Old Bailey Proceedings, 5th September 1833.
Reference Number: 18330905
Reference Number: f18330905-1

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR PETER LAURIE , KNT., MAYOR.

SEVENTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, On THURSDAY, THE 5th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1833, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY WILLIAM JOHNSTON , LOVELL'S COURT, PATERNOSTER ROW; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1833.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable SIR PETER LAURIE , KNT., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Patteson , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Gurney , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; John Ansley , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; Anthony Brown , Esq.; and Matthias P. Lucas , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; the Honourable Charles Ewan Law , Recorder of the said City; Charles Farebrother , Esq.; Henry Winchester , Esq.; William Taylor Copeland , Esq.; Thomas Kelly , Esq.; Samuel Wilson , Esq.; Sir Chapman Marshall , Knt., and James Harmer , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; John Mirehouse , Esq., Common-Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First.

Charles Lambeth

William Linsdale

Ratcliff Pick

Richard Loudin

Thomas Raymond

William Thomas

Mark Milner

John Barfield

William Hill

Thomas Holder

Sam. Russell , Jun.

Milton Harsant

Second.

John Norman

Edward Conder

John Coventry

James Hind

Edward Suter

John David Coles

William Gieslar

John Parr

Jas. Barnard Dew

John Bundy

James Raden

Joseph Dredge

Third.

G. Shea Pugear

William Delf

John Bundy

William Famrer

William Bell

Benjamin Rose

William Kendall

James Radden

William Brewer

Lloyd R. Beale

William Brooks

W. Chamberlain

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First.

Richard Clarke

Demon Dirnot

David Davis

James Davenport

Charles Denny

Samuel Devereaux

Thomas Edge

William Emery

Thomas Extall

John Fray

John Freeman

James Forsyth

Second.

William Kenny

Thomas Kearing

Charles Latty

William Law

Henry Lewis

Thomas Lincoln

Thomas Mears

Alex. McBaine

Charles Maxfield

Thomas Miller

Andrew Malloch

William Farr

Third.

Godfrey W. Ginger

Thomas Goulding

Edwin Gaffin

Thomas Hunt

Linford Horn

James Hunt

Thomas Headaway

Joshua Harper

G. Hummerstone

Richard Hillery

Thomas Jenner

Robert Johnson

Fourth.

William Arms

Robert Ardour

John Alsept

William Allen

Thomas Arbour

Charles Bishop

Samuel Bull

Charles Barnard

William Bowman

James Burgess

William Bentom

Joseph Bennett

Fifth.

John Brank

John Thos. Blandall

James Bonner

William Bath

Melchior Barlow

Grove Brooks

Lawrence Barlow

Edward Bright

William Collins

John Clark

John Cross

Job Cook

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1833.

LAURIE, MAYOR. - SEVENTH SESSION.

*A star placed against the verdict denotes that the prisoner has been previously in custody.

Reference Number: t18330905-1

1202. HENRY PERRY was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Murrell on the 14th of August , at St. Sepulchre , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 25s.; 1 watch-chain, value 6d.; 1 seal, value 6d., and 2 watch-keys, value 2s., his property .

JOHN MURRELL. I am an apprentice to a surgeon , and live at No. 33, George-street, Blackfriars-road. On the evening of the 14th of August, I went to my father's in Regent's-park with my brother-in-law, James Jackson - we afterwards went to the Red Lion, Fleet-lane; that was between seven and eight o'clock in the evening - I saw the prisoner there with others; he forced his conversation on us, and prevailed on us to play at skittles; we had only gone there to have a pint of porter being thirsty - about a quarter to nine o'clock we were going away; Jackson, and a companion of the prisoner's, went to the bar to have something to drink for what they had lost - I had my hat and coat on, and was coming out of the ground - I had got part of the way out of the ground, going towards the bar to Jackson, and the prisoner came before me and struck me in the stomach with one hand, and with the other hand pulled out my watch, and broke a strong steel guard which was round my neck - he took the watch and ran through the bar and I after him as fast as I could - Jackson stood at the bar, and I said,"James, that man has ran away with my watch" - Jackson ran and pursued him, and took him - next morning at Guildhall, a man produced my watch - the blow the prisoner gave me pained me all the way home; I should have fallen down, but his pulling the watch, and the resistance of the chain, pulled me up again - it was a severe blow; he left part of the chain round my neck, the rest of it was found on the watch, and was produced the next day with it - this is my watch and chain, (looking at them).

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you were very much annoyed at being robbed at the skittle-ground? A. Yes; I never went to a skittle-ground before nor since - I went with the policeman to the house to-day to look for a man - I was not put out of the ground; I was told I should not play there, but I was not going to play- I went with my sister, and two, or three, or four policemen, to day - I do not know what I went for I am sure - I went on account of my sister going with the other men - she did not go to the skittle-ground, the others went there to have something to drink - I did not know it was the house in which I had been robbed, till I got there, because I had never been there before that night - I was not exactly sober when I was robbed; I had one glass of gin and a drop of beer; perhaps I drank part of a pot of beer; I did not measure it - I did not pay for above a pint of beer or so; Jackson had some money of me - I paid 4d. or 5d., not more, for what I had - I call myself an apprentice to a surgeon - I had not been in any other public-house that day - I drank nothing at my father's; I was not drunk in the skittle-ground; I was a little worse for what I had, but I did my work when I got home - I was a little sick in the skittle-ground; that was on account of eating some fruit; I had the fruit before I had the beer; I had it at my father's, in King's-place, Regent's-park.

Q. Did not you empty the contents of your stomach in the skittle-ground, and get the pot-boy to clear it up? A. Well, he was paid for it; Jackson, I believe, gave him two or three halfpence - it was not my intoxication caused me to be sick, it was eating the apples - I did not charge anybody with stealing my coat that night; I had pulled it off to play; I did not say it was stolen - Jackson might say it was stolen; he went to the landlady and got it; he said somebody had been playing a lark with it, or something - I paid for part of what was drank with my own hand; Jackson said he wanted some halfpence, and took 4d. out of my coat while it was off, to pay for what he had at the bar with the prisoner's companion - I did not speak to the landlady; I did not

state to her that I had lost my watch outside the street-door - I did not charge anybody with stealing my coat - my brother-in-law, when he found somebody had been playing a lark, said he thought my coat was taken out of a lark; he went to the landlady, and the coat was produced - he did not say the coat was stolen at all in my presence - I eat a few apples at my father's, nothing else, to make me sick; I had them about an hour before I got to the skittle-ground; I only played one game at skittles - nobody is here that saw me attacked, that I know of; there were about twelve persons in the ground.

JURY. Q. Was it before or after the blow that you were sick? A. A long while before; I never went to any skittle-ground before, and not being used to drinking, made it take effect on me - I did not play with the prisoner at all; he sat next to me in the ground all the while - I did not show him my watch; I did not see him before I went to the public-house - I am seventeen years old.

JAMES JACKSON. I live at No. 33, George-street, Blackfriars-road; I am the prosecutor's brother-in-law. I was with him on the day in question, at the Red Lion, he was quite sober when he went there - I had no fruit; he had some apples in my presence; he bought them in the street, and eat them going along the street, not at his father's - he had one glass of gin at the Red Lion, and part of a pot of beer - five drank out of the pot of beer- he is not in the habit of taking spirits; I consider his sickness was on account of the fruit - he appeared rather affected by liquor, but knew what he was doing perfectly well - I went to the bar to have something to drink with the prisoner's companion; we had fallen into their company in the skittle-ground - during the time I went to the bar to have something to drink, the prisoner came running as hard as he could run, out of the house; he came through the bar as fast as he could run; John Murrell was behind him, and cried out,"Stop him, stop him, he has taken my watch" - I ran after him as hard as I could run, and the prisoner ran as hard as he could till he got opposite Mr. Waithman's Obelisk; he ran right across Farringdon-street, and there I detained him till the constable of the night came up, and being certain that he was the man, as I had never lost sight of him, the constable of the night took him to the watch-house - he was searched, but no property found on him; being positive of him, I had him searched again; he was locked up, and we had to appear next morning at Guildhall, and there the watch was produced by a man named Joseph Frier - the prosecutor complained of his stomach all the way home, and appeared suffering from pain.

JURY. Q. Were you in the habit of frequenting these places? A. Never; we were thirsty, and went in to drink something, not intending to play at skittles.

Cross-examined. Q. Would not gin, beer, and apples, give him a pain in his stomach? A. He never had the pain in his stomach before - he was sick that night, but he did not have the pain in his stomach till after the watch was stolen - the five that drank out of the pot were all strangers, except the prosecutor; they all paid their share- I paid threepence that night; the prosecutor paid about fivepence; he was not in the habit of going to skittle-grounds - his master did not know he was going that night- I have not gone to the skittle-ground since; I did not go into the ground to-day, I went close to it - I was not refused to play there to-day; I did not stop a minute - I went there to have some beer it was the same place as the robbery took place - we were on our road going home from here; and it was the nearest place, when it was proposed to have some porter - neither I nor my brother made any demand to play at skittles there to-day- some of our company played, but I did not hear them refused - I got there just as they had finished playing; I did not stop to hear what the landlady said - I stated, that I did not stay a minute, but I went back afterwards; they were playing then - they were not prevented from playing - the man that found the watch was playing with somebody, I do not know who - none of my company were playing, except Frier; the prosecutor remained in the ground - I left him there when I went away; I was absent about five minutes, and remained there about five minutes, when I came back, the prosecutor was there all that time - I saw my brother that night sick; he was laying on the benches; he was not so drunk as not to know what he was doing; he did lay down on the bench - it was not through drunkenness; he laid down merely to rest himself, I suppose - it was not because he was sick - he did lay down and was sick.

Q. You have sworn he laid down to rest - now you say he laid down and was sick? A. He was sick during the time he laid down; the pot-boy was obliged to come and clean up the filth he had vomited - I did not see the benches soiled and dirty by his vomiting; it was on the ground - I saw nothing else soiled; he vomited all on the ground - none of his garments were dirty - the pot-boy was called to clean up the filth; he was paid for it - my brother did not complain that his coat had been stolen, it was me - I could not see his coat any where, I searched all round the ground; I asked the landlady to come and see if she could find it - I did not complain that it was stolen - I did not say my brother had been robbed of his coat; I had drank very little indeed; I was as sober as I am now - I drank no liquor whatever, only porter; there was one pot among five of us - I paid threepence; one man had not got money, and I gave him a penny, which made the threepence I paid.

Q. Where did you go while, your brother, and the rest were in the skittle-ground to-day? A. I came up here to meet my sister; I did not see my brother kicking the pins about in the skittle-ground - I do not know William Bastard, to my knowledge; I did not state to any body, that some persons had stolen my brother's coat - I saw nothing happen to my brother myself; I and the prisoner only ran along Farringdon-street at the same time - six or seven persons did not rush out of the house, they all remained behind; my brother did not give the alarm till he came to me - no one ran from the house but the prisoner; the others did not leave the place.

JURY. Q. It was at the bar you first heard your brother had lost his watch? A. Yes; the skittle-ground is some distance from the bar - I could see the persons

in the skittle-ground as I stood at the bar, if I had looked - the ground is straight forward, from the bar.

JOSEPH FRIER. I live at No. 55, Brandon-street, Locks-fields, Walworth. On the morning of the 15th of August, I picked up this watch in Farringdon-street, about a quarter before five o'clock - there is a heap of granite just by the Obelisk, and I saw something laying on the ground; I got up, and looked, and it was a watch out of the case, which laid about a yard from it - the case and the inside of the watch were both bruised, and there was part of the guard, and seal, and chain, on it - any body could have thrown it there running by Mr. Waithman's Obelisk - it was about the middle of Farringdon-street; I heard of the robbery, and told the officer; he advised me to go to Guildhall, and I went and gave it up.

JURY. Q. Were you at the skittle-ground that night? A. No.

CHARLES JOSEPH EGLETON. I am an officer. I produce the watch, seal, and guard; I received them at Guildhall, in presence of Frier - he gave it up at Guildhall; I heard in the morning a man had found a watch - I sent our patrols to find him out, which they did, and he brought the watch to Guildhall.

JOHN MURRELL. It is my watch - I have the other part of the guard, which was left round my neck.

Prisoner's Defence. It is very unfortunate for me, having no friends - I have not been long in London, where I came to from Bath; were I at home, I could find a character as to my working hard all my life-time - I get my living by hawking, and came to Field-lane to procure goods along with some more hawkers - I went to the skittle-ground.

GEORGE PORCH . I am going on for fifteen years of age - I have been a pot-boy thirteen months; I was pot-boy at the skittle-ground when the prosecutor says he was robbed of his watch - Mrs. Marks keeps the house; I saw the prosecutor on the night in question - he was very tipsy, laying on the seat, and he sicked all over the ground - I asked him what he would pay me for cleaning the place up; he said he would pay nothing - he was sober enough to speak; he was sitting down on the stool - I afterwards cleaned the place; I got nothing for cleaning it; there were about a dozen men there, playing at skittles - I saw the prosecutor's brother there; he complained that his brother had been robbed of his coat; he went and fetched mistress, for he said he would see the long and short about the coat, for he had lost it in the ground - I remember the prosecutor coming to the bar about his watch - he ran outside the door; he said he had lost his watch outside the door - I am sure he said it was lost outside the door; he said he lost it on the left hand side of the door, and that is the side going into the street.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say he used the word"left side," what did he say? A. He ran out of the yard, and said he had lost the watch outside the door, he did not say he had lost it in the skittle-ground - he said he had lost it outside the door - the skittle-ground is not outside the door - there is a door from the house to the skittle-ground; the skittle-ground is outside that door; he said outside the door in the street in Fleet-lane.

Q. Did he say in the street? A. He said, "outside the door;" he did not say on which side of the door he lost it; he told mistress he had lost it outside the door - I saw him run out into the street; three more besides him ran out of the house into the street, at the same time as he did - I was out of the yard myself, and saw them run down the street; three besides me ran out, I made the fourth - they were strangers to me; I never saw the prisoner in the house above two or three times; he is no acquaintance or friend of mine - I saw the prosecutor at mistress's house to-day; he came about twelve o'clock; four persons were with him; he was going to play at skittles, and mistress would not let him - I saw him play; mistress came and took the ball away from him.

JURY. Q. Have you been questioned on this matter before to-day? A. No, not by any body; this is the first time I have given any account of it.

COURT. Q. Have you not been questioned by the prisoner's attorney? A. Yes; to day; and by my mistress.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did the attorney say more to you than to tell the truth? A. No; I told him what I have stated - he wrote it down.

JURY. Q. Did he ask if you had heard the prosecutor say he had lost his watch outside? A. Yes; I do not recollect what passed between us.

COURT. Q. Did you hear the prosecutor cry "Stop him, he has taken my watch?" A. Yes; I saw three run out.

Q. On your oath, did not you see the prisoner rush out of the house through the bar? A. Yes, he ran out first.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did two men run along with him? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. How did they run along with him? A. They ran along Farringdon-street with him - I saw Jackson running after the prisoner; the prisoner was running hard; I did not see him caught; I saw the man who drank with Jackson at the bar; he did not run out at all.

Q. Who was the third man that ran out? A. There was another went out, I do not know who he was - he ran up towards Ludgate-hill; he ran into Farringdon-street down to the corner of the lane - I think the third man kept up with the others - he got to the top of the street by Waithman's monument - I could see as far as that; it was about half-past eight o'clock - I ran to the Fleet, which is about six yards from the monument - I did not see the prisoner stopped - I never knew it till he was in the watch-house; the companion who was with him is a young man who goes with him, and deals at Powell's hardware shop - he was not the third man that ran out.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know the third man? A. No; I had not seen him before, and should not know him again; he was a stranger - he had played two or three games at skittles; he was short and stout, I think- I do not know how he was dressed.

JURY. Q. Where were you when the prisoner ran out?

A. Inside the door in the passage - he ran past me; I saw nothing in his hand - he ran very fast; Murrell called out immediately that he had lost his watch, and ran out.

MRS. MARKS. I am landlady of the Red Lion. I remember the night the gentleman lost his watch - I saw both the gentlemen there that night - the prosecutor was so drunk that he could not stand; I saw him laying on the bench in the skittle-ground - I did not see him sick; I saw marks that somebody had been sick - he came to the bar and said he had lost his watch outside the door; he was standing outside the door; leaning against the door.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say he said he was standing outside? A. He said he was leaning against the back of the door, on the threshold of the door, and the man gave him a knock on his stomach, and took his watch out; and he hallooed out to his brother, to run after him, for he had stolen his watch - he said the man snatched his watch, and ran off.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he show you the way he was standing? A. Yes (leaning herself back.)

Q. Are you quite sure he said he was standing at the door? A. Yes, I am quite sure - I have not witnesses to prove it, but there were two - he showed me the way he was standing, and he said I was standing here, and pointed to the door, and he was at that time standing at the street-door, but this was an hour after it took place; he said, "I was standing here," and he was at that time leaning against the door.

Q. Where was he standing at the time he spoke to you? A. On the threshold of my bar-door in Fleet-lane; that is the street-door - he said he was standing at the door - I am sure he told me that he had been robbed at the street-door - this was an hour, or an hour and a half after the alleged robbery took place; he had at that time in a degree recovered his sobriety - he came to my house to-day; I saw him; he came with some policemen; and they had the ball, and they wanted to play at skittles; I said they were not to play; the boy said he was not playing; I went out, and he was playing; I took the ball from him, and told him I would throw it at his head, for I had had enough of him - I was not in court when the other witness was examined.

COURT. Q. Where were you standing when the alarm was first given of the robbery? A. In the cellar below; I came up directly - I saw no one but the friend of the man who had lost his watch apparently; they were all gone when I came up - the prosecutor was standing in the lane so tipsy he could not run himself - he was standing in Fleet-lane - I have kept the house fourteen months - I had never seen the prisoner at my house - I don't know him now - when the prosecutor's brother-in-law complained that the coat was missing, he was laying on it on the bench (the man himself was) they came to me and said if it was not found we should hear more of it, and when I came in he was laying on it on the bench in the skittle-ground; I told them if they could not agree, they had better give up the ball.

Q. Now, when Murrell lost his watch, give us the exact words he used? A. He said, "I was standing against the door, the man came and gave me a punch on the stomach and snatched my watch, and I directly called to my brother, who was drinking, to run after him, for he had stolen my watch;" he said nothing more - he did not describe the person who had taken his watch.

JURY. Q. Was the prisoner in the habit of frequenting your house to play at skittles? A. No, I don't know him- I never saw him before to my knowledge; I did not see him on the night in question playing in the skittle-ground - the pursuit was directly on the alarm - I never saw the prosecutor before, and never saw him since till to-day.

Q. Why did you threaten to throw the ball at his head to-day - why drive a customer away? A. Because Jackson came with a friend and said, if I did not make good the value of the watch, he would get my license stopped on licensing day - I did not know the man, nor encourage him to steal it - there was nobody left in the skittle-ground when I came up from the cellar - by the prosecutor's brother coming about the watch, I have had an opportunity of knowing him - I don't know the prisoner - a great many hawkers come to my house, as they come to Field-lane to purchase goods.

JURY to GEORGE PORCH . Q. Was the prisoner in the habit of frequenting your mistress' house, have you seen him before playing at skittles two or three times? A. Not playing at skittles; he comes into the house of a morning and has half a pint of beer; I have seen him repeatedly there; I have not seen him there frequently before this occurrence of the watch - I have seen him several times.

COURT. Q. How many times? A. About twice - he has been there about an hour and a half at a time - he did not go to the bar to get what he wanted at those times he was playing at skittles - I take them what they want into the skittle-ground - the door leads into the yard, and the yard to the skittle-ground; you walk through the house, through the bar, into the yard to the skittle-ground- the coat was found on the seat where the prosecutor was laying, under him; his brother-in-law complained of his brother losing his coat - I was in court part of the time that Mrs. Marks was examined - I did not see Jackson at the bar drinking - the young girl was serving in the bar when the cry of "Stop him" was given - my mistress was down in the cellar - I was not in the bar; I could see the young girl at the bar from the passage.

Q. You had seen the prisoner about twice before in the house, how long before it occurred was it? A. About a week; I don't know how long it was before that, that I saw him the first time - I did not know where he lived, nor any of his friends.

COURT to JAMES JACKSON . Q. Did you threaten to get the license taken away, unless the watch was produced? A. Never; I never heard anybody threaten it - I did not go there to-day with any intention of threatening the woman for the value of the watch.

MRS. MARKS. It was the evening the watch was lost, that the boy's master came to me saying he would report the case, and this man said unless the watch was paid for -

JAMES JACKSON . His master did go there, he wanted to know how the boy had lost his watch; he did not demand any money.

MRS. MARKS. Jackson himself demanded the money.

JAMES JACKSON. On my oath I did not, I never demanded any money.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18330905-2

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1203. WILLIAM FIELD was indicted for, that he on the 8th of July , at St. Giles' in the Fields, in and upon Bartholomew Neville , feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously, did strike, cut, and stab the said Bartholomew Neville, in and upon the left side of his body, and right shoulder and loins, with intent to kill and murder him , against the Statute, &c. 2d. COUNT, stating it to be with intent to disable him. 3d. COUNT, stating it to be with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

BARTHOLOMEW NEVILLE . I sell fish in the street. On the 8th of July, I was in Drury-lane, within ten minutes of ten o'clock at night; I went into Smith's public-house and saw the prisoner there and others in company - I was going in to sell pickled eels and perriwinkles; the very minute I went in I saw this company and never went near them - I turned round to another company and said, "Gentlemen pickled eels and perriwinkles," and the very minute the prisoner saw me he came and pulled up his trousers and said, "Kick that dirty stocking;" I said, "No, my good boy, go away from me, I will have nothing to do with you in the name of God;" he was tantalizing me a long time to kick his shin, I would have nothing to do with him - he went up to the end of the tap room and brought a piece of wood, and said he would have my life; he was prevented from doing that - he went out and came in again, and said he would not leave the place till he had my life: he went out again, and Smith said to the officer "Look out, for there is to be something this night;" and I was given in charge of the officer to protect me; I went as far as Parker's in Broadway, St. Giles' , and when I could find nobody to buy what I had got to sell, I went towards home, and the prisoner came out of Short's-gardens with something in his hand; I could not see what it was - I could not see him at all myself, but I was stabbed in the left loin; I immediately went into Smith's and laid down my basket on the bar, and as I came out, he was standing by the door, and raised his hand and gave me a stab in the right shoulder with all his violence - I saw him then; I bawled out to the officer that I was stabbed; the officer and Smith's son ran after him and caught him; he dropped a trowel between me and Smith's son - I saw him drop it - I had struck him in Smith's house when he struck me, and he fell down.

Q. Was that before you went out of Smith's house? A. Yes; he struck me, and I struck him, and he fell down; it was not the blow I gave him that knocked him down; I did not hit him very hard - I think it was better than a quarter of an hour after that, that I was stabbed - it is not a very short distance from Smith's to Broadway St. Giles'; I struck him and he fell down - he only struck me once, and I believe I never struck him but twice; I went out of the house immediately on that, and left him there - I was stabbed once on the loin, and again on the shoulder; I was afterwards attended by a surgeon.

RICHARD THOMAS SMITH . I am assistant to the surgeon whom the prosecutor came to; he came into the surgery in Drury-lane a little after ten o'clock; he had two wounds, one over the shoulder, and the other in his loins; the one over the shoulder was a very trivial wound, indeed, both of them were very slight; I saw a trowel which appeared to me to be the instrument which would inflict them; the wound over the shoulder penetrated about a quarter of an inch, the other was a slight scratch.

ROBERT SMITH . My father keeps the Sir John Barleycorn , public-house, Drury-lane; it is No. 15, near the top of Drury-lane. I saw the prosecutor and prisoner at our house; I saw the prisoner ever so many times pull up his trousers for the man to kick his shins, and he said he would have nothing to do with him; I went out of the house and was out a good bit; I came in again, and the prisoner came into the house and struck the prosecutor, and then the prosecutor hit him again, and then the prisoner went; I did not see any more blows struck, for the prisoner fell down - he did not fall down on being struck; the prisoner then went out, and then the prosecutor went out; the policeman was outside, and the policeman went with him as far as the corner of the street; when the prosecutor came back to my father's door, I was standing outside; but before that, the prisoner had come up, and said he had got something in his hand which would do for the prosecutor; he repeated that several times; the prosecutor came by the door, and the prisoner was there, and directly the prosecutor came by the door, the prisoner came behind him and gave him a stab in the left loin, then the prosecutor went into the house and put down his basket, and as soon as he came out, the prisoner stabbed him again on the right shoulder; the prosecutor hallooed out "I am stabbed," and then the prisoner ran across the road - the officer ran after him, and I followed him; and when I got up to him he had got his arms round him; he tried to throw the trowel away, but could not, and he dropped it; the prosecutor picked it up and gave it to the policeman - the prosecutor had left our house about five minutes before he returned; the prisoner was trying to provoke him to kick his shins some time, and then he struck the prosecutor, and the prosecutor returned the blow; that was all that I saw.

RICHARD KEELER . I am a policeman; I was not in the public-house - I was on duty on the 8th of July; Smith's son came to me - I went up to the house, and saw the prisoner in the attitude of fighting the landlord; I went up to him and remonstrated with him, and said he had better go away or I should lock him up; he said he would take my advice, and went away; I went round my beat twice, and the second time of coming round, I heard something at Smith's door again, and saw Neville come out of Smith's, and I saw the prisoner with the trowel in his hand, stab Neville in his shoulder; he ran away, Smith ran after him, and I also; he caught him by the right arm; the prisoner tried to throw the trowel away and dropped it in the gutter; the prosecutor picked it up - I have it; it is a bricklayer's trowel; I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the public-house, sitting down; a young man told me how the prosecutor had

kicked his shins; this was about half past nine o'clock - the young man was telling me how the prosecutor had kicked his shins; I said, "If he had kicked mine so, I should return that with another kick;" the prosecutor said,"If you give me any of your jaw I will serve yours ten times worse;" I said, "You may kick them if you like, but I shall soon kick yours again;" he used two or three oaths, and said, he would serve me out before the night was over; about a quarter of an hour afterwards, I was going into the tap-room, and he came behind me and gave me a violent blow, and knocked me down; I had the trowel in my hand - I do not know whether I struck him with it or no, as they were shoving me out, he turned round, kicked at me, and I made a blow at him; I was pushed across the road by the people, who told me to go away.

RICHARD NEVILLE re-examined. I did not strike him till he struck me; I struck him two blows; it was after that that I went to St Giles', with the policeman, and returned, and on my returning back, he stabbed me - I never had made any kick at him.

ROBERT SMITH . The prisoner's account is not correct; the prosecutor did not strike him till he struck the prosecutor - that was after his trying to provoke him to kick his shins.

GUILTY (on the Third Count). - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18330905-3

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1204. DANIEL CLARK and EDWARD PICKARD were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Place Hebden , on the 14th of August, at St. James, Westminster, and stealing therein 7 handkerchiefs, value 22s. his property .

JOHN PLACE HEBDEN . I live No. 270, Regent Circus, in the parish of St. James, Westminster ; I am a linendraper . On a Wednesday in August, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I found a pane of glass in my window was cut, there was a hole made, by a piece being cut away - the hole was large enough to put both hands through; I had seen the window quite safe a little after eight o'clock - I was busy in the shop with customers the whole time after that; the street-door was open all the time; I had not heard the glass broken at all - I looked to see if anything was gone, but missed nothing at the time, I told the first policeman who went by to report it at the station-house, and next morning Hobbs, a policeman brought me one piece of silk handkerchiefs; it has my mark on it all the way through - we had not sold a piece of handkerchiefs that day; I have two young men and myself in the shop; the piece of handkerchiefs was kept in the next pane of glass to the one which was cut; there was a pile of twenty or thirty pieces - I had seen them all safe at eight o'clock that evening - I did not miss it that evening, because in the quantity I have it was impossible to miss it - I had seen the window all safe, and the pile there at eight o'clock - I did not count them; they did not appear to be disturbed when I examined them afterwards - anybody could very easily, by putting their hand through the hole, reach the pile - they were piled up in a row, one on the top of the other; theymight have taken twenty pieces, if they had had time.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a policeman. On the 14th of August, I saw the prisoners in company with another person, in Lower Regent-street, a little before nine o'clock, in the Quadrant - I followed them into Coventry-street, and laid hold of Pickard; the other two walked away; they were all three together - when I laid hold of Pickard, I asked him what he had got there; he said, "a suit of clothes;" seeing some silk handkerchiefs, I took him to the station-house, and untied the bundle and found a piece of seven handkerchiefs, and a child's dress, tied in a black apron - I have had them ever since; I called Stone to lay hold of the other two, but one ran away.

GEORGE STONE . I am a policeman, I went after Clark; his companion was close to him; it was a boy- I took Clark, and the other one ran down Oxford-street; I found nothing on Clark - I asked him who the other boy was, that Hobbs had in custody; he said, he did not know; he had never seen him, and when he got to the station-house, he said, he did know him, and that a man gave him (Pickard) the bundle to carry.

JOHN PLACE HEBDEN re-examined. This is my piece of handkerchiefs; it is marked i.a. all the way through; I marked it myself - I might have thirty or forty pieces in the window that day; I cannot say the exact number, our stock is too large - I merely take an account of what money I take, not of every piece of goods sold - we never sell goods without putting them in paper, and this was found without any paper on it - we do not take off the marks when we sell; we had not sold a piece of handkerchief that day, because we enter in a book what is sold; we take an account of what money we take - we do not enter every article we sell; we should put down, "goods £5." if it was a lot; but if it was merely one thing, we put down what it is, but such a thing as this we should have recollected - if that piece of handkerchief had been sold with other articles to one customer, I should have entered them as goods; but we should have recollected it, if I had sold one whole piece - when a large parcel is sold, I generally require the young men to mention what they consisted of, and we had not sold one piece that day - when we sell a parcel the bill is made out, the money brought to me, and I always read over what is sold, and take the money, and give change, and such a thing as that did not occur that day - I do not recollect any piece of handkerchiefs being sold, but if it was sold with other goods, it would not have been entered in the book.

Pickard's Defence. At the top of Coventry-street, by the stages, a man asked me to carry the parcel to Turnstile, and he would give me 6d.; the policeman took me, and dragged me along; I told him the man who gave it me had gone, and he would not look after him, and then the man ran directly.

JURY to MR. HEBDEN. Q. Would it not require an instrument to cut the window? A. It seemed to be starred, as if forced with a blunt instrument in three or four places, and the glass was either cut or broken in the direction of those stars - the corner of the square was taken out.

CLARK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

PICKARD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

Pickard Recommended to Mercy by the Jury believing him to have been dupe of others . - There was another indictment against Clark.

Reference Number: t18330905-4

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1205. CHARLES REYNOLDS was indicted for, that he, on the 28th of June , at Fulham, with a certain loaded pistol, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did shoot at Sarah Parry , with intent feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder her , against the statute, &c.

2ND COUNT stating it to be with intent to disable.

3RD COUNT stating it to be with intent to do some grievous bodily harm.

SARAH PARRY . I am a single woman . I have known the prisoner about three months; he was a fellow- servant of mine. at Mr. Wetherell's, at Highgate; he had left the place - in June last I was living with my sister at Hammersmith , and on the 28th of June, I and my sister were in the kitchen together, and the prisoner came into the sitting kitchen - I did not know he was in the house until he came into the kitchen - (I had seen him about a week before) - he came in and stood at the kitchen-door, and said to my sister, if she moved she was a dying woman, by God he would shoot her - he had a large pistol in his hand; he went to the other kitchen door, and pulled two more pistols out of his bosom, and he said we should suffer for it, for injuring his character with his parents - the gate bell rang, and my sister said to him, "Hark, some of our people are coming" - I stood by the kitchen-dresser and he fired the pistol at me; he was four or five yards from me - I was hit in the neck and finger with it; my finger was shot off - I do not know whether he said anything at the time he fired the pistol, I was so frightened - I do not know what he said; I fell down - when I recovered myself, I do not know whether he was gone out of the room - I was taken to the hospital.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you and the prisoner been friendly as fellow-servants together.? A. Yes, friendly as fellow-servants - I saw him afterwards at the police-office; I had not seen him between the time I was wounded, and the time I saw him at the police-office - I did not see anything wild in his manner; I was so flurried I did not observe it - I never saw him before I went to live with Mr. Wetherell.

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I am the sister of Sarah Parry. I was sitting with her on the 28th of June, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening - we were sitting down to tea together, and presently I heard the door unlocked, I turned my head, and Charles Reynolds was standing by the kitchen-door - he had a large pistol in his hand, and said if I stirred he would shoot me; I stepped up to him, and asked what I had done to him; he said, we had injured his character to his parents and we should suffer for it; he put his hand in his bosom and brought out two small pistols, and said there was one for me, one for my sister, and one for him - the gate bell then rang; I told him to be quiet, for some of our people were coming; he up with the pistol, and shot at my sister - he did not say a word when he shot her - he then ran up stairs; she fell down - I took the key of the gate to let the porters in, and called for assistance, as I saw she was lying down.

Cross-examined. Q. You and he had been on good terms? A. Yes; we had had no quarrelling at all - I did not see anything particular in his appearance - I did not see any wildness about him when he said he had a pistol for each of us.

COURT. Q. Had he ever courted your sister? A. Not that I know of.

SARAH PARRY re-examined. He had never courted me.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to say, he had not paid you some attention? A. No; he had not, not at all.

CHARLES PYE . I was passing the house at the time the first pistol was fired, and in an instant afterwards I saw a young woman in great distress, crying out that her sister was shot, and she appeared greatly agitated - I immediately opened the gate, and took her to the opposite house, ran back, and assisted in getting the prosecutrix off the ground; she was laying on her back; I took her to the same house as her sister was at, and medical assistance was sent for; I stood by while her wounds were dressed, and I saw this ball taken out of her neck.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner afterwards? A. Yes; as soon as the prosecutrix's wounds were dressed, I returned to the house, and saw him surrounded by persons who had just taken him - his face was discoloured from the explosion of the pistol from gunpowder, and it was bleeding very much, he had shot himself, evidently.

FRANCIS HICKS . I am house-surgeon at St. George's Hospital. On the evening of the 28th of June, Sarah Parry was brought to the hospital; the index finger of her left hand was shot off, and there was a wound on the left side of her neck; it was such a wound as a pistol shot would produce - the ball had been extracted before I saw her - I was obliged to take off the remainder of the finger; it was very much shattered indeed - the wound in the neck was a small wound in the centre, rather behind, it had penetrated about three inches; she was in danger for some time - the prisoner was brought to the hospital about an hour afterwards; he appeared to have been wounded with a pistol on the left cheek, just by the angle of the eye, and on the upper lip; the shot had passed from one to the other, there was a communication between the wounds.

CHARLES COX EYRE . I am a surgeon. I dressed the prisoner's wounds before he was taken to the hospital; while I was dressing them he said with a look of inquiry,"I hope the wretch is dead;" but he put it more as a question than from any bad feeling - I said, on examining his wound, that it was not so bad as it might have been; and he expressed his regret that he had not completed the job towards himself; he said, "I am sorry I have not completed the job" - and when I was dressing the wound he said, "You are trying to preserve me from one death, that I may suffer another."

JAMES WRIGHT . On the 28th of June, I went down to a sale at Hammersmith, at No. 8, St. Alban's-place - I heard the report of a pistol, and went to the house; I rang the bell, got into the yard, and Davis sung out"Murder, my sister is shot!" I ran down into the kitchen, and found this pistol by the side of the prosecutrix, who laid there weltering in her blood; I took it up, and heard footsteps going up stairs; I went up stairs, and when I got part of the way up, I heard the report of another pistol up stairs; I ran up as fast as I could, and before I reached the attic, where the report was, the prisoner had jumped out of a two pair of stairs window -

I found this small pistol and his hat up stairs - I came down to the balcony on the first floor - I found the prisoner in the garden, and asked him if he knew what he had been guilty of? he said, "Oh! my poor mother" - I asked him if he had any more weapons about him, he said he had a third pistol - I went up stairs, and found the third pistol about a foot from where I found the second - the pistols had all been discharged - he was taken away to a surgeon's.

JAMES FISHER . I am a policeman. I was standing at the corner of Angel-lane, about eight o'clock in the evening - I was informed of this, and went to the house - the prisoner was standing there with his face tied up, and Mr. Eyre had hold of him by the right arm - I took him to the surgeon's, and had him dressed.

STEPHEN CULLUM MARCHANT . I am a policeman. I was on duty at the station-house, the prisoner was brought in, and on searching him some papers were taken from his person.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not aware of what I was doing at the time.

John Atkins , watch-maker, Goswell-road; Philip Somers , fancy stationer, Islington; and James Hay , surgeon, Newgate-street, gave the prisoner a good character for humanity and kindness of disposition.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Unanimously recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his previous character, and the absence of malice or revengeful disposition .

Reference Number: t18330905-5

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1206. JAMES HARRIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Margaret Jennings , on the 18th of July , at St. Leonard's Shoreditch , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 necklace, value 10s., her property .

MARGARET JENNINGS. I am a shoe binder , and live in Felix-street, Hackney-road. On the 18th of July, I was in Shoreditch, near upon twelve o'clock, with Susan Steel ; we went to the Gun public-house, Shoreditch, and had a quartern of rum - the prisoner was standing at the bar - I had never seen him before, but I am certain of him - while I was having the rum, he put his hand on my shoulder; I pushed it off and drank the rum, and came out of the public-house; I cannot say whether he came out before me or after me - I had a necklace of seven rows of coral beads on my neck - when I came out, a young man outside took hold of my necklace; when I got a few doors from the public-house, the prisoner snatched them off my neck, and ran away with them - Steel was on a little before me at that time; I was a little distance from the public-house, walking along, when the prisoner took hold of my necklace, that is all he did - I fell down, because the way of his catching hold of the necklace, threw me down on my back; he did not get the necklace off till I fell on the ground, because it got entangled with my cap-strings; he got it off before he ran away - he did not strike me, he threw me down; it was by pulling the necklace that he threw me down.

Q. After losing it, what did you do? A. I had been to my mother's before I lost it, and I returned there again; one of the officers picked me up - I lost sight of the prisoner and went to my mother's, and one of the officers came there - he had the prisoner outside the door; I went to the station-house, and saw the prisoner; he is the man, I am quite sure - Sergeant Grove had my necklace.

Prisoner. Q. Were you in liquor or not? A. I was the worse for what I had had.

COURT. Q. Could you walk straight? A. Yes; I was sober enough to distinguish the person of the prisoner- I have not a doubt but he is the man; Steel was near enough to see him.

SUSAN STEEL . I was at the Gun with Jennings, on the night in question; we had some liquor there - she was rather the worse for liquor, and so was I; I saw the prisoner in the house - he is the man; he put his arm on her neck, and played with the lock of her beads; I asked her to give me the beads, and I would take care of them until she got home; because I thought I was more sober than she was - I went out before her, and was on a few yards before her; I turned round, and saw her down on the ground - nobody was near her then, because the prisoner had then ran away; I saw the prisoner, because I hallooed out "Stop thief" after him.

Q. How do you know it was him? A. He was against her when they came out of the public-house - he was close to her; and when I saw her on the ground, I saw him running away; it was about twelve o'clock - I hallooed out "Stop thief" after him, and ran after him; he turned round Austin-street, and I lost sight of him - I went to the station-house the same night, and saw him, and was certain it was the same man; I have not a doubt about him.

WILLIAM BARROW . I am a policeman. On the night of the 18th of July, I was on duty in High-street, Shoreditch - I heard the cry of "Stop thief," from a female, and saw a man run round Shoreditch-church, and turn down Austin-street - I looked, and saw the prosecutrix laying on the ground; I ran over and helped her up- I then pursued the man as quick as possible; I lost sight of him when he turned down Collingwood-street - I was forty or fifty yards behind him; and it is a very dark street - my brother officer, (H 125,) came up, and we went to No. 12, Collingwood-street, knocked at the door, and an old man let us in; I saw the prisoner coming out of the back yard - I could see his countenance then, and told him I wanted him for the coral beads - he said he had not been out for an hour - he was then very much out of breath; quite exhausted with running so fast - he had got his hat and coat off then; he was so out of breath, he could hardly speak - the man I saw running before, had his hat and coat on; I took him into the front room, and gave my lanthorn to Grove, and told him, in the prisoner's hearing, to search all the back yards over, and to search the privy, as the prisoner said he had just been to the privy - I kept him in my custody till he was locked up.

WILLIAM GROVE . I am a sergeant of the police. I was at the house in Collingwood-street, and searched the back yard, and found these beads, which I now produce - they were outside of the back window, hanging on the ledge or sill of the window - I brought them into the

house, and told the prisoner I had found them; he made no observation at all - I took them to the station-house, and showed them to the prosecutrix; she made no hesitation in identifying them.

EDWARD TEMPLE . I am a policeman. I was at the end of Collingwood-street on duty, about twelve o'clock at night; and the prisoner ran past me at a very quick pace - I could see his face as he passed close by me; I am sure he is the man - he went up Collingwood-street, and from the manner he ran, I thought something was wrong - he knocked at the door, No. 12, in the street - I spoke to him at the door; I saw him go into the house when it was opened; he told me a girl had scratched his face - he came from Shoreditch Church.

MARGARET JENNINGS re-examined. This is the necklace I had on that night; I know it by the silk I threaded it with, and by the lock, and the way I have joined the thread.

JURY. Q. Had you been drinking together in the public-house? A. No; I knew nothing of him - I gave the liquor to a young woman, who tried to make herself known to me - but I did not know her, and I believe she gave it to him to sip, but not in my presence - I never saw him before.

SUSAN STEEL . I did not know him before.

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove the woman to be a common prostitute; I have had connexion with her time after time, and because I would not correspond with her one night, she said she would set a project some day to take away my life; I met her this night, she was very much intoxicated; she pulled her beads off her neck outside the Gun, and gave them to me, to mind, to take care of for her, and then sung out Police, that she had been robbed; I immediately went away.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18330905-6

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1207. ROBERT WRIGHT and JOHN REYNOLDS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Solomon Leventhall , on the 15th of July , at Christ Church, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 3l., his property; and that the said Robert Wright, before the said felony was committed, to wit, at the delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, on Thursday, the 17th of May, 2nd William IV, was convicted of felony, by the name of Robert James Bright .

MORDECAI MOSES . I attended the examination of the prisoners before the magistrate - the prosecutor, Solomon Leventhall , attended there - I knew him before; he is now gone abroad; he came here from America to fetch his children, and has returned.

THOMAS KNIGHT KENT . I attended the examination before the magistrate, and saw Leventhall there - About seven weeks ago last Monday, at half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I saw Wright at the top of Fashion-street, in Rose-lane, Spitalfields , standing there threatening somebody how he would pay them when he caught them; I turned round, but could not see who he was threatening - when my back was turned, when I got three-parts down Rose-lane, Wright, and Reynolds, and another, stood against some brick-work talking together - the old gentleman (Levent-hall) was coming down, and the pavement being narrow, I stepped off the foot pavement over the way to give him the path - I was five or six yards from him, and I directly saw Reynolds and another young man run after the prosecutor they shoved him in the back, and Wright met him in the front, knocked his arm up and pulled his watch out of his pocket; he broke the guard in two, and they all ran away together, and passed me all three down towards Essex-street, and when I got into Whitechapel, I saw the old gentleman had been thrown down in the mud by somebody; that was the person I saw at the office when the prisoners were examined; and who is gone abroad.

Wright. On the evening of the robbery, the witness came to identify us at the station-house, at eleven o'clock, and he swore positively we were not the party. Witness. I was called out of my bed by somebody, and went to the station-house - there was only one man there, and I said,"That man I never saw" - I was taken over to the watch-house, and these two and another man came out of the lock-up place, and I said, "That lad was never there;" that was the other, and he was quite a boy; and then I turned round to Green and said to him,"Them are the men."

Wright. He was not at the first examination, but at the second examination on the 20th, he came up and said he was rather in liquor at the time.

COURT. Q. Were you in liquor? A. I was not at all; I never had anything to drink all that day - I was in liquor at one of the examinations.

Wright. At the second examination, the magistrate asked if he knew the prisoners at the bar. Witness. I said I knew them.

COURT. Q. Have you any recollection what you said when you were in liquor? A. I said they were the party, but seeing I was rather gone, I was not asked so much about it; Mr. Broughton put it off to examine me when I was more sober, and I swore to them - I never swore Wright was not one of the party.

JAMES JOHN CONELLY . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner Wright on Monday afternoon, about four o'clock, (the afternoon of the robbery) in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel, in a house of ill-fame where he lodged; he was up reading the newspaper - I waited about twenty minutes for more of my brother officers to come up - I told him I wanted him for the watch in Rose-lane, and he said he thought I wanted him by my hanging about so - I then took him to the station-house, and then looked for the direction of the prosecutor; and as I came out of the back-office, Wright said to me,"It is a pity the innocent should suffer for the guilty, ar'nt you going to apprehend Cakey," (which is a nickname of Reynolds) - I said I should as soon as I could see him; and after I had been to Houndsditch I was coming along with the prosecutor - I received some information and went to a house in Rose-lane, and found Reynolds laying on the bed without his coat, in liquor - this was about four yards from where the robbery was committed as I understood - I said, "Cakey, I want you;" he said, "I will go with you, I will not run away;" I said, "I will take care of that;" he went with me to the station-house - I then had a third person in custody

who was suspected - I produced all the three to Leventhall, and as soon as he got inside the station-house, he said to the third man, "That man I do not know, these two(the prisoners) are the men that robbed me" - I do not know that they said anything to it at the time - I was present at the examination when Kent attended and was tipsy; I saw he was not fit to go in, and tried to persuade him to go home, but he would go in - he was examined, and said Wright was not one of the men who committed the robbery, but I consider myself that he was not capable of speaking about it; he said nothing about Reynolds - he was not capable of judging correctly, or of speaking about it.

JOHN CRAGG . On the 9th of May, 1832, I apprehended Wright in the Old Jewry for stealing a coat; he was convicted in this Court at the following Sessions - I have the certificate of his conviction, (read) the prisoner is the person who was tried and convicted.

Wright's Defence (written). On the 15th of last July, I came to town from Woolwich, where I was residing with my mother, in consequence of being out of employ; about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I was proceeding down Essex-street, Whitechapel; I saw two young men pass me in great haste; within about fifty yards of thent, I saw a person making an uncouth noise, and was running after the young men; when he came towards me some one came behind him and knocked him down; when he got up, I saw a watch and appendages lying in the kennel; I stepped off the pavement, with the intention of picking it up, to give it to the prosecutor, when two men (to all appearance labourers) procured it and gave it him; when he had it, he proceeded towards Whitechapel, in the direction after the young men who ran away. I did not know at the time exactly what had happened, and followed him to ascertain; when he stopped a mob collected round him, I joined them and inquired of him what had happened, when he replied, the two young men he was following had robbed him of a watch; I then told him I did not think he had lost a watch, as two men had picked one up, and gave it him; he then stated he had two watches in the same pocket and had lost one; I conversed with him, persuading him what to do, nearly twenty minutes; during the time two policemen came up, and inquired into it; he never at the time accused me of being a party concerned: he then went with them to the station-house, and gave information of the robbery; about two hours after three policemen, with the prosecutor, came down the street where I was residing with my sister; I was standing at the door, they all looked at me; the policeman put some question to him, to which he shook his head, and passed on; afterwards I had my tea, and cleaned myself, with the intention of returning to Woolwich. I was sitting in the front parlour, when the policeman Conolly called, and said he wanted me; I asked him what he wanted; he replied, on suspicion of highway robbery; I stated I was entirely innocent of the charge; he asked me several questions going to the station-house; I told him, I knew nothing of the transaction, and for him not to bother me with questions; I added, it was a pity that the innocent should suffer for the guilty. There was a person whom I did not know taken at the same time with me; when locked up in the station-house the aforesaid person said to me, "Young man you are entirely innocent of the charge, and should we go before a magistrate, I will tell him so;" he called the policeman, and made a communication, which I did not hear; the policeman replied, "He'll be here by and by," but to whom he alluded I did not know; about eight o'clock in the evening the prisoner Reynolds was brought in; we were then placed together for the prosecutor to recognize us; he then swore to the prisoner Reynolds as the person who robbed him, and me as the person who shoved against him, we were then locked up in the station-house cell, with some other prisoners, when a person (which afterwards proved to be the witness, Kent) came with two policemen and said he could identify the persons who committed the robbery; at eleven o'clock at night we were taken out for him to view us, when he positively stated that we were not the persons who committed the robbery; next morning we were examined before Mr. Broughton, at Worship-street, when the prosecutor swore to the statement he made above; the policeman Conolly begged for our being remanded, as he stated he could prove our being the parties; we where then remanded till the 20th of July, when the witness Kent (being on oath) swore positively I was not one of the party, of which there is proof in the depositions. We were again remanded till the 27th, when the magistrate was going to commit us, but being reminded of the depositions of the witness Kent, he again remanded us till the 30th, when he took the witness Kent's depositions down again, in which he flatly contradicted his former statement, swearing to me as the person who took the watch, and Reynolds as the person who shoved against the prosecutor: when they told him to beware of what he stated, as he had stated quite different on a previous examination, we were then remanded till the 3rd of August, when we were fully committed to Newgate. Mr. Broughton, the magistrate, remarked, he should be most happy to discharge us, as he believed us to be innocent, but under the peculiar circumstances he deemed it his duty to send it before a Jury. I beg most solemnly to assure you, I am entirely innocent of the charge laid against me, and beg to call your attention to the fact of the prosecutor seeing me several times, and not recognizing me as a party concerned; the witness Kent twice positively stating I was not one of the party. Were I guilty it is not probable I should have remained about the spot where the robbery was committed, but would naturally have endeavoured to conceal myself, or have left the quarter where I was residing. I now humbly leave my case to your serious consideration, trusting the importance of the case will induce you to ponder well 'ere you return your verdict. Solemnly asserting my innocence, I appeal to the well-known justice and humanity of a British Jury.

JAMES JOHN CONELLY re-examined. I was not there when Kent was first brought to the station-house.

Reynolds' Defence (written). On the 15th of July, the day that the robbery was committed, I was at work until five o'clock in the afternoon; about seven o'clock the same evening I went to see a friend of mine, and after I had been there about half an hour, a policeman knocked at the door of the room that I was in, and said that I was his prisoner; I was surprised and asked him upon what charge? he, the policeman said, for stealing a watch; I denied the charge, but he took me to the station-house. When I arrived at the station-house, I saw two other men which I learned were there for the same robbery that I was charged with. The next morning, the 16th instant, I was taken to Worship-street office, the prosecutor came and said that I was the man that robbed him, I was then remanded. On Saturday, the 20th instant, I was again placed at the office, and was again remanded until the 27th instant; I was taken to the office, and a man came and swore that neither me nor my fellow-prisoner were the men who had robbed him, meaning the prosecutor. He, the witness, said that he should know the men, if he was to see them: we were again remanded until the following Tuesday, the 30th instant, I again was placed at the bar, and the witness swore that my fellow-prisoner Wright was the man that robbed him; at the same time the prosecutor swore that I was the man.

Reynolds. That gentleman was not present before three examinations passed - he came down to the cell, and

said that for 3l. 10s. he would put the prosecution on one side, and Conelly said he was quite angry with him for talking to the prisoners - he came to us several times; he said he was a man of the world, and had a son and daughter transported himself, and knew the business perfectly well.

Wright. I only had the use of one hand, and was not able to attack anybody.

WRIGHT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

REYNOLDS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18330905-7

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1208. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Cummings , on the 14th of August , at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias Stepney, and stealing therein 4 pairs of shoes, value 12s.; and 3 shoe lifts, value 1s., his property .

WILLIAM CUMMINGS. I live at No. 59, Church-street, Mile-end, Old-town, in the parish of Stepney . I shut up my house about ten o'clock at night on the 14th of August; I fastened my shop window shutters with screws, and between twelve and one o'clock I was knocked up by the policeman, who gave me information; I came down and examined the shop window, and observed the shutter was pulled down - it was forced out - it was an outside shutter; it could not be got down without being forced down by some instrument; the nut of the screw was slipped; the window does not open - the glass was broken; I had left some shoes in the window when I went to bed; I dare say there were about twenty pair; I examined the shoes and missed three pair then, and on taking what was left up stairs, about one o'clock, I missed a fourth pair; the four are worth 13s. 6d. - 5s. 6d. a pair; they were my property, (looking at one pair) these are the shoes; I swear they are part of what I lost that night; they are the only pair of this sort I had in my window; I bought them on the 6th of April, of Robert Cumming, of Red Lion-street, and they are stamped R. C. - I know them by being made with boot legs; I had seen that pair safe before I went to bed.

Prisoner. At the first examination he stated he made the shoes himself, and could swear to them. Witness. I did not say I made this pair - I made two pair myself; those two pair have not been found yet.

Prisoner. At the second examination he brought this pair up, and said he could swear to them by the letters R. C.; I have every reason to believe by his not saying so the first time, that they were marked afterwards.

THOMAS SIMMONS . I am a pawnbroker. The prosecutor came to me about these shoes, and the prisoner afterwards brought the pair of shoes now produced, and offered them to me in pawn; these are the shoes, they have not been out of my possession; I have produced them now; they are the same I produced before the magistrate: he asked 2s. 6d. on them, they were stamped on the bottom with R. C., which is now on them; I detained him, and gave him in custody; I asked him if they were his own property, he said yes, that he bought them in Petticoat-lane for 2s; it was about twelve o'clock on the 15th of August, that he came: I live at No. 25, Whitechapel-road, and am servant to Mr. Dexter.

ROBERT CUMMING . My father serves the prosecutor with shoes; I know he bought this pair of shoes of me on the 6th of August - I know them by the stamp, and also it is twelve months since I made such a pair of shoes; I made them twelve months ago; it is very seldom we make such shoes - I did not make them myself; I am positive they are the shoes.

Prisoner. On the third examination the witness said he made them himself, and that was the reason I was committed.

ROBERT CUMMING . I did not say I made them myself.

Prisoner. If you will call Savage, a policeman, of the H division, he will prove it - he promised to be here at ten o'clock this morning; he said he was at the first examination, when Cumming swore he made them himself; at the second examination this man swore he made them; in the third examination the witness said his man made them; I mentioned it to the magistrate at the third examination, and they would scarcely read over the evidence to me.

THOMAS SIMMONS . The shoes were marked when he brought them, as they are now - I have had them ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I get my living by dealing in Petticoat-lane, and bought the shoes that morning for 2s. and a pair of boots besides; I pawned them to make up money to lay out in the afternoon; it is not likely I should pawn them so near where the robbery was committed if I was guilty.

THOMAS SIMMONS . I live about five minutes walk from the prosecutor.

Richard Budd, of Lambeth-street, Whitechapel, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18330905-8

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1290. JOHN WILLIS, alias JOHN HUTTON , and THOMAS JOHNSON , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Goodman , on the 21st of April , at Hillingdon, and stealing therein 1300 yards of silk, value 160l.; 700 yards of lace, value 70l.; 60 shawls, value 45l.; 345 handkerchiefs, value 54l.; 80 scarfs, value 15l.; 15 spoons, value 12l.; 1 clock, value 5l.; 1 table-cloth, value 4s.; 1 imitation-cigar, value 2d.; and the sum of 2l. 5s. in copper monies, his property : and SARAH JAMES was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, at the same parish, 48 yards of silk, value 5l.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 1l.; 1 scarf, value 5s.; part of the said goods, so as aforesaid feloniously stolen, well knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute, &c.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM GOODMAN . I am a silk mercer , and live at Uxbridge, in Middlesex, in the parish of Hillingdon . In consequence of information which I received on Sunday morning, the 21st of April, I went down stairs, about five o'clock, and found my private door wide open, and my shopdoor was forced open - the goods in the shop were scattered in all directions; many silk rollers were lying about; the silks had been taken off them - I missed from twenty to

thirty pieces of silk - I missed two wrappers of shawls, worth 60l. or 70l., and a whole box of lace, worth about 100l. or 140l.; the whole loss we estimate at 400l. and upwards - my desk in my shop was broken open; I lost nine papers of halfpence from that desk, containing 5s. worth each, and each paper was marked with a figure of 5s. - the iron chest in the shop was safe; there had been an attempt made on it certainly, but it had not succeeded - I found a chisel very near the iron chest, it did not belong to me, and a bunch of keys, which had been taken out of my desk; they were in the desk the night before - I have a cupboard in my breakfast parlour, and from that was taken twelve or fourteen silver spoons - I missed some cigars, and a variety of other things - I observed something very indecent had been transacted in the house - there was an imitation of a lighted cigar taken - I went into the kitchen, and found part of the pannel of the door cut out; the aperture enabled a person to put his hand through and undraw the bolt; the door was open - the pannel was cut out of the cellar-door, which was open, and a small window at the back of the house had the glass taken out, and the cross-bar and two squares of glass were taken out; a person could get through there into the house - I tried it myself - my house was safe when I went to bed - Willis's father keeps some stables at the back of my house; he goes by the name of Hutton there; these stables are about four or five hundred yards from the back of my house - I saw the chisel applied to the door by Attfield, it corresponded with the marks exactly - when Johnson was taken we found two chisels in his room, they were applied, and fitted exactly the impressions where the places were broken open; one chisel had a small piece broken out of the corner, and the space was wanted in almost every mark - Brock afterwards showed me a piece of silk, and Prendergrass produced a piece to me - I went into Newgate soon after Willis was taken into custody - it is about two months ago - I found the female prisoner in Newgate, and Willis too - the female prisoner had a light puce silk dress on; I considered the silk the dress was made of mine; I had one a similar colour, and a short length of it, and from the appearance of it I considered it mine.

VALENTINE BULLER . I am shopman to Mr. Goodman, and live in the house. On Sunday morning, the 21st of April, I was called up about five o'clock, and went through the premises - I observed the place broken open, and the property removed - I afterwards went to the stables of Hutton (Willis's father) and could see there the traces of a cart or narrow wheeled chaise from Hutton's stables into the street, and pursuing the track of the wheels I found a piece of lace, which I believe to be Mr. Goodman's; there is a mark in pencil of the length of the lace; it is one of our shop marks, but not made by myself - I have seen Willis before at Uxbridge in company with his father, and believed him to be the son of that man.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. When did you track the wheels? A. On the 21st of April, the morning the robbery was discovered - the constable ( James Darvill ) went with me - the stables are four or five hundred yards from the house.

Q. Do you go along the highway to them? A. No, it is a sort of enclosed yard belonging to three houses - it was a dewy morning, the grass was wet with dew - it was not market morning, it was Sunday - I had not looked at the same place the night before - I should judge from the appearance of the grass that the tracks had been just made; the dew appeared to have been brushed off - it was a narrow wheel.

JAMES DARVILL . I am a constable of Uxbridge. On Sunday morning, the 21st of April, I was called up in consequence of a robbery, and went to Mr. Goodman's house - I observed the track of a wheel leading from the High-street down to the stables, in the direction it would come from Mr. Goodman's house - I traced it down to Hutton's stables; the track was quite visible - I thought Hutton's horse had been stolen from there, and called his man up; it was a fresh track, the dew was brushed off - I received from Buller a chisel and some lace.

