more followed - I saw the prisoner outside - he and the deceased had two or three words in the street - the prisoner challenged him to fight, and before the deceased had sufficient time to raise his arms up for self-defence, the prisoner hit him a blow which knocked him down - I did not observe that his leg was broken - the prisoner ran away - I followed him and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you sober? A. Perfectly - the prisoner was not drunk - I cannot say he was sober - the landlord came into the tap-room with one pot of beer - the prisoner was leaning with his elbows on the iron railing in front of the bar outside - he did not complain of the deceased turning him out of the house in my hearing - he got no blow from any body in my presence.

ISAAC FLOWER . I was house surgeon at the Middlesex Hospital. John Moulton was brought in on the 22nd of February, at half-past twelve o'clock at night - he had a very severe compound fracture of the right leg - he got on very well for the first three or four days, but by the third or fourth day erysipelas followed, and ended by suppuration and sloughing, and then exhaustion: in my judgment, the broken leg caused his death.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he broken a blood vessel? A. I understand, from his friends, he had been troubled with spitting of blood.

JOSEPH CRICK . I assisted in taking the deceased to the hospital - his name was John Moulton.

Prisoner's Defence. He made the first blow at me.

JAMES McNAIR . I am the landlord of the George the Fourth. I stood behind my counter - the prisoner came out of the tap-room, and asked for half a pint of beer - I did not see the quarrel between him and the deceased - I saw the prisoner come from the tap-room to the bar - he stopped there a second or two - then the deceased came out and asked if he was going to pay for the porter he had lsot - he said he was not - the deceased took hold of his collar, pulled him towards the door, and called him a shabby fellow, or something.

COURT. Q. Did the deceased take hold of the prisoner's

collar? A. Yes; he opened the door and threw him out - I told the deceased to let him alone, for he was drunk, and I told another man to see if he had fallen down the steps - I went and looked, and found he had not fallen - the deceased went into the tap-room, and came out in a few seconds - they went out into the middle of the street - I saw them both in the attitude of fighting - the prisoner struck the first blow and no more - I saw the deceased with his hands up, and at that very moment he received the blow - I am positive before that, that I had seen the deceased push the prisoner down the steps - the deceased was a stiff set man - not so tall as the prisoner - they were both fresh - the prisoner is a chaff-cutter, and the deceased an omnibus driver.

WILLIAM INGOLD . I was in the house that night - I know the deceased turned the prisoner out before this happened.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I had seen the prisoner outside in a state of intoxication - the deceased told me he had turned him out - the prisoner was standing out on the iron rails intoxicated - the deceased said he had turned him out - I said, "Why, I saw him leaning on the rails" - then the deceased said to a person there, "Come on, he is standing outside," and then they went out to him.

( William Ives , bricklayer and builder; John Lambert , farrier, No. 2, Duke's-mews; and John Carter , livery-stable keeper, Duke's-mews, Earl-street, Lisson-grove, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY. - Recommended to mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18340410-188

710. JOHN CHAMPKIN , SAMUEL LAKE , and MICHAEL GEORGE were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Newsom , on the 9th of March , and stealing therein, 1 watch, value 1l., and two time-pieces, value 13l., his goods .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

SAMUEL FLETCHER . I am a shopman to Thomas Newson, watch and clock-maker , at Edmonton . He does not live in the house - I live in it, as his servant - he pays the rent and taxes - on the 9th of March, I went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock, and left the shop and everything safe - I was alarmed by a crash in the night - I got up, and went down stairs - I found two shutters wrenched from their place - the bar was knocked off, and two panes of glass were broken - I missed a time-piece - it was dark in the shop - it was about half-past eleven o'clock at night - the shutters had been secured by me the night before(Saturday) - I saw Mary Turner about fifteen yards from the shop, when I got up - a person was afterwards sent for the watchman - I did not see either of the three prisoners - I saw one who was taken, but is now at large - I know the prisoners - I went out that night after the robbery, in my shirt, to see if I could find any of the depredators - I watched about fifty yards from the premises, and when I returned back, there was Michael George, the prisoner, and a person named Streak, by the shop - George asked who were the people who had been doing the mischief? - I told him we had sent the officer for one Muggleton - he said, "You should not have sent for him, for he is an innocent man, you should take Lake and Champkin" - I saw some hands taking things out of the window, when I first came down, and saw a table-clock in somebody's hands - I caught hold of it, and made an alarm - they immediately withdrew, and I recovered it - I could not see who it was had hold of it - it was a man - I saw the other two prisoners next morning, about eleven o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What time did you find out the robbery? A. About half-past eleven- I am sure it was after eleven o'clock, for the time-piece was going in the place, and their pulling it down, stopped it - I saw George four or five minutes after I came back to the shop - I might be ten minutes gone - in a few minutes after I returned, I saw George - it was not so much as a quarter of an hour after half-past eleven o'clock, that I returned, and saw him - there were other persons about where I saw him - Muggleton was in custody at that time, and that led George to say what I have stated - I could not tell whether he was intoxicated; he might be - I could not see him reeling about - he was outside the shop, when I first saw him - he was standing - I did not see him leaning against the wall.

MR. PHILLIPS? Q. Are you sure he said what you have stated? A. I am.

MARY TURNER . I am married - on the night Newsom's shop was robbed, I was about 200 yards from the shop, when I heard the fall of the shutters, and soon after that I observed Samuel Lake coming in a direction from Edmonton - he passed me in a direction from Newsom's shop - he was running - I followed him to the next door to mine - I asked him what was the reason he stopped out at those hours, to be locked out? - he said his father had fastened the door up, and the shutters too, that he should not come in - I saw nothing more of him - I saw him about two hundred yards from Newsom's shop, at first - there are a great many houses between Newsom's shop and where he was running - I cannot say whether he was alone, or in company - there was another man running, but I could not say who it was - he was running with Lake in the same direction - they ran to the next door to me, No. 11, Union-row - I followed them, but they separated before they got to the bottom of the row - they ran together a very few minutes - I lost sight of the other man in a few minutes, at Mrs. Muggleton 's yard, and opposite to that, I spoke to Lake.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were in Union-row; does that go in the same line as the High-street in Edmonton, or turn off from it? A. It turns off from it - every body coming along Edmonton would be coming from the prosecutor's shop - Lake was over at the door when I overtook him - his father lived next door to me - I heard him at the door, and they refused to let him in.

