Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd January 1833.
Reference Number: 18330103
Reference Number: f18330103-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR PETER LAURIE , KNT., MAYOR.

SECOND SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 3rd DAY OF JANUARY, 1833, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER BY GEORGE TTTTERTON , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1833.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable SIR PETER LAURIE , KNT., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; John Singleton Lord Lyndhurst, Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir James Parke , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's of King's Bench; Sir Edward Hall Alderson , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; John Ansley , Esq.; George Scholey , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq; John Atkins , Esq.; and William Venables , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Charles Farebrother , Esq; Samuel Wilson , Esq.; and Sir Chapman Marshall , Knt., Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

James Long

David Rankid

Robert Wilson

John Henderson

John Barrowforth

John Potts

Samuel Shearman

William Price

William Ford

John Gower

Wm. S. Hutchinson

Henry Ehn .

Second

George Barclay

Thomas Tyson

William Buttery

Bowey Hepworth

Henry Powell

Richard Lloyd

James Gray

John Sanders

James Gunniss

Charles Webb

Frederick Bennett

Thomas McLellan .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Thomas Forgan

William Tierney

William Martin

Manning G. Duke

John Woodk. Smith

Charles Reader

James Claud. Heran

William Biddle

Thomas Edwards

Charles Winter

William Kerr Read

Richard Molton .

Second

Richd. V. Windsor

Alexander Maxwell

Alex. Wm. Mills

Joseph Credock

Edward Barton

Andrew Northcroft

Charles Folkard

John M. Thompson

Wm. Aug. Bartelot

William Burn

Charles Butcher

William Lawrence .

Third

Wm. Hy. Hammond

Giles Stevens

William Molineaux

Joseph Reynolds

Francis Barrough

Douglass C. Gardner

Erasmus Clunn

Benjamin Stevens

Thomas Allwright

Henry Taylor

Thomas Double

William Tierney .

Fourth

Thomas Marshall

John Epps

William Noyes

Thomas Packer

Richard Blake

Thomas Haroor

Richard Davies

George Hibberd

George Hull

James Francis

Charles Aldwinkle

Evan Firth .

Fifth

Thomas Bodger

Saul Brice

George Barrett

Robert Collard

John Thomas Brant

Mark Baker

William Jackson

Samuel Davies

Henry Harris Fox

James Green

John Gunby

George Cook .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 3, 1833.

LAURIE, MAYOR. - SECOND SESSION.

*A star placed against the verdict denotes that the prisoner has been previously in custody.

Reference Number: t18330103-1

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

249. JOHN EMBURY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Moore and another, on the 13th of December , at St. George, Bloomsbury, and stealing 2 glass decanters, value 6s.; 2 printed books, value 2s.; 3 spoons, value 3s.; 1 brush, value 1s.; 1 liquor-stand, value 10s.; 1 cruet-stand, value 5s., and 120 pence, their property; and 2 printed books, value 4s., and 1 pair of boots, value 6s., the goods of the said John Moore .

JOHN MOORE . I live at No. 60, Marchmont-street, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury . On Wednesday, the 13th of December, I went to bed about one o'clock in the morning - I fastened the front door with a bolt inside and a slip lock; the area was covered over with an iron grating, which is very heavy - the kitchen door, which communicates with the area, was always left open, as sheep are left to run in there; I do not know whether the inner door of the kitchen was fastened: when I got up in the morning I found a cupboard door in the little back parlour was broken open - the door of that parlour had been shut the night before, but not locked - a liquor frame and three decanters were taken out of the cupboard, and a plated cruet-frame, three plated spoons, and about 10s. worth of copper; four books were taken off a shelf in the same parlour, and a brush was taken off a shelf - a pair of boots were taken off the floor; I missed these things about seven o'clock in the morning: my man, John Wright, was up before me, but he had not been in the room - I cannot judge which way the persons had got in; the front door was found ajar in the morning - I saw my property the same day at Hatton-garden - it was safe the night before; my partner's name is Hulbert - all the property belongs to us both, except two books and the boots, which were mine.

JOHN WRIGHT . On the morning of the 13th of December I was up first, and found the front door ajar; I did not notice any other part of the house disturbed; a person inside could open the street door - it was not damaged outside; it appeared to have been opened from the inside.

HENRY POOLE . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Tavistock-square on the morning of the 13th of December, and saw the prisoner about half-past two o'clock, with a bundle; I asked what he had got - he made no answer; I followed him, and then he turned back - I asked what was in the bundle; he said a pair of boots - I asked where he got them - he said from his master's, in Holborn; I found some books there also - he said they were his own; I asked where he got them, and he could not tell me; he resisted being taken to the station-house, but I at last got Payne's assistance, and took him there - he was searched, and a pair of boots, four books, a brush, and a decanter were found on him, and another broken decanter was in his pocket, and he had three spoons.

MR. MOORE. These boots have my name in them, and this Prayer-book and Bible; it is part of the property I lost; and these other things I know.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking in company with two young men till twelve o'clock, and from there I went to Oxford-street, to get something to drink; I heard a young man say he had got some things at his master's house, and as his master and him had had a few words, he did not like to fetch them in the day time - I waited in Little Coram-street, and went to sleep in a doorway; in about half an hour they came to me, roused me up, and gave me the articles - I said I thought they had been doing wrong - they called me a fool, and told me to go along; one of them gave me two keys, telling me it would be too late to go home, and to go with them, and have some breakfast.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[Jan. 5th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18330103-2

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

250. GEORGE WILLIAMS and WILLIAM GLADDEN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Harper , on the 30th of July , at St. Mary, Islington, and stealing therein 16 spoons, value 7l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; 1 punch-ladle, value 1l.; 2 butter-knives, value 1l.; 1 fish-knife, value 3s.; 30 sovereigns, 24 half-crowns, and 100 shillings, his property .

ELIZABETH CONNELL . I am servant to Mr. John Harper , who lives at Ball's-pond, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington - he keeps a public-house . On a Monday in

July last, while I was at work, I saw the prisoners in the sitting-room up stairs; I knew Gladden, and can speak to him, but cannot exactly speak to the other - I am sure of Gladden; they were sitting in the room, having a glass of gin and water - the eldest man, who I cannot speak to, told me to bring up the newspaper; when they had been in the house a quarter of an hour mistress told me to fetch a pair of slippers out of her bed-room, which is on the same landing-place; the bed-room door was locked then - I unlocked it to go in, and locked it when I came out; I gave the key to my mistress - every thing was safe in the room; the two men were in the sitting-room at that time - I saw them there; they went away about half an hour after that - they could see the bed-room door where they sat; the sitting-room door was open; I did not see them go away - I went up stairs before they left, and met the eldest man on the first flight of stairs, next to the sitting-room door, exactly at the turning of the stairs turning up to master's bed-room, and within two or three stairs of the bed-room door - he told me to bring up a glass of gin and water; I did not see the other man at that time, and cannot say whether he was in the sitting-room; I went down for the gin and water, and while I went into the tap-room to get the hot water for it, the two men came down, and said they did not want it, as it was not ready - they paid for what they had had; I did not see them go out - they went away, that is all I know; I afterwards found a pair of gloves in the sitting-room where they had been, and three weeks afterwards I found two keys and a crow-bar in the sitting-room.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose a great many persons had been in the sitting-room during that three weeks? A. Yes - I never saw either of the men before, but I kept Gladden in my memory, and described him to the officers next morning; I kept his features in my memory, and described him as a tall thin spare young man, with high cheek bones, and pock-marked a little; Gladden wore a new hat, but I cannot say whether he had it off or on in the room; I gave the gloves to the officer.

JOHN HARPER . I am a publican, living in the parish of St. Mary, Islington. I went into the bed-room on the 30th of July, and put three or four sovereigns into a drawer in a bureau; I put them into a canvas bag, in which there was about 38l. partly in silver, about 11l. in silver, 23l. in sovereigns, and about eight half-sovereigns, and there was some plate in a handkerchief close to the bag - it was tea-spoons, table-spoons, salt-spoons, butter-knives, and some plated articles, which were a pair of gravy-spoons, a fish-slice, and one or two pairs of plated nut-crackers - they were all safe when I went into the room about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon; I locked the drawer of the bureau, put the key into my pocket, and locked the room door, but left the key in it - I went up a story higher, and laid down; about half-past five o'clock I was called by my little boy - I went down to the bed-room door, and the key was gone; I called for it - it was brought to me, and I found the lock hampered: I could not open it with the key, and I at last forced the door open, and found the drawer, which I had left safe, forced open, apparently by some iron instrument going between the top of the drawer and the bureau, and the handkerchief, plate, and canvas bag were gone; a pair of the plated gravy spoons have since been brought to me by Collyer, Policeman 94 N. - I think it was about November; I did not see either of the prisoners at my house.

MARY HARPER . I remember the evening of the robbery; I saw two men at our house that afternoon - they went up stairs; they went away a little before five o'clock, and about half an hour afterwards my husband sent for the key, and broke open the door; I was in the bar when the men went away - the elder man came to the counter, and threw me down 2d. to pay for the sugar; they had ordered a glass of gin and water, which they did not stop to drink - the sugar belonged to the gin and water; he threw it down in a great hurry - I cannot swear the prisoners are the men, but they look very much like them.

GEORGE COLLYER . I am a constable. On the 21st of November, the day after we apprehended the prisoners, I searched a house, No. 8, Frances-street, in company with Murphy - the prisoner Williams lived there - I found a pair of Gravy-spoons and a quantity of other property, and housebreaking implements, one hundred and five skeleton and other keys - when we took the prisoners I found three keys on Williams, which will open Harper's bed-room door; I found thirty-three keys on his person, but three of them opened the bed-room door - I was one of the persons who apprehended him on the 20th of November, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, opposite the chapel in Pentonville - Gladden was with him - Serjeant Miles was with me; they were walking, and as soon as we got near them I observed Gladden throw away a dark-lantern and a crow-bar - he threw the lantern over the rails of the chapel; I got over the rails, and got the lantern and crow-bar - I produce them: I afterwards went to search Williams' house - here are the two spoons found there.

Cross-examined. Q. It was about half-past eleven o'clock at night - had you a light? A. No, Serjeant Miles had a light, but it was exactly under a gas-lamp; I could see distinctly - the two men walked side by side; I distinctly saw his hand go, and could not mistake one for the other; Gladden denied throwing them away, but I saw him do it.

JOHN MURPHY . I searched Williams' house in Frances-street, and found a crow-bar - I have applied it to the part of the broken drawer at Harper's house, and it fits it exactly; I was not present at the apprehension of the prisoners.

FREDERICK MILES . I am a serjeant of the Police. I was present when the prisoners were apprehended; Gladden threw the dark-lantern and crow-bar over the rails -I am quite sure it was him: I was present when the thirty-three keys were found.

Cross-examined. Q. What kind of a night was it? -A. Star-light; I had my lantern - they were close together, and I believe at first were walking arm-in-arm; both were walking close together when the things were thrown away.

JOHN HARPER . These two spoons are part of the property taken from my bureau - here is a mark where one has been scratched; it is a very remarkable scratch, almost as if it was a name, and I know them by their general appearance.

MRS. HARPER. I am quite sure these are the spoons;

I have had them some years - they are so familiar to me, I know they are mine.

Williams. Q. Might not the scratch be made on other spoons? A. I did it with a knife myself, taking off some gravy of roast mutton - I recollect doing it.

JURY to ELIZABETH CONNELL . Q. How do you know Gladden had not left when you met the elder prisoner on the stairs? A. He came down afterwards; I did not see them leave the house, nor speaking to mistress at the bar.

MRS. HARPER. The two men went away together; I cannot swear to the prisoners, but the two that were up stairs came down and went away together; there was nobody else up stairs.

Williams' Defence. The servant says she cannot swear to me, nor can Mrs. Harper or the servant say that I left the house.

Gladden. I am innocent.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 45.

[Jan. 7th] GLADDEN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

There were four other indictments against the prisoners.

Reference Number: t18330103-3

First Middlesex Jury,

Before Lord Chief Baron Lyndhurst.

251. WILLIAM PRICE and FREDERICK SAMPSON were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Price , on the 18th of December , at St. Leonard, Bromley, and stealing 6 spoons, value 15s.; 1 bodkin and case, value 1s.; 1 castor top, value 6d.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 10s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 7s.; 1 bottle, value 2d., and 1 quart of brandy, value 7s., her property .

SARAH MILLS . I live at Bow, in the parish of St. Leonard, Bromley , with my aunt, Sarah Price. On the 16th of December I fastened up the house, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and remained at home during the rest of the evening - I went to bed about eleven; I was the last person that went up - the door had not been opened after I fastened it; it was bolted - the house remained fastened up until I went to bed; Sarah Price lived in the house - I was alarmed in the course of the night I sleep up stairs: I heard a noise - I came out of my room on the staircase, and saw two men; I should know them again - neither of them were the prisoners; one was on the stairs, and one at the bottom - one had a hatchet, and the other a candle; they said nothing - they went away immediately; I alarmed my aunt, and she got up: I went down stairs before her, and found the property was stolen; the back door was ajar; how it was opened I do not know; there did not appear to have been any force used; I missed two table-spoons, four tea-spoons, a silver bodkin, the tea-tongs, the top of a pepper-castor, a bottle of brandy, and a pair of spectacles - the men were gone when I got down stairs; I knew the prisoner Price before this, by his coming to do the garden - it was light enough for me to see the faces of both the men; I did not know either of them - neither of them was Price.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Price worked in the neighbourhood? A. Yes, I saw him frequently; he once worked in my aunt's garden.

Sampson. She swore to me at the office.

COURT. Q. Did you swear to Sampson at the office? A. I was frightened at the time when I said so; I did swear to him, but I recollected my words afterwards, the second time I was called up.

WILLIAM ROBERT GARDE . I am an inspector of the Police, at Bromley. On the morning of the robbery, between four and five o'clock. I was out; I saw the prisoners together, about a quarter of an hour before I heard of the robbery - they were at the corner of Devan's-lane, in close conversation together, Price with his hands in his pockets: I did not speak to them, but looked at them very hard - they passed on, and I soon afterwards heard a scream; the wind blew very hard - I went from there into the Bow-road; I went to Mrs. Price's, and found a robbery had been committed, and on examining the premises, I found there was no marks of violence - they could not have got in without violence, if the house had been secured, and there was no marks of violence - outside; I then went to a coffee-shop in New Bromley, and saw the prisoner Price sitting down with his hat on, and his hands in his pockets: he took his hat off, and put it down by his side - Sampson was sitting by him; he put it down on the opposite side, not where Sampson sat - there were between thirty and forty other persons in the coffee-shop; I said, "My lad, I want you:" Price got up - I said, "Now I want your pall;" and Sampson immediately got up - he had his hat on, I believe; I desired every person there to sit still, and I reached over and took the hat, which Price had taken off his head, and I am sure it was the hat he had taken off his head a minute or two before - I am positive of it; on my taking it up, and while I was in the act of taking a handkerchief out of it, he snatched at the hat, and said something, which I did not hear - I pushed him off, and took out the handkerchief; I examined the hat, and there were two table-spoons, four tea-spoons, a pair of sugartongs, a pair of spectacles, a bodkin, a case, and cruet top; I took them out in his presence - he said nothing to it; I took him to the station-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Were not some persons in the same box with the prisoners? A. There is no box, it is a round room; there were other persons near them - two persons could not have gone out, for the serjeant was placed outside; I cannot myself swear two persons did not leave the room - I had not an opportunity of seeing; I had returned Price his hat when he got to the watch-house - he made no remark when I gave it to him; he said publicly at the office afterwards, that it was not his, but not to me - that was between eleven and twelve o'clock the same day.

Q. Did he not say the hat was too large for him, and that his was a silk hat? A. He said so before the Magistrate; I believe it was a silk hat which I returned to him: he said it was too large for him - he put it on, and pulled it over his eyes.

COURT. Q. Did it appear to be his hat? A. I cannot say; such men are not particular what hats they wear - I have a letter written to Price; the last witness acknowledged it to be her hand-writing - I have had no conversation with Price about it.

WILLIAM BARBER . I am a Policeman. I was out on the morning of the robbery, between four and five o'clock, and saw the prisoners in the coffee-shop; I went in with Garde - I searched them; when I first went in Price had his hat on his head - he took it off, and put it down by the

side of him; I saw Garde take a handkerchief out of the hat - Price made a snatch at the hat; I laid hold of him by the collar at the time, and pulled him away - I am sure it was the hat which Price had taken off his head, and put down; it was examined in my presence, and these things taken out - I searched both the prisoners; I found 2s. 9d. on one, and 3s. 9d. on the other, and under the bench was a bottle, with a portion of brandy in it - they were taken to the station-house; I examined the premises - there was no marks of violence outside.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you tell whether it was a silk or beaver hat? A. I do not know; it was on his right-hand side on the bench - there was nobody between me and the prisoners, nothing but the table - I had my Police dress on; he could see me as I came in - his hat was turned upwards.

JURY. Q. What fastenings were there inside the door? A. A bolt top and bottom, and a latch in the middle; they must have got through the wash-house door, and then to this door - if the outer door had been bolted, it could not have been drawn back outside; I examined other parts of the premises, and found no marks of violence.

Q. Had you any reason to suppose the prisoners were admitted into the house? A. I have no reason to suppose so; I cannot tell how they got in - the place must have been left unfastened, or they must have been let in.

Price's Defence. What that man has said is false; when he came into the room, my hat laid on the bench, but this is not my hat, nor is the handkerchief the property was in - if you will look at that man's features, his countenance changes in telling the lie he has told about seeing me take the hat off my head; I am innocent.

SARAH PRICE . The house which was broken open is mine - this property is all mine, and was stolen that night; it is all I lost; I cannot state the value of it - I went to bed before Mills; the house was secured when I went to bed.

WILLIAM BARBER . I should think the articles worth 30s.; bolts must have been broken from both the doors, if they were both bolted; there was no marks of violence at all.

PRICE - GUILTY , believing he was admitted into the house by some person inside. - DEATH . Aged 19.

SAMPSON - NOT GUILTY .[Jan. 7th.]

Reference Number: t18330103-4

First Middlesex Jury,

Before Lord Chief Baron Lyndhurst.

252. EDMUND MILLER and HENRY HUTCHINSON were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Thomas , and James Sams Whitaker , on the 16th of December , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing therein 1 silver cruet-stand, with cruets, value 15l.; 1 tea-pot, value 10l.; 2 candlesticks, value 8l.; 1 snuffer-stand, value 5l.; 1 pair of snuffers, value 2l.; 1 sugar-basin, value 4l.; 24 spoons, value 12l.; 2 cream-ewers, value 7l.; 1 pepper-box, value 1l.; 1 cheese-knife, value 1l.; 1 butter-knife, value 15s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 15s.; 1 toast-rack, value 15s., and 4 knife-rests, value 10s., the goods of the said William Thomas .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of William Thomas only.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I live at No. 225, Shoreditch, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch : I am a surgeon , in partnership with Mr. Whitaker; I live in the house, and did so on the 16th of December; my partner does not live there: Miller was our groom and errand-boy - he slept over the back kitchen, which is in the yard, but not attached to the dwelling-house. On the 16th of December I went to bed about twelve o'clock; I was the last person up in the house - I went down stairs, and saw my windows and doors fastened - I did not examine the bolts: about four o'clock in the morning I was aroused by my wife, and thought I smelt fire; I lighted a candle, went down into the dining-room, found the dining-room door open, and a kind of wooden box on the table, which did not belong to me - I found one of the windows up, the shutters open, and all my plate gone from the sideboard; the wooden box was a kind of clumsy dark-lantern, with a candle in it, which no doubt was what I smelt - I had left on the sideboard the plate stated in the indictment, which was a silver snuffer-tray and other plate, which is my property, to the amount of nearly 70l.; the dining-room is on the first-floor: I went down into the kitchen, and found the kitchen door fastened outside - I went into the stable, and found Miller with a light in his hand; I said, "Miller, this will not do- I must know all about this;" he was dressed - it was long before his usual time of being up; he made no answer, and an alarm being given by my wife and servants the Policeman Green came almost immediately; there was neither threat nor promise held out to Miller, in my presence - Mrs. Thomas was not present; I was the first person who got to Miller - I had got out through my surgery window; I remained with Miller until the Policeman came - I neither threatened nor made him any promise, nor did the Policeman; the Policeman came up to him, and asked him some questions about the property - the Policeman then turned round to me, and said, in his presence, "The property is on the premises, you may depend," and the prisoner said, "No, it is gone;" the Policeman searched in the stable, and afterwards I dressed, and went into the yard - I found nothing in the stable; some of my property was brought in by the Policeman - Miller said nothing in my presence that morning at the station-house; I now remember that at the stable Miller said he had let three men into the hay-loft the night before - he said so in the stable before we went to the station-house; he said he had admitted three men into the hay-loft over the stable the night before; I had found the surgery window up, the shutter not bolted, and at the station-house I asked Miller how he dared to get in at the surgery window, knowing that my assistant slept in the surgery - I knew he must have come in there, as every other part was fastened; his answer was, that he chanced it, and he mentioned at the station-house the names of the three men he had let in - I left him with the officers; I did not see Hutchinson.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you say, "I will give you 10l. to tell me where my property is?" A. No, nothing of the kind; my shopman slept in the surgery- I had him taken up - he was discharged, and I discharged him from my service; he slept in the room, the window of which was opened - the kitchen window was also thrown open; it was the shopman's duty to fasten the window - I know myself that it was shut down.

Q. Had you been about various parts of the house with

the prisoner before he said the property was gone? A. No - I had not left him; he was in the stable - he knew I had been robbed, because I charged him with it; I have two female servants.

JOHN GREEN . I am a Policeman. On the morning of the 16th of December I was called to Mr. Thomas' house, and went into the stable; I found Miller and Mr. Thomas in the back kitchen, adjoinding the stable - Mr. Thomas said, in his presence, that he had been robbed, and had nobody to suspect but his servant; I asked what he had lost - he said his plate off the sideboard; I asked Miller if he had robbed his master - he made no answer; I then told him I must take him into custody - he made no answer; I went with him into the stable; I saw him put his hand into the cornbin, and shake the corn about; I asked what he was doing there - he shook his head, and said "It is gone;" I went into the shop with him, and I there again accused him of robbing his master - Mrs. Thomas was there; she did not say, "I will give you 10l. if you will tell me where the property is," before he said what I am going to say; he said he only wished for one thing - I asked him what that was; he said if he was allowed to go about a mile and a half he would get the property back - I told him I could not allow him to go out of my sight, if his mistress allowed him to go; I would not allow him to go out of my custody- I was going towards the shop door, and Martin, my brother-officer, produced a basket containing some plate; before that I consented to go with Miller as far as he wished me to go - he said they had put him in the hole, and he would split upon them, meaning he would say where they were; by putting him in the hole, I understood they did not take the property away as he expected - Miller said nothing when the basket was brought in; previous to my taking him to the station-house he admitted that he had let three men into the stable, and in consequence of what he said at the station-house I went to search for Hutchinson among others, and found him in Globe-fields in the evening, and apprehended him; I told him what I took him for, and he said, "What, for that concern?" and asked me if they had taken any person else - I said I had, and then I handcuffed him; in our way to the station-house (he had the handcuffs on) I saw him feeling about his bosom two or three times - I asked him what he did it for; he made no reply - I said, "You must have something there;" he said, "Take it from me," and I took this snuffer-stand from his bosom - I took it from him, and the precise words he said were, "That is all I have got - I have had no more."

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you and Miller alone when he made the observation about splitting? A. Yes - it was in the shop; Mr. Thomas was not present, that I know of - he was in the stable when he made some observations to that effect, and when he said he would take me to where the property was.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q. Where are Globe-fields? A. In Bethnal-green, about a mile and a half from where Mr. Thomas lives - I took Hutchinson between six and seven o'clock in the evening - he went willingly.

COURT. Q. Could he have escaped from you? A. He could not.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a Policeman. I went to Mr. Thomas' premises, in consequence of the alarm; I went, among other places, to the stable, and in Plough-yard I found this basket, about ten yards from the gate of the prosecutor's stable - the yard is a thoroughfare, but not in the direction this was in.

RICHARD COLLINS . I am a Police-constable. I went to Mr. Thomas' on the 16th and searched in Plough-yard - I found what is now in this basket, but it was in a dunghole in the yard; it contains several articles of plate - I heard Miller say he had let three men into the stable, and they had slept there all night; he named the three men; in consequence of what he said a search was made after Hutchinson.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did he not say he was sorry that he had let three men in? A. No, not in my hearing.

PATRICK KENNESSEY . I am a Police-officer. I was called to the premises on the 16th of December, and went with Mr. Thomas into the dining-room; I found on the dining-room table a small wooden box, with a piece of candle in it - this is it; the candle was in it - it is used as a dark lantern.

RICHARD HUNT . I am a Policeman. I was present when Hutchinson was apprehended; he asked if any more were apprehended - he was then taken to the station-house.

MARGARET BAKER . I am servant to the prosecutor. -On the night of the 16th of December I fastened all the doors; I did not fasten the surgery window - I saw that the window was down, and the shutter closed; I am quite sure the window was down - there is a cellar-flap to the house; I saw that closed by my fellow-servant - I went to bed near twelve o'clock; I had seen Miller the last thing at night - he bade me good night: he did not sleep in the house - the cellar-flap was only shut down; Miller slept over the back kitchen, which is not connected with the house - I observed the surgery window open next day, when the alarm was given, and the kitchen window and the dining-room window were all open; I heard Miller say he had let three men into the stable.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Who slept in the surgery? A. The shopman; I do not know when he went to bed.

MR. THOMAS. This snuffer-tray is mine - the initials on it are J. B. W.; it belonged to my wife's family, who are now deceased - the tea-pot is mine, and all the plate is mine; it is all silver except the knife-rests.

Miller's Defence. Mr. Thomas speaks false with regard to coming down and meeting me in the stable; he met me in the stable first - I went into the kitchen, and saw a Policeman; Mrs. Thomas immediately put her hand on my shoulder, and said, "Edward, for goodness sake tell me where the property is, and I will give you 10l.;" I made no answer - Mrs. Thomas begged hard of me to tell, and said if I did not the others would tell of me, and then the Policeman brought the property in.

Hutchinson's Defence. Miller made it known that I slept in his master's stable; what he had been at I do not know - he cannot say before my face that he let me into his master's stable, for on the Sunday previous, at nine o'clock, I left my master's, and went home to my mother; she wished me to go to my aunt's, at Chelsea - I got there, and found she had left the house; I proceeded home - it

was late: I cannot say the time, but it might be between one and two o'clock - I got up on Sunday morning, had breakfast, and walked into Hare-street-fields, about ten minutes' walk from where I live; I there found the property which was found on me - I had it on me all day, and in the evening Miller's brother came to my house, and asked if I was coming out; I came out with him about one hundred and fifty yards, and saw three men walking sharp behind me; I looked round, and said to Miller's brother,"I should like to call at my mother's;" I was crossing the road, and a Policeman came over, and said I was his prisoner - he says I said, "Is it for that concern?" which is false - I only said I was willing to go with him; he handcuffed me, and two Policemen, who were with him, left; as we went along he asked if I wished to know what I was taken for - I said I did not mind, not having done any thing; he said, We want you on suspicion of some weights;" I asked what he meant by weights - he said,"I suppose you don't know;" I said, No, I never heard the word in my life - he said he wanted me on suspicion of being one of the party concerned in Mr. Thomas' robbery; I said I knew nothing about it - I was taken to the station-house, and gave him up the property, without his uttering a word to me; he did not ask what I was doing about my bosom; I was trying to button my coat several times - that is all I did: had I been inclined to put away the property, I had plenty of time - I am entirely innocent.

Five witnesses gave Miller a good character, and Six deposed the same for Hutchinson.

MILLER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

HUTCHINSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .[Jan. 7th.]

Reference Number: t18330103-5

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

253. GEORGE FORRESTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Arnold , on the 5th of January , at St. George, Hanover-square, and stealing therein 1 clock, value 7s.; 6 shirts, value 1s.; 9 napkins, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 6d.; 10 caps, value 1s.; 1 pinafore, value 3d.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3d., and 1 comforter, value 3d., his property .

THOMAS ARNOLD . I live at No. 1, Lee's-mews, Grosvenor-square, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square , and am a carver and gilder . On the 5th of January I went to bed at eleven o'clock at night; I sleep in the back room, on the parlour floor; I was awoke about half-past two o'clock in the morning, by my wife, who had heard a noise for some time - we have a cat and dog in the room, and thought it was the cat playing with the weights of the clock; I listened, and heard them moving and then the clock stopped - I got out of bed, and heard my room door shut; I opened my back parlour door, and saw the clock was gone, and five drawers pulled out - the parlour window wide open, and the half-shutter wide open; I saw a Policeman, and asked him if any body had gone out - he said No; he came into my room, and said the property must be on the premises - he turned his lantern round, and there was a red comforter on the second stair; the privy door is behind the street door - I pulled the privy door open; the Policeman turned his lantern round, and the prisoner was sitting on the seat of the privy, with my clock, tied up, at his feet, and a bundle at his feet, tied in a red handkerchief; the clock was going when my wife awoke me - he must have got in at the window, which was shut safe when I went to bed; here is the clock and the two bundles - it is all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down, and found the door open - I went in, and sat on the stairs; it was cold, and I went and sat on the privy.

THOMAS ARNOLD . I have lodgers in the house - my door was fastened in the usual way when I went to bed; it was on the latch; the window was shut and fastened.

[Jan. 8th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18330103-6

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

254. JOHN GAME , JAMES ROGERS , and ROBERT TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Wade , on the 23rd of December , at St. Mary, Islington, and stealing therein, 11 spoons, value 3l.; 8 pairs of boots, value 5l.; 4 pairs of shoes, value 1l.; 2 candlesticks, value 1l.; 4 dozen of knives and forks, value 2l.; 4 decanters, value 2l.; 1 celery glass, value 10s.; 1 basket, value 6d., and 2 towels, value 1s., his property; and 1 pair of boots, value 4s., the goods of Elizabeth Peck ; and SARAH JACKSON was indicted for feloniously receiving on the same day, 1 pair of boots, value 4s., part of the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS WADE . I am a broker , and live at Torrington-park, Hornsey-road - it is my dwelling-house, and is in the parish of St. Mary, Islington . When I went to bed on the night of the 22nd of December the house was all safe, and a little before seven o'clock the next morning my maid-servant called me, and I found the back kitchen door had been cut by some sharp instrument - a hole was cut large enough to admit a man's arm to open the fastenings; it had not been there the night before - I found the back kitchen all in confusion, and I missed sundry boots and shoes; I missed nine silver spoons and two metal ones, worth 2l. or 3l. - I missed eight pairs of boots, worth 3l. or 4l. - I missed four pairs of shoes, a pair of plated candlesticks, some knives and forks, four decanters, a celery-glass, and one or two roller-towels from the kitchen: on the Friday following the officer called, and gave me some information - I know the prisoner Taylor.

THOMAS FARRANT (Police-constable C 42). On Wednesday, the 26th of December, I was passing down Broad-street, St. Giles', with Stone, a little before twelve o'clock; I saw Game come out of Wells', a pawnbroker's shop, and join in company with two others, whom I do not know - he said he had put off a glass goblet for 3s.; I followed them, and they went into a gin-shop - they came out of that, went down Drury-lane, and into another gin-shop; they stopped there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and then came out, and I lost them - I went back to Wells' shop, and asked if they had such a thing pawned there; they said they had, and I ordered it to be detained - it was what is called a celery-glass; I searched the Police reports, found Mr. Wade had been robbed; I fetched him, when he identified the glass - I saw Game again on the

Sunday, the 30th of December, at a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening, in Long-acre - he was alone, and I apprehended him; I told him I wanted him on suspicion of felony, but did not tell him what felony - he then asked how long it had been done, as he had been in the country for the last three months, and had only come home on the Saturday night before - I told him I had seen him in Broad-street on the Wednesday - he said it must have been after ten o'clock in the morning; I took him to the watch-house, and found on his feet this pair of boots - I let him wear them to the office, and have had them ever since - they have been identified by one of Mr. Wade's servants; Game stated he had brought them out of the House of Correction with him, and I think he said on the Wednesday morning, but I am not exactly positive - I asked him where he lived; he said No. 8, Charles-street, Drury-lane, and having seen him on the day before Christmas-day, in company with the other two male prisoners I suspected them - I went to No. 8, Charles-street, on the Monday morning; I went to the top of the house, and in the back room I found Rogers - he was dressing; it was a little after ten o'clock - I told him I wanted him to come with me, on suspicion of felony; he said, "The other one is in the next room;" Stone went into the next room, and I began to search the room I had found Rogers in - I found this crow-bar in the corner by the fire, and under the bed I found this stock, four bits which fit it, a chisel, a screwdriver, a bunch of keys, two phosphorus-bottles, a phosphorus-box, and a little phial with some oil in it; and on a shelf I found two small knives and a metal spoon, which were identified by one of Mr. Wade's servants.

GEORGE STONE (Police-constable C 99). I went with Farrant to No. 8, Charles-street; Rogers said the other one was in the next room - I went into the other room, and found Taylor there; I found in that room a pair of shoes, which I have kept ever since - Mr. Wade claims them; I took Taylor into the room where Rogers was, and in that room I found two pairs of women's boots, one pair under Rogers bed, and one pair by the side of it - they have been claimed by Mr. Wade's servant s; Jackson was in bed there; I asked her who these boots belonged to, and she said they were hers, that she had bought them, but she did not know where, as she was drunk at the time; we left Jackson in the room then, but she said she would be there at any time if we wanted her - we took Rogers and Taylor to the station, and I there took a pair of boots off Rogers' feet, which were identified by Mr. Wade's servant; Rogers said he had bought them in another country, but he did not know the place.

JURY. Q. Did you try the centre bit to Mr. Wade's door? A. No - the door had been mended when I went there; the hole was about large enough to put a man's arm in.

ELIZABETH PECK . I lived in Mr. Wade's service at the time this happened - I came down in the morning, and saw the hole in the door; I called Mr. Wade, and told him the house had been broken into; I did not see the prisoners till they were in custody; I know this celery-glass to be my master's (looking at it) - I had seen it safe the night before; I know we had a spoon exactly like this, and we lost it - I know these boots are mine: I have had them a year and a half; I had not worn them a great deal - I left them in the kitchen the night before the house was broken open and I missed them in the morning; I know one of these knives to be my master's, by its being worn so much at the point; I have often noticed it - I had seen it safe the night before the house was broken open.

Game. Q. You say you can swear to the celery-glass? A. Yes, there is a little bit out at the top - I said at the office that I knew it was my master's.

Taylor. Q. Which knife can you swear to? A. This one which is worn; I cannot tell whether my master had two dozens or one dozen like it, but five dozens and a half were missing in all - I have no hesitation in swearing to this one; they were not all worn as this is.

Jackson. Q. How can you swear to the boots? A. By their being worn at the heel, and by their general appearance -I have no doubt about them at all.

THOMAS ALLEN . I was in Mr. Wade's employ - I clean boots and shoes; I believe these to be his boots, but I am not positive - I know the shoes to be his by their general appearance.

MR. WADE. I know this pair of shoes to be mine - they have been a good deal worn since they were taken from me; they had been mended, and I did not wear them afterwards - I cannot swear to the boots, but I can to the shoes, by the binding and mending.

Taylor. Q. Are you a shoemaker then? A. No, but I speak to them from having worn them, and it is natural to take notice of shoes that pinch.

HENRY LINDER . I live with Mr. Wells, the pawnbroker. This celery-glass was pawned on the morning of the 26th of December, for 3s., I believe by Game, but I cannot swear to him - Farrant came in about half an hour, and asked if we had such a thing pawned; I said Yes, and produced it to him.

WILLIAM CLARK (Police-constable N 149). I went to Mr. Wade's on Sunday morning, the 23rd of December; I found a pair of boots and a pair of shoes there, which I have had ever since - I have since tried the shoes on Taylor; they fitted him exactly, and he said he had no doubt they would fit - we wanted to try the boots on Game - he said if we wanted them tried we might try them ourselves; there is no doubt but they would have fitted him, but he kept moving his leg about, and would not let us try them.

MR. WADE. These boots and shoes were left in my house - they are not mine, nor never were.

THOMAS ALLEN . They did not belong to any person in Mr. Wade's house; I never saw them till the morning after the robbery.

Game's Defence. When they wanted to put the boots on me, I told them to put them on - they tried ten minutes, and grazed my skin - they then said it was my obstinacy, and that I would not put them on; I made no resistance - I held my leg still.

Rogers' Defence. The boots they took from me I bought in Sheffield, before I came into this country; all the tools they found at my place were there when I went there.

Taylor. I should like to ask Mr. Wade if he could swear to these shoes, if a dozen pairs were produced bound in the same way, and worn as they are.

MR. WADE. I can swear to these shoes by the binding and mending.

Taylor. A shoemaker mends them all in the same man

ner; if you go to Monmouth-street you might buy a dozen pairs like them.

Jackson's Defence. I bought the women's boots of a man who came to a lodger.

GAME - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

ROGERS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

TAYLOR - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

JACKSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-7

255. WILLIAM JOHNSON and SAMUEL FARE, alias SLEITH , were indicted for the wilful murder of Benjamin Couch Danby .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

PETER ADDINGTON . I live at Enfield, in Middlesex , and am a baker. In December last I was acquainted with Benjamin Couch Danby - I married his first cousin: he came to lodge at my house on the 12th of December last - I believe he had been in the East Indies recently before; he continued to lodge with me from the 12th to the 19th of December , and accompanied me in my cart to deliver my goods to my customers, except the day after he came. On the morning of Wednesday, the 19th of December he borrowed a gun of me to shoot some larks and starlings - I had the bowl of a tobacco-pipe, which I used to charge the gun, and I lent him that at the same time, to charge the gun with; he went out on the morning of the 19th, to shoot birds, and returned to dinner about one o'clock, and afterwards went with me in my cart, and returned about five or half-past five o'clock; the Crown and Horse-shoe, kept by Perry, is in my neighbourhood - he left my house again about twenty minutes before six; he did not return me the tobacco-pipe bowl - after he left my house I did not see him again alive; he did not return to sleep: in the morning, about half-past six o'clock, in consequence of what I heard, I went to the Serjeant public-house, Parsonage-lane, and there saw a dead body - it was the dead body of Benjamin Couch Danby .

JOSEPH PERRY. I keep the Crown and Horse-shoe, Enfield-chase-side; there is a bridge over the New-river within three yards of my door. On the 19th of December last I saw both the prisoners at my house, and I saw the deceased there - I first saw them about eight o'clock at night - I went into the tap-room, and saw the deceased, the prisoner Johnson. Fare, Cooper, Wagstaff, Taylor, and Jackson; nobody else was present, I believe, at that time - I went into the tap-room, and saw Fare laying along a bench, apparently asleep; Johnson laid on two chairs, with his lead on a bench opposite him, and another man named Wager was laying on a bench also - I went to Fare or Wager, I cannot say which exactly, and told them I would not have any sleeping there, and I disturbed the whole of them; I aroused them all, and Fare was angry at it - Fare said, "D-n your eyes, you would not serve me so, but you think I cannot pay for a pot, but I have money that will pay for a gallon;" he put his hand into his pocket, and showed me what appeared to me to be two shillings and a sixpence; I understand he was at that time receiving assistance from the parish - I knew he was not in employment; the deceased, Wagstaff, Taylor, and another, were playing at dominoes at the time - they were playing, as I understood, for a pot of beer; only two pots of beer were taken into the tap-room until ten o'clock; I went into the tap-room at ten o'clock, and the dominoes were taken away - the party still continued in my tap-room, and just afterwards I saw the deceased and Fare tossing for some beer - I went up stairs about a quarter to eleven o'clock, having told them before I went up that it was time to go; the shutters had been shut up at ten o'clock, and I had told my wife not to serve them with any thing more - just as I got to the top of the stairs I heard Fare call for another pot; they said they would go if they had half a pint of gin, and I then heard them go away together - the deceased pulled out a purse several times during the evening; it was a silk net purse, with steel slides and tassels - I had seen it on other occasions in his possession; he took a shilling out of it to pay me for half a gallon of beer, and I afterwards saw him take it out, and take a shilling out to toss with; by the appearance of it there were from twelve to fifteen round coins in it, whether shillings or sovereigns I cannot say, but none of them were larger than a shilling - I saw nothing more of them: about eight o'clock in the morning I was informed of the murder - during the evening the deceased was showing the number of pockets he had in his dress; he appeared to me to have two suits of clothes on, and pockets inside and out.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Had you seen the person several times before at your house? A. At my own house, and at other houses; he has been at my house before - I never saw Johnson in his company before that evening - when he showed his pockets I heard an observation made about it, but do not know whether it was by Cooper - I do not think he was present; Cooper did not come in till past ten - I believe Cooper was the only person who came in; he worked at the brewery opposite - now I come to recollect, it must have been after Cooper came that the pockets were exhibited, as they played at dominoes till ten o'clock, and it was after that; one of the party said, "D-n it, what a number of pockets he has got - he has got sixteen:" but I am certain it was not Cooper's voice, as it is so familiar to me - if he had mentioned it I should have recollected it; the others were in the habit of coming there, but I was not so familiar with their voices as Cooper's - I might see them once in a week or a fortnight, but was in the habit of seeing or hearing Cooper all day long; he used to make my house almost his home.

JOSEPH MATTHEWS . On Wednesday, the 19th of December, I was in the service of Mr. Perry, who keeps the Crown and Horse-shoe; I was in the tap-room that evening - Johnson was in the tap-room with the deceased; I first saw him there near upon seven o'clock - one was sitting on one side of the fire, and the other on the other; Charles Jackson came in next - the deceased had a glass of gin; when Jackson came in, he asked if there was any body who would play at dominoes, and the deceased said he would - I fetched the dominoes; Jackson asked me if I would play - I said I did not mind, and the deceased asked William Johnson if he would play; he said, "No, I cannot, for I have not got any money" - the deceased said,"Never mind about the money, if you lose I will pay for you;" he put his hand into his pocket, pulled out some halfpence, and gave to Johnson - we all four played for a

quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes; I was then called away by my master - before that Richard Wagstaff came into the tap-room, and he took my place at the game; I was absent about a quarter of an hour: when I returned I found the same persons at play - that was before eight o'clock; I go out with the beer at eight - I went as usual with the beer, and returned near upon nine, and they had just done playing; I took them a pot of beer, and after that William Johnson left off playing, and John Taylor took his place -I found him there when I came back from taking the beer; they played again after I brought them the beer -Taylor played with them; they played then for near three quarters of an hour, and before ten o'clock I took away the dominoes - master came into the tap-room after that; John Wager was then laying on one of the seats, and Johnson laid with his legs on the chair, and his head on a stool; Fare was in the tap-room, and he had words with my master - my master went up to bed about half-past ten o'clock; the same persons were still in the tap-room -Cooper was there; I cannot say when he came in - he was not there at nine, when I returned from taking out the beer; Cooper had an old lamp with a piece of candle in it when he came in - they stopped about half an hour after master went to bed; the deceased did not say any thing before he went - they had half a pint of gin; the deceased said,"We will have half a pint of gin, before we go;" I do not know who paid for it - mistress took the money; there was no more beer had after that - the deceased pulled out his purse several times in the evening; I could see there was money in it - I took them beer and gin from time to time; I remember my mistress coming into the tap-room: she said the clock had gone eleven, and it was time to go- Fare said, "Be so good as to give me a piece of bread before I go, Mrs. Perry;" she cut him a piece, and gave it to him - they went away about ten minutes after eleven o'clock; the deceased went out last - Wagstaff, Johnson, Cooper, and Fare went out altogether, and the deceased went out at the door last, but at the same time; when the deceased went out he staggered about, and mistress said to me, "See him by the river," and I led him over the bridge, which is about ten yards from the door; when I had led him over the bridge, I said to Fare, "Will you be so good as to see the young gentleman home:" he said he would - he took hold of his left arm, and John Cooper came, and took hold of his right; Johnson was with them at the time, and Wagstaff stood up against our house, making water; I then left them.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you in the room when the deceased showed his pockets? A. No; he was the last person who went out of the door - I cannot say whether Cooper went out first, for I did not notice; Wagstaff lives about one hundred yards from our house, in the road the deceased would have to go - he would have to cross the bridge; I gave him into the care of Fare and Cooper, and they took him.

Q. Who did you speak to when you gave up the care of him? A. Fare was the only name I mentioned, but Cooper came, and took hold of him as well; Wagstaff at that time had stopped for a particular purpose - he was on the same side of the bridge as our house stood; he stood just at the corner of our house, before you go over the bridge.

Q. Was not Johnson at that time standing by Wagstaff, talking to him? A. No; Wagstaff was by himself -Johnson was not above five or six yards from him; he was with the others - Wagstaff was not talking to any body when I came out of the house; when I returned from taking the deceased over the bridge, he was at the corner of our house, and Johnson was over the bridge on the same side of the bridge as the deceased - the bridge is not above three yards long; it crosses the New-river - I only went just over the bridge with the deceased.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When you got over the bridge, and handed the deceased to Fare and Cooper, was Johnson with them? A. Yes, and Wagstaff was on the other side of the bridge, by our house.

RICHARD WAGSTAFF . I am a baker, and live at Chaseside, Enfield. On the night of the 19th of December I was at the Crown and Horse-shoe, playing at dominoes with the prisoners, the deceased, and others - at ten o'clock the dominoes were taken away; I continued there with them, and a little after eleven we went away - I went out first, and the rest followed; I observed the deceased - he appeared sober when he was in the house, but when I went out, I went to make water by the side of the house, and when he got out, the pot-boy called on Jack Cooper, and Sam Fare, to see him home - he did not use their surnames, but said, "Jack and Sam, for God sake see him home, for he is so drunk, he had liked to be in the river;" Johnson was with the others - after I had got over the bridge, Johnson and Fare had got hold of the deceased, leading him, and Cooper was standing by the side of the bridge; I know Mr. Addington's house - they led him towards there - Cooper went with them: I saw them as far as my house: when I got to my house, which is in the way from the Horse-shoe, to Addington's - I went to the bottom of the garden, took up a loose post, put it over the gate, and at that time, the deceased was making water by the side of the gate; Johnson and Cooper were standing alongside him, and Fare was about six yards off, leaning against some paling - I bade them all good night, and went in doors; I saw no more of any of them that night -Fare was farther on in the path, nearer to Mr. Addington's house; when I saw Cooper was coming out of his way home to go with the deceased, I said, "Are you going with them?" he said Yes - I said, "Take my advice, and go home, and have nothing to do with them, for I think they are going to rob him;" Cooper and I walked together up to my house - we were after them; they were before us - Cooper said he would go with them; I said he must do as he liked - I went in, and shut my door.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. This is not the first time you have been in the Court? A. No; I have been in trouble before, and that is the very reason I gave Cooper the advice - I told him I thought the man was going to be robbed, and advised him to go home; I did not mention my suspicion to any body, nor call a patrol - there was none, and when he said he would go with them, I thought there would be a third person, who would be a protection; I was tried here two years ago.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you acquitted or found guilty? A. Acquitted.

JOHN COOPER . I am eighteen years old. In December last I worked at a brewery near the Crown and Horse,

shoe, at Enfield - on the evening of Wednesday, the 19th of December, I was at the Crown and Horse-shoe; I went there about ten minutes after ten o'clock - I found Charles Jackson , Richard Wagstaff , the deceased, William Johnson , and Fare there - Matthews, the pot-boy, came in once or twice; when I went in they were sitting at the table, drinking - I staid there till ten minutes or a quarter after eleven o'clock; the mistress ordered us out - she told us to go out, it was time to shut the house up; I did not notice how the deceased walked when he came into the air -I saw him go over the bridge; Johnson and Fare helped him over the bridge - Matthews came out, and asked somebody to lead him home; Wagstaff's house is about one hundred yards from the public-house, on the right-hand side of the road - there is a path goes up to his house - the road is about ten yards from the house; Johnson, the deceased, and Fare went first, and I and Wagstaff behind them - I had no lantern with me; it was a kind of candlestick, with the bottom like a lamp - it would do for a candlestick or lamp; I had no light - I did not assist Johnson and Fare in taking him over the bridge; I was with Wagstaff, about four or five yards behind - when we came as far as Wagstaff's house he went in; before he went in he said to me at the corner of Horse-shoe-lane,"Jack, you had better go home" - I would not go home; I said, "I shan't go home;" I said so to Wagstaff - Wagstaff said, "You had better go home;" that was all he said - he only said, "It would be much better for you;" he did not say why I had better go home - the deceased was not sober; I know Sheffield's house - it is about seventeen or twenty yards from Wagstaff's house; it is a very little distance - they went on a little way from Wagstaff's house - that would lead them by Sheffield's; when they got to Sheffield's they were shoving one another about, and Fare fell down - Johnson, Fare, and the deceased were shoving one another about; I observed some scuffling; I was about four yards off at this time - I could not distinguish whether any thing was taken from the deceased - Fare fell on the ground; after that I did not observe what became of Fare - he got up, and went away somewhere; he did not stop any longer - the deceased was then with Johnson; after Fare went the deceased caught hold of my arm, and asked me to lead him home; Johnson had hold of the other side of him - we went on together, Johnson on one side, and I on the other; Mr. Addington's house is not two hundred yards from Sheffield's - it is on the other side of the way - I did not know that the deceased lived at Addington's; I never saw him before - when we got opposite Addington's, Johnson asked the deceased whether he would go and get a pint of beer; the deceased said"Yes, with all my heart;" Mr. Addington's house is on the chase-side road - Holt White's-lane comes into chaseside road; we passed Addington's house, and went along the chase-side road, leading to Holt White's-lane; when we got to the bottom of Holt White's-hill, two persons passed - I bade the gentleman good night, and they bade me good night; I turned along the chase road, towards the Holly-bush, which is about ten minutes' walk from Holt White's-lane; you would turn to the left when you get to the end of the lane, and to go to Addington's you would turn to the right - there are four roads at the corner of Holt White's-lane; I know Parsonage-lane - we did not meet the two persons; they passed us at the bottom of the lane, where the four roads go, and went along the chaseside road, towards the Holly-bush, and we turned up Holt White's-lane, to the left; Parsonage-lane is opposite Holt White's-lane - Pinnock's beer-shop is at the top of Holt White's-lane; we three went up Holt White's-lane, within nine or ten poles of Pinnock's beer-shop, but not farther; Johnson then turned himself round - the deceased was on the right-hand side of Johnson at this time; I was not aware that Johnson was going to turn round - I was on the side next the ditch when we had turned; when Johnson turned round the deceased said, "Where are you going?" and I said, "We are going home;" we had no beer - when we were going towards the beer-shop, we were going away from the deceased's home, and when we turned we were going towards it - I did not then know where he lived; I meant I was going home myself - after we turned round we came about nine or ten poles together down the road; I was on the footpath - there is no footpath on either side; I was near the ditch, Johnson on one side, and I on the other; when we got nine or ten poles on, Johnson said to me, "I will be d-d if Sam has not robbed him;" he said"I will be d-d if he has not robbed him."

Q. Did you say both Sam and he just now? A. Yes; about half a minute after, as we were going down the road Johnson put his foot out behind the man, and threw him on to me, and I fell into the ditch; the man's head and shoulders fell on my head - Johnson fell too; I did not remain under the man above half a minute - I had a cap on when I fell, and when I drew my head from under the man - my cap came off; it was left behind; when I got my head out I felt for my cap, and got it - it was underneath the side of the deceased's face; it was wet when I got it out - blood was on it; when I observed the blood on my cap I said to Johnson, "What have you been doing? don't hurt him - don't do any thing to him; don't kill him!" Johnson was uppermost when we fell - I could not see any thing done by Johnson before I got my head from under the deceased; when I said to Johnson, "Don't hurt him, don't kill him," he said, "I have done him;" I then got out of the ditch, and went and stood in the middle of the road - when I got out of the ditch, Johnson had his knees on the top of the deceased's breast, and his hands on his head; Johnson got off the deceased, and came to me; the deceased did not struggle - I heard him make a noise once; he did not make a noise in his throat then - it was a groaning; Johnson came from him up to me, and said, "You take this knife, and go and finish him; I have began him;" I said, "No, I won't;" he had a knife in his hand - that was the first time I observed him with a knife; it was open - after I said, "I won't," Johnson went up to the deceased, and said to him, "What will you give?"

Q. Had the deceased then done any thing? A. Yes, he held up his head, and said, "Oh, don't hurt me; Oh, don't," and Johnson said, "What will you give?" the deceased said, "Any thing;" I could then see that he was all over blood - I could see it on his face; when the deceased said, "Any thing," Johnson went and cut his throat; I heard him gurgle in his throat as I stood in the road - Johnson stood by the deceased about half a minute - he took a handkerchief out of the deceased's jacket.

Q. When Johnson said, "You go and finish him - I have began him," did he say any thing to you besides? A. Yes, he shook his fist, and said, "Don't you say a word - don't tell any body;" that was before he cut his throat - his fist was doubled when he said this, and he held it at me; only the deceased's head and shoulders were in the ditch - his feet laid towards the road.

Q. Why did not you interfere to prevent this? A. I was afraid - I was afraid of my life; after Johnson got up from the deceased, we went down the road together, down Holt White's-lane - as we were going down the lane, Johnson kept saying, "Don't say any thing to nobody - don't know any thing about it, don't say a word;" when we got into chase-side road, there is a way across the fields which will lead to the back of the house opposite Addington's; when I came to the turning, I wanted to go down the road, and he said, "Come this way across the field, don't go along there," and I went across the field with him; it is called Corney's-fields - the way across the fields leads back again to Perry's house the back way; we must cross the New-river bridge before we get to Perry's house - it is a small bridge close to the one we went over before; they are both on the chase-side road of the house - we went over that bridge together; when we got over Johnson stooped down, and washed his hands in the river, and the knife - we then came over the same bridge as we crossed coming from Perry's - it is called the Horse-shoe bridge; we then went away to the left, that leads us in the direction to Giles' house (there is a lane from the Horse-shoe bridge); we turned to the left, and went along the river side - when we had got about forty yards along the river side, Johnson took a handkerchief from his pocket and threw it into the river; the stream runs towards Giles' house - this was about forty yards from Perry's; we did not go twenty yards on together after he threw the handkerchief into the river; there is an alley leading into the chase-side road below Perry's house, down the river side- when we got to that turning, I went up the alley home, and Johnson went over the iron bridge, towards his home; I turned to the right, and he to the left - his home is not far from Giles' house; it is in that direction - the iron bridge is opposite the alley; I was not taken in custody till ten o'clock next morning, Friday - it was Friday, I believe; it was the morning after this happened - I went home about twelve at night, and was taken at ten o'clock the next morning; I was taken on the road towards Potter's-bar - I was going with my master's dray; Mead and Watkins took me; my cap was examined - I was asked some questions about the cap, and gave some answers.

Q. Was what you said true? A. Why I had been carrying some dog's meat the morning before - I do not know whether that made the blood, but I told them so; about an hour after I was taken I made a statement to Dr. Cresswell, at the George, at Enfield - I made the statement I have made here; I have been in custody since.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. At what time did you go to the public house that night? A. Ten o'clock, and staid till after eleven; I had never seen the deceased before - he took out his purse once while I was there; it was a brownish colour - it had some slides on it, and appeared as if it had money in it by the look of it; I saw that - I am quite certain he did not take it out more than once while I was there; he did not unbutton his coat or show that he had a good many pockets while I was there; I never saw him do it - they had just done playing at dominoes when I went in; I staid in the room from that time till we all left together - he did not show me his pockets, nor did I say what a many pockets he had, nor did I hear any body else say it; when we left I was the first person that went out - I went on the bridge.

Q. Before the rest came out of the house? A. No, they were close behind me; my way home would be over the bridge - the others came out close to me, the deceased came out last; the deceased first took hold of my arm just before I got to Sheffield's, just after I had passed Wagstaff's - that was the first time I had any thing to do with the deceased, I am sure, either leading him or taking his arm; Matthews did not put him in my charge, he said,"Sam take care of him," and Sam went to lay hold of him - I never heard him say Jack.

Q. Did he not say, "Jack and Sam take care of him, for he has nearly fallen into the river?" A. I never heard him say that - he left him with Fare and Johnson; I had not hold of him at all, I am positive - I took the candlestick home with me, and took it to the brewhouse next morning; I always take it home at night, to bring a light in the morning to light the fires - it was not lighted; I cannot take it home lighted, as it has got no cover - I cover my apron over it in the morning; I have not five yards to go - I do not want the light at night; all Wagstaff said to me was, that I had better go home, it would be better for me - he did not tell me that the man was going to be robbed, or any thing of that sort.

Q. You say after you left Wagstaff's they pushed each other about, what do you mean by that? A. They pushed against one another as they walked along.

Q. Who did? A. Fare, Johnson, and the deceased; it was in that pushing that Fare fell down - their pushing him about did not raise my suspicions that he would be robbed; I did not think any thing of the kind; when we got to Addington's, Johnson asked the deceased to go on and have a pint of beer - I dare say that was near upon half-past eleven o'clock; I went on with them, under the notion that they were going to have more beer - I knew the place would be shut up, but I thought they would call them up, or something - the beer-shop is kept by Pinnock; we turned back before we got there - the deceased said, "Are you going home?" I said Yes; I did not ask why they did not go on to the beer-shop - when they turned I turned; when we got back eight or nine poles, Johnson said, "Be d-d if Sam has not robbed him;" this was down Holt White's-lane - it was after we had turned round.

Q. Then, as far as you could learn, Johnson appeared to be impressed with the idea that he had nothing to be robbed of? A. No.

COURT. Q. Had you observed whether he had put his hands to his pocket or not? A. No; I cannot tell whether he had or not.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did I understand you to say Johnson kicked the deceased? A. He tripped him up - he made a blow at him with his foot; his foot struck him on his feet next the ground - Johnson had hold of him at the time; the tripping threw him against me, and I fell into the ditch, which is not above a foot deep - his head im

mediately came on mine, and prevented my seeing any thing till I got it off; when I drew my head from under him Johnson was on the top of the deceased - it was a star-light night, and it froze quite sharp; there are no lamps in the lane - when I took hold of my cap my fingers were bloody; I could see that by the light of the night; it was quite light.

Q. Were you afraid of your life when, after getting into the road, you went with Johnson across the field by a path? A. No, I did not think any thing about it then, not when he was talking to me, my fright had gone off; we went about twenty yards along the road before we struck into the path; it is a public road; I never saw a patrol there; I did not pass any house on the road, nor meet any body - I got home about twelve o'clock, or it might be later; I went to work at five next morning, as usual - my master came and called me up; I was taken into custody at ten o'clock.

Q. You was dreadfully shocked, of course, at what you had seen? A. Yes I was; I had no rest - I did not mention a word about it to my master, nor to any body, till I was taken; I had the cap on my head when I was taken, with the blood marks on it - I was asked how they came there; I said I had been burying some dog's meat for master, and the blood dropped off that on the cap - the deceased appeared to be very much in liquor, quite incapable of offering resistance - one person might easily overcome him.

Q. On your solemn oath, when you got to the corner, after you passed the two strangers, did not Johnson separate from you and go home? A. No, he did not.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where did Johnson live? A. His father lived in Stafford's-row, and I believe he lodged with him - that is near Giles'.

COURT. Q. How was you dressed that night? A. The same as now, except this ffannel jacket - I had this fustian jacket on; Johnson had on a black coat and trousers.

EDWIN BROWNING . I am a timber-merchant, and live in Little Windmill-street. I was at Enfield on the 19th of December, and was returning home to my father's about a quarter before twelve o'clock; I was at the end of the road leading to Holt White's-hill, and saw two or three men standing together up the lane - I saw two more a little further on, towards the Holly-bush; I was on foot; I did not see their faces at all, and cannot describe them.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you know whether it was two or three you saw? A. I am sure there were two up the lane, but as to the three I cannot swear to - the two were eight or ten yards up the lane.