MARTIN SPENCELEY . I am a groom. I was in the employ of Mr. Batty of Uxbridge - in April last, I slept in Mr. Hutton's stables - I know Willis; Hutton passed as his father - I was sleeping in the saddle-room on the night of the 20th of April; Mr. Hutton gave me leave to sleep there - I knew Johnson before; I never saw Johnson in Uxbridge before, but Willis had lived there with his father - while I was in the saddle-room I saw Willis, he awoke me by tapping at the saddle-room window, he asked me where the keys of the gates were, I said they hung up on a nail near the door; Willis then came in and said,"Johnson has come down, and we have brought a horse and cart;" I said, "Have you?" he said, "Yes;" and they brought the horse and cart into the yard, turned the horse out, and brought the horse into the stable; there was only one horse in the cart; I don't exactly know what sort of a cart it was; it was a light cart; there had been no other cart up the yard that morning, not to my knowledge - Johnson and he both came in the stables; Willis instantly got a light, he got it in about a moment; I don't know how he got it, he got it from something he brought with him; there was no tinder-box there - Johnson lit his pipe, and Willis told me in Johnson's hearing, that they were going to crack a bl-y crib - I don't know what that meant, but fancy it meant to break into a house - Willis fed the horse with oats - they went away in about twenty minutes - I cannot say at what hour I was awoke, I had not a watch, but imagine it was near four o'clock when they went away; they came at near one o'clock I suppose - they came back, I did not see whether they brought anything with them - when they went away about four o'clock, they took the horse out of the stables, put it in the cart, and went away - I was in bed, but I could hear them do that; and about half-past five o'clock I heard of Mr. Goodman's house being robbed - the constable came down into the yard about five o'clock; I got up, and dressed myself - I saw nothing found - I did not see the prisoners when they came back; but I heard them stirring about, as if in a great hurry - the horse, according to what I could see as I lay in bed, was a chesnut horse, about 14 hands, 2 inches, as near as I can guess.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You were lying in bed, and the horse in the yard? A. No, the horse was in the stables; there was no stall in the stables, he was standing by a rail - I thought it was a dark chesnut; almost a brown - I did not understand what they meant

when they said they were going to break a b-y crib - I rather judged it was to break into somebody's house - I have had nothing to do in that way myself - I remember living in Northumberland - I was never charged with robbing any body there - I did not live at a public-house - I was never charged with robbing my master, nor any body else - I was never taken into custody till I was taken on this, and then I could not find bail - I was fetched from Cambridge by Mr. Goodman and an officer - I was taken into custody then, and brought on this charge; I told this story after that; I had not told a word about it before I was taken into custody; I never told it, except to one man, named Maddox - he is not a particular friend of mine; he was a friend, and he was not; he lived with Mr. Hutton at that time - he lets out flys, and horses, and gigs - I know where Mr. Goodman lived - I heard of the robbery about half-past five o'clock - I went to Cambridge soon after Epsom races, about two months after the robbery; I staid at Uxbridge until Epsom races, that was about three weeks - I knew where the prosecutor lived, but did not give an alarm; I might have got 20l. if I had gone near him, but I had no hand in it, and did not wish to make a disturbance; there was 20l. reward offered; it is not offered still that I know off; I have not the least notion of getting any part of it now - I was out of place when I left Uxbridge; I went to Epsom, and got a place with an old master who I had lived nine years with, and staid with him till Mr. Goodman fetched me away; I went with my old master to Cambridge; his name is Edwards, he is a gentleman jockey - I did not bring seventy sovereigns from Epsom; my pockets were very clear when I returned from Epsom; I did not show any body seventy sovereigns, and say I had made a good thing of it there, nor did I show any money.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Is there not a reward still offered for the robbery? A. I don't know; I know there was a reward before I left Uxbridge, and I suppose it will remain - I don't expect to get any portion of it; I never said I had made a good job or good thing at Uxbridge; I remember being at the Ben Johnson, in Shoe-lane - I never said there that I had made a good thing at Uxbridge, and had been to Epsom races; I made nothing at Uxbridge but what I earned by hard work; I worked for Mr. Batty, that was the only thing I made money by there; I was never charged with robbery at Newcastle; I lived with Lord Kelburn in Scotland - I was never charged with committing robbery there; I know a man named George - I did not go with him to Scotland, I went with him to Yorkshire; I was never charged with robbing his mother - I don't know whether he was; I never knew George charged with robbery while I was with him; there are several George's - none of them were charged with robbery while I was with them; I saw the tracks of the wheels, there were two tracks; I looked at them in the morning, as a good many people were looking at them; the cart was in the yard, and I was in the stable in bed; I could not see the cart from my bed - I saw it once - I stood by the stable door then; I was in bed before they came with the cart; I got up to shut the gates, and saw them going out, they had not got quite out; there were only two tracks on the ground; the cart only had two wheels - I saw the prisoners plainer than I saw the horse.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. It has been said you said nothing about this, what was your reason? A. Because I was rather under obligations to Hutton; not being in regular service, he gave me leave to sleep in the saddle room, I did not wish to make any disturbance, as I had no hand in the robbery, I thought they would find it out soon enough - I mean that I saw only the marks of two cart wheels.

JOSEPH JESSOP . I am a carpenter, and live at No. 3, Charles-street, Commercial-road, Whitechapel. Willis and the female prisoner lodged in my house as man and wife; they lodged with me six or seven weeks; on Sunday, the 21st of April, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I heard a horse and cart drive up to my door; I took my little boy and went to my door, and saw Willis and Johnson in the cart; Willis got out and went up stairs, and left Johnson in the cart; I saw Willis come down, and Johnson handed him a large parcel, wrapped in brown wrapper; Willis took it up stairs, came down and took a second parcel; he took them from out of the underneath part of the cart below the seat; I walked away into my back parlour, and heard one of the prisoners go up stairs twice; I returned again to the door, and Johnson said to Willis, "I think that is all;" he said "No, there is a small parcel," which he gave to Willis who went up stairs; it appeared to me to be five shilling papers of coppers tied up; I walked away from the door; they both went up to the room, and in five or ten minutes Willis came down, and drove away with the horse and cart; the horse appeared to be driven very hard, and it was very hot; Willis returned in ten or twelve minutes and knocked at my back parlour door, and paid his rent with five shillings worth of copper; his rent was 3s. 6d.; I asked him to take the change; he said, his wife should come down and take it; there was a figure of five on the brown paper; I untied the parcel of halfpence, and put the eighteen pence out; the female prisoner came down and fetched it; Johnson dined with them that day, and stopped all day until towards evening; I am not a judge of horses, but it appeared a chesnut horse, with a white face and white foot.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you know that he came to your house from Tooting, where they lived before? A. No; I don't know where they lived, but they told me they came from Uxbridge; the halfpence were tied in a handkerchief, but it appeared papers of copper; I looked at the paper they paid me, that had a figure of five on it - I looked particularly at it; that was all that was on it I am sure; it is very common to make halfpence up in five shilling parcels; they saw me standing at the door, and must have known that I saw what they were doing; they continued to lodge in my house for four or five weeks after.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Have you ever said you would do all you could to convict the prisoners? A. Not to the best of my knowledge; it is possible I might have forgotten saying such a thing; I did not say I should like to hang the whole lot - on my oath, I did not; I never said anything at all like it - I will take my oath to the best of my knowledge, that I never said I would do all I could to convict the prisoners; I can only swear to the best of my knowledge; if I ever said so respecting any

one of them, I have forgotten it - I don't recollect it; I believe I never did - I never had any quarrel with them.

HARRIET JESSOP . I am the wife of Joseph Jessup; Willis and the female prisoner lodged at our house; I remember Willis and Johnson coming to the house on the morning of the 21st of April, in a little chaise cart; it had a lightish horse; I saw them take two or three large parcels out of the cart, wrapped in brown wrappers - I saw nothing else taken out; they owed us one week's rent - I had not asked for it; it was only due on the Saturday; Willis brought the five shilling paper of halfpence to the back parlour door, wrapped in a brown paper, and it was marked with a figure of five, with a long mark after it; I burnt the paper; in about two or three hours the female prisoner brought me several little bits of lace down and gave to me - I gave them up to the officer; I am a dress maker; on the Wednesday, she brought me down two pieces of silk, a piece of puce-coloured silk measuring eight and a half yards, and a piece of lavender-coloured silk about forty yards; I made her a gown of the pucecoloured silk, and made a dress and bonnet of the lavender-coloured silk, and returned her the remainder; I think twenty-two or twenty-three yards were returned to her, because she cut two or three little pieces off herself to make a bag of; she gave me a yards and a half of the lavender-coloured silk afterwards; I made up nothing else for her; she never paid me money; I considered the pieces of lace sufficient to pay me for making the puce-coloured gown, and she gave me a yard and a-half of silk for making the lavender-coloured, and a little bit more; I saw in her possession a very handsome shawl, and four very handsome handkerchiefs; the shawl had a handsome green middle, with a reddish border - the handkerchiefs were French colour; I don't know what you call them; some of them were figured - I gave her a shilling for a scarf and made her a bonnet for it besides; all the things I had from her were delivered to the officer; I sold the yard and a half of silk to Mrs. Allen - I cut off a little bit to make it a yard and a half - On Saturday evening Willis and James went out together; nobody was with them; the woman returned about nine o'clock, as near as I can guess; she came and sat in my back parlour, and told me she had been as far as Charing-cross with her husband, and that he was gone to Uxbridge to fetch their things home; when they took my apartments, they said they came from Uxbridge - they said they had been lodging at Uxbridge; they brought nothing with them but what they had on their backs; Johnson was in the house all day on Sunday, and dined with them - I did not see any of the goods at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You always considered the woman Willis's wife? A. I did; I never knew otherwise; these transactions were all done while they were living together; I don't know the value of the scarf; here it is, it is a gauze one; soon after they came to lodge with me, I remember their getting some goods from a tally shop; I did not recommend them to the shop particularly; Mrs. Willis knew very well where the shop was; I went with her to the tally shop, and she procured some goods there; a tally shop is where you pay so much a week for goods; I did not advise them to go away and leave the tally man without paying for the goods; I had not a word with them about going away - I had no idea they were going away; I don't know what amount of goods they had from the tally shop - I don't know what the bill was; they had the goods from the tally shop about a week before they left.

COURT. Q. That was after the 21st of April? A. Yes; they had been but three weeks with me on the 21st of April.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Had they any goods from the tally shop before that Sunday? A. Not to my knowledge; I had not been with them to the tally shop before that.

ELIZABETH ALLEN . I am a single woman, and live at No. 3, Charles-street, in the house of Mr. Jesop; I purchased of Mrs. Jessop a yard and a half of silk; this is it I am certain - I gave it up to the officer.

THOMAS BAGLEY . I live at the corner of the street in which Mr. Jessop lives. On the morning of the 21st of April, I saw the two male prisoners in the street, and a cart; they stopped at Mr. Jessop's house; I saw a time-piece hauded out and carried into the house by one of them; he took it out of the cart and took it in himself.

WILLIAM BROCK . I am shopman to Mr. Law, pawnbroker, No. 1, Commercial-road. On the 27th of April, Willis pawned eighty-four yards of silk at our shop for £4 10s., in the name of John Willis, No. 3, Charles-street; I took it in; I had seen him once or twice before, and am quite certain he is the person; on the Wednesday following, Woodman came to the shop and brought the same duplicate as I had given to Willis; and he(Woodman) took forty-two yards of the silk, the remaining forty-two ramained in my custody; I have it here - I am certain this is part of the eighty-four yards Willis pawned at the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you know Willis before? A. Yes, he gave me his own name and direction.

WILLIAM WOODMAN . I am a jeweller, and live in French-alley, Goswell-street. I bought a duplicate of Willis; I gave him 1l. for it - it was for eighty-four yards of silk, pawned at Law's, at the corner of the Commercial-road - I went there, and took half the silk off, and left half there; I sold the half, and pawned the half which I left for 2l. 10s.; that produced appears to be the same.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long have you known Willis? A. About sixteen months - I have seen him at sales, and have been with him at sales, and have seen him buy silks and things at sales - I always considered him a man who dealt in such things; I have seen Jessop several times - I went to Lambeth-street to give evidence, but was not called; and when I came outside the door, he stood there with his wife, and I presume his lodger - when I came out, he was abusing the reporters for not inserting the robbery in the paper.

Q. Did you hear Jessop say he would do anything? A. When I came out, he said he should like to transport the whole lot, and he should not be particular what he said in order to do it - he said that in my hearing; my wife said, "Is that what you say? - you cannot transport me" - he said, "No; I know I cannot transport you."

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he mean to include you and your wife in the lot? A. I persume so; I was perfectly sober, and knew what he said - I think he is capable of saying anything.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am a constable of Lambeth-street. On the 5th of June, I apprehended the female prisoner and Willis, in Newcastle-court, Strand, in a two-pair of stairs back room; I searched the room - there was a chest of drawers in it, and there I found two silk dresses, this zephyr handkerchief, a sham segar, and a small piece of silk - I saw Willis pay 6s. to a woman of the house; he said it was for a week's rent - the house is a common brothel.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Do you know Jessop? A. Yes; I did not hear him say any thing about what he would do.

MATTHEW NEWMAN . I am a principal turnkey of Newgate. The female prisoner was in my custody, and was discharged at the Special Commission - when she was discharged, I asked her for a gown which she had been in the habit of wearing - it was a puce-coloured silk gown; she said she was turning it - I said Attfield the officer was waiting for it; she said she would fetch it from her ward, which she did, and gave it me; I gave it to Attfield - this is the gown; it has my initials on it.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long had she been in prison? A. About three weeks; she was not there on this charge, it was on another charge of which she was tried and acquitted.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am a police officer of Worship-street. On the 25th of June, I apprehended Johnson at No. 23, Harp-alley, Farringdon-street; I took him to the station-house, in Black Horse-court, and told him he was charged on suspicion of being concerned with others in breaking and entering the house of Mr. Goodman, at Uxbridge, and stealing a quantity of silk, plate, and other articles - he said he was never at Uxbridge in his life, and knew nothing about it; I asked if he knew a man named Willis, at No. 3, Charles-street, Commercial-road; he said he knew him perfectly well, and had been there a good many times - I found a phosphorus bottle in his pocket, which I produce; after finding that in his pocket, I went back to the house in Harp-alley with Mr. Goodman; and in a back room, on the second floor, in a table drawer, I found two chisels, and a bunch of keys; two of them are latch keys - when before the magistrate, at the office, the chisels were produced, he said they were his chisels; I took those chisels out of the same drawer as I found the keys in - on Thursday, the 27th of June, I went to Mr. Goodman's at Uxbridge, and examined the premises - I examined the inside of the cellar door, I observed a mark where the staple was drawn, and a mark about three inches under that; I applied this large chisel to the marks on the cellar door; it exactly fitted the indentations - one corner of the chisel had been broken, and that corner was wanting in the impression, and there was a notch in the chisel which corresponded - I have not a doubt that chisel was used for that purpose - I observed the kitchen door had part of a pannel taken out, and there were two impressions there, which I applied the chisel to, and they corresponded - there was the deficiency in the corner of the chisel, in one of those impressions - on the shop door leading from the passage, there were two impressions, apparently of the same chisels, they fitted it; I observed impressions on the cupboard; I applied the smaller chisel to one of the impressions, and it corresponded in every respect, and the larger chisel corresponded with some of the impressions on the cupboard door as exact as possible, and on a cupboard, on the left hand side were impressions, and both chisels fitted them - a large desk, in the shop was broken open, on which I found ten impressions of the large chisel, several of them very clear, and one impression of the smaller chisel - Newman gave me a puce coloured gown, which I produce - on the 24th of June, I received a zephyr scarf from Mr. Jessop - I received a yard and a half of lavender coloured silk from Mrs. Allen.

WILLIAM GOODMAN re-examined. I can identify many of these things, but can only positively swear to two of them - I lost such things as these; I have a scarf exactly corresponding with this in my pocket, and the silk has a mark on it; I bought it at Morrison's; this scarf I cannot swear to - this puce coloured gown, which the female prisoner had on, I can swear to, by an ink mark on it, which is the mark of my young man, who is present - I have pattern prints here, corresponding with all the silk and all the lace; I identify them positively, but have not a mark on them - I lost such things, and have corresponding things remaining behind, and I have marks on the other two.

MR. BODKIN. Q. When you sell silk, you do not rub off the private mark? A. I cannot, it is in ink.

VALENTINE BULLER re-examined. My mark is on this puce coloured gown, and this puce coloured silk was marked by me also - I can see the figures "84" - the other things resemble goods we lost - I believe them to be my master's property - this imitation cigar I cannot say any thing about.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Let me look at the mark "84" - was this marked at your house, or the manufactory? A. At our house - the manufacturer charged it as 82 yards - I marked and measured it, and made it "84" - the manufacturer don't mark the length; I mark all the goods that is not a fashionable colour particularly; it is saleable - we only had this one piece of that colour; the gown is a different colour; we had eight yards and one-eighth of that, and that is the mark on it - it was a remnant; we had not sold it - we had had that some years, being a short length; it is about three years since we had the whole length - I had seen it a week or ten days before the robbery; one or two other persons served in the shop, besides my master - but the silk goods fall particularly under my department.

MR. GOODMAN. I had such a cigar as this, and lost it.

Johnson's Defence. I am quite innocent.

Sarah James 's Defence. I am quite innocent.

Margaret Sconser , of Easton-street, Spafields, and Mary Grub , gave the prisoner James a good character.

WILLIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

JOHNSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

JAMES - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .(See Sixth Sess. p. 584, and Special Sess. p. 644.)

Reference Number: t18330905-9

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1210. JOSEPH STEADWELL was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Allen , on the 1st of September , at St. Luke, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 12 shillings, his monies .

JOHN ALLEN . I lodge at the Queen's Head, public-house, Whitecross-street; I am a clerk to Mr. Braithwaite, a brewer . On the night of the 1st of September, I was going home; I had drank four or five glasses of ale, and one glass of gin; I was fresh but not tipsy; I knew what I was about - I was rather elevated - I was crossing Chiswell-street into Lower Whitecross-street a few minutes after eight o'clock, and received a blow on my left cheek - I know nothing more of it, but when I came to myself in the station-house, I found I had lost 12s. 4d.; the 12s. was in silver, and the rest in copper - I am sure there were shillings among it; it was shillings and sixpences - my not recollecting anything was the effect of the blow; it was a very violent one - my silver was in my right hand waistcoat pocket, and the copper in my trousers pocket - I had paid away about 7s. that day; I had 21s. in the morning; I had 2s. still left after the robbery - I had not come fifty yards from the public-house when I received the blow - I know nothing about the prisoner.

JOHN BROOMING (policeman G 174). On the night of the 1st of September, I was in Whitecross-street about eight o'clock, crossing Chiswell-street, I saw nine or twelve persons standing opposite; Martin the officer was with me - on my coming there they ran away, and I saw the prisoner on his knees, and the prosecutor lying on his back on the ground, and the prisoner by the side of him on his knees - the mob which dispersed had separated from the spot leaving the prisoner in view; they had previously been round him - I saw the prisoner draw his right hand from Allen's left hand trousers pocket, and the pocket came out with his hand, turning it inside out - he ran off; I ran after him and lost him in the crowd - I took the prosecutor to the station-house - when we first raised him up he was quite senseless, but before I got him to the station-house he got better and could walk alone - I knew the prisoner well before, and can swear to him.

Prisoner. Q. What can you swear to me by, did you ever know me in trouble? A. By seeing you so often- have not I frequently ordered you off, and threatened to take you before the magistrate? I have seen you at different times with a gang of thieves.

COURT. Q. At the time the prisoner drew his hand from the prosecutor's pocket, was any other person about him? A. There was two, one of whom I could swear to if I met him - a portion of the crowd parted, leaving the prisoner with his hand in the prosecutor's pocket, and two others by the side of him, and they all three ran away - I swear the prisoner drew his hand from the prosecutor's pocket.

JOHN ALLEN re-examined. When I stood at the bar of the Cat public-house, about fifty yards from the spot, I felt money in my pocket; I felt the silver in my pocket.

JOHN MARTIN (policeman G 202). I was with Brooming. On the crowd dispersing, I saw the prisoner on the ground on his knees, and his hands very close to the prosecutor's pocket, which was turned inside out - I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and saw him about half an hour after at the corner of Banner-street; he appeared to be peeping round the corner as if on the lookout - I laid hold of him - he asked what I wanted of him- I said he knew very well - he said he had been in the fields all day; that was the first time he had been in Whitecross-street.

Prisoner. I was coming down Banner-street with some pudding in my hand, and turned down Whitecross-street, and saw Martin and another officer with him; the other said, "Is this him" - he said "Yes" - I said,"What do you want with me" - he said, "Come to the station-house, and I will tell you" - but as to his catching hold of me it is false; it was not above a quarter past eight o'clock.

JOHN MARTIN . The officer who was with me laid hold of him, because I thought if I had gone after him he would have ran away - I was rather behind the other man - he took hold of him and handed him to me - it was about half-past eight o'clock; he was eating pudding.

Prisoner. I went with him to the station-house, and they said I had robbed Allen; I said I had never been there all day - I had been to Tottenham on the Sunday, and I had just come down Banner-street - I know nothing of the robbery.

JOHN MARTIN. I swear he is the man who was kneeling by the prosecutor's side; I have not a doubt of it, I see him so many times every night, and have occasion to move him and a gang who follow with him - I cannot be mistaken in him.

Prisoner's Defence. If I had been concerned, I should not have come down right into their hands - it is false that he saw me at the bottom of the street; ke knows he did not see me in Whitecross-street all day, for I was not there all day until the time he took me to the watch-house.

JURY to JOHN ALLEN. Q. Where was your money? A. The silver was in my waistcoat pocket, and the coppers in my right hand trousers pocket; I lost every thing but 2s.

JOHN MARTIN . There was 2s. 31/2d. found on the prisoner; no money was found on the spot.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor on account of his youth, and believing him to be misled by others .

Reference Number: t18330905-10

1211. WILLIAM TILBURY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Edward Watts , on the 3rd of September , at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias Stepney, and stealing therein, 1 silver pepper-castor, value 12s., his property .

WILLIAM BAKER . I am servant to James Edward Watts , who is a pawnbroker , at No. 1, Hereford-place, Commercial-road, in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney . On the 3rd of September, in the evening, about a quarter-past seven o'clock, I was standing in the shop about three yards from the door, and heard a pane of glass break;

I immediately rushed to the door, and saw the prisoner pass the door to turn the corner of the street; I followed and caught him seven or eight houses off - I put my hand in his breast, and took out this silver pepper-castor, worth 12s. - I brought him back to the shop and sent for an officer; he was quite a stranger to me - I had seen him pass the door two minutes before - on examining the pane of glass, I found it broken - I had looked at it a few hours before, and it was quite whole, and I heard it break - the castor was close to the pane about an inch within it - here is the castor; it is my master's property.

WILLIAM HORNER (policeman). I took the prisoner in custody - I said "It was a mercy you did not cut your hand to pieces, such a smash as you made" - he said"No, for I took my fist in this manner."

The prisoner made no defence.

JOSIAH GILL . I am a shoemaker, and live in Great Leonard-street, Shoreditch; I have known the prisoner about seven years and a half; he was apprenticed to my father as a shoemaker and left him about a year and a half ago - we had a great deal of trouble with him, and I have every reason to believe he is not right in his head - there has been a good deal in the newspapers about his falling in love with Fanny Kemble .

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

JOSIAH GILL re-examined. He has been in Shoreditch work-house twice, they could do nothing with him - he appears like a lunatic; he has almost knocked himself to pieces; he has got into the wash-house, and nearly covered it with blood; this was when he was apprenticed to my father - one evening my father asked him to see my cousin home, and instead of that he ran to her house, and waited till my cousin came home.

Reference Number: t18330905-11

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1212. GEORGE TREAGLE was indicted for, that he, on the 6th of August , at Isleworth, in and upon George Tait , feloniously, unlawfully; and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument feloniously,&c. did strike, stab, and cut the said George Tait, in and upon his left breast, with intent feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought to kill and murder him , against the statute, &c.

2ND COUNT stating it to be with intent to disable him.

3RD COURT stating it to be with intent to do some grievous bodily harm.

GEORGE TAIT. I live at Isleworth . The prisoner lodged in the same house with me, but in a different room; he is a married man; it is Mr. John West's house; West also lives in the house - about eight o'clock on Tuesday evening, the 6th of August, there was a disturbance in the house; the prisoner was making a disturbance in his own room - I went up stairs and went into West's room and spoke to him, and then went towards the prisoner's room, and told him it was Mr. West's desire that he should be quiet or leave the house; he was then standing in his own room doorway - I was in the passage and he in the doorway - after telling him that, he said, "What do you say?" and stepped back into his room; I followed him in about a yard into his own room, and repeated the same words as I did in the passage - he had a knife in his hand; at first he seemed to be eating - when I went into the room, he changed the position of the knife; he had it at first in this manner (holding it as usual) - he then changed the position so (turning the blade downwards), and plunged it into my left breast; I had not touched him, nor said anything more than I have stated - on feeling myself wounded, I went down stairs, and asked the landlady to send for a surgeon, and we sent for Mr. Farrell; I bled a good deal; the wound was rather more than an inch deep; I had never had any quarrel with him at any time - before he gave me the stab, he said something about that he would put me out, that was at the time he was striking; he had not desired me to leave the room before that, nor said anything to me except at the time he was striking - he said he would put me out - I had my coat and waistcoat on; it cut through the coat, but it was outside the waistcoat; it went through the coat and shirt at the armhole of the waistcoat; it was a knife similar to this (a dinner knife) - my coat was taken off; the officer has had it since - my face was towards him the whole time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you anything to Mr. West? A. No, I do not know that West and the prisoner had had any disagreement that morning; they might have had; I was not a joint lodger with the prisoner; I thought it was my duty and an act of kindness towards the old man, the landlord, to remonstrate with the prisoner to be quiet - he was using abusive language towards the landlord; he was in his own room, the landlord was not in his room - the prisoner seemed angry, and as if he had drank a little; he had given me no offence - I was inside his room, when he said he would put me out; I never had the least quarrel with him at any time; he was not sitting down at the table - I did not notice whether any food was on the table; his mouth was in motion as if he was eating; the knife he had was one which he might use to cut his food - I had known him about three months; he had no ill feeling towards me - I told him the landlord desired him to be quiet; he said in the passage,"What did you say?" I stepped in after him, and repeated the same words - I think the landlord was afraid to go in and speak to him; I do not know that it was because the prisoner was so much excited, that he was afraid to go in; West is not here, he is very unwell; he wished me to advise the prisoner to be quiet - the prisoner has one child; his wife was in the room at the time, and the child.

SAMUEL ODLING (Policeman). I apprehended the prisoner the same evening - I asked him if he had got any sharp instrument about him - he told me he had not got it about him - I then asked if there was any person to give him in charge, they said not - I searched him and found no knife on him - I took him to the station-house and then returned to the room and found five knives there and two or three forks with them - the one I picked out was stained with blood; this is it - the stain was plain at that time, it was dry; this was about an hour after I apprehended him - the stain appeared quite fresh, but it was dry - I have the prosecutor's coat, I found the cut and the knife correspond.

Cross-examined. Q. You would not undertake to say the blood might not have been two or three days there? A. I cannot positively swear that; this knife is larger than the rest; it is a common table knife - I searched him and found no instrument on him.

JOHN FARRELL . I am a surgeon and live at New

Brentford. I was called in to see the prosecutor - I examined his wound, which was on the left breast; it was rather more than an inch deep, and an inch in breadth, it bled a good deal; a small artery was wounded but not a large one - I dressed the wound; I did not apprehend any danger from it - he was ill about three weeks - the wound was not healed before that time.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor came in my room- he was not in my passage - he came into my room and caught hold of my collar, and said, he would kick my a-s out of the door, and said he had power from the landlord to do it, and in the scuffle I had the knife in my hand, eating my meat, and do not know how it happened.

GEORGE TAIT re-examined. I did not touch the man at all - I never laid a hand on him.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was any body in the room beside the man's wife? A. No.

GUILTY on the 3rd COUNT.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of his previous excitement, and the prosecutor having no business in the room .

Reference Number: t18330905-12

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1213. LEWIS KING was indicted for, that he, before and at the time of committing the several offences in the first 4 counts mentioned, was a letter-carrier , employed by and under the Post-office of Great Britain, to wit, at St. Anne, Westminster, and that, whilst he was so employed, to wit, on the 20th of July , a certain letter, then lately before sent by the Post of Great Britain, to wit, by the Post from Cornhill in London, to a certain Post-office, for the receipt and delivery of certain letters and packets, sent and to be sent by the Post, to wit, in Gerrard-street, Soho, in the county of Middlesex , aforesaid, for and to be delivered to a certain person, at No. 2, Portman-square, in the said county, to wit, to Anna Matilda Denison , and then containing 3 bank notes for the payment, and value of 10l. each, and 4 bank notes for payment, and value of 5l. each, came to his hands and possession, and he was entrusted with the same in consequence of such his employment, and that he, whilst he was so employed, as aforesaid, feloniously did secrete and embezzle the said letter, containing the said bank notes, the property of William Willoughby Prescott , and others , against the statute, &c., and MARTHA KING was indicted, for feloniously receiving the said bank notes, as aforesaid, contained in the said letter sent by the Post, &c. &c., feloniously embezzled by the said Lewis King, well knowing them to have been contained in the said letter, and to be feloniously embezzled by the said Lewis King, whilst he was such letter-carrier , against the statute, &c.

2ND. COUNT, charging the said Lewis King , as in the First Count, only for stealing the notes from and out of the letter; and the said Martha King with feloniously receiving the same.

3RD and 4TH COUNTS like the two former, only stating the notes to be the property of Anna Matilda Denison .

4 Other COUNTS, like the four former, only stating that Lewis King was a person employed by and under the Post-office of Great Britain, in certain business, relating to the said Post-office, to wit, in sorting certain letters and packets sent by the Post to a certain Post-office in Gerrard-street, Soho.

9TH COUNT, charging Lewis King with stealing 3 bank notes, value 10l. each, and 4 bank notes, value 5l. each, the monies of William Willoughby Prescott; and Martha King, with feloniously receiving the same, well knowing, &c.

10TH COUNT. Like the 9th, only stating the notes to be the property of Anna Matilda Dension .

11TH COUNT, charging said Martha King with feloniously receiving 3 bank notes, value 10l. each, and 4 bank notes, value 5l. each, the property of William Willoughby Prescott and others, well knowing them to have been lately before stolen, against the statute, &c.

12TH COUNT. Like the 11th, only stating the notes to be the property of Anna Matilda Denison .

LEWIS KING pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

No evidence being offered against Martha King, she was acquitted .

Reference Number: t18330905-13

OLD COURT. Thursday, September 5th, 1833.

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1214. JOHN DOYLE and JOHN MAHONY were indicted, for feloniously assalting John Adam Bender , on the 24th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 3 half-crowns, 3 shillings and 1 sixpence, his property .

JOHN ADAM BENDER (through an interpreter). I come from High Germany. I was in a public-house in Plough-street, Whitechapel, on a Saturday in August - Elizabeth Nelling was with me; I left the public-house with her at eleven o'clock at night; and as soon as I got into Essex-street , John Doyle asked me to fight (I had never seen him before) - I would not fight, and when I went to go out of the street, the other man knocked me down - I do not know the man who knocked me down, I only know Doyle - I do not know whether the one who knocked me down was in company with the other - after they knocked me down, they took three half-crowns, three shillings, and a sixpence out of my left hand coat pocket - I cannot say who took it; I had 1s. 6d. in my right hand pocket, they did not take that - Nelling saw it all; I have been in London five months - both the men ran away after taking my money; and a little while afterwards I went after a policeman, and he took Doyle the same night; they struck me in the face and ear when they knocked me down.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not there a regular fight between you and one of the men? A. No; I was not abusing the King - I did not d-n the King of England; I did not say that the King was married to a German lady, and that the Germans had a right to do what they liked in England; that was not the way the battle began - I will swear I said nothing about the

King nor the Queen either - I had been with the girl in a public-house, in Plough-court, before the row began - I had not been drinking, only dancing; the room was full of people - there were plenty of people in the street when the fight was going on.

ELIZABETH NELLING (through an interpreter). I was at the public-house with the prosecutor on a Saturday in August - I do not know the day of the month; I left the public-house with him, and as soon as we came into Essex-street, Mahony asked him to fight - there were four of them together; the prosecutor did not say any thing to them before they asked him to fight - one of them knocked him down; he got up and told me somebody had taken his money; I did not see it taken; I had seen him shortly before with 11s. and 1s. 6d. - as soon as they knocked him down they ran away - I did not see them do any thing; I went down Whitechapel to look for a policeman; I can tell the person of any of the men except the one who knocked him down.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you understand English? A. I speak it a little; Bender understands a few words; he told the English in the German language that he would not fight - I have known him two years; I knew him over in my own country - he was paying for drink at the public-house when I saw the money; there was a good many there who he asked to drink, I had some, and Bender took a little - there was a few words before he was knocked down, but not about the King and Queen - when the prisoner knocked him down he said, "A German b-r, why don't you go over to your own country?" Bender heard that; it was said in English; Bender made no answer to it.

JOHN WHITE . I am a policeman. I was on duty on this Saturday in Essex-street, Whitechapel; I don't recollect the day of the month - I was not present when this took place; I met one of our policemen with a young man, in consequence of what they said, I went into the Rose and Crown, Essex-street; I saw Doyle there, but the man who went with me did not know him; I came out to go to the place where the prosecutor was knocked down, and Doyle followed us to the place; I received information from a person who was standing by, and I asked Bender if that was one of them, he turned round and said it was; Doyle heard that, and said he knew nothing of it - I took him into custody, searched him, found nothing on him at all - I apprehended Mahony on the Monday following; I found nothing on him but 3d. and a duplicate; I knew both the prisoners very well, I had seen them on the Saturday before the robbery two or three times, they were at the Rose and Crown in Essex-street together, about eleven o'clock that evening, but I can't say whether they were in company.

Doyle's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

Mahony's Defence. I never saw Doyle on Saturday night at all.

JAMES BRADFIELD . I am a carpenter. I was in Catherine Wheel-court, Essex-street, at eleven o'clock - my wife was there; there were three of us there - I saw the prosecutor there with two females dressed in the foreign fashion - I saw Mahony there - I did not hear Bender say any thing about King William - I saw Mahony and Bender talking together, but did not understand what they said - I was passing out of the court into Essex-street, and did not notice - I did not know what language they talked - I saw the prosecutor go into Essex-street, Mahony followed and put himself in an attitude of sparring, and while I stood there the other prisoner came up, and knocked the prosecutor down - I am positive it was not Mahony that knocked him down - I heard the other prisoner say, he could knock him down if anybody else could not - I believe that was in reply to something that passed in the court - the prosecutor was not down a second before he ran into Whitechapel.

COURT. Q. You say the prosecutor was not down a moment? A. No, not before he recovered himself and ran into Whitechapel, and I pursued him leaving the prisoner Mahony with his wife - I was near him when he was knocked down - neither of the prisoners were near him when he was down, they were across the street; Mahony was talking to his wife - there was a lamp, but not exactly close to it - I swear nobody touched him when he was down; I was close enough to be certain neither of them were near him after he was down.

SARAH BRADFIELD . I am wife of James Bradfield. I was in the court - I saw a foreigner there; I should not know him again - it was on the same occasion as my husband speaks - two females were with him dressed as foreigners - I saw the prosecutor in Catherine-wheel-court - Mahony was saying something to him, but what I did not hear, and then they came out into Essex-street- Mahony and the prosecutor were sparring together; I thought they were in fun, and not fighting, but Doyle came up and knocked him down - it was not Mahony who knocked him down - I should not know Doyle again if I saw him - I knew Mahony before; his wife was there at the time - after the prosecutor was knocked down, he ran into Whitechapel; he was not a moment on the ground - I could see him plainly; nobody could have put their hands into his pocket and taken his money; they could not do it without my seeing it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-14

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1215. TIMOTHY BOWSER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Carpenter , on the 14th of August , and stealing therein two live tame rabbits, value 4s., his property .

JAMES CARPENTER. I keep the Bricklayers Arms, North-street, Marylebone - I keep rabbits in my back kitchen, which is part of the dwelling-house; it is under a lead flat adjoining the house; there is a space of a yard and a half between the back-door of the house, and the kitchen, it is a passage covered with lead; it has a wall on one side, and it is open on the other - I missed two rabbits about eleven o'clock at night, on Wednesday, the 14th of August, after I had shut the house up - I had seen them at three o'clock that afternoon in the back kitchen - nobody slept in the back kitchen; I locked the back kitchen up at three o'clock that afternoon, and at eleven o'clock at night on going to feed them, the lock was off, and the two rabbits gone - the key hung up in the bar; the lodgers use it as well as I do - I found the padlock off and laying on the kitchen dresser, and the door wide open - a small poker which used to

be in the tap-room, laid on the drawer; the door was not at all injured - the staple of the lock was not broken, but the lock knocked off - I saw the rabbits next day in the possession of Brain, in Stingo-lane; one was spotted, and the other's ears lop down instead of standing up - I have had them about three months - I have no doubt of their being mine - they are worth about 2s. each.

JOHN SHORAY . I live in Grafton-court, Marylebone, right facing the Bricklayers Arms. I know the prisoner by sight - I saw him with a lot more in Mr. Carpenter's house; I cannot tell on what day, it was about a quarter to eleven o'clock - he went out of the tap-room and came back again in about three or four minutes; he had nothing with him - I did not see anything in his hands; I did not take any notice of him - he stood in the taproom, and then we all went out together about eleven o'clock, as it was time to shut up, and he ran across the road out of the tap-room with two rabbits, one under his arm, and one in his hand; he ran across the road with them - he ran into the back yard from the tap-room - I did not see him come out of the back yard, but he got out into the street in two or three minutes, and ran across the road - I knew the rabbits to be Carpenter's; I had seen them before - they were kept in the back kitchen - he had nothing in his hand when he went out of the tap-room.

WILLIAM BRAIN . I live in Stingo-lane, half a mile from the Bricklayer's Arms - I know the prisoner by sight; he came to my house on the 15th of August; he brought two rabbits - I was not at home, he came again in an hour's time, when I was at home, and asked me to buy them, he said, he had won them the previous night, at a raffle, and asked me 4s. for them; I said, I was rather overstocked and did not want them; after standing a little while, he said "I have no where to put them, what will you give me for them," I said 3s., and after a short time he took the 3s. and went away - I heard in the afternoon that Mr. Carpenter had lost some; I fetched him to my place; he saw them and claimed them, that was the same evening - I have them here.

Prisoner. I said I bought them of a man who said he had won them at a raffle. Witness. I understood him to say he had won them himself.

DANIEL DUTCH . I went with the prosecutor in search of the prisoner, on Thursday, the 15th of August, and found him in the skittle ground at the Rock, public-house, Lisson-grove; Carpenter pointed him out, and I took him, and told him it was for stealing two rabbits; he said, "Very well, I will go with you."(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoners Defence. I bought them in Mr. Carpenter's tap room, of a man who said he won them at a raffle, that he wanted money, and I gave him half-a-crown for them - I never went into the back yard at all.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-15

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1216. JAMES HUNT was indicted, that he, on the 10th of August , at Acton , feloniously and burglariously did break and enter the dwelling-house of Peter Grant , about the hour of twelve o'clock in the night, with intent the goods in the same dwelling-house feloniously and burglariously to steal .

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM OLIVER GRANT . I am son of Peter Grant, and live in my father's house in the parish of Acton. On the morning of the 12th of August, about one o'clock, I was awoke by somebody opening my bed room door; I laid perfectly quiet for a short time, to see what he would do, and in a few seconds a person came in contact with my bed curtains; I immediately started up and cried out "Who is there?" upon which the person ran down stairs; I immediately jumped out of bed to follow him, when to my surprise, I heard him pull open the hall door and go out, and hearing that, I then ran to the window overlooking the front court, and saw a person scale the iron gate in front of the house, and disappear on the other side; the police having answered my first call, by this time ran up; I went down stairs and found the prisoner lying perfectly stunned, in the road at the foot of the gate; the gate is about nine feet high, but it is lower on the road side; he must have fallen about fifteen feet; he was taken in custody; I went round the premises with a servant, and found one of the kitchen windows open, and the dresser drawer immediately below the window had been opened, and the contents strewed about, but nothing taken away; a purse containing 3s. 6d. was left untouched, belonging to one of the servants; there was a pocket book on the dresser I believe, but I did not see it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you hold the house jointly with your father? A. No; I am on leave of absence from my regiment, and visiting at my father's.

THOMAS PATIENCE . I am in Mr. Grant's service; I cannot positively say I fastened the house the night before, but to the best of my knowledge, every thing was fastened; the kitchen window which was found open, was shut when I went to bed, to the best of my knowledge; but I really cannot say; there is no catch to the window, so that it might easily be pushed up; I went into the kitchen before I went to bed; I usually go there the last thing, and fasten the back door - that was about half-past ten o'clock; I went into the kitchen to see that all was fast, and to the best of my knowledge, the window was shut; I went round the house after the alarm, and found the window open wide enough for a person to get in; there are iron bars, but it is wide enough for a young person to get through; I found no other way in which he could have got in - the back door, and all was fast.

Cross-examined. Q. How many servants are there? A. Three maid-servants and myself; it is usual to open the window at night to cool the kitchen, and it has frequently been left open all night; I could not swear positively that it was closed that night.

COURT. Q. Do you know anything of a pocket book? A. It is a memorandum book which the cook uses; I saw it laying on the dresser - I don't know where it was the night before; it is very possible I might not have noticed whether the window was open; I went into the back kitchen to see whether all was safe, and I saw that all was safe - I have no doubt at all but the window was shut, but I cannot swear whether it was shut or not - I

might be deceived; I went to see that all was safe, and I have no doubt I did see all safe.

JOHN TEDMAN . I am a policeman. I did not hear the alarm from the house; but Welling, who has resigned, brought the prisoner into the station-house; Welling resigned last Thursday, and is not here; Ball was with him when he brought the prisoner.

THOMAS BALL . I am a policeman. On the 10th of August, I heard the cry of police; I was about thirty yards distant, and as I ran, I heard something fall, but could not see what it was, it was so dark; when I came to the prosecutor's gate, I found the prisoner laying there quite senseless; I took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of getting into the house; I went down to Acton to see a few friends - I had been there with Lady Byron, and I am acquainted with several people in the town; I stopped there with them playing at skittles till after twelve o'clock at night, (Mr. Grant inquired of my character and found I was tipsy,) they asked me if I was capable of going home by myself, as they had no bed for me to sleep in; they left me, and I know nothing more, till I found myself in the station-house; they asked me if I knew what had happened; I said, "No;" they asked how I came in Mr. Grant's house, I said, "I have not been there;" the policeman said somebody had been there, at all events; Mr. Grant has inquired of my character, and knows I was with the people that day; the policeman said he could not tell whether I was drunk or not - that I might be laying there drunk for what he knew; nobody came up in time to see me fall, if it was me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-16

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1217. THOMAS BARRIN was indicted for stealing on the 20th of August , 1 sofa, value 10l., the property of Louisa Summers , in her dwelling-house .

LOUISA SUMMERS. I live at No. 10, Charles-street, St. Paul's, Covent Garden . I have employed the prisoner on two different errands; on the 19th of August I employed him to pledge a table and a carpet for me, at Bird and Haslop's, in Long-acre, he took them and brought me back the money - I told him probably I should have to employ him to pledge me a sofa, but never told him to do it - I did not mention any time when I should probably want it pledged - I gave him no authority whatever to take the sofa and pawn it - he gave me the money for the table and carpet at my house - I left him at the house and went away; I left his sister with him, in care of my house, and there was another person in the house; that was at a quarter before twelve o'clock in the morning - I went to Mr. Wooller, a solicitor, on business - I did not return home myself till between eleven and twelve o'clock at night - he was not there then; I missed the sofa, which was worth 10l., it was in the house when I went away in the morning - I had given him no authority whatever to take it; he brought me no money that day, nor at any time after - next morning I made inquiry about him; I found it, I believe on the Thursday following, pawned at Bird and Haslop's Long-acre.

JOHN GRAYGOOSE . I am an apprentice to Bird and Haslop, pawnbrokers, Long-acre - Miss Summers came to my house and claimed a sofa, about the Thursday - I was present when the prisoner brought it to our shop on the 20th of August, he made no remark to me; I did not give him the money; I received the sofa from him, and took it part of the way up stairs - I did not see him receive any money for it; he had a boy to assist him to bring it- Mr. Bird tapped at the window, and told me to receive the sofa at the private door, which I did - I did not hear what passed between him and the prisoner; I did not return to the shop - Mr. Bird is not here - the sofa is worth 8l. - it was about two o'clock in the day; he appeared perfectly sober; he assisted me part of the way up stairs with it.

JAMES DARLING . I took the prisoner into custody on the 26th of August - I questioned him about the sofa, he said he had got tipsy on the same night as he pawned the article, his words were, "Why, policeman, I pawned the sofa."

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed for the express purpose, to pledge every thing in Miss Summers' apartments, as she wished to quit her apartments - I was to get the goods out in the most secret way I possibly could; I first took the carpet and pawned; afterwards the table, and gave the money to her - she led me to suppose I was to pawn every thing in the apartments in the most secret way possible; and I next took the sofa, but before I took it they gave me three or four glasses of gin in the house, and when I got to the pawnbroker's with the sofa I felt rather warm, and a little elevated - I came out and had two or three more glasses; I became so stupified I was completely lost, and what money I did not spend I was either robbed of or lost - I was to have gone next day, with the chairs and the bed.

LOUISA SUMMERS . I received this letter; I never saw the prisoner write, but he has acknowledged that he sent it to me - I received it the day his mother gave him in charge - he said he had sent it to me before he was taken; but I did not receive it till he was in custody: a man brought it to me - I gave the prisoner no liquor.

The letter being read, expressed the prisoner's regret at not having brought the prosecutrix the produce of the sofa, and stated that he had lost it when in a state of intoxication.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-17

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1218. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing on the 17th of July , at St. Martin in the Fields , 70 yards of velvet, value 7l., the goods of Francis Morgan and another, in their dwelling house .

SAMUEL SNENDELL . On the 17th of July, I was crossing from Long-acre to Drury-lane, and I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Morgan's shop, with a bundle under his left arm - I asked him what he had got - he d-d my eyes, and asked what it was to me - he knocked me down and ran away - he dropped three parcels near Broad-court, and I secured him with one - he was never out of my sight - he ill used me very sadly - I have been under the doctor's hands ever since - the bundles were picked up - they are black velvet - he had one when I took him.

FRANCIS MORGAN. I am a linen-draper , and live in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields. I am in partner

ship with Robert Memont - I was called down stairs about twenty minutes or half-past nine o'clock - I found the velvet gone from the shop, it had stood about two feet within the door of the shop - three pieces were brought back by the next witness - I saw the prisoner with the other at the station-house - it is worth £7 altogether - that is rather under the value, I had seen it ten minutes before.

GEORGE GEDGE . I was in Drury-lane, and saw the prisoner coming from Mr. Morgan's shop, with a bundle under his left shoulder - Snendell asked what he had got, and where he was going to take them - he said, "What is that to you," - he turned round, and hit him in the mouth - I picked up three pieces of velvet at the corner of Broad-court - I saw him drop them, and saw Snendell take him.

JOHN BAYS . I am a policeman. I was on duty in Duke's-court, and heard the cry of "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner taken into custody - I have the velvet.

FRANCIS MORGAN. There are about seventy yards, of it - it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny all knowledge of the crime, against me - I know nothing of it - I thorw myself on the mercy of the court - another man was charged with striking him at the office.

GUILTY - Aged 18. Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330905-18

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1219. JOHN ELLIS was indicted for stealing 2 packing-cases, value 8s.; 2 yards of canvas, value 1s. 6d.; 2712 pairs of gloves, value 212l. 5s.; 6 bottles, value 2s.; and 9 pints of seidlitz water, value 10s., the goods of John Dent and others .

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM LAW . I am warehouseman to Messrs. John and William Dent and another, in Friday-street - they have a house of business at Worcester. On the 23rd of June - I remember packing two wooden cases, and one truss - they contained among other things one hundred and ninety dozen pair of gloves, worth 212l. - there was some seidlitz water - I was present when they were taken from the warehouse that day - I was at the desk, but I did not notice who they were delivered to - they were directed to "Dent and Co., Worcester, from the Rose Inn, Farringdon-street, by van" - Pedley was in the habit of calling for things to be carried to the different waggon offices.

JOHN BOUCHER . I am an apprentice to Dent and Co. On Saturday the 23rd of June, I remember about four o'clock in the afternoon a person calling for packages to go to Worcester - there were two cases and a truss - I did not know the men who came - I had not seen either of them before - to the best of my knowledge the prisoner was one of them - when they came in, they said, they had come for the cases for Worcester - I cannot say which of them said that - it is the custom to have a book signed for the things - one of them signed it - the book is here - it is signed John Edwards - I believe the prisoner to he the man who signed the book - I gave it to him to sign, and was close by him when he signed it - I believe he is the person - the packages were delivered - a cart was brought to the door - I saw John Robinson in the cart - the persons who came in put the cases and truss into the cart - they were told to take them to the Rose Inn, Farringdon-street - I did not see them start - I knew William Pedley at that time as a porter at the Carron-wharf - he was not present on this occasion - he was afterwards tried here - he had an opportunity of knowing what parcels we had to go to Worcester.

Cross-examined. Q. This is more than a year ago? A. It is; I do not speak positively to the prisoner; he was apprehended before, he was at the Mansion-house last summer; I saw him there; I was unable to swear to him; I said I thought I should know him if he had his hairy cap on as I thought he had one on when he came to the warehouse; I don't remember the Lord Mayor ordering his cap to be put on; I never swore I believe he was not the man, he was discharged.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You don't swear to him now? A. No, I only speak to the best of my belief; Robinson was not present to give evidence when he was discharged.

JOHN ROBINSON . In June, 1832, I was in the service of Mr. Elston, a carter. On Saturday afternoon, 23rd of June, I was going home with my cart, and the prisoner met me on Dowgate-hill, and asked if I was for hire, I said I was - he asked me to go and do a job for him; he took me to the corner of Friday-street , to Mr. Dent's - nobody was with him then (William Pedley and Wall went across while I was loading there,) - Ellis went into Dent's, and in a minute or two, two cases and a truss were brought out; I could not read the direction - they were two square cases and a truss covered with canvas - I was ordered to turn to the left, towards Newgate-street, by Ellis' - I went about twenty yards in that direction, and then Ellis ordered me to turn about, and drive to Smith's, in Castle-alley, Whitechapel - I did so; and as I went along Pedley and Wall were about twenty yards off - and when I got to Castle-alley, Pedley and Wall had got there before me - the packages were deliverd there, and Ellis paid me ten shillings.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before? A. By seeing him walk up and down by the Docks - I mentioned this when Pedley was tried; I stated it to Lee, the officer, near twelve months ago; I was taken up for it, and was in custody ten weeks, and came from gaol to give evidence against Pedley - Ellis put the property into the cart himself - I was up in the cart all the time - I was not present when Ellis was examined, some time ago - I heard nothing of it - I was taken up nearly twelve months ago - I might know Ellis before by passing backwards and forwards about the Dock - I am positive of his person.

JEREMIAH ALLCROFT . I am one of the firm, and manage the business, at Worcester - I never received these packages and truss; they never arrived; we received the packages and truss; they never arrived; we received the invoice by another parcel, by coach.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. When I apprehended Pedley and Robinson, on the 21st of September, I went to apprehend the prisoner, but he had left his house - I searched for him several weeks and months, but could not discover him - he was not at the Mansion-house on this charge - it was on another charge.

COURT. Q. How do you know it was his house you searched? A. When he was brought to the office, a woman, who passed as his wife, at his lodging, was there - I never saw him at the lodging; I never saw him till he was apprehended - he kept moving about.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner last Friday week, in Back-church-lane, St. George's - I said, I wanted him on suspicion of robbery, at Messrs. Dents, of Cheapside - he said, he knew he had done nothing of the kind and was not afraid to go with me - I knew him before the robbery was committed, and had endeavoured to find him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know where he lived? A. I know within a few doors; I had not seen him in his own house - he lived in Helen-court, Helen-street - I have seen him go up that court, but don't know the house.

JOHN BLOOMFIELD . I keep a waggon office, at the Rose Inn, Farringdon-street, and did so in June, 1832. I know that on the 23rd of June I received no packages of this sort, from Dent & Co. - there was a small package, brought about eight or nine o'clock at night, but no square packages or truss.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you the only person superintending the business? A. No; I have sons and have a clerk - I was not at home all day, but I have inspected the books - the books are not here now.

MR. BODKIN. Q. If they had been brought to you, you would have forwarded them? A. Certainly.

WILLIAM LORD re-examined. On the same day as the packages were delivered I sent a small case to be sent by a van, from Blossoms-inn, and the invoice of these goods was inclosed in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never absconded since I was apprehended before, and acquitted - this man says, Wall was in the robbery - he knows himself he has seen that man several times, and he knows him to be innocent; he took him for another man - I have worked at the West India Docks ever since April - Robinson has been transported for seven years himself; he received 15s. from Pedley; Pedley told me so himself.

JOHN ROBINSON. I received the money from the prisoner himself - I was transported twenty-one years ago.

JURY. Q. How long have you known the prisoner before the transaction? A. I might have known him about twelve months - I know him perfectly well - I used to see him walking backwards and forwards about the Docks - I knew him by name and person.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-19

1220. JOHN BOVINGDON was indicted for stealing on the 15th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; the goods of William Joseph Sparrow , from his person .

WILLIAM JOSEPH SPARROW . On the 15th of July, I was in Bridge-street, Blackfriars , and felt something at my pocket; I immediately turned round and seized the prisoner with my handkerchief in both his hands; I gave him into custody - this is it.

CHARLES LOWTHER . I am a City-Policeman, No. 55. I received the prisoner in custody, and have produced the handkerchief.

GUILTY .* Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-20

1221. JAMES WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , 24 yards of calico, value 8s. 6d., the goods of John Middleton and others, his masters .

JOHN JONES . I am porter to Messrs. John and Lewis Middleton , of Bread-street ; there are two brothers, and one partner besides - about half-past eight o'clock, on the 23rd of July, the prisoner, who was a porter to the house, was going away for the day, and I asked him what was the matter with him, and what he had under his trousers, he said he had been very ill with a pain in his bowels, and had put a piece of wrapper or canvas round him to keep him warm - I had it taken off, and found it was twenty-four yards of calico, nine-eighths wide.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did he not appear unwell? A. No; I asked him what was the matter with him because he appeared confused - I insisted on seeing what he had got - I have been in the employ eight months; he had been there much longer; there was no jealousy between us.

JOHN MIDDLETON. I am one of the firm - this calico is our property, I know it by the private mark.

Cross-examined. Q. How long has the prisoner been with you? A. About two years, he came to me with a character from his father - there were smaller pieces in the warehouse - I never knew of a jealousy between him and Jones - I have two partners.

JOSEPH RENSHAW . I received the bundle from Jones, and have produced it.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday evening I was very ill, and laid in bed all Sunday, and on Monday evening I was doing up calico, and was taken very bad, I undid my trousers to rub myself, and my fellow servant came and said "What are you doing there?" - I said "I am taken very bad, John, and I wish to go home - we went home together, and next day, at four o'clock, the policeman came in, and told me to turn my pockets out; he found nothing, and accused me of the calico.

JOHN JONES . I gave information of it the following day, because he asked me not to tell my master - I walked out with him, but did not go home with him - I took it from him that night, and he begged me not to mention it- I had no quarrel with him afterwards, but I thought if I did not mention it, it was more likely to be laid to me - I mentioned it soon after breakfast in the morning, about ten o'clock; he came to work at seven o'clock, but master don't come to the warehouse till nine o'clock; it happened on Monday night; I mentioned it on Tuesday morning, about ten o'clock; I left the premises at the same time as him at night.

JURY. Q. Was anybody present when you took it from him? A. No his trousers were buttoned up - it was wrapped round him once - when I asked him what was the matter, he complained of being ill - I knew nothing of his being ill the day before - I had no reason to believe he was ill.

JOHN MULLIGAR . I am a boxmaker. The prisoner lodged with me, and bears a good character - he complained of being ill in his bowels on the Sunday - I

saw him; he appeared suffering under that complaint, and was in bed in the afternoon - I did not see him on Monday.

COURT. Q. On Monday night when he came home did he complaim? A. I did not see him; he said on the Sunday he was very ill, and had a pain in his bowels; he had no medical man that I know of - he asked for no flannel or anything on Sunday, that I am aware of.

CHARLES HARRISON . I am a tailor, and live in Great Portland-street. I have known the prisoner two years he bears a good character - I was with him on Sunday, all day; he complained of a pain in his bowels; he was in bed, and did not get up till after nine o'clock, and then went to bed again, from ten till four o'clock; and at ten o'clock at night I saw him, and he was very ill; I gave him some tincture of rhubarb - I dined at his house on Sunday; he never eat anything.

GUILTY. Aged 20. - Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18330905-21

1222. DANIEL BRANDON and JOSEPH GOODE were indicted for stealing on the 19th of July , 1 basket, value 1s.; and 48lbs of cherries, value 4s. ; the goods of Charles Barrington Jacobs .

CHARLES AUGUSTUS JACOBS . I am assistant to my uncle, Charles Barrington Jacobs, fruit-salesman , Farringdon-market . On the 19th of July, I saw the prisoner, Goode, take a sieve of cherries off the stand - he took it to his basket, and Brandon emptied it into their basket, and Goode ran away with it on his head, leaving our basket behind - Brandon came walking by the stand - my uncle called him several times, he would not answer, and he went and collared him - Goode was brought back with the cherries.

Brandon. I was helping a man there with a load; he said, Jacobs wanted me - I went to him, and he said,"Who pays for the cherries?" I said, I knew nothing about them; it is common to help each other to empty our fruit. Witness. Brandon did not attempt to go away; he said something about the person outside (Goode I suppose,) paying for them - Goode ran away directly he took them - Brandon did say he thought they were sold - my uncle said, "What have you done with the sieve of cherries?" and he said something about the other person settling it.

JAMES VERYAN . I am porter to Mr. Jacobs. I went after Goode - he ran up Bear-alley with a basket of cherries on his head - I stopped him with them and made him carry them back.

Brandon. Q. As I came here did you not say you believed I was innocent? A. No; I did not.

Brandon's Defence. I went to the Borough-market to buy, and came to Farringdon-market with a young man who I always work with - I never work with this prisoner - when I was taken, I had no money, but my partner had the money and was in the act of buying two sieves of cherries of Jacobs at the time, my baskets stood just by - this prisoner asked me to help the cherries out, which I did; and then helped another man, with two sieves more, and I did not see where Goode was gone.

JAMES VERYAN. They don't generally empty the fruit themselves - they look at it to see whether it is dry and sound; and if it is good - the basket belonged to Goode I suppose.

CHARLES AUGUSTUS JACOBS . The basket belonged to one of the prisoners - I don't know which brought it to the spot.

Thomas Harper and John Edwards , butchers, Bethnal-green, gave the prisoner, Goode, a good character.

CHARLES AUGUSTUS JACOBS re-examined. I had not noticed either of them in the market before - I had not dealt with Brandon that morning - we lose five or six sieves of fruit a week, in this sort of way - they never empty the fruit out till they have bought it.

GOODE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

BRANDON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-22

NEW COURT. Thursday, September 5th, 1833.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1223. ANN CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 2s. 6d.; 2 watch keys, value 6d., and 1 watch ribbon, value 6d., the goods of Henry Sheriff , from his person , to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-23

1224. SARAH CRUNKHORN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , 1 table spoon, value 12s. , the property of John James Day , to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Confined for Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-24

1225. ROBERT EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Eden Rowler .

WILLIAM DRANE (police-constable C 141). On the 27th of July, at two o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Jermyn-street, and saw the prisoner come from the Haymarket, with this coat under his arm - I stopped him, and asked whose it was; he said his own, and he began to put it on - I said I thought he took it from the Haymarket; I took him back; he called to a man who had the care of the cabs and said, "Take care of my cab, I am going to the station-house" - in going to the station-house, he said to me, "I took it for a lark to get a drop of gin" - and he said he knew the cab-man he took it from - this is the coat.

EDEN ROWLER . I am a cab-man . On the day in question my cab was in the Haymarket ; I was feeding my horse; this coat was on the seat of my cab - I missed it the minute before the officer came back with it and the prisoner - this is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a cab of my own in the Haymarket; there was a lot of them larking, and one of them gave me this coat; I turned and saw the officer who took me.

Thomas Briant and Henry Bennison , of the New-road; John Thody , and Joseph Blundell , of Deane-street, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined 9 Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-25

1226. ROBERT TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , 1 coat, value 1l. , the goods of Samuel Phillips .

LEON LEVY . I know the house of Mr. Samuel Phillips, at the corner of Newcastle-street, Strand - at a quarter before eight o'clock, in the evening of the 22nd of July, I saw the prisoner, and knowing him, I watched him; I saw him come up the street, go down again, and then come up behind two ladies - he then tore this coat down from the prosecutor's window, and went off with it; I called "Stop thief" - he dropped it - I took it and pursued him till he was taken.

GEORGE HYAMS . I am shopman to Samuel Phillips - this is his coat, it hung at the window.

ADAM BOOTH (police-constable). I took the prisoner, and have the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-26

1227. JEREMIAH McCOLIFF was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 1 watch, value 4l. 17s.; 1 chain, value 1s.; 1 seal, value 1s., and 1 watch key, value 6d. , the goods of Richard Jenkins ; and WILLIAM CLARY for receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen .

RICHARD JENKINS. I keep an eating-house in New Compton-street. At half-past nine o'clock at night, on the 10th of July, I was in Crown-street, Soho , going home, and saw Mc Coliff about a yard off me, coming towards me; as he was in the act of passing me, he snatched the chain of my watch, took my watch out of my fob, and ran off down Crown-street; he turned into Dudley-court, and was taken there - I only lost sight of him for a moment, while he turned; I was close to him; he was stopped by a private watchman, who is not here, but the policeman is who took him directly - it was a silver watch - I have not seen it since.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Where had you been spending the evening? A. I had been out on business in Tottenham Court-road, at a private house - I had not been drinking at all - I had known Mc Coliff by sight before, but I did not know where he lived; it is rather a crowded neighbourhood - it was not quite dark; the prisoner only turned one corner, and I was close to him.

THOMAS HENLEY (police-constable F 70). I was on duty, and heard a cry of "Stop thief;" I saw Mc Coliff run, and turn up Dudley-court, pursued by a mob of people and the prosecutor; I followed and took him into custody from a watchman - I know Clary; I had seen him about Crown-street before.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there not a great crowd? A. I should think forty or fifty persons - I was at the corner of Denmark-street; they came from Sutton-street; the court Mc Coliff turned up was between me and him - I am sure no one passed me.

WILLIAM SMITH . I live at No. 29, Crown-street. I was at our door, and heard the cry of "Stop thief;" I saw Mc Coliff run, pursued by the prosecutor - he was stopped by the private watchman, and the police officer took him - when he had brought him about one hundred yards, I saw him pass the watch to Clary in Crown-street; Clary was behind Mc Coliff - he took it and ran off - I know Clary by sight, and I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you first mention this? A. At the station-house, Bow-street; I was afraid to call out at the time I saw him take it, as there were so many thieves about me, and only one policeman - I do not know whether most of the persons were thieves, but there were a great many - I know Clary by sight - I never quarrelled with him; he was taken on the 13th of July - I did not hear anything said about him before I got to the station-house, but when I got there, I told the policeman that Mc Coliff had passed the watch to a young man, and I described him and his dress - he was taken from the description.