JANE CHAMBERS . I live at Tottenham. On the night Newsom's shop was broken open, I heard a crash of glass; and soon after a second smash - I saw three tall men run from Mr. Newsom's shop - I could not identify any of them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you in the High-street? A. Yes; I was very near the shop - I was five houses from it - I saw them run from there direct up the road - I cannot say whether they separated.

WILLIAM BOAYSER . I am a watchman. On the night in question, I apprehended Lake and a man named Muggleton - I took Lake about half-past two o'clock in the morning, and Muggleton about a quarter before twelve o'clock - I took Muggleton to Mr. Fletcher's shop - Michael George was there - and after Fletcher ordered me to take Muggleton up, George asked me what I was going to do with Muggleton - I said to lock him up - he said, "You need not take him, he is an innocent man," and he would be answerable for him, if I would take Lake and Chamkin; they were the two - I afterwards took Lake and Champkin - I searched Champkin, and found a handkerchief and a glove on him - I laid them on the table at the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did you take Lake? A. In Mr. Pomfrey 's shed, asleep, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's - I found nothing on him - he said he came to the shed to sleep, for his father had fastened him out - I found no timepiece or watch on Champkin - I should know the handkerchief again by the colour of it, and the blood on it; but I did not see the blood on it until Carter showed it to me at Angel on the Friday - the glove is a left hand glove, marked with blood - I did not see that when I took it from him - I know them to be the same I saw Carter produce - Champkin himself owned them at Mr. Carter's house.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did not George ask what was the matter when he first came up? A. I was not there when he first came up - the robbery was on Sunday night - George was ordered to come before the magistrate, and was taken into custody on the Friday afterwards- he had attended before a magistrate - I went with the summons, and fetched him from Southgate - he was before a magistrate three times, and was at large after the first and second examination; and at the third he was detained - that was on Friday - I went to him on the Monday, and found him at work at Southgate - I told him he must come before a magistrate to give evidence against Champkin and Lake - he said he could not say any thing against them - I told him he had said last night that he would - he said he could not prove what he had said - that he was in liquor, and did not rightly know what he did say - he said he had seen the persons who committed the robbery at the Roebuck public-house, and that was the reason he said it was them.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far is the Roebuck from Newsom's? A. A quarter of a mile - I did not notice whether he was too tipsy to know what he was saying - I am sure he said what I have stated: and in consequence of that I took the other two men by order of Fletcher - George was examined first as a witness - I took Champkin at a quarter past six o'clock, about 100 yards from his own house.

MRS. TURNER. I did not see George that night.

RICHARD CARTER . I am watch-house-keeper of Edmonton. I saw Champkin in prison - Bowser gave me a handkerchief - it was wet, and appeared as if a person had been using it to his nose - it appeared dirty and wet - I have taken care of it ever since - it is in the same state as it was then - here is the glove - I did not take any particular notice of it till it was before the magistrate - it was then as it is now - it appears to me to have blood on it - I kept it in my possession safely - I put no blood on it - it appears to fit a left hand.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did you keep the glove? A. With this handkerchief and another which I returned to him - I kept them in a drawer which is locked, but not when I first put the in - my wife and daughter could get to the drawer, but they are strictly forbidden to touch things - every thing in that drawer is considered my personal property - I did not notice the handkerchief except it being wet when I received it.

JOHN CAMP . I am a constable. I examined Champkin's fingers on the Wednesday or Tuesday after the robbery - I found a cut on the top of the second finger of the right hand, and there was blood on it - he said he cut it with a bill on the Saturday before - I asked afterwards if he was a right handed man or left hand - he said right hand - I asked how he came to cut his right hand then with a bill - he made no answer.

JURY. Q. Did you examine both hands? A. Yes.

JOHN WALL GRIMLEY . I am a glazier at Edmonton - I went to mend Mr. Newsom's window on the Monday morning after the robbery - I found the broken panes shattered very much, and on parts of the glass were spots of blood.

ROSA HART . I live at Tottenham. On the Tuesday after Mr. Newson's robbery, my little boy brought me a timepiece - I gave it to Fletcher.

SAMUEL FLETCHER re-examined. Here is the timepiece which Mrs. Hart gave to me - I know it to be one of the timepieces I received on the night in question - it is Mr. Newsom's.

COURT. Q. How long after you had taken a timepiece from a man's hand outside the shop, did you see Turner the witness? A. Three or four minutes - she was about forty yards from the house, not more - I was three or four minutes replacing the things - I then went out and saw her.

MR. DOANE. Q. When you saw George, did he ask you what was the matter? A. Yes.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he give you any reason for saying the other two men were guilty, and Muggleton was innocent? A. None.

COURT. Q. Was Mrs. Turner present when he said that? A. I do not know, there were some people present - George came into the shop.

Witness for the defence.

GEORGE SMITH . I live at Tottenham. I have known George six months - on Sunday night, the night of Mr. Newsom's robbery, he was with me from eleven to five minutes past twelve o'clock, down at the Bell - we just went into the Roebuck that night - there was George and Champkin, and Lake there - about twenty minutes before eleven o'clock, they were coming out - there were four of them - the Roebuck is about 100 yards from Newsom's shop - I and George and Henry Davis went down to the Bell - we left Champkin and Lake about the Roebuck - we left the Bell about a quarter or ten minutes before twelve o'clock - George had not any means that I know of, of knowing that Champkin and Lake had committed any robbery that night.

SAMUEL FLETCHER re-examined. This happened on Sunday night - the Bell is about 300 yards from the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-189

711. SARAH WRIGHT was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with killing and slaying Frances Sarah Everett .

NATHANIEL MORRIS . I am bailiff of the County-court of Middlesex, and am bound over to prosecute - I know nothing of the facts - I went to see this child on the 1st of March - I found it dangerously ill; it died on the third of March - I saw it had been very ill-used by somebody - it had a bruise on the side of the face, and marks on the back of the head, and the spine was injured by somebody - its name was Frances Sarah Everett - I saw the body when it was dead - Mr. Robinson, the medical gentleman, showed it to me.

