Old Bailey Proceedings, 29th November 1832.
Reference Number: 18321129
Reference Number: f18321129-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR PETER LAURIE , KNT., MAYOR.

FIRST SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 29th DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1832, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY GEORGE TITTERTON , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1832.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable SIR PETER LAURIE , KNT., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir William Bolland , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bernard Bosanquet , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; John Ansley , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq.; and Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Charles Farebrother , Esq; Henry Winchester , Esq.; Thomas Kelly , Esq.; Samuel Wilson , Esq.; and Sir Chapman Marshall , Knt., Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Edward Puckle

Charles Hodson

Joseph Truce

Richard Emly

George Wood

Henry Weston

Thomas Hopper

William Haines

Wm. Wittington

Richard Palmer

James Samways

John Muckle .

Second

Wm. John Mallett

William Peach

James Waters

William Matthews

John Larky

George Eaton

John Bartholomew

Thomas Redhouse

Thomas Power

George Ridley

Thomas Penny

Charles Innman .

Third

Perceval Clark

George Edwards

William Harrison

William Royhew

William Heard

W. Cole Thompson

William Abel

James Jackson

Charles Hedges

William Walker

Thomas Turner

Josh. Southwood .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

William Moore

John B. Pope

Fre. W. Pinkerton

John Reynolds

John Reed

Joseph Radford

Gilbert McKay

William Moon

Arthur Matthews

Christop Metcalf

William Martin

R. T. N. Morson .

Second

Jacob Richards

Thomas Norman

Henry Owen

Wm. H. Osborne

Joseph Poole

Wm. McHowell

Henry Morgan

Henry Manning

Thomas Richley

Richd. Molyneux

Thomas Pilbie

William Morrell .

Third

Geo. Minifield

John Palmer

William Pearce

William Poole

William Penny

Edward Quin

Edward Rawles

Charles Newbery

John Pepperall

Samuel Poole

Joseph Pickard

Robert Mopsey .

Fourth

John Maddle

James Manning

Wm. Mortimer

Thomas Moorwood

William Marrs

Noah Marshall

William Mackey

James Mitchell

Richard Pitt

John Prest

John Parker

Henry Payne .

Fifth

William Radman

John Relf

Samuel Rudduck

James Purser

Robert Pryor

Joseph Ryder

Thomas Pinnock

Peter Pearse

Thomas Pearose

George Pratt

John Pooley

John Perry .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, NOVEMBER 29, 1832.

LAURIE, MAYOR. - FIRST SESSION.

A star placed against the verdict denotes that the prisoner has been previously in custody.

Reference Number: t18321129-1

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1. GEORGE BLATCH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alexander Duncan , at St. Ann, Blackfriars, on the 20th of October , with intent to steal his goods .

JOHN BARRETT . I belong to the Foreign Post-office, and lodge at Mr. Duncan's, who lives in the house himself; we both enter at one door; I have a key of the street door, as I am often out late. On Friday, the 20th of October, I went out about a quarter to twelve o'clock at night, and came home between one and a quarter-past, having been absent about an hour; when I went out Mr. Duncan and his family were all at home; I had the key of the street door, and am sure the lock sprung when I went out - on returning I opened the door with my key; I had no light - I was bolting the top bolt of the door, and the passage being newly painted, I was obliged to turn my face from the door - I perceived on the newly painted wainscot a shade, and it turned out to be the shade of the prisoner; I said "What the devil do you do here?" then another man ran down the passage, and put his hand over my mouth - I stood with my back to the door; the other afterwards made his escape - I held the prisoner tight, and got him outside the door; I put my leg out to throw the other man down, which I did nearly, and the prisoner got out of my hand - I pursued him closely; he was never out of my sight - the watchman seized him: I am certain he is the same man, for I never lost sight of him for a moment.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How did you leave the door when you went out? A. On the spring lock, and I locked it fast - nobody could open it without a key; I found it shut, on the spring, when I returned, but not locked - several persons live in the house; I am the only one who has a key - the party must have got in by a false-key.

JOHN FARMER . I am a watchman. I heard an alarm given, and saw the prisoner running; two more watchmen turned him back - I knocked him down, and stopped him; Barrett said he was the man - we took him to the watch-house.

JOHN MADDEN . I am a watchman of Blackfriars. I searched the prisoner, and found on him a dark lantern, a screw-driver, a chisel, two keys, and a box of matches - one of the keys will lock and unlock the door.

ALEXANDER DUNCAN. This is my dwelling-house, and in the parish of St. Ann, Blackfriars . Barrett lodges with me; the prisoner was quite a stranger to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you other lodgers? A. Yes - none of them have keys except Barrett, who has to attend the Foreign Post-office.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Water-lane, and a young man asked if I would hold these things - I said Yes.

[Dec. 3rd.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18321129-2

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

2. JOSEPH ALLEN & CHARLES TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Goldsworthy , at St. Dunstan Stebonheath, alias Stepney, on the 15th of October , and stealing 6 spoons, value 8s.; 1 silver-ladle, value 5s., and 6 keys, value 1s., his property .

WILLIAM GOLDSWORTHY. I am a ropemaker , and live at No. 20, Tothill-street, Stepney, in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney - I rent the whole house. I left my house about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 15th of October; I fastened it up myself, my family being all from home - I locked and bolted it, and left nobody at home; I double locked the front door, and put the key into my pocket - I returned about nine o'clock, in consequence of something which was said to me, and found the house in confusion - the front door was open, and the Policeman in possession of the house; I found a picklock key in the closet in the back parlour - it was not there

when I left the house; I had left that closet locked, and found it open - nothing was gone from it; I lost six spoons, a silver punch-ladle, and a bunch of six keys from my bed-room; they have been shown me again by the Policeman, and I know them again - I had desired Mrs. Mills to look after my house.

SUSAN ELIZABETH MILLS . I live next door to the prosecutor. I was requested to attend to his house on Monday, the 15th of October, and about five o'clock in the afternoon, just as my little girl came home from school, a young man dressed in a flannel jacket and a pair of light coloured trousers, was at Mr. Goldsworthy's door - he knocked at the door; I pushed up my kitchen window, and asked him who he wanted - he asked me for the name of Andrews; I said no such person lived there, and he asked me if there were any lodgers - I said no, the family had the house to themselves, and they were not at home; I saw a person next morning at Lambeth-street office, and think he was the same man, but I cannot positively say - he only knocked once at the door, and when I told him there was nobody there, he went away: about half an hour after that there was another knock, and I opened the window again, and saw another man, a tallish man, dressed in dark clothes, and he asked me for the name of Drew - I was very agitated, and left the window without answering him, as I knew my servant was shutting the parlour window, and she answered him- I shut my kitchen window down; I had not a good sight of that person, but he had a dark dress, and was a very dark looking man - the prisoner Taylor appears to me to be the first man whom I saw - he appears to be the very same young man who asked for Andrews, but I cannot positively swear to him.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. This was a little after five o'clock? A. Yes - the child generlly leaves school at five; it was not dusk - I could see pretty well: I was at the kitchen window, which is below; there are bars before the window, which would impede my view of him - I can speak to his dress, but not particularly to his features; I cannot speak to the features of either of them.

REBECCA GLADWELL . I am servant to Mrs. Mills. On Monday, the 15th of October, I saw a man knock at Mr. Goldsworthy's door; that was the second knock - I did not see the first man, except just his back - I heard mistress speak to him; I cannot speak to the first person at all - the second person knocked at the door, and asked for Drew; I said there was no such a person lived there - I was at the parlour window; he stopped there two or three minutes - he said, "I was directed to No. 51, Tothill-street," and asked if there were any lodgers; I said No - he would not go away; he staid there two or three minutes, close to the window - I had to answer him a second time before he went away; I told him no such person lived there, and the family were all gone out - he looked through our parlour window, and then went away; about half-past six o'clock a Policeman came to our door, and as he stood at the door three men came by the window, from Mr. Goldsworthy's - I had not heard any thing between the time I spoke to the man and then: I was in the house, not watching the door; the three men passed our door, one by one, and looked veryhard at the door - I knew the last man again, and gave the Policeman some information, as I recognized Allen as the man I had seen; the Policeman followed - I saw him take Taylor and Allen - Taylor got away, and the third man run away; he secured Allen; Taylor was dressed in a flannel jacket, and drab trousers - Allen is the man who asked for Drew; I knew him directly the Policeman brought him to the door - I just saw Taylor's back, but not his features.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you first see Allen? A. Half-past five o'clock - when he asked for Drew I was in my mistress' parlour, and answered him from the window; he was right in front of me - he came off the step of the door, right facing the window - it was quite light then; I had never seen him before; I swear positively he is the man, and have been as certain of him from first to last; I was twice before the Magistrate - I said at first that I was positive Allen was the man - he looked right into the parlour window; I could not be mistaken.

JAMES MULLINS . I am a Policeman. I went to Mr. Goldsworthy's on the 15th of October, between six and seven o'clock; I found the house in a very confused state; all the things tossed about; the back door was open, and the front door on the spring lock, and the top of the door bolted - as I came towards the house I saw Allen, Taylor, and another man come up by Mr. Goldsworthy's door - I stood at No. 51, which is Mrs. Mills', and as they passed I looked very sharp at them - it was between six and seven o'clock; Mrs. Mills and the servant were at the door at the time, and when they had passed fifteen or twenty yards the servant gave me information - I ran after them; as soon as I got close to them I heard something fall, it jingled - Taylor ran away; I laid hold of Allen, and the other; I called for assistance, but got none, and the other one forced himself from me; I kept Allen - he has not been secured - Allen threatened that if I did not let him go he would strike me; I took Allen down to Mrs. Mills' door, and asked the servant if that was the man who had knocked at the door, and in his presence she said, "Yes, that is one of the men;" whether Allen made any answer I cannot say; as I took him to the watch-house I met Smith, the Policeman, and he assisted me - we locked him up; Smith got a lantern, and we went to the place where I heard the things fall, and found six spoons and a punch-ladle, two small bits of candle, and the top of a phosphorous-box, on the ground - we afterwards went through Mills' house to the back of the prosecutor's house, and found the back door open, went in, and saw the things in the house very much tossed about; I did not go into the house very much tossed about; I did not go into the house till after I took him - Smith went for Mr. Goldsworthy; Goldsworthy found the skeleton-key in the closet - I found in Allen's pocket a latch-key; he would not let me search any more at that time - I searched him again at the watch-house, and found a large penknife, and a small bit of whalebone; I found a small bit of whalebone on the step of Mr. Goldsworthy's door, about the size of a brass pin, but it did not correspond with the other; on the following morning, when I came to take Allen to the office, I saw Taylor outside the door - I knew him again, and the inspector sent for Mrs. Mills; we did not take Taylor then; he followed us to Lambeth-street office, and was then taken - he was dressed in a flannel jacket, and had the

coat he has on now outside it - I knew him to be one of the three who passed the door.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. At what time did you see the three? A. Between six and seven o'clock- Taylor had a hat and a flannel jacket on then, but in the morning his coat was over it - he could see me as well as I saw him; I was dressed as a Policeman; I had a great coat on at night, but not in the morning - the Magistrate offered to admit Taylor to bail.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Did the house appear to have been entered by the back door? A. I cannot say, but it was open - I was the first person who went in; there is a skittle-ground at the back of the garden, and they could get from there into Palmer-street - the prosecutor's house is not in a populous place; I saw nobody else pass while I was there; when I saw the three men they were walking one after the other, close to each other, within two or three feet of each other; I seized Allen at once, and told him he was my prisoner - I did not tell him the charge till afterwards, and then he resisted.

COURT. Q. Did you tell him what you took him for before he resisted? A. Yes. both before and after.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a Policeman. I went to where the scuffle took place, and found two bits of candle and a phosphorous-box - we went round by some alms-houses, and over a wall found the six spoons and punch-ladle, just opposite where the scuffle was - I went to Goldsworthy's house, and found the front door was fast; I afterwards went in at the back, and found the house as Mullins has stated - I went next morning to the same spot, and found a bunch of keys by the alms-houses; there were footmarks at the prosecutor's back door, apparently of two or three persons - they were made apparently in getting away from the house; Taylor came to me next morning at the watch-house, and asked leave to see a prisoner, whose name I do not recollect; I did not let him see him - there were eight or nine prisoners taken before the Magistrate that morning for different offences - Taylor followed them; I saw him speaking to Mrs. Mills' servant as he went along.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. After the scuffle you found the spoons and things over the wall? A. The spoons were over the wall, which is about sixteen feet high - there is a gas-light a little way off; the footmarks were about two hundred yards from that spot, at the prosecutor's house; the wall the things were found over is in the street - there were no footmarks where the keys and things were found, as it is grass there; the footmarks did not go in that direction.

COURT. Q. At what hour did you find the spoons? A. About a quarter to seven o'clock, directly we had put him in the watch-house.

WILLIAM GOLDSWORTHY. I believe, when I went out, I fastened the back door as well as the front; I might have left it on the latch - I double-locked the front door, and put the key in my pocket: I am confident I shut the back door too; it was not left open; in fact I am almost certain I bolted it - when I saw it afterwards there was no appearance of force about it; this punch-ladle is marked G; I have had it four years, and am certain of it - the spoons are not marked; I lost spoons of this description, and these are my keys; they fit my locks - this skeleton-key was in the back closet door, which was forced; it is not mine.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Are you quite sure you may not have left the back door open? A. I fastened it - it has no lock on it, but I believe I bolted it; there is a latch to it - I am confident the latch was fastened.

JAMES MULLINS. When I went to the prosecutor's house I looked at the back door; there was no mark of violence on it - the skeleton-key would not open the front door.

Allen's Defence. I am a seaman, and have worked about the West India-docks lately: I was at work at the time on board the Eliza, for two days, and returned home - I was coming to the Blue Anchor to spend the evening; I do not get my living by thieving, which my hands will show, for I do hard work.

Taylor's Defence. I was at home at the time the robbery was committed.

JOHN WALKER . I live at No. 1, West-street, Globefields. On the 15th of October, about a quarter-past five o'clock, the prisoner Taylor came home from his work, to where I lodge - he had his tea, washed himself, and sat by the fire till a quarter to seven; I then went with him to Mr. Swallow's, the Angel, in Globe-fields, and remained there with him till nearly half-past eleven o'clock - he was never out of my company all that time.

COURT. Q. What are you? A. A weaver - Taylor has lodged at the house nearly two years; he is a drover; Mrs. Duff keeps the house - Taylor lodges in the back room; I have lodged there ten months; a person named Edwards lodges there - he is not here; he was not at home at the time; Taylor was working at Smithfield at the time - I did not ask where he had come from, but he always came from Smithfield to tea; nothing was said about where he had been - Mrs. Duff, her daughter, and sister, and this young man were at tea; we all took tea at one time - every one had a different cup to drink out of; we had the same tea-pot - we generally drink tea together; I, and the prisoner, and his young woman, who is Duff's daughter, all came home from Swallow's together, about half-past eleven o'clock at night; I work at Duff's, and was at home weaving before tea; I was at home when the prisoner came in, and after he went to Swallow's; the prisoner came in alone from his work; I and my sister were at home when he came, and Mrs. Duff and her daughter - nobody went out till we went out together; we had bread and butter at tea.

JURY. Q. Did you ever see the prisoners in company with each other? A. Never in my life.

CATHERINE DUFF . I live in West-street, Globe-fields; Taylor lodges at my mother's house. He came home on the 15th of October, at a quarter-past five o'clock, stopped at home till after seven, and then went to Swallow's; I went with him, remained with him till eleven at night, and then came home with him to his lodgings.

COURT. Q. How long have you known him? A. He has lodged at my mother's two years and a half; John Walker also lodges there, nobody else; they are they only two lodgers we had; my mother was at home when Taylor came in, at a quarter past five o'clock, and that was all -Walker came home about six, and then I went with him to Swallow's.

Q. Where did Walker come from? A. From his mother's; Taylor had come from Smithfield - we had done

tea before Walker came in; Taylor said at tea-time that he had just come from his work at Smithfield; nobody but my mother, my sister-in-law, and I were present at tea - my sister-in-law's name is Duff; there was no other lodger in the house - that was all the lodgers my mother had then - James Brooks lodges there now, and nobody else; she once had a lodger named Edwards, but he had been away five months.

Five witnesses deposed to Taylor's good character.

TAYLOR - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

ALLEN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.[Nov. 29th.]

Reference Number: t18321129-3

3. JOSEPH KINSLEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Lambe , on the 26th of October , at St. Martin in the Fields, and stealing 12 gold rings, value 40l., and 1 gold key, value 10s., his property .

JOHN WELLS LAMBE . I am the son of John Lambe, who lives at No. 29, Cockspur-street, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields , and is a jeweller and dressing-case maker . On the 26th of October, soon after five o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour communicating with the shop - I had only been out of the shop three or four minutes, and am certain the shop door was shut and latched; I came out of the parlour, and saw a man's hat behind the counter - it moved, and I immediately ran to the door, feeling certain there must be a man there; the man immediately bolted out - it was the prisoner: I ran after him, calling Stop him! and he was stopped by a corporal in the Guards, about a hundred yards from the shop; I am certain of him, for I never lost sight of him - directly I caught hold of him I saw him put his hand into his pocket, and called to the corporal not to let him throw any thing away; he then showed me a piece of paper in his hand - I went back, and missed twenty-two gold rings from a glass-case, which was locked up; twelve of them were found in his pocket - the property taken was worth much more than 40l.; the others have not been found: I found three on the ground - I still miss seven, and two gold watch-keys; they had all been locked up - fourteen spring keys, or something of the sort, were found on him - he must have got in at the door; the case was locked, but the keys were in it.

THOMAS GELLATLEY . I am a corporal in the third regiment of Guards. I saw the prisoner running, and heard Lambe cry Stop him! I stopped him, and while I held him he put his hand into his pocket, and threw something away - I prevented his throwing more away; he was searched, and this property found on him.

THOMAS MARSDEN KNIGHT . I am a Policeman. I found the prisoner in Gellatley's custody, having heard a cry of Stop him! I ran up - I searched, and found the property in his pocket; he calls this bunch of keys linchpins, but I believe they are intended to open Bramah's patent locks.

Prisoner's Defence. The keys are linchpins, which any gentleman can tell.

[Nov. 30th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18321129-4

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

4. GEORGE WILLDEN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Lawrence , on the 20th of November , at Ickenham, and stealing therin 1 watch, value 2l., his property .

JOHN LAWRENCE. I am a labourer , and live at Ickenham, near Uxbridge - I keep the house; it is a cottage - I rent it. On Tuesday, the 20th of November, I left the house at two o'clock in the afternoon - I locked the door, and the windows were closed; I left nobody in the house - I left my watch hanging on a shelf - it is a large silver case watch, with a blue ribbon, and two keys to it; I came back at three o'clock, and before I got to my door I saw the window had been moved, and ajar; one side of it was pushed in; it was a sliding sash - I am sure it was fast when I went out: I unlocked the door, went in, and my watch was gone - I saw fresh footmarks from the window towards the shelf, and marks of one foot on a chair by the window; I looked outside, and there were marks on the window where they had jumped up; there was the print of a nail in the heel of one shoe, and part of a tip of the other; there were only two marks - there were no nails in the front of the shoe; the marks were quite fresh - I saw the prisoner about twenty minutes after two o'clock, fifty or sixty yards from my house; he lives at the end of the buildings, near me - directly I missed my watch I went to look after him, and about seven o'clock next morning I found him laying in a barn on the top of some beans; I took him to the window, and measured his shoe with the footmarks on the ground - I did not take his shoe off; the marks were just the length of the shoe - there were nails on one side of the heel of one shoe, and on part of the tip of the other - one of his shoes had a whole tip on the heel, and there were marks of that whole tip, and the other had half a tip, and there was a mark of that; I saw my watch again last Thursday afternoon.

JURY. Q. What induced you to go after him? A. I suspected him; I told him I would not hurt him if he told me where the watch was.

JOHN SOUTHAM . I am fourteen years old, and live at Vine-street, Uxbridge. I was at play with Lipscomb, on Tuesday, the 20th of November, by the church-yard, and saw the prisoner there; I never saw him before - I said to Lipscomb, "I wonder what it is o'clock," and the prisoner pulled out a watch, and said it was five minutes past four o'clock; the clock struck four at the time - he opened the watch-glass, and put it to his ear; the watch had a kind of a blue ribbon, which had something on it - I am not sure whether it was seals or keys.

WILLIAM LIPSCOMB . I am thirteen years old, and live at Vine-street. I was at play with Southam; he asked what o'clock it was - I saw the prisoner there; I did not know him before - he came to my father's about a black bitch, and staid there some time; when Southam asked the time the prisoner pulled a watch out of his pocket - the clock was just striking four, and he said it was five minutes after four by his watch; he opened the glass of the watch, and put it up to his ear - it was a large silver watch; I cannot say whether it had a string or what to it.

WILLIAM BALL . I am a constable. I took the pri

soner into custody, and put him in the cage - I searched him, but found nothing; I took him from the cage to the Magistrate's at Uxbridge, and he kept stamping with one foot as he went along - he did it a great many times; he was delivered to me by Lawrence on the 21st, who said, in his hearing, that he had his house robbed of his watch - he said nothing about his shoes then; the house is in the parish of Ickenham.

WILLIAM INGRAM . I am a constable. I found the watch at Uxbridge-common, in a ditch; the prisoner denied the charge until his commitment was made out, but afterwards told me where he had hid it, and I found it at the place he described - I never heard any promise made to him.

JOHN LAWRENCE . This is the watch I lost.

[Nov. 30th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18321129-5

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

5. JAMES CARTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Dobree , on 13th of November , at St. Marylebone, and stealing therein, 1 brooch, value 18l., his property .

JOHN HENRY BRADLEY . I am in the employ of Mr. William Dobree, a silversmith and pawnbroker , of Oxford-street, in the parish of St. Marylebone ; I sleep there as his servant - he does not sleep there; he rents the house. On the 13th of November, at five minutes before two o'clock in the day, I was standing in the shop with the other young man, and saw the prisoner, who had been walking before the window for several minutes or a quarter of an hour; and seizing an opportunity, when few persons were passing, I saw him strike a large pane of plate-glass with his elbows; it was very thick, but he broke it into several pieces, then put his hand into the window, and took this brooch, the case being open, he caught it, the lid shut, and he lost his hold in shutting it - he picked it up again, and walked away with it; I immediately followed, and collared him twenty yards from the house, with the brooch in his pocket - I said, "You rascal, what have you got there? give it to me;" he immediately took the brooch out of his pocket, and I took it from him, and sent for an officer who took him - nothing more was found on him; this is the brooch; it is master's property, and worth 18l.

[Dec. 1st.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18321129-6

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

6. JOHN McCARTHY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of Daniel Horragan , on the 19th of November , at St. Luke, and stealing therein, 2 jackets, value 11s.; 2 waistcoats, value 10s.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 9s.; 1 bed-tick, value 19s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 9s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 1 coat, value 9s.; 1 blanket, value 18d.; 1 box, value 7s., and 3 sovereigns, his property .

MARY HORRAGAN . I am the daughter of Daniel Horragan, who is a labourer , and rents a house, No. 2, Three-Pigeon-court, Golden-lane, in the parish of St. Luke . On Monday, the 19th of November, I went out about three o'clock in the afternoon, and left nobody at home; it is a small house - I shut and bolted the shutters; they are outer shutters: the window was down, and the street door locked - I came back between seven and eight o'clock, found the street door wide open, the kitchen window shutters open, and the window broken; the kitchen is on the ground floor; I left the window fastened - I found the shutters broken, and forced open; there was a piece of iron on the cill of the window, which was not there when I went out - on going up stairs, I found my father's box, which contained all the articles stated in the indictment, and three sovereigns, gone; it was quite safe when I went out: it is a seaman's chest, and a dark green colour - I know the prisoner; he had been at our house with a woman on the Sunday: he wanted something to drink - the public-house was not open, it being church time: my father stood at the door, and he came into our house and sat down nearly two hours, till church was over - I knew him by sight, but never associated with him; they went away together - I had seen the piece of iron in the prisoner's possession about half-past nine o'clock on the Monday morning before the robbery; he was in the court where we live - the woman he lived with had words with him, and he lifted up this iron, and was going to strike her; she had come to see a person opposite our house: I saw but one woman with him then - it was the same iron.

Prisoner. Q. How many times have you drank in my company? A. Never in my life; when I found the house broken open, I went and acquainted my father.

DANIEL HORRAGAN. I am a labourer. My daughter came and told me what had happened; I suspected the prisoner, and gave information to the Police, and he was taken soon after - the trunk was brought to the station-house, about three quarters of an hour after we missed it; it had then been rifled of every thing almost, except three sovereigns, which were in a till in it, in a black pocket-book, which might not be seen in the dark - on the Sunday, the prisoner had been fighting in Golden-lane, with another man; after the fight was over, he met his father-in-law, whom I knew, and they came to my house, but I never drank with him before.

JAMES SEAL . I keep the Three Pigeons and Star inn, Attfield-street, Goswell-street. About half-past six or a quarter to seven o'clock on the Monday evening in question, I saw the prisoner at my house, in company with the woman he lives with, and her father and child - they drank nothing at my house; they stopped there about half an hour, and said they had been drinking down at the Goat; they went away nearly together - I went and placed myself in a small parlour to watch them, and saw them leave the tap-room, and go out at the back door, which leads into Pigeon-court; after the prosecutor's daughter gave an alarm, I went and found the piece of iron laying on the cill; the prisoner might have had it in my house, and I not see it - the shutter appeared to have been broken open with that iron; I have not a doubt of it - I gave it to the Policeman.

JOHN BUCKLEY . I am a printer, and live on Great Saffron-hill. On the Monday night I was going to fetch my child home from Macclesfield-street; I came down Brick-lane, and in Golden-lane saw a person carying a box, which I believe to be the one produced - he was not above twenty yards from Pigeon-court; I had heard a noise in Pigeon-court, like the scraping of something against the

wall, and I made way for the person with the box - he was dressed in a white flannel jacket, and a leather apron; he came out of Benbow-rents - he had something which seemed like a sort of great coat on his shoulder under the box; forming a kind of pad - the prisoner is the man who was carrying the box; I have seen him off and on for the last eight or nine months, and speak positively to him.

Prisoner. This man was not broght forward till the second examination. Witness. I did not know any thing was wrong at the time - I put my child out to nurse, being a widower, and fetch it home every evening; I know nothing of the prosecutor's family.

ANN O'BRIEN . I am the wife of Michael O'Brien - we live in Redform-place, Little Whitecross-street; it is a court which is no thoroughfare, and is a dark place. I found this box next door to my house, and gave it to the Policeman - it was in a dark place in the court; I found a little black-pocket book, containing three sovereigns, in a little till in the box - Reform-place is a great deal more than twenty yards from the prosecutor's house.

TIMOTHY MAHONEY . I am a seaman. I was at Seal's public-house on the Monday evening, about seven o'clock; the prisoner, his father-in-law, his woman, and child were there - I saw them go out at the back door; the prisoner, and his father-in-law said they wanted to see Horragan, to borrow some money of him, as they had none; the back door of Seal's house is about ten yards from Pigeon-court.

Prisoner. Q. Did I mention Horragan's name, or was it not my father-in-law who said, when Mr. Carter would not stand treat, that if Horragan was there he would treat him, and lend him money into the bargain? A. I have stated what passed.

PAUL PLANT . I am a constable. I was on duty in Whitecross-street about half-past eight o'clock; O'Brien came and said she had found a box; I went with her, and saw it in her house - it had been forced open; I took it to the station; she said she had found three sovereigns in it -I met the prosecutor at the public-house door, went with him to his house, and Seal gave me this piece of iron.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a Policeman. About eight o'clock on Monday night I received information of this robbery -I went down the lane with another Policeman, and the prisoner called out, but it being very dark I could not discern who it was - I went forward, and he begged pardon of the man who was with me, and said he thought it was somebody else - I saw he had a flannel jacket on; I went into a public-house with him, and said to my brother officer,"Why, he answers the description given by Harragan," as he had a white jacket and curly hair;" when he came out, I said, "Do you know a man with a white cap on? he said he did not - I said I suspected him of robbery; he said he would go to him with me - I took him to Horragan, who was at the public-house in Whitecross-street - I found 18s. 2d. on him.

Prisoner. He had no suspicion of me till I mentioned my name - he asked me to go with him to the Cherry Tree, which I did, and went quietly to the station; Buckley was afterwards brought to the station by Horragan.

JURY to JOHN BUCKLEY. Q. Was he going in a direct line from Reform-court to Pigeon-court? A. He was crossing the road nearly opposite Benbow-rents.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Monday I was drinking in company with this man; he came in with Mr. and Mrs. Carter - Carter went to borrow some money, but could get none; he went away - my father-in-law said we would go to the Three Pigeons to see if Carter was there; we went, and there was a row - it is through that this happened; I went to the public-house; Horrangan came in with gin in a jug - Mary Horrangan wanted me to drink with her - I refused, and on the Monday she wanted me to drink; my father-in-law said if Horrangan was there he would stand treat; I persuaded my father to come home, as I was more sober than him - the back door was our nearest way out, and is as public as the front; I always went in and out that way - I declare before God and man I know nothing of Buckley - he is brought forward by Catherine Carter to swear my life away; he lives on Saffron-hill, and how could he become acquainted with the robbery? he has perjured himself; the Magistrate was very much dissatisfied with his evidence; a woman can prove I had no iron in my hand - there was a regular Irish fight the night before in the court, and the iron might have been used in that affray; I was taken in less than half an hour, and I was drinking in the public-house twenty minutes before, and in conversation with a Policeman a quarter of an hour before - the Policeman knows I was drunk, and could not carry the box.

JAMES SEAL re-examined. I did not notice that the prisoner was tipsy - he had nothing to drink at my house.

JOHN MARTIN re-examined. Horragan was perfectly sober; he had just left his work, and had been into the public-house in search of the prisoner; the prisoner appeared to have been drinking, but was as sober as I was.

[Dec. 3rd.] GUILTY * - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18321129-7

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29TH.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bolland.

7. EDWARD DRAYTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Latchford , on the 28th of October , and stealing therein 1 carpet, value 10s.; 1 hammer, value 6d., and 1 copper, value 5s., his property; and that he had previously been convicted of felony .

EDWARD LATCHFORD. I am a bridle-bit maker , and live in St. Martin's-lane - I have a house at Enfield-wash . I went into Staffordshire for a fortnight, and left nobody in the house; I locked the doors, and left a person named Amey in charge of the house, who lived next door; I took the keys with me - the house was to be let, and if inquiry was made he was to let me know; he had a key of the garden and the back door; he could then go into any part of the house - when I returned, on the 26th or 27th of October, I unlocked the outer gate, then unlocked the door, and went into the kitchen - I found the back door locked; I found the copper had been taken out of the kitchen, and on going further into the house I missed a carpet, a hammer, a bell, and several other things - I then went into the garden, and found the copper in one of the trees in the garden - it held eight or nine gallons; it had been put into the tree, I suppose, to be taken away afterwards - the kitchen window was broken, so that the sash

could be pushed up; it was fastened with a sliding-catch when I left it - it was broken by the hasp; I found no other part of the house broken.

JOHN WILSON . I am an officer. I examined the house, I found the window broken over the hasp, and by pushing that away the sash must have been opened - the latch had been pulled away; the window was down; the copper had been unfixed and taken away - they had got over the back premises into the garden, as I could trace the marks where they had been - they had come from Mr. Palmer's premises; he is a farmer; the prisoner is a labourer, and had worked for Mr. Palmer three or four months regularly - I discovered a carpet in the possession of John Sleight, at his house, which is about a mile from the prosecutor's - Joseph Hobbs brought a hammer to me.

JOHN GUIVER . I apprehended the prisoner in a lane leading to Cartwright's-lane - I found the carpet in Sleight's house; on the 29th of October a man named Hobbs brought me this hammer, and on the same day I received a ticket from Sleight with "Lot 60" written on it.

MR. LATCHFORD. I believe this carpet and the hammer to be what were in my house; when my tenant left it in July he had a sale, and the carpet was one of the lots - this ticket was on the carpet when I saw it last - I swear to the carpet and hammer.

JOHN SLEIGHT . I am a labourer, and live not quite a mile from the prosecutor's house - I know very little of the prisoner. I bought the carpet of him on a Sunday morning; I do not know the day of the month; I gave it to Guiver the next day - it must have been about the 28th- I gave him 2s. 6d. for it; he told me he had found it; that he fell over it in the road when it was dark - I saw no ticket on it, but my wife found the ticket in the house; the prisoner was working at Mr. Palmer's; I had only known him about three weeks.

JOSHUA HOBBS . I live at Enfield-wash - I knew the prisoner while he worked at Mr. Palmer's with me for three or four months; he worked in the fields. On Sunday morning, the 28th, he slept up in the hay-loft; I saw him against the stable door on Mr. Palmer's premises with the hammer - I asked him where he got it from, he said,"What is that to you?" I asked him what I should give him for it, as I wanted one, he said he did not know - I told him I could buy a new one for about sixpence at Enfield, and I would give him a pot of beer for it, he said he did not want beer - I told him I would give him fourpence for it, which I did; I gave the same hammer to Guiver - he asked me if I wanted to buy a carpet; it was about eight o'clock in the morning - he did not show it to me; I said I did not want any thing of the kind; he asked if I wanted a copper - I said No; he did not show it to me, but said it was pretty handy; I saw him with a bell in the stable - it was a bell made to stick into a wall with a kind of bow to it; I saw that when he was in Mr. Palmer's stable - it was at the same time.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the carpet in the high road; Sleight met me, and asked what I had there, I said"A carpet;" he said, "Will you sell it?" I said Yes; and asked 4s. 6d. - he offered 2s. 6d., which I took; Hobbs saw me with the hammer, and asked how I came by it - I told him I found them all tied up together.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - (read).

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-8

Before Mr. Baron Bolland.

8. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charlotte Lee Russell on the 19th of November , putting her in fear and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 bag, value 1d.; 2 shillings, 1 sixpence, 2 pence; 1 piece of silver, value 6d.; 2 knives, value 3s.: 1 pair of scissors, value 1s.: 2 pieces of trimming-work, value 2s.; 1 purse, value 6d., and 1 umbrella, value 2s., her property .

CHARLOTTE LEE RUSSELL. I live in Shore-place, Hackney, and am single . On the 19th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was returning from Blackfriars-road, and as I passed London-place, I saw a man standing at the corner; he was a tall young man, with light hair, about the prisoner's height, and as near as I can recollect it was him, but I cannot swear to his countenance; as I crossed the Triangle he said to me, "You are walking very sedately;" I walked on quick, and when I got into Tryon's-place , which is not above one hundred yards, he came up to me - to the best of my knowledge it was the same young man; he came before me, and said, "Have you any money? give me your money;" he was dressed in a frock coat and corderoy trousers - he saw I had a bag in my hand, and caught hold of it, saying, "Give it up, madam;" he put his hand into my face, with his fist, doubled in a threatening manner - the string of my bag was entwind round my arm; there was a lamp very near me - he laid hold of my bag and umbrella very violently, and said,"Give it up, Madam;" I was then untwisting it from my arm, and in the act of giving it him, being very much alarmed - he had hold of the bag, and I threw the string off my arm, and he took the umbrella also; he was pulling the bag from me before I threw the string from my arm - he then went away; I was going on straight home, but recollecting there were coins in the bag, I returned and called out Police! it contained four coins, one a Queen Anne shilling, and a Bilston piece, and old shilling and an old sixpence, and the other articles stated in the indictment - there were two men by the side of him during the whole time; my veil was down - I did not discern his face; Lambert, a Policeman, overtook me a very little distance on - he had the prisoner in custody; I said I could not swear to him - in my fright I asked Lambert what right he had to enquire whether I had lost my bag, for I did not want to have any thing more to do with it: I asked if he had found my bag - he said No; he was not in a Policeman's dress, and I did not know him.

Q. What became of the umbrella? A. He threw it away when he began to run, which was as soon as I called Police! he went round Tryon's place into the Triangle -I took up the umbrella; I saw my bag next morning in possession of a Policeman.

HENRY LAMBERT (Police-constable N 186). I was on duty near the Triangle, and saw the prisoner running across Mare-street, from Tryon's-place to the Triangle; he had nothing that I saw, and as he passed me he cried out, "What a bl-y lark" - I had not spoken to him; I was n plain clothes: I heard a faint cry of Police! I

pursued, calling Stop thief! and took him about one hundred yards further on - on my coming up to him, he put himself in a posture of defence, and said, "What do you want with me?" and said he had not done any thing; I took him back to Tryon's-place, where a crowd said a lady had been robbed; I saw the prosecutrix in the crowd, and asked if he was the man; she said she was so frightened she could not swear to him - I searched him, but found nothing; I took him to the watch-house, and asked what brought him to Hackney, and where he lived - he at first said in Green Arbour-court, Aldersgate-street, and afterwards said it was in Old-street; he said he had come with a boy with butter to the Cat and Mutton, and he had known the boy eight or nine months, by sight; he was searched again at the watch-house, and 4s. 7d. found on him in common coin; when he ran from Tryon's-place I saw nobody with him - at six o'clock next morning I and Jones went to West-street, and in the front garden of a house near the spot where the prisoner was taken, Jones found the bag, against the wall in the direction it would have fallen, if the prisoner had thrown it; he had passed that garden.

- JONES. I found this bag in the garden.

MISS RUSSELL. It is my bag - the articles are still in it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-9

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

9. JOSEPH BIGG was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Peverill , on the 5th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 pocket-knife, value 3d.; 2 shillings, and 3 sixpences, his property .

MESSRS. BARRY and BALL conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD FOUNTAIN . I am a mealman, and live at Denham, in Bucks - I go to Pinner on the fourth Monday in every month, for orders, and generally call at Mrs. Webb's at seven or eight o'clock in the evening; I travel in a gig. On the 5th of November I went there about half-past seven o'clock, and went through the shop into the parlour; I remained there about a quarter of an hour - I did not see the prisoner there; I received some notes and a draft, which I put into my pocket-book, and three sovereigns, which I put into my purse - in going from Pinner to Ruislip; I pass the Black Horse at Eastcote - it is about half a mile from the half-mile gate, and half a mile from Ruislip ; I understand there is a shorter way by a footpath; before I came to the half-mile gate I saw three men walking in the road - it was a little after eight o'clock; they were walking abreast, and on my chaise approaching they all three went to the left of the road - I drove nearly past two of them, and the first of the three seized my horse by the bridle: it was a very moonlight night; I was driving on the right side of the gig, and the prisoner was on the left side, close to the gig - my servant was sitting by my side in the gig, and the instant the man seized the bridle, the two persons from behind the gig made an attack on us with bludgeons - I had a blow on the back of my head, and my man had the same; I said to my man, "Get out and fight;" I got up, and on turning round received a blow on my nose, which stunned me for a moment, and completely closed up my eye - my man got out of the gig immediately, and the first thing I saw afterwards was his collaring a man behind the chaise, after which he struck a blow or two; they said, "Deliver, deliver" - I heard nothing else: I caught up the reins as soon as I possibly could, and galloped away to Ruislip for assistance, and went back again - (I had a considerable sum of money in my pocket); I met my servant, who gave me information, and next morning I got a warrant, and went on Wednesday with Murray to Mrs. Webb's; I saw the prisoner there, and said, in his presence, the instant I saw him, "That is the man I saw" - he said nothing at that moment, but afterwards said I was mistaken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How soon afterwards did he say so? A. In a very short time; I cannot say that I saw any bludgeons; the attack was from behind - I saw my man attack one of them, and that parto had a bludgeon, and I saw one in the hand of the man why knocked him down - I saw two bludgeons, but that was not the first attack; the prisoner was one of the two who had a bludgeon, and took an active part - he had a hairy cap on, and a drab coloured dress; I cannot tell whether it was a coat or jacket - I do not know what trousers he wore; I left my servant fighting with them, because I was disabled.

Q. Did you ever say to any body, "Well, I will not swear to him till I see whether my man does?" A. Never, nor any thing of the kind; I had a conversation with Mrs. Webb on the morning he was taken, but said nothing of the kind; I saw several bonfires on the road.

ROBERT PEVERILL. I am servant to Mr. Fountain, and was in the chaise with him - we arrived at the half-mile gate about half-past eight o'clock, I think: there were three men in the road before us - I will not swear to them; directly we passed one of them seized the horse by the head, the other two dropped behind, and hit us with bludgeons; I jumped out, ran round the wheel, and made a grasp at the one who held the horse; the others came up instantly, and knocked me down - they were unbuttoning my clothes, to take what I had; they said, "Where is it, deliver it;" I said I had nothing to deliver - they said,"Where are your side pockets?" I said I had none; I am sure they had sticks - one of them said, "D-n him, let us kill him;" I said, "That is never worth your while" - they took my knife from my watch pocket, and 3s. 6d. from my breeches pocket; they got from me, and ran out of the high road into the field which is on the left, going towards Ruislip; I received a blow on my head, which stunned me for a moment - I did not notice how any of them were dressed.

JAMES WOODLEY . I am a carter, and live at Eastcote. On the 5th of November, a little before eight o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner with John Wilchen and William Cooper; I called out to him, "Halloo, Joe, how came you over here?" he said Halloo, and went away - they went at a quick pace towards Ruislip; they were in the road, and about ten minutes afterwards I saw a one horse chaise pass.

WILLIAM BIGGS . I was with Woodley on the road between Pinner and Ruislip, and saw the prisoner a little before eight o'clock, with Wilchen and Cooper.

HANNAH SMITH . My mother keeps the Black Horse.

On the 5th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner there with two others, who I do not know; they came in, and had three segars, which the prisoner paid for; they lighted them, and went away - I afterwards saw two men before the Magistrate, who I suppose to be the others.

CHARLES MURRAY . I am high constable of Uxbridge. On Wednesday, the 7th of November, I apprehended the prisoner in Mrs. Webb's yard; as soon as Mr. Fountain came into the yard he said, "That is the man - I will swear to him."

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove my innocence.

GEORGE BOW . I am a schoolmaster, and live at Pinner. On the 5th of November, about two o'clock in the day, I saw three men in the road near Pinner - they had something under their arms, wrapped in cloth; they had no sticks - neither of them had a bairy cap; I know the prisoner: he was not one of them.

MR. BARRY. Q. Give me their names? A. I never saw them before; I knew the prisoner as a neighbour's servant - I never saw him wear a hairy cap; I live about three hundred yards from Webb's - I do not deal there, and did not see the prisoner that afternoon.

ROBERT WEBB . I am a farmer's man. On the 5th of November, about ten minutes to eight o'clock, I was at the half-mile gate, in the road, near Pinner, and saw three men with each a stick; one of them had a kind of dark cap - I cannot say whether it was hairy - I know the prisoner by sight, and am certain he was not one of them; about twelve minutes after I saw them, I saw Mr. Fountain in his gig, going out of the village very fast.

MR. BARRY. Q. With whom do you work? A. I am on the parish now, and have been so for a fortnight - I had been out of work three weeks before I got relief; the man who had the cap had a dark coat - each had a stick: I knew the prisoner by his serving bread - I did not go before the Magistrate about this; I went to bed about half-past nine o'clock that night - I was lodging at Ruislip; I ran all the way from the half-mile gate, and got home about two minutes to eight o'clock; I ran because I was afraid of those three men - I did not know either of them before; they did not speak to me, but looked very rough - I had 3s. or 4s., which my father had given me; there is a shorter way from Pinner to Eastcote, across the fields; I went that way - my wife was with me.

JOHN COOPER . I am a plasterer, and live at Pinner. On the 5th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was cleaning Mrs. Webb's son's horse, in her stable, and the prisoner was cleaning Mrs. Webb's horse; we agreed to go to Eastcote together, to see a bonfire - we left about half-past seven o'clock; we saw Wilchen on the bridge, and he went with us - the prisoner went into Mrs. Nash's house, and staid about three minutes, then came out, and we went to the Black Horse public-house, and had a segar each; we got back to Pinner about nine o'clock - the prisoner was not out of my sight except for the three miminutes he was in at Nash's; he wore a black hat - neither of us had a stick or bludgeon.

MR. BALL. Q. Is it a plasterer's work to clean horses? A. No, but I had done no work for a long time - I did not live there; I did not see Mr. Fountain that night, nor any chaise at the door - the prisoner works in a kind of skin cap.

- WILCHEN. I am apprenticed to my brother, who is a shoemaker, and have known the prisoner about half a year. On the 5th of November, about half-past seven o'clock, I saw him and Cooper over Pinner-bridge - neither of them had a stick; the prisoner had a black hat on: he went into Mrs. Nash's house for about three minutes - we then went into the Black Horse, and had three segars; we went to the bonfire, returned to Pinner together, and got there at near nine o'clock.

MR. BARRY. Q. Do you know the footway across the fields? A. Yes; it is shorter than the carriage road - we returned that way; we could go from the Black Horse to Pinner in twenty minutes; it was about half-past eight o'clock when we were at the Black Horse - we went from Pinner to Eastcote by the fields; I saw nobody with bludgeons - when we returned the prisoner went into Mrs. Webb's; I waited outside for about an hour and a half, till half-past ten o'clock, and he came out to me after he had his supper - I was examined before the Magistrate, and stated this; the prisoner had on a black hat, white trousers, and a kind of drab coat - he wears a hairy cap in his business; I never saw him wear it in the street.

FRANCIS GREEN . I know the prisoner perfectly well. On the 5th of November, about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening, I saw him with Cooper and Wilchen, letting fire-works off at the young women; he had a light coat and black hat - I had seen him at three o'clock in the afternoon; Deacon was there.

MR. BARRY. Q. Where did you see him at three o'clock? A. At Mrs. Nash's - nobody was with him; he had his bread cart at her door - he was round the bonfire at eight o'clock, with Henry, William, Jane, and Mrs. Nash - Long, Hilliard, Deacon, and others; I did not see him leave - I went in doors about eight o'clock, and cannot say what became of him afterwards.

COURT. Q. Where was he with all these people? A. Round the fire by my house; I keep the William the Fourth beer-shop - it is not half a mile from the Black Horse; I could run from my house to the half-mile stone in about ten minutes - I did not bear of a robbery till Wednesday, when I heard the prisoner was taken.

DANIEL DEACON . I am a labourer, and live at Pinner. I was at Green's bonfire on the 5th of November, and saw the prisoner there about half-past seven o'clock till after eight, with some squibs; he fired off a gun twice - he wore a hat - I saw Henry Nash there.

MR. BALL. Q. He had a gun? A. Yes, my gun - I left at ten o'clock; I did not see him there after about ten minutes past eight.

WILLIAM NASH . I live at Eastcote. I saw the prisoner at the bonfire, letting squibs off; Cooper and Wilchen were there, and some young women; the prisoner had on a black hat.

MR. BARRY. Q. When did you leave? A. At half-past eight o'clock; the prisoner went away at the same time, with Cooper and Wilchen - he had a long drab coat on; I never saw him in a fur cap - I have known him two years; I never called at his mistress' - he had a flannel jacket and apron on when I have seen him.

HENRY NASH . I was at Green's bonfire on the 5th of November, and was with the prisoner there from about a quarter to eight o'clock till a quarter after, letting fire

works off - he wore a hat: Cooper and Wilchen were there.

MR. BALL. Q. Do you go by the Black Horse to go from the William the Fourth to Pinner? A. No.

GEORGE SCOTT . I am in Mrs. Webb's service. The prisoner left about half-past seven o'clock, on the 5th of November, with Cooper - he did not wear his fur cap, for I saw it on the bakehouse board after he was gone; he had a black hat on - he had no stick when he left us; when he returned he did not seem as if he had been in a row.

MR. BARRY. Q. Did he go out again that night? A. No; he and I went to bed about half-past nine o'clock - he slept in the same bed with me all night, in a small room on the top of the stairs; I did not see Wilchen at all, and know nothing of his waiting outside the house; I was employed in the bakehouse, and did not see Mr. Fountain there that day - there is a back way out of the stable; the prisoner went out that way.

THOMAS RUDD. I am a carpenter and live at Eastcote. I was at Green's bonfire, and saw the prisoner in a drab coat and a black hat; I missed him from there about a quarter-past eight o'clock.

MR. BARRY. Q. How long would it take to run from there to the half-mile stone? A. I suppose ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

DAVID DEAN . I am apprentice to a wheelwright at Ruislip. On the night of the 5th of November I saw Mr. Fountain galloping in his gig, calling Murder! he had just told me of this as the village clock struck eight.

MR. BARRY. Q. Was it eight or nine o'clock? A. It struck eight after he told me of it - he had arrived at Ruislip about two minutes before eight; I did not count the clock - I saw that it was eight o'clock by it - I looked at the dial; it was quite moon light.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-10

10. THOMAS JAMES BARNES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of George Millington , from his person . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-11

11. FRANCIS WILTSHIRE and CHARLES WILTSHIRE were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Schmidt , from his person; and that the said Charles Wiltshire had been before convicted of felony .

JOHN SCHMIDT . On Friday, the 26th of October, about half-past twelve o'clock in the day, I was passing through White Rose-court, Coleman-street ; I felt something at my pocket in the narrow part of the court - I put my hand in my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, and on turning round, saw the two prisoners immediately behind me; there were others behind them - Charles was nearest to me, and Francis immediately behind him; I laid hold of them both immediately, and charged them with the robbery: Francis attempted to run away, but having hold of them, I took them to the wide part of the court to search them; but before I moved them, I found my handkerchief between them, on the ground - an officer was fetched, and I gave them in charge.

ABRAHAM HAM . I am an officer. I received the handkerchief from the prosecutor - the prisoners denied the charge.

Francis Wiltshire . I was passing through the court, a young man and boy were behind me; directly they got to the broad part of the court, they immediately ran away.

MR. SCHMIDT. I saw nobody running away - the persons behind him could not have done it - the court was too narrow.

F. WILTSHIRE - GUILTY . Aged 12.

C. WILTSHIRE - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-12

12. JOHN MAGRAW , SAMUEL DRAPER , and JOHN SPENCER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse of William Morrice , on the 2nd of November , and stealing therein, 220 lbs. of coffee, value 11l., 2 bottles, value 4d., and 3 pints of wine, value 10s., his property; and that the said John Magraw, had been before convicted of felony .

WILLIAM MORRICE . I live in Finsbury-circus - my warehouse is in St. Mary-axe, in the parish of St. Mary-Undershaft ; I am a wine-merchant . I had some coffee in my warehouse on the 22nd of November; I am not quite certain whether I was there that day - I was sent for the same evening, and perceived a quantity of coffee taken out of a cask, and put into a bag; I had given no order for that - there were between 2 cwt. and 3 cwt.; I have a wine warehouse at the back, and there I found a bottle with the cork knocked off, and the wine drank - I have seen Draper frequently; I do not know how he was employed - I found Magraw secured in the warehouse, and two bottles of sherry close by him; he had no business there - the sherry had not been drawn: it laid close to the coffee, which was not the proper place; on searching further, we found a dark-lantern and chisel - the entry had been made by picklock keys.

JOHN WILLIAM KNIGHT . I am twelve years old - I live in Three Cradle-street, nearly opposite Morrice's warehouse. I came out about seven o'clock, to get a penny worth of biscuits for my schoolmaster's little boy, and saw Draper at the gate of the warehouse, by the lock - I went back to school with the biscuits, and about eight o'clock I came out of the school, which is over the prosecutor's warehouse; I saw Draper standing at the corner of the court - he went away for about five minutes, and then he came back; I was standing at the corner of the court - he went back, and came over to the gate of the warehouse; I thought he was making water at first, but I heard the padlock struck up against the door several times: the door was secured by two padlocks and bars - I then went, and called Mr. Purser, who has the care of the warehouse, and lives two or three doors from it; I went on to the corner of the court, and heard the locks knock up against the door again, and then Draper went away; I saw him run from Mr. Purser.

EDWARD CROOK . I am a watchman of Aldgate ward. On the 22nd of November, about a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening, I heard a cry of Watch! and Stop thief! I was in St. Mary-axe, at the bottom of Cradle-court - I got into the middle of the road, and saw Draper running down, as fast as he could run; I stopped him, and

took him to the watch-house on suspicion; he said nothing- Purser was pursuing, calling Stop thief! and was not four yards behind him when I stopped him.

JOHN PURSER . I am in the employ of Mr. Morrice. I was at the warehouse at a quarter or twenty minutes after five o'clock, and left it all safe; John Knight came and gave me information - I went to the warehouse directly, and found a padlock missing from the gate; it was fastened - the warehouse could not be entered without undoing the lock; I saw Draper standing at the door - as soon as he went away I followed him; he walked quickly; I caught hold of him by the coat - he struck me, and broke from me, threw the lock and key down the area, and then ran away - I afterwards saw the padlock and key brought up; the padlock belonged to the warehouse, but the key in it was a skeleton one; he ran away as hard as he could - I never lost sight of him; Crook stopped him: I went to the warehouse, and found a bag of coffee which had been filled from a cask, which stood there - there were 220 lbs. or more; it was quite safe when I left - I searched, and found the other two prisoners in the warehouse; they had no business there - they had no means of getting in, but by opening the gate; on going farther up the warehouse I found another bag, with 70lbs. or 80lbs. of coffee; I am sure it had no coffee in it when I left it - I found two bottles of wine alongside the bag, which had not been opened, and there was one bottle with the neck knocked off, and the wine gone.

JAMES COOPER . I am constable of Lime-street. On Thursday evening, the 22nd of November, about half-past eight or a quarter to nine o'clock. I was at my own house, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I live at No. 49, St. Maryaxe; I came out, saw Purser and others running, and in about a minute, as I followed them, Crook and Purser were returning with Draper - I pursued till he was lodged in the watch-house; in going along, in consequence of what I heard, I went to Mr. Lindo's, No. 14, St. Mary-axe, and asked for the lock and key; Mr. Lindo gave me a padlock and two skeleton-keys - I did not see where he got them from; Purser claimed the padlock - I went into the warehouse, and found Spencer; as we entered the premises he cried out, "Here I am master;" he did not say how he came there: we found two bags of coffee and two bottles of wine, and on searching the farther end of the warehouse we found Magraw concealed in some hampers - I have the padlock and keys; we searched further, and found a dark-lantern, and a chisel.

JANE HARRINGTON . I am servant to Mr. Lindo. I found the padlock and keys in the front area - I had heard them thrown down against the shutters in the area; I went out, and found the padlock with one key in it, and another key a short distance from it; I heard the cry of Stop thief! and went to the street-door in a minute or so, and gave them into Mr. Lindo's hands; he gave them to Cooper.

ROBERT REGARLSFORD . I am ward-beadle. Draper was brought to Lime-street, watch-house; Stevenson came in - I went with him to the warehouse, and found the other two prisoners there.

ABRAHAM DRAPER . I am constable of the night; the prisoners were given into my charge; I searched them, and found nothing material about them.

WILLIAM ROBINS . I am foreman of St. Katharine's-dock. I know that Magraw was convicted of stealing coffee - I was present at the trial in April last; I have not a doubt of his being the person; he received a good character, and was confined for two months.

JOHN PURSER . I am quite certain this is the padlock; I did not examine to see if the other padlock had been picked.

ROBERT REGARLSFORD. I opened the padlock by a picklock-key, which I found would open it.

Magraw's Defence. I went in the warehouse in the day time, and went to sleep

Draper's Defence (written). I was coming up St. Mary-axe, and I had occasion to stop at Mr. Morrice's warehouse door, which is a place much frequented; when I came away, a man overtook me, and accused me of taking the lock off the door, and likewise stated that he saw me throw the lock and two keys away, which is utterly false.

Magraw. I had a good character after I came out of my trouble, and hope you will be as lenient as possible, having a wife to maintain.

MAGRAW - GUILTY . Aged 27.

DRAPER - GUILTY . Aged 32.

