Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th February 1833.
Reference Number: 18330214
Reference Number: f18330214-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR PETER LAURIE , KNT., MAYOR.

THIRD SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 14th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1833, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY GEORGE TITTERTON , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1833.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable SIR PETER LAURIE , KNT., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Patteson , Knt, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq; John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; Sir William Heygate , Bart.; and Anthony Brown , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Henry Winchester , Esq; and William Taylor Copeland , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justice of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Benj Hickenbottom

William Watson

William Potter

James Smea

John Joss

John Berry

M. Hugh Chapman

Joseph Bottomley

Frederick Pite

William Elliott

James Bent

David Perry .

Second

Edward Tyler

John George Page

Peter Kebble

William Baker

William Hall

John Hickson

Thomas Davidge

John Tester

William Overall

George Sparks

Thomas Drawmer

Philip Ager .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Robert Temple

Anthony Unthank

Benjamin Vialls

William Vale

Hopton Verey

John Virtue

William Venning

John Walker

Patrick C. Walters

Thomas Waller

William Ward

Charles Wilson

Second

William Weeden

James Woods

Thomas Weeks

William Wellen

Joseph Wingfield

William Wheatley

Henry Tan. Wells

Thomas Walker

David Wyeman

Robert Wade

John Wells

John Wilde .

Third

Thomas E. White

Charles Westley

William Wellercot

Robert Winter

Edward Winkworth

Richard Wm. Webb

William Whitehurst

John Wiltshire

William Wren

William Wright

Joseph Wilson

George Woodley .

Fourth

Isaac Serey

William Sanderson

Thomas Silverwood

William Spendlow

William Simmonds

Joseph Sturbridge

John Wm. Swale

John Wm. Soppitt

John Streak

Thomas Stevens

Samuel J. Stevens

Charles Stanberry .

Fifth

John Tilbury

James Taylor

Edward Trail

Thomas Tilbury

Joseph Thompson

John Tollitt

William Thatcher

William Thompson

James Trower

Samuel Taylor

John Tate

Henry Taylor .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 14, 1833.

LAURIE, MAYOR. - THIRD SESSION.

* A star placed against the verdict denotes that the prisoner has been previously in custody.

Reference Number: t18330214-1

Second London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

435. GEORGE CONEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Gervase Wheeler , on the 20th of January , at St. Andrew, Holborn, and stealing therein 2400 thimbles, value 100l.; 360 pencil-cases, value 45l.; 36 tongue-scrapers, value 3l.; 12 segar-tubes, value 1l.; 12 segar-holders, value 1l.; 24 pairs of scissors, value 5l.; 6 yard measures, value 15s.; 21 stilettoes, value 1l. 16s.; 6 emery baskets, value 18s.; 3 wax-holders, value 5s.; 78 knives, value 25l.; 50 vinegarettes, value 50l.; 60 snuff-boxes, value 120l.; 8 taper-stands, value 6l.; 30 caddy-ladles, value 9l.; 1 knife-rest, value 12s.; 10 corals, value 16l.; 720 bodkins, value 15l.; 300 tooth-picks, value 15l.; 3 watch-chains, value 16l.; 3 neck-chains, value 20l.; 80 studs, value 25l.; 4 watch-guards, value 16l.; 8 pairs of ear-rings, value 16l.; 2 lockets value 3l.; 8 ozs. of gold, value 25l.; 30 brooches, value 30l.; 6 crosses, value 26l.; 96 rings, value 72l.; 3 bracelets, value 14l.; 6 watch-keys, value 1l. 10s., and 1 precious stone, called a sapphire, value 1l., his property ; and RICHARD SMITH was indicted for that he, before the said felony was committed, on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did incite, move, procure, counsel, hire, and command the said George Coney , the felony and housebreaking aforesaid, in manner and form aforesaid, to do and commit ; against the Statute, &c. &c.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

MARY KING . I am servant to Mr. James, who is clerk and book-keeper to Mr. Wheeler, who lives at No. 25, Bartlett's-buildings, Holborn . On Sunday evening, the 20th of January, I was called to the door by the watchman, between eight and nine o'clock, and found the door was open; I secured it, and went up stairs again - the family consists of master, mistress, and two sons; I am the only servant - one son is between six and seven years old; Joshua, the other, is older than him; master went to bed that night about nine o'clock - mistress had gone out for the day, and came home between ten and eleven; nobody in the house was then up but myself that I know of - I stopped in the kitchen till she came home; I let her in, secured the doors, and went to bed - my mistress went up stairs to bed; she slept in the garret at the top of the house - I sleep in the kitchen; we had a black terrier dog in the house - I did not hear the dog during the night, but about half-past six o'clock in the morning, when I was in bed, I heard the dog barking outside the door; I believe I was the first person up in the house - Scheurrer, the journeyman, came to work that morning about twenty minutes to eight o'clock - I let him in- I found a stool at the door, which I moved, and then found the bolts of the door had been drawn; the top bolt is high - I am quite sure I fastened the bolts myself the night before; when I let in Scheurrer I did not see the dog come in, but when I came down into the kitchen I saw the dog in the kitchen, with a cord round its neck; it was never tied with a cord before - I have seen the prisoner Smith at the house; I saw him there on Saturday night, the day before the robbery; I saw him at the house, taking tea with Mr. James' son, Joshua.

ALBERT SCHEURRER . I am a workman in the employ of Mr. Wheeler, of Bartlett's-buildings - I have worked for him about four years. On the morning of the 21st of January I got to the warehouse about twenty minutes after seven o'clock, and when I came to the door Mr. Wheeler's black terrier dog was outside the door, with a piece of cord round its neck; King let me in, and the dog ran in at the same time - I had never seen it with a cord round its neck before; the dog has been there longer than I have - it was a favorite dog in the house.

WILLIAM BEDFORD . I am Mr. Wheeler's porter. On the Monday morning I saw the dog with the rope round its neck; I took it of, and put the rope into my pocket - I afterwards gave it to Mr. Forrester.

DANIEL FORRESTER , I am an officer. I went to the prosecutor's house; I received a cord from Bedford - this is it.

NICHOLAS JAMES . I am clerk and book-keeper to the prosecutor - I occupy that portion of the premises which is not used as warehouses; I occupy them as the servant of Mr. Wheeler - the front parlour is what we call the warehouse; the house is in the parish of St. Andrew,

Holborn; myself and my son Joshua sleep in the back room on the first floor - Mrs. James sometimes sleeps there, but on the night in question she went to see a married daughter in Cross-street - I have two sons a wife, and a maid servant; my son Joshua John is sixteen years old - the other son is between eight and nine; he sleeps in the attic. On Sunday, the 20th of January, I was very unwell the whole day; I never stirred out from the Saturday till Monday - I went to bed before nine o'clock, being unwell; I had the care of the warehouse - Joshua went to bed with me, about nine o'clock, and I am pretty well certain he was in bed with me the whole night; I have no doubt of it, for being unwell I was awake most of the night - in the course of the Sunday I had occasion to go into the warehouse three or four times; it was quite safe - the drawers in the warehouse were secured with a bar across them, which was padlocked - I had seen them quite safe on Saturday night; the drawers were barred and locked, and the key of the drawers was in possession of a person not in the house; I locked the warehouse door between seven and eight o'clock, and put the key of the warehouse under my pillow; all was safe then - I got up next morning about a quarter before eight o'clock, and when I came down stairs I found a dark-lantern at the foot of the stairs, within a few inches of the counting-house door, that alarmed me - I then observed a stool in the passage, which belonged to the warehouse, and two small pieces of clean writing paper, and two worsted socks; I took them up, and immediately went to the warehouse - the socks were two odd ones; I gave them to Waller, the officer - the two pieces of paper were at the foot of the stool; I went to the warehouse, and found the counting-house door a little way open, but the key was safe in my breeches pocket, as I had put it the night before - I am quite certain I had locked it; that was the warehouse key, but it goes into both counting-house and warehouse - that is the door which secures all the property; I am perfectly certain I locked it overnight - I have been there fifteen years; on going into the warehouse I found the floor strewed with empty drawers - they were the drawers where the principal gold and silver articles were kept, and which were safe overnight, having a bar across them, and padlocked; they were all empty on Monday morning - I saw that the bar was not in its proper place, and that day or next, I saw a piece of wood sticking to it, with the marks of a centre-bit; I looked round, and found from fifteen to twenty skeleton-keys, a centre-stock, four or six bits, for making circular holes, a pair of gloves. two oranges half sucked away, a bottle of oil, a match-box, a bank of whipcord, a crow-bar, a tinman's soldering iron, a chisel, and one or two straps, apparently of a pair of trousers; these things remained in the warehouse, and in my fright I instantly ran off for Mr. Wheeler, who lives at Camden-town - he seldom missed coming to town every day; I remember finding a tin box on my son Joshua about a week before - this is the box(looking at it) - I have no doubt; but it then had a lid to it; I was searching in his pockets for a key I had lost; I did not find the key, but found this, and he immediately snatched it from me, and ran out of the house - it had a lid to it, but what was in it I cannot say.

Q. After this, and before the Sunday night, did you at any time see this tin article, in this condition, in your house (producing the lid of a tin box, with two wheels attached to it?) A. I did, but cannot exactly say whether it was before or after - I saw my little boy dragging it about, but it did not occur to me at the time that it was the same; (looking at it) I am the more strongly convinced of it being the same now, for I remember its being painted; while I was gone for Mr. Wheeler the officers were sent for, and I delivered to Waller the different articles found on the floor; here are the picklocks, crowbar, phosphorus-box, socks, matches, and other things - the picklock-keys were spread about the floor, and here is a knife I forgot to mention - it had been recently sharpened.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. I presume you have no share in the business? A. No, I am merely the clerk; Mr. Wheeler has no partner at all - he pays for the dwelling-house; I live there as his clerk; my son staid at home with me the greatest part of the Sunday; he was out two or three times for an hour or an hour and a half each time - he has just left school, and has not been put to any business yet; he may have left school six or eight months - I have been endeavouring to get him to sea; my wife had gone to Cross-street, Hatton-garden - I did not see her return that night, but she came in after I went to bed; I did not hear her come in, nor did I hear any body come in that night - I was pretty sound asleep for the first two or three hours.

Q. If you were sound asleep, your son might have got out for an hour or two without your knowledge? A. He might; I came down in the morning, without being alarmed, and found things as I have described.

Q. If the door was fastened and bolted inside, how could a person get in? A. I do not think there was any way, for there had been an attempt at robbery a few years before, and the house was perfectly well fastened.

Q. There must have been somebody to withdraw the bolts? A. Undoubtedly; a short person would require a stool to reach it - I found all the things scattered about in different parts of the warehouse; my son was in the employ of Mr. Boyd, a jeweller, of No. 312, Oxford-street, for three or four months; that was the second place he had - before that he lived with Mr. Statham, a great tailor in Bedford-street, Covent-garden, and with an apothecary in Tavistock-street; this is since he left school; I was looking for a berth at sea for him, and during that time he lived with those people - it did not strike me to mention this; he was not more than a fortnight with Statham, and rather less with the apothecary, and with Boyd four months - I did not think that worth mentioning; he left the apothecary and tailor in credit; he left Boyd, I believe, because he had three shops, and gave up two of them.

Q. Was that the real cause? A. Why the boy had stolen a knife - I cannot call it stealing; he had given it to be ground - he would have left the place in a week if it had not been for that; that accelerated his being discharged; I never saw the knife in his possession - I know he robbed Mr. Wheeler of 3s. 6d.; Mr. Wheeler found it out, and I returned it to him - I never heard

that it was marked money put into the till on purpose; I understand some waste-paper was stolen while my son was in the house; it was books belonging to the late partnership, and was sold as waste-paper, and the prisoner Smith took it, with my son's consent, as I have heard - it was found at a cheesemonger's; I taxed my son with it, and he owned to it - he stole a shilling from somebody whom I do not know, and cannot tell when it was - I know of nothing else; I wanted to get him to sea for that very reason.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. He was a very bad boy, I believe? A. I have related all I know of his badness; I cannot tell when the bolts were drawn - I know it must have been after eight o'clock; my son was acquainted with Smith when these wicked acts occurred; he has drank tea at our house full half a dozen times - my son was out three times on Sunday, and he was out about seven or eight o'clock for an hour; I cannot say how long he staid to half an hour - he was in the habit of going out with Smith repeatedly; I have seen Smith at the house six or eight times.

CHARLES WALLER . I am one of the City Police. I received these articles from Mr. Nicholas James (the articles found on the floor) - they were left in the house, and Mr. Wheeler delivered them to Forrester; I saw these odd socks.

GERVASE WHEELER. I am a manufacturer of jewellery, gold. silver, and gilt articles - I have a warehouse in Bartlett's-buildings, and a manufactory attached to it; Nicholas James was my clerk and book-keeper. On Monday morning, the 21st of January, I arrived from my house in Camden-town, between nine and ten o'clock - my attention was excited by the unusual appearance of the door not being open, and the shutters of the warehouse were shut; they ought to have been open - (I pay the rent of the house and the rates; it is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn) - I was at the warehouse late on Saturday evening- my stock in the drawers was all perfectly safe on my leaving on Saturday, at near ten o'clock or later - when I entered on Monday morning I found my clerks assembled in the passage, who asked if I had seen Mr. James, but I had not seen him - I immediately went into the warehouse; my attention was drawn to the drawers strewed on the floor, and a variety of keys strewed on the counters, and various other implements: this lantern and other articles of housebreaking, which did not belong to my house - the value of the stock I lost I cannot state within some hundreds of pounds; but I lost decidedly considerably beyond 500l. worth of goods - I cannot speak with accuracy within some hundreds; among other articles which I deal in, is a waxer; I had several of them in my house on Saturday night - I have now brought one from my own stock; here is the die which the top of the waxer I have brought was stamped with; it is the die which made the impression on the silver - the die is made for the purpose of making one of a larger size as well; it has two borders - the waxer produced is made to the reduced size; you will also find that there is a screw for the purpose of screwing into this tube - on trying that through the guage plate, you will find it fits No. 10; this is not one of the articles stolen, and here is a die my bodkins are made with - here is a lead impression made from it, and here is a similar indented impression in the die - it is for the purpose of showing us where to make the hole.

DANIEL FORRESTER. I produce two bodkins, one of which I picked up in the house, No. 47, Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell, and the others I received from Mr. Cope in the same house, on the 28th of January - the one I found was among some things in the front room; it was a week after the robbery.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was any body at home in the house? A. No; the prisoners were both in custody - they were taken on the 22nd; I found the bodkin among some things which had been turned out of some drawers - I had turned several of the things out the first time I went, which was on the 22nd, about nine o'clock in the evening.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. On the 28th, when you examined more particularly among those things, you found a bodkin? A. Yes.

MR. WHEELER. These are silver bodkins; when they were first produced, they exhibited an appearance of being new - they had the bloom of newness on them, evidently showing to me that they had not been used; if they had been exposed in a place where the air was damp, there would be a tarnish on them - to the best of my belief, this bodkin which I now hold in my hand is my manufactury and was made in this die; the bead in it exactly corresponds with the hole made in it - there is the piercing of it in the place where the indentation is made to guide my men where to pierce it; I cannot speak to the second bodkin with the same confidence, because the die from which it has been made has been much more used, and is very old - it is similar to those I manufacture, and it fits the die - it had the same degree of comparative newness when produced to me.

WILLIAM WADHAM COPE . I am one of the City marshals. I have a waxer, which I found in the front parlour, at No. 47, Red Lion-street; the prisoners were apprehended on the 22nd, and it was four or five days after that - the drawers had been examined and emptied on the night of the 22nd, by me and Forrester, but on making a more minute examination afterwards, I found this waxer and a bodkin; I delivered the bodkin to Forrester.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How was the house left between the 22nd and the 28th? A. We got in on the 22nd, between nine and ten o'clock at night - we left nobody in the house when we came out; there were no keys.

Q. If any body was disposed to make evidence, they could have deposited these things there. A. I think not, for I recollect on the first night, on turning over the things, seeing the two bodkins and this piece of was; I was not aware that such things had been lost, not having read the bill minutely - I turned the things out of a kind of workbox.

MR. WHEELER. This waxer bore every appearance of being new, and I have every reason to believe it was once my property; I tried it in the die, and have no doubt whatever that this was struck in that die - here is the die; it fits exactly - I have no doubt these two ends of the waxer are made in the same die.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long has the die for the waxers been in your possession? A. I cannot say; I have been a manufacturer thirty-three years

- the die has been in my possession some years; a great many of these things have been made and sold to different people - I sell to the trade; I had not many waxers in my possession at the time of the robbery - I might have from a dozen to twenty - they were kept in the warehouse; I have made a great many bodkins - they are a common pattern; the eye and slit would be about the same position nearly in all the bodkins which are made - there would be a little variation in the end nob, as generally speaking they are made rounder; Joshua James could not have access to these things, for the drawers were always locked up, and the keys kept by my respective clerks - I cannot conceive any time at which he might have got at them; I saw some waste-paper which was said to have been brought from a shop in Clare-market, and questioned him about it - he said he had taken it together with another, who carried it out of the warehouse; this was before the robbery - on discovering this robbery, I occupied myself the whole of Monday taking the examinations of every body in the house; I asked Mr. James about it - I told him it must be a gross act of negligence.

Q. Did you not give him a hint that he would leave your service in consequence of it? A. He had a hint previous to that - the son gave me information on the following morning, and I sent the Police to Red Lion-street; I was there once when they searched, and saw the bodkins and the wax, but they were not brought away, because I brought away nothing - on picking up the waxer, I recognized it at once; I said "This is decidedly my property"- I brought nothing away; Joshua was not in my service; I never personally detected him in robbing me - one of my clerks stated some money was found on him; it was not produced to me that I recollect - that was full two or three years ago; I only knew of the paper being stolen since this robbery - I knew nothing of any ear-rings.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. I believe you have every reason to believe he was a very bad boy? A. Very great reason- I can safely say that at least every one of the articles stated in the indictment was gone from my stock; they are stated less in number and value than what I lost - Joshua and his father were kept separate in my house after I came on the Monday,

WILLIAM WADHAM COPE re-examined. I was sent for to Mr. Wheeler's - I arrived between four and five o'clock on Tuesday afternoon, the 22nd; Joshua John James was fetched to me, and in the one pair back room he detailed to me a variety of particulars, and I went to No. 47, Red Lion-street, directly after the conversation - I went there in consequence of what he told me; I did not examine the house then - we did not go into the house; the shutters of the lower room were left open, and apparently nobody was in the house - it appeared to be deserted; I then went to the White Horse public-house, Clare-market, which is a flash house, from the same information, and took Joshua with us - we found the prisoner Coney there; the boy, Joshua James , said Coney was in the one pair front room - we went and found him there with twelve or fifteen others; we immediately took him in custody - Forrester searched him on the spot, but not in my presence; we walked to Holborn, put Coney in a coach, took him to the Compter, and then went back to No. 47, Red Lion-street, and waited there until near ten o'clock, on the look out, and then got into the house - Forrester was with me; I should think we were outside the house nearly an hour, and I had waited outside the house an hour and a half or two hours on the first occasion - when I went into the house, No. 47, Red Lion street, Forrester searched the front room, while I searched the bed-room; I found nothing particular in the bed-room on that occasion - I found a tea-cup in the front parlour closet, containing some oil; I expected to find a tea-cup with some oil; I produce it - here is part of the oil in a phial; I took it out of the teacup, and put it into the phial - I went with Forrester into a back shed through the yard, and there found a piece of cord; Forrester picked it up - I think this is it; I have compared it with the piece of cord with the noose in it found at Wheeler's, and should think they belong to each other - they are precisely the same sort of cord; I cannot swear they have joined each other, but think it probable - Forrester found it under a shed in the yard; before I went to the shed, I expected to have found a piece of rope, from what the boy said, and was not surprised to find that cord there - I found nothing else that evening, except the two bodkins and the waxer, as I said before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. That cord is common enough? A. I should think it is, and the oil also - I did not find every thing which I expected - I examined the back bed-room minutely, as far as I could.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you expect to find some other persons? A. Not in the house.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I accompanied Mr. Cope to Mr. Wheeler's house on the Tuesday - I received from Nicholas James the articles found in Mr. Wheeler's house; I received a phial and oil, and all the articles produced - I accompanied Mr. Cope and the boy to No. 47, Red Lion-street, but did not go in; we then went to the White Horse, Clare-market, in consequence of what the boy said - I went into the first floor room, and there found the prisoner Coney; he was taken to the Compter - I searched him, and found a duplicate on him; the address on the duplicate was No. 47, Red Lion-street - I afterwards went back to Red Lion-street; I searched one room while Mr. Cope searched the other, and in the shed I was directed by the boy to a particular place, and there found this piece of cord - here is a hank of twine which I found there, in the front kitchen; it is the same in quality and make as that found at Wheeler's, and the piece found at Wheeler's appears to have had some cut off it - that found at No. 47, Red Lion-street was an entire hank - I received from Bedford a piece of cord with a noose; I should judge that to be the same kind of cord; I also found a life-preserver - here is some fresh twine tied over it; we expected to find a preserver, which had been repaired with whipcord, from the boy's statement; the whipcord found at Wheeler's, from which part had been taken, appears the same as this round the preserver; it has six threads in each, and appears the same - it is repaired with the same description of cord; I also found in the house these two parts of worsted stockings, with two pieces in them - two odd parts of stockings, or socks, were delivered to me by Nicholas James, as found in the house; the two parts of stockings were found by the side of the bedstead, in the back room at No. 47, Red Lion-street - they are two bottoms of stockings with the tops cut off, and two little pieces of white worsted inside one

of them; I found this "Forget Me Not" on the table in the front parlour I think, and I found these three skeleton-keys, one in the table drawer, and one of the small ones in the back room - I found this vice in the kitchen; I also found some papers with the name of Coney on them, and some bills and books, and some tin; I found this book with writing in it there - here is written in it,"Cab hire, lush and grub, 1l. 10s. - woman for keep, watch to keep, watch-ribbon to keep, &c.;" keep is a slang term for boys - here is a card with "Mrs. Smith, 9, Wingrove-place, St. John-street," written on it in pencil; I found the prisoner Smith at No. 9, Wingrove-place, at his mother's residence - on the back of the same card, in print, there is " George Coney , oil and colourman, &c." - I found this piece of tin in the house; grocers and oilmen use such tins, with the prices of their articles painted on them, to stick in their windows - I expected to find these tins, from what I heard from the boy; you will find this piece of the tin cart found at Mr. Wheeler's, corresponds with this piece of tin found at No. 47, Red Lion-street - it appears to have been cut with a chisel, and there is a jag on it, and it appears to be the bottom of the number, the rest of the number being on the tin.

Q. Compare the wheel of the cart with another piece of tin found at No. 47, Red Lion-street? A. In my judgment this wheel has been part of this piece - they correspond exactly except the round part being away; it corresponds in the painting, and the shading inside the figure - I found this piece of tin there; the worsted socks would prevent a noise being made by a man's shoes - here are three samples of oil, one from the prosecutor's, the other from the cup, and one from Mrs. Count's.

SARAH COUNT . I live at No. 36, Cowcross-street, and deal in oil. On Sunday evening, the 20th of January, early in the evening. Joshua James came for some oil - I should know him again; that is him (looking at him) - he asked me for 3d. worth of sperm oil, which would be about a gill - I had no sperm; I did not tell him so, but I gave him pale rape - here is a sample I have brought of it - this bottle, produced from the prosecutor's, contains the same sort of oil, and this bottle is also the same kind of oil; I sold him rather more than is in these two bottles - here is some in a cup; I do not recollect what sort of a cup he brought for it - but he brought a cup.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This is not an uncommon oil? A. No, very common; it is cheaper than sperm - I did not tell him I was giving him an inferior article.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a hosier. These socks are not in the state in which they were originally sewn - they agree in colour with the two pieces of stockings found at the house in Red Lion-street; these two pieces of white cotton appear to have been cut from the white part of the odd socks found at Wheeler's - I have not a doubt that this odd sock and the bottoms originally formed one stocking; in my judgment, the whole once formed a pair of stockings - this white piece undoubtedly belonged to this one.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You fix on one piece particularly, have you any doubt about the other? A. No, but there is something in this which particularly convinces me that this part was once united to this; I say decidedly that this once formed a complete stocking - it is not an uncommon texture of stocking.

JOSHUA JOHN JAMES . I was fifteen years old on the 20th of April last; I live with my father at Mr. Wheeler's. I have known the prisoner Smith about two years; I became acquainted with him by meeting him several times in the neighbourhood, and we went to the same school; in December last I was in the service of Mr. Boyd, a jeweller, in Oxford-street - I was then rather less intimate with Smith, but became more intimate with him after I left Boyd - we have talked together a good deal; I am sorry to say, I once stole 3s. 6d. from Mr. Wheeler - I do not recollect that I told Smith of that; I was in the habit of communicating privately to Smith about what I had done - I told him several things which I had done, and he told me several things that he had done, and we became very intimate; about a month before the robbery, I had some conversation with him about Mr. Wheeler - he asked me what Mr. Wheeler was worth, and if there was much property, and where it was kept; I told him - I know 47, Red Lion-street; I went there with Smith about a week after he asked me what Mr. Wheeler was worth, and where he kept his property - Smith's mother had asked me to go with him to No. 47, Red Lion-street while the lady of the house was absent, and I went with him; that was the first time I had ever been there - Mrs. Coney was the lady of the house; when I got to the house, Smith told me the house was kept by cracksmen - I asked what he meant; he said housebreakers - he then took me into the kitchen, which appeared like a cellar; he showed me a number of keys there and a life preserver which was broken (looking at a bunch of keys); I think they were larger keys than these(looks at another small bunch of keys) - there were several of these, and this is the sort of thing called a life-preserver, but I can not be certain of it, for it was broken at that time; and he showed me a number of old articles - he showed me some old drawers, and several rubbishing things; he did not that day show me any thing else that I recollect - I saw some whipcord there, but cannot say on what day, and a crow-bar; I went to the house a short time afterwards with Smith again - I have seldom gone without Smith: the second time I went I saw three more persons there, Coney was one, and when I got there (I think this was the second time), Coney asked me where Mr. Wheeler's property was kept, and what situation the warehouse drawers were in; I told him - (looking at the top of a tin box made into a cart) I know that; about a week after Coney asked me about the premises, Smith called for me at Mr. Wheeler's - I went out with him into Bartlett's-passage, and there I found Coney waiting - Smith produced a tin box to me full of soap, in Coney's presence in the passage; Smith had before that asked me to get him the impression of the counting-house key, and the iron chest key; the counting-house key opens the door leading to the warehouse - I had said I would get him the impression of only one; Coney was not present when Smith first asked me to get the impression - he was present afterwards, when he asked me about it, before I went into Bartlett's-passage- I refused to get the iron chest key - I said there was a great deal of property there, and I would not get it; Coney heard me refuse to get the impression of the chest key, and the (Coney) said I was a fool - in Bartlett's-pas

sage Smith gave me the box of soap out of his pocket; this tin cart was the lid of it, to the best of my knowledge - Smith gave it to me before I came up to Coney, and when I got up, Coney told me to press the key even with the soap; it did not matter which side - I was to get the flat side of the counting-house key and press it level with the soap; I was to wet the key before I pressed it to the soap, and I was to hold the key up afterwards, to see that no soap was sticking in the wards - I received these directions from both Coney and Smith in the passage; I took the box of soap, and had it in my pocket - I left them, and came home; my father was searching my pockets on the following Monday for a key, and saw the box of soap in my pocket - I had at that time got the impression on the soap; the lid was on the box - my father saw it, and tried to take it away from me, but I was quick and put it into another pocket, and I ran off to Coney's house in, Red Lion-street, and saw Coney, who was cutting wood; I told him the box had been seen - he said he hoped nothing was suspected, and while I was there he lent me a book called the Forget Me Not; this is the book, to the best of my knowledge - it had a cover exactly like this; Coney said they only wanted 20l. - my father had no opportunity of examining the impression of the key: this was at nine o'clock in the morning - I was to call again at eleven o'clock (this was the Monday before the Sunday of the robbery); I came home then, and lent the Forget Me Not to my mother - I went to Coney's again about eleven o'clock, and found Coney and two or three more men there; Smith was there - I now know a person named Cook, and another named Pearce, and there was a tall man who I do not know the name of; they were the three persons who were there; I should know them all three again - when I returned at eleven o'clock, Coney was filing a key in the vice; (looking at a vice) it was about this size, but not so rusty - the box of soap was on a window ledge by him, with the impression on it, and Pearce was making a little cart of the top of the soap box; he put this little axletree to it, and I saw him put these two wheels in, and saw him cut two other pieces to fasten the wheels to - he made the cart, tied a string to it, and told me to give it to my little brother, so that my father might see it, and be deceived, that he should not suspect any thing was in the box which he had seen; Coney and Pearce together told me that; I waited until Coney had finished the key, and after he had finished it, he put it in the fire, and then gave it to me to try if it would fit - putting it in the fire took away the brightness; I took it home, and had no opportunity of trying it until the Sunday night of the robbery - I delivered it to Smith, as I could not try it; he had it in his possession to prevent my father seeing it - he had it while I went in to dinner on Tuesday, and returned it to me again, but I had no opportunity of trying it; on the Friday before the robbery, I went to Coney's house - Coney then said, that he and another would call at Mr. Wheeler's with a job to mend, to see the situation of the premises; I was to meet him at the White Horse, Gilbert-street, Clare-market, on the Saturday afternoon - I went, and Smith with me; there was Pearce, Cook, and the tall man, and several others there, and Coney came about half an hour afterwards; I was talking with them, and when Coney came he asked me to bring the dog to Red Lion-street the next afternoon; I said several times to them on that Saturday, that they had better leave it alone, because I was afraid my father would be suspected - Coney said they would leave all their tools there, to wipe off the suspicion from my father, and to show that it was done by the profession; on the Saturday, Cook said, if I ever split, he would muzzle me (both the prisoners were present) - Pearce said if I did not go on with it, he would scrag me, and the tall man said he would take me before a Magistrate if I did not proceed with it; I am certain both the prisoners were present then - Coney said the tall man was to watch at the kitchen door, to see that the servant did not awake; Coney wanted me to poison the dog - I said I would not, because it was a favourite dog, and one we had hed by us for many years; when I would not-poison it, he asked me to bring it to the house on Sunday; I went home on Saturday, and was to come between five and six o'clock on Sunday with the dog - I went with it between five and six o'clock, and found Coney at home, and in a little time Cook, Pearce, and the tall man came and Smith came in - they saw the dog, and one of them remarked, "Have you got the barker?" and Coney said, "We have him all right;" the dog was running about there until the men came in - Coney then told me to come with him; I went with him through a yard into a shed, and he tied the dog there with a string to a post in a shed in the yard - we then all drank tea together; after tea I was sent for 3d. of sperm oil in a tea cup - I went for it to Cow-cross; I believe Mrs. Count was the woman I went to, but I cannot be certain - this is the sort of tea cup Coney gave me to fetch the oil in; I brought it back to him, and he then put some into a dark lantern, some into a phial, and some remained in the tea cup (looking at a dark lantern) - this is the lantern; I cannot speak to the phial - Coney said "I have got some laudanum, could not you contrive to put some into the servant's and your father's beer;" he said this in the presence of all the rest - I refused, and he said, I was a great fool, and Mrs. Coney said I had better not; after tea, Coney brought out all the housebreaking implements - Pearce, Cook, and all were present at the time (looking at the articles produced); there was a piece of whipcord like this on the table - I think this is the piece and the bag of keys; they were shook out of the bag by Pearce, shown to me, and put in again; I looked them all over in my hand, and then they were put into the bag again - it was such a bag as that; this centrebit I certainly saw, and the stock-handle - the bits were in this corderoy case, as they are now; a little before that, Coney was mending a pair of worsted socks - I asked him what they were for - he said they were to put on over his shoes, to prevent his making any noise - this is one of the socks, and the other was like this - they were odd ones; I saw them at the examination - they are the same as I had seen at Coney's, to the best of my knowledge; there were four or five oranges on the table, one of which was given to me, and I eat it; I asked what they were going to take the oranges with them for - they said they had got bad coughs - after tea on Sunday, Coney said he had been to Mr. Wheeler's, and seen a young man, and he asked me what was in the drawers in the chest opposite, and I told him all the silver; he said he had been to Wheeler's with a pin, to get a diamond put in, and the young man toldhim they did not do such jobs for strangers, and there was plenty of shops in Holborn if he would go to them - he said the drawers were opposite just by the window; those are the drawers which are fastened by a bar and padlock - I left them on Sunday evening, about half-past six o'clock; I had the key with me then, and they told me to be sure and try it, and give it to them at the Magpie and Stump, Fetter-lane - I had not before that had an opportunity of trying the key; I went home and left Smith with them - when I got home my father was in the drawing-room; I went into the room - it was agreed that I should leave the door ajar, and return to them at the Magpie and Stump, and give them the key if it fitted, and that was to be a signal that I had left the door open; there is a fan-light over the door, and they were to put a piece of paper on the fan-light, as a signal for Pearce that they were ready to come out - Pearce was to be outside, Coney and Cook were to be in the warehouse, and the tall man, at the kitchen stairs; Smith was one of the party on the Sunday evening, and I asked him if he should be at the house with them; he said No, he would not, and he would never sell his liberty for such a thing as that - I tried the key while my father was up stairs in the drawing-room; it fitted - I was to meet them at the Magpie and Stump between eight and nine o'clock, and went there; I left the door ajar, as I had agreed - I was to deliver the key to one of them at the tap-room in Fetter-lane, as a signal that the door was ajar, but I found the tall man at the door of the Magpie and Stump; I gave it to him, and he said "We can't find George," meaning Coney - Coney came running up directly, and whispered to him; I then walked down Bartlett's-buildings, and saw Coney and another man (I cannot say whether it was Cook or not) dodge round the bricks to go in at the door; Coney was nearest the lamp and I saw his face - they went in before me; they were to hide themselves behind the counter in the warehouse till I was in bed - I went home directly and found the door open, and shut it; while I was at Coney's on the Sunday, I asked what the whipcord was for, and they said it would be useful, and I saw Pearce sharpening his knife - I asked the use of every thing; he was sharpening his knife on a new whetstone - I believe this is the knife; the life-preserver was on the table - I saw Coney at one end of the room, tying something, but I could not tell what, and just before I left I saw the life-preserver laying on the table, mended in the state it is now; Smith had it in his hand, and struck me with it several times in play, and said it would hit any body a good crack - I went to bed about nine o'clock, and after I was in bed I heard a ring at the bell, and a knock, and heard a man's voice; I do not know the watchman's voice - I had been in bed I should think three quarters of an hour, or an hour - I had not gone to sleep; shortly after that I heard footsteps running up the stairs, and the person that ran up tried one of the doors - he made a noise in running up - it appeared a man's footstep; I returned the Forget Me Not to Coney a few days before the robbery; I gave it into his own hands - I did not see the dog next morning till about twelve o'clock; I remember Mr. Wheeler's making inquiry on the Monday about this, and again on the Tuesday, and I made a statement to him, and afterwards saw Forrester and Cope - I disclosed to them what I knew, and where Coney lived; I afterwards accompanied them to where he lived, and to the public-house in Clare-market, where he was apprehended, and then went with them to No. 47, Red Lion-street.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I took Smith on the Tuesday, before Coney was taken.

JOSHUA JOHN JAMES re-examined. I went to a house in Great Mitchell-street with Smith; I waited outside while he went in; it was before the robbery - I have been there with him several times, and he told me the property was to be taken there - it is at the corner of Brick-lane, and a grocer's shop; the last time I went there with Smith, he said, "Mr. Wheeler little thinks that some of his prime stuff is coming here."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it for fear you have not done mischief enough to Smith that you add that, without being asked? A. No; Smith is fifteen years old - I should not have done this, if I had not been frightened at being muzzled or scragged - I was afraid of their threatening; I was not so much afraid at the beginning as at last - I never was with them in any robbery, not with Coney; I am sorry to say I have committed a robbery.

Q. Will you tell us how long it is since you began? A. I do not know - it is about three years ago.

Q. I should not be surprised if you do not say it was Smith brought you into all the robberies? A. He did into this; I have done wrong things three years ago, and have been robbing at different times - I once took 1s. from my father; I stole it - I have taken some books from him, and have taken halfpence several times; I do not remember taking any thing particular of my mother's; I have stolen things from her three or four times, but do not remember what they were.

Q. Was it because you repented of this that you told? A. It was, Sir, I assure you; I was afraid something would happen to me if I did not tell - it was through fear and repentance both; I was afraid of being taken up - I have been in the infirmary at the Compter ever since this.

Q. You have said a great many things here which you did not state at the Mansion-house? A. I was not questioned so much then; I was sworn to tell the whole truth; what I said was taken down in writing - I do not remember whether I said there, that Smith kept the key to prevent my father seeing it; I do not think I did - nobody has refreshed my memory in the prison; I have seen Mr. Wheeler there, and my father and mother - I did not state at the Mansion-house about leaving their tools there to show it had been done by the profession - that is the expression they used; I forgot to state it - I did not say that Cook said he would muzzle me, because I was not asked, nor that the tall man was to stop at the kitchen door, but Mr. Wheeler has all that in writing - I did not mention their asking me to poison the dog, nor about the barker, nor about Coney mending the socks, that I recollect; I was not so long at the Mansion-house as I have been here - I was about a quarter of an hour being examined.

Q. Was it not at least two hours? A. I do not remember how long it was - when my father found the soap-box he was searching for a little key; he asked me

for it; I said I knew nothing about it - I was not so intimate with Smith while at Boyd's as I was afterwards; he never came to see me there - I stole a knife from Boyd once, and some halfpence several times; I do not recollect any thing else that I did there - I pledged my own watch while there; my father had given it to me - I do not think I pawned any thing belonging to the family; I will not swear I did or did not, for I do not remember - I pawned my watch at Mr. Cotterel's, in Oxford-street; I pawned several of my own books in Gray's Inn-lane - I swear I did not pawn any of Mr. Boyd's books there, nor of any of the family; I never pawned any thing belonging to the family - I had several of his young man's books, and pawned them; I had bought them of his young man; I had exchanged with him - I got the money from my father to buy them.

Q. Did you pawn any which you had neither bought nor exchanged? A. Not to my knowledge, I do not remember - I have sold some of my father's books; I do not remember pawning Mr. Boyd's young man's books opposite Gray's Inn-lane; I cannot swear I did not - I do not remember doing any thing else wrong in Mr. Boyd's service; I might have taken a penny or so, but cannot remember - there was a printed circular came; I opened it, as I found it was printed - Mr. Boyd found it in my pocket very soon after; I should have given it to him, or laid it on the counter for him - he searched my pockets before I went away, and found it; he turned me away for quarrelling with the young man, not for stealing - I had one of his young man's books which I had bought of him; I remember I did pawn one which did not belong to me, that was the Mirror - I forgot that before; I pawned the Casket - I took 3s. 6d. from Mr. Wheeler, and 1s. before, and I robbed him of some medals, that is all to my knowledge - I robbed him of some paper, and sold it at 3d. a lb. by Smith's persuasion; Smith did not persuade me to the other robbery.

Q. Did you ever rob him of any ear-rings? A. If you will give me time I will tell you the truth; I have not robbed Mr. Wheeler of ear-rings - I do not think I robbed any body of ear-rings; I cannot remember every thing - I do not remember the ear-rings; if I did steal them I would own it directly - I might have stolen them, but do not remember; I have lived at Mr. Statham's, a tailor, Mr. Foot, a surgeon, and Mr. Boyd - I left Mr. Foot because I did not like the place; I took nothing from there, nor at any place except Wheeler's and Boyd's - I never picked a pocket in Smithfield; I left the prosecutor's door open for the party to go in.

Q. Have you any idea who drew the bolt inside? A. No, nor who put the stool by the door - there was no other boy in the house but my little brother, who is seven or eight years old; he slept with his mother - I can reach the bolt without a stool; Mr. Wheeler did not threaten to send me to gaol before I told of this - he advised me to make a confession: I suppose he suspected me by my being had before - I refused the impression of the key of the iron chest; they asked what was in the drawers - I said silver goods.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You was intimate with Smith, and told him from time to time what had been done? A. Yes; I do not recollect telling him I had taken 3s. 6d. from Mr. Wheeler.

SARAH WILKINSON . I am servant to Mr. Gibbs, of No. 46, Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell. I know the house of Coney, No. 47. On Sunday, the 20th of January, in the course of the night, I heard a dog barking there a good deal from half-past five o'clock until six, not at any other time - I have been seven months in Mr. Gibbs' service; the dog was in the back yard - I never heard a dog barking there before.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You do not know who brought the dog there? A. No.

JOSEPH BEAVAN . I am in the employ of Mr. Gibbs, No. 46, Red Lion-street. I have seen Coney at No. 47, I suppose a dozen times.

Cross-examined. Q. Within what period? A. Just before Christmas and after, between the latter part of December and early in January; our workshops overlook the yard - I have seen him in the yard at times.

HANNAH WRENALDS . I live in Red Lion-street, opposite to No. 47. I know the prisoner Coney - I have seen him there frequently from three or four days before Christmas, until the Monday before he was apprehended - I know Smith by sight; I saw him there on the Tuesday morning on which they were apprehended.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you mean that you saw Coney there every day? A. Not every day- I have seen him repeatedly go in and out, as if inhabiting the house himself.

NICHOLAS WRENALDS . I am the husband of the last witness, and live opposite No. 47, Red Lion-street. I have seen Coney there frequently from a little before Christmas - I have not seen him there since the robbery was committed; the house has been closed chiefly since that time.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw him go in and out? A. Yes, sometimes once and twice a day; I considered him the inhabitant of the house.

MARY SIBLEY . I am married, and live in Red Lion-street, nearly opposite No. 47 - I cannot say whether I saw Coney there; I do not know him; I have seen Smith there frequently. On Monday morning, the 21st of January, I saw a coach at the door, about a quarter or twenty minutes after eight o'clock - it did not wait many minutes: I saw a trunk brought out of No. 47, and placed in the coach - two men got in, and then the coach drove away; about five minutes after it drove away Smith came out of the house, and he appeared to me to have a saucer in his hand.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was in the coach you do not know? A. No; it was not Coney who brought the trunk out - it was a stout man.

BENJAMIN POWNALL . I live at No. 31, Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell. I was near No. 47 on Monday morning, the 21st of January, about half-past eight o'clock; I do not know either of the prisoners - I saw a coach stop at No. 47, and a hair trunk brought out, and put in the coach; a man got in, and the coach drove away.

Cross-examined. Q. Coney is not the man? A. No.

THOMAS DUGARD. I am the son of a jeweller, living in Red Lion-street - I know Coney, and have seen him at No. 47. On Sunday night, the 20th of January, I saw

him shut up the house No. 47 - I saw him move into the house when he came there, not move goods in; I saw him walk into the house - I have no idea when he moved into the house; I saw him put up one shutter between four and five o'clock on Sunday.

JAMES BARTHOLOMEW CRONIN . I am warehouseman to the prosecutor. On the Monday morning after the robbery, about eleven o'clock, I was called from the kitchen, went into the passage, and saw the prisoner Smith- I asked him what his business was; he said he wished to see Josh, by which name Joshua James goes - I asked what he wanted to see him for; he said he had an appointment to go with him to look after a situation; I asked him when he saw Josh last - he said Saturday afternoon; on the following morning Smith was examined by Mr. Wheeler, and I heard him tell Mr. Wheeler that he had met Josh on the Sunday, near the pump in Aylesbury-street; I think he said it was between four and five o'clock - I reminded him that on the previous morning he had told me he had not seen him since the Saturday; he said it must have been a mistake; after the robbery was discovered young James was kept separate from every body, until he told his story I believe - he was not allowed to leave the house. On the Saturday previous to the robbery two men came to me in the warehouse, in the afternoon or evening - one of them was about Coney's sizeand appearance, but he had a great coat on; they came about getting a job done - no other person came about a job that day; they did not explain what the job was - I do not know what reply I made; the person said he had been recommended to us - I declined the job, and told them to go to some of the shops in Holborn.

Cross-examined. Q. Smith said he had seen Josh last on Saturday afternoon? A. Yes, when he was talking to me - he said he came by appointment to go to look after a situation; he did not say he had been with him for the same purpose on Saturday.

ROSETTA BUTLER . I live at No. 48, Red Lion-street. I know Smith - he came into my house for a pail of water about a month ago; I asked him where he came from, and he said from next door.

MARIA JAMES . I am the mother of Joshua John James - I think I know this Forget Me Not; I remember my son lending me such a book - I believe it to be the book he lent me; it had a cover to it like this - it is about a fortnight since.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you where he got it? A. No, he said it was lent to him - I would depend on his word in such a case as that; he has occasionally taken little things from me.

Coney's Defence (written). My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - I now stand before you charged with the commission of an offence which seriously aims at my life; but from the evidence you have heard this day, I hope you will be convinced that no reliance can be placed on the word of the boy James: Will you, Gentlemen of the Jury, doom me to forfeit this existence on the word of a boy who in connected with the worst of characters, and who has been away from his parents at all hours of the night? can it be doubted that he would not be guilty of asserting any thing, and screeming the actual perpretrators of this robbery, and place it on an innocent man's shoulders? Then Gentlemen of the Jury, I hope you will, by your verdict this day, restore my character unstained as you have heard this day it was, previous to this charge.

Smith. I have nothing to say.

Seven witnesses gave Smith a good character, and three deposed the same for Coney.

CONEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

[Feb. 18th] SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18330214-2

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

436. JOHN SINNETT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Howroyd , on the 31st' January , at Christchurch, and stealing therein 3 decanters, value 30s.; 1 table-cloth, value 6s.; 1 spoon, value 4s., and 1 printed book, value 1s., his property .

ANN BROOKS . I am in the service of Robert Howroyd, who lives at No. 9, Warwick-lane, Newgate-street, in the parish of Christchurch - he lives there and keeps a coffee-house . On the 31st of January I had occasion to go up to the first floor of the premises; I had left the back room door locked an hour before - I then found the door open, and the lock projected a very little; I had taken the key down with me, and put it in the bar - I went into the room, and saw the prisoner in the act of getting up from the floor: he was packing up the decanters when I entered - it was about two o'clock in the afternoon; the table-cloth was on the floor - I called Mr. Howroyd's servant; the prisoner then said he made a mistake - he came down stairs, passed us, went out of the door, and ran towards the Meat-exchange - the servant went out, and the prisoner was followed and brought back by the officer; I observed a work-box on the floor in the room - a needle-box had been taken away, and I missed a silver spoon, and a book called the "Fair Maid of Perth;" the articles produced were brought back by the officer - I saw on the table-cloth three decanters, which had been in the cupboard when I locked up the room; I am certain the key had remained in the bar till I went up stairs.

ELIZABETH DOREY . I am servant to Mr. Howroyd. In consequence of an alarm from the last witness, I went up to the first floor passage; I saw the prisoner - he gave me a push, ran down past me, and shut the door after him; I followed him into the market and gave charge of him - I saw this silver spoon taken from his pocket.

JOSEPH BATES . I live at No. 8, Warwick-lane. I was called for, and took the prisoner in Newgate-market exchange - I found this tea-spoon, and eleven keys in his pocket, and this one volume of a book; I asked him if it belonged to him, he said Yes, he had purchased it - these decanters were in the room, packed up in the table cloth; I have a dial which I found on him, which is not in the indictment.

ANN BROOKS . These are Mr. Howroyd's property.

[Feb. 15th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 46.

Reference Number: t18330214-3

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

437. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Page Buckle , on the 6th of February , at St. Marylebone, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 3l. 10s.; 1 umbrella, value 1l., and 2 knives, value 8s., the goods of Thomas Devey ; 2 half-crowns, 2 shillings, 2 sixpences, 4 halfpence, 1 farthing, and 8 beads, value 2d., the property of Margaret Knight .

THOMAS PAGE BUCKLE. I am a chemist , and live at No. 235, Oxford-street, in the parish of St. Marylebone - my bed-room is on the ground floor behind the parlour. On Wednesday, the 6th of February, I was sleeping there, and about half-past three o'clock in the morning I was disturbed by the rats of my neighbour nibbling at the wall; I laid awake from then, and between that and a quarter to four o'clock I heard the handle of my parlour door opened, which door leads into the passage of the private part of the house; I afterwards heard footsteps, and saw the reflection of a light, as I sleep with my bedroom door open - I, imagining my servant had got up earlier than usual, said, "Ann, is that you?" (I saw nobody at that time;) a feigned voice said, "Yes, Sir;" I instantly knew it was not the girl's voice - I rushed out of my bed, and made a regular rush at the prisoner, who I saw retreating out of the parlour door - I was so near to him in the parlour that I might have caught him myself; I saw his figure plainly, but not his countenance- I got very near him, and should have caught him, but he slammed the parlour door in my face, and slipped a little bolt in the parlour door outside, which prevented my pursuing him that way; there being a door leading into the shop, (I slept with that open as well as my bedroom door) I instantly ran to that door, threw back the bolts and the chain, and got out into the street nearly as soon as the prisoner got out at the private door - when I came out into the street I saw the same figure in full flight; I did not see him come out of the door - he ran away; I ran after him in my shirt, as I had got out of bed, as far as a neighbour's door, and seeing a Policeman four or five doors below, I thought the prisoner must have run into his arms, but he shot by him; I was shouting Stop thief! all the time - the Policeman chased him, springing his rattle, and being undressed I returned to put on my clothes, and then two Policeman came in - I let them in at the back kitchen window; they undid the fastening of the back door, and then entered the private part of the house - when I got into the passage I instantly saw Mr. Thomas Devey's coat and hat on the mat in the passage; he lodges with me - I afterwards went into the drawing-room, and saw things were deranged there; the prisoner was brought to the house in the custody of the Policeman: I then saw his face - he is the man who was brought there in custody; I examined the house, and found he had entered at the stair case window, which I found thrown up; I was not the last person who went to bed the night before - I had seen that window about eleven o'clock the night before; it was merely shut down then - I missed nothing of my own: Devey missed property, and in the passage the Policeman, in my presence, picked up some phosphorus-matches; the prisoner's figure is like the figure of the man I saw in my house, and who I pursued.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. By the figure, you, mean the back of the person? A. Yes; I left Knight, the servant up - the window, which was opened, was between the ground and the first floor; I swear I looked at that window before I went to bed; I lost sight of the man when he closed the door, and the next thing I saw was the same figure in the street; it was a bright morning - the moon was bright, and was going down; it was not foggy - the man got twenty or thirty yards; I lost sight of him when the Policeman pursued him - I was alarmed, but not the least confused or in fear; I had no light but what the person brought in.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a Police-serjeant. On the morning of the 6th of February I was on duty in Oxford-street, about twenty minutes before four o'clock, and within twenty or thirty yards from Mr. Buckle's door; I saw a man come out and slam the private door too very violently; in two or three seconds afterwards I saw a man come out of the shop door in his shirt and night-cap - at that time the first man was just passing me, and as the prosecutor called Stop thief! he said, "Oh, never mind him, he is a fool;" he was running at a brisk pace; I said, "Never mind that we will see about that," and we both ran as hard as we could; he ran down Oxford-street, and Orchard-street, into Portman-mews; I kept him in sight all the way till I came to the bottom of the mews; he turned down the mews - I was then joined by another constable, who is not here; I then went into Orchard-street - I then turned round, and saw him on an out-house at the back of Portman-street barracks; I said,"Come down, we have had a good run for you - come down, or I will shoot you;" the sentry, who was on the other side of the wall, said the same; two soldiers who were in bed got up, and one said, "Give me a firelock, and I will fetch him off;" he then jumped down, and I cut him on the head with my staff; he said, "You vagabond, what did you do that for?" I said, "I don't know, but I will take you back to the house you came from;" I apprehended him with the assistance of the constable, No. 40, who is not here - the prisoner is the man; he never got away - I tied his hands, in going down the mews he put his hand into his pocket, and flung out two knives and two half-crown pieces; Thomas Harrison, No. 22, picked them up before I left the spot - I am sure he picked up what the prisoner threw out of his pocket; I took him to Mr. Buckle; I searched him in Mr. Buckle's house, and this phosphorus-box was in his pocket; I was going to cut his pocket to get it out - he said, "I will get it out;" he took it out of his pocket, and gave it to me; these matches were with it - these other matches were found in the passage; I returned to the mews, as there was a shilling deficient, according to what the girl said she had lost, and I found these other matches, but not the shilling; it might be a minute from the time I lost sight of the man and seeing the prisoner on the wall.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe the prisoner stoop? A. No, I never said so; when he came from the shed he was coming down at me; I struck him on the head with my staff as he came down - I have known him some time.

THOMAS HARRISON (Police-constable D 22). On the morning of the 6th of February I was on duty in Edward-street, and heard the rattle spring; I ran to Portman-mews, and saw the prisoner, Harrison, and a Policeman named Games scuffling together; I assisted in securing him, and as we took him away I saw him put his hand into his left-hand pocket - I caught hold of it, and he instantly dropped some things on the ground; I picked up a shilling, a sixpence, and four halfpence, which I

gave to Harrison directly; a man who was with us picked up two knives, which I also gave to Harrison.

THOMAS HARRISON re-examined. These are the things I received from the witness; I sealed them with my own seal, and gave them up at the watch-house.

THOMAS HARRISON re-examined. (Police-constable D 22). I went with him to the prosecutor's house, then returned to the mews, with a light, and found these beads and this key exactly on the spot where I found the money, and this little steel pin - I took them to the station-house, and gave them to Serjeant Harrison.

JOSEPH WINDLEY . I am a private in the Guards. I was at the barracks, and at a quarter before four o'clock in the morning, I saw a man get on the wall, and then on the shed: I turned round, and said, "Halloo, what do you want there?" he said, "D-n your eyes, if you don't hold your noise, and let me go this way, I will shoot you"- I said, "Come on then," and cocked my firelock at him- then the chevaux de frise turned round, and I saw no more of him till I saw him at the station-house - I cannot swear to his person.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him with a firelock? A. No - I made ready, and presented; I should have shot him if he had come down further to my post.

MARGARET KNIGHT . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Devey , who lodges at Mr. Buckle's house - I sleep in the back attic. On the night of the 5th of February I went to bed at ten minutes before twelve o'clock - I put my hand on the staircase window at that time, and the window was shut; there was nobody up in the lower part of the house at that time; I was awoke about ten minutes after four o'clock, by Mr. Buckle talking; I got up, put on my things, and went down stairs - I found the staircase window open, which I had left shut; I went down to the kitchen, and found the kitchen door open, and all my kitchen drawers, and a small work-box, with all my things, turned out, and some silver gone from my purse, which was in the work-box; I missed two half-crowns and two sixpences from the purse, and two shillings from a small paper box on my work-box, and four halfpence and a farthing out of my work-box, together with some beads; I missed out of Mr. Devey's drawing-room two small knives - one was a silver one, and the other steel, and the steel top of a cork-screw; they were Mr. Devey's- these knives are the same, I am certain, and this umbrella was taken from the drawing-room; I saw it there at half-past ten o'clock the night before, and found it in the morning, in the passage, standing by the parlour door- it is Mr. Devey's; this coat I saw the night before, laying on a chair in the drawing-room; I saw it in the morning in Mr. Buckle's parlour - these are my beads, which I missed, I am quite sure: I have some which correspond with them, and they are threaded on ribbon broader than heads are usually threaded on, and this steel top of a corkscrew I know; I was the last person up at night - my master and mistress, the prosecutor, and his servant were the only persons in the house; we never open the staircase window in the evening.