HENRY CHARLES ROBINSON . I am a surgeon, and live in Seymour-street, Euston-square - I have been a surgeon about five years - I saw the deceased after death,(not before,) on the 8th of March, at No. 23, Exeter-street, Brompton - she died of disease, effusion on the chest, and a concomitant disease - I should say the effusion of water on the chest, and perhaps the combination of water in the head also, was the cause of her death - there was effusion of water on the head, and congestion of the ventricles - these I should say were the causes of death- they produce death - I cannot precisely say the occasion of those symptoms - she had externally two bruises, one on the left eye, and one on the back of the head - I cannot say that they produced the symptoms - the bruises would have accelerated death, supposing the child to be labouring under disease - she had tubercular disease of the lungs.

Q. Can you pronounce at all what was the occasion of the state you found her in? A. The effusion of water on the chest or head, or the tubercular disease of the lungs? A. It might be produced by fever, which I understand she laboured under - if she had fever at the time, I should conceive the blows accelerated the fever - the blows inflicted on a child in a healthy state, I should suppose, would not cause death.

WILLIAM DICKINSON . I am a member of the college of surgeons. I attended the child for about three weeks before she died - she was labouring under fever, occasioned, I suppose, from atmospherical causes, the effect of change of weather - if she was badly fed, it might have increased that, but would not have occasioned it - she was labouring under, fever, and had a pain in the head, which was produced, I understood, from a blow at the back of the head - which was sufficient to account for the pain in the head - it was a violent blow - the effect of the blow subsided before she died - I certainly do not consider that to be an exciting cause of the fever - it appears to me, she was labouring under fever, and died from the effect of the fever, produced from atmospherical causes, I suppose - I do not think that ill usage, or want of food, or violence, had any thing to do with it - she was not under the prisoner's care at the time I attended her, but under the care of a Mrs. Saunders .

Q. Am I to understand that, having attended her three weeks before death, you are by no means prepared to say any violence, or blows, or want of food, or care, had occasioned the illness of which she ultimately died? A. I think not - if she had been used well, she must have died of the complaint - the blows on the back of her head or neck might have accelerated death - I cannot say it did - the blows were external and subsided - when she died, she had no symptoms whatever of water in the head, nor any fracture - I examined the body - there was disease in the bowels and intestines, but not the effect of want of food - it was the result of continued fever.

SARAH BARTON . I live in Orange-street, Southwark - I am married - I met the child on the night previous to her being taken away from the prisoner - I never saw her ill treated - she asked me for a half-penny or a penny to buy a roll - I gave her a penny - she made a complaint to me - she did not look in good health - I can't say how long this was before her death.

- SEVERN. I am the wife of Joseph Severn - I live in Orange-court - the little girl used to come to my house to bring my mangling things - she complained several times to me of being beat sadly: and the last time she came she was in a very bad state of health, with a black eye and bruised nose - she asked me to take her - I said I could not- she said, "Will you be so kind as to put me into the workhouse?" - I said if she would tell me of any friend she had, I would go for her - she said Mrs. Baker would tell me where Mrs. Saunders lived, who would take her - I went - she sent me to Mrs. Saunders, who said she would take her: and next afternoon I took her to Mrs. Saunders, and left her there in a very bad state - she was extremely ill, and not able to walk - the boy who works for us was obliged to carry her - she said she was very ill, and very bad in her inside - she was in a very bad weak state - she had a bruise on the back part of her, and the eye and on the nose - she never returned to the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-190

712. WILLIAM THOMAS PICKARD , GEORGE RICHARDSON , and GEORGE DREW , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Attenborough, the younger, on the 15th of March , and stealing therein 11 gold rings, value 1l. 5s. , the goods of Richard Attenborough , and Richard Attenborough the younger ; and MARTHA PICKARD , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH, jun. I am in partnership with my uncle Richard Attenborough, sen., who is a pawnbroker , and lives in Crown-street, Finsbury - our shop is at the corner of Long-alley - our shop door opens and is closed by a spring, and another spring closes it to when it is shut, so that these springs act one on the other - it requires pushing to open it - a small push would not open it - one spring forces it to, after it has been opened, and another spring fastens it to, when it is closed - the spring is put against the top corner of the door, and holds it tight - it is contracted, and when the door is pushed it removes the spring - it is a check spring, to prevent the door going to with too great force, and it holds it tight when it is shut - the door only opens one way - this spring presses against the door, and the moment the door is pushed it yields - it holds the door the same as if a hand was put against it; but a superior force against the door will open it - on Saturday night, the 15th of March, one of our win

down was broken, and mended with three pieces of putty - it was the square of the inside sash of a glass case, containing jewellery - there were cards of rings in it - you must enter the shop about two yards to get at it - about twelve o'clock I discovered lying inside the glass case a piece of iron wire, with a hook at one end - I threw it away - I missed two cards of rings, containing about eleven or twelve, I should imagine - I consider them worth 35s. or 2l. - I have seen nine or ten of them since, and knew them all.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Had you seen the door that night? A. Yes; I was in the shop - when any body goes out of the door the spring forces it to - if a hand held the door, just at the point where it touched the spring, the second spring would force it open, I am certain - the spring which holds the door to, projects five or six inches - I live in the house and occupy it myself - I pay the rent.

THOMAS PAWLEY . I was in the employ of Messrs. Attenborough. On the night in question, I saw the prisoners Drew and Ware in the shop - I did not see Richardson - Drew stood nearest to the window where it was cut, and Ware before the counter - they saw me and went out of the shop - I went out immediately after them- Drew crossed the road, and Ware followed - nobody joined them in the street - they went up Long-alley - that was after the pane was broken - I saw the wire found about two inches in the window - if they had put it in an inch further they could have got half a dozen more cards of rings - I missed two cards of rings containing ten or twelve.