JOHN WYNN . I am a shopkeeper at Enfield-chaseside. On the 19th of December I was passing along the road, from eleven to half-past eleven o'clock at night, and when I got to the bottom of Holt White's-hill, I saw two men standing across the road - I only saw two; I passed them, and said nothing - they said nothing to me at all; I was going towards the Holly-bush - there was a young man with me; they were standing at the corner of the lane - the one I passed had on a kind of jean coloured dress, but I did not take particular notice, for I was rather alarmed, seeing them standing in the road, and not talking together; I was glad to push on home as fast as I could - they were standing close together, side by side, right across the road; they never moved all the time they were in sight - neither of them said a word; it was a young lad, about fifteen or sixteen years old, named Frencham, that was with me - I was walking home, and asked his father to allow him to walk with me, not liking to go alone; the men stood across the road at the bottom of the Holt White's-hill, at the four road ways.

EDWIN BROWNING re-examined. I did not speak to either of the two or three persons I saw in Holt White's-lane, nor did they speak to me; I did not see more than two up the lane, or it might be three, and two towards the Holly-bush - the first two were eight or ten yards up the lane, and the other two eight or ten yards up towards the two up the lane, or it might be three, and two towards the Holly-bush - they were two men, not a man and a boy; I think one of them was in a dark dress - the two were about ten yards from the others; I did not notice whether one of them was a youth.

WILLIAM WHEELER . I am a labourer, and live at Enfield-chase. On Thursday morning, the 20th of December, at half-past five o'clock, I went up Holt White's-lane, towards Parsonage-lane, to my work; I passed by Pinnock's beer-shop, along Holt White's-lane, and I got about half way down the lane, about three hundred yards from Pinnock's; there is a ditch on the left hand side of the road, and in that ditch I saw the body of a man laying on his face - his face was in the ditch, and his feet in the road; I kicked it, thinking it might be a man in liquor - I called to him several times, and got no answer: I pulled him, but could find no life in him, and judged that he was dead - I went back towards home, and met James Ashley with a load of straw; I turned back with him to the spot - he stopped his cart, and we tried to move the man, but found he was dead; I went to Parsonage-lane, to Radley's house, got a light, went to the spot, and found by him two halfpence, a small knife, and a pair of gloves - the gloves were in the ditch; I found some shot about - these things were all close to the body; Radley and Whitehead fetched a board, while I and a man named Chapman stood by the body - it was put on the board; there were several wounds on his face - I assisted in taking him to the Serjeant public-house, Parsonage-lane; I saw some wounds on the throat: his left-hand side trousers pocket was turned inside out - the same gloves were put into his cap, and they were brought down to the Serjeant; (Mead here produced a pair of gloves) these are them; there was an appearance on the ground, as if there had been a scuffling, and there was a great deal of blood - I found the body about one hundred yards from Holt White's-gate; the gate is nearer to Pinnock's than where the body was - there are two gates between Pinnock's and the chase-side road, both on the left hand as you go up, and on the opposite side to where I saw the body.

Q. If you were coming down Holt White's-lane, from Pinnock's, towards the four lane ends, should you come to the gates or the body first? A. The body; it was nearer to Pinnock's than the gates - I found the body about one hundred yards from the first gate, as near as I can judge.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you come out? A. Half-past five o'clock; it was dark - I was about the middle of the road; I could not see the deceased's face where I was walking, nor any blood before I got a light - his face was towards the ground; I could not have seen his face by the light in the road.

JOHN CUFFLEY . I am landlord of the Serjeant, Parsonage-lane. On Thursday morning, the 20th of December, at twenty minutes after six o'clock, I was called up by Radley and Whitehead - I gave them a shutter, and followed them to Holt White's-lane; the gate is on the left-hand side, going up the lane - there are two gates; I passed both those gates, and went to the spot where there was a dead body - the nearest gate is sixty or seventy yards from the body, on the other side of the way - when I got to the spot I saw the body: several persons were there; I picked up two halfpence, a cap, and two gloves; those produced are them - (Mead here produced the cap) this is the cap I picked up; I assisted in placing the body on the shutter - it was carried to the Serjeant; I observed a great deal of blood on the ground; the body was about one hundred yards from Pinnock's beer-shop - Holt White's-gate is about seventy yards further off from Pinnock's; I only guess the distance - the cap, with the halfpence in it, was placed on the board, and taken to my house, and taken from there by Mead - there was blood on both the gloves; I sent for Mr. Astbury, the surgeon, and Mead, the beadle - I went with Watkins and Mead, to show them where the body was found, and then they went on further, and about seventy yards before I came to where the body was found, I found a silk handkerchief, which I gave to Addington.

PETER ADDINGTON . I gave it to Mead - (Mead here produced it.)

JOHN CUFFLEY . It was such a handkerchief as this.

JOHN MEAD . I am a beadle of Enfield. On the morning of the 20th of December I was applied to concerning this, and went to the spot where I understood the body was found; I observed a great quantity of blood in the ditch and on the road side - there was more in the ditch than in the road a great deal; this was about ten minutes after seven o'clock in the morning; the ground was trampled about as if there had been a great scuffling - the ground and the grass in the ditch were trampled about just as if a horse had been rolling on the bank-side - I made inquiry as to where the deceased had been the preceeding evening; I had before this seen the dead body at the Serjeant - I had the handkerchief from Addington; Cuffley gave me the shot, the cap, and gloves; the gloves were in the cap - there was a quantity of blood on the gloves; I cannot say whether there was blood on the cap: in consequence of the inquiry I made, I took William Johnson in custody first - I did not tell him what I took him for; all I said to him was, "Bill, I want you - you must go with me;" he said, "Very well, I will go" - that was all; I took Fare and Cooper - Watkins was with me when I took Cooper; I searched Fare at the watch-house, and found on him three clasp-knives, a dessert-knife, two sixpences, eight halfpence, a penny-piece, and a key, and I found the bowl of a tobacco-pipe in his right-hand waistcoat pocket, and in the same pocket I found some shot - I also found two or three little pieces of paper on him; I produced the bowl of the pipe to Mr. Addington - I locked up Fare, and then went to Cooper; I took him about four miles from Enfield, near Potter's-bar; Watkins said to him, in the course of conversation, "You have heard about the murder;" he said "No, I have not, I know nothing about it;" we asked him some questions respecting the blood inside his cap - he said he had been carrying some horse-flesh for his master's dog, and it was the blood of that; I asked him when he carried it - he said, "One day last week;" this was on Thursday - I said, "Why you did not carry it inside your cap, for the blood to get there, besides, it is wet now;" Watkins said, "That gammon won't do for us, you must get up in the cart, and come with us:" three or four hours after a message came to me, in consequence of which I went to Cooper, who was in a private room at the George, at Enfield, up stairs - he said he would tell me all about it; I refused to hear what he had to say, and told him to tell it before the Magistrate; I have a black silk handkerchief, which I took off the deceased's neck - it was very wet with blood then; there are a great number of holes in it; when it was on his neck the holes were one on the other, as if they had been cut at the same time.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you take Johnson? A. In his father's premised, close in the neighbourhood, at a little after eight o'clock; I took Cooper about ten - Watkins told Cooper he took him on suspicion of the murder; it was in answer to the question put to him that he said he knew nothing about it - Watkins has the cap he had on.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have a cotton handkerchief in your hand? A. Yes, Robinson gave it to me.

RICHARD WATKINS . I am one of the horse-patrol of Bow-street, stationed at Enfield. On Thursday, the 20th of December, at twenty minutes to seven o'clock, in consequence of an alarm, I went to the Serjeant public-house, Parsonage-lane, and saw a dead body; I went to Holt White's-lane, and observed some blood on the side of the road, and in the ditch on the right-hand side of the lane - the ground appeared to be disturbed about that spot: in consequence of further information I went with Mead to Johnson's father's house, and took him into custody; I asked where he was last night, and at what time he came home - he said, "I don't recollect what time it was;" I told him there was a murder committed last night, and I apprehended him on suspicion of being one implicated in it; he said, "That I know nothing of;" I took him to the watch-house, searched his person, and found on him a small iron box, containing fifteen duplicates and a shilling, nothing else - I locked him up; I afterwards accompanied Mead towards Potter's-bar, and apprehended Cooper - I took off his cap, and observed blood both inside and outside it, and the blood inside was wet; a conversation took place about it, and he gave an account about some dog's-meat; after he was taken a message came from him, from the George - I took him before Dr. Cresswell, where he made a statement; I observed Cooper's clothes - there was dirt on the back part of his trousers, and on several parts of his waistcoat; it was a sleeve waistcoat, and there was some on the elbows - he has the waistcoat on now; on the following Saturday I took Johnson to the New-prison - he then wore the same clothes as he wore when he was taken into custody; as I took him along, I saw several spots of blood on his trousers - I borrowed a pair of trousers at a public-house, and when I arrived at the New-prison, I took Johnson's trousers off, and gave him another pair for them; I have had his trousers in my custody ever since(producing them); he had a drab great coat and a black one under it when he was taken; here are some of the marks

on the trousers now, but the blood is very faded - here is one spot; the marks are the same as when I took them off - the blood is in front, below the knee; it was three days after the murder that I noticed it - I see very little difference in it now; I examined the bottom of the trousers, and found there was a square piece torn out of them - I showed the trousers to Dr. Astbury, at the Coroner's Inquest, on the following Wednesday; here is a piece torn off the bottom - I observed that as soon as I took them from the prisoner; I searched his coat pocket on the same Saturday, at the same time - I found a glove in his coat pocket; I did not take particular notice of it till I got home - I then looked at it, and found marks on it, which I believe to be blood; there was very little blood on it - it is between the thumb and the fore finger; I showed that to Dr. Astbury at the Inquest - I received a piece of cloth from Mr. Perry, the same Wednesday, at the Inquest; I compared that with the bottom of the trousers, where a piece is wanting, and it fitted - I observed a dull spot of blood or two on that cloth; it was dirty, and had been trod on, and torn off as it appeared; I returned the cloth to Perry again.

Cross-examined. Q. You found an iron box, with duplicates on Johnson? A. Yes, and returned them to him - they were all his own, I believe; I cannot tell what amount they were pawned for - I first went to the spot a few minutes after seven o'clock; the body had then been removed to the Serjeant - it appeared to me that there had been considerable struggling on the part of the person; there was trampling of feet there - the ground was a great deal disturbed.

Q. Did it present an appearance of a person having fallen into the ditch, or of a person struggling? A. I cannot tell - there had been many persons there before me.

JOSEPH PERRY . I produce the piece of cloth which I received from Budd - I gave it Matthews, who gave it to me again.

WILLIAM BUDD . I am a gardener to Mr. Holt White . I went to the spot on the 20th of December, where the murder had been committed - there were two or three people there; I found that piece of cloth there, about two or three yards nearer to Pinnock's than where the deed was done - I gave it to Perry; there was blood on it when I picked it up - it seemed fresh blood - this is the piece of cloth; I saw marks of blood on the ground, and in the ditch - it was about three yards from that place.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. What time was this? A. A little before eight o'clock in the morning - Collins was there, and Pinnock, who keeps the beer-shop, and Webber, a painter; I do not know whether Pinnock saw it found, but other persons did - the body had been removed.

THOMAS BOSWELL . I am a tailor, and live at Enfield. I have seen these trousers and this piece of cloth before, and have matched the cloth with the rent at the bottom - I believe this piece of cloth formerly formed a part of the trousers: I have no doubt of it whatever.

MR. ADDINGTON. I know this cap well - it is the cap the deceased wore on the night of the 19th of December, when he left my house - he had rough sailor's trousers on outside, what are called pea trousers, and he had black trousers on under them; I myself picked up that piece of cloth on the spot on the morning, before the witness found it, and threw it down again, not thinking it of any consequence - neither of the pairs of trousers which the deceased wore were at all like that cloth, and his trousers were not torn at all.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you find the cloth? A. About twenty minutes past seven o'clock - it was on the spot where the deceased was found; it laid in the path, not a quarter of a yard from the ditch - I handed it to Cuffley, who said it was of no use, and threw it down; he and I both had it in our hands at once, looking at it, and threw it down together; and as we came away we met Budd very near the bottom, going towards the place.

JOHN CUFFLEY . I saw the piece of cloth when Mr. Addington took it up; I did not think it was of any consequence, and it was thrown down - it appeared the same size as it is now.

MR. JOHN EBENEZER DAVIS . I have come here casually, not as a witness - I have examined the cloth; I am a Blackwellhall-factor, and have had an opportunity of examining cloth for twenty years; I should say the trousers and cloth were of the same fabric, decidedly - I have not examined to see if the piece fits the place - I should say the colour is the same, and the quality is the same; that is, that it is black milled kerseymere, and they appear to have sustained the same degree of wear.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Are you a manufacturer of cloth? A. No; I receive cloths from the manufacturer, and sell them - I heard his Lordship express some doubt as to the identity of the pieces; I did not volunteer my evidence, but was asked by Mr. Alderman Venables to give an opinion as to the texture of the cloth; there are a great many black kerseymeres manufactured - in my opinion the piece is the same as the trousers.

THOMAS BOSWELL re-examined. Q. Is there any thing about the stitching or sewing of these trousers which enables you to speak to the cloth being the same? A. Yes, they are turned up at the bottom, and sewn to secure it; the sewing at the bottom of the piece corresponds with the sewing at the bottom of the trousers - I should say decidedly they have both been done by the same hand.

MR. BODKIN. Q. On the piece of cloth has not every stitch been separated - is there one stitch which holds both ends together? A. No; here is the sewing on the piece, it is where the hem has been sewn, but has now become separate - it is the turn up at the bottom; I should think this sewing and that on the trousers have been done by the same person, but the trousers are worn in that state I cannot tell - the legs of the trousers should be of an equal length.

Q. One of these legs are considerably longer than the other? A. There is a piece gone off all round the bottom - (here the witness pinned the piece of cloth to the trousers.)

Q. Is not that at least half an inch longer than the other side? A. I should think it is not one-eight part of an inch different - you cannot account for half an inch, because in these sort of trousers sometimes one leg gets stretched down longer than the other, being trod upon, and different things - they are sewn with silk, and so is

the piece; trousers of this kind are usually sewn with silk.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is the silk of the same texture and fabric? A. Yes, and both are worn the same.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I observed the trousers which Cooper had on that night - they were corderoy trousers; Fare had large corded knee breeches - Johnson had black trousers, and a black coat.

JACOB VALE ASTBURY . I am a surgeon, and live at Enfield. On the 20th of December I was called in to see the body of the deceased; there was a wound on the right side of the cheek - there was a wound sufficient to cause his death on the right side of his neck; it was produced by a stab from a sharp instrument, which, in passing into the neck, transfixed the common carotid artery, which would produce death instantly; the beadle showed a pair of trousers at the Inquest - there appeared to me to be two distinct spots of blood on them; I have not a doubt that it was blood - they also produced a glove to me, with a mark of blood on the fore finger; I saw the piece of cloth - it is marked with blood and dirt.

Cross-examined. Q. Whether it is human blood, or the blood of any animal, you cannot say? A. No.

CHARLES ROBINSON . I am a farmer, living at Enfield. I know the bridge between Giles' and Perry's houses; I found a handkerchief on Thursday morning, between eight and nine o'clock, facing Mr. Giles' house, in the New-river - I pulled it out, and put it into my pocket; I took it to Mr. Addington, and gave it to him - (looking at it) this is the same; the stream runs towards Giles' house; I know the handkerchief - here is a mark on it, and a hole in two corners; I noticed that after I delivered it to Addington.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know where Cooper lived? A. Yes; it would not take two minutes to walk from his house to where I found the handkerchief - it was not floating; it had caught by a bit of bush or wood.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How near to the spot does Johnson's father live? A. About two hundred yards - Cooper lives in the chase-side road; I am sure I found it between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

RICHARD WATKINS . When Cooper went before Dr. Cresswell, and made his statement, nothing had been said to him about the handkerchief being found.

JOHN MEAD . I said nothing to him about the handkerchief being found - I did not know of it; Addington gave it to me the morning after it was found I think - it was quite wet when he gave it to me; it was in the morning; I think it was the morning after Cooper was taken.

CHARLES ROBINSON. I did not inform Addington, or any body, that I had found it, until the Saturday morning.

THOMAS HOLDER . I am clerk to a barrister. I packed up some things for the deceased on the 12th of December, and among them were two cotton handkerchiefs and two silk ones; the handkerchief produced is one of those I packed up for him when he was going out of town -I know it by a stain in the middle.

Cross-examined. Q. You merely put them together for him? A. I have used this handkerchief myself - there are no initials on it.

HANNAH HAWTHORN . I used to wash for the deceased; this handkerchief was his - I have not a doubt about it.

JOHN COOPER re-examined. After the murder was committed, when we returned down the lane, I saw nobody before I got into the field by the river; I saw two persons going towards the Enfield-chase road - I took them to be a man and a lady; I saw nobody else - at that time Johnson, I, and Danby were together.

JURY. Q. How long before the murder had Fare left? A. About twenty minutes I dare say.

EDWIN BROWNING . I had a lady with me. I could not tell whether it were two or three persons I saw in Holt White's-lane - they did not say a word to me.

JOHN COOPER . I said, "Good night" to the gentleman and lady, and they answered me again "Good night;" that is the truth.

Johnson's Defence (written). Being informed that a very strong prejudice against me exists in the mind of the public, I most humbly and respectfully beg your full attention to all that I can state, or know of the affair which has placed me in this unhappy situation. On the morning of Wednesday, the 19th of December last, there was a stag-hunt at Enfield; it was attended by a great number of the towns people - the stag was at Walker's farm, Enfield-chase; I was there - there was great pushing, and trying to get the stag to run, but it would go only a short distance; it was then killed - the stag belonged to Mr. Abbot, of Layton, Essex; I, and Aldridge Hare, of Turkey-street, Joseph Short and Thomas Haggleton , of Enfield, opened the stag - as I had no knife of my own I borrowed one from Thomas Moles , of the Holly-bush; this knife I returned to him directly after we had opened the stag - the blood of the stag spirted over our clothes; we had the pluck of the stag and 2s. for our trouble - my clothes were much torn in getting through the hedges; myself and the others, who had opened the stag, were afterwards in Holt White's-lane, where I pulled out of my pocket some of the stag's pluck, to show to some people whom we met; in my pocket there was also a piece of cloth I had torn from my trousers a week before, and as I did not afterwards find this piece in my pocket, it is by no means unlikely that it dropped out at that time: we then went and dined at Gosling's, at Windmill-hill, off part of the inside of the stag - this was about two o'clock; about half-past five I went to the Horse-shoes public-house to get a pint of beer; at that time no person was there but the pot-boy - about half an hour afterwards the deceased came in; I had never before seen the deceased - Jackson came in soon after the deceased; they asked me to play a game at dominoes, and I played part of a game with them - I do not recollect at what time Wagstaff, Fare, or Cooper, came in, but I think they were all there by nine o'clock; during the whole time I was there the deceased never made any display of, or boasted that he had any money - some time after we left the Horse-shoes public-house; the deceased appeared a little intoxicated - Matthews, the pot-boy, asked Cooper to see deceased home, and Cooper led deceased over the bridge - Fare followed; I went on as far as Wagstaff's, about which place Fare went away, and Cooper went on with deceased; Wagstaff did not speak to Cooper, but I think Wagstaff said to me, "I must go in and set the sponge;" Wagstaff then went in - I then went on to the end of Holt White's-lane, when Cooper said he would take deceased to Pinnock's beer-shop, and I refused to go any further, and went directly home. Gentlemen, - I most solemnly declare myself innocent of the crime laid to me, or of any participation in it, I am perfectly aware that asseverations of innocence, unaccompanied by proofs, are disregarded in a Court of Justice-like this, but while I bow to the voice of the laws of my country, I cannot but deeply feel that I have, by the most unmerited and cruel aspersions, been deprived of the first and noblest right of an Englishman, which entitles him to be presumed innocent until he be proved otherwise: that in saying

this I do not submit more than is true, is proved by my having been, from the first moment that suspicion attached to me, held up to the country as a declared murderer, and one whose atrocities should long since have brought him to this bar; what is the consequence to me at this dreadful moment? this - that fear has possessed my friends, and that I am in danger of falling a sacrifice to the prejudice which ascribes their standing aloof, as a sign that I am an abandoned and worthless man. I shall not, Gentlemen, trouble you with comments upon the calumnies cast upon me, but just observe that they have been the cause, and the only cause, that I have not, in this, my hour of trial, the attendance of some most worthy gentlemen to speak to my character, and assure me, to your satisfaction, to be a person wholly incapable of committing the horrible crime for which I am indicted. Bred up to be a gardener by my respected, and I fear now heart-broken father, I have ever been able to earn sufficient funds for my support, without having resort to indirect means to obtain them; is it fair then to suppose that I should follow the trade of the midnight assassin. That I had funds at my command is proved by the very duplicates, taken for a time, by Watkins, the patrol, when he searched me, and I had then other and valuable articles upon which I could have raised a considerable sum had I wanted it: why then am I charged with having murdered Mr. Danby, to obtain what was already at my command? and as he had never offended me, what other motive can be assigned that would have caused me to attempt his life? - none could exist - none did exist. Gentlemen, I leave my case in your hands, and I implore you (not more for my own sake than for the sake of my afflicted wife) dispassionately to weigh the whole of the circumstances adduced in evidence, and I pray that the Almighty, dismissing all prejudice from your minds, will enable you to discover that though I may have been unfortunate, that I am not guilty.

THOMAS MOLES . I am a labouring man, and live at Enfield. On the 19th of December I was at a stag hunt at Enfield - Thomas Haggleton , Joseph Short, the prisoner Johnson, and several more were present; the stag was at last killed in one of Mr. Walker's fields, at Enfield-chase - I cannot say who stuck it, but the prisoner Johnson had my knife to help take the entrails out; I cannot say whether any of the blood came on his clothes - I did not see any; he was near enough to the stag for blood to come on his clothes - he returned me the knife about three quarters of an hour after he had used it; the stag was killed between twelve and one o'clock in the day on which the murder was done at night - the knife has been in my possession ever since Johnson was at the hunt, from the beginning of it in the morning, to the end; the stag did not run far, and Johnson followed it - it went over hedges.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long had it been dead before they cut it open? A. As soon as it was dead they stuck it.

THOMAS HAGGLETON . I am a labourer, and live at Enfield. I was at the stag hunt with Moles, and saw Johnson there, from the beginning to the end; Aldridge Clare stuck the stag, and a good deal of blood came from it; Johnson helped to open it, and received part of the inside of it; he was so placed that some of the blood must come on his clothes.

JOSEPH SHORT . I am a labourer, and live at Enfield. I was at the stag hunt, and followed as far as I could - I was there when it was killed; I think the people fell on it, and broke its back - I saw Hare cut its throat; Johnson was there, and assisted in taking out the entrails, the pluck, and liver - he was near enough for blood to come on his clothes.

THOMAS MOLES re-examined. When the hunt was over, the huntsmen gave us some money, and we went to a public-house and had some beer on the chase - we continued together about half an hour; Johnson had black trousers and a black coat on - he was on foot.

Johnson. Watkins asked where I was that night, and I said at the Horse-shoe.

RICHARD WATKINS . I asked him at what time he came home the night before; he said he did not know what time it was - I asked where he had been that night, and he gave me no answer; I am sure he did not say he had been at the Horse-shoe.

JOHNSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

FARE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-8

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, JANUARY 3RD.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

256. JOHN HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , 2 bedsteads, value 15s.; 1 feather bed, value 3l.; 1 bolster, value 2s.; 2 palliasses, value 1l.; 1 counterpane, value 1s.; 1 table, value 40s.; 22 chairs, value 3l.; 1 clock, value 5s.; 2 wash-hand stands, value 10s.; 1 knife-box, value 6d.; 6 knives, value 2s.; 6 forks, value 2s.; 1 tea-tray, value 18d.; 1 kettle, value 6d.; 2 decanters and stoppers, value 10s.; 9 pieces of carpet, value 5s.; 1 looking-glass, value 6d.; 2 fenders, value 20s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 3s.; 1 pair of snuffers, value 1s.; 1 snuffer-stand, value 1s.; 6 cups and 6 saucers, value 18d.; 1 washing-tub, value 18d.; 24 plates, value 18d.; 1 milk-pot, value 6d.; 5 jugs, value 18d.; 2 waiters, value 1s.; 1 set of glass cruets, value 3s.; 6 candlesticks, value 2s.; 1 window-curtain, value 4d.; 12 wine-glasses, value 3s.; 4 goblets, value 2s.; 1 pair of tongs, value 6d.; 1 shovel, value 6d.; 3 spoons, value 1s.; 2 basins, value 6d.; 2 tea-pots, value 3s.; 1 set of bedfurniture, value 20s.; 3 bonnets, value 6d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 6d., and 1 blanket, value 3s., the goods of William Evans , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM EVANS . I live in Sheppard's-walk, City-road, and am a dealer in English timber . I had a house at Enfield-wash ; I locked it up the latter end of December, and left it - I had lived in it in the summer; it was a private house - I intended to go back to it: the furniture was all safe when I left in December; I went down on the 10th of May, and found all the furniture removed - on the 19th of May I went to the house of Potter, who has been tried, and found a good part of my furniture there; I brought it away - Potter lived about a quarter of a mile from the house: I went to London on Sunday, and on going there on Monday, the 21st, when I went down, Hanley, Mead, and Wilson, the officers, were taking some of my property out of Hill's house - some of it was in the garden; I went into the house myself - he lived in Swin's-buildings, Enfield-wash; he is a labourer - he lives next door to Potter; I myself found a tea-tray, some chairs, and things - I pointed out what was

mins; the officers brought out nine chairs, a tea-tray, a bedstead, two wash-hand stands, and several small things- the value of the property which I lost was about 30l.; Hill had absconded - the property had been found at Potter's on the Saturday evening; I do not know myself when Hill absconded; I did not know him at all, nor Potter - I did not discover my loss until the 10th of May, and on the 11th I gave information at Worship-street; I found a large hole had been opened in my garden, and property had been buried there; we found Potter at home, and took him into custody.

JAMES HANLEY . I am a Police-officer of Worship-street. On Sunday morning, the 19th of May, the prosecutor gave me information, about four o'clock in the morning, and I went with him to Enfield-wash; we first went to the house of Potter, who was convicted in July; I remained in the house the whole of Sunday and Sunday night, and in the course of Sunday night Mead and Wilson, the beadles of Enfield, received information, and we went very early on Monday morning to a cottage in Swin's-buildings, next door to Potter's; we found a woman named Hill there - we went up stairs, and took possession of a bedstead, a mattress, nine chairs, a washhand stand, basin and jug, a knife-box, three pieces of carpet, a dish, a tea-board, and several other articles - we removed them into the garden in front of the cottage, and by that time the prosecutor came down from London, and identified them as his property; the prisoner Hill was not at home - I sent Wilson off to where he worked - the property found at Hill's I should think was worth more than 5l.; it appeared to be equally divided between him and Potter - I know nothing of Hill; Potter was apprehended before I went down to Enfield.

JOHN WILSON . I am a beadle of Enfield. On the 19th of May (Saturday) the prosecutor came to me, and said he had lost his goods - in consequence of what he said I went with him to Potter's, who was at home, and found a great quantity of articles - he was taken into custody; on Monday morning Hanley, I, and Mead went into Hill's house - he was not at home; I found his wife Ann Hill, at home - I found the property there which Hanley has named; I went to Mr. Walker's, where Hill worked, at Enfield brewery, but he was not there - it is about half a mile from his house; I had seen him on the Sunday, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, in Walker's yard, with a horse - I searched for him, but never saw him till within the last month, when I saw him in the office of Mr. Sawyer, the Magistrate's clerk - the property at Hill's was in the up stairs rooms; he had the whole of the house; his eldest child is about eight or nine years old - his wife was acquitted.

JOHN MEAD . I am a beadle. I went with Wilson to search the prisoner's house; I found the bedstead fixed in the room, and the mattress on it, and the different articles; the woman was very much confused, and I brought it away - Potter had been taken on the Saturday night, after dark, but I cannot say the exact time; Hill was given in my charge on the 11th or 12th of December, by a patrol of South-mimms.

JOHN WILSON . Potter was taken on the Saturday night - I saw Hill the next morning, but not afterwards.

WILLIAM EVANS . I went down on the 10th, and my property was gone; I found the front door on the latch -I had locked it; there was no appearance outside of the house having been broken open; nothing to call a person's attention to it - these chairs are mine, and what I found in his house; I have had them ever since Potter's trial, when Mead produced them.

JOHN MEAD . The chairs I produced on the trial are what I found at Hill's.

HANNAH PRYKE . I saw Hill's wife burning one of the chairs - I live near them; Hill was about there until the things were found, but I never saw him afterwards.

SARAH SWIN . I am landlady of Hill's house - he is my tenant - I have not seen him since the things were found.

WILLIAM EKINS . Hill's wife worked for me; I did not see Hill - Mrs. Hill brought a fender to my house on the Saturday night, about nine o'clock.

WILLIAM EVANS . Potter was taken in Custody on the Saturday night, between seven and eight o'clock.

JURY. Q. Was it a common lock? A. Yes; I took the key home with me - one of the room locks were broken open.

ELIZA AKERS . I live at Enfield-wash. I bought a fender and wash-hand stand of Mrs. Hill last May.

PRISCILLA EVANS . I am the prosecutor's daughter, I came away from the house with him in December last; he locked the door, and brought away the key with him; the property produced was left in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. Potter had asked my wife to let him put the things there, he being a neighbour.

WILLIAM EVANS re-examined. The bedstead was cut down to fit the prisoner's room; it was fixed up, and had the mattress on it - it is a four-post bedstead.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-9

Before Mr. Justice James Parke.

257. HENRY LARBY was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Anthony Roberts , on the 11th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 pocket-book, value 6d.; 6 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 28 shillings, one 200l., one 20l., one 10l., and one 5l. Bank note, and one 1l. promissory note, his property .

WILLIAM ANTHONY ROBERTS . I am clerk to Mr. Harridge, solicitor , of the Strand. On the 10th of December, at one o'clock in the morning, I took a cabriolet in Tottenham-court-road; the prisoner was the driver - I drove it to various parts of London, and returned to Tottenham-court-road at a quarter to four o'clock; I went into a public-house there: I had nothing to drink there - I went to the King's Head, and think the prisoner had something to drink there; when I got to the public-house in Tottenham-court-road, I paid the prisoner 4s., and one of the traces being broken, he demanded 6d. more - I would not pay him, and he gave me in charge of a Policeman; I was taken to the station-house, and on giving my address there, the inspector set me at liberty - I passed up Tottenham-court-road, and saw nothing of the prisoner till I crossed the New-road, towards Camden-town; I then met the prisoner without his cab - a person named Young was with him; he said, "He was extremely sorry for taking me to

the station-house:" I took no notice; and then he said as it was a cold morning, would I object to give him some warm beer - I said, "Not the least," and we went to the King's Head, at the corner of Hampstead-road; he had some beer there, which I paid for, and left the house - he followed me; I went through several streets, until I arrived at Carburton-street - he and Young followed me; I went into the Lord Nelson, in that street, and ordered some breakfast: as soon as the breakfast was brought, the prisoner and Young both came into the room where I sat; it was between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, nearly eight: they stood by the fire-place, talking; I immediately left the room, and walked out, without taking my breakfast, or paying for it - with the intention of leaving the house without their perceiving me; when I got about three hundred yards from the house, the prisoner ran after me, and told me I had neglected to pay for my breakfast: I returned, and paid for it - I immediately left the house again, and the prisoner came out, and again began to apologise for having sent me to the station-house, and requested me to have some spirits, or something at his expense, which I refused - he then wanted me to pay for some, which I refused; he immediately took hold of my coat, with his back towards the house, and tried to drag me towards the house, but I resisted - I being stronger than himself, he could not get me in, and he turned with his face towards the door, and tried to push me into the house, but in that he failed; I cannot swear whether it was accidental or not; but he still had hold of my coat - his foot slipped, and he fell down on his back, and pulled me down on my knees; my coat burst open, and my pocketbook fell from the pocket, and the gold and silver which I had in my pocket-book fell from it, by the weight of it - the notes remained in another pocket of the book; I snatched up my pocket-book, and put it into my pocket - that was never in the possession of the prisoner; the gold and silver fell on the pavement - the prisoner and Young immediately snatched it up: there were six sovereigns, one half-sovereign, and 28s., that was my own - there was 245l. in notes in the pocket-book, belonging to my employer; I did not recover any of the money from the prisoner and Young - I am certain the prisoner took up some of the money; I positively swear I saw him pick up two sovereigns and three shillings: Young immediately ran away, but the prisoner leaned against the right-hand post of the door - I went to him, and asked him for the money he had picked up; he refused to give it me, saying he had picked none up - I suppose, on account of his having wooden shoes on, he was not able to run; I called for a Policeman, but none being near, I crossed over to Mr. Lamb, gave him my pocket-book, and immediately went to the station, and got a Policeman: at the time of the robbery the prisoner was not at all intoxicated, nor was I - he was taken up about half-past ten o'clock that morning; I have not a doubt of his person - when I was at the King's Head, St. Giles', I think, I produced the pocket-book in his presence, but the notes could not be seen; I took my pocket-book out, and paid for what I had there out of it - my pockets were in a dilapidated state; it was about one o'clock when I was at the King's Head: he was not intoxicated at the time I was robbed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you? A. A clerk; I have to say, that in taking the prisoner into custody, he was in such a state of intoxication, we could not take him before the Magistrate at the usual hour, and deferred it till the evening - I consider that he got intoxicated with my money; I had been at a party in the King's-road, Pimlico: I went there about eight o'clock, and staid till about half-past ten - I played at cards, and different diversions; I had about two glasses of home-made wine there, that was all - I went from there to my employer's, in Edgware-road, staid there about a quarter of an hour, and went from there to Tottenham-court-road, without stopping: I live in York-place, Kentish-town - I drove to different parts of London, first to the King's Head, St. Giles'; the prisoner had a small glass of brandy there, which I paid for; I had nothing - I drove myself; I got to the King's Head about a quarter past one o'clock: I went from there to the watering-house in the Old Bailey; I had no business there, it was merely in my way.

Q. Where to? A. To no place in particular - I did not get out of the cab there; the prisoner said it was cold, and wished for something - he had a small glass of brandy there, which I paid 4d. for; I then drove over Blackfriars-bridge, and back over London-bridge, down Fenchurch-street, to the Old Bailey again: I gave him a glass of brandy there - then drove through Covent-garden, Drury-lane, to Tottenham-court-road; I went into the Red Lion there, and gave him up the cab - it was about five o'clock; I called for some bread and cheese for supper, and he came in, and asked for 6d., for the broken trace: I did not pay for it - 4s. was what he demanded for his fare.

Q. When he was pulling you into the house in Carburton-street, why not give an alarm? A. I did not consider his intention was to rob me; I told him repeatedly to desist, but he would not, and then he tried to push me in - I did not call out, because people were standing by, and if I had chosen to use any means I could have done so, without assistance; there were one or two cab-men standing by the door, when I called for the Policeman - my money was scattered about the street; the persons about were a set of cab-men: I saw nobody in the house, but two women - if I had offered to detain the prisoner I considered I should not have got off so easy, as there were a number of cab-men, and such sort about; I am not in the habit of associating with such fellows - I considered the 245l. quite safe; I have had treble that sum in my pocket - it was a silly foolish excursion; I am not in the habit of doing so.

JAMES LAMB . I am a grocer, and live in Carburton-street. On Tuesday morning, the 10th of December, I was at my door, and observed the prosecutor pulled about by a set of cab-men, and observed the prisoner lay hold of his coat and pull it open - his pocket-book fell out, and the money fell out; I saw the prisoner pick up some money, but what it was I cannot say; and I saw Young distinctly pick up money, and put it in his pocket; I beckoned to the prosecutor to come over - I certainly observed the prisoner pick up something; I could not tell whether it was money or not - he picked up something twice off the ground; I could not see what he did with it - I could distinctly see that it was money which Young picked up: I beckoned to the prosecutor to come over to my door - he came into the shop; he gave me his pocket-book to take care of - there was a 200l. note in it, and other notes.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw the prosecutor pulled

about by a set of cab-men? A. Yes, I saw the prisoner pull him; there is a cab-yard next to my house, and the cabmen assemble at the house opposite.

Q. Just tell me whether you saw the prosecutor pulled about by the cab-men, and then the prisoner seized hold of him? A. Young, who has escaped is a cab-man, and they both pulled him about - the others were round him; I cannot say whether they touched him - I did not go up to the prosecutor; I was across the street - the prosecutor stood against the Lord Nelson public-house; I did not leave my shop to give him in charge - I had nobody in it; the prosecutor called for a Policeman for a quarter of an hour, but there was none - the station is about a quarter of a mile from my house; the prisoner had wooden shoes on - I saw him go away at last; he walked away leisurely.

JURY. Q. Was the prosecutor intoxicated? A. No, he appeared as if he had been out all night, raking, but not drunk; he knew what he was about, and delivered his money into my hands.

THOMAS SOPER. I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner at twelve o'clock on Tuesday, the 11th of December, at his lodging, Ames-yard, Charles-street, Hampstead-road - he was drunk and asleep; I told him I wanted him to go with me - he said, "I know all about it, go on, and I will follow you;" he then dozed off again -I told him the gentleman gave charge of him for robbing him; he said, "It was a b-y good job to charge him with robbing him, for he had got nothing;" I searched him and his lodging, and found no money at all - the prosecutor was with me; I saw him about nine o'clock - he appeared as if he had been drinking, but was not drunk then.

WILLIAM PEARCE , I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Tottenham-court-road, on Thursday morning, about five o'clock - the prisoner gave the prosecutor in charge for not paying his fare; Roberts, at that time, I could perceive had been drinking, but knew perfectly what he was about - I could tell by his appearance that he had been out all night - he talked rational; I afterwards saw the prisoner in company with another man - I overtook them in Tottenham-court-road; it was ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after Roberts was discharged; I was with them in the Blue-posts public-house, and drank a glass of rum with them - I heard the prisoner say Roberts had got plenty of money, between 200l. and 300l. - that he saw two 10l. notes in his front coat pocket, and he put his hand to his breast: Young and another person were standing behind him at the time - he knew that I was present; he left the house with Young - they drove the cab away.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you on duty that night? A. Yes, my beat is nearly half a mile from Carburton-street; I had my uniform coat on - the prisoner paid for my rum; I was sober - I was off duty then; we are not forbid to go to public-houses when off duty - I did not know him before; the prisoner said he had been paid 4s., and demanded 6d. more at the public-house, but at the station-house he demanded 2s. 6d. - he demanded the 6d. for his fare; I heard nothing about the trace till afterwards - there ought to be a Policeman round Carburton-street, but it takes the man there half an hour to go round his beat; the station is three quarters of a mile from the Lord Nelson, I think.

JURY. Q. Who was driving the cab? A. Nobody; when I saw it they were in the public-house, and the cab was at the door - the prosecutor walked from the station-house.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor went to several houses and was quite intoxicated; he drank at every house as I did - he changed a sovereign at the Old Bailey, to give the waterman something to drink; he treated several people who stood round.

WILLIAM ANTHONY ROBERTS re-examined. I had received the money from my master that night, to apply to different purposes, as he was going from town next day; I changed a sovereign at the Old Bailey, to pay for brandy.

GUILTY of stealing, but not from the person . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-10

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

258. MICHAEL GRADY was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-11

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

259. WILLIAM WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Edward Adolphus James Walsh , from his person .

EDWARD ADOLPHUS JAMES WALSH . I live at Camberwell. On the 8th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was at the corner of Carter-lane ; I did not feel my handkerchief taken - I received information from a man, then felt my pocket, and it was gone: it was given to me in about ten minutes, by Harslett - I found the prisoner in custody at the top of Creed-lane.

JOHN HARSLETT . I am a cow-keeper. I was at the top of St. Andrew's-hill, and saw the prisoner in company with another person, step up behind the prosecutor, and take the handkerchief from his pocket; I immediately raised a cry of Stop thief! and told the prosecutor of it - I pursued the prisoner, and saw him throw the handkerchief from him; he got out of my sight - I saw him in custody in about ten minutes, and was quite positive that he was the same person; his companion got away - there was no attempt to take him; I am positive I saw him take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket - it was picked up by somebody, and given to me; I gave it to the prosecutor.

THOMAS WILMOTT . I am a Police-officer, and live in Creed-lane. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I went to my door, and saw the prisoner running; I secured him immediately; the prosecutor came up afterwards, and gave me the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330103-12

260. JOHN LEFEVRE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 dead hare, value 3s., the goods of Michael Myers and another, his masters .

MICHAEL MYERS , JUN. I am in partner ship with my father - the prisoner was our journeyman for many years, off and on. On Thursday afternoon, the 6th of December,

about half-past four o'clock, I was very busy in the shop in Peter's-alley , and heard two or three persons call out that a man had run off with a hare; I went towards Grace-church-street, and found the prisoner going up Bell-yard, with the hare in his hand - I said, "Where are you going with that hare?" he said, "To the coach, Sir;" I said,"That won't do for me;" he then said, "Well, Sir, I stole the hare, and hope you will forgive me;" I refused, as he had robbed me frequently before, but we did not prosecute him, on account of his family - we took him from the workhouse.

RICHARD BARRET . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge; the hare was delivered to me - as I took him to the Compter he said, "You have been a long time looking for me - you have got me at last."

MICHAEL MYERS. This is the skin of the hare.

Prisoner. I have a wife and six children.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330103-13

261. JOHN INSTANT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 2 candlesticks, value 2s., the goods of John Brees , his master .

JOHN BREES . I live at No. 25, West-street, Smithfield , and am an ironmonger . The prisoner was in my employ for three months - he lodged and boarded in the house; I found one candlestick in his coat pocket, and the other in his hat, about nine o'clock in the morning of the 10th of December; his coat and hat laid in a corner of the shop at that time - I set an officer to watch him; he afterwards left the shop; I went after him - the officer stopped him, and produced the pair of candlesticks; when they were in his pocket they had a paper round them, with my private mark on it, but when the officer produced them the paper was not on them; he said it was his first offence.

GEORGE LOCK. I am a constable. I followed the prisoner through Field-lane, Farringdon-street, over Blackfriars-bridge, and just by Christchurch he took one candlestick from his left-hand pocket, and then another from his hat; he went into a pawnbroker's, and I followed him- he asked for 1s. on them; I asked how he came by them - he said he bought them in the Strand, for 2s.; I asked where - he said, "That is of no consequence;" I asked his master's name - he said, "That is of no consequence;" I said, "I can tell you your master's name;" when his master saw him, he said, "It is the first time;" I found in his pocket the paper that had been round the candlesticks; and I found ten duplicates in his hand, all for candlesticks; most of them have been given up to the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 55. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-14

262. WILLIAM CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 77 lbs. of butter, value 2l. 14s., and 1 tub, value 4d. , the goods of John Titterton .

JOHN WALKER . I live in Wood-street, Cromer-street, Brunswick-square , and am in the employ of John Titterton, a wholesale cheesemonger . I saw the prisoner going out of the shop, on the 11th of December, about a quarter to nine o'clock in the morning, with the tub of butter on his shoulder; I was in the counting-house with the clerk; I pursued the prisoner, and never lost sight of him; I stopped him, brought him back, and asked him if he wanted Smith, whom he had been inquiring for at our shop a few weeks previous - he gave no reason for taking the butter.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How far had he got from the house? A. About twenty yards - he threw the tub of butter down when he saw me following him.

JOHN STEVENS . I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's door and cross over - he had nothing with him when I saw him; I saw him running across the road.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him come out of the shop? A. Yes, down the steps; he had nothing that I saw - he had nothing when he came down the step; I was about nine yards from him - my eyes are not very good.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I am an officer. I was fetched to the prosecutor's counting-house in Newgate-street, and took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking on the other side of the way, and heard a cry of Stop thief! a number of people were walking backwards and forwards - a man charged me with entering the shop with intent to steal the butter.

JOHN WALKER re-examined. He dropped it on the step of the door; a person outside could not see it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-15

263. JOSEPH YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 1 coat, value 3l. , the goods of James Mottram .

JAMES MOTTRAM. I live at Leeds, and am guard of the Rockingham coach , which puts up at the Saracen's Head. I left this coat in my bed room, at the White Hart, Giltspur-street , on the 2nd of December, when I left London - I returned on the 6th, and the coat was gone; I saw it that day in the possession of the officer who had taken the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you employed the prisoner at times? A. I had, and had a very good opinion of him; I trusted him with a variety of things, and always found him honest.

JOHN WRIDGLEY . I am a City-officer. On the 5th of December I was at the end of Duke-street, West Smithfield - the prisoner passed me; he turned his head round two or three times, and looked at me - he had a bundle under his arm; he went up Cloth-fair - I followed, and stopped him, and asked what he had in the bundle; he said linen, which he was going to take to his washerwoman; I said, "You have something black there;" I untied the handkerchief, and found it was a coat - there was a shirt and flannel waistcoat with it; the coat was much too large for him - I said, "This is much too large for you;" he said No - I said, "What are you going to do with it?" he said, "I am going to take it to my washerwoman to pawn for a shillings;" I said, "Could not you have done that yourself;" he said he thought she might get more on it - I asked where he lodged; he said at the White Hart, Giltspur-street - he did not object to my taking him there; I found he had lodged there some time off and on, and the landlady said she had no doubt but the coat belonged to Mr. Mottram.

Cross-examined. Q. When you said there was something black, what did he say? A. He said it was a coat.

JAMES MOTTRAM. I never gave him permission to pawn it - he has brushed it for me once or twice, and I should think he knew it was mine.

JURY. Q. Could any body in the house get into your room? A. Yes; it was used during my absence - it is on the third floor - the prisoner lodged in the garret.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the coat some distance down Snow-hill for 8s. - I took it home, and kept it till next day, when I was going to Hampstead after a situation; I wanted some money, and took the coat - I went before the Lord Mayor; the prosecutor was not in town; I was liberated on promising to come next day - I went and slept at the house, and, in order that the Policeman should not walk with me, I certainly went out of the way, but I went to Guildhall, and met the gentleman who owned the coat.

JOHN WRIDGLEY . The Lord Mayor took his word to appear next day, on condition of his leaving the coat with me - he appeared next day of his own accord.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-16

264. THOMAS GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 pair of boots, value 21s., the goods of Aaron Gush ; and that he had before been convicted of felony .

JOSEPH GRIFFITHS. I am shopman to Mr. Aaron Gush , boot and shoemaker , Poultry . On the 24th of December, about twenty minutes before seven o'clock, I saw a man walking round the shop - I was cleaning up the board; we had lost several pairs of boots before - I concealed myself, and saw him take a pair of boots; I ran after him as fast as I could, and in turning to the right, saw him with the boots in his hand, and caught him about fourteen yards from the shop - it was the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Were not the boots in the road? A. No; I caught him round the waist - he struggled to get away, but could not, and then he threw them down.

WILLIAM HAYMAN . I am a Policeman. I was passing the prosecutor's door, and found the prisoner in the shop; he said it was the first offence he had ever committed.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE DUNCAN . I am a Policeman. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from the officer of this Court; I was a witness against him, and am certain he is the man - (read).

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330103-17

265. SAMUEL BEAMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of December , 1 canvas bag, value 3d.; 4 shillings, and 2 sixpences , the property of John Clarke .

JOHN CLARKE. I live at Acton, and am a carman . On the 22nd of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I came to London - I had 6s. in a canvas bag in my pocket; about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon my cart stood in Newgate-street, for about five minutes, as I was waiting there for my master; the prisoner came and said the cart should go on - I said I was only waiting a few minutes for my master; he moved the cart himself - I took it round into Newgate-market, and came back to wait in Newgate-street for my master; the prisoner took me to the Compter - I do not know what for, unless it was for leaving my cart in the street; he gave me no reason - when I got to the Compter they threw me down, and some knelt on me, and the rest took my money; five or six persons got me in there - the prisoner was one of them - he was the first who was the occasion of taking me; and when he began to shove me about, to push the cart on, I told him not to shove me about, because I had property about me; when I got to the Compter, they threw me down, and took my money: the prisoner was present - I cannot say how many persons there were; I had not a chance to look up; I resisted their taking me in - they kept me from Saturday about half-past three o'clock, until eleven o'clock on Monday; I had not been there five minutes before I missed my money - I did not make any complaint of it - the prisoner was present when I said they took my money; he said nothing - I was taken before the Alderman on Monday; I complained of having lost my money - it was late before the Alderman about my leaving my cart standing in the street; I mentioned about my money being taken from me, and charged the prisoner with being one of them - my canvas bag was produced before the Alderman; the prisoner was there that day - the money was all in the bag when it was produced.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The prisoner is a Police-officer of the City? A. Yes - I placed my cart along the curb, and stopped with it; I did not kick up a row with the officers - there were two officers; they moved the cart themselves, and I took it into Newgate-market; I was not told in Newgate-street that a complaint had been made about my cart being left there; I resisted being taken to the Compter - I cannot tell how many officers I found there, whether there were six, eight or twelve - there might be twenty; I was thrown down by the officers, and my clothes all torn off my back - I was searched.

Q. Did you say as you were taken to the Compter, that you had about 100l. about you? A. I do not know that I did; I could not tell whether I had 100l. or one hundred guineas, as I had a packet of money tied up, besides what was in the bag - it was my master's, and I had never seen it counted; I found after I got home that it was 20l. - it was all taken from me at the Compter; the prisoner took my bag out of my pocket, and put it into his own, I suppose - I do not know who took the 20l. - I do not know that any body searched me besides the prisoner.

Q. Was any body sitting there as constable or superior officer? A. Yes - it was all taken while they had me down, but they were a good while doing it; I resisted all I could - I could not see what was done with my money, for I was knelt down, on my head; Butler was with the prisoner, but he would not have taken me if it had not been for the prisoner.

COURT. Q. Is there not a board up, prohibiting persons leaving their carts in Newgate-street? A. I do not know; I cannot read - my master ordered me to stand there a few minutes.

JOHN LAWES . I am an inspector of the nightly watch, Farringdon ward. I was in Newgate-street on Saturday afternoon, the 22nd of December, and saw the prosecutor in the custody of the prisoner and Butler - they wished me to assist in taking him, as he resisted violently, and they could not get him along; they said he had been obstructing the passage - it took four of us to take him to

the Compter - when we got there he was very violent, and they were obliged to get him down to search him; it is usual to search every body who is taken into custody, and to take the property from them till they get before the Magistrate, that they may not be robbed there; he said before he got to the Compter that he had property about him, and it might be 100l., he could not tell; I saw the money taken from him; the silver was in a canvas bag, and there was 20l. worth of silver in four 5l. packages - that was done in the presence of us all; he had the 20l. in his outside jacket pocket - he was taken before the Magistrate on Monday, and a complaint made against him for obstructing the street - he was discharged; his employer came soon after, and took the 20l. of silver - I have the canvas bag; it was taken from him by Beaman - I saw him take it from his small-clothes pocket; he did not give it to me - I suspected there was something wrong, and was convinced the prisoner had put it in his pocket without giving an account of it with the rest of the money - this was just after the search on Saturday; I saw the packages sealed up, and I said to Beaman, "Is the canvas purse sealed up with the rest of the property?" and he said there was no canvas purse among his property; I was convinced there was one, for I had seen him take it out of the prosecutor's pocket - he denied a second time that there was any canvas bag; I described it, and he said there was none - I said I was convinced there was something wrong, and proposed that one and all of us should be searched before we left the Compter; I then saw that the prisoner was confused, and wanted to get away - I followed him very close, and saw his hand lift his great coat pocket up; he pulled his hand out of his trousers pocket, and I saw the purse in his hand - I said, "There in the purse," and he instantly threw it down; I did not pick it up - it was delivered to me; Butler picked it up - this was stated to the Magistrate, and he was committed; we do not usually take a man to the Compter for obstruction, but take the number of the cart, and summon the owner.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been an inspector? A. Above two years; I am not a candidate for a vacancy in the City Police - I do not wish to change my situation.

Q. You have heard the prosecutor say he was thrown down and knelt on, is that all a lie? A. He was on a chair at the time he was searched; when he first got to the Compter, he was knelt on, in consequence of his violent conduct; it was necessary - the 20l. was taken from him by another person, and I believe it was all put into Butler's hat; the bag was in his left-hand trousers pocket - the prisoner has been an officer ever since April; it was generally thought that he conducted himself well - he was taken before Mr. Cope, the marshal, and then he was at large till Monday, when he came to the office, and I charged him with stealing the purse, before Messrs. Aldermen Wood and Kelly; I saw the bag in the prisoner's hand - I saw him take it out of his pocket and drop it; I stood alongside of him - there might be six, seven, or eight persons in the room; Butler stood on one side of him and I on the other - Mr. Teague delivered the 20l. to the prosecutor's employer; Wilmot, I believe, took it from him, and sealed it up - he is a constable of Farringdon; it might be the prisoner who took it from him, as I did not see it taken.

WILLIAM GOULD . I was in the Compter when the prosecutor was there - I am a hair-dresser by trade, but am frequently employed on messages for Mr. Teague and others; I saw Clarke brought in - he resisted with a great deal of violence; I saw the money taken from him - I cannot exactly say who took his master's money from him, but I saw it in Wilmot's possession - I did not see the canvas bag; a search was afterwards proposed for the canvas bag, and I saw Beaman, with his right arm, pass the canvas bag behind Butler, and I immediately heard something drop - I looked down, and there was the canvas bag behind Butler; the silver was in it - he appeared before the Magistrate on Monday, and was charged with having stolen it - there were several officers belonging to the prison present; there was one to take care of the money as soon as it was taken from Clarke.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you an amateur attending at station-houses? A. No: I do not attend different gaols; I went to the Compter that night, to see if there was any message, and on other business - I cannot exactly tell what; if Mr. Teague has any thing to send, I am there to take it - I was never in Newgate, except when I have been employed there; I was never confined there - I have been to Whitecross-street with messages; I am not in the habit of attending other prisons; four or five officers were present at this search - I am not a candidate for a vacancy in the Police, and never applied for a situation there.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I am one of the Police. I was in Newgate-street when Clarke was laid hold of for obstructing the way - I was called by the inhabitants to move his cart, which stood before a door; I went up to the prosecutor, and desired him to move on quickly - he hesitated, and, in fact, got quite impudent, and said he would not move on; I told him to go on, and the prisoner and I moved him on - he was quite violent, and kept backing his horse into the road; he moved into Warwick-lane, and threatened to fight for a sovereign, and used very bad language - I told him he was obstructing the road; he moved into the middle of the lane, and said if I did not get out of the way he would run over me; I left him - he went into Newgate-market, he there left his cart, and came into Newgate-street; his conduct was very violent, and I said it was fit to take him to the station-house - we could not manage him; seeing Wilmot and Lawes we begged their assistance, and took him to the Compter - his conduct was so violent, it was necessary to throw him down, for he both hit and kicked; he was then put in a chair and searched - the contents were taken out of his pockets and placed in my hands; that was four parcels, which we afterwards delivered to his master - what I had was taken into the lobby, sealed up, and placed in the hands of the Governor; I did not see any thing else taken from Clarke's pocket - but Lawes said there was a purse; I said I had seen none, and I believe every body but Lawes said they saw no purse, and it was the wish of Lawes to go into the lobby to be searched - the prisoner stood by my side; I felt his hand go behind me, and immediately something dropped - I turned round, took up the purse, and gave it to Lawes.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you unwilling to take Clarke, or were you persuaded by the prisoner to take him? A. I thought fit to take him; it was the prisoner's duty

to search him - it was three o'clock; Lawes only came to assist - I have seen Gould at the Compter at times; I cannot say whether Clarke heard the inhabitants complain of his cart - I wished to take him before my inspector.

MR. TEAGUE. I am keeper of Giltspur-street Compter. I was attending at Guildhall when this happened - when a man is brought in, it is the practice to search him, to prevent his being robbed; the money was locked up in my desk, and when I came home I delivered it to Clark's master; one of the officers has the canvas bag - the officer who brought the prisoner in should search him, and take possession of the property; one of my turnkeys was present.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it customary to have persons brought to the Compter for obstructing the street? A. Every day - they generally take the cart to the Green-yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the purse in my hand, nor ever saw it.

JOHN LAWES . I saw the purse in his hand.

GUILTY. Aged 33

Recommended to Mercy . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-18

NEW COURT. THURSDAY, JANUARY 3RD.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

266. ROBERT CORD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 2 silver spoons, value 5s. , the goods of Timothy Bunn . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-19

267. JAMES WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December, 15 iron staples, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Miers .

WILLIAM LAKE PARR . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Miers, an ironmonger , of Whitechapel-road . On the 6th of December I saw the prisoner pass through the shop, about two o'clock in the afternoon - he went into the warehouse; I saw a bag under his arm, and followed him into the warehouse - I then saw he had a paper parcel of staples under his arm, partly concealed by the bag; I asked what he had there - he said he did not know, but he was going to take it to a person outside - it was a parcel of box staples; it had been kept in the shop, and I had seen it safe a few hours before.

Prisoner. He might see the parcel under my arm when I went through the shop. Witness. No, I did not see the parcel - the bag was not my employer's; I saw the parcel when I went into the warehouse; it was all covered with the bag but the card in front of it - he was buying a small quantity of hooping.

GUILTY . Aged 19*. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-20

268. DAVID WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 book, value 2s 6d. , the goods of John Thomas Noble .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-21

269. STEPHEN STEVENSON and SARAH STADLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 watch-chain, value 2l.; 4 seals, value 2l., and 1 key and book, value 2s., the goods of Gent Burton , from his person .

GENT BURTON. I am a servant out of place , and lodge in Crescent-street, Euston-square. On the 3rd of December I was at the King's Head, at the corner of Hampstead-road; the two prisoners came in there - I spoke to them, and they drank with me; I had not had much to drink - when I left I went out at the left-hand door, and they went out at the right; they came in contact with me again in the street, and asked me to go with them to their house, at No. 10. Eagle-street , which I did: we had some beer and gin there, which I paid for - I fell dead asleep for three or four hours; when I awoke I missed my watch, and my pocket had been ransacked - I lost some silver from my pockets; I had seen my watch safe about a quarter-past eleven o'clock, when I went down stairs; I had it safe when I went up into the room again where the prisoners were - it was between seven and nine o'clock in the morning when I went to the public-house; when I missed my watch I waited for about three hours - I then gave information to the Police; I had a loose watch-key in my pocket, and that key has since been attached to the chain of my watch and a seal has been taken off it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long had you been out of place? A. About two months - this took place on Monday morning; I had not been to bed the night before - I walked about all night; I was alone -I was out late on Sunday, and did not like to go home to disturb the persons in the house; I had been drinking brandy on Sunday - I was not drunk; I got to the King's Head about seven o'clock in the morning - I went out of the door intending to go home; I had no female with me, nor did I procure protection from any female in my way from the house, but there was a woman with the prisoners; I should not think we had as much as nine pots of beer or ale at their room; I believe we had not five half-pints of gin; I believe we had two half-pints of rum - I had lived with Mr. Hoggarty, the auctioneer, for sixteen months, and had 40l. a year - when I left him I had a cheque of him for 13l.; when I began this carousal on the Sunday I had a sovereign in my pocket; I cannot tell when I changed it- when I left the last public-house I had 13s. or 14s. - I did not ask the prisoner Stevenson if he had any money.

Q. Will you venture to swear that you did not ask him as soon as you got into his house, if he had any money? A. I cannot say that I did not, but I cannot see what I should ask him that for - I will not swear either way; I did not tell him I had no money, and ask him for some to buy the drink - I paid for what I had brought in; when I went to his house I was not drunk; I cannot say whether he told me he had 15s. saved up for his rent: we had the beer, the gin, and the rum at the prisoners' - I had two glasses of brandy and water at the public-house; I had no breakfast - the prisoner asked me for the money when he went to fetch the drink; he did not ask to be paid back what he had paid for drink, but he said I was indebted to him - that was in the evening, after he was apprehended; I did not tell him I did not mean to go home till night, and wanted some money for myself, nor that I knew a pawnbroker, at the corner of Stingo-lane, in York-street, who was a friend of mine, and ask him to borrow 30s. on my watch, in the name of Davies - there were two persons there, one was named Pye; I did not retire with any

female; I might go into another room, but I soon came out - I believe I went into two rooms.

