Old Bailey Proceedings, 5th April 1832.
Reference Number: 18320405
Reference Number: f18320405-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR JOHN KEY , BART., MAYOR.(SECOND MAYORALY.)

FOURTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 5th DAY OF APRIL, 1832, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE COMPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY GEORGE TITTERTON , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1832.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable SIR JOHN KEY , BART., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Charles Lord Tenterden , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Vaughan , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Edward Hall Alderson , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq.; and Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Henry Winchester , Esq.; Thomas Kelly , Esq.; Henry Hughes , Esq, and Sir Chapman Marshall , Knt., Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City, and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

John Walker ,

Joseph Marriott ,

Robert Goodhall ,

Henry F. Gadsden ,

J. Power Royston ,

Robert Leach ,

John Ellis ,

James Carter ,

William Drake ,

Henry Varnish ,

George Greenland ,

William Paterson .

Second

George Rodwell ,

Wm. Thos. Moull ,

James Stewart ,

Cornelius Lawler ,

Henry Berry ,

Thomas Foster ,

William Hodges ,

Edward Ashby ,

Robert Beck ,

Thos. Geo. Mansell ,

James Grant ,

John Stewart .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Robert Roberts ,

William Pennycad ,

Lewis Rabey ,

Charles Porter ,

Roger Pattison ,

George Ryder ,

Geo. Fred. Reynolds ,

John Robinson ,

James Pagelsam ,

George Reynolds ,

Edmund McCrea ,

Edward Plant .

Second

Thos. Marshall , Jun.

John Pearson ,

George Morley ,

Matthew Oliver ,

William Oakley ,

William Moseley ,

Alexander Ottery ,

Richard Nelmes ,

James Mingay ,

Henry Newington ,

William Mace ,

Thomas Manning .

Third

William Monk ,

Hugh Munday ,

Adam Munford ,

William Merry ,

Thomas Mott ,

Thomas Pullinger ,

Joseph Miller ,

George Marshall ,

Charles Baddeley ,

George Binns ,

Joseph Price ,

Fran. Merryweather .

Fourth

Thomas Pugh ,

Richard Perry ,

Benjamin Pardon ,

James Martin ,

George Pill ,

Henry Petty ,

William Percy ,

George Parker ,

Sampson Mockett ,

James Morley ,

William Morgan ,

John Perkins .

Fifth

John Manning ,

Henry Price ,

John Murphy ,

Abraham Pearce ,

Joseph Moatt ,

Alexander Moyer ,

George Newberry ,

James Norris ,

Thomas Mason ,

Ralph Peacock ,

John Parker ,

Alexander Ross .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 5, 1832.

KEY, MAYOR. - FOURTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18320405-1

Second London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

792. MICHAEL MACDONOGH was indicted for that he, on the 9th of October , in the 10th year of the reign of George the Fourth, at St. Martin, Pomeroy , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the false making, forging and counterfeiting a certain bill of exchange , which said false, forged and counterfeited bill of exchange is as follows, that is to say:-

Berwick-upon-Tweed, 25th of August, 1829.

200l. - At ninety days date, pay to my order, in London, Two Hundred Pounds sterling, value received.

JAMES ANDERTON .

To Messrs. Robert Makin and Co., Merchant s, Liverpool. with intention to defraud Joseph Fletcher , Edward Fletcher , and John Myrie Holl ; against the Statute, &c.

2nd COUNT, for uttering and publishing the said bill of exchange, knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, with a like intent.

3rd COUNT, that he, having the said bill of exchange in his possession, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, &c., an acceptance of the same bill of exchange, which is as follows, that is to say:-Accepted, payable at Joseph Denison and Co's., Esqs., Bankers, London. Robert Makin and Co., with intent, as in the first Count.

4th COUNT, for uttering and publishing the said forged acceptance, knowing it to be forged, &c., and with a like intent.

5th COUNT, like the third, only with intent to defraud Robert Makin and John Christopherson .

6th COUNT, like the fourth, only stating the intent as in the fifth Count.

MR. JOHN MYRIE HOLL. I was in partnership with Joseph Fletcher and Edward Fletcher at the time in question, but am not so now - we were merchants and Irish factors ; I recollect seeing the prisoner at our counting-house in Ironmonger-lane, for a short period before the transaction in question, but not at the time - I have not a doubt of his person.

Q. What do you know of this transaction? A. A person brought to our counting-house this letter, containing the bill of exchange I now hold in my hand; I do not know who the person was - the letter was wafered at the time; by the endorsement on the letter it appears to have been brought on the 9th of October, 1829, and I believe that to be the date - I did not see the prisoner after that till he was in custody about a fortnight ago; we did not make any advance on the bill, nor see the prisoner about it - my partner had before advanced him 500l. on a bill of lading; I am certain of his being the person who was at our house, although he had whiskers at that time, which he has not now, and he had no wig then - if he had, it was not one of the colour he has now; when I saw him at Lambeth-street his whiskers were shaved off, but I am quite sure he is the man, both from his tone of voice and his appearance.

FRANCIS LAWSON WHATLEY . I am a clerk in the house of Fletcher and Co., and was so in October, 1829. I know the prisoner's person, and am quite positive of him - I saw him at the house previous to this transaction, but not subsequently till he was in custody; I never saw him write, but we have done business with him upon writing, which he acknowledged to be his - he called at our house the latter end of September, 1829, with a bill of lading, which had his endorsement on it, desiring the contents to be delivered over to our house, and 500l. was advanced on it; this enables me to form a judgment of the character of his hand-writing; (looking at the bill) I do not believe the bill to he his writing, nor the acceptance, but the endorsement I should say is his hand-writing; - I did not see him write when he presented the bill of lading; I never saw him write, but from my judgment from the endorsement to the bill of lading - I should say the letter which contained this bill was his hand-writing; I did not see him after the transaction about the bill of lading, till he was in custody - he was then very much altered in appearance; he had light hair when he called at our counting-house, and I considered that it was his own hair; he had a black wig on at the office, similar to what he has now, and he had very small light whiskers, which are now shaved off - I have not the least hesitation in swearing he is the man who I saw relative to the bill of lading.

Prisoner. Q. Did you compare the hand-writing of the letter with the endorsement of the bill of lading? A. I have; my judgment remains the same - I have

not the least hesitation in saying positively it is your hand-writing, both the letter and the endorsement on the bill - I received the letter, and handed it over to Mr. Holl; I stood by him while he read it, and saw the bill taken out - I have not the slightest doubt it is the bill which was in that letter.

MR. EDWARD FLETCHER. In October, 1829, I was in partnership with John Myrie Holl and Joseph Fletcher . I saw the prisoner at our counting-house, on the 30th of September, and early in October, 1829, relative to a professed shipment of goods - this was before the letter and bill arrived at our counting-house; I did not see him afterwards till he was in custody - I saw him sign and endorse the bill of lading, upon which I advanced 500l. - I have not a doubt upon my mind that the whole of the body of this bill of exchange is in the prisoner's handwriting; I do not know James Anderton , of Berwick-on-Tweed, and never could find any such person - I have not made inquiry at Berwick.

Q. Look at the letter which contained the bill - does that letter appear to be in the hand-writing of the prisoner? A. It does; I have no doubt whatever that it is his hand-writing; I saw him endorse the bill of lading - I have seen him write twice, and have not a doubt of its being his writing: when I saw him in custody I knew him again immediately; he had the same black wig on as he has now, but at our counting-house he had rather light brown hair, and as far as I could judge it was his natural hair; I think I described him to the officers in 1829, as having whiskers, but do not recollect that - I remember the colour of his hair perfectly well; the bill of exchange is addressed to Robert Makin and Co., merchants, Liverpool; I do not know such persons myself; I have since seen Mr. Meyer, who was connected with them; the William is the ship the bill of lading alluded to; I believe the endorsement on the bill of exchange to be the prisoner's hand-writing - there is an endorsement on the bill in the name of Usher.

Prisoner. Q. Did you try if there was such a person as Coates to be found? A. Yes, I found there was a Mr. Coates in St. Martin's-lane, but could not find him himself - he is subpoenaed here to-day: I never heard of your being at Havre, in France, nor any thing relative to an imposition being practised upon you in any shape whatever; I marked the bill, and know it again - it has been in our solicitor's hands part of the time; I did not advance any money on it.

Q. Did you hear of my having been latterly unwell? A. You applied to the Magistrate to be continued in the infirmary - I never heard of your having had a fever.

The letter containing the bill was as follows:

Brighton, Tuesday, 6th of October, 1829.

GENTLEMEN, - With the hope of finding the William safely arrived by the time I return to London, which will be on Sunday or Monday next; I came to see this celebrated place, accompanied by a Mr. Usher, who is considerably engaged in trade in Dublin, and who I shall take the liberty of introducing to you; Mr. Coates, of St. Martin's-lane, who presents this letter, has kindly undertaken the trouble of paying for some things purchased by me in London, for which purpose I send the enclosed bill for 200l., for which I request you will be so good as to give a cheque on your bankers. No demand shall be made on you for money untill the bill be paid; my letters are directed"Post-office;" perhaps you would be good enough to take them into your care should there be any - shall make you an early call on my arrival in London. I am, Gentlemen, yours, &c.

MICHAEL MACDONOGH

Messrs. Fletcher, Son, and Co., Ironmonger-lane, London.

GABRIEL WILLIAM MEYER . I am clerk to Back-house and Co., of Liverpool, and was formerly clerk to Makin and Co., of Liverpool; I was their book-keeper in 1829, and know their hand-writing; there are only two partners - (looking at the bill) this acceptance is not the hand-writing of either of them; I have seen them write frequently for about thirty years, and am certain this was never written by either of them - I know no Mr. Anderton, of Berwick-on-Tweed; if they had a customer of that name, I must have known him - I never heard of such a person transacting business with them: we had no acquaintance whatever at Berwick-on-Tweed - I have known the prisoner nearly twenty years, and have not a doubt of his person; when I knew him he had lighter hair, and wore pretty long whiskers, of a light colour: when I saw him at the office he appeared as he does now - I knew him in Liverpool, and have frequently conversed with him; he knew me in Makin's office, and knew who they were - he never resided at Liverpool; his father did business with Makin, and lived at Sligo, in Ireland; the prisoner frequently came with him, and was introduced to our house by the father, who was in the corn trade; the firm was Morgan Macdonogh and Co.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect when my father ceased to do business with Makin and Co.? A. Fourteen or fifteen, or seventeen years ago; it is nearly twenty years ago that he was introduced by his father; the prisoner himself never did business with the house - I saw him occasionally in the streets of Liverpool, within two or three years ago, at different periods.

Q. Do you know that I was acquainted with the banking-house where you made your bills payable? A. I cannot tell; we had one James Hume in our office - he left a long time ago; I never heard of his having a misunderstanding with you; if your father got an acceptance from us you might have seen our banker's name; I cannot positively swear he ever had our acceptance; every body who did business with us knew our bankers.

WILLIAM COATES . I think I have known the prisoner about three years; I knew him in October, 1829 - I took a letter, by his direction, to the counting-house of Messrs. Fletcher and Co.

Q. Is this the letter? A. I really cannot say; it was directed in the way this is - I took it by the prisoner's direction; I am not aware that he did any thing more, than desire me to take it to the counting-house - he, at that time, had more hair upon his face, and I think, if any thing, it was lighter than the hair he has now.

Q. Was the hair on his head light or dark then? A. On my word I cannot say; I did not see him at the office, and do not think I have seen him since I witnessed an instrument for him, when he was in Whitecross-street prison, eight or nine months ago - I am perfectly satisfied of his person; I lived in St. Martin's-lane for many years - I have a warehouse there now, and had so in 1829.

JURY. Q. How came you to take the letter? A.

On my word I do not know how I came to take it, but it strikes me I had the letter at Nightingale's, a tailor, who worked for him; I called there, and I believe he was there, and he might ask me if I was going into the City- I know I was going into the City.

COURT. Q. Do you know his hand-writing? A. Yes- I am satisfied the letter is in his hand-writing.

Prisoner. Q. What did I say to you when you took the letter? A. I really do not recollect; I am not aware of your desiring me to get any money from Mr. Fletcher - I heard you were under embarrassments about fifteen months ago; I never heard of Usher, of Dublin -I recollect your being arrested by Nightingale, a tailor, for about 40l.; you were in prison at his suit - I know Nightingale; I have got goods for him on credit in the City - I have known him about twenty years; you were released from prison on signing a deed of some property you have in Ireland - I witnessed your signature in prison; I am not aware that I signed any paper - this is my signature, (looking at a paper) - I never knew Usher of Dublin; the deed was signed six or eight months ago- I think you have been at my house once or twice during the last year, on a Sunday; I said I should certainly never injure any man if I could avoid it, but if called upon to answer questions about you, I should tell the truth; I was not at all aware of the transactions between Messrs. Fletcher and you, not in any shape - I might have heard it, but I do not take notice of other people's business; I think you once told me you were lodging at Bayswater - I do not recollect hearing of your living at No. 19, Downing-street; I never asked you to interfere in getting a peerage for a gentleman in Wales -I recollect I once called on you at Hill's hotel, Charing-cross; I unfortunately was bail for you - I took you from there and surrendered you; I knew a Mr. Dawson, a member of Parliament, who lived in Downing-street - I understood he was acquainted with you, but never knew you lived in his house; I have solicited votes for members for Westminster - I think I have had letters from you, but do not know where they are; I am satisfied the letter produced is your hand-writing - I do not know Mr. Addington, of Middleton-hall.

THOMAS GEORGE CURTIS . In 1829 I was in the employ of Messrs. Denison and Co., bankers, London, and am so still. Messrs. Makin and Co. kept their accounts with Messrs. Haywood and Co., the Liverpool bank, and made their bills payable at our house; when Messrs. Haywood and Co. directed us we paid them - we had no advice in 1829 of a bill of 200l., drawn by James Anderton, and accepted by them; I know no James Anderton - it is possible we may have paid bills drawn by him on them; I should judge by the appearance of this bill that it was never presented at our house - it does not bear the mark of the notary; I have paid acceptances of Messrs. Makin's at our house - I think this acceptance differs materially from what I have been accustomed to see, but from my ignorance of the party I should decline saying it was not their acceptance; it does not resemble their acceptances on which I have acted - I think, on looking over our books, we appear to have paid bills drawn on them by Anderton.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I am here a stranger - the circumstances of the case debar me from making any defence than what I could elicit from the gentlemen present; as to their swearing to my hand-writing, you, of course, will judge, and as to Coates I was not aware he would have been here, or I could have let you see the character of that man - he caused me to be arrested after coming from France, and being plundered by a man named Usher; Mr. Fletcher wrote to Ireland respecting Usher, and got a letter giving him the character of that man, and he read it at the office; I know Coates and Usher were very intimate - he will not acknowledge he knew Mr. Addington, about whom he bothered me exceedingly, by saying he wanted a peerage, that he had the interest of the Marquis of Conyngham, but could not get the Duke of Wellington; and he will not acknowledge where I lived, though he knew perfectly well - I have been entirely deceived by Usher; he went to America from Havre, in France, where I followed him, to try to recover money he had from me - the newspapers have spread reports of my being a swindler, to prejudice my case, of my having swindled people at the west end of the town, but not a single person has come forward against me; I lived at No. 89, Regent-street, up to the time I was apprehended - I am an utter stranger here, and can have no witnesses; as to Coates, many persons know he is as hardened as a stone; he is a perfect Judas, and has been told by a Judge, that the next time he came into a Court he had better take care, for he perjured himself then; an apothecary at Westminster, named Cowan, knows he is connived with a notorious character on elections, named Stanbury - I hope your Lordship will think of my unfortunate situation, being subject to the reproach of a villain, who commenced with Nightingale to rob me of my property, and I was obliged to sign a deed, through terror and fear of him, subject to a sale if I did not pay my debts in six months; he is well known in London as a notorious fellow, and he signed this paper that I should be in no danger (reads), "Mr. McDonogh has given me a deed of trust, executed by him to Mr. Nightingale, which I engage to return, in the event of his being arrested on any account whatever before he reaches Mr. Nightingale's house;" Davis and Co., their attornies, would not be concerned for them, and they employed another; I am well aware of the influential body I have to do with, and am sorry they have gone about slandering me even in the prison I am in - I wish to ask Mr. Fletcher when he was at Exley's office, in Devon - shire-square.

MR. FLETCHER. I know these parties as prosecutors on another indictment - I was never at their counting-house in person; I have made no inquiry about your property - I have heard something about title-deeds, but have no reason to believe you have any property whatever; I sent my attorney to make inquiry about you.

Prisoner. There are several letters of mine in the hands of Exley and Co., which might be produced - I trust the Jury will consider whether the bill is my handwriting.

GUILTY of uttering - DEATH . Aged 36. April 10.]

793. MICHAEL MACDONOGH was again indicted for

that he, having in his possession a certain bill of lading, feloniously did forge and counterfeit on the same, an order for the delivery of goods, with intent to defraud Joseph Fletcher , Edward Fletcher, and John Myrie Holl .

MR. EDWARD FLETCHER . On the 30th of September, 1829 , I was in partnership with Joseph Fletcher and John Myrie Holl; I saw the prisoner at our counting-house that day - he said he was one of the firm of Michael Macdonogh and Co., and produced an invoice of sundry goods, purporting to be shipped on board the William, of Kincardine, George Sorlie , master; I have the bill in my hand now - he stated that he had intended to consign them to Jennings, Bury, and Co., of Cheapside, with whom he had had former dealings - I went with him to Jennings and Co., and inquired of Mr. Bury, in his hearing, if they knew him; he said they had had former dealings with him of a regular nature, but had declined receiving his present consignment, because they had at that time disposed of their premises, and were retiring from business - the prisoner and I returned to the counting-house; the prisoner required an advance on the goods, stating that he had, on his way home to Ireland, by Manchester and Liverpool, to purchase some goods, which he wished to do with cash, to make a better bargain; I inquired if the goods were insured - he replied that they were insured in a branch-office of the Phoenix, at Sligo; I understood him to mean the Phoenix office here; I accordingly advanced him, on the whole of the goods named in the bill of lading, 500l., and saw him endorse the bill of lading to our order; I paid him a cheque, which has since been paid by our bankers - he called two or three days after, requiring a further advance, which I said I should decline till the goods arrived, and told him I had inquired at Lloyd's respecting the William, and they did not know much of her, she being a very small craft, but that the captain or master's name was not George Sorlie, which it purported to be by the bill of lading - he hesitated for a moment, and then said, with complete self-possession, the captain's name is right, and wrote on the corner of the bill of lading, "The captain's name is right - Macdonogh"- finding I would advance no more, he left; I did not see him again till he was apprehended - we have never received the goods.

Prisoner. Q. What did Mr. Bury say to you? A. That he knew you to be the person you represented yourself to be; I understood him to say he had had transactions with the house in which you were concerned - you did not state what goods you wanted to purchase; the bill of lading has been out of my possession, but I know it is the same, for I marked it; we are in the habit of receiving considerable consignments from Ireland; I do not know what stamp should be on an Irish bill of lading - it is different from an English bill, but I do not know the exact price; I should rather imagine the stamp on this bill to be English, but cannot tell: I felt satisfied with the recommendation of Mr. Bury, and did not look narrowly to those particulars; you wished to refer to Bury, and volunteered to go over to him - Mr. Holl has now left our firm, but by his agreement all the liabilities continue on my father and myself.

The bill of lading being here read was in the usual form, stating the goods to be shipped on board the William, of Kincardine, George Sorlie, master, as 330 pieces, containing 16,904 yards 7-8ths linen, in eight bales, and 80 pieces, containing 4126 yards 7-8ths grey linen cloth, in two bales, to Michael Macdonogh and Co., signed George Sorlie ; it was endorsed as follows- "Deliver the within marked ten packs of linen cloth to Fletcher, Son, and Co., Esqs., or order, Michael Macdonogh and Co."

GEORGE SORLIE. In September, 1829, I was not captain of the William, of Kincardine. I know nothing of this bill of lading; the signature, George Sorlie, is not my writing - I know the prisoner perfectly well, and he knew me; I was not captain at the time the bill of lading is dated - I left the ship in 1823, and had no control over the goods in the ship in 1829; I never saw the prisoner write.

RICHARD BESCOBY . I am clerk to Barnet, Hoare, and Co., bankers, Lombard-street. Fletcher and Co. kept cash at our house; (looking at a cheque) this cheque is drawn by them - I paid it on their account, and returned it to them; I do not recollect the person I paid it to, but he gave his name as Macdonogh - I gave him eight 5l. notes- (looking at four 5l. notes, Nos. 12,481, 12,482, 12,484, and 12,485, dated August 17, 1829) these correspond in number and date with those entered in my book as paid for this cheque.

MARY PRATT. In 1829 I lived at No. 8, Charterhouse-street. To the best of my belief the prisoner paid me these four notes - he lodged and boarded with me for four or five months; I made a small cross on them, which I find here, and believe these crosses to have been made by me.

Prisoner. Q. Was I very ill at your house? A. Yes, for, I think, eight or nine weeks - I do not recollect any body visiting you but Mr. Stevenson; I was perfectly satisfied with your conduct - you paid me every thing before you left.

COURT. Q. Did he stay some time at your house after his illness? A. Yes; he did not lose his hair - I think it was a lighter colour than he has now.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not obliged to have my hair cut off, to have leeches applied? A. I recollect some of your hair being cut off for leeches; you complained very much of your head, and I think had a blister at the back of it, but there was no appearance of a loss of hair when he recovered.

Prisoner's Defence. I feel for Mr. Fletcher's loss, and am very sorry for it: I was made the dupe of a man who came here after leaving another country, and was prowling about with a considerable sum of money, with one Allen, a Scotchman; they travelled together, and invented all this - he called on me in Downing-street, and asked me to let him use my name and firm, he having failed; I trust you will consider what I have offered in my defence has not been done from hardened feelings - I regret the loss exceedingly; I have often blamed people in London for being suspicious, as I did not know what a place it was, but from my experience since I have been committed, I cannot blame any body; I never thought such vice could exist - I have been made the dupe of a vile man, who is now in New York; at the time the bill of lading was delivered I was not aware of its being an imperfect instrument till Usher went to America - I then became aware of it, and was on my guard, fearing I should be arrested. -Mr. Fletcher cannot state whether the bill of lading is my

hand-writing; if the stamp is an English one, it is not a legal instrument - if I had known it was forged I should never have paid for my lodging; I did not know the goods were not shipped by Usher.

[April 10.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 36.

Reference Number: t18320405-2

First Middlesex Jury.

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

794. WILLIAM CROFTS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , at St. George, Hanover-square, 20 shawls, value 30l.; 1 silver waiter, value 8l.; 1 fishslice, value 30s.; 3 spoons, value 1l.; 1 cheese-scoop, value 10s.; 2 silver salt-spoons, value 10s.; 2 silver salts, value 30s.; 2 decanter-stands, value 10s.; 1 Dresden box, value 1l. 8s.; 1 pair of French blankets, value 2l. 10s.; 4 coats, value 1l. 5s.; 3 pairs of trousers, value 10s.; 8 handkerchiefs, value 1l.; 3 waistcoats, value 1l.; 2 shirts, value 10s., and 2 pairs of stockings, value 5s., the goods of Robert Owen ; and 1 silver tankard, value 5l.; 1 ring, value 10s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 5s., and 2 shirts, value 10s., the goods of Arnold Blount , in the dwelling-house of the said Robert Owen .

ROBERT OWEN . I live at No. 5, New Bond-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square - I keep an India warehouse . On Tuesday morning, the 21st of February, my sister missed property, and informed me of it; I searched, and missed the property from four different rooms - I missed from the sitting-room on the second floor a silver waiter, a pair of silver salts, two silver spoons, and a pair of decanter-stands(they were not silver); from a bed-room on the same floor we missed twenty China silk shawls from a wardrobe, also four of my own coats and three pairs of trousers - my young man slept in that room; the things were in my wardrobe on the Monday - I also missed a silver tankard belonging to my young man, Arnold Blount, also a pair of spectacles and a mourning ring, which belonged to him; I had seen these things in a chest of drawers in that room a very few days before; I missed from my bed-room, on the same floor, a pair of boots, a pair of shoes, two white waistcoats, two shirts, and some stockings - I had seen them safe the day previous; I slept at home that night, but did not open my drawers - I missed from a show room on the first floor a Dresden China box, and from the staircase a pair of white kid gloves; I also missed a black velvet waistcoat from the wardrobe in the second floor bed-room- this was between eight and nine o'clock on Tuesday morning; the prisoner is quite a stranger to me - Avis, the officer, discovered that the house had been entered at the top.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. On the 21st of February I went to Mr. Owen's house, and traced footmarks of a man from Mr. Owen's attic window, which was open, along the gutters, towards the house where the prisoner lodged - they appeared the footmarks of only one man; I traced them to the third house, towards an attic window there - Mr. Owen's house is at the corner of Blenheim-street and Bond-street; I inquired, and found the prisoner lived at No. 10, Blenheim-street - I found a trunk there, which he acknowledged to be his; in consequence of receiving that information, I went on the next day (Wednesday,) and searched his lodgings, in the presence of Luke Allison, his landlord; I searched a room in which he said the prisoner lodged - I found there a silver fish-slice, two dessert-spoons, two gravy-spoons, a cheese-scoop, a small China box, a pair of spectacles, a coral necklace, four shirts, six handkerchiefs, five pairs of stockings, a coat, three waistcoats, a pair of trousers, a pair of boots, a pair of shoes, and a pair of plated decanter-stands, all of which have been claimed - I have them here; I went into the cock-loft, on the landing of the same floor, and found a large parcel tied up in brown Holland, containing a pair of blankets, twenty shawls, and a large silver waiter; I searched a jacket which hung up in his bed-room, and found a chisel, a picklock key, and a phosphorous-box - I did not apprehend the prisoner; the room was an attic - I looked out of the trap-door the next day, and saw footsteps leading towards Mr. Owen's house; the trap-door leads out on the roof; I traced a man's footsteps from there to Mr. Owen's house - there is a large parapet to get down, which divided two houses.

LUKE ALLISON . I am a tailor, and live at No. 10, Blenheim-street, Bond-street. The prisoner lodged in my front garret for nine months - he came home before eight o'clock on the evening of Monday, the 20th of February; I saw him the next day - he went out as usual: the officers came after he was gone out - I showed them into the prisoner's room; I know his trunk, and saw these things found, which Avis has mentioned - I do not know whether the prisoner came home at night; I did not see him - he told me he was a gentleman's servant out of employ, but that he had several engagements with gentlemen for short times.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday, the 22nd of February, about nine o'clock in the evening, at the Green Man public-house, Bond-street, a few doors from Mr. Owen's; I was sitting in a room, and overheard some conversation in the passage, between him and another man - I came out, found him there, and charged him with the robbery: they were talking about some ducks they had for supper, and I had heard before that the prisoner was spending a good deal of money, and was going to have ducks for supper; they were quarrelling in the passage, and were drunk; there were only two men - I took them both into custody, and took them to Marlborough-street; I searched the prisoner, and found in his right-hand coat pocket a pocket handkerchief - I found a key in his waistcoat pocket, which he said belonged to his trunk at his lodgings, which he said were at No. 10, Blenheim-street; I kept the key till the trunk was produced by Avis, the following day, at the office - the key opened it; I produce the handkerchief and key: I have a silver tankard, which I received from Mr. Polingo, No. 20, Prescot-street, Goodman's-fields - he is not here; he gave it up to me: the prisoner saw it in my hand, and said it was the one he had sold in Long-acre - Mr. Habert had sold it to Polingo; he is not here - the prisoner saw it in my hand at the office, and said, publicly, that it was the one he had stolen; I received a ring from Mr. Smart, a gold-refiner, in Princes-street - he is not here; I have a coat, which I got from Mr. Turner, a pawnbroker, of Brydges-street, Covent-garden.

JOHN MARTIN . I keep a general clothes sale-shop. - On the 21st of February I bought of the prisoner two

coats and two pairs of trousers, which I produce; I am sure I bought them of him.

MR. OWEN. I am certain these two coats and trousers are mine; this silver tankard, spectacles, and ring belong to Arnold Blount, who lived in my house - I know them well: the coat produced by Schofield I had worn on the Saturday previous: the goods produced by Avis are all mine - the shawls are China, and there are none like them in London.

Prisoner's Defence (written) From an early period in life I have been in the services of gentlemen of wealth and consequence in town and country, and not being able to obtain an engagement for these last nine months. I have been reduced to the greatest vicissitudes, and, as it is customary for young men seeking situations to call at taverns, where vacancies are made known; on my occasionally calling at one of them, I most unhappily became acquainted with a young man, who, being unemployed, frequently staid all night at my lodgings, and by whose persuasions I was weakly induced to consent to become his participator, and I have neither heard of or seen him since my apprehension. Until this misfortune befel me no blemish has stained my character, and the miseries of poverty alone prompting me to listen to the evil voice of deviation from the paths of rectitude; I most humbly implore your merciful consideration.

[April 5.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Reference Number: t18320405-3

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

795. ALEXANDER HAMILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , at St. James, Westminster, 1 chaise, value 20l.; 1 set of harness, value 3l.; 1 whip, value 6s., and 1 gelding, price 10l., the property of William Henry Reitz and another .

WILLIAM HENRY REITZ . I am a livery-stable keeper , and live at No. 12, Archer-street, St. James, Westminster , and am in partnership with my brother George. I have seen the prisoner twice at my stables - he had hired a cart on a former occasion, and I sent my man with him; I saw him again in about a fortnight or three weeks, before he hired the chaise. On Saturday, the 18th of February, about a quarter-past nine o'clock in the morning, he came alone, and said he wanted a horse and chaise to go to Carshalton; I asked if a light cart would not answer his purpose - he said No, he was going to take a female with him, and a chaise would be more respectable; I said as he wished a chaise he should have one - he wished it for five hours, and was to pay 18s. - I gave him the duty-ticket, and he went away with a chaise worth 20l., a gelding worth 20l., harness worth 3l., a horsecloth and whip - I delivered them to him; he was to return that afternoon - none of my servants went with him; I asked him for a deposit - he said he had no money till he went to Carshalton, where he should see his uncle, who resided there, and he should receive some money from him; I have never seen the chaise and horse since- I inquired on the following Monday, at the Marsh-gate, to see if he had delivered the ticket; I could learn nothing of the chaise or horse - I did not see him again till he was in the custody of Goddard, on the 22nd of March.

Prisoner. Q. I believe I told you I was going to an aunt of mine at Carshalton? A. No, to an uncle; you only hired them for five hours - I was to have no more if he kept it that day; I said I would not mind an hour or two, if he would not distress the horse - I never let you a horse more than twice.

COURT. Q. Did you know where he lived? A. He gave his address at his mother's, in Alfred-street, Bedford-square; I believe she deals in ladies' wardrobes - I went there, and found he had not lived there for six months; the officer is not here, as no property was found on him - I have heard nothing of my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I surrendered myself to Goddard- I hired the horse and gig for a young man named Harrison, a veterinary surgeon, who lived in Brook-street, Regent's-park, who was going to see his aunt at Carshalton; I took the responsibility, and hired it as for myself - I left him in the Hampstead-road, to go to Carshalton; he met me in the evening, and said he had but half a sovereign, to pay the expences - I did not like to take it home with that money, and told him to take the horse and gig home to the prosecutor's, to pay the half-sovereign, and say I would make it up in a few days; he met me on Sunday, and promised to meet me on Monday, which he did - he appeared confused; I asked what was the matter, and he acknowledged he had not taken the horse and chaise home, but if I would meet him in the evening, he would fetch them and take them home with compensation for the time he had had it; I called at the Belvidere, Islington, at six o'clock, but he never came - I went out of town, and wrote to the prosecutor, proposing to pay by monthly instalments, but received no answer, and in about a fortnight surrendered to meet the charge; I told Goddard the particulars.

WILLIAM HENRY REITZ . I do not know how he came into custody; I have a letter, which I received some time after he got the gig - the post-mark is the 16th of March, and on the 22nd I found him in custody.

Prisoner. I wish that letter read - (read.)

Thursday evening, March 15th, 1832.

SIR, - I have no doubt you feel much surprised you have not heard from me, respecting your horse and gig, before this time, but, under the circumstances, I know not which course it might he most prudent to adopt; when I borrowed the gig, I must admit, I said it was for myself - however, to speak the truth, I borrowed it for another young man, to whom I entrusted it to return to you, when he promised me he would do so, and adjust the difference incurred for its use, and he further promised to meet me the following day, Sunday, which he did, when he told me he had drove it into the Country, and, being pushed for money to pay his passage to Scotland, had parted with it there; to this I held out threats, when he promised me if I would meet him at nine o'clock the next morning, Monday, he would get it returned him, and deliver it to me, with 2l. for its use; I was at the appointed place, when a youth, waiting there by his desire, told me he could not get it back, and, therefore, had started for Edinburgh: under these circumances, I know not how to act, and, therefore, I wish to make the following proposition, which is all the remuneration it lays in my power to make- that is, by an agreement, signed and stamped, to pay 30s. per month - the first payment down, and the rest at the expiration of every month, until the value of the horse and gig be paid, which, considering how I am situated, ought to be set down at the lowest price - I must then endeavour to get into business, that I may be able to fulfil what I engage to do; and if you will so far oblige, as to let my mother know all particulars, and tell her the overture I make, I dare say she would favour me so far

as to recieve any decisive answer you might make to what I have proposed; if she refuses this, I shall feel obliged for a note left for C.R.S.H., Post-office, Gerrard-street, Soho: should she have no objection, a person shall call for your reply in writing, when it will reach me the following day; and I trust, as a sincere favour, you will forward it as speedily as possible.

I remain, Sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN ALEXANDER HAMILTON .

[April 5.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18320405-4

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

796. JANE MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , at St. Pancras, 1 purse, value 6d.; 3 sovereigns; 4 half-sovereigns; 12 crowns; 16 half-crowns; 60 shillings, and 20 six pences, the property of Peter Bennett , in his dwelling-house .

PETER BENNETT. I live at No. 4, Tottenham-mews, in the parish of St. Pancras - it is a dwelling-house over a stable; my cousin, Henry Bennett, and his wife live over the stable with me, and have the care of the place. On the 7th of February I put 10l. in a purse, and left it in Sarah Bennett 's care there were two sovereigns, four half-sovereigns, and the rest in crowns, half-crowns, and shillings; next morning I gave her 30s., to put into the purse with the other money, and on the 9th I gave her a sovereign and 1l. in silver - the prisoner was there when I gave it to her; she saw her unlock the burean drawer, take the purse out, and put the sovereign into it - the bureau stood in the room; I left the prisoner in the room with my cousin, and know nothing more.

SARAH BENNETT . The prosecutor gave me 10l. in a purse - he afterwards gave me more money, making in all 13l. 10s.; I put it into the drawer, which I locked and put the key in my pocket - I have known the prisoner two years; she was my nurse when I was in the Middlesex-hospital - she was in and out of the premises all the day; in the evening I was washing in the same room, and she asked me to lend her a clean cap - I unlocked the drawer, and told her to take one out; I left her at the drawer with the key there - this was about eight o'clock at night; she went away, and I saw no more of her till my husband brought her from Gravesend, in custody - I did not miss the money till next morning, the 10th, when Bennett asked me for some, and the key was gone; I broke the drawer open, and the money was gone also - my husband then went in search of her.

HENRY BENNETT . In consequence of my wife missing the money, I went on the 11th, and found the prisoner in Gravesend market-place - I said, "I suppose you know what I am come for;" she said not; I said, "I have come for the money you stole from the drawer;" she said, "Oh, pray, don't hurt me, I did take it, I will give you all I have left," and gave me 1l. 11s. 6d.

Prisoner's Defence. Sarah Bennett took the money out of the drawer before I did, and asked me to go to Red Lion-street with her, and the following day she took more out, and bought a yard of stuff to finish the gown she has on now.

[April 5.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18320405-5

First Middlesex Jury.

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

797. JAMES BOSWELL and WILLIAM HANCOCK were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Gooud , on the 18th of March , at 8t, Mary Abbotts, Kensington , and taking from his person and against his will, 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 6d., and 2 watch-keys, 6d., his property .

JOHN GOOUD. I am a gardener , and live at No. 12, Eden-court, Regent-street. On the 18th of March I was on the road to Hammersmith, at half-past four o'clock in the morning - I met three men; they were coming in an opposite direction, but met me at the corner of the lanc - they came from a different road into the road where I was; one of them said, "Good morning to you;" which I returned - I walked on; they joined my company immediately, and were with me about five minutes - then they got behind me, and in about a minute they came up to me, one of them on my left side, and one on my right, and one kept a short distance behind me - they walked with me a considerable distance; one of the three, who was dressed in a black surtout coat and black trousers, took my watch out of my pocket, and one who gave his name James Boswell, struck me at the same time on my right arm, and exclaimed, "D-n you, where are you going?" and knocked me down - the one who drew my watch out ran across the fields, and the other two went in another direction; I lost sight of Boswell and the other - I followed the one who had my watch, but could not overtake him; I am sure Boswell is the man who struck me on the right arm - it was just break of day: the man who took my watch was of a very dark complexion, and very much pitted with the small-pox - he wore a black surtout coat and dark trousers; I saw Hancock at Hatton-garden on Monday last, and twice before that - the first time was the Saturday after the robbery, which happened on a Sunday; he was very much marked with the small-pox, and I thought he was the man, but he was not dressed the same way then.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. You have no means of knowing Hancock, except by his being marked with the small-pox? A. That is all - I do not swear to him; it was a very star-light morning, sufficient to see that the man was marked with the small-pox - the watch was gone before I was struck; they were all three marked with the small-pox.

SOLOMON GARNETT . I am a Policeman. On Sunday, the 18th of March, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner Hancock with another man named Thomas or James Boswell, (not the other prisoner) at the Green Dragon-yard, Holborn - I met a stranger in Holborn, who took me there; I went up to Hancock, and asked if he had not a watch in his possession - he told me he had, and that it was his own property; he took it out of his pocket, and gave it into my hands - I asked how he came by it; he said his mother gave it to him - he did not say when; he said his uncle, who lived in the house against which he was standing, would satisfy me the watch was his property; I told him he and the other must go with me to the station-house, to satisfy the inspector - they went willingly with me; I afterwards inquired if his uncle lived at the house, and found he did not - I was told so: they were afterwards taken before Mr. Laing, the Magistrate - Hancock was detained, and the other discharged; Hancock offered to leave the watch with me before I left the Green Dragon-yard.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you the particular house his uncle lived in? A. The house he was standing against; it was not a pawnbroker's shop - he said his uncle's name was Brown; Mr. Brown did not live at that house - it is a respectable looking house; I inquired if there were any lodgers, and was told no such person lived there.

EDMUND DAVIS. I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner Boswell on the 26th of March, in bed, at No. 43, Charles-street, Drury-lane, in consequence of information, on suspicion of this robbery - I asked if he knew a person named Hancock; he said No - I told him to dress, and asked where his brother was: he said he had no brother - I said nothing to him about the watch then, but at the station-house he was asked about the watch, and said he knew nothing about it; I was before Mr. Laing, but did not hear the prisoner say any thing; I do not know Mr. Laing's hand-writing.

JOHN GOOUD . This is the watch I was robbed of.

Boswell's Defence. I can prove where I was on Sunday - it was my birth-day.

Hancock. I have nothing to say for myself.

WILLIAM MONDAY . My birth-day was Saturday, the 17th of March, and Boswell came to smoke a pipe with me, and keep my birth-day, being employed all day; he was with me on Saturday night, and left me at five o'clock on Sunday morning - it was just break of day; I live at No. 9, Great Wild-street, Great Queen-street - my landlord saw me let him out.

Q. Has the prisoner a brother? A. He has a brother named Thomas; the prisoner is a grinder, and bore a good character - I have known him five years; he works hard for his living.

WILLIAM JAMES McDONALD . Monday lodges with me - I remember his having a young man there on his birth-day, and about five o'clock in the morning I was taken very ill in my bowels, and saw him let him out; it was the prisoner Boswell, and he has the same clothes on now - it was on Sunday morning, the 18th.

Q. What day of the month was it? A. The 17th, I think; I always lock and bolt my door at night - I am a brass-founder: I keep Nos. 9 and 10, and let lodgings.

BOSWELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

HANCOCK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.[April 5.]

Reference Number: t18320405-6

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

798. WILLIAM JONES , JAMES RAYMAN , and ANN GRAHAM were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Lenham , on the 29th of February , at St. Andrew, Holborn, and stealing therein 3 coats, value 2l.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 15s.; 4 waistcoats, value 15s.; 4 shifts, value 10s.; 7 gowns, value 3l.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 4 brooches, value 1l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 7s.; 1 seal, value 3s.; 6 yards of linen, value 10s.; 2 tablecloths, value 4s., and 8 half-crowns, his property .

ANNA LENHAM . I am the wife of Richard Lenham. At the time of the robbery we lived in Portpool-lane, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn ; Jane Rayman lodged at our house about five weeks before the robbery, which was committed on the 29th of February - I left the house hat day a little before two o'clock in the afternoon; I locked my room door after me, leaving nobody in the room - I returned a little before three o'clock, and found the door closed, but not locked; I missed from the drawers my husband's three coats, two pairs of trousers, five waistcoats, and a gown - a box had been taken from under the bed, broken open, and six gowns, four shifts, four handkerchiefs, six yards of linen, two table-cloths and 1l. in half-crowns taken out.

JOSEPH EDWARD SAUNDERS . I live in Stanhope-street, Clare-market. On the 29th of February, between three and four o'clock, I saw a hackney-coach stop right opposite my master's door, at Lambeth; I saw Graham get out of the coach, and go over to Higginbottom's, the pawnbroker, twice, with some things - the coachman was on the box; there was a young woman in the coach - I did not see her face: Jones was also in the coach - I am quite sure of him; Jones got on the top of the box afterwards, and rode round the corner; they went away - Graham had a bundle, which she took to Higginbottom's, and when she came back the second time she had a bundle in her apron again - she went back into the coach.

GEORGE WEIBLE . I am servant to Mr. Higginbottom's, On the 29th of February, about four o'clock, Graham came and offered me four gowns; I offered a sum on two of them - she said she would ask her employer if she could take it; she went to the coach, came back, and said she would take the money - I lent her 14s. on two silk gowns, which I have here; she returned to the coach - I did not see the other prisoners.

JOSEPH PARKER . I am servant to Barnet and Dickers, pawnbrokers, Charlotte-place, Lambeth-marsh. Graham brought a black coat, black trousers, and waistcoat, to our shop to pledge; I offered her money on them; she said she must go back and ask somebody if they would take it - Jones came into the shop while I was serving her, and produced a blue coat, two pairs of brown trousers, black waistcoat, and two fancy ones; I had then taken Graham's things, and while I was in the act of giving Jones the money, the Policeman came in and took him; he wanted 30s. on them - the articles were taken from me, but I can identify them; those pawned by Graham I have had ever since - she said she was not pawning them for herself, that she would go and see if the money I offered her would do; she returned in a very few minutes.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a backney-coachman. On the 29th of February, about half-past two o'clock, Jones called me off the stand at Fulwood's-rents, Holborn, and took me to the Horse Shoe and Magpie, Middle-row; the other prisoners were in the parlour there - they all got in, and I took them over Blackfriars-bridge, to William-street, opposite Higginbottom's; Graham get out there with two bundles - she staid ten minutes or a quarter of an hour there, then came back, and went a second time, and returned; while I was waiting in the New-cut the Policeman came up - I am sure of the three prisoners' persons.

THOMAS ROWLEY . I am a Policeman. About half-past four o'clock a little boy gave me information; I went and took the two female prisoners in the coach - I found this bundle in the coach; while I detained them Haggerty went to the pawnbroker's, and took Jones; I found on Rayman two skeleton-keys, which I tried to

the prosecutor's door - they open it: I found 14s. on Graham, and fifteen duplicates.

DANIEL HAGGERTY . I am a Policeman. I apprehended Jones on the 29th of February, about four o'clock, in Barnet and Co.'s shop, and took this property off the counter - Graham was not in the shop then; I found two skeleton-keys in the coach, one of which opens the prosecutor's room door - they are not what were found on Graham.

ANNA LENHAM. All this property is ours.

Jones' Defence. The things were given to me by a man who asked me to go to Lambeth, and he would follow me; he gave me half-a-crown to pay the coach hire, and said would I pledge the things for him; I met the other prisoners, and asked them to pawn them for me.

Rayman's Defence. When I got into the coach I found the key, and put it into my pocket - the small key belongs to a box I have at home.

Graham's Defence (written.) I met Jones and Rayman near the corner of Gray's Inn-lane, with two bundles, when they asked if I would have something to drink - I answered in the affirmative; we went to a public-house in Holborn, where Jones left us for a few minutes, when he returned with a coach, and said they were going over the water, and asked if I would go with them; the coach stopped in the New-cut, when I was asked by the prisoners, Jones and Rayman, if I would pledge the things, not having the slightest knowledge that they were stolen.

JONES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

RAYMAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

GRAHAM - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 45.

Reference Number: t18320405-7

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

799. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Somerville Telfer , on the 26th of March , at St. George, and stealing there in 1 seal, value 17s., his property .

JOSEPH JOWERS . I am servant to Somerville Telfer, a pawnbroker , who lives at No. 178, Ratcliff-highway, in the parish of St. George in the East . On the evening of the 26th of March, about a quarter-past nine o'clock, I heard an alarm of thieves; I ran out, and saw the prisoner running - I pursued him about three hundred yards, and took him, without losing sight of him; I took him into a shop at the corner of the street, and a Policeman came up - I gave him to him; he searched him, and found this seal in his jacket pocket - I had seen it on a card in our window about a quarter of an hour before; the window was then whole - I heard a noise just before the alarm was given, but did not know what it was: when I came back I found a square of glass broken near where the seal was; it would admit a hand - it was plate glass: the door was open at the time, and Mrs. Telfer in the shop; I know the seal to be master's - the prisoner was running - he turned up a court by the side of the house; nothing else was missing - our shop had four gas-lights in it.

MICHAEL CONDON . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Princes-square, between nine and ten o'clock on the 26th of March, and heard an alarm at the side of the square - I ran towards the spot, and in a short time came up; Jowers had hold of the prisoner; I took him, and found this seal on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the seal of a young man in Rosemary-lane, the day before, for 10s.; it is not likely I could have broken the window without cutting my hand.

JOSEPH JOWERS . His right-hand was bleeding at the time.

[April 5.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18320405-8

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

800. JOHN GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , at Ealing, 1 mare, price 2l. 10s. , the property of Thomas Galloway .

THOMAS GALLOWAY. I live at Feltham . On the evening of the 24th of August I had a mare, and left her safe in the field at nine o'clock at night; the gate was padlocked; I missed her at eight o'clock next morning; I found the staple of the gate had been drawn and put in again - I found the mare on the 29th of August, at Ealing parish, in the possession of Durden, and am sure it is the mare I lost.

ROBERT DURDEN . I live at Ealing, in Middlesex, and am a collar-maker - I occasionally buy horses for slaughter. On the 25th of August, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and told me he had a horse to sell; I asked where it was; I went with him, and saw it about a mile on the road, towards Hanwell; I gave him a guinea for it, and sold it to Mr. Ford, of Sharpe's-alley - Galloway saw it there; it was the horse I bought of the prisoner - it was a blind brown rusty mare; I am sure I bought it of the prisoner - I never saw him before: we walked a mile together to see the mare; I told him to bring it home to my house, and I would pay him, which he did, and I paid him.

Prisoner. I hope the Jury will take it into consideration, and be as merciful as they possibly can.

[April 6.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 36.

Reference Number: t18320405-9

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

801. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charlotte Cole , on the 7th of December , at Twickenham, and stealing therein 1 barometer, value 30s.; 1 tea-pot, value 1s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 20s.; 2 picture-frames, value 1s.; 6 knives, value 2s., and 6 forks, value 1s., her property .

ZACHARY ALLNUTT . On Sunday, the 11th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I fastened up Charlotte Cole's house, which is in Sion-row, by the waterside, at Twickenham - the house was empty, as Cole was ill in bed at my house at the time; I locked the door, fastened all the windows, and took the key away in my pocket - I was informed about seven o'clock next morning of what had happened; I immediately went to the house, and found it had been entered by the ground floor parlour window, which is a French sash; I had been very particular in fastening that window - the shutters were forced open, and the bar bent nearly double; it had sprung out of the socket - the window faces the river, but there is a road between that and the house: I found wine taken from the cellars, boxes opened and robbed, and every thing turned out of the boxes, and the drawers broken open - things were all scattered about; I informed Mrs. Cole of it.

CHARLOTTE COLE. I left my house on the Sunday morning in question, about half-past eight o'clock, or near

nine, and went to Mr. Allnutt's - I left all the property safe, and every drawer was locked; I had nothing but a little ginger wine in the cellar; the barometer was in the octagon, and the tea-pot in the kitchen - it was a common metal one; all the plate was locked up - I missed the articles stated in the indictment, also ten silver tablespoons, eighteen small spoons, a silver castor, a pair of silver salts and spoons, and other property.

JAMES WEBB . I am a private watchman. On Sunday night, the 11th of December, about ten minutes past twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner with Kite, Seth, and Bunce, coming up Bell-lane, towards Church-street; Kite said,"Good night,,' and I said, "Good night;" I saw nothing more till about half-past four o'clock in the morning, when I was going by the Queen's Head-yard, and heard footsteps - I went into the yard, and saw Kite and the prisoner standing at the stable door; I said, "Halloo, Kite, what are you up to here?" he said, "Is that you, Jem? why, to tell you the truth, I have been drinking a great deal of beer, and it has filled me with * * *;" I saw two metal tea-pots close to Kite's feet - Davis stood close to him; I asked if they were going to remain in the stable for the rest of the night - they said Yes, they were; I went away to my own yard, which is about fifteen yards off; Kite came and called me three times Jem, but I made no answer; I crept into the wash-house, and he came and looked into my yard, and went into the stable again - I then thought I would go back, and as I went I heard something fall; I instantly ran into the yard, sprang my rattle, and called Thieves! and Robbers! - four men directly ran out of the stable; I called Kite and Davis by name, as they passed me, and said I could swear to them, as I knew them before - I am sure of them; I then went into the stable, and found the property all strewed about; I had a bull's eye lantern - I could see the tea-pot and how it was marked; it appeared a metal tea-pot, but it was taken away; I found a barometer in the stable, also a pair of pictures, a teacaddy, and other things - I took possession of the property, and gave it to Neale: the Queen's Head is about a quarter of a mile from Cole's; the plate has never been found.

HENRY NEALE . I am a tallow-chandler, and live near the Queen's Head, at Twickenham. On the Monday morning, at a quarter-past four o'clock, I went to the Queen's Head stable, and observed a quantity of linen, a barometer, a pair of pictures, and a tea-caddy; Webb gave them into my care while he went for a constable - I had seen two men run by my window, but cannot say whether the prisoner was one.

MRS. COLE. These articles are all mine, and were in the house that day.

THOMAS BUNCE . On the 11th of December I and Seth went to the Bell public-house; the prisoner came in and drank with us - he spoke to Seth, and then spoke to me; he told me Mrs. Cole was out, and asked if I and Seth would go with him, and break Mrs. Cole's house open; he proposed to meet in the evening, and we all met that evening at the Queen's Head, between five and six o'clock, staid there some time, then went to the Two Sawyers, and then to the Bells, where we stopped till about ten minutes past twelve o'clock - during that time Seth had spoken to Kite about going, and we all four came away - Davis and I went through the church-yard, and stopped for Kite and Seth; we then proceeded to Mrs. Cole's house - we sat in the summer-house till we heard the watchman call half-past twelve o'clock - Seth then went and attempted to break in at the back of the house, but not gaining an entrance he came to the front parlour window, and opened it; we all came up to him - he wrenched the bar of the shutter -Davis, Seth, and Kite went inside; I waited outside, and in about two hours they brought some parcels out to me; they then went into the house again, and had not been in long before their light went out - they came out, and got another light, went back, and came out with the barometer and other articles; the articles produced were brought out to me - I put them in the summer-house till we all came away together, and took them to the Queen's Head stable: Davis went with us; I saw Webb in about five minutes - the things were then about the stable; part of them stood outside the stable door.

Prisoner's Defence (written,) I humbly throw myself on your mercy, and implore your humano consideration of these circumstances, which are the truth. On the Saturday night the robbery took place, I was at the Eight Bells, at Twickenham, till eleven o'clock - I drank more than I ought, and on getting home found the door fastened, and went to a barge belonging to Mr. Kerby; on going over a plank to the harge, I slipped into the water, and laid all night in the cabin in wet clothes - I went home in the morning, and about four o'clock was wiping my wet stockings when the watchman came up; I returned to the barge, finding it was so early - I then went into Hampshire to work at my sister's; I do not know why Bunce should accuse me of the robbery, except from a knowledge that I was not in my father's house that night.

Prisoner to THOMAS BUNCE. Q. Did you not sell the plate? A. No.

Q. Did not the man who bought it give you 5l. 10s. for it? A. I never had a farthing of the property.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

[April 6.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18320405-10

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan,

802. EDWARD MILLINER alias THOMAS LILLEY , and HENRY SLY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Francis Green , on the 27th of February , at St. Pancras , and stealing therein 17 silver spoons, value 7l.; 5 silver forks, value 3l.; 2 silver ladles, value 2l.; 1 fish-knife, value 2l.; 1 butter-knife, value 10s.; 1 bread-tray, value 1s., and 1 towel, value 6d., his property .

JAMES FULLER . I am a constable. On the 27th of February, a little before eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in Brunswick-square, and saw the prisoners in company together, going from door to door, with scouring-paper; I suspected, and followed them round into Henrietta-street, Brunswick-square, and saw them try the area gates - they came to the bottom of the street, and I observed them both tie their two rolls of scouring-paper into one parcel, and Milliner put it under his arm; I saw them try the lock of the gate, No. 1, Henrietta-street, and saw Sly go down into the area, after opening the gate - I do not know which opened it; they were close together- Milliner walked to and fro; I observed him beckon to

Sly, and then saw him push the area gate open, which had drawn to; he reached his body inside, and took something up out of the area - I could not see from whom he took it; it looked like a dark bundle - Sly then immediately came up, and crossed the street away from Milliner; I crossed over, and collared Milliner - I felt his bundle, and found it was silver; Sly immediately ran off - I called Stop thief! he was near enough to see me take Milliner; I have the bundle I took from Milliner - it contains four table, five dessert, and six tea-spoons, two ladles, a fish and a butter-knife, five forks and two salt-spoons; Sly was taken in about two minutes - I never lost sight of him; he was getting over a fence, and a boy held him till I came up - he said to me, "I don't know that man, I never saw him before in my life" (meaning Milliner); he had the plate in a japanned bread-tray.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Sly was taken in about two minutes, had you looked at the bundle before he was taken? A. No - I chinked it, and found it was plate; I was looking round at Sly - he never got out of my sight; he was the only one running in the street, but when I cried Stop thief! about two more persons ran- nobody told me I was mistaken in Sly's person; he was never out of my sight - the house is in St. Pancras parish.

FRANCES VOLLAR . I am servant to Mr. William Francis Green, No. 1, Henrietta-street, Brunswick-square . I know this plate to be his; I had the care of it, and had seen it ten minutes before the alarm, in the pantry in front of the house, in the bread-tray; there was a curtain before the window - nobody could see it; I was on the second floor at the time - there was no servant below; there are only four in family - I saw the prisoners about the premises two or three days before, both of them - they were standing looking steadfastly down the area when I was coming down stairs about ten o'clock in the morning; I saw them through the half window - our area gate was locked at this time; it is never open; there are no steps - he must have jumped down seven or eight feet I should think; the kitchen door was on the latch - a person below could reach any thing up to a person who was stooping down; I had been up stairs about ten minutes - a gentleman knocked at the door, and gave an alarm; I found the plate gone, and the doors all left open - the house door was latched before, and shut, but not locked.

Cross-examined. Q. The area is seven or eight feet deep? A. It is; the door of the coal-cellar being pulled open, any person might climb up it - there are ledges on the inside of the door; the door is three or four feet high - there are no iron bars; I cannot tell whether the cellar-door was open - it is never locked; the area rails are four or five feet high, with spikes at the top.

Milliner's Defence. I was going about my business, and on coming by the area there was a lad down there; it was no the prisoner; he asked me to give him a help up- I asked how he came there; he said the servant had been giving him some bread, and said "Here it is" - I took it up, and the officer immediately took me.

Sly's Defence. I was walking along, selling pincushions, and coming from a door, where I had just sold the last; when I came out a mob was hallooing Stop thief! I ran before them, and this man came up to me, and said, "That is him, stop him before he gets over the paling" - they were looking over the paling, thinking the boy had got over, and he said, "That is the boy who gave him the silver."

Two witnesses gave Sly a good character.

MILLINER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

SLY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

Sly recommended to Mercy on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18320405-11

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

808. JOHN WHITEHALL and JAMES ROGERS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Charles Benton , on the 30th of March , at St. Giles in the Fields , and stealing therein 1 gold chain, value 9l., his property .

EDWARD BENTON . I am assistant to George Charles Benton, my father, who is a pawnbroker , and lives at No. 244, High Holborn . On Friday evening, the 30th of March, about seven o'clock, I saw a man, in company with another, looking through the window; I believe it was the prisoner Whitehall who was looking, and on being observed by me, they both walked away - Whitehall shortly returned, and a person came into the shop; in consequence of what he said, our young man went out in pursuit - he returned without seeing anybody; I examined the window, and missed a gold neck-chain which I had seen the day before hanging in the window - I had not noticed it that day; I found the corner of a square of glass, about the centre of the window, which was cracked before, was pushed in - the putty must have been loosened by some instrument and the piece pushed in or broken; I saw the piece laying inside - it had fallen on some seals and cracked; the space was sufficiently large to admit two fingers - I had observed the window that afternoon about five o'clock; the piece was not out then - ours is a double window; Farrant, the officer, came on the Monday, and produced a gold neck chain, which I knew to be ours.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You believe Whitehall to be the man who looked in at the window? A. Yes, the alarm was given about five minutes past seven o'clock; I had been in the shop for a quarter of an hour, but heard nothing to attract my attention - I heard no glass fall: it was fastened with very old putty, and was very firm - ours is a noisy neighbourhood; a great many carriages pass.

KNELLER SMART . I manage the business of my father, who is a gold refiner, in Princes-street, Leicester-square. On Friday, the 30th of March, a young man came to our shop- I cannot form a judgment of who he was; he came within a few minutes of half-past seven o'clock, and produced a gold neck-chain - I did not buy it then; he came a second time, and 1 weighed it - it was 2 ozs. 6 grs.; I bought it of him at 50s. an ounce, which is the value of the gold - it came to 5l. 1s.; that is the value, independent of the fashion and make; he was alone - I paid him a 5l. bank note and a shilling; I should know the note again - it was No. 26,908, dated the 17th of February; Farrant, the officer, came into my shop in less than two minutes after the transaction, and immediately went out after the man - he came again, and I delivered him the chain.

JOHN INGS . I was in Mr. Smart's shop when a man came in; I have not a doubt of it being the prisoner

Whitehall - he was alone, and produced a neck-chain; he said he had brought the chain - Mr. Smart asked where he lived; he said in Lisle-street - he asked his name; he said Smith, and that he lived at No. 14 - he asked for an account of the chain; Smart gave it to him, and laid down a bank note and a shilling; Farrant came in in about a minute - I was behind the counter talking to Smart.

THOMAS FARRANT . I am a Policeman. On Friday afternoon, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw both the prisoners in company together in Princes-street, Leicester-square, walking up and down the street several times; and suspecting, I watched them - I observed Whitehall cross the road towards Smart's shop; I did not see him go in, but lost sight of him for a few minutes - he returned to Rogers; they then walked up the street together several times, then came and stood in front of Smart's shop, on the opposite side, for a minute or two; I then saw Whitehall cross the road and go into Smart's shop - Rogers remained on the opposite side; Whitehall came out in a few minutes, and joined Rogers again - they both went up Princes-street; I then went into Smart's, and made inquiry, then went after them, and watched them into a public-house at the corner of Compton-street, and went for assistance - when I returned they had just gone out into Wardour-street, where I saw them both in company; they turned round, saw me, and separated - I secured Whitehall, and gave him into custody, then went in pursuit of Rogers, and took him in Pulteney-street; I took them to St. Ann's watch-house, and on searching Whitehall, I found three sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, two shillings, and a knife, which is used for cutting glass - it is cut off sharp at the point; I have found many of them on prisoners who were in the habit of starring the glaze - I went to Smart's in about a quarter of an hour, and got the chain; I went to the public-house I had watched them to, and Ann Glandfield produced a note to me - I took the number of it, and left it in her possession.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your beat about Princes-street? A. I have no beat; I go where I like in our division -Princes-street is about three quarters of a mile from Beton's house, which is opposite Day and Martin's.

ANN GLANDFIELD . I assistat the public-house, at the corner of Compton-street. The prisoners came in there together a little before eight o'clock, and changed a 5l. note, which I have here - Whitehall produced it; they had two small glasses of brandy, which they paid for with the note; I asked Whitehall his address - he said Mr. Smart, Princes-street, which I wrote on the note, and gave him change.

KNELLER SMART. This is the note I gave for the chain - my writing is on it.

EDWARD BENTON . This is my father's chain - the tongue of the snap fastens in with a cross; I never saw one fasten so before - I have no doubt of it.

Whitehall. I am innocent.

Two witnesses gave Whitehall a good character.

WHITEHALL - GUILTY - DEATH .

ROGERS - NOT GUILTY .

[April 7.]

Reference Number: t18320405-12

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

804. JOHN GRAVES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , at St. Mary, Islington, 2 lambs, price 4s. , the property of Huntley Bacon , Esq .

JAMES SCOTT . I am shepherd to Huntley Becon, Esq., who lives at Bruce-green, Tottenham . On Saturday, the 24th of March, at twelve o'clock, I missed a lamb from the flock, and at six in the evening, I missed another - I found one at Mrs. Turner's, in Hornsey-lane, on Wednesday, the 28th, and am certain it was one I had missed on the 24th - I took it home; I knew it by some particular marks it had - it was only lambed on the Friday before; the ewe was left, but I did not try it with the ewe - the prisoner has been in Mr. Bacon's service, and was discharged a few weeks previous.

GEORGE TURNER . I am the son of Mrs. Turner. I know the lamb which Scott took away - I bought it of the prisoner on Saturday evening, the 24th of March, about seven o'clock, for 2s.; it was in my mother's care till the 28th -I did not know the prisoner before, but am certain he is the man; I was five or ten minutes with him - he brought two more lambs on the Tuesday morning, but I did not buy them; I have no doubt of him.

THOMAS SEAKENS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, in Hornsey-lane, with two lambs - I asked where he was going with them: he said to Mrs. Turner's - he was within one hundred and fifty yards of Turner's.

Prisoner. I hope you will have mercy on me.

[April 7.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18320405-13

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

805. JOHN DRUITT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Harriet Wallbridge, on the 26th of January , at St. Pancras, and stealing therein, 10 pairs of ear-rings, value 5l.; 1 gold cross, value 2l.; 3 diamond studs, value 3l.; 3 eye-glasses, value 2l.; 2 necklaces, value 10s.; 2 gold chains, value 5l.; 5 bracelets, value 1l.; 4 rings, value 1l.; 3 lockets, value 1l.; 1 silver mug, value 2l.; 21 silver forks, value 10l.; 20 silver spoons, value 10l.; 3 silver ladles, value 2l.; 2 silver fish-slices, value 3l.; 2 silver knives; value 10s, and 3 seals, value 2l., the goods of the said Sarah Harriet Wallbridge ; and JANE DRUITT and JANE REEVE were indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, on the same day, at the same parish, they well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

HANNAH FRANCIS. I am servant to Sarah Harriet Wallbridge, who is single , and lived at No. 31, York-square, Regent's-park, at the time in question, but not now. On the 26th of January my mistress went to the theatre, and about half-past nine o'clock the prisoner, John Druitt, knocked at the street door - I went to the door, and he told me my mistress had fallen out of a coach, and she was at a doctor's shop, in James-street, Covent-garden; he did not come into the house - he said I must go with him to the shop, and take her cloth cloak; I had never seen him before - I fetched the cloak down stairs, then locked up the house, and went with him; I left a candle burning on a chair in the hall - I double locked the door of the house, and took the key with me - nobody else was in the house; he went with me to James-street, Covent-garden - I went to go in at the shop door, and on turning round found he was gone; I went into the shop, but could hear nothing of mistress - I immediately returned home, and found the door locked, but am not certain whether it was double locked;

I am sure I left it double locked - I found the chair in the hall, on which I had left the candle, had been kicked on one side; I am sure it was not as I had left it - I found the parlour cupboard door open, but nothing gone from there; I had left it locked, with the key in it - I had been absent about an hour; I then went into the back drawing-room, and found all the drawers out of the wardrobe and all the things on the floor, nothing was gone out of that room - I then called in a Policeman, and on the second floor I found the plate chest was broken open, and the whole of the plate gone; it was under my care - there were about twenty-one silver forks, four table, six tea, and two gravy-spoons, a salt-spoon, two fish-slices, a soup-ladle, and a silver mug, a pair of silver scissors, in a case, and an opera-glass - these were all gone from the plate chest; the lid had been forced up on one side: all the trinkets were gone out of the wardrobe drawer: there were gold chains, ear-rings, rings, and bracelets - I missed from the kitchen three silver tea-spoons, a mustard-spoon, and two table-spoons.

John Druitt . Q. Does your mistress frequently go out of an evening? A. Sometimes, not often - I have lived with her five or six months.

Q. Does she bring home strange gentlemen from the theatre? A. That is not my business; she does not.

Q. Do the same gentlemen come home with her as go out? A. That you must ask her about.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I live with Mr. Walter, a pawnbroker, of Goswell-road - I know the male prisoner. On the 1st of March he pawned a pair of ear-rings and a cross for 25s.

John Druitt. Q. Did I not say they were not my own? A. After he had pawned them, he said he had them left with him as security for some money; he did not mention any name.

Q. I said the person I pawned them for said their value was seven guiness? A. I do not remember any thing of the sort - they are pink topaz pearls and crystals; I think it was about half-past seven o'clock in the evening - I have not a doubt about him.

CHARLES WILLIAM MAINE . I live with Mr. Morrison, a pawnbroker, of York-street, Bryanstone-square. I believe the male prisoner to be the man who pawned a pair of coral ear-rings, for 4s., on the 3rd of March.

John Druitt . Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate you could not positively swear to me? A. I do not swear to you, but believe you to be the man; I have no doubt about him at all.

WILLIAM ROHINSON . I am servant to George John Boyee , a pawnbroker, of Theobald's-road. Three brilliant diamond studs were pawned with me on the 22nd of February for 1l. 4s.; they were valued at three guineas - I have no recollection of the person, and do not remember seeing Druitt till he was at the office.

JOHN LOVICK . I live with Mr. Brickhill, a pawnbroker, of Tottenham-court-road. I took an eye-glass in pawn, from a shortish man, about the male prisoner's size, but have no recollection of him.

WILLIAM BAKER ASHTON . I am a Policeman. On the 5th of March I went with other officers to No. 7, Grove-place, City-road, and saw the prisoner Reeve there; I found a quantity of duplicates under her stays, one for the ear-rings and cross, and one for the studs; and on the mantel-piece, up stairs, I found some more duplicates -Reeve stated that the house was occupied entirely by the prisoners (Druitt, his wife, and mother;) there were a quautity of housebreaking implements and skeleton-keys there; Druitt is landlord of the house - the prisoner Jane Druitt is his wife - she was brought into the house just afterwards, by West.

John Druitt. Q. What information did you receive, that made you search my house? A. A report in the neighbourhood that there were two sacks carried in, and the neighbours thought there were two dead bodies in the house - I found the duplicates on Reeve after I returned from the watch-house, and after we had taken the things from the house - she declared they were her own property; I believe she is Druitt's mother.

Reeve. I picked them off the floor, and put them under my stays.

JOHN BUSAIN . I am a Policeman. I was with Ashton on the night of the 5th of March, and assisted in searching the prisoner's house, at No. 7, Grove-place - I found an opera-glass in a little basket in a box, in the upper room, and a jemmy - there are only two rooms; there was one bedstead, which turns up, and another bed on the floor - as I was taking the male prisoner to the station people were hooting after him; I said, "You see they still suppose you to be a body-snatcher;" he said, "I wish it was no worse."

John Druitt. Q. Were there not other things with the opera-glass, such as gloves, which you took away? A. There were; I did not at first take the opera-glass till after I had been to the station; it remained there when I returned, but a watch, which laid by the side of it, was gone - I was never at the house before; I asked Druitt about certain property which I found there - he said it had been brought to him only that morning by two young men, who asked him to take care of it, as they were afraid of getting into trouble about it - he could not tell me their names or address, this did not relate to the property in question.

SARAH HARRIET WALLBRIDGE . I lived at No. 31, York-square, in the parish of St. Pancras . I have found no part of my plate, but some of the trinkets - the property produced is all mine; the ear-rings and cross are mine. I have the brooch corresponding with them here - they were in my house on the evening of the 26th of January; I know the coral ear-rings by a particular mark; one of them is broken and has been mended - I have no doubt of them; I know the opera-glass by its being broken - they were all taken on the 26th; I went out about half-past eight o'clock that evening - I was not taken ill, nor taken to any doctor's; I occupied the house at the time.

John Druitt . Q. Had you any lodgers? A. I had a lady there at the time, named Ellen Seymour - she had lodged with me about five months.

COURT. Q. What became of her that day? A. I put her down out of my coach in Tottenham-street, to go to the Tottenham theatre; she lodged with me for three weeks after - the value of the plate I lost is 200l.

John Druitt 's Defence. The articles were brought to me by a young man I have known for years - he requested me to pawn them to pay me money he owed me three years before; that is the ring and cross - I know nothing of the other articles; I was at Mitcham at the time of the robbery

- I went with Mr. Butler to communicate the intelligence of the death of an aunt to a person, and did not return till five o'clock in the morning.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I live at Chelsea, and am horse-keeper at a coal-merchant's, named Spellcock; a young woman, about forty years old, died at my house - it happened on the 16th - 26th of June.

John Druitt."January." Witness. I mean January: I am no scholar - it was the 26th of January: the poor woman's name was Mary Farmer - she had got a sister living with Druitt, who had been to see her once while she was ill, and left a direction where she was to be found, and I went to let the gentlewoman know - I went to Druitt's, down in the City-road; I cannot say the name of the place - it was very near the Sportsman, but I was never there before: I had a direction to find it then, but have forgotten it now - I saw Mr. Druitt, his wife, and the old lady; I got there about eight o'clock at night - it was after six when I left Chelsea: he went down with me to Chelsea, and I went with him to Mitcham, to let the brother know.

Q. How came you to go? A. It was late at night, and I went with him for company, and I wanted to know particularly whether they would bury the corpse out of the house or not; I am sure she died in January, and here is the undertaker's bill; we staid at Mitcham from about half-past eleven o'clock till nearly a quarter-past four - I then came away home to my work; Druitt came with me - I left him at my place at Chelsea, about a quarter-past five o'clock in the morning.

JOHN GOOGE . I live at Mitcham - Butler and the male prisoner came to my house on the 26th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, to let me know my sister was dead; she lived at his house at Chelsea - they left my house about half-past four o'clock, or not quite so much; I live about seven miles from Chelsea - they left on foot: I saw no more of them - I had no liquor to give them; my sister died on the 26th.

HANNAH FRANCIS . I have not a doubt of the prisoner being the man - he has altered his dress; he had a dark coat on - he had not the same coat on when he was taken up, but it was put on before the Magistrate.

John Druitt. She could not identify me without my putting the coat on. Witness. I knew his features, and am confident of him - I identified him before he put the coat on.

JOHN BUSAIN . She identified him before the coat was put on.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner, John Druitt, a good character, but they had not known him for the last fifteen months.

ANN BACON . I live in Grove-place, directly opposite the prisoner, and have known him since last October; he was out of work all that time - I believe he was a very honest industrious man, but in a great deal of poverty; I saw him at his house about six o'clock on the morning he was taken.

ANN BULLOCK . I live in Grove-place; my husband works in Regent's-park. I have known the prisoner eleven or twelve months; I never saw any thing but civility about him.

WILLIAM BAKER ASHTON . These witnesses are the women who gave me the information of his being suspected as a body-snatcher.

JOHN BUSAIN. They are the women who said they had no doubt they were body-snatchers, and they have been backwards and forwards to the place ever since he has been in custody.

John Druitt . The property was brought to me by John Williams , a bricklayer and plasterer; he was close to me coming for the property when I was taken - after the property was found I considered it much more serious to be brought up on this charge than as a body-snatcher.

JOHN DRUITT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

JANE DRUITT - NOT GUILTY .

REEVE - NOT GUILTY .

[April 9.]

806. JOHN DRUITT was again indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Kemp , on the 5th of March , at St. Giles in the Fields, and stealing therein 3 sacks, value 3s.; 112lbs. of tobacco, value 20l.; 30 lbs. of cigars, value 18l., and 10l. in copper monies, numbered, her property ; and JANE DRUITT and JANE REEVE were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

ELIZABETH KEMP. I am a tobacconist , and live at No. 52, Broad-street, St. Giles . On Sunday night, the 4th of March, I made my house secure; I locked and bolted the doors, as usual, and the windows were fastened; next morning I found the warehouse had been entered at the back, and from there they got into the shop, which is part of the dwelling-house, and under the same roof; the shop and warehouse is on one floor, and are not divided; they are all one room - I had gone to bed about twelve o'clock, and was the last person up; I came down at four o'clock in the morning, being alarmed, and found the street door had been opened inside; they had entered at the ware-house, the casement of which was broken, and part of the inside shutter was broken and open; there was a hole in the window large enough for a man to get through - the shutter had been put up again: I missed 1 cwt. of tobacco, and 25 lbs, of cigars, worth 53l. together, and 10l. in 5s. papers of copper, which I had tied up myself; I saw it afterwards, and knew it to be mine; I have seen some of the tobacco since - I lost four bags.

WILLIAM BAKER ASHTON . On Monday, the 5th of March, I went with another officer, to the prisoner's premises, about half-past eight o'clock at night; I did not find the male prisoner at home - I knocked at the door; a voice asked who was there: I said, "Open the door," and it was opened by Reeve - she screamed violently at seeing strangers, and said she could not open it without shutting it, as her foot was under it; I pushed it open, went up stairs, and on the stairs found a quantity of 5s. papers of halfpence piled up - I have them here; I went up stairs, and the room was strewed about with a great quantity of gloves, tobacco. and skeleton-keys; I asked Reeve if any young men had brought any thing there that morning - she said No, that no young men were in the habit of coming there at all; there were forty-eight keys in all, not all skeletons - there was a dark-lantern found in the back kitchen, and the inspector found a small crow-bar.

John Druitt Q. Did you not say the halfpence must have been laying there some time, as they were covered with dust? A. The papers were nearly all broken; I said I thought they must have laid there longer than the morning, but the bags would cover them with dust in a moment; I had not received information of this robbery; Reeve said the money was theirs, and they used it as they wanted it - I found a cash-box there, which has not been owned, and a life protector, also a new method of getting a light in a moment, and here are keys which will open the smallest places; Reeve said her son had been an ironmonger, and made the keys when in business - the skeleton-keys were in a bag on the mantel-piece in the upper room: there are 5l. 19s. in copper - there were three phosphorus-boxes.

JOHN BUSAIN. I am an inspector of the Police. I assisted in searching the house, and apprehending the prisoners, on the evening of the 5th of March; I found two sacks up stairs, and a jemmy, which I applied to Mrs. Kemp's desk, which was broken open, and found it exactly corresponded with the marks on it - one part is rather shorter than at the other end; it appeared to have been done by that instrument - Druitt and his wife were out at the time; I apprehended the wife.

John Druitt. Q. After you called me out of the station-house several times, what account did I give of the property found? A. That it had all been brought by two young men; I alluded particularly to the gloves.

THOMAS DELANEY . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Broad-street, St. Giles', on Monday morning, about half-past two o'clock, and saw the male prisoner standing at the end of a court; Mrs. Kemp's house is at the corner of that court - I saw him there for nearly an hour, from half-past two till half-past three; I kept going round my beat, and saw him there again before four; I asked what his business was - he said he was waiting there for a cabdriver, who was in the habit of coming to a corn-chandler's shop there, as he wanted him to give him a ride home, as he lived in the neighbourhood of Finsbury-square; I came back about four, and he was then gone -I saw a backney-coach drive up to the stand a little before four o'clock, and it was gone when I missed him; in about ten minutes I discovered that Mrs. Kemp's house was broken open - I have not a doubt of his person; there is a coach-stand right opposite her house.

FRANCIS LAMBELL . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Broad-street, St. Giles', on the night in question, from nine o'clock in the evening till six in the morning - I saw the male prisoner about half-past two o'clock, standing at the end of the court, within a foot of the prosecutrix's front door; I have not a doubt of him - it was a very stormy wet night; he had an umbrella under his arm, and appeared a respectable man; I thought he was standing out of the rain, and did not remove him.

MRS. KEMP. I tied up these halfpence myself, and know them to be mine, and here are two sacks - my son's hand-writing is on this paper bag of tobacco.

John Druitt's Defence. The things were all brought to me by Williams on the day in question, and the information given was that two persons were seen to bring the bags into my house; I have witnesses who saw me open my shutter at seven o'clock in the morning, before the things were brought - I met Williams on the previous Saturday night; he asked me to let him leave some things at my house on the Monday morning, as he was afraid of their being seized for rent - these things are what he brought; where he is I cannot ascertain.

JAMES -. On the 12th of March I was taken into custody in the New-road, by this Policeman, with my son, as I was going home from the London-docks - I was locked up twenty-three hours, then brought up, and saw Druitt at Clerkenwell on the 13th of March, but never before: when I was in the yard the turnkey ordered us all to stand up - several people came in to identify parties - some person said, "That is the man in the fustain jacket," meaning Druitt.

John Druitt. They said, "That is Druitt, the man in the fustian jacket," and after being pointed out it was easy to identify me.

JOHN BUSMN . I took this man and his son, understanding he had been in the habit of using Druitt's house.

FRANCIS LAMBELL. I am a Policeman. The inspector took me to see the prisoners at Hatton-garden; there was Druitt and four more - I identified him without his being pointed out; I had passed him five or six times at the end of the court.

JOHN DRUITT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

JANE DRUITT - NOT GUILTY .

REEVE - NOT GUILTY .

There were four other indictments against John Druitt , which were not tried.

Reference Number: t18320405-14

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, APRIL 5.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

807. HENRY GREENWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 4 coats, value 2l.; 3 waistcoats, value 30s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 10s.; 1 hat, value 8s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 1 stock, value 2s.; 2 shirts, value 5s., and 1 watch, value 15s., the goods of Thomas Haile , in his dwelling house .

THOMAS HAILE. I live in Bridge-row, Paddington . The prisoner lodged at my house for a month, and on the 21st of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I left this property safe in my box in my bed-room - I returned at eight o'clock at night, found my box in the middle of the room, and all these things gone; the prisoner was also gone, and never returned - he left his working clothes behind him; he had given no notice to leave - he boarded with me, and worked for my mistress; I did not see him again till he was apprehended - the property is worth more than 5l.

ROBERT WILSON MEAGLE . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, of Tottenham-court-road, pawnbroker. On the 23rd of February the prisoner pawned a silver watch for 7s., in the name of Henry Williams, Stafford-street; it is worth about 12s. - I believe him to be the man, but should not like to swear to him.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I am a Police-serjeant. On Tuesday night, the 13th of March, I met the prisoner in Hereford-street, Lisson-grove, and said I wanted him; he said, "What for?" - I told him for stealing a quantity of wearing-apparel from Paddington; he said "Come along,

let us go and settle it" - I knocked at my own door in Hereford-street, and asked for the inventory, and read over to him all the articles stated in the indictment; he said he had only got 14s. for the lot, and 3s. 6d. for the watch - I asked where he had pawned it; he said, at Harrison's, in Tottenham-court-road - I went there, and Meagle said there was no watch pawned for 3s. 6d.; it was produced on the 16th and identified.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell me it would be better for me to confess? A. No such thing; I knew his friends so well, I took pity on him - I have known him some years; he was going to tell me more, but I would not hear him.

Prisoner. I left my old clothes with his wife for a week's lodging.(Watch produced and sworn to)

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-15

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

808. GEORGE RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 8 mourning-rings, value 5l. 10s., the goods of Robert Fenn , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT FENN. I live in Whitechapel-road , and am a gold and silver worker; I keep a jeweller's shop . On the 21st of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, my boy rang me down; I found the prisoner in the shop - my lad said he wanted a morning-ring; I turned the gas on full, unlocked the case, and looked out a card containing six or eight morning-rings, which I gave him - he took them out of my hand, and walked to the door, (which was open.) as I supposed to look at them; he immediately ran out with them - I told my lad to run out and cry Stop thief! I had to go round the counter, and should have left nobody in the shop if I had gone myself; he was brought back in about an hour or three quarters - I saw him at the office next morning, and swore positively to him; I am now sure he is the man, but will not swear it - he had his hat on then; I am confident of him.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Do you swear positively to him? A. No, but I am sure he is the man; he was brought back to my shop that evening, and I knew him then - there was not less than six rings, nor more than eight; one of them was worth 3l. - the weight of the gold was 1l. value, but it was an expensive pattern.

COURT. Q. If there were only six, what would the value be? A. Not less than 5l. 10s. or 6l.; I should have sold them for about 8l. - he was searched in my shop, and a shop-ticket taken from him, with my handwriting on it.

MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Were there not several other tickets about your shop at the time? A. Yes, but not on that part; they were at the end of the counter - I saw the Policeman take it from him, and lay it on the counter; they had been cleared away before he was searched.

BENJAMIN WOOD . I am shop-boy to Mr. Fenn. The prisoner came about seven o'clock and asked for a mourning-ring; I rang master down - he said he believed he had some mourning-rings, if he knew where to find them; he produced a card of rings - I am sure there were from six to eight on it; I noticed them - the prisoner ran out of the shop with them; I attempted to follow him, and was knocked down as soon as I got about a yard from the shop - he went across the road I got about a yard from the church. I went with the constable, in about three quarters of an hour, to the Pavilion, and saw the prisoner there, just at the back entrance to the gallery - he was coming out; I gave him in charge of Lewsey - I saw him searched at master's shop, and saw the card taken from his pocket, with some money; Lewsey put it on the counter.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in the shop all the time? A. Yes - I ran out as quick as I could; when I was knocked down, the blow came from behind - I did not run against anybody; I am sure there were no cards on the counter, for mistress swept it down before, and I saw it taken from his pocket - I am quite sure the prisoner is the man.

THOMAS LEWSEY . I am a Policeman. I went with Wood to the Pavilion theatre; I got there about seven o'clock - I cannot be exact to the time; I saw the prisoner at the entrance of the pit door - he was coming out; I took him to the prosecutor's, and took from his trousers pocket this card, with a shilling and 8 1/2d - I am sure the card was in his pocket; I was in Whitechapel-road before I saw Wood, and saw somebody run away from the prosecutor's shop-door, but cannot speak to his features - it was a person answering the prisoner's deseription; I did not see his face - it was getting dusk.

Cross-examined. Q. What did the prosecutor tell you he had lost? A. A card of mourning-rings; they had not been on this card.

ROBERT FENN . My hand-writing is on this card, and the wire attached to it I believe to be my own work - this card had been attached to a scent-box, which was laying in my window: I had just commenced business there, and had not sorted my goods - some of the tickets were off the work.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen the card shortly before? A. No - I only know it by the hand-writing; it would not be fastened to the card of rings, but having a hook to it, most likely it attached itself to the card.

BENJAMIN WOOD. I know this card - I had seen it fixed to a scent-box that morning, before I put the things in the window, with the rings which were taken out of the window-case to be shewn to the prisoner.

The prisoner's Counsel called -

JOHN CECIL . I am a shoemaker, and live in Church-row. On the 21st of February, at a quarter-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at my door - he accompanied me, my sister, brother, and wife, to the Pavilion theatre; we went to the pit, and staid till after eight o'clock- he sat by my side all the time.

Five other witnesses gave precisely the same evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-16

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

809. WILLIAM SMITH and THOMAS PREECE were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , 24 yards of merino, value 28s., the goods of Owen Roberts , in his dwelling-house .

OWEN ROBERTS. I am a linen-draper , and live in Brewer-street, Golden-square . On the evening of the 2nd of April, about seven o'clock, I observed the prisoner

Smith waiting about my door - I was serving a customer; he came to the door, and inquired the price of a silk handkerchief, which I told him - he did not buy it; he then went off, and returned in about five minutes - I suspected, and watched him: I saw him leaning into the shop, and taking this merino off a pile - he ran round the corner; I immediately pursued, and overtook him - I tripped him up, and took the merino from him: I observed nobody with him - Hobbs came up, and I gave him in charge.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a Policeman. I was near Brewer-street, and observed the prisoners in company before they came to Brewer-street, walking and talking together - I saw them go up to a shop in Hayes-court, and look in at the window; a lady came into the shop - they then left, and went to Brewer-street; Francis and I watched them - I saw them go up to Roberts' shop, and both look in at the door and window - I saw Smith by hold of some handkerchiefs which laid at the door; Preece stood at the corner of a post on the same side of the way, about six yards off; Smith left the door, and came up to him - they turned the corner into Great Pulteney-street, then came all the way down Brewer-street, on the other side of the way, and then came back to Roberts' shop; Smith went to the door - Preece stood on the other side of the way - two young women came out of the shop, and I saw Smith lay hold of something on the pile; he left it there - Preece moved from his station, and went into Great Pulteney-street, which Roberts's shop is at the corner of - I then saw Smith put his foot over the threshold of the door, lean forward, take this merino off the pile, and run off with it, followed by the prosecutor and a young man - Preece was not in sight at that time; he was a little higher up - I was round the corner, and could not discern him at the moment, till Smith came towards him with the merino; I saw him secured - I had seen them in company for a quarter of an hour.

THOMAS FARRANT . I am a Policeman. I first saw the prisoners in Sidney's-alley, in company together - they looked at the shop window, and then at the door; a female came out, and they went away together across different streets into Brewer-street - I saw them both go up to Roberts' shop door, and look in; they walked away a short distance - Smith then returned to the shop door; Preece was about two yards from him, looking through the window - Smith took hold of some handkerchiefs at the door; some person came out, and he walked away - they went together a little way down Brewer-street, and then returned- Smith went up to the door; Preece stood on the other side of the way; I saw Smith put his hand into the shop, but could not see what he took hold of - he then walked away; Preece walked over - they stood talking for a few minutes; Smith again went up to the shop door - Preece stood round the corner, looking through the window; I then saw Smith put one foot inside the door, and reach in; be immediately turned round with a piece of merino in his hand - the prosecutor followed, and took him just round the corner; Preece had his apron hanging down, and the moment he saw Smith pursued he undid his apron, doubled it up, and shoved it under his coat - I followed, and took him.

Smith. I know nothing of this man, except speaking to him in the street.

SMITH - GUILTY. Aged 18.

PREECE - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-17

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

810. CHARLES TOMLIN and WILLIAM SHIPTON were indicted for feloniously assaulting Giles Clements , on the 3rd of March , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, 1 box, value 4d.; 1 pouch, vlaue 6d.; 2 half-cowns and 5 shillings, his property .

GILES CLEMENTS. I live at North-end, Fulham - I knew Tomlin well, and knew Shipton by sight. On Saturday, the 10th of March, I was at a public-house with them - I was there from between nine and ten o'clock till near twelve; they were not there all that time - we came away together, and as I was going along in front of them they were talking to me; I was thrown down on my head, and nearly stunned - one of them got on me; they got off, and in two minutes I found I was robbed of two half-crowns, five shillings, and a tobacco-pouch - nobody but the prisoners were near; I was quite sober - I do not know which of them was on me; it was in Brooke's-alley , which is narrow, and one of them tripped me up - I saw Tomlin next day, and told him how he had served me; he denied it, but I cannot recollect what he said - I saw Shipton on the Saturday following, at a public-house, and said, "I want you, Shipton, to make up the money you robbed me of;" he said, "I'll go down to the Wheatsheaf to meet Tomlin, and we will make it up to you;" the Policeman was at the door and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When first asked by the Magistrate did you know what coins you had? A. I said there was a half-crown or two among it; I now remember there were two - I have known Tomlin three years, and knew he lived in Star-lane, but I did not understand how to go to work to have them taken, till my master told me - I think I told him about it on the Wednesday; there were some women in Tomlin's company, but not in mine - I did not drink with them; I called for half-and-half - Tomlin asked if he might drink; I said he might - I turned my head, and then my beer was emptied into his pot.

JAMES CLARK . I am a Policeman. I was present when Clements went up to Shipton at the public-house - directly he came out Clements charged him with the robbery- I took charge of him, and he repeatedly requested me to go to the Wheatsheaf, to Tomlin, to settle the matter, and said he was willing to find his half if Tomlin would find the other; I afterwards went, and took Tomlin.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Shipton say, sooner than go to gaol he would find 5s.? A. He said nothing about a gaol.

MARY LANGSTON . Clements lodged with me. He came home quite sober, about half-past twelve o'clock on the night in question.

Witnesses for the Defence.

JAMES FLOYD . I was at the Wheatsheaf on the 3rd of March - I was there about half an hour, when Clements came in about three-parts drunk, about ten minutes to

nine o'clock; two bad women came in, sat down by him, and were with him all the time till the house was shut up - he kept sending for liquor, which he paid for; I saw him change three half-crowns myself, for gin-and-cloves and shrub, and saw him go away arm-in-arm with the two women - I think it was nearly one o'clock.

COURT. Q. What is the landlord's name? A. Mr. Durvell - he is not here; I do not think he was there that night - the waiter was; he is not here.

MARIA JENNINGS . I was at the Wheatsheaf on the night in question, with another woman - the prosecutor was there when I went in, at eight o'clock; I drank once with him - he paid for it; he was a long time with two bad girls.

COURT. Q. What were they drinking? A. Rum-and-shrub and gin-and-cloves - he paid for it in silver; I saw him pay two or three half-crowns - he went out with the girls twice for three-quarters of an hour; I saw them go away together at one o'clock - I was going home with a young woman, and he was very tipsy; we were coming back, and he fell down with his head against the wall, nearly dead drunk - he could hardly walk; I was there at ten o'clock, but was afterwards going across the fields on an errand for my mother, and this young woman went with me - the prosecutor was by himself when we saw him last.

WILLIAM KING . I am a gardener. I was at the Wheatsheaf on the 3rd of March, and saw the prosecutor there, between ten and eleven o'clock, sitting down drinking half-and-half with two girls; he changed a half-crown in my sight - I left him there about a quarter-past twelve o'clock; he was very much in liquor indeed.

COURT. Q. Was he able to walk? A. He could walk, and that was all - he told me on the Sunday morning that he had been playing at dominoes at the Cock before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-18

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

811. THOMAS TISSIKER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 7 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign, the monies of George Kent , in the dwelling-house of Harriet Glee .

GEORGE KENT. I lodged with Mrs. Gleed, not Glee, in Chapel-street - the prisoner lodged there four months, and slept with me. On the 29th of January I missed from my box in my sleeping-room seven sovereigns and a half; they were in a small box in the larger one; the prisoner had then been gone three days - I did not know he was going; I never found the money - I saw him in custody in about five weeks.

WILLIAM BONNER . On the 4th of March I apprehended the prisoner, and took him to Kent, who gave him in charge - he said nothing to me on the way from the station-house to the office; but he made a statement at the office, which Mr. Laing took down - I was present, and saw him sign it; I know this statement to be in Mr. Laing's hand-writing - (read)

The prisoner voluntarily says, "I own the deed of unlocking the box, and taking the money out, seven sovereigns and a half, and sixpence - I left my lodgings, and went to No. 3, Cock-alley; I have none of the money left. THOMAS TISSIKER."

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-19

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

812. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 6 merino shirts, value 4s., the goods of William Matthews , from the person of John Read .

JOHN READ. I am in the employ of Mr. William Matthews, hosier and glover , St. Martin's-le-grand. On the 14th of March, about seven o'clock, a man came for some linen shirts - we told him we did not deal in linen shirts - he then said he would look at some flannel ones, which were not fine enough; he selected six merino ones, and said if I went with him to Newgate-street he would pay for them there - I went with him, carrying the shirts, and just at the corner of St. Martin's-le-grand he told me to wait there, and he would come and pay me- I kept the goods; he crossed Newgate-street, then came back, and told me to come to Queen's Arms-passage; I went with him, and then he told me to give the shirts to him - I said I wanted the money first; he said that gentleman, meaning the prisoner, who was there, would pay for them - I did not know the prisoner before; I went up to the prisoner, and asked him for the money; he said he wanted the bill of them - I told him the person who ordered them had got the bill in his pocket; he called after him, but he did not come back - the prisoner then told me to come to Love-lane, to the other person's lodging, and he would pay me there; I went with him to Love-lane, Wood-street, and then he said he must go to Aldermanbury, to Mr. Coster's, in Fountain-court - I went with him there; he led me up into the corner, by the Baptist's Head coffee-house, then laid hold of me, struck me in the mouth, and knocked me down; the person who ordered the shirts had taken them from me in Newgate-street - I should know him again; I got up, called Stop thief! and he was stopped - I am certain of his person; the shirts came to 24s. - on the Friday after the shirts were left at Mr. Matthews' shop, by a porter of the Bull and Mouth inn, with this paper; (reads) "The goods not having been paid for, must beg to return them"- the goods were taken from me by force, by the person who ordered them; I am sure the prisoner is the person to whom he referred for payment, and who struck and knocked me down.

GEORGE RAY . I am porter to Price and Co., and live in East-court, Foster-lane. I was in Cateaton-street about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and heard a cry of Stop thief! in Church-passage, which I was going up; I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him- I saw Read shortly after, who said he had robbed him and knocked him down; the prisoner said nothing at the time.

THOMAS ARMSTRONG . I am a constable. I heard a cry of Stop Thief! and the prisoner was immediately given into my charge; he was struggling to get from Ray.

JOHN READ . The prisoner was not present when the man took the goods from under my arm, but when I was

at the end of Queen Anne's-passage; he referred me to him for payment - he was in sight when the goods were taken from me and could see them taken, and he said if I went with him to Fountain-court, he would pay me for them.

GUILTY . Aged. 24. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320405-20

813. JAMES WILSON, alias ANDERSON , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Earrington , on the 24th of October , and stealling 3 gowns, value 30s.; 1 scarf, value 10s.; 1 cloak, value 20s.; 1 shawl, value 8s.; 1 necklace, value 2s.; 1 gold pin, value 2s., and 1 coat, value 1l., the goods of Mary Grimes .

MARY GRIMES. I am servant to Robert Earrington, who keeps the Blue Posts, Holborn . On the 24th of October the prisoner, who was a stranger, came about nine o'clock, and engaged a bed; he went to bed in the top room, about eleven o'clock, and paid 1s. 6d. for the bed that night - he went away next morning, about seven o'clock; I went up to the room about ten, and missed a frock-coat, which was tied in brown paper, and put into the cupboard of the room he slept in; a gentleman had left it in my care - I missed from my box,in the opposite room to his, three gowns and the other things; I slept in that room, and am sure I closed the door when I left, but did not lock it - the things were taken after I got up.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you the chambermaid? A. Yes - we had no other lodger that night; I never saw the prisoner before - he came to me in the morning, and asked if he could have a bed again that night; I said Yes - he said he would come back about two and let me know; I was the only female servant, and my room is on the second floor - it was fastened with a spring latch; I polled it too, but did not lock it - I have found nothing but a piece of my gown.

COURT. Q. Did he come back, as he said he would? A. No.

ROBERT EARRINGTON. I rent the house. I recollect the prisoner sleeping there on the 24th of October, and am quite certain of him; I got up at half-past seven o'clock, but did not go into the servant's room at all; I have not a doubt of the prisoner's person - we had no other lodger that night; I saw the prisoner at the Mansion-house about a month ago - he is the man, although he has trimmed his whiskers; he had whiskers down to his neckcloth when at my house - he has now very small ones; they were the same at the Mansion-house as when I saw him at my house.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he a stranger to you? A. Perfectly so; I know nobody had been up stairs the morning he left, as they must pass my room.

JURY. Q. Did you attend on him? A. I did - he had a pint or two of porter, and I waited on him.

JOHN ROE . I am an officer of the Mansion-house. The prisoner was brought there on this charge on the 24th of February, and on the 27th I went to his house in Blue Anchor-alley, Bunhill-row; I found a woman there who had been brought to the Mansion-house, as his wife; I followed her home - she represented herself as his cousin; I am not certain that the prisoner lived there - I found in that house this piece of a gown.

MARY GRIMES. This is part of my gown tail; I had made the tail, but not finished the body - it is my own work.

Prisoner's Defence. There are a number of prints of the same pattern.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 38.

814. JAMES WILSON, alias ANDERSON, was again indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 2 coats, value 7l. 10s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 25s.; 1 shaving-case, value 20s.; 2 waistcoats, value 2l.; 1 cravat, value 4s.; 1 stock, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Autrim Webb , in the dwelling-house of Joseph York Oliver .

JOSEPH YORK OLIVER . I keep the City hotel, King-street, Cheapside . I believe the prisoner lodged at my house on the 30th of January, but I will not swear to his person - Mr. Webb lodged at my house, and a complaint was made to me about four o'clock on the 31st, of the loss of this property; on the 24th or 25th of February, my waiter brought the prisoner to the house, in custody - he had recognized him in the street, and charged him with breaking open Mr. Webb's trunk; he said he had never been in my house before, and did not know there was such an inn.

JOSEPH ANTRIM WEBB. I am a tanner . On the 30th of January I was lodging at Mr. Oliver's house, in the upper part; I do not recollect seeing the prisoner there - on the morning of the 31st I packed up all my things in my trunk, as I was going to leave town at night; I saw them safe in my room between seven and eight o'clock in the morning; they were the articles stated in the indictment -I went out, returned in the afternoon, and my things were gone.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know that you ever saw the prisoner before? A. No - I did not spend my evening at the coffee-house that night.

WILLIAM COLE . I am waiter at Mr. Oliver's. I am quite certain of the prisoner's person - he came into the coffee-room about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, asked for a bed, and had one; I inquired his name - he said Anderson: he had a carpet-bag in his hand, and a great coat on his arm - I asked if I should take his luggage up stairs; he said No, he would take it up himself when he went up - he slept on the same floor as Mr. Webb - he came down about nine o'clock, and asked for his hill; he said he was in a great hurry, and if I told him what he was to pay, he would not wait for the bill - he paid me, and left; he had very prominent whiskers then: about six o'clock in the evening I heard of this loss - this was Tuesday, and about the Friday week following I saw him in Finsbury-square; I thought I knew him, and upon looking at him I recollected he was the man, and from the description I had received of Mr. Webb's things, I had every reason to think they were on his back; I followed him into a court by the Tabernacle chapel, but I could find no Policeman; he went somewhere in the court - I sent a boy to fetch my master, and watched at the end of the court till master came, but I could see nothing of him- I saw him in about a fortnight, in Coleman-street, and followed him to the end of the street; he went into two or three shops - I got the street-keeper, and we took him to

the hotel; he was taken to the Mansion-house - this was about the 24th of February.

Cross-examined. Q. How many people slept in the house that night? A. Six or seven, they were all customers except the prisoner.

THOMAS GENNER . I am a porter at the City hotel. -When the prisoner came in I was called to take his luggage up to his room, but he would not let me touch it; he took it up himself in about two hours and a half - I saw him when he asked for his chamber candle; I took the boot-jack to him - he refused to have his boots cleaned, as he said he wanted to go to Aldermanbury, and should return and have them cleaned then; I saw him about twenty minutes past nine o'clock in the morning, for about five minutes; he stood at the bottom of the stairs, with his coat over his hand, and his carpet-bag in his hand - he gave me 3d., and went away; I cannot be mistaken in his person; his whiskers were much larger than they are now- when he was brought to the hotel I did not at first recognize him, but directly he took his hat off I said I could swear to him, as I had seen him without his hat.

MARY JOHNSON . I am chambermaid at the hotel. On the 30th of January the prisoner slept there - I am certain of him; he slept at No. 12, on the same floor as Mr. Webb - he went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock; I took his candle up, and asked if I should take his carpet-bag: he would not let me - I saw him in the morning, coming out of his bed-room door, and have not a doubt of him; he had large whiskers then: I saw him again when he was brought to the house - his whiskers were not removed then; that has been done since; I was sweeping his room in the course of the day, and found a quantity of cabbage-leaves and young cabbages under the bed; they would fill his carpet-bag - if they had been there when I lighted him up, I must have seen them.

JOHN ROE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner - his whiskers were taken off while he was at the Compter.

CHARLES WORLEY . I am servant to Mr. Castles, a pawnbroker, of Old-street. I have two coats, a shaving-case, and waistcoat, which I took in pawn from a female, in the name of Ann Mitchell, Thomas-street, Hackney-road, for two guineas, on the 24th of February - I would sell them for 3l.

ELIZABETH KENSEY . I am the prisoner's wife.

COURT. Then you cannot be examined.

CHARLES WORLEY . That is the person who pawned them, I am certain.

MR. WEBB. These articles are mine, I am certain; I left my portmanteau locked, and when I returned the lock appeared to have been hampered - the end of it was ripped up, and the things dragged out; it appeared prized open; this shaving-case is worth 1l.

Cross-examined. Q. You have had the great coat some time, perhaps? A. Yes, but not worn it much.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the things at a public-sale in Rosemary-lane.

MR. OLIVER. The goods being lost in my house I paid the prosecutor 10l. for them.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 38

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-21

815. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 2 bottles, value 6d.; 3 pints of wine, value 3s. 6d., and 1 towel, value 6d., the goods of Joseph Dudley Webb , his master .

JOSEPH DUDLEY WEBB . I am a wine-merchant - my cellars are in Walbrook ; the prisoner was my cellarman . On the 29th of March, between five and six o'clock, I was writing in my counting-house, at the back of the ware-house - I went and called the prisoner and boy to lock up- neither of them were in the warehouse; I went and called them from the public-house next door; they came in, and went down to the cellar - I went into the warehouse again in a few minutes, and they came out of the cellar; the boy (Crew) came up first, and I observed something under his arm; I asked what it was - he said a towel which he was taking home to be washed; the prisoner was coming up the steps after him, and heard what passed - I observed the towel rather bulky, but said nothing; Crew went into the public-house next door; the prisoner then said, "Sir, will you be kind enough to let me have a bottle of wine, and I will pay for it with the 7s. I borrowed on Monday;" I then went to a case at the back of the ware-house - he and I opened it, and I took a bottle out and gave him; he assisted to close the case, and put the bottle of wine behind him: I then told him to come and lock up- the keys were missing, and have never been found; I had given them to Crew a few minutes before; I said,"Very likely they are wrapped in that towel Edward has taken out, I'll go and see;" Smith said, "There is nothing in the towel but the bottle of wine I have bought of you;" I said, "How can that be? there is that bottle of wine;" I went to the public-house with Crew, and asked for the towel he had left there - I found in it a bottle of wine, with my seal on it; I returned to the warehouse, and asked the prisoner how he could act so - he went on his knees, and begged forgiveness; I gave him in charge, and next morning Crew's father and mother brought him to me, and he gave me information respecting another bottle of wine which I also found at the public-house; the seal was broken off that - they were two quart bottles - it was Steyne wine, and all taken out of one case.

EDWARD GORDON CREW . I am nearly seventeen years old, and was in Mr. Webb's employ. On the evening in question the prisoner told me he was going to buy a bottle of wine of Mr. Webb, and after he had asked master leave to buy a bottle, he gave me one bottle wrapped up on the case, told me to take it into the Bull's Head, and just as I was going out he came and gave me another, and said they were both paid for; they both had master's seal on, but next morning master found one at the public-house with a piece of the cork broken off; I know nothing about a third bottle.

Prisoner. Q. Did not your master tell you to take the towel home to be washed? A. Yes; it had nothing in it then; I am certain you gave me a second bottle, and said both were paid for; I was brought up in Whitechapel charity-school - I did not tell master that the prisoner gave me the wine till next morning; I then told him of my own accord - I had seen him at night, but had no conversation with him; I did not suppose it was stolen, but when I found the prisoner was taken up I told; I took the two bottles from the cellar; the prisoner gave them to me

about half-past five o'clock - master asked in the morning if I knew about the wine, and then I told him; the towel hung in the counting-house when he told me to get it washed; Smith afterwards wrapped the wine in it - I am sure both bottles had the seal on them when he gave them to me; the neck was out of the towel.

ROBERT BUTT . I am ward-beadle. The prisoner was given in my charge; Mr. Webb said, into his hearing, that the bottle he had sold Smith laid in the warehouse - that while he was in the counting-house he saw Crew and Smith together; that Smith gave him something, then Crew went to the public-house, and Smith followed him; the prisoner said he had given him the wine he had purchased - Webb said, "No, there is the wine I sold you;" and as soon as the bottle was found next door he fell on his knees, and begged forgiveness.

RICHARD GALE . I am a baker. I lodge at the Bull's Head; Crew brought in a bottle of wine, and left it on the settle opposite me, and before he could turn out, Mr. Webb came in to inquire about the keys, and took Crew out: there were two bottles, one on the settle and one in the room; the prisoner came in presently, and had one bottle of wine away, and the next morning I delivered the other to Webb.

Prisoner. I acknowledge to one bottle - I thought I had a right to take it, because I had to pay for it; I have had three bottles at a time - I fell on my knees, fearing I should be locked up from my motherless child; Mr. Webb's son, who is a stock-broker, has given me 1000l. at a time to pay into his banker's - his son was a fellow-servant of mine.

MR. WEBB. He has been nearly two years in my employ; I placed confidence in him - I believe he has carried money to my son's banker.

JURY. Q. Did you ever sell him wine before? A. Now and then a bottle - I used to stop it out of his wages.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-22

816. JAMES HEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Smith , from his person .

JOHN SMITH. I live in Banner-street. On the 26th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was on the City side of Temple-bar , and was on the watch, having lost handkerchief before; I felt a motion at my pocket, put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief; I saw the prisoner putting one inside his coat, and directly called Stop thief! he ran across into Chancery-lane, and was stopped - I am quite sure of him.

JAMES WALTERS . I live at Mr. Davis', in Fleet-street. I was in Fleet-street, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from Mr. Smith's pocket; I ran across after him, calling Stop thief! but did not see him stopped, as a carriage came in the way; I am certain he is the boy - the handkerchief was found under his coat.

CYRUS ELLIMAN . I am a beadle of St. Dunstan's. I was coming out of Serjeant's-inn - I heard an alarm, and saw the prisoner pursued and taken by a person, who took this handkerchief from him; I think he took it from his right-hand pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it fall on the ground, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320405-23

NEW COURT. THURSDAY, APRIL 5.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

817. SAMUEL MAJOR was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March , 2 shillings , the monies of Haden Smith ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-24

818. DANIEL COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Dennis Edward Jones , from his person .

DENNIS EDWARD JONES . I live at Stamford, in Lincolnshire, but did live in Old-square, Lincoln's Inn. On the 21st of February I was at Whitehall ; I felt a slight pressure behind me - I looked round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand, which had been safe in my pocket shortly before; he threw it down, and ran away - I pursued, and took him; a lady I had been walking with took up the handkerchief, and gave it me.

JOSEPH SHACKELL . I am a Policeman. I was in Whitehall, and received the prisoner from the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-25

819. THOMAS WOOLFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 20 looking-glasses, value 4l.; 3 shirts, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 2 picture-frames, value 15s., the goods of William Sweet , his master .

WILLIAM SWEET. I live in Frith-street , Soho, and am a carver and gilder - the prisoner was my errand-boy . On the 25th of February I missed two picture-frames, a handkerchief, and some other thiings.

WILLIAM GOULD . I am apprentice to Thomas Stevens, a pawnbroker, in Wardour-street. On the 18th of January this glass was pawned by the prisoner, in the name of William Brown, for his mother - I have two other glasses; I do not know who pawned them.

GEORGE MACKIE . I am in the employ of Mr. Wells, of Broad-street, Bloomsbury, pawnbroker. On the 17th of January the prisoner pawned one looking-glass with me.

Prisoner. He said at the office that he could not swear to me. Witness. No, not about this glass, but about another which I have.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My master said if I would confess he would forgive me.

MR. SWEET. I did not positively do so; I said I could prosecute him, but if he would confess he would save me a deal of trouble, and he would see how I should act towards him.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-26

820. WILLIAM BLANCHETT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 47 ounces and 6 penny-weights of silver, value 11l., the goods of Jonathan Haynes , his master .

JONATHAN HAYNES. I am a silversmith , and live in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell - the prisoner was in my

employ; I had been robbed to a considerable amount. On the 20th of February my foreman gave me information - I went into the shop to the prisoner, and desired him to give me up my silver, or I should send for an officer; he hesitated a little time; I again desired him to give it up - he then turned round, and gave me some silver cuttings, twisted up in a piece of paper, from the back of a press where he was working; there was I oz. and 4 dwts.; I said to him, "A fortnight ago you robbed me of 50 ozs.;" he asked me if I would forgive him, and admitted that he took 39 ozs. of it - I said, "It will be better for you to state all you know."

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long had he lived with you? A. About twelve months - he was a stamper; he had been employed making tea-pot handles, and he brought back some deficient in weight - the press is mine, but he worked there; cuttings are never placed behind it.

THOMAS HOUGH . I am apprentice to Mr. Haynes. I went with the officer to the prisoner's lodging, and found 7 ozs. of silver, in a box.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS. I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodging, and found some silver there - this is what was found by Mr. Haynes.

MR. HAYNES. This is my property - it is cuttings, and could not have been there for any honest purpose; it should have been given back to te foreman.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the foreman here? A. No; the articles are cut out in his shop, and the cuttings should have been left there - there could be no silver on my premises but my own.

GUILTY . Aged 44. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-27

821. JOHN OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 14 pieces of veneer, value 5s. , the goods of John Bartholomew .

JOHN BARTHOLOMEW. I live at Bonner's-hall, Bethnal-green , and am a timber-merchant ; I have a yard in Heneage-street - the prisoner was in my employ for three or four months. On the 14th of March I called him, and observed that he had something in his inside pocket; I followed him on to Church-street; I then spoke to him - he walked with me to the station-house, and fourteen pieces of veneer, which are mine, were found on him - they are parts of longer pieces which had been on my premises.

JOHN LAWRENCE McDONNELL . I am superintendent of the Police. I found these veneers in the prisoner's right-hand jacket pocket.

MR. BARTHOLOMEW. I know these by their being cut from some long pieces in my possession; they have been cut as if to do some work which he had at his lodging - I missed two long pieces, Nos. 34 and 35.

Prisoner. Q. Do you mean to say they were cut out of two veneers? A. It is most likely; here is rather more than two veneers, but I know I missed two.

Prisoner. They are not his at all; they are the ends of several veneers.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-28

822. WILLIAM ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 1 silver cup, value 4l. 10s.; 6 dessert knives, value 3l.; 50 table knives, value 2l.; 1 pair of shoes, value 8s.; 1 tea tray, value 2l., and 1 silver wine funnel, value 30s., the goods of Sir Robert Smirke , his master .

WILLIAM HORSFORD . I am a serjeant of the Police. On the 17th of March I saw the prisoner in Stratford-place , coming out of the area of No 5; he had a bundle with him - he went down Oxford-street, and into Gee's-court; I followed, and asked what he had under his arm - he said it was no business of mine; I said he must go with me - when I got him to the watch-house, I found his bundle contained coals; I then went to Sir Robert Smirke 's, and found a bunch of keys in some drawers in the butler's pantry, and a small deal box, with twenty duplicates in it - Sir Robert Smirke , the footman, and coachman were with me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What time was this? A. About half-past five o'clock on Saturday, the 17th of March; the pantry was open.

HENRY LIVERMORE . I am shopman to Mr. Cottrell, a pawnbroker, in Oxford-street. I have a silver cup, pawned on the 24th of September, for 20s., in the name of John Rowe, No. 5, Stratford-place, but I was not in the service at that time - I have some plated dessert knives and forks, and twenty-four table and dessert knives, two cervers and forks, pawned with me, by the prisoner, on the 16th of January, in the name of John Rowe, No. 10, Oxford-street; I have a pair of shoes, a tea-tray, and six spoons, pawned by the prisoner on the 14th of February, and six more on the 10th of March - (they have a crest on them) in the name of John Rowe , No. 10, Oxford-street, and two dessert-spoons, and a silver wine-funnel, pawned by the prisoner, on the 16th of March, in the same name, with the address, No 10, Davis-street - the officer has the duplicates of them all; he has pawned things for two or three years, and has brought one article to take another out.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure it was the prisoner. A. Yes, I knew him, and I did not always recollect what address he had given before; he had often redeemed plate, apparel, and other things - I lent 15s. on the two dessert spoons, and 2l. 10s. on the tea spoons; I suppose the cup is worth 4l. or 5l.

SIR ROBERT SMIRKE . I live at No. 5. Stratford-place. The prisoner was my butler for eight or nine years; he had no authority to take coals or anything from my premises - these are all my articles, and were under his care- I know the drawer in which the keys were found; the box which the duplicates were in belonged to the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you received a good character of him from a gentleman named Thistlethwait? A. I believe that was the name; I felt great regret at being compelled to prosecute - he had the care of my plate, and I have not the least idea of when these articles were taken; he recived his wages quarterly, and conducted himself well.

Prisoner's Defence. Sir Robert had a good character with me, and I could have had a character from Lord Duncannon, where I lived, but I did not like to trouble him - I should have received twice the money which would have redeemed these things on the 25th of March, and should have redeemed them; they could not have remained there, for they would have been wanted.

COURT to HENRY LIVERMORE. Q. What is the amount on the whole of the duplicates? A. About 8l.

GUILTY. Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-29

823. WILLIAM WELSDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 sovereign and 8 shillings, the monies of Charles Bishop , his master .

CHARLES BISHOP. I live in Milbank-street, Westminster , and am a coal-merchant ; the prisoner was four months in my employ. On the 14th of March, in consequence of suspicion, I marked some sovereigns, half-crowns, and shillings, and put them into a purse, which I left hanging to the key of my desk in the counting-house - I had been in the habit of hanging it there; I missed one sovereign and eight shillings - I took the prisoner to Ballard's house, and he was desired to produce what money he had about him; he produced a sovereign and six shillings - I found on them the marks which I had put on them, and knew them to be mine.

WILLIAM BALLARD . The prosecutor brought the prisoner to my house, and he gave up the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I had to open the shutters every morning, and the purse was placed close against the window - I am very sorry I did it.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320405-30

824. CHARLES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 portmanteau, value 24s. , the goods of John James .

ROBERT JAMES . I am assistant to my father, John James , trunk-maker , Coventry-street . On the afternoon of the 9th of March I was in his shop, and saw a man take a portmanteau from the door, where it was exposed for sale; on going to the door I saw the prisoner, about four doors off, with it; I followed, and took him at the corner of Oxenden-street - I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said it was his - I said it was not; he threw it down, and ran away; he was pursued, and taken in Rupert-street - I did not lose sight of him.

GEORGE BURTON . I am a Police-constable. I heard the alarm as I was going down Rupert-street - the prisoner and the portmanteau were given to me; I found 5s. 8 1/2d. on him - he seemed very sorry.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-31

825. RICHARD HEALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , 3 pewter pots, value 5s. , the goods of Moses Hopper .

- TAPLIN. I am a grocer, and live in Berwick-street. On the morning of the 2nd of March I was at my door, and saw the prisoner go into a passage of a private house, nearly opposite Mr. Hopper's - he took up three quart pots, and put them into a bag; he came along with them, and when he got opposite my house I went and asked what he had got; he said Nothing - I took him back to the door he took them from, and he gave me the pots.

MOSES HOPPER. I keep the White Hart, in Berwick-street . These pots are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-32

826. MARGARET THORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 silver table-spoon, value 15s.; 3 bottles of wine, value 15s.; 1 pocket-handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 napkin, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Chitty , her master .

THOMAS CHITTY, ESQ . I live in Calthorpe-street - the prisoner was three months in my service, as cook . I missed a small quantity of wine from my cellar; I was in the habit of carrying one of the keys of my cellar in my coat pocket - if I took off that coat the key would remain in the pocket; I missed the key one day, and asked the prisoner about it - she said she found it on the Sunday morning, under the supper-tray in the dining room; I said we had not supped in that room - I then went, and found the key on the book case, about seven feet from the floor, and out of sight; I then went into the kitchen, said I had missed some wine, and asked if she knew any thing of it - she denied it, and seemed astonished at my taxing her with it; I then desired her box to be unlocked, and she opened it - some duplicates were found in it, also a napkin, and a pocket-handkerchief; I had lost a silver spoon, which cost me 26s. - I gave her into custody.

Prisoner. The duplicate of the spoon was not in my box, it was down stairs in the kitchen. Witness. No - it was in the box which she unlocked.

GABRIEL BURROWS . I am in the service of Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker. I have a spoon, pawned on the 15th of December, but I do not know the prisoner - it is pawned in the name of Ann King; this is the duplicate.

JAMES MOONEY . I am a Police-constable, No. 112, E. I was present when the prisoner unlocked her box with a key which she pulled out of her pocket - these duplicates, this handkerchief, and this napkin, were found in it; there was no duplicate found in the kitchen - she said she got the duplicates from a woman, instead of some money, and the towel and handkerchief, she said came there by washing.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the housemaid had been inquiring the value of the spoon, that the duplicate of it was sold to her, by a woman who came to the house to buy old clothes.

MR. CHITTY. My other servant is here, and has been with me a long time - I am positive the duplicate was in her box; she came to me with a false written character - I have ascertained she is a labourer's wife.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

827. MARGARET THORNE was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 gold diamond ring, value 2l., and 1 other golden ring, value 2l., the goods of Benjamin Glover , her master .

BENJAMIN GLOVER. I live in South Island-place, Brixton . The prisoner was in my service in the latter end of 1831, and she had lived with my late father and mother for seven or eight years - I then lost sight of her, but met her by accident, in St. Paul's church-yard; she said she was out of employ, and I said she was welcome to go to my house till she got a situation - she was there about three months, and I told her she might consider herself a servant , and agreed to give her wages; I missed a number of articles, and among the rest a diamond ring - the duplicate of it was found in the prisoner's box, at Mr. Chitty's.

JAMES MOONEY. I found this duplicate in the prisoner's box, on the 28th of February.

STEPHEN WHITAKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-lane. I have a ring, pawned in the name of Smith, for 1l. - the prisoner has a strong resemblance to the person who pawned it, but I think she was rather stouter, and I understand she has a sister; this is the duplicate I gave.

MR. GLOVER. This is my ring, and I missed it while the prisoner was with me - I mentioned it to her, and she said I must have left it at the Tavistock-hotel, where I slept one night.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-33

828. CHARLES CATESBY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 1 cheese, value 35s., the goods of Luke Ridge ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

WILLIAM HOLLIS . I am shopman to Mr. Luke Ridge, of Lower Sloane-street, Chelsea , a cheesemonger . On the morning of the 27th of February I put a cheese on our show-board - I saw it safe at four o'clock, and did not miss it till the officer came - this is it.

Prisoner. I should like to know how he knows the cheese. Witness. By the private-mark on it - we sell them with this mark, but we had not sold a whole cheese that day, and I do not recollect when we had; we had five or six others about the same size; this has not been in our possession since - the mark was not put on in going to Queen-square; here has been a mark put on, which was wrong - that has been erased, and another put on.

MATTHEW RIORDAN . I am a Police-constable. On the night of the 27th of February I was on duty at Ebury-terrace; there is a grove of trees in front of it - I saw the prisoner going along about half-past ten o'clock, with this cheese on his head; I hailed him to stand; he took no notice, and I ran after him - he was then about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's; I asked where he brought it from; he said it was no business of mine, and it was very odd that men could not go about their lawful business without such busy fellows interfering with them - I then asked where he was taking it to; he said, "Home," but I could get no account that was satisfactory; he mentioned a street, but he was going in quite a contrary direction - I said he should tell me where it came from; he would not, and I took him to the watch-house - he swore, and said, "You may have the cheese, that will be of some use, but I am of no use;" I said I would not part with the cheese nor him; he then said he would not carry it, and I was not aware it was so heavy as it is - he then threw it towards me, struck at me, and broke from me; I parried off the blow, and took hold of him; we had a hard struggle before I could draw my rattle; when I sprang it, two of my brother officers came, and we took him; he then said he had found the cheese in that grove - I made enquiries, and found the prosecutor, and the shopman swore to it.

Prisoner. Did you not ask where the other two men in the white apron, and the basket were, and say if I could tell you where they were, you would let me go? Witness. No, I did not say I would let you go; I asked where the other two men were - there were three together at first, and I disturbed them; I then saw them again in a quarter of an hour, and the prisoner had the cheese - I found the basket afterwards, but nothing in it.

CHARLES HAWARD HUGHES . I have a certificate of the former conviction of the prisoner, which I got at Mr. Clark's office; I apprehended him, and know he is the same man (read).

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-34

829. THOMAS CASTLES and WILLIAM BEDFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , I live tame drake, value 2s. 6d., and 2 live tame ducks, value 4s. , the goods of William Webb .

JAMES JOHNSTON . I am a superintendant of Police. Between twelve and one o'clock on the night of the 7th of March I was on horseback, near Newington-green ; I saw the two prisoners with something in an apron; I came up with them, got off my horse, and saw them in a passage - I saw a duck thrown out of the other person's apron; Castles ran off towards Ball's-pond, through some skeleton houses, and I took him in one of them.

Castles. I had nothing in my apron. Witness. He had not when I took him, but he had when I first saw him - these are the poultry.

Bedford. Q. Was I the other person you saw? A. I have no doubt of it, but I cannot swear that you were with Castles.

JAMES CALDOW . I live in Maberly-terrace, Ball's-pond. On the 7th of March I was at my fire-side, and saw some ducks in my garden; they went into an adjoining carcase of a house, and were found there - I soon afterwards saw Castle in custody.

PATRICK CALDOW . I am the son of this witness. On the 7th of March I saw some white ducks in our garden; they flew to the next house, and were caught.

MARY ANN BRAZIER . I am the wife of William Brazier - we live at No. 1, Union-row. On the 7th of March, between one and two o'clock, I was in a shed in my yard; my little boy gave me information, and I saw Bedford near my yard door - I asked what he did there: he said, "God bless you, Mrs., don't be hard hearted - I am a poor fellow in distress, and I was induced this morning to take some ducks; they have got my mate, and are after me;" he asked me to keep him from them - I told him I could not- he then asked me to let him out at my front door, which I did; he walked out, and turned to the left: I saw the officer - I called him, and he took him.

GEORGE HAWKINS . I am a labourer, and live at Green Gate-gardens. On the 7th of March I was in Ball's Pond-road; I saw Castles with some ducks in a blue apron - I saw the officer come up and take him afterwards.

CHARLES EVE . I am servant to Mr. William Webb. These ducks are his property - one of them has a mark on the top of the bill, which I can swear to; I used to turn them out about eight o'clock, and put them in between four and five - our yard joins a field next to the road; I should think they were taken half a mile from our place.

Castle's Defence. I know nothing of them - I went after a job.

Bedford's Defence. I am a brick-maker , and have worked for one master seven years - I was looking for em

ploy, but could not get any; I was coming home, and the officer took me.

CASTLES - GUILTY . Aged 23.

BEDFORD - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320405-35

830. JOHN DOUGHTY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 1 hat, value 16s., and 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Webber .

CHARLES WEBBER. I live at Poplar gas-works , and work as a gas-fitter under my father. I lost my hat and handkerchief from the back bed-room, inside the office at the gas-works, on the 23rd of March; I found the door open, but I did not miss the articles till I had information from Rich - these are my property.

EDWARD RICH , I live in Cottage-place, East India-road. I was at work in the retort-house on the day in question - my mistress came in, and said a man had gone out with a hat-box under his arm - we went out, and I saw the prisoner with the hat-box under his arm, and the hat in it - the handkerchief was in his pocket; I asked him how he got them - he gave me no answer: I gave him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. A man offered me 6d. to carry them for him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-36

831. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for embezzlement .

ANN DREW . I am single , and keep the Devonshire house, High Holborn - I sell Devonshire pigs and butter ; the prisoner was my errand-boy for about ten days. On the 15th of March I delivered him some mutton to take to Mr. Pitman, in Bernard-street, Russell-square; I gave him a bill, and told him he would have to bring home 9s. 6d.: he returned, and said the gentleman had not been in since he went out, and the cook had not the money to pay.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. When did he return? A. In about an hour.

SOPHIA BOUGHTON . I live in the service of George Pitman , in Bernard-street . The prisoner brought a haunch of mutton; I took it of him - there was a bill on it, which I took to my mistress, and she gave me three half-crowns and two shillings, which I gave to the prisoner; the bill was 9s. 6d.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure you paid it him? A. Yes; my master was in the drawing-room with my mistress at the time - this is the bill, but there is no receipt to it; I did not think to ask him to write any - I did not tell him my master was not at home; I have lived five months with Mr. Pitman - I am nurse, but I opened the door as I was going up stairs; the prisoner said I had not paid him, but I am certain I did.

MRS. DREW. I sometimes send bills out without receipts to them, but he had authority to write receipts if he got the money; I had a good character with the prisoner: he left me the day after he received this, without notice - he came back about six o'clock on the Sunday morning, and said he was come for his clothes; I said there was a haunch of mutton which he had not paid for; as Mr. Pitman had called and said he had paid for it - he gave me no answer, and I sent for the officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not receive the money.

The prisoner received a good character, and a person engaged to employ him.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-37

832. BARBARA GRUNDY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd March , 7 reels of cotton, value 1s. 6d.; 1 reel of hobbin, value 6d.; 18 yards of edging, value 16s.; 17 yards of lace, value 2l.; 4 yards of cambric, value 1l. 16s.; 10 yards of diaper, value 30s.; 7 yards of lawn, value 50s.; 12 yards of flannel, value 2l.; 10 yards of muslin, value 24s.; 10 yards of linen, value 36s., and 12 yards of binding, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William James and William Baucutt .

JOHN STEPHENSON. I am shopman to Messrs. William James and William Bancutt, mercers and drapers , Soho-square . On the 23rd of March the prisoner came to our house, with a note and a pattern of linen - she said she came from Lady Auckland, of Grosvenor-street, for some more of the same linen as they had last week - I am not aware that they had had any the week before, but in consequence of the note, I sold her the articles stated in the indictment; this is the note - it was in consequence of her producing this that I let her have the things; I did not know that there was such a person as Lady Auckland, but I believed there was, and I dealt with the prisoner as her agent - I did not give her credit; she gave an order for some other goods, to be sent for her ladyship to see the following morning; she said she had been in Lady Auckland's family ever since she was a child of six years old - we have ascertained there is no such person; the goods she had amounted to 14l. odd; I made the bill in the name of Lady Auckland - I gave credit till the following day, when these goods were to be paid for, with some others which were to be sent; the prisoner gave her name as Maria Perry, No. 12, Aldersgate-street - I had suspicion, and sent a person to watch her, and she went to the Grafton Arms, Grafton-street; I found her there the following morning; I met her coming down stairs, and I told her I had ascertained the note was a forgery, as I had been to Lord Auckland's; she said it could not be the case, and she would go with me to Lord Auckland's; I said, "You had better come with me to the Police-station" - I sent for an officer, who took her; she had had all these goods away, but I found them all at the Grafton Arms - I had been there the night before, and they said no such person had been there, but I got up early the next morning, and found her; she had cut up one or two of the articles.

Prisoner. Every thing he states is correct but the name - I said Mary Perry, No. 13, Aldersgate-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-38

833. BARBARA GRUNDY was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 4 yards of velvet, value 3l., and 2 pairs of silk stockings, value 15s., the goods of George Drake Sewell , and another .

JAMES SMITH . I am shopman to George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , mercer s, of Frith-street . About ten o'clock in the forenoon of the 6th March, the prisoner came and said, "I have brought this note for Sewell and Cross; I opened it, and read it - reads

"Lady Clive requests Sewell and Cross, to allow her maid to select four yards of green valvet, with one pair of good silk stockings; also send to her residence in St. James, a variety of rich figured white silks, between the hours of two and five, with the bill of the velvet.

St. James', Monday morning."

Lady Clive does not live at St. James'; I asked Mr. Evans if Lady Clive's account was good - he said, Yes; and I called Mr. Scott to serve the prisoner with the goods - I saw them sold to her, and entered to Lady Clive, as other goods had been before; I should think a bill of parcels were given her as usual, and the goods were delivered to her under the impression that she was servant to Lady Clive.

JOHN SCOTT . I am in the employ of the prosecutors. The prisoner desired me to serve her with four yards of green velvet; I asked what colour she would like, and she said she left it to Sewell and Cross, to let her have a good one - I selected an emerald, at 15s. a yard; she had two pairs of silk stockings; she wished them to be laced; she debated about the pattern, and asked if I would allow her to take two patterns, which I did, in consequence of what was stated in the note which I had seen, and which I believed to be a genuine request of Lady Clive - I should not have let her had the goods without.

JOHN CORDY BAXTER . I am a pawnbroker; I have two pairs of laced silk stockings, pawned by the prisoner, on the 6th of March, about twelve o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-39

834. JAMES GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 copper, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Prowler .

JOHN POINTING . I am a Police-constable. On the afternoon of the 15th of February I went to Mr. Dennis's shop, in Queen-street, Brompton; I found the prisoner there with this copper; I took him.

THOMAS DENNIS . I am an ironmonger; I have known the prisoner some time. On the evening of the 14th of February he came and asked what I gave a pound for a washing-copper; I said 6 1/2d - he then went and got this copper; I said, "I hope you got it honestly - you know the impropriety of stealing goods and then selling them;" he said Yes, he had been at work at a gentleman's at Little Chelsea, who had it about in the way, and he had bought it of him - I gave him 10s. for it; I then said, "What did you give for it?" - he said 9s.; I said it was worth a shilling to bring it from Little Chelsea - my man put it out the next morning; the prisoner saw it, and said I had better take it in - I asked why; he then said it was stolen, that he had sold it for a man, and he had told me a story the night before - I sent for the officer, who took him.

CHARLES BOWLER . I live at Culverden, near Tunbridge Wells. The prisoner set himself to work cleaning down a house of mine at Chelsea ; there was a copper left in the parlour of the house on a Wednesday, I think it was the 8th of February - I never gave it to him, nor allowed him to dispose of it - this is it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returnng home about one o'clock; a man came and told me he had an old copper to sell - I was out of work, and I thought I might as well earn 1s.; he was to meet me at the bridge - he brought it and gave it me, and I took it to Dennis; I gave him the money, and he gave me 2s. for my trouble.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-40

835. ELIZABETH GRADY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 3 coats, value 3l.; 2 waistcoats, value 15s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 15s. , the goods of Charles Sadler .

MR. CHURCHILL conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES SADLER . I am a hair-dresser - I lodge with Mr. Charles Wilson , in Goodwin-court, St. Martin's-lane ; the prisoner was his housekeeper . I went there about the middle of February, and about the 6th of March I lost these articles; I was out at the time they were taken.

JOSEPH HIGGINGS . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and told her it was for robbing her brother's lodger; I took a man of the name of Badger - the prisoner followed us, and asked if her brother had given me in charge; I said No - she said, "If he has given me seven years, I will give him fourteen;" I then said I had got Badger - she said, "Poor George, but he is innocent, I did it all myself;" I had mentioned what the things were, and Mr. Sadler's name - Badger was afterwards discharged; I found none of the lodger's things, but some of her brother's things were found - she had been living with Badger in a court near the Seven-dials; I took her on Thursday, the 8th of March - I believe Badger had been in the habit of coming to the house to see her.

CHARLES SADLER . Mr. Bretnor lodged in the house; the street door was occasionally left open for people to go in and out of.

CHARLES WILSON . I keep a piece-broker's shop. The prisoner is my sister - I saw her on the Thursday afternoon, and when I saw her again she was tipsy; we went into a public-house, and she said she would get me most of my things - I did not see her again; I knew nothing of Badger till he was taken up - I never knew him to be at my house; the street door is usually open from morning till dark.

JOSEPH THOMAS . I am a superintendant of the Police. The prisoner appeared in great distress of mind, and said,"It was I that did it, poor George is innocent."

Prisoner's Defence. I gave myself up to the Policeman - I am innocent of these things; I pawned two or three of my brother's things - I went to the watch-house, thinking they were my brother's clothes; I have cautioned Mr. Sadler not to leave his door open.

MR. SADLER. She never did - we have left the key when we were gone out, for her to make the beds.

MR. THOMAS. She was partially intoxicated, but I asked her if she alluded to the stolen property; she said,"Yes, it was me, poor George is innocent;" it appeared to be a tacit admission of her guilt, but I think she might not have said this under other circumstances.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-41

836. THOMAS JUGGINS was indicted for stealing,

on the 2nd of March , 2 coach-braces, value 5s. , the goods of James Yeomans .

JOHN YEOMANS . I live in Brunswick-mews. I drive the chariot, No. 729 - it belongs to my brother, James Yeomans ; I saw the prisoner, on the night of the 2nd of March, get up behind the chariot, at the end of the New North-road - he rode some distance till I came to a gate; he got up again, and rode till I came to Penton-street -I then found the near side brace was off; I looked to the other side, and saw the prisoner's hand taking off the other brace; I beckoned to a Policeman, but did not speak to him - he came up; I had seen by the shadow what was going on - I stopped, and both the braces were off; one of them was in the prisoner's pocket.

THOMAS SAGE . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner - I found in his left-hand coat pocket one of these braces, and the other on the ground; these are them.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320405-42

837. WILLIAM IRISH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February , 1 pistol, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Trinder .

JOHN GOSNELL . I am errand-boy to Mr. Trinder - he lives at No. 39, Frederick-place, Hampstead-road . On the 29th of February, in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner with another young man, after five o'clock; there were two pistols, and some other things there - they pulled about the things; the other took up a pistol, and walked away with it; the prisoner followed him - I went after him, and they ran; there is a field at the back of the house; I saw the prisoner in the field with a pistol in his hand - I called Stop thief! they ran off, and the prisoner was taken near the reservoir.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where were you standing? A. In the road, not above two yards from my master's stall - I lost sight of them, but I am quite sure the prisoner was with the other man when the pistol was taken, but the other man pulled the things about; the other get away - the pistol was on the stall.

JAMES COLE . I am a Police-constable. I saw the prisoner and another man, near Camberland-market, about fifty yards from the field, behind Frederick-place; I saw them turn a corner - I went down another street to meet them; they got a head of me, and went on to Cumberland-market - they there dropped a pistol, but I cannot say which it was, as they were close together; I called Stop thief! and my brother officer took him.

THOMAS LINDEGREEN . I am a Police-constable. I saw the prisoner and another man running down Mary-street, and from there to William-street, and on to the back of the reservoir; I took the prisoner there - I found on him three knives, a comb, and a key.

WILLIAM TRINDER . This pistol is mine, and had been at my stall.

Cross-examined. Q. When had you seen it? A. Not from the time I purchased it, to my knowledge; my father attends to my business - I bought a number of pistols at Machin and Debenham's, about six weeks before.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man, and we went to Camden-town - in coming back he took a pistol off a stall; he showed it to me in the field, and I ran off.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-43

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

838. THOMAS KEMP was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Charles Barton , from his person .

JOHN CHARLES BARTON . On the 2nd of March I was in Upper St. Martin's-lane , between half-past four and a quarter to five o'clock - I felt something; I disengaged my hand from my brother, and felt my pocket - I missed my handkerchief; I saw the prisoner and another man in conversation, on the opposite side of the way - they then separated; the prisoner was going off - I went towards him, and he threw down this handkerchief; I took him, and a gentleman took the handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see him take it? A. No - I have inquired, and find his father is a respectable man.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-44

839. WILLIAM LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 pint of wine, value 1s. 6d., and 2 stone bottles, value 6d. , the goods of George Henekey .

HENRY POOLE . I am a Police-constable. On the 15th of February I saw the prisoner drunk in Tottenham-court-road - I had not known him before; I advised him to go home, but he would not, and I took him to the watch-house; I found two stone bottles on him - he said one contained gin, and the other sherry; I asked where he got them - he said he bought them of Mr. Henekey, where he worked; I went down, and found he did not buy them there - the next morning Mr. Henekey charged him with stealing them, and he acknowledged, in my presence, that he took them - these are the bottles.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. I believe he was very drunk? A. Yes, he could not stand.

GEORGE HENEKEY. I am a wine and spirit-merchant . The prisoner was working in my vaults, as a bricklayer's labourer - I only know that he confessed he took my wine; the bottles have my name on them, and I believe they are mine, but I do not know how he could get them - the bottles were not in the cellar, but the butt of sherry was.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you a person named Williams in your employ? A. Yes - my bottles are sold, but I do not know that the prisoner bought any.

MR. BARRY called -

JAMES WILLIAMS . I am in Mr. Henekey's employ. The prisoner was at work in his cellar for about three months, during which time he has had bottles and spirits in them, but not wine; I have sold him spirits in larger bottles than these - he had left a deposit for the bottles he had of me,

COURT. Q. What you sold him was by your master's permission? A. Yes - I sold him gin; these are both sherry.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-45

840. JAMES LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 3 shillings and 22 sixpences , the monies of John Phillips .

JOHN PHILLIPS. I keep a public-house in Upper Marylebone-street . I have known the prisoner about six

months; he represented himself as a man who made buttons for coachmen and guards ; he said he made them frequently from shillings and from sixpences, but he was troubled to get such as would suit him, and perhaps I could accommodate him; I said if I could I would - I have been in the habit for a month or two of showing him silver to select from, and at last I was so fully satisfied that I lost some, that I marked some shillings and sixpences; on the 5th of March he came, said he had an order to make some buttons, and asked if I had any sixpences; I said"Yes," and took out a cup of sixpences, which I had marked - I spread them out on the table; he selected two, for which he gave me 1s.; I put them back into the cup, and saw there was a deficiency - he then said,"Have you any shillings?" I took forty, which I had marked, out of my pocket, and laid them before him; he said there were none which would suit him - I watched him, but did not see him take any; I counted them, and missed three of them - he went into my tap-room; I counted my sixpences, and missed twenty-two - he called for some ale and rum, and gave me one of my marked sixpences in payment; he then came out, as if to go, but said he must have another drop of rum, which he did, and he gave me another of my sixpences - the officer, whom I had sent for, then came in; I gave charge of the prisoner: he denied having any silver of mine on him - he was taken to the station, and my three shillings and twenty sixpences were found on him; two of the sixpences he had paid to me.

JOHN MOULD . I am a Police-constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner to the station; he denied having any money of the prosecutor's - when he was at the station he said that what money he had about him was what he had received of the prosecutor on the Wednesday before - he took the silver out of his right-hand breeches pocket, and he had no more silver there.

Cross-examined by MR. DONNE. Q. What else did you find on him? A. Two buttons, which are what he calls his trade, as a button-maker - another officer afterwards found a sovereign on him.

WILLIAM CRESWELL . I marked this money by the prosecutor's desire, on the Sunday before, and I know it again.

MR. PHILLIPS. This is my money; I know it by the marks on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner take out his purse at the tap that morning? A. No, not that I saw -I watched him closely, but did not see him take any thing; I put sixty sixpences before him; I said I had more silver up stairs, because he asked me.

Prisoner. We looked over the silver together, and I would have given him the sovereign if he had given me the rest of the silver for it - I have changed many a sovereign with him.

MR. PHILLIPS. He never changed but one in his life - he looked over this silver, I did not; he used frequently to take home a pint of rum in a bottle with him.

GUILTY . Aged 62. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-46

841. JOHN MANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 1 plane, value 14s. , the goods of Thomas Hunt .

THOMAS HUNT. I am a carpenter - I work at Fox-court, Gray's Inn-lane . I lost a plane from there on the morning of the 13th of March, before we came to work - I do not know the prisoner.

THOMAS LOWE. I am a pawnbroker. I have a plane, which the prisoner offered me in pawn, on the 13th of March - I detained him with it.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given me by Henry Spirt to pawn.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320405-47

842. FRANCIS MARRIOTT and CHARLES DUNBAR were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 2 printed books, value 10s. , the goods of George Hobson .

GEORGE HOBSON. I am a bookseller , and live in the Commercial-road . On the 25th of February, at a quarter before three o'clock in the afternoon, I was looking through my window, and saw the prisoner and two other persons come to my stall; I saw one of them lift up these two folios and give them to another person - I cannot say who lifted them up, but I came round my counter to pursue the one who had them; the other three met me at the door - I set off to run after Dunbar, who had the books, but I was tripped up by one, who I believe to be Marriott; I got up, and pursued Dunbar with the books - I took him about one hundred and fifty yards up Jubilee-place; the other three came up, and one of them said,"D - n your eyes, what are you going to do with my brother?" Mr. Hobbs came to my assistance; I can swear Marriott was one of the party.

WILLIAM HENRY HOBBS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Jubilee-place. I had just dined; I saw Dunbar go by with these two books, and the prosecutor following him - a man came up, and said, "What are you doing with my brother," and struck the prosecutor - I took hold of him; Marriott came up and said to me,"Don't hurt him" - I said I would not, but Marriott' got him from me, and I secured him; I had seen Dunbar before, but I believe, of late years, he has followed an honest life.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Dunbar's Defence. I saw a man throw down the books, and I took them up; I walked twenty or thirty yards with them.

Marriott's Defence. I saw Dunbar take up the books, and go up the place, and two others came up; I went to see what it was.

MARRIOTT - GUILTY . Aged 21.

DUNBAR - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-48

843. CHARLES PARSONS and WILLIAM WELDON were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 1 pewter pot, value 1s., the goods of Agnes Parlour ; 1 pewter pot, value 10d., the goods of John James ; and 1 pewter pot, value 10d., the goods of James Early .

SAMUEL NICHOLLS . I live in Wellington-street, Camden-town . On the evening of the 28th of March, I was sitting at my kitchen window, smoking my pipe; my house is within two doors of Mr. Early's, of whom I have my deer, and there was one of his pots just inside my

tails - I saw the prisoners come up - Weldon took up the pot, and passed it on to Parsons; they stooped together, and hid one another - I ran out, and watched them, but I did not see an officer till I got on the other side of Cumberland-market; I then gave them in charge, and three pots were found on Parsons.

JAMES EARLY . I am a publican . This pot is mine; I lose a great many in a year.

WILLIAM ELISHA CARTER . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and have the pots.

EDWARD CRAGG . This pot is my mother's, Agnes Parlour , of Edward-street, Regent's-park ; Mr. James is not here.

Weldon's Defence. I know nothing of this prisoner; I was twenty yards from him.

Parson's Defence. I have been in the army, and since that in the Police.

PARSONS - GUILTY . Aged 29.

WELDON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-49

844. JOHN PETERS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 Guernsey frock, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Matthew Taylor .

MATTHEW TAYLOR . I am a slop-seller , and live in Ratcliff-highway . On the 18th of February the prisoner came to my shop with two Chinese, as their interpreter; they bought a monkey-jacket, and two pairs of stockings, for 10s. - the prisoner got behind them, and while I was engaged in serving them, he contrived to get a frock off a rail, and secrete it in his handkerchief; the Chinese paid me for what they had - they went out, and as they turned from the door, I missed the frock; the Chinese returned, and wanted to buy a pair of trousers - I beckoned the prisoner to come, but he would not; he went up the street; I went after him - he ran off, and got half-way up Betts-street, where he was stopped; he threw away the frock, and I got it - but I took a cab to go to the office, and left it in the cab.

JOHN WOOD . I saw the prisoner run, and throw the frock from him.

GUILTY. Aged 30. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320405-50

845. AMBROSE PEARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 2 sovreigns, 1 half-crown, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence , the monies of Benjamin Gutteridge .

BENJAMIN GUTTERIDGE . I am a labourer , and live at Potter's-bar, in the parish of South Mimms ; I work for Mr. Brown, of Enfield, but this happened at Potter's-bar. On the morning of the 18th of March, I put this money on the bed, in my lodging, at a private house there, while I changed my breeches; I went down stairs and forgot it - there were two sovereigns, one half-crown, one shilling, and one sixpence, in a purse; I missed it in about fifteen minutes- I went back to the house, but the money and prisoner were gone; he lodged and slept in the same room, and he was in bed when I put the purse on it - I went out in pursuit of him; he was taken about twelve o'clock, at St. Alban's, but I was not present - he had lodged there four months, and is a tailor.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner at St. Alban's; I said I wanted him - he said,"What for?" - I said, "You have a little money, I believe, and you must go back with me - we went into a public-house, and when we came out, he gave me out two sovereigns, a half-crown, a shilling, and a sixpence.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 56. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320405-51

846. EMANUEL BRACE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 watch, value 2l.; 3 seals, value 1l., and 1 watch-key, value 1s., the goods of William Gregory , from his person .

WILLIAM GREGORY . I live at Ruislip. On the 20th of March, about eleven o'clock at night, I was returning from Mr. Meadows, at the sign of the Sun and Ship, and as I came out at the door the prisoner hustled me, but I did not miss the watch for about five minutes; I then returned, and accused him of taking it out of my fob; he denied it- I locked him in the bar while I sent for the officer, and kept him there about two hours; he then said he saw a man go across the road with something like a watch - I asked where he put it; he said if I went through the gate, and looked on the left-hand side, I should find it - the landlord went with a candle, and found it; this is it.

JAMES TEMPLE . I am the officer. I took the prisoner, and have the watch.

JOHN MEADOWS . I am landlord of the public-house; what has been stated is true.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was standing against the door I saw a man with a round frock on, with his hand up to his side; I watched him to the gate, and then went in doors - I did not say any thing, and the prosecutor thought I had taken the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .(See Second Day.)

Reference Number: t18320405-52

847. WILLIAM PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing on the 20th of March , 1 snuff-box, value 4l., the goods of James Russell , from his person .

JAMES RUSSELL . I am a manufacturer . On the 20th of March, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was walking down Wellington-street ; I had seen the prisoner in the Strand, and I saw him elbowing me again in Wellington-street - I went on to the pay-gate; a gentleman met me and said, "Are you aware that you are robbed?" I then put my hand to my right-hand coat pocket, and missed my silver snuff-box; I turned, and saw the prisoner running away - I cried Stop thief! a waggoner intercepted him; he threw the box into a cart - I said,"Get it out of the cart," which he did, and gave it to me - this is it.

ROBERT FOOT . I was sitting on Waterloo-bridge, and saw the prosecutor coming up to the pay place; the prisoner was behind him - the moment he got to the gate the prisoner took up his pocket, and took something out; I could not see what it was - I at first thought he was his son, and that he was going to take the halfpence out of his pocket that he should not have money to pay the toll- I thought it was a joke; I then heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner run; the box was taken out of the cart, and delivered to the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-53

848. DANIEL REDDIE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 5 shillings, the monies of Henry Marson , his master .

HENRY MARSON . I am a licensed victualler , and live in Ebury-street, Pimlico , The prisoner was seven months in my service as pot-boy ; I had some suspicion, and marked some shillings on the 2nd of March, which I put into my till on the 6th of March - I was not at home when they were missed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You put them into the till on the 6th of March? A. Yes, on the Tuesday; I had kept them in the mean time in a small box by themselves, in the bar parlour - the box was not locked; the bar-maid had access to it - the key was in the box; I marked sixteen shillings, four half-crowns, and two sixpences, in the presence of Mr. Binks.

PHILIP JOHN BINKS . I saw the money marked by the prosecutor on the Saturday - I should know them again.

JANE COLVIN . I live with Mr. Marson. He went out on the 6th of March, and I was left at home to mind the business; the money was put into the till, and between five and six o'clock I missed 5s.; the prisoner was at home when the money was put into the till - I know it was marked; no one but the prisoner could have taken it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he access to the bar? A. Yes, but not to the bar-parlour - he might casually pass through the room; the money had been in a work-box, which was always open - the prisoner was taken up about seven o'clock in the evening.

HYACINTH CLARK . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner on the Tuesday - I found four shillings on him, which are marked.

MR. MARSON. These are four of the shillings which I had marked.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe the prisoner had been a good servant till this time? A. Yes; I had the best opinion of him, and did not wish to prosecute him.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320405-54

849. GEORGE SPIKESLY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 sack of potatoes, value 6s. , the goods of Charles Russell , the elder.

CHARLES RUSSELL , JUN. I live at Winchmore-hill , and am a farmer . The prisoner was in my employ as a carter , and paid by the week. On the 24th of November I set up all night to watch, and the prisoner and another man, who were both labourers, came together about twenty minutes past five o'clock in the morning: they went down to the house for the key of the potato-house, and got a sack of potatoes out - they were my father's; the other man had them on his shoulder, and was taken with them; the prisoner helped him up with them, but he escaped at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where were you? A. In another shed, about ten yards off; it was quite moon-light - I did not try to take the prisoner, for he ran off - I took the other.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18320405-55

850. THOMAS STRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 truck, value 4l. , the goods of James Hardy .

JAMES HARDY . I live in Upper Thames-street . The prisoner called on me on Saturday, the 18th of February, about five o'clock, to hire my truck for a job, and the truck was never returned; he called about eight o'clock, and asked if the truck was come home - I said No; he said, "I sent it by a boy from the top of Queen-street, and it is very strange it has not come;" I let out my truck by the hour, but there was no bargain made - the prisoner knew what he was to have it for, as he had had it it before for his master, but he said this was for a job of his own; he came to my house a second time, and asked if it was come - I said No; he seemed quite astonished, and asked what was the value of it - I said about 4l., and he said, "I suppose I must pay for it;" I found it in Milbank-street, Westminster.

AARON BANFIELD . I am a slater. I met the prisoner on the 18th, about eleven o'clock; he asked me if I knew any body who wanted to buy a truck - I said I did not; he said he had one to sell very cheap, and asked if I could recommend him to any one; I had known him for some time - he asked where I lived, and I gave him my card at No. 22, Milbank-street; he asked what time I should be at home - I said about six o'clock; he said he gave 50s. for the truck, that his wife had run away with some money, and he wanted 1l. to go after her - he came to me in the evening; I let him have 2s., and told him to go over the way and get some beer - he left the trunk with me that night, and the next morning I saw the prosecutor's name on it, and went to him.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he owed Banfield 2s., and he had taken the truck from the public-house door, in payment, without his consent.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-56

851. JAMES SAYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 piece of wooden fence, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Robert McWilliam , Esq .

DENNIS MAHONEY . I live at Battle-bridge , and am in the service of Mr. Robert McWilliam ; we had some mangleworzle for sale in pits, and this fence was put to preserve it - I did not see the prisoner with it, but I saw him at the office; the fence was not fixed.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When did you see it safe? A. At seven o'clock on the Saturday evening, and the next morning it was gone.

WILLIAM COLE . I am a Police-constable. On the 19th of February I was on duty, at half-past three o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner cross to Victory-passage, Battle-bridge, with this piece of fence under his arm- I do not know where he got it; it is very old, but I suppose it is worth more than for fire-wood.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-57

852. GEORGE WALLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 quart of spirituous liquor, called loveage, value 6s.; 1 bottle, value 2s., and 1 tea-spoon, value 1d. , the goods of Richard Painter .

RICHARD PAINTER . I am a publican , and live in Jermyn-street . On the 30th of March a great number of coachmen were at my house, early in the morning - we had been endeavouring to clear the house, but could not, it being a night house - we had refused them any more liquor - it was about two o'clock; I did not see the prisoner there, but I was given to understand he had been there, and he was brought back with the remainder of the bottle - it had been on a shelf by the side of the counter, and

had a cordial in it; it was a large Scotch bottle, and I missed it when the prisoner was brought in - it had been quite full; I suppose there were three pints of liquor in it.

JOSEPH VAUGHAN . I am a boot and shoemaker. I was at the house, waiting for a lodger, who was out; I saw a number of hackney-coachmen there, and the prisoner among them; there was a great disturbance, and the landlord said he would not serve any more; the prisoner said he wanted to go out, and asked who would let him out - I said I would, and I saw him pushing something under his apron; I went out, and saw him running - I pursned, and cried Stop thief! the Policeman pursued him- he fell down, and the bottle broke; I saw part of the bottle picked up, and the officer showed me the spoon.

JOHN BURKE . I am a Police-constable. I was going my rounds between two and three o'clock; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running - I endeavoured to stop him, and when he fell down I caught him; the bottle broke - this is a piece of it, and I found this spoon in his pocket.

MR. PAINTER. This is my spoon, and I believe this is part of my bottle.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take them - some of them shoved it under my apron, and told me to walk out.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320405-58

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, APRIL 6.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

853. MARY MEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 sheet, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Ford .

ANN FORD . I am the wife of Thomas Ford - we live in Cadogan-terrace . On the 8th of March the prisoner took a furnished room of ours by the week; she left next morning, about half-past eight o'clock, and did not return - I missed a sheet and silver spoon from the room; my husband met her in the street on the following Monday, and took her - the duplicate was found on her.

JOHN GAMMON . I am shopman to Mr. Sherman, a pawnbroker, of Sloane-street, Chelsea. On the 9th of March the prisoner pawned this sheet.

RANDAL McDONALD . I am a Policeman. I received the prisoner in charge; she said she had left the spoon at Mrs. Conden's, George-street, Richmond, but I could find no such person; the duplicate was found on her before I came.(Sheet produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the spoon - I pawned the sheet for victuals.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-59

854. PETER MORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 2 waistcoats, value 4s., and 1 razor, value 1s. , the goods of William Gilbert .

WILLIAM GILBERT . I am a clothes-salesman , and live near Battersea-bridge . On the 3rd of March the prisoner came to my shop, with two more men and three women; they bargained for a pair of breeches - I took the men into another room, to try them on; they went away without buying any thing; the man who wanted the breeches is not here; soon after they were gone I missed two waistcoats, and afterwards a razor - I went and overtook them in the road at Fulham, and the two waistcoats were found on the prisoner's wife, in his presence; they wished me to make it up, and not take them before a Magistrate - the constable said he must take Moran's wife; Moran struck me two or three times, and struck the Policeman also, and the constable took him in charge - the others all then came up, and wanted to take him from the constable; they all three knocked me down, and I went for assistance, as I thought the constable was murdered - they made their escape, and the other men have not been taken; the prisoner also escaped, and was taken that night - I swear he was one of the party; I did not miss the razor till I got home.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I buy a waistcoat of you? A. Not then; he bought one in the early part of the day.

EDWARD WHIDDETT . I am a Policeman. The prosecutor told me of his waistcoats being stolen - I went with him, and found three women and three men; he charged them with stealing three waistcoats, which were found on Moran's wife - I took them from her, and said she must go to the station; the prosecutor's account of the resistance is perfectly true - the prisoner struck at me three or four times, but only hit me once; I was knocked down by three men, and they made their escape.

ALEXANDER McCASKERY . I am a Policeman. I received information of this, and apprehended the prisoner in Parson's Green-lane, Fulham, about twelve o'clock at night, with his hat off; I had been informed one of the men lost his hat; he appeared much intoxicated, and his head was all over blood - I asked where he had been; he said to London: I searched him, and found this razor in his pocket.

WILLIAM GILBERT . This is my razor - it has my name on the handle.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday night I was shaving - my wife came and asked me to go to market with a woman, who would show us where to get things cheap; I put My razor into my pocket, and went with them to Chelsea; as I came home I met some friends, and went to a public-house with them; I got in liquor, and as I came home I went into the prosecutor's shop, and gave him 2s. 6d. for three waistcoats, one of which I have on now - the prosecutor followed us, and my wife had the waistcoats hanging on her arm; she said, "Here is nothing but what has been paid for;" she was within seven days of being put to bed- I told the Policeman to mind how he shoved her about; he then struck me on the head with his staff - two men came up, saw his barbarous treatment, and knocked him down; I went home, and was taken on the way - the prosecutor claimed the razor before he had seen it.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-60

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

855. DANIEL LYNCH was indicted for the wilful murder of William Harrington .

GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS SABINE . I was house-surgeon of Middlesex-hospital. On the 28th of February Harrington was brought there, about two o'clock in the morning - I found a would on the left side of the abdomen, about an inch long, and in about ten minutes after he was admitted a portion of the intestines came through the wound - they

were replaced, and the wound dressed; he died in consequence of that wound twenty-three hours after his admission; his body was opened, and the intestines were found wounded in four places.

Cross-examined by MR. BABRY. Q. Did he appear to have been drinking? A. He appeared a little in liquor, but not drunk - I judge he had been drinking by the smell- he was almost insensible, which was the effect of the injury; I did not open his head - I am sure he did not die of apoplexy.

COURT. Q. I suppose the four parts of the intestines had been wounded at the same time? A. I should judge so; the wound had been inflicted by stabbing with some cutting instrument - the Policeman brought me a knife, which I fitted to the wound; it was the exact size of it.

WILLIAM JAMES . I am a Policeman. I went to the station-house, in George-street, St. Giles', on the 28th of February, between twelve and one o'clock at night; I found William Harrington sitting on the ground there, wounded in the left side; his clothes were bloody - his trousers were down; I saw the wound - I assisted in taking him to the hospital, and delivered him into the care of Mr. Sabine; I apprehended the prisoner between two and three o'clock that morning, at No. 14, Buckeridge-street, in bed- he appeared to have been drinking, but was getting better, Poole was with me - he examined his clothes before he was dressed, and I saw a knife drop out of his pocket; the blade of it was bloody - Poole took charge of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he asleep when you went in? A. Yes; I looked at his face, but could not discern that he had been struck - I noticed, at the station-house, that he had a slight black eye; he was in bed with a man.

HENRY POOLE . I was present when the prisoner was apprehended; I found a knife in his coat pocket, which I produce - I saw Mr. Sabine apply it to the wound; it was never out of my sight - I observed, at the station, that his eye was a little swollen and black.

NICHOLAS GRADY . I am a labourer, and live in Buckeridge-street . On the 28th of February, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I was standing at the corner of that street, and heard the prisoner crying and hallooing Police! William Harrington was with him; they were close to each other - I knew them both before; they crossed the street against the Cock public-house - I then saw the deceased strike the prisoner; I cannot say whether on his face or body, but I saw him strike him; there was a scuffle, and they then parted - the deceased stood where he was, and the prisoner left him; he came back again in five or ten minutes crying, and they turned face to face; I was four or five yards from them - I immediately saw the prisoner's hands go towards the deceased's body; I did not see whether he had any thing in his hand - I saw the deceased put his hands up to his body, and draw back; the prisoner went away - I then went up to the deceased, and he begged of Grady, who was there, to take him to a doctor; he put his hand to his breast, drew it out again, and I saw blood on it - he was stabbed; we took him to a doctor, in Broad-street, but could not get in- we then took him to the station, and then carried him on a shutter to the hospital.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know that the prisoner and deceased were companions? A. Yes; I have known them so for three or four years; during all that time the prisoner lived in St. Giles - he was always considered of a weak mind; I have seen boys plague him and play larks with him: they used to call him Boss-eye; he was considered foolish.

COURT. Q. Do you mean that he did not know right from wrong? A. I do not say that.

MR. BARRY. Q. Had you been drinking that night? A. Not at all - there is a free-and-easy held at the cock; I had not been there - I do not know whether Harrington had been there; my son, Dennis, was not with me all the while - I saw him when the deceased called him to take him to the doctor's; I do not know what caused him to call out Police! he appeared crying, and in distress all the time - I did not see the prisoner attempt to pull a handkerchief off the deceased's neck.

COURT. Q. Did you see more than one blow given by the deceased? A. No - the prisoner had a hat on.

DENNIS GRADY . I was at the corner of Buckeridge-street - I came out of the Cock between twelve and one o'clock, and saw William Harrington ; nobody was with him then - he begged me to take him to a doctor, and said he was stabbed; I and my father took him.

GEORGE PALMER . I am a Policeman. On the night the deceased was stabbed I had seen him and the prisoner together, at the Buckingham Arms, at the corner of Buckeridge-street, drinking together; I was in the room about five minutes - they were not quarrelling.

MR. BARRY called -

JEREMIAH LYNCH . I am a labourer, and am the prisoner's father. When he was fifteen months old he fell out of a window three stories high, at Portsmouth barracks - he received an injury, and there has been a mark over his eye ever since; he is not over and above right in his mind when he takes a drop - his mother was eleven years in a mad-house in Bethnal-green, and died there; my son used to be teazed, and followed by the boys in the neighbourhood - he always had a knife in his pocket to untie bags with; he is a carter of coals and coke - he and the deceased were acquainted from their infancy.

GUILTY, of manslaughter only . Aged 23.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-61

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

856. ABIGAIL MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 purse, value 1s.; 13 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and three 5l. Bank-notes, the property of Joseph Harfield , in the dwelling-house of Abraham Moss .

WILLIAM RAWLINSON . I am a clerk to Williams and Co., Birchin-lane. On the 19th of March I paid a cheque for 30l., drawn by John Copeland, with three 5l. Bank notes, Nos. 17,880, 17,881, and 17,882, dated the 11th of February, 1832, and fifteen sovereigns - I cannot say who presented it.

JOSEPH HARFIELD . I am an officer of an Indiaman . On the 19th of March, about half-past twelve o'clock, I received for a cheque, at Williams and Co., from Mr. Rawlinson, three 5l. notes and fifteen sovereigns - I put them into my purse; I went next day into a shell and curiosity shop, in High-street, Poplar - the name of Moss

was over the door; I bought a small piece of coral for 1s. 6d. - I took out my purse to pay for it, but recollecting I should pass the door on my return, I told Mrs. Moss I would pay for it as I returned; she is the prisoner's mother - I saw nobody else in the shop; I laid my purse on the counter to examine some shells, and was there about five minutes; I then went out of the shop towards town - I went into another shop, about a quarter of a mile further, to pay some money, and then missed my purse; recollecting where I had left it, I immediately returned to Mrs. Moss, and saw her in the shop - I asked if she had seen it; I could not find it - it was not on the counter- I am positive I left it there; I informed the Police, then got the numbers of the notes, and stopped them at the Bank; I am certain they were in my purse when I went to the shop - I produce two of the notes, which I got from the Bank; I have not a doubt of their being the same, from the numbers.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had no transaction with the prisoner? A. None at all; Mrs. Moss was on the other side of the counter, not more than a foot and a half from where I laid the purse down - it was a red silk purse; she could hardly look on the counter without seeing it - she was the only person in the shop.

EDWARD RICE . I am shopman to Murphins and Co., linen-drapers, Tottenham-court-road. On the 20th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner purchased a few articles at our shop, and paid me a 5l. Bank note - I gave her the change, and gave the note to the cashier, without getting her address on it; he returned it to me - I took it back to her, and asked her address; I am sure it was the same note, for it was not out of my sight - she gave me her name, Mrs. Willson, No. 24, Portland-street, which I put on the note - (looking at a note, No. 17,880) I am sure this is the note I received from her; I afterwards applied at No. 24, Portland-street, and found no person named Wilson lived there; she wore a straw-bonnet, a black veil, and dark clothes.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. I suppose she was a stranger to you? A. Yes; I do not recollect what goods I served her with, not the exact amount -I believe I have said it was about three or four o'clock, but believe it was about four - I was not very busy that day.

COURT. Q. What distance is your shop from Poplar? A. I should think five or six miles - it was on a Tuesday, the day before Fast day.

JAMES EDWARDS . I am servant to Mr. Robertshaw, of Oxford-street. On Tuesday afternoon, the 20th of March, about three o'clock, I took a 5l. note from the prisoner, to the best of my knowledge - I had no previous knowledge of her; she was dressed, I think, in a straw bonnet and veil, and dark clothes - I think the veil was black; she had a dark shawl, and I think a dark dress - I believe it to be her; she bought a coloured silk handkerchief for 7s. 6d.; I gave her the change, and took the note to Mrs. Robertshaw - we never mark notes; I do not know what became of it.

JAMES SHEPHERD . I am a Policeman. On the 20th of March, about six o'clock in the morning, the prosecutor came to the station, at Poplar - I went to Mrs. Moss with him; I saw nobody but her - I asked if there was any body in the house besides herself; she said No; I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th - I believe she lived with her mother; I have seen her in the shop several times, both before and since this happened.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where did you take the prisoner? A. At Lambeth-street office; she said she had come there to make some complaint - I had been to her mother's with the prosecutor before that; she came of her own accord to the office.

JOSEPH HARFIELD . It was about half-past ten o'clock that I went to Moss' shop; I was absent about a quarter of an hour.

AARON LOCKWOOD . I serve Mrs. Moss with cat's-meat. I was at the house on Tuesday, the 20th of March, at a quarter to eleven o'clock; I saw Mrs. Moss and the prisoner, both in the shop - I know her perfectly well, and frequently see her when I call there: I cannot say whether she lives there, or that I ever saw her serving in the shop: I am generally there about that time, three times a week - the prisoner gave me a half-penny for the meat; I did not see the prosecutor there.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent; I am well known to be an industrious woman, and am out from nine o'clock in the morning till nine o'clock at night; I saw the cat's-meat man that morning, but it was a quarter or twenty minutes past ten o'clock; and at three o'clock in the afternoon I was at Limehouse, purchasing some things - I went home, and did not go out again; I was at home by four o'clock.

REBECCA JOHNSON . I live in Samuel-place, Rose-lane, Ratcliffe - my husband is a sail-maker; our house is about a quarter of an hour's walk from Moss', and I should think five or six miles from Tottenham-court-road - I saw the prisoner the day before the Fast-day, at my house, about a quarter to three o'clock - Mr. Whitewood, my lodger, who was ill, saw her.

Q. How can you recollect the time? A. I began to wash a few things after dinner, and soon after she came - we dine at one o'clock; we have a newspaper, which comes at one, and goes at three - my husband goes to work about five minutes past two; the newspaper had been about three-quarters of an hour when she came; she staid twenty minutes or half an hour - Mr. Whitewood let her in; he was reading the newspaper when she knocked.

ANTHONY WHITEWOOD . I am a sail-maker, and lodge at Johnson's. On the day before the Fast I was at home, ill, and let the prisoner in from half-past two to three o'clock- I was reading the paper when she knocked; she remained there twenty minutes or more; I did not go to work that day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-62

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

857. WILLIAM WILLIAMS and HENRY WATERS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Topaz , on the 29th of March , at St. Dunstan Stebonheath, alias Stepney , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 handkerchief, value 4d., and 8 half-crowns, his property .

THOMAS TOPAZ (through an interpreter.) I know the two prisoners; I was going down the Commercial-road , towards Blackwall; I had a handkerchief in my

pocket, with eight half-crowns tied in the corner of it; the two prisoners and a man named Perue were with me- Williams struck me, and I fell down off the curb into the road with the blow; I fell on my side, and while I was falling, Waters took my handkerchief and money from my jacket pocket; part of my handkerchief hung out of my pocket at the time - Waters slipped off my shoes, and ran away; Williams took up the shoes, and began hitting me with them, merely joking not to hurt me.

PERUE (being a Mahometan was sworn on the Alcoran.) I was with the prosecutor when the prisoners were there; we stopped at a beer-shop in the Commercial-road; the prosecutor paid for what we drank, and went on first, leaving me and the prisoners behind - the prisoners followed him, leaving me behind to finish the beer, and on turning round, I saw Waters snatch the handkerchief, and ran away with it - I did not notice Williams do any thing.

WILLIAM WEST (the interpreter). I saw Waters the morning after this took place - the prosecutor was talking to me, and Waters was coming down the barrack-yard, and seeing me talking to the prosecutor he came up to me, and begged pardon for robbing the prosecutor; he said he did not know there was any money in the handkerchief, but when he found money in it he spent it, but was very willing to make it up in any way he could.

The evidence was communciated to the prisoners by the interpreter.

Waters. I am a stranger in this country; this is the first offence - I have done wrong, but am willing to make it up in any way; I hope you will be as lenient as possible.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

WATERS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

The prisoners have received His Majesty's most gracious pardon, and have been sent to their own country .

Reference Number: t18320405-63

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

858. ELIZA WALLER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 1 sextant, value 13l. 13s., the goods of William Boyle , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH BOYLE . I am the wife of William Boyle - we live in Lucas-street, St. George's in the East - the prisoner was in my service for not quite a month. I told her on Saturday, the 3rd of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, that she would not suit me, and she left that day, without being paid - I missed a sextant from my bed-room on the Monday.

JAMES HARRIS . My father is a pawnbroker, and lives in Upton-place, Commercial-road. On Saturday, the 3rd of March, the prisoner pawned this sextant for 1l.; I am certain of her person - I should think it would sell for 5l. or 6l.; I asked where she brought it from; she said from her father's,(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS BATES . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, on the 6th of March, at a common lodging-house in George-yard, Whitechapel; I asked what she had done with the sextant, in a mahogany case, belonging to her master; she said she had left it at Harris', for a sovereign.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-64

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

859. JAMES DANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 violin, value 6l., the goods of Samuel James Wood , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD JENNINGS FORD . I am shopman to Samuel James Wood , pawnbroker , of Ashby-street, St. John-street-road - the shop is part of the house. On the 9th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and offered a handkerchief in pawn for 1s.; he placed it on the counter, and while I was looking at it, he took this violin out of a case at the side of the shop, and ran off directly with it - I pursued him down Ashby-street, across Northampton-square, and the Policeman took him in Willow-court; the violin had been pawned with us, and not redeemed - it is worth 6l.; we had advanced 30s. on it - we had put the price of twenty guineas on it in the shop; I have advanced from 2l. to 5l. on such things.

EDWARD WILD . I am a Policeman. I pursued the prisoner, hearing a cry of Stop thief! I took him in Willow-court, sitting on some dung, and the violin was under the dung, where he sat - I took him back with it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure that the man you saw running you found sitting on the dung? A. Yes - I saw the violin in his hand before I heard the cry.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Islmgton; I saw a man run from Perceval-street, and turn up Seward-street, with a violln under his arm - nobody was in pursuit; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and followed him; a little girl at the bottom of the court said he was gone into a yard - I could not find him; I met the Policeman alone; we had been in the court several minutes when the prosecutor came up.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 2l. only . Aged 18.

Confined One Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-65

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

860. THOMAS McMARNEY and JOSEPH EVANS were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Baker , from his person .

CHARLES LANCKHAR . I live on Great Saffron-hill. On the 2nd of April, about a quarter-past one o'clock, I was in St. John-street-road , and saw the prisoners and another; I saw McMarney put his hand into the prosecutor's coat-pocket, and take out a handkerchief, which he gave to Evans - I took hold of Evans; he dropped it, and McMarney ran away; I called Stop thief! he was stopped, and brought to me - I took them both to the station.

THOMAS BAKER . I was in St. John-street. This handkerchief is mine - it was in my pocket a few minutes before Lanckhar spoke to me; I did not feel it taken - I saw McMarney run across the road, heard a cry of Stop him! and on turning round saw Evans in custody.

The prisoners put in a written defence, denying the charge. They received a good character.

McMARNEY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

EVANS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320405-66

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

861. JOHN MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , a leg of pork, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Charles Lawder .

CHARLES WALLER . I am a Policeman. On the 12th of March I was in the New North-road, and saw the prisoner take something from Lawder's shop window - I followed him, and he dropped this leg of pork; I secured him, brought him back, and took it up.

CHARLES LAWDER . I keep a cheesemonger's-shop . This pork was in my window; Waller came in, and I missed it - he produced it: I knew it, as it was the only one I had; I had not seen the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320405-67

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

862. JOHN MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , a pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Nicholson .

WILLIAM JARRET . I live in William-street, Regent's-park , opposite the prosecutor's. I saw the prisoner go in at the door, reach a pair of shoes down, and run away with them - I followed, and took him; he dropped them - I took them up.

HARRIET NICHOLSON . I am the wife of Robert Nicholson ; we sell shoes - Jarret brought the prisoner in with these shoes, which I know to be ours.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320405-68

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

863. JAMES MANBY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 1 print, framed and glazed, value 3s. , the goods of William Downes .

SARAH DOWNES . I am the wife of William Downes , who keeps the Rose and Crown, Spitalfields . On the 27th of March the prisoner came and had some beer - he left about half-past five o'clock; I was in the bar, and saw a picture under his left arm, part of it was uncovered: I knew it to be our's - it was a view of Gravesend, which had hung over the back parlour mantel-piece; I went to the door, and looked out after him, but was alarmed, and did not follow, having nobody in the house - he had left a companion, named Gardener behind, who had been in his company all the morning; I demanded of Gardener the money for a pint of beer - he said the prisoner had gone to get the money to pay for it: I said he had stolen my picture - the prisoner came back in half an hour without the picture, and was detained.

ABRAHAM MARTIN . I am blind - my hearing is very good; I am accustomed to attend to voices - I play a fiddle at public-houses, and know the prisoner by his voice. On Tuesday evening, the 7th of March, I was at the Rose and Crown - Mrs. Downes told me she had lost a picture, and about a quarter-past six o'clock, the prisoner came into the room; he spoke to me, and then Mrs. Downes followed him into the tap-room, and charged him with stealing the picture - he said he knew nothing of it, she said she should fetch a Policeman - she left, and I remained in the room; I turned my head, as if I did not notice their conversation, and heard him say to his companion, "I have stolen the picture, and me and Jem Gardener sold it;" he said to his companion, "You b-r, bolt out backwards;" I was going to tell Mrs. Downes, but the Policeman came in and took him.

Prisoner. He said at the office that I whispered. Witness. No; I said he spoke in his ear.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to this house with three young men, two strange men came in, and played at skittles - I went home to get my tea, with some bread in a handkerchief; I returned in a quarter of an hour, and Mrs. Downes charged me with this.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-69

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

864. JAMES WILSON and CHARLES JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March, 1 purse, value 1s.; 2 keys, value 6d., and 1 sovereign, the property of Mary Ann Routledge , from her person .

MARY ANN ROUTLEDGE . I am single , and live in Brighton-place, Kent-road. On the 28th of March, about one o'clock in the day, I was in Fleet-street , and had a black silk bag on my arm, containing two keys and a sovereign - I had not observed either of the prisoners; I was near Carlile's shop, where there was a crowd - my bag was cut through at the bottom, and my purse and money taken out - I observed a boy's hand leaving my bag; I then observed that the bottom of it was cut - the boy was behind me; my brother, who was with me, pursued the prisoners, and took them - I saