Old Bailey Proceedings, 6th September 1832.
Reference Number: 18320906
Reference Number: f18320906-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR JOHN KEY , BART., MAROR.(SECOND MAYORALTY.)

SEVENTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 6th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1832, AND POLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY GEORGE TITTERTON , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1832.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable SIR JOHN KEY , BART., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bailey , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Patteson , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Gurney , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; John Thomas Thorp , Esq; Sir William Heygate , Bart.; and Anthony Brown , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Charles Farebrother , Esq.; Thomas Kelly , Esq.; Samuel Wilson , Esq.; and Sir Chapman Marshall , Knt., Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City, and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Alfred Mason

Henry Kennet

John Coverly

John Hewitt

Peter Mumford

Rufus Wincott

John Fairby

Robert Bays

Nicholas Stone

William Daniels

David Ray Piggot

John Davenport .

Second

Rob. Anthony , Jun.

William Asketh

John Haynes

James W. Brewer

William Newman

William Lowe

William Turner

Robert Edw. Gavey

Thomas Hudson

James Gann

John Shaw Holmes

John Gerrard .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Ben. T. Nightingale

Henry Howard Nash

Benjamin Neave

John Owen

Samuel Phillips

William Page

William Proctor

John Philipson

John Reddal

John Riggs

John Rogers

Francis Rowe .

Second

Joseph Paul

George Maynard

Jasper Moore

William Murfield

Richard Moore

Robert Melvill

William Marshall

Thomas Porter

Charles Muston

Henry Major

Allen Mason

James Hen. Martin .

Third

Richard Pugh

Josiah Phelps

John Pike

George Rishon

Joseph Miller

David Macher

Thomas Rogers

John Railey

John Retalic

William Reynolds

John Poole

Robert McDonald .

Fourth

Thomas Manley

John Marshall

Edward Moore

Thomas Marriott

Samuel Moore

James Nichols

Edward Powell

James Poole

John Pitman

Peter Patterson

William Powell

Richard Pritchard .

Fifth

Philip Risdon

Joshua Rogers

William Reynolds

Thomas Parkins

George Perry

William Reynolds

William Rathbone

Charles John Rowe

James Rolph

Robert Russell

John Mundy

William Mason .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1832.

KEY, MAYOR - SEVENTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18320906-1

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bailey.

1726. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Davies , on the 21st of August , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing, 2 coats, value 5l.; 3 waistcoats, value 1l.; 1 pair of boots, value 1l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 15s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 15s.; 1 bat, value 8s., and 1 umbrella, value 1s., his property .

THOMAS DAVIES . I live at No. 1, Three Cups-alley, in the Parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; I rent two rooms on the first floor in the house, at 4s. 6d. a week, of Mr. Briggs, who does not live in the same house. On the 21st of August, at a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, I went out - I locked the door, and took the key in my pocket: I returned about a quarter-past seven, and found the door wide open - it was unlocked by a strange key or something - the bolt of the lock was not shot: I am quite certain I locked it: I missed one coat, and found a pair of breeches, a pair of black trousers, and two waistcoats in a bundle, ready to be taken away - they were removed down to the ground floor room, and there was a black coat, a pair of boots, a hat, and an umbrella on the floor; I went up stairs to my bed-room, and found a waistcoat on the floor: I had left all these things in my drawers when I went out; I did not see the prisoner there - I know him by sight; I went to the station-house about nine o'clock, and found my coat - this is it (looking at it); I can swear to it - I had left it in my drawer when I went out: I had seen that and all my other clothes that morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you worn it often? A. Not very; I swear to it by a stain of tobacco on the sleeve, and there is a piece of rag and different things in the pocket - no violence was done to my lock.

WILLIAM HENRY CLARK . I am a Policeman. On the 21st of August, about a quarter to seven o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner coming out of Three Cups-alley into George-street, with this coat on, over his own clothes; another young man was with him - I saw them running very fast, and stopped the prisoner; he made great resistance: as I took him to the station, I asked him where he got the coat from - he said he picked it up, he lid not say where; I have had it ever since: I returned to Davies' house, and found the rest of the property - I first saw the prisoner about fifty yards from the prosecutor's house, coming in a direction from it; I had been watching three or four of them for half an hour, and had seen him near the place about six o'clock, in company with three others - he had not got this coat on then; when I took him he had it on over his own black coat: I searched, and found only a knife on him - I cannot say whether the others had any thing about them.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he putting the coat on when you saw him? A. No, he had got it on; he had been out of my sight about twenty minutes - the things would make a middling size bundle, such as he could carry; there was no mark of violence on the prosecutor's lock - I found nothing on the prisoner to pick it with.

COURT. Q. How could the door be opened? A. By a skeleton-key very easily.

THOMAS DAVIES . Here is the stain of tobacco on the coat sleeve, and this blue rag in the pocket; I know that: I am certain I locked the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to work, and in George-street picked the coat up, laying in the street; I was in the act of trying it on when the Policeman seized me by the collar, and dragged me to the station-house - I asked what charge he had; he said he would tell me when he got me there - I can prove I was going to work; I am a sofa and bedstead-maker.

[Sept. 6.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18320906-2

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1727. THOMAS DUBBER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Janes , on the 1st of August , at St. Marylebone, and stealing two pairs of boots, value 10s., and 3 pairs of shoes, value 12s., the goods of Joseph Vickery .

JOSEPH VICKERY . I am a shoemaker , and live in Knutford-place. In August I lived at No. 8, Edgware-road, in the parish of St. Marylebone ; I occupied one room up stairs and the shop; William Janes , the landlord, lived in the house, and slept there. On the 1st of August I went to bed about eleven o'clock - I locked the shop door, and put the key into my pocket; that door opens into the street - there is no communication between the shop and my bed-room; I get to the bed-room by a private door from the street; there is no door from the shop into the house or passage; the only door to the shop is from

the street - it is under the same roof; my bed-room is over the shop. I was alarmed about one o'clock by the Policeman's rattle springing - I went down, and found the prisoner in the hands of the Policeman, with five pairs of shoes and boots, which were my property: the shop door was open - the lock was not broken at all; I saw three pairs of shoes and two pairs of boots in the Policeman's hands - they are nine; I am certain I left them in the shop that night - I examined, and missed a considerable deal more boots and shoes.

CHARLES EDWARDS . In August last I lodged at the same house as the prosecutor; William Janes , the landlord, lives there. On the 2nd of August, about one o'clock in the morning, as I came home, I was about opening the private door, and saw a man standing at the shop doorhe ran away very fast; I went to the door, and found it was open - I pushed it open, and two men came out; I laid hold of them both - I saw them inside the shop: they came out; I seized them both, and called the Police - one escaped, and the prisoner, who was the other, I kept hold of, and delivered him to the Police - the two men were very busy, taking shoes out of their pockets, when I laid hold of them; there was nothing on the pavement when I took hold of them, and I heard nothing drop, but shoes were found on the pavement, which they must have dropped - there were no shoes on the pavement when they came out; I first saw them there at the time I gave the prisoner in charge, which was while I was struggling with him.

GEORGE GROUNDWELL . I am a Policeman. On the morning of the 2nd of August I was nearly opposite the shop, when Edwards called Police! I immediately ran across, and found the prisoner struggling with him - he gave him into my charge; I saw a man running up the street, and on looking on the pavement I saw the property laying there at the time I took him into custody; I took the shoes and boots off the pavement, which I produce - I searched the prisoner immediately, and found nothing on him but a bit of sealing-wax; I saw nobody come out of the shop - the struggle was the first I saw.

JOSEPH VICKERY . These shoes and boots are mine, and what I left in my shop that night - my initials are on some of them; I have had them three weeks or a month, and some of them nearly six months.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work for six weeks, and went to a person who promised to give me work - as I returned home I heard a cry of Police! I ran up, and saw this man with a man in custody - I went up, and he said"You are one of them;" the one he held then struck him, and got away - he then seized me, and said, "You are one of them."

[Sept. 6.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18320906-3

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1728. WILLIAM JONES and HENRY SMITH were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Corsan , on the 6th of July , at St. John of Wapping, and stealing, therein 2 watches, value 13l., and 2 thimbles, value 6d., his property .

THOMAS CORSAN. I am a watch and clock-maker , and live at No. 119, High-street, in the parish of St. John, Wapping . On the 26th of July, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I lost two watches and two silver thimbles from my shop - I was in the back room, adjoining my shop, and was alarmed by a noise; I ran to the side door, which communicates with the back room where I was, and not seeing any thing particular; I returned, and Mr. Linklater brought Jones into the shop, and I received one of my watches from him; I went to the window and missed another watch - I went to the station-house, where the other prisoner was, but it was not found there; I returned to my shop, and found the other watch under a loose sheet of paper on my counter - Jones had been about a yard from that spot when he was brought into the shop; I missed nothing but two watches and two thimbles from the window.

THOMAS LINKLATER . I am a provision-merchant, and live at No. 269, Wapping. On the day in question I was in my counting-house, which is opposite Corsan's - I saw Jones and Smith standing before Mr. Corsan's window; I saw Jones pull the wire guard of the window towards him, so as to admit Smith's hand between the guard and window; I then saw a pane of glass fall inside the shopSmith put his hand in, and unhooked two watches; they went away, and when they got opposite our warehouse, I went out and caught Jones; Smith immediately ran away, and Hagan, a lighterman, went after him - I took Jones into Corsan's; Judge, the officer, came in - when I took Jones in he pulled a watch from his pocket, and put it on the counter; I took it up, and gave it to Corsan - I saw two thimbles fall on the floor from Jones, he was taken to the station-house.

Smith. I was not near the window. Witness. I am quite sure he was - I was observing them for about a quarter of an hour; they were about the window all that time - they occasionally went into a public-house, which is next door to Corsan's.

WILLIAM JUDGE . I am a Thames Police-surveyor. I happened to be next door to Corsan's - I went into the shop on hearing the alarm, and found Jones in charge of Linklater - I took him, and received the watch from Mr. Corsan, and inside the window I found a piece of glass, which exactly fitted where it had been cut out.

PETER HAGAN . I was in Mr. Linklater's counting-house - I saw Smith and Jones at Mr. Corsan's window for about ten minutes; I saw Smith with his hand in the window - he seemed to be taking the watches, and giving them to Jones; I went out with Mr. Linklater, and Smith ran away - I ran after him, hallooing out, and a baker stopped him near Wapping church; I did not lose sight of him; Watts, the Policeman, took him in custody to the station-house.

HENRY WATTS . I am a Policeman. I saw Smith in the custody of Hagan, and took him to the station.

THOMAS CORSAN. Here is the watch I found on the counter - it was in the window, hanging with the other before, and the thimbles just below them.

Smith's Defence. I went over the water to look for a ship, and coming up Wapping I met a friend, who gave me something to drink - not being used to it it overcame me; I went by this place - the gentleman ran after me, and said I had been stealing a watch - I had not been near

the place; I had been into a public-house next door, as the gentleman gave me 2s.

JONES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18320906-4

Before Mr. Baron Bailey.

1729. SAMUEL FISHER , HENRY TREVILLIAN , and RICHARD ROBINS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Girling , on the 2nd of September , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 1 necklace, value 5s.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 15s.; 20 yards of linen, value 2l.; 2 half-sovereigns, 1 crown, 10 half-crowns, 20 shillings, 14 sixpences, 50 pennies, and 100 halfpence, his property .

FISHER pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

JOHN GIRLING. I live at No. 2, Fenton-street, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; the prisoner Fisher's mother lodged in my house. On Sunday afternoon, the 2nd of September, I went out between half-past five and six o'clock, and left all the doors locked; I returned between eight and half-past eight, and found the outer door apparently as I had left it, but on going through the shop, into a little room, the door of which I had left open, I found that door shut, and on entering that room I missed several articles - I suppose persons must have got in by false keys; I think they must have got in at the doors.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a Policeman. Last Sunday, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners in company, and kept my eyes on them; they separated; Trevillian and Fisher went away in a direction towards Mr. Girling's house - they were about fifty yards from it when they left Robins; that was about half-past six o'clock - I did not see where they went to; I saw Robins standing at the corner of the street - I do not know the name of the street; he was in the street in which Girling lives, and was standing at the corner of another street - he was in sight of Girling's house; I cannot tell where Trevillian and Fisher went - I saw them together again about seven o'clock; all three - I afterwards stopped them; they had then got about four hundred yards further; I stopped Trevillian, the other two were stopped in my presence by two Policemen - I searched Trivillian, and found nothing on him which Girling claims; I found nothing but a silk handkerchief and a tobacco-box on him.

JAMES GODFREY . I am a Policeman. I was with Taylor, and took Robins - I searched him, and found a piece of linen cloth, measuring twenty yards, and a 5s. paper of penny-pieces, but nothing more belonging to the prosecutor; these are them - I asked Robins what he had got there, alluding to the linen, when I apprehended him; he said he did not know - he did not tell me how he came by it; Fisher was close to him when he said he did not know what it was.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a Policeman. I apprehended Fisher, and searched him - I found on him nearly all the property which was stolen; I know nothing against the other prisoners - I found, three keys on Fisher, and a broken knife; two of the keys open an inner door, leading to the shop, but none of them open the outer door, where they got in, as I suppose.

JOHN NOBLE . I saw Robins enter Mr. Girling's house- he went in at the private door, between six and seven o'clock - I cannot say whether it was open; the door leads up to Fisher's mother's room - it is not the door which was broken open; there is a shop door and a private door - I saw him come out again in a few minutes; I did not see him bring any thing out with him - he came out alone; I did not see Fisher come out.

JOHN GIRLING . My shop door was fastened inside - they must have got in at the private door; I had left that door locked - this is my linen; I believe it to be part of a piece belonging to my wife - I lost a piece similar to it- I have no mark on it; the paper, these halfpence were in, resembles what I tied them up in, but I cannot swear to it - I lost a 5s. paper of penny-pieces; I have seen the articles in possession of Johnson, and can speak to the watch with certainty - I miss nothing now; the linen, which was taken, was dry.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Fisher's mother lodged with you? A. Yes; she had no key - she went out about half-past three o'clock; I went out between five and six o'clock, and left nobody in the house; I have no servant - it was on Sunday; the shop door was shut, and fastened inside - Mrs. Fisher had no servant; I believe the prisoner is her son - I did not go into her room to see if any body remained there; it was not likely - she did not have many visiters; Fisher did not live there - he was there on Sunday morning; there are two keys to the private door, one for the lock and another for the latch; I have them both - I was at the public-house opposite all the while, taking tea with Orchard, the landlord, and had told Mrs. Fisher the keys would be there if she wanted to get in.

COURT. Q. Was any inner door unlocked? A. The door between the staircase and shop was opened, I suppose - I had left it locked, and found it locked when I returned; nobody could get at the property without unlocking that door, unless they got in at the window which was not open - if any body had got in at it I should have seen some traces, and it could not be opened from the outside - I lost a necklace, a pair of bracelets, two half-sovereigns, and about 2l. 17s. in silver.

JAMES GODFREY . He had the linen concealed in a handkerchief; every body could see he had a handkerchief with something in it.

Trevillian's Defence. About three o'clock on Sunday, after Mr. Robins and I had dinner, we were walking out, and met Fisher in Shepherd and Shepherdess-walk - he said to us, "Where are you going?" we said, "Nowhere particular;" he said we might as well go with him - Robins said we would go with him: he said, "My mother said she would have a few things to give me, which I am in want of, and I am going for them;" we went with him - his mother was not at home; we walked about the fields till between six and seven o'clock, and he went back again and said his mother was at home; he brought these things out with him, and asked Robins to be so good as to carry them; Robins asked what he had got there - he said some things his mother had given him.

Robins' Defence. I have only to say the same.

TREVILLIAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

ROBINS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.[Sept. 6.]

Reference Number: t18320906-5

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1730. JAMES ELWOOD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Milton Southcombe , on the 24th of July , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington, and stealing 2 handkerchiefs, value 10s., and 1 towel, value 1s., his property .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

MARY ANN SOUTHCOMBE . I am the daughter of George Milton Southcombe; who, in July last, lived in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington - he was not in the house on the night in question. On the night of the 23rd of July I and my cousin Charlotte slept there - I got up at ten minutes or a quarter-past four o'clock in the morning, on the 24th, and went down stairs; I found in the passage the bell-ropes, the table-mats, table-covers, and different articles of furniture; I heard a noise in the back kitchen, and returned up stairs to my cousin - we gave an alarm: I saw Mr. Green, who lives next door, shortly after - he had the prisoner in his custody; I examined the premises, and found they had entered through the sky-light by taking the glass out - the sky-light is part of the covering over the wash-house, which communicates with the back kitchen- they forced a door open, leading from the wash-house into the back kitchen; by breaking the glass in the door a person could put his hand through, and unlock the door; on getting into the kitchen they had forced open a door between the back kitchen and the house, by taking off the lock and chain; they could then go all over the house - the property I found in the passage had been in the parlour the night before - I was afterwards shown two handkerchiefs and a towel, which I knew; the lock in the door, between the back kitchen and the house, was on the kitchen side of the door, and the chain on the house side.

CHARLOTTE SOUTHCOMBE . I am single. I was at Mr. Southcombe's house on the night of the 23rd of July - I have lived there some time; the house was perfectly secure when I went to bed; the last witness alarmed me about four o'clock in the morning - we gave an alarm out o the top bed-room window, by calling out, then went down stairs, and found the property in great confusion in the passage - I saw the prisoner in Green's custody, about a quarter of an hour after I went down stairs; I went over the house, and found the property as the last witness has described; we had both gone to bed together, and the doors were perfectly safe.

EDWARD GREEN . I am a tailor, and lived next door to Mr. Southcombe's, at Kensington. I was alarmed about half-past four o'clock in the morning of the 24th of July, by the witnesses; I immediately went into my own garden, and had got about half-way down the garden when the prisoner jumped over the wall; he was the only one I saw there - he jumped over from Southcombe's garden into mine; I immediately secured him, by taking a rope and twisting it round him; he was on the ground - I cast the rope round him, and secured him; I gave him to the officer, and they took him to the station-house - I saw the house in the state the witnesses have described.

TIMOTHY LYNCH . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in the neighbourhood of the prosecutor's house on the morning in question, and in consequence of an alarm I went to the back of the house - I found the prisoner in Green's custody; I took him to the station-house, searched him there, and found on him, between his shirt, and his skin, two silk handkerchiefs and a towel; I asked what he had there - he said he had nothing; I searched him, and found them.

MARY ANN SOUTHCOMBE . These handkerchiefs and towel are my father's; I know the handkerchiefs, and the towel was marked - it was in my father's house; it is marked S. E. B. - I had seen the handkerchiefs the day before; I do not know when I had seen the towel - my mother and myself bought the handkerchiefs.

Prisoner. I hope you will recommend me to mercy.

[Sept. 6.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18320906-6

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1731. JAMES FIELD and JOHN GRIGG, alias HURLEY , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Casamaijor , on the 2nd of August , at St. Marylebone, and stealing 38 spoons, value 15l.; 18 forks, value 10l.; 1 pair of tongs, value 8s.; 1 ladle, value 10s.; 6 waiters, value 12l.; 1 ladle, value 1l.; 1 pair of nut-crackers, value 4s.; 1 fork, value 5s.; 2 ice-pails, value 5l., and 1 tea-urn, value 5l., her property .

MARY JONES . I am housemaid to Mrs. Elizabeth Casamaijor , who lives at No. 10, Manchester-square, in the parish of St. Marylebone . On Wednesday night, the 1st of August, I went to bed about half-past ten o'clock; the house was then fastened, and quite safe - I was disturbed between one and two o'clock in the night; I slept in the back drawing-room, and heard a noise like the breaking of glass - a female friend, named Mary Scurr slept with me; we both got up, looked out of the back drawing-room window, and saw a light in the kitchen; we then went to the front drawing-room window, and called to a Policeman - he got assistance; I then went down, and let in three Policemen at the front door: they went down stairs towards the kitchen, and as they went down I heard glass breaking at the kitchen window in the back area; I went down afterwards, found the pantry open, and the plate packed up in a bag, and part of it loose on the floor of the pantry - it was kept in the cellar, which is through the pantry; there were spoons, forks, tongs, a ladle, waiters, nut-crackers, ice-pails, and a tea-urn - they were all silver I believe; they had got in at a small window by the front area door; the glass was broken - there was room there for a man to get in; no door was broken except the cellar door, where the plate was; that door had been locked, and was forced open.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know Mrs. Casamaijor's name is Elizabeth? A. I have seen her write ber name.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you recollect at what time you went to bed that night? A. About half-past ten o'clock, or between that and eleven - there was only one other person in the house; we both went up to bed together - I had secured the back kitchen myself overnight.

COURT. Q. What glass was it you heard crash? A. The first glass must have been the front kitchen window, and I found the back kitchen window broken when I got down after the Policemen.

HERBERT KING . I am a Policeman. On Thursday

morning, the 2nd of August, about twenty minutes past two o'clock, I was alarmed by the last witness; I collected other Policemen - I did not go into the house myself; I went into Seymour-mews, at the back of the house, to prevent an escape - when I got there I heard a cry of "Stop them! look out in the mews!" and shortly after that a cracking of glass - shortly after there was a cry "They are getting out of No. 9," and then I heard it said, "They are getting through No. 8," and I found they were taken; I afterwards examined the house, and found they had got in through a small window - the door was open at the time I got there; I found a crow-bar - it was about three feet inside the area door - by breaking the glass in a small high window near the area door, a person could get in; I have every reason to believe they got in there.

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am a serjeant of Police. I was called to Mrs. Casamaijor's, and went into the house with another - we went down stairs, and as we went down I heard a rushing noise, as if the windows were breaking; when we got down we found the persons had got away up a ladder against the wall, communicating with the back leads of the house, over the out-houses; I found the kitchen window leading to the back area broken; it appeared as if persons were getting away in a hurry; I saw two men, and pursued them up the ladder - I followed them along the leads to the leads of No. 9, and then saw them descend into the back premises of No. 8; two or three voices called out "They are gone down to No. 8" - I went through the front door of No. 10, and entered the front door of No. 8, being let in by the butler, and saw a door in the hall gently move - I went into the room, and found the two prisoners, one against the wall, and the other under the bed of the butler, who had got up to let us in at the door; I secured Grigg, alias Hurley - he had no hat on.

JOHN CRAWLEY LITTLE . I am a Policeman. I went into Mrs. Casamaijor's house with Goodwin, and at the back part I saw Field distinctly, having a lantern with me - the other man, who I believe was Hurley, was rather forward - we followed them on the leads from No. 10, till it was said they had gone down at No. 8; we went in at the front door of No. 8, and found them in the butler's room; Field was laying under the bed - I got him out; we handcuffed and took them to the station-house, and on Field I found two knives, a nail, a piece of iron, and a piece of cord; his feet were muffled with worsted stockings, which would prevent any body hearing him walk; as we went along he slipped his hand from the handcuffs, and tried to make his escape; I found two handkerchiefs on the leads - Hurley had no neck handkerchief on, and this was folded up as a neck handkerchief; here are three keys - I then went down to the prosecutrix's house, and found the plate strewed about outside the wine-cellar in the pantry, some of it in a green baize bag; a bottle of wine had been opened, and partly drank; the lock of the pantry was broken open, and nearly off, and the lock of the cellar where the plate had been was broken open; there was a silver fruit basket, thirty-eight spoons, eighteen forks, one pair of tongs, two ladles, six waiters, a pair of nut-crackers, a fork, two ice-pails, and one tea-urn.

RICHARD READING . I am butler at No. 8, Manchestersquare. On the night in question I was sleeping in the pantry, and heard a great noise, and presently heard a great running over the leads of my pantry; I got up, opened the pantry window, and saw two men jump down off the leads on the passage; they came over from No. 9; I lifted up the window, called out "Halloo, you thieves! what do you want here?" they retreated a little, but I shut down my window, went to the street door, called in the Policemen, and on returning with the Policemen, I found them in my pantry; Field was under the bed, and the other by the door; I afterwards saw a hat in the back area of our house - that is the way they had come; they jumped down off the passage, broke two squares, and tumbled down into the kitchen.

JOSEPH ROUSHAN . I am butler to Mrs. Casamaijor. -I had packed up the plate safe about a fortnight before, and placed it in the wine-cellar, locked up: I was not in the house at the time of the robbery. I know the prisoner Hurley, or Grigg; he was in was in Mrs. Casamaijor's service about four years ago, in the same house; I was in the country that night, and did not come to town till the Saturday.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is Mrs. Casamaijor a window? A. Yes.

Field's Defence. On the 1st of August I had been to Astley's theatre - I stopped loitering on the road on returning; it was rather late in coming back - I had two or three dogs to take care of for noblemen till the 1st of September, and had some taken from me; I had information one of the dogs was down this mews - I had been down the mews four or five times; the Policeman came down two or three times; he saw us once down the mews, and took no notice; as we were going by I heard a dog barking, and the stockings I put on my feet was to prevent the dog making a noise, so that I might find out where it was - the Policeman took no notice, and three men came running along by me, and in about ten minutes the Policeman and two others came down with lights; I said to Hurley "The Policemen are coming down, I dare say they will take us;" I got over the wall to the leads of No. 11, and over a wall - there was a springing of rattles before and behind me, and to prevent being taken to the watch-house, seeing a window open, we got in at No. 8 - as to making my escape, the handcuffs are large enough for a hand twice as big as mine; if he had told us to leave the mews when he came down the first time we should certainly have done it.

THOMAS GOODWIN . Grigg gave the name of Grigg at the office.

Thirteen witnesses deposed to Grigg's good character.

GRIGG - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his character .

FIELD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18320906-7

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bailey.

1732. CHARLOTTE LLOYD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Warren , on the 23rd of July , at St. Mary Matfelon, alias Whitechapel, and stealing 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 gown, value 3d.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 watch, value

2s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 6d.; 1 shift, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 3d.; 1 pinafore, value 8d.; 1 night-cap, value 6d., and 1 pair of sleeves, value 2d., his property .

RACHAEL WARREN . I am the wife of James Warren - we live at No. 2, Black Lion-yard, Whitechapel . The prisoner came to lodge with us on a Wednesday, and on the Monday following I went out about one o'clock, leaving nobody in the house - I locked my door, put the key into my pocket, and fastened the window with a fork, as it had no fastening to it - it is a sash window, which throws up: I am positive it was shut down close - I got back about ten minutes past three o'clock, and found the window a little way open; one prong of the for was broken - I had left the key of my street door at Mr. Pryor's; I got it from there, and let myself in with it, when I came home - I found the parlour door open, which I had left locked, and had the key in my pocket; I missed a sheet off the prisoner's bed on the first floor - if she had got in at the window, she must have gone through and opened the parlour door to get to her room; I missed a bedgown, a petticoat, a child's watch, four pairs of stockings, a shift, a handkerchief, a night-cap, a pinafore, and a pair of sleeves; (Cooper here produced the property) these are mine - this bed-gown is not mine - I have not found the petticoat or watch.

THOMAS COOPER . I am a Policeman. On the day after the robbery I took these articles from the prisoner's person - when I took her into custody she had got them under her arm; I asked what she had got - she said her night things.

WILLIAM PRYOR . I live close to Warren. On the Monday in question, the 23rd of July, I saw the prisoner get in at his window - I did not see how she got it open.

RACHAEL WARREN. I had seen the things in my box before I went out; the box was under the bedstead in the parlour - I saw the sheet on the prisoner's bed just before I went out.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in through the window, because I was obliged to do so, owing to the badness of the lock, but I did not take the things.

[Sept. 6.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18320906-8

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1733. CHARLES WILSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering a certain building within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of George Tickner , and stealing therein 1 live tame goose, price 7s.; 1 live tame gander, price 7s.; 1 live tame duck, price 3s.; 11 live tame fowls, price 30s., and 20 eggs, value 1s., his property .

GEORGE TICKNER . In 1830 I lived at the Custom-house of the West India-docks , and kept my poultry in an out-house in the garden, which is walled all round, except where there is a piece of water; the wall or water enclose it all round, and in front there is an iron railing. I lost my poultry some time in March that year; I discovered the loss in the morning, about seven o'clock - I saw it all safe overnight, when I locked the door, and took the key - I missed a goose, a gander, eleven fowls, a duck, and I think twenty-four eggs; the out-house door was not broken open; there is a window to it, and part of the glass had fallen out of the frame - the persons appeared to have got over the wall, knocked off some of the tiles, and then brlken the window frame, and so got in -I had a dog to guard my premises, and that dog was killed; I found it had been beaten - he died in two or three days after; I saw the marks where they had got down by the windows - there were the marks of the nails of shoes, and I think they were the marks of more than one person, but whether it was more than two I cannot say; I found all my poultry the same evening, in the possession of an officer, and found Joseph Wren in custody - he was tried afterwards; I am quite certain the poultry was mine.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. This was two years ago? A. Yes - Wren was convicted; the prisoner has not been taken long - I was not mistaken in the identity of some of my fowls when I went to look for them; I did not say they were light ones, and they turned out to be dark - a great many were shown to me at Lambeth-street which belonged to other people.

JAMES LEA . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 17th of March, 1830, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was going along the Lea-cut, about a quarter of a mile from Tickner's - Prendergrass was with me, and we met three men approaching us; I have every reason to believe the prisoner was one of them - I have no doubt of it; one of them, named McEwin, had a sack across his shoulder - I stopped him, and the other two,(Wren and the prisoner) walked on: I sent Prendergrass after them, and they both ran away as hard as they could run; I found in the sack a goose, a gander, seven or eight fowls, and a duck - some of them had been recently killed, and were warm; I laid hold of McEwin - he knocked me down, and got away - Prendergrass did not succeed in taking either of the others; then he and I went to a house on Bow-common, kept by a man named Wilson - it is rather more than a quarter of a mile from the place; I saw a woman in the house - I remained there about fifteen minutes, when two men entered; I was in the kitchen - they ran into the parlour: I have no doubt the prisoner was one of the men, they ran away; he had a green jacket on - that was the prisoner, and the same man appeared in the parlour with Wren; he said,"Oh, my God, here are officers here," and both ran out as hard as they could - I pursued, but did not catch them- they got into the fields; I went to various places after the prisoner, but could not find him - Wren was taken the following morning; I searched the house, and found two hens in a cupboard in an up stairs room, sitting on some eggs - there were about twenty-four eggs, which had a cross on them in ink; I showed the hens and eggs to Tickner the same day, and he claimed them.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you positively swear the prisoner was one of the men? A. I have no doubt of it from the recollection I have - it is so long since I would not positively swear it; I found a rent-book in the house with an account of some rent which had been paid.

JONATHAN NEW . The prisoner occupied a house of mine, as tenant; (looking at the rent-book) this is my writing - I received the first rent on the 27th of February, 1830, but whether that was for the first week's rent I cannot say; that is the only week's rent he paid me - I

did not see him after the officer searched the house; he never came there afterwards, to my knowledge - I let the house to somebody else some time afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you leave the house yourself immediately after the officers had been there? A. I was not there - I did not live there at all; the date in the book is not 1820. but 1830; it is a figure of three - that is the way I write; I let the prisoner the house, but how much he occupied himself I do not know - I went there once to receive my rent; there were people there: I cannot say whether they were lodgers - there are two rooms and a kitchen.

THOMAS GREEN . In March, 1830, I lived on Bowcommon, next door to the prisoner - I remember Len and Prendergrass coming there to search; I was near my own gate, and saw Wilson and another; I cannot say whether it was Wren - they came to the door while the officers were in the house: they entered, opened the door, and ran back again; and said, "Oh, my God, the officers are there;" they ran away - Lea ran after them, but did not catch them; I never saw Wilson afterwards - there was a woman there who passed as his wife; she went away afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Might you not be mistaken in his person so long ago? A. I am quite sure of him.

JOHN EDWARD POTTY . In March, 1830, I lodged at Green's; I remember seeing the officers come that day; I know the prisoner, and saw him that day before the officers came to the house - I met him, Wren, and McEwin by the New-riverhead, by the Old Eel pie-house, about a mile from Tickner's they were going towards Limehousebridge - one of them had a bag on his shoulder, which of them I cannot say - this was about half an hour before I saw the officers at the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you examined against Wren? A. No; I gave evidence at Lambeth-street about two months ago - that was the first time I told any thing about it - I think I had told Lea or the prosecutor what I had seen, but am not sure.

COURT. Q. Were you called upon to give evidence? A. No.

JOHN POTTY . I am father of last witness. I remember a person named Wilson occupying the house in question; I cannot swear the prisoner is the person - I was near there when the officers came, and while they were in the house I saw two persons come there, go to the door, and in a very few seconds they ran back again, and passed me as I stood in the road - Lea followed them, but did not catch them; the one who passed by the name of Wren had a green jacket on, such as watermen wear.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am a Police-serjeant. I apprehended the prisoner on the 5th of July in Waterloo-town, Bethnal-green - I did not know where he lived two years and a half ago; I have known him many years, and knew Wren - I have seen him in Wren's company.

MR. TICKNER. I knew the poultry which the officers showed me, and knew the eggs, for the hens were sitting and I used to make a mark on them to know the new laid eggs from what were being set on - I knew them by the marks, and swore to them.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

1734. CHARLES WILSON, alias GEORGE MUMFORD, alias SMITH , was again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Thomson , on the 17th of February, in the 11th year of the reign of George the Fourth , at St. Leonard, Bromley, and stealing therein 2 pairs of scales, value 4l.; 7 weights, value 14s.; 1 pair of shears, value 5s.; 4 brooms, value 2s.; 25 sacks, value 38s.; 50lbs, of canvas, value 1l.; 1 table, value 10s.; 1 1/2 bushel of split-peas, value 14s.; 1 bushel of apples, value 5s.; 1 bushel of pears, value 5s.; 3 pecks of beans, value 8s.; 30 papers of seeds, value 7s.; 4 quires of paper, value 4s. and 1 candlestick, value 3d., his property; and 5 books, value 7s.; 2 coats, value 5s., and 2 knives, value 4s., the goods of Archibald Thomson , since deceased .

JAMES THOMSON . The late Mr. Archibald Thomson was my father, and lived at my house. My countinghouse was broken open about the 17th of February, 1830 - it communicates with the house, and is part of the house - there is an internal communication: it is in the parish of St. Leonard. Bromley - the watchman gave an alarm between three and four o'clock in the morning, and I found the counting-house was broken open, by entering a green-house, then breaking the shutter of the counting-house window, and forcing the window open - some scales, weights, shears, and other things (enumerating the articles stated in the indictment) were taken belonging to me - my father reslded in the house; the business I saw some articles at Lambeth-street, about a month ago, which I conceive to be the articles stolen.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Who paid the rent of the house? A. I paid the rent of the whole; my father had nothing to do with the counting-house - I paid the rent of the house, and lived in it.

JAMES LEA . I searched the prisoner's house on the 17th of March, 1830, and found the top of a mahogany table under the bed, on the floor, and two more pieces belonging to it- I also found a gardener's knife with a silver ferrel on it. which I have not here, also a quantity of seeds, and about a peek of scarlet beans, part of a Latin dictionary, and Johnson's dictionary.

Cross-examined. Q. You found these things with the rest? A. Yes; I saw a woman at the house, who I have since seen at the office, when the prisoner was taken - she passed for his wife; I saw two men come up to the house, and run away, on the 17th of March.

COURT. Q. Do you believe the prisoner to be one of those men? A. Yes.

JAMES THOMSON . I will not positively swear to the top of the table - I believe it to be mine; the seeds have my hand-writing on the papers containing them, and are part of what were stolen that night; this Johnson's dictionary belonged to my late father - I know one was lost, but the covers are taken off and I cannot identify it; here are a few leaves of a Latin dictionary - we lost one.

JONATHAN NEW . The prisoner rented the house in question of me; I received rent from him in February, 1830.

THOMAS GREEN . I lived next door to the prisoner, and remember the officers coming to search his house; he is the person who occupied the house in the name of Wilson.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

[Sept. 6.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18320906-9

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1735. JOHN WILSON and GEORGE TOWERS were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Padget , on the 14th of July , at St. Luke, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 2l.; 3 watch-keys, value 3s., and 1 seal, value 1d., his property .

JOHN PADGET . I am a plumber, painter, and glazier , and live at No. 3, Ossulton-street, Somers'-town. On the 14th of July, about half-past, ten o'clock at night, I went into the City Arms, City-road, to have a pint of beer; Wilson came in, and said he thought he knew my face somewhere before; I said he might - he asked what part of the country I came from; I said from Devizes - he said, "I came from Devizes myself; I should like to have a little talk with you, if you will come to the public-house down here, where you will see several young men who came from the same place as you did;" I went with him to the Cooper's Arms, Golden-lane ; he was a perfect stranger to me - I called for a pot of half-and-half, and paid for it; in a few minutes he asked me to lend him a few halfpence to get something to eat; I gave him 1s.; he went out, brought in twopenny worth of bread and cheese, and never gave me the change - shortly after, about eight or nine, more men came in; they were chimney-sweepers - the beer was handed round to them; Towers was one of those men; Wilson handed the beer round to them; they all took some, and after emptying the pot they put it round to me, and asked me to fill it again - I refused for some time to get it filled; I refused paying for any more; Wilson then pointed out a man who he said he wished to toss with me for some more - I tossed with him, and he beat me three times; I then said I was certain they had cheated me- believing that to be the case, I refused to pay for some time, but at last I paid, and then the man went out - I saw more of him; I wished to go into the yard, that I should make my escape from them; there were seven in the room besides the prisoners at last; when I rose up to go into the yard, Wilson refused to let me go; he pushed me backwards - I said "I must go into the yard," and after a bit he let me go, followed me, and asked me in the yard what it was o'clock; I said it was too dark to see the time by my watch - I took my watch out of my fob, and put it in my breeches pocket, thinking it not safe in the company I was in; directly I came from the yard I told him I wished to go home, and that I had a long way to go; Wilson had a young woman, who was in his company all the evening; he wished me to go home with her; I refused - he then dragged me back to the tap-room door, shoved me into the tap-room, and then he sat on the right-hand side of me, and Towers sat next but one, on the loft-hand side; Towers had been out somewhere, and came in again, and sat in the same place; directly he came in, some of his friends who were with him pointed to me, and said, "That is not man that cheated you;" I stood up, and said, "That is not the man who cheated me" - Towers directly stood up, and struck me a violent blow in the face; he then enclosed me round the wsistband with his two arms, and while he was holding my arms down, he said, "What can you do now?" while he was holding me I saw Wilson go out of the taproom door with my watch in his hand; I felt the watch go out of my pocket, but did not see him take it out; I saw it in his hand; the case of the watch fell off on the ground - I have not seen the watch since Wilson went out with it; the landlord's daughter came in, and said to Towers,"George, let the man go," and she said to me, "Young man, pick your watch up off the floor;" I said the man who had just gone out had got the watch - I took the case up, and put it into my pocket; I then went to the bar, told the landlady I had lost the watch, and should stop there till she gave me some account of the man who had gone out with it, as apparently he was well known in the neighbourhood - she said she knew nothing of him; the girl who was with Wilson went out with him when he had the watch, and in about a quarter of an hour she came in: I went out, saw a Policeman, asked him to come in, and pointed the woman out to him, and gave her in charge; I saw Wilson at the station-house on the Monday morning,(it happened on Saturday); Towers was taken on Monday night - I swear positively to them both.

Wilson. Q. When you had the third pot of half-andhalf, did you not offer the landlord's daughter your watch to pay for it? A. No; I was not at all intoxicated.

ELIZA BROWN . I am the landlord's daughter. I was backwards and forwards in the room - there were some chimney-sweepers there; I believe they were tossing up; I heard a noise in the room, went in, and saw Towers holding the prosecutor - I said, "George, leave the man alone;" he did so, and sat down; I turned round, and saw a watch, as I thought, on the floor - I said, "Young man, pick up your watch;" it turned out to be the case - Wilson and the young woman were then gone, but at the beginning of the evening the prosecutor certainly did offer me the watch for a pot of beer; I told him to mind his watch, or he would lose it.

THOMAS HEAD . I am a Policeman. I was passing; the prosecutor called me in, and stated that he had been robbed of his watch, and told me to take the young woman as one of the party; I did so - he told his story very correct at the station, as he has here; I afterwards apprehended one of the prisoners.

Wilson's Defence. When I met him at the City Arms he looked at me, and said he thought he knew me - I said I thought I had some knowledge of his features; he said it was not in this country; I said No - he asked where I came from; I said from the North; he said he came from some other part, and asked me to drink - I drank with him - he took me to a public-house; I had a glass of rum, and he had rum and shrub - we then went to the Cooper's Arms; he called for half-and-half; several sweeps came in - he asked them to drink, and after the second pot he asked them to sing - he offered his watch to pay for the third pot; she refused, and he was some time before he would give her the money; he then put his watch on the table; the men in the house told him to be quiet - he threw his hat up, and said he would toss any man for a pot of beer; a sweep tossed with him, and he said that man, Littles, cheated him; he struck him, and Littles went out; he then said he would fight anybody - nobody took notice of him - some sweeps came in; he struck them, and said they were the men he had been tossing with; Towers came to light his pipe, and he said he was the man who had tossed with him; he denied it - he said he would knock

his head off, and they began to fight; I went out, as I had some work at the canal tunnel.

Towers' Defence. I took the young man out who he was tossing with, as he struck him: I went in again directly, and he said I was the man who had lossed with him - I said I was not; he said he would knock my head off; he struck me, and I struck him again - he then said he had lost his watch, and he would fight any man in the room.

THOMAS ASH . I am a chimney-sweeper. I was in the house - Towers is innocent of the crime; I saw no watch; I was there at pretty well the beginning of it - I saw no watch-case; if there had been one I must have seen it.

Two witnesses gave Towers a good character.

WILSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

TOWERS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.[Sept. 8.]

Reference Number: t18320906-10

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1736. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Dennis Doyle , on the 30th of August , at St. Mary Matfelon, alias Whitechapel , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 5l., his property .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

DENNIS DOYLE. I am an Excise-officer . On the night of the 30th of August, at nearly half-past twelve o'clock, I was in the Whitechapel-road, returning from my duty, and was stopped by three men at the corner of Mary-street , under a lamp; one gave me a blow on the left shoulder, the other on the right, and the third struck me on the breast, knocked me backwards, and took my watch - the prisoner is that man, I am quite positive; it was right under the gas-lamp; I had an opportunity of seeing his face as well as his dress - he had a kind of fustain coatee, which came down nearly to his knees, with outside pockets, like a shooting jacket - I did not quite fall to the ground; I put my hand to the ground, and saved myself, and as I fell back his countenance came right to mine, and he matched my watch - he ran off; I called Police! Stop thief! I pursued myself, and endeavoured to take him, but did not succeed - I saw him about two o'clock the same day, in custody; he was then in quite a different dress, but his countenance had struck me, as the light shone as brilliant as the day almost - I gave a description of his dress to Bolton, at the station-house.

Cross-examined by MR. DONNE. Q. What description did you give? A. That he was a man about my own stature, with a round face, but stouter; I had been on duty, but had nothing to drink more than my usual beer - I was quite sober; I know Mr. Ainsley; he is a stout man, about five feet high - he is the man who came forward to make a compromise on behalf of those who robbed me - I had not seen Ainaley that evening.

Q. I mean Thomas Ainsley ; had you seen either of the Ainsleys' that evening? A. I had not - neither of them gave me a watch, nor any money; I had never seen the prisoner before - there is not the least resemblance between Ainsley and the prisoner; only one other man was taken up.

Q. You said you thought that was the man? A. No. 1 said he was not the man who robbed me - I thought he was one of the party; I never said I was drunk.

MR. BARRY. Q. When did Thomas Ainsley call on you? A. On the Monday following - it happened on Thursday night; I was not at home when he called, but saw him about seven o'clock in the evening - he asked me what news; I told him nothing particular, knowing him to be a bad character - I was cantious; he said, "I think I have seen your name in the paper, have you lost any thing?" I said I had lost my watch; he said, "Are you positive of it?" I said Yes - he said, "It is a sad thing, but your watch is quite sufficient, if you are positive, but would not another watch and money satisfy you?" I said,"Is it my own watch?" he said, "No; your own watch is not comeatable, but you shall have a watch and money to satisfy you" - I said,"No, I decline it, the law shall have its course;" the prisoner was then in custody.

COURT. Q. You had been on duty that night? A. Yes, at the chief office in Broad-street - it was my duty to be there to watch: I left there at twelve o'clock.

HENRY BOLTON . I am an officer of the Police. I saw Doyle at the station-house on Thursday morning, the 31st of August, about ten o'clock - he gave me an account of his having been robbed, and described the person who robbed him; he described his dress, and said he was a man about his own stature, with broad shoulders, and wore a fustain jacket - I acted on his information, and took the prisoner in Angel-alley, Whitechapel, close to Whitechapel-church; I said, "Bill, I want you" - (I had seen him before in the habit of wearing the dress described, but he then had a different dress on) - he said, "I am wanted for every b - y thing;" I took him to the watch-house, and fetched the prosecutor there before I told him what he was taken for - the prosecutor immediately said, "That's the man, I will swear to him from one hundred men."

Cross-examined. You received information about ten o'clock? A. Yes, on Thursday morning, and took him about two - I had seen him between ten and two, but did not take him; he could not help coming with me - there were two examinations before the Magistrate on the Thursday and Saturday - when I took him he was dressed as he is now; I believe he had the same coat on; I am not unacquainted with his person - I do not know that I ever saw him in that coat before; I have seen him in a fustain jacket five nights out of a week - I have seen him in a black coat before, but am pretty certain I never saw him in the coat he has on; I have seen him in one of the same shape - there are a great many had characters on my beat, and I am in the habit of looking at them: when I saw him in a different coat to the jacket he usually wore, I always suspected there was something wrong.

COURT. Q. Had you seen him in the fustain jacket lately before? A. I am quite certain I saw him in it the night before this occurred; when I saw him he was generally in company with others.

JAMES WALTON . I am an officer of the Police. I know the prisoner - I saw him on Wednesday night, the 29th of August; he had on a fustain coatee, which came down straight in the front, with pockets outside like a shootingjacket, but no breast pocket; he was not alone, there were three going on before him; he appeared to be one of their party - I cannot be certain whether the clock had struck seven, but it was about seven, getting towards dusk

- I could not he mistaken in him, I know him so well; that was the night before he was taken up.

Cross-examined.Q. He seemed in company, was he talking to them? A. It was a narrow part of the pavement, where two could not walk abreast; they walked one after the other - he was the last of the four.

DENNIS DOYLE. I have never recovered my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I have witnesses to prove I never had on the fustain jacket from the 28th of the month, and that I was at home and in bed at the time the robbery was committed.

EDWARD WILLIAMS . I live at No. 31, George-yard, High-street, Whitechapel. I have known the prisoner about three months; he rents an apartment in my house - I saw him on Wednesday, the 29th of August, and on Tuesday night, the 28th - it was last Wednesday week; I saw him three times on Wednesday, about five o'clock in the evening - at about nine, a few minutes before or after, he went in with his pint of beer - he had on a brown coat, but the other part of his dress I cannot tell, but think it was light trousers; this was at nine o'clock or a few minutes after - he slept there on Wednesday night, the 29th of August, I will take my solemn oath; he called me up stairs, and paid me 6s. 6d. about half an hour after he took the beer in - my wife was up in the room with me; that was between nine and ten o'clock - I saw him up stairs after that time.

Q. How late? A. Between nine and ten o'clock; the latest time I heard him was when I called up to ask if all the lodgers were in; I then fastened the door, and am thoroughly convinced no individual could get out without my knowledge that night.

Q. How did you fasten the door? A. I bolted it, and turned the handle right down to the plate; I found it so in the morning - I did not lock the door, but am thoroughly convinced the door was as I had left it; nobody could get in or out.

MR. BARRY. Q. What are you? A. A wheelwright: a master - I sometimes employ one man and sometimes more; this man and his wife, and another couple, were my only lodgers that night.

Q. What is the name of the person you call the prisoner's wife? A. Louisa Adams is the person I believe to he his wife; it is impossible for me to swear she is his wife.

COURT. Q. Have you any belief that she is his wife? A. No; I should not think she is.

MR. BARRY. Q. There was another couple there, pray who were they? A. The name is Thompson; he is a butcher in Whitechapel-market - I do not know a person named Thomas Ainsley , nor any person going by that name; I know nothing of any body going from my house to the prosecutor - I am married; my wife is outside - the couple, who lodged with me, are not here; I went to bed about half-past eleven, and shut the door up - I am sure it was never opened till I opened it; the prisoner slept in the top room - I sleep below; my head is underneath the staircase - I was not awake all night; we supped before we went to bed - I know it was Wednesday by my repairing a wheel for a gentleman, which I booked; I have seen the prisoner wear a fustain coatee or jacket with pockets, but he had not it on on the Wednesday.

COURT. Q. You were not asked that question - how came you to know that it was material? A. I did not know it was material at all, only I was asked about the coat.

MR. BARRY. Q. Why did you say, in answer to my question, that he had not got the fustain jacket on on Wednesday evening? A. Because I before told you he had a brown coat on, which is the truth, so help me God, the man had no other - I did not see the fustain jacket that night at all; I do not know Walton by name - (looking at him) I have seen that gentleman about my place, but not oftener about my place than in any other neighbourhood: I do not often change my lodgers while they keep peace and soberness in my house.

Q. Did your wife see the prisoner at five o'clock? A. I do not know - I was at work in the yard at a wheel: my wife was in the kitchen - the prisoner passed through the yard to go in: he had a fish or something with him: it was something moist in a handkerchief - he went up to his own apartment: I lost sight of him till nine o'clock when he passed me with the beer in his hand - I did not see him in the fustain jacket about eight o'clock.

Q. Have you ever seen him change his dress in the course of the day? A. Not particularly change his dress - I never in my life saw him change his dress in the day, nor have I seen him with it changed; I never saw him with two dresses on in the course of one day - he did not, to my knowledge leave a fustain jacket in his lodging when he was taken; the Policeman must know that best, I went to the Magistrate's when he was taken, but was not called in; my wife went with me: Thompsons did not go - they had nothing to do with it.

COURT. Q. You were going to tell your story yourself - tell it your own way? A. My name is Williams; I reside in George-yard - I am a coach and cart wheelwright by trade; Mr. Palmer, of Bartholomew-close, is my landlord - I have lived in the house twenty years, about ten years on my own hands, and before that under my father's direction; the prisoner passed me in my own yard about five o'clock in the evening, as I was at work, and I saw him at the door again about nine, as I stood by an old coach-carriage - he went up stairs with his pint of beer, and about half an hour after, or it might be a few minutes before, he called me up, paid me 6s. 6d. for rent, and I saw no more of him that night, but when I shut my door that night, I called up to know if he was in, and Mr. Adams himself answered Yes; I bolted the door, and went to bed, and found the door so in the morning, when I got up, and between eight and nine o'clock that morning he passed me in the yard.

Q. Just repeat that? The witness did so almost verbatim.

Q. You have got your story very perfect indeed - how often have you said it over? A. Never before I came here; I never had any talk with my wife about it - we had muscles for supper that night, and bread and cheese for dinner; I had nothing but bread and cheese; I will not be sure what it was.

Q. You can tell what you had next day? A. If I must tell you, I had no dinner; I had bread and cheese for supper; the prisoner would not have lived in my house if he had gone out and in at irregular hours - he

went in and out at meal times; I took him to be a labouring man - I do not know where he worked he had lodged about three months with me.

MR. BARRY. Q. Did Louisa Adams sleep there that night? A. Yes; she was up in the room that night when I received the money.

MARY WILLIAMS. I am the wife of the last witness -I saw the prisoner last in the house on the 29th of last month, which was last Wednesday week; I saw him last about eleven o'clock in the evening, when I went up stairs to return a pair of seissors I horrowed of the young woman he lives with, and he was then in bed; I saw him there - that was the last time I saw him; my husband caled up to know if all was in before he fastened the door, and the prisoner answered Yes.

Q. What did your husband then do? A. He called my husband up stairs, to pay him 6s. 6d., which he owed him - my husband then came down, locked the door, and we went to bed; I saw the door locked.

MR. BARRY. Q. How many lodgers had you? A. Two.

Q. Is the woman who lived with the prisoner the sister of a man they call Bobby odd legs? A. I do not know; I do not know a man who is called by that name - I have heard the name, but not in my house; I do not know what has become of him - I am sure he never lodged with me; I have seen the prisoner in a fustain jacket - he wore it sometimes, not very often: he sometimes wore that and sometimes a brown coat - I do not think he wore the fustain jacket four or five times a week; I did not see it that Wednesday - I saw him about nine o'clock that evening, between nine and ten o'clock, going up stairs; I did not see him any more till I went up stairs - he had a coat on, and a pint of beer in his hand; he generally takes a pint up at supper time - I am confident this was Wednesday week, I know it very well - he generally slept at home: he slept at home every night as far as I know - we always call up to know if all are in; I cannot swear he slept at home every night.

Q. Then he might have slept out sometimes? A. Sometimes the door is shut, and I do not see who comes down.

Q. Do not people go in and out late at night? A. When my door is shut the staircase is in the passage, and I do not open the door - people go in and out: our street door has got a bolt and a lock.

Q. If a person wished to go out, one could let the other out and bolt the door? A. Not when the door is all fastened; the passage door has a lock to it, and that locks the staircase in - the gate has a bolt to it; we take the key of the door inside the room where we live every night; we always call up to know if the lodgers are in; I will not swear that is the invariable practice - I do not know Thomas Ainsley; I never in my life heard the name, and never saw such a person at my lodging.

Q. Pray, what had you for dinner that day? A. That day I and my husband had some rump tails for dinner - that was on Wednesday, and we both had the same for supper - we both dined off beef-steaks next day.

Q. You had two comfortable dinners then on Wednesday and Thursday? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. What had you on Tuesday? A. On Tuesday we did not have any thing; if I have not the money I do not have any thing. We were married at Whitechapel three years ago; I have had no talk with my husband about this story, nor he with me.

Q. What time was it that you went up stairs, when the money was paid to your husband? A. About eleven o'clock, I went up, and my husband went up after that, about half an hour after.

Q. What, when he received the money? A. Yes - the prisoner went in and out very regularly, like a lahouring man - I do not know where he worked; he was a labouring man, but I do not know what sort of labour he followed; he used to go out regularly at six o'clock in the morning, come home about nine to breakfast, and again at twelve and four - those were his regular hours.

HENRY BOLTON. I have known the prisoner since last February; he was constantly standing in Wentworth-street - I never saw him employed as a labourer; I have seen him for hours together in Wentworth-street, at two and three o'clock in the morning.

[Sept. 8.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18320906-11

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1737. THOMAS FORD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Temple , on the 28th of July , at Isleworth , and stealing therein 14 lbs. weight of veal, value 10s., and 1 towel, value 1s. 6d., his property; and that before the felony aforesaid was committed, to wit, at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, holden for Middlesex, at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, on Thursday, the 8th of September, in the second year of His Majesty's reign, the said Thomas Ford was convicted of felony .

JOHN ROLSTON . I am a Policeman. On the 27th of July, about nine o'clock at night, I was on duty at Old Brentford, and saw the prisoner several times from that to twelve, and from twelve to half-past twelve - I saw him with other bad characters, and in a different coat to what he were before; I followed them up the town, then returned, and told my inspector, and asked if he would allow me to follow them, but he would not, and exactly at three, I saw him and the same men return again; they went by me, and I saw the prisoner had something inside his coat - I collared him, and asked what he had got; he said nothing belonging to me - I took him to the station-house, searched him there, and found the veal part in his pockets, and part in his hat in a towel; he was about two miles from the prosecutor's house.

WILLIAM TEMPLE . I live in the parish of Isleworth, about a mile and a half from Brentford - it is my dwelling-house - I went to bed about eleven o'clock, and saw every thing secure; I got up at six o'clock in the morning of the 28th, and found a pane of glass taken out of my window, and the window opened; they had got in, and cut a calf from top to bottom - they had opened the door, and gone out there; I am not a butcher - this was a calf of my own fatting; I missed about 16 lbs. of veal; they had hacked and cut from every joint; I missed a towel; I am quite sure I shut the window, and fastened it myself the night before - this is the towel; the veal is not here - it corresponded exactly with mine.