THOMAS PLATTS . I am in the service of a pawnbroker, at the corner of York-street. On the 3rd of December I saw Stevenson at the shop, with a female, who I believe was Stadley; Stevenson put down this watch, and asked me 30s. for it - there was a chain, two seals, and a key attached to it; I took it to Mr. Dennings, one of my masters, and he told me to write the duplicate for it, which I did: Stevenson gave me the name of John Davies, Mitcham-street - he said the watch cost him fifteen guineas; and the woman said, "We took it for a debt."

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prisoners before? A. No; I did not know the watch and seals - I never said so; I did not know the prosecutor, nor did Mr. Dennings: I swear the prisoner said it cost him fifteen guineas, not 15s.; Mr. Dennings is ill, and could not attend here.

JOHN GORDON (Police-constable S 79). On Monday, the 3rd of December, I apprehended the prisoners in the Goat and Compasses, public-house, in the New-road, in company with another girl; I found on Stevenson five half-crowns, four shillings, a sixpence, and some copper, and on Stadley 3d. - I found also on Stevenson two pocket-books and two duplicates; I asked if they knew any thing concerning Burton's watch - they said they knew nothing about it; I said a person in their house had been robbed of his watch, chain, and seals: they both said they knew nothing about it, and had not seen any watch with him, and they were not afraid of me, whatever I could do, or words to that effect.

JOHN MILTON . I live with Mr. Alder, a pawnbroker, in Berwick-street, Soho. I have a seal, which I took in of Stevenson on 3rd of December for 2s. 6d.; there was no one with him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Stevenson's Defence. When the prosecutor came to my house, he asked if I was landlord; I told him I was - he asked if I had any money; I said Yes, 15s., to pay my rent: he said he had been out all night with a woman, and asked me to lend him the 15s. - I said if I did I must have it again; he said he would send me to a friend of his to get some; I then lent it him - we had nine pots of ale, five half-pints of gin, two half-pints of rum, and 1s. worth of bread and cheese; he gave me his watch about two o'clock, and told me to go and pawn it in the name of Davies - he gave the seal to a young woman; I took it for her to several places, but they would not lend me any thing on it, as they said it was only cased - I at last took it to this gentleman, who lent me half a crown on it; the officer took the money and duplicate from me, and the Magistrate asked him how he came to go to the pawnbroker's where the watch was, and he said something struck him to go there.

JOHN GORDON . No, I did not say so; I went to several pawnbrokers before I found it - the duplicate of the watch has not been found.

STEVENSON - GUILTY . Aged 35.

STADLEY - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-22

270. DENNIS READING was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 wrapper, value 1s. 6d., and 3 bed-ticks, value 5l. , the goods of William Haydon .

JOSEPH VENN. I live with my father in Smith-street, Clerkenwell. On the 4th of December I was in Goswell-street , about half-past six o'clock, and saw the prisoner jump up into a waggon, and take this parcel - I was in a cart, and told the driver of it; the prisoner got some distance before he was taken.

GEORGE WORT . I was driving the cart, and Venn was in it - he told me a man had jumped up in a waggon, and taken a parcel; I saw the prisoner running towards me: I got out of the cart, pursued, and took him with the parcel; I said, "You have taken this from a waggon" - he said, "I am going to take it to the waggon;" I said, "You are going a contrary way" - he said,"I am going to take it to my master;" I said, "Where is your master?" he said, "This is him," and pointed to a man, but the man went away; the officer then came up, and I left him.

JOHN MARTIN (Police-constable G 202). I took the prisoner and this parcel in Goswell-street-road; the parcel weighs about - cwt. - he had it in his arm; just as I came up he said he would take it to the waggon, and that he had picked it up.

THOMAS DOOLEY (Police-constable G 177). I took the parcel.

DANIEL COOK . I am in the employ of Mr. Haydon. I had charge of this parcel in my waggon on the 4th of December - I missed it.

WILLIAM HAYDON. I am proprietor of the waggon . I had this bale of goods in it - Cook was driving it; I was answerable for it; I had taken the order for the three bed-ticks in the morning - the parcel was packed safe in the waggon, and could not have fallen out; it was taken out in Goswell-street - the waggon was on the left side; the prisoner and parcel were on the other side.

JOSEPH DODMAN . I am apprentice to Mr. Brown, of the Red Lion inn. I received the parcel, and booked it.

BENJAMIN WINTRIDGE . I delivered the parcel at the Red Lion inn, Aldersgate-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the parcel fall out of the hind part of a waggon; I took it up, and called after the waggon - it fell in the road, and the mud is on it now; I told the officer I was going after the waggon - it is too heavy for a man to lift out of a waggon.

GUILTY .* Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-23

271. JANE RICKETTS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 4 sovereigns, and 2 sixpences, the monies of Adam Aberdeen , from his person .

ADAM ABERDEEN. I live in Stanhope-cottage, Brompton, and am a gardener . On the 10th of December I was walking along the path, at Brompton - I saw a woman walking on the same path in the same direction; I could not swear to her person or her dress, but I felt her hand in my pocket; I took her arm, and held it till the officer came - I told him I had been robbed of four sovereigns and two sixpences, and I thought I saw her throw it over the railing; the officer went, and found the same money which I had lost, wrapped in a bit of paper - I had it in my pocket when the woman accusted me, and never let her go till the officer took her.

JOHN POINTING (Police-constable T 6.) I received the prisoner into custody from the prosecutor between twelve and one o'clock; I got over the rails of a little garden, and found four sovereigns and two sixpences, about two yards from the prisoner - in taking her to the station-house, she said it did not signify between them, as she had had two children by him; one of our men said he had seen her and the prosecutor just before.

Prisoner. There were two or three women with him, and he was in that place with one of them; I was going by, he seized me, and because I would not comply with him he charged me with this.

ADAM ABERDEEN . I was not over in the garden, nor did I offer to take any liberties with the prisoner - there was no woman with me; I had had a few glasses of wine, but knew what I was about.

COURT. Q. Did you speak to her? A. No; she asked me to give her some drink - I do not know whether I made any reply; I had never seen her before.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-24

272. JOHN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 4 lbs. of bacon, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Clifford .

THOMAS CLIFFORD. I live in Upper Seymour-street , and am a cheesemonger . On the 11th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I missed a piece of bacon - this is it.

WILLIAM COX (Police-constable S 78.) I was on duty in Drummond-street - I saw the prisoner with three or four other boys - the prisoner had this bacon under his arm; I asked him what it was - he said bacon, which his father had bought in Brewer-street, and he lived at No. 10, Pancras-street, but I found that to be untrue.

Prisoner. He said there had been another boy in the shop.

THOMAS CLIFFORD. There had been a lad, but I did not see him take it.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a lad I knew, who asked me to carry the bacon.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18330103-25

273. THOMAS HOMEYARD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 child's dress, value 8s. , the goods of Anna Maria Bennet .

ANNA MARIA BENNET . I am a dress-maker , and live in Museum-street . On the 15th of December the prisoner and another lad came into my shop, and asked for a thimble - I went to serve them, and laid this dress on the counter; the prisoner was brought back with it in less than a minute; this is it.

JOSEPH PEARCE . I am a pot-boy, and live in Museum-street. I saw the prisoner and another lad in the shop -I saw the prisoner take the dress; I waited till he came out, and took him.

THOMAS SUMPTEN (Police-constable E 43.) I took the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, expressing his contrition, and stating that he had been seduced by the other boy. He received a good character.

GUILTY. - Aged 15. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18330103-26

274. ELEANOR HEDGES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 60 yards of printed cotton, value 4l.; 28 yards of calico, value 7s.; 9 yards of striped cotton, value 3s., and two pieces of carpet, value 2s., the goods of Henry Miles and another, her masters .

THOMAS BAILEY . I am foreman to Henry Miles and John Edwards, upholsterer s, Oxford-street . The prisoner was in their service nearly two years, as needlewoman - there is a printed regulation stuck on a board, at the entrance of the workshop, which states, that no one is allowed to take any thing off the premises, however small, as it would be considered a felony; on the 7th of December some property was missing - the workmen were searched, but nothing was found on them; the prisoner gave her address at No. 4, Tottenham-place - she went there with Mr. Edwards and me; we found a large quantity of my employers' property, and she then produced two pieces of print from her person, which she said she had taken that day while the men were gone to dinner, and asked me to say what I could in her favour - I know several of these from the pieces which they were cut off, which I have here, and I know the whole of these to be patterns which are made for my employers only.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Some of these are very small bits? A. Yes, but they are valuable - several of them cost us 4s. 6d. a yard; we do not sell any cotton in pieces, but made up into furniture.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-27

275. WILLIAM HERD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 2 candlesticks, value 3s. , the goods of George Gibson .

GEORGE GIBSON. I keep the Craven Arms public-house, at Westminster . On the night of the 28th of November I lost these two candlesticks.

EDWARD FUSSELL . I live in New-street, Vincent-square. On the 28th of November I was at the Craven Arms - the prisoner came in there while I was in the parlour; he said there was a very sad fire - I asked where, and he pointed towards Oxford-street; I went out to see it - he followed me, and said if I would go to the corner I should see it quite plain; I went there, but there was no fire - I then went back to the house, and found the two candles on the table, burning; when I went out they were in candlesticks - the candlesticks were then gone, and the prisoner also.

RICHARD JACOBS . I am a broker, and live in Green-court. On the night in question the prisoner came, about ten minutes before nine o'clock, and asked if I would buy one of these candlesticks; I asked if it was his own - he said, "Do you think I stole it?" I said, "I don't know, but you will have no objection to write down your name;" I gave him pen and paper, and he wrote down, "William Steward, 37, Windmill-street;" I then said, "I shall go and see if you live there:" he went with me some distance, and then ran from me - I pursued, and cried, Stop thief! he fell down, and broke the other candlestick; he was then taken.

Prisoner. When I went to his shop he got out of his bed, drunk; I wrote down this direction, and was going to show him the place; he would go a contrary

way, and I ran from him - I was going along, and saw three young men looking into a shop; they asked me to buy the candlesticks, and I gave them 1s. 6d. for them - I wanted the money, and went to sell one of them.

JOHN BALDWIN (Police-constable C 103). I took the prisoner in Crown-court - he was running, and fell down; I asked him in going along what made him take the candlestick - he said his grandmother gave it to him - when we got to the watch-house I found this other one broken on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-28

276. GEORGE GIBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 2 shoes, value 3s. , the goods of John Marchant .

JOHN MARCHANT , JUN. I am in the employ of my father, John Marchant, a shoemaker , who lives in John-court, Marylebone-lane . On the night of the 6th of December I saw the prisoner, with two others, standing next door to our shop - he left the other two, went to our shop window, put his hand through a square of glass, which I had taken out that day, and took out this pair of shoes; he put them under his pinafore, and went to his companions - he had made more attempts than one to take them; he took them off a nail - I went and took him; his two companions ran away - he asked me to forgive him.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON (Police-constable D 4). I took the prisoner; I asked who was with him - he said nobody, but that he was going to put the shoes on and wear them - he had a good pair on at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 9. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-29

277. WILLIAM ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Dalziell , from his person .

JOHN DALZIELL. I live in Lisson-grove. On the 7th of December I was at the Court of King's Bench , and lost this handkerchief out of my pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see a man in a brown coat near you? A. Yes, about half an hour before.

WILLIAM RAYNOR , JUN. I live in Gardner's-lane, Kingston. I was in the Court of King's Bench on the 7th of December; I saw the prosecutor there - the prisoner was standing behind him; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and put it into his own hat - he then passed me- I touched the prosecutor, and when the prisoner got to the curtains he attempted to run, but I followed, and caught hold of his arm; I told him to stop - he said, "What have I done?" he turned over his hat, and the handkerchief fell out - I called my father, who took him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see a man in a brown coat? A. Yes; I did not know him.

WILLIAM RAYNOR , SEN. (Police-constable A 70). I was in the Court, and took the prisoner - he said he had not done any thing; this handkerchief was given to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I stood an hour and a half there - as I was coming out a man came behind me with a brown coat on; this young man then said, "I think you have taken a gentleman's handkerchief;" I said I had not - the man in the brown coat then dropped this handkerchief, and went away - the witness left me, and went for the usher; I might have gone away - when the officer took me, he said he knew the man in the brown coat to be a thief, and asked if I would tell him where he lived; I said I did not know - he said, "Well, there has been a robbery, and if you won't tell you must go."

WILLIAM RAYNOR, JUN. I am quite sure it was the prisoner picked the pocket, and when he came out he had his hat doubled up - when I took him he dropped the handkerchief from his hat; the man in the brown coat was two or three persons behind him.

WILLIAM RAYNOR, SEN. I know the man who had the brown coat on, but I had no conversation with the prisoner about him.

GUILTY *. Aged 37. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-30

178. THOMAS MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 pair of of bellows, value 2s. , the goods of John Bosworth .

ROBERT HUGHES . I live in Phoenix-street, Somer's-town, and am a broker. On the 27th of December the prisoner came to my shop, and offered me a lock for sale - having heard some inquiry about it, I said I should send for an officer; he ran off - I pursued, but could not stop him: but I saw this pair of bellows taken from under his arm - they were taken to my shop, and I gave them and the lock to the officer; he told me where he lived, and we found him behind a palliasse at his father's - his father denied his being at home.

WILLIAM COX (Police-constable S 78). I produce the bellows, which I received from Hughes - I went with him to apprehend the prisoner.

JOHN BOSWORTH . I live in Seymour-street , and keep a toy-shop . These are my bellows - I did not miss them till they were brought to me; I had seen them safe that day in my shop - I do not remember seeing the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in his shop - my brother picked up the lock, and asked me to sell it; I went with it, and met a boy who I knew, who asked me to sell the bellows, and he would give me 2d. or 3d. - I went to sell the lock and could not; I ran off, and a man took the bellows from under my arm.

WILLIAM COX. When I found the prisoner concealed, as has been stated, I said I wanted him concerning a lock he said, "My father gave me the lock;" but his father who was there, said he knew nothing about it - I then asked the prisoner if he had offered a pair of bellows - he said he knew nothing about them; but afterwards he said, "Be as favourable as you can to me, I will tell you the truth," and he showed me the shop where he offered them.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Fourteen Days , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18330103-31

279. WILLIAM AINSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 sack, value 1s., and 2 cwt. of potatoes, value 5s. , the goods of John Farrow .

JOHN FARROW . I am a farmer , and live at Upway, in Essex - the prisoner was in my employ as a carter . On the 4th of December I sent him with fifteen sacks of potatoes to Bethnal-green-road - there were 252 lbs. in each

sack; we call them 2 cwt. - they were to be delivered to William White; they were worth 5s. 6d. a sack - he was not authorized to sell them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. He had been some time in your service? A. Yes, he had been twice in my service - perhaps about six months this last time; I am told he has a wife and five children.

JOSHUA STONE (Police-constable K 228). I was standing at the corner of Three Colt-street, on the morning of the 4th of December and saw the prisoner with a cart; David Simmons , the ostler, came up to him, and I saw the prisoner untie a rope at the back of his cart - Bannister came up to me; the prisoner saw me speaking to him - he and the other then went away; I and Bannister went to the corner of the next street, where Bannister laid down, and he said to me, "They have got them;" we ran to the place -Simmons came up to me, and said, "Will you have a glass of gin;" I said, No, I did not want it; the prisoner had then gone into the public-house - I went to an alley, into which they had carried them; I found the potatoes and sack there - I went into the house, and took the prisoner; he said Mr. Farrow gave him liberty to sell the potatoes on the road, and he would have taken the money to the person he was to take the potatoes to - Simmons said he was to give 6s. for them.

GEORGE BANNISTER (Police-constable K 234). I was with Stone, and saw the prisoner undoing the rope - another man then took a sack of potatoes off the back of the cart; Simmons, the ostler, went with him down an alley - the prisoner went into the tap-room of the public-house; I asked him what he had been doing - he said his master allowed him to do so, he should make the money good to Mr. White.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-32

280. ROBERT BARRON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 3 live tame fowls, price 4s. , the property of Joshua Thompson .

WILLIAM JONES (Police-constable E 46). On the 16th of December I was in Sussex-street , and heard a noise in Mr. Thompson's area - I waited about a quarter of an hour, and then saw the prisoner's head and shoulders protrude through the railing; I seized him - he let fall three fowls in his hat - I pursued him for a quarter of a mile, and took him- when I brought him back I found the fowls were quite warm; he kicked his shoes off to run the quicker.

JOSHUA THOMPSON . I live in Sussex-street, and keep an oil-shop . I lost four fowls; they had been kept in the front area - I recovered three of them, but they were dead I have the feet of them, and know them.

THOMAS EMM . I lodge at the prosecutor's. I picked up the fowls on the pavement in front of his house on the night of the 16th of December.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330103-33

281. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 basket, value 4s.; 8 loaves of bread, value 5s.; half a peck of flour, value 1s. 6d., and 1 quart of oatmeal, value 4d. , the goods of Henry Stone .

ARTHUR DEATH . I live in James-place, Hoxton , and am a baker. On the 14th of December I was in the bakehouse, and saw Mills place his basket on the pavement, and leave it there; the prisoner came up in about a minute, he took the basket, and walked with it down Ivy-lane; I followed him, and said, "This don't belong to you;" he said, "For God's sake, don't take me;" he threw it down - I jumped over it, and took him.

JOSEPH YEOWELL . I am a baker, and live in Temple-street, Hackney-road. I was in the bakehouse with Death - I saw Mills put the basket down, and the prisoner take it.

JOHN MILLS . I am in the employ of Mr. Henry Stone. I was out delivering bread; I put my basket down, containing the bread and the other articles - I found it again in Ivy-lane; it was my master's.

JOHN BRAUND (Police-constable N 199). I took the prisoner, and have the basket, the flour and oatmeal.

Prisoner. I saw the basket, and took it up to take it to Shoreditch workhouse - I was in great distress, and thought I should get a trifle for it.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330103-34

282. CHARLES DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 2 lbs. weight of bristles, value 39s. , the goods of Robert Rudland .

ROBERT RUDLAND . I am a brush-maker , and live in Shoreditch . On the morning of the 7th of December I was called into my shop, and saw the prisoner; he looked out brooms, brushes and various other articles, to the amount of 8l. or 9l.; among which were 2 lbs. of shoemaker's bristles - I was going to pick them out from the other articles; he said "Stop, we will pack them so and so" - I said "If you do, you will spoil them" - he said, "Never mind, they will be undone on Monday morning, or perhaps on Sunday night;" he then said he wanted some closing-hairs; I went backwards to get them, leaving him in the shop; when I returned, he said he expected his cart to call for the goods, and begged me not to detain him; he then went away; the hamper in which the goods were packed remained with me, but no cart came, and the next morning I opened it, and missed the 2 lbs. of bristles - they were worth a guinea a pound.

Cross-examined by Mr. DOANE. Q. What time was this? A. Between eight and nine o'clock in the morning - my man was in my shop, and my wife came in once or twice - she was waiting breakfast for me, but I would not leave the prisoner as he was in such a hurry to be off.

EDWARD KING . I am a street-keeper, and took the prisoner in another shop - I found 6d. in his pocket.

Prisoner. I went to buy some goods of him, but I could get them cheaper; there was a boy and a man in the shop.

MR. RUDLAND. When I returned with the closinghairs, he told me to put some other goods on the top of the hamper, which was done, and then he went away; I then finished the invoice, and expected him back - I had put the bristles in one paper in the middle of the hamper, but he would have them put into two papers; and he moved them or three times - how he got them out, I do'nt know.

JURY. Q. Might not your boy or your shopman have taken them? A. They were in the shop, and might have taken them as well as the prisoner - but I have every confidence in them.

Q. Did the package remain in the shop all day? A. Yes, but it was packed up and corded within three quarters of an hour after the prisoner left, and remained so till the next morning, when I opened it.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-35

283. CHARLES DUNN was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 2 lbs. weight of bristles, value 38s. , the goods of George Edward James Perkins King .

GEORGE EDWARD JAMES PERKINS KING . I am a brush-maker , and live at No. 116, Bunhill-row . On the 15th or 16th of October, the prisoner came to my shop about half-past seven o'clock in the morning - he asked if I supplied goods wholesale at the trade price; I said I did - he then left me a written list of articles, which came to about 3l., and they were to be ready by seven o'clock the next morning; he called at seven in the morning for them - there were three dozen of broom-heads, scrubbing-brushes, shoe-brushes, and other things, according to his order; he assisted me in putting them into a package, and as we were putting them in, I called them over for his satisfaction - he then asked the price of bristles; I told him a guinea a pound, but I wanted him to have some of an inferior quality with them; he said he should be much obliged to me to let him have them, and I did on condition of his taking some more brushes - I then weighed him out 2 lbs. of bristles; I should have tied them in one parcel, but it was his wish that they should be put separate, which was done; I then put them into the hamper myself - he then purchased some other goods, some of which I put into the hamper, and some he put in; he then went away, and said he would call in ten minutes with a cart, or his cart, and take them - I had fastened the hamper down before he left the shop, concluding the bristles were inside; I never saw him again till he was in custody - as he did not return, I opened the hamper the next morning, and the bristles were missing; they were worth 1l. 18s. in the trade - all the other things were the same as they were put in.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You put them in yourself? A. Yes - I did not leave the shop, but I did not see him take them out of the hamper; I was on the other side of the counter - my brother was in the shop part if not all of the time; I had only gone into the back warehouse at first to get the hamper; - the prisoner ran away, as he said he was in a hurry to get his cart; the goods he ordered were such as a general dealer in the country would be likely to want - I concluded he was such a person.

JAMES KING . I am the prosecutor's brother. I have heard what he has stated; it is correct - I saw the hamper opened the next day, and the bristles were missing.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Transported Seven Years longer .

Reference Number: t18330103-36

284. SAMUEL DEE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 seal, value 20s., and 1 watch-key, value 6d. , the goods of Martha Ward .

MARTHA WARD. I live in Princes-row, Pimlico ; I am a widow , and have two children. On the 20th of November the prisoner came to my house - he lodged with me seven years ago; he called that day to ask how I was - I turned my back to go to the street door, to see after one of my children; I had a watch, a seal, and a key in my work-box; he staid five or six minutes after I returned to the room, and then he left - in a few minutes I went to look what time it was, and missed my watch; it was a large silver watch, and had a gold key - I found it in pledge.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. When had you seen it before he called? A. About half an hour; my mother was there and went with me to the street door, but no one else was there; he pawned it in his own name, at Mr. Townsend's, but he is not here.

JOHN COLLIS (Police-constable A 48.) I took the prisoner on the 4th December - I told him what he was charged with - he said he knew nothing of it, but at the station he said he took it through poverty, and intended to return it in a little time; he said he had pawned it near Covent-garden, and had lost the duplicate.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-37

285. CHARLES DOLLEY was indicted for stealing on the 24th of November , 1 chaise, value 25l. , the goods of Louis Martinelli .

LOUIS MARTINELLI . I am a coach-maker , and live in Albany-street, New-road . On the 24th of November the prisoner came to my shop, and said he wanted to hire a gig for a fortnight, to go a journey into the country, for Fry's house in the City; he asked how much it was a week - I told him a guinea; he said he had but 18s. a week for it from his employer, and after some time I agreed to lend it him for a fortnight, for 32s.; he said his employer had a new one building for him, which would be ready in about that time - he was then a tenant of mine, and I had no doubt but that he was in Messrs. Fry's service. About two hours afterwards, a country - looking man called for the gig, and I let him have it - on the 4th of December I received this letter - (read).

Andover, December 1, 1832.

SIR, - I am very sorry to inform you, that I have had a very serious accident with your chaise on last Thursday, at Andover, in Hampshire. As I was standing at a shop in Andover, my horse did take fright, and ran away, and unfortunately broke your chaise almost to atoms; the axletree and wheels are quite asunder; likewise the shafts and the body were so far injured, that it was quite incapable of moving it to town; therefore I have left it with my uncle at Down, ports-town, in Hampshire, and I shall arrive in town on Friday, when I will call upon you.

I am your's, &c., CHARLES DOLLEY.

P.S. I have forwarded this letter by a coachman whom I know.

L. MARTINELLI. On the Saturday morning after, the prisoner called, and said he was very sorry, but a waggon was going by, and he thought the man must have smacked his whip and the horse set off, broke the gig to atoms, and he had left it with his uncle to sell - I said I would not have it sold; I would have it sent up if it were in one hundred pieces - he said he would write to his uncle, and I should hear from him; on the Tuesday he called - he said he had not received a letter, but he expected one by hand; he called again about half-past two,

and produced a letter from his uncle, stating that it was sold for five guineas - I said I should wish to see his uncle; he said he would be in town at Christmas, and settle with me - he then went away; I went to Fry's, and asked if such a person travelled for them - they said No; I then went to Tattersall's, and made some inquiries about the horse - the prisoner said after he was in custody, that he had taken the gig to Robertson's, in Little Britain, and pawned it for 4l., but he intended to redeem it, and let me have it back again - I went to where he said he had pawned it, and found that they had sent it to the Talbot Inn, and it was gone into the country - he offered to give me a bill at a month for the value.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What did you mean to take for it? A. I would not have taken any sum, but I did not tell him that.

HENRY AGATE . I am clerk to Mr. Robertson, of Little Britain. On the 24th of November the prisoner brought a gig, and said he wanted an advance on it -I let him have 4l.; he said we were to sell it at ten guineas, and in the event of its not being sold before the following Thursday, we were to sell it by auction to the highest bidder; we sold it on the Wednesday for 10l. - he called on the Thursday; I said it was sold - he asked to have the account made out, and he received the balance; there was 14s. deducted, 10s. for commission, and 4s. for standing.

JOHN BISHOP . I live at Bodmin - I bought the gig on the 28th of November, for 10l.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 12th of December, in Earnest-street; I told him I had a warrant against him for stealing a chaise from Mr. Martinelli - he said he knew where it was; it was in the country, broken, but what he had to say, he should say in another place - he then said he wished to speak to Mr. Martinelli in private; I said no, I must hear it; he then said he had left it at Mr. Robertson's for 4l., and they had sold it without his order - I found on the prisoner a receipt for a gun, and this letter, which appears to be a copy of one from the country. - (read)

DEAR NEPHEW, - I received your letter on the ninth instant, and according to your request, I feel a pleasure in answering it, but I am very sorry to inform you that the chaise was sold last Tuesday, for 5l. 5s., and when I come to town at Christmas I will settle with you for it. I am yours, J. COLEMAN.

Prisoner's Defence. When I hired the chaise I was fully sensible that when I returned from the country I should have some money from my father's executors; it was my full intention to redeem it and take it home what I said was merely to get time to redeem it.

WILLIAM SHARP . I work in a stable; I received directions from the prisoner to attend the sale at Mr. Robertson's on the 29th of November, to prevent the gig being sold - I went there, and was to bid more money than any body else, to buy it in, but it had been sold the day before.

COURT. Q. Who did you see? A. I asked a person named Goodge to go and inquire for me - I did not go into the office myself.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-38

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

286. WILLIAM BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , one pair of bellows, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of James Spenceley .

WILLIAM RICE . On the 17th of December I was passing the prosecutor's shop, in Goodge-street, Tottenham-court-road , at half past four o'clock - I saw the prisoner at the door; he looked round two or three times - I crossed the road, saw him go into the shop, and bring out this pair of bellows; I went up to him, and said,"What have you got there?" he said, "I have had these given to me" - I took him back.

ELIZA JONES . I live with Mr. James Spenceley , and assist in the shop; these bellows are his, and had been hanging on a post a little way inside his shop; I missed them when my attention was called to them; I had left the shop for a few moments.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330103-39

287. DANIEL FITZGERALD and WILLIAM JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of William Day , from his person .

WILLIAM DAY . I am a solicitor . I was in Oxford-street on the 30th of December, about half-past five o'clock, near the Pantheon; I heard a noise behind me; I turned, and saw Fitzgerald just behind me, in custody of a person - I saw my handkerchief in his hand; I took it, and began to punish him, but the person who had him told me to desist, and said he was an officer - I did not see Johnson.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. On the Sunday evening in question, I was returning from the City with a friend - I saw the prosecutor cross Oxford-street, and the two prisoners ran after him: when he got on the pavement, Fitzgerald went up and took the handkerchief out of his pocket; Johnson was by him at the time - they were in company together: I seized Fitzgerald, with the handkerchief - Johnson ran off but I called to my friend, who caught him, and brought him to the station-house.

JOHN DAWSON . I am a mason. I was with this officer, and saw him take Fitzgerald with the handkerchief in his hand; but I had not seen it taken from the prosecutor - Johnson ran off - I caught him.

FITZGERALD - GUILTY .* Aged 15.

JOHNSON - GUILTY .* Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-40

288. MARY HAMILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 bag, value 1d., and 20 sovereigns, the property of William Carter , from his person .

WILLIAM CARTER . I am a mariner . On the 13th of December I was in a street, which I do not know the name of; we had come up with a cargo of coals to St. Katharine's dock , and I was going on board my ship - I was with a friend of mine; and we got a glass or two of grog, and were rather merry - I got dogged by a person who robbed me of all I had; it was a woman about the prisoner's pitch - I do not know that she spoke to me at all; but it was a woman about her size, and I could not get on board my ship for her; I had my watch in my fob, and a bag with twenty sovereigns in my right hand pocket, because I have but one hand - I have seen the purse since, and know it - I was half and half.

JOHN EASTERROOK (Police-constable K 25). On the Friday night after this robbery, I saw the prosecutor, and heard of his loss, and on the Sunday morning, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner driving in a cab along the highway; she inquired for the White Swan, which was not open, but the Ship and Shears was, and she went there - I watched her, and saw her treating some persons out of the cab; she then went into the Ship and Shears, and was offering every body gin, or what they liked to take - I went up to her, and asked if she had any money; she answered rather vague - I saw her put her hand into her pocket, and put it down by her side; I took hold of her hand, and found in it thirteen sovereigns, 7s., and some halfpence, and in her pocket I found three half-crowns; I asked where she got it, but she was too drunk to tell - I took her to the watch-house; I asked her next morning where she had got it: she said a captain had given her 5l., and the rest she had saved up - I said hers must be a very good trade; she then said that two homeward bound seaman, had given her some - I found on her this bag, which the prosecutor identified.

WILLIAM CARTER . This is my bag; I cannot say the prisoner is the person - I am sure I never gave my watch or money away.

COURT. Q. Did you go into any house with the person? A. If I did it was but for a moment; I had nothing to drink with her - I did not drop my bag, nor my watch.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-41

289. THOMAS HARDING and WILLIAM LENERMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 copper, value 10s., the goods of John Windsor , and fixed to a building : against the Statute.

WILLIAM ELLIOTT (Police-serjeant 18 D). I was in Great James-street, Lisson-grove, on the 8th of December, about eleven o'clock at night; I saw a donkey-cart coming towards me - Harding was in the cart, beating the donkey, and two others were walking by the side of it, in fustian jackets, one of whom I believe was Lenerman, but I did not see his face; I followed the cart to Lisson-grove, when Harding jumped out of it, and they all three ran off - I took hold of the donkey, and a man named Page came up; I said to him, "What have you got in the cart?" he said a copper - I took it to the station, and found two coppers in it; I went in search, and in about two hours I saw the two prisoners in Bell-street, in company - I said to Lenerman, "You are the man I want for a felony, about a copper;" "Aye, aye," he said - I then turned to Harding, and said, "You are the other man I want;" he said, "Don't handle me, and I will go with you;" I took them into a shop, and handcuffed them - I found on Harding a latch-key and a shilling, and on Lenerman a handle of a door; on the left shoulder of Harding's coat I saw some soot and dirty mortar - I asked him how he came by it, and he said in the public-house where he had been sitting; I found a copper had been stolen from No. 7, Charles-street.

Cross-examined by MR. FRENCH. Q. When you saw the cart was Lenerman with it? A. He was walking by the side of it; I knew him before, but I did not see his face - I knew him by his dress - I followed them, and did not lose sight of them; they were not driving furiously -I came up with them in about five minutes; it wanted five minutes to eleven o'clock - when they saw me they ran off; there was plenty of light to see them - when I took them before Mr. Rawlings, on Monday morning, he asked if I saw Lenerman's face - I said I did not, but I was positive it was him, at least I verily believed it was him; I did not see him have any thing to do with the copper.

WILLIAM HORSFORD (Police-constable D 6). On the Friday, I had some suspicion of three men, and about nine o'clock that night, I saw Lenerman and Groom come down William-street - they then parted; I followed Lenerman, and when I got to another street, I saw them together again - on the Saturday, at a quarter-past six o'clock, I saw Harding and Lenerman in the street, they stood five minutes and Groom joined them; I went and visited some of my men, and when I returned I saw Lenerman and Harding in Great James-street - I went away, and left them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know when the coppers were stolen? A. Yes, on Saturday, from No. 5, and No. 7, Charles-street; Mr. Windsor's house is No. 7.

JAMES PAGE . I am a wood-chopper, and live in Grove-street, Lisson-grove. On that Saturday night Groom came and asked me to lend him my little donkey-cart, and I went with it to Little Charles-street, in Great James-street , to No. 31 or 32, not to Mr. Windsor's; I left the cart in custody of Groom and Harding - Sheen and Lenerman were there; I stood in sight, and never lost sight of them; I saw Harding in the cart - Groom and Lenerman went into the house, brought out two coppers, and put them into the cart; I suppose it was about half-past ten o'clock - they then took the cart down into the grove; they then left - the officer came up to me, and asked what I had got- I told him; they had agreed to give me 1s. 6d. to take the coppers to St. Giles'; they all ran away - the officer took the cart, coppers, and me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Groom hired the cart? A. Yes; Harding had nothing to do with hiring it, but he was in the cart when Groom and Lenerman brought the coppers out; it was out of No. 31, but I cannot say whose house it was; it is a private house, and I have heard that Lenerman lodged there - I saw nothing brought from Windsor's.

Cross-examined by MR. FRENCH. Q. Will you swear that Lenerman lodged there? A. No, it is only what I have heard; I had never seen him before, but I can swear to him - I was in bed when Groom called me.

ELIZABETH WINDSOR . I am the wife of John Windsor - we live at No. 7, Charles-street. This is our copper- I had seen it safe at one o'clock on the Saturday, and put a pail of water in it.

Cross-examined by MR. FRENCH. Q. Was it fixed firmly in the brick work? A. Yes.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How far is your house from No. 31? A. It is quite the other end of the street - I know the copper by a nail in the bottom of it, which I drove in myself, when some person made a hole in it; I have seen it fitted to the brick-work.

Lenerman's Defence. I was drinking in the Stingo

about eight o'clock that night; Groom came in, and we had two or three pots of beer and a drop of gin - he then asked if I would go to Oxford-street with him, as he had something to take there - I asked Harding, and we agreed to go; Groom then went and got the cart, and asked Harding if he would drive it, as he was rather in liquor, which he did - I never saw the coppers till I was in custody; it is my brother who lodged at the house in Charles-street.

HARDING - GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined 6 Months .

LENERMAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330103-42

290. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of December , 1 flour-tub, value 6d.; 3 lbs. of flour, value 1s.; 4 loaves of bread, value 1s. 6d.; 4 lbs. of cheese, value 3s., and 8 ozs. of butter, value 6d. , the goods of James Lomas .

MARY SLOW . I live with Mr. James Lomas , a surgeon , in Dorset-street . We lost this property from the safe in the area; I saw it safe on the 22nd of December, at half-past nine o'clock - I then locked the safe, and at six the next morning I missed the property; this is the flour-tub, which I can swear to - there is no area door; they got over the railings.

MICHAEL SEABRIGHT . I am a Policeman. On the morning of the 23rd of December a man ran up, and said he saw two fellows come out of a house in Dorset-street - I ran there, and found the prisoner with this property; he said he was guilty of stealing the things, and was very sorry - he dropped this little jemmy - I took it up.

Prisoner. I had the property, but another man got it out of No. 40; I did not steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-43

291. JOHN KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 6 lbs. weight of cheese, value 4s. , the goods of Joseph Dunford .

JOSEPH DUNFORD . I live in Little Chesterfield-street . I received information, and missed two cheeses off another cheese on my counter, about a quarter-past two o'clock in the day - I have not seen them since.

MARY ARNOLD . I live opposite the prosecutor. On the 9th of December I was going on an errand for my mother, and saw a boy with two cheeses at the first door round the corner, close to the prosecutor's shop, about a quarter before two o'clock; there was a tin ticket on the cheeses, with a blue ground, and a yellow figure of six on it - the boy was in quite a different dress to the prisoner; I cannot say he was the boy.

FRANCIS CUNDELL . I saw a boy close by the prosecutor's, with two Dutch cheeses under his arm - he had corderoy trousers on, and I firmly believe the prisoner is the boy, but he has changed his dress; I have seen him about Marylebone these two years.

WILLIAM HOOKER (Police-constable D 3). I took the prisoner from information - he asked what it was for; I said, "For the cheese;" I took him to a shop to search him, and he there said, "Now let us hear all about the two cheeses."

Prisoner's Defence. These are all the clothes I have; I was having my dinner at the time they say they were taken - I went to a public-house to get half a pint of beer; the waiter asked this girl if I was the boy, and she said I was not.

JURY to FRANCIS CUNDELL . Q. Had you no suspicion that it was not all right? A. Yes, and I said so to a friend; I had a great mind to go and take him, but being Sunday I would not; the prisoner had been to the prosecutor's for a slice of bacon just before.

JOSEPH DUNFORD . Yes, I had served him with 1d. loaf and a slice of bacon - he has frequented my shop for some time.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-44

292. THOMAS MONDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 1 pair of trousers, value 6s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of George Baker .

GEORGE BAKER . I live with my parents, in Fleet-row, Leather-lane ; my father is a porter. I have known the prisoner some years - he came to me some time before this happened, and said he was in great distress: I took him in from charity, and he lived with my father and 1 for a fortnight; I missed the articles stated on the 3rd of December, from my bed-room - the prisoner did not go to bed that night; he said he was so cold he could not sleep - I went to bed, and in the morning I missed the articles, and the prisoner was gone.

SAMUEL CANNON BARNETT . I am a pawnbroker. I have the property, which was pawned by the prisoner on the 3rd of December, for 6s., in the name of Robinson.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-45

293. MARTIN MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 1 copper, value 18s., the goods of Thomas Pye , and fixed to a certain building of his ; against the Statute, &c.

DAVID JONES (Police-constable B 135.) On the 14th of December I saw this copper in the possession of a man named Plummer, in Sloane-square, Chelsea - he went into the Star and Garter public-house; I went in, and asked him where he got it - he said at a marine-store shop in Queen-street, Pimlico; I took him there, and found Mrs. Martin - I took her and Plummer to the station, and then Martin went with the serjeant, and found the prisoner.

LUKE NIXON (Police-serjeant B 16.) I went with Martin to a building at Westminster - the prisoner was not there; we went to another place, and found him: he ran away when he saw me - he went to Eliza-place, and hid himself in a bed; I took him to the watch-house - I found half a crown and a sixpence on him; I believe he is a bricklayer's labourer.

LOUISA MARTIN . I keep a marine-store shop, at No. 7, Queen-street, Pimlico. I bought the copper of the prisoner; I had seen him before - he lived in the neighbourhood - I bought it about half-past five o'clock in the evening of the 12th of December, for 7s., at the rate of 6d. a pound; I asked whose it was, and he said it was all right - I sold it for 11s. on the 14th, to Plummer.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. I am told you keep a green shop? A. No; I very seldom buy things, but if any thing comes in I think is fair, I buy it; I have known

Plummer two years, but I never bought any thing of him; I have sold him things - he lives on Chelsea-common.

THOMAS PYE . The house is mine; a copper was stolen from it, which I had of Mr. Dobbins; I cannot swear to it.

JAMES DOBBINS . I sent this copper to Mr. Pye's - I know it to be the same; I did not see it after it was set.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you manufacture coppers? A. No, I deal in them, and here is a mark on this, by which I know it.

ANN LYNCH . I was in Martin's shop when the prisoner brought this copper, and asked what she gave a pound for it; she said 6d. if it was clear copper - it weighed 14 lbs., and she gave him 7s.; she asked if it was his - he said it was all right, and it might be put at the door for sale.

GEORGE STEVENSON . There were two coppers sent to one of Mr. Pye's houses, and they were set there - I saw them safe.

JOSEPH LASSAM . I set the coppers.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of stealing it; I did not know where it came from.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-46

294. EDWARD PRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 parasol, value 2s , the goods of James Mundy .

JAMES MUNDY . I keep a shop in William-street, Lisson-grove - I lost this parasol, but I was not at home at the time.

CHARLES CLARKE (Police-constable D 117.) I stopped the prisoner with this parasol, about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's shop, about nine o'clock in the evening, on the 14th of December; it was under his coat - he said he brought it from home.

JAMES MUNDY . This is mine; the hook of it was left in the window - I lost several the same evening; I saw this one safe at half-past six o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it, and paid for it.

GUILTY *. Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-47

295. DAVID SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 14 yards of silk, value 2l., the goods of John Graham , his master .

ROBERT PARKYN . I have the management of Mr. John Graham's business; he is a linen-draper , and lives in Holborn . On the 27th of December, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner conceal a piece of silk, in a recess behind the counter; I secreted myself in the carpet-room, and in a few minutes I saw him take the silk from the recess, place it on the counter, and cut off some of it; I then came out, and sent him up stairs to his tea - I then told Mr. Graham, who sent for him, and desired him to produce the silk; he put his hand into his hind coat-pocket, and produced the silk - we sent for the officer, and gave him into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Is it not customary to put silks there? A. Not where this was placed; there were some shawls upon it - they would have been removed at night; I believe Mr. Graham had a good character with the prisoner - he had been with him for some time; I never heard any thing against him before - Mr. Graham said, "Produce the property you have robbed me of instantly;" and he pulled this out of his coat-pocket.

JOHN JOHNSON (Police-constable D 117.) I took the prisoner; in going to the station I asked how he could be so foolish as to commit the robbery - he said he did it with the intention of sending it to his sister.

Prisoner's Defence. There were three bales of goods on the end of the counter; the witness could not see me from the carpet-room - he came to me, and asked me for a ladies address, which I gave him, and then he told me to go to tea as soon as I could - when I got up I heard a voice calling Scott; I came down and met Mr. Graham, who took me into the counting-house, and asked what was the last thing I had cut - I said fourteen yards of silk, which I intended to send to my sister, and to pay for, as is common in the trade; I believe Mr. Parkyn has done in the same way.

MR. PARKYN. I never did; he brought this silk from the silk counter, and placed it on the side where silk is not sold - had it been on the silk side, I should not have thought of it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-48

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, JANUARY 4TH.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

296. SABIN GREY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , at St. Marylebone, 1 purse, value 1s., and 10 sovereigns, the property of Charles Francis Arundell , in the dwelling-house of Henry Raymond Arundell .

CHARLES FRANCIS ARUNDELL . I am a solicitor , and was living at the house of my brother, Henry Raymond Arundell , Montague-place, St. Marylebone ; I employed the prisoner as an errand boy for about two years - he cleaned my boots, and attended on me. On Tuesday, the 3rd or 4th of December, he came into my bed-room in the morning, before I was up; I had placed my purse, containing ten sovereigns, on my dressing-table: I think he came into the room twice that morning - when I got up, I found my boots were not cleaned, and he was not in the house - he did not return; I saw nothing of him till he was apprehended - I missed my purse and money about five or six o'clock in the evening; I found it was not in my pocket, and I thought I had left it on the dressing-table: I went to look for it, and it was not there - the prisoner was taken into custody while I was out of town.

CHARLES PHILLIPS . I am a Policeman. On Thursday evening, the 6th of December, about nine o'clock, I was called into Mr. Arundell's house, to take the prisoner - Mr. Arundell's brother gave him into my charge with a purse, containing five sovereigns and some silver, which I produce; on taking him to the station-house, I told him I thought he had got a very bad connexion, which he denied - I asked what he had done with the remainder of the ten sovereigns; he said he had bought the clothes which he had on, and some segars and wine: I told him it was a bad job - he asked if it was too late to mend; I said, "I think not."

THOMAS PAYNE . I am a wine-porter. I had informa

tion where the prisoner was gone, he had absconded with a young man in my service - I found them together at the house of one Solomon; I brought them both away: I asked the prisoner coming along what he had done with Mr. Arundell's purse - I said, Sabin, "How could you do so?" he cried very much; I said the Police were out after him - he did not deny it at all, but gave up the purse with five sovereigns in it, and I delivered it up to Mr. Arundell's brother.

MR. ARUNDELL. This is my purse; the prisoner behaved well before.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330103-49

297. WILLIAM BANKS and ROBERT TURPIN were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , at St. Martin in the Fields, 12 lbs. weight of worsted, value 1l. 3s., and 24 gross of worsted-lace, value 5l. 17s., the goods of Alfred Amstie and another, in their dwelling-house .

JOHN OWEN . I am a Policeman. On the 3rd of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I was watching the house of Alfred Amstie, in Long-acre, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields ; I was within four or five yards of the house; I was dressed as a Policeman - it was not quite light; I observed Banks go in at the side door, with an empty bag - the door was closed for a moment; he came out without any thing, looked about, and went in again - I then saw Turpin at the door; I kept watch, and saw Banks come out with the bag half full; he had been in the house about half an hour altogether -Banks crossed Long-acre, up Mercer-street - Turpin was then inside the house; he lived in the house - he never came out further than the door; I followed Banks, keeping him in sight to the end of Castle-street - he at last saw me, and dropped the bag; I took it up, and asked him what was in it - he said he was employed by a man to carry it to Somers'-town - and at that time Appleton met us - I took Banks with the bag and its contents.

THOMAS GEORGE APPLETON . I am clerk to the prosecutors. I had desired the Policeman to watch, having suspicions - I was watching in front of the house; Turpin was formerly in our employ; he left about four or five months, but lived on the premises with his father, who was our foreman at the time in question - I watched the premises for three-quarters of an hour; Owen came and gave me information - I went down a street, and met Banks, and the Policeman behind him; I went on, and met Turpin, with the worsted in his possession, in a blue apron.

ALFRED AMSTIE . I am a lace-manufacturer , and live in Long-acre. My foreman resided in the house, as a servant - I and my partner pay the taxes; it is the dwelling-house of us both - I know nothing of Banks; Turpin himself had been in our employ once - I swear positively to both parcels of property; my handwriting is on the papers - it is regimental lace, and worth more than 9l.

Banks' Defence. A young man in Covent-garden-market asked me to carry a parcel for him to Somers'-town, and said he would give me 1s. - this young man told me to go to the first turning on the left and stop till he came; as I went through the court, the young man brought the parcel out, and gave it to me.

Turpin's Defence. I happened to be standing in my father's passage. I dropped a shilling down the cellar grating - I observed some parcels laying there, but did not interfere with them.

BANKS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

TURPIN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330103-50

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

298. HENRY TOMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 hat, value 12s., the goods of John Cobb Ayres ; and that he had been previously convicted of felony .

WILLIAM ROWSELL . I live in Cheapside, and am a stationer. On the 24th of December, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Birchin-lane, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running with a hat in his hand, and came up to him after he was stopped - he had not got the hat then; I saw a gentleman pick it up, and give it to Betterton.

GEORGE AYRES . I am thirteen years old - I am the son of John Cobb Ayres , who lives in Clement's-lane . On the 24th of December, about five o'clock in the evening, a man came into the shop, and took a hat off a stand; he was quite a stranger - I think he saw me; he left the shop immediately - I went to the door, and called Stop thief! but did not leave the shop: I was not present when the prisoner was brought back - I saw him at the Mansion-house; I cannot swear to him.

WILLIAM BETTERTON . I am one of the Police. I received the prisoner in charge - somebody was holding him by the collar; the hat was delivered to me.

MR. ROWSELL. It was a hat similar to this I saw him with - I saw him throw it away, and saw a gentleman pick it up.

JOHN COBB AYRES . I am a hatter . This hat is mine; it has my name and address on it.

JOHN ROBINSON . I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction (read) - I know him to be the person who was convicted in the July Session; I was present at his trial.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-51

299. SAMUEL GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 2 sheets, value 5s.; 3 blankets, value 8s.; 2 pillows, value 3s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 6d.; 1 looking-glass and frame, value 4s., and 1 bolster, value 4s. , the goods of John Williams .

CHARLOTTE WILLIAMS . I am the wife of John Williams ; we live in Cock-lane, Smithfield . The prisoner lodged nearly three weeks with me - he came on the 5th of December; I make it a rule every fortnight to look over my room, and on the 22nd I asked him to let me look over the room; he said he had made use of my bed-clothing for want - he said he would get them back by eight o'clock in the evening, but he did not, and I sent for an officer - he was not in any employ.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he tell you

how he had made use of them? A. Not till the officer came - his wife lodged with him; they have no family.

JOHN TURNER . I am a servant to Mr. Baxter, pawnbroker, Snow-hill. The prisoner pawned at our shop three blankets, one on the 13th of December, for 1s. 6d., one on the 10th, for 1s. 6d., and one on the 8th, for 1s. - on the 17th of December he pawned a pillow - he pawned a looking-glass and frame, but fearing it would get broken, I did not bring that; I advanced him 2s. on that.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you knew him well? A. Not before he began to pledge; I gave him almost the full value - the blankets were not worth more than 1s. 6d. each; I do not think they would fetch a farthing more than I advanced - I have been nine months with my employer.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner; he said he had pawned the things, and showed me the duplicates.

Cross-examined. Q. Did they appear in distress? A. Every thing was gone off the bed; I saw no food, and have no doubt they were in distress.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-52

300. CHARLES PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 5 yards of bed-sacking, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of William Wood .

2nd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Christopher Scales , and others.

3rd COUNT, stating it to be the goods of the Parishioners of St. Botolph without, Aldgate .

WILLIAM WOOD . I am master of the workhouse of St. Botolph, Aldgate - the prisoner was a pauper there. On the 29th of November I was in the Committee-room, assisting in paying the poor - Fuller gave me information, and I took an officer to Woolf Hyam's marine-store shop, Petticoat-lane; I made inquiry, and about five yards of bed-sacking were shown to me, which I knew belonged to our workhouse - it was in three pieces, and had all belonged to one piece; one of them corresponds with a piece which remains in the workhouse; Hyams at first denied having bought any - we had the prisoner taken up.

JOHN FULLER . I am fourteen years old - I was living in the workhouse, and knew the prisoner. I saw him with something bulky under his arm, on the 29th of November, about half-past three o'clock - I saw him go out of the house the back way; I informed Mr. Wood what I had seen - I followed him; he ran down Petticoat-lane, into Hyams' shop, and came out without any thing - I then returned, and called Mr. Wood, went with him to Hyams' shop; Mrs. Hyams produced the bed-sacking.

SARAH HYAMS . I live in Petticoat-lane, and am the wife of Woolf Hyams, who is since dead. The prisoner came to the shop on the 29th of November, and offered the sacking for sale for 1s. 6d. - my husband took it out of his hand, and said it did not suit, and he would not buy it - he asked if he might leave it there till he came back from Whitechapel, and in less than half an hour Wood came with the officer, and I produced the sacking.

JOHN LITTLE . I am an officer. I went to Hyams' with Wood, and received the sacking.(Property produced and sworn to)

Prisoner. I was two years and seven months in one situation, and nine years foreman to a carpenter, and never had a blemish on my character.

GUILTY . Aged 74. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18330103-53

301. MARY KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 8 yards of printed cotton, value 5s. , the goods of Stephen Whitaker .

STEPHEN WHITAKER . I live in Long-lane, Smithfield , and am a pawnbroker . On Friday, the 28th of December, about ten minutes after two o'clock, the prisoner, in company with a woman, came to ask the price of several articles of children's apparel - the prisoner was behind her companion, who asked the prices - I had seen the printed cotton within the door-way when they came in: I missed the prisoner while the other was talking to me, and, on looking round, missed the cotton - I told the female she must give an account of her - she said she never saw her before - I took her to the Compter, and then received information from my son; the prisoner was brought in while I was there, by Carlisle, and the cotton was produced.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am an officer. I was fetched from the corner of Long-lane, and found the prisoner in Stafford's(a pawnbroker) shop; she was delivered to me with these eight yards of cotton, which was claimed by Whitaker; she said she picked it up inside the shop, and she had had no victuals for two days - she was destitute of money when I searched her - she appeared in distress, low and faint.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 67. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-54

302. GEORGE ALLISON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th December , 10 yards of merino, value 1l. , the goods of Samuel Savage Woollatt .

THOMAS PUNWELL . I am in the employ of Samuel Savage Woollatt , a linen draper ; the prisoner came into the shop on the 13th of December, about four o'clock; he said nothing - he came up to a pile of goods and took this piece of merino off it; it was within the door; he came inside to get it; I did not see him take it; I saw him go from the door with it under his arm - I went after him; I overtook him about twenty feet from the house, and stopped him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see it on my person? A. Yes, and saw you lay it down before I took you.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-55

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, JANUARY 4;

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

303. JOSEPH FURNISS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 wheel, value 25s., the goods of John Mackrow ; and that he had been before convicted of felony . To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-56

304. JOHN BENSON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 2nd of November , a certain request for the

delivery of goods, with intent to defraud George Ossibrook Kember , and another ; against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, for uttering the same.

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL KEMBER. I am in partnership with my brother, George Ossibrook Kember ; we are brass-founder s, and live in Northampton-street, Clerkenwell ; we have a customer named William Mister , who lives in the Dover-road; we have also a customer named Richard Mister . On the 22nd of November, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came, and brought this order; he said he came from Mr. Mister, of the Dover-road, and he wanted these things with him, as they were to be sent with an engine to Richmond that evening; he said his master, or Mr. Mister would have come himself, but he had had an accident with his cart, and the shaft was broken: I asked if he was hurt; he said No, that he was in the cart, but was not hurt - he said he was going further, and would call again: he called in about twenty minutes; the goods were then nearly ready; he said he had been to the White-horse, in the York-road: I said it must be wrong; he must mean the Liverpool-road: I gave him the goods, as specified in the order - they were worth 2l. 12s. - he went away; after he was gone I noticed that the order was signed R. Mister; and not W, but I thought it might have been written by one of his men: on the following evening the prisoner brought another order, which I have in my hand; he handed it to me, and drew back; there seemed a shyness about him, which excited my suspicion; I asked where he got it, and who gave it to him - he at first said Mr. Kember; I repeated my question, and then he said a young man at the corner of the street - the same person who gave him the order yesterday evening; that he was in the street, and a young man came and asked him if he wanted a job; that he said Yes, and he said, "Take this order, and get the things, and I will give you sixpence;" which he did, and he said if he would meet him the following evening at the Bull's Head, Smithfield, he would try to get him a place, and he said "If they ask you any questions, say you sometimes work at turning a wheel at Mister's," and that the young man said, "I do not like to call for the goods myself, because I once worked there." I sent a man out to look for the young man, but he could not find him.

PATRICK CASEY (Police-constable G 225). I took the prisoner at the prosecutor's, on the 23rd - I asked him who his employer was; he said he was not in any one's employ at present, but he was sent there by a man who was standing in the street, who had offered him 6d. for his trouble; I went out into the street, but could not see any man who answered the description - I waited there ten minutes.

WILLIAM MISTER . I live in the Dover-road. This order is not my writing, nor any one belonging to me -I never saw the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know but that the person who gave me the order was sent with it, by the person, or I should not have taken it; he asked if I wanted a job, and said he would give me 6d. to get these - I did so; he said if I met him the next day at the Bull's Head, he would try if he could get me a regular place, as he had heard of one.

SAMUEL KEMBER re-examined. Q. Did you state before the Magistrate that the prisoner said the man who employed him did not like to go to your premises because he had worked there? A. To the best of my recollection, I think I did - I am sure he said so; the first day he said he came from Mr. Mister, but the next day, when I questioned him, he told me at once, that a man told him to bring it, and he was waiting in the street - (order read).

MESSRS. KEMBER, - Please to let the bearer have one dozen of tapping cocks of the common screw, with nuts and swivels; you will much oblige me by sending them, as I want to send them with an engine to night to Richmond. For Richard Mister , Dover-road.

November 22, 1832.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of his distress, and believing he was employed by others .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18330103-57

305. JAMES BELT was indicted for stealing. on the 22nd of December , 16 bread-baskets, value 16s. , the goods of Edwin Alderman .

MARY PERIAM . I am shopman to Mr. Edwin Alderman , who lives in Norton-falgate . On the 22nd of December, in the evening, about half-past ten o'clock, I was behind the counter - my attention was called to the door; I missed a number of bread-baskets, from about a yards within the shop - the officer produced these sixteen bread-baskets; they are the same pattern as those which had been at our door, and the same quality.

HENRY COTTON (Police-constable H 60). I was in Spital-square, at half-past ten o'clock, on the night of the 22nd of December - I observed the prisoner running in a direction from Norton-falgate, towards Spitalfields-market, about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's; there was an alarm, and I stopped the prisoner - he wished me to take these bread-baskets, and to let him go; he tried to get away - he said distress drove him to it, and he intended only to take one, but he could not get one without taking the lot; I found nothing on him - he was quite destitute.

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18330103-58

306. MARY HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 2 blankets, value 2s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 1 table-cloth, value 1s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 2s.; 1 salt-cellar, value 6d.; 1 mustard-pot, value 6d.; 1 pepper-box, value 6d., and 1 vinegar-cruet, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Barnes .

HARRIET BARNES . I am the wife of Thomas Barnes , he lives in North-street, Lisson-grove . On the 3rd of November the prisoner took our ready furnished room - a man came in just after her; they lived together as man and wife - the second week she told me she could not pay me; she went out and never returned - on the Wednesday, I went up to her room, and spoke to Mr. Croft, the man she lived with; I did not miss any article, but he went away that evening - I went up stairs, and missed the articles stated; I had not seen the man come down stairs at all - the prisoner said he was ill with the gout.

THOMAS NEWTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have several articles, which were pawned, at our shop in the name of Ann Clare, No. 6, Earl-street; I took in a blanket and a

table-cloth of the prisoner, on the 19th and 20th of November.

Prisoner. The goods have been paid for. Witness. A person came to my master and gave him the money, and wanted the prisoner to be released, but my master said I was bound over, and he could not release her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN TAYLOR (Police-serjeant S 17). I took the prisoner on the 20th of November, on another charge - she said her name was Mary Hill, that she had come from Bristol, and had been living at the Saracen's Head and several other places; on Wednesday the prosecutrix came and stated her loss, and identified the prisoner - a man attended before the Magistrate, but he was not detained, as the prosecutor could not identify him - the same man was here yesterday.

HARRIET BARNES . I had only seen the man once when he came in - I said I thought he was the man.

Prisoner. I had not left the lodging.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-59

307. EDWARD JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 tub, value 5s. , the goods of John Burden .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Charles Barclay and others.

JAMES JOHN CONNOLLY (Police-constable H 135). On the 6th of December, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was in High-street, Whitechapel ; I saw two drays coming along - the prisoner was by the side of the last one; he made several attempts to get this tub off that dray, and at last succeeded - he came across towards me; I seized him; he threw the tub down, and got away - I knew him well, and did not follow him far; but in the afternoon I took him in Petticoat-lane; he resisted very much, but I got him into a shop. and sent for more assistance.

Prisoner. I threw the tub down - he ran a hundred and fifty yards after me, and when he returned he found a man with the tub. Witness. He threw it on my feet; I ran a short distance after him, and then lost sight of him; a person could have stopped him, but he was afraid, as he had some instrument in his hand.

JOHN BURDEN . I am in the service of Barclay and Co. I was driving the dray , and lost this tub off it; it was under my charge - I am answerable for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very ill, and went to bed between eight and nine o'clock the evening before, and did not get up till one o'clock the next day - I was just going out when the officer took me, and said it was the second time he had had me that day, and he would take care of me.