HENRY WARE . - I was at Mrs. Pickard's house on the night of the 15th of March - while I was there William Pickard, George Drew, and Richardson came in - William Pickard pulled out of his pocket eleven gold rings on a card - he showed them to me, and said he got them from Attenborough and Burgess's in Sun-street - (I had not been there that evening before) - they gave them to Mrs. Pickard, and asked her if she would mind them, and put them away for hem - she said she would; and, as near as I can recollect, she put them in the table-drawer down stairs - they then asked me go with them - I agreed, and we all went back again there - Drew took a piece of iron wire with a hook to it - he went in with intent to pledge a handkerchief - I and Richardson stopped in the shop - William Pickard stopped over the way by the post - Drew did not pawn his handkerchief - he tried with the wire to get another card of rings - a woman was looking at him all the time, and he left the wire hanging to a piece of glass, and we all went away - the woman told Mr. Attenborough's man, I believe, that the window was broken - we all went away together, and all ran together - William Pickard was not in the shop - we all went home to Mrs. Pickard's - I do not know what became of the rings afterwards - I have very often been out thieving before this - I have-got my living by working for my father - I went out thieving once or twice a week for the last two years.

Martha Pickard . Q. Did not you bring the rings in with a young man, who lodges with me? Witness. No; it is false - you were not in bed - I did not ask you to pawn a ring - your son never turned me out of your house, but always wanted me to come, and you too.

WILLIAM HOLLAND . I am a policeman. I searched the female prisoner at the station-house, and found this gold ring in her pocket - she said it was her own.

RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH re-examined. This is one of mine I believe - but I will not positively swear to this one.

JOHN TONGE . I am an inspector of the police. I searched Mrs. Pickard's house, and found two rings on the floor in the lower room - she had been out of the house then for two hours - we found her in that room when we apprehended her - there were four children in the house, and a man named Gig, who was taken into custody - Drew was there.

JAMES GLIBBERY . I am a policeman. In searching the house, I found a duplicate referring to Castles of Church-street - I found a ring there in consequence of that duplicate.

WILLIAM GOLDEN . I have come from Mr. Castles, a pawnbroker. I have the ring corresponding with this duplicate - the female prisoner pawned it on the 17th of March.

GEORGE KEMP . I am a policeman. I found five duplicates in Mrs. Pickard's house, on the table in the lower room, belonging to Edwards, Hewett, and others - I searched Drew, and found a wire with a hook at the end of it.

FREDERICK SHIRLEY . I am servant to Thomas Thomas , No. 7, Blackman-street. I produce a ring pawned by Mrs. Pickard on Monday, the 17th of March.

EDWARD ALLFORT . I am assistant to Mr. Hewitson, of Kingsland-road. I have a ring pawned by Mrs. Pickard.

MR. ATTENBOROUGH. I can identify all these rings, they having private marks on them - this is copper wire - the one left behind was iron.

Drew's Defence. I was not in the shop at all that night.

Martha Pickard's Defence. I received the rings from Ware, and certainly pawned them, but did not know they were stolen.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-191

713. WILLIAM THOMAS PICKARD and GEORGE DREW were again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Christopher Partridge , on the 8th of March , at St. Dunstan's, Stebonheath, alias Stepney , and stealing therein 9 rings, value 5l., his goods ; and MARTHA PICKARD for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen , against the Statute.

CHRISTOPHER PARTRIDGE. I am a jeweller , and live in Wentworth-place, Mile-end , St. Dunstan's, Stepney. - I rent the house - on the 8th of March, between half-past eleven and half-past twelve o'clock in the day, I was in my shop occasionally - I discovered my window was broken, and some rings taken out - the window was safe before - it was cracked, but no piece was out of it before - I missed nine gold rings; three with hair in them.

HENRY WARE . I think it was on a Saturday between one and two o'clock, or it might not be so late, that I went to Mr. Partridge's shop - I did not take notice of the time - George Drew and William Pickard went with me - when we got there, one of the windows round the corner

of the shop was cracked - I put my finger against the glass, and it cracked all across and fell out - I got under the iron bar in front of the window, put my hand in about a foot, or a foot and a half, and brought eleven gold rings to the hole; three were hair, but the tops of them were gold - I took nine of them out, and gave them to Drew - both the prisoners stood at the window, and told me when any body was looking at me - their standing there would prevent people seeing me so easily; but people could see if they looked - they covered me - we all went to Mrs. Pickard's and looked at the rings - there were three hair - the other six were all gold - I only took nine, because a gentleman dressed in black went along, who I thought noticed me; and William Pickard said, "Come on;" so I took no more - the three hair rings were on one card by themselves, and three of the gold ones also - when we got home, Mrs. Pickard said they would fetch 2s. apiece, and some not so much - she went and pledged two wedding-rings at Mr. Cotton 's - I went with her; and another one she pawned in Ratcliffe-highway for 2s., and one for 1s. - I do not know the name of the shop - after we got home, we had one of the hair ones apiece - Mrs. Pickard said one of the rings would not pledge, because it was not worth taking in - she said the pawnbroker said so - when we got home she gave me part of the money - I do not know what it was now - we tossed for the ring that was not taken in, and William Pickard won it - he told me he had pawned it at Cotton's for 1s. - he showed me the duplicate, and said he had got the best of it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sur you did not give it to him? A. Yes - I always kept in my mind where I had been - I may make a mistake sometimes - I have told a great many of these things to my father, and he tried all he could to stop me from committing these depredations; but he could not keep me from going - I do not mean to continue it - it was quite daylight when this was done - I have never been convicted.

Q. How often have you been tried in your life? A. I was never tried more than before the Lord Mayor once, about a handkerchief - I was discharged then - I was never before a Jury except here last sessions, for a gold watch - that was Blake and Hall's business - I never did any thing wrong till I knew the prisoners - they enticed me, and said what good things they got.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you stole things, who did you take them to? A. Mrs. Pickard, I went with her son and Thomas Hall - my father endeavoured to persuade me from it.

WILLIAM BOLTWOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Cotton, of Shoreditch. I produce a gold ring pawned in the afternoon of the 8th of March, (it was not after six o'clock,) by William Pickard, for 1s.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This is not a hair ring? A. No; it is a gold stone ring - they are coloured stones, not glass - a shilling was all he asked on it- I knew him before - I have seen his father at my shop, but not these nine months.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was 1s. all he asked for it? A. Yes; we do not offer more than people ask - I should not consider the stones in the ring worth two-pence.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are they cut? A. I do not consider them cut.

CHARLES PADDON . I am in the employ of Mr. Cotton. I produce the duplicate of two rings, pawned by Mrs. Pickard, on the 8th of March, and redeemed.

JAMES GLIBBERY . I found a duplicate of a ring, at the female prisoner's house in a drawer.