Mc COLIFF - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

CLARY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-27

1228. CHARLES LEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; and 1 pair of boots, value 8s. , the goods of John Dovey .

JOHN DOVEY. I am a picture-frame maker , and live at Mr. Evans, No. 16, St. Martin's-lane ; the prisoner lodged there, and slept in the same bed with me - on the day stated I got up first; I left these boots on the floor, and the waistcoat on the chair; I went out a quarter before seven o'clock, and returned between twelve and one o'clock at night - I did not miss them till the 11th; the prisoner did not return to his lodging - he was taken on the 15th.

RICHARD EDWARD BARBER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Green-street, Leicester-square. I have a waistcoat which was pawned by some man.

GEORGE NORMAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Clare-street. I have a pair of boots pawned by some man.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES EVANS . I keep the house in which the prisoner and prosecutor lodged - the prisoner had been but three days there; he took the lodging by the week, but went off abruptly, without notice or payment - he was brought to me afterwards by the officer; I asked what he had done with the boots and waistcoat - he told me where he had pawned them; I went and got them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the greatest distress; I sent the prosecutor the duplicates.

GUILTY. Aged 23. - Recommended to Mercy .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330905-28

1229. ALFRED FLANAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 2 silver spoons, value 5s . the goods of John Tapster .

JOHN TAPSTER. I am a licensed victualler , and live in Southampton-street, Covent-garden . On the 17th of August, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I saw the prisoner in my hall; I asked him what he was doing there; he said he came for his uncle, Mr. Cohen, who was a straw bonnet maker, and lived in Maiden-lane - I went into the coffee-room and missed two tea spoons off the tray; I came back to the prisoner, and asked what he had done with them - he said he had not seen them; I took him into the next room, and found them in his trousers pocket; these

are them - I had not known the prisoner before; I gave him to the officer.

The Prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 13. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18330905-29

1230. SARAH EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 1 leather box, value 10s.; 1 yard of flannel, value 2s.; and 3 yards of silk, value 6s. ; the goods of Edward Aylesworth .

ELIZA AYLESWORTH . I am the wife of Edward Aylesworth ; we live at No. 4, Phoenix-alley, Long-acre . On the 19th of August, between two and three o'clock, I was in the parlour at work; I heard a noise, and sent my servant girl to see who it was in my bed-room; she went up and saw the prisoner at a box of mine which contained two glasses and a caddy tea shell - she had lodged a fortnight in my house - I had left my bed-room about an hour before; the door was shut, but not locked; it was hasped; I had spoken to the prisoner about ten minutes before - I sent for an officer, and she was taken.

CATHERINE ALLEN . I live with the prosecutrix - she told me to go up stairs to her bed-room; I went and found the prisoner there at my mistress's box; the door was open - the prisoner said to me, "Come here, my dear"; I asked her, what she came into my mistress's room for; she said, to see for a towel she had dropped out of her window - I called my mistress; the prisoner went to go down stairs; she met my mistress coming up, and she threw this leather box down on the stairs - these articles are my mistress's property.

ELIZA AYLESWORTH. I met the prisoner on the stairs; she had this flannel in her hand which she had taken out of a black leather trunk in my bed-room - she said it was her own, and she had bought it for 1s. 6d. - these three yards of silk were in her hand; this box she threw down - she had come to my house as a married woman - I saw a man she called her husband, who is a gas-fitter.

LOUISA LILLY . I lodge in the house - I met the prisoner on the stairs with these things; I heard her say, she had bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-30

1231. WILLIAM CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , 1 half-sovereign; 4 half-crowns; 20 shillings; and 2 sixpence , the monies of John Bodger .

JOHN BODGER. I lived at Mr. McGregor's, a publican at the Horse-guards - the prisoner had lived there before me; I took his situation as pot-boy there - on the 21st of August, early in the morning, I missed thirty-one shillings in silver, and a half-sovereign - I know the prisoner had been there the evening before, and he had asked me to lend him 5s. which I refused to do; he bade me good night, and I saw no more of him - when I went to bed, I put my money in the right hand corner of my box, which stood in the kitchen - I locked the box, put the key into my right-hand waistcoat pocket, and went to bed in the room above the kitchen - in the morning I found the key was in my left pocket - I suspected something; I went to the box, unlocked it, and missed the money stated, 2l. 1s.; 1l. 0s. 6d. was left - when I went to bed I put my waistcoat on a bench by the side of the door, and in the morning the coat and waistcoat had been taken from that bench and put on the other side - I told my mistress when I missed my money, and the prisoner was taken on the 23rd from the information of a soldier, who was on duty, and had seen him get in at a window which leads to one of the tap rooms, from whence he could get to the bed-room and to the kitchen.

Prisoner. Did you not tell me you had not a farthing? Witness. No, I said I had not a farthing to spare - the money all belonged to my master for beer.

COURT. Q. The prisoner had left your master's family? A. Yes; he had no business in the house at all.

HENRY KIND . I am a private in the 2nd battalion of the 1st regiment of guards. I went on guard on the night in question, at a quarter before twelve o'clock, and at about half-past twelve o'clock the prisoner came to me at my box, near the prosecutor's door; he asked if the people at the public-house were gone to bed; I said I thought not as there was a light in the house - he said it was of no consequence, he could get in as they had left the window open for him - I thought he lived there, as I knew he had lived there before - he said he had got in at the window before - he opened the window, went in, and shut it down, and I saw no more of him till he was at Bow-street.

EDMUND LARKIN (police-constable T 104). I took the prisoner; I found half-a-crown on him.

Prisoner's Defence. When I left, the prosecutor told me if I was out of place, to come and sleep there, which I did for six nights - he told me of a situation, which I went and got, but I returned there to sleep that night - I asked him to lend me 5s., which he said he could not, as he had not a farthing in the world - I then borrowed 6d. of a young man and went away - it was impossible for me to get into the bed-room without being heard.

JOHN BODGER. The prisoner was not in the house in the morning, but the window shutters were open, which I had shut too when I went to bed.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-31

1232. EDWARD LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Daniel .

ROBERT DANIEL. I am a publican , and live in High-street, Marylebone. On the 13th of August, about ten o'clock at night, I was going up Holborn ; I felt my handkerchief taken; I turned and caught the prisoner as he drew the latter part of the handkerchief out, and put it under his clothes - I asked him for it; he denied it; I shook him smartly, and the handkerchief fell from him - I took it up; this is it; I gave him to the officer.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-32

1233. MARY KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 3 sovereigns, the monies of Joseph Johnson , her master .

JOSEPH JOHNSON. I am a publican , and live in Drury-lane - the prisoner was my servant of all work for about five weeks - on the 28th of July, which was Sunday, I and my wife went out about three o'clock to take a walk; we left the prisoner and Sarah Ann

Hawes , my niece, at home - we returned between eight and nine o'clock, and in consequence of what my niece said, I looked at the drawer where the money was kept, and missed three sovereigns - I said to the prisoner,"Mary, what has become of this money?" she said she knew nothing at all about it - I called the policeman and she was taken to the station-house - she there denied it again before the inspector; but just as she was going to be locked up she wished to see me - she said to me,"This won't hang me, will it?" I said, "I know nothing about that" - she then said, "Don't let me be locked up with this parcel of dirty people, I will tell you all about it; you will find three sovereigns under a seat in the kitchen" - we went there and found it - the next morning she asked me if we had missed a pair of sugar-tongs; I said not that I knew of - she said, if we went and looked under some wood, we should find them, which we did.

SARAH ANN HAWES . When my uncle and aunt went out, I was left at home - the money was kept in the corner of a drawer, in a chest of drawers in the bar-parlour - the door was shut but not locked - there was no one in the house but the prisoner and the lodgers - I was drawing some gin, and hearing the money rattle, I turned and saw the prisoner at the drawer; I set down the gin and went to her; she had an apron of my aunt's in her hand, and was putting it into the drawer - I said she had no business there, and she walked out - I told my aunt when she came home.

MARIA JOHNSON . I had counted the money in the morning; there was 21l. 10s., and when I returned there was only 18l. 10s.; the prisoner was accused, and said she had seen nothing of it - I saw it found afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence. I went up stairs to clean myself; when I came down I went into the parlour, there was no one there; I then went into the little parlour and saw Sarah at the chest of drawers - she took several articles out; she showed me some things, and said she was looking for her likeness to show me; I then heard the parlour-bell ring; I went, and was ordered to get a penny biscuit, which I paid her for, and took it - I then went into the kitchen and saw her there with a small brown purse of gold; she said on the Friday before that her mother had been there, and asked her mistress for some money, which her master did not lend her, and I saw she had three sovereigns in her hand in a bit of paper, which she said she was going to lend to her mother - I went out with the baby, and when I came home she told my mistress that I had taken the money; my mistress did not look at the drawer till eleven o'clock at night, when she brought the money up-stairs, and said she was 2l. 10s. short; and when they took me, Sarah told me she would put the money back if I would go to the station-house.

SARAH ANN HAWES . There is not a word of truth in this.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

1234. MARY KELLY was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 5 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 2 night-gown, value 3s., and 3 shifts, value 12s. , the goods of Sarah Idle .

SARAH IDLE . I am single . In May last, I lived at the Ship Tavern, Aldersgate-street , and the prisoner lived there as housemaid for about nine weeks - while she was there I missed five handkerchiefs, a night-gown, and three shifts; part of them from my box, and part from a pair of drawers - I suspected the prisoner, and spoke to her; she denied it.

EDWARD MULLINS . I live in St. John-street, and am a pawnbroker. I produce the articles stated, which were pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I went there I had not clothes sufficient for my situation, I asked the prosecutrix if she could oblige me with any money, she said she had a brother who had bad eyes, and she could not lend me any money, but she would lend me that which I could get a pound on; she lent me these things, on which I got but 17s. 6d.

SARAH IDLE. She never had them of me - she accused the young woman who lived there before of taking them.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years longer .

Reference Number: t18330905-33

1235. STEPHEN MARKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 1 hat, value 2s.; 1 half-crown, 8 shillings, and 3 sixpences, the property of Joseph Annison , and that he had been before convicted of felony .

JOSEPH ANNISON. I am ostler at the George Inn, Enfield . On the 12th of August I lost a hat, a half crown, eight shillings, and three sixpences; my hat had been on the landing, and the money in a box in the bed-room; I had seen it safe a little after six o'clock that morning, and I had seen the hat safe on the day before - I knew the prisoner, he is a labouring man , but had nothing to do in our house, or in my room - I have lost the money, but I got my hat again from the constable.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable. I received information on the Monday night that the prisoner was suspected, and that he had absconded - on the Wednesday following I overtook him in the street with a bundle at his back, he went into a public-house, I followed him, and took this hat off his head, I then took him into custody.

ANN WHEATLEY . I live at that public-house. On the 12th of August I saw the prisoner on the ostler's bed; I don't know how he came there.

JAMES COX . I lodge in the house. I saw the prisoner there between one and two o'clock that afternoon, he said he would go to his mother and get a cup of tea; he then went away, and the prosecutor came and asked me to go and look at his box, as he had heard the prisoner had been on his bed - I went, and found the box open.

JOHN MEAD. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clarke's office - I was a witness, and know he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lived two years in the house, and had many opportunities of stealing things if I had been so disposed.

GUILTY . Aged 25.* - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-34

1236. DIANA OWEN was indicted for stealing, on

the 13th of July , 1 shirt, value 5s. , the goods of David Jones .

ANN JONES . I am the wife of David Jones. I take in washing, the prisoner was employed to fetch and carry the linen ; she received this shirt on the 13th of July, and did not bring it to me; this is it.

GEORGE LOWDER . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this shirt with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-35

1237. GEORGE WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Rysdale , from his person .

JOHN RYSDALE. I am a hosier , and live at Lambeth. On the 20th of August I was in Drury-lane , I felt for my handkerchief and missed it, I turned and saw the prisoner and another man walking away; the other man gave my handkerchief to the prisoner, I collared the prisoner, and took my handkerchief from his left-hand coat pocket - I gave it to the policeman, but he is not here.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-36

1238. THOMAS GIDLEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering a building within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of Thomas Nettleship , on the 1st of June , at Shepperton, and stealing 5 decanters, value 2l. 5s.; 8 cruets, value 15s.; 2 cruet stands, value 1l. 15s.; 13 wine glasses, value 7s.; 9 drinking glasses, value 9s.; 1 pair of salts, value 5s.; 16 knives, value 16s.; 22 forks, value 1l. 2s.; and 12 yards of carpeting, value 24s.; the goods of the said Thomas Nettleship .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FOSTER . I am a builder, and live at Islington. I was employed by Mr. Nettleship to build a villa at Shepperton, in Middlesex ; the old villa was to be pulled down, and the goods, glasses, &c. which were in it were removed to a loft, and locked up for security; the key was in my possession - the property stated was part of it - the prisoner was in my employ as a journeyman carpenter , and for about three months, from September to November in last year, he was employed on that job; he left me about April last, and I paid him all the wages due to him - about the beginning of June last we discovered that a great quantity of the goods were gone from the loft - it had been fastened by a hasp and a padlock, the hasp appeared to me to have been drawn, but was replaced; I could see that force had been used to move it; I went on the 3rd of July to the prisoner's premises in Noble-street with the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you missed anything out of the loft before the prisoner came into your service? A. No; he had left three months before these things were found on his premises - he had all that time to have made away with them - there were a number of workmen on the premises where these goods were.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you remember Christmas eve? A. Yes, the prisoner worked on the premises at Shepperton that day.

FRANCIS KEYS . I went on the 3rd of July with a warrant to apprehend the prisoner, I went to No. 5, Noble-street, Spa-fields; I waited till the prisoner came home, and followed him into the house; he went into a bit of a work-shop, where there was a bench and some timber - I asked him if his name was Gidley? he said, yes; I said I had a warrant to apprehend him for stealing goods from the country; he made no answer - I asked him which was his apartment? he said his wife was out, and had got the key, but if I would go with him he would look for her; I said I should not - I asked if that was his room? he said yes - I said then we would try and get in at the window; he said it was fast, but I tried it, and it was not; he then said, if I would let him get in he would open the door for me; he got in, and I followed close to him - I then saw him put his hand to his pocket and take something out, I seized his hand, and found in it two keys which opened the doors of his two rooms, and one was the key of the room we were in - I found a number of screws in a box in that room, we then went into the front room, where I found these glasses and other property - these salts and cruet stand I found at Mr. Nettleship's in Portman-square - I asked the prisoner how he accounted for the decanters and glasses? he only said I might take them away; I said I should take them all away - I then searched the drawers, and found this part of a cruet stand, which he said was a plaything for his children; it has a silver top to it - I then took him to the station-house.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an escapement maker, and live at No. 5, Noble-street, the prisoner lodged with me - on Christmas eve he brought home a box, but I did not see it, till I saw it empty about a fortnight before he was apprehended - when he came up to my room in the evening with one of those glasses in his hand, and said, that was one among the others which he had bought of a man at a public-house.

Cross-examined. Q. You would not swear to the glass he showed you? A. No.

MARY HUNT . I am the wife of George Hunt, a carpenter at Camden-town. I received the salts and cruetstand from the prisoner's wife.

GEORGE HUNT . I took them to Mr. Nettleship, from information I had received.

WILLIAM COOK . I am groom to Thomas Nettleship, Esquire. I put the articles in the loft - there was a carpet like this; I cannot say that this is it; it was of this kind and near to this pattern; I have not been there myself, but I have heard some has been lost; I recollect the pattern of these glasses, and there was a cruet-stand with a silver top, something of this kind, but there were stands round it for the cruets.

Cross-examined. Q. Your expression was, "something of this kind," are there not many other stands and glasses similar to these? A. No doubt there are, but I never noticed any of them; when I put them away there were fifteen small glasses, and some large ones, these are the same pattern.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-37

1239. STEPHEN PEARCE was indicted for embezzlement .

SPARKS PHILIP . I am a farmer and live at Arlington, the prisoner was my servant , and when he went out with straw he had to receive the money for it; on the 1st of June, I sent him with a load of straw, which was sold to Mr. Lee, the prisoner returned and told me he had

not received the money for it; it was 26s. the load, but the prisoner was to be allowed 5s. for his expenses; he left my house the same night without notice; he was taken in about a month afterwards.

CHARLES ADAMS . I live with Mr. Lee at Fulham , he purchases hay and straw of different persons; on the 1st of June I paid the prisoner 26s. for a load of straw, for his master.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a friend who took me into a beer-shop, I spent a great deal of the money, and was afraid my master would be angry with me.

GUILTY. - Aged 19. Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18330905-38

1240. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 7 watches, value 25l.; 1 watch-key, value 25s.; 1 broach, value 25s.; 1 gold pin, value 10s.; 1 spoon, value 14s.; and 1 box, value 1s. , the goods of William Sarginson .

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Robert Nelson .

3rd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Robert Jacobs .

ROBERT JACOBS. I am a watch-maker , and live at Sudbury. On the 19th of June I packed up a parcel which contained the watches and other property stated; I put them into a box which was nailed down, and directed to Mr. Edward Keat, No. 69, Banner-street, St. Luke's; I sent it to the coach by my servant.

MARY BLANDON . I am servant to Mr. Jacobs, he gave me the box, which I took to the Rose and Crown Sudbury.

JOHN RAVEN . I received the box, and when the coach came I put it in.

WILLIAM BARNARD . I am coachman to the Sudbury coach. I brought the box up on the 19th of June, and delivered it to Tyler.

GEORGE TYLER . I am porter at the Belle Sauvage , the box was given to me, I put it into the delivery porter's box.

WILLIAM SARGINSON . I am porter at the Belle Sauvage. I saw the box directed for Mr. Edward Keat, Banner-street; I sent the prisoner with that and five other parcels- I gave him a basket to carry them in, with a strap at each end, so that no one could take them out; he ought not to have taken out any parcel till he got to the door at which he was to deliver it; I gave them to him on the evening of the 19th of June, he came at six o'clock the next morning, and brought me the money for the six parcels which was 13s. 8d.; on the 22nd of July, I found that the box in question had not been delivered; I spoke to the prisoner about it, he said, he took it, and recollected the man he had given it to; he said, he would show me the place, and the man who had received the box, and paid him 2s. for it; I went with him to Mr. Keat's house; I saw Mr. Keat and three other young men, but the prisoner said it was neither of them; we then left the house, and I took him into a public-house a few doors off; I there said to him, "I am determined to know what you have done with the box;" he burst into tears, and said, "It was taken away from me in the City-road," and that he had borrowed the 2s. of his mother to pay me for it, but I have seen his mother, and she denies giving it him; he has been with me about six months.

EDWARD KEAT . I never received the box.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-39

1241. MARIA PITT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August 1 pair of tongs, value 2s.; 1 cap, value 6d.; and 1 blanket, value 1s. the goods of John Goldsworthy , her master .

SYLVIA GOLDSWORTHY . I am the wife of John Goldsworthy, we live in Gloucester-place , the prisoner was our servant for two or three months; I lost a pair of tongs, a cap, and a blanket; I had missed a sheet, and some other articles before - I spoke to the prisoner, and asked to look into her box; I there found these tongs, and blanket; she said the tongs were hers, and she could bring a man to swear it, and her master who died two years ago, had given her the blanket; I sent for an officer, and gave her in charge; I looked into my own room, and found the blanket had been taken off my own bed.

JOHN SHORT . (police-constable S 24). I took the prisoner; she said the tongs belonged to her mistress, but not the blanket; I found this cap in her pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had had the blanket in my box for four months before I went to her house; I had put the tongs in there because I had wetted them, and put them there till I could clean them.

GUILTY. Aged 24. - Recommended to Mercy .

Confined for Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-40

1242. LEWIS THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM LOWE . I am clerk to a gentleman in New-square On the 13th of August, I was looking out of the back window into Tavistock-square ; I saw a gentleman walking, and the prisoner took a handkerchief out of his pocket; I ran down, and tried to find the gentleman, but I could not; the prisoner was taken in three or four minutes.

Prisoner. Q. How high was the window? A. On the second floor; it was open; I swear you are the person who took it; I ran down and told the porter who was sitting on the bench; you could not have got away.

SAMUEL WALKER . Mr. Lowe told me that the prisoner who was then crossing the square, had picked a gentleman's pocket; I pursued him; he ran through a passage into Serle-street, and threw the handkerchief into Mr. Green's passage - I pursued and took him in the next street; when I brought him back, a little girl had picked up this handkerchief and gave it me.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent; I saw the mob and ran with them; a gentleman stopped me, and the witness swore I picked the pocket, but I was not near the place.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-41

1243. JOHN JAMES FRASER was indicted for bigamy .

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES KNIGHT . I am a plumber, and live at Rotherhithe; I produce a copy of the register of the marriage of the prisoner with Sarah Dunn ; I have examined it with the register, it is correct; I am not acquainted with the prisoner. (read.)

"Marriages solemnized in the parish of Queenborough, in the county of Kent. John James Fraser , widower of this parish;

and Sarah Dunn, widow of this parish, were married in this church by banns, 25th of November, 1830; by me William Bowman , minister; in presence of John Emptage, and Frances Green."

Witness. I was present at Lambeth-street when the prisoner was there; he made use of dreadful language, and denied the marriage altogether.

Cross-examined by MR. PARKER. Q. What relation are you to Mary Ann Bliss? A. My wife is her sister.

FRANCES GREEN . I live at Sheerness; my husband is a labourer; I was present at the prisoner's marriage at Queenborough, on the 25th of November, 1830, with Mrs. Sarah Dunn, a widow; I witnessed it, and am quite sure the prisoner is the man; he was something in the Ordnance; Mrs. Dunn is here now.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know what became of Mrs. Dunn, after the marriage? A. No; I never saw her at Sheerness; I never knew the prisoner nor her till they came to be married; my father was then clerk of the parish, and the prisoner asked me to be bridesmaid; I was frequently called on to officiate in that way at that time, and if people asked me civilly, I had no objection; but I will not do it any more.

MARY ANN BLISS . On the 21st of December, 1831 , I married the prisoner at St. George the Martyr, Southwark , in the name of John Frayer ; I was called in the church as Ann Bliss ; I said my name was Mary Ann, he said it was no consequence.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you write your name, Ann? A. Yes; he said I must not put Mary, as it was not in the book; I had been a widow for six years - I had six children; the prisoner had no property; he had half-a-crown a day pension; I told my brother by the prisoner's desire, that I had married at Greenwich - I did not induce the prisoner to marry me by representing that I was pregnant; he wished to be married soon after our acquaintance, but I objected to a speedy marriage, as I had a family round me; I was in business, but I told the prisoner the property was not mine but my brother's.

MR. DOANE. Q. You had some property? A. Yes; a shop with property in it; he has taken a great deal of property away in my absence.

COURT. Q. How long had you known the prisoner before you were married? A. From the beginning of the summer; he married me by the name of John Frayer - he had a pension of half-a-crown a day; he was a cabinet-maker, and could have done many things in the shop; he stated he had been a widower for four or five years, with one child; he lived with me till the July following, and then left me; but before that, he sent away what things he had, he said they were Government stores, and they must go, as he expected a man would be hanged; he then left me in distress for rent and taxes; I did not find he was married till after he left me - he had taken away a great deal of my property.

JAMES COOK (police-sergeant H 7). I took the prisoner into custody on the 22nd of August, at No. 8, Grove-street; he said his name was Frayer; I told him he was my prisoner on a charge of bigamy; he said I had that to prove; I said two certificates had been produced which was sufficient for me to take him.

Prisoner's Defence. After I was married at Queenborough, I went with my wife to a public-house, where we parted; I then met a friend who said I was bringing myself into disgrace and trouble, as my wife's friends were the worst of characters, and then I went and told her of it, but she contradicted it, and told me to go to Chatham; I got permission of the Board, and went there; she came there to me some time afterwards, gave me threatening language, and said the child she had did not belong to me, it was my master's; I offered to take her home, but she would not, and she went away God knows where; Mrs. Bliss says that she had property, but she was £53 in debt - she insisted that I should marry her, and said she was with child.

GUILTY. Aged 40. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18330905-42

1244. HENRY JOHN EMBLEM and ELIZA ALLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 3 blankets, value 6s.; 2 pillows, value 3s., and 1 sheet, value 3s. , the goods of Ann Willis .

ANN WILLIS . I am a widow , and live in Great Barlow-street, Marylebone . The prisoners came there together as man and wife on the 12th of August, and I let them a one-pair back room furnished, at 5s. 3d. a week - on the 27th of August, I gave the woman a clean pair of sheets and a pillow-case, and asked her to give me the dirty ones - she gave me the sheets but not the pillow-case; I had some suspicion, and in about half an hour I went into their room, and missed the pillows; I went and got an officer, and we missed three blankets, the two pillows, and one of the clean sheets, which I had given her just before - when the female prisoner came in, the officer told me to search her, and I found the duplicates in her bosom - the male prisoner was in the room at the time; they had paid one week's rent, and owed two weeks and three days.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did they not live as man and wife? A. Yes; I had a good character with them - the woman said she took in needle-work, and the man said he was a coach-maker.

CHARLES WALTER . I am a pawnbroker in the service of Mr. Morris. I have two pillows, three blankets, and a sheet; I took in two of the articles of a woman, who, I believe, was the prisoner - I gave these duplicates.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am the officer. I was called in - I found the male prisoner in the room, and when the woman came in, I desired the prosecutrix to search her, and she found on her the duplicate of the sheet, pawned on the 27th of August, for 3s. 6d. - I inquired for the other duplicates and the male prisoner produced a little bag in which I found some other duplicates, which led to the other property; the woman stated that the man had directed her to pawn them.

Emblem's Defence. I was out of a situation and destitute of food - I ordered my wife to pawn these things- she would not for some time, but after persuading, and in fact forcing her, she did do it.

ELIZABETH SARAH NICHOLAS . I am sister of the female prisoner. I know the man by the name of Allen; they have lived as man and wife together for four years, and

I believe they are married - I believe he is a deserter from some regiment.

EMBLEN - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

ALLEN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-43

1245. RICHARD HERRING was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 1 order for payment, and value of 5l. , the property of Hugh Biers .

HUGH BIERS . I live in Dorset-place, Dorset-square . The prisoner called on me on the 29th of July, and said he had called for Mr. Woodin's account; he had called once or twice before, but he had not seen me - I owed Mr. Woodin 3l. 11s.; I asked the prisoner what the amount was, and he told me it was 3l. 11s. - I asked him to give me change for 5l.; he said he could not, but he would bring the change down, and I wrote him a cheque for 5l.; he did not return, and I did not see him again till he was at the office - Mr. Woodin afterwards called to know if I had paid his former clerk, and said he was not his clerk then - this is the cheque.

WILLIAM TYSON . I am clerk to Sir Claude Scott and Co. This cheque was paid at our house on the 29th of July, the day it is dated.

DENNIS WOODIN . I am a veterinary surgeon. The prisoner has been my clerk , but had been discharged on the 1st of July; he had access to my accounts, and could know who was indebted to me - some papers were found on him, and among the rest is the sum due from Mr. Biers, extracted from my books.

Prisoner. That account is not in the paper. Witness. I believe it was, but I have not seen the paper since the night he was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Woodin discharged me at a moment's notice - I had no one to apply to, and no means of support - he knows well enough that I had no intention to defraud him, or I could have done it, without leaving myself open to the law of my country - I hope, being my first offence, you will visit it with a light punishment - I meant to have repaid it.

GUILTY . - Aged 21. Transported for Seven Years .

1246. RICHARD HERRING was again indicted for falsely pretending to one William Ingarfield , that he had come from Mr. Dennis Woodin , and obtaining from him 3 sovereigns, 16 shillings, and 1 sixpence, with intent to cheat and defraud him thereof .

WILLIAM INGARFIELD . I am a fishmonger , and live at No. 36, Paddington-street . Mr. Woodin is my veterinary surgeon - I owed him some money; and on the 15th of July, the prisoner called on me, and said he came for Mr. Woodin's bill or account; I said certainly - I took the bill off the file; it was 4l. 11s. - I said, "Mr. Woodin owes me a little bill for fish; I suppose that is to be deducted" - he said certainly - I made the deduction and paid him 3l. 16s. 6d.

DENNIS WOODIN . This gentleman owed me this money, but on the 15th of July the prisoner was not in my employ - I did not send him for it, and I never had the money.

WILLIAM HODGE . (police-constable N 97). I took the prisoner - I found some papers on him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years longer .

Reference Number: t18330905-44

1247. THOMAS JERVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 2 waistcoats, value 9s. , the goods of Francis Cotton .

WILLIAM STRACHAN . I know the house of Mr. Francis Cotton , in Shoreditch . On the 24th of August I was within sight of the house, and saw the prisoner loitering about - he then entered the door, unpinned what I supposed to be a waistcoat, rolled it up, put it under his arm, and walked out of the shop - I ran across the road, and secured him; he dropped two waistcoats as I took hold of him - they remained in my sight till the officer took them.

JAMES BLAKE (police-constable G 203). I took the prisoner and have the waistcoats.

FRANCIS COTTON . I live at No. 90, Shoreditch; these are my property - I don't know the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330905-45

1248. MARY O'BRIAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , 6 pair of gloves, value 6s., and part of a lace collar, value 1s., the goods of Ignace Vanbever her master .

IGNACE VANBEVER. I am a harp-maker . My wife sells gloves; the prisoner lived seven weeks with her, and sold gloves for her - I have nothing to do with the glove trade, and my wife is not here - I had an excellent character with the prisoner, and I would take her back again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-46

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1249. CHARLES WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 2 sovereigns, and 1 £5 Bank note , the monies of Robert Hobart .

ROBERT HOBART . I am groom to Colonel Dyson, of Spanish-place, Marylebone ; I lodge in a room over the stable - I had a box in my room on the 24th of April, which had one £10 note, one £5 note, two sovereigns and one half sovereign in it; the prisoner had been in the' habit of assisting me all the winter; and the latter end of May I sent him to a situation at Upton Gray; on the next day I missed the money from my box, and on the Monday, which was two days afterwards, I went down after him, but he was gone to Southampton with his master's horses, and I did not see him again till the 15th of July, when I met him in Vere-street, I said,"Charles, you never call to see me now;" he said, "You said I had taken your money;" I said, "Did you not take it;" he said, "No;" I said, "Where did you get the money to buy your clothes;" he said, "I borrowed £2 of a groom in Devonshire-mews;" I did not see a policeman, and he walked with me down Welbeck-street; in going along, he said, "If you will forgive me I will tell you the truth;" I said, "I will not forgive you, but it will be better for you to tell the truth;" I went to the prisoner's mother with the officer, and saw some new clothes, which the officer took.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you say to the prisoner "If you don't tell me whether you took the

money, I will tie you to the stall-post in the stable and horsewhip you"? A. No; I will take my oath I did not use any threat or promise; I did not say I would charge a policeman with him - I will swear I did not strike him at all, nor touch him.

JOHN ADDIS . I was with the prosecutor when he took the prisoner; he asked him to forgive him, he said he would not, but it would be better for him to tell the truth.

DAVID DAVIS . I am a clothes salesman, and live in Marylebone-lane; the prisoner came to my shop about three months ago, and purchased a pair of breeches, a waistcoat, a pair of gaiters, and a hat; I think they came to between twenty and thirty shillings; I showed him a coat at the same time, for which I asked him twenty-five shillings; he said he would not give that, but he would come in the afternoon and have it, if I would take £1 for it, and he came and had it for that; he came again some time afterwards, and bought a fustian jacket, two waistcoats, and a silver watch; he paid for them 2l. 10s.; he gave me a £5. note - I asked him who he had it of, he said I had no occasion to be afraid, that he lived with Colonel Dyson round the corner; he said he had just received his wages and he was going into the country; I sent to enquire, and he did live there; these are the clothes, some of them have my mark on them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-47

1250. THOMAS FLYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Edward Hambrook , from his person .

WALTER LEWIS . I live in Rathbone-place. On the 16th of August, I was going to Maiden-lane, Covent-garden ; as I was turning into Bedford-court, I saw the prisoner and two more boy s following Mr. Hambrook and a lady; I had not known the prisoner before, but I am sure he is the person; he lifted up the tail of Mr. Hambrook's coat, and took his handkerchief out of his pocket and gave it to one of the other boys; it was twenty minutes after seven o'clock in the evening; the prisoner and the boy who had the handkerchief, then ran away; I told the gentleman, and he and I ran after the boys; I kept in sight of them all the way - the gentleman caught the prisoner in Covent-garden, church yard, where he had hid himself behind a tomb-stone; I pointed him out to the gentleman - I am quite sure he is the person who took it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was it not dark? A. No; I was about twenty yards from the prisoner when he raised the skirt of the coat - I had not known the prisoner before; I live with a book-binder - I had been at work that day but was then going on an errand - I had no boys with me.

MARY EGAN . I was in Bedford-court, Mr. Hambrook and the lady passed me; I saw two boys going after him, and one of them picked his pocket, but I don't see that boy here.

EDWARD HAMBROOK . On the evening in question, I was told of this circumstance, I missed my handkerchief, and two boys were pointed out to me; I followed them - the prisoner secreted himself behind a stone in St. Paul's, Covent-garden, church yard; I went to him and asked him for my handkerchief; he said he had not got it, and he did not know who had.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two boys running, and I ran to see what was the matter; I went through the church-yard which was my nearest way home.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-48

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1251. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , 1 gown, value 7s. , the goods of Frances Johnson . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-49

1252. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 1 trunk, value 14s. , the goods of William Frederick Green . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330905-50

1253. JOHN HOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 snuff-box, value 1s., the goods of Ann Donaldson , from her person .

ANN DONALDSON . I live in Tower-street, Seven Dials. On the 16th of July, I went in the evening to see Simmons's exhibition of wax-work - I am in the habit of taking snuff - I had my snuff-box when I went there - I staid about three-quarters of an hour, and as I came out of the last room I missed my snuff-box - there were a great many people there, but I did not observe any one in particular - when I came out and had got five or six doors down Holborn , I saw the prisoner on the opposite side of the way looking at something; I went up to him with a young man who was with me, and I saw him with my snuff-box in his hand - it proved to be mine when it came out of the area which he threw it down - I took hold of him and said, "You have got my box;" he put his hand behind him and said, "No, I have not;" and dropped something down.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Had you the box when you went into this place? A. Yes, I am sure I had; I missed it before I came out - I did not notice the prisoner there - when I came out I saw the prisoner and another person with him, but the prisoner had the box - it was between nine and ten o'clock, but I saw him looking at my box by the light of a shop - I saw a box in his hand which afterwards proved to be mine - I saw it was a black box; I should have known it if I had seen the picture - I was never married; I have gone by the name of Ann White.

CHARLES BAINBRIDGE . I was with the prosecutirx - I did not see the box in her possession at the exhibition, but I afterwards saw the prisoner on the opposite side with a box in his hand - I crossed and took him by the collar; the person who was with him ran away - the prisoner dropped the box when I charged him with having it, and I gave him in charge of a policeman; the person belonging to the house went into the area and handed up the box - the prosecutrix saw it, and said in the prisoner's presence, it was her's - it was given to the policeman, who is now in Whitecross-street for debt - it had an oil painting on it; I should think it cheap at 6d.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A grainer -

I have known the prosecutrix fourteen or fifteen months; I am often out with her in the evening when my work is done; I do not live with her - I saw a box in the prisoner's hand; he put it behind him and dropped it when I accused him of having it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-51

1254. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 1 pair of shoes, value 1s., the goods of John James Brewer , from the person of Caroline Brewer .

CAROLINE BREWER . I am the wife of John James Brewer; he lives at No. 20, Marquis-court, Drury-lane; this is my daughter, her name is Caroline; she is four years and a half old - she went out into the court to play about six o'clock in the evening, on the 17th of August; she had this pair of shoes on at the time; they are worth 1s. - I missed the child soon after seven o'clock, and did not see her again till she was brought home at twenty minutes before nine o'clock; she had no shoes on then.

EDWARD DOBSON . I am ten years old - I live in the same court; I saw the prisoner there on the night in question; she was feeding Caroline Brewer with potatoes and meat - I did not know the prisoner, but I knew Caroline; she had her shoes on then - the prisoner went down Vinegar-yard towards Brydges-street , and the child followed her.

GEORGE EVANS . I am a coachmaker's labourer; I live at No. 19, White-horse-yard, Drury-lane - I saw the child that evening sitting on the step of a door, in York-street, Covent-garden, about twenty minutes past eight o'clock - there were two respectable persons talking to her; I went up, and she had no shoes on - my wife keeps a little shop, and sells children's clothes, and shoes, and toys - the prisoner came there that night, and offered this pair of children's boots or shoes for sale; I asked her what she wanted for them; she said, 1s. - I asked if she would not take 9d; she said, no, she would take 10d. - I looked particularly at them, and said they would not suit me - she took them out and I followed her to a pawnbroker's with them; she took them just inside the door, and I gave her into custody, on suspicion that these were the shoes belonging to the child I had seen in York-street.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had found the shoes in Monmouth-street.

GUILTY. Aged 46. - Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutrix . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330905-52

1255. HANNAH MUCKLING was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of Augu st, 1 watch, value 2l.; 3 seals, value 8s.; and 1 watch key, value 6d., the property of William Bond , from his person .

WILLIAM BOND. I live at No. 31, Marylebone-street. On the 8th of August, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in King-street, Covent-garden; I met the prisoner and went with her to Rose-street, Long-acre , and we were shown up stairs - I had a watch when I went there; I felt it in my fob when I was in the house; I remained there about a quarter of an hour; I then came out by myself, but the prisoner was close behind me - I went on to Longacre, which was fifty or sixty yards; I then missed my watch; I turned back; I saw a policeman and took him to the house - I asked the persons there if they knew any thing of the watch; they said no; the prisoner was then gone - this key and seal and these four watch papers were with my watch that evening - the watch was worth 2l. and the seals and key 7s. or 8s.

Prisoner. He said at Bow-street that he was in liquor. Witness. I was.

COURT. Q. Then are you able positively to swear that this is the woman you went with? A. Yes, and I can swear I had the watch when I was in the house.

MARY DAVIS . I am servant at the house; I recollect on that evening the prosecutor coming there with the prisoner; they went up stairs, and the prosecutor came back soon after he went out, and made a complaint of his loss.

Prisoner. I was coming from Piccadilly and I asked the servant of this house if I could go backwards; she said "Were you not here last week," I said "No, I never was in the house before;" she said, "Come in and talk to my mistress;" she then said, that I had been to the house with a gentleman, and she had shown him into the front room up stairs, for which she asked 2s., which he refused to pay; and she had shown him to the back room which was 1s. - she said she could swear to my make, but not my face; I never was in the house before - I ran out; she cried, "Thief, thief, thief," and I was taken.

Witness. I knew her, and she had been in the habit of coming to the house frequently; I am certain of it, but I did know her name.

THOMAS POCOCK (police-constable L 38). I met the prosecutor on the 8th of August, and in consequence of what he said, I looked after the prisoner for three or four nights running, but I did not find her till the 17th - I charged her on suspicion; she denied all knowledge of the robbery; she told me where she lodged, and gave me the key of her door - I went there on the 19th, which was Monday morning; I found a duplicate of a watch in a tea-cup on the mantel-piece; I searched further, and in a work-box, I found this seal, and four watch-papers - I went to the pawnbroker and found this watch; the prisoner gave her residence at No. 4, Princes-court, Commercial-road.

WILLIAM CHARLES ELLIS . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in York-row, Kennington-road. This watch was pawned by a woman on the 9th of August - I cannot say who pawned it, but I remember seeing the prisoner in the shop about the time.

Prisoner. He said at the office that it was at eight o'clock at night, but it was eight o'clock in the morning. Witness. I stated that to the best of my recollection it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening.

Prisoner. It was in the morning; I go out charing; I was cleaning a person's room, who said to me, "What is the matter;" I said, "I have six dresses in pawn, and if I could get them out, I could make double the money of them" - she said she would give me her husband's watch to pawn, which I did; her name is Turner - I got my dresses out, and brought the duplicate of the watch to her; in a few days afterwards she said to me, "My husband died abroad, and I want to go abroad, if you can sell the duplicate of this watch for me, I should be much obliged to you;" I said, I would inquire of my friends - I had been out at work on the Saturday, and on returning home through

Long-acre, I called at the house, and was accused of having been there with the gentleman, which I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-53

1256. ROSETTA BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , 44 yards of silk, value 6l. 12s. the goods of William Venables .

THOMAS TAIT . I am shopman to Mr. William Venables he is a linen-draper , and lives in Lamb's Conduit-street - on the 6th of August, the prisoner came to the shop and bought several articles which came to 3s. or 4s. - as she was going out I suspected there was something under her shawl, I told our superintendent and he followed her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many persons are there in the firm? A. Only one; there are some brothers; I will not swear that one of them is not in the firm; Mr. William Venables pays me; his brother Richard lives in the house; he manages when Mr. William is away; I will not swear he is not in the firm, Mr. William Venables is not here.

COURT. Q. Who do you consider your master? A. Mr. William Venables .

JOHN SMART . On the 6th of August, in consequence of what I heard, I went after the prisoner whom I had seen in our shop; I overtook her about one hundred yards from the house; I said I suspected she had something which did not belong to her, and I took this piece of silk from her, and took her back to the shop, she gave me the silk, and wished me to let her go; I said it would not do - this is the silk, it is the property of Mr. William Venables; I can swear to it by the private mark; it is worth 6l. or 7l.

THOMAS TAIT . The prisoner had not bought this silk, nor any part of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she buy of no one but you? A. No - she bought some black silk, but I cannot tell whether it was off this piece; she paid about 4s.; I don't know the exact amount; this silk was on the counter; I left the prisoner for a short time; there are fourteen or fifteen shopmen; it is called Navarino house; there were no persons near her, she was sitting at the counter - Mr. Smart was near the door; about twenty yards from the prisoner; I don't know any thing to prevent either of the Mr. Venables being here to night.

COURT, to JOHN SMART. Q. What name is over the door? A. W. Venables, and Co. - Mr. Walford was a partner, but he has ceased to be so; I am acting under Mr. William Venables; he is the sole proprietor, and was so on the 6th of August.

Cross-examined. Q. As William Venables and Co. is over the door, how do you know that he is the sole partner; is it not from what you have heard, you state this? A. Yes - the word Co. is over the door, it has not been erased - I saw Mr. Richard Venables to day, but he could not attend here without leaving his business.

COURT. Q. Did you hear of his being subpoened on the part of the prisoner? A. No - Mr. Richard certainly acts as master, and has the privilege of dismissing hands.

Cross-examined. Q. Have any of the shopmen that privilege? A. No.

JOHN LINCOLN . I am an inspector of police. I took the prisoner, and have the silk.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-54

1257. THOMAS BARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 basket, value 4s.; and 8 loaves of bread, value 5s. 8d. the goods of Joseph Wilson .

JOSEPH OLIVER . I live with Mr. Joseph Wilson, he is a baker ; I had a basket with some loaves in it on the 16th of July, which I left at the corner of Harley-street , at a quarter before twelve o'clock, in care of a woman who was selling fruit; there were three quartern loaves, and ten half-quarterns; I was not gone more than five minutes, when I came back the basket and bread were gone - I instantly went home; I told my master, and heard no more of it till about half-past one o'clock; when I met a witness, and went to the office, where I found the bread, and the prisoner, and basket.

JOHN NEWMAN . I am a journeyman baker. On the 16th of July, about a quarter before twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another man with a basket of bread; there were eight loaves in the basket; I followed them, the other man was carrying the basket, and the prisoner followed him about twenty yards behind; they turned round Wimpole-street, and went on almost to Oxford-street; I met the policeman, and gave them in charge; they went on to Bond-street; the prisoner turned round and saw me and the policeman; he put the basket down at a shop window, the other man went away; the prisoner had lived fellow servant with me about two years ago; he was secured.

Prisoner. I asked you whether the basket belonged to you. Witness. Yes, you did - I never heard the policeman say he would not take you in charge.

THOMAS PROCTOR (police-constable 25 D). I was called by Mr. Newman on the 16th of July, and saw the prisoner carrying the basket - I took him into custody - I asked him whether the basket belonged to him, he said it belonged to him and his mate, the other man ran away when he saw me - I took the prisoner while he was putting the basket off his shoulder.

Prisoner. Was not the basket turned round at a shop window, and you asked me if I was minding it? Witness. No; I saw you put it there - I did not say I would not take the charge; I held you by the collar; you could not have got away.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, and I asked a man if he knew of a place, he said, "Come with me and mind my basket, I will give you part of my dinner;" I did so; he turned down the basket and told me to mind it - the officer came and asked whose it was, I said it belonged to a man who was gone down Bond-street - Newman then came up, and said I had stolen it - the policeman said, as he did not see me take it he could not take the charge.

JURY to OLIVER. Q. What has become of the old woman? A. I don't know; I only saw her at the corner of the street; she attended at the office, but was not bound over.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330905-55

1258. HARVETT HOBBS was indicted for stealing,

on the 16th of August , 1 tub of pickled salmon, value 18s. the goods of James Pierce

JAMES PIERCE . I live at New Brentford and deal in pickled salmon . On the 4th of August, I bought twelve kits of pickled salmon, of Mr. Ridpath, in Lower Thames-street that was on Monday; they were then 16s. a kit; but on the Friday, when I came to fetch them away, they were 18s. - I brought my cart that day to Mr. Ridpath's door; I am sure I put the twelve kits in - I then went on board some oyster boats, and when I came back one of the kits was gone from the cart - I made inquiry, and the man who minds the carts said, he saw a man take one kit away - I had known the prisoner by sight, having seen him about Billingsgate - I ran up to London-bridge, hired a cab, and made the best of my way to Oxford-road - I then went on to Paddington, and took the prisoner near the White Lion, with the kit of salmon on his head - I said to him "You have got my tub of salmon," he said,"I have not, I bought it of Mr. Ridpath," I said, "If it is mine; it has two T's on it with a dot between them," which it had; this is the bottom of the kit - I then gave him into custody.

GEORGE ROGERS (Police-constable D 68). The prisoner was given in charge to me; I found the tub on him; the salmon was given up, but this is the head of the tub - the prisoner said he bought it of Mr. Ridpath.

GEORGE RIDPATH . I am a salesman in Thames-street. I sold Mr. Pierce twelve kits of pickled salmon on the Monday, and he came for them on the Friday; this is the top of one of them; I know it by the mark - I may have seen the prisoner but don't remember it - I had not sold him any salmon that day, for I had none to sell.

Prisoner. I have bought a great many tubs of him. Witness. I cannot say that I recollect it - I am sure I did not sell him this on that day.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . About ten minutes before twelve o'clock I saw the twelve kits in the cart - I happened to cross to take a penny from another cart, and I saw the prisoner take one of the kits, and run off as quick as lightning.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330905-56

1259. THOMAS GODDARD was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , 1 seal, value 5l.; 1 ring value 1l.; and 1 watch-key, value 5s., the goods of Francis Lyne , from his person .

FRANCIS LYNE. I live at No. 169, Prospect-place, Edgeware-road . About eight o'clock on the 22nd of August, I was at my own gate, ringing the bell, for my servant to let me in; my house is on the left-hand side of the Edgware-road, going to Maida-hill - the prisoner, I believe, came up to me and snatched at the seal and ribbon of my watch - I have no doubt of his person, but I could not identify him, because it was dark - he took the seal and key away; the ring which was attached to the ribbon broke - he ran off with great expedition - the policeman saw the transaction - he followed him and brought the prisoner back in less than five minutes, but the seal was gone; it cost me about 5l.; and the key cost a guinea.

CHARLES THOMPSON . I live at No. 7, Earl-street, Lisson-grove. On that evening I was coming along the Grand Junction-road, and saw Mr. Lyne on his face, in a sort of a fit - I assisted to lead him home, and when he got to his gate the prisoner snatched his seals and ran away them - I am sure of his person; there was another man with him - I ran after them, crying, "Stop thief;" I lost sight of them, and when I came back, I found the prisoner in custody.

RICHARD HANCOCK (police-constable, 138 T). I was in Edgware-road, and saw the prisoner and another in company - I knew the prisoner, and watched them, first on one side and then on the other - they passed Mr. Lyne and then returned and took the seal from his person - I followed and took the prisoner; I said, "I want you," he said, "For what," I said, "For a snatch and a run;" I brought him back and Thompson came up directly afterwards - this ring was found against the prosecutor's door the next morning - I knew the person who was with the prisoner by sight; but I knew the prisoner by name.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along the street, and when I got to the corner, Thompson crossed and asked a gentleman if he saw any chaps running down there, he said, No, the policeman then came up, and said,"Halloo you b-r, I have got you" - I said, "For what?" he said "You know what it is about" - he then asked the gentleman if I was the person, he said he thought I was, but when at the office he swore to me.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-57

1260. OLYMPIA EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 2 half-crowns, the monies of William Mousley , from his person .

WILLIAM MOUSLEY . I live in Brewhouse-lane, High-street, Hampstead . On the night of the 7th of July I was on the road between High-street and the George, and I saw the prisoner; she came up to me, and asked if I wanted anything, I said I did not; she then walked away, and I went lower down, as I was waiting for a fly returning from town - the prisoner overtook me, and again asked me if I wanted anything, I said no - she then struck me a blow in the **** and forced her hand into my right hand breeches pocket, where I had four half-crowns, and she took two out - it was then between eleven and twelve o'clock on the Saturday night - I charged her with the theft, and told her she had better deliver it up - I followed her nearly a quarter of a mile till I met a policeman, I called him over from the other side - the prisoner then threw the money down, I heard it fall, and told the policeman - he came with his light, and picked up one half-crown in my presence.

Prisoner. I solemnly declare to God he gave me a shilling to go to the George public-house and get a quartern of gin. Witness. No, I did not; I had no shilling in my possession - she did not go into any house in my presence.

WILLIAM WICKS (police-constable S 49.) I was on duty in Hampstead-road, I saw the prosecutor and prisoner coming towards me; he said to me "I will give her in charge to you, she has picked my pocket of two half-crowns, and has thrown them into the ditch" - I turned on my light, and found one of them, but I could not find the

other - I took the prisoner to the station-house, and then returned, and after some time I found the other half-crown - she told me that he had given her a shilling to get some gin, and that she had the eightpence halfpenny change in her pocket, which she had.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I met the prosecutor late on the evening mentioned, when I was coming from my work; he asked me where I was going in such haste, I told him home; he asked me to stop and have something to drink, I did not refuse as I knew the man well; he then gave me one shilling to fetch out anything I liked best, I brought out one quartern of gin, and I offered the change to the prosecutor, which he refused taking, and he told me to put it in my pocket; after that he said he would take a walk with me, and then he proposed sitting down to rest: we had not been together more than half an hour, when the prosecutor wanted to take more liberties than welcome, and we had a great scuffle; then he saw the policeman coming, and he asked me to come back, and he said if I did not he would give me in charge; I ran towards the policeman, and he followed me, and told the policeman I had taken five shillings from him; and when we were going towards the station-house, he told the policeman where the money was, and on looking down on the bank where we had been sitting he found one half-crown. I declare solemnly I am innocent of what the prosecutor states, but I did not give it a thought at that fatal moment what the prosecutor's intention was towards me; I forgot the promise he made me one evening a few weeks before this occurrence, he promised me as soon as he had an opportunity he would make me remember him as long as I lived.

WILLIAM MOUSLEY re-examined. I had never seen her in my life before - I am a labouring man - I have lived in Hampstead ever since I was six years old - I am married, and have two children - I was then waiting for Mr. Pool's horse and fly coming from the coach-maker, as he wanted it to go to chapel on Sunday morning - I locked up his premises about half-past eleven o'clock, and met the prisoner not fifty yards off.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-58

OLD COURT. Friday, September 6th.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1261. FREDERICK WILKS and JOHN RANDALL were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 2 coats, value 5l.; and one shooting jacket, value 1l., the goods of Michael Parsons , in his dwelling house .

MICHAEL PARSONS . I am a tailor , and live in the Strand . On the morning of the 31st of August, I had on my shop counter, a great coat, a frock coat, and a shooting jacket; I had occasion to go into my parlour, which is separated from the shop by a passage; my daughter alarmed me, and I ran into the shop, and turned into Heath-cock-court, by her direction, and saw the two prisoners as close as they could stand together, having my property between them; the skirts of my coats hung down from them; I called, "stop thief," and they threw them down; I told them to stop, and Randall struck me, and I laid hold of him; Wilks ran away; Randall struggled to get away; Mellish the policeman came to my assistance, and I gave him in charge; my daughter picked up the property and took it into the shop; I delivered the great coat to Rice; I have not got the other things; I was to return them that week as they belonged to a customer; the great coat, and frock coat were worth 5l., and more. The shooting jacket was worth 1l., and more.

Cross-examined by MR. DAWSON. Q. Are you positive you saw the property in possession of the two prisoners? A. I am; it was between them; I saw the skirts of the great coat hanging down so that it touched both; I cannot say which of them threw it down; they were so close together; I saw it hang down between them; they stood as close together as could be; I never saw Wilks before; I am positive he is the man; I saw Wilks run away when I caught hold of Randall; I went to Bow-street with Randall, and while he was under examination, the magistrate sent for my daughter; and as I returned to Bow-street with my daughter I saw Wilks in Bow-street; he was not in custody then; the first time I saw Wilks after he left the court was in Bow-street; it was a few minutes more than an hour after I saw him in the court; I knew him by his face; they did not separate till Randall struck me; I ran between them in the court, and looked them in the face; when I saw Wilks in the street, I told two officers that he was Randall's companion, and then two men turned him back, and I said, "He is the man;" I did not know then that he was in custody.

MARY ANN PARSONS . I am daughter of Michael Parsons , I am fourteen years old. There is a passage between the back parlour and the shop; I was standing there on the 31st of August, and I saw Wilks come in and take the clothes off the counter; two of them had passed the door before that; that was him and Randall; Randall did not come into the shop; he was passing the door when Wilks took the clothes; after taking the clothes they joined company, and went up Heath-cock-court together, Wilks was carrying the property; Randall would have an opportunity of seeing what Wilks was doing in the shop, when he took the clothes; they joined company between the door and the court, three or four yards from the shop; I gave an alarm and my father came out.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you positive Wilks took the property? A. Yes; I never said Randall took it; Wilks had the property after leaving the shop; I saw him pass the door before, and observed him, because they looked into the shop; they stopped and looked in; I am positive Wilks is the man who entered the shop; I said so, at the office; I swear to Wilks.

JOSHUA MELLISH , (police-constable N 5). I live in the Kingsland-road. On the morning of the 31st of August, I was in the Strand; I heard an alarm of police; I came up, and Parsons had the prisoner Randall in his custody; I took him from him; I saw Wilks at Bow-street, and asked him what he came for, he said, he came to see a young man who was taken in custody from the Strand; this was about an hour afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he in custody when you first saw him? A. No, an officer was running after him when I first saw him; he was at Bow-street when I entered; he was taken in custody within a minute after.

WILLIAM RICE . I am a servant out of place, and live at No. 12, Swallow-street, Piccadilly; I received a great coat from Parsons at Bow-street; I produce it.

MICHAEL PARSONS . This is the great coat which was taken from my shop.

Wilks's Defence. The fact is the young man who was with the prisoner, came and asked me to go to Bow-street, I said, my coat was wet, he said, "You can put on my great coat if you like," which I did, and when I got to the office to ask about him, they said, I was the same person; I know nothing about it.

JOSHUA MELLISH . He had a great coat on; when I stopped him - it was a wet morning.

MICHAEL PARSONS . I lost my coat between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning; within a few minutes of eleven o'clock.

Randall's Defence. I went to Hungerford-market and bought two red herrings for my breakfast, I was passing from Heath-cock-court when Parsons came and took me into custody - I am innocent - I did not get up before half-past ten o'clock that morning.

MARY HEATLEY . Q. Do you go by the name of Bassett? A. Yes; I live at No. 43, New Peter-street - I left home on the Saturday morning, and went up to a young woman named Mary Ryan ; it was a little after nine o'clock when I passed the Abbey; I went to No. 42, Charles-street, Drury-lane - I saw Frederick Wilks standing by the window - during the time I was in the room, Wilks never left the room - a young man came up and told him Randall was taken into custody for a robbery, and asked him to be kind enough to go and see what became of him; he told him to go to Bow-street - Wilks asked him to lend him his great coat, because it rained so - I know the man who brought the message.

COURT. Q. What time will you swear you were at No. 42, Charles-street? A. From ten till about half-past eleven o'clock; I know the time, because I stood talking to a friend of mine in the Strand - the young woman in the room went to see what time it was, to let Mary Ryan know the time - I never knew the prisoners before - I only went to see the young woman - Wilks had a brown frock coat on - I did not hear he was in custody till the evening - it was a short, stout man came with the message.

Q. He took off his great coat and sent Wilks to make the inquiry, which he could make by turning round the corner himself? A. Yes.

MICHAEL PARSONS . At the time Wilks was in the court he had a brown great coat, bound with galloon - I ran between the two prisoners and saw their faces; I am positive of Wilks; I have not a doubt of him, from my knowledge of his face.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it a large Petersham he wore, did it cover his chin? A. No, the coat was loose round him, loose enough to wrap the property under it.

Wilks. The prosecutor says he had a curtain in the shop, if so it was impossible for the girl to see.

MICHAEL PARSONS . There was no curtain in the shop - as soon as I got to Bow-street I saw this young woman there weeping; she was there at the very moment Wilks was shoved into the office, and she wrung her hands; I can swear to her, I wondered why she cried.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the office very crowded when you went there? A. This was outside the office - she cried all on a sudden, and burst into tears - I noticed only her and Wilks; they were outside the office.

MARY HEATLEY . When I was at the young woman's, and Wilks went out, I was wringing wet, and never went out of the place - I was not at Bow-street crying - I was never out of the place till I went home.

MICHAEL PARSONS . I will swear she is the very person - my daughter saw her too.

Witness. I was never out of the place, till I went out to my own place.

JOSHUA MELLISH . Wilks had only one coat on; a great coat, and a waistcoat.

MARY ANN PARSONS. I saw the witness Heatley at Bow-street crying, I am quite certain she is the person.

WILKS - GUILTY. Aged 19.

RANDALL - GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-59

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1262. GEORGE HIGGS was indicted for, that he, on the 8th of August , in and upon Mary Ann Green feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, did strike, cut, and wound her in and upon her head and neck, with intent feloniously to kill and murder her .

2nd COUNT, stating it to be with intent to disable her.

3rd COUNT, stating it to be with intent to do some grievous bodily harm.

MARY ANN GREEN. I am fifteen years old; I live with my mother in Charles-street, Drury-lane. On the 8th of August last, in the evening, I was out with Bridget Welch in Leicester-square , and saw the prisoner; I knew him before; he came up to me and asked me for a penny, and because I had not one, he hit me in the eye; nothing had passed between him and me before about the penny - when he hit me in the eye, I went to hit him, and then he sparred at me, and knocked me down against a scraper, and cut my head; and when I was down, he took a knife and cut my throat - he ran away when he had done it - the lower part of my neck was cut - I went to a surgeon - he called me a name when he cut my throat, and ran away - he said nothing about what he would do with the knife - Welch went with me to the doctor.

Prisoner. She wanted to fight me at first. Witness. No, I did not; he asked me to fight at first, I did not agree to fight him; he hit me in the eye.

Prisoner. She was fighting me against a gentleman's door. Witness. No, I was not - I told the surgeon that I was hurt by the scraper about my head; I did not tell him I received the hurt in my neck from a scraper.

BRIDGET WELCH . I was with Mary Ann Green, and saw the prisoner come up to her and say, "Give me a penny" - he hit her in the mouth, and knocked her down afterwards; and then she got up again, and then he was sparring up to her, and hit her in the mouth, and knocked her down; he said, "Come up into Leicester-square, and will fight you," and I would not let her - this took place in St. Martin's-lane; she was going up, but I would not

let her, and then he came up unawares, and hit her in the eye, and knocked her down; he took her by the hip, and threw her down; her head came against the scraper - I saw him take a knife from his right hand waistcoat pocket, and stab her in the neck, and run away; and as he ran away he said, "I have done for her" - I went with her to the doctor's, and left her there, and went home to fetch her mother - the prisoner hit her first, and then she hit at him again; she did not hit him.

GEORGE EDWARD BARTHROP . I am a surgeon, and live in King-street, Covent-garden; these two girls came to me that evening; the prosecutrix's wound on her neck was about an inch and a-half in length, but the depth was very little, nothing of any consequence; it was of sufficient depth to be necessary to sew the wound up; it was across the jugular vein; if it had been deeper it would certainly have been dangerous - if it had been a quarter of an inch deeper it might have been fatal; I repeatedly asked the girl how she came by the wound, and she as often repeated that it was by falling on a scraper; and while I was sewing it up again, I asked her, and she said it was done by a spade; I said it certainly could not have been so, it must have been done by some sharp instrument, as the wound was cut; she then denied it being done with any sharp instrument - she never told me how it was done.

Prisoner's Defence. I went up Charing-cross, and heard a band, these girls came up and challenged me to fight, I said I would not fight, and one of them hit me; on going down Leicester-square, they all three pitched into me; one of them fell on a scraper; a gentleman pushed us all away from the door, and did not make any remark about her neck being hurt, only her head; next day the policeman came and took me from my own door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-60

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1263. WILLIAM STRAWS was indicted for, that he, on the 16th of July , at St. Mary-le-Bow , feloniously did forge a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows:

"£12 10s. Bankrupt Dividend Account, No. 45. Estate of Thomas Purson , and William Sammon , bankrupts. Final Dividend 3s. 9d., London, July 5th, 1832. Pay to James Ogilby , Jun., or bearer, the sum of twelve pounds, ten shillings.