J. J. CONNOLLY. I know him perfectly well - he is a dreadful character; it was between eight and nine o'clock in the morning when he took the tub; I met him in Petticoat-lane, where I believe he lives, about three o'clock - he had been discharged from Worship-street the morning before.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-60

308. DAVID SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 sack, value 1s., and 2 cwt. of potatoes, value 5s. , the goods of John Farrow .

The evidence in this case was precisely the same as that given in the case of Ainsworth, page 136. The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined for Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-181

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

309. MARGARET SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of December , 7 yards of merino, value 15s. , the goods of Frederick Head .

WILLIAM GRAY . I am in the employ of Frederick Head , a linen-draper , in Oxford-street . On the 22nd of December I was behind the counter, and saw the prisoner walk into the shop and take this piece of merino off the pile - I followed her, and took her with it, before she had passed the window - it is my master's.

GUILTY .* Aged 60. Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-61

310. JOSIAH RANDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 4 trowels, value 7s., the goods of Thomas William Barry ; and 1 trowel, value 1s., the goods of James Johnson ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

THOMAS WILLIAM BARRY . I am a bricklayer . On the 24th of December I lost four trowels from my shed in Wood-street, Old-street-road ; there were two young men in the shed at the time, and my brother-in-law, but they were up stairs; the prisoner has worked for me.

EDMUND JULIUS SUTTON . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I took in two trowels from the prisoner on the 24th of December.

JAMES JOHNSON . I am a bricklayer . My tools were in the same shed; I lost one trowel at the same time - this is it.

WILLIAM SAMUEL CALVER . I am a pawnbroker. I have three trowels, which were pawned by the prisoner on the 24th of December.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. Johnson was in the shed when I went in, and when I came out.

JAMES JOHNSON . Yes, but I did not allow you to take any thing.

Prisoner's Defence. It was impossible that I could carry them out without being perceived; I found them in a public-house at the corner of the street - if I had taken them from the prosecutor I should not have pawned them close to his house.

THOMAS WHITTLE (Police-constable G 200). I have a certificate of the former conviction of the prisoner (which I got at Mr. Clark's office); I was the officer who took him - he had twelve months imprisonment.

GUILTY . Aged 50. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-62

311. HENRY WARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 hat, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of William Judd .

WILLIAM JUDD . I have been lately discharged from the Marines, on a pension of 10d. a day . On Thursday night, the 27th of December, I was at the Jolly Butchers, in the Green-lanes, Enfield ; I had been to see my brother in that neighbourhood - I took my hat off, which had my handkerchief in it, and put it on the form by my side,

I laid my head on the table, and got into a doze; I awoke about a quarter before ten o'clock, and missed my hat and handkerchief - I went out and saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, with my hat on his head, by the side of his own waggon - he was just going to drive off; I went up and said, "You have got my hat on;" "You be d-d," said he - I said, "I am sure it is," and just at that time the horse-patrol came up, and said he would soon see who it belonged to - he took my hat off the prisoner's head, and found in it my handkerchief and a cap; I know them to be mine.

JAMES GEORGE . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on duty in the Green-lanes a little after ten o'clock - I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner close by the waggon; I heard the prosecutor claim his hat; I took it off the prisoner's head, and found this handkerchief and this cap in it - the prisoner said the hat was his; he was not the driver of the waggon, but a sort of cad - I told him I should take him, and the driver got into the waggon, gave the prisoner a very old hat, and said that was his; he said he would stand a quartern of gin if we would mix it up and settle the business - I said I did not do business in that way.

JOHN WALKER . I was at the public-house; I saw the prosecutor sitting there - the prisoner came in with a round leather cap on; he took this hat up, put it on, and walked out with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was rather in liquor, and did not know whether I had a hat or a cap on.

JAMES GEORGE. I am well aware he knew what he was doing, and if I had not come up he would have ill-used the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-63

312. JAMES BOWDEN YATES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Henry Richard Bown , from his person .

HENRY RICHARD BOWN . I am an apprentice to a silversmith . On the morning of the 9th of December I was by the milk-house, close by the Palace; I felt something at my pocket; I turned and took hold of the prisoner - the officer came up, and found my handkerchief on him.

JOHN GRAHAM (Police-constable A 32). I was on the spot - I went up and seized the prisoner; I found this handkerchief concealed between his trousers and shirt.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a crowd going through the gate - I was amongst the people, and this gentleman accused me of stealing his handkerchief; in the scuffle my hat fell off - in putting my hand to take it, I saw this handkerchief, and took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-64

313. MARY BELCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , 7 yards of printed cotton, value 5s., the goods of James Bromley and another .

WILLIAM CRUSH . I am in partnership with James Bromley - we are pawnbroker s. On the 22nd of August the prisoner came to our shop with a man, who asked for a great coat - he selected one, and agreed to give 2l. 5s. for it; he paid a part, and they left the shop - this print was missed in about two hours; it had hung close by where the prisoner stood - it was traced to a pawnbroker in the neighbourhood, pawned in the same name as the coat was bought in.

JOHN JOSEPH REARDON . I am in the employ of a pawnbroker. On the 22nd of August, about seven in the evening, I took in a remnant of cotton of the prisoner - I lent 2s. on it, and in about two hours the prosecutor's young man came and asked if I had taken in such an article -I said I had, and described the person - this is the print.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Have you had the cotton in your possession ever since? A. It has been at my employer's, but I have not been there - I left him in November, but it had my duplicate on it; I had not seen the prisoner before, nor did I see her again till she was at the office, on the 17th of December - I swear she is the woman.

ELIZABETH KIMPTON . I have known the prisoner for some years. I purchased a duplicate of her for 8d. - it was for some printed cotton pawned for 2s.; I gave it to my daughter.

EMMA KIMPTON . My mother gave me the duplicate, and I took it to the pawnbroker.

WILLIAM CRUSH . I believe this to be our property. I missed a piece of this pattern and quality - I had known the prisoner before, and frequently saw her; I cannot recollect what day of the week it was - they came to my shop between twelve and two o'clock; I suppose they were there a quarter of an hour.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you miss it? A. Between two and three o'clock - there were other persons in the shop. I cannot tell who the man was.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work that day from eight o'clock in the morning till half-past eight at night.

ELIZABETH TANNER . I am a widow, and live in Mansfield-place, Kentish-town. I have known the prisoner for the last two years, and worked with her at Mrs. Disney's every Tuesday and Wednesday at washing, and every Thursday and Friday at ironing - she has been there from nine o'clock in the morning till eight at night regularly for the last two years.

ANN DAIRY . I live at Kentish-town, and work for Mrs. Disney - the prisoner worked for her. I can take it upon myself to say that she has been there every Tuesday. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, for the last two years.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-65

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

314. CATHERINE CALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 2lbs. of pork, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of James North .

CHARLES FAULKNER . I am shopman to Mr. James North - he lives in St. Pancras . On the 24th of December I was in the area, and saw the prisoner go into the shop and take a piece of pork off the board; she then asked for change of a shilling - I went into the shop, and saw her taking up the halfpence; she went away - I asked my mistress if she had served her with any pork; she said No, I went and took her with it - it had been outside the shop, just by the step.

HENRY COLLINS (Police-constable S 101). I took the prisoner.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Days .

Reference Number: t18330103-66

315. ELIZABETH CHRISTMAS and ANN COOK were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 purse, value 1d., and 3 pawnbroker's duplicates, value 4.s 3d. the goods of James Bettis , from the person of Sarah Bettis .

SARAH BETTIS . I am the wife of James Bettis ; he is a labourer , and lives in Mary-street, Bow. On the night of the 19th of December, I went into a public-house in Shoreditch - the two prisoners came to me there, and Cook asked me to give her a drop of gin; I felt my pocket, but I had not enough by three farthings - a gentleman who was there gave me a halfpenny, and the landlady excused the farthing; the prisoners drank the gin, and then one of them called for half a pint of beer for me - I drank it, and we went out together; when we had got some distance, Christmas caught hold of me round my waist, and took out of my pocket a purse, containing three duplicates - I gave charge of them; and the officer afterwards showed me my purse, which I am sure was safe when I came out of the house - this is the purse and duplicates; when Christmas put her hand into my pocket, Cook had hold of my clothes - I had been drinking, and was the worse for liquor,

JURY. Q. What time was it? A. Half-past one in the morning.

GEORGE DEVEREUX BOLTON (Police-constable H 49.) I was in Union-street, Spitalfields, on the morning of the 20th of December; I looked down Red Lion-street, and saw the two prisoners and the prosecutrix - they had hold of the prosecutrix's clothes, and were hustling her - I went towards them; Cook crossed the road - I heard the prosecutrix say "You have robbed me of my purse, containing three duplicates," and she called Police! I took the two prisoners to the watch-house, and in going along Cook struck the prosecutrix on the face - I got a light and on the opposite side to where the prosecutrix had been, I found this purse and three duplicates.

JURY. Q. Did they scuffle together? A. They both had hold of the prosecutrix, who was certainly in liquor; she had not been on that side where I found the purse, but Cook separated from them, and went on that side.

Christmas' Defence. We had two or three quarters of gin, and the prosecutrix had some beer; we went out and she asked if she could sleep with me - I said No; she then said, "I have spent all my money, and now you will not take me home" - I said I could not; she then said we had robbed her, and gave charge of us.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-67

316. WILLIAM CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 3 brushes, value 12s. the goods of William Greatorex .

WILLIAM JOHNS (Police-constable D 41.) On the 18th of December I was in Crawford-street, and saw the prisoner near Mr. Flynn's shop, standing against the rails, with a bundle in one hand, and he was handling some women's shoes; I staid until he walked away with the bundle - I followed him, and asked if he had taken any shoes from the door; he said he knew nothing about them - I took him back, and in the bundle I found a pair of new shoes, which Mr. Flynn owned, and these three brushes.

WILLIAM GREATOREX . I am an oilman , and live in Lisson-street . These brushes are mine, and were hanging on the story-post of my door on the 18th of December; I missed them about two o'clock.

WILLIAM JOHNS . I found on the prisoner a staircase carpet, a book, a bottle, and a pair of shoes belonging to a broker in Devonshire-street.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

317. WILLIAM CARTER was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of John Flynn .

WILLIAM JOHNS . I took the prisoner on the 18th of December, about two o'clock in the afternoon, with the bundle, in which I found this pair of shoes; he said he had bought all the property of a stranger in Lisson-grove.

JOHN FLYNN . These are my shoes, and were taken from my shop in Crawford-street ; I cannot say when I had seen them safe, but I know they had not been sold; they are never sold in this state.

Prisoner. I bought and paid for them.

GUILTY .* Aged 28. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-68

318. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 chaise harness, value 5l. the goods of John Henry Dines .

WILLIAM WESLEY (Police-constable E 154.) I live in Cromer-street. On the 14th of December, I met the prisoner in Harrison-street, Gray's-Inn-road, with a sack on his back; I asked several times what he had got there - he at last said, a harness. which he got at Portland-town, and was taking it to his master's stable - but he would not inform me where, so I took him to the station; he threw it down, and said, if I was going to take him to the station, I should carry the harness.

JAMES DYER (Police-constable E 81.) I came up, and took the prisoner to the station.

JOHN HENRY DINES . I live in Woburn-buildings . This harness is mine - I was ill at the time of the robbery.

JAMES CLIFTON . I live in Latham's-court, and look after Mr. Dines horse and chaise'. I saw this harness safe on the Thursday night - it was found on the Friday morning; I locked the stable door that night, and in the morning I found the lock had been picked, and the harness was gone.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-69

319. JAMES GRIMES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 card-case, value 3d., and 4 sovereigns , the property of William Jefferys .

LUCY JEFFERYS . I am the wife of William Jefferys ; I have the care of a house, No. 16, Bryanstone-square . On the afternoon of the 19th of December, I heard the bell ring; I went up, and the Police-officer gave me information: I looked, and missed a card-case, containing four sovereigns, which had been kept in one of the top drawers in the housekeeper's room - I have seen them at the Police-office; they were my husband's property.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Where is this room? A. In front of the area, down stairs; I had seen the card-case safe the day before: no one had been in the house but myself and my husband - I had had some coals in,

but the person did not come into the house, only into the cellar.

PATRICK BOURKE (Police-constable D 101). I was on duty on the 19th of December, in Bryanstone-square, and saw the prisoner come out of the kitchen door, of No. 16; he slammed the door too, and came up the area steps - he had a basket in one hand, and some oranges in the other; I rang the bell, and was answered by the witness - I followed the prisoner, who ran round Montague-place, into Crawford-street, and on to Seymour-place, where he was stopped; I had seen him throw his basket and oranges away in Bryanstone-mews - my attention was called by a person to an area in Crowford-street, by which the prisoner had run; I knocked at the door, and saw a person pick up from that area, this card-case: I took him to the station - in going to the office he said he was very sorry for what he had done, but if he were released he would get a ship and leave the country.

Cross-examined. Q. How near were you to him when he came out of the kitchen door? A. I was opposite: he saw me; he did not run at first - he had turned several corners, and I lost sight of him, before he was taken.

COURT. Q. How long did he retain his basket and oranges? A. Till almost the last; he walked at first, but when I ran he did.

JOHN RAND . I am a milkman, and live in Little Church-street, Marylebone. I was in Seymour-place on the 19th of December; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running very fast, and a mob after him; I stopped him; he cried for mercy, and begged me to let him go - I gave him to the Policeman; he came from Crawford-street.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner. I never made any such statement as the officer says I did.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-70

320. AMELIA GOODEN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 silver mug, value 20s.; 1 silver lid, value 10s., and 2 silver bottle tops, value 3s. , the goods of William George Ives Bosanquet .

WILLIAM GOFTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gilbert-street. The prisoner came to my shop on the evening of the 24th of December, about seven o'clock, and wished to dispose of a silver mug, and three silver tops belonging to a dressing-case; I inquired whose property they were; she said her own, and they had been given her - I think she said by a lady's maid, whose name she mentioned, but which I forget - she gave me her own address at No. 25, James-street - I sent my young man there; they said they knew her very well, and she was a very respectable woman; but I did not feel satisfied, and sent for a Police officer - I think these articles are worth 25s. as old silver.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you go to James-street? A. No - the prisoner did not say it was her brother's house; she did not wish to pawn these articles - she went to James-street with my young man.

WILLIAM HOOKER (Police-serjeant D 3.) I took the prisoner - these articles were on the counter; I asked her how she came by them - she said they were given her by Fanny Baptiste, who had formerly lived in Green-street, Grosvenor-square, but she could not tell the number, and who was now gone to Russia or Prussia; she said she had known her for two months - I asked her where she herself lived; she said at No. 51, James-street; I went there, and found she had a lodging, and a few things there - I found on her 1l. 2s. 6d. and a bottle - and at the watch-house the inspector saw something on the floor, which turned out to be this silver lace band; I asked if she had any more plate - she said Yes, she had a silver spoon in her box.

WILLIAM HENRY BOSANQUET , Esq. I am a solicitor, and live in Lincoln's Inn-fields. I have known the prisoner two years - she was put into the house of William George Ives Bosanquet , No. 8, Hereford-street , to take care of it; on the 19th of October I saw her there - Mr. Bosanquet is now abroad; there was a dressing-case with some silver articles in it - I saw it on the 21st of December, in the prisoner's hand; she took it out of a cupboard, and gave it to me; I put it into another cupboard - I went there that day, for the purpose of taking some articles out of one cupboard and putting them into another; I locked them up in the cupboard, and took away the key, but the dressing-case itself was not locked; I do not recollect putting the mug into the cupboard, but I know this lid of a tooth-brush glass, which came out of the dressing-case; that has Mr. Bosanquet's crest on it, and so had the tops of the five bottles which were in the dressing-case; I have brought one of the two tops which were left in the case after the prisoner had been apprehended; I gave her a present of some articles of linen and a hat, which had this lace-band round it - I found the cupboard locked and nailed.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you at first doubted whether these articles belonged to the gentleman? A. I never doubted about this top of the tooth-brush glass; I did not tell Mrs. Marsh that I should be better able to tell if I went back and looked at the cupboard - Mrs. Marsh told me the prisoner had been taken; she supposed, for trying to pawn some articles belonging to Mr. Bosanquet; I said if she had only been going to pawn them I should take no notice of it, as I thought she might intend to restore them - she said she could not tell what the articles were; she said she thought it was the silver lid of a sugar dish - I said I did not recollect such an article; this mug has the initials of one of Mr. Bosanquet's children on it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 46.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330103-71

321. ROBERT HARLOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 51 panes of glass, value 5l., the goods of William Ireson , and fixed to a building of his ; against the Statute.

GEORGE SEAMAN (Police-constable H 150,) I was in Montague-street, Spitalfields, on the evening of the 16th of December - I saw my brother officer Reynolds there, and went with him to a house in Pelham-street ; I found the windows at the back of the house deficient of two sashes, and every square of glass was taken out of the frame down stairs - I went into the cellar, and found a number of squares of glass there, and a basket, with some

squares in that; I remained there from half-past ten o'clock at night till half-past six the next morning - I then heard footsteps come to the shop window, and stop for about a minute; a person then pushed open the side door, staid there for about a minute, and then jumped down into the cellar - I waited, and took the prisoner in the act of going out at the door again, with this basket in his hand; he said he came there for his plumb-rule, which he had left there on Saturday night.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS (Police-constable H 138.) I was with Seaman, and assisted in detaining the prisoner; here is the glass which was in the basket - some of the squares fit the sash window, some the shop front, and some the door; I found on the prisoner two knives, the handles of which are plastered with putty, and they are bent in the blade.

WILLIAM MASON . I live in High-street, Wapping, and am employed by Mr. Ireson in the house in question. I had fastened it up the day before, and taken away the key; the prisoner had been employed there as a bricklayer's labourer, but had nothing to do with the cellar - I had fixed the glass in the sashes myself.

WILLIAM IRESON . I live in Whitechapel. The house belonged to me - it was nearly finished; I missed fifty-one squares of glass, which had been taken out, as it appeared, with a knife; I think they were worth 5l. or 6l. - they cost me 5l. 18s. to put in again; the house was let, and the tenant was to have gone in on the Wednesday following.

Prisoner. The cellar is not under the house. Witness. It goes down a step or two, and is partly under another house; the prisoner had no business there at all.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that having differed with the prosecutor on the subject of wages, and hearing of another job, he had gone to the premises to fetch his tools, and on the Policeman making his appearance, he stumbled against the basket, and was accused of stealing it.

GUILTY . Aged 26. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-72

322. MARY ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 2 pairs of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Edmund Hardwick .

EDMUND HARDWICK (Police-constable G 110). I keep a shop in Playhouse-yard , which my wife attends to. On the 7th of December I was in a little parlour adjoining the shop - I had kept the shop door ajar with a brick; I heard the brick move, and told my brother-in-law to go to the door - the prisoner came into the shop; I went and missed two pairs of shoes from the show-board - she pulled out a piece of meat from her apron, and asked if I would buy it - I said, "You don't want to sell this - where are the shoes gone?" she said she had seen no shoes - I said she had; she said it was a lie - I took hold of her apron, and found one of my shoes in it, and at the same time I heard something fall: I came round and found two shoes on the floor, and while I was taking them up another fell from under her arm; these are the shoes - they had been safe on the show-board ten minutes before, it is two feet higher than the counter.

Prisoner. What he says is false - I had nothing of the kind in my possession; I went in to sell an article, being in distress. Witness. They were close to her on the floor, except the one I took from her apron.

RICHARD FALLSHAW . I am the prosecutor's brother-in-law. I was in the house, and heard the noise - I saw the prisoner come in sideways; I went behind some green baize, which hangs in the shop to conceal a bed, and heard a noise as if some shoes had fallen down - my brother then came round the counter, and saw the shoes on the floor; the show-board is in the window, a little higher than the counter - I saw one shoe fall from her while the others were on the floor; I heard her offer to sell some meat - I knew the prisoner before; she had been taken up for stealing something from the next door.

GUILTY .* Aged 35. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-73

323. MARY ANN JAUNCEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 24 yards of linen, value 2l. 14s. , the goods of William Spooner .

WILLIAM SPOONER. I am a linen-draper , and live in Chiswell-street . On the 21st of December I placed a piece of linen across some other pieces on my counter, at a quarter-past seven o'clock; I went out for about five minutes, and then returned; I found the prisoner at the end of the shop, and a young girl near the door - I missed this linen, and inquired for it; my young man came from behind the counter, through a flap, and this piece dropped from the prisoner's person - I did not see it, but I heard it; I saw it on the floor, and my young man took it up; the flap had been raised to get to her, but the linen could not have been thrown down - the prisoner said she had not taken it- she was about five feet from the place where it had been; there were two other pieces on the counter - she had moved from where she stood while we were looking for the linen.

SAMUEL HODGKIN. I am in the prosecutor's service. On Friday evening, the 21st of December, the prisoner came into the shop - she asked for some ribbons, and produced a pattern which we could not match; she then asked for some calico, and then for some black stockings; I had to leave her to go to the window, and turned my back towards her - while I was doing that, she moved towards the cross-counter, where the linen was, and where the flap was; when Mr. Spooner came back, he asked what had become of the linen - I said I did not know; we began a search for it - I came through the flap, and heard the linen fall from the prisoner: I can undertake to say it did not fall from the counter - I picked it up near her feet.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say I had never moved from the place? A. No - I said you moved about three feet nearer the counter where the linen was.

COURT. Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate that, after looking for some stockings, you found the prisoner in the same place you had left her in? A. No, I said I left her six feet from the counter, and when I returned, she was three feet nearer to the linen - this is my deposition - but she had removed three feet nearer the linen; when the alarm was given, she remained still in the same place.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I live in Finsbury-street, and am a carpenter. I followed Mr. Spooner into the shop, and there was a search after the linen - I stood about a yard and a

half behind the prisoner; I heard the linen fall, but did not see it till it fell on the floor - it fell close to her feet; she said she knew nothing of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to purchase some articles - Mr. Spooner came in and went round the counter several times; there was a confusion, and something fell; he said I was going to steal this linen - I said I was not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-74

324. WILLIAM LEAVER was indicted for bigamy .

ELIZABETH TAYLOR . I am the wife of Isaac Taylor ; we live at Milbourn-port, in Somersetshire. I have known the prisoner from his youth - he lived at Yeovil, where I lived from my childhood; I knew Ann Symonds ; in 1810 I saw her and the prisoner married at Yeovil church; I was a witness to the marriage - my name was then Elizabeth Ostler ; Mary Symonds , who was present, is since dead - the prisoner and his wife lived together for two or three years next door to me; I saw his wife alive at Yeovil on the 13th of December last - I had lost sight of the prisoner from two or three years after his marriage till lately.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. How old were you at that time? A. Nineteen or twenty; I was in the church, and signed my name to the register, but the book is not here - I do not know whether the present parish clerk is the one who officiated then; I was at the prisoner's wife's confinement, and we were very intimate - she was a dress-maker; I was summoned to Worship-street by the Magistrate, and then I saw the prisoner.

CHARLES WILLIS . I live in Ivy-street, Hoxton Old-town. I went to Yeovil church on the 14th of December - I saw the register of marriages examined in the vestry of the church; this extract was made from it - I compared it; it is a faithful copy. - (read).

Cross-examined. Q. Did you examine it yourself with the book? A. Yes, it corresponded word for word.

THOMAS HOBBS (Police-constable N 40). I apprehended the prisoner; I told him it was on suspicion of intermarrying, his first wife being alive, and for robbing Mrs. Catling of 5l.; he said it was no such thing, that it was a trumped up piece of business against him - he told me not to disgrace him in the street, but to let him walk; he went a short distance, and then made his escape - he was taken again, and at the station he asked if there was any letter from the country; I said there was, but I could not let him see it till the Magistrate had seen it: he said it was a bad job, but he must make the best of it, the worst they could do was to transport him for seven years, and he should petition the Court to let him go out of the country.

GEORGE COOPER . I am sexton and officiating clerk at St. John's church, Clerkenwell . I was present on the 19th of November, 1832 , when William Lyddon Leaver and Margaret Catling were married; I made a copy of the register at the time - I wrote "spinster" instead of"widow," and it came back to be altered; I have no recollection of the features of either of the parties, but I remember the names being written, and I handed the pen to the parties; there has not been any thing written there, but what I attended to - I have the book; they were married by banns.

COURT to ELIZABETH TAYLOR . Q. Were the prisoner and Ann Symonds of full age? A. I believe they were; they appeared two or three years older than me: I did not hear the banns published - I generally attended at a Dissenters' place of worship.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you consulted about the marriage beforehand? A. No; it was not a public wedding, for in the country there is generally a great assemblage of people if it is known - I can almost say positively they were married by banns.

SAMUEL TAYLOR . I live in Crown-street, Soho. I was present at the marriage of Margaret Catling to the prisoner on the 19th of November last, and acted as father to her.

MARGARET CATLING . I was a widow , and married the prisoner on the 19th of November last, by banns, at St. John's church, Clerkenwell; I only lived with him a few days before I found out that he was a married man - he had before represented himself as a person of some property; I found that to be inaccurate; we had some words - he left me, and took away some property of mine, to the amount of about 5l. - he married me by the name of William Lyddon Leaver.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you discovered his former marriage before he left you? A. No, I had my doubts about it, but I did not find it out till after he left me - I found he had deceived me about his property.

Prisoner. You urged me to marry you, and you recollect saying, "We must be married now at all events;" that was when we were on the carpet. Witness. It is false - as false as you are.

Prisoner's Defence. She first induced me to take breakfast with her, then dinner, then tea, and then bed; she then told me she was in the family way, and urged me to marry her - at the beginning of our acquaintance I desired her to secure the property she was possessed of, on herself, which was done a week or ten days previous to our union; I did not wish to defraud her, nor to injure her orphan son - I consider her the transgressor, not me; there is no dependance to be placed on the witness; she came forward for the sake of gain.

ELIZABETH TAYLOR . I have not been promised any reward whatever.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-75

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

325. ISAAC JOHN WYATT was indicted for embezzlement .

EDWARD COLLINS . I am clerk and cashier to Richard Surridge ; he is agent to the Northampton boot and shoe warehouse - the prisoner was his porter , and was employed to receive money on his account. On the 27th of December I gave him two receipts for the sums of 32l. 4s., and 4l. 17s. for Messrs. Parlour and Co., in the Waterloo-road , and to bring me back the value for them; he did not return till between ten and eleven o'clock the next morning, when he came voluntarily, and stated that he had got drunk, and had lost the cheques - his salary was 18s. a week.

JOSEPH PARLOUR . I am a linen-draper, and live in the Waterloo-road. The prisoner called with the receipts, and I gave him two cheques on Lubbock and Co., for his master.

SAMUEL ACKROYD . I am clerk to Messrs. Lubbock and Co.; I paid these two cheques with three 10l. notes, and 7l. 1s. in cash; I asked the person in what name he received them, and he said Surridge - I do not know who it was; these are the cheques.

JOSEPH FULLER . I am a fireman. On the 27th of December I was in a public-house on the Surrey-side of Blackfriars-bridge; the prisoner came in, and asked me to drink - I took a glass of rum; he then asked me to walk with him as far as the Waterloo-road, where he was going to receive some cheques: he went and got them - he showed them to me, and put them into his side pocket.

Prisoner. I was intoxicated, and lost them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-76

326. CHARLES COLLINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 boot, value 8s. , the goods of Clara Collier .

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am shopman to Mrs. Clara Collier - she keeps a shoe warehouse in Cheapside . On the evening of the 14th of December my attention was called by a young man - I went to the door, having heard a noise, and seen one of the boots moving; I saw the prisoner with one boot in his hand about a hundred yards down Wood-street.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am an officer. I was in Wood-street, Cheapside, on the night in question, between seven and eight o'clock; I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him with this boot in his hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was driven to it by necessity.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

327. CHARLES COLLINGTON was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December, 1 pair of boots, value 22s. , the goods of Aaron Gush .

AARON GUSH. I am a shoemaker , and live in the Poultry . On the evening of the 14th of December I lost two odd boots - I have brought the two which match with them.

WILLIAM HENMAN . When I took the prisoner I found two new boots on his feet; I took them off - in bringing the prisoner from the watch-house to the Compter he asked me if I had found the owner - I said No; he said, "If you go to the corner of the Old Jewry, you will find the owner"- I then asked him why he did it, and he said he wished to be transported.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for 7 Years longer .

Reference Number: t18330103-77

328. THOMAS WALKER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH RICHMOND HOLROYD. I am the daughter of Hannah Holroyd - she keeps a coffee-house in Warwick-lane . The prisoner came there on a Tuesday, I think the 27th of November, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning; he called for coffee and bread and butter - it came to 2 1/2d. - he gave me a shilling, which I put into a cup, in which I am certain there was nothing but halfpence - I gave him change, and he went away; I afterwards found the shilling was bad - I did not see the prisoner again till the Thursday afterwards, and may be mistaken in his person; I will not swear to him - we gave the bad shilling to the officer - he marked it in my presence, but I could not swear to it.

ANN BROOKS . I am sister to Mrs. Holroyd. I saw the shilling in the cup, and took it out; I found it was bad- there was no other shilling there; I saw the officer mark it.

MARY KEEFE . I am servant to Mrs. Holroyd. I think the prisoner is the person who came there, but I am not positive.

ERINA IRELAND . I am servant to Mrs. Holroyd. I saw the prisoner come the day after the first shilling was given, about a quarter-past four o'clock; he called for a cup of coffee, and offered a shilling, which I saw was bad - I showed it to my mistress, and gave it to the officer.

JOSEPH BATES . On the Tuesday morning I received a counterfeit shilling from Miss Holroyd - I marked it at the time, and have it here now; I was sent for again on the Wednesday, and found the prisoner there; I then received this other shilling, which I marked in a different manner - I took the prisoner into the back parlour, and found a penny-piece on him - he put out his hand, snatched up the second shilling, and endeavoured to swallow it; I knocked up his arm, and it fell out of his hand - he tried to get it again, but I prevented him.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin to the Mint; these two shillings are both counterfeit, and I believe from the same mould.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-78

329. JOSEPH TAYLOR was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MESSRS. SCARLETT and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

ELIZA RUDGE . I am the wife of William Rudge - he is a green-grocer , and lives in Wormwood-street, Broad-street . On Saturday, the 1st of December, the prisoner came to our shop, between three and four o'clock, for two pears at 1d. each, and a 6d. bottle of blacking; he put on the counter a 5s. piece - I went into the kitchen for my bag, to give him change; he said, "I think I have enough change;" he then said he had not, and I gave him 4s. 6d., and he gave me 2d. - he went away; I examined the crown, and found it was a bad one - I showed it to my husband, and we went after the prisoner up Broad-street, but we lost him; my husband marked the crown-piece, and we have kept it ever since - I saw the prisoner again on the Friday following.

WILLIAM RUDGE. I am an officer. What my wife has stated is correct; this is the crown which I received in myshop; I afterwards went to Mr. Tennant's, and received two crowns, which I also marked.

MARY TENNANT . I live in Little Bell-alley, with my mother, who keeps a green-grocer's. On the 1st of December I saw the prisoner, about nine o'clock in the evening; he came for 6d. worth of eggs - he gave me a 5s. piece: I looked at it, and thought it a good one - I was going to give him change, and he told me to make it up to 1s. worth of eggs, which I did; I then gave him 4s. in change - I gave my mother the crown-piece, and she put it into her pocket; she gave it to me again the next morning, and I marked it; I kept that and another which I had taken half an hour before - these are them; I took one from the prisoner - I cannot say who I took the other from.

MARIA TENNANT . My daughter gave me a crown-piece about half-past eight o'clock, and another at nine - I put them into my pocket, and returned them her to mark; these are them.

CHARLES WRIGHT . I am shopman to Mr. Kain, an ironmonger. On the 6th of December, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came for a pair of hinges; I said we did not sell them - he then asked for a padlock, which came to 1s., he tendered me a crown-piece, which I passed to my employer, who returned it, and said, "I don't think it is a good one;" the prisoner took it up, and said,"If you don't know that it is a good one, I do," and went away.

NANNY SYMONDS . I am the wife of John Symonds; he lives in Fetter-lane. On the 6th of December the prisoner came for a knuckle of ham, which came to 1s. 2d. - he offered me a crown-piece in payment; I passed it through the scale, and it was good weight - he then said I need not give him change, he had enough to pay for it, and he counted out 5d., and said, "Now, if I give you 6d. more, that will do;" I said No, it came to 1s. 2d.; he then said, "You must give me change;" I had returned him the crown-piece I had at first, and he gave me another, which I saw was a bad one - I reached it to my husband, who came into the shop, and marked it in my presence; he then went and stood before the prisoner, who wanted him to return him the crown - my husband then rang the bell, and Mrs. Whittaker came down; my husband said, "I want a constable," which her husband is - the prisoner then said he would go past my husband, and he put his hand against him, pushed him down, and ran towards Fleet-street; he was taken at the bottom of the lane, where be also knocked a gentleman down.

Prisoner. I gave her a good crown-piece, which she weighed before my face - her husband then came out, and she gave it to him; he then brought out two bad ones, and said somebody gave him them.

JOHN SYMONDS . I was in the back parlour, and saw what took place - what my wife has stated is correct; the prisoner pushed me down, and endangered my live - I have felt the injury ever since, and so has the man he knocked down afterwards; I held the crown-piece fast in my hand, and ran after the prisoner, who was brought back to my shop - the officer has the crown-piece.

WILLIAM CUTTRISS (Police-constable C 24). I took the prisoner.

JOHN FIELD. These crowns are all counterfeits, and the two produced by Tennant are of the same mould.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave her a good crown-piece, which she weighed - I thought I had change enough, but I had not; gave her the same crown-piece again, and her husband brought two bad ones from the parlour - I shoved him from the door, but I was in liquor; when I got to the corner, there was a man whom I shoved down - my hat fell off, and I returned forty yards back for it; I was then taken back - all these other people have come against me since - I never was at their shops.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-79

330. SAMUEL NESBITT was indicted for feloniously putting off 2 counterfeit half-sovereigns, at and for a lower rate and value than the same were counterfeited for .

FREDERICK DANIEL . I am a coachman. On the 29th of November, I met Mr. Hall, the Police-officer, and two others, at nine o'clock in the morning, at the Wilmington Arms, John-street; I was searched by Mr. Reynolds, the officer - there was nothing on me; Hall gave me five shillings, which I expect were marked - I then went out, followed by the officers, to a private house in Catherine-wheel-alley, Bishopsgate-street , which I believe is kept by the prisoner - the side-door was open as usual; I went up to the first floor, front room - I saw a little girl, who, I believe, was the prisoner's daughter; the prisoner was called down - I asked him if he had got any things; he said Yes, he had five; he took from under an image on the mantel-piece a paper which he placed on the table, and told me to take which I liked, saying, "There is an Irish one there" - he opened the paper, and I saw in it five gilt sixpences; I said I had only 5s., and I would take but two - I tore a piece off the paper, put my own two into that, put it into my pocket, and gave the prisoner 5s., which Hall had given me in the morning; he told me if they looked any thing queer, to rub them in my hair, to make them look genuine, and he said there was one or two of them which were cut, and they looked better, as people had no suspicion of them when they were bruised or knocked about; he then folded up the other three, put them under the image, and went up to his workshop - I came down, and met Reynolds, who took me back to the first landing, and the little girl called her father down; the officer said to me, "What have you got here?" I showed him, and told him I had them from the prisoner; I did not take notice of what the prisoner said.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you been a coachman? A. All my life; I have been out of a situation better than two months - I have driven a cab and an omnibus; I have been a Police-constable and a porter - I never was charged with any offence in my life; it is a year since I drove a coach - the last two months I have got my living by going on messages, and have had the assistance of my wife's purse; she is a laundress - I have assisted officers occasionally, but that you know, you need not have asked me that; Hall, the officer, has employed me - I never was told what I was to have; I made no agreement about it, or ever asked; I have been employed by him since the 13th of November; I have borrowed money of him as a friend; I do not know but what I owe him money now - I have known him about three years, and have been employed in about three jobs for him; I never asked for any money, and it is an impossibility to tell what I expect - any thing will satisfy me, if they give me 5s.; I may have spent twenty days in these jobs - I have borrowed 5l. or 6l. of Hall; I have had no money at all for labour - I did not know there was any due to me; I did not know but what I was doing it for nothing - I believe I have been a witness for the Mint three times, twice in this Court, and once at Clerkenwell; I do not know when I began to borrow of Hall - I never borrowed any thing of any other officer - I left the Police force to join the West Middlesex regiment of militia, for which I was drawn - I was discharged from the Police for quarrelling with my serjeant; I did not think myself justly used, and instead of reporting him I swore at him; I never was in any gaol, nor accused of passing bad money - I had been to the prisoners on the 27th of November, but I did not see him.

Q. Why did you not mention that before? A. Because the prisoner was indicted for what happened on the 29th, and if I had mentioned that, you would have said I prejudiced the minds of the Jury; I did not tell him I wanted five sixpences gilt to put them into punch-ladles - I did not see him; I had a shooting-jacket on then - I did not tell him I was a silversmith; I was at his house on the Monday, and purchased one of these sixpences - I did not say to him on the Tuesday, "Do these as well as you did the one yesterday, for that was done very well - I must have them on Thursday, and get the punch-ladle done on Saturday - don't disappoint me;" nor any thing like that -I saw a person there on Tuesday, who I expect was his wife; I did not see any man, nor did I say in the presence of any man, that the sixpences were intended for punchladles - I did not take down two of these on the Thursday, and say I had only two punch-ladles ready - he did not tell me they only came to 2s. - I said I had but 5s., and could take but two.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. In consequence of information I employed this witness to assist me in apprehending the prisoner; I sent him to his house on the 29th of November - we met at the Wilmington Arms; Daniel was searched by Reynolds - he had no money and I gave him five marked shillings - I then told him to go on; Reynolds followed him, and kept him in sight, and Lloyd followed me, and kept me in sight - when we got to the house I went up, in consequence of a signal; I went in, and when I got to the first floor landing-place, the prisoner was coming down; he asked me what brought me there - I said I did not know; we then went into the room - I caught hold of Daniel's hand, which he had in his pocket, and found this bit of paper, in which were these two gilt sixpences; I asked where he got them - he said of the prisoner; Lloyd searched the prisoner, and found on him 27s. or 28s. in silver, and, I believe, a half-sovereign, all good; I found the five shillings which I had marked - I said to the prisoner, "Nesbitt, it is a pity a man like you should do such a thing, to be taken from your family; where did you get these things?" he said, "Of him," pointing to Daniel - I said, "Now you are telling an untruth, for he has been employed by me to detect you;" we found two gilt farthings in a tea-chest, which the prisoner said were only counters - in going to the office he said he did not know there was any harm in guilding sixpences to put into the bottom of punch ladles and pots - but as to the selling he did not know how he should get over it; I have known Daniel about twelve months - he states he has been a cab-driver, and I believe he has been in the Police - I never advanced him any money; I have paid him when a case has been done - I think on the last occasion I paid him 1l. 10s.

COURT. Q. Did you give him that for past services, or was it money lent or advanced? A. No, it was money for past services; I have been employed by the Mint for many years.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is he in your debt? A. No, Sir; I do not recollect that I ever lent him a shilling; I paid him for what he did, and he knew it was for that - I think the first time I employed him was in the case of Cole, tried here, and the last time was at Clerkenwell; when the case is over Mr. Powell pays me, and I pay him - if he says I have lent him money as a friend, it is wrong.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a constable. I was with the other officer and Daniel at the Wilmington Arms -Daniel was searched, and he had no money but the five shillings marked by Hall; I kept Daniel in sight till he went into the prisoner's house, and when he came out I stopped him, and beckoned to Hall to come to me; when we got on the first floor the prisoner was called, and came down - we went into the room, and Daniel told me I should find three sixpences under an image on the mantel-piece, which I did; as we went to the station the prisoner said, "You have known me some time; be as merciful as you can."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Daniel told you where to find these three? A. Yes; I have known him two years - he was in the Police; I have apprehended several persons for passing bad coin - I believe this is about the second case I have known Daniel to be employed in.

ANDREW LLOYD . I was with the other officers, and followed to the prisoner's house; I searched him, and found a good deal of silver on him, and a half-sovereign; I found the five marked shillings - as I was going to the office he said, "I don't think they can do any thing to me for colouring these things.

JOHN FIELD . These are all good sixpences, which have been gilt with a mixture of gold and quicksilver.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has it not been the habit, as long as you can remember, to put little coins into the bottom of punch ladles? A. I have seen them certainly, and I think I have seen them in tankards.

The prisoner, in a long address, stated that he had been a water-gilder for many years, and that Daniels had called on him, and employed him to gild the sixpences, to put into the bottom of punch-ladles, which he had done, and placed them on the mantel-piece, out of the reach of his children.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-80

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, JANUARY 6TH.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

331. BENJAMIN DUPIER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert James , on the 2nd of December , at St. Ann, Westminster, and stealing therein 11 shirts, value 4l.; 2 cloaks, value 2l. 10s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 1l.; 1 gown, value 5l., and 1 shawl, value 1l. 15s., his property .

SARAH JAMES . I am the wife of Robert James, who is a bricklayer , and lives in Dean-street, Soho, in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster . On the 2nd of December, about a quarter after five o'clock in the afternoon, on going upstairs I found my bed-room door unlocked - I had locked it myself about half-past one o'clock, and on entering the room I found part of my drawers open; they had been rifled - I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and three lace caps, value altogether about 10l. or 12l., which were all safe when I locked the door; I had not been out of the house - I keep a coal and potatoe shop; my private door was kept shut - I do not know the prisoner; the door must have been opened by a false key: the lock was hampered.

GEORGE STONE. I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on another charge, on the 24th of December, in Porter-street, Newport-market - I searched him, and found on him six keys, a knife, and a duplicate of a watch - the keys opened the prosecutor's private door.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you try them to the bed-room door? A. No.

THOMAS FARRANT . I am a Policeman. I searched the prisoner in St. James' watch-house on the 24th. I noticed that the bosom of his shirt was rather large, and having had information of this robbery, and having seen some of James' shirts, I took his shirt off - I saw the end was cut off it, and a piece put in; I asked him how he came by it - he said he bought it in Moumonth-street; I asked how long he had had it - he told me six months, I am sure he said that; Mrs. James claimed it, and he said to her, "It is very curious if that is your shirt, I have had four months."

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to his lodgings? A. I asked where he lodged - he told me first one place and then another; I went to some of the places; I did not see his brother.

MRS. JAMES. This is my husband's shirt - it is my own making, and the mark is cut out. I swear positively to it; - it is part of the property I lost on the day in question.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you sent any shirts to be washed? A. No - I do not know whether any of these keys would open my bed-room; I do not know the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the shirt in Monmouth-street.

GUILTY of stealing in the dwelling house only . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330103-81

332. JOHN COOPER and SAMUEL FARE were charged on the Coroner's Inquisition, with the wilful murder of Benjamin Couch Danby .

Mr. CLARKSON declined offering any evidence. * NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-82

Before Mr. Justice James Parke.

333. SAMUEL FARE alias SLEITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin Couch Danby , on the 19th of December , at Enfield , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d.; 1 cigar-case, value 1s.; 1 purse, value 1s., and 11s., his property .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH MATTHEWS . I was in the service of Mrs. Perry, at the Crown and Horse-shoe, Enfield. On Wednesday, the 19th of December, Mr. Danby came to our house - the prisoner was there, among other persons; they remained there till about ten minutes after eleven o'clock at night; I was in the tap-room when there was a difference between my master and the prisoner - master shook him, and told him to get up off the bench, for he should not lay there - the prisoner threatened if he pulled him up again, he would knock him down; I did not see him produce any thing - they had three or four pots of beer and half a pint of gin; when Danby went out, he staggered about, and I told Fare to take care of him - he came to him when I called him - I led him over the bridge, and then called to Fare, who came and took hold of him, and so did Cooper - Wagstaff was making water at the corner of our house; he went after them - they went in a direction to Wagstaff's house; I observed that the deceased had some shot and powder with him at the public house - I heard next morning that he had been murdered.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. I believe the deceased was so tipsy he fell against the pales? A. He went against the pales - he appeared so tipsy he was likely to fall, if somebody had not held him up.

JOSEPH PERRY . I am landlord of the Crown and Horse-shoe. On the 19th of December Danby and others were at my house - in the course of the evening I went into the tap-room, and saw Fare and some others laying asleep - I laid hold of Fare, and told him to get up; I went into the bar, and heard Fare and another grumbling about my disturbing him; I went in, and asked him what he was grumbling about - he said if I pulled him up again he would knock me down; I told him not to come into my house again; he said it was a public-house, and he should come when he liked - he said, "D-n you, you would not serve me so, but you think I can't pay for a pot;" he put his hand into his pocket, and produced two shillings and a sixpence; Danby produced his purse several times in the prisoner's presence, and I could observe that there was money in it - it appeared to be shillings or sixpences; he took a shilling out to toss with the prisoner - it did not appear to have any half-crowns in it - I could form a judgment of that by the size of the bulk; I should think there were from 12s. to 15s., as far as I could judge - I went up stairs before they left; I desired Mrs. Perry not to draw them any more.

Cross-examined. Q. Fare had been drinking, had he not? A. No; I did not see him there till eight o'clock; I believe only one pot of beer went in - I had not seen him drinking, but before they left more beer was sent in.

RICHARD WAGSTAFF . I am a baker and live at Enfield. On the night of the 19th of December I was at the Crown and Horse-shoe public-house; Fare was there in the course of the evening - we came away a little after eleven o'clock; Johnson, the prisoner, Cooper, and the deceased went out altogether; I went with them as far as my house - we all left at the same time; my house is about a hundred yards from the Crown and Horse-shoe; the deceased was intoxicated: they all passed me at the corner of the house; Johnson and Fare led him along, one on one side, and the other on the other - I was behind them, with Cooper; we proceeded in that manner until we came to my house, and there I parted with them: they were going in a direction towards Sheffield's house.

JOHN COOPER . I was at the Horse-shoe on the night of the 19th of December - I remember the party leaving the house about ten minutes after eleven o'clock; Fare was one, and the deceased was another - Fare and Johnson led the deceased along the road; after Matthews went in, I was behind with Wagstaff - they went just by Wagstaff's house; Wagstaff went into his house - I know Sheffield's house; they did not go quite so far as there: Fare and Johnson were leading him, and just before they got to Sheffield's, I saw a scuffie and a pushing about with them, and Fare fell down - I did not go up to them - the deceased caught hold of my arm, and Fare went

away directly he got up; he was not on the ground half a minute - Fare lived with his mother, at the Holly-bush - I did not see which way he went; I never saw any thing more of him after that - I afterwards proceeded as far as Holt White's-hill, and while there I did not observe any body meddle with the deceased's pockets, or turn either of them inside out.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not state yesterday that you saw a person in Holt White's-lane take a handkerchief out of Mr. Danby's pocket? A. That was up the lane, when the man was killed; Johnson took a handkerchief from his jacket.

COURT. Q. From his jacket pocket or his breast? -A. It was about his breast that he took it from.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Was not the handkerchief taken from his jacket after he was murdered? A. Yes - I had been knocked into the ditch, and he upon me, and when I had an opportunity of seeing, Johnson's knees were on Danby's body, and his hands on his head; it was starlight and freezing; I was about three yards from Danby when the pushing took place.

Q. Did it appear to be larking among drunken men? A. Yes - I did not know they were doing any harm; it appeared to be larking - Sheffield's house is seven or eight yards from Wagstaff's; Fare went away about a minute after Wagstaff went into his house - Wagstaff did not advise me to go home as he went in; he had done so about half a minute before - he said it would be better for me to go home; the prisoner was about four yards off - he could not hear that as Wagstaff did not speak loud - the prisoner had been drinking with the decased and Johnson; I do not think he was at all tipsy.

Q. Fare was thrown down with this pushing? A. I do not know that he was thrown down; he went on the ground - I had my eye on him from the time Wagstaff went in till he fell down.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you able, from the position you were in, to tell whether he was robbed or not at that time? A. I cannot tell one way or the other; I heard no money rattle when Johnson took the handkerchief from Danby's pocket; I was near enough to hear if there was any - I was about four yards off; Johnson did not produce any silver to me after the murder - there was an opportunity to rob Danby near Sheffield's house, if they were disposed to do so.

Q. Is there a passage between Wagstaff's and Sheffield's? A. Yes, it goes up the high road; it is a narrow passage by a public-house - the scuffle was in the footpath at the side of the passage: the road runs two ways - there is a little road branches off into the high road; that is what I call the narrow passage - the scuffling was in the footpath at the bottom of the passage, about ten yards from the high road, in the passage.

JURY. Q. Do you know if he kept his money in the same pocket as the handkerchief? A. I do not know.

COURT. Q. Was it a silk or cotton handkerchief that was taken from him? A. I do not know, I had not hold of it; it was the handkerchief which was thrown into the river; the passage goes up into the road - it leads from the public-house to the chase-side road; we did not go out of the road - the passage was in the course of our way.

JOSEPH PERRY . When I saw the deceased produce his purse from time to time; he always put it into his right-hand breeches pocket, I am confident of that, for I had seen him pull it out the day before at the Holy-bush, and observed how very careful he was in putting his purse away.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How late did you see him with the purse? A. About half-past ten o'clock; I am certain he then put it into his right-hand breeches pocket - I went to bed after that, and cannot say whether he pulled it out again; I heard he was tipsy when he left the house.

JOSEPH MATTHEWS . I saw the deceased produce his purse after my master went away: I did not notice what pocket he put it into, I think it was his inner pocket; I know he did not put it into any pocket in his jacket; I know he put it down below.

JOHN COOPER re-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Where Fare fell was there any ditch on the side? A. No. It was a level ground - he fell against the fence; it was on the right-hand side going along: the scuffling was hugging one another, pushing each other about - there was not much struggling.

JURY. Q. Did you observe who commenced the struggling? A. Johnson apparently: Danby did not resist the struggling as offensive or troublesome - he was not in a state to resist it; I cannot say whether he was sensible enough to take it as a joke - I do not think there was struggling enough to make Fare fall down; they were only hugging and pushing about: he was not pushed down.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable of Enfield. On the morning of the 20th of December, I received information of the murder; I went to the spot, and saw the deceased's body - I observed a cap and gloves in it, with the body; I took Fare into custody on the Thursday morning, about ten minutes after eight o'clock: (it was about half-past eight when I got home;) I took him at his mother's house, in chase-side, near the Holly-bush - if persons were going from the Crown and Horse-shoe, to the Holy-bush, they would pass Sheffield's house to go to the footway, and along the chase-side road: he would be in a direct line to his home when he was with Cooper, and the deceased in the chase-side road - his mother keeps a small cottage; there are two little rooms down stairs, and two up stairs - she has a family, but I do not know how many; I did not search the cottage: I took Fare to the watch-house - I searched him there, and found on him four knives and 4d. in halfpence, a penny-piece, the bowl of a tobacco-pipe, some shot, a key, and two sixpences; I have known Fare from his infancy - he had been living in different families: he has lived at his mother's for some months; it is my duty to attend the parish officers at Enfield - Fare was a pauper of the parish, and received relief on the 19th at the poor-house, I saw him there that Wednesday morning, and in the afternoon; I was in the committee-room with him when they gave him an order for 2s. 6d. - I said,"Give it to me Sam;" I passed it over to the master of the house, who handed him two shillings and a sixpence in my presence - I cannot recollect whether he was in the habit of receiving relief before that; when he came, he applied for work or relief, saying he had got no employment, and he could not starve - the chairman said, "A youngman like you, coming for relief, you let yourself down

very much to come as a pauper;" I know he said, "I must have relief or starve," or something like that - I showed Mr. Addington the tobacco-pipe bowl; Watkins searched his mother's house - I took a key from him, which I applied to a box at his mother's house, in company with Watkins; it opened the box.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you been in the habit of attending the committee when giving relief? A. Yes, for some years; persons sometimes get relief who are not really in want.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you not sure he said he must have relief, for he could not starve? A. Yes, I am sorry to say that is a remark too often made.

RICHARD WATKINS . I am a Bow-street horse-patrol. I received information of the murder, and Fare, Johnson, and Cooper were apprehended; I saw the body at the Serjeant - I did not notice the cap and gloves - I went and searched the prisoner's house while he was taken to the watch-house by Mead - I found a box in the house, and asked his mother a question about it; she gave me an answer, in consequence of which I broke open the box, and found in it 11s., and two duplicates - Mead and I afterwards applied a key to that box which opened it - I had not the key when Mead took Fare - Mead afterwards produced it; I had opened the box in Mead's absence, and found in it 11s., all in shillings - it was scattered about loose in the box, a little distance apart, as if it had been dropped in; there was nothing else in the box but a few old buttons - I produced the key before the Coroner - I do not know whether what the prisoner said was taken down - he was examined as a witness - a person was writing - I am sure the key Mead produced fitted the box.

Cross-examined. Q. There are several persons living in this cottage? A. I believe they are all one family; I do not know how many there are in family.

JOHN MEAD. It was the key I found in the prisoner's possession which unlocked the box.

WILLIAM WHEELER . I am a labourer, and live at Enfield-chase. On Thursday morning, the 20th of December, at half-past five o'clock I was going to work; as I passed down Holt White's-lane, I found a corpse; I got assistance, and came back to the spot; I found the body had been murdered; I found a cap on the spot, with a pair of gloves; some shot and two halfpence laid close to the body - it was brought down to the Serjeant public-house, and taken possession of by Mead; the deceased's left-hand trowsers pocket was turned inside out; the right hand pocket was in.

JOHN MEAD. I took possession of the cap and gloves at the Serjeant, but not the halfpence; the shot was then in the cap; when I searched Fare I found a very small quantity of shot loose in his waistcoat pocket, with the bowl of the tobacco pipe - I did not take them all out; they are the same size as those found with the body; I found no shot in the deceased's clothes - I did not search.

Cross-examined. Q. The shot was inside the cap? A. Yes, when I saw it - I understood it was picked up, and put in the cap; here is all the shot I took from Fare, he had more, but it was a very small quantity.

Re-examined. The shot was produced before the Jury; that found on the ground and on the deceased were compared, and they were the same shot, No.4.

JOHN CUFFLEY . I keep the Serjeant. On the morning of the alarm I went to Holt White's-lane, and saw the body of the deceased; I got there about a quarter to seven o'clock; Wheeler and several others were there; I saw the cap, the gloves, some halfpence, and some small shot laid by the side of it; I do not think the face was downwards, but it had been moved; I put the gloves into the cap; there is about three quarters of a pound of shot in the deceased's pocket now - the deceased had half a quarter of a pound of shot in his rough jacket pocket I think; in turning the body over, some might have fallen out.

Cross-examined. Q. It is a very common size shot? Yes.

Upon comparing the shot produced, some corresponded in size and the rest differed.

JOSEPH MATTHEWS. I gave the deceased change shortly before he left the public-house that night, and gave him 4d. in halfpence; that was the last time he paid me any thing - I cannot say whether it was all in halfpence.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you notice which pocket he put it into? A. No; he put it into some of his pockets - he did not pull out his purse to put it in; I do not think he put it into his trousers pocket.

JOHN MEAD. I found eight halfpence and a penny-piece on Fare; when I went to the spot where the murder was committed - in searching about, I picked up a halfpenny - I saw no more; the two had been found before, as I was told - Watkins searched Johnson.

RICHARD WATKINS . I found a shilling on Johnson, that was all the money I found on him.

PETER ADDINGTON . The deceased was a connexion of mine by marriage, and lived at my house, at Enfield, from the 12th to the 19th of December, and accompained me in my rounds to my customers - I drove a cart; he had been out with me on the Wednesday on which he was murdered, and on the Tuesday and Monday - on the Wednesday morning I lent him the bowl of a tobacco-pipe; I should know it again, (looking at it) this is it; I had it about twelve months, and used it to load a gun, and lent it him for that purpose; I can take on myself to swear this is the bowl I lent him - here is a little bit broken out of it - I passed the Holly-bush with him on Tuesday, the day before the murder.

Cross-examined. Q. There are several bits broken out of it? A. No, only in one place; I only broke it in one place, that is inside - I never knew any body else charge a gun with a bowl.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is it a bowl with figures on it? A. Yes, here is a greyhound on it, and a leaf worked up the back - I never noticed more than one greyhound on i- I broke this piece out myself - I am quite sure it if the same bowl.

JURY. Q. Do you know if he had different size shots with him? A. I cannot tell.

MR. BODKIN. Q. In what pocket did he keep his shot and the bowl? A. I believe in the inside jacket pocket.

THOMAS NEWMAN . I am a labourer, and live at Enfield. On the day before the murder, in the morning, I was with Fare

by the Holly-bush - Addington and the deceased went past in the cart; Fare asked me if that was the man who had got all that money which they talked so much about; I said I did not know no more than a child; he said he wished he knew whether it was him or not; for if he could light on him in the dark he would cut his wizen; but he would have some of it.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you went and told the nearest constable you could find? A. No; I told one Brown on the Thursday night; nobody else was present; it was about half-past nine o'clock in the morning.

WILLIAM WALKER . I keep the Rising Sun, at Enfield, about a quarter of a mile from Addington's - it leads on to the Chase side-road. On the morning before I heard of the murder I saw Mr. Danby at about half-past twelve o'clock, Wednesday morning - he came to my house; I had given him change for a sovereign on the Tuesday night; I gave him 20s.; he returned me one to pay for some gin and water - I gave it him all in shillings.

JURY to JOHN COOPER . Q. You say Fare fell towards the paling - was the deceased's face or back towards Fare? A. Fare had hold of the right-hand side of the deceased when he fell.

Q. Was Johnson twisted about at all? A. A little; he was on the left-hand side.

MR. BODKIN. Q. After Fare left you, on which side of the deceased did Johnson walk? A. On the right-hand side all the way; I should think he had an opportunity of taking any thing from the deceased if so inclined - the struggling lasted about half a minute; Fare had hold of him; I did not see him meddle with his pockets.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. On which side of the deceased was Fare? A. On the right-hand side; he had an opportunity of robbing him if so disposed; I could not see whether he had his hand in his pocket - he was on his right side all the time till he left; he did not tell us he was going away; he left without saying a word.

Q. Was the road light? A. There is a hedge; it is not so light as the Chase-side road.

JOHN CUFFLEY. I was present when the deceased's clothes were examined; there was some halfpence and a sixpence I believe found; I had the key of the room all the time, till the Inquest; nobody could get at it.

RICHARD WATKINS. I examined the deceased's clothes at the Inquest, and found a sixpence and a foreign halfpenny in the inside jacket pocket - there was no other money on him at all.

MR. ADDINGTON. I lent him the bowl between nine and ten o'clock on Wednesday morning; he was shooting that day.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I most solemnly declare my innocence of the charge - I am accused of having in my possession a tobacco-pipe bowl, some shot, and 11s. in silver, the supposed property of the deceased Benjamin Couch Danby, which has been attempted to be proved, by circumstantial evidence only, to have been the property of the deceased; I submit to your Lordship and Gentlemen, that there is no proof that the deceased was robbed by me, nor indeed was he, which I most solemnly declare; I do trust, that your Lordship and Gentlemen will not deem the possession of a tobacco-pipe bowl, and which I had had upwards of one month previous to the day in which the unfortunate and dreadful business was committed, and which I had used at least three weeks previous to the murder, on which day I had been shooting birds on the Chase, in company of Henry Keep, Thomas Moles, and George Hill, all of whom would have proved they saw me with the tobacco-pipe bowl, which I then used to charge the gun with powder, with which I shot the birds - the gun had been lent me by a person named William Cufflin ; the shot found also upon me was part of what I had on that day, and are No. 4 shots - the above persons were present yesterday to prove these facts, as my instruction to the Counsel would prove: they all of them having been subpoenaed, and were in attendance, but in consequence of my acquittal of the murder, they have thought themselves discharged from their subpoenas, and never contemplated being called upon this day, as evidence to prove that for which they were in attendance yesterday - placed as I am this day before you, entirely unprotected by any friends as to character, who were all present yesterday, to prove that I was not the dissolute and abandoned character the newspapers has made me appear to be; I throw myself upon your protection, certain my unfortunate case will recommend your best attention and consideration - my Lord and Gentlemen, my case is in your hands, and I anxiously look forward to a favourable result; I forbear to say any thing respecting the evidence of the approver Cooper, and shall leave him to a wicked conscience, but a merciful and just God.