WILLIAM HOLLAND . I am a policeman. I found this hair ring up stairs in the female prisoner's house, after I had taken her to the station-house.

MR. PHILLIPS to Ware. Q. Did not you say it was a hair ring, that Mrs. Pickard said nobody would take, and which you tossed for? A. No; I said there were three hair rings, but I did not mention what sort of ring it was at all.

CHRISTOPHER PARTRIDGE re-examined. The ring is one which I lost that day - I am positive of it by a mark on the back of it - it is one I manufactured myself.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you sold any of them? A. No; it was the only one I manufactured of this pattern - it was made too large - I cut it and resoldered it - the stones are pink topazes - I think I paid 4d. each for the stones - it is a gold ring - I should sell it for 18s. - it had got discoloured by being put in the ink at the office - this ring found in the woman's drawer, is one of the hair rings that I lost.

William Thomas Pickard's Defence. On Saturday evening, I came home to my mother's about six o'clock - mother took a ring off her finger, and asked me to pawn it for her for 1s. - I pawned it for her at Cotton's - Mr. Paddon looked at the ring when I took it to him.

CHARLES PADDON . He came in the evening between five and six o'clock, I think.

Martha Pickard's Defence. I bought this ring in Petticoat-lane, for 1s. 9d., and gave it to my son to pawn.

THOMAS PARTRIDGE . I swear it is mine - it was in my window on the morning of the robbery.

W. T. PICKARD GUILTY . - Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

DREW - NOT GUILTY .

MARTHA PICKARD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-192

714. MARY ANN WEEMYS and ARCHIBALD McINTYRE were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , at St. Marylebone , 1 cloak, value 4s.; 2 waistcoats, value 4s.; 4 chains, value 6s.; 1 seal, value 1s.; 1 snuff-box, value 6d.; 1 silver case, value 1s.; 1 row of beads, value 1s.; 4 brooches, value 4s.; 3 pins, value 3s.; 4 rings, value 1s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value, 1s.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 5 gowns, value 14s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 1s.; 1 veil, value 6d.; 3 shirts, value 3s.; 1 table-cloth, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 2 towels, value 1s.; 2 aprons, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 watch, value 30s.; 5 spoons, value 10s.; 1 coat value 1l.; 1 necklace, value 5s.; 1 pair of stays, value 3s.; 1 shawl, value 8s.; 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 veil, value 3s.; and 4 sovereigns, the property of Thomas Williams , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Allen .

THOMAS WILLIAMS. I live at No. 7, Great Barlow-street, St. Marylebone , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Allen. I am a porter to Mr. Stephen Bond, a wine-merchant in Westmoreland-street - the prisoner Weemys in my sister - she is married, and has lived with me between seven

and eight months - her husband is in the Fleet prison - I took her in, and supported her - McIntyre lodged with me, in a room on the second floor, but my sister lodged in the first-floor front room, and slept in the same room with me and my wife - my wife left home on the 1st of April to go to Hounslow, to do some work for a former mistress - I left my sister in care of what I had on the premises - she left the house on Tuesday evening, without any notice, and McIntyre, I believe, left at the same time - I did not see him again till he was in custody - he had given me no notice of his going - about half-past nine o'clock on the evening she went away, I saw the tea-caddy open, which I knew my wife always kept her money locked up in - I looked into it, there was no money in it - there had been four sovereings - on Saturday the 5th of April, I missed other things - she had come while we were out on Saturday evening, as we were told - I have since seen some of my property, at the lodging of Mrs. Norris, of Tottenham-street - both the prisoners were there - I lost the property named in the indictment - and I found some of the articles at the lodging where both the prisoners lived - my wife had come home, and we both went out on Saturday; and, on returning, missed the things.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How these things went, of your own knowledge, you cannot tell? A. No.

SARAH WILLIAMS . I - am the prosecutor's wife. I went to Hounslow - I left four sovereigns in the tea-caddy, locked up - I had the key in my pocket - the caddy stood on the drawers, in the room - when I left, Weemys was in that room - she knew where I kept my money, and had seen it placed there - when I returned, I missed her and McIntyre - the key of his room and mine unlocks both doors - I had one of the keys with me - I came home, and found another key in the door - my sister-in-law had taken one key away with her - I had one myself, and I still found one in the door on Saturday - that would enable anybody who had it to go into both rooms - I missed from the room a quantity of things - the greater part of the property is old - the value of the whole is 9l. or 10l. - I missed nothing of value, but the four sovereigns - until the Saturday night, I have ascertained that nothing was taken besides the four sovereigns - I came home on the Wednesday - the prisoner had left on the Tuesday - the value of the things taken is about 6l.

Weemys. I never saw the money in the caddy. Witness. She has seen me put it there.

WM. MITCHELL . I am a constable of Marylebone-office. I went to the shop of Cotterell, in Oxford-street, last Monday week, and saw Mrs. Norris - I went with her to No. 18, Tottenham-street, St. Pancras, up to the two-pair front room, and there I saw the two prisoners - McIntyre was smoking, and she was sewing - I directly called up Williams, and told them I should take them into custody, for robbing Mrs. Williams - I said, "I shall search McIntyre" - he said, "You may search me, there is nothing in my pockets"- his coat was off - he said, "There is my coat on the chair"- I went to the coat, and found a purse, containing two sovereigns, one half-sovereign, two sixpences, and four silver coins, which I took - the prosecutor claimed the purse, and the four silver coins - I searched a box which was in the room, and found in it three duplicates of goods pawned, which he identified - I also found in the box a silk cloak, a boa, a waistcoat, a collar, a gold chain and seal, a snuff-box, a row of beads, a brooch, some pins, ear-rings, a black petticoat, gown, veil, cap, night-shirt, table-cloth, and all these other things, and some duplicates - I told Weemys she must go to the office - she said McIntyre had nothing to do with it, for she had committed the robbery herself - I found a duplicate in McIntyre's coat, of property which is not claimed - I asked Weemys where the money was, the things had been pawned for? - she said she had got none, that the money the things were pawned for, was in the purse - I found no money on her - I produce the things found in the box and the purse - McIntyre claimed the coat, in which the purse and duplicate were - he said nothing.

Weemys. These duplicates are my own property, for things which I pawned during the time I was with my brother.