SPENCER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-13

13. KENNITH CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 tea-poy, value 5l. 15s. , the goods of John Pitway .

JAMES RUSHBRIDGE . I am in the employ of James Pitway , of No. 4, Kirby-street, Hatton-garden , a cabinet-maker . On the 3rd of November, about half-past two o'clock, the prisoner called at the warehouse, and asked to look at some tea-poys; he said he had come from Mr. Hunter's of Finsbury, and Mr. Hunter had a gentleman from Manchester waiting to see some; he selected two - I never saw him before, and had no dealing with Mr. Hunter; I got them ready, called the porter down, and gave them into his possession; I directed the porter to go with him, and take them to Mr. Hunter's, and gave him directions not to leave them; this was at about twenty-five minutes to three o'clock; I told him after they had looked at them to bring them back, as I thought they were only going as patterns; about half an hour after, the porter returned without either of them - one was worth 5l. 15s., and the other 4l. 15s.; one of them was returned three or four days afterwards; about a fortnight afterwards, I saw the prisoner in custody at Hatton-garden, and was quite certain of his person, and he said he would pay for it; I cannot find the other poy - it was worth 5l. 15s.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am porter to Mr. Pitway. On the 3rd of November I was called to take two tea-poys to Mr. Hunter, in Finsbury - the prisoner went with me as far as Long-lane, and then left me; I met him within three or four doors of Mr. Hunter's - he told me to wait there till he came back; I waited about a quarter of an hour, and then he came - I was told not to leave the poys; I saw him go into Mr. Hunter's with Mr. Hunter's man - he went up the gateway; I did not know the person to be Mr. Hunter's man - he came back to me in a quarter of an hour, and took me up the gateway; he was there with the man, and helped me down with the two poys; they carried them both into the place - the prisoner came out, told me the

keys of the poys were not there, and Mr. Hunter could not decide which they would have, because he wanted to try the locks; he said, "How long will you be getting them?" I ran off directly to get the keys, leaving both the poys behind; I was gone about an hour and an half, and on returning I went in - the prisoner was gone; Miles, Mr. Hunter's man, asked me what I had come about; I said I had come for the poys - I found one there, and told him not to let that go away; he said the prisoner had taken the other to Mr. Paynter's, in London-wall - I went there immediately, but could hear nothing of it; I have not seen it since - I returned to Mr. Hunter's, told him to keep the poy, which they did for about a week, and then it was returned - I did not see the prisoner again till I gave him into custody.

THOMAS MILES . I am in the employ of Mr. Hunter, a wholesale cabinet-manufacturer, in Finsbury-place - the prisoner is not in his employ; I had seen him five or six times before, but not in Mr. Hunter's employ. On the 3rd of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw him: he said he had two tea-poys to sell; I said he could not sell any goods then, as Mr. Hunter was going to bury one of his children - the house was shut up; Williams was not present then - about a quarter of an hour afterwards he returned with Williams, and the tea-poys, through the gateway at the back of the premises; I helped them down off the porter's back, and helped him into the front warehouse with them; then the prisoner and I were left alone - he asked if Mr. Hunter would be back to business that afternoon; I said he might, about dusk - he said he wished to take one of them to show to Mr. Paynter, in London-wall; supposing them to be his poys, I told him to take it- I was not present when he spoke to Williams; I saw Williams again in about an hour and a half - he asked me to see if there was any keys in the tea-poys, and there was one; the poy was afterwards returned to the prosecutor -I did not see the prisoner again till he was taken; he never called for the poy.

Prisoner. Q. Was any body present when I asked to take the poys away? A. There might be, I did not notice - I was at the end near the counting-house.

WILLIAM CHINNERY . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 20th of November, in Exmouth-street, at two o'clock in the afternoon - I took him to the station-house - he said he knew nothing of it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-14

14. HENRY WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 6 handkerchiefs, value 24s. , the goods of William Henry Ablett .

JOHN LEE ABLETT . I am nephew of William Henry Ablett , an outfitter , of No. 37, Cornhill . On the 27th of November, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner came to look at some goods; he was sitting down at the counter - he was there about twenty minutes; he looked out goods to the amount of 6l. or 7l., and handkerchiefs among them; he went out, saying he was going to the Jerusalem coffee-house, and would call on his return - I suspected him, followed him out, and stopped him two or three hundred yards off, and said I thought he had taken a piece of handkerchiefs, which did not belong to him; he had looked at these handkerchiefs, but had not selected them; they laid within his reach on the counter; he was very much agitated, and said he thought I was mistaken - he went back to the shop with me, and I took the goods out of his great coat inside pocket - he was speechless when I found them; he had not paid for any thing, nor taken the goods away.

IVES ELVERSTON . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Cornhill; I was fetched to the shop, and took the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite ashamed of my situation; I might have put them in my pocket, for what I did buy, intending to return - I offered to take him home with me and pay for all the goods I had, and convince him I had no dishonest intention; I should have got the money where I was going.

MR. ABLETT. After he was detected he offered to pay for the goods - he had not sufficient money with him; those he ordered were a very large pattern, and these are very small - he said he was going a short voyage.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-15

15. GEORGE TURNER and LAWRENCE REARDON were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Samuel Read Ludlow , from his person .

SAMUEL READ LUDLOW . I live in King's Arms-yard, and am in the employ of Mr. Nicholson. On the 5th of November between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was on London-bridge with my brother, and missed my handkerchief, which I had used five minutes before; we walked back to look for any suspicious persons, but saw none - and as we turned back I saw the prisoners together on the bridge; this was in about a quarter of an hour - Reardon pointed to me, and I followed them; they kept looking back at me - they went down Thames-street; I continued to follow them - I saw a Policeman, and gave them in charge; my pocket handkerchief was found on Turner, concealed in the seat of his breeches.

GEORGE WRIGGLESFORTH . I was night constable. The prisoners were searched in my presence; the handkerchief was in the seat of Turner's trousers - he had only one handkerchief.

Turner. He took it out of the side of my pocket, Witness. I felt he had something very bulky, and told him to unbutton his trousers; he rather shifted it round to the side of his trousers - it was not in his pocket at all.(Property produced and sworn to).

Turner's Defence. I left home to go to a stationer's in Tooley-street, and in the dark part of the bridge I kicked something - I found it was this handkerchief; I went after one gentleman, and asked if it belonged to him; he said No; I then met Reardon - two gentlemen came and took him; they then said they might as well take me.

Reardon's Defence. I met this young man on the bridge, and asked how he did - he did not tell me he had found the handkerchief.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-16

NEW COURT. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29TH.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

16. WILLIAM ASHWICK was indicted for stealing,

on the 26th of October , 2 glass dishes, value 1l. 1s., the goods of Samuel Rixon - also for stealing, 4 decanters, value 2l., the goods of Samuel Rixon , his master . - To which indictments he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Confined Six Months .

There was another indictment against the prisoner, on which no evidence was offered.

Reference Number: t18321129-17

17. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 14 gross of corks, value 2l. 12s., 1 gross of bungs, value 2s., and three bags, value 1s. , the goods of Robert Elliott . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 47. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-18

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

18. JOHN MAY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of November , 1 piece of silk, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 4d.; 1 bunch of keys, value 18d.; 1 crown, and 7d., the property of Richard Miller ; 1 watch, value 10s., and 1 locket, value 5s., the goods of Ann Noakes .

RICHARD MILLER . I am clerk to a solicitor in Clifford's Inn. On the 22d of November I was removing from Old Compton-stree t to High Holborn, in the evening; these articles were all in a silk bag, on the table in my room in Compton-street - I saw it all secure about seven o'clock, while the van was at the door; my wife was to have carried the bag - I had a man named Smith to assist me to carry some things; he was not strong enough, and I went and got the prisoner (who is I believe a coach cad) to assist him - we missed the bag about twenty minutes past seven o'clock; I made inquiries but could not find it; the next morning I saw the prisoner, and asked him if he had got the bag; he said he had not, and had not seen it- I was not satisfied, and took him into custody.

THOMAS EASTBROOK . I am a publican. I have known the prisoner six or seven years - he is a hackney-coachman - he brought a bag to my house on Thursday evening, and asked my wife to take care of it for him; it was about nine o'clock in the evening - it laid on the table about twenty minutes, and then my wife locked it in a cupboard - I heard the next morning that the prisoner was locked up; I went to the watch-house to ascertain what he was locked up for - he winked at me; I said he need not wink at me, if he had brought stolen goods to my house he must suffer for it: I took the officer to my house, and my wife gave him the same bag.

CHARLES DEWING . I am an officer. I received this bag - the watch and locket belong to Ann Noakes.

RICHARD MILLER . This is the bag and the property, except a crown-piece, which is gone from it.

Prisoner's Defence. The bag was given to me - I took it there for security till the next morning; I did not open it, nor know what was in it.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-19

19. SUSAN CAYLER , JOHANNA CROWLEY , and MATILDA RYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 8 lbs. of veal, value 4s. , the goods of William Hurrey .

JOSEPH VOSE . Mr. Hurrey is a butcher , and lives in Sun-court, Curzon-street, May-fair . On the 13th of November I was passing there, and saw the three prisoners in company, walking together; Crowley took a piece of veal off the shop board - they walked away: I went into the shop, and gave notice - they were pursued, and taken in company, opposite Queen-street.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Is this a place of much thoroughfare? A. Yes; the prisoners were talking together - I had not seen Crowley before; I think she was tipsy - the prosecutor's son was in the shop.

WILLIAM HURREY . I was in my parlour - this veal was my property; I did not see it taken, but I went after them, and found the veal, which was mine, wrapped up in a shawl, on Crowley; she said she bought it in Piccadilly - they were altogether.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure it was yours? A. A. Yes - it had not been bought of me; my son is not here, but he said they had not bought it of him - there were about 8lbs. of the chump end.

Ryan's Defence. I was as far as the length of this Court from the others; Cayler had been carrying onions, and she asked me to take her basket, as she was very tired - I saw a crowd, and went down - this gentleman gave charge of Crowley - Cayler and I followed her to the watch-house, and the officer came out and took us in.

JURY to JOSEPH VOSE. Q. Did you go to the prisoners with the prosecutor, and point them out? A. Yes.

CAYLER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

CROWLEY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

RYAN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18321129-20

20. ROBERT THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 collar, value 6d.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 5s; 3 pair of stockings, value 18d.; 1 shirt, 2s.; 1 pot, value 2d., and 1 bottle, value 2d., the goods of Henry Lyke ; and 1 pair of shoes, value 5s., the goods of Edward St. John Mildmay .

RICHARD NORRISS . I am footman to Lady Mildmay; the prisoner had been footman to her brother, Captain George Mildmay, who had been living with Lady Mildmay. On the 15th of November the prisoner came and asked for a trunk which he had left there - it was up stairs - I fetched it for him, leaving him below - there was a bundle in the room; I brought that also down to the prisoner, thinking it belonged to him; I saw a pair of shoes in the bundle, and I bought them of him for 1s. 6d.; I did not ask him if they were his, but he said the bundle was his, and he took it away; the next morning he came for the trunk, which he did not take the first day; I then asked him if the shoes were his, and whether they had not belonged to his master's brother? he said No; they were Captain George Mildmay's, and that he gave them to him.

HENRY LYKE . I am valet to Captain Edward St. John Mildmay; we were out of town - this bundle was mine, and contained the articles stated; the prisoner had lived with Captain George Mildmay a year before this; these shoes are a pair of my master's; I had tied them up in the bundle till we returned from the north.

JAMES DAY (Police-constable C 157). On the Monday following I went to a public-house; Lyke went in and got the prisoner out - I took him; the

bundle has not been found, but I have a collar, a bottle, and a small pot, which I found in a deal box at his lodging - the rest of the things are lost.

GUILTY. - Aged 25. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18321129-21

21. WILLIAM CLUNIE was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS PETTIS . I am a baker , and live in Down-street, Piccadilly . The prisoner was in my employ seven or eight months - it was his duty to carry out bread, to receive the money, and to give an account the moment he got home, which was entered in the cash-book.

MARY BOYOR . I am servant to the Marquis of Cholmondeley. On the 20th of October I paid the prisoner 14s. 4 1/2d. for bread, about ten o'clock in the morning - he gave me a receipt on the bill.

THOMAS PETTIS . He never accounted to me for this money - I asked him repeatedly about it; he said it had not been paid.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating, that he had been induced to commit the offence in order to purchase a watch, hoping to be able to repay his master.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18321129-22

22. RICHARD HEWETT was indicted for breaking and entering, on the 19th of October , a building within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of Thomas Beazley, and stealing therein 1350 pens, value 14s., and 18 copy-books, value 1s., the goods of the said Thomas Beazley ; and 1 box, value 1s.; 1 pen-knife, value 1s.; 1 half-sovereign, and 2s., the monies of George Hine Young ; and MARY HEWETT was indicted for receiving 18 copy-books, value 1s.; 1 box, value 1s., and 1 pen-knife, value 1s., part and parcel of the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. BALL conducted the prosecution.

DR. THOMAS BEAZLEY . I keep an establishment at Uxbridge - my school-house is within the curtilage of my dwelling-house; there is a fence all round it; it is about forty yards from my dwelling-house - I can go to it without going into the public-road. On the Friday morning, soon after I rang the bell for the young gentlemen to leave their rooms, I missed from my school a number of pens, some copy-books, and other things; my pupils gave me information of the robbery; they found it out themselves; I went, in consequence of information, to Mary Hewett 's house, at Amersham - I found her at home; Richard Hewett had been in custody from the Friday before - I told Mary Hewett we came to search the house, where I knew the property was concealed - she said the only bundle she had brought from Uxbridge was an Evangelical magazine, and a gown; she exhibited them both on the table - she distinctly said she had no other property about the house, and that she had left Uxbridge before there was any disturbance; we searched the house, and the officer found some old copybooks, and a mahogany box, in which one of my pupil's money had been kept before it was broken open - it was concealed under some beech rafters, under a staircase, and done with so much art, that you would not suppose the beech rafters had been removed for ten years; there were some rags, old bits of iron, and other things thrown over them - when they were found, she exclaimed, "What has my son brought me to!" or something of that kind; she told me she had slept on the Thursday night at a public-house a great way up Uxbridge, on the left-hand side, and her son had slept in the same room with her; that he had come to bed some time after her, and did not leave the room till the next morning.

PETER WRIGHT . I am servant to Dr. Beazley. On the night of the Thursday all the windows of the school were shut down, and the door fastened - I was the first down the next morning; I received information, and went to the premises - I found some footmarks leading from the school-room to a meadow, about one hundred and fifty yards off, where I found this bundle of quills; I watched till about half-past eight o'clock, and then saw Richard Hewett come searching about the place - I had the quills then in my possession; I asked him to come with me, and took him into custody - his shoes were taken off before Dr. Beazley, and compared with the footmarks.

COURT. Q. Did you see marks of any person having been inside the school? A. Yes, and some books were thrown about; the windows were all shut down the night before, the room locked, and I had the key in my pocket.

CHARLES MURRAY . I am high-constable of Uxbridge. On Friday, the 19th of October. I went and saw the footmarks - I took the shoes off Richard Hewett 's feet, and fitted them to the marks - there are some nails out of one shoe, and the marks exactly corresponded.

Richard Hewett. Q. How many footmarks did you find? A. There were several marks, but I could only try one, which was close under the window - there had been rain all the morning.

GEORGE HINE YOUNG . I am a pupil of Dr. Beazley's. I lost from the school-room a small mahogany box, which contained a penknife, a half-sovereign, and two or three shillings in silver; I found the box at Mary Hewett 's, under some old rafters - this is it; the pen-knife is in it, but the money was gone.

RICHARD JORDAN . I am constable of Amersham. I went to Mary Hewett 's house; I found this box and some copy-books under some wood concealed; Mary Hewett had denied having any property there, except the gown and the Evangelical Magazine; when these things were found, she said "What trouble my son has brought me to."

JOHN LLOYD . I keep the Jolly Ostlers, public-house at Uxbridge. The prisoners slept at my house in the same room on the Thursday night; the mother went to bed about ten o'clock, and the son came home about one or two in the morning.

JAMES DARVILL . I am an officer. I had Mary Hewett in custody; she told me she was surprised how Dr. Beazeley should know, or have any suspicion of her having any thing at her house; and she said that her son gave her the bundle on the Friday morning, that she did not know what it contained till she got to Amersham, and then she found there was a little mahogany box in it, and some copy-books; she said she afterwards heard her son was in custody, and that was her reason for putting it under the wood.

DR. BEAZLEY. These copy-books and pens are mine; I bought the pens a few days before, and ex

amined them particularly, because I bought them of a Jew; my school-room windows swing in the middle, and fasten with a button; my house is in the parish of Hillingworth.

Richard Hewett 's Defence. I had been out spending the evening at a public-house, and on going to Mr. Lloyd's to sleep, I saw two men rush out of Mr. Cox's park, and drop a bundle - I thought it was game, and took it up; I found what the contents were, and put them into my pocket - I gave it to my mother in the morning.

MR. LLOYD. He had no bundle when he came to my house, that I saw.

RICHARD HEWETT - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

MARY HEWETT - GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-23

23. JAMES NEED and NOAH STEVENS were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , 2 sacks, value 2s., and 9 bushel of oats, value 21s., the goods of William Mellish , their master .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT CORK . I am bailiff to Mr. William Mellish of Bush Hill-park, Middlesex ; the prisoners were in his service. On the 2nd of November I went home; I got to the farm gate a little after six o'clock; I saw Stevens standing outside, as I supposed, waiting to take my horse, but instead of that, he went in at the gate and said, "Here comes master!" I did not see any one else; I spurred my horse, and went in at another door; I went up to him and said, "What are you doing? I think there is something wrong;" he said,"No, nothing is wrong;" I got off my horse, and felt with my stick, and felt something; I got nearer, and found it was a man with a sack of oats on his back; I said, "Who is here?" Need said, "It is me, Sir;" I said, "What have you got here?" he said, "Only a few oats, which the groom (meaning Stevens) has given me for my horses;" I had myself given out corn to each of the carters the same morning, sufficient for them till the Tuesday following, as we give out corn every Tuesday and Friday morning, and I had locked up the key of the granary in my cash drawer, so that it could not have been opened by that key; I made Need put the oats down, and he said, "I hope you will forgive me;" I went to the granary, and found the door locked, and in an old granary, about five feet from the door, I found a sack with some corn in it; and before I got into the granary, I found a basket which Stevens had been using that morning for another purpose, the bottom of which had been recently tarred, and some oats were sticking to the bottom of it; when I went into the granary I found some oats had been taken from the bulk since the morning, and on the bulk was the impression of the bottom of the basket; I went to the stable, and said to Stevens, "This is a very bad job;" he began crying and said, "I hope you will forgive me;" I said, "It is not my place to forgive you, I shall tell Mr. Mellish of it;" I then got a warrant, and the officer took both the prisoners; the granary must have been opened by a master key, as no force had been used; I have compared the oats found in the sack with those in the granary, and have no doubt they were the same.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable. I took the prisoners. Need said he was very sorry for it, and hoped his master would forgive him; I compared the corn, and have no doubt it was the same - this is the corn and the sack.

Need's Defence (written.) I wanted some corn to feed my horses; the prosecutor's foreman was not in the way, as I was informed by the prisoner Stevens, who was in the loft - I told Stevens I wanted some corn, and observing two sacks full standing on the landing-place near to the granary, I asked him whose that was - Stevens said he did not know; he looked towards the landing-place from where he stood, and saw the corn - I went, and put one sack upon my back, intending to take it to my horses in the stable - while in the act of so doing, I saw the foreman coming towards me; I was afraid he would he angry at my taking the corn without his leave - he came to me, and asked what I had there in the sack; I told him without hesitation - I declare I had no felonious intent; I became alarmed, because I thought he would discharge me for having taken the corn without his leave; had I contemplated any felonious act, it was impossible I could carry the same into effect without immediate detection, because a watchman is always stationed at the gate, who would not allow me to pass out at the gate with corn or any thing else, unless I fully satisfied him.

Stevens handed in a similar Defence.

NEED - GUILTY . Aged 28.

STEVENS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-24

24. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 60 yards of flannel, value 4l. , the goods of John Ferguson .

JESSE HORSON . I superintend the business of Mr. John Ferguson , of Hind-street, Covent-garden . On the 29th of October I received information from a woman, and went out - I saw the prisoner carrying this roll of flannel on his left shoulder; I called out Stop thief! and he threw it down, but I did not see that.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Then you lost sight of him? A. Yes, but only while he turned a corner, and threw down the flannel; I saw the prisoner about two hundred yards from the shop, with the flannel; I took him, and gave him to the officer - he was hurrying towards me when he was taken; there was no other person there - I can only identify him by the size of his person; I was behind him, and did not see his face - there was no other person in the street but a woman, who was coming promiscuously towards me.

JOHN MILLS (Police-constable F 86). I was on duty, and saw the witness pursuing the prisoner, and I took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you say "Is this the man you saw with the parcel?" A. No - to my knowledge, I did not say any such words; I did not say any thing to him about the prisoner's identity; it was two or three hundred yards from the prosecutor's - it was about ten o'clock at night; I saw the parcel picked up about three yards off.

JESSE HOBSON . The flannel has my mark on it, and was in the doorway; to the best of my judgment the pri

soner is the person who was carrying it - there was no other man on the spot where he was taken.

JURY. Q. Was there any doorway there? A. No, I believe it was a wall.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from my aunt's, and when I got to the corner I was accused by this gentleman - there were several persons on the other side of the road, and there was plenty of time for a person to have crossed.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-25

25. GEORGE WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Ann Combs .

WILLIAM BEALE (Police-constable H 6). I was on duty in Bethnal-green on the evening of the 26th of October - I saw a number of persons; I went up, and heard some person charge the prisoner with stealing a pair of shoes, which they had taken from him; he said nothing then, but on taking him to the station he said he took them out of pawn, and they were his own.

JAMES GOLDER . I saw the prisoner run from the prosecutrix's window - I pursued him, and the mob stopped him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take the shoes? A. No, but I saw them under your coat.

JOSEPH NOCK . I am in the service of Mrs. Ann Combs, a pawnbroker . These shoes are her property, and were taken from outside her shop, a little higher than I could reach; I had seen them safe half an hour before, or less.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18321129-26

26. THOMAS WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 3 sovereigns, the monies of Robert Graham and another .

SAMUEL LONG . I am in the service of Mr. Robert Graham and another, silk manufacturer s, Spital-square - the prisoner was their porter . On the 3rd of November he came to me, and said Mr. Harris wanted 3l. to finish paying the girls in the factory, and produced a note, which is lost, saying "Let Walker have 3l.," and signed by Mr. Harris: I gave him three sovereigns out of the till - they belonged to my master.

JOHN HARRIS . I am foreman of the factory, and pay the girls. I sent the prisoner to Mr. Long with the note for the money - he absconded with it, and I did not see him again till he surrendered at the Police-office.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18321129-27

27. MARY ANN STAINS and MATILDA PLUCE were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 28 yards of printed cotton, value 9s. , the goods of Simeon Browne .

JOHN SWAINE . I am in the employ of Mr. Simeon Browne, a linendraper , of No. 199, Holborn . On the 17th of November the two prisoners came together to the door, about six o'clock in the evening - I was behind the counter, and saw them through the circular panes of glass; I saw Stains draw this piece of print from the inside to the outside of the rail - she motioned to the other to take it off; they then both ran away - I followed, and took them both; Pluce had the print.

Stain's Defence. I had just left work, and saw this on the ground, hanging quite off the rail; he took hold of her first - I asked what she had done, and he took hold of me, and said he would let me know; I had not touched it.

Pluce's Defence. I had been with Stains that night to receive 5s. 6d. for shoe-binding - I was looking into this linendraper's shop; I saw this print on the ground, and thought I had as much right to it as any one.

STAINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

PLUCE - GUILTY . Aged 17.(See Fifth Day.)

Reference Number: t18321129-28

28. JAMES SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Rose , from his person .

WILLIAM ROSE . On the 24th of November I was in St. Giles' , and felt my handkerchief taken from my pocket -I turned, and seized the prisoner with it; it was taken to Bow-street, and I knew it to be mine, but I believe it has been lost since; there were two or three other boy s about.

Prisoner's Defence. There were two young men before me, who took it.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18321129-29

29. MARY READING was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October , 1 gown, value 5s. , the goods of Francis Healing .

ANN HEALING . I am the wife of Francis Healing - we live in Ossulton-street, St. Pancras . On the 22nd of October I heard a person come in and go up stairs, who I thought was my son - I called to him twice, but he did not answer - I then heard my bed-room door open; I went up, and saw the prisoner in my yard - I said, "What do you want?" she said, "I came to see a lodger of yours;" I said I had no lodger - she then went round my yard; I went to her and said, "It is curious you should come into my house without asking me," and I saw my gown in a basket in her hand, and there were some plates and knives and forks in it; the gown had been in my bed-room, where I had wrapped it up about ten minutes before - she ran away, but in about half an hour she came opposite my house; my son and another lad ran after her - this is the gown.

DAVID BARRY . I went in pursuit of the prisoner - she ran down several streets, got into a stable, and hid herself, but the dog smelt her; I went in, and found her - when I got her out she fought and scratched my face very much, but I got her to my mistress', who took her to the station; the dog was poisoned on the Saturday afterwards.

JOHN WALKER (Police-constable S 40). I received the prisoner, and have the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going with my brother's dinner, and on passing the prosecutor's I saw the gown rolled up - I took it, and put it into my basket; the prosecutrix snatched the basket from my hand, and said it was hers - I ran back to tell my mother, then went to her house, and went with her to the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-30

30. JAMES LEVIS was indicted for stealing, on the

16th of October , 1 waistcoat, value 12s. , the goods of Henry Browning .

ABIGAIL REES . I take in washing, and live in Molyneux-street . On the 16th of October I hung a waistcoat and some other things of Mr. Henry Browning 's in the passage - the prisoner lived in my house with his parents, and he had been in the passage that evening.

HENRY DUGGAN . The prisoner came to me one Tuesday night, and asked if I would buy a waistcoat; I gave him 6d. for it, and took it home to my mother; she said it must have been stolen, and gave it to my father.

JOHN DUGGAN . My son brought me this waistcoat, and I pawned it for 1s. 6d., at Mr. Nicholls'; I live apart from my wife, and she allows me money to maintain two of my children.

WILLIAM FAULKNER . I live with Mr. Nicholls, a pawnbroker. I took in this waistcoat, and lent 1s. 6d. on it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ARTHUR MINTON (Police-constable D 80). I took the prisoner, and have brought Duggan's own waistcoat - he had cut the buttons off this waistcoat, and put them on his own.

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18321129-31

31. GEORGE LAMBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 15 pence, and 30 halfpence, the monies of Jeremiah Underwood , his master .

JEREMIAH UNDERWOOD . I am a butcher . The prisoner was my apprentice for two years and a half; I missed some money: I and my wife marked half a crown's worth of halfpence, and half a crown's worth of penny pieces on the 24th of October - I put them in my bureau, and locked them up; next morning I found the lock went rather hard, but there was no money missing then - I left the money there, and on the following Friday morning, I went to it again; the lock was injured, and I could not open it - I had it opened, and then missed half a pound of copper from the bag; I put it in again, and said nothing; and on the Sunday, I went to it again - I could not open it with the key, but I found it was opened; the prisoner was then gone out for the day - I then missed 1 lb. more in weight, from the bag; I had sent the prisoner that morning for a bushel of oats, and two bushels of chaff - and had given him a 5s. piece to pay for it; he was taken at half-past ten o'clock at night, when he came home, but nothing was found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your daughter here? A. No - my family had access to the bag when they wanted it; I gave them the key of the bureau - my daughter was about to pay away some of the marked money by mistake; my wife had a key of the bureau - I received 25l. premium with the prisoner at different times; I had tried to get rid of him as an apprentice, and to take him as a journeyman at 5s. a week, on account of his bad conduct, but his father refused it - I did not want to take another apprentice with 60l.; my son is not here - I allowed him and the prisoner some little perquisites, and they told me they kept it in a little box: I did not tell the prisoner's father, that if he would sign a bond to get rid of his indentures, I would not prosecute him: it was suggested by a gentleman named Roudley - I did not say any thing.

ELIZABETH UNDERWOOD . I am the prosecutor's wife. I had one key of the bureau; the bag was there from the Wednesday till the Sunday: I did not give my daughter the key - I opened the bureau to give change, but did not take any thing out of the bag.

Cross-examined. Q. Your husband paid him nothing as an apprentice? A. No; he had often given him half a crown - I found one halfpenny of the marked money in the prisoner's coat pocket this morning.

SARAH ROBINSON . I keep a corn-chandler's. On the Sunday morning the prisoner came to me, and bought some corn and chaff, which came to 5s. - he paid me 4s. in silver, and 1s. in copper; I put the copper into a drawer, with some other copper - Mr. Underwood came in the evening, and took some copper out, which I have here; I cannot see any mark on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there other money in the drawer? A. Yes, and it remained there till Mr. Underwood came; I believe he had no money in his hand when he came in - he had gloves on; he requested to see the contents of my drawer, and took the money out himself - I have not seen his daughter at my shop.

GEORGE WOODGATE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; I have two penny pieces, and four halfpence, which I got from the prosecutor - I found this halfpenny this morning in the prisoner's jacket pocket, in his box.

MR. UNDERWOOD. This is some of the copper I marked.

COURT. Q. Why did you not send for an officer on the Sunday morning, and give him into custody? A. I had not missed it till after he had fetched the corn, and gone out for the day - I did not send for the corn to detect him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-32

32. JOHN KEEFE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Taylor , from his person .

JOHN TAYLOR . On the 21st of November, I was in Drury-lane , about half-past ten o'clock in the morning; I felt my handkerchief taken from my pocket - I turned round, and seized the prisoner, and another person with him; they were the only persons who were close behind me - I saw the prisoner's hand go very quickly behind him, and the handkerchief fall between them on the ground.

WILLIAM RICE . I was going to Bow-street, and saw the prisoner and two others; the prisoner's hand was in the pocket of a gentleman who was going by - that gentleman walked on; they then crossed to the prosecutor: the prisoner took the handkerchief from his pocket - I was going to spring across, and the prosecutor secured the prisoner, and the other.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along, and this gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-33

33. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Chodwick , from his person .

THOMAS CHODWICK . I am a ship owner . On the 24th

of October I went to the National School rooms in St. George's in the East , having understood that Colonel Stanhope would make a declaration of his political sentiments - while I was there, Tool asked me if I had lost any thing; I felt, and missed my handkerchief - I asked him if he could point out the thief; we went round, and found the prisoner in the crowd - I took him by the collar, and accused him of having taken my handkerchief; he denied it, but I took off his hat, and found my own handkerchief and another in it, and an old one which I believe to be his own - this is mine.

THOMAS TOOL . I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor; he looked at several other persons, and felt the bottom of their pockets - I pointed him out to the prosecutor, and the handkerchiefs were found in his hat.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

34. WILLIAM JONES was again indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Skeggs Francis , from his person .

WILLIAM SKEGGS FRANCIS . I was at the same place; I lost a handkerchief from my coat pocket - I did not miss it till after I left the meeting; I know nothing of the prisoner, but this is my handkerchief.

GEORGE FINDLAY . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in custody - this is one of the handkerchiefs found in his hat.

GUILTY . Aged 53. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-34

35. JAMES HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 pair of boots, value 10s. , the goods of John Edwards .

SAMUEL HAYNES . I am in the service of John Edwards , a shoemaker , in the Strand . On the 24th of November I saw the prisoner put his hand into the shop, and reach these boots from off the floor - I was returning from an errand at the time; the officer pursued, and took him.

JOSEPH EVANS . I am an officer. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner run, and drop the boots - I took him.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18321129-35

36. JOHN GIBLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 2 brushes, value 3s., the goods of John Augustus Thrupp , and others; and 2 planes, value 4s., the goods of John Newling .

ROBERT BELL . I am in the service of Mr. Thrupp, a coachmaker. On the 24th of November I found the prisoner on his premises - he was a stranger; I asked what he wanted, he said one of the painters, but he could not tell me his name - I then saw a dusting-brush stick out of his waistcoat; he said it was his own - I asked him to let me see it - he said No, but I opened his waistcoat, and it fell down - Mr. Thrupp found a plane in one of his pockets, another dusting-brush in another, and in his hat another plane.

JOHN AUGUSTUS THRUPP . These brushes are mine and my partner's - I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN NEWLING . These planes are mine - I had left them, at Mr. Thrupp's my master.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see a painter, a friend of mine, but he was not there; I had been without food for two days.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18321129-36

37. GEORGE FELL and JAMES McPHERSON were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 3 silver spoons, value 15s., and 3 pairs of trousers, value 10s., the goods of Charles Chamier Raper ; and 1 butter-knife, value 10s.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 3s.; 1 necklace, value 10s.; 1 smelling-bottle, value 1s., and 3 thimbles, value 6d., the goods of Peter Nugent Kingston .

MARGARET RAY PEDEN . I am cook to Mr. Raper; he lives at Chelsea. On the 25th of October my master and his family were at Hastings; I was left in charge of the house, with Augusta Pever , a friend of mine - I had known Fell for sixteen months - he is a tailor , but I never saw McPherson till last Tuesday - I never saw him at my master's; we had Fell in the house for company - he slept there on the night of the 25th of October, and for a fortnight before; I had known him before, and had gone out with him, but nothing had passed between us- he slept in our bed-room which he had to himself; Pever and I slept in master's bed-room on the same floor- between four and five o'clock in the morning Pever heard the creeking of the dressing-room door and some one going down stairs; she awoke me; I flew out of bed, rang the bell, and ran into Fell's room, for protection -I found his door open; I asked him if he had been down stairs - he said No; I asked him how the door came open; he said he did not know - he got up and went down, and found the places open, and the bells had been taken off the hall door and shutters; I called the officer; he and I went down to the stable, where we found a tinderbox, which had been taken from the house; three spoons and three pairs of trousers were missing from different rooms, but nothing from the room Fell slept in; we found one of the pairs of trousers on the way to the stable - Fell appeared to be asleep when we went into his room; there was a hat found under his bed, which was not there the night before - a smelling-bottle which was lost has been found on McPherson; Fell had sat with us that evening, and went out in the dark, to get a little tobacco - he said I need not light him out; that was about nine o'clock or a little after - and about ten he took a light and went down to the stable.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Have you told us all the transaction? A. Yes, as far as I have been required; I know Fell's two brothers - they are respectable; we had a pint and a half of porter for supper that night - he had been very dull for several days, and that night he was very cheerful, and we sat up till about twelve o'clock; I swear he slept in the same room the night before, and I and Pever in my master's bed - I went into Fell's room for the light after he was in bed that night; I sat down on the edge of his bed and we sat talking there - I swear that I and Pever were not laying on his bed; I only laid on the edge of the bed - I was not there an hour; Fell was in a very merry humour - we did not lay down on the bed; we might have joked

on the bed - I had my gown on; I was not in my nightgown - Pever put, her night-gown over her things.

Q. Upon your oath, were you not yourself in your night-gown? A. Pever persuaded me to put my night-gown on over my things, against my will - I swear I had the whole of my dress on; I shut Fell's door close when we went out of his room.

AUGUSTA PEVER . I am a friend of this witness, and slept in the house with her for about five weeks, in her master's bed, and Fell slept in her bed in the next room. On the morning in question, the creeking of the dressing-room door awoke me, and I heard a person go down stairs- I awoke the cook, she rang the bell, and ran into Fell's room; I got on my gown and went to him; he said,"How frightened you look;" I said, "There is some one in the house;" he said, "Nonsense, it is only the cats;" he got up and we went into the dressing-room, and found the drawers all opened - he went to the window, and found it was unfastened; I can take my oath it was fastened the night before; the cook then called the Policeman, and Fell said, "Stop a minute, if you think there is any one in the house let us go down and see;" and he took a poker and went down - the cook called the officer in; McPherson never slept there while I was there - I never saw him till last Tuesday; when we got down we found the kitchen door wide open - the bells had been taken down and put on the table, which must have been done by some one in the house; Fell was given into custody, and when we went to make his bed, at eight o'clock, we found a hat under his bed, which had not been there the night before, as I had cleaned out the room that day.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you married? A. No; Fell had slept there almost all the time the family was away; I went into his room that night with my night-gown on over my clothes, and so did the cook - she went in because some of her things were in that room; she had pulled her gown off and slipped her night-gown on - I did not lay on his bed; I sat in a chair by the side of the bed - I know nothing about the cook; I had all my things on but my gown, and I put on my night-gown - I never said that we two ghosts intended to sleep with him.

COURT. Q. Did Fell go out in the course of the evening? A. Yes, to get some tobacco; one of the three pairs of trousers which were missing from the house, was found in the garden, by the officers.

ROBERT SMITH (Police-constable V 137). I was called to the house a little after four o'clock; the two women told me the house had been robbed - I found Fell there; they gave charge of him as concerned in the robbery - I found the door open, and it appeared to me that more than one person had been concerned in it; I went into the garden, and found one pair of trousers - the house had not been broken; it appeared to me that some one inside had opened the door - I know nothing of the other prisoner; this hat was given to me afterwards - these trousers, one of the bracelets, and a smelling-bottle have been found.

Cross-examined. Q. What was the state of the doors? A. They were open when I saw them - the woman called Police! I desired them to come and open the door, which they did - the garden is in front of the house.

DANIEL RIERDON (Police-constable V 156). On the morning of the 16th of November, the house of Captain Brown, in Robert-street, was robbed; I heard that a person answering the description of McPherson had been seen there, and I, knowing him, went and took him in bed, at No. 22, Pye-street - I found this bottle on the mantle-piece in his room; I said, "Who does this belong to?" he said, "Not to you, lay it down;" I took it, and took him to the station, and told him there was a hat there, and asked him if he knew any thing of it - this was before it was brought near enough for him to take notice of it; the inspector said to him, "Perhaps it would fit you?" and it did; he said many hats would fit him.

ELIZA REES . I keep a beer-shop. On the afternoon of the day before the robbery, the two prisoners were at my house; McPherson then had a black hat on, and I afterwards saw him with a brown one.

MR. CHARLES CHAMIER RAPER . This is my house. I had left my cook in the care of it - the articles stated and some others were missing, as I am told; I cannot swear to these trousers which were found in my garden, but I had some like them.

CATHERINE MINET KINGSTON . I am the wife of Peter Nugent Kingston, and daughter of the prosecutor. This smelling-bottle is mine - when I left town I left it in my bed-room at my father's; the butter-knife, bracelets, and necklace were mine, and a thimble.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any mark on this bottle? A. No, but I know it from its general appearance.

JURY to ELIZA REES . Q. Were the two prisoners together at your house? A. Yes, and two or three other persons - they were drinking together.

FELL - GUILTY . Aged 24.

McPHERSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-37

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

38. ABRAHAM FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 18d., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Valler .

THOMAS VALLER . I am a groom ; I lodged at the King of Bohemia public-house on the 30th of October; the prisoner slept in the same room; on getting up the next morning I left him in the room - I had a pair of shoes at my bed-side, and left them safe: when I returned about nine o'clock, I met the prisoner in the hall - he was pursued, and brought back by Hickman; I found a box which I had left in the room locked, was broken open - I missed nothing from that; I missed my shoes: a handkerchief was found on the prisoner - I lost one, but I cannot swear to that.

NATHANIEL HICKMAN . I am a painter and glazier, and live in Church-row, Hampstead. I slept at the King of Bohemia, in the same bed with the prosecutor; he got up about half-past six or seven o'clock in the morning: when he went out, he left a pair of breeches on the bed, and a pair of shoes by the bed-side - I got up about eight, and put the prosecutor's shoes under the bed, and the gaiters over them; I put the breeches under the bed-clothes- I went down, and while I was there; the prisoner came down; he said, "Good morning;" I went up stairs, and found the box broken open, I came down - the prisoner

was gone; I pursued him about one hundred yards, and told him to come back with me to see that all was right; when we were coming back I saw the prosecutor; the prisoner was given into custody - I saw him give up the shoes to the Policeman; he took them out of his pocket in the back parlour.

JOHN GRAYSTOCK (Police-constable S 102). I produce the shoes which I received from the prisoner, who took them from his coat pocket.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY of stealing the shoes only. Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18321129-38

39. HENRY EAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 35 yards of flannel, value 18s. , the goods of Jabez Ranwell .

GEORGE ELLIS . I am a Thames Police-officer. On the 1st of November I stopped the prisoner at the bottom of Dock-street, St. George's; I asked him, what he had got - he said flannel, that he bought it of a young man at the top of Albion-street for 9s.: he had seen the man before, but did not know where he lived - I found on him this silk handkerchief, which he said he bought in the City, for 4s.

JABEZ RANWELL . I am a linen-draper , and live in Bedford-place, Commercial-road . The prisoner came into my shop on the evening of the 1st of November - he requested to look at some silk handkerchiefs, and after some time, he bought one for 4s.; as he was going out, some flannels at the door fell down, and as soon as he was gone, we missed one of them - this is the one; it has my mark on it.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18321129-39

40. THOMAS BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 gown, value 19s. , the goods of John Smith .

SARAH SMITH . I am the wife of John Smith - we live in Asylum-terrace, King's-road, Chelsea . My husband is a draper ; I made a black gown for Sophia Howes - it was afterwards brought back to be altered, and was in my care; I tied it up in a handkerchief - it was on the counter on the 25th of October; the prisoner came to the shop: I had seen it about five minutes before - I had been up stairs; when I came down the prisoner was in my shop; he had been detained - he begged for mercy, and said he had been turned from home, seeking employ.

ELIZABETH KEPPLEWHITE . I went to the shop on the 25th of October: I met the prisoner at the door, and prevented him from going out with the dress; he dropped the parcel, and I think one of the young persons in the shop took it up, and put it on the counter; I saw another lad at the window; his attention was directed to some one in the shop - when I stopped the prisoner he cried, and said he hoped we would forgive him; I might have touched the parcel; I did not take it from him - it dropped between us; this is the parcel - I opened it at Westminster.

GEORGE TOPPING (Police-constable B 150). I took the prisoner - I received this parcel from a lady in the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court; it is my first time of being in trouble.

The prisoner received a good character, and his master engaged to take him into his service again.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18321129-40

41. MARY WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 purse, value 6d.; 5 sovereigns, 5 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Nathaniel James Turner , from his person .

NATHANIEL JAMES TURNER . I live at Oldford, and am a surveyor . On the 27th of October I was walking in the Strand , about twelve o'clock at night; the prisoner came up; she took hold of my arm, and I walked rather involuntarily down a street with her - she went down a court, and wanted me to go into a house, but I declined; I went down the court with her, which I thought would take me into the Strand; we went down two or three courts, and when she came under a lamp she stopped, and asked me for 6d.; I opened my great coat, and gave her one - I heard something chink, and said, "You have dropped something;" she said the Policeman was coming, and she ran off; I looked on the ground, and saw my own key on the ground; I took it up, and put it into my pocket -I then missed my purse; I ran after her, and said she had robbed me - she ran on into the officer's arms, and he took her; he turned round with his light, and I heard something chink - I looked down, and saw my purse; I suppose that was about twenty yards from where I gave her the sixpence - I might have pulled out my purse and key at that time.

MICHAEL KELLY (Police-constable F 143). I saw the prisoner accost the prosecutor at the corner of George-court - they went down Buckingham-street, and down Harp-alley; she attempted to take him into a bad house, No, 12; he declined to go in - he went down another court with her; I remained at the corner of the court, and soon after I heard a cry "Stop her! Stop her! she has robbed me!" I stopped her, and she dropped this purse, with 5l. 5s. 6d. in it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is the first offence I ever committed - I left my husband six months ago; he will take me again.

GUILTY (of stealing only.) Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-41

42. HENRY BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 watch, value 1l. 15s. , the goods of Philip George Patmore .

ELIZA TITCHENER . I am the wife of Thomas Titchener , and am cook to Mr. Philip George Patmore- he lives at Bayswater . On the 24th of October the prisoner came to the house, with another youth; the prisoner had some capsicums for sale - Miss Harris, who was there on a visit, let the prisoner into the kitchen; the other lad did not go in, but he employed my mistress' attention to buy some buttons for children's shoes - I left the kitchen, and the prisoner soon after went away, leaving his basket behind him, and said he would call again for it; my mistress then asked if the dinner was ready to dish - I went to look at the watch, which had been on the kitchen mantel-piece, and it was gone - I ran out with Bott, and we saw the prisoner

come from a garden; the watch was produced from that garden by a coachman - I saw it picked up; it is my master's.

JAMES BOTT . I am beadle of Paddington. I was going down Elm's-lane on the 24th of October, about two o'clock; I met the prisoner and another person - when they passed me they moved quick, and then commenced running; I met the witness, and went in search of the prisoner; I found him in a garden - when I was about fifty yards from him he turned off towards some cottages; I met a coachman coming out, and asked him where the young man had gone - he described another garden; we went and found the prisoner there - this watch was found in the garden.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-42

43. LAWRENCE HAMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of William Thomas Hopper , from his person .

WILLIAM THOMAS HOOPER . I am a clerk in the East India-house , and reside near the East India-docks. On the afternoon of the 26th of October I was in the Commercial-road ; in consequence of information I felt my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, which I know had been safe a minute before; I followed the witness up several streets, and came up with the prisoner -Mr. Barker took him, and produced the handkerchief; this is it.

JAMES BARKER . I live in the Commercial-road, and am a pastry-cook. I saw the prisoner, in company with another boy, running from the place where the prosecutor stood; I followed the prisoner - I do not know whether he saw me or no, but he dropped this handkerchief.

Prisoner. I never had it in my hand. Witness. I am quite sure he dropped it - I gave it to the officer.

ROBERT EDWARDS (Police-constable K 43). I received this handkerchief from Barker - the prisoner said, as he was going to the station, that he had done it because he was very hungry.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the docks to look for work on board a ship; they would not let me in; as I was returning I met another boy; we saw this gentleman with his handkerchief three parts out of his pocket - the boy said he would go and get it, and he did; we ran off, and he dropped it - he got away, and I was taken.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Seven Days , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18321129-43

44. WILLIAM BASSETT was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 1 dressing-glass, value 6s. , the goods of William Weeks .

MARTHA WEEKS . I am the wife of William Weeks- he is a broker , and lives in Pulteney-street . On the 23rd of October I missed a looking-glass from a table in the shop, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

DINAH PRESCOTT . I lodge in Peter-street, St. James'. On the evening of the 23rd of October I was at my door, and saw the prisoner go past with a looking-glass under his arm; he ran down the street - I gave information - I knew him before.

THOMAS WILSON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner - the glass has not been found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-44

45. RICHARD BOWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Alexander Douglass , from his person .

ALEXANDER DOUGLASS (Police-constable K 240). On Saturday, the 1st of October, I was walking in Whitechapel with my wife; I was in plain clothes; my wife gave me information, and I took the prisoner from her- I saw him pull my handkerchief from his bosom, and throw it down; as I was taking him to the office he got from me, and I got my coat torn by some persons - I took the prisoner a few days afterwards, and know he is the man.

SARAH DOUGLASS . I was walking with my husband in Whitechapel, between four and five o'clock; I looked over my shoulder, and saw the prisoner with my husband's handkerchief - the end was just going out of his pocket; I took the prisoner, and dragged him to my husband - he took the handkerchief from his bosom, threw it down, and then told me to search him; I am certain he is the person.

Prisoner. I know nothing of the handkerchief.

ALEXANDER DOUGLASS. I took him at his mother's, in North-street, Whitechapel - he gave his right address at the watch-house; he said some more boys threw the handkerchief at him.

SARAH DOUGLASS . I am quite sure he had the handkerchief, and I saw no other lads there.

GUILTY .* Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-45

46. WILLIAM READ was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 wooden roll, being part of a weaver's loom, value 5s. , the goods of William Pope .

Mr. BODKIN, on behalf of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-46

47. WILLIAM BRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 12lbs. of bacon, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Simpson .

THOMAS HOBBS KING (Police-constable N 248). On the evening of the 6th of November, about seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Winchester-street, with three others - they saw me, and separated; the prisoner ran down York-street, and dropped this bacon - I took him: he said he had it given to him.

THOMAS SIMPSON. I keep a chandler-shop in Winchester-street, Pentonville , not more than three minutes' walk from York-street. I missed 6 lbs. of bacon about six o'clock that evening - here is a mark on this bacon, by which I know it; there was another piece lost at the same time.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18321129-47

48. HENRY COUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 candlestick, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Edwards .

THOMAS BOND . I am a servant, but out of a situation. On the morning of the 17th of November I saw the prisoner near the Merlin's Cave public-house - he went in, and had nothing, but he came out again with a brass candlestick wrapped up in a pocket handkerchief; I stopped him, and asked what he had got - he said something he was going to sell to get something to eat; I took it from him - he ran off, but I took him; I gave the candlestick to Mr. Edwards' servant, who is not here, but I know this is the same that I gave her.

RICHARD EDWARDS . I keep the Merlin's Cave . This is my candlestick - my servant gave it to the officer.

THOMAS MAGNOR (Police-constable C 61.) I received this candlestick from Mr. Edwards' servant.

Prisoner. It is the same candlestick; I should not have stolen it if I had not been without food for three days- it is a thing I never do.

GUILTY . Aged 47.* - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-48

49. ANN COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 1 shawl, value 3s. , the goods of Ann Clark .

ANN CLARK . I lived in King-street, Soho. On the 29th of October, about four o'clock in the morning, I was in Grafton-street - the prisoner came, took the shawl off my shoulder, and ran away; I had been out for two or three hours, and was going home - I described her person and dress to the officer; I had no conversation with her.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not drunk, and laying at a doorway? A. No, I was walking.

ROBERT CULLEY (Police-constable C 95.) The proscutrix described the prisoner to me, and told me she had been robbed of her shawl - she was sober when she told me of it; she described the prisoner - I knew I had seen her about an hour before; and I had seen the prosecutrix with the shawl on her shoulders about that time - I took the prisoner in Moor-street, about a quarter-past four o'clock the same morning, with this shawl on; she said it was her own, and she had bought it at a shop in Greek-street three weeks before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is my own, and my landlady was with me when I bought it - the prosecutrix was drunk, and the officer removed her from several places.

ROBERT CULLEY . The prisoner had no shawl when I saw her about an hour before, but the prosecutrix had one which appeared like this; I saw the prosecutrix sitting at a door in Moor-street, and told her to go home, and the prisoner passed by at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-49

50. JAMES CARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Shand Low , from his person .

WILLIAM SHAND LOW. I live in Cornhill, and am a stationer . On the evening of the 25th of October I was walking in Holborn - I felt a tug at my right-hand coat pocket; I felt, and missed my handkerchief - I turned, and seized the prisoner immediately behind me; I asked him if he saw any one take my handkerchief - I believe he said No; the officer came up, and said he saw him take it.

THOMAS TIPPER (Police-constable F 152.) On the evening of the 25th of October I was on duty in Holborn - I saw the prisoner with three or four others; I saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, take out his handkerchief with his left hand, and pass it to the other - they made off, and I secured the prisoner.

Prisoner. You asked the gentleman if he had lost any thing, and he told you to search me, which you did, and could not find any thing, but you said you would lock me up at all events. Witness. I told the gentleman his handkerchief was gone, and I saw it pass to the other.

MR. LOW. He asked me if I had lost any thing, and I said, Yes, a handkerchief; and I think he said he saw the prisoner take it, and pass it to an accomplice, who run away.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not lay hold of my arm, and ask if I saw any body take any thing from you? A. I felt the tug, and saw you immediately behind me - I seized your arm; I believe there were some others about, but my attention was directed to you.

Prisoner's Defence. Just as I got past Chancery-lane, the prosecutor stopped me, and asked if I saw any body take his handkerchief; I said, No; I stood talking to him, and the officer came up, and he said he saw my hand in his pocket, and afterwards he said; he saw me take the handkerchief out.

JURY to TIPPER. Q. How far were you from the prosecutor? A. About a yard - I could not take the prisoner with the property, as it was done so quick; I had been watching them some distance, but I had a plain coat on, and they did not know me.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-50

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30TH.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

51. JAMES RUTLIDGE, alias ROUTLEDCE , was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , at St. George, Bloomsbury, 1 trunk, value 10s.; 3 gowns, value 30s.; 5 petticoats, value 12s.; 5 pairs of stockings, value 5s.; 11 aprons, value 11s.; 2 shifts, value 5s.; 1 bed-gown, value 3s.; 5 pieces of lace, value 5s.; 4 caps, value 8s.; 1 shawl, value 8s.; 1 tippet, value 8s.; 1 scarf, value 10s.; 1 box, value 3s.; 1 pair of pattens, value 1s., and 5 printed books, value 20s., the goods of Caroline Moore, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Pashfield Davidson .

CAROLINE MOORE . I was servant to Thomas Pashfield Davidson, who lives in Southampton-street, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury . On the 16th of October I left his service - I left two trunks behind me, containing this property, and went to lodge with Mrs. Hawkes - on the 17th a young woman named Warren, who lodged there, was going to a situation, and wanted a porter to carry her trunk; I was walking with her, and met the prisoner carrying some goods in Portland-street; Warren asked if he knew a porter who could carry her box - he said he would take it for her as soon as he had put down what he had; he was to take her box to Snow-hill; I thought that in his way back he could fetch my boxes to Hawkes', which I agreed with him to do; and by St. Giles'-church, when he heard where my boxes were, he said to Warren, "I will get you a cab, as you are in a

hurry, and I will return with this young woman to get her boxes;" he put her into a cab, with her trunk, and then ran away from me - I waited about five minutes; he did not return, and I took a boy with me to Southampton-street; when I got there I was told a man had fetched my boxes about a quarter of an hour before - I have not found any of my clothes - the cord of my box was found in his apartment; I am certain of his person; my things were worth 7l. 4s.; Keys produced part of a trunk at the office, but I could not swear to it.

EMMA BUTTON . I am servant at Mr. Thomas Pashfield Davidson's, in Southampton-street. On the 17th of October I opened the door to the prisoner, who asked for the young woman's boxes - I had only come to the place a quarter of an hour, and being a stranger, mistress took the candle, and took him to where the boxes were - I remained at the door till he went out with them; I cannot swear to his face, but think the prisoner as much like him as possible - I believe he is the man.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. I received information, and from the description the prosecutrix gave me I took her into Well-street, and she saw the prisoner coming up the street - he is a cab-driver; she pointed him out without my speaking to her - I said, "Is your name Rutlidge?" he said Yes; I asked if he had not worked for Mr. Paul somewhere; he said that was his business - I asked where he lived; he said that was his business; I said, "Well, it is my business to take you into custody, you are charged with stealing a young woman's box" - he said, "I know nothing about it;" I took him to the prosecutrix in the street, and said, "Did you ever see this young woman before?" he said, "Never in my life;" she said he was the man - I could not find where he lived, but his wife came to see him in prison - I followed her to a house in the Seven-dials, went into the house, and she directed me to No. 96, Tottenham-court-road; I now know the prisoner lodged there - I found there a bit of a trunk, broken up, and in a basket on the landing-place I found some cords, and a pair of white trousers; the prosecutrix had described him as wearing dark trousers - I afterwards went again, and found a cord, which appeared to have been round a box - I went to the prosecutrix, and she identified the cord by a piece of ribbon tied to it.

SARAH HAWKES . I live in Oxford-market. Warren and Moore lodged with me - I recollect a man coming for Warren's box; I noticed that he had two black eyes- I believe the prisoner to be the man; Moore's boxes were not brought to my house.

CATHERINE MOORE . I positively swear he is the man; one of my trunks was corded, and a piece of black ribbon was tied to the loop at the end, as I had not sufficient cord, and here it is now.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent, which I can prove.

ELIZABETH HAGAN . My husband is a marble-mason, and lives at No. 61, Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner lodges in the next room to us - I kept my clotheslines on the landing-place; the cord the officer found in the basket was mine; there were several in the basket -I had had the cord several months; I do not know where I got it - there were several pieces tied together - it was a drying line.

Q. Was it twopenny cord, or what? A. I cannot say - nor what sort of hemp it was made of; I do not know whether I tied it myself - some was like twine, and some rather thicker, like a bedstead cord - there was something at the end of it, I cannot say whether it was black tape or silk; I told the officer it was mine, and he did not take it away the first day; I cannot swear the cord produced is mine - it is like it; I swear the cords on the landing were mine; I cannot say whether I had had it three, five, or six months.

FRANCIS KEYS . I found the cord against the room door; I afterwards found the prisoner and witness were acquainted, and went and got it; the prisoner had two black eyes, and rags round his fingers when I apprehended him.

CATHERINE MOORE . The man who took my trunks had two black eyes.

EMMA BUTTON . I did not look him in the face; he came into the house in great haste, before he was asked.

Prisoner to SARAH HAWKES . Q. Had the prosecutrix hired any body else to fetch her boxes? A. Sarah Warren had gone out and hired a ticket-porter from the Green Man, but they met the prisoner before he came, and that porter did not have the box, for when he came the prisoner was sitting in my room, and they sent the ticket-porter away.