Seven witnesses gave the prisoner a very good character.

GUILTY of stealing from the person only . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years . (See page 118.)

Reference Number: t18330103-83

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

334. JAMES HODGES , WILLIAM BIGGS , and THOMAS GEORGE were indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin New , on the 9th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 2l; 3 half-crowns, and 3 shillings, his property .

BENJAMIN NEW. I live at Smallhouse-green, Isleworth; I am a dealer in fish and fruit . I was in the tap at Cranford bridge on the 9th of December; I went down there about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, and continued there till near six in the evening; I went down there to receive some money, and had been drinking but very little; the prisoners, Biggs and George, came in, as near as I can remember, about half-past three o'clock, and remained there till within a quarter of an hour of my going away - I was never in their company before - I cannot say whether Hodges was there; I went out a little before six o'clock, and went on towards Hounslow; I cannot exactly say the time, as the clock in the room did not go; as I came upon the bridge, going towards Hounslow , I was stopped by George, who had on the dress he wore in the tap-room (a kind of velveteen coat); he met me on the bridge, and said, "This is not the way to Brentford;" and he said "Come here old boy, I want you a minute;" I then attempted to pass on down the bridge, and he made a snatch at my watch - I passed on by him a little way down the bridge, and then the other two prisoners came up, and all three together assisted in throwing me on my back - then George put his hand in my left-hand waistcoat pocket, and took from it three half-crowns, and three shillings; and while he was taking my money, Biggs took my watch - Hodges received the money out of George's hands; as George was stooping over me, Biggs said "I have got his ticker, come on," and they all three ran off - I got up and went back to the

tap, where I had come from, and told somebody who I met, that I had been robbed on the bridge; I am perfectly sure I had my watch safe in my pocket at the time I was robbed - the prisoners ran away the same way as I ran; I followed after them, but saw nothing of them, till they were apprehended next morning - I have not seen any of my property; I was not on the ground I think above five minutes - I was knocked down almost immediately after George spoke to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many public-houses had you been to that night? A. Only that one, I am certain; it is the White Hart; I was in no other house before the robbery - I was not turned out of any public-house, and refused any liquor; I was not altogether sober, but was not drunk; I cannot say how much I drank, to a pint or two - I paid 1s. 6d. for it, but the prisoners had part of it; I recollect saying I was the best body-snatcher in England; I should not have said that, but when I came in Biggs said, "There is that body-snatcher;" George said, "I'll lay a pot of beer he never took a body in his life" - Biggs said, "Oh, Yes, he has many a score, ayn't you old boy?" I said, "Yes, to be sure, many a one," &c.; I said so in order not to have any words; the tap-room was nearly full of people; I do not know the man I met on the bridge: I said to him,"Here they are coming," but it was some boys I mistook for them - I have a perfect recollection of all the prisoners.

Q. Were you not cursing and swearing, and so tipsy that the man you spoke to left you to follow your own devices? A. No; I said to him, "Here are the b - rs coming who have robbed me;" the persons might be ten or twelve yards off at that time - I will not swear they were within five yards; the witness Williams is not the man I spoke to - it was a taller man; there might be a person behind the man I spoke to, but I only saw him - I was much more sober then, through the fright; I was not in the Hare and Hounds that night - I know Knivton, the landlord - it was not at his house I said I was a body snatcher.

COURT. Q. Are the White Hart and Hare and Hounds on the same side of the way? A. No - I am not certain that Hodges was there, but more than three partook of what I had.

WILLIAM BONSEY . I deal in potatoes, and live at Cranford. I was on the bridge on Monday, the 9th of December, about seven o'clock at night; I cannot say whether the clock had struck or not; I saw the prosecutor on the bridge, and before he got to the bridge - I knew Hodges and Biggs from children - we are all neighbours together- I was going towards the bridge, and saw Hodges and Biggs; I live towards Hounslow, just before you come to the bridge - I saw them about two hundred yards, as near as I could guess: they came and walked by the side of me - I said to Hodges, "Jem, is that you?" and I said"Bill, is that you?" Biggs said Yes, and I tapped him on the shoulder; they passed me, and walked too fast for me -Hodges said, "He has got him in the road;" Hodges then set out running, and Biggs after him - I went near to them, and saw some man before they got up to the prosecutor, but I could not swear it was George; there were four together, and the three dragged the prosecutor on the bridge- as they drew him on the bridge, New said, "You are picking my pocket; "Hodges said "No, I am putting your handkerchief into your pocket;" they dragged him right on the top of the bridge - New had a white and black Newfoundland dog with him; Biggs asked where the strap was - I cannot tell what strap he meant; Biggs had the dog in his hand - as I passed close to them on the bridge I went a little way; I then stood and listened, and heard New halloo out, "You are picking my pocket - you are robbing me;" he cried very much at the time, and hallooed out, "You have got my money," and then he hallooed out Patrol! Patrol! six or seven times, and up came a postboy, Harry Burt, who lives at the bridge; I said, "Harry, let us go, perhaps they will drag him into the ditch;" we went up to the top of the bridge, to New, and Harry said,"Where are they?" they were gone then; New said,"Here they come;" there was a lot of boys coming along then, one of whom I saw in the yard to-day; the boys were not the persons who had been pulling New about - they were coming, and he thought it was the men coming along, and said, "Here they come back; I shall know them" - New was standing up when we got to him, he crossed the road to me - I said, "How much have they robbed you of?" he said 17s. and a watch - he was tipsy, but sensible - it was not very dark, it was moon-light -I did not interface to prevent it, because I knew if I had gone near them they would as soon have knocked me down as him; I went down to the White Hart to have a pint of beer at the tap, where the prosecutor had been, and told them what had happened - I told them the men's names.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a costermonger? A. Yes - I was not drinking at the White Hart, and never saw the prosecutor before: there was nobody on the road when I first saw them - they dragged him to the top of the bridge, about fifty yards from the houses, and one hundred and fifty or two hundred yards from the White Hart; I did not see Williams there - I know him; I do not think I met any body between the bridge and the White Hart; New did not point out two persons, and say "There are the two b-rs who robbed me;" if he did it was before I went up - Burt, the post-boy, and I went up together; I was quite sober.

JOHN EMMERSON . I am a horse-patrol. I was on duty in the road near Cranford-bridge on the 19th of December about ten o'clock at night - I was called to disperse the three prisoners and another man, who were fighting. on the Hounslow-side of the bridge - they separated before I got up to them, Hodges and another man, insulted a man and woman, who were travelling on the footpath; the man stopped, looked at Hodges, and said,"I suppose you wish to serve me as you served that poor man on the bridge to-night, by drawing his money;" I then inquired whether there had been a robbery - I was informed there had been one, and that the prisoners were the three men; in consequence of what I heard, I went in pursuit of George and another, and found him at the White Hart-tap, and hearing a watch had been lost, I searched him, but found no watch - I left him then until I had seen the prosecutor; after I came off duty the prosecutor said he had lost a watch and about 10s. - I asked him why he did not make it known at the time that he had been robbed; his excuse was that he had some gold about him, and I

and my partner found two sovereigns in his pocket - he described the prisoners, and we apprehended them according to the description he gave; the robbery was on Sunday - I apprehended them on Monday; I took George again on the Monday, in Harlington, at work, and took him to the prosecutor, at the Halfway-house at Windsor; he said he was one, but he had a different dress on at that time - I did not take Hodges that night, as I had not seen the prosecutor; the other officer was with me on the Sunday evening - he apprehended the other two prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. You were called in consequence of their fighting with a man? A. They were fighting when I came up: the White Hart is about one hundred and fifty yards from the bridge - I found George there, but finding nothing on him, let him go; I found two sovereigns in New's breeches pocket - he said his silver was taken from his waistcoat pocket; he said he had received 13s. or 14s. at the White Hart, and it was all gone but half a crown, and he went away to make sure of his gold - I could see he had been on the ground; it was reported on the bridge that he had five sovereigns in his possession, but I did not hear him say so,

COURT. Q. Did you know either of the prisoners before? A. Yes, and knew them from his description - he described one as tall, the other short, and that one man in a dark coat was stouter than the rest, and shorter than the other stout one; that description answered to the prisoner's- George had a dark coat on on the Sunday evening, and Biggs is stouter - he described Hodges as the tallest.

MARTIN BURTON . I am a patrol. I was with Emmerson on the Sunday night, when he saw the prosecutor; he described the persons who he said had robbed him, as Emmerson has stated - I apprehended Hodges and George in consequence of that description; I took Hodges at work at Cranford - he answered the prosecutor's description; I did not search him then - I brought him to the prosecutor, and asked if he knew him; he said, "Yes, I will swear to him - he was one of the men who robbed me;" I left him with my partner, and then went and took George, at Harlington, at work, cutting down a hedge, about half a mile from Cranford - I bought him to the prosecutor, who said,"That is another of them, I will swear to him;" I was with Emmerson when he apprehended Biggs on the Monday morning (before I took the others) - the prosecutor said, "He is one of them" - Emmerson searched Biggs; nothing was found on any of them.

BENJAMIN NEW re-examined. I had two sovereigns that night, in my left-hand breeches pocket - I had 6d. in my right-hand waistcoat pocket, and I think a 1d.; the silver I was robbed of, was three half-crowns and three shillings; they were in my left-hand waistcoat pocket - I felt George's hand in my waistcoat pocket; I had a Newfoundland dog with me, and missed the dog all at once; I thought it was gone down to the water under the bridge to drink - I was dragged some distance before I was robbed.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you tell nobody you had lost five sovereigns? A. No; it happened on Sunday night.

George's Defence. I came out of the tap where the prosecutor was, and went across the road with a young woman, about half-past four o'clock, and then he came out- he behaved indecent, and the young woman went away.

THOMAS KNIVTON . I keep the Hare and Hounds, near Cranford-bridge. I know all three of the prisoners, and New perfectly well - I recollect the night of Sunday, when the alarm of the robbery was raised; before that the three prisoners and New were at my house: I am certain New was there, and will swear he was very much intoxicated - he was very abusive indeed: he wanted more drink; I told him I would not fill him any more, on account of his bad language, and bad behaviour - he was not fit to drink any more; he had had too much: he said he was the best body-snatcher in this country, there was no one equal to him - this was at my house; I heard an alarm of robbery the same Sunday night - he was at my house a little before six o'clock, between half-past five and six; my wife pressed him to go away several times, but he wanted to stop, and dropped his cap off, which I picked up, and put on his head as I wished him to go - my house is on the London side of Cranford-bridge: the White Hart is on the other side, on a different side of the road.

COURT. Q. What time did he come to your house that evening? A. From half-past five to six o'clock; all three of the prisoners were there, two of them were in the house before he was (Hodges and Biggs), and when I had drawn them a pot of beer, New came in - George came in a few minutes after, they had conversation together; merely romancing with each other - I do not know on what occasion he said he was the best body-snatcher; they were talking with him about it, but did not ask him any questions about it - it was his own voluntary discourse; they all four went out of my house together, and went towards London - it was about six o'clock, as near as I can guess; I have seen New before, I do not know that I ever saw him in my house before - he gave me half a crown to pay for a pot of beer: he was only once in my house that day; he did not come back.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a labourer. I recollect the Sunday night the robbery was committed near the bridge; I know New: I was about two hundred yards off the bridge - hearing this man swearing, brought me to the spot, he was very drunk indeed; he said I had robbed him, I and another witness - before I came up to him, I heard him use a very bad expression; when we got up, and went close to him, he said, "They are the two b-rs that robbed me;" he said he had got five sovereigns left, they had not taken all - I went away, Colley and Burt were on the other side of the bridge, six or seven yards from us; Burt is a post-boy, and the other a shoemaker - that is all I know.

JURY. Q. Did you hear this man swearing at a distance of two hundred yards? A. Yes, and could have heard if I had been further; he was very drunk, but he could swear very well; he was swearing about body-snatching.

COURT. Q. At what time was that? A. As near six o'clock as I can guess, it might be five minutes after - I was about fifty yards from him, when he said, "Here are the two that robbed me;" I could not see him till I got upon the crown of the bridge - I do not know who he al luded to; I saw no boys about: when we came up he said we were the two who robbed him, but not before - but he was swearing when we were fifty yards off: I know Bonsey, I did not see him there - I saw a Newfoundland dog on the bridge with him; John Ayers was with me.

JOHN EMMERSON . The prosecutor was not drunk when I saw him; it was near twelve o'clock: I rode after him to get information.

CHARLES HAMMOND . I am a labourer, and live at Harlington. On the night of the robbery I found New laying by the side of the road, very drunk - it was about half-past six o'clock; I took him to Hounslow: I drank part of two pints of beer with him - he went up to a woman, and wanted to shake hands with her, and asked her who she was, and where she was going; I pulled him away: he did not annoy her - he did not tell me he had been robbed; it was near half-past six o'clock when I found him, as near as I can say; I had no watch - I went to Hounslow with him, to the King William the Fourth, and left him there: he was very drunk - I wanted him to go, but he said as I had brought him so far, he would treat me with some drink, and insisted on my going in; I drank twice with him, and came out, leaving him there -I had seen him before, he used to cry oranges, coals, and fish, with his father when I knew him before; I think he changed 6d. when he treated me.

THOMAS KNIVTON . I never saw him with a watch.

JOHN COLEMAN . I am a farmer and gardener. I have known George from a child; I always understood him to be an honest character - he worked for me until I left off farming six years ago; since that he has worked for a neighbour of mine - he has lived there the last two years, up to this time - he is willing to take him again.

BENJAMIN NEW. My Lord, Coleman told me he would get me my watch for half a crown last week; I was in the Coach and Horses, at Harlington, and several others of the prisoner's friends were in the house - I sat eating my bread and cheese, and this man was in liquor; he very much ill-used me, though I never said a word to any of them, and he said he knew where my watch was, and he would get it me if I gave him half a crown.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How many people were there? A. Seven or eight; I told Emmerson of it the same night.

JOHN COLEMAN . There was a party there drinking and joking; it was mentioned that New was a prosecutor in a case: and I said that, but I know nothing of the matter.

WILLIAM BONSEY . After seeing what I did, I left New on the bridge; I went to the White Hart, and stopped there about an hour - the prosecutor did not come back into the tap-room while I was there; he might have come into the house: neither of the prisoners came there while I was - I saw Biggs and Hodges, I think as near seven o'clock as I can guess; it might be earlier - I am sure it was after six; I should think it was about eight when I got back, after I came from the bridge - I left the bridge to go to the tap about seven o'clock; it was more than half-past six.

BENJAMIN NEW. I went to Hounslow after it happened; a man went with me to the George the Fourth - I staid at Hounslow till about a quarter after nine o'clock, and then went on towards home - after being robbed, I went to the White Hart tap to give an alarm, but did not go into the house; I then went on to Hounslow, which is my way home.

JOHN EMMERSON . I saw him a little way through Hounslow, on his way home.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-84

335. WILLIAM STONE and JAMES MILLS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 44 lbs. of butter, value 50s.; 1 basket, value 2s., and 1 butter-cloth, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Curtis ; and that the said William Stone had been before convicted of felony .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Joseph Hedges .

JOSEPH HEDGES . I am a carrier , and live at Aston Abbots, Bucks. On the 15th of December I brought a flat of butter in my waggon, between five and six o'clock in the morning; I put it down by the side of the waggon, in Newgate-street , near the market - it was to go to the Minories, to Mr. Metcalf, who was to send to the waggon for it; I just left the waggon before it was taken - I found it at the watch-house in less than an hour afterwards - I have not a doubt of it; the direction was on it; I do not know the prisoner.

JOHN FARMER . I am a patrol of Farringdon within. On the 15th of December, about a quarter after six o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Newgate-street, and met the two prisoners, and another person with them, coming down Newgate-street, towards Giltspur-street - Stone had got a flat of butter on his shoulder; I called to Lloyd, and told him my suspicions, and we ran down Newgate-street, and found they had all three stopped in Giltspur-street, and Mills was in the act of taking the flat of butter from Stone; he put it on his shoulder, and they went on; the third man turned, saw us coming, and crossed over the other side of the way, and gave a whistle - the prisoners turned down Windmill-court, which is no thoroughfare; we stood, and as they came out of the court we stopped them - Mills had then got the flat on his shoulder; they were both together - we stopped them; Lloyd asked Mills where he was going to take the flat - he said he was going to Mr. Smith's, in Whitechapel; we opened the flat, and it contained butter - there was a bill inside the flat; we then took them to the watch-house, and went out into Newgate-street to make inquiry -Hedges came to the watch-house.

JAMES LLOYD . I am a patrol. About a quarter after six o'clock on the 15th of December, Farmer called me, and we followed the prisoners down Newgate-street, with another person, into Giltspur-street, and there Mills took the flat from Stone - the third man crossed the road; the prisoners turned down Windmill-court - we waited there until they came out; Mills had the flat then - I took it from his shoulder; I asked Mills where he was going to take the butter to - he said to Mr. Smith's, in Whitechapel; I asked where he brought it from - he said from Leadenhall-market.

WILLIAM BEALE . I am clerk at the Rose, inn Smithfield. The flat was put under my care on the pavement in Newgate-street; I was looking at the directions on some more things, and did not see it taken - I missed it at a quarter after six o'clock; I saw it again at the watch-house, and knew it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BURROUGHS. I am a Policeman. I have a certificate of a former conviction of Stone (read) - I was present when he was tried and convicted; he was con

fined one month - I am certain he is the man; I knew him before.

Stone's Defence. I met a young man in Newgate-street, who asked me where the Bull's Head, Smithfield, was -I said I would show him, and when I was within twelve yards of going out of Newgate-street, Mills asked me to carry the flat while he stopped for a certain purpose - I went down the turning, not knowing it was no thoroughfare.

Mills' Defence. I was looking for a job, and in Newgate-street, a gentleman asked if I wanted a job, and said,"If you will take this to Smithfield I will give you 1s.;" this man came by, and I asked him the way to the Bull's Head.

STONE - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

MILLS - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-85

336. ALICE RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 4 blankets, value 10s.; 1 rug, value 4s.; one bed-tick, value 3s.; 2 flatirons, value 1s.; 1 tea-pot, value 18s.; 1 yard of carpet, value 3s.; 1 sheet, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pillow-case, value 6d., and 1 candlestick, value 1s. , the goods of Joseph Still .

MARY ANN STILL . I am the wife of Joseph Still , and live in Sugar Loaf-court, Dorset-street, Fleet-street . These articles were in the third floor room in my house, which the prisoner lodged in; I let it in August at 4s. a week; her husband has been foreman at Mr. Wilkinson's, Ludgate-hill, for several years - all these articles were let with the room; the husband came with her to take the room, but did not live with her; he only came to pay the rent - after she had been with me for a short time, she was delivered of an infant, and she left in November, and in three weeks I had the room broken open, and missed the things - she had locked the door, and taken the key; her husband told me to break open the door, which I did, and missed the articles - I found she was lodging on Saffron-hill, and my son gave her in charge.

EDMUND BROWN . I am shopman to Mr. Flemming, of Newgate-street. I have a rug which was pawned on the 13th of November - I was not present when it was taken; the person has left - 15d. was advanced on it.

FRANCIS GEORGE HERBERT . I am in the employ of Mr. Niblet, of Farringdon-street. I have four blankets, pawned at four different times - I took in two of them from the prisoner; I did not take in the rest - I lent her 2s. on each of them - the other person is not here; they are pawned in the name of Ann Richards .

JAMES PERKINS . I am apprentice to Thomas Cottrell , pawnbroker, No. 99, Shoe-lane. I produce two shirts, pawned on the 25th of October by the prisoner, for 2s. - I have a flat-iron pawned, by her on the 30th of October, for 4d., and a carpet for 3s.; I did not take that in; the foreman who did, is not here.

JOHN SMITH . In consequence of information, I apprehended the prisoner on the 15th of December, in a back room, on Great Saffron-hill; she was intoxicated at the time. I found on her duplicates of part of the property - I found fifteen duplicates on her; one duplicate is for a tea-pot, pawned in Picket-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 41. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-86

337. HENRY FLANDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , at 63 lbs. of pork, value 34s., and 9 yards of linen cloth, value 1s., the goods of Samuel Howes ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

SAMUEL HOWES . I am a butcher , and live in Tabernacle-square, Old-Street. On Saturday, the 1st of December, this pork was in my cart, in Newgate-street - I had just bought it in the market; in about half an hour I missed it - it was wrapped up in a cloth; I saw it again about half an hour afterwards - the prisoner was in custody with it, close to my cart; I knew it to be mine - the prisoner was a perfect stranger.

HUMPHRY EASLEY . I am a butcher, and live in Church-street, Bethnal-green. I saw the prisoner take the pork out of Howes' cart, in Newgate-street - the tail-board was down - I went after him, and hallooed out Stop thief! and as he turned round Ivy-lane, a man stopped him; I never lost sight of him.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge. The meat was returned to the prosecutor - I kept the cloth which Howes claimed - the pork weighed 63 lbs.(Cloth produced and sworn to.)

JAMES BLAKE . I am a Policeman. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction (which I got from the clerk of this Court) - I know him to be the man - (read); I was present at his trial, and heard the verdict given.

Prisoner. I am extremely sorry - I did it through distress - I have a wife and six children now in Clerkenwell workhouse.

GUILTY . Aged 41. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-87

338. JOHN DENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 1 pair of gloves, value 18d., the goods of John Stannard , from his person .

JOHN STANNARD. I live at No. 160, Whitecross-street. On Christmas-eve or morning, between two and three o'clock, I was in Holborn , just beyond Glo'ster-court, near Brook-street - I was sober; I was returning home, having been out to supper - I had a pair of gloves in my outside coat pocket; I was standing to hear the bellman, and missed my gloves all at once - my cousin being with me, I told him - the prisoner was close behind me; there were several persons listening to the bellman - my cousin said he would look after the prisoner, while I fetched Simmons, the watchman, who took hold of the prisoner, and found my gloves in his hat; he said nothing till he got to the watch-house, and there he said they were his cousin's, which he had taken by mistake; and before the Magistrate he said he found them.

JOHN STANNARD . I had been with the prosecutor, supping out - we were both sober; the prisoner was standing close to my cousin, who turned round, and said, "I have

lost my gloves;" the watchman was fetched, and found them in the prisoner's hat.

CHARLES SIMMONS . I am a watchman. I laid hold of the prisoner, who was with another lad and a prostitute, conversing together; I took his hat off, and found the gloves - I said, "Are they yours?" he said, "Yes, my cousin lent them to me;" the prosecutor described them exactly before he saw them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman and his friend were going to fight; I picked up the gloves, and full half an hour after he came up, and accused me of the robbery.

JOHN STANNARD . A young man who was with the prisoner interrupted us, and there being no watchman, my cousin said if he did not go away he would disperse him - my cousin took his coat off, but I did not take any thing off; I did not fight with my cousin.

GUILTY .* Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-88

339. JAMES SORRELL was indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE HODGKINSON . I am a grocer and tea-dealer , and live in Aldersgate-street. I took the prisoner into my employ out of charity, from the overseers of the parish - I employed him to receive money. On the 1st of December I sent him with a parcel of goods to Welbeck-street, Cavendish-square , and gave him a receipt for a former bill of 2l. 18s. 6d., and told him if the lady was not in the way to leave the goods, and bring the receipt back - he returned and brought the receipt back, without the money; he should give me the money immediately he received it; he gave me 1s. 6d. which I had given him in case he should want change - he said he was to call again on Tuesday, and the lady would give him the money; and on Tuesday morning he told me the lady particularly wished him to go- I gave him the bill and receipt and 1s. 6d., and he never returned - he surrendered on the Friday week after; I have never received the money - he behaved well on other occasions.

MARIA GARROD . I live with Mrs. Beaumont. On the 4th of December (I am not quite sure of the prisoner, but) a man brought the goods, which were not paid for - he called again, and I paid him 2l. 18s. 6d. in money.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear it was 2l. 18s. 6d. - was it not in a piece of paper? A. Yes; mistress gave me the paper to put it into.

JOHN ROWELL . I am a patrol. The prisoner came to me, said he had been in Mr. Hodgkingson's employ, and had been sent to receive 2l. 18s. 6d., and under those circumstances he wished to surrender - Mr. Hodgkinson had given instructions to the officers to take him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and two children- Mr. Hodgkinson gave me 1s. a day to support them and pay my rent - after receiving the money I met a friend, who gave me some ale, and I lost part of the money; I was afraid to return.

MR. HODGKINGSON. I merely took him to oblige the overseers, to run on errands.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-89

340. FRANCES HALLIDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th December , 2 candlesticks, value 2s., the goods of Ann Sergent ; and that she had before been convicted of felony .

ANN SERGENT . I am single, and keep the Jacob's Well public-house, Barbican . On the 12th of December I put these candlesticks down at the tap-room fire, to melt the grease, and the prisoner came in to sell something which she had in a bag, and was alone in the tap-room; it was about a quarter to ten o'clock; my servant missed the candlesticks; the prisoner was stopped with them while I was up stairs - I had not myself seen her that morning.

ELIZABETH CLARKE . I am the prosecutrix's servant. About a quarter before ten o'clock I was in the kitchen; I heard the candlesticks rattle in the tap-room; I followed the prisoner up a court; she turned round, and I saw the candlesticks under her shawl - I asked two women in the court to mind her, while I went to ask mistress what I should do with her, and while I was gone the women sent for an officer, who took her - I saw her at the station-house, with the candlesticks.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you I had just bought them? A. No; I took one from her, and she would not let me have the other.

EDWARD MACDOWALL . I am a Policeman. I took charge of her for stealing the candlesticks in the court; they stood down at her feet - I found six black-lead pencils on her; she was very much intoxicated, and wanted to strip herself at the watch-house.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer. I know the prisoner well; I saw her tried here four or five years ago, for robbing her lodgings - I have the certificate of her conviction - (read); I am certain she is the woman; I have known her ever since - she was at that time very heavy with child, and took the whole on herself to save her husband, who has never been near her since.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the candlesticks in Long-lane, of a man, for 1s., and a glass of gin - I was going to give him the gin, and he absconded.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330103-90

341. RICHARD BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 16 1/2 yards of woollen cloth, value 10l. , the goods of Robert Morrison .

ROBERT MORRISON . I live at No. 53, St. Paul's church-yard , and am a tailor . I can only swear to the cloth, which was found in the prisoner's possession.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you keep many shopmen? A. Two shopmen, two errand-boys and two foremen; only the two shopmen are authorised to sell - they are not both here; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN DENYER . I am in the employ of Mr. Morrison. Last Tuesday morning, the 1st of January, about twenty minutes after eight o'clock, the shop-door was open for business - master sells cloth as well as makes it up; I was coming down stairs into the shop, and a young man from Mr. Dunnet's, in Cheapside, came in, and asked if I missed a piece of cloth - I said Yes; I had not missed it, but said so, because no time should he lost - I instantly went out, and spoke to a Policeman, who was near the end of the church-yard; and as I returned home on Ludgate-hill, the Policeman pointed the prisoner out to me; he was taken in charge, with a piece of cloth, sixteen yards and three

quarters - I went up to him, and asked where he had got the cloth; he said a man gave it to him in St. Paul's church-yard, to carry - I asked where he was taking it to; he said to the first coach-stand - he said nothing more; he had nobody with him - I can say the cloth is my master's; there is the mark of the threads left, where the ticket had been sewn on; but it is torn off.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it your ticket or the manufacturer's? A. Our's - I do not know when I had seen the cloth last; I cannot say that I do know that it was taken from our shop.

JAMES CUTHBERT . I am porter to Mr. Dunnet, at the corner of Paternoster-row. About a quarter after eight o'clock I was standing at my master's door; I saw a person come round the corner of St. Paul's church-yard, with a piece of cloth under his arm, part of it being unrolled - directly he got into Paternoster-row, he began to roll it up; he went down Paternoster-row, towards Ludgate-street - I followed him part of the way; he was in my sight two or three minutes - I cannot say who he was; I went round to Morrison's, and made inquiry; and then went back to master's.

THOMAS ISITT . I am a Policeman. A person came and gave me information, and I saw the prisoner coming out of Paul's-alley, with this cloth under his arm, by the Charter-house - he was in the alley at the time I received the information; he had a handkerchief over the cloth -I followed him into Ludgate-street, and met Denyer; I spoke to him, and then took the prisoner - I had followed close to him; he was walking very gently along, and I did not hurry after him, because he should not notice me - I went up and asked him where he was going to take the cloth; he said a gentleman gave it to him to carry to the first coach-stand, in Bridge-street - I took him into custody; I have not had any inquiry after the cloth; I took the prisoner to Guildhall - I have had the cloth in my possession ever since.

Cross-examined. Q. He was walking leisurely? A. Yes, with the handkerchief over the cloth; it had no paper on it - a stranger had given me information before I saw Denyer; I told the prisoner he had passed the first coach-stand, and then he said, "The first stand in Bridge-street;" the handkerchief did not cover all the cloth - I had my suspicions directly I saw him.

COURT. Q. Did you expect to see such a large piece of cloth, with nothing but a handkerchief over it? A. I did not.

JOHN DEACON . I am in the employ of Mr. Morrison. I have looked at the cloth - I am positive it was in my employer's shop the same morning it was missed; I am quite certain it is the cloth - it had master's mark on it when in the shop; it had a ticket on it - when it was brought back there was no ticket, but there was the thread where the ticket had been.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you heard Denyer describe the threads? A. No, I did not attend to what he said; I saw the cloth again at Guildhall - I am the prosecutor's shop-boy; I have folded the cloth up - it is black; I saw it on the counter a quarter of an hour before it was missed- the other boy was lighting the first at the back of the shop, and a person might come in and take it; there had been no customer that morning - there was a canvas ticket on the cloth, with a number on it - it could not have been sold.

JOHN MORRISON re-examined. I swear to the cloth - I keep an account of every particle of stock, and enter every thing sold; directly I was told the cloth was missing, I set the young man to work to see what cloth it was - he discovered the number, and then ascertained what quantity was cut from it; he is not here - I examined also, and found the quantity which ought to have been left was sixteen yards and three quarters, which was put down on this piece of paper before we measured it; there are marks where the ticket was - here is still the manufacturer's number on it, 17,917; I wrote that down before I saw the cloth, and part of that number had been cut out; it was very likely done at the cloth-worker's - there are two numbers, one the manufacturers on the outer part of the cloth, in very large numbers; but there is one part of the number now, which is 917 - the rest has been cut out: here are the threads which sewed on our number; I positively swear to this cloth - it is worth 10l. - the large figures were probably cut out before I purchased it.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman asked me to carry it to the first coach-stand - I pointed him out to the Policeman, but he took no notice of him.

THOMAS ISITT. He did not point out any body to me, or I should have taken that person.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-91

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, JANUARY 5TH.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

342. JAMES WALKER was indicted for embezzlement ; - also for stealing 16 handkerchiefs, value 30s., the goods of Thomas Hodgkinson , his master . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-92

343. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 sovereign , the money of Gottlieb Schwartz . - To which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 47. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-93

344. CHARLES BOWEN was indicted for stealing various articles of household furniture, value 100l. , the goods of Susannah Fearne .

MR. PRENDERGAST declined proceeding in this case, it being a subject for a civil action.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-94

345. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 pocket-book, value 2s.; 1 pencil-case, value 5s.; one 100l., two 20l., one 10l., and one 5l. Bank note, the property of Thomas Knox Holmes , from his person ; and JOHN GUEST was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT, charging the said John Guest with feloniously receiving, of an evil-disposed person, 1 pencil-case, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Knox Holmes, well knowing it to have been stolen.

His Majesty's most gracious pardon, granted to John Kennedy , who had been convicted of felony, was put in and read.

JOHN KENNEDY . I am the person who was convicted and was on board the bulks; I was liberated by this

pardon; I know the prisoner Smith. On the 5th of July last, I saw him and Grimbley at the Bank public-house, in King-street, Drury-lane, about ten o'clock in the morning; we went out together to pick pockets - we went to the top of Lansdown-passage, Berkeley-street, and saw Mr. Holmes, whom I did not then know, and two other gentlemen coming across; we followed them up Hay-hill - Smith took a pocket-book out of Mr. Holmes' coat pocket, and gave it to me; we all turned back, and went into Berkeley-square, where we opened the pocket-book, it was red morocco, and I took from one pocket one 100l. note, one 20l. note, and four 5l. notes, and a silver pencil-case - there were some papers in the book; I think I should know the pencil case again - we then went to Davies-street, Berkeley-square, where we took a coach, and drove to King-street, Drury-lane; we went to a house, in which Mrs. Page lives in the parlour - she used to do our washing; we all three went in there - I burnt the pocket-book in her presence; I had not taken any thing from it but the notes and the pencil-case; we all three then went to the Bank public-house, where we looked at the notes again - we then all three went to No. 43, Eagle-street, to William Guests ', the son of the prisoner Guest; there is a shop in front, and a half-door - we went into the parlour, and William Guest asked us what we had got; I told him some notes - I pulled them out of my pocket, and gave them to him, and I showed him the pencil-case, but still kept it in my hand; he turned his head and so did I, and I saw Frederick Watts standing leaning over the half-door - William Guest asked him what he wanted: he said Nothing, and went away; William Guest told us to come over with him to his father's, and he would sell the notes for us - William Guest, I, and Smith, then went to Holborn, and took a cab; we had left Grimbley in the Bank public-house - we then drove over Waterloo-bridge to Belvidere-road ; we stopped at a house which has a shop in front - we knocked at the private door, and the prisoner Guest answered the door; we went in, and William Guest pulled the notes out of his pocket, and gave them to his father, the prisoner, and likewise the pencil-case which we had sold to William Guest , as we were going along in the cab, to pay the cab hire which was 2s. - the prisoner Guest put on his spectacles, looked at the notes two or three times over, and asked what we wanted for them; I asked him 120l. for them - he said he could not give that, but he told us to wait a bit, and he would be in in a short time; we waited about a quarter of an hour - he then returned, and offered us 90l. for the notes, and we agreed to take it - we made this agreement in the back parlour; we then went up stairs with him to a bed-room, and he went to an old oak chest, and took out a little bag of sovereigns - we came down again into the parlour, and he gave me thirty sovereigns and three 20l. notes; I asked him if he could not let me have it all in gold, as we did not know how to get the notes changed; he said No, for he had taken all his gold to the Bank a short time before, and got notes for it; the notes he gave me were new looking notes - William Guest then said he had ten sovereigns in his pocket, which we might have, and he would go with us to the Bank of England, and change the notes - he then got a pen and ink, and wrote his name and address on all three notes - we then all three came over Waterloo-bridge, took a coach in the Strand, and went to the Bank; we went up some stairs there, and got the notes signed, or done something to; we then came down stairs again, went to another part of the Bank, and got cash for them; we received sixty sovereigns - William Guest took ten sovereigns out of the sixty, and gave me the other fifty; we came back again to the coach, and drove to the foot of Holborn-hill - we parted the money in the coach; I gave Smith thirty sovereigns, took thirty myself, and I kept thirty to give to Grimbley - William Guest left us in Holborn, and Smith and I went into a hosier's shop, and bought six handkerchiefs and two shirts; we then went to a tailor's shop, which had the name of Spratswell over the door - Smith there bought a pair of white trousers; I asked them if they had a coat to fit me; they had not - we then went to another tailor's, and I bought some clothes; we were then going into a jeweller's shop to buy a watch, and just as we were going in we met William Guest and Grimbley - Grimbley went into the shop with us, and I gave him his thirty sovereigns in the shop; we then went a little higher up, and each of us bought a hat - I then left them, and went to William Guest 's - I there cleaned myself, and changed my clothes; while I was doing that Smith, Grimbley, and William Guest all came in, and we agreed to go down to Brighton, but I said I would go to my mother before I went, which I did; as I was returning I saw Smith Grimbley, and Higgins, the officer, in a cab.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How old are you? A. Nineteen - I had not been a pickpocket long; I cannot recollect when I began; it might be about eight months before this happened; I have been three times in prison - I was sent from Newgate to the hulks; the first time I was taken up was on suspicion of stealing some things - I do not know what they were; that was about two months after I began thieving - it was from a house in St. Martin's-lane; I was charged with stealing knives about a fortnight afterwards; I was discharged for stealing Mr. Holmes' note; and three days afterwards I was taken for stealing a purse, but went out by proclamation, and six weeks afterwards I was taken for stealing a handkerchief; I have not been in prison on any other occasion - I was sent on bail to Tothill-fields for being in company with a lad who stole something from his master - I do not recollect any more times - I was nearly eight weeks at the bulks before I got out; I was tried on the 20th of October, for receiving a pocket handkerchief, or for stealing it; I do not remember which - when I was at the hulks Mr. Thomas and Mr. Higgins came to me; they said they would hold out no promise, but if I had any thing to say I was to say it to them - I had intimated to Mr. Higgins that I had something to say when I saw him in Newgate, two or three days after my trial - I did not send for him; he came to me - he said very little; I do not remember what it was about; I had made a communication to my cousin, and Higgins came, with my cousin, to me - he did not speak about these notes, nor about Mr. Holmes' robbery -I cannot recollect what it was about; I have known Higgins from the time I began to be a thief - he is an officer; I have seen him, and drank with him; I do not know that he knew I was a thief - he never proved me one - he had taken me into custody; I drank with him after that, but paid for what I had - I have drank with him since I came

from the hulks; he lives in Drury-lane, and I in Bow-street - he has had me in custody from the time I came up from the hulks; I was not charged with any offence -Higgins told me I was to have my pardon before I gave evidence - I have not had the pardon; I was kept in custody at the station, but I went to Higgins' to have my breakfast, and sometimes my dinner, and sometimes he used to bring it to me; I have been once or twice in a public-house with him - I cannot tell how often, perhaps six times: sometimes we had a pint of beer - I was not told what I was going to Bow-street for; I had no idea, but Higgins told me that Mr. Stafford craved an interview with me, and I should see when I got there - the interview was about Mr. Holmes' robbery; Mr. Stafford took down my deposition - I was sworn, but there was no prisoner present; there was a Magistrate - no questions were put to me - I told of my own head; this was last Wednesday week; I saw Mr. Higgins twice on board the hulks, with Mr. Thomas - they asked me about Mr. Guest, and several things about the robbery, but they did not say I was to be brought up; I did not know what I was brought up for- my object in appearing here to-day is to serve the public, not myself; I did not know I was going to have my pardon till last Tuesday - Higgins told me he dared to say Mr. Stafford would get me a pardon; I was not certain that it was got - no one had said any thing to me about a pardon before then, upon my oath.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You say that for about eight months you have been out on these expeditions - whose company did you go in? A. Very often with Smith and Grimbley.

THOMAS KNOX HOLMES , ESQ . I lived in Grafton-street, Bond-street. On the day before this robbery I put 125l. in Bank notes into my pocket-book, but it contained other notes to a considerable amount, 30l. at least; there was one 100l. note, and some 5l. notes - I had full 140l. in notes, or more; I had a pencil-case in my pocket-book, which I bought of a jeweller in the Strand - the name of Smith is over the door; I had sent that pencil-case back to him to be repaired - it had a stone in the top of it, with a crest on it; when I lost my pocket-book it was in it - the pencil-case was a particular one; I should know it again: I did not miss my pocket-book for some time after it was gone - I walked that morning near Berkeley-square; I came up Hay-hill, and into Dover-street - this is my pencil-case, but the stone is removed; I took rather a fancy to this case, and had a pocket-book made to fit it - and then I found the head of the pencil-case unsoldered, as I turned it rather sharp in sealing a letter.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You know nothing of either of the prisoners? A. No, except from having seen Smith at Bow-street; the pocket-book was in my right-hand coat pocket; my handkerchief was not in that pocket - I did not feel any pull at my pocket; my pocket is deep - it was rather a large pocket-book, made to hold this pencil-case; there were some letters in it- I missed it about twelve o'clock - I had left home about ten; I had not seen the pocket-book that day -I had seen it at seven o'clock the evening before, and had put it into my pocket; I had the same coat on I have now- my servant generally brushes my clothes in the morning, but having this money in the pocket-book, I desired him not to take my coat down in the morning; I had not taken the book out of my pocket, but I felt it there.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Though you had not seen the pocket-book, had you felt your coat, so as to know that it was there? A. Yes, I had, more than once, enough to satisfy myself that it was there, after I was in the street - I have heard that pickpockets do things very dextrously, but this is the first time I was ever robbed.

JOSEPH HENRY LLOYD . I live in the Strand - the name of Smith is over my door. I sold this pencil-case to Mr. Holmes, and afterwards repaired it; I am quite sure it is the same - there was a stone in it, which is not in it now.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Are you a working silversmith, or do you only sell? A. I do both; I was apprenticed to Mr. Guest, of Fleet-street, who used to employ persons to manufacture for him; I have no manufactory in my own house.

MARY ANN PAGE In July last I lived at No. 25, King-street, Drury-lane - I knew Smith, Kennedy, and Grimbley - I washed for Smith and Kennedy; they all three came in together one morning in July - Smith and Grimbley asked if I had the kettle boiling, and they sat down and had some breakfast - I afterwards saw Kennedy poking up the fire, and he poked a pocket-book in, and it was burnt - Smith and Grimbley were having their breakfast, and took no notice of what he did.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did they all come in together? A. Yes, and in five minutes Kennedy went out and staid three-quarters of an hour - when he came in he produced the pocket-book; Smith and Grimbley remained there all the time.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see who had the pocketbook before it was in the fire? A. Yes, Kennedy had - he pulled it out of his pocket just as he came inside the door; Smith and Grimbley were sitting with their backs towards him - they might have seen it, but I do not think they saw it put into the fire till I spoke about it, and objected to Kennedy poking up the fire; Kennedy went out directly he burnt the pocket-book, but Smith and Grimbley staid about two hours; they washed themselves, and put on their clean shirts.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to represent that both Smith and Grimbley remained after Kennedy went away? A. Yes, for about two hours - I had not got their shirts ready- I was obliged to iron them and air them, and they remained in the room. I was not examined before the Magistrate.

FREDERICK WATTS . I am a carpenter, and live in Little Peter-street, I lived in Parker-street, Drury-lane, in July last, I know Smith, Kennedy, and Grimbly - I saw them all three in company, at the Bank public-house, in July last; the first time I saw them was about ten o'clock in the morning - I did not see them go away; I saw them again between twelve and one - I saw them enter the house, and they all three left together - they came in in a great bustle, and left in the same manner -I followed them to a house in Eagle-street; I did not see them enter the house, but I judged they had gone in there -I looked in, and saw Smith, Kennedy, and William Guest; I did not see Grimbley - the house has been a coal-shed, or something of that sort - the door parts in the middle;

I touched the doors, and they went open; William Guest had some Bank notes in his hand, and Kennedy had a note in his right hand, and a pencil-case - I did not take notice of the pencil-case - I saw nothing on Smith; I advanced one step into the shop, but no further - William Guest was standing in the door-way of the glass door, which leads into the parlour; they were talking - I heard a voice say, "What do you want there? we don't want you;" I retired and went away - I imagine it was Kennedy's voice which spoke to me; I afterwards saw Smith, Grimbley, and Mr. Thomas, in a cab, coming out of Covent-garden - I saw Smith in six or seven weeks after, at the Bank public-house; I heard him talk about some money that Higgins, the officer, had taken from him - I said, "What money is that, Smith?" he said,"The money I was up at Bow-street for, that I got from Mr. Holmes;" he did not say how he got it, but he said it was somewhere in the vicinity of May-fair, or in May-fair.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Which did he say? A. I will not be certain whether it was May-fair, or in the vicinity of May-fair; I have been a carpenter and joiner for nine years - I once lodged in Royal-street, Stangate, and worked at that time in the Belvidere-road; I had no shop there - I was preparing some roofs for granaries at Puddle-dock, for a gentleman in Thames-street; it is a dock which leads down to the Thames - it used to be called Pedlar's-acre; I have never been of any other trade - I am not a discharged Policeman; I left the Police honourably - I got my living as a carpenter previous to that, and since; I left the Police on the 22nd of February last - we had a rule of being at the station-house at eleven o'clock at night, but I was at my sister's, and imprudently stopped there all night: I went in the morning, there had been a disturbance at St. Martin's vestry-room, and the men were all called out - I met Carter, who said to me, "The inspector has suspended you," and I sent in my clothes and resigned; I refused to go before the Commissioners when Carter told me to go, but I consulted my friends, and resigned the next morning - my sister then kept the Bank public-house - I did not know the house before she took it - I certainly know it now - I have heard the term, a flash house, but I do not know what it means; a great many bad characters frequented that house - it was not at that sister's I slept the night before I left the Police - I have more sisters than one; I have not got my living as a carpenter ever since I left the Police - I have been living with my sister at the Bank for five or six months; I slept there, and my sister was good enough to keep me; I left it about five weeks before she did - I left it to go to St. Bartholomew's hospital; I have not been in the habit of hanging about at Police-offices - I was not at Bow-street office in July last; I went by, but I was not in the office.

Q. Upon your oath, were you not there with Higgins when Smith was discharged in July last? A. I was not, I knew he was discharged about six or seven weeks afterwards, but I did not hear it from Higgins - I have drank with Higgins, but not in July last - I suspected Smith was in custody when I saw him in the cab with Mr. Thomas; it was not Higgins who was with him, it was Mr. Thomas - I did not go into the office when he was examined - I disclosed what I heard him say in the public-house about a fortnight before the examination at Bow-street - I saw what passed at William Guest's on the 5th of July; I did not think it was all right, but I did not give any information of what I saw, because I thought I had nothing to do with it,; I had no interest in it; I consulted my father and my brother-in-law, who advised me to have nothing to do with it and I did not bother myself with it - Higgins came to me about it in October; I do not know how he knew that I could tell any thing about it; I told him then, because he said it would be the means of bringing the parties to justice; there would be no blame attached to me, and I should be in no danger - I did not tell in July, as I did not know how I might be served by characters of that description; my sister who did keep the Bank is now in lodgings in Bull Inn-court, in the Strand; they have not kept any other public-house since that; she and her husband lived in Royal-street, Stangate, before they took the Bank - and when I got the job in the Belvidere-road, I went to lodge with them - I am not in the habit of removing goods in the night for people - I believe there was a distress for taxes at the Bank public-house, in March or April last; I was living there at the time; I lent the persons who were legally engaged in taking the goods away, a hand to remove them; it was about two o'clock in the day; I do not think there was enough to pay the distress; I never removed goods from there of a night - I do not know Henry Phillips - I do not know a person named Calder, in Wild-street; I have seen a man who goes by the name of Mo; he used to resort to the Bank, when my sister kept it; I do not know what his name is - I believe he assisted in removing goods from there for a lodger up stairs, but it was by day-light, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon; that was five or six days before the distress was put in - I do not know whether they had removed all the goods before dark; there might be some left till the next day; they were not my sister's goods, they belonged to the lodger, whose name was Wingate.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where was it Smith talked about the money? A. At the Bank, about six or seven weeks after I had seen them in the cab - there might be seven or eight persons in the public-house; I did not think of asking him what he meant by saying he got it of Mr. Holmes - I thought it was remarkable to say such a thing in a public-house, but it was not my business - I thought he had stolen it, but I knew he had been examined at Bow-street, and as that was over, I had no business with it - if Higgins or any body else had come to me, I should have told them; I had told my sister and several persons of my own family, and they advised me to have nothing to do with it - I thought when Smith said it, it was done more out of bravado than any thing else; but I suspected it might be true, from his having been in custody - I did not ask him what Mr. Holmes he meant: I had seen him several times at the Bank, and I think I told my sister the next day, or the next night, after I heard him say it; but my sister had left the Bank then; I think she left it about a fortnight before I came out of the hospital - I think she left it in June.

Q. Did you not say you saw the three men at your sister's house in July? A. I meant the house that had been my sister's, and my sister was there that day with me; she only lived about four doors from it - I was there, having a pint of half-and-half; I do not know whether my sister was having any thing to drink - I had been home, and could not get in; I went there, and saw her standing at the bar, talking to Mrs. White, the landlady - I did not stay more than twenty minutes; I left her there, and followed the three persons to Guest's; I certainly thought things were not right, but I did not give any information and thought I had better let it alone - I have known Higgins for fifteen months, I suppose; but have not conversed with him respecting this trial, except when he asked me what I knew of it - when I heard the trial was put off, I asked him why he did not let me know; I was never a witness in a Court of Justice but once, and was once at the Westminster Sessions - when I was at my sister's I did what there was to do, and served in the bar; I knew the house was resorted to by bad characters, but I did not harbour them; the house was not in my control; my sister could not help their coming there - I was there when Higgins took a man named Donovan out of the house; I believe it was about a cloak, but it was not stolen in that house; I believe my sister kept the house eight or nine months; they paid as far as they could, when they went away - I believe they did not pay the rent; I helped the goods away when they were seized - nothing had been removed before but the lodgers' goods.

Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were Smith, Kennedy, and Grimbley among the company who resorted to that house? A. I have seen them there repeatedly; I have often seen bad characters there, and heard them relate their exploits to one another; it was very common - I left the house three weeks or a month before my sister did, and went to the hospital.

CHARLOTTE BALDWIN . I am the wife of William Baldwin ; we kept the Bank public-house - I did not know it by the name of a flash-house; very indifferent characters came there - Smith, Kennedy, and Grimbley came there very often; on the 5th July, the day Smith was taken, I saw him with some money - I did not keep the house then; I used to go there very often to get in my debts; I saw Smith with some sovereigns in his hand, between twelve and one o'clock; I asked him to pay me what he owed me, which was 11s.; he used some very bad language, and said he did not owe me any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you arrived there before your brother? A. No, I rather think he was in the house when I went in; I am not sure; I used to attend at the bar - I do not know what you mean by calling it a flash-house - I am very sorry I ever saw it; I lost my all there; I did not owe so much when I left it as was owing to me - I had not a good opinion of Smith, though I trusted him; I think my brother left the Police in the latter end of 1831; or it might be February, 1832 - we went to the Bank in November; and it was some time after Christmas he left the Police - he afterwards came to live with me; I kept him; he cleaned knives, and did any thing there was to do - I did not pay him wages; I gave him a shilling or two, now then - when I saw Smith there in July, I stopped about twenty minutes in the house; I think I left the house before my brother, but I can hardly recollect which went first - Higgins, the officer, has been there occasionally, when he came for prisoners; he has not been there every week - I have known him not to call for a month; I knew he took two prisoners there, who were transported, and four or five others; my brother was not there five months; he was there three - he knew of two being taken in the house, because we told him; I do not know whether he was in the house when they were taken; he staid with us till we left the house, or nearly so; I am not aware where he went to; he was ill while he was with us; he had a bad leg, but it got well about a month or five weeks before we left, which was in May - we went to live in Parker-street, which is the next street; my brother lodged with me in Royal-street; he took the lodging the same week I did - I think he was at the Bank at the time we left it, but I took no sort of charge of him, and do not know when he left - my goods were seized for ground-rent, which I imprudently did not see paid before I took the house; we had a lodger named Wingate, who left us about a week before our goods were taken, and in about a week after we left.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This house was frequented by bad characters? A. Yes, but I was not aware of it before I took it, or I would not have taken it; I left it very much reduced, because I had given credit to a great many persons - I tried my utmost to let the house before I left it; Smith owed me 11s. for board and for drink - I generally trusted good characters with more, but I stopped at 2s. with bad characters; I did not trust many bad characters - I believe my brother went to the house after I left it; he did not go much there that I know of -I remember Smith going away on the 5th of July, with Kennedy and Grimbley; I believe my brother followed them: I remained there then, but I meant I did not know whether my brother or I left first in the evening - I went there very often; I believe my brother did, though he did not board there; I have drank in the house after I left, but not often - I may have drank half a dozen times there: I generally drank porter; I might have taken half-and-half- I paid the landlady for what I drank; my husband is now very much reduced, and is obliged to work in a brewery - he never was in any trade; he never was a fighting-man: his brother is one.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were any prisoners taken in your house for any crime or misdemeanor committed there? A. No; my brother was not always there, but generally - Donovan was one of those who was taken, there was another taken at the same time; I always gave Mr. Thomas all the assistance I could: my brother went to St. Bartholomew's-hospital with his leg - I think he was there at the time we removed.

BENJAMIN WADE . I live on Holborn-hill; I carry on business under the name of Spratswell: I am a tailor. On Thursday, the 5th of July, Smith came to my house with a taller lad, and then he came again with a smaller lad; he first bought a pair of white trousers - the next time the younger one bought a suit of clothes - I forget whether Smith paid me two or four half-sovereigns; I saw a considerable quantity of money in his hand; I think twenty sovereigns or more, and the other lad had as much - here is my book in which I made the entry at the time; my attention was called to it the same day by the officer.

JOSEPH HIGGINS (Police-constable F 35). I knew Smith before the 5th of July, and on that day I met him and Grimbley in a cab, in Holborn; I knew them to be thieves, and stopped them: they had each a new hat on, which took my attention first - it was about six o'clock, or between six and seven; I got into the cab, and saw a little bundle - I cannot say which of them had hold of it; it contained a jacket, waistcoat, and trousers, all new, and Smith had a new pair of white trousers on: I asked what they had in the bundle - they said some new clothes which they had purchased at a tailor's, and if I wished I might go there; I went in the cab to Mr. Spratswell's - I took them in there, and found that they had purchased such articles as were in the bundle; I then saw Smith had a watch in his pocket: I took it out, and asked how he came by it - he said he had bought it; I then searched him, and found in his trousers pocket fifteen sovereigns, and I found on Grimbley three sovereigns, but he had no watch - I left them in the shop, in the custody of a friend of mine, whose name I do not know; and I went to the cab, and found a green purse, containing twenty-five sovereigns under the cushion; I went into the shop, and said, "Here is a purse, do you know any thing of it?" they both denied all knowledge of it - I turned out the gold, and counted it in the presence of the shopkeeper; I got into the cab with them, and told the driver to go to Covent-garden station-house: when we got to the corner of Little Queen-street, I saw Kennedy come up to the cab, and halloo; I put my head out, and the moment he saw me, he appeared to bolt off - it appeared to me that he saw the others in the cab, before he saw me; they had several examinations at Bow-street, and were then discharged - Kennedy was out of the way for nearly a week.

COURT. Q. Where had you usually found him? A. At the Bank, and I at last found him there, playing at cards with William Guest; it might be about the 12th or 15th of July.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you known Watts? A. Twelve or fifteen months; I have seen him in the A. division of Police - I have frequently been to the Bank to look for thieves; I have drank there when it is necessary, or we could not find them - I have been there thirty times a week sometimes, and sometimes not once; I cannot swear that I have not been a month without going there - I should think not two months, while Baldwin kept it; when I have been looking after thieves: I have gone in many times a day - I have been in when I was not looking for thieves; my own judgment or my own interest sometimes leads me to drink with thieves - I have never been told, as an officer, not to drink with thieves; I took up a gentleman some time ago as a suspicious character - I did not swear to him as a reputed thief; I charged him as a suspicious character, lurking about Covent-garden, but he turned out to be a respectable person, and I apologised publicly; he was locked up, but bail was taken for him - he admitted that he was in company with thieves, but he did not know them; I do not know his name at this moment, upon my oath - I should know it if I heard it; he told me he lived in a house in a court opposite Drury-lane theatre: he was a theatrical man I believe - I took twenty-five sovereigns to the Stamp-office on the same day that I took Smith; they were what I found in the cab - and the other eighteen sovereigns I have had in my possession ever since; I never offered any money respecting this prosecution - I never offered either of the prisoners any; I went to Smith's mother's house on the 19th of November: I found him in bed - I took him to Covent-garden station-house; I did not take him to any public-house, nor give him any gin.

Q. Did you ever tell Smith that if he would split and say where the notes were, you would make a man of him, and give him 20l.? A. Never in my life; I have known Kennedy eight or twelve months - I was not in Court when he was tried; I knew he was in Newgate, because he sent for me - I went to him once; I do not know that it is part of the orders to the Police not to visit convicted felons - I never received such an order, nor heard of it; I went to the bulks three times, and spoke to Kennedy, in the presence of the keeper of the ship - he had sent me a letter, and I asked him what he wanted; I believe Mr. Thomas has the letter - I took down an order with Mr. Capper's name to it the last time I went, but I said nothing to Kennedy about a pardon; he might speak to me about a pardon, but not on board the ship, not to my knowledge, not that I recollect; such a word never came from my lips - when I got him on shore I took him to a public-house at Greenwich, and gave him some dinner: I paid for it; I am in the habit of eating and drinking with thieves, but not living with them - Kennedy has no money nor friends; I have been obliged to feed him since I have had him in custody - I expect to be paid for it; I have sometimes sent him his breakfast, and sometimes he has come to my house - I have been once in a public-house with him since I brought him up; I will not swear I have not been oftener - I do not know that I have drank gin with him; if I have I paid for it; I have not drank rum with him -I never employed Watts; I have seen him at Bow-street, and on the evening Smith was under examination I think he came to the office with two or three more, but I will not swear it - there were several examinations, and I might have seen Watts once or twice.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know of any order that you are not to drink when on duty? A. There is an order that men are not to go off their beats to drink - I acted under the direction of the Magistrate with respect to the money - Kennedy was never in my house till I brought him from the hulks; I am compelled to feed him now, or take him to a cook-shop, or do something with him.

WILLIAM ADAMSON . I am an inspector of Police, division A. On the 16th of November I went to the house of the prisoner Guest, in Belvidere-road - it has the appearance of a shop, but there are no goods for sale; it was about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon - I saw Guest at the door; I told him I was an officer, and I had come to search for some notes taken from Mr. Holmes - he said,"Dear me, I am taken very bad in my inside;" he repeated it several times, and said, "Will you allow me to go backwards;" he stepped out towards the back door, and I saw his hand was in his waistcoat pocket - I went to him, turned him sharp round, and took from his hand this pencil-case; I searched his bed-room, and found two boxes, one large and the other small - there was 20l. in money and some valuable articles in each of them - he did not go into the yard after I took the pencil-case from him.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you examined at Kingston? A. Yes - I have always stated that I told him I came to search for notes which Mr. Holmes had been robbed of; I never stated that I said I came to search his house, without stating for what - I was there half an hour or more; Higgins was with me, and he had charge of the prisoner while the search was going on - I sent him in a hackney-coach to the watch-house; a person might have a thousand opportunities of getting rid of a pencil-case between July and November.

GEORGE DYER . I produce from the Bank of England three 20l. notes, cancelled, which came in on the 5th of July, 1832 - one is No. 19,740, another 19,741 both dated the 24th of January, 1832, and the other is No. 19,843, dated the 10th of May, 1832; the name of William Guest , No. 42, Eagle-street, Holborn, is on each of them- I have no knowledge of who brought them.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Can you, of your own knowledge, state that they were brought in the state in which they are now? A. No, I did not take them in - they were cancelled by one of the cashiers, and are kept in the library; I received them to-day - it is impossible to say who made the memorandum at the time they were cancelled; I can tell by the ledger that gold was given for them.

JOSEPH HIGGINS re-examined. I have seen William Guest write twice; I believe these words on these notes to be his writing.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Where did you see him write? A. At the Black Horse, Kingsland-road; he was writing, but I do not know what; and one evening I went into the Bank, and saw him with a thief - he had a watch in his hand, and he was making out a bill of something he had done for the watch-maker: this may be three months ago - I saw these notes the day before yesterday.

JOHN KENNEDY. I saw William Guest write these words on these notes.

MR. BODKIN to MR. LLOYD. Q. Had the stone ever come out of the head of the pencil-case before? A. No; the stones do sometimes come out, but this had not.