JANE NORRIS . I am the wife of Daniel Norris , and live at No. 18, Tottenham-street. I have known McIntyre many years - he introduced Weemys to my house on the 4th of April - I understood from Weemys that they had been married on Sunday morning, and during the week they came two or three times to my place, calling and taking tea in a friendly way - on Saturday night Weemys brought a large bundle of things to my place, and said they were to be married on the Sunday morning, and were going to leave town on Monday - McIntyre was with her then - they did not stay that night - Weemys said she had brought her goods from her brothers, and was going to take them away on Monday morning - that they were going to be married on Sunday morning - McIntyre was not present then - she had taken some things out of the bundle, and asked me to go out with her and pawn some things - we had left McIntyre at my house - we went to Dobree's, and pawned a great many of the things, and it was then she said they were going to be married in the morning - we came home, and they left about about eleven o'clock on Saturday night - on Sunday afternoon they came between seven and eight o'clock together - they stopped to supper - it was rather late, and Weemys told my husband if he had no objection they would stop all night, as they were going away early in the morning - they did stop all night, and occupied the same room - in the morning Weemys asked me to go and pawn some more things - I went to Dobree's, and pawned some more things for 18s. - I afterwards went to Cotterell's for a coat and waistcoat of McIntyre's - I was there stopped by the officer - Weemys said she had left her brother - I furnished the box the things were found in - they were taken at my premises on the Monday - 23s. was lent on one parcel of goods, 22s. on another, and 18s. I got myself - I thought they wanted money to go out of town with.

JOHN HUGHES . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree , pawnbroker, living in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square. I have a variety of articles pawned by Mrs. Norris - there was a woman with her at the first pledging - I have three distinct pledges - two on the 5th of April, and one on the 7th.

THOMAS WILLIAMS re-examined. I have seen all these articles - they are what were stolen from my house - this purse is mine, and these four coins also - McIntyre was in

the habit of being in my room on Sundays - I was very intimate with him - I do not think he ever saw my purse - the coins are twopenny and threepenny pieces - I did not go home till nine o'clock, and then both the prisoners were absent - I was at home at seven o'clock, and my sister was at home then - at half-past two o'clock that day McIntyre came in, which was a very unusual thing, but it being holiday week, I did not think any thing of it - he had arranged to go out with me that evening, and when I went home at seven o'clock, my sister said he was gone to Portland-street- I said I should not go after him, and at nine o'clock when I came home I found they were both gone - the goods were taken on Saturday, and the money on Tuesday; I cannot tell whether McIntyre came home between seven and nine o'clock - I never knew him sleep out.

JOHN HUGHES . The goods I advanced 3l. 5s. on would not produce 20s. or 25s. more - the goods are not worth 5l.

SARAH ROGERS . I live next door to Williams. I had known Weemys some months - she came to me at a quarter after eight o'clock on Saturday night alone, and brought a bundle, and asked me to help her to carry it - I did so - we carried it to All Souls' church, Portland-place - she left a small caddy with me.

SARAH WILLIAMS re-examined. The purse was kept in a drawer, and the coins in the tea-caddy with the sovereigns - when I missed the sovereigns the coins were left - I did not miss the purse till I saw it at the office.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at home on the Tuesday? A. Till one o'clock, I was.

THOMAS WILLIAMS re-examined. I went into my room at seven o'clock on Tuesday - I missed nothing then - every thing appeared as usual - I did not miss the other things on Saturday - my wife missed them - I found the strange key in the door - every thing was upset, and the drawers left open.

Weemys. I did not take the money - I took the other things - McIntyre was not aware but what they were my own.

McIntyre. I am totally innocent.

WEEMYS - GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only. - Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, believing McIntyre had induced her to commit the offence. - Judgment Respited .

McINTYRE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18340410-193

NEW COURT. - Tuesday, April 15th.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

715. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 purse, value 3d.; 2 crowns; 20 half-crowns; 4 pence; and one £5 bank note, of the goods and monies of William Izod , from his person .

WILLIAM IZOD. I am servant to Mr. Francis Patience, of Much Haddam, in Hertfordshire. On the 7th of March, I left home, and arrived in London on the 8th of March - I went to the Red Lion, in Whitechapel - I saw the prisoner there - he said he had had nothing to eat since the Thursday - this was on the Saturday - I got him some steaks, and gave him some - I then got my own breakfast, and then went and got the money for my hay, which had been sold by the salesman - I then went to the public-house, and saw the prisoner - he asked me if I would be so good as to let him go as far as Hoddesdon with me; I said he might, if he pleased - I had received a £5 note, twenty half-crowns, two crowns, and some half-pence - I put the whole of that money into a purse in my pocket - I had some loose silver in my pocket - I started between one and two o'clock, and went with the prisoner towards Kingsland - when I got there, I went in to have some beer and some victuals - I gave the prisoner part of it - I had been up the whole night before, and I got into the waggon and fell asleep, as the prisoner said he would drive - I felt the money safe when I went to sleep, and my pocket was buttoned up - while I was asleep the fore horse was unhooked from the waggon and the other horses - the waggon and I were turned down a nasty lane - a gentleman called out, "You are wrong, I think;" and I awoke and found myself in a lane, close by Ponder's End - I stopped the waggon, and got out - I missed one of the horses - I then felt my breeches - they were cut open, and my purse and money were gone - I gave information, and got a man to go back with me to see if we could find the prisoner - we heard of him, and at last found him lying down before the fire, in a private house, at West Green - we knocked at the door, and Mr. Green asked if Robert Smith was there - (the prisoner had told me his name) - they said he was not there, but we got in and found him - the prisoner asked what we wanted him for - I told him for picking my pocket - he said he did not pick my pocket - I said he did; Green handcuffed him with one hand; and we got him into the lane - in going along, he pulled something out of his pocket, and threw it down, it jingled - I told the officer, and my purse was picked up in the grass - there were four sovereigns, and 44s., in silver in it - I had got into the waggon, and gone to sleep about five or six o'clock - I was awoke between seven and eight o'clock, and we found the prisoner about eleven that night.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am an officer of Tottenham Highcross. I went after the prisoner - we found him at this house - I hand-cuffed him and brought him out - as he was on the way to the station-house he tried to escape from me, and threw down this purse with 6l. 4s. in it - here are four sovereigns, twelve half-crowns, two crowns, and 4s. - this new hat and new smock-frock were on him.