CATHERINE MOORE . The prisoner said as soon as he had put down the things which he had, he would come; Warren ought to have been at her place at eight o'clock, and it was near nine; she went to the Green Man to speak to a porter, and when we brought him the prisoner had come; the ticket-porter never knew where my boxes were; I told the prisoner twice that they were at No. 1, Southampton-street.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-51

Before Mr. Baron Bolland.

52. JOHN BRAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of November , at St. Giles in the Fields, an order for the payment of 41l. 13s. 4d., the property of Basil Jackson and another, in the dwelling-house of John Hodge ; against the Statute. &c.

JOSHUA BLOUNT . I am in the employ of Spalding and Co. The prisoner has been in their employ, but was not so at this, but he came to the premises; I had a cheque in my possession on the 16th of November - it was the property of Basil Jackson and John Hodge; I keep it in a desk in our room, on the premises of Spalding and Hodge - Mr. John Hodge lives in the house, it is his dwelling alone; my desk was not locked - I missed the cheque about a week after, in consequence of a gentleman from Messrs. Coutts' coming to our house, and I saw the cheque afterwards - it was for 41l. odd, payable at Coutts'.

RICHARD MINSHAW . I am clerk to Messrs. Coutts. The prisoner presented this cheque for payment on the 22nd of November; it being dated so far back as April, before I paid it I kept the cheque, and asked him from whom he received it - he said from Spalding and Hodge, who had desired him to bring it down to get the money; he then went away, as he said to explain the circumstance to Mr. Hodge - he did not return that day; I called on Spalding and Hodge that evening, and next day the pri

soner brought a note to our house from Spalding and Hodge, and I asked him how he came in possession of the draft he had presented the previous day; he said he had found it in the counting-house - I gave the cheque to Mr. Hodge; Jackson and Co have an account at our house.

JOSHUA BLOUNT . The prisoner came occasionally to our counting-house, as he was employed by Mr. Lewis, our traveller; Spalding and Hodge are wholesale stationers - there is a room between my room and the counting-house; they are all on the same floor - the room is my counting-house; it communicates with the rest of the house.

JOHN HODGE. I live in Drury-lane . Minshaw gave me a cheque on the 22nd of November; it was the property of myself and Basil Jackson - the prisoner has lived with me; he had left several months, but he came to the premises afterwards, being employed there by Lewis - I had given the cheque with other papers to Blount; it was in a cheque-book, partly cut from the margin, but not completely - I never entrusted it in any way to the prisoner, or authorised any body to hand it to him; I am not not certain whether he was on our premises on the 22nd of November - he came three or four days in the week, just when our traveller wanted him; I did not see him after Minshaw produced the cheque till he was in custody, but he had come to our house on the 23rd, to be employed by our traveller - Mr. Spalding sent for him, and sent him to Coutts' with a note; I saw him in custody at Bow-street afterwards - I had possession of the cheque till I gave it to Blount.

JOSHUA BLOUNT . I received the cheque from somebody, and gave it to Thomas - it was the cheque I lost out of my desk.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS . I am superintendent of the Police. The prisoner was brought to the station-house on the Friday; I told him he was charged with stealing a cheque from Messrs. Spalding and Hodge; he replied, "I am very sorry for it;" I said,"What are you sorry for?" his answer was, "That I should have done it, or that I should do it;" I produce the cheque which I received from Blount.

Prisoner. It is my first offence; I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 27. - Transported for Life .

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Reference Number: t18321129-52

Before Mr. Baron Bolland.

53. EDWARD WARREN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Leake , on the 17th of May , and stealing therein 2 live tame rabbits, price 5s., his property .

JAMES LEAK . I live at Ball's-pond, Islington , and rent the house; I am a labourer, and deal in rabbits and fowls - I know the prisoner; he came to me on the 16th of May, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, and said he had got an order for four or five rabbits from a gentleman, but he was limited to four shillings; I said I had none so low; mine were long eared fancy rabbits; I let him look over the hutches - he said they were very handsome; I said, if I could see the gentleman, I could make arrangements with him; he said his name was Shillitoe; nothing more passed, and he went away; I said I had none under 5s. On the following day I went out at three o'clock in the afternoon; I have no family - nobody lives in my house - it is a small house; my rabbits and poultry are kept in the room I live in; I have one window and two or three doors to my house, I made them all safe before I went out; I returned at near six o'clock; I found my front door locked, but on going in I found the wall pulled down near the back door - it is a mud and timber wall - it was pulled down sufficient for a person to get in, and on looking about, I missed two doe rabbits; I went with a Policeman to Shillitoe, who we found lived at Dalston; we got there at nearly six o'clock, and saw Shillitoe in his shed, where there were some rabbits; among them was a white doe, which was mine - I had had her about six months; she had kindled four days before, and her young ones were in my hutch - we took it to the station-house; the Inspector put a mark on her ear, and allowed me to take her home to the young ones; I have it here - this is it; on taking her back, she went into the inner hutch to the young ones, and suckled them; Mason, a Policeman, brought me a smut rabbit, a black and white one, the same evening - it was one of the two I had lost - she was with young; Mason took it away for some time, and gave it up to me, when it was about kindling.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How large was the hole in the wall? A. Large enough for a man to get through easily; there are small air-holes in my walls - a fowl could not get out of them; the prisoner told me Shillitoe lived at Dalston; he said nothing about taking them to show him, but said he would call again about some ducks' eggs, at nine o'clock in the morning; I have forty or fifty hutches; my cottage is at the corner of a field; I never knew my rabbits to stray into the field.

COURT. Q. Are there small openings to give air? A. Yes; they are in the upper part of the wall.

JAMES SHILLITOE . I live at No. 16, Kingsland-road; I bought the rabbit of the prisoner; the prosecutor called, and I gave him the same white rabbit as I bought of the prisoner; I had bought it of the prisoner about an hour before, and was to pay him in a few minutes; I went to fetch some silver for that purpose, and as I came home, the Policeman spoke to me.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the prisoner? A. I knew him as waiter and pot-boy at a respectable public-house in Kingland, and considered him honest; he knew I kept rabbits; there was no concealment about it.

JESSEE PEAKS . I am a Policeman. In consequence of information I went with the prosecutor to Shillitoe's, and the rabbit was delivered to me; the same rabbit has been produced to-day.

GEORGE MASON. I am a Policeman. I received information of this - I went to the prisoner's mother's house - I knew he lived there, and in a rabbit-hutch found this black and white rabbit; I afterwards gave it up to the prosecutor, as she began to be near her time to kindle - it is since dead.

JAMES LEAK. That rabbit died after having the young ones.

WILLIAM REDFORD . I am a Policeman. I ran after the prisoner on seeing him, and he ran away.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18321129-53

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

54. HENRY BARTHOLOMEW was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Lady Caroline Barham .

MESSERS. ADOLPHUS and PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LUCAS . I am a solicitor, and live in Alsop's-terrace. On Wednesday eveening, the 31st of October, between five and six o'clock, I was in Margaret-street, near Prince's-street , and saw a cabriolet coming round the corner of Cavendish-square - the horse was gallopping; the driver appeared to be whipping the horse as he came round the corner; and when it came opposite Sir Claude Scott's banking-house I saw a female cross the street, and the cub run against her, just opposite the steps of the banking-house - she was knocked down, and the wheel went over her; I think it was the shaft of the cab knocked her down - I ran to her assistance, having called out"Stop the cab;" somebody ran, and took the number of the cab, as it did not stop, and then came to my assistance; the lady was placed on the steps of the banking-house for about five minutes; I sent for a medical gentleman - the lady was quite insensible; I found her address in her reticule, No. 26, Queen Ann-street, St. James'; the medical gentleman came.

Q. If the driver had driven as he ought, in a cautions manner, could the accident have taken place? A. Certainly not; the lady appeared to be walking very well -I do not think there was any body in the cab.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Are you attorney for this prosecution? A. No; it was nearer six o'clock than five; it was twi-light - there were two gaslights opposite Sir Claude Scott's, which gave a great light - I was near Prince's-street; I saw the cab just at the corner of Cavendish-square - the accident happened fifty or sixty yards from the corner; I do not exactly know when the lady began to cross, but think it must have been when the cab was coming round the corner.

Q. Would there not be abundant time for her to cross before it came that distance? A. Not at the rate he was coming; he was gallopping, not trotting - I do not know how far across the lady had got; I was looking at the cab more than her, as I thought she must be run over - I did not call out to her; I did not think it would have any effect; the accident happened near Sir Claude Scott's, on the left-hand side coming from Cavendish-square; I was further from the square - the road may be seven or eight yards wide, or more; he was driving most furiously - it entirely happened from the manner he was driving; she might have seen the cab, I suppose.

Q. If she had seen it coming at this furious rate, she must have put herself in the way of it? A. She tried certainly to run to the pavement to get out of the way.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you walking along the pavement? A. Yes; I heard no cry of warning from the driver to her - when I first saw the horse it was gallopping - the driver whipped it after that; and after the accident, he whipped it again to get out of the way.

JURY. Q. Was the lady on the side that the driver was sitting? A. Yes, she must have been - I do not know whether he came round the corner or not, but just at the corner he was gallopping; he was on the proper side of the road - the lady came from the right side, and the off shaft struck her.

WILLIAM ROKINGS . I am a journeyman fishmonger, and live in Wigmore-street, Cavendish-square. On the evening in question I was at the end of Prince's-street, before the cab - I saw the cab four or five yards before the accident happened; I was about ten yards from where it happened; I saw it four or five yards before it came to the lady; it was being driven violently - the horse was gallopping, and the driver was whipping it; I do not think there was any fare in the cab - I saw Lady Barham cross towards Sir Claude Scott 's; the shaft on the off side caught her, and knocked her down - I did not hear the driver call to her to get out of the way; I was near enough to hear if he had - the cab went over the lady, over some part of her body; I think it was near her breast - she laid on the ground insensible; the wheel jolted in going over her; the driver must have been conscious of it; he did not stop to give any assistance - I called to him to stop - he was near enough to hear me; the road in Prince's-street is paved, but in Margaret-street it is Macadamized; I saw the number of the cab was 897; I ran after it four or five yards to stop him - I think he gallopped faster; I think he was frightened; I came back to the lady - she seemed much hurt; two persons assisted in getting her up, and put her on the steps of the banking-house; I there left her in the hands of her friends -I recognized her ladyship as Lady Caroline Barham; I had known her some time.

Cross-examined Q. This was about the time the gas is lighted? A. Yes; it was between light and dark - I did not notice any dizziness - the gas was just lighted; I think it would be more difficult to see a person at that time than at any other; I was standing at the right-hand corner of Prince's-street, furthest from Cavendish-square - the cab was on the other side - I was about ten yards from it when the wheel went over her; if the driver had called out at all, I think I must have heard him.

Q. Have you ever said you thought this happened accidentally? A. Yes, by negligence; I received 5s. for helping her ladyship - I had a deal of trouble in fetching a coach from Oxford-street, and complained that it was not sufficient, and got a friend to write to say I was not satisfied, as one of the young ladies said I should be handsomely rewarded - and after I had given my evidence at the office I received 20s. more for the trouble I had in picking her ladyship up - it was left at a shop for me.

JURY. Q. Are you sure her ladyship was not moving out of the way to avoid another carriage at the time? A. No, I saw no other carriage there.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see or converse with any body about the 20s.? A. No, I was ten yards from the cab - her ladyship was crossing; the cab-driver could have seen her as well as I could, I saw her plainly - I did not notice whether she mended her pace as the cab came along.

THOMAS JONES . I am a surgeon, and live in Princes-street, Cavendish-square. I was called to attend her

ladyship, who I found sitting on the steps of Sir Claude Scott 's banking-house; she was perfectly insensible - we had a coach provided, and took her to her own house, and Mr. Maclure was called in; there are five gas-lights very near the spot - I could see perfectly well.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. It is a particularly light spot? A. Yes, much more so than other parts; the square was lighted, but I think it is darker than that spot - there was light enough even in the square to see any thing.

MR. MACLURE. I am a surgeon, and live in Harley-street. I was in the habit of attending Lady Caroline Barham ; I was called in that evening - she was sitting on a sofa in the front dining-room, with Mr. Jones, and a number of people round her: she had great difficulty of breathing, and complained of pain - she put her hand to her breast, and on the right side of the thorax, there was a mark of contusion; five ribs were broken, and the radius of the left arm was broken near the wrist - the radius is the large bone of the arm; her being run over would occasion the injury - the two ribs behind might be broken by the shaft, and the other three by the wheel; she lived till Saturday afternoon, the 3rd: the body was opened in my presence - I have not a doubt these injuries caused her death.

MR. JONES. I was present at the post mortem examination, and agree with Mr. Maclure's evidence as to the cause of her death.

WILLIAM HOOKER . I am a serjeant of the Police. I went on the Saturday after the accident in search of the driver of the cab - I went to Kepple-mews, Russell-square, and saw the prisoner there; he was standing with his father - I told the father I wished to see the driver of the cab, No. 897; the father said, "This is my son who drove the cab" - I asked the prisoner if he remembered taking me up on the Wednesday, near Cavendish-square; I was then in plain clothes - he said No; I asked if he was sure he drove the cab on the Wednesday - he said Yes; I asked if he remembered running against a lady near Cavendish-square - he then hung down his head, and said, "Yes, I do;" I asked if he knocked her down, and run over her - he said, "Yes, I did;" I asked if he heard any body call after him: he said Yes; I asked why he did not stop - he said he did not like; I took him to the station-house.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Did he not say he was frightened? A. No.

Several witnesses deposed to the prisoner's being a skilful, careful, and attentive driver, and stated that the horse he usually drove was lame.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-54

Before Mr. Baron Bolland.

55. THOMAS WILLIAM FRICKER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 snuff-box, value 5l. 5s., the goods of John Barclay , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN BARCLAY . I live in Hornsey-lane . About a month ago, on a Saturday, I left my snuff-box on the dining-room mantle-piece at nine o'clock, and it was missed at twelve, by the servant - the end of my dining-room looks into the garden, and the side of it into the road; on coming home in the afternoon, I observed footmarks at both ends of the room, and marks which proved somebody must have got into the dining-room through the window - mine is the last house towards Crouch-end, on the right-hand side; a person coming over the fields could get into my garden - I think the footmarks were too small to be the prisoner's; they were evidently the footmarks of a boy; the box was presented to me - I understand ten guineas were given for it, but a jeweller fixed the value at the least, at five guineas.

WILLIAM STILES . I am a silversmith, and live in Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner came to my shop on Saturday, the 20th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, and laid on the counter a very handsome silver snuff-box, requesting to knw what it was, and what it was worth; I asked him who it belonged to - he said it belonged to the mate of an East Indiaman; I asked how the mate came by it - he said the mate's father left it him; I asked him where the mate lived - he said down at the east-end of the town, and if I disputed his word, he would leave the box, and go and fetch him - I said he must not go away till he had given some better account of it, and said it was very strange that he came from the east to the west, as there were so many shops between, and I did not believe his account - I came round the counter to look for a Policeman; I looked out at the door, but could not see one, and while my back was turned, the prisoner rushed by me out at the door, and run away; I followed, and overtook him about fifty yards off - we had rather a violent struggle, and at last got him back to my shop; I am sure the box is worth more than five guineas - I would give that for it myself, as a second-hand box.

GEORGE POWELL . I am a Policeman. I received him in charge, and asked him where he got the box; he said a man gave it to him outside - I asked if he knew the man; he said he had seen him once before, but did not know his name, nor where he lived.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-55

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

56. JOHN GRIGG was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 2 silver sauce-ladles, value 50s.; 16 silver spoons, value 10l.; 1 coat, value 2l.; 2 waistcoats, value 10s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 10s.; 1 jacket, value 5s.; 1 pair of overalls, value 3s.; 1 hat, value 4s., and 1 pair of gaiters, value 2s., the goods of Roger Riding , in his dwelling-house .

ROGER RIDING . I live in Camden-cottage, Camden-town . The prisoner came into my service about the 25th of September; on the 14th of November he came into my breakfast-room - I did not see him in my house after that; I found he was gone about nine o'clock in the morning, and missed all this plate, which was worth about 25l., and two suits of his livery; the clothes were not given to the prisoner - it was the livery, and stable-dress, which were worth about 3l.

ROBERT HAWKSLEY . I am a Police-serjeant. On Wednesday, the 14th of November, I made inquiry after the prisoner, and found him at No. 22, Richmond-street, Lisson-grove, in the back attic - I opened the door, and

said, "I want you, I suppose you know what for?" he said, Yes - I had not told him what he was charged with; and under the table I found the silver lace which had been taken off his hat and coat; his hat and coat were there - in his right-hand breeches pocket, I found six dessert-spoons, four tea-spoons, two salt-spoons, and two sauce-ladles; I took him to the station-house, and asked him what had become of the four table-spoons he had taken - he said Ned Palmer was gone to pawn them.

JOHN WOOD . I am a Policeman. I went to No. 22, Richmond-street, after the prisoner had been taken; I searched the top back room, and found a suit of livery and two pairs of stockings.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-56

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

57. WILLIAM PEDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of June , 2 packing-cases, value 8s.; 2 yards of canvas, value 18s.; 2712 pairs of gloves, value 212l. 5s.; 6 bottles, value 2s., and 9 pints of seidlitz water, value 10s., the goods of John Dent and others ; and JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing them to be stolen .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM LORD . I am warehouseman to Mr. John Dent , who has three partners - they are wholesale glover s, and carry on business in Friday-street and at Worcester; I do not know Pedley. On the 23rd of June I assisted in packing some goods for Worcester; there were one hundred and ninety dozen pairs of gloves, with some other trifling things; they were packed in two French deal cases- they were not covered with any cloth; they were corded: one case was about a yard and a half cube - the other was much smaller; they were addressed to Dent and Co., Worcester - there was a truss, which was not packed at our house; I was at the desk when the things were taken away, but paid no attention to it.

THOMAS ANGEL . I am in the service of Messrs. Dent. I entered the goods - I was in the warehouse, and saw one case taken away; I did not see the prisoners.

FRANCIS TIGHE . I am porter to Messrs. Dent. I did not see the prisoners till they were before the Magistrate; I was in the warehouse when the cases were packed, and when they were taken away; two cases and a truss were taken away - the truss was packed in canvas; it was about two feet and a half each way, and two feet deep - they were taken away in a cart; I cannot say whether I know the man that came into the warehouse to take them out- it was about three o'clock, or between three and four; Boucher gave me 6d. to give to the man who was with the cart - I went into the passage, and gave him 6d. for booking; the goods were then in the cart.

JOHN BOUCHER . I am apprentice to Dent and Co. I do not know either of the prisoners. On the 23rd of June I remember seeing a cart coming for the goods, between four and five o'clock; I was in the warehouse, and saw the person who came for the goods in the warehouse, but do not know him; I saw him remove two cases and a truss - one case was about four feet long and three high, and the other a smaller one - the truss was packed in canvas; they were to be sent to Dent and Co., at Worcester, from the Rose-inn, Farringdon-street; Robinson drove the cart - I only saw his back; the cases and truss were taken out of the warehouse and put into the cart - the prisoner Pedley generally called at our warehouse on Saturday morning, to know if there were any goods to go to Carron-wharf; and he would take goods to pitch as he passed by other wharfs.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You only saw the back of the driver? A. No; I do not swear it was Robinson - I saw him in the same dress at the office; he wore a dark drab jacket.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How long did you look at him? A. Only as I came down stairs; there was a cart there at the time; I saw Robinson when he was in custody - the Magistrate told him to turn round: I said, as far as I could tell from his back, he was the man; he was dressed the same as the man was.

JOHN BLOOMFIELD , SEN. I keep the booking-office at the Rose inn, Farringdon-street. On the 23rd of June no packing-case or truss were brought there, except one which I fetched myself from their warehouse, at seven o'clock that night; I have not received the packages in question at all.

JEREMIAH ALLCROFT . I am a partner in the firm of Dent and Co., Worcester. We did not receive the cases and truss in question; they would be two or three days coming from London - I did not receive two cases and a truss within ten days.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any means of recollecting that they did not arrive, except from your books? A. That is one means - we received the invoice of them, but have never received the goods; I know we did not receive them - the invoice and our books are in Court.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you receive the invoice about the 23rd of June? A. Yes, enclosed in a small parcel, by coach, but the goods which were to come by the waggon were deficient; this is the invoice - the first two lines of it allude to goods in the parcel which accompained it - the other items were to come by van.

JOHN ROBINSON . In June last I was in the employ of Mr. Thomas Elston, an owner of town-carts. On Saturday, the 23rd of June, I was out with one of the carts; coming through Dowgate-hill, between four and five o'clock, and I was hired by John Ellis, who took me to the corner of Friday-street - I was dressed as I am now; I went to the first house on the right-hand side of Cheapside - when I got there, Ellis put three packages into the cart, which he brought out of the warehouse; I did not go into the warehouse - I remained in the cart; the packages were two deal cases, and a small truss - one case was rather bigger than the other, the truss was covered with a kind of sackcloth; I did not see any body belonging to the warehouse - Ellis got into the cart, and by his direction, I turned round to the left, towards St. Paul's, and when I got twenty or thirty yards, he told me to turn round, and go back down Cheapside - Pedley and Wall were at a distance; they did not join the cart at all, till I got where I was desired to go by Ellis - I was ordered to go to Castle-alley, and they joined me there; I was ordered to go to Smith's, in Castle-alley, by Ellis - I had seen Pedley before; they joined the cart at Smith's, and each took a parcel out.

Q. Where was Pedley when you first saw him after Ellis

hired you? A. Pedley and Wall were both twenty or thirty yards from Ellis, walking on up Dowgate-hill, towards Cheapside, they passed by after I got to the warehouse, while the goods were loading into the cart; I had got about ten or twenty yards down Cheapside before I saw them again; they were following the cart down, going in the same direction as the cart, and about twenty yards from it; after seeing them then, I did not see them any more till I got to Castle-alley, which is in Whitechapel, near Wentworth-street - there is no thoroughfare in the alley for carts - it leads strait into Whitechapel; my cart drew up Castle-alley - Pedley and Wall were there by the time I got there, they were at the end of the court, ready to take the goods out when I drew up; they were up the alley - they each took a package, and went up the court with it; I did not see what house they went into - I was not there above ten minutes; Ellis paid me 10s. for the cart, in the evening, in Church-lane, Whitechapel, in the street; nobody was present when he paid me - I was afterwards apprehended, in consequence of this, by Lee, and made this statement to him after I was taken; I afterwards went with Lee to Castle-alley, and pointed out the place where the cart stood.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is there a turning to the left in Castle-alley leading to Castle-place? A. At the bottom there is - there are five or six houses in Castle-place; I believe Castle-street is to the right - I never saw Smith at all; the cart stopped very near the bottom of Castle-alley - the horse's head stood towards Whitechapel; the cart stood at the turning that the goods went up - they were taken up the turning to the left.

Q. Did you come into Castle-alley out of Whitechapel? A. No, there is no thoroughfare there; I got into it by the brewhouse - I might be there ten minutes; I am positive I was not longer - I got into the cart, and delivered the goods to them; the cart stood still in the same place till I drove away - I am positive I did not back into any premises, if any body has said so, it is not true; master has four carts, three large and one smaller - the large ones may be eight feet wide; the one I drive was No. 152,884.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. The first time you saw Pedley he was walking up Dowgate-hill? A. Yes, with Wall, and they passed as I was loading the cart; I saw them in Cheapside, and saw no more of them till I got to Castle-alley - I there delivered the goods to Ellis, Pedley, and Wall.

SARAH GROVES . I am married - my husband is abroad; I live now at No. 44, Russel-street, Mile-end-road. In June last I lived at No. 8, Castle-place, Whitechapel - I know the prisoner Smith; I was in his house about ten weeks, to take care of his children, three years ago - he then lived at No. 2, Castle-place; I went to live in Castle-place about a week or fortnight after last Christmas -Smith was not then living at No. 2, for he had had two rooms made at his shed, or warehouse, in Castle-alley; that was where his business was carried on - I cannot say what his business was, further than it was receiving stolen goods - while I lived with him he was receiving stolen property; the warehouse in Castle-alley, and his house, in all in the same place - it is not a stone's throw; we have to turn round from one to the other; the alley goes up towards Whitechapel; the warehouse is in Castle-alley. On Saturday, the 23rd of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw a town cart driven down round Castle-alley, by the witness Robinson - the cart was backed into Smith's premises; I saw it back into Smith's premises - I saw it drive down - I could not see any thing taken from the cart, as it was backed into the premises -I saw two packing-cases, and a truss in it: the truss was covered with canvas; I saw the cart go away empty in about twenty minutes, and in about an hour and three-quarters I saw another cart, a brown cart - Smith, the prisoner, came out of his premises with it; it had the name of Dunn on it, with the same packing-cases apparently as had just before gone in in the town-cart, but not the truss - Smith was in the cart; nobody else - it was a light brown cart, with a seat in it, made more like a chaise-cart.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You lived at Smith's, as a servant at the time the cart came? A. No, I lived at Mrs. Morris', No. 3, Castle-place; that is in the same line of buildings as Smith lived in - I know his premises, and the way into his back yard, and the gateway into it - I saw the town cart back into his premises, through the gates, into the back yard - I saw Robinson drive the cart round the corner of Castle-alley, and he backed it into the yard - the gates were closed; I could not see any thing taken out of the cart; Robinson, the horse and cart, were all inclosed inside the gates, which were closed - I saw that; I saw nobody but him with the cart, neither taking it in nor out - it came out empty; I saw nobody else go into the yard; he backed it in, and somebody closed the gates inside - I could not see who was inside.

Q. Had you been looking into the yard before the cart came? A. No; I was standing close to my own place when the cart passed - there was nobody in it but Robinson; I saw nobody else pass; I know Mr. Allum, at No. 4, Castle-alley - I never lived with him - Mr. Morris has been a master-hackneyman, but now drives a cab; his wife lives with him - after leaving Smith's, I went to a house in Brathwaite's-buildings, Finsbury; Smith was a receiver of stolen goods when I lived with him - that was the reason I left, so many bad characters came backwards and forwards - I discovered it about six weeks after I went to live with him, but waited there till I could suit myself with a house; my husband lived with me at that time - he is now in America; he went last May - I never asked Smith for money after I left him; I know Mary Ville ; she is Mr. Smith's washerwoman - I know Thomas and Ann Litchfield ; she is called Scruby - I never said to any body that if Smith did not continue to support my children, I would transport him; I never asked him for a single shilling - I have six children - I am positive Robinson's cart backed into Smith's premises - I saw another town cart there on the Saturday after.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Your husband left this country last May, where did he live when you was in Smith's service? A. With me; it was through him I went to Smith's - I kept the house in Finsbury for nearly three years; my husband lived there with me, and he was at Smith's house with me - one of my children are at sea, and the other four were with me - Smith had three children.

JURY to JOHN ROBINSON. Q. What is the usual cartage from Cheapside to Whitechapel? A. I cannot say -I did not demand any money, he gave me what he liked: I think it was rather more than the usual cartage - I did not back my cart into Smith's premises; I never took a cart there on any other occasion.

JAMES LEE . I am a Police-officer. I apprehended Robinson on the 21st of September - he did not at first make a statement of the share he had in the transaction, but did afterwards - I took Pedley the same day (before I took Robinson), and told him it was for taking some goods from a warehouse in Friday-street; he said he knew nothing about it, and asked me when - I told him about June; he said it was very hard he should be taken, it was not him, for he was in confinement at the time - he did not say where; he said he had been tried and acquitted; I asked him what he had been - he said he had been a porter at the Carron wharf; I afterwards took Robinson - he went with me to Castle-alley: I pointed out where the cart stood - the prisoner Smith was in custody at the time, taken for another affair; I searched the premises, and found a tinplate there, with the name of William Dunn on it - I gave it to an officer here last Session; Smith's premises have a side door, which goes up a passage to his house, and then there are two folding gates leading to a shed; you can enter either by a side door or the gates - his premises go to the corner of the wall; I have been to the prosecutors' premises - they are the first house on the right-hand side from Cheapside.

JURY. Q. What width are Smith's folding gates? A. Eight feet two inches inside - I saw them measured to-day by a wheelwright; there is room for a cart and horse to stand within when they are closed; the shed is fifty-six feet deep by twelve wide.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If there was a good sized van in the yard would there be room for it to be kept in? A. Yes - I should think it would hold six carts.

JOHN SEAMAN (Police-constable H 150.) I received a plate from Lee, but have left it at home; I have been to Smith's, shed two or three times since this transction - I noticed a van there and two chaises on the 12th of September, as near as I can recollect; I apprehended Smith on the 12th or 13th of September, at the Three Crowns, Castle-street, and told him it was on suspicion of receiving stolen property - he said he knew nothing at all of it; I watched his premises for twenty-one days before he was taken, and noticed several well known thieves going there- I saw Mr. Dunn's cart go there several times; it is a brown cart - I should call it a common stage cart.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Smith has been at large, on bail, has he not? A. Yes, and surrendered to-night.

Smith's Defence. It is a made up thing of this woman's; I made a subscription for her husband leaving the country, and subscribed a sovereign towards it - I always gave her money, and since May, when I denied her any, she has held out this, which I have all the neighbours to prove - Robinson gave me the number of his cart, and it will not go into the gates.

JOHN ROBINSON . I gave him the number of my cart voluntarily.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you in the House of Correction at that time? A. He was in the van with me, as we were going there; my cart is about eight feet wide, or rather better.

SARAH GROVES . The prisoner did give my husband a sovereign - my husband asked him for it; I thought, when I saw the cart backed in, that it was a dishonest transaction; I gave information of it when I saw about it in the newspaper - I wrote to the gentleman in Friday-street about the beginning of July; my husband has sent his little boy to the prisoner for a shilling or two, but I have not asked him for money - this is the letter I wrote to Friday-street (looking at it) - I never threatened to cause the prisoner to be prosecuted; I did not quarrel with him - I wrote the letter in consequence of reading of the transaction in the newspaper.

MARY VILLE . I am a washerwoman. At the time Groves came backwards and forwards to Smith's, she told me she would transport him if he did not give her money to support his family; Ramsay, Scruby, Cripps, and others heard her say so when she has been quarrelling with Smith- it was eight months ago that I first heard her say she would do her best to transport him.

MR. BODKIN. Q. That was when she quarrelled with him? A. Yes, and before; I have heard her say it coolly, when nobody but me and Smith's children were present - I repeatedly heard her say it at Smith's house, and afterwards at the quarrel, about ten weeks ago, it might be twelve weeks, it was about fortnight before he was taken into custody, or not so long; Ramsay, Joseph Brown, Thomas and Miss Scruby, and Solomon and Thomas Cripps were present - it was at the bottom of Castle-place, in the open air, in the evening, just before dark; the lamps were not lighted - she did not address any one in particular - the whole heard it; they made no answer to it - I came away, and left the rest there; Scruby sometimes goes by the name of Litchfield; Groves always used those words.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You do not mean to say you have given us the exact words? A. Yes, I have, the very words; I have had no quarrel with her - she came in and out at Smith's, I thought, as a friend, and when he would not oblige her with money she was angry, and said if he did leave her money she would do for him, she would transport him.

ESTHER RAMSAY . I live in Castle-street - my husband is a skin-dresser. About fourteen or sixteen weeks ago I heard a quarrel between Mrs. Groves and the prisoner; I heard her say she would transport him if he did not support her or her children, or words to that effect; this passed in Castle-place, between her landlord's window and the next house - it was late in the evening.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Quite dark? A. Yes, between nine and ten o'clock at night; Ville was there, and Scruby and Joseph Brown - Cripps was not there; it was about ten weeks previous to the last Session.

ANN SCRUBY . I live with my brother, at No. 6, Castle-place, and work at shoe-binding. I know Groves by sight - I heard her say she would do her best to transport Smith if he did not help to support his and her children, and give her money now and then; that was one evening when she was quarrelling with him - my brother was pre

sent; I do not know whether Ville or Brown were, or Cripps; Esther Ramsay was.

Mr. BODKIN. Q. A good many of you had got together? A. There being a quarrel, and it being fine weather, people came out - it was not only then, but I have heard her say it at other times constantly, when she passed up and down; it was at supper time, between eight and nine o'clock - it was after eight, I know - I have been called Scruby from a child, as my father was known by that name; but when we came on this side the Borough, our circumstances were not so good as they used to be, and he went by the name of Litchfield, which is one of his Christian names - Groves has gone up and down, saying she was determined to have her revenge on Smith, and on those who took his part.

JOSEPH BROWN . I live in Castle-alley, and am a tailor. I know Groves by sight - I heard her say she would do her best to transport Smith if he did not do his best to support her and her family; Ville and Ramsay were present - it was between ten and eleven o'clock at night, at the bottom of Castle-place; I did not see Miss Scruby there; I have heard this two or three times, but never attended to it more than once myself - I never spoke to Groves in my life.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Ramsay and Ville were both present when the quarrel took place at the bottom of the court? A. Yes; I think it was nearer eleven o'clock than ten - I was coming home from work, and heard the disturbance; I left work about ten - I am not acquainted with Smith; I believe he is something of a wool sorter.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you heard this at other times in the evening? A. Yes; it was thirteen or fourteen weeks ago - a fortnight or three weeks before Smith was taken up.

THOMAS SCRUBY . I am a shoemaker, and live in Castle-place. I heard Groves say she would do her best in transporting Smith if he did not do his best to support her children - it was twelve or fourteen weeks ago, or more; I have heard her say it both private and public - it was her common practice; she said she would certainly have her revenge on Smith, and all who took his part.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You think it was thirteen or fourteen weeks ago that you last heard it? A. The quarrel was thirteen or fourteen weeks ago - the last time I heard it might be a week or a fortnight after; I was at home on the night of the quarrel; the noise called me out - it might be about nine o'clock, or between nine and ten; I am sure it was before ten - I mended a pair of shoes for Smith about two years ago; I never dressed any leather for him, nor did he apply to me to dress some, which I refused; he never applied to me to do any thing which I refused - I knew Mrs. Morris, and Groves; I never told them Smith brought me stolen leather to work, and because I would not have it he took his work from me, nor any thing of the sort.

SOLOMON CRIPPS . I am in the wool business, but have been out of a situation some time - I lived in Castle-place, but now live in King-street, Spitalfields. When I lived at Hoxton I heard Groves say, at Smith's own place, that she would transport him unless he supported her and her children - I heard it at both places.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You heard it at Smith's place? A. Yes, the very morning Mr. and Mrs. Groves left the house(they ran away); they quarelled that morning, because Smith said he would not take her into his place - I was at work for Smith that morning, it was about nine o'clock, in the shop; Mr. Heather was there - he works in the same stable in Ropemaker-street; I get my living by portering - I have been out of a regular place since three weeks after Christmas; I was in the employ of Mr. Gooch, who houses wool - I never sold Smith any wool; I never took any to him - I have taken cotton to his place when he employed me; I was discharged from Gooch through Mrs. Groves - after Grove's, husband was discharged, Gooch said he could not keep me any longer, as he had such a piece of work at his house; it was nothing about wool.

JURY. Q. Did you ever take any cotton wool to Smith? A. No.

JOHN BENNET . I am a carman in the employ of Mr. Elston. I went to Smith's premises last Friday, and tried to back one of our three large carts into his gateway; Robinson used to drive one of the large ones - they are all three the same size; I rather think this was the smallest of the three, if there is any difference - I could not back it into his premises; there was not room to turn it.

JURY. Q. Can you tell us the dimensions of the cart? A. I should think it is about five feet without the wheels, and six or seven feet, including the wheels.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Could you not back a cart that width, through a gateway eight feet two inches? A. No, the street is not wide enough to turn it; there is no footway on either side - I do not recollect any curb on either side; I did not go down to the bottom of the street - there is no curb by Smith's gate; the gates were open when I tried to back the cart - the gateway is up the street; I went inside his shed, and saw a four wheeled van there - I should not think that is longer than our cart, not shafts and all; it is a longer van, but they are very narrow compared to a town cart.

JURY. Q. How did you get out of the alley with your cart? A. I backed it out all the way, because I could not turn it; Mr. Elston sent me to try it, by Smith's desire - Smith was with me, and saw me do it; I have been a carman eight or nine years, but only worked for Elston a few weeks.

JOHN ROBINSON. I did not turn the cart round; it was not so high up as the gate - I backed into Castle-place, and turned round.

THOMAS BROWN . I am in Mr. Elston's employ. He had four carts in June, three large and one small; three are of the same size - I never measured them; Robinson used to drive one of the large ones; he always drove the same cart.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Are you in Elston's employ now? A. No - he is in health, and attends to his business.

MR. WILLIAMSON. Pedley was taken up on a charge of robbing me, on the 1st of July; I was robbed on the 30th of June.

JOHN ROBINSON re-examined. I pointed the gateway out to the officer; I did not see where the goods were carried into; my cart was within ten yards of the gateway - I remained by my horse.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When the persons took the parcels

out do you mean to say they took them to Smith's premises? A. I could did not tell where they took them.

JURY. Q. Did the men pass the gateway? A. No, nor did they go to it: there was no door between the cart and gateway; the men went out of my sight up the alley; they did not go to the gateway - they did not go towards the gateway; they went up the alley, away from it - I never saw Smith.

PEDLEY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH - GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-57

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

58. ELIZABETH BOYER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of James Rennie , from his person .

JAMES RENNIE . I am a sailor , and belong to the brig Bridget, of Sunderland. On the 29th of October I was at the Coach and Horses, public-house, Shadwell - the prisoner was there - I had known her before; I gave her a glass of gin, and had a pint of porter myself: I changed a sovereign - I got 19s. in silver, and put it into my pocket; I left, and wanted to go on board, but the prisoner followed me; I ran from her, but she overtook me - I went home with her - she wanted me to stop, but I would not; I said,"I must away;" I sat down on the bed-side with her, and might have been ten minutes funning and joking; I then said, "I must away," and she was then very agreeable to let me go; when I had got a few yards from the door I missed 7s. - I had only 12s. left; I am sure I had the 19s. when I went into the house - I had not given her any money, nor promised her any; I had not put my hand into my pocket while I was in the house; no one else had an opportunity of taking it; I was never in any company but hers - I went to a house opposite, where I found her, with two or three more; I said to her, "If you don't return that money to me, I will call the Police;" she said I might, she did not care for me nor them - I strnggled with her, and one shilling dropped at her feet; I picked that up, and still asked her to be so good as to give me my money; she said she had taken no money, but I said she had; she then took something from her stocking, and put it into her month - I called in the Police, who overhauled her, and 1s. 6d. dropped from her; when the Policeman came in she took something from her mouth, and put it on the chair.

Prisoner. He gave me the half-crown, and promised to give me half a crown more to sleep with me. Witness. No, I did not.

COURT. Q. How came you to go home with her? A. I could not get rid of her before; it was about eight o'clock in the evening.

GEORGE HARRISON (Police-constable K 64). I heard the cry of Police! I went to the house in a court in Bluegate-fields; I saw the prisoenr there - I asked what she had done with the man's money; she said he had given her no money, and she had no money - she was sitting on a chair, and one of her stockings was off; I searched her, and one shilling I received from the prosecutor - the prisoner said they had been to another room, but did not give any reason how the prosecutor could have lost his money; she was affected with liquor.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-58

59. SAMUEL WILSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering a building within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of Susannah Nash , on the 5th of December, 1830 , and stealing 1 bushel and a half of onions, value 5s., her property .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD ROSEWELL . I am gardener to Mrs. Susannah Nash; she lives at the High-house, at Edmonton . I had some unions of hers to tie up in the tool-house, which joins her building, and is surrounded by a brick wall and a shrubbery - there is no way of getting into it but by getting over the wall, or the shrubbery, or in at the gates - I tied up the onions, and placed them in an inner place inside the tool-house; I locked that place and the toolhouse safe on the night of the 5th of December, 1830 - I went to the tool-house the next morning, found the door shut, but not locked; but the key of that door I had left hanging up as usual, and it might have been opened - there was no marks of violence; I had the key of the inside place, where the onious were, in my pocket - I went in, and found the door of that place standing open; the lock was broken off, and banging by one nail - I went in, and found the door of that place standing open; the lock was broken off, and banging by one nail - I missed all the onions; I think there had been twenty-five or thirty strings of them - I told Mrs. Nash, and then got a warrant; I went to Mrs. Scate's house, which adjoins our premises, with an officer - the prisoner is her brother; we there found about a bushel and a half of onions loose, and found the strings of them under the stairs - I know they were my own tying, and have not the least doubt but that the onions had been fastened to these strings.

JAMES PORTER . I am a gardener to Mrs. Nash. I assisted in tying the onions - I saw them and the strings, at Mrs. Scate's, and know they were what we tied up.

HARRIET SCATE . I am the wife of James Scate , and live near Mrs. Nash. In December, 1830, I was in the family way, and on Sunday night, the 5th of December, I was burning a light all night - the prisoner is my brother; he at that time lodged with me - I went down, between three and four o'clock in the morning, to see if he was coming to bed - I found him and Perry down stairs; they had a number of onions, and were picking out the rotten ones - they appeared to have been tied up in strings; I told my brother not to bring them there, as he knew my husband would not suffer any thing of the kind- Perry said he was going to take them away, and I think he mentioned something about his going after apples, and he got onions instead - my brother sometimes went to bed at nine or ten o'clock - I never knew him so late as that before.

GEORGE ANGUS . I am a labourer, and live at Edmonton - my master lives about a mile from Mrs. Nash. On the morning of the 6th of December, 1830, I got up at half-past two o'clock, to look after my horses; I met the prisoner, with Perry, about a stone's throw from my house, about half a mile from Mrs. Nash's house - Perry had a sack on his shoulder, which had something in it,

but found no money on her, but 1s. 6d. was on the floor, but I could not tell what - they were coming from Mrs. Nash's, and close against her premises, though some distance from her house; they were about a furlong from Scate's, on the high road.

RICHARD WATKINS. I am an officer. I took the prisoner last Friday-week - I have been looking for him ever since Perry was tried.

RICHARD ROSEWELL re-examined. Q. Who lives in the house? A. Mrs. Susannah Nash - she is a widow; her son-in-law lives with her, but she is the proprietor.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-59

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

60. ANN ROGERS was indicted for stealing, 9 yards of printed furniture, value 12s.; 3 yards of cotton, value 18d.; 1 pillow-case, value 1s.; 1 pillow-ticking, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s.; 1 night-cap, value 6d.; 4 towels, value 3s.; 1 chair-cover, value 18d.; 1 table-cover. value 3s.; 1 sofa-cover, value 1s.; 2 books, value 2s.; 28lbs. of feathers, value 2l. 16s.; 1 handkerchief, value 18d.; 1 blanket, value 5s.; 1 sheet, value 4s.; 3 saucers, value 18d.; 3 plates, value 18d.; 1 teapot stand, value 6d.; 1 dish, value 18d.; 1 mug, value 6d.; 1 glass-lamp, value 2d.; 1 wine-glass, value 2d.; 1 root-glass, value 4d.; 7 pieces of bed-furniture, value 20s.; 1 carpet-cover, value 5s.; 3 glass-cruets, value 1s.; 1 foot-bath, value 2s.; 1 jelly mould, value 5s.; 1 toasting-fork, value 6d.; 1 steel, value 6d.; 1 cloak-pin, value 1d.; 2 bell-pulls, value 6d.; 1 lamp-hook, value 2d., and 1 weight, value 6d., the goods of Edward Downes , her master .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. EDWARD DOWNES . I am an attorney , and live in Soho-square . I left town with my family about the end of May; the prisoner was in my service: I did not then know that she was married - she was with me about two years; I had occasionally come backwards and forwards to town, and my family returned to town on the 27th of October; while I was in the country I received information, and wrote to the prisoner, desiring that she would leave on my return, and on the 27th of October she left - I almost immediately missed some articles from the house; I obtained a warrant, and appointed for the prisoner to be at my chambers to receive her board wages, and any items due to her - she came there, and I asked her what could induce her to marry without letting me know of it, when she might be quite certain that if her husband was a man of good character, I should have been happy to have had the protection of a man sleeping in my house at night - she said she knew she had done wrong, and repented it as much as I could; I appointed for herto come again, and went to my chambers with an officer - she came there, and I said as she was now married, and in possession of a house, what would she think of leaving an individual in charge of that house, and to find that every bed in it, had been robbed of feathers to make one for themselves - she said, "You don't suppose that I have done that;" I said, "That is not the question, what would you do to such a person;" she said, "I should imprison them" - I said, "That is your case, you have stripped every bed in my house; this is the officer, and you will accompany us to your house to search:" we went there in a hackney-coach - in going along I asked her where she got the feathers of which she had made a new bed; she said she bought them of a woman in Wardour-street, in July - I asked what she knew of the person; she said nothing, but that in passing Wardour-street, she met a woman carrying a bed to a pawnbroker's, and that she purchased it; when we got to the house we found the things stated in the indictment, and I believe some more: I asked how she came to take them - she said she really did not know, and that she was the only person who was guilty of the feathers; I asked her how she came to do it - she said from having heard of it, and that other servants did it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I believe she had conducted herself well? A. Up to the time of my leaving town; I placed unlimited confidence in her - I heard she was married the Sunday after I left town; I searched her house again on a subsequent day, and found some other things which were not taken before, though they were there - I have indicted the husband separately; I believe some of the articles in this indictment are in the indictment against him - there were a quarter's wages due to her, and some board wages; there may be 13l. due to her.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer. On the 13th of October I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's house, with a search-warrant; what has been stated is correct.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My prosecutor said he wished me to clear the rubbish out of the house, before my mistress came home, which induced me to take more than I should have done.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-60

61. JOHN ROGERS was indicted for stealing, 9 yards of printed furniture, value 12s.; 3 yards of cotton, value 18d.; 1 pillow-case, value 1s.; 1 pillow-ticking, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s.; 1 night cap, value 6d.; 4 towels, value 3s.; 1 chair cover, value 18d.; 1 table-cover, value 3s.; 1 sofa-cover, value 7s.; 2 pieces of carpet, value 5s.; 1 sheet, value 4s.; 3 saucers, value 18d.; 1 dish, value 18d.; 1 tea-pot stand, value 6d.; 1 mug, value 6d.; 1 glass lamp, value 2d.; 2 wine-glasses, value 2s.; 1 root-glass, value 4d.; 1 bason-stand, value 6d.; 21 stone bottles, value 1s.; 7 pieces of bed-furniture, value 20s.; 1 carpet-cover, value 5s.; 1 pair of boots, value 7s.; 1 pair of boot-hooks, value 1s.; 3 glass cruets, value 1s.; 3 pictures, value 10s.; 1 foot-bath, value 2s.; 1 jellymould, value 5s.; 1 toasting-fork, value 6d.; 1 steel, value 6d.; 1 cloak-pin, value 1d.; 2 bell-pulls, value 6d.; 1 lamp-hook, value 2d., and 1 weight, value 6d. , the goods of Edward Downes .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-61

62. SIGISMOND KRYNSKI was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and 1 gown, value 20s. , the goods of James Smith .

The prisoner being a native of Poland, had the evidence communicated to him by an interpreter.

REBECCA SMITH . I am the wife of James Smith, we live in Regent-street - I am a dress-maker; I lost these articles on a Wednesday, I think the 16th of October; I had seen the prisoner on the Monday evening before, when he called to solicit charity; he spoke in some language which I did not understand, and seemed to wish to see Mr. Smith; on the Wednesday, about two o'clock, I was in the back parlour, and there came a double knock at the door; Miss Pierpoint went out first, and I heard footsteps in the parlour, where this dress was; I went into the passage, and saw the prisoner - he went away, and I soon afterwards missed the dress and handkerchief; I saw him on the Saturday afterwards go past; the house-maid and a boy pursued him - I know he is the person.

JAMES STOKES . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this dress on Wednesday, the 17th of October, for 16s.

MARY MARIA PIERPOINT . I saw the prisoner come to the prosecutor's; he asked me in broken French when Mr. Smith would be at home; I believe he was in the passage ten minutes.(Property produced and sworn to).

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 30. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18321129-62

63. THOMAS CALVER and JAMES COLLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 gown, value 12s. , the goods of Mary Marshall .

GEORGE STONE (Police-constable C 99). On the 27th of October I saw the two prisoners together - I watched them, and saw Calver go a few steps into Mr. Marshall's shop, in Cranbourn-street, take down a gown, and put it under his apron - he came out, and they both walked away; I took them into the next shop, and took the gown from under Calver's apron.

HARRIET FREEMAN . I live with Mary Marshall; this gown is hers.

Calver's Defence. I was going along, and saw the gown laying down; I took it up, and had not got many yards, when the officer took me.

Collins' Defence. I was coming along - I know nothing of it.

CALVER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-63

64. JOHN SMITH , THOMAS SPIERS , and GEORGE STEPHENS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 trunk, value 10s.; 31 silver spoons, value 15l.; 1 tongue-scraper, value 10s.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 1l.; 1 pair of boots, value 1l.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of William Rayner .

MR. WILLIAM RAYNER . I live at North-bank, Regent's-park . On the 6th of September, I and my family arrived at St. Katherine's-dock, from Broadstairs; a friend of mine provided us with a coach and a chariot - Smith drove the coach, and Stevens the chariot, and Spiers I afterwards found rode behind Stevens' chariot; there were six females in the coach, and my footman rode with Smith - I, my female servant, and the boxes went in the chariot; when we arrived, the coaches were unloaded - I did not attend to it, as I was very ill, but going into the garden, I observed my trunk (which I had given to my footman, while on board, and told him to take particular care of) standing on the grass plot, leading from the house to the gate; in a few minutes after I got into the house, my wife asked me for the keys, as we wanted some tea-spoons, and the trunk was gone - I sent out 11s. to pay the coachman , which he said was the fare; that was paid to Smith, and he drove off; I thought that was the whole fare, but my servant then asked for 6s. 6d., which Stevens said was his fare - Stevens came into the house for it, and he said that as soon as the other man had got the 11s. he drove off immediately; I then asked Stevens the number of his coach, he said it was 191 - the trunk was afterwards found at the Stamp-office.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you examined at Marylebone office? A. Yes, and stated that I saw the trunk on the grass plot; Stevens squabbled with me a considerable time about the money.

JOSEPH SEABROOK . I am footman to the prosecutor. I returned with him from Broadstairs; I rode on the box with Smith, who drove the coach - the trunk of plate was put on the foot-board of Stevens' chariot; Spiers rode behind Smith's coach; when we arrived home the trunk was put on the grass plot, that I positively swear - I saw Spiers place it there; Smith afterwards asked me for 11s. which he said was his fare - I got it of my master, and paid it to him; he and Stevens were both then at the gate - Stevens then said he waited for his fare, and I went to my master for that; I left all the three prisoners then at the gate, but the trunk was not then on the grass plot - I thought some of the servants had taken it in; I had seen it when I paid the 11s., and before I went in again for the 6s. 6d. it was gone - I went in about five minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you examined at Marylebone-office? A. Yes; I did not swear that Smith drove off as soon as he had got his fare - I did not see him do so; there were three other trunks beside the one which was missed - that and one of the others were covered with brown holland; I saw Stevens the next night at Great Ormond-yard, where he puts up - I rode on the coach which went first; this trunk was on the foot-board of the chariot.

COURT to MR. RAYNER. Q. Do you mean to swear that, to your own knowledge, Smith drove off as soon as he got his 11s.? A. Stevens told me so.

JOSEPH ROBERTSON RAINES . I am a surgeon. I remember calling on the prosecutor the evening he returned - I saw the trunk standing on the grass plot, covered with brown holland.

THOMAS SOPER (Police-constable S 20). On the 6th of November I received information that the trunk was lost- and on the following morning I went to the Stamp-office, to see if it had been left there, but it had not - I then went to Islington, and found Smith and Spiers; Smith was just going off with his coach; I saw Spiers run off - I brought him back to Smith, and asked Smith if he had taken a family to the Regent's-park - he said he had; I then asked if he knew any thing of a trunk which had been lost - he said No, he had taken two trunks, and he did not know of any other, I then asked if he knew the other coachman - he said No, but in a few minutes Spiers said, "It is Mousey," and Smith said, "Aye, it is

Mousey" - I asked who he drove for, and they said for Mr. Mayhew, in Great Ormond-yard; I took them there, but he was not at home - I then went to the prosecutor's, and on Thursday morning I went to the Stamp-office, and the trunk had just been left there.

Cross-examined. Q. Smith gave you a correct account of where Stevens lived? A. Yes - Smith was going with a fare to Judd-street, and I followed him - he did not attempt to escape.

JOHN TAYLOR (Police-constable S 17). I went in search of Stevens, and took him on Wednesday night - when I went into the stable he had just unharnessed his horses; I asked if he had been to the North-bank the night before - he said he had; I asked if he knew any thing about a trunk - he said he had found one in his chariot, and he had sent it at twelve o'clock to the Stamp-office - I went to the office the next day, and found it.

MR. RAYNER. This is my trunk - I found it quite safe, just as I had left it.

WILLIAM QUAIFE . I am a clerk in the Stamp-office. This trunk was brought there on Thursday morning, about ten o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know Stevens? A. Yes- there are by law four days allowed to bring any thing to the office; I believe Stevens has before brought articles there - one article in particular I know he brought; it was a blue cloth coat - the owner had it, and Stevens got a reward for his honesty.

Witness for the Defence.

JOSEPH STEVENS . I am a hackney-coachman, and brother of Stevens, the prisoner; he gave me the trunk on Wednesday, to take to the Stamp-office; I was very tired, having been up the night before, and I did not take it till the Thursday morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-64

65. JOSEPH PIGRUM and ANN (HIS WIFE ) were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 4 bridles, value 50s.; 2 pairs of straps, value 5s.; 1 leather breeching, value 1s.; 2 pairs of reins, value 15s.; 2 bits, value 3s.; 1 pair of spurs, value 2s.; 4 sheets, value 20s.; 1 blanket, value 4s.; 2 pillows, value 6s.; 1 counterpane, value 4s., and 2 tablecloths, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Hopper .

THOMAS HOPPER . I am an architect , and live in Derby-place, Bayswater . Joseph Pigrum is my servant - his wife did not live on my premises; my stable is within my garden - I missed various articles, and charged Joseph Pigrum with taking them; I went to his room, which is over my stable - I found both the prisoners there, and gave charge of them; they implored mercy - I found a number of duplicates there of the property, which had been lost from the stable.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM MATTHEWS (Police-constable T 147). I went to the room, and found sixty-four duplicates, some of which relate to the prosecutor's property; the prisoners both begged for mercy, and the man said his master should not be a loser.

GEORGE WEBB . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Kensington. I have a pillow, a pair of spurs, three bridles, a sheet, a pair of reins, and a variety of other things pawned at our house - there are fifteen pledges in all, some of which I took in of the female prisoner, I believe -I had made some inquiry of her on a former occasion.

JOHN WELLS . I am in my father's service. I took in three sheets and a pillow - they were pawned by the woman.

CHARLOTTE WARD . I went with the female prisoner to pawn some of these articles; I went to a house with her, where she sold some corn; she said she had taken that unknown to her husband, and sold it there.

J. PIGRUM - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

A. PIGRUM - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-65

66. ROBERT WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Wells , from his person .

THOMAS WELLS . I am a clerk . On the 2nd of November, in the afternoon, I was in Bagnigge-wells-road ; the witness told me my pocket was picked; I saw the prisoner running - I pursued: his hat fell off, and I saw my handkerchief, which I think fell from his hat; this is it.

WILLIAM DICKIE . I was going along, and saw the prisoner pick the prosecutor's pocket - I told the prosecutor; he pursued, and the handkerchief was picked up just inside a shop, where the prisoner was stopped.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running across the road, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I received a push on the shoulder, and the handkerchief was thrown into the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-66

67. MICHAEL CONWAY and JAMES PEARCE were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 12 combs, value 4s. , the goods of Henry Stephen Wintle .

DAVID LARKEY . I was in Tottenham-court-road , between six and seven o'clock on the 10th of November - I saw the prisoners loitering about Mr. Wintle's shop; Conway went into the shop, and took out a parcel - he went to Pearce, who stood ten or twelve yards off; they crossed the road - I followed them, and found a Policeman.

RICHARD PEARCE (Police-constable E 80.) I took the prisoners; Conway threw this parcel from his hand - it was taken up, and given to me immediately.