Guest's Defence. I am innocent - I received the pencil-case in the way of business, as a working silversmith, to put some chequered silver to it, to serve as a water-seal.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

GUEST - GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-95

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

346. CHARLES STEANE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 box, value 2s.; 1 bottle of essential oil of orange-peel, value 10s.; 1 bottle of essential oil of calamus aromaticus, value 10s.; 1 bottle of essential oil of bitter almonds, value 10s.; 1 bottle of essential oil of cubebs, value 7s.; 1 bottle of essential oil of coriander-seed, value 1l. 12s.; 1 bottle of essential oil of sandal wood, value 9s.: 1 bottle of essential oil of tansey, value 4s.; 1 bottle of essential oil of cardamus, value 1l.; 1 bottle of essential oil of angelica, value 1l.; 1/2oz. of strychmine, value 1l. 10s.; - oz. of acetate of morphine, value 12s. 6d.; 1 glass bottle, value 1s. 6d.; 2 leech-glasses, value 6d.; 1 case of lancets, value 4s.; 2 cakes of camphor soap, value 8d.; 2 bottles of cement, value 8d.; 1 bottle of chemical liquid, value 4d.; 4 boxes of pills, value 4s.; 1 bottle of scented spirit, called eau de bouquet, value 7s.: 1 German silver spatula, value 4s.; 1 German silver spoon, value 4s. 6d.; 1 bottle of oil of ben, value 4s.; 1 bottle of scented spirit, called eau de Portugal, value 3s.; 1 bottle of lavender-water, value 4s.; 1 ink-stand, value 2s. 6d.; 1 instantaneous fire-box, value 7s.; 2 ivory tooth-picks and cases, value 3s.: 2 lbs. of paper, value 1s.; 3 silver coins, value 6d.; 7 wax seal-impressions, value 1s., and 1 piece of jet, value 6d., the goods of Samuel Forfeit Gray and another, his masters .

MESSRS. PHILLIPS and CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

MR. SAMUEL FORFEIT GRAY. I am a chemist and druggist , and live at No. 97, Bond-street - I have one partner. The prisoner came into our service as a shopman on the 26th of July - he staid till the 29th of October, and on my coming down from dinner that day, he exhibited an open letter, and requested me to read it - it stated that his eldest brother at Oxford was dangerously ill, and that he and his brother at Denmark-hill must go off that evening to Oxford; I begged him to remain two hours, while I went to procure an assistant - he remained, and I in the mean time got an assistant; when I returned he sent a boy to inquire at several coach-offices about the Oxford coach - he left that day, and the next day a carrier called for his boxes; I did not see him again till the 13th of November, when he called at my shop, and stated he had just come from Oxford, on business, and he was going back in a few hours; I paid him the balance due to him, I think about 3l. - I paid him up to the day he left, without deducting a fortnight for notice, which he proposed I should do; I said"This is a case you have no control over, and I shall not deduct any thing." On the 3rd of December, in consequence of some information, I took Ballard and Goddard, the officers, to Mr. Gill's, a chemist, at Charing-cross; I saw the prisoner there, behind the counter, acting as an assistant; I did not speak to him, but passed through, and spoke to Mr. Gill - I then had the prisoner called in, and told him that we had been robbed, and I wished to see his boxes; he agreed that we should - he accompanied us up stairs, but we did not find any thing in his boxes; in consequence of something else, we went to a house in Groveterrace, Camberwell - I was there shown a portmanteau, which Ballard searched, and found in it the articles stated, which are mine; a part of them were in a cholera medicine-box, and the rest in the portmanteau; we then went back to Mr. Gill's - we did not find the prisoner there, but in consequence of what I there saw, we went back to Grove-terrace; we found the prisoner in the house in which the portmanteau was- the officer stated to him that we wished to go up stairs, and search the portmanteau again, and the prisoner accompanied us up stairs - the portmantean was opened, and the officer asked the prisoner who the things belonged to; he said they were his, meaning the things which were then in it - the officer then said, "I have turned many articles out of it that Mr. Gray claims;" the prisoner said they were Mr. Gray's, but he had paid for them - I remarked "Mr. Steane, you remember it was your duty, whilst in my house, to set every article down in the book that was

sold, however small their value," that the book should be produced, and I trusted that he would be able to clear himself by it; I had given him those directions on his coming into my service - I have examined the book, and these articles are not entered - my shopmen are occasionally allowed to have articles if they ask for them, but not otherwise; among other articles found in the portmanteau, I found some essential oil of orange-peel, which was drawn in England many years ago - it had become by age exceedingly thick - and for a compound which I make, it is very valuable - and I stated to the prisoner when he once put up 2 ozs. by accident, not to sell it to any druggist at any price, even if five, ten, or fifty guineas an ounce were offered for it - it is quite different to what we have in the trade; here are a number of other essential oils which have marks on them - and, among others, here is an essential oil of sandal wood, which is in an unfinished state, not fit for sale; here is some essential oil of angelica, about an ounce and a half of it - I have missed about this quantity of it from my shop; I have no doubt that all these things are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long had the prisoner been in your service? A. About three months - I believe I had a good character with him, as I cannot find any written one; when any of my young men bought articles of me, they had them at the trade price, which is much under the general price; but if he had put the money into the till, and not entered them in the book, there would have been an excess of cash in the till - I certainly have known that some things have not been entered in the book; we profess to balance the book by the till every ten days, it may have been fourteen days, I think not a month; if there has been an excess in till, it has been entered in the book as sundries, but there generally has been less in the till than in the book; the common petty cash disbursements were made out of the till, and there was a book for them - I have spoken to the prisoner about the money in the till being deficient; I forget whether the prisoner's salary was 30l. or 35l. a year; I found the prisoner at Mr. Gill's; I knew Mr. Gill's shop, but had not seen him before - he keeps a respectable chemist's shop; the prisoner was there, and was quite willing that we should search his boxes - when I saw them, I inquired respecting a hair-trunk, and a carpetbag, which I knew had gone from my house with his other boxes - we found the carpet-bag in the portmanteau; when we first went to Mr. Gill's, it was about twelve o'clock in the morning; and we did not see him again till six or seven o'clock in the evening - I had desired Mr. Gill not to let him go out; but he did go out, and left a note - we found him at Camberwell; he might have gone off if he had chosen - the portmanteau did not belong to him; I really cannot tell whether it was locked or not - there are stamps of mine on these bottles; the oils could have been poured out, but I should have known them any where; they had been removed from our store bottles to stopper glass bottles.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner write? A. Yes, this letter is his writing; I received it by the Twopenny post - I am quite sure I saw the prisoner on the 13th of November; I am certain there was a hair-trunk and a carpet bag among the articles I sent for the prisoner, and he denied having them- (letter read).

Mr. Gray, Oxford, 4th of November 1832.

DEAR SIR, - I am exceedingly sorry that I cannot write you in favourable terms of my brother, who still continues in a very precarious state - and it is the wish of my friends not to leave Oxford while he continues so ill; in all probability I may be in town the latter end of this week, on business of my brother's - should I, I will give you a call; - the "Bride of the Isis" I have not yet been able to get, but shall have them as early as possible, when I will forward them you. I am extremely sorry that my leaving town so hasty, but under the present circumstances it could not have been prevented; should I return to London again for a permanency, shall solicit the favour of your interest in procuring me a situation. I am, Dear Sir, your obedient servant, CHARLES STEANE .

To Mr. Gray, 97, New Bond Street.

Per favour of Mr. Delf.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I went with Ballard and Mr. Gray to Mr. Gill's, at the corner of Scotland-yard - and while Mr. Gray and Ballard were in the parlour the prisoner asked me if any thing was the matter; I said Yes, Mr. Gray had been robbed, and several of his servants were taken into custody, and I asked him if he had at any time given the servants any thing out of the shop - he said he had not; I then asked if he had any thing at all in his possession belonging to Mr. Gray, and he positively denied that he had - Mr. Gill, Mr. Gray, and Ballard then came out of the parlour, and we all went up stairs to search his boxes, but nothing was found there of the prosecutors' - we then went to No. 3, Grove-terrace, Camberwell; Mr. Gray and Ballard went into the house - I staid outside about an hour; they then came out, and we went back to Mr. Gill's - we then went to Camberwell again, and found the prisoner there; he was asked if that was his portmanteau - he said Yes; Ballard asked where he got the articles found in it - he said he had bought them of himself; Mr. Gray then asked him if he had entered them in the book, which was a regular thing - he said Yes, he had.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 3rd of December I went to Mr. Gray's, and went with him to Mr. Gill's; I saw the prisoner in the shop; we begged to speak to Mr. Gill first - I think the prisoner spoke to Mr. Gray, but nothing material passed; when the prisoner was called into the back parlour, I told him Mr. Gray had been robbed by several of his servants, and he was suspected; I asked if he had taken any thing- he said No, he had not; I asked if he had given any thing at any time to any of Mr. Gray's servants; he said No, he had not - I said, "A bottle of lavender water - now, have you given that to any body?" he said No, but he had given a box of tooth-powder, and I think he said a box of pills to the maid; I said we must search his boxes; he was quite willing that we should - we went up stairs, and he produced some keys, but I did not have them; there was nothing found there - Mr. Gray then asked the prisoner respecting a hair-trunk, and whether he had any other box; he said he had not - I will not be sure whe

ther any thing was said about a bag, but he said he had no boxes at his brother's - I am quite sure he said he had nothing at his brother's; we then went down stairs, and left the prisoner in the shop - this was in the morning, perhaps about eleven o'clock; we then went to Camberwell - I found the articles which Mr. Gray claimed, in a portmanteau on the landing of the second floor; the prisoner was not there - I saw a lady and gentleman there; the portmanteau was not locked, I believe; I opened it; I took the articles away, and have had them ever since -I have them here; part of them were in this cholera-chest, and the others in the portmanteau; we then went to Mr. Gill's, and in consequence of a note which I got there, we went back to Camberwell and showed the note to the prisoner, who said it was his writing - this is it - (read.)

To Mr. Gill.

SIR, - Excuse the liberty I have taken in leaving your premises without your consent, as I could not rest satisfied till I had seen my brother at Camberwell. I will be back as soon as I possibly can. C. STEANE.

Witness. When we went back to Camberwell I told the prisoner I had found a great many things in a box, which Mr. Gray claimed, and some others which Mr. Gray had some doubt of, and he had better go up to the box; we went up and found the box where we left it, I threw open the lid, and said, "Whose things are these?" the prisoner said, "They are mine;" I said, "I have taken out a great many things, what answer have you to give to it?" he said,"Yes, they came from Mr. Gray's;" I said "Do you mean you have taken them without Mr. Gray's knowledge?" he said he had accounted for them; I said, "Of whom did you buy them?" he said, "Of myself;" I said,"Do you mean you have bought them, and paid the money into the till?" he said "Yes;" I then took the prisoner to the station.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was Mr. Gray up stairs when you had the conversation with the prisoner? A. Yes, and Goddard also; I should think they must have heard the prisoner say he had nothing at his brother's; I said so at Marlborough-street, but it was not taken down.

MR. GILL. I am a chemist, and reside at Charing-cross, The prisoner was in my service for three weeks - he came on the 12th of November; I did not see him taken, but he left me abruptly on the day he was taken - he did not leave me to go to Oxford, nor did he intimate a wish to go - on the 29th of October I applied to Mr. Gray to make inquiries respecting another young man; I saw the prisoner there, who said, "He was going to leave Mr. Gray, as there were several things uncomfortable in the situation;" I said, "Well, if you have made up your mind to leave, I may as well engage you as any other person, but I beg you will leave Mr. Gray in a handsome manner, and whatever notice you have agreed to give him, I hope you will give;" he said, that was a fortnight - on the 10th of November he called at my house in my absence, and said, he was very sorry but he could not come to me till the 12th; he came to me on the 12th, and from what he said I was led to conclude he had left Mr. Gray

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was what he said to you that he had received his wages from Mr. Gray and done with him? - A. Yes - he did not desire me to keep it a secret that he was coming to me; I received notice to attend here about an hour ago.

MR. GRAY. These are my property; some of the articles have never been opened - this is a bottle of essential oil of orange-peel; here is about 4 ozs. of it, which I should refuse to sell at any price - here is some oil of sandal wood in an unfinished state, in which no one would buy it; I cannot speak to the bottles, but I can to the contents of them; here is a case of lancets, which are wrapped up in a paper, which has two of my seals on it - here is a German silver spatula and spoon, which I had from Prague, in Bohemia, and I am short of them; I believe there are none such in London - I kept them in my shop for use, but do not sell them; this ink-stand contained these three coins, which were up stairs in my cabinet.

The prisoner read the following Defence: My Lord and Gentlemen, - I entered the prosecutors' employ to get acquainted with his method of chemistry, and to get such information as would ultimately enable me to set up in business; and I accordingly bought, while in the prosecutors' service, essential oils, and other articles, which I did not enter in the day cash-book. I have already stated to the officers, on my being taken into custody, that these goods were Mr. Gray's; and that they came from his shop. When I took them, I was under the full persuasion,(which I believe is common to young men employed as I was in that trade,) that the custom of the trade allowed the young men to take goods at the cost price. I paid the cost prices into the till, from time to time, as I took the goods. They were curious articles, and I took them to be useful to me as samples, when I went into business for myself, as I fully intended to do. The cost prices bear but a small proportion to the actual selling price. I have been wrong in not paying Mr. Gray himself, or keeping evidence by somebody that I did pay for them. Mr. Beacall, my fellow-shopman, knew (as I thought) of my paying for some; but by a letter received from him by my attornies since I have been in custody, it appears that there was only one article which he could distinctly remember, and for which he knew that I paid into the till; as his evidence would not go further, and as he is in Dublin, and to bring him here might be the loss of his situation, I have not so far made use of his good feeling for me as to bring him as a witness. Mr. Gray said before the Magistrates, that if I had paid, it would appear by his daily cash-book; that book was not regularly kept, and only balanced once a month, as I can show; therefore that is no proof. I once reminded Mr. Gray of an omission to enter an article sold by himself, and he told me, in harsh terms, to mind my own business, and leave him to take care of his; I confess that this, which happened soon after I went to Mr. Gray helped to make me careless in entering. I made no concealment of having these things - I showed many of them to my sister Jane long before my apprehension, and they were left in an open old trunk of my brother's. My condition in life was such as not to make me at all needy - if I wanted more money than my salary gave me, I had it on application to my brother; I mention this to show that I could easily pay for what I had. The character which I have always borne will show, I trust, that I am incapable of stealing - I have had no motive for it. If I had wished to conceal them, the last place where I should have deposited them would have been my brother's, at Camberwell, to whose house, according to Mr. Gray's evidence, I had directed him to send my boxes, when I could as easily have had them sent to a coach-office, which would have afforded no clue to their discovery.

- GWATKINS. I was in the service of Mr. Gray, the prosecutor, for three months. The cashbook and the disbursement-book were not regularly kept; they were balanced once a month, but did not always come right.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Mr. Gray sell such coins as these? A. No - I have seen such spoons and spatuals as these at the prosecutor's; they were not for sale - I left him in consequence of a quarrel; I went to Mr. Gardner's, but am not there now - he gave me a trial, but I was not fit for his situation; I have seen essential oil of orange-peel there; it was old and spoiled - it might be of use to him, but it would not sell in the market; I have seen such coins as these given to children.

The prisoner received a most excellent character from nine highly respectable winesses.

GUILTY. Aged 22. Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, for his excellent character, and believing it to be his first offence .

Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-96

OLD COURT. MONDAY, JANUARY 7TH.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

347. GEORGE HUNTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Duncan , on the 22nd of December , and stealing therein, 2 shirts, value 8s.; 1 seal, value 1s; 1 key, value 6d.; 2 collars, value 1s. 6d.; and 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 5s., 1 book, value 1s. 6d., 1 knife, value 6d., the goods of Edward Tooth ; and 1 coat, value 8s., the goods of Charles Duncan .

EDWARD TOOTH. I am clerk to Charles Duncan . I live in the lower part of his house, in Little Hermitage-street . I left the place about half-past eight o'clock in the evening of the 22nd of December, and returned about half-past nine o'clock - I believe I left the counting-house door locked; I found the staple of the lock broken, it was the staple of the front door; I believe I had locked it - it is a common door lock - I had shut the door after me, in the usual way; it was a latch lock - I am not certain whether I locked the counting-house door; I had the key in my pocket; I had left nobody in the house - Mr. Duncan does not live there; he never sleeps there; I live there myself; Duncan has no servant there - when I came home, I found the door fastened inside, and called the Policeman; two Policemen entered and found the prisoner behind the door, with a crow-bar in his hand - he was quite a stranger; I found part of the property in question packed up in a bag.

JAMES HOWARD . I am Policeman. I was called in by Tooth, about half-past nine o'clock, and found the staple of the door forced; there was marks of a crow-bar on the door - I found the prisoner behind the door, and a bag close behind him; he had an iron crow-bar in his hand, which corresponded exactly with the marks on the door; some of the property was in his pocket.

EDWARD TOOTH re-examined. All this property is mine, all except this coat, which belongs to Charles Duncan - the bag is not mine - I had left the things in the room.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I am a Policeman. I accompanied my brother officer to the house; his evidence is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the things in the bag - I never saw them.

GUILTY (of stealing only.) Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-97

Second London Jury, before Lord Chief Baron Lyndhurst.

348. JOHN WILLIAM LAIRD was indicted for feloniously uttering a certain piece of paper, having thereupon the impression of a forged and counterfeit stamp, well knowing the same to be forged .

ELEVEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. SOLICITOR GENERAL, with MESSRS. ALLEY and SCARLETT conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HENRY BEAURAIN . I am clerk to the solicitor to the Board of stamps. On the 24th of December I had occasion to go to the prisoner's place of business, No. 11, Bishopsgate-street, City - I went there about one o'clock, and saw him: I asked him for three bill-stamps of 3s. 6d., 2s. 6d., and 1s. 6d. - he took a case out of a drawer under the counter, and gave me two bill-stamps of the value of 2s. 6d. and 3s. 6d., and said he had not got one at 1s. 6d.: I paid him 6s. for the two - I then asked him if I should be safe in drawing bills on the stamps, as I understood there were many forgeries about; he said, "You may depend on their being good;" I asked whether he had got them from the head office, at Somerset-house - he said he did and said, "Depend on it they are genuine;" I then left the shop - I returned on the 28th of December to his shop(I had two Police-officers outside) - I went in alone, and saw the prisoner; I told him the stamps I had purchased of him a few days ago, and which he told me were good, turned out to be forgeries; he said he did not know it - I then opened the door, and introduced the officers: I told him the business of the officers, and desired him to produce what stamps he had; he produced from a drawer under the counter two cases, containing stamps of various descriptions - I asked him if he had any more; he then opened a drawer behind him, labelled "Sealing-wax," and produced another stamp - about the same time he went into his back warehouse, followed by one of the officers, and while I was engaged examining the stamps, the officer beckoned me to come to him in the back warehouse; when I got there the officer produced a quantity of stamps in his hand, saying the prisoner had given them to him, he (the prisoner) having taken them from a drawer in the bureau; I asked him where were the keys of his drawers - he took out of his pocket some keys, and opened a drawer in a desk at the end of the counter, and produced other stamps- I then inquired of him where he got his stamps from; he answered of Mr. Letts, of the Royal Exchange.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You called his attention to their being forged - he said they were genuine, and you might use them with confidence? A. He did; I asked where he got his stamps from, not these particular ones - I should not think he had any stamps but

what he produced; he might have said he bought of Letts and other stationers, very likely he did.

MR. SOLICITOR-GENERAL. Q. Repeat the conversation between you and him on the 24th of December, after he gave you the stamps? A. I said, "Shall I be safe in drawing bills on these stamps, for there are so many forgeries about;" he said, "You may depend on it they are all perfectly good" - I then asked if he got his stamps from the head office, Somerset-house; he said he did, and said, "You may rely on it they are genuine;" I never had possession of the stamps which he produced - the officer has them - I believe he kept them separate.

CHARLES PRESSLY . I am secretary to the Board of Stamps. About the beginning of November I went to the prisoner's house, in consequence of information received at Mr. Mann's shop, who is a stationer in Cornhill; I did not see the prisoner then - I intimated a desire that he should call at the Stamp-office; he came on the following day, and I told him a forged stamp had come into my possession, which had been purchased from him - (that was a stamp brought to the office by a Mr. Burridge for allowance); I observed to the prisoner, that the stamp was a forgery, and asked him where he got his stamps - he told me from various stationers; he first named Mr. Deacon, of George-yard, Lombard-street - I asked him if any discount was allowed him on the purchase of stamps from Mr. Deacon; he said no discount on bill-stamps - I asked from what other stationers; he said he had purchased some stamps of Mr. Letts, Royal Exchange, who also allowed him no discount, and from Mr. Summers, who had allowed him a discount of 5 per cent. - I observed that there was no doubt the stamps so procured from Mr. Summers were the forged ones, in consequence of the discount- he remarked that he purchased receipts as well as billstamps from Mr. Summers, and therefore 5 per cent. was not an inordinate discount on bills and receipts - I do not exactly recollect his expression; he said "9 per cent. being allowed on receipt-stamps;" I asked what proportion the bills bore to the receipts that he bought of Summers - he said very small; I then told him I had no doubt in my mind it was from that quarter the forged stamps had come into his possession, and that it behoved him immediately to send his stamps to the Stamp-office, in order that the genuine stamps might be pointed out from the forged ones; and I observed to him, that if hereafter he sold a forged stamp, he might be placed in a very unpleasant situation - I pressed on him the necessity of sending them to be examined, and he said he would; nothing further passed that I remember - 30s. per cent. is the discount on bill-stamps if 30l. worth are purchased at one time, and 7 1/2 per cent. on receipts; he mentioned 7 1/2 per cent - it was my mistake when I said 9 per cent.; these is no discount under 30l.: Mr. Sawtell and Twyford were appointed to inspect stamps which might be brought in by different stationers - I saw the prisoner again at the Stamp-office (after the appointment of the inspectors), some time in the middle of November; no conversation then passed between him and me on this subject - he applied to be allowed a spoiled stamp, and was refused; he did not say any thing about having sent his stamps to the office to have them inspected, nor I to him; Mr. Halfhide is the person employed by the Commissioners to engrave the dies - I have the minutes of the Board of the 27th of October, 1830, in which it is recorded, that the engraver delivered to me certain dies, among others is the 3s. 6d. die - I know that they were delivered to me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You had a conversation with him on the 6th of November? A. Yes; I then only had one stamp in my possession which had been bought of him: it was a 1s. 6d. one - I then cantioned him that he would be in danger if others were sold; when I saw him again I am sure he did not tell me he had sent his stamps to the office, and they had refused to receive them, because they were too late - I do not know whether he had sent them; I have heard from stationers that they buy more stamps than they want, in order to get the discount: if they want the money to use of course they must sell them to somebody - I cannot say whether they allow a greater discount than the office; that is a mere question of trade - money is never returned for spoiled stamps, but a stamp of the same amount; but deed-stamps of a large amount may be divided into different amounts: if 30l. is laid out in different stamps, a proportionate discount is allowed - the amount of forged stamps found at the prisoner's is under 3l.; he told me had been nine months in business.

COURT. Q. Was the 18d. stamp produced at your conversation? A. Yes, he saw it; I desired him to bring to the office all the stamps he had: I told him the stamps he had sold to Mr. Mann were forgeries (he made no answer), and that Burridge had bought this 1s. 6d. stamp at Mann's.

HENRY COLLYER . I live with Mr Mann, my uncle, who is a stationer, in Cornhill, and assist in his business. I bought for him some bill-stamps of the prisoner; I did not buy them myself - I sent a lad for them; I saw the prisoner the day after, respecting them - Mr Pressly called on me; it was the beginning of November - this was the first time I saw him after I knew about the stamps; I told him the secretary had been down concerning a stamp bought at our shop, and which we had of him, and I had referred the secretary to him - the stamp had been sold to Mr. Burridge; Mr. Pressly looked out some stamps at our shop - I do not recollect the number; I sent for Mr. Laird, and showed them to him - I had a list of them, and told him Mr. Pressly had been from the Stamp-office, and said the stamps were forged, that he could not expect us to lose them - he gave me the money for them, and took them away with him - I think they amounted to about 1l. 14s.; I think there were about twenty stamps, or not so many - most of them were 18d. stamps; they were bill-stamps.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The transaction between you and him was open, public, and fair? A. Yes - when our boy brought the stamps, I looked at them to see if they were right; they appeared to me to be genuine - the prisoner called on me the day after I had seen the secretary; he was not taken into custody for some time after, and had abundant opportunity to destroy the stamps.

JOHN BURRIDGE . I went in company with William Gibbons to the prisoner's shop on the 6th of November - I had before that bought two 1s. 6d. stamps at

Mann's, in Cornhill; I saw the prisoner when I went to his house - I said I was the young man who had bought the forged stamps of Mr. Mann, in Cornhill, and asked if he had seen the gentleman from the Stamp-office; he said he had, and showed me some stamps, and said they had pronounced those as forged, but had not shown him where the forgery laid, and he should continue to sell them, for he did not think they were forged, but that there was some trick at the Stamp-office, making two for one - he said they were so near alike, that he could not tell the forged from the good ones, and he said that they would keep one for themselves, and the other for the office; when they struck off two, that one was to be sold at the office, and the other was to be kept back - I called again on the 19th of the same month, with Gibbons; I saw him, and asked him for a 1s. 6d. stamp - he gave me one; I paid him for it, and said I hoped it was not a forged one, as I wanted to have it filled up, and should not like to lose my money, if it turned out to be forged; he said, Oh, he did not believe there were any forgeries in circulation, but they wanted to trace it, to find it out at the Stamp-office, for they found a difference there, and there must be two for one struck from one die - when I asked him for a 1s. 6d. stamps, and said I hoped it was not forged, he took the stamps out, and said he continued to sell them, and that was all he had left, showing me three or four; he took out, I should suppose, three or four; I took the 1s. 6d. one to the office - I have it here; this is one of the two I bought on the 19th.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He said he believed the office worked off two for one, and it would be found that was the only fraud? A. They wanted to trace that, not that they were forged, but that they were double impressions, from the same die - he did not tell me he had sent all his stamps to be inspected, and they were returned without being looked at - I was not employed by the Stamp-office.

MR. ALLEY. Q. When you bought the first stamp, you took it to the office to be allowed for? A. Yes, and that is how they detected me with it, and I wanted to clear it up.

WILLIAM GIBBONS . I went with Burridge on these occasions to the prisoner's house, and heard the conversation which passed - I have heard the evidence; what he has stated is correct, according to my recollection.

JAMES WINTLE . On the 24th of December, I went to the prisoner's shop, and saw him; I asked him for two bill-stamps of 1s.; two of 1s. 6d., and two of 2s. 6d.; he opened a drawer, took out a case, and said he had only one of 1s., and asked if that would do - then he opened a drawer behind him, and took out some stamps, looked at them, and put them back; then went with his keys, and opened a desk at the end of the counter, and took two of 1s. 6d., and two of 2s. 6d. - he asked me whether they were for a gentleman in the City-road; I said No; he said "Because we do not charge him the odd pence;" he then asked if they were for the trade; I said No, they were for my own use - he put them altogether, wrapped them in a piece of paper, and gave them to me; they amounted to 9s. which I paid for them - I took them to the Stamp-office - I have them here; I am sure these are the five I bought from him on the 20th of December - I made a mark on them before I parted with them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You bought them in his shop, in the middle of the day? A. Yes; there was no concealment about it; nobody else was present - the shop was open.

THOMAS JAMES . On the 14th of December, I purchased two stamps at the prisoner's shop - I went again on the 17th; I am not certain that I saw the prisoner then, as it was dusk - I bought nothing - they had not the stamps I wanted; I went again on the 19th, and bought a 1s. bill-stamp of his lad - on the 22nd of December I again went, and bought a 2s. 6d., and 3s. 6d. bill stamp; the boy served me on that occasion; I marked all the stamps I bought, and have them here.

WILLIAM HAZEL PAIN TWYFORD . I am a clerk in the stamp-office - my department is in the allowance of spoiled stamps; I was appointed about the beginning of Novem ber, with Mr. Sawtell, to inspect the stamps brought by stationers to the office to be examined - it was our duty to point out such as were forged; some stationers attended; the prisoner did not attend to my recollection - about eight or ten attended; if the prisoner or any one on his behalf had attended, I should not have forgotten the circumstance - I knew him, and undertake to swear he did not apply to me to have stamps examined; Mr. Sawtell and I inspected together - nobody mentioned the prisoner's name; I never refused to inspect for any body; I do not remember who attended - Mr. Sawtell has got all their names down; some of them sent their stamps; the prisoner came on the 15th of November, to swear to some spoiled stamps; he did not complain to me that he could not get his stamps examined, nor that he had sent any one for that purpose.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever know that a boy came from him one day, and was sent away? A. No; the office hours are from ten to four - I am always there between those hours; I cannot say whether any body attended for the prisoner - there is a door-keeper to the office.

GEORGE SAWTELL . I hold a situation as inspector of stamps, at the Stamp-office - I was appointed with Twyford, to inspect stamps produced by stationers on the 6th of November; I inspected some with him, and others alone - I never refused to inspect any stamps brought for that purpose - the office has been open every day since, from ten till four, for that purpose: I do not know the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you have not a perfect recollection of every person who appeared before you? A. No - my first question to them is, from whom they come.

MR. SOLICITOR-GENERAL. Q. Can you say whether any person mentioned the name of Laird? A. I immediately put down in a book the names given to me; I have a copy of that book taken by myself a few days ago - but, independent of that, I can distinctly recollect that name was not mentioned - there were eleven persons in all.

COURT. Q. Did you find many forged stamps among those people? A. A considerable number; there have been a great many brought, down to the 2nd of Janu

ary; I was appointed on the 6th of November; nobody applied till the 16th, and from that time to the 2nd of January, I found stationers with forged stamps - I do not think there were above 2l. or 3l. worth brought by those persons - I should say no one person brought stamps exceeding 5l.; I found one person in possession of 2l. or 3l. worth - that person was not taken up.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBETTER . I am a marshal's-man. I attended at the apprehension of the prisoner - his house was searched, and stamps found, which I have; they were taken while the prisoner was there; he produced two books from the counter with the first, then produced a drawer, labelled, "Sealing-wax," with one in it: and some more he took out of a desk and brought to me - I found none, which he did not produce - Forrester brought some out of the warehouse.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not take Forrester himself to the back place? A. Yes - he said he bought stamps of Mr. Letts and other stationers; and I think he named a Mr. Richardson - I did not search for the stamps; he produced them on being asked for them.

COURT. Q. Did you search any place yourself? A. No; the gentlemen of the Stamp-office were satisfied, and it was not required.

JOHN FORRESTER . I went with Leadbetter. The prisoner was asked if he had any more stamps - he took some keys out of his pocket; I went into a back warehouse with him - he opened a bureau, and took out a paper with four stamps in it, which I took out of his hand.

WILLIAM HENRY BEAURAIN . I produce the stamps I bought of the prisoner on the 14th of December.

GEORGE SAWTELL . These are a 2s. 6d. and 3s. 6d. stamp; they are forged, I am satisfied - they very nearly resemble the die employed by the authoritity of the Commissioners, so as to impose on any ordinary person; this one bought by Burridge is a forgery - all those five produced by Wintle are forged: here are one for 1s., two for 1s. 6d., and two for 2s. 6d. - the two 1s. 6d. are from the same die as the one produced by Burridge; this one of 2s. 6d. first produced, and the two are from the same die, (looking at those produced by the officer) here are two of 1s. 6d. forged - and these two of 2s. are forged; and this 3s. 6d. one is forged - these three of 4s. 6d. are all genuine; these two of 5s. are forged - I have examined all in this book; two of 1s. 6d. are forged - two of 2s. forged; one of 3s. 6d., two of 5s., and two of 6s. are forged - three of 4s. 6d., and five of 3s. are genuine; the two 1s. 6d. ones are of the same die as the former ones, and the paper appears to be the same - the 3s. 6d. ones are of the same die; this next parcel are receipt-stamps - two of 1s. are forged; and here are ten of 9d. genuine - two of 6d. genuine; two of 1s. 6d. genuine - seven of 2s. 6d. genuine; eleven of 4s., four of 5s., two of 7s. 6d. and two of 10s. all genuine; the one stamp found in a drawer marked "sealing wax" is a forged bill-stamp for 5s.; it is the same as the other 5s. ones(looking at the four produced from the bureau) here is one 2s. bill-stamp forged, and the other three are 6s. stamps; they are all forged - we have no such die in the office, (looking at those produced from the desk in the shop) these are all receipt-stamps; and all genuine - there are twelve; we have 6s. bill stamps, but no die with the letter C on it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are all the stamps so well forged as to impose on any body who did not belong to the office? A. I think they are - I should say decidedly that a tradesman who sold stamps would not discover it; I never knew any person in our office mistaken relative to stamps.

CHARLES PRESSLY re-examined. The prisoner said he could not tell a genuine stamp from a forged one - I do not recollect his asking me to show him how; I cannot swear he did not - I told him to bring them to the office to be pointed out; no particular day was fixed for his coming.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-98

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

349. DANIEL DONOVAN and EMMA DAVIS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Jacob Wasem , on the 7th of December , and stealing 2 watches, value 10l.; 6 tea-spoons, value 1l.; 17 sovereigns, 4 half-sovereigns, 4 crowns, 11 half-crowns, 35 shillings, 30 sixpences, 300 pence, and 920 halfpence, his property .

ANNE WASEM . I am the wife of George Jacob Wasem, and live at No. 16, Green Dragon-yard, Whitechapel . On the 7th of December, about ten minutes to three o'clock in the afternoon, I left the house, leaving nobody in it; I locked the door, took the key in my pocket, and left all safe - I came back at half-past three, and found the lock had been hampered; I went up stairs, and the drawer this property was in was broken open, and placed on the table - seven sovereigns, four half-sovereigns, four crowns, and some sixpences were in a blue bag, and the rest was in a drawer - I missed all the property stated; every drawer was opened, and all my clothes about the room, but none of them taken - Lea, the officer, showed me next day some silver, and I could identify one shilling which was cut, as when I took it I doubted its being a good one; and there was another dark shilling which I believe to be mine, but cannot swear to that.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you seen the shilling before the prisoners were examined? A. They were examined between two and three o'clock, and in the evening I saw the shilling.

SARAH HOLLAND . I live next door to Mrs. Wasem. On the 7th of December, after she went out, I heard a noise at her door - I opened my own door, looked out, and seeing nobody near I went in and shut the door, and a few minutes afterwards I heard it again; I then went and tried her door, and it was fast - I went in again, and thought I heard it pulled too; I got up, looked out, and saw two men in the court, going different ways, one towards Whitechapel-road, and the other to Montague-street - I then went and found her door open, and gave an alarm; I believe the male prisoner to be one of the men - I will not positively swear to him; it was soon after three o'clock, and rather a darkish day; the lamps were not lighted - one was a tall man.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Your court is rather narrow? A. Yes, at the end of it - it was foggy in the morning, but rather clear in the afternoon; I was rather busy, and cannot recollect - the court is a thoroughfare;

the man I suppose to be the prisoner was three or four doors off, going towards Montague-street; my sight is not bad - his back was towards me; - I did not see his face.

MARIA WILLIAMS . I live in Green Dragon-yard. I was cleaning our windows, and saw a man come down as far as No. 7. so that he could see the prosecutor's house; he returned, and leaned against a post, until a man exactly like the male prisoner came up to him - he was exactly his stature, but I did not see his face; he appeared to have something heavy in his pockets, and it seemed as if there was white paper at the top of his pockets.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it not rather a foggy afternoon? A. Yes, rather - his pockets were outside; I did not take particular notice of the other man - the men spoke to each other, and both went away together.

CHARLES BROOKS . I live seven doors from the prosecutor. About a quarter of an hour before I heard of this robbery. I went through the court, and saw two persons standing in the court - and as I returned, I saw one about twenty yards from Mrs. Wasem's house, and one at the end; the one up the court made a sign to the one at the end - the male prisoner resembles the one who stood about twenty yards from the house, but I cannot swear to him; I never saw a man more like him - I did not see his face, for when I came up the court, he put his hand to his face; I did not take particular notice, but he resembles the prisoner exactly.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was either of them leaning against a post? A. No, the prisoner who was nearest to the house leaned against the wall - it was rather foggy, but light enough for me to see if I had had suspicion, but I had none.

ELLEN SULLIVAN . On the day in question, about three o'clock, I saw a man standing in the court, and until half-past three; it was one of the men who had walked up and down the court with the male prisoner the beginning of the week; that is all I know.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You did not see the prisoner in the court that day? A. I did not notice him - I had seen him pass up and down on the Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, and knew his person.

COURT. Q. The person you saw on the 7th was not Donovan? A. No.

JAMES LEA . I am an officer. I apprehended Donovan in Albion-street, at a house of ill-fame, on the next morning; I believe the house was kept by the prisoner Davis; he was in bed, and she was in the room - she took a woman's pocket off the bed he was lying on, and wrapped it up; I took it from her, and found in it four half-crowns, fourteen shillings, and five sixpences - there was a particular shilling among it; I found in Donovan's trousers pocket twenty shillings, ten sixpences, two half-crowns, and half a sovereign, and in his waistcoat pocket a piece of wax candle - there was one shilling in the trousers pocket, with a mark on it, which the prosecutrix spoke to - he said he got part of the money at a collection which had been made for some man; he afterwards said he got it at gambling.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you inquired if he had made a collection? A. Yes - I found a collection had been made for a poor man; the shilling the prosecutrix swears to by a mark was in Donovan's pocket - two other men were taken up on this charge; one is under examination now; he is a tallish man; the third was discharged - I know Donovan lives with Davis.

MRS. WASEM (looking at the shilling.) This shilling is the dark shilling - it looks like mine; I am sure it had been among my money; I can swear to this other shilling, the cut one - I will not swear to the one found in the man's trousers pocket - the other is as much like the dark one as can be - I had had the marked shilling about eight days before the robbery.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The shilling found in the man's trousers you have no mark on? A. No; but you might see one hundred, and none like it - it is dirt, which I tried to rub off, but could not.

JURY. Q. What is there remarkable in the dark shilling? A. I do not think this is the shilling.

Donovan's Defence. A poor man in the hospital was going to have his leg taken off; the money was gathered for him - I was to take it him the day I was taken up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-99

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

370. JOHN BATES, alias HABBACK , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Dowden , on the 28th of November , and stealing 3 live tame geese, price 12s., and 4 live tame fowls, price 12s., his property; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

EDWARD DOWDEN. I live at Hanwell . On the 28th of November I locked the house up about six o'clock - I locked my cellar door at six; my fowls and all were safe then - the cellar is under the house - I cannot go from the inside of the house into the cellar; I went to bed about eight, and between eleven and twelve o'clock I heard a noise in the cellar - I got up, went out of doors, and saw the three geese laying dead; they had been in the cellar - a man stood by the side of the verandah - I made a blow at him, and he ran away; I called for my gun, and the prisoner came out at the cellar door; I struck at him with a stick, and saw his face - he was dressed in a smock-frock; he had no hat on; he called for mercy: my wife checked my arm, and he went away; having no shoes on, I did not go after him - I struck him a heavy blow on the head; he was taken next day, and I went down to the office, but he had been liberated; I saw him near a month afterwards, and am positive he is the man - I saw a mark on his head then.

HARRIET DOWDEN . I got up with my husband, and saw the man come out of the cellar door, and saw my husband hit him - he begged for mercy; I went out, caught hold of my husband's arm, and begged him not to hit him any more - the prisoner was the man, I am sure.

THOMAS POYNTON . I am a Policeman. On the 29th of November I met the prisoner coming down Jackass-lane, in a direction from the prosecutor's house, about one o'clock in the morning; his head was bleeding - he appeared to have recently had a severe blow on the head; he said he had been to Uxbridge, drinking with some friends, that he had fallen out of a cart, and lost his hat; his clothes were not dirty - he had no hat on; I took him into custody; he had his smock-frock wrapped about his head - he was about a mile and a half from Mr. Dowden's.

FRANCIS MALLALIEU . I am an inspector of the Police. produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction of felony, in Surrey (read) - I know him; I was present at the trial - he is the person; I apprehended him on the charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Uxbridge to look for a job, at Fowler's barge: another man got the job - I fell in with two or three coalheavers, and got a little too much to drink: they put me into a cart, to take me home; I pitched off the cart on some gravel stones, which cut my head; I got up, and about ten minutes after I found three young chaps by me; they snatched my hat off: I put my smock-frock over my head, and walked towards home - I was tipsy - the Policemen stopped me; next morning the serjeant looked at my head, and said, "Well, it looks like a fall, there is a little gravel in it; I shall let you go."

GUILTY (of stealing only.) Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330103-100

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

351. ISABELLA THOMPSON was indicted for stealing on the 28th of December , 3/4 of a yard of woollen cloth, value 9d., 3 yards of binding, value 6d., 2 shawls, value 3s., 3 pairs of clasps, value 1s. 6d. and 1/2 a yard of cantoon, value 1s., the goods of Morris Woolf , her master .

MORRIS WOOLF. I am a tailor and draper ; the prisoner was in my service for about six weeks; from about a week after she came in my employ, I was continually missing property. Last Friday week, the 28th of December, in the evening, when I came home, Mrs. Woolfe complained of missing two shawls from the parlour cupboard, and next morning I sent for a Police-officer, and searched her box, which was in the garret; three quarters of a yard of linen cloth, two middles of shawls, with the borders cut off, some Prussian binding, three pairs of clasps, and this cantoon, were found - she was present at the search, and said they were her own property, and had been left to her by her father.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe her father, who is dead, was a tailor. A. I understand so.

WILLIAM CUTTRIS . I am an officer; I was sent for about eleven o'clock in the morning - the prisoner gave me the key; these articles were found in her box - she had a great number of things belonging to tailors, such as tape, binding, and other things; she said they were part of a lot of property left to her by her father - she had two boxes; one box, contained her wearing-apparel, and this contained tailor's articles, and books - these were not the only articles of the tailors trade.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose Mr. Woolf pointed out what he considered his own? A. Yes; he did not think any of the others belonged to him; she did not object to give up her keys.

MR. WOOLF. I know this woollen cloth by matching with a piece I have here, which it was cut off; it tallies with the notches where it has been cut; it was sent to me to make up, and measured about five yards; I had cut off about a yard and three quarters, leaving about three and three quarters - I call this three quarters, and about three yards remained which made up the quantity - these three pairs of clasps I know, by having others similar; here is a pair which exactly match - they are not uncommon; other tailors may have them as well as me - this binding I would not swear to it; I can swear to the two shawls, by having the very same sort of things; they are the centres of shawls, and here is where the border has been cut off; I have a complete shawl here, and this black one I had only got in a few days before; I looked over the cupboard on the night of the 28th, and the shawls were gone - I knew they had been there before; this half a yard of cantoon had been cut off this piece - it had no mark on it, but it is a complement for a pair of trousers; it was the same colour and quality, and I can safely say it is part of the same, on my conscience, from the quality and colour, and quality of the back.

Cross-examined. Q. How many thousand pieces of the same colour and quality have been in the County? A. Certainly, there are hundreds, and so there are of this colour of cloth, but not with this indenture: these are shawls with the borders cut off - it can be used as a shawl; the prisoner's keys were in her box - she afforded every facility to the search.

Witness for the Defence.

BENJAMIN BURTON . I live in the Strand, and am the prisoner's uncle; her father was a tailor - when he died a great quantity of tailor's articles were left her - I told her to put them into her box, and at some future time they might be of use to her - she had a small trunk full; I did not take them in my hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-101

352. WILLIAM CROCKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 2 shirts, value 2l., and 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Emanuel Cohen , from the person of Israel Cohen ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

ISRAEL COHEN. I am ten years old; I am son of Emanuel Cohen , of Middlesex-street, Whitechapel. I had two shirts in a handkerchief to bring from the laundress, who lived behind the Eagle, in the City-road; at the corner of Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street , the prisoner and two others took them out of my arms, and ran away with them - I am sure of the prisoner; they snatched them out of my arms; I hallooed out Stop thief! it was on the 23rd of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon; I lost sight of them; I saw the prisoner at the office in about a fortnight, and was quite certain of him; I have never seen the property since - the prisoner was the man who snatched the bundle.

EMANUEL COHEN . I am father of Israel Cohen; I sent him to the laundress about four o'clock in the afternoon, and about half-past five he returned without the things, and gave the account he has now; I saw the prisoner about a fortnight afterwards in Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street: my boy was not with me - I laid hold of him from my son's description; he was taken before the Lord Mayor - the prisoner was disguised in the watch-house, before my son saw him, but he identified him from among others.

Prisoner. He at first said it was another man, then the Policeman said, "Ayn't it somebody else?" and he said that it was another - the inspector said, "Look again," and then he said it was me. Witness. The prisoner was under a gas light; another person had the

prisoner's clothes on - my boy looked into the prisoner's face; he was going to point to another man, but did not point to any body but the prisoner - he said the prisoner, and nobody else, was the person.

SAMUEL BEAN . I am Policeman. The prisoner was given into my charge on the 5th of December, in Long-alley, Moorfields, by the prosecutor's father; he was taken to Bishopsgate watch-house; I sent for the son - I do not believe we had any other prisoner there, but other persons went in, on purpose that the witness might not see him alone - he was a long time considering; he at first looked at one, and I think he said, "I think that is the man;" that was not the prisoner, but after that we turned him round to the gas-light; he turned to each individual, and looked strongly at the prisoner for some time, and then said "That is the person, I am positive;" the prisoner at that time was disguised, and had a large coat on, and a big bat - he identified him when he came under the gas-light.

JOHN CLARKSON proved a former conviction.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time of the robbery I was at work at an umbrella-makers.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-102

353. JAMES CLEMENTS & THOMAS STERNE were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Edward Pidding , from his person .

EDWARD PIDDING. I am clerk to Messrs. Dolman, solicitors , and live in Leatherseller's-buildings. On Sunday, the 16th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was walking with a friend in Beech-street, Barbican , and heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned round; I did not observe the prisoners near me; an officer came up, and asked if I had lost my handkerchief; I felt, and it was gone from my inside coat-pocket; it was safe shortly before; the officer produced it - I went back with him to the public-house, and found the two prisoners in custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH CADBY. I am a constable of Clerken well. I was with Colton on the 16th, in Beech-street, and saw the two prisoners following the prosecutor and his friend; I watched them - I saw Sterne leave the other prisoner and cross over to the other side of the road - they were near the prosecutor at that time; after Sterne had got on the same side of the way as we were, Clement drew the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket - he crossed over, and had hardly reached Sterne before we took them both into custody - the handkerchief was on the ground; I did not see from whom it dropped; Clements caused a scuffle in endeavouring to escape; Sterne was quiet, and did not at all endeavour to escape; they were close together when the handkerchief was found; there were one or two other persons passing, but not in their company.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You never saw Sterne with it? A. No, he was on the other side of the way when it was taken; he did not offer to receive it, and made no resistance; but said he was willing to go any where.

WILLIAM COLTON . I was in company with Cadby on the opposite side of the road - I observed the two prisoners behind Mr. Pidding and another gentleman; Sterme crossed the road, and about two minutes before he had got across, I saw Clements take something from Mr. Pidding's pocket - he crossed over, and had hardly got to Sterue before I laid hold of him, and the handkerchief was dropped; I did not see him drop it - Cadby picked it up by his feet, and he ran away; Sterne did not.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Sterne attempt to take any thing? A. He did not, nor did he attempt to take it up.

Clements. He said at Worship-street that I did not run away, but made a rustle out of his arm - I did not run at all, I only stooped my head down.

WILLIAM COLTON . He got half way across the road before I caught him, and threw the handkerchief away - I saw Cadby take it up; before Sterne had crossed the road I had not observed them behind the prosecutor hardly a minute.

JOSEPH CADBY . I had seen them behind the prosecutor for nearly five minutes.

Clements, in his Defence, handed in an address from his father, containing remarks upon the evidence.

Sterne's Defence. I was not dressed well enough to go to church in the day time, and was walking about till Barbican chapel opened - this boy came up, and asked me at what time it would be open; I said I did not know.

CLEMENTS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

STERNE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-103

354. LOUISA BOTTRILL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Matthew Pearson , and with a certain sharp instrument unlawfully stabbing and cutting him, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating her intent to be to disable or do him some grievous bodily harm.

MATTHEW PEARSON. I am clerk to a law-stationer , and live in Bride-court, Fleet-street ; the prisoner and I lived together as man and wife for twenty-two months; I had no children by her. On the 16th of December, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, (I was not sober) I was coming in at the door, and the prisoner put on her bonnet and cloak, and was going out - I asked where she was going; she said that was her business; I said I wished to speak to her before she went out - she then deliberately went towards the table, took a table-knife off the table, and made a thrust at me with it - I had not spoken to her; there had been no angry words between us before - I was not jealous of her; I do not know whether on her part there was any jealousy; I expressed no jealous feeling towards her at that time - there had been disputes formerly, but not on that day; I had just come inside the room door when she took up the knife, which laid open on the table; she made a thrust at me, but she said nothing; it did not reach me - I laid hold of her arm which held the knife; she then said she would have my life; she resoued her arm from my hand, and made another thrust at me with the knife, that went through my coat, and slightly grazed my shoulder; she then made several thrusts at my head, which I warded off with my arm; one of those thrusts struck me on the wrist - it was rather a deep wound; there was no one else in the room; I then got hold of both her wrists, wrested the knife from

her, and then a woman came into the room, who I have not been able to find out since; I made a complaint at Guildhall next day; she was held to bail; I told the Magistrate I did not wish to hurt her, except to protect myself; we had been on bad terms for some time before; I staid with her till about five o'clock that day, then left, and went to Mrs. Peake's, my present landlady - I left her without charging a constable with her; she was committed for want of bail to Giltspur-street - I have not visited her in prison; I lived with her in Shoe-lane when it happened.

ELIZA PEAKE . I live in Bride-court, Bridge-street; it comes into Bride-lane. Pearson lives in my house now; I have known him for about twelve months - I do not know the prisoner. On Sunday, the 16th of December, about half-past five o'clock, Pearson called on me; he knocked at the door, and looked pretty nearly covered with blood, which came from his face and arm - I am sure blood came from a wound in his face; he was not intoxicated, but it appeared that he had been - I got him some water to wash himself; he had his arm in a handkerchief for a fortnight- the next day the prisoner came to me, and asked if the prosecutor was at my house; I told her he was not, but I expected him in every minute, and asked her how she came to use the man as she did, and cut him about; she said she wanted to murder him, and was very sorry she had not done so - the prosecutor had been living at my house once before, but not with her; she went away - she did not appear influenced by liquor.

JURY. Q. Are you married? A. Yes; my husband lives with me.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutor had compelled her to resort to prostitution for his support- that on the day in question he came home intoxicated; she endeavoured to leave the room, in order to avoid him, but he prevented her, and a scuffle ensued, during which she took up the knife and struck him with it, unconscious of what she was doing.

MATTHEW PEARSON . I did not lay hold of her; she never accused me of sending her out for prostitution, nor of doing her any injury.

MARY KNIGHT . I am a widow, and live in Aylesbury-place, Bream's-buildings-Chancery-lane. I have known the prisoner some time; I always thought she and the prosecutor were man and wife - she always conducted herself with that propriety that I always considered she was; the prosecutor called at my house on the Friday preceding the Sunday this happened; they had been separated for three weeks, and he said they had been together again for three weeks - he said he was going to send her down to her mother, who lives a little way out of town; and on the Sunday morning in question she called on me, and inquired if Pearson had been with me since last night- I said I had not seen him; she came to me on Monday, and said she had cut him; I understood they had quarrelled about his being out all night and all day on Sunday, and words ensued - I said to her, "Why not go out of the room?" she said she was going, and he laid hold of her by the throat, and he would not let her - I never saw her otherwise than mild and good tempered.

MATTHEW PEARSON . I had not been home that night; I was earning 35s. a week at this time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-104

NEW COURT. MONDAY, JANUARY 7TH.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

343. WILLIAM MURDOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 80 lbs. of coals, value 3s., and 40 lbs. of coke, value 1s. 6d., the goods of the Rev. George Moore , and others, the Trustees appointed for putting an Act into execution for building a church , &c.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN COLQUHOUN . I am clerk to the vestry-clerk of St. Pancras. The Rev. George Moore is vicar of the parish, and is one of the Trustees of Camden-town chapel , which is in that parish - I have the Act of Parliament by which the Trustees are appointed.

WILLIAM CLARK (Police-constable S 117). On the night of Saturday, the 15th of December, about eleven o'clock, I was in Pratt-street, near Camden-town chapel - I saw a woman come out of the house the prisoner lives in; she walked up and down, between that house and the chapel, for nearly a quarter of an hour; she did not see me- she went into the house again, then came out, and made a sort of cough; I went up to her, and then saw the prisoner coming from the chapel, in the road; I did not see him come out of the chapel - he had a large bag on his back; I asked him what he had there - he said it was nothing to me; I found it contained coals - I asked where he got them from; he said it was no business of mine, he was going to take them home; I insisted upon taking him and the coals to the station-house - he said I had better not, that he was a constable, and he entreated me not to expose him, as he should lose his situation; I took him to the station, and found 127 lbs of coals and coke in the bag- he wanted me to let him go, and said he would give me something to drink.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was he not on the common pavement? A. He was close to the chapelgate; persons can go on that side, but there is no one goes there all night - the houses are on the other side, or mostly so.

SAMUEL BRADBURN (Police-serjeant S 3). On the night of the 15th of December I met the prisoner and this witness; he said he had stopped the prisoner coming from the chapel with some coals; I said, "Perhaps he has a right to these coals;" the prisoner said, "No, my friend, I have no business with them at all, they don't belong to me at all; I take such a bag home once a fortnight, instead of using them in the chapel, and I did not think that any of your men would take such a mean advantage of me as to take me into custody;" he said the Trustee was a good sort of a man, and he did not think he would appear against him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Clark hear all this? A. No, I sent him to get a wheelbarrow to carry the coals; he did not say at that time that he had taken coals from his own house, to light the chapel fires, and he thought he had a right to a return for them, but he said so before the Magistrate, who told him he must go and make a Judge and Jury believe it.

COURT. Q. What did he say? A. He said he had taken over a quantity of coals to the chapel, when they were out of coals, and when he went home that night, his wife said, "William I am out of coals, I wish you would fetch those you took to the chapel."

WILLIAM COLQUHOUN. The prisoner is verger of the chapel and chapel-keeper; it was his duty to take charge of all the property there.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he not the communnion plate and many valueable things in his care? A. Yes; he lighted the fires and had care of the coals - they were supplied by an order from the vestry clerk; he applied for an order on the 17th of October.

RICHARD WILLIAMS . I am a carman to Mr. Wood, a coal-merchant, in Camden-town. I delivered three tons of coals at Camden-town chapel, on the 20th of October, in thirty sacks; part were put on one side and part on the other.

COURT. Q. Do you know by whose order they were delivered? A. The Trustees of the parish; I saw the printed order - they would not have been sent without an order; the prisoner was there, and was about to light the fires when we got there.

RICHARD HEAVER . I am a carman to Mr. Wood. I delivered some coke on the same day.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had taken the coals for some of his own, which he had used previous to the supply for the chapel being ordered.

ELIZABETH JANE HINTON . I am a widow, and live in Grove-terrace, Kentish-town. I remember seeing the prisoner in the early part of October come across the street from his own house to the chapel with some coals in a scuttle; his wife called, and asked him if he had the tinder-box - he put down the scuttle in the street, and went back for it; he then took the scuttle of coals into the chapel - I saw him about a week afterwards take some coals in a bag into the chapel on his shoulder; he said to me, "Good morning;" I said the same - it was a thin dirty bag, and appeared to have coals in it; I said to him, "You are loaded:" he said they were out of coals at the chapel, and he was taking some to light the fires.

COURT. Q. When were you applied to, to give evidence on this subject? A. Last Thursday; I had not mentioned this circumstance - I was not before the Magistrate; I heard of the prisoner's being in custody: there was nothing to make me look at the coals.

MR. DOANE. Q. When was it you observed the coals in the scuttle? A. It was on a Thursday morning, in the early part of October, at twenty minutes past nine o'clock; as I passed the chapel I looked up, and saw the time - I could see the time every day if I looked up; it was a black scuttle - I cannot tell what day it was when I saw him again, but I had particular business on the first day, which makes me remember it; I never saw him carrying coals at any other times.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-105

356. THOMAS VIZE was indicted for bigamy .

ELIZABETH SHERWOOD . I am the wife of William Sherwood. The prisoner paid his addresses to my husband's sister, Sarah Ann Sherwood - he is a painter ; I was present at St. George's church, Hanover-square, when they were married on the 18th of July, 1830: Samuel Sherwood was present, and another female - Sarah Ann Sherwood was twenty-eight years of age; the prisoner appeared to be more than twenty-one; I had not heard the banns published - the parties went afterwards into the vestry-room, and we signed our names; they lived together at her mother's for some months, then they removed, and took another lodging; they lived together for two years and a half - the prisoner had lived with Sherwood's mother before in Cleveland-street, Fitzroy-square.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did the prisoner live at her mother's when they were married? A. Yes; he represented that he was twenty-one years of age when he first came to live there, which was twelve months before they were married: I believe they hardly ever quarrelled - Sarah Ann Sherwood is alive; I saw her last night.

SAMUEL SHERWOOD . I was present at the marriage of the prisoner with Sarah Ann Sherwood ; I have examined the register of the parish - I attended at the church on the first Sunday of the publication of the banns, and heard them asked - the usual time had elapsed before the marriage, or more, I dare say it was five or six weeks: Elizabeth Sherwood , Sarah Hagley , and I think one other person were present at the marriage.

MARIA DAVEY . The prisoner visited Jane Moore , a fellow-servant of mine; I understood him to be a single man - I was present at St. Martin's church , at their marriage; I walked with her to the church, and saw them married - I heard the prisoner say he was going to America; the marriage was on a Tuesday in last November - I have seen Jane Moore once since.

WILLIAM DICKINSON (Police-constable H. 11.) I produce a certificate of the marriage, which I got from Samuel Sherwood.

SAMUEL SHERWOOD . I got it from St. George, Hanover-square; I examined it with the register - it is a true copy; I looked at the book, and then at this paper - (read.)

WILLIAM DICKENSON . In consequence of information. I went on board the Florida, an American vessel, as she was warping out of the dock for America; I went between the decks, and found the prisoner and a young woman, who called him her husband - he said it was a bad job, and wanted me to give him some advice.

Witness for the Defence.

JOHN LAWSON . I am a painter; I live in Windmill-street, Haymarket - the prisoner was my apprentice at the time of his first marriage in 1830; he came to me about ten years ago - he was then eleven years of age; I knew it by the register of his age, from the parish, and from his father and mother; his father is since dead - his sister is my wife; Sarah Ann Sherwood 's mother came to me, and inquired if the prisoner was out of his time - this was in the April before his marriage; I told her he was not, that he was but nineteen, or in his twentieth year, and I would not consent to the marriage, as he was my apprentice.

COURT. Q. Did you know for what purpose she made the application? A. She said he was going to be married to her daughter, who was twenty-eight years of age, and she was a cripple - she said she was a very good daughter to her, and she would not wish her to be married to any body, except a person who would be kind to her; I told her he was rather wild - I would not consent to it; and if she had any regard or love for her child, by no means to allow them to be married - I had had a few words with him before that, and told him if he could get work at another place, I would not hinder it, but he was at my

house occasionally - my wife is forty-three years old; she is the eldest of ten, and the prisoner is the youngest - he called on me the morning he was married, and told me of it; I was angry, and would not speak to him.