WILLIAM IZOD. He had no hat nor smockfrock on when I saw him with me.

GEORGE SCANLER . I am a labourer. I met the prosecutor at Enfield, on the evening stated - I came back to Tottenham with him; we then found the officer, and I stated the case to him - I went to the house, and we found the prisoner - I knew the prisoner well; he has been about the road for the last two or three years - I saw him throw the purse on the grass - I took it up.

HENRY KINGSBY . I keep a draper's shop at Tottenham. About seven o'clock that evening the prisoner came to my shop and purchased this smock frock, he paid two 5s. pieces for it - he then bought this hat of me, and gave me a £5 note - I gave him the two 5s. pieces back, and four sovereigns - the hat was 10s.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18340410-194

716. THOMAS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 6 pair of shoes, value 12s. , the goods of Mark Mountain .

MARTHA PETIT . I live with my father Mark Mountain - he is a shoemaker , and lives at Stepney - he had some shoes in his shop on the 27th of March, behind the counter - I had seen them safe ten minutes before I received information from Rumbell - I then missed six pair - I had not seen the prisoner about the shop that day, but I had seen him about the shop a fortnight before, when a gentleman came and told me something, and I noticed the prisoner, and know him again - I saw him going by on the Saturday afterwards - I brought him into the shop, and called for an officer - I asked the prisoner if he had taken the shoes - he denied it then, but at Lambeth-street he said he had sold one pair in the lane for 2s. 6d.

ELIZABETH RUMBELL . I live opposite the prosecutor's shop. On the 27th of March I was cleaning my mistress's window - I saw the prisoner and another boy against the Jew's Hospital gate - they stood there about five minutes- they then went past the prosecutor's window, and came back again - the other boy then left the prisoner and went and stood against a butcher's shop - the prisoner went and stood against the prosecutor's door for two or three minutes - he then went in and went round the counter - he came out with his apron full of something, and went up White Horse-lane.

MARK MOUNTAIN. I keep the shop, but I was then confined to my bed - I lost the shoes mentioned in the indictment.

MARTHA PETIT. The prisoner told me he had sold one pair for half-a-crown, and he had confessed it to his aunt first - I made him no promise.

JURY. Q. Had he ever been at your shop as a customer? A. No.

GUILTY . Aged 10. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18340410-195

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

717. JOHN BELL was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 12th of February , of a certain evil-disposed person, 500lbs. weight of wool, value 50l.; and 2 canvass wrappers, value 2s., the goods of Robert John Smith and another, well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen , against the Statute, &c.

2nd COUNT, stating it to belong to Thomas Brocklebank and others.

3rd COUNT, stating it to belong to John Cooper .

MR. ADOLPHUS and MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

RICHARD MULES . I am a tide-waiter. On Tuesday, the 11th of February, I was on board the Belfast steamer from Hamburgh - I superintended the delivery of eight bales of wool to Galley Quay - the steamer was close against the Custom-house - five of the bales were marked with a triangle and three circles, and the other three with a plain triangle - they were landed between three and four o'clock in the afternoon.

HARLOE TRUMBLE . I had charge of the Belfast in her progress down the river - I delivered the eight bales at Galley Quay, on the 11th of February - they were marked and numbered - five of them had a triangle and three circles on them, and were numbered 203, 204, 206, 207, and 208- the other three had a plain triangle, and were numbered 300, 301, and 302.

WILLIAM DEBNAM. I am landing foreman. On the 11th of February I was at Galley Quay , when the eight bales were landed, about half-past three o'clock - I left at five o'clock, and went again the next morning at nine o'clock - I was not then aware that any of the bales were missing - at ten o'clock the landing officer came to weigh them, and about twelve o'clock one of the bales was missing - it was one of the eight which had the previous afternoon been landed from the Belfast, and had the triangle and the circles on it - the bales were about seven feet long.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you the amount of the weight? A. No, I put them into the scale, and the Crown weighs them - there were twenty-two bales all together on the Quay, when I left at five o'clock the day before - I did not count them that morning - I had not taken the numbers of them.

WILLIAM PIPER TOMLINS . I am landing-waiter at the Custom-house. On Tuesday, the 11th of February, I counted some bales of wool which were at the Custom-house - there were twenty-two in all, and I believe fifteen had been landed that day from the Belfast - they were all safe five minutes before four o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you are not certain as you say "I believe"? A. I am positive there were twenty-two all together.

WILLIAM JOYCE . I am a Custom-house officer - I was on duty at Galley Quay - I left at four o'clock - there were twenty-two bales there, and fourteen had been landed that day from the Belfast - I returned to the Quay at eight o'clock the next morning; and between twelve and one o'clock one bale was missed.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. There were fourteen landed from the Belfast, were there? A. Yes.

JAMES ATWOOD . I am a night watchman at the King's warehouse, at the Custom-house - I went on duty at Galley Quay at four o'clock on the 11th of February - Joyce was there - he delivered to my charge the bales of wool - he gave me a note stating there were twenty-two bales - I did not count them - I went off duty at half-past twelve o'clock - I then left them in charge of John Warren - I had not the least reason to believe that any of them had been removed when I left - it was high water the next morning about five o'clock - there is a great depth from the Quay to the water at low water.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose it was impossible to steal one of the bales while you were there, as you were put there to take care of them? A. Yes, I took strict care of them - I did not fall asleep.

JOHN WARREN . I am a watchman at Galley Quay - I went on duty at half-past twelve o'clock in the morning of the 12th of February, and remained till nine o'clock - during the time I was there, I had no reason to believe that any of the bales were stolen - the removal of one of them into a boat at high water would not make much noise - it was high water at a quarter before five o'clock - a boat could come close along side the quay at high water, and a bale would not have above a couple of feet to drop into a oat, from the quay.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Would it not take some trouble to drop a bale into a boat? A. No - I was there for the purpose of watching, but I had several

articles to watch - these bales were standing on end - there was another watchman with me - I don't know how long he had been there, as that was my first day - the bales were about nine feet long - two of the bags, which are here, are not so large as one of the bales - one man would not be able to roll one of them; but when a bale of wool was thrown down, it would project from the edge of the quay two or three feet over the water - I suppose the wharf is fifty feet long - I did not go to sleep.