ELIZABETH WINTLE . I am the wife of Henry Stephen Wintle . These combs are his; they were kept in the window.

CONWAY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

PEARCE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18321129-67

68. HENRY HEPBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 watch, value 3l., the goods of Nathaniel Smith Machin and others .

MICHAEL MEREDITH . I am in the employ of Mr. Nathaniel Smith Machin and others; they are auctioneer s, and live in King-street, Covent-garden . On the 28th of June the prisoner came to the sale-room; I did not see any one with him - I handed him a silver hunting watch out of Mr. Hindrey's hand; I turned round, and he and the watch were gone - I do not think any one could have taken it but him.

EDMUND HINDREY . I was at the sale-room, and looked at the watch; I gave it back to Meredith, and I suppose he gave it to the prisoner, but I did not notice the prisoner

there; the watch was immediately missed, and I gave a description of it.

HENRY GIBSON . I am a pawnbroker. I have the watch, which was pawned by the prisoner, on the 28th of June, from twelve to two o'clock.

JOHN LEWIS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 6th of November, in Nelson-street, Whitechapel.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-68

69. MARY ANN INGLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 tea-caddy, value 1s.; 1 crown, 4 shillings, and 3 pence , the property of Morgan Tate .

ELIZABETH TATE . I am the wife of Morgan Tate, who is a labourer . I had not known the prisoner more than eight weeks - she came to live with an old lady in our house; on the 20th of October I went out, about half-past four o'clock, leaving no one at home but the prisoner; I asked her if she would give an eye to the place till I came back; she said she would; I returned at twenty minutes after five, and the next morning I missed the caddy; the money stated, and some duplicates were in it - when the prisoner came in I said I had lost my caddy - she said it was a bad job.

HARRIET STEVENS . I knew the prisoner eight years ago; she married from next door to me, but I had not seen her from that time till she called and left this caddy for me to take care of; it was not locked - it was in a basket; the prosecutrix called on the Thursday after, and had it.

EDWARD PURCHASE (Police-constable K 244). I have the caddy - it was broken open, and the money gone; I took the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18321129-69

70. HENRY KING was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 sheet, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Smith .

ELIZABETH SMITH . I am the wife of Charles Smith - we live in Rolling Ball-passage ; the prisoner took a room of me, and lodged there one week - he paid 2s. out of 4s. 6d. On the 31st of October I went up for my money, and missed the sheet - I asked what he had done with it - he said he had taken it to his mother, to be washed; I said,"Why did you do that, I told you I washed once in three weeks?" he would not tell me any thing else, but sent me to his mother's, as he said, but found his mother had been dead for years - I have never found my sheet.

JOHN RATTRAY (Police-constable F 54.) I was sent for, and took the prisoner - he said he took the sheet to his mother to wash, and offered to give me a note to go for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out on the Wednesday morning, and returned in the evening - my room door was open; there was no lock on the door, and any one might open it; I was accused of taking the sheet - I said the young woman who lived with me might have taken it; I did not know she was then gone - the officer had time to apprehend her, but he would not.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-70

71. JAMES KIRBY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 purse, value 6d., and 3 shillings, the property of Mary Neale , from her person .

MARY NEALE . I am a servant , and lived in Curzon-street, May-fair, but am out of a situation, and have been so for three months. On the 3rd of November I was at the corner of Hayes-court, Newport-market , at near nine o'clock in the evening - I had a purse in my right-hand pocket, containing 3s.; I stood with a friend, who was purchasing a fowl; I felt a hand in my pocket - I turned, and caught the prisoner drawing his hand out of my pocket, with my purse in it; I said, "You have got my purse" - he said, "No, I have not;" he ran off - I caught the skirt of his coat, but he was stronger than I was, and got away; my foot slipped, and I fell down - he ran across the street, and the officer took him; I have not seen my purse since, but I am sure the prisoner is the person.

THOMAS COX (Police-constable C 118.) I was on duty in King-street - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running - he was the first person running; I asked what he was running for - he said to see what was the matter, but the people were all behind him- while I was speaking to him the prosecutrix came up, and charged him with having stolen her purse.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to look for a person who owed me some money - I heard the cry, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-71

72. WILLIAM KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 cloak, value 1l. , the goods of Griffith Humphreys .

JOHN BOSTON . I was in Oxford-street , about five o'clock in the evening, of the 13th of November; I saw the prisoner, and another man - the prisoner went to the prosecutor's door, snatched down a cloak, and wrapped it in an apron; I went and took him; he got from me, and another man took him back to the shop - I took the cloak up.

GRIFFITH HUMPHREYS. This is my cloak; it was taken from my door.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran to see what was the matter; I was laid hold of.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-72

73. JOSEPH REED was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 iron-vice, value 3s. , the goods of William Parker .

WILLIAM PARKER . I am a fancy cabinet-maker , and live in Hoxton Old-town . The prisoner was in my employ for four or five months - he was taken into custody for stealing a saw from one of my journeymen, and as I had missed a quantity of property I went to his place, and his wife produced the duplicate of this vice - I allowed him to work with my tools, and meant to employ him out of doors.

HENRY ROBERTS . I am a pawnbroker. I have the vice, which was pawned by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no intention of stealing it -I pawned it to give my wife 1s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-73

74. JOHN MORTLOCK was indicted for stealing,

on the 13th of October , 1 saddle, value 30s., and 1 bridle, value 10s. , the goods of James Thomas .

JAMES THOMAS . I am a livery-stable keeper , and live in Cumberland-mews . On the 12th of October, the prisoner came and brought a bay mare - he told me he was Mr. Best's servant, and that he was stopping at Long's Hotel, in Bond-street; he brought an old bridle and saddle with the mare, and said his master had bought her of Mr. Shirley, of Staines, who had lent him the bridle and saddle to bring the mare home, and he asked me to lend him a bridle and saddle for his master to ride out with the next day; I lent them to him for his master, as I supposed - he took them away; he said his master would send me three or four more horses; he came again on the same day, and hired a horse and gig for a friend of his master's - it was brought back, but I have never been paid for it; the bridle and saddle I lent him were very good, but not new - I have never seen the mare since, but I have found the saddle and bridle at a pawnbroker's - I knew the prisoner before.

RICHARD WALCOCKS FAIRLAM . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this bridle and saddle on the 13th of October, from Thomas Darvey.

THOMAS DARVEY . I drive a Paddington Omnibus. I saw the prisoner and another young man in a horse and chaise - they asked me to pawn the saddle and bridle, which I did, for a guinea; I gave the duplicate and the money to the prisoner - I had seen him once or twice before, and thought him a respectable man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress, and had an execution in my house for rent.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-74

75. ANN OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 3 sovereigns, 2 half-crowns, and 5 shillings, the property of Henry Walker , from his person .

HENRY WALKER . I am a book-keeper to Messrs. Atkinson and Co., and live at Highgate. On the 9th of November, I was going home, and called at the Robin-hood, public-house , to take some refreshment, as I frequently do - I had some ale; the prisoner was there drinking with a man and another female - she was at the bar, and I had an opportunity of looking at her - I know she is the person - she must have gone out just previous to me, for when I went out on my way home, I saw her just at the door - she came and said she wished to speak to me; I said, "Good woman, I know nothing of you, go about your business;" I went on for about twenty yards - she followed, and began speaking to me again, and went on for some distance - she wanted me to go home with her, which I refused; she then asked me to give her something to drink - I said, "I will give you a shilling to go about your business;" I took out my purse, gave her 1s., and put my purse into my pocket again; she immediately put her hands upon me, and said, "Now you must go home with me;" I put my hand out and said, "Go about your business;" she then ran off - I put my hand into my pocket, and missed the purse; I ran after her, but she got to a corner, and as it was very foggy I lost her; my purse contained three sovereigns and 10s. or 12s. - I have never found it since - I gave notice to the Police office.

HENRY BUSBY . I am a publican. I remember the prosecutor being at my house on the night in question; the prisoner was there, and went out a few minutes before him, while he was paying his reckoning.

HENRY DUBOIS (Police-constable N 34). About one o'clock on Saturday morning, the 10th of November, I apprehended the prisoner, from the prosecutor's description - I had seen her the same morning in the Vinegar-ground, with a brown purse - she emptied some money into her hand, and saw three sovereigns quite distinctly.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the Robin-hood, and asked the female to go home - she told me to go and shut the sutters; I went out, and was tying my pattens, when the prosecutor came and tapped me on the shoulder - he asked where I lived, and I told him; but he said it was too far to go, and bade me good night.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-75

76. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 gown, value 16s., and 1 shawl, value 4s. , the goods of Eliza Thomas .

The prosecutrix being married, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18321129-76

77. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 coat, value 3l. 12s. , the goods of George Richmond .

JOHN EWING . I live with Mr. George Richmond , a tailor , in Pitfield-street, Hoxton . On the 10th of November this coat was taken off a block in the lobby of the door; I heard of the loss, and ran out - I saw the prisoner and another person; the prisoner was carrying the coat - I am sure he is the person.

GEORGE ROBINSON . I am a painter. I was coming through Charles-square, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning; I saw the prisoner running with the coat - he dropped it, and I told the officer of it.

THOMAS KAIN . I saw the prisoner at the corner of a street, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man gave me the coat to carry; I saw him run away - I heard the cry of Stop thief! and dropped it.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18321129-77

78. ANN SHEPHERD and MARTHA OTTER were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 3 pairs of shoes, value 7s. 6d. , the goods of Charles Dando .

JOHN MANSON . I live with my father, who is a gentleman's servant. I was at Mr. Dando's shop on the evening of the 5th of November; I was at the door, and saw the prisoners come there - they went into the shop, and as they came out Shepherd took one pair of shoes and Otter took two pairs: I caught Shepherd while she was putting them under her shawl, and called to Mr. Dando, but Otter got away.

CHARLES DANDO . I am master of the shop . I was called, and took Shepherd who had one pair of shoes

under her shawl - I saw Otter turning a corner; she got away then, but was taken next day.

WILLIAM ROGERS (Police-constable C 138). I took Shepherd, and found on her one pair of shoes.

WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM (Police-constable C 132). I took Otter the next day.

EDWIN SUFFELL . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of shoes, which was pawned by Otter on the 5th of November, for 1s. 6d.; she said her name was Mary Store, and that she brought them for her father.

JAMES ALDOUS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of shoes, pawned by Otter on the 5th of November, for her mother, No. 21, St. Ann's-court; I have known her mother two years.

Otter's Defence. Shepherd asked me to go with her and buy a pair of shoes; she told me to wait at the top of the street - she brought two pairs, and told me to pawn them, and bring her the money; she then went, and got another pair, and the man came, and took her - I ran away, and told her mother.

SHEPHERD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

OTTER - GUILTY. Aged 12.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18321129-78

79. CHARLES SIDDONS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 waistcoat, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Dore .

DANIEL COLEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Islington. I have a waistcoat, which was pawned by a boy; I cannot say who.

THOMAS CLEGG . I know the prisoner; I saw him throw away a duplicate on the pavement at Islington - I was stooping for it, but a little boy took it up, and I told the officer, who took it.

JOB FRANKS (Police-constable N 26). I got the duplicate from the boy.

RICHARD DORE . I married the prisoner's mother. This is my waistcoat - the prisoner stole it while his mother came with my breakfast.

Prisoner. He has turned me out of doors, and I slept on the stairs several nights. Witness. I never turned him out - he has broken the lock open before.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18321129-79

80. ANN THOMPSON and MARY JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 watch, value 50s., 1 seal, value 12s., and 1 watch-chain, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Owen , from his person .

JOHN OWEN . I am a shoemaker , and live at Daltson. On the 17th of October I was at White Lion-street, a little after twelve o'clock at night; I was sober - I saw Thompson, and I think she spoke to me; we got into conversation, and she wished me to go with her, but I was not in the humour - we walked together some distance, and saw Jones on the other side of the way; Thompson called out - "Is that you, Poll?" she said Yes, and came over; they then wanted me to treat them, which I did - they each took a glass of rum, and a bit of sugar; I took nothing myself: we then left the house - I went on my way towards Dalston, and they went with me; I had my watch safe at that time - when we got on to Church-street, Bethnal-green, they wanted me to treat them to something to eat at a pastry-cook's shop, which I did: they took a cake or a bun - I had one; we then went on to the corner of Little Anchor-street : the door of the public-house was closed, and they asked me to give them some money - Jones then put her hands about me, and I felt my watch go from my fob; they both ran off alongside of each other - I ran after them, and raised an alarm; I took Jones, but Thompon made her escape - I have not seen the watch since.

CHARLES SHEPPEY . I am a private watchman. I heard the alarm, and saw Jones running across the road -I took her from the prosecutor, but I have not found the watch.

RICHARD HUNT (Police-constable H 70). I took Thompson about one o'clock the same day.

Jones' Defence. I met the prosecutor with another woman; we had some liquor, and he took some ale at each public-house we came to; when we walked a little way down Church-street I bade him good night, and then he said I had robbed him.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-80

Third London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

81. THOMAS PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 57lbs. weight of mutton, value 26s., the goods of Joseph Smout ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

JOSEPH SMOUT. I live in Upper North-place, Gray's Inn-lane , and am a butcher . On the 25th of October I lost the carcase of a sheep, and two hind quarters; there were about 57lbs. - it was missed about eight o'clock in the morning; I had this sheep from Rich, Sowter's servant: the meat was lost from Mr. Hicks', in Newgate-market, on the west side - I had paid for it, and gave the scaleman 1d. to deliver it to my porter.

THOMAS RICH . I am servant to Mr. Sowter, of Newgate-market. The prisoner brought the meat into his shop, put it on the block, and booked it in the name of Wood - there were 57lbs, of it; it was hung up in the front of the shop for sale - the hind quarters were sold, but the sheep was delivered to the prosecutor.

SAMUEL COTTEREL . I am in the employ of Mr. Hicks. Mr. Smout bought a carcase of a sheep, and a pair of hind quarters of my master - he paid for them; and left them in my charge till he sent his porter for them; the prisoner came in Mr. Smout's name, and said he came for a Welch sheep and a pair of quarters of mutton - I gave them to him, and he took them away; soon after Mr. Smout's porter came, and I told him they were gone - I saw the carcase of meat at Mr. Sowter's, and knew it by some notches on the legs.

CHARLES WINCH . I live in Portpool-lane, and am a butcher. I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Hicks' shop, and ask for the sheep and the two quarters of mutton - they were given to him, and he went away; he said, "I am come for Mr. Smout's sheep, and a pair of quarters of mutton;" I saw the marks, and saw the sheep at Mr. Sowter's afterwards.

JOHN REA . I am a constable. I was called to take the prisoner; he was applying for the money at Mr. Sowter's desk.

JOHN MURPHY (Police-constable E 135). I have a certificate of the prisoner's conviction in May last, which I got at Mr. Clark's office - I was present at his trial, and know he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-81

82. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 9d., the goods of William Snow , from his person .

EDWARD RIGBY . I live in Bread-street. On the morning of the 17th of November I saw the prisoner in Cheapside - he took the prosecutor's handkerchief from his pocket, and ran across Cheapside; I pursued with the prosecutor - he dropped the handkerchief; I pursued him till he was taken - I am sure he is the person.

OSCAR THOMAS HART . I live in Redcross-street. I was in Cheapside - I saw the prisoner throw the handkerchief down and run across; I saw him stopped, and am sure he is the prisoner.

WILLIAM SNOW . I live in Windmill-street, Tottenham-court-road, and am a tailor . On the 17th of November I was in Cheapside - I lost my handkerchief; I saw a man in the road with it, and he threw it down, but I cannot identify the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was going to Charles-street, Westminster - I was walking fast, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran across the road, and some person took hold of me - the gentleman came up and said he had lost his handkerchief.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-82

83. GEORGE THOMPSON and HENRY RICHARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Frederick Humphrey Groves , from his person; and that they had been before convicted of felony .

SAMPSON SWENDELL . I live in Hart-street, Covent-garden. On the 16th of November, in the forenoon, I was on Ludgate-hill - I saw the two prisoners and another person, who was not taken, following Mr. Groves; Richards put his hand into his pocket, took out his handkerchief, and gave it to Thompson; I took them both, and Thompson took the handkerchief from his pocket and threw it down; I gave them to the officer.

Thompson. Q. Where did you see the handkerchief? A. You took it from your right-hand pocket, and threw it down - I took it up, and seized your collar again.

GEORGE CHIDGRAY (City Police-officer No. 74). I took the prisoner, and produce the handkerchief.

FREDERICK HUMPHREY GROVES . I lost this handkerchief on Ludgate-hill, on the 16th of November - it has my initials on it.

Richard's Defence. I was going to dinner, and the witness caught hold of me.

THOMAS WHITNEY . I was formerly in the Police, No. 134 G - I now live in Tabernacle-row. I produce a certificate of the conviction of George Thompson, which I got at Mr. Clark's office - it was for stealing a necklace from a child's neck; he was ordered to be whipped and confined six months in the House of Correction - I know he is the person.

JAMES BUCKLE . I am constable of St. Luke's. I produce a certificate of the conviction of Henry Richards, by the name of Henry Pope - I was present, and know he is the person; he was confined for one month.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-83

84. RICHARD HEALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 snuff-box, value 1s., the goods of William Burnham , from his person .

WILLIAM BURNHAM. I live on Holborn-hill, and am a tailor . On the 9th of November I was at the foot of Blackfriars-bridge , on the City side, about one o'clock; I felt a hand in my pocket - I turned and seized the prisoner by the collar; I charged him with taking something from me; he said he had not, and made use of very blasphemous language. but I saw his hand go behind him - I put my hand and felt my snuff-box, and he dropped it; I held him for near half an hour, till a friend got an officer - I was surrounded by a gang, and had the most abusive language from them all.

MICHAEL HALL . I was with the prosecutor. I saw him seize the prisoner, who dropped the snuff-box behind him; I took it up, and got the officer.

FRANCIS LONG . I live in Cox-court, Aldersgate-street. I saw the prisoner take the snuff-box from the prosecutor's pocket, who collared him directly, and he dropped it.

JOSEPH LLOYD . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the foot of the bridge, and the prosecutor accused me of taking his box -I had my hand behind me, and some person dropped the box; he said I dropped it - the crowd was so great, it was impossible to see who took it; the prosecutor said at the office that he had lost two silk handkerchiefs, and if he could, he would prosecute me for that.

MR. BURNHAM. I said I had lost two handkerchiefs, and if I found any one with their hand in my pocket I would prosecute them; but I did not suspect the prisoner of taking the handkerchiefs.

GUILTY *. Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-84

85. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 handkerchiefs, value 3s. , the goods of James Selby Robson , from his person.

THOMAS PROTHEROE (City Police-officer 61.) On the night of the 4th of November I followed the prisoner and a companion of his, from Fleet-street to St. Paul's church-yard ; I there saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take his handkerchief - I was about four yards from him; I sprung at him, but fell down, and hurt myself very much; I said to my brother officer,"Follow him, he had got the property."

HENRY LUCAS SCOTT (City Police-officer No. 59.) I was with Protheroe; I followed the prisoner into Paternoster-row, and from there to Ivy-lane - I saw him shuffling his hand, but I was exhausted, and did not see what he did - he was stopped by a gentleman; he knocked the gentleman down - I did not see the handkerchief picked up, but I saw the prisoner make a motion with his hand.

EDWARD TUCK . I am a watchman, and live in Holiday-yard. I found this handkerchief in the gutter, in Ivy-

lane, a few yards from where the prisoner was taken, and in the direction he had run - I gave it to Scott, at the watch-house.

JAMES SELBY ROBSON . I live in High-street, Borough. I was in St. Paul's church-yard on the day in question - I lost this handkerchief; it has my name on it.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-85

86. ELIZABETH HALES was indicted for stealing' on the 28th of November , 18 yards of ribbon, value 18s. , the goods of Thomas Hall .

JAMES EYNON . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Hall, a haberdasher , in Bishopsgate-street . On the 28th of November, between four and five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in, with another woman - the prisoner asked for some ribbon, and some were shown her; they bought two yards, and the prisoner paid for it: they then left the shop - I suspected, and brought them back - I saw this piece of ribbon fall from the prisoner, and I picked it up.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Was your shop pretty full? A. Yes; there were others there; we do a good deal of business - I did not see her take this ribbon - when I brought her back she sat down in a chair, and I found the ribbon under the chair; I suppose it fell from her hand, which appeared to be under her apron - I did not see her hand; she might be half a yard from the counter - it could not have fallen from the counter, as there is a brass ledge, and the ribbon-drawers had been removed; I looked on the chair, and on the floor, before I brought her back.

ROBERT ADAMS (City Police-officer No. 19.) I took prisoner, and have the ribbon.

JAMES EYNON . This is the ribbon; I know it by the mark that was on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not this the mark that is on all your ribbons? A. Yes, all of this quality - we had not sold it; I had not observed her in the shop before that day.

COURT. Q. Did she suggest, at the time, that it might have been bought in the shop? A. No; I was not aware that she had taken any thing - it was only on suspicion that I followed her.

THOMAS BROWN CHAMPNESS . I am a shopman to the prosecutor. I saw the ribbon drop from the prisoner's person.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? A. On the opposite side, behind the counter, which is about a yard and a quarter high; it fell from her hand, which was down by her side - her arm might be under her shawl, but her hand was not.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18321129-86

87. THOMAS COE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 seal, value 1s.; 1 watch-key, value 6d.; 1 ring, value 6d., and 1 watchribbon, value 1d. , the goods of Thomas James .

ELIZA JAMES . I am the wife of Thomas James ; he is a carman , and lives in Bull and Mouth-street - the prisoner's sister lodges in the same house with me. I missed my husband's watch between ten and eleven o'clock at night, on the 1st of November; the prisoner had been there that day between four and five - I saw him come and go up stairs, and saw him go out again; he could get to the room in which the watch was by going up stairs - he was up stairs about five minutes; no stranger came to the house that day.

JOHN PACKER (Police-constable L 63.) I took the prisoner at the Rotunda.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-87

88. JOHN MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 27 umbrella-hooks, value 23s., and 19 coquilla balls, value 19s., the goods of Clarke Winchester , his master .

CLARKE WINCHESTER. I live in Portpool-lane , and am an umbrella-stick manufacturer - the prisoner has been in my employ some years. On the 17th of November I went out at ten o'clock in the morning; I returned at half-past ten, and missed this property, which I had left safe in the shop where the prisoner was at work.

JAMES HAWGOOD . I am in the service of Mr. Baxter, a pawnbroker. I have twenty-seven ivory umbrella handles pawned at our shop, in the name of John Brenan - I cannot say by whom.

WILLIAM MURDOCK . I am in the service of Mr. Clunes, a pawnbroker, in Liquorpond-street. I have some umbrella handles, which were pawned by Lockwood.

CHARLES SHUTTLE FLETCHER (Police-constable G 137). I apprehended the prisoner in Gray's Inn-lane; in going to the office he stated that he had stolen the property, and pawned part of it at Mr. Baxter's - I went to Mr. Baxter's the same evening, and found these twenty-seven ivory handles in consequence of what the prisoner told me,

MR. WINCHESTER. I can swear to these balls; I lost handles just like these, and of the same man's make: I have known the prisoner six years, and never missed any thing before.

ELIZABETH LOCKWOOD . I pawned some balls like these at Mr. Clunes'; the prisoner gave them to me on a Tuesday - I do not know the day of the mouth; I paid the rent of the room, in which the prisoner and I lived, with the money I got for the balls.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18321129-88

89. WILLIAM TUTE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 36 pairs of gloves, value 4l. 17s., and 30 pairs of other gloves, value 3l. 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Abel ; and CHRISTOPHER CHRISTIAN was indicted for feloniously counselling, procuring, and commanding the said William Tute to commit the said felony .

CATHERINE ABEL . I am the wife of John Abel , of St. John-street-road. On Saturday, the 27th of October, the prisoner Christian came, and said he wished some gloves to be sent to No. 60, Aldermanbury, for a gentleman to look at who had come from Hastings; he left an order and a card - they were not to be left for sale, but only to be looked at, and an order given on the Monday morning following; I had not known Christian or Tute before - on the Monday morning Tute brought a note, and said the gentleman was then waiting at the warehouse to look at them, and they must go immediately to

him - I said my son was going that way, and he should take them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you remember going into the Green Man, in Bucklersbury, after this? A. Yes, I went into the parlour with the officer; he told me to look round and see if I could see the person - I saw Christian there; I did not say I did not see him.

GEORGE ABEL . I am the prosecutor's son. I took the gloves to No. 60, Aldermanbury , on Monday the 29th of October: I found Tute there - I told him I had brought the gloves; it was then about nine o'clock - Tute said,"Oh, very well; Mr. Christian has just stepped out with the gentleman who wished to see them, and will not return till three o'clock; you had better leave them;" he asked what quality I had brought, and I told him - he asked the prices, and seemed to be writing the prices down on a piece of paper; I left the gloves, and went to a person named Carter - I went back to the premises in Aldermanbury about eleven o'clock, and found them closed; I then went home, and in the evening I went to the premises - I was waiting at the door, and some person told me they were swindlers; I saw Tute come up to the place - I told him I wanted the gloves back; he said he knew nothing of them, he was Christian's servant, and he had given them to him - that he went and closed the premises, and I gave him in charge of an officer - the goods I left were, thirty-six pairs of gloves of one sort, and thirty pairs of another.

Cross-examined. Q. You left them of your own accord? A. Yes; I did not leave them on credit - I left them for Mr. Christian to show the gentleman.

Order read.

"Women's town made black kid gloves; women's coloured ditto; men's town-made black kid; men's coloured ditto, different prices."

Card read.

"Christopher Christian and Co., Warehousemen, 60, Aldermanbury, London."

Note read.

"Messrs. Christian and Co. will be glad if Mr. Abel will send, as soon as possible, some habits, coloured, town-made kid habits, black, and gentlemen's black and coloured, as samples, having a customer calling this morning to give an order.

60, Aldermanbury, Oct. 29, 1832."

Tute's Defence. I had been acquainted with the parties only three days before; I had no part or share in it - I received the property, but I handed it to Christian and Co., in the warehouse.

Christain's Defence. I called with the order on the Saturday, and on the Monday my partner gave Tute the order to go and get the goods - there was not time to return the goods, as Tute was taken the same day; I was not at home that day.

JURY to GEORGE ABEL. Q. What did you mean by saying the shop was shut? A. The door was shut, but the shutters were down; I waited about the greater part of the day, and no one came till the evening - none of the goods were ever offered to me back; I saw some horse-hair strewed about the warehouse, not more than would fill a hat, and some empty boxes: Tute seemed to be sorting the horse-hair; when I returned at eleven o'clock I made what noise I could, but could not get in.

TUTE - GUILTY . Aged 35.

CHRISTAIN - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years . (See 3rd Day.)

Reference Number: t18321129-89

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1ST.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bolland.

90. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 purse, value 6d.; 25 sovereigns, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Thomas Humphries , in his dwelling-house .

ANN HUMPHRIES . I am the wife of Thomas Humphries , who lives in Chad's-row, St. Pancras . On Saturday, the 13th of October, we went into the house; we purchased the good-will of the prisoner's father, and the fixtures; my husband gave 35l. for them, which was paid in sovereigns to Mr. Smith, by my husband; I saw him pay it on the 13th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning - he paid the money in the house; Mr. and Mrs. Smith, me, my husband, and a lady where we lived before were present when it was paid; we had not any furniture in the house at that time - the prisoner was also present when the money was paid; I think she saw it paid - she saw her father have the money afterwards; we brought our things in that evening- Smith did not leave the house; we wanted them to go, but we could not get them out - we used the front room second floor for our sleeping-room - our bed was there, and their bedstead was in the room, and some drawers and a table of theirs, and we had a trunk in the room; we carried on a school - the girl's school is on the same floor, as the bedroom, and the boys' school is on the first floor (the prisoner was to have carried on the school until the Friday, as we gave them all permission to stop in the house without paying rent.) On Monday, the 15th, about eleven o'clock, she and I were in the school-room, and there was a knock at the door - she said, "Shall I go into your room and look out of the window:" I did not object to it, and she went; she called me, and told me the knock was for me - I went into the room, looked out of window, and saw it was for me; I then went down stairs to speak to the person, leaving her there, and when I returned up stairs I missed a purse, containing two shillings and a foreign sixpence, off the mantel-piece - I had seen it when I went out of the room to speak to the person - I told the prisoner I had missed it- she said it was very strange, and she hoped I did not think she had got it; I said I should be sorry to think so- I then went into the school-room, and she also said, before the children, that she hoped I did not think she had got it; I said the same as before, that I should be sorry to think that she had got it; the person I went down to speak to was the broker - I went into my bed-room again, and she followed me into the room, and while the man was bringing the furniture up stairs I told her she had better go and look after the children - she went, and returned almost directly with a piece of work in her hand: I had some money in a box in the same room; I had eighty-two sovereigns in a bag, which I took out of the box - she was sitting in the room at the time; I put the bag on the bed, that she might not see it, but she did, because she came

close to me - I opened the bag to pay nine sovereigns to the broker; she came close to me - she said she wished I would let her put her hand into that bag, and take out a thousand- I said nothing to that; I paid the broker, and put the bag into the box again - I know there were eighty-two sovereigns in the bag, because on Saturday, when we paid the thirty-five, my husband counted them - he counted them about two days before the Saturday, at No. 24, Chapel-street, Pentonville, where we lived before; the bag was never out of this box after that - I saw it put into the box: sometimes my husband had the key, and sometimes I had it; it was always in possession of one of us; the box was always in our bed-room at Pentonville, till we moved to Chapel-street, and then it was put into our bed-room; a porter brought it from Pentonville there on a truck - I did not see it delivered to the porter; my son accompanied the porter with it to Chad's-place, but I did not; when I paid the broker the 9l. I took out ten sovereigns; I kept the one sovereign, and put the bag into the box again, and locked it; when the broker was gone I and the prisoner were going into the school-room again, and as we came out of the bedroom door, she told me her mother was calling me - I did not hear her mother call me; I looked over the bannisters, and told her I could neither hear nor see her mother call me - she insisted that her mother was calling me; I went down one flight of stairs, as far as the boy's school-room, and then returned, as I did not think her mother was calling me - she looked over the bannisters, and told me her mother was in the kitchen, and that she was calling me; I went down stairs, and saw her mother in the parlour - she did not want me; I went up stairs - she was then standing just inside the school-room door - I told her her mother had not called me, that I had been down, and spoken to her - she made no reply to that, but said, in a very hurried manner, that she had thought of a key, which would fit my room door, and that the key of the school-room fitted it, (we had enquired for a key to the bed-room door) she put the key into the key-hole herself, and locked the door - she was trying to see if the key fitted it; she left the key in the door, and I tried it myself, to see if it was locked - the key was taken out of the door; I do not recollect which of us took it out, but if she took it out, she gave it to me, for it was in my hand directly; Mr. and Mrs. Smith, the prisoner, my husband, and myself were in the house at this time; Mr. Smith was engaged down stairs in the boys' school-room - nobody was up stairs besides the prisoner and the man who brought the furniture in, and I was there the whole time with him - I should think this took place about eleven o'clock, as near as I can guess; the school hours are from nine till twelve - it was her duty to remain in the school the whole of the day; the moment she gave me the key, she went down stairs; she did not tell me she was going - she returned at ten minutes after twelve o'clock - I asked where she had been - she said she had been out with a friend; I had sent down stairs to inquire for her, but she could not be found - she then told me to dismiss the children, and they all went home - they ought to have gone at twelve o'clock, but I did not know the time; I remained in the school-room with her a few minutes; there was a desk in the room, which I told her was not the one we had bought with the fixtures - she said it was; I heard my husband coming up stairs, and I took the key she had given me off the school-room table, and unlocked the bed-room door - the school-room commands a view of the bed-room - when I sat in the room I could see any body who went into the bedroom - nobody had gone to it from the time she locked it, till I opened it for my husband; the school-room door was open the whole day; when I went into the bedroom, my husband sat down, and my attention was called to the trunk - I found it was shut, the bolt of the lock was turned, but it had not caught - it was like a desk lock; it was my husband called my attention to the box when he sat down - he said I had not locked it, and found the bolt was shot, but it did not go into the lid; I examined the bag, and found that it was open - I had twisted a string round it when I paid the broker, but did not tie it - I found the mouth of the bag open; we counted the sovereigns, and twenty-five were deficient - I found forty-seven in the bag - the prisoner was in the school-room; we went into the school-room, and told her we had been robbed, and that we should like to know where she had been while she was out - she said she would not tell us; we told her we would have a Policeman, and then she ran away down stairs - my husband ran after her, and I went down and found her at the front gate - she still said she would not tell us where she had been; my husband said, if she would, he would take her there himself, and not have a Policeman - she would not tell us, and we sent for a Policeman - she then ran into the kitchen, and fastened the door - we could not get in, we tried to get in repeatedly; I went to the front window of the kitchen, but could not see her; a Policeman came, but she would not let him in - he tried the door and window - she had fastened them both; he at last got in at the window, and let us in at the door - the prisoner slept in the kitchen - her bed was opposite the window, on chairs; she was examined at the office between one and two o'clock, I think, and after that the Magistrate ordered the house to he searched - I went with the Policeman; we searched the kitchen - Mrs. Smith was there, with the Policeman, and myself; both the Policeman and her mother searched the bedding, and I saw the mother find two purses under the bed, either between two beds, or between the bed and mattress - one was a brown purse, and the other a bead purse; I had seen the bead purse frequently in the prisoner's hands - she was in the habit of using it - neither of the purses were mine; there was about 4d. in the bead purse, and in the brown purse there were fifteen sovereigns, and 12s. 6d. in silver - the brown purse has two ends to it - the gold and silver were separate.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you and and the family had any disagreement before this? A. No; we wanted them to leave the house, but after the money was paid, it was agreed they should stop till the 19th; I do not know that the prisoner's mother is weak in her intellect; when we paid the father, he handed the money over to the mother, who put it into

her pocket - she did not hand it to the prisoner; we did not repent our bargain; I never said I would be revenged on them; I could not get the prisoner out of the bed-room - it would not have been polite to turn her out; she was absent from the house about an hour- it is a large wooden box, and locks like a desk - I thought I had locked it; it stood on another high box, and as my husband sat down he could see that the hasp had not caught; I was flurried at losing the purse, and must have shut it down in that way; I told the prisoner that morning that I missed some rings, but did not know whether I had brought them there or not - she went and found them; when we said we would have a Policeman, she said she defied twenty Policemen - I never wanted to compromise this; the mother said,"I would have given you 50l. if you had not taken my daughter;" I had not asked what she would give me not to appear - I never said I would be revenged about the school; I asked the prisoner about nine o'clock that morning, what she would stop with me for a week for - she said 6l. - I refused to give that - that conversation was in the kitchen; she and her mother were together; I had said before I took the school, that I was rather deficient in fancy work, and would she object to show me - she said she could do that in half an hour, but I found it was not necessary in that school; she gave me the names of fifteen scholars, some at 1s. 6d. a week, and some at 1s. - I found I had but three scholars, but the prisoner said they did not come on Monday morning - two new ones came that morning.

THOMAS HUMPHRIES . I am a schoolmaster . I had a bag of money at Pentonville; I counted it three or four days before the 13th - there were a hundred and twenty sovereigns; I took out, I believe, two, but I will say three, in order to be within the mark; that would make it one hundred and seventeen, and on Saturday I took out thirty-five at Pentonville; I did not count the rest that day, but there were about eighty-two left - I tied the bag up, and put it into the box, locked the box, and corded it; the key was always in possession of either my wife or myself - the box was sent to Chad's-place, in a truck; my son accompanied the porter - he is not here; I did not go with it - I paid the 35l. on Monday; I believe I paid it into Mrs. Smith's hands, but they were all present - to the best of my recollection the prisoner never had it in her hands. On the Monday, I went up into my bed-room, a little after twelve o'clock, and after a little conversation with my wife on other subjects, I discovered that the lid of the box was not shut down - I found the bolt of the lock had been shot, but the staple rested on it; my wife handed me the bag, and previous to counting it, I knew from the weight a very large sum had been abstracted from it - I counted it, and found forty-seven sovereigns; I missed twenty-five - we went into the school-room, and I told the prisoner I had lost twenty-five sovereigns, and I should be much obliged to her if she could tell me where she had been - she refused to tell me; I said if she did not I would put her into the hands of a Policeman - she quite laughed at it, and said, "Do you suppose I am such a fool as to care for a Policeman," and then ran down stairs; I followed her to the front gate, brought her into the passage, and sent for a Policeman, who arrived, but I hesitated at giving her in charge at first, fearing she might bring an action for false imprisonment, but after having gone to the station-house, and got advice of the inspector, I returned and gave her in charge; she had previously threatened to stab the Policeman if he took her, and had barred herself into the kitchen; the Policeman attempted to break the door down with an axe, but not succeeding, he at last got in at the window - I had seen the prisoner before I discovered the lid of the box to be open, in the school-room - I had gone into the bed-room, and returned to the school-room before I discovered the loss, for some money, which she had received of the children for schooling that morning; I was rather in a passion about it, understanding she had spoken to my wife in an improper manner about it, and I said,"Miss Smith, I should thank you for the money you have received this morning;" she replied that she had nothing to do with money matters at all, that she had given the money to her papa, who had gone out - he had left the house about twelve o'clock; I asked her about the desk-there was a very good desk in the room, and that was removed, and another put into its place; she said it was the same desk - I remarked that she behaved very singularly, in fact, like one almost out of her mind or intoxicated; she capered and danced about the room in a manner I could not understand.

Cross-examined. Q. Then there had been a dispute between her and your wife about money she had received? A. No, I understand something had been said about it; to the best of my recollection I paid the 35l. across the table to Mrs. Smith, because she said she always had the money matters to do, and her husband said so too; I said before I opened the bag, that I was sure a great sum had been taken out - I made a memorandum of what was left in it, in a journal which I keep, within two days of the robbery, but within a few hours I made a memorandum on paper, and transcribed it into my journal, and here is a copy which I took from the journal two or three days ago; the porter who took the box is not here - here is the original memorandum - it is a leaf of the journal.

CHARLOTTE FARRELL . I am ten years old. I was one of Mrs. Smith's scholars, and was at school the morning when Miss Smith was taken up - I went at nine o'clock: I remember the furniture coming up stairs - it was up in Mrs. Humphries' room; I remember Miss Smith saying to Mrs. Humphries, "Mrs. Humphries, my mother calls you;" Mrs. Humphries called over the bannisters, and then said, "I don't think she she did;" Mrs. Humphries went down the first flight of stairs - the prisoner was standing on the landing, very near the school-room door- when Mrs. Humphries went down stairs the prisoner went into Mrs. Humphries' room; she staid there between five and six minutes, then came out, and came into the school-room - she sat down, her hand was shut, and she put it behind her - when Mrs. Humphries came back the prisoner got up out of the chair, and had her hand open; she went away.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was Mrs. Humphries below? A. I suppose about ten minutes - I had only gone to the school that morning; there were five scholars- I had heard Mrs. Humphries had lost a purse; Miss Smith said she hoped Mrs. Humphries did not think she

had it; the prisoner appeared a little angry - there was no dispute; Mrs. Humphries mentioned it more than once - she said she should be very sorry if she thought the prisoner had taken it - she mentioned it before the scholars about four times; the prisoner at last got rather angry about it.

JAMES MILLER . I am a Policeman. I was sent for on the 15th of October; as I entered the passage the prisoner was close to the back parlour door - the prosecutor said he was robbed of twenty-five sovereigns; the prisoner seemed very much flurried, and desired me to take her - she threatened to run a knife into me, or to any Policeman who offered to touch her - Mr. Humphries hesitated what to do - he went to the station-house, and returned to give her in charge - she was then in the kitchen, and had fastened the door; I wished her to open it; she refused - I got in at the window, and found her sitting in a chair, with a small dessert knife in her hand; I secured her - Mrs. Humphries searched her at the station-house, and 2s. were found on her - she was taken before a Magistrate, and by his direction I searched the house; her mother and Mr. Humphries were present-I searched the front kitchen; there are two beds there - it was before three o'clock - the beds appeared to have been slept on; I saw her mother find fifteen sovereigns in a purse, with four half-crowns and five sixpences under her bed - she found two purses in a small pocket handkerchief, rolled up, and put between the two beds, which laid one on the other - I mean there are two beds for two different people to sleep in - I could not say whose bed it was; there was 4d. in coppers in the bead purse, and in the other fifteen sovereigns in one end, and 12s. 6d. in the other - I have them here.

Prisoner's Defence. My father received the money from Humphries, and handed it to my mother, who gave it to me, as was customary; my mother has not for some years had the care of money; the whole has devolved on me - my father gave me a sovereign the same day; I kept the whole together, and put it between the beds in which I slept, which I always did, in consequence of an attempt having been made to break into our house; for the same reason I slept in the same room as my parents; on Sunday I gave my father 18l. to pay the rent and taxes - the Policeman found 2s. on me, and 15l. 12s. in the bed, making 34l.; the remainder I spent in house expenses.

SAMUEL SMITH . I am the prisoner's father. I received 35l. from Humphries; my wife has never been very strong in her mind since the birth of my daughter-she lost the use of her limbs by a paralytic stroke; I gave the 35l. to my daughter; I cannot say whether she put it into her pocket, but she took care of it - she was in the habit of taking charge of my money; I received 24s. that day from a pupil named Grove - on the Monday morning I received from my daughter 11l., and then 8l., to pay rent and taxes - some thieves had attempted our house about five weeks before, since which the prisoner slept in the kitchen with us; we could not persuade her to sleep up stairs.

COURT. Q. How long did you remain in the house? A. Till Friday the 19th, by agreement - I have a receipt for the rent and taxes; I paid the last quarter's rent on the Monday, the taxes the following morning, and the poor rates the next day.

- TOMLIN. I am landlord of the house. This is my receipt; I went in between five and six o'clock in the evening for the rent; Mrs. Smith called Mr. Smith on one side, and told him not to pay the rent - I saw they were flurried; I said there was nothing like the present time; they went into my parlour, and then they paid the rent.

EMMA JEMIMA SMITH . I am the prisoner's sister-in-law. I heard Mrs. Humphries say, on the Monday morning, that they had been swindled, and would be revenged; she said they had been taken in with the school.

JAMES DEACON . I am a shoemaker. The prisoner drank tea at my house on Sunday, the 14th of October, and paid me 2s. 6d. for repairing shoes; she took it out of a brown purse, which had money at each end.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-90

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

91. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , at St. Mary, Matfelon, alias Whitechapel , 1 gelding, price 17l. , the property of Robert Yalden .

JAMES YALDEN . I am the son of Robert Yalden . On the 13th of September he had a bay gelding; I saw it safe in the field on the night of the 14th of September, about seven o'clock; I fastened the gate with a switch-next morning, at five o'clock, I missed it; I found it on the 21st of October at Bow, in possession of Mingay, at his livery-stables - it had been trimmed about the head; the tail had been docked before, but was cut shorter then.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your father a farmer? A. Yes; they cut the bone of the horse's tail, which made it look square behind.

RICHARD JOHNSON . I am a labourer, and live in Castle-street, Whitechapel. I do not recollect the day, but I saw the prisoner ride into Draper's yard, a farrier, on a horse; he said he wished to have a bit of the horse's dock taken off, and asked me where the farrier's shop was - I showed him, and saw Dexter cut the tail.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you were yourself charged about this horse? A. No; it was in September that I saw the horse, for I worked for a butcher next door to Mr. Scales at the time; I worked for him three months- I may have worked there in October; it must be seven or eight weeks since I worked in the yard.

WILLIAM DEXTER . I am a horse-keeper. I saw Johnson and the prisoner in Draper's yard, about nine or ten weeks ago, and cut a horse's tail for him; I sold the prisoner a truss of straw, and he gave me 2s. the following morning; he said he wished to sell the horse; I told him my master, William Cue , was a horse-dealer - I saw Thomas Rogers and his brother in the yard; I did not see the horse leave the yard.

Cross-examined. Q. What month was this? A. I should think some time in September - I am sure it was not in October; I think it was before October, but will not swear it.

THOMAS ROGERS . I sell horses on commission for people - in September last I lived at No. 5, Colling

wood-street, Bethnal-green. I was in Draper's yard on the 18th of September, and saw Dexter and Johnson -I saw the prisoner; Johnson said to me, in the prisoner's presence, "Tom, here is a horse I think you are likely to get a guinea out of," and pointed to the prisoner - I asked what he wanted for it; he said 9l. or 10l.; I went to the yard next day, and told him I had a customer if he would get him shod, and get him a belly-full - he said he should be ready to go about half-past twelve o'clock; and about half-past one I went with him to Belt-street, Ratcliff-highway, but did not sell it; I saw him again next day, in the same yard, and I saw my brother Mark there; Mark said if the horse was down at his master's he could get a customer for it, at the Eel-pie house - the prisoner said he did not know the way to the Eel-pie house; I said I would show him - I took him there about half-past one o'clock; on getting there we waited for my brother; when he came to us, we all three went to the Black Swan, at Bow, close to Mingay's - my brother went out with the horse, leaving me and the prisoner behind; he returned without the horse, and saw the prisoner with me - he said he could only get 7l. for the horse; the prisoner said he would not take less than 8l.; then my brother said, "You had better go with me, and hear the deal, for I think that they will spring a little" - they went together, leaving me at the public-house, and returned in about two hours, without the horse - we all went to the Eel-pie house together; the money was to be sent by eight o'clock, and about nine Pepper brought it - I was then in the tap-room, and my brother and the prisoner at the bar - something took place there which I did not hear; they returned to the tap-room, and 7l. 15s. was handed to the prisoner; I had 10s. for my trouble, and my brother had 5s.; I saw a paper, which the prisoner made a cross on when he got the money.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the Magistrate refuse to take your evidence at first, and say you had as much possession of it as the prisoner? A. No such thing took place.

MARK ROGERS . I am a labourer to Mr. Flowers, at the Eel-pie house, Limehouse. On the 20th of September I went to Whitechapel, up Draper's yard; Dexter showed me the stable where the horse was, and then I saw the prisoner - I said, "Does this horse belong to you?" he said Yes - I asked the price; he said nine guineas - Johnson was in the stable: I said, "I can't sell it at that price, but if you will bring it to my master, at the Eel-pie house, I could sell it this afternoon for you;" he said he did not know the way - my brother said he would show him, and they came down together; I said to him, "Put the horse into the stable - I cannot go with you yet;" I afterwards went to Bow with them, and called at the Black Swan - they stopped there while I took the horse to Pepper's, and we went over to Mingay's; he offered 7l. - I returned to the prisoner, who refused to take it - I said, "Come along and make your own deal;" he went, and Mingay bought the horse for 7l. 15s.; I was to be paid for it at eight o'clock - the prisoner waited there till half-past eight, and by and by Pepper arrived, and it was paid for; the prisoner made his mark to the receipt, and Pepper said he would have"Warranted sound" written on it - as he could not write I wrote it, and the prisoner made his mark to it; I gave him the money - he gave me 5s. for my trouble; we had four or five pots of hock beer there.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure you did not bargain about it as your own? A. I tried to sell it as my own - the Magistrate did not threaten to commit me; I generally sell in my own name - when Mingay said he would bring the money at eight o'clock, I said, "Don't disappoint us, for this man will want his money;" he knew before the money was paid that it did not belong to me; I sold it as one I had exchanged - I wrote "Warranted sound" on the receipt, as the prisoner directed me; I do not know who wrote the rest of the receipt.

JAMES PEPPER . I am a farrier at Bow. I remember Mark Rogers bringing me a gelding for sale in September- I walked over the way, and the price agreed on was 7l. 15s.; the horse was left there - the dealing was not made in my presence; I went to take a chaise home, and on returning stopped at the Eel-pie house; they were kicking up a bother about the money - Mark Rogers and the prisoner were there: I got on a mare, fetched the money, and took it to them, and Mark Rogers gave me a receipt; I was in the bar, and they were in the parlour - I saw a mark on the receipt; I paid the money to Mark Rogers , for Mr. Mingay - we had some drink in the bar; I drank that afternoon with Mark Rogers , Mingay, Mr. Porter, the landlord, and the prisoner came in, as a more straggler; we drank together - this was before the bargain was made, and afterwards too; I did not then know the horse belonged to the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Your dealing was with Mark Rogers ? A. Yes; he said he had chopped a large horse away at Flowers' - that his master told him not to chop, but he had, and must sell the horse, for he must take the money home to his master.

WILLIAM MINGAY. I keep livery-stables at Bow. In September I had a gelding, which was claimed afterwards by Yalden; I bought it of Mark Rogers on the 20th of September, at my premises at Bow, for 7l. 15s.; I have a receipt for it, which Pepper gave me; I had not authorised him to pay the money, but I was not there at eight o'clock, as I appointed, and he knowing me, paid it for me; I kept the gelding till it was claimed - I drank at a public-house with Pepper, Mark Rogers , and others; I cannot say whether the prisoner was one - a strange man came in, and Mark Rogers shook hands with him, as a mere stranger, and asked him to drink; they appeared to me not to have seen each other for some time - I gave the horse up to Skillern.

MARK ROGERS . This is the receipt - the prisoner put his mark to it, in my presence.

Cross-examined. Q. Who did you get it from? A. Pepper said he would have a receipt - Mr. Flowers, my master, had a stamp in his pocket, and I think Mr. Flowers wrote it. - (Receipt read.)

JAMES PEPPER . I do not know who wrote the receipt; Mark Rogers brought it to me; I gave it him back, as"Warranted sound" was not written on it - he wrote that, and gave it to me; the prisoner was in the tap-room, and not in my sight; I did not see who put the mark to it -Rogers brought it to me in the bar; when I saw Robinson's name to it, I said, "Is this right?" and gave it to

Flowes - he said, Oh Yes, it was all right he thought, but he knew nothing about it.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN. I am an officer of Unionhall. On the 21st of October I went to Mingay's stable, and found a gelding, which Yalden's son claimed; it was delivered to him - I apprehended the prisoner the same day, in Bunhill-row, about five miles from Mingay's; I told him I wanted him - he wished to know what for; I told him for selling a stolen horse to Mr. Mingay, at Bow; he said he had bought the horse on the other side, or on this side of Farnham, and gave 6l. or 7l. for it - that he did not know the person he bought it of, and did not know his name.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you acquainted with Mark Rogers ? A. Yes - I have known him many years as a horse-dealer; I drank with him the morning I apprehended the prisoner, and at Hick's-hall.

Prisoner's Defence. I own I sold the horse, but I had bought it.

GUILTY . Aged 41. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-91

Before Mr. Baron Bolland.

92. WILLIAM GEORGE and WILLIAM HAMSTEAD were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Robinson , the elder, on the 26th of October , at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias Stepney, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 20s.; 6 spoons, value 10s.; 1 box, value 1s.; 1 seal, value 6d.; 3 keys, value 6d.; 1 pair of tongs, value 1s.; 1 purse, value 1d.; 6 sovereigns, 1 crown, 4 shillings, one 10l., and one 5l. Bank note, and 1 promissory note, value 180l., his property .

JOHN ROBINSON . I live in Eagle-place, Princes-street, Mile-end, and rent the house; it is in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney - I am a grocer's porter . I left my house at seven o'clock in the morning, on Friday the 26th of October; I did not return till nine in the evening - I left my wife at home; she is not here: when I came home I found the place was broken open - I found my wife at home; my son had detected the robbery before I got home - my house was all in confusion, and several neighbours there; it had been opened, by forcing the back door with some instrument: there was the appearance of a wrench between the back door, and the post - it was not locked, but fastened inside; my table drawer was broken open, and six silver tea-spoons, and a leather purse, containing 4s., taken out: I had seen it in the purse the day before - my wife had the key of the drawer, and takes money when she wants it; I lost a watch from up stairs, and a box, containing a purse with six sovereigns, and a crown-piece, a 10l., and a 5l. note, and a promissory note for 180l. - I had the key of that box myself.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Was any body but your wife left in the house? A. No.

WILLIAM McKENZIE . I am a Policeman. I apprehended George about ten minutes before one o'clock on the morning of the 27th of October, in Albion-street, Commercial-road; I found a silver watch, six silver teaspoons, 9s., a 10l. note, and a 5l. note on him - all the property but the notes were in his pockets; he said the watch was his own, and that he found the spoons - he had something clenched in his left-hand; I asked what it was - he said only a piece of paper, but it turned out to be the two Bank notes; he afterwards said he had found all the property together in Finsbury-square, watch and all - there was a half-crown, and a sixpence among the silver.

THOMAS HOLLAND . I work for Mr. Burton in Eagle-place - he is a chair-maker; I know Hamstead, but not the other. On Friday evening, the 26th of October, about five minutes to eight o'clock, I was there, and four persons came into the shop between five and six- our shop is about four doors from Robinson's; it was George, Hamstead, Buce, and Dennis - Buce and Dennis are neighbours; they generally came there to see us work; Buce and Dennis went back into the yard; the prisoners remained in the shop - master has only a yard behind the house; Dennis came out of the yard in about a quarter of an hour - I did not see Buce again; Dennis had something in his hand when he came back, I could not tell what it was; whatever he had, he must have left in the shop, for he took nothing out with him; he joined the prisoners, and they all three went out together: in about a quarter of an hour, master came in, and ordered them out, and as George went out, he threw a bundle of shoes under the bench, and left them there - they were translated shoes.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you worked for your master? A. Three years; Hamstead lived about two minutes' walk from the shop - I saw them all four come in together; I saw nothing of Buce after he went into the yard - the prisoners did not go out till all three left together; I did not see Hamstead at our shop afterwards - I leave work at eight o'clock, leaving master there.

WILLIAM BURTON . I am a chair-maker. Holland worked for me; I had gone to tea at five o'clock, and returned at six: I found the prisoners, and Dennis in the shop - I told them to go out; George asked leave to leave his bundle there, and before I could say Yes: he threw it under the bench - they went out; I did not see them again.

Cross-examined. Q. Did George leave before the others? A. No.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am an inspector of Police. I had charge of George at the station-house, and asked where he got the watch and other property; he said he was going from his home to Playhouse-yard with some shoes, which he had made up, and in passing along Finsbury-square, he found them - after the constable had searched him, this leather purse was found on him.

JOHN ROBINSON . This is my purse, this watch is mine; I have had it about thirty years, and the spoons are mine: I have had them twenty-eight years - I have not got the numbers of the notes, but Mr. Warner's name was on one, and Mr. Young's on the other, and I find those names on them; I have never seen the promissory note.

JOHN ROBINSON , JUN. I am the prosecutor's son. I was not in the house on this Friday - I had come home to my master's shop, which is a few doors off, about eight o'clock, and my mother passed me to go home; I did not go with her, but in less than half a minute, my attention was called to the house - I went and found the front door open, she had

not been into the house, I am certain; a neighbour brought a light, and I saw the table-drawer broken open - the lock was torn completely off; I called the Policeman to examine the premises - I saw the back door had been broken open; the Policeman found an instrument in the next house.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know how long your mother had been absent? A. No.

RICHARD HUNT (Police-constable H 79). I was called in by Robinson, and in Mr. Burton's shop, which is next door, I found this crow-bar.

George's Defence. I left home about six o'clock with my work - I saw Dennis and asked him if Mr. Burton was at home, as we often went there at night; he said he believed he was - I went in, and had not been there five minutes before Dennis and Buce came in; Buce went backwards, Dennis remained in the shop - Dennis said to me"Leave your bundle here, for I want to speak to you;" I went out, and he told me to stand in Princes-street till he came to me, and in a quarter of an hour Robert and James Buce came to me - James Buce said he had half a dozen tea-spoons which he had got out of the house; soon after Robert Buce and Dennis came and told me to go down to Whitechapel, and they would meet me - they did, and asked me to take these things to sell as I dealt in Petticoat-lane; being in great distress, I took them to sell.

GEORGE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

HAMSTEAD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-92

93. MARTHA TRIVELLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a bill of exchange for payment of and value 500l., the property of Thomas Foster and another .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-93

Second London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

94. JOHN WHATMORE was indicted for a misdemeanor . To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-94

95. THOMAS POLLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 3 pairs of shoes, value 24s., the goods of John Maclaren , his master .

JOHN MACLAREN . I am a shoe-maker , and live on Cornhill , the prisoner worked for me out of doors. On the 23rd of November he was brought into the shop, charged with stealing three pairs of shoes which were found on him; he said he had taken them and was sorry for it -I had employed him two years, and always considered him honest.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you made him any promise? A. I might have said he had better confess; he has been recently married and his wife is near her confinement.

JOHN MARTIN . I am in the prosecutor's employ. On the 23rd of November I saw the prisoner take one pair of shoes from one of the cases, and put them in his bag; I said nothing to him but told the street-keeper in about two minutes; he apprehended him and found three pair of shoes in his bag; I do not remember what he said.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was you when you saw him take them? A. On the cellar stairs there is a door which was shut - it is bolted at the side; but I looked under the bottom, where the floor is worn away, there is a space of about an inch or half an inch; I stood down the stairs - the cases where about two yards from the door; he was standing up.

JOHN PARKER . I am a street-keeper. Martin told me to stop the prisoner, and bring him back, when he came out of the shop, as he suspected he had robbed his master I stopped him, and asked what he had got in his bag; he said he had his work - I put my hand on his bag, and felt a pair of made up shoes; I said, "Have you got any made up shoes?" he said No - I said, "There is a pair here;" he said, "Yes, there is; I am going to take them to a customer in Tabernacle-square" - I then asked if he had got any more made shoes; he said No, and on feeling I found two more pairs - I took him into the shop, and he voluntarily said he had done it, but he did not know how he came to do it; I heard nobody say he had better confess; if it had been said I think I must have heard it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you say, if he confessed you would do all you could with his master not to hurt him? A. Not at the shop - in going to the Compter, I said the best thing he could do was to give his master information, as he had lost a deal of property; this was after he had said what he did.

MR. MACLAREN. I cannot say, in my confusion, whether I made him any threat or promise - I have no mark on these shoes; they were made for me, but I cannot swear to them.

Cross-examined. Q. Many shoes are bought from depots? A. If these are mine they came from a depot - I cannot swear to them, though I know they are mine.

JOHN MARTIN . I cannot say whether either of them are the pair I saw him take - he was stopped about four doors off.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen him all the time he was in the shop? A. Yes; I did not see him go out, as I was down stairs - I only saw him take one pair; another young man was in the shop, but his back was turned - he was about a yard and a half from him, writing; the prisoner is an excellent workman - there is no jealousy between us.

JOHN PARKER . I saw him come out of the shop, and and took him within three doors; he went no where.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to show Mr. Maclaren a last, with part of my work fitted on it, for a lady I had a pair of shoes to make for; I had my bag under my arm; I remained in the shop a quarter of an hour, and brought the same things out in my bag as I had taken in - I got about seventy yards before Parker came to me; I told him I had shoes, and that I was going to take them to King's Head-court, White-cross-street.

MR. MACLAREN. He showed me a last for a lame foot; I had lost 230l. worth of property, and set a watch - I cannot say whether his bag was under his arm; I never suspected him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-95

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1ST.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

96. MARTIN DUNPHY was indicted for embezzlement ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-96

97. SARAH ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 4 gowns, value 12s. , the goods of Robert Purser .

ROBERT PURSER . I live at Limehouse-causeway . On the evening of the 27th of October the prisoner was at my shop; after she left I received information, and followed her - I found her in a street leading from her house towards the docks; I asked her what she had done with the gowns which she took away; she said she did not take any- I went with her to her house, but could not find them; I then gave charge of her - the four gowns were afterwards brought into my shop.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Had you known her before? A. Yes; she is married, and has eight children; I did not know that her husband was ill in bed - I found nothing on her, nor in the way, but it was dark, and I could not see it.

JOHANNA CARTHY . I was at Mr. Purser's shop on the 27th of October; I heard a noise, as if some hooks were breaking - I turned, and saw the prisoner pull some gowns down behind a sheet; I saw the sleeves of the gowns - she put them into her apron; I gave an alarm; she ran out, and went towards the West India-docks - I went after her with Mr. Purser; I am certain she is the person - I had seen her in the shop two or three times.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there other persons in the shop? A. Yes, about a dozen; they were not near where the prisoner was - she was near the door; she did not return into the shop, and some persons said, "That is not the woman."

PETER COGHLAN . I happened to be at Mr. Purser's that night - my wife went out, and picked up the bundle; I did not see her find it; I carried it to Mr. Purser's.

ELLEN COGHLAN . I picked up the bundle about thirty yards from Mr. Purser's, on the way towards the West India-docks,

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-97

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

98. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 2 sheets, value 10s.; 7 cravats, value 14s.; 3 pairs of socks, value 2s.; 1 belt, value 10s.; 4 night-caps, value 4s.; 2 pairs of drawers, value 3s., and 4 handkerchiefs, value 8s. , the goods of Andrew Cochrane .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Cleopas Roper .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

MARY ROPER . I am the wife of Cleopas Roper, a carpenter - we live in South-street, Berkeley-square . Captain Andrew Cochrane lodged with us, and left us three years ago on the 6th of last March; he left a quantity of wearing-apparel and other articles at our house; I put the linen articles into a trunk, which was locked, and I kept the key - it stood on the attic landing: the prisoner came in June last to lodge at our house - he lodged the first three weeks in the front attic, and afterwards in the back: on the 17th of November, in consequence of information from Emma Watts, she and I went into the prisoner's bed-room- Watts took a bundle from behind the curtains, which contained net night-caps, and sundry articles of apparel, which I knew belonged to Captain Cochrane - I went to the chest immediately, and found the hasp loose, and the flap which went over it forced up; I opened it without the key in a moment - it had been broken open; it was empty, except two towels and some little articles - the prisoner came home at three o'clock in the morning, and I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know the name of the gentleman? A. By letters which I have received; his letters were generally directed "A. C. Cochrane;" I never knew what the second name was- my husband's name is Cleopas only.

THOMAS ALKINGTON (Police-constable C 39.) I was called to the prosecutor's house on the Sunday morning; I found the prisoner in bed - I asked him for his keys, and I found two or three in his coat pocket; we asked where his boxes were, and he told us - we opened his boxes with the keys, and found these articles; I also found this chisel on his bed, which I applied to the marks on the chest, and it fitted them exactly.

MRS. ROPER. These are Captain Cochrane's property, and were in the chest - this is my husband's chisel.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe the prisoner was in distress? A. He was out of a situation; I know his father is a clergyman, and has a large family; he had not a farthing about him when he was taken.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18321129-98

199. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 25th of March , of a certain evil-disposed person, 8 glazed window-sashes, value 8l., the goods of John Puckeridge , well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN PUCKERIDGE . I am a watchmaker , and live in King-street, Snow-hill - I have a house at No. 38, Richard-street, Liverpool-road, Islington . In March last it was to let; on the 23rd of that month two ladies called about it, and in consequence of what they said I sent my son to the station-house - in the evening I went to the house in Richard-street, found the back shutter broken open, and eight sashes gone - I had seen them safe a few days before; on the 25th of March I went with Collins and King to the Hornsey-road, into a house belonging to the prisoner; the officer knew it to be his - I found two of my sashes in the first floor front room, near to the window - the house was nearly finished; it wanted sashes and painting only; we then went into a little back house, about twenty yards distant, and there I found two more sashes. concealed behind some wood - they were also mine, and were a portion of those stolen from my house in Richard-street; we then went to the prisoner's house, in Copenhagen-street - we found him at home -Collins asked for him, and he came out; Collins then asked him if he had any sashes; he said he had nothing of the kind, that he had nothing but some old lumber in the yard - the officer went into the yard, and I followed - he looked into the yard; there was nothing there, but on looking in at the kitchen window he saw some sashes; I looked at them, but did not know them then - we went into the kitchen, and I found them to be mine; they had been chopping at the tenons, as if to cut them off - one of

them is off, and the stile is taken off; there were some chips about - Mr. Smith came down into the kitchen, and the officer asked him how he came by the sashes - he said he could not tell what to say; the officer then said he had found four more sashes in his houses in the Hornsey-road; he still said he did not know what to say, and he said so several times on his road to the station-house; when he got there, he said to the officer who took it down that he had them of a man named Church, who lived at Bethnal-green; he had not mentioned that before - these are the sashes; I have no doubt they are mine; they were new when I bought the house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know the prisoner? A. I knew him by having seen him in the next yard; I then thought him to be the father of the person who lived there - I have since heard he is a person of property; I went before Mr. Laing, the Magistrate, on the 26th of March - I did not state all that I have stated now - I was asked but very little; I did not state that the prisoner said he did not know what to say, but I belive it was stated by one of the officers - I will not swear it; I answered all the questions that were put to me; I cannot take upon me to swear that I did say that the prisoner could not tell what to say, but I think I did; the prisoner was discharged on giving his own security for 100l. - I think he appeared three times; I do not know that the Magistrate then discharged him altogether - orders were given to the officer to try and find the thief; I went before the Grand Jury last Session, as I found the thieves had not been discovered, and the house remained in a delapidated state - I had not been to the prisoner's house after the 25th of March; I went back to his house that day, as I did not know there was any one to tell his wife that he would not come back - I do not remember seeing his daughter there; I do not remember ordering his daughter out of the room, as I had something to say that I did not want any witnesses to- I have no recollection of the kind, but I will not swear that I did not; Mr. George Finch is a broker - he had lived for six months in the next house to mine, I never had any conversation with him; I did not know where he lived afterwards, but he came tampering with me; he did not say he had come in consequence of something I had said to the prisoner's wife - he called on me, and said he understood I particularly wished to see him; I swear I did not say I did not wish to see Mr. Smith, but I was surprised he should lay himself open to become the purchaser of such property; he did not say that the sashes should be replaced until the thief was taken - he came to me in the character of a house-agent, asked if my house was to let, and whether I was inclined to dispose of it - I said I had been very unfortunate with it, and that two tenants had gone away, and robbed me of nearly 50l. - I asked him what character he came in, for I was very doubtful of him, as I had seen him with the prisoner; I said I should have no objection to part with the house for 240l.; I did not say that I had a house to sell for 240l., and that he must understand what I meant, nor that people must expect to make sacrifices in the situation in which the prisoner was - I was too cautious, for I knew Finch's character too well; I did not say, if money was not quite convenient, there was plenty to be had on good security, at 5 per cent.; I told him if he found me a customer for the house, he should have his commission on it; I did not say I did not care who I sold it to, and of course all would end; I have no recollection of saying that I should trouble myself no more about the matter, as I was not bound over to prosecute, but I cannot take upon myself to say - I am seventy years of age, and my memory may not serve me - I have not been a prosecutor before; when Finch called on me the sashes were at Mr. Wormald's.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Finch came to you in the character of a house-agent? A. Yes; he said this was a very serious thing, and I said I wished to know what character he came in - he said he was a house-agent, and he understood I had a house to let; I did not send for him, nor did I send word that I wanted to see Smith; Finch said he understood my house was to let, or to be disposed of - I said I could not let it in that state, but if he could get me a customer for it, he would get his commission.

JAMES COLLINS (Police-constable N 160). I went in company with the prosecutor to some premises in the Hornsey-road, which belong to the prisoner; we went into an unfinished house, and found some sashes in the first floor front room - the prosecutor identified them; we then went into another house at the back, which was also unfinished, and there found another pair of sashes behind some boards - the prosecutor identified them; we then proceeded to the prisoner's house in Copenhagen-street, about two miles from Hornsey-road; King, my brother officer, went into the house be fore me - when I went into the house, I asked Smith if he had any sashes - he said, No, he had none at all, he could assure me he had none, and he never kept any thing of the sort there, he kept them at his shed, or at his building; I then asked if he had a shed at the back of his house - he said No, but he had a yard with some old rubbish in it - I went immediately down into the yard - the prosecutor followed me - King was then gone; when I got into the yard I looked through the kitchen window, and saw some sashes standing in the middle of the room - Smith was then on the stairs; we proceeded to the kitchen, and found two sashes there, one of which was broken, and there were some chips on the ground; Puckeridge said he verily believed them to he his; I asked the prisoner how he came by them - he said he had bought them, and given 9d. or 9 1/2d. a foot for them; I told him I had found four others in the Hornsey-road - he said he had bought altogether seven or eight pairs; I took him to the station, and he there said he bought them of a man named John; he had before said he had bought them of a man named Church, and two or three of his men, and he afterwards said he bought them of Church's man, John.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you told us all that passed? A. Yes, to the best of my recollection; I was near to Mr. Puckeridge the whole time, and heard all that passed - the prisoner first said he had them of Church, and two or three of his men, and then he said

he had them of Church's man, John; he did say on the second occasion that he hardly knew what to say - this was when I found the two sashes in the kitchen; I do not know what he meant by it - I believe he is in a large way of business; I was before the Magistrate - there was but little stated there; I did not hear the prosecutor state what passed with the prisoner - I knew I could find the prisoner when I wanted him; the sashes were left at Mr. Wormald's - I told the prosecutor I would leave them there, and he made no answer.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you seen the prisoner from the time he was discharged till the bill was found against him? A. Yes, twenty times, and I once asked him if he had found the man he had given a description of -I took two persons to him, and another person was pointed out to him, but he could not identify either of them; one of Church's men was taken to him, and Church was taken - he said that was not the person; he bought them of his man, John - John has not been taken; I cannot find him: I have been in the prisoner's house but once since he was taken.

THOMAS HOBBS KING (Police-constable N 248). I went with Collins, and the prosecutor to the Hornsey-road, and then to the prisoner's house; I saw the prisoner, and told him I had an unpleasant piece of business to state to him, and he asked me into the parlour - I then told him Mr. Puckeridge had lost a number of sashes from a house in Richard-street, and from information I had been to some houses belonging to him, in Hornsey-road, where I had found four sashes, and I asked how he became possessed of them - he said he bought them of a man named Church; I asked where he lived - he gave me a pen and ink, and a piece of paper, and I put down the address at Bethnal-green; in the mean time, Collins and the prosecutor came in; I had to be on duty at one o'clock, and left them: I went with Collins the same afternoon to Chuch, and saw him.

HENRY WORMALD . I live in Mount-row, Liverpool-road; I am a painter and glazier. I have had the care of these sashes; I have fitted them to the prosecutor's house in Richard-street, and they belong to it, to the best of my judgment.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose every house of the same size would require the same sized sashes? A. Yes, but here is one half-sash, I can swear to - it had been in the front parlour; I had seen it while it was in, and remarked it - I should think 9 1/2d. a foot, a fair price for them.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave a fair price for them, and bought them of Church's man; he told me he bought them from Church - I bought them on the 3rd of March, and had them till the 20th; I then sent them in the middle of the day up to the house at Hornsey.

MR. MALLETT. I am chief clerk to the Magistrate at Hatton-garden. I took the examinations in this case on the 26th of March; I have no recollection of any statement being made, that the prisoner had given contrary accounts how he became possessed of them, or that he at first said he did not know what to say - the prisoner was discharged on his own recognizances to appear on the Saturday, which he did.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. May Collins have stated that the prisoner said he did not know what to say, and you not to take it down? A. He might, it was a very hasty examination, as the thief was not in custody.

GEORGE FINCH . I am an appraiser, and live in George-place, Holloway. I know the prisoner; I called on Mr. Puckeridge, and had some conversation with him, in the course of which he said he did not particularly wish to see Mr. Smith, but he was surprised he should lay himself open to purchase such property - I told him the sashes should be replaced till the thief was taken; he said he had a house to sell for 240l., and I must understand what he meant - he said people must expect to make sacrifices in such cases as Mr. Smith's, and if money was not quite convenient, there were plenty to be had on good security at 5 per cent. - he said he did not care who he sold the house to, and of course all would end; he said he should have no house, nor trouble himself more about the matter, as he was not bound over to prosecute - I had before this been to Mr. Harmer, and told him what Mrs. Smith had said to me; he said it was a very delicate point, but there would be no impropriety in my going to Mr. Puckeridge, and telling him the sashes should be replaced till the thief was brought forward - I had only seen Mr. Puckeridge at the office when the case was brought forward; I was agent for Mr. Smith on several occasions: I know there was such a man as Church, and I had heard that Mr. Smith had dealt with him for sashes, and other things - I know Church had a servant named John or Jack; I have been to inquire for him, but cannot find him - we have offered a reward for any information about him; I went to inquire for Church about a fortnight or three weeks back - his house was shut, and I could get no account of him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you ever seen Jack? A. I saw him once with Church - I am in the service of Mr. Smith occasionally; he wished me to accompany him to the office - I had been once to a Police-office before, on a disputed levy; that was on Mr. Smith's account - I am agent for other persons, and for Mr. Williams, of Hatton-garden office - I swear most positively before God that I did not tell the prosecutor that the windows should be put in if he would forego the prosecution - I had retained Mr. Harmer as Mr. Smith's solicitor, at his request - then I went, by Mr. Harmer's advice, to the prosecutor, and proposed to replace the sashes - I knew they were at that time in possession of the officer; Mrs. Smith first requested me to go to Mr. Puckeridge, but I saw Mr. Smith about it before I went - I saw Church three or four weeks ago on some premises belonging to Mr. Smith, in George-yard, Islington; Mr. Smith said he must give him a job, that he might know where he was, and set him to solder a piece of iron - I lived next door to the house from which these sashes were taken, shortly before they were lost - I have to collect the rents of six houses in Pierpoint-rents for Mr. Sage, of Pimlico, and I have distrained on them twenty or thirty times - I live now in one of Mr. Smith's houses; I saw Jack in Liverpool-road with Church, and another man, about eight months ago - I have never seen him since; Church is a plumber, painter, and glazier.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you seen Church, Smith, and Jack together? A. Yes, and I heard Jack called by that name - I have not been retained by Smith as a

regular servant, but only to do such jobs as he desired me; I have been eight years an appraiser and broker - when Puckeridge said he had been at such considerable loss, I said I would undertake to replace the sashes as they were before, upon condition that if the thief was found, he should pay Mr. Smith any expence he had been at.

JOHN STONE. I am a sawyer, and live in Sermon-lane, Liverpool-road. I know Church; he had two men in his employ who used to come to my house with him; one of the men was called Jack - I have not seen him since the beginning of March; he called at my house about that time, and brought two old sashes - he asked if Mr. Smith was at my house; I said No; he left the sashes about ten minutes, and then fetched them away.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What are you besides a sawyer? A. I keep a little beer shop, just at the back of the prosecutor's premises - Mr. Smith is in the habit of paying his men at my house very often; Smith knew Jack, and they have drank at my house frequently, but Church and his man were more frequently there than Smith was - I never saw Smith and Jack there without Church; I had no suspicion when these sashes were brought to my shop- I had worked for Mr. Smith - on the morning after the sashes were brought to my house a person named Davis told me they were improperly come by, and he believed he could point out the house from which they came - I have never seen Jack since the time he brought the sashes - Church and Smith came to my premises about a month ago; they had some beer, and talked together; I did not give any information when Davis told me what he did - I did not know Mr. Puckeridge; Davis showed me the place, but I did not go to the Police-station.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who is Davis? A. A shoemaker - he did not say he had seen them stolen, or knew who stole them, but he said he saw a man come into my house with them, and he thought something was wrong; I have seen Smith and Church since that time in company, but I have not seen Jack with them; I have never looked after Jack - I have seen Smith and Church together till within about a month; I have not looked for Church since.

COURT. Q. Did you say to Davis, "I can tell you who was the man that stole them, it was Jack?" A. No - I had no idea that they were stolen.

MARY HAMBROOK . I am the prisoner's daughter. I recollect seeing the prosecutor about the 25th of March; he came to my father's house - my mother was there; he wished me to leave the room, as he wished to speak to my mother alone; I left the room, and he staid about a quarter of an hour.

HENRY ST. JOHN LANGDON . I am a builder. I have known the prisoner thirty years - he has had an honest character; I should think 9d. or 9 1/2d. a foot a good price for these sashes; as they are now, we give 1s. a foot for glazing them.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you in the habit of buying sashes? A. Yes; I knew Church kept a new beer-shop next door to me, in the Hornsey-road, two years ago.

COURT. Q. Are not these sashes worth a great deal more than 9d. a foot when fixed? A. Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 51. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-99

100. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , 1 pair of pistols, value 18s., 1 bullet mould, value 1s., and 1 pistol-key, value 6d. , the goods of Robert Braggs .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT BRAGGS . I am a gun-smith , and live in Holborn . On the night of the 4th of September my premises were on fire - I did not see the prisoner there at all; I had a great many pistols in bags - I have seen some which I believe to be the same as were in my counting-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long before had you seen them? A. Perhaps about a week - I cannot swear that; I have only one young man in my employ who had the opportunity of selling goods; they are my own make - I keep a register of what I make; I have looked at it, and the number of these pistols is not down as being sold.

WILLIAM SALTER BADCOCK (Police-serjeant G 20). I saw the prisoner on the premises the night of the fire -I was in the counting-house; the prisoner produced some small bags that he was taking from some books - they were hanging round the counting-house; he passed them to me, and I said, "What are these?" he said, "Pistols;" I said,"What these little things?" he said, "They are, for I have seen them" - he handed several to me; I took care of what was handed to me.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known this man? A. Five or six months - he has borne a very good character and was in the Police.

JOHN HODGES (Police-constable G 77). The prisoner asked me to subscribe to a raffle last Wednesday fortnight; I think it was on the 14th of November; I gave sixpence for my chance, and there were twenty at one shilling - mine was half a share; I won a pair of pocket-pistols and a mould - I sold them to Serjeant Read; the prisoner gave me the pistols.

THOMAS READ (Police-serjeant G 5). I bought these pistols of Hodges on the 14th of November, for 11s.; on the Wednesday night I went to buy some caps to try them at my leisure - I heard something from the person; I went to the prisoner, and asked how he came by them; he said he got them of a friend, a gentleman's servant - I asked if he was to be found, or where he was; he said he did not tell him, but his master's name was Stevens - I took him before my superintendent; he then said he got them of Mr. Barry, in King's-court - I then took Mr. Barry to the station, and he asked the prisoner if he got them of him, and he said, "No, I did not."(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-100

101. JONATHAN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 coat, value 30s.; 1 waistcoat, value 14s.; 1 shirt front, value 4s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., and 1 box of water-colours, value 1l., the goods of Pryce Jones - also for stealing, on the 28th of October, 2 sheets, value 6s., 2 pillows, value 12s., and 2 books, value 6s., the goods of Samuel Harris . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 63. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-101

102. JOHN DYE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 cloak, value 9s. 6d. , the goods of William Sharman .

CHARLES PRETTY . I am shopman to William Sharman, linen-draper , Chiswell-street . On the 10th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in the shop; I saw the prisoner come to the door, pull the cloak down, and drop it partly in the shop and part out; it was hanging inside the shop; I went to the door, and he dropped it -I believe he did not see me coming; he run off, but I pursued, and took him without losing sight of him.

JAMES CROSS (Police-constable G 172). I took the prisoner, and have the cloak

GUILTY *. Aged 10. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-102

103. GEORGE MACKLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving, of an evil-disposed person, on the 28th of June , 11 dozen pairs of brass rings, value 15s., the goods of Alexander Hawkins , well knowing them to have been stolen .

Mr. CLARKSON declined the prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-103

104. DAVID WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 2 sheets, value 7s.; 1 blanket, value 3s.; 1 bottle, 1s., and 1 iron, 1s. , the goods of Mary Hayward .

MARY HAYWARD. I am single and live in William-street, Westminster . I let the prisoner a lodging on the 19th of October at 5s. 6d. a week - on the 23rd I missed these articles, which I had let to him with the room; he returned in the evening, and I asked where the things were- he told me, and offered me the duplicates.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket and sheet, pawned by the prisoner.

JAMES STANTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet, which was pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM BOORE . I am a pawnbroker. I have a water-bottle which was pawned by the prisoner.

MRS. HAYWARD. These are my property.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. He gave up the duplicates at once? A. Yes, and said he was out out of employ - he said he would have got them out if I had not discovered it; the officer took him and I went several days after.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress - I had the prospect of a situation, and should in a few days have taken the things out again; I had not a change of linen to go to my situation.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-104

105. ANN WHITEHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October , 6 silver spoons, value 20s.; 2 coal-scuttles, value 20s.; 1 window-curtain, value 1l.; 1 decanter, value 5s.; 4 sheets, value 30s., and 1 tablecloth, value 5s., the goods of Edward Boodle , her master .

MR. CARRINGTON conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD BOODLE . I am a solicitor ; my chambers are in Paper-buildings, Temple . The prisoner was my laundress , and had to take care of my chambers; she had 12l. a year. In October last I returned to town, after a short absence: soon after I returned I missed these articles - I sleep at my chambers; she came at her usual time to remove my breakfast things - after the arrival of an officer, I inquired of her first what had become of the plate, which I missed from my chambers; she said she had removed it to her house for safety - I asked what she did that for, as I had told her not; I then asked what she had done with the two coal-scuttles - she said they were at her house; I then asked for the sheets: she said she had taken them to be washed - I said she had no right to remove them, as I had given her express directions not to do so, and insisted upon her accompanying the officer to her house, and giving them up - she became alarmed, and begged I would give her two or three days time, and they should be returned; I said I would not - she then said she had pawned part of them; I said she should go to her house, give up the duplicates of what she had pawned, and give up the other things, and they left for that purpose - they returned, and said they had not been to her house; there were sixteen or seventeen duplicates produced to me of my property, and some other property - I then went to the pawnbroker's, and found some of these things, but most of the property has since been produced at my house.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Did she occasionally wash your linen? A. No, nothing but dusters; the rest of my things I gave to a washerwoman.

JOSEPH HALL WASSELL . I am a pawnbroker. In October the prisoner came to our shop, and pawned these spoons, and some other things.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did it from distress.

GUILTY. Aged 44.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-105

106. CHARLES WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 sheet, value 5s. , the goods of David Evans .

DAVID EVANS . I keep the Nag's Head, public-house, Marsham-street . On the 5th of November the prisoner came and hired a room; he was in bed very late one morning; I went and asked him if he was not going to get up - he said Yes, and came down in half an hour; I went and missed a sheet - he was then gone, but I found it at the pawnbroker's.

NEWSON GARRETT . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet, pawned by the prisoner, on the 12th of November.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18321129-106

107. GEORGE CHURCH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 hammer, value 2s. , the goods of the Trustees of the Poor of St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; and JOHN GREEN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH HARRIS . I am fourteen years old. On the 17th of October I was in the yard, where the poor of the parish of Shoreditch were breaking stones; Church was there, breaking stones - he took up a hammer and threw over the railings, and shortly afterwards I saw Green go over the bridge with it in his hand, putting it under his waistcoat.

Church. When I was charged with it, that boy was not there at all; and it was on the day after, that his father said he did not care what he did, to get money to get

drunk with. Witness. I have told the truth; I was there picking up stones for my father, who was employed there.

SAMUEL CORDEN . I am superintendent of the stoneyard. Church was employed there that day; we have missed a dozen hammers - Green was not employed there that day; he had been in to get work, but I would not give him any - I had given him a hammer the day before, and missed it; these two boys were employed to assist their father in breaking stones - they gave information, and the prisoners were apprehended; this hammer belongs to the Trustees of the Poor of Shoreditch.

HENRY HARRIS . I saw Church throw it over the wall, and Green received it, and I saw him go over the bridge, putting it under his waistcoat.

Green's Defence. I was at work all day; I went home in the afternoon, and came again next morning, and then I was charged with taking the hammer, and I said,"Why, did you not give me in charge when you found it?" he said because he did not find it on my person -I went to the house for relief; they would not give me any, but did not give me in charge - on the Sunday morning the officer came and took me.

CHURCH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-107

108. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 3 billiard-balls, value 10s. , the goods of Charles Bott .

CHARLES BOTT. I am waiter at the Yorkshire Stingo ; the billiard-room is on one side of the green. I lost these balls on the 10th of November, off the table - I do not know the prisoner - it was a private table, and I always kept the key of it - I had seen them all safe at six o'clock, there were two sets on the table, and some persons were playing in the next room, but the door of the private room was locked.

WILLIAM BENHAM TOMLINSON. On the 10th of November the prisoner brought three balls to pawn for 5s.; I asked if they were the balls he brought three weeks before, which I had refused - he at last said he had offered them, and I gave charge of him.

WILLIAM CARTER (Police-constable D 110). I took the prisoner.

CHARLES BOTT . I know these balls - they are an old set of balls turned up, and there are several marks which the turner could not get out of the red ball - it had been a blue one - I missed some exactly the same size as these.

Prisoner. Q. Could not other balls have been marked the same as these? A. No, not in the way this is done; I lost two sets of balls three weeks before, when I saw a person, who I believe was you, who asked me for a situation.

GUILTY *. Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-108

109. WILLIAM EDMONDS and ELI JACKSON were indicted for stealing, 1 box, value 1s.; 1 trunk, value 1s.; 1 watch, value 1l.; 2 pencil-cases, value 1s.; 5 gowns, value 20s.; 2 shawls, value 10s.; 5 waistcoats, value 1s.; 2 net collars, value 1s.; 2 counterpanes, value 5s.; 1 pelisse, value 1s.; 2 night-gowns, value 18d.; 1 piece of bed-tick, value 6d.; 1 apron, value 3d.; 2 frocks, value 2s.; 1 lace veil, value 3s.; 1 box, value 6d.; 2 shirts, value 18d.; 1 shoe-horn, value 3d.; 1 printed book, value 6d.; 1 purse, value 6d., 2 shillings, and 9 pence , the property of Thomas Willis .

ELIZABETH WILLIS . I am the wife of Thomas Willis, of Dean-street, Lisson-grove . At a quarter past five o'clock in the afternoon of the 31st of October, I was in the kitchen, and heard footsteps in the parlour; I sent a little girl up stairs - she came down and told me something; I went up and missed two trunks from the parlour, containing the articles stated in the indictment - I had seen them safe an hour before.

CATHERINE WISE . I live in Lisson-grove, very near the prosecutor. I saw Jackson go into the prosecutor's house, and bring the boxes out; Edmonds was standing round the corner in Union-street, not a dozen yards off - it was about five o'clock in the afternoon; Jackson brought one out first, and then brought the other - I did not give an alarm, because I thought they were authorised to take them; I have seen them about, and swear they were the two men.

WILLIAM HORSFORD . (Police-serjeant D 6). I met the prosecutrix crying, in Jane-street, about half-past five o'clock in the evening - I took her home; Wise then came in, and described the persons - I knew the prisoners, and went with a constable to No. 31, Steven-street, and saw Jackson coming out of the back parlour with a light - he saw me, went back and fastened the door; I went into the yard, and saw Edmonds throwing a number of things out of the window, and I believe he was getting out himself - I called to him, and said it was of no use; I called to Kendrick the officer. to let no one pass him - I went into the back parlour, and found the prisoners there; I found the watch under the fire-place, and some other things in the room, and this Bible in the privy, with Willis's name in it.

HENRY KENDRICK . I am a Policeman. I went to the house; the prisoners occupy the back parlour - on entering the house I saw the back room door shut very quick; the serjeant went into the back yard, and called to one of them; he then called to me - I put my shoulder to the door, and pushed it; it gave way: the officer then came in with some things in his arms, and found the watch in the ashes - Jackson gave up this silver pencil-case, a segartube, and a small rule.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Edmonds put in a written Defence, stating that Jackson had employed him to assist in fetching the boxes, and on the Policemen coming, told him to throw the property out of window.

Jackson put in a written Defence, stating, that a young woman had met him in the street, and desired him to fetch the boxes from No. 8, Dean-street, to take them to his lodging, and tie the contents in bundles; but on finding they contained property of value, his suspicion was excited, and he was putting them out of the way when the Policemen arrived.

EDMONDS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JACKSON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-109

Third London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

110. WILLIAM TUTE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 pair of boots, value 28s. , the goods of Joseph Collins .

JOSEPH COLLINS . I live at No. 11, Old Jewry. A person named Stevens came and ordered a pair of boots to

be sent to No. 60, Aldermanbury; I sent them by Joseph Bell on the 27th of October, with a bill and receipt for 1l. 8s.; I never saw the money nor boots again.

JOSEPH BELL . I am foreman to Mr. Joseph Collins. -On Saturday, the 27th of November, about half-past two o'clock, I took the boots to No. 60, Aldermanbury , and asked for Mr. Stevens: the prisoner said that Mr. Stevens was just gone to dinner - I then said I would wait: after I had waited a few minutes he called me inside the door, and said it was rather uncertain about Mr. Stevens being seen, as he believed he was gone to the west-end of the town with a cart of goods; I said I would call at four o'clock - he said I might call at half-past three; I took the boots home with me, and went again between half-past three and four; I saw the prisoner - he said Mr. Stevens had just stepped out, that he could not wait for me, but had left word I was to leave the boots, and he would call at the shop in the evening and pay for them; I said I could not leave them, as Mr. Stevens was an entire stranger, and we did not leave goods without the money - he said Mr. Stevens was a respectable person, and he was their collecting clerk; I hesitated, but agreed to leave them with him till I could go to my master and have his permission to leave them; in consequence of what my master said, I ran back - I was not gone ten minutes; when I returned the place was shut up, the window as well as the door - I rang the bell, but got no answer: I never saw the prisoner again till he was in custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not request you the first time to take them back? A. No, you did not.

Prisoner. I did not say Mr. Stevens was our clerk; I said he was town-traveller and head warehouseman. Witness. All I saw in the warehouse was about as much horse-hair as would fill a hat, and two or three empty boxes.

JOSEPH COLLINS . A person in the name of Stevens called on the Wednesday afternoon, and ordered a pair of boots, price 1l. 8s., to go home before four o'clock on Saturday - he left this card - (read) "Christie and Co., warehousemen, No. 60, Aldermanbury, London;" I sent the boots there with the bill and receipt, and directed they should not be parted with without the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I had only been in their employ two or three days; after Bell had left, Christie came and took the boots - he said he would take them to Mr. Stevens, and told me I might shut up and leave the place; I was in their employ, at 15s. a week.

GUILTY . Aged 35. (See page 41.)

Reference Number: t18321129-110

111. WILLIAM PLUMMER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Ward , on the 12th of November , and stealing therein 1 pair of boots, value 32s., his property .

WILLIAM WARD. I live in Angel-court, St. Martin's-le-grand , and am a shoemaker . On the night of the 12th of November I fastened up my shop before I went to bed; I was alarmed in the night by some person getting down the shutters; I got up, and found one of the shutters down- I went out at the private door, and saw the prisoner crossing the road; I pursued, and gave an alarm, but I did not see him taken - I found one of the panes of glass in my shop window broken, and I saw a pair of boots at the watch-house, which are mine, and had been in my shop the night before; they had slipped the shutter down, without taking down the bar, then broken the glass, and taken out the boots, which stood on a shelf.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Were you the last person up that night? A. Yes - I saw the shop was fastened; the pins were in the bolts of the shutters, and the glass safe.

THOMAS WEST . I live in Oat-lane, Noble-street. On the morning of the 13th of November, soon after twelve o'clock, I was coming out of St. Martin's-le-grand; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and the prisoner came right upon me; I stopped him - there were three or four persons after him- I saw the prosecutor soon after.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the three or four others going in different directions? A. No, they were running after him.

CHARLES SIMMS . I live in Angle-street, and am a hair-dresser. I was in my cellar, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I went into the street in about five minutes, and found this pair of boots opposite Mr. Ward's shop.

HENRY MARTIN . I am a watchman. I received the boots from Mrs. Ward.

WILLIAM WARD . These are my boots.

JURY. Q. Have you any mark on them? A. No, but I know they are mine; my wife is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-111

112. THOMAS WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 11 lace veils, value 60l.; 20 other lace veils, value 18l.; 59 lace caps, value 5l., and 100 yards of bobbinnet, value 5l., the goods of Price Mottram ; 494 yards of bobbin lace, value 17l.; 109 yards of silk lace, value 2l. 12s., and 18 lace veils, value 11l. , the goods of Samuel Edenborough .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JAMES OSBORN . I am a porter to Mr. Price Mottram, a lace-dealer ; he lives in Old 'Change. On the 7th of November I was out with Mr. Wilson, Mr. Mottram's traveller - we went round Whitechapel and Shoreditch, to the City-road; and at the Lying Inn-hospital Mr. Wilson left me - I took the parcels of lace, and went to dinner at the Crown public-house, in Shoreditch, where porters in our trade generally dine - I there saw Mr. Carpenter, Mr. Edenborough's porter; we dined together, and the prisoner, who I had known before, came in - he partook of some refreshment; after we had got out, he said he was going home, and would carry our parcels for us - we agreed, and I gave him my parcel, consisting of lace veils and net, which I had received of Mr. Wilson, and Carpenter gave him one of his parcels; we went down Bishopsgate, and along Cheapside - when we got to the corner of the Old Jewry I saw the prisoner following us, but when we got to King-street I turned round to take my parcel from the prisoner, and he was gone; I gave information, and Mr. Mottram offered a reward - I did not see the prisoner again till he was at the office; I gave him one of the brown paper parcels, which I received of Mr. Wilson.

Prisoner. He said, "Tom, you may as well carry this parcel." Witness. No, I did not - when we got out he asked to carry it; he had carried four parcels the day before.

PHILIP COPEMAN WILSON . I am town-traveller to Mr. Price Mottram. On the 7th of November I had been out - I carried in my hand a parcel, containing eleven Chantilly veils, worth about 60l.; fourteen or fifteen British lace veils, worth about 15l.; fifty or sixty lace caps, worth 5l.; four pieces of bobbinnet, worth 1s. a yard - the whole was worth about 80l.; I packed up the parcel, and observed the paper had Mr. Mottram's address on it - it was outside - I turned the paper, and put it inside - after we had been to several places, we got to the City of London Lying Inn hospital; I there gave the parcel to the porter, telling him to get his dinner, and go home; I went round Islington, and then went home - the porter came home about five o'clock, without the parcel, and about an hour after he came home he stated something - I had wanted some of the veils; the porter was then out; I went out, and saw him - he told me what had happened - on the 9th of November I went to Guntor's house; I saw some goods there; I know the net I saw there was part of the property I delivered to the porter.

COURT. Q. Did Osborn tell you nothing when he first came in? A. No; he set his boxes down, and said he wanted to go to the end of the Old' Change, and he should be back again presently.

JOHN CARPENTER . I am porter to Mr. Samuel Edenborough , a lace-dealer . I was out with Mr. Stone, his traveller, on the 7th of November - I was at the Crown; I had two boxes and two parcels with me; one of the parcels I brought from home, and the other I received of Mr. Stone; Osborn was there when I went in - the prisoner came in while we were there - he had some porter, and when we went out I saw he had Osborn's parcels in his hand; he said if I would give him mine he would carry them - I gave him the one which Mr. Stone had given me; we walked on - he was before me, and behind Osborn - we pitched, and rested in Threadneedle-street; I saw the prisoner when we got by the Bank, and when we got near Milk-street I missed him, and my parcel - I did not see him again till he was in custody.

WILLIAM STONE . I am town-traveller to Mr. Edenborough. On the 7th of November I was out with goods- I gave a parcel to Carpenter; I told him to get his dinner, and go home - it contained black lace veils, bobbin lace, silk, and cotton.

DANIEL COLEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Lower-street, Islington. On the 8th of November this veil was pawned with me for 4s., by the prisoner, in the name of John Walker - I received information afterwards, and on the 13th the prisoner came again with two caps - my brother knew him directly, and he was taken.

ROBERT PARLAMAN . I am a dealer, and live in Cumberland-street, Regent's-park. On the night of the 7th of November I was going with Guntor across the fields, near the Rosemary Branch - I saw two parcels - I took one, and Guntor the other; I opened mine, and found it was lace; I took it to Guntor's house; there he opened his parcel, and found it contained net - the next day I saw Mr. Mottram's name on one of the parcels.

- GUNTOR. I was with Parlaman, and found the parcels; I saw Mr. Price Mottram's name on one the next day - I gave information; Mr. Mottram and Mr. Wilson came, and looked at them; the officer took them away.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. These parcels were delivered to me - Mr. Mottram's name is on one of them; I went the next day where I understood the parcels were found, and found this other parcel, with Mr. Edenborough's name and address on it; on the 13th I went and saw the prisoner at the office; I asked him what he had done with the goods he had not pawned - he said he had thrown them into the canal; I questioned him further, and he said he had left them by the side of the canal - I asked where he lodged; he said, "At a public-house near Islington-gate;" I went there, and in a bed-room, which I had understood he had occupied, I found these marks, which had been on the goods.

MR. WILSON. This is the paper in which one of the parcels was wrapped; some of these tickets have our marks on them, and were attached to the veils.

MR. STONE. This is one of Mr. Edenborough's wrappers, and I believe it inclosed the parcel I gave to Carpenter - some of these tickets were on the goods - they have my writing on them; this veil is ours.

GEORGE BARBER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 8th of November this veil was pawned by the prisoner, for 4s., in the name of John Walker , No. 6, Britannia-row.

THOMAS HARVEY. I live with Mr. Goodburn, a pawnbroker, at Islington. I have a lace veil, pawned on the 8th of November, for 8s, by the prisoner.

HENRY PERRIN. I lived with Mr. Smith, a pawnbroker, at Islington. I took in this veil of the prisoner, on the 8th of November, for 4s.

JAMES PEACHEY. I am a pawnbroker. I have a veil, pawned on the 10th of November, for 3s., with a young man who has since left me.

WILLIAM BOLTWORTH. I am in the service of Mr. Cotton, a pawnbroker, in Shoreditch. I took in two veils of the prisoner, on the 8th of November, for 7s.

COURT. Q. Are you in the habit of taking in lace veils of persons of his description? A. I asked if they were his own, and he said they were, and that he was a housekeeper - I do not know the value of these veils; he wore a jacket with sleeves.

MATTHEW BROWN (Police-constable N 101.) I received the prisoner, and found on him fifty-nine lace caps.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was out of work, and did it from distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-112

113. THOMAS MOXON was indicted for embezzlement . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 59.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18321129-113

114. THOMAS GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 pair of boots, value 12s. , the goods of James Cordy Baxter .

JAMES HAWGOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Cordy Baxter, of Snow-hill . On the evening of the 21st of November, in consequence of information, I ran out of the shop, and saw the prisoner running up the hill - I followed,

and took him - I found these boots on him; they are my master's; I had seen them about half an hour before, hanging about two feet inside the door.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-114

115. WILLIAM SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 cloth cloak, value 16s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Drawmer .

WILLIAM CHARLESWORTH . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Drawmer , of Beech-street , linen-draper . On the night of the 31st of October I was in the shop; some person came and stole five handkerchiefs from the door, and in about ten minutes a person came, and cut a square of glass - I was waiting for him when the prisoner came near the door, and tore down a cloak that was pinned up to a box, between the door of the shop and the lobby -I ran out, overtook him, and brought him back; I am sure he is the person; he had got thirty or forty yards - there was only him running - I only lost sight of him while he was turning from the door - he gave the cloak to his companion.

JOHN ANDERSON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner.

JURY to WILLIAM CHARLESWORTH. Q. Can you swear positively that the prisoner is the lad who took the cloak? A. Yes; I saw him go up the steps, come into the lobby, and take it down; I had to come round the counter to pursue him.

GUILTY *. Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-115

116. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Henry Weatherhead , from his person .

HENRY WEATHERHEAD . I live in Newcastle-place, and am a water-gilder . On the 25th of October I was in Lombard-street - when I got to the end of Birchin-lane I felt some one at my pocket; I put my hand, and missed my handkerchief - I saw the prisoner going off in a very suspicious manner, and ran after him - I seized him, and charged him with taking my handkerchief; he denied it; my friend, who was with me, saw him drop it; it was picked up in my presence, in the direction in which he had moved.

GEORGE GULL . I was with Mr. Weatherhead; - he said his pocket was picked - I saw the prisoner running away; he collared him; I saw him drop the handkerchief.

HENRY HODGES (City Police-constable No. 75.) I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner. It is the first time I was ever before a Court of Justice.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-116

117. WILLIAM SOUCH and JOHN CHARLES THOMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Samuel Bousfield , from his person .

JOHN SMITH . I am a patrol. On the evening of the 21st of October I saw the prisoners in Cheapside together; there was a considerable crowd, as there had been a fire in Bucklersbury ; I saw Mr. Bousfield passing - I saw Souch take the handkerchief from his pocket; I took hold of him, tapped Mr. Bousfield on the shoulder, and asked if he had lost any thing - Souch then dropped the handkerchief; Thomas was standing quite close to him; they had been walking close together from the end of Queen-street - I did not see Thomas do any thing; when I took Souch he walked away.

JOHN FARMER . I was with Smith, and saw the prisoners together; I saw Souch take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket - Smith laid hold of him; the other began to walk away very quick, but I stopped him, and took them both into custody.

MR. SAMUEL BOUSFIELD. I lost this handkerchief on the 21st of October; it has got my name on it - this is it.

Souch's Defence. I am quite innocent; I know nothing of this young man.

Thomas' Defence. I went to see a friend in Whitechapel - I saw the fire; I was just crossing the road - Smith laid hold of me - I know nothing of this young man.

SOUCH - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-117

118. HENRY STEVENS EDMONDS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 book, value 20s., and 100 pieces of paper, value 1s., the goods of Robert Marsden , and others; and 1 book, value 10s., the goods of Charles Shaw .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

JOHN COX . I am a clerk at Messrs. Robert Marsden and others, Princes-street, Bank . On Saturday, the 10th of November, I left the office safe, at half-past five o'clock - I locked the door when I went out; I put the key on the top of the kitchen stairs - I did not return to the office till the Monday morning; when I left there were two Bank Reports on a shelf, and some papers in a drawer, which were not there on the Monday morning.

THOMAS SMITH . I am clerk to Messrs. Marsden and others. I left the office about four o'clock - I had locked the drawers myself; the bureau drawer is Mr. Marsden's - he locked that himself; I had observed the Bank Report books on the shelf in the course of the day, and when I returned at half-past six o'clock that evening, they were gone; I found several drawers open, but the locks did not appear to be broken, except that of Mr. Marsden's bureau, which had been broken - the prisoner was not there when I returned.

THOMAS MARTER . I had the care of the house - it is No. 29, Princes-street, Bank. On Saturday, the 10th of November, I came home about twenty-five minutes before six o'clock, I was induced to go to Messrs. Marsden's office - I found the door shut - I went for the key to unlock it, but I found it was unlocked; I opened it, and went in to see if things were safe - I saw the prisoner in a little private room belonging to Mr. Marsden, standing with his back to the bureau, hiding the part which had been broken; he immediately rushed at me, and knocked the candle out of my hand - he did not succeed in getting by me, for I stopped him in the room, and called out Stop thief! and my

wife locked us into the room; he begged and prayed for mercy - he said I was a much older man than himself, and he would give me all the money he had, and for God's sake to let him go; when I found the room door was locked, I loosed him - he said, "O good God!" he ran to the window, and tore the blind up - I ran and seized him, and never let him go; he put his hand into his pocket, and dropped some picklock-keys, which the officer afterwards took up in my presence, and a clasp knife was found, which did not belong there; the drawer of the bureau was open, and a bundle of papers was afterwards brought in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know how these papers got out? A. No - if the prisoner had taken them out, he might have gone off; I did not try whether any of these keys would open the drawers - I think they are too large; I do not know who opened the drawers or the doors - the bureau had been forced open, and the lock off; the prisoner said before the Lord Mayor, that a person sent him to the place; I do not know whether I frightened him, but I did my best to keep him, and cried out Thieves!

JOHN COX . The Bank Reports were a quarto size, three or four inches thick - they were worth more than 6d. a volume; these papers belong to Messrs. Marsden, who are stock-brokers.

COURT. Q. Are you sure when you quitted at half-past five o'clock, that the two Bank Reports were on the shelf? A. Yes - I cannot form any judgment of their value; I think they weighed 4 lbs. - one of them was the property of Mr. Charles Shaw, and one of the Dean of Salisbury - I left them safe in the office when I went out.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know that one was the property of Mr. Charles Shaw? A. He is one of the proprietors of Bank stock, and I saw him bring it in - they have not been found.

HENRY HODGES . I was going down Bartholomew-lane, and found this bundle of papers - I received information, and took them to Messrs. Marsden's - it was just before six o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were they from Messrs. Marsden's? A. About fifty or sixty yards - they were on the top of a fire-plug.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Princes-street, and was accosted by a respectable looking gentleman, who asked me to go and inquire if Mr. Burnell lived there - I went and knocked, and Marter passed me with a light in his hand, and went to a closet; as he returned he took hold of me, and said if I had been a wide awake thief, I should have got away; he took me by the neck, and almost strangled me - the officer said I was not so green.

MR. PHILLIPS to THOMAS MARTER . Q. Upon your oath, did you say, if he had been wide awake he would have made his escape? A. I did not; I never heard the word before, that I know of.

COURT. Q. What was he about when you first entered the room? A. He put his own candle out; we found a small bit of candle in the room, about two yards from the bureau, which had been broken open, and the screws drawn out.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he any pincers to draw them out? A. No; but there was this knife found; one of the keys will fit the office door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-118

OLD COURT. MONDAY, DECEMBER 3RD.

Second London Jury, before Mr. Baron Bolland.

119. GEORGE TUCKER was indicted for feloniously secreting and embezzling a letter, containing a 5l. note, the property of Eliza Parminter , which came into his hands and possession whilst in the employ of the General Post-office .

ELEVEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL and MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and SHEPPARD conducted the prosecution.

ELIZA PARMINTER . I was visiting Ilfracombe, in Devonshire - I live in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square. -On the 9th of October I wrote a letter to Miss Hetherington, of No. 56, Margaret-street, Cavendish-square, and enclosed in it a 5l. Bank note and a sixpence; I took the number of the note, but not the date - I delivered the letter with my own hands at the Post-office at Ilfracombe; I saw the post-master, and told him it contained a 5l. note -I saw him mark it as a money-letter: on my arriving in town on the 26th or 27th of October, I learnt from my friend that the letter had not arrived - I had written my name on the Bank note - (looking at one) this is my name and the Bank note I sent, and the number is the same, I believe.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You made a memorandum of the number? A. Yes, but I have lost it; I cannot recollect the number, but the writing on the note is mine - I had been at Ilfracombe about a month, and received the 5l. note there, from Mrs. Willis; I generally write my name on notes which I pay away - I had no other 5l. Bank note at Ilfracombe, nor for the last six months, and can positively say I have not written my name on a 5l. Bank note for the last twelve months; I may have been in possession of one since July, 1830; the date of the note, and have written my name on it, but do not remember; I only swear to this note by its having my name on it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You miss your memorandum, had you shown it to any body? A. Yes, I sent it to the General Post-office by Miss Hetherington; it was the memorandum I made at Ilfracombe - the name of Parminter on the note is my hand-writing; I have not put my Christian name - I remember omitting to do so, and writing the name on the note diagonally, as this is.

MARGARET HETHERINGTON . In October last I lived at No. 56, Margaret-street, Cavendish-square - I did not receive any letter on the 12th from Miss Parminter, containing a 5l. note - I expected one, and attended for the postman that day. but he did not come; Miss Parminter some time afterwards gave me a paper with a number on it; I took it to the General Post-office, by her direction, and showed it to a clerk in the Secretary's-office - he took the number down on a paper, and returned me the

original paper; I do not recollect what I did with it - it is lost: I have looked for it - I do not recollect the number.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you keep the house? A. No, I am in a situation there - seven or eight persons live in the house; there are two females and only one servant; the letters are delivered usually about half-past nine o'clock, except on Mondays; this was on Friday - I gave up expecting it about half-past ten, and paid no further attention to it; I afterwards went to the Post-office with the memorandum - I showed it to a person there; I gave it him to copy - he gave it to me back again immediately; I was not aware that it was the original memorandum, and do not know what I did with it; I did not return it to Miss Parminter - I have searched my writing-desk for it.

COURT. Q. Did you at any time receive a letter from Miss Parminter, containing a 5l. note? A. I did not.

JOHN RAMSAY . I am a clerk in the Secretary's-office at the General Post-office . I recollect Miss Hetherington coming there some time in October; she showed me a memorandum with a number on it, which I copied: here is the copy which I made at the time - it is No. 18,165; this is my own hand-writing - I believed I returned the memorandum to Miss Hetherington.

ROBERT ROLLO . I am employed in the Inland department of the General Post-office - I do not know the prisoner. On the morning of the 12th of October I opened the Ilfracombe bag - there were two money-letters in it; one directed to Sir Francis Freeling, and the other for Miss Hetherington - (looking at a paper) this bill arrived with the letters, and I delivered it, with the letters in it, to Mr. Ravenscroft; I put my initials on it.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know there were two money-letters that morning? A. By looking at this bill.

COURT. Q. Did you compare the letters with the bill? A. I did, and am certain they were correct.

The bill being read contained the direction of the letter in question.

THOMAS RAVENSCROFT . In October last I was clerk of the money-book, in the Inland-office. On that morning I remember receiving some money-letters from Rollo; the addresses were entered in the money-book by my assistant - I signed my initials to the bill; (looking at it) here are my initials which I signed; I was assisted that morning by Mr. Hinton, as it was a heavy morning(Monday) - I gave the letters to Hinton to be entered in the book, and after he had entered them, I received them back from him; they were directed to different parties: he had about fifty of them - here is one money-letter entered in the book, in the name of Miss Hetherington, No. 56, Margaret-street, London - this was on the 12th of October; the entry is dated Friday, the 12th of October - I keep the letters till I deliver them to the letter-carrier, who produces receipts for them, corresponding with the directions; I cannot remember who the carrier was - I am not acquainted with their names; before or shortly after the addresses are entered, receipts are made out corresponding with the addresses, and delivered over to be sorted in the different divisions; after the letters are sorted in the different divisions, the amount of postage is counted up - the amount is first entered in a docket, and afterwards copied into a charge-book; the letter-carrier who tells it up with the officer, signs his initials to the paper - the carrier then has the letters not containing money, and receipts for the money-letters; he brings those receipts to me, and I deliver money-letters corresponding with the receipts - he enters his name in the book opposite the address, as an acknowledgment that he has received it; the name signed against the letter in question, appears to be J. Moulden; I know him by sight, but do not know his hand-writing - I cannot recollect who received the letters that morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Hinton always assist in the office? A. No; it was a heavy morning: Saturday is almost as heavy a morning as Monday - Hinton is a clerk in the establishment; there are fifty or sixty letter-sorters: they all know they can get letters by producing the receipts, but they must sort them out of the regular course to get them - we only look to see that the receipt corresponds with the letters.

COURT. Q. If a man whose name you knew brought a receipt in another name, would you deliver the letters to him? A. He must put his initials to it; any lettercarrier producing a receipt would have the letters - I do not know the men; there are two hundred and twenty carriers.

MR. SHEPPARD. Q. The carrier's name is not on the receipt? A. No, if a carrier brings a receipt, I conclude it is in his division, and give him the letter on his signing the book - I knew the prisoner as a carrier, but did not know his name; he would know the manner of obtaining letters as well as the others.

JOHN HINTON . I am a clerk in the Inland-office. On the morning of the 12th of October, I assisted Mr. Ravenscroft; (looking at the money-book) here is "Hetherington, No. 56, Margaret-street," entered here in my hand-writing - I copied it from a letter which I received from Mr. Ravenscroft, and returned it to Mr. Ravenscroft.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not give the letters out that morning? A. No.

WILLIAM HAWKINS ADAMS . I am teller in the Inland-office. On the 12th of October two charges of letters were made up for the Cavendish-square district; I took down the amount of them on a docket, and afterwards entered it into a check-book - here is the entry; here are two charges entered here: one for 2l. 5s. 8d., and the other 1l. 8s. - these are entered from the dockets; here is the docket for 1l. 8s.; I entered it from this docket into the book; I have not got the other docket: when the carrier comes to receive the letters, and to tell up the postage, it is his business to put his initials to the docket, as a voucher for his having received letters to that amount; I did not tell up the letters to which this docket relates.

WILLIAM GRANT . I am a teller. This is the docket for the Cavendish-square district on the 12th of October: my initials are on it; I do not tell the amount of the letters with the carrier when he comes to receive them -I do it before; I do not know what he does with it: my business is merely to tell up the charges, and to sign my name to the amount - I told it for Adams, putting my initials to it, and gave it over to Adams.

Cross-examined. Q. This certifies that letters to that

amount were in the pocket? A. Yes, I cannot say whether any receipts for money letters were among it.