SAMUEL SHERWOOD re-examined. Q. Is your sister a cripple? A. Yes, and rather ailing - I had nothing to do with her marriage; I understood the prisoner was about twenty at the time - I knew of the marriage two or three weeks before the banns were put up; it might be wrong, but I was younger than either of them, and it did not strike me.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-106

357. MARY ANN PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , 8 ozs. of rhubarb, value 2s.; 6d., 1 book, value 1s. 6d.; 1 bottle of lavender-water, value 4s. 6d; 1 bottle of Perry's essence, value 2s., 1 bottle of marking ink, value 1s.; 2 boxes of pills, value 2s.; 1 box of tooth-powder, value 8d.; 1 bottle of tincture of myrrb, value 8d.; 1 tooth-brush, value 7d.; and 2 quires and 5 sheets of paper, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Samuel Forfeit Gray and another, her masters .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

MR. SAMUEL FORFEIT GRAY . I keep a chemist and druggist's shop in New Bond-street ; Mr. Rogers is my partner - the prisoner was my housemaid ; she came in June or July last; she left me on or before the 29th of November - I would have given her the best of characters; she left of her own accord. I had reason to suppose my shop was being plundered, and had some of my servants taken into custody, and among the rest, Jones, the cook; the prisoner came to the house door on the 1st of December, to see the cook - I called her into the counting-house, and told her I had been robbed, and Jones and Fudger were in custody; I told her I had always had a good opinion of her, and begged her to tell me of any circumstance that she knew of while she was in my service - she denied knowing any thing about the robbery; I do not remember her words, but it was to that effect - she appeared to be flurried, and I told her to walk up into the kitchen, and sit down, as I had no wish to take her by surprise; she went up stairs, and I sent for the two-officers - I went up stairs with them, and told the prisoner I had then given her an hour to consider of it, and I begged to know if she still persisted in what she had formerly said; she still denied it - some other conversation took place, which I do not remember, and I gave her to the officers; I afterwards told her, that if she even had some of our property, if her account was found perfectly correct, and she would give a full statement of all she knew (or words to that effect), that I would not press the case against her - but if, on the officers searching her boxes, any articles were found, she must take the consequences - I am sure I said "on searching her boxes;" I had not then discovered any thing against her - she went away with the officers, and on the officers return they produced some property, which I could identify.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You had a person named Steane in your service? A. Yes, he was convicted on Saturday, and my cook and porter are now indicted; my suspicions arose on the 28th of November - I had no suspicion when she left me; Steane was a confidential person, and if he or any of the servants were ill, they had medicine free of expence.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You did not receive information till the 28th of November? A. No; the prisoner had the means of taking articles; I could not miss a few articles in my trade.

COURT. Q. Had Steane and Fudger more to do with the shop than the prisoner? A. Yes; they were employed only in the shop.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I went with Goddard to Mr. Gray on the 1st of December; I heard Mr. Gray tell the prisoner he had been robbed, and he wished her to say whether she knew any thing about it - she said No; he then asked if she had taken any thing - she said No; he said two or three times over, that if she had, and would tell him, he would not press the case against her; but if any thing should be found hereafter, that she must not expect any consideration, or any mercy from him; I will not be sure whether he mentioned her boxes or not; I then took her into custody - I told her we must go home and search her boxes; she walked on to Rochester-street, in the lower part of Westminster, and we followed her - she turned into a house; we went into the kitchen, and saw her aunt - she had before told us she was stopping with her aunt; she asked her aunt for a light, and said we were come to search her boxes - a light was got, and we went to the front room, on the first floor; she then took a key from her pocket, opened two boxes, and we found these articles.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know where she lived? A. Certainly not; she took us there, and we found the articles stated in the indictment.

HENRY GODDARD . I went with the other officer; what he states is correct.

MR. GRAY. These articles are all mine.

Cross-examined. Q. That is, they have been in your shop? A. Yes, and some of them we do not sell; the medicines have my name on them.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How much rhubarb is there? A. Half a pound; it is worth 2s. - there is no mark on it, but we do not sell that, and we are short of this quantity; it is trimmed in the same way as the rest we have - this book is mine; it is the third volume of Peter Pindar - I never gave it to her; here is a bottle of Perry's essence for the tooth-ache, but that I cannot swear to - these boxes of pills and other things bear my name on them, and this paper has my writing on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Who trimmed this rhubarb? A. I do not know, we bought it so in a large quantity - most likely the person we had it of supplies other persons; I had the other volumes of Peter Pindar : this has no name in it - two more of the volumes have been found, one in the possession of the cook, and one of Wyer; I missed the whole four volumes about four months ago, and inquired for them, but they could not be found then, nor since, till these indictments were preferred; there is nothing in this book to show any person that it belonged to me - I cannot tell whether this tooth-powder, lavender-water, and pills had been sold or not.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you inquire respecting these books while she was your service? A. Yes; I am not certain whether I inquired of the prisoner, or of the cook,

but I rather think of the prisoner; I never sold, nor gave any of these things to the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 19. Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330103-107

358. ANNA JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 4 pieces of camphor soap, value 2s. 6d.; 3 boxes of pills, value 3s. 6d.; 1 bottle of scouring-drops, value 6d.: 1 box of soda-powders, value 1s.; 1 toothpick-case, value 6d.; 1 saucer, containing blue dye, value 3d.; 1 sheet, value 5s.; 6 ozs. of cinnamon, value 3s. 6d.; 1 1/2 oz. of nutmegs, value 9d.; 3 1/2 ozs. of mixed spice, value 1s.; 2 ozs. of ginger, value 3d.; 1 basin and cover, value 6d.; 1 1/2 lb. of vermicella, value 8d.; 3 books, value 3s.; 3 jars of jam, value 1s. 6d.; 3 quires of paper, value 2s.; 1 bottle of pomade divine, value 1s.; 1 bottle of Perry's essence, value 2s.; 1 bottle of lavender-water, value 4d.; 1 box of tooth-powder, value 1s. 6d.; 1 box of matches, value 3d.; 9 tooth-brushes, value 5s.; 9 boxes, value 1s.; 2 boxes of pills, value 2s.; 1 instantaneous fire-box, value 1s.; 1 bottle of cement, value 1s.; 1 bottle of scouring-drops, value 8d.; 1 box of soda-powders, value 1s.; 3 corn-rubbers, value 1s.; 3 ivory toothpick-cases, value 4s. 6d.; 2 ozs. of rhubarb, value 8d.; 1 pot of composition, value 1s. 6d.; 1 lb. of arrow-root, value 2s.; 5 ozs. of sponge, value 5s., and 1 1/2 lb. of concentrated vinegar, value 2s., the goods of Samuel Forfeit Gray and another, her masters .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

MR. SAMUEL FORFEIT GRAY . I am in partner ship with Mr. Rogers - the prisoner was in my service as cook . On the 29th of November I sent for the officer, and took her into custody; the key of a drawer in the scullery was required of her - she produced it; the drawer was opened by the officer, and we found three or four packages of camphor soap - we then proceeded to her bed-room, and in her boxes we found some other articles; they then looked under the bed, and some other things were found- we then came down stairs, and she begged to speak to me in private - she walked across the larder, and I followed her, but the officer did not go; I did not make her any promise or threat - she took down a plate-basket from a shelf, put it into my hand, and said, "There, now you have all the property I have taken, pray forgive me - I will pay you any thing;" I took it to the officers, and she was taken away in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where does your partner live? A. At Milfield, in Surrey, and in Leicester-square - he never lives in Bond-street, but the expences are borne out of the joint stock; he has a control over the business; the servants are mine, but the business pays for them; they are not engaged without his knowing it - he takes his meals at the house occasionally, and has since the prisoner has been there.

HENRY GODDARD. I went to Mr. Gray's on the 29th of November - I searched the drawer in the scullery, in the presence of the prisoner, and found some of these articles there; I went to her bed-room, and found some of them in her box, and some others under her bed - Mr. Gray brought this volume of Peter Pindar , and this paper from the larder.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character, and a witness stated he was commissioned to send her into the country.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-108

359. PHILIP FUDGER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 book, value 1s.; 1 cut glass smelling-bottle, value 4s., and one instantaneous light-box, value 5s., the goods of Samuel Forfeit Gray , and another, his masters .

SAMUEL FORFEIT GRAY. The prisoner was our porter . On the 29th of November he went out about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, and returned about half-past eight - I had the officer ready, and gave him in custody; he went with me to search his premises, in Woodstock-street, Bond-street; we found in his box a silver top smelling-bottle, and an instantaneous fire-box; he said he bought that of Mr. Jones, during the first three months of his being with me; and the smelling-bottle he had had before he came into my service - he had been two years and eight months with me.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I took the prisoner, and went with him to his lodgings, in Woodstock-street - we found this fire-box, this smelling bottle, and a volume of Fairy Tales.

MR. GRAY. I know this smelling-bottle to be mine -I took stock in August, and it was then on my premises; it has my mark on the inside of it - this fire-box is mine; it had been injured, and I had that and two others taken out for the purpose of being repaired - this book is mine: I have the fellow volume to it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever give the prisoner leave to take that volume to read? A. Never; it has broken my set - this smelling-bottle is empty, and it has my mark on it - we generally rub the marks out when we sell them, and always sell them full - this has never been filled; I know this fire-box by the cap being injured - I only owe the prisoner a few shillings.

Prisoner. Mrs. Gray asked me if I was fond of reading - I said Yes, and she lent me that book.

MR. GRAY. I believe he cannot read well enough to read a book; I paid for his learning to read.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined 6 Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-109

160. PHILIP FUDGER was again indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 12 ozs. of Italian juice, value 1s.; 20 ozs. of ginger, value 3s.; 3 1/2 lbs. of curd soap, value 3s.; 9 lbs. of cloves, value 2s.; 2 lbs. of loaf sugar, value 1s.6d.; 1 1/2 oz. of nutmegs, value 9d.; 10 ozs. of pepper, value 10d.; 1 bag, value 8d.; 1 can, value 1s., and 2 gallons of oil, value 13s., the goods of Samuel Forfeit Gray and another, his masters ; and WILLIAM WYER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen against the statute.

SOPHIA SURGEON . I live in Great Ormond-street . On the 29th of November Fudger lodged there - Wyer's wife is Fudger's sister - I saw Fudger and his sister one Thursday, the latter end of November, they went out together; and I saw Mrs. Wyer come back - the prisoner Wyer had at that time a bad leg, which had confined

him to the house; but, after his wife returned I saw him go out with two or three bags or parcels in cloths.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time was this? A. Between eight and nine o'clock in the morning - I cannot say that he might not have been out for a short distance before, but his leg was better that day.

WILLIAM GOODRICH . I am a baker, and live in Great Ormond-street. On the morning of the 29th of November, the prisoner Wyer came to me between nine and eleven o'clock - he brought with him a bag in one hand, which was full of something, and a can, which was three parts full - he stood at my door, and I came out of my parlour, and said to him, "Mr. Wyer, what do you do carrying things when you are on your club?" - he said,"That is the very thing that I called here for; let me leave these things, and I will call in the course of the day;" he left them, but did not call again - on that day week, a person called and said he was an attorney; and after he was gone, I opened the bag in the parlour, before my wife and her sister; the bag coutained ginger, nutmegs, soap, and a variety of articles, and the can was three parts full of oil - Mr. Gray's name and address was on the bag, stamped with a small stamp; the prisoner Wyer called the same evening, about a quarter-past nine o'clock - he said he had called for the things; I said,

"I cannot give them up; I am going to take them to the owner" - he made answer, "You can take the can, but not the bag" - I said,"I shall take them all, just as I received them;" he left me, - I got a cab, and went to Mr. Gray's with them, accompained by a neighbour.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you what was in the bag? A. No; I have no reason to think he knew; Mr. Gray's name was on a part of the bag, which was tied up, and was not seen till it was untied - I do not consider that he knew Mr. Gray's name was on it; he did not, when he said, "Do not take the bag," add to it, "As it may get Fudger into a scrape" - he said no more than I have told you; I have known Wyer two years - he is a hard-working and honest man; he is a farrier; I thought the bag contained horse-medicines, as they made such a smell.

MR. SAMUEL FORFEIT GRAY . These things were brought to my shop by the witness. I sell some of these articles, but not the sugar, soap, nor oil - I know the bag is mine, and the lavender-water has my stamp on it; it has not been opened - two of these bottles are wrapped up in one of the shop-dusters, which I know, by its being burnt with our acids; the paper round this liquorice has my writing on it - and so has this paper round the ginger, and these cloves; this camphor soap is in an unfinished state - it is in a handkerchief like one I have seen Fudger use; and we have missed some soap - we do not keep pepper in bottles like this, but in large jars; I found a tin scoop bent up like a funnel, as if to put pepper into this bottle - I have one partner.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you missed any pepper? A. No; there may be thousands of bottles in the world like this - these papers have the names of plants on them; I once had a large collection of them; the plants are destroyed, but the paper being in good order, I put it up in quires, and this is some of it.

HENRY GODDARD . I apprehended Wyer on the 7th of December, about seven o'clock in the morning, in Great Ormond-street - I told him we had come to take him; he said he had remained in the room on purpose, expecting we should come - on our way to the office, he said he was much happier now than he was before, and he was very willing to go where his wife went; he said he knew nothing about the bag or the can.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I went with Goddard to Wyer's lodging - he said he expected us, and that he had taken the things by the advice of a professional adviser, or fetched them away by it; he afterwards said it was Fudger who had got his wife and himself into trouble, and he felt happier than before he was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-110

361. REBECCA WYER and THOMAS WYER were separately indicted for feloniously receiving various articles, the property of Samuel Forfeit Gray , and another, well knowing the same to have been stolen .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-111

362. HENRY IRELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 2 pair of trousers, value 40s. , the goods of James Ford .

JAMES FORD . I am in the service of Mr. Faulkener, who has a stable in Doughty-mews - I lodge there. On the 30th of November, the prisoner was there in the evening, and I gave him a lodging by the Policeman's desire - I said I had not room in the stable, but he might sleep in the loft; he slept there three nights, and on the third night, I missed two pairs of trousers which had been hanging up in my bed-room - these are them.

JAMES JOYCE (Police-constable E. 130). I took the prisoner on the 3rd of December - he said he left the trousers at two shops near Smithfield - I went and traced them.

JOHN KEBBELL . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Field-lane - I have a pair of trousers, which I bought of the prisoner, between eight and nine o'clock at night, on the 30th of November; he asked if we bought clothes; I said Yes - he showed me these trousers, and asked 4s. for them - I gave him 3s.

SAMUEL FALK . I keep a clothes-shop in Field-lane. On the 30th of November, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought me these trousers, and asked 6s. for them - I offered him 4s., which he was eager to take; I asked where he came from; he said he had them given him a board a ship -I said I would keep them till he brought the person he had them of; he then went away.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-112

363. JAMES MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of John Dodd .

JOHN DODD . I am a carter to Mr. Hankey, at Finchley. On the 13th of December I came to London - I left my cart in a street I do not know the name of, while I went down a mews; when I returned, my coat was gone from the cart - this is it.

WALTER GEORGE PHILLIPS . I carry out newspapers. On the 13th of December, I was in Cavendish-street - I saw the prisoner take the coat off the shaft, and run into Harley-street; I saw a Policeman and told him.

SAMUEL PATMORE (Police-constable D 67). I followed the prisoner into Harley-street; I saw him putting on this coat - he looked at himself, to see how it fitted; he then saw me, and ran off with it on - I cried Stop thief! he pulled the coat off in running - I took it up, still pursued him, and a person caught him; he said distress made him do it.

Prisoner. It was distress made me do it; I have three children, and my wife is dead.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-113

364. MARTHA OAKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 2 silver spoons, value 20s., the goods of Richard Wilcox Fairlam , her master .

RICHARD WILCOX FAIRLAM . I live in Lisson-grove - the prisoner was in my service. On the 12th of December I came down, and found on the stairs a duplicate, which led me to Mr. Till's, in the Edgware-road - I there saw a silver spoon, which was mine; I then took down a light spoon to the prisoner, and told her to bring me up a heavy one, which she had in the kitchen - she went out; I went up stairs, was called down, and found Mr. Till's young man in my shop - I went to Mr. Till's, and found the prisoner; I took her back with me, and sent for an officer - she said she had pawned the spoon, intending to redeem it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. What did you do with the duplicate? A. When I returned I threw it on the floor; I afterwards found the prisoner at Mr. Till's- I did not give charge of her there; there was a stir about a young man stealing some silk handkerchiefs from me, but I did not give charge of him.

JOSEPH TILL . I am a pawnbroker. I have a silver table-spoon, pawned with me on the 8th of December, by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Payne , Devonshire-place - she redeemed one by pawning this, which he took away; it was pawned for 8s.; it is worth 12s. or 13s. - in the morning of the 12th of December the prosecutor came and claimed it; the prisoner came again in the evening, to bring another to redeem this one - I said her master had been there, and desired me to detain her, which I did.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not very common for persons to give false addresses? A. I have every reason to believe so.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; I found this spoon on the drawing-room table - the prisoner said she pawned the former spoon to pay for making a gown.

MR. FAIRLAM. This spoon, pawned on the 8th of December, is the heavy spoon - the one I gave her she did not take out of the house; we had four silver spoons in use in the kitchen.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any wages due to her? A. She had been paid her quarter's wages about five weeks before - she had 11l. or 12l. a year; she had a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-114

365. ROBERT POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 2 loaves of bread, value 1s. 2d., the goods of David Mackie ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

WILLIAM BOWHILL (Police-constable S 160.) I was on duty in Edward-street, Battle-bridge, on the 17th of December - when I got near the prosecutor's shop, I saw the prisoner and another boy come out of it - the prisoner was carrying four loaves of bread; the other boy went off - I went up to the prisoner, and when I was approaching him, he said, "I don't want them boy, you may have them;" I said, "What have you got?" he said,"Only a piece of bread which that boy gave me."

JAMES WHALEY . I am shopman to David Mackie, my brother, who lives at the corner of Northampton-street ; he is a baker . I saw the four loaves brought in by the officer - they are my brother's, and had been taken off a shelf.

THOMAS GOODYEAR (Police-constable E 39.) I know the prisoner - his father and mother are very hadly off; I was present in July last, when the prisoner was tried by the name of Robert Isaacs ; he was ordered to be whipped and discharged; I have a certificate of his conviction.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330103-115

366. CHARLES READING was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 2 sheets, value 3s. , the goods of Daniel Walker .

DANIEL WALKER . I keep a coffee-shop on Great Saffron-hill . The prisoner hired a bed at my house on the 7th of December - he left next morning, and I missed two sheets; I saw them again in the hands of the Policeman.

RICHARD BAYLIS (Police-constable G 67.) The prisoner surrendered himself at the office on the 8th of December; he said he had stolen a pair of sheets from Mr. Walker, and put them down a privy - I went by his direction, and got them.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330103-116

367. THOMAS RICKETTS and WILLIAM LANGSTONE were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December . 1 spoon, value 5s. , the goods of Ann Ellice .

JOHN HOWES . I am butler to Mrs. Ann Ellice , of Hereford-street . I missed a silver spoon on the 13th of December - I had seen it safe at ten o'clock that morning; Langstone was pot-boy at the City of Quebec public-house, Quebee-street.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Have you ever said this was on the 22nd? A. No; I did not see Langstone at the house that day - the spoon had been on the dresser.

RICHARD HUBBARD (Police-constable T 144.) On the afternoon of the 13th of December I was on duty in Edgware-road - I saw Ricketts go into Mr. Smith's, who is a pawnbroker's; he had been in company with Langstone before, and when he came out he had a spoon in his hand; he then went into the next house, and offered it to the shopman, who said, "Is that your property (or) your spoon?" he said Yes; he said, "Where did you get it?" he said,"I found it on a dust-hill;" he came out of the shop,

and told me it was not his, but the other boy gave it to him - the shopman gave me the spoon; Ricketts came with me, Langstone was then gone; I went after him, and found him at the corner of Chapel-street, Edgware-road - he said he gave the spoon to Ricketts to dispose of.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say how he got it? A. Yes, he said he found it in Hereford-street.

RICHARD HANCOCK (Police-constable T 138). I was on duty in Edgware-road; I saw the two prisoners and another get out of a donkey-cart - Ricketts had a spoon in his hand; Hubbard followed him, and Langston turned up a street by the side of the pawnbrokr's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Rickett's Defence. I met Langstone; he asked me to pawn the spoon for him, and said he found it in Hereford-street.

Langstone's Defence. I picked it up, and kept it till the evening; I did not hear of any one losing it, and I thought I would pawn it.

JOHN HOWES . Langstone came with beer to the pantry in general, and this spoon was on a dresser in the pantry.

Langstone received a good character.

LANGSTONE - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

RICKETTS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-117

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

368. FRANCES SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 counterpane, value 1s. 6d.; 2 aprons, value 1s.; 1 pair of clogs, value 2s., and 2 spoons, value 6d., the goods of Henry Dobson , her master .

HENRY DOBSON . I live at Hammersmith - the prisoner was my servant for eleven weeks. I lost this property- it was found in her box, on the 1st of December, she was gone out, and my wife looked into her box, and when I came home we sent for a constable - she said she intended to take them home to her mother; our washing was done by Mrs. Clay and Mrs. Johnson - not by the prisoner's mother.

JAMES COOK . I am a constable. I found these things in the prisoner's box; she said she was truly sorry for what she had done, and hoped she should be forgiven - she said she was going to take them to her mother.

HENRY DOBSON . These are my property - the prisoner had come from Mr. Smiths' to me on trial; she did not suit us, and was then going away - her box was corded and locked up.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18330103-118

369. WILLIAM TIGNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 6s. , the goods of Robert Richardson .

ROBERT RICHARDSON . I keep a shoe warehouse in Tunbridge-place, New-road . The prisoner left a pair of boots at my shop, to be mended - and on the evening of the 15th of December, he came for them, and wished to take them away, without paying for them; I said he should not - he then said he would come again next week; he lingered about for some time, and I had several customers - he then left the shop rather suddenly; I followed him about fifteen feet from the door, and took him with these shoes under his coat; he said he had a wife and two children.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined 14 Days .

Reference Number: t18330103-119

370. ATHENETHA WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , 7 spoons, value 30s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 14s.; 2 table cloths, value 3s.; 1 gown, value 7s.; 1 shawl, value 2s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 2s., 1 tea-kettle, value 8d., and 2 books, value 3s. , the goods of Ann Webb .

ANN WEBB . I am mother-in-law to John Webb , who is the prisoner's husband - I am a widow . This property was taken out of a little drawer in a chest of drawers - the prisoner resided in my house from the 4th February, till the 8th of August; I chiefly maintained them in firing and house-rent, as he was a good deal out of work - he is a plasterer; I missed this property on the 31st of July while they were in my house - I have found four articles the duplicates of which are destroyed; I never permited the prisoner to pawn them.

GEORGE ADNUM . I am a pawnbroker. I took in a tea-kettle and a silver spoon of the prisoner, in the name of Ann Webb .

WILLIAM NEWTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have two books pawned by the prisoner.

EDWARD HANDS . I am an officer. The prosecutrix came to my house, and I took the prisoner; she went on her knees and begged for mercy - she said she had no duplicates, as she had left them at a person's house, and she would send for them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. She always lent them to me to pawn - they went out once or twice a week.

ANN WEBB. I never allowed her to pawn my goods- I lost six spoons, the tea-tongs, and a pap-spoon; it was the only property I had - and I lost 30s. on the first week in July.

GUILTY . Aged 54. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330103-120

371. THOMAS WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 half-sovereign, 4 shillings, and 6 halfpence , the monies of John Sealby .

JOHN SEALBY . I am a cheesemonger , and live in William-street, Marylebone . I never saw the prisoner till the evening of the 14th of December, when he came into my shop, about half-past four o'clock; he asked the weight of a north Wiltshire cheese: I told him 6 lbs. or 7 lbs. - he ordered it to be sent to No. 70, Wimpole-street, with change for a sovereign; the cheese came to 5s. 9d. - I put it up, and sent a boy with it, and the change; he brought the cheese back, but not the change - I have never had the sovereign.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was it dusk? A. Yes; I had no other customer in the shop - I gave the boy a half-sovereign and 4s. 3d.; I saw the prisoner again on the 18th - I could not be mistaken in him.

FREDERICK KING . I took the cheese, the half-sovereign, and 4s. 3d. to No. 70, Wimpole-street; I was at

home when the prisoner ordered it - when I got there I went down the area steps; the servant took the cheese, and the bill up to her master - she came down, and said it was not ordered there; I took it back, and met the prisoner in Queen Anne-street - he said he had given a wrong number, that he had been to my master's, and given him the sovereign, that I was to give him the change, and take the cheese to No. 7 - I gave him the change, and went with the cheese, but there was no No. 7; I then went home - my master said the prisoner had not been there; I am certain he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. You had never seen him before that day? A. No, but I am certain he is the person - I did not swear to his coat, and say the other man had a coat of this sort on.

WILLIAM HOOKER (Police-constable D 3). I took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

372. THOMAS WEBB was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 2 shoes, value 8s. , the goods of William Hall .

WILLIAM HALL. I am a shoemaker , and live in South-street, Manchester-square . On the 17th of December the prisoner came and asked to try on some pumps; I showed him several pairs, but had none to fit him - he then fixed on a pair of light shoes, and ordered me to send them to No. 10, Dorset-place, to the name of Cooper; I sent my man with them: he came back without them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure he is the person? A. Yes.

EDWARD HUGHES . I live with the prosecutor; I was sent with the shoes: I followed the prisoner to the corner of Manchester-street, and South-street - he then turned round, and said to me, "Does not your master keep Spanish leather Wellington boots?" I said Yes; he said,"I was at your shop just now, and intended to have a pair, but I did not give it a thought; give me the shoes, go back, and bring a pair or two of boots to my house, and I will pay you for the shoes" - I said I would take the shoes back with me; he said, "No, give me the shoes, and bring the boots, as I am going out of town shortly" -I gave him the shoes, and ran back to my master, who sent me in search of him; I went to the address he had given, and there was no such person known - I am sure he is the person; I was not to have parted with the shoes without the money.

Prisoner's Defence. They swear to me by my having a great coat on.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for 7 Years longer .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner of a similar nature.

Reference Number: t18330103-121

373. HENRY WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 8lbs. weight of lard, value 3s. , the goods of John Hooker .

HENRY HOOKER . I live with my brother John, who is a cheesemonger , and lives in Brick-lane . On the 18th of December, about eight o'clock, the Policeman called, and I then missed this bladder of lard, which had stood on a pile of cheese; I saw it at the station.

JOSHUA HARCOMBE . I am an officer. I was in Thrawl-street; I saw the prisoner and another person - the prisoner was carrying this lard; I said, "What have you got there?" he said, "Only a few potatoes;" I put my hand and found this lard; he then said he had picked it up - I said it was not muddy; I took it and him to the station.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Brick-lane, walking sharp, and fell over this, which was wrapped up in brown paper - I met a young man, who asked what I had got; I said I did not know; we looked at it, and he said his sister kept a chandler's-shop, and might have brought it of me - we were going there, and met the officer.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-122

374. MARY WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 2 pelisses. value 18s., the goods of Jonathan Jones ; and that she had before been convicted of felony .

REBECCA JONES . I am the wife of Jonathan Jones - I keep a clothes-shop. I went into the yard, and when I returned I saw the prisoner standing behind the counter, with the pelisses in her lap; I asked what she had got - she could not answer me; I opened her lap, and found them - she fell on her knees, and begged for mercy; they had been in the window.

WILLIAM PERRY (Police-constable G 25). I took the prisoner into custody.

JAMES GLIBBERY (Police-constable N 21). I produce a certificate, which states that Eliza White was tried and convicted on the 6th of September last, and was sentenced to three months' imprisonment in the House of Correction - I was a witness, and know the prisoner is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to cheapen a gown; I knocked a long time, and no one came - at last the prosecutrix came; I asked the price of a gown - she struck me, and said she thought I came with no good intention; she called the Policeman, and said she took these two pelisses from my lap, which she did not; she took them off the counter.

RERECCA JONES. I had not been five minutes out of the shop - she had them quite closed up in her apron.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-123

375. ANN DOOLING was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 1 sovereign, the money of Magnus Jameison , from his person ; and CATHERINE CARR was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

MAGNUS JAMEISON . I belong to the Hopewell bark. On the 29th of December I was going home at a late hour, and lost my road - I met Dooling, who asked me to go home with her; I asked if she would direct me to my lodging, and said I would satisfy her for her trouble; she took me down a street which I thought was not right, but she said it was - she got me into a house; I had not been there five minutes before I was going out, as I knew it was not my lodging, and she shoved her hand into my trousers pocket, and got the sovereign out; I was not drunk, but not quite sober - I should not have gone into the house but she told me it was the right house; I had nothing to do with her - I am sure I had a sovereign and a half when I went out; I had changed the half-sovereign, and had the sovereign in gold in one pocket, and some silver in the

other - as soon as I missed my sovereign I went to the door, and called Police! I did not notice Carr at all.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You went into a bed-room? A. Yes; I am sure I had no connexion with Dooling - I did not notice the room till I got into it; I did not put any coppers on the mantel-piece - I did not go to bed, nor was I on the bed; I said, "I am not going to stop here," and I was going down when she took the sovereign.

LAWRENCE WILSON . I went to the house that night to get a lodging; when I had been there a minute or two, I heard a row up stairs - the prosecutor and Dooling came down; he said he had lost a sovereign - he went to the door and sung out Watch! in the mean time Dooling slung herself round, and slipped the sovereign into Carr's hand, who was sitting there - the officer came in; he went up stairs, and came down, but could not find any sovereign; I took hold of Carr's hand, and said, "I will show you where the sovereign is;" he found it in her hand - she had been down stairs in the room where I was; she had not been up stairs at all.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there nothing in Carr's hand but the sovereign? A. No; she said she would not give it to me, but to the officer.

JAMES FORBES (Police-constable K 94.) I was on duty at half-past twelve o'clock that night, in Ratcliff-highway - I heard a cry of Watch! I went to the door, and saw the prosecutor outside; he said, "I have lost a sovereign in this house;" he gave me this piece of paper, which has still the print of a sovereign on it - I went in, and said to Dooling, "Where is this sovereign?" she said,

"I have not got it; he had no sovereign, and there is not one in the house" - I went up stairs, but could not find it; I came down, and Wilson said, "I will show you where it is;" he had hold of Carr's hand - I took the sovereign out; he said he saw the other give it to her; he asked her to give it him, but she would not - the prosecutor said the sovereign had been in this paper, it had been taken out, and the paper put into his pocket again.

JAMES WHITE (Police-constable K 285.) The two prisoners were brought to the watch-house - Dooling said she put her hand into the prosecutor's waistcoat pocket, and took 2 1/2d. and a sovereign out.

Dooling's Defence. I met him very tipsy - he said,"Do take me home, I will pay you for your trouble;" he then stood a few minutes, and said he had been robbed of his watch - I said, "Look, perhaps you have got it in your pocket," and he found it there - he then gave me 2d. worth of rum; he then asked me to take him to Back-lane - I took him a little way; he was too drunk to go any further - he then said he would go home with me; I took him up stairs; he sat down on the bed, and discharged his stomach - he said, "I have no money to-night, I will pay you to-morrow;" I said, "The old woman must be paid, give me your watch;" he then put his hand into his pocket, and took 2 1/2d. and a sovereign out of his pocket - I took the sovereign down to the woman, thinking it was a shilling, and put the half pence on the mantel-piece - he then got up, said he was better, and would go; he took the halfpence off the mantel-piece, and then said he had lost a sovereign - he called this officer, who found the sovereign on Carr, but she did not know what was in her hand, nor did I.

DOOLING - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

CARR - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-124

376. HENRY DAWSON and JOHN HUNTER were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of December , 10lbs. weight of pork, value 5s. , the goods of David Groves .

JAMES PARKER . I live with Mr. David Groves , a cheesemonger , in Chichester-place, Gray's Inn-road . On the 22nd of December I was in the shop, counting some money - I heard an alarm, ran out, and found Williams in pursuit of the prisoners - I joined him, and took Hunter, with the pork in his hand, about one hundred yards from our house; it is my master's - I did not see it taken.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a bricklayer. I was opposite the prosecutor's shop, and saw Dawson take the leg of pork, and give it to Hunter - I gave an alarm; we pursued, and took the prisoners.

DAWSON - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Judgment Respited .

HUNTER - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-125

377. JAMES GIBBERT and MARY GIBBERT were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 4 lbs. of beef, value 1s.; 9 lbs. of soap, value 4s., and 13 pieces of crockery, value 4s. , the goods of Francis Sharpe .

FRANCIS SHARPE . I am a butcher , and live in Lisson-grove ; Mary Gibbert had been my servant for a year and a half, or more - the other prisoner is her husband, but I did not know they were married till they were taken. I received a letter, in consequence of which I watched her out on the 27th of December; I soon afterwards saw the man with her; they talked together for a few minutes - she then went home, and he went across the road; I saw him put his hand to support his pocket - I followed him, and gave him in charge; we took him to the station, and found this soap and the beef on him - the crockery-ware was found at his lodgings, and one of these glasses in particular corresponds with one I had asked the woman to account for.

DANIEL LOFTUS (Police-constable D 42.) I searched the lodgings, and found these articles on the man.

MR. SHARPE. This glass corresponds with one I lost, and this soap and beef corresponds with some I have.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you a doubt that they correspond with thousands of pieces in London? A. No; I have no mark on it - I dined off this beef the day before, and should not hesitate to swear to it.

John Gibbert 's Defence. The glass belonged to me three years ago, and the crockery was bought at different times.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-126

378. WILLIAM GIBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 stove, value 15s., the goods of Letitia Elkington , and fixed to a building .

LETITIA ELKINGTON . I have an empty house in Hope-

street, Holloway - my son was in there after me; when I went again, in consequence of what the officer told me, I missed a stove from the front parlour - the prisoner has papered and painted for me in that house, and others.

WILLIAM WALLIS . I am the prosecutrix' son-in-law. On the 18th of December I saw this house all safe - I left the doors locked; the week following the Policeman told us of the robbery - I then went, found the back parlour window had been broken in, and an entrance made - I missed this stove.

JOHN COX (Police-constable N 112.) On the 20th of December I saw the prisoner bring this stove along the New North-road, at five minutes before nine o'clock at night; I asked him if he was removing; he said Yes, from No. 5, Hope-street - I said it was a curious time to be carrying things, and asked if he would go with me to the landlord; he said Yes, tha the was a person named Watson, and lived in Southampton-street; I went there, but could find no such person - as I took him to the station he told me he had stolen it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you make him any offer? A. No, I asked him several times where he got it.

MR. ELKINGTON. This is my stove - I have known the prisoner three or four years; he is married, and has a family.

The prisoner received a good character, and a witness engaged to employ him.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330103-127

379. JAMES HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 watch, value 2l. 18s.; 1 seal, value 1s., and a watch-key, value 6d. , the goods of Elizabeth Strickland .

ELIZABETH STRICKLAND . I am a widow - I live in Green-street, Leicester-square , and get my living by letting my house. The prisoner came to lodge with me on the 12th of November - he called himself a coachspring maker, and said he worked for a gentleman in Long-acre; he went out eight days after he came to me; he said his father was dangerously ill, that he had left two doctors with him, and he should come to a great deal of property; I had a watch, seal, and key, wrapped in a white silk handkerchief - I put them into this half cocoanut, and that into the bottom drawer; on the 14th of December the prisoner called in and asked me to go for some beer, which I did, and when I returned he was gone - the handkerchief, watch, seal and key, were missing; he had the seal in his possession in the evening, when I had him taken at my house.

JONATHAN RIDER , (Police-constable, C 5.) The prosecutrix sent for me on the 14th of December - I found the prisoner there, and took him; I found this seal on him - and some money in his trunk; I found no trace of the watch, but I found in his box this paper, with the models of wards of keys on it.

Prisoner. The prosecutrix lent me the seal on the 11th of December, to seal a letter.

ELIZABETH STRICKLAND . I did, and I stood by his side while he sealed it; then I put it into the cocoanut again - I did not untie it on the 13th of December, and say it was so much trouble to do so - I had seen my watch safe half an hour before I went out; there was a lady there from ten to twelve o'clock, but she was gone before I lost the watch - no one but you could have taken it; the seal was tied to the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-128

380. DANIEL HART and MARIA REED were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 jacket, value 8s., and 1 hat, value 2s., the goods of Richard Boote , from his person .

RICHARD BOOTE. I am in the East India Company's service. On the 20th of December I received my pension, which was 1l. 15s.; I fell in with the prisoner Reed in cliffe-highway, between one and two o'clock in the forenoon; I had seen her once before - I went home with her; we drank tea, and then came out to take a walk about seven; I was perfectly sober; I had not spent all my money - we walked down the highway; I saw Hart about ten, or half-past ten at night - we had been in different public-houses; we fell in with Hart at the door of the Half-moon and Seven Stars; I had not seen him before; we drank together, in the same house - I was perfectly sober, and had my money safe; I went out with the two prisoners; they took me up a court in the Highway, and there took my jacket and hat off, and left me; they took one sleeve of my jacket off first, then capsized the jacket over my head, and dragged it off; I was not perfectly sober - I was walking home very cold, and fell in with the Policeman, who saw me home.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long is it since you were at sea? A. I came home on the 9th of September, from the West Indies; I never was in this Court before, nor in any other - I had only been with this woman to drink tea, and it was there the jacket was found, as the officer said; I was walking quietly home when the officer spoke to me - I did not tell this woman I was going on board an Indiaman, and had no money, and left her my jacket - I did not give her any thing for her tea.

JAMES WHITE . I am a Police-constable. I saw the two prisoners and the prosecutors going arm-in-arm together; I took notice of them - in about twenty minutes my brother constable spoke to me; we went along the Highway, and fell in with a companion of the woman's; we went with her to Glass house-street, and found the two prisoners in bed, about half-past one or a quarter to two o'clock - the woman was dressed; we made search, and found the jacket under the bed, behind the chest, and in the man's pocket I found this East India paper of wages.

JAMES HENRY ANDREWS (Police-constable K 104). I have the jacket which I found.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prosecutor so drunk that a jacket and a hat could be taken without his knowing it? A. He was perfectly sensible, but they took him up a bye place - he could have avoided being taken there.

EDWARD BOOTE . This is my jacket, and this pension-ticket was in my hat.

Hart's Defence. I met him with two women; they asked me to drink - I then left them, and went to drink

with a friend; I afterwards met Reid, and went with her as a woman of the town - how the papers came in my pocket, I do not know.

Reed's Defence. He told me he had no money; we met a friend, who treated us - the prosecutor said he had only 3s. about him, and would leave his jacket till the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-129

OLD COURT. TUESDAY, JANUARY 8TH.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

381. THOMAS RALLINGS, alias RAWLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6s., and 1 box, value 6d., the goods of John Jennings , from his person .

JOHN JENNINGS . I am a pot-boy to my uncle, who keeps a public-house; I am fifteen years old. I was in company with Francis Perry , and went with him to Hackney to fetch a jacket - we got rather too much to drink. but knew what we were about - we met the prisoner at the top of Cold-bath-lane; I had seen him before, but never spoke to him; he came up, and said, "Halloo! my lads, where are you going?" we said, Home - he said, "Come with me, I will give you a night's lodging;" he took us to Back-lane ; it was after eleven o'clock - he took us into a shed; we went to sleep on some straw until the Policeman came - I had a handkerchief, a pair of gloves, and a box in my pocket; I felt the prisoner's hand in my pocket, going down the lane; the Policeman came and took me and Perry out of the shed to the station-house -I told him I had lost my things, and he fetched the prisoner; the handkerchief was taken off my neck, the gloves from my inside pocket, and the box with it.

FRANCIS PERRY . I am sixteen years old; I was with Jennings - his evidence is correct.

JOHN BEDFORD . I am an inspector of the Police. About two o'clock in the morning, in consequence of a coachman being robbed of his hat, and hearing a noise in the shed, my officer went there, and found the two witnesses and another man, who was accused of robbing the coachman - the witnesses said they had been robbed; I went and found the prisoner, and found on him the handkerchief belonging to Perry, and the gloves and box belonging to Jennings - I have not found Jennings' handkerchief; both their handkerchiefs were taken off their necks.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It does not stand feasable that I should rob them; they cannot say whether they gave them to me, or whether I took them - they had money, and that was not taken; I went to the shed myself, with the officers, and they said nothing about it.

JOHN BEDFORD . They never said they had lent or given him the things - they always said he took them.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18330103-130

382. WILLIAM FLANNAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 140 pieces of stamped paper, each of the value of 1 1/2d. , the goods of Richard Annesley Sparkes .

MR. CALRKSON conducted the prosecution.

DAVID AMICK . I am foreman to Richard Annesley Sparkes , soda water manufacturer , Berners-street . The prisoner was in Mr. Sparkes' employ for about five months. On the 28th of December last he came to our warehouse, and I delivered that day to Barnes a quire of stamps, to cut them into single stamps, and place in a box where they are always kept; it was at the end of the warehouse - it would make two hundred and fifty-six stamps; on my return from dinner I missed some - the prisoner had been there shortly before I missed them; on the 29th, a little before one o'clock, I had forty-eight dozen more stamps cut and put into the same box; I marked forty-eight of them, and numbered them - the prisoner had been several times, wishing me to write him a petition to get him into the Police, and on the 28th it was settled that he should come on the 29th for it; I put Barnes into a hamper, about nine yards from the box - the prisoner came there about half-past one o'clock; I sent him to the counting-house, to the clerk - he passed where the box was; he came back again - Barnes gave me a signal; the prisoner was brought back, and on my ordering him to be searched, he delivered up these stamps - said he was guilty, and begged for mercy; forty-one dozen and one stamps were found on him; they cost 1 1/2d. each- the officer found more at his lodging.

CHARLES ALEXANDER BARNES . I was put into the hamper; the prisoner passed through the warehouse into the counting-house; he took his hat off, came out of the counting-house, took the stamps out, and put them into his breeches pocket; I gave a signal - he was taken into custody, and the stamps found on him; he had been six months in our employ at one time, and behaved well.

SAMUEL PATMORE . I am an officer. I went to the premises and took the prisoner into custody; he had produced the four hundred and ninety-three stamps before I came; I asked if he had taken any before; he said, he took some on the Friday, and sold them to a Jew for 12s. in Fleet-lane.

FREDERICK PRINCE . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodging No. 29, Back-lane; he said he lodged there; I found five dozen and eight stamps there.

JOSEPH HARRIS . I am deputy supervisor of stamps at the stamp-office - these are genuine medicine-stamps, and have not been used.

Prisoner's Defence. As I returned from the warehouse on Friday, I picked up the stamps found at my lodgings wrapped in paper; on the day in question I took some out of the box, and was going to show them to the foreman, and tell him I had found some like them - the man stopped me at the door, and said I had done wrong.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-131

Before Mr. Recorder.

403. JOHN MILLER , JAMES BOLLAND , and JOSHUA DURDEN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Ward , on the 30th of November , and stealing 13 shirts, value 30s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 4 towels, value 4s,: 1 collar, value 1s. 6d.; 1 frill, value 1s. 6d., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. his property .

JOHN WARD , JUN. I live at Uxbridge ; my father

John Ward , rents the house. On the 30th of November I got up between six and seven o'clock in the morning; I found the house quite safe; I left the house directly I came down; I returned at eight o'clock, and these things were then gone from off the dresser - (there had been a wash in the house;) I saw the prisoners in custody with them on the Friday following, which was a week after the robbery - Miller lived near us at Uxbridge; I am sure when I left that I closed the latch of the door; I heard it shut, but did not try it.

ANN WARD . My husband rents this house. On the 30th of November, when I went to bed, these articles were all safe in the kitchen; I got up at seven o'clock, and they were then gone; I found the door and the gate open - the prisoners all live at Uxbridge; I saw the property before the Magistrates on the next Friday.

JOHN STEVENS . I am a labourer, living at Uxbridge. I saw the prisoners Miller and Bolland, who I knew before, about half-past six o'clock, twenty or thirty yards from Ward's house; they had nothing with them that I saw; Bolland lives in the parish, but a great distance from the house - Miller lives not far off; I did not speak to them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far from the house does Durden live? A. Nearly a mile - I did not see him.

JOHN FRANCO . I stood in Uxbridge-market. Durden came to me, and asked if I bought old silver; I do not know the day of the month; it was the Saturday before the prisoners were taken - I am a traveller; Durden asked if I would buy some old silver; I said Yes, and asked him where it was; he said he would bring it to me at six o'clock in the evening; and at six he came to me, and said if I would come home with him he would show it to me; I went to his house, which was by a common, about a quarter of a mile from Uxbridge - he produced some leather gaiters, and some linen, but no silver; I said it was of no use to me - he opened a shirt, which I saw was marked

"29, G. Tollet," on the body - it was mended with a piece of new linen in front; I declined buying them- I did not know him before - I saw him under examination and am sure of his person; on Sunday morning I was walking out with a traveller, named Stennet, and was telling him of this, and heard from him of this robbery - we then went and gave information to the Police.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you? A. I serve shops with pencils and things - I never buy old clothes - I was then living at the Three Legs public-house, at Uxbridge; when he asked me to come and see the things he said,

"It is just up here" - I did not know it was a mile off; he said he had plate to sell - he showed me some new gaiters, said he had forty-eight pairs, and mentioned 3l.; I offered him no money for them; but on the Monday, when we wanted to detect him, I offered him two sovereigns - Miller was at the house when I went to look at the things, and he said, "Will you buy them?" I said No, it was quite out of my line - I had not above 5s. in my pocket, and could not have bought more than an ounce of plate - I had come from Reading: when I am in town I live at the Bear and Ragged Staff, Smithfield.

WILLIAM HENNELL . I am a licensed-hawker; Franco gave me information, and I went and gave information to the officers - I know nothing myself.

JOHN BIRCH . I am a constable of Uxbridge. I know all the prisoners. On Tuesday, the 4th of December. I apprehended Miller and Bolland, at the bottom of Uxbridge common - they asked what I took them for; I said, "Come with me a few yards and I will tell you what for," and about thirty yards on a head was Hennell and Franco; I took them up to them, and asked if they were the men who had offered them some linen for sale - they said they were; I took Durden the same day in Uxbridge - I told him the charge, but before I apprehended him, Franco said, in the hearing of the others, that they were the men who offered him the linen, and that the linen was hid in the plantation - a constable then came up, and we secured them; I searched the plantation, and found a blue bundle, containing, shirts, towels, handkerchiefs, and several little articles - there were thirteen shirts, four handkerchiefs, and four towels; the plantation is by the side of the road - this was before I had secured Durden; there was another bundle in the same place, containing forty-three pairs of leather gaiters, which are not claimed by Ward; Mrs. Ward saw the linen, and claimed it; most of them, having the name of Tollet and Budd on them, at full length -I found nothing on either of their persons.

Cross-examined. Q. Franco said you would find the linen in the plantation? A. Yes.

WILLIAM STRANSON . I am a constable. Franco gave me information - I was with Birch when Miller and Bolland were taken; I kept them while Birch searched the plantation, and found the bundles - Franco said, that was the bundle which had been offered to him by Bolland and Miller, on the morning we took them - we found Durden at Uxbridge; I told him we wanted him about some linen and gaiters - he said he knew nothing of it; Mrs. Ward claimed the contents of the blue bundle - they made a statement before the Magistrate, which I saw the Magistrate sign; I saw all the three prisoners sign the paper - I was present during the whole examination; neither threat nor promise was made to either of them - I am quite certain Bolland and Miller put their marks; Durden signed his name - (read).

MIDDLESEX.

" Joseph Durden voluntarily says, that John Miller came to him, and said he had got two bundles, one was a bundle of gaiters, and the other a bundle of shirts - he asked him if he knew any body as would buy them; he afterwards saw Franco, and asked him about them, and he said he would buy them - he them told Miller, who asked him if he had any place where he could take them to; he said they might take them to his father's stables - Miller brought the bundles to the stables, for what he knew; the bundles were at the stables when he got there with Miller - Miller and he, as it was dark, took the handles into his father's house, Miller one and he one - this was when Franco came; he did not expect to get any thing for doing what he did - after Franco did not buy them, Miller took them away; he never saw any more of the things - he did not have any gaiters; when he saw Mr. King, he said he had plenty of gaiters, but wanted shoes, and would swap."

"John Miller voluntarily says, that on Saturday morning last he met Joseph Durden, and said to him he knew where there were two bundles of things under some hay - Joseph Durden afterwards said he knew a young man who would buy them if they could agree to price; John Franco then came to the Jolly Ostler; Durden said he would show him the things, which he did, and

he asked 3l. for them, and Franco offered 30s. - he then took the things back to the place where they were found - Durden fetched one of the bundles along with him, and they took them to his father's stables; he said he should leave it all to Durden to sell the bundles for him; there were forty-eight pairs of gaiters when he had them - five pairs were missing.

James Bolland voluntarily says, that he was asleep in Cooper Ellon 's shed, under some hay, and as he was covering himself over, he kicked against the two bundles now produced - they pulled them out, looked at them, covered the two bundles up again, and came away with John Miller, who slept in the barn, within.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Miller put in a written Defence, making the same statement as he had done before the Magistrate.

MRS. WARD. Here is one shirt, with the name of Tollet, No. 29, on it - the linen all belongs to persons whom I wash for.

MILLER - GUILTY. Aged 19.

BOLLAND - GUILTY. Aged 19.

DURDEN - GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-132

384. JOHN DARBY was indicted for feloniously forging a bill of exchange for 25l., purporting to be drawn by R. H. Duff, upon and accepted by Watson and Co., army-agents, Charlotte-street, payable at Brown and Co.'s, Abchurch-lane, with intent to defraud Joseph Brook .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering the same.

TEN OTHER COUNTS, for forging an acceptance to the said bill, and uttering the same, with an intent to defraud different persons.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

MARY ANN BROOK . I am the wife of Joseph Brook , of Foley-street, Fitzroy-square , a corn-dealer . I know the prisoner perfectly well, as a customer. On the 27th of July, 1830 - he was in my husband's debt 35l.; he came to our house that day, in my husband's absence - he said he came to settle his debt - he was then living in Edward-street, and was a baker ; it is about three-quarters of a mile from our house - he gave me 10l. in money, and this hill; he asked me if I thought Mr. Brook would have any objections to take the bill; I said, "I should think not, if it was a good one; I know no reason why he should not" - he replied, "As for the bill being good, it is as good as the Bank of England - all the parties are highly respectable;" he said, "You see the acceptor is Watson, the army-agent, of Charlotte-street, Portman-place" - I had heard of such a person; he pointed to the name of G. Carew, the endorser, and he said, that was the person he took it of; I gave him credit in the ledger while he stood there, for the bill and cash, that settled his account, and 5s. over was the interest on the bill - between that time and the bill becoming due, he got into our debt 81l. odd, and paid 12l. of it - we gave him credit to a larger amount, on the belief that this was a genuine transaction.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long did your husband deal with the prisoner? A. I do not know; he used to fetch goods away and pay cash for them; I never took a bill from him before; I did not know that he kept more than one shop; I never heard the name of Chesney mentioned till he was at the office - he did not say Carew had been represented to him as respectable; but said the bill was as goods as the Bank - (bill read.)

JOSEPH BROOK . I am a corn-dealer. On the 27th of July, 1830, when I came home, I received this bill from my wife - I thought it genuine - I called on the prisoner two or three days after; he asked me if I liked the bill - I said I did, as I found the acceptors very respectable persons; I had not inquired of the acceptors as to its genuiness, only of the respectability of the firm - he said they were the parties who bad accepted it, and he was sorry he could not pay me money, as he was forced to take that bill in part of money, from George Carew - he said Carew had taken it of Duff, and that they were all respectable persons - and he knew all the parties very well; I parted with him, and paid the bill into my banker's, Sir Claude Scott - it was returned to me on the 17th of September; it was due on the 16th, there was then written on it, "No knowledge of acceptor" - I went, I think, on the same day to Darby, in Edward-street, Regent's-park, and told him the bill was returned, as having no knowledge of the acceptors; he said that was very strange, but that Carew was out of town, and Duff was with his regiment - that Carew would be in town in a few days, and he should be able to settle the bill; he then said that Carew lived in Edward-street - I think he said it was No. 3; I will not swear he said No. 3, but the house he then told me Carew lived in, I swear I went to; he said Duff was in the second regiment of Life Guards - I found the house in Edward-street he referred me to, and found no such person as Carew lived there; I went to several houses, but could hear of no such person - there was then about four houses at one end of the street, and five or six more at the other end; the other houses have been built since; I went to three or four at the end he described to me, and made every inquiry about the neighbourhood, but could not find Carew - I then made inquiry about Duff, and could not find any such person; I afterwards took the bill myself to Watson and Co.'s Charlotte-street, Portland-place, and learnt that it was forged; before the bill became due, I had given him credit to the amount of 80l., and received 12l. of it; I gave him that credit on the faith that this bill was a genuine transaction - he is now in my debt 96l. 8s. 6d.; he lulled me on for several days before I suspected anything - I could have apprehended him, but did not think that he had any thing to do with it - I had not discovered that there was no such persons as Carew and Duff; at the end of six or seven days, I went to look for the prisoner, and found his shop shut up, and could not find him - I saw his son; I have never seen him since, till I apprehended him in the Corn-market, in December last; I never saw him in the Corn-market during that interval in my life, nor ever in the New-road; I never saw him nod his head to me there; when I took him, I said "I have never seen you since you left your shop in Edward-street, since you gave me that bill, which turned out to be a forgery" - he said, "Walk along

with me now, and we will settle it;" I said, "I can't run after you now" - I got an officer, who took him.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had he dealt with you? Perhaps two or three months? A. I never heard of his having three shops - he never mentioned the name of Chesney to me; I knew he was doing business in Regent's-park barracks; he had a bakehouse there once - he never told me Chesney had told him Duff belonged to the 17th Light Dragoons - I never heard Chesney's name; I attend the Corn-market once or twice a week, but never saw the prisoner; since his apprehension, I have heard that he was carrying on business in Blackman-street; I saw him three or four times after the bill became due, and lost sight of him some time before quarter-day.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you ever hear of the prisoner from the time he left his shop till you took him? A. Never.

GEORGE BARKER . I am clerk to a notary. I presented this bill for payment on the 16th of September, 1830, at Brown, Tanson and Co.s', No. 32, Abchurch-lane, bankers; there is no other Brown and Co. in the lane - the answer I had was, that they had no knowledge of the acceptor; I noted the bill, and returned it to Sir Claude Scott .

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to every house in the lane? A. No; I do not think there are above thirty-five numbers - I went to a great many, as I knew Messrs. Watson, and was surprised at the answer; I could find no Mr. Brown.

WILLIAM FRANCIS WATSON . I live with my father, William Watson, an army-agent, No. 60, Charlotte-street, Portland-place - he had lived there thirteen or fourteen years; there are no other Watsons, army-agents, living any where in London - a list of army-agents is published under the authority of the Secretary at War; I have examined that- I accept bills for my father; and sometimes my father does so - no other person was authorized to accept bills in 1830- this acceptance is not in the hand-writing of myself or my father, nor of any person in his employ; my father does not bank with Brown and Co, Abchurch-lane; I know nothing of Mr. Duff, the drawer, or Carew, the endorser.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you do business for the 17th Light Dragoons, or 2nd Life Guards? A. No; I do not know an officer named Duff - nobody of that name did business at our house; Mr. Brook presented the bill to us in 1830 - I do not think it was before it came due.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When he called, did you tell him it was a forgery? A. The last time he called I did - if genuine, we should have paid it.

JAMES MEE . I am cashier in the house of Brown and Co., bankers, Abchurch-lane; Mr. Watson does not keep cash at our house, nor did he in 1830 - I have been in the house about fourteen years; they never kept cash at our house during that time, nor have we had customers of that name for the last seven years, in London.

COURT. Q. Have Brown and Co. lived in Abchurch-lane the fourteen years you have been there? A. Yes; I never heard of any other Brown and Co. there during that time.

SARAH WILD . I am the wife of Thomas Wild, and live at No, 7, Edward-street, Regent's-park; I formerly lived at No. 6; the numbers in the street have been altered; No. 6 was formerly No. 3; both 6 and 7 are shops - I lived at No. 6 two years ago next February; I never knew any person named Carew living there; I never had a lodger of that name who used formerly to come from the country - it was a shoe-shop; I have lived in the street seven years; I never heard of a person named Carew living there.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you leave No. 6? A. It was No. 3 two years ago, when I lived there; it was a lodging-house - we had the first floor; there were four families in the house - I was acquainted with them all.

COURT. Q. Was there any family named Carew? A. No; for I let the lodgings, and must have known.

THOMAS PLAYFORD . I am a corporal in the second regiment of Life Guards. I have been in the regiment upwards of twenty years; during the last seven years no person named Duff has held a commission in that regiment.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know any body of that name? A. I do not; I do not know the officers of the 14th Hussars.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you examined to ascertain if such a person was in the regiment? A. I am the regiment clerk, and have examined the books; there has been no Duff in the regiment, either a commissioned officer or not.

THOMAS DEVEY . I am beadle of Aldgate ward. On the 10th of December I received the prisoner in charge from Mr. Brook, who charged him with uttering a forged bill; he said, "Mr. Brook, you need not give charge of me - if you will step on one side, I will make it all right;" Brook said he should do no such thing, and told me to do my duty; the prisoner said it was very hard and very strange of Mr. Brook; that he had an opportunity of seeing him several times on the Corn-market, and on one occasion he met him in the New-road, and he nodded his head to Mr. Brook, who nodded to him again; I found twenty or thirty cards on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say "I am surprised at this - I thought the bill had been paid?" A. He did not, nor did he say, "I must pay the bill, because I know I am liable to it."

JAMES FELL . I am chief clerk to the Magistrates of Marylebone-office. I produce a book, in which I took notes of the examination of the prisoner; I took down what fell from his mouth; neither threat nor promise were made to him - he said, "I am in the habit of dealing with Mr. Brook; the bill came into my hands through Mr. Chesney, of Carnaby-market - he took it of Duff; Chesney said,'You may rely on its being good' - I gave him 10l. and the residue of the bill; he did not endorse it - I did not request him to do so; I paid it to Mr. Brook - I have repeatedly seen Mr. Brook since;" this was on the 11th of December - On that day week he was again examined, and said, "I unfortunately did not get the man Chesney to endorse the bill - the man that paid me the bill."

The prisoner put in a long written Defence, stating that at the period in question he was in the habit of supplying John Young , of Drury-lane, and Thomas Chesney, of High-street, Bloomsbury (since deceased), with bread - that he had discounted the bill for Chesney, taking 15l. which he was indebted to him, and that Chesney had represented that he had received it from Duff, an officer of the 14th Hussars; that he disposed of his business

the latter end of October, on account of the Insanity of his wife, with whom he retired into the country, among her friends, and in twelve months returned to London, took a situation in Wheeler-street, and subsequently went into business in Blackmoor-street.

JOHN YOUNG . I have been a Sheriff's officer - I am out of any thing now: I have ceased to be a Sheriff's officer for two years. I sold bread for the prisoner at No. 166, Drury-lane till the end of October, or the beginning of November, 1830; I knew a man named Chesney - he lived up by Carnaby-market, and was selling bread for the prisoner in the same way as I was, between St. Giles' church and Tottenham-court-road; he died in the Marshalsea prison six months ago - I know this bill of exchange; I have seen it in the hands of Chesney - he brought it to me to discount it for him about the month of June, 1830, I think, but I cannot be sure; we were very intimate at the time - he was at my shop almost every day; he told me if I would get it discounted for him, that it was drawn by an officer in the army, accepted by an agent, and made payable at a banker's; I told him when he called on me a second time I could not do any thing with it - his answer was, that he could get Mr. Darby to do it, but he owned him 15l., and he was afraid Darby would stop the 15l. out of the bill; this bill is exactly in the same state as when shown to me.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you a Sheriff's officer, or a follower? A. I was an officer's man two years ago; before that I was an officer - I had some business of my own, and took it to what officer I liked: I have had a sufficiency to maintain me for the last twenty years - I have ceased to be an officer five years - I may go to Serjeant's Inn three or four times in a Term; I never hired sham bail; I have hired persons to put in bail above, when I was an officer - they had half a crown each.