WILLIAM PEASGOOD . I am a Policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, from the

clerk of arraigns' office - (read) - I was a witness against him; he is the person who was tried and convicted of stealing a box, and was imprisoned seven days.

Prisoner. I protected the person who it was said I robbed - I had been drinking with him, and took the box for security.

[Sept. 10.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18320906-12

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bailey.

1738. FRANCIS SHARPE was indicted for that he, on the 28th of August , at St. Dunstan Stebonheath, alias Stepney , in and upon Thomas Allpress , feloniously, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain piece of wood, feloniously, &c., did strike and wound the said Thomas Allpress in and upon his head and face, with intent to kill and murder him ; against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable.

THIRD COUNT, stating his intent to be do him some grievous bodily harm.

THOMAS ALLPRESS . I am a coachmaker . The prisoner did some work for me, and charged me 30s. for it; I paid him 25s., and he summoned me for the rest; the case was decided in my favour - this was about twelve, or between 12 and 1 o'clock on the 28th of August; I did not see him again, but went home, and about six in the evening I was going down Mile-end-road, and stopped to speak to Mr. Wissett, a friend - we were in conversation, and somebody came behind and struck me a violent blow on the side of my head, in the eye; I did not see who it was - I do not remember receiving more than one blow, and have no idea with what it was struck; I do not know whether I fell to the ground, or what; my senses were entirely taken away - when I came to myself I found I was wounded; the wound had broken the skin.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you hunted this poor man into a public-house? A. No - I never saw him after leaving the Court; I did not abuse him as I left the Court; I did not hunt him into the Two Bells.

CHARLES WISSETT . I was in conversation with Allpress about two minutes, and then the prisoner came up to him, and struck him violently in the face with a piece of wood, made into the shape of a bat - (producing it) - he did not say a word; he struck with only one hand; he struck him the first blow on the top part of the eye - his hat was on, but he hit him on the face; he struck him three times, the second blow over the forehead, and the third over the head; the first blow drove him from the path into the road - he reeled into the road, but did not fall; the prisoner followed him into the road, and struck him again, but he never fell; I secured the prisoner from striking him any more - some people came up immediately, and he was taken into custody; he was in liquor - he said nothing when he was striking him, but when the stick was being taken away from him he requested they would not pull his arm off.

Cross-examined. Q. He appeared to have been drinking a good deal? A. He seemed greatly excited, and his mind being under the influence of much liquor, I should hardly suppose he knew what he was doing.

SAMUEL JOHN HAM . I am a Policeman. I received the prisoner in charge at the station-house, and did not see the blows given.

WILLIAM EPHRAIM SNOW . I am a surgeon. Allpress came to my house between 6 and 7 o'clock in the evening of the 28th of August; he had three wounds, each of them laid the bone or covering of it bare; the skin was broken in all the wounds - great violence it appeared had been used; I did not consider his life in any degree of danger- he had fever to a slight extent: I could not judge what instrument had inflicted the wounds, but should think a weapon of this description very likely to have inflicted them - his eye, I fear, is entirely lost - that is the only injury which still continues; he has got well in other respects - he cannot see at all with his eye now, nor has he since I first attended him.

JOHN CULLENFORD . I am a harness-maker. I saw a blow struck by the prisoner - I saw no provocation given - I was eighty yards off; the blow was given with this bit of wood.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you agree with the witness that the prisoner seemed intoxicated? A. He seemed in liquor; I cannot say whether he knew what he was doing - he knew his daughter, who he met about two minutes after, as I took him to the station-house.

COURT. Q. When you took him to the station-house he met his daughter, did he? A. Yes, she spoke to him first - she said, "What have you done, father?" he said he had done what he intended to do, and he hoped he had killed him - that is all I heard him say.

Prisoner's Defence (written). My Lord, - I deeply lament the injury the prosecutor has received at my hands, but which was solely occasioned by his own outrageous and unprovoked violence and abuse; and when I explain to your Lordship and the Jury the circumstances under which I experienced that violence and abuse, I humbly trust that your Lordship and the Jury will think my case deserving merciful and lenient consideration. I had done some work for the prosecutor, for which he was to pay me 1l. 10s., but when he had paid me 25s., he said if I expected to get any more, I must summon him; I did summon him to the Court of Conscience, in Orange-street, but in consequence of some evidence produced by him as to the work done by me, the Commissioner refused to make any order enforcing payment of my demand. I left the Court, but immediately on getting into the street I was assailed by the prosecutor, and persons in his company, with oprobious epithets, and with such violence and abuse, that I was compelled to seek refuge in a public-house called the Two Bells, where I remained drinking with a friend until the prosecutor, and those who were with him, were gone away; I then left the house with my friend, and went to my own home to fetch a tool, or piece of wood, used by me in my trade, which my friend much wished to see, and borrow (he is in the same trade as me;) I was then a good deal intoxicated. We both then went forward to a public-house, called the King's Arms, to have some more beer; we remained there some time drinking I had occasion to go outside the door, into the street; I happened to have the piece of wood in my hand; at that instant the prosecutor was passing, and seeing me, pointed me out to a man who was with him, and seemed to wish to annoy me: I felt greatly irritated, and at the instant, and on the impulse of the moment I struck him, and inflicted the injury he has sustained. I was very much intoxicated, or even under the provocation I received I should not, I think, have raised my hand against him; but I was irritated at his having a short time before exposed and abused me in the

street, in addition to refusing payment of what I conceived to be a just demand. I sincerely lament the occurrence - I am in a very infirm state of health, and throw myself on the mercy of my prosecutor and the Court.

CHARLES WISSETT re-examined. Q. Did the prosecutor say any thing to the prisoner, or do any thing before the prisoner came up and struck him? A. No - I do not think he had seen him before he struck him; he did not point the prisoner out to me.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[Sept. 10.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 60.

Reference Number: t18320906-13

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1739. THOMAS ANDERSON and HENRY CROSS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Abbott Kent , on the 7th of May, in the first year of his Majesty's reign , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing therein 33lbs. weight of silk, value 60l.; 7 sovereigns, 7 half-sovereigns, 6 half-crowns, 20 shillings, and 10 sixpences, his property .

MR PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES HADFIELD . I am foreman to Mr. William Abbott Kent, a silk-manufacturer , who lives in Wilson-street, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch - in 1831 he had no partner. On the 7th of May, 1831, about five o'clock in the morning, I was awoke by our servant, and in consequence of what she said I went down stairs, and found a Policeman in the house - I went into the back yard, and found there had been an entrance effected through the shutter of the back warehouse window, with a centre-bit: I found a considerable quantity of silk velvet on the floor of the front warehouse, and in the back warehouse a considerable quantity of dyed silk was removed out of its place - my desk was broken open, and 12l. 10s. taken out of it; I missed a considerable quantity of silk - I had gone to bed about eleven o'clock the night before, left the window, and every thing perfectly secure - I was in the warehouse at eleven at night - I fastened the shutters myself; there are both inside and outside shutters - I went into the workshop; that was broken open also, and some silk was missed - the value of all the property taken was about 70l.; the tiles of the workshop were broken, as if persons had passed over them in a direction leading to a dust-bin - in consequence of information, I went at six o'clock that morning to Bishopsgate-street watch-house, and saw two parcels of silk, which I knew as Mr. Kent's property; I have never seen any more of the silk since.

SARAH FULLER , JUN. I am the daughter of Sarah Fuller . In May, 1831, I lived at No. 8, King-square, near the back of Mr. Kent's premises - I and my mother were sitting up on the night of the 6th of May, at work; I remember, at an early hour in the morning, going to draw the curtains of the window - I looked out of the window, and saw two men, who were the two prisoners; they were close against the dust-bin; I observed their faces particularly - the tallest (Anderson) had his face towards me; they both stood there - I saw Cross' face, but not then; when he turned away from the dust-bin, I saw his face - it was day-light, just before four o'clock in the morning, and I saw two females standing at a distance from the dust-bin: one of the females had two baskets in her hand; each of the prisoners took a parcel from the dust-bin, and put it into the woman's baskets - they were wrapped in brown paper; the woman's bonnet came off, and the other female put her hand to her head, and put her bonnet on; Cross said,"Never mind your bonnet, come along without it" - she said, "Harry, I must have my bonnet, it looks so to go without it, but you cut" - that woman was convicted this time last year; her name was Sarah Hooker - they all went away, the men rather before the women; the two men had occasion to pass our window as they went away; my mother and I opened the door, and went out; when the women said to the men, "You cut;" my mother said she thought it was time - we followed, and watched them into Long-alley; I gave information there to a private watchman - the dustbin is near the wall, at the back of the prosecutor's premises; I saw Cross at the time the female was having her examination at Worship-street, and recognized him as the man I had seen in the morning, and pointed him out - he saw me and my mother noticed him, and went away; my mother pointed him out to me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long ago was that examination? A. This time twelvemonths - I have never seen Cross since till I saw him in the House of Correction, in August - I had not seen him before that occasion; it was quite day-light - my mother had the same opportunity of seeing as I had; I am quite positive he is the same person.

Anderson. Q. Did you know me before? A. No; I have not seen you since, till you were at Worship-street last month - the dust-bin is about three yards from the window, which was shut.

COURT. Q. Did you point them out to the watchman? A. Yes; the two men and the two women - he pursued them directly.

SARAH FULLER . I am the last witness' mother. I remember, on the night of the 6th of May, 1831, sitting up all night - we are bonnet-makers, and had a large order; my daughter drew the curtain aside, and called me to the window; I went, and saw two men at the dust-hole; one with his hand in the dust-hole, taking the parcel out, with his face rather towards me; when he saw me, he rather put the parcel back again, and took away his hand from the dust-hole - the other man, who stood with his back towards me, took the parcel out, and then the one who had his face towards me, took a parcel out also - Auderson is the one who had his face towards me; Cross stood with his back towards me; I saw both their faces that morning, for I opened the door, and followed them down the court - I am certain of them both; I saw Cross at Worship-street when Hooker had her second hearing; my daughter also saw him - he observed us looking at him, and went away as fast as he could.

JOSEPH RYAN . I am a Police-constable. On the morning of the 7th of May, 1831, I was on duty in Wilson-street, and in consequence of something which was said to me by a private watchman, I went to Half Moon-alley, and saw two men and two women before me; one of the women had two baskets on her head - I pursued them as far as I could, and met a City-watchman; he joined in the pursuit, and finding us coming close on them, the two men and one woman escaped into Petticoat-lane - I seized the woman with the baskets - that was Hooker, who has been transported; she threw the baskets and parcels on the ground; my brother officer took them up; we took her to the watch-

house, with the parcels; they contained silk - I have kept it ever since - Had field came to the watch-house that morning, and saw it; here it is.

JAMES CASTLE . I am a City watchman. On the 7th of May, 1831, between four and five o'clock in the morning, the two prisoners passed me; when I first saw them they were about forty yards from me, with their faces towards me, coming towards me - they came quite close to me; I am quite positive of their persons - I saw two women; one of them had two baskets on her head - the prisoners walked, and after I received the information, I pursued them; the prisoners escaped - I stopped one of the women, and she took the baskets off her head, and turned the parcels out on the pavement; I took one up, and the Policeman another - I took the woman to the watch-house with the parcels; I saw Cross in the House of Correction about a fortnight ago - I knew him instantly, and swear to him.

Cross. Q. Had you any previous knowledge of me? A. No; I had you in sight about a minute and a half - I had a good view of your face; he was coming towards me, and I was looking at him.

JAMES PAYNE . I am a City-officer. On Saturday morning, the 7th of May, 1831, Hooker was brought to the watch-house; I received from the person who brought her two baskets, and two paper parcels - I have kept this one in my possession ever since.

MILES STANDLEY . In May, 1831, I was a Policeman, and was on duty about four o'clock in Long-alley; I went to Mr. Kent's house, and observed the state of the windowshutters - they had been entered by a centre-bit; a person making an opening with a centre-bit could then open the window; I found the piece which was cut out, and fitted it - I found silk thrown about the warehouse; I found a centre-bit inside the window, corresponding with the marks, a dark lantern, and the piece that was cut out of the outside shutter - the centre-bit fitted the holes.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer of Worship-street. I know the prisoner; I have known Cross about four years, and have seen them in company together many times - I heard of this robbery, and have searched for the prisoners at various parts of the town ever since, with Waters, and at last found them in the House of Correction, about five weeks ago - I knew Anderson by the name of Tom Appleby ; Cross was always called Harry Cross - I know Hooker lived with Cross for three or four years till the time of the robbery; I had not seen either of the prisoners after that, till I found them in the House of Correction.

Cross-examined. Q. Why not tell us Hooker was married to Cross, when she was tried? A. I was not examined on the trial.

Anderson. Q. Where have you seen us in company? A. At various places in St. Luke's, Golden-lane, and other places; I cannot say the exact time.

MARY HOOKER . In May, last year, I lived in Ballyard, Golden-lane; I know Cross - I remember his coming home at a quarter to four o'clock, one morning in May, and calling his wife up; she took out two baskets with her - she was afterwards convicted here; she was my sister - I heard she was taken up that morning; Cross went out with her.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she married to Cross? A. Yes.

JAMES HADFIELD . I know this parcel of silk; it is Mr. Kent's property, I am quite certain - here is my mark on the other parcel; it is Mr. Kent's - I had packed them up the day before; they both have my hand-writing on them - there are near 20 lbs. of silk here.

Anderson's Defence. I am totally innocent of the offence, and hope you will consider it is sixteen months ago since the robbery was committed; the woman says the dust-bin is three yards from the window, which was shut down, and she did not know me before nor since - I deny knowing Cross.

Cross' Defence. I am totally innocent of the charge; as to my fetching the woman out, it is certainly false - I do not deny having lived with her, but I had left her some months before; as to the people swearing to me, they say they never knew me previous, nor since, and they had but a short view - I was not prepared for my trial; I knew nathing of it till Saturday morning, when I was fetched here - I did not know what I had to meet, or anything, and could not get my brief drawn up in a proper manner; another thing I have to state, that is, that on the 6th of May, in the evening, I went to Mr. Hewitt's and had tea there; I occasionally used to work for him then - I had previously worked constantly for him, and I was there from five till close upon three o'clock in the morning, waiting for Mr. Hewitt to come home, to borrow 5s. of him.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner Cross a good character.

ANDERSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.[Sept. 10.] CROSS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18320906-14

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1740. THOMAS FULLER was indicted for that he, on the 10th of August , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, upon John Langford , feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain instrument he the said John Langford did strike and maim on the head, with intent to kill and murder him .

2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable him.

3rd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN LANGFORD . In August last I lived at No. 21, Philip-street, Kingsland-road , and am a shoemaker - the prisoner occupied two rooms in the house; he rented the house; I was his tenant. On Friday, the 10th of August, between five and six o'clock, I was at the back yard door, leading into the yard, and heard my wife speaking to the prisoner; I heard her say, "Oh, you nasty spiteful fellow, to go to our employer to take the bread out of our months;" he said, "Yes, you d - d wh - g b - h, I did;" I then advanced towards him, saying, at the same time, "Will you dare to call my wife a wh - e?" he laid down a trowel, which he had in his hand doing something with some bricks, and took up a hammer - he met me as I was repeating those words, and hit me a most tremendous blow with it on the head; the blow did not stun me - I endeavoured to take the hammer from him, but he parried me off with one hand, and my wife, to save me or prevent a repetition of it, came forward - he directly turned his eyes to her, and gave her a blow with it on the forehead; I endeavoured to get the hammer from him, but failed, and he then made a deadly blow at the infant which she had

in her arms - he hit me several more blows; I desired my wife to go out and call Murder! she went out immediately, and called Murder! several times - he gave me one or two more blows, and I should have had more, but I prevented him - I did not get hold of the hammer till one or two persons came in.

Q. Did you receive more than one blow on the head? A. Several - there was one here, and two wounds were dressed by the surgeon; when the persons came in he had me round the neck with his left arm, and as he was inflicting the last blow I put my hand up just in time to catch the hammer - a witness rushed forward, and with assistance we got the hammer from him; I had two wounds, which bled most profusely - I went to a surgeon immediately, taking the hammer with me; I was under his care about ten days.

Q. Before he struck you had you struck him? A. No, nor attempted it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I believe you have preferred another indictment against the prisoner for an assault on your wife? A. I did; Mr. Arneson is the surgeon; he is here - I did not go to Mr. John Heath ; he came in on Sunday evening or morning with Mr. Arueson, my doctor; it was the Sunday after I received the injury, which was on Friday - it was a very severe blow indeed: I should not like to meet with a similar punishment - I was not confined to my bed, but was so weak I could not go to the office to give evidence; I could not attend to my work for ten days after - I was weak; I did not go to work till the Tuesday week following; I went to the Policeoffice the next morning, and went to the surgeon the same evening, with the hammer in my hand - he lives there hundred or four hundred yards from me; he plastered and dressed my head, and I had medicine to take - I believe it was only a bottle; I neither struck the prisoner, nor attempted to do so; he was building an oven in his back kitchen at the time - he was using the trowel; I did not see the hammer near him till he took it up; it was within his reach - when I overheard the conversation between him and my wife I was at the yards door, about two yards from the kitchen and about four yards from where the prisoner was - the place where he was working was open, so that I could see him from the yard door; when I heard him use this language to my wife I did not rush forward, I advanced slowly - I had not been at all troublesome to the prisoner before.

Q. Do you know whether he had consulted his attorney to get you out of the house? A. Not that I know of - he gave me notice to quit; I think it was on the Monday before.

Q. I presume you do not make shoes and work with your hammer on Sundays? A. Yes; I have been obliged unfortunately - I have been in custody twice; I believe they might be termed charges of felony - I can specify them; I am not ashamed of them; it was illegitimacy.

COURT. Q. Do you mean respecting a bastard child? A. Yes - the other was a robbery of a chapel.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. And likewise for a rape, I believe? A. That was the same person - the child; I was charged with rape in that case.

Q. On an infant eleven years old? A. No, a person twenty-three.

Q. What do you mean by calling it illegitimacy? A. Because the person, who swore the rape against me, swore the child to me afterwards; I was then about twenty-one years old - I am now twenty-five; I think it was about four years ago - I can almost take on myself to swear it was in 1828 - I was not charged more than once with a rape, that I will swear; I have been a potato-dealer - the affair of the chapel was in November last: I have not been in the habit of singing ballads about the streets; I swear that positively.

Q. Among other persons that came to the spot, was there a Mr. Patteson? A. I do not know a person of that name, nor Susan Smith - Mrs. Heaps was there, and a Policeman's son, named Cook - I did not see any body else; I went to the surgeon as soon as Heaps and the boy came in and rescued the hammer from him - several persons came to the office to give an account of the transaction; there was a woman named Abbott - I do not know Mrs. Smith or Everard by name - two females came up stairs where they took the evidence down, but they said there was sufficient evidence then, but if they found it necessary they would let them know - they were witnesses on my side; I did not advance to the prisoner with my fist doubled; my fist was down at my side - I felt hurt at my wife being called that name; I advanced to him slowly, not in anger or hostility - I was not in the constant habit of quarrelling with him; I never insulted him - I never had any words but on one occasion, that was a disputation on tea and camomile - that was after I was charged with the chapel robbery; it was after that I went to reside with him - he occupied the back parlour and the back room up stairs; Sarah Everard lives in the house - she was up stairs; the back window looks on the kitchen, if the person looks out.

COURT. Q. How long had you lodged there? A. Four weeks I paid for, and the fifth was then running

SOPHIA LANGFORD . I am the wife of John Langford On the afternoon of Friday, the 10th of August, I went into the yard for some water, and saw the prisoner doing something to an oven with a trowel - I called him a nasty spiteful fellow, to try to go and take the bread out of our months - he called me a d - d w - g b - h; my husband went into the kitchen, and demanded an explanation why he called me a w - e; he then laid down a trowel which he was working with, took up a hammer and struck my husband on the head; I then went to prevent him striking my husband again - he turned round, and struck me on the forehead with the hammer, and then said he would murder us both - he aimed another blow at the child in my arms; I put up my arm and received the blow on it - my husband then told me to go and call murder; I went to the door, and called Murder! when I came back he still had the hammer in his hand; I brought Mrs. Heaps in, and the hammer was taken from him by her and my husband - my husband had not struck him, nor offered to do it, nor had I.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to state, on your oath, that the prisoner attempted to strike the infant? A. Yes, he did - that is as true as the rest I have stated; the child had not cried or done any thing - my husband was standing by the yard door when the prisoner used the offensive language; that is about four yards from him; my husband felt hurt; he did not look angry at all - he

walked slowly into the kitchen, and was advancing towards the prisoner, and the prisoner walked a few paces towards my husband; my husband said, "How dare you call my wife a wh - e;" his hands were down at his side - his fist was not doubled; he was quite calm - he walked quite slowly; I swear the prisoner walked towards my husband before any blow was struck at all - I do not know Susan Smith , and did not see her there; he said he would murder us both - he did not say he would murder the infant; I went to the doctor with my wound, and he dressed it - I did not go to work the next day; I staid at home.

ANN HEAPS . I live in Philip-street, about ten doors from the parties, on the opposite side of the way. On Friday afternoon, the 10th of August, I was at my own door, and heard a cry of Murder! several times - I went to the house, and when I got to the door the prosecutrix came to the door with her apron all covered with blood; she said,"For God's sake, will nobody come in, my husband will be killed;" I went in, got to the stair foot door, and saw the prisoner strike Mr. Langford one blow with the hammer on the forehead; he was behind Langford with his left arm round his neck, and the hammer in his right hand - I went and assisted Langford in getting the hammer from him - Langford's face was covered with blood; he was led away to the doctor's.

Q. When you got the hammer from the prisoner, did he do any thing? A. He took up a spade which laid there, and said, "I will kill you all;" that was said to me - I said, "You good for nothing old villain, will you dare to hurt me; and he threw the spade down - the Policeman came shortly after; I had come out then, and he had shut the door - when the officer was at the door he looked out of window, pointed to me, and said he would mark that black eyed woman - I had never seen the prisoner or prosecutor before I entered the house; the officer took him in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not get there at the beginning of it? A. No - I saw one blow struck; he took up a spade, and said, "I will kill you all;" I called him a villain - he threw it down, and ran up stairs.

MARY ANN ABBOTT . I live in Philip-street. On Friday afternoon, the 10th of August, I heard screams of murder - I saw Mrs. Heaps go into the house, and followed her; I was come distance behind her - when I got there I saw her in the attitude of wrenching the hammer out of the prisoner's hand; I saw the prosecutor covered with blood, likewise his wife and child - the child had the mother's blood on it; I took it from her, and washed it - nearly all the prosecutor's face was covered with blood; when the officer was at the door, I saw the prisoner put his head out of window, and say he would mark that black eyed woman, meaning Mrs. Heaps - he pointed to her.

WILLIAM COOK . I was twelve years old last March - I go to school, and have learnt my prayers; it is wicked to tell a lie - wicked people after death go to hell fire; I live in Philip-street. On the afternoon of Friday, the 10th of August, I heard a cry of murder, and went into the house - I saw the prisoner with his left arm round the prosecutor's neck; he a hammer in his right hand, and hit him on the left side, on the forehead; I saw Mrs. Heaps and the prosecutor take the hammer out of his hand, and saw the prosecutor and his wife all over blood; I came out: the prisoner looked out of window, and said, "I will mark that black eyed woman," meaning Mrs. Heaps, for he pointed to her.

WILLIAM MOORE . I live at No. 85, Philip-street, Kingsland-road. I went to the house on this occasion, and saw the prosecutor with his head all over blood; the prisoner ran up stairs - the hammer was in the prosecutor's hand when I went in; he showed it to me - I did not hear the prisoner say any thing.

GEORGE ARNESON. I am a surgeon, and live near Philip-street, about three or four hundred yards from this house. On Friday afternoon, the 10th of August, the prosecutor came to my house, accompanied by Moore; his head was considerably stained with blood, and on the left side of the forehead there was a wound, and another towards the back part of the head, and a slight scratch on the nose - the wound on the forehead was, I should think, such as would be inflicted by a blow from a hammer; it was about an inch long, and penetrated to the immediate covering of the bone of the head, and owing to the swelling of the scalp, was about half an inch deep - the cut on the head was towards the left side, on the upper part, throught the hair, and penetrated to the scull, or its immediate covering; there had been a considerable effusion of blocd - I dressed it; it healed favourably - I did not consider the external wounds dangerous, but could not say that dangerous consequences might not result.

Q. Is a blow on the head, producing that sort of laceration, a dangerous thing? A. If it is given with considerable force.

Q. You saw it - would a blow producing such consequences be dangerous? A. It might; I was desired at the office to say whether I could pronounce him out of danger a day or two after, and was not then able to pronounce him out of danger.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a member of the College of Surgeons? A. No, I am a licenciate of the Apothecaries' Company; I put some adhesive-plaster on the wounds after washing them with water - I put plaster on each of them; there were three wounds, including the scratch on the nose; Mr. Heath, a friend of mine, saw the prosecutor on the Sunday morning - when I considered the manner in which the wounds had been inficted, I certainly considered dangerous consequences might result.

Q. When you heard what was done? A. No, from what I saw.

Q. When you speak of the scalp being divided, you mean the skin? A. The integumeuts.

Q. Might not a man with a hammer in his hand, intending to murder another, split his skull with the greatest case? A. If his arm was quite at liberty, I suppose he might; I should not consider the wounds slight, except the one on the nose; I did nothing to the wounds but putting sticking-plaster on his head - I dressed them afterwards; I gave him physic: if there had been symptoms of fever, I should have bled him; there was no fever - there was a little degree of excitability.

Q. Much the same as might be produced by hearing his wife called ill names? A. Yes.

Q. If you anticipated the slightest injury to the brain, would you not have bled him? A. I should not have

bled him from apprehension, but if I saw fever approach I should do it; I did not order him to keep his bed, but to keep himself quiet, and abstain from any thing of a stimulating nature, and enjoined spare diet.

Q. Was there the slightest reason why he should not have gone to work the next day? A. Yes, I think there was; I am sure there was - I coutinued to attend him perhaps eight or ten days, and removed the plaster perhaps five or six times; I called at his lodging the following morning, but heard he had gone to Worship-street office; he called on me in the course of the day - I did not think it necessary to confine him to the house; I saw Mrs. Langford - she was not very bad: her scalp was divided; I mean the skin and integuments.

Q. What a nail or a pin would do, if drawn across the forehead? A. No, a penknife would; the scalp is perhaps a quarter of an inch thick.

Q. I am speaking of Mrs. Langford's wound? A. Her wound was not so serious; I did not think it serious at all- I gave her no medicine.

COURT. Q. For a blow with a hammer, through the man's hair, to divide the scalp, must it be given with some force? A. Yes, I should say so.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor and his wife both rushed on me at one time, in a hostile manner, which he admitted in his examination, and then retracted it after being examined - I was at work with the hammer in my hand, and had not time to lay it down, in a little place where I had not an opportunity of getting away from him- from his general conduct, and the manner he rushed upon me, I considered my life in imminent danger, and drove him off with the hammer - I held him in my hands, to prevent his returning on me, and had no hostile intention towards him whatever - I did nothing more than I considered I was justified in doing in defending myself, when I considered I was in danger; I desired that he should leave my house peaceabley, which he would not do; I have evidence to prove his intention was to do me bodily harm before he would leave the house; as to swearing and calling his wife a wh - e, I have never sworn a profane oath for twenty-five years: as to calling her a wh - e, I never did, in the presence of your Lordship and God; I am a sober, steady man - I do not drink a pint of beer a day, nor spirits; I mind my own business, and nobody else, but he is a very violent person, and continues in no place long - he was determined not to leave me without doing me some injury; after this he continued in my house, and the Magistrate was obliged to order him out; and from what I have been informed my locks have been picked.

MR. ARNESON re-examined. Q. In wounds where no vessels are divided, is the mode in which you treat them merely closing it, and putting on adhesive-plaster? A. It is the most approved method, and if it heals without inflammation, that is all that is done.

SARAH EVERARD . On Friday, the 10th of August, I lived at the prisoner's house, in Philip-street - I am his housekeeper; Langford and his wife were lodgers. The prisoner was building an oven in his back kitchen - I was up stairs, in the back room, between five and six o'clock; the window was open, and commands a view of the kitchen, where he was - the oven was building by the kitchen wall; the wall was down, and open - the prosecutor occupied the parlour floor.

Q. If Mr. Langford had any thing to say to the prisoner, could he see him from the yard door very well, without going into the kitchen? A. Yes; the yard door commands a view of where he was, and was within a yard or a yard and a half of him - I heard some words pass between the prisoner and Mrs. Langford, but could not make out what it was; I was coming down stairs, in consequence of a knock at the door, and could see the yard door - Mrs. Langford was then in the yard, and Mr. Langford in the parlour; I heard Mr. Fuller say, "You good-for-nothing muck," and with that Mr. Langford came out, and said,"How dare you call my wife a wh - e?" he came out of the parlour, and ran furiously towards the back door - (he did not walk slowly, with his arms down) when he got to the back door, he rushed violently into the back kitchen; the prisoner was at that time working at the oven - there was a hammer there; I did not see him use it, and there was a trowel - when the prosecutor rushed into the kitchen, the prisoner was at the oven, which stands in the corner, and it was impossible for him to defend himself.

Q. On your oath, till Mr. Langford rushed violently into the kitchen, did he come from the oven? A. I never saw him; he could not rush from the oven without my seeing him; when Langford rushed in, it appeared to be with his fist clenched - I saw Langford strike the prisoner in the forehead immediately he came into the kitchen - the prisoner did not strike any blow with a hammer, or any thing, till he received the blow from Langford; I saw one blow, and do not know whether Langford struck more - he appeared to be in a very violent passion indeed, and Mrs. Langford appeared very ill-natured and spiteful; immediately as the blood came she ran to the door; she first of all fell upon the prisoner, to disengage her husband - the prisoner had not seized Langford when he struck him.

Q. What did he do to Langford when Langford struck him? A. I do not know, but I saw the blood come; there was no blood till after Langford struck the prisoner - I distinctly saw him strike him.

Q. When did Mrs. Langford rush upon the prisoner? A. The moment the blood came - he had done nothing to her at that time; he appeared to me to strike her in the scuffle, not on purpose; I am sure no blow was struck at her or the baby - he was very fond of the child; the prosecutor's conduct to the prisoner since he has been in the house was very insolent indeed, and very abusive.

COURT. Q. Did you see the prisoner strike any blow? A. No; but I saw the blood come from the prosecutor over his face, but saw no blow struck; I have been the prisoner's housekeeper about five years; he is a widower, I believe; we have three rooms; the back kitchen, the parlour, and the room over it; we have only one chamber - there are two beds, both in the same room.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY on the 3rd Count - DEATH . Aged 48.[Sept. 11.]

Reference Number: t18320906-15

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1741. SAMUEL AUSTIN and SARAH NEWMAN were indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Petty , on the 20th of August , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , putting

him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, I handkerchief, value 4s., his property .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

HENRY PETTY (Police-constable N 92.) On Monday, the 20th of August , about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was on duty near Haggerstone-bridge; there was no other Policeman within hearing - I was going up my beat, and heard cries of Police! and Murder! I made the best of my way towards the spot, and two gentlemen came running down my beat; I stopped one, who made a complaint to me; I stopped him, thinking he might be an offender- at that moment three girls came up, and struck him violently, and as soon as I got them from him he ran off, and four men and the three women came and attacked me, knocked me down, kicked me about as long as they pleased, and robbed me of my handkerchief, which I had in my hand - they kicked me about, and left me all on a sudden; both the prisoners were among those persons, I can swear; the prisoner Austin kicked me violently several times while I was down, and struck me while I was falling - Newman tore my face; I cannot say who took my handkerchief; they searched me all over, and particularly the outside of my watch-pocket; they knocked me about as much as they pleased - I called Murder! till I was exhausted, but no assistance came - they left me altogether, and in the road began singing and dancing; I got up as soon as I could, sprung my rattle, and hallooed Murder! some of my brother officers came up, and went to look for them, and at that time found only three men; they were under Haggerstone-bridge - they were armed with a pailing each; Austin was one of them; they run from under the bridge into the field - Austin was taken, with the assistance of my brother officers, that night; that was not the prisoner at the bar, but his brother - the prisoner was not taken that night; only two were taken that night, and I swore to one at the office on the Friday - in consequence of information, I accompanied my serjeant, on the 28th of August, to the prisoner Newman's house, at Haggerstone; her mother kept the house - as soon as we went in, the serjeant asked me which was the one, and I immediately pointed her out; he charged her with taking the handkerchief, which she denied; he afterwards charged her with having the ticket of the handkerchief in her possession - she denied that, and said she did not know any thing of it; the serjeant searched, and in a drawer in the house found the duplicate of the handkerchief - (handkerchief produced) - this is mine, and what I lost that night; I have had it two years; we took her into custody, and as we took her to the station-house she said she hoped we would not make one girl suffer for all, and that Sam Austin gave her the ticket; she told us where he lived - after securing her, we went and secured him; I knew him again directly, and had not the least doubt of him - we afterwards went to the pawnbroker's with the duplicate - I saw my handkerchief, and swore to it.

Austin. I was in bed by ten o'clock.

JOSEPH MELLISH . I am serjeant to the division of the Police to which the prosecutor belongs - I was not present at the transaction. In consequence of information, I went to assist in apprehending the prisoners; I have heard Petty's account of taking the woman - it is true; he knew her directly, and pointed her out among four in the room, without hesitation; I have the duplicate which I found in her drawer - she said nothing; I assisted in taking the man.

WILLIAM JOHN HEWITSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Kingsland-road. I have the handkerchief here, and the duplicate I made out with it - the duplicate found in the drawer corresponds with it; it was pawned by a person very much like the male prisoner, but I cannot swear to him - I should rather say he was the man than that he was not; it was pawned on the 21st of August, about twelve o'clock in the day.

Austin's Defence. I was sitting in the George the Fourth public-house - I went home that night just as the clock struck ten, and went to bed - I was not out of bed again till six o'clock in the morning, when I was going to work; as I went over the bridge after my work, I picked up a ticket - this girl ran up to me, and said, "What have you picked up?" I said, "This ticket, it is of no use to me, you may have it."

Newman's Defence. I came up accidentally on the bridge next morning, and who should I see but Austin; he said he had picked up a ticket, and I might have it, if it was of any use to me - I put it in my drawer.

JOSEPH HOOKER . I am a cabinet-maker, and live at No. 21, Harford-street, Heggerstone. The prisoner Newman, was with me at Camberwell Fair on the night in question - we arrived at Haggerstone about eleven o'clock at night; she was in my cart, and rode home with me - we then went to the George the Fourth at Haggerstone bridge; after we came out of the house, which was about half-past twelve o'clock - we were coming home, and heard a cry of Murder! there were two or three young men and a Policeman down on the ground - they were beating him about; when he got up, my wife said to him, "Good God! I thought they were going to murder you;" he said nothing, but went across the bridge, and brought two more Policeman - they took two young men, and took them to the watch-house; I, my wife, Newman, and her mother went to the watch-house to see what was done with them - he said he had lost a handkerchief and half-a-crown, that there were several women outside, and he should like to have them searched - the women were called in - my wife, Newman, and her mother; the Policeman said, "Is this one?" (meaning my wife); she said, "Do you mean to say I touched you?" he said No, she said, "All I said was, 'are they going to murder you?" Newman was present, but he said nothing to her - I can take my oath she was twenty yards from him; she remained at large till the day her mother was buried, and coming from the church-yard she was taken.

COURT. Q. How near was she to the Policeman? A. About thirty or forty yards.

Q. You said twenty before? A. Twenty or thirty - I was about thirty yards from the spot.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Seeing him ill-treated, and his life in danger, I suppose you assisted him? A. I said,"If he would be quiet, I would point out the person to him;" I had a child in my arms at the time.

Q. Your wife could hold the child I suppose? A. She was going on about thirty yards ahead - both my wife and the prisoner's mother were going towards Haggerstone - they were ahead.

Q. Towards the robbery, or away from it? A. Away

from it; the moment the Policeman was attacked, I gave my wife the child, and said I would tell the Policeman who had attacked him in that manner - I knew them by sight, not further; I am not acquainted with the prisoners; I only know Newman by where she works - the female prisoner, my wife, and her mother went to the watch-house.

Q. Were there other people in the watch-house? A. Nobody but the Policeman - I am positively sure the female prisoner went in.

Q. How came she in your company again, having got thirty yards ahead? A. It was my wife and mother that went on; the prisoner was by my side.

Q. Why could not the prisoner hold the child? A. She went to her mother, because a gentleman came up, and said she was one of the party.

Q. When was that, after the Policeman got up? A. It was before the Policeman was knocked down at all.

Q. Do you mean it was before his handkerchief was taken, or when they came up, and attacked him with sticks? A. A young man came up, and said, "Did you hear the cry of murder?" - I said, Yes; he said, "Well, come along with me to search;" we went down to the side of the canal, and met a Policeman with two or three young men - my wife is not here, nor my mother - it was Newman's mother who is dead; I declare Sarah Newman was not near the spot.

COURT. Q. Then you came up before the Policeman was knocked down. A. I was coming across the bridge when the cry of murder was; when I got up to him, he was down - Sarah Newman, my wife, and her mother all went up the watch-house to see what it was.

HENRY PETTY . When I took the men to the watch-house, three women came up; I did not desire to have them called in - they crushed in; they all pushed in - they were all very much in liquor at the time; the prisoner Newman was not one of those three - I am sure of that; I only knew one of them, and that was Newman's mother - she was very much in liquor.

JOSEPH HOOKER re-examined. Q. At what time did you go to the fair? A. About one o'clock in the afternoon; I came away about nine, and got to Haggerstone about eleven, in a donkey cart - we were all sober I declare; we had but one pot of beer the whole day till we arrived at Haggerstone.

Q. How had you been employed at the fair from one o'clock till nine? A. We took some fruit down to sell; a young man who I took down did - I stood by his stall all the time; I did not sell fruit - I merely went with him; he is not here - he did not come home with us; the prisoner's mother did not go with us.

Q. How came she in your company? A. When we came home, she said she would go and have a pint of beer with us, and we went to the George the Fourth; we left that house about half-past eleven or a quarter to twelve o'clock - my wife is at home; the Policeman says I was not there, now, he gave me an answer in the watchhouse.

HENRY PETTY . I saw him at the watch-house; he came up with the three women - he was in liquor; I do not say he was drunk.

One witness gave Newman a good character.

AUSTIN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

NEWMAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.[Sept. 12]

Reference Number: t18320906-16

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1742. WILLIAM KENNEDY and WILLIAM BROWN were indicted for the wilful murder of William Wilkinson .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS WILLIAM SMALES . I am a printer and stationer, and live in Aldersgate-street. I was acquainted with the deceased, Mr. Wilkinson; he was in the employ of a gentleman in the City. On Tuesday, the 17th of July, I accompanied him on the river; we started at nine o'clock precisely from Bull-stairs, Blackfriars - we were in a funny, and had no waterman, but rowed overselves; when we got near Vauxhall-bridge , I observed two boats, one a little ahead of us, and the other by the side of us - at the suggestion of Mr. Wilkinson, I made some exertion to prevent the boats getting a-head of us, and we got through the bridge as far as the Spread Eagle - one boat had then got by us, and I saw no more of it; it had shot ahead - when we got to the Spread Eagle we rested on our oars, the other boat being astern of us; we were about fourteen or fifteen yards from the shore on the Middlesex side - I pulled out my watch, and it wanted two minutes to ten o'clock; we remained there, and the boat which was astern shot past us, between us and the shore - I had observed two men in that boat; we remained there till the clock struck - we then went about forty yards further; the boat which had shot ahead between us and the shore ran foul of us - it had turned round and met us; it ran foul of us by rowing the head of their boat against ours - the head of their boat was outside the shore, more from the shore than our boat was; Mr. Wilkinson said, "We are foul of a boat, Smales, lend me a hand to shove off" - I got up in the boat, and at that moment their boat's head had advanced to the centre of ours, side by side, we being nearest to the shore; one of the men in the boat locked the two boats together with his hand, by taking hold of our boat, and holding them together - the other man darted his hand into our boat, and snatched two coats which laid at Mr. Wilkinson's feet; they were mine and Mr. Wilkinson's - he took them out of our boat into his own; I raised the oar out of the water as fast as I could, and endeavoured to strike them - that was the oar nearest to the shore; I was rowing one oar, and Mr. Wilkinson the other - I endeavoured to strike, and at that moment the strange boat was going off; Mr. Wilkinson jumped up in our boat, and endeavoured to jump into the strange boat - the two boats were at that time about six feet apart; I was looking at him when he made the jump, and he jumped into the water - he did not get close to their boat; he caught the gunnel of it with his left hand - he jumped into the water, but his head did not go under water; he caught the gunnel so as to keep his head above water all the time - I am sure of that.

Q. Can you say whether he did or did not strike his head, or any part of his person against the boat? A. I

am certain he did not strike any part of his person against the boat when he jumped from ours; he could barely reach it with his left hand - after he had got hold of the boat with his left hand, the men that were in the strange boat began to strike him with their sculls; he was endeavouring to get his coat - he still kept hold of the boat with his left hand only, and was struggling with them with his right hand at the time they were striking him.

Q. Was he then closer to the boat than when he first jumped? A. He was holding on with his left hand; his body was close to the gunnel of the boat then, and his head came just above the gunnel; I saw both the men in the boat strike him on the head - I cannot say how many blows they struck; one seemed to strike, and then the other, as if they struck in turns - several blows were given- they appeared to be given with force; he had no hat on- I did not observe them strike him any where but on the head; the blows I saw struck were given with the sculls - I cannot say that I saw any thing else used to strike with.

Q. Did the men hold them in one hand, or two? A. I was so much alarmed, I did not notice - he held by the gunnel of the boat for three or four minutes, I suppose; I saw him quit the boat - he appeared to have received a blow, or something then, which sent him back on the water.

Q. How did he fall from the boat? A. He seemed to leave go his hold, and fall back with his head on the surface of the water; I had seen blows struck the moment before.

Q. Observing him in this state, what did you do? A. I threw him out a scull or oar from our boat, and called to him to take hold of it; he did not do so, but made again for their boat - he was nearest to their boat then, considerably; he did not quite reach their boat again - he got within about a yard of it; he had gone four or five yards when I called to him to take hold of the oar - he was thrown back on the water, and appeared to recover himself again, and make towards the strange boat; he was swimming in the water - he was considerably out of his depth; when he got within about a yard of their boat again, he was either pushed or struck away from it by some means.

Q. Did you see the scull or any thing belonging to the boat used on that occasion? A. I could not see the article; it appeared to me to be something, but I could not tell what it was.

Q. Did you see the effect it produced on Mr. Wilkinson? A. He left the boat immediately, and commenced plunging.

Q. What do you mean by that? A. Different from swimming - he was going down, and struggling with his legs; he was up and down five or six times, and then finally sunk, and I saw no more of him.

Q. You endeavoured to strike the men in the boat when the coats were taken - can you say with certainly whether, in that attempt, you struck Mr. Wilkinson or not? A. Most assuredly I did not; he jumped from the boat after I made the blow at them - he was in the boat at the time; the tide was running down at the time - it was in favour of their boat; their boat then made across the river, in a sloping direction - Wilkinson was between our boat and theirs when he struggled and went down, rather nearer to our boat, I think, as the other was then going across; they began to go across at the moment they pushed him, or struck him, when what I name happened; I called Murder! and brought assistance from the shore - the river was searched, and the body found twenty-eight hours after: I recognize Kennedy as one of the men in the boat - I saw the body next day; it was the body of Mr. Wilkinson - it was the body Mr. Davis examined.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the tide running down when you rowed from Vauxhall-bridge? A. It was; we were rowing against the tide, in order that we might come down with it - we were not very near the shore before we saw the strange boat; I am not much accustomed to the water - I know how to manage a boat; I am not particularly acquainted with the currents of the river - I know when a man is going against tide; the further he is from shore the greater labour - Mr. Wilkinson was desirous of not being overtaken by the boat which was astern, but it ultimately got by.

Q. When if afterwards run foul of you, did it not drift on you? A. I cannot tell; it struck us in a moment - it was a very nice night indeed; the moon was rising on the other side - I swear it was a light night; I never said it was dark, that I recollect; I do not know that I ever said so - I told Mr. Wilkinson the time by my watch, two minutes before ten, and if it had been very dark, I could not have done that - I will not swear I have not said it was dark, because in the state I was in after the accident, I possibly might have said many things, for I was obliged to be rowed ashore; I believe I did say that I struck once or twice; I said I did not know whether I hit the prisoners or not; I do not know whether the blow took effect.

Q. Did you say you might have struck more than once or twice? A. No, I am quite sure of that - to the best of my knowledge I never said I struck more than once or twice; I will swear I never said I struck more than twice; and swear that I did not do so.

Q. Will you swear you did not strike after your friend was out of the boat? A. I will positively, nor did I strike at any body - the light was as nights generally are, at that time of the year; I could see the boats very near half across the river - I swear that: I recollect the moon was rising on the other side - it was just showing itself; their boat was as near as possible six feet from ours when my friend jumped at it - I was about the middle of the boat then, with an oar in my hand.

Q. It was not more than six feet? A. When he took a spring out of our boat, it drove our boat down the stream - he had not told me he was going to jump; he jumped from the head of the boat - I had an oar in my hand, which I had been attempting to strike the prisoners with, and I had been rowing with it; I was standing when Mr. Wilkinson jumped; the prisoners' boat at that moment was somewhere about even with ours, and about six feet from us.

Q. Might you not, with your oar, have secured the boat, and brought it alongside yours? A. I was thunderstruck at his jumping out of the boat - he

jumped towards the side of their boat; his hand caught hold of the rullock, the place where the oars go.

Q. Do you mean to say you could distinctly see that his face was not struck with the rullock? A. I could not see between his face and their boat, but his left hand caught hold of the rullock; as far as I could possibly distinguish, his head did not go near the boat till he pulled himself to it - his face was sideways at first, and his left hand caught hold of the boat; I am sure he did not strike himself as he jumped out - I thought you meant, could I say his face did not strike while he held to the boat.

Q. On your oath, at the very time he jumped, did you not strike at the prisoners' boat? A. I did not, I had just given a blow - I may have given two blows, but it was while the boat was alongside; I did not give any blow after he jumped - he wished to jump into the boat; he was five feet ten inches high.

Q. His length would come within two inches of the boat then? A. The boat he was in gave way with his jumping, and he got just near enough to catch hold of the boat with his left hand - his body did not touch the boat at that moment; I do not know whether he could swim - I never saw him swim; when he made the second effort to get to the boat, I was about twenty or thirty yards from it - I saw the prisoners strike him.

Q. Well, but the second time? A. He was either struck or pushed with something - I was looking at the boat.

Q. What better means had you of seeing what passed at first, than then? A. Why, I got more frightened, and was screaming Murder! and for help - I cannot say whether he was pushed from the boat, or whether he was struck; if he had been struck with a scull then, I should have seen that - I swear I saw two sculls in their boat when they were striking, sculls or oars; we had both sculls and oars in our boat - I threw my friend out an oar, to catch hold of, when he fell back; thinking he was coming towards my boat - he did not take that, but got towards the prisoners boat again; my oar did not go near him - the boats were twenty or thirty yards distant at that time; I threw the oar as far as I could - I was a good deal agitated and alarmed, but I am sure I did not strike him with it, for he did not come near it; I threw one oar and one scull overboard - I cannot tell which went nearest to him; I do not know which I threw first - I threw them towards him; I cannot tell whether they went to the right or left of him - I know they did not go near him; it would go with the tide - I appeared to have got them out about half way between him and my boat, which was twenty or thirty yards from him at the time - he was nearer their boat; it was a very awkward thing to throw - I threw it into the water as near to him as I could - I did not look at the oar to ascertain if it was bruised any where; I saw the prisoners skiff.

Q. Did you not see the mark of your oar on the gunnel of their skiff? A. Decidedly not.

Q. I do not mean that night? A. I have not examined it, only the general appearance of it - I have not ascertained whether there is a mark or not on it; my friend never went down till he was pushed away from the boat - the prisoners attempted to row across the river, immediately on their shoving or striking him away; he went up and down five or six times - I sat down, and endeavoured to row towards him, but having one scull and one oar, the oar overpowered the scull, and sent it back again; I cannot row with an oar and scull, nor can one man in ten.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You are not quite clear whether you struck one blow or two? A. No; nor whether they took effect on the persons in the boat; I struck towards the boat - I am quite certain Mr. Wilkinson was in the boat at the time I struck the blow or blows - I struck no blow after he was out; the moment the boats separated, he jumped, seeing them going off - I am certain the oar and scull I threw out, went considerably short of Mr. Wilkinson's person.

JOHN ROWAN . I am what is called jack-in-the-water, at the Spread Eagle, Millbank. On the night of the 17th of July I was on the causeway till ten minutes before ten o'clock, when the last boat went away; I was then standing at the water edge, about forty yards from the house; I took my stool to the house; and about five minutes past ten I heard cries of Murder! - I got out of a boat's head, in which I was laying, but did not attend to the cry, till I heard it a second time - I heard a guggling; I knew then it was somebody drowning; I ran to the house, and as I ascended the stairs, I heard the guggling a second time - I called the waiter - he came instantly with me to the causeway, got into a gentleman's boat, and before we took twenty strokes, we came alongside of a boat, with Mr. Smales standing up in it - he put his hands together, and said,"My friend is gone!"

Cross-examined. Q. What sort of a night was it? A. A dark night; the moon had not risen.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Was there a moon that night. A. There was; it might be rising, but not to throw any light on the river - it was very dark at the time; Mr. Smales pointed the direction the boat had gone in, but I did not see it - the funny was about forty yards from shore, when I heard the guggling noise; I could not discern any boats.

JAMES ADAMS . I live with my father, who is a picturedealer. On Tuesday night, the 17th of July, about five minutes after ten o'clock, I was at Millbank - about forty yards from the Spread Eagle, I saw two boats; I did not see the funny which the gentlemen were in - when I first saw the two boats, they were about four yards apart; two persons were in each boat - I could see that from the shore; the moon was just coming over the houses; I saw one boat come to the other, and saw one leave the other, and go right over.

Q. Before it left the other, and went over, did you see what was done? A. I observed a pole go up by the shadow of the moon; I could not see in which boat it went up - I do not know what was done with it; it was not light enough to see - it went down again towards the boat which was going away; there was two men in each boat at that time - I afterwards heard a cry of murder.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it at the same time as you saw the pole go up, that you heard the cry of murder? A. No, I saw the pole after murder was called; I saw the shadow of the pole about two minutes after I heard

the cry of murder - the pole was going towards the boat, which was rowing away.

ROBERT GARE . I am a painter, and live in Fore-street, Lambeth. On the evening of the 17th of July I saw the prisoner Brown; I do not know the time, as I had been asleep - I went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock, and it was after that time; I cannot tell how long I had been asleep - Brown came and knocked at my door; I asked who was there - he said, Me! I got up, and when I opened the door, he asked me if I would be so good as to let him leave his coat there till morning; he said nothing else - I said, "Very well," and he put the coat down; he gave me no reason for leaving it - I knew him before; I did not observe any thing particular about him - he did not appear to have been walking in a hurry; I heard he was taken up next morning, and took the coat to Jane Spicer, my mother.

Cross-examined. Q. You had been to school with him? A. Yes; he always bore the character of an inoffensive man.

JANE SPICER . I am the last witness' mother; I received a coat from him on a Wednesday in July last, and gave it to a gentleman - this is it (looking at it.)

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer. I received this coat from Mrs. Spicer, and have had the care of it ever since.

JAMES EVANS . I am an officer. I produce a coat which I found in a barge's head at Talbot's premises at Lambeth, under the head sheets; I found it in consequence of a statement made to me by Kitley.

JAMES KITLEY . I am a waterman's apprentice. On Tuesday, the 17th of July, I was employed in the barge, Hieron, which was under repair at Lambeth; I know both the prisoners - Kennedy had been sleeping on board that barge for some time before the 17th; on Tuesday, the 17th, about ten o'clock, I think, but cannot tell, as I never looked at the clock, Kennedy came to me for the key - my barge laid about a mile and a quarter from the Spread Eagle; he appeared to me to be in a muck sweat I told him I was going myself directly, but he pressed me to give him the key - I did, and he went towards the barge by himself - I went myself in less than half an hour, and slept on board that night, and a person named Flack; I did not see Kennedy when I went into the cabin, but he must have been there, for he got up with me and Flack in the morning, and he, Flack, and I, went to a beer-shop kept by Bean; I asked Bean's son for a light - he said they had no fire; Kennedy pulled out some papers and a book out of his pocket - he tore some of the papers, saying he wanted to burn them, and I tore some of them, not knowing what they were; the pieces were thrown into the grate of the room we were in - a light was brought in at last - Flack lighted his pipe, and threw the paper which he lighted it with into the grate, and the papers caught fire; I cannot say whether they were partly or entirely burnt - I was going out in about an hour, when the officers came and took Kennedy into custody; they afterwards called me - I went to them, and went before the Magistrate with them, and after we had been before the Magistrate, Kennedy told me, that he and Brown were guilty, but he would turn up me, Lyons, and Flack; we were all in custody under suspicion at the time, but he said we need not fear, for he would turn us up - he told me he had put one of the coats in a barge at the back of a barge-buileder's place, but the barge-builder had moved away; I informed a gentleman at the office of it; Evans, was present, and I described where the barge was.

Cross-examined. Q. You informed nobody of it till you was taken up? A. No, I did not know of it - I did not know whether he might have picked the papers up; I took one paper in my hand, and said, "Let us read this," and he snatched it out of my hand - I went into the house to have some beer, and knew nothing of the papers till I got in there; I asked for the light, as Kennedy asked me to ask for one - he did not tell me that night that he had stolen the coats; I do not recollect seeing him in the barge - I had been out drinking with some young men that night; I do not think he can read, but cannot swear he cannot - he told me after the examination, that he and Brown were guilty; he did not say of what - we were then in custody at the Thames Police office; he told me where he had put the coat - that is what he was speaking of when he said he was guilty, and he said, "When I get cast I shall pray;" I said, "My good! Bill, if you are guilty, now is the time to pray."

JOHN BEAN . I am a carpenter, and keep a beer-shop. On the morning of the 18th of July I saw Kennedy at my premises, in conversation with others; after they had been there, in consequence of what I heard I looked into the grate, found a bit or two of paper, and took them to the prison-ship, on the Thames, and gave them to Mitchell, the Thames Police officer - there had been no paper or fire in the grate before these men came - my son had found some papers before me.

JOHN BEAN , JUN. I am the son of the last witness. On the morning of the 18th of July Kennedy, and some others, were at the house; after they left, my little brother found some papers under the grate - he is not here; about half-past six o'clock that morning Kennedy, Kitley, and another came to the house; they asked why we had not got a fire; I said we did not want one this warm weather - I took no more notice of them, but turned round afterwards, as they seemed shy of me; I saw Kitley and Kennedy with a pocket-book, tearing up some bills, which they put into the grate, and they were burnt - I saw no part of them that was not burnt.

Cross-examined. Q. Kitely was the one who interested himself about the light and paper? A. Yes.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am a Thames Police-surveyor. I received some papers from Bean, Sen. which I produce.

JAMES SHEARAM . I am apprentice to Mr. Moore, boatbuilder, Lambeth. On Tuesday, the 17th of July, between half-past nine and a quarter to ten o'clock, I saw the prisoners ashore at my master's place - I did not speak to them; one lifted up a wherry belonging to Mr. Green, and said what a light one it was; a skiff of Mr. Moore's was laying there at the time - I went away, leaving them there, and on returning, in about ten minutes, they were gone; I did not go down to see if the skiff was there, but it was missed next morning - I knew the prisoners before, and am sure of their persons.