George Gibson , Official Assignee.

To the cashiers of the Bank of England. Examined E. Lewis, Chief Register. N. B. This draft must be indorsed by the Payee."

with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

2nd. COUNT, for feloniously offering, uttering, disposing of, and putting off a like forged order, upon the back of which was a certain forged indorsement, which is as follows; " J. Ogilby, Jun.," with a like intent, well knowing the same order to be forged.

3rd and 4th COUNTS, like the 1st and 2nd, only stating it to be with intent to defraud George Gibson .

5th and 6th COUNTS, like the 1st and 2nd, only stating the intent to be to defraud James Ogilby , the younger.

7th and 8th COUNTS, like the 1st. and 2nd, only not setting out the forged instrument.

WILLIAM BICKLEY . I am clerk in the cash office at the Bank; there is an account kept there for the assignees of bankrupts; it is kept by drafts signed by the official assignee, and counter-signed by the register; on the 16th of July, this cheque was presented to me by a porter named Young; I looked at it, and saw the endorsement "James Ogilby," agreed with the name in front of it; I asked if his name was Ogilby, he said not; I asked if he could write his name and address on it, he said he could not write; and I gave the cheque to Mr. Palmer, one of the clerks, who sent me with the cheque to Mr. Gibson, the official assignee - I delivered the cheque to Mr. Palmer.

JURY. Q. If you had believed the signature to be genuine, would you have paid it? A. Yes.

JAMES PALMER . I am a clerk in the Bank of England; a cheque was brought to me by William Bickley, this is it; Young was produced to me as the man who had brought it; he stated that he had received it at the Elephant and Castle; I placed the cheque in the hands of the chief cashier, who went for Mr. Christmas, and gave it him in my presence.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am inspector of Bank notes; I received this cheque on the 16th of July; I saw Young; I put a mark on the cheque by which I know it; I went to the Elephant and Castle with him and Forrester, and I saw the prisoner there afterwards, Young had pointed him out to Forrester; I had left the house, and as I came in, Forrester was speaking to him.

ABRAHAM YOUNG . I am a porter; I do business at the Elephant and Castle; on the 16th of July, I was sent for there, and saw the prisoner; he gave me this cheque, and told me to take it to the Bank and get it changed for £12 10s., and I was to be back in an hour's time; I went to the Bank and presented it, it was not paid; I went back with Christmas and the officer; the prisoner was there; I told him "I have got your money sir;" putting my hands to my pocket - he said nothing to it; Forrester took him; I cannot write; I was not asked to write my name at the Bank - I am sure he is the man who gave me the cheque.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a City officer; I went on the 16th of July, to the Elephant and Castle, with Christmas and Roe; I saw the prisoner there about ten minutes after I first got there; he was pointed out to me by Young, and I asked him where he got the cheque which he gave that man, pointing to Young; he said,"I never gave him any cheque;" there was then a little confusion with the men; I said, "Don't make a disturbance, we want to trace the cheque;" the prisoner then said, "That is not my name at the back;" I did not show him the cheque, or say anything about a name at the back; I said to him, "From whom did you take it?" he said, "From Mr. Ogilby, No. 70, Guildford-street;" I said, "In payment for what;" he said, "For a debt of £10;" I asked him if he had given the difference; he said, "No;" I said, "Which Guildford-street is it, is it Guildford-street, Gray's Inn-lane?" he said, "Yes;" I asked him for his address, and he wrote it on this card; he gave me two addresses, both on cards. (read).

"W. Smidt, No. 4, over at Kensington." "Mr. Straus, No. 1, Berkley-street, Lambeth." I took him into custody.

JURY. Q. Did you not say at first he denied having a cheque at all? A. Yes; he afterwards said he received it from Ogilby; it was all in one conversation.

MR. GEORGE GIBSON. My place of business is in Basinghall-street; I am one of the official assigness of the Bankrupt Court . The prisoner was in my employ above six months as clerk - I have a book of the orders for money in my possession, for the different estates for which I am assignee - it was kept in my private room, to which the prisoner had access - about the 15th of July I was going to part with the prisoner; I had given him notice some time before, but he requested I would allow him to remain a few days - he was to leave about the 15th of July - at that time I had all the orders belonging to this estate in my possession - I have the cheque-book here; this cheque has originally been in that book - I have compared it with the margin; they correspond exactly - the name "G. Gibson" at the bottom of it, is not my hand-writing - I know of no such person as Ogilby having made this indorsement - it is not in the handwriting of Ogilby who lives in Guildford-street - I believe it to be in the hand-writing of the prisoner - the signature Gibson is very like my hand-writing; I think in some of the letters to that signature, I can trace the handwriting of the prisoner; I am inclined to think it is written by him from the character of one particular letter N - I never authorised him to sign my name to such an order as that - the orders are filled up, all but the signature of the official assignee, and indorsement, and kept in a book (cheque read).

MARY ANN MOLINEUX . I am housekeeper at Mr. Gibson's office. I know the prisoner; I recollect his being there, but I don't know the day, it was the last evening that I saw him there - I saw him in the morning; he came there before the other clerks about a quarter of an hour; I don't know which room he was in - I recollect on Saturday, the 13th, his being there with all the other clerks; he went away with them and came back again by himself, and was there about ten minutes - I heard him in Mr. Gibson's room; I am certain it was Saturday evening.

WILLIAM LAW OGILBY . I live at No. 61, Guildford-street. I am cousin of James Ogilby; he has been dead ten or eleven years - I never signed this cheque, nor ever saw it till after this occurred - it is not my hand-writing; it purports to be my cousin's signature - the cheque is dated the 5th of July, 1832 - I never lived at No. 70, Guildford-street.

ELIZABETH WRIGHT . I live at No. 70, Guildford-street - Mr. Freeman, my master, lives there - I have lived there six months; no James Ogilby lives there; there are no lodgers.

ROBERT MILLS . I am a waiter at the Elephant and Castle. I saw the prisoner at our house on the 16th of July - I am confident he is the man; he came to me to recommend him a respectable man he could place confidence in to go to the city, and bring some money back.

THOMAS CARD . On the 16th of July, I saw the prisoner at the Elephant and Castle; he asked me to go into the city to get him some money - I could not go, and recommended Young.

The prisoner in his defence stated, that he was a foreigner, and declared he had no intention to defraud the Bank, and trusted that he should have the benefit of any discrepancy in the evidence.

GEORGE GIBSON. The indorsement is not in the prisoner's usual hand-writing; it is a little concealed, and my signature is still more feigned - all my clerks have access to my private room.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330905-61

1264. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Callwell , from his person .

MARY ANN EDWARDS . I live at No. 15, Grove-street, Commercial-road. Between ten and eleven o'clock at night, on the 17th of July, I saw the prisoner in Cheapside , take the prosecutor's handkerchief out of his pocket and put it in his own breast pocket - I told the prosecutor; he followed the prisoner who was taken by the watchman- I was alone at the time.

WILLIAM CALLWELL . I live at No. 3, Crown-court, Philpot-lane. In consequence of what Mary Ann Edwards stated, I ran after the prisoner - The watchman stopped him, and took my handkerchief from his coat pocket.

JOHN LAWS . I am an officer. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I never was in any place before.

GUILTY. Aged 13. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18330905-62

1265. WILLIAM FREEMANTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 2s., the monies of David Mitchell and another, his masters .

DAVID MITCHELL . I am a woollen-draper , and live in Cloth Fair . The prisoner was in my employ - I have a partner; on the night of the 16th of August, I marked a quantity of silver money, and placed it in a till in the shop - I had sent the prisoner home previously; he returned about seven o'clock the next morning, and I afterwards saw him go round to the side where there was a till, and heard the till drawn out - I ran down the stairs and charged him with having robbed me; he at first denied it; I said I was certain of it - I asked him what he had done with all the money he had taken from us at different times; he said he had spent it - I went to the till to see what was missing, and then he pulled 2s. out of his pocket, laid them on the counter, and said that was all - I examined them, and found my mark on them which I had put on the night before; the till had not been locked - the prisoner made no application to me; the marks are under the head, it is a figure of 7 - I had marked some money on the night of the 15th; I had marked money two nights, but I can distinguish the marks, because what we marked on the night of the 16th was a different mark - I made the figure 6 before that- he had not been in the shop five minutes when I charged him with this.

JURY. Q. Are you in the habit of keeping your till unlocked? A. Yes.

HENRY DAVIS . I am an officer. I came in and took the 2s. off the counter; the prisoner said he was very sorry for taking the money out; he was crying - there was 18s. in the till, marked No. 7.

JURY. Q. Did you hear him deny it at first? A. He never denied having it - I was sent for by Mr. Mitchell after it occurred - this happened after he was given into my custody - I was fetched from my house which is about fifty yards off.

William Thacker , of Coleman-street; James Slack , 29, St. John-street; Thomas Freemantle (the prisoner's uncle), and Henry Cross , 23, St. John-street, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 14. - Confined Seven days .

Recommended to Mercy on account of the till being left open .

Reference Number: t18330905-63

1266. JOHN BURGIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 4s. 6d., the goods of Hannah Greenwood , and that he had been before convicted of felony .

MARY TREADWELL . I am in the employ of Hannah Greenwood , of Fore-street, Cripplegate . On the 19th of July, in the morning, I was near the door, and heard a noise at the window - I turned round and saw three boy s; the prisoner was the middle one - a small hole had been made in the window a few days before; the prisoner was pulling a handkerchief through that hole - all the parts of the handkerchief had been removed half a yard from its original place - I laid hold of him; he got from me, and got into the middle of the road - I there seized him again.

PHILIP SLATER . I live in Milton-street, and am a labourer. I heard a cry of "Stop thief;" I ran after the prisoner and stopped him - he begged me to let him go: I said no - he said, "Let me go, for God's sake, I will give you a sovereign" - I took him back to the shop.

Prisoner. I did not say a word about a sovereign. Witness. He said he would give me one - he had no money.

WILLIAM BARNET . I am one of the city police. I took him into custody, and produce the handkerchief - I found on him another handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES GODFREY . I am an officer. I was present on the 5th of July, 1832, when the prisoner was tried and convicted; he is the person described in this certificate which I got from Mr. Clark's office (read).

GUILTY *. Aged 13. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-64

1267. RALPH BENJAMIN was indicted for feloniously receiving, of a certain evil-disposed person, 1224 yards of ribbon, value 39l., the goods of Thomas Dodd , which had then been lately before stolen, he knowing them to have been stolen .

2ND COUNT stating them to be the goods of Thomas Bullock .

THOMAS BULLOCK. I am agent to Thomas Dodd, ribbon-manufacturer . of Coventry; my warehouse is No. 3, Huggin-lane, City. On Friday morning, the 16th of August, in consequence of information, I went to my warehouse, and observed the lock was partly off the door, the iron bar was off, and the padlock broken off - I missed a lot of figured lustring ribbons, and some figured satins; my desk was broken open, and I missed from it a cashbox, containing a bill of exchange, a 10l. note, a 5l. note, some sovereigns, and some silver - in consequence of information I went to Spooner's, in Chiswell-street; I saw some ribbons, and went in consequence of information to Lower White-cross-street; I saw some lustring and satin ribbons, about one-third of the quantity I lost.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long had the ribbons been in your possession? A. They were purchased about the 23rd of May, and some on the 1st of June, and I believe some since; there are various patterns - we have sold some of the patterns, and very likely we have sold some of each pattern: I cannot swear we have not - they were spindled on a small paper, not blocked, when taken from my warehouse; but when I found them at Lander's they were blocked, and some of the ends changed - I never saw Lander before; I had information first from the dresser, and went to Spooner's, who gave me information where he got them, and then I went to Lander's - I know nothing of the prisoner, except what was stated by Lander.

COURT. Q. Was the quantity you found at Lander's and the other place greater than the quantity you had sold or less? A. We had sold a much larger quantity; there are so many patterns mixed together; I usually average the price of different manufacturers' goods and put all together at one price - I never sold a quantity of so many different patterns to one individual - at different times I dare say we had sold more of the same patterns.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You had the ribbons from Dodd? A. Yes; he is not the original manufacturer of them; there are three or four manufacturers - the lot was in my warehouse when I left the premises; they were a little out of condition - I could pick out this lot of goods from others made by the same manufacturer, because they were out of condition; they were lying on the counter; other people might have goods lying on the counter, and out of condition - as a lot I could pick them out, so as to be certain they were mine and nobody else's - it is possible others might be injured in the same way.

COURT. Q. Did you find as much as you had lost? A. About half; I had lost sixty-eight pieces; I found the same mixture of goods as I lost, with the same marks of damage, and some of each sort, and in the same state and condition, except that some had been put on blocks, and some spindled, but the ends altered - I believe them to be part of the property; I lost the same mixture and assortment.

JURY. Q. Do you sell ribbons dressed or undressed? A. Satins must be dressed, but lustrings we do not dress; Mr. Spooner sent them to the dresser; I intended to have the satins dressed after they were sold; these were undressed when stolen.

COURT. Q. When did you lose them? A. On the 15th of August, and found them on the Thursday following, the 23rd, some of them had been dressed in the intermediate time.

GEORGE THOMAS EDWARDS. On Thursday evening, the 15th of July, I was in the warehouse, and left it about half-past seven o'clock; it was secured by a lock and a bar across the door, and fastened by a padlock; I found it

broken the following day - these very goods were on the premises that evening; I know them to be the same; I can identify them positively; we have had them too long on the counter not to know them; I believe if there were a thousand pieces of the same patterns I could pick them out; they have been constantly under my eye, and they are the make of several different manufacturers, and we, after taking stock, mixed the several manufacturers' goods together, and these are the same assortment of goods as we had made.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a partner? A. No, he has no partner; it is Thomas Dodd's warehouse; the goods were his, and in his warehouse - Bullock is only the agent; he is not answerable for them; they are consigned to him for sale without his being responsible - I know Mr. Dodd has no partner; they are all Dodd's goods.

THOMAS MARSHALL . I live with Mr. Spooner, at No. 85, Chiswell-street. I bought five half-pieces of satin figured lustring ribbon of Lander - Bullock afterwards claimed them.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How much did you give him for them? A. 17s.; I had seen him several times before; he is a linen-draper and dealt in ribbons - I have seen some goods as good as those at 19s. 6d. a piece, at wholesale houses in the city; I gave 17s. - I will not swear these are not worth 29s.; I should not like to give that for them - I should think Lander was a judge of these articles.

WILLIAM MAY LANDER . I live at 149, Upper Whitecross-street. The prisoner came to my house in the afternoon of the 20th of August, and said he wished to speak to me - my young man called me down to him; and he said he had some goods, would I step home and look at them - I had bought of him before in that manner - I went down in the evening; he keeps a clothes-shop, in Golden-lane; he took some papers off his shelves, and produced some ribbons; I said, "It is too late in the season for them;" he said, we could not get jobs unless the season was gone by; he named the price at 18s. a piece - I said, "Where did you get them?" he said,"I bought them of a very respectable man" - I offered him 16s. a piece, and he said I should have them - I bought thirty-four pieces - I paid him 27l. 4s. in gold and silver; they were not worth more - in the proper season some would not be worth more, and others would; some patterns would not sell at all - some of them were worth considerably more - they were not worth 18s. - I conceive I gave a fair price.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What are you? A. A haberdasher; I have lived in Upper Whitecross-street three years and a half. I have dealt with the prisoner for the last six months, occasionally, three or four times, for different sort of things, in our way - I have bought ribbon and haberdashery; I bought some trimmings of him, about a month ago; and some ribbons, about six weeks ago; that was not so large a parcel as these - I have bought goods three or four times, or six- I did not take an invoice of the goods I bought - I marked it down myself on a piece of paper which came from the ribbons - I have not got that paper - that is the way I deal, I take no invoice when I pay money - I have dealt with many people buying goods, and not had an invoice - I knew him to be a very respectable man - I was in trouble about this, on the following Thursday, which was two days after - I told our young men in the shop who I bought them of when I brought them home; there was a gentleman in the house when I was called down to the prisoner - I have two shopmen, one is here; there was nothing in the goods to make me think them improperly come by - it is very general to buy different patterns at so much a piece, altogether - nobody but Mrs. Benjamin was present when I bought them - I did not know what I was going to look at, when I went to his house - I went home for the money and then came back with it - I brought the goods from his house myself in a paper parcel.

JURY. Q. Is it customary to buy goods and not take an acknowledgment or discharge from the party? A. I believe it is quite general; if I go to a house and see a lot of goods; I bring them away - it is generally the case with job lots.

HENRY BUCKLAND . I am shopman to Mr. Lander. I recollect the prisoner coming to my master's shop on Tuesday - he asked if Mr. Lander was at home, I said,"Yes," and went for him; when he came down stairs he said he had something to sell him - Lander said, he would come down in the evening, he went and returned with a quantity of ribbons.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear all that passed? A. No; I heard the prisoner say, he had something to sell him, in the shop - my master went out, and when he came home next he had the ribbons with him - I saw him return and he had the ribbons - I was at home all the afternoon; he was gone about half an hour; he lives about half a mile from the prisoner's house - it would take him half an hour to go there, to examine the goods, and bring them to the house - I cannot say whether you can go twice in half an hour - I don't know whether he was half an hour or three quarters - I should think it would take him the time he was gone - I was in the shop- there is a private door; my master goes in at that door very seldom - I was in the shop all the time - I don't know whether I was or not - I might have been out part of the time; except going out for a necessary purpose I was in the shop - I might have gone out into the yard, and if I did, I was not out three minutes - I never saw master return till he came back with the ribbons.

JOHN ROE . I am an officer. I produce the goods - I got one parcel of twenty-four pieces, from Spooner; and another parcel of forty-five pieces, from Lander - I searched the prisoner's premises, but found no ribbons, nothing but clothes.

Cross-examined. Q. When you searched the premises was he at home? A. He was; he certainly told me I might search his house all over - I found nothing of a suspicious nature - I found no silk goods at all there.

THOMAS BULLOCK . These are the goods I lost, I am certain of it.

Prisoner. I am totally innocent. I never dealt in such articles - I have been eighteen years in the clothes line and know nothing at all about them; I never had a thing of the kind.

THOMAS BULLOCK. re-examined. I know them from the

appearance and the condition they are in - I am confident of all the patterns.

JURY. Q. Might not you find these patterns at Leaf's, or Morrison's? A. I think not; not mixed up as these are - it is usual to keep goods separate, not to mix four or five manufacturers' goods, of different prices, together, as these are - I put them together and averaged them in stock, at 23s. a piece - some have been dressed since they were stolen - the trade never send them out till they are dressed.

JURY to WILLIAM MAY LANDER . Q. You said you bought thirty-four pieces of ribbon of the prisoner? A. Yes; the officer had the whole I had left.

JOHN ROE . There are forty-five rolls; but I understand they are half-pieces, which has caused the mistake.

WILLIAM MAY LANDER. I have had the same sort of goods offered me before; precisely the same patterns.

JURY. Q. Did anybody see the prisoner in the shop besides a young man? A. Yes; both my young men.

COURT. Q. When you bought them of the prisoner was anybody present at his own place? A. Only his wife; he sold them to me in the shop - I think there was a young man at the door when I went in; they were sold in the front shop.

JURY to JOHN ROE. Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner at the time you apprehended him? A. I took Lander to the prisoner's shop, and asked him who he had bought the ribbons of, he pointed to the prisoner - the prisoner said, he had never sold him such things, he never dealt in such things, he always denied it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-65

NEW COURT. Friday, September 6, 1833.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1266. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 1 cheese, value 2l. 5s. , the goods of William Redgrave .

JOHN BARRICK . I am a shoemaker, and live in Wilsted-street, Somers-town. On the 15th of July, I was in my shop, and saw the prisoner pass about half-past twelve o'clock; he was carrying a cheese which I suspected he had stolen - I went into Mr. Redgrave's shop, who lives at No. 6, in the same street, and in consequence of what he said, I went and caught the prisoner - I told him he must come back and give an account where he got the cheese; he gave no answer, but came back, and I gave him to the officer.

WILLIAM REDGRAVE . I live at No. 6, Wilsted-street . This cheese is mine; I had been turning it five minutes before - I know it by several marks; it is worth 44s. or 45s.

SAMUEL EVANS . I am inspector of police. I took the prisoner, and have had this cheese ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Wilsted-street, and a respectable man asked me to carry the cheese to No. 15, Swinton-street, Gray's-inn-lane, and he would give me 1s.; I carried it a short distance and was taken.

GUILTY. Aged 19. - Confined Three Weeks .

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18330905-66

1269. ROSE COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 1 coat, value 28s. , the goods of William Dew .

WILLIAM DEW . I live at No. 36, Steven-street, Lisson-grove . My wife knew the prisoner, and gave her leave to sleep in our room; she came on the 30th of June, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening; the next morning she went away; and when she was gone I missed my coat and handkerchief - I had worn the coat the day before, and hung it on the bedstead; it was worth 28s.; and the handkerchief was worth 2s. - no one had been in the room but the prisoner - she went out for a bundle of wood; she staid a long while; I then missed the articles and went to some pawnbrokers- I did not see the prisoner again till the 15th of August, when I met her in the street; I asked what she had done with my coat; she said she had pawned it, and I went and found it.

ISAAC PLATTS . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this coat from a woman; I cannot say who.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). Gentlemen, I have known Mary Dew , the young woman now living with William Dew , for some time; I went to stay with her for a few days on the 28th of June, and remained with her Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, during which time a quarrel ensued concerning my being there, and he struck her on the head with a shoe-brush, and I was obliged to go for a doctor: William Dew then told me that I should remain there no longer, and I left them at eight o'clock on Monday morning, the 1st of July; they were in bed at the time, and awake: and I saw nothing of either party until the 16th of July; when Mary Dew told me that she was going to live with another man, as Bill was gone to Clerkenwell prison. They have both been to Clerkenwell before, charged with stealing a hat. I am indebted to them about 6s. I saw him several times after he came out of prison; and his only reason for sending me to prison, was to satisfy his cruel revenge. I know nothing of the property, and am innocent of what I am accused of.

WILLIAM DEW re-examined. Q. Were you ever in prison? A. I was sent down for bail for being tipsy - the prisoner had not been at my house till the 30th of June - I am not married; I have lived six or seven years with a woman - I am twenty-three years old - I am a waiter; I don't get any settled salary - I am sometimes employed at the Eyre Arms Tavern - I cannot tell when I was there last - I did not see the prisoner take the coat, but she took the handkerchief round her neck.

ISAAC PLATTS . When the prosecutor came to our house, he said he had been drinking with this girl and some others, on the Sunday.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-67

1270. HENRY COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 2 purses, value 5s. 6d.; 4 half-

crowns, and 8 shillings, the monies of Eliza Talbott , from her person .

ELIZA TALBOTT. I am single . I was walking along Whitechapel, on the 23rd of January, and when I got to the corner of Goulston-street , I was prevented from crossing by six or seven men, one of whom was the prisoner - (two of the persons have been tried and found guilty) - I have no doubt the prisoner was one of the persons - every time I attempted to cross, I was pushed back beyond the curb - one of the former prisoners, who was named Gandy, said, "Ladies, move on, you are a long time passing;" there was then an opening made, and I passed on - somebody then cried out, "Somebody has been robbed, stop thief!" I then looked at this bag which I had in my hand, and I found it had been cut open and two purses taken out; there were four half-crowns, and eight shillings in one purse, and some silver in the other - I have never seen the purses or money since; I am sure the prisoner was one of the persons.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What time was it? A. Twelve o'clock in the day, as near as possible; I was not much flurried; I never saw the prisoner again, till he was at the Police-office on the 6th of August; I can swear he was one of them - the transaction might last three or four minutes - I have sworn to two other persons before - a lady was with me but she is not here now - I had had both the purses in my possession the whole day - I have never said I should not have known the prisoner if I had seen him - I swear I did not say I should not have known him if I had not seen him with a policeman - I swear he was one of them.

CHARLES BAKER . I was at the warehouse of my employer on the day stated - I ran out and took another man into custody - the prisoner came running up the street; he struck me three times on the side of the head, and tried to rescue the other man - I can swear the prisoner is the person - he said, "B - r your eyes, let him go, or I will knock your head off;" I then saw Gandy pass the purses to Atkins.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen the prisoner between January and August last? A. Yes; once or twice, but I had a parcel of butter on my head, and he was along with several others - there were other people about but no policeman - the prisoner knew me, and he got out of my sight before I could get my butter down - I give evidence at the trial of Atkins - I did not say that he knocked me down, but he struck me and so did the prisoner.

COURT. Q. Are you correct in swearing that the prisoner struck you? A. Yes - he picked up Gandy's hat and struck me.

WILLIAM SAVAGE (police-constable H 50). I was in Whitechapel on the day stated; I saw the prisoner and five others at a quarter before twelve o'clock - I knew the prisoner perfectly well, and so I did Gandy and Atkins - they were all going towards the city - I believe they saw me - I saw the prisoner and Atkins about three days after- the prisoner ran off, and we took Atkins; I have a letter which the prosecutrix has received.

JAMES JOHN CONNERLY . I am a police-constable. I was with Savage on the third day after the 23rd of January, when we took Atkins, the prisoner was with him, but he ran away - I saw the prisoner again in a public-house in White chapel on the 3rd or 4th of August; when I entered into the tap-room he was sitting on the table; I said to him,"Harry, how are you," he asked, if I would have anything to drink, I said I did not drink so soon in the morning - I then tapped him on the shoulder, and said, I wanted him, he said, "For what?" I said, "for Billy odd legs and Nick Gandy ;" he said, if I would let him go he would give me a sovereign; I said, I did not do business in that way - I then got him outside the door- I took him by the cuff of his left sleeve - we came a little distance, he then gave a sudden jerk, got from me and ran a few steps across the road; I ran and caught the tail of his coat; I then took him by the other sleeve, as he had torn the sleeve I had hold of, in getting from me - I then got him some distance further, when he threw me down, and had a great struggle with me, but I secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent, and wish that letter read, which I sent to the prosecutrix (letter read).

"Madam - I feel great regret that you should have been so much deceived in the identity, of the persons who were concerned in robbing of you; I assure you most solemnly, I had no connection, neither did I know any of them. I beg you to consider ere it is too late, the great responsibility that devolves on you - time may bring to light those who were concerned in it, which will prove me to be entirely innocent; consider what then will be your feelings, when you reflect, you have been the means of depriving an innocent person of his liberty for ever - I have a beloved father who is sinking fast into the grave, could you wish to deprive him of his sole stay and support? as I am confident the loss of me would soon finish his days, besides it would plunge a family who have hitherto been without stain or blemish in their character, into the deepest distress and anguish of mind - sisters who are looking up to me for that protection which females always require - indeed you cannot picture to yourself the misery and distress you may cause. I beg and entreat you to consider if you may not be mistaken, many resemble one another, and it is difficult then to identify a person on only seeing him once, especially in the state of mind you were labouring under at that moment - I solemnly assert my innocence before the Almighty God, and as you value your peace of mind in this world, and the salvation of your soul in the next, to pause seriously, on the consequence of falsely swearing away the dearest blessing of man - his liberty, especially situated as I am at the present moment - leaving it to your consideration. - HENRY COLE ."

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330905-68

1271. JAMES SMITH , JAMES STRACEY , and HENRY STRACEY were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 1 carpet bag, value 10s.; 2 coats, value 8l.; 3 waistcoats, value 2l.; 2 pairs' of trousers, value 3l.; 2 shirts, value 10s.; 4 pairs' of stockings, value 10s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; and three handkerchiefs, value 8s. , the goods of Anthony Browne Story .

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

ANTHONY BROWNE STORY . I am studying as a conveyancer , and live in Lincoln's-inn-fields. On the 27th of July, I packed up the articles stated in the indictment in a carpet bag, and gave them to George Courcell , to take to the Greyhound in Smithfield; there was a plate on the bag with my name on it - the articles never reached the place I sent them to - I have seen the property at the office.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What time of day was it - A. I think a little before twelve o'clock; I think it wanted ten minutes to twelve.

GEORGE COURCELL . I am turned twelve years of age, I know the nature of an oath, - in July last, I was errand boy at the prosecutor's chambers. On the 27th of July, he gave me a carpet bag, to take to the Greyhound - as I was going through Lincoln's-inn-fields - I saw the prisoner Smith, - he asked me if I knew any body who wanted an errand boy - I told him "No," he then asked me where I lived, I said, "At No. 58, Lincoln's-inn-fields;" he asked me what my mistress' name was; I told him"Cooper," she is the housekeeper of the house; he walked on with me till we came opposite Fulwood's-rents, in Holborn; he then asked me where I was going, and I told him to the Greyhound in Smithfield - I told him that my mistress wanted a servant of all work - he then bade me good day, and crossed over - I went on till I got to King's Head-court , and then the prisoner James Stracey came up to me, and gave me a note which was wafered, directed to Mrs. Cooper, - he told me he had come from Mr. Story at the Greyhound in Smithfield, and I was to go back to my mistress, and fetch the things which were named in that note, and he was to take the carpet bag on to Smithfield - I gave him the carpet bag, and took the note back to my mistress - I asked him how he came to know that I was the person - he said, he was told it was a little boy with a carpet bag; when I took the note to Mrs. Cooper, she sent me back to the Greyhound, but I did not find Mr. Story there - about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour had elapsed from the time I saw Smith till I saw James Stracey - I had sat down a minute.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not delay longer than that? A. No, I went straight on my errand - it was not more than a quarter of an hour after my master gave me the bag that I gave it to Stracey - it was before half-past twelve o'clock.

COURT. Q. How do you know it was before half-past twelve o'clock? A. It was about a quarter before twelve o'clock when I started; I did not look at any clock, I guessed at the time - I don't know what time the coach was to have started - I am quite sure the two men I have spoken of were Smith and James Stracey - I have no doubt of them whatever.

THOMAS TIPPER (police-constable F 152). On the 27th of July, I was on duty in Holborn and the Strand. I met the three prisoners in Fleet-street, about two o'clock, as I was returning from Clerkenwell prison; my brother officer Brooks was with me - Smith had a bundle under his arm; I suspected them and followed them to Holywell-lane, Shoreditch - they were in conversation at times - Smith there gave the bundle to James Stracey , and he crossed Shoreditch, went up Swan-street, and into Anchor-street, where he went into a house, but just before he went in, he looked back - when he went into the house, we went and stood against the door; I saw him go towards the back parlour, but instantly return out again - we stopped him at the door; he had no bundle then - we asked him what the bundle had contained - he said he did not know; that it was given him by a man named Smith to leave there - we took him back into the back room, and found the bundle there and I asked the people of the house if they knew him; they said no - I then asked James Stracey if he knew them; he said no, but he had orders to leave the bundle there - I then opened it, and saw it contained gentlemen's wearing apparel; we brought him out, and about twenty yards off, we met the other two prisoners going towards the house where he had been; when they came up I secured Henry Straccy, and my brother officer took Smith - I instantly asked Henry Stracey if he knew James Stracey ; he said he did not - we then took them to the station-house - I found on Smith this plate of a carpet-bag, with Mr. Story's name on it - this is the bag; it contains the coats, waistcoats, and other articles.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not an undertaker's house? A. Yes; I was close to the shop when James Stracey went in - the door stood open; I saw him go through into the back room, and come out immediately; I did not see him give the bundle to a girl.

CHARLES BROOKS. I was with Tipper - what he has stated is correct - I found these spectacles and a pair of slippers in James Stracey 's pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH* - GUILTY . Aged 40.

JAMES STRACEY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

HENRY STRACEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-69

1272. CHARLES DYSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 1 pair of trousers, value 7s.; 1 counterpane, value 1s. 6d.; 1 frock, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 6d., and 1 bundle of patch work, value 2s. , the goods of Martin Mehrtens .

ELIZA MEHRTENS . I am the wife of Martin Mehrtens - he lives at No. 75, Church-street, Mile-end New-town - on the 13th of July, about a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening, I took some work home next door but one - I locked my door when I went out; I had left a counterpane on my bed, and a frock, a petticoat, and a bundle of patchwork in my drawer; I returned in twenty minutes - my room door stood open, and the drawers were not quite shut - the door had been unlocked, not broken open - this is part of the patch work that I lost - I can swear to it; the whole of it was worth 2s.

SARAH HULSE . I live about twelve doors from the prosecutor's. On the 13th of July, about a quarter after seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come by with some things under his arm; I had not known him before, but I am sure he is the man - he had two bundles under his arm, and a red merino frock - he went towards Waterloo-town.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me with two bundles? A. Yes, I am positive I did; you came past me on the same side of the way, and was not more than a quarter of a yard from me.

MARY ELIZABETH BRANSCOMB . I was talking to Sarah Hulse on the 13th of July; the prisoner passed us with two bundles and a red merino frock - I knew him before by his passing our door to go to work.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me come out of the house? A. No; only going by with two bundles, one was a quilt, and you had a bundle of patch work under your arm; I don't know what it was in, but it was tied up, and I saw some pieces of it hanging out.

WILLIAM CLAY (police-constable K 278). In consequence of what I heard, I went to the prisoner's house in Wellington-street, Waterloo-town - I knocked, and the prisoner and his wife were at home; the prisoner opened the door - I asked him if Mr. Dyson was at home; he said no - I asked if he knew when he would be in; he said no - I asked what part of the house he occupied; he said the back parlour - I said I would call again that day, which I did, but he was not at home - I went the next day at two o'clock; his wife came to the door - I asked if Mr. Dyson was at home; she said no - I said"That was your husband who spoke to me yesterday" - she said, "Yes, I know it was; I am lawfully married to him" - I then went into a room with her; a knock came at the door - I opened it, and the prisoner came in - I said, "I want you;" he said, "Let me go to bed; I have just been fighting" - I said, I could not; but he washed himself, and put on a clean shirt, and I took him - I afterwards went with the prosecutor to his house - we searched a box but found nothing - his wife then turned down the bed clothes till she came to the bed, and said, "You see there is nothing there;" I then turned the bed over myself, and found this bit of chintz trimming, which the prosecutrix said she could swear to - we then looked further, and found this patch work, which he also claimed.

Prisoner's Defence. If my trial had come on yesterday, I should have had friends who could have proved that I bought this property and paid for it in Petticoat-lane - I am a silk-dyer and dresser by trade; I buy old things and make them look like new.

GUILTY - Aged 28. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-70

1273. HENRY HARROLD was indicted for embezzlement .

RICHARD PARKHOUSE . I keep an eating-house . The prisoner was in my service, he served the customers, and received the money; I gave him credit for the articles, and he was answerable to me for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-71

1274. WILLIAM KEMP was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 1 coat, value 12s. , the goods of Henry Jeffs .

HENRY JEFFS . I lived at the Apple-tree and Mitre. On the 12th of August, I went into the skittle-ground, and pulled off my coat to play at skittles; I laid my coat on the seat - I saw the prisoner come into the ground, and soon after I missed him and my coat; I pursued, and took him in Covent-garden, with my coat on his back, in about an hour - I gave him into custody - my coat is worth 7s.

Prisoner. I was not in the skittle-ground at all, I was in the tap-room the whole of the evening. Witness. Yes, you was in the ground.

FRANCIS KNIGHT . I was in the skittle-ground at the time the prisoner came there; I saw him take the coat and go out, and in a few minutes the prosecutor missed it- I pursued. and took him with the coat on.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sitting in the house the whole evening, I left it about ten o'clock, and saw a man coming from the house, who dropped the coat; I took it, and put it on.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330905-72

1275. SUSANNAH LEE and CHARLOTTE LEE were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 1 pair of salts, value 1s.; 1 counterpane, value 3s.; 2 pillows, value 4s.; 1 blanket, value 2s.; 1 tea-pot, value 1s. 6d.; 1 painting, value 3s.; 4 shells, value 1s.; 1 bolster, value 4s.; 1 table cover, value 2s.; 1 coal scuttle, value 4s.; 4 drinking glasses, value 3s.; 2 bottle stands, value 9d.; 1 carpet, value 14s.; 1 candlestick, value 6d.; 50 books, value 2l. 10s.; 1 glass jug, value 4s.; and 3 decanters, value 10s. , the goods of Jane Bull .

JANE BULL . I am a widow , and live in Took's-court, Castle-street, Holborn . I know the prisoners, they came to my house to lodge; Susannah Lee took an apartment at ten shillings a week - all the articles in the indictment were in the room, and were let to them - I think they came on the 22nd of May, and they left on the 2nd of August; Susannah Lee had said she would leave me if I was not satisfied with the way in which she paid, but I did not know she was going - on the 2nd of August she left the room locked, and took away the key; as they did not return at night, I went into the room the next morning, and missed all the articles stated - on the Saturday week following I heard of the prisoners, and went to the Colonade, Russel-square, where they were both lodging; the younger prisoner is her daughter - the officer found the duplicates of the property in their lodging, and by means of them we found the articles; these are my property.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Are you not aware that these persons had been pawning articles before? A. I was not aware of it at the time, I have since heard they pawned them through distress; I never saw them take them - I began to suspect it a week before they left.

THOMAS TIPPER (police-constable F 152). I took the prisoners - I found about two hundred duplicates, about sixty of them belong to this property.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prosecutrix say she would prosecute them for illegally pawning? A. Yes, she did afterwards; I said it was a felony, but I don't know whether I said that before or after.

ARTHUR STAINS . I am a pawnbroker in the service of Mr. Brown of Fetter-lane. I have a blanket, two tumblers, four shells, and one bolster, pawned at different times, from the 25th of May to the 7th of June, by a female, but I cannot say who - I recollect seeing both the prisoners.

WILLIAM NEWTON . I am an apprentice to Mr. Walker, a pawnbroker in Holborn. I have two books, pawned on the 22nd of July, for 2s., by Charlotte Lee; I had not seen her before, but I took particular notice of her.

WILLIAM SAMPSON HAYES . I am a pawnbroker I have two books, pawned on the 27th of July; I don't know by whom.

JAMES PERKINS . I am shopman to Mr. Cottle, a pawn

broker in Shoe-lane. I have a painting, pawned by Susannah Lee ; and a book, pawned by Charlotte Lee .

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known any thing of the prisoners before? A. Yes, I had seen them on different occasions before.

JANE BULL. These are my property.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any mark on this book? A. No, but I have had it some years in my possession; there may be others like it, but I can swear to it, though I have no mark on it; these other books I can swear to, but I have no mark on them - there may be others like them, but I could distinguish them, and can swear to them.

COURT. Q. Have you had them some time? A. Yes, and to the best of my belief they are mine.

JOHN LEPHARD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Flemming, a pawnbroker. I have a pair of bottle stands, a pair of salts, two decanters, and some other articles - the bottle stands were pawned by Charlotte Lee for 9d.

Prisoner's Defence. We were in great distress.

Mary Allen , of White-row; and W. Ladd, a boot-maker, gave the prisoners a good character; and a gentleman in Court engaged to take Charlotte Lee into his service.

SUSANNAH LEE - GUILTY. Aged 48.

CHARLOTTE LEE - GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutrix.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18330905-73

1276. ALEXANDER CAMPBELL was indicted for embezzlement .

MICHAEL MELHAUSEN . I live with Mr. Joseph Rothschild in the Quadrant, Regent-street . The prisoner was in the habit of bringing bread and flour to the house - on the 24th of July he brought this bill of 13s. 111/4d. from Mr. Glen his master, and I paid it him - on the 5th of August he brought this other bill of 8s. 101/2d. which I paid him - he wrote the receipts on them in my presence.

ADAM GLEN . The prisoner lived with me, and was authorized to receive money on my account; he was to settle with me daily - he never paid me either of these bills.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. When did you settle with him? A. He generally settled about eleven or twelve o'clock every morning, when he came home; I had no running account with him - I have my day-book and ledger here, in which I entered my accounts; it is from these books I speak of this - I can swear positively that I have never received these monies.

Prisoner's Defence. I had got all the money but a few shillings, which a friend promised to lend me, and while I was looking for him I was taken.

Francis Clark and Edward Metcalf gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 23 - Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-74

1277. THOMAS PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 13 pieces of fir timber, value 18s. ; the property of John Knapp and Henry Knapp ; and DAVID CADWELL was indicted for feloniously receiving the same .

RICHARD PUNCH . I am in the employ of Messrs. Knapp, they have a wharf called Cirencester wharf , where they keep timber and stone - Palmer is occasionally employed as a carter , and was so on the 15th of August; he came to the wharf about seven o'clock that evening, and told me he wanted some pieces of timber for shoring a house, No. 7, Mary-le-Bow-lane; I supposed it was a job of Mr. Knapp's; I looked out four pieces for him, and he took them and some more away; he put them into the cart and drove off with them - when I went home, I saw the cart and timber standing at a door, Cadwell came out and Palmer was in the cart - Cadwell went to the tail of the cart, and I saw the wood going into the house; Palmer took it out of the cart, and Cadwell took it into the house - I then acquainted our foreman with it, and showed him where it had been taken.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. The cart stopped at Cadwell's? A. Yes, and the wood was carried into the house.

CHARLES GAUNTLETT . I am foreman to the prosecutor's; I went to Cadwell's, and asked him, if he had been buying any wood; he said, he had, and he showed it me - I told him it was stolen, and went and acquainted my master; there were thirteen pieces altogether - Mr. Knapp told Palmer that he understood he had been robbing him; he declared he had not, and he knew nothing about it - Cadwell said he bought it of a man with a cart; I knew it to be Mr. Knapp's - I never sold it to Palmer nor authorized him to take it - if it had been sold I must have known it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Cadwell make the slightest hesitation in showing it to you? A. No, he said he had bought it, and when Palmer was taken, he said he believed him to be the man; Cadwell went voluntarily before the magistrate, and was admitted to bail.

HENRY KNAPP . I am a builder , in partnership with my brother John Knapp - I went to Cadwell's; when the foreman came he showed me some wood in the shop, and some in a room up stairs - Palmer denied having stolen it.

PATRICK QUIGLEY (police-constable S 58). I took the two prisoners, and these thirteen pieces of wood; Cadwell said his wife bought part of them, and they had come at two separate times - that Palmer had brought some in the morning, and some in the evening - he said his wife gave 1s. for that in the morning, and he gave 1s. 3d. for the other; he said he was not aware but he had given a fair price for it - I thought well of him; he has been two or three months in the business.

MR. KNAPP. This is my property; it is worth about 18s.; it is not possible for a man who had been in our business to make so great a mistake about the value.

Cadwell's Defence. I bought them for fire wood.

PALMER - GUILTY - Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor - Confined One Month .

CADWELL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-75

1278. MARY WEBSTER was indicted was stealing, on the 6th of August , 2 pair of gloves, value 3s. 9d. ; the goods of George Arnold .

DAVID PRICE GARTON . I live in Titchfield-street. The prisoner came to my house on the 6th of August; she wished to look at some drapery goods, which were to be

sent to Lady Duncannon's, in Cavendish-square - she desired me to be very punctual to the time; she told me to bring them, and said, she should like a little gin and water, which she had - she then saw some shoes which hung up in the shop; she looked at them, and asked me, if I would allow her to take some with her, and when I went in the evening she would return them - when she went away, I followed her, she went to Mr. Jordon's shop, and came out and went on to Mr. Arnold's; she staid there some time, and when she came out, I stopped her, and begged her to walk back with me; she said, she was very sorry, and wished me to let her go - I went to Mr. Arnold's and asked if he knew her; he said, yes, that she had given a large order to be sent to Lady Duncannon's; she then gave up to Mr. Arnold, a pair of gloves - I then took her to Mr. Jordon's, and there I took from her a pair of snuffers.

GEORGE ARNOLD . I am a glove manufacturer , and live in Berner-street . The prisoner came to my shop on the 6th of August, and said she came from Lady Duncannon for some gloves; she wanted some long white kid and some short ones, and some of three different sizes for some children of seven, eleven, and thirteen years of age - she then asked me to show her a pair for herself; she tried them on, and asked me to allow her to take them, and they were to be paid for when the others went home - when Mr. Garton brought her back, he found on her this other pair, not the pair she chose for herself; it is one of the pairs she pointed out as the proper size for the children.

Prisoner. When I went to his house, the goods I had in my hand were loose, and he asked me to let him tie them up, and the gloves were tied inside the shoes. Witness. She had two pair of shoes and some other things, all scattered about; I asked if she would allow me to put them into paper for her - it appears to me that these gloves must have been put into the shoes, but I did not put them there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-76

1279. MARY WEBSTER was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , 1 pair of snuffers, value 2s. 3d. , the goods of John Jordon .

WILLIAM JORDON . I am the son of John Jordan ; he lives in Well-street . On the 6th of August the prisoner came and wanted to look at a lot of articles; she looked at four pairs of snuffers, some tea-pots, and other things; she bought nothing but left the shop; I then missed a pair of snuffers - she was afterwards brought back and the pair of snuffers was found on her; it is one of the pairs I had shown her - she said she hoped we would let her go.

Prisoner. I asked the price of a Dutch-oven; he said his father was at tea; I said I would take the snuffers, and return in a quarter of an hour. Witness. No, you did not; I did not know you were going to take them; I did not know you had them till Mr. Garton brought you back - she afterwards said she would pay for them.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-77

1280. MARY WEBSTER was again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 1 pair of snuffers, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Draper .

JOSEPH DRAPER . I live in Great Titchfield-street . On the 27th of July the prisoner came and wanted a number of tin goods - she said she came from Mr. Paris, No. 50, Cirencester-place, where she had taken the first-floor - she asked me to let her take a pair of snuffers, which she would pay for when I sent the other things, which I allowed her to do.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-78

1281. JOHN WILD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 2 handkerchiefs, value 7s., and 2 shillings, the property of Alexander North and another, his masters .

ALEXANDER NORTH . I live at No. 247, Shoreditch ; I have one partner; the prisoner was in our service. On the 13th of July, in consequence of having missed some goods, I marked four half-crowns and gave them to a young man, to give to his wife to come and purchase goods; together with ten shillings, which were not marked - we all left the house except the prisoner, just before nine o'clock, and I returned just before ten - I went into the counting-house, and returned to the prisoner, who was in the shop; he said, "I have just taken some ready money" - I had just looked into the box where we put the money, and saw two of the half-crowns which I had marked - I asked the prisoner how much he had taken; he said, "14s. 9d." - I went and looked at the book, and he had entered 14s. 9d. - the young man then came in to whom I had given the four half-crowns, and from what he said, I sent for the officer - I called the prisoner into the counting-house to Mr. Partridge, my partner, and told him I suspected him, and wished to search him - the officer found on him two of the marked half-crowns, and two black silk handkerchiefs, which belonged to me and Mr. Partridge; they are worth 7s. - the prisoner was to have 30l. a year, and his board and lodging.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How do you know these handkerchiefs? A. By the mark on them - this mark is put on at the warehouse; I cannot say who put it on - the same mark might be on other handkerchiefs - the prisoner was the only person in the shop besides myself and my partner - we had another young man, but he was not accustomed to the business, and did not serve in the shop; our other shopman had left before the prisoner came - if these handkerchiefs had been sold the ticket would have been taken off and they would have been entered in the book - I had seen these handkerchiefs there the day before; we had no other of that price - I looked this morning to see if we had any other tickets the same as these, and we have not - if persons in our employ ask for goods, we let them have them - there was a quarter's wages due to the prisoner on the 27th of August; it was 7l. 10s.; he had had 3l. in money, and 30s. or 40s. worth of goods.

EDWARD RICHARDS . I received the four half-crowns and silver from the prosecutor - I saw those found on the prisoner's person, and in the till; they were what I had received from the prosecutor.

WILLIAM GROVE (police-sergeant G 6). I was sent for, and found these two half-crowns in the prisoner's waistcoat pocket, and these two handkerchiefs in his coat pocket; he did not say whose they were.

Prisoner's Defence (written). With respect to the two handkerchiefs found on me, I can account for the possession of

them as my own property. Some time ago I purchased a lot of(about eighteen) silk handkerchiefs, and gave them to a friend(the witness Mrs. Longdon, who, with her husband, lives at the house of my uncle) to make up for me. On Sunday, July 7th, I called upon, her for some of the handkerchiefs, when she told me they were not done, but that I should have a couple of them in the course of the week. Being out on business the Friday following, I called for them, but finding they were not ready, I took the two silk handkerchiefs with me in the same state in which I bought them: I put them into my coat pocket, where they were found the next morning on my being searched.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-79

1282. HENRY BRANSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 case of drawing instruments , the goods of William Penny .

WILLIAM PENNY . I keep a shop in Church-street, Shoreditch . On the 4th of July, I saw the prisoner about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening; he took a case of drawing instruments, and ran away with them - I pursued and cried "Stop thief;" I got up to him, and laid hold of him, but some of his companions held my coat and kept me back from him - he ran away again, and I again pursued him - just before I came up to him a second time, he threw the instruments over an iron yard; I still pursued him - he then ran into a public-house - somebody then held my coat again, and I lost sight of him - I went back and got my instruments from the iron yard in Nelson-street - I did not see the prisoner again till the 1st of August.

JAMES GLIBBERY (police-sergeant N 21). On the 21st of August, the prisoner was brought to the station-house on another charge; I had received information of this, and sent for the prosecutor, who identified him directly - these are the instruments.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home on the day stated, and the prosecutor said I had got a case of his instruments - I said I had not - a number of persons told me not to go as I was not the person; they then pushed me into a public-house - I then went home; I had not been one hundred and fifty yards from the place till I was taken - I have a brother very much like me.

WILLIAM PENNY . I am quite sure he is the person; he had been at our place two or three days before.

William Harris , of Green-street, Bethnal-green, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - Aged 18. Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-80

1283. WILLIAM NIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 1 reticule, value 6d.; 2 shillings; 2 sixpences, and 2 pence, the property of Caroline Juden , from her person .

CAROLINE JUDEN. I am single , and live at No. 2, Church-street, St. Giles's. On the 29th of July, I had been out with some friends, and as I was coming home, the prisoner overtook me - he asked what I was doing; I said counting my money, which I was - I had got my money in my hand; it was from twelve to half-past twelve o'clock - I took two shillings, and two sixpences, and tied them in a corner of my handkerchief with two knots - I put it into my bag; there was in the bag beside, two penny pieces one halfpenny, and a small key - I put the bag on my left arm; when we got to the corner of Princes-street , I said to him, "You are taking me out of my way" - he then turned and stood in front of me, and carelessly took hold of both my hands; he stood for about two minutes - I then turned my head; he snatched my bag off my arm, and ran down Princes-street, as fast as he could run - I took my gown in my hand, and ran after him, calling "Stop thief" - the policeman sprang his rattle, and Mr. Hopkins being on the opposite side of the square, stopped him - I saw my bag at the office the next morning.

Prisoner. Q. Did you say you was a servant out of place? A. Yes, I had been out of place for three weeks; I had never seen you before - I do not know what induced you to put your hand round my waist - I never gave you any authority to do so - the last place I lived in was at No. 16, Great Quebec-street, New-road - I did not say that you had kept company with me. I never was at the Feathers at Pimlico with you, I do not know the place - I never slept with you in Oxford-street; I never asked you to borrow a shilling of your comrades, and pay my lodging and sleep with me - I went to the office after you was locked up, to get an officer to go to my lodgings, because there was a soldier in my bed.

COURT. Q. What do you mean by that? A. When I went home I looked through the key-hole, and saw a soldier in my bed; he had opened the door and got in; mine is the two-pair back room - I had left it locked when I went out; I have lived there five weeks; it is at No. 2, Church-street, St. Giles's, close to the brewhouse - there are two small windows on the stairs - I got home about half-past five o'clock in the morning: when the prisoner took my bag, the key of the padlock of my door was in it - I could not get in; I went to a friend of mine in Oxford-buildings, and slept the rest of the night, and when I went home, I found a soldier in my bed, but not belonging to the prisoner's regiment.

Prisoner. Q. Did you never attend Portman-street barracks within the last six months? A. No; I do not know two shops for drink, one on the right, and the other on the left hand side there - I was not at one of them three nights before this happened, drinking beer with you.

COURT. Q. Now attend - are you quite sure, and do you swear, that to the best of your belief, you never saw that man before? A. Never in my life; I never was with him.

Prisoner. Q. There is a public-house next to a hospital at Pimlico; were you never in the skittle-ground there with me? A. Never in my life to my knowledge.

HENRY HOPKINS . On the night of the 29th of July, I was at the corner of Harley-street, talking to a friend; I heard a cry of "Stop thief" and a rattle sprung; I then saw the prisoner running as fast as he could - I caught him by the collar and put my arm round his waist, and we fell together - when he was on the ground he put his hand to his bayonet and drew it three or four inches out, but just before he came to me, (nearly fronting the Duke of Portland's house), I saw him fling something into the square - the policeman came up, and this girl after him - she said he had robbed her of some money and a reticule - the prisoner said, "I know nothing about it;"

he did not appear to be drunk - I told the policeman there had been something thrown into the square; they could not find it then, it being dark, but they did the next morning.

Prisoner. Q. Did I make any resistance? Witness. A. Yes; when I was on the ground you flung your leg up and tried to throw me over your head; you drew your bayonet three or four inches.

Prisoner. I only put my hand to it to save it from falling out. Witness. I hope it was so, but you appeared to me to be drawing it.

JAMES CLAPSON . (police constable D 153). I was in Cavendish-square, and saw the prisoner running; I pursued him, and saw Mr. Hopkins catch him; it was then about half-past twelve o'clock; the prosecutrix followed me and said he had taken her bag from her; I asked the prisoner where it was, he said he had not got it, that he was out on leave of absence till twelve o'clock, and he knew nothing of it - I took him to the station-house, and the sergeant went to look for the bag.

WILLIAM HOOCKER . (police sergeant D 3). I was in Cavendish-square, and saw the prisoner running; I then saw him and Mr. Hopkins struggling; the prosecutrix then came up and said she had been robbed of her bag or reticule; I took the prisoner to the station-house, and then went opposite the Duke of Portland's to look for the bag - I afterwards found this bag with two shillings, two sixpences, and twopence-halfpenny in copper in it; both the strings of the bag are broken as if it had been snatched off; the prosecutrix stated that the silver was tied up in one corner of the handkerchief which it is.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-81

1284. RICHARD BIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 bag, value 2l.; and 1 coat, value 3l. the goods of William Fitzroy Scudamore .

DANIEL COOPER . I am servant to Mr. William Fitzroy Scudamore, he lives in Bow-street. On the 25th of July I got into a cab - I cannot say who drove it, but I told the driver to drive to Devonshire-street , to take me and my friend and a bag; we got out there, and I forgot my carpet bag which contained a coat - when I thought of it, I turned round, but the cab was gone, and it being late I thought it was no use to go in search of it; the next morning I went to one of my friends with whom I had been the night before, and after some conversation with him, I went to Somerset house to get the name of the person who belonged to the cab; I found the name was Spear; I went to Spear, at William's-mews, Hampstead-road, but I could not find him; I then went to Little Coram-street, Russell-square, when I found that Mr. Morey had the cab and the horse; I saw the prisoner that night, I asked if he recollected me, he said,"Yes;" I then asked if he recollected taking me and a friend and a carpet bag up to Devonshire-street, Portland-place; he said,"Yes;" I then asked if he recollected my taking the bag out; he said, "No;" I then asked him what had become of it; he said he had taken a gentleman from Devonshire-street, Portland-place, to Chancery-lane, and if the bag was there he must have taken it out; I said, "No gentleman would do such a thing;" and I gave him in charge of a police officer; in going to the station-house, he said the carpet bag was in care of his sister in Tothill-street, at the back of Hatton-garden; the policeman went there and got the bag and the coat; they are my master's.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Had you not had something to drink that night? A. Yes; I did not drink with the prisoner - I had drank before - I was capable of knowing what I was about, but I forgot this bag; I don't recollect the prisoner asking me the colour of this coat, he appeared to be cautious of giving it up, and said he was not certain whether I was the person; he went with me to his sister's.

JAMES DYER . (police constable E 81). I took the prisoner; I asked him if he knew the prosecutor; he said yes, he remembered taking him for a fare the night before, he remembered the carpet bag being put in, but he knew nothing of it; when I took him, he said it was at his sister's; I went there and found it, this is it.

Prisoner. I took it to my sister and went away, being drunk.

SARAH GORDON . I am married; I am the prisoner's sister; he came to me in liquor that evening, and said,"I will give you this bag to take to the office; I will come back and give you a direction," the policeman afterwards came with him, and I gave up the bag.

Prisoner's Defence (written). When I took the gentleman's servant s up, they were intoxicated; they gave me drink likewise; after setting them down I did not perceive the bag in the cab, the cab was called again to take a gentleman into the city; after setting the gentleman down, I got into the cab, I perceived the bag under my feet; through having drink and carrying different persons, I could not recollect which the bag belonged to: I took the bag to my sisters, to give it up to the office, I being incapable myself; I told her I would give her the direction; I unfortunately went away and gave her no direction at all; at night I went to my work, the bag had quite slipped my memory; when the gentleman's servant came, I recollected driving the man; I denied knowing any thing of it until he told me the colour of the coat; I took him where I had left it, and gave him up the bag without being damaged; I did not know the rules were so strict as they are, when I was taken to the office, (having never been in such a place before,) when I was called on I could not vindicate the cause.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-82

1285. RICHARD BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 3 ounces of silk, value 10s.; and 4 bobbins, value 2d.; the goods of Thomas Walker , his master .

THOMAS WALKER . I live at No. 29, Fort-street, Old Artillery-ground , and am a silk weaver . The prisoner was my servant - he worked in my house, I delivered him silk to work in the house, but he was not to take it out - on the 4th of July I sent him to a person to tell them to bring home their work - I had missed property, and I sent the prisoner out that day, supposing he would take some with him - I had a policeman placed outside the door - he and I followed the prisoner and took him; he had these four bobbins of silk between his shirt and his skin - it is my property - the bobbins are marked with my surname in full.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you not

employed him to have twenty-five yards of work ready by Saturday morning? A. Not to my recollection; I might have done so - there was eleven yards, or eleven yards and a half done of it on the Thursday when he was taken - it certainly was necessary that he should have quills wound to do this work with, but he should not have taken them to wind at home - there is a person at my house who does that - he could not have had to wait more than one minute in the morning to have his quills wound - when we give out silk to work we weigh it, and we weigh the work when done, to see if it corresponds in weight, but I could not have ascertained that, when the twenty-five yards were brought in; not till the whole cane was done.

COURT. Q. When the twenty-five yards of silk was done, would not the weight of that make up the weight you gave? A. No, because part of the cane would be still in the loom; we could not ascertain the weight till all was finished.

THOMAS WATKINS . I live in Fort-street. I work for the prosecutor - on the morning in question I went down stairs, and saw the foreman weigh out eight bobbins, and put them into a basket up stairs, where he always keeps them - there were three more there - the prisoner took them up, and he went out soon after - I then went into the room, and saw but seven bobbins in the basket; the prisoner returned, and went to work - when he went home at night there were still but seven bobbins there, and the next morning I saw the foreman weighing some white shute.

WILLIAM ABRAHALL . I am foreman to the prosecutor. I weighed out eight bobbins to the prisoner, these are four of them; they are worth about 10s.

Cross-examined. Q. Here is the name at full length on them, and no attempt to destroy it? A. No; this silk must be put on quills to be worked - I have been in the room the prisoner worked in; I don't know whether any one else worked there.

SAMUEL MILTON (police-constable H 27.) I took the prisoner, and found these four bobbins of silk between his shirt and his skin, under his arm.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you take him? A. In Spicer-street, Spitalfields - I believe his master sent him out on an errand; I asked him if he knew the prosecutor, he said yes; his master then came up, and asked if he had any of his property, he said he had not; I felt his pockets, there was nothing there - I then found these bobbins, he cried, and begged for mercy.

MR. WALKER. I did not send him out before the regular course of work was concluded, I told him to go when he had done his work - he did not tell me he intended to work till dark - I only sent him to one place - he paid 2s. 6d. a week for his loom standing in my house.

Prisoner's Defence. On that Thursday he asked me if I would complete him twenty-five yards of work to go into the country, and to go down and take the silk to finish it, I said I had enough, he said I had better take some more, and he gave it to me - at seven o'clock he asked me to go to two places, and one was for some work to go home at the same time with mine; and as I would not disappoint him of the order, I put the four bobbins into my bosom to wind the quills at home.

RICHARD BROWN . I am uncle of the prisoner, I keep a shop on Peter's-hill, Doctor's-commons. The prisoner has been an honest, hard working lad - I am a silk weaver; it is usual for masters to weigh silk when they give it out, and when it comes back, if it don't correspond, they stop the wages for it.

THOMAS WALKER re-examined. Q. Was it your practice with this man to weigh the silk when it was given out, and when it was brought in manufactured? A. Yes, we keep a regular debtor and creditor account in the book - I should at the end of the work have discovered that this was deficient - this work was silk and cotton.

George Craddock , of Hare-street, Bethnal-green, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 20. - Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330905-83

London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1286. JAMES MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 1 printed book, value 2s.; and 1 watch-key, value 2s., the property of David Cracklow; and 1 corkscrew, value 3s., the property of Henry Ward Farrer . Also, for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 pint of brandy, value 4s.; and 12 glass bottles, value 2s.; the property of David Cracklow , and another, his master ; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-84

1287. GEORGE PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 coat, value 2l.; the goods of James Hope .

2ND COUNT stating it to be the goods of Thomas Hope .

THOMAS HOPE . I am the son of James Hope ; I am a gardener , and live at Limehouse ; my wife packed up a parcel, and sent it by the prisoner.

MARY HOPE . I am the wife of Thomas Hope ; I packed up the parcel, it contained two coats and a letter; one belonged to James Hope, and the other to Thomas Hope ; they were tied round with a string; I delivered them to the prisoner, who is a carrier , on the 19th of July; they were to go from Limehouse to Ewell, directed for James Hope .

JAMES HOPE . This parcel did not come to me, but the prisoner brought me the letter; I opened it and read it before him - I said, "Where is the parcel, and the coats?" he said, I should have them on the Wednesday, it was then Monday - he called again about a week afterwards, and told me, I should be sure to have them on the next Wednesday, but he never brought them.

WILLIAM HURST . I am a constable; I live at Benson, in Oxfordshire. James Hope came to me on the 26th, and ordered me to take the prisoner up for not bringing his coats - I took him; he said, he was sorry, but he was going back that night, and he would send the coats, the next night - I said, I would send a man up with him; he then said, he would give up the duplicates, which he did.

EDWARD HORNE . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, on Snow-hill - I have a coat which was pawned by some man

on the 19th of July, I cannot say by whom; this is the duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am very sorry for it; I hope you will have mercy on me.

GUILTY . Aged 31 - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-85

1288. JOHN HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 8 lbs. of bristles, value 24s., the goods of Robert Smith and another .

ROBERT SMITH . I am a wharfinger and warehouseman ; I have one partner; the prisoner had been a labourer at our wharf for some years; on the 5th of July, I heard that he had broken open a cask - I went and found him by the side of a cask of bristles, and he had got some packages out; they weighed about 8lbs., and are worth about 24s.; he was not at work for us that day; I called our foreman, Magner, and told him to secure him till I sent for an officer.

ROBERT MAGNER . I was called and secured the prisoner till we got the officer, who took him; I had seen him taking the bristles from the cask.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me break the cask open? A. No, but I saw you taking them out.

JOHN DELANEY . I am an officer; I was sent for, and took the prisoner; I found these three bundles of bristles by the side of the cask.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330905-86

1289. HENRY HEARDER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 1 bag, value 1s. 6d.; 2 woollen shirts, value 3s.; 1 smock-frock, value 1s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 3s.; and 3 pairs of stockings, value 3s. the goods of John Nowell .

JOHN NOWELL. I was a mariner , on board the St. Ann. I had been on shore about five weeks; on the 27th of May, I met the prisoner by London-bridge - I had a bundle with me, containing the articles stated; I asked him where he thought I could leave my clothes; he took me to Mr. Wood's, No. 6, Tower-dock ; I asked Mr. Wood's two girls if I might leave them there, and we left them - I had not known the prisoner before, but he said he was out of a ship; I went again for my clothes on the Friday afterwards, but the prisoner had been the day before and got them; I have never seen them since - I met him about a month afterwards coming across Towerhill, with another boy, I followed them to Billingsgate, and gave him in charge.

JANE WOOD . My father keeps a greengrocer's shop. I remember the prosecutor and the prisoner coming, about three months ago, on a Monday; they left a bundle; the prisoner came on the Thursday afterwards and said, "If you please will you let me have that bundle," which I did, and he went away - I supposed the other boy was near - I had seen the prisoner about before.

JOHN OSBORNE (City police-constable No. 62). I took the prisoner.

Prisoner. I met the prosecutor, who said he was out of a ship, and I told him I was the same; he had no bundle with him.

GUILTY . Aged 15 - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330905-87

1290. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; the goods of a man whose name is unknown, from his person .

GEORGE STONE (police-constable C 99). On the 17th of July, I was at the top of Ludgate-street , near St. Pauls, between three and four o'clock; I had seen the prisoner in company with two others; he and one more went and felt several gentleman's pockets - the prisoner then went behind an old gentleman and took this handkerchief from his pocket - I took the prisoner and the other; the prisoner then took the handkerchief and threw it on a horse's back; while I was getting it, the other lad got off, but I kept the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. What he says is false; it was in the middle of Ludgate-hill.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-88

1291. JOHN YORKE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Richard Williams , from his person .

RICHARD WILLIAMS . I am a silk-mercer . On the 25th of August, I was in Holborn , about nine o'clock in the evening - I felt a pressure at my back; I turned and saw the prisoner making his escape; I collared him, and a constable came and took charge of him - I turned and found my handkerchief on the flag-stone - I followed the prisoner to the Compter - some one struck me twice in the face, but I cannot say who.

HENRY BAKER (police-constable E 44). I was passing and saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take something out; I seized him and he dropped this handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it; I know nothing about it; I was standing by some people looking at a horse which had fallen down; when the gentleman came and took hold of me.

HENRY BAKER . I saw him take the handkerchief out of the pocket; another lad who was bigger than the prisoner, and who seemed to be with him, struck the prosecutor.

Charles Collins , of Budge-row, and Thomas Bent , of Cornhill, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-89

1292. GEORGE HERDSFIELD and WALTER ANDREWS were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Henry Pierce Perkins , from his person .

HENRY PIERCE PERKINS . I am an ironmonger , and live at Enfield. I was in Giltspur-street between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, on the 10th of August, a witness called to me, and I saw Herdsfield standing with my handkerchief close to his feet - Andrews ran across the road - the witness told me to take him, which I did.

Herdsfield. You said it was at Andrew's feet. Witness. Well, I think it was so; and Herdsfield ran across the road.

THOMAS RICHARDS . I was going along on the 10th of August, and saw the two prisoners behind this gentleman - Andrews had the handkerchief in his hand, and was going to give it to Herdsfield - I took Andrews, and

Herdsfield ran across the road - I told the gentleman to take him; which he did - Andrews dropped the handherchief.

WILLIAM McLENNAN (City police-constable No. 63). The prisoner were brought to the station-house, and given to me; this is the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HERDSFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 15.

ANDREWS - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-90

1293. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Alexander Loftus , from his person .

THOMAS ALEXANDER LOFTUS. I am a clerk in the law . I was standing at the corner of Giltspur-street , between twelve and one o'clock, on the 2nd of September; I felt a tug at my pocket, and turned round and saw the prisoner close to me - I seized him, and accused him of taking my handkerchief - he denied it - I looked behind him and saw it - I took it and him; this is it.

ARTHUR WINDSOR . I turned at the moment and saw the prisoner drop the handkerchief.

ROBERT TURLE (City police-sergeant, No. 5). I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along and the gentleman accused me of taking his handkerchief.

Mr. Morgan gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 15. Confined Three Months .

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Reference Number: t18330905-91

1294. JOSEPH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of a man whose name is unknown, from his person .

JOHN FARMER . I am a patrol of Farringdon Within. On the 30th of August, I was in Newgate-street , a few minutes after eight o'clock in the evening - I saw the prisoner and two others following a gentleman; one of the others took this handkerchief from his pocket and gave it to the prisoner, who put it into his pocket - I followed and took him with it.

Prisoner. I had been to take a letter to the post-office - I was running because it rained; the handkerchief was thrown in my face - I put it in my bosom, and the officer came and took me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-92

1295. ABRAHAM SAMUELS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 watch, value 20l., the goods of William Robertson , from his person .

WILLIAM ROBERTSON . I am a ship-broker , and live in Crutched-friars. On the 11th of July I was in Gracechurch-street, near Bell-yard , a little after nine o'clock at night - there were several persons congregated together, and the prisoner took hold of my watch-chain and drew my watch to the extremity of my fob - I felt the tug, and saw the prisoner with his hand upon my chain and seal - he dropped it - I followed him - he looked round, saw me, and took to his heels - I pursued him; he ran fifty or sixty yards, when I had him taken - I did not lose my watch - if he had got it out, I have a strong guard, which would have caused him some difficulty to break; but the watch was lifted from the bottom of my fob; it was all but out.

FRANCIS LEDGER . I was getting on a coach to go home to Kennington - I saw this gentleman, and the prisoner made a sudden snatch at his watch chain - I got down and ran after him - I saw the prosecutor seize him.

MILES SWEENEY . I saw the prisoner running across the street, and the prosecutor close by him - there was an officer over the way, and he took him - there were about a dozen or fourteen in a gang, near the Flower-pot, and they made use of the word "Slog," meaning get away.

THOMAS TIDD . I am a patrol of Bishopsgate - I was on the opposite side, and heard the cry of "stop thief" - I crossed, and my brother officer had hold of the prisoner - I assisted in taking him to the watch-house - we got him to the corner of Threadneedle-street, when the prisoner turned his head and said, "Slog, slog, the b - rs," and down we were in a moment, but we kept the prisoner - my hat was lost, and my shirt torn to ribbons but we got him to the watch-house - my hat was brought to me afterwards.

JOHN PRICE . I was in Gracechurch-street, and heard the cry of "stop thief" - I saw the prisoner running, he was stopped - I took hold of him - I was taking him down by the South Sea-house, when I heard the word, "Slog, slog, the police" - my partner was knocked down, and I was struck on the head - it was then all pulley hauley - I was up and down several times, but we kept the prisoner, and got him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. My mother was ill in bed, she desired me to go to my aunt's in London-road - I was running across Gracechurch-street, and two or three persons came and said, I was a thief - I was struck in the mouth several times, and was taken - I can assure you I have maintained my mother for six years, ever since the death of my father - I get my living in an honest way - I know nothing of the mob they speak of.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-93

1296. FRANCIS GALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , 3 dwts. and 6 grains of gold, value 9s., the goods of William King , and another his masters .

WILLIAM KING . I am a working goldsmith and jeweller . I have one partner - we live in Bridgewater-square - the prisoner was our journeyman for about four years - on the 4th of September some of our men were watching him, and in consequence of what they said, I sent for an officer, and gave the prisoner into custody, some gold was brought down to me, which I weighed, and gave to the officer - I believe it to be mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. All that you know is that some gold was shown to you? A. Yes; it is in a small lump - the gold is given out to men in small pieces of flatted gold, and gold wire, it is necessary to work it into what is intended to be made - I did not see this lump of gold found.

JOHN SKIDMORE . I am foreman to the prosecutor. On the 4th of September, I went into the work-shop - when I had been there two or three minutes, seven or eight men rose up, and said, there was a thief in the shop stealing cuttings, they said, "Seize him, seize him," and two or three men laid hold of the prisoner, and said, he had been stealing cuttings, and melting them - I said if he had been stealing anything he must give it up to me - he said, he had none about him - I walked up, and said, "I shall search you, if you don't give it up to me" - he at last with reluctance put his hand into his left-hand pocket, and took out a small piece of gold, and gave it me - I took it to Mr. King.

BENJAMIN LAWSON . I work in the shop - I was watching the prisoner - in the course of that evening a call came from the counting-house, to take the cuttings down - the prisoner said he supposed he must take his cuttings down and he took down one box, but left another box of cuttings at his place - I looked at it - when he came up again, he took those cuttings and melted them at the lamp - and I saw him put the lump into one of his pockets.

Cross-examined. Q. How many were in the place? A. Perhaps half-a-dozen - some of them might have their backs to the lamp - some of them might be looking at the prisoner at the time - the lamp is in a conspicuous part of the room - I had no quarrel with the prisoner - I have sometimes joked with him, but had no disagreement - we sometimes call one another names out of fun.

WILLIAM DARBY (City police-constable No. 52). I took the prisoner, and have the gold.

WILLIAM KING . This is my gold.

Cross-examined. Q. If you saw it twenty miles off would you swear to it? A. Certainly not.

JURY. Q. Are the raw materials weighed to the men? A. Yes, and they are returned, part in work, part in cuttings, and part in filings - I should not have detected any deficiency till the filings were sifted and melted which they are every month.

JURY to BENJAMIN LAWSON . Q. What is the custom of your shop, to take all or part of the cuttings down? A. We work various qualities of gold, sometimes the seventy cuttings are called for, and sometimes the sixty - I believe it was the prisoner's duty to have taken down those cuttings which I saw in the box - there were other men saw the transaction, but the Alderman did not bind them over.

Mr. George Cross, and Henry Moorham, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 36. - Confined Three Months .

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18330905-94

1297. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Pennington , from his person .

THOMAS PENNINGTON. I am clerk to Mr. Alderman Thompson. On the 31st of August, I was in Idol-lane , between two and three o'clock - I felt something at my pocket - I turned and saw the prisoner - he dropped my handkerchief - I took it up, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. It was another boy took it - I saw it on the ground, and put my hand on it, and then the gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-95

1298. GEORGE JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 2 hams, value 32s. the goods of Benjamin Gardner , and that he had been before convicted of felony .

BENJAMIN GARDNER . I am a carcase butcher in Newgate-market. On the 1st of August, I went to Mr. Biggerstaff, the banker, in Smithfield - I had left my cart just by, and when I returned I missed two hams from it.

WILLIAM PATTERSON . I am an undertaker. Between two and three o'clock in the day I was going to Bartholomew Hospital - I saw the prisoner get into the cart, and take out two hams, and put them under his smock frock - I watched him across the market, he put them under some hurdles; two little children, said he had put them there, and then he took them out, and put them behind some other hurdles and straw - I went to get an officer we went to look for the hams, but they were gone.

WILLIAM BISHOP . I was with Patterson - I saw the prisoner have the hams, and then he walked away with some other person.

GEORGE CRAWLEY (City police-constable No. 61). I took the prisoner.

JOHN LAPTHORNE (police-constable C. 182). I produce a certificate of the prisoner's conviction, on the 20th of October, in the tenth, year of his late Majesty's reign - I was a witness and know he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-96

1299. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Daniel Lambert , from his person .

DANIEL LAMBERT. On Wednesday last, about one o'clock in the afternoon I was walking through Smithfield with a friend - when I was near King-street, I felt something at my pocket - I turned round and saw the prisoner endeavouring to conceal my handkerchief in his pocket - a friend saw him drop it - I took him - this is the handkerchief.

HENRY NIXON . I was with the prosecutor, he turned round, and I saw the prisoner drop this handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at a show, and the gentleman turned, and said, I had taken his handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-97

OLD COURT. Saturday, September 7, 1833.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1300. DAVID DUNDAS was indicted for, that he, on the 8th of August , at St. Pancras , feloniously did forge a certain order for payment of money which is as follows ; that is to say,

"No. London, 10th June, 1833.

Messrs. Drummond pay to Captain Dundas or bearer, eighty pounds.

£80. Dundas." with intent to defraud Andrew Berkeley Drummond , and others; against the statute, &c.

2ND COUNT, for feloniously uttering a like forged order for payment of money, well knowing it to be forged, with a like intent.

3RD COUNT, for feloniously putting off a like forged order for payment of money, well knowing it to have been forged, with a like intent.

4TH, 5TH, and 6TH COUNTS like 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, only not setting out the forged instrument.

6 OTHER COUNTS like the six former, only stating the intent to be to defraud William Edmead .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM EDMEAD. I live at No. 29, Gower-place, Euston-square . The prisoner lodged at my house three or four months in 1829, and again for about the last twelve-months in 1829, and again for about the last twelve-months - he had incurred a debt of 49l. 10s. with me for lodging, and paid me by a bill of exchange which would become due on the 17th of August last - I paid it away - on the 8th of August, he sent for me up-stairs; I went up and he said, "Here, Mr. Edmead, is your account" - there was another quarter's account about coming due, and that was the account he referred to - he produced the quarter's account, including the bill; I have it here; this is the paper I received from him, here is "bill 48l." mentioned, but it should be 49l. 10s.; the account was 17l. 12s., making the whole 67l. 2s. - on his producing the account, he placed a cheque on the account, this is the cheque, and he said, "Here is this, I have some pressing letters to go into the country, and I shall be absent about three weeks; I think I shall be obliged to go off about seven o'clock in the evening; I am going into the city, to the Bank, should I have time to return before I go off into the country, I will return and take up the bill, and call upon you and settle your account and take this again" - I had paid the bill away, and he knew where it was - he said, "I have reserved this for a certain purpose, I did not want to make use of it immediately" - this passed about twelve o'clock in the day; the cheque was laying on the account all this time - I took the cheque up with the account, and said I would take care of it; I then left him - I went up again about an hour after; he still remained at home; I went up and told him he had made a mistake in the amount of the bill; he said, "Never mind, Mr. Edmead, that is of little consequence, I have a fifty for it" - he went out about two o'clock, and in a short time a boy came for his portmanteau; I went up-stairs myself to fetch it down, and found all that there was in the room nearly, was put into the portmanteau, except a pair of shoes and boots; they were packed in the portmanteau - I brought it down stairs, and gave it to the boy; he took it down towards Euston-square, the same way as the prisoner went - in consequence of what I observed up-stairs, I was induced to present the cheque; and I went that day to Drummond's banking-house, presented the cheque, and payment was refused - he went by the name of Captain Dundas at my house.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Are you quite sure you have told us all that occurred between you and him, when he delivered you the cheque? A. Not quite; he asked me where Moggridge lived, at the time he gave me the cheque, I told him, and he took down his address - I am quite sure when he gave me the cheque he did not say, "This is not for payment." - the cheque is for 80l.; the amount he owed me altogether was 67l. when the bill became due and the quarter's account; the bill had not become due then - if it had been due there would be a balance owing to the prisoner, if the cheque was paid; the bill was 49l. 10s. and the account was 17l. 12s. which would be 67l. owing to me - there would be a balance of 12l. 18s.; he did not ask me for the difference; he did not tell me he gave it me as a security, nor anything of the kind - he told me he intended to call for it again; he did not say he would call for the cheque again if the bill was not paid; this was on the 8th of August - I am quite sure he did not say, "Remember, I wish to have that back again."

Q. Did he not say, he intended to have the cheque back again, or words to that effect? A. Yes; I replied, "Very well, I will take care of it."

MR. BODKIN. Q. Was that when he said he would get back about seven o'clock, from the City, if he could? A. Yes; he did not return at all that day - Moggridge is the person in whose hands the bill was; it was the prisoner's acceptance, drawn and accepted by himself; he drew the bill, I signed it, and he accepted it - I am a baker.

THOMAS ANDREW RUSH . I am a clerk in the house of Messrs. Andrew Drummond and others; there are more than two partners besides him - on the 8th of August, I was at the banking-house; Mr. Edmead presented this cheque; it appears a very strong resemblance to Lord Dundas's hand-writing - I was struck at the first appearance of it, as being something different, but I went and examined it, and inquired the opinion of others, and eventually declined paying it - Lord Dundas had an account at our house at the time, and that is the form in which he draws his cheques, and a very good imitation of his signature.

Cross-examined. Q. Yet something struck you that it was different? A. Yes.

THOMAS LINDIGREEN . I am a policeman; I was called on the 8th of August, and took the prisoner into custody, at the corner of Hampstead-road, in the New-road, at the King's Head public-house - a solicitor who was with me said, "I give this man into custody for forging a cheque of 80l." - the prisoner heard it, but said nothing; I took him to the station-house, searched him, and found a quantity of memorandums, sixty-three pawnbrokers' duplicates, ard a cheque-book of Drummonds, and 3 cheques of it filled up - this is one of the cheques which I found. (looking at it.)

RIGHT HONOURABLE LORD DUNDAS. I keep an account at Drummond's house, and have always done so - I believe I once saw the prisoner in the street, he presented a paper to me; I don't recollect the contents, but from the contents of the paper I presumed he might be a Mr. David Dundas, who had corresponded with me; I have had letters from him, but have no other knowledge of him - no part of this cheque is my hand-writing; I think I should know anywhere that it is not my hand - I don't draw on these cheques, I have a private cheque-book of my own, unless I receive money in the banking house I don't sign these cheques - the signature is made in the way I sign my name, it is an imitation, but I should discover it in a moment (looking at another cheque) this other cheque is still less like mine, it is not the way I sign cheques, it is the way I sign franks - I

have had several letters from the prisoner, and corresponded with him; I probably franked my answers.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your Lordship prepared to say that this is an imitation of your hand-writing? A. I cannot answer that more than another person; I imagine it being signed "Dundas" is intended to imitate my signature - I should say the last cheque would not deceive anybody, that is for 40l.; the other might deceive, but not a very accurate observer - it ought not to deceive a person used to my signature, because I invariably draw a line and join the D's.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Is it a different signature to that with which you draw a cheque? A. Yes, the tail of the D comes through it and joins the u, which I do in franks (cheque read).

Prisoner's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury - Painfully distressing as my present position is, arraigned a prisoner at this bar - a spectacle to the world, charged with the intention to commit a frand on the Messrs. Drummonds. Gentlemen, my conscience prompts me to reprobate that which I feel to be a vile attack on a character which I have in varied climes maintained without blemish, for a period of more than thirty years in the service of my king and country, having throughout the whole course of my professional duties, uniformly received the high commendations of all under whom I had the honour to serve. I do not name my services, Gentlemen, with any view of moving your pity; nor would I, had I the power, attempt to excite your sympathies to shield me from any pains or penalties, an error in judgment may bring upon me- they are altogether of a secondary consideration, inasmuch as an incurable wound was inflicted the moment of my arrest; nor will your verdict of acquittal heal that wound, or give me back my peace of mind, or allow me again to taste the sweets of social intercourse, or evermore to feel the sacred influence of friendship - under such depression, the sufferer sighs for his final release, to meet the righteous sentence of the Judge Eternal.

In looking, however, at the evidence given by Edmead, I wish you, Gentlemen, to favour me with your undivided attention to a few points, which, from their tendency, it appears to be imperative in me to notice. Bear in mind, then, that the transaction in question took place after mid-day on the 8th of August, and that I was arrested soon after four o'clock the same afternoon. This man has sworn, Gentlemen, that he assented to hold the cheque as a collateral security, until I took up a certain named bill, coming due on the 15th of the same month. Such was our specific agreement. He has admitted on his oath, that he promised to keep this cheque in safe custody, and to restore it to me at the time already named. He again tells you, Gentlemen, that the impression or understanding of his mind was that the bill should be taken up on that day, a week before it was due, and his account to be liquidated that night. Admitting, then, for a moment the truth of the latter statement, which I deny in the most unqualified manner. Examine, however, this man's conduct; do you see him acting agreeably to his own shewing? Certainly not. You must fancy him flying on the wings of the wind to the banking-house at Charing-cross! Mark his laudable purpose: was it to satisfy himself of the validity of the document? The clerk of Messrs. Drummond's answers no! that he required payment for that which he has sworn he promised to keep in safe custody for a fixed and positive period. I can easily imagine with what chuckling exultation he would bound away, with the honest hope of realizing by his breach of faith the sum of £80, for a debt of £17 odd. All this was done, and my caption made, in little more than two hours; hence it is manifest that his determination was that I should not have the power to do as he has stated he expected me to do! This witness, however, has had honesty sufficient to state on his oath, that I refused to accept any money consideration for this document; and admits that I enjoined him, over and over again, not to let the cheque go out of his possession: his answer was, "I will not." He has further sworn, that when I gave him the cheque, no person or party was named, or even alluded to, so as to give him any idea or reason to think that the document emanated from any person but myself, for it bears no other than my own name. I think I may then fearlessly ask you, Gentlemen, where is the evidence in all this to show even a shadow of "criminal intention" on my part towards the Messrs. Drummonds? Rather would not justice have been more fully satisfied, had this man Edmead, whose conduct herein was based on treachery and falsehood, been put to the bar in preference to the witness box? I shall, therefore, leave my destiny to the decision of your impartial judgment. My conduct in this particular instance may not have been in exact accordance with the requirement of the laws, but I submit that there is not a tittle of evidence to justify the charge of"guilty intention" on my part towards any of the individuals named in this indictment. I appeal then, Gentlemen, to your own feelings, assured that you will conscientiously view all the bearings of the case; and by your verdict show to the world, that you cannot sanction such abandonment of principle, or make me the victim of such nefarious conduct.

GUILTY . Aged 50. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330905-98

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1301. FRANCES SAMPSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sophia Matilda Pitt , on the 11th of July, and stealing therein, 3 table-cloths, value 4s.; 2 shirts, value 3s.; 3 petticoats, value 18d.; 2 shifts, value 2s.; 2 pinafores, value 18d.; 7 aprons, value 2s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 1s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 6d.; and 1 frock, value 2s.; her property .

SOPHIA MATILDA PITT . I live at No. 20, Shepherd-street, Spitalfields . On the 11th of July last, I had some things to wash for Mrs. Cardosa - I fetched them myself from her house; I found them in a bundle, on a chair, in a room on her first floor; there was nobody in the room - I never opened the bundle; I took it to my own house and put it in the back-kitchen; there was nobody in the kitchen - I then went up stairs; the back-kitchen is part of the house - I shut the door leading from the passage - I don't know whether the door leading from the kitchen to the yard was shut; I shut the door leading to the passage; I did not lock nor bolt it; I came down stairs afterwards and found the things still there; I went up stairs again and shut the door - then I came down again, on being alarmed, and found the door shut - (I rather think the yard-door was open,) the witness asked me if I had sent a woman out with a bundle - I then looked and missed it; the street-door was open.

ANN GIBBS . I live in Shepherd-street, opposite to Mrs. Pitt's. On the 11th of July I saw the prisoner go into Pitt's house, on tip-toe, just before two o'clock - the street-door was open; I had seen her in the street looking about her before she went in - I saw her come out again, in a few minutes, with a bundle of clothes, in her hand - I called out to Mrs. Pitt, who came down stairs - I did not know the prisoner before; but she crossed instantly

opposite my door - I have not a doubt of her; I had a baby in my arms; I called out to Mrs. Pitt; I know nothing more.

ESTHER CARDOZA . I employ Mrs. Pitt to wash for me. On the 11th of July I made up a bundle of clothes to wash, and put them on a chair in my room; it contained the articles stated in the indictment; my room is on the first-floor - I left them there for Mrs. Pitt to come and take them - I went out, and when I came back, they were gone; I have not seen any of them since.

SOPHIA MATILDA PITT . I have not seen any of my things since; a person cannot go down the passage into the yard without going through the kitchen; there is no other way out into the yard without going through the kitchen; there is no front kitchen, it is on the ground-floor; the front-room is a parlour; you can go into that from the passage; but you must go through the kitchen to get to the yard.

Prisoner. I implore your lordship's mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 43. - ( Of stealing only .)

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-99

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1302. JOHN SMITH alias SARGOOD and WILLIAM SALTER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Howard , on the 25th of August , and stealing therein, 1 watch, value 1l.; a pair of ear-rings, value 2l.; 1 pair of drops, value 10s.; 1 necklace, value 7s.; 1 ring, value 2d.; 3 breast pins, value 7s.; and 2 chimney ornaments, value 5s.; her property .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

MARY HOWARD . I am a maiden lady , and live in Prospect-place, in the parish of Tottenham . On Sunday, the 25th of August, I went to church, in the afternoon; I secured my house - the front door was barred, double-locked, and bolted top and bottom, and the back-door was on the spring lock - while I was in church I received information that my house had been robbed - I instantly returned to my house and found the front door open, and the back door bolted only at the top - I had left it on the spring-lock only; that door being bolted, could not be entered without being forced open - I examined the premises, and lost a silver watch; three coral necklaces, and chimney ornaments; they were taken from my top drawer, in my chamber - when I entered my front gate Smith was in the custody of Forster - I found all my drawers turned out; nobody lived in the house but myself at the time - my mother had lived with me, but was not in town.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Does your mother pay the rent? A. No; I do.

ANN DALE . I am the wife of Thomas Dale , I live next door to Miss Howard. On Sunday afternoon, the 25th of August, at church time, I was in front of my house; Miss Howard's house, appeared at first, to be perfectly safe; but shortly after, I heard a noise in her house, and, as soon as I possibly could, I went to the front of the house and saw her street door open; I saw nobody come out - I saw the prisoner Smith, coming from the end of her house, to cross the field; he was a very few paces from Miss Howard's palings; her's is a corner house - I gave an alarm; Smith walked very fast across the fields - I pursued him myself, calling out, "Stop thief," and then, I cried, "Murder;" I was within a few yards of him at one time - he heard my cries, but went on - Forster, the constable, came up to me and went after him - some boys took him and brought him to the constable - I am sure he is the man I saw going from Miss Howard's house.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known him before? A I never saw him before; no property was found on him.

COURT. Q. Did you keep pursuing him for some time, calling, "Stop thief?" A. I did; he never slackened his pace, but hastened it.

JOHN FREDERICK ENGLAND . I am fourteen years old. I was with Charles Saitch , at Tottenham, about four o'clock on Sunday, the 25th of August - we were in the field next to Miss Howard's house - I saw the two prisoners together, going towards the church; that would lead in a direction to Miss Howard's house; they parted - Salter came back and waited on the wooden bridge, between the fields, about two hundred yards from Miss Howard's house - I could see her house from the bridge; I saw Smith shortly after coming across the fields, from Miss Howard's palings, as fast as he could walk; he went to the wooden bridge and joined Salter - I heard Mrs. Dale cry out; Smith was then coming across the same fields as she was; Salter was nearer than me to Mrs. Dale, and I heard her cry out; Smith was nearer than me to Mrs. Dale; she was running after him; he must have heard her cry out - Salter was at that time on the wooden bridge - Smith joined him; they waited on the bridge two or three minutes, then Salter ran up towards Mr. Wright's moat, from Mrs. Dale and Smith - and Smith walked up towards the main path - I ran to him directly Mrs. Dale hallooed, and he walked the faster; and I said,"You are wanted," he then stopped, came back, and said, "It is not me that is wanted, it is somebody else," he came back after that.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Mrs. Dale in view of Smith when he turned back? A. Yes; but she could not see him turn back, as it was down in a hollow; this was after he had joined Salter and left him - then he came back towards Mrs. Dale, and me, and the beadle - the beadle was in view of Smith; and the beadle called, "Stop thief," as well, he was dressed as the beadle; he turned round at my speaking to him, and came towards the beadle, and was then taken into custody - I had been to church, and came out again, before the service was over - my father sent me to church; he has been in the habit of sending me to church and punishing me for not going; I had been that day at three o'clock, and came out at four o'clock, it was not over; my father has found fault with me for not going to church, when he sent me, but I always do go - I had not known either of the prisoners before; the wooden bridge is about two hundred yards from the prosecutrix's house - Salter had a black coat on - I will swear that, I cannot be mistaken - I was at the office before the magistrate when Salter was brought there; he was let out on bail, promising to

come there on the following Wednesday, and he came and was taken into custody.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When you saw Salter at the magistrates, did you know him again? A. Yes.

CHARLES SAITCH. I am fourteen years old; I was in company with England on Sunday, the 25th of August; I saw the two prisoners near Miss Howard's house that afternoon; I know them both - I am sure they are the persons; I first saw them up towards the church, going in a direction towards Miss Howard's house; I saw them return and go back towards Mr. Wright's moat; when I first saw them in the field, they kept together a very few minutes, then parted - Salter went down towards Wright's moat, and stopped at the wooden bridge; Smith went towards the church, and when we saw Smith again, he was against Miss Howard's palings - we had lost sight of him; I heard Mrs. Dale cry out; Smith then walked quite fast across the fields; Mrs. Dale followed him crying "Stop thief," and"Murder;" he took no notice of it, but kept going on; he went to Salter at the wooden bridge - he remained with him a few minutes, and when us boys were after him, Salter ran towards the moat; Smith was running up towards the path, he turned back and said were we calling after him; we said, "Yes;" he turned back and asked Forster if he wanted him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he walk towards the beadle? A. Yes; I saw Smith all the time he was on the wooden bridge - he was talking - he did nothing but talk; he gave nothing to the person who was standing on the bridge; I was at Salter's house shortly after this, and he was produced to me; I said that he was not the man I saw on the bridge; there was an officer with me at the time - that was on the Tuesday after the robbery; he was not dressed then the same as when I saw him - he is not now dressed as he was on the day of the robbery; none of the officers or the prosecutrix have been speaking to me since.

COURT. Q. Why did you then say he was not the same man? A. On Sunday he had a black coat on, and on Tuesday a brown one.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He has a brown coat on now; why swear to him now? A. He had whiskers under his chin on the Sunday, and he had none on the Tuesday - he has no whiskers under his chin now; I said the person had bandy legs, and the magistrate took up his apron to look at his legs, and after that let him out on bail.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Before the magistrate did you say he was not the man, or what? A. I did not go in before the magistrate.

COURT. Q. Where did Salter live? A. I saw him at his brother's house in Union-street, Shoreditch.

JOHN HAMMOND . I live at Tottenham. On Sunday, the 25th of August, I was at Tottenham in the fields at twelve o'clock, where the prosecutrix's house stands; I went by two young men at twelve o'clock. one in Spark's field, and one in the field the house is in; but I did not take notice of them then; and on returning, I met two young men who asked what o'clock it was, and I told them half-past twelve o'clock; Salter was one of them - I will not swear to the other; I had not noticed them before, and I cannot say they were the young men I met before - I cannot be certain whether I saw Salter more than once that day.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you see Salter? A. At half-past twelve o'clock; I had no clock, but I heard the clock strike one about half an hour after - I did not know them before; I did not notice his clothes, only his face - he was four or five yards behind the shorter one, which made me notice him more - I might be about half a minute in his company; he had his hat on - I did not notice his clothes; I do not know whether he had a black handkerchief on - it was not a white one, I think; but I will not swear that.

COURT to CHARLES SAITCH . Q. When Smith went to Salter, hestaid two or three minutes with him on the bridge; how far were you from them then? A. About twenty yards - their backs were to me; I stood against a tree by the side of the bank, and could see between them - and I think if one handed anything to the other, I must have seen it.

JAMES PAGE . I live at Tottenham. On the 25th of August, I saw two men together in the fields about half-past twelve o'clock - Salter was one of them; I do not know the other - I saw him only once that day; he was nearly a quarter of a mile from Miss Howard's house - the person with him was not so tall as himself.

JOSEPH FORSTER . I am a constable of Tottenham. On Sunday afternoon, the 25th of August, I heard a screaming, and went to the spot, and found Mrs. Dale, and joined with her in the pursuit - she was hallooing "Stop thief" as loud as she could - I observed the prisoner Smith coming from Miss Howard's house before Mrs. Dale cried out - he was about a hundred and fifty yards from Miss Howard's then - he went a few paces from me, and returned quite fast in a bustle towards the house - a few minutes after I heard the cry of "Murder, thieves;" I ran to the spot and saw Mrs. Dale running and hallooing - I passed her; came to a hedge about a hundred and fifty or two hundred yards from the prosecutrix's house - some people on the other side of the hedge called to Smith; he came back and asked if I wanted him; I said yes, and took him - I could not see him at the time Mrs. Dale was hallooing out - I found on him a key and a piece of candle in a piece of paper - a tobacco-box and a short pipe; I took him to the cage, and went in search of the other - I took him before the magistrate the next morning; he gave his name John Smith ; I asked where he lodged; he said at No. 5 or 7, Mount-street, Bethnal-green, near Friars-mount - I went to Nos. 5 and 7, but could find no such person - nobody knew any thing of him; I returned and told him all he had told me was false, and I could find no such person where he said he lived - he said it was of no use to deceive me any longer, his name was John Sargood , and he lived at No. 5 or 7, Mount-street - I asked who he lived with; he said a person named William Salter - he told me where Salter worked, and where I could find him - I asked him to describe him - I went to his brother's house, in Union-street, Kingsland-road; he came in a few minutes after - I told him my business, and asked if he knew John Smith - he said no - I asked him if he knew John Sargood ; he said "No, no such person" - I asked if anybody lodged with him; he said, "No, nobody whatever" -

I asked him to show me his lodging, and he took me to Mount-street, the place I had been to before, as Smith's lodging - when I got up-stairs I saw Salter, instead of unlocking the door, draw the staple from the lock, lock and all with it - I said, "What have you done with the key of the lock;" he said he had lost it - I put my hand into my pocket, and with a key I had taken from Smith on Sunday, I tried the lock, and it unlocked it immediately - I searched the premises; I found nothing relating to this property.

COURT. Q. Were there several persons about the fields when you laid hold of Smith? A. In the second field there was - if he had gone another way he could not have escaped.

JOHN FOWLER . I am a constable of Tottenham. In consequence of an alarm I went in pursuit with Forster - he had secured Smith when I came up to him; I afterwards went with him for Salter, and after some conversation between him and Fosrter, accompanied Salter to his lodgings - the door of the room was secured by a padlock; Salter pulled the staple out with the padlock; he took it into the room, and laid it on the table - Forster asked what he had done with the key; he said he had lost it - Forster pulled out a key and unlocked it immediately.

COURT. Q. Had you heard Forster ask Salter if he knew Smith? A. Yes, he did; and he said, "Do you know Sargood?" he said no - I found two duplicates in a cupboard in the lodging in the name of Sargood - Salter was asked if any person lodged with him - he said no.

MR. PHILLIPS to MARY HOWARD . Q. What property did you lose? A. A silver watch, a pair of garnet hoop ear-rings, a pair of cornelian drops, a gold pin, and two silver ones, two necklaces, a gold ring, two chimney ornaments of our Saviour on the Cross, and the Virgin and Child - they were not much larger than my finger.

Smith's Defence. On the Sunday the robbery was committed, Salter left me at home at half-past eight or nine o'clock - I never saw him any more; I got up and had breakfast at a coffee-shop in Church-street, Bethnalgreen, and went to take a walk - having no money and nothing to eat, I walked round Hornsey way, passing the day away, till I came to where the lady lives, and passed it - I was walking on, and did not hear Mrs. Dale cry out "Stop thief" - I was walking in the footpath; when I came to the wooden bridge, I heard the boys hallooing; I asked them what they were hallooing for - they said I was wanted; I immediately stepped down to ask the officer if he wanted me; he said yes, and I gave myself into his custody; the officer says he saw me within three minutes of the robbery - it is impossible I could have committed the robbery within that time - I am positive your Lordship's opinion must be that I am innocent.

Salter's Defence. I left him at home at half-past eight o'clock and went to Mr. Cash's, and had a pint of porter - I left there at eleven o'clock, and went from there to the Victory in Whitechapel, and stopped till near two o'clock; I went and got my dinner, and was seen to go into my own door, by a respectable witness.

WILLIAM CASH . I am landlord of the Jane Shore public-house, Shoreditch. I have known Salter above six years; I saw him on Sunday, the 25th of August - he left my house about ten minutes before eleven o'clock, it being service time - I always close my house; I did so on that day - he returned to my house about half-past two o'clock, or a little more, and went out - it might be a quarter before three o'clock, when I closed my house for the afternoon service, and I saw him about half-past eight o'clock at night; he had on the same coat that day as he has on now - I am confident of it, because Mrs. Cash laughed at him about throwing off his black coat on the Sunday.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. He was in the habit of wearing a black coat before, was he? A. He was; I have seen him in a brown coat before - I had known him well, but only by sight; he said he lived at No. 1, Mount-street - I have seen Sargood at my house; I have seen them together, but not frequently - Salter was there more times than Sargood - I never knew Sargood go by the name of Smith - Sargood was in my house that morning about half-past eight o'clock - I cannot answer whether Salter was there then - Salter came about half-past nine o'clock; Sargood was not there then - I know this was the 25th of August, because I heard he was in trouble on the Tuesday following - he gets his living by industry; he has been in the military line - he worked for his brother at the horse-hair business - he belonged to the musicians in the Tower Hamlets; he has not left that long - Sargood and he did not to my knowledge live together; they were friends, they drank together at different times - I did not see Sargood at all except just after breakfast-time that Sunday - my house is about five miles from Tottenham - the latest time I saw Salter in the afternoon was a quarter to three o'clock.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you go to Edmonton? A. Yes, and bailed Sargood - I have kept the public-house eight years.

COURT. Q. Were any of your family at home that day? A. I have only a wife and servants; my wife was at home - she is not here, nor the servants.

- CONGDEN. I kept the Victory public-house - I left it on the 24th of July, but I was in the house on the 25th of August - I have seen Salter several times; I saw him on the 25th of August, in the parlour of the Victory, Friar's-mount, Bethnal-green, by Shoreditch church; I saw him from half-past eleven to twelve o'clock, and I left him at twelve o'clock - to the best of my knowledge he had on the same coat he has on now.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Will you swear it was not a black coat? A. It was certainly not black, that I will swear - the Tottenham coaches go from the Basing-house, about a quarter of a mile from the church - I don't know whether it would take a man long to get to Tottenham from there - I have not known him long; I had seen him six or eight times in the house - I don't know Sargood; I have seen him at my house, but not with Salter.

COURT. Q. When did you go to the public-house? A. I am there every day - I know it was on that day, because I had a collector who used to collect for me; he ran away with part of the property, and I was obliged to go down on Sunday to receive my money, and I saw this man there - I was there at half-past eleven, and he was there when I went in; I left about twelve o'clock - the house shuts up during Divine service, but my collector

pays me my rents there, having several houses in the neighbourhood, and several tenants of mine had come there to pay my rents; one of them is here, a man named Smith, who paid me rent at the time - Smith lives in Mount-court, Friar's-mount, No. 4, some call it Mount-place - neither of the prisoner are my tenants - I don't hold the house Salter lives in.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-100

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1303. JOSEPH WOOD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Scoulen , on the 21st of March , and stealing therein 13/4 yards of woollen cloth, value 19s.; 1 jacket, value 16s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 17s., and 1 waistcoat, value 5s., his property .

JOSEPH SCOULEN. I am a tailor , and live in King-street, Poplar - I reside with my father-in-law, William McHappie - I occupy the back room on the ground floor, and sleep in the second-floor back-room; I don't pay rent for the rooms - I use the back room as a tailor's shop, it opens into a passage at the foot of the stairs; the street-door is at the end of the passage - my father-in-law lives in the house, and keeps the key of the street-door - on Friday night, the 21st of March, I went to bed about twelve o'clock, I left some cloth and a black coat in a handkerchief, a brown jacket, a pair of brown trousers, and sundry articles partly made; next morning I missed them - my mother got up first - the shutter was up when I went to bed, but not fastened, and the window was down - the prisoner has worked for me off and on for eight months; he might have worked for me about a month or five weeks before in my shop - next morning when I missed the things, I examined and found footmarks on a neighbour's garden - the window opens into a yard which is brick-paved, and foot-marks could not be seen there, but the neighbour's garden was newly dug up - there is a wooden paling, seven feet high, between them, and on the other side of that paling was the foot-marks; they were like the foot-marks of a man - I was present when Cockrene the policeman compared the foot-marks the next morning with some shoes; I had got the shoes from the prisoner's master, Mr. Jackson, who we both worked for; he is not here - I did not know the shoes myself.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Are you quite sure it happened on the night of the 21st of March? A. We went to bed at twelve o'clock on the night of the 21st of March.

SAMUEL CHRISTIAN WILLIAMS . The prisoner lodged at my house for seven or eight months - a woman lodged with him as his wife - he left me on the morning of the 15th of March - his wife left on the 16th, in the night - I heard of this robbery, and went with the policeman on Friday morning, the 22nd of March, and examined the foot-marks in the garden - I did not see the shoes compared - while I was with the policeman I met the woman who lived with the prisoner in Dunk-street, Whitechapel - the policeman took from her a bundle in a handkerchief - no shoes were left in my house - when he went away they took away every thing they had - the policeman and I went home with the woman to her lodgings, Rose-lane, Wentworth-street, kept by Sarah Martin - I saw a tinder-box in the fire-place, but neither steel, flint, nor tinder with it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know that on the 15th of March, the prisoner had obtained work at some distance from your house? A. No; he had not, for he told me he had not - he left me clandestinely.

SUSANNAH McHAPPIE . I am the mother of Scoulen. On the morning of the 22nd of March, when I came down I found every thing taken off the board in the workshop, and the window wide open - I was awoke about six o'clock in the morning, by hearing my neighbours talking - I went down immediately, and found the workshop as I have described - two suits had been removed from where they had been left; I observed foot marks in the next garden, they appeared to be footsteps of only one person - my daughter picked some things up; she gave me a piece of flint and steel, and two or three matches, one had been lighted and the others not - I gave them to the policeman.

ANN ELIZA SCOULEN. I am the prosecutor's sister - I picked up the flint, and steel, and tinder, and matches, in the workshop; they did not belong to the house; I gave them to my mother.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any lodgers in the house? A. Not then.

JONATHAN COCKRENE . I am a policeman. I have the steel here, and produce it - I have not the other things - I compared some shoes with footmarks in the next garden - the shoes were on the feet of a man who worked for the prosecutor, they were compared and did not match - no others were compared with them - Scoulen did not bring me a pair of shoes to compare, which were not on a man's feet; I apprehended the prisoner's wife, but not him; I went with Scoulen to Martin's; I took the bundle from the woman in the street - I saw the tinder-box at Martin's without flint or steel in it; the magistrate at Lambeth-street desired Scoulen to make use of the cloth in the bundle, as he wanted it; I gave it to Scoulen the bundle I took from the woman; Williams was with me when I took it from her; I gave the things in the bundle to Scoulen, after going before the magistrate.

SARAH MARTIN . I live at No. 8, Rose-lane. The prisoner lodged with me five or six days - he came about the 15th of March, a woman lodged with him as his wife, and a child; it was a furnished room, there was a tinder-box, flint, and steel in the room, among the furniture; the steel was very much like this, but one steel might be like another; there is no mark on it; I recollect the policeman coming to me on the 22nd of March with Williams; I showed them where the prisoner lodged; there was a tinder-box there then, but the flint and steel were not there; I had not been in their room while they were there; they left my house on the 22nd of March - they slept there on the night of the 21st of March both of them; I did not see the prisoner on the 21st of March, after dinner time, about noon; I never saw him any more till I saw him in custody; I saw a light in his room at two o'clock in the morning; I did not see him in the room; I saw the woman next morning - I saw the woman when I went to bed at ten o'clock at night - she was then at

work; I did not hear her go out; the prisoner was not in the house when I went to bed; they had no key of the outer door; it bolts inside, but has no lock; I did not bolt the door that night; I heard the woman bolt it after I went into my room to go to bed - I did not hear anybody go out in the night nor come in - I should have heard if I had been awake; I saw a light in their room about two o'clock in the morning; it shone into my room and I got out of bed; I heard no voices in their room.

Cross-examined. Q. There was a steel and flint in the room - when did you last see the steel? A. I never saw it till after he was taken to Lambeth-street; I had not seen it in my room after I gave it to them; I saw it when they came to lodge with me on the 15th, in the evening - I gave it to them.

JOSEPH SCOULEN re-examined. The policeman gave me the bundle, it was cloth - I used it by the magistrate's leave - I had bought three yards of the cloth, and cut a coat of it; and when it was before the magistrate, the chalk marks which I had left on the cloth to cut it by, were on it- I saw them - I can swear it was in my shop on the night of the 21st; I have not the least doubt of it - the cloth was in a handkerchief, which belongs to my brother - I have not brought that here - I have got a shirt front, which was found in the prisoner's lodging, which is mine, but I cannot tell whether it was taken that night or not - here it is - I know it by the tape, which I sewed on it myself - I found it myself at the prisoner's lodging at Martin's - I thought it was Cockrene that measured the shoes, but I may be mistaken, as there were two or three there at the time - my mother was present - it was a new pair of shoes, which had never been worn.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any mark on the cloth? A. Yes, a chalk line right across it; I had crossed it several times, it was three or four times across - the cross lines were made to cut the coat by, but the other line was made that I should not cut any further; to cut my coat according to my cloth.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent - I left my supposed wife about half-past eight o'clock in the morning in pursuit of work, I went in the country, and heard she was taken for felony when I came to London.

GUILTY. Aged 26. - Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-101

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1304. ELIZABETH WRATTEN * was indicted for that she, on the 26th of June , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows:

*Upon the prisoner being brought into court, on the previous day, to be arraigned, she did not plead to the indictment, and appeared to take no notice of what was passing. A Jury were impannelled to determine whether she was of sound mind, and upon the evidence of William Woodward , William George , Hannah Reeve , Thomas Wood , Thomas James , Thomas Gook , and Dr. Uwins, on her behalf; and Thomas Halifax , Francis Punter , Walter Smith , Thomas Danby , Samuel Gardner , John Burke , John Ward , William Simpson , Jonas Glapham , Mr. McMurdo, surgeon of Newgate, Sarah Ruthven , nurse, and Eliza Brown , sub-matron, the Jury found her of sound mind: and the Court ordered a plea of Not Guilty to be recorded.

"Woolwich Bank, 25th June, 1833.

"Messrs. Masterman pay Mr. Gregory or Bearer sixty pounds five shillings. For Budgen and Co.

" JOHN WARD ."

with intent to defraud William Masterman and others.

2nd COUNT. For uttering, disposing of, and putting away the said order, with like intent.

2 other COUNTS. The same, only stating her intention to be to defraud John Ward and others.

4 other COUNTS. The same, only omitting to set out the forged instrument.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DAWSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WARD . I am a partner in the house of Bugden and Co., banker s of Woolwich. We correspond with Masterman's bank - shortly before the 26th of June the prisoner came to the bank to get a cheque for 4l. 9s., which she said she was about to send to Lymington, she paid me 4l. 9s. for it - I did not see her again till she was in custody - the cheque was signed "for Bugden and Co., John Ward" (looking at the signature to the cheque in question) - this is a good resemblance of the signature to that cheque - our clerk afterwards received the cheque back from her, and gave her the money for it; I was in the bank at the time, but did not take notice of her - this cheque is not signed by me, it is not my hand-writing.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to swear that positively? A. Yes, the signature very much resembles my usual mode of writing, it very much resembles the signature to the cheque I gave her.

Q. Have the kindness to write "Messrs. Masterman and Co. pay to Mr. Gregory or bearer 60l., and 60l. 5s." in figures? (the witness did so.) Witness. I have written that the way I usually write - it is like the signature to the cheque in my opinion - I think it is rather smaller than that - I don't think that that "Gregory or bearer" is quite dissimilar; I think there is a character about it very like mine - I wrote the cheque in my ordinary hand - I think the two are alike - I knew the prisoner before: she frequently came to the bank; I frequently saw her myself - I should say she is fifty years old; I should not think she is nearer seventy; I am a very bad judge of ladies' ages.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am a clerk to William Masterman and Co., bankers - there are other partners - on the 26th of June the prisoner came to the banking-house, she presented this cheque for payment about three o'clock in the afternoon - Bugden and Co. of Woolwich have an account at our house - on taking the cheque from her hand, I observed something in the body of it which looked suspicious, and the appearance of it altogether - I took it to the counting-house, and afterwards to the country-office, where it was compared - I asked her if the cheque was payable to her, and she said yes, that was her name; it was payable to Mr. Gregory - I then went into the country-office, and returned to the counter; she remained there - I then asked for her address, and in what way she got possession of the cheque; she stated that she lived at No. 3, Stewart's-buildings, Battersea; and that this cheque formed part of a letter which was sent to her by the post, it has that appearance - I wrote the address she gave me on the cheque in her presence - I know the signature of Mr. Ward. I am in the habit of paying drafts which he draws - I consider this a very good imitation of his handwriting so that on mak

ing inquiry I was authorised to pay the cheque, and asked the prisoner how she would receive it - she said two twenties and four fives, or to that effect - I paid her two 20l. Bank notes, four 5l. notes, and 5s. in silver - she was in the banking house, for ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour - she answered to my questions quite readily; I paid her and she left.

Cross-examined. Q. She said, she would take two twenties and four fives did she? A. Yes, that was the way I paid her; I have not the least doubt she asked for the notes I gave her - I am not sure whether she answered "two twenties and four fives," or whether I asked her if she would have it in that way; I have not a doubt but she asked for two twenties and four fives; I will be positive she did ask for those particular notes, in the way I paid her - I cannot say whether she said she would have it so, or whether I asked her; I am aware that the prisoner's defence is weakness of intellect.

COURT. Q. Are you in the habit of suggesting what money cheques shall be paid in? A. Frequently parties say how they will have it, and if they do not say what they will have, we suggest it to them.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did she mention the description of notes, or did you suggest it? A. I have no doubt she did ask for the notes I paid her, for at the time I was paying it she inquired of me if it was in time to send money by the Portsmouth mail, and I considered she wanted small notes to inclose in a letter - I will swear she used the words two twenties and four fives; I am sure of it; I have not a doubt in my mind, that she asked for the particular notes I paid her, that she said, "Give me two twenties and four fives"; I have not a doubt of it - I have no doubt it was paid in the way she asked for it, but whether she said two twenties, or two 20l. notes I cannot say.

Q. Now, if she asked for any notes at all, did not she say "two 20l. notes and four 5l. notes," if she used any phrase at all about the notes? A. I cannot tell her exact words.

MR. BODKIN. Q."Twenties" and "fives" is a phrase used in banking-houses, to denote notes of that amount? A. Yes; she inquired if she was in time to send money by the mail; this was while I was paying her the notes - she asked when the Portsmouth mail went off - it was about three o'clock.

ELIZABETH DANCE. I live at No. 3, Stewart's-buildings, Battersea-fields. The prisoner did not live there; I know nothing of her at all.

JOHN PAGET TREMLET . I am clerk and shopman to Mr. Williams, of 174, Fenchurch-street, a hosier and linendraper. I remember seeing the prisoner in our shop, on Wednesday, the 26th of June, at near three o'clock in the afternoon; she asked the price of a gingham dress; she did not bargain for anything; she then asked for a pen and ink - she made no purchase in our shop - at her desire, Davies, a person in our employ was sent to Messrs. Hankey's bank; on his return, a police-officer was sent for, and she was taken into custody.

JONAS CLAPHAM . I am an officer. On the 26th of June I took the prisoner into custody; she was pointed out to me, and as soon as she saw me making towards her she attempted to run away; I caught her at the end of Fenchurch-street, and took her there - I inquired the charge from the last witness; he said it was for a forgery on Hankeys; I took her to the Mansion-house, and searched her - before I searched her I saw her thrust her hand into her pocket, in a hurried way, and immediately took hold of her right arm - I found her fist clenched and opened it with great difficulty, and there found two 20l. and four 5l. notes; I marked the notes and delivered them to Mr. Cope, the marshall; I marked them on the 27th, before they were out of my custody - I will not swear they were not out of my hands before I marked them, but they were not out of my sight - I believe they were not out of my hands; I believe Mr. Bush the solicitor, looked at them in my hands - I considered myself responsible for them, and that I ought not to lose sight of them; I believe Mr. Bush saw them in my hands - I have no recollection of delivering them into any person's hands; I do not believe I did; I was at the Mansion-house - I have no recollection of delivering them, (the notes,) there to anybody; but that was the following day, and I had marked them on the day I took them - before I went to the Mansion-house.

MR. DAWSON. Q. Take these notes in your hand and say whether they are the notes? A. They are the same.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What do you call them? A. Two 20l. notes and four 5l. notes - she put her hand into her pocket openly, so as I could see her; I was in my police dress at the time, and close to her; she must have seen me.

Q. She did not attempt to swallow them? A. I did not give her that opportunity; I supposed her to be between forty and fifty years old at that time, but she is very much altered since.

WILLIAM SIMPSON re-examined. I only entered the numbers of the notes which I paid, not the dates, the numbers are 5l., 23,222; 23,223; 15,874; 15,578 - and the 20l. 10,695, and 813; the notes produced are those numbers.(The Cheque was here put in and read.)

The prisoner being repeatedly desired by the Court and by her Counsel to enter upon her defence; made no reply for some time; but at last said, "The four corners of the earth and the strength of the hills is his also." "I said, they were all going down to the Red Sea." During the whole trial she kept distorting her feautures, working her fingers about, and conducting herself in an incoherent manner.

WILLIAM SIMPSON re-examined. I cashed the cheque; there was nothing of apparent incoherence in the prisoner's manner; nothing of any rambling at all.

JOHN PAGET TREMLET . I see the prisoner's manner now; there was nothing of that sort of behaviour at the time of the transaction.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear a person may not be perfectly collected one hour, and go perfectly mad the next? A. I will not swear it.

Q. Have you not known instances of fever, where a man may be perfectly sane the first forty years of his life, and then go quite mad for five years; and have his intellect all the rest of his life? A. I have heard of instances from fever; there was certainly not any aberation of intellect while with me - she was rational, and behaved as any sane person might have done - I don't think her mind was the least disturbed.

Witnesses for the Defence.

MARY ELIZABETH WRATTEN . I am the daughter of the prisoner. Some time ago my mother was carrying on business at Woolwich - I think she left it in the year 1831 - she had been carrying it on two or three years before - the house was once burnt down; my mother slept at the top of the house; I was not in the house at the time of the fire - my mother's conduct has been very strange indeed, occasionally; I have many times heard her threaten to put an end to herself; sometimes she said, she would hang herself; at other times, she said, she would cut her throat; we were always very much terrified at her threats.

Q. What grounds did she allege for hanging herself or cutting her throat? A. The least irritation in her family; she has behaved very violently towards us; she used to throw herself upon the ground, when she went off in these fits; and I used to be afraid she would injure herself very much, by so doing; throwing herself about with very great violence; since the fire, I think the business has not been so good; I assist occasionally in the business.

COURT. Q. Who conducted the business? A. My mother.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you with her when she kept the Northumberland Arms? A. Occasionally; I remember her taking a public-house, in London; she kept that only four months before she threw it up again - I never knew of any expectations we had of a large estate - I have seen her look as she does now, on many occasions, when throwing herself about, only not looking so ill; but she has exhibited that kind of manner many times - I must beg to say, at the Northumberland Arms, I irritated her slightly - I was going up stairs, and she would have thrown me down if I had not caught by the bannisters; I had given her very trifling irritation.

COURT. Q. Then the way she conducted herself at the Northumberland Arms was by violence? A. Yes; generally after the violence was over, perhaps she would turn to the action and manner she does now; I have seen her use her hands as she does now, before she was in custody, after the violence was over.

Q. How did you bring her to herself? A. We would keep her quiet a little while; being desirous nobody should see her in that state, I kept her as quiet as possible; I sometimes made her sit down, and sometimes lie down, and then I humoured her; the rest of the family saw her in that state; but I was particular that the world should not see her.

Q. You suffered her to go on, and conduct the business as usual? A. Yes; she had the whole management of the business; to pay and receive money; she cast up accounts; saw the customers; she drew bills, and accepted bills - I occasionally thought she managed her business in a very strange way.

Q. What instances can you state of any blunders in her business? A. In the management of her house she was anxious to remove from one place to another; she was never satisfied above a week, or a month, in one house - we removed a number of times on that account - when we left the shop, we moved to a cottage - we lived in the Northumberland Arms four months; and in the other place where she did business, eight years; we lived in several other houses; we moved to Greenhill-cottage, and were there three months; and then in King-street, six months; and in a cottage, at Bow, six months - she did not carry on business at all these places - she had given up the business at the Northumberland Arms - I think it was nearly twelve months; and then she was anxious to go into business, but against our wish, and she took a small concern, merely as we thought, to amuse her mind, it was in Church-street; she kept a grocer's business there; I cannot say whether there were any books kept there.

Q. Are her affairs at all embarrassed? A. I think she had got into a very strange manner - I had no reason to think she had lost by business, or was in debt.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did your mother lose property at the time of the fire? A. She lost a considerable quantity of property; she was insured - I cannot tell whether she lost property independent of the insurance - yes, she did; it is two years since the fire; I was sixteen years old at the time of the fire - I don't know that she has been unable to pay her bills since.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you here yesterday? A. Not in court; I was in the neighbourhood - brought here by my mother's friends; I had told them what I knew about her state of health and mind; I was not examined - I have seen her exhibit the symptoms she does now several times; she has been precisely in this way several times, and has continued so for some hours; it has not always continued for days; I have observed her strange for days, but not violent - I have not seen her in this state for days - I have seen her for hours in the state she is in now; I cannot say whether it has continued a whole day - it has not so violently; I don't think it is many days since she was in this state, indeed the morning she went away, I thought there was a particular strangeness attending her; I was at home that morning; I was under an impression that she was out of her mind for a long time; no medical men were ever called in to see the state of her mind - I did not conceive but what I could attend to her; she went to town alone; I think she walked down the road; she took a parcel with her; she told me she wished to see a gentleman on business in the Kent-road, but at the same time I observed a very great lightness in her manner - she did not tell me she was going to receive a cheque, or that she had received a letter from a friend with a cheque in it; she took the shop that she had at the time this happened, about two months after Christmas; I think she received £1000 from the insurance office after the fire; she lost her stock in trade, books, and every thing - to the best of my knowledge she told me she received £1000 from the insurance office - it was a month after the fire that she received it; it must be more than two years ago; I think it is three years.

Q. At the time she kept the public-house at Westminster, was your father in a situation at the docks at Woolwich? A. Yes; he never came home in the week, the business was entirely in my mother's management; my father continues to hold the situation at this time - it occupies his time all day; the business at Woolwich was managed by my mother; she saw the tradesmen

and purchased the articles - I don't think she gave any credit at that shop; I did not attend to the business, she managed it entirely herself.

COURT. Q. Was she strange in her conversation and manner, at the same time? A. Yes; she sometimes did extraordinary things when her mind seemed better; on the morning she left home she jumped about very different to what she was accustomed - she moved about the house very quick and light; her husband usually lived with her when he came home, but she slept with me sometimes, for I was afraid of her committing suicide; she first slept with me soon after the fire; I have been afraid of her committing suicide ever since the fire - I never expressed that idea even to my father, but I wished her to sleep with me, as he slept more sound than I did; if she made the least move she would awake me; I often got up and went to her room with some excuse, for fear anything should happen.

Q. Why did you allow her to go to town alone on this day? A. My father was so engaged he could only mind his own business at the docks; I allowed her to go alone for many reasons - we have often said we would not let her go to town alone, but it was driven off from time to time; economy was one reason why we allowed her to go alone: and if I went, I could not transact the business she did, as no gentleman would transact business with a young girl; it was too expensive for me to go with her and I thought she could conduct the business without me; it was of no moment; I thought her competent to transact it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has the business fallen off? A. It has come down to be not worth the name of business lately; it was a small concern merely to occupy her time; I have a sister, and a brother who is thirteen years old.

FRANCES REEVE . I am the prisoner's sister. I remember her coming to Worcestershire to see her mother, who was very ill - she came down on purpose to see her in the state of insanity she was in; to the best of my recollection it is upwards of four years ago - she knew my mother was in a state of insanity before she came to see her - a few minutes after she came into the house, she said she must be off again immediately; she said she came to spend the time with her mother; but instead of that she went to a neighbour's house, and spent her time mostly; my mother died in a state of insanity - she was in that state at times we were obliged to tie her down - her grandmother was in a raging state of insanity; she was obliged to be chained, and her aunt was insane several times, and was chained down several times also.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How long did she stay when she came to see her mother? A. I believe two days and two nights; her mother was quite incapable of seeing or knowing anybody; she came down alone, travelled by the stage, and took the stage from Pershore home - I cannot say whether she had seen her mother before she said she must go back again; she had not been there many minutes - the neighbour's house is about a quarter of a mile from my mother's; she came backwards and forwards - my mother had five children- the other three are living in good health.

Q. And you have had no affliction of your mind? A. Not particularly so; my head is very bad at times - I have violent pains in the head at times; I have not got it now; not more than a fortnight since my head was very bad - I have had my hair taken off twice. I remember when the fire happened at my sister's house; the last witness was at my house at the time - it happened the summer before the death of my mother - it is more than four years ago; I live in Worcestershire - I have not been up to town for ten years - I have not seen her since she came to see my mother.

COURT. Q. When your mother or grandmother shewed symptoms of insanity, have these symptoms been attended with violence? A. At times, but not always; they have been very quiet at times.

Q. What strangeness of conduct did they exhibit? A. They could not answer any questions put to them - at times my aunt would assist in business, and be outrageous at times; her business was very trifling; she had a husband living - she very seldom answered rationally; at times, when she was insane, she would appear like other people, but it would be gone in a few minutes; for a few minutes she would be out of it, and then in it immediately - she very seldom would speak when she was in it; I have not been with the prisoner - I never heard of the prisoner being supposed to be insane till she was charged with this.

THOMAS WOOD . About fifteen months ago I was assistant to the prisoner at the Northumberland Arms - she used to give me directions to dovarious things, and then contradict those directions; I remember her calling me and the female servant up at night - she said there were thieves in the cellar, and she could hear them knock; but we could hear no knocking, though we were in the same room - I remember her on another occasion fancying there were thieves in the chimney, and there was a fire in the grate at the time - she wanted to let the house after she had been in it a week; I always thought she was out of her mind - she went about the house doing what business there was.

MR. DAWSON. Q. When she said she heard the noise which you did not hear, was her husband living in the house? A. He was not at home, he was at Woolwich - she was in the parlour, and said she heard the noise in the cellar - we stood in the parlour; she called us up about three o'clock in the morning - I was not with her when she first said she heard the noise; she kept us in the parlour, and said she could hear the noise underneath; she then went to bed again - she was in bed and got up, and came down and insisted that she heard the noise- she must have heard it first in her bed-room - on saying we did not hear the noise, she went to bed; I heard her come up after me; she gave very little credit in the house; she had the care of the till - she took care to lock it up, either she or her daughter; it was always locked up every night - I have frequently seen her lock it up - she seemed very careful of it always.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did she persist in it that she heard the noise of thieves knocking? A. She did - we could not hear the slightest knocking all the time she said it was going on.

THOMAS JAMES . I am assistant to Mr. Hitchcock, a broker, at Woolwich. We let some furniture to the prisoner - I remember last winter calling with Mr. Hitchcock for 3l., which she owed him; she stated, that in a

short time she was coming to an estate, and then would discharge that, and return the furniture and buy new furniture - when she came down to us she was dressed quite in an indelicate state, with her bosom quite exposed; she had nothing except a little shawl on the back of her shoulders, and her petticoat and shift on; it was about eleven o'clock in the day; Hitchcock was a grown up man as I am; she did not exhibit the slightest shame at being so exposed; her bosom, down to her waist, was stark naked - I have heard her talk of coming to an estate, at other times.

COURT. Q. In what terms did she talk of large property coming to her? A. She said, she had a large sum of money and an estate in the country, coming from some relative - I understood her that it was out of this large estate she was to pay the 3l.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did she pay the 3l.? A. No, never; this was the beginning of last year; it was for the hire of furniture - I called several times for my money, but was not able to get it; I believe I have seen her once since, and asked her for the money; she gave me the same tale, that she was coming to a large estate, and would pay Mr. Hitchcock and buy new furniture.

Q. What part of the house did you see her in? A. I was ushered into the parlour, by a servant, and waited for half an hour - I supposed she was not up; she came down to speak to us in that state; she did not present the appearance of a person coming down suddenly, half dressed; she had a flannel petticoat on, and a shawl hastily thrown over her, but had her bosom exposed; she did not come down in a hurried manner - we were not expected to come that day - I cannot say whether she was aware who was to see her when she came down - nobody was in the parlour besides us; it was a private-house, not a public-house; it was in Bow-water-crescent, the servant let us in.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you send the servant up to tell her you were waiting? A. No doubt she told her; I asked for her mistress; she had half an hour to dress, if she chose.

Q. Was not Mr. Hitchcock so deaf that you were obliged to tell him what she said? A. At times he could hear better than at others; I told him what she said.

MARY ELIZABETH WRATTEN re-examined. Q. Did you take your meals with the prisoner? A. Yes; she did not drink spirits; she might take a portion, but not more than other people; she did not take spirits every day; she was by no means in the habit of taking spirits, nor laudanum, she was never intoxicated; she would taste spirits if they were on the table.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. Some time ago, in the early part of last year, I went with some companions to the Northumberland Arms, kept by the prisoner - I went to spend about half an hour there with six or seven more persons; I saw the prisoner there; not one of us spent our money there, for she behaved in that strange way; the most inconsistent way possible - when we called for something she turned her back to us, and we could not get a rational answer; one our party said, "Why bring us here, when we cannot get served;" we asked for liquor again, and were more than half an hour in the house, and then we went to another house, as we could get nothing - four or five strangers left the house also, who were calling for something, and could not get served - I thought nobody in their senses would act so.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you a constable of that district? A. No; I had been at the House of Commons, on duty.

Q. I believe constables expect to be treated with very great respect at public-houses? A. No; there were several persons in the tap-room; one man, with a pipe, wanted a pint of porter, and could not get served; he went out with his pipe - three customers stood at the bar, wishing to be served; when I went in with seven others, we could not get served, and left.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did she turn her back to you instead of turning to you? A. Certainly; I did not see her serve any customers at all; it was about seven o'clock in the evening.

COURT. Q. Did she appear to you to be sober? A. I do not think it was the act of a drunken person; I fancied at the time it might be the case, and watched her; she went out of the bar into the tap-room; persons spoke to her there, and she returned to the bar without noticing them; I said, "My good lady have the goodness to attend to us;" having to go back to the House of Commons again, but I could get no answer.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did she reel or stagger as if tipsy? A. Certainly not; I considered her manner to be from wildness of mind - I watched her, thinking her drunk, but my impression was entirely altered before I left the house.

DAVID UWINS , ESQ. M.D. I am a physician, and live in Bedford-row - I have been twenty-five years in the profession; I have had considerable experience in cases of insanity, having been connected for the last five or six years with a lunatic establishment - I attended at the prison at the request of the prisoner's relatives, to ascertain the state of her mind - I examined her three times; I had some suspicion of acting at first - I endeavoured to ascertain as accurately as possible, if that suspicion was correct - I have heard the evidence of the witnesses - from what they have stated, and from my own observation, I should say her intellect is by no means such as would be considered sound; I should say she is in a state of feeble intellect - I should consider her an irresponsible being.

Q. Should you be at all surprised at her committing suicide? A. No, I should not be surprised at it - I have written on the subject of insanity - I distinctly state and maintain there is no possibility of drawing the line precisely between sanity and insanity; that assuming a point of sanity, is assuming a point which cannot exist - it is not possible, in my opinion, to point out where sanity ends, and insanity begins - a person may be perfectly sane for a week, and next week quite the reverse.

Q. There have been, I believe, instances in this kingdom, in which the mind has gone all at once, and returned, and very high duties have been performed? A. Certainly.

COURT. Q. That being the case, would you not judge of the state of mind, by the degree of contrivance exhibited at the time of a transaction; should you deem a person

insane who appeared aware of what he was about, and contrived and took measures for his own benefit? A. I cannot say that an act itself sane, might not be coupled with insanity.

Q. You have heard of the prisoner obtaining a writing, and presenting one resembling it, and obtaining through that, a sum for her own benefit? A. I have heard of aberration of mind, being manifested before that took place - I can conceive a great deal of contrivance in the process of effecting a design.

Q. Would such a degree of contrivance be consistent with imbecility or idiotcy; would it be consistent with the absence of reason? A. Among my patients at the Institution, they have gone through the process of reasoning for the object they have in desire, as a sane person would - the act itself, I should not call an act of insanity, but should conclude that an individual being insane, could perform that act; there may be considerable imbecility of mind, and yet the process of reasoning exist - I conceive it possible for an individual to act as the prisoner did with respect to this cheque, without knowing the degree of responsibility under which she herself must stand in reference to it.

Q. Is it not within your experience, that many persons partially insane, are perfectly capable of knowing they are doing a wrong act? A. That more refers to cases of monomania.

Q. Do you conceive all this stratagem might be employed without a consciousness of there being anything wrong in it? A. I conceive it possible, having seen several instances where the object has been of less importance, where the same process has gone on - I merely allude to this as matter of opinion and comparison - I should not pronounce that the prisoner was positively unconscious of a deviation from moral rectitude.

Q. Should you hesitate to say that this act of the prisoner could be any other than the act of a reasonable mind? A. I could conceive it, and from the circumstances of the case, I must unequivocally state, I should feel a reluctance in condemning her - the motive would considerably influence my opinion, but it is impossible to state what the motive really was - persons partially insane at intervals, are perfectly competent and sane at others.

Q. Would you not judge of the state of mind by the act - supposing a person executed a will in every respect as a person of sound mind, would it not lead you to conceive it was made in a sound state of mind? A. That would be a circumstance, but it would not be conclusive.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You have heard the evidence of her conduct within the last four years, and observed her yourself, and heard that her grandmother and aunt died in a state of insanity, and the aunt raving mad; do you think that at any time within the last two years, it would be safe to trust her, or that you would trust her with the management of property? A. Certainly not; nor should I think any instrument she executed was valid - I think there are no proofs of her insanity at the time in question; I don't think she was in a state to distinguish right from wrong at the time of this affair.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you hear the witnesses examined yesterday after you had given your evidence? A. I did; I heard Mr. Mc Murdo examined - I have already admitted there was a good deal of feigning; when I saw her in Newgate she appeared sensible of the importance of establishing her insanity; I saw her a second time, and still considered she was feigning; I had some conversation with her solicitor and her friends before the third interview - my opinion became modified at the third interview; I am not prepared to say she is decidedly insane - my opinion of her insanity is fully as strong as it was yesterday, and stronger; as I have heard the evidence on both sides; the evidence given of her sanity did not weaken my opinion in the least - when there is any symptom of insanity, we cannot suppose a person accountable - I should not admit the act performed by the prisoner was itself insane, but if the party was insane the day or week before I should say the act though apparently a rational one, might be the act of an insane person; when we take into account the exceeding cunning connected with mental aberration, especially where there is an intention to accomplish an object - supposing her to be insane before, I do not think the transaction the result of insanity, but consistent with insanity.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you known persons labouring under insanity pursue an object with a cunning you would only expect from very clever persons? A. Certainly; in the only instance of suicide which has occurred since I have been physician of the Asylum at Peckham, the cunning evinced for months and weeks to accomplish the purpose would surprise every body.

COURT. Q. But that was an insane object? A. Yes.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Whether the object was to the person's interest or prejudice, have you known instances of their endeavouring to effect their purpose, by means quite as cunning as you would expect from the highest order of intellect? A. Certainly; I should say the object in view had some supposed good in contemplation.

COURT. Q. Is not the very act of suicide a symptom of insanity? A. With submission, I do not entirely admit that; it evinces an absence of moral principle, but that is delinquency - I should say insanity prevented the individual from being fully sensible of the delinquency; I should not allow a man to be insane that went from the gaming table and blew his brains out.

Q. Where the object is obviously beneficial to the parties, and they pursue every reasonable means to accomplish it, is it not evidence of sanity rather than insanity? A. It is abstractedly, but it might be quite the reverse.

Q. How could you judge of a lucid interval except from the conduct of the party? A. It must last for a long time before I could guarantee its long continuance; you cannot always determine an apparently lucid interval correctly, but if it lasts a long time from acts of insanity, I should determine it to be a lucid interval; it would require a very long probation.

Q. When a person acts with reference to the transaction in question, exactly as anybody else would do, why do you pronounce that person insane? A. Because we have heard the person was insane before in other instances - I do not come here as an advocate, nor do I positively say she was not conscious of the delinquency of the vact.

Q. Is there anything beyond what you have heard that leads you to suppose her deranged; is there anything constitutional? A. I never could discover her breath to

be in a fetid state, which is usually a characterestic feature of insanity.

MR. BODKIN called the following witness.

THOMAS HALIFAX . I am an apothecary, at Woolwich, a graduate in medicine. I have attended the prisoner's family as a medical attendant - I was never called to attend her on the score of madness - I always considered her perfectly sound in mind; I saw her in June last I think; it was in June or the end of May; I saw her at her own house, and had some conversation with her relative to the receipt of some money she was to receive from a friend of her's, and was to deliver to me - she had not then received the money, but I had understood she had, and had a conversation with her on the subject, and on some other affairs relative to the family, from whom it was to come - she explained the circumstances how she was to receive the money, and explained my mistake, why she had not it ready for me - it was a mistake on my part, and she explained it - from that conversation I should say she was perfectly sound in mind, as I have witnessed on former occasions; I have known her seven or eight years - I have been the medical attendant of the family during the whole of that time - in my opinion, her mind, during the whole of that time, has been perfectly correct and sound.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you heard the evidence given to day? A. I have; I cannot say it shakes my opinion; it creates a degree of doubt, but in a very minute degree - such a degree of doubt, that from such circumstances, I should not form any opinion, unless, as I stated before, I was in possession of circumstances connected with each fact enabling me to conclude - I said, yesterday, that it would shake my opinion; but I modified my answer in the same manner, that it would shake my opinion, if unexplained - I said so to the best of my belief; and that her grandmother, mother, and aunt dying in a state of raving insanity - her coming down to two young men with her person exposed, and her imagining thieves were in the chimney, while there was a fire in the grate - and that there was a knocking underneath, when others could not hear, was inconsistent with other facts - I did not say absolutely that it would shake my opinion - I said the mere facts would, without any explanatory facts, which might be offered - I came here to deliver the truth - I said, I was a graduate in medicine, by which I meant doctor of medicine - I considered doctor of medicine would be understood by that - I consider them synonymous - I have been in practice above ten years - I was graduated in Edinburgh - I am not a member of the College of Physicians, in London - I have no connexion with any insane institution - my practice has not been considerable in public institutions for insane persons; I have had under my own hands several cases - I cannot answer at the moment how many I have had within ten years - I have one under treatment at this instant, an individual residing at Woolwich - I will not swear whether I have had five in this year or not - I believe Dr. Uwins has an experience of two hundred a week - I did not visit the prisoner in prison - I consider a disorder of some intellectual faculty, a symptom of insanity - monomania, is insanity, relative to one particular subject, distinguished from a disordered intellect relative to all affairs.

Q. In a person proved clearly insane at one time, do you think it easy to distinguish when the process of insanity ceased? A. Unless I had some evident proof in language, or wandering of thought, or particular conduct, I should not form an opinion on the subject; it is known that insane persons have pursued an object of self-interest with a degree of cunning which belongs to very few except the most exalted talents; but I should distinguish the conduct she exhibited at the time, compared with previous conduct - the conduct of the prisoner previously, would determine me as to the state of mind at the time - I consider a person sane at the time, whose conduct is sane, and whose view of things is the same as persons in their ordinary senses.

Q. If they were a little mad before and after, would not that influence you? A. It would depend on the conduct at the time; I know of no means but comparison - I have visited Miles' mad-house, at Hoxton, with a view to place a person there - my reading on insanity has been cursory; I have read Dr. Burrows' work.

COURT. Q. You think the conduct of the individual would determine your opinion of the state of mind at the time? A. Yes.

FRANCIS PUPTER . I am a baker, and live at Woolwich. I have been acquainted with the prisoner fourteen or fifteen years; I had frequent opportunities of seeing her; I had transactions with her in business, and have lent her money - about nine years ago I lent her 100l. to take a shop; the first application was from her, and then she and her husband; came both together; she told me the purpose she wanted it for - she and her husband were both together when I advanced the money; my acquaintance continued till within three or four weeks of this matter - in all my intercourse with her she has appeared to conduct herself like a rational person; there was nothing in her conduct to induce me to suppose that she was a person who could not distinguish right from wrong.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Should you not be surprised at her coming down stairs to two men with her neck bare? A. Yes; I should think it an act of indecency quite inconsistent with correctness of mind; it would appear as if she was going rather astray - it would appear strange if she had told me there were thieves in the chimney while there was a fire in the grate - I saw her every day; her habits were those of a regular, quiet, decent woman; a woman as fit for business as any woman in the world; she conducted the whole business herself.

Q. If she turned her back on seven customers and obliged them to leave, should you not think she was going a little astray? A. Yes; it never was the case when she was at Woolwich; I should imagine if she had done that thirteen months ago, she was a very different woman to what she was when I knew her - I am not much acquainted with subjects of insanity.

MR. BODKIN. Q. These circumstances would strike you as strange, but if afterwards she conducted herself as before, would that impression be removed? A. It might be so.

COURT. Q. Up to what time did you know her? A. I saw her about three weeks before she was taken into custody, at my house at Woolwich - the Northumberland Arms is at Westminster - she lived in Woolwich when this matter happened.

WALTER SMITH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Andrews, at Woolwich. I have known the prisoner about five years; I lived in her house till two years ago last June; it was subsequent to the fire - she generally managed all the business; Mr. Wratten was in it a little in the evening - all the time I knew her, she always conducted herself in a proper kind of way - I never saw her amiss - I never thought her anything out of the way, or out of her mind - I have known her since I left her up to about four months; I never thought she was insane; she conducted herself like other people.

SAMUEL GARDNER . I live at Deptford; I am a grocer. I have known the prisoner about fourteen years; I have had considerable dealings with her in business; she managed the business at Woolwich, her husband never interfered; she failed in 1830 - I knew her before that; I knew her previous to the fire; and by referring to my ledger to-day, I find from 1826, until the time of the fire, I had very considerable transactions with her - I have known her since the fire, up to the present time - before, and since the fire, I have from time to time, been concerned with her in business, but not the whole time - my dealings have generally been with her, or my young man has dealt with her; she conducted herself always as a very rational, and very clever woman in business; she gave her orders, and depended on my honour to serve her; she gave orders in a business-like manner - she paid me in money; she may have paid me bills, but I never drew bills on her - I frequently settled accounts with her; she understood them as far as was necessary in her business - at the time of the fire, having received money from the fire-office, she came and paid her debts, and then commenced again; and at that period, I had a very high opinion of her, and opened a new account; she gave me an order to the amount of 160l., and since that she has failed at the expiration of one year, in November, 1830 - on the 13th of February last, she called to open a new account with me, after having failed twice - I declined taking her order until security was offered - she was with me an hour or two; securities were proposed by herself; she named them - she brought her brother to my house as security, and I did not accept it; that was on another day - during these transactions, she appeared perfectly conscious of what she was doing.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Within what time did she fail twice? A. She failed in 1830, and again about twelve months ago - she failed in 1830 and 1832 - she had been in business a long time before - she never wanted to borrow money of me; it was because I did not approve of the security that I would not open a fresh account with her; if it had been only 5l. I would not have given her credit for it, nor for 1d. not at that time - she has had a reverse of fortune - I trusted her for a year after the fire and she failed again - it was in February last - I would not trust her, as I have lost 170l. by her - I considered she had treated me ill - I trusted her after 1830, to the amount of 7l.; 5l. of which has not been paid; I thought her not trustworthy in February last.

MR. BODKIN. Q. In February last did you call her attention to the 5l.? A. I did, and she said she would pay it some day; when she failed, her brother proposed to pay 5s. in the pound for her; she attended and explained the state of her affairs to her creditors, but not at all to their satisfaction; she explained it so as to make them understand it would be best to take the 5s.

JOHN BURKE . I keep a tavern at Greenwich. I have known the prisoner about seven years - I saw her last about nine months ago - I always considered her a very clever shrewd woman, the whole time I knew her; she called on me relative to taking the Ship tavern, twelve months ago - she asked the usual questions, went over the premises, inquired the profits, and every circumstance - she was there half an hour - in the inquiries she made, she showed herself a particularly shrewd woman; she inquired the profits and what business was done, and the amount of business, and what it would take to come in, and every necessary question - from every thing I saw of her, my opinion is that she was a very clever shrewd woman, and of perfectly sound mind - her husband was with her, but she undertook all the inquiry, and her husband did not interfere.

Cross-examined. Q. I dare say she was the cleverest woman you ever saw in your life? A. She was.

HENRY MOODY . I am a baker, living at Woolwich. I have known the prisoner ten years or more; I have not had any particular dealings with her - I have seen her within the last four months; I should think her a woman of perfectly sane mind, and a very acute, intelligent woman - I never observed anything to induce me to conceive to the contrary.

Cross-examined. Q. What should you think of her stripping and showing her naked bosom? A. It would appear very indelicate - it would appear rather strange if she attempted to persuade me there were thieves in a chimney and a fire in the grate; I have spoken to her within the last two months, prior to her committal, and I have spoken to her in this court, and at the last sessions, and up to within a week of her committal; she appeared a perfectly modest woman, and particularly acute and intelligent.

Q. Would you not be astonished at her turning her back against seven customers and driving them out of the place without taking their money? A. It is singular, but many persons in trade are eccentric; very likely she is one of them - at times there is something in trade which turns people eccentric - if she was not eccentric, I should think it strange her turning her back on customers - I should think it very odd if she acted so.

MR. BODKIN. Q. It would depend on what sort of customers came? A. Certainly.

THOMAS DANBY . I am a grocer, living in Whitechapel. I am not at all aware of the prisoner's state of mind.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you state yesterday that on one occasion she appeared to you to be strange in her manner? A. Yes; she came to open an account with me six months ago, I declined opening the account several times, till at last she brought security - I stated I thought she was not capable of managing her business, and I declined it, because she appeared so exceedingly strange,

and exhibited such conduct, begging for goods, and crying, and making such exclamations; her manner was quite incoherent - I asked who was going to assist her in business, she said her daughter - her manner appeared very much changed from that of her usual manner - I was subpoened to attend on the part of the prosecution.

COURT. Q. What sort of exclamation did she make use of, was it the importunity of begging you to trust her? A. It might arise from that, she called repeatedly for a fortnight, and seemed very anxious to be served with goods, imploring me to give her credit, and that it should be paid - she did not complain of being refused credit elsewhere - she begged I would send goods in, and she would pay me at the regular time - she seemed very much distressed at my making a difficulty about it, and went about the room for an hour together, wringing her hands and crying - I gave her credit at last - she was very different when she obtained her object, she then appeared milder; she appeared thankful, and expressed herself so - she said she was going to have goods at a cheesemongers - she might have probably said it was important for her to have the goods - I let her have them, because I got security for them - at one time the daughter came, the only words the daughter used were, "We had better go away, Mr. Danby declines to give credit," and the prisoner said she hoped I should change my mind.

MR. GILBERT McMURDO . I am the medical man employed in the gaol. My attention has been called to the prisoner since she has been confined, as to whether she was sane or otherwise - I was examined yesterday, and said I would rather not give a positive opinion, but rather thought she was feigning; since that I have taken particular pains to ascertain her state of mind, and from information I have received in her presence to-day, I should say I consider her to be positively of sane mind - I was told in her presence of observations she has made relative to her trial; she made no observations to me about it, nor in my presence - I told her what I had heard of her since yesterday, and of what she had said; she appeared to understand me, but would not answer - I told her that she had said to one of the nurses, "I know all that has passed in the Court," and I said, "I understand, Mrs. Wratten, although you behaved well to Mrs. Ruthven up to this time, yet in consequence of her evidence to-day, you have behaved ill to her, striking her, and threatening her daughter, by which it appears you fully understood her evidence;" she made no observation, but she did not make the motion of her eye, or the distortion of her face, as she does now; she appeared to know what I was saying, but would not answer me - I have observed her manner at the bar, she can conduct herself different at times in the gaol; and when I was sitting in the box just now, the moment I spoke to her, to try the effect of my observation, she instantly began to assume the position of the eye, which has been observed; she was perfectly right before, and she began moving her mouth as she does now.

Q. Then from your observations, and from what passed, you are of opinion she is not insane, but of sound mind? A. That is my opinion; I did not like to give so decided an opinion yesterday, as I heard some of her relatives have been mad, and we have understood that madness is hereditary.

SARAH RUTHVEN . I am superintendant in the infirmary in Newgate; my attention has been directed to the prisoner; she has been principally under my care; she never spoke to me until the day before yesterday - she then came into my room, and seemed very cold; I asked her to sit down and warm herself, which she did, and she then said she should like to tell me all about it - I asked what she meant, and told her I wished she would tell me about it; she then turned round and went out of the room; and yesterday when she came out of Court, she came up stairs in a dreadful rage, and kicked over a bucket of water; I said if she behaved so she must have on a straight jacket - she kicked me and became quite outrageous; afterwards she came into my room, and was dreadfully abusive to me; saying it was all my doing, that I was the wretch who had done it; she did not say what; I had been examined yesterday as to my observation of her conduct.

Q. From the observations you made of her conduct and demeanour, do you believe her insane or of sound mind? A. I shall always think she is of sound mind; I really do - but I think she has been greatly distressed in mind owing to her situation; she said she was quite aware of everything that was going on in court yesterday; and I mentioned it to Mr. McMurdo before her to-day; she made no reply whatever.

ELIZABETH BROWN . I am a sub-matron; I have seen the prisoner several times - I considered she was not quite right in her mind, but likewise considered she assumed a great deal more than is really the case; I am of that opinion still; I have spoken to her repeatedly, she has not given me any answer; I have found, when she has thought she was not observed, that she has been calm and collected in appearance; but when she knew she was observed, or I found she knew she was observed, she put on all these grimaces and actions; I saw her after coming out of court yesterday - I heard her making a great noise calling out murder; I went up and saw her confined down on the bed, she had kicked over a bucket of water, and was very refractory; she has been violent at times before, and had the straight waistcoat on; but she was much more violent when she came out of court than I had ever seen her before.

GUILTY . Aged 50. - Transported for Life .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18330905-102

NEW COURT. Saturday, September the 7th, 1833.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1305. WILLIAM PRITCHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , 24 cups, value 35s.; 12 saucers, value 18s.; 1 tea pot and stand, value 18s.; 1 sugar box, value 7s.; 1 cream jug, value 12s.; 1 slop bason, value 7s.; and 2 plates, value 12s.; the goods of William Taylor Copeland and another, his masters, in their dwelling house ; and GEORGE COOPER was indicted for receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

Messrs. ADOLPHUS and CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

MR. THOMAS GARRETT . I am in partner ship with Mr. William Taylor Copeland , there is no other partner; our

warehouse is in Portugal-street, Lincolns-inn-fields, in the parish of St. Clement Danes ; there is no one sleeps on those premises, but they communicate with the dwelling house which is in Lincolns-inn-fields; the house is in another parish; on the 26th of July, I received some communication from Groves, and I sent for the prisoner Pritchard, who was a warehouseman of ours; I asked him if he had sent any goods to Mr. Groves, of Blackfriar's-road; he said he had; I requested to refer to a book, and on looking back to the 23rd of July, I saw an entry in Pritchard's hand-writing, to a person named Cooper, in Wellington-street, Blackfriars-road; I asked Pritchard what it was; he said a few odd pieces of earthenware which had been sent to Cooper, and which had been paid for; I asked how much, he said he could not recollect exactly; and on reference to the cash book, there was no entry in the name of Cooper; it was his duty to have every sum entered in the cash book, whether small or large.

COURT. Q. Did your house at all know Cooper as dealing with you? A. No.

Pritchard. It was not my place to enter in the cash book. Witness. No, but to go to the clerk and see that it was entered,

THOMAS BOWNIE . I am in the employ of Messrs. Copeland and Garrett; Pritchard applied to me for some patterns of tea service; I showed him I believe four - he afterwards applied to me for one of those services, which he had - it was the only one we had of that pattern; here is a tea pot of the same, which had belonged to another service, which had been sold all but the tea pot - the other entire service I gave to Pritchard; he said he had sold them, but he did not say to whom; I assisted him to look it out, and he took it from the counter; the price of it was four guineas and a half.

DAVID DAVIS . I am in the employ of the prosecutors, Barnard Turney is in their employ. On the 23rd of July, I heard Pritchard ask Turney to pack a tea service which was in the packing room, Pritchard asked me to help to bring it down, which I did - I brought down some, and Pritchard brought the rest - it was put down by the side of Turney - it was packed up, and Pritchard put the direction on - it was G. Cooper, or George Cooper , at Knight's livery stables, Wellington-street, Blackfriars-road - when it was packed Pritchard asked me to take it there, and I asked him whether it was entered in the book, which is customary for all parcels to be, which go from our warehouse - he said, he had not entered it, but he would, and he got the book and entered it - I then took the parcel as it was directed - I saw Cooper the prisoner there - he was a stranger to me, but he said, he was the person - I delivered him the parcel, he signed the book, and I returned home.

Pritchard. It was not my place to enter these things, but Mr. Powell was at his dinner. Witness. It was anybody's business if Mr. Powell was not there, any one who sent goods out was to enter them.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was it usual to enter all goods before they went out? A. Yes, that was the reason why I inquired if they had been entered.

The direction being read from the book was, "Mr. G. Cooper, Mr. Knight's livery stables, Wellington-street, Blackfriars."

SPENCER THOMAS GARRETT . I am a clerk in the employ of Messrs. Copeland and Co. Messrs. Yeats of Staffordshire, are manufacturers of poreelain, they sell to us occasionally, and there is an engagement on their part, that any pattern chosen by our house shall not be sent to any other person - about eight months ago this pattern of tea service was ordered by our house, and two services were sent, and in November last, one of those services was sold with the exception of this tea-pot, which is here- there was still one service of it in our house, and this tea-pot, and that service has never to the knowledge of the firm been sold to anybody - no other service of that pattern has ever been ordered - the selling price of it was four guineas and a half - the sum of 2l. would be nothing like the manufacturer's price - there is no entry in the day book of this service being sold - there is no entry of any service being sold to Cooper on the 23rd of July, and no entry in the petty cash book of the money.

JAMES YEATS . I am the chief manager of the manufactory in Staffordshire - we never manufactured but two complete services of this pattern, and they were both sent to Messrs. Copeland's firm.

GEORGE RUTHVEN . I am an officer of Bow-street. I received a service of china from Mr. Powell - I took the prisoner Cooper into custody at the Hope public-house, in Blackman-street, Clare-market - when he was at the office, he said, he had the china on commission from a person named Pritchard - Pritchard was then in custody- Cooper said he received it to sell, and he was to have a per centage on it - and he had soldit to a Scotch captain named Wilkinson, who was gone to Scotland - he had sold him two services at the Edinbro' Castle, in Swithin's-lane, and that he had met him on the French-walk, Royal Exchange - he described his person, but he did not know where to find him, and he did not say what he gave him for it - I told him I knew he was telling me an untruth, and I asked him if it was not at Mr. Knight's, he said, no, it had been taken there, but did not remain there an hour, and had not been unpacked there.

WILLIAM VALENTINE POWELL . I delivered the same set of china to Ruthven which I got from Mr. Knight's livery-stables in Blackfriars-road, this is the china.

WILLIAM KNIGHT . I keep a livery stables in Wellington-street, Blackfriars-road - I have known the prisoner Cooper about four years, he showed me four patterns of cups and saucers about ten weeks ago, he said, he had them for sale - this pattern was not one of them - but he showed me this a day or two before he was taken, and I purchased it of him for 2l. 8s. the complete set - I am not a Scotch captain - I delivered the same china to Mr. Powell.

Cooper. Q. Was there not an account between us? A. Yes, I was to give 2l. 8s. for the china, and 10s. was to be set off the debt you owed me.

COURT. Q. Did you know what Cooper was? A. I considered him a general agent - I employed him to get several debts in for me, and so did others.

Cooper's Defence. I have known Pritchard for thirty years, and had several dealings with him - I met with him at the Hope public-house, and asked him if I could have some patterns of tea services - he said if I called he would give me some at the warehouse - I called and some

patterns were given to me - I showed them to some persons and among the rest was Mr. Knight - he asked the price, I said, five guineas - he said, that was too high for him, but if I should have any about three guineas, he should have no objection to treat with me - I returned those patterns, and had some other patterns which I showed to several persons, and among others to Mr. Knight - he selected this pattern, and I asked him 3l. for it, he said, he would give me 2l. 8s. and take 10s off an account which I owed him - the price Pritchard told me for this set was three guineas, and twenty per cent, off for cash, which reduced it to 2l. 8s., so that I got 10s. by the sale - I then went to the warehouse, and told Pritchard to get them packed up and sent for me, according to the direction, which he did, and I signed the book - if I had known they had been stolen I could have got them away without having a book signed- because when the book goes back I know it is looked over, and the cash book examined to see if the money is entered for them, and the goods are entered in the daybook - when I received the money, I went and paid Pritchard 2l. 8s. which he acknowledged before the magistrate that he had received.

Edward Tickner Esqr gave Pritchard a good character.

PRITCHARD. - GUILTY. Aged 44.

Of stealing under the value of 5l.

COOPER. - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

The prosecutor stated that they had been robbed to the amount of 500l., within the last six months. There were two other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18330905-103

1306. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for embezlement .

JAMES GARLAND . I am a butcher and live in Wellington-street, Goswell-street ; the prisoner came to live with me as errand boy , on the 19th of July, he had 1s. 6d. a-week and board - he did not sleep in the house - I used to send him out with meat, and to receive money which he was to return to me, as soon as he came back.

MARY ANN ROWBOTTOM . I live with my sister Mrs. Prior - I paid the prisoner 2s. 1d. on the 27th of July - he did not give me any receipt for it.

HENRY HALFORD . I live with my uncle. My grandmother paid the prisoner 3s. 5d. in my presence, on the 27th of July.

THOMAS FEW . I took the prisoner on the 10th of August, at half-past eleven o'clock at night - I found nothing on him - he said he had spent all the money he had taken.

JAMES GARLAND . He never accounted to me for either of these sums - he had not left my service when he was taken - he continued to go to the customers, and to receive money - I asked him if these sums had been paid to him- he said they had not.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18330905-104

1307. EDWARD COOKE and WILLIAM BURRELL were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 14 sovereigns, and 2 - 5l. Bank-notes, the monies of Henry Frideburg and another, in the dwelling-house of John Willmott , against the statute, &c.

HENRY FRIDEBURG . I am a Polander. I was at the Jolly Ostlers public-house, at Hillingdon , on the 8th of July, about eight o'clock in the evening; my friend Samuel Schenkolowski was with me; we are licensed hawker s - the prisoner Burrell came in with his wife; Burrell then went out, and another person who is not in custody came in - in a few minutes the two prisoners came in; they were all three strangers to me - I was having some tea with my partner; the other man who is not in custody then asked me if I was a hawker, I told him I was, and I was going to hawk in Uxbridge; he said, if I would do him a small favour he would give me four guineas reward - the two prisoners were present - he said he was acquainted with a widow-woman at Uxbridge, who had a little dog, which was a great favourite with her first husband, that he going there, and being acquainted with the woman, the dog knew him, and had run after him, and he had lost it, and he was afraid she would say he had lost it on purpose, and he would give me four guineas if I would make inquiry about it; or he would give twenty guineas if anybody would bring him the dog back again - I said, I would not take any money or any reward, but if I could do any favour for any man I would; he went out in a short time and came in again, and told me he had met with a man in the parlour, a friend of his, who proposed that he should have some bills printed to find the dog - and he asked me my opinion, whether he should have them printed or not - I said, I thought there was no occasion for it, for if the person who had the dog should hear of it, he would hide it - he shook hands with me, and said, he was much obliged to me, and gave me his direction to call upon him - the two prisoners were there all the time; the other man then went out, and soon returned again with a little lock in his hand; he said, if that lock had been put on the dog a few days before, nobody could have opened it, and that the locksmith who made it had offered fifty guineas if any person could open it - Burrell, the prisoner, said "What, a lock that nobody can open?" and he asked the man, if it would not be inconvenient to him, to show us the lock - he took the lock out of his pocket, and said, "This is the lock, and I will give fifty guineas if any one can open it but me and the locksmith" - he put it on the table and went out, and my partner asked me to give him the lock, he took it and opened it immediately - he then gave it to me, to see if I could open it, and I opened it also; the man who had put the lock on the table then came in again, and Cooke, the prisoner, said to him, "Well, sir, now I think that either of these two young men are entitled to the fifty guineas, which you offered to give to any one who could open this lock" - he said, "Well, I said, I would, and if anybody opens it before my eyes, I will give fifty guineas" - he then asked if I would lay a wager of fifty guineas, that I could open it; I made answer, that I was not so rich, and that I did not lay wagers, if I did, the most would be a pint of beer or a glass of gin, and that would be a great thing - he bothered me a long while to lay a wager, and kept saying, "You cannot open the lock, you cannot open the lock," - at last, when I saw I could not get rid of him, I said, "Well, sir, I do not wish to lay any wager, but to satisfy you, I will lay down as much money as I and my friend have, that I can open the lock" - he seemed to be satisfied that I should lay down the money - I took out fourteen sovereigns, and my friend took out two 5l. notes; they were the joint property of my friend and

me - I laid the money on the table - Cooke then took the lock off the table, which was presented to me to open, and put down another lock in its place - I did not see him change the lock, but my partner did - I saw Cooke take it off the table - when my partner saw it, he said to me, "Do not take the lock off the table, he has changed it, take your money back - do not lay it on the table, take it back" - Burrell then caught hold of the money off the table - I went up to him, and said, "Give me my money;" he said, "Do not make an uproar, I have your money, and will give it you back again," but instead of giving it to me, he gave it to Cooke - I then let go of Burrell and caught hold of Cooke by his coat; Burrell then began to beat me, and Cooke bit my hands; I have the marks now; but I was determined I would not let him go, if he bit my thumb off - when they found they could not get him out of my hands, one of them, I do not know which, threw his coat over his head, and Cooke got out of his coat, and got away; I had the coat left in my hands - I ran after him to catch him, but one struck me on one side, and another on the other; they threw me on the ground, took the coat from me, and I lost Cooke till the officer brought him to me - there were a few sovereigns found, but the magistrate asked me if I could swear to them; I said, I could not, and they were returned.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How old are you? A. Twenty-eight; I have been a hawker half a year - before that I worked as a journeyman shoemaker in London; I am not fond of wagers - the prisoners were strangers to me; it was in the absence of the man that laid the lock on the table that I opened it - I did not tell him that I had opened it, but Cooke said I was entitled to the fifty guineas for opening it.

Q. As you had such an objection to laying wagers, how came you to suffer yourself to be persuaded to lay 24l. with strangers, that you could open a lock which you had in fact opened before? A. Because I considered them to be honest people, and I thought I should not lose any thing by it; there was no money on their side offered, only my money was on the table - I did not ask to have any deposit from them; I have been in partnership with my friend Schenkolowski nine months; the two Bank notes and four sovereigns were mine, and the ten sovereigns were his, but it is all one money; when he comes to me, he is bound to give all the money into my hands, and I buy goods with it, but I have to give him an account of what I do with the money - I can ask him at any time to give his money into my hands; I had met him three weeks before at Liverpool, and he came to Uxbridge the same day that I did - when I went into partnership with him, he gave me six sovereigns; I furnished his box - he now pays me half the profit he gains, and I give him the third part of what I gain; the prisoner Burrell had the money in his hand - I did not try to open the lock after it was changed.

SAMUEL SCHENKOLOWSKI (by an interpreter). I was at the public-house with the last witness; I saw the two prisoners there; my partner asked me to give him ten sovereigns, which I did - the money and Bank notes were laid on the table; Burrell took them up, and Cooke took them from him and carried it out; my partner seized him, but he got beaten and bit; the money has never been found since.

JOHN WRIGHT . I was at the Jolly Ostlers, and saw the two witnesses and the two prisoners there, and a third man; they were looking at a lock when I went in; I saw the prosecutor put the money on the table, and it was afterwards delivered into Burrell's hand; I cannot say by whom.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prosecutor object to lay any wager? A. By appearance, he was as willing to lay as the other; I did not hear him say he would not - Burrell was appointed the stakeholder; I did not see any other money but the prosecutor's - when I went in, the whole of them were sitting looking at the lock; the man who is not in custody then went out, and when he came in again, he said he would bet 50l. that no one could open that look but himself and the man that made it; he appeared a stranger to the prosecutor; I then understood that the prosecutor made a wager with that other man of 12l., that he would open the lock before Cooke could mark 20 on the table with his finger; that was agreed to, and then the man said to the prosecutor, "If you lose your money will you be offended;" the prosecutor said "No" - Cooke then began to count twenty; I heard him count as far as twelve; whether he counted any more, I do not know; I then heard a quarrel, and the money was taken off the table by some one, and put into Burrell's hand; I had not seen the lock changed, though I was close to it - I did not see the prosecutor fight, nor did I see him beaten; I remained in the house, and assisted in securing the shutters inside as they were afraid the windows would be broken, as there was such a mob - it did not appear to me that the prisoners were any parties to the wager, except Burrell being appointed to hold the stakes.

COURT. Q. Who took the money off the table? A. I could not say; it was put into Burrell's hand - I saw Cooke without his coat when he came back and was searched; I heard one of them complain that he was beaten; I do not know whether it was the prosecutor or his friend.

WILLIAM STRANSON . I know the house; it is kept by Mr. John Wilmott ; it is his dwelling-house, and is in the parish of Hillingdon - I heard a cry of "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner Cooke running up my yard without his coat, and he was crying "Stop thief" also - he got over a high paling trying to get away, but he got more closely confined; I took him in the yard - he said, "They are gone that way" - I said, "It is you I want, you must come this way" - I then received information that a man in a black fustian jacket had gone into a public-house and taken off his jacket and put it under him - I went and found Burrell; I found on them a watch, a knife, a pair of scissars, and three thimbles, some duplicates, and two sovereigns on one, and two sovereigns and some silver on the other; the magistrate ordered the money to be given up - the third man made his escape; the prisoner said they had been put in the hold, and the party who had the money was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you swear before the magistrate that you believed the man had swallowed twelve

sovereigns? A. No; I said I believed the man had swallowed some, but I never said how many - that was Cooke - I confined him in the cage; I did not give him any medicine - I did not know that I had a right to do so; I told the magistrate I had taken him by the throat, and made him make a gurgling noise, but that was not the reason I thought he had swallowed the sovereigns- I thought I saw him put something into his mouth; I think I took the thimbles from Burrell, I will not be certain - we took them into a public-house, and it was so crowded I could hardly tell who we took them from; I do not know that I said I took them from Burrell - I cannot call to mind what I said before the magistrate.

COURT. The deposition states "I took them from Cooke." Witness. I will swear I took them from Cooke- I went before the magistrate the next day, or next but one - I am sure what I then stated was correct.

Cooke's Defence (written). I was on my road to Oxford. I called to have a pint of beer at the sign of the Jolly Ostlers. I saw several persons making a wager about opening a small lock. I saw Frideberg with the lock in his hand, and while the person who owned the lock went to the bar for something, I saw Frideberg asked him if he would show him the way to open it. The person who owned it then said, that the maker would forfeit 50l. to any person who could open it. I remarked that Frideberg was entitled to the 50l. when he pinched me on the knee, and said, "Do not say any thing;" he then offered to bet a sovereign that he would open it before twenty was counted. The owner then said, if he disputed his word, he would bet him 50l. that he could not open it while twenty was counted. Frideberg then pulled out ten sovereigns, and asked his partner for all he had, when he took out two sovereigns from his partner for all he had, when he took pounds aside; it being agreed to by both parties that neither should grumble at losing, or if they did to forfeit a pint of gin for the good of the company. The parties then directed me to count the twenty, which I agreed to do with my finger on the table: at the same time Frideberg kept the lock in his hand, not allowing any person to touch it. Burrell was then called from the other side of the room to hold the stakes, the person who owned the lock placed three 5l. notes first, and Frideberg taking twelve sovereigns off the table placed them into his hand upon the notes, making 24l. for the winner. I then counted the twenty out, when the winner insisted upon taking the money from Burrell's hand, saying he had won it fairly, leaving the room soon after. Frideberg then accused me of counting the twenty too quick; his partner then asked me to go with him to look after the man who had got the money. I went with him down the street as far as the Wheels, when he inquired of a butcher who stood there of the name of Freeman, if he had seen a man go that way with a scratch on his nose, and dressed in black; the butcher replied No. The prosecutor was going away several yards from me, and turned back saying, "You are one of the party". I went with him back to the Jolly Ostlers, when Frideberg and his partner both began to ill use me, by tearing my coat from my back, until I was glad to get away from them. I was going round the market-place, when I saw the person who had taken the money from Burrell. I ran after him, and called out stop him; the constable came and took me. I never had a lock in my hand, or money, nor was I aware of doing any thing wrong.

Burrell's Defence (written). I travel with lace. On the evening mentioned, I took lodgings at the Jolly Ostlers at Uxbridge; I had not been long there, before I heard a conversation between these persons respecting the opening of a small lock; I heard Frideberg offer to bet twelve sovereigns (all the money himself and partner had) that he would open the lock before twenty was counted; the wager of 12l. aside was agreed to. I was called by Frideberg to hold the money, from the opposite side of the room, which I at first objected to, but was still pressed upon by both parties to hold it. The person who owned the lock put three five pound notes into my hand. Frideberg placing twelve sovereigns into my hand upon the notes, told me to give 24l. to the winner. Twenty was then counted out by Cooke, when the winner insisted upon taking the money from my hand, and soon after left. Frideberg then came upon me for the money, saying the twenty was counted too quick. I told him I did not exactly understand the wager, but the winner insisted upon taking the money. I remained in the room some time after, but from the confusion that was made by the prosecutors, I walked over to the opposite house; when I had been there about half an hour, the constables came and took me.

COOKE - GUILTY . Aged 20

BURRELL - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330905-105

1308. JAMES SMITH and RICHARD BROOKS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 mare, price 8l. , the property of George Martin .

JAMES GAY (police-constable E 161). On the 8th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw a mare in Gray's-inn-road - the prisoner Smith was leading her with a rope halter - I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said, he wanted a pound or a green-yard to put it into; he said, he had had it given him to hold, in St. Paul's church-yard - I asked where he lived, he said, in the Dover-road; I asked him again, soon after he said, in the Waterloo-road; and then, at another time, in the Kent-road - this satisfied me that things were not right - and I took him to the station-house - he was taken before the magistrate and was ordered for reexamination, and during that time the other officer found the owner of the mare - he saw it on the Tuesday following, in the green-yard, where I had put it.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I was in the police, but have left it - I found the owner of the mare, and took Brooks on the Tuesday following.

GEORGE MARTIN . I live at No. 17, West-square, Lambeth - I saw the mare on the Tuesday, it was mine - I turned her out at Mr. Wheeler's, at Newington, Surrey , which I have done for three years - on the 5th of July I saw the man put her in and fasten the gate - I left her at eight o'clock at night - I went the next morning and missed her - I do not know either of the prisoners.

WILLIAM HUDSON . I live with Mr. Wheeler. I remember the mare coming, and I fastened the gate with the chain; the next morning she was gone.

CHARLES EDWARD BREWIN . I live at No. 14, Hunter-street, Dover-road. I am a policeman - on Friday, the 5th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was on duty in Dover-road; I saw a person, who I rather think, was Smith, on a mare, walking up and down the Dover-road for half an hour - I at first thought he wanted to get through the gate without paying -

there happened to be a noise in one of the turnings; I went to see what it was, and found it was only a few drunken people quarrelling; I then returned to the road and missed the man and the mare - I went down a street and saw the mare tied up, and no person near her - I examined it, and when I had stood about ten minutes the two prisoners came there together, and one of them untied the mare; I walked towards them, and said,"Is that your mare" - Brooks answered, and said, "Yes it is, Charley;" I said, it was a very wrong thing of them to tie the mare there, for if it had been there five minutes longer I should have taken it to the green-yard, which would have cost them 5s. or 6s.; Brooks then said, it was not his; it belonged to Bill Adams , and he had given a boy some half-pence to take it into the Kent-road - I asked who Bill Adams was, whether he was the broom-hawker, he said, he did not know - I knew the prisoners and let the mare go with them; and on the Saturday Wheeler's son came to me and I heard it had been stolen - I gave a description of the mare I had seen in Fox's-buildings.

CHARLES BURRIDGE (police-constable M 77). I was in Kent-street on Friday night - I saw Brooks there, and a third person, whom I knew, and a person was leading a mare, I cannot say whether it was Smith - they took it to the cornner of Fox's-buildings; and as I knew there were stables there, I went away.

JOSEPH CADBY . I was at the bar of the White Hart, at Battle-bridge. On Monday, the 8th of July, and Brooks came and asked if I would tell him where a horse-dealer lived; I said there was one named Allen, he said, it was not him he wanted, it was one named Ball, I said, he lived up Edward-street.

Smith's Defence (written). My fellow-prisoner, Brooks, is perfectly innocent, and I should not like to see an innocent man suffer for the guilty one. On the 5th of July, I went to Kennington-common to see a cricket-match; I had not long been there when a man came to me that I knew by the nickname of Toney, living at Croydon: he asked me if I would earn a shilling; I said I had no objection. He then said,"Come with me;" he took me to a field at the back of Kennington-common, and showed me four or five horses, and said that one of them was his own. He took me to a public-house and gave me some bread and cheese, and a pint of beer; we sat talking until nine o'clock at night: he then said, "You must go, and that horse that I showed you this afternoon, you must fetch here to me." I accordingly went to the field and took the horse from the rest, and took it to him. He then said "That is right, I want you to take it to Mr. Adams," he gave me the direction, and then left me with the horse. I proceeded leading the horse to the Dover-road; I forgot the direction that he gave me; I asked a man if he could tell me where a person by the name of Adams lived, a horse-dealer; he said he did not know. I then asked him if he would hold the horse while I got information where Mr. Adams lived; he said, yes; I gave him the price of a pint of beer and went into Kent-street; the first person that I saw was my fellow-prisoner, Brooks, sitting at a door along with two women, I afterwards learned one was his wife. I asked him if he could tell me where Mr. Adams, a horse-dealer, lived; he told me that Mr. Adams lived in the Old Kent-road. I then said,"If you will give me the direction right, I will treat you with a glass of gin:" he gave me the direction, and I gave him the gin. I never saw him in my life before that night about half-past ten o'clock. I could not find the man that I was with on the afternoon previous. I took the horse to a field and tried to find the man that sent me, but I could not find him; and on Monday the 8th instant, I was about taking the horse to the green-yard, and was taken prisoner.

Brook's Defence (written). I was sitting on a chair at the door of my house with my wife and my landlord's daughter; a lad came and asked me if I knew a person by the name of Adams or Allen, a horse-dealer. I told him that I knew a man by the name of Adams, and that he lived in the Old Kent-road; he then said if I would direct him right, he would treat me with a glass of gin. I gave him the right direction; he then said, "Come along with me, and I will give you the gin." I walked with him about an hundred yards from the house that I live in, and up a turning I saw a horse tied to some paling; he, the lad, untied the horse, and we both proceeded the same way back that we went: I saw a policeman that I know by the name of Charles Brewin , standing at the corner of the turning that the horse was in, I also saw him on my return. He, the policeman, said, "Whose horse is that." I told him it belonged to a Mr. Adams. I asked the lad if that was right, he said yes, and said that he had given a man the price of a pint of beer to mind it; the policeman, Charles Brewin , then said, "It is a good job that you have come for it as you have, as I should have taken it to the green-yard;" we both left him, the lad leading the horse to the first public-house we came to; I drank a glass of gin with him; I then left him. On Monday, the 8th instant, Brewin came to my house and inquired if I was at home, my wife said I was not. I came home in about ten minutes, my wife told me I was wanted by Mr. Brewin, the policeman. I went directly to him in the Dover-road, where he had left word I was to meet him: he said,

"I only wanted to know what sort of a horse that was, that I saw you and another man with on Friday night last." I gave him the description of the horse as well as I could, and that a lad came to me and asked me for a Mr. Adams, or Allen, and I directed him to Mr. Adams living in the Old Kent-road; he then said, "Do you know the lad?" I told him I never saw him in my life before. He said there was a man close by that had lost a mare, and by the description that he gave of the one that he had lost, it answered to this one. On Tuesday, the 9th instant, a man came to me and told me, that he came from a young man that was a prisoner in Clerkenwell New Prison; and that he, the prisoner, sent him to tell me that he wanted to see me; I said I did not know any person that was in prison - he said that the prisoner's name was Smith, and he himself was a prisoner in the same prison, and had just got liberated; he then said,"You are my prisoner." I asked upon what charge; he said,"On suspicion of stealing a horse." I knew that I was innocent; I went with him to Hatton-garden office. I was removed from the office to Clerkenwell New Prison. The lad that came to me to ask the above questions, I saw in the class that I was placed in; I recognised him to be the same that I saw before. I asked him what he was placed in the prison for; he said, "For stealing a mare;" I immediately said, "Why you are the lad that came to me on Friday night;" he said, that he was, and asked me what I was sent to prisoner for; I told him that it was through him that I was sent to prison. He asked how the officers came to take me into custody; I told him that it was through going with him to have the gin that he gave me for giving him the direction that he asked for. He said, that he was sorry I should suffer for his crime that he had committed; and also said that he would clear me before the magistrates. I told him that, it was his place to do so, as he knew I was innocent. On Saturday, the 13th instant, we were taken to Hatton-garden office, and after the examina

tion my fellow-prisoner, Smith, confessed that he was guilty, and that I was innocent.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

BROOKS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-106

1309. JOHN FARRELL , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , 4 pewter pots, value 4s. , the goods of James Glaze .

WILLIAM KINGMAN . I live in Clerkenwell, and work for Mr. Roberts, in Vere-street, I was in Harley-street on the 7th of August, and saw several pewter pots at the door of No. 72; the prisoner took up a quart pot and put it under his apron; he came to the end of the street, then went back, and took up two pint pots - I had my master's goods with me - I put them down and told a person to mind them - I then went after the prisoner and collared him - he threw down three pint pots and got from me; I seized him again; he then pushed me down the stables of Prince Esterhazy, and then he threw out one quart pot and one pint.

HENRY SANDERS (police-constable D 111). I took the prisoner and have the pots; one of them is bent double.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I live with Mr. James Glaze, he keeps the Turks Head , in Harley-street - these three pint pots and one quart pot are his - I do not know the prisoner.

JOHN KNIGHT . I am helper in the stable of Prince Esterhazy - I saw the prisoner and Kingman in the yard struggling; I went up and saw the prisoner throw a pint pot and a quart pot from his trousers - I took them up - this bent pot was in his hat.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my children in distress and went to look for work; in passing a dead wall I saw a quart pot half-full of beer, and a toast in it- I took it up and drank part of the beer - I then crossed over and saw some pint pots with toasts in them; I ate the toasts - I went on to the stable door where some pots were standing - the man came up and said, I was thieving- I said, "Let me go into the stable, do not expose me in the street" - I plunged into the stable, and this other man came and took me - I never had a pot in my possession.

GUILTY. Aged 56. - Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-107

1310. ESTHER FIDGEON was indicted for stealing, on the 21th of August , 1 sovereign; 3 half-sovereigns; 6 half-crowns; 13 shillings; and 4 sixpences, the monies of George Ransom , from his person .

GEORGE RANSOM . I am a fishmonger . On the 21st of August, I went into the Bird-Cage, public-house - I was sober; the prisoner who was a stranger to me followed me in; I called for half a pint of beer - then said "Let me have a pint" - I went into the tap room and the prisoner came in there - I told her to keep her own company - I dropped asleep while she was in the tap-room - I slept till past eleven o'clock, when the publican awoke me, the prisoner was then gone - I first missed my handkerchief from my hat; and on turning from the bar to the street door, I put my hand into my pocket and found it turned inside out; I then felt my right-hand pocket, in which I had the money stated - I had a sovereign, and from 30s. to 2l. besides - I am certain the prisoner is the girl.

JOHN GIBSON . I am servant at the public house - I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor there; they appeared to come in together; he called for a pint of porter; I took it to him; he paid for it; and almost directly he fell asleep - he appeared to be sober - the prisoner was standing up at that time - I was called out to get a pot of porter; and when I went in again, the prisoner was jumping over the table - I saw the prosecutor's hat fall off, and the prisoner took a handkerchief out of it and put it to her mouth - she then sat down by his side - I was then called out, and before I returned she was gone.

THOMAS JEROME . I am a pawnbroker. On the 22nd of August, a female, who I believe to be the prisoner, pawned this handkerchief for 6d. in the name of Mary Sayers.

CHARLES EAST (police-constable H 33). I went with my brother officer to take the prisoner; she made an excuse to stop - I went back to the spot and saw her pass something from one hand to the other, I took her hand, and found this duplicate.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor overtook me and invited me to have something to drink - I went and he gave me a piece of cold pork, out of a bason, and three cold potatoes; he then gave me the handkerchief to wipe my mouth - he dropped asleep - I staid about an hour talking to Gibson, and then went home.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-108

1311. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 ring, value, 5s.; 2 sovereigns; and 10 shillings, the goods of George Gibbs , from his person .

GEORGE GIBBS . I am a tailor . On the 27th of June I was returning from Vauxhall-gardens - I was quite sober- I fell in with the prisoner in the Commercial-road, she was walking along and appeared to be in a state of intoxication - when I got up to her she laid hold on my arm - I asked her what was the matter - she said, she had been out so late with a party of friends, and was afraid to go home to her parents, and she asked me as a favour to go home with her - I went half way down a street, and asked her which house it was, she then said she did not live there but in White Lion-street - I told her I could not go there, as I lived in Norfolk-street - she hung upon my left arm - my purse was in my left hand breeches pocket, and my watch was in my fob - I hade her good night and went away - I then missed my purse, which contained a gold ring, two sovereigns, about 10s. in silver or more - I knew it was safe three minutes before I saw the prisoner, and I had not met any other person - I then ran down the street, and saw a policeman at the bottom - I told him the circumstance, and the prisoner was taken on the 6th of July - I had not been with the prisoner more than three minutes.

ABRAHAM SCOTT (police-sergeant H 12). I received the information - I had seen the prisoner three times that night, and I knew her - I told one or two of our men, and she was

taken and lodged in the watch-house - I went and saw her, and took the prosecutor, who identified her as the girl - I went to her lodging, and found the duplicate of the ring.

JOHN VAUGHAN . I am a pawnbroker and live in Whitechapel, this ring was pawned by the prisoner on the 5th of July.

GEORGE GIBBS . This ring is mine, it has three letters on it, by which I can swear to it.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor, he walked with me some time, and asked me to go up a court, which I did, he then said, he had no money, but he gave me the ring off his finger as a pledge till the following night; but as he did not come, I kept it for a few days, and pawned it.

GEORGE GIBBS . There is not a word of truth in it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-109

1312. JOSEPH JUDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 20 dozen of caps, value 25l., the goods of Shepse Davis Wolken , and another .

SHEPSE DAVIS WOLKEN . I am a cap-maker , and live at Ratcliffe-highway , I have one partner. The prisoner was in my employ to block the caps; on the 25th of January I packed up these twenty dozen of caps in a basket, to go to Messrs. Harris and Warner, Winchester-place, over the water - I left word with my wife to send them by the porter as soon as he came in - the prisoner was not to take them - I left him there blocking when I went out - when I returned I inquired where these goods were - the prisoner stood next to me, and said, he had taken them to Harris and Warner, and I was to go the next morning, and they would give me a larger order - the prisoner took breakfast there the next morning, and then went away without notice - I then discovered the property had not been delivered - I have never seen it since- it was worth 20l. - the prisoner was taken on the 5th of August.

JULICA LYONS. I was servant to the prosecutor at that time; he packed up the caps, and when he went out they were ready to he sent away - the prisoner took them - I told him he was not to take them - he said, his master left word that he should - I went out to keep him back till I should send for the porter - but the prisoner went off, and said he was obliged to take them - he returned in about an hour and a quarter - I was astonished to see him back so soon, he said, he made haste as there was more work for him to do - I asked him where the basket was, he said the clerk was not there, and he had left it, and my master was to call the next morning for another order.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not open the door for me? A. No, you forced the door open and went out.

BENJAMIN VALETTA SHORT . I am servant to Messrs. Harris and Co. On the 25th of January no caps came there - there was an order for them, but it was not executed at that time - there were some sent from the prosecutor about a week afterwards - but not by the prisoner.

MR. WOLKEN. I executed the order with other caps.

THOMAS TAFFE . (police-constable H. 124). I took the prisoner on the 5th of August, he denied stealing the caps; but in a moment or two afterwards. he said, Mr. Wolken knew all about it - on his way, he said, he had made away with the goods, at the suggestion of a man in Cutler-street, Houndsditch, who had waylaid him, and told him, if he could get some goods, he would buy them - that he took the hamper there, and the man bought half of them for 1l., and told him to take the rest to Gravesend, which he did, and sold them, and then he went into the country.

Prisoner's Defence. My master told me to take them- I called at the Blue Anchor and had a pint of beer, and left the basket at the door - when I came out it was gone- I was obliged to go back again - I told my master I had taken it, but the next morning he sent another parcel, and the man came back, and said, they had not received them, and I was obliged to leave.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-110

1313. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , 1 cloak, value 6s.; and 1 shawl, value 1s. , the goods of Mary Hutton .

MARY HUTTON . I live in Clarence-gardens . I go out washing and ironing - I lodge in a back room there - I had not seen the prisoner before the 4th of August - I had been out with some friends, and was returning home about half-past eleven o'clock in the evening - the prisoner asked me if he should see me home - I said, yes, and he went home with me to my room, he said, he would give me 5s., but when he got up stairs, he said, he had no money - he then took my cloak and shawl, and ran down stairs - I cried"Stop thief," and the officer brought him back with them.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. He is rather a young man? A. Yes - he was not to have these things for any liberties with me; he took no liberties with me - I had no candle in my room - I have lived there eight years - my maiden name was Garland, and my husband's name was Shaw, but he has been dead nine years - I am not married to Hutton, but I go by his name.

HENRY EAST (police-constable S 217). I was on duty at near twelve o'clock at night in Clarence-gardens; I heard a cry of "stop thief;" I saw the prisoner run; I took him with this property under his arm about a quarter of a mile from the house.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix stop me and asked where I was going; I said, "Home;" she took hold of my arm and said I had better go with her - I was rather the worse for liquor, and went with her; she gave me these things to hold, and said she would fetch a candle - she had 1s. of my money.

John Pilcher and Mary Draper , gave the prisoner a good character; and Mr. Howard, of Fitzroy-square, his master, engaged to take him back into his service.

GUILTY. Aged 19. - Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-111

1314. SARAH MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 1 gown, value 7s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; and 1 shawl, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of Ann Murrell ; and that she had been before convicted of felony .

ANN MURRELL . I live with my father in King's-place, Brook-street ; the prisoner was employed by my father to look after the children, and had been with him four

years; on the 12th of August, she went away at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, and took away these articles which were mine - she did not say she was going.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not borrow the gown of you on the 9th, to get you a dinner? Witness. A. No; you did not live with my father as his wife.

COURT. Q. Does your father live with the prisoner as his wife? A. No, he does not; these articles are mine; she never pawned my things before - she has my father's, but took them out again - I am sixteen years old.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a pawnbroker; I have the gown, shawl, and handkerchief, which were pawned by the prisoner on the 12th of August.

THOMAS LINDEGREEN (police-constable). I took the prisoner on the 12th of August.

WILLIAM WILSON . I produce a certificate from Mr. Clarke's office of the former conviction of the prisoner; I was a witness, and know she is the person.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she had cohabited with the prosecutrix's father for six years; that they all resided together in one room, and the prosecutrix had given her leave to pledge the articles.

ANN MURRELL re-examined. Q. Did you all live together? A. Yes; I had only been at home one week; we all slept together, but my father is not at home of a night; he is a broker; I did not give her permission to pawn these things.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-112

1315. MARY MACDONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , 7 sheets, value 1l.; 2 blankets, value 1l.; 1 shirt, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; 1 table cloth, value 6s.; 1 pillow case, value 2s.; and 1 flat-iron, value 3d. ; the property of Evan Owen .

EVAN OWEN. I live in Liquorpond-street , and am a French-polisher ; my wife died on the 5th of February, the prisoner was then a lodger in my house, and six weeks afterwards she came into my service; on the 8th of August I went out of town leaving my property all secure; I returned in nine days - I had left the prisoner to take care of my house; I found her and her husband in lodging, coals, and candles; I was to pay for the washing and what was done beside - when I returned, the prisoner was gone and this property also; there was a young man in the bottom part of my house to mind my shop - I came home on the 19th, and the next day she sent me the duplicates by a friend of hers.

JAMES ASHLEY . I am a pawnbroker; I have all the articles which were pawned by the prisoner at different times.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He did not leave me in care of his house; he left me no keys; his young man had them; I had only the care of the kitchen - I pawned some of the things through distress, and so did my husband; and since I have been in prisoner my husband is dead.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-113

1316. ELIZABETH MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 2 sheets, value 14s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 rule, value 1s.; 1 pair of stocking, value 1s.; and 3 napkins, value 2s. ; the goods of William Stewart .

WILLIAM STEWART. I live at Limehouse , and am a bricklayer ; the prisoner had lived servant in my house eighteen months or two years before this; she was at this time a char-woman ; on the 15th of March, I sent her away for getting drunk - she was afterwards taken up for something else, and then these duplicates were found on her - I am married, and my wife lives with me.

JAMES LAMB . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Waterloo-terrace, Mile-end; I have a handkerchief pawned for 1s. 3d., a sheet for 2s., a pair of stockings for 6d., a rule for 6d., a towel for 4d., and a sheet for 5s., all by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The officer had a spite against me, and said he would see me transported for this - I have worked for the prosecutor for seven years; I had a good character till I pawned these things; I was going to take them out when I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-114

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1317. JOHN McPHERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 sovereign; 1 half-sovereign; and 14 shillings, the monies of Elizabeth Sheward , from her person .

ELIZABETH SHEWARD. I am single . I bind shoes; I lodged at Trafalgar-street, Hammersmith - on the 17th of July, I came to town, and when I was going back, I went to the Black Horse, in Coventry-street, to wait for an omnibus - while I was sitting there the prisoner came up to the window; he put up his hand and appeared to be beckoning some one, he then came in, and sat down on the same seat where I was - he asked what I was waiting for; I said for an omnibus to go to Hammersmith; he said, "I am going to Paddington, and if you go with me, I will see you across to Hammersmith" - I was not aware it was so much out of my way, and with a great deal of persuasion, I went with him - I had never been to Paddington before, and did not know where it was - when we came out of the Black Horse we walked to Titchfield-street, and from there to Regent-street - he there staggered a little, and I said to him, "You appear tired;" he said he was very tired, and should like to ride; I said there was no omnibus there; he said, if he called for a cab would I like to ride; I said, I should have no objection; he called a cab, and desired it to drive to the Yorkshire Stingo ; he then got out and the cab-man asked him for the money; he said, he had no change; the cab-man then turned to me, and said, I must pay - I said, I had no right to pay, after this man had said he would - I detained the cab-man, I suppose, ten minutes; I then took my purse out of my bosom, and asked a young woman to give me change for a sovereign, which she did, and I gave the driver 1s. 6d. - the prisoner then said to me, "We may as well go, and have some refreshment," we went and had some ale and some half and half; he desired me to pay for it, and said he would pay me again; I paid for it, but I do not recollect how much - I do not recollect how much we had - we had ale and half and half, and cheese and biscuits - the prisoner then said he

should like to have some tea, we went and had some tea - I took two sixpences from my purse and laid them on the table to pay for the tea - the prisoner took them up, put them in his pocket, and knocked his finger on the table, and asked the man what was to pay; he paid for it out of the two sixpences, and put the change, 31/2d. or 41/2d. into his pocket - when we came out he said, "I have a sister just by whom I must call and see, but I will not detain you two minutes" - I said, I could not stay long; he said, he would not stay, and we went to No. 3, Dean-street, Paddington - he knocked at the door, and a very decent woman came to the door, and she asked me in; the prisoner had gone in - I went in, and she said, walk up stairs; I went up, and saw the prisoner in the room; he gave the woman 1s. 6d.; I said, "What is that for?" he said, "It is all right" - he then put his hand into my bosom, and took my purse out; I sat down and took off my shoe, as there was some gravel in it - the prisoner then went down, and said, "I shall bid you good day, I shall see you again soon;" I said, it was very strange behaviour, after bringing me to a place I did not know - he then ran down, I put on my shoe and turned to look for my pocket handkerchief and that was gone; I gave a scream and two women came up; they asked me if I had been robbed - I did not say anything to them before they asked me that - I said, "Yes, I have been robbed by that young man, who said, he was your brother" - the woman said, "He is no brother of mine; do you know where you are?" I said, "No" - she said, "You are in a house of accommodation" - I walked out, and when I got two or three hundred yards off, to another street, I saw the prisoner talking to a man; I went up to him, and asked him for my purse and money - I had had one sovereign, one half-sovereign, and 14s. in my purse; the prisoner bade the other man, good night, and took hold of my arm; I was talking with him about ten minutes; I begged him kindly to give me my money, and I would not give him in charge - he said, he had not got my money; I said, "You have, and I am determined, and insist upon having it" - he then gave me a violent blow and knocked me down; he then ran off - he was taken on the Wednesday after.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. What time did you leave the house at Paddington? A. A little after eight o'clock - I am a shoe-binder , and get my living by that only; I can earn 1s. 6d. a day, that is the outside - I dare say the veil I have on cost two guineas, when it was new, but my aunt made me a present of it - this shawl I bought with my own money; I had earned the money I had in my purse by shoe-binding - I worked for Ann Cannon , No. 3, Trafalgar-street, Hammersmith - I believe she lives there now, but I have left there, and live with my father at Shephered's-bush - I do not get money in any other way than by shoe-binding; I had not received money for any other purpose - that was the first time I ever walked about the street with a perfect stranger; I knew town well, but I did not know the description of the house I went into; I did not take notice of the door - the door was shut - when I was told it was a house of accommodation, I did not know what it meant, till it was explained - I did not leave the prisoner when he would not pay for the cab, because he said, he would pay me the money - it was wrong in me to go about with him, but I was persuaded, and I did not think he would turn out so bad - I was not struck with the prisoner paying 1s. 6d. for the room; there was a bed in it; I did not know what to think then.

WILLIAM ELLIOTT (police-sergeant D 18). On the evening of the 17th of July, I saw the prisoner and the prosecutrix coming down Stafford-street; she was crying, and seemed very angry - she had hold of the skirt of his coat; I knew the prisoner very well, and as I did not know the prosecutrix, I followed about two yards behind them - I overheard her say "I will have it; do pray give it to me" - I expected she would give him in charge, but as she did not, I returned, and in a quarter of an hour she returned, and said she had been robbed.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in your uniform? A. Yes, I was on duty.

WILLIAM HORSFORD (police-sergeant D 6). I was on duty on the 23rd of July - I met the prisoner; I apprehended him as I had heard he was wanted - I told him I wanted him for robbing a girl - he said I was mistaken; I said, "No, I want you," and took him to the station-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Dean-street? A. Yes; it is the worst street we have in the neighbourhood- it is full of brothels.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening of the 17th of July, I went to the Black Horse, and called for a pint of of beer; I saw the prosecutrix quarrelling with some coachmen - she then came and took hold of me, and asked me to go and have a pint of ale, and we went and had some; she said she had no money and I paid for it - I then said I was going to Paddington; she said she would walk with me, as she did not want to get home before eleven or twelve o'clock at night - she then said she was tired; she called a cab and asked me to ride with her to the Stingo; when we got there she made use of all the oaths you ever heard, that she had no money- I paid 1s. 6d. for the cab, and we went to a coffee-shop, where I paid 41/2d.; we then went to a common brothel in Dean-street - I paid 1s. 6d. for the room, and after being there some time, I went away.

MARY ANN JONES . I live servant at the house No. 3, Dean-street. On the evening of the 17th of July, the prisoner brought the prosecutrix to the door which stands open from the time we get up in the morning, till three o'clock the next morning - they came about a quarter-past eight o'clock in the evening and went up-stairs; he gave me 1s. for the room - he came down in about a quarter of an hour and went out, and she came down soon afterwards and went out; she did not mention about being robbed - she came again about ten o'clock with a short stont man with a flat hat; she was then up-stairs for about half an hour - she then came down and was so tipsy she could not get out; I took hold of her and led her out - my mistress heard a noise and asked what it was- I said it was Eliza Willis who had used the house for three or four months; I have seen her there many times - she has slept there; I have made the bed after her and prepared it for her - she came back again that night at one o'clock, and asked for a lodging; I said it was not the custom of that house to let beds to single

persons, and I would not let her he there - she then said she had been robbed in that house, but could not say who robbed her; I would not let her in; and the next morning she swore to William Hilton, a young man who uses the house.

COURT to WILLIAM ELLIOTT . Q. What time was it when you saw the prosecutrix with the prisoner? A. About a quarter past eight o'clock; she was not tipsy, but had been drinking - I had never seen her before in my life to my knowledge - the prisoner I know well.

COURT to ELIZABETH SHEWARD . Q. However unpleasant it may be to you, it is quite necessary that you should inform us - have you ever been in the habit of going to that house? A. I never entered that house upon my oath, nor saw the woman till that night - upon my solemn oath I never went by the name of Eliza Willis in my life - I certainly did not go back to that house that night - she has told a very great untruth - I did not go back at one o'clock to ask to lodge there; I was at home at No. 3, Trafalgar-street about eleven o'clock; I walked there as soon as I had given notice to the officer - I have none of my friends here.

COURT to WILLIAM ELLIOTT . A. When you left the prosecutrix, in what direction was she going? A. Towards the City, not towards that house - when I first saw them they were coming from towards that house; I have walked in that neighbourhood four years, and never saw the prosecutrix in my life before - I think I should have seen her if she had frequented the neighbourhood.

WILLIAM HORSFORD re-examined. Q. Do you frequent that neighbourhood as a police officer? A. Yes, and have for the last two years; we have a great deal of trouble in that street, and are there a great deal - I never saw the prosecutrix, and I think if she had frequented the house I must - we have particular directions to watch that street, and have a man there on purpose.

William Poole , coachmaster, Edgeware-road, and William White , stable-keeper, Pentonville, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

JURY. We cannot find words strong enough to express our indignation at the conduct of the Witness, Jones.

Jones was committed to prison for perjury.

Reference Number: t18330905-115

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1318. CATHERINE REED was indicted for stealing on the 17th of August , 1 pair of ear-rings, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 crown; 4 guineas; and one 7s. piece, the goods of Isabella Bartlett, her mistress - also 1 pair of shoes, value 1s.; 1 knife, value 1s.; 1 thimble, value 1s.; and 3/4 of a yard of ribbon, value 6d. ; the goods of Martha Bartlett . - To which she pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 17. Confined Six Months .

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix s'.

Reference Number: t18330905-116

1319. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 3 pillows, value 9s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; and 1 sheet, value 5s. ; the goods of Michael Jones . - To which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 39. Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330905-117

1320. SARAH CAVANNAH was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , 71 yards of linen cloth, value 9l.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 6s.; 1 parasol, value 8s.; 14 yards of ribbon, value 5s.; 1 fur tippet, value 28s. ; the goods of Robert Sharland .

ROBERT SHARLAND. I live in Bishopsgate, Within, in the parish of St. Helens . The prisoner lived servant with me on the 22nd of July - I had missed a piece of Irish linen cloth, containing twenty-five or twenty-six yards some time before that - on that day, I searched two or three boxes which the prisoner had at our house, where I found a pair of white cotton stockings, with my private mark on them, worth 61/2d.; a pair of brown lace stockings fell from her petticoats, they were worth 5s.; this Irish linen was in her box, it is worth 1s. 41/2d. a yard, and this parasol worth 8s. 6d. - the officer found some duplicates in her pocket; we know we had this Irish cloth on the 29th of April.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know you had it then? A. By having examined the stock-book on that day - this parasol and the other things might have been sold, but that the bills would have shown - the prisoner said she bought some of these things at our shop before she came to my service - but the Irish linen cloth, we know, was in our possession on the 29th of April - there have been one or two mistakes made since I have been in business - but I forgot to mention the prisoner had a piece of ribbon in her hand, and was endeavouring to keep it from me - I told the magistrate she had it, but I do not think I said she was concealing it - these stockings might have been sold - I have two apprentices.

COURT. Q. You say the stockings and other things might have been sold? A. Yes; but if this Irish linen cloth had been sold, the stock-book would have shown it.

DANIEL PAMPLETT (City police-constable No. 73). I examined the box - I found this linen and other articles, and this ribbon was in her hand.

ELIZABETH BEVERIDGE . I know the prisoner. She brought me a piece of linen once, and asked me if I would make her a few shillings on it, as she wanted to pay for two pair of shoes - I pawned it for 17s. at Mr. Barker's, in Houndsditch.

Cross-examined-by MR. DOANE. Q. Did she not say she bought that at Mr. Sharland's? A. Yes; out of her quarter's wages.

MR. BARKER. I have two pieces of linen; one pawned on the 10th of May, and one on the 20th of July, for 17s. one was brought by the last witness - I cannot tell which it was.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know that one of them is the piece this witness pawned? A. I have had them both, but I have taken the duplicate off.

ROBERT SHARLAND. This is the piece pawned on the 20th of July, it is mine, and here is my private mark on it - this other is also mine, and here is my mark on it.

Cross-examined. Q. If you sold cloth would it not have your mark on it? A. Yes; but if been booked; my book is here, and these had been sold they would have my brother, who keeps it.

THOMAS SHARLAND . I keep the book; these pieces have never been sold.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you make the mark on either of these? A. I did on this piece; if it had been sold the mark would remain on it; but if it had been sold it would have been entered as sold in the book, and the customer's name against it.

GUILTY. Aged 40. - Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-118

1321. JOSEPH JACKSON was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS LLEWELLIN . I live at No. 40, Ludgate-hill. The prisoner was in the service of Thomas Feaver and myself, at the latter end of March and the beginning of April - he staid till I had him taken into custody on the 18th of July, - he had to receive money from customers.

JOSEPH DOWN . I live at No. 174, Strand, and am a tailor. I have known the prisoner for ten years - I paid him 8l. 6s. on the 28th of June, for his employers, Messrs. Feaver & Co.

GEORGE WILLIAM COOK. I live in Princes-street, Hanover-square . I have known the prisoner many years- on the 5th of July I paid him a draft on Coutts for 12l. - my house is in the parish of St. George's.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Has he not been a very respectable man? A. Yes; he has been in business for himself.

DAVID BLACK . I live in King William-street, Strand. I paid the prisoner 8l. 8s. 6d. on the 4th of July, for Feaver and Llewellin.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you dealings with that house? A. Yes; I paid him a 5l. note, and the rest in cash.

THOMAS LLEWELLIN . He never accounted for any of these sums.

Cross-examined. Q. What wages did you give the prisoner? A. I meant to have given him 90l. a year for the first six months - he had been three months with us - I had not paid him his wages; I owed him about 15l. which he might have had if he had asked for it - he had 7l. or 8l. worth of goods, and he had 7l. in cash; when I taxed him with having received these sums, he denied having received any.

COURT. Q. When was it his business to settle with you? A. Just as he came in from receiving money, either with me or some one in my establishment - I believe, on the 29th of July, he received four small sums and they were made paid - I believe he did not pay any after the 4th of July.

JURY. Q. What took place on the 18th of July when you made the charge against the prisoner? A. I went to a place and received some information; I then called the prisoner up stairs, and said, "I understand you have been receiving money and not accounting for it," he said,"No, I have not;" I said, "Have you not received 12l. of Mr. Cook," he said, "Not on your account, I borrowed that;" I asked him if he had received anything of Mr. Black, or Mr. Down, he said, "No," I then showed him the voucher, and he said, he had.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not give you a list of the sums which I had received that morning? Witness He did; after I had shown him the voucher; I had told him the more candid he was the more lenient I would be.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-119

1322. JOSEPH JACKSON was again indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS LLEWELLIN . The prisoner was in the employ of me and my partner, and had to receive monies for us- on the 18th of July I had him taken into custody.

CHARLES RICHARD MORLEY . I live in New-street, Covent-garden - I have known the prisoner twelve or fourteen years - on the 18th of July, I paid him 2l. 11s. 6d. for the prosecutor - I have his receipt on this bill.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you not know him to be a very honest man? A. Yes.

THOMAS FEAVER. I am one of the firm - the prisoner never paid this money to me; he ought to have paid it on the day he received it - it was never known to us that he did not pay on the day he received money.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not taken into custody immediately after the very money was paid to him? A. Probably this was one of the items we charged him with; he denied having received them, till the vouchers were shown, and then he did not deny.

THOMAS LLEWELLIN. He was taken about twelve o'clock in the day; we had not found this out then.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-120

1323. JAMES WITHAN was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MESSRS. SCARLETT and GURNEY conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN MICKLAM . I am a tobacconist , and live in Fleet-street . On the 22nd of August the prisoner came into my shop and asked for a quarter of an ounce of rappee and scotch snuff; he put me down one shilling; it came to one penny - I took up the shilling and saw it was a bad one - an officer then came in, who had been watching the prisoner, and asked me what the prisoner had given me, I said, one shilling, and it is a bad one; the prisoner then put something into his mouth; the officer seized him by the throat and squeezed him so tight that he dropped two shillings more out his mouth, on the counter - I marked the shilling he gave me, and gave it to the officer.

GEORGE STONE (police-constable C 99). I was on duty in St. Martin's-lane - I followed the prisoner from there - he looked into several shops, and when he got through Temple-bar, he took something out of his pocket and rubbed it; he went past Mr. Micklam's shop, then returned, and went in - I went into the shop and asked what he had given - Mr. Micklam said, one shilling, and gave me this one - I saw the prisoner put something into his mouth - I seized him by the throat, and told him if he did not put it out I would choak him - he put out these two shillings.

Prisoner. You never knew anything against me before? Witness. Only seeing you in company with thieves.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin to the

Mint. These three shillings are all counterfeit, and I believe have been made in the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-121

1324. MARY SALES was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-122

1325. ELLEN ROBERTS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MESSRS. SCARLETT and GURNEY conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK SANDON . I am a druggist , and live at No. 92, Newgate-street . On the 15th of August the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for an ounce of salts, which came to a penny; she gave me a sixpence, I gave her change, and placed the sixpence on a shelf, as I was not near the till - after she was gone I found it was bad; I kept it separate from all other silver - on the 19th of August she came to the shop again for two-penny-worth of rhubarb, I recollected her again; she then gave me a shilling, I saw it was bad; I kept it in my hand, went round the counter, and called in an officer; I gave him the sixpence and shilling which I had from the prisoner.

Prisoner. He went to his desk and put the shilling into a bowl. Witness. No, I went and took out the sixpence, which I had placed in a bowl, with two bad five shilling pieces.

Prisoner. I never passed the sixpence, you might as well say I passed the two five shilling pieces, but if you like to take a false oath I cannot help it. Witness. I am sure it was you.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I took the prisoner, and have the shilling and sixpence.

MR. FIELD. These are both counterfeit.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-123

OLD COURT. Monday, September the 9th.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1326. JOHN EDWARD ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-hosue of John Collyer , on the 20th of August , at St. Mary, Stoke Newington , and stealing therein 1 bag, value 6d.; 2 pinafores, value 1s. 6d.; 3 mangling cloths, value 2s.; 1 jacket, value 3d.; 2 ironing blankets, value 2s.; and 1 basket, value 2s.; his property .

JOHN COLLYER , JUN. I am the son of John Collyer, who lives at Newington. On the 20th of August, about eleven o'clock, as I was going to bed I heard footsteps, they appeared to me to be in the garden; I went to the door, and heard them plainly - I put on my things, then went round the premises, and returned about half-past twelve or a quarter to one o'clock, and found my bed-room door open, and some things in a basket, and some on the table - I had gone outside the house, round the premises, which are about four acres of land - I am sure I shut and latched the door after me when I went out, for I tried it - there was no window or any thing open - I found a basket in the room, and two blankets, and two ironing cloths, and a jacket, and other things, on the table - they were worth 7s. or 8s. - the prisoner was in my room - some of the things I had left in the basket at the end of the mangle, and the others on a shelf, and the jacket hung on a nail - the mangle stands under the window in my room - I could not see the prisoner when I first entered the room - I heard the bedstead creak - it was quite dark; I felt and caught hold of him by the throat, and held him at the door, and called my father to come to my assistance - I am quite sure the things in the basket and on the table had been removed from the spot on which I had left them - I gave the prisoner to my father, and took him to the policeman - I am certain the house was closed while I went to look over the premises.

JOHN COLLYER , SEN. I am the father of the last witness, and live in the same house, I am a gardener . My attention was called to the prisoner, I assisted in taking him from my son, and took him out of the premises about three hundred yards to a policeman - I afterwards got a light, and went to my son's room, and saw the property all lying about, some on the floor, and some on the table, all removed from their proper place - I brought the prisoner back to the room - the things were pointed out, and he was asked what he did in the room, he said he came there to sleep - the jacket I had put away that night, and the bag also, both were removed from the places I had put them in - my house is in the parish of St. Mary, Stoke Newington.

JOHN BLACKLEY (police-constable N 204). On Wednesday morning, the 21st of August, I was at Newington-green, and Mr. Collyer brought the prisoner towards the station-house; he was given into my charge - I took him back to Mr. Collyer's house, and went into a room below stairs, and saw a basket and ironing things on the floor, and other things on a table down at the door - I took the prisoner to the station-house.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work ten weeks - I was tired, and looking for a place to rest; there was a broken pailing in the place, I got through to a shed, and laid for about an hour; it was very cold - I went to another door, which I found open, and I had not been in there two minutes - as I was coming out this young man shoved that basket down off a box, and knocked me down, and took me by the collar.

JOHN COLLYER, JUN. re-examined. I am positive the door of the house was closed; the prisoner could not get into the room without opening the window or the door; no window was open I am sure, nor was any door open; I am certain I latched the door, I found it open when I returned - my room is attached to the house, you can go from it into the house without going into the open air.

GUILTY. Aged 24. - Of Stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-124

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1327. THOMAS READY and MICHAEL MULANY were indicted for the wilful murder of Edward Thompson .

JOHN HARRISON . I am a surgeon, and live at Whetstone. On Tuesday, the 9th of July, a man named Thompson was brought to my house in the afternoon, between three and four o'clock I think; he was insensible

totally - I examined and saw several bruises on him, but no wounds - there was a bruise or two on the head, on the parietal bone, and bruises on the chest; on the right arm and left groin, and a few small punctured wounds on the instep of each foot; these were all the external appearances - I bled him on the right arm, and took three pints from him, then opened an artery in each temple, then applied six leeches, and in an hour after I again took about ten ounces from him; I rubbed an embrocation on the chest; he was then removed from my house to the Green Man - these remedies relieved him, but he did not recover his senses; it relieved his breathing very much - I attended him afterwards at the Green Man until his death - I applied a large blister to his neck, and gave him one scruple of calomel; I found him beyond recovery and did nothing more; he died on the Friday morning - I did not administer anything after Wednesday morning - Mr. Evans also attended him; I understand he is not able to be here.

Q. Describe the bruises on the head? A. There was no violent bruise on the head; there were a few on the parietal bone, and a slight scratch, but no wound whatever - I could not at all judge from the appearances on the head by what instrument they had been made - the external injury on the head could not be of itself the cause of death; the bruises on the chest were heavy, but not sufficient to cause death, they were such as would be made by a man's fist; the bruise on the groin was not of any consequence - he never recovered his senses at all - I was present at the examination after death; I did not operate; I was present, but not for the first half-hour; Mr. Evans operated - on opening the scull the dura mater appeared perfectly healthy, on removing it we discovered a quantity of coagulated blood - on removing the coagulum, we discovered three superficial vessels had burst on the upper part of the brain, one on the right hemisphere, and one on the left hemisphere of the brain, the brain itself appeared perfectly healty; I saw nothing else particular respecting the brain; the scull was not fractured, nor the least denture - I examined the heart, lungs, and liver, all of which were perfectly healthy - we next examined the bowels and groin, and could discover no rupture whatever, nor any material injury - I next examined the scrotum, that was likewise healthy - in the ancles we found some punctures about half an inch deep, they were rather on the instep, we opened one and found it nearly half an inch deep; they could not have caused his death at all - there was one bruise in the eye, the right eye was very much bruised, such an appearance as a black eye commonly has - in my opinion a fall was the occasion of his death; the rupture of the blood-vessels on the brain, and the extravasation of the blood, were the immediate cause of death - that I suppose to be caused by a fall; the bruises had not the appearance of being inflicted with such blows as would cause the rupture, there was not sufficient external marks to produce the effect.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do I understand you to say, because you saw no external bruise to justify it, you think the rupture of a vessel must be caused by a fall? A. Yes; I cannot account for the bursting of the vessels in any other way, in the manner they were burst; if he had been fighting an hour and forty minutes, and had made use of very violent exertions himself in that fight, that would not have caused the bursting of the blood-vessels in the manner these were burst; the vessels were so full and congested, they burst from a shake - the personal excitement such as takes place in a fight, would be very likely to congest and shake the vessels, but I think they would not then have burst in the manner they did.

Q. What would be the difference of bursting of a vessel, supposing it to be burst by a fall or over excitement? A. I don't think it would make a difference in the appearance - I should have thought it might have burst from over exertion, but one vessel had burst on the other side, on the left hemisphere - I will not swear that a violent personal exertion continued for an hour and forty minutes might not have caused the rupture of the vessels; I think it is not probable, in the manner they were burst, as there was not sufficient to justify that they were burst by any violent exertion; the scull was not fractured.

Q. Would not that render it more likely that the vessel burst from exertion? A. If only one had burst it might, but I think not four vessels - I think if it had been produced by external excitement, larger vessels would be burst - if it was a fall, no doubt it must have been a violent one - he might have fallen on the grass without there being any mark of violence on the head.

Q. If the vessels had been ruptured by a fall, must it not have been a violent one? A. A violent shake; it was a fall produced the shake - in the act of falling a shake was produced in the act of coming in contact with the ground - if he had fallen on his shoulder, that would not produce it - I think he fell on his head; I found no mark to be certain of that - I found no mark on his head to indicate how he got that fall - I think I can take upon myself to say these vessels were not ruptured by the exertion of fighting desperately; because these were less full than larger vessels - they were congested, but still the larger vessels would be more congested - I don't think these vessels could have burst; for instance, the one on the left hemisphere of the brain had no coagulum; there was some extravasated blood; my opinion is, nothing but the violent shake could produce it.

Q. Are you a member of the college of surgeons? A. No, I am not a member of any college; not graduated in any college - I have no degree; I practise as an apothecary; I don't keep any shop - I only dispense medicines for my own purpose; I do dispense medicines; I am not one of surgeon's hall - I have practised for the last ten years; I was apprenticed to a Mr. Ives an apothecary; I finished my apprenticeship - I have never kept an apothecary's shop at all; I took three pints of blood from him at once; and I afterwards took ten ounces more - I did not measure it; I only took it in a basin; blood varies in weight - we consider the ordinary weight of a pint of blood sixteen ounces; but it varies in almost every person - I should think sixteen ounces is the average.

Q. Being no surgeon you opened both the temporal arteries? A. Yes, I did; I think he died about thirty-six hours after; nobody attended him but me at first there was afterwards Mr. Evans and Mr. Hammond came;

there is no gentleman here who attended with me; Mr. Cox was with Mr. Evans when I visited - I should not think the leeches took more than two or three ounces of blood; I included that in the calculation I made - I believe only five leeches went on, six were applied; they did not take much blood - they did not remain on so long as some do.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you had much experience in post-mortem examinations? A. Yes; not lately - not within two years; I am not sure that I have had one within that time - I had when I was assistant to Mr. Hammond; that is four years ago, at Whetstone - I have had one or two since; the last is about three years back; I have not attended post-mortem examinations of subjects who died by rupture of the vessels of the brain - I have read various works on the subject; I do not know that I can recollect any of them; I cannot recollect any.

Q. Have you ever read treatises on the effect of violent passion? A. Yes; I do not know who they were written by - I have read on the effect of violent exertions of the human frame, but I do not know who they were written by - I have not, since I examined the body of the deceased, looked into any treatise to confirm my opinion; I have not treatise at all at home on the subject of the brain - I cannot tell how long ago it is since I looked into any work on the subject of the brain, or the effect of violent exertion of the body; the last time was about three years ago - I was in the habit of reading a great many medical works at that time; they were not my own - I have not been practising without having any book to which I could refer on medicine or surgery - the deceased was brought to my house by the parties who were fighting; I was not at the fight myself - I have read that violent exertion will sometimes effect the rupture of vessels of the brain; I cannot tell the name of the work - I have generally been an assistant till lately, and have read my employer's books; I have a pharmacopiae and anatomical works; death has been often caused by violent passion rupturing the larger blood vessels; I think it is not so likely the weaker vessels would be burst.

Q. Do you think a strong vessel more likely to give way than a weak one? A. I think so, from the great quantity of blood in it; I think the external vessels would not be likely to give way from the effect of passion; I have had a great deal of experience as a medical man, but not on this immediate subject.

COURT. Q. Are you occasionally called in to see cattle? A. No, never; I have not been called on to prescribe for diseases of cattle.

CHARLES JAMES COX. I am an apprentice to Mr. Hammond, he is a surgeon and apothecary at Whetstone; he is not here - John Evans is his assistant; he is labouring under fever and a sore throat, and unable to attend - I saw the deceased before his death, on the Tuesday, at Mr. Harrison's; he was insensible - I did not examine him then; I examined him with the assistance of Evans and Hammond at the Green Man on the same day; there were a few external marks of injury on the parietal bone, which I thought was violent; it was merely a swelling externally; I could not tell the internal appearance - the skin was not ruptured at all; the swelling was about the size of half-a-crown; I could not see it, I could only feel it, because the hair was on it - the hair was not taken off at that time - on the arm there was a severe blow; that could not cause death - there were a few slight blows on the chest which could not produce death; the blows on the groin and feet could not produce death - the only important one was the one on the head, which I believe must have been made by a fall, or by a blow from some broad and flat weapon; the fist would have left a greater mark - the mark produced by the fist would not be the same as the mark I saw; it would not be so large - that was the only mark on the head that I observed; I saw him after his death, but did not take any part in the treatment - I think he died on the Thursday morning, about one o'clock, early in the morning; I was present at the post mortem examination - I have been at the King's College studying, but was never before present at the examination of a person's head dying from rupture of a blood vessel - on removing the scalp there was the sign of a severe bruise on the parietal bone; on removing the scull, about two ounces of blood issued from three vessels which had burst, and on examing the dura mater, that was healty; the lower ventricle had a small quantity of coagulated blood - the whole of the viscera was in a healthy condition; the brain was healthy; the three vessels I have named were ruptured, and one on the other side; they were immediately underneath the bruise of the head - the rest of the body was healthy; there was no appearance in the rest of the body to indicate the cause of death - my opinion is, he died from the rupture of the blood vessels, occasioned, in my opinion, from the external injury by the bruise - I have been apprenticed to Mr. Hammond two years; Mr. Evans was at the post-mortem examination; he and Mr. Hammond were present - Evans operated.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Was the apprenticeship the commencement of your medical experience? A. Yes - I never attended a post mortem examination, where death was caused by effusion on the brain - I know nothing of Mr. Harrison - he was present at the time I speak of, and had the same mears of observation as I had - he lives in our neighbourhood, and practices in the neighbourhood near Mr. Hammond - I know nothing about him - I see him practising - he has been at Whetstone all the time, I have, and practised that time - but how much longer I cannot tell - I see him go to see patients - I have known him two years practising in the neighbourhood - the man was in a state of total insensibility, and continued so - I am surprised to hear Mr. Harrison say there was no appearance of external injury, it is not true - I can bring evidence to prove, the contrary thatwhat Mr. Harrison has said, with regard to that is false, as regards the head - it was evident to all those who saw it - they must have noticed it.

Q. You are asked whether the colour of the skin was changed, and you say you could not see that for the hair, would the hair hinder your seeing that? A. It would more or less - I could tell easier by the post-mortem examination than before - I did not see it discoloured.

Q. Now in your judgment as a medical man, do you mean to say the hair on the man's head would prevent your ascertaining whether it was discoloured? A. I did not remove the hair - I should think you could see it

my observation of the wound was plain - I felt the bruise, and therefore, there was one, there was a swelling - I felt the swelling, it was about the size of a half-crown in my judgment - and the shape a bruise generally is - it was round I think - I did not examine the shape closely - I felt it- I looked at it.

Q. Then what is the reason you cannot tell us whether it was discoloured or not? A. Because I looked at it cursorily, so as to see that it was a swelling - I could see there was a swelling without putting the hair aside - I saw there was a swelling and likewise felt it - it was more raised on that side than the other - a round instrument, a staff or stick would have produced an oblong swelling to the best of my belief in my humble opinion: a cricket ball would not produce an oblong - I explain the round instrument - I mean a staff or stave - I cannot tell exactly the size the instrument must have been to produce it - it must have been a few inches broad - four inches perhaps, and perfectly flat - a blow struck by such an instrument would not produce a larger circumference on the part the blow was given - it was on the parietal bone, and would not take four inches of a flat surface - if the man fell against a stone, or anything, that would account for the swelling - it must have been produced by something flat - the nature of the wound leads me to conclude that.

Q. Now you call it a wound? A. Yes, a swelling - it was not a lacerated wound - I should think it was a wound- I cannot say how many times I saw the man before he died - I was not present when he was bled - I did not prescribe for him at all - in my judgment it was by no means a judicious thing to open two temporal arteries, and take sixty-four ounces of blood. I cannot say it would accelerate death, but I conclude it was injudicious to take so large a quantity of blood - it was requisite to take away a small quantity, but I think so large a quantity would weaken him too much - when the blood was taken away we did not know the state of injury done to the head - his insensibility might be produced by concussion - I thought there was injury to the brain by the snoring noise he made.

Q. Was the pupil of the eye dilated - do you know what I mean by dilated? A. Yes, if the eye was closing - I do not know what you mean by dilated - the eye was closed.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Which part of the scull did you feel the swelling, put your hand to it. A. It was on the left side - on the very spot I put my hand - I have before examined the brain of a party after death, at the King's College dissecting room - but only once - there is no water in the brain when it is healty, when it is unhealthy there is generally water, and signs of inflammation - redness is a sign of inflammation - I heard him, Mr. Harrison give his evidence, but don't recollect anything about it - I should not think a fall on soft grass likely to produce the appearances I saw - I said I should say most assuredly it would not - a fall on a round stone might produce that appearance, but it would be according to the size of the stone - a round stone of large circumference might, but a small circumference would not do it - according to my judgment it must have been a flat instrument - it must have been a very violent blow according to my judgment - there was no appearance of fracture of the skull - the skull was extremely thick - in some skulls it might produce a fracture, but in this it did not - I should not think a fist able to cause such an accident - I have seen swellings on the head from a blow of a fist - it must have been a very heavy blow to cause four vessels to burst - that depends on the state of congestion of the vessels at the time - if he had been fighting for an hour and forty minutes, that would have produced congestion of the vessels - it would be difficult to give such a blow like the bruise presented, by the back part of the hand - the knuckles are not sufficiently large to produce it - the swelling was about the size of half a crown - Mr. Evans was present at the post mortem examination, but not my master - I am perfectly satisfied that he died of the bursting of the blood vessels of the brain - he never could have recovered - he died in consequence of the injuries he received.

Q. From the appearances you have seen, and the improper treatment you describe, he had received, can you say he died of suffusion, or from the improper remedies? A. Had the quantity of blood been taken away, which Mr. Harrison says he took, I should say it was decidedly injurious - a man might get well after bleeding three pints, but it would be hazardous to take that quantity - I conclude he must have died from the injury - the remedies did not hasten his death - had it been concussion of the brain, instead of effusion the individual might have recovered - the remedy was a right one - the remedy pursued by Mr. Harrison was correct, had he known the vessels had been ruptured - I have never read on subjects of violent excitement of the brain - I have attended lectures, but not given my time sufficiently to the subject.

Q. Perhaps the brain is of all parts what you know least of? A. It is

COURT. Q. Was Harrison present during the whole post mortem examination? A. He was not; he came in shortly after it began; to the best of my knowledge he came in while we were sawing through the skull; I cannot state whether I had observed the external state of the skull before he came in or not; I believe we did not look at the skull together to see if there was any bruise, I don't remember to have spoken to him; I believe he did not make any observation as to the external state of the skull- I did not hear him speak.

Q. When you say it was a flat instrument, might not the flat part of the hand have done it, though not the knnckles? A. No, I should think that could not have made that bruise, it might, but I should think it was not broad enough.

FREDERICK TOMKINS. I live in Stafford-street, Middlesex-mews, Paddington. On the 9th of July, I went to see the fight at Whetstone , there were a great many people there; a man named Edward Thompson and Michael Murphy were fighting; I was there at the beginning; I knew the men before by sight; the first rounds till about the third round, were fought in a fair way, what I call a stand up fight; I have witnessed a good many; from the the third round Thompson appeared to be the strongest and the best man, and the bye-standers who I concluded to be Murphy's (party, because they were Irish,) broke the ring, and with sticks and other weapons, they pushed and drove on from one place to another, and knocked down by-standers there; they did not call out any thing that I

could understand particularly, for it was mostly spoken in Irish; I knew one or two persons who I saw very busy there, but have not seen any of those since; I saw both the prisoners there - Mulany was very active in the fight, but I never saw him strike any body; I saw him there about the third or fourth round, pushing people about with a stick in his hand; it was more breaking the ring than keeping it; he was keeping all the people backwards in a cluster, towards the people who were fighting, pushing them towards the people, that was all I saw him do - Ready was Murphy's second - I saw him act very fair towards his man indeed, I never saw him use any ill language, or put his man forwards, he acted fairer than I ever saw a man in my life - he acted very fair towards his adversary, very fair on both sides - after the third round, the people pushed in, they continued fighting for a length of time - they might have fought for an hour or better for what I know, for I was senseless myself part of the time, being knocked down by one of them; not by the prisoners; I saw no blow given to the deceased - I saw the end of it, but not the middle part of it; I recovered at the end, Thomson and Murphy were very much exhausted; they had been fighting I should think an hour - before I was knocked down, Murphy gave in; I heard him, he looked round to the man who was seconding him, and said to his brother, "I will have no more," in a faltering voice - I then spoke to the other one's second, and said, it was right now and that the battle was theirs - and as I said so I was knocked down; previous to that, (when his brother took him up, just before I was knocked down) he stood across, and put his hands up, and said "Give it to him, you can serve three such as him;" after I recovered, when I got up at the last round but one, they were fighting towards the upper part of the ring, which was on rising ground, grass; Murphy's people had got them all up in a close corner together, on the highest part of the ground; they were at that time breaking the ring and making a disturbance; the whole of the Irish people together were making a disturbance, and their sticks were dropped, and a glass bottle was thrown in, whether wilfully or not, I don't know; several sticks were held up, and some of them fell on them, but whether by accident or design I cannot say: neither of the prisoners had anything to do with that to my knowledge; I never saw Ready in particular; a glass bottle was thrown into the ring; I helped to pick up some of the pieces; at the last round the men were both fighting, apparently as well in strength and health as at first; that was at the first of the last round; they were hustled completely round the ring by Murphy's party, as I considered them, because they were Irish; both the men had fought that round for a good length of time, and were exhausted; the man hit the deceased in the forehead, and he fell down, more by being exhausted, than by the blow; I saw Thompson fall, there was a small turf of grass lying a little on the descent, and he fell on it, and it appeared to reek his head a little back; he fell on an uneven place; there was no stone or hard substance there; I examined the place; his two seconds instantly took him out of the ring, and Ready the second of the other man came to him, and his other second; he got him across his knees, and Ready came and put his knee under him to prop the man up; he was not sensible, there was no breath in his body, apparently at all; he was taken to the doctor's shop, but before he was taken away, I tried to get him to breathe, and pressed my hands on his stomach, and he made a rattling in his throat; I stopped his nostrils, and drew about three ounces of blood, I should think out of his mouth, and then he breathed freely; they took him away directly after; I wished him to be bled, he was taken; in a gentleman's chaise; I afterwards saw him at Harrison's; he was the same man as Harrison attended to; I went with him from there to the Green Man, and left him there about a quarter past nine o'clock, in the care of two surgeons.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you attend the inquest? A. Yes, and so did Evans; Mulany was there also, and to give evidence I suppose - he was not in custody - I heard no outcry about a robbery at the fight - Mulany never touched the deceased, as I saw - it is impossible to say how many persons were at the fight more than three or four hundred; there were as near one thousand as four hundred.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. In the early part of the fight, all went on well? A. Yes; and towards the middle part I received an injury, and could not observe what was going on; and towards the latter part the thing was done fairly; I mean by the seconds and the men themselves - the conduct of Ready was fair, both to his opponent and principal, from the commenoement to the conclusion: and when it was found the deceased had been seriously injured, he manifested every anxiety to help him, and render him assistance in the ring; and at the doctor's shop he appeared anxious and concerned for him - Ready did not attempt to break the ring; he endeavoured to avoid it - not one of the seconds had any thing to do with it; it was their greatest wish to keep everything peaceable and quiet - every man would regard it as a fair fight.

GEORGE LORD . I was present at the beginning of the fight; the first round was conducted fairly; the ring was broken-in at the second by the Irish; they hit Thompson on the back of his head; only one person hit him on the back of his head; it was Mulany - he struck him with a blackthorn stick; I had not known him before; a number of persons rushed in together; I can say positively that he was the man; he only gave one blow - he was striking about with the stick, but I never saw him strike anybody else; he hit him in the back part of the head; I cannot tell in what place; it did not knock him down; it made him stagger a little, he did not fall, he went on fighting still - I do not know how long they fought afterwards; they had a great many rounds; the ring was broken in at every round but the first round - I saw Mulany kick Thompson at the last round, after the round was over - when he was lying on the ground, after he was down, he kicked him in his private parts - Thompson did not stand up at all after that; I saw nobody else kick him; I am sure of that - Mulany is the one; I swear that he is the man who struck Thompson with a stick in the second round, and kicked him in his private parts after the last round - I never saw any body else strike him; I do not know a man named John Lane; I was examined before the Coroner - I swore it was Lane did it because I heard his name was Lane, but this is the man - I saw him

in the yard at the inquest; I swore to him directly he came into the yard - I gave my evidence the day before he was before the Coroner, and he came the next day - I saw Ready at the fight seconding Murphy, he behaved very well throughout the fight.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I think you say, the ring was broken-in, every round after the first? A. Yes, I am sure of that; I do not know how many rounds were fought during the battle; I did not take notice; I should think about twenty - I am not certain how long the battle lasted; it was better than an hour I should think - Thompson was not ill-used every round; only in two rounds, that was the last round and the second; the blackthorn stick that Mulany had was about a yard long; I knew it was blackthorn by the colour of it; such a stick as you would cut out of a hedge; a round stick with knots on it; I am sure of that - I went to look on with other people - I have not seen above three fights in my time - I am a farrier, and live at home, with my father and mother - I was never engaged in a fight myself.

Q. Did you ever find your way into any gaol? A. No; I have been in a watch-house for being saucy - the policeman took me there for being saucy in the street, for insulting people, I suppose, when I was coming home, running up against them - it was at night.

Q. Did your running against them happen to be very near their pockets? A. No, I do not get my living that way - I was not taken up on suspicion of attempting to steal; I will swear that; I used no words when I ran against the persons; I was given in charge of a policeman; he was by at the time and saw it, and seized me, and put me into Marylebone watch-house; I staid there till about twelve o'clock, and then was bailed out - I appeared the next day at the office, and the prosecutor was there, but nothing was done to me; I swear nothing was done to me - I swear I never was in any prison in my life - I know the House of Correction; I was never there, nor in any other prison; nor charged with an assault for which I was ever sent to prison.

Q. Were you charged with an assault on a woman? A. Yes, at Clerkenwell, where you go before the grand jury - I was at Clerkenwell when I was charged; I was bailed out from Marylebone sessions-house.

Q. Was it for the same assault as you were bailed for before? A. No - yes; I was at Clerkenwell for insulting the woman; it was not at Clerkenwell that I committed the insult; the woman took me there, to that part of it where you have your trial - I was found guilty and fined, and paid 5l.

Q. What was the reason you swore a few moments before, that you were never taken up, except for being saucy? A. I don't know; I forgot it at the time; I forgot that I was tried, convicted, and fined - I totally forgot it, and thought nothing had happened to me - I swear that I was never tried before nor since - I never was in Clerkenwell; I was tried there; I mean to swear I never was into custody at Clerkenwell - I was not put into the dock during my trial; I was not locked up at Clerkenwell- I was not there till I had my trial - I have not asked money from anybody here for coming to give evidence; that I am sure of; I never told anybody that he ought to find me, and the witnesses with money - I did not say so to Mark Walsh, nor anything of the kind - I live at No. 62, Market-street, Paddington - I did not describe myself as a labouring man living at Marylebone; I did not tell Walsh so - I did not ask Walsh for a shilling, telling him that as he was prosecutor he ought to find us in money; I am quite certain I did not.

JOHN TARGETT . I was at the beginning of the fight; the first two or three rounds were fair fighting: at the third round the ring was closed - the second round was fair; I was not near enough to see all that took place in the second round; I was in the ring, but not near enough to see everything that was transacted; I saw nothing unfair in the second round, nor any blow struck with a stick- at the third round the ring was closed, by the mob going in, and getting close round the men who were fighting; they kept on stumbling about, but no one could see them fight for the mob - there were a great many rounds; at every round after the third the ring was closed - I did not see Thompson struck; during the whole time, I could see no one strike Thompson, except Michael Murphy , who was fighting him - I did not see anybody kick Thompson, not at any time - there is no other John Targett besides me - I was examined before the coroner - I saw nobody throw a bottle, at any part of the fight - I saw the last round as well as I saw several of them; I could see it, but the mob pushed the people about, nobody could get to see the round; I was in the ring at the last round - I remember Murphy saying he would give in; it was near the end of the fight - Ready was in the ring as bottle-holder to Murphy; I don't remember seeing the other man there.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. By the ring being closed, you mean the people did not keep the proper distance from the men fighting? A. No, there were no ropes to keep them away; there was still an open space for them to fight; but it was as much as there was - I was close inside the space - I saw no foul play on the side of the seconds, barring on Murphy - I think Edward Murphy was the worst of the lot; I saw no foul play on the part of the seconds, except Edward Murphy ; I think he was very foul in his play - Ready was very quiet all the time.

WILLIAM STUCRBURY . I am a constable. I was at the fight, only dare not interfere, seeing no other officer there- I considered the first six or seven rounds as fairly fought as I ever saw; after the sixth or seventh round, they seemed all to form together in one corner, and I saw sticks up in the air - I cannot say who the parties were that did so, or which side they took; I saw nobody strike or kick, only a general confusion.

WILLIAM LUKAR . I was at the fight from the beginning; it was fair until the third or fourth round, and then after that, the ring was broken in every time by the people round; several people broke it in; they rushed about the ring with their sticks; I did not see them strike anybody, not at any time - I was struck myself - I saw nobody strike Thompson, except the man who was fighting with him - I saw nobody kick him - I was there all the time of the second round; I was in the ring, taking hold of each other's arms to keep the ring; I wasnear enough to have seen anybody hit Thompson on the head, but I saw nobody strike him at the second round - Michael Murphy was the man who was fighting; I saw him strike foul about the middle of the fight; I saw him strike Thomp

son below the handkerchief in his ****; when he did that Thompson rubbed both his hands and shook his head- I hallooed out immediately that was foul - a man came up and gave me a blow, and somebody else said it was foul- Ready was one of the seconds; I did not hear him speak at all; he seconded Murphy fairly - I don't know John Lane, I cannot say whether such a person was there- I saw the last round, and saw Edward Thompson knocked down, and afterwards saw him fall, and the crowd came so quick I was pushed away, and saw no more of it; he fell on the back of his head on the grass; I cannot say whether he fell on anything.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it a very heavy violent fall? A. Yes.

MARTIN HUSSEY . I was there at the beginning of the fight; it was very fair indeed at the beginning, but at the latter end, it was unfair; I saw three, four or five rounds fair: and then the man named Murphy who was fighting, retreated into one corner of the ring, the other man followed him, and when he got there, the ring came round on both sides and was broken in - and then the fight was sometime without seconds, and sometimes with - it was very irregular; the spectators broke in; the men always fought to one corner of the ring, and then the people all broke in; I did not know who the people were; I heard them crying out and hallooing - I was in a gig; I went into the ring and said, "Do keep the ring, let them have a fair fight;" a man said, "What business is it of yours;" and the prisoner Mulany struck me on the hat and cut it; I went out of the ring and stopped outside in my gig - I saw the ring broken in every time, and both men were completely debarred from their seconds altogether; I saw nobody strike Thompson nor kick him; they were both separated from their seconds at times - the seconds acted very fair on both sides; Mulany struck me on the hat - I did not see him do anything else; Ready was second - I saw him do nothing but second; Thompson's antagonist, who he was fighting with struck him a foul blow below the waistcoat - I don't say it was in the private parts; I don't know John Lane.

JOHN LYON . I was at the fight; I knew Thompson before; the first, second, and third rounds were fair fighting; but when they found the deceased was getting the best of the fight, the opposite party immediately broke the ring in, and there was no fair play afterwards; they used their sticks and whips every time after that, beating every body, it was immaterial who; Murphy fought to one corner of the ring; I cannot say I saw anybody strike the deceased except Murphy - sticks were flung about in each direction; I saw no stick strike Thompson, nor did I see him kicked; I saw the last round - I saw Thompson fall; Murphy took his fist and gave him a dab, and that was all, and he fell down on the grass - I could not tell whether he struck his head on anything; I was in a cart; when I found how the fight was going, I got out of my cart and went across the field to a man named Miller; I went to a man who I believe was stake-holder, and said to him "Call out and say you will not give the money up unless it is a fair fight;" I saw both the prisoners there - I did not see them strike any blow; Mulany was active there; he had got a stick beating people out of the ring - he was very busy with his stick; he was trying to clear the ring to make room for them to fight.

ROBERT PURVIS . I was at the fight; I saw a disturbance take place after the third round - several people crowded into the ring, and fell before Edward Thompson with intent to throw him down; I don't know their names; on the fourth round, a man named Mulany in the crowd, went with a pretence of keeping the mob back with a large stick, and struck Edward Thompson on the back of his head twice; that was about the fourth round - I had never known that man before - I never saw him before; there were plenty of men round the ring with whips and sticks near Mulany at the time he struck the blow - I am quite sure he is the man who struck the blow; it was given out that his name was John Lane at first; I was examined before the coroner, and said Lane struck the man; but I said they gave his name as Lane; but it was Mulany; he is the man I called Lane before the Coroner; after the fourth round, I cried out"Shame," and was knocked down by Thomas Hands , a butcher, who threatened to knock me down again; I got up and went away for about twenty minutes - I returned and got up into a cart, but not near enough to see what happened afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was Mulany inside the ring at the time this happened? A. Yes; a great many persons must have seen him; he had a kind of a black stick - a round black stick - he was flourishing it about under the pretence of keeping the mob off - Thompson was not fighting at the time, he struck him; the fourth round was over - Thompson was not sitting on his second's knee; he was standing - he was standing in an attitude to fight; Mulany did not come in front of Thompson; he was running round Murphy; he hit him the first blow on the back of his head; I was outside the ring, but saw the stick hit him; he swung the stick with all his force - Thompson took no notice of it; he did not seem to mind it as anybody would have thought; he looked round at the man who struck him; I was too far off to hear him say anything; then he gave him a second blow on the back of his head, in the very same place for what I could see; it was in keeping the mob off that he gave him the second blow, in the same round; he did not seem to take any notice of the second blow - it was a very thick stick; a middling size - he hit as hard as he could both times.

JAMES PORTER . I was present at the fight. I saw persons break into the ring about the fourth round - they all surrounded the two men fighting, and the sticks flew over their heads, as much as to say, "Keep aside, and let them fight" - and about the middle of the round, I saw Mulany, as Thompson was falling, lift up his foot and kick Thompson in the p*****s - I did not see him kick more than once; directly Thompson fell down he drew his two legs up together, and I never saw him move till the seconds picked him up - I saw nobody else kick or strike Thompson at any time; there were a great many people about - I do not know that any more saw him, there were several strangers close to me - I cannot say whether there was any more ill usage, for I was lifted right away by the mob, and could not get near the ring afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. After the kick(which was when the man was falling,) he was picked up by the seconds? A. Yes; that was the end of the round; it was about the middle of the fight the kick was given.

Q. You said it was the fourth round? A. No; I said it was about the middle of the fight; I did not say about the middle of the fourth round; he received a blow from the man he was fighting with, after he was kicked - as soon as the man received the kick, Murphy struck at him and the man fell down.

Q. On your oath did you not just now tell us he was falling when the man kicked him? A. To be sure; Murphy made a hit at him and the man kicked him, and Murphy put out his hand and the man fell; the man was hit first and kicked afterwards - while falling Murphy struck out the other hand; the blow which caused him to fall, was received just here (over the nose); the ring at that time was about the size of this table; he fell backwards, and the man who knocked him down was facing him - as he stood with his legs open, a man stood in the ring, and came and kicked him; he came to the side, he could very easy kick him, by swinging his leg round; he kicked as he stood, for he must kick rather round; he first came in front and struck him while the man he was fighting with was standing before him - I don't know anybody there who saw this; I did not look round; I was afraid to move; I saw some of the witnesses there who have been examined - they were all there at the time this happened - I do not know that they had an opportunity of seeing this kick - I am a day-labourer; I work for anybody I can get to work for - I do not work exactly for anybody now - I have had employ from Mr. Manning, a builder; about a week ago, I worked for him, close by my own home, in Little James-street, Marylebone; he lives in Earl-street; I did not work for him above two or three days - I cannot give the name of anybody else I have worked for; these are not my usual working clothes that I have on; this is the first time I have had this coat on - my mother brought it home from a gentleman's house, - I have had the trousers two or three months - on my oath I have not been furnished with these clothes for the purpose of appearing before the Jury - I received the coat on Saturday; I do not know who the gentleman was my mother brought it from - I did not trouble about that.

Q. Pray have you ever been here before? A. If I have been here I suffered the law; I stood where the prisoners do and suffered the law for it; I was charged with stealing some prints; I cannot say how long it is ago; I never keep a recollection of these things; it is as near as I can guess two or three years ago; I was sent away about my business; I was never here on any other occasion at all, nor in the other Court - I was never charged with stealing shoes in my life; nobody said I had stolen shoes from my master's shop, nor boots, nor anything - I never had any charge against me but stealing prints, that was all.

WILLIAM LLEWHELLIN . I was at the fight, and saw the crowd break in about the third or fourth round - both parties broke in; it was the friends on one side as well as the other - I saw no blow struck at Thompson, nor did I see him kicked, I saw no sticks used to Thompson, I saw them used to keep the ring out - Thompson died on Thursday morning, ata quarter before one o'clock, I was there, I saw Ready there.

WILLIAM PETERS . I was at the fight from its beginning; I saw everything fair up to the seventh round - I watched the party closely, I was close by the principal part of the time - I did not see Thompson struck any blow with a stick at the second or third round; I watched minutely, but saw no blow struck with stick or stave; I saw no blow struck until the seventh round, all was fair; I did not see him kicked at any time, - from the seventh round to the tenth round I saw Michael Murphy put his left foot out to the deceased's foot, with his spiked shoe, and lacerated the upper-leather; he was the man fighting; he put a spiked shoe on his foot, and lacerated the leather, and it penetrated his foot, at least I could see the stocking through the leather - Thompson made a very wry face, and drew his foot back, and made a motion with his first which he held out as much as to say, "I will reward you for that" - I did not see any bloed on the foot till the evening - I think it was possible for everybody there to see his shoe was lacerated; I made a remark about it to those who were in the cart with me - I was at the extremity of the ring in a cart - I saw his foot at Mr. Harrison's, there were marks such as the spiked shoe would make; I have no doubt they were made at that time - I saw the prisoner Ready there, but not the other prisoner - Ready was second, and he was the best man in the ring; he acted most fair; he and Dan Sheen surrounded the combatants, but Ready acted fair; if I had been second I should have done the same - I saw him fall at the last round; I think a man named Ray got between them by accident, but he was unknown to me; but I heard Edward Murphy say, if he got between them again, - if he came that again, he would bury a bottle in his b-y brains.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The battle was in a field? A. Yes; it was a very fine day, the grass was slippery, it had been fed off - I occasionally play at cricket; it is usual to wear spiked shoes when the grass is slippery - here is the shoe Thompson had on, they have sparables half-way driven into the sole, to enable him to stand better on the ground; but Murphy's shoe had a spike in the centre like the heel of a skate; I only noticed one spike - I consider his object in wearing it was to keep his foot secure on the ground - Ready's conduct was manly and fair; after the man fell he manifested every anxiety to assist him to my knowledge - from what I saw, I think if it had not been for the interference of the mob, the fight would have gone off all quiet and pleasantly, there is no doubt of it.

WILLIAM GOSLING . I assisted Walsh in apprehending Ready at Barnet.

MARK WALSH . I am a constable bound over to prosecute; I know nothing of the circumstances; I took Ready at Barnet, on the 23rd of July.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. I believe Mulany gave his address? A. Yes; he was admitted to bail, and surrendered here to be tried; I was bound over to prosecute - no application has been made to me for money; Llewhellin asked me for 1s.

Ready's Defence. I unfortunately became second in this fight, and in that character used every possible exertion to preserve order and see fair play, but was prevented by a number of persons rushing in and breaking the ring; I could have no possible controul over them - Murphy, at my request, wished to give in, and would have done so if the ring had not been broken in.

Mulany's Defence. I never struck a man with a stick in my life - never - I neither kicked nor struck him I declare - I was in a cart the best part of the time, and I have witnesses.

SAMUEL HAINES . I am a smith. I went to see the fight between Thompson and Murphy in a cart; the prisoner Mulaney and two or three other neighbours were with me - the fight had gone on about half an hour before Mulany got out of the cart, as near as I can recollect - a stick was given him after he got out of the cart; nothing had happened to him before the stick was given to him - I observed him nearly the whole time of the fight; he took no act or part in the fight whatever - he had not been long in the ring before a man called out that he was robbed, and I and a neighbour who was in the cart got out, as it was said Mulany was being robbed- when I got to Mulany, he was coming towards me, towards the cart, and he had his hat broken; his hat was whole when he left the cart - I asked him to get into the cart, which he did, with me and the others; Mulany was out of the cart about twenty minutes or half an hour before I saw him as I have described - I had a pretty good view of him all the time; I did not see him attempt to strike or beat anybody, nor anything of the kind, and from the time he got into the cart again, he did not get out till we got to Finchley-common - the fight went on after he returned to the cart - I had a view of the people fighting generally; I never saw Mulany within ten or eighteen yards of them - I have known him ten or twelve years - he is a smith.

COURT. Q. How many rounds took place before he got out of the cart? A. I should think six or seven, as near as I can recollect - he is an Irishman, I believe- I have not seen him particularly a companion of Murphy's; he might have spoken to him in passing, as he lived in our neighbourhood; I never knew him as a companion of his - he might have spoken to him at the door as he passed, but never to go out drinking - they knew each other - I am not in the habit of going to fights, but it being a very fine day, and a neighbour having a horse and cart, I agreed to go - Mulany and I went together, and came back together; it was a neighbour's cart - several others went with us - he stood in the outer ring among the people; I did not see him near the men; for some time the ring was kept, but Murphy was brought out of the ring; then he was called back again by Thompson's party, and there was five or six rounds afterwards; there was great confusion then - at the beginning the fight was conducted very well; there was an excellent ring - the ring was not broken in before Mulany got out of the cart, nor before he came back again; there was some confusion, but not so close as to compass the men; the ring got closer and closer every round, after the sixth or eighth until the fight finished.

JOHN SLATER . I am a journeyman whip-maker, and live at No. 9, Oxford-buildings. I have worked in Marylebone-lane twenty-one years; I went with Mulany in the cart to see the fight - I saw the beginning of the fight, and was in the cart, and as far as I can recollect there was Mulany and some others in the cart with me- he continued in the cart after the fight began, I should think half an hour or perhaps more; he then left the cart and went away on the left hand side round the ring- I saw him come back to the cart; he said he had been robbed; I saw him while he was out of the cart, outside the ring, not in it - I cannot say how long that was before he came back to the cart; when he came back he got into the cart again, and stopped till we got to the Green Man on Finchley-common - when he came up to the cart, the crown of his hat was broken; I never saw him strike any body or interfere while he was out of the cart - I cannot say whether he might have struck any body without my seeing it, for my attention was on the fight- I am quite certain he could not have struck either of the men who were fighting without my seeing it; I did not see him strike either of them, or attempt it.

COURT. Q. When he was out of the cart your eye was not constantly fixed on him? A. No; it was on the people who were fighting - I went out of the cart myself when he did, but it was at the back part of the ring; I remained in the cart when he returned - while he was gone I got out for a necessary purpose, and got in again - I was looking at the people fighting, not watching him - during that time I did not see the ring closed on the men who were fighting - when he got up into the cart and we were coming away, I perceived a confusion in the ring, but not till after he came back - the ring was not properly kept certainly, at the latter part - while he was out of the cart - I first saw it broken in after he came back with his hat broken; he did not come back to the cart twice - I never saw the ring broken in at any other time - I will certainly take on myself to swear it was not broken in at the fourth round, nor at the seventh round; not before the eighth - when Mulany came back, and said he was robbed was the first time the ring was broken in; that was the first time I saw the confusion, and the only time - they did not restore the ring afterwards; there was confusion, and I saw no more fighting - I was a long distance off.

JOHN HAYES . I am a dealer in coals. I went to the fight in a cart with Mulany; he remained in the cart about twenty minutes, then got out and joined the mob - in forming the ring there was a confusion in the mob, and two people, whom I drove down got out of the cart,(Haines and Dunn,) and got into the mob to the assistance of Mulany, who was attempted to be robbed - I saw Mulany's hat, the crown of it was broken-in, and I saw the lining - Mulany went back to the cart and got in - we remained till the fight was over; Mulany did not get out again till we went away; we went to the Green Man, on Finchley-common.

COURT. Q. The cart was a good distance off? A. Yes; I remained in it all the time.

JOHN MURPHY . I live with Mr. Hayes, as a coal-dealer. I went in the cart to the fight; I saw the beginning of it; Mulany continued in the cart, as near as I can say, twenty minutes; he then got out of the cart, and I with him - I was with him all the time he was out

of the cart; he did not attempt to strike either of the men who were fighting; he could not have done so without my seeing him; he went back to the cart by himself - while he stood near me he found a man's hand near his pocket, and gave an alarm that his pocket was picked - he pursued the man, but he got away, and a man struck him across the hat with a stick - he left the ring and went to the cart, and did not leave it again - I went to the Green Man, in the cart, after the fight was over - he went to the cart before the fight was over - I remained in the ring, and kept my eye on the cart the whole time.

COURT. Q. You never looked at the fight then? A. Yes I did, but while the men were down I looked towards the cart.

WILLIAM HAINES . I am a whitesmith, and live at No. 10, Oxford-buildings. I went to the fight; I was on the top of a coach, near the cart in which Mulany was - I did not see him get out of the cart; I saw him out of it; the fight had been then going on about twenty minutes - I heard a scuffle on the opposite side of the ring, and saw him surrounded by a mob of men, and saw the crown of his hat was knocked in - I was standing on the roof of a coach; I saw no one go to his assistance; he appeared flurried in the mob; I called to John Hayes, and others in the cart - I never saw him within ten or twelve yards of the men; I had a very good view of the fight; he never was near enough to strike the men; I knew him well and must have seen him if he struck either of the men - there was a man named John Lahe , I believe, on the field.

COURT. Q. Do you know that man? A. I know him by sight; I knew him by sight and name before - our coach was five or six yards from the outer circle, not more - when I gave the alarm that Mulany was assaulted, my brother and John Dunn went from the cart, and took him from the ring; it was a very few minutes after I had first seen him on the ground.

JAMES BRANHAM . I was at the fight; I was sitting on the box of a hackney-coach, which gave me a very good view of the fight - I saw Mulany there in a cart; I did not see him get out; when I first saw him in the cart, the fight had not began; the ring was forming; I saw him in the cart after the fight began; there might be two or three rounds taken place before I saw him; I afterwards saw him out of the cart, on the side of the ring; I noticed him there for about half an hour, and saw him return; during the time he was out of the cart the fight was going on; I was looking at it - I did not see Mulany strike, or attempt to strike, either of the men fighting; I don't think such a thing could have happened without my seeing it; I must have seen it.

JOHN HENWRIGHT . I am a shoemaker. I was in a van looking at the fight; I saw Mulany there in a cart; I saw him out of the cart afterwards - I suppose the men had fought ten or twelve rounds before he got out - it might be twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour; I remember his returning to his cart again; the fight was going on then, and continued a long time after he got into the cart; I observed him while he was out of the cart, he did not take any part in it; he was fifteen or sixteen yards from the combatants - if he had attempted to strike either of them, I must have seen it - I remember seeing him near Finchley with the crown of his hat all broken.

MICHAEL ROACH . I am a plasterer. I was at the fight, inside the ring, very near the men who were fighting; I was there before the fight began, not in the centre of the ring, but inside the spectators who formed the ring; I continued there during the whole fight, as near as anybody to the men, except the seconds - I saw Mulany there; I never saw him attempt to strike either of the men, he could not have done it without my seeing it.

COURT. Q. Had Mulany a stick in his hand? A. When I first observed him in the ring he had a small cane in his hand; he was inside the spectators that formed the ring; once he was near me, and that was all; I did not see him moving about, I saw him near me, and that was the only time I saw him; I might have seen him about two or three minutes - the ring was not broken in at the third or fourth round: it might have been broken in about the sixteenth round, but to the best of my knowledge not before - I was there but I did not take notes of the fight - it was broken in, but I did not take notice what time it was broken in; it was late in the fight, I should say about the sixteenth round, not before, to the best of my knowledge - I saw nobody strike Thompson but his combatant; I saw nobody kick him, nor any foul play at all on the part of the man who fought him; it was foul play breaking the ring in - I term the ring being broken in, foul play; the confusion continued from the time it was once broken in, to the end of the fight - to the best of my knowledge there were twenty-seven rounds altogether, the last ten all in confusion - I understood it lasted about an hour and forty minutes; it might be about an hour after the fight began, that the ring was broken in, not till then, to the best of my belief.

WILLIAM KING . I am a smith, and live in Oxford-buildings. I was at the fight on the roof of a coach with Branham; I saw Mulany, he got out of the cart about twenty minutes or half an hour after the fight began - I saw him in the act of getting into the cart again afterwards; he was on the shaft of the cart, and his hat was broken - he did not say anything in my hearing about how his hat got in that state - I was about seven yards from him; the fight continued after he got into the cart for twenty-five minutes or half an hour - I observed the two persons who were fighting while Mulany was out; he did not go near them, or attempt to strike either of them, I must have seen it if he had - I was ten or fifteen yards from where the commencement of every round was.

COURT. Q. Then Mulany was three quarters of an hour on the ground? A. Yes, before he left the cart, and then half an hour out of the cart - I did not keep my eye on him all the time; he was out of my sight - I did not see him with any stick in his hand at all - I did not observe whether he had a stick or not when he got out of the cart; I took no notice of it, the whole of my attention was directed towards the men fighting - I saw no foul play from anybody present, all was fair from beginning to end - about the end of it, both parties seemed anxious to see who was winning - but as to striking either of the parties, that could not be done without my seeing it -

the ring was broken-in after the twentieth round, not before that.

JAMES MILLER . I am a publican, I live in Union-street, Bond-street. I was at the fight at the beginning; I was outside the ring in a cab - I saw the fight from beginning to end - I have known Mulany five or six years; he was in a cart; he jumped out and I asked him to come and take a walk round the ring - I walked round the ring with him; he did not attempt to interfere, but some of them who were coming along, he put his stick up to them and said, "I will give you a knock if you don't keep off;" I went away to my cab, and he to his cart; I think I must have seen him if he had struck, or attempted to strike.

COURT. Q. He threatened to strike a man if he did not stand back? A. Yes; he struck his stick on the ground to keep the ring; he was inside the ring, there were people behind and before us; I was about ten minutes with him walking round the ring - I did not see exactly the time he got out of his cart, but he was in it for twenty minutes after the fight began, to my knowledge; in a few minutes after he got out, he walked round the ring with me - it could not be more than ten minutes after that I saw him in the cart; I did not see him go back to his cart, but I saw him in the cart about twenty minutes after; I was not with him when his hat was struck.

John Kempshaw , coachmaster, of Fulham; John Lee , omnibus driver; Thomas Reid , police-officer of Marylebone; John Morris , bricklayer, Whitechapel; William Granthan , coach maker, Edgeware-road; Thomas Oliver , Hunter's Arms, Compton-street; James Bound , smith, Newcastle-place, Edgeware-road; Thomas Clifton , stage coachmaster, Fulham; and Mark Winkham, law writer, Whitechapel; gave Ready a good character, for humanity and kindness of disposition.

READY - GUILTY. Aged 26. - of Manslaughter .

Confined Two Months .

MULANY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-125

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1328. WILLIAM HAYDON was indicted for, that he, on the 17th of June , feloniously did forge a certain order, for the payment of 300l. with intent to defraud William Praed and others , against the statue, &c.

2nd COUNT for feloniously offering, uttering, disposing of, and putting off a like forged order with the like intent.

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

CLARK EDWARD TOMALIN . I am clerk to William Praed and others, banker s, Fleet-street . On the 17th of June last, this cheque (looking at it) was presented to me - I know John Davis, a customer of our house; I paid 300l. for this cheque, by giving two notes of 100l., three notes of 20l., and four notes of 10l.; I have no recollection of the person who presented it - I believed the signature to be genuine, it was presented by a man.

Cross-examined by MR. DAWSON. Q. Do you know the prisoner? A. I have seen him, he has been frequently at our house; I should have recollected if it had been him; it was not him.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a newspaper vender, and live at No. 47, Broad-street, St. Giles'. The prisoner was in my service upwards of four years, and left on the 16th of June, without giving any notice (looking at the cheque) - I believe this to be his hand-writing; he has made my bills out every week, for upwards of four years - I saw his writing every day in the week; I did not see him again until the 25th of August, when I saw him in Cork gaol - I went there to identify him - I got to Cork on the 25th of August, he was detained on my charge, and brought here to be tried - one hundred and thirty-two sovereigns were found on his brother, as I understood - I had sent the prisoner to my bankers, with my banking book, on the 16th of June, before he absconded; that enabled him to ascertain what balance I had, which was about 320l.; this is a printed cheque which Praeds issue to all their customers; and I stamp all my cheques with, "Davis, 47, Broad-street," this is stamped so, and I swear it must have been in my possession - I might have had the cheque-book in my pocket, or in my desk, and he could get access to it - when I went to see him at Cork gaol, the gaoler said to him "Your name is Smith," he said, yes; his name while with me was Haydon.

Cross-examined. Q. Would you tell me is that writing like your hand-writing? A. It is something similar, or the banker would not have paid him - it is not like the prisoner's common hand-writing, he has tried to imitate mine - it is a feigned hand, but it is the prisoner's writing.

Q. Is it not possible a hand being feigned to resemble yours, may have some slight resemblance to another person's without its being that other person's? A. It is possible, but it is exactly as the prisoner writes, and makes out the bills, a kind of up and down - I have not the least doubt of its being his hand-writing.

COURT. Q. You saw nothing of him till you apprehended him? A. No; he had given me no notice to quit.

MR. DAWSON. Q. Have you not frequently known people mistake in person's hand-writing? A. I have heard of such a circumstance; but I know his hand so well, being so long in my service; his writing is something similar to mine - I have not a doubt he copied one of my old cheques - I have nobody in my employ besides him that could write it - I do not know how the cheque was got; I could not have lost it - it was torn out of my cheque book - the book was generally in my desk, of which I keep the key, or I sometimes had it in my pocket; I kept the key in my pocket; I hang my coat up when I have not got it on - I have a neice and brother in my service - nobody could get at the cheques but the prisoner - the notes paid for the cheque were changed at the Bank, and had his brother's name on them; his brother could not get at my cheques.

Q. You say the prisoner knew you had 300l. in the bank, how did he know that? A. By seeing my book which he took to the bankers on the 15th of June, and left it there to be made up - my book was not returned till the Wednesday - my book had not been made up for three weeks; but I had been down at Hastings, and had not drawn any cheques.

MR. BODKIN. Q. He knew no drafts had been drawn out during the three weeks? A. Yes; nobody but himself would know that - I hung my coat up sometimes in my parlour - I wore an old coat in doors - the prisoner

knew every motion of mine about the house; he could take the book out of my pocket; he might take my coat down to brush or beat; he did that about twice a week, perhaps on Wednesdays and Saturdays.(The Cheque was here put in and read.)

- Davey, publican; Robert Renman , Black-horse-yard; Eliza Golman , Edmund Kelly, St. John-street; and - Mitchell 80, Old Broad-street, gave the prisoner a good character.

COURT to DAVIS. Q. Was the cheque written in the usual way you write your cheques, there appears a letter too much? A. No, it is not; there is not a letter too much.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330905-126

1329. SARAH WEST was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying a certain male infant child .

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I am a medical man, and a member of the college of surgeons, and an apothecary - I attended the coroner's inquisition - I had seen the body of the child a day previous - I did not see it before the inquest - I attended the child's mother Mrs. West, and saw the child frequently during her illness - I should say the immediate cause of its death, was from neglect of proper care and attention, and nourishment - I conceive it died from want of proper food, such as is usually given to children of that age - the body exhibited the appearance of extreme emaciation, without any visible sign of disease; and marks of erosion on the skin, and different parts of the body, which I should say was from the clothes being left dirty on it, and not being properly changed - I cannot positively say the child died of starvation - there had been a bowel complaint I understand, and there was that appearance - it had the appearance of having suffered from weakness of stomach - that is a common thing with children, independent of the want of food - I can offer no decided opinion of the cause of its death - it might have been a disease incident to children, from weakness of bowels.

Q. Is it not common, that where the most proper food is administered, a child which has been weaned, and the stomach being out of order, the child becomes weak, and dies? A. It is common - the child had been weaned in consequence of its mother's death.

EDWARD HARRISON LINNICAR . I am an apothecary - I am not a member of the college of surgeons - I first saw the child on the 9th of August - it died in a week or ten days - the immediate cause of its death was diarrhoea, a complaint that is common to all children that don't wean well - the child had been weaned - the most proper food would be that most like the food it had left, such as milk and water.

Q. Do you think the prisoner, (a child of fifteen years old) able to distinguish what should be done in such cases? A. The knowledge of young people at times is very great, as to the treatment of children, - otherwise I should be sorry to trust a child to so young a nurse; the selection of food may undoubtedly, be attributed to want of experience in persons so young as the prisoner; a child requires great care; I say the child died of diarrhoea - but we must draw our conclusions from what we hear; in this child there was no appearance of disease in the bowels, and where children don't thrive from natural food, there is generally an appearance of disease in the bowels; they certainly sometimes die of mere weakness of the bowels; it is entirely a matter of opinion; my idea is, that if the child had received proper attention, and food, it would not have died; I cannot swear that it would have lived, but in all human probability it would have gone on well with proper treatment; if a child of the prisoner's age were not informed of what was proper to give it, she would naturally give it the food she used herself; it had certainly not been nourished, the body was extremely emaciated, that always follows with the bowel complaint undoubtedly, especially in the epidemic which had recently visited us; the mother died not long after the child's birth; I understand then it had a nurse for a short time; then it was sent into the country, and afterwards came back to the prisoner.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS . I live at No. 4, Addle-street , in the house where the child was; I am the wife of William Williams ; - the prisoner is the sister of the deceased child - the father is a working man; absent all day, and sometimes all night; two years ago an infant died; which the prisoner had the care of during her mother's life - she nursed it a good deal, and appeared very fond of children; the mother died on the 9th of June; before that the child went out to be weaned at Hammersmith; it came back in four weeks; it had no bowel complaint when it returned - it appeared rather poorly, through losing the breast, but the mother was very fond of it, and begged of the prisoner to take care of it; it died only eight weeks after; I have heard the prisoner say, she could get everything that was wanted at the chandler's shop, and her father would pay for it; I never saw her feed the child; the little boy told me that bread and butter, and water was given to the baby; I have seen the baby very dirty, and have given it bread and milk, and broth, and it eat always very hungry, and ravenous; the prisoner appeared fond of it in my sight, at times; but she used to leave it to go to her companions, they were very numerous, and I have frequently told her of it; she has had the domestic business to do, and her father to wash for; she is about seventeen years old; she has to look after a little boy eight years old; I never saw her beat it, or treat it unkindly; it was kept up stairs in the two pair, where the prisoner was herself; I always found it there, it was in a small bed room not a closet.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-127

1330. DENNIS CONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 2 metal cocks, value 11s., the goods of William Cubitt and another his masters ; and EDWIN BELLAMY for feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

EDWARD APSLEY STOCKMAN (policeman A 1). On Saturday night, the 21st of July, I was in Southampton-street, Tottenham-court-road, on duty, and saw the prisoner Connell - I followed him; he went into Bellamy's shop in Fleet-lane ; I looked through the window and saw him offer two cocks for sale, to Bellamy - Bellamy took the cocks and put them into the scale, and I heard him say they weighed 31/2lbs., for which he should give him 1s. 2d at the rate of 4d. in the pound - he took them out of the

scale, and put them into the till under the counter, and at the same time turning his head towards the window looked towards me, and I thought, observed me - I moved further up the lane; a woman came to the door in about ten minutes, then went in, and came to the door again and went in - immediately after Connell came out and went down the lane; I followed and took hold of him, and asked him whose property he had been selling; he said it was his own - I said it was Mr. Cubitt's, the builders, where he worked, which he denied - I took him back to the shop, and said "Bellamy, where are the cocks you bought of this boy ten minutes ago?" he said "Cocks, what cocks? ten minutes ago." - I said "Yes, it may be a quarter of an hour; it is useless to deny it - they are in that till, take them out, or I shall for you" - he said"Oh yes," and took them out, and gave them to me - I told him to come with me; he refused - at last I took them both to the Compter; Bellamy was let out on bail.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He had not denied having them, though you said it was no use to deny it? A. No; but I should not have thought it could have slipped his memory - he said "Cocks, what cocks?"- he hesitated, and would not give me an answer whether they were there or not - and not giving me an answer, in my opinion, admitted that he had not got them, when he had only bought them ten minutes before - he went along with me - I had hold of him at first, when he came from behind the counter, but not in the street, as he was willing to come - he walked by the side of me; I had hold of Connell - there was sufficient time to conceal the cocks, but not being in my uniform it was impossible to know I was an officer - I was looking in at the window, and I thought he observed me, by his turning and looking towards the window - I do not mean that he put the goods under the counter because he observed me - it is proof sufficient that he saw my person at the window, or a woman would not have come to the door - I have been in the New Police eighteen months, and was in the old establishment - I do not think Bellamy could have escaped from me, as my attention was directed to him; I think I should have caught him if he had run.

MR. DOANE. Q. Did you hold out any threat or promise to Connell? A. None at all; after he was in custody he said it was the second time he had been there - Bellamy did not hear that.

WILLIAM BRIGHT . I am foreman of the smith's department, at Mr. Cubitt's, Connell has been in the employ some years, and was so on the 20th of July - I know these cocks, at least one of them, positively; the other is not so particular a one - these are cocks made unusually heavy and rather different from the general course of the trade; and they are made to a given pattern, to fit a screw to fit to an iron pipe - I have no hesitation in swearing to them, from having had them in my possession - we never sold any of them; I believe it is charged 10s. 6d., subject to five per cent discount - the other I should say is worth 1s. 6d. being old, but it is worth 3s. - the value as old metal would be 7d. per lb.; they are not made of cock metal, but with copper and a portion of tin - the 10s. 6d. one is new, and is of more value than to be melted down- it may weigh 21/2lb.; 7d. a lb. would be the value if it was melted down, but it is quite new and perfect - I had not given either of them to Connell, he had no right with either of them.

Cross-examined. Q. The mixture of the metal is what makes it valuable? A. Yes; perhaps there are few men in that business, but know the relative value of that metal, and copper, and other metals; they know by the colour of the metal; no marine store dealer would give as much for old cocks as for clear copper, and bell-metal; we keep a stock of these cocks; I have no private mark on it.

JOSHUA WHEELER . I am a metal cock manufacturer; these cocks are my manufacture; they are made of better metal than usual, according to the directions of Cubitts; I have made none of that description for any other house; this one is made to an iron guage; I am certain of their being made for Mr. Cubitt.

Cross-examined. Q. This being made particularly for Mr. Cubitt would not be likely to fit any other pattern? A. I cannot tell the size of the different gas pipes in London; it is an uncommon pattern as regards the size of the screw, and certainly less likely to be generally useful; a person would be more likely to buy it, for the value of the metal than for its particular use.

Bellamy's Defence. I am innocent of knowing them to be stolen.

- Liscomb, builder, of Haggerstone; John Edward Bull , grocer and cheesemonger, of Haggerstone; William Wallace , of the Duke of Sussex public-house, Haggerstone; Robert Whatley , dealer in brass and copper, Nos. 60 and 63, Shoe-lane; John Willis , clerk in a merchant's office; William Cooper , plumber and glazier, Willow-walk, Tabernacle-square; George Denny , blacksmith, No. 106, Saffron-hill; and Henry Jones , clerk to Okey's, glass manufacturer, Turnmill-street, Red-lion-square; gave the prisoner Bellamy a good character.

CONNELL - GUILTY . Aged 16 - Confined Fourteen Days .

BELLAMY - GUILTY . Aged 40 - Confined Six Months

Reference Number: t18330905-128

NEW COURT. Monday, September 9, 1833.

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1331. JAMES HUME was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 3 pieces of silk, containing in length 160 yards, value 30l., the goods of William Jones , and John Jones , also for stealing 354 yards of silk, value 44l. and 54 yards of lace, value 6l., the goods of William Daniel Owen , to which indictments he pleaded

GUILTY . - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-129

1332. MARY THOMAS was indicted for, that she on the 9th of July , unlawfully, unjustly, deceitfully, and feloniously did put off to Henry Cooper a false and counterfeit 6d., knowing the same to be false and counterfeit; she having been previously convicted of having uttered on the 6th of August, in the third year of the reign of his present Majesty, a false and counterfeit shilling; and on the 15th of August, one other false and counterfeit shilling , against the statute, &c.

MESSRS. SCARLETT and GURNEY conducted the prosecution.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I produce the certificate of the prisoner's former conviction at the September Sessions, 1832, at Clerkenwell; I have examined it with the original, it is correct. (read.)

JOHN SUMMERSELL . I am a turnkey of the House of

Correction; I know the prisoner, she is the person who was convicted at the last September Sessions.

HENRY COOPER. I am assistant to Mr. Robert Muliner Pite, a linendraper; he lives in Cranbourn-street ; on the 9th of July, the prisoner came to his shop for a piece of tape; I served her, it came to 1d.; she gave me a bad sixpence; I told her it was bad; Mr. Pite was standing by and heard me say so; he looked at it and asked her where she got it; she said her sister gave it her - she afterwards said a gentleman gave it her; after equivocating for some time, she said she lived in Newport-street; William Dunn was sent there to enquire, and from what he said, we sent for an officer and gave the sixpence to him - I marked it.

ROBERT MULLINER PITE . I received the 6d. from Cooper and gave it to the officer.

WILLIAM DUNN . I was sent from Mr. Pite's shop to No. 15, Little Newport-street, where I heard the prisoner say she resided; I found the house was empty.

JOHN TRUMAN (police-constable C 94). I was sent for and took the prisoner; I received this sixpence from Mr. Pite; I took the prisoner to the station-house but found nothing on her; she was put into the cell, and in two or three minutes she put out a good shilling and said she wanted some refreshment - I asked her where she had hid that, and she said under her garter.

JOHN HOLMES . I am a bookseller, and live in Duke-street, Grovesnor-square. On the 27th of June, the prisoner came there for a pennyworth of curling paper; I served her, and she gave me a bad shilling; I saw it in a moment and told her so - I said "Have you the impudence to come here again, when you were here on Saturday;" she said I was mistaken, she had not been there; I sent for an officer, marked the shilling and gave it him, with the prisoner.

JOHN WOODS (police-constable S 103). I took the prisoner from Holmes and received from him this shilling.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin for the Mint; these are both counterfeits.

Prisoner. I was intoxicated when I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-130

1333. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 1 silver mug, value 18s.; 1 thimble, value 5s.; 2 rings, value 1l. 2s.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 3 sovereigns; 3 half-crowns; 17 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of John Mussendine Camplin , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN MUSSENDINE CAMPLIN. I am surgeon , and live at No. 11, Finsbury-square . The prisoner was in my service up to the 10th of June; he slept on the ground-floor behind the shop, in the surgery - on the 10th of June, I got up about six o'clock; I went down into the room in which the prisoner slept; I found his bed and everything put away as if he had not been in bed all night, or had got up very early - I went into the shop and one of the drawers in which my assistant keeps his private matters, was on the floor; the lock had been broken open; the till in which we keep the petty cash in the shop, had also been broken open, and the prisoner was gone - I then went into the dining-room, and found my escrutoire had been broken open, and a desk in the dining-room had been opened by a key - I missed a ring which was worth about a guinea, and some money, but I don't know the exact amount; I had had change for a 5l. note a night or two before, there was the remainder of that and some silver, to the amount of 3l., but I cannot swear to more - my wife missed a gold seal from her desk, and a gold thimble from her work-box; I also missed this silver mug which is worth about 18s. - the prisoner had 9l. or 10l. a-year, and his board and lodging.

DAVID COLLINS (police-constable G 63). The prisoner came up to me on the 1st of July, between nine and ten o'clock, in Banner-street, he said, "Will you take me to the police-station?" I asked him what for; he said,"I have been robbing my master, and I wish to give myself up" - I took him; he told me where his master lived.

JAMES TILT (police-sergeant G 7). I was at the station-house when the prisoner was brought in; he said he had felt uneasy in his mind ever since he had robbed his master, and wished to tell me all about it; I said if he did I should take it down in writing; he then stated, that on the 10th of June, at five o'clock in the morning, he had robbed his master to the amount of 3l. from a drawer, and that he had taken a silver mug which he had pawned at Chatham - I went there and found it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17. - Value 99s. only .

Recommended to Mercy. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-131

1334. WILLIAM NEWTON and JOHN LEVESQUE were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 69 handkerchiefs, value 1l. 17s. , the goods of William Loftus .

BASIL MACKIE . I am shopman to Mr. William Loftus, he lives at No. 7, Orange-row, Islington . On the 28th of August, about eleven o'clock, I observed a boy going out of the shop; I went out and saw the prisoners in the street - I was going after them to know what they wanted, when Levesque threw down these handkerchiefs out of his apron; they were all loose; he then ran off - I caught hold of Newton, who was with him; I gave him to Collins; he did not say anything - we took him and the handkerchiefs back into the shop - they had been at the further end of the counter, quite away from the door, on a brass rail; there are sixty-nine of them.

JOHN COLLINS . I am a bricklayer. I saw the prisoners run from the door-post of the prosecutor's shop - I did not see them in the shop - I did not see anything in their hands - I saw Mackie running out of the shop; I turned and saw the two prisoners ten or twelve yards behind me - Levesque dropped the handkerchiefs, and I took them up.

JURY. Q. Did you see them come from the shop? A. Yes, from the door; they were both together, and were walking; Newton was caught before he ran, and Levesque directly.

Newton put in a written defence, stating that he was merely looking in at the prosecutor's window, and that his fellow-prisoner was unknown to him.

Levesque's Defence. I was walking along and a man called me to earn a few half-pence; he told me to stop

while he got a parcel, and he went and got these for me to carry.

Newton received a good character.

NEWTON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Year .

LEVESQUE - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-132

1335. JOHN REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , 3 pair of boots, value 16s.; and 1 pair of boots, value 2s. ; the goods of Robert Bryant .

SAMUEL FLEMING . I live in Tottenham-court-road . On the 10th of August, I saw a man in a flannel jacket, at the window, he was cutting a string, to which four pair of women's boots were attached - he took the boots off and gave them to the prisoner, who was standing on the railings, at the time, close to the door; the prisoner put them under his coat and ran away - I pursued him and took him three doors off; he said, he had not got anything - I called for assistance; the policeman came and took the boots from him; these are the boots, they are the goods of Robert Bryant.

ALFRED WILLIAMS . I was employed to watch the shop- I saw the prisoner run away, putting the boots under his coat.

JOHN WEST . (police-constable E 42). I was on duty in Tottenham-court-road, about ten minutes after eleven o'clock - I saw the prisoner run, I took him from the witness, he did not seem intoxicated then, but he pretended to be so afterwards.

Prisoner. I was coming along very much intoxicated, and the property was popped into my hand.

GUILTY .* Aged 19. - Confined for One Year .

Reference Number: t18330905-133

1336. JOHN FARLEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse of George Francis Davis , on the 6th of July , and stealing therein, 12 chair bottoms, value 5s.; 12 chair tops, value 1s. 9d.; 12 chair stays, value 2s.; 12 turn tuffs, value 3s. 10d. his goods .

CHARLES WRIGHT (police-constable G 105). On the 6th of July I was on duty at the top of Long-alley, Bishopsgate-street; about twenty minutes past two o'clock in the morning, I had received information that some suspicious characters had been seen about the prosecutor's workshop, and I saw the prisoner and Snook coming from the workshop, each having a load on his shoulder, I called out "What have you there," they made no reply, I followed them, and in a short time they began to run down Acorn-street, and finding I was close to them, they threw down this property; part of it was in a sack, which I believe the prisoner carried, but I am not quite sure - he was rather in advance of the other man; here are twelve chair bottoms, and a variety of materials enough for a dozen chairs - I still pursued the two men, who ran as fast as they could, down Bishopsgate-street, and just by New-street, I came up to them, and with the assistance of a watchman, I took them - they were both committed to Worship-street on the 6th of July, but by some mistake, they were both discharged at the Special Session - I then got a warrant and apprehended the prisoner again, I know he is the man.

WILLIAM LAIFORD . I am a City-watchman. I stopped Snook about half-past two o'clock that morning - I picked up these chair bottoms at the corner of Acorn-street.

JOHN DALE . I am a watchman. I took up the bag in Acorn-street.

GEORGE THOMAS DAVIS . I live in Long-alley, and have a warehouse, at No. 35, Skinner-street , it has no communication with my dwelling-house - I believe all these articles to be mine - there are eight of these seats which I can swear to, they were made for an express order, to go to Manchester; I had seen them safe the day before - nothing had been broken open; they had got over the wall, and then the warehouse is open, and these articles had been packed up in racks - I have no doubt all these things are mine, but I could not swear to them.

CHARLES WRIGHT . The prisoner came from the passage which leads to the wall of the prosecutor's workshop - I swear he is the man.

JAMES LINDER . I am a turnkey. The prisoner is the man I had in custody, and he was discharged.

John Perry and Henry Pound gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330905-134

1337. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of Jacob Russell .

THOMAS SCHOFIELD . I live in King's Head-court, Shoreditch . On the 12th of August, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was opposite Mr. Russell's door; I saw the prisoner go and look at a handkerchief which hung there - he then turned round; then went back, got on the step, unpinned the handkerchief, rolled it up, and was putting it into his bosom - I took him to the shop, and found the handkerchief in his bosom - this is it.

Prisoner. Q. Had I it in my hand? A. Yes, and was putting it into your bosom; when I got him back to the shop, he pulled some money out of his pocket and said, "Here is the money, take for it" - he had got three or four yards from the door when I took him.

THOMAS REEVE . I am shopman to Mr. Jacob Russell. This handkerchief is his, and was hanging at his door that morning - it is worth 3s.

GEORGE FEAKLE (police-constable K 121). I took the prisoner and have the handkerchief - he said he was going to purchase it.

Prisoner's Defence. I came on shore that morning to buy a pair of stockings and a handkerchief for our mate; I looked at this handkerchief, and took it to the door, as there were so many clothes I could not see into the shop - I was holding it up, and this man came and snatched it out of my hand; I asked the price when I went in, and was told 3s. by a thin faced man.

THOMAS REEVE . We have a thin faced man named Savage, but he was up-stairs at the time - I was in the shop and must have heard if the prisoner had asked the price of the handkerchief - we should have asked 3s. 6d. for it.

GUILTY . Aged 24. Judgment - Respited .

Reference Number: t18330905-135

1338. JANE THEOBALD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 3 shirts, value 3s.; 3 shifts,

value 3s.; 2 sheets, value 6s.; 2 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 2 petticoats, value 2s.; 3 irons, value 2s.; 2 frocks, value 2s.; 3 aprons, value 2s.; 1 gown, value 3s.; 1 cloak, value 2s.; 2 caps, value 2s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 2s.; and 1 brush, value 1s., the goods of William Barber Claringbould , her master .

WILLIAM BARBER CLARINGBOULD. I live at No. 7, Camden-row, Camden-town . I took the prisoner into my service from the workhouse - on the 17th of August I was going to bed about eleven o'clock; the prisoner told my wife in my presence, that she had left the child's frock in the yard; I told her to go and fetch it - she went, and came back, and said she could not find it - I then accused her of pawning it; she said she had, and gave me the duplicate - I then asked her what else she had of my property, and she handed me over eighteen more duplicates; I told her she could not deceive me, but I made her no promise nor threat - she gave me the duplicates, and said she hoped I would not be hard with her - I made no reply, but took her to the station-house, and gave the duplicates to the officer.

WILLIAM SPENCER . I live with Mr. Cassell, a pawnbroker, in Camden-town. I have a cloak, two shifts, a gown, and a variety of different articles; they were pawned at different times by the prisoner - these are the duplicates we gave - I can swear to her pawning this tumbler, this brush, and this frock.

THOMAS MORTON . I live with a pawnbroker. I have a shirt, a petticoat, and some other articles pawned by the prisoner in the name of Ann Wilson.

JOSEPH SCRIVEN . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shirt, a shift, a cap, and several other articles pawned by some female in the name of Ann Wilson.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY MARTIN BURTON (police-constable S 138). I took the prisoner - she said she hoped the prosecutor would not be hard with her.

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned them, but his wife knew it; I asked him for some money one Saturday night to get some out, which must be got out that night - he said it did not suit him, but he would on Monday; his wife then told me to take some other things to pawn, but not to let him know or the house would not hold him.

WILLIAM BARBER CLARINGBOULD. My wife told me the nurse wanted 2s.; I said it did not suit me that night, but if she particularly wanted it, I would give it her on Monday.

GUILTY . Aged 52. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330905-136

1339. GEORGE POULTENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August , 1 truss of hay, value 2s. 3d. , the property of Edward Coton .

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

BRIERS BULLEN . I am a labourer in the employ of Mr. Coton, at Nutting-hill . On the night of the 3rd of August, I counted forty trusses of hay, on his farm, at half-past seven o'clock, and at half-past three o'clock the next morning I missed one truss which I tracked - the policeman gave me some information - I went to the prisoner, at Nuttingdale, I found three quarters of a truss of hay in his cart, which I know to be Mr. Coton's; I said, it was my master's; the prisoner said nothing to me, but told the policeman that he bought it for 1s. 6d. and a pint of beer; I found some hay, (about two handfuls,) in a track, about forty yards from the rick.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q. Where had the forty trusses been? A. In the rick-yard by the side of the rick; what I picked up was not in the road but in the meadow - the trusses of hay all weighed 56lbs - two handfuls of hay would not make a quarter of a truss - we reckoned our hay at 2s. 3d. a truss - I do not know whether any was sold for less; it was about four o'clock in the morning I saw it at the prisoner's shed, any one might see it.

EDWARD COTON . I had forty trusses of hay there, as I was informed - I had sold some at 2s. 3d. a truss, to Mr. Wright, but I consider this is worth more than that; I have no doubt this is mine.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know it? A. By the growth of it; this is a sample from the bulk, and this is the hay found at the prisoner's - they appear to be the same growth, and have small clover among them.

BARTHOLOMEW HERRING (police-sergeant T 2). On the morning of the 3rd of August I went with Buller to the prisoner's premises - we found the hay there, the prisoner said he had bought it in the Edgware-road, on the night before, for 1s. 6d. and a pint of beer, of a countryman, whom he did not know.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is Welling? A. He has now left the police - he was with me at the time; the hay was in a cart, in a shed, at the prisoner's - I had not seen the prisoner about the hay-rick.

WILLIAM CUPIES . I am in the prosecutor's employ, as a haybinder. On the 3rd of August I cut and packed forty trusses, and left them on his premises - I am sure that this hay found on the prisoner's premises is Mr. Coton's - it is hard coarse hay; this is a band which I made.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there anything particular in your haybands? A. I make them about eighteen-inches- I can swear this is one of my hands - I cannot say that no other person could have made such an one.

BRIERS BULLEN re-examined. Q. How many places did you see the hay scattered in? A. In four or five; it was in a meadow, fenced all round, and no foot path in it; it was not in the road from the rick to the prisoner's house - I should not have gone to the prisoner's; but Welling, the policeman met me, and told me something - there were some foot marks on the dew, but I did not compare them with any shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it for 1s. 6d. and a pint of beer, the patrol saw me and went home to see if it was right - if I had known it had been stolen I would have taken it away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-137

1340. SAMUEL WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , 1 oven, value 5l.; and 2 baker's troughs, value 5s. the goods of Richard Attwood , being fixed to a building , &c.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

RICHARD ATTWOOD. I am a market-gardener , and live at Mortlake, in Surrey. I have a house in Britannia-street, City-road - I let it to the prisoner in August, 1832, at the rent of 40l. a year - there was no agreement in writing; but he asked me whether I should have any

objection to let him have it on a term at the end of twelve months - I told him if I found him to be a respectable tenant I should have no objection - he asked me if I would allow him to remove an oven which was there - I told him that would be an after consideration; but I would not allow it to be removed, on any account, till after the term was granted - I gave him the key of the house, but whether he went into possession I do not know - I went once or twice afterwards, but could not get admission - I afterwards got possession of the house by a magistrate's warrant - I met the prisoner in the New-road, I stopped him, and asked if it was true as I had heard, that the oven was gone? he said, yes, he had removed it; I said, I should give him into custody, he said, "Don't do that, I am not the kind of man you take me for, I will bring you respectable persons to be bound for the oven being built up again" - I asked him to go with me to them, at that time, he said, he could not, but he would meet me at the Rainbow Coffee-house, the next morning, and bring persons who would be bound - I went there, but he did not come, and I did not see him till he was before the Lord Mayor - the value of the oven is laid at 5l., but I could not build it for 50l.

JOHN LLOYD . I am a linen-draper, I live in George-street, Somers-town. I was present when the prisoner took the house.

Prisoner. Did I not say to Mr. Attwood that my intention was to make a warehouse. and unless he would give me authority to remove the oven, the premises would be of no use to me. Witness. I did not hear that; you said, you wanted it for a warehouse, but he particularly named that you were not to remove the oven - I was not to go into business with you, I was to go as your servant - I drew an agreement for a man to take the oven away.

JAMES GODDARD . I am a carman, and live in Europa-place. The prisoner applied to me, and said, he had an oven in Britannia-street, which he was going to pull down, to make a warehouse - and he asked if I could get a customer for the oven - I spoke to Mr. Dymock, for whom I was at work, and he bought it for 4l. 10s.

FRANCIS DYMOCK . I live at No. 46, Brick-lane. I bought the oven for 4l. 10s.; I have the receipt.

JOHN VICKERS . I live in Albany-street, Regent's-park, but I did live opposite to the house the prisoner had in Britannia-street; I frequently saw him go in and out, but the house was always shut up close - I saw an old woman frequently go in and out, and always shut the door very carefully; I have seen people knock at the door, but I never saw anybody let in; I never saw any furniture taken in; I saw the materials of the oven carried away; the prisoner entered some time in August last year, and Mr. Attwood got possession in May last.

Prisoner's Defence. I told Mr. Attwood I wanted the premises as a warehouse, provided he would give me leave to take the oven away; he said, "Very well;" and asked if I would take the lease; I said I would within twelve months; to which he consented, and gave me possession; I had a person living in the house; as the oven was of no use to me, I applied to Mr. Bedell who built it; he said it had been built twenty-two years, he took hold of a brick and some of the bricks fell down; he said he could not allow me anything for it and if he removed it he must be paid for his man and horse and cart; in a few days Goddard told me that Mr. Dymock would buy it as he was going to build a wall, and he would allow me 4l. 10s. for it; I agreed to those terms and it was carried away; but circumstances did not admit of my making the alteration so soon as I intended; but I resided there six months; I was not applied to for rent, till I met the prosecutor in the road, and he asked if I could pay him, I said "Not at present;" he said I had better give him up the key if I could not make the alterations I intended, that he might let the house; I said if he would give me a little time I should be able to fulfil my promise - I never saw any one for five weeks afterwards; when I went home one night and knocked at the door, I found it had been broken open and a notice on it, which I took down and put into my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-138

1341. THOMAS SWINDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , 1 ham, value 9s. , the goods of Frederick Chandler .

DANIEL CHAPMAN . I am a headborough; on the 10th of August I saw the prisoner in a cart; from some circumstance, I went to the cart and asked the prisoner what he had got in his apron; he told me to take it, and I found this ham which he said a gentleman gave him to carry.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say it belonged to the young man in the cart? A. No; there was another person in the cart who run away.

JOHN GARDNER . I am a cheesemonger , and live at Ball's-Pond , in the service of Mr. Frederick Chandler , this is his ham - I saw it in the shop on the 9th of August, and I missed it on the 12th; the officer came that evening and brought it.

Prisoner. I have not been to Ball's-pond these three years.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-139

1342. WILLIAM PETERS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 3 pairs of boots, value 7s. 6d. , the goods of Isaac Calway .

ISAAC CALWAY . I live in Bray's-buildings, Lower-road, Islington . On the 15th of August, I heard something; I ran down stairs, and my wife pointed the prisoner out to me - I pursued him to Norfolk-street; he there threw down three pairs of boots; I took them up but still pursued him, and found him in an unfinished house at the corner of Shepperton-street; I called him out and took him back to my shop where my wife recognized him as being the person who took the boots from my shop; I gave him and the boots to the officer; they are my property, worth 7s. 6d.

HENRY BROWN . I am an officer, I took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18330905-140

1343. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , 1 reticule, value 3s.; 5 half-crowns; 3 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the property of Mary Ann Cattell , from her person .

MARY ANN CATTELL. I am the wife of Robert George Cattell .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-141

1344. HARRIET HALES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st August , 1 pair of boots, value 5s. 6d. , the goods of Francis Bignell .

CATHERINE TERRY . I had the care of Francis Bignell's shop; on the 1st of August, the prisoner came into the shop and said she wanted to look at some leather shoes; I showed her some which she said would not do, and asked if we could make her some; I said, "Yes;" she said she would come in on the next day; I then saw a pair of boots under her shawl - and as she was going out I asked her for them; she said, "What boots;" I said,"Those under your shawl;" she then ran off with them - she had bought no boots, and she had none when she came in: these are the boots, I saw them picked up by Henry Roberts - they are a pair we had had made for a lady; the prisoner said she was very sorry and would we allow her to go; I said, "No."

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you have a hand in making them? A. No; they have the mark D on the bottom; it is done with a stamp which is kept for bespoke goods - these were the only pair in the shop that had been bespoke; they had only been from the makers two or three days; they were sent home and would not fit the lady - I did not see the prisoner take them, but I saw the place in the case where they had been; she dropped them opposite the shop, and I saw them picked up.

HENRY ROBERTS. I work for Mr. Bignell; I saw the prisoner running, and she dropped this pair of boots - I took them up; I am sure these are the boots.

FRANCIS BIGNELL . I keep the shop, No. 5, Hayes-court - I can swear to these boots; they were in my shop when I left home that evening.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you make them? A. No; I stamped them - I can swear to the workmanship of them - I can swear to these by their having an extra heel to them, which is not usual.

Prisoner's Defence. They fell off the horse, and I took them up; I was then called back and begged pardon.

Mr. Francis Smith, a coachmaker, of High-street, Bloomsbury, gave the prisoner a good character, and promised to take her into his service.

GUILTY. Aged 14. - Recommended to Mercy .

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18330905-142

1345. JOHN EGGBEER was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES HALFORD . I live with Mr. Paxton, at No. 18, Jermyn-street : he bought a carpet broom and a looking glass at Mr. Graham's, in Holborn; the prisoner brought them home on the 18th of July, and left the bill - I told him to call the next morning, which he did, and I paid him 1l. 7s. 6d. for his master, Mr. Graham - I had the receipt from him, but it is mislaid - I have a book in which I entered the payment.

GEORGE AUGUSTUS WILLIAMS . I am apprentice to Mr. Paxton. I saw the prisoner call on the 19th of July for 1l. 7s. 6d., which I saw paid to him.

RICHARD BRAINE . I live in Great Tower-street . I bought some damask carpet of Mr. Graham, and on the 23rd of July the prisoner called for the money for it; I paid him 20s.; this is his receipt.

JOSEPH HEALEY . I am clerk to Mr. John Graham , of High Holborn. The prisoner was collecting clerk , he had to get in accounts and pay the money over to me; he did not pay me either of these sums, which he ought to have done, on the day he received them.

Cross-examined by MR. DAWSON. Q. Have you the book here? A. Yes, this is it - many persons write in this book; here is no credit entered to these customers by the prisoner, which he should have done - this other book is the cash book, which I keep; if he had brought these sums to me I should have entered them here; if I had omitted to enter them the cash would not have been right- it is the rule of our house to make up the accounts every night - it has happened that some items have been entered the next day; I think they have not been left for three or four days - I pay every body, the workmen and collector bring the money to me - our business is not conducted in a very irregular manner; I do not know that I ever said it was - I might, on some occasion have said so; some of our workmen have staid out all night, and they have been spoken to about it, and Mr. Graham has been told of it - it has happened that one salesman has given his money to another, to enter it for him, but that was for ready-money transactions in the shop - I will not undertake to say the prisoner did not give these sums to another person, but it is not likely - we never give credit to the men - it the prisoner had come home very late at night, and had not paid me till the next morning, I should not have considered him a debtor for it - I should not have known what he had received till he told me.

COURT. Q. Was it his business to give the money to you the night he received it? A. Yes, and I enter it in the cash book, and it is not here - I have never had it; he did not pay it on the 20th of July.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330905-143

1346. HANNAH CONNOLLY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , 1 purse, value 6d.; 8 crowns; 8 half-crowns; 20 shillings; and 20 sixpences , the monies of Timothy O'Connell .

TIMOTHY O'CONNELL. I live at No. 6, Rebecca-court, Well-street. The prisoner lived next door to me; she was in the habit of coming to one of the lodgers in the bottom of my house, and they mostly kept her while her husband was in prison - on the Thursday before the 26th of August, I gave the prisoner a breakfast, and she went that day to Clerkenwell as a witness with my wife; my wife did not give her any thing in my presence, but while the prisoner was there, my wife handed me the purse which contained 4l. 10s. in silver, in five-shilling pieces, half-crowns, and shillings, there were no sixpences - I saw the purse put into a box in my room, and locked up - on the 26th, I looked into the box and missed the purse and money; the box had been broken open - the prisoner returned to my house, and was taken on the Tuesday after; we found my purse empty on the tiles of a little house under the prisoner's room window.

ELLEN O'CONNELL. I and my husband were looking at the 4l. 10s. in the purse, and I put it into the box; the prisoner saw me put it in, and lock the box; and on the 26th, the box had been opened, and the purse and money gone.

Prisoner. I did not see it - there were five persons in the room. Witness. No, there was only the prisoner.

CAROLINE HAYNES . I am the wife of William Haynes . I have known the prisoner some time; on Sunday, the 25th of August, she came and asked me to take care of some money for her till her husband came out of prison - I did not know till then that her husband was in prison, but as she was rather tipsy, I consented to take the money; she gave me 3l. 10s. all in silver, in crowns, half-crowns, and shillings, in a purse of the same sort as this, and I believe it was this purse - she came again in a quarter of an hour, brought two more half-crowns, and told me to put them with the rest, which made 3l. 15s.; the next morning she came and asked for some money - I gave her 15s. of it, and she wished me to keep the remainder till Tuesday night; I locked it up again, but she came again at five o'clock the same day and wanted 5s. more - I then gave her the purse and all that was in it.

WILLIAM WELSH (police-constable E 54). I heard of the robbery, and went to the prosecutor's house - the prisoner saw me and went in at the side-door; the prosecutor gave her in charge, and I took her to the station-house - she was searched, but nothing found on her but some duplicates; this bundle of new clothes were in her possession when I took her - I went back to the prosecutor's, and found this purse on the tiles of a little house in the yard, under the window of the prisoner's lodging - I asked the prisoner about the money; she denied having had it, and either she or her mother said that money could not be sworn to.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband is a sweep, and he was in trouble for thirty days - I stand out in the street with fruit, and what money I could put by I did, till my husband came out; I went to Mrs. Haynes, and asked her to take care of my money till Monday night - I called on her for some, and she said I had better take the whole, which I did.

TIMOTHY O'CONNELL. This is my purse.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18330905-144

1367. WILLIAM BYE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 2 images, value 1s. 6d., and 6 plates, value 9d. , the goods of William Hart .

HANNAH HART . I am the wife of William Hart; we keep an earthenware shop in Goswell-road . On the 30th of August, the prisoner came with another man; I had seen the prisoner two or three times before - he asked for some toy-dishes and plates; I had some suspicion of the prisoner, and asked what he had in his pocket; he said nothing - I put my hand into his pocket, and took out one of these images, - and he put his hand in his pocket, and took out the other; they are my husband's property - the other person who was with him then put his hand under his coat and took out these six plates; he gave them to the prisoner, who put them on the counter; they then ran off - I gave the alarm and the prisoner was taken.

Prisoner. Q. Do you think I had the images with an intention to steal them? A. Indeed I do.

JOHN PIGGOTT . I heard a cry of "Stop thief;" I saw the prisoner run, and secured him.

THOMAS PAGE (police-constable G 102). I took the prisoner - in going to the station-house, he said he did it to make up the money he had lost in playing at skittles.

Prisoner's Defence. I have dealt with the prosecutor for a long time, and never wronged him - I went to her house, and took those images which I had ordered, with intention of paying for them, and as they are very delicate, I put one in each pocket; I had no intention of stealing - I had not done paying for the dishes and teapots I had bought.

HANNAH HART. He did not ask the price of these images - he bought some things which came to 1s. 71/2d.; he gave me 2s. and I gave him the change.

GUILTY. Aged 20. - Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Reference Number: t18330905-145

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1348. JAMES DUKES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 28 yards of cotton cloth, called twilled cambric, value 18s. , the goods of Joseph Penrise .

JOSEPH PENRISE. I keep a Scotch and Manchester warehouse at No. 50, Old Change . On the 9th of July the prisoner was brought in by Andrews, with this piece of twilled cambric under his arm, which is my property.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am servant to the prosecutor. On the 9th of July I saw the prisoner going out with this piece of goods, which he had taken from the front counter; he was a stranger - I followed, and took him at the corner of Paternoster-row.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that a man had given him the property in Cheapside, to carry to Newgate-street.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-146

1349. MICHAEL DORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Emerson Archer , from his person .

EMERSON ARCHER . On the 16th of July, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon I was passing Foster-lane , and felt a twitch at my pocket, I turned and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand - he was trying to conceal it - I took him with it - I believe he was alone.

The Prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he saw the handkerchief on the ground, and was seized by the prosecutor instantly upon his taking it up.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Confined for Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-147

1350. JAMES BARREY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 pocket, value 6d.; 9 keys, value 4s.; 1 key-ring. value 2d.; 1 half-crown, 3 shillings, and 3 sixpences, the property of Mary Ann Casar , from her person .

MARY ANN CESAR. I am a widow , I was at Bartholomew-fair on the 5th of September at a quarter before

ten o'clock, the prisoner put his hand into my pocket-hole, and took my pocket from my side, and if I could have got my right arm up in time, I could have taken him, while taking it out of my pocket hole, but I called out, "That man has got my pocket" - I looked him full in the face - he turned away directly, but I met him again - I lost 7s. or 8s. in silver, and a bunch of keys.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Was there a great crowd? A. Not till we came against Mr. Richardson's show, then the crush came, and the prisoner came up against me - I was not flurried - I am sure I am not mistaken in his person; here is the string of my pocket which he left round my waist - he got but two or three yards from me when he was taken.

JOHN SMITH (City police-constable, No. 93.) I was at the fair, there was a rush of twenty or thirty persons, the prosecutrix called, "Stop thief," I turned and saw the prisoner go into the crowd, he put his hand out with something in it, to some other person - I took hold of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there not a great confusion? A. Yes, I saw the prisoner pass something to another - I saw a dark substance - I cannot tell what.

JURY. Q. Did you see anything in the prisoner's hand? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. When he took me I was looking at a boy dancing, he said, "You have robbed this woman," I said, I had not; she then said, I had the property on me, I said, "I never robbed any body in all my life," the next morning as I was going to Guildhall, the officer said, he did not believe I was guilty.

JOHN SMITH. No, I said I should not have taken him to be one who would have done such a thing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-148

1351. HENRY WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 16 metal cocks, value 31s.; 25 bosses, value 4s.; and 7 wrenches, value 5s. the goods of Mary Walkin ; and HARRIET WATTS was indicted for receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

DAVID BULLIVANT. I am in the employ of Mrs. Walkin a brass cock founder , who lives at No. 29, Bridgwater-gardens . Henry Watts was employed to assist in removing there from Little Moorfields; he is a paper ruler , but was out of employ; these articles were missing from a drawer on the 4th of August, - and on the 8th of August, I was passing a broker's shop in Whitecross-street, and saw the property, I knew it to be my mistress's - I asked the price of one of them, and went and told my mistress of it; we cannot tell when they were lost.

ANN WALLIN . I keep a broker's shop in Whitecross-street. I bought these fifteen brass cocks of the female prisoner about the middle of July; I bought them in two lots, and gave 6s. 6d. for them; I bought them as old metal, not knowing the value of them; the bosses don't fit the cocks; I gave them up to the officer.

THOMAS ELMER . I am an ironmonger, and live in Playhouse-yard. I bought seven cocks of the female prisoner, one of them the officer has, and the other six were only old metal; this one, was the only one I put in the window.

JOSEPH HORTON . I am an officer. On the 8th of August, I was sent for, and went to the shops, where I got these cocks; I left word for Mrs. Wallim to come to me, which she did, and said, she was ready to show who she bought them of; I went with her to Butler's-alley, Little Moorfields, to the prisoners' lodging, but they were not at home; I afterwards received information that the prisoners were walking in Whitecross-street; I ran and took them, the woman said her husband gave them to her to sell, and they had been given him as wages for work, he had done for Mrs. Walkin; I have known Henry Watts eighteen years, he has had a good character.

MARY WALKIN . These cocks are my manufacture, I sell them at 3s. each.

Henry Watts . I did certainly take the cocks, a few at a time; I told my wife I took them for payment, and she sold them.

Harriet Watts. I am the wife of Henry Watts.

JAMES FAINT. I live in White Rose-court, Whitecross-street; I was present at Christ Church when the prisoners were married, on Christmas morning, three years ago, and they have lived together as man and wife since.

HENRY WATTS - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

HARRIET WATTS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330905-149

1352. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , 1 pair of bellows, value 6s. the property of George Wright .

GEORGE WRIGHT. I live in Long-lane, Smithfield . On the evening of the 22nd of August, between eight and nine o'clock, while I was at work, three boys came to the window; a customer came in at the same time, and while I turned the boy s ran away; a man then put his head into my shop, and said, "Have you lost a pair of bellows" - I looked and said, "Yes," he said, three boys had run off with them; I ran out, but could not see them, the officer afterwards brought the prisoner and the bellows.

THOMAS TRAXLER . I was on duty a short distance from the prosecutor's shop, the prisoner and another boy ran past me, and the prisoner had a bag; I pursued, and took them; I asked the prisoner what he had in the bag, he said, "Bones," I said, "You know better than that," he then said, "A pair of bellows," I took them, and as I saw them run from Long-lane, I went there and found the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met three boys at the corner of Bartholomew-close, who shoved these into my hand, they went on through the pens; I followed them, and this gentleman took me, he asked what I had got, I said,"Bones," he said, "I know better," I said, "You may look," he then looked, and he said, he knew where they came from; I said it was more than I did.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330905-150

1353. WILLIAM WYTHE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 2 shirts, value 15s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; and 1 towel, value 2s. , the goods of William Woods .

WILLIAM WOODS. I keep the Castle and Falcon hotel in Aldersgate-street . The prisoner was employed there for some time as a plasterer - on the 2nd of August I

found him intoxicated; I searched his basket, and found some of my property - I sent for an officer, and he found on him three duplicates, which led to these articles.

WILLIAM BROCK . I am a pawnbroker. On the 20th of July I took in this shirt from a man in the name of Wythe; I lent 3s. on it - I cannot say the prisoner is the man, but I gave him this duplicate.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Had you ever seen him before? A. No; he made no concealment of it; the shirt has a mark on it.

RICHARD STEVENS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields. I have a shirt, pawned on the 29th of July; I cannot say by whom - this is the duplicate we gave.

WILLIAM WOODS. The prisoner had been working for me on the 20th of July - these shirts were taken from a drawer in the room No. 5; they belonged to a gentleman who lodged there; they are marked T G G 8 32, and T G G 4 31.

Cross-examined. Q. Who do they belong to? A. To Mr. Glover, who is out of town - all his shirts are marked in this way, I had looked at a great many of them; I don't know that I have seen the whole of them; I cannot swear that I had seen these two shirts - Mr. Glover is out of town, I don't know where - these shirts were not locked up, but kept in a drawer in his room - I have a number of servants, and they have access to that room - I certainly did not take an account of the number of shirts Mr. Glover left, but I have no doubt these are his; I don't know the number he had; I don't think he ever gave these away - there were a number of workmen in my house in June, and I believe the prisoner was one.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought these two shirts and a handkerchief of a man in the new Post-office for 10s. 6d.

Samuel Bennet , bricklayer, Hackney-road; Edward Richards , a carpenter; William Marblay , baker, Brick-lane; Thomas Little , carpenter, Hackney-road; Mrs. Wilson; and Edward Tighe , gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330905-151

1354. WILLIAM WYTHE was again indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , 1 cup, value 1s.; 1 saucer, value 1s.; 2 bottles, value 6d.; 3 pints of wine, value 6s.; and 1 towel, value 2s. , the goods of William Woods .