BENJAMIN CRITCHETT . I am inspector of letter-carriers. In October last the prisoner was in the employ of the Post-office, as a letter-carrier - he has been there about eighteen months; I do not remember whether he told up the letters of the second charge of 1l. 8s. for the Cavendish-square district on the 12th of October - these initials G. T. on it, I believe to be in the prisoner's handwriting; this is the docket for 1l. 8s. - here is G. T. in pencil; we take the initials in pencil from the carriers -I was afterwards present with Mr. Peacock and the prisoner; Mr. Peacock, the solicitor, showed him the initials in my presence, and said to him, "Did you tell this charge?" he said he did, and that the initials were his: Margaret-street, Cavendish-square, is in the walk of a man named Hazell, who is assistant to Moulden, they were the only two on the walk - it is not at all irregular for one letter-carrier to tell up a charge for another; it is done daily, for expedition sake - the prisoner's seat is in the first division of the letter-carrier's seat, No. 1; Moulden's seat is next to the prisoner - eight, ten, or twelve sit in that division; there is a small partition, about two inches high, between them: last October I remember the prisoner asking for leave of absence - I think it was about the 15th or 20th; he said he was going to Chichester, because he was unwell, and wished to go there, as his friends lived there- leave was granted him for about ten days; he had told me before that Chichester was his native place - I have often seen him write - (looking at the 5l. note) I believe this " G. Simes, 17, Spital-street, Guilford," on the front of the note to be his writing, but do not positively swear to it - here is the same name and address on the back; I believe that also to be his writing - there is no letter d in the word Guildford; I think both addresses are in his hand-writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Carriers sometimes tell up the amount of postage for each other? A. They do if one is engaged at the moment the charge is called - they occasionally charge their seats in the division; while he was in that walk he would sit in that seat - I am present while they are engaged; the prisoner generally sat in the next seat to Moulden - I do not know that I can be positive he sat in that particular seat that morning.

Q. Have they each a desk? A. No, a small table - he could not occupy a seat in another division; each man has a table about two feet six inches wide, enclosed by a small partition - I have no doubt these two pencil letters are the prisoner's hand-writing; also the address on the front and back of the note - I have not a doubt of either of them being the prisoner's writing; I will swear the pencil letters are his - I do not consider it a disguised hand; the endorsement is not so natural as that on the front of the note, but still it is his - I consider it a little disguised; the note was first shown to me about the 25th of October - I am not certain who showed it to me.

Q. Were you told the particulars of the charge, and asked whose hand-writing you thought it? A. I believe the idea of it being the prisoner's hand-writing arose in my own office - there was no charge against the prisoner then: he was absent on leave at the time, and I wrote to him at Chichester to attend the office a certain day; I knew the note was supposed to be stolen when I was asked about the hand-writing - he admitted at once that he had told up the charge, and the initials were his; I am not quite certain whether he knew he was suspected at that time - he was told so at that meeting.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can you tell whether the addresses were both put on the note at the same time? A. I cannot; I took a day or two to consider before I discovered the similarity of the prisoner's hand-writing; we referred to other carrier's hand-writings, the letter not being in his delivery - my assistant selected out the book, and then we made up our minds that it was his writing: my assistant (Hoskins) may have said to me "This is very like George Tucker's hand-writing" - I agreed with him; nobody desired me to say it was his writing.

COURT. Q. Had you seen the note before the assistant pointed it out to you? A. Yes; when it was first put into my hands I did not form an opinion of it - I had my opinion that it was his hand-writing without reference to any document, but it is usual in the office to refer to documents; directly my assistant told me his opinion I formed mine, without reference to any document.

JOHN MOULDEN . In October last I was a letter-carrier to the General Post-office; my walk was the Cavendish-square district - Margaret-street is in that walk; the letters there would be delivered by Hazel, my assistant. On the 12th of October I was on duty in the morning at the Post-office; if a letter had come directed to Miss Hetherington, it ought to have come into my possession - if it was a money-letter, the receipt of it would come into my hands first; I should have given Hazel the receipt for letters for delivery in Margaret-street, and he would take it to the clerk to get the letter; (looking at the book) here is the entry of Miss Hetherington's letter; I do not make the name signed against it to be "Moulden" - I do not know what to make of it; I am sure it is not my hand-writing: no such money-letter came into my possession on the 12th of October - I know the prisoner very well; he sat by my side in the office on the 12th of October; when I deliver letters to Hazel, I tell the postage up; Tucker has been in the habit of telling the letters up for me almost every morning; I do not recollect whether he did so that morning or not - he brought in the second charges for me that morning: some letters were sorted for Hazel from this charge; if there had been a receipt for a money-letter in that charge, he would have an opportunity of taking it; the letters delivered to Hazel corresponded with the charge of 1l. 8s. - I cannot say whether I told them up that day or not, but if the prisoner had told them up, and told me, I should have put it down; when the prisoner told them up, I put down the amount, without looking to see if it is right; I always trusted to Tucker - on that morning he brought out the second charge; when I deliver over the letters to Hazel, I do not check them to see that he has the letters named in it - I trusted to Tucker's word; I do not know whether Hazel has them.

Q. On that morning did you deliver the other charge? A. Yes, and such of this charge as had the letters which were for my part of the delivery I delivered; I have seen Tucker write several times; " G. G. Simes," &c. on the front of this note, I believe to be Tucker's writing; I do not know whose this is on the back.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner brought out the second charge, amounting to 28s.? A. Yes - I mean he brought it out from the office, which is about a dozen yards from where I received it - he had to go into another office for it; I did not see him tell over the charge - he does that in another office, not the one I was in; he has to cross another office to bring the letters to me - receipts are not so bulky as letters, merely slips of paper mixed with the letters; if he dropped a receipt the charge would be wrong when retold; if he told me it was correct, I should take his word, without retelling it; I have seen him write almost every morning for the last six or seven months - I first saw the Bank note last Tuesday week; when I was asked if I knew the hand-writing I knew the object of the question; I believe the writing in front to be his - I can say nothing of the back; I think they are written by different persons - I was not shown any of the prisoner's writing to compare with it; but last Tuesday I looked at the mail-cart book, with his writing in it, to see if it corresponded with his writing or not; I did not ask for it - it was shown to me: the signature was G. Tucker: I looked at it to see if it agreed with the name of Moulden, not with the name on the note - Mr. Critchett never gave his opinion of it before me; the prisoner always sat next to me, and in one place in the division: he did not change his seat while with me.

COURT. Q. On the 12th of October there were two charges? A. Yes; Hazel brought out the first charge, which was 2l. 5s. 8d. - I checked that with him, to see if it was right; Tucker brought out the second, and I trusted to him to tell me the amount - I received the letters from him, which I delivered; I checked with Hazel those I delivered; I have several Members of Parliament on my beat- they have gone out of town, and I have got Tucker to write me their directions, to send their letters on; I have seen him write a great many directions.

WILLIAM JAMES HAZEL . I am assistant to Moulden. I remember on the 12th of October delivering the letters in the Margaret-street, part of the divison; I had no letter to deliver to Miss Hetherington, No. 56, Margaret-street; I do not know the prisoner's walk - " J. Moulden" in this book, is not my writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you receive the letters you delivered from Moulden himself? A. I believe not; I received part of them from Tucker; I do not examine the letters to see if they agree with the bill; I saw that my letters were the same as they were charged to me, which I could tell by reference to my own books, I found mine were 13s. 5d. - I ascertained that was correct; I believe I received the letters from Tucker - I looked them over before I left the office, to see that the 13s. 5d. was correct; I knew nothing of the other part of the charge.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At what time in the morning would your delivery be over? A. About eleven o'clock - it was a light delivery.

JOHN KEMPSTER . I am a clerk in the Bank; this 5l. note came into the Bank on the 12th of October, and judging from my book, I should imagine it was between the hours of twelve and two o'clock - I gave five sovereigns for it - I do not know the person I gave them to; the name of " G. Simes," &c. was on the front of it at the time I paid it, and I believe the name on the back was there at the time; I cannot say whether the note was brought to me with the name on it, or whether I asked him to do it - all I can say is, it was on the note when I paid it - I should not ask the person if the name was his.

JAMES SCOTT PEARCE . I am a clerk in the Cash Book-office at the Bank; this note came to me after it was paid, and I entered it.

JAMES AUSTIN . I am an assistant inspector of letter-carriers at the Post-office. I have known the prisoner eighteen months - I have received letters from him, and am acquainted with his hand-writing - he is assistant carrier to the Bedford and Fitzroy-square walk; the letters in that walk are generally all delivered by eleven, or between eleven and twelve o'clock on common days - I believe this " G. Simes," &c. on the front of this note to be the prisoner's handwriting - I never corresponded with him; I received two letters from him on official business, stating that he was too ill to attend his duty, and have seen him sign his name to the dockets - he only signed " G. Tucker." I have also seen him write his name when he entered the returned letters; that entry contained in his handwriting the address on the letters, and his signature; I have no knowledge of the character of his handwriting but by comparison; I saw this note first about a fortnight ago; the suspicion on my mind when I first saw the note was, that it was the prisoner's independent of any comparison - it was previous to my comparing it; my mind was chiefly made up when I first saw it - I believed it then to he his; the writing on the back of this note seem to me precisely the same, and I believe it is the same hand-writing - I believe it to be the prisoner's; I remember giving an order last November, for all the carriers to be on duty in the evening - it was in the morning I gave the order, it was the day before the prisoner was apprehended - he was present when I gave the order - I was close to his seat when I gave the order - I gave it aloud to every one who went out - he must have heard it, they were to attend that evening - he did not attend in the evening; I have reason to believe all the others were there, all that could possibly be there - I am sure the prisoner was not; I cannot be positive whether all the others did attend; I had heard of the charge against the prisoner - they were merely called together, as two clerks were to come to recognize a person.

Cross-examined. Q. You told the whole party as they went out to attend? A. They were all told of it round their several divisions - and as they went out, I told them individually; nothing was said about the cause of their attending - the prisoner had returned from Chichester on the Monday previous, in consequence of a letter sent to him - the note was first shown to me by one of (Mr. Stow's) the president's clerk; I did not then know the prisoner was suspected, and had no reason to suspect it, not till about a fortnight after - two other persons have been suspected, but not of this identical act; the writing both on the back and front of the note, I believe to be the prisoner's, and his natural writing - I afterwards compared it with the book to convince my mind further of it; my opinion was more confirmed by the comparison - the prisoner's district

is not a very large one; he might be engaged on a heavy day, till about twelve o'clock or a little after.

MR. SHEPPARD. Q. Was it in consequence of seeing the hand-writing on the note that you first suspected the prisoner? Yes, I had heard nobody say they conceived it to be his writing.

COURT. Q. On what day did the prisoner come from Chichester, in consequence of being written to? A. On the Monday; he was on duty that day, and was taken up on the Tuesday - it was on the Monday I told him to attend in the evening.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Though he did not attend in the evening, did he come to duty as usual next morning? A. Yes.

JOHN JAMES SMITH . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the 13th of November at the Post-office; I heard Mr. Peacock ask him at the Post-office, if he knew any person at Guildford - he said he did not; Mr. Peacock asked him if he knew Spital-street, Guildford - he said he did not; he asked if he stopped at Guildford on his way to Chichester - he said he did not, but on his return, he stopped there about five minutes, while they changed horses.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he stopped to speak to a person whom he knew? A. No, he was asked that question by Mr. Peacock, and he said he did not; that he only stopped while the horses were changed - not, that he stopped at a house; after denying knowing any body at Guildford, Mr. Peacock asked if he knew a person named Simes there - he said he did not; I asked him no questions till I took him to Mr. Peacock - I afterwards asked him the same questions as Mr. Peacock, and he told me he knew nobody at Guildford; that was after I took him to the office.

WILLIAM BOCKENHAM . I am a clerk in the Post-office. I was present when the prisoner was before Mr. Peacock and Smith; I was present part of the time, and heard him asked if he knew Guildford; he answered he merely knew it by passing through it on his way to Chichester - he was asked nothing else in my presence.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you there when he was brought in by the officers? A. Yes, but at the early part of the conversation I was obliged to go down into another part of the office.

WILLIAM CESAR . I am the post-master at Guildford. I know Spital-street there: I have enquired at every house in that street for George Simes , but can find no such person; there are about thirty-eight houses there, they are not numbered: I remember about a month ago a letter coming to my office, post paid - it was directed to George Tucker , letter-carrier to the General Post-office, London, and had a private address as well - it was put into my office to be sent to town.

JAMES PINK . I live in Spital-street, Guildford, and am a shoe-maker. The houses are not numbered; I served my aprenticeship to the prisoner's father in West-street, Chichester - I have been out of my time about seventeen years; during my apprenticeship I was on particularly friendly terms with the prisoner - since that time I have lived in the street I do now (nearly seventeen years), and the prisoner has called at my house four or five times, and it may be six - he stopped five or ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and then left; he called on me last about the latter end of October or the beginning of November - I was just going to dinner, and saw him; I asked if he was going home - he said No, he had been home, his mother was very ill, and he was returning to London again; he stopped with me ten or twelve minutes, and took two glasses of wine - he has never written any letter to me; I know Spital-street well - I have lived there so long; there is no house numbered 17 in it - no person named Simes has lived in Spital-street these sixteen years I am sure.

Cross-examined. Q. His friends live at Chichester? A. I believe they do - I have not been there for some years; the London coach changes horses at the Crown, which is four or five doors from me - he called about one o'clock; I do not know whether the coach comes at eleven, half-past eleven, or twelve o'clock; the six visits the prisoner has paid me have all been within four or five years.

JOHN MOULDEN re-examined. I checked my letters to see that the postage agreed, the same as Hazel did; I always count them over to see they are correct.

Prisoner's Defence (written). Although some circumstances may appear to place my conduct in a suspicious light, yet do I solemnly assure you that I am innocent. I never knew any person of the name of Simes in my life; nor did I know there was such a street as Spital-street in Guildford, for I have only called on Mr. Pink there a few times, merely in passing to and from Chichester, where my friends reside; but, if the fact, as it now appears that Mr. Pink lives in Spital-street, shall, from its unfortunate coincidence with the address upon the note, appear to press against me, does it not also furnish a strong argument in favour of my innocence, furnishing, as it was likely to do, a certain clue to detection: if, indeed, I were guilty, (the serious consequences of which every person in the post-office is well aware of) is it probable I should have obeyed, as I instantly did, the summons to attend at that establishment, or would not a natural impulse have induced me to seek for safety in flight; I attended at the Post-office, and was there informed of the charge against me, yet I voluntarily remained to meet it - gave readily and candidly every explanation in my power, nor did I hesitate to write the name and address required by the Post-office solicitor, although if I had really committed this offence I must have well known I was thereby promoting my own condemnation: I need hardly observe that nothing is more fallacious than the opinions which are formed upon hand-writing, nor would any person he safe if such a test were for a moment to be depended upon by a Jury.

GEORGE PEARSON . I am a twopenny-postman, and knew the prisoner at Chichester; I came from there eight months ago: I believe the coach arrives at Guildford about half-past twelve o'clock - it changes horses there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-119

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

120. ELIZABETH SEDGWICK was indicted for feloniously making and counterfeiting a false and counterfeit coin, intending to resemble a good shilling .

MR. ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

STEPHEN WALTER UNDERHILL. I am a Policeman. On the 27th of November I went to No. 19, Old Pye-street, Westminster , at seven o'clock in the evening; I went up stairs to the back room first floor, and found the door fast - I and my brother officers forced it, and found the prisoner in the room on entering, standing near the fire-place, with a pipkin in her left hand - she threw it down when we entered,

and fell back in her chair; I looked on the hearth, and saw a mould, which I took up; it bore the impression of the head side of a shilling - I afterwards found a shilling on the mantel-shelf, a tea cup, and a file on the mantlepiece, with apparently white metal in the teeth of it; when she threw the pipkin out of her hand, there was white metal in it, which fell part of it on the coals, and part on the ashes - I believe it to be Britannia metal; there was a brisk fire in the grate - there was another part of a mould found, which my brother officer gave me.

HENRY BROWN . I am a Policeman. I was present when the prisoner was apprehended - I went into the room with Underhill; the prisoner was sitting in a chair by the corner of the table, before the fire - I was the last constable that entered the room; as soon as she saw me, she said, "My God! I am undone; I wish all the bloody curses may light on Bill Barrett, for learning me to make them!" - I searched her; nothing was found on her - I found on the table this file, with white metal in the teeth of it; there were two files found; I also found by the file the handle of a metal spoon, with the bowl melted off - I found this old perfect spoon on the table; on the hob of the fireplace, I found this tobacco-pipe, with white metal in it, and in the drawer I found this piece of mould - it is made of plaster of Paris; and on the table was this bag of plaster of Paris.

Prisoner. I did not wish curses on Bill.

GEORGE HEATON ROW . I am a Policeman. I accompanied the witness to the prisoner's room; saw the prisoner leaning towards the fire-place, with the pipkin in her left hand - I caught hold of her; she endeavoured to upset it; it was very hot, and the metal melted in it; I picked up some of the metal which came out of it - I found part of a mould for the reverse side of a shilling on the hob -I laid it on the table, and Underhill took it.

SAMUEL BANNISTER (inspector of the Police.) I was on duty at the Police-office, at Queen-square, last Tuesday, near the cell door; the prisoner was in the cell alone: there was a man and woman at the cell; she was talking to them - she described to them what passed when she was taken, and said they found one on the mantel-piece,"but I had just time to throw three into the fire."

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin at the Mint. The shilling produced is counterfeit - this is part of a mould for the obverse side of a shilling; I have examined it, and it appears the counterfeit shilling has been cast in this mould - there are two scratches across the nose which are in the mould, as well as on the shilling - the mould is made of plaster of Paris; here is also the broken part of a mould, having a portion of the reverse side of a shilling; it is also made of plaster of Paris, and appears to be a portion of the same mould - here is a bag of plaster of Paris; I cannot say whether the reverse side of the shilling has been cast in the mould, but the two parts of the mould fit together - these spoons are Britannia metal, the same as the shilling is made of; the metal which fell from the pipkin is the same metal - the files are used to remove any roughness from the shilling after it is cast - here is white metal in the teeth of these files; the shilling bears a fac-simile impression of a genuine one.

Prisoner's Defence. I was with my brother all day, and met a young girl coming down stairs; when I went to my mother in the morning she gave me the key of the door - I saw the pipkin and mould on the fire, and lifted it up; it was hot; I let it drop, and it broke - I went after the young woman, but could not find her; I had not been there many minutes before the officers came -I said if they would wait I would let them in.

MARY DIGGLE . I am the prisoner's mother, and live in Great Peter-street, Westminster - she lived in Pye-street. She was with me all day, till half-past six o'clock- she was decoyed away from home by bad companions.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-120

Before Mr. Baron Bolland.

121. JAMES PRIEST was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Angier Mark Perkins , on the 27th of November , at St. George, Hanover-square, and stealing therein 3 silver spoons, value 30s., his property .

PHOEBE ROSE. I am in the service of Angier Mark Perkins, who lives at No. 11, Great Coram-street, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury . Last Tuesday, the 27th of November, I left the kitchen about ten o'clock, and went up stairs - I left six silver spoons on the dresser - they could be seen from the street; I was absent two minutes; a young woman then knocked at the door - I went to it; she gave me information, and pointed out a person - I ran across the street, and called Stop thief! I followed him, and got within a yard of him, but did not see his face; he was the same height as the prisoner - he threw six spoons into a potatoe-warehouse in Kenton-street - the man's figure was the same as the prisoner's, and he was dressed as the prisoner was at the office - I saw him at the office at twelve o'clock - I went into the potatoe-shop; a young woman picked up the spoons; I knew them to be master's - our area gate was locked.

DENNINGTON BEAVER . I live in Kenton-street, Bloomsbury. I saw the prisoner running, and Rose following, calling Stop thief! as he passed the potatoe-shop I saw him throw some spoons into the shop - Mr. Taylor stopped him - I assisted him; I returned to the potatoe-shop; I found him in custody.

EMMA SPRANG . My father keeps the potatoe-shop. Six silver spoons were thrown into the shop, which I immediately took up - I kept them till the Policeman came, and then gave them to him.

CHARLES FIELD . I am a Policeman. The house is in St. George's, Bloomsbury - Mr. Taylor brought the prisoner to the station, and 6s. 9d. and four duplicates were found on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and on turning the corner of Judd-street a man stopped me, took me to the station, and in a quarter of an hour brought this robbery against me.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-121

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

122. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 2 saws, value 9s., the goods of William Sartain ; and 1 saw, value 9s., the goods of John Harper .

JOHN JONES. I am a carpenter . On the 19th of No

vember I worked at No. 66, Cornhill - an alarm was given, and I missed two saws; I ran out, and went with a young man to Bishopsgate-street, where I took the prisoner with them.

JOHN PARKER I am an officer. I received him in charge.

WILLIAM SARTAIN. I am a carpenter. I was at work at Cornhill, and when I returned from dinner my saws were gone - the prisoner is a stranger.

JOHN HARPER . I was at work at the same place - this is my saw.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the utmost distress - I was coming along, and saw the saws under the window at the corner of Cornhill, and took them up; I never knew they had been in the house.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18321129-122

123. GEORGE DAVENPORT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of James Miller , from his person .

JAMES MILLER . I am an accountant , and live in Princes-street, Spitalfields. On the 29th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Cheapside ; I felt something behind touch me - I immediately turned round, and saw the prisoner putting a handkerchief under his coat; I took it from him, and found it was mine - I gave him in charge.

HENRY HODGES . I am an officer. I have had the handkerchief ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it laying at a door - I took it up, folded it up, and put it into my pocket.

JAMES MILLER . He had not time to take it up - I turned round immediately.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-123

124. CATHERINE WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 2 shifts, value 4s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s.; 1 comb, value 2s. 6d., and 1 shawl, value 6s., the goods of Lewis Lazarus , her master .

LEWIS LAZARUS. I am a dealer in unredeemed pledges . The prisoner was eleven weeks in my service, as housemaid - on the 18th of November, having strong suspicions she had been robbing me, I sent for an officer, and in his presence she opened her box, which was in her bed-room, and these articles were found, with three duplicates.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you go to the pawnbroker's, to see the shawl, before it was delivered up? A. No, nor did I send any body; I confine my dealings to clothing and jewellery - she opened her box when the officer asked her; my sister, who keeps house for me, had access to her room; she is not here.

THOMAS BROOK . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a shawl, which was pawned at my house in Whitecross-street, in my absence, with a young man who has left me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prosecutor call about it? A. He called with the officer, and showed me a mark on the shawl when he saw it, but not before - he was not asked for a mark.

GEORGE WEST . I am a City officer. On Sunday, the 18th of November, Lazarus sent for me; I found the property in the prisoner's box - she went up stairs with me, and unlocked her box herself, readily.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Lazarus describe any thing he had lost till the box was opened? A. No.

MR. LAZARUS. This comb is mine, and was taken from a cupboard - I had seventy dozen of them; the stockings are marked with my warehouse mark on them - the shifts are also marked with the warehouse mark; they never were sold.

Prisoner. I bought the things before I lived with the prosecutor, and have had them two years.

LEWIS LAZARUS. I had four or five hundred of these shifts; I sometimes sell goods with the shop-mark on them, but at times I cross them off - my sister sells in my absence; these stockings I bought since the prisoner has been in my employ.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-124

12. JOSEPH COBBIN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of Michael Bullock .

MICHAEL BULLOCK . I am carman to Mr. Unwin, of Bermondsey-street. My coat was in the waggon, which stood for hire in Thames-street ; I had put it in the waggon ten minutes before - I heard a cry of Stop thief! while I was putting the nose-bag on my horse, and my coat was gone; I saw Bradley with it across his arm, and the prisoner in custody - he was a stranger.

RICHARD BRADLEY . I am a ticket-porter. About ten o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner and a boy rather taller and stouter, together - I suspected them, and when I was at the corner of Water-lane, the coat was taken; I did not see who took it, but I followed them, and found the prisoner with it in his possession - I could not see which of the boys put his hand on the coat first, but it was gone in a moment; they were both there, and I found the prisoner carrying it - the prosecutor's handkerchief was in his coat pocket; I never lost sight of him till the officer took him - the other escaped.

JOHN AMBROSE . I am a City-officer. I stopped the prisoner, who was being followed by the people.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was on London-bridge, and saw the coat on the ground; I took it up, and a gentleman ran after me, halloing Stop thief! I threw it down, and ran.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-125

126. JOHN WILCKES , JOHN SKIPPS , and ROBERT CAIN , were indicted for breaking and entering the warehouse of William Sewell and Jonathan Wholey , on the 18th of November , at St. Michael, Crooked-lane, and stealing 1 dial, value 5l.; 72 pencils, value 3s.; 28 ozs. of nutmegs, value 10s. 6d.; 15 lbs. of raisins, value 14s., and 5 lbs. of figs, value 2s. 6d., their property; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 2 coats, value 20s., and 1 waistcoat, value 5s., the goods of the said William Sewell; 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 20s.; 3 pairs of shoes, value 15s.; 1 hat, value 5s., and 3 brushes, value 4s., the goods of the said Jonathan Wholey .

PHILIP HENRY PARISH . I am a City-officer. On Sunday morning, the 18th of November, I was on the approach to London-bridge, on the City side, about a quarter to eight o'clock - I saw the prisoner Shipps with a bag

over his shoulder, between some new buildings in Miles-lane; I crossed over to ask what he had got, and missed him - I walked towards Cannon-street, and when I got to the top of the lane I saw him and Cain together; Cain had a parcel under his arm and a bag - Skipps still had his bag over his shoulder; I followed them till I saw Evans - I spoke to him; we followed them - he went after Skipps, and I went after Cain, and asked what he had got - he said,"Only a piece of wood;" I opened the bag, and found it was a dial - while I was doing so he ran away; there was nobody to leave the dial with or to stop him, and he got away; I got information, and found him in a house in Fryingpan-alley - I took a pair of shoes off his feet, which the prosecutor identified; I passed down Cannon-street, and met Wilckes with a bag over his shoulder - I stopped him, and asked what he had got; he said I might look - I took him to the watch-house, and found six coats in it, and some boots and shoes; he was dressed in a coat, waistcoat, trousers, shoes, and hat, which are identified by the prosecutors - in his pocket were various articles, which are claimed also.

JOSIAH EVANS. I am a street-keeper. I have heard Parish's evidence - it is correct; I secured Skipps, and asked him what he had got - he said some plums; I asked what else - he said nothing else; I said, "I shall look in your bag;" he said I had better, if I was not satisfied: I found he had got figs, plums, and nutmegs, in the bag - I took a pair of shoes off him at the watch-house, and he had got some bad coins in his shoes.

MR. JONATHAN WHOLEY . I am a wholesale grocer , and am in partnership with William Sewell; our warehouse is No. 129, Upper Thames-street - we did not live there. On Saturday night, the 17th of November, I left the warehouse at 7 o'clock in the evening, and was the last person there; the warehouse was entirely fastened up, and all the property secure: about eight o'clock on Sunday morning my attention was directed to the warehouse - I found it had been entered through a sky-light, several panes of glass were broken, a rope fixed to it, and they had let themselves down; they had got out the same way - they could get on the sky-light through some new buildings behind the warehouse; I have seen the property produced - it all belongs to me and my partner, and was all secure on Saturday night; the dial belongs to the firm.

Wilckes. The other young man was quite drawn in by us; I am very sorry it has happened - I am a German, and have been six years in this country, starving, and do not know how to get my living.

WILCKES - GUILTY . Aged 23.

SKIPPS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

CAIN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-126

127. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 10 shawls, value 10l., the goods of Joseph Bowman and another, his masters ; and EDWARD EVESON was indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing the same to have been stolen .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES WALLER (City Policeman No. 71). On Friday, the 16th of November, I met Eveson on Holborn-hill with this bundle - I asked what he had got there; he said he would not tell me, and dared me to stop him in the street, for he was going on business - it was twelve o'clock in the day; I said I had some suspicion that the bundle was stolen, and he must go to the watch-house - he went a little way, then said he would not go, but I made him go; on getting there, before I opened the bundle, I asked him what was in it - he said shawls; I asked how many: he said he believed there were ten - I asked where he got them from; he said he brought them from a person named Hawkins, at No. 39, London-wall - I asked if they belonged to Hawkins; he said No - I asked if they belonged to himself; he said No - I asked where he was going to take them: he said no where - I asked if he hawked them about; he said No - I said, "Whose are they then?" he waited a few minutes, then said they were a person's named Harris, but he did not know the young man, nor his Christain name, nor where he was to be found; I asked what he was himself - he said he was a plumber and glazier out of employ; I then gave him into custody of a brother officer - I went to No. 39, London-wall, and saw Mrs. Hawkins, I went to the first floor room, and there found two small bits of paper, which I produce; I have kept them ever since - I brought the shawls to the prosecutor, and marked them before I parted with them at all; these are the same shawls.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. He first mentioned Hawkins? A. Yes; he afterwards said he did not have them from him.

JAMES STOGDEN . I was with Waller when he had the conversation with Eveson in Holborn; his evidence is correct.

DAVID SMITH . I am a clerk to Messrs. Bowman and May, No. 15, Wood-street , warehousemen . Eveson came to the warehouse; the prisoner Harris has been porter to our firm nearly twelve months: Charles Waller had some conversation with me, in consequence of which, when Harris came in, I called him aside, and asked him what he had been doing - he kept wringing his hands, and seemed in very great agitation, and would not give me any answer; I pressed him, saying it was his duty to his employer who he had robbed, to give information where there was property, to say where it was to be got back - he at last said, "There are these things, I have been taking to London-wall;" I had not mentioned shawls to him - I asked him what things; he said shawls - nothing more was said about the shawls; he was given into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Might not these things have been sold? A. We have no customers in London-wall; we sell wholesale - we sell as many as ten shawls at a time; I do not manage the shawl part of the concern.

GEORGE PERRY . I am a warehouseman to the prosecutors. I believe these shawls to be theirs; these two bits of paper have my hand-writing on them - I had affixed them on shawls of this description; I have not a doubt of the shawls having never been sold - here is a mark on the shawls where the marks have been gummed on.

Cross-examined. Q. Are the marks on the shawls? A. No.

RICHARD HAWKINS . I am a baker, and live in London-wall. The prisoner lodged on my first floor.

HARRIS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

EVESON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

There were four other indictments against Harris.

Reference Number: t18321129-127

128. THOMAS THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 6 brushes, value 14s. 6d., the goods of George Kent , and another, his masters .

JOHN WHITELOCK . I am apprentice to Mr. Kent, who is a brush-manufacturer ; the prisoner works in the warehouse . On the 15th of November, about one o'clock in the day, I saw him take the brushes out of the place they are kept in, and put them in a basket; I went up and told one of the men - they were afterwards gone from the basket - I told a man and he came down stairs, but the basket was gone and the prisoner also; he had been three years with masters.

JAMES VINE . I work on the premises. Whitelock gave me information - I went down stairs and the basket was gone; I found the cellar door fast, which is usually open -I suspected the prisoner was there; I went into the court behind to endeavour to see, and as I returned, I saw him place the basket in the hole it had been moved from - it was then empty.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. I was sent for and took charge of the prisoner - I found 7s. in his pocket; I asked how he came by it - he said he had sold the brushes to his brother for 6s. 6d.; I asked where his brother lived - he said he would show us - we went there, and found the brushes in a bag.

GEORGE CHARLTON . I am foreman to Mr. Kent. This brush I can swear to - the prisoner's brother was not employed by us; the prisoner has hitherto borne a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18321129-128

129. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 pane of glass, value 10d. , the goods of Charles Ash .

HENRY SELANE . On Wednesday, the 14th of November, I was in Farringdon-street , and saw the prisoner near Ash's shop; I watched him, saw him go in, and come out with something under his coat - he turned towards me up Newcastle-street; I followed him, and seeing me he ran - I ran and overtook him on Holborn-bridge, and pushed him into a shop; a Policeman came in and took the pane of glass from under his coat.

THOMAS PROTHEROE . I am a Policeman. I took the pane of glass from under his coat.

CHARLES ASH. I am a painter and glazier . I cannot swear to the glass; I missed a pane of glass very much like this - I live at 36, Farringdon-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming over Blackfriars-bridge and saw two men standing very near together; a man stopped me, and asked where I was going; he gave me the glass - I did not go into the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-129

130. EMANUEL SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 hat, value 15s. , the goods of William Henry Fleming .

GEORGE BERKELEY HEWSON . I am shopman to William Henry Fleming , pawnbroker . Farringdon-street . On the 19th of November I heard something snatched from the door, and missed a hat; I went out, and saw the prisoner running with a new hat on - I secured him, and found it was ours, and had my hand-writing on it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18321129-130

NEW COURT. MONDAY, DECEMBER 3.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

131. ELIZABETH McCARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 4 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 2 china ornaments, value 1s.; 2 salt-holders, value 3s.; 1 pillow-case, value 1s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 10s.; 2 scarfs, value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 boa, value 14s.; 1 tippet, value 1l.; 2 pairs of slippers, value 3s.; 6 egg-cups, value 1s., and 1 waistcoat, value 18d., the goods of Griffith Humphreys , her master ; and MARY McCARTY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen

SARAH LEGGETT HUMPHREYS . I am the wife of Griffith Humphreys, a haberdasher - we live in Oxford-street ; Elizabeth McCarty was in our service about five months. On the 1st of November I saw a handkerchief of ours on her; I spoke to her about it; she put her hand to her bosom - I insisted upon seeing what it was - she at first refused, but afterwards produced a duplicate; she said it was for her own shawl, which she had pawned - I looked at it, and found it was for a shawl and a boa; I gave it to my husband - I went to her bed-room, which was open, and found a fur tippet, a scarf, and a pair of black silk hose - these articles were kept in the shop; at the office two combs were produced from her hair, which are ours.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not promise if she would confess, you would not be severe with her? A. I said if she had not taken any thing else- she told me about the boa after a long time.

HENRY LIVERMORE . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Oxford-street. I have a shawl and boa, pawned for 12s., on the 8th of October, in the name of Mary Riches; this is the duplicate I gave the person, whom I do not know.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 1st of November I went with Mr. Humphreys to No. 60, Snowhill - the house was to let; I saw Mury McCarty, and asked if she had a daughter living in Oxford-street, with Mr. Humphreys; she said she had a daughter living in Oxford-street, but she could not tell the person's name; I said I came to search the place; she said I was welcome, that her daughter brought a bundle of things the day before to wash, and they were in the wash - I found some stockings and other things; I went a little higher, and broke open a box, where I found the goods, some glasses, two china dogs, an India handkerchief, a cambric handkerchief, a waiter, a scarf, two crape handkerchiefs, two pairs of slippers, and other things - I asked Mary McCarty for the key of the box; she said she knew nothing of it; but I afterwards found the key on the mantel-piece of the first floor front room, which Mary McCarty lived in - I found some stockings wet in a pail, and one small towel, which was

not wet; she said she knew nothing of the articles in the box, but the others had been sent to wash.

Cross-examined. Q. These appear to be things that have been worn, and required washing? A. Yes; she was rather frightened at what I said - the box was shut; she said her daughter had left it there.

GRIFFITH HUMPHREYS . I went with the officer to Mary McCarty - I did not know the box in which these things were found in, but Mary McCarty said her daughter brought it there - I know these articles to be mine.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner had been in various services before she came to you? A. Yes; the mother might suppose that many of these were given to her daughter; these black stockings, which were found in her bed-room, are a very fine dress stocking, which would only be worn by a lady going to a ball - they cost me 7s. a pair.

Elizabeth McCarty . The scraf and tippet do not belong to the prosecutor, nor the silk stockings; they were brought at Gray's Inn, Holborn - if they are examined again they will be found to belong to me.

MR. HUMPHREYS. We had exactly the same kind of stockings - we had a great many scarfs of this description, and my impression is that this is mine.

Elizabeth McCarty . I took the things home to wash, not to steal.

MRS. HUMPHREYS. These articles, which were half washed, are what I had in wear; she wore a great many things of mine while I was in the country - one of these combs I had in use; the other has the shop mark on it.

E. McCARTY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

M. McCARTY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-131

132. MARY CHADWICK was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN CURRY . I live in Upper Ebury-street , and keep a laundry - the prisoner was in my employ as servant , for nearly ten years - she frequently received money on my account; I have never received 2l. 5s. from Mr. Learmouth - I never sent her to receive that money in particular, but she was frequently paid when she took linen to his house.

SARAH COLLIS . I am servant to Mr. Learmouth, in the Albany. I paid the prisoner on the 25th of October, 2l. 5s. for Mrs. Curry, for one month's washing for Mr. Learmouth - it was due to Mrs. Curry; I gave it to the prisoner, to be handed to Mrs. Curry - I received no voucher from her; I gave her two sovereigns and two half-crowns.

RICHARD GOOSE (Police-constable B 55). I apprehended the prisoner on the 5th of November, at the prosecutor's house - I told her what I wanted her for; she said she had never received any money - I told her she must go with me; she put on her shawl and bonnet, and asked me to let her go into the yard, which I did - we then went to the station; I found 17s. and a torn book in the privy.

GUILTY. Aged 32

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18321129-132

133. WILLIAM BROTHERIDGE & DANIEL BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 20 lbs. weight of sugar, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Clark .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be goods of George Lyford Salter.

ALEXANER BROWN (Police-constable D 129). On the 15th of November, in consequence of information from John Sayers , I observed Brown driving a waggon in Wigmore-street; I lifted up the tarpauling, and saw the leg of a man - I followed the waggon, which went up Edward-street, into Portman-square - the horses were stopped in Baker-street, by the prisoner Brown; I did not hear him speak, but thought he did -I observed his lips moving; he immediately drove the horses on, and I saw Brotheridge come from under the tarpauling in his shirt-sleeves; I told Brown to stop the horses, which he did - I got up into the waggon, and Brotheridge said, "So help me God, master, all is right;" I found the bung of the hogshead of sugar half way up, and found this bag; he said, it was only a little he had got for his own use - they said they were going to deliver it; I asked Brotheridge what he had been doing there - he said he had been asleep; I said it was strange to go to sleep without his jacket and hat - the waggon went to Mr. Salter's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was any person present at this conversation? A. Yes, Sayers and my brother officer, who was not bound over - Sayers is not here; I did not ask Brown whose servant he was, but I asked if Brotheridge was regularly employed, and he said No.

GEORGE LYFORD SALTER . I am a grocer , and live in East-street, Dorset-street, Manchester-square . On the 28th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, Brown came into the shop, and said he had brought two hogsheads of sugar, that a very unpleasant circumstance had occurred, for he had brought a man to assist him, and the Policeman had discovered that he had been taking sugar out of the hogshead; I thought it was a trifling circumstance, and desired the waggon to be brought to the door; I then saw several Policeman, and one in the waggon, who was examining the nose-bags; they then showed me the hogshead - the tin was off the drawing-hole, and some lumps of moist sugar were in the waggon - the tin had been forcibly removed, but was not entirely taken off; I took a sample from the bag and the hogshead - there were 22 1/2 lbs. of sugar in the bag; we did not weigh the hogshead, but it was nearly full, and as full as many hogsheads - we found it was a rocky hogshead, being in large lumps, so that if the tin had been removed, this quantity of sugar could not have got out without some hand - I received the hogsheads from Clark, the carman; I had paid 72l. for them, but he was answerable for the safe delivery.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Clark here? A. No, his name is Thomas; I believe I never had a hogshead with the tin robbed off.

WILLIAM OLDFIELD . I am the regular driver of Mr. Thomas Clark's waggon - I was employed on his account to remove this sugar; on the 15th of November; I took in one hogshead at the East London-docks, and one at the West India-dock - they were in a perfect state, and the tin safe over the bung; I met with an accident, from a pully falling on me, and employed

Brown to drive the waggon, and gave my papers to the foreman to deliver my load - they were quite safe when I received them, and I do not think the tins could have been chafed off - I should have gone alone.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not the custom sometimes for a carman to ask another to give him a lift? A. Yes, I could not have taken out the hogsheads myself, but there are men standing about in the trade, and sometimes the grocers men would do it; the tins will chafe off at times in going along; I have known Brown three years - he bore an honest character; I know Mr. Clark's name is Thomas, by his bills, and his name is on the waggon - he has no partner.

Brotheridge's Defence. I picked up the sugar for my own use - I had my smock-frock on.

JURY to WILLIAM OLDFIELD . Q. Is the bag the sugar is in a nose-bag? A. No, but there were nosebags in the waggon, and this is the same sort of stuff as they are made of.

COURT. Q. Was this bag in the waggon at all? A. No, I do not know any thing about it; the bag I carry my meat in is very much like it - bags are so much alike I cannot tell.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 28.

BROTHERIDGE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-133

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

134. ANN WALTON was indicted for stealing on the 4th of November , 1 watch, value 1l. 16s.; 1 seal, value 2s.; 1 watch-chain, value 2s; 1 watch-key, value 6d.; and 2s. 7d., the property of John Sanders , from his person .

JOHN SANDERS. I am a carpenter , and live in Clare-market - on the 4th of November, I was out between six and seven o'clock in the morning - I had been at work at the Morning Advertiser Office - I was very much fatigued, and called at the King's Head in Cross-court, leading out of Russell-court - I called for a pint of beer - the prisoner came in, and asked me to give her a glass of ale, which I did - when I went out she followed me; I told her not to follow me, as I would have nothing to say or do with her; I then went on to Covent-garden , and felt myself sick from working by gas-light, and I sat down on a step to revive myself - I was quite sober, but being fatigued, I fell asleep; I know my watch was safe in my pocket when I went to sleep; I considered the prisoner had then left me - I suppose I had not been asleep half an hour when the Policeman roused me, and said I had lost my watch; I went to the station, and recognized the prisoner as the person to whom I had given the glass of ale, and who had followed me; I found my watch there, and 1s. 6d. in silver, and 1s. 1d. in copper, but I considered I had had 1s. 6d. in copper about me, and it was all gone.

JOHN KENNELLY (Police-constable 144 F.) I saw the prosecutor at ten minutes before seven o'clock heavy with sleep, sitting on a step; I came on to White Hart-yard, and saw the prisoner standing close by: I kept my eye fixed on her, and saw her go to the prosecutor, stoop down, and put her hand into his left hand trousers pocket; she looked back - I went up, and saw a 6d. by the prosecutor's pocket on the step - I asked the prisoner what claim she had to that man - she said she claimed him as her husband - I said, till I got a more satisfactory account, I would take her to the watch-house; I noticed in her apron-pocket the chain of a watch - I took her to the watch-house, and sent a brother officer to arouse the prosecutor; I found this watch, 1s. 6d. in silver, and 1s. 1d. in copper on her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I get my living by servitude - I had 3s. 7d.; I met the prosecutor, who said he knew me; I said I was sure he did not; he asked me to hold his watch, which I refused, and he laid it down; I waited ten minutes for him, he then sat down; several persons passed, and I said, "Please Sir, get up, and take your watch, for I must go" - the Policeman then came and took me - he wanted to search me in an impudent manner.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-134

135. WILLIAM REECE and ANN REECE were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 17th of November , of a certain evil-disposed person, 1 box, value 1d.; 120 pence; 180 half-pence, and 120 farthings, the property of Robert Smith , well knowing them to have been stolen .

ROBERT SMITH. I live in Drury-lane, and am a retailer of beer - I did not see either of the prisoners near my place; I lost the box from my bar, containing the money stated, between nine and ten in the morning - I gave information at the Police-office, and the officer went with me, about two o'clock, to a cellar opposite my private door, where the two prisoners lived - I saw the prisoners there, and asked them to deliver to me the box which my son had told me he took there; they knew my son and all my family - they both denied all knowledge of a box being brought there - I searched, and found the box hidden under some ashes, under the forge, partly burnt; they both work and live in the cellar; the man is a smith - my son is thirteen years of age - I know these parts of the box - I made it myself, seventeen years ago - it contained the property stated; the prisoners denied all knowledge of it; it contained the money which I had received at the beer-shop, for tobacco and pipes; I told them it contained copper.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am not quite thirteen years of age, and know the nature of an oath; I have been out to place, but I live with my father; he keeps a retail beer shop; I know the box; the copper used to be put into it; I went to the prisoners, and asked them for a piece of wire - the woman gave me a thin piece, and a thick piece, and she said I must get her some money for it - I said I had none; she said I must go and get some; I went and fetched this money-box, and took it to them in their cellar, and left it with them - I know it contained half-pence; both the prisoners were there when I took it; they did not give me any of the money - my father missed it, and asked what I had done with it - I took him down to the prisoners, and said, "Mrs. Reece, if you will give me that box, my father will not say a word;" she denied it, and said I had not brought any box there - I believe this is part of the box.

Ann Reece . You brought it down, and put it in the shop, and ran up again, and afterwards came down with your sister, and asked for a bit of wire, and then said that I told you to go and get it. Witness. No, I did not.

JOSEPH FAREBROTHER . On the 17th November, at a quarter-past nine o'clock, I was passing the prosecutor's door, and saw this witness taking this box from the counter - when I went to get my dinner beer, the prosecutor told me of his loss, and I stated what I had seen.

MICHAEL CALE (Police-constable 149 F.) I took the two prisoners - they denied knowing any thing about it.

Ann Reece. He brought it down, and then returned with his sister - he then took up the box, which he said was his money-box, asked me for a knife, and took out some half-pence, farthings, and pence - he put them into his pocket, and went up again - he returned afterwards, looked about, and said, where was the knife, I said I did not know - he said he had been living at a beer-shop, and took a great many halfpence and farthings - he said he could not get all the money out with his knife - he took a hammer, and broke it to pieces - I said, would he not want it again - he said, No, he would get one that would lock - he told my husband to put this in the fire, and said he was going to buy a cap and an apron.

ROBERT SMITH. It was quite a good box, and perfect.

WILLIAM SMITH. They took an old knife, and got out 1s. 1 1/2d., and said would I have it - I said No, I must make haste home, as my father wanted me to do some work; I had before said that I would have 1s., but when they got the copper out I said I would not, as I was in a hurry to get to Somers'-town, to get a goldfinch; I was getting the wire to mend a bird-cage.

W. REECE - GUILTY. Aged 49.

A. REECE - GUILTY. Aged 47.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-135

136. ROBERT THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 12 towels, value 6s., the goods of George William St. John Mildmay , his master .

CAPTAIN GEORGE WILLIAM ST. JOHN MILDMAY . - The prisoner was my groom and valet about a year and a half before this robbery; I may have given him clothes, but never gave him these articles.

MARY HARRISON . I am upper housemaid to Lady Mildmay - she lives in Bruton-street ; Captain George Mildmay sometimes resides there - the prisoner had left his service; this linen was in my charge, and belonged to Captain Mildmay; the prisoner had access to it.

HENRY LIVERMORE . I am a pawnbroker. I have six towels pawned with me by Mary Evans, who was discharged at the office.

HENRY CHANCE REDWOOD . I am an officer. The prisoner was delivered to me to lock up; I put him down in the cell, and afterwards going down with another prisoner I found a duplicate torn in pieces in the water-closet - I told the inspector of it - I went down again, and found on the prisoner some more duplicates, corresponding with the one that was torn.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My master gave me the towels, and if he says otherwise he is a false man.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for 7 Years longer .(See page 15.)

Reference Number: t18321129-136

137. JAMES WOODCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 12 brooms, value 3s., the goods of Ezekiel Delight ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

WILLIAM THOMAS . Mr. Delight is an oilman . On the 8th of November I saw the prisoner take a bundle of brooms from his door; I told the prosecutor of it - I went after the prisoner, and wanted him to come back, but he would not - I was forced to get another person to help me.

Prisoner. I did not take them at all. Witness. I took him with them on his shoulder.

EZEKIEL DELIGHT . These are my brooms.

WILLIAM TOVEY (Police-constable E 113.) I took the prisoner.

JAMES WILMOT. I have a certificate, (which I got from Mr. Clark's office,) of the conviction of James Reeves, on the 1st of December, in the second year of His present Majesty's reign - he was sentenced to six months in the House of Correction; I took him, and know the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-137

138. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 70lbs. weight of coffee, value 4l., and 1 bag, value 1s., the goods of William Oakley ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

ISABELLA CHANDLER . On the 15th of October, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Oakley's shop, at the corner of Osborne-street, Whitechapel - he is a grocer ; another person took the bag of coffee out of Mr. Oakley's shop: he fell down with it opposite the door - the prisoner took it up, and ran away with it; he had been close by the other when it was taken - I took up a hat, and gave information; Oakley and Jones pursued the prisoner; the other made his escape.

ROBERT JONES . I serve in Mr. William Oakley's shop. I heard the alarm - I jumped over the counter, and pursued the prisoner; I did not see him that evening, but he was taken about a week afterwards - here is a sample of the coffee which was in the bag; it was loose, and the bag open.

JOHN GREEN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner a week afterwards.

ISABELLA CHANDLER . I knew the prisoner before, and am certain he is the person.

EDWARD WILD (Police-constable M 133). I produce a certificate of the prisoner's conviction on the 5th of July- I was a witness, and know he is the person.

Prisoner. I am innocent.

SAMUEL TAYLOR (Police-constable H 83). I pursued the prisoner with the coffee on his shoulder, but he got away.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-138

139. JAMES JONES , ELIZABETH HICKS , and LOIS BOONE were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 looking-glass, value 2l.; 1 mirror, value 2l.; 2 blankets, value 10s.; 4 sets of bed-furniture, value 8l.; 21 printed books, value 5l.; 3 counterpanes, value 30s.; 4 decanters, value 30s.; 1 writing-desk, value 5s.; 1 glass jug, value 5s.; 2 drinking-glasses, value 10s.; 1 clock, value 2l.; 12 dessert-knives and forks, value 3l.; 3 prints, value 2l.; 1 tea-caddy, value 2l.; 2 curtains, value 10s.; 2 coal-scuttles, value 10s.; 1 table-cover, value 10s.; 16 knives and 18 forks, value 20s.; 1 tea-kettle, value 3s.; 1 snuff-box, value 1s.; 4 cruets, value 2s.; 1 spice-box, value 1s.; 2 pictures, value 10s.; 4 salt-holders, value 10s., and 2 pepper-castors, value 5s. , the goods of Sarah Birch De Windt .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

JAMES BLAKIE . I am an auctioneer and house-agent -I live in Seymour-place. In July the prisoner Jones called

on me; I had seen him before - he told me he was about a house at 200l. a year in Connaught-terrace, and he wished me to go over the inventory, to see if it was correct; he did not take that house; but I afterwards arranged to let him Mrs. De Windt's house - he said he was a respectable person, and could give me the best of references; that when he was at home he resided at Carno, North Wales - he afterwards said he was connected with an extensive mining concern in North Wales; he called on me afterwards, said he had seen Mrs. De Windt, that all was settled, and he was to have possession; I forget whether I sent a man with him or not, but he said he expected his housekeeper in town, and she would be ready there to take possession - I saw him after that, when he said he had taken possession, and found every thing quite correct; he afterwards appointed me his secretary for his mining concerns; and I must confess, I looked upon him as a very wealthy individual.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Was it you who recommended him to Mrs. De Windt, as an eligible person? A. Certainly not - they became known to each other by some other means.

SARAH BIRCH DE WINDT. I am a widow . I had a furnished house in Winchester-row, Paddington ; the prisoner Jones called to look at it, and said he wished to hire it - there was at that time a bill on the house to let it; I asked him 110l. a year - he said that was more than he should like to give, and I finally agreed to let it him for 105l., on condition of his taking it for twelve months certain; he said he had possessions in Wales, a house, servants, and an establishment there - that his property chiefly consisted of mines; he stated he had a wife and family, and the motive of his coming to town was on account of Mrs. Jones' health; I had not then seen either of the other prisoners; but on the 24th of July Jones took possession of the house, and that day I saw Boone - she presented a card to me, saying she came from Mr. Blakie, to take possession of the house, in the name of Mr. and Mrs. Jones, her master and mistress; she went over the furniture with me with the inventory, but prior to that she showed me a letter, which she said she had received from her master that morning - she said he was a most excellent husband, master, and father - that she had lived with him twenty-two years, and that she had strict injunctions to be particular in taking the house, as she would most likely have to give it up as she received it: in the month of September Jones called on me in Judd-street - he spoke of some alterations he had made in the house; I said I was surprised at it, and he said did I not suppose it would make the property all the better - I said no doubt it would make it all the better; he had taken to the old sashes in the parlour and put in new ones; I never saw Hicks but twice - the first time was about a fortnight or three weeks after Jones had taken the house; I called there, and she came down to the gate - she did not know me, but I made myself known to her as the lady belonging to the house, and said if Mr. and Mrs. Jones were at home I wanted to speak to them - she said Mr. Jones was not, but she asked me into the parlour, and said she did not think I could see Mrs. Jones, as she was laid down; she went out of the parlour, but not long enough to get up stairs, when she returned, and said Mrs. Jones was too ill to see me - I saw Jones at the house I think about the 17th of September, when I went to look at the improvement which he had told me of; and I told him I wished very much to go into the back parlour, where there was a book case with some valuable books, which were not let with the furniture; the bookcase was locked, and I had the key in my possession - Jones said that room was sacred to his son, and his papers were there; I then observed that when I left the house there was no lock that would secure the door between that room and the front parlour, and now there were patent locks on - Jones said if I very much wished it he would send and have the lock picked for me, but he would rather not till his son came home; he afterwards called on me in Judd-street, and made an offer of marriage to me - he told me his wife died a week after he went into my house; I referred him to my husband's executors and all my friends, to prove that his wife was dead, and that he was the gentleman he represented himself to be - he exhibited some papers to me, which the officer has, and said he would settle 600l. mining shares on me; he said he had a great deal of property, if it could be realized, but that was all he could then settle on me: on the 7th of November I went to the house, having had my suspicions - I had had a man to watch some days before; I found the gate open, and on going into the house I found it nearly stripped - the doors were all open, and I called a Policeman to go in and prove that they were so; I missed all the property stated in the indictment, and more - I had gone to the house on the Friday previous to the 7th of November; I saw Boone at the gate - I expressed a great wish to go into the house; she said she had positive orders from her master not to admit me, but she said if I went the next morning most likely he would be in town - I went the next morning- she was there; she did not let me in, but offered me a letter through the gate from her master - I said unless she let me into the house, and treated me like a gentlewoman, I should not take it, and I did not.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Is the inventory in your possession? A. Yes; Jones had altered the windows by taking out old sashes and putting in new ones - Mr. Watts, who put them in, told me they were not paid for; Jones talked of making other alterations - the locks which were put on appeared to me to be a sort of lock I had never seen before; he paid me very few attentions - he did not give me time to receive them; from July till the 17th of September, I never saw him at all - it was about three weeks after he had been in the house, that I called and heard his wife was ill; I did not accept him as my future husband, unless he could prove himself to be what he had stated - I never wrote letters to him in tender terms; I think I wrote one note to him signed with my Christian name only - I went with him in a carriage to Beulah Spa ; I should rather think that was at my expense, as my property paid for it - he was not to have any thing to do with the books; they were in the back parlour, but any that were not locked up, of course, he would have access to -I one day asked him to bring me a book which was in a closet by the door, but that was not locked; I never received any presents from him, but I suppose you allude to the ring he offered me - this note is my writing (read).

Received from my (I hope will be for ever) dear friend and protector, a trifle, called a ring.

October 22,1832.

I do not recollect saying at Beulah Spa "I authorize you to manage and deal with my temporal concerns, and I will undertake the care of your spiritual concerns, and then we shall each of us know our respective duties hereafter;" I could not swear I never said any thing to that effect.

COURT. Q. Did you ever say those words or any thing of the sort, to authorize him to dispose of your property? A. No.

MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Did you not say at Beulah Spa, some words that would convey to the mind of Mr. Jones something of that sort? A. I do not know what entered his mind, I never authorized him to manage and deal with my temporal affairs; I said just now I would not swear I had not, because you confused me - there was no jealousy on his part from my having received the visits of a younger man; Mr. Cole called on me one evening, when Jones was with me - I left the keys of other locks in the house - I could not swear to a key - I do not think either of these keys would unlock the bookcase.

COURT. Q. When you did get into the back parlour, which Mr. Jones told you was sacred to his son, did you miss the books which had been there? A. Yes, and a silver cup, and some other things.