JURY. Q. What width is the quay? A. From thirty to forty feet - the bale of wool stood within six feet of the water.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Then if one were thrown down, and some part of it projected over the water, would it be easy for a man in a boat to draw it into a boat with a hook? A. Yes, very easy - I was walking about the wharf- the place where these bales stood was in total darkness, and quite absconded from seeing anybody, while we were walking on the other part of the wharf.

WILLIAM MALLANDINE . I was with the last watchman on duty at the quay - I came on at eight o'clock in the evening, and stayed till eight o'clock in the morning - I did not see any bale taken.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Whose watchman are you? A. Robert Smith's - I had to mind the bales of wool, and other things - it is a small wharf - we walked about together - we sometimes had our backs turned on the goods - it is an easy thing to hook off a bale of wool - I did not see anybody come to hook off a bale.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you see any bale carried out through the gates that night? A. No, they were all fast.

WILLIAM PARR . On the morning of the 12th of February, I was attending the Lock at Lee Cut, Limehouse, which communicates with the Thames, and I should think is a mile and a quarter from Galley Quay - about half-past seven o'clock that morning, a boat arrived, and a young man was in it - there was a bag in it, made of coarse stuff, such as they put hops in - I think it was rougher than these bags are - it appeared about five feet in length, and about three feet and a half wide - I spoke to the man, and he to me, and he went up the river towards Limehouse - it was a lug-boat - I saw some pieces of wool about the bag - I noticed the words "Legal Quay" on the boat - it came back about half-past six o'clock in the evening, and was then empty.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you took particular notice of the bag? A. Not particular notice - it was about six feet long, a thing they carry hops in - I was about four feet from the boat - the bag could not have been nine feet long - it was a rougher covering than this - it was a different kind of material to these covers - it appeared to be stowed close - it filled the boat almost - if it had dropped into the boat, it must have made a splash - there might have been something in the boat to prevent its making a noise - it was a small lug-boat - the bag was not up to the top of the boat - it was about the middle - I did not know the man - it was on Ash Wednesday morning, and was very wet - it rained when he came in - it was a narrow boat, about ten feet long, perhaps, and would carry about four ton - there was no concealment about this.

JOHN WELLS . My father is a carman, and lives near the London Hospital. On the morning of the 12th of February, between seven and eight o'clock, a man came and hired a van - I went with him down to the Stinkhouse-bridge, near Bow Common, that is the river Lee - I received a bag of wool out of a boat - I do not know whether it was a lug-boat - I took it to Mr. Bell's house, (the prisoner,) it is up in Old-street, and down by some church - I do not know the name of the street - I arrived there a little after nine o'clock - I saw the prisoner there - he did not say any thing to me, but helped us with the bale into the house - the prisoner was in his shirt sleeves - the bale was between eight and nine feet long - I saw something appearing through it, which appeared to be wool or flock - I thought it was wool.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Who was with you? A. The person who came and hired me - I should know the man if I saw him - it was in the same sort of case as these bags here, but it was more packed; and neater than these are.

WILLIAM PARR re-examined. Q. What time did you go on the lock that morning? A. At two o'clock, and I stayed till eight o'clock - I do not think there was any other boat went up - there were barges.

WILLIAM KEMP . I am clerk to Messrs. Pickford, wharfingers, in the City Road. On the 12th of February, three small bags of wool were brought to our wharf, about ten minutes past one o'clock; two came on a truck first, and one came afterwards - the prisoner, Mr. Bell, came with the last, and another person with him - the prisoner wished me to weigh the bags for him, which I did, which is not usual to do when the freight is not paid - but we do it as a favour - they weighed 5cwt. and 6lbs. - I saw they contained wool, and I saw it was not British wool - I saw it through a place which was not sewn up - the bags were not of equal size - I see bales of wool every day - these bags were not packed up as bags of wool are usually packed - they were not sewn as if by a wool-packer - Mr. Bell asked me to let them remain till the next day, and he then came, and gave me the consignment - "three small bags of wool, for Mr. Joseph Dufton , Leeds, from Mr. Lufton, John Bell" - these are the bags which were sent off.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? A. Yes; I had seen him several times in the way of business - I saw no concealment about him - any one could see the wool in these bags, they were not finished sewing - I had not received any wool of Mr. Bell before - I had received strips of cloth, and gun cases.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you his residence in your book? A. Yes; "John Bell, of Old-street" - I asked him his address, and he gave me this, which is our general way.

JAMES SKILLMAN . I am a porter at Messrs. Pickford's wharf. I saw the prisoner there on Wednesday, the 12th of February, when these bags were brought on a truck - there was a hole in one of the bags, and I saw wool in it- the hole was sewed up, by Mr. Bell's desire - I saw him again the next day - he asked me if they could lay there three or four days or a week, or if there was a boat going, that we could send them off directly - he followed me down the stairs, and I asked the porter who was shipping at the scale, if he was shipping any thing for Leeds - he said,

the boat for Leeds was not in, but he would call it in, and he did, and shipped the three bags in it - at Mr. Bell's request, I marked the bags Nos. 1, 2, and 3, and a D with L under it; and they were consigned to Mr. Dufton, of Leeds - they were shipped on board the Conqueror, Captain James Simpson - they appeared to me to be like one bag, cut into three parts, and they were packed clumsily.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did they appear to be like one rough bag cut into three smooth ones? A. No; they were different qualities of case - they appeared to be one cut into three - I did not see the consignment - Mr. Bell, said to me, if I would ship them directly, he would give me 1s.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have said the bags had the appearance of different qualities cut out of one bag? A. It is different qualities, some of it is like sacking, and some like the regular bags.

Q. Will you tell us what you mean by one bag cut into three? A. It appears that the wool has been taken out and sewed up in separate bags - bags of wool are of a certain weight; but I do not weigh them.

WILLIAM BREED . I am porter at the shipping scale, at Pickford's wharf - I remember these three bags of wool being weighed to be shipped to Leeds - they weighed as follows: - No. 1 - 1 cwt. 2 qrs. 14 lbs. - No. 2 - 1 cwt. 3 qrs