SARAH COVINGTON . I live in William-street, High-street, Lambeth. On the 17th of July, a few minutes past eleven o'clock at night, I remember Brown coming

in; his mother lodges there - as he went through the passage he was saying something to himself.

THOMAS WILLIAM SMALES re-examined. (Examining the coat) this is my coat, which I had in the boat on the night in question; and I believe this one to be Mr. Wilkinson's, but cannot swear to it; I know his hand-writing; it is on two or three of these pieces of paper.

JOHN PETTY (Police-constable No. 102). On the 19th of July I was on duty on the Thames-bank, above Vauxhall-bridge, and found the body of a man in the river, about two o'clock in the morning - he had no coat nor hat on; I observed that his shirt collar was bloody, and blood coming out of one ear, and his nose was cut - the body was wheeled up to Mrs. Foster's, and examined by a surgeon at the inquest; I was not present.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am a surgeon, of Upper Belgrave-place, Pimlico. On the 19th of July I examined the body of the deceased in an out-house at the Spread Eagle; it was afterwards opened, in my presence, at a house in Jewin-street; there was a wound on the bridge of the nose, about an inch long - the bone was bare, and slightly broken; there were marks of a considerable bruise on the forehead - and on nearly the whole forehead there was extravasation of blood under the skin; there was the mark of a bruise behind the right ear to a slight extent, and also behind the left ear; the wounds behind each ear were slight, and about the size of a half-crown; there was a slight bruise on the back of one hand, and I think it was the left hand; I observed no other appearance of external violence - the body was afterwards opened in my presence, and on the surface of the brain there was an extravasation of blood on the upper part, as large as my hand; it was quite at the top of the head, and external to a certain degree backwards - there was no external mark there at all; there was no further appearance of injury within the head - the injury on the forehead did not extend beyond the bone; I observed no appearances in any other part of the body.

Q. To what do you attribute his death? A. My opinion is, that the blow on the nose or forehead produced stunning, and he was incapable of supporting himself in the water; I attribute the extravasation of blood on the top of the head to the blows on the forehead and nose - those injuries were sufficient to cause death ultimately; I consider the immediate cause of his death to be, that he was stunned by the blow, and being incapable of exerting himself in the water, the drowning completed his death.

Cross-examined. Q. He died by drowning? A. I consider he would not have drowned if it had not been from the blow on the head.

Q. Suppose he had reeled from the boat by a blow or shove, and afterwards recovered himself so as to make towards the boat again, should you consider that man stunned? A. There are different sorts of stunning - a blow over the nose might stun him; it is very common for a blow on the nose or forehead to cause blood on the head - the extravasation of blood was on the surface of the brain, not on the top of the head; and that certainly might have been the effect of a blow on the forehead - it very commonly produces extravasation in front of the forehead, and the internal injury on the brain also; if the body had struck against any thing in the water after death there would be external appearances probably, and extravasted blood - I state that as my experience; a dead body receiving a blow would not exhibit a mark of a bruise to the same extent, but there would be the appearance of it something similar to blows inflicted during life; there would be a difference between blood coagulated and not - the appearances depend on the blood under the surface; there would be a slight difference in the colour, and a certain degree of redness - I do not say it is necessarily so - I have known instances of blows after death where there have been no appearances, it depends on the degree of violence, and how long after death - the appearances I found on the brain could not be the effect of a blow after death; this injury would have caused inflammation, which is frequently fatal - I swear the blow on the forehead was a mortal wound, but the cause of death was drowning.

COURT. Q. Could extravasation of blood on the brain be produced by suffocation in drowning? A. I am not aware that drowning ever occasioned such appearances.

EDWARD WILLIAM SYMONS . I am chief clerk at the Thames Police-office, and produce the examination of the prisoners. The first examination was on the 18th of July - I have my book containing the original examination - the examinations returned to the Court are fairly copied from the book, and read over to the witnesses, in the prisoners' presence; this statement is my hand-writing, and is signed by Captain Richbell, the Magistrate - I think it was read over to the prisoners, but am not sure; I took it in my book from their own lips, sentence by sentence, and think I read it over to them - they have not signed it; they were under examination on this charge; nothing was said to induce them to make the statement -I think what they stated on the 18th was not read to them; here is the entry made by me in the book from their months on the 18th of July.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the Magistrate sign that book? A. No - he was present when it was taken; I am quite positive every word that occurred was taken down accurately - I think the subsequent statement was read over to them; the copies which are verified by the Magistrate were not made in their presence.

COURT. He may use his book to refresh his memory as to what passed.

Witness. On the 18th Kennedy said "I was at Mr. Bean's beer-shop all day, and went on board the barge just after the clock struck ten - Kitley and Flack went with me; I turned out this morning a few minutes before six o'clock, or after I cannot tell to a minute, and went to Mr. Bean's - I walked afterwards down High-street, and coming back again Kitley said to me "The officer has been here, inquiring after you;" I said, "Which way is he gone? I will go after him;" directly, the officer came and said, 'Kitley, I want you.'" Brown said, "Last night I was standing at the corner of Princes-street, about a quarter to nine o'clock, and some young chaps asked me whether I would go and have some beer at the Feathers - I said' No, I have no money - I mean to take a walk;" a young chap who works in a Dartford barge came up, and asked me to take a walk - we went down Bishop's-walk, round the Westminster-road, and down the Newcut - we went up as far as Blackfriars-bridge and back,

then we went down Union-street, and round the Borough, along by the Elephant and Castle, and there I left him - then we came down by Bethlem, and along High-street, home; directly I got in doors I went to bed, and as soon as I got to bed the clock struck eleven." - They were remanded for further examination, and brought up again on the 26th of July, and at the close of the examination were asked if they had any thing to say - Kennedy said, "I have nothing more to say than what I said before - that is that I am not guilty of drowning the man; I was in the boat at the time, but neither one nor the other did not strike him - his own friend made a stroke at me, and instead of striking me he struck his friend; that is all I have got to say." - Brown said, "I never touched no coat, nor never got off my seat where I sat on, nor never struck no blow, nor lifted any thing to strike with - I have nothing more to say." Kennedy then said, "Can I speak again - when Mr. Wilkinson struck me he went along the boat with one hand over the other, till he got to the stern of the boat; he made three or four attempts to leave go, and he left go at the stern of the boat; with taking the spring out of his own boat, and leaping over into ours, just as though he was coming head first into our boat - the answer he made, says he, 'Oh, I have hurt myself,' but very lowly spoke; I should suppose he must have come with his face first against the boat, for he only just caught hold with his hands - that is all."

Kennedy's Defence (written). My Lord, and Gentleman of the Jury, - Placed as I am this day before you, upon so solemn and grave a charge, my feelings, as you must naturally suppose, are most powerfully worked upon; and indeed so overcome am I at this time, that I hardly know how to address you; if, therefore, I should be censured for saying so little upon so serious a charge, I trust that it may not be construed into a supposed indifference as to my truly awful situation. My Lords and Gentlemen, as there have appeared in the daily papers various reports relative to the unfortunate affair which now engrosses your solemn and serious attention, and as many of those reports are erroneous, and have reflected (and severely so too) upon the character and disposition of myself and my unfortunate companion, I do most earnestly entreat that you will at once divest your minds of any undue impression that those reports may have made, and which I am sure you will do. My Lords and Gentlemen, - as regards the evidence which you have this day heard, there is little remark I have to make thereon; but trust you will allow me to assure you (and in this trying and awful moment I would not deceive), that neither I nor my companion went out with a premeditation to do the slightest personal violence. I was distressed to the utmost at the time, as my witnesses will prove to you; but I accompanied my fellow prisoner, and started out on the fatal evening, under different intentions. We went out to obtain a few coals - we saw the deceased's boat - we arranged to approach them, to see who they were; we observed the deceased and his friend had their coats off - we agreed to try and get their coats - we succeeded; to recover them the deceased jumped overboard, towards our boat: he jumped with his face against the boat; he said, "Oh! I have hurt myself." While in the water the deceased's friend, Mr. Smales, struck at me three times with his oar - Mr. Smales' blows fell on deceased's head. After the third blow with Mr. Smales' oar, deceased left go his hold of our boat; my fellowprisoner began to row away - I had no scull, having lost mine overboard at the time I took the two coats out of their boat: we succeeded in getting away; I had no idea that the deceased was in any peril or danger of his life, for he was close to his friend's boat, and made a splashing noise, as if swimming; I was unconscious that harm had ensued; and, Gentlemen, I can assure you that no one more than myself can more deeply lament and deplore the melancholy catastrophe. Depending, Gentlemen, upon your discrimination, intelligence, and impartiality, I trust and repose my unfortunate case to your hands, and look forward to a favourable result.

Brown's Defence (written). My Lords, and Gentlemen of the Jury, - The defence which my unfortunate fellow-prisoner has addressed to you, has embraced every circumstance connected with the melancholy occurrence which now demands your most solemn and serious attention; little, therefore, remains for me to say, but I trust you will pardon me while I intrude a short time upon your patience. The allusions which have been made by my fellow-prisoner, relative to the public prints, will not, I am sure, be unattended to, consequently I have little to apprehend on that head. My Lords and Gentlemen - I was legitimately born, but lost a kind and indulgent father when I was only eleven years of age; I was then sent to a parochial charity-school, at which I made small progress in education, and which, I am sorry to observe, was soon totally forgotten by me: I remained at school three years, and was then removed, since which period I have endeavoured to obtain an honest livelihood. I never was before in custody upon a criminal charge. My Lords and Gentlemen - allow me to say, that in conjuction with my fellow-prisoner, our intentions on that fatal evening were very opposite to personal injury or violence; and with him I deeply lament and deplore the melancholy catastrophe. Gentlemen - trusting to your calm and dispassionate view of the evidence which has been adduced, I submit my fate to your discriminating consideration, looking forward to a favourable result.

Five witnesses gave Kennedy a good character.

KENNEDY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

BROWN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.[Sept. 7.]

The prisoners have since been Respited during His Majesty's pleasure.

Reference Number: t18320906-17

OLD COURT, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER, 6.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1743. JOSEPH TURNER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Jones , on the 24th of July , and stealing 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 4s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., and 1 frock, value 2s., his property .

SARAH JONES . I am the wife of Thomas Jones; we live in Carpernter's-row, Walham-green, in the parish of Fulham . On the 24th of July I got up about half-past one o'clock in the morning, and went out about ten minutes to two, leaving my husband in bed - I was going to Covent-garden, with a head load; my brother-in-law, William Jones , went with me - I saw my brother-in-law latch the door, but it was not locked; the windows were all fast, and the back door bolted inside - my husband is a carter - I returned at half-past four o'clock, found the street door locked, and made a noise; my husband opened the door - the key was inside; the back door was open: we went up stairs, and found the box lid open, and these things gone; the box was in the room where my husband was sleeping - I had pulled that door too, but it had no

lock; I had seen the things in the box overnight - I saw footsteps from the back door, about three yards, and then over the wall; we traced footsteps till we came to the house where the prisoner's mother lived; I knew him before, and had seen him about twenty yards from the door when I went out at two o'clock; he made a reel, as if he was tipsy - I have only known him since he came from transportation, which is about ten months ago.

WILLIAM JONES. I am Thomas Jones' brother, and rent the first floor garret - he rents the middle room of Comber, the landlord, who is a market-gardener; my brother's bed-room is on the first floor - I pay my rent to the landlord. I went out in the morning with Sarah Jones , about ten minutes to two o'clock; I shut the door, and am certain I latched it, for I pushed it to try it - I saw the prisoner about twenty yards from the door, on the step of the house where his mother used to live - I pay my rent to the landlord; nobody else lives in the house.

SARAH JONES. I left my husband in bed, and pulled the bed-room door too, but it has no lock nor fastening at all - all the things were in a box in that room.

JAMES SELLS . I am a Police-constable. On the 24th of July, about half-past four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Belgrave-place, Pimlico, about two miles and a half from Walham-green; he had two coats on and two pairs of trousers - I went and asked where he was going; he said he had got up rather too soon, and was going to Jew's-row, Chelsea, to awake a friend to go to Coventgarden market; I asked where he lived - he said at Fulham; I told him he was going the contrary way - he said he came through Knightsbridge for a walk, being up too early - I took him to the station-house, and found this shawl, handkerchief, and stockings, all stuffed in the crown of his hat; he said he had bought them at a large linendraper's at Putney, at nine o'clock in the morning before; I asked if he bought them for his mother or sister, he said No, for his girl, and that he lived at No. 6, down the Almonry.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of stealing the goods, or breaking into the house - I bought them at a pawnbroker's, as I told the Policeman when he took me; I defy any body to say they saw me go near the house, or come out of it.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-18

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1744. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , 1 umbrella, value 20s. , the goods of Benjamin Tomkins . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-19

1745. WILLIAM SAWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 pair of boots, value 6s., and 5 pairs of shoes, value 12s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Chamberlain , and others, his masters .

JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN , JUN. I am in partnership with my father and brother - we are shoemaker s, and live in Milk-street ; the prisoner was in our employ; he worked in our house, but lodged out of it. In consequence of suspicion I had him taken into custody, and asked if he had any thing to communicate to me respecting what was happening in our concern; he said he had not - he went with us to his lodging; I found his wife there, and found a pair of boots and five pairs of shoes; he had nothing to do with manufacturing, only cutting out; these boots have been worn, and four pairs of the shoes - his wife was a binder; I can identify the whole of them; I am acquainted with our own manufacture, and most of them have marks - we never allowed him to take goods home; I claimed them in his presence - he said, "The pair of shoes which are not worn are here for my wife to repair;" there was a cut in them, and on trying them on his wife, I found they had been cut to fit her foot - he had worked for me eight years.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What was his duty? A. He was foreman of the manufacturing department; he gave out the materials; his wife could not have work to do without his knowledge; I swear to the manufacture of all the boots and shoes - each of them have our mark on them, which was made at the time they were given out to be made; they have no soles when sent to the binders' - our trade is entirely in the country and shipping; it was the prisoner's duty to see that shoes sent out were brought back - the prisoner never bought any shoes of me; it is not usually done.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I apprehended the prisoner, and went with the prosecutor to his lodgings, and found these articles; the prisoner said one pair had been brought there to repair; Mr. Chamberlain asked the wife to put one pair on, and then said he was satisfied what the cut was for.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutors .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18320906-20

1746. ROBERT DENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Frederick Vander Meulen , from his person .

FREDERICK VANDER MEULEN . I live at Bishop's Stortford, in Hertfordshire. On the 16th of July, between halfpast eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I was on Holborn-bridge - I felt a jerk at my pocket, looked round, and saw the prisoner and a boy about three years older than him; I saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - it was being handed from one to the other; I took it, and seized the prisoner, as he was the one who had it first - the other escaped; he said he found it on the ground.

WILLIAM BONUS . I am one of the City Police. I received the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 10. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-21

1747. ANN WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 1 purse, value 1s.; 10 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 4 shillings, 4 sixpences, three 15l. Bank-notes, and a bill of exchange for 50l., the property of Horatio Collman , her master .

HORATIO COLLMAN. I live at No. 41, Old Broad-street - the prisoner was four or five weeks in my service. On the 24th of July I had been to a wedding, and returned home about eleven o'clock; I saw my purse about six

and did not miss it till next morning; I was the worse for liquor, but was more tired than in liquor - I had been to Hackney, and was brought home in a glass coach; Mrs. Collman and other friends were with me; I had been there in the morning, and returned home to see some patients; I then went there to dinner, and with the toasts "Three times three" I was exhausted and unconscious.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? A. You may call me drunk, if you like, I do not think I was - I believe it was more fatigue and exhaustion; I do not know whether my purse was in my possession when I came home; I saw it lost at six o'clock - it then contained the bill and money stated in the indictment; I found next morning, about half-past seven o'clock, that I had lost it - the prisoner was the only servant who slept in the house; my friends undressed me in my bed-room, and threw my trousers in the corner of the room - the purse was in the trousers pocket; my clothes were afterwards removed to my dressing-room, which joins my bed-room; I had no suspicion of the prisoner at first; I stopped payment of the notes at the Bank - she remained with me till the 3rd of August, when she was taken up; my brother-in-law and his brother undressed me - I got the notes from the Bank, and have them here; I have not found the bill of exchange.

Prisoner. He sent me to Hackney next morning to look for his watch, and his mother-in-law brought it to town. Witness. I sent her to Hackney for my watch, as my wife told me it was left there; a friend had taken it to take care of, but I did not know it; the lady of the house brought it while the prisoner was gone for it; I was never drunk before in my life.

JOHN KNEEBONE DOUGLAS . I was shopman to a linendraper. I heard of the prosecutor's loss in August, and about four days before that (I now forget the date) the prisoner came to our shop and bought a shawl and goods amounting to 2l. 12s., for which she paid me a 5l. note - she then bought goods which came to less than 1l., and paid me another 5l. note; I am quite certain of her person - I wrote on the notes the name of Mrs. Alley, Waltham-stow, who, she said, was her mistress; I went to my employer's house - he took me to the prosecutor's, where I saw the prisoner, and was confident she was the person -I paid the notes to our cashier - (looking at two) these are them.

Prisoner. Mr. Collman's shopmen can prove I did not leave the house that night till after seven o'clock, but Mr. Collman has put them out of the way to prevent their coming. Witness. She paid me the notes between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; she said one note was her mistress's, and the other she received for her wages, which was her reason for changing both.

MR. COLLMAN. These are the notes which I had in my purse - I got the numbers from Esdaile's bank, where I received them; I did not know the numbers when I lost them - I have no writing on them; on my oath they are the notes, for I asked Esdaile's the numbers.

HENRY SLOW . On the 27th of July I received this 5l. note (looking at it) from a female; I cannot positively say who - I delivered it to Messrs. Thompson and Fearon, of Holborn Hill, my employers.

MR. COLLMAN. I did not know any of the numbers till I got them from the banker's.

SARAH BRODIE . I am a widow, and live in Half-Moon street, Bishopsgate-street. The prisoner came to me in July - I should think it was near a fortnight before she was taken up; she left a bundle with me, which the linendraper swore is the goods he sold her.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Collman's. I found nothing on her nor in her box; but after her committal, I received information, and being ill, I sent Marchant somewhere.

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I am an officer. I went to Mrs. Brodie's, and asked her for the property the prisoner had brought there - she gave me seven sovereigns and a half; they have no marks on them.

MRS. BRODIE. I gave him eight sovereigns - the prisoner left them with me; I do not know how she came by them - I have known her have two or three sovereigns at a time before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-22

1748. WILLIAM SMITH and JOHN MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 2 hats, value 17s. 6d. , the goods of George Payne .

GEORGE PAYNE , JUN. I am in the employ of my father, George Payne , a hatter , of St. Martin's-le-Grand . On the 20th of July, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon; these hats were on a side counter in the shop; I was sitting in the parlour, behind the shop, reading, when Moore came into the shop - I went to him; he asked the way to Castle-street, St. Martin's-le-Grand; I directed him to Castle-street, Falcon-square - while I was speaking to him, Tyrrell brought in Smith with two hats, which I claimed; Tyrrell immediately said to Moore, "Stop! I have seen you before" - he took them both into custody.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer of the Post-office. On the 20th of July I was on duty in front of the Postoffice, and saw the two prisoners, and another, in company, walking up and down on the opposite side several times; I observed them look into Mr. Payne's shop, and watched them - the one not in custody went into Mr. Payne's shop, and brought out two hats - the prisoners were outside, and could see him come out: he ran across the road, and went in at the south gate of the Post-Office - I went through the principal entrance, and met Smith at the back of the office; I took the two hats from him - I asked him where he was going with them; he said some boy had given them to him to carry - I took him into Mr. Payne's shop; I saw Moore there, and asked what he had been inquiring for - I took them both, having seen them all three together in company.

Moore. Q. Where was I when the man brought the hats out? A. You stood at a post about two doors from the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Smith's Defence. I was walking down the back of the Post-office; a lad came and asked me to direct him to Moorfields, and asked me to hold the hats, while he tied his shoe - directly I got them, an officer came up.

Moore's Defence. I was going to meet a young man, named Hendon; I did not exactly know Castle-street, where I was to meet him - I met two young men in St. Martin's-le-Grand, and asked them to direct me; they

said they did not know it - I went into this shop, and the officer detained me.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I consider they were all three in company; when one stopped, they all stopped, and when the other went into this shop, Moore stood by the post - I saw them walking together in company, before the hats taken.

MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-23

1749. MICHAEL CRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Oakes , from his person .

JOHN OAKES. I live in Salisbury-court, Fleet-street. On the 26th of August, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I lost my handkerchief at the bottom of Farringdon-street, near Holborn-bridge ; I had used it ten minutes before - I have not found it; I did not observe the prisoner near me.

THOMAS JOHNSON . I am a warehouseman in Cateaton-street. On the 26th of August, I was at a first floor window of a house in Farringdon street, and saw Mr. Oakes walking with a lady; I saw the prisoner, and two other boys rather older than him following Mr. Oakes -I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from Mr. Oakes' pocket; I came down immediately - the prisoner had turned up Turnagain-lane; I laid hold of him - he had not then got the handkerchief; I thought it was a yellow one, but did not particularly notice it - the other boys were not taken.

FREDERICK GIBBINS . I am a perfumer, and live in Farringdon-street; I saw Mr. Oakes walking with a lady; I was sitting at my window - I saw the prisoner and two others; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from Mr. Oakes' pocket - he then danced away, apparently pleased, and then turned up Turnagain-lane, and gave it to one of the others, who had a blue surtout coat on; I pursued in a contrary direction to Mr. Johnson - I went up Skinner-street, and found the prisoner in Johnson's custody; I did not see the other boys.

WILLIAM KENT . I am a linen-draper, and live in Great Warner-street. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket; I did not see what he did with it - I assisted in securing him.

Prisoner. I was not with any boys.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-24

1750. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 2 glazed window sashes, value 15s., the goods of Robert Fisher , and fixed to a building .

JOHN CRONK . I am an upholsterer, and live in Bartholomew-close. These glazed windows were fixed to a house, No. 5, Phillip-lane , which I let for Robert Fisher ; it was empty, and under my care - I had not seen it for a month; when I went there again, I found the lock off the street-door, the beading taken out of the windows, the lines out, and the sashes gone, with the glass in them; the prisoner was a stranger - they were worth about 15s.

MARIA BAMFIELD . I live in Philip-lane, opposite Fisher's house; the prisoner was a stranger to me. On the 1st of August, I saw him coming out of Fisher's house with the windows - knowing he did not belong to the house; I followed him to Red Lion-market, Whitecross-street, where I saw an officer, and told him - he had just got inside a door; the officer seized him with them, and told him to take them to where he brought them from - he carried them part of the way back, then put them down, and would not carry them further; I saw them fitted to the house.

JAMES ROWDEN . I am a constable. On the 1st of August, Mrs. Bamfield charged the prisoner with taking these sashes; I was at the corner of Red Lion-market, and had seen him with them, but as he dealt in old materials, I took no notice, till she gave me information; he had then gone through a court, into the house where he works - I went, and said, "Bill, I want those windows;" he took them up - I told him to carry them back to where he took them from; he put them down, and would not take them further - I took him into custody; his employ is cutting up fire-wood.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man in Aldermanbury with them on his shoulder, and bought them of him for 7s. 6d.; I had bought several of him before.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-25

1751. WILLIAM NORCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 2 pair of shoes, value 5s., and 1 pair of boots, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Chamberlain , and others, his masters .

JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN , JUN. I am in partnership with my father, Joseph Chamberlain , and my brother; we are boot and shoe maker s. The prisoner was in our service between four and five years, and on the 9th of July, as he was going home to dinner, in consequence of suspicion, we brought him back, and charged him with stealing leather, which dropped from his person at the time; we sent for an officer, and asked where he lived - he said in Newcourt, Bell-alley; we went there and found his wife and family kept the room on the ground-floor, and in that room, I found a pair of boots, and two pair of shoes; the daughter took a pair of shoes from the drawer, and was concealing them under her clothes - we took them from her, and one pair off her feet, and another pair we found in the room; they had all been worn - I knew them by our marks remaining on the sole leather and the lining; one is a stamp, and the other a mark in writing - he never bought shoes of us, nor charged himself in our books with any.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You keep a shoe-warehouse? A. We do; the clickers write on the inner leathers - we sell shoes with the mark on them, but do not sell by retail; I might accommodate a friend - such a thing may happen eight or nine times a year, and my brother might do so - we never allow our work-people to sell to their friends; the prisoner's daughter is sixteen or eighteen years old - he came to me with a good character; the leather had been decreasing some time - he had 22s. a week; ours is entirely shipping and country trade - his wife or daughter bound for us, and would come into our passage for goods, but not where the goods are deposited - I knew where he lived before.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. I took him in charge, went to his lodging, and found two pairs of shoes and

one pair of boots - I found one pair under the daughter's stays; the prisoner gave no account of them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-26

1752. MARY ANN PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 1 watch, value 30s., and 1 key, value 1d., the goods of John McGillycuddy , from his person .

JOHN McGILLYCUDDY . I am a labourer , and live on Saffron-hill - I rent the house; the prisoner was in my service for about a month. On the 19th of August, between ten and eleven o'clock, I went up stairs, as there was a disturbance with my lodgers, and had my watch in my fob; the prisoner did not go up with me - I had words with my lodgers, and was knocked down by three or four of them; I got from them, and returned to my room, which is on the ground floor - I was asked about my watch in about five minutes - it was gone from my fob; I had not missed it, and cannot say where it was taken from me - I afterwards suspected the prisoner, and gave her in charge.

WILLIAM PENNY . I am journeyman to Mr. Cotterel, a pawnbroker, of Shoe-lane. On the 21st of August I took this watch in pledge for 12s., in the name of Mary Grub , No. 19, Fetter-lane; I believe the prisoner to be the person - (looking at a duplicate) this is the duplicate I gave her; she pawned it in the middle of the day.

CHARLES JOHN KEMP . I am a Policeman. On Thursday, the 23rd of August, I received the prisoner in charge from the prosecutor; he at first accused her of taking the change of a sovereign, and then with stealing his watch -I searched her, and found this duplicate of the watch on her - I took her to Penny, who said, in her hearing, to the best of his knowledge she was the person who pawned it; she made no answer.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged there, and paid him 1s. a week; his wife was out, and they asked me to mind the children; he had a fight with his lodgers, and took them to the station next morning, and swore they had stolen his watch, but the inspector would not take the charge; on Wednesday morning his wife took two tickets out of the box, and asked if I could read; I said No, but one was marked 1s. 6d.; she then went to the box, gave me this ticket, and told me to mind it for her - I did not know what it was for till I was taken.

GUILTY of stealing, but not from the person . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-27

NEW COURT. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1753. JAMES SLATER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , 3 sovereigns, the monies of Charles James Heslop , his master .

CHARLES JAMES HESLOP . I am a publician , and live in Church-passage, Jermyn-street ; the prisoner was my potboy . On the 21st of April, about six o'clock in the evening, I gave him three sovereigns to get change in the neighbourhood - he went out; I saw him no more till the 21st of July, when he was in custody.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am beadle of St. James'. I met the prisoner on the 21st of July; I told him I wanted him - he said he had seen his master, and made all right; I said he must go to his master; as we went he said it was not true, that he had seen his master, and begged I would not take him to him - he said he was drunk when he did it.

The prisoner put in a petition for a lenient sentence.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-28

1754. WILLIAM LEGGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 4 yards of linen, value 4s.; 6 yards of cotton, value 2s., and 2 yards of holland, value 2s., the goods of Joseph Pettengell , and others .

JOSEPH PETTENGELL . I am in partnership with Thomas Evans and William Pettengell ; we are tailor s, and live in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square ; the prisoner was our errand-boy for about twenty months; he was allowed the cuttings of cloth as his perquisite. On the 12th of July I saw him go out with his bag, and directed West to watch him - the officer brought back the articles now produced, which are ours, and had been safe about a quarter of an hour before.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST (Police-constable C 15.) I received information, and followed the prisoner to a house in Upper Grosvenor-street; he knocked at the door, and threw the bag over the rails - I asked him if there was any thing in it which his master was not aware of; he hesitated, and then said he had taken a remnant, which he did not know of; I said, "Is there any thing else?" he said No - I took him and the bag to the station, and when I turned out the list, I found the articles stated; one of them has a private-mark, which was to be seen through a hole in the bag - he begged forgiveness, and said he never could make reparation to his master, or to his parents.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner handed in a petition for a lenient sentence.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320906-29

1755. MARGARET HARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 1 umbrella, value 2s. , the goods of William Gooding .

MARY NEWMAN . I live in Dean-street, Soho - my husband is a comb-maker. On the 25th of August I was outside my room, on the second floor - I heard a person going down stairs; I followed, and saw the prisoner going down; I went after her into Dean-street, and found this umbrella under her apron, and detained her.

WILLIAM GOODING . This is my umbrella; I live in the first floor of the same house; it was generally kept in a small room, which we used as a kitchen - my wife was at home.

JAMES WARD (Police-constable C 172.) I was sent for, and took the prisoner - I produce the property; the prisoner said it had been given to her.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny taking it.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320906-30

1756. JAMES BRENNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 1 horse-cloth, value 1s.; 1 roller, value 1s., and 1 martingale, value 1s. , the goods of the Earl of Clarendon ; and CHARLES DAVIS and THO

MAS SHEPHERD were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM JELLY . I am a carpenter. I know the hayloft of Lord Clarendon, in North-row, North Audley-street . On the 17th of August I saw Brennan come out of the hay-loft with a bundle; he went along the leads over the coach-house, and dropped it into a piece of vacant ground at the end of the stable - he then went back, came out of the stable door, and walked down the row; he went back, and then I lost sight of him.

THOMAS HORBS (Police-constable C 85). On the 30th of August I was in St. James'-park; Brennan was pointed out to me - I told him he was my prisoner - in going through the park he said, "What am I to do?" I took him to the station, showed him the bundle, and said, "You are charged with stealing this;" he said, "I know it;" it was in a handkerchief, which he said was his; I said he should have it at the trial - I had seen the bundle thrown over the fence of the vacant space where it had been dropped on the 17th of August, about seven o'clock in the evening - Shepherd got over the fence, and threw it over; Davis took it up, and walked away with it - the lowest part of the fence is about six feet high; no one could look over it, but there were vacancies through which persons might have looked; I took Davis with the bundle - I said, "What is this?" he said, "I don't know; I picked it up - if I had looked at it I should have taken it to the coachman;" I did not see Brennan then.

THOMAS EDDEN . I am in the service of the Earl of Clarendon. This is his property; it had been safe just before - Brennan had been three or four months in the service of the Earl; we sometimes go to the place where these things were thrown.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been five months out of employ - I took the articles through distress; I did not take them off the premises - I threw them into a place where I was sure the coachman's wife would find them; I meant to pawn them for a shilling or two for support, and when I got employ I would have returned them; the Earl of Clarendon has been a kind friend to me for ten years.

The prisoner received a very good character.

BRENNAN - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Ten Days .

DAVIS - NOT GUILTY .

SHEPHERD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-31

1757. THOMAS EATS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , 1 bag, value 2s.; 1 purse, value 2s.; 1 scent-bottle, value 2s.; 1 lozenge-box, value 2s.; 2 half-sovereigns, and 8 shillings , the property of Lady Harriet St. Germain's .

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the property of the Countess Dowager St. Germain's.

3rd COUNT, stating them to be the property of Harriet Elliott , commonly called the Countess Dowager St.'Germain's.

LADY HARRIET ST. GERMAIN's . I am the widow of Lord St. Germain's. On the 23rd of July I was in a carriage at a review, at Wormwood-scrubs - I was looking at the troops, and heard an alarm of Stop thief! or Stop the man! I was informed a bag had been taken from the carriage - I missed a black bag with gold tassels, from the seat of the carriage; I turned, and saw the prisoner at a distance, with a bag in his hand - I could not tell at that distance that it was mine; this bag, which is mine, was brought to the carriage, and the prisoner was brought to the carriage door - it is my bag, and contains the articles stated.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were there many persons about? A. Yes, a great many - I cannot tell whether the prisoner's back was towards me when I saw the bag in his hand, he was at some distance; a person named Ford came to the Police-office, and said he was a constable - Ford had said that he saw the prisoner snatch the bag from my hand, but he denied it then; I had not been there the day before.

WILLIAM GUNNER . I am a servant out of place. On the 23rd of July I was at the review - I heard some persons cry "Stop that man! he has taken something from a carriage;" I turned, and saw the prisoner running towards me, with a bag in his hand - he dropped it behind a gig; I took it up, and took it to the lady; I am sure the prisoner dropped it - I afterwards saw him in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you not running yourself? A. No, the prisoner was running towards me; the last place I had was in the service of a clergyman in Grosvenor-street - I have been out of place three months; I was not dismissed for dishonesty - he did not give me a character, but I dare say he would.

EDMUND BUNCE (Police-constable T 4.) I took the prisoner - he said he did not know what I took him for; he then said would I take a sovereign and say nothing about it - I said No; he then said he had a wife and family, and would I take two sovereigns, as it would injure him - I said No; he then went on a little further, and said if he were to give me 5l. would I let him go - I said No, not if he were to give me 50l., as I had a wife and family too; I then took him to Paddington station - a man, who false swore himself, gave him to me.

Cross-examined. Q. And I believe, in consequence of his swearing what the Magistrate knew could not be true, he was not heard? A. I believe so - he told me he was a special constable; the prisoner said he did not know what he was taken for, and I said I could not tell him, for I did not know then - this is the bag and property.

LADY ST. GERMAIN's. This is my property - I am sure the prisoner is the man who had something in his hand, but I could not see that it was my bag.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see his face? A. I cannot say that I did, but I know the man from the whole of his appearance - I can be positive of him.

COURT. Q. Though you do not know whether his face was towards you, had you an opportunity of seeing his face? A. I saw rather his side face, but I saw his figure altogether - I saw enough to be quite sure he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent; I was talking to two gentlemen, and this Ford came and said"I want you" - he took me to the carriage, as the soldiers were going the other way; Ford said, "I will have a job now," and he afterwards told my wife if she would let him have 5l. he would be out of the way - he

swore I snatched the reticule from the lady's arm, and made two attempts at it; he said so on the Monday, and on the Tuesday, and the Magistrate said his evidence would not do at all.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-32

1758. ROBERT MARCHANT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 1 pair of shoes, value 9s. , the goods of James Cole .

JAMES COLE . I live at Cranfield, Bedfordshshire. On the 13th of July, I lost a pair of shoes from a hay-stack at Mr. Chalkley's at Finchley ; the prisoner came on the haystack about twelve o'clock at night, and said he wanted to find his wife - he staid about ten minutes and then went down, and we heard no more of him; about four the officer came and asked us if we had lost any shoes - I then missed this pair; these are my shoes.

Prisoner. I was never there. Witness. Yes, he was.

WILLIAM FOUNTAIN . I am a labourer, I live at Cranfield. I was working at Mr. Chalkley's, I saw the prisoner come on the stack at twelve o'clock at night, swearing and saying he could not find his wife - he staid on the stack about ten minutes.

WILLIAM CRABB . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Whetstone; there was a mob of twenty or thirty hay-makers - I went up and found the prisoner, who had knocked a woman down; I took him and found these shoes across his arm in Black Horse-lane, two hundred yards from the hay-stack.

WILLIAM McCAFFERY . I am an officer. I assisted in taking the prisoner with the shoes; there was no man near him at the time, but I saw a man soon afterwards - the prisoner was not drunk.

Prisoner. There was a man by the side of me. Witness. No, there was not.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was intoxicated and had quarrelled with a woman, that on going down the lane, a man, who was assisting him home, gave him the shoes to hold while he took some tobacco from his pocket, and he was apprehended by Crabb, who had followed him, to prevent his illusing the woman.

WILLIAM CRABB re-examined. Q. Did you go there in consequence of his ill-treatment of a woman? A. Yes, a respectable gentleman called me as he had ill-used a woman - the people had got her away; he said she was his wife, and he threatened to murder her - he was not drunk, but had been drinking; I had seen him go up the lane before, and he had no shoes then but those on his feet.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320906-33

1759. JOSEPH AKERS and WILLIAM SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Peter Ferraro , from his person .

THOMAS HOBBS (Police-constable E 85). On the 12th of August, I was in the Quadrant, Regent-street , I saw the two prisoners walking and talking together; I saw the prosecutor walking up the street with two ladies -Akers went up, put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and pulled out this handkerchief; Smith was close to him, but did not touch the handkerchief - I went and took hold of Akers, who threw it on the ground; I took it up, and we took them both - they had followed the prosecutor for a quarter of an hour; they were sometimes close to him, and then they stopped and came up again, two or three times.

PETER FERRARO. This is my handkerchief - it has my name on it; I had not observed the prisoners till the officer seized them.

HENRY BALL (Police-constable C 31). I saw the prisoners; we had them in sight about thirty minutes - they were close together; they stopped several times when people were passing, and then they went on again - I took Smith; he got from me, and ran about forty yards - I took him again.

Aker's Defence. I had been to my sister's to get my clean shirt to go to Mr. Jackson, in Smithfield, my employer - my sister was not at home; and as I was coming back down Regent-street, the officer took me - I asked him what for; he said he had got me; I saw some one run and throw the handkerchief down - the officer pulled me up against the shutters, took up the handkerchief, and said I stole it, which is false - I had never seen Smith before; I was on the curb-stone, making room for people to pass.

THOMAS HOBBS. Akers dropped the handkerchief from his hand when I put my hand on his shoulders - itwas near the shutters.

Smith's Defence. I was walking along, the man came, took hold of me, and said, "I have got you;" I swung out of his hand, because I knew I had done nothing.

AKERS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-34

1760. GEORGE KENDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 20 quires of paper, value 7s. , the goods of John Brown .

JOHN JONES . I am son-in-law of Mr. John Brownwho lives in South Molton-street ; he is a carpenter, and keeps a chandler's shop . On the 20th of July I was in the parlour adjoining the shop - I had a glimpse of a person in the shop; I went out, and overtook the prisoner in the middle of the street, with this bundle of paper in his hand, which had been on the counter - I asked him for it, and he would not give it me; I took hold of him; he struck me, and ran away; the Policeman took him - he dropped the bundle; it is my father's paper - I had seen it in the shop before.

JAMES BURTON (Police-constable C 88). I saw the prisoner and the witness scuffling, at about twenty minutes past nine o'clock; I went up and saw the bundle; the prisoner struck the witness - he ran off; I pursued and took him - I am sure he is the person; I took him to the shop, and got this paper from Mr. Brown.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Oxford-street; I heard an alarm, and ran in to Bond-street, where I was stopped; the boy said I had taken the paper; I was on an errand, and had been playing in the park.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-35

1761. JAMES MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Laurence Stuart Morris , from his person .

LAURENCE STUART MORRIS . On the 21st of July, as I was in the New-road , about twelve o'clock, I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief - I saw the prisoner near me; he began to shake himself; I took hold of him, and drew my handkerchief from his waistcoat - he was not more than one yard from me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Ten Days and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18320906-36

1762. JOHN POOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 2 carriage-cushions, value 5l. , the goods of Thomas Deeks .

THOMAS DEEKS. I am a stable-keeper . I lost two carriage-cushions from a carriage in Fox and Hounds-yard, Princes-street, Hanover-square - they were safe on the 13th of July; I consider them worth 4l. or 5l. - these are them.

JOSEPH SEAL . I am a private watchman of Princes-street and Swallow-street. On the morning of the 14th of July I saw the prisoner without a bundle - I afterwards saw him with one, about five yards from the entrance of the yard where the carriage was; I followed, and stopped him in Oxford-street - I found these two cushions on him in a butcher's apron; I asked what he had got - he said Nothing; I said, "Do you call this nothing?" he then said they were his own, and he had found them in Oxford-street - I took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was waiting in Oxford-street for a man to come to pay me a little money; I was to meet him between eleven and twelve o'clock at night - I was walking about and found these cushions, which I tied in my apron.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-37

1763. JAMES WOOLLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Edward Hughes , from his person .

WILLIAM SHEPHERD . I am the son of William Shepherd , who lives in Macclesfield-street. On the morning of the 21st of July I was in Old-street - I saw the prisoner close behind Mr. Hughes; I watched, and saw him put his hand into his pocket, and pull out the corner of his handkerchief - I informed the officer, and went on; I then saw him take the handkerchief quite out of his pocket.

HENRY BERESFORD (Police-serjeant G 8). On the morning of the 21st of July I saw the prisoner near the prosecutor - I followed him about three hundred yards; he then took the handkerchief from the prosecutor, and put it into his jacket; I walked up to him as he stood at a coffee-shop door - when I got within two or three yards of him I ran up; he retreated into the shop and closed the door - I saw his hand go round behind the door; I went in, and found this handkerchief there.

EDWARD HUGHES . I live in Devonshire-street, Bishops-gate. I had this handkerchief safe about five minutes before I lost it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-38

7164. JOHN WHITING was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July, 1 live tame goose, price 2s. , the property of Sarah Johnson .

SARAH JOHNSON. I live at Southgate . I lost a live tame goose, which was taken from six young ones, on the 10th of July; I saw it safe alive about five or six o'clock - it was afterwards brought home dead - this is the skin of it.

JOHN BROOKS . I live at Palmer's-green. On the afternoon of the 10th of July, I saw the prisoner catch the goose and put it into a cart, in which there was another man; I went and told of it - my premises are twenty or thirty yards from the prosecutrix's; the cart was going towards the prosecutrix's, and was stopped by Scott.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I called after the prisoner, and stopped the cart; I found some feathers and blood in it, but no goose - there was a nose-bag in the cart.

SARAH BUNKER . I live at the tile-kilns, Edmonton. On the 10th of July I was going by the prosecutrix's, and saw the goose by some pales, dead, but quite warm.

JAMES GEORGE . I am a Bow-street patrol. I received information, and followed the cart from Palmer's-green to Edmonton; I found it in Miles'-yard, and some feathers in it - I took the prisoner; he said it was not him, it was the other man, and it was a bad job.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took any goose; all I threw into the cart was the horse's nose-bag.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-39

1765. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , 7 yards of printed cotton, value 4s., the goods of John Mirfin and others .

ROBERT FROST. I am in the employ of Mr. John Mirfin and his two partners - they are linen-draper s, and live in Tottenham-court-road . On the 7th of August, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in, and desired to look at some prints; I showed her some dresses, and she desired to look at some off the piece - I brought some down to her, but they would not suit, and she desired to look at others; as I was getting another piece off the shelf I turned my face, and saw her put a dress into her basket, which she had brought in with her; I cut her seven yards off one piece which she had chosen; she then looked at some lining muslin, and while I was getting that I named the circumstance to Mr. Driver, one of the partners, and he desired me to follow her out, which I did, for about twenty yards; I then accused her of having a piece of print, and desired her to let me look in her basket; she gave it to me directly, and I saw the print the goods which she had bought were on the top of it; Mr. Cranch followed me out, and brought her back to the shop - she said she was very sorry for it, but she had taken it; and she said, in going to the station, that she would give me a sovereign if I would let her go; she was taken to the station, and given to the officer; I had seen her repeatedly in the shop buying goods.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Do all the three partners take an active part in the business? A. Yes, and all their names are over the door; there were no other customers in the shop; I am quite sure the prisoner took the print - I served her afterwards, because I heard it was a regular plan to let persons go out of the shop with what

they had taken; I am sure she took the cotton - there are twenty-eight hands in the shop altogether; I had seen her come in with the basket, here is a mark on this cotton - it is a gown-piece - she did not say it must have got in by mistake; I gave the basket to Cranch.

RICHARD CRANCH . I am in the service of the prosecutors. I took this basket from the witness, and produce it in the same state; Frost had it given to him at the officehe sealed it, and left it there; I have just broken the seal.

ROBERT FROST . I sealed it up at the office, and left it there; I then took it again - this is it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am confident there were twenty females in the shop, and it was but half-past eight o'clock.

ROBERT FROST. There was not a single customer in the shop; there were some young women who serve there; it was half-past nine o'clock; only myself saw her take it-it is a long shop.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-40

1766. SARAH BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 9 spoons, value 2l. 6s.; 1 sheet, value 6s., and 4 towels, value 4s., the goods of Isaac Cohen , her master .

ISAAC COHEN. I live in Great Alie-street, Goodman'sfields - the prisoner was employed in my house as a charwoman for five or six months. I gave her into custody on the 9th or 10th of July; she had no authority from me to pawn any thing.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I took the prisoner on the 10th of July, at the prosecutor's house; she then took me to her home, in Little Prescot-street - I found some duplicates there, and went to the pawnbroker's, where we found the property; the prisoner is a widow, and appeared in great distressshe has four children.

CHARLES PADDON . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Shoreditch. I have six tea-spoons and one dessert-spoon; four of the tea-spoons were pawned by the prisoner - the others I did not take in myself.

Prisoner. I had four spoons of my own, which I pawned there twice, for 8s.; they were given to me seven years ago by my cousin, who died in St. Bartholomew's-hospital.

MR. COHEN. These are my spoons - I know them by having others to correspond with them, and the hall mark is similar.

JAMES FINCH . I am apprentice to Mr. Murray, a pawnbroker, in East Smithfield. I have a sheet and two towels pawned by a woman who lives in the same house with the prisoner, in the name of Stevens; and two spoons pawned by the prisoner; one of them has the name of Moses on it, which I took in on the 24th of May.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS. I found the duplicates for the sheet and towels at the prisoner's.

THOMAS REEVES . I live with Mr. Russel, a pawnbroker. I have a spoon pawned by the prisoner on the 23rd of June - it is marked L. I. C.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18320906-41

1767. JOHN BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 5 rows of coral beads, value 5s., the goods of Samuel Beale , from the person of Frances Beale .

SARAH BEALE . I am the wife of John Beale , a cooper ; we live in Chichester-place, Gray's Inn-road . On the evening of the 19th of July I was near the Southampton Arms - I had my three child ren with me; Frances, who is four years and a half old, was at my right hand; she said,"Mother, the boy has taken my necklace;" I turned, and saw it in the prisoner's hand - he put it into his trousers pocket; he ran off, and I followed; I did not lose sight of him.

EDWARD RAY (Police-constable S 92.) I was on duty in Camden-town, near the Southampton Arms. I saw the prisoner in custody of a gentleman; I took him, and searched him, but found nothing - he said he did not take them, but it was another boy named Hughes; I took that boy the same evening, but he had not got them.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Day , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18320906-42

1768. THOMAS FLANNAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 silver snuff-box, value 30s., the goods of Henry Vincent de Berckem , from his person .

HENRY VINCENT DE BERCKEM . I am a blacking manufacturer , and live in Aldermanbury. On the 25th of July I was near Windmill-street , and felt somebody at my pocket - I turned on my heels, felt my pocket, and missed my silver snuff-box; I saw a boy running, about a hundred yards off - I afterwards saw a boy, who I suspected was the same; I walked after him - when I got near to him he ran, and I pursued - he threw my box into a shop; a friend, who was with me, took him - he was the prisoner.

JOHN LEWIS AUBERT . I was with the prosecutor, and saw the prisoner run and throw the box into a shop - I pursued, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-43

1769. ELIZABETH BOWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 1 pail, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Bryant .

SARAH HANCOCK . I am the wife of William Hancock-we live in Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's . On the 10th of July I was coming down stairs, and saw the prisoner with a pail in Mr. Bryant's passage; I called the prosecutrix.

MARY BRYANT . I am the wife of Robert Bryant . Mrs. Hancock called me, and I found the prisoner with my pail, which I had in the yard the night before.

JOHN BRYANT . I went in pursuit of the prisoner with my mother's pail - I brought it back.

GEORGE GLADWELL (Police-constable G 23.) I took the prisoner, and have had the pail ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 47. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18320906-44

1770. FREDERICK CAREY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 work-box, value 8s. , the goods of David Morgan .

DAVID MORGAN. I am a broker , and live at Kensington-terrace . I had a work-box in my shop - on the 19th

of July I missed it, and went into the street; I saw the prisoner running, two hundred yards off, with it under his arm; he threw it on the ground, and a boy stopped him in my presence - this is it.

RICHARD REEVES . I live at a green-grocer's. I saw the prisoner take the box.

WILLIAM MOORE (Police-constable T 63). I was passing by, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-45

1771. EDWARD HOUSDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , I live tame fowl, price 5s. , the property of James Chilman .

The prosecutor not being able to identify the fowl, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18320906-46

1772. JOHN HATTON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 waistcoat, value 6s. , the goods of James Francis Thomson .

JAMES FRANCIS THOMSON . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Crown-street, Finsbury . I missed a waistcoat from my door on Monday morning, the 9th of July - I had seen the prisoner pass the window; I went after him, opened his jacket, and found it - he said he had found it; I had seen it safe a few minutes before he took it.

RALPH JACOBS . I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it laying in the middle of the pavement; I waited some time, but no one came, and I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18320906-47

1773. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , 1 sack, value 2s., and 1 horse-cloth, value 2s. , the goods of David Golding .

STEPHEN GARDNER . I work at a distiller's, and live in Regent-street. On the morning of the 14th of August, I was in Piccadilly , and saw a waggon, which Golding was driving - the prisoner was standing near some cabs, and as the waggon passed I saw him stoop down, snatch these articles off the shafts of the waggon, and draw them under his horse's belly; I told Golding what he had done - the prisoner saw me in conversation with Golding, and he produced this sack and cloth from under his horse's belly; he said he was the driver of one of the cabs - Golding went up to him, and I saw some blows pass; I ran from the pavement, and saw Golding's nose bleeding.

Prisoner. How was it possible for me to observe that they were talking - he was on the other side, and I did it merely out of a lark, as we often do with these countrymen; I called after him, when he had got about twenty yards. Witness. He had got forty yards past before I spoke to the prosecutor.

DAVID GOLDING . On the 14th of August I was driving along Piccadilly, about half-past five o'clock in the morning - Gardner told me that the prisoner had snatched someoff the shafts; I turned round, and he began to call out-I went back, and said, "You thief, what did you take that for?" he said he did not - I said, "You did;" I made a blow at him - he jumped back; I went to take the things and he struck me on the nose - I gave him in charge.

Prisoner. I did not deny taking them - when he asked me what I had done with them, I said I did not take them- he struck at me, and I struck him in self-defence.

HUGH CHURCHILL (Police-constable C 70). I took the prisoner, and have the articles.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-48

1774. JAMES HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 2 chaise cushions, value 6s., and 1 driving-box, value 4s. , the goods of Samuel Bowley .

JOHN SHEPPARD . I am servant to Mr. Carr, at the Union, public-house, Bagnigge-wells-road . On the 7th of July, I was in the yard, and saw another man; I was looking after him, and saw the prisoner come out of the gig-house with these cushions and driving-box - I went and accused him of taking them; he threw them down when he saw me - they belong to Mr. Samuel Bowley .

HENRY ROWLISSON (Police-constable G 54). I took the prisoner; he said he knew nothing of these articles.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the gig-house for another purpose.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-49

1775. FREDERICK NEWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s., and 1 half-sovereign , the property of Letitia Newson .

LETITIA NEWSON. The prisoner is my son; I was employed to take care of a house in Mincing-lane , for ten months-I put some articles into a box to go to Stockwell, for Mr. Leaf; the prisoner was there at the time - he went away in the morning, before I was up, and when he was gone I missed two handkerchiefs, a half-sovereign from my pocketbook, and a pair of shoes; he left me in the beginning of June, and I did not see him again for a month, when he was brought back - I am a widow.

MARIA NEWSON . I was living with my mother at Mr. Leaf's; I assisted her to pack up the box of linen, and I tied it - the prisoner slept in a room adjoining where the box was; I missed him in the morning, and in the afternoon when I looked for the box, I found it moved, and a handkerchief taken off it - I looked into it, and missed two silk handkerchiefs out off it, and the one in which it had been tied; he afterwards came back, and on the Thursday morning after, he came home, I was lighting the fire, and he told me he had sold one of the handkerchiefs; my mother had taken away his boots, to prevent his going away- he put on her shoes, and said he was going to his brother's.

ROBERT WALKER . I was going out with my milk one morning in July; the prisoner asked me for a pennyworth of milk, and when I had served him, he asked me to buy a handkerchief of him, which I did - I gave the same handkerchief to the officer; this is it - I have known the prosecutrix for many years: the prisoner said he found the handkerchief in Lombard-street, and I gave him 1s. for it: I went for the prosecutrix, but she had moved, and I could not find her - I heard no more for a month afterwards.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-50

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1776. JOSEPH ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 watch, value 30l.; 3 seals, value 2l.,

and 1 key, value 10s., the goods of James Cook , from his person .

JAMES COOK. I live at Hyde Park-corner gate. On the night of the 18th of July I had been dining with some friends at the Slaughter coffee-house, and I was, on my return, in Piccadilly a little after eleven o'clock at night; a friend, who had been with me, went for a coach, and I was waiting on the curb-stone to get into it; I felt a snatch at my fob - I called out Police! and Stop thief! and ran after a person whose back I saw; I missed my watch from my fob - the person ran about seventy yards up Titchbourne-street, and then I understand the watch was thrown away; he was the person nearest to me, and ran off directly - I only saw his back, but I never lost sight of him.

WILLIAM BREEZE TUCKER . I was passing in Titchbourne-street, and heard an alarm of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running up the street; I attempted to stop him - he avoided me, and threw down a watch; I took it up.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me throw away the watch? A. Yes, on the pavement near the top of Titchbourne-street; I am sure you are the person.

FREDERICK JOHN GUY . I am a silk-mercer. I was crossing from the County Fire-office towards the end of Titchbourne-street; the prisoner was running and the witness pursuing him - he ran against me; the officer came up and took him; he took from his person a gold watch, and threw it down, with a view to throw it down the area of a butcher's-shop.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say I threw it on your foot? A. No; I said it fell on my foot, and Mr. Tucker took it up.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST (Police-serjeant C 15). I was on duty at the end of the Quadrant; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner the foremost person, running with great speed; I ran to stop him, and a person laid hold of him - a gentleman then came up with this watch in his hand.

Prisoner. I was not running, I was held by the collar - he came up and said, "What is amiss?" and it was said a watch was taken.

JAMES COOK . This is my watch.

Prisoner. You were in liquor, and not able to stand? Witness. No, I was sober; I never lost sight of you.

Prisoner's Defence. When he came to the office a man stood behind him, and told him what to say; one said that I threw it on some railings, and another that I threw it on his foot - I deny that I threw it, and they cannot say it with a clear conscience; the prosecutor had been to a party, and had his cargo of grog.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-51

1777. SARAH RIORDON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 silver-spoon, value 5s., and 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Evans , her master .

WILLIAM EVANS. I am a linen-draper , and live in Edward-street, Portman-square . The prisoner was eight days in my service, and in consequence of her being tipsy she was discharged, and on the day stated she was intoxicated; I told her she must leave - she was very impertinent, and said she would not go till she had had her tea; I said, "Get your tea" - she did not seem to do that, but was very saucy; I then said I should look through her boxes - she said, "You may look, you have nothing to lose;" I then looked into a bundle of hers, and found a loaf of bread quite new - she said it was her own, and she had bought it; I sent for an officer, who found the other things.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON (Police-constable D 4). I took the prisoner; I found this handkerchief in her pocket, and this spoon was wrapped up in a napkin between her bed and the mattress - I found another halfquartern loaf under her pillow.

MR. EVANS. This handkerchief and spoon are mine, and I believe the bread was; she gave us a reference to a Clergyman at Bath; she did not say she had lived in town, but we find she has; property worth 20l. or 30l. was found in her box.

GUILTY . Aged 30 - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-52

1778. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 purse, value 3s.; 1 half-sovereign, and 16 shillings, the property of Amelia Rosenhagen , from her person .

AMELIA ROSENHAGEN. I live with my parents. About eight o'clock in the evening on the 16th of July I was opposite Old Gravel-lane ; the prisoner accosted me, and told me my dress was in a dreadful state, and if I would go with her she would clean it for me - I said No, I was in such a state that I could not; Mary Costelow then came and took me to her mother's - the prisoner went with me, and washed my dress inside and out, and while doing that she took out my purse, containing a half-sovereign and some silver; I missed it when I went to remunerate them for their kindness - I am certain I had felt my purse safe a quarter of an hour before; I have not seen it since.

MARY COSTELOW . I live in the neighbourhood, and was going for some vinegar; I saw this lady's dress in a dreadful state - the prisoner said if she would go over the way she would find her a place to clean it; I went up to her, and said if she would go to my mother's, I would give her some water and a towel; she said she hoped it was not far - I said No: she then went, and thanked me - the prisoner went with her, and cleaned her dress, and while doing that she took a steel purse out of the lady's pocket, and put it into her own; the lady then put her hand into her pocket, and missed her purse; I told what I had seen, and told my mother to get an officer, but the prisoner was gone before he came - she was taken soon after.

JOHN MURRAY (Police-constable K 178). About ten minutes after eight o'clock I saw the prisoner come down the court - she made a full look in my face-she had no shawl or apron on then; in about five minutes the prosecutrix came, and said she had been robbed - I said "Is it by that girl who passed me?" she said Yes - I went after the prisoner, and found her at the end of Cannon-street - I said, "I want you;" she said "I know what it is about - it is about that young lady;" I took her into the parlour of a publichouse, and found 3s. 6d. in silver on her, 5d. in copper, and a purse, but not the prosecutrix's; she said her father was in the artillery at Woolwich - I went there, but could find no one to own her.

Prisoner. The prosecutrix said she had lost her purse, and thought she had left it at a confectioner's shop.

MISS ROSENHAGEN. I am sure I felt my purse when I went into the house to be cleaned; I had been to a shop before, and I went there to satisfy myself - my purse was a steel one; the one found on the prisoner is silk, with a steel snap.

Prisoner. The prosecutrix came out of the house with me, and wished me a good afternoon; the purse the officer found on me is my own - Costelow was locked up herself.

JOHN MURRAY. I took them all, but no one was locked up but the prisoner.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, protesting her innocence.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-53

1779. RICHARD STROUD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 3 lbs. weight of beef, value 2s., the goods of Esther Barnett , from the person of David Joseph .

DAVID JOSEPH . I live with Mrs. Esther Barnett; she sells beef . On the 11th of July I was carrying some, at ten o'clock at night, to Middle-row, Holborn - there were three men going along Holborn , and one of them came and took the beef out of my basket; I asked him what he was going to do with it - he said it was only done out of a lark; I said, "If you don't put it down I will give you in charge;" he then put it down, and I went on; in about two minutes the prisoner came and took the same piece of beef out of my basket, and ran off with it - I called Stop thief! and pursued him; he was taken, and I got the beef again.

JAMES EDMONDS . I went up to the place where the prisoner was taken, and as I was returning I took up the beef.

JOHN CROCKER . I was in Gray's Inn-lane, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running-I stopped him, and held him till the Policeman came up.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not running, but walking pretty fast - I fell down, and this witness came up.

THOMAS ROBERTS (Police-constable F 48.) I took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320906-54

1780. WILLIAM SYDIE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John James Way , from the person of William Stewart .

ELIZA WAY . I am the wife of John James Way; William Stewart is the son of a lodger in my house. On the 9th of May I sent him with a silk handkerchief to Mr. Barnett's, a baker, in Jamaica-street - the prisoner lived there as journeyman ; Stewart came back without the handkerchief.

HENRY FOWLER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a handkerchief, pawned by a person resembling the prisoner, but I cannot swear it was him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-55

1781. WILLIAM SYDIE was again indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS BARNETT . I am a baker , and live in Jamaica-street, Commercial-road - the prisoner was my journeyman for ten months; he had to collect bills, and when he received money, he was to pay it to me every day, when I booked his bread. On the 28th of May he went out with his bread, and never returned.

EDMUND ISAAC FIELD . I took bread of the prosecutor; I saw my wife pay 4s. 7 1/4d. to the prisoner, in the last week in May, or the first week in June; we never had a bill - we paid him every Saturday.

ELIZA WHITE . I dealt with the prosecutor - I paid the prisoner three times a week for two loaves each time; he did not give me any bill - I cannot tell when the last payment was; it must have been three months ago.

SUSANNAH ROGERS . I dealt with the prosecutor; I paid the prisoner the last day he was in his service for six loaves; he gave me this receipt - I was in the habit of paying him at the door; he signed it in my presence.

MR. BARNETT. He did not give me any account of these sums of money; he left me on the Tuesday.

Prisoner. I never received the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-56

1782. CHARLES HORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s. 6d., and 1 pair of braces, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Cooper .

CHARLES COOPER. I live at the White Horse, at Islington . On the 11th of July the prisoner came there for a night's lodging; he slept in the same room with me, but in a separate bed - I got up about six o'clock the next morning, and left my trousers, waistcoat, and braces on the top of my bed; I left him in bed - I went to the room in an hour and a half, and missed the property; he was then gone; I overtook him in the layers in the Liverpoolroad - I said, "You have got my clothes;" he pulled them out of his hat, threw them down, and asked me to let him go.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Is this a kind of lodging-house? A. Yes; I cannot exactly swear the prisoner is the person I saw in bed - I cannot swear to these clothes.

COURT. Q. You missed your trousers, waistcoat, and braces? A. Yes; and they were found in the prisoner's hat - I believe them to be mine, but I cannot swear to them, nor say that the prisoner is the man; I have not seen him since; I was cleaning the parlour when he went out, and I took him between seven and eight o'clock.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-57

1783. WILLIAM STOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 set of bed-furniture, value 3l. , the goods of Cuthbert Wigham Whitfield .

ROBERT LEE . I was at Hackney-marsh gate , on the 11th of July, from five to six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come through the hedge with a bag on his back, and another person with him; I gave an alarm, but I could not pursue myself, as there was a ditch between us - the prisoner dropped the bag; I called to a gentleman in a chaise; the prisoner ran across the marsh, and jumped into the river - I ran round, and saw him stopped by a number of haymakers; I took him back to the prosecutor.

REBECCA WILSON . I took down this bed-furniture, and laid it out in a field belonging to Mr. Fletcher, to dust it, between eleven and twelve o'clock.

STEPHEN LOWE . On the 11th of July I was in my father's field, hay-making; I saw the prisoner stopped near Temple Mills - I had seen him come through the hedge, and drop the bundle.

ELIZABETH WHITFIELD . I am the wife of Cuthbert Wigham Whitfield . This is his property.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320906-58

1784. SARAH WOODCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 shirt, value 4s.; 1 shift, value 9d.; 1 sheet, value 1s. 6d.; 2 caps, value 3s. 6d.; 1 gown, value 2s.; 2 aprons, value 6d.; 1 towel, value 3d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 6d.; 1 pillow-case, value 4d.; 1 pair of shears, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2d., the goods of William Bond , her master .

MARY BOND . I am the wife of William Bond - he is a weaver , and lives in Hope-town ; the prisoner was my servant for one week. I went out on the 7th of July, at a quarter before one o'clock, and returned at half-past four- I missed all these articles; she was gone - I found her six days afterwards, with my gown and cap on.

MARIA PLAYDELL . The prisoner gave me an apron and handkerchief to wash - I gave them to the officer.

JOHN WILLIAMS (Police-constable H 18). I took the prisoner, and have the gown, cap, handkerchief, and apron.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 3 Monhs .

Reference Number: t18320906-59

1785. HENRY WARREN & WILLIAM POOLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 5 live tame geese, price 30s. , the property of George Tickner .

JOHN SHORTHOUSE . (Police-constable N 200). On the 20th of July I was at Hackney-wick, about three o'clock in the afternoon - I saw Warren carrying a bag; I asked what he had got - he said three geese, which he bought of a countryman at Lea-bridge for 8s.; I saw Pooley at a distance behind, and I asked Warren if he knew him - he said Yes; he was his cousin, and he had geese also; I waited till Pooley came up - he said he had two geese, which he bought of a countryman, at Lea-bridge, for 5s. - from the appearance of the bags and the prisoners I told them they must go the station; they went part of the way, when Pooley threw his bag down, and attempted to run away - I caught him, and then Warren threw his bag down; Giles took the bags to the station; I took the prisoners - it was three miles from the prosecutor's.

JOHN GILES . I went and assisted the officer, and carried the bags to the station.

GEORGE TICKNER. These are my geese - I have had them ever since Christmas; I missed them from the forest on Friday evening, the 20th of July - I know nothing of the prisoners.

WARREN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

POOLEY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-60

1786. ELIZABETH WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 key, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Brushfield .

JEREMIAH VINES . I was servant to Thomas Brushfield; he is an oil and colour-man , and lives in Union-street . On the evening of the 17th of July, between seven and eight o'clock, I had the key to go to the warehouse with some goods, and left it on a cask inside the warehouse; this is the key.

THOMAS GREEN . On the 17th of July the prisoner offered this key to my wife for sale; I was sent for, and I asked where she got it; she said she found it, but she was no scholar, and could not tell where.

MARY LOVETT . I saw the prisoner go into the warehouse, and come out again; I did not see anything in her hand.

JOSEPH HARLEY . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I took up the piece of wood, and the key hung to it.

GUILTY. Aged 64.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320906-61

1787. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of William Smith .

JEMIMA SMITH . I am the wife of William Smith; we live in Rochester-row, Westminster . On the 8th of July, the prisoner came and took a lodging at 2s. a week; he said he was a carpenter , and was going to the parish for work - next morning, at twenty minutes after six o'clock, he got up, and was coming down with this coat; I said, "You had better take that coat up again" - he said,"I will have it to work in;" I said he should not - he went up stairs into the room again; I sent for the officerwe found in his room this coat, and a pair of stockings, folded up in a sheet and counterpane; I had not seen them in his possession, but I suppose they had been round his body - this is my husband's coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not have it.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320906-62

1788. WILLIAM BARRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 1 chaise, value 8s. , the goods of Louisa Hodge .

LOUISA HODGE. I am a widow ; I am a broker in a small way; the prisoner had occasionally carried home goods for my husband, and he has occasionally worked for me since his death. On the 18th of July, while I was out, I lost a child's chaise; I had not seen the prisoner that day, nor for some time before, nor sold him any thing - I saw the chaise the same day at Mr. Harris'.

ROBERT HARRIS . I am a broker. The prisoner brought this chaise to my house; it was one Wednesday - he said he had been trying to sell it at a good many places, and he had a wife and family waiting for bread; I gave him half a crown for it, which was the full value, as it was all to pieces.

AMELIA HODGE . I am the prosecutrix's daughter. The prisoner came while my mother was out, and asked me for the chaise; he said he had seen my mother about an hour before, and paid her for it - I asked if he could not leave

it till my mother came home; he said No, he had paid for it, and must have it away.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320906-63

1789. WILLIAM BRAKEN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , 1 silver spoon, value 10s., the goods of Robert Baker , his master .

ROBERT BAKER. I keep a public-house in High-street, Marylebone . The prisoner was in my employ for three weeks; I missed a silver spoon on the 31st of July - I made inquiry the next day. but could get no answer; I went to a pawnbroker, who sent his shopman to my house-he looked at the persons who were there, and indetified the prisoner as the person; I called him into the parlour, and asked him how he came to do it, and if he was in distress; he said he had not done it - I said, "You are a good-for-nothing scoundrel, and you may go about your business;" he said he would be d-d if he would - I was forced to get an officer to take him.

WILLIAM SPENCER . I live with Mr. Hall, a pawnbroker. I took in the spoon of the prisoner, and gave the same to the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-64

1790. GEORGE BRENTLEY and THOMAS WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 1 jacket, value 20s. , the goods of James Jones .

THOMAS KING . I am constable of Staines . On the 31st of August I saw the two prisoners, and watched them for nearly half an hour; I saw them go to Mr. Jones' shop, who is a linen-draper - Brentley first tried to get down a pair of breeches, and then he went into the passage, and hooked off a jacket with this stick; he gave it to Williams, and I took him with the jacket - Brentley ran off, but was afterwards taken; this is the jacket.

JAMES ALLISON . I saw Brentley take the jacket off with the stick, and give it to Williams, who put it into his handkerchief.

JAMES JONES . This is my property.

BRENTLEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-65

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bailey.

1791. CATHERINE BAINBRIDGE was indicted for the wilful murder of William Francis .

ELIZABETH BOWLES . I lived at No. 4, Match-walk, Shadwell ; the prisoner lodged with William Francis in the room facing mine - they had lived there together not quite a week; both came there together - whether they had lived together before I cannot say. On the 19th of July Francis came home between eleven and twelve o'clock, before the prisoner; I saw him - he did not appear to me at all intoxicated nor elevated with liquor; he appeared to me ruffled in his temper - he knocked at my door, and asked for a light; I gave him one, and while I was getting it, he put his hands together, and said to me, "You would have been frightened to hear the expressions she has been calling me up in Shoreditch;" he said she had said she would not let him come in that night, and he would not let her in; the prisoner came up stairs in about a quarter of an hourshe opened the room door and went in; I heard him tell her to go out - I did not hear whether she made any answer; I then heard basins, plates, and things being broken - I could not tell whether they were striking each other, but there was a great rustle between them, which continued a very few minutes; whether any blows were given I cannot possibly tell, but I heard her say, "I will stab you with a knife;" she had been in the room a very few mintes when I heard that - it was altogether a very few minutes; they had been rustling together before I heard her say that; she almost immediately called Nancy! Nancy! meaning Leonard, who lived in the room underneath; she seemed frightened - Leonard went up immediately; I was partly undressed, and did not go into the room till the Policeman took the prisoner away; I then went and asked for a light; I had heard no words between them but what I have stated - there were words between them, but what I could not understand; it was before she said she would stab him - but they were both in a passion, and I could not understand what was said, nor tell whether any blows were given; there might or might not be blows - I heard the crockery breaking before I heard her say she would stab him; the deceased was about fifty years old, or more - he was a very powerful man.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. He was a black, I believe? A. A tawney - he appeared a foreigner; I had not seen the prisoner the early part of the day, and did not see her come in that night - I was in my room with the door closed; I knew her by her voice.

COURT. Q. How many minutes do you think she had been in the room before she said she would stab him? A. I suppose five or six - they had been quarrelling all that time.

ANN LEONARD . I lodge in the same house - Francis had been there six days; I knew the prisoner before she came to that house; she had only lived with Francis about a week the last time - she had lived with him before, and they parted when he went to sea; he had returned about a week - I was not at home on the 19th when he came in, but was at home when the prisoner came in, and heard her go into her room; I had not heard Francis say any thing before that - when she had been there about five minutes, she called out Nancy two or three times pretty quick; she did not seem much flurried - if she had not called I should not have known any thing had happened; I had heard the crockery breaking, but how it was broken, or by whom, I cannot tell - the prisoner said, when I went up stairs, that she had broken it; when I went up stairs I found the prisoner laying on the floor, and Francis had his foot on part of her body, and her hair in his hand, and he was aiming to strike her - she had her cap off; I said, "Francis, what are you doing?" he put his hand to his breast, and said,"See what Kitty has done!" his breast was streaming with blood - it was all over blood; I thought he had a red flannel waistcoat on - I asked Catherine how she had done it; she said she had thrown the bason at him - nothing more passed: the prisoner was very much in liquor - whether he had beat her when she came home I cannot tell; I have known him beat her - his temper was violent; I do not know whether he was in liquor.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever know him to bite her? A. I did not see him bite her, but she showed me a mark on her arm; they did not lodge in our house then, but we lodged with the deceased.

Q. Had she been in the habit of calling you before? A. No; she used to get out of his way when they quarrelled; she has often got out of his way because she was afraid of him - I live in the room under them; she called loud enough for me to hear; a struggle might happen in the room without my hearing it - they so often quarrelled, I did not notice whether there was struggling or not; the breaking of the crockery sounded loud, as if it was dashed about the room; when I went up, he was making an aim to strike her with his fist, and had hold of her hair to beat her; she could not get away from him.

COURT. Q. Had you seen her that evening before? A. Yes, at the George and Dragon, about half-past eleven o'clock, and desired her to come home; she came home in a few minutes - I told her to come home, as I knew how he used to beat her, and I was afraid he would beat her for being out late; she did not express any unwillingness to go home, nor ill-will against him - she went directly; he was very jealous of her.

MARY SPURDEN . I lived in the same house as Francis. I was in bed, and heard him come home alone, and in about a quarter of an hour I heard the prisoner come home - she went up stairs - I did not hear her go into her room; as soon as she got up stairs I heard him say, "You shan't come in," and heard her say she would come in; I heard no quarrelling or scuffling - I heard the crockery break-I heard a rustling, as if he was endeavouring to keep her out, and she was endeavouring to get in; it appeared as if only one person was throwing crockery about; by whom it was thrown I cannot tell - I heard the prisoner call Nancy three times quickly, as if she wished her to come up as soon as she could; I should not have known any thing had happened if she had not called - I went up stairs; the man was then laying under the window, and the prisoner sitting on a chest.

JOHN DOUGLAS . I am a Policeman. On the night of the 19th of July, about five minutes before I went up to the room, I was in the street and heard the prisoner call out Little Ann! Little Ann! very lond a great many times, as if she was anxious for her to come - I heard nothing more till I was called up; the first thing I then saw was the deceased in an inclining position over the back of the chair - the prisoner was going about the room backwards and forwards, as if in distress; I noticed the blood spurting from a wound in the deceased's right breast - I then said he had been stabbed; the prisoner replied, "No, he has not been stabbed - I have only set his nose bleeding by throwing a basin at him;" I then looked at him and saw another wound bleeding fresh over his left eye - I said again to the prisoner; "This man has been stabbed:" she said, No, he had not - I looked about, and just on the other side of the room, by a chair, I picked up this knife; there are marks of blood on it, particularly on the lower part, and high up it is greasy; the other knives in the room were not of the same kind as this - they were all round points; when I picked the knife up, the prisoner said, "That is not the knife, it was little Ann's knife" - I turned round to little Ann, and asked where her knife was; Tucker said she had taken little Ann's knife down stairs - I went down to little Ann's room, and on a table found a knife, which I now produce; there are no marks of blood on that - the knife was damp; I took the prisoner to the station-house: when I told her I must take her into custody, she immediately rushed to the table, and took another knife out of a drawer, which I took from her; and as we were going to the station-house, she said, "This is through my speaking to another man" - she afterwards said he had no business to leave his money in Old-street as he had, and that he had left 20l. odd, with somebody else in Shoreditch.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were you from the house when you heard the cry for little Ann? A. I stood in the street opposite to the house; the window was shut - I had been there before, on account of hearing them talk loud; I had heard a noise about ten minutes before from the same room, from the prisoner only; I did not see her, but knew her voice - she had been released from the deceased's grasp when I got up, and was pacing the room; the knife is a table knife - the deceased was cook on board ship; I found the room in confusion, broken crockery laid about, and some was outside; there was no cloth on the table, the crockery was dinner articles.

SARAH TUCKER . I am landlady of the house - the prisoner took the lodgings for herself and Francis - I heard him come in on the night of the 19th; I was in bed, and heard the prisoner come in about half an hour after him - I heard the crockery breaking, and heard her call Nancy two or three times; I went into the room almostly directly, and saw the deceased with his foot on the prisoner's body, her hair in his hand, and his hand was rising as if he was about to strike her, but he seemed very faint - he gave me a round pointed knife out of his hand - it was Ann Leonard's; he turned round when I saw the blood on his breast, and said, "See what Kitty has done" - he did not say what had been done with that knife; that was all he could say - the knife he gave me was not bloody, when he turned round I saw a great cut over his left eye - when I saw the blood on his shirt; I said, "What have you been doing?" the prisoner said, "I threw the basin at him:" when he said, "See what Kitty has done" - he staggered and fell; I saw him die in a very short time - he was in the habit of beating her violently; he was passionate - he would scarcely speak while he was beating her.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe this is also a table knife? A. Yes; the large knife belonged to the deceased - he used to keep it in his room, it is rather sharp: he had a knife in his hand while he was bleeding - ithad no blood on it that I saw; it was in the hand he was aiming with to strike her.

COURT. Q. Then, if he had had strength, you think he would have struck her with that knife? A. Yes.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I am a Policeman. On the 19th of July, a little before ten o'clock, I was on duty, and saw the prisoner and deceased at the top of Old Gravel-lane, having a great many words - Andrews, my brother officer, was coming up the lane, and moved them on; they crossed the road and went on quarreling - hesaid, "Kitty, I will have no row with you to night;" he crossed over on my

side again - she started off, and ran for nearly fifty yards; then stopped, and looked back - when he got nearly opposite to her, she said, "You shall not come into the room to night - I will go home, and fasten the door, or fasten you out;" I saw nothing more till I went up to the room, after the deceased was stabbed - as Douglas was going to the watch-house with the prisoner I heard her say she did not do it, if she did, it was with the crockery; I picked the crockery up and examined it as narrowly as I could, but could find no marks of blood, except one drop on a little bit, as if it had come from his eye - as I was taking the deceased down stairs to go to the hospital he died.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they both sober at ten o'clock? A. The prisoner had certainly been drinking -I have known her a good while; I never saw them quarrel before - I had not seen the man above three times.

JOHN TRIPE . I am a surgeon. Mr. Bird was called in to see the deceased; I examined the body about seven o'clock in the evening - the death was occasioned by a wound on the right side of the chest; either of these knives would produce that wound.

JOHN WILLIAM BIRD . I examined the body; the stab in the chest was the cause of death; either of these knives would produce it - the blow seems to have been struck on the collar-bone, and the large knife was bent in the blade- I cannot say which knife it was done with.

ANN LEONARD. The small knife is mine; the prisoner had asked me to lend it to her on the Monday; I lent her two knives and forks.

GUILTY of manslaughter . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-66

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1792. JOHN HOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Joseph Railton , from his person .

JOSEPH RAILTON. I am a silk-mercer , and live in Regent-street. On the 31st of August, about half-past one o'clock, I was in Fleet-street , and had my handkerchief safe in my pocket - I felt somebody behind me; I looked round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; I was alone - I seized him, and took it out of his hand.

WILLIAM DARBY , I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge with the handkerchief; he said he knew nothing about it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, and distress drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-67

1793. GEORGE JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of William Sentance .

WILLIAM BELLCHAMBERS . I am a Custom-house officer. I was on Fish-street-hill , and saw the prisoner and another lad walking before Mr. Sentance; I saw the other put his hand towards Mr. Sentance's pocket, and look into it; after walking a few paces he took the handkerchief out, and gave it to the prisoner, who was in his company and talking to him: Mr. Sentance turned down Eastcheap, and the two boys ran away; I informed Mr. Sentance, then ran after the prisoner, and took the handkerchief out of his trousers pocket: he denied having it; but when I found it, he said he had picked it up.

WILLIAM SENTANCE. I live in Blackman-street. On the 1st of August the witness gave me information - I felt my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; I afterwards saw it in King's possession.

JOHN KING . I am a constable. Bellchambers delivered me the handkerchief, and I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written) On the day previous to the robbery, I was going along Fish-street-hill, a boy came up to me and asked me whether I would be so kind as to pawn a handkerchief; he pulled it out of his side pocket; I asked him where he got it from - he said it was his mother's; while I was in the act of pledging the handkerchief I was taken into custody, and the boy made his escape.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-68

1794. ALFRED APPLEFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Coxon Picken , from his person- and that he had been before convicted of felony .

JOHN COXON PICKEN. I am in the employ of Messrs. Whitakers, of Ave Maria-lane. On the 11th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was at the Holborn end of Farringdon-street , and perceived a few boy s playing on the pavement - as I passed them I felt a twitch at my pocket; I turned round, and caught hold of a lad, who said, "It was not me, Sir - it was that boy," pointing to the prisoner - I ran, and caught hold of the prisoner, but could not find my handkerchief - I gave him in charge; I had used it a few minutes before; it was found on him at the watchhouse.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I found the handkerchief inside his clothes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS PROTHERO . I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - (read) - I gave evidence against him, and am certain of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw another boy walking along - he threw the handkerchief down; I ran and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-69

1795. ROBERT TINKER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , 1 knife, value 1s.; 1 bottle, value 2s.; 1 pocket looking-glass, value 2s., and 1 knife and rule, value 2s., the goods of John Seabrook , his master .

JOHN SEABROON . I am a trunk and case-maker , and live at No. 5, Cheapside . The prisoner was about ten days in my service; I had a character with him. -On the 9th of August, about nine o'clock in the morning, Tyrrell brought me a pocket mirror, which I knew to be mine - he then produced the other goods, which I claimed; I cannot say they were in my possession while the prisoner was with me.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer of the Postoffice. On the 8th of August I was at a pawnbroker's in Aldersgate-street - the prisoner came in, and offered

a pocket-glass in pledge for 1s.; I asked where he got it - he said his father, who made them, sent him to pawn it, and that he lived in White's-alley, Coleman-street - I said I would go there with him; when we got out he said he had not received it from his father - that his father Was dead, but his sister gave it to him, and he had had it some time; I asked if his mother knew of it - he said Yes; he gave his right address - I asked the mother, in his presence; she said she recollected his sister giving him much such another glass - I searched, and found in his pocket this glass-bottle, covered with leather; he said he had that to carry water in when he went out - I then found this sportsman's knife and a rule- I asked where he worked: he said at Mr. Seabrook's, and afterwards admitted that they were his articles(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320906-70

1796. WILLIAM BULL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Joseph Todd , from his person .

MR. JOSEPH TODD. I have retired from business , and live in Lancaster-place, Strand. On Saturday, the 1st of September, I was at the corner of Fleet-street and Bridge-street , waiting to cross, and in less than two minutes I felt something touch my pocket, and on turning round to the right, saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - he instantly threw it down at a person's feet; I took it up, and called Stop him! I saw him turn down Bride-lane - I believe he was stopped going into Bridge-street; I walked down, and met him in the officer's custody - he had the same coloured clothes, but I did not see his features suffciently to identify him positively - heran away the instant he threw the handkerchief down.

JOHN ODOUD . I am a gardener, and live at Chelsea. I was standing at the corner of Bridge-street - I saw Mr. Todd standing for a cart to pass; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from his pocket - I am certain of his person; I saw him throw it down and run away - I followed him down Bride-lane, into another street, and the officer caught him: I am certain of him.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Were you there accidentally? A. Yes, waiting to cross - several persons stood there waiting to cross; there was not a crowd - the prisoner went away immediately; I pursued him, and saw him taken - I had lost sight of him; nobody but him was running before me.

ROBERT MASON . I am an officer. I was standing in Bridge-street, and the prisoner came running down Bride-lane - he crossed the street; Odoud then came down, crying Stop thief! I ran across Bridge-street, and took the prisoner - I saw Odoud and Mr. Todd in about two minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see any other persons running? A. Several - he was running first, and directly Odoud came up he said, "That is the person."(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young lad was before me - there was a stoppage; I saw the lad behind the gentleman - he threw the handkerchief down; I took it up - the gentleman turned, and laid hold of it; I then ran away, conceiving the lad had done something wrong.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-71

1797. CHARLES NORTHFIELD and CHARLES PERROTEN were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 1 pocket-book, value 18 pence, and one 10l. Bank note, the property of John Dyte , from his person .

JOHN DYTE. I am a pen-maker , and live at No. 106, Strand. On the 24th of August, about twelve o'clock in the morning, I received a 10l. note at Messrs. Hankeys', Fenchurch-street, which I put into my pocket-book in my pocket, and went on to Bucklersbury; I stopped in Clement's-lane about a minute - I got into a house in Bucklersbury , stopped there about five minutes, and missed it as I came out; I had received it about a quarter of an hour; the prisoners are strangers to me - I went to the Bank the same day to give information, and while there the note was presented; I was in the secretary's office - I had noticed the number and signature on the note when I received it; my pocket-book has not been found.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you sober? A. Perfectly so; I put my pocket-book into my inside coat pocket behind - I am certain of that; I consider it a very safe pocket - I felt nobody at it; my handkerchief was not in my pocket, but in my hat; I called at a house in Clement's-lane, but seeing a person of the same business there, I did not wish him to know I dealt there, and left - I stopped no where else till I came to Bucklersbury; my pocket is a very deep one, and the book was not large - I have no idea of the distance of Bucklersbury from Fenchurch-street; I suppose it is about half a mile - my pocket was not cut; the book contained papers and a card; I am certain I put it into my pocket.

BENJAMIN ALEXANDER . I am a dealer and salesman, and live at No. 10, Field-lane, Holborn. On the 24th of August, about two o'clock, the prisoners came to me to purchase some clothes - they looked out two waistcoats and a pair of trousers, which came to 18s., and offered me this 10l. note; I said I had no cash in the house to give change, and immediately ran to the Bank to get change for it - it was stopped; Mr. Dyte was there - I returned with him; we met an officer on the road, and he went with us to my house; the prisoners were waiting there - I had told them I was going to change the note at the Bank, and found them waiting; they were immediately given into custody - I had never seen them before.

Cross-examined. Q. Yours is a clothes shop? A. Yes; I looked at the note, and told them to wait while I went to the Bank to see if it was right - I was gone about a quarter of an hour; I had told them I was going to investigate about the note.

COURT. Q. Had you any suspicion of it? A. No, but if I have a large note, I always make inquiry to see if it is a good one - I took it to the Bank, because if it was a bad note I should lose my money.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure you told them you went not only to get change, but to investigate? A. I did- I left them in my back parlour; my wife was with them.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say that when you first

gave an account of this transaction, you stated that you told them you were going to the Bank to investigate about the note? A. I might not have said so at first, but perhaps the question was not put to me - I presented it at the Bank for change; I believe I asked the gentleman if it was a good note.

JURY. Q. Can you tell the exact words you made use of to the prisoners? A. I told them I should go to the Bank to get it changed, and see if it was good.

JOHN LENT . I am clerk to Messrs. Hankey. On the 24th of August I paid Mr. Dyte a 10l. note for a cheque, drawn by Aaron Solomons; the note produced corresponds in number and date with the one I paid him.

MARMADUKE BLAKE SAMPSON . I am a clerk in the secretary's office at the Bank. This 10l. note was presented by Alexander between one and two o'clock, and stopped - we never issue two notes of the same number and date.

HENRY HODGES . I am a constable. On the 24th of August Mr. Dyte passed me in the Poultry; I went with him to Alexander's, found the prisoners there, and asked how they became possessed of the 10l. note; they said they picked it up in Thames-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Dyte was present when they said said they had picked it up? A. I think so; the prisoners were in Alexander's parlour waiting his arrival - he told them it was all wrong.

Northfield's Defence. We did not say we picked it up in Thames-street - we were coming down Thames-street, and up Walbrook.

Perroten's Defence. I met Northfield, and at the corner of Walbrook he picked up the pocket-book, opened it, and it contained a 10l. note; he threw the pocket-book away, and went to Alexander's to change the note - he said he would go to the Bank, and get it cashed, and we waited till he returned.

NORTHFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

PERROTEN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-72

1798. HENRY SMITH was indicted for embezzlement .

2nd COUNT, for stealing 5 shillings.

THOMAS HENRY INGHAM . I am a basket-maker , and live in Upper Thames-street . On the 8th of August I saw the prisoner standing by my cellar, and asked if he could get no work; he said his parents had turned him out of doors, and he was wanting victuals - I said I could give him victuals, and he could take a few baskets out for me; on the 10th, after he dined, my wife gave him 5s. to get changed - he never returned; I saw him again on the 18th, and charged him with it; he seemed very indifferent about it, he said he could not help it, and that he had got work at the Rotunda.

ANN INGHAM . I gave the prisoner the 5s. to get changed, at Mr. Johnson's, who lived next door; he never returned.

SAMUEL JOHNSON . On the 10th of August the prisoner came, and I gave him change for a 5s. piece.

BARTHOLOMEW SCANLAND . I am an officer. I took him in charge.

Prisoner. I am very sorry for it.

GUILTY. - Aged 19. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320906-73

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1799. FREDERICK WILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Norman , from his person .

WILLIAM ROUTH . On the 6th of July I was in a carriage in the Strand , near the end of Norfolk-street; I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from Mr. Norman's pocket - I got out of the carriage and stopped him; I charged him with taking it - he said he had not, and that he had no handkerchief, but I saw something in his breast, and took out this handkerchief; I left him in charge of Mr. Lucas, and ran after the prosecutor, who came back and identified it.

JOSEPH NORMAN. I live in the Strand, and keep a coffee-shop . On the morning of the 6th of July I lost this handkerchief, which the officer has.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up the Strand; a boy threw it down, and I took it up and put it into my breast.

MR. ROUTH. I am sure the prisoner took it.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-74

1800. JABEZ HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 pair of boots, value 9s. , the goods of John Candy .

JOHN CANDY . I live in King-street, Hammersmith , and am a boot-maker . I missed a pair of boots from my door on the 7th of July, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; I had tried them on a customer within half an hour before.

ARTHUR MILLS (Police-constable T 5). On Saturday, the 7th of July, I took the prisoner into custody; I searched him, and found a boot in each of his pockets - I took him on another charge at Kensington, near two miles from the prosecutor's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out of the country, and bought them of a man I do not know.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-75

1801. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 hat, value 4s.; 2 pair of unmade boots, value 5s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Daniel Mason , from his person .

DANIEL MASON . I live in Cirencester-place. On the night of the 16th of July I was in Oxford-street ; I had been with a friend - I had drank too much; I sat down at the step of a door - I then missed the hat; my head felt cold, which brought me to my senses - I cannot say whether it had fallen off my head; it had two pairs of unmade boots in it, and a red handkerchief - I do not remember seeing the prisoner at all.

WILLIAM DRANE (Police-constable C 141). I saw the prosecutor on a step in Oxford-buildings, on the night of the 16th of July; the prisoner was sitting on the same step- about a quarter of an hour afterwards I saw the prisoner alone in Woodstock-street, not more than ten yards from Oxford-buildings; he then had a hat on (he had had a cap on before) - I suspected he had stolen the hat; he was running, but when he saw me he stopped - I went up, and took

this hat off his head; I found in it his own cap, this handkerchief, and boots.(Property produced and sworn to)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to have a game at skittles; I saw the prosecutor there, who asked me to be his partner, but he played so bad, that he said he would pay for what I lost, and himself too; he gave me liquor, which made me insensible, and if I did take it, I did not know what I did.

DANIEL MASON . I do not recollect being at any public-house with him; I left Lisson-grove at nine or ten o'clock at night, and then called at the Lord Keith, to see the undertaker who had buried my child the day before, and there I took some gin and water.

GUILTY of stealing only. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18320906-76

1802. HENRY POPE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Bennett , from his person .

THOMAS BENNETT . I live in Dalby-terrace, City-road. On the 26th of July I was in Goswell-street-road , about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, and a gentleman told me that I had lost my handkerchief; I felt, and missed it -It was afterwards produced by the officer.

CHARLES BATH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Goswell-street. On the evening of the 26th of July I was at my shop door, and saw the prisoner in company with another person; as they passed my door I saw the other get near the prosecutor; I suspected, and followed them about twenty paces, when I saw the prisoner put one hand to the skirt of the prosecutor's pocket, and take his handkerchief out with the other - I took the prisoner; the officer came up, and took him from me, but he had thrown the handkerchief to his companion, who made off, and the handkerchief fell on the ground.

SARAH BENNETT . I am sister to Thomas Bennett. I was walking with him on the 26th of July, and saw this handkerchief, which is my brother's, laying on the pavement, close behind me; the prisoner was then in custody a yard or two from the spot - I saw another person run away.

JAMES BUCKLE . I am an officer. I heard the alarm, took the prisoner from Mr. Bath, and received this handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had just left work at my brother's, in Spitalfields, when the gentleman came and took me into a shop; the handkerchief was brought in about three minutes after.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320906-77

1803. WILLIAM HURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d.; 1 hat, value 6d., and part of a music-book, value 6d. , the goods of John Burgess .

JOHN BURGESS . I live at the Castle public-house, Child's-hill. I was at the Eyre Arms , at ten o'clock at night on the 18th of July; I had a bundle with me, containing the articles stated, and two pieces of a flute - they were all tied in a cotton handkerchief: I had my bundle on my arm, and fell asleep - a girl awoke me, and told me I had lost my bundle; I went into the road, and met the prisoner, who asked if I had lost my bundle; I said I had- he said the soldier had gone to the Duke of York public-house, with a bundle, and if I went there I might get it - I went, but could not find it; I went back, and met the prisoner again, with the bundle - he said he had been down, stopped the soldier and a man named Charley, and got it from them.

RICHARD MITCHELL . I am a private in the Grenadier Guards, and am quartered at the Eyre Arms. I was with the prosecutor, and when I went to bed he had his bundle- I left the prisoner sitting at the same table with him; I was afterwards called by the serjeant.

JOHN WOODS (Police-constable S 103.) I was on duty near the Eyre Arms on the 17th of July - the prosecutor told me what he had lost; I went with him to Portland-town - on our return we met the prisoner, who gave up this bundle to me; he said he stopped a soldier, and a man named Charley at St. John's-wood chapel with it.

CHARLES MAYES . I am called Charley. I was at the Eyre Arms; I saw the prosecutor come in with his bundle about ten o'clock in the evening - there was no soldier there but Mitchell; I left the prisoner and prosecutor there when I went away. (Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the Eyre Arms, and saw the prosecutor - he went to sleep, and in about five minutes I saw the soldier and the other man take the bundle out; I thought all was not right - I went out, and saw them going towards Portland-town; I returned, and told the prosecutor - we went down towards Portland-town, but not seeing them, he left me for about ten minutes - I then met the men, and told them the prosecutor wanted his bundle and they gave it to me.

JOHN BURGESS re-examined. Q. Did the prisoner go with you? A. He went with me part of the way, and then left me - I told the Policeman, who went on with me and as we came back we met the prisoner coming towards us.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-78

1804. GABRIEL MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 1 guage, value 29s.; 1 candlestick, value 1s.; 1 salt-cellar, value 1s.; 6lbs. weight of brass, value 2l., and 2 spoons, value 10s. , the goods of John Moses .

The prosecutor did not appear NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18320906-79

1805. SARAH JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 quart of pickled capers, value 5s.; 1 quart of pickled cauliflowers, value 1s.; 2 quarts of pickled walnuts, value 1s.; 1 pint of essence of anchovies, value 1s.; 1 quart of oil, value 2s.; 1 lb. weight of raspberry-jam, value 2s; 4 jars, value 2s., and 6 bottles, value 1s., the goods of Robert Jesse Makins , her master ; and MARY TOMLINSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

ROBERT JESSE MAKINS . I am a grocer and oilman , and live in Blandford-street, Manchester-square - James lived with me as servant of all work for one month. In

consequence of suspicion, I procured an officer on the 9th of July - he searched her bed, in her presence; we found under the pillow a bottle of capers, some sal prunella, a bottle of tea, and, I believe, a little isinglass; she said she was very sorry, and hoped I would forgive her - we then found these other articles, which are all used in my trade; there are no marks on them - this is a bottle of capers, which must have been filled by herself, as we never keep capers in bottles of this size; here is a packet of tea, which has a paper of my shop round it - Tomlinson is James' aunt, and lives in East-street; we went there, and found a bottle of cauliflower - I do not know that I had seen her at my house; I know the cauliflower by its being pickled in white vinegar; we also found a bottle of salad oil, which I judge to be mine by the colour of the cement, which is composed of rosin and bees' wax.

James received a good character.

JAMES - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

TOMLINSON - NOT GUILTY .

There was another indictment against James.

Reference Number: t18320906-80

1806. CHARLOTTE DAVIS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 2nd of August , two necklaces, value 6l., the goods of Clementina Caines , well knowing them to have been stolen , against the Statute.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

CLEMENTINA CAINES. I am a parlour-boarder , at Mr. Stables' at Hendon . On the 2nd of August I had some necklaces and trinkets, and money in a small box; I saw the box safe on the drawers in the parlour at half-past eleven o'clock in the morning; the drawers were within a few yards of the window, but not near enough for any one to put his arm in and reach the box - the window was open and the blinds down; on going into the room at a quarter before two o'clock I missed the box; it was shown to me by the officer about half-past two or three, broken to pieces - I found in it a pair of pearl ear-rings, which were under the part of the box which drew up; among other articles which I lost from the box, was one pearl necklace and one cornelian - I have seen the pearl necklace since and part of the cornelian.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is the parlour on the ground floor? A. Yes, there is a railing before the window.

JOHN WARREN . I am a constable of Hendon. I was sent for about this robbery; I found this box in a field about fifty yards from the house - it was broken open, and some letters thrown about.

EDWARD RAY (Police-constable S 92). On the 2nd of August I saw the prisoner by the tap-room window of the Southampton Arms public house at Camden-town; three or four miles from Hendon, between nine and ten o'clock, in company with a boy named Gray and another girl - in consequence of suspicion I took the prisoner's address out of the bail-book at the station, and went to her lodgings in Jeffry's-buildings Westminster, on the 11th of August - I found her there; I searched and found this cornelian necklace, a gold watch, a silver thimble, and a china thimble: Warren, who was with me, found eight sovereigns - I told her I apprehended her on suspicion of being concerned in a robbery; she said she had nothing to do with it - I asked if she had seen Gray; she said No, she had not; I then asked whose the necklace was: she said it was hers, and had been given her by a cousin - we then took her to the station-house, and on the same day, the 11th of August, we took her before the Magistrate at Hendon - I told her in going along, it would be better for her to tell the truth to the Magistrate, but not to tell me any thing.

COURT. Q. Where did you find these articles? A. In her box in the lodging; it was not locked, there was a quantity of women's clothes in it - there was only one bed in the room, she was in bed with a yound man named Chapple; he was taken, but discharged.

Cross-examined. Q. You found her in company with this man? A. Yes; he lived with her; I had known her some time - I saw her on the night of the 2nd of August, at Camden-town, which is in the road from Hendon to London, with Gray, which she denied.

GEORGE HENRY RODOLPH . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in the Westminster-bridge-road. I know the prisoner; on the 4th of August she came to my employer's, and pawned this necklace for 9s.; there was another female with her; I asked the prisoner how much it cost; she said a gentleman purchased it, and I believe she said in the Strand, and made her a present of it - this is the counterpart of the duplicate I gave, it is in the name of Charlotte Clark, lodger, No. 4, Charlton-street, Somers'-town - this is a pearl necklace; I did not apprize her of the value of it; if she had asked 2l. I should have lent it; it might have cost 6l.; she was dressed quite in a fashionable manner, in a silk hat and silk dress.

COURT. Q. Did you not take her for an unfortunate woman? A. Yes, and they frequently take gold watches and other things to pawnbrokers.

EDWARD RAY . I found a slate-coloured dress on the prisoner's bed, and some silk, quite new; she was partly dressed, in common clothes.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-81

1807. DENNIS FOLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 2nd of August , at Hendon , 1 brooch, value 1l., the goods of Clementina Caines , well knowing the same to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

MR. PHILLIPS declined the prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-82

1808. JOSEPH NICHOLLS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 2nd of August , 2 brooches, value 2l., and 1 ring, value 5s., the goods of Clementina Caines , well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

CLEMENTINA CAINES. Amongst the articles which I lost on the 2nd of August, were these two diamond brooches and this ring; I lost several other article; which I have not recovered.

LEONARD GEORGE NEEDES . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I think I saw the prisoner when he pawned this small brooch and ring with me, but I cannot be positive of his person; I lent 2s. on the ring, and 6s. on the brooch; the real value of the brooch is not more than 12s.; there are four very small dia

monds in it; the address given was " Joseph Edwards , No. 5, Dean-street." I asked whose they were, and he said his own - I considered him to be a dealer.

EDWARD RAY . On the 11th of August the prisoner was at the office on another charge; I told him I took him on suspicion of being concerned in the robbery of Mr. Stables, at Hendon; he said he knew nothing at all of it.

HENRY GIBSON . I am in the service of a pawnbroker, in Tothill-street. The prisoner pawned this large brooch with me; I have the counterpart of the duplicate I gave, it was on the 4th of August, in the name of John Edwards, Grove-street, Camden-town - I lent him 16s. on it; it is worth from 30s. to 35s.; the diamonds are not worth 6d. a piece; they are all roses; small sparks - he asked me 1l. for it, and I lent him 16s.; I asked how he came by it, and he said it was his own - he was dress respectably.

COURT. Q. Do you mean, Sir, that this could be made for five guineas? A. I do not suppose it could be made for that; the workmanship is very valuable - I really do not know what the pearls that are in it are worth.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to swear that these are rose diamonds? A. I should take them to be such -I had not the curiosity to count that there are sixty-five of them.

Prisoner's Defence. That is the only thing I pawned; Gray came to me, and said he had a present from his uncle- I did not see the other things, but he asked me to pawn that brooch; he assured me it was his own; I did not know it was stolen.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-83

1809. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 6 lbs. of soap, value 3s. , the goods of William Digby .

WILLIAM DIGBY. I live in Crown-street, Finsbury , and am a grocer . On the 17th of July, in the afternoon, I was in my shop; a person came, and asked if I had lost any soap; I said I was not aware of it, but I looked, and missed two cakes; I went out, and pursued another lad, whom I saw about two hundred and fifty yards from my shop - he went up Earl-street, and joined the prisoner, four or five hundred yards from my shop, and out of sight of it; they walked on together for some distance; I followed very close to them - I then saw the two ends of the soap in the prisoner's apron, and took and secured him with it; this is it; I know it to be mine by some coals on the end of it - there had been a ticket on the soap, which Mr. Hawkes found.

JAMES HAWKES . I was in Clifton-street on the 17th of July, and saw the prisoner walking with the two cakes of soap in his apron - I saw him throw away this ticket in the passage of a schoolmaster's house. I took it up.

GEORGE KEMP (Police-constable N 82.) I took the prisoner, and have the soap.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Clifton-street, and saw a boy drop it - I was walking with it when the prosecutor came and took me.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing it to be his first offence .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320906-84

1810. JOHN MACHENERY was indicted for bigamy .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

EDMUND LOVATT . I am parish-clerk of St. Nicholas chapel, at Liverpool. I produce a paper, which I copied from the register-book of the church - it is a verbatim copy; this is my name signed to it as a witness - I was present at the marriage, and William Richards , who was then under sexton; he is now a pauper in the Liverpool workhouse; this register states that " John Machenery , of this parish, labourer , and Ann Evans , spinster, were married in this chapel, by banns, on the 27th of August, 1827, by John Thompson, curate;" on the 23rd of June, 1827, a man, calling himself John Machenery, directed me to have the banns put up - I wrote the names on the top of this paper, and he signed it at the bottom, John Machenery; I have not the slightest doubt about the prisoner being the same man - I have a recollection of his person; I did not know the woman before the marriage, but I saw her last Saturday morning, at the Neptune hotel, Liverpool, where she lives as cook - I saw her married to the man on the 27th of August, 1827; I only saw the prisoner on these two occasions.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Have you always been as confident as to the identity of the prisoner as you are now? A. I have no doubt on my mind - after I saw the wife I identified her, and thought I could identify the man; I was not always as confident of the identity of the prisoner as I am now, but having seen him twice, and connecting one thing with another, it brings it to my recollection very forcibly - my conversation with his wife was the first that brought the subject to my recollection; I only saw the prisoner twice before I saw him at the Police-office - we have seven or eight hundred banns published at Liverpool in the course of twelve months; I saw the prisoner about ten minutes when he put up the publication of the banns; it is from that circumstance I speak to him, and I have no doubt the woman I saw at Liverpool was the person I saw married to him.

COURT. Q. Do you clearly recollect her as the person who was married to this man? A. Yes.

MR. PHILLIPS. How long did the marriage ceremony last? A. Perhaps a quarter of an hour, and I had then an opportunity of seeing the prisoner.

MATTHEW WHITRIDGE . I am a tea-dealer. I have known the prisoner since 1828 - he then lived with a friend of mine, and in 1829 he came to live with me - there was an application from his wife in Liverpool, I believe, to have some money from him; I asked him if he had been married, and why he had been married in the name of Machenery: I think this must have been in the early part of 1830; he said it was his mother's name, and he had frequently gone by that name in his youth, and that he was married in that name - I only knew him by the name of John Lillis ; I believe he was a native of Ireland, but I do not know of what part - the conversation took place in consequence of some person calling at the shop, and asking for Mr. Machenery - they saw him in the shop in my presence, and they applied for some money.

JOHN BARNETT . I live with a grocer, in Charles-street, Manchester-square. I have known the prisoner for about

twelve months last Christmas; I have seen him write a great many times; I believe this letter [No.2] to be his writing; also the name of John Machenery to this other [No.1], and the signature to these marriage instructions.

Cross-examined. Q. You have seen these letters before? A. Yes - I have not compared them with any writing; I speak from my recollection of his writing - he frequently came to the shop, where I was, to fetch the money; sometimes I gave it him, and sometimes another young man in the shop - the prisoner signed his initials, and frequently, when he was there, he would write on some paper in the shop; he has written his name at full length, and my name also; and on one occasion I was there every day for a month - I never saw him write "Machenery" in full, but he would frequently write " James M. Hooper ," and from the M. and the John, and the other letters, I believe this to be his writing; I have seen him write small and large letters, and though these signatures are different letters, I believe they are his.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I am an officer of Marylebone-office. I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of July, at Calvert's brewhouse; I told him it was on a charge of marrying a person named Draper, he having a wife living - he said, "It cannot be me, it must be a mistake;" I said,"Is not your name Lillis?" he said, Yes; I said, "Did you ever go by any other name?" he said, No; I said,"Did you never go by the name of Machenery?" he said,"No, I never did;" I brought in Mrs. Machenery unawares - she reproached him with his heartless conduct, and said he had robbed her; he made no answer, but appeared to wish to shun her.

MARY DRAPER . I keep a public-house , in Oxford-street. I married the prisoner.

JOHN BURGE . I live in Perry-terrace, Brewer-street, Somers'-town - I have known the prisoner about two years- I know Mary Draper. I was present at the church of St. Pancras, on the 24th of October last, when the prisoner and her were married; I signed my name in the book as a witness.

- THISTLETON. I am clerk of St. Pancras . -This is the register of marriages there. On the 24th of October, 1831 , John Lillis and Mary Draper were married; it is signed by John Burge and several others.

MR. LEE to MR. WHITRIDGE. Q. Can you tell what age the prisoner was in 1828? A. He appeared very young at that time; I should think he was from twenty to twenty-one - I think it was in August, 1829, he came into my service; I am quite certain it was not so early as February, 1827.

COURT. Q. Did any thing further pass then his saying that he had gone by the name of Machenery? A. No, only that he had used that name in his youth - the person came from Liverpool, and asked for Mr. Machenery; he was at the back of the shop, and came forward himself.

THOMAS DRAPER . I am a licensed victualler. I brought these letters from Liverpool; I received them from Mrs. Machenery, at the Neptune hotel, in the presence of her master and mistress - (letters were here read).(No. 1.) 91, Cheapside, London, January 26, 1829.

MRS. MACHENERY, - I received your letter this morning, and, in return, have to inform you, that I have resolved that no alteration shall take place in my first intention respecting the settlement of the money I possess; I am much surprised that you should have employed an attorney to endeavour to obtain the money from me, as you must be perfectly aware that there is no existing law which can compel me to part with it - when I promised the person, who called a few days ago, to forward the money, it was upon the understanding, that I should be totally free from all demands from you in future; but I find, upon reference to competent authority, that that cannot be the case - you seem to insinuate that I possessed myself of the money, and then left you; but you know perfectly well that I never received it until a long period after my marriage with you, and consequently the free act was your own, although, as your husband, the law saw in me the rightful possessor of it - I disclaim all intention of wronging or injuring you, but I cannot allow myself to become the dupe of any one whom you may choose to employ against me; the money is quite safe in the hands of the person who at present holds it for me, and there I am firmly resolved it shall remain - but if, at any future period, you should be in want of money or assistance, you may depend that I will withhold neither from you; I am charged with having changed my name from Machenery to Lillis - but although Lillis was the name in which I was brought up, Machenery was my father's, and consequently the name in which I was compelled to be married; and do not think that because I withhold the money from you now, that it is my intention to squander it away without your having any prospect of deriving any ultimate advantage from it, as it will be my first care to save up all my earnings to increase it, with the hope, after a short lapse of time, of being comfortabley settled with you; the reason I have not more money now is, that when I was in Scotland I was taken ill, which compelled me to part with a great deal of it - I shall always he happy to hear from you, and will answer all your letters: until I see you again. I remain your affectionate husband,

JOHN MACHENERY.

To Mrs. Machenery, Neptune Hotel , Liverpool.(No. 2) London, 8th January, 1828.

DEAR WIFE, - I take the opportunity of writing these few lines to you, hoping to find you in good health, thanks be to God, which leaves me at present; I am about getting a good situation, and will save all the money up, and will be able to make it up again please God; dear wife, when I was down in Scotland I had the scarlet fever, and I had like to die; but now, thank God, I am quite well - I hope you will forgive me, and if you should like to leave, you will come up to me, or else to go live with my friends; I am very sorry that I left, but if you would keep your situation I would write to you every three weeks or a month regularly - I hope your master and family are in good health, likewise John and family - if you will send me an answer I will write, and you would get a situation in London; a gentleman I lived with in London had 30l. of mine, and put it in the savings-bank, and I put 8s. a week with it - send me an answer by return of post as soon as possible; no more at present from your well wisher, JOHN MACHENERY.

Direct No. 94, Cheapside, London. - Please God, I will make you happy for the time past. JOHN MACHENERY .

H. Machenery, Neptune Hotel, Clayton-square, Liverpool.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Whitridge has known me nearly five years - the first place I was at in London was at his brother-in-law's, and then he took me into his service for four years; if his books were produced " John Lillis ," my signature is in it, which is my name.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-85

1811. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 8 yards of printed cotton, value 5s. , the goods of Richard James .

RICHARD JAMES. I keep a linen-draper's-shop in Middle-row, Holborn . I was called down into the shop on the 9th of July - I saw the prisoner and another woman near the counter; the prisoner was looking at some printed cotton for some time - I said to her, "I will thank you to decide whether you will have it or not;" she then said,"Cut me off half a yard," which was done, and she paid for it; I followed her out of the shop, and brought her back - I took hold of her arm, and this piece of print dropped from under her clothes; I took her into the passage, and she said, "If you will allow me to go I will send for the money immediately, and pay for it;" before she had left the shop her companion said to her "Come along:" I followed and took her.

THOMAS FARRANT (Police-constable C 42). I took the prisoner into custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18320906-86

1812. GEORGE CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 purse, value 1s.; 4 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, and 3 shillings, the property of the Honorable George John Cavendish , from his person .

THE HON. GEORGE JOHN CAVENDISH , R.N. I live at No. 37, Half Moon-street, Piccadilly. On the 7th of July, I was at the bottom of Hay-hill , about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon - I felt something touch my coat, and heard a person on the opposite side of the street say "He has picked your pocket," and at the same time he cried Stop thief! I followed the prisoner - my purse was picked up in the way which the prisoner ran; it is mine, and had four sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and three shillings in it; the prisoner was stopped in Albemarle-street, about two hundred yards from where I missed my purse - I had lost sight of him, but I know him to be the person I had been running after.

SAMUEL HICKMAN . I am in the service of Mr. Foley, in Berkeley-square. On the afternoon of the 7th of July I was near the bottom of Hay-hill - I saw the prisoner walking behind the prosecutor, and then I saw his hand in one of his pockets - he drew out the purse; he then turned round, and ran towards me - he saw that I saw him, and he turned down a turning; I called out "He has picked your pocket," and ran after him; I lost sight of him, but I saw his person and face, and am certain of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many turning did he turn? A. Three, but I saw him between the corner; I lost sight of him as he turned - I cannot tell which of the gentlemen's pockets, he had his hand in, when I first saw him I thought he belonged to the gentlemen, but as I kept looking at him, I saw him draw the purse out momentarily - I did not take particular notice in what pocket he had his hand in; I first thought he was pushing in the gentleman's handkerchief - I had not seen him before, I cannot tell whether he had boots or shoes on; he had a black cravat.