THOMAS HARRISON . When the prisoner was in the mews, he put his hand into his pocket, and then dropped something; I picked up the money, and another man, in my presence, took up the knives, and gave them to me.

Prisoner. I leave myself to your merciful consideration.

[Feb. 14th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18330214-4

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley.

438. HENRY HERRICK , HENRY ANCION , and WILLIAM NICHOLLS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Evans , on the 18th of January , at St. Pancras, and stealing therein 12 shoes, value 1l. 6s., his property; and that before the said felony was committed, towit, at the delivery of the King's goal of Newgate, holden for Middlesex, at Justicehall, Old Bailey, on the 8th of July, in the 1st year of the reign of William the Fourth, the said Henry Ancion was convicted of felony .

HENRY EVANS. I am a shoemaker , and live at No. 2, Camden-row, Camden-town, in the parish of St. Pancras ; my shop is part of the house - there was a cracked pane of glass in my shop window; it had been broken nearly a month, but there was no piece out - it was only cracked. On Friday, the 18th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, the piece which had been cracked, was taken out, and twelve shoes were taken away; I was at work in the back shop at the time - I was alarmed almost directly; I had seen them safe about half an hour before - I saw my shoes at High-street office, next day - (looking at six pairs of shoes produced by the witnesses Archer, Chenn, and Worters) I know all these to be mine; they are my own workmanship, and I can swear to them.

HENRY ARCHER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Griffiths' of Ossulton-street, Somers's-town, pawnbroker. I have produced two pairs of shoes, which I received from Ancion, on Friday, the 18th of January, about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening; he came into the shop to pledge them - I did not know him before; I asked him where he got them; he said they were the property of his mother - I asked him if both pairs belonged to his mother - he said No, one pair belonged to his sister; I lent him 4s. on them - he gave me the name of John Anderson; I saw him again on the Monday following - I have not the least doubt of his being the person.

THOMAS WORTERS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Phoenix-street, Somers'-town. Herrick came to my shop about a quarter before eight o'clock in the evening, on the 18th of January, and offered these two pairs of shoes in pawn for 4s.; I took them, and asked him whose property they were; he said his father's - he did not say who his father was; he pawned them in the name of Henry Jones- I did not know him before; I saw him again on Monday, the 21st of January - I have not the least doubt of his being the boy.

HENRY CHENN . I am apprentice to Mr. Ridpath, No. 25, Upper Seymour-street, Somers'-town, pawnbroker. On the Friday night Herrick brought me two pairs of shoes, a little before eight o'clock, to pledge - I do not know what he asked for them; he spoke to John Poole, our young man, who is not here - I saw him, and saw what he brought; I am sure these are the two pairs of shoes he pawned - I wrote the ticket for him, and asked him who sent him - he said his father sent him; he gave the name of Herrick - I saw him again on the Monday following; I never saw him before - I have not the least doubt of his person.

JAMES MARTIN . I work for a bricklayer when I have got any thing to do. On the 18th of January I was at Mr. Worter's, the pawnbroker's shop, and saw the prisoner Herrick come in there, alone - the prisoner Nicholls was outside the door; I did not see them together, but he said by the door when Herrick came in - I went out of the shop while Herrick was there, and walked up to Nicholls, and he said, "Do you want to buy a ticket of two pairs of shoes?" I said No - I did not see that he had any shoes; he was alone then, and I went home, leaving him standing outside the shop and Herrick inside.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you? A. A bricklayer's labourer; when I have nothing to do my father keeps me, and I have worked in a brickfield - I sometimes sell green-grocery in the street; I was never at Hatton-garden or any office on any charge - I know a boy named Couch - he asked me what expences I was to have here; I said I might have 3s. 6d. a day - a Policeman told me so; he is not here - he came on Sunday morning, and told me to come to the office on Monday, and I did not go; the Policeman came on Monday, and said, "You will be satisfied for your time, you will get 3s. 6d. a day" - I have 9s. a week; I have attended here three days and expect 3s. 6d. for each - I have seen Nicholls carrying a baker's basket about before; I did not see the ticket he spoke of - I was in employ last Christmas; my father is a bricklayer - there is no work for men, much more for boys; I have sold vegetables and onions about for the last three months - I sold some last week; I was once at Marylebone office - a boy lent me a coat; I did not take it back when he told me, and he sent a Policeman after me; I had gone into the country with my master's carter, but not to get out of the way - the young man did not appear against me at the office; he was employed at the turnpike - he was a friend of mine; I forget his name - I had known him about three months; it was six or seven months ago - I have not seen him since; he came to our house for the coat just as I came home from the office - I was in the watch-house from Saturday until Monday morning, but a boy found the coat at our house; I was taken at home - I had been in the country for a week, and he thought I had run away with it; I believe he lives at Battle-bridge - I never was at any other office.

Q. How came you to tell Couch you was to have 3s. 6d. a day? A. He called me over to his house, and his mother put Nicholls' mother behind the door - young Couch asked how much I should get; I said very likely 3s. 6d. a day - I did not give that as a reason for appearing against him.

ROBERT RATCLIFF (Police-constable S 194). I was on duty; Evans' boy called me on Friday the 18th, between seven and eight o'clock - I had not seen any of the prisoners that evening; I know them, and have frequently seen them together before - in consequence of what Evans' boy said, I went to the shop, and found he was robbed; we went round to the pawnbrokers, and found two pairs at Archer's and Worters: Ridpath would give us no information - when we took Herrick on the Saturday, we took him to Worters', the pawnbroker; he denied having been there, but when the pawnbroker said he was the boy, he owned it, and said he had taken but two pairs of them - that he took them out of Evans' shop; when we took Ancion, he owned that he had pawned two pairs in Somer's-town, and Nicholls owned that he had part of the money that had been raised - he said he had received 3s. 3d. out of 9s. 6d., and he said Herrick was the first that took two pairs out of the window; that he saw him - Herrick was not present; he said they took six pairs in all - he said he had two pairs himself; he did not say he took them out of the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell Martin he would get 3s. 6d. a day? A. No; what I stated, at the office was taken down - I dare say it was read over to me, and I believe I signed it; I said there that Nicholls told me he had 3s. 3d. - I do not know whether that was taken down; I dare say my evidence was taken down - I do not know whether it was; nobody was present at the conversation.

COURT. Q. Is this signature your hand-writing, and what you said? A. Yes; I state here - "after Nicholls was at the watch-house, I asked if he was one of the three, and he said he had received his share of it."

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a Police-serjeant. I have a certificate of the conviction of Ancion, which I got from Mr. Clark - (read); I took him in custody myself on the charge - I was present at the trial; he is the man who was convicted.

ROBERT HAWKSLEY (Police-serjeant S 1). I apprehended Herrick on Saturday night, the 19th, and took him to Worters', who said he was the boy who pawned the shoes; I took Ancion about one o'clock the same night in Hampstead-road, and on the Sunday in Chalk Farm-fields I saw Nicholls with some more boys, and he ran away - about half an hour afterwards I met him, I took him in custody, and found 1s. 9d. on him; he saw the other prisoners there, and in the course of the evening I said to him, "I suppose that 1s. 9d. is part of the money for those shoes" - he said Yes, that he pawned them for 9s. 6d., and divided the money - I neither threatened him nor made him any promise.

Cross-examined. Was any body present? A. Yes, a serjeant and a reserve man; they are not here.

Ancion handed in a petition, as follows; "The humble petition of Henry Ancion - I hope your Lordship's usual clemency and lenity, will be graciously extended towards me in the situation into which I have been brought from want of employ, which I sought in vain; I was ignorant of the character of my companions when I yielded to their had example - I have had my name entered in the Marine Society, and was only waiting for the next vacancy to go to sea; a gentleman who frequently employed me, will come forward and prove I behaved honestly towards him.

Two witnesses gave Nicholls a good character, and one deposed the same for Ancion.

HERRICK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

[Feb. 14.] ANCION GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

NICHOLLS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy, particularly Nicholls, on account of his good character and youth .

Reference Number: t18330214-5

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

659. FREDERICK SAMPSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Noel , on the 11th of February , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing therein 5 snuff-boxes, value 3s. 10d., and 36 cigars, value 4s., his property .

SUSANNAH NOEL . I am the wife of John Noel, who lives in Cross-street, Westmoreland-place, City-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch , - my husband is a carver and gilder, and we keep a small tobacconist's shop . On the 11th of February, about a quarter past ten or eleven o'clock at night, there were five snuff-boxes in the window; I was in the parlour - the shop shutters were open; I heard a noise at the window, jumped up immediately, and ran to the window; I saw the prisoner put down the glass and run away - I am certain he is the man; I never lost sight of him; my husband was in the parlour with me - he ran out and seized him close at hand. I had seen the glass secure just before, and found it had been cut - it was perfectly whole before; five snuff-boxes and thirty-six cigars were taken from inside the window - three of the snuff-boxes were afterwards picked up close on the spot, and nineteen of the cigars.

JOHN NOEL. This is my dwelling-house. I did not hear the window break - my wife alarmed me; I ran out immediately, and seized the prisoner about twenty yards from the house; I never lost sight of him after he left my door - there was another person running with him who escaped, as they separated. The Policeman picked up the cigars - I followed him till I saw the Policeman take him.

ELIZABETH SARAH MOORE . I am the wife of George Moore , a carver and gilder - I live in the neighbourhood. I was passing by Noel's house on the night in question, and saw the prisoner standing at the window, and another lad, in a dark place, two or three doors further down; I went on to the butcher's shop, and found it shut - as I came back the prisoner and another were coming at full run from the prosecutor's house; the gas lamp was lighted, and the gin shop gave a full light: I could distinctly see his face - he ran by me, and threw the property down close at my side. I immediately went back to the prosecutor's, and said, whatever he had taken he had thrown away in Britannia-street - the Policeman took the lantern, and found nineteen cigars and three boxes there.

Prisoner. Q. Where did I throw the boxes? A. Close by Ebenezer-street; I was going to Smith's for some ale, as the butcher's shop was shut.

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I am a Policeman. I was on duty, heard the alarm, and saw two persons running, and I siezed the prisoner, who was running - I took him to the station-house, and found the cigars and snuff-boxes in Britannia-street.

MRS. NOEL. These are part of our property.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from Maidenhead that morning - I was going home at a quarter to eleven o'clock, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw two men running by Tenter-row - I ran after one of them, and at the bottom of Britannia-street, I ran up Plummer-street: they then said they had run round a turning by the public-house; I lost sight of them, and stopped in the street; the Policeman ran by me, turned round, and said, "Have you seen them run this way;" somebody said No; he then caught hold of me.

[Feb. 15th.] GUILTY - DEATH *. Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18330214-6

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley.

440. EDWARD STILL, alias RICHARDS , and SAMUEL BASSETT , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Cramp , on the 10th of February , at St. Martin in the Fields, and stealing therein 5 pairs of boots, value 40s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 10s.; 5 silver spoons, value 17s.; 1 microscope, value 1s.; 1 pair of scales, value 2s.; 1 lb. weight of tea-dust, value 5s., and 1/4lb. weight of tobacco, value 9d., his property .

JOHN CRAMP. I live at No. 33, Bedfordbury, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields . On Saturday, the 9th of February, I made the house up fast, and went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock - I was the last person up, and left every thing safe; I got up at seven the next morning, and found the shop door wide open, the pannel of the door was taken out, and the lock forced off - I missed five pairs of boots, one pair of spectacles, five silver spoons, a brass microscope, a pair of guinea scales, about 1 lb. of tea-dust, and a small quantity of two sorts of tobacco - I could not judge whether one or more persons had been in the house; I found a phosphorus-box, and matches, a latch-key, another key, and a pair of old dirty Wellington boots wet; I took off the clapper of the bell part of an old pocket, which had been put there as if to muffle it - I gave it to the officer Cooper with the other things; I had seen the bell at night - it was not muffled, for I unmuffled it that night - I always muffle it by day, and unmuffle it at night; I saw some of my property on the Sunday afternoon, at the station-house at Westminster - (Bugbud here produced the property) - I know these top boots - I never wore them; I have sold boots - I know them, and here is another pair of boy's boots which have my own writing on them; here is a pair of scales which I know, and another pair of boots and an odd one which I know - they are what I wore myself; when the bell was not muffled it would give an alarm if any body came in.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. What bell is it? A. One which we fix to an inner shop door; they got in at the outer door first - the shop door was locked the night before, and I found it wide open; the box of the lock was broken all to pieces - that is the inner door; the bell slips into a piece of iron - the outer door was not broken; they must have let themselves in by a latch-key, and forced the inner door - they could get to the bell by taking out the pannel; a hand could then reach it very easily and unfix it if they chose, but in taking it out it would make more noise than being muffled; I particularly recollect unmuffling it that night - I muffle it with a piece of linen, and that linen laid on a table close by; I will not swear whether that muffle was there in the morning, but to the best of my recollection it was.

WILLIAM BUGBUD . I am a Policeman of the B division. I was on duty on the morning of the 10th of February in Duck-lane, Westminster, about a quarter before five o'clock - I saw Still, who gave his name as Richards; his pocket looked very bulky - it was rather dark, and I turned my light on; I said, "What have you got here, my man?" he said he had got some tea which he was going to take to his mother - he turned his back to me; I said, "You must go to the station-house with

me;" he said he would, and on getting to the end of Duck-lane we had to go through some posts - he went through first, and then ran away; I pursued, and never lost sight of him - he was stopped by Faulkner; I did not lose sight of him for a moment; I have not the least doubt of him being the same man - he was then taken to the station-house in New-way, Westminster, and searched; as I was pursuing him he threw several things away - a screw-driver, a pair of boy's boots, another pair and an odd boot, and a pair of scales and a case - Faulkner searched him at the station while I went to where he had ran, and picked up these things; I have had them ever since - I have not the least doubt of their being the things he threw away - I picked them up about five minutes after he threw them away, or less: Faulkner gave me the other things which I have produced.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it not a very dark morning? A. It was; he ran up Orchard-street - he ran up Little and Great Dean-street - there is only one turning, which is from Little to Great Dean-street. I did not stop him - I did not see his face, - I could see his clothes; it was not so dark when I turned my light on - I saw part of his side face, because he turned it half round - but did not see his full face.

JACOB FAULKNER . I am a Policeman; I heard the cry of Stop thief! five or six times, and stopped Still - I had him in custody four or five minutes before Bugbud came up; as soon as I saw Still, I saw Bugbud with his light - the prisoner had come out of Orchard-street into Great Dean-street, and stopped in Little Dean-street - he had run fifteen or twenty yards; I saw Bugbud directly I stopped him turn his light - Bugbud was then about a dozen rods off; when I stopped him he put his hand in his pocket, and turned out a quantity of tea in the street; then Bugbud came up - he was running pretty fast; we took him to the station-house - I searched him there; I found a pair of spectacles, some tea; a snuff box, and four phosphorus matches in his pocket, similar to those found at Cramp's, and he had this pair of boots on his feet - I delivered the boots and spectacles to Bugbud; I was sent for on the day in question about two o'clock, to the station-house, and while there, the prisoner Bassett came - he did not see Still; he asked if Still could have any dinner brought him - he went away out of the station-house to go to Worship-street; I went and brought him back to the station-house, searched him, and found on him a tobacco-box full of tobacco, and a small purse with a lancet in it, and I found his right-hand trousers pocket was cut or torn out; the inspector asked where he lived - he said No. 5, Off-alley, Strand - I went there and found he did not live there, or I should have searched; I took his trousers off his legs, and Cooper, the Policeman, produced a pocket, which I saw corresponded with the trousers; I have not the least doubt of its being the pocket of these trousers, the trousers and pocket are here- I found nothing on him belonging to the prisecutor, unless the tobacco was his.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far was Still from the corner of Orchard-street when you stopped him? A. Thirteen or fourteen rods; I looked up when I stopped him - I heard Bugbud's voice calling Stop thief! and saw his light before I stopped Still; it was three or four minutes before he came up, I think.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Bassett came to the station-house voluntarily? A. Yes; the inspector asked where he lived - he took his address down, and gave it to me; I inquired at two Nos. 5, in Off-alley - there are two Off-alleys; I inquired at both - many persons there take in lodgers for a night, I understand; Bassett's pocket had been cut or torn out.

COURT. Q. How soon after you stopped Still did you see Bugbud? A. He was in sight when I stopped him; he was about sixty-six yards off, and came up running fast.

SIDNEY COOPER . I belong to the F division of Police. I got this pocket from Mr. Cramp - I got the trousers from Bassett at the station-house; he was wearing them - I saw the pocket and the trousers compared; they corresponded exactly; they are both here.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Was the pocket in the state it is now? A. The very same state; the fear at the top would cause the tear below - I know nothing about the small tear, the smaller hole might be mended, and then the pocket would be good.

CAROLINE PARRY . My mother keeps the Horse and Groom public-house, Bedfordbury. On Saturday night, the 9th of February, I saw both the prisoner, about half-past twelve o'clock, at the same table in our house - I do not know whether they came in together - I went to bed at a quarter before one o'clock; the last time I saw them was at half-past twelve.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see that bit of rag? A. No.

JURY to WILLIAM BUGBUD. Q. How soon after you turned the corner, was it before the prisoner Still was in custody? A. Not half a minute - I did not stop at all, but went up to him immediately.

Still. I leave it entirely to your merciful consideration.

Three witnesses deposed to Still bearing a good character, and one to that of Bassett.

STILL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

BASSETT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.[Feb. 15th.]

Recommended to Mercy, on account of their youth .

Reference Number: t18330214-7

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

441. JOHN TURFREY and SAMUEL HARDING were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Bodle , on the 3rd of February , at St. Luke , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 6 shillings, 5 sixpences, and 3 halfpence, his property .

THOMAS BODLE. I am a boatman , and live at Ratcliff, near Nottingham - I am in the employ of Mr. Munday; I came from Shipley to London for coals - we came to London on the Friday before I was at the Police-office; I was at the Windsor Castle, City-road, on the Saturday, about six o'clock, or about half-past six in the afternoon; I drank there until half-past eleven o'clock; I remained there the whole time - Turfrey was drinking on the other side of the table I sat at; he did not drink with me - he was trying to sell something; I did not drink such a vast deal there; I was not at all drunk when I left there, nor was I the worse for liquor; I left the house, at half-past eleven o'clock - I

wanted some more liquor, and they would not give it to me- I paid for what I had; I then had between 8s. and 9s. in my pocket in silver, and 1 1/2d. in copper - when I came out Turfrey followed me close - I went to the Macclesfield Arms, over the canal bridge, City-road; Turfrey came into the house after me - I had some drink there; I believe I had a glass of gin and a glass of red port wine; I wanted more there - they would not give it me; I left there, then went across the way to the City Arms, and did not see Turfrey go in there; I sat down and went to sleep there - I do not remember drinking any thing there; I felt myself rather fresh when I was there - I do not know how long I slept there; the next I recollect was when I was walking on the bridge by myself (I do not recollect coming out of the house) - then Harding and Turfrey came up together; I had never seen Harding before, to my recollection - they came up and said, "Lay hold of the b - r's hands, and let us take him on board;" Harding said so - my boat laid at the wharf No. 33 in the City-road, three or four hundred yards from the bridge; they were then taking me along the road - one laid hold of one arm, and one the other; they took me along the road till I showed them which wharf my boat laid down - they took me about halfway down the wharf; I said I could go by myself then, and thanked them - they let go of me, and I was going to the boat by myself; they ran after me again, and said, "Let us knock the b-r down and take his money from him;" Harding said that, and he ran up to me, hit me on the breast, and knocked me down - Harding put his hands into my breeches pockets, and then said, "Lay hold of the b-r's legs, let us kill the b-r, and heave him in this hole; Turfrey was looking on - he was close to me when Harding struck me; Turfrey then laid hold of my legs, and Harding laid hold of my arms; they hove me right into a hole - it was like an unfinished building, like a cellar hole; I do not know how deep it was - I recollect nothing more till I found myself at the station-house on the Sunday morning; my money was not in my pocket then - the last place I saw my money at was the Macclesfield Arms; I took it out to pay there, and Turfrey saw me with it - the landlord, said in his presence, that I had better have nothing to do with such a man as that, and told me to go and get a bed somewhere, or else go to my boat; I do not recollect what Turfrey said - he was jawing the landlord; this was inside the Macclesfield Arms - the landlord's man put him out of the house, before I went out; I then went to the City Arms - I do not recollect seeing Turfrey after I left the Macclesfield Arms, till he came up with Harding; I did not know him before that day - I had never seen either of them before; I swear Harding is the man - I was sober enough to speak to his features; it was a very light night, moon-light, as light as it is here almost.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you tell us how much you drank at the Windsor Castle? A. No, I had some porter - I cannot tell how much I paid for; I will swear it was not two or three quarts - I do not recollect what I drank next; I had a glass of gin, I believe there, and a pint or two of porter - I will not swear I did not drink four pints of porter; I might have a glass of gin or two - I do not know how much; I cannot recollect whether I had any thing else there - I do not think I had any wine, but am not certain; I believe I paid the man for what I had - I do not know whether he waited on me all the while; I may have paid a man and a woman - I paid for every thing as it was brought; I believe the last thing I had was gin - I was not drunk when I left the Windsor Castle; I saw the landlady at the City Arms - I was rather fresh when there, I believe; I was sensible.

Q. Perhaps then you recollect Turfrey requesting the landlady to give you a bed there, as you was so drunk? A. I cannot recollect it - I do not recollect seeing him there at all; I do not know at what time I left the City Arms - I do not recollect being taken out of that house by Harding in his arms; I recollect nothing till I found myself walking upon the bridge, which is forty or fifty yards from the house - I do not remember being outside the house by the shutters and falling down.

Q. Did you not tumble into the cellar yourself? A. No, when I awoke at the station-house, I was surprised to find myself there - I do not recollect saying I knew nothing about Harding.

JOHN GROOME . I am waiter at the Windsor Castle, City-road. On Saturday, the 2nd of February, I remember the prosecutor coming there, about six o'clock - he staid there and had a pint of beer, and went out again; I know Turfrey - he came in about half-past five o'clock, and was there when Bodle came in, and remained there; they were in the same room - Turfrey offered some seals for sale, while Bodle was there; he remained there all the time - Bodle came back about eight o'clock, had a pint more porter, and remained there smoking his pipe till about half-past nine o'clock, and was singing, and then he had a quartern of gin and some warm water; he sung several songs after that, till about half-past ten o'clock - then he had a glass of rum in some warm water, then he sat till about a quarter after eleven o'clock, and wanted another glass of rum in warm water - master said it was too late to serve, and would not serve him with any more; he paid for the liquor as he had it, except for the glass of rum - master told him it was half-past eleven o'clock, and it was time to go out; I told all the people it was time to go - Bodle was going out without paying for his rum; master called him back and he stood talking in the passage while I let Turfrey out, and when I opened the door to let Bodle out Turfrey stood at the door, and they walked off together - the prosecutor was not drunk; he was capable of knowing what he was doing - he was not sober.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is the Macclesfield Arms from your house? A. One hundred yards.

NICHOLAS LUCRAFT . I keep the Macclesfield Arms. Bodle came into my house on the 2nd of February, a little before twelve o'clock, alone - Turfrey was there; I will not be certain which came in first - Bodle certainly had been drinking; he was not sober, but I think knew what he was doing - he had a glass of gin put into some cold water; he paid for it - I saw 8s. or 12s., in his hand when he paid me; he held it open in his hand for a minute -Turfrey was standing close by him, and saw it; the prosecutor asked me if he could have a bed at my house for the night - I said he could not, but I dare say he could get one in the neighbourhood; Turfrey told him he would give him a bed if he would go to Paddington with him -

I told him he had better not go to Paddington, but get a bed in the neighbourhood, and desired him to have nothing to do with Turfrey, as he was a strange man; Turfrey did not like what I said, and got insolent to me - I ordered my servant to put him outside the door; and again told the prosecutor to have nothing to do with him; my servant took Turfrey by the arm, and rather lead him out of the house - Bodle stopped about two minutes, and then he went; I saw no more of it.

Cross-examined. Q. About what time did the prosecutor come to your house? A. About five minutes to twelve o'clock - I thought before he went that he had had quite sufficient; I served him as I should another customer - I was preparing to clear my house; he had a glass of port wine almost immediately after the gin - he mixed it all up together - I did not say any thing to him about it; he did not walk out of my house like a tipsy man - he was not very drunk; the City Arms is about one hundred yards from my house.

RACHAEL JONES . I keep the City Arms. On the night of the 2nd of February the prisoner Turfrey came to my house - I never saw him before; it was about ten minutes or a quarter after twelve o'clock - he came into the house, and had half a pint of ale; Bodle came in five or ten minutes after - he staggered in, and the moment he got in he sat down on the bench by the bar, and said to Turfrey,"Old fellow are you here, you shall have a glass of something to drink," naming gin; Turfrey said he had rather not, he had got his ale, and would not take any thing more - Turfrey then came to me, and said, "I have been in company with this man before this evening - he wants a bed;" Bodle was sitting close to him, and was awake then - I said nothing to that, and Turfrey said, "He has got some money about him, I know, and if he will leave it with you, I will take him to Paddington to sleep;" I recollect nothing more - I made no answer about my taking the money, but some man at the bar said it would be as safe as if he had got it with him, if he left it with me, but I said nothing, he being a stranger - he fell asleep, fell under the bench, and laid there about twenty minutes, till I was about to clear the house; I requested somebody to go and take him up from the bench - Harding was the man who took him up - he was there when the prosecutor came in; he took him up several times, endeavouring to awake him, but could not - he was quite in a state of insensibility; I recollect nothing else - they took him outside the door, and I saw nothing more; this was about a quarter to one o'clock - it was some time before I could get him out of doors.

Cross-examined. Q. At the time he left your house was he not in such a state of drunkenness that you would not rely on any thing he either said or did? A. I would not; I never saw a man more drunk in my life; I am sure Turfrey desired him to leave his money with me - I have known Harding four years - he is married, and has two children; he gets his living by working at the wharfs, or any thing he can get to do - I never heard any thing against his honesty; he frequented my house with a set of hard-working men.

COURT. Q. When this happened was he in work or not? A. He had been at work that day at Green and Barrett's - I heard the men say so.

WILLIAM EPPS . I am a Policeman. On Saturday night, the 2nd of February, I was on duty in Wharf-road, City-road - part of my beat was in the City-road, near the canal-bridge; I first saw Bodle between eleven and twelve o'clock that night, it was nearer twelve; Turfrey was walking about three feet from him - he and Bodle were walking up the City-road about three feet apart; I did not observe any other person - they went over the bridge, and I lost them; I saw the two prisoners and the prosecutor, about half-past two o'clock, just coming out of the City-road into the wharf road - Harding had hold of the prosecutor's right arm, and Turfrey his left arm, and as they went past me, Turfrey said to him, "You make yourself drunker than you really are;" he said, "You know I am your countryman and your friend, why don't you walk as you ought to do;" by his saying that I thought it was not all right, and watched them; I went a little way from them, then turned back, followed them, and observed them in the yard of No. 33 wharf, all three together, but what they were doing I cannot say - Harding looked back, and then I popped behind a gate-post for them not to see me, and in about a quarter of a minute I looked again, and the prosecutor was missing; I did not know where he was gone to - the two prisoners were coming down the yard; Turfrey came out first, and Harding followed - Harding said to Turfrey, "Are you going home?" Turfrey said Yes - Harding said, "Good night," and they parted; Turfrey went one way and Harding the other - Turfrey had not gone above ten yards before he turned and came back, and wanted to make me believe he was as drunk as he could be to walk - I went and met him, and he said, "Have you seen any thing of a boatman?" I said No, I had seen no boatman, and as I told him that Harding came up (they at first were both going in a direction from me) - Harding said, "Have you seen him?" Turfrey said, "No, and the Policeman has not seen him;" I then walked towards the City-road, a few yards away from them - they went towards the wharf No. 33 again together; I went and concealed myself behind a cart opposite the wharf gate - they came out of the yard again, looked about for a quarter of a minute, and Harding said to Turfrey, "Let us go and see if we have done for the b-r;" Turfrey replied, "If we have not, we soon will do;" they went back up the yard again - I observed my brother officer Cook coming up; I called for his assistance, and told him my suspicious; we were going towards the gateway, and met the prisoners just out of the gate - we went up to them, and I asked Harding what business he had up that yard - he told me he had not been up the yard; I told him I had seen him go up; he said he had not been up - I asked him where the countryman was - he said he knew nothing about the countryman, he had not seen him; I said."Then let us go back, and see if we can find him;" he said very well, and we all four went back, and Cook, looking into an unfinished house, with a cellar under it, said, "Here he lays;" I turned my lantern on, and saw him laying flat on his back in the cellar- I thought he was dead; we then got the two prisoners down to assist him up, for I did not like to go down myself, for fear they should escape - Cook said,"Here is his pocket inside out;" it was his right-hand breeches pocket; I looked, and it was so - I then got the prosecutor up; I laid him down, sprang my rattle, and got more assistance - I said to Harding, "It is my opinion

you have robbed this man, and meant to murder him;" he said, "No, I have not;" I said, "I shall search you;" he said, "You may search me, I have nothing about me;" I then searched him, and found six shillings, five sixpences, and 1 1/2d. - I asked him how he came by it; he said he earned 1s. 5d. that day, and afterwards that he had earned 1s. 7d.; I asked him how he got the rest - he said he should not satisfy me; we took them to the station-house, secured them, and then fetched the prosecutor - he could not walk; we were obliged to get a truck; we could not make any sense of him - I could not tell whether it was with liquor or from his fall; my brother officer searched the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. When you first saw the prosecutor, he was walking as if he was drunk? A. No, not when I saw him between eleven and twelve o'clock, but when I saw him near the wharf; I afterwards saw the two prisoners alone - they separated, went different ways, and then both came back to me.

Q. If conscious of having done wrong, was there any thing to prevent them going away? A. No; I should have taken care that Turfrey did not go away - I was about five yards from him; he turned back and came to me.

Q. After that they were looking about for him? A. They were looking for somebody - the cellar is six or eight feet deep; it is an open cellar - a drunken man might very readily tumble into it; he appeared to walk as if he was very drunk - he had the prisoners with him; the place is near the water - he might have fallen in if left alone. I thought it my duty to watch them, and not to go and inquire where he was going; the prisoners went down the cellar readily to help him up'; Cook did not go down with them, he took hold of him as they lifted him up.

Q. If they were conscious of robbing him, might they not have put his pocket in before they lifted him up? A. We should have seen it; Turfrey did not appear drunk when we got to the station-house.

JURY. Q. How far from the cellar did you last see the prisoners with the prosecutor? A. Right opposite, about four yards, or not quite so far; I saw them all three together there - I did not see the prosecutor alone at all, till I found him in the cellar; they were all three standing still, opposite the cellar, when I last saw them, they were in the middle of the cart road, and after I had seen them together there I missed the prosecutor - the prisoners were then coming towards me; they could not get out without coming to me - I had lost sight of them for about a quarter or half a minute.

Q. When they returned and asked if you had seen the boatman, are you aware whether they knew you had overheard them? A. I was close by them - they were not aware that I had seen them go up the yard a second time - they saw me going, as they thought, up the City-road; they both went down towards the yard; they were not aware that I overheard their conversation - it did not take half a minute to get behind the cart.

COURT. Q. If we understand you right, they separated once, and went different ways, neither of them then coming towards you? A. No, but after that, Turfrey turned back and came and spoke to me - while he was talking, Harding also came up, and asked if he had seen him; I then turned from them and they went towards they yard - they could not then tell that I could see what they did, as I went and concealed myself behind the cart; it was moon-light.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When you saw the three standing together, how near were you to them? A. About five yards; it was moon-light - the wind blew very much, I could hardly hear any thing - it was a very boisterous night indeed: but I was not above two yards from them when I heard them speaking, and close to them when Turfrey said to the prosecutor,"You are making yourself drunker than you are;" they could not avoid seeing me then.

COURT. Q. How near were you to them when they said, "Let us go and see if we have done for him?" A. About four yards.

WILLIAM COOK . I am a Police-constable. On the Sunday morning, between two and three o'clock, my brother officer called me; I went with him to 33 Wharf, and when I was within nine or ten yards of the gate I met Harding, I walked up to him, and asked what he did up that wharf at that time in the morning; he said he had not been up the yard. I told him I saw him come out; while I was questioning him, Turfrey came out, and when he saw me, he asked me if I had seen a countryman of his; I asked him what countryman; he said, "A boatman that he just took up the yard;" he said, "We have been to look for him, but cannot find him." I said to both the prisoners"Go up the yard, and I will see whether I cannot find him;" we proceeded up the yard, about half way, and there is an unfinished building, and in the third opening there is a place dug out for a cellar, between five and six feet deep - I looked down, and observed the prosecutor laying on his back; I turned round to Harding, and said, here he is; he said, "So he is;" my brother officer turned his light on, and I thought he was dead at first - I desired Turfrey to get down, which he did, and we sent Harding down - they lifted him up, I laid hold of his arms, dragged him up, laid him on the ground, and his right-hand breeches-pocket was turned inside out; my brother officer said he had been robbed - I said, "Yes, it appears so;" I sprang my rattle twice, and another officer came up. I desired him to stand over the prisoners, while we laid the prosecutor in a shed - then we took the prisoners to the station, returned and fetched the prosecutor in a truck. I searched Turfrey on the spot, and found 1 1/2d. on him. I searched the prosecutor's pockets - he had no money at all, I did that when I came back to fetch him - in going to the station-house, Turfrey said he had nothing to do with leading the prosecutor down the Wharf-road. Harding turned round and said, "Don't tell a falsehood, speak the truth - you know you was with me."

Cross-examined. Q. Had you both the prisoners in charge at the time? A. No; I had Turfrey, Epps and another officer had Harding on a-head of me, he might hear what Harding said - I should think he could not avoid it. Epps said the man had been robbed; I did

not hear him say, "In my opinion you have robbed the man first, and then intended to murder him." I was not paying attention - I was three or four yards from him; I paid attention to some part of what he said, but might not hear all.

Turfrey's Defence. Gentlemen, I hope you will look into it; I am myself really as innocent as a new born babe, of either word, deed, or action, but kindness to the man, to get him a lodging.

Harding's Defence. I have had the distance measured from where the Policeman stood watching; it is fifty-eight feet from the hole - he was behind a cart which is across the road-outside the wharf; it is eighteen yards from the cart to the waggon inside the wharf, where he says we stood and made the expressions to each other.

JOHN WILSHAW . I am a coalheaver. I was on Sunday night with Harding's wife, and went with her on board the prosecutor's boat, and saw him - I asked him who was the gentleman that the row was with last night; he said, It "was me;" we asked him if he was much hurt - he said No, he was not much hurt, and if he could get his money again, he would say nothing about it; I said "What is your money?" he said, "Why, I want 9s., but bring me 8s., and I will not go up again" - I said the poor woman had not got 8s. then; he said, "Well, bring me 8s. to-morrow morning, and I will not go up again" - she pawned her bed next morning for 8s.; I took it to him - he then said "No, I will have a sovereign before I go any farther, and then I will give it up;" the prisoner's wife's sister was present when he said he would not take the 8s. - she not is here.

COURT. Q. You took him 8s. in the morning - where is he? point him out. A. That is the gentleman; I know the cellar of the unfinished building - I work just by: it is as near as I can say forty yards from the gate.

Two witnesses gave Turfrey a good character.

TURFREY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Feb. 15th] HARDING - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18330214-8

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

442. CHARLES CLARKE , JAMES ALLEN , and JOSEPH ALLEN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Berry , on the 7th of January , at Hanwell, and stealing therein, 6 watches, value 60s.; 7 rings value, 14s.; 1 wooden box, value 2d.; 4 gold pins, value 4s.; 1 gold buckle, value 2s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value, 6s.; 12 sovereigns, and 12 shillings, his property ; and SARAH ARMITAGE was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 handkerchief, value 7s., part of the said goods, well knowing the same to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH BERRY . I live in Hanwell parish, and keep the whole house - I have been assistant overseer of the parish these twenty years; I am married, but have no children. On the morning of the 7th of January, about a quarter before nine o'clock, I and my wife went from the house; I locked and bolted the back door - the front door had a slip lock, and I locked it again when I got out; I am certain the house was locked and fastened in all parts - I returned with my wife about ten o'clock at night, and when I undid my door, a dog which I had left outside the house, I found inside; I struck a light - my wife called me, and I found the back door open; the plate of the bolt was bent double, and it had been opened - I found my grubbing axe at the foot of the stairs; I had left it in a shed in my back premises - there were marks on the door as if it had been used on it; a silver watch was gone from a chimney-piece in the room, on the ground floor - I have three rooms, one over the other; I found the bed-room drawers broken open, and two watches gone from there - I found an iron instrument on the bed, it belonged to me; I used it to break sugar with - they had used that to break my drawers open; we then went up stairs, and found a silver watch gone from the side of the chimney up stairs, and there were two watches taken out of the bureau, one was a pinchback watch; a great many more things were gone - I missed twelve or fourteen sovereigns, some half-crowns, shillings, and some halfpence - I know all the male prisoners; they used to live at Hanwell; I saw Clarke there on the 9th of January, when the Policeman sent for me to Brentford - the prisoners left Hanwell after the robbery.

ANN BERRY . I am the wife of Joseph Berry . I went out with him on the morning of the 7th of January; the house was quite safely fastened up - when we came home we found it had been broken into; I missed a silver watch from the mantel-piece, and in the bed-room I saw mydrawers broken open, and a little box empty which had contained six rings, four gold pins, a gold buckle, a gold brooch; a box containing twelve or thirteen sovereigns, was taken out of the drawer; a sovereign and a shilling remained at the bottom of the box, wrapped in paper, and three half-crowns were gone - another drawer was broken open, but I missed nothing from that; I missed a silver and a pinchback watch from the bed-room, and from up stairs I missed a silver and a tortoiseshell watch I missed six watches in all, and 10s. 6d. from a little bag in the bureau, and a seal, three silk handkerchiefs, and a foreign gold coin - one of the rings was made in Queen Anne's reign, there was A. R. in gold letters under the stone, and a gold brooch and a buckle were gone; I have seen some of the things since.

ELIZA PETERSON . I know all the prisoners by sight, and I knew Clarke. I did not hear of the robbery till Charles Clarke was taken; I saw him in a beer shop at Brentford, on Tuesday, the 8th, he was not in company with any body; he spoke to me - he had a silk handkerchief round his neck, and two watches in his pocket - he produced them; one was a pinchback, and one silver - I saw another silk handkerchief round his hand; I do not know what was the matter with his hand - I saw he had a gold buckle.

Clarke. Q. Did you see any watches in my possession? A. Yes, two; my landlady wound one of them up.

CHARLES PIPER . My father keeps the Six Bells at Brentford. On Tuesday, the 8th of January, Clarke and two others (neither of the prisoners) came to our house - Clarke came in and called for a pot of beer; I refused it to him at first, but after a little time I brought it to him - he pulled out of his left-hand pocket a few half pence, three half-crowns, and two sixpences; when he paid me, he gave me sixpence - I gave him 2d., and out of his right-hand pocket he pulled a bag, and in that bag was a box with four sovereigns in it; he said, "Do you think these are good ones?" I said "I am no judge of them," and he put them into his pocket again.

JOHN BOLSTON . I am a Police-constable. I was at Old Brentford on Wednesday, the 9th of January - some

body gave me information as I was going home, and in consequence of that I went to a house, and found the prisoner Clarke there - I searched him, and found on him a gold buckle and a silk handkerchief, which I produce.

MARTHA MATTHEWS . I have seen both the Allens before - I saw them on Wednesday, the 9th of January; I went to Kingston with them, and got lodgings at a house there, and James Allen said, "Who will go out with me;" I said I would, and he asked me to go and pawn his watch - it was a large silver watch, but it was too late to pawn it; he was waiting outside the door - I came out and gave it him again; we waited at Kingston that night, and next day went to Ripley and slept there; then we went to Godalming and slept there, and returned to Kingston on the Saturday - James Allen said he must go and pawn his watch, for he had only got 6d. left - he sent his brother Joseph to pawn it for a sovereign - he returned with the money; Joseph was with us at Kingston and Ripley.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. An unfortunate girl; I have known Allens about a month, or less, by seeing them about - they came to my sister's room at Brentford - I had the watch in my possession about ten minutes; it was not very common - it had a pink ribbon and key to it.

JOHN MARTIN . I live at Kingston. The prisoners Allens, and Martha Matthews , came to lodge at my house on the 9th of January; I saw a tortoiseshell watch in the possession of James Allen (pointing to Clarke) - he was one of them; three men and three women came - the same young man paid me for the lodging; I never saw either of them before.

COURT. Q. Do you recollect being before the Magistrate on the 19th of January? A. Yes - I pointed out the same man who gave me the watch as I have to-day; I did not call him by any name - I did not know their names; he was in a flannel dress before the Magistrate, as he is now - their dresses are different now to what they were then, but he had the flannel dress on; what I stated before the Magistrate was read over to me - I made my mark to it; they paid 1s. 6d. for their lodging.

GEORGE BOND . I am a pawnbroker, at Kingston upon Thames. On the 12th of January, a silver watch was pawned with me, in the name of Thompson; the Allens are so much alike I cannot swear to them, but I believe it is the one in the black coat (Joseph) - he was alone; to the best of my belief he was the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Is yours an extensive business? A. Pretty good; I was asked about the watch about a week after - there was nothing particular in the transaction; I am almost certain it was Joseph, but the brothers are so much alike I cannot swear it.

WILLIAM BLACKWELL . I am a watchmaker, and live at Ripley. The two prisoners Allens came into my shop, and of the shortest one I bought a watch, which I produce, and is a tortoiseshell watch; I gave him 8s. for it - they were both together; I cannot be certain of the day of the week, but it was the 16th of January I am positive.

Cross-examined. Q. When were you asked about it? A. On Thursday, the 31st, Mr. Berry and a Policeman came to my shop - Allens were not more than five minutes with me; I never saw them before to my knowledge - I swear to their persons; I now recollect it was on the 9th instead of the 16th; I am quite certain of that.

HENRY ALMOND . I am a labourer, and live at Hanwell. I remember Mr. Berry's house being broken into; I did not see the prisoners near the house that day, not nearer than four or five hundred yards; I saw James Allen and Charles Clarke in Hanwell about one o'clock, and Charles Clarke had a bundle under his arm - they were going out of the parish, towards Ealing.

James Allen. It is false.

WILLIAM BLACKWELL . I now recollect very well it was on the 9th that they came.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you been talking to any body about this since you were examined? A. One of the female witnesses said she was sure I had made a mistake.

MRS. BERRY. This silk handkerchief is mine; I know it by the pattern - this gold buckle is mine; these two watches are ours - there is no mark on the handkerchief, but I am sure it is my husband's by the pattern, that is all, and here is a little mark underneath the buckle, a scratch, by which I know it; I know the watches - the silver one has a little nob loose where you open it - I am sure of both of the watches.

JOHN BURFORD . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Brentford. I have a silk handkerchief and pin, pawned with me - they were both pawned by two women who are not here.

MRS. BERRY. They are mine - it is a gold pin.

MARTHA MATTHEWS . I believe this silver watch to be the one I had in my hands - I know it by the key and ribbon.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Clarke with you in your journey to Kingston? A. No, nor at Ripley.

Clarke's Defence. The man has false sworn himself, to say I was at his house; I was not at Kingston.

Joseph Allen 's Defence. The man swears false, to say I brought him a watch; I was never near his house.

Four witnesses gave Allens a good character.

CLARKE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

JAS. ALLEN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

JOSEPH ALLEN - NOT GUILTY .

ARMITAGE - NOT GUILTY .[Feb. 16th.]

Reference Number: t18330214-9

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

443. JOHN SMALLMAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Loder , on the 13th of February , at Isleworth , and stealing therein 7 shirts, value 30s.; 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 seal, value 10s.; 3 watch-keys, value 20s.; 1 nightcap, value 6d.; 4 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 16 halfcrowns, 90 shillings, and 20 sixpences, his property . -To which he pleaded

[Feb. 18th.] GUILTY - DEATH .

Reference Number: t18330214-10

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14TH.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley.

444. JOHN JAMES was indicted for feloniously striking and cutting Henry Sharpe , with a certain sharp

instrument, with intent to resist his (the prisoner's) lawful apprehension, for stealing a carriage-glass, value 30s., the good of Henry Valentine Stafford Jerningham .

THREE OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN SHARPE . I am coachman to Mr. Henry Valentine Stafford Jerningham, whose coach-house is in Grosvenor-mews. On Friday, the 18th of January, I padlocked the coach-house, and fastened it as usual, about three o'clock - master's chariot was in the coach-house; I left the property secure - I returned that evening about half-past six, or a quarter to seven, and found the padlock off the door, and it was tied inside with a pocket-handkerchief; I pulled it open, and on going in, I perceived the blinds of the chariot down - I opened the carriage, and the prisoner jumped out of the window (I had left the blinds up); he jumped off the box into the mews - I called to my son to stop him; I found one of the glasses of the sash of the carriage removed from its place, and put on the seat, and the top of the frame had been cut with a view to take it out - there are four glasses to the carriage; the first glass was taken out of the frame, and put on the seat inside - the frame was left in its place, but the glass taken out; the top of the frame was cut, and the glass taken out - the top of the other glass had been attempted to be cut off, but was not cut through; I had not the least knowledge of the prisoner - he had nothing to do with the premises.

HENRY SHARPE . I am the son of Benjamin Sharpe . was in Grosvenor-mews , and heard my father cry out- I then saw the prisoner come from the box of the carriage; he jumped from the box, and when he was on the ground I collared him - he then struck me in the breast; I still kept hold of him, and threw my left arm up (I held him with my right hand) - he then struck me on the arm; I did not see any thing in his hand, but my arm had a deep cut in it - I had no coat on; I was in my shirt sleeves - my shirt sleeve was cut through, and my arm bled - it was such a wound as a knife or chisel would make; it was a very broad cut - the prisoner ran up into Bond-street; I pursued, and he was taken, but not by me - I never lost sight of him; I am sure he is the person who struck me - I was attended by Mr. Chapman, the doctor, for about a fortnight or three weeks; my arm is quite well now.

Prisoner. Q. How can you swear that I cut you? A. I am sure he cut me - nobody else was near enough to cut me; I did not fall at all.

WILLIAM WADMORE . I am servant to a gentleman. I was near Grosvenor-mews on the night in question, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running, and both the Sharpes in pursuit of him; I went up to the prisoner, and told him to stop - he said,"Pray don't stop me;" I instantly caught him by the collar, and held him till Sharpe and his son came and caught hold of him - I saw something drop from his hand, and picked it up; it was this chisel - Plank took him to Marlborough-street.

Prisoner. Q. How can you swear that I dropped the chisel? A. I saw it fall from your hand - I stopped down, and picked it up immediately; I took hold of the handle - a little boy had hold of the blade, as well, but it never went out of my hand.

JOSEPH FROST . I was near the coach-house in the mews, and heard a great noise - I ran out, and saw the prisoner taken into custody, and on returning I picked up this knife in the mews, about twenty yards from the coach-house, in the road, the prisoner had run - I did not notice whether there was any blood on it.

HENRY THOMAS CHAPMAN. I am a surgeon. Henry Sharpe was brought to me on the 18th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I found him with a severe cut in the arm - it had glanced across the arm; it was not a wound likely to endanger his life - it was within one-sixth of an inch of the blood vessels, which would have been serious - but in reality there was no material danger from the wound; a few fibres were divided, but not to interfere with the use of the arm - he can now use his arm as well as ever; it was such a wound as a knife or chisel might have inflicted - I think a knife a most likely instrument to have done it: I attended him eight or ten times.

COURT. Q. The knife is blunt at the point, is it sharp in other parts? A. It is sharper in the middle - it is not a knife likely to inflict a serious injury; the wound was nearly half an inch deep.

Prisoner. I hope you will be as merciful as you can.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-11

445. JOHN JAMES was again indicted for stealing a carriage glass, value 30s. , the goods of the Honourable Henry Valentine Stafford Jerningham .

Benjamin and Henry Sharpe gave the same evidence as in the former case.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-12

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

446. JAMES GODFREY, alias JOHNSON , and THOMAS SHORT, alias Moss , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Dixon , on the 13th of January , and stealing therein 10 silver spoons, value 2l., 1 table-cloth, value 10s., 1 watch, value 30s., 3 sheets, value 10s., 1 eye-glass, value 10s., and 5 sovereigns, his property .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DIXON . I am principal clerk in the Dividend-department of the West India dock-company . On Sunday the 12th of January I occupied the house, No. 16, Shepperton-cottages, Islington . I left the house on Sunday morning, about half-past ten o'clock with my wife, leaving nobody in the house; I closed the door with a latch lock - I am certain it was closed, it could not be opened by being pushed against - it is a spring lock. I locked the gate myself, and took the key with me; my property was all safe: I returned about half-past one o'clock - I received information from my landlord Smith, a few doors before I got to my house; I found the garden-gate open, my door had then been pulled too - I used the key to let myself in again; on entering the house, I found it in great confusion, missed the property stated in the indictment, from the sideboard drawers, and a great deal of property was strewed about

the rooms - I lost some sovereigns and silver - in all between 5l. and 7l.; the spoons had been in the kitchen cupboard - the kitchen drawers were open, and things strewed about; there were a great many foot-marks in the house; I have not recovered any of the property: the sideboard-cupboard was open.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a builder, and live in Rotherfield-street, about twenty yards from Mr. Dixon's house. On the 13th of January, in consequence of information from Mr. Colson, I proceeded to Mr. Dixon's house, I found the gate open, and the door partly open as well; I went into the passage - the back parlour door was open, the side board door was open, and things strewed about - it was twelve o'clock. I looked all over the house, and found all the rooms open; I gave charge of the house to a person until Mr. Dixon arrived. About half-past eleven o'clock that morning, I had gone to the adjoining house, and heard a noise in Dixon's house, but did not suspect a robbery was going on; I heard a great noise in the house, and heard stepping, and noticed a great many people walking backwards and forwards before the house.

THOMAS SCOTT . I live with my father, who keeps a horse, and does any thing he can get to do - he is employed by a builder. On the 13th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was right opposite Mr. Dixon's door, sweeping a crossing, and saw three men standing about twenty yards from Mr. Dixon's house; I saw Short go up to the gate, and tap with his umbrella - he did not find any body come; I am sure he is the man - he walked up the street, and did not take any notice, then Godfrey went to the gate and just touched it; he put his hand towards the key-hole, and the gate went open; it is a low iron gate - Short had a long brown coat on, with pockets at the side; it seemed to fit him very well - I saw him go and put his hand to the key-hole of the door; the door went open, and he went in - he left the door rather ajar; Short was walking up and down the street - I did not see the third man at this time; I was on the right-hand side of the way, opposite Mr. Dixon's house - I looked at him; I am sure Godfrey is the man who went into the house - I stopped there till Mr. Colson came out; I saw Godfrey come out, and he had a red and white handkerchief up to his face, as if he was crying: he and Short went on together towards Hoxton - he left the street door and garden gate open; Colson spoke to me - I recollect Mr. Smith coming up; I attended at the Police-office on the Tuesday afterwards - I went to Dartford, in Kent, with the men afterwards; they took me there in a horse and cart - I should know them again if they had the same dresses on; I slept at Dartford that night, in a barn - the two men slept in the barn with me; that was on the Sunday, a week after the robbery - I was there three nights, and slept always in the barn; I left Dartford on Thursday morning - I was not at all pleased at being taken and kept there; the two men had gone out, and I took the opportunity of coming away, and walked home - I came to Islington, and went to my father's house - he lives in Shepperton cottages, in a house which is partly finished; I did not know where the men were going to take me to; Godfrey had a blue coat on - the third man had a long brown coat.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You went to Dartford against your will? A. Yes; I never left my father's house before without his knowledge; Collier, the Policeman, gave me half a pint of beer at the first examination, that was all - I was quite sober; I never told any body that I had ale and rum given to me - I did not tell my father so, nor that the Policeman told me to swear to the men; my father was about twenty yards off when I saw the men - I was at the Painted Red-lion, Islington, where a gentleman gave me half a pint of beer with the Policeman; I went to several public houses to look for the men - I went to a public-house by the church; Brown, the beadle, gave me about a spoonful of beer there - I had nothing else; I am thirteen years old - I did not tell my father the Policeman told me, if I was asked the meaning of an oath, to say I should go to bell when I died; I do not know that I told him so, I forget - it was true, if I told him so, I think I did tell him; I remember it now - I never said the Policeman told me to say I was thirteen years old, nor to be sure to swear to the men - the Policeman only said, "Are these the men," I said Yes; I told my father the Policeman told me to mind to state they were the men, not that they desired me to swear to them - I was never charged with stealing; the Policeman did not tell me to say I should go to bell if I told a lie - I do not know why I told my father so; it was an untruth.

MR. BARRY. Q. Had you described the men to the officer? A. Yes; I shall be thirteen years old in March.

JAMES COLSON . I am a builder; I live in Shepperton-cottages, about fifty yards from Dixon's. On Sunday, the 13th of January, I saw four men near Dixon's premises, between eleven and twelve o'clock, three in brown great coats, and one in a blue coat and trousers - they were some distance from Mr. Dixon's at one time, and then they drew up; I communicated it to Turthill, my servant - I afterwards saw the man in a blue coat enter Mr. Dixon's house - I was standing at my parlour window, and saw him go into Mr. Dixon's front door; he came out in about a quarter of an hour, and when he passed my window, a short man was with him, with a brown great coat on; the man in a blue coat had a handkerchief over his face, so that I could not see his face - I do not remember the colour of the handkerchief; I could not swear to the men, not by their faces - the man with the handkerchief was half a head taller than the one he was walking with; after they were taken, I went to the watch-house, and the men had shifted their dresses.

ELIZABETH TURTHILL . I am housekeeper to Mr. Colson. On the 30th of January he spoke to me; I looked towards Mr. Dixon's house - I saw four men about half an hour before, or more; three had long brown coats, on with side pockets, one had a short blue coat - I did not observe the heighth of the man in the blue coat particularly - he was going towards Mr. Dixon's when I afterwards saw him; I did not observe him do any thing - he crossed the road towards Mr. Dixon's; I looked to the right, and saw a short man standing with a brown coat, and he had an umbrella in his hand, and at the same time, I saw a man at the back of Mr. Dixon's house - he had a long brown coat on; he gave a signal at the back of the house towards the place the short man stood, where he waved his hand, then stooped, and I lost sight of him - he went to the back

of Mr. Dixon's house, and the short man walked more to his right; while I was looking at him, I lost sight of the man in the blue coat suddenly - I looked towards Mr. Dixon's house afterwards; I then went down into my own kitchen, and Mr. Colson called me up, to ascertain whether Mr. Dixon's door was safe, that was in about half an hour - I did not go myself, but sent a person; in consequence of what Mr. Colson said to me, I came up stairs, and saw that Dixon's door was ajar - I saw nobody come from the house; I saw the man in the blue coat pass towards the Rosemary Branch-bridge, about four houses from Dixon's - I saw a handkerchief up to his face; it was the same man as I had suddenly missed; it was a red handkerchief, with a light border.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at Hatton-garden? A. Yes; I saw Short; a brown coat was put on him, to see if I could recognize him - he had a coat on under it then, but not on the Sunday, and the coat hung loose about him - I said I thought he looked a thinner man on the Sunday, but he did not appear to have a coat on under his great coat; I did not see the men's faces, and do not swear to them, all I speak to is their dress; on the Sunday, the coat was buttoned up, and appeared loose - I cannot say the man had not a coat on under the other on Sunday.