Q. You say this bill was in the same state when you saw it in Chesney's hands? A. Yes; I was examined before the Magistrate - I have not said that Carew's name was on it then; I was looking at the body of the bill - I do not know whether Carew's name was on it or not when I saw it in Chesney's hands; I might tell the Magistrate that that name was not there when I saw it - I do not know that it was not there; I swore at the officer that it was not, and it was not - I paid the prisoner so much out of every loaf; I sold on my own account - I kept the shop; I had a halfpenny out of every quartern loaf, and sold two hundred a day, perhaps; a man named Williams lived in the house; Chesney sold in the same way, as far as I knew - there was no name over either shop - Chesney was about a twelve months at the shop, and left about October, 1830; I sold for the prisoner till the beginning of November - I saw Chesney about three weeks before his death; he lived up by Carnaby-market, and he lived there when he was selling for the prisoner, and before the prisoner left off business - I should suppose the prisoner knew where to find him; I did not hear the bill was forget till the prisoner was apprehended - I have not seem Chesney with the prisoner since 1830; he could be found at any time before he died - I know he was in the Marshaleoa a long time before he died; I did not know Duff - Chesney told me he was in the army - I have not been arrested for the last ten years- I saw the prisoner in Wheeler-street once or twice in 1830; Chesney lived in Carnaby-market till he was taken to the Marchalsea, but he was out in the country, and he told me he had been hopping; I swear I sold bread on commission for the prisoner in October, 1830 - I do not think he left his shop in Regent's-park before the 29th of September - I think I sold bread for him after that.

MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure you sold bread for him in October? A. I am pretty sure I did; I remember his disposing of his business in Edward-street - his wife was out of her mind at that time, and went into the country to her friends; I saw the prisoner in the Corn-market early in 1831 - he used to call on me when he came to town; I had no reason to suppose he was keeping out of the way -I did not know George Carew ; if the prisoner had asked me where Chesney was, I could have told him, but not in 1831, when he was hopping.

CHARLES CROZIER . I am serjeant-armourer to the 1st regiment of Life guards - I live in Clarence-street, Regent's-park; I lived there in 1820, and the latter end of 1830 - I know the prisoner very well; I remember his leaving his shop in Edward-street some time in October- I believe his wife was not in her right senses at that time; that was the reason of his going away - I saw him afterwards in the neighbourhood he called on me for some money I owed him - he called only once; I saw him many times after - he was seeking for a shop, or something to get his bread there; he went round to collect debts due to him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you know Chesney? A. No; my duty is to clean the arms - I knew the prisoner as a neighbour; I was pretty well acquainted with the neighbourhood - I did not know George Carew living there; the 2nd Life Guards sometimes quartered at our barracks - I never heard of Captain Duff; the prisoner's wife was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to our house till within a week of his leaving - she generally came alone.

Q. Where did the prisoner go to in the country? A. He said he was going to his father; he expected to be able to do better for his family, as his friends lived there -I do not think I saw his wife after he left, till within the last week she was at my house; she appears to be in her right senses now - I do not know that any doctor attended her; I knew she was not in her right mind from the way she addressed herself to my wife - I knew they did not live comfortable together on account of her mind; I cannot swear that he did not leave his house before the 29th of September.

MR. BARRY. Q. Are you satisfied, from your observation of his wife that she was not in her right senses? A. That is my opinion.

JAMES WARREN . I am a cheesemonger and live in Portpool-lane, but did live at No. 31, St. Mary-street, Hampstead-road, when the prisoner became a lodger of mine, which was in the middle of October, 1830 - I had known him a very little time before; he brought in some furniture, and was there about six weeks; he took his family into the country, but always boarded with me when he came to town - his family were with him just when they came in; he was there in July following, once or twice a week (July 1831) - Mary-street is near Regent's-park.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You are sure it was in October,

1830? A. Yes, quite; about the middle I think, but am not positive - I cannot swear he did not come before the 30th of September; Mary-street is about seven minutes' walk from Regent's-park - he remained six weeks before he took his furniture away, and he came backwards and forwards till July - I do not think he was away four days together from October till July; after his furniture was gone he slept next door, and boarded with me - he carried on no business in town; he was backwards and forwards in the country on business - when he went into the country he did not come home for two or three days; he never told me he had received a forged bill from a man named Chesney - his family went into Suffolk; they were about six weeks in my house, but his wife was not with them, till the day he took her to the country - he has four children; I went to St. Pancras parish for a strait-waistcoat for his wife in October, 1830.

Q. On your oath, did he not come to you before the 30th of October? A. Not to my knowledge. I once saw his wife and she was almost delirious; that was about the middle of October - I do not know Carew; I knew the prisoner when he lived in Edward-street - he came to my house from there; his brother married my wife's sister - I never heard him talk of Chesney, nor of Duff; I do not believe he was ever away seven days together, for if he went away, he left word that if any body wanted him he should be in town in three days - I cannot swear he did not come to me before the 29th of September; he brought his goods to my house about seven o'clock in the morning.

MR. BARRY. Q. Had you reason to believe he was avoiding or shunning any body? A. None in the least - I went round the neighbourhood with him to collect debts.

COURT. Q. From the time he came to you, till July 1831, did you know him to be baking bread to supply persons? A. I cannot say I did; if he had I think I should have known it.

JOHN HILL . I am a carpenter and builder; I live in Clarence-street, Regent's-park. I was the landlord of the house which the prisoner kept in 1830 - he left about the middle of October, after quarter-day, but I cannot say the exact day - he attended his business regularly, and paid me my rent.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you ever see Chesney in his company? A. I never heard the name, nor of Carew or Duff; I know he left after quarter-day, because the person who took the house after him, paid me the rent directly he took possession - the prisoner had a lease from me for ninety-six years, I first heard of him giving up the lease in the middle of October, soon after he left - he had given me no intimation of it, but I saw the shop shut up - I know he had just left, for only one house parted us, and I used to see him frequently every day.

MR. CLARKSON to CHARLES CROZIER . Q. Was not you out of town with your regiment, when you say you saw the prisoner after he left? A. No, my regiment left in July, 1830, and staid out of town twelve months - I was in the habit of seeing him after that; we removed from Regent's-park barracks in 1830, to Knightsbridge - I was at Windsor from 1831 to 1832.

FRANCIS DRAKE . I sell flour on commission. I have known the prisoner ten years - I have been in the habit of attending the Corn-market for the last twelve months; during that time I have seen the prisoner there regularly twice a week - he kept a shop lately in Blackmoor-street, Clare-market, for about twelve months; I kept the same shop seven years ago - I have sold him flour at the shop within the last ten months.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was his name over the door? A. I do not think it was; I land flour at Boy's wharf - I am agent for Mr. Elder of Romford, Essex, who has a mill at Bromley; I do not know Aylet and Co., surveyors, of Newgate-street - I think I have heard of the name; I never knew the prisoner dealing for them - I was in the habit of supplying the army with bread; I knew the prisoner by his keeping a shop near the barracks - he kept what is called a second rate shop; I knew the 2nd Life Guards, and served them for ten years, at times - I did not know Duff; we did not know much about the officers; I knew one Playford - I cannot say I know Chesney or Carew- I think I have heard the name of Duff, but cannot tell.

THOMAS GRAY . I am a baker and flour factor, in Mark-lane. I have been in the habit of attending the Corn-market for the last twenty years; I have seen the prisoner within the last ten months, regularly there, once or twice a week -I knew of his keeping a shop in Blackmoor-street; I have dealt with him.

JOHN COLLYER . I am a baker, living in Poplar-row. I attend the Corn-market - I have seen the prisoner there once a week, and very often twice, for the last ten months, attending regularly in the open market.

SUSANNAH FIELD . I am a married woman, and live at No. 2, Little George-street, Hampstead-road - I knew the prisoner's wife in 1830; I knew her in Edward-street -I recollect their leaving it; she was insane - I attended her, and was in the house to do every thing; the prisoner used to attend to his business - I do not remember Mr. Brook calling there; the prisoner did not sleep at home.

Six witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY of uttering Aged 39. Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330103-133

385. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , in the Liberty of the Rolls, 1 padlock, and key, value 6d.; 1 crown, 3 half-crowns, 10 shillings, and one 10l. Bank note, the property of William Crofts in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM CROFTS . I am a bookseller , and live in Chancery-lane, in the Liberty of the Rolls . The prisoner was my errand-boy for about eight weeks - he is eleven years old; this Bank note was in my cash box - I saw it there on Monday morning, two days before it was taken; the cash-box is generally locked - the money was in the till under the desk; the cash-box was kept in my box looked up - I sent for an officer, and gave him in charge, in the shop, and charged him with taking a shilling out of my till; I had not then examined my cash-box - he was searched, and the 10l. note found in a leather purse in his pocket, and 22s. in silver was found on him, in half-crowns and shillings; the padlock and key, belonging to a glass-case in the shop, was found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say he had found the 10l. note behind the counter? A. No, not at any time; I took him without a character, as I had

known him four years - I left my key in the till intentionally that day; I had not done so before.

THOMAS GRIMWOOD . I am a drawing-instrument maker, but having no employment, I drive a cab. I was on the rank in the Strand - the prisoner came and asked what I would take him to Exeter-hall for, and back to Chancery-lane - as he came back he asked me to drive him about to different places, where he said his master had sent him - I drove him about for thirteen days or a fortnight; he paid me for it - he told me Mr. Crofts was his master; I drove him once to Stratford, Kennington, and Chelsea, and different places - the most I received from him at one time was 6s.; he generally appeared to have plenty of money - I know nothing of the 10l. note.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you driven a cab? A. About three months - he paid me 6s. one Saturday night for taking him to Stratford, over the second bridge; I waited for him at the end of the bridge - I once took him to Kennington, where he said he had a letter to deliver; he always had a letter with him, which he said he was to deliver - I at last suspected something; I told him I had rather not carry him any more, for I was afraid I should get into trouble - I have often driven him to his master's door; I asked him if his master was at home - the other boy used to come to the door when he jumped into the cab, and I, of course, thought all was right - he once changed a sovereign - I never gave him a bad half-crown.

JOHN GURNEY . I am a Policeman. I was sent for and took charge of the prisoner in the shop; I found 22s. 6d. on him in silver, a 10l. Bank note, and a purse in his right-hand trousers pocket - he said he found the note under Mr. Crofts' writing-desk.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say so in Mr. Croft's presence? A. Yes, he said he found it under the counter, loud enough for Mr. Crofts to hear.

MR. CROFTS. I can distinctly swear to the note; he said at Bow-street that he found it on the desk, rolled up.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the note under the desk.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 12. - Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18330103-134

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

386. ANN HINES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 ring, value 15s. , the goods of Robert Upsall .

ROBERT UPSALL. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Barbican . On the 4th of January the prisoner came to my shop and asked to look at a fancy ring - I took a tray from the window with rings in it, and put it on the counter; she asked to see some pearl rings - I put a case of them on the counter; she selected one at 15s.; I turned round to wrap it in a piece of paper, and, on turning again, she said, "I will leave you one shilling on this ring and call again;" she went out of the shop directly, and I immediately missed a ring off the counter - I rang the bell and my young man came down; I followed her down the street about ten doors, and charged her with taking the ring off the counter; she denied it - I said she must come back with me - I said I must search her; she said, "Don't do that;" she took her hand out of her pocket with her handkerchief in it, and laid the ring on the counter.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is the meaning of leaving a shilling? A. She left 1s. and I was to keep the ring till she called for it - I did not say it would be better to give up the ring.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330103-135

387. JOHN SHAW, alias JOHN BATT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Henry Waring , from his person .

HENRY WARING . I am an articled clerk to Mr. Bush, of St. Mildred's-court. On the 10th of December I was in Bridge-street , between six and seven o'clock in the evening; I felt a pull at my pocket - I turned round, and saw the prisoner close to me; I followed him over Blackfrairs-bridge without intimating that I suspected him - he attempted to turn down a street, and I stopped him; he was taken to the station, and my handkerchief was found concealed in the bottom of his trousers.

JOHN DUNCAN . I am an officer. The prosecutor gave the prisoner into my charge - I found the handkerchief inside the lining at the bottom of his trousers; I searched him twice before I found it.

Property produced and sworn to.

Prisoner. I was out of employ.

GUILTY. - Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330103-136

388. FREDERICK COOPER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

CHARLES SAMUEL SMITH . I am a clothier , and live in Beech-street, Barbican . On the 12th of December , about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was standing in my shop and heard linen or a string breaking; I turned round, and saw the prisoner with the coat in question in his hands; he was standing in the act of pulling it down; it had been torn down from one loop, but still hung by the other loop; he was in the shop, the door opens four or five feet into the shop, and the shop is up two steps; I seized him, and sent my child over for an officer - while I held him under a gas-light in the middle of the shop; he said repeatedly that if I would let him go he would stand quietly - and as the child could not get an officer, I loosed my hold and went to the door to call assistance, but seeing nobody near at that moment, he rushed from the back of the shop to get out; I seized him before he got to the door, and he began fighting desperately, and while this was about, another man came up the steps into the shop, and struck me a violent blow in the face, which I felt for some days - I then disengaged one hand from the prisoner, to defend myself, and he rushed from me - in going down the steps, round the corner, he came against the glass, and broke two squares - he ran in the road; I pursued him, and opposite Mr. Druce the butcher, the shopman came out, and caught hold of him - he knocked him down and ran away; I still pursued, and came up with him by the corner of Golden-lane; I was not the first that took hold of him there - a Policeman came, and he was secured, but previous to this several others had come round him, and I received some blows - there was evidently a gang of them.

GEORGE BROWN . I am shopman to Mr. Druce. I was standing at the door, and the prisoner ran by - I tried to

catch him, and he knocked me down; we proceeded on, and the officer took him - he is the man.

EDWARD MACDOWALL . I am an officer. I was at the corner of Redcross-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief!- I immediately crossed over to the corner of Golden-lane, and caught hold of the prisoner; there was a cry of Rescue! and at the corner of Beech-street he struck me a violent blow in the face, and afterwards a violent blow on the left side of the breast; he was secured.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a coat hanging at the door, and was going to buy it - I asked the prosecutor the price - he immediately collared me; I said, "Let me go;" he would not; as I went out, by accident, I broke two panes of glass.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-137

389. BENJAMIN CLARKE was indicted for a fraud .

RACHAEL BARKER . I am a servant, but out of a situation. On Saturday, the 3rd of November, I was coming down Holborn , from the Institution in Bedford-row, between one and two o'clock in the day time, and the prisoner came by my side; I never saw him before - he instantly kicked his foot against a piece of paper; he said,"I am not in the habit of finding presents, but I may as well pick it up and see what is in it, very probably it may be a bit of tobacco, or a few old nails screwed up;" he stooped down, and picked it up, opened it, and there was a pair of ear-rings, and two rings in three different papers, one of which was a bill, charging the things 5l. 18s. 6d. - I saw the bill - he did not then tell me what it was; he said he supposed some lady had been at a jeweller's shop, and purchased these articles, which he supposed had fallen from her muff - he then said he was sure the articles were of no use to him, and I said I was sure they were none to me; he crossed over on the opposite side to the church, and said he was going to his employer, Mr. Clarke, and said, "If you will walk on slowly, perhaps, I may meet with you again;" I said it would be very uncertain whether he did or not - I had no idea of seeing him again; I went down Holborn-hill, and by the grocer's shop at the corner, a man in a brown coat came up to me - he was a thinner man than the prisoner; he also kicked his foot against a paper, but there was nothing in it - he picked it up, and said, "I suppose it is not a 5l. note;" I said I did not consider that 5l. notes were so plentiful; he said a man had picked up a parcel in Holborn, which contained a pair of ear-rings, and two rings, with the bill for 5l. 18s. 6d. - I asked how he came to know it; he instantly said, "Oh, there is a lady, who has just got into her carriage, and she is just going to advertise the jewels for 2l.;" (I was very much concerned that a lady should have such a loss) - the man said he was going towards Smithfield, and while I stood there the prisoner came by the side of me again, and said, "I did not think I should meet with you again;" he then crossed over the road with me into Farringdon-street, having the articles in his hand, and though he said before that he could not read writing, he then told me the amount of the bill, which he could not tell me before; he said they were 5l. 18s. 6d., and they were going to be advertised for 2l. - I said I was a servant, and had been out of place three months, and I was not able to purchase any thing of the kind, but if I did, it should be for the welfare of the lady; he said he would take a sovereign for them, and I gave the sovereign into his hand, and he gave me the things - he shook hands, and wished me much joy; he then crossed over to the man in the brown coat - I went home to my lodging very delighted, and carried the things about for a fortnight, thinking I should meet with the prisoner - the ear-rings turned out to be worth about 2s., and on Saturday week I saw the prisoner with seven or eight others, and gave him into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. It was entirely to serve the lady you bought them? A. It was done with a good intention; I ran the risk of my sovereign, as I was out of place, and he said he was going to Brighton, and could not keep them - I thought the reward would be beneficial; he wore a brown coat, and blue apron like a butcher, and knee breeches; and when I took him he had a black coat - he told me he had changed his coat.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer - I have been a jeweller. I examined these things - they are worth 2s.; that is the utmost they are sold for.

EDWARD MATTHEWS . I am an officer. The prosecutrix pointed the prisoner out to me - I took him in charge, but found nothing on him.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-138

Third Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

390. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of James Hales .

JAMES HALES. I am a cheesemonger , and live at Bethnal-green-road . On the 31st of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner run out of the parlour behind my shop; I do not know how he had got in; he threw this coat out to two other boy s at the door, and went back, I suppose to get something else - I did not see the coat in his possession; I asked what he wanted; he said 1d. worth of cheese: I looked round, and saw my coat was gone, and detained him - nobody but him could have taken it; there was no one in the house, but my sister.

MARY ANN DRAPER . I was at the next house, and as I stood at the door, I saw a coat flung out of the prosecutor's shop; I did not see who by - two young lads picked it up, and ran away with it; they made their escape.

JOSEPH PEARSON . I was coming down the Bethnalgreen-road, and saw a coat thrown out at the prosecutor's door; a boy ran up, put it under his arm, put it in his apron, and went off - I went to the shop, and saw the prisoner in the shop; the prosecutor had hold of him - nobody had come out of the prosecutor's shop, for I went up to the door directly; nobody but the prisoner or prosecutor could have thrown it out.

HENRY WEBB . I am an officer. I took him in charge in the prosecutor's parlour.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-139

391. THOMAS KITTERIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 gold-earing, value 18d.; 1 box, value 6d.; 1 pair of pattens, value 1s.; 1 bottle, value 1d.; 1 umbrella, value 1s., and 6 shillings, the property of Ann Andrews , from her person .

ANN ANDREWS. I am a widow . On the 27th of December I was on the road to Hackney, near Shoreditch - I

have an allowance of 2s. a week from the parish, and earn a little besides; it was a foggy night, and it might be between eight and nine o'clock in the evening - I was going to Hackney where I live, a young woman came to my side, and said, "Were are you going?" she was a stranger - I said I was going near the old church Hackney; she said,"I am going that way, take hold of my arm:" I was very tired, and very glad to take hold of her arm - she led me a good distance; the prisoner came up and spoke to her, and then came to my side: I had this property about me- I felt his arm go down me; he started away from me, then laughed at the young woman, and went away; I saw nothing more of him - when I got a little further, I asked the young woman to go in and take some refreshment; she refused, but she went into the public-house in Hackney-road, called for some gin; and when I put my hand to my pocket, my bottle was gone, and my money, which had been on the side the prisoner came on; I had felt his arm go down me- I came out of the house very much alarmed; I called a coach which was going by, and went home - I mentioned it to nobody but the young woman; I said, "I am robbed I" and caught hold of her, but she snatched herself away, and ran out - the coachman put me down by the old church; I paid the man what halfpence I had, and missed my pattens, which I had put down just before me, and I then found the prisoner close to me - I said, "Where is my pattens?" he said, "It is the rogue of a Policeman has got your pattens;" I said, "Nobody was near me but you, and it must be you:" he then dragged me along till the Policeman came to my assistance - I lost 6s., my umbrella, pattens, a little box, with five duplicates in it, and a gold ear-ring which was in the box.

THOMAS MEREDITH . I am a Policeman. About half-past nine o'clock on the 27th of December, I was near the station-house, at Hackney - I heard a talking and noise; I proceeded to the spot; I knew the prisoner's voice, and as soon as I got there, the prosecutrix said she had lost her pattens and umbrella - I stood there some minutes; she was talking with the prisoner; my inspector was there - he searched the prisoner's jacket, but seemed satisfied, and went away; I began to talk to the prosecutrix - I asked her where she lived - the prisoner insisted on her going with him, saying he would see her home; I told him to go away, and I would see her home - he would not, and we had a scuffle - one of my brother officers came and we took him to the station-house; one of my brother officers saw the bottle drop from him - the prosecutrix did not appear to be in liquor.

JOHN SHORTHOUSE . I am a Policeman. About half-past nine o'clock, I was at the station-house door and heard a dispute between the prisoner and my brother officer; I went towards them and saw him strike my brother officer; I took him into custody, and I saw this bottle drop from his person; it contained rum I believe.

ANN ANDREWS . I took this bottle to get some eye-water - there is rum in it now - I saw nothing of the prisoner from the time he went from my side, till I got off the coach; he did not go in the coach with me - a person asked me to drink a drop of something; I said I could not, and as I had not got the eyewater, I put the rum into the bottle, and put it into my pocket, with my money, and little box - I am sure the prisoner took them all; I had felt my money and the bottle all safe in my pocket before the prisoner came up; I lost it in Hackney-road, near to Shoreditch.

JOHN BEDFORD . I am an inspector of Police. On the evening in question, I was going on particular business, and found the prosecutrix and the prisoner in the street; she said she had lost her pattens and umbrella; I stood for a moment; the prisoner knew me very well, and I knew him; and as his short jacket pocket was rather bulky, I came round to him and said, "What have you got here?" he said, "The pattens" - and took out this bottle; I searched for the pattens, but could not find them - he began to be rather abusive, and being particularly engaged at that moment, I left him, and the other officers came up.

Prisoner's Defence." I can prove I was at the Mermaid-tap, from ten o'clock in the morning, till nine in the evening.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I live with Mr. Wicks, at the Old Mermaid, at Hackney. On Thursday, the 27th, the prisoner came there between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and was there till between nine and ten at night - he was drinking all day in the tap-room - he is a bricklayer's labourer; our house is about two miles from Shoreditch; I was in the house all day almost; I am the pot-boy - I go out with beer - I keep no account at what hour people go out and come in; I cannot tell who was there on the 26th.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-140

392. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 tame fowl, price 2s. , the property of James Stevens .

JAMES STEVENS . I am a cow-keeper , and live at Turnham-green . This fowl was stolen from my hen-roost; the prisoner knew my premises; he worked in the neighbourhood - there is no door to the roost - he had no right on my premises at all.

WILLIAM CHURCH . I am a Policeman. On the 1st of January, I took the prisoner into custody, coming from his employer's house, a witness having given information.

JOHN COLBURN . I live with the prosecutor. On the 31st of December I was in the stables, early in the evening, and heard the fowls squeak - I took a light, and found the prisoner standing against the roost; I called to him several times - he did not answer me - at last he said he was reaching a turnip from the cart, and he went away - I went after him, saw something under his smock-frock, and found it was the fowl; I took hold of him and he dropped it from under his smock-frock.

Prisoner. I did not intend to take it away.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18330103-141

393. WILLIAM JENKINS , ALFRED JENKINS , and HENRY HOLDSWORTH were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 3 snuff-boxes, value 4s., the goods of Peter Clisswold ; the said William Jenkins having been before convicted of felony .

MILDRED CLISSWOLD . I am the wife of Peter Clisswold,

a tobacconist - we live in Brewer-street, Somer's-town . On the 21st of December I saw all the prisoners about the shop-window, but suspected nothing; I went into the parlour, and in half a minute turned round, and saw Alfred going out of the shop; I ran out, and missed three snuff-boxes from the window - I am sure the prisoners were altogether; I ran round the corner, saw the same three boys, and called Stop thief! but there was nobody to stop them - I saw each of them throw a box down the area, and throw some down in the street; I picked up one - I swear they are the boys: I could not run fast enough to take them.

SAMUEL VINE . I saw the prisoners together near the prosecutrix's shop - I heard them say sneak in; Alfred Jenkins went in, he came out again in half a minute, and they all ran away together.

JOHN VENNELL . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoners - the prosecutrix gave me three boxes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES STEWART . I am a Policeman. I produce a certificate of a former conviction of William Jenkins, on the 29th of October - I attended the trial; he is the same boy who was tried - (read).

W. JENKINS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

A. JENKINS - GUILTY . Aged 12.

HOLDSWORTH - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-142

394. THOMAS HILT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of Henry Johnson .

HENRY JOHNSON. I live at Chelmsford, Essex. On the 1st of January, between four and five o'clock in the evening, I was returning home - I was at Hackney, in a light cart of my own; I stopped at Mr. Jackson's, in Chapel-street , to purchase a few things, leaving the cart at the door, with my coat in it - Mr. Jackson's nephew looked through the window and alarmed me; I ran to my cart, and my coat was gone - I saw a man running up the street; I called Stop thief! several persons followed him - I lost sight of him, but he was taken; I might have been in the shop about five minutes - I found him in custody, and a Policeman brought my coat in.

JOHN LLOYD . I was in the shop of Mr. Jackson - I looked through the window, and saw a man take the coat off the cart; I cannot say whether it was the prisoner, as it was dark.

JOHN HARRIS . I live at Hackney. The prisoner was on one side of the way, and I on the other; I heard somebody halloo Stop thief! I looked round, and saw the prisoner with the coat - when the gentleman hallooed Stop thief! I saw him drop it; he ran away, and was pursued: I did not follow him, but I knew him before, and am sure he is the man - the gas-lights were lighted; I swear positively to him.

Prisoner. Q. How far from the shop did I drop it? A. Just by Slatterie and Green's - it was not quite dark.

WILLIAM GANFIELD . I was opposite Slatterie and Green's. I saw a man drop the coat; I do not know who it was.

THOMAS BALL . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running as hard as he could - I grasped at him, but could not get hold of him; he said, "Don't stop me, don't stop me" - I followed him, calling Stop thief! till he was stopped; I never lost sight of him at all - I hallooed Stop thief! all the way.

JOHN TAYLOR . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running as hard as he could - I held up my stick to stop him; he would not stop, and I cut him across the legs with my stick; some man came out of a stable, threw him against the wall, and there we took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had just left a young man who was crossing the fields; I wanted to speak to him, and was running to catch him.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-143

395. JOHN GROOM and JOHN BAILEY were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 24 deals, value 4l. , the goods of John Lucas .

THOMAS BAULSOM. I am foreman to John Lucas, a timber-merchant , at the City-road bason . These deals were on the wharf; I had seen them safe in the after part of the day - I did not miss them till the next day, when a Policeman gave me information, and produced twenty-four; the prisoners worked for a builder at Paddington, and they assisted to load a boat that day for their employer's, but had nothing to do with these deals - Bailey was captain of the vessel .

JOHN CURTIS . I was applied to to have the deals landed at my wharf - I am a wharfinger; Bailey brought the deals to me - I did not see Groom; a man named Pike had applied to me; the deals were landed with my permission - I had occasion to go out of the yard; I returned in two hours, and the Policeman asked me if I knew any thing of them - I said not; Bailey came to my house about half-past eight o'clock that evening, and asked me if the deals had been taken away; I said they had - he said he was sorry for that, for if he had known it, they should not have been taken away, as the person he had sold them to had appointed to meet him at the Wheatsheaf, to pay him for them; I asked him two or three questions - he said he had loaded his boat at Limehouse; I asked if it was from a ship or boat; he said partly from both, and he was to take them to Paddington, for a master builder.

ROBERT SIMMONDS . I am a bricklayer. Pike came to me, having a small quantity of deals to sell: I went to the wharf, and both the prisoners were present - they said they had a small quantity of deals to sell; I said when they were landed, if they suited me, I would buy them - they were landed, and I had no money in my pocket, and gave him my address where to call for the money: both the prisoners dealt with them as their own, and the deals were afterwards claimed by the prosecutor.

RICHARD NORTH , I am a sawyer. I was standing at King's-cross one morning, and Groom asked if I knew who would buy any deals, as he had some to sell; I said I knew no body but Mr. Brewer - I went to Mr. Brewer with him; he declined buying them - Pike and Mr. Simmonds went up to the wharf, and landed them; I loaded them in a cart, by Simmond's direction, and unloaded them - Bailey was not present.

THOMAS HOBB KING . I produce the deals - three

skeleton-keys were found on Bailey, and seventeen in the cabin of their boat.

THOMAS BAULSOM . These are part of the deals stolen from the wharf; I do not know how many I lost, but these twenty-four belong to Mr. Lucas - other things were stolen - these were a parcel of odd deals, which stood at the end of the wharf, and some of them have my own figures on them; I have made some calculations on them - I swear to them positively.

GROOM - GUILTY .* Aged 29.

BAILEY - GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-144

NEW COURT. TUESDAY, JANUARY 8TH.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

396. ELIZABETH SWEET was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 17 yards of silk, value 34s. , the goods of Richard Smither Beauchamp . - To which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-145

397. MARY ANN LYAS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 copper boiler, value 8s., the goods of John Gibbs , and fixed to a certain building ; against the Statute.

The article not being fixed, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18330103-146

398. LEWIS MYERS and THOMAS BOLTON were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 table, value 2s. , the goods of John Stidston .

JOHN STIDSTON. I am a broker , and live in Artillery-street. Old Artillery-ground . I had a table stolen from outside my door on the 6th of December; I saw it again on the 13th.

WILLIAM GURNEY . I live with my father in Dolphin-court, Sandy's-row. On the 6th of December I was in Artillery-passage - I saw the prisoner Myers carrying a table, six or seven doors from the prosecutor's shop; Bolton was walking close to him - they appeared in company - I gave information.

ESTHER BARNETT . I live in Middlesex-street, Whitechapel. On the 6th of December Myers came to my window, and bought 1d. cake; he had this table, and asked me if I would buy it; I asked where he got it - he said,"Honestly;" I said, "Are you sure?" he said, "Do you think I should sell you a stolen table?" he asked me 1s. for it, which I gave him - he said he had been sent to sell it - I bought it for my own use, and put it into my room.

JOHN ARNOLD (Police-constable H 74). I took the prisoners into custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Myers' Defence. This boy said he knew where to get a table - he took it, and gave it me to sell for him - he said he would give me 1d.

Bolton's Defence. I did not take it; I saw him going along with it - he said his mother was moving.

MYERS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

BOLTON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18330103-147

400. MARY ANN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 3 sovereigns, and 1 promissory note for 5l., the property of John Turner , from his person .

JOHN TURNER. I live at Worthing, and when in London. I lodge in the Kent-road. On the night of the 18th of December I was in a street, in a line with Shoreditch church, but some distance from it; the prisoner, and another woman came up to me - I continued walking on; they continued with me a short time, and then left me: when they were gone I walked a short distance, and then put my hand to my watch-fob, and missed from there, three sovereigns and a 5l. Brighton note - I know they had been safe a few minutes before the prisoner came up to me; I found a Policeman coming after me, and went with him to the station; I saw the prisoner and two others - I pointed out the prisoner, as the one who was most conspicuous in accosting me, and importuning me; I saw a 5l. Brighton note in a mutilated state - the one I had was not so; I was not sober.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you could not swear I was the female, because you were surrounded by two or three? A. I said I could not swear you robbed me, but you were the one who made yourself most troublesome, and you accosted me first.

JOHN GREEN (Police-constable H 91). I was on duty in Shoreditch, early in the morning of the 19th of December; I saw the prisoner in company with the prosecutor - she was the only female with him at that time; she then left him: I saw her tearing a bit of paper, and throwing it away - she put her hand to her mouth; I followed her, she then ran: I pursued - when I came up with her, she produced three sovereigns, and begged me to take them and keep them, and say nothing about the robbery; I took the three sovereigns to the station, and left her in custody - I then went down the street, to where I had seen her throw something away, and found these two pieces of a 5l. Brighton note; one piece is lost - I then took the prosecutor to the station; he recognized her as one of the parties who had been about him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the prosecutor very much in liquor - he was surrounded by two or three females; I saw the piece of paper at his feet: I took it up, and took the sovereigns out of it - I cannot read, and I threw the paper away; when the officer took me, I said I had three sovereigns, which I had just picked up.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-148

401. ELIZABETH MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 1 bolster, value 5s.; 1 quilt, value 3s.; 2 shifts, value 4s.; 1 blanket, value 2s., and 1 flat-iron, 6d. , the goods of Robert Thomas Cable .

ANN CABLE. I am the wife of Robert Thomas Cable ; we live in Peter's-lane, Cow-cross . The prisoner occupied a furnished room in our house for ten weeks; she lived with a person who passed as her husband: these articles were let with the lodging - I missed them on the 21st of December, and on her return home that day, I gave her into custody: she produced the duplicates - her husband was at home every night.

JOHN HODGES (Police-constable G 77). I took the prisoner, and received the duplicates; she said she intended to get the property out again.

JOHN BROWNING . I am in the service of a pawnbroker.

I have a bolster, pawned on the 12th of November, by the prisoner, for 2s. 6d., in the name of the Ann Martin.

JOHN BALL . I am a pawnbroker. I took in a flat-iron of the prisoner, on the 15th of November.

JOHN SAUNDERS . I have two sheets and a flat-iron, pawned by a female at different times; I cannot say it was the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned them by my husband's desire, and should have got them out again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-149

402. JOSEPH PAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 2 pairs of boots, value 9s. , the goods of Jonathan Tilly .

The property not being identified the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18330103-150

403. JOHN PLUMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 coat, value 1l. 15s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 18s.; 2 waistcoats, value 15s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 pair of braces, value 6d.; 1 pad, value 6d., and 1 bag, value 3d. , the goods of William Clark , the younger.

WILLIAM CLARK. I am a weaver , and live with my father in Pelham-street ; I have a workshop at the top of the house. The prisoner was employed by my father to mend quills ; on the 24th of September he was there - I gave him a pair of boots to clean; he took them down stairs, and on his going up again, I saw a knife in his hand - I then missed him, and on opening a box of mine afterwards, I missed these articles, which I had seen safe that morning - I did not see him again till three weeks ago, at Bethnal-green workhouse; I asked him why he was guilty of doing such a thing - he said he did not know; I asked what he had done with the things - he said, "Sold them to a Jew in Petticoat-lane, for 15s.;" I took him to the station - the articles were worth between 3l. and 4l.

THOMAS HALL . I am schoolmaster of Bethnal-green, workhouse. The prisoner was under my care; he went to the prosecutor's to work, but came home to dinner - he absconded, and I did not see him again till Saturday three weeks; he said he had done this, and I asked him what for - he said he did not know but he had sold the things to a Jew - he had been two years in the workhouse, and I knew nothing wrong of him before.

WILLIAM BEALE (Police-constable H 6). I received the prisoner at the station; I asked him if he could point out the Jew he sold the things to - he said Yes; I took him to Petticoat-lane, but he could not find the person.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-151

404. JOHN SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 3 prints framed and glazed, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Sherburd .

JOSEPH SHERBURD. I am a cutler , and live in Union-street, Shadwell . On the 4th of December I let the prisoner a bed-room for the night; he paid for it, and went to bed about ten o'clock - on the next morning, he went away, and a few minutes after he was gone, I missed some pictures from the room he slept in; I went and found him in the Crown public-house, and gave him into custody - he said if I would not hurt him, he would show me where the pictures were; he took me to a broker's, where he had sold them.

TIMOTHY DONOVAN . (Police-constable K 854.) I accompanied the prosecutor to the public-house, and found the prisoner.

THOMAS MACROW. I live at No. 5, Back-lane, Shadwell, and am a broker. I bought these pictures of the prisoner, for 1s.(Propety produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did it from distress.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

The prisoner having been convicted before, and escaped from the Hulks, was sentenced to be transported for seven years, from the expiration of his former sentence .

Reference Number: t18330103-152

405. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 3d. , the goods of James Tulley .

WILLIAM TEMPLE . I am assistant to my brother-in-law, James Tulley; he is proprietor of a Bazaar , at Finsbury . I was behind the counter on the 29th of December; I heard a noise at the window - I saw the prisoner take a pair of shoes, which he put on his left-side, between his coat and waistcoat; I followed - when I got within a few yards of him, he dropped the shoes; I took them up, and took him near the bottom of Tabernacle-row.

WILLIAM MAYNARD . (Police-constable G 113.) I took the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY Aged 11. - Whipped and Discharged

Reference Number: t18330103-153

406. MARTHA WARE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 2 pairs of boots, value 10s. , the property of William Henry Bloomfield .

ROBERT WHITRY . I am apprentice to Mr. William Henry Bloomfield; he lives in Pulteney-court, St. James' , and is a shoe-maker . On the 29th of December the prisoner came to the shop, and asked my mistress if she had any side-lace boots; she said she had only one pair, which she showed her - the prisoner said they were too small, they would fit her, but she wanted them for a lady, and they must be a large size; my mistress sent me with some others - I took them with the prisoner just round the corner; she went up stairs, at a house, as she said, to tell a person - she then came down, and said she would take two pairs; she took two pairs up, came down, and told me to wait at the door, while she went to get change - I waited about five minutes, when a person came down, and said, "What are you waiting for?" I said I was waiting for a person who had gone to get change, to pay for a pair of boots - she said she had seen the prisoner there, who had inquired for a person, whom she never saw in her life; I was to have had the money or the boots back, but not to leave them without the money - the person who came down, told me I had better run to the pawnbroker's shops: I went to my master, who sent me and my mistress out; I went to Mr. Harrison's, and found one pair pawned there.

GEORGE FARMER . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker. I have a pair of boots, pawned by the prisoner, for 2s., on the 29th of December, about nine o'clock in the evening.

JOHN BALDWIN (Police-constable C 103.) I went to a pawnbroker's shop, and found the prisoner there, and this pair of boots, which she had offered; I asked what she had done with the money she had received for the other pair - she gave me this 2s.

ROBERT WHITBY . These are my master's boots - I did not intend to let the prisoner have them - they were to be shown to another person.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-154

407. JOHN WRIGHT and ROBERT MAY were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 6 loaves of bread, value 4s. 3d. , the goods of Andrew Gall .

JOHN PORTEUS . I am servant to Mr. Trail, a baker. On the 27th of December I saw the prisoners pass the bottom of Edward-street, Hampstead-road - they had each three loaves of bread; they separted - I followed Wright, and took him with them.

THOMAS TIFFIN . I live in Judkins'-row. I saw the prisoners in Camden-terrace , on the 27th of December, about ten yards from a baker's truck - there were five boy s in all; three of them had bread - I followed May, and took him with three loaves; he threw it down, and said he should not carry it any further if he was to go to the station.

THOMAS TAYLOR (Police-constable S 210.) I took the prisoners, and have the bread; they said they had found it on the side of the bridge.

JOHN STEWARD . I am servant to Mr. Andrew Gall, a baker, who lives at Camden-town. I left my truck in Camden-terrace with some bread in it - I missed six loaves; this is part of it.

WRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 13.

MAY - GUILTY , Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18330103-155

408. MARY PARFITT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 2 spoons, value 8s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s., and 1 shirt, value 3s. , the goods of James Cailes .

MARY ANN CAILES . I am the wife of James Cailes - he lives in Marylebone-lane , and is a tobacconist . The prisoner has been in the habit of working at our house occasionally for a year and six months; about three weeks before Christmas she came to nurse me, and had access to every thing in the house - I missed the articles stated on the 26th of December, and on the Saturday she left me without notice, and did not return.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you made any inquiry about her? A. I know she had a brother at the hospital, who was there ill, but he is better, and I have seen him since - I do not know that she took things to him; she had money from me every week to help to support him - she is married.

WILLIAM THOMAS BARTON . I am shopman to Mr. Cotterell, a pawnbroker. I have two spoons, two handkerchiefs, two shirts, and some other articles, pawned with us, between the 28th of November and the 27th of December, for 19s. in all - I advanced 2s. more on the spoon, on the 27th of December, to the prisoner, and believe she is the person who pawned the other articles.

THOMAS GODWIN (Police-constable D 7.) I apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed, and did it for the sake of supporting my brother, who was in a very ill state - these things are not the prosecutor's.

MARY ANN CAILES. These are mine - I may have been called by the name of Wilson, but I never went by that name; I was married to James Cailes on the 7th of August, 1831.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-156

409. MARY PARFITT was again indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 20 yards of linen, value 20s. , the goods of William Lock .

The property not being identified, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18330103-157

410. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 basket, value 6d., and 1 bushel of apples, value 6d. , the goods of Henry Harris .

HENRY HARRIS. I sold some apples to Mr. Bird, of Turnham-green, and when I got to his premises, I missed a bushel of apples and a basket, which I had brought from Working; I have seen some apples since, which I believe were mine.

JAMES FITHERIDGE . I live at Turnham-green . On the 14th of December I saw the prisoner take a bushel of apples and a basket off the waggon.

JOHN WATSON . I live with Mr. Burnham. He sent me to call one of the foremen; I saw the prisoner with a bushel-basket, and straw on the top - I do not know what was in it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18330103-158

411. WILLIAM BLAZEY was indicted for that he, on the 22nd of November , 20 pieces of false and counterfeit coin, resembling, or apparently intended to resemble and pass for shillings, feloniously did sell and put off at and for a lower rate and value than the same by their denomination imported .

MR. ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

DAVID CARPENTER . I am a shoemaker. On the 22nd of November, Evans, the officer, asked me to go with him to Westminster , which I did - he searched me at the Feathers public-house; I had nothing, and he furnished me with five good shillings - he then told me to go to the opposite corner of the street and there remain; I did so, and the prisoner came to me - I had never seen him before, but I had the description of his person; I spoke to him, and he to me - he told me he had just got a score, and he wanted 5s. for them; he pulled them out of his pocket, wrapped up in a piece of paper, and told me they were of a new die - I took the paper, examined them, and found them all correct, and gave him the five good shillings for them; he then appointed to meet me on the Saturday following, and he would bring down two scores - he then went away, and Evans followed me; he had been in sight all the time, perhaps half a dozen yards off; when Evans came to me, he went with me to the Green Man, in Little George-street, he took the bad money from me, and I marked it - I met the prisoner on the Saturday afterwards, and he was taken.

OWEN BONNELL EVANS . I am an officer. I applied to Carpenter on the 22nd of November, and

asked him to go with me to Westminster, and we went to the Feathers, where I searched him; he had no money - I gave him five good shillings; I told him to go and stand against the lamp-post opposite the Feathers, about six or seven yards off - I remained in the tap-room, and had a full view of him; when he had been there a quarter of an hour, I saw the prisoner come up with a pipe in his mouth - I saw them speak together, and then the prisoner pulled something out of his pocket; I saw it was money, but could not tell what coin - I saw it told out.

COURT. Q. It was not in paper then? A. Yes, it was - I could not ascertain what it was; I saw Carpenter telling it out of one hand into the other - I had seen Carpenter give the prisoner something into his hand; I saw it was money - I had no authority from the officers of the Mint to employ Carpenter on this occasion; I had no intimation at all - I did not see any money in Carpenter's hand, except what he told into the prisoner's hand.

MR. ELLIS. Q. Did you see any money told out by Carpenter except what he gave the prisoner? A. No, except the money he told out of the parcel; the prisoner then went away, and Carpenter came over towards me; I took him to a public-house, and found a score of shillings in his waistcoat pocket - these are them; they are in the same paper now - I took the prisoner on the Saturday following - I said "I want you for some bad coin which you have been making away with;" he said he knew nothing about it - he had nothing on him; I took him before the Magistrate, who detained him till I let the gentlemen of the Mint know of it; there was another person with the prisoner when I took him, on whom I found some utensils of the trade, but he has escaped.

COURT. Q. How came the prisoner to come to the corner of the street to meet Carpenter - had you made any arrangement to procure his attendance? A. No, it was pure accident - I did not in the least expect he would come there; I took no steps to procure his attendance.

MR. ELLIS. Q. Had you no knowledge of the prisoner's coming to the corner of the street? A. Yes, I understood he was coming there; I made a mistake when I told his Lordship it was pure accident - I had information where he was to come.

JURY. We cannot rely on either of these witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-159

412. AMELIA HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 shawl, value 4s. , the goods of William Shaw .

RUTH SHAW . I am the wife of William Shaw. The prisoner rented a furnished room in the house we live in; she was in the habit of coming into our room - I missed a shawl on the 4th or 5th of December, and charged her with it - the landlady searched her room and found two duplicates; in consequence of which I went to a pawn broker, and found my shawl; this is it.

WILLIAM GOULD . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have the shawl, which was pawned by the prisoner on the 4th of December.

Prisoner. I was very much distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 25

413. AMELIA HUGHES was again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 shirt, value 2s., and 1 iron, value 6d. , the goods of William Kennedy .

WILLIAM GOULD . I have a flat-iron and a sheet, pawned on the 29th of November, and on the 1st of December - I know the sheet was pawned by the prisoner.

SARAH KENNEDY . I live in Little St. Andrew-street , and am the wife of William Kennedy. The prisoner lodged there five days - these articles are mine; a respectable man brought her as his wife, and paid the weeks rent - I do not know who he was, but he has called on me since she had been taken, and said, she was quite a stranger, and he brought her out of charity.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-160

414. GEORGE EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 truck, value 50s. , the goods of Adam Edwards .

MAURICE NICHOLAS (Police-constable E 10.) On the evening of the 26th of December, I was called to Mr. Gummer's, in Buckeridge-street; I found the prisoner there, and this trunk; he said he had bought it a year ago for 18s., but he had been gambling, and lost money, and he wanted 8s. on it - I took him.

ADAM EDWARDS. On the 26th of December the prisoner applied to me for a truck for Mr. Benham; he told me he had been employed by him to draw some tins from Thames-street - I knew Mr. Benham, and lent it him at 4d. an hour, but not knowing the prisoner I watched him, and saw him go into Mr. Benham's shop - he came out again, and went in the direction of Wood-street; the truck is mine.

JOHN BENHAM . I keep a tin-shop in Fore-street. The prisoner had no authority from me to obtain the truck; I never saw him till he came into the shop on the 26th of December, and asked my mother to direct him to Mr. Lewis, a grocer, he then went out, and took the truck away.

WLLIAM GUMMER . I live in Buckridge-street. The prisoner brought the truck to my house, and asked if I wanted to buy it - he said he had been gambling and lost his money; he offered it to me for 8s; I thought it could not be right; I got the officer to take him.

Prisoner. I was not the person who offered it for sale. Witness. Yes he was - he brought the truck to the door, and stood by the side of it till he was taken.

GUILTY *. Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-161

415. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 glass bottle and stopper, value 4s. , the goods of Samuel Jerman .

SAMUEL JERMAN. I live in Upper Islington-street , and am a broker . This bottle was taken from outside my shop - it stood on a mahogany table.

DANIEL MOBBS (Police-constable E. 11.) I apprehended the prisoner in Cirencester-place, near one hundred yards from the prosecutor's - he had this bottle under his arm, and this stopper in his hand.

Prisoner. Some boys told me to carry it for them; they took it off the table and gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18330103-162

416. JAMES HUGHES was indicted for stealing,

on the 31st of December , two 5l. Bank notes, the property of John Bedford , from his person .

JOHN BEDFORD. I am a seaman on board the Lady Kennedy - I received my wages on Monday week last, which was 11l. 19s.; I had two 5l. notes, and the rest in cash - I lodged in the same house with the prisoner, at No. 75, New Gravel-lane , he waited outside while I went to get my money from the owners - I had been in a public house with the prisoner before I was paid, he said he had not one farthing of money, and I treated him; after I was paid I went to the same public-house again, but I cannot say whether he was with me then - I got drunk, and found myself on my bed in the evening, and my two notes were gone; I afterwards found the prisoner in a public-house near my lodgings - I told him of my loss; he said he knew nothing about it, but he pulled out a handful of silver, and said he had been over the water to get it - I gave him in charge.

ELIZABETH HOY . I live with my father in New Gravel-lane - the prosecutor and the prisoner both lodged there; they came home together that night - my mother told the prisoner to put the prosecutor on his bed, because he was drunk, which he did; the prisoner then told me to go out - I told him to come and get his dinner; he said,"You go, and I will come after you" - he then got his dinner, and went out.

WILLIAM DOWELL . I keep the Ship and Whale on Wapping-wall. I have known the prisoner eighteen months; he owed me some money - he came on the 31st of December; he said he had just got his wages, and had come to pay me the 10s. which he owed me; he put down a 5l. note, and told me to take the 10s. out of it, which I did - when I gave it him, he showed me another 5l. note; I told him to leave it with me, which he did, and 2l. 10s. in cash; this was between five and six o'clock in the evening - I had one other 5l. note in the house, and I cannot tell which I received of the prisoner, but two of them are dated the 16th of November, 1832, and are Nos. 31,617, and 31,624 - I know I received one of these from the prisoner, and I believe both of them.

JOSEPH DOWSON . I am one of the owners of the Lady Kennedy; I paid the prosecutor his wages, and amongst them, two 5l. notes - I had received some 5l. notes from Williams, Deacon and Co., Birchin-Lane.

GEORGE POLLARD . I am clerk to Williams and Co., Birchin-lane. I paid Mr. Dowson some 5l. notes on the 31st of December; amongst which were Nos. 31,617 and 31,624.

Prisoner. I hope, as this is my first offence, you will have mercy on me; I did it with the intention of giving it him the next morning.

GUILTY. Aged 22. - Judgment Reapited .

Reference Number: t18330103-163

417. CHARLES FRIEND was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 1 looking-glass, value 15s. , the goods of John Towke .

JAMES JOSLEN (Police-constable G 99.) I stopped the prisoner on the 30th of December, at the corner of Sutton-street, with this glass, a little after five o'clock - he said he was going to Hatfield-street with it, and had brought it from Mr. Watts, near Sadlers' Wells.

JOHN FOWKE . I live in Northampton-place, Clerkenwell . This glass is mine - I had seen it safe on Sunday morning, the 30th of December, in a back chamber on a table; I heard a noise a little before five o'clock - I went into that room, found the window open, and the glass gone; a person in the street could lift up the window, and take it.

Prisoner. I was going down Northampton-street, and saw the glass on the pavement; there were two boys close to it - I asked them whose it was; they said they did not know - I said I would take it to my house, and the next morning to the station.

JAMES JOSLEN. He said he got it from Mr. Watts', who keeps the wine-room at Sadler's-wells, and was going to take it to Hatfield-street, which is a very bad street - this is the seventh window which has been opened in the same street.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18330103-164

418. CHARLES FRIBERG was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 9 lbs. of bacon, the goods of William Davis ; and that he had before been convicted of felony .

There being no value affixed to the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18330103-165

419. ROBERT FISHER and SUSAN WALLIS were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 1 purse, value 1d., and 5s., the property of Thomas Broadmead , from his person; and that Robert Fisher had before been convicted of felony .

THOMAS BROADMEAD. I live in Freeman-street, Spitalfields, and work in a leather factory . On the night of the 28th December I went in company with Joel Sanders to his brother's house in the Borough; we had some beer there, and then Sanders and I set off to go home; I had my purse in my trousers pocket; I took it out and put it into my waistcoat pocket; there was 5s. in it; we came on to Bishopsgate-street, and in Widegate-alley we met with two women, who asked me to give them some gin - we went to the Grapes opposite Artillery-passage , but I would not go into the house; Fisher came up and said if we would be a quartern, he would be a quartern more, and make up half a pint - we afterwards went on to the Paul's Head, opposite the Tenter-ground; we stopped there talking; Sanders was on the other side of the way, going home; the prisoner and the two women had all left me, and then I missed my purse - I ran after Wallis, who was one of the women we had been with; I took her, but as I saw that Fisher had knocked Sanders down, I left Wallis and went to his assistance; Fisher was taken to the watch-house, and the watchman afterwards brought in my purse; I had not felt my purse safe for an hour before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you sober? A. I was very tipsy; I had been with the other men before, but not women; I did not feel any one take it - Sanders was also tipsy.

JOEL SANDERS . I was with Broadmead. I saw a purse in his possession before we started from my brother's; I was not drunk; when we got to the Paul's Head I saw Fisher behind the prosecutor; he put his hand between the prosecutor and Wallis - I told him to mind his money, or he would be robbed; Fisher then turned round and ran off; he hit me over the left eye, and

knocked me down - I got up, and saw him going round the corner of Crispin-street; when I got up to him the Policeman had stopped him; I saw the purse brought to the station.

SYLYANUS GILL (Police-constable H. 55). I was in Green-street on the 29th of December; I heard a scream in Crispin-street, and ran to the spot; I found Wallis, and asked her what she was screaming for; she said a man was murdering two females down the street; I ran towards the Paul's Head - I found Fisher, the prosecutor, Sanders and a watchman - Fisher gave charge of the prosecutor for striking him, and the prosecutor charged Fisher with robbing him of his purse and 5s.

THOMAS ROE GRICE . I am a headborough, and was on duty in Fort-street - I went into Union-street, and saw Wallis walking very quietly; in consequence of information I pursued her, and took her near Spital-square, and found the prosecutor at the station.

MARGARET ANN BEST . I am the wife of a Policeman; I live at the station - I was called to search Wallis; I took off all but her stays - she told me not to take them off, as she had no money about her; I said if she would not let me take them off I would call one of the men - she then took them off, and 4s. in silver fell from them - I found 1s. 2 1/2d. in a pocket in her stays; she said she would give me 2s. if I would not say any thing about it.

Cross-examined. Q. Ladies often have pockets in their stays? A. Yes.

THOMAS RESTALL . I picked up this purse in White's-row, opposite an a arch-way leading to the Tenter-ground; it contains a small piece of paper, which I have here.

THOMAS BROADMEAD . I cannot swear to this purse - mine was a lighter colour than this.

JOEL SANDERS. It is exactly like the purse he had - I believe it is it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know James Green? A. No, we had not been in any public-house that night - we had three or four pots of beer at my brother's, but no spirits - I did not want to go into a public-house; I did not offer to stand a quartern, nor did Broadmead - I have heard him swear I was tipsy, but he was wrong; I had been in the George and Dragon that night, but that was before we went over the water.

THOMAS BROADMEAD . We had two or three glasses of gin each, in a public-house coming home.

JOEL SANDERS . I had not, I can take my oath.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-166

420. JAMES DEVINE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 2 sovereigns, 4 half-crowns, 9 shillings and 2 pence, the monies of Francis Gannon , his master .

FRANCIS GANNON , I am a general-dealer , and live in Grosvenor-place, Chelsea ; the prisoner was in my service. On the 14th of July, 1831, I gave him 2l. 19s. 2d., to pay at Machin and Debenham, in King-street, Covent-garden, on account of some silver hunting-watches, which I had purchased - the prisoner left me; I saw no more of him till he was taken into custody - the money I gave him was two sovereigns, four half-crowns, nine shillings, and two penny pieces; I put it down at the time.

ISAIAH HILL RALPH . I am foreman to Machin and Debenham. The prosecutor purchased two watches on the 1st of July, 1831 - I delivered them to him the latter end of the month; the prisoner did not come for them.

JOHN WALTER GANNON (Police-constable B 136). I am the prosecutor's son. I took the prisoner between eleven and twelve o'clock one Saturday night, in December last.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked for the prosecutor, and on the 8th of July, he came to me in a public-house - he said there was an execution out against him for a milk score of 8s., and as he had purchased two watches at the sale, he wanted as much as he could to get them out, but I never received this money at all - I have been in the country since February.

FRANCIS GANNON. What I have stated is true - he had the money.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-167

421. ROBERT GARDNER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 2 live tame fowls, price 8s. , the property of John Bacon .

JAMES POSFORD (Police-constable S 50). On the night of the 30th of December I was coming down Grenville-street, Somer's-town - I heard the noise of some poultry in Grenville-mews ; I went down, and found the prisoner with two live tame fowls, one under each arm, coming out of Mr. Bacon's yard - I asked what he did there; he said he had come there to sleep; I took him to the station, and found 2s. 5d. on him - I went back, and found the two fowls.

ALGERNON SMITH (Police-serjeant S 22). The prisoner was brought to the station, and at half-past eight o'clock the next morning I heard him making a noise in the cell - I went and opened the door - he seized me by the collar, got me down, and nearly killed me; the reserve man came to my assistance - the prisoner then got these two lanterns off the shelf, threw them at us, and broke them all to pieces; we struggled with him, I suppose twenty minutes, and were then obliged to throw open the doors, and call for assistance - and several people came to our aid; he was very violent indeed before we handcuffed him.

Prisoner. My gold ear-rings were taken from my ears, and they took 2l. in money from me. Witness. His ear-rings were given back to him - he had a wound in his leg when he came in; he had only 2s. 6d. on him.

JOHN BACON. I am a cow-keeper and live in Grenville-mews. These two fowls are mine - they were in the hen-house that night.

JAMES POSFORD. I have made great inquires, and cannot find where the prisoner comes from - he was quiet while he was searched, but soon after, he struck at the inspector and hit the board.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-168

422. ROBERT HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 4 live tame fowls, price 4s. , the property of Sir Wathen Watler , Bart .

JOHN GRUNDY . I am bailiff to Sir Wathen Waller, Bart. I lost these fowls from his house at Twickenham ; I saw them safe on the 19th of December, and have not seen them since - they roosted in the cow-house; and in that cow-house, a cap was found, under

the cow's feet; I saw the prisoner in custody on the 24th - he said he had taken the fowls, and that the cap was his; he was taken at his father's house at Twickenham.

EDWARD HARRIS . I am cow-man to Sir Wathen Waller. I found the cap - the fowls have not been found.

THOMAS JACKSON . I am constable of Twickenham. I apprehended the prisoner, and showed him the cap; he said, it was his and that he stole the fowls and Johnson who was with him, had them - the prisoner's father works for the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18330103-169

423. ANN PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 umbrella, value 15s.; 1 waistcoat, value 12s., and 1 tea-spoon, value 3s. , the goods of Samuel Reeve Waters .

SAMUEL REEVE WATERS. I am a tailor , and live in Coventry-street . The prisoner lived in my house with her sister, who was servant there - I missed these articles.

ARTHUR JAMES JONES . I live with a pawnbroker. I produce a spoon which the prosecutor cannot swear to; he took out two which he could swear to - the prisoner has often brought this one to our shop, and pawned it in the name of Moore.

GEORGE TURNER . I am in the service of a pawnbroker. I took in this umbrella on the 7th of November; I cannot say of whom

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-170

424. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 garden-roller, value 50s., the goods of William Livermore and another .

JOHN DALADY . I am porter to William and Edward Livermore, ironmonger s, in Oxford-street . On the 1st of January I was going down stairs from the shop - my attention was called to an iron-roller, which I had seen safe a few minutes before; it was then about half-past seven o'clock - I went out towards St. Giles's, and overtook the prisoner drawing the roller after him, two or three hundred yards from my masters'; I stopped him, and said I must have it - he said, "Stop a bit, and hear me speak;" I asked what he had to say - he then said a man ordered him to draw it to the top of Tottenham-court-road, and said he would give him 4d.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You never saw the prisoner near your premises? A. No; he refused to give me the roller till the Policeman came up - I did not go to the top of the road to see for the man; the roller had been tied to the railings outside our house.

EDWARD CAMPION (Police-constable E 45). I saw the prisoner and the witness holding the roller - the prisoner said a man told him to take it to the top of Tottenham-court-road; I asked him if he knew the man - he said No, but he had a long coat on.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he going in the direction of Tottenham-court-road? A. Yes.

JOHN DALADY. I stopped him by Rathbone-place - he said a man told him to take it from the corner of our shop, which is at the corner of Perry's-place.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any thing to prevent him from putting it down, and running off? A. Yes; I would not let him - the officer came up in about five minutes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18330103-171

425. THOMAS HARRISON SKATE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 table, value 30s. , the goods of Joseph Simmonds .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM AVERY . I have a house, No. 9, Phoenix-street, St. Giles' - Joseph Simmonds and his wife occupied the front parlour of that house. On the 31st of October I gave the prisoner authority to call on them for a week's rent, and if they did not pay, to distrain for it; but I never-authorized him to break any lock, or to injure any poor people;