SAMUEL TATE (Police-serjeant D 11.) I went to No. 2, Bryanstone-street, on the 8th of November - we found Hicks at the attic door; the inspector asked if she had been in Mr. Jones' employ; she said Yes - we asked where he was; she said she did not know; we began to search her, and I saw this duplicate drop from her - I picked it up; it is for some furniture, pawned the night before for 1l. 1s.; we found nine keys, eight cups and saucers, a slop-basin, sugar-basin, and three egg-cups, which the prosecutrix claims - we went into the next attic, and found Boone in bed; we found Jones on the top of the house, on the tiles - he was not dressed; he had only a frock coat on, and a pair of light trousers - I found some men's clothes in Boone's bed-room, and Jones put them on - he said, "What I have done I must answer for; the things are all pawned, not sold - these women you have no occasion to take into custody; what they have done is by my orders, and I exonerate them."

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Were not the duplicates given up? A. Yes; I did not hear him say he did it from temporary distress.

STEPHEN MARCHANT . I am an inspector of Police. I went with the officer; what he has stated is correct: on searching Jones I found this pocket-book, containing some mining shares - he said it was no use looking in his pockets for duplicates; if I would go with him, he would produce them - we went to the Delaware Arms, and asked the servant for a parcel he left there, and gave me sixty-four duplicates, saying they belonged to Mrs. De Windt's property - part of it has been given up.

MRS. DE WINDT. This letter is in Jones' writing - I received it - (read.)

MADAM, - I hope that that religion, and that God whom you so devoulty worship, will incline you to adopt towards my truly sorrowful mind a degree of mercy. I never had the slightest thought of doing wrong towards you, whom I really did, I may say worship - but this I must only now think of in my repentant mind, for having pledged your goods. In your religion you will find the noble happiness to be derived from compassion and mercy. There is still a chair and glass to be restored to you, which I had forgot, but shall not be so on Wednesday; also six cups and saucers, three or four plates, and part of a glass there, I am taking means to obtain and deliver. O spare me the continuance of a further agony, most mental agony, but sincere penitent.

Mrs. De Windt, I, Winchester-row, New-road.

10th Nov. 1832.

GEORGE JOHN MOULTON . I am in the service of Mr. Aldous, a pawnbroker. I have a looking-glass, picture, and mirror, which were pawned with me on the 5th of November, by Jones, in the name of John Jones - he said he brought them from a friend of his, who was under distress for rent.

Jones, in a long address, stated that he had pledged the property to relieve a temporary embarrassment, fully intending to redeem them, and in no way injure the prosecutrix, for whom he had a strong attachment; that the female prisoners were his servant s, and having left town without the means of providing them with cash, had desired Hicks, if in want, to pledge articles.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 51.

BOONE - GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

HICKS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-139

140. JAMES JONES was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 60 printed books, value 20l.; 1 set of castors, value 5l., and 1 silver cup, value 2l. , the goods of Sarah Birch De Windt .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

SARAH BIRCH DE WINDT . I had a bookcase at the house which I let to the prisoner - it contained some bound books, and a silver cup and cover; they were not let to him, and when I endeavoured to get access to the room it was in, the prisoner prevented it, saying it was sacred to his son.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Had these things belonged to your husband? A. Yes; he left a will - there were two executors, and I was executrix; I had the key of this bookcase.

GEORGE BENTON . I am a pawnbroker. On the 26th of July the prisoner brought me a writing-desk, and desired me to put it in the name of Juston - he told me he had sold a house of furniture under a valuation, but the gentleman was out of town, and he asked me if I would take a few books in; I said I would, and on the 28th he brought Cole's History of England, on which I lent him 5l.; he called again, and I let him have 3l. 10s. more - he afterwards brought a set of castors, and a cup and cover, which are here; I lent him 15l. 16s. on the two pledges, in the name of John Jones .(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I cannot deny pawning the goods.

GUILTY . Aged 51. - Transported for Seven Years longer .

Reference Number: t18321129-140

141. STEPHEN BRANDRAM and THOMAS NEAL were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 5 bushels of potatoes, value 8s., and 1 sack, value 2s. , the goods of William Rogers .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I am a farmer , and live at Iver. On the 25th of October I consigned some potatoes to Mr. Steadman, in London, and sent them by two barges on the Paddington canal; they were shot loose in the

barges - Neal was my servant , and was employed to cart them from the field to the boats; Brandram was the master of the two boats : in consequence of information, I came to town on the Monday following - I went to the barges at Paddington , and requested Mr. Steadman to examine them.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. The boats were not yours? A. No, they were Mr. Gore's; the potatoes were not to be brought back to me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you know whether Brandram's brother was employed in carrying any of the potatoes to the barges? A. He was occasionally in the field; it took three days to remove them from the field to the barges.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Had you sold them absolutely to Steadman? A. No, they were consigned to him, but they were not his till the Monday following; they were mine till they were delivered at his shop - we had not exactly agreed about the price.

THOMAS PARKER STEADMAN . I am a dealer in potatoes, and live in Oxford-street. There was a large quantity of potatoes consigned to me by Mr. Rogers, and on the Sunday he directed me to search the barges after they were unloaded - they were unloaded on the 31st of October; Brandram then had the care of the barges - his master and I went and examined them; we went into the cabin of one barge, and found a quantity of potatoes in a drawer - they were similar to those I had received; there were about 2 cwt. or 2 1/2 cwt. found altogether, and about 2 cwt. of them I can swear to - Mr. Gore lifted up a seat in the cabin, which formed a sort of locker, and found a quantity of potatoes in a sack, marked with Mr. Rogers' name, and Iver on it; we found in the forehold about 1 1/2cwt. in a sack, marked Lovegrove, of Reading - I have no doubt that they were all of the same sort and quality as mine, and the soil which clung to them appeared the same- there was another man in the other boat.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Do you know which boat Brandram went in? A. He was on board the one in which the potatoes were found.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did he say any thing about them? A. He said he bought them of a man; Mr. Gore and myself both asked whose man it was - he said one of Mr. Rogers' men.

WILLIAM COWLE (Police-serjeant T 9). I apprehended Brandram; what has been stated is correct: I produce the potatoes, which Brandram said he bought of one of Mr. Rogers' servants, but he did not know what he gave, as he was drunk at the time - I saw the potatoes found; they appeared to me to be stowed away with care.

JOHN BBANDRAM . I am brother of the prisoner.

MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Do you recollect your brother's wife paying any money for potatoes? A. Yes, she paid Neal for four bushels of potatoes; she paid some silver, but I cannot tell what.

MR. BARRY. Q. Were you sober? A. Yes, I was pretty near; I had been working in the fields sometimes, and sometimes in the barges - I did not go to the cabin, nor carry any potatoes; I did not attend before the Magistrate, but a person did who is not here.

WILLIAM ROGERS. This is my sack, and this other belongs to Mr. Lovegrove, of Reading; I had some corn in it on my premises.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long has Neal been with you? A. Three years; he lived with my father from infancy.

Brandram's Defence. I bought them, and thought they were Neal's.

BRANDRAM - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

NEAL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-141

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

142. SAMUEL DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October . 28 yards of printed cotton, value 11s. , the goods of Samuel Ling .

GEORGE DEVEREUX BOLTON (Police-constable H 49). On the 27th of October I was in Brick-lane, Spitalfields -I saw the prisoner with a piece of printed cotton under his arm; I watched him, and saw him go into Mr. Phillips', an egg-merchant in Brick-lane - he came out in three minutes without the parcel, and crossed the road; I went and asked him where he got the print - he seemed agitated, and said,"Cotton print," and dropped an egg from his hand; I took him to the shop, and asked Mr. Phillips for the bundle - Mr. Phillips came from a little back sitting-room, and produced it; I told the prisoner he must go with me to the station - he got from me, and ran to Fashion-street, where another officer caught him.

Prisoner. Q. How did you know what the bundle contained? A. By information that I had received.

JOHN BURROUGHS . (Police-constable H 97). I was on duty in Fashion-street, and stopped the prisoner.

ELIZABETH PHILLIPS. I am the wife of the Joseph Phillips , of Brick-lane, egg-merchant. The prisoner came to our shop on the 27th of October; he bought two eggs - he said he had forgotten something, and asked me to let him leave the bundle for two or three minutes; I told him he might - the officer brought him back, and received the parcel.

SAMUEL LING . I live in the Commercial-road , and am a linen-draper . This print is mine, and has my mark on it; I cannot say it had not been sold.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-142

143. ELEANOR GOODRICH , ESTHER REEVES , WILLIAM HEARN , and WILLIAM HUTTON , were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 coat, value 1l. 15s.; 1 pair of boots, value 15s.; 1 half-sovereign, and 7s., the property of James Bennett ; and that William Hutton had been before convicted of felony .

JAMES BENNETT . I lodged at the Queen's Arms, Cheapside. On the 6th of November, I met Goodrich in the street, near St. Giles' - I asked her to recommended me to a confortable lodging for that night, and she took me to a room on the ground floor in St. Giles' ; I do not know the name of the street - I saw Reeves on a bed on the floor; I had some drink there, but I said that was no place for me; they said they were providing a place, and a good one - I gave them some money, but I do not know how much, as I was in liquor; I am confident these are the two women - I drank out of a jug of liquor which they got; I do not know what it was - after I drank I did not know what I

was done to till the morning; I know I had a half-sovereign in my pocket, and I did not give them that - I had seen it about two hours before I went to that room, and am certain I had not lost it; I do not know that I went to any other place but that room - I came to myself about three o'clock in the morning; I found I was bereft of my coat, my boots, my pocket-book, and three memorandum-books - they contained letters and accounts, shares of mines, and my money; I know nothing of the two male prisoners.

GEORGE PALMER (Police-serjeant E 5). On the morning of the 31st of October I went to a house in Ivy-street , where I found the prosecutor in a room on the ground floor - it was a little before ten o'clock in the morning; he was without coat or boots, and in such a state that I could not make any sense of him; I went to the station, and got him a pair of shoes - it was five in the evening before I could get any account from him; he then stated he had been robbed of 23s. and his coat, boots, and pocketbook; I took the two female prisoners that evening - I heard some person cry out, "Honest Bill has the money!" I knew who was meant by it - I went and took Hearn; he denied having the money - in going to the station Reeves said, "We may as well tell the truth; after he went to sleep we took his coat and boots off" - Goodrich said, "One is as bad as the other; after we took them off Honest Bill came up the court, and we searched the prosecutor again in the dark - Bill accompained us a short distance, when he took the coat, pocket-book and papers from us, and asked for some money to drink" - that Goodrich opened her hand to give him some, and he snatched the money away.

JOHN JAMES BARTLETT . I am in the service of Mr. Wood, a pawnbroker. I have a coat, pawned in the name of Jane Brown, for her brother, No. 9, Star-court; I do not know who by.

ROBERT HUSSON (Police-constable E 94). I took Hutton, and found the duplicate of this coat on him.

Hutton. Q. Were you not present at the Black Jack public-house when I was? A. Yes, and when you passed the duplicate to Retallick, I took your hand; I did not say you might have what you liked to drink.

WILLIAM RANDALL . (Police-serjeant F 8). I was with Husson when Hutton was taken; he said all the papers should have been delivered up, but taking him so fast he would serve seven years or eighty-four months before that should be.

Hutton. Q. Did you not both give me liquor? A. No.

JOHN RETALLICK . I lodge in Gilbert-street, Clare-market, and am a mining-agent. On the 5th of November I met Hutton in St. Giles' - he came up to me, and said he knew what I was looking after, was I do not inquiring after Captain Bennett's purse?" I said Yes - he said he knew all about it; we went to a public-house, and drank two or three pints of porter - he then said if he was prepared with means he could produce the papers at nine o'clock in the morning; I said, "What means?" he said about 12s. - I went out, and told the Policemen to meet me in disguise; I then went and told Hutton to meet me at the Black Jack at seven o'clock - I went there, and he then said he would go to a person who had the papers; I advanced him 10s., and he was to bring them at nine o'clock in the morning - I went, but he was not there; a young woman said, "Are you the person who is waiting for William?" I said Yes; she said, "Come with me, and I will put you into the place where he is:" she took me to a room, where I found him in bed - he said he could not succeed, for a person had offered a sovereign for them; I told him not to let any person have them, and to meet me at the Black Jack at four o'clock; I went there with the officers - Hutton came and sat down by me, and said he had not succeeded; I began to think he knew nothing about it, but he said, to convince me that he did, there was the duplicate of the coat - he put it into my hand, and the officer seized him.

Hutton. Q. Were you not in the habit of coming to the room I live in? A. I do not know where you live - I never saw you at the room but once; there was an old lady, who told me she would do all in her power to get the papers; I might have given her liquor - I did not say I had a 5l. note that was got queer; I said I had a 5l. note but no silver - I had a man with me, to see how you acted- I did not borrow money of that man; I had the 10s. from the prosecutor; I said I had been to the house two or three times myself, and was afraid to go again, but if you could get the papers - I would reward you for your trouble - I certainly believed there were persons in the house who knew of the robbery; when I returned the duplicate you were taken immediately - I did not see any persons pulling you about.

Hutton's Defence. I found the duplicate in the house - I know nothing of the robbery, but this man pretended to be a friend, and like a wolf in sheep's clothing, he jumped out at me.

MARTHA GARDNER . I live in High-street - my husband is a baker. On the 30th of October we let a room in a a court turning out of lvy-street to the two female prisoners - I had not seen them before; I delivered the key to Goodrich - they were to pay 8d. a night.

Reeves. She keeps a house of ill-fame, and lets out rooms to any one. Witness. No, they are all hard-working people; we cannot ask for characters in that neighbourhood; I let the room to them both.

HENRY POTTER . I keep a grocer's shop at No. 35, High-street. Hearn came there on the 31st of October, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon; he brought a piece of paper, and asked what it was - I looked at it, and saw it was a bill of exchange, drawn by Benwell on Lyle, for 15l., and payable at Williams and Co.'s, bankers - I advised him to take it there, as they would most probably make him some amends for his trouble; he left the shop - I thought he had found it.

COURT to JAMES BENNETT . Q. Had you a note of that description? A. Yes, I drew it in Cornwall, on Mr. Samuel Lyle.

Reeves' Defence. The old lady's son had the pocketbook where Retallick went and gave the liquor; he had the coat and a brooch, which has not yet been mentioned; he sent the coat to pawn, and he said it was pawned for 1s. 6d., and I must do the best I could for the money - I went for the boots, and they said Douglass had them.

Goodrich's Defence. The prosecutor met me, and asked if he could go home with me; I said Yes, and we went home - Reeves was in bed; I asked her to get up - he asked for no other place; he sent for some liquor, which

I fetched - he went to sleep, and I went to meet Reeves; on my return - I heard there was an alarm - I said I was guilty of taking the things, but I would not make my escape; I went out, and met Honest Bill - he took me to a place, and searched the coat; then he went back, and searched the man; I then met Condy, and told him all that was passed - he said it was very wrong; I gave him the coat to mind till the next morning, and then he said what money could be made of it I should have; we then went to Douglass', and left the boots - we then met Honest Bill again; I was going to give him something to drink, and he snatched the whole of the money from my hand, and ran away.

Hearn's Defence. The young man who had the coat and boots used to live with this girl - I know nothing of it, but having the piece of paper, I cannot read, and I tore it up.

GOODRICH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

REEVES - GUILTY . Aged 16.

HEARN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

HUTTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-143

144. GEORGE HENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Howel Short , from his person .

HOWEL SHORT. I am a smith , and live in Robert-street, New-cut, Lambeth. On the afternoon of the 4th of November I was passing through the Treasury-passage ; I felt something touch me behind; I put my hand round, and could not feel the substance of my handkerchief - I then pulled my glove off, and put my hand into my pocket; my handkerchief was gone - I looked round, and saw the prisoner, who appeared to be putting something into his pocket - I followed him to Spring-gardens; I there saw a constable, and told him what had happened - he took the prisoner by the arm, and said, "Have you this gentleman's handkerchief?" he said, "I have" - he took it out of his pocket, gave it him, and said he picked it up.

GILLERY PIGOT CAMPART (Police-constable A 19.) I took the prisoner, and said I wanted him; he said,"What for?" I said, "You have this gentleman's handkerchief;" he denied it - the prosecutor then came up, and accused him of stealing his handkerchief in the Treasury-passage - he gave it up, and wished to be let go.

Prisoner. I denied stealing it - I said I picked it up, and if it was the gentleman's handkerchief he was welcome to it. Witness. He denied having it till the prosecutor came up.

HOWEL SHORT re-examined. Q. You have heard what the officer has stated; did he go in advance of you, and speak to the prisoner? A. Yes; this is my handkerchief - it is of the same appearance and pattern.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up - if I had stolen it I should have run away.

MR. SHORT. When I looked back he was ten or twelve yards behind me; there was no person nearer to me, to my knowledge.

GUILTY .* Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-144

145. RICHARD HARDY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 coat, value 1l. , the goods of William Haggatt .

WILLIAM HAGGATT . I live in Prince's-street, Wapping, and am a coal-merchant . On the 27th of October, between two and three o'clock, I was in George-yard, Whitechapel ; I had some coals to deliver there - I left my coat in the head of my waggon; I saw the prisoner running away with it - I pursued, but he got out of sight- I informed a Police-officer, and saw him in custody on the 5th of November; I know he is the person.

Prisoner. Q. What do you know me by? A. By seeing you many times before in Whitechapel and Georgeyard.

ISABELLA LUCK . I am the daughter of John Harris - we live in Bell-lane. On the 27th of October I was at the top of George-yard, and saw a boy take the coat out of the head of the waggon, and give it to the prisoner, who put it under his arm, and ran down George-yard - he got away; I knew him by sight before.

Prisoner. Q. What do you know me by? A. I have seen you in George-yard and Wentworth-street, in a black coat, grey trousers, and a cap.

JOHN GREEN (Police-constable H 91.) I received information, and took the prisoner, from Haggatt's description, in George-yard; I had been in search of him for a week - he strictly denied it - he said a small boy took it; I said,"Yes, a small boy took it, gave it to you, and you run away with it;" the Magistrate thought there was not sufficient evidence to commit the other boy.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing outside the door on the 4th of November, and the officer took me - I said,"I know nothing about the coat."

JOHN GREEN . He said he understood a small boy took it from the waggon - I had seen the prisoner in a black coat, grey trousers, and a cap, as the little girl has described; but I afterwards saw another boy with the prisoner's coat on, and the prisoner had a flannel jacket.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-145

146. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 150 gold borders, value 7s.; 100 yards of galloon, value 1s. 6d.; 26 pieces of cardboard, value 6d.; 1 sheet of paper, value 3d., and 1 penknife, value 6d., the goods of William Frederick Rock and another, his masters .

WILLIAM FREDERICK ROCK. I live in Wilson-street, Finsbury, and am in partner ship, with Thomas de la Rue - the prisoner was in our employ for two or three years. On the 3rd of November I searched him, and found on him a penknife,; he first said he bought it of another errand-boy , and then he said he picked it up in the warehouse - we got an officer, and went to No. 2, Northumberland-place, where the prisoner said he lodged - we found his brother in the front room first floor; we found some embossed gold paper, a piece of cardboard, some galloon, a sheet of paper, and a sovereign - I had lost 25s. the week before, but I could not swear to that; I allowed the prisoner 7s. a week - he did not board with us; I swear positively to all these articles but the cardboard, and that I believe is ours; these articles are manufactured to our order; they are not sold in this state -I do not know whether they would be of any use to the

prisoner in this state; they are not laid about the warehouse in this state.

THOMAS HARRIS . I am the prisoner's brother, and lodge in the same room. These articles were found in his desk and box - I had some of my clothes in his box; I can find employment for the prisoner, and will send him into the country.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18321129-146

147. JAMES HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , 1 brass castor, value 4s., and 1 yard of ticking, value 1s., the goods of Philip Watkins ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

PHILIP WATKINS. I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Crown-street, Soho - the prisoner was in my employ as a French-polisher . On the 2nd of November he came to work, but I had left orders, if he came, not to put him on till I was sent for; I had a great number of brass castors in a tray in my shop - he was detained, and I was sent for; when he went into the street, I went after him, and asked what he had got of mine - he had one castor on him, and he told the officer where he had put the other.

Prisoner. He took me back to the shop, took it off a table, and then said he had taken it from my pocket. Witness. No, you had one on you in the street - I took hold of it - you would not let it go, but kept pushing me back, and then threw it into a tray in front of the shop; you showed the officer where the other was in the shop; this piece of ticking is mine - it was found in his hat.

HENRY THOMAS . I know this piece of ticking - I cut it off two pillows.

EDMUND REA (Police-constable F 37). The prisoner was given into my custody - he made very great resistance, and begged from the house of the prosecutor to the watch-house, to be forgiven, for if it was made known, it would ruin his character for life; I found this piece of ticking in his hat, and the other castor was secreted in the shop, behind some other goods.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am an officer of Marylebone. I have a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner, which I got at Mr. Clark's office; I was present at his trial, and know he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-147

148. SAMUEL JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 jacket, value 15s.; 1 shirt, value 3s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 cap, value 1s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of William John Howey .

WILLIAM JOHN HOWEY . I live on board the barque Yvoca - she came from Bombay. The prisoner came on board on the 11th of November - I had known him before, but had not spoken to him; I was cooking when he came, and I gave him some dinner; I afterwards went on the forcastle, and he came and spoke to me there - I had a jacket there - he observed it was a good one; I then went on shore with him, but he left me before I got out of the docks; when I returned on board the vessel, I found an axe by the side of my chest, which had been broken open with the axe, I believe; I missed my jacket, trousers, cap, shirt, some knives, stockings, and other things - they had all been safe when I left the vessel in his company; he was afterwards taken, and he had my cap, waistcoat, shirt, stockings, and trousers on - these are them.

WILLIAM DICKENSON (Police-constable H 11). I took the prisoner at No. 3, Brown Bear-alley, in bed with a girl of the town; I told him to get up, and he put on these clothes, and said they were his own.

Prisoner's Defence. I went on board, and he gave me some dinner; I returned on shore, and went into the Anchor and Hope, public-house; a young man came in with these things, and asked two or three persons if they would buy them; he at last came to me - I gave 10s. for them, and put them on.

WILLIAM JOHN HOWEY . When he came to me he was very poorly clad, and said he was glad to pick up all he could - I gave him a dinner, because he had not the means of getting one.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-148

149. JOSEPH MILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 4 deal boards, value 30s., the goods of Charles Pritchard Haswell and another, his master .

JAMES RUSSELL (Police-constable N 221). On the evening of the 30th of October, I stopped the prisoner in a field behind the Caledonian-school, at Holloway - he had a female with him; he had a truck, in which were two deals, and two were on his shoulder - I asked what he was going to do with them - he said to take them to the owner, but he did not know his name, nor where he lived; I took him to the station, and then he said he brought them from his own home; on the following morning, I traced the mark of the truck-wheels from the place where I stopped him, to Mr. Haswell's premises.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did he not tell you where he worked; and ask you to accompany him to the place where the man who had brought them to him to cut, was? A. No, he said he had cut twenty-one flats for the man before, and had a farthing a foot for them, but he did not know his name; and about an hour after he was locked up, the woman brought a man with her to own the deals - I asked him what he was; he said a carpenter, and he was building a small hut at the back of the Caledonian school, that he gave the prisoner the deals to cut, and he bought them in Little Coram-place; he said the prisoner had never cut any deals for him before - I did not detain him, as he promised to attend in the morning, but he did not come; I went to Coram-place, but could find no timber yard there - I afterwards found the residence of the man who came to own the deals, and found he was a sawyer out of work; I took him, and he was reprimnnded - when I took him he said, "My God! I know nothing about the deals - the woman who was represented as the prisoner's wife came and begged me to own them."

CHARLES PRITCHARD HASWELL . I am in partnership with Mr. Richard Bell - we are builder s and live in Northampton-street, Lower-road, Islington. We have a store of deals in a stable at the back of the new buildings at Holloway ; the prisoner was a sawyer in our employ - we put

him into a new house to take care of the property - I have examined and know these deals to be ours; they have our mark on them, and make up our stock, which is deficient without them.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had he been in your service? A. About four months; I had permitted him to use our saw-pit - he had done so on one or two occasions cut for other persons - these timbers have the mark of Mr. Loraine on them, of whom we bought it; I had put no marks on them - I have a neighbour named Shelley; he had some timber on his premises which he bought of Loraine, and that would, no doubt, have Mr. Loraine's mark on it; Johnson is in our employ.

WILLIAM COLE . I am a mason, and live at the corner of Park-lane. I was employed at the stable where the prosecutor's timber stood - I went to the prosecutor for the key of it; I fastened the door and put the key in the place where we usually put it - the next morning I found the stable locked, and the key gone; I climbed up, and got a sight of the place - the position of the deals was altered, and there appeared to be some gone.

Cross-examined. Q. How many men had access to those premises? A. Only myself; I had not counted the deals.

JOHN GREEN . I am foreman to the prosecutor. I received a load of deals from Mr. Loraine - there were three tiers of twelve feet deals, fifteen pine planks, and some others; the Policeman applied to me - I looked and missed four planks.

Cross-examined. Q. Had those been what you received? A. No. I received twelve feet deals, and I missed four pine planks - these are pine planks.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutor allowed him to saw planks for other people when not fully employed; that a man had brought those in question to him to saw; and after laying in the yard three days, he was taking them to Copenhagen-street to be cut, as he was fully occupied with work. - He received a good character.

SAMUEL JOHNSON . I am a sawyer and worked with the prisoner. I recollect his being taken; a few days before that, a man came to the pit, and asked him to cut some deals for him into planks, and the prisoner said Yes he would; the next day the prisoner showed me four of these pine planks near the pit; this is one of them - they were there two days, and he asked me to help him cut them.

COURT. Q. Where did you see these? A. In Mr. Haswell's stable - there were some deals there; I did not assist the prisoner, because it was dark - I am not the man who went to the station-house.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18321129-149

OLD COURT. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4TH.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

150. JAMES WILKINSON was indicted for stealing on the 29th of November , 2 pairs of shoes, value 6s. , the goods of George Smith . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-150

151. JOSEPH WALTERS was indicted for stealing on the 3rd of November , 1 hammer, value 2s., the goods of Harvey Combe and others .

THOMAS ADDIS . I am a cooper, in the employ of Harvey Combe and others. On the 3rd of November I saw the prisoner, who is a stranger, take this hammer off the head of a cask in the yard, and go away with it - I overtook him, and took it from him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went there for a pail of water - a black and white dog barked at me - I picked up the hammer for my defence.

THOMAS ADDIS . That is false; the dog did not run at him at all; he had got ten or twelve yards from the premises.

GUILTY . Aged 19. Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-151

152. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 waistcoat, value 30s., the goods of Joseph Gobby ; and 1 coat, value 10s., the goods of Dominects Gobby .

JOSEPH GOBBY . I am the son of Dominects Gobby, a broker , in Leather-lane. I was fetching some luggage from St. Katharine's Dock, and in Hatton-garden, near Charles-street, a female came up and said, "There is something taken off your cart;" I crossed to the cart, and two coats were gone off it; I found the prisoner in custody with them.

JOHN FARMER . I am an officer. On the 20th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in Cheapside - I saw the prisoner, and another man in his company, following the cart - they went behind, and tried to get a box off; they followed it to Hatton-garden , and on the other side of Charles-street his companion went to the cart, pulled the coats off, and gave them to the prisoner, who stood on the pavement - he then went and stood with his back to the railing of a house; I went and took the prisoner with the coats on his arm; the other ran away.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I heard an alarm that a cart was robbed; a young man ran by me and dropped the coats at my feet - they never were on my arms.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-152

153. EDWARD WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of November , 1 coat, value 9s., and 1 comforter, value 6d. , the goods of William Payne .

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am carman to Mr. Edwards. This coat was taken off the shaft of my cart, in Samuel-street, Brick-lane , about half-past twelve o'clock in the day; while I was in a house, two draymen told me a young chap had run away with it through High-street - I ran and saw the prisoner running in Great Garden-street, with it under his arm - I saw him put it on, and when I got up to him he took it off, and gave it me.

MARTIN CLITHEROW . I live at Mile-end - I heard the cry of Stop thief! and found the prosecutor holding the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-153

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

154. THOMAS LOHFINK was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , 1 watch, value 12l.; 1 gold chain, value 7l.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 30s.; 8 pairs of stockings, value 50s., and 47 sovereigns, the property of David Wertheimer . in his dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

DAVID WERTHEIMER . I live in Leman-street, Whitechapel - I am collector to the Jewish synagogne - the prisoner has been employed in my house as a glazier , to clean the windows - I keep my money locked in a writing desk in my bed room. On the 23rd of September I was at the desk, and the prisoner saw me; there was a considerable sum of money before me; on Friday, the 2nd of November, I had above 123l. in the desk, and several small sums besides, belonging to a particular charity, and wrapped in different papers - I cannot be certain of the amount - and there were some Bank notes which were not taken - I saw my money safe at a quarter before four o'clock - I was to have handed the money over to the treasurer that day, but the Sabbath set in, and it was too late - I intended to take it to him on Saturday night - on the Friday evening, about half-past five o'clock, after I came home, I went up stairs to look for a letter, and found my desk broken open - I had been away about an hour and three-quarters; all this money was gone - the Bank notes were left - my wife's drawer was broken open, and a watch, a pair of ear-rings, a gold neck chain, and 16l. in money, taken - my wife keeps the key of the drawer - I made an alarm, and in consequence of what passed between my boy and I, I got an officer - I saw the prisoner at the office next morning; I have not been able to find any of my property - there was an empty house next door to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many persons had you in family? A. Seven; myself and wife, my son, his wife, a servant, and two young men: one who attends to the confectionary, and the other is my son's foreman, who is a printer - we occupy two houses; there is an internal communication between them - about six young men are employed in the printing-office; my desk, and my wife's drawer were locked.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was it dark between a quarter to four o'clock and half-past six? A. Yes; only one workman was left in the printing-office: the others had left at half-past three - I made the money good to the charity out of my own pocket.

INGRAM PICKLES . I live in Leman-street, next door to the prosecutor, in the house which was to let. The prisoner applied to me on the 31st of October, to look at the house for a beer-shop; he went over the house - I went up to the first floor, and left him to go up higher himself; I heard him up stairs, and when he came down, he asked me if the cellar door opened into the street - I said No; he went into the cellar, put up the flap, and asked me about the fastenings - I told him the rent was 44l.; he said it was 40l., and that he should bring his old woman, or his wife to look at it - he came again on the Friday following, but I was not at home.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A coachman; I have lived in the house about two months; only my wife lived in the house with me - I drove for Mr. Hill, a stagecoach master, of Highgate; I left him twelve or fourteen years ago - I have been with my son since that, not as a coachman; he is a coach-spring maker, and lives in Mortimer-market.

ANN PICKLES . I am the wife of the last witness. On Friday, the 2nd of November, I was at home when the prisoner and his mother came together, about four or five o'clock: I was at tea; the prisoner said he had been there before, and he knew the way up stairs, and did not wish me to go up - I said I should go too, and went up with them to the top of the house; he came down just before us: the front of the house being shut up, he went forward to the street door to give us some light, as the passage was dark; he went out, and I saw no more of him - his mother and I stopped talking together some time at the street door - I did not see him go out; he could not get up stairs without my seeing him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-154

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

155. JOHN READ, alias REEVES was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Charles James .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN SPENCER . I am a bricklayer. On the 29th of October, Charles James and I went out to spend the evening; he was a printer - we went to a public-house in Fleet-street; I cannot tell the name of it - we entered the house at nine o'clock; we were coming home between one and two in the morning, and were obstructed in our way- we had had a little to drink, but I was not tipsy; I think the deceased was a little in liquor: some person or persons shoved us off the pavement near Wych-street , and struck me - I should not know any of them; I cannot say the prisoner was one of them - the Policeman Randall was called by Lawrence, and they made off: my friend was then laying in the gutter - I cannot say whether Randall could see who hurt him; we were taken to the watch-house - James was taken there, and locked up till the morning, and taken to Bow-street; we were both fined for being out late and disorderly in the street - I then took James home, and put him to bed, as he was dangerously ill; we called in Mr. Edwards, and James was taken to Middlesex-hospital, and died there.

COURT. Q. How many persons met you? A. Two or three, or more; there was more than one or two.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Did you see James when dead? A. No, not in his coffin; I followed him to the grave.

WILLIAM RANDALL . I am a Police-serjeant. On Tuesday morning, at two o'clock, I was passing up Wych-street, on the right-hand side of the way, towards the Olympic theatre; I saw four or five men scuffling or fighting on the right-hand side, and on the left-hand side I saw two men, who proved to be the prisoner and the deceased - I saw Read push or strike James in the chest - he instantly fell; I ran, and took the prisoner into custody, and sprung my rattle for assistance; Lewin came up - I told him to look to James, and said I believed he was dead; I directed Lewin to bring him to the station-house if he got better, to give charge of the prisoner; I took the prisoner to the station - James was brought to the station, and Spencer followed; James did not seem much hurt at the station-house - he said, in the prisoner's hearing, that he had lost his handkerchief, and that the prisoner was not the man who struck him; I said, "If you choose to give charge of him I will answer to his being the man who struck you;" James was the worse for liquor - there is no doubt of the prisoner being

the man who struck him; there was an oyster-shop open on the right-hand side of the way, which threw a light on them, and I seized him immediately - I was within ten yards of them when the blow was given; after James was brought to the station I turned his head back to the gas, and saw on the back of his head the cut he had received by the fall - it did not appear very serious.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons were assembled? A. About five on the right-hand side, and two on the left - it was in a narrow part, near Newcastle-street, but still it is the widest part of the street; I was coming from the Strand towards Newcastle-street - the light was nearer to me than the prisoner - it threw a reflection on the two on the opposite side; what took place might have been seen by the persons in the oyster-shop - the deceased would be as likely to see the person who struck him as I; I did not tell the Magistrate I had locked him up because he would not give the prisoner in charge; they were all three taken before the Magistrate, and fined 1s. each - Spencer did not request me to send for a medical man to the deceased; it happened near Lyon's-inn, under the dead wall - there was a general fight on the right-hand side, but on the left I did not see James strike at all.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were the deceased and the prisoner separated from the others? A. Yes; the light from the oyster-shop reflected on the dead wall - I took the prisoner at the deceased's feet, as he fell; there was no other person so near - the inspector locked them up for being intoxicated; after the prisoner was discharged from Bow-street, he said that it was perfectly right, and that he had struck James; and when I took him on the Corner's warrant, he said he did push him down, but did not think any thing serious would happen to him - I saw his hands go against the deceased's chest, and he instantly fell.

ANN HEMMINGS . I am a nurse to the Middlesex-hospital. I remember Charles James being brought there on the evening of the 1st of November - Spencer called two or three times to see him; he seemed rather in an insensible state when he was brought to the hospital - he was attended by Mr. Pagson, the house-surgeon; he died on Thursday, the 8th of November.

MILWOOD PAGSON. I am house-surgeon at Middlesex-hospital. Charles James was brought there; I attended him - his death was occasioned by the injury done to his brain; there was a slight would on the back of his head, but which was not connected with the fracture: on the post mortem examination an extensive fracture of the skull was found, and the bone slightly depressed; I do not think the fracture to be produced by a fall - it must have been from a blow, or by falling on the head, and coming in contact with some hard substance; the fracture began on the right side of the head - there was a concussion of the brain, which would be produced by a violent fall against a hard substance; the only external appearance was the wound on the back part.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the pressure of the skullbone on the brain produce death? A. No - there was a clot of coagulated blood on the brain, and a fracture opposite it, on the other side; I should say the two together produced death, but not the wound on the back of the head.

Q. Did the concussion and fracture arise from the same act as produced the mark on the head? A. I should say they were different - I do not think the fall on the pavement produced the mark on the back of the head.

COURT. Q. The fracture on one side, and the concussion on the other, would arise from the same cause? A. Yes, that is very common; the wound on the back of the head was very slight, and might be occasioned by a fall or blow.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Suppose the fall to have produced the fracture and concussion, would he be likely to be insensible from it at the time? A. He might or might not- it is probable.

JOHN SPENCER re-examined. Q. How long was it from the time you was first obstructed that the deceased fell into the kennel? A. Directly after; I got several blows - I was standing in my own defence.

MILES RAINER . I am a working-jeweller. I saw the whole transaction; I was perfectly sober - I was standing at my door at two o'clock in the morning, when the prisoner's party forced the deceased and Spencer against Ruthven's shutters; Spencer lifted up his hands to resent it, and he was immediately bit between his eyes, and knocked down, and likewise James - they had not given the slightest provocation; they were coming along quietly, arm-in-arm - the deceased retreated across the road, on the defensive - and about the curb-stone the prisoner hit him on the bottom of the throat, and knocked him down on his back, against the curb-stone; the prisoner appeared one of the party who first attacked them.

Cross-examined. Q. This was a late hour to be at your door? A. I am later than that sometimes - I have two shops; there were four or five in the prisoner's party - the pavement is narrow; Spencer and James were arm-in-arm, and would be likely to force persons off the pavement.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did they attempt to force any body off? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I had supped at the Angel inn, and was walking home, but had nobody with me - there was a fight in the street before I came up, and the deceased fell against me.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-155

Before Mr. Baron Bolland.

156. CATHERINE SPILLER was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Mary Elizabeth Landon .

JOHN CARTER . I am a surgeon, and live in South-street, Manchester-square. I was applied to by the mother to see this child , on the 19th of September - it was labouring under a very severe scald-head, and a cutaneous disease over the whole body - she was about three years old; the disease over the body appeared to be of very long standing; I attended her until the 4th of November, which was the last time I saw her alive - I only saw her occasionally, and prescribed for her till the disease progressively yielded, and on the 4th of November she was considerably better - there was no sore on the head, but merely two dry scales, and a branny kind of matter thrown off, which is the case on its getting well - one dry scale was on the right temple, and the other on the back part of the head; on the 4th of November I called, and found the child had been removed; I did not

see it again till about the 16th of November, the morning the inquest was held; it was then dead - I understood had died the day before; by desire of the Inquest I examined the body the day after, and the whole of the internal appearances were very healthy; there was no appearance of organic disease - I opened the body; externally some of the disease remained on the joints of the limbs, and a little about the mouth; the brain was very healthy - there was a plaister covering the whole of the head, except the face, it was spread on lint - I removed it, and had the head washed well with soap and water, to cleanse it; the flesh adhered to the plaister, but I do not know that any of it tore off with it - after washing the head, I found a general sloughing extending over the whole scalp, except the forehead, and there was a large slonghing over the left ear - the plaister did not cover the ear; in some parts the sloughing penetrated to the pericranium, which is the bone covering the skull.

Q. Can you say whether that deep penetration arose from putridity after death, or would it have been so if you had examined it immediately after death? A. It could not have arisen from putridity; in my opinion, if I had taken the plaister off previous to death, the same appearances as to depth would have been exhibited - it appeared to me that the injury of the head had been produced by some irritating application - and there was no other cause to account for death; I attribute the death to the injury done to the head by some external application - I attribute it to the sloughing; it was impossible, from the state of the plaister, to form a judgment of what it was composed, it was in that state of filth.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you left the child, on the 4th of November, it was in a general state of disease? A. Yes; it had a scald-head, and the humour showed itself in various parts of the body; scaldhead is extremely prevalent now - I have several under my care; the scalp was thicker than a shilling; the part which was penetrated may be as thick as half a crown, or thicker - the flesh was swollen; it might be thicker than half a crown; when the child was alive it was getting rapidly well under my care; I expected it would have been well in five or six weeks; I had stated to the parents the improvement in its health.

Q. Might not a very innocent plaister, kept on too long, cause ulceration, by becoming dry? A. A plaster of an adhesive quality, by being taken off after being kept on too long, might break the skin - if I directed a plaister to be kept on two days, and it was kept on five, I should think that was neglect.

JURY. Q. When you first saw the child had it a plaister? A. No; it was then under Dr. Sims; I applied no plaister to it - the mother told me it had been under the care of many medical men.

WHITTINGTON LANDON . I am a fishmonger and live near Manchester-square. The deceased was my child - her name was Mary Elizabeth; my wife took her to Highgate on the 7th of November - I did not go with her; I saw the child when she brought her home - when she went out she was in bodily health; she had a few sores, on her head and a few blotches and sores in different parts of the body - when she returned she had a plaister, which covered the whole of her head, except her temples and face; the child was at home on the 4th of November, and Mr. Carter saw it - she gradually grew worse from the day the plaister was applied to her head; the 10th of November was appointed for her to go to Mrs. Spiller's again, as I understood, but it being a very wet morning, I did not take her till the morning of the 11th, (Sunday) I saw Mrs. Spiller; she took the plaister off the head, and applied another plaister to it; I told her the day being very wet, and the child being very ill, I deferred coming till then, and she said it was of no consequence - I took the child home again; that plaister remained on till Tuesday afternoon, when I took her again, by appointment - I saw the prisoner; the child had been very ill between Sunday and Tuesday, she was lightheaded and not on her legs all day, and she had eat nothing from the time the plaister was applied - except one small bit of bread; on Friday after the first plaister was applied she got light-headed at night - when I went to Mrs. Spiller's on Sunday, I said she had been light-headed, and her appetite quite failed; she told me to give her a little gin and water, or brandy and water, or beer, or ale - that any thing nourishing would keep her alive - and she said the same on Tuesday; I asked her if any other medical assistance was wanted, telling her the state she was in - she said, "No, have patience and your child will be better, you will see her better in a day or two;" but the second day after she expired: after the Saturday night, Mrs. Spiller desired a few drops of laudanum might be given her, as my wife said, and on that Saturday night she had laudanum given to her, and on the Sunday night - five or six drops each night; on the Tuesday she applied a fresh plaister, and gave me a box of ointment, and some lint for my wife to apply a plaister on the Thursday morning, which was done - she put it on on the Thursday morning; after it was put on, the child screamed dreadfully, and was very light-headed indeed -I was obliged to shut my shop door, for she screamed so dreadfully until between one and two o'clock; it began directly after the plaister was applied, which was between nine and ten - she died on that Thursday (the 15th of November,) between 4 and 5 in the afternoon; she seemed a little easier on Thursday morning, before the plaister was put on, and took some barley in water - my wife gave her some sago and beef-tea; I was recommended to the prisoner by Mr. Beckley, a grocer, in David-street, Oxford-street - I paid the prisoner on Sunday, the 11th of November, 1s. 6d. for the plaister, and 1s. for the box of ointment, which my wife had to rub the various parts which were affected.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You found the prisoner out, she did not come to you? A. No, she lives in the Archway-road, Highgate , nearly four miles from my house - she had appointed for me to come on Saturday; when I went on Sunday, she said, "Why did you not come on Saturday?" I told her why - she said it was of no consequence; Sunday was a very fine morning - I carried the child to Camden-town; I then put her into a cab. I got there about ten minutes to six o'clock on the Tuesday evening - it was a foggy day, but warm, and she was properly wrapped up; I took her in a cart - she was not exposed to the air, but had a cloak and blankets over her; she got light-headed and feverish on Friday, and got worse and worse.

Q. Instead of taking her in the open air, why not get Mrs. Spiller to come to her? A. I understood she

never came to see patients - I did not ask her to come; she had been under three doctors before I went to the prisoner; I was perfectly satisfied with Mr. Carter as to the head, but there were blotches and sores in different parts of her body; I was anxious to try for the best - it is nearly eighteen months since she first had the disease - she was two years and eight months old.

JURY. Q. Did any of the medical gentlemen express, in your hearing, that the complaint was incurable? A. No.

WILLIAM RANDALL VICKERS . I am a surgeon. I assisted Mr. Carter in the post mortem examination; the general appearances of the body were healthy, except a few spots on the joints - the body did not appear at all reduced - it was not at all emaciated; the interior appeared perfectly healthy - there was no organic disease; there were a few eruptions of the joints, I could scarcely give them a name - there was a plaister on the head, spread on lint, I think, but will not swear it was not leather - I could not tell what it was composed of; it was removed in my presence, and the head washed with soap and water - it appeared at first sight quite pulpy, and disorganized; on a closer examination, I found a deep ulcer at the back of the head, extending nearly to the bone; on the left temple there was another ulcer, but not so large; I removed the scalp - the inner surface of it was highly inflamed, and in some parts ulcerated; the dura maler very firmly adhered to the inner surface of the skull, which is very common with infants, and I do not consider it a cause of death; the adhesion was greater than natural at that age; I will not say it arose from any topical application, but rather from long-continued irritation of the surface of the head, during the eighteen months it had been ill; I can say confidently, that could not cause death; we carefully examined the brain, and found little or no effusion - there was nothing in the brain to cause death; my opinion is, that the child died from irritation produced by the extensive disease of the scalp, excited by some irritating cause, and that from a recent period - I could not say how recent.

Q. You have heard the father's account, and that of Dr. Carter - might not the irritation and excitement, and the inflammation it would produce, have commenced long before the child was placed under the prisoner's hands? A. I should think not; I think the irritation proceeded from the same exciting application.

Cross-examined. Q. What depth was the wound on the back of the head? A. It extended from the surface to the skull; it might be an eighth or a quarter of an inch; the part the plaister covered was ulcerated through, and I should think the other wound was under the plaister - the plaister was over the ulceration on the temple, I am sure; it might be rather above the temple; there were three or four lacerations, and the whole surface pulpulated - I consider the whole irritation of the scalp to have caused the death; that disease could not be going on while it was under the doctors - I presume the cause of death occurred from the period she was under the prisoner.

COURT. Q. Will you take on yourself to say that? A. I will not - I only know from the evidence of the child being apparently in good health.

MARY ELIZABETH LANDON . I am the child's mother, It was two years and eight months old; it had been afflicted with this scorbutic attack for nearly eighteen months - it came out at first, I think, about six months before I applied to any medical man; it made its appearance first at the ears, and extended afterwards to the body - it had not made its appearance on the body when I applied to a medical man; Dr. Sims was the first gentleman I applied to - he wrote for it; I only took it to him twice - he said it was very simple, and gave me an ointment to apply; I used that about six months - she continued getting a little worse, and I then took her into the country; that brought it out a great deal worse on the head, but not on the body: I had a doctor while I was in the country, and he gave her two or three powders - she seemed better; I brought her home, and after some time went to Dr. Mclntyre - she was under him for a month or five weeks, and the breaking out came on her joints when I took her to him - she was much the same when I left him; I continued by his prescriptions until Mr. Carter saw her; she got much better under him- I first applied to the prisoner on the 7th of November; I went to her in the Archway-road, and saw her - that was on Wednesday; I showed her the child's head, and asked if she could make a cure of it - she said she could; she said it was a scald-head, and affected the body all over, it must have its head shaved - she sent her servant with me to have it shaved, and when done I washed it with soap and water there; she then put a plaister on it: she did not tell me what it was; it was spread on lint - it was a light chesnut brown plaister; after putting it on she said she generally did these things by contract - that I was to give her a sovereign down, and two more when the child was cured; I said she should have told me so, for I had not the money with me - I did not pay her then; she said the plaister would make her very ill, and make her head all sore, for the humour must be all drawn out in the head - that the places which were healed up were bad flesh, and it must be all drawn out; I asked if there was any medicine required - she said I might give her a little cooling magnesia, if required; I asked if I need be particular in her diet - she said No, I might give her any thing, I might give her a little weak brandy and water, or gin and water, and she offered to give it a little gin and water then - I refused that, and she said I might give her a little laudanum; I said it was dangerous to give landanum to a baby: she asked its age, and said I might give it from five to six drops - she did not say how often; she said it was to lull the pain, and make her sleep - she said she must see it two or three times a week; I asked if she could not come and see it, as I had got a young baby, and could not come so far - she said No, she never went out; I was to let her see her again on Saturday - her appetite failed her directly, and on Friday she was taken with a giddiness in her head; she was very giddy, and continued getting very ill: Saturday was very wet, and on Sunday my husband took her again; the plaister remained on her head till she went to Highgate - I never saw the prisoner afterwards; when my husband brought her home on Sunday she was taken with a violent reteching, almost directly that she returned - I had given her nothing; the retching continued the whole day - she brought off her stomach all that she had drank, and then it went off; I had given her arrow-root,

made with water - I got it at the grocer's opposite where I live; I gave it her in the morning, before she went to Mrs. Spiller's - I gave her nothing when she returned; she continued ill all day, and on Monday she was worse; she had no appetite, and seemed quite exhausted and faint from fatigue - she complained of her head, and wished me to take the plaister off, but I did not: on Monday she was quite light-headed all night, and all day on Tuesday, and on Tuesday night she went to Mrs. Spiller's again with her father - I did not think that she was in a fit state to go out, but Mrs. Spiller telling me she did not go out, we were obliged to take her; I wrapped her up in several things, put her into my great cloak, and covered her over, head and all - no evening air could get to her; she returned at a quarter or nearly half-past six o'clock at night - they left home about five: she was very bad indeed on her return, and on Wednesday still continued worse - she was very bad on Thursday indeed, and at five o'clock that day died: she had a different plaister on her head on her return from the prisoner's, and some lint and ointment was brought for me to spread another, and to apply on the Thursday morning, which I did; she seemed exhausted at her return from Highgate, and slept for an hour or two that night, at intervals - the vomiting did not come on again, but she could not bear any thing with milk in it; I gave her a little beef-tea, barley-water, gruel, and sago; after the plaister had been on on Thursday morning about half an hour, she was taken in a screaming way, from pain - she complained of pain, and told me to take the plaister off, and it would make her well.

Cross-examined. Your child was thirty-two months old? A. Yes; it got worse after I took her out of town; it spread over her body - I had not shaved the head then - I cut away the hair as the sore places spread; the doctor in the country attended her for a week; she then got better, and I removed her to town - she then got worse, and I took her to Dr. Mclntyre, and while under him it broke out in her joints - she was under Dr. Carter for six or seven weeks; I had no doubt she would get better under him, but I took her to the prisoner by my husband's advice; I put on one plaister myself from the ointment he sent; I have kept none of the ointment; she lost her appetite from the first day she went to the prisoner.

Q. She had nothing to eat while she was under the prisoner's care? A. Only a bit of bread and butter which Mrs. Spiller gave her; she lived upon drinks, but got very thin - she had arrow-root, gruel, and beef-tea every day - she could not take food - I put on the last plaister about ten o'clock in the morning, and she died at five in the evening - I did not think it right to call in a medical gentleman while the prisoner was attending her, as she said she would be better in a day or two, and she kept saying so to the last - when I went to her she said she would be ill - I naturally thought that she was doing right - I had heard she had performed such wonderful cures - I sent a message to Dr. Carter on Sunday to say she was gone to Highgate; my husband expected the horse and cart to take her in the day-time on Tuesday, but the horse was engaged till the evening - I gave her two spoonsful of brandy and water on Sunday, which stopped the sickness - when I put on the last plaster she was very bad - I did not send for any body to look at her - I have not spoken to Mr. Carter since the inquest.

Prisoner's Defence (written). No one can regret more than myself the death of the poor child, but my conscience acquits me of all blame; I used the same remedy I had successfully used to many others, and had hoped the same result, but for the inattention to, and neglect of, my directions. Upon the first occasion, when the child was brought to me, it was in a very black and emaciated state, and as I understood had been under medical advice, without relief for a considerable time; it was on a Wednesday when the child was first brought to me, and I desired that I might again see it on the Friday, instead of which it was not brought until the Sunday, and the plaister I had put on had got hard; I told the father he ought to have come on the Friday, he excused himself by saying he was busy on that day, and as Saturday was wet, his wife would not allow him to bring the child out; I then dressed the child's head, and particularly desired the father to come again to me on the Tuesday morning, but my directions were again unattended to, for the child was not brought until near eight o'clock at night, which was cold and foggy; and as I afterwards heard taken to the father's house in Marylebone, from my house in the Archway, road Highgate, in an open cart, and on the Thursday morning following it died. I shall call before you many persons who have been relieved and cured by me, and who will tell you how incapable I am of an unkind act.

Eight witnesses who had been under the prisoner's care for scrofula disorders, deposed to her skilful, humane, and kind treatment.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-156

157. JOHN BEARD was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Ann Mountain .

MESSRS. ELWIN and CORFE, who had opened and examined the body of the deceased, having deposed that in their opinions she had died a natural death, and not from external violence, the witnesses were not examined.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-157

Before Mr. Baron Bolland.

158. WILLIAM LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 9 sovereigns, the property of Joseph Swift , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH SWIFT . I have known the prisoner twenty years, but had not seen him for two years - I deal in old iron . Last Tuesday week I saw him in Back Church-lane, about seven or eight o'clock in the morning; I did not ask him to come home, but he came with me - he went into my house; I lent him 6d., which he said he would pay me at night; we went out together to take a walk for about two hours - he went to Smithfield to buy a cow for me, which I employed him to do; he kept cows formerly - he bought the cow; he drove it home; the owner came with him, and my wife paid the owner for it - it came to 15l. 10s.; I kept it in my shed, and he was to have the milk of it, and give me a guinea a week - he slept in a chair in my house all that night; he asked leave to do it, and I allowed him - he went away next morning, between seven and eight o'clock; I went with him; I had nine sovereigns in a cream-jug, on the shelf - I came home about eight or nine, and asked my wife if the money was all safe; she went to look, and it was all gone - I looked myself, and saw that they were

all gone; there was a handkerchief on the back of the chair the prisoner slept in - I missed it - I have seen it since in the hands of the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were any other persons in the house that evening? A. Yes, two, Betsy Kemp and Richard Tyrrell ; Tyrrell's wife was there, but went away - she went away too; Betsy remained, and sat up in a chair all night - my house consists of a dwelling and a sleeping-room; there was no dancing nor gin-drinking at my house that night - I was in bed and asleep when Mr. and Mrs. Tyrrell left; I was not drunk, but rather fresh; I had drank some half-and-half - I had 20l. locked up in a box, out of which the cow was paid for, but the nine sovereigns were in the cream-jug - I had been drinking half-and-half all the afternoon.

ELIZABETH SWIFT . I am the wife of the last witness. I had the 20l. locked up in my box, and the nine sovereigns in the cream-jug, on the Friday, when the prisoner came; the 9l. was the stock-money of the house, to be used in the business; the prisoner staid all Friday night - he sat up in the arm-chair, close under the shelf where the money was - Elizabeth Kemp was there (she was my master's daughter,) another young woman, a lodger of Tyrrell's, was with her - they came about eleven or twelve o'clock, and went away between one and two; the young woman came with them, and Elizabeth Kemp stopped with me all night; she and I sat up together; my husband was asleep on the bed, rather fresh; I sat up to mind the cow did not get loose, as it had a calf, it being strange to me - it had come from Smithfield that day; the prisoner had brought them; I paid the owner for them - I gave him fifteen sovereigns and 10s. out of my box; I took the whole 20l. in sovereigns out of the my box; I left them in the landlord's hands at the beer-shop, not knowing what the cow and calf would come to; when they came home I went over to the beer-shop; the landlord paid the money, and gave me 4l. 10s.; I put it away in the box again - I had seen the nine sovereigns in the cream-jug at three o'clock on Friday, and they were there between six and seven - that was the last time I saw them; I went out twice after I saw them safe - I left the prisoner in the house, and an old man, who I have kept there these twenty years; my husband was out; nobody else was in the house - the prisoner staid all night; the silk handkerchief was on the back of the chair - I missed it on Friday, when I was going to wash it; on Saturday morning my husband and Lawrence went out together; my husband came home, and asked me to give him a shilling; I would not give it him - I went to the cream-jug, and missed the nine sovereigns.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure Tyrrell's lodger was there? A. Yes, and the old man, who is sixty-eight years of age - I left him and the prisoner both in the shed, looking at the cow: we live in the shed - Mrs. Tyrrell came to look for her husband; he is a nightman; he, Betsy, and the lodger came to see the cow - I staid there talking; there was no drink - my husband was asleep for about two hours before Tyrrell and his wife went away; they were there from eleven till one or two o'clock; no spirits were drank, only a pot of beer - there was no dancing nor singing.

RICHARD BALL . I am a carpenter. I know the prosecutor's house; I am there five or six times a day - I was on his premises on Friday evening, between seven and eight o'clock, in the shed that joins his dwelling; I saw the prisoner there, in the dwelling-room, by the back door, near the shelf - he was standing up; the shelf was about five feet high - the old man that lives with the family was not there; the prisoner had sent him up into the loft for some hay for the cow - there was nobody in the room but the prisoner; the prosecutor and his wife were over the way at the beer-shop - the prisoner did not see me; I saw him take the cream-jug off the shelf, pour money out of it, and put it into his left-hand pocket: I did not see what money it was - it was twenty-minutes before eight o'clock at night; he then went over the way to the beer-shop; I went over also - he joined company with the prosecutor and his wife; he had a pint of half-and-half: there was a dispute about paying for it - the prosecutor would not pay for it, and the prisoner said he would if nobody else would; he put his hand into his pocket, and pulled out six sovereigns and a sixpence, but he drew the sovereigns back, and put down the sixpence - I had not been in the prisoner's company before; I heard him say in the parlour, before he took the sovereigns, that he had only sixpence left, and that he threw down, saying "That is the last sixpence I have got" - after the second ale was paid for, they all three went over to the place: the prosecutor was a little in liquor, and the prisoner also - I did not tell the prosecutor, because I did not know whether he was related to him or not, as he called the prosecutor his brother.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Mrs. Swift present when he called him his brother? A. No, it was as he stood at the bar - the landlord was present; three pots of ale were had in my presence - the dealer, I understood, paid for the third pot; the prosecutor was in the room when the prisoner produced the sovereigns, but did not see them - I mentioned this next morning, when the prosecutor said he had lost his money; I asked if the prisoner was related to him - he said No, and then I told him; it was after he paid for the first beer that I saw him take the sovereigns; I have know the prosecutor for a year and a half, and am in and out of his place five or six times a day on business - I did not know the money was kept in the cream-ewer; I live in John-street, Cannon-street-road: I heard the prisoner called Lawrence, but did not know he was not his brother-in-law - he tapped the prosecutor on the shoulder, and said, "Never mind, brother, I will put you in the way of getting money;" the prosecutor said, "That is right boy" - the landlord was seven or eight feet from him; he called him brother, both in the bar and tap-room.

FRANCES BARGEMAN . I am a publican. I have known the prisoner some years; he came to my house last Saturday week at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, and called for a glass of ale - he gave me a sovereign in payment; I had no change - he then gave me eight more sovereigns, and asked me to take charge of them for a short time; he went out, and returned in a short time with Mr. Quicksley, a tailor, and asked me for three sovereigns, which I gave him, and he paid Quicksley 3l. 9s.; he took four half-crowns out of his pocket - he

returned again in half an hour with Quicksley, and got the six sovereigns; I never saw him afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before? A. Yes, for many years as a respectable man; he bore an honest character, and was a milkman - he has six children.

CHARLES QUICKSLEY . I am a tailor: I have known the prisoner twenty years; he was formerly a cooper. On Saturday morning he came to me for a suit of clothes which I sold him; he bought things which came to 3l. 9s. 6d. - he said he had money next door, at Mrs. Bargeman's; he took me there; I got 3l. from Mrs. Bargeman, and he gave me the silver - he wished me to go afterwards, and fetch the 6l. from Bargeman's, and give it to my wife, as he did not like to leave it there, for fear of spending it in drink - I did so; I went into the country, and during my absence he had 3l. 19s; I have 1l. 9s. left - I have known him twenty years; he has been three times in Bethlem to my knowledge: liquor has that effect on him.

JESSE TRAVERS . I apprehended the prisoner at Quicksley's, at ten o'clock on Saturday, the 24th. I told him it was for robbing Swift - he was intoxicated when I took him; I searched him at the station-house, and found two duplicates on him - one for a silk-handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-158

Second London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

159. ELIAS LEVY was indicted for feloniously receiving of an evil disposed person, on the 29th of October , one 50l. Bank note, the property of Joseph Thomas Chidwick , well knowing the same to have been stolen .

JOSEPH THOMAS CHIDWICK . I am a chemist and druggist , and live at No. 22. Houndsditch . I had seen this 50l. note in my possession, on the Tuesday or Wednesday previous to Thursday, the 25th of October, when I missed it; it was in a bag in an iron safe, in my counting-house: the iron chest was locked part of the day - I opened it, when I wanted a book, and I might have left the counting-house, leaving the key in the chest; it must have been taken out of the iron chest - I stopped it at the Bank, and advertised it; it was No. 9295, dated September the 1st, 1832 - I have not seen it since; I never saw the prisoner before, the Bank note was lost - I received information from Jones, and went to his house on the Monday following; I went to the prisoner's house twice, but did not see him - I then applied to Prendergrass, and he went with me to a street in which was the court, the prisoner lived in; I waited in the street while he went to the prisoner's house.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. I believe you first considered the note was accidentally lost? A. My confidence in my servants was so great, I could not make up my mind that it was stolen, and having had it in my pocket a day or two after I received it, I thought I must have lost it, and advertised it accordingly, offering 10l. reward, and stating the number, date, and amount - it was to be brought to Mr. Biggs, No. 41, Hounsditch (looking at a newspaper, dated 27th of October) this is the advertisement; I afterwards had reason to alter my opinion; I missed the note late on the night of the 25th; I called at the prisoner's house on the Monday after the advertisement, in consequence of a communication from Mr. Jones and Mr. Biggs; I found Levy was not at home; I left word for the prisoner that I called about the 50l. note, and he called at my house the following day - I had called on him twice, but had not seen him.

Q. Did he state to you that he knew nothing about the 50l. note? A. He did not - my memory will not enable me to recollect what was said; he said something about a porter who formerly lived with me; he merely said, "I have come about this 50l. note; have you a porter in your employ named B. Lee ;" I said,"I have;" the prisoner was a perfect stranger to me - Prendergrass had been to his house that morning.

RICHARD JONES . I live with my uncle in Raven row, Spitalfields - he is a grocer. On Friday, the 26th of October, Mrs. Battye came to the shop about three or four o'clock in the afternoon with a 50l. note in her hand, and asked our young man to give her change - I gave her change for it - I knew her before perfectly well; I did not know of the prosecutor's loss then - she bought nothing - I gave her the full change; on Saturday morning, I saw an advertisement in the Times respecting the note; I sent for Mr. Levy, who I knew before - Battye had said she had come from Levy; the prisoner came into the shop - I asked him to walk into the counting-house, which he did; I said to him "I gave you the change for a 50l. note on Saturday, which I hope you will give me back;" he said, "What is the matter? is it a forged one?" I said,"No, but I hope and trust you will give it me back;" he said, "I will give you 20l. which I have in my pocket-book, and will go and fetch you the rest directly;" this was about nine o'clock in the morning; he gave me the 20l. and then asked me what was the matter - I said, "It is a lost note, and you will get something by it now, for there is 10l. reward offered for it;" he went and brought me the 30l. and I returned him the note; I am certain it was the same number and date as the note advertised - I compared them before I delivered it to him - he said he should take it back to the person; I said, "You will get the 10l. reward;" he said he wanted to get nothing by it -(he is a master boot and shoemaker) I said to him,"How did you come by it;" he said, that he and another picked it up in Houndsditch on the Thursday morning - he did not say who the other person was - I did not ask him; when I gave him the note, he followed it up, and pointed out where it had been trod den upon - it had either been trod on, or got dirty in a person's pocket - I have never seen the note since; my uncle was out of town - he returned late on the Saturday evening; I mentioned this to him on the Sunday - I went to Levy on the Monday morning, and said, "Well Mr. Levy, have you taken back the note" - he said,"Yes, I gave it to the person I took it of;" he did not say who that was; I said, "I thought you meant to take it back to the person who lost it" he said he did not mean any such thing as that, but meant to give it to the person he had it from - and said he would give me the person's address from whom he had it, but he

should like to see the person first himself - he said he could not see him till after nine o'clock at night, as he was out to work, and after that he would call on me at half-past nine - he did not call; I did not receive from him any address or description of the other person, till I was at the Police-office - he was taken up the next day; I went twice on the Monday with Mr. Chidwick, but he was not at home; Mr. Levy called on me on Tuesday morning, about ten o'clock, and said,"What do you want with me, Mr. Jones?" I said,"I do not want you," hut said that Mr. Biggs or Mr Chidwick wanted to see him respecting the note; he went away, saying he would go there - I did not see him again till he was at the office.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He said he would go to Mr. Biggs? A. To him or Mr. Chidwick; I cannot say which he meant - I did not think myself entitled to any of the reward; had I not known him to be a respectable man I should not have given change - he lives in a private house; he came to me with the change - and afterwards on the Tuesday - I believe he went to the Police-office of his own accord - he went with Biggs and Chidwick; I had known Mrs. Battye some years - there was no concealment where she brought the note from; I stated at the second examination about his saying he had picked the note up - I did not think it necessary to state it before, but at the second examination the Magistrate asked what he said; I did not go to Mr. Biggs when I saw the advertisement, because I gave Levy the opportunity - I should have thought it very unhandsome to have gone without seeing Levy; I had a right to the 50l. back - there was nothing to prevent his absconding if he thought proper; the Magistrate admitted him to bail at the third examination, and he has surrendered here.

COURT. Q. Did you ever see the 50l. note after you returned it to the prisoner? A. Never.

JANE BATTYE . I live at No. 2, Dolphin-court, Ravenrow, Spitalfields; I have known Levy about three years and a half. On Friday, the 26th of October, I received this 50l. note from him - he said if he had change for that note he would pay my husband what he owed him; he lives next door to me - he owed my husband 10s. 6d.; I took the note to Jones, to get change, the same day - I had known Jones a long time; I got change for it, and took it home to my own room - I gave it to Levy; he did not pay me the 10s. 6d. - I did not speak to him about it; he has not paid it, to my knowledge - I did not ask how he came by the note, nor did he tell me; he went out of the room, and I did not see any thing more of him till Prendergrass fetched me; I went to the office, and was examined there; I do not know how he got the note.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. I believe he is in a large way of business? A. Yes - he employs a good many people; I work for him - he came to my room on this occasion; I did not go to him - he did not tell me to go to Jones, nor ask me to get change; he held the note in his hand, and said if he had change for it he would pay my husband - I took it out of his hand, and got change; he did not desire me to conceal it - I am well known in the neighbourhood to be in his employ; I brought him forty sovereigns and two 5l. notes - I did not ask where he got the note; I should consider him too respectable for that.

Q. Do you remember his saying, "This is not mine?" A. Yes - I remember his saying those words when he took the change out of my hand.

COURT. Q. Did he say whose it was? A. No; I should have gone for the change if he had asked me, if he had said nothing about paying my husband; I am in the habit of going to Jones for change.

ELIZABETH BLUMSON . I live at No. 6, Tillet-street, Tenter-ground, Spitalfields: my husband is a carpenter. On going up to Mr. Lee's room on Sunday afternoon(he lodged in the some house as me) I found Mr. and Mrs. Lee much agitated, and asked what was the matter - the prisoner was not present; I never saw him with them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You have a room of your own? A. Yes - Lee and his wife have a separate apartment; Lee showed me a 50l. note on Sunday afternoon, the 28th of October.

Q. Did you see the 50l. note? A. Yes - he held it in his hand, and I read it in his hand; it was dated the 1st of Sept., 1832 - I did not observe the number; Lee is a journeyman cabinet-maker - I knew he worked in Houndsditch; I have not seen him since the Sunday evening - he eloped that night, and the wife went on Monday; he did not change his clothes after showing me the note.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am an officer. On Tuesday, the 30th of October, the prisoner surrendered himself to me at Lambeth-street office; I told him there was information laid at the office about his having a 50l. note, and questioned him - he said he should not state any thing to me, but before the Magistrate he would state the particulars.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Perhaps you know the character of the prisoner? A. I have made inquiry, and find he bears a very honest industrious character - he surrendered at the office; I did not see the prosecutor with him then, but I did almost immediately after; he made a statement at the office - I had been to his house with Mr. Chidwick about half-past ten o'clock on Tuesday morning; he was not at home - I saw his brother, and left a message for him, that I had called about the note, and he surrendered in about two hours.

EDWARD WILLIAM LILLEY . I am a tallow-chandler, and live in Raven-row, Spitalfields. On Saturday, the 27th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, Mr. Jones brought the Times newspaper to me, and desired me to step into the house, which I did; while I was there Levy came in - I went into the counting-house with him and Jones; Levy put down 30l. in gold, which made 50l. altogether on the table, as there were two 5l. notes and 10l. in gold laying on the table previous to my going in -I took a 50l. note in my hands which laid on the table, and said to Levy, "This note is advertised - of course you know who you took it of;" he said, "I found it;" he took the note in his hands, and doubled it twice, putting a soiled part to the back of it - and said that to ascertain whether it was good, he had sent to Mr. Jones for change; I held the newspaper in my hand, and said, "If you found this note you have the claim for the reward;" I put the newspaper before him, and showed him the address where it was to be taken to, and with that we separated - he said he had found it; I have not seen the note since - he did

not say when he had found it, nor whether he was alone at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you mean to say the questions were put to him by you, and not Jones? A. I put them as I have stated; I do not recollect Jones putting any questions - I am certain my questions and answers are correct; I made no memorandum of them, but am sure I am correct - I am certain he said he found the note: I was there the whole time - I was not precisely attending to all that passed, but what I have said is correct; I attended to no other part of the conversation - the whole might occupy fifteen minutes.

Prisoner's Defence. The only remark that will fall from me is simply this - Mr. Lee called on me on Friday afternoon, and asked me to obtain for him change for a 50l. note, which I did, and on Saturday morning Jones told me it was advertised; I immediately returned him the change, and told him I should take the note and return it to Lee, who I had it from.

RHIMA LEVY. I am the prisoner's mother. I remember Lee being at my son's house on the last Sunday in October, and I myself gave Lee the 50l. note which I fetched down from my drawer; my son had given it to me the day before, when he received it from Jones; I cannot say at what time I gave it to Lee - it was between light and dark; I got the 50l. note from a drawer, where I put it when my son gave it to me, when he came back from Mr. Jones'; when I gave the note to Lee I told him he should go and receive the reward - he then left the house; Moses Levy and Catherine Abrahams were present.

COURT. Q. When did you first get the 50l. note? A. On the Saturday, the day before; I cannot read, nor can I read writing at all - I knew it was a 50l. note, because I knew the number; I cannot remember the number.

Q. How did you know the number, if you cannot read? A. I cannot tell - I knew there was a reward offered, because my son had read the paper, and sent Lee to go and get it - my son was present when I gave the note to Lee - I had never seen the fellow before - my son was never acquainted with him I am certain; he knew his wife, by her binding shoes for him - I did not know he was her husband; my son said, "Get down the note mother, and give it to this man; it is his, and he found it." - I did not go to the office with my son on Tuesday; I cannot say when I first gave this account - I am so forgetful and aged - I have not seen Lee nor the note since -Abrahams is my niece - she and Mr. Levy were present when I gave the note to Lee, and told him to go and get the reward.

Q. Did you afterward inquire if Lee had got the reward? A. Yes, when Mr. Jones came on Monday morning - I do not know where Lee lived - my son knew.

MOSES LEVY . I am the prisoner's brother, and live in the same house with him - I am a boot and shoemaker, but our business is separate. I do not know how the note came into his possession; I was at his house on Sunday, the 28th; I did not know Lee personally, but there came a knock at the door in the morning - I opened it, and a man was there - I asked what he wanted; he said, "It is of no great consequence, I wanted to see your brother;" - my brother was not at home; he did not go away - he did not see my brother; he went away, and returned again - my brother was not at home then - he came again in the evening part, and saw my brother between four and five o'clock - my brother had not come home the second time, but when he went out he met him, and they both returned together - my brother said,"Mother, you know the 50l. note I gave you yesterday morning - go up stairs and fetch it, and give it to Mr. Lee;" - my mother went up, fetched the note, and delivered it into Mr. Lee's hands; I had no opportunity of seeing what note it was, nor the amount; I could see it was a note; my brother said to Mr. Lee, "There is a reward for this note of 10l.; go to Mr. Biggs, No. 41, Houndsditch, and be sure to receive the reward" - I did not know Lee nor his wife, nor where they lived.

COURT. At what time did your brother return with Lee on Sunday? A. Between four and five o'clock; I cannot say what sort of a day it was; it was between light and dark on the 28th; I did not ask to look at the note; my mother can read, but not well; she cannot read writing; she can read a plain book; I had a candle at that time to do my work; I was at work in the opposite room; the transaction took up about four or five minutes; it was on the ground floor - I did not learn from my brother where the Lee's lived; when the inquiry was made, I understood they lived at the Tenter-ground; my mother is rather infirm; I went with my brother to the office; I did not go with him, but I was at the office; he was there about half an hour before me - I cannot say at what time I went there; it was before dinner - we dine sometimes at three, and sometimes at two o'clock; I had no communication with the Justice - I was in the office when my brother was there, but not when he was held to bail.

Q. Did you leave your brother without seeing the end of it? A. I was rather too late; he had been held to bail before I got there; he did not walk home with me; Mr. Levy and Mr. Thomas were his bail - I gave no account of this at the office; I gave this account previously, when the brief was drawn up; I was not present when the brief was drawn up, but I was when it was finished - that was last Thursday; I did not mention this to any body from the Tuesday, when my brother surrendered, down to the 28th of November; my brother did not show me the note.

Q. Did you ever tell Mr. Jones or Mr. Chidwick they were very wrong in thinking your brother had received the note, knowing it to be stolen, because he had returned it to Lee? A. No.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you ever see Jones or Chidwick after the Sunday? A. I saw Jones on Monday evening, and told him the note was delivered to Lee then.

COURT. Q. You said before that you had not mentioned it till the brief was drawn, last Thursday? A. I mean I did not speak to any body about the concern till the brief was made out - I mentioned it to nobody but Jones: I did not understand you before.

MR. BODKIN. Q. After your brother was held to bail, was there any further hearing, or was the whole business finished that day? A. He was twice before the Magistrate: first on Wednesday, and again on the Thursday - he was only at the office once.

Q. Was it on the Tuesday after the Sunday that you went to the office, found you were too late, and that your brother was held to bail? A. Yes; there was an examination on the Saturday following - he was held to bail on the Thursday; I was not present when he was bailed, and cannot exactly say when it was; I was there only on the Tuesday - he did not come home then, but was detained: he was not bailed that day - I mentioned nothing at the office, as I did not hear any thing about it then; I knew he was in custody on suspicion of having the note, but said nothing at the office of what I knew.

RICHARD JONES . I saw the witness on the Monday evening - when I called at Levy's house; he said the 50l. had been returned to the party his brother had it from.

COURT. Q. Did he name the party? A. No; I saw him at the office on Tuesday - he said nothing about it there.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate what he had said? A. No.

CATHERINE ABRAHAMS . I was at Mr. Levy's house on Saturday, the 28th of October - I was present when Mrs. Levy delivered the 50l. note into Mr. Lee's hands, by desire of her son; I did not know Lee before; I was sitting with the prisoner's mother, and saw the prisoner come in - nothing passed then; a man came in, ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after, and Levy said to his mother, "Mother, this is the man the 50l. note belongs to; fetch it down, and give it to him, and he will go and receive the reward;" the name of Lee was mentioned, or else I did not know him - Lee went away, but Levy told him to deliver the note to Biggs, and he would get the 10l. reward.

COURT. Q. You say Levy was at home - is he your brother? A. No, my cousin - he had been at home, as near as I can guess, about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before Lee came in; it was a little before five o'clock - I am quite sure Levy had been at home ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before Lee came - it was about that, not above ten minutes; nobody came into the house with Lee - I am certain Levy did not come in with him; I am positive of it - I saw the note in Mrs. Levy's hands when she brought it down stairs; I saw a 50l. note in her hands - she said it was 50l.; I had not the note in my hands - I saw it near enough to know it was a 50l. note, but not to see the number; I am certain it was a 50l. note; I did not read the note, but when Lee took it in his hand, he said, "Oh, this is the 50l. note," and Levy said, "Mind you go and receive the reward of 10l.;" I could see the mark of 50l. on it.

Q. How was it marked? A. The same as notes are - in figures, I think, but I did not notice it.

Q. If you did not notice it how can you tell it was a 50l. note? A. Because at the time I saw it I could explain it, but I did not know I should be called on about it.

Q. Did you see "fifty" in words or figures? A. I do not exactly recollect; Mr. Lee looked over it twice, and repeated that it was 50l.

Q. He might tell you a falsehood? A. That is not my fault; the prisoner said, "Here is the 50l. note - mind you take it, and receive the 10l.;" he said, "I will certainly take it where you tell me, and come back and let you know;" I was not living at the prisoner's at the time, but am more there than at home - I did not go to the office; I knew nothing of it till he was bailed - I was then very angry, and said, "Why did not you send to me in Leman-street, and I would have come?" I did not know he was in trouble at all.

Q. Did you see Levy come into the house or into the room? A. I saw him come into the room where I was, through the street door, and in ten minutes after Lee came - I am certain Levy came in ten minutes before Lee.

JURY. Q. Was Levy in the room with you ten minutes before Lee? A. He was - he might have gone into another room for a minute or two, but there was nobody in the house but Mr. Levy, me, his mother, and brother; I am certain he must have been in the house ten minutes before Lee came.

GUILTY . - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-159

NEW COURT. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5TH.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

160. THOMAS BRIMBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 144 fender-feet, value 10s.; 2 knives, value 2s., and 1 sash-line, value 4d., the goods of Henry Clark , his master .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

HENRY CLARK . I am an ironmonger : I have five men in my employ; the prisoner had been with me for two years. On the 12th of November, in consequence of something I heard, I spoke to two officers; and on the 16th I gave the prisoner into custody, and we went with him to his house - he said we were welcome to search; I went with Hanley into the front room on the ground floor, and the officer found these fender-feet between the sacking and the bed - they are in an unfinished state; Mr. Line, of Birmingham, makes them for us, and we have them in this state - some knives were also found; the officer asked how he came by the feet - he said some person had left them there, and he intended to call for them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where did you go? A. To Union-court - he has a house there; he said the man who left these feet there was a fender-maker, and he knew him, and he asked him as a favour to let him leave these feet.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer of Worship-street. I found these feet between the bed and the sacking, in the front room - the prisoner's wife and I were present, and I believe no one else; I asked the prisoner how he could account for the feet being between the bed and the sacking - he said he could not account for it, but his wife said, "This is his first offence - I hope he will be forgiven;" he told her to say nothing - some time after he said they were left there by some man, and he would produce that man at the office, but he did not.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not add that the man called in his absence, and left the feet? A. Not at that time.

COURT. Q. You first of all went into the back room? A. Yes, my Lord - the prisoner's wife was there, and in consequence of her leaving the room I went into the front room, and found these things; I did not perceive her carry any thing out of the back room - there was not time for her to have put these things under the bed; there were two children sleeping on the bed, and they must have been

disturbed - these feet were right under the middle of the bed, wrapped up in two pinafores; she resisted my searching the bed repeatedly.

THOMAS WATERS . I am an officer. I have heard the account given, which is correct; I saw the prisoner's wife leave the room - she had nothing with her; I found these two knives in a drawer.

MR. BARRY to MR. CLARK. Q. I believe the prisoner's wife was in the habit of bringing his dinner? A. Not his dinner, but his tea - she only came into the shop; I had not missed these articles - they had been in my cellar.

JOHN LINE . I am a brass-founder, and live at Birmingham. I supply Mr. Clark with these fender-feet, and I have brought the mould from which they are made - I make them only for him; I do not sell any in this state but to him.

GUILTY. Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18321129-160

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

161. WILLIAM COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of November , 12 yards of silk, value 50s., the goods of John Howell and others .

MR. BALL conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS OLIVER . I am shopman to John Howell and Co., silk-mercer s, of Regent-street . On the 22nd of November, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came - he brought a pattern of silk, and said he wanted twelve yards like it; I cut off twelve yards - I had almost finished the bill when he desired it to be placed to the account of Mrs. Bell, of Wimpole-street; I asked a young man in the shop if he knew him - he said not; one of the partners said it was all right, and I let him have it, believing his representation.

NOT GUILTY .

The prisoner was again indicted for a like offence, which being misdemeanor, he was acquitted.

Reference Number: t18321129-161

162. JOSEPH DOWNING was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 51 shirts, value 4l. 18s. 3d. , the goods of John Robinson .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Charles Mott and Bartholomew Peter Drowett .

GEORGE HUTCHINSON . I am assistant to Messrs. Mott and Drowett, contractors for Lambeth workhouse ; John Robinson supplies them with articles, which we employ the poor to work up - the prisoner was a pauper . On the 10th of October a bundle, containing these shirts was delivered to him to take to Mr. Robinson, in the Commercial-road; they belong to Mr. Robinson; we have never seen them since.

THOMAS LAWRENCE . I put the fifty-one shirts into a bag, and gave them to the prisoner to take to Robinson's; he went as far as London-bridge with me - I told him and another man to go on while I went to Houndsditch; I did not see him again till the 19th of November, when he was in custody.

WILLIAM WHITE . I live with Mr. John Robinson. -These shirts were never brought there.

Prisoner's Defence. I put them down in a public-house while I got half a pint of beer, and they were gone.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-162

163. HENRY KENNETT and FREDERICK RESTEAU were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 18 yards of gauze ribbon, value 6s., and 1 net cap, value 2s., the goods of James Underwood and another .

WILLIAM GARRAD . I am in the service of Mr. James Underwood and another, who are draper s. On the evening of the 30th of October, this property was taken from a shop of the rs in Judd-street , of which I have the management - a round pane of glass was broken in the window, which requires two or three days to mend it - I had sufficiently secured it, as I thought, but while I was out these things were extracted from the window.

JAMES POSFORD (Police-constable S 50). I was on duty in Somers'-town, and saw the two prisoners lurking about in Charlton-street; I crossed over to them - they separated: I followed Kennett, and took this cap out of his hand, and these two scarfs from his bosom, this scarf from his pocket, and this roll of ribbon from another pocket - I asked how he came by them; he said Resteau gave them to him to pawn - he told me where he lived, and I went to his house, but he was not at home; I took Kennett to the watch-house, and Resteau was afterwards brought to the prosecutors' and I knew him to be the boy; I found nothing on him: in going to the watch-house he said he was with the other boy when he took the things, but he had none of them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

KENNETT - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

RESTEAU - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-163

164. JEREMIAH MANNING was indicted for stealing, no the 13th of August , 1 earthen jar, value 4d.; 36 pence, and 84 halfpence, the property of Leonard Wass .

ANN WASS . My brother, Leonard Wass, keeps a chandler's-shop in Wentworth-street . On the 13th of August five men came into the shop, and had some beef and bread - I served them; the prisoner was one - they were all in company; they began to be rather noisy, and my brother turned them out - I had a jar standing on the counter, it contained thirty-six penny pieces, and eighty-four halfpence; when the prisoner was gone this jar was missing - three of the men have been apprehended and convicted; I knew the prisoner before.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. He came to buy some meat? A. Yes, and he paid for it; they did not run away - they were turned out.

ANN SHEEN . I live next door to the prosecutor. On the evening of the 13th of August I saw the five persons together, and watched them for half an hour; they went into the shop, and tried to throw the jar and some papers down - I watched them out, and saw the prisoner and his brother go into a little alley; Mr. Wass then went to have a pint of beer, and one of those who were before tried, got the jar, and gave it to another, who ran off - the prisoner said to me, "If you say a word about my brother I will kick the front of your head in;" I ran and called the Police; the prisoner was not taken till now.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not see the prisoner eating his meat quietly at the door? A. No, he came to his brother when I charged his brother with this; I am a housekeeper - my husband is a wheeler; I get my living by hard-work.

JOHN GREEN (Police-constable H 97). I was in a coffee-shop in Houndsditch; the prisoner came in - he looked at me, and went out again; I followed, and took him - I had been looking for him, but could not find him.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-164

165. MARTIN MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 2 coats, value 1l. 2s. , the goods of Charles Udall .

CHARLES UDALL . I am an upholsterer and auctioneer . On the 25th of October I was in my gig in Chiswell-street - I stopped there between six and seven o'clock in the evening - I left my two coats in the gig, and told a boy to mind it - I was absent half an hour, and when I returned I found the boy standing with his back to the gig, and the coats were gone - the prisoner was apprehended immediately, but I know nothing of him; I have never seen the coats since - my gig was opposite to No. 16 - I had called at our printer's - one was a drab coat, and one brown.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Is the boy here? A. No.

WILLIAM PITTAL . I am a printer; I work at No. 16, Chiswell-street. I was there between half-past six and seven o'clock on this evening; I saw the prosecutor's gig there, about a quarter of an hour before the robbery, and a boy in care of it; I left the office to get some bills which the prosecutor was waiting for, and as I returned, I saw the prisoner take the coats from the gig; I at first thought him to be the prosecutor, and I went up to him to give him the bills, but just as I was going to speak to him, he gave them to another man, who ran off with them - I swear the prisoner took them - he walked off; I left my bills at Mr. Hawkins's; I followed, and gave him into custody in Type-street.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not notice the coats at first? A. No - I first saw the prisoner about six yards from the gate; I only lost sight of him while I left the bills at the shop - I followed him a hundred yards or more - he made no attempt to escape, but expressed his surprise.

JAMES CONNOR (Police-constable G 138). I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and heard the witness call Police! - I might have escaped; I was walking gently - I made no resistance.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-165

166. GEORGE METCALF was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 7 pairs of shoes, value 14s., the goods of Evan Jones and another .

EMMA MARIA FINES . I live with my brother, Evan Jones , a boot and shoemaker , in Liverpool-road, Islington . I was in his shop on the 21st of November, about five o'clock; there were two bundles of shoes at his door; I saw the prisoner pass by, take up the top bundle, which contained seven pairs of shoes, and ran off - I ran and called Stop thief! - he dropped them when he got a few yards from the door; I did not stop for them, but ran on; a gentleman said he could run faster than I could - he ran across the road, caught the prisoner, and brought him back - I had not lost sight of him.

JAMES CONNOY (Police-constable N 148). I took the prisoner, and have the shoes.

EVAN JONES . These are the property of me and my father.

Prisoner. I am not the boy .

GUILTY .* Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-166

167. GEORGE MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 1 pair of boots, value 5s.; 1 cap, value 10d., and 1 belt, value 6d. , the goods of Henry Wilson .

Mr. BODKIN declined the prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-167

168. WILLIAM MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 1 pair of boots, value 5s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 1 jacket, value 2s.; 1 shirt, value 2s., and 1 frock, value 1s. , the goods of Henry Wilson .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-168

169. DENNIS DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 1 frock, value 4s.; 1 pair of boots, value 5s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 1 cap, value 10d., and 1 leather belt, value 6d. , the goods of Henry Wilson .

No evidence NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-169

170. DANIEL DUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 shirt, value 2s., 1 pair of trousers, value 2s., and 1 cap, value 10d. , the goods of Henry Wilson .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-170

171. ALFRED CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 1 pair of boots, value 5s., 1 frock, value 4s., and 1 leather belt, value 6d. , the goods of Henry Wilson .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-171

172. MATILDA PLUCE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 cloak, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Drake Colson .

WILLIAM DRAKE COLSON . I keep a lace and cloak shop , in High Holborn . On the 17th of November I lost a cloak, which had been pinned to some others in the lobby of my shop - I named it to the serjeant on duty, and in about half an hour he brought it back.

JOHN BENNETT (Police-serjeant F 10). I received information from the prosecutor; I went to the watch-house, and received intelligence that the prisoner was at Bow-street, with the cloak on her shoulders; I went there, and found her the same evening - I asked her where she bought the cloak; she said, "I did not buy it at all, I borrowed it of my mother."(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My father has been dead two or three months - he bought it for my mother; she was going into the country, and made me a present of it.

MR. COLSON. I never sold it; it met with an accident in the collar and is joined - it was safe not more than a quarter of an hour before we missed it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .(See page 18.)

Reference Number: t18321129-172

173. JOHN PATON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 10 handkerchiefs, value 20s. , the goods of Abraham Edmund Reynolds .

ROBERT JENKINS . I was passing the shop of Mr. Reynolds, a pawnbroker , in Mile-end-road , on the 23rd of October, and saw two men at the door; I crossed, and waited about ten minutes - I then saw a third man, who was the prisoner, come out of the shop; he crossed the road, and turned down a place: I followed - he saw me; he opened his coat, threw down these handkerchiefs, and ran off - I pursued him a mile and a half, and took him.

RICHARD PEACHY . I am in the service of Mr. Abraham Edmund Reynolds. These are his ten handkerchiefs; they were about one yard inside his shop, and were safe before; the officer brought them back.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer asked if they had lost any property, and they said No, not that they knew of; I had not been near the shop - I was coming home from Bow, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw several persons running.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-173

174. JOHANNA RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November, 1 shift, value 2s. , the goods of the Guardians of the Poor of the parish of St. Luke .

JEMIMA POPE . I am matron of St. Luke's workhouse, in the City-road ; the property there belongs to the guardians of the poor. The prisoner was an inmate there - we allow all the paupers to go out on Sundays, and partially search them; but on the 25th of November I was particularly engaged, and the prisoner passed me, and was nearly out of the door; I said to her, "Granny, I must search you more than all the rest" - I took her back, and found this shift under her apron; she must, in the absence of the wardsman, have taken it off the pile - this is the shift; it was dirty when she took it, but I have washed it - the prisoner has been there six years, and was a night-nurse.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to take it to an old woman who wanted one; the matron cannot say I ever stole any thing.

MRS. POPE. I have nothing to say against her - it is merely to deter others that we bring her here.

GUILTY. Aged 68.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18321129-174

175. CHARLES GROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 13 printed books, value 4l. , the goods of James Johnson .

JAMES JOHNSON . I am a bookseller , and live in Tudor-street . On the 9th of November I missed these books, about nine o'clock in the morning, when I came down stairs; I first noticed a vacancy on the shelves; they had been a good way in the shop, and had all been secure when I went to bed the night before - my boy, who was in the shop, said they must have been taken while he was taking down the shutters.

DENNIS POWER (Police-constable H 1.) On the morning of the 9th of November I saw a hackney-coach come and stop by the toll-bar, in the Commercial-road - the prisoner got out, and went down Morgan-street; he came back, gave the coachman something, and took a bag out of the coach, containing these books - I followed him down the street, into a brothel; I asked what he had got- he said his own property; I looked, and found these books; I said he was my prisoner - he came with me some distance quietly, and then made great resistance; but with assistance I got him to the station.

WILLIAM PRYOR . I am a Police-inspector. I produce the books, which were left with me by another officer.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-175

176. HENRY REDDING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 1 ass, price 30s. , the property of William Rogers .

HENRY ROGERS . I am a farmer , and live at Iver . I lost this ass on the 25th of February, 1830; it used to stray about - I found it at Ealing about a fortnight after; it was a she ass, and a very remarkable one - I knew it to be mine; I had bought it seven weeks before; the person I bought it of knew her as well as I did.

JOSEPH HIGGINS . I apprehended the prisoner, and a man named Haynes, early in the morning of the 27th of February, 1830; they had this ass, and a great quantity of lead, which it was carrying - they both said the ass belonged to them, and they had come from Harrow; they were remanded three times, and then discharged - on the Friday following the prosecutor applied to me, and the prisoner was taken again; but he broke out of Uxbridge gaol on Sunday, the 20th of March, 1830; the other day he was in custody on another charge, and I stated this - Haynes was brought here, and pleaded guilty.

JOSEPH DICKINSON . I sold the ass to Mr. Rogers, and know it is the same.

Prisoner's Defence. I never owned it at all - Haynes owned it.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-176

177. WILLIAM STANWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of November , 8ozs. of segars, value 12s. , the goods of William Burton .

WILLIAM BURTON . I keep a segar-shop , in Great Ormond-street . On the 22nd of November I was told these cigars were taken, by a person in the next shop - I followed, and took the prisoner with the box in his hand, about one hundred yards off - I believe he had been in the shop one night before, and we lost a box then.

JOHN MILLS (Police-constable F 86.) I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave them to me, and said he would give me 2d.

GUILTY *. Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-177

178. CHARLES WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of William Leuchars .

THOMAS JONES . I am porter to Mr. William Leuchars, a dressing-case maker , in Piccadilly . On the 24th of October, about a quarter before ten o'clock, I was cleaning the brass work outside, and I saw the prisone walk out at the private door, with my master's great coat on his back - he was a stranger; he walked as far as the corner of Sackville-street, and then looked back, which caused me to have suspicion - he instantly ran up Sack

ville-street; I followed, and took him with it; the servant had been cleaning the steps, and the door was open.

GEORGE GLASSE (Police-constable C 135.) I took the prisoner, and have the coat - I found this skeleton-key on him, and 3d.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-178

179. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 rope-mat, value 2s. , the goods of Johanna Walker .

JOHANNA WALKER . I am a widow, and keep an oil-shop in Rathbone-place, Gray's Inn-road . I lost a ropemat from the door, on the 3rd of November.

WILLIAM BARTON (Police-constable G 1.) I saw the prisoner watching the door; I saw him unhang the mat, put it under his arm, and walk off - I took him with it.

Prisoner's Defence. This mat laid outside the door -I very near fell over it, and before I had got it up, he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18321129-179

180. THOMAS WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of June , 10 sovereings, the monies of Christopher Geddes , his master .

CHRISTOPHER GEDDES . I live in Wapping , and am a spirit-merchant - the prisoner was not my regular servant , but he used to carry out wine for me; he had been employed by me about seven years. On the 23rd of June I gave him ten sovereigns, to get silver for them, and he never returned - he was taken about a fortnight back, and said he had spent the money, and was very badly off.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am an inspector of Police. I heard of the robbery, and have been looking for the prisoner - I took him on the 15th of November.

Prisoner. I was in great distress when it happened -I thought I would go somewhere, and earn the money; I will work it out by day or night.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18321129-180

181. JAMES SHEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Edward Wentworth .

THOMAS DAVIS. I am in the service of Mr. Edward Wentworth , a floor-cloth manufacturer , in Whitechapel-road . On the 24th of November, a little before five o'clock, my master's gig stood, with his coat in it, facing the door - I saw the prisoner reach up, take the coat out of the gig, and walk away - I followed, and took him with it - this is it.

Prisoner. I was running by, and I saw two more men running: I was taken, but I actually had no coat.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-181

182. DAVID REDDING was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 earthen jar, value 2s.; 12 bottles, value 2s., and 2 gallons of wine, value 2l., the goods of Christopher Harrison and another, his masters .

WILLIAM WOLFE BONNY . I am in partnership with Mr. Christopher Harrison; we are wine merchant s, and live at Brompton ; the prisoner was in our service; he worked on the premises, and carried out wine; we had missed wine, and suspected him. On the afternoon of the 9th of November, I discovered a bottle of gin - a bottle three-parts full, and one quite full of wine among the empty bottles; and as the bottle-house was under the direction of the prisoner, suspicion lighted on him - a lad gave me information, and I discovered that the prisoner had delivered a dozen of wine to Mr. Kirby, a surgeon, who produced a bottle of the wine, and came over with me to our house; we opened the bottle, my partner and I tasted it, and my opinion was that it came from No. 2 bin in our middle cellar - it was the oldest wine we had - I could swear to it; the bottle found among the empty bottles was our wine, but of a different sort - I cannot swear to the gin, as many other persons have gin from the same distiller; I was not aware of the loss of this earthen bottle, but it was found at the prisoner's.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Have you no more partners? A, No - Mr. Kirby said that the prisoner brought him the wine to place against an account; the prisoner was not in the habit of having wine of us; he had special permission once to have some; that was some months before.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am a surgeon. When the prosecutor applied to me I gave him a bottle of wine, which was one of a dozen I had had from the prisoner in payment of a debt; I had had some of him some months before, by his master's permission - I think it was two dozen.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you live near the prosecutor's? A. Yes, they knew me very well - I have dealt with them.

MR. BONNY. I never authorized him to take any but once; on that occasion he said he owed Mr. Kirby a bill, and two dozen of wine would cover it, and we allowed him to take it; when the officer brought the prisoner round to our front door, I said he had been using me exceedingly ill, considering I used him well, and he never wanted any drink himself; he said he could not tell why I treated him so, and said he bought the dozen of wine of Frank Denny, at Thompson and Fearon's, but on producing Frank Denny at the office, he said, "That is not the man, it was John somebody that was with Thompson and Fearon, but I do not know where to find him;" on the second examination he said it was our wine, and he was willing to pay for it in any way if we would allow him.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe he had conducted himself well up to this time? A. Yes, we had him from Thompson and Fearon's, where he had been twelve months.

Prisoner's Defence. I have had the jar upwards of twelve months; Mr. Kirby sent for a dozen of wine, and I took it over - I meant to have entered it, but it slipped my memory.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-182

183. JAMES REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 2 lbs. 5 oz. of silk, value 3l. , the goods of Thomas Walker .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS WALKER. I live in Fort-street, Spitalfields , and am a silk manufacturer ; the prisoner served his time to me, and after that I allowed him loom-room; it was part of his business to weigh the silk for the other work people now and then. On the 25th of October I watched him, and when he came out of the warehouse I collared

him, and found his pocket was full; I called a workman to assist me - we took him a little way, met an officer, and gave him into custody - some silk which he had been permitted to weigh that day was found in his pocket and in his hat - I had not permitted him to carry any away - he only begged for mercy.

WILFRED JOHNSON JAMES . I watched the prisoner going into the warehouse - I watched his pockets; they appeared to have nothing in them; I observed before he came out of the warehouse that his pockets were very bulky - he had been weighing silk for other workmen.

JOHN McGINNIS (Police-constable H 90). I took the prisoner, and found this silk in his hat and pocket - I found some silver and gold on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-183

184. ELIZABETH RODWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , 6 sovereigns, the monies of Francis Edward Bishop , in his dwelling-house ; and GEORGE RODWAY and JOSEPH RODWAY were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

FRANCIS EDWARD BISHOP . I am a herald painter and lodge in Gloucester-street, Clerkenwell . Elizabeth Rodway lived servant with me for about a week - she went home to sleep; my wife missed these sovereigns, and told me of it.

SOPHIA BISHOP . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 2nd of November Elizabeth Rodway told me a person wanted me - I went to her, but she did not; I then suspected her, and on looking I missed six sovereigns out of a writing-desk, which I had left locked, and which had been unlocked, not broken open - the sovereigns had been wrapped in a piece of blue paper; the officer came and took her - she denied stealing them, but when my husband came home she acknowledged it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe you fell on your knees before her, and said, provided she would confess that she took the sovereigns, nothing should happen to her? A. I said if she produced the money - I did not say that God might strike me dead if she did not go harmless; she said that her brother George told her to steal the money from me, and she had given it to her brother Joseph - I did not show her some trinkets and gold, and ask her if she had ever seen so much.

EDWARD KENNARD (Police-constable G 95). I took the prisoner Elizabeth Rodway - she said she took the money and gave it to her younger brother, who gave it to the elder; I found on the elder the sovereigns, and this piece of blue paper.

Elizabeth Rodway 's Defence. Mrs. Bishop showed me the money, and asked if I should like so much; I said,"No, if it was not my own," and when I owned to it, she said she would not do any thing with me.

E. RODWAY - GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

G. RODWAY - NOT GUILTY .

J. RODWAY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-184

185. CHARLES MANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 watch, value 4l. , the goods of William Horne .

HENRY MERRY . I live with Mr. William Horne , a watchmaker , in Ratcliff-highway . On the evening of the 20th of November, while my master went out, the prisoner came, and wished to look at a watch - we showed him some, which he did not like - at last he went out, and pointed to one in the window - he looked at that, and approved of it; he was to give 4l. for it, and to have a chain and seal into the bargain; I turned to get a chain and seal, and he ran out with the watch; I ran out, and two officers caught him with the watch.

GEORGE HARRISON (Police-constable K 64). I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running - he had something white in his hand, and threw it away; I heard the smash of the glass, and picked up this watch.

JAMES WHITE (Police-constable K 285). I saw the prisoner come out of the shop and run - I overtook him as he was stooping, and trying to put the watch up a water-spout; I took him, and he threw it over my shoulder.

ANN HORNE . I am the prosecutor's wife. I was in the shop, and showed the prisoner the watches - what the boy has stated is correct.

Prisoner. I was out of employ.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-185

186. DANIEL KALE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 half-crown, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the monies of Nicholas Davison .

NICHOLAS DAVISON . I am a grocer , and live in Ratcliff-highway . On the 14th of November, I was at dinner, between twelve and one o'clock - the prisoner came in, and I saw him behind the counter; I went and asked what business he had there - he said he wanted some plums; I saw the till drawn out, and the money gone - I went after him and found the money on him.

JOHN GEORGE STATCHER (Police-serjeant H 7). I took the prisoner, and have the money.

Prisoner's Defence. My father sent me for this 5s., which I got; I called in at the prosecutor's shop, and knocked some time - he then came and asked what I wanted - I said, "Half a pound of plums;" he said he had none at my price.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-186

187. ELIZABETH BATHURST was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 pair of ear-rings, value 12s., and 1 glove, value 2d., the goods of Ann Balls , from her person .

ANN BALLS . I live in Nutfield-place, and am a dress-maker . I have known the prisoner three months; we lived together, but not in the same room. On the the 9th of November, I was walking in St. Martin's-lane with her, at half-past five o'clock in the evening; I had my gold ear-rings on - all on a sudden I received a blow on the side of my head, and fell down; when I recovered, I found myself in the arms of a Policeman - I did not miss my ear-rings for some time, but I missed my glove - I cannot tell who knocked me down, but the prisoner was there,

and she said I had been knocked down by a female who had run down a passage - I did not see my ear-rings found; I had not been quarrelling with the prisoner - she saw gentlemen sometimes, and occasionally I do the same.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Is not the prisoner your landlady's daughter? A. Yes; we do not sleep together - we had gone out between twelve and one o'clock, to see the Lord Mayor's show - we had walked about all the time; she had not complained of being tired or hungry - she went to a pawnbroker's to pawn her bracelets, to buy some boots, to put on, but they would not take them in - we had been to a friends's to tea - we had a glass of gin each, but were not drunk.

JOSEPH OSTELL . I am street-keeper of St. Martin's-lane. I saw a crowd, and went to clear it away; I saw the prisoner pulling the prosecutrix about, and endeavouring to get her to go home; the prisoner said some woman had robbed her friend of her finger-rings, earrings, and an eye-glass; I asked her why she did not secure the party - she then said it was some man; I then began to have some suspicion of her, and said,"I shall take your friend to the station," and when we got there, I said to the prisoner, "I don't like this, I shall search you;" the prisoner then turned to a gentleman there, and said,"Will you fasten this bracelet on my wrist;" the gentleman did so, and while he did it, she dropped this glove, and its contents; I took it up, and found in it the ear-rings and finger-rings - she tried to put her foot on the glove, but I prevented her.(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I was with the prosecutrix, and a gentleman and lady were going through St. Martin's-court - the lady was jealous of the prosecutrix, and struck her; I turned back, and found her beating my frined - I asked her where her ear-rings were, and a gentleman took them up and gave them into her hand; she pulled off her glove to put them into her ears, but was too tipsy to do it - she was then taken to the watch-house, and there the glove and ear-rings were found, but I had not touched them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-187

188. JOHN BUCKMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Richard Attenborough and another; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

HENRY CHIDGEY . I was near the shop of Mr. Attenborough, in Crown-street, Finsbury , on the 25th of October; I saw the prisoner walk by, and take up the handkerchief, and look at it - I watched him; there was another with him; they went to an oil-shop, and then came back: the prisoner took the handkerchief, and I gave information.

JOHN BAWLEY . I live with the prosecutors. We had information, and I ran out; a man stopped the prisoner with the handkerchief in his hand - I took it from him; this is it - it has our mark on it.

GEORGE HANLEY . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my custody.

RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH . This handkerchief belongs to me and my uncle.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer of Worship-street. I have a certificate (which I got at Mr. Clark's office) of the former conviction of the prisoner - I apprehended him, and know he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for 14 Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-188

189. WILLIAM ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 hammer, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Featherstone .

RICHARD FEATHERSTONE. This hammer is mine, and was lost in the Hay-market - my brother had lent it to a man named Perkins, who was working for Mr. Johnson.

JOHN FEATHERSTONE . On the 9th of November a young man gave me the hammer to take home to my brother; I put it behind me in the Hay-market, and it was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Were there not a great many men working there? A. Yes.

WILLIAM ARMANDALE (Police-constable B 86) I found this hammer on the 23rd of November, in Market-street West, by the side of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-189

190. CHARLES STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 4 silver spoons, value 15s. , the goods of William Howard .

FREDERICK HOWARD . I am the son of William Howard - he lives at Fulham . The prisoner was in his employ for fourteen days, to clean shoes and sweep the garden , two or three hours every morning; these spoons were missing on the 15th of November.

EDWARD MURVEN . I am shopman to Mr. James Stewart, a pawnbroker, at Putney. I have three spoons, which were pawned by the prisoner - I knew him before.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Is not your master the prisoner's grandfather? A. Yes - I asked the prisoner who they were for - he said Mrs. Brown, of Fulham, a housekeeper.

GEORGE GEVERS . I am in the service of a pawnbroker at Knightsbridge. This spoon was brought by the prisoner; I stopped him with it: he said he brought it for Mrs. Brown.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18321129-190

191. MARGARET ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 6lbs. of beef, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of George Anderson .

GEORGE ANDERSON. I am a butcher , and live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields . On the 17th of November, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was in my shop, and saw the prisoner come and take the piece of beef off the corner of the stall; she put it under her shawl, and went to the next door - I went and took it from her; she pretended to be tipsy - she said it was not hers, and I might have it.

THOMAS ARNOLD (Police-constable H 127). I took the prisoner - she appeared to be very drunk, but when I got her to the watch-house she appeared quite sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I got a little drink, and do not know what I did.

GUILTY . Aged 41. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18321129-191

192. BRIDGET BRODERIP was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 40 half-crowns, 100 shillings, 80

sixpences, and 1 bag, value 2d., the property of Michael Dwyer , in his dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MARIA DWYER . I am the wife of Michael Dwyer - he keeps the Wellington public-house, Lucas-street, Commercial-road ; it is his dwelling-house. On Friday, the 9th of November, the prisoner came in about two o'clock in the afternoon; she asked for half a pint of beer, and asked me to warm it - I went into the parlour to the warming-pot; I had seen my till safe the instant before, when I gave the prisoner change - when I came back, I observed the till was partly out, but I did not suspect any thing; the prisoner finished her beer, and went away - when she was gone I examined the till, and missed a bag, containing from 12l. to 15l. in silver; I had seen it safe, and had my hand in the bag not a minute before she came in - I sent my pot-boy after her; he could not find her, but she came back in half an hour, and asked if I could get her a customer for a goose - I asked her for my money; she said,"What money?" I said, "The bag of money you took from my till;" she said had I lost a bag of money - I said,"Yes, and you have got it;" I asked her if any one had been at the bar while she was there - she said No; I said,"Then you have got it;" I sent for an officer, who took her - there was a 6d. in it, which I knew; the head was white, and it was black all round it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. She dealt in poultry, I believe? A. Yes - I had bought things of her; she expressed her astonishment when I charged her with it - she stripped herself, but nothing was found but 2s. 6d. in her pocket; I never told a servant girl that I thought one of Newton's dust-women had it - there was myself and the pot-boy at home, but the pot-boy was not at the bar.

SARAH AMOR . I am the wife of William Amor , a baker, in Lucas-street. On the 9th of November the pot-boy spoke to me, and in consequence of what he said, I went to my shop door, and saw the prisoner; I said to her, "Mistress, your are wanted at the Wellington;" she said, "Wanted at the Wellington?" I said, "Yes - the lad is in a hurry," but instead of going to the Wellington she went towards Cowdery's field.

MARY MATTHEWS . I live in Vinegar-lane. On the 9th of November I saw the prisoner going towards Cowdery's field, between one and two o'clock.

SAMUEL CHESTER . I am a sail-maker, and live in Union-terrace. On Saturday morning, the 10th of November, I was going to work across Cowdery's field - I saw a shilling; I looked further, and found 3l. 14s. 6d. in silver - I gave it to my master, all but 4s.

PETER DOYLE . I am Chester's master. He gave me the money to take care of, and said he found it in Cowdery's field.

JAMES KNIGHT . I am a waterman. I went into Cowdery's field, and found a shilling; Daniel Smith told me to go - I saw him have eight half-crowns, two shillings, and some sixpences.

WILLIAM OSBORNE (Police-constable K 66). I was called to the Wellington, and the prisoner was given in charge - she said she was innocent; but in going to the watch-house she seemed flurried, and asked for my hand; I gave it her, and she put half a crown in it, told me to do what I could for her, and she would make it all right.

MRS. DWYER. This sixpence was among the money that was lost.

Cross-examined. Q. Dirty sixpences are not very uncommon? A. I have had it three or four months - it has been repeatedly offered in change, and refused.

Prisoner's Defence. I went for change for a shilling, and asked her to warm me half a pint of beer, which she did - I then came out with the two sixpences she had given me; I then went to a lady's, and received half a crown - I went across Cowdery's field in my way home, but did not go where the money was found - I then returned to the witness, to offer her a goose I had to sell, and she said the boy from the Wellington was looking for me; I went there- I gave the half-crown to the officer to get some beer for us to drink.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18321129-192

193. MARY REDDINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 4 half-crowns, and 5s. in copper monies, the monies of Timothy Tuomey , from the person of Bridget, his wife .

BRIDGET TUOMEY . I am the wife of Timothy Tuomey , a labourer, who lives in Ratcliff-highway. On the 12th of November, between nine and ten o'clock, I was in Bluegate-fields - I saw the prisoner, whom I knew; she asked me to come home, as her husband was ill-using her - I went into the passage of her house, and she knocked me down, with my child in my arms; she took my money out of my pocket - it was tied up in a small silk handkerchief; there were four half-crowns and 5s. in copper - she struck me, and threw me out of the door; a man threw mud over me, took my cap, and made pieces of it - I went home, told my husband, and then gave the prisoner in charge; I never got my money again.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you not consider the prisoner a friend? A. Yes; I have not been intimate with her husband - I have quarrelled with her about a little money; we did not quarrel in going to her house - my child fell out of my arms when she knocked me down; my husband has 1l. a week - I had been saving up the money to bury a child in the hospital.

TIMOTHY TUOMEY. I am the husband of this witness. The prisoner came and said her husband was kicking up a row with her; my wife went with her, and returned with her face black and bloody, and her gown torn and full of dirt - she said she had been robbed of 15s.; I saw her change a sovereign in the morning, and she paid some to the woman at the next door, who used to give her bread.

HENRY LEE (Police-constable K 262). The witness came to me in a very bad state; I took the prisoner in her room.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any confusion or quarrel? A. No; I found nothing on the prisoner, but in a cap on the mantel-piece I found a half-crown, two penny-pieces, and one halfpenny.

Prisoner's Defence. She followed me, and attempted to strike me in my own house; I struck her, and we fought, but I never saw her money. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18321129-193

194. THOMAS NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 watch, value 15s., and 1 gold chain, value 1l., the goods of John Warder , and 2 salt holders, value 5s., the goods of Catherine Warder .

CATHERINE WARDER . I am a widow ; I keep a china

and glass-shop , in Great Marylebone-street . The prisoner came to my shop between eleven and twelve o'clock on the 27th of November - he asked for a pitcher; I went down stairs to get it: when I brought it up, he said I might as well send it to Mr. Oliver's, No. 10, Devonshire-place, whom we supply with things - I afterwards found Mr. Oliver did not want it; my son returned in half an hour after the prisoner was gone, and missed his watch, chain, and the salts; the prisoner could easily have taken the watch - he stood just opposite to it; he did not say he was a servant of Mr. Oliver's.

THOMAS HUGHES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Hampstead-road. The prisoner pawned the watch with me on the 27th of November, and the prosecutor redeemed it; the prisoner then came to redeem it, and I stopped him - he ran off, and the officer took him.

JOHN MICHAEL JOLLY (Police-constable T 164). I took the prisoner, and found on him two duplicates; one of an umbrella, pawned for 2s., and the other a pair of salts.

THOMAS PEWTNER . I am a pawnbroker, I have the salts, which were pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did it through distress.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18321129-194

195. FELIX PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 cap, value 8s., the goods of Joseph Spencer , from the person of John Spencer .

JOSEPH SPENCER . The prisoner was brought to me by a neighbour, and I was informed he had stolen a cap from my son John's head - this is the cap; I know it is my son's- he had been sent to school with it, and as he came back this happened; he is six years old.

ROBERT MANN . I was coming along Myrtle-street, and heard the child scream; the prisoner ran towards me: I caught him - he said, "Pray, let me go," and the cap dropped from him - he said, "Allow me to go back to the child, and I will give it him."

JOHN BRAND (Police-constable N 199). I have the cap, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY of stea