GEORGE COLLIER . I am a Policeman. On Monday, the 14th of January, the boy Scott went with me, and gave me a description of two men - I went about with him to look for them at a hundred public-houses, round Spitalfields, Shoreditch, and Hoxton; he was not with me when I took the prisoners - I received information from Henry Vinall , on the Tuesday, and on the Wednesday he gave me a description of some men; he went with me to thirty or forty public houses, and I found the prisoners at the King's Arms, Hoxton, sitting in the front tap-room - Vinall pointed them out to me; he wanted a guinea for his trouble - next morning, the 17th, he went with me to several places; we went to a public house in the Lower-road, and we drank together - he wanted me to give him the money; I said I would not - Short had on a green coat, and black waistcoat, when I took him; Godfrey had a flannel jacket; there were two men in the room with flannel jackets, but in consequence of what Vinall said, I took Godfrey - he was playing at dominoes; I sent Vinall for some officers - they arrived, and we took the prisoners to Hoxton watch-house; we then went and searched Godfrey's house - it is No. 5, Kenning-terrace, by the side of the canal; I took Godfrey to the watch-house, and in the City-road, he looked at me, and said, "Don't say any thing against Bill Chandler - he knows nothing of the robbery;" Chandler is a man who was taken for attempting to rescue the prisoners in the public-house - there were upwards of twenty men in the room when we took the prisoners, and when they saw I had officers outside, they said no more about it; Chandler was the only man who attempted the rescue - Godfrey told me not to take Chandler, as he knew nothing of the robbery, and to let the guilty suffer; I went in search of two more prisoners with Vinall some days afterwards.

HENRY VINALL . I am a bricklayer's journeyman. On the 13th of January I was out of work; I live at No. 80, Norris-street, Hoxton - I was going out to see my brother-in-law; I saw Scott and his father together by Shepperton-cottages, and saw three or four men about - it was about half-past eleven or a quarter to twelve o'clock - they were dressed like gentlemen mostly; I could not tell them from gentlemen- I cannot tell the colour of all their coats; there was one near to the Rosemary Branch with a light drab coat on - it is impossible that I can recollect whether they had brown coats; I saw an umbrella in the hand of the man who tapped at the gate - he had a stick or umbrella; I saw three men all go in at the gate one after another - I was going along, and I spoke to Tom Scott and his boy; all three went into the cottage - I saw them come out all together; I gave Collier information about the men, and went about with him for the purpose of finding them; I was not present when they were taken - I went to the King's Head, looked into the tap-room, came out and told him the men were in the room, the very men I had seen go into the house; I did not see the prisoners, when they were taken, not till they were at Hatton-garden, but never saw them before.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? A. I never saw their faces till they were at Hatton-garden - I know the faces of the men I saw go into the house, and could swear to them at this moment, if I saw them: they were all dressed like gentlemen - I never knew where the prisoners lived; I never gave the officers information where to find them - I never said they were the men; I swear that.

Cross-examined. You looked in at the King's Head? A. Yes; there were twenty or thirty persons there, two in flannel jackets sat by the side of one another - I never saw the prisoners there; the persons I had seen were there - there is a back door to the house.

MR. BARRY. Q. Were the two men who really had been to the prosecutor's, acquaintances of yours? A. Not at all; I only knew them by sight.

HENRY DUBOIS . I am a Policeman. On the 18th of January, I saw Vinall, and went to the King's Arms public-house with Collier; I went into the tap-room - Vinall was outside; I and Collier went, in consequence of what he said to me, and in consequence of the information we received from him, we took the prisoners into custody - a rescue was attempted, and we took Chandler afterwards; Godfrey said on the road, in my hearing, "Let Bill Chandler go, he is an innocent young man, he knows nothing about it- let the guilty suffer;" I went to Short's residence, and found some property - I know it to be his lodging, by the prostitute he lived with; I had seen him in the house with a woman about two months before he was taken - I do not know it to be his lodging from any other circumstance; I showed him a short coat which I found there - he denied it being his; he did not claim any thing which I found there - I went to Kenning-terrace with Collier; Godfrey's wife lived there - I never saw him there; I did not know him before.

CHARLES NOEL . I am a Policeman. Vinall accompanied me on the 29th of January to look for some persons - he gave me a description: he called on me about nine o'clock in the watch-house - I went with him to the New Prison, Clerkenwell; we waited near the gates, and when the prisoners were brought out, Vinall said something, but not in their hearing.

Witness for the Defence.

THOMAS SCOTT . I am a brick-carter. The witness Scott is my son; he came to me drunk one day, and was sick all over the place - when he got sober, he said the Policeman

gave him ale and rum to drink; and that the Policeman told him if the Magistrate asked him what an oath meant, to say he should go to bell if he told a lie: he has run away from me once or twice before for a day or two - he has been up to Hornsey-wood without my knowledge: I have given him money to fetch things from the chandler's shop - he has kept the money, and set it up to me; he is twelve years old next March - he said he was to say he was thirteen, that he might get men's pay.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-13

Before Mr. Baron Bayley.

447. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Halksworth , on the 27th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 2l. 10s., his property .

WILLIAM HALKSWORTH . I am a tailor . On the 27th of January, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in a court leading out of Shoreditch to Cock-lane - I am a visitor of the Strangers' Friend Society , and went to visit a widow in distress; and about four yards from the door, after I came out of her house, I was going to another person to visit, and just previous to my coming into a narrow passage, there stood three men; one of them seemed to stagger a little, as if intoxicated - he turned round, and placed his hand on my shoulder: he rather twisted me round - I was endeavouring to extricate myself, and as soon as he got me to face him, he plucked my watch out of my fob, and ran away with it; seeing his intoxication was merely pretence. I ran after him as hard as I could down Shoreditch, calling Police! and calling out that I was robbed - he gained ground on me, and turned up Church-street; I pursued him thirty or forty yards - I was rather confused, and do not know his features; but the appearance of his person and clothes were the same - he was never lost sight of, though I lost sight of him; he was taken in a few minutes afterwards - I saw my watch at the station-house, and the prisoner was there also; he only staggered against me, and laid hold of me - he did not strike me before he got the watch; he did it so momentarily that I had no apprehension of it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a headborough. I apprehended the prisoner in Cross-street - he was running, and the prosecutor calling Stop thief! when I caught hold of him he put his hand into his right-hand coat pocket, and threw this watch on the ground; a young man who was coming down the street, picked it up, and gave it to me, as I held him by the collar - I think he had been drinking, but knew what he was about.

JOSEPH SNOSWELL . I saw the prisoner running with a watch in his hand for about forty yards - I was in pursuit of him; I lost sight of him at the top of Nicholl-street; he was running very fast, and laughing very heartily.

JOHN ROBERTSON . I joined in pursuit of the prisoner, saw him run about a hundred yards, and assisted in taking him; he was laughing very heartily - I thought it was a mere joke, till I saw the officers; he ran very well, and lifted up both the tails of his great coat to enable him to run faster; he said nothing when he was taken - 9s. 7 1/2d. was found on him.

Prisoner. I was in liquor, and knew nothing about it till the next morning.

GUILTY of stealing from the person only . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-14

448. WILLIAM BRADBURY , was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , at Hayes, 1 sheep, value 35s. , the goods of Henry Davis .

SECOND COUNT, for killing the said sheep, with intent to steal the carcass.

HENRY DAVIS . I am a farmer , and live at Southall-green, Hayes, Middlesex - I had ninety-nine sheep in my turnip field on the 2nd of February - I saw them in the middle of the day, as late as four o'clock; I had counted them in the morning in the fold, and on the morning of Sunday, the 3rd, about half-past nine, seeing some blood in the field, I counted them, and there were ninety eight, I saw the blood where the sheep had been killed, and traced foot steps from there over the hedge, and across the turnips; I suspected the prisoner, got a search-warrant, and went to the prisoners house in Heston parish, about half a mile from my premises; he was not at home - his wife and family were there; I know it was his house, having known him for years; I and Walton searched, and asked his wife what she had got in the pot - we found part of the four legs chopped off at the thighs, part of the thigh, part of the knuckle, and part of the bough in the pot; up stairs we found the top part of the legs, two kidneys and the fat; all the meat was skinned; and on Tuesday morning I found the skin about a mile and a half from his house, and nearly a mile from my house; I can swear to the skin - it has my mark on it, which is B, and a jag wheel on the near hip, here it is - I bought eight of them at Overton fair; on the 18th July, and here is a red dot upon it; the mutton I found at the house corresponds with the sort of mutton of my sheep - it was all backed up into joints, but part of the fat remained on it when we compared them together, and they fitted exactly - the fore feet remained on the skin, I did not compare them, except that; as we did not take the mutton away - when we came back, after looking for the husband, only part of the mutton remained there - Walton saw it; we compared it before the Magistrate at Brentford, and compared the thigh of the skin with the fat, but it was so jagged about, we could not match it except the piece of fat; it was a year old tag mutton.

JAMES WALTON . I am constable of Norwood, in the parish of Hayes. I went with a search-warrant on the Sunday to the prisoner's house, and found a quantity of mutton, I took it before the Magistrate, all that I found there; there was the four shanks, part of the breast, and part of the neck in the pot; and up stairs I found all the rest, except two loins - I found nearly the whole sheep; the prisoner was a labouring man - I took all the mutton before a Magistrate; a butcher attempted to put it together with the skin - in my judgment it answered to the skin; it was very much haggled, not as if it had been done by a butcher; I was not present when the skin was found.

GUILTY . Aged 57. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330214-15

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

449. FREDERICK PRIDDIS was indicted for

stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 pair of clogs, value 9s. , the goods of Aaron Gush . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-16

450. HENRY DIAPER was indicted for stealing, 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s. 6d., the goods of James Coster and others - also 24 purses, value 19s. 6d., the goods of Edward Rawson and others; and 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s. 6d., the goods of James Coster and others . - To which indictments he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-17

451. MICHAEL LEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Taylor , from his person; and that he had before been convicted of felony .

JOHN TAYLOR . I live in Bedford-row, and am an engineer . On the 5th of February, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was in Holborn , between Furnival's Inn and Hatton-garden - I felt a slight touch at my coat; I instantly put my hand to my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone; I turned round, and saw three boy s together - the prisoner was one of them; he was about three yards from me - I observed the prisoner attempting to lay hold of something, and took hold of him; I charged him with the theft, which he denied - I found my handkerchief concealed under his jacket; I have not a doubt of its being mine - he merely asked what I meddled with him for; the other two ran away - I gave him in charge: I am quite sure the prisoner took the handkerchief from me.

JAMES GRAY . I am a Policeman. I received the prisoner in charge - I found nothing on him; he said another boy threw the handkerchief on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH BANES . I was a constable. I was present in April last when the prisoner was tried here and convicted - I have a certificate of his conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - (read); the prisoner is the person - I heard the verdict given.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-18

452. GEORGE THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 10 lbs. of tea, value 3l. 10s., and 1 box, value 1s. , the goods of Samuel Nash .

2nd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Peter Palmer .

3rd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of William Henry Lewis .

HENRY CONSTANTINE . I am servant to Samuel Nash , of Union-street, Borough, a tea-dealer . On the 22nd of January Palmer was employed to bring this tea from the India-house to my master's, in this box; it did not arrive - I have seen it since.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How do you know what quantity was coming? A. I did not know the precise numbers - my master is in partnership with Thomas North .

JOHN DARTER . I am a constable of Bread-street ward. About six o'clock on Tuesday evening, the 22nd of January, I was in Bread-street , and saw four men - the prisoner was one of them; I observed them go down towards a cart, which stood at the end of Basing-lane - two of the men went on the pavement, and the prisoner and the other went on the off side of the cart - the tall man got on the shaft, fetched a box out of the cart, and gave it to the prisoner, who went down Little Friday-street, and the other three came up Bread-street; I went after the prisoner, and overtook him - he turned round, and threw the box at me: he then ran down Great Distaff-lane, and I after him - I lost sight of him for nearly a minute, but was quite certain of him when I saw him again in custody in Old Fish-street; I said he was the man who had taken the box, which I found contained tea - he said he was running the same as other people.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he had not taken it? A. No - I was out on my business; I am a chair-maker - I was about five yards from the cart; I never said I was not nearer than thirty yards; I could not identify the other men - I had never seen the prisoner before; I know the prisoner, because he was on the side of the cart, and when he turned and threw the tea at me, I looked him full in the face; it was about six o'clock in the evening - it was very light in some part of the street; I never missed the prisoner but once, and when I saw him again I was certain of him - the Policeman brought him up to me - there were no turnings about that spot; the other three passed me, and went up Bread-street - they were on the other side of the cart.

WILLIAM CARTLIDGE . I am a constable. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running without his hat - I followed, and stopped him; he said he had broken a window; I said he must come back and prove it - Darter came up in a very short time, and said he was the man who had stolen the tea out of Bread-street; he had a box with him then, I believe, but I am not positive - I saw the Excise-mark on the box; I afterwards saw it opened - it contained tea: at the watch-house the prisoner said he merely ran with other people.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you the person who apprehended him? A. Yes; a person had stopped him just before I came up, and he told him the same - nobody was holding him when I came up, the other person had let him go; I had seen him stopped on Old Fish-street-hill - Darter said, "That is the man that took the tea;" I stopped him in Old Fish-street-hill, by Labour-in-vain-yard, four or five hundred yards from where he had come, I suppose - I believe Darter had the box of tea with him; I know he had it before we got to the watch-house - it was enough for me to look after the prisoner; I had seen him come out of Distaff-lane.

JURY. Q. Labour-in-vain-yard is not in Old Fish-street-hill? A. I believe it is - when I first saw the prisoner nobody but him was running, but several followed; there was nobody between me and the prisoner; I inquired all round the neighbourhood, and there was no glass broken; Darter was not with me when he said he had broken a window.

WILLIAM HENRY LEWES , I am a carman to Peter Palmer , who is the owner of the cart the box was taken from - I had twenty-eight boxes and chests of tea in my cart, which I brought from the East India-house; I had two chests to leave at Gerrard's Hall, Basing-lane, and stopped the cart to deliver them there - all the load was complete when I took those two chests out; the cart was about fifty yards from Gerrard's-hall - I left a little boy to look after it, and

as soon as I came out again I saw that a box of tea was gone, as I knew how I had loaded it; I told the young man who was with me, that one was gone - he said No, they were all right; I afterwards saw the box at the watch-house - the prisoner was in custody at that time; I knew the box as soon as I saw it - I was quite sure of it; I had the fellow box which came in the same ship, in the cart, and had the warrant and permit of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was with you? A. William Kennet , he is not here, the box is here; and I have the permit and warrant; the boy who had charge of the cart is not here; it was not a very dark night - there is a gas-light just there, and a light at the butchers shop.

PETER PALMER . I am the owner of the cart - it is my sole property; I gave my man directions to load the cart with tea that afternoon, he was to fetch nothing but tea.

JURY to JOHN DARTER . Q. Had the prisoner his hat on when he received the box? A. Yes, but I saw it fall off afterward; he was close to me when he threw the box on me - he owned the hat when it was found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-19

453. ROBERT NASH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 table-cloth, value 10s. , the goods of John Howard .

JOHN HOWARD . I am a publican , and live at St. Mary-at-hill ; I have known the prisoner some time. On the 5th of February, from ten to eleven o'clock in the morning, he came to my house, and was about the coffee-room for about twenty minutes, or half an hour; he did not call for any thing - this table-cloth was placed in a cupboard in front of the bar, out of the coffee-room - and I ordered it to be taken out of the cupboard and placed in the coffee-room while the prisoner was there, as I had suspicion of his having taken table-cloths before - when he first came in there were six or eight persons there, and before he left one or two might have come in; a great many people attending the market breakfast at my house - I saw the table-cloth placed on the first table in the coffee-room; I saw him remove it on to a seat near the table - I was observing him all the time he was there; he stopped there till every body had left the coffee-room, and I left him there by himself, near the table where this cloth had been laying; it was on the seat at the time, where I had seen him place it - when I left the coffee-room, I went into the bar, to tell my sister to watch, and to call me the moment he left the coffee-room, and the moment he left I ran out; I could not see him for ten minutes - I then met him in Darkhouse-lane; I laid hold of him, and accused him of taking the table cloth - he denied it - I have never seen the cloth since; I went and looked behind the door before I ran out, and the table-cloth was gone, and I think that gave him the opportunity of getting out of my view.

Cross-examined. Q. You say the instant he left the coffee-room you ran out? A. Yes, after my sister called me - I ran first to look into the coffee-room; I passed the coffee-room door to go out - Darkhouse-lane is not a quarter of a minutes walk, but I went to search for him in different public-houses; mine is the Newcastle coffee-house - I cannot recollect whether I took his hat off when I met him; I went to his lodgings and saw his wife - she gave the duplicate of a table-cloth, but I found it was not mine; my sister was in front of the counter at the bar - I was in a small room behind the bar; I have not inquired at the pawnbroker's for the table-cloth - Mr. Cook, a salesman, and Mr. Reid were in the coffee-room, and several persons came in to settle with them; my waiter was not in the room, for I had my eye on the bar the whole time - I saw him go up stairs; I could see the coffee-room door where I stood, but could not see inside - I will not swear nobody but the prisoner was there.

SARAH HOWARD . I am the sister of John Howard . I saw the prisoner in the coffee-room; I saw the table-cloth on the table - there were two other persons there, I believe, at the time he was there; I did not see who else was there, but I do not think there were any other persons - I only saw the prisoner sit down in the coffee-room, and then he removed the table-cloth from the table, and put it behind him on the seat behind the door; I saw him do that, and afterwards he moved the table-cloth back, and put it on the table again - I did not see him do any thing till he took it and put it under his apron, and then he left the room directly; I called to my brother immediately, and he went out directly after him - I have not seen the table-cloth since.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there only two persons in the coffee-room? A. Not that I am aware of; I was standing at the bar, which commands a view of the whole coffee-room, but not when the door was shut - not one person came in after the prisoner left till he returned; two or three came in when he was first there - there were two persons in the room when I saw him take the table-cloth, and as soon as he took it, he went out; the two persons were still there, sitting in the box - they were across the room; he sat with his back to them - I am not aware that any body else came in while he was there - my brother was in the back bar, I was in the front bar.

Q. While the prisoner was there, were there six or eight persons in the room, and two more came in? A. Not that I know of; the waiter was gone up stairs - I cannot say who served the two persons in the tap-room; I cannot tell whether they called for any thing - the prisoner was in and out several times; the prisoner might have had two coats on for what I know - he had a blue apron and a pocket apron, two aprons and two coats; the coffee-room door was fastened back, and wide open - he put the cloth under his apron; he could see me, as well as I saw him.

COURT. Q. Were the two persons sitting with their faces or their backs towards him? A. Their faces towards the door; his back was to them - they could not see him put any thing into his pocket, as the partition was too high.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-20

NEW COURT. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14TH.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

454. WILLIAM BASSETT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 25 sovereigns, the monies of Charles Lewis , his master . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-21

455. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for stealing,

in the 8th of February , 1 coat, value 1l. the goods of Bentley McLeod . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-22

456. THOMAS JARVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 3 silver spoons, value 1l. 2s., and 2 silver ladles, value 12s., the goods of George James Player - also for stealing on the 4th of February , 1 mourning-ring, value 20s., and 1 scent-box, value 3s., the goods of Edward Booth . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-23

457. PETER MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 pair of trousers, value 5s., and 1 flannel shirt, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Nutting . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 65. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-24

458. WALTER FREDERICK PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 4 pairs of shoes, value 20s., the goods of William Dadley and another, his masters .

WILLIAM DADLEY. I am a bootmaker , and live in Regent-street ; I have one partner. The prisoner was in our service for two months; I suspected him, and sent for Goddard, who found a duplicate on him - I had a good character with him, and he had behaved well.

HENRY GODDARD . I went to the prosecutor's about nine o'clock in the evening - the prisoner was out, but returned about ten o'clock; I asked if he knew any thing relating to Mr. Dadley's property - he said he did not; I began to search him, and saw him take something from his left-hand pocket, I took from his hand this card-case, containing four duplicates; he then said he was paying for a watch by weekly payments, and had taken these to pay for it.

JOHN ANDREW SIMPSON . I am in the employ of Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker. I have a pair of shoes, pawned on the 14th of January; I cannot say by whom, but I gave this duplicate for it.

HENRY FREAK . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of boots, pawned in the name of Walter Page ; I gave this duplicate for them.

WILLIAM EDMUND RUMSEY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of shoes; I cannot say who pawned them, but I gave this duplicate for them.

GEORGE TURNER . I have a pair of shoes, pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330214-25

459. JOHN COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 4 quart pewter pots, value 7s. , the goods of Joseph Cable .

JANE CABLE . I am the wife of Joseph Cable - we keep the George on Little Saffron-hill . On the 12th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came - he had some gin at the bar, and went into the tap-room - I had seen him before, and had suspected him of taking pots - I went into the yard, and placed four quart pots on a window ledge, from whence I had lost pots before, and put Sufferson, my servant, into the parlour, to listen; the prisoner then went into the yard - my servant came and told me she heard the pots rattle; I sent a man into the yard, who found three pots down the privy, and one at the prisoner's feet, in the privy.

CHRISTIAN SUFFERSON . I saw my mistress place the pots in the yard - I listened, and heard them rattle.

JOHN DUNKS . I am a smith - I was in the tap-room, and saw the prisoner come in; he talked about some marble chimney-pieces which he had to make; he then went into the yard; Mrs. Cable came into the tap-room, and said the pots were gone - I said, "Stop a bit, perhaps he will come in;" he opened the door once or twice, but did not come in - I then got a light, and went to the privy; I found him sitting there - one of these pots was between his feet, and three of them were down the privy.

Prisoner. The pots were not in my possession at all, and he knows there was another man in the yard. Witness. There was no other man in the yard.

MRS. CABLE. These are my pots, they are now bent double, but they were quite right when I put them in the yard.

GUILTY *. Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-26

450. ANN CLARK , ELIZABETH PRITCHARD , and JAMES CROUCH were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 watch, value 4l., 2 seals, value 20l., 2 rings, value 15l., 1 watch-chain, value 1s. 6d., 1 key, value 2s., and 1 knife, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Britcher .

CHARLES BRITCHER . I am a waiter, but am out of a situation - I was last employed at Putney. On the 14th of January, about five o'clock in the morning, I went into a public-house at the corner of Moon-street, Seven-dials ; I had been at work all night at the cyder-cellar in Maiden-lane - I then lodged in Princes-row, and could not get into my lodging; I went to this public-house, and called for two penny-worth of rum, and a little cold water - I sat down, and fell asleep; I saw all the prisoners there before I went to sleep - I had my watch and seals about me; the bar-man awoke me afterwards, and asked where my watch was; I felt for it, and missed it; I saw my watch again the same morning, at the pawnbroker's.

ROBERT POPE . I am a waiter at the public-house. I remember the prosecutor coming there; he sat down at the corner of the lobby - the three prisoners were there; I had seen them before, and knew them well by sight - they had been there a quarter of an hour before he came in; they were all in company together - they went away about half an hour before the prosecutor; the prosecutor had his watch and seals in his pocket when he came in, and when I went to awake him he had not got it - I gave the description of the prisoner to a private watchman.

Crouch. Q. Did I not go in with Kelly and English the two private watch-man? A. No, you were in before them - one of the women was in before you, and the other came in after you; I have seen you in our house before - you were all in company, and drank together.

HENRY LONG . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Grays' Inn-lane, with Mr. Nicholls. I have a watch, which was pawned by Crouch and Pritchard, between eight and

nine o'clock in the morning, of the 14th of January - I cannot exactly say which of them produced it, but I asked Crouch whose it was, and he said it was his own; he pawned it in the name of George Fermey , Little Windmill-street - they then went away, and the next day Pritchard came by herself, produced the duplicate, and asked for 6s. more on it; I had lent 30s., I had received information of the robbery and detained her.

Crouch. Q. Did not the woman pawn it? A. I cannot tell, but you gave your name, and said it was yours - I did not tell the Magistrate I was not certain you said that.

WILLIAM McKENZIE (Police Constable C 182). The parties were described to me - the prisoner, Clark was with the prosecutor when he told me of it, and he gave her into my custody; she denied it, but I took her - in going along I asked her how she came to do it; she said "I know I did wrong; it was pawned in Grays' Inn-lane, at Nicholls'" - I went and stopped it.

JOHN RATTRAY (Police-constable F 54). I went to Nicholls' and took Pritchard - she said she pawned the watch, but she did not care so long as the other two were in for it, as they were as bad as she was - I found this knife on her which the prosecutor identified.

CHARLES BRITCHER . This is my watch, this knife is mine, and had been in my waistcoat pocket.

Clark's Defence. When I went into the house neither of the prisoners were there - Crouch came in afterwards, and so did Pritchard; I did not know them before - when the prosecutor came in Pritchard went and spoke to him - she soon afterwards went out all in a hurry, and then she came back again, and Crouch asked me to go and have a cup of coffee with them, which I did - they had three cups of coffee, and then said they had no more money; but Pritchard said she had something to make money of when the pawnbrokers were open - we went out, and in going along, she said she had got his watch, and where should she pawn it; I said we were very near Gray's-inn-lane, and we went there.

Pritchard's Defence. Clark saw me take it, and went to pawn it with me - Crouch put me up to take it from the gentleman; he then took us to the coffee-shop, and hardly let us have time to drink any before he took us away; he wanted to get the watch from me, but I would not let him - he and Clark went with me to pawn it, but Clark staid outside while we went in; Crouch wanted me to give him the sovereign, but I would not, I gave him 5s. and Clark 2s. 6d.

Crouch's Defence. I went into the house for some refreshment - I saw Clark in the corner, and then Pritchard came in; I afterwards went with them to the pawnbroker's, but I did not see what was pawned, nor did I have any money.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 25.

PRITCHARD - GUILTY . Aged 27.

CROUCH - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-27

451. WILLIAM CURTIS was indicted for stealing on the 15th of January , 65 yards of merino, value 4l. 14s., the goods of Robert Pirrie and another .

THOMAS FARRANT , (Police-constable C 42). On the 15th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner with a bundle in Crown-street, Soho; I took him on suspicion, and found this merino on him - there are three different pieces of different colours; he said a man gave it him to carry.

RICHARD NELMS . I am a haberdasher , and live in Oxford-street - I have one partner; these merinos are ours - I do not know what part of the shop they were in, but we missed them when the officer brought them; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. About nine o'clock that morning I was going up Crown-street and met a man, who asked me to carry this, as he had something else to carry; he said he would give me 1s.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-28

452. JAMES RUST and JOHN HOWARD were indicted for stealing on the 14th of January , 2 cheeses, value 26s. the goods of John Brooks ; and that Rust had been before convicted of felony .

JOHN BROOKS . I live in Red Lion-street, Holborn , and am a cheesemonger . On the 14th of January, about five o'clock in the evening I heard of this, and went as I was directed; I saw Howard carrying one cheese, and another person carrying one - Howard turned his head, saw me, and dropped his cheese and ran off; his companion saw that, and he dropped his cheese; I pursued them both some distance, but I thought I might lose my cheeses; I returned and took them up - in a few minutes Howard was brought back, and I knew him; these are my cheeses.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You pursued two persons? A. Yes; it was dusk - there were a great many persons passing - they had their backs towards me, but Howard turned his face, and I can speak confidently to him; I knew him as soon as he was brought back.

ANN AYERILL GREGORY. My husband lives opposite the prosecutor. On the 14th of January I was sitting in our shop - I saw Rust go to the prosecutor's and take two cheeses; I did not see any other person - he turned a corner.

JHON BROOKS. They might be a hundred or a hundred and fifty yards off before I saw them; they had turned a corner.

JAMES FULLER (Police-constable, E 118.) I took Howard that evening in the shop, and I took Rust on the 16th of January.

WILLIAM BURTON (Police-constable, G 1.) I have a certificate of the conviction of Rust, by the name of Ward, which I got from Mr. Clark's office; I took him, and am certain he is the man.

Two witnesses gave Howard a good character.

RUST - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

HOWARD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-29

453. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 16 lbs. of copper, value 13s. , the goods of Thomas Snook .

SECOND COUNT, stating to be the goods of James Greig .

WILLIAS JONES. I am a ship-joiner in the employ of Mr. Thomas Snook - this copper is his property; the Montreal was in his dry dock - it belongs to Mr. Greig; the prisoner was quite a stranger - we lost copper from

time to time; I was set to watch in the joiner's shop on the 11th of January - the men went to dinner at one o'clock, and about twenty minutes after I saw the prisoner come into the dock - he had no right there; he could not see me, as I was concealed - he pulled off a pea-jacket which he had on, then crossed the boom of the vessel, and went down into the dock; he came out again and crossed the boom - I jumped out, and took him about twenty yards before he got off the premises; I saw these two sheets of copper taken from him - I had seen him lurking about before he crossed the vessel, as if to see if he was observed.

RICHARD MILNER . I took the prisoner in the dock-yard, and found this copper under a round frock which he had on.

THOMAS MOODY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and this copper, which weighs 16 lbs.; I asked how he got it - he said a strange man gave it him; he said his name was Jones at the office, but I had seen him there before, and he gave his name as Michael Collins - he was discharged on that occasion.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-30

454. FREDERICK NORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 glazier's diamond, value 17s., and 1 glazier's stopping-knife, value 1s. , the goods of Richard Blackmore .

RICHARD BLACKMORE . I am a glazier , and live in Dean-street, Soho . On the 14th of January the prisoner came to my shop for some glass, which his master had bought; I had left a diamond on the counter, after cutting the glass - I missed that and a knife after he had gone; I went the next morning, and found him in a public-house; I accused him of taking the articles - he said he had not, but he afterwards said he had taken the diamond and broken it, and thrown it over a house; my man got a ladder, went over the house, and found the stick and the setting of the diamond, but the spark is gone; it appears to have been filed to get the spark out.

GUILTY. Aged 17

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330214-31

455 TIMOTHY RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 3 lbs. weight of rags, value 1s., the goods of Elihu Willson , his master .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ELIHU WILLSON. I am a stationer and rag-merchant ; and live in King-street, Seven-dials - the prisoner was in my employ. On the 11th of January I called in a Policeman, and had him searched - these rags were found in his stockings; he fell on his knees, begged I would forgive him, and not take him before a Magistrate - he had been five or six years with me, and had a guinea a week; I have five or six persons in my employ.

PETER O'BRIEN (Police-constable F 94.) I took the prisoner, and produce the rags which were between his stockings and his legs - he fell on his keees, and begged for pardon.

Prisoner's Defence. I keep a shop myself, and bought these rags before the shop was open in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-32

456. CHARLES SALTER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 2 coats, value 4l. , the goods of John Le Richeux .

JOHN LE RICHEUX. I am a warehouseman in Lad-lane. On the 4th of January, between twelve and one o'clock, I hired a coach from the stand, at the top of Goswell-road, Islington; I had a bag with me, which contained two coats - I discharged the coach at the Cock, at Holloway ; I forgot to take the bag out - I have seen the coats and bag since; I believe the prisoner was the driver of the coach , but am not quite positive.

WILLIAM HEMMING . I am the watchman at Goswell-road stand. I remember the coach being hired between twelve and one o'clock on the 4th of January - the prisoner drove it; he is not the regular driver, but the coachman was at supper, and he called the prisoner to drive it and bring it back - he brought back the coach, but did not say any thing about the bag or coats.

JOHN WILSON . I am a pawnbroker in St. John-street. I have a coat, pawned by the prisoner on Saturday, the 5th of January - this bag was with it.

JOHN JONES . I live in St. John-street. I bought this coat of the prisoner on Saturday evening, the 5th of January.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I recollect carrying this gentleman, but I did not find the bag till I had carried another fare.

GUILTY . Aged 28. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-33

457 THOMAS YOUNG was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am a brewer , and live on Islington-green. The prisoner was in my service as drayman ; he carried out beer, and had to receive money, for which he was to account on the day he received it; he kept one book and I kept another which I have here.

ANN BURRELL . I live in Upper Seymour-street . I paid the prisoner 9s. on the 23rd of November; he gave me this receipt - (read.)

ELIZABETH KISS . I live with Mr. Freeman. I paid the prisoner 18s. on the 6th of December; I gave him a sovereign, and he gave me 2s.; he gave me this receipt - I saw him sign it - (read.)

MARY HARRISON . I paid the prisoner 6s. on the 26th of November - he signed this receipt, and gave it me - (read.)

JAMES GRIFFITHS . He ought in the course of the same days to have paid those sums to me or to my clerk; he did not pay this on the 23rd of November, nor give me credit for it - I called to his memory this bill of Mr. Freeman's, and he gave me 9s. of it, and said that Mrs. Freeman intended to pay for one cask under another - he did not pay me this sum on the 26th of November; he had been about six months with me.

ROBERT HOLLOWAY . I am clerk to Mr. Griffiths. I did not receive any of these sums of the prisoner.

ELIZABETH GRIFFITHS . The prisoner did not pay me any of these sums.

Prisoner. I am no scholar; the clerk used to go round with me to sign the receipts - then he left off

going round, and used to write out a great many receipts for me.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

MR. GRIFFITHS. I lost a great number of pigeons, some hay and corn, and was informed the prisoner carried them away; I have a number of other cases of embezzlement against him.

Reference Number: t18330214-34

458. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing on the 24th of January 1 boot, value 6s. , the goods of Galon Bamfield .

CHRISTOPHER BAMFIELD . I live with my father, Galon Bamfield, a bootmaker , who lives in the Strand . On the evening of the 24th of January I saw the prisoner take this boot from near the door, and run off with it; I pursued him, and saw him throw into in the road.

WILLIAM KENNEDY (Police-constable F 22). I saw the witness stop the prisoner, and took him - this is the boot.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Before I got past the window this witness came and said I had stolen a boot; a man brought the boot from the other side of the road; and then he said he did not see me take it, nor throw it away - but the next morning he said he saw me take it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330214-35

459. BENJAMIN WEBB was indicted for stealing on the 21st of January , 3 tin kettles, value 10s., 1 pint measure, value 6d., and 3 quarts of milk, value 9d. , the goods of Robert Mandar .

ROBERT MANDAR. I am a milkman , and was out with my milk on the 21st of January; I set down my cans in Gower-place while I went to put some small milk cans down some areas where the people were not up; as I came back I saw the prisoner take up my tin can: I pursued and took him with it - this is it; there are some small milk cans inside it - the prisoner is a stranger; a great many cans have been lost in that neighbourhood.

Prisoner's Defence. I appointed to meet a person there that morning between half-past seven and eight o'clock - I took up this can, supposing it was that person's; I have been in the milk business all my life - I did not mean to steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330214-36

460. THOMAS WILLIS COOPER was indicted for stealing on the 7th of January 4 live pigs, price 6l. , the property of James Taylor .

JAMES TAYLOR. I live at Feltham, in Middlesex . On Monday evening, the 7th of January, I went round my premises - my pigs were then all safe: I had three in my yard, and three in the sty; on the next morning I missed three sows and one boar pig - I made inquiries and found them in possession of Mr. Cox; I knew them to be those I had lost - I know nothing of the prisoner.

EDWARD COX . I live on New Hampton-common, about four miles from the prosecutors'; I know nothing of the prisoner, but on the 8th of January he came about seven o'clock in the morning, and knocked at my door - I looked out of window, and he asked me if Cox lived there - I said Yes; he then asked if I was not a buyer of pigs; I said I was - I expected some pigs to come, and thought he had brought them; I told him to put them into the yard, which he did - but when I came down I found they were not those I expected; he had brought four, and asked me 35s. a piece for them - I agreed to give 28s.; but I asked where he lived; he said at Hatton - I went with him there: there was no person who knew him, and I had him apprehended; I showed the same pigs to the prosecutor.

(See No. 46). GUILTY . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18330214-37

461. JOSEPH CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 1 coat, value 2l.; 2 waistcoats, value 14s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 20s., and 1 hat, value 16s., the goods of William Maurice , and that he had been before convicted of felony .

WILLIAM MAURICE. I am a carver and gilder , and live at Westminster . I knew the prisoner for about two months, and in August last he met me - he represented himself in great distress; I said I would give him a night's lodging - he went home with me; I gave him three nights lodging - I went home in the middle of the day afterwards, and missed this property; he was then gone, and I did not see him again till he was taken, which was five weeks ago - I asked him what had become of my things; he said he had sold them to a Jew who travelled about the streets.

JOSEPH WARD (Police-constable C 172). The prisoner came and gave himself up to me.

GEORGE BOX (Police-constable C 65). I have a certificate of the conviction of John Smith; the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 22. Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-38

462. THOMAS WILLIS COOPER was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 1 cow, price 7l. , the property of Henry Brumbridge .

GEORGE BRUMBRIDGE . I am the son of Henry Brumbridge . This cow was taken from a farm yard at Feltham - I saw it safe on the 4th of January, and it was missed on the following morning; I found it at William Farmer's - I knew it to be my father's; I do not know the prisoner.

WILLIAM FARMER . I live about three miles from Feltham; I buy cows and other things. The prisoner brought this cow to me on the Saturday morning, about half-past seven o'clock; I was not at home, but he asked my wife if I did not buy cows - she said Yes, and sent him to me; he asked me 6l. for the cow - I bought it of him for 3l. 10s.; I told him to bring it into my yard, and asked him where he got it - he said he brought it from Hanworth, and his name was Willis; I went there, but no such person was known - I had the cow cried, and I saw the prisoner again, when he was taken into custody, about the pigs. (See No. 460).

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330214-39

463. SARAH SHEPPARD and MARY LEE were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 pocketbook, value 1s.; one 20l., eight 10l. and one 5l. Bank

notes, the property of William Burns , from his person against the Statute, &c.

WILLIAM BURNS. I am a chair-maker and live in Rose-street. On the night of the 10th of January I had been with Middleton; we spent the evening together in some measure - we went to a shop and had some alamode beef; I then went to a house which I thought was a public-house, but it proved to be a pastry-cook's - I do not recollect meeting the prisoners; but I recollect being in some house and seeing two females, but I cannot say who they were - I had eight 10l. notes, one 20l. note, one 5l. note, and two sovereigns and a-half, in a little canvass bag in my left-hand breeches pocket; I have not recovered any of the property - I do not know the number of the notes; I fell asleep in the house, and I suppose I was there six hours, or more - I do not remember picking up any girls.

JOHN MIDDLETON . I am a book-keeper. I spent the evening with the prosecutor - I was not so drunk as he was; we fell in with the two prisoners at the corner of Oxford-street - I think about half-past one o'clock; they accosted us, and we went home with them to a house in Nottingham-court, Long-acre - I can swear to Lee, and I believe Sheppard to be the other girl; I did not have any gin, I believe Burns gave Lee 1s. to fetch some gin, but whether it was fetched or not, I do not know - Lee said to the other girl, who I believe was Sheppard, "Why don't you undress and go to bed;" she undressed and was in bed directly - I then undressed and went to bed too; I remained awake a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes, and during that time, Lee called Sheppard out of bed - she got out; when I got up in the morning, I found Burns laying on the bed, and the two women were gone - I had been robbed of four sovereigns and a half myself; I found it was broad day-light when I awoke - I jumped up, as I knew it was time to go to my employ; Burns was outside the bed, with his clothes on - I awoke him, and told him I was robbed, and told him to feel his pockets, as I knew he had a canvas bag the evening before, which had some money in it; I had seen it at the public-house where we had the brandy and water - he said, "I am a ruined man - I have lost above 100l."

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Were you in more than one public-house that night? A. Yes; I think we were in three or four - the first house was the Hercules Pillars, in Greek-street; we then went to a house near the Middlesex-hospital - then to Clark's, in Oxford-street, where you can get a glass after hours; I rather think we went to another house in Hanway-street - I was perfectly sensible; I might have a share of five glasses of brandy and water, and I might afterwards have some gin - we had not twenty-three glasses of brandy and water at one house; we had not so many as ten in one house - I do not think we had more than five; it was about ten o'clock when we went to the Hercules Pillars - I saw the prosecutor's bag there, and again in Oxford-street, and at Clark's, that was the last place; I cannot tell how much was in the bag, but I know there were some sovereigns in it, and a good deal of silver - I do not recollect a third female coming into our company, but when you get out of Clark's there will be a dozen females about you; I do not recollect any other female but the prisoners being about us after we got out of the last public-house - I had no intention of stopping, nor should I if Lee had not given me the challenge; there might be 12s. asked for two beds, but I do not remember it - there might be some other females about us, but none walked with us; we might go into some other house - I do not remember going into any house where there was an old Jewess, but there was a Jewess brought to the office who had bought the notes; I had never seen her before.

COURT, Q. This Jewess was taken on suspicion of having purchased the notes? - A. I believe she was, but I never saw her till we were at the office; the two prisoners and a boy were in custody.

JOSEPH HIGGINS (Police constable, F 35). On Friday morning, the 11th, I received information of this robbery; I went with Burns and Middleton to Nottingham-court - I knew the prisoner before, but did not know where they lived till I heard it from the landlady next morning; I took Lee at Somer's-town on the 20th, and Sheppard came in while I was there - I found a number of new articles of wearing-apparel; Lee asked me, in the way to the station, who told me where she lived - I said it was a female, but I would not give up the name; she said "I suppose it is Mrs. Strachan" - I had before told her I took her for robbing Mr. Burns, a Scotchman of eight 10l. a 20l. and a 5l. note and some sovereigns; she said "I did rob him," and said she had part of it, and plenty of drink, using the expression the d-d b-h or d-d w-e - I found four sovereigns and two half-sovereigns on her person; I asked if that was all she had got - she said Yes, and that her part did not amount to 20l. altogether - I found on her a bill of parcels for different articles of wearing-apparel; I left Stewart at the door of the same house to take Sheppard, and he brought her about an hour afterwards - the next morning Sheppard inquired for Mr. Thomas, and said she would tell him who had the notes; she said she had nothing to do with the robbery, that she was in bed and was called out by Lee to get some water to make some tea; she went to the pump, and there was no water - that Lee told her she had got some notes, and she took her to Mother Cumming's, in St. Giles'; that she could not read the notes, but Lee read them to her, and a receipt, which was in the pocket-book - that there were three keys found in the pocket, and they were put into the pocket-book, and shoved down Mother Cumming's privy; she said they got up at twelve o'clock, and Lee took her to a place to sell the notes, and that if one of us went she would find the woman - I went with her to Mrs. Allen's, a fence, in Petticoat-lane: Allen asked her how her friend was - I took Allen; she was remanded once, and then discharged.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Sheppard say she saw the contents? A. Yes, at Mrs. Allen's - she said she saw them; that they were in a pocket-book, with a receipt for 10l. rent.

JOHN STEWART (Police serjeant, F 2). I took Sheppard at the same house at which Lee was taken - I found nothing on her, but the clothes she had on were new and corresponded with what Lee had on.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS . I am superintendent of Police. On the morning after their apprehension I saw the two prisoners; I knew Sheppard to be the daughter of a man who had been in the Police; I spoke to her, and said

I was sorry to see her in such a situation - she burst out crying, and said she had committed no robbery herself, but she would tell me all about it - she then made a statement quite voluntarily, which I wrote down - (reads).

"Early on the morning of the 11th of January I met the old gentleman and a younger man in Oxford-street, both under the influence of liquor, the younger man not so much as the elder one; I was in company with this young woman - we went to Nottingham-court, Mr. Mahon's house; when we got there we had some rum to drink - we remained in conversation an hour, or an hour and a half, and, by desire of Lee, I went to bed with the young man, leaving the other young woman and the old man sitting up together - I fell asleep, and was called up by the other young woman, who desired me to get up and get the kettle to boil; I got up, and we went to a watering-house, where we had some beef and mutton - we then went to Mother Cummins' house in St. Giles', and slept till twelve o'clock in the day; previous to going there Lee showed me a roll of notes, and said she had got them from the old man - she said she could not read, and could not tell what notes they were; we then went to Whitechapel, to the house of a Jew, to fence the notes - she did not know whose house it was, or where situated, but she could point it out; Lee said to the woman, "I have got some notes to sell;" they went up stairs, and then came down - the Jewess went out, returned, and paid forty-two sovereigns and some silver for them; we then purchased a variety of articles which were found in the house where I was taken - I got 7l. in gold for my share, and 2l. was given to Charles Hemmings, the other person,"

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

SHEPPARD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-40

464. THOMAS RIELEY and JANE RIELEY were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 14 bottles, value 2s.; 1 quart of wine, value 50s., and 2 quarts of brandy, value 10s. , the goods of John Cranage .

JOHN CRANAGE, ESQ . I live in Tavistock-square - Thomas Rieley was in my service, as footman , for about five weeks. On the morning of the 7th of January I was called out of bed, and told I had been robbed - I went down and found the Policeman, who had taken the woman into custody for going from my door with fourteen bottles of wine and two of brandy - I found my writing-desk had been opened, in which were the keys of my wine-cellar, and on going into the wine-cellar I found several dozens of wine had been stolen from it; I identify the wine found on the woman, and also more than seventy bottles, which were afterwards found at her lodging; the man now states her to be his wife, but when he came to me he stated he was single, and I believed him to be so.

THOMAS MITCHELL (Police-constable E 157). On the morning in question, about twenty minutes after six o'clock, I saw the female prisoner coming down the steps of the prosecutor's door, rather heavily laden; she had a basket in one hand and a bag in the other - I asked the male prisoner, who was letting her out, whether all was right - he said Yes, all was right; we followed her about one hundred yards, and then stopped her; she said she had got some wearing-apparel belonging to a man who was going to leave the house we had seen her come from - we thought it was not all right, and asked her what it was; she said she did not know - we asked her if she knew the person who was going to leave; she said Yes, it was her husband - we took her to the station, and found on her fourteen bottles of wine and two of brandy; she told me where she lived - I went there, and found seventy-four more bottles, which I believe to be wine, and three small cloths and one large one; I then went back to the prosecutor's house, and rang the bell; the male prisoner answered it - I told him I wanted to speak to him; he said he would be out presently - he had the chain on the door; I said I wanted him immediately - he went down, as he said to get his coat and hat; still the chain was on the door - I rang the bell again; the cook came, she went and told him he was wanted - he made his escape from the house, and was not taken for three weeks.

CHARLES MAYHEW (Police-constable E 152.) I was with Mitchell - what he has stated is correct.

JOHN LAWRENCE (Police-constable F 72). I took the male prisoner on the 3rd of this month, in Grange-court.

MR. CRANAGE. I saw the wine - it is my property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know whose service the man had been in? A. I had a character with him from Miss Morgan, but I am sorry to say it was five months after another character had been had.

LETITIA SMITH . I am cook to the prosecutor - the male prisoner was the footman; he made his escape.

LUCY RANDALL . The prisoners lodged in my house as man and wife - I believe they were married.

T. RIELEY - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

J. RIELEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-41

465. THOMAS FLOWERS and WILLIAM DUKES were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 6lbs. weight of candles, value 3s., the goods of Christopher Wawn and others .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Henry Robinson .

MR. WALESBY conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES LANGSTAFF . I am apprentice to Mr. Christopher Wawn, on board the brig Cumberland. I was in charge of the ship's boat on the 9th of January, at the back of the Half Moon public-house, close to the river side, at Wapping ; it might be a little after four o'clock in the afternoon, or not quite so late - I saw the two prisoners, one on a coal-barge, and the other on a ballast-barge; I went into the yard, and when I came back my boat was laying athwart the coal-barge - I saw Flowers hand these candles out of the boat to Dukes, who was on the ballast-barge; there were 2lbs. of mould candles, and 4 lbs. of other candles, which were going to the cabin - I shouted out to them to let the candles be, they told me to go to hell, or they would heave me overboard; they were quite strangers - they were neither of them in my boat, but Flowers was reaching the candles out of the boat sheets; I went and told my master - he came back with me; he put me on board the barge, and told me to see that nothing was taken out while he went for the Police - I saw Dukes in the barge's cabin, breaking up candles; Flowers then went away in a light barge, and I went to Dukes, and asked him to give me the candles - he told me to go to Flowers, who would give them to me; Dukes then went on shore to the

blacksmith's shop - I followed, and gave him in charge, and Flowers was taken in about an hour afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Was it not a dark evening? A. Yes; I had not property fastened my boat, the painter was put the through the rails, and she had drifted to a barge about ten yards lower down; when I returned they were taking the candles - I could distinguish their persons; I have always given the same account - I was toying a little in the wash-house with the servant maid of the Half Moon, but I did not know her name; that was before I got the candles - I cannot tell what time I took the candles on board; I did not say I could not tell who took the candles.

HENRY ROBINSON . I am master of the brig Cumberland ; Mr. Christopher Wawn is one of the owner s - I sent my boy to a shop for some candles which I had bought; he afterwards came to me - I went on board the barge.

WILLIAM KEATON (Police-constable K 54). I went on board the barge, and found in the cabin 3 lbs. or 4 lbs. of candles broken into pieces.

Flowers received a good character.

FLOWERS - GUILTY. Aged 50.

DUKES - GUILTY. Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330214-42

466. ANN COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January 1 tin-kettle, value 10s. , the goods of William Thompson .

WILLIAM THOMPSON. This is my tin-kettle - I lost it from Mr. Powell's, where I lodge; I know nothing of the prisoner.

MATTHIAS POWELL . I live in Rose-lane, Spitalfields . The prosecutor lodged with me - he left me this kettle on the Saturday night to take care of till the Monday morning; on the Sunday evening I went out about seven o'clock, and when I returned, it was gone, but I did not miss it till the officer brought back the prisoner with it - she and her husband had lodged in my house; I missed several things, and told them to suit themselves.

SAMUEL GREEN (Police-constable H 61). I met the prisoner on the 6th of January with this kettle - I asked whose it was, she said her own; I took her to the station - she then said she took it out of a lark, and took me to the house she took it from.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see a person - I took it out, not thinking any harm of it; it was of no use to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-43

467. GEORGE ACTON DENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 card counter, value 1d. , and 1 sovereign the property of Alexander McLeod .

ALEXANDER McLEOD. On the 14th of January the prisoner came to dress my hair, as he had once done before - I had been paying some money just before, and laid my purse on the table; the porter came into the room for some parcels - I got up to tell him which to take; I heard a noise of money - I turned to the table where the purse laid, and saw it open; I missed a sovereign, and accused the prisoner of taking it - I told him it would be better for him to tell me the truth at once, or I would send for an officer; I rang the bell, and told the landlord to send for an officer - the prisoner then pulled out a sovereign, and said he would never do the like again.

GEORGE WEBB . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330214-44

468. JULIA COTLER DOWN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 pair of breeches, value 8s., and 10 napkins, value 8s. , the goods of John Tripe .

JOHN TRIPE . I am a surgeon , and live in Cannon-street-road . The prisoner lived, with me as cook , but had left me five days before the officer brought this property - we had missed other property, but not these articles; she had been with me five months.

JOHN THOMAS (Police-constable K 24). I received information, and found the prisoner at No. 3, Cottage-lane; I took her to Lambeth-street office, and there she told me this bundle was at the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill, where she and her sister were booked to go to Bristol - I went there, and found the parcel.

MICHAEL DAY (Police-constable K 165). I found on the prisoner this knife, which belonged to the prosecutor's son.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-45

469. WILLIAM HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 pig's head, value 2s. , the goods of James Morris .

GEORGE SULLIVAN . I am servant to James Morris; he keeps a pork shop, and sells pig's heads - he had lost one before this, and on the 18th of January he set me to watch; I hid myself behind some rabbits, and watched from six o'clock till half-past eight - I then saw the prisoner take the pig's head; I had not known him before - he took it from the window, but did not come into the shop; I jumped out, called Stop thief! and he was taken.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON (Police-serjeant D 4). I took the prisoner before the alarm was given, as I knew him before.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-46

470. THOMAS PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January 700, nails, value 8s.; 40 screws, value 1s. 6d., and 1 apron, value 2d. , the goods of John Baker .

JOHN BAKER . I am a carpenter . I lost this property from an unfinished house in which I was at work in Compton-terrace, Islington , while I was gone to tea; some articles had been taken from the next house - we looked about, and found that a wooden-legged man had gone to the building; on the Sunday after, I saw the prisoner, and had him taken on suspicion - he had made a bag of my apron, and had it on him; this is it - I know it by a particular hole in it.

GUILTY . Aged 41. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-47

444. ROBERT SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 ham, value 10s., the goods of James Somers ; and that he had been before convicted .

THOMAS ELSAM . I am in the employ of Mr. James Somers : he lives at the corner of North Audley-street - I

had hung this ham at his door on the 16th of July; I heard an alarm, went to the door, and took the prisoner with it.

JOHN CRAWLEY LITTLE (Police-constable D 74). I took the prisoner with this ham.

GEORGE ELLIS (Police-constable C 66). I produce a certificate from Mr. Clark's office, of the conviction of the prisoner - he was whipped and discharged; I know he is the same person.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-48

472. ROBERT WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 1 gig-cushion, value 1l. , the goods of Peter Mallard , the younger.

STEPHEN VOSS . Mr. Peter Mallard Jun's., gig stands at my master's, Mr. Kirkwood, in Cumberland-mews, West . I shut the carriage-house door where the gig was on the evening in question - I went into the stable; I then saw the carriage-house door open - I went in and missed the cushion; I went and overtook the prisoner with it under his arm - I told him he had stolen it; he took up his stick and struck me - I called the Policeman.

THOMAS GODWIN (Police-constable D 7). I took the prisoner, and have the cushion.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a man had given him the cushion to carry.

STEPHEN VOSS re-examined. There was a man talking to him - but I had seen the prisoner going out of our yard, and that induced me to go after him; I saw he had something under his arm, but could not see what.

GUILTY . Aged 74. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-49

473. HARRIET PENRISE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 4 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 1 shawl, value 17s.; 1 necklace, value 10s.; 1 nightgown, value 2s., and one night-cap, value 1s. , the goods of Elizabeth Evans .

ELIZABETH EVANS . I live in Wellington-terrace, Waterloo-bridge . The prisoner lodged with me, and left with - out notice - she was indebted to me for board and lodging during the whole time she was there; she had told me she was a respectable married woman living on a maintenance allowed by her husband - I missed these articles; I heard she was walking in Regent-street - I went there, and gave her into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you known her before she came to lodge with you? A. No; I was not at all acquainted with her husband - I did not agree to board her when she came, but she met with an accident, and no one came to her; I cannot say that I never went out with her, but it was before I knew what she was - I was not in the habit of going to places of amusement with her; I was not there above three times with her - it was her wish that I should go with her; I paid for her; she has gone without me, and I have lent her money - one gentleman used to visit at my house; a gentleman of the name of Thorn once lodged at my house - I lent the prisoner a shawl once to wear when she was ill; it was returned, and put into my drawer; that and other things were taken away - we went to different theatres; I went to the prisoner's husband to say she had robbed me - he said he had been the things about her, and he wished her to send them home; she said she would rather he transported than send them back; I said unless she did, and made arrangements to pay the rent, I would have her taken.

COENELIUS HEYNDRICK (Police-constable C 112). I was in Oxford-street - the prosecutor gave the prisoner in charge; I found nothing on her, she refused to say where she lived, but I found she lived in Henry-street - I found there this bed-gown and night-cap: she owned to having the shawl and silk handkerchief, which she put round her knee, and lost in the street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She lent me the beads to go to Covent-garden in, and in three or four days afterwards I returned them to her - she would not have them, but put them round my neck again.

MRS. WALEV. I am housekeeper in a gentleman's family; I have known the prisoner twelve months; she had a respectable character - she is separated from her husband; I called at the prosecutor's to see her about a week after she had left - the prosecutrix told me she had lent her a shawl to put round her knee, and she said, if she did not bring the things back and pay the rent, she would charge her with felony.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-50

474. ROBERT TAYLOR was indicted for bigamy .

MARIA TAYLOR . I am the daughter of Ann Taylor , and live with her - she is alive; I know the prisoner - he has not exactly lived with my mother, but he has come home when he could - he slept with my mother, he lived with as her husband, and I called him father; I know his writing, I have seen him write several times - I went to Marylebone church, and searched the register; this is the entry.

- PAUL. I am clerk at Marylebone church. I have the register-book of marriages in that church, which states, that on the 5th of May, 1815, Robert Taylor , batchelor, and Ann Carpenter were married by Robert Lee - it is witnessed by the clerk and the assistant clerk, who are both dead, and so is the curate.

MARIA TAYLOR . I believe this to be my father's writing.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long is it since you saw him write? A. About two or three months; I am seventeen years old - this marriage was a year before I was born; I saw the prisoner write last at Lady Sandwich's, where he lived.

JAMES HIGHAM . I am clerk to a salesman, and live in Hoxton New-town; Mrs. Taylor lodged in my house about twelve months - I have lent her money; she referred me to her husband, and I wrote to him; I have two of his letters here.

MARIA TAYLOR . I believe the letters to be my father's writing - (read.)

Hinckingorook,

SIR, - You seem to take a great deal upon yourself about my wife and family, although unknown to me, and now I must tell you, that all future debts she may contract with you, you must allow her to do so on her own account, for I forbid it on my account; do you think I am going to give up to an extravagant and obstinate woman - no, never; and the sooner she applies to the

parish of Huntingdon the better, as I am here to answer for myself, for I never will send a farthing until she complies with my request; and remember, the parish allowance will not be quite so liberal as my offer is, so, Sir, I think this had better close our correspondence, as there is plenty of things in the apartment to pay that sum - so that if I am troubled with any more letters from you about my wife's troubles, I must return them without any answer - some money will be sent if the papers come signed, and not one single farthing without; I must tell you, that she has had from me for May, June, and July 19l. - now if you are a man of family, I ask you if she ought to starve or not; I think, myself, the best way to settle this, will be for her to apply to the parish, and then I will pay into the hands of the parish what they deem sufficient - I have got copies of all my letters to her respecting what I proposed to allow her, then they, (the parish,) will see whether I wished her to starve or not.

I am, Sir, your obedient servant, R. TAYLOR,

SIR, - I have now to request that you will lend no more money to Mrs Taylor, that is to say, on my account - and also that the rent is at her own charge and not mine; I think it proper to give you this notice, after which you cannot call upon me.

P. S. Will you have the goodness to give the enclosed note to my daughter Maria.

To Mr. Higham, 16, Dorset-crescent, Hoxton New-town.

THOMAS HENRY CARPENTER . I am a bricklayer; I have a sister named Ann - I was born many years before her; I know the prisoner well, he is my sister's husband - I have had frequent conversations with him; the last sixteeen or seventeen years they have lived together as man and wife: I have seen them scores of times.

FRANCES SADLER . On the 24th of January, 1832 , I married the prisoner at St. Pancras church - my sister and another were present; I had been lady's maid to Lady Harriet Baring - I had known the prisoner nine years, and he had been courting me two years; he represented himself as a single man, and I believed him to be so - I had money when I married him, which I laid out in furniture; we lived happily together - I first knew he was married some time in May, by a letter which I received from Thomas Carpenter, but I still continued to live with the prisoner; I have had one child by him.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you was present at the christening of one of his children? A. Yes; it is more than seven years ago; I stood proxy for Isabella Bradshaw - I saw the mother of the child there, but I did not ask if she was his wife; I did not know he was married.

MARY SADLER . I was present when my sister married the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you on a visit to a person at Huntingdon? A. Yes, I was there a month on a visit to a person who I considered Mrs. Taylor; I did not know she was the prisoner's wife.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I apprehended the prisoner in Middlesex.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - (See the Second Day.)

Reference Number: t18330214-51

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

475. JOHN HAYHOE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 seal, value 10s.; 1 brooch, value 5s.; 1 stock, value 1s. 6d., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Edward Tegart , his master .

JAMES HORTON ROBERT CUGNONI . I am pupil to Mr. Edward Tegart, surgeon , of Pall Mall ; the prisoner was his footman for more than twelve months. On the 10th of January the officer was sent for; he arrived about a quarter before six o'clock - the prisoner was quitting the service; his box was packed to goaway - it was searched, and in it was found two pocket handkerchiefs, one of mine, and one Mr. Tegart's, with this seal, brooch and stock - I know the seal and brooch are the prosecutors.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had he lived with your master? A. About twelve months; he first said the seal was his own, but after it was identified, he said it was his master's; I know it well.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found these articles - he first said the seal was his own, but when Mr. Tegart claimed it, he said it was his - Mrs. Tegart claimed the brooch.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe the house is handsomely furnished? A. Yes; and there were many articles of more value than these.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-52

476. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , at St. Pancras , 1 silver tea-pot, value 9l., and 1 silver milk-pot, value 3l., the goods of Jacob Montefiore , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE ALFORD . I am in the service of the prosecutor. On the 17th of January I was cleaning the second floor window; I saw the prisoner on the area steps with this basket, which had the tea-pot and milk-pot in it, but I did not see them in it - I saw the basket, it is a fruit basket; I ran down stairs, and missed from the pantry the tea-pot and milk-pot - I went after the prisoner and found him in custody of a Policeman; in my way back from the place where the prisoner had been stopped, to the prosecutor's, I received the same basket which I had seen the prisoner with in the area, and in it I found this tea-pot and milk-pot.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? A. No; I had a down view at him - the area gate is always kept locked; I cannot tell whether it was open on that occasion or not - he pulled the gate too, but I do not know whether it was closed; I lost sight of him, but for not more than five minutes - I had a sufficient side-view of his face to be able to know him.

THOMAS HARVEY . I am a servant, and live in Gordon-place, Tavistock-square. On the morning of the 17th of January, a little after eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another person at the corner of Ansley-street; the prisoner had a flag basket, and was doubling it up - the other man had a sailor's jacket on; I passed the prosecutor's house again about half-past eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner coming up the steps with the same basket hanging down which I had seen him with before, and it seemed rather heavier - I made a pause, and had a great mind to stop him; he crossed from one side to the other, and then ran - I ran after him, crying Stop thief! not knowing whether he had stolen any thing or not - while I was pursuing him he threw the basket, containing the milk-pot, tea-pot, and some lemons over the enclosure, and these articles fell out of it; I saw a fishmonger's

servant, whom I had known for some years - I told him to mind it; I ran after the prisoner, and found him in custody of a Policeman, about a hundred yards further - we returned and received the property; the other man who was with the prisoner ran away.

Cross-examined. Q. How was the prisoner dressed? A. In a dark jacket, with either white or pearl buttons; I had not known him before - I lost sight of him about two minutes; I stopped and took up the things when he threw them down, and gave them to the other person.

GEORGE PAINE (Police-constable E 1). I heard the cry, and saw the prisoner running; I stopped him - he said he knew nothing about it; I asked what he was running away for - he said nothing at all; I took him back to Tavistock-square, and saw the parties coming after him - these are the property.

MR. JACOB MONTEFIORE. These are my property; I had used these articles at breakfast on the 17th of January, about ten o'clock - I suppose the tea-pot is worth 9l., and the cream-ewer, 2l. or 3l.; I live at No. 24, Tavistock-square - I keep the house, and pay the rent and taxes; it is in the parish of St. Pancras - I do not know the prisoner; I know these articles by the maker's name on them, and by a dent or two on them.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer did not stop me, but a man who owed me a grudge did; he winked at the officer, and said it was all right; and when he got back to the house he told the servant to go and see if they had lost any thing - she went down and brought up some spoons; she said the gate was locked and the kitchen door shut, and I must have got over the rails.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330214-53

477. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 28 lbs. of black lead, value 7s. , the goods of William Pinchin .

JOSEPH BRADING. I am errand-boy to Mr. William Pinchin ; he lives in Church-street, Shoreditch, and is an oil and colourman . On the 24th of December a man came to my master's shop for 28 lbs. of black lead; he had not money enough, and my master told me to go and take it, but not to leave it without the money - I went with the man to the corner of New Inn-yard, where we saw the prisoner; I had seen him once before, and he nodded at me; we then all went to Guildford-street - the man who ordered the lead went into a shop with me; the prisoner told me I was to pretend not to know that man - the people into the shop said they had not ordered it; we came out, and the man said it was no go - the other man then told me to wait at Clerkenwell church till the prisoner and he returned; I waited, but they did not come - I then went towards home; when I got to New Inn-yard I met them - they said they had been to my master's, and I was to go with them to a small shop; I still had the lead - when they got a little way they changed hats and caps; they then said they would not go into the shop, as the people would say there was some roguery; we then went down several streets and got opposite Holywell-mount chapel - the other man then threw me down and took the lead away; I went down some streets and met the prisoner - I said if he did not tell me where the man was, or give me the money, I would give him into custody; he went with me to my master - I did not see the prisoner when the man took the lead - I do not know where he was.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-54

478. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 2 boots, value 2s., and 2 brushes, value 2s. the goods of Arthur Johnstone Blackwood .

The witnesses did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-55

479. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 7th of January , 2 boots, value 12s., the goods of Samuel Woolston ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

JAMES FULLER (Police-constable E 118). I lodge in Cromer-street - on the 7th of January, at half past eight o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner in Holborn, with something under his apron; I asked what it was - he said a pair of boots, which he had brought from Mr. Walker's at St. Giles', and he was going to a Mr. Walker's on Saffron-hill; I took him back, and he wanted to get across into Seven-dials - I took him to the station, and he then said,"To tell you the truth, a man gave them me to carry."

Prisoner. I told him I had got a pair of boots, and I pointed to a young man who gave them to me, but he ran away. Witness. There was a young man at some distance who made away.

SAMUEL WOOLSTON. I live in High-street . These are my boots - they are two odd ones; I had seen them safe about half-past six o'clock - I do not know any Mr. Walker of St. Giles'.

SAMUEL HINDLEY . I live on Saffron-hill. I was present on the 16th of February last, when the prisoner was tried for stealing a pair of shoes from me - I have the certificate of his conviction from Mr. Clarke's office; I know he is the person - he was tried by the name of Edward McDonald .

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-56

480. WILLIAM COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , at St. Paul, Shadwell, 2 waistcoats, value 18s.; 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1l., and 1 hat, value 1l., the goods of Thomas Driscoll , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH DRISCOLL. I am the wife of Dennis Driscoll - he lives in New Gravel-lane, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell . The prisoner came to lodge at our house, and quitted without notice in October last - when he was gone, I missed from my bed-room a watch, worth about 3l., an olive-coloured brown coat, which cost 50s., and had only been worn twice, a pair of blue trousers, worth 1l., two waistcoats, worth 13s., and some shirts, but they belonged to another person - on the 6th of October I went to No. 8, Playhouse-yard, with two Policemen - I waited in the passage, and the prisoner came into the passage; I was going to catch at him, but he made a start from me - I ran after him, and cried Stop thief! but no one stopped him; he made up towards Golden-lane - he had my husband's coat and trousers on; these things had all been kept in one place, and I missed them all at one time; I saw the prisoner again twelve or thirteen weeks after the robbery, in Aldgate; he ran from me, but I pursued, and he was taken.

JOHN WHITELOCK . I live at the Flying Horse, Milton-street, Fore-street, and am a journeyman baker. I have

known the prisoner six or seven years - he called on me about four months ago; I gave him something to drink. and while we were drinking, he asked me if the hat he had on would fit me, and he put it on my head - it was too large for him; I asked how he came to buy such a hat as that - he said an old lady, who was lodging where he was going to work at on the Saturday week, had given him these things; he had white trousers on, and a dark coat - I think it was black: he called on me again in about a fortnight, and seemed rather destitute.

SAMUEL PATRICK (City Police-constable 66.) I took the prisoner into custody from the prosecutrix - he said at the station that he had no occasion to be afraid, for they could do him no injury, as I could find no property on him.

HARRIET JONES . I am the wife of William Jones - we lived at No. 8, Playhouse-yard. The prisoner lodged there as the husband of a young woman in that house - I remember the two Policemen coming there in search of the prisoner; they came up stairs, and Mrs. Driscoll was in the passage - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and on going to the window, I saw Mrs. Driscoll running after the prisoner; I saw him again on the Saturday afternoon in Chiswell-street - I accused him of taking money, which I thought he had taken: he said he had taken no money, but the clothes and a watch - I asked him how he got them out; he said he put them under his own clothes, and buttoned his own clothes over them - he said he ran into a privy in Ball-yard, Drury-lane, and sat there till nine o'clock in the evening.

DENNIS DRISCOLL . I had seen all these articles safe about two hours after the prisoner went to had, on the same evening as he went away; I went up to clenn myself, but I declined doing it, as it was wet, and when I went up afterwards he was gone; I found his cap, his waistcoat, and a key of my bed-room in the room he had slept in - I had not seen my watch since the day before; it was in the same box my clothes were in, and wrapped in flannel.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-57

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

481. GEORGE COOK was indicted for stealing the sum of 136l. , the property of Samuel Fisher - To which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-58

482. SARAH PETERS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Whitaker , from his person .

THOMAS WHITAKER . On the night of the 8th of February I was going house, along Thomas-street, towards London-bridge ; I saw the prisoner and another woman - the prisoner took hold of my arm, and asked me to treat them; she then left me - the other woman came and asked the name; they followed me to the steps of the new bridge- I then felt a pull at my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in her hand - I seized her, and desired her to give it one; she would not - I gave charge of her, and it was taken from her bossom.

JOHN BAYLEY , I am a patrol of the ward. On the evening of the 8th of February, I was called by the prosecutor, and took the prisoner to the watch-house - I found this handkerchief in her bosom.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-59

483 JOHN SPARKS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 24 Wellington-boot fronts, value 32s.; 11 half-boot fronts, value 11s.; 7 boot vamps, value 7s. 6d., and 3 welts, value 4d., the goods of Cuthbert Colling , his master .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing 40 pieces of leather, value 2l. 10s. 10d.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES BROWN . I am porter to Mr. Cuthbert Colling, a master currier , who lives in Bartholomew-close - the prisoner has been six or seven years in his employ, as I have heard. On the morning of the 17th of January I found a pair of half-fronts at the top of the cellar stairs, behind a candle-box, which was not a proper place for it- I lifted up the box, and found under it a pair of Wellington-fronts; this was about eight or nine o'clock in the morning - the prisoner was working about the shop at the time; I told my master, and then called the prisoner, who was then in the cellar - I told him to wait in the shop while I went up stairs; I returned in ten minutes, and when I came back the prisoner was gone in the cellar - I went to the candle-box, and the leather was gone, all but one half-front; I told master of that, them went into the cellar, and found the same pieces of leather which had been under the candle-box, under two papers - I watched the prisoner that day, on the Friday, and on the Saturday, at dinner time, I saw him come up from the cellar; I went into the cellar, and missed some of the leather which had been there on the Friday night - I told my master, then went after the prisoner, and brought him back with my master; the prisoner put his hand into his pocket, took out the four pairs of half-fronts, and said they were all he had.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any mark on them? A. No, but they were at the stairs - I have known the prisoner for four years; I believe he is married, and has a family.

CUTHBERT COLLING . I was informed by Brown of the discovery he had made in the cellar - I went into the sellar, and found this property concealed under the stairs; it was covered with paper - it was what I had seen under the candle-box, and there was one half-front left on the box; this is what was produced by the prisoner, and he said,"This is all I have" - here is a pair of Wellington-fronts, which one of a peculiar description of leather, which I believe, no person but myself cuts; they are a peculiar skin- the prisoner was the shumac man, a sort of porter to the men, he had nothing to do with this sort of leather, but with leather that was not manufactured; the hours of working were in summer from six till eight o'clock, and in winter, from eight till eight - I was in the warehouse on the Saturday, when the prisoner came from the cellar, and went out at the door; he was employed in the cellar in handling the leather through the liquor.

Cross-examined. Q. Then the cellar was the place where he was employed? A. Yes, and these the leather was found; there were other men employed in the cellar,

but not at that particular part - this is the pair I can particularly speak to; it is what we call a kip, not a calfskin - it is a Russian hide; no doubt there are many of them in London - I do not curry them myself, but there is something peculiar in my way of currying; we have a peculiar pattern of our own that we cut by.

COURT. Q. These pieces produced by the prisoner are the same as those you have? A. Yes, they are curried in the same manner, and cut in the same shape.

HENRY DAVIES . I am a constable. I produced the leather which was found under the stairs in the cellar, and the same the piece on the candle-box.

JONATHAN GIBBS . I work for Mr. Colling. This front, which is part of what was found in the cellar, I know to be the prosecutor's.

JOHN BARKER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; he took these pieces of leather out of his pocket, put them on the counter, and said that was all he had about him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him when he was first in the prosecutor's possession? A. Yes; he said he had lost property, and he suspected the prisoner had some about him - the prisoner took this out, and said, "This is all I have got;" he did not say it was Mr. Colling's - the leather was marked by me.

JURY to CUTHBERT COLLING. Q. Do you know of any other place from which the prisoner could have procured leather of this description and quality? A. There is no likelihood of it at all - he has been in my employ six years, and had 17s. a week; there were 5s. found on him.

GUILTY. Aged 48.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-60

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15TH.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

484. JOB FENSOM was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Owen , on the 11th of February , and stealing therein 1 book, value 4s., his property .

JOHN OWEN. I am a stationer at Cambridge-heath - I was not at home when this happened; on the 11th of February, I went out in the morning, and returned in the evening, and found the window broken, and the book gone - it was produced next morning.

HENRY LAMBERT . I am an officer. About a quarter before eight o'clock I saw the prisoner standing by the prosecutors window; and from a circumstance which happened an hour before, I suspected him - I passed by the window and saw it was not broken; I watched him for nearly half an hour, and when nobody was passing by, his two companions gave a signal - and when the regular Policeman passed they went away, and then I observed him leave the window, I met him in the middle of the road with the book under his coat, and secured him - the window was then broken; it was a quarter after eight o'clock, it was not broken half an hour before; he resisted and would not come back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the book laying on the path, and as I knew the officer would take it from me if he saw me, I put it under my jacket.

HENRY LAMBERT. Part of the square of glass was broken out; he told the Magistrate he heard the window break, put his hand in, and took it out as he passed by; I saw the broken glass in the foot path.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-61

Before Mr. Baron Bayley.

485. EDWARD JUDGE was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-62

486. JAMES BRYAN was indicted for a rape , and MARGARET BRYAN as accessary to the same .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-63

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

487. JAMES BUTTERWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 9s., the goods of John Sholl , from his person .

JOHN SHOLL . I am an oilman , and live in Church-street, Bethnal-green . On the evening of the 20th of January, about twenty mistress after six o'clock, I was between Cornhill and the New London tavern; I was perfectly sober- I had my handkerchief in my outside coat pocket; I felt it being taken - I turned round, and saw it in the prisoner's hands; there was a little boy with him, who passed on - I laid hold of the prisoner, and gave him to the Policeman in five minutes - I took the handkerchief off the ground: I saw him drop it; he begged my pardon, and wished me to excuse him, before I accused him of it; he told me the little boy had taken it - I saw it in the prisoner's hands, and saw him drop it; I went back, and found the boy.

HENRY BURSELL . I am a constable, and received him in charge; he begged to be excused - the boy was discharged next morning.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman was three or four yards before me - he all at once turned round, and charged me with taking his handkerchief; a boy ran before him - I asked if that might not be the boy; he said No: it was never in my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-64

488. JOHN PICKERING was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 5 printed books, value 27s., the goods of Philos Gisburne and another .

PHILOS GISBURNE. I am a bookseller and stationer , and live in Bishopsgate-street . On Saturday, the 5th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and said he came from Mr. Barton, a neighbour, for a small day-book; I told him I had not one of the kind he wished, but would get one made by Monday, at twelve o'clock - he said he would go and see if that would do: he said he was in Mr. Barton's employ; he returned in about five minutes - he produced a small piece of paper, and said twelve o'clock on Monday would do; and he ordered a ledger for Mr. Barton, which was to be done by Monday evening, and he also wished for a Bible and two Prayer-books; he said they were all for Mr. Barton, that Mrs. Barton was waiting in the counting-house for them - I got down some Prayer-books, and was going to send four for Mrs. Barton to chose; he wished to have another, which I gave him, and told him he should have the Bible on the

Monday, with the day-book; he said he would return in a short time with the Prayer-books that were not approved of; he did not return that evening - on Monday morning he called for a bill of the Prayer-books; I inquired if Mr. Barton intended to keep the whole of them - he said he would keep the whole if I would take off 2s.; they came to 27s. - I took of 1s. 6d.; he said he dare say that would do, and I made out a bill at his desire, in the name of Mr. Barton; he then said there was some slight difference respecting the account-book, and he wished me not to send them in, but if I would get them both done by the evening, he would call for them; he called in the evening - I suspected it was not correct, and stopped him; he always said they were for Mr. Barton.

WILLIAM LUDLAM BARTON . I live in Bishopsgate-street within. On the 5th of January the prisoner was not in my employ; I never authorised him to call on Mr. Gisburn for any Prayer-books - I have employed him occasionally as a cooper, but never as a servant; I had no occasion for any Prayer-books, nor had any of my family; they were never brought to my house; I heard of this the beginning of January - the prisoner was taken soon after.

Prisoner. I had the order given me by a person in the street; I gave the books to that person.

GUILTY . * Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-65

489. WILLIAM CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 jacket, value 5s. , the goods of Benjamin Harris .

BENJAMIN HARRIS . I am a carpenter , living in York-place, Lambeth. Between eight and nine o'clock on the morning of the 26th of January, my jacket was in an inner room on the ground floor of an unfinished building near London-bridge, in King William-street - I did not miss it till I was informed it was stolen; I saw the prisoner in about ten minutes, at the station-house, with it.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I live in John-street, in the Borough. I saw the prisoner go into the unfinished building - I saw him come out with the jacket, which he rolled up under his coat; I saw Harris and told him - I followed him up Mile's-lane till I met a Policeman, and then gave him in charge, without losing sight of him; he pulled the jacket from under his coat, and gave it to the Policeman.

JOHN KING . I am one of the City Police. The prisoner was given in charge to me in Nicholas-lane; he had the jacket concealed under his coat - Masters gave me information; Harris claimed the jacket in about a quarter of an hour.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the building to look for George Smith, a carpenter; a man there asked if I was out of work - he took the jacket off the floor, and said, "Take this to the public-house, and have a pint of beer, and I will be with you presently."

WILLIAM MASTERS. There was nobody to give him the jacket.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-66

490. THOMAS CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of William Matthews , from his person .

WILLIAM MATTHEWS. I am a stationer in Holborn. On the 10th of January, soon after eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in White Hart-court , and felt a motion at my coat, and a boy passed before me - I was looking very earnestly at that boy, when a gentleman gave me information, and laid hold of the prisoner; I found my handkerchief under his arm - he said he had just picked it up.

Prisoner. Q. Did you feel me at your pocket? A. I felt something press my pocket, and when I had gone four or five steps, the gentleman charged him with it.

JOHN ROGERS . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge; he said he did not take the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-67

491. JOHN WOOD and WILLIAM SYKES were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Kerry , from his person; and that they had both been before convicted of felony .

JOHN KERRY. I am a brewer , and live in Paul-street, Finsbury. On the 3rd of February, about ten minutes before eleven o'clock at night, I was in Long-lane , returning home - I felt my handkerchief safe in my pocket not three minutes before; I did not feel it taken - a witness gave me information; I returned back, and at the corner of Aldersgate-street, I saw him lay hold of Wood and another, who was in his company; and a Policeman took Sykes, who ran across the street and dropped my handkerchief - I did not see it thrown down, but came up in time to see the officer pick it up, not twenty yards from where he took Sykes.

CHARLES PRICE . I live at No. 2, Wade-place, Long-lane - I know the prisoners. About three quarters of an hour after ten o'clock, I saw the prisoners in Long-lane, in company; there were five or six in company together - I saw the two prisoners, with a third, take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket; Wood drew it out and gave it to Sykes - the others went away, except one of them - I crossed over, and told the watchman what I had seen - he sent me to tell Kerry; I saw the prisoners taken into custody - I saw Sykes throw the handkerchief at the watchman's feet; the watchman picked it up.

JAMES McNIELL . I am watchman of Long-lane. Price gave me information; we walked on the opposite side, and saw the prisoners take the handkerchief - Wood stooped down by the side of the wall; I said "They have done it, now you go and ask the gentleman if he has lost his handkerchief, and I will keep them in sight" - he came and gave me information - I took Sykes, and he threw the handkerchief from him, and ran down Hare-court; I ran after him, and brought him back; Kerry claimed the handkerchief - the third person was taken, and discharged by the Magistrate.

WILLIAM HICKS . I am a constable. I received them in charge - I have the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN VINN . I am a Policeman. I have a certificate from Mr. Clark's office, of the conviction of Edward Luck - (read); I was present when he was tried and convicted - the prisoner Wood was the person who was tried under that name.

WILLIAM KERRY . I am a Policeman. I have a certificate of the conviction of Sykes, which I got from the

office of this Court - (read); I am sure he is the man - I was present when he was tried.

WOOD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

SYKES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-68

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15TH.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

492. MARY CRANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 8 sheets, value 1l. 5s.; 5 tablecloths, value 15s.; 1 counterpane, value 5s.; 1 quilt, value 7s.; 1 pillow, value 3s.; 1 curtain, value 2s.; 20 napkins, value 8s.; 5 pairs of stockings, value 7s.; 1 shirt, value 6s.; 2 neck hankerchiefs, value 3s., and 2 pairs of drawers, value 4s., the goods of Sally Jeffery , her mistress . - To which the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-69

493. BENJAMIN WELLING was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of James Welling .

SUSANNAH WELLING . I am the wife of James Welling; the prisoner is his son by a former wife. These shoes and handkerchief were lent to the prisoner by my husband to wear, and then he said he might sell the shoes to buy him another pair of boots - he did not give him the handkerchief; my husband is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-70

494. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 2 pairs of trousers, value 7s. 9d., the goods of Samuel Dias ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

FRANCES FLOOD . I lived with Mr. Samuel Dias, a clothes salesman , in Brick-lane . On an afternoon in November last, I saw the prisoner steal two pairs of trousers from the shop; I saw him pass about three weeks after, and pointed him out - I had not known him before, but I had a sufficient opportunity of seeing him to be certain of him - there were two men together, but the prisoner took them.

LEWIS HARRIS . I am shopman to Mr. Bradley, a pawnbroker. I have a pair of trousers, which were offered in pawn by a man who was convicted in November - I never saw the prisoner.

Prisoner. On the Tuesday before I was taken, Mr. Dias and the officer came to my house; the officer and Mr. Dias asked Flood if I was the person - she denied it, and on the Friday they came and took me.

ROBERT DAVIS (Police-constable H 35). I saw the prisoner in the presence of Flood; she denied him, but Mrs. Dias had threatened her if she identified him, as I was informed.

FRANCES FLOOD re-examined. Q. Did you say he was not the man? A. Yes, my mistress was in a bad state of health, and she told me not to recognize the prisoner to my master, but he is the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-71

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

495. HENRY AKHURST was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 horse-collar, value 7s.; 1 trace' value 2s.; 1 pair of harness, value 5s.; 2 bridles, value 5s., and 1 pair of reins, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Vincent Webb .

WILLIAM WARN . I am servant to Mr. Charles Vincent Webb; he rents a stall in the stable in Ebury-mews - the prisoner was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to see a person who lives in the loft. On the evening before this robbery I saw my master's harness all right, and next morning it was gone.

WILLIAM HAYSON . I rent a room over the stable. On the Saturday night the prisoner came and asked me for a night's lodging; I had known him four or five years before, and told him he might sleep in the loft, which he did, and in the morning he left me without notice - Ward came to me, and said the property was lost; I was ill in bed, and swear I knew nothing about it.

BENJAMIN FLORD . I am a hackneyman. On the Sunday morning in question, about half-past seven o'clock, the prisoner came and knocked at my stable door; I was not up - I had known him seven or eight years; he had been in respectable situations, at Lady Murray's and other places - he brought this harness to me; he asked 18s. for it- I asked whose it was; he said, it had been given to him by a young man who he had done some work for - I said I did not want it, but he begged me to let him leave it with me till he could get a customer for it, which I did; this is it.

THOMAS YOUNG (Police-constable D 132). I apprehended the prisoner at the corner of Riding-horse-lane; he said his name was Hall, and he knew nothing about the harness.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a man had given him the harness to dispose of, and that the stable was free of access to every body.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-72

496. THOMAS BUCKINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 34 yards of flannel, value 2l. 11s., the goods of James Carter and another; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

JAMES CARTER . I am a linen-draper , and live at Hoxton - I have one partner. On the 16th of January, between twelve and one o'clock, I was behind my counter, and saw the prisoner come to the door, and take a roll of flannel from the lobby - there were thirty-four yards of it - I pursued, and never lost sight of him; I saw him drop it.

THOMAS WARR . I was in my shop, and saw the prisoner pass with the flannel under his arm - I turned, and saw the prosecutor come out of his shop - I saw the prisoner drop the flannel.

JOSEPH BLACKHURST (Police-constable N 71.) I took the prisoner, and have the flannel.

WILLIAM ATTRIDGE (Police-constable G 55.). I have a certificate (which I got at Mr. Clark's office) of the conviction of Thomas Heads; I was a witness, and know the prisoner is that man.

GUILTY . Aged 21. Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-73

497. JAMES BROOKS and CHARLES CARPENTER were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of

January , 4 sovereigns, 2 half-crowns, 10 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Thomas Barber , from the person of John Ponsonby .

JOHN PONSONBY . My uncle's name is Thomas Barber - he is a pensioner . On the 16th of January he and I had been drinking - we fell in with the prisoners near the Angel, at Ratcliff-cross; my uncle knew Brooks before; Carpenter was with him - my uncle asked Brooks to have half a pint of beer, and we went into the Queen's Head; my uncle was drunk, but I was not very tipsy - he asked me to take care of his money, and gave me five sovereigns; when we came out of the first public-house; before we went into the Queen's Head, I had changed one of them, and had then 4l. 16s. 6d. in my pocket; the prisoners sat on the opposite side of the table - it was between six and seven o'clock when we went there; I fell fast asleep, and the waiter awoke me about half-past ten or eleven - my uncle and the prisoners were then all gone; I had wrapped the money up in a piece of newspaper - I cannot say what pocket I put it into; I did not miss it till the next morning, when I got up - I had lost my hat, and another hat was left, which turned out to be Brooks', and Brooks had my hat.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Had you not been drinking in several houses? A. I had been drinking; I was not drunk - we had had some rum, and some half-and-half; I think we had been into three houses - my hat was returned next morning.

THOMAS BARBER . I had been drinking a good deal - I have known Brooks twenty-five or twenty-six years; he has been a hard-working man all his life. I gave my money to my nephew to take care of on the Wednesday evening, and on the following morning Brooks came to where I lodge, and brought this hat and a handkerchief which was in it - he said, "Is your money all right, for Carpenter is a bad character, and I have been uneasy about your money all night?"

Cross-examined. Q. Had he not come a considerable distance to bring back the hat? A. Yes, upwards of six miles - I had asked him to drink with me; I believe my nephew was not so drunk as I - he had drank as much as me.

RICHARD ANDREWS . I am pot-boy at the Queen's Head. I saw all these persons come in together - Ponsonby fell asleep - Brooks sat next to him, and Carpenter opposite, but at no great distance, perhaps half a yard - I do not know whether he saw what Brooks did, but if I had sat where he did I should have seen it - I saw Brooks searching Ponsonby's pocket - I was called away, and did not see whether he took any thing out.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you told your master? A. No, he was not at home, and my mistress was confined - I did not tell Ponsonby of it - I did not know but he might be his friend.

JOHN WARNKIN . I am a coal-whipper. I was at the house, and saw Ponsonby asleep - Carpenter sat opposite him; Brooks was close to Ponsonby - I saw him take a piece of printed paper out of his pocket and put it into his own; I cannot say whether there was any thing in it; Carpenter had gone out at the time for about ten minutes - Carpenter went away about eight o'clock, and Brooks between eight and nine; Carpenter had called for a pint of half-and-half, and had no money to pay for it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you give any alarm? A. Yes; I told the men who were sitting there to look at it - one man who was there awoke Ponsonby, and told him he was being robbed; he said something, and laid down his head again directly - Brooks was standing by the fire at that time; I did not say it was white paper which he took from him.

DANIEL DERRIG (Police-constable K 280.) I apprehended Brooks - he told me, of his own accord, the address of Carpenter, and seemed very anxious that I should apprehend him; he said he had cautioned Carpenter several times not to meddle with the man's money.

Brooks' Defence. If I had had the money he should have had it back; I had no thought of doing any thing of the kind - I did not know I had his hat till I got home, and went to hang it up; in walking that distance home I got rather sober, and I could not rest till I went back with the hat and handkerchief.

BROOKS - GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined One Year .

CARPENTER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-74

498. CHARLES BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 50 yards of fustian, value 4l. , the goods of John Henry Skelton .

JOHN HENRY GOODYER . I live with John Henry Skelton , a Manchester warehouseman , in Piccadilly . On the 31st of January the prisoner, who was a stranger, came to the shop - he said he wanted two pieces of fustian for Mr. Curlewis who is a customer of ours; he asked for two pieces to cut from, which is usual in the trade, and I let him have them - I entered them in the book, but it was only to cut from; in two or three days we sent to Mr. Curlewis to return what was left, and he had not had them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How much of these articles did the prisoner come for? A. His words were "I want two pieces of fustian for Mr. Curlewis, to cut from, a dark piece and a light piece" Mr. Curlewis is a tailor - he did not mean the whole piece was to be kept; I did not enter them as being sold - I have entered thirty five yards, and sixteen and a half, as pieces to be cut from, and the rest to be returned.

HENRY CURLEWIS . I am a tailor. The prisoner had been in my employ, but had left me about fifteen months; he knew I dealt with the prosecutor - I never sent for this fustian, and did not have it.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was he in your service? A. About three months; I have reason to believe he has been led away by other persons, as he conducted himself so well with me.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-75

499. HENRY CLEASBY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 silver spoon, value 10s. , the goods of Charles Harris .

CHARLES WORLEY . I am a pawnbroker . On the 14th of January the prisoner brought this silver spoon to me - I saw a crest on it, and asked whose it was; he said his mother's - I detained him.

HANNAH KEMP. I live with Mr. Charles Harris near Myddleton-square - the prisoner used to come to clean shoes and knives; this is my masters spoon.

GUILTY Aged 13. - Whipped and Discharged

Reference Number: t18330214-76

500. THOMAS EMANUEL DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 pair of trousers, value 18s., the goods of Richard Day ; and 1 watch, value 20s., the goods of Jane Hawkes .

RICHARD DAY . I am the prisoner's brother - I lodge with my mother and the prisoner; I lost my trousers, and my aunt lost a watch which was hanging in the same room; my brother left home on the 15th of January, he came back on the Saturday evening and gave himself up; he is a tailor, but has been living with my mother for the last three years.

GEORGE KEDGE . I am a pawnbroker; I have a watch, pawned by the prisoner on the 15th of January.

JOHN WILCER . I am a pawnbroker; I have a pair of trousers, pawned by the prisoner on the 15th of January.

JANE HAWKES . I am great aunt of the prisoner. This watch is mine, and was in the room.

RICHARD DAY . These are my trowsers.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-77

501. CATHERINE GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 sovereign, the money of John Holt , from his person .

JOHN HOLT . I am a tailor . On Sunday morning,, the 10th of February, between two and three o'clock I was going through Fitzroy-square - I had left work at eight o'clock the evening before; I was sober; the prisoner accosted me, and asked me to go with her - I said I was going home, and did not wish to be bothered with her; she followed me up Brook-street , and offered to let me go with her for 6d; I agreed to this, paid her, and went with her up a court - I had a sovereign in my watch-pocket, which I pulled out and looked at before I went up the court - as we were coming out, she kept cuddling round me, and I felt something coming out of my right-hand waistcoat pocket - I put my hand in and missed my sovereign; I did not see a Policeman there, but we went about thirty yards up Brook-street, when I saw a Policeman - I called out Police! she then said, "Why did not you speak about it before?" I gave her in charge - she denied it, but at the station she gave it up, and said I gave it her by mistake for 1s.

JOHN NEEDLES (Police-constable, S 153). The prosecutor called me, and charged the prisoner with taking a sovereign from his waistcoat-pocket; she said she did not, and had not her hand in his pocket; but at the station she pulled it out, and said she thought it was a shilling - I found on her 1s. 6d. in silver, and 6 1/2d. in copper.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him I would not go with him for 6d., and he said he would give me 1s. 6d. - I thought it was a shilling he gave me.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-78

502. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing on the 28th of January , 3 pairs of half-hose, value 4s., and 1 stock, value 2s. , the goods of Sarah Augusta Bell .

ELIZA HASLOCK . I live with Sarah Augusta Bell - she keeps an outfitting warehouse in the Commercial-road ; the shop had been frequently robbed, and we were keeping watch. On the evening of the 28th of January Mrs. Bell's son told me something - I went out, and found the glass broken; I did not see the prisoner, but he was brought back with this property in about five minutes.

JOHN THOMAS (Police-constable, K 34). On the 28th of January, between seven and eight o'clock, I was walking along the Commercial-road; I saw the prisoner go up to the prosecutrix's window - I passed on about thirty yards, then crossed over and concealed myself; I saw him take something out of the window, he crossed towards me, I collared him, and took him back to the shop - I found these articles in his hat, and in his pocket this nail, with which glass is generally cut - he said it was his first crime, and starvation had driven him to it - there were two others with him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-79

503. ELIZABETH HARRISON was indicted for steal - on the 28th of September , 5 table-cloths, value 10s.; 4 glass-cloths, value 1s. 6d.; 5 towels, value 3s.; 5 blankets, value 15s.; 1 pair of snuffers and tray, value 1l.; 1 cap, value 3s.; 2 straw-hats, value 4s.; 1 set of bedifurniture, value 1l. 5s.; 1 piece of drugget, value 1l.; and 6 cups and saucers, value 2s., the goods of Jane Weippart , her mistress .

JANE WEIPPART . I am a widow ; my husband lived in Newman-street, Oxford-street , and the prisoner was then my servant of all-work ; my husband died on the 16th of August - I left on the 28th of September, leaving these articles in the house; the prisoner remained in the house, and was to enter into the service of a gentleman who had the first floor, the day after I left, and she continued there till she was given in charge; when I quitted the house the furniture was mine - I had not sold it; it was mine for the benefit of my landlord - I owed the prisoner 5l. or 6l. for wages; I spoke to her about it, and she agreed to wait twelve months, or two years for it - she said she would not distress me, as she knew I was not able to pay it, and she was not in want; I heard the week afterwards that the landlord had put some person in possession the day after I left.

HANNAH MILLER . On the 28th of September the prosecutrix went out of town; I went with her to the coach-office, and when I returned the prisoner gave me this bedfurniture and other articles to go and pawn, which I did in my own name - I gave her the duplicates, and the money; she told me she would get them out again - she entered that day into the service of the gentleman who occupied the first floor.

RICHARD HOWARD . I live with a pawnbroker in Oxford-street. These articles were pawned there on the 28th of September, but the person who took them in is not there now - here is some bed furniture, blankets, and a tablecover.

MARY ANN WALTON . After the prosecutrix had left

the house the prisoner came to me; she said the goods had been distrained for rent, but she had taken care of herself by taking some articles to pawn - I said it was not just; she said it was no loss to Mrs. Weippart, as she owed her money, and had promised to pay her as soon as she was able, but she did not believe her.

MRS. WEIPPART. She had been paid 1l. 5s. out of her wages.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you leave her any money when you went? A. No, buy she had food in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-80

504. JANE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 2 sovereigns, and 1 half sovereign, the monies of William Smart , from his person .

WILLIAM SMART . I am a carpenter and builder . On Saturday evening last I went out to pay a bill; I met a friend whom I had not seen for ten years - we got drinking; I afterwards met the prisoner in Whitcomb-street - she spoke to me and I at last went home with her, and went up stairs; I had two sovereigns and a half in my pocket - I had not made any bargain with her; I went on the bed - I left my breeches on the floor; my money was in my left-hand breeches pocket - I cannot say what I might have given her; I am turned seventy-nine years of age - she left me, and I missed my money; I do not know but I might have given her a half-sovereign to go and get change - I have a wife.

Prisoner. Q. Did you speak to me first, or I to you? A. I do not exactly recollect; I do not recollect going into the parlour of the public-house, and calling for rum and water, and having a silk umbrella, and telling you to hold it till I got into a coach - I did not go after you and say I would go home with you; I never was in the house before in my life.

ELIZABETH GARDEY . I live at the house in Whitcomb-street; I remember the prosecutor and prisoner coming that evening - I had never seen them before; it is a house of accommodation - they were tussleing in the passage for some minutes; I went out, and she was trying to persuade him to come in; he was very much intoxicated, and had been down in the mud; she put a shilling into my hand, and said, "This is a friend of mine I have known for fifteen years; he is a respectable man, the father of a family, and I found him in company with two prostitutes" - I took them into the first floor front room, and said "this room will be two shillings;" she said, "We came for nothing criminal" - the prosecutor sat down on a chair, and she asked him to send for some rum; he said, "I have had quite a sufficiency" - she said to me, "I know he has many guineas about him, you had better search him for fear any improper person should come up, and rob him;" I said, "That is a thing we never do" - she said."Then you had better search my pockets, for I must go home to prayers at ten o'clock at night, in the family I live with;" she then took out some pieces of bread, and said he took her to the coach-office and gave her some rum and water, and three shillings; she afterwards came down with a half-sovereign to get some drink - I said, "It is a thing we do not allow, for any lady to go away without the gentleman; and my master said there was 2s. to pay for the room - she then gave me the half-sovereign to go; I went, returned, and gave her the change - I then went up stairs to the adjoining room to where they were, to light the fire for some company, and looked through a crevice in the wainscot; I saw her on the bed, and the old gentleman tumbled down twice - he was partly undressed, and laid his clothes on the floor; he then tumbled on the bed, and complained of being cold, and she said she would get her gown and put over him - I then saw her take two sovereigns out of his pocket, I think his waistcoat pocket- she felt all his pockets; she held the two sovereigns up to the candle, put them into her mouth, and went to bed again; I then went down, and told my master what I had seen - he went up stairs, fastened the door of the room they were in, and sent for an officer; in about ten minutes the prisoner was dressed, and was calling to me to get her some rum to treat me and my master - she said the old gentleman was gone to sleep, and she wanted to go home by the omnibus, to her family; one sovereign was found in her stays, and one in her mouth.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not beg you to take care of his money? A. Yes, and I refused - I saw you take the sovereigns out of his pocket; you had been drinking.

CHARLES FREEMAN (Police-constable C 71.) I was sent for, and took the prisoner; I told her she had been robbing the man - she said, "No, I have not;" I said,"What is that in your hand?" she said it was some silver of her own; I said, "Where is the sovereign?" she said,"I have no sovereign;" I was searching her, and a sovereign dropped from her neck; I took her to the station, then went back, and fetched the prosecutor.

JOSHUA FREDERICK CLEMENTS . I saw the prisoner put her hand to her mouth, and take this sovereign from it- I have made inquiry, and I believe she is not a common prostitute.

Prisoner's Defence. The old gentleman gave me the two sovereigns, on my oath, previous to my putting my hand into his pockets - when he dropped his things on the floor he said, "My dear, there is more money," and when he took up the change he said, "Take it for your trouble."

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-81

505. HENRY JOHNSON and JAMES SHAW were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , 1 cask, value 10s., and 10 gallons of spirits of wine, value 10l., the goods of John Anderson and others; and that Johnson had been before convicted of felony .

SAMUEL FIELDING . I am a carman to Mr. John Anderson and others; there are five partners - they are rectifiers of spirits . On the day stated I was in Whitecross-street, about one o'clock - I had a cask of spirits of wine in my waggon; I did not see it taken out, but a woman gave me information, and I stopped and missed it - I saw the persons at a distance before they dropped the cask, but it was very foggy, and I could not swear to either of them - there were more than two or three of them; the cask was picked up, and I knew it to be the one I had lost.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Is not that place a great thoroughfare? A. Yes.

JOHN GILLETT . I live in Chequer-alley . I saw the waggon, and Fielding driving it; I saw Johnson go to the rail of the waggon, and hoist the cask off the pad - it

rolled to the back of the waggon; he then unhooked the chain, took the cask out, and carried it on his knee to the pavement - I then saw Shaw and three others come and stand round it; Shaw lifted the cask on Johnson's shoulder - they made use of a bad word, and all ran down Chequer-alley - the carman came up soon after, and we ran down Chequer-alley, as far as Twister's-alley; we there saw them again; they pitched the cask, and all ran away- Johnson had a shooting-jacket on, which appeared to be new; I can positively swear to the two prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you give any information of this? A. I did not at first, because I was afraid of being ill-used; I afterwards heard some person say there was a reward - I did not hear that from the carman; I am a labourer - I work for the parish, and break stones; I worked for a Mr. Smith for six years and a half, till they had no more work for me; I have not been maintained by a Police-officer since this charge.

CHARLOTTE SHELLY . I was going up Whitecross-street, and saw Johnson go and unhook the chain, and take the cask out, put it on his knee, and carry it to the pavement; I thought he belonged to the waggon till I saw Shaw, and three others come and stand round the cask -Shaw then made use of a bad expression; he hoisted the cask on Johnson's shoulder, and they all ran down Chequer-alley - I ran and told the carman; he missed it, and followed the men, and when we got to Twister's-alley, I saw the men again; I said, "There they are," and they put the cask down.

Cross-examined. Q. What dress had the man on who carried the cask? A. A fustian jacket.

JOHN McDONALD . I am a linen-draper, and live in Chequer-alley. I saw another man carrying the cask, but the two prisoners were there and others - Johnson had a new fustian jacket on.

GEORGE HAWKINS . I know this cask, it is the proproperty of John Anderson and others.

PAUL PLANT . (Police-constable G 94) I took Shaw on suspicion; I saw him in the riding-school, and looked at him - he tried to get away; I said, "Stop, I want you," and took him; I took Johnson afterwards.

ROBERT REID (Police-constable, G 138.) I produce a certificate from (Mr. Selby's office) of the conviction of Johnson, on the 2nd of April, 1832 - I was a witness, and know he is the person.

Shaw's Defence. I was going by, and the man asked me to give him a lift up with it, which I did.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

SHAW - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-82

506. FRANCIS TUBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 1 set of harness, value 3l. , the goods of John Corfield .

JOHN CORFIELD. I am a dressing-case maker . I lost my set of harness from Mount-row, Berkeley-square , where I have a horse stand - I know nothing of its being taken.

JOHM WELLS . I live with the prosecutor. I was in the stable - the prisoner came and said, he had seen Mr. Corfield, and he came to borrow the harness for an hour to show a horse with; I lent it him, and it has never been seen since.

JOHN CORFIELD . I did not send the prisoner for it - I have known him many years; he has been a horse-dealer in respectable circumstances, but has been reduced - I would find him employment.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18330214-83

507. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Joseph Parker .

JOSEPH PARKER . I am a gentleman's servant ; this coat was stolen from a clothes-shop which my wife keeps, in Crown-street - I was at home on the 23rd of January, and my little girl told me of it - I ran out, and saw the prisoner walking with it in the New-row; I called an officer, who took him with it.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS (Police-constable D 145). I took the prisoner with this coat on his arm.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18330214-84

508. WILLIAM LAMBOURN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 coat, value 4l. 10s. , the goods of William Pode .

WILLIAM PODE . I hired a cab on the 8th of January to go from the Haymarket to No. 1, George-street, Adelphi , where I lodge. I had a bundle, which contained this coat - I got out and knocked at my door, and the prisoner drove off immediately; I then missed my bundle - I ran in pursuit of the prisoner, but could not find him; I told an officer, but he was not taken till this month, when he was found at the Rising Sun - he did not deny driving me, but said he had no knowledge of the coat, but that he had given it to me when he set me down at the door.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Were you sober? A. Yes, sober enough to know what I was doing; I had only taken a share of two glasses of rum and water - I did not say I was not sober, and did not recollect him giving it me; it was tied in a black silk handkerchief - the prisoner put it into the cab; he sat on the side of the cab.

CHARLES THOMPSON . On the 25th of January I bought the duplicate of a coat of the prisoner for 3s.

JOHN JAMES BARTLETT . I am a pawnbroker. I produced the coat - it was pawned at Mr. Wood's, my employer, for 1l. 5s., in the name of Jones - I cannot say who by.

ANDREW VALLANCE . I am an officer. I secured the prisoner; he wished to speak to the prosecutor as he was going down to the cell - I asked what he had got to say; he said he had pawned the coat at Mr. Wood's for 1l. 5s.

GUILTY . Aged 22. Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-85

509. HENRY PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 pair of trousers, value 20s. , the goods of John Westmoreland .

JAMES WESTMORELAND . I am the son of John Westmoreland; he is a tailor , and lives in St. Pancras . On the 8th of January, I saw the prisoner loitering about our door - he then snatched at a pair of trousers; he came a second time, snatched again, and got them down - my father ran out, crying Stop thief! he did not get away, but

threw down the trousers - my father took him; these are the trousers.

CHARLES WILDING (Police-constable E 125). I took him and found 3s. 3d. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw another man snatch the trousers, but I did not - they were down by another man's side.

GUILTY . Aged 19. Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330214-86

510. JEREMIAH THOMAS MANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January, 1 pair of shoes, value 3s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of Michael Manley .

MICHAEL MANLEY . I live in Little Norfolk-place, Curtain-road . The prisoner is my son; he lived at home with me - I missed this property; I never allowed him to take these or any other things - he has been going on in the same way for three or four years; I had forgiven him a great many times.

JOHN BOARDS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoreditch. I have a pair of shoes, and a pair of stockings, pawned by the prisoner at different times.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-87

511. WILLIAM MORLEY was indicted for stealing 1 coat, value 40s. , the goods of Thomas Barrell Leonard .

The particulars of this case are stated in the Fifth Days proceeding, when the prisoner was convicted of receiving the coat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-88

512. ROBERT TAYLOR was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

LADY MARY ANNE JULIA LOUISA HARRIET LOWRIE SANDWICH . I live at No. 31, Dover-street . The prisoner was in my service for about seventeen years - he was footman to Lord Sandwich, and since Lord Sandwich's death, he has been my confidential servant and butler ; it was the practice in my family for the prisoner to make out a list of bills due, and I gave him a cheque on Drummond's for the gross amount - a list was made out and presented to me every month, and when made out it was entered in the house-book, which is here; this is the cheque which I gave the prisoner in December, 1831, for bills due in November, including a sum due to Mr. Hayes for coals - the cheque I gave was for 171l. 15s.; here is the entry in the house-book of a sum due to Mr. Hayes in the prisoner's hand-writing of 67l. 10s.; it was shown to me in December, and here is the prisoner's hand-writing -"By draft for November bills 171l. 15s. 10d.;" I have since then been called upon by Mr. Hayes to make this pavment again.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You gave the cheque to the prisoner in December? A. Yes, and the bills were given me at the same time; I do not always look over the bills, but this bill I did look over, and remember it.

GEORGE OLIVER . I am clerk to Messrs. Drummonds. Lady Sandwich keeps cash there; this is her cheque, and I paid it on the 7th of December, 1831 - it is payable to Mr. Taylor, or bearer; I have every reason to believe I paid it to the prisoner, as the entry in the book is in his name - the person who presented that, presented another cheque, drawn by Lady Caroline Montague , for 311l. 1s 8d.; they made together 482l. 16s. 8d. - I paid fifteen 20l. notes, sixteen 10l. and 22l. 16s. 8d. in cash.

WILLIAM HAYES . I am a coal-merchant, and live in Oxford-street. I supply Lady Sandwich with coals; I delivered a bill of 67l. 10s., for coals up to the 10th of September, 1831, - I was never paid it; the last conversation I had with the prisoner was one morning, when I called by his desire; he excused himself by saying her Ladyship was not in town.

GUILTY . Aged 36. See page 249.

There were two other indictments against the prisoner of a similar nature, at the suit of the same prosecutrix,

Transport for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-89

513. ROBERT SUTTON was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ISAAC TWILLEY. I am steward and storekeeper to the Directors and Guardians of the poor of St. Mary-le-bone - their workhouse is in Northumberland-street ; the prisoner was clerk of the cheques ; we manufacture sacks among other articles - they are made by the poor, and sold for their maintenance; Mr. James Clark has sacks of us - he applied in the course of last year for a number of sacks; these cheques are the prisoner's hand-writing. - (read.)

Mr. Twilley, May 22, 1832. Deliver to James Clark 150 - 4 B. sacks. ROBERT SUTTON .

Mr. Twilley, June 6, 1832. Deliver to James Clark 140 - 4 B. sacks. ROBERT SUTTON .

Mr. Twilley, June 12, 1832. Deliver to James Clark 150 4 B. sacks. ROBERT SUTTON .

I entered them in a book which I have here; as they stand now in the book - they are, "on May 22 1832, James Clark, 50 4 B. sacks; on June 6, James Clark, 10 4 B. sacks; June 12, James Clark, 50 4 B. sacks" - I cannot say that I entered them in his presence; I am certain that these are not as I entered them; there has been one hundred erased from each of these places; when I have matle entries in the book it is handed to the prisoner, and he posts it into the ledger, which I have here; it is entered in the ledger, in the prisoner's hand-writing, as it now stands in the journal, but it does not agree with the cheques nor with what I entered in the journal - this invoice is in the prisoner's hand-writing.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Is not Mr. Watts the superintendent of this work? A. He was formerly - he does not superintend the manufacturing department; he is the head of the whole establishment - the prisoner was employed there before me; in this entry there appears to have been an erasure before the word James - I do not know what that is; it might be there when I entered it - I make the entries in this book one day, and give it to the prisoner to post the next morning, about nine o'clock- he posts it, and returns it; no other person but the prisoner and me were employed in the writing department- the books are locked up at night in the store-room, and I kept the key.

JAMES CLARK . I am a sack and bag maker. In M

and June last I dealt with Marylebone workhouse, for sacks and bags - this invoice was delivered to me for sacks and bags delivered from there; on the 22nd of May I am charged with one hundred and fifty sacks, 15l. - on the 6th of June one hundred and forty, and on the 12th of June one hundred and fifty; the amount of the whole bill is 111l. 13s. 2d.; I gave the prisoner this cheque of my own, and on the 27th of August I gave him this other, which I had received.

HENRY VANE . I am partner in a firm of ship-chandler's, at Limehouse - we employ the paupers of Marylebone workhouse in picking oakum. Our half years account to Midsummer last was 23l., which I paid the prisoner at my counting-house, on the 14th of August, 1832; this is his receipt - he wrote it in my presence.

ISAAC TWILLEY . This is my cash-book - it is the prisoner's duty to account to me for cash he receives the same day he received it; on the 18th of July I received of him 46l. 2s. 3d., on account of Mr. Clark, and the cheque he received was 55l. 17s. 2d.; on the 29th of August, I received 45l. 16s., and the cheque is 55l. 16s., and on account of Mr. Vane I received 17l. 12s., and Mr. Vane paid him 23l. - I made these entries in the cash-book in the prisoner's presence, and he paid me no more than is here put down.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-90

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

514. CHARLES BARRELL was indicted for stealing on the 22nd of December , 1 violoncello, value 7l. 7s. , the goods of William Boyce James .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Harris Watson and others.

RICHARD HOLDFORTH . I am under porter to the City of London Literary and Scientific Institution - there are concerts held there; the gentlemen leave their musical-instruments in the theatre. On the Saturday before Christmas day, the prisoner came there, and he said he came for Mr. Watson's base - I delivered a base to him; Mr. Watson and other gentlemen were in the habit of sending persons for their instruments, and I had no suspicion.

HARRIS WATSON. I live in Whitecross-place, and am one of the managers of the music of this institution. I have been in the habit of sending my own bay for my instruments, when I have left them there - the prisoner was intimate with a lad who was in my service, but has left me nearly two years; this violoncello did not belong me.

WILLIAM BOYCE JAMES . I am a member of the institution. I had this violoncello there - it had been lent to me; it is worth seven guineas - I did not send the prisoner or any one for it.

HENRY RICHARD GEISON . I am shopman to Mr. Dexter, a pawnbroker. I produce this violoncello which was pawned at our shop on the 24th of December - I cannot say by whom.

GEORGE DEWER (Police-constable G 151). I apprehended the prisoner, and charged him with stealing a baseviol - I took him to Mr. Watson's; on our way he said it was Callow who told him to go for it; I had seen Callow in his company, and he was with him when I took him - the prisoner said it was pawned, but he did not pawn it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-91

515. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 2 pints of fish sauce, value 4s.; 50 pickled girkins, value 2s., and 8 glass bottles, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of George Coyne .

SECOND COUNT. Stating them to be the goods of Charles Alexander Griglietti .

GEORGE COYNE. I live in Watling-street . On the evening of the 5th of January, I came home and found the prisoner in the warehouse, in conversation with my lad; when he saw me, he turned about and asked if we could tell him where the cork-cutter lived; I said I did not like his coming to the place so late in the evening - I detained him, and found this fish-sauce and other things on him; I sent for the officer, and gave charge of him - he had before produced one of the bottles of pickles, and said that was all he had, but the whole of these were found on him, some in his bat, and some in his pockets - I am agent to Mr. Griglietti, and these were his property; ours is a wholesale warehouse; we do not sell small quantities.

PATRICK SULLIVAN . I am in the service of the prosecutor. The prisoner was in the habit of coming to the warehouse to sell jars, and he used to have things from there. On the evening in question he came and asked for these things - I delivered them to him; he said he wanted them for a relish; he was going off with them when the witness came in - the prisoner used to give me a halfpenny or a penny at different times.

ROBERT TURLE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody and have the property.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-92

516. JOHN ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 watch, value 25s.; 2 seals, value 2s.; and 1 watch-ribbon, value 2d., the goods of William Thomas Fletcher ; and JOHN FRANKLIN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM THOMAS FLETCHER . I live in Bury-court Love-lane, Wood-street . On the Thursday night before the 11th of February I went to bed late, leaving my watch hanging up in the bed-room; I awoke between two and three o'clock - I did not hear the watch tick; I got up, put my hand to the place where it had been, and it was gone - the prisoner Rowe lodged in the next room; my watch had a ribbon and two seals to it.

EDWARD BROWN . I am assistant to a pawnbroker in Newgate-street. Franklin the prisoner pawned a watch at our house for 10s. on Friday morning, the 8th of February, it had two seals to it, and a ribbon; he came again on the Saturday afternoon, and wanted to look at it; I had heard something about it, and detained it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe on the Saturday a person accompanied him? A. Yes, and he desired to see the watch.

WILLIAM DOUGLAS . I live in Bury-court. I took the lodgers of that house to the pawnbroker, on hearing the watch had been pawned - Rowe was one, and I apprehended him; he asked me if I had heard any thing more about the watch; I said, yes, one man had been taken up and I would not lose sight of him - he ran away, but I took him; he then said he took the watch when he went

in for some water; he said he was intoxicated, and when the liquor was in, the wit was out, but Jack Franklin had split upon him, or he should not have been taken; he said they had had a drop of gin together, but they should not have many more drops as he should go over the herring-pond.

JOHN LAWS . I am an officer. I took Rowe into custody; he said he was very sorry that he had done it in a drunken spree, and he supposed he should get seven years of it; he wanted to know if it could not be settled without his going before the Magistrate.

Rowe. I took the watch, and am sorry for it - I gave it to the prisoner to pawn.

ROWE - GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

FRANKLIN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-93

517. MARY CALLAHAN and MARGARET FITZGERALD were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 bag, value 1s., 25 sovereigns, and 19s., the property of James Atkinson , from his person .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

JAMES ATKINSON . I am master of the brig Rowena . On the 6th of February I called at the office of Mr. Metcalf, and received twenty-four sovereigns and 1l. in silver - I had one sovereign before, and I put it all into a bag, tied it up, and put it in my right-hand breeches-pocket; when I got to the corner of Harp-lane, Tower-street, Callahan asked me to buy an orange of her, and said she would let me have two for 1 1/2d. - I said I would give her a penny for the best, and I did so; she then asked me to give her something to drink, and I said I would, as it was cold - we went to the Three Kingdoms' public-house ; I passed the bar, opened the door of a room in which there was no person, and we went in - the other prisoner followed me, but I did not speak to her; I called for 4d. worth of gin and water, and the women called for what they chose, which I think was brandy - I had to pay 6d. for it; I sat down - Callahan was on my right side, and Fitzgerald on my left on the same seat, but not close to me - when I had to pay for the liquor, I could not feel a shilling among my money; I pulled my bag out, held it fast, and was looking for a shilling - Callahan saw it, and said, "There is a shilling;" I paid that shilling, and got 2d. back - I then rolled the bag up again, and shoved it into my pocket; I might sit there for three quarters of an hour, but I missed my money and bag before the prisoners had been gone ten minutes, and no one else had been in the room; I called out that I had been robbed, and desired the landlord to get an officer; I stopped there till the two women were brought in custody in an hour - I had seen the cook there; she brought the liquor and took the money; I did not see the prisoners searched - I was ordered out of the room; when they were brought in they were asked if they had any money - they said they had none; I have got 14l. 14s. 10d. back.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you in the habit of giving liquor to ladies? A. No; I had not been out of my ship for a week before - this was done at their request, it was an accident; we went to a room in which there was no other person, but nothing passed between me and either of the prisoners before I went there - I did not say I wanted a wife for that night: my duty required me to go back to my ship, as I had twelve men to pay that night, and the ship was going away at four o'clock the next morning; Fitzgerald sat at a distance from me - I did not button up my pocket when I put my bag back into it; I rather think it was taken out of my pocket while I was reaching over the table to take my 2d.

SINAI DOLD . I live at the Three Kingdoms. I saw the prosecutor and prisoners there, I served them with two small glasses of brandy and one glass of gin and water; the prosecutor put his hand into his bag to find a shilling; he pulled it up, and Callahan said,"That is a shilling, she gave it to me;" I gave him 2d., and at that time I saw Callahan wink at Fitzgerald; they were afterwards brought back to our house, and asked if they had taken Captain Atkinson 's money; they said No; I searched Fitzgerald first - her clothes were not then taken off, but I found on her four pieces of gold and some odd silver; I then went to search Callahan; she put her hand behind my back towards Fitzgerald - I said I thought something had passed; I searched Fitzgerald again, and found in her bosom five sovereigns - I had searched her bosom before, and they were not then there; I then searched Callahan and found some gold on her, but before that she said she was guilty.

Cross-examined. Q. I thought you said that they both said they were not guilty? - A. So they did at first, but just as I was going to search Callahan I asked her again, and she said she was guilty - the officer was in the room; I am sure it was not at the prosecutor that Callahan gave the wink.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am street-keeper. I received information, and took the two prisoners in Thames-street, where they generally sit with fruit; they said they were innocent - I took them to the Three Kingdoms, had them searched, and have the money.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known them before? A. Yes, about three years; they get their living by selling fruit - I never heard any thing against them before.

JOHN AMBROSE , (City Police-constable 28) I have known the prisoners about six months - I had seen them put up their baskets at a house at the corner of Harp-lane; I went there the day after this robbery - I found five baskets there which I know to be theirs, and this bag was close to them.

JAMES ATKINSON . This is my bag; this 14l. 14s. 10 1/2d. was found on the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. It was in your right-hand pocket? A. Yes, and Callahan sat on that side - Fitzgerald could not have taken it; Callahan might have taken it without her knowing it.

COURT. Q. How far was Fitzgerald from you? A. Not more than a foot, on my left side; they both left the room together - no one came into the room after the cook left it.

JURY. Q. Did you pull out the money when you paid for the orange? A. No; I had a penny, or per

haps twopence in my pocket - I had not spoken to Fitzgerald at all.

The prisoners received excellent characters.

CALLAHAN - GUILTY. Aged 17.

FITZGERALD - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-94

519. SIR JOHN LADD was indicted for stealing on the 1st of January , 1 watch, value 5l., the goods of Richard Pinfold Ganthony , his master - also for stealing, on the 19th of January , 6 watch-cases, value 24l., and 4 watches, value 40l. the goods of Richard Pinfold Ganthony, his master - also for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 watch, value 12l. the goods of Richard Pinfold Ganthony, his master - To which indictments he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 46.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined, on the first indictment, Two Months; on the second indictment, Two Months more; and on the third indictment, Two Months more .

Reference Number: t18330214-95

520. JOSEPH MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 23 dead fowls, value 2l. 17s., and 1 basket, value 1s., the goods of Francis Wragg ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

JOHN WALKER . I am a warehouseman, and live in Newgate-street. On the morning of the 14th of January I observed a cart standing in Newgate-street , between eight and nine o'clock; the prisoner was near the cart, and a man was in it - the man gave a flat to the prisoner, who took it and crossed the road with it; the other man came with him, and said to him, "Go on, it is all right" - I let them go on about three feet, and then I took the prisoner with the flat on his shoulder; he told me not to handle him, and he would not go away.

Prisoner. Q. Did the man say "It is all right?" or"Go on, I will follow you?" A. He said, "Go on, it is all right;" but I knew the owner of the cart, and I knew he was not employed by him.

FRANCIS WRAGG. I live in Lamb's Conduit-street, and am a poulterer . This is the flat; it was in the cart - it contained twenty-three dead fowls; it was in my care.

Prisoner. Q. Was there anything else in it? A. Yes; three pigeons - the cart was Mr. John Gadd's.

TIMOTHY FISHER HODGSON , (City Police-constable, 34.) I took the prisoner and this flat, with the fowls in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the man at the corner of Warwick-lane; he offered me 1s. to carry the flat - I crossed the road and was taken.

JOHN DAVIES . I know the prisoner; I have a certificate of his former conviction - since then I have watched him very narrowly; he has been trying to get his living in an honest way.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18330214-96

521. JOHN KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 15lbs. of pork, value 8s. , the goods of Robert Pocklington .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Joseph Moulden .

JOSEPH MOULDEN. I am a butcher , in the employ of Mr. Robert Pocklington. On the 2nd of February I was drawing his truck from Newgate-market to the Old'Change - at the corner of St., Paul's Church-yard , a young woman told me a man had taken a leg of pork out of the truck; I followed the prisoner, and saw him drop this leg of pork in Friday-street - I knew it to be my master's.

SARAH ELIZABETH BRIMBLE . I was crossing the end of Watling-street - I saw the prisoner take the leg of pork from the truck; I told Moulden, and he ran up Watling-street after the prisoner, who had the leg of pork in his hand.

JAMES BATES (City Police-constable 44.) I took the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. What did I say? A. You said poverty had driven you to do it, and you hoped I would take you to the prosecutor.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330214-97

522. THOMAS CUFF was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of George Ingall , from his person .

GEORGE INGALL. I am a commercial traveller , and live in Dorset-street. On the 4th of February I was walking in Fleet-street , at a quarter after eight o'clock in the evening - I felt something at my pocket, and turned round; the prisoner was close behind me, and had my handkerchief in his hand.

Prisoner. There were two or three boys who threw this handkerchief on my breast - I took it in my hand, and the gentleman took me. Witness. I saw some boys at a distance, but did not see any thing thrown to the prisoner; he was putting the handkerchief under his arm, and when I looked at him, he pretended to use the handkerchief; I have inquired, and find he has a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-98

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16TH.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

523. JOHN PAINE (THE YOUNGER) was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 14 spoons., value 2l. 10s.; 2 pairs of sugar-tongs, value 13s., and one 5l. Bank note. the property of John Paine , in his dwelling-house ; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN PAINE . I am a pianoforte-maker , and live in Frederick-place, Hampstead-road - I only lodge there; it is not my dwelling-house - the landlord lives in the house. The prisoner is my son, and was apprenticed to a cabinet-maker; he was living with me - I lost a variety of plate and silver-spoons, and out of my desk a 5l. note.

CHARLES WALTER . I am servant to Mr. Merret, a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of silver tongs, pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM PETHEBRIDGE . I am servant to Mr. Hall, of High-street, Marylebone, a pawnbroker. I have four silver table spoons pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM THOMAS BARTON . I am servant to Mr. Cockel, a pawnbroker. I have a tea-spoon, a mustardpoon, and caddy-spoon, pawned by the prisoner.

CHARLES DEARING . I am a Policeman. I was on

duty at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in by his brother; and before he gave him in charge, he came up to me, put this 5l. note into my hand, and one spoon, saying it was property he had stolen from his father that day.

THOMAS GODFREY . I apprehended the prisoner - on searching him I found four duplicates of property which he had pawned - I found him in company with two prostitutes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I deny being with any prostitutes - I beg for mercy.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-99

524. JOHN DUIG was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 2 loaves of bread, value 1s. 5d. , the goods of Thomas James Webb .

THOMAS ROGERS . On the 13th of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in Portman-street, and saw the prisoner with two loaves in his hand - he ran away round Portman-square, into Edward-street; I called Stop thief! and pursued him - he threw the bread down; I followed, and saw him stopped - I am sure he is the man; I did not see where he got it from.

JAMES CLAPSON . I am a Policeman. I was on duty, I heard an alarm, and took the prisoner - I have the bread.

ALEXANDER ALLEN . I am servant to Thomas James Webb, a baker , of Great Marylebone-street . I left my basket in the square, while I went down to serve a customer, when I came back, I missed two loaves - these are them.

Prisoner. I never touched them.

GUILTY *. Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-100

Second London Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley.

525. THOMAS HODGSON was indicted for feloniously stealing from and out of a certain Post-office, a letter , the property of Joshua Watson .

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS, SCARLETT, and SHEPHERD, conducted the prosecution.

JOHN NELSON . I am clerk in Messrs. Foster's bank, at Carlisle. On the 5th of January, the Rev. William Mark came to our bank with a printed circular letter, and 10s. 6d. in silver - he gave it to me, and wished to have the money transmitted to London; this is the letter which he brought- the blank describing the nature of the enclosure, I filled up, and enclosed in the letter half a guinea in gold, I folded it up, and wafered it; I placed it in a drawer in the Bank where letters for the post are placed, and on the same evening I took it to the Post-office, and put it in, to go by the London mail that night - the direction to the letter was all printed "To the Secretary of State, Whitehall, on His Majesty's Service, Issue No."

The letter was here read, stating that the half guinea was enclosed, being a collection in aid of the National Society, addressed to "Joshua Watson, Esq., Treasurer ."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You put the half-guinea into the letter? Yes, I put nothing else into it.

MR. SHEPHERD. Q. Was it loose in the letter, or enclosed in paper? A. It was closely folded in the inner half sheet - it was not likely to slip out.

HENRY MEAUX. I am clerk in the Inland Post-office. The Carlisle mail bag of the 5th of January arrived at the Post-office, on Monday, the 7th of January - I opened it, and took out the letters; I put the franks on one side, and the other letters on my right - it is then the duty of the messenger to take the franked letters to the frank-table (looking at the letter); in the usual course of business this letter would be taken to the frank-table by the messenger.

Cross-examined. Q. If a letter comes into the hands of an experienced person in the office, may they not discover whether it contains an enclosure? A. They may by the weight, or by holding it up to the light, or feeling it, they could tell this contained only one coin, but franks go to the table without being examined - an immense number of letters contain Bank notes; a great many of these letters came containing very small enclosures about that time - it was the prisoner's duty to stamp letters at the frank-table.

JAMES LEIGHTON . On the 7th of January I was inspector of franks at the frank-table, and was on duty at the frank-table that morning; the prisoner was also employed at the frank-table - I observed him there first about ten minutes after six o'clock; the frank-table is divided into two parts - the interior part is called the pound; he was employed on the outside of the pound at that time - his duty was to face the franks, which is putting all the directions the same way, and separating those addressed to the public offices from the others; the State letters addressed to the different public offices are placed inside the pound - the greater part of the franks are stamped inside the pound, and the rest outside; the greater portion of the State letters are stamped in the pound - I observed the prisoner inside the pound in the morning;(looking at that letter) this is a State letter - it would go inside the pound to be sorted to the office it was to be sent to, certainly, but whether it was stamped outside or inside, I cannot say - after being stamped, it would go into the hands of the person who sorts all the State letters, to their respective offices; a letter of this description having been once stamped, and inside the pound, could not have got outside without being taken improperly - it would not get outside the pound in the ordinary course of business; the letters would be again examined inside the pound by the inspector of franks, and put into a bag to be delivered to their respective directions - the prisoner's duty inside the pound was to sort the whole of the State letters for the offices; if any money-letters were among them, the person's duty would be to hand them over to the inspector of franks - it would be the duty of any messenger to do so; the instructions I have always given, is to take any money-letters to the inspector, who sits at a different part of the same table, and my practice as inspector of franks is to take them to the clerk of the money-office - if a letter of this nature containing money came, I should not send a messenger with it, but should take it myself to the clerk; I am not prepared to say whether that is the practice of the other inspectors - the money-book office is about the length of this Court, from the table, in the same building; you go out of one room into another - Mr. Hume was the other inspector of franks that morning; I am not aware that there are any water-closets appropriated to the messengers.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you been in the office? A. Twenty-six years; there are water-closets for the clerks generally, but I do not know of any particular one for the messengers - there are four inspectors of stamps, but only two employed at one time; it is the duty of about seven messengers to be at the frank-table - I know Baker, a messenger; the frank-table receives all the franked-letters - we have nine or ten thousand in a morning; they are placed on the table indiscriminately at first - one messenger in particular sorts letters for the Secretary of State, and at one time that morning I saw the prisoner engaged in that duty - I cannot say who else sorted; I do not think I saw Baker there - little inaccuracies sometimes occur; there is nothing on the face of this to denote that it is a money-letter - coin is very commonly transmitted by franks; I never saw a particular Post-office stamp for money-letters - they are often endorsed "money-letter," but whether it is endorsed or not, if the messenger discovers it, his duty is to bring it to the inspector; it might easily escape his observation - the prisoner has been in the office seven or eight years, I believe; I understand his father was there a great many years before him; letters addressed to the principal officers of state are sorted inside the pound, which is the interior of the frank-table; a letter intended for the inside might, by mistake, he outside.

MR. SCARLETT. Q. Was the prisoner employed on both sides the pound that morning? A. He was; if he found a letter outside; his duty was to put it inside.

JOSEPH HUME . I am an inspector of franks. I was on duty on the morning of the 7th of January; Leighton and I were the only inspectors employed - I observed the prisoner about three-quarters of an hour after; I had been there in the pound - I did not see him outside; I was there about six o'clock - he was in the pound about a quarter before seven; I did not observe him there long - I missed him about seven o'clock, or a quarter after, and sent a messenger to ascertain where he was - when persons employed in sorting letters discover a money-letter, they should bring it to the inspector of franks; it was the practice of Leighton and myself to keep the money-letters until the end of the morning - I always keep them to the end of the morning, and then give them to Mr. Leighton in a mass, and he would himself carry both mine and his own letters to the clerk of the money-book; the messengers are very seldom trusted to carry them to the clerk; I have known an instance of one single letter being carried by a messenger, but under pocidiar circumstances - it is not the practice; I am certain I did not send the prisoner with any that morning - it would not be his duty to do so without particular orders; it would be against his duty to take it without orders; we never send a letter to the clerk of the money-office unstamped - they are always stamped first.

Cross-examined. Q. What letters do you and Leighton keep till the end of the morning? A. Letters containing coin - the duty would not end on Monday morning perhaps till eight o'clock, or a little after; I have sent a messenger with a money-letter to the clerk, but it is not the practice - our time is very precious, and we have not time to go there; business is done as quick as possible - inaccuracies sometimes occur without a criminal intent; the prisoner has been a messenger some time.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am a Police-officer, employed entirely by the Post-office. On the morning of the 7th of January, by direction, I placed myself in a watercloset, leading from the passage of the secretary's office in the Post-office - I believe there is only one watercloset on that floor; I went there about half-past six o'clock, and remained there nearly an hour - about half-past seven the prisoner came into the water-closet; I took hold of him, and told him he must come with me - if any body except the prisoner had come there I certainly should not have seized him; I told him I must search him - he said, "Allow me to go into the water-closet to ease myself;" I said, "No, Hodgson, I can't, you must come with me;" he endeavoured to prevail on me to allow him to go in - I said, "Hodgson. it is of no use, you must come with me;" I took him into the adjoining room in the passage - I searched his coat, and could find nothing there; I then searched his right-hand breeches pocket, and took out a purse, containing three sovereigns and a half - I then searched his left-hand trousers pocket; I was in the act of searching it, when he put his left-hand into that pocket, and said, "I will give you what I have got;" he took two letters out, and gave them to me - I took them from his hand; I then asked where he had got them from - he made no answer; I asked him again, and he made no answer - I said, "Hodgson, you are not bound to answer unless you think proper, but it is my duty to ask you where you got them from;" he then said, "I got them from the office;" I asked him from what part - he said from the frank-table; I then marked the two letters - these are them, here are my initials on them; I took the letters to the clerk in waiting, then took the prisoner to Bunhill-row station, and went to search his house in Hertford-place, Haggerston - I found his wife there, and six or seven children, and she was far gone in the family way; I mentioned very slightly to her that there was some little suspicion of dishonesty, and under those circumstances we had come to search the house (thinking it not proper to state the nature of the case) - I found eleven sovereigns; I left one with her, and brought away ten - I then returned to the prisoner at the station-house, and took him to Mr. Peacock, the solicitor to the Post-office - Mr. Austin, the inspector of letter-carriers, had accompanied me to the house with the prisoner; we went in a coach with him to the solicitor's office, and in the coach the prisoner asked how his wife felt; Austin replied that he did not tell her the whole nature of the case, but that she felt rather uneasy - the prisoner then gave a heavy sigh, fell backwards, and said, "Poor thing, she must know it;" I then went with him to Mr. Peacock's office - I took him into the office, and Mr. Peacock said,"Hodgson, I am sorry to see you in that situation;" the prisoner said, "There is no one so sorry as myself;" Mr. Peacock asked how long he had belonged to the office - he said about eight years; I rather think Mr. Peacock took his answers in writing, but I am not certain.

MR. PEACOCK. When I examined the prisoner I did

not take his answers in writing - I made a memorandum of a particular reply which he made.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I take it for granted you cautioned him how he answered? A. I told him whatever answer he gave, might be used against him; I will send for the memorandum.

ROBERT TYRRELL in continuation. Mr. Peacock said,"You well know the consequence of this thing, and you recollect what occurred this time twelve months"; the prisoner replied, "I hope it will not be so bad as that." Mr. Peacock then said, "You are not bound to answer questions unless you think proper - What explanation have you got to give of the letters, Hodgson?" (holding the letters in his hand) the prisoner replied, "What can I say, Sir?" I then took him to Bow-street; he was examined before the Magistrate - the Magistrate asked if he had any thing to say; he said No - I believe what he said was taken down; this was at the first examination - he was then remanded for a week; I attended the second examination, and what he said was taken down - (looking at two letters) these were marked by me, and are what the prisoner gave me; one was stamped and the other was not - the one directed to the Secretary of State is stamped; I have been employed by the Post-office nearly three years - there is one water-closet below appropriated to the messengers alone; there are others, but not near the messengers' - the clerks water-closet is nearest to the frank-table, but the messengers' is not a great distance, it is down a stair-case; he must go out of the office altogether, and along the hall to go to the Secretary's closet.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you examine to see if the messengers' water-closet was engaged at the time? A. No; I should say he could not so well destroy a letter in other closets as in the Secretary's, because that has a spring lock to fasten the door inside, and he could fasten himself in, and prevent any one coming in - he did not tell me he had a violent pain in his stomach; he said, "Allow me to go in and ease myself" - he did not say he was in pain or any immediate pressing nature; there is a lock to the messengers' closet, but no spring fastening; the key is seldom inside the lock - I do not know whether it was in that morning, if so he could have locked himself in - I did not mean by what I said to convey to the Jury that there was no means of fastening the messengers' closet; if he went there and the key was not there, somebody might come in while he was destroying the letters - after I saw the letters he said, "Will you allow me now to go to the water-closet;" I said, "Certainly" - I had no motive in not stating that before; I did not think it important - he waited long enough to ease himself; I saw him undo his braces and sit down - the door was ajar - the letters were sealed when I took them from him.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you were examined did you recollect his asking to go in again? A. I did not - if the question had been asked I should have told you.

MR. PEACOCK. Here is the memorandum - I recollect, by looking at this paper, that he said he was facing franks part of the time, and sorting letters part of the time; the rest of the memorandum does not relate to this inquiry.

WILLIAM BOCKENHAM . I am a clerk in the Post-office. On the 7th of January I took this letter to the Secretary of State's office, Whitehall - when I got there I was directed to take it to the office of the National Education Society, No. 67, Linclon's Inn-fields; it was sealed when I had it - I took it there, and opened it there; it contained half a guinea.

WILLIAM DYOT BURNABY . I am clerk to the Magistrates at Bow-street. This is the statement I took from the prisoner's mouth; he did not sign it - I took it from what he said on the 14th of January.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was he examined twice? A. Yes, before Mr. Halls - I did not attend the second examination - I took down from his mouth on this paper what he said; it is signed by the Magistrate - I read it over to the prisoner; he said, "That is what I wish to say." - (read.)

The prisoner says "The letters I had in my possession, were for the purpose of taking them to the clerk of the money-book - I was taken very bad in my bowels at the time, and went to where I was taken; I went to one water-closet first, somebody was there, and I went to the other instantly; but as to stamping the letters, I did not observe whether they were stamped or not.

JAMES LEIGHTON re-examined. At that hour in the morning every body is very busy - there is a large fire in the secretary's lobby; I do not know where the watercloset is.

COURT. Q. Should you go into that lobby in going from the frank-table to the money-book office? A. No; I could have gone into the lobby if business took me there- I suppose I must have gone about business.

MR. BOCKENHAM re-examined. I know the secretary's-lobby, where the fire is - there is a messenger to prevent persons going there who have not business, and to whom they must state that they have business; the messenger is forty or fifty feet from the water-closet - he sits in the outer lobby, near the fire.

Cross-examined. by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Does he sit at the fire? A. Yes, or else he is going from one office to another; most people at that hour are engaged in their different departments - I should not pass near the fire to go to the water-closet.

COURT. Q. To go from the frank-table to the moneybook-office, should you go to that lobby? A. No; it is in quite a different part of the building.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning in question I was at the Post-office by six o'clock, and was suddenly attacked with a violent pain in my bowels, and ran to the closet - I found the first occupied; I came back to the office again, and resumed my sorting - I went to the Ship-letter office to leave a letter, and in my hurry took up the two letters in question, and made the best of my way to another closet, where I met the officer, who took me into custody, and to whom I delivered the letters which I had in my hurry put into my pocket; and which I might have put into the fire in the lobby, if improperly disposed; I declare solemnly my innocence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-101

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

526. JOSEPH REEVES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Byway , on the 11th of January , and stealing therein 1 watch, value 2l. 10s.; 1 set of fleams, value 5s.; 1/2lb. of cigars, value 5s.; 1 guinea, 1 half-sovereign, 7 shillings, and 6s. in coppers, his property .

JAMES BYWAY . I keep a public-house in Long-acre . I apprehend somebody had remained in my house over night, and broken out of the kitchen - I saw the prisoner in my tap-room drinking on the evening of the 10th of January, at a quarter to ten o'clock, and never saw him go out; he had lived with me above twelve months - at six o'clock next morning the Policeman alarmed me, and I found I had been robbed; I lost the property stated in the indictment - there was more than 7s. in shillings, and 6s. in farthings, and 5s. or 6s. in halfpence, or penny-pieces; I saw part of the property again on the 13th at No. 52 Monmouth-street; the prisoner was in the room - John Smith , the officer, was with me; he searched him, and found a sovereign and a half on him, (not a guinea;) we found half a pound of cigars tied up in a newspaper, and a set of fleams - we asked him about my watch - he denied it for a considerable time; at last he fetched us the duplicate out of a crack in a small cupboard; we found some tea, coffee, and other things in his box, which I believe was taken from my bar.

GEORGE ADAMSON I am a pawnbroker. I have a watch, which the prisoner pawned in the name of Archer, on the, 11th of January - it is worth about 2l. 10s; I lent him 1l. which was all he asked for.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN LLOYD . I am pot-boy to the prosecutor. I remember seeing the prisoner on the night of the 10th of January, at half-past eleven o'clock - I shut up at twelve; I did not see him go out.

JOHN SMITH . I am a Policeman. I went with Mr. Byway to the prisoner's lodging - his account is quite correct.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s only . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-102

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

527. DANIEL DENYER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 8 pairs of shoes, value 24s. , the goods of Richard Chart .

RICHARD CHART . I am a shoemaker . I live at Great Ealing - the prisoner has worked for me nearly nine years. In consequence of information last Saturday morning, I went to Mr. Butcher's, and found a pair of shoes, which I could swear to - I went in about three hours to the prisoner's house; he was from home - his wife fetched him, and I said I had something serious to talk to him about; that he was aware I had lost property to a great amount - I had traced property pawned at Butcher's, and had traced it to him; he put his hands up, and said, "All that I have got to say, master, is, be merciful"- Tomkins was there; he said he had not taken much - I said I was convinced he had taken a great deal; I said"You have taken eight pairs in one week" - he said,"No, master, five pairs I took in one week;" he still asked for mercy, and said I should find more if I sent to Butcher's - I said, "You have shown no mercy to me, and can expect none from me;" I neither threatened nor made him any promise - I gave him in charge, returned to Butcher's, and found seven more pairs of my shoes.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. He worked nine years for you? A. Yes, and in my shop nine months - he has no family; I thought I could trust him with any thing, but I was constantly missing shoes.

JAMES TOMKINS . I was present when Chard and the prisoner were together. Chard said he was sorry to say he had found he had been robbing him to a great extent; he said, "Not to a great extent," the prosecutor said"You have - there are several more shoes pawned at Butcher's;" I think he said "Not above four or five;" then he said, "I think there may be seven or eight" - he said, if Mr. Chard was harsh with him it would be the first time that he had been harsh, for several of the men had robbed him, and he had not been harsh with any of them.

JAMES CHARLES BUTCHER . I am a pawnbroker and live at Brentford. I have some shoes, pawned by the prisoner's wife at different times; the first was pawned on the 19th of June.

RICHARD CHARD . They are all mine - the prisoner's wife was never in my employ, and had not access to my house; she has been there but once for three years.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-103

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

528. WILLIAM HART and JAMES KIRKHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 168lbs. weight of potatoes, value 5s. and 1 sack, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Pegg .

JOSEPH PEGG . I am a green grocer , and live in King-street Cloth-fair . I bought a sack of potatoes at the water side, I saw them on the morning of the 2nd of February, I was getting coke out of the cellar; my wife and daughter called me up and gave me information in the evening - I went after the prisoners, and caught sight of them about a dozen yards from our door; the sack of potatoes was dropped in the back yard of my premises - the prisoners were strangers to me.

Hart. Q. Was I not in liquor? A. Not in the least, for it took six of us to take him to the Compter; this is the sack the potatoes were in; I took Hart in charge, as I am a constable.

HANNAH STEVENS . I am the prosecutor's daughter-in-law. I did not know the prisoners until the 2nd of February, between five and six in the afternoon, when, I was coming down stairs, I saw them both in the passage - I asked them what they were doing; one of them said that as they were passing, the sack of potatoes had fallen, and they were lifting it up; I saw Kirkham lift the sack on Hart's back, and as they got to the yard I and my mother stopped them - they were just stepping outside the door; I fetched my father, and Lawrence came with him; they were secured.

Hart. Q. Were the potatoes in the yard or in the passage? A. In the passage; I saw them on Hart's back - he was just stepping into the yard; they could get into Cloth-fair from the yard.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I am servant to Joseph Pegg . I stopped the prisoner Hart in the passage; he had nothing with him then - I saw the sack of potatoes in the passage near him; he was charged with stealing it, and he said he was only cracking nuts, and he would not go with us unless we handcuffed him - we had no handcuffs; he swore we should not take him, and called me all manner of names; we got him down, and he said if he was not enough he would get a dozen more for us; Kirkham had got away somewhere.

GEORGE LOCK . I am a constable. I apprehended Kirkham on Wednesday, the 3rd of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon - I fetched the parties who charged him with being with Hart who took the potatoes; he said nothing to it then.

Hart's Defence. I once fell from a mast-head, and if I get a drop it effects my head. Kirkham was not with me - the prosecutor will buy any stolen property from children.

Kirkham's Defence. The statement is false. I was in company with a person from five until seven o'clock that evening, but he is not able to come.

JURY to JOSEPH PEGG . Q. Were the potatoes in the passage or yard? A. Before they were taken they stood in the yard, three or four yards from the yard door - after the alarm the sack's mouth laid on the threshold of the door, having been dropped.

HANNAH STEVENS . I saw Kirkham lift it on Hart's back in the passage - my mother stopped him with it on his shoulder.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I and my master secured Hart; he resisted very much and kicked me in the eye; he nearly kicked my eye out - we had to tie his hands and feet and then carry him, he did not appear at all in liquor till he got to the Compter and then he did not speak or any thing.

HART - GUILTY . Aged 26.

KIRKHAM - NOT GUILTY .

529. WILLIAM HART and JAMES KIRKHAM were again indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 6l. of tea, value 37s. , the goods of Valentine Smith .

PETER CRAWLEY . I keep the Queen's Head Public-house Duke-street near Smithfield. I saw the prisoners at my house on the 2nd of February, between two and three o'clock, in company; they had something to drink, and left without paying the reckoning - they left a parcel at the bar, and I detained it for the reckoning, as they had tendered me a had five shilling-piece in payment; they left my house to fetch the money to pay me; next day Kirkham returned, and I told him I thought the property left in my possession was not all right, and I would not give it up till I knew whether it was rightly come by; he said he got it in Mare-street Hackney - I sent for a Policeman and gave him in charge, having heard that Hart was taken; the parcel was claimed on the Monday, by Smith's young man - I had seen Kirkham at my house several times; he always conducted himself well - Kirkham placed the parcel on the bar while he went to get some refreshment; I cannot say which tendered the bad money, us my servant received it - Hart received it back from me; it was between two and three o'clock in the afternoon - as he went out he seemed half tipsy and used very bad language.

BENJAMIN FURNLEY . I am apprentice to Valentine Smith, of Alderagate-street, tea dealer and grocer . I saw a parcel at Crawley's house; It belonged to my master - it was 6lbs. 1os of tea; I had packed it up about half-past three o'clock, and placed it on the fourth counter from the door, I left my master in care of the shop; I came into the shop again in about twenty minutes and it was gone; it was to go to our other shop at the west end of the town - I was quite certain of it when I saw it again.

GEORGE COOK. I am a constable. I apprehended Kirkham at Crawley's - the pracel of tea was there; I asked how he came by it: he said he had it from Mr. Summers, a carpenter, in Mare-street, Hackney - that he had it as part of a debt of 5s. for making a pair of trousers; I asked him his name, and he gave me the name of Kay - I went to Mare-street, but could find no Summers there; on Monday morning I took Furnley to Mr. Crawley's, and he claimed the tea.

BENJAMIN FURNLEY . I can say this is the parcel I packed, for as I was tying it, one of the threads of the string broke, which I see here plainly - it was not entirely broken, but cracked - it corresponds in weight with the parcel I made up: I have no doubt of it.

Kirkham's Defence. I had it from a man who did some work for - I met him, and he said, "I cannot pay you money, but if you will take this tea, I will call and settle with you in about a fortnight;" if he gave me a false address, that is not my fault.

HART - GUILTY .* Aged 26.

KIRKHAM - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-104

530. FRANCIS HARRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 42lbs. weight of butter, value 24s., and 1 tub, value 2d. , the goods of Samuel Jones .

JOSEPH GURNNALL . I am warehouseman to Mr. Samuel Jones , wholesale cheesemonger , St. Mary-axe - our warehouse is up a yard. On the 21st of January, about twenty minutes before nine o'clock in the morning, I took the prisoner with this tub of butter on his shoulder - he was quite a stranger; I saw him come out of the gateway leading to the warehouse with it on his shoulder - he said nothing about it; I can swear to it - it has a brand-mark on it.

JOHN BIN. I am a constable. I was at the side of the gateway, and saw the prisoner come out with the butter on his shoulder; Gurnnall laid hold of him - I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18330214-105

531. THOMAS JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 70lbs. weight of butter, value 3l. 16s., and 1 tub, value 4d. , the goods of John Titterton .

WILLIAM HAYNE . I live in Newgate-street , with John Titterton , a cheesemonger . On the 9th of February I was in the counting-house about eleven o'clock, and heard a slight noise, which induced me to look, and I saw the prisoner with a firkin of butter on his shoulder, just going outside the shop; I went and overtook him ten or eleven yards off - I stopped him, told him the property was not his, and begged him to bring it back, which he did; there was nobody in the shop - he was a perfect stranger.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I was opposite Mr. Titterton's shop, and observed the witness holding the prisoner;

he acknowledged stealing the butter, and said it was better to be transported than starve.(Tub produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-106

532. SAMUEL GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 2 half-crowns and 1 shilling, the monies of John Moody , his master .

JOHN MOODY . I am a tin-plate worker . The prisoner had been in my employ for a month or two - I gave him this money on the 12th of January to go and buy some wire and tin, about three o'clock in the afternoon; he did not sleep in the house, and did not return afterwards; I saw him on Monday morning, the 14th, and charged him with having the money and applying it to his own use - he said nothing to me.

THOMAS WHITTLE . I am a Policeman. I received him in custody on the 14th of January, about eight o'clock in the morning, in Whitecross-street, St. Lukes'; I asked what he did with the money - he said he had spent it; I asked what he spent it in - he said he had been to the play.

Prisoner. I am very sorry for what I have done; I meant to go back and tell him I would work it out.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18330214-107

533. JAMES LAMB was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 6 stocks, value 9s. 6d., and 18 yards of ribbon, value 5s., the goods of Edward Rawson and others, his masters .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JAMES WICKENS . I am warehouseman in the habashery department of Edward Rawson and others, of Wood-street, Cheapside . Previous to January the 20th we had sustained considerable losses, and in consequence of that, on the evening of the 1st of February, I was concealed in the warehouse, between five and six o'clock, behind the door at the end of the warehouse; the prisoner was in their employ in the hosiery warehouse - the door has two squares of glass in the top of it, and I had a view of where he was; we usually drink tea between five and six - I had scaroely got concealed before the prisoner came out of the hosiery warehouse below, up into the haberdashery warehouse, and seeing nobody there, he went up stairs to the top warehouse, came down again, and called Jem; nobody answered, and he directly went to where the black silk stocks were, which was about the middle of the warehouse - I could see him through the glazed part of the door; he took up one parcel of stocks and laid them down, then took up another, twisted them up in his hand, and put them into his hat; the first he took up appeared spotted, those he put into his hat were black - he immediately went down stairs into the hosiery warehouse - I left my concealment, and was going to follow him down, when he came back to me and had his hands in his pocket - he asked me if I had any snuff - I said No; he then asked me if there was any more goods coming down to be entered; I said, I believe a small parcel was coming down after tea; he went down stairs - I met Nicholson coming from his tea, and told him; he told my brother of it; I was sent up to tea, and left it to them to watch. The prisoner went up to his tea; I could not see how many black silk stocks there were; an officer was sent for, who took him - he had no business in the upper warehouse at all.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. What do you call these stocks? A. Opera ties; the top warehouse is the store-warehouse for haberdashery - he had no business there, nor in the other warehouse; his business was on the ground floor, at his desk, where goods are called over to him by the entering-clerk - I met him coming up a second time as I was going down; he was not in the habit of inquiring if more goods were coming down - he frequently came into that warehouse while the young men were at tea, and sometimes he had business there; he has been in the employ three or four months - I have been there six; goods are brought down to the ground floor in baskets to be packed - we carry them down; the entering-clerk has sometimes come up and taken a thing down in his hand; Mr. Sawer is the entering-clerk - the prisoner is the clerk to write the invoices; another clerk books them.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How many are there in your employ? A. Between twenty and thirty - the prisoner had a particular seat in the warehouse, and had no business to leave it.

WILLIAM WICKENS . I am the brother of James Wickens. It is my duty to mark the black stocks among other things- they were kept at the end of the counter in the warehouse on the first floor; the prisoner was employed on the ground floor, near the door - he had no business with the stocks in the upper warehouse; I know there ought to have been five dozen and a half of stocks in the place - I received information, counted them, and half a dozen were gone, and were found under his desk - they had no business there; they appeared to have been rolled up - I did not touch them, but fetched the officer; they were worth 9s. 6d. - half a piece of ribbon, measuring eighteen yards, was found with the stocks; that was kept in a drawer in the first floor warehouse - the prisoner could have no business with that; the sales were bought from our warehouse and entered by him; nobody could have any business to deposit these articles under his desk - the ribbon drawer was directly under where the stocks were; it could easily be taken, for we generally have the drawer open on the counter.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were these stocks kept? A. On the counter, tied in half dozens - the prisoner's only duty was to make invoices; another clerk entered the goods - we have about six clerks; he had no business to touch the goods - a person called a "giver in" calls over the goods while one enters them, and another writes the invoice at the same time - these goods were found under his desk; they were not covered, but were behind a box which he puts his feet upon - we had to move it before we saw them - I counted the stocks when my brother gave me information, and know six were missing.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had the prisoner any thing to do with handling the goods? A. No, my brother was placed behind the door, in consequence of suspicion.

MR. ROBERT WALLS STEPHENS . I am a partner in the firm of Messrs. Rawson and others. The prisoner was in our service - his occupation was to make out invoices under the desk of the person who enters them; the entering counter

is directly opposite the desk - the giver in comes there, and calls the goods over - that is the regular system of business; the prisoner had nothing whatever to do with meddling with the articles of trade - we began to miss goods shortly after he came to our employ; I have seen the stocks - they are our property.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose he has been up in your warehouse while in your employ? A. I have seen him there several times - he had no business there, but having no suspicion at that time I did not rebuke him; his duty could not lead him there - he might have gone to talk to the people there.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am an officer. I was sent for to the prosecutors' house, and took the prisoner - I sent for him up into the private room, and charged him with stealing six silk neckerchiefs and a piece of ribbon; he denied it - I searched him, and found nothing - while searching him, William Wickens came to me, and from what he said I went down stairs to the prisoner's desk, and there saw under the desk a box, and behind that six silk stocks, and a piece of ribbon; Wickens was alongside of me - they had a tape with a mark on it, and Wickens claimed them; I went up stairs and told the prisoner I had found them - he denied the charge.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

534. JAMES LAMB was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 3 pairs of silk stockings, 21s.; 144 other stockings, value 6l. 2s.; 131 socks, value 1l. 10s. 6d.; 16 cuffs, value 5s.; 20 gloves, value 17s.; 1 pair of shoes value 3s. 6d.; 2 frock bodies, value 2s. 6d.; 248 yards of lace, value 3l. 2s.; 2 table-covers, value 20s.; 6 hankerchiefs, value 15s.; 2 under-waistcoats, value 15s.; 6 hair braces, value 5s. 6d.; 1lb. of cotton thread, value 2s.; 1 hare-skin, value 2s.; 6 cravats, value 12s.; 36 yards of braid, value 5s.; 136 yards of ribbon, value 8s. 6d.; 52 pieces of tape, value 13s.; 12 purses, value 13s.; 10 gross of shirt buttons, value 1l. 10s.; 23 reels of cotton, value 2s.; 8 gaiters, value 3s.; 1 belt, value 6d.; 30 papers of needles, value 2s. 6d.; 36 yards of galloon, value 1s. 6d.; 12 stay laces, value 1s. 6d.; 1 boa, value 10d.; 1 piece of braiding, value 9d.; 1 yard of net, value 3s.; 4 cap-crowns, value 2s.; 10 yards of quilling, value 5s.; 3 bracelets, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of drawers, value 2s., and 1 Angola shirt, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Edward Rawson , and others, his masters .

WILLIAM HENMAN . After taking the prisoner in custody, I went to search his lodgings, No. 11, Prince's-street, Bedford-row; he told me he lodged there - I got there a little after eight o'clock, and took possession of a great quantity of property - William Wickens was with me, and pointed out what he thought belonged to the prosecutors; here are about twenty-two pairs of silk stockings, and a quantity of cotton stockings, in all about seventy pairs of stockings of both descriptions, quite new; a great quantity of lace, upwards of two hundred yards, and a gross of shirt buttons - I found some things concealed in boxes under the bed, some in baskets, and some in another place; he occupied three rooms on the second floor - I found a duplicate of stockings pawned with King.

Cross-examined. Q. He told you without hesitation where he lived? A. Yes; his wife was out, but on her return, she gave me every facility in searching, and said, she always told her husband not to bring things home, but he told her he had bought them as jobs; I never heard of his being in business for himself - I found other things there claimed by other people in whose employ he had been, and there was table-linen and other things in wear, in the same boxes; the lace was concealed at the bottom of a box of trinkets, and a paper carefully laid over it, so that it appeared the bottom of the box - you would not suspect any thing was under it.

HENRY RICHARDSON . I am servant to William King , a pawnbroker, No. 34, High Holborn - the prisoner occasionally came to the shop. On the 22nd of October he pawned with me three pairs of black silk stockings for 10s., in the name of John Long , No. 16, Brownlow-street; this is the duplicate I gave him - they appeared new stockings.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not common to pawn in a false name? A. I believe it is.

MR. ROBERT WALLS STEPHENS. I am one of the firm of Edward Rawson and Co.; we had missed several things; I have looked at these stockings - they are the manufacture of Mr. Gibbon, whose son is a partner in our firm, and they have my hand-writing on the paper - I can swear to them; I have looked at the different articles, and believe them to belong to us - I could swear to the greater part of them, and some corresponding with our stock I believe to be ours - there are about ten gross of shirt-buttons.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any doubt but the property must have been taken at different times? A. It must have been taken at several times - we had missed stockings, but not black ones; our stock is so large, and so many goods lay about the counter - Mr. Gibbon does not make entirely for us, but these are a particular description of stockings, which had been re-dyed, and were in three pair parcels; we should sell them with the mark on, but then there would be the entering mark in addition.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. If you sold the whole parcel the paper would go with them? A. Yes; we never sold the prisoner any goods, and never had an idea of his dealing in such things, or I should not have employed him.

EDWARD BENJAMIN LEEFE . I am in the service of the prosecutors, as warehouseman. Among these articles I see a pair of worsted shoes, which have my mark, and are my masters' property - I never sold them to the prisoner; they are worth 3s. 10d.

MR. RICHARD BEESTON. I am one of the firm - here is a table-cover among these articles, I believe to be our property; when it was produced I could not swear to it - we have articles of this description; the prisoner had 70l. a year and his board.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-108

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16TH.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

535. THOMAS KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s. , the goods of Benjamin Etchells . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-109

536. WILLIAM BERRY was indicted for embezzlement . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18330214-110

537. DIANA ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 shilling and 1 sixpence, the monies of John Dyson , her master .

ELIZABETH DYSON . I am the wife of John Dyson - we live in High-street, Portland-town - the prisoner was our servant of all work . On the 8th of February I placed 9s. 6d. in shillings and sixpences in the till, which I had marked; I sent her the same evening to put up the shutters, and after she had done that, I missed one shilling and one sixpence - I accused her of it; she denied it for some time, but then acknowledged it, took it from her pocket, and gave it to me; I gave her into custody; I had not made her any threat or promise.

JOHN BYRNE (Police constable S 83). I took the prisoner, and have the money - she acknowledged taking it out of the till to buy a pair of shoes.

MRS. DYSON. This is the money I marked - the prisoner was to have 6l. a year, but as she was poor I had advanced her 21s.; there would have been a few shillings due to her in a few days.

Prisoner. I am sorry I took it.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18330214-111

538. GEORGE SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 truck, value 20s. , the goods of Ann Kimble .

RICHARD GOBBY . I am the son of Ann Kimble , a widow , who keeps a broker's shop in Vine-street, Hattonwall, On the 15th of January I missed a truck, which had been left in a sort of mews, in George-street - I afterwards saw some wheels at a house in Turnmill-street; and on the 19th of January I saw the body of the truck at the watch-house.

JOSEPH COLE . I am a smith, and live in Turnmill-street. I purchased the two wheels of a truck of Robert Savage.

ROBERT SAVAGE . I lodge in Field-lane - I keep a sale-shop. The prisoner left the wheels with me for sale on the Thursday evening, and I sold them to Cole.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not state that they were not my own? A. No; you afterwards brought a person to buy them, if they were not sold, and if they were, to have the money - you delivered them to me as your own to sell, but you were taken before I had paid you for them.

ELIZABETH SAVAGE . I am the mother of Robert Savage . The prisoner came on the 19th of January, in company with a young man; he asked if the young man was at home who kept the shop - I said No; he said he had brought the other person to look at some wheels, which my son had got; my son was them in custody, and I got a neighbour to get an officer, and the prisoner was taken.

RICHARD BAYLIS . (Police-constable G 79). I found the truck-body in Sharpe's-alley - I showed it to Gobby, and he identified it.

Prisoner's Defence. I get my living in the markets as well as I can - I lodge in George-street, Bloomsbury, with a young man who is easily traced; his name is James, and he travelled to Portsmouth backwards and forwards - he told me he had a pair wheels, and asked me to get him a customer; I took him to Savage, and asked if he could get a customer for them, and I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-112

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

539. WILLIAM STROTHER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 1 piece of gold, value 2l. , the goods of Alexander Nossoc .

ANN MARIA DURBRIDGE . I am servant to Mr. Alexander Nossoc, a dentist . On the 2nd of February the prisoner knocked at the door, and asked if my master was at home; I said Yes - he asked to speak to him; I asked him into the front parlour, and went to tell my master - I was not absent more than half a minute; I returned to the parlour, and saw the prisoner touching my master's things on the table - my master then went in and spoke to him for about two minutes; I then let him out, and immediately afterwards, my master cried out, "He has stolen my gold"- we ran after him into Foley-place; I pointed him out - this is the piece of gold which was picked up in the road in which the prisoner had ran.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me touching any one thing? A. Yes; I imagined you were touching the teeth.

ALEXANDER NOSSOC . This piece of gold is mine, and was on the table in the room into which the prisoner went; I pursued him from George-street - I called Stop! Stop! but he did not till he was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I called and asked him what he charged for scaling teeth - I never went near the table; when I went away, he called me back - I was not near the place where the gold was found.

GUILTY . Aged 64. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-113

540. SOLOMON TAYLOR and JOSEPH REYNOLDS were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 46 yards of flannel, value 30s., the goods of John Brown ; and that Taylor had been before convicted of felony .

JOHN KAIN . I am a plumber. On the 28th of January; about half-past five o'clock, I was near the house of Mr. Brown, a linen-draper ; I saw the two prisoners lurking about the side window - I stood about a quarter of an hour; I then saw a Policeman cross the road - I told him; we stood and watched, and saw Taylor go about two yards into the shop, take the roll of flannel, and run off - he was pursued and dropped it; the officer took him - Reynolds ran off at the same time, but was taken afterwards.

Taylor. Q. Did you not say then that I dropped it, but Reynolds took it? A. No.

JOHN GEORGE (Police-constable K 267). I was passing the shop - I watched and saw Taylor go into the shop and snatch up the flannel; he ran down South Conduit-street, and dropped it - I took him there, and Reynolds on the Sunday afterwards.

HENRY THOMAS DALLEY (Police-constable K 23.) I was passing the shop, and saw the two prisoners standing near it - I went down White-street, and on returning, I heard of the robbery; I knew Reynolds - we went on Sunday morning, and found him in bed with a female; she made great resistance, but he said "It is of no use, Emma, I know what he wants me for, and I must go" -

he said in going along, "I was persuaded to be in it, by Taylor, who asked me to take a walk with him."

THOMAS MORFORD (Police-constable K 83). I produce a certificate of the conviction of Taylor, which I got at Mr. Clark's office - I know he is the person.

JAMES TARRATT HILL . I am servant to Mr. John Brown - this is his flannel.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

REYNOLDS - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-114

541. WILLIAM TEDMAN and WILLIAM DORMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 1 coat, value 2s. 6d.; 1 cloak, value 6s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 3 waistcoats, value 2s.; 1 hat, value 5s.; 1 knife, value 1d.; 1 loaf of bread, value 1s.; 3lbs. of beef, value 1s.; 8 pence, 73 halfpence, and 4 farthings , the property of Henry Thacker .

CORNELIA THACKER . I am the wife of Henry Thacker ; we live in Butler's-building's, George-street, St. John-street, Bethnal-green . I have known the prisoners about twelve months - they were pauper s, but at this time they lodged in my house; on the 29th of December I went out, and returned home between twelve and one o'clock; I found my boxes had been broken open, my apartment rifled, and all the property stated was gone - the prisoners never returned; I gave notice, and they were afterwards apprehended; the greater part of the property has been entirely lost.

JOHN BURNHAM (Police-constable H 58.) The officer who took the prisoner is dangerously ill, but I saw this waistcoat found on Dorman, and Tedman had this coat and trousers on - these beads had been sold at Mr. Yardley's, in Hare-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Tedman. Distress drove me to it - the parish gave me 6d. a day to work for them.

TEDMAN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

DORMAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-115

542. JAMES WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 1 pair of boots, value 7s. , the goods of David Jehu .

ERASMUS CHARLTON (Police-constable K 130.) On the 23rd of January I fell in with the prisoner in Brook-street - I asked him what he had got under his arm; he said a pair of boots, which he had bought in Brook-street, and he put them into my hand - I said he must go and show me where he had bought them; he then ran off - I pursued, and took him; I inquired, and found the prosecutor.

DAVID JEHU . I keep a shoe shop in Ropemaker's-fields - these are my shoes; the officer came and inquired if I had lost any, and on looking I missed them.

JAMES JEFFREY . I hung the boots out at Mr. Jehu's, and missed them when the officer came.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a young man in a smock frock for 6s. in the Commercial-road.

GUILTY .* Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-116

543. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of January , 30 yards of flannel, value 30s. , the goods of John Savage .

FRANCIS SMITH . I am in the service of Mr. John Savage , a linendraper , in Crawford-street . On the 3rd of January, at a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening, I was serving some customers, and was told a piece of flannel had been taken from about five feet within the door - I ran round a place about twenty yards off; the flannel was dropped, and I took it up.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. When you saw it it was on the ground? A. Yes - I saw the prisoner in custody; there were three persons in the shop serving, but I am quite sure none of them had sold it.

THOMAS KENNETT . (Police-constable D 97.) On the evening of the 3rd of January, I and my brother officer were coming past Windmill-place, the prisoner was coming down running with this flannel under his arm; he dropped it, and walked on very slowly, calling out Stop thief!

Cross-examined. Q. Did you meet him? A. Yes, and never lost sight of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-117

544. JOHN WALL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 2 silver spoons, value 5s., and 1 flatiron, value 6d. , the goods of George Warne .

MARTHA ANN WHITMORE WARNE . I am the wife of George Warne. The prisoner was our errand-boy - we had missed articles; I spoke to him about the articles mentioned in this indictment - he said he knew nothing about them; I sent for an officer on the 8th of February, and the prisoner at last told him he had pawned part and sold part.

DAVID TURNER (Police-constable T 20.) I was sent for, and the prisoner told me at last that he had sold one spoon in Tottenham-court-road and the other in Holborn, and the flat-iron he had pawned in the Edgware-road; I found the iron accordingly.

WILLIAM PEIRCE . I live in the New-road, and am a silversmith. I bought this spoon of the prisoner for 1s. 9d. - he told me he had found it in the Hampstead-road; it was bent as it is now - I had no suspicion of its being dishonestly come by; I would have sold it for 2s. to any one.

Prisoner. I did not have half enough to eat, and that was why I took it.

MRS. WARNE. I gave him many meals, and 1s. 6d. a week, and he had money at other times.

GUILTY . Aged 12. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-118

545. SARAH WOLF was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 3 gowns, value 3s.; 1 apron, value 1s., and 2 pairs of stockings, value 10d. , the goods of James Dawson .

MARY DAWSON . I am the wife of James Dawson . On the 11th of January I washed some gowns, and hung them up to dry in the court where we live, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning - I missed these articles between five and six in the evening; I looked about, and found them at the mangler's - the prisoner has lived in

the same court; I have visited and drank tea with her - I have only found the gowns.

AMELIA ROBERTSON . My mother lives in Mulberry-court, and keeps a mangle. The prosecutor found these three gowns at my mother's, the prisoner had brought them there - she told me to hang them up before they were mangled.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did not the prisoner tell you she was sent with them? A. No, she did not.

WILLIAM DAMON (Police-constable G 161.) I took the prisoner.

MARY DAWSON. These are my property.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you had another person taken up? A. Yes, I have made inquiries in my own language, and I rather think a man who has gone away from the neighbourhood took the property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-119

546. HENRY WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 25 yards of merino, value 1l. 8s. , the goods of John Fulcher .

SAMUEL ROSE . Mr. Fulcher's shop is in High-street, Shoreditch . On the 19th of January I saw the prisoner in his shop, taking down this piece of stuff - he ran out; I crossed the road, and took him - he resisted, but I called for assistance, and secured him.

ALFRED DE VITRY (Police-constable H 29.) I took the prisoner, and have the property.

JOHN FULCHER . I am master of the shop . This merino is mine; there are twenty-five yards of it - I was at home when it was taken, but was busy, and did not miss it till I was told of it; after the prisoner had been taken to the station.

The prisoner put in a long written Defence, declaring that the property was never in his possession, and that he had not entered the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-120

547. KEZIAH TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 table-cloth, value 2s.; 1 pillow, value 2s., and 1 frock, value 2s., the goods of John Griffiths ; and 1 quilt, value 2s., the goods of Amelia Buckley .

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I live in Violet-street, Bethnal-green . I let the prisoner a lodging on the 10th of September - she had her own furniture in it, but this table-cloth, pillow, and frock, were mine, and the quilt was Amelia Buckley 's, my mother's, who is eighty-two years old; the prisoner took these things on the 8th of January, and I missed them on the 1st of February - I found the duplicate on her; she paid her rent, and lived by taking in needlework.

THOMAS ROE GRICE. I am an officer. I took the prisoner - she was searched by a female, and the duplicate found on her.

EDWARD RUBERY. I am a pawnbroker. I have a pillow, a frock, a quilt, and some other articles, pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had no intention of stealing the things.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18330214-121

548. WILLIAM SIMMONDS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 flat-iron, value 4d.; 1 pillow, value 3d.; 2 sheets, value 3s.; 1 knife and fork, value 1d.; 1 tea-cup, value 1d.; 1 pot, value 2s., and two blankets, value 5s. , the goods of Robert Criper .

ELIZABETH CRIPER . I am the wife of Robert Criper; we live at No. 116, Brook-street, Ratcliff . The prisoner and his wife lived in a ready-furnished room in our house at 4s. a week; in the beginning of October they left, without notice; on the 31st of December there was only one week's rent due - I went into the room, and found six duplicates on the table; I found part of my property, but not all - the prisoner is a sawyer .

JOSEPH HAIRES . I am a pawnbroker. I have two sheets and a flat-iron; one sheet was pawned by a man, and the other by a woman.

EDWARD WILLIAM WIGGINS . I am a pawnbroker, and have a pillow pawned by Elizabeth Simmonds .

THOMAS BAYLEY SMITH (Police-constable K 4). I took the prisoner at his father's, while he was getting his supper - I told him what I took him for; he said he was aware the things were pawned; that he was at work for a master, and they were obliged to pawn them, because he could not get his money till the end of the week, and the next week being Christmas, he could not get them.

Prisoner's I was in distress. I know of three of the articles, but not the others.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330214-122

549. ANN MARSHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 brooch, value 15s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 1 scarf, value 1s., and 1 umbrella, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Ann Gray .

ANN GRAY . I am a widow , and live in Leicester-square. On the 19th of January I met the prisoner in Holborn, it was after dark - I do not know the time; I was going home, and did not exactly know my way - I went into a house to get some refreshment, and there I met the prisoner; I had been at work all day at a gentleman's house, at St Katharine's-docks - the prisoner and I spoke to one another; I asked her if she knew Leicester-square - she said she knew it, and would go and show me the way; we went there - I saw the gentleman of the house at the door, but the servant was not at home; the gentleman sent me to the King's Head public-house, to get a lodging for the night - I took the prisoner there to give her some return for showing me the way - and while I was talking to some person there, the property stated was gone, and the prisoner also; my brooch had been in my pocket, my umbrella by my side, and the other articles were in a little parcel behind me on the seat.

WILLIAM CLAGGET (Police-constable E 98). I took the prisoner on the evening of the 20th of January; I found this umbrella there, with two handkerchiefs, and this scarf on her.

BENJAMIN THOMPSON . I live at No. 13 Buckeridge-street. The prisoner lodged with me; on the Sunday morning, about one o'clock, she came to pay me her rent; she had something in her hand, which looked to me like a brooch - I did not examine it.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not a brooch, it was a pin.

I had been on the Saturday to take some clean linen to a friend in St. Bartholomew's-hospital, and on returning, I met the prosecutrix in a public-house, opposite Middle-row; she spoke to me, and said she knew the family I lived with - she asked me to show her the way to Leicester-square; I went as far as Drury-lane, and then I wished to go home, but she urged me to go to Leicester-square with her, and said she would give me one of her handkerchiefs to tie my dirty linen in - we then went on, and the gentleman asked her if she was going to Hampstead; she said No, she was going to sleep with me - I said she could not; she then said if I would go with her to St. Giles', she would give me some cap-ribbon - I went with her, and there she got this parcel; we then went to a public-house, when she gave me the cap-ribbon and this other handkerchief - we then went to Leicester-square, and she gave me the umbrella to carry to the public-house; we had some more to drink there - I do not recollect where I parted with her, but I got into some dark passage, and the officer took me; we were both drunk.

ANN GRAY . I did not give her the umbrella to carry - I lent her a cambric handkerchief till I parted with her; I put my parcel behind me at the King's Head - I was not at all intoxicated.

JURY. Q. When did you lose your brooch? A. While I was at the King's Head - it was taken out of my pocket, and I believe by the prisoner - it had belonged to my husband, and I did not wish to part with it.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-123

550. CATHERINE MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 1 pelisse, value 5s., and 1 frock, value 1s , the goods of Ann Combs .

RICHARD COLLINS . I am in the service of Ann Combs ; she keeps a pawnbroker's shop . On the 22nd of January the prisoner came to our shop, I was selling an article at the time - I then went out and missed this frock and pelisse from outside the door; I had seen the prisoner in the shop twenty minutes before - she came in the shop at this time with these articles under her cloak - I sent for an officer, and took her.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You say she was going into the shop again with the things? A. Yes, she might have thought there was some one there to bargain with for them.

ANN COPLAND . I went to the shop to pawn an article - the prisoner came in with a pocket-book in her hand; I thought she was going to produce a duplicate - Collins then came in, and asked what she had under her cloak - he lifted up her cloak, and took this pelisse and frock from her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-124

551. ALFRED LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Henry Newsam , from his person .

HENRY NEWSAM . On the 27th of January I was in Merlin's-place , going out of Wilmington-square; the prisoner was following me; he passed me - I felt something at my pocket, and missed my handkerchief - he ran off - I pursued, and took him; a boy said he saw him take my handkerchief, but it has not been found.

MARTHA MAY . I was in my parlour, and saw this gentleman and a lady going along - I saw a boy take his handkerchief from his pocket, wrap it round his hand, and run off, but I do not know who he was.

LEONARD SEATON . I saw the prosecutor and a lady walking along; a lad, who I think was the prisoner, took his handkerchief and run away - it has not been found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-125

552. SAMUEL LANGFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 14 shillings, and 12 sixpences , the monies of John Stocker .

MARIA STOCKER . I am the wife of John Stocker . We keep a chandler-shop at Marylebone-green . On the 4th of February the prisoner came and brought some goods from Mr. Exton's; I was first going to pay him 1l. 6s. 6d. for them; I put 1l. worth of silver on the counter, but my husband called me into the parlour, and told me to pay him 13s., and send 1/4 cwt. of sugar back - I forgot at the moment that I had put the 1l. on the counter, and paid the prisoner the 13s.; I then remembered the money that I laid on the counter, and I said to him, "Have you seen any money on the counter?"- he said No; I said "Search your pockets and see if you have not - what money had you?" he said, "I have only 3d.;" I then gave him 1d. for half a pint of beer, and he went out of the shop - I looked about and missed the money; I told my husband - then went after the prisoner to Mr. Exton's, and asked them to send for a Policeman, but they would not; Mr. Exton then came in, and I asked him to send for one, but he would not; the prisoner then said he would go with me to the Police-office - I was going on with him and met a gentleman; I asked him if he would go with me to the station, which he said he would; the prisoner had denied it, and said at Mr. Exton's, that he had not got the money, all he had was 3d. - I had seen him move his hand in going along, from his breeches-pocket to his waistcoat, and the 1l. in silver was found on him at the station - I am sure I had left it on the counter; no one else had come into the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What was the amount of the goods the prisoner brought? A. I can tell the money I paid - I had paid him 1l. 10s. on the day before; and on that day I had paid him 1l. 10s., but that was the first time he came - he came again that day and I paid him 13s., when he denied having any more than 3d. and the 1d. I gave him for beer; he went voluntarily to the station-house.

SAMUEL TATE (Police-constable D 11). I met the prisoner in Seymour-place; the witness said he had robbed her of 20s. - he said he had no money of hers; I took him to the station, and found in an inside pocket on the left side of his waistcoat, 14 shillings, 12 sixpences, and four pence in copper - the prosecutrix said, he had said he had only 3d., that he showed it her, and she gave him a penny for bringing the goods.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say that this was what he had saved from his wages? A. Yes; but he did not say that this was the amount of what I should find on him - I searched his other pockets; there were

small holes in each of his trousers pockets; his master said he had always behaved very correct.

Prisoner's Defence. What I had was my own.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-126

553. JOHN HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s. , the goods of Benjamin Etchells .

BENJAMIN ETCHELLS . I am a steel-refiner , and live in William-street, Portland-town ; the prisoner was a lodger of mine. On the 26th of January, I missed a pair of sugar-tongs; I asked him about it, he denied knowing any thing about them, but at dinner-time one of my other lodgers turned to him and said, "You must know something about them, you may as well confess;" he then gave up the duplicate and said, "I may as well give it up" - I went and got the tongs.

JOHN LOVICK . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 127, Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner pawned the tongs with me, on the 22nd of January.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It was not my wish to keep them.

GUILTY . Aged 18*. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-127

554. WILLIAM GOLDSMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 8s. , the goods of Robert Bird .

ANN BIRD . I am the wife of Robert Bird; we live in High-street, Shadwell . On the 28th of January I had my chimney swept - the prisoner was one of the boy s who came to do it - when they were gone I missed a pair of shoes; I followed them and told a person of my loss - these are the shoes.

JAMES FLETCHER (Police-constable K 175). I took the prisoner - he said he had not got the shoes, but I detained him; and in going across the wooden bridge he found the shoes and gave them to me - these are them.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330214-128

555. ELIZABETH GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 spoon, value 2s. , the goods of Ard Holmes Keighley .

ARD HOLMES KEIGHLEY. I am a house-keeper. The prisoner came once a week to my house as a char-woman . I had missed a spoon for some time - the prisoner heard me accuse my servant of knowing something about it.

JOHN MELVILLE (Police-constable K 63).) I took the prisoner on another charge - I found the duplicate of this spoon on her.

JOHN HASLOP . I am in the service of a pawnbroker. I have a spoon, which I took in of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 61. - Confined One Year .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18330214-129

556. ANN CLARK , ELIZABETH DEVALIEN , JOHN MEAD , WILLIAM STANFIELD , and RICHARD BULL were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 4 dishes, value 3s. , the goods of Elizabeth Owen .

MARY AYRES . On the 23rd of January, about a quarter to eight o'clock, I was going to the shop of Elizabeth Owen , to purchase some glass articles; I saw two girls standing near her door, as I was going into the shop a boy came from behind the door, which was ajar, and passed me with some dishes; I considered Owen had been robbed, but I did not interfere, as I thought he might be her servant - but I turned my head and saw the boy give the dishes to a girl; I think the boy was Mead, and to the best of my belief the female prisoners were the two that were standing there - Devalien was the girl who received the dishes.

ELIZA DYER . I lodge at the prosecutrix's. About seven o'clock in the evening I saw Devalien near the house - a tall boy and a short one who I believe was Mead were watching the house; I then saw Devalien cross from the boys, but she had first looked in at one shop window, and then in at the other.

ELIZABETH OWEN . I keep the shop , when Ayres gave me information I missed four dishes, which the officers afterwards found. I had seen Devalien and Mead watching the shop.

THOMAS HALPINE (Police-constable K 217.) I found these dishes at No. 5. Hart's-court.

GEORGE MUROVE (Police-serjeant K 3). Devalies told me where the dishes were; I sent for them - Bull and Stanfield were in custody at the time, and they told me they were all in it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Devalien's Defence. Bull took the dishes and I received them - Mead was not there, but the rest of us were.

Mead's Defence. I was at home at supper at the time.

Bull put in a written defence denying that he was in the other prisoner's company and declaring his innocence - He received a good character.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 25.

DEVALIEN - GUILTY . Aged 24.

MEAD - GUILTY . Aged 12.

STANFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

BULL - GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18330214-130

557. THEODOSIA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 3 half-sovereigns , the monies of Maria Leist , and anothers.

MARIA LEIST . I am a widow , and live in Edward-street Portman-square . The prisoner lodged in my attic for about seven months; she had a small income- while she was there I missed monies from time to time, and on the Tuesday before she was taken, I marked eight sovereigns, three half-sovereigns, four half crowns and twenty shillings; I marked them on one side, and Mr. Watts marked them on the other - I put them in a wardrobe in my bed-room, where the prisoner had no business; and on the Monday following I missed three half-sovereigns and two half-crowns, (I had missed two sovereigns on the Wednesday before this) I sent for an officer and went up stairs with him to her room; I told her I had come about a very unpleasant business, I had lost three half-sovereigns; that there had not been any person in the room, and I suspected she had taken them - she seemed indignant, and said it was false; the officer asked to look at what money she had, and she gave him two of my half-sovereigns; he saw that they were marked and said

"They will do;" he put them into his pocket - he then asked her for the other - she said she had not got it, but while she was putting some things into her box, this other half-sovereign fell from her person or her hand.

ALEXANDER BROWN (Police-constable D 129). I took the prisoner, and have the half-sovereigns.

MARIA LEIST . These are my half sovereigns.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe all her things were taken from her? A. Part of them were left at my house; I sent her a change of clothes by the Magistrate's desire - her gold watch and trinkets were left at my house.

Q. Now be careful, did you say to any body that if the prisoner would give up her gold watch and trinkets you would not appear against her? A. No; I said if she had shown contrition, and offered me a recompence, I should not have pressed it, but I did not say I would not appear - I did not make any proposal that she should give up her gold watch.

BENJAMIN WATTS . I was called in by the prosecutrix, and marked eight sovereigns, three half-sovereigns, four half-crowns and twenty shillings - I made a mark on one side and she on the other; these are a part of what I marked.

Witnesses for the Defence.

WALKER HARMER . I am a painter. The prosecutrix told me that she had authorized a person to propose to the prisoner that if she would give up her gold watch and trinkets, she would not appear against her at the second examination.

MRS. OSBORNE. My husband is a master carpenter, and lives at No. 64. New-road. The prosecutrix told me she had authorised a person to propose to the prisoner that if she would give up her gold watch and trinkets she would not appear.

GUILTY. Aged 34. - Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-131

558. JAMES YEOMANS was indicted for killing and slaying William Sutton .

HUGH CASH (Police-constable E 145). On the 17th of January, I heard that a man had drank a considerable quantity of brandy at the Hope public-house, Windmill-street, Bryanstone-square - I went there about half past eight in the evening, and met the deceased in the passage, coming from the parlour, going out of the house; I considered him in liquor, and desired him to go home, and he did - I heard the next day of his death.

CHARLES WOOD . I am a carpenter. I was at the Hope in Windmill-street at four o'clock, and again at seven in the evening - I saw the deceased there, and about eight o'clock I saw him drink half a pint of brandy which the pot-boy had brought in; I suppose it was brandy, but I do not know - I know brandy was ordered; no one gave it to the deceased, or coaxed him to drink it - he took it off the table, said, "Here is all your healths," and drank it, without taking it from his mouth - he then got up, lighted his pipe at the fire, and I went away.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you hear him say he was ready to drink another if any body would treat him? A. He said something to that effect.

ARTHUR MARTIN A'BECKETT . I am a medical student. I opened the body of the deceased; the stomach was partially inflamed, but the appearance of the brain accounted for his death more than any thing else - the vessels were very full, in consequence of the liquor he had drank; I could smell the brandy on the brain and the stomach - the brandy he drank occasioned his death.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you many cases of this kind? A. Not very many - many perpersons might take half a pint of brandy without injury, or even a pint; I should not think a coachman would be likely to know that half a pint of brandy would be injurious to him.

JOHN SPENCER . I am pot-boy at the Hope. The deceased had been drinking there with his friends all day; I do not know when the prisoner came, but there were a good many people who were with the deceased more than the prisoner was - the deceased took the half-pint of brandy off the waiter I had in my hand, and drank it all up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-132

559. ROBERT BRODIE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 cap, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Ellen Wright .

CHARLES LEWIS . I know Mrs. Wright's house in George-street, Hampstead-road . On the 8th of February I was going along the street, and met the prisoner running from the house; I stopped him and took him back - the officer found the cap on him.

SAMUEL BRACKER (Police-constable S 3). I took the prisoner; I found this cap in his hat, and this latch-key I found on him - it will open the prosecutor's door.

MARIA LAWRENCE . I live in the house with Ellen Wright ; this cap is hers - it was taken from the back parlour; I do not know whether the door was shut.

Prisoner. The latch-key belongs to my mother's house.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330214-133

560. ALEXANDER SMITH and EDWARD VICKERMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 2 scales, value 12s., and 3 scale-beams, value 5s., the goods of George Bather ; and that Vickerman had been before convicted of felony .

THOMAS FARRANT (Police-constable C 42). On the 4th of February, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was with Stone in Regent-street; we saw the two prisoners, and watched them for upwards of an hour, as I knew them - I lost sight of Smith for a few moments, and saw Vickerman standing opposite the prosecutor's shop; I then saw Smith come out of the shop, and they went off together - I went and took Smith, and found these articles on him.

GEORGE STONE . I was with Farrant - what he states is correct; I took Vickerman.

JAMES BROMLEY . I am apprentice to George Bather, a scale-maker - when the officer brought the prisoners into our shop, I missed these articles; they are my master's, and had been in the middle of the shop.

ROBERT JONES . I am a shoe-maker - I have a certificate of the conviction of Vickerman, which I got from Mr.

Clark's office; I was a witness, and know he is the man. - (read).

SMITH - GUILTY Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

VICKERMAN - GUILTY Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-134

561. HENRY RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 3 candlesticks, value 4s.; 1 gown, value 5s., 1 apron, value 3d.; 1 pair of pinchers, value 3d.; the goods of Phoebe Tripp ; and 1 fixture, i.e., a copper, value 30s., the goods of the said Phoebe Tripp ; against the Statute, &c.

MARTHA TRIPP . I am the daughter of Phoebe Tripp ; she is a widow , and lives at Holloway . This copper was taken from her out-house, where it had been fixed; the candlestick, apron, and gown were in the same place - they were all safe the night before, and were missing the next morning; they had taken a pane of glass out of the out-house or wash-house window - a man could get through there; the window would not lift up - I know this gown, apron, candlestick, and copper.

ALFRED HARRIS , (Police-constable N 100). On the 29th January I met the prisoner at half-past nine o'clock in the morning, in Upper Holloway, carrying this copper on his shoulder - as I was coming down the road he saw me, and tried to get round a hay-cart; I asked him what he had got, and where he was going - he said he had got a copper, and he was going to get some pin-holes made in it, but he did not care where, as he was going to pay for it; these candlesticks he said he meant to get exchanged for steel ones - I then asked him what was in the bundle under his arm; he said some things he was going to get mangled for his wife; I found these pinchers on him, which he said he had used to take out nails - he said he lived at Finchley, and had done so for eight years, but there was no mangler there, and he was going to take the things to Islington, to get them done.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-135

562. GEORGE HELLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 2 1/2 yards of oil-cloth, value 5s., the goods of Joseph Sheppard ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

THOMAS GOODYER (Police-constable E 39). On the 26th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in company with two others in Cleveland-street - one of the other two went into the prosecutor's, fetched out this oil-cloth, and gave it to the prisoner; I took the prisoner with it - a gentleman came up, and asked if I wanted any help - I said Yes; one of the others knocked the gentleman down, and the other two escaped, but I detained the prisoner.

JOSEPH SHEPPARD . I am a broker . This is my oil-cloth, and was on a chest of drawers in my shop.

JOHN COBLEY (Police-constable C 114). I have a certificate (from Mr. Clark's office) of the conviction of George Dawson, on the 6th of September last - I know the prisoner is that man.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-136

563. JOHN BOWMAN , WILLIAM CARTER , and JAMES ROBINSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December, 36 bottles, value 3s., and 30 quarts of wine, value 6l. , the goods of John Pettinger .

JOHN PETTINGER. I keep the Green Man, at Finchleycommon - Bowman is a gardner , and Carter is a labourer ; they both lodged at my house - Robinson worked on the road. On the Thursday after Christmas-day I employed Bowman and Carter to lade some water out of my cellar, and during that time, I lost a dozen and a half of wine, but I did not miss it till the 12th of January, and on the 13th of January, the cellar-flap was broken in the night, and I lost near a dozen and a half more - I went to the Magistrate, and gave information; I went with the patrol, and found Bowman with two full bottles of wine, and one nearly empty, at Mr. Horner's stable, where they change horses for the first stage out of London - the bottles were hid in the straw of the stable, and Bowman was rather in liquor; I asked him how he came by it - he said he had bought it, or had it made a present to him, I do not know which - I believe it to be my wine, and it is sealed in the same manner, but I cannot swear to it.

NEAL LADD . I am a publican, and live at Finchley. On the 8th or 9th of January, Bowman was in my tap-room - he called me, and said, "Here are two bottles of wine, which I will make you a present of;" I said, "Did you get them honestly" - he said Yes; "Then (said I) take them home, for I will have nothing to do with them" - I had only seen him once before.

JOHN BLINDALL . I am servant to the prosecutor" - Bowman told me that Carter took the first bottles of wine, and showed him the way to the cellar; that was on the first day they were taken to Clerkenwell - Carter was with him, and did not deny it; Bowman also said, that Robinson took four bottles of wine, and sold them to Mr. Bell, at the Red-lion, Finchley.

THOMAS BELL. I keep the Red Lion. On the morning of the 9th of January, Robinson came to me, and said he had got two bottles of wine to sell - I said, "How did you get it?" he said a van broke down, and he and Bowman had assisted, and they got six bottles for their labour, they had drank two, and he would sell these for 2s. a bottle - I did not want it, but I bought it.

FRANCIS CLARK . Bowman came to my stable on Monday or Tuesday, the 14th of January; he said he had two bottles of wine, and asked me if I could tell him where he could sell them; I told him No, and he went away.

THOMAS MARTIN . I am a horse-patrol. On the 14th of January the prosecutor came to me to go to apprehend Bowman - we found him in the stable of Mr. Horner, and these bottles of wine were there; I took Carter and Robinson on suspicion.

BOWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 36.

CARTER - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROBINSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-137

564. JOHN GANDY and JOHN ATKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 2 purses, value 5s.; 4 half-crowns, and 8 shillings, the property of Eliza Talbott , from her person .

ELIZA TALBOTT . I am a widow , and live in Adam-

street, Manchester-square. On the 23rd of January, about twelve o'clock at noon, I was at the corner of Goulston-street, Whitechapel - I had a reticule on my arm, and was walking quickly along - I was hustled by four or five or six persons, who got round me, and when I attempted to cross, the opening was stopped by one or another of the gang - I was rather pushed back by one or the other of the gang, and one of them, whom I believe to be Gandy, said, "Ladies, pass on, you are a long time crossing," and at that time there was an opening made for me to move - I went to move, and immediately heard a cry of Stop thief! I found my reticule was cut, and two purses had been taken out, each of which had silver in it- I have never seen any of the money or the purses since; I can swear the two prisoners were at the corner of the street, and I believe Gandy was the one who said "Ladies pass on" - he was taken immediately, and Atkins on the 30th.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Were there not a great number of persons there? A. No; there were several passing and re-passing - those who did pass were obliged to go into the road to cross; I wished to pass on- when I heard the expression, Gandy was before me, and the others were chiefly before me or on the side of me; I should think it could not have occurred by accident - I was impeded in my walk.

CHARLES BAKER . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Harben and Larkin, I was in the warehouse, on the 23rd of January, about twelve o'clock in the day, and heard the alarm - I ran to the door, and saw Gandy run up the street; I stopped him, and asked what he had been doing - he said Nothing; I seized him - he struck and bit me, but I still held him - Atkins then came up, and Gandy passed a purse to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you run? A. No; he ran towards me - I met him; Atkins came up, and received a green purse from him - it had a little tassel to it.

ELIZA TALBOT . One of my purses was green, and the other black.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . I am high-constable of the Towerhamlets - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a mob running up Goulston-street - I went up, and found Gandy in the possession of Baker; I took him and found on him this pen-knife, and a cork attached to a leather thong; Baker described Atkins to me, and I took him some days afterwards.

WILLIAM SAVAGE (Police-constable H 50). I was on duty in Whitechapel on the 23rd of January; I saw the two prisoners and five others at the corner of Goulston-street - I went on, and was afterwards told I was wanted; I went back, and found Gandy in custody - on the Wednesday following, I found Atkins, in company with Douglas in the City; I took him, and found this pen-knife on him.

Atkins. Can Baker state that I took the purse?

CHARLES BAKER. Yes; I have known him the last three years in company with bad characters - he had a brown surtout coat on, blue waistcoat, and light trousers.

Atkins to WILLIAM SAVAGE. Q. What dress had I on? A. A brown surtout coat, but I did not notice your trousers or waistcoat; I have known you well for the last two years.

Gandy. The prosecutrix at first said she could not swear to my being there.

ELIZA TALBOTT . No; I said I would not swear you were the person who cut the bag, but I said you were there.

GANDY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

ATKINS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330214-138

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

565. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Frederick Rheinlander , from his person .

FREDERICK RHEINLANDER . I am assistant to Messrs. Underwood and Todd, drapers . On the 7th of January I was walking over Blackfriars-bridge ; I put my hand to my pocket, missed my handkerchief, and found a companion of the prisoner's lifting up the flaps of my coat - I seized the prisoner's companion; he declared he had not the handkerchief, and passed it to the prisoner - I then seized the prisoner; he protested he had not got it; he got to the rails, and threw it into the water - I had seen it was my handkerchief; I detained the prisoner, and gave him to the officer - his companion got away.

Prisoner. I was a dozen yards behind him, and I ran up to see what was the matter. Witness. No, they were arm-in-arm, and close together - the prisoner was within a foot of me; I told him if he would give me the handkerchief I would let him go.

ROBERT MASON (City Police-constable 91). I went up and took the prisoner - he said another person took the handkerchief, and he had nothing to do with it.

GUILTY *. Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-139

566. WILLIAM PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 handkerchief , the goods of Aaron Goldsmid .

JOSHUA ROBINSON . I live in Noble-street, Goswell-street. On the 31st of January I saw the prisoner and another near the corner of Newgate-street - the prisoner pulled the prosecutor's handkerchief partly out of his pocket, when he got as far as the Magpie and Stump; they still followed him, and when they got to Bull's Head-court , he pulled it again - the prosecutor and another gentleman then went through the Post-office-yard; the prisoner turned, followed them, and then took the handkerchief quite out of his pocket, with his right-hand, and put it into the breast of his own coat, under his arm, on the left side - he passed on, and the officer took him.

IVES ELVERSON (City Police-constable 98). On the 31st of January I was on duty in Newgate-street, and in consequence of what Robinson said, I saw the prisoner and another follow the prosecutor on to the Post-office - I directed Robinson to follow them close; I went down Cary-lane, and took them both - the prisoner had the handkerchief.

AARON GOLDSMID. I live in Upper Bedford-place, Russell-square. I lost this handkerchief; it has my mark on it.

Prisoner. I was out of work, and was going to some of the warehouses to ask for work.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-140

567. THOMAS SMITH and THOMAS JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Avery , from his person .

JOHN AVERY . I am a sugar-broker , and live in Mincing-lane. On the 1st of February, about noon, I was passing the end of Gracechurch-street ; I felt a tug at my pocket - I turned, and saw the colour of my handkerchief in Jones' hand; he passed it to Smith - I seized them both, and Smith dropped it at his feet.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. I believe this is a great thoroughfare? A. Yes, but I am positive Smith is the man who dropped the handkerchief, and that Jones gave it to him - I had seen them together for some time.

Jones. The prosecutor said that Smith took it, and now he says I took it.

JOHN AVERY . No, I can swear Smith dropped it, and I took it up - it has the mud on it now.

JONAS CLAPHAM (City Police-constable No.82). I took the prisoners, and have the handkerchief.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-141

568. JOHN NEWCOMB was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 20 lbs. of cheese, value 10s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Doggrell .

SECOND COUNT. stating it to be the goods of Isaac Pothecary .

JOHN HYDE . I am a tripe-dresser, and live in Whitecross-street. About four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 4th of February. I was passing by the prosecutor's premises in Redcross-street ; I saw a little boy, about six years old, bring a cheese out of the shop in his pinafore, and join the prisoner, who was standing by the shopwindow - the prisoner put his hand on the little boy's shoulder, and told him to go on, which he did; the prisoner then took the cheese himself, and put it into his basket - the prosecutor and I followed him; the prisoner saw us; he threw it down, and went to a public-house - I am sure he is the man who received the cheese.

HENRY DOGGRELL . I live in Redcross-street; and sell cheese . I was in my kitchen, and heard the door rush open - I got up, and missed a cheese; I found the prisoner at a public-house door - this is the cheese; I know it to be mine - it is a Wiltshire cheese, and worth about 10s. 6d.

EDWARD MACDONALD (City Police-constable 78). I received the cheese, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY *. Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-142

569. JOSEPH COBB was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 7s., the goods of William Martin , from his person .

WILLIAM MARTIN. I live at the East India Arms, in Fenchurch-street. On the 12th of February, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was passing Aldgate , with two friends - I felt a pull at my coat, and caught the hand, and it turned out to be the prisoner's; he gave my handkerchief to another person, who ran away - I am sure the prisoner gave it him.

Prisoner. I was passing this gentleman - he said he had lost his handkerchief; I said I could not help that - he said I had got it, and searched my pockets; when he found I had not got it, he said he would swear he saw me give it to somebody else who ran across the road, but if he had seen that he might have taken the other person, as there were two friends with him.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I caught his hand at my back, and saw him take the handkerchief out, and give it to another, who put it into his bosom, and ran off with it.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-143

570. JOHN LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 cask, value 2s., and 4 gallons of brandy-bitters, value 28s. , the goods of Francis Pothonier .

FRANCIS EARL . I am a constable of Cripplegate. On the evening of the 8th of January I was passing Aldermanbury, and saw the prisoner with this cask on his shoulder - he turned into Fountain-court; I then asked him what he had got, and where he got it - he threw it down, and ran away; I pursued him, raised a cry of Stop thief! and he was taken in Aldermanbury.

HENRY TINSON . I am clerk to Mr. Pothonier - he is a rectifier . On the evening of the 8th of January I sent this cask and others in a cart to Hackney; it is Mr. Pothonier's property.

FRANCIS DRUETT . I am carman to the prosecutor. I had this cask in my care to take to the Roebuck, at Hackney; I found the tail-ladder of my cart down in Leadenhall-street , and missed this cask.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-144

571. HENRY KIRBY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Joseph Winney Gull , from his person .

JOSEPH WINNEY GULL. I live in Old Broad-street. About seven o'clock in the evening, on the 4th of February, I was in Aldgate ; I felt a pull at my pocket - I turned instantly, and saw the prisoner, and a boy about seven or eight years old - the prisoner threw my handkerchief to the younger boy, but it fell down - I took them both; I called my friend back, who took the prisoner - the younger one cried very much, and I let him go; I am sure the prisoner had the handkerchief.

JOHN FORRESTER . I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. Two boys picked his pocket, and then he said it was me.

GUILTY *. Aged 16. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-145

572. JOHN ROBERTSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of George Snelling , from his person .

GEORGE SNELLING . I live in Great Trinity-lane. On the evening of the 8th of January I was passing down Skinner-street - the officer came to me; I felt my pocket, and missed my handkerchief - I saw the officer take it from the prisoner's pocket; I had used it just before.

JOHN FARMER . I am a patrol of Farringdon within. I saw the prisoner attempt the prosecutor's pocket two or three times in Newgate-street - I followed him into Skinner-street, and saw him putting something into his pocket, and coming away from the prosecutor; I stopped him, took him to the prosecutor, and found the handkerchief in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Newgate-street, and picked the handkerchief up in a door-way - the officer took me, and found it in my pocket.

GUILTY .* Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-146

573. JOHN ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of Zachariah Foster .

The witnesses did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-147

574. JOHN WATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Abraham Duffell , from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

ABRAHAM DUFFELL . I am a cheesemonger , and live at No. 128, Edgware-road. Some time after nine o'clock in the evening of the 3rd of February, I was at the bottom of Holborn-hill - I felt a snatch at my pocket; I turned, and missed my handkerchief - I saw the prisoner, searched him, and found my handkerchief on his person; it has my mark on it.

THOMAS LONG . I am an officer. I received this handkerchief from the prosecutor - I saw him take it from the prisoner; I found another handkerchief and a knife on him.

DAVID LAING (Police-constable E 58.) I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - I was present, and know he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-148

575. TIMOTHY LANE and JOSEPH JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of a person unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM EVANS . Between three and four o'clock on the 14th of February, I saw the two prisoners together at the back of the Mansion-house - Lane had his hand in a gentleman's pocket; I saw him pull a handkerchief out, and hand it to the other prisoner, who put it under his jacket - the gentleman turned, and asked me to run after them, as he was lame; I ran after them, saw the street-keeper, and asked him to take them; he said, "Go on, and take hold of them yourself, for they will see my hat;" I ran on, and took Johnson in a court - some men pursued Lane, and took him; Johnson threw down the handkerchief when I took him - I have not seen the gentleman since.

JOHN PRICE . I took Lane, and have the handkerchief here.

Lane's Defence. We were walking together, and found the handkerchief - this lad took it up, and put it under his jacket, and when we got a little way we ran.

Johnson received an excellent character, and a witness engaged to employ him.

LANE - GUILTY .* Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18330214-149

576. JOHN BROWNE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of William Bruce , from his person .

WILLIAM BRUCE . I live at No. 18, Creed-lane, Ludgate-hill. On the evening of the 3rd of February I was on Ludgate-hill , about seven o'clock, and lost my pocket handkerchief; I missed it when I got to Fleet-street - I had had it safe in Creed-lane.

JOHN LAWS . I am a constable, and live at No.3, Butcherhall-lane, Newgate-street. I took the prisoner into custody, when he was brought to the watch-house, on the 3rd of February; I found four handkerchiefs on him - this is the one the prosecutor claims - the prisoner said this was his own.

MR. BRUCE. This is my handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Would you swear that? A. Yes, it is marked with three spots forming a triangle - I do not know whether it is done in the printing or not; I only bought this one of this pattern - it was scented strongly with musk when I lost it.

Prisoner. It is my own handkerchief - I gave 5s. for it six months ago.

JOHN LAWS . This handkerchief was scented with musk when I took it from the prisoner; there was another silk handkerchief on him, and two cotton ones - he was given in charge by a gentleman who had lost a handkerchief - he attended, but could not swear the prisoner took it.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-150

577. WILLIAM CHAPLIN was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Lynn , on the 18th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 shillings 1 sixpence, and 1 penny, his property .

JAMES LYNN . I lodge at No.4, Crown-court, Muttonhill; I did live in Northampton-square; I am an umbrella and parasol-maker . On the 18th of January I went to the Redcross tap in Barbican , between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, to have a game at bagatelle with some young men whom I had met in a coffee-shop; I played and lost some money - I was coming out about half-past five o'clock, when another man asked me if I would have a game; I said I would not, as I had no more money - another man who was there said I had, and I was knocked about by one or two who had seen me play, and they knocked my hat over my eyes - I was knocked along a little bit of a yard into the tap-room of the public-house, from the long room which is one side, from the public-house; a young man (not the prisoner) seized hold of me by the neck and arm - and twisted me round; and to get from him, I kicked him terribly on the legs; the prisoner then laid hold of me, and said I should not kick his friend in that manner - the prisoner then flung me across the seat in the tap-room, with my face downwards; he unbuttoned my waistcoat, and took two shillings a sixpence, and two halfpence from my right-hand pocket - I know they were there when we began to scuffle; I felt his hand in my pocket, and told him not to take my money - he then took this brad-awl out of my left-hand pocket, and after he had done that, he knocked me down against the water-butt, and made my nose bleed; there were one or two persons who called

out, "Don't hurt him" - I asked him to give me my money, and I would go out quietly; he said, "I will not give you the money" - I laid hold of him again, and asked him for my money; he kicked me down in the passage, and kicked me till I got outside the door - he then went in; I ran in again after him, and asked him for my money- he knocked me down again in the passage, and we had another scuffle; he took me by the two ears, knocked my head right against the post of the door, and my mouth and nose burst out bleeding, and I went right against the linendraper's window - he then took me from the window, and knocked me inside the linendraper's door; the shopman then came running out to see what it was - the prisoner then took me from there, and knocked me right against the grocer's window; the Policeman then came up, and took him - I then saw the prisoner take something out of his left-hand pocket, and give it to another man, who walked off with it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take the money out of your pocket? A. Yes, I did.

JURY. Q. Had you paid what you had lost? A. Yes, I had - I lost one pot of beer, and threepenny worth of halfpence; I had not played with the prisoner's friend.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Were you in liquor? A. No, we only had a pot of beer between seven, and it was so bitter I could not drink it; the landlady was close to the bar when the prisoner laid hold of me, and three or four men in the tap-room called out, "Don't hurt him" - they were looking at him when he took the money; they were all of the party - I know they were of the party, because they called out his name, they said,"Do not knock him about, Chaplin;" I think I gave the same account before the Magistrate - I cannot say exactly, as it is a month ago; I had not seen the prisoner before that night - I did not see him give any money, but I saw him give something into the hand of another person, who walked off with it; I lost every game - I was taken to the watch-house, but not charged with being drunk - I cannot tell how the prisoner was dressed; I had been knocked about terribly before I lost my money, but I had no idea about its being taken from me; no angry words passed between me and the prisoner - I do not know what has become of my money; I got it by my work - I have worked for myself the last two years; I had 3s. 4d. in my pocket, and 10d. was in halfpence - I had spent 2d. before I went to the public-house, and then I spent 4d. for beer, and had lost 3d.

JOHN HEARN . I was at that time shopman to Mr. Sears, a hosier, No. 32, Barbican, next door to the Red-cross-tap - there is a passage at the end of our window which goes up to the Red-cross tap. About twenty minutes after five o'clock on the day in question, I was behind the counter; I heard a noise as if some person had been knocked or had fallen against the window - I looked and saw the prosecutor knocked against the left-hand doorpost, by the prisoner, with his face covered with blood; as soon as I got round to the door, I saw the prosecutor forcing his way up the passage - there were three persons resisting him, and would not let him pass; the prisoner then took hold of him again by the collar, or by the ears, I cannot say which, and knocked him against the wall in the passage, and it seemed to me to be with violence - the people gathered round, and some persons called out"Don't hurt him," or "Do not hurt the man;" the prisoner then dragged him out of the passage, struck him twice, and the last time, he knocked him against the window of Mr. Borringdon, the grocer - the Policeman then came up, collared the prisoner, and took him into custody; there were several persons round the prisoner when he was taken - I did not see either of them walk off, nor could I see where they came from.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prisoner drunk? A. He seemed to me to be sober. I was within arm's reach of him - I could not say whether it was a quarrel, but it came from a very noisy bad house; I rather think the prosecutor kicked the prisoner.

EDWARD MACDONALD (City Police-constable 78). I was on duty at Barbican, at half-past five o'clock; I took the prisoner - I had seen him knock the prosecutor off the pavement into the road, and I took him to the station; I asked him why he struck the prosecutor - he said it was only done in a bit of a lark; I asked the prosecutor what he had been doing to the prisoner - he said they had been gambling at the Red-cross tap; he said he had lost 2s. 6d. and 1d., and the prosecutor had robbed him of it - I asked the prisoner whether he had got any money; he said No - I searched him, and found a key on him, but no money - there were two men came to the watch-house, and the watch-house keeper would not let them in; they said the prisoner was innocent of the charge.

Q. At the time you took the prisoner were there any more about him who could have received any thing from him? A. O, no, my Lord, not within ten or twelve feet; I have heard what the prosecutor has said about his handing something to another man, but it was quite impossible.

Q. At the time you took the prisoner was any body near enough for the prisoner to reach, to whom he had an opportunity of handing any thing? A. He had an opportunity, certainly, there was a crowd about.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take the prisoner by the arm? A. No, by the collar - I am in the habit of keeping a sharp look out on prisoners; I had not two minutes walk to take him to the watch-house - I particularly observed what he did as we went along - I did not see him hand any thing to any one; if he had done so I think I must have seen it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent - the prosecutor kicked my master on the knee, and **; I took him by the collar and pushed him down in the passage; I was merely taking my master's part.

JOHN JONES . I live at No. 9, Reynold's-court, Ropemaker-street, Finsbury; I am a painter and glazier - the prisoner works for me. On the 18th of January we were in the Redcross parlour with a person named Stevens, having something to drink - the prisoner and I had occasion to go into the back yard, and we heard a dispute in the coffee-room; we went up to it, and it was with the prosecutor and some others, about a pot or a pint of beer, which the prosecutor had lost and would not pay for - they instantly began pushing him about, one to the other; he was pushed into the yard, and then into the tap-room and there some person, but I cannot say who, struck him - and I suppose he mistook me for the person, as he instautly at that mo

ment gave me a severe kick on the knee - he then kicked me on the ***; and after that, but not before, I certainly, slapped his face with my open hand - I had not struck him when he first kicked me, as I made the remark, "You are a deformed man, and I will not strike you;" after I had struck the prosecutor the prisoner took him by the shoulders, and turned him down the passage, but I did not see him throw him against any thing - I was in the tap-room, but I did not see him throw the prosecutor across the seat.

Q. Will you swear he did not throw him across the seat? A. No, I did not see it; whether it happened or not I cannot say - I was among them; I swear postively I do not know that it was done - when the prisoner took him and turned him down the passage he went out at the street door, and I went into the parlour; I had not been playing- I know the character of the house, but I did not see that part of it; I had been into the parlour, and went into the tap upon hearing the noise, and crossed into the coffee-room, which belongs to the tap - there are two parts of the house, and a passage in between them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-151

OLD COURT. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18TH.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin

578. SARAH GEAR was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , at St. George, Hanover-square, 2 sovereigns and one 50l. Bank note, the monies of Henry Holmes , in his dwelling house .

HENRY HOLMES . I live in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . The prisoner had been about six weeks in my service; in consequence of missing property, suspicion fell on the prisoner who was my only servant - Mrs. Holmes, in my presence, stated to her that she had lost a great deal of property, and must have the key of her box, which she readily gave up; Mrs. Holmes searched her box, and found nothing; I told her I should send for an officer, and have her examined - she made no objection to it, but remained in the house quite unconcerned; Goddard came, and she was taken into custody - I am a hair-dresser; I had missed two sovereigns and a 50l. note - my 50l. note was found between the mattress and bed in my sister's room; it had been taken out of my cash-box that day, the 13th - on my promising the prisoner I would forgive her, she took me up stairs herself; she took the 50l. note from between the mattress and bed, and gave it to me; I had said if she would acknowledge where there was part of the property I would forgive her - I had missed it that day with the sovereigns from the cash-box.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer. I was sent for, and accused her of stealing the property - she denied all knowledge of it; I left the room to search her bed and boxes, and when I came down she took Mr. Holmes up stairs - she soon after returned with the 50l. note, and we asked when she took it, she said "Last Saturday night," meaning the Saturday week; that she took the sovereigns at the same time, and had bought a veil - that the reason she put the note under the bed, was to watch an opportunity to get her master's keys, and return it to the cash-box.

HENRY HOLMES . This is my note - it has my initials on it.

GUILTY. Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor, having had an excellent character with her .

Reference Number: t18330214-152

579. CHARLOTTE BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 reading-glass, value 12s. , the goods of Elizabeth Bangham .

ELIZABETH BANGHAM . I live at Hammersmith .

The prisoner lodged in my house for about five weeks - she was a servant out of place ; I lost a reading-glass on the 6th of January, and the officer produced it on the 8th - she behaved well with me; I believe it is her first offence.

CHARLES JAMES TOPPER . I am an officer. The prosecutrix complained to me of her loss - the prisoner told me she knew nothing about it.

ABIGAIL MORDEN . I keep a sale-shop at Hammersmith. The prisoner changed this glass with me for a pair of boots on the 7th of January - she said she had it to sell; a person in my shop offered her something for it, and she said she could not part with it till she went to the lady who owned it, to see if she would take it; and in an hour she returned with it, and said she was willing to part with it; I gave her a pair of boots for it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330214-153

580. FREDERICK EDINGE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 2 fur boas, value 8s. , the goods of Theodore Wipert .

THEODORE WIPERT. I live at No. 9, Rahere-street , and am a manufacturer ; the prisoner had been apprentice d to me for about three years - I missed about 25l. worth of property in August: I afterwards missed these two boas, and the Policeman gave me information.

JAMES JOHN EAMS . I am a Policeman. I made inquiry, and found one boa at Sadlers'-wells theatre, and another at Glhan's.

HENRY VON GLHAN . I live in Princes-street. Eams, the Policeman, found a black boa at my house; I bought it of the prisoner on the 15th of January - he asked if I had any boas to sell; I said Yes - he said he had got a man who would buy some, and then he said he had got one to sell himself - he asked me 4s. for it, I was to give him 3s. 6d. for it - I told him to bring it up stairs, which he did, and on looking at it, I said I could not give more than 2s. 6d., as it had two knots in it.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear that is the boa? A. No, I will not, but I gave the same one to the prosecutor.

THEODORE WIPERT . I swear to this black boa by the peculiarity of its make.

Prisoner's Defence. It is impossible for any man to swear to such a thing. I bought them of a man.

THOMAS WIPERT. I swear it is mine, because I never made any in this manner before; I had fifty-one of them - I sold one and missed two.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-154

NEW COURT. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18TH.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

581. JAMES BURTON and WILLIAM HARROLD were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 great coat, value 20s ., the goods of Thomas Upchurch .

JAMES RUSSELL (Police-constable N 22). On the 31st of January, about a quarter-past twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoners and another man in the turnpike-road Upper Holloway ; I saw a fish-cart going along, and a drab great coat on it; I saw Harrold cross the road from his companions, and as he passed the back of the cart he pulled the coat - he then crossed again to his companions, and in crossing, he pulled the coat again - they then all crossed, and Harrold pulled the coat quite down, and they all run away; I called to the driver of the cart, and pursued - they saw I was gaining on them, and dropped the coat about one hundred yards from where they had committed the robbery; I went with another officer and apprehended the prisoners in Maiden-lane.

Burton. Q. Can you swear I was with them? A. Yes, I am positive of that, though he had disguised himself as much as possible - when I saw him first, he had a frock-coat open, a blue apron under it, and a comforter inside - when I took him, he had his coat buttoned, and the apron and the comforter outside.

HENRY WILLIAMS (Police-constable N23). I saw the prisoners on the 31st of January, as I was standing at Holloway turnpike-gate; they had another person in company with them - they passed me, and in a short time I saw Russell running with a coat on his arm; I followed with him and took the prisoners in Maiden-lane, close to Belle Isle ; when we took them I sent the other officer for the coat to the turnpike-gate, and when I got Burton within sight of the gate, he said,"Oh, it is the coat, is it!" I had not told him what I tock them for.

Harrold. He stated that he lost sight of us, then went back to the carman, and asked if he had lost a coat; Maiden-lane is two miles and a half long, and is it likely we should have got so far? Witness. It is about a mile; I saw them about a quarter of a mile from where the coat was taken.

THOMAS DENNIS . I am a labourer. I drive a cart for Thomas Upchurch , of Hitchin. On the 31st of January I had this coat on the cart - I am sure it is it.

Burton's Defence. The other prisoner, whom I had not seen for three years, asked me to go with him to Highgate, and then I told him I knew a nearer road home; we crossed over into Maiden-lane - the two officers jumped off a bank a hundred yards off; they looked in our faces, and took us into custody.

BURTON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

HARROLD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-155

582. GEORGE BURT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 2 coats, value 2l., the goods of John Comfort ; and 1 coat, value 5s., the goods of Edward Shephard .

JANE NETTLESHIP . I am servant to Mr. John Comfort , of Stonefield-street, Islington . On the 5th of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was called up from the kitchen by my mistress - in running through the passage I missed some coats; when I got out, I saw a person at the corner of Stonefield-street, walking with a coat on his arm; he was like the prisoner in size, but I could not see his face - there was a man pursuing him; I returned; the prisoner and these coats were brought back - these two are my master's, and this other is Mr. Edward Shephard 's, my mistress's father - his coat is worth 5l., and my master's 2l.; they hung in the passage, and the door was open.

WILLIAM HILLS . I live in West-place, Chapel-street. I was delivering coke at the house that day; I heard the alarm - I ran out, and saw the prisoner turning the corner; I stopped him with the coats on his arm, and brought him back.

Prisoner. I had not the coats on my arm; I saw a man come running round the corner with them, and he asked a man whether I saw any body turn the corner with them. Witness. I did not; the prisoner had them on his arm till I came up to him, and then he dropped them - there was no other man there.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-156

583. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Charles Courteney , from his person .

CHARLES COURTENEY . On Monday evening, the 28th of January, I was walking in Holborn - I fell something at my coat pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner and two others - the prisoner had his hand at his side; I missed my handkerchief, and accused him of stealing it - I took hold of his hand, and he gave it me.

Prisoner. I saw two boys throw it down; I picked it up, and when the gentleman turned round, I gave it him.

Witness. He said so, but he was hiding it at first.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-157

584. HENRY BODEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Alfred Gouger , from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

ALFRED GOUGER . I live in Castle-street, Falcon-square. I was between Smithfield and St. John's-gate , on the 4th of February, about nine o'clock in the evening - I felt my handkerchief being taken from my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner crossing the road, perhaps less than twenty yards from me - I gave an alarm; he ran towards Smithfield-bars, where he was stopped - I never lost sight of him; I saw my handkerchief at his feet when he was stopped, about one hundred yards from where I lost it.

DAVID RICHARDS . I stopped the prisoner, and he dropped this handkerchief from under his coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RALPH JOHN MASON (Police-constable G 214). I have a certificate of the prisoner's conviction in September last, which I got from Mr. Clark's office; I was present, and know he is the person.

Prisoner. I am quite innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-158

585. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on

the 31st of January , 1 pair of boots, value 3s. , the goods of David Lloyd .

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX (Police-constable E 49). I live at No.7, Bury-street, Bloomebury. On the 31st of January, about twenty minutes before six o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Regent-street begging; I searched him, and he gave me this pair of boots from his hat - he said a gentleman gave them to him for his wife.

WILLIAM HENRY THOMAS . I am in the employ of Mr. David Lloyd, of Great Portland-street , haberdasher; he deals in shoes . On the 31st of January, the prisoner came into the shop - Mrs. Lloyd gave him a pair of stockings and a pair of Wellington boots for himself; the officer came to our shop the same evening, and we missed this pair of boots from a side shelf of the shop, near which the prisoner had sat while he put on the stockings - they are Mr. Lloyd's, and had not been sold; I am certain these were not given him.

Prisoner. The lady gave them to me; I did not steal them.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-159

586. WILLIAM FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 5 live tame fowls, price 10s. , the property of Frances Weatherley .

HENRY WEATHERLEY . I live at Ealing ; my mother's name is Frances - she is a widow, and keeps a number of fowls ; I missed four hensand one cock, which were safe on the 9th of February - I do not know the prisoner.

JOHN THOMAS RICHARDS (Police-constable T 26.) I saw the prisoner at a public-house at Ealing, on the Sunday morning, at two o'clock; I afterwards met him near Tomkin's garden, which is about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutrix's; he then had a bundle - I turned my light on him, and he ran into Tomkins' stable, and was making towards the hay-loft - I took him before he got there, and my brother officer produced this bundle, with four hens and one cock in it, in a smock-frock, which I had seen on the prisoner at two o'clock that morning, and several times before.

Prisoner. What I carried was a bag of nuts, and he never turned his light until he got into the stable. Witness. He had a bag of nuts besides the bundle; I turned on my light four hundred yards before he got to the stable; he jumped over the ditch and got into the stable.

WILLIAM TAYLOR (Police-constable T 36) I searched the stable, and found this smock-frock, two cloths, and a handkerchief - the five fowls were dead, and tied up in this smock-frock; they were taken to Mrs. Weatherley's and owned, but the Magistrate ordered them to be given up.

HENRY WEATHERLEY . I saw the fowls, and know they were my mother's.

Prisoner. I am quite innocent; the smock-frock I know nothing about - I had leave of the ostler to sleep in the stable.

JOHN THOMAS RICHARDS . I can swear to the smockfrock, I had seen him wearing it at two o'clock, when he was turned out of the Green Man - It was about half-past three when I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-160

587. SARAH HILLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 5 spoons, value 20s.; 2 sheets, value 8s.; 1 table cloth, value 1s.; 6d.; 1 coat, value 40s.; 2 remnants of lace, value 1s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 9d.; 2 night caps, value 1s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 3d., the goods of Robert Ayris , her master .

MARY ELIZABETH AYRIS . I am the wife of Robert Ayris - we live at old Nicholl-street, Bethnal-green . The prisoner nursed me during my confinement, which took place on the 28th of December; she left on the 18th of January; while she was with me I missed some silver spoons, a table-cloth, and other things - while she was with me she had my keys to get whatever was wanted.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Did you miss them while she was with you? A. I missed the spoons; I had seen them in the morning, and am quite sure she had an opportunity of taking them the same day - I was not then confined, and I kept my own keys, but the spoons were not locked up; Elizabeth Smith was in my service at the time - she is not here, she left just after the prisoner did; I was given to understand that when we went to the prisoner's house Smith was there, and she got over the palings and ran away; she never returned to me - I was not on terms of intimacy with the prisoner; I had a pair of stockings of hers, which she lent me because I got out of my confinement too early to buy a pair which were warm enough, and she lent me a handkerchief which was more convenient than my own - I offered to buy it of her; after she left me, my children called on her occasionally; but I do not recollect their going at any time in a thin handkerchief, and her sending them home in a shawl.

WILLIAM BOLTWOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Cotton, a pawnbroker, in Shoreditch. I have a table-cloth, pawned by the prisoner on the 31st of December, for 1s., in the name of Ann Stevens , Batemans-row.

EDMUND JULIUS SUTTON . I am shopman to Mr. Miller, a pawnbroker, in Kingsland-road. I have four tea-spoons and a table-spoon, pawned on the 19th of January, by the prisoner, in the name of Sarah Stevens , No. 2, Sanders-gardens, for 16s. - I have no doubt it was the prisoner; it was a woman of the same age and appearance, and in the same cloak.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean that you have any recollection about her? A. I mean to say she is the same woman; I have no doubt of it.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 6th of February I went with Mrs. Ayris to Nelson-street, Bethnal-green. I found the prisoner there - I asked if she had any thing belonging to Mrs. Ayris; she said No, and denied it strongly - I took her in charge, and searched the drawers, where I found these two remnants of lace; I asked if she had any duplicates; she showed me some, and among them I found one of this table-cloth; I then asked if she had any more property; she said No, but we found these two caps wet in the front room, and this Belcher handkerchief was round her neck - the prosecutrix claimed them.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you happen to know whether there was a girl there, washing, who left the house the back way? A. I have heard so, but I did not see her.

MRS. AYRIS. I know this table-cloth by the cutting of it; it was a larger one, and I made it into two - I know all these articles.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not this the handkerchief that was left at her house by your children when she sent them home with a shawl? A. No; I swear this was not left there, my little girl had a spencer on; these caps had been put away to be repaired - when I owned them at her house she said I had given her them to wash, which I had not; I had never employed her to wash but once, and the things were all returned.

COURT. Q. Are there any articles missing which you have not found? A. Yes; I am quite sure I had not given her these things to wash.

JOSEPH REDDING . I am a french-polisher, and live in Turville-street, Bethnal-green - I have known the prisoner six or seven years. I recollect seeing the prosecutrix at a quarter past nine o'clock last Thursday morning - I met her, and she stood talking with me for a moment or two; she said she had found her silver spoons; a female was passing on the other side of the way, and the prosecutrix called her over and asked if her mother could swear to her spoons, as she had cleaned them many times, and she said she thought she could; I made the reply -"Can you not swear to your own property - are they not marked; or have they no initial on them?" she said No, she could not.

MRS. AYRIS re-examined. Q. Did you ever ask a female whether her mother could swear to your spoons, because she had often cleaned them? A. I said that she had cleaned them many times, and I thought she could swear to them - I said, "I do not stand in any fear, though they are not marked, for others know them as well as I do;" I never said I could not swear to them - I was stating how old fashioned they were.

GUILTY. Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-161

588. LOUISA IVORY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 2 doors, value 10s., the goods of Edmund Sharp , and fixed to a building ; against the Statute.

EDMUND SHARP . I am a solicitor , and live in Beaumont-street, Marylebone, and have a house in Bosier's-court ; it is my father's, but is beneficially assigned to me to receive the rents - there will be six quarters rent due at Lady Day. I have received rent for it many times - I do not know how long it is since it was occupied; I do not know the prisoner - I was over the house the other day, and two doors were missing from the first floor; I have examined the doors, and the places they came from, and have ascertained that they came from there - I have no doubt of it - one of the hinges is broken, and the part of the hinge left fits it exactly.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you let the house to Mr. Colvill? A. I did not, but it was let to him - I do not know that he let it to the prisoner's husband, or that I ever saw her husband, but she says I have; I understand he is in prison - I have been in the house recently; I collected the rent in Colvill's time.

WILLIAM HUTCHENCE . I am a porter, and live in St. Andrew's-street. I work for Mr. Wells, of High Holborn - he deals in fixtures; the prisoner came and asked if my master did not buy fixtures - I said Yes; she said she had four or five old doors and some shelves in Lumber-court, which she had bought at a sale; when my master came home, he sent me there, and gave me 1l. 1s. to pay for them - I went there, and saw the prisoner; she said, "Are you come for those things?" I said Yes - I paid her the money, and she delivered me five doors in all, and amongst them were the two claimed by the prosecutor; the hinge of one is broken - this is it.

MR. SHARP. This is one of the doors.

Prisoner's Defence. The doors were down when I took the premises - my husband is in confinement; I was taken nine times to Bow-street, and when the Magistrate asked me where I got them, I said I bought part of them at a sale, but that part was a carpenter's bench, and some other things - I offered the keys to Mr. Sharp, and he would not take them; that is twelve months ago - he said he had a deal of money owing to him.

MR. SHARP. Some one called on me about nine months ago, and I think it was a woman, but no key was offered to me - the party stated they were about to take the houses, and asked if I had any claim for rent.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

589. LOUISA IVORY was again indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 3 doors, value 10s., and 9 shelves, value 2s., the goods of William Morgan , and another, and fixed to a certain building ; against the Statute.

JOHN MORGAN . I live in Hill-street. I and my brother William are owners of a house, No. 13, Lumber-court, St. Giles' ; I let it to James Ivory , the prisoner's husband, about eighteen months ago - they were both together at the time; I was in the house early in January - the prisoner's husband was then in confinement; the doors and shelves were then all in their places - I did not see the prisoner there, but they held possession; on the evening after they were taken to the office, I went to the premises, and the doors and shelves were gone - this is one of them; the hinge is broken, and I had the other part of the hinge taken off the door-post to match it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You went there some time in January? A. Yes; it is about five weeks ago - there was no lodger in the house; it was empty, and all the things were safe - I went there in consequence of a neighbour writing about a nuisance; I got in at a window - on the evening after the things were taken to Bow-street, there was a man, a woman, and a child in the house, and they were burning part of the fixtures - I am certain these doors are part of the fixtures of that house; they were found at Mr. Wells'.

WILLIAM HUTCHENCE . I am porter to Mr. Wells. The prisoner called at my master's on the 29th of January, and said she had some doors and shelves to sell, which she had bought at a sale - I went to Lumber-court, where she said they were, and bought these doors and shelves; I paid her a guinea for them - I was coming away, and was stopped in the street.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen her before?

A. Not to my knowledge - she was there only a short time; she was taken into custody in about an hour and a half - there was another person in the house with her, but I did not see any man, till I was coming out, I then saw a man going in.

CHARLES JAMES CHANNON . I am a broker, and live in St. Ann's-court, Soho. I have measured she doors and door-ways at No. 13, Lumber-court - I am satisfied that these doors belonged to that house; I had seen them safe and the shelves also, on the Saturday before, - these shelves agree with the measurement of the place exactly; they are worth 10s. or 12s.

Prisoner. That man never came till he came and took forcible possession - the first of this case was from jealousy; when I left the house, every thing was correct, and when I went again the house was nailed up - I got in and found every thing thrown about; my husband told me he wished me to clear the cellars of both houses, and part of these things are what were in the cellar. and part I bought at a sale - I considered them to be my own; I never pulled any of them down, but I got a person to get them out of the cellar.

WILLIAM HUTCHENCE. The doors were in the shop.

MR. MORGAN. This glass door was between the shop and parlour.

Prisoner. That never belonged to you. Witness. Yes, it did; I am certain of it - I know it by the place of the hinges.

MR. CHANNON. I saw this door standing up in the place the Saturday before - I cannot say whether it was fixed.

Prisoner. I purchased five doors for a house of my own in South Audley-street, and that was one; a person is here who was with me.

ANN IVORY . I am the sister of the prisoner's husband - I recollect her bringing some doors to South Audley-street, which she had bought; this door is one of them - she put it up in the partition; I know it by a mark across the frame.

COURT. Q. When did she buy it? A. About two years ago - I was present when she removed them from South Audley-street, and put it up, as there was no door between the shop and parlour when she took it.

MR. MORGAN. I am certain there was a door there.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-162

690. MATTHEW HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of Robert Brownsmith .

ROBERT BROWNSMITH . I live in St. Martin's-court . I lost this coat from within my shop, on the evening of the 26th of January.

JOHN GROOM . I am a constable, and live at No. 2, Hunt's-court, Cutler-street, Leicester-square. On the evening of the 26th of January I was going up St. Martin's-court, and met the prisoner with a coat; he went very quickly down St. Martin's-court, and gave it to another man - I followed the prisoner, thinking he was going to meet the other man again; I saw him go into the prosecutor's shop - I put a witness to watch him, who called me, and I saw him come out with this coat on his arm.

THOMAS CRAFFORD . I am a porter, and live in Sack ville-street. On the evening of the 26th of January I was with the officer, and saw the prisoner go into the prosecutor's shop and bring out a coat - I called the officer, who took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY *. Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-163

591. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 shilling, 9 sixpences, and 1 farthing , the monies of Emma Ann Latham .

ELIZABETH MARY ARCHER . I am bar-maid at the George inn, Acton , it is kept by Emma Ann Latham . On the 5th of February, while she was out, I saw the prisoner come there to beg; I saw him just outside the bar, after I had told him to go away - as soon as he was gone I saw the till open; I sent the ostler after him - he brought him back, and produced nine sixpences, one shilling, and one farthing; I know one of these sixpences, it is cracked and black - I know there was one shilling and one farthing in the till.

SAMUEL ROYDES (Police-constable T 12). I took the prisoner at the Geroge - the ostler had hold of his collar; I found this money in his hand.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-164

592. CHARLES MARKHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 pair of trousers value 4s. , the goods of Barnet Hart .

BENJAMIN POCOCK . I live in Shoreditch , and am a shoemaker, and headborough of Shoreditch. On the 28th of January, between four and five o'clock, I was standing at my door, nearly opposite the prosecutor's - I saw the prisoner pass, and take these pair of trousers off a line; he went down a court - I went after him, and took him with them at his feet; he said, "I am a poor distressed creature, and have nothing to eat.

Prisoner. A man knocked my hat off, and I turned up the court, thinking my hat was there, and there laid the trousers.

BARNET HART. These are my trousers - Pocock brought them and the prisoner to me; they had been taken off a line in front of my shop outside.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-165

593. MARY ANN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 sovereign, and 2 sixpences, the goods of Charles Wilcher , from his person .

CHARLES WILCHER. I am a pensioner of Greenwich . On the 11th of January I drew my pension, and went to the Coach and Horses, at the corner of King David-lane; the prisoner came in there - I went home with her, and asked her what I should give her; she said 3s., which I gave her out of my pocket - I had then a sovereign and two sixpences left in my pocket-book in my jacket pocket - I had seen them about twenty minutes before; when I had been with her about fifteen minutes, she said she had a gown in pawn, and she would go and get it while she had the money - she went out, and did not return for two hours; I had then missed my money - I gave charge of her; my sovereign was a bright one.

WILLIAM BUTLER (Police-constable K 48.) On the day stated I took the prisoner - she said so help her God

she had no more than the 3s. which the prosecutor gave her; I searched her, and found some halfpence and one shilling - I took her to the watch-house; and found she had a new shift and flannel petticoat on - I asked how she got them; she said they were given to her by the workhouse people - I inquired, and found she had changed a sovereign; I asked how she got it - she said, "I had the old fellow's money - don't you like me? I have got 10s. left, and I will give you half of it;" I went to a house she described, but could not find the 10s. - my brother officer said he had seen four half-crowns in her hand.

THOMAS TURNER . I keep the White Lion. On the 12th of January the prisoner came for a quartern of gin, and gave me a bright sovereign; I gave her four half-crowns, nine shillings, and twopence.

Prisoner's Defence. A person came, and asked if I would have any thing to drink - I said Yes; she gave me the sovereign to bring the gin, and I gave her the change; I do not know where she lives, but she has known me from a child - I never saw the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-166

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

594. JANE LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 sheet, value 7s., and 2 shifts, value 8s., the goods of William Haynes , her master .

SOPHIA HAYNES . I am the wife of William Haynes - he lives in Goswell-road . The prisoner was about eight weeks in my service - this duplicate of the property were found in the kitchen by my char-woman; it had been taken from a drawer and a box.

FRANCIS THOMPSON . I am a pawnbroker. I have two shifts, pawned by a woman, in the name of Mary Lee - I cannot say who, but this is the duplicate I gave; one of the shifts is in an apron belonging to the prisoner, and the other in a handkerchief belonging to the prosecutor.

ELIZABETH SOUTH . I am char-woman to the prosecutor. I picked up four duplicates in the kitchen, and gave them to my mistress.

MARY ANN MAY . The prisoner asked me about these duplicates on the 11th of January, the day they were found; I said I knew nothing about them.

RICHARD STEPHENS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet, pawned by a woman, I cannot say who; I gave her this duplicate, in the name of Ann Lee.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was forced, by the death of my husband, to pawn many things of my own; I took the duplicates with me, and lost them after I had been there three weeks; the servant desired me to put on one of my mistress' shifts one day when we were washing, but I am innocent of taking her things.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-167

595. BARTHOLOMEW SULLIVAN & JAMES HARRINGTON were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 6 pairs of shoes, value 18s ,. the goods of John Lowe .

HENRY HUDSON . I am a locksmith. Mr. Lowe is a shoemaker , and lives in Goswell-street . On the 8th of February I saw the prisoners there - Sullivan went into the shop, brought out the shoes, and gave them to Harrington; they ran down a street - I pursued, and called Stop thief! they were brought back - I saw Harrington drop the shoes.

GEORGE ABRAHAM . I was passing the prosecutor's shop about three o'clock - the lady came to the door with a lad, and said, "I am robbed;" the lad said to me,"Come round here;" I ran down Compton-street, and saw the two prisoners running - they found I was pursuing them, and dropped the shoes - I saw them taken.

WILLIAM KING (Police-constable G 120.) I took the prisoners, and have the shoes.

CELIA LOWE . I am the wife of John Lowe . These are his shoes, and were taken from inside the door.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY , Aged 14.

HARRINGTON - GUILLY . Aged 13.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18330214-168

596. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 40 yards of canvas, value 40s. , the goods of Benjamin Edgington .

JOHN SIMMONDS . I am in the service of Benjamin Edgington , who lives in Piccadilly , and is a warehouseman . I saw the prisoner in his passage on the 2nd of February - he went out of the door, down the steps, and passed the shop window; I looked, and missed a roll of canvas - I called some one to mind the shop, but no one came; I ran after the prisoner, and saw him crossing Regent-street - I called the officer, who took him with the property on him.

WILLIAM MACKENZIE (Police-constable C 132.) I took the prisoner with this canvas - he said he did it from distress, but he had 3s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-169

597. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 saw, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Pett .

HENRY PETT. I am a carpenter . I was at work at a new beer-shop in St. Luke's , building a kitchen , on the 29th of January; the prisoner came to warm himself at the fire - I went to dinner, and left my saw in the yard; I returned in about three-quarters of an hour; when I came back; I saw the prisoner going away; I missed my saw.

LEONARD CLARE MATTHEWS . I have the saw, which was pawned on the 26th of January by the prisoner and another lad.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-170

598. SAMUEL WALLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 2 bladders, value 2d., and 11lbs. of lard, value 6d. , the goods of Francis Thomas Dovey .

SAMUEL ROSE . I am a salesman, and live in High-street, Shoreditch . On the 19th of January I was at my shop door, which is four doors from the prosecutor's - I saw the prisoner and two others lurking about his door; I watched them, and saw the prisoner take two bladders of lard out of the window, and put them into his apron - I went to him, and he dropped them at my feet.

JOSEPH HAYNES . I am in the service of Mr. Francis Thomas Dovey . These are his property.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-171

599. JOSEPH WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 2lbs. 8ozs. of silk, value 3l., the goods of James Barton , his master .

JOHN RUSSELL . I am servant to Mr. James Barton , a dyer - the prisoner was a labourer in the dye-house. On the 30th of January, about one o'clock, I saw him go from the dye-house into the skeining-room, take a handful or two of silk off the beam, and put it into his bosom; I told one of the men there was something wrong, and went after the prisoner, but I could not find him - I went and looked at the silk, and missed nineteen or twenty skeins.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Had you been drinking? A. We had had a little rum; I was not affected by it, nor was the prisoner; the silk was missing; it was black, but it had been wrung, and would not stain any thing - I was about four yards from him when he put it into his bosom; I did not charge him with it before he went out - I did not know how to act, as my master was not there; there had been 41lbs. of silk in the parcel on the 26th, and this was on the 30th - there were seven other persons there; I saw the prisoner take one handful, but there were two missing - I looked at his shirt afterwards, it was not stained; that silk would not stain it.

JAMES BARTON . I received information of the loss of the silk: I looked, and missed twenty knots - it was black silk, dyed, but not dried.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had the prisoner been employed? A. About a fortnight; I had seen the silk all right that morning.

ZACHARIAH BAKER (Police-constable H 9.) I took the prisoner about five o'clock the same day - I found nothing on him, nor any stain on his shirt.

Prisoner. I am innocent; I was rather in liquor, and went away to dinner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-172

600. EDWARD WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 1 box, value 1d., and 31 cheroots, value 5s. , the goods of William Henry Walker .

ANN WALKER . I am the wife of William Henry Walker , he lives in Chichester-place, St. Pancras , and keeps a tobacco-shop . On the 2nd of February, the prisoner came in, a little before twelve o'clock at night; he asked to light his pipe - I gave him a light, and turned to go into the parlour again; the watchman was outside shutting up the shop - he came in in a minute, and asked me if I missed anything; I looked and missed a box of cheroots - the prisoner was then gone, but was taken in about an hour.

EDWARD LEHEUP . I am a watchman. I was at the private door, going to shut the shutters; I saw the prisoner in the shop - he took something off the counter very quick, and went out - I inquired if this lady had missed any-thing: she said Yes; I went to the prisoner's place, and found the box of cheroots.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know him? A. Yes, but he went out of the shop so quick I could not stop him.

CHARLES FREDERICK FIELD (Police-constable E 12). I received information, and took the prisoner at his lodgings, in bed, and this box of cheroots was under his head.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I had been drinking with a few friends, and know nothing about it.

The prisoner received a very good character.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-173

601. WILLIAM YOUEN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 4 handkerchiefs, value 14s. , the goods of William Holland .

HENRY DOVER . On the 2nd of February I saw the prisoner and another lurking about the prosecutor's shop; I watched them - they crossed the road, and divided about four doors off: they then walked backwards and forwards, and the prisoner whipped his hand through a square of glass in the prosecutor's window, and took out something; he came over towards me - I followed him, and saw an officer - I told him, and he took him with the handkerchiefs on him.

JOHN NICHOLSON Police-constable K 38). I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchiefs.

WILLIAM HOLLAND. These four handkerchiefs are mine - they are in one piece; my window had been cracked, but not broken.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a lad, who asked me to go with him, and take these handkerchiefs.

GUILTY . Aged 18. Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-174

602. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 25 yards of calico, value 12s.; 4 yards of printed cotton, value 1s.; 7 handkerchiefs, value 9s., and half a yard of net, value 6d. , the goods of Joseph Shephard .

SARAH SHEPHARD . I am the wife of Joseph Shephard - we live at Woodford-bridge. On the 31st of January I came to town with my husband and a female friend; I went to a linen-draper's shop in Shoreditch, and purchased twenty-five yards of calico, four yards of cotton, seven handkerchiefs, and half a yard of net; my first cousin carried the parcel to a friend's of mine, in Fleet-street , where we had some refreshment, and there I saw it safe; my nephew then carried it to our cart, and threw it up to my neighbour, who was into the cart, she missed it, and it fell into the mud - my nephew took it up again, and gave it to my neighbour, who took it and put it into the cart - it was a light cart on springs; there was nothing particular in it but this parcel and a little basket - it had a tail-board to it; we left town between five and six o'clock - when we got home the parcel was missed - this is it.

ELIZABETH DUDLEY . I was with the prosecutor at the shop where these things were purchased; I put the parcel into the cart - it could not have fallen out.

GEORGE EDWARD ENO . I am shopman to Mr. Rotherham, in Shoreditch, where these articles were purchased; I know them by the private marks, and my own mark on the parcel.

CATHERINE BURRELL . I keep the Blue-coat Boy, in Dorset-street, Spitalfields. On the 31st of January, about twenty minutes before eight o'clock in the even

ing, the prisoner came into my house and asked for a pint of porter - he paid for it, and asked if he might leave his bundle while he drank it - it had some light brown paper round it, which was rather dirty; I asked what was in it - he said I knew as well as he did, for he had just picked it up; I said it was my general rule if parcels were left, to look at them - I looked into this parcel, and saw these articles; before the beer was drawn the officer came in and took him.

HENRY BOLTON (Police-constable H 87). I was directed to this house, to make inquiry respecting some other property which had been stolen; there is a lobby door there - I pushed against it, but could not open it; I looked through the window over the door, and saw the prisoner there, and this witness just throwing this parcel into a chair behind her; I went in and said to the prisoner, "How came you by this?" he said it was his own that he had bought it; I said, "You must go to the station" - he made no resistance, for I told him it was of no use, for I had assistance outside; I got a person there to take him to the station, and in going along he said he had bought it; I saw the same kind of print as this in a window in Shoreditch - I went there; they said they had not sold this, but referred me to Mr. Rotherham - and the shopman recollected that he saw three females, who said they lived next door to Old Sal, at Woodford-bridge - this is the parcel, it is dirty on one side, not on the other.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, and went to get a pint of beer; I told the officer I had found it.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-175

603. GEORGE YEEND was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES HUCKER . I am a baker . The prisoner was my servant , and was employed to carry out bread and to receive money, which he was to account for immediately on his return - he was with me a fortnight.

MARY MASON . I am a customer of the prosecutor's; I left half a crown with Elizabeth Ville on the 30th of January, to pay the prisoner for his master.

ELIZABETH VILLE . I received the half-crown, and paid it to the prisoner.

EDWARD MEDLEY . I deal with the prosecutor for bread. On the 4th of February I paid the prisoner a sovereign for a board of bread, which he brought at that time, and one which he had brought before - he gave me this receipt.

MR. HUCKER. He did not give me either of these sums on the 30th of January - he returned his account not so well as usual, and on the 4th of February he went away entirely, carrying the money, board and all- I could have brought half a score of other persons who have paid him money.

GUILTY . Aged 33. Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner for larceny.

Reference Number: t18330214-176

604. PHOEBE WILSON and CAROLINE RICHARDSON were indicted for stealing on the 30th of January , 1 watch, value 4l., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Charles Lever , from his person .

The prosecutor did not attend. - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-177

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

605. JOSEPH SMITH and MARY ANN SMITH were indicted for feloniously receiving on the 29th of December , 2 1/2yards of silk, value 6s.; 2 tippets, value 2s., and 1 yard of cotton, value 2d., the goods of Thomas White , well knowing them to have been stolen .

The witnesses did not appear. NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18330214-178

606. JOSEPH THOMASON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1/2lb. weight of leather, value 1s. 3d. , the goods of William Wolf Fink .

WILLIAM WOLF FINK . I am a leather-seller , and live in Church-street, Bethnal-green - the prisoner has been in the habit of purchasing leather at my shop for about two years. He came on the 5th of February and asked to look at some leather called kid-bellies - I sold him some; he put the money down, and I saw him put a bundle of the same kind of pieces into the bosom of his apron; he was then going out - I called some one to keep the door, and insisted upon his coming back; he then pulled these pieces out of his bosom, and begged I would not give him in charge, but be merciful to him - I said I had long had a suspicion of him.

JOSEPH PATTERSON . I live in New-street, Bethnalgreen; I was in the prosecutor's shop at the time. I saw the prisoner pull these pieces out of his bosom - Mr. Fink said he would give him in charge - he begged for mercy, and said he would pay him the value.

THOMAS BESLEE (Police-constable H 84). I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19 - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330214-179

607. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 watch, value 3l. 10s.; 1 seal, value 30s.; 1 key, value 10s., and 1 piece of ribbon, value 6d. , the goods of John Parker .

JOHN PARKER . I live in Massetts-place, Bloomsbury. I went to the George and Crown public-house on the 10th of February, to have a glass of spirits and water; the landlord reached it over to me, as I could not get near the bar; I drank it and handed the glass back, and while I was reaching I felt something at my fob - I looked down and saw the prisoner's hand let go of my watch-ribbon; he had drawn it up from the bottom of my fob quite up to the top; every part of the watch, the seal, and the key, had been altered in its position - I put my hand down, and my thumb caught against the ring of the watch, which joins to the watch; the watch was just out - when he found he was detected he commmenced fighting; I warded off his blows, got to the door, and called the officer, who took him.

Prisoner. I called for half a pint of rum, and as I was taking it a fellow shoved it down; this gentleman then accused me of taking his watch - I told him to go for the Policeman - I waited till he came back with one; there were four or five persons between him and me. Witness. I am quite sure he is the person who had hold of my ribbon - he stood next to me when I felt it. I saw his hand let go of the seal and ribbon; I cannot say which hand it was - when I got to the door; I held the door, and called the Policeman, who came and took him.

THOMAS WAVERLY (Police-constable F 188). I live at No. 32, King-street, Long-acre. I took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330214-180

608. JOHN WILDES and WILLIAM JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 coat, value 3l. , the goods of Edward Riley .

ELLEN RILEY . I am the sister of Edward Riley - he is a tailor . On the 7th of February the prisoner Johnson came to the shop and asked for employment - I merely answered No; in about ten minutes Wildes came in, and asked the same question - I was in the act of answering him, when he placed his hand upon a coat which was on a chair before the counter, and made off with it - I flew to the door and called Stop thief! or something to that effect; I returned to the shop; the coat and Wildes were brought back - Johnson had left before Wildes took it.

ROBERT SUSELL . I live in Arbour-square, Commercial-road. On the night of the 7th of February, I heard the alarm - I saw Wildes running; I pursued, and he was stopped in my night - I laid hold of him and he threw down this coat, which I produce; I took him and the coat back to the shop - on his way to the station he said if he had got clear off with it, he should have pawned it, and he intended to go on the tramp - Johnson followed us all the way; I asked what he wanted, and he said he had as much to do with the coat as the other, for they were both acting together.

EDWARD RILEY . I keep this shop at No. 61, Ratcliffe highway. On the 7th of February I left this coat on a chair in my shop - I know it to be mine.

JOHN SCASE (Police-constable 51 K). Johnson came to the station - I asked what brought him there, he said he merely, came to give himself up, as he was as much concerned with the coat as the other.

Wildes. For the last eighteen months we have travelled all through South Wales in search of work, and have been unsuccessful - we were in the greatest distress, and had parted with our scissors, the last things we had.

WILDES - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHNSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-181

609. GEORGE TURNER , GEORGE WIGGINS , and JOHN NEALE were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 13 pairs of shoes, value 3l. , the goods of Joseph Borsley .

JOSEPH WARRY . I am foreman to Joseph Borsley , a boot and shoe maker , in Sloane-street, Chelsea - the prisoner Turner was three weeks in his service. On the 15 th of February I examined a part of the stock, but not this part - I have since seen these shoes; they are worth 5s. a pair; I had left Turner alone in the shop the night before they were taken.

Neale. When he took the shoes off my feet, he said they had been worn, and he could not swear to the private marks - I had them of my uncle, and made him a waistcoat for them. Witness. I saw a pair on his feet, but I spoke most unequivocally to them - I had not sold such a pair while Turner was in the service; I had before, but I am certain that pair had not been sold - by their general appearance, and a mark inside.

ROBERT GOOSE (Police-constable B 55). I was on duty in Jew's-row on the night of the 15th of February; I saw Wiggins and Turner - I knew Wiggins; I followed them to George-street, which is a dark street, and then I heard Turner say "I can't," and Wiggins said, "You can if you like" - they parted; I saw Wiggins go into a public-house in Sloane-square - I got a man to go in and tell the landlord to come out and speak to me; the bar-man came out to me, and I spoke to him - I then pushed up the shutter and saw Wiggins and Neale there - and while I was there Turner came in and joined them; I got another officer to go in and ask them where they came from - Neale said he lived in the London-road; I then stepped up, and took Wiggins - I said to him, "I know you to be a reputed thief;" I unbuttoned his trousers, and found two pairs of new shoes, and on Turner I found two duplicates of two new pairs - I found nothing on Neale; I went to the prosecutor - he sent the shopman with me to the cell where Neale and Wiggins were; the shopman said he could swear to the shoes on Neale's feet, but of those on Wiggins he had a doubt - they utterly denied knowing Turner, but the publican said that they had all been to his house for a fortnight; I found some money on Turner, and the next day I found five pairs of shoes which had been pawned at one shop, and four pairs at another.

JOHN LEPTROP FINLEY, I am apprentice to a pawnbroker. I have four pairs of shoes, which were pawned on the 6th, 7th, 11th, and 15th of February, by Turner.

Turner. Q. What do you know me by? Witness. A. By your countenence and dress.

JOHN BRYANT . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have five pairs of shoes pawned by Turner - I can swear to him by his countenance.

RICHARD WOOD . I keep the Star and Garter in Sloane-square. I had seen the three prisoners coming to my house for the last ten days before they were taken, and on that Friday night they came in - I said to a person who kept the house before me, "I wish you would look after these men;" he went out and told the Policeman.

Turner. I bought the duplicates, in Sloane-street, of a man who said he was in great distress, and if I would give him 2s. for them he would be obliged.

JOHN BRYANT re-examined. I bought this pair of shoes of Turner for my own wear, on the 14th, when he pawned another pair for 3s.; I gave him 3s. 6d. for these.

Wiggins. A. man came into the Star, who was hawking shoes about - I bought these two pairs of him for 13s. and the pair I had on my feet my aunt sent me.

Neale. I went to the house, called for a pint of beer, and sat by the side of Wiggins.

JOSEPH WARRY re-examined. Q. Can you prove that the shoes found on Neale or Wiggins had been in your shop that day? A. No,

ROBERT GOOSE re-examined. I lost sight of Turner after he said he could not do it; then Wiggins and Neale were waiting for him at the public-house, but he had joined them before, about fifty yards from the prosecutor's shop.

Neale. He did not see me in company with Turner - I was sitting in the public-house when Wiggins came in.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WIGGINS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

NEALE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-182

561. ELIZABETH SEDLEY , MARIA POTTER , and MARY SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 4 sovereigns, and 1 half sovereign, the monies of Thomas Wright , from his person .

THOMAS WRIGHT . I am a canal boatman , and live at Droitwich, in Worcestershire. On the night of the 2nd of February I went to the British Lion, in the City-road; my mate was with me - Sedley and Potter came in - one of the company asked them to drink, and they had some beer at my expence; I then sent my mate to see to my horse, and when he returned, he brought some bottles back for me - Sedley asked me what I was going to do with them; I said, "To take some gin to some of my neighbours;" she said I should not have them filled there, she could take me to a place where I could get it better and cheaper - I then went with her, Potter, and my mate, to another public-house, where I got them filled; I had some gin and cloves there - Sedley, Potter, and my mate, had some rum; we then all went to the prisoners' house - I agreed to give Sedley 3s. to sleep with her: we had some more gin and cloves there, and I and Sedley went into a bed, in which there was another woman - I had put my waistcoat and breeches under the pillow, in which I had my pocket-book, with a 5l. note, and four sovereigns and a half, and some silver lapped up; I cannot tell whether I put out the candle or Sedley, but, after we had been some time in bed, Sedley had one arm under my head, and the other over me - I heard some hand handling of paper: I then listened and heard my pocketbook drop on the floor; I made an excuse that I wanted to get up, to which she objected, but I did get out, and, on getting out, I trod on my waistcoat, took it up, and the pocket-book was not in it; I then felt on the floor, and found my pocket-book open - I called my man, and said,"I am robbed;" he came into the room - we looked, and found the 5l. note in my pocket, but the sovereigns, and half sovereign, were gone; Potter then came into that room, but I did not see Smith till after the officer came - neither Smith nor Potter were in the room when I lost my money; I opened the window, and called Police! two sovereigns were afterwards found on Potter, and one sovereign in Smith's month, but that was in the lower room - I am positive it was Sedley took my money; I think it must have been conveyed to the other; when my man and Potter came up, I had charged Sedley with having my money, and she said, "Search your pockets" - I felt, and found the 5l. note, and some silver loose in my pocket.

JOHN HAYFORD (Police-constable G 184). I was on duty, and went to the house in Garden-row , between two and three o'clock in the morning I saw the prosecutor calling out of the window - the door was opened; I went up stairs, and found Sedley, Potter, and another female in the room; the prosecutor said he had been robbed of four sovereigns and a half - I asked where it was; they said they had never seen it; Sedley said, if I would go about my duty, they would make it all right with the boatman - I then attempted to search them; they objected - I sprang my rattle, and Colee came to my assistance; we got them down stairs, and after a great struggle, I found one sovereign on Potter, and Colee found another - Potter kicked me and bit me very much; I found nothing on Sedley.

HENRY COLEE (Police-constable G. 126) I assisted this officer to search Potter - I found a sovereign between her shift and stays - that was in the lower room; I saw Smith sitting on the bed, and she had a sovereign in her mouth - I charged her with it, and it was gone, but it was afterwards found close by the bed, in the lower room.

Smith. Q. You did not see it in my mouth? A. Yes, I did.

FREDERICK MILES (Police-serjeant G 14). I went to the house, and found a woman ill - I told her to go to bed, which she did, I then found two half-crowns on the cushion she had sat on.

Sedley's Defence. I went to the British Lion, and saw the prosecutor sitting there - he asked me to drink some half-and-half, which I did, and so did Potter; he then sent his mate for two bottles, and asked where he could get good gin - some person said at the Weaver's Arms, and we went there, and had seven quarterns of gin - we came out, and he wanted me to go home with him, but I refused, as he had a wife and family, but at last I took him home; after some time, he said he had lost some money - I said, "Get out and look for it," which he did, but there was none there.

Potter's Defence. The two sovereigns found on me, were given me by a young man - one was for myself, and one for him to buy some shirts; I was not in the room where the prosecutor was - his mate was in the room close to me, and must have seen if any money passed between us.

SEDLEY - GUILTY. Aged 20.

POTTER - GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-183

611. MARY STEWART and ELIZABETH CROUCH were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 pair of boots, value 6s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 8s. , the goods of Joseph Peate .

JOSEPH PEATE . I am a shoemaker , and live in Ratcliff-highway . About twelve o'clock on the night of the 1st of February, I heard a knock at my door - I inquired what was wanted, and they said some boots, as they were going to Gravesend in the morning; I opened the door, and the two prisoners came in - they each had a pair of boots, for which they paid 5s. 6d.; I went to the station-house the next day, and identified a pair of shoes, and boots; they were not what I had shown them.

JOHN MELVILLE (Police-constable K 63). Between two and three o'clock in the morning of the 2nd of February, I heard some conversation between two persons who passed me, and in consequence of that, I went to a house of ill-fame, at No. 6, Isaacs-buildings - I found the prisoners there, and a man who goes by the name of Stewart; I took them into custody - the women was so tipsy that they refused to go; I called in further assistance - when we were going out the woman who keeps the house, sung out to them, "Where are the boots and shoes you had? I saw you give Broomy (meaning Stewart) a pair, and a pair to Peamey" (meaning a man who sells peas) - the other officer went up stairs, and found these two pairs of boots; and when we were at the station, Edward Crouch , who goes by the name of Peamey, was brought there; he stated where he lived, we went there, and found this pair of boots and shoes.

JAMES FORBES (Police-constable K 94). I went up stairs, and found this pair of Adelaide boots, and this pair of leather boots; Crouch said these Adelaide boots were hers - I saw these other shoes and boots found at Edward Crouch 's.

THOMAS PEATE . I am the son of Joseph Peate . I attend his shop - this pair of men's shoes were safe in his shop at eleven o'clock, at night, on the 1st of February, no person came to buy any thing afterwards but the prisoners, and these Adelaide boots were in the shop the same night.

JOSEPH PEATE . I did not sell either these men's shoes or these Adelaide boots to the prisoners - the shop was shut at ten o'clock.

Stewart's Defence. I told the officer I bought my boots at Mr. Peate's.

JOHN MELVILLE . Yes, she did.

COURT. Q. When the woman talked of their giving a pair of boots or shoes to the Peaman, did either of the prisoners make any remark? A. No, my Lord; when Edward Crouch was asked how the boots and shoes came into his room, he said he could not account for them in any way - he has lived with Crouch for some time.

Crouch's Defence. I never saw them till they came to the station.

CROUCH - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

STEWART - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-184

612. JAMES PHILLIPS ROWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 sheet. value 3s.; 1 pillow, value 3s.; 1 bolster, value 6s., and 1 blanket, value 8s. , the goods of William Winder .

MARY DONOVAN . I am servant to Mr. William Winder, he keeps the Fox and Pack public-house, in Gray's Inn-lane . On the night of the 26th of January I went up to a back bed-room on the second floor, and saw the prisoner behind the room door, sitting on a chair - his dress was disordered, and the bedding in the room was disturbed; I saw a sheet in his lap - I ran down stairs to the pot-boy, who came up into the room, and the prisoner was then laying on the floor with the sheet under him; the pot-boy spoke to him, and told him to come down stairs, he said he would not till he had seen Mr. Jones - the pot-boy then said he would get an officer to bring him down; we came down, but had scarcely got to the bottom, before the prisoner was down after us, and he attemped to run out at the side-door, but my mistress would not let him - he then ran into the yard; my master came in, and he was detained - we went up stairs afterwards, and under the bedstead, where the prisoner had laid, was this sheet rolled up, and on the next bedstead, this bolster, this pillow, and this blanket folded in four; they are my master's property - I had made the beds in the usual way.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. When you first saw him, what did you say to him? A. Nothing; he was sitting on the chair, his trousers were undone, and he had the sheet in his lap - he was sober, though he pretended to be drunk; when we went up the second time, we told him to come down - he was sitting the first time near the foot of the bed; if he had fallen down he would not have been so high up towards the top of the bed as he was when he was laying down - it was about eight o'clock in the evening; I had not been in the room after one o'clock - the room door had been unlocked, but there is a door on the stairs.

WILLIAM WINDER . I received information when I came in, while the prisoner was in the yard; I went to him- he pretended to be very drunk; I asked him what he was doing, he said he wanted to go - I sent for the Policeman, who took him; there was no one of the name of Jones in my house.

WILSON HAYNES (Police-constable G 117). I took the prisoner - he was not drunk, but pretended to be so; he said he came there to see Mr. Perry - he gave various addresses, but I found he lived in Hertford-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the house to find a man named Jones who owed me 15s. - I asked one of the men in the tap-room, who I thought was the landlord, and he said one of the lodgers was gone to bed - I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-185

613. CATHERINE RYALLS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 apron, value 2s.; 5 pairs of gloves, value 3s.; 14 pieces of ribbon, value 15s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 7s.; 2 collars, value 8s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d., and 1 purse, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Duch Hopper , her master .

THOMAS DUCH HOPPER . I am a mariner , and live in Colet's-place, Commercial-road ; the prisoner was in my service three for months. On the 11th of February I sent for an officer, and assisted in searching the prisoner's boxes, which were not locked - I found all the articles stated. among which is a collar, which belonged to a visitor of ours - I had heard my wife ask the prisoner about it. and she denied knowing any thing of it; when it was found she said she had discovered it about the bed the morning before.

WILLIAM BLACK (Police-serjeant K 19). I searched the prisoner's boxes and bed, in her presence, and found these articles on her bed - she said she did not take these ribbons to keep, but to show to some persons.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The Prisoner received a good character, and a witness engaged to send her to her friends in the country.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18330214-186

614. JAMES PICKERING was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 truck, value 2l. , the goods of Thomas Weller .

JOHN SHEERING . I live in Mead's-row, Westminster-road. I was in Mr. Weller's shop on the 6th of December, Mrs. Weller lent the prisoner a truck, and sent me with him to Marsham-street .

ELIZABETH WELLER. I am the wife of Thomas Weller, a wheelwright , who lives at No. 8, New-street, Borough-road. The prisoner borrowed the truck of me for an hour and a half, or two hours - he left me one shilling deposit; it was worth about 2l. - I saw it again at Worship-street.

WILLIAM GARRAD . I am in the service of the prosecutor. On the 6th of December the prisoner came and borrowed the truck; I have seen the wheels and axletree of it at the office.

JOHN HARRISON CLARK. I am the son of John Clark, a pawnbroker, in Old-street. I had the wheels and axletree pawned with me on the 28th of December - I do not know by whom.

JAMES WATSON . I am a broker. On the 28th of December I went to Mark-street, where I saw the prisoner and a truck, which he offered me for 35s.; I understood it belonged to him - I remarked it was broken; he said he had lent it, and that was what he got for lending it; I saw the same truck at the office.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a headborough; I live in Pool-terrace, City-road - I have the body of the truck, which I got from Mr. Riddle of Radnor-street.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that having broken the truck he kept it till he had money to pay for the repairs, during which time it was stolen from him.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330214-187

615. ELIZA PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 2 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and 2 sixpences , the monies of Edward Bellringer .

EDWARD BELLRINGER . I live in Aske-street, Hoxton , and am a baker ; the prisoner and her husband lodged in my house. I missed money from my drawers repeatedly; I put four sovereigns, two half-crowns, one crown, twenty shillings, and some sixpences into a drawer, in my parlour, which I marked - I locked the drawer and gave the key to my wife, and on the evening of the 8th of February, I opened the drawer, and missed two half-crowns, and four shillings in silver; the drawer had no appearance of violence on it - the officer found on the prisoner, one half-crown, one shilling, and a sixpence; I had locked it up on the Thursday, and saw it safe on the Friday morning - my wife is not here, but she declared she had not been near the drawer - she was not in the habit of having dealings with the prisoner.

ANN ROGERS . I am the wife of Thomas Rogers of Aske-street. The prisoner came on Friday afternoon to my house, about one or two o'clock; she gave me one shilling, and I remarked there was a lion on the reverse side of it - I put it into the till; the prosecutor came the same evening - I showed him the till, and he found the shillings.

JAMES MILLER (Police-constable N 8). The prosecutor came to the station; I went with him to the house, and asked the prisoner for her pocket - she took it off and gave it me; I found in it this half-crown, this one shillings, and this sixpence - I have known her some years; she has had a good character - her husband was a waiter at a tea-garden, but was out of employ.

MR. BELLRINGER. These are a part of what I marked; the prisoner's husband was at home in the morning and evening - he still lodges with me, and is here now; I believe he breaks stones on the road; I have still lost 4s. - the prisoner must have had a key of my drawers; I kept my money first in the top drawer, and then moved it to the bottom drawer, but still it went - there was nothing found on her husband.

JURY. Q. Did you mark all your money alike? A. Yes, with the point of a pair of sharp scissors; the prisoner lived in the front room on the first floor - she had no occasion to go through our parlour; I am out most part of the day - she could see when my wife went into the bakehouse.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18330214-188

OLD COURT. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19TH.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

616. SAMUEL MAYCOCK , RICHARD BRAD-LEY , and JOHN METCALF were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hodges , on the 1st of January , and stealing therein 1 washing-tub, value 3s., 1 cask, value 4s., and 1 rabbit-hutch, value 3s., his property .

ANN HODGES . I am the wife of William Hodges, we live in Trevor-square, Knightsbridge , and rent the house. I had been about seven weeks in the country, and had not seen the house for seven weeks; I returned home on the 9th of January, and missed these things - I had locked the house up, and left nobody in it; we still continued to rent it - I fastened it all up when I left, and on returning, the washhouse, which joins to the house, was broken open; there is no communication between that and the house without going into the yard - it is all under the same roof; there is a little back yard - there is an opening at the top, which they had got in at; it is always open, and when they got down there is a door which leads into the yard, and then they had taken the lock off - they did not break the house; I missed a washing-tub, a rabbit-hutch, some beer-casks, and a gridiron.

GEORGE HARMSWORTH . I live in the prosecutor's neighbourhood. On New-year's-day, in the afternoon, about four o'clock, I saw Maycock on the top of the archway, close by the yard; I saw him take a gridiron out of the wash-house and take it into a field - Bradley and Metcalf were with him; I saw them all three - I saw Metcalf alone two hours afterwards, carrying the washing-tub - they were all close to the house when they had the gridiron; there were four of them together, and at eight o'clock at night I saw Maycock carrying the beer-barrel.

JOHN LONDON . I am an officer. On the 13th of January I took the prisoners, Bradley and Maycock, at a coffee-shop, in company together; Metcalf I took two days after - he acknowledged being in company with the other two at the robbery; I did not ask him any questions, but he said he was with them when they broke into the place; and that the property was taken to Maycock's house, and that the washing tub and barrel were there, and the others were hid some where - I went to Maycock's house, but could not find the beer-barrel.

MAYCOCK - GUILTY. Aged 18.

BRADLEY - GUILTY. Aged 17.

METCALF - GUILTY. Aged 13.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-189

517. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Ann Harrison , on the 9th of February , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 2 shirts, value 9s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 3 collars, value 1s.; 1 apron,

value 8d., and 1 jacket, value 3s., the goods of Samuel Burrows .

MARY ANN HARRISON . I received a blow in the street, with a fist, and at the same time my bundle was snatched from me - it was my uncle's property; his name is Samuel Barrow .

NOT GUILTY. Detained .

Reference Number: t18330214-190

Second London Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley .

618. ROBERT SPENCER was indicted for feloniously forging a certain bill of exchange , which is as follows: To T W. Coke, Esq. Holkham. December 13, 1832.

Sir, - You will greatly oblige by paying to my order, one month after date the sum of £405. for value received, by purchase of land. MARY ANN BLOOM .

Walsingham, Norfolk.

with intent to defraud John Henton Tritton and others.

2nd COUNT, for uttering the same.

3rd COUNT, for forging an acceptance on the said bill as follows, "Accepted payable at Messrs. Gurney's and Co.'s Bank, Fakenham, or elsewhere, John W. Coke Holkham , Norfolk."

NINE OTHER COUNTS varying the manner of laying the charge.

MESSRS BODKIN and LEE conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL WOODCOCK . I am clerk to Mr. Wynne, of Cambridge-street, Hackney-road, coal-merchant. I lodged at Mr. Newson's, in Cumberland-street - the prisoner also lodged there. On Thursday, the 10th of January, I had some conversation with him in the evening, in the course of which he showed me a bill - (looking at the bill) this is it; he showed it to me, and remarked that he would pay my landlord, Mr. Newson, the amount of his bill if he could give him change for a 100l. bill, he then put this bill into my hand - I read it over, and remarked that it was drawn out in a very unusual form; he answered that it was drawn out by a lady - this was about ten o'clock at night; on seeing him next evening, when he had reached the stairs leading to his bed-room, I called after him, and asked him if he had got his bill cashed - he returned to me, and said he had no knowledge of having shown me the bill, and said he had not got it cashed, but he should get it cashed in the country.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You remarked on the extraordinary nature of the bill? A. Yes; I never saw one begin in that style before - it is the clumsiest performance I ever saw; I cannot make the name to the acceptance "Coke" - it does not purport to be endorsed by Bloom; I never saw an endorsement begin with "Messrs."

JOSEPH NEWSON . I live at No. 30, Cumberland-street, Hackney-road - the prisoner lodged with me for about three weeks before he was apprehended. On Thursday, the 10th of January, he came home about ten o'clock at night, and appeared to be in liquor - he asked if I could give him change for a bin; he owed me about two guineas - I asked him the amount of the bill; he said it was a 400l, bill - I did not read it myself; it was shown to Mr. Woodcock in my presence; he had lodged at No. 26, in the same street, previous to coming to my house; he was not lodging there in January.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you think him in his senses? A. He was drunk; he told me he had come to town to receive a legacy of 80l. for his wife.

WILLIAM COVINGTON , SEN. I am principal clerk in the country office of Messrs. Barclay's bank. On the 11th of January last I received a letter by the two penny-post, enclosing a bill of exchange - this is the letter and bill (looking at them, see letter No. 1.) - I gave them into the hands of Mr. Bevan, one of the firm.

ROBERT COOPER LEE BEVAN , ESQ. I am one of the firm of Barclay and Co. - Mr. John Heaton Tritton is the senior partner ; there are four partners besides him. This letter, and the bill it enclosed, were handed to me by Mr. Covington, on Friday, the 11th of January - I made a communication to Mr. Samson Hanbury on the subject, in writing; this is the letter I sent - it was sent by John Bull , our porter, and about twelve o'clock the next day(Saturday) I received this letter (looking at it - No. 2.) from one of our clerks; Mr. Robert Hanbury came in while I was reading it - I showed him the letter, and in consequence of what he said, I went out to inquire who had brought it; I found the prisoner there, and asked him if he was the bearer of that letter - he said he was; Mr. Robert Hanbury was at that time in the partners room, not in the office where the prisoner was; I desired the prisoner to take a seat while I saw more about it; he asked whether he had not better call again; he saw me go to a clerk to desire him to look after him, upon which he immediately begged to speak to me in private - I should not think he heard what I said to the clerk; I took him into a private part of our premises - he then said he had never done such a thing before, and begged me to let him go for the sake of his wife and family, for he had been driven to it by distress - he repeated this application to me several times, and he fell down on his knees; I desired an officer to be fetched - Furrester came, and he was taken into custody; I had no previous knowledge of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he drunk when he came to you? A. Not at all; it would be impossible for this forgery to escape detection, on a view of it - it is very clumsily done; a person used to bills would see that it was out of the ordinary course - Mr. Coke, of Norfolk, does not keep cash with us.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you ever find that bills coming from the country between persons not in trade are drawn hadly? A. Yes, many country bills are drawn very bad.

HARRY NORRIS . I am cashier to Messrs. Barclay. On the 12th of January the prisoner came to me, and delivered this letter - on his giving me this letter, he accompanied it with an inquiry, which I did not understand at the time - but mentioning the name of Mr. Hanbury, I looked at the letter, and seeing it was addressed to the house, I desired him to take it into an inner room, where it would be conveyed to the partner; he then repeated his question asking if we had not heard from Mr. Samson Hanbury respecting a bill - I then asked him if he knew the contents of the letter; he said that he did - I then opened the letter, as he said it alluded to a bill - he said nothing else that I recollect - I opened the letter, and took it to Mr. Covington, who came forward, and asked who had brought the letter; I pointed to the prisoner, and he went into a private room with him.

ROBERT HANBURY , ESQ. I am a partner in the house of Hanbury and Co., Brick-lane. On Saturday, the 12th

of January, I came to business at ten o'clock in the morning, and found the prisoner waiting in my counting-house - I believe him to be the man, but did not take much notice of him; I learned from him, that he came to make inquiry about a bill - he said the bill was at Barclays' - he said he was clerk to Messrs. Oxley and English, and was sent by Messrs. Barclays to make the inquiry about the bill; I do not recollect his saying why he was sent - he did not say why it was necessary to make inquiry about the bill; I told him I knew nothing about it - Mr. Samson Hanbury, my uncle, was not in town that day - he only comes to town on a Thursday, once a week; I said nothing to the prisoner about Mr. Samson Hanbury; while I was talking to him my attention was called to a letter addressed to Mr. Samson Hanbury - this is the letter: it was brought to me by one of the clerks from the letter-box, unopened - on inquiring about the bill, one of the clerks said, in the prisoner's hearing, that there was a letter from Barclays' which might refer to the subject, and this letter was produced - I opened it in the prisoner's presence, read it, and said to the prisoner, "I will inquire about it;" he immediately left - I gave him no letter to take to Barclays', nor was any given him by my direction; I have a clerk named James Young, but no William Young - (looking at a letter, No.2,) this is not the handwriting of Young, my clerk, nor of any person in our establishment; the prisoner left me about a quarter after ten o'clock, and soon after twelve I called myself at Barclays' bank; while I was there, the letter signed Young was shown to me - I saw the prisoner at Barclays' on that occasion, and, in consequence of what I said, he was taken into a private room by Mr. Bevan - he fell down on his knees, and addressed himself to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see a bill drawn in such a manner before? A. It is very clumsily done, but in the country they are very often very curiously drawn - we do not bank at Barclay's.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am one of the City Police. In consequence of information on the 12th of January, I took the prisoner into custody at Barclay's bank; I searched, and found a key on him (looking at several letters and papers); I found all these on his person - in consequence of something I observed on the letters, I went to No. 26, Cumberland-street, and saw Mr. Purchase who brought me a box, which I tried the key to, and it opened it - in the box I found several papers and letters, in consequence of the directions on some of them, I went to Brisley, in Norfolk - I found some letters there.

WILLIAM PURCHASE . I live at No. 26, Cumberland-street. I recollect Forrester coming to my house on the 12th of January - I showed him a box which belonged to the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you knew him when he lived in the country? A. Yes; he was about nine weeks at my house - I have known him altogether about five years; he bore the character of a respectable honest man - he was formerly a schoolmaster, but latterly kept a new beer-shop.

JAMES YOUNG . I am a clerk in Mr. Hanbury's house, Brick-lane - I am the only Young in their employ. This letter is not my hand-writing, nor the writing of any body in the house.

MISS MARY BLOOM . I did live at Wells, I now live at Norwich - I never lived at Walsingham; my father had a small estate at Walsingham - he sold it some years before his death; he died last July three years - I do not know the distance of Brisley from Walsingham; I never sold any land at Walsingham - this signature to the bill is not my hand-writing.

Cross-examined. Q. It is not your name? A. No, my name is not Mary Ann - I never sold any land to Mr. Coke, of Norfolk; I know him very well - my father sold his land to a Mr. Brook; it might be three or four years before he died - Mr. Coke did not owe me 400l.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Is Brisley in the neighbourhood of Walsingham? A. Yes, but I do not know the distance.

DANIEL FORRESTER . Brisley is eleven miles from Walsingham.

SAMSON HANBURY , ESQ. I am one of the firm of Hanbury and Company of Brick-lane0. (Looking at a letter with a post-mark dated the 23rd of November, No.3) this is my hand-writing; there is something under the signature which is not my writing; I wrote the letter in consequence of an application for assissance from R. S. No. 26, Cumberland-street, Hackney-road - (looking at another letter, No. 1;) this is not my hand-writing, not one word of it - the name is something like my signature; I do not think it much like the signature to the letter, I wrote; the same characters are used; the letter, was not written by my authority at all; the endorsement Samson Hanbury on the bill is not my hand-writing, nor written by my authority - I never saw the bill till it was shown to me after the prisoner was taken.

HENRY VICRY WILSON . I am a clerk in the banking establishment of Messrs. Hammersly. I am acquainted with the hand-writing of Mr. Coke, of Norfolk; this acceptance is certainly not in his hand-writing; it is an attempt to imitate it, but a very bad one.

Cross-examined. Q. A very clumsy performance altogether? A. Yes.

JOHN ENGLISH . I am a partner in the firm of Oxley English and Oxley, of Lynn, Norfolk. The prisoner was never a clerk in our house; I have no reason to suppose this bill was ever in possession of our house - the endorsement is not our writing.

Cross-examined. Q. The firm is not properly described on the bill? A. Yes; it is English and Co.; we do not endorse bills in this way with "Messrs." before the name, nor write Lynn under it. I see many bills in the country drawn as clumsily, and should not object to take such a bill if I knew the person; I know nothing of the prisoner - Lynn is about twenty-five miles from Walsingham.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How long have you lived at Lyon? A. Twenty-four years - there is no other firm of our name.

The following letters were read.

[No. 1.] SIRS, - I beg to say, the enclosed bill which I have endorsed, should you think proper to cash, I will stand account able for; the owner will call in the course of the day; should you not think proper to comply with the same, I will thank you to return the bill to me. S. HANBURY, Brick-lane.

To Barclay, Tritton, and Co., No. 54, Lombard-street.

Saturday morning.

[No.2] SIRS, - In answer to your letter, received last night, respecting the bill of acceptance, endorsed by Mr. S. Hanbury,

I beg to say the same is perfectly right; the bearer of this note is the person to whom the bill belongs. - I am, for S. Hanbury, Brick-lane. W. YOUNG, Clerk.

[No. 3.] - To R. S. No.26 Cumberland-street.

SIR, - As you request a line from me, in reply to your letter of yesterday, I beg to say, it is not agreeable to me to interfere in the affairs of a stranger. S. HANBURY.

At the bottom of this letter several attempts had been made to imitate the signature; other papers were found on the prisoner, which were produced, upon which were written the name of" F. Joke or Coke" several times; also the words "accepted and payable at Mr. Gurney's bank, Fakenham;" the form of a bill for 447l. on J. W. Coke, Esq., Walsingham, and various attempts at making an acceptance, and the signature of J. W. Joke.

MR. WILSON. I have seen a great deal of Mr. Coke's writing; he writes the first letter of his name rather carelessly - it is something in the shape of a C.; I cannot say it never resembles any other letter.

MISS BLOOM. I have been at Walsingham very frequently: it is a village - there is no Coke, Esq. there but Mr. Thomas William Coke.

The prisoner handed in a paper, simply declaring his innocence, in addition to this, he made the following:

Defence. Gentleman. I was perfectly aware I should be taken into custody at the banking-house, because I was aware that Mr. Hanbury was there; is it probable, if I intended to commit a fraud I should have suffered more than two hours to elapse between the time of my going to Mr. Hanbury's? or that I should return to the brewery two hours after, and inquire of Mr. Hanburys servant, at what time he would be at the bank? they said his usual hour was about two o'clock; I told them to tell Mr. Hanbury I would meet him there - I went and waited outside till Mr. Hanbury went in, and we both went in at the same time; I was labouring at the time under an abberation of mind, certainly I was not in a sane state at the time; is it likely I should have made two people acquainted with the bill under circumstances which would lead to immediate detection? if I had even got the proceeds of the bill; I stated to Woodcock that I was going to Mr. Hanbury's next morning, which he must recollect; the reason I went to Mr. Hanbury was, it was said the bill was sent in a letter, saying the owner would call in the course of the day, but I did not call, as I thought very probably, if I went, they might have offered me the cash, but that was not my object; I went in the morning and informed Mr. Hanbury of it; he said he was going into the City, and would call; now, if I had intended to get the money, should I not immediately have gone to the banker's, instead of waiting till I had been taken into custody? is it feasable that a man in his senses would have done that?

MR. BEVAN. The prisoner must have been in the bank before Mr. Hanbury came in, for I had the letter in my hand, when he came into the room.

MR. HANBURY. I understand he went and asked what time I generally went into the City; I do not recollect them telling me the prisoner would meet me there; I generally go into the City about one o'clock, but went earlier than usual, suspecting something.

GUILTY, of uttering . - Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330214-191

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

619. WILLIAM OATS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Baldwin Curl , and striking and cutting him upon his face, with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable, or do him some grievous bodily harm.

RICHARD BALDWIN CURL. I am a coach wheel-wright . On the 18th of January I went into the shop of Mr. Goodbody, in Lang-street, Long-acre , to take a pair of wheels; there were five men in the shop - John Goodbody was one, Mr. Parkin, one Saunders, and the other two I did not know; the prisoner was there - I knew him before, he worked there; as soon as I went in, the prisoner began to abuse me, calling me a swindler - he said I had been in Whitecross-street prison, and had swindled people; I told him it was false, I had not been in any prison to defraud any one; he said, "It is a lie, I know you have;" and he said he did not care for me - I told him if he talked in that way, I should not take notice of him, but should take other means to prevent his using that sort of language; after that he made a rush at me, and tore the flap of my coat off - I then talked to him, held him, and told him to be quiet, but he would not, and I held my fist at him, and said I should be obliged to hit him - I hit him; he was coming at me again, and I hit him again; I turned away from him, and was speaking to another man, and while talking, I felt myself struck with something in the face - after that I was taken to a surgeon; I was cut through my lip, and had it sewn up at the surgeon's - it bled very much; it did not knock me down, I saved myself by the bench - after having it dressed, I came back to the shop, and had him taken; it lasted about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes - I had turned away from him for five or six minutes, talking to another man, after he had torn my coat, thinking it was all over; I should think it was about five minutes from the time I turned away, till I received the blow - it was an iron wedge that cut my face; I did not see it thrown at me - it was thrown at me; my lip was sewn up, and got well at last.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not call him a thief, and say he was robbing his master daily? A. No; I dare say I gave him a black eye, for I was obliged to strike him twice him my own defence; I did not throw him down - he tried to throw me down, and I tried to prevent his injuring me; he got down by attempting to throw me - I will not swear I did not kick him when he was down - I believe I did, but not violently; I swear I did not call him a thief - I have no recollection of saying he had robbed his master; Mr. Goodbody, jun. was not present at any part of it - the prisoner began had language to me the moment I entered the shop, without any provocation; if I said he had robbed his master, it is unknown to me.

WILLIAM PARKIN . I was in the shop of Goodbody on the 18th of January; Oats was working there; I saw Curl come in between ten and eleven o'clock - I was on the other side of the shop, three or four yards from him, when this occurred; I heard Oats call him a swindler, and say he had been in

Whitecross-street - Oats struck Mr. Curl first; the moment he said it he struck him - Curl had made no reply; when he was struck, Mr. Curl hit him again, which knocked him down on the ground; and about three minutes after, he ran up to Curl and tore his coat: he had got up then - after he got up he ran to him, in about two minutes, and tore his coat; Curl instantly told him to be quiet for he wanted to have no more to say to him; I had not heard Curl say anything before - Oats then said "I will kill you, for you know if I can't one you, I will two you" - and about five minutes after it was all settled I saw Oats pick the wedge off the ground, and heave it at Curl - Oats during that five minutes was at his bench working; nothing had passed between Curl and him during that time, nor any blow of any kind; the wedge hit Curl in the face - Curl did not abuse Oats at any time - I am quite sure of that.

Cross-examined. Q. He never called him a thief? A. I never heard it, nor that he was robbing his master; I was near enough to hear, if he said so - I heard him tell him to get on with his work, and not rob his master of his work; the prisoner had two black eyes when he got up - he might have struck himself against the bench; I did not see him kicked, nor observe his mouth bleeding - the prosecutor struck him on the breast, which knocked him down.

JOHN GOODBODY . When Curl came in, I was at work at one end of the shop; there being forges in the centre of the shop, I could not see, but I heard a terrible noise, and when I ran up to them, Parkin gave the wedge into my hand; I saw Curl come into the shop - it was near ten minutes or a quarter of an hour from the time he came, in a Parkin's giving me the wedge - it happened at the further end of the shop, and I was by the door; I could not tell what was doing - the Policeman took the wedge from me at the doctor's shop.

RICHARD MOORE . I am a Policeman. I have the wedge; I saw the prosecutor led out of the shop, between two witnesses, bleeding - I took him to the surgeon, and received the wedge from Goodbody.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-192

Before Mr. Baron Bayley.

620. CHARLES WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Whitaker , on the 8th of February , and stealing therein, 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 cloak, value 1l.; 3 sheets, value 10s.; 6 pairs of stockings, value 5s.; 3 books, value 3l.; 2 flutes, value 2l. 17s., and 7 spoons, value 7s., his property .

JOHN WHITAKER. I am a brewer, and keep a beershop in the parish of St. Pancras . I have known the prisoner about five months - he was once in my service, and left about a week or fortnight before Christmas; he never slept in the house - my house was broken open on Monday morning, the 8th of February, and this property taken; I am not sure that any stockings were taken - my daughter knew my stockings; I have seen nothing since but some old stockings - the persons got in at the back of my brewhouse, which is at the back of the house, but detached from it a little; they got into the house by throwing up the back kitchen window, which, I am sure, was down the night before; I was the last person up in the house, and am sure it was down when I went to bed, they could get into the house by lifting up the back kitchen window - they could not have got in any where else.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At what time did you go to bed? A. About eleven o'clock, my son was the first person up; I never lent the prisoner any stockings - two or three persons have been taken up.

EDWARD MUNDY . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the evening of the 8th, performing as clown at Haydon's theatre - I found a pair of stockings on him sewn to his drawers; he was wearing them - I produce them; I have had them ever since; and I found this pair of stockings at his lodging - he told me he lived in the back room first floor, No. 8, Southampton-street, Seymour-street; I there found another pair of stockings laying on a chair.

Cross-examined. Q. Who else was taken up? A. Durden and a prostitute the prisoner lived with - Durden slept with the prisoner on the night of the robbery - I only heard that from Durden; the prisoner told me the particular room he lived in - that was before I told him what I took him for.

MARY WHITAKER . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I know these stockings to be my father's - my work is not on them; I know them by a mark on all four - I did not mark them; it is wove into one pair - they were wove for my brother, who ordered them; that was only one pair - I know the other pair by a mark, and have seen them; they are not very valuable - I had seen the stockings on the Thursday.

Cross-examined. Q. The initials are wove in? A. Yes; not the name at length - the mark is J. W.

Prisoner's Defence. One pair of the stockings belonged to my father - my mother gave them to me when he died; - the other pair Mr. Whitaker's son gave me, with several old things which laid on a dust heap.

MARY WHITAKER. My brother is twenty-one years old. One pair belongs to my father, and were given to us by my aunt; they are marked R.; those with the initials wove in belong to my brother.

JAMES DURDEN . I lodge at the prisoner's mother's; he did not lodge with her. On the 7th of February, as I was out late, I slept with him - we went to bed about twelve o'clock, and got up about half-past six; he could not have gone out without my knowledge - I gave myself up to the Police as I understood I was charged with this; I told Mundy, I had slept with him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-193

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

621. WILLIAM MANN and JOHN LEE were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Hall , on the 13th of February , and stealing therein, 11 spoons, value 1l.; 5 rings, value 3l.; 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 chain, value 1l.; 1 pair of gold drops, value 30s.; 2 veils, value 1l.; 1 silver knife and fork, value 1l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 16s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 2 pairs of bracelets, value 10s.; 1 sheet, value 10s.; 1 pair stockings, value 1s., and 1 silk slip, value 30s., his property .

ROBERT HALL. I am a carman , and live in Cornwall-place, Lisson-grove, Marylebone ; the prisoners lodged with me for about five months, and continued to lodge there to the time in question; they slept together in the back room up stairs - Lee had a key of the outer door of the house, for the use of them both; I occupy the front parlour, but do not sleep in it - I had two more lodgers. On Wednesday, the 13th of February, I went out about ten minutes or a quarter to eight o'clock, leaving nobody in the house, I am certain; I have a wife and one daughter - I fastened the outer door, and the parlour door also; I locked the parlour door with a key which I put in a desk in my back parlour - the desk was shut, but not locked, nor was the back parlour door locked; I looked into the parlour before I locked the door - the drawers were shut, and the room was not in confusion at that time; my wife had gone out at half-past five o'clock, and my daughter also - I came back a few minutes before nine o'clock, and found the outer door about half open; the parlour door was also open - I held the door, pulled it too, and sent a person for a light, while I held the door, as I thought there was somebody in the house - when the light came we looked into the room; the things were all about, every drawer open, and every thing in confusion - my wife came in about ten minutes after nine o'clock, as I sent for her; I remained in the room till she came, and so did the Policeman and three or four more - she can tell best what was missing; I have found nothing except a pin, which was found in a handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you take the parties to the station that night? A. Yes, and they were discharged, and went to bed at their lodgings as usual - I took Mann up again that night, when I found the pin in his handkerchief; I returned to the house three or four minutes before nine.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. I believe you apprehended some other persons? A. Two more; Lee was taken a second time in my house in the morning; their room was not locked.

COURT. Q. Was it at your request they were discharged at night? A. The superintendent said as nothing was found, he saw no need to detain them, and it was agreed they should appear at the office next morning.

SARAH HALL . On the night of the 13th I came home, and found the place in confusion; I missed these articles: they cost more than 20l. - the drawers were all open; I missed a gold pin which had been stuck in a collar, and I found it in the room, stuck in a handkerchief belonging to William Mann - I found the handkerchief on the floor by the drawers; I had seen it before in the room the prisoners slept in - Mann had it on his neck on the Tuesday night; nothing was taken from any other room; my daughter picked the handkerchief off the floor - the parlour door had been locked; the lock was not injured - the key was not in the lock when I returned; we had two other lodgers in the house whom Lee had recommended - I had seen the property safe the last thing before I went out; I saw the collar with the pin in it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are the other lodgers still with you? A. One, the other is Mann's brother; I would not keep him - whether either of the other two went into the house between eight and nine'clock, I cannot tell.

MARY ANN HALL . I am the prosecutor's daughter. On the Wednesday night I returned with my mother; I picked up the handkerchief, which I know I had seen on the Tuesday, on Mann's neck - I gave it to my mother; I know it was not in the parlour when I went out - I was in the parlour just before I left.

WILLIAM HORSFORD . I am a Policeman. I apprehended Mann at half-past twelve o'clock on Wednesday night; he was at the prosecutor's door, just going in - he had the key in the door; I said, "You are my prisoner" - Mann said, "What again;" I said Yes - he said, "I have been at the watch-house once;" I said I was aware of that - Lee was with him, and Mann's brother; they were all going into their lodgings; I took him to the parlour door, and received this handkerchief with the pin in it from Mrs. Hall - I said to Mann, "Do you know this;" he looked for a minute, and then said, "Yes I do, it is mine;" I said "You are quite sure of that" - he said Yes, I had it round my head last night; I said, "Then where have you been all the evening" - he said he had been at Robinson's coffee-shop, Edgware-road, with Lee and others, from six to seven o'clock - that they went from there to the Key in Bell-street, and he was there until he was apprehended; I then took him to the station-house - Lee and Mann's eldest brother went with us, and he said at the watch-house that he had not left off work until twenty minutes to nine o'clock.

HENRY EGERTON . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoners at the Key in Bell-street, about half-past nine o'clock on Wednesday night - I searched them and found nothing except a key, which I found on Lee; I took them to the station, and they were discharged, promising to attend next morning - Hall consented to that; next morning I went down to the prosecutor's house, as Lee's new trousers were left behind and the prosecutor's trousers taken, I apprehended Lee again - that was before the time he should have attended at the office.

Mann's Defence. I drive an omnibus for Mr. Poole, and was with it from half-past six o'clock till ten minutes to nine o'clock - I went to the Key and saw Lee there; Hall came in and said the place had been robbed; I went out with them - the prosecutor said it would be satisfactory for both parties to go to the station; we went and were discharged - we returned to the Key then; as we got to the prosecutor's door to go to bed, he found the handkerchief.

GEORGE WILLIAM POOLE . I am conductor of my father's omnibus, which Mann drove last Wednesday; I am sure he was with it from eight till about ten minutes to nine o'clock - he had been driving all day, except at dinner time.

COURT. Q. Were you with it from six till seven o'clock? A. No; we did not start till a quarter-past six o'clock from the New-road - we went to the Bank and back to Southampton-mews, New-road; we went into the yard for about twenty minutes after we returned - we went up to the Wheatsheaf before we took the horses out.

ELIAS COLLINS . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in York-row. On Wednesday last I saw Mann come to the Key in Bell-street, at five or ten minutes after nine o'clock; it is about half a mile from his lodging - he had a pint of of half-and-half, and was apprehended there.

ARBAHAM BACON. I am horse-keeper to Mr. Poole; I remember Mann driving the omnibus into the yard at five or ten minutes after nine o'clock on Wednesday - I helped him out with the horses.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-194

Before Mr. Baron Bayley.

622. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Piper , on the 8th of February , at St. Dunstan, Stebouheath, otherwise Stepney, and stealing therein 146 cigars, value 11s., his property .

JAMES MULLENIS. I am a Policeman. On the 8th of February, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was on duty in Mile-end-road, in Beaumont-street ; I saw the prisoner and another at the prosecutor's shop, in Mile-end-road - they went up to the window, and stood there a short time; I saw the other put his hand in, and take out two or three handsful of cigars - he drew them through the hole in the window; he took two or three handsful out of the window, and put them into the prisoner's pocket - they then crossed the road, and looked about; they returned to the window again, and took two or three handsful - they did this two or three times; I was on the opposite side - a lady came along; I begged her to allow me to walk behind her, till I got nearer to the window where they stood; I seized the prisoner, and tried to seize the other, but the prisoner cried out to him, and he got away; I secured the prisoner, searched him at the watch-house, and found twelve dozen and two cigars in his pocket, and two pen-knives, one of which seemed to have a little putty on the edge of the blade; I looked at the window, and saw the putty was fresh cut, to take out the glass - he was detained.

Cross-examined by DOANE. Q. Why not take them before? A. I could not, I was on the other side; I could see all that took place - I did not see them cut the glass; I had been there about five minutes.

MARTHA PIPER . I am eleven years old; I was at home on this night - my father was not at home - a young man was in the yard, but I was the only person in the room. A few minutes before Mullenis came, I heard the noise like glass falling; we had one pane cracked, but none of the glass was out of it - I saw nothing until Mullenis came; there were cigars in the window - Mullenis brought the prisoner with him; the prisoner then had the cigars in his pocket.

HENRY PIPER . I am the brother of Martha Piper . I rent the house; I am a hair-dresser. I had about sixteen dozen cigars in the window; one of the squares of glass was cracked, and puttied up - the glass was all in; I was out when this happened - next day I found the piece of glass was taken quite away; I did not look at it before then - a person could put their hand in through the hole, and reach the cigars.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had the window been cracked? A. More than six months; the putty was very dry, which would make it hold tighter.

Prisoner. It is false.

GUILTY of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330214-195

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

623. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of James Stone , from his person .

JAMES STONE. I am a merchant , and live in North-street, Poplar. On the 15th of February I was in Leadenhall-street , about eleven o'clock in the morning; I felt my coat move, turned round, and found the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; I collared him, and gave him in charge - he had another person with him.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am one of the City Police. I saw Stone on the 15th of February holding the prisoner - he charged him with robbing him of his handkerchief, which then laid under the prisoner's feet; he denied the charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing, when the gentleman collared me, and said I had his handkerchief.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330214-196

624. JOHN LANGSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 2 frocks, value 7s., and 1 shawl, value 3s., the goods of Jeremiah Richardson , from the person of Esther Richardson ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

ESTHER RICHARDSON . I am the daughter of Jeremiah Richardson , and live with my father in Grecian-place, Moor-lane. On the 5th of January, at half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was returning home from Russells', the pawnbroker's, where I had been to redeem these things - I saw the prisoner in Tenter-street, when I came out of the pawnbroker's, and he followed me to Sweeting's-passage, Moor-lane , which was about six yards; I had these things loose in my hand - he uncovered my cloak, and took them from me - I ran after him, crying Stop thief! and did not lose sight of him till he was stopped by a watchman.

JOHN SIMPSON . I am a watchman. On the 5th of January I was on my heat, and heard an alarm of Stop thief! about half-past nine o'clock, and saw the prisoner running - I stopped him; the witness, who was running after him, said he had snatched two bundles out of her lap; I found nothing on him - her brother picked up one bundle, and brought it forwards afterwards; one was a frock; and the other a shawl - the prisoner said nothing.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say, "There goes the man who robbed the girl, I was running after him, let me go?" A. No; he dragged me to the end of the court - there was nobody in the place but him.

JOSEPH HORTON . I am an officer. I was at the watch house - the prisoner was brought in by Simpson, charged with snatching the bundle, from under the girl's cloak; two frocks and a shawl were delivered to me - one watchman had picked up one, and another another frock; the girl swore to them before the Magistrate.

JEREMIAH RICHARDSON. My wife sent my daughter for these things - I went to the watch-house, found them there, and knew them.

JOSEPH RICHARDSON , JUN. I am the son of the prosecutor. I saw the things at the watch-house, and knew them to be my father's - I am certain of them.

JAMES DALLY. I am a watchman. I found a cotton frock in Reynold's-court, about twenty yards from where the prisoner was stopped.

CHARLES PALMER . I am a Policeman. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from the officer of this Court - (read) - I attended the trial, and am certain he is the man; I apprehended him.

Prisoner's Defence. The man let me go, and when I got into Middlesex, I fell - the watchman took hold of me, dragged me to the City, and then said, "I shall take you."

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330214-197

625. JOHN ISAACS and THOMAS PEARSON were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 watch-key, value 1s.; 1 seal, value 3d., and 1 watch-ribbon, value 1d., the goods of John Mitchell , from his person .

JOHN MITCHELL. I live at Wright's-buildings, Bermondsey. On the 14th of February, as I was returning from Regent's-park, between three and four o'clock, I came into the City, and in Fleet-street , between Bride-lane and the corner of Bridge-street, at Alderman Waithman's funeral, (the carriages were waiting there) there was a number of people on the pavement, but it was not so crowded but what they might pass - one man got in front of me, another on my left side, and another on my right, and they kept pushing me; I recollect two of them - one I can positively swear to, but the other I was doubtful about; I positively swear to Pearson - he was on my left side; I was shoved along, one pushing me on one side, and the other on the other, until I got to Bridge-street - I am quite sure I had my watch in my fob when I was at the end of Bride-lane; I did not feel it go out of my fob, but when I got to the corner of Bridge-street, I perceived that it was gone - I have not seen it since; Pearson was on my left-hand - he turned to go away, and an officer caught him by the arm; I put my hand to my fob, and called out that my watch was gone - the other two turned away towards Blackfriars-bridge, and another officer went after them; Isaacs was brought into my presence afterwards - I will not positively swear to him; I attended before the Magistrate next day, and was certain of Pearson.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know when you missed your watch? A. I lost it between Bride-lane and the corner of Bridge-street - I do not know who took it; I was pushed about in the crowd - I felt it safe at the end of Bride-lane.

Q. Did you walk one hundred yards before you said any thing about it? A. No, I did not go from the place - the crowd was greater near Messrs. Waithman's house; I had got no great coat on - the watch had a black ribbon to it.

Q. Did you tell the Magistrate that on missing it you went back to where you missed it, and found Pearson standing there? A. I do not recollect saying any such thing - he had not time to get away, for the watchmen laid hold of his arm directly he turned round.

GEORGE PARKER . I am a ginger-beer manufacturer. I went on Thursday to see the funeral - I went as far as the church, then came back, and stood against Mr. Waithman's to see the coaches come back again; I saw three men close together - I saw Mitchell coming by, and these two men standing against Mr. Waithman's house; I recognized lsaacs - before they separated, the one who has got away, got before Mr. Mitchell, who was walking very slow; the two prisoners went on each side of the prosecutor; I am quite certain Pearson was one of them - Isaacs was on his right hand, and Pearson on his left; I saw Pearson stoop down his arm, and lift Mr. Mitchell's up, and then Isaacs gave him a push, which nearly hoisted him off the ground, Pearson stopped again, and Isaacs pushed him - then somebody in the street sung out about the swell mob - I then went to Mitchell, and asked if he had lost any thing - he felt, and said, "Yes, I am robbed of my watch;" one of the City officers laid hold of Pearson, and in about ten minutes Isaacs was secured - I am positive they were both engaged in pushing the prosecutor; I did not see them take his watch.

Cross-examined. Q. When somebody called out the swell mob, I believe you were in the midst of them? A. No, I was against Mr. Waithman's house - there was not much of a mob when they were caught - there was plenty of room for me to walk; I sometimes get a job to cut bills for the newspapers, and have been a gentleman's servant; I do not keep a ginger-beer shop, but serve several shops with it, and stand at the corner of Old-street in the summer - I get my living in the winter, by any thing I can get to do; I have 1s. job now and then - I earned 2s. 6d. last Sunday morning; and can have a good character from Mr. Eaton, of the Saracen's Head, Aldgate.

THOMAS WOODRUFF . I live in Upper Thames-street; I am out of business at present. I was at the funeral, standing with Mr. Betterton, at the bottom of Fleet-street, on the curb, just by Mr. Waithman's corner; I felt a pushing come against me that turned me round, and I saw Pearson, Isaacs, and another person by Mr. Mitchell; I should not recollect the other person again - Betterton took Pearson by the arm, and said he had better go home; I did not see them do any thing, only standing by the prosecutor - I heard Mr. Mitchell say he had lost his watch; Betterton had laid hold of Pearson then - I did not see Pearson at the time of the shoving, I did after it was done - I called Davy to secure Isaacs, and he took him, in my presence.

Cross-examined. Q. You had seen them pushing about in the crowd? A. No, not till they came down on us; I am a jeweller, out of business at present, and live on my property, which is a little money I have saved - I do not go about to help officers; I had a case of my own here four years ago - if I happen to be with the officers I assist them; this is the first time I came upon a case - I have often been with the officers, but was never employed by them, nor have I ever been paid by the Police; I knew Davey when he came on the new establishment - I went to see the funeral, the same as others.

WILLIAM BETTERTON . I am one of the City Police. I was at the funeral, and saw Mr. Mitchell near Mr. Waithman's corner - I caught hold of Pearson before I knew that the prosecutor was robbed; I did not see any thing done to the prosecutor before I caught hold of him; I was standing with my back to him, or nearly sideways; I caught hold of him by the arm, and advised him to go away - Woodruff turned round, and said, "Here is a gentleman robbed;" I said, "Then you must stop;" and I

said, "Woodruff, do you see any of the party?" he said,"Here is one going along;" I said, "Follow him;" he either followed him or sent after him, and Isaacs was taken - Mr. Mitchell saw Pearson in my custody almost immediately, and said he was one of the party who had hustled him; Pearson appeared to be in liquor, but he very soon became sober at the watch-house - whether he was in liquor I cannot say; Isaacs was brought into the watch-house within two minutes after, and a man in a brown fustian coat, who came in with Mitchell, gave charge of him - he stated, in the hearing of both the prisoners, that Isaacs was one of the party who hustled the prosecutor - Isaacs said something about his going to Ragfair; we had very few words, for I sent them to the Compter almost directly - Mitchell appeared before the Magistrate; he spoke more positively to one of the prisoners than the other, but which I do not recollect - I never saw him till Isaacs was brought to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Parker come into the watch-house after both the prisoners were there? A. Yes, I think so - I never saw Parker before; there was a rush, which threw Pearson on my shoulder, as they stuck so close to him - I have known Woodruff some years, but never knew him as assistant to the officers; I have occasionally found him a very useful man on public occasions; he is a very respectable man - I believe he has a sort of agency business at times - I have known him employed to look after pavement contracts; I do not believe he ever employed himself in going with the officers - he might go round Bartholomew-fair for an hour for amusement.

THOMAS DAVEY . I am a Policeman. I apprehended Isaacs, under the wall of the Fleet-prison, in Farringdon-street, it was on the 14th of February; a gentleman named Woodruff came up to me and pointed to Isaacs, and said"Bill Betterton has got a prisoner - there has been a robbery, and there goes another of them," and I laid hold of him.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known Woodruff. A. About eight months; he is a respectable man - I understand he has been a builder; he never went out with me - I have repeatedly seen him with other officers; he may have known me while I have been on the new establishment, which is about twelve months - I do not recollect his ever being at the apprehension of a thief with me; I have met him at public houses.

Pearson's Defence. I had been to the west-end of the town, taking my sister's child home - the crowd were pushing me about, and somebody trod the heel of my shoe down; I turned round - I might have shoved the prosecutor; when I had put my shoe up I made the best of my way out of the crowd, and the officer laid hold of my arm, and in about ten minutes they brought Isaacs to the watch-house - he was unknown to me.

THOMAS WOODRUFF re-examined. I did not see Isaacs hustle the prosecutor.

PEARSON* - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

ISAACS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330214-198

626. WILLIAM CASTLES and ROBERT BONNER were indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD HOUNSLOW . I am a tobacconist and deal in fancy goods - I live in Aldersgate-street . On the 14th of January , between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came to my shop; it was nearer eight than seven o'clock - they came in together, and Castles asked for an ounce of tobacco, which came to 3 1/2d.; Castles gave me a crown-piece, and I gave him change - Bonner was by his side; they went out both together - I threw the crown into the till; I had only one crown there besides, I am positive of that; the crown remained in the till, till Bates came in, which was soon afterwards, and asked what money I had taken of the two men - I looked into the till, and produced the crown piece; I could easily distinguish it from the other, because I had taken that half an hour before of a woman, and suspecting it, had looked at the date, and it was 1820 - the one the prisoners paid me was dated 1819; I gave it to the officer, and saw him mark it.

Castles. Q. Did I not ask you to give it me back, and say I would give you 6d.? A. You said, "If you do not like it, I have got a 6d.," and put your hand into your pocket, but did not produce one; on examining the crown, when the officer came, it appeared to be bad.

JOSHUA JOHN FORSTER . I am a pork-butcher and poulterer, and live at No. 62, Aldersgate-street. The prisoners came into my shop on the 14th of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening together - Castles asked the price of some chops; I served him and he gave me a bad crown-piece - they came to 8d.; I took the crown-piece off the counter and rung it - I said, "My good fellow this will not do, have you got another;" Bates then came in, and was at the further end of the counter - the prisoners stood close together; I said"My good fellow this is a bad one" - I gave it back; Castles rang it on a halfpenny, or penny-piece, and said it was as good a one as ever was made, and handed it to Bonner, who said, "You need not be afraid of it, it is as good a one as I ever saw;" Bates said, "Let me look at it - it is a bad one, and I know these men to be common smashers" - I directly gave them in charge; they both used such foul language I cannot name it - Bonner began; he said, "What do you detain me for?" I said "For aiding and assisting this man in trying to impose this crown-piece on me," and then he abused me; after the officer searched Castles, he put the crown-piece on the further side of the counter, out of their reach, and said it should be there till he had searched Bonner - Castles then made a struggle to get at it, and I prevented him; he said he would have it, and as he nearly overpowered me I called my man up - they were secured; I gave the crown to Bates in my shop after I had marked it - on Castles was found a good half-sovereign, a crown piece, and 2 1/2d.; and on Brown, 7s. 6d. or 9s. 6d., all good.

THOMAS BATES . I am a superintendent of the watch. On Monday night, the 14th of January, I saw the prisoners, between seven and eight o'clock together against the coach-rank in Aldersgate-street - I watched them and saw them go into Hounslow's shop; I looked through the window and saw them pay something - I watched till they came out; they then went four doors on into Forster's - I watched till the chops were weighed and then went in; I saw a pound of chops weighed - I knew them both very well - I saw Castles throw a crown

piece down which rang very well; I stepped into the shop instantly - I said I should want something; Forster had the till in his hand, ready to take the change out, and said, "I do not like the look of this" - Castles said, "It is as good as ever was coined;" he put it on his finger and rang it with a halfpenny, or a penny-piece, and Bonner said, "It is as good a one as ever was, master" - I said, "Allow me to see it, I am a good judge;" I looked and said it was exactly as I expected - I said, "It is a very bad one, you are two well known faces;" Forster gave them in charge directly - they wanted to get out of the shop, and used very bad language, both of them, Bonner in particular; Castles made a snatch across the counter to get the crown-piece - I found on Castles a good crown, a half-sovereign, and 2 1/2d., and an ounce of tobacco; on Bonner, a parcel of good shillings - I think 7s. or 8s. 6d.; I have had the crown ever since, and one which I got from Hounslow - it is dated 1819, and he had a good crown which he had taken from a woman; I returned to his shop in half an hour.

MR. FIELD. I am inspector of counterfeit coin at the Mint, and have been so many years. This crown piece dated 1819 is counterfeit - this one is also counterfeit, and of the same date, and both impressed from the same mould, certainly; they are Britannia metal, and ring extremely well - the other crown produced by Hounslow, dated 1820, is a good one.

Castles The one Hounslow says he took from the woman I could point out among one thousand; all the letters under the chin are nearly defaced - I had it in my possession seven or eight days, and there was a mark where I dropped it on the pavement.

Bonner. We desired that crown to be taken care of, as we know all the marks on it, which we could not do if it had not been in our possession.

CASTLES - GUILTY . Aged 32.

BONNER - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330214-199

627. HENRY CLARK was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JAMES ROBSON JUN. I am assistant to my father, a fringe-manufacturer , in Newgate-street ; I know the prisoner. On Saturday, the 2nd of February , he came into the shop, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, for three green blind tassels, which came to 8d. - I served him; he gave me a good 5s. piece - I am certain it was good; I examined it, and showed it to my father who said it was good, and I put it into the till to give him change - he then said he had got some small change; I returned him the good 5s. piece, and he appeared to put it into his right-hand trousers pocket - after a little while he said he had no small change, and gave me another crown, which I looked at and told him it was bad; he said it was not, and that he had not got another one about him - I gave it to my father, who sent me for an officer; I am certain the first crown was good - I had no other in my till.

Prisoner. Q. Did you put any mark on the first crown? A. No.

JAMES ROBSON , SEN. I was in the shop; my son gave me the crown-piece to look at - I told him it was good, and he gave change: I heard the prisoner say he had small change, and wished him to return it, which he did - I am not certain that I saw the prisoner give the second one, but my son brought me another to examine, which was bad; I beckoned him round the counter, and sent him for a Policeman - I marked the crown-piece, and gave it to the officer; I am sure it is the same; before the officer came I charged the prisoner with having the good crown in his possession, which he denied.

CHARLES KENT . I am one of the City Police. I was sent for to Robson's on the 2nd of February; a bad crown-piece was given to me - the prisoner said he had no other piece of money about him; I searched him at the Compter, and found a good crown-piece concealed between his legs, secreted - he had no bottom to his pockets, so that he could easily put it there; it was placed between his legs, and must have been done by his hands - I saw it marked; when I found where it was, I made him shake it out of his trousers.

MR. FIELD. This is a bad crown, and the other is a good one; the counterfeit one is cast.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined One Year

Reference Number: t18330214-200

628. RICHARD JEFFERY was indicted for a misdemeanour .

EDWARD PAGETT . I am clerk to Mr. Shaw, cheesemonger, Gracechurch-street . On the 7th of February the prisoner came into the shop, between four and five o'clock, and asked for a quarter of a pound of butter - I served him with it, he gave me a shilling, and I gave him sixpence, and 3d; he said, "I don't like the sixpence, give me copper," which I did; he then said, "You are charging me for 1s. butter" - I said Yes; he said he wanted tenpenny. - I then changed it, and gave him one halfpenny back; a man in the shop said something to me, and I looked into the till, where I had no shilling except the one he gave me; I perceived that it was bad, marked it, and put it on a shelf by itself - it remained there till I gave it to Smith, the officer.

JOHN HUGGINS . I am shopman to Mr. Shaw. The prisoner came to the shop again on Saturday, the 9th of February, about half-past four o'clock, for half a quartern of butter - I said we did not make half a quartern, I would make him 1 1/2d. worth; he gave me a shilling, which I saw was bad immediately, and my fellow-servant spoke to me as I passed him; I immediately told the prisoner it was a bad one - Smith was called, and my master came up to me- I gave it to him; he held it in his hand, beckoned Smith in, and gave it to him in my sight; no money was found on the prisoner - the shilling was not out of my sight till the officer had it.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. I received a shilling from Mr. Shaw - I produce another from Pagett; I took the prisoner, but found nothing on him - he said he lived at Bethnal-green; I found he did live there - I marked the shilling I had from Shaw; I kept it in my hand till I marked it.

MR. FIELD. These are both counterfeit, and cast in a mould.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330214-201

629. CHARLES WINTER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MARY ANN HALL . My husband keeps a tobacconist's

shop at No. 87, Crown-court, Dorset-street, Fleet-street . The prisoner came on Monday the 11th of February, about two o'clock, and asked for an ounce of shag tobacco; he applied to my sister - I saw him served; he offered a crown-piece, which I rang and weighed; it appeared good, and when I was going to give him the change, he said "I think I have enough halfpence" - he took 2 1/2d. out of his pocket (it came to 3d.); he took up the crown-piece which I had laid down; he then said "I will have half an ounce," he said "No, I won't, I will change, and have an ounce," and laid down a crown piece, which I did not take up, thinking it to be the one he had given me before - I had not sufficient change in the till, and sent my sister into the parlour for the cash-box; I gave him 4s. 9d. change - the crown-piece was still on the counter; he was scarcely out of the shop, when I took the crown-piece, and found it was bad - I, my sister, and a young person ran after him; a crowd brought him back to the shop - I sent for the constable, and gave him the crown; I am sure it was the same as he had given me the second time - he was searched in the shop; he said I must have mistaken him, that he had not been in the shop, it must have been some other man; I had no other crown-piece in the house whatever; 3s. 11 1/2d. was found on him - he then said if I would take that 3s. 11 1/2d., he would go back and fetch another shilling, if I would not give him in charge; I have not seen the first crown-piece again - he was brought back to the shop within two minutes; there were two women and another man outside the shop, and a man came in while I was giving him change, for a 1d. worth of shag, and they went out together - they appeared to know each other.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not put the crown-piece into your cash-box? A. No; I never took it off the counter till you were gone.

CAROLINE GEE . I live nearly opposite Mrs. Hall. I was at the window about two o'clock on Monday, and heard two women and a man say to another man, "Go in and baulk them, for he is there" - the man went in, and the prisoner and him came out together; I went into the shop, suspecting them - Mrs. Hall was just giving him the change; I said, "It is bad money you have taken" - she looked at it, and said, "Yes, it is," and we ran after them directly; the cash-box was on the counter - she gave him the change out of that - I saw her give him the change; I did not look at the crown-piece myself, till the prisoner was brought back - he said he would give the 3s. 11 1/2d. and bring a shilling, if Mrs. Hall would not give him to the officers, but she would not take it; I saw the crown given to Brown, the officer, and saw him mark it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me speak to the man? A. No, I did not look to see if you walked down the court together.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in the shop - Mrs. Hall gave me a crown-piece, and charged him with uttering it; I put a mark on it, in Mrs. Hall's presence, and have had it ever since - the prisoner said he was not the man, that it was the other man in the shop that gave it her; I searched him, and found 3s. 6d. and 5 1/2d. in copper on him - he said he would give up the money rather than be taken into custody, and bring or send another shilling to make up the money; Mrs. Hall would not agree to that - I asked him where the tobacco was, he said he had given it to his wife to take home for him.

MR. FIELD. This is a counterfeit crown-piece, cast in a mould.

ELIZABETH CROCKER . I keep a beer-shop, in Little Carter-lane. The prisoner brought me a bad crown-piece between seven and eight months ago - I had him taken up and he was discharged.

JOHN SPEECHLY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on Crocker's charge, for uttering a bad crown-piece - he was discharged; I have the crown here, and have had it ever since.

MR. FIELD. This is also bad.

JOHN WOODWARD . I keep the Crown public-house, West-street, Smithfield. I know the prisoner - about the 12th or 13th of September last, he came in company with Clark, who has been tried; they gave my wife a bad crown-piece - I saw it given to her; they ran out before I could get hold of them - Kent, the officer, has the crown-piece.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish to have the Mint Act read over to me - I never tendered that crown-piece at the tobacco-shop - what could I have done with the good one and the tobacco? I could not eat them.

MRS. HALL. I did not lose sight of him - he and the other man appeared walking together; I cannot say what he did after he was taken, as I went in doors.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330214-202

NEW COURT. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19TH.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

630. MOSES SAMUELS was indicted for feloniously receiving of an evil-disposed person, on the 19th of February , 9 pieces of silk handkerchiefs, containing 63 handkerchiefs, value 9l., the goods of Cornelius Marsh Payne and another, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MESSRS. CLARKSON and ROWE conducted the prosecution.

JAMES JONES . I am in partnership with Mr. Cornelius Marsh Payne - we are silk printer s; our premises are in Garrat-lane, in the parish of Wimbledon. When I came to the premises on Monday morning, the 21st of January, I learned that there had been a robbery between the Saturday night and the Monday morning; I missed fifty-one pieces of silk handkerchiefs, ten of them were quite plain, and the other had a mere outline of the pattern on them - they were in an unfinished state; I also missed some printed stockings - Knight afterwards showed me some handkerchiefs which I have here, and which I recognise as part of what I lost; I afterwards went with the officer to the prisoner's house.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you at the Police-office when the prisoner camethere? A. Yes; he came there voluntarily - he produced a boy, who was discharged, I believe; the prisoner was not in custody as I conceive; the Magistrate told me to get further evidence - I went before the Grand Jury, and took the prisoner on a warrant last Friday night.

JOHN WINDSOR . I am in the prosecutor's employ. I had been at work on these handkerchiefs, among other things, in the course of the week, and on Saturday evening, the 19th of January, I left them safe on the machine, about half-past three o'clock; I came to

work on the Monday morning at half-past eight - I found the premises broken open, and the handkerchiefs gone.

JOHN WINDSOR, JUN. I left all safe at half-past four o'clock on the Saturday, and got there again at a quarter before eight on Monday; I found the blue knocked down, all the place disturbed, and the handkerchiefs were gone.

ANN KNIGHT. I am the wife of John Knight, he lives at No. 190, Brick-lane, and is a block-maker; he occasionally works for the prosecutors - I know the prisoner, he is a watchmaker and general dealer, and lives in Mansel-street. On the afternoon of a Thursday, the beginning of February, I received a message by his daughter to go to his house on the Friday, which I did - I saw these handkerchiefs there, and while I was purchasing these four of them, the prisoner came in; I gave 11s. for them - the prisoner saw them, and saw me while his wife was cutting them off; I did not inquire where they came from; I had been in the habit of dealing with them, and thought them people of good character; I showed these handkerchiefs to my husband - he knew them, and showed them to the prosecutor.

COURT. Q How far is Mansel-street from Brick-lane? A. I suppose half a mile, and six or seven miles from the prosecutor's.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Where does your husband work? A. At home; we make blocks for the prosecutors - I do not know that the prisoner or his wife knew that; they keep an open shop, in which handkerchiefs and such things are sold - I gave a fair price for these handkerchiefs; it was an open transaction in day-light - I had no idea that the handkerchiefs were not finished, but my husband did directly he saw them.

JOHN KNIGHT . I am the husband of this witness. I do all the prosecutor's business in block-making. On that Friday my wife showed me these four handkerchiefs - I knew they were not finished; I had a bill in my house, offering a reward for the robbery, and the mark on one of these handkerchiefs (H. F.) corresponded with the description in the bill; I knew that they were not finished, but every one would not know that; it would depend on their judgment - I should think drapers or persons dealing in them must know it; I went to Mr. Jones, and went with him to get a warrant.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is the mark you speak of, a paper mark? A. It is a printed mark on the handkerchief; I am aware that in cases of bankruptcy every thing is sold, whether finished or not - I know the prisoner: I am not aware that he knew that I worked for the prosecutors - he knew I worked for the trade in general; my wife did not know that these handkerchiefs were not finished; the chemical process which fixes the colour, does not alter the appearance of them.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. I suppose they put borders to them before they sell them? A. Yes, they are subject to no duty as they are now.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I was applied to by the prosecutor on Saturday, the 9th of February, for a warrant; I got one, and went with him to the prisoner's premises - he was not at home, but his wife was; I told her my business, and she produced to me this bundle of handkerchiefs, which I have here, from a cupboard in the shop; she made no hesitation whatever - I asked where they came from; she did not tell me, but referred me to her husband - I waited for him, and one of the girls went after him, but he did not come; I left a message for him, and in about an hour and a half afterwards he came to me; he said "I am very willing to go before the Magistrate" - I told him the prosecutor and another gentleman would meet him at six o'clock in the evening, and he said "I shall decline to answer any questions, till I go before the Magistrate:" he came again at six o'clock, and I took him before the Magistrate - he then stated that he bought the handkerchiefs of a man named Nathan, that Nathan's boy brought them to him, and he paid him 8l. odd for them - the prisoner was not then in custody; in consequence of what he said that night, I went and brought Nathan and his son, a boy about eleven years of age, while the prisoner waited; - the prisoner then repeated the same story, that he had the handkerchiefs fromthem, and gave 8l. odd for them; both Nathan and his son denied it - the Magistrate asked the prisoner if he had any bill of parcels or receipt, and he said he had not; to the best of my knowledge, he said they were purchased in his own house, and that Nathan's boy brought them - the boy was upon that given into custody, and remanded till Monday: the prisoner then produced two servant girls of his - they were examined on his behalf, and stated they had seen the transaction of the purchase of these goods, and that 8l. odd had been given for the lot.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. What time did you go to the prisoner first? A. About twelve o'clock; these handkerchiefs are very nearly in the same state as when I received them - they are not much more tumbled; I have been an officer for five years, and have known the prisoner as a most respectable man - I left work with his wife, and he came to me about three o'clock; I had left my card at his house - I told him the prosecutor would be there at six o'clock, and he went at large till then; the Magistrate took his word - he did not say that he had seen old Nathan at all on the business, but that he bought them of him, and his boy brought them to his own house; I think he said on the Thursday, which would be about the 7th of February - Nathan denied that he had sold him these, but he admitted that he formerly had had dealings with the prisoner, through the medium of his son; I stated just now that the prisoner's servants were not examined till the Monday, but I now recollect they were examined on the Saturday night; when Nathan's boy denied taking the handkerchiefs, the prisoner desired the two servants to be sent for, and they were examined separately - after that the prisoner was allowed to go home, and the boy was remanded till the Monday; I cannot tell whether these handkerchiefs would be useful to persons in their present state, or whether the colour would wash out.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Now just attend to me; the prisoner was allowed to go home on the statement of the two women? A. Yes; he was not in charge at that time - the boy was charged with stealing them, and he was detained. On the Monday, the two females appeared again before the boy, but the boy was discharged; the Magistrate asked old Nathan if he had had dealings with the prisoner before, through the medium of the boy; and he said he had to the amount of 15l. or 20l. - that was five or six months ago.

MR. JONES re-examined. Q. What was the value of what you lost? A. About 50l.; they are worth 1l. a piece - I lost fifty pieces, but only ten are found; these were to receive five or six more colours - there are none sold in this state; I dare not offer them to any dealer in this state - they never leave us completely finished; they have to go to the folders.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I have been in the habit of dealing with various tradesmen in job goods, among them is a Mr. Solomon Nathan , of Greenfield-street, Commercial-road, whom I have known as a general dealer for four or five years; he is frequently accustomed to send his son to my house with various kinds of goods, in the same manner as I know he does to other houses - on this occasion, the boy came with some handkerchiefs; Mrs. Samuels, who was up stairs with me, went down and looked at them, she came up and informed me that Nathan's son had brought some handkerchiefs; that she had offered him 2s. 6d., or 17s. 6d. per piece, and that he took them away - the boy returned, and I went down stairs; he said "Tell Mrs. Samuels she must give 18s. for them" - I said "No, I am positive she gave the full value for them;" I took them up stairs - I brought him down the money, which was 8l. 15s., for ten pieces; on the same Thursday evening they were put in the shop, and exposed for public sale - on the Friday morning I took two or three pieces with me to a shop; I could not sell them as they were bought too dear - when I came home, Mrs. Samuels was cutting four handkerchiefs from different pieces, which were sold in my presence to a Mrs. Knight for 11s., being 3d, each profit; on Saturday morning after breakfast I went out with several gentleman to visit the sick of a charitable institution of which I am founder, and have been secretary for nine years; when I came home, Mrs. Samuels informed me that an officer from Lambeth-street, with two gentlemen, had been there, and inquired after the handkerchiefs - that she went down with them into the shop, and delivered them all up, with the exception of five, which were sold; I went instantly down to the office, and informed the officer, that I knew from whom I purchased the handkerchiefs - I went before the Magistrate, and informed him from whom they came; I then asked the officer whether I ought not to go with him to Mr. Nathan's house - he said "You had better let it rest till the gentlemen call on you, as they agreed on, this evening, at six o'clock;" they came at seven o'clock, when the officer informed them of my having been at the office - I related to them the particulars of the purchase of the handkerchiefs; they inquired to whom I had sold the five - I informed them that four was sold to a Mrs. Knight for 11s., which circumstance he must have known to be correct, from the information he received; I then inquired whether it would not be adviseable to go to Mr. Nathan's house, whom I supposed would state from whom he purchased them - they thought it was best to go first to the office, when Nathan and his son were fetched; Mr. Nathan admitted that he was in the habit of sending his son to me, but said he had not to his knowledge been there for a fortnight - my two servants were sent for, and were separately examined on their oath; they swore to the identity of the boy, and to the circumstance of his having sold me the handkerchiefs - the boy was remanded, and I went on Monday with my servants to the office; the case was gone into before four Magistrates, which, after a long investigation was dismissed, one of the Magistrates particularly observing, that there was the manufacturer's name plainly on the goods, which was evidence that they were not bought or sold with any felonious knowledge; I trust that all the circumstances, the price I gave, the public manner they were bought and sold, together with my character, which has ever been unblemished, will operate on your minds in my favour. The handkerchiefs were exposed in the shop, and were sold precisely in the same manner as they were bought; nobody ever observed to me that they were in an unfinished state, and but for the prosecutor's own statement I should not have known it.

REBECCA HARRIS . I am servant to the prisoner and his wife; I know a young man named Nathan - my master has had dealings with Nathan for some time past. I recollect young Nathan calling at my master's on Thursday, the 7th of February, about four or half-past four o'clock - he had some handkerchiefs with him; I saw them - they were of this description, exactly the same - I do not know whether my master was at home; he was not in the place when the boy came - my mistress was at home; the boy had some conversation with her, and then took the handkerchiefs away - he returned in about five minutes, or not so long as that; he came in as he usually did into the kitchen, and I called my fellow-servant to call my mistress; my master and mistress were then both up stairs - they both came down; Mrs. Samuels bargained with young Nathan for the handkerchiefs, and he said that Mrs. Samuels ought to give him 18s.; the prisoner said Mrs. Samuels had bid the full value, and he could not afford to give any more - I saw 8l. and 5s. or 15s. paid; the prisoner took the handkerchiefs into the shop, and placed them on the counter; at night the goods are generally put in a cupboard, some in a trunk, and some in a desk.

COURT. Q. Do you know what time the officer came? A. I cannot say - it might be one o'clock or half-past one; the goods are generally removed from the counter and put away, in consequence of our Sabbath.

MR. ROWE. Q. What time does the Sabbath terminate? A. On Saturday, after dark - at half-past twelve or one o'clock, the Sabbath was in full operation; I was not in the shop on that Saturday, but our kitchen is even with the shop, and we see the things moved from the counter to the cupboard, and the trunks, as much as they will hold; I opened the door for Mrs. Knight when she came on the Friday, between eleven and twelve o'clock, as near as I can recollect; that was before the Sabbath - she was in the shop with my master and mistress; I did not notice whether these handkerchiefs were then on the counter - they were on Thursday night; I have seen young Nathan frequently - he seems to be about fifteen or sixteen years old; he is not very big - he came on the Thursday to the kitchen door, and I called Mrs. Samuels down - he brought a bundle tied up, and it was in a blue chequered bag, not a very large one; he talked with mistress for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour - he took the handkerchiefs out, and put them on a chair - that was the first time he came; he came again in about five minutes, and came into the kitchen; my master and mistress came down together - master went up again, and got the money; the boy said, "Mrs. Samuels ought to give me

18s.," and master said she had bought them well at 17s. 6d. - that was half a crown a handkerchief; I saw the money paid in sovereigns and silver - I did not see say receipt taken, or bill of parcels; Mrs. Samuels asked the boy how many pieces there were, and he said ten.

MR. BARRY. Q. Is your mistress in the habit of dealings with Nathan? A. Yes, Sir - our kitchen adjoins the shop; dealings are generally carried on in the kitchen.

COURT. Q. Do not they bring goods in at the front door of the shop to sell? A. No, always into the kitchen.

JANE MUSTO . I am servant to the prisoner. I know the boy Nathan; I have seen him at the house frequently - I saw him there on Thursday, the 7th of February, between four and five o'clock - he brought some handkerchiefs for sale; I do not know whether my master was at home, but my mistress was up stairs, and she came down and bargained for the handkerchiefs - I saw my master afterwards pay some money, but I do not know how much; this was done in the kitchen - I saw the handkerchiefs - they were left there; the boy called twice about them.

MR. ROWE. Q. Are you sure it was not in the shop? A. No, Sir, it was in the kitchen, the shop and kitchen adjoin - the kitchen is more private than the shop; there is a shop door and a kitchen door, both come into the passage; I know the boy very well, but I do not know where he lives; he is a thin pale faced boy, not so tall as I am; I should think he is 15 or 16 years old - I did not let him in, but I came there after he had been there a minute; I came into the kitchen for something - I was at work in the yard; I believe I came in for some sand to scour some saucepans - I did not stop long; I left the boy and my fellow-servant there, and my mistress was bargaining with him; the handkerchiefs were tied in a bundle, and I saw him untie them - I did not see whether the bundle was in any outer wrapper; I did not see any bag - I did not see one on the table; if it had been on the table I should have seen it - he might have one under his arm; I do not know whether he had a cloak on - he went away for about five minutes, and then returned, and my fellow-servant called me in to call my mistress and I refused - I had gone into the kitchen the first time while the boy was there; I then went into the yard - I went into the kitchen again in about six minutes; I saw the boy there again, and my fellow-servant - my mistress was not there; I refused to call her, but I did call her - I am quite sure the boy had gone away, because I saw him go; I was in the yard, and the passage leads into the yard; he went out of the kitchen into that passage, and went out; the first door in the passage goes into the shop, and the next into the kitchen - my master mostly buys things in the kitchen; I went into the kitchen again, and saw my master pay the boy - I came in with a saucepan just at the time he was paying it; he counted it on the corner of the dresser; it was silver and gold, but I do not know how much.

JOHN SAWARD . I live at No. 15, New-road, St. George's. I know the prisoner, and have dealt with him for six or eight years - I always considered him a very honest man; he offered me some handkerchiefs for sale on Friday, the 8th of February, and on the Tuesday before; it was two or three of this description; I think he said 2s. 9d. was the very lowest he could take for them - I did not think them worth the money, and did not purchase them.

COURT. Q. What are you? A. A linendraper - it did not occur to me that they were imperfect articles, and that the colour on them would he discharged by water; I did not observe that, I hardly looked at them - I believe I did take hold of them, and I found they were silk; the silk might he worth as much as it is now - I bought some a great deal better for 4s. each, something very similar to these.

MR. ROWE. In the course of your experience with silk and silk handkerchiefs, have you often had articles of this kind offered for sale? A. I never bought any exactly of this kind - I did not want these, and I thought they would not suit me: I should think that these are unfinished handkerchiefs, if any one had pointed it out to me, but I should not have given it a thought at first - they are undressed; the goods in respectable shops are not in this state; they are done up in pieces, and made up, but these are quite in a tumbled state; I can see now that these are unfinished; I never bought any in this state, but I do not see why if a Jew were to take these about, many persons might not boy them in this state; but if I were to go into a warehouse I should not buy such, unless they were sold as a job lot.

JURY. Q. Did you ever see such a job lot in any house in the City? A. No, I never did - I have no doubt now that they are unfinished; I do not know whether they should have had borders to them.

COURT. Q. Would that have struck you on a cursory obser