THOMAS FULCHER . I am a servant out of place. On the 7th of July I was at the top of Hay-hill; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running - he was calling Stop thief! but there was no one in front of him but me; I followed him, and he took something from his girdle and threw it away down an area - I followed him; I did not see the article which he threw picked up - he turned towards Albemarle-street; I did not see him taken, but I am certain he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. How near was he to the corner of Hay-hill, when you saw him? A. About ten yards; I was in front of him on the other side, with my back to the corner - I was not far enough up for any one to have turned the corner.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-87

1813. JOSEPH BOWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 1 piece of mahogany, value 10s.; 1 coffee-mill, value 5s.; 1 filterer, value 8s.; 10 candlesticks, value 1l.; 7 cocks, value 14s.; 3 tea-trays, value 6s.; 1 saucepan, value 8s.; 6 locks, value 18s; 1 set of fire-irons, value 12s.; 3 brushes, value 4s.; 2 hammers, value 1s.; 10 lbs. weight of brass, value 1l.; 1 set of castors, value 2s.; 1 chain, value 4s.; 12 files, value 2s.; 4 gimblets, value 5s., and 1 pair of scissors, value 1s., the goods of John Peachy , his master . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-88

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1814. THOMAS CARTWRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 12 half-crowns, 40 shillings, and 20 sixpences, the monies of Thomas Cunnington , his master .

THOMAS CUNNINGTON . I am a farmer , and live at Hampstead ; the prisoner was in my employ for about two months, and has been in and out of my place for twelve months. On the 29th of June when I went away from dinner, I left word for them to send me down 4l. of silver to pay the hay-makers; the prisoner was to bring it to me in a bag - he went away without giving me notice; the Policeman found him three weeks afterwards at Hampstead.

CAROLINE COLSTONE . I live with the prosecutor. I gave the prisoner about 4l., and desired him to take it to the field and give it to his master, on the 29th of June - it was Mr. Cunnington's money.

EMANUEL TURNER (Police-constable S 15.) I took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-89

1815. JOSEPH DOLLY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 pair of stays, value 2s., and 1 shirt, value 1s. 4d. , the goods of John Boards .

CHARLES RANDYLL (Police-constable H 68). On the 9th of July I was at the corner of Phoenix-street, Bricklane, and saw the prisoner carrying a bundle; I asked what he had there - he said a pair of stays of his wife's; I took him.

JOHN BOARDS . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Shoreditch - these stays are mine. They were taken from about one yard inside the door; I did not miss them till the morning of the 10th - I had not sold them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Then you did

not see them till the 10th? A. No; they had been in my shop the evening before.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320906-90

1816. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Samuel Adolphus Philbrick , from his person .

SAMUEL ADOLPHUS PHILBRICK . I am a surgeon . On the 7th of July, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was in Whitechapel ; I had a handkerchief in my pocket; I felt something, and turned round; I saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; I collared him, and asked him for it - he gave it me.

ROBERT ADAMS . I am a City Police constable, No. 19. I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had found the handkerchief under a fruit stall.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-91

1817. JAMES JEFFERIES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 pair of stocks, value 18s.; 1 pair of dies, value 5s., and 3 taps, value 7s. , the goods of Charles Gray .

THOMAS CARR . I am a smith and engineer, in the service of Mr. Charles Gray , in New Park-street, Southwark . On the 15th of September, 1831, the prisoner came to his shop to me, and said he came from Mr. Embleton, to borrow a pair of stocks and dies, as he had a job to do for Mr. Magnay; I knew Mr. Embleton to be a customer, and though the prisoner was a stranger, I let him have the articles, as I believed he came with a true story.

Prisoner. Q. Do you mean to say I asked you for these things? A. Yes, you asked for them - it was not my Mistress asked me.

LUKE EMBLETON . I am a smith. I know Mr. Gray, and have dealt with him; the prisoner worked for me about four years ago, but I did not authorize him to borrow these articles.

JOHN MILTON . I produce the stocks and dies, which were pawned with me on the 17th of September, 1831.

JOHN JARVIS . (Police-constable C 13). I took the prisoner on another charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I only borrowed them for work.

GUILTY . - Aged 28. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-92

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1818. WILLIAM SEABROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. the goods of Charles Ely , from his person . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 11. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-93

1819. ELLEN HESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , 2 sheets, value 4s.; 1 pillow, value 1s., and 1 coverlid, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Howes . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-94

1820. THOMAS GOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July , 1 ewe, price 30s., the property of William Skinner and another .

WILLIAM SKINNER . I am a salesman and drover . I had a ewe sent me from Kennington to Smithfield; she then became my property; I was responsible for it. I saw it into Smithfield between four and five o'clock in the morning on the 2nd of July; two of my servants brought her with seventy or eighty other sheep; I know the prisoner by his working in the market for different drovers ; I never authorized him to have possession of the ewe; on the second examination, he wished to see me, and I went into the lock-up place to him - I made him no promise or threat; he then said that the sheep belonged to me, and he had let Robert Smith have it, who had made 18s. of it, and had not given him any part of it; I made inquiries round Newgate-market, but could not find the butcher who had bought it - I never saw the sheep again.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me with the sheep? A. No; I went to you about three or four o'clock in the afternoon; you said Smith and a man they call Cucumber, had the sheep; I do not recollect Cucumber's saying that he saw you throw the sheep into the pens, and that he helped you to lift it.

NISBY WALKER . I am a drover, and attend Smithfield-market; I remember seeing the ewe between four and five o'clock in the morning in the pens with other sheep; I did not see it any more till twelve o'clock in the day, when we were taking it home with some other sheep which she came with in the morning, belonging to a person named Wilkinson; the prisoner came and took that sheep away from the others - he carried it off; I knew he had no right to it, and asked why he took it; he said it was a sheep he had put into the pens in the morning - it has never been found since.

EDWARD JENKINS. I am a drover. I was standing with the sheep from the first thing in the morning till they were taken out at dinner time - Goss came and laid hold of this sheep; I asked what he was going to do with it - he said to put into the pens, where he had put it before; I told him it was ours - he called me a liar, and would not let me have it; it was my master's, and I had charge of it all the morning - it was a Kent ewe; the prisoner said it was a little half-bred sheep.

Prisoner's Defence. I caught the sheep at half-past ten in the morning, running round the market, with three dogs after it; it is a regular thing to take a sheep or bullock that runs loose, to take care of - Smith asked me for it afterwards; I showed it to him, and he took it.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-95

1821. HENRY BROWN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Massell Croom , on the 24th of May , and stealing 1 pair of trousers, value 30s.; 1 waistcoat, value 12s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 12s.; 11 handkerchiefs, value 1l.; 1 shirt, value 10s.; 3 neckcloths, value 6s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 2 razors, value 8s.; 3 brushes, value 2s.; 1 note-case, value 2s., and 1 bag, value 5s., the goods of Richard Sparkes ; and two 10l. Bank notes, the property of the said Richard Sparkes .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD SPARKES. I am a farmer , and live near Guildford, in Surrey. I arrived at the Sussex hotel , with my wife and part of my family, on the 24th of May - I changed a cheque that morning at Hoare and Co.'s for

34l 7s. 6d.; I received two 10l. notes, and the rest in cash - I put the notes into my pocket-book, and the cash into my pocket; I did not pay particular attention to the notes, but I think if the name of John The but had been on them I should have noticed it - I have seen two notes since which have that name on them; I went back to my bed-room at the hotel, and put my pocket-book, with the notes in it, into my carpet bag - the other articles named in the indictment were in the bag; I came out, and shut the door, I believe, but I am not certain; this was about ten or eleven o'clock - I returned about three or four, and went to get some clean linen, to dress for dinner - I then missed my bag, and inquired among the servants.

JOHN PALMER . I am cashier at Messrs. Hoare's, in Fleet-street. On the 24th of May this cheque was presented for payment; I gave two 10l. notes, Nos. 6162, dated 27th April, 1832, and 5039, 26th April, 1832, and 14l. 7s. 6d. in money for it.

JOHN KEMPSTER . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I have the two 10l. notes which have been described - they were paid into the Bank on the 24th of May, before twelve o'clock; I gave twenty sovereigns for them.

JOHN THEBUT . I am a solicitor, and live in Austinfriars. The prisoner's father was in my employ; I paid him 200l. a year - he asked me to let him bring his son, which I did, and the prisoner came in 1828, and staid till July 1829; I had nothing to do with him after that - the name of " John Thebut " on these notes is not my writing, but to the best of my belief it is George Frederick Peters ', which is the prisoner's name; I have seen him write when in my service frequently.

FREDERICK JOHN MANNING . I am a solicitor, and live in Dyer's-buildings, Holborn. The prisoner was in my service, as writing-clerk , in 1830 - he staid three or four months; I have frequently seen his hand-writing, and firmly believe the address on these notes to be his writing; I knew him by the name of George Frederick Peters .

JOHN NICHOLS . I am a waiter at the Sussex Hotel - it is kept by Mr. Joseph Massell Croom . I do not know whether the door of the prosecutor's room was shut or not - but I remember his giving an alarm of having lost his bag.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent; the only evidence against me is the writing on these notes, and you are aware how difficult it is to swear to writing on silver paper, or any other paper; I was not seen at the hotel, nor at the Bank.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-96

1822. MORRIS HOWLING and JEREMIAH BRESNEY were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Wiggins , from his person .

WILLIAM WIGGINS. I was at the corner of Fleet-street , about nine o'clock in the evening, on the 26th of July; I felt something at my pocket, and turned round; the officer called out, "You are robbed;" I turned, and detected the two prisoners close to my coat - Bresney had my handkerchief under his jacket.

THOMAS PROTHERO (City Policeman No. 61.) I was coming into Fleet-street, and saw Howling take hold of the prosecutor's coat, and in an instant the handkerchief was handed to the other prisoner - I took them; they both had hold of it.

RICHARD BARRETT. I was present, and saw what Prothero has stated.

Howling's Defence. The gentleman says that Bresney took it, and the officer says I took it - they do not know who took it, for neither of us took it.

HOWLING - GUILTY . Aged 13.

BRESNEY - GUILTY . Aged 10.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-97

1823. WILLIAM FAULKNER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 2 bottles, value 4d.; 1 pint of wine, value 2s., and 1 pint of gin, value 1s., the goods of Charles Pugh and another, his masters .

CHARLES PUGH. I am a wine-merchant , and am in partnership with Samuel Vincent - the prisoner was our porter for three months. On the 25th of August we had suspicion, and before paying the men their wages we called them all into the warehouse - I taxed the prisoner with having some property about him belonging to us; he hesitated, but at last pulled out a bottle of gin - we sent for an officer, and gave him into custody; I said it was mine, and he did not deny it - the officer found the wine on him.

FRANCIS MACLEAN . I am a City-officer. I took the prisoner; when I got him to the station I observed him to be rather fidgetty - I then searched, and found this bottle of wine in his breeches.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The wine did not belong to my master, it came in the day before with some empty bottles; I took them out, and found this wine.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-98

1824. SAMUEL SOLOMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May , 1 clock, value 10l., the goods of George Bland , and others, in their dwelling-house .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE BLAND. I am one of the partners of Garraway's coffee-house, Cornhill - there are two other partners - we had a bracket clock on our premises on the 3rd of May; it is the dwelling-house of myself and Mrs. West; I saw the clock safe about half-past twelve o'clock on the 3rd of May, and missed it a little after three - Messrs. Frodsham and Co. had the key of that and all the clocks in our house, as they wound them up for five guineas a year. On the 14th of July, in consequence of information I went to Ship-alley, Wellclose-square - I think it was past nine o'clock in the evening; it was dark; I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner - there appeared to be counters on each side, but the shutters were closed; I did not see any business going on; I asked the prisoner if his name was Samuels, which I understood was his name; he said Yes, it was - I said I wanted to speak to him relative to a clock that had been stolen from our house; he asked what clock- I then described it, and told him from what part of the house it had been stolen - I think I told him from the two pair of stairs, and the right hand room, and that the maker's name was Lloyd, of Aldgate; he said he knew nothing of the clock whatever, and asked if I supposed he would do such a thing, as he had a family of eight children, and he often assisted the officers to take thieves; I told him it was needless to make those observations, as I knew all about

it, and stated to him that he had pawned the clock for 2l. 10s. or 2l. 5s., I do not know which, and that I knew he had afterwards sold it to a gentleman in the neighbourhood of Doctors'-commons for 4l. 10s.; he still declared he knew nothing of it, and asked me my name - I told him the name was of no consequence, that I came from Garraway's coffee-house, and I was going to a furniture broker in Ratcliff-highway, named Solomons, and he might make inquiries there who I was - I did not see the prisoner again till he was at Worship-street; this is the clock.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know Mr. Warner? A. Yes, he is my attorney in this case - I believe four bills have been thrown out against the prisoner; I told the prisoner he had pawned the clock for 2l. 10s.; I do not know that that was untrue - on my oath I believed he had pawned it; I have not seen the pawnbroker - I received my information from a person in Horsemonger-lane prisone - the name on the letter is David James; he was tried and convicted here, and transported; I do not know when it was, but he himself told me he was a transport at the time I received the information.

RICHARD PHILLIPS . I am a wheelwright, and live in Addle-hill, Doctor's-commons. I have known the prisoner about eight months; he came to me at a public-house in May last, about the middle of the month; it was before the 16th - he said he had a bracket clock, which he thought would suit me; I asked what the figure would be - he said one of his people had got it in pawn, but he thought it would be about 5l.; the prisoner is an umbrella-maker, and has been in that neighbourhood for these twenty years, as a general dealer - he said he would get the clock in a few days, and show it to me, and he brought it about the 20th; I know the dates, because my daughter went into the country on the 16th, and I had mentioned to her that Samuels had spoken about bringing me a clock, and he brought it a few days after she was gone - he asked 5l. for it; I offered him 4l. 10s. - he said it was a very good one, for the person who pawned it knew its value very well- I said I would not give any more than 4l. 10s., which he agreed to take; I then said, "Samuels, set it going" - he said, "I can't, the key is lost," but he went out, and was gone an hour or two; he brought a key, and with it he readily wound up one side of the clock, and tried it to the other, but the key would not go in - he then went out and filed the key, I believe; he then brought it back, and wound up the clock - when he was going out for the key, he said, "I wish you would let me have 3l., as we have been obliged to borrow some money;" I let him have it, and when he brought the key, I paid him the rest of the money - I gave the same clock to the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw him at a public-house? A. Yes, I am in the habit of going to that house every day about eleven o'clock, to read the paper; I have known the prisoner eighteen months or longer - he had the name of honest Samuel, or the honest Jew; I did not know the clock was stolen - I should have brought any thing of him; I have lived thirty years in the parish, and served all the parish offices.

EDWARD TREWINARD . I am in the employ of Frodsham, and Co., Change-alley, I was employed to take care of and to wind up this clock; we have the key of it at our shop - I wound it up every week; the fair value is about 10l.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer of Worship-street. I went to Mr. Phillips' on the 25th of July, and brought away this clock; I saw the prisoner at the office before the clock was produced, and I asked him if he knew any thing about a clock, the maker's name "Lloyd, Aldgate" - he said No.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of knowing it to be stolen; I bought it of Brown, and it was in pawn at Mr. Walter's, in Aldersgate-street.

Nine witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged. 50.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character .

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-99

1825. GEORGE SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 20 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and three 5l. bank notes, the property of Samuel Farrington , from his person .

SAMUEL FARRINGTON, I am a canal boatman , and live in Staffordshire. On the 23rd of March I was in London' and met a person who asked me to go and drink with him at the New London-bridge tap ; I went with him - he was a farmer, who said he had been on foot ever since ten o'clock, that he was fatigued, and was going to have a bit of bread and cheese, and a pint of ale - he asked me to go with him; I said I had no objection, as I had a bit of leisure time - I had not known him before; when we went into the room, the prisoner came in and called for bread and cheese, and said he meant to have had a flesh meat dinner, but they had none there - he said he had not had flesh meat for a long time, and the reason was he had no money, for he had been at law a long time, and an old lady advised him to employ her lawyer, which he did, and he got him the money directly; he said he had part of the money with him, and offered to let us have some if we liked - he pulled it out, and said he should have more on the 4th of next month - the other gentleman told him he was very silly for pulling out his money before company; he said it did not signify before we - he said the lawyer told him to take care of his money, and keep from the ladies; the other gentleman then said, "I will tell you the safest place to put it in, that is in your watch-pocket" - the prisoner then pulled out his watch, and put his bills in, and I crammed them down with a fork haft, so that he could put his watch in - then the other farmer must have his put in so; and then, as I did not want money, I pulled out mine, and the prisoner gave us 2s. to drink his health - I put my purse into my watch-pocket, and my notes; this prisoner told me to hold my pocket open, and he would put it in for me, and he did so - I took all the notice of it that I could; they then both went out - I went on to Stones-end - I then came back, and went and ordered some liquor at Thompson and Fearon's; I went to pull out my money to pay for it, and I had nothing but some halfpence with paper round them - I saw the prisoner about a fortnight afterwards in Ratcliff-highway; I followed him - he walked about twenty yards, and then ran; I ran after him, and met two Policemen; they overtook him somewhere in Rosemary-lane - I know he is the man; there were three notes found on him - he said it

would cost me 30l. or 40l. if I prosecuted him, and he would give me part of the money back again.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. They breed acute men in Staffordshire, do they not? A. Yes - I do not know whether they call me acute; I am speaking the truth - I had come to London at that time to bring salt; I had three 5l. notes in a yellow purse, and twenty sovereigns and one half-sovereign - I mean I saw the prisoner a fortnight ago, not a fortnight after the time; it was five months after I lost my money that he was taken - I had seen a man once in the mean time, who I thought had taken my money, but I had a load on my back, and could not follow him; it was a gentleman farmer who asked me to go in - I drank once or twice of the ale, and had some tobacco; I was there an hour - the other man did not touch my money at all, I believe: I kept my eye on the prisoner, but he deceived me, or some what else did - I felt the same bulk in my pokcet, as I went along; I am not mistaken in the prisoner.

JOHN BARNES (Police-constable H 168.) I was in East Smithfield, and heard an alarm of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running away - I pursued him; he turned up Dock-street - I followed him: he turned to the left, and went into a Jew's, who sells old clothes, the second door on the left-hand; he hid himself behind the door, and I went in and took him - he said, "You must not take me -I have done nothing:' I took him to the station - I found on him this watch, a duplicate, a Bath note for 5l., and two flash notes for 100l.

Cross-examined. Q. I dare say you know that persons who are not thieves, carry flash notes? A. I have seen them - I cannot find that there is such a bank at Bath as his other note refers to.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor is mistaken in the person - there were several persons in the room, as he says - I get my living by selling horses on commission.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-100

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bailey.

1826. JAMES WYATT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , 1 gelding, price, 26l.; 1 saddle, value 1l., and 1 bridle, value 3s. , the property of Samuel Daniel .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL DANIEL. I live at Holycourt-farm, near Witney, Oxfordshire - my aunt lives at Witney , and I put my horses up at her house when I attend the market, and did so on the 19th of July; I found the prisoner there as a lodger - he was a stranger: he saw the horse, and asked if I should like to sell it - I said I had no objection, for I should sell it soon; he said he would see it another day -I did not mention any price; he came to my house on Fri. day, the 24th, and saw it; on Tuesday, the 31st, he came and asked if I was agreeable for him to try it - I said Yes, if he would not go too far with it; it was saddled for him- I walked with him down the farm till he came to the road, he being on the horse; I walked by his side about half a mile - he asked what village that road led to; I said to Falder - he asked how far it was; I said about a mile, and that would be far enough for him to try the horse; he said, "Very well," or some such words, and went towards Falder - he walked white in my sight; this was about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon - he did not return; I never saw him in the house till I found him in custody on the 11th of August, at Tottenham; I found my horse there, with the bridle and saddle - Witney is sixty-eight miles from London.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. You found the horse in the same state as he took it away? A. Yes; he saw it three times before he took it away.

JOHN BOWES . I keep the Black Boy, at Tottenham. On Saturday, the 4th of August, the prisoner came to my house, about two o'clock in the afternoon; he rode into the yard, and asked if I could give him accommodation for him and his horse; I said I could - he asked what I could keep the horse for; we agreed for 12s for six days- he asked what I thought of his horse; I said I did not know, for I had scarcely seen it; he said, "Well, what do you think it is worth, is it worth 20l.?" I said, "I dare say it is, from that to 25l." he said, "Well, will you buy it?" I said I was not in want of one then - he said he wanted to sell it - I said, "What is the lowest you will take, perhaps I may meet with somebody who will buy it?" he said the lowest would be under 14l.; Mr. Dawkins' son came into the yard while he was there - I had told the prisoner Mr. Dawkins, over the way, bought horses at times, but whether he offered it to Dawkins' son I cannot say.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was he at your premises? A. He came on Saturday, and left on the Thursday, in custody.

JOSEPH FORSTER . I am a constable of Tottenham. In consequence of information, I went to the Black Boy, at Tottenham, with Fowler, about three o'clock - I found the horse, with the saddle and bridle; the prisoner came there about four o'clock in the afternoon - he did not know I was a constable; I passed as a dealer; he asked if I was in want of a horse - I said not particularly, but I was in the habit of buying horses sometimes; he said he had one in the stable, which he wished to part with, as it was rather too big for him, and he wanted a smaller one; he wished me to go to the stable to look at it; I did so, and asked him the price; he said 25l.; I said the horse might suit me, but the price would not - he asked what my price was- I said I thought about 14l. or 15l.; he asked if I could not give another pound or two - I said I would consider, and talk to him about it presently; it appeared about six years old - I asked if it would go in harness; he said Yes- I asked how long he had had him; he said, "Ever since it was two years old;" I left the man, giving directions to the landlord, and left Fowler to look after him - I returned about seven o'clock, and found John James with him - they were trying to deal for it; James said if I was about buying it, he would not interfere till I had done - I heard James offer him ten guineas for it, but that would not do; I told him I was a constable, and suspected it was stolen, and requested to know where he got it - I searched him, and he only had 1s. about him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you think 25l. too much? A. I thought it worth about 20l., or more - it was about fifteen hands high.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you find any duplicates on

him? A. Several; also a padlock, several keys, and two purses - one duplicate is for a pledge of wearing-apparel, at Cotterel's, in Oxford-street, on the 2nd of August, for 20s., in the name of Wyatt, another for goods pawned on the 4th, in Bishopsgate-street, for 4s.

JOHN BOWES . He did not pay for any thing at my house - Daniel saw the same horse on the 11th.

JOHN FOWLER . I am a constable of Tottenham. On the 6th of August I accompanied Forster to the Black Boy, and on the 7th I took the prisoner from Tottenham before Dr. Robertson, the Magistrate - he was committed for re-examination, and on our way back he said voluntarily, "Well, I am glad I am knabbed for this, or it might have been worse; shall I be hung for it?"

SAMUEL DANIEL . The horse I saw at Bowes' is the one I gave the prisoner to go to Falder; the road he took crosses the Woodstock road, which is the main road to London - it was a gelding.

Prisoner's Defence. It was my full intention to send the bridle, saddle, and money back.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-101

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1827. JOSEF RAMON DE SUSTACHA was indicted for that he feloniously did assault William Palmer , and feloniously did strike, cut, and wound him in and upon the back part of his head, with intent to disable him .

2nd COUNT, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

WILLIAM PALMER. I was master of the sloop Deborah . On the 9th of July she laid abreast of Union-stairs, Wapping , alongside the Thoetus, which I was taking some linseed out of; a Spanish vessel laid just inside the Thoetus - it did not touch mine at low water; at the flood tide she came up to the quarter of the Deborah; I looked over the quarter of the Deborah, and seeing no fender I put one down, and the top part of it touched the paint of the Spanish vessel - the prisoner was on board the Spanish vessel and appeared to be the master ; when I put the fender down, four or five of his people came on board the Deborah - I did not know what they were going to do; I got in between them, put my hand on the fender lashing, and said, "This is my fender and my lashing:" the prisoner was on his deck, quite near enough to hear what I said - I heard him say something, but could not understand him; he did not speak English: none of them spoke to me in English - the prisoner spoke to some person in his own language, and a hatchet was brought; he took it from the person's hand, reached over the bulwark of his ship to strike at the fender or the lashing - he struck once at them, and I put a handspike on the top part of the fender to prevent the lashing from being cut; he drew back again two or three feet, with both hands holding the handle of the hatchet - his right hand nearest to the blade of it; he then aimed a blow at my head with the hatchet - I saw the blow coming, and stooped to get out of the way of it; I put my hand on the top part of my hat which was on my head, and the crown of my hat was very much broken - I saw some stains of blood on my fingers; the crown of my hat was broken before - the second blow he struck was aimed at me, and the blade of the hatchet struck me on the back part of my head; I put up my hand and it was full of blood - the skin of my hand was cut; the blow did not knock me down - it stunned me so that I did not know at the moment what was the matter with me; I had not struck at him at all, nor spoken to him - no other violence passed.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had not the outside of the Spanish vessel been newly painted? A. I cannot tell; the top of my fender laid against his paint work, but I did not observe its being wet; my fender was made of wood - I do not recollect the prisoner puting out a canvas one; when his men came on board, I said they had no right to remove the fender, but I cannot tell what their intention was; if the fender did him any damage, I should have wished him to have put another on - he made the blow at me about a minute after he struck at the lashing; I had said nothing to provoke him, nor made any action or geature: my head was about three feet from the lashing - he made the second blow at my head; it could not be made at the lashing - I was below him, and stooped with my head downwards to get it from the blow; I received the blow on the back part of the top of my head; the surgeon ordered me to keep still, but I was about my duty as usual - I went to Mr. Barry's counting-house an hour after it occurred: that was about a mile, and I went before the Justice directly; I charged him with cutting my head with the hatchet, and the officer had a warrant when I went to Mr. Barry's; I did not state there that it was only a scratch, and if I had 40s., I did not wish to go further with it - I have not brought my hat here; the mate was on board and saw the transaction - I have not brought him here; I had three men in the ship.

COURT. Q. You was close to the side of the vessel when the blow was made? A. Yes, I stooped to get out of the way of it: my head was then over the rail of the fender.

CHARLES THOMPSON . I was on board the Deborah. I put the fender down by Palmer's order; my master pushed the Spanish vessel off with a handspike, to make way for the fender, and then it was put down - the prisoner came in a minute or two, and saw the fender laying there; he spoke to some of his people - I could not understand what he said, and they came on board our vessel; he spoke to somebody - they fetched an axe or hatchet from the cabin; the prisoner took it, and made a blow at the fender-lashing, or the fender; master prevented that blow with a handspike - the prisoner then rose the axe with both hands, and cut him on the back of his head; I cannot say how long this was after he cut at the lashing; it was a very short time -I stood alongside Palmer, and saw that he aimed the blow at his head.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did your master's ship go up to the Spanish ship? A. The Spanish vessel was moored, and ours came up, to her; I did not see the prisoner wave his hand for us to move the fender - the bulwarks of his ship were over ours; she laid higher in the water, being lighter.

ROBERT BOWIE . I am a surgeon. I examined Palmer's head on the 19th of July, and found a very slight wound, merely penetrating the skin; it was a cut, apparently by a sharp instrument.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Should you

think so slight a wound could be given by a blow with a hatchet, struck with both hands? A. I do not think that it could be given with great force.

Q. If a man was raising his head, and so touched the hatchet, could it have made such a wound? A. Yes, if he had no hat on.

JOSEPH BUTLER . I am an officer of the Customs. I was on board the Thoetus; I did not see the fender put out of the Deborah - I was four or five yards from the prisoner; there was an altercation between them about the fender - I saw an axe brought to the prisoner, and he made an aim at the fender, or lashing; I do not know whether he struck then - I saw nothing to prevent it; he then said something what I could not tell, and made another blow - I cannot say whether he held the hatchet in one or both hands, nor whether he struck at Palmer's head or not; I did not see the blow come on his head, and whether he intended it for Palmer, I cannot say - the quarter of the vessel I was in was higher, and I could not see distinctly.

JOHN PATMORE . I am an officer of the Customs. I was on board the vessel adjoining the Spanish vessel, and saw the prisoner with the axe in his hand; I saw him strike only one blow - he struck with both hands - his vessel laid between mine and Palmer's; I could not see Palmer, and cannot tell what the prisoner struck at.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see all that passed? A. No; I only saw the blow with the axe - after he struck, I heard somebody cry out, "You have cut my head;" that is all I heard.

Prisoner (through an interpreter). I am perfectly innocent.

JUAN ANTONIO RITUDITER (through an interpreter). I was mate on board the prisoner's ship. I remember a wooden fender being put out by Palmer; the prisoner's vessel was newly painted - the paint was still wet; the fender would have injured it if left - the prisoner said the fender was too high, and requested him to lower it, as it would damage our bulwarks; he spoke in broken English, and by signs - Palmer did not remove it, and the prisoner called for an axe to cut the lashings of the fender; he was in the act of cutting at the lashing when the prosecutor stepped over, and the prisoner withdrew the axe, and rested it on the bulwarks - the prosecutor remained in that position for a little while, then lifted up his head, and must then have cut his head against the axe; the prisoner remained on board, without any alteration in his conduct.

COURT. Q. How near were you to the prisoner? A. Close to him; he did not strike any blow at the fender at all, nor at Palmer - when Palmer stooped over his vessel, he took his hat off; it was not on when his head came in contact with the axe - the prisoner did not aim a blow at any body, or any thing; he held the axe up, and told Palmer he would cut the lashing off, if he did not move it - he did not strike at all.

JUAN EMANUEL DE LIS . I was on board the prisoner's vessel; the prisoner complained of the fender, and tried to induce Palmer to remove it two or three times - he did not; the prisoner sent for an axe to cut the lashing - I did not see Palmer use the handspike; the prisoner was holding the axe in this position, pointing at the fender - I afterwards saw it resting on the bulwarks; I saw Palmer raise his head, but cannot say that any thing happened then - I did not see the prisoner raise the axe with both hands, and strike at Palmer's head; if he had I must have seen it - I was standing three or four feet from Palmer.

COURT. Q. Did you see the prisoner strike a blow with the axe at all? A. No; I swear he did not - I was close to him all the time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-102

Before Mr. Baron Bailey.

1828. MARY McCARTHY was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Margaret Sheehy .

SARAH BURLEY . I live in Great St. Andrew-street, Seven-dials ; Margaret Sheehy lived right opposite me- the prisoner is her sister; they did not live together. On the 21st of August, after twelve o'clock at night, I heard the deceased call Murder! and then the prisoner ran out of the gateway of the house which the deceased lived in; the deceased threw a handful of mud into the prisoner's face - the prisoner then struck her with her hands two or three times; the blows brought her to the ground - while she was on the ground the prisoner stamped on her breast two or three times violently; Sheehy was taken up stairs, and I did not see her afterwards - I had seen a strange woman strike her between the eyes about ten minutes to nine o'clock that night, but only once; she struck her violently - I saw her receive no other injury that night.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you get your living? A. I am a dress-maker; I did not observe what the quarrel was about at nine o'clock - Sheehy was not sober then; she was about twenty-eight years old- she did not seem so much intoxicated at twelve; she said her sister had beaten her and her mother; I had heard her making a noise and fighting with other people that night, but do not know who they were; I heard the noise under the gateway - it did not appear as if she had been beaten; they had been quarrelling about the death of their brother; the deceased lived in Duggan's house - I heard the noise under the gateway from nine to twelve o'clock; she had been at home from nine to twelve - I only saw her go out once; that was when she got the blow on the face - the noise was in the house under the gateway - I could not discover her voice among the persons quarrelling, till I heard her out in the street.

ANN EVANS . I live at No. 16, Great St. Andrew-street- Sheehy lived at No. 15; there is a gateway between her house and mine. On the 21st of August, about twelve o'clock, I heard cries of Murder! at the back of the house - I had heard nothing before; I went out, and saw the deceased take a handful of mud and throw at the prisoner, who had given her no provocation that I saw or heard; the prisoner then seized her by the throat, dashed her down on the stones, stamped on her breast once or twice, and kicked her on the breast once or twice - she was in a violent passion; Sheehy was carried up stairs - I saw no more.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at home between nine and twelve o'clock? A. Yes, and heard noises proceeding from the house; it appeared like persons quarrelling - I could not tell whether there were any blows; I heard Sheehy's voice several times, as if she was quarrelling, but did not

hear the prisoner's voice; I believe the deceased to have been a violent tempered woman; I saw her about eight o'clock, she was not sober then; she stood at the corner of the court driving and tearing at every body almost; they were people who had given her no provocation.

ELLEN JONES . I live in Great St. Andrew-street, almost opposite No. 15. I did not know the deceased, but between seven and eight o'clock I stood at my door and saw two women scolding each other; one ran after the other - whether the deceased was one I cannot tell; they only went two or three houses from the gateway, then returned peaceably, and went in doors - about twelve o'clock or a quarter-past, I heard an old lady's voice cry,"Don't, don't;" I lifted up my window, and saw a woman on the ground; she was carried into the gateway.

JOHN PERRY . I am a Policeman. I heard a cry of Murder! went to the spot, and found Margaret Sheehy laying on the ground - I saw no marks of violence on her; I advised them to take her up to bed, and send for a doctor- the mother wanted me to take the deceased's sister into custody, who I did not see present, and she also wished me to take the deceased to the watch-house.

RICHARD RYAN . I lived in the same house as Margaret Sheehy; I did not notice her that evening till between eleven and twelve o'clock, when I was disturbed; I put my head out of window, and saw her laying on the pavement; I saw no body beating her; after that she came up stairs and kicked my door open - I lodge in the front room second floor; she afterwards went down stairs - I heard a person tumble down stairs, and saw her brought up as the woman who had fallen down - I know it was her kicked my door open, for I turned her out, as she used very bad expressions; and almost directly I heard the person fall down stairs, and am almost sure it was her - there was nobody else on the stairs that I heard; she appeared to fall down very heavily - she appeared in liquor; she had not time to go out into the street before she was brought up, and she never went out of the house after that; my opinion is that this was between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. When she was carried up stairs, did she appear able to go out again? A. No; she was a troublesome little body, and in the habit of getting drunk; I do not know why she kicked my door open; she appeared in a violent passion, and used very bad expressions - she fell down stairs directly after I put her out; Anthony Daley was one who was carrying her up stairs after the fall; she appeared very much hurt and worked in fits like, and was knocking her arms against the stairs as they carried her up - I was not at home in the evening.

MARY RYAN . I am the wife of Robert Ryan. I was in bed with my child when Sheehy kicked our door open, and heard her using violent expressions, but heard nothing more.

JOHN BENNETT re-examined. When I advised them to take her up stairs, she was in the street where she had been knocked down by her sister; I saw her carried part of the way up by Gould and some others- she was not able to stand, unable to move.

Q. Was she in that state when her mother desired her to be taken into custody? A. Yes; the mother was intoxicated as well as her.

GEORGE GOULD . I helped to carry Sheehy up stairs - she was not able to stand; I put her on the bed in her brother-in-law's room - I think it was on the third floor; I had seen her fall as I went along; I had not seen the prisoner do any thing to her; whether any thing was done while she was on the ground I cannot tell; I did not see her struck, and cannot tell what made her fall; I was not there all the time.

Cross-examined. Q. How near were you to her when she fell? A. Fifteen or twenty yards; I was not above half a minute going up to her; she was then on the ground on her back - nothing could be done to her while I was there without my seeing it.

COURT. Q. Was any thing done after you got up? A. I went away towards the Seven-dials for a few minutes, then returned, and carried her up; I remained by her two or three minutes before I went to Seven-dials - nothing was done to her then.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS . I am a superintendent of the Police. The prisoner was brought to the Covent-garden station by the parish beadle; while I was taking the charge she was very anxious to tell me, as she called it,"all about it" - I cautioned her not to say any thing, but she still persisted; I then said "Recollect what you say to me now will be made evidence against you;" she said "I don't care, I will tell the truth;" and said that on the previous day (21st) she had been drinking with her sister, and had quarrelled with her, and in the course of the quarrel her sister spoke disrespectfully of her husband, (and mentioned what words passed, but I do not recollect them,) and in consequence of that she said, "Peg, if I catch you I will serve you out - I will give you a good beating;" that this happened in the street - that her sister retired a short distance, gathered some mire out of the kennel, and threw it at her; that she followed her, caught her, and beat her - that the deceased fell, and while she was down she kicked her - she said "That is the truth, let me suffer what I will."

JAMES REID . I am a surgeon. I examined the body of the decased on the morning of the 23rd - she died on the 22nd; I impute her death to a fracture of the bones of the neck - a kick must have been very heavy to produce that; she might have walked after receiving that injury; falling down stairs would be very likely to produce such a fracture, more so than a common kick - Mr. Buss had attended her, and was present at the examination: a person intoxicated would fall down stairs more heavily then another.

WILLIAM BUSS . I first saw the deceased on the 23rd of August - I was present when Mr. Reid examined the body, and agree in his judgment.

THOMAS GATTY , surgeon, deposed to the same effect.

Witness for the Defence.

ANTHONY DALEY . On the 21st of August I saw the deceased first about nine o'clock at night, and from that time till twelve she was quarrelling with every body she could get to - she was very much in liquor, and fell down stairs three times to my knowledge; I assisted her up after one fall.

COURT. Q. Did she fall backwards, or how? A. She fell head foremost every time, and once she came down

the first landing, which was nine or ten stairs - she was very helpless, from liquor; I had not seen her at Ryan's door - Ryan met me; the last time I brought her up stairs I took her to her room - I slept in the room that night; she lodged with me - I went out for a candle, and was gone about twenty-five minutes, and when I returned her mother told me she had jumped up and said she would go to look for her ring, and had fallen down stairs again.

MR. REID. The fracture would be more likely to be caused by falling headforemost than in any other position.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-103

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1829. JAMES STILL and ANN STILL were charged on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with killing and slaying James Still .

The Inquisition being bad, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18320906-104

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1830. JAMES HAWKES was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Thomas Marks .

EDWARD FRANCIS LONSDALE . I am house-surgeon of Middlesex-hospital. On Wednesday, the 8th of August, between five and six o'clock in the morning, the deceased was brought to the hospital, labouring under symptoms of having received some injury in the head; he lived till the 16th; I opened his head afterwards, and found an effusion of blood on the brain, owing to the rupture of a vessel of the brain; in my judgment the rupture of the vessel of the brain caused his death - it was likely to arise from a fall off a ladder into a dray.

GEORGE MAITLAND . I am a painter. On Wednesday, the 8th of August, I was at work at Combe and Delafield's brewhouse, Castle-street , Long-acre; Marks was at work at the back of an office which looked into the back yard; he was on a ladder, which was placed in the carriage way where the drays come - about half-past five o'clock I saw the prisoner come in with a dray; as he came in, Butcher cautioned him to mind how he came in - the ladder was placed so as to require caution; there was not room to pass - when Butcher cautioned him, he said he would send his footman next time to let us know he was coming; he passed by where I was at work, and I went to work again - he took off his leading horse; I did not see whether he took it to water or not - but after I had been at work a short time, I heard a voice say, "You will have the man off the ladder;" I looked round, and saw two men at the ladder endeavouring to save Marks, to prevent the ladder from falling - I saw Marks fall from about fifteen feet high; he pitched on the dray, and appeared injured - he was taken up; I gave him all the assistance I could, and ran for a doctor - when I returned he was gone to the hospital; I afterwards saw him at the hospital, dead, and knew him to be the same person.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How many horses were there to the prisoner's dray? A. I am confident there were two, but cannot say whether there were three; the prisoner might have meant what he said about sending his servant as a joke - my back was towards him; I did not see him take off his leading horse, nor whether it had the nose-bag on; I saw the wheel of the dray against the ladder.

COURT. Q. What occasioned the horse to go on with the dray you do not know? A. No, I did not see it move to the ladder.

CHARLES BUTCHER . I am a painter. I was at work at the brewhouse; the prisoner came to the gate with his dray - I said he must not go forward at present, because there was a man up the ladder; he said, with a laugh, that he would send his footman next time he came into the yard; no doubt he said that in a joke - Marks was at that time on the ladder; I saw the dray going forward; it had been there but a short time, and I saw Marks fall the dray shook the ladder on which he stood, and I saw him fall; I cannot say whether I had seen the leading horse taken off - I was not particularly looking at the time.

GEORGE BANTON . I am a carpenter, and was at work in the brewhouse yard. I did not see the dray come in; I saw it after it was in - only the shaft-horse was in it then; I heard the dray move on - I turned round, and saw it come in contact with the ladder; I should not imagine that there was proper room for it to pass without touching the ladder; when I turned round, the prisoner was at the horse's head, with the bridle of the horse in his right hand - it appeared to me, that when he took the horse by the rein it moved on; I said, "Stop a moment," and I do not think it went four or five steps before the man stopped, but the dray had touched the ladder, and the man pitched off, and his head pitched on one of the planks of the dray - the dray was standing still when I came up, which was not half a minute before it happened.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you are foreman to Mr. Cubit's men, who were at work there? A. Yes; I was not there when the dray arrived - horses sometimes will go on after others; I saw no other horse - whether the prisoner's taking hold of the rein was to stop the horse I cannot tell; I have known him four years - he bore a good character for humanity; I went to the hospital, and saw the prisoner there on the Friday, sitting down by the deceased's bed - I do not know whether he had been there more than once.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I was at the brew house, and saw the dray come in - there were two horses to it; after it came into the yard it stopped, and the prisoner took one horse off, took the bit out of its mouth, and went down to the water with it; he then came back to take the nose-bag off the dray and his whip, and just put them inside the stable; while he did that, the horse drew on - he caught hold of the horse's head as soon as he could - the stable was close by; the horse stood very still then.

Q. When the horse moved on, there was a cry to take care? A. I did not hear that; when the horse moved on, he came and caught hold of its head directly and stopped him, but was not able to stop it before it touched the ladder - he did all he could to stop it; the dray turned the ladder aside, and threw the man down; the prisoner had only gone two or three yards from the horse, and turned himself round, just to put his bags inside, he came back again, and the horse went on.

COURT. Q. When he turned round, how far had he

got from the horse's head before the horse moved? A. It might be two or three yards; the ladder was before the dray, and almost in the middle of the carriage way - it could not go on without striking the ladder.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did he appear to you to use all the care and caution he should do? A. Yes; he was very sober and steady; the dray stood quite still while he took off the nose-bag - he might be two yards from the ladder. I am certain it was an accident; I have known him some years - he bore a good character for steadiness and care.

COURT. Q. If he had stood with his horse instead of turning his back, could he have prevented it going on? A. Yes, I should think so.

ROBERT LOWDEN . I am a painter. I was at work in the yard, and was near the foot of the ladder on which Marks stood, at the time the dray came into the gateway - I remained there; the leading horse was taken off before I saw the dray - it had come by one ladder; I saw the dray stopping - it then went on again; the prisoner was then near the horse's head; when the dray went on he stood sideways, and I think he had hold of the reins; I do not know how the horse came to go on - I believe the bit was out of its mouth at the time.

Cross-examined. Q. Then the prisoner was at his horse's head when the dray moved on? A. Very near it, and had his hand on the rein; whether he led the horse on, or whether it moved of its own accord, I do not know.

GEORGE HAGGER . I am a drayman. I was in the yard standing against the counting-house door, about twenty yards from the dray, sideways - I did not see the prisoner take off the leading horse, but it was taken off; and the next I saw was, he went, took his nose-bags, put them into the stable, and while his back was turned the horse rode on - as soon as he got hold of him he caught him by the head and endeavoured to stop him, but could not before the ladder moved; it moved before he could catch the horse by the head.

Cross-examined. Q. The stable door was close to where the horse stood, was not it? A. Within about three yards- the nose-bags hung on the fore part of the dray; he was close to the horse when he came for the bag, and had not turned his head half a minute when the horse moved on; in my judgment it was purely accidental; he used every diligence to prevent it, when he saw what was about to happen.

EDWARD FISHER . I am a painter. I was at work in the yard, and saw the horse move on - the prisoner at that time was gone into the stable with the nose-bags; he was in the stable when the horse first moved.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is the stable from the dray? A. The pin for the nose-bags is close to the stable door - he had hardly turned round before the accident happened; the dray was too far in before, and the moment the horse moved the dray caught the ladder; he then ran, and caught the horse by the head and the man fell into the dray - I do not think he had any control over the horse at the time; the only fault was his coming too near at first.

COURT. Q. If he had not left the horse could not he have stopped it? A. Not in time, for it was close to the ladder before it moved.

Prisoner's Defence. I shut the spare horse outside the gate, and took them by the ladder; when I came back I put the other horse nearer up - I stopped the horse in the gateway, and while I took the nose-bags to the stable he moved on again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-105

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1831. JAMES BROADHURST was indicted for feloniously uttering 3 forged requests for the delivery of certain linen goods, with intent to defraud Andrew Calders and others . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-106

1832. HENRY LUCAS was indicted for feloniously forging a bill of exchange , which is as follows:-

Maindenhead, June 24, 1832.

Sirs, - Pay to Mr. Murdy, or order, on demand, 99l. 10s., on account of, Your obedient servant, WILLIAM POLE .

Messrs. Childs, Temple-bar, London, with intent to defraud John Wormald and others.

2nd COUNT, for uttering the same, knowing it to be forged, with the like intent.

3rd COUNT, for forging an endorsement on the said bill in the name of Edward Murdy .

4th COUNT, for feloniously uttering the said endorsement.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WORMALD , JUN. I am a clerk in the banking-house of Messrs. Childs and Co.; my father, John Wormald , is the senior partner - there are four others. On the 3rd of July I was present in the banking-house when the prisoner came, and produced a bill of exchange for payment; he was asked how he came by it, and said he had it in a letter from France that morning; I do not know whether he said from Calais or not - we detained him; he told us where he lodged - we sent an officer to the place, and he brought two letters; (looking at the bill) - I believe this to be an imitation of the signature of Sir William Pole, who has kept cash at our house eighteen years.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At what time did he come? A. Between three and four o'clock; he presented the draft to another clerk, who handed it to me for examination, and the prisoner was desired to walk into another room, which he did; he was then told, in my presence that we suspected it to be a forgery, and that he must account for the way he came in possession of it - he said he had it in a letter which he received that morning from France, and may have mentioned the town for what I know- he wrote a letter himself to desire the letters might be given up to the officer, who came back within two hours, or it might be but one hour, but I went home within two hours of the transaction; he remained in our counting-house waiting the officer's return, and gave us the information without the least hesitation - this erasure was on the draft when I received it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Could he have got away? A. Not very well; there was an officer in the adjoining room - he said he received the draft from a person named Emerson; that he had received that letter from him, that he was acquainted with Emerson, but what else I do not recollect; the draft was presented between three and four

o'clock; I dined at the banking-house at four - I came from dinner soon after five o'clock, and left at half-past.

COURT. Q. How does Sir William Pole sign his name to drafts? A. In the manner this is signed.

Sir WILLIAM TEMPLE POLE , BART. Previous to the discovery of this forgery, I always drew drafts in the name of William only - not a letter of this draft is in my writing; it very much resembles it, certainly, but I have not the least hesitation in swearing not a letter of it is my writing, nor do I know the person in whose favour it is drawn.

Cross-examined. Q. Did a female, in the name of Emerson, apply to you for charity? A. Many years ago a woman, describing herself as the wife of a clerk in the Custom-house, applied to me, and begged as a matter of charity that I would take some drawings of her, and I gave her what I considered more than the value of them; I frequently relieved her, till at last I found her applications troublesome - I never saw her, and do not know her age.

Q. Did you not send her a cheque for 3l.? A. She sent me a letter previous to the 23rd of April this year, and I sent a respectable tradesman to inquire if she was a fit object of charity; I sent her a cheque for 3l. 1s. - the 1s. was to cover the expences of postage; that was this year.

Q. So that if she happened to have a son, he had an opportunity of seeing your hand-writing? A. Yes.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you empower her or any body else to draw in your name? A. Never - I know nothing of the prisoner - (the draft was here put in and read).

JOHN CHADWICK . I am an officer of the City Police. I was called into Child's banking-house, and saw the prisoner there; I stood in the banking-house, and heard Mr. Wormald ask how he came by the cheque: he said he had it in a letter from France, from a person named William Emerson ; that he was quite innocent of knowing it to be forged, and was very sorry he had had any thing to do with it - he did not, in my presence, say how he became acquainted with Emerson; I remained there while Edwards went to his lodging; he was gone about an hour, or an hour and three-quarters, and brought two letters with him - while he was gone, the prisoner said nothing to me about Emerson.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you remain in the same room with the prisoner? A. I did not all the time - he wished to write a letter; I was absent from the room all the time Edwards was gone - I did not tell him I was going to wait.

Q. For what he knew, you might be gone? A. Yes; I am sure he told Mr. Wormald he was quite innocent of knowing any thing of the forgery - he manifested no inclination to escape; when asked how he came by the draft, I believe he gave an answer without hesitation - while Edwards was gone, he wrote a letter, which I took from him; he gave it to me to send to France, but I told him I should take possession of it, and keep it; it was not sealed; I had my officer's uniform on.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. It was undirected as well as unsealed? A. Yes; I took it from him; he did not give it to me - there were several people in the banking-house, backwards and forwards, and five or six clerks, quite sufficient to detain him, if he attempted to escape.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How came the letter not directed? A. Because I took it from him; he said he wanted it to go to Emerson, in France - he did not say to what part - I took it from him before he had an opportunity of directing it; I took it from him because I thought it would be the means of enabling other persons to escape.

JOHN EDWARDS . I belonged to the City Police, but have since resigned. I was fetched to Child's bankinghouse, and received a paper from a clerk, who directed me to No. 23, Barret-street, Vauxhall - it is about two miles and a half from Child's; I went, and saw Mrs. Elsgood, the landlady of the house - I made application for a letter; having left directions with her not to give them to any body but his aunt - she would not give them up; but on telling her who I was, she gave me these two letters in the ground floor back room - she took them out of a trunk - I had no conversation with the prisoner about them.

MR. CHARLES TENNANT , JUN. I am one of the firm of Tennant, Harrison, and Co.; our house are the acting solicitors for Child's house, but we have given the formal part of this business out of our hands. When the prisoner was taken into custody I was fetched to the banking-house, and saw him there - he said he had been for some time living about the town, that he was formerly clerk to Richards, Clark, and Co., of Lincoln's Inn-fields, but not liking the profession of the law, he had quitted it, and that he been entirely dependent since he left their office on the charity of his aunt, Mrs. or Miss Langton - I think he said she was unable to support him, being in very indifferent circumstances herself, and that she had been without any occupation for some time; with regard to his knowledge of Emerson, he said he had met him but a short time before this at a billiard-table; that his acquaintance with Emerson was very slight - I remarked on his making an acquaintance at a billiard-room, and asked how he could undertake to tender that bill for payment, received under such suspicious circumstances (meaning the slight acquaintance he had, and meeting him only at a billiard-room) - he said Emerson had left London to go to Calais only about three days before; I asked if he had any idea or notion why Emerson went over to Calais - he said he did not know why he went, and that the circumstance of his sending the bill had excited his surprise, and made him suspect there was something wrong about it; the rest of our conversation related principally to a letter he wrote to his aunt, enclosing the letter he had received from Emerson - he said he had enclosed the letter he received from Emerson to his aunt; the letter he spoke of was then in my hands(looking at two letters) - these are them; I asked him if this letter was his writing; he said it was - I expressed my regret at the production of that letter, and stated to him that letter showed a guilty knowledge - he was a good deal confused at that, and said he certainly had some suspicion about the transaction when he wrote that letter.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he confine his acquaintance with this young man, to the billiard-room? A. Entirely - he said he first became acquainted with him in a billiard room, and that he had a short acquaintance with him since- I did not ask him the precise time that the acquaintance began; I asked how long he had known him, and he said a short time - I did not press that inquiry further; I did not ask if he had visited Emerson at the Clarence hotel,

nor whether he had gone to Bath with him - he admitted at once that the letter was his hand-writing; he told me he was to receive from Emerson a sum of money when he delivered the proceeds of the bill; I cannot tell the precise sum; I certainly asked him - I think it was about 15l., but am not sure about it.

Q. Did you ask how it happened that he was to receive 15l.? A. I did - his answer was that it was for his trouble; I have been an attorney about fifteen years: I made these inquiries with a view of seeing whether I could with propriety advise his discharge - I had not the slightest notion of giving evidence when I came into Court, and I reluctantly give it; I did not expect to be called - I did not tell our agent what had passed between me and the prisoner - a note was sent up to me, to know if I could confirm Mr. Wormald's evidence, and I have confirmed it - I believe it is stated in the brief that Mr. Wormald would prove the prisoner's stating his acquaintance with Emerson commenced in a billiard-room, as I thought he was present - I believe I stated in the brief (the heads of which I drew up myself) the conversation I had with the prisoner, and that the acquaintance began in a billiard-room; but I have had no conversation with the agent about it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is Mr. Harrison, who sits by me. instructing me in the case, your partner? A. Yes - I drew out general instructions for the brief, but have never seen the brief itself; I drew up what was necessary for it: I cautioned the prisoner all along against making commucation to me, and when I saw this letter I told him not to say another word, as the law must take its course. - (Letters read.)

(No. 1.) Simmond's Hotel, Calais, July 2, 1832.

DEAR HARRY, - We arrived here on Saturday morning, at one o'clock, so you see, we came over here in sixteen hours - I have enclosed in this, a draft on Messrs. Childs, and Co., for 99l. 10s., which you must go and get, and then meet me in Paris, at the Poste-restant, or office, as quick as possible; you will have to sign your name at the back of the draft, when you get it, and come to me immediately - you may spend between you and Carley, 9l. 10s. in coming over, but pray do not be extravagant - Paris is seventy-five leagnes from Calais, so you will be thirty-six hours going to Paris from Calais - do not let any one know that you or Carley are coming to Paris, and for fear of mistake tear this letter up. I must now conclude, - Your's sincerely, W. LEA EMERSON .

You may bring Carley with you or not, as you like; do not let him see this - get me a 50l. note, a 20l., and 29l. in gold.

Dear Harry, - do not betray my trust; I have always thought well of you, and will reward you when you get to Paris - I shall expect you on Friday at Paris; as the cheque is made in Mr. Murdy's name, you must say you came from him - Charley Phillips wants you to call at his house to see his father, and get something.

This letter had the Calais post-mark of the 2nd of July, and the London mark of the 3rd of July.(No. 2.) July 3, 1832.

DEAR AUNT, - I am much surprised at not having had an answer to my letter of the 28th of June; I received yours of that date, which was of course no answer to mine - I am obliged to go to Paris immediately, as you will see by the enclosed, which I beg of you to keep as if it was the crown of England; I am sorry I cannot see you before I go - farewell, H. LUCAS.(No. 3.)

DEAR BILL, - What have you been about; the draft you sent me to get changed for you, is a forgery - I will use no disguise to get you to return to London, but have to inform you this: that if you do not, I must be answerable for it.

Temple-bar, July 3, 1832. HENRY LUCAS .

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I cannot state further than my counsel has stated; I received the letter from my friend in Calais - I had asked if I could go over with him- he said, "No, I shall want you to do something for me in a day or two, and come over to me;" I received the letter, and took the draft to Childs' - they detained me, and told me it was a forgery.

One witness deposed to the prisoner's good character.

GUILTY of uttering only . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-107

1833. THOMAS JARVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Edward Booth Hewitt , from his person .

EDWARD BOOTH HEWITT . I live at South Lambeth, and am clerk to my brother. On the 31st of August, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was on the approach to London-bridge , on the London side, and felt my pocket become very light; I immediately turned, and saw the prisoner behind me - he was alone, and the only person who was close to me: I saw his hands pass from his own clothes, which made me suspect him; he went towards the paling - I followed him - he crossed the path, and paid something to see a show; I asked for a Policeman - the beadle of the bridge was fetched: I stated the circumstance to him - he took him, and at the watch-house my handkerchief was found in his breeches.

SAMUEL BOWDLER . I am beadle of London-bridge. -I took the prisoner, and told him the gentleman had lost his handkerchief: he said he had not got it - I searched at the watch-house, and found it in the flap of his breeches; I asked him where it was - he said, "I have not got it," and on searching I found six other handkerchiefs on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was on Fish-street-hill - I saw a boy throw the handkerchief down, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-108

1834. JOSEPH EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Richard Smalley , from his person .

RICHARD SMALLEY . I live at Wandsworth. On the 13th of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in King-street, Smithfield , and felt my handkerchief drawn from my pocket - I turned round, and saw the prisoner close to me, and the handkerchief on the ground, between us; it was impossible any body but him could have done it; as I stooped to take it up, he ran away, and was stopped by a gentleman, without my losing sight of him.

WILLIAM BONUS . I am an officer. I saw a crowd; a gentleman gave the prisoner to me with the handkerchief on Snow-hill - he said nothing to the charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Cow-lane - a bullock was running; I ran after it, and the gentleman stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-109

1835. SARAH RIORDAN, alias CHAPMAN ; was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 3 handker

chiefs, value 5s.; 2 napkins, value 2s.; 5 pillow-cases, value 3s.; 7 towels, value 6s.; 2 aprons, value 1s. 6d.; 1 cravat, value 1s.; 2 table-cloths, value 10s.; 2 books, value 1s.; 7 wine glasses, value 5s.; 2 tumblers, value 1s. 6d.; 1 goblet, value 1s.; 1 salt-seller, value 1s.; 3 d'Oyleys, value 1s., and 1 snuffer-tray, value 1s., the goods of George Gray , her master .

GEORGE GRAY. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Fleet-street . The prisoner was in my service for six months, as cook ; these articles were my private property, I did not miss them - about a fortnight after she left, she was brought to me by a Policeman, who produced these articles, which were in my possession when she was at my house; she had eleven or twelve guineas a-year: I paid her wages before she left, which was on the 26th of June.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 5th of July, on another charge (see page 744); I found the articles stated in the indictment in her box, except a few napkins which I found in a pan, in the back yard of the place where she lived - she said the linen was given to her and her sister, by her uncle or grandfather.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The things are my own, many of them - I have been robbed a great deal by the Policeman.

MR. GRAY. All the linen except a towel has my mark on it; some are marked with initials, and some with my name at full length.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-110

1836. JOHN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 3 lbs. of cochineal, value 20s., the goods of Edward Pryce Griffiths and others .

EDWARD PRYCE GRIFFITHS. I am a drysalter , live in Leadenhall-street , and have three partners; the prisoner was in our service as an occasional porter . On the 7th of July in consequence of a deficiency in our cochineal, I requested an officer to watch our premises; the prisoner was there that morning.

EVAN DAVIS. I was in the prosecutors' employ. On the 7th of July the prisoner came about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was in the counting-house; I went into the warehouse, and saw him go up stairs (his brother was employed at our house): he came down while I was in the warehouse and left; I gave the officer information: he took him and produced about 3 lbs. of cochineal - the prisoner said he was done.

THOMAS DEVEY. I am a constable. I observed the prisoner come down the prosecutors' gateway, and asked if he had not come down there - he said No, that he did not know them; I took him into a public-house, and found cochineal in his outside coat pocket, and some in the crown of his hat, tied up in a handkerchief.

MR. GRIFFITHS. We never allowed him to purchase cochineal of us - I have no doubt this is ours.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-111

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1837. ANN JEFFRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 13 yards of printed cotton, value 3s. 3d. , the goods of William Sharman .

WILLIAM SHARMAN . I live in Chiswell-street , and am a draper . On the 18th of July the prisoner walked about six feet into my shop, and took a piece of print; she ran out - I and my assistant followed her; she partly dropped the print on the pavement, but held one end of it still under her arm and dragged it into the shop with her.

THOMAS ROBSON . I am assistant to the prosecutor. On the 18th of July about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop: there was another person very near to her, and they both entered at the same time - the prisoner took the print, and walked out; I followed and brought her back.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How near were you to her? A. About three yards; I am sure she dropped it.

HENRY BEAN (Police-constable G 111). I took the prisoner and have the print.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320906-112

1838. HENRY BODEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Edington Fulton , from his person .

EDINGTON FULTON. I live in Cumming-street, Pentonville. On the morning of the 17th of July I was in Bunhill-row - a person spoke to me, and I missed my handkerchief; I saw the prisoner running, and he was stopped by the Policeman - I charged him with taking my handkerchief; he said he had not got it, but when we were going to search him, he had it secreted behind his coat - I saw it drop.

RALPH JOHN MASON (Police-constable G 214.) I was in the watch-house, and heard an alarm; I ran out, and stopped the prisoner; I saw this handkerchief hanging from the bottom of the tail of his coat, and it fell from him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a young man drop it - I took it up, and ran after him.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-113

1839. ARTHUR FAULKNER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 coat, value 10s.; 3 waistcoats, value 15s.; 4 shirts, value 1l.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s., and 1 brooch, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas White .

THOMAS WHITE . I am a silversmith , and live in Rahere-street, Goswell-street . On the 19th of July I missed these articles from my bed-room; the prisoner slept in an adjoining bed-room for two or three months.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know whether he was in employ? A. I believe not, he had but a very small pittance to live on.

CHARLES OSMOND . I am a pawnbroker. I have two shirts, a waistcoat, and handkerchief, which were pawned on the 13th and the 17th of July, by the prisoner.

GEORGE LANCASTER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have two waistcoats, a coat, and two shirts, pawned by the prisoner.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Walton. I have a shirt and brooch, pawned on the 17th of July, I believe, by the prisoner, but am not certain.

EDWARD BINGHAM (Police-constable G 80.) I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-114

1840. WILLIAM KNAPP was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 12 combs, value 3l. , the goods of Solomon Lloyd .

MARY ANN LLOYD. I am the wife of Solomon Lloyd ; he lives near Regent-street. On the 14th of July the prisoner came to the shop, and said, "Mrs. Lloyd, I want some back combs, to be sent to Mrs. Johnson's young ladies to look at;" he desired them to be handsome ones - I looked them out, packed them up, and gave them to my daughter to take.

MARY ANN LLOYD. I am the prosecutor's daughter. I went with the prisoner and the parcel - when we got to James-street, Golden-square , he turned round, and said,"Dear me, I forgot the dressing-combs, I wish you would go back, and fetch them;" he took my parcel - I turned to see where he went; he went to the step of No. 3, and appeared to ring the bell - I went to my father's, and procured some dressing-combs; when I got back to the house in the square, he had not been there.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did he take them from you by force? A. No; I had them loosely in my hand, and he took them, and said, "Go back, and fetch some more;" I turned back with them in my hand, and he said, "You had better give them to me, as the young ladies are going out this evening;" I did not say at the office that I gave them to him - I did not ask him to give me them back, as I thought his statement was right; I did not know him before - I was just turning round when he took them; I had him in my sight; I did not perceive him raise his hand to take them - I said I would bring these with the others; I will swear that was part of my answer to him - I did not say "Take them," nor put out my hand to give them to him.

GEORGE AVIS . I am the officer. I have these twelve combs, which I received from Mr. Reynolds on the 16th of July.

JOHN REYNOLDS . I purchased these combs of the prisoner on the 14th of July, at my shop in Vinegar-yard, for 25s.; two days afterwards I saw a hand-bill, and gave information to the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they brought to you the same day they were stolen? A. Yes, between seven and nine o'clock in the evening - they are damaged, and I could swear to them among five hundred.

MRS. LLOYD. These are our combs, and the same I sent with the prisoner - I know them by the colour and shape, and by a scratch on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you put the mark on them? A. No, my husband does - it is a letter; they were not damaged when I parted with them; they cost us about 3l.; I think they are worth that now.

WILLIAM PASSENGER . I live with Mrs. Johnson, who keeps a ladies' boarding and day-school, at No. 3, Golden-square. There were no ladies there on the 14th of July - they were all gone home for the holidays.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at home all that day? A. Yes, and two said servants - I attended to the door, and was there when the young lady came about the combs.

Prisoner. What the witness has said is true, except my taking the combs; she deliberately gave them to me.

GUILTY . - Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-115

1841. SUSAN TEWKESBURY and MARY ANN STIFFIN were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 1 scarf, value 11s., and 2 shirt pins, value 1s. , the the goods of Gabriel Souza .

GABRIEL SOUZA . On the 1st of August I went to the house of an acquaintance, in Chapel-street, Somers-town ; I do not know the number, nor the name of the lady who keeps it, but I go there regularly to sell my goods - the two prisoners lived there; they asked me if I had any ear-rings - I sold Stiffin a pair for 6s.; they paid me 1s. down, and were to pay me the rest - I sold the other prisoner a pair for 2s.; the lady of the house was not at home: Stiffin then said she had had some bacon, and was thirsty (it was between five and six o'clock) and I went and got a pot of beer, leaving my bundle of goods behind me; when I came back I sat down in the room - we drank the pot of beer, and then we had another; I was an hour with them altogether - I then went with my goods to Lancaster-street; and when I got there I missed a scarf and two pins - I went back to where the prisoners were, and said,"Give me back my goods;" they both said they knew nothing about them, and I got a Police-constable - I am quite sure I did not give either of them these things.

Stiffin. I was not at home. Witness. Yes, they were both at home in the room where the goods were.

COURT. Q. Had you any conversation with them? A. I only stopped while I drank - the mistress was in the shop; it is a rag-shop - I was in the back room with the prisoners; I told them when I came again they should let me have a shilling or two; I do business in that kind of way - I did not ask either of them to meet me, or take a walk with me; I was not playing with either of them - I was not civil to either of them; I fetched the beer each time.

JAMES POSFORD (Police-constable S 50). I met the prosecutor on the 1st of August, and went with him to the house in Chapel-street, No. 55; I found both the prisoners in a little back parlour at the rag-shop - I told them he had complained of losing a scarf and two handkerchief pins; they said they had not seen any thing of the kind -I staid some time, and they gave me leave to search the house; the prisoner Tewkesbury said to the landlady,"You know right well that neither of us went out of the house;" she said, "Yes, you did go out for ten minutes for some tea;" she pushed her arm, and said Hush! I sent them to the watch-house, and then asked the landlady again if they had been sent out - she said Yes, and told me the way; I went that way, and found a pawnbroker's, where the articles were pledged.

WILLIAM JOHN LOUGEN . I am apprentice to a pawnbroker in Clarendon-square. On the 31st of July, at five o'clock, both the prisoners came to our shop - Stiffin pawned the scarf for 3s., in the name of Ann Smith, a

lodger, No. 19, Ossulton-street; she asked me 8s. for it; I offered her 3s. - Tewkesbury handed it to her, and said,"That won't do, will it;" she said, "Can't you make it 4s.?" I said No - she said, "Then give me 3s.;" I asked Stiffin if it was hers - she said Yes; she had two pins - she asked me if they were worth more than 1s.; I said No - she then said to Tewkesbury, "He wants half a crown for them;" they were two gold pins, with coral heads.

Tewkesbury. I said the property was mine; Stiffin said nothing, but asked the value of the pins. Witness. I asked Stiffin if it was hers, and she said Yes, and gave me the address.

GABRIEL SOUZA . These are my property.

Q. While you were there, did Stiffin go out for a short time and come back? A. No; I will swear they were both in the room the whole time, except when Tewkesbury went out to pawn something to pay me the 3s., but while she was out, I did not say or do any thing to the other.

Tewkesbury. Whilst Stiffin went out with a friend he took improper liberties with me - I told him I would call a Policeman; he said, "Don't do that, I will give you this scarf, and two pins."

GABRIEL SOUZA re-examined. Q. Upon your solemn oath, did you take any liberties with Tewkesbury? A. No, I did not touch her, upon my oath - I did nothing of the kind; she did not complain of any thing - I always fetch beer for ladies where I go to sell goods; the door was open, and the mistress was in the shop - she was not out at all; I swear the mistress remained in the house all the time - I opened my bundle and showed my finery, but I did not show this scarf; my bundle was done up when I went for the beer, and when I took it away I did not notice that it was altered - I swear I did nothing improper to either of them; I had not seen them before that day; I was quite sober; we only had that beer between the four of us, the mistress of the house, the two prisoners, and I; as I passed the door to go into the parlour I gave the mistress some beer; I had only had a cup of coffee and some bread for dinner, and no meat, beer, nor spirits.

Tewkesbury. While he was there the mistress went out with another woman, and then he took liberties with me, and solicited me to meet him in Lancaster-street, and promised the next day to give me a gold chain. Witness. No, I did not.

Stiffin. I was sitting at work in the back parlour when he came; the person of the shop was not at home; he asked leave to wait for her, and he waited half an hour. Witness. It was not a quarter of an hour - Tewkesbury staid with me, not Stiffins - she was behind the counter and I in front; the mistress then came and said, "Gabriel, show your goods to this young lady."

Stiffin's Defence. A female friend, who had left her situation, came and asked me to go out - I went, and was gone nearly an hour - when I came back the prosecutor was sitting on the sofa with Tewkesbury; the mistress was out, and the door was shut and locked - I asked Tewkesbury what was the matter; she made no reply, and when the prosecutor was gone, she asked me to go with her to the pawnbroker's.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-116

1930. JAMES MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , 2 coats, value 1l.; 1 jacket, value 10s.; 3 shirts, value 6s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Millan .

MARY ANN MILLAN . I am the wife of William Millan; we live at No. 16, Old Gravel-lane . The prisoner came there on the 24th of July, for a lodging; he slept there that night, and he went out at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, and came back at half-past ten - he said he was a little in liquor, and would I allow him to lay down, as he had to appear before his betters; I went up stairs with him to the two-pair room, and said I would advise him to pull every thing off but his shirt, and got to bed till twelve o'clock; I shut the window, and saw him pull off his coat and waistcoat - he had a dirty shirt on; I was down stairs washing - he did not stop till twelve o'clock, but I heard him run down stairs, and go out; he said, "I am so dry, I must go and get some drink"- a woman who was there said, "He must be dry indeed, to run out so;" he was about all the day, and was seen in a new shirt - he came in at night, and as I was giving him a candle, I saw he had two waistcoats on; I sent for my neighbour, and said he had robbed me - he got an officer, who found these things on him, which are my husband's; the other articles are still missing - he had a bundle when he ran down stairs.

Prisoner. The things I had on, I own I took when I was intoxicated; when I came to myself, I found they were not my things, and went back to return them. Witness. I am sure they were all locked up in a box, which was broken open; another person slept in the room, and they both breakfasted there that morning, but it was when he came back that he broke the box open, and the chips were thrown under the bed.

MILES RILEY (Police-constable K 224). I took the prisoner, and found on him these three shirts, two waistcoats, and a pair of stockings.

MARY ANN MILLAN. These are my husband's property, and were all safe in the box when he came to lay down.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say it was nine days before you had seen them safe? A. A week before, I had the room cleaned; and on the Saturday I had the room dusted and swept again, but I tried the lids of the chests the day you came, and they were fast.

Prisoner. I am innocent of breaking open the chest; the things I had on I meant to return.

MILES RILEY . I found a knife on the prisoner, and some chips under the bed; he said at the station-house"I am very sorry for breaking open the chest."

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-117

1842. REBECCA PIZZEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , 1 mattress, value 5s.; 1 set of bedfurniture, value 5s.; 2 glasses, value 3s.; 2 dishes, value 2s.; 5 plates, value 2s.; 4 cups, value 6d.; 4 saucers, value 6d.; 3 knives, value 6d.; 2 sheets, value 15s.; 6 towels, value 1s., and 1 napkin, value 6d. , the goods of William Parrot Lovegrove .

MR. WILLIAM PARROT LOVEGROVE. I keep an hotel in Oxford-street ; the prisoner was employed there occasionally as charwoman . I missed a great many articles, and called the officer, who found them; I was not aware precisely what I had lost, till the things were found.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I went to No. 11, Rose-street, Soho, where the prisoner lodged, and while I was there, she came in; I told her she was suspected of robbing Mr. Lovegrove, at Fladong's hotel - she said I was welcome to search; I searched, and found the napkin which has the prosecutor's name and address, in full, on it- she said that had been brought there by a young man, and neglected to be sent home; I searched further, and found the mattress, bed-furniture, plates, and some other things - I then went to the pawnbroker's, and found some others; she said the mattress had been put into the dusthole by Eliza, and the bed-furniture was to make dusters of.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court; I did it through distress - I had not a penny, and my daughter was dying in a decline; I know I have done wrong.

MR. LOVEGROVE. I employed her for two months; she had 1s. 6d. a day, and her food - when I had not work for her. I have got her work at another person's house; I think she has been employed five days out of seven on the average - she has been there for a whole week together.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320906-118

1843. GEORGE DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 2 half-crowns, the monies of Timothy Davis , from his person .

TIMOTHY DAVIS . I was at work on the 21st of July, at logwood-cutting, till six o'clock - I then went to a beershop in Widegate-street ; I got the worse for liquor, and when I came out, the prisoner came up to me - he had a man with him; I told him where I lived - he then put his hand into my left hand waistcoat pocket, where I had one sovereign, two half-crowns, and one crown-piece; he ran away, but was pursued and taken.

EDWARD LUMBY (Police-constable H 110). I saw a crowd in the street; the prosecutor pointed the prisoner out - I found on him 3d. in copper and two half-crowns; he was fumbling about his trousers pocket; I prevented his putting his hand in, and found this money in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor - he asked me the way to Pelham-street - I left him.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-119

1844. MARY ANN CURLE and SARAH CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-sovereign, and 1 half-crown , the property of Samuel Hart .

SAMUEL HART. I live in Princes-court, Drury-lane, and am a labourer . On the night of the 16th of July I was with Simon Drewitt , in Drury-lane; we met the prisoners - we went to some public-houses, and all four of us drank; I afterwards went with Curle to a house in Charles-street, Drury-lane - I went to bed, but she did not; I had my watch in my pocket, with one sovereign, one half-sovereign, and one half-crown; the money was in a purse; as I laid on the bed, I heard a knock at the door - Clark appeared at the door, and asked for a light; in a minute or two there was another knock, and Clark asked for an- other light; in a minute or two there came a third knock - the light was then put out in the room I was in; the door opened, and the chair was moved from the head of the bed, which had my clothes on, and they both ran down stairs -I got up, and missed my breeches; I called to Drewitt, who was in the room above, and he came running down -I told him - he went down and found my breeches on the stairs, and the purse, which was then empty.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I take it for granted you were both pretty far gone in liquor? A. No; it was about half-past twelve o'clock - the first public-house we went to was Wilson's, where we had half a pint of gin amongst five of us - there was a third girl with the prisoners then; I had been with Drewitt to the Crown and Anchor, and had two pots of halfand-half with two or three friends; I cannot say how many - I suppose eight or nine; we had no gin there - we did not leave till twelve o'clock, and then went to Drury-lane - we then went to the public-house in Little Russell-street, and had a pot of half-and-half among the five of us; I was sober - it was Curle put the light out in my room; I had not been in bed more than two minutes - I saw Curle move the chair; the other woman had gone up stairs with Drewitt - I know Clark came twice to the room for a light, but I cannot tell who came when the candle was out.

SIMON DREWITT . I live in Drury-lane. I was with Hart; I saw both the prisoners; I went to the room over that in which Hart was; he gave an alarm - I went down stairs, and found his breeches and the purse on the stairs - his purse was empty, and there was no watch in his breeches.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the prosecutor a little tipsy? A. No, he was sober, and so was I - I had been with him to the Crown and Anchor; that was near nine o'clock - there were a great many more persons there - we had a glass of rum and water there, and some halfand-half; we then met the prisoners, and went to the Constitution, where we had half a pint of gin among the five - we then went to another public-house; we had a pot of half-and-half there, and the girls had something short - the prisoners told us the lodging we went to was theirs - the other woman was taken up because I lost some keys out of my pocket, and my purse, but was discharged; I found no other females in the house, but one in the second floor back room - the other woman was with me in the second floor; when I went out of the officer the street door was open, and I met the two prisoners going up stairs.

THOMAS PERRING (Police-constable F 1). I took the prisoners between three and four o'clock in the morning on the 16th of July at No. 43, the house adjoining the one described - they were in the garret, and concealed in a dark place - I could not find them till I turned my light on; I found nothing on them, but in the house the prosecutor went to, I found a number of duplicates.

Cross-examined. Q. What kind of houses are they? A. They are houses of ill-fame.

Curle's Defence. We went to a house in Drury-lane, and the prosecutor sent Smith, the other woman in - they asked 2s. for the room for the night; he said he had not money enough for that, and he would go home with us- the prosecutor went to bed, and I was in a chair, drunk and asleep; I did not awake till the prosecutor called out.

CURLE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-120

1845. JOSEPH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on

the 21st of July , 1 cap, value 3s. , the goods of Francis Pinkney .

SIM JEWELL . I live with my father, in High-street, Shadwell . On the 25th of July I was sitting at his door, and saw the prisoner take the cap from Mr. Pinkney's door - when he got a few paces he put it on his head; I ran after him - he threw it over a high wall into some ruins: he was taken back to the prosecutor's shop, and I took the cap up - it was on some hat-boxes inside the door when he took it.

RICHARD BATTERSBY . I live in High-street, Shadwell. I heard Jewell call Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running - he had nothing on his head then; he ran behind a coal-shed gate; he said, "What have I done?" I said,"Come along" - he was going to strike me, but the officer came up and took him.

WILLIAM McKENZIE (Police-constable K 206). I took the prisoner, and have the cap.

FRANCIS PINKNEY. This is my cap.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take any cap - the boy came and asked me to give him the cap, and I said,"What cap?"

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-121

1846. GEORGE DAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 glass lamp, value 7s. , the goods of Wilson Jones .

GEORGE COATES . I am in the service of Wilson Jones , of New Bond-street . On the afternoon of the 16th of July I was in his passage, and saw the prisoner in the shop; he asked if we wanted an errand-boy - I missed a lamp which had been on the counter, and asked the prisoner for it; he gave no answer, but was going out - I caught hold of him, and brought him into the shop; the top of the lamp fell from his pocket and broke - the rest of the lamp was in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18320906-122

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1847. MARY BUTCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 watch, value 6l.; 1 watchchain, value 24s.; 1 seal, value 10s.; 2 watch keys, value 7s., and 1 hook, value 2s., the goods of William Cotton , from his person .

THOMAS COTTON . I am a silk weaver. On the 14th of July, a friend came from Dublin, and on the 17th, I went home with him to his lodging, and left him about one o'clock in the morning; I was returning home, and got to Old Nichol-street, Bethnal-green about two; the prisoner there accosted me, and asked me to go home with her, which I refused; she then asked me to give her some money; I took out a few halfpence, to show her it was all I had - she snatched them and ran off; I then felt my waistcoat pocket and missed my watch - there was another person with her, but the prisoner took the money and the watch; I ran and called Stop her! I met two men who threw out their arms, and one of them kicked me on the leg, and made a bruise - the prisoner had then made her escape, but I pursued after the other person; I went to the station, gave information, and on going back, I met a Policeman, whom I informed of it; he took the prisoner from my description the next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many persons did you have taken up upon this business? A. Two men and two women; I had seen the prisoner before that night at some place, but I cannot say where - it was a pleasant night, not so dark but I could observe any one who come near me; I told the Magistrate that I felt her fingers about me in rather a cuddling manner, and he asked me why I did not seize her hand; I said I felt myself almost stunned; I bought the seal at a watchmaker's shop at the corner of Brown's-lane; I had worn it three years - it is a plain seal, but I am positive it is mine, for on the 16th I had cleaned it, and my wife told me I had not cleaned the whitening out; I never said if the duplicate were given me I would stop the proceeding.

JOHN GREEN (Police-constable H 91). I was told by the prosecutor that he had been robbed; I took the prisoner and Thompson about eleven o'clock the same morning; I found nothing on Thompson - my brother officer searched the prisoner and she dropped the seal; I saw it close to her feet.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see it drop? A. No.

EDWARD BERRINGER (Police-constable H 51). I took the prisoner - she said, "Let me put my money into my bosom;" she put her money into her bosom, and dropped this seal through her gown.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the other woman close to her? A. She was about a yard and a half from her; I found 5s. 9 1/2d. on her, but nothing connected with this watch - a female searched her afterwards.(Seal produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had the money in my hand; he wanted it, and I wanted to put it into my bosom - I was then going along, and he said, "What have you dropped?" I said nothing; he turned from me and said he had found a seal, and that I had dropped it - I had not seen it.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-123

1848. ANN REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 1 watch, value 2l. 10s., the goods of Charles Blacklock , from his person .

CHARLES BLACKLOCK. I am a carpenter . On the 12th of July, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I was making the best of my road home - I had been out with a young man who was going into the country, and staid out rather late; I was drunk - I met two women, whom I do not know that I had seen before; the prisoner was one: she spoke to me first, and then the other came up - I went with them to a house which I now know is in Hopkin's-street, Berwick-street ; I do not know whether I went to bed - the first thing I remember was Bassett (the other woman) bringing an officer, who awoke me, and told me of the robbery - I went with the officer to the station, and saw the prisoner there; I know I had my watch when I went into the room - I afterwards missed it; I had been at a public-house with the prisoner before she took me home - I know I had my watch then, I lost 10s. or 12s. in money.

CHARLES VISIT (Police-constable G 92). Bassett came to me and said the prisoner had robbed her friend of his watch - I took the prisoner to the station and, went to her lodging, but found no watch.

WILLIAM JOHN BIRD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Holborn. The prisoner and Bassett brought this watch to pawn, on the 12th of July, about half-past eight o'clock; the prisoner pawned it for 25s.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Covent-garden to sell some goods, and went to a public-house; the prosecutor and two women had some liquor there, and he asked me to take something to drink - Bassett asked me to assist her to take him home, which I did, but did not go up stairs.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-124

1849. CHARLES BAYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 1 pair of shoes, value 6s. , the goods of Joseph Walker .

JOSEPH WALKER . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Tabernacle-walk . I was at dinner, and heard the wooden rod at the door, on which the shoes hung, move - I saw the prisoner going past the window, tucking them under his coat; I went and brought him back - these shoes are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the shop and the bar he mentions I caught against; I knocked the shoes down, and caught them in my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320906-125

1850. JOHN ROWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Field , from his person .

JOHN FIELD. I have a situation in the Ordinance-office ; I was in Wilderness-row , on the 21st of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; I felt a twich at my pocket - I turned and saw the prisoner and another boy , I pursued the prisoner, and he threw my handkerchief at my feet; this is it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it given me.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-126

1851. JOHN BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of James Henry Mollett , from his person .

JAMES HENRY MOLLETT. On the 22nd of July I was near the Golden-cross, Charing-cross , a few minutes before twelve o'clock; I felt a slight touch at my pocket: I turned round, and saw the prisoner - I collared him, and found in his left hand jacket pocket my handkerchief, which I took out.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-127

1852. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 39 pence, and 42 halfpence, the monies of Nicholas Charrington , his master .

GEORGE EARLE . I am a clerk in the counting-house of Mr. Nicholas Charrington; he is a brewer , and lives in Mile-end - I take care of all the money which comes into the counting-house; I keep the copper in a cupboard, which is locked - I keep the key in my pocket, or in a desk, which is locked. The prisoner was a watchman there in the morning when the night watchman went to call the men, and in the evening before the night watchman came on duty; he has been so employed for a few months, but he has been four years employed on the premises; I had missed money from time to time, and on the night of the 13th of July I marked twenty-eight packages of 5s. papers of halfpence, in the presence of the storehouse clerk, and gave him the key of the cupboard, where they were put - the prisoner was apprehended early the next morning, but I was not present; no one had access to the cupboard but me.

BENJAMIN BELL . I am the storehouse clerk. I saw the papers of halfpence which had been marked, put into the cupboard in the evening; the prisoner came at four o'clock in the morning, and had to clean out the counting-house in which the cupboard was - I unlocked the cupboard when he had cleaned out the counting-house, and missed one paper of copper; they had been marked from No. 1 to 28, and No. 24 was missing - I was present when he was searched, and that identical paper was found in his trousers pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You saw the prisoner about four o'clock in the morning? A. Yes; I am always there at the beginning of business - there was nobody but him employed that morning in the counting-house - when he came out, and shut the door, no one could go in but myself; there were, perhaps, fifty persons in the yard.

SAMUEL JOHN HAM (Police-serjeant K 16.) I was sent for, and found this packet of copper in the prisoner's trousers pocket; I found in his jacket pocket this chisel, and on the cupboard door was a slight mark, which appeared as if done by this chisel - I opened the door with it very easily.

MR. EARLE. This is one of the papers I marked - it is No. 24.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the copper from a stool - the storehouse clerk owed me a spite, and he sent for the officer; he often said he would get me turned out.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-128

1853. JOHN WINKS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July I live tame fowl, price 1s. 6d. , the property of John Ray .

WILLIAM MULLICHAP (Police-constable N 77). I was on duty at Ball's-pond, Islington , about five minutes past two o'clock in the morning, on the 23rd of July; I heard some fowls making a noise - I listened, and heard some footsteps in the prosecutor's yard; I jumped on the palings, and saw the prisoner; he said he came for a lodging - he jumped over the pales, and I caught him in my arms and sprung my rattle - he tried to throw me, but some of my brother officers came to my assistance; I sent them to see if there was any one else, but there was not - I then went over myself, and found the fowl-house door open; we took the prisoner to the station, and when I came back I found this fowl under some straw, about a yard from where I saw the prisoner.

FREDERICK BEST . I am servant to Mr. John Ray; this is one of his fowls - the fowl-house door was not locked.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been working for Mr. Frazer, till it was late, and having drank more than I ought, I was hardly capable of walking home; I saw this straw,

and laid myself down - another officer brought this bag, which I had never seen before.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-129

1854. ROBERT WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 2 pairs of trousers, value 17s., and 1 waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of James Clary .

JAMES CLARY . I lodge at the Old Rum Puncheon, Rose and Crown-court ; the prisoner had lodged there before. On the 25th of July I left my room at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, leaving my property safe, and when I returned I missed it.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker. I produce here a pair of black trousers, pawned in the evening of the 24th of July, and another pair of trousers and a waistcoat, pawned on the 25th, by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was out of work.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320906-130

1855. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , 3 pewter pots, value 3s. , the goods of John Lambert .

JOHN LAMBERT . I keep the Grapes, in Little St. Martin's-lane . The prisoner came to scour the pots on the 3rd of September, in the morning; I said there were not many to do - he staid about a quarter of an hour; I asked if he was done - he said Yes, and came up with his hat and coat in his hand; he put his coat on, and put his hat down - I took up his hat, and found a quart pot in it - I sent for an officer, who found three pint pots on his person; two of the pints, and the quart pot are mine, and the other is a neighbour's; they are all hent.

Prisoner. I have a very heavy family, and was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-131

1856. MARIA SIDNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 1 watch, value 12l.; 1 watch-chain, value 2s.; 2 seals, value 1l.; 1 watch-key, value 10s., and 1 watch-guard, value 1s., the goods of Joao Nogueira Gandra , her master .

JOAO NOGUEIRA GANDRA . I live near Brunswick-square . The prisoner was in my service in April, 1830, and left me on the 18th of June, in the same year; she had lived with me three months, and I knew her perfectly well- on the morning of the 18th of June, she came to me while I was at breakfast, and asked if she should go and put my room to rights, and put up the curtains which had been washed; she said if I could wait an hour, she would have it all to rights - I said Yes; I went to the room after that time, and found the curtains not put up, but laid on a table; my gold watch and seals, which I had left on the table, were gone, and so was the prisoner - I had paid her wages every month; I never saw her again till three weeks ago, when I met herin Shoreditch with a man who was blind with one eye - I said to her, "Maria, give me my watch;" she said, "I never saw you in my life" - I said, "I shall go to the Police;" she said, "Stop a few minutes, I will give you a good character, that I am not the person you think" - she then said to the people, "Come, come, come, this man accuses me of robbing him," and the people came round me and ill-used me, and she ran off - I got from the people, and ran after her; she ran into a house, and shut the door of a room - an officer came up, and he went and got her.

RALPH JACOBS . I am headborough of Shoreditch. I heard the prosecutor give an alarm; I went in to the house - a lady who was there told me she was not there- I went to the back of the house, and could find no one, but I looked up, and saw a window open; I went up stairs, got out of the window, and found the prisoner in the gutter - she said she never saw the gentleman before.

JOHN NORRIS . I am a private gentleman. The prosecutor resides near me; the prisoner came to live with him, and he came for my wife to make some inquiries of her, as he spoke very indifferent English; I know he was robbed at the time he states, and am quite positive the prisoner is the person who lived with him.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she was servant at the house at which the prosecutor lodged, and being unwell had left and sent another woman to do her work; that she had never seen the watch, which might have been taken by others, as several emigrants were in the habit of calling there.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-132

1857. ELIZABETH STOW was indicted for bigamy .

ELIZABETH STOW . I am the mother of William Stow . I was present when he married the prisoner at Lambeth, but I did not take notice of the day of the mouth - my son was a vertical jack-maker , and was just entering into business - the prisoner was a servant , and lived next door to us; they lived together about nine months - she then left him - I believe something occurred in business that they could not get on; my son is alive, and is here.

EDWARD SHAW . I am a hair-dresser. I became acquainted with the prisoner seventeen or eighteen months ago; I had no idea she was married - I married her as a spinster on the 28th of September, 1831 ; she had no fortune, but she spent about 200l. of my money, and when all that was gone she turned out a common prostitute, and annoyed me very much as I was coming home from work; I had very nearly got a thrashing once or twice by the man she supports - I have instituted this prosecution, and have the two marriage registers - (registers read).

Marriages solemnized in the parish of St. Mary, Lambeth, 1824. - William Stow, bachelor, a minor, and Elizabeth Gilbert , spinster, a minor, both of this parish, were married in this church by banns, with consent of parents, 19th April, 1824, by me, Arthur Gibson, Curate.

Marriages solemnized in the parish of St. Anne, Westminster , 1831. - Edward Shaw and Elizabeth Gilbert, both of this parish, were married by banns this 28th day of September, 1831, by me, George H. Hine , Curate.

Prisoner's Defence. Shaw's father only left him 100l., and that he spent in drink; he used me very ill, and said as I was his wife he had a right to do as he liked with me; he threatened to cut my throat, and I was obliged to swear my life against him - he was confined in Tothilfields for a few days; he wrote to me to intercede and get him out, and said he would behave better - he knew I was married at the time he married me; when I first married I was very young, and had no friends to give their consent to my marriage - his friends did, and his mother acted as bridesmaid; I left my husband when I was under age, and I was told, that having been away seven

years I was entitled to marry again - I have been ill-used by both these men; my first husband's mother knows that I behaved well - my husband will take me again.

MRS. STOW. I have nothing to say against her whatever.

GUILTY. Aged 26. - Judgment Respited .

WILLIAM STOW. I am her husband; I will take her back, and not upbraid her with what is past - we will live happily together. I will give security for my good conduct to her; we merely parted on account of difficulties - I have nothing to say against her, but poverty came in, and we had words.

Prisoner. I will go back to him, and be an affectionate good wife .

Reference Number: t18320906-133

1858. CATHERINE PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 6 yards of ribbon, value 4s. , the goods of James Wilson .

JOSEPH ELLIOTT . I am in the employ of Mr. James Wilson - he is a draper , and lives in Clerkenwell . On the 21st of July the prisoner came and asked for some articles, which I showed her; she then wanted some ribbons; I showed her the drawer - she looked, and said we had not what she wanted - she was then going away; I missed one of the ribbons - I followed her, and found it on her - this is it; she was a stranger.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-134

1859. EDWARD LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 2 half sovereigns, 12 shillings, and 20 sixpences, the monies of John Lander , his master; and 1 purse, value 1s.; part of an ear-ring, value 1s., and 1 trinket, value 2d., the goods of Charlotte Merryfield Lander .

CHARLOTTE MERRYFIELD LANDER . My father is a military stock maker - the prisoner was his errand boy . On the 21st of July, I went down stairs, leaving my work basket in the shop, and the prisoner there; when I came up again he was gone, and I missed a purse containing the money stated, belonging to my father, and my own things from a small box down stairs.

BENJAMIN GEORGE LEWIS. I took the prisoner on suspicion on the 21st of July, at half-past five o'clock - I saw him go into a tobacconist's, and come out smoking a cigar- I saw a large bulk behind him, and asked what it was; he refused to tell me - I looked, and found it was a gingerheer bottle, nearly full of rum; he then said it was his birth-day, and his master had given him some money and leave to enjoy himself; I asked what money he had - he said it was not my place to know; I searched, and found on him this purse, and in it three half-sovereigns, two half-crowns, two shillings, part of a gold ear-ring, and a trinket - he then said the money was given him by his master to take to Camberwell, to his mistress.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner delivered in a petition, expressing his contrition.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320906-135

1860. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , 1 watch, value 3l. 10s. , the goods of William Trail .

WILLIAM TRAIL. I live in John-street, Edgware-road . On the 11th of August a person told me a watch had been taken from my shop; I went out - I overtook the prisoner with it in his hand - this is it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-136

1861. JAMES STEPHENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 purse, value 1d.; 4 halfcrowns, 6 shillings, and 6 sixpences, the property of Charles John Bythesea Brome , from his person .

CHARLES JOHN BYTHESEA BROME. I am in no business. On the 25th of July I was in St. James's Park , coming from Downing-street - I saw two men and a boy running into the Tilt-yard; they got out of sight - some person said they had picked my pocket - I ran into the Tilt-yard, and inquired which way they had run - when I got to the Horse Guards, I saw them again; they saw me, and set off running - the prisoner dropped my purse, which I took up; I pursued and caught him, and then came back for my purse - this is it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running through the passage, and saw the purse on the ground; I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-137

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1862. GEORGE WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , 1 coral necklace, value 10s., the goods of David William Hall , from the person of Mary Ann Hall .

ANN HALL . I am the wife of David William Hall, and the mother of Mary Ann Hall; my brother's servant had her out in her arms. On the 8th of August I went up stairs, heard a noise, and saw out of the window "Punch" was being exhibited before our house in Maiden-lane, Covent-garden ; I saw the girl go into the midst of the crowd with my child in her arms - I saw the prisoner near her, holding up his hands; I thought the necklace was not safe - I ran down stairs; when I got down I saw the prisoner in the act of taking the necklace off my child's neck - I collared him with it in his right hand; the string was not broken - it was dropped in the crowd, and picked up.

BENJAMIN RULE. I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and have the necklace.

Prisoner's Defence. The lady pulled me into the house, and found nothing on me - a gentleman came and said he had found the necklace.

The prisoner received a good character from his master, who engaged to take him again.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined 2 Days & Whipped .

Reference Number: t18320906-138

1863. LOUISA PULBROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , 1 silver spoon, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Price .

ROBERT PRICE. I live in Pitfield-street, Hoxton . On the 22nd of July I missed a spoon, and on the 23rd another from the kitchen cupboard - the prisoner used to come to the house to see a lodger.

DANIEL COLEY . I am assistant to a pawnbroker at Islington. On the 22nd of July I took in this spoon from the prisoner.

WILLIAM BARROW (Police-constable C 158.) I took

the prisoner - in going along she told her mother that she stole a spoon, pawned it for 1s. 3d., and tore the ticket up - I said, "What is that she says?" the mother said, "I could not rightly hear;" I said, "You must be a wicked woman;" the prisoner said, "I stole a spoon, pawned it for 1s. 3d., and tore the ticket up:" "Yes, (said she) she did."

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18320906-139

1864. SARAH ANN PICKERING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 1 counterpane, value 2s.; 1 plate, value 2d.; 1 pig, value 2d., and 1 image, value 2d. , the goods of Charles Wilkinson .

SARAH WILKINSON . I am the wife of Charles Wilkinson - we live in Cross-street, Marylebone-lane . On the 26th of July I was out, and my child was at home or at play - I came home, and missed these articles; I have seen some articles at the pawnbroker's, but I cannot swear that they are mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-140

1865. JOHN NIMMINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , 1 pair of boots, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Loder .

MARY LODER. I am the wife of Thomas Loder , who is a hackneyman . On the 30th of July we missed a pair of boots of my son's; the prisoner had been employed by my husband a few days - I have seen a pair, but I cannot swear to them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-141

1866. JOHN MAGENNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Kymer , from his person .

JOHN KYMER . On the 17th of July, about twelve o'clock, I was passing Whitechapel - I felt something at my pocket, turned, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; I followed, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I went on an errand; I saw two boys going into a pawnbroker's, and I saw this handkerchief on the ground; I did not have it in my hand. Witness. Yes, he had it in his hand, and threw it down.

GEORGE FURLONG (Police-constable K 1.) I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-142

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1867. JOHN MAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Richard Mountford Baddeley , from his person .

DANIEL MEASON . I live in Francis-street, Newington. On the 23rd of July I was near the corner of Farringdon-street, and saw the prisoner behind the prosecutor, with a handkerchief in his hand; I called out to him, "Sir, you have lost your handkerchief - there he goes;" the prisoner dropped it, and ran off - the prosecutor followed him.

Prisoner. He said it was not me, but another boy. - Witness. I never said any thing of the kind.

RICHARD MOUNTFORD BADDELEY . On the 23rd of July I was in Fleet-street , and felt something at my pocket- I put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief; I turned, and saw the prisoner and another person - I accused the prisoner of taking my handkerchief, which was then on the ground; Meason and one or two others pointed out the prisoner - he ran off; I pursued and took him.

FRANCIS FELTHAM . I am a City-officer. I received the prisoner in charge - Mr. Baddeley gave me this handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along Fleet-street on the 23rd of July, between three and four o'clock - a boy picked the gentleman's pocket, and threw the handkerchief behind him; the gentleman followed that boy, and then two persons said the handkerchief was in the road - he then said it was me.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-143

1868. THOMAS PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 5 handkerchiefs, value 17s. , the goods of Benjamin Prew .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be 5 yards of silk.

ROBERT SOWTELL. I am shopman to Mr. Benjamin Prew - he lives at Aldgate , and is a hosier . On the 28th of August, in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at his shop, with another person; they purchased a pair of stockings: the other person paid for them; the prisoner wished to put them on in the shop, near the door - I wished him to go further in; he went back, and while he was putting on the stockings he took from the side of the shop five silk handkerchiefs, and put them into his bosom; I saw him do it - these are them.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-144

1869. CHARLOTTE HOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , 3 handkerchiefs, value 12s. , the goods of Joseph Carpenter .

THOMAS JAMES MASON . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Carpenter , of Fish-street-hill , a hosier . On the 9th of August the prisoner came, and asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs; I showed her a large number, but she could not find any to please her - we had some more in another part of the shop; I went for them, and on coming back I missed one piece, containing three handkerchiefs; I went for the officer - he took her to the back of the shop; she made a stumble, and dropped these three handkerchiefs from her person.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were they not placed on the counter? A. Yes; she had been looking at them - she had set her child down on the counter, and took it up to go to the back part of the shop - there was no rat-hole in our floor that I am aware of, but she stumbled in going along, or stooped, and these things fell; she went readily - she appeared to be confused; there was a boy in the shop; I did not see her take them.

PHILIP HENRY PARISH (City Police-officer No. 45.) I was on duty, and took the prisoner to the back of the shop; as she was going back I saw her make a stumble, or a stoop, and this piece of handkerchiefs fell from the child's clothes - she might have taken it up with the child.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-145

1870. JOHN CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of James Charles Cockerell , from his person .

JAMES CHARLES COCKERELL . I live in Blackman-street, in the Borough. On the 14th of July I was in

Cannon-street ; I felt something at my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner behind me, and my handkerchief on the ground - there was only this little girl near me.

EMMA NEWTON . I am fourteen years old. I was just behind the prosecutor, and saw the prisoner put his two hands into his pocket, and take out his handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. She said before that she saw a young man take it, and run up a turning.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-146

1871. CHARLES BOYD DALY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 1 shawl, value 9s. , the goods of Mary Daly .

MARY DALY. I lodge at the Rose and Crown, Newwharf, Whitefriars - the prisoner is my grandson. On the 29th of August I went out - I left the prisoner in my room, and missed my shawl next morning from my box.

THEODORE JAMES YATES . I am a constable. I was sent for on the morning of the 30th of August to take the prisoner - I met with him in Fleet-street, and found this duplicate in his hat - it led me to the pawnbroker's, where I found the shawl.

CHARLES MASON . I am shopman to Mr. Gray, a pawnbroker, in Fleet-street. I produce a shawl, pawned by a female - this is the duplicate given for it.

Prisoner's Defence. The duplicate was given to me by a young man.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-147

1872. RICHARD HORNER BARBER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 6 planes, value 11s.; 2 gauges, value 1s.; 1 oil-stone, value 1s.; 2 hammers, value 2s.; 3 gimblets, value 9d.; 2 squares, value 4s.; 3 chisels, value 1s. 6d.; 1 gouge, value 6d.; 1 screwdriver, value 6d.; 1 pair of pincers, value 9d.; 1 pair of compasses, value 4d.; 2 punches, value 2d.; 1 bradawl, value 1d.; 1 file, value 2d.; 1 mallet, 6d.; 1 chalk line, value 2d., and 1 basket, value 6d. , the goods of Underwood Males .

UNDERWOOD MALES. I live in Cock-lane, Smithfield, and am a carpenter . I left my tools safe in a shed in Bartholomew's-hospital - I was sent for, and found the prisoner in the shed, and the tools on the bench; the other witness is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-148

1873. GEORGE CHAMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Richard Jones , from his person .

RICHARD JONES . I am in the employ of a silk-mercer, in Oxford-street . On the 16th of July I was on Holbornhill; I felt something at my pocket, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - he dropped it, and the officer took it up; this is it.

Prisoner. Q. If you saw it in my hand, why strike me, and offer to search me in the street? A. I did nothing of the kind; you offered to strike me.

JOHN BEAN . I saw the prosecutor holding the prisoner - the handkerchief was down by his side - I did not see him strike the prisoner.

Prisoner. You said you saw two young men and a young woman run away. Witness. No, I did not.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that two men and a woman had passed the prosecutor (who was intoxicated) just before he turned, and accused him of the offence.

RICHARD JONES re-examined. Q. Was there any other person near you? A. There was a woman with the prisoner; he said, "Here is your handkerchief," and dropped it down.

JOHN BEAN. The prosecutor was as sober as he is now.

GUILTY . Aged 23 - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-149

1874. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 pistol, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Jerome .

THOMAS JEROME . I am a general-dealer , and live in Sun-street, Bishopsgate . On the morning of the 7th of July I saw the prisoner at my door; he put out his left hand, and took hold of what I thought to be a pistol, and with his right hand he seemed to be cutting it down - I pursued him through several streets, and took him back to the shop; I am sure he is the person who cut the cord.

PETER ADAMS . I am a fishmonger, and live in Duke-street. I saw the prisoner running down that street, and the prosecutor pursuing him - he dropped a pistol, and I took it up.

GEORGE STONELY (City Police-constable 44). I took the prisoner, and have the pistol.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-150

1875. HENRY FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 2 pairs of shoes, value 7s., the goods of Charles Endfield , his master .

CHARLES ENDFIELD . I am in the shoe trade, and live in Wormwood-street . The prisoner was in my service on the 16th of July, and on the 18th he absconded, taking with him two pairs of shoes.

WILLIAM BARNETT (City Police-constable 84). I stopped the prisoner, and found on him two duplicates.

REGINALD CHARLES OTTER . I live in the City-road, and am a pawnbroker. On the 18th of July I took in this pair of shoes from the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-151

1876. JOSEPH CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of George Downing , from his person .

GEORGE DOWNING . I am a draper . On the 20th of August I was in Newgate-street , and felt something at my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner, whom I collared, and found my handkerchief in his pocket.

WILLIAM BUTLER (City Police-constable 30). I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Newgatemarket, and on crossing the road I found the handkerchief - the gentleman came, and said, "You have my handkerchief;" I said, "Is this yours?" and I gave it him.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-152

1877. WILLIAM CROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , 1 pair of trousers, value 30s., the goods of Thomas Engley , his master .

SAMUEL ELLIS . I am foreman to Mr. Thomas Engley; he is a tailor . On the 30th of August these trousers were taken from a room in his house; the prisoner had been in that room most of that day.

JOHN GRAMSHAW. I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have these trousers, which were pawned on the 30th of August, I believe by the prisoner, but I cannot swear to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-153

1878. HENRY JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Robert Wilson , from his person .

ROBERT WILSON . I am a fish-factor , and live in Lower Thames-street. On the 25th of August I was in Cheapside , and felt something at my pocket - I turned, and a person gave me information; I saw the prisoner running; I followed, and he was taken by the watchman.

JOHN BODY . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner in Foster-lane; as he came towards me he dropped the handkerchief, which was picked up, and given to me; I gave it to the officer - I stopped the prisoner.

THOMAS GEORGE POSTAN . I am a constable in my own right. I received the prisoner with this handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from my brother's to Eyre-street-hill, where I live - I was running, and the watchman told me to stop, which I did; a young man brought the handkerchief from the top of the street, and I was at the bottom.

JOHN BODY . The prisoner dropped it about twelve yards from me, and the prosecutor was close, in pursuit, of him; a gentleman came, and took the handkerchief up.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-154

1879. SARAH SOLOMONS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 2nd of July , of a certain evil disposed person, one 5l. Bank note, the property of John Thomas Graves , Esq ., well knowing it to have been stolen ,&c., against the Statute.

JOHN THOMAS GRAVES, ESQ. I live at No. 2, Fig-tree-court, Inner Temple, and am a barrister. On the 18th of June, when I returned to my chambers in the evening, I found the door broken open, my furniture scattered about the room, my chest was broken open, and I missed some 5l. Bank notes; I do not know the numbers, but I received them at Paget's - I had no other notes - I afterwards got from a clerk in the Bank of England, this 5l. note, No. 11,191, dated 28th April, 1832; the prisoner was taken into custody - I asked her if an account which she gave at her own residence when she was taken, was true; she said it was in substance true, that she received the note, not from a man she met in the street, but from a man named Sanders, whom she knew.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I believe you have traced all the notes you lost to different persons? A. Yes, one of them was at Chertsey, and two at Hampton; I lost four.

ABRAHAM BAYLEY HERBERT . I am cashier at Messrs. Paget's. This note was in their house on the 8th of June, and paid with three others to Mr. Graves.

JOHN LYON . I live in Fenchurch-street, and am a boot and shoe-maker. On Monday or Tuesday, in the first week in July, which was the 2nd or 3rd, the prisoner came to my shop, and bought a pair of shoes for 6s.; she gave me this 5l. note, and the name of Sanders, 15, Liverpool-street, Bishopsgate, which is on it in my writing - she only said, "Sanders," and I put the word, "Mrs." - my man then told me that her name was not Sanders; she said,"What he says is very true, my name is not Sanders, but Solomons; if you don't like to take it, you need not, but Sanders is the name of the person I took the note of" - I gave her change, and sent the note to the Bank the next morning, and while my man was gone, the prisoner came to my shop; she said, "Have you inquired about the note;" I said, "No, I have passed it" - she said, "I called to pay the money for it," and then said she would tell me all about it; that it was a note which laid on the counter, belonging to her husband, that she was going to a wedding, and wanted some things, which she did not want him to know of; she again asked if I had put the name of Solomons on it - I said, "No, Sanders," she said, "I am obliged to you," and went away.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you a person named Publet in your service? A. Yes, and he knew her, as he had lived in her house; but she did not see him when she was at my shop, as he was in another shop at the time; I had my information from another man named Horne, but Publet confirmed it.

SAMUEL STEPHENS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at the Rosemary-branch, near Rosemary-lane, on the 6th of July; I saw her and her husband there - I had a warrant to search the house; they wanted to know what it was for - I did not satisfy them, but asked the prisoner, when her husband was not very near her, to account for the 5l. note; she then said it was a note belonging to her husband, which she took off the counter - I did not appear satisfied with that, and she called me aside, and said she would tell me all about it; she then went up stairs with me, and said she was not Mr. Solomon's wife, and that she had had the note from a gentleman, to go with him, and she would not have Mr. Solomons know it on any account; I asked if she knew the person - she said she had seen him once before, but did not know where he resided.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she received the note from Sanders, who accompanied her to Fenchurch-street, and waited outside while she purchased the shoes.

COURT to MR. GRAVES. Q. Have you made any inquiry as to the address of a person named Sanders? A. I enquired at Liverpool-street, and the woman who resided there, said she did not know such a person; but I heard that a person named Sanders was apprehended at Bow-street, and in consequence of a note I received from the prisoner, I let her know of it - she did not mention the name to me, but I did to her.

ANN PUBLET . I know the prisoner. I was at her house on the 2nd of July; I remember a gentleman coming there while I was there - he appeared respectably dressed; he asked her if she was quite well - she said, "Quite well, thank you Sanders;" he then asked if she had any thing in the house to drink - she said, "No, Sanders, I have not, but I will take the liberty of asking this young woman to get 1s. worth of brandy;" I went for it, and I had my share of it - she then said to him, "Sanders, I am going to a wedding, will you treat me with a pair of shoes;" he said, "I have no change, but I have a 5l. note, if you will go with me I will treat you with a pair" - they then went out together, and as she was going, she asked me to mind her place, which I did - she returned alone, and brought a parcel with her, wrapped up in paper, and

she, showed me a pair of shoes, which seemed to be new; she might have been gone about an hour.

COURT. Q. What sort of man was he? A. A tallish gentleman - I had not seen him before; I called to see the prisoner, and show her my baby, after I came out of my confinement - there was no servant there; it was on Monday, the 2nd of July - I returned home to George-street, Minories; had been churched on the 1st of July - I did not take particular notice of Sanders; to the best of my knowledge, he had a brown coat and a black hat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-155

1880. THOMAS KING & ROBERT NICHOLLS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Brook , from his person .

JOHN BROOK. I live in Castle-street, Holborn, and am a timber merchant ; I lost my handkerchief in Castle-street , on the 6th of August, as I was going home; I saw it again in the officer's hand.

THOMAS TIPPER . (Police-constable F 152) Between eight and nine o'clock in the evening on the 6th of August, I was in Castle-street; I saw the prisoner King put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and draw out his handkerchief; Nicholls was close to him, and had his arm nearly round his neck - the handkerchief was thrown down by one of them - I laid hold of King.

JOSEPH HIGGINS . (Police-constable F 35). I was with Tipper; I saw Nicholls throw the handkerchief down; they had been following the prosecutor for some time, and we watched them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Two witnesses gave Nicholls a good character, and his master engaged to employ him.

NICHOLLS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Seven Days .

KING - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-156

1881. CHARLES SPROTT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 4s.; 1 pair of braces, value 3d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 badge, value 1d., and 1 bag, value 3d., the goods of William George Elsam , from his person .

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of George Elsam .

3rd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of William Henry Angell and others.

GEORGE ELSAM. I live in Parliament-court, Artillery-lane ; my son William George Elsam is a scholar in Lime-street, charity school ; I have known the prisoner some time - he had lodged in my house; I put the articles stated into a bag belonging to the school on the 16th of June, and delivered them to my son.

WILLIAM GEORGE ELSAM . I was eight years old in June on the 16th of June, I received the clothes in the bag from my father; I went out, and met the prisoner at the corner of St. Mary-axe - he snatched the bag off my shoulder; he said he had been to my mother's, and he was to come to spend the whole of the day with us, and I was to go and fetch my father out of the shop for him to pay him some money - he went with me to my father's, and while I went in and got my father, the prisoner was gone with my bag.

CHARLES ROBERTS . I am a waiter at the Coal Exchange, Little Eastcheap; I received a duplicate from the prisoner, and got the clothes out of pawn.

ROBERT MAYHEW BARRYMORE . I am assistant to a pawnbroker; I produce the articles - I do not know who pawned them.

GEORGE ELSAM . These are the articles in which my boy went to St. Paul's on the 7th of June; they were in my charge, and I was answerable for them; the badge was found on the prisoner.

WILLIAM HENRY ANGELL. I am one of the trustees of the school .

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-157

1882. GEORGE GOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Douglas , from his person .

THOMAS DOUGLAS. I was in Hounsditch on the evening of the 9th of July; in consequence of what was said to me, I looked round, and saw the prisoner on my left hand - he ran away, and I missed my handkerchief.

JAMES DOUGLAS . I am the prosecutor's son; I was with him, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of his pocket; he threw it into a gentleman's door-way, and ran off.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I worked on board the Lord Melville steam packet; I left one of the stokers the same afternoon, who told me that the engineer was waiting at the Duke of York, public-house for me; I ran of, and a lad with a green surtout coat on dropped this handkerchief; there were four or five persons running at the time.

JAMES DOUGLAS . I am positive he took it, and threw it into a door-way; a gentleman with a green surtout coat on took it up when he threw it down.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320906-158

OLD COURT. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin, 1883. JOHN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , at St. James, Westminster, 36 yards of carpet, value 7l., the goods of Alexander McDonald , in his dwelling-house .

VINCENT ALLISON. I am in the employ of Alexander McDonald, who deals in carpets , and lives in the Quadrant, in the parish of St. James, Westminster . On the 16th of July, between two and three o'clock, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take a piece of carpet from the window - I was about the middle of the shop; he ran out, got about twenty yards, and was turning through a court, when I secured him - I had never seen him before.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You do not know whether your master had sold him the carpet? A. He had not; it had been purchased by a Mr. Nutt, in Hertfordshire, but was not to be sent home till he wrote for it; when the prisoner was taken he said a gentleman sent

him for it, but he did not say who he was nor where he lived - it was not paid for, and was not to be sent home till next March, or till we heard from him; I asked who sent him for it - he said a gentleman told him to go in and take it; there were several other pieces of carpeting with it - it is worth 7l.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Regent-street - a gentleman asked if I wanted a job, and asked me to carry the carpeting to No. 17, Vine-street; he took me to the step of the door, and pointed it out - I was following him.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-159

Before Mr. Baron Bailey.

1884. GEORGE HEAVEN was indicted for feloniously forging a bill of exchange for the sum of 15l. 1s. 6d.,(setting it forth, dated the 2nd of May 1832, at three months after date, on John Smith , High-street, Maidstone, signed Whittaker and Co.) with intent to defraud John Lindsay .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering the same with a like intent.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, for forging an acceptance of the said bill, and uttering the same with a like intent.

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LINDSAY. I live in Earl-street west, Edgware-road , and am sub-collector of the parochial rates . The prisoner lodged with me - he did not pay his rent regurlarly; I applied for it several times - it was about 8l.; and on the 14th of June he gave me this bill to get discounted to pay my rent and give him the difference - I endorsed it, and got it discounted at Henry Hodson's, in New Church-street - I paid 5s. for the discount, and paid the prisoner 7l. 2s. 6d.; on its becoming due, it was returned to me as dishonoured; I paid it - the prisoner had then removed to Mr. Clark's, at Kilburn; he had remained five weeks with me after paying me the bill.

Prisoner. Q. What was the cause of my leaving? A. In consequence of his getting my son turned out of a situation, I gave him notice to leave - when he gave me the bill, I asked him if it was on Whitaker, of Ave Maria-lane; he said it was, and that he got it from them for work he had done for them.

GEORGE BYROM WHITAKER. I am one of the firm of Whitaker and Co., Ave Maria-lane. This bill was not drawn by me, or any member of our firm; the prisoner never worked for our house; but he worked for another house in a trade-book, in which our house holds a small share - we were not the managing persons; Mr. Collingwood, who is now dead, managed it - we have a correspondent named John Smith , at Maidstone, but never drew bills on him.

Prisoner. Q. Is the bill drawn in the way your firm sign? A. No, we never draw in the names Whitaker and Co.

JOHN SMITH . I am a bookseller, and live in Week-street, Maidstone. The acceptance to this bill is not my writing - I do not know whose it is, and have not the least suspicion; I formerly lived in High-street - I know no John Smith in High-street; there was Jacob Smith , a linen-draper, there - I do not know his hand-writing; I do not know the prisoner.

BALTIMORE CLUBB . I am clerk to Messrs. Luke and Wilkinson, solicitors. I caused the prisoner to be apprehended at Mr. Clark's, Kilburn-wells; I am Lindsay's brother-in-law - I took Jones, a Policeman, with me, on the 9th of August, about nine o'clock in the evening; he was not at home, but came in shortly after - we were waiting in the neighbourhood, and Mrs. Clark sent for us; I said,"Mr. Heaven, I am very sorry, but I am obliged to give you in charge of this Policeman, on a charge of uttering a forged bill of exchange" - he said nothing then; on our way to the station, I said it was an unlucky thing - he said he did not intend to defraud Mr. Lindsay, but he had hoped, by getting money for some work he had published, to have got sufficient to have taken up this bill: at the station he wished me to use my influence with my brother-in-law, not to prefer the charge, as he should then be discharged; I cannot tell his precise words.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner in charge at Kilburn, Middlesex.

Prisoner's Defence. I feel myself in a most distressing situation - I never attempted or wished to wrong Mr. Lindsay in any way; I trust any favourable point in my case will be considered, also my having a wife and children; I have hitherto moved in a respectable situation in life - I declare I never used the name of Whitaker and Co., nor did the prosecutor ask me the question.

GUILTY of uttering . Aged 36.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-160

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1885. JOHN JAMES LEVIEN was indicted for feloniously forging an order for payment of money - as follows:

London, 2nd of August, 1832.

Messrs. Coutts and Co., pay to B. H. Gill, Esq., or bearer, Two Hundred Pounds. W. G. PAXTON .

£200. with intent to defraud Sir Coutts Trotter and others.

SECOND COUNT, for offering and uttering the same, with a like intent.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud William Gill Paxton .

MESSRS. BODKIN and LEE conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH PARTRIDGE . I am cashier in the banking-house of Messrs. Coutts, in the Strand; Sir Coutts Trotter is one of the firm - there are other partner s. On the 2nd of August the prisoner came into the counting-house, and presented this cheque - my initials are on it;) on inspecting it I suspected it was not correct, and asked him in what name he received it; he replied Gill - I then asked his own name; he answered Watts: I then quitted my seat, and showed it to the other cashiers; in consequence of what transpired in his absence, he was desired to wait by Sir Edward Antrobus, to whom I gave the cheque.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS Q. You put your initials on the cheque, I suppose that was a considerable time after? A. On the following morning.

Q. In reply to your asking his name, are you sure he was not interrupted in his answer, and meant to say,"What's the use of telling you," or something of that sort? A. I heard him say Watts.

SIR EDWARD ANTROBUS . I am a partner in Coutts'

banking-house, and was there on the 2nd of August - my attention was drawn to this cheque, purporting to be drawn by Mr. Paxton; I went to the prisoner after the cheque was shown to me, and told him a difficulty had occurred respecting payment of the draft, and begged he would sit down till it was cleared up - he followed me immediately to a chair, which I pointed out inside the counter; I do not recollect his making any answer - I then desired Mr. Partride to send for Mr. Paxton; the porter was sent for him, but Mr. Robinson, his clerk, came, and made a communication to me: after remaining on his seat about twenty minutes, the prisoner was taken into another room; the door between that and the room I was in was always open; I happened to look into the room, and saw him emptying a small phial into his mouth, the contents of which he had almost drank before I saw him; I do not think he had had an opportunity of seeing Mr. Robinson - it was about half an hour after he presented the cheque; I sent him to an apothecary close by, who gave him an emetic, which proved effectual; the cheque was placed in my hands by Mr. Partridge: I believe that produced to be the same.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was he sitting for the first twenty minutes? A. In a room within the office, not in the banking-house; there were two clerks in that room; I took the cheque in my hand when I asked him to sit down: I then gave it back to Mr. Partridge; I believe he parted with it afterwards.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you compare it with other cheques? A. Yes, with five or six - it was under my notice about five minutes; I have no doubt in my mind that this is the cheque.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS . I am a superintendent of the Police. On the 2nd of August the prisoner was brought to the station-house, Covent-garden, on this charge - I received the cheque the following morning from Mr. Colthurst, one of the firm, in Mr. Partridge's presence; Mr. Paxton marked it at the time - I had a conversation with the prisoner; I cautioned him that I was about to put a question to him, and that he had no occasion to answer it unless he thought proper.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was he not at that time in an extreme state of suffering, both in body and mind? A. He was - my opinion is that he was in that state of mind I could not depend on his evidence in any case; I had a second conversation with him about three-quarters of an hour after he was in my custody - I think he was then considerably excited; I told him he was not obliged to answer any questions affecting his case - he said, "Then I suppose I am not obliged to answer at all?" I said, "Certainly not."

COURT. Q. When this took place, was he in his senses, so as to know what he was saying? A. I conceive he knew what he was saying, but was certainly considerably excited; he spoke as if he knew what he was about - I told him whatever he said would be used against him on his trial, and that he was charged with uttering a forged bill for payment of 200l., on Messrs. Coutt's; he said, "Oh yes, oh, yes, I did;" I said, "Was it a good cheque?" he said "Yes, it was" - he was at that time crying very much; I searched him, and found this note on him, enclosed in this I envelope - I marked them at the time.

Cross-examined. Q. The cheque was brought to you next day, and then Mr. Partridge put his name on it? A. Yes; there was no mark on it before, that I am aware of - the prisoner was in a back room at the station-house when I put these questions; they were put within an hour after he was taken.

Q. He was under the operation of posion and counterpoison at the time the conversation took place? A. He was - his answers were quick and sharp, but at the same time he was under so much excitement, I could not depend on what he said; the room was full of officers, and one or two surgeons - I asked the questions, because I had the previous assurance of the surgeon that he was in danger, and I thought it my duty to put them; I had no idea of giving evidence at the time; I certainly considered if he survived I should have to give evidence; I put them from a sense of duty, considering him in danger, and that crime might attach to other persons.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did he make any statement to you before you cautioned him? A. No; he answered as if he understood my questions.

WILLIAM GILL PAXTON . I am a wine-merchant , and live in Buckingham-street, Strand. In August last I had an account at Messrs. Coutts', and am in the habit of drawing cheques on them; no part of this cheque is in my handwriting, nor was it written by my authority - Mr. Watts, a stockbroker in the City, is a friend of mine; I am often at his counting-house, and have seen the prisoner there - he was clerk there, I believe; I frequently saw him in the office when I have been there; and dare say I have written when he has been there, and he might know I kept an account at Coutts', but I cannot say particularly.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you had a very good opinion of the prisoner, and recommended him to a situation? A. I spoke to a person to give him one, in consequence of Mr. Watts speaking well of him.

WILLIAM WATTS . I am a stockbroker, and live in Tokenhouse-yard. The prisoner came into my service the middle of March, 1830, and remained till the time in question - I have had frequent opportunities of seeing his handwriting; this note, and the envelope, appear to be in his writing; I believe them to be so - the body of the cheque seems to be the same hand-writing; the signature and all the written part of the cheque, I believe to be his writing; I saw him at the station-house about six o'clock on the evening he was taken - I held out no inducement or promise to induce him to say any thing to me - the first question I put to him was, where he had got the cheque, it being a printed one; he told me it was one remaining cheque in an old cheque-book, which was put away with my old books in my office - I asked where he had written it; he said he wrote it at his desk while I was washing my hands in an inner room - I had not sent him that day to Messrs. Coutts'; I beg to add, he was not my clerk, but my office boy.

Cross-examined. Q. Has he not been above two years with you? A. Yes, he bore a very excellent character - he was about fifteen years old when he came to me.(The note produced was here read).

2nd of August, 1832.

MY DEAREST MOTHER, - When you receive this, your son will be no more, my dear mother, I am sorry to say I cannot explain

why I have thus acted - you will find many that will do more than I have, could; but none that loves you more; may blessings attend my dear mother. Yours devotedly, J. J. L.

MY DEAR ANNETTE, - I am sure you will not refuse, now I am no more, to take advice from one who so dearly loved you; that to behave yourself and learn to improve, and be a blessing instead of a curse to your good mother - heaven bless you! to my dear Matilda I can only add the same; heaven bless you.

J. J. L.

On the envelope was written "That heaven may bless you all is the sincere prayer of yours, affectionately," J. J. L.

Directed to S. Levien.

Prisoner's Defence (written). My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - In most respectfully submitting to your kind consideration, a few observations, I trust I shall be forgiven for any thing intrusive or irrelevant to the legal position in which I stand before you; especially, as under his Lordship's enlightened mind, every thing will be examined and scrutinized - I might safely leave my case to your merciful consideration; I therefore humbly beg to allude to the evidence of Thomas - circumstances of a private nature, inapplicabel to the present inquiry, will account for the laudanum being in my possession; I trust the inference drawn from my possesson of it, will form no consideration on your minds, although my feelings were the cause of my using it; I trust the evidence of Thomas will be rejected, for I trust you will feel that, under the influence of the laudanum, and the state of excitement, I could not be in a situation to answer questions put to me, and my answers ought not to be taken as evidence against me.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS . He was brought to the station-house about six or seven o'clock in the evening, to the best of my recollection; it was between the hours of the Magistrate's sitting, which are four and seven - I was there when he was brought in; I was not present when Mr. Watts saw him.

Eight witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

Strongly recommended to Mercy, on account of his character and youth .

Reference Number: t18320906-161

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1886. ROBERT CARR was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying John Webb .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

HENRY HUGHES. I am an oil and colour man, and live at Brentford . The prisoner is an iron-founder ; I employed him to make twelve cannons; I gave him one as a pattern, and told him they were wanted to celebrate the passing of the Reform Bill - I gave the order for six at first; I had four at first, and tried them - one out of the four burst under the touch-hole; I had loaded it myself, in a very hard way, for the purpose of proving it - I sent it back to the prisoner, and told him to have it melted up; I kept the three which stood the proof, and received nine more from him about a fortnight after, one of which was the same as I had before; it was nailed down to a carriage, so that I could not perceive what had been done to it at the time - on the 20th of August (about a week after I received the nine) they were fired; I had sent them to be proved in a gentleman's field, but my orders were disobeyed; as far as I know, they were not proved - the prisoner represented to me that they were made of pig-iron, and told me who he had the pig-iron from; he told me that in his own foundery, after some of them were sent in, but before the accident: pig-iron is the best for things of that sort - I could not form any judgment whether they were made of pig-iron or not.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you remember going to Hollingshead, an engineer? A. Yes; I went to him before I went to get the cannons from the prisoner - I did not insist on the cannons being cast with a bore; I made no remark whether they were to be cast hollow or solid - I asked Hollingshead what the boring would come to; he did not tell me they must be bored to render them safe - I had the order for the guns from a young man, named Smith, and after the rejoicing was over, they were all to be put on board a pleasure-boat; I never told the prisoner that some of them were for ornament, and never to be fired, nor did I even tell his son so.

JOHN FULCHER . I am a labouring man, and live at Brentford. John Webb was out with me on the 28th of August, when these guns were fired - he took the command of the guns, and loaded them; they were fired in Mr. Nichols' brick-fields at first, to be proved - three were proved; Webb then came to me, and said "There is no cause to prove any more of them, we will take them down to the water and fire them;" I had fired three by way of proof; and at Webb's suggestion, we took them down by Kew-bridge, under the wall, on the Middlesex side - Webb loaded one; I gave him the cartridges.

Q. When you are proving guns, do you charge them beavier than usual? A. Some people do, but I did not; I did not load them to prove them on the river, but in the ordinary way - I fired them; the first I fired by the river side, burst, but not knowing it would cause an accident, I fired two afterwards, before I knew Webb was hurt - he stood as near eighteen yards from me as possible; I did not know the first gun had burst - after I had fired the third, I was called to to cease, and saw Webb laying on his back on the ground - I went up to him; he laid all in a gore of blood, and a piece of the cannon laid close to him; he never spoke in my hearing - he was taken to the Star and Garter; I had known him from a child - his name was John Webb; Mr. Bonny attended him - I was not with him when he died.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had the gun which burst been proved, to your knowledge? A. Not to my knowledge; Webb said, "We need not prove more."

Q. Is it not prudent and usual to prove guns before they are brought into common use? A. Yes, but I did not know how many had been proved; I have fired a good many guns - it was fine powder, but of what strength I cannot tell; it came from Mr. Hughes; I did not know whether any of the guns were for ornament.

COURT. Q. What was the deceased? A. A labouring man.

RICHARD ONLEY . I am a brick-maker. I was down by Kew-bridge when this accident occurred; I saw the gun fired, and saw the man struck by it - I helped to take him up; I found part of the gun laying by his shoulders.

JOHN SIMMS . I am a carpenter, and live at Brentford. I was present when this occurred, but not near at the moment - I picked up part of the cannon; this is the part, but it has since been broken - it is a white metal - there is some lead in this piece of iron; that must have been

done to stop up the part of the cannon that had burst - it matches the former aperture in the cannon; I have it here, and the pieces match it.

COURT. Q. Where do you apprehend the lead to have been? A. At the under side of the cannon, and being placed on the carriage, it was not very visible.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Is that the cannon which caused the man's death? A. There is no doubt of it.

JOSEPH DICKENSON . I am a constable of Brentford.

I have produced the cannon - I also produce another cannon, which has been broken to pieces, to be inspected by the jury.

HENRY HUGHES re-examined. This is the cannon which burst and killed the man, and this broken one is the one I returned to him as having burst - it was mended here, exactly under the touch-hole.

FRANCIS BONNY . I am a surgeon. On the 29th of August I was called in to attend John Webb, who laid in an outhouse at the Star and Garter, Kew-bridge - he lived till six o'clock in the morning; he had a wound on the right side of his head, about three inches long, penetrating to the bone; there was a great appearance of contusion on the whole of the right side of his head; I examined the body next morning, and found a quantity of extravasated blood on the outer covering of the brain, (the dura mater,) and am full convinced that injury was the cause of his death; it was such an injury as a blow from a piece of cannon would inflict.

Prisoner's Defence. Hughes came to me, and wanted me to make him six cannons; I refused more than once or twice - he then went to Hollingshead, as I understood, to know what he could get them bored for out of the solid - he came back to me, and said it was too much money, would I make them hollow for him; my answer was,"Hughes, it is no use my pretending to make them, do you mean to kill yourself? if I make them I cannot warrant any one of them sound;" well, he repeatedly talked to me about it, and I made him four - my son took them to Brentford, and I gave him a caution; I said, "Hughes, be very particular how you use these things, or else you will get hurt;" he told me he would try them in a field, would cover them with dirt, and put wet rangs and lay a fusee to them; I said, "If you don't mind what you are about you will be killed;" he wanted me to do it, but I would not - he said they were for a sailing-boat, two to put on each side; then he came to me, and wanted me to make it up a dozen, and said they were to be sham ones, not to fire at all; I owed him a little money, and he sent me a letter, saying if I did not do them he would put me to trouble - he sent the iron to make them with.

HENRY HUGHES . He owed me money, and I believe I wrote two or three letters to him - I did not supply the iron to make the guns with; I supplied him with iron on different occasions; it was old iron - he told me these were made of pig-iron, which is new.

Prisoner. This iron was sent after I sent home the four gune - he told me he only wanted four for firing, and did not mind how the others were done. Witness. I said no such thing - I told him they were all for firing; here is the bill for them; it is in his own hand-writing.

The bill charged them as twelve guns, at 10s. each - 6l.

WILLIAM HOLLINGSHEAD . I am an engineer, and have been so for ten years - I carry on business in King-street, Long-acre. Hughes came to me about three months ago, and asked what the boring of cannons would come to, and whether it was requisite to have them bored; I told him they must be bored to render them safe - it is quite impossible to make them safe without boring; he said he had got an order from a gentleman, he did not mention how many guns he wanted, he merely asked me the expense; I said it was impossible to say without knowing the quality of the metal, and seeing them; he said he had been speaking to Carr about casting them - he said Carr had not, at that time, cast them; it is not safe or usual to use guns without first proving them; I always understood there was a penalty for so doing.

Q. According to your judgment, could a person, who founds cannons, tell whether they are honeycombed unless they are proved? A. Not without breaking them to pieces; an engineer, with the greatest care in founding them, could not prevent their being honey combed, provided they are cored - if cast solid and bored they stand a great deal better chance of being sound, and then they are always proved - it is not the founder's business to prove them; he has nothing to do with it.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You understand that business very well? A. I do; cannon is cast in either case, but no prudent man would order one to he made hollow; I have been acquainted with Carr some time, and always considered him a good workman, and a man who knew his business; any body, who knew the trade, would know the proper way was to cast them solid, and bore them.

COURT. Q. You say it is the only safe way? A. Yes- casting them hollow is unsafe.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you mean to say the purchaser and not the founder is to prove them? A. The person, who orders them, should prove them; founders cast them for manufacturers, but do not finish them - if a private person ordered them the private person should prove them; this cannon is not made from the best pig-iron; there may be some pig-iron in it, and the rest what is technically called plate - I should consider there is some pig-iron in it; this lead is, most undoubtedly, put in to fill up what we technically call a blow in it, which is a flaw, a defect caused by the air in the process of casting; it is the common practice of founders to do so.

COURT. Q. Was it safe to send out cannon with that lead in it? A. According to the strength of it, I do not think it would affect it; but I should not think it a safe cannon to be sent out at all, even for proving; on account of its being cored out instead of being cast solid.

Q. Should you consider it safe to send out a cannon even for proving, which had such a blow in it? A. I should not conceive the blow would materially affect the strength of it where it is; if there was nothing but this lead in it, I should certainly think it unsafe - I should think the proving would discover whether the defect extended farther.

Q. Then you let them take the risk of that? A. We let them take the risk of that.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When cannons are cast hollow, they undergo a process, called smoothing? A. Certainly - the hole cast is not of sufficient capacity for the bore required; it is cut out afterwards, and that would discover any defect in casting - this has never been smoothed; that is the

duty of the person who orders them of the founder - the founder has nothing to do but to give you a cast from your pattern; I was never present at the process of proving; there appears to me a very slight blow on the under part of this cannon, not where the strength is required - I know what caution should be used to prevent mischief in proving guns; they should be loaded with double or treble the usual quantity of powder, and embanked round with sand or clay, to prevent the fragments flying about, if it burst.

COURT. Q. If an oil and colour man orders cannons, should you consider it his duty to smooth them? A. The founder considers he has nothing to do with it - it is his business to cast the wheels, but not to send them home mounted; these are mounted - I have known them sent home on a carriage.

Q. If these are sent home on a carriage, do you mean the oilman was to expect he was to smooth them after their coming home in this way? A. I do not consider a founder should take orders from an oilman; they are smoothed with a lathe, which is an engineer's business - oilmen do not keep such tools.

HENRY HUGHES re-examined. I am a dealer in marinestores.

SAMSON STEPHENSON . I have been an iron-founder between fifty and sixty years - I have carried on business in King-street, Long-acre, forty-two years. It is not a founder's business to prove or smooth cannon; he has no tools to do it - it requires an engineer, with a very expensive apparatus; cannon cast hollow should be smoothed - it should be bored, which would prove the imperfection; smoothing would detect it; it is impossible for a founder to tell whether cannon is sound till it has been proved - it might get honey combed with the greatest care in casting; I never heard before of casting them hollow - I cast a great many for different people; they send me the carriages and wheels - I send them home in that state, and hear no more of them - I am in an extensive business; it was the custom many years ago to cast them hollow.

COURT. Q. It has ceased to be the custom to cast them hollow? A. It has; I would not cast them hollow for any body - I consider it unsafe, and dangerous.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is boring more expensive? A. Certainly; it would cost more to bore them than is charged for these.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Is it perfectly known among founders that it is dangerous to cast hollow? A. Yes, if a founders knows his business he must know it, but many founders do not cast cannon; we usually supply gunmakers, who carry on the finishing part of the trade - it is the duty of the person ordering them to get them finished.

COURT. Q. Have you ever known a case of a person out of the trade ordering them? A. Never.

JOHN CARR . I am the prisoner's son. I remember Hughes coming about these cannons; he ordered them to be cast with cores; my father said he could not make them with cores as they would blow, he would make them solid for him, if cast with cores they would have air holes; he sent my father a letter, which was burnt or torn up - we are not in the habit of preserving letters; my father at last said he would make them - Hughes told him to come down, and he would give him some iron to make them; and before we began them, Hughes said he would take them out into the middle of a field, and have them proved there - there were four sent first; he returned one - three had stood the proof but that one had not; he said they were for a sailing-boat - that there were three good ones, and one, which was his pattern, would make four good ones, which were two for each side of the boat, and the others were for ornament; I am quite sure he said that.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Tell me the difference there is between those you made for ornament and for use? A. I showed them to Hughes when I took them down, and he said he would put a private mark on them; there was no difference in the manufacture - we charged them all the same price.

Q. If they were for ornament there was no occasion to have a hole in them? A. They were as he ordered them.

COURT. Q. What did you do with the one which was sent back? A. I do not know what became of it more than Adam.

Q. Is not that it with the hole plugged up with lead? A. That is it; the hole was filled and sent back to him, because he said they were not for firing - he said, "Send it back if you have it by you;" we sent them home on carriages.

GUILTY. Aged 56.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined 10 Days .

Reference Number: t18320906-162

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1887. THOMAS MOFFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 2 horses, value 20l., and 1 mare, value 10l. , the property of William Elson .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ELSON. I live at Broomshot, near Liphook, Hampshire . On Friday, the 14th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I put three small horses and a mare into my stable, and left them safe at seven in the evening - I went again at five o'clock in the morning, and found only one in the stable; I missed a light brown mare, a dark pony, and a black one - the stable door was broken open; I traced them from the dunghill up the road - there was also the traces of men's feet, one being larger than the other; when I got into the road I could see where they had drawn a cart out of the side of the road by the green sward - they had turned towards London, which would be through Godalming and Guildford; I traced them ten miles - I went to Union-hall on the Tuesday morning following, and saw Pople and Curtis, the officers, with my three ponies, and swore they were mine; I found a man in custody there, who I appeared against - the mare's fore feet had been trimmed, all the hair was cut off; I am sure she was my mare - I had bred her myself.

CHARLES MANDERVILLE . I am a watchman in the neighbourhood of Guildford, which is the high road to London, from Liphook. On the 15th of January, 1831, about a quarter to four o'clock in the morning, I saw four horses, one of them in a cart, drawing it - they were in the High-street, Guildford; three men were with them - the prisoner was one; I recollect him well - the church clock projects over the hill; I had a good opportunity of seeing his face - he was right under the gas-lamp, looking up at the clock; he

was doing nothing to the horses, but walking up the hill by the side of them - he said, "Good morning" to me, and asked what it was a clock, but whether he spoke to me I do not know; he looked up himself, and said it was a quarter to four - I saw his face then; there was a gaslamp close to him - the horses stopped at the corner of Chertsey-street, and then the prisoner got up into the cart; the grey mare was tied alongside the cart - one horse was in the cart; one man was riding a third, and leading a fourth- I do not know who that man was; I looked at the horses - I saw the three horses in March, that year, in the prosecutor's possession, and am certain of them; I saw no more of the prisoner after he got into the cart - I did not know the prosecutor before, but as he was coming home through Guildford, with the horses; I stopped him, and told him they were the three horses I had seen in January.

Prisoner. Q. Had you seen me before? A. No, nor since; I am positive you are the man - you spoke to me in the town; Chertsey-street is the direct road to Uxbridge.

JAMES WILKINS . I was watching with Manderville in the High-street, Guildford, on the 15th of January, 1831, about a quarter to four o'clock, and saw the horses and cart; I am certain the prisoner was one of the men with them - I had a good opportunity of seeing his face, and have not a doubt of him; I never saw him before nor since till now.

THOMAS KITCHEN . I keep the Industry, public-house, at Hayes, Middlesex, about three miles and a half from Uxbridge; I know the prisoner perfectly well. On Saturday morning, the 15th of January, 1831, between nine and ten o'clock, I met him about half-way between Arlington and our house, with a cart, and three ponies; one horse was drawing the cart, one tied by the side of the cart, and one black pony behind it - the other; they were little ponies - the ther lighter than the other; they were little ponies - the prisoner at that time lived on Hayes-common, about two hundred yards from my house; he was coming in a direction from the Bath-road, towards our house - I spoke to him, and went on; I returned about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, and when my boy put my horse into the stable, he said, "There is a pony, father" - I went into the stable, and saw the black pony which I had seen the prisoner with; next morning when I got up, it was still there -Charles Haynes lodged there, and was there; I saw the prisoner reading the newspaper in my bar, about ten o'clock that morning, or between ten and eleven, and shortly after Pople came, and Haynes was apprehended - the prisoner was then gone; he went about twenty minutes before the officer came - I went to Union-hall four or five days after, and saw the black pony, and two brown ones; they were the very same as I had seen when I spoke to the prisoner.

Q. Are you sure he was gone before the officers came? A. Yes, when they came - he was in the bar when they first went by; I thought it was somebody coming to take notice of me - I was drawing beer in the bar it was Sunday); I saw the prisoner look out after them, and said to him, "I think they are informers or something" - and while I was drawing the beer the prisoner went away; I never saw him again, till he was apprehended a fortnight ago.

Prisoner. I believe I drank with you on the Sunday evening. Witness. Yes, between six and seven o'clock; the officers had then gone, and taken the horses with them.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When he came to you that Sunday night, did he owe you a score? A. Yes, it has never been paid; his wife came to me that evening, and by her desire I took his cart, my mare, and his wife over to Hillingdon, to a public-house there, and drank with him, between eight and nine o'clock, at a public-house - it was not at my own house I drank with him.

SARAH KITCHEN . I am the wife of the last witness. and have known the prisoner some time. On the 15th of January, 1831, about eleven or twelve o'clock, I was in the tap-room, when my husband had gone out, and saw the prisoner go by out door - he nodded his head at me; he had two horses with him, one in a cart and the other by the side of it - he lived about one hundred yards from us, on Hayes-common: he nodded at me, meaning that Charles was on another horse, and had gone to the stable door - I went to the door, looked out, and saw Haynes there, on a pony - I told him nobody was at home, but he might put it into the stable if he liked; after that was done the prisoner went towards his own house, with his cart and horses- I saw the same horses when People came to the stable; that was the black one which Haynes put in, and the two the prisoner had.

WALTER WICKENS . In January, 1831, the prisoner was a tenant of a house of mine, on Hayes-common; he left suddenly, without notice, about the middle of the month, but I did not myself see him in January; Osborne held the key for me.

MARY OSBORNE . I gave the prisoner's wife the key of the house about two years ago; the officer went to the house he lived in on the 16th of January - I did not know of his going away, but did not see him afterwards; I saw him there on Sunday morning, the 15th - he had the cottage and outhouse, or stable.

ROBERT CURTIS. I am an officer. On Sunday, the 16th of January, 1831, I went with Pople to the cottage the prisoner occupied, on Hayes-common, about eleven o'clock in the morning; we passed Kitchen's house to go there - when I got there I saw a female look out at the kitchen window - I immediately went to the kitchen door, opened it, and found a light brown mare in the kitchen; I found some horse hair on the kitchen floor - the fore feet of the mare had just been trimmed; I ran into another room, and observed the female wave her hand, as if somebody was escaping; I pursued and caught a man, who has been tried; I afterwards went into the stable, and assisted Pople in taking charge of a black and a dark brown pony- they were in the stable adjoining the house: I went back again to Kitchen's, but had no conversation with any body - I took the horses to London, showed them to the prosecutor at Union-hall, and he claimed them; I have been looking for the prisoner ever since till about six weeks ago, when I found him at Gloucester, in custody.

RICHARD POPLE . I was with Curtis - his evidence is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never at Guildford in my life; the horse I had in the cart that morning was my own property - I had had them four months, and had been to Uxbridge-market, to buy some meat; the part of the house

where the horse was found was occupied by a man named Smith; I was not at home when the officer took them away - I was at Kitchen's, and went from there to a public-house at Hayes.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-163

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1888. FRANCIS SALMON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 2 book cases, value 10l., and 1 stove, value 5s., the goods of Joseph Griffith , and fixed to a building; and 2 stove fronts, value 5s., his property .

JOSEPH GRIFFITHS. I live in Finsbury-terrace, City-road, and am proprietor of a house No. 75, Coleman-street ; these book cases were fixed in the first floor room, and cost me 20l. a few years ago; I had not seen them for six weeks or two months; I went to the house on the 14th of July, and they were gone; the prisoner was clerk to a person who rented offices in the house - my tenant had decamped.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You let the house to Douglas? A. Yes; I know nothing of his selling the fixtures to a man named Wilson - I never heard of it; I do not know the name of Wilson in this transaction; I let the premises by an agreement in writing, which I have; the book-cases and property form part of the fixtures demised in the agreement; the house is in the parish of St. Stephen, Coleman-street.

MORRIS DALEY . I am a working-man, and live in St. Luke's. I moved these book cases on a Saturday; I do not know the date, as I can neither read nor write; the prisoner came to my master's stable for a horse and cart to remove the goods - there were two of them together; I received them into the cart at No. 75, Coleman-street - two book cases were put into the cart - I should know the men who helped them in, the prisoner was one of them; the things were taken to Mr. Wilcox's, Moor-lane, and the prisoner helped to take them out of the cart.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear the name of Wilson or Douglas in the course of conversation? A. No; I am servant to Murphy, whom the cart was hired of; the prisoner had a person with him when he hired it; I cannot tell whether he appeared the servant of that person.

WILLIAM WEIR . I am a box-maker. The prisoner and another came with a truck with two book-cases to Mr. Wilcox's, in Moor-lane - Wilcox is a box-maker; the prisoner first came and asked Wilcox if he could spare me to put some goods in, for about a quarter of an hour, and said he came from Mr. Saul's, which is three doors off; Wilcox said he could not spare the room for more than a quarter of an hour - neither of them mentioned their names; two book cases and one stove were brought to Wilcox's - I saw them taken away by three men in a truck - the prisoner was one of those men; they had came in Murphy's cart.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the name of the person who accompanied the prisoner? A. No; I saw two doors of book cases - they were similar to those produced.

GEORGE ADAMS . I am a cabinet-maker, and live at No. 5, Rose and Crown-court, Moorefields. On Saturday morning, the 14th of July, about a quarter or half-past nine o'clock, the prisoner and another came and asked if I would buy two book-cases; I asked where they were - they said in Moor-lane, and if I went with them, they would show them to me; I went and found them at Wilcox's, laying by some boxes, all in pieces; they are enclosures for recesses - nothing but the fronts; I said No, they could not suit me; they said I should have them cheap - I said they were destroyed in being got down, and would never come together again; I was going away - the prisoners came after me, and said I should have them cheap- I asked what he wanted for them, and will not be certain whether he said 30s. or 3l. - I offered a sovereign; he said that would not do, and went back - he then ran after me, and said I might have them for the sovereign - I got a truck, and brought them away; the prisoner and the other man came home with me - I changed a 5l. note, paid them, and I do not think it was a minute before Mr. Griffiths and Wilcox came together to my house; the book cases were at the door - Mr. Griffiths claimed them; I should know the other man again - he was a thin man.

Cross-examined. Q. The things were made of deal? A. Yes, except the fronts; if taken to a sale, I do not know that they would fetch what I gave for them - if I fitted them up to a recess, they might cost 12l. - I afterwards heard that it was Wilson who was with the prisoner; I believe I had that information from the gentleman at your side (the prisoner's solicitor) - I did not suppose the prisoner to be the other's servant; I gave him the money - I could not get change without 5s. worth of halfpence, and the prisoner came over and asked me to give him 5s. for the halfpence - what was done, was with the consent of the other party.

JOHN WILCOX . I carry on business in Moor-lane. On the 14th of July, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner and another came to my shop, and asked if they might put some recesses into my shop, as it rained very hard - I said I could not spare my shop; they pressed it, and said they were coming from Mr. Saul's with the recesses, and under that impression, I gave them leave; in about twenty minutes, as I was going to breakfast, I saw Murphy's cart loaded at my door - I told the other man I could not have them in my shop; they said they would take them away immediately - I said I should expect to see them moved before I came from breakfast; when I returned the truck was there, loaded with them - the prisoner and the other man was helping Adams to load; I was fetched away, and when I returned the truck was gone - we found it being unloaded at Adams'; Griffiths came there, and claimed them.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you are not sure the goods are the same? A. I never looked at them - the other man asked me to let them be on my premises; he was a tall thin man - the prisoner seemed to act under his direction, from what I saw.

ABRAHAM HAND . I am street-keeper of Coleman-street Ward. On Friday evening, the 13th of July, about eight o'clock, I was sent for, and informed that some stoves were, removed; I inquired for the landlord,

and found Mr. Griffiths; I left word at his house, and in the morning he came - I was watching about his house, and saw a man named Wilson, come out of No. 75, on Friday evening; I knew him before - I saw the prisoner follow him out shortly after and lock the door of the office; he had a blue bag on his arm at the time.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Wilson a tall thin man? A. Yes; I believe he is an attorney's clerk.

WILLIAM COLLYER . I am an officer. I was standing in Coleman-street, on Saturday, the 14th of July. Griffiths called me over to No. 75 - the prisoner was pointed out to me, and I took him in the counting-house; he was charged with taking the fixtures - I examined the door at the bottom of the stair case, and it had been forced with a crow-bar or something; that was necessary to get up stairs.

RICHARD MURPHY . I am a carman. On the evening previous to this, the tall man, John Wilson, whom I had known for years, met me - Turner, who is present, and the prisoner were with him; they said they had nothing to spend, or they would treat me - Wilson said his friend, pointing to the prisoner, had a job to do; they asked at what time I could spare a horse and cart - I agreed to lend it to them - they did not say when they should want it, but said they should want it.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you had any thing to drink to-day? A. Nothing but to nourish nature; the man who sits by you ought to be at the bar with the prisoner - I may have had three half pints of beer; I have not taken more - I knew Wilson to be a respectable man once; he did not mention Douglas as his friend - I have not seen Wilson since.

COURT. Q. Did Wilson point to any body as his friend? A. No, not to my knowledge, but mentioned his friend.

DAVID MURPHY . I am the last witness' son. On the morning of the 14th a knock came at the door; my sister answered it - I did not go down till the cart was gone; I saw it brought back about nine o'clock; Wilson and the prisoner came into our place; I did not see the goods - they both came together - Wilson paid me 1s. 6d. for the cart, in the prisoner's presence; they had come on the Friday evening to hire the cart, and wished to know if we could not take the goods into our stable; I said we could not spare room - the prisoner then wanted to know if they could not put them into our shop; I would not let them - our shop is in Milton-street; it was going to be opened as a tripe-shop.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not buy any of the goods? A. No; I did not offer to buy any - my father did not purchase the stoves - they left them in our place without leave; my father did not know they were there till after they came about the goods.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Wilson came to me, and said he had received orders from Mr. Hughes, who had paid Griffiths for the fixtures, and if I would assist him to take them down, he would pay me - he went to the broker in Moorfields, and told him he had them to sell; Wilcox looked at them; he asked 3l. for them; he would not give more than 1l., and went away - Wilson said, "Run and tell him he shall have them" - Wilcox knew Wilson very well, so does Murphy, and he knew the whole nature of the business; I did not give orders for the cart; it was Wilson.

JURY to JOHN WILCOX . Q. Which of them said they came from Saul? A. Wilson.

- TURNER. I am clerk to Mr. Garton, an attorney, who occupies the office on these premises. I have known the prisoner three years - he was in Mr. Garton's employ regularly, and Wilson has served one or two months; our business is entirely conducted on the ground floor.

MR. GRIFFITHS. May I ask the witness if he was present when they went to hire the cart of Murphy.

- TURNER. I was not.

DAVID MURPHY . On my oath he was, and I treated him with a glass.

GUILTY. Aged 53.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-164

1889. WILLIAM DEACON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 1 umbrella, value 5s. , the goods of William Underhill .

WILLIAM UNDERHILL . I live in Wine-office-court, Fleet-street , and am a silk-manufacturer . On the 31st of August, about half-past two o'clock, I saw the prisoner at my house door, with two ropes of onions; I had occasion to leave the warehouse for a moment; I then had an umbrella by the side of the fire-place - I went up stairs for a few minutes, and on coming down saw the outer gate open, which I had left shut; I found the prisoner at the house door, with my umbrella against the door-post - I laid hold of him; he got from me, but was secured without getting out of my sight - he had placed it against the door-post before I laid hold of him.

JOHN CHICKELDAY . I am an officer. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn

Prisoner's Defence. I went to ask if they wanted any onions; there was a person came from the door as I went up - the umbrella was by the side of the door.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-165

1890. GARRETT REDMOND COTTER was indicted for embezzling the sums of 20l. and 53l., which he had received on account of William Heseltine and another, his employers . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-166

1891. JOHN CUNNINGHAM and PETER BRANNON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Pritchard , from his person .

MR. WILLIAM PRITCHARD. I am a proctor of Doctors'-commons . On the 17th of July, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was walking in the Old Bailey , and just before I got to the gate of the Sessions'-house I felt the skirt of my coat move - I had a lady on my arm at the time - I put my hand behind me; the patrol immediately accosted me, and asked if I had lost something - I missed my handkerchief, which the patrol produced in about half an hour; I did not see the prisoners.

ISAAC EASLEY . I am a watchman of Blackfriars-

bridge. I was looking through my window in the Old Bailey, and saw Mr. Pritchard with two females come down from Newgate-street; the two prisoners were close behind them, and just by the Debtor's door, Brannon put his hand into Mr. Pritchard's pocket, took the handkerchief out and gave it to Cunningham - I came down stairs, and told the patrol; we went and apprehended both the prisoners; Cunningham had the handkerchief -I took Brannon; he said nothing.

JAMES LABON . I am a patrol. Easley gave me information, and pointed out Mr. Pritchard; I went and told him he was robbed, and that I would find the thieves, as I had seen the prisoners pass me - I went down to where I thought they resided, and met them coming from Black Bear-alley, Seacoal-lane, towards Field-lane; Brannon had the handkerchief in his hand, and was just giving it to Cunningham: some palls in the street hallooed out "Go it, here is the patrol" - Cunningham started off; I pursued, saw him take the handkerchief out of his pocket, and throw it into a stable; I got it from there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Cunningham's Defence. I had nothing to do with it; I was merely walking along.

CUNNINGHAM - GUILTY . Aged 16.

BRANNON - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-167

1892. WILLIAM NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of August , 1 painting and frame, value 1l., the goods of James Franklin ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

ROBERT CAFFIN . I am shopman to James Franklin, a pawnbroker in Newgate-street . Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, Lloyd brought the prisoner into our shop, with this painting, which had hung at the door, it was not outside, but within reach of persons passing.

JOHN LLOYD . I am a poulterer. I saw the prisoner take this picture off the hook at the prosecutor's door; any body could reach it; I told him to put it down or the Policeman would come - he made no reply, and I secured him; he said it was his own property.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I received the prisoner in charge; he said nothing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD GEORGE STATHAM . I am a constable. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction; I was present at his trial, and know him to be the man - he was in great distress at that time - (read).

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-168

1893. HENRY NASH was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , 1 towel, value 1s. , the goods of Charles Godwin .

CHARLES GODWIN. I live in Little Knight Ryder-street . On the 27th of August, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went out to a customer, and on returning the prisoner was in custody with this towel, which I had left on the table - I am a hair-dresser; my door is usually open.

DENNIS SULLIVAN . I am a boot-maker, and live opposite to Godwin. I saw the prisoner go into the shop and take the towel, and walk out with it under his jacket - he was giving it to another boy, who was waiting outside, when I secured him; the other was eighteen or nineteen years old; I believe the prisoner went into the shop to ask charity.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The man who was with me said if I did not take it he would do me some serious injury.

GUILTY. Aged 13. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320906-169

NEW COURT. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1894. MARY MOSELY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 1 half-sovereign, 3 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and 2 sixpences , the monies of James Donnelly ,

MARGARET DWYER . I lodge in Clement's-lane - the prisoner lodged there; I had a box in my room - I found in it one half-sovereign, and 12s. in silver; I do not know how it came there.

ANN DONNELLY . The prisoner used to do needlework for me - I gave her 6d. a day and her victuals. On the 10th of July I told her I should want her the next day - while she was there my husband, James Donnelly, counted a half-sovereign, three half-crowns, one sixpence, and twelve shillings; he put it into a tea-caddy on the shelf, and said, "I think there is a shilling more than we want;" the prisoner was then laying her head on the table, and appeared asleep; I said to her soon after, "I want to go out;" she said, "Is there any thing I can do, if there is, I would rather do it to-night than come in the morning;" I said, "Here are some bed-curtains I want unpicked;" I then went out, and said I should be back in a quarter of an hour, but I staid for an hour - when I came back I missed her; Dwyer afterwards gave me this money in a piece of bed-furniture which I had left the prisoner at work at - my husband has lost his speech, and the use of his limbs.

JOHN MURDOCH (Police-constable F 151). I took the prisoner in Lincoln's Inn-fields two days afterwards - I told her she had made a foolish job of it, and she must go with me; she said she was aware of it, and the next morning she said, "They have sworn falsely against me, it was 29s. 6d. instead of 30s."

Prisoner. I never said so. Witness. Yes she did, as I was taking her from Covent-garden station to the office.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-170

1895. WILLIAM FANE WOODESON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 2 copper flanges, value 5s.; 26 rivets, value 6s., and 15 copper bolts, value 12s., the goods of Joseph Norbury and another, his masters ; and MARY CLARK & MICHAEL CLARK were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

SECOND AND THIRD COUNTS, stating them to be the property of Joseph Norbury and others.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT MATTING CREBER . I am a Thames Police surveyor. I saw Mary Clark going into a marine-store shop on the 18th of July - she put something into the scale, and I went in after her - I saw these flanges,

rivets, and screws, which are new; she said a man gave it her to go and sell, and she was to have 1s. for selling it -I asked whose it was; she said she could not tell - here are 15 lbs. of copper.

JAMES FOGG . I am a Thames Police-surveyor. On the 18th of July Mary Clark was brought to me with this copper; I said, "Mother Clark, where did you get that; have you brought it from your son's shop?" - she said Yes, but that her son knew nothing about it, as he was out bathing, and it had been brought last night (her son keeps a marinestore shop in Cable-street); I asked if she knew the man that brought it - she said No, but he was a dark man, and looked respectable; I went to her son, and said to him -"I suppose you know your mother is in custody;" he said Yes - I said, "It is for some metal" - he said Yes; I said,"Did you send her with it" - he said, "Yes, I did, it is mine, and it is all right;" I said, "Where did you get it?" - he said, "I bought it last night of a very respectable man, I have seen several times, and I believe his name is Watson"- he said he did not know where he lived, but he was to meet him at one o'clock, in Whitechapel; I said, "We will go and see for him" - as we were going, he said, "I am sure it is all right, for I have a bill of parcels;" I said,"Did you get it last night, or to-day" - he said, "Last night when I got the metal;" I said, "This is one of Mr. Glasscott's bills, it is in two hand-writings, and here has been an erasure of a name" - I went to Mr. Glasscott, and in consequence of what I heard there, I went to Mr. Norbury's, and in going along, Clarks said to me, "I did not get the bill last night, but after you had stopped my mother, I went to Mr. Norbury's clerk, and told him my mother was stopped, and he must give me a bill to satisfy the officer; he took this bill, and erased the name, and gave it to me" - I went to Mr. Norbury's, and saw Woodeson there (I had left Clark with a friend of mine, but not an officer, and he made no attempt to run away) - I said to Woodeson, "I want you for stealing some metal;" he said, "Me, I know nothing of it" - I said, "Do you know a man named Clark;" he said No - I then fetched Clark in, and said, "Do you know this man?" he said, Yes, I said, "Do you know this bill of parcels?" he said "Yes, I gave it to him" - I said, "Did you alter it?" he said, "Yes, I did" - Mr. Norbury was present, and Woodeson said to him,"I hope you will forgive me, Sir; if you knew what I did it for, you would;" I asked Woodeson how he got them off the premises - he said he put the two flanges under his waistcoat, and the other articles in his pockets.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you quite sure that neither you nor Mr. Norbury told him it would be better or worse for him to tell you? A. Yes; he never gave any account of any person who had brought these articles in.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Do you know whether Mary Clark lives with her son as housekeeper? A. Yes, she does; his name is up, and Clark might have taken me directly to Mr. Norbury - he was examined as a witness against Woodeson, and let go.

JOSEPH NORBURY. I am in partner ship with my brother; Woodeson was our clerk - this is our property; the alteration on this bill is his hand-writing; what the officer has stated is true.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Is this letter Woodeson's writing? A. Yes - (letter read).

"SIR, - I will lay the whole truth before you that relates to my present horible situation, with all the circumstances attendng my guilt, and then if you still withhold your pardon, I shall indeed despair. I, a short time since, received a summons from Moore, the shoe-maker, which I did not at the time attend to, and fearful of it coming to your hearing, I, on Saturday last, paid him for a pair of shoes out of my week's salary; and on Sunday I lent my mother 7s., which she promised to return me on the Tuesday, but which she was unable to do; the master of the house at which I boarded, from my not having paid him the full amount of my week's bill, declined giving me credit this week; and thus, by a mere act of carelessness, I was placed in a situation of vexatious unpleasantness, and without the means actually of procuring my regular meals. I, on Tuesday, considered what was to be done; I knew my mother would send me that money on Friday, at the farthest, but a few shillings untill that time, I could not do without. On a sudden, the wicked idea came across me to take a few pounds of copper, which could I dispose of, it would not, I thought, be ever missed, and would relieve me from the only chance I had left, to ask yourself for a few shillings. I recollected this shop in Cable-street, from my having inquired my way to Stone's, the carman the other day. I went at teatime, and representing myself as an engineer, inquired whether a small quantity of copper bolts, which I wanted to sell at a sacrifice, being pressed for money, could be purchased; after considerable hesitation, I was told to bring them, and he would consider. Before I left in the evening, I hastily seized on the first light things that lay in the way, and tremblingly, and in a guilty manner, I left the shop, and took them to Cable-street; the man was out, and I received no money. - I was desired to call in the morning, but so frightened was I at what I had done, that nothing on earth could have induced me again to go there. I had resolved to pawn my silk handkerchief at dinner-time, and was happy to think I would no longer continue in the course I had so wickedly thought of the night before. What was my horror then to see the man enter the counting-house, and hurriedly inform me that I was found out; that nothing could save me but giving him a printed bill of parcels, I did so, and the rest I need not relate. WILLIAM FANE WOODESON.

Clerkenwell Prison, Thursday.

Woodeson's Defence. It would be almost impossible to convince the Court that I did not take them with a felonious intention, though I certainly did not; I wrote that letter at Clerkenwell-prison, thinking that if Mr. Norbury knew the whole truth he would forgive me; I did not even offer to obtain money on the property - it was left for them to tell me the price of it.

WOODESON - GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

MARY CLARK - NOT GUILTY .

MICHAEL CLARK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-171

1896. MARY ANN MUMFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 table cloth, value 2s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 jacket, value 6d.; 1 bed-gown, value 6d.; 4 frocks, value 4s.; 1 petticoat, value 6d.; 7 pinafores, value 4s., and 4 shifts, value 2s., the goods of John Grant ; and that she had been before convicted of felony .

JOHN GRANT. I live in Plumber's-place, Clerkenwell ; I am a wire-drawer , and my wife keeps a mangle. On the 8th of July I saw the prisoner go into my house with nothing, and come out again with a bundle containing the articles stated; I followed and stopped her with it - I asked what she had there; she said she did not know, nor where she had been; she said it was nothing to me - I asked

what she was going to do with it - she threw it down, and attempted to make her escape; these are articles brought for my wife to mangle.

WILLIAM CUTHBERT (Police-constable G 98). I took the prisoner, and have the articles; she had only been discharged at half-past six o'clock that morning, and at seven o'clock I had her again.

CHARLOTTE GRANT . These things were brought for me to mangle; I had seen them safe a quarter of an hour before.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a young man, with whom she had been drinking, had sent her for the bundle, assuring her that it was his property.

JOSEPH PARRATT . I was an officer. I received this certificate from Mr. Clark's office; the prisoner was tried here in December, and was sent to the House of Correction - she was discharged in June last; I know she is the person. (Certificate read.)

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-172

1897. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 piece of silk handkerchiefs, value 1l. 5s., the goods of Charles Richard Parry ; and that she had been before convicted of felony .

CHARLES OUTHWAITE . I was in the service of Mr. Charles Richard Parry , of No. 29, High-street, Islington . On the 14th of July the prisoner came there with another person - the other person looked at some ribbons, but could not find any thing she liked - while the other was looking at the ribbons, the prisoner took the piece of silk handkerchiefs, and put it under her dress; as they were going out I went round, and took her - she dropped it from her dress- she was taken into a room, and given to the officer.

WILLIAM HORNSBY (Police-constable N 124.) I received the prisoner, and have the handkerchiefs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I hope my prosecutor will forgive me; I am subject to fits, and have been in the infirmary - I did it from distress.

JOHN COX . I produce a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner, which I got at Mr. Clark's office - I saw her tried in July last; her judgment was respited. - (read.)

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-173

1898. JAMES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Joseph Bond , from his person .

JOSEPH BOND. I live in Edward-street, Portman-square , and am a merchant . On the 1st of August I was coming along Percy-street, between four and five o'clock; two boys followed me from Tottenham-court-road; I found them very close to me - I then missed my handkerchief: I turned, and they ran off in different directions - I followed the prisoner, who was one of them; I saw him take my handkerchief out of his breast, and throw it down an area; the officer stopped him in Tottenham-court-road - this is my handkerchief.

DAVID LAING (Police-constable E 58). I took the prisoner as he was running down Tottenham-court-road - he said it was not him who took it, but another boy took it and gave it to him.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-174

1899. ELIZA HOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , 1 coat, value 2s. 6d., and 1 flat-iron, value 6d. , the goods of Josiah Lowe .

JOSIAH LOWE . I lost these things on the 11th of August. I have known the prisoner some years - my wife was ill, and she was at our place to assist; I gave her the coat to be altered, but it has not been done.

CHARLES WILKENS (Police-constable F 106). I had information of the robbery - I had suspicion of the prisoner, and found her locked in her room in Drury-lane - I found the duplicate of the coat and the iron there; the iron has been given up.

JAMES NEWBY . I am in the employ of a pawnbroker. I produce the coat; this is the duplicate of it.

Prisoner. I was in distress, and pawned the coat for 1s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-175

1900. THOMAS HUNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 pocket-globe, value 5s. , the the goods of James Child .

ANN TANNAM . I am the wife of George Tannam - we keep a marine-store shop in Portpool-lane. On the evening of the 8th of February the prisoner came and brought a little pocket-globe for sale - he asked 8s. for it; I said I would not buy it - he then asked if I would oblige him with the loan of a shilling on it till the next morning; he said it was for another young man - I lent him 1s.; he left it, and went away; the Policeman came in about ten minutes, and I gave the globe to him - the prisoner never called again.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When was this? A. It was in February, about the 8th, I think; it was on a Tuesday; I had not seen the prisoner before; it was by his dress I knew him - he had at the Police-office the same dress.

RICHARD BAYLIS (Police-constable G 67). On the evening of the 8th of February I was near Tannam's shop- I saw the prisoner and two others near the shop; I did not see any one enter the shop; after they were gone I went in - I received this globe; and took the prisoner on the 19th of July; I had seen him once before in Cold Bath-square, but I had a prisoner in custody, and could not take him; I knew the prisoner by sight and by name.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say he went into the shop? A. No; I had been looking for him at different times - I had had him in custody before, I think a little before Christmas - I had been looking for him at different times in the neighbourhood of Old-street; I went into the Jolly Butchers, in Old-street, where I took the prisoner.

JAMES CHILD. I believe this globe to be mine; there is a mark on it, under the maker's name; I had such a one, and lost it on the 8th of February from my shop, in Amwell-street, Pentonville .

ANN TANNAM re-examined. Q. What dress had the prisoner on at the Police-office? A. A long coat, and I knew his face.

Cross-examined. Q. Has he the same dress on now? A. I cannot say; I believe I said at the office that it was a blue coat.

Q. Did you say he had an old blue coat on, with the pockets outside, a black waistcoat, blue trousers, and a

round cap? A. No, only the blue coat and black waistcoat; he had the same sort of dress on before the Magistrate, but I could not tell the colour.

Q. Was it day-light? A. Yes; I looked at him before the Magistrate, and knew him immediately - I know he had the same sort of dress, but I do not know the colour.

Prisoner's Defence. The clothes I now have on my master gave me the money to buy; I had not one thing then that I have now.

RICHARD BAYLIS re-examined. He had a long blue coat, a dirty waistcoat, and corderoy trousers - it was about ten minutes past nine o'clock in the evening.

JOHN TALBOT . I keep the Three Jolly Butchers, in Old-street-road - the prisoner was in my service for some time - he came in January or February, but I paid him weekly, and cannot say exactly when he came to me - I think it was in February; I think he had been with me three or four months when he was taken - I gave him money to buy some clothes, and he has them on now, excepting, I believe, a dark waistcoat, which is now with me - he had been three or four months with me before he purchased them; he used to go publicly about the street - he did not conceal himself; he used to take my children about.

COURT. Q. What clothes did he come in? A. I cannot exactly say - he had a dark coat on; it might be blue or black; I believe he had a dark blue coat - he had several pairs of trousers - I cannot say whether any of them were corderoy; I never saw any - he had a brown pair, and an old green pair; he had a dark waistcoat and a light one; I do not know whether his coat had pockets - there was no pocket outside; there might be the cape of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-176

1901. WILLIAM HENBERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , 7 watches, value 14l., the goods of John Norris , his master ; and JOHN POULETT and GEORGE JACKSON were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN NORRIS . I am a watch-maker , and live at Fulham . Henberry is my nephew, and was with me on liking - on the 8th of August I went to town, and when I returned the prisoner was out; he did not return: the next morning I missed two watches from a glass-case in my shop - I afterwards missed five more; six of the watches are here - I have a slight knowledge of Poulett; he lived with a printer.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Henberry had a good character? A. Yes - I have entrusted him with gold watches and money; his father brought him to my house the next day, but I was not at home - I had a good opinion of him.

EDWARD SHAYLER (Police-constable S 187). I went on the 9th of August to the Camden-head, Camden-town; I saw the prisoner Jackson there - he is pot-boy there: I took him into the parlour, and asked how he had become possessed of a silver hunting-watch which he had pawned - he said a young man had met him in the course of the afternoon, and taken him to Somers'-town, and while there he had asked him to pawn the watch, which he did, in the name of Mr. Hughes, No. 6, Chapel-grove; he gave me this duplicate of it, and 1l. 10s. 9 1/2d. - I took him to the station, and on the way he spoke to John Macey ; I got the watch by means of the duplicate, and the next day I received another watch from Jackson's master.

JOHN MACEY . I am pot-boy at the King's Head, Middlesex-street, Somers'-town. Jackson is my brother-inlaw; I saw him in the custody of the officer - he gave me three duplicates and a key, and told me to go and take three watches out of his box, but his master would not allow me to go up stairs to look for them; I gave the duplicates and the key to Collard.

Jackson. I told him to go and get them out of my box and give them to my master, for the young man for whom I had them to mind till the morning.

JOSEPH COLLARD . I was a Police-serjeant, but am now promoted. On the 9th of August Macey came to the station, and gave me the key and these three duplicates; I went to the Camden Head, and found a box, which the landlord and a fellow-servant pointed out - I opened it with the key, and found three watches in it, which I have here.

ABRAHAM LORIMER . I am a constable of Camdentown. Henberry and Poulett were brought to me by Henberry's father on the 10th of August; his father gave me a duplicate, in his presence - we did not say any thing to induce Henberry to confess, but he said he had pawned one watch for 14s., and that half the money and six other watches he had given to Poulett; and Poulett said he had handed them over to Jackson, and he acknowledged he had received 7s. for the watch which had been pawned: he said Jackson had pawned two of them for 1l. 15s., and he had handed over to Jackson above a sovereign, he could not say what; he said he was going to sell the watches, and they were going to America.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did his father bring him to you? A. To my house in Pratt-street - he said he had been a very honest steady young man; his family are very respectable.

JULIUS HOCKLEY . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Somers'-town. I have a silver watch and a gold chain, pawned by Jackson, for 1l. 15s. - he said it was for Mr. Hughes, No. 6, Chapel-grove.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Islington. I have a watch, pawned on the 8th of August, between two and three o'clock, by Henberry, for 14s., in the name of John Henberry, No. 10, Upper-street, Islington.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known him before? A. No; he was dressed as he is now; I took notice of him, and asked him a variety of questions.

THOMAS FRANKLYN . I live in Brady's-passage. On the 8th of August Jackson came to me, as I was selling some apples - he said he had a watch belonging to a friend, and asked me to pawn it for 17s.; I went, but I got but 10s.

Jackson. Q. Was not Poulett with me? A. Yes, but he did not speak to me; you told me to pawn it in the name of Rolph, which I did.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Poulett's Defence. Henberry called at my place, and asked me to go out - I said I could not then, but at one

o'clock I went out, and he was at the door; he asked me to go with him, and took me to Islington, to a cook-shop, gave me some victuals, and then took me to the theatre - when we came out it was late; he gave me six watches, asked me to mind them till the next morning, and promised to meet me, but he did not come; I took a walk, and met Jackson - I asked him to pawn a watch, which he did; I then went to Somers'-town, and asked him to pawn another- my master owed me a little money, and I thought I could get them the next morning.

Jackson's Defence. Poulett asked me to pawn a watch for him when I was out with the one o'clock beer - I could not, but I asked Franklyn to take it, which he did; I said I did not care in what name, as it was for this young man; I then delivered my beer, and when I came back Franklyn and he were there, and Franklyn gave him the money; I had my dinner, and at three o'clock I went out again -Poulett then asked me to pawn another watch; he said a friend of his had given them to him the night before, and he did not like to take them himself - I said I did not like it, but I did not mind; I took it, and said it was for Mr. Hughes, as I thought I should get the more; I got 35s. for it, and gave all the money to Poulett; we then went to the African, and had a quartern of gin and cloves- we then went to the Cheshire Cheese, and had some more - he then gave me four watches, and said they belonged to a friend of his, whom he could not find that morning, two duplicates, and 1l. 2s. 6d. in cash; I put three of the watches into my box, and had the other in my pocket.

HENBERRY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

POULETT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

JACKSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-177

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1902. JOHN GROVE and WILLIAM HITCH were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 1000lbs. weight of iron, value 2l. , the goods of Isaac Sowter .

MR. LEE. Conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES FOX . I am the son of John Fox , of No. 28 wharf, City-basin . On the night of the 1st of August I was at the gate, at a quarter before nine o'clock - I saw the prisoners at Mr. Sowter's wharf, which is two wharfs below ours; Hitch helped Grove over the gates - I went and asked Hitch what he was doing; he said the man was only gone down to the boat: some time after I heard Grove inside speak to Hitch, who was outside, and say,"Joe, shall I bring out five or six - they are all down in the yard;" he said No - I then saw my father, and told him- I then went to the gate again, and saw Hitch go towards the bridge: Mrs. Sowter took hold of him.

Grove. Q. How can you swear to me, when the gate is close pannelled? A. I saw you before you was put over; you called him Joe, not Bill.

ISAAC SOWTER . I had a quantity of iron on my premises; in consequence of information, on the 1st of August, I went and found Hitch in custody; I found Grove under the manager in the next stable; I had seen all my iron safe at seven o'clock that night, and in the morning I missed half a ton - part of it was found in the basin in front of my premises, about six yards from the stack - I know it was mine; there was one layer gone, and we put half a ton in each layer - I had seen Hitch there.

JOHN FOX. My son gave me information, I went and saw Hitch standing at the prosecutor's gate alone; in a few minutes I went to the gate again - Hitch was still there talking to some person inside; I then heard some iron come under the gate - I gave information, and Mrs. Sowter came to the door - I kicked the iron and said to Hitch, "This is a bad business;" Mrs. Sowter took Hitch, and I went with the prosecutor and took Grove.

Hitch. Q. Why did not you take hold of me? A. I thought it better to stop and take the one inside.

TIMOTHY RYAN . (Police-constable G 153). I took Hitch, and saw a piece of pig-iron at the prosecutor's gate - soon after I found three more pieces; the next morning I assisted the prosecutor in getting some iron from the canal.

ROBERT KIRBY . (Police-constable N 54). I went to No. 28 wharf with the prosecutor, and found Grove in a stable under the manager, concealed under some straw; he said he got there for a night's lodging; Mrs. Sowter identified him as the person who had been on their premises - he said he was not, for he had been there two or three hours.

WILLIAM HERITAGE . I am assistant-clerk at Worship-street office. I remember the prisoners being brought there on this charge, and Eliza Sowter was examined as a witness - her statement was read over to her, in the presence of the two prisoners; this is her deposition, which I took at the time - this name is her writing, and this is the Magistrate's signature.

ISAAC SOWTER . This is my wife's signature - she is since dead - (read).

The said Eliza Sowter, on oath, says - I am the wife of James Sowter, No. 27 wharf, City-road basin, a wharfinger. Last night, about a quarter-past nine o'clock, I was in my bed-room, which has a full command of the wharfs; I heard footsteps in the yard, and looked out at the window - I saw the prisoner Grove in the yard talking to the prisoner Hitch, who was standing outside the gates, which were locked; Grove then went down the yard, and took four pieces of pig-iron from a quantity at the bottom of the yard; he brought them up the yard from the gates, put one pieces under the gates, and said to the prisoner Hitch, "Bill, take hold" some person appeared to be taking it under the gates, and Grove was pushing it under, but it was too large and would not go through; upon which Grove said,"Bill, let it go," and pulled the piece into the yard again, and tried to put it under another part of the gates, and called out,"Bill, pull it" - upon which a voice answered, from outside the gates, saying he could not; Grove replied, "You must, now I've got it;" and then threw it into the ditch - he also said he had thrown some pieces in the cut, and could get them out afterwards with a fork - he then asked if any one was there; at that moment the bell rang - I went down stairs to the door, and a neighbour gave me information; I saw the prisoner Hitch walking towards the bridge - I waited at the door about five minutes, watched the prisoner Hitch, and saw him return towards my door - I then went up to him, collared him, and told him I wanted to speak a word with him: he asked what about; I told him to look under the gate, and he would see - at that time one

of the pieces of iron was half-way under the gate; he looked at the door, and said he knew nothing about it - I sent for a Policeman, who took Hitch into custody; my husband came home, and went into the yard with a Policeman in search of Grove - I afterwards saw Grove in their custody; I can positively swear to both the prisoners - when I went to the door to answer the bell I saw three pieces of iron placed against the wall, within about a yard of the gates - the other piece was still under the gates; I saw the Policeman take possession of them - they are the same now produced. (Signed) E. SOWTER.

Groves' Defence. I was there for a night's lodging, being in debt to my landlord.

Hitch's Defence. I was returning from Islington - by the prosecutor's gate, a woman called me, and said, "Do you know any thing of these pigs of iron?" I said I knew nothing of it; she said I did, and must stop with her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-178

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1903. CHARLES GOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 2 bridles, value 30s. , the goods of John Edmands .

WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM (Police-constable C 132). I was on duty in Oxford-street on the 28th of July, about six o'clock in the morning, the prisoner passed me with a sack, and two bridles in it - he was going past; I stopped him, and asked what he had got in the sack - he said it was two bridles of his own, which he was taking to James Johnson , a harness-maker, in Drury-lane, to repair, and that he brought them from Mr. Thomas' stables, in George-street, Edware-road - I said I lived there, and there was no such stables there; he then said he had made a mistake, he found them.

JAMES BICKERSTAFF . I am in the employ of Mr. John Edmands - he is a cow-keeper , and lives in Connaught-terrace ; these are his property - I left them safe at nine o'clock the night before.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating, that he had found the sack and property at Paddington.

JURY to JAMES BICKERSTAFF . Q. Was the stable fastened? A. It was bolted, but the window had been knocked down; Connaught-terrace is near Oxford-street Paddington-green is a considerable distance off.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-179

1904. JOHN GINNERLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , 1 purse, value 6d, 1 half-crown, 7 shillings, 2 sixpences, and 1 penny, the property of Charles Dyer , from his person .

CHARLES DYER. I live in Park-street, Westminster, and am a surgeon . On the afternoon of the 5th of August, I was walking near the Stable-yard, in St. James' Park - I felt something at my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner and two others - the prisoner had my purse in his hand, and he threw it to the others, but I caught it; this is it - it has 10s. 6d. in it; I am sure he had it, and he was nearest to me.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD (Police-constable A 35). I took the prisoner, and have the purse.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, declaring, that the purse was never in his possession, and that he was not in company with the other boys.

MR. DYER. He was close to me, and I felt the purse taken from my pocket; I turned, and he had it in his hand.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-180

1905. WILLIAM GRABBETT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 looking-glass frame, value 7s. , the goods of Anthony Grego .

PETER ORTELLI . I am in the service of Mr. Anthony Grego - he lives in Leather-lane . On the 17th of July the prisoner came and asked me if Mr. Grego was within- I said No; he then asked if he wanted any writing-paper - I said I did not know; he said he would come back and see - he turned to go out, and I saw he had this looking-glass frame; I went and took him with it.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought into my custody - I have known the prisoner some time, and have employed him; he said it was done from distress.

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320906-181

1906. CHRISTOPHER FAIRBROTHER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 60 pence and 120 halfpence , the monies of James Watson .

JAMES ETHERINGTON . I live with Mr. James Watson, at the King's Arms, Tothill-street . On the morning of the 21st of July I saw the prisoner and two others there; they asked for a pot of ale, and were served with it - while they were drinking it, I fell asleep; when I awoke, I saw the prisoner at my elbow, inside the bar, taking some copper off the side board with one hand, and with the other he was putting some into his pocket - I looked at him, and he said, "There is a big Irishman run across the road with some halfpence, run after him;" I said,"No, you are the Irishman," and I took hold of him; he tried to get away - my fellow-servant got up, and he was secured; I found on him the same money which as missing.

JAMES CROSS (Police-constable B 67.) On the morning of the 21st of July I received the prisoner - I found 10s. in pence and halfpence on him, some in each pocket- he had some silver, which I believe was his own.

JAMES ETHERINGTON. The copper was counted up in shillings worths, but not in paper; two 5s. lots were gone.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the house with two other persons; on leaving the house I called for half a pints of gin; I returned in half an hour, saw three persons behind the bar, and two in front, and one who was behind the bar was giving something to another person in front; I called to this witness "Charles!" which is the name he goes by, and one of them struck me a blow on the back of the head, and ran off - I ran round, and awoke the witness and his fellow-servant, who were both asleep.

OLIVER KING . I was there, and was asleep; when I awoke I saw Charles asleep, and the prisoner shaking him - that is all I have to say, for I fell off to sleep again.

ANN ELIZABETH REED . I live with my mother, who keeps a sale-shop in Orchard-street, Westminster. On the morning of the robbery I went to this house, and Charles said the place had been robbed of 10s. by a man

- I asked if he saw the man; he said he and his fellowservant were asleep.

JAMES ETHERINGTON. I told her a man had committed a robbery, and 10s. had been stolen - I said I awoke, and saw the prisoner in the act of taking it.

ANN ELIZABETH REED . He said he was asleep, and was awoke by the man shaking him, and that some men ran out with the money - I do not know the prisoner, but I happened to mention this in the house on Monday last.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-182

1907. GEORGE MEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 3l. , the goods of John Hill .

JOHN HILL . I am a jeweller , and live in St. James'-place, Clerkenwell . On the 30th of July the prisoner came to my house, and wished to have two or three pairs of ear-rings, to show a lady in Old-street-road - he was almost a stranger to me; I called my lad, and sent him with him, and two pairs of ear-rings, telling him to bring back the goods, or the money - the lad returned in about two hours, and said the prisoner had run away; he brought neither the money nor the goods back - the goods were not entrusted to the prisoner, but to the apprentice, and these directions were given him.

ROBERT WILLIAM CAMPION . I am apprentice to Mr. Hill. On the 30th of July my master gave me the goods to go with the prisoner - I went with him as far as the Old Fountain, in the City-road; as we were going along, he told me he had agreed with my master, that I was to stay outside, as if I went in the lady would not buy them, thinking he did not manufacture them - when I got to the door, he said, "Wait here, and I will return in five minutes; I will not detain you longer;" he took the goods out of my hand - I waited about twenty minutes, and then I went in, and inquired if there had been a person there to show two pairs of ear-rings; they said there had not - I gave them to the prisoner, not to keep, but to return one pair, and the money for the other.

Prisoner. I told Mr. Hill that I did not know whether I should be able to pay him the money down, as I did not know whether I should get it.

MR. HILL. So far from that, there was a suspicion expressed that all was not right, and I said my lad must go with him, and not lose sight of the goods.

WILLIAM MITCHELL (Police-constable K 5.) I took the prisoner at the Green Man, James-street, Commercial-road - I found on him one pair of gold ear-rings, a number of duplicates, and one duplicate torn up.

MR. HILL. This is one pair of the ear-rings which I sent on that occasion.

JOHN BENT (Police-constable K 20.) I was called into the house where the prisoner was taken - I found a orn duplicates on the ground, and by means of that I found another pair of ear-rings.

THOMAS BARNES . I live at Mr. Dexter's, a pawnbroker, in Whitechapel. I took in these ear-rings of the prisoner; I lent 25s. on them - they are worth about 2l.; I asked how he came by them; he said he was a jeweller, and in the habit of selling them at private houses - I had taken a ring or two of him before, and thought he was a jeweller - he gave the name of John Williams , No. 2, Cleveland-street.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

1908. GEORGE MEAD was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 3 rings, value 10s.; 2 watchkeys, value 8s., and 2 lockets, value 3s. , the goods of Mary Sumner .

MARY SUMNER. I keep a shop in Church-row, Houndsditch . I lost the articles stated on the 28th of July - the prisoner had come there the day before, and he came again that day: he asked me if I would allow him to have some rings and plated goods to show to a captain of a ship, from whom he was likely to get extensive orders, and he was to meet him at the Crown and Anchor, in Storey-street; he asked if I would allow my apprentice to go with him; I said Yes, and I gave the articles stated to the apprentice, telling him not to leave them with him, nor to allow him to take them into an adjoining room - he was to bring back the goods or the money; the prisoner was to have paid 1l. 5s. 6d. for them.

ROBERT BRITTEN . I am in the employ of Mr. Sumner. I went with the prisoner on the 28th of July, and was ordered not to leave the prisoner, but to bring back the goods or the money - when we got to the Crown and Anchor, he asked me to let him have them to take in to the captain, for if I went in the captain would think he did not make them himself; I let him have them, and in about two minutes a young man came, and asked if he belonged to me, as he had run away.

WILLIAM ANDERTON . I am a pawnbroker. I produce two lockets and a ring, which were pawned by the prisoner, on the 30th of July, in the name of John Williams , No. 6, Cleveland-street.

WILLIAM HOLMES . I am a pawnbroker. I have a ring which I took in of the prisoner on the 28th of July, in the name of Williams.

MRS. SUMNER. These are my property - there were more articles, but these are all that have been found.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

There was another indictment against the prisoner for a similar offence.

Reference Number: t18320906-183

1909. EDWARD MILTON & ROBERT FIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 1 cap, value 3s., the goods of Samuel Adams ; and that the said Richard Field had been before convicted of felony .

EDWARD BARRINGER (Police-constable H 51.) I was in Shoreditch on the 25th of August, at half-past eleven o'clock; I saw the prisoner near Mr. Adams' shop -Field took this cap from the right-hand side of the shop door, and gave it to Milton - they went about five yards, and I took them and the cap, which Milton dropped, to the station-house.

THOMAS FOWLER . I am errand-boy to Samuel Adams. This is his cap - I saw it safe at ten o'clock that morning; it has our shop ticket on it.

WILLIAM GROVE (Police-constable G 157). I have a certificate (which I got at Mr. Clark's office). of the conviction of Field, on the 5th of July last - I was present,

and know he is the person; he was ordered to be whipped.

Milton received a good character.

MILTON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

FIELD - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-184

London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1910. EDWARD SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 479 shawls, value 142l., and 5 packing-cases, value 2l. , the goods of Robert Williamson ; and WILLIAM PEDLEY was indicted for feloniously inciting, procuring, &c., the said Edward Smith to commit the said felony .

ROBERT WILLIAMSON. I am a shawl-agent and warehouseman , and live in New-court, Bow-lane . On the 30th of June, Pedley, whom I had known for some years, employed at the Carron-wharf, called about half-past eight o'clock in the morning; as I had often sent goods by him before - I went to the door, and I believe, before he asked me, I told him I should have two boxes containing goods, and three empty boxes, to send that day; I expected he would send a cart for them, but they were not ready then - I said they would be ready between eleven and twelve o'clock; they were to go down to Glasgow - I told him not to be later in sending than five or six; he said very well, if he did not come himself he would tell some one else to call; the boxes contained the four hundred and seventy-nine shawls, and I intended to entrust him with them; about twelve o'clock, or a little before, two strange men called - I was in the countinghouse; I thought they asked if the goods were ready for the Carron-wharf - I think Smith was one, but he did not ask for the goods; I asked my young man if they were ready - he said they were, and I told them they might have them; the three empty boxes were outside the door, addressed for the Carron Company; they might have read the directions - while my young man gave them the goods I was engaged with a customer; I fully believed they came from the Carron-wharf - as soon as I was disengaged from my customer, the man whom we have not found was waiting for the return-note from the Carron-wharf; my young man said he was waiting for beer, and I gave him 2d.; I then looked narrowly at him, and told him his face was not so familiar to me as some of the others - he said he had been seven years at the Carron-wharf, and he had been sent by the little man, who had been there in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Pedley you knew had been employed by the wharf? A. Yes, I had every confidence in him; he had called in the usual manner, but I thought he called rather earlier than usual - I believe he is what is called a trouncer; he comes with the carman, and has brought the cart himself.

JOHN SEAMELL . I am carman to Mr. Wilcox, of Consin-lane - he lets out carts. On a Saturday morning Smith came and hired a cart of my master; I was sent with it to New-court, Bow-lane, to know how long they should be - when we got there, Smith loaded the goods at Mr. Williamson's, and said they should not be long, they were only going to Bishopsgate-street; I then went home.

Cross-examined. Q. There was another person with Smith? A. Yes, it was not Pedley, but a man who is not here.

CHARLES WHITE . I am wharfinger at the Carronwharf. I know Pedley, but I do not know Smith; I never sent him, and the goods were never brought to the wharf.

Cross-examined. Q. You have known Pedley for some time? A. Yes; he has occasionally driven Sansom' carts.

DANIEL FORRESTEB . I am an officer. The prosecutor stated his loss to me on the Sunday morning; I took Pedley - I asked where he was on the Saturday, he said he went to the St. Katherine Dock at ten o'clock and worked till four, and received 2s. - I asked in what part of the dock; he said Nightingale-lane, and he answered to the name of Murphy.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe he was aware that some person had obtained the boxes? A. I believe he was, and he told what was not the truth.

Smith's Defence. A man came to me and asked me, to go and do a job in Bow-lane; I put the case into the cart, and he gave me 6d. and a pint of beer - the boy knows I have hired carts before.

JOHN SEAMELL. He has hired carts before.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

PEDLEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-185

1911. RICHARD PORRATT and CHARLES RUSH were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 2 painting brushes, value 4s., the goods of John Lorkin and another, his masters .

JOHN LORKIN . I live in Aldersgate-street , and am an oil and colour man . Porratt has been six years in my service and Rush about two; I paid them a guinea a week - in consequence of several losses, the officer marked some brushes in our warehouse.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a City-officer. I marked the brushes, in company with the prosecutor's foreman on the 9th of July, and put them into their place again; I was placed in the spice-room, to watch, and about half-past two o'clock, I saw Rush come from the place where he was at work, take two brushes, and place them under his smock-frock; I remained quiet till the men went to dinner - I then asked the foreman which way they were gone; he said they were but just gone - I had a brother officer outside, who told me they were gone to the King's-arms: I had them all brought back, and charged Rush with having them - he said he had nothing on him; I searched him, but found nothing - I found the brushes on Porratt.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. I suppose you were placed there for the purpose of watching? Yes; I had known the persons who work there by going there occasionally, I have seen Porratt there - I did not say the reason I knew Rush took them, was because he had a cap on - I said he had a cap; I said to him, "This is the cap you had on," and he said he had no cap - I have been twelve years an officer; I think Rush told me that

Porratt wore a smock-frock, but I do not know that I ever saw him in one - I looked through some rails, and saw him before he took the brushes.

COURT. Q. Are you sure Rush took the brushes? A. Yes.

GEORGE ELLIOTT . I am a warehouseman in the prosecutors' employ. On the 28th of June the officer marked some brushes and I marked some, but these are two the officer marked; they were found on Porratt - the officer came and said some property had been taken; I called the men back, when they had been out about two minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. Then they were found about two minutes after they had gone out? A. Yes; Porratt could get to where the brushes were, but he had no business there - I had not suspected Porratt of going to the brush room for improper purposes, nor cautioned him not to go; I have asked him and others what they went up stairs for, when I have seen them coming down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PORRATT - GUILTY . Aged 52.

RUSH - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-186

1912. RICHARD PORRATT was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 5 lbs. of Italian juice, value 5s. 6d., the goods of John Lorkin and another, his master ; and JOSEPH HANCHETT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

JOHN LORKIN. At the latter end of July the officer told me there had been some person in our trade robbed, and the articles were offered for sale; I gave directions that if any articles were offered which we sold, to bring them to me - I gave my knife to the warehouseman to mark some juice, and as I thought he did it rather awkward; I said, "Give it me, and I will mark some;" the officer afterwards told me that they had discovered some juice which Hanchett had bought, and he stated before the Magistrate that he bought it of Porratt.

GEORGE ELLIOTT . I am in the employ of Mr. Lorkin. I marked some Italian juice, and the officer brought this parcel a few days after, and asked if I knew it, which I said I did - I knew him by seeing him in the neighbourhood.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . When I took Porratt on the 9th, I asked him whether he took any thing on the 6th; he said he did not - I went home and got the juice, and asked him if he took that; he then said he took it to Hanchett's, in Maidenhead-court, and sold it there.

SAMUEL SEAGAR . I am an officer. On the 6th of July Hanchett came, and brought to my house 5 lbs. of Italian juice, and asked 1s. a pound for it, as I deal in that article; I knew him before'; he is a hair-dresser- I gave him 5s. for it, and then went to Harrison, and we went together to the prosecutors'; this is the juice, but I never saw it in possession of Porratt.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-187

1913. HENRY DEVINE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Surridge , from his person .

WILLIAM SURRIDGE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Smithfield . I was passing there last Tuesday, about four o'clock in the afternoon, to go to Bartholomew-close; I received information, turned, and saw the prisoner in possession of an officer; I believe he had my handkerchief in his hand.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were there a great number of persons there? A. There was no crowd at that spot; there might be a hundred or a hundred and fifty persons within about thirty yards; it was in the open place, opposite the entrance to Clothfair; there were some small shows there.

JOSEPH FOYER . I was in the fair. I saw the prisoner and another boy come towards me - the other boy took the prosecutor's handkerchief and threw it to the prisoner; I took the prisoner and the handkerchief, and told the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. Might it not have fallen on your own arm? A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing through the fair, and a boy picked the pocket and threw the handkerchief on my arm.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-188

1914. JOSEPH BLACKBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 2 1/2 yards of woollen cloth, value 2l., the goods of Richard Edden , his master .

RICHARD EDDEN. I am a tailor , and live in Newgate-street . The prisoner was my clerk for about three months; he had been with me various times before - he was taken up on another subject, and some duplicates of cloth were found on him, which caused inquiry to be made.

WILLIAM HUMPHRIEYS . I am in the employ of a pawnbroker. I have two yards and a half of woollen cloth, which were pawned by a person who gave the name of Smith - I do not know who it was.

WILLIAM MASON . (Police-constable G 45). I took the prisoner, and found on him two duplicates of two remnants of cloth; I went to the prosecutor, who came and knew them - the pawnbrokers have the counter duplicates; the prisoner tore up those he had on him, but we made them out.

RICHARD EDDEN . This is my cloth; I can positively swear to it.

JURY. Q. Have you any mark on it? A. No, but I know by comparing it with what I have left, and it is the quantity I lost.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had always acted faithfully to the prosecutors, and was never guilty of an act of dishonesty.

GUILTY . Aged 41. (See 8th day.)

Reference Number: t18320906-189

1915. SAMUEL HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 half-crown, 3 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Elias Moses and Isaac Moses , his masters. - Also for stealing, on the 5th of July, 76 sovereigns, 6 half-sovereigns, 4 crowns, 9 half-crowns, 10 shillings, and 20 sixpences, and 1 bank-note, value

20l.; 5 Bank notes, value 10l. each, and 8 Bank notes, value 5l. each, the property of Elias Moses and Isaac Moses, his masters . - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-190

1916. WILLIAM COLE was indicted for unlawfully breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Leach , on the 7th of July , with intent feloniously to steal her goods and monies .

ELIZABETH LEACH. I live in Sherborne-lane, in the parish of St. Mary Abchurch . On the 7th of July I fastened up my house about twenty minutes before six o'clock in the morning, and went to market with my niece; I returned before seven, and the doors were all opened; they had opened the door, and gone through a passage into a parlour; I am sure I had locked the door when I went out - the prisoner was then in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you single? A. Yes - I keep a chandler's-shop.

JAMES HOLMAN . I am a watchman of Walbrook. I know the prosecutrix's house; a few minutes before six o'clock that morning I saw the prisoner and another man come out of her shop door; I thought they had no business there - I stepped up, and saw the door ajar; I then followed them up to Cornhill, where they separated - I followed the prisoner, who ran as fast as he could; I called, Stop thief! and he was stopped by Tokenhouse-yard - he was taken to the watch-house, and seven skeleton-keys were found on him, a phosphorus-box, and a lantern, and this crowbar - one of the keys opens the shop door.

WILLIAM BOYCE . I was at the watch-house, and saw these things found on the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18320906-191

1917. HENRY EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s., the goods of William Thomas , his master .

WILLIAM THOMAS. I am a warehouseman , and live in Cheapside; I am a stay and shoe manufacturer - the prisoner was in my employ. I was in the country when this took place.

JAMES THOMAS . I am in the prosecutor's employ. On Saturday night, the 21st of July, while the prisoner was gone to our other warehouse with a box of shoes, I was told he had got something - when he came back, I called him, under a pretence of paying him his wages -I saw these shoes in his bosom; I asked what he had there - he said Nothing; I said he had, and called a man to take them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. And you gave him a good beating, I believe? A. No, I shook him - there were 12s. due to him that night.

CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM WORDALE . I saw the prisoner take the shoes from the box which he was packing them in, to take to the other warehouse, and I told Mr. Thomas of it.

FRANCIS EARL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received an excellent character, and his master promised to employ him.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320906-192

1918. MARY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 watch-key, value 7s., and part of a guard-china, value 5s. , the goods of Edward Meredith Lewis .

EDWARD MEREDITH LEWIS . I have a situation in the Stamp-office , and live at Pimlico. Late on the 7th, or early on the 8th of July, I was slightly inebriated, but knew what I was doing - I was walking along the street, and the prisoner ran up to me, and made a sudden snatch at my watch; the chain broke, and she got the watch - she ran off, and I lost sight of her altogether; I mentioned the circumstance to a watchman, who was almost on the spot - he recommended me to go to the watch-house, and in about half an hour, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How much had you had to drink? A. I had been out to dinner with some friends - I had drank, perhaps, three or four kinds of wine, I cannot saw how many glasses; I might drink six or eight glasses of port, and some sherry and madeira -I drank no liquor; I will not swear that the prisoner is the woman who robbed me; there was no other woman near me at the time the prisoner was; one other woman had spoken to me in Bishopsgate-street.

THOMAS PETCH . I am a City-officer. I heard of the loss about twenty minutes or half-past twelve o'clock at night, and from the description I received of the prisoner, from another person, I took her - I found she was fearful that I was going to lay hold of her, and I pushed her down a gate way - she then put her hand into her bosom, took out this watch, and threw it away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There were several women going past me; I never saw the prosecutor - the officer owes me a spite, and said he would transport me if he could.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-193

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 11.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1919. HENRY COSMO MILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 21 spoons, value 15l.; 4 salt-stands, value 3l.; 1 silver cup, value 2l., and 1 ladle, value 1s., the goods of John William Calvert , in his dwelling-house. - To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-194

1920. HENRY ACKLING was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 1 gelding, price 20l. , the property of Thomas Gunn .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

HENRY GUNN. I am the son of Thomas Gunn, a farmer of South Newington, near Banbury, Oxfordshire . On the 20th of July, at eight o'clock at night, the prisoner saw me put the bay horse into the field; I shut the gate, and next morning (Saturday) it was missing. On Monday, the 30th, in consequence of information, I found it at the Rose and Crown, at Heston, in Cook's possession - the prisoner was a drover's boy, and sometimes lived at South Newington.

EDWIN COOK . I keep the Rose and Crown, at Heston. On Saturday night, the 21st of July, at eleven o'clock, the prisoner brought this gelding to my house, and asked for a

quartern of corn; he had some beer and cheese, for which he paid me; he appeared fatigued, and confused - he asked if he could sleep in my stable that night; I gave him leave, and locked him in - I went at half-past five o'clock in the morning, to let him out, and noticed that the horse was in a very bad state, distressed and fatigued - I asked why he did not feed his horse over night; he said he did not know - he said that he was coming from between Daventry and Banbury, and overtook a man with three horses, who asked if he wanted a horse - he said not particularly; the man said riding was better than walking, and he then took one of them - Heston is nearly seventy miles from South Newington; he got to my house about ten o'clock on Saturday night - Gunn afterwards saw the horse, and claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. A man met me on the road, and gave me the horse.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-195

1921. CHARLES GALLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , at St. James, Westminster , 18 silver spoons, value 9l., the goods of Francis Fenton , the younger, in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES PEACH . On the 29th of June, when this happened, I was chief waiter at Mr. Fenton's hotel, St. James'-street - he lives there; the prisoner was second waiter , and had been so more than five months; the plate was in my immediate custody; it was the prisoner's duty to clean it. On the 23rd of June I lost three salt-spoons, which raised my suspicion; and on the 29th I went into the plate-room, and while I was counting the plate up the prisoner came down and told me he was very sorry, but he had taken twenty-two table-spoons and pawned them, and had the duplicates in his box, at the top of the house; while I was speaking to Mr. Fenton he went up, brought the duplicates down, and, in his confusion, dropped them - they were picked up and given to me.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. I believe he said he had pawned them, but not with intent to steal them? A. He did, and if Mr. Fenton would give him time he would take them out.

PETER TATE . I am a pawnbroker, of Crown-row, Walworth - I formerly lived with Mr. Barclay, a pawnbroker. I have five table-spoons, which were pawned at various times - I cannot say who by; these are the duplicates of them.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS . I am an inspector of Police. Mr. Fenton put these duplicates into my hand, in the prisoner's presence; I asked the prisoner what they were - he said they were duplicates of property he had unfortunately taken, and which he was sorry for.

Cross-examined. Q. Were not his words, that he had unfortunately pledged them? A. No.

JOSEPH ROSIER . I am a pawnbroker. I have three table-spoons, which were pawned by the prisoner on the 10th and 21st of January.

FRANCIS FENTON. I keep this hotel . These spoons are mine.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was he in your service? A. He came about January; I received a good character with him - he found 20l. in my house at one time, and gave it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I most conscientiously call God to witness, it was the most remote of my thoughts that the prosecutor should sustain any injury - had I not resorted to this measure I must have suffered incarceration, which I trust will be a sufficient cause for your merciful consideration.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320906-196

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1922. EDWARD HOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , at St. James, Westminster, 53 veils, value 87l.; 1853 yards of silk, value 276l.; 554 yards of satin, value 83l.; 578 yards of Persian, value 28l.; 132 yards of gauze, value 12l.; 1206 yards of blond, value 149l.; 1176 yards of thread lace, value 256l.; 7 pairs of lappets, value 5l.; 10 yards of crape, value 1l.; 57 yards of velvet, value 25l.; 21 scarfs, value 4l.; 254 handkerchiefs, value 35l.; 5 caps, value 1l.; 54 collars, value 16l.; 560 yards of quilling, value 3l.; 7 habit-shirts, value 15s.; 119 yards of net, value 12l.; 50 yards of bobbin lace, value 30s.; 59 pairs of stockings, value 11l.; 6 pairs of cotton socks, value 4s.; 144 pairs of gloves, value 6l.; 590 yards of ribbon, value 12l.; 15 yards of cambric, value 4l.; 2 yards of lawn, value 4s.; 6 shawls, value 6l.; 1 apron, value 1l.; 4 dresses, value 3l.; 35 yards of muslin, value 1l. 1ls.; 26 yards of linen, value 1l. 10s.; 5 yards of woollen cloth, value 4l.; 5 pairs of silk cuffs, value 5s.; 11 fans, value 2l. 10s.; 2 boxes of eau-de-cologne, value 1l.; 480 rows of beads, value 10l.; 73 feathers, value 15l.; 174 worked trimmings, value 10l.; 2 boxes, value 2s., and 2 brushes, value 6s., the goods of Ann Hogard , in her dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating him to be the servant of the said Ann Hogard.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

HENRY HOGARD. I am the son of Ann Hogard , a widow , who lives at No. 4, Waterloo-place, in the parish of St. James', Westminster . In my father's life time a very extensive business was carried on in the silk-mercery line - he died in September, 1830; the stock at that time was worth about 12,000l. - my mother carried on the business till March, 1832; the prisoner came into her service about March 1831, and managed the silk department from October, 1831 to March, 1832 - my mother was selling off her silk stock, intending to continue only the millinery business; the prisoner left in March, 1832, as soon as the stock was sold; he left without the slightest suspicion; my mother left the silk business entirely to his management.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What was your father's name? A. Robert; my mother is his sole executrix - nobody else administered; part of the stock was there in my father's time - the business continued in my mother's name, she is the sole legatee; part of the stock was sold off at a reduced price - while the prisoner was in our employ, he told me had received a commission from his brother to buy job goods in the City; if he had taken out goods, and entered them in the books as sold for money, that would be sufficient, but he has not done so - the blocks and things would remain with the goods;

we sold off about 5000l. of stock; I missed goods at different times; and more particularly on closing the concern, on confining the goods to a smaller space, we missed goods which we should not have done in a lerger stock, particularly in one or two patterns of lace; he had left about three months before that discovery was made.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you keep your mother's books? A. Yes; I remember the prisoner once purchasing some goods on his own account, and then an invoice was given him, the same as other persons.

ROBERT LUKE HOGARD . I am the prosecutrix's eldest son; we missed articles from time time, but entertained no suspicion of the prisoner when he left. On the 26th of July, I received information from Mr. Goldney, and between six and seven o'clock that evening went with him to the prisoner's lodgings, in Newman-street; the prisoner opened the door to us - Burridge, the officer, was with me, but had no warrant - I said, "I dare say, Mr. Howe, you know what my business is;" he said, "Walk into the parlour for a minute" - he went into the back room, and Burridge followed him; we afterwards went up stairs together; and as we went up, the officer said, "We are come without a search-warrant, but if you object to our searching your rooms, Mr. Hogard will go to the Magistrate and procure a warrant, while I remain here to see that nothing is removed; Mr. Hogard suspects there is property of his mother's here" - when I got into the room, I saw some boxes; I think the prisoner opened one of them - I saw in it a piece of cashmere, which I knew; I said, "Did you purchase this of my brother" - he replied, "I should like to speak to you alone;" the officer objected to that - the prisoner then said he would go into another room with me and the officer, which we did, and then he said, "Mr. Hogard, there is a great deal of property in the other room - some it is yours, and some mine - there are two boxes of lace, which are yours;" we then cautioned him not to say any thing that might criminate himself - we returned into the other room with him, and he delivered to me two boxes of lace, saying, "These are your's, they might have been here 17,000 years, and I should never have touched them;" he said he had been the dupe of another party, and he hoped we should be merciful to him - these two boxes contained one hundred yards of foreign lace, the cost price of which, is 250l.; this piece of Mechliu lace cost 19l., and other pieces worth 6l. and 7l. each - they are entire pieces, and have our shop mark on them; the boxes are not ours - we found about one hundred and sixty yards of silk there; here is one roll which cost 6l. or 7l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are the shop marks in your hand-writing? A. No, they are in the prisoner's writing; the laces are partly marked by me and partly by my mother - our stock was advertised as a cheap sale; a quantity of silks and various things were sold - I have not brought the books here; no application has been made for the prisoner to have access to our books, but there was for his own books, which was refused.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How much property have you recovered? About 1200l. or 1500l.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I am an officer. I accompanied Mr. Hogard to the prisoner's lodging; before I got up stairs I told him, Mr. Hogard had information that he had a quantity of foreign lace, and would he obliged to him to show it to him; that they had lost a quantity of lace, silks, and other property, and if he did not allow us to search, I should wait there while a warrant was obtained: when we came into the room, he produced two boxes of lace, and said, "I hope you will forgive me Mr. Hogard; here are the two boxes of lace - I have had them in my possession two months, and dare not touch them" - he said they were Mr. Hogard's properety, and Mr. Hogard identified this piece of cashmere; we found in the room silks and feathers: I have some property which I obtained at another place the following day, and a quantity of cases of property which came from Bristol, and which Mr. Hogard claims; they were delivered to me by the prisoner's brother - this direction (looking at a card), came off one of the cases; I found three duplicates for silk in the prisoner's room.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What did the prisoner say to Mr. Hogard? A. He said, "There is a great deal of property in the other room, some of which is mine, and some yours; I have two boxes of lace in the other room;" I asked him to point them out - we went into the room - he produced two boxes, and said, "I hope you will forgive me, Mr. Hogard, they have been in my possession two months," &c.

Q. Did he not say he had received them, being made the dupe of a villian? A. No - about a quarter of an hour after, he said he did not bring them there; and when I was locking the door to bring him away, he said he had been made the dupe of another person, but should not mention his name, and asked me to speak to Mr. Hogard to be favourable to him; he did not say he had received them from another person, but that he did not bring them there - he said he should not have touched them for a thousand years; I found other things at his lodgings next day: he was in Newgate then - I did not search the room the first day, but locked it up, bringing away what property was identified; and on going again, I found the door had been broken open, a great many things removed and other things left; I brought away some invoices: the Magistrate did not positively direct him to have them - it was to be with the consent of the other party, but they did not seem to consent; I was applied to for them by his attorney, and refused, by the prosecutor's desire - they are here.

SOPHIA SAUNDERS . I am in the employ of Miss Charlton, a milliner and dress-maker. The prisoner was in the habit of bringing articles there for sale; I have received silks and satins from him - (looking at some silk goods) I do not know who brought these goods to Miss Charlton's, nor who they were purchased of - I have known the prisoner several years, and think this invoice is in this writing.

Q. Does that bill relate to this property? A. I do not know; I have been intimate with the prisoner - here is plum coloured silk, also pink, drab, black, sage, and peagreen.

COURT. Q. You must know whether that invoice relates to those goods? A. I do not - I was not present when the goods were brought; I think I have received silk from the prisoner myself at Miss Charlton's, but am not certain.

JAMES ALDOUS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 17th of May a piece of silk was pawned with me for 30s., and another piece the same day for 9l., by a foreigner named Osborne, who I have known for many years, dealing in such things; I have another parcel, which he pawned for 5l. 6s. on the 20th of May - these duplicates are what I gave for the articles.

ROBERT LUKE HOGARD. The different articles produced are my mother's.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know them? A. By having pieces at home of the same; I have compared the selvidges where they have been cut, and some are marked.

HENRY HOGARD . This direction-card is the prisoner's hand-writing; I have examined the silk produced by Miss Saunders - there are numbers on the invoice, and figures on the goods corresponding with those numbers, and the goods correspond in colour.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whose hand-writing are the figures? A. Those in the invoice are the prisoner's; those on the goods do not appear the same hand-writing - the property which came from Bristol is my mother's; I cannot say it had not been sold.

Eleven witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-197

1923. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously forging a bill of exchange , which is as follows:-

London, 3rd of July, 1832.

Two months after date, pay to my order, the sum of one hundred and sixty-seven pounds, five shilling, value received

A. McKENZIE.

Messrs. Baring, Brothers, and Co., 8, Bishopsgate-street, London.

with intent to defraud William Hudson and others.

SECOND COUNT, for uttering the same, with a like intent.

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud different persons.

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS, charging him with forging an acceptance to the said bill, and with uttering the same. -To which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-198

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1924. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 1 watch, value 8l.; 1 chain, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 10s., and 6 studs, value 30s., the goods of William Henry Desborough , in the dwelling-house of Atkinson Morley .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HENRY DESBOROUGH . I live in Huntingdonshire. On Tuesday, the 26th of July, I was residing at the Burlington hotel, Cork-street, in the parish of St. James' , of which Atkinson Morley is the proprietor, and lives there. About six o'clock that evening I went out, leaving a gold watch and appendages on my dressing-room table in my bed room - the watch cost 20l.; I returned about one o'clock in the morning, and about eleven in the morning I missed them - I gave notice to my servant, who had attended when I dressed, and about the 6th of July I found my property at Worship-street office.

GEORGE BOTT . I am the prosecutor's servant. I attended him to dress, and after he left I saw the watch and property on the dressing-table, about ten minutes after seven o'clock; he informed me of his loss next morning.

CHARLES WORLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Cassell, a pawnbroker, Old-street. On the 26th of June, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop, and pawned a gold watch, a gold chain, and six shirt studs, in the name of John Stennet - I have seen him frequently before, and am certain of him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say it was not for myself? A. I asked him what name - he said, "The name I in general pawn in, J. Stennet," and that is the name I always knew him by.

JAMES ROBERT CASSELL . My attention was directed to this property, and on Tuesday, the 3rd of July, the prisoner came to the shop - I said I was busy, and would attend to him presently; I sent for a Policeman, and gave him in charge; I said to the prisoner, "You recollect pawning a gold watch and other things here last Tuesday"- he hesitated a moment, and then said he did; I told him it was taken from Burlington hotel - I do not recollect his making any remark.

THOMAS JONES . I am a Policeman. The prisoner was given into my charge; Mr. Cassell told him the watch was stolen from the Burlington hotel - he said he could answer for all that.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I received the watch from a young man who was transported last Surrey Session; I told Cassell's man I did not pawn it for myself - he did not ask what name, but put it in the name he knew me by; is it likely if I had stolen it that I should have gone to the shop a week after?

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

There were three other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18320906-199

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1925. WILLIAM NOWLAND was indicted for feloniously assaulting Patrick Preston , and cutting and maiming him in the head, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable him, or do him some grievous bodily harm.

PATRICK PRESTON. I am a tailor , and live in Dean-street, Shadwell. On the 12th of August I lived in George-street, Ratcliff ; I had been to Greenwich that day, and got very tipsy.

MARGARET PRESTON. I am the prosecutor's wife. On the night of the 12th of August, he was very drunk - he was in company with the prisoner and more of his friends - the prisoner was also drunk; my husband was sick - the prisoner helped him up stairs to bed, and helped all his clothes off except his trousers; I was putting my baby to bed at this time - my husband was laying on the bed; the prisoner assisted to take off my husband's trousers, but he would not let him, and the prisoner went down stairs - my husband followed him with all his clothes off but his trousers; they were not gone many minutes - I followed them down, and when I got down, I saw them wrangling together and fighting - they had hold of each other; I went between them to part them, and received a scar

on my left hand; I then observed some blood on my husband - I called Murder! I found he was hurt on the head and body - a surgeon attended him afterwards; when my husband went out of the room after the prisoner, he ran down following him - I was sober.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you one of the party at Greenwich? A. Yes; I was confused; my sister is married to the prisoner - we had been happy and comfortable; I suppose I was two or three minutes in the room before I followed them down, and when I got down they were struggling.

PATRICK PRESTON re-examined. I do not remember the prisoner putting me to bed, or pulling my clothes off; I remember his trying to take my trousers off; I told him I would not let any body take them off; he gave me some saucy answer, and them went down stairs - I went after him, but how it began, or how I got on after I got down I do not know; I do not know what passed till I found my neck bleeding, and he said, "Now I have you;" who first struck I do not know, but I was cut - I do not know whether supper was going on then.

MRS. PRESTON. Supper was over; nobody is here who was present when they got down stairs.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320906-200

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1926. JOHN ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 1 mare, price 18l. , the property of Henry Gray .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES MOULTON . I am a farmer , and live at Crouch-end, near Hornsey - Gray's mare was at my premises at grass. On the 24th of July, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw her safe, and missed her at six next morning; the gates of the field were locked, as I had left them, but there was a gap broken down, communicating with a field next to a wood - I traced the mare's feet through the wood, and there was grey hair scraped off on the gate-post - this was a grey mare; I saw her next in Gray's possession; she had two fore-shoes on when stolen, but no hind-shoes.

JOSEPH COX . I keep the Tiger's Head, in the New North-road, four or five miles from Crouch-end. On Wednesday morning, the 26th of July, I saw the prisoner in my skittle-ground, behind my house, about half-past eight o'clock, and he had a grey mare there - there is a side door to the ground, communicating with the street; it was fastened, but a person climbing over the wall could unfasten it inside; I have since seen a mare at Worship-street, in the officer's possession, which I believe to be the same - I told the prisoner there was no room for any thing there - I went out in about half an hour, leaving him and the mare there, but desired him to go away -I was out all day; Larman, the farrier, lives about a quarter of a mile from my house; I did not send any horse to him to be shod.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know a man named Taylor in this transaction? A. He was charged with this at Worship-street; the prisoner said Harry Taylor gave him the horse to be shod, and I saw that man outside the Court this morning - it was another man, named James Taylor , who was taken up with the prisoner.

JOSEPH LARMAN . I am a farrier, and live in Philip-street, Kingsland-road. On Tuesday morning, the 25th of July, the prisoner brought a grey mare to my place to have two hind-shoes put on; he said it was Cox's mare - I said I had been with Cox the day before, and he had got none like it; he then said it had come home early that morning; my man put the shoes on, and booked them to Cox; he took the mare away - I saw the same mare afterwards at Worship-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask who desired him to get it shod? A. No; he said it was Mr. Cox's.

FREDERICK MASON . I am in Larman's employ. I shoed the mare, and saw the same mare at Worship-street, but the shoes were so worn, I could not identify them.

JEREMIAH EVANS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 26th of July, on the approach to the London-bridge, on the grey mare; the witness saw the same mare at Worship-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask from whom he had it? A. I did; he said it was given him to take care of by two men, and he was to wait there till they returned - he said at the watch-house that they appeared to be brothers, and that one of them was named Harry - I asked what house they used; he said he had seen Harry Taylor several times at a house in Smithfield; he afterwards mentioned the Tiger, at Hoxton; I went and apprehended Harry Taylor there; and while I went out with Cox to look for James Taylor , he came into Cox's house, and was taken - the prisoner was on the mare coming towards the bridge, not standing still.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did he say where he received the mare from the two men? A. He said at the watch-house that he had it from them at the Rosemary-branch; Harry Taylor was discharged by the Magistrate, and the Grand Jury ignored the bill against James.

HENRY GRAY . I am a livery-stable keeper, in Earl-street. This grey mare is my property, and worth 18l.

Prisoner's Defence. Taylor gave the mare into my possession at the Rosemary-branch, and told me to go to London-bridge, and wait for him.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-201

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

1927. THOMAS BAYNHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , at St. George, Bloomsbury, 1 purse, value 1s.; 2 sovereigns, 3 half-sovereigns, and one 10l. Bank note, the property of George Kent , in his dwelling-house .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

MARY KENT . I am the wife of George Kent , a butcher , who lives in Upper King-street, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury ; in August last the prisoner was our foreman , and had been in our service about four months - he had received notice to quit, and was to leave on the Saturday night. On Wednesday, the 15th, Mr. Hanson was in the counting-house with my husband - I was in the shop, taking money; Mr. Kent called me away to get Mr. Hanson a glass of wine - I had a purse, containing a 10l. Bank of England note, and some money rolled up in it - I do not know how much; there were

two sovereigns and three half-sovereigns rolled up in a piece of paper, and besides that there was other money in the purse - I was absent from the shop less than five minutes; I had left my purse on a counter by the counting-house - I believe the prisoner was in the shop when I left; when I came back I missed my purse - he was there; I mentioned my loss, in his hearing, immediately; he said he was sorry, and went out with Mr. Hanson, to search for a man named Moore, at the public-houses in the neighbourhood - he said he had no doubt Moore was the thief; Moore is a poor man, who was in the shop when I left, and was gone when I returned - the prisoner had 8s. a week, with his board and lodging.

LUCY JONES . I live with my parents in Great Russell-street. I was in Mr. Kent's shop on the Wednesday, and saw Mrs. Kent's purse on the shopboard; I saw the prisoner go and lay a piece of paper on the top of the purse; after that I saw him take the paper back again, and lay it where he had taken it from; I did not then see the purse - the prisoner had an apron on - I saw him shuffling in his pocket a good deal, with his hand under his apron; he was quite near the place where the purse was in then; the sheet of paper was taken away after that - after shuffling in his pocket, I saw him go backwards into the yard; he returned to the shop before Mrs. Kent - when she came into the shop, the purse was missed; Moore was in the shop at the time - the prisoner cut a piece of skin off some beef, Moore came there for it, and then went away - he did not interfere with the purse at all.

Q. Did you not tell the Policeman you saw Moore take up the purse, and go out with it? A. I did not.

Prisoner. She said Moore took up the purse, and dropped something at the door - master knows the same, and Mrs. Kent too. Witness. I never told any body so.

GEORGE JARVIS . I am apprentice to Mr. Kent. Shortly before the purse was lost, I knew the prisoner was going to leave; and he told me two or three days before the purse was lost, that he had but one sovereign to take him into the country; he said he should try to get a sovereign, or half a sovereign, from his aunt.

JOHN MOORE . I live at No. 12, Princes-street, Red Lion-square. On the day this purse was lost I went to the shop to purchase some meat - I had been a customer there many times before; I did not see the purse on the board, and did not interfere with it in any way - the prisoner served me; I had a towel to taken my meat in - no paper was used to wrap it in; I always had paper previous to that, but not then; I heard I was suspected of this, and went to Kent's directly about it.

THOMAS REEVE . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, of the Strand. On Monday, the 20th of August, the prisoner came and purchased wearing-apparel at our shop, and paid me a 10l. Bank note; I gave him eight sovereigns and some silver out of it - I asked his name, he said William Williams , which I wrote on the note - the policeman has it; here is this name on it in my writing - it is the note he paid me.

ANN GINARD . I keep a public-house; the prisoner lodged with me before he went to Kent's; he went from my house there - he owed me a few weeks rent; he told me he was poor, and could not pay then; he never paid me - I said he should pay me when he could.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner on the 20th of August, and told him it was on suspicion of robbing his master of a 10l. note and some sovereigns; he said he was willing to go with me; I said I must search him - he said "Well, you may search me, I have some money about me;" I found six sovereigns and 13s. on his person, and in his box in a room at Mrs. Ginard's, I found two sovereigns and two half-sovereigns screwed up in this paper; he said there were two sovereigns and two half-sovereigns in it, and that he had taken half a sovereign from it from that morning.

COURT. Q. Did you find on him any of the articles he had purchased? A. Yes; I asked where he bought them - he said he had them from his aunt; I asked where she lived, he refused to tell me; when he got to the station-house, he said a woman had purchased them for him, and before the Magistrate he said he had bought them at a shop in Middle-row, Holborn (this was not taken down) I went to several shops there, but could find no person who had sold them; I afterwards found out Harris.

THOMAS REEVE. This is the waistcoat and shirt I sold him.

MRS. KENT. These sovereigns and half sovereigns were wrapped in paper of this kind, and in this manner; I had just taken the note, and did not know the number -I know it had no writing on the back.

Prisoner's Defence. It was my own money.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320906-202

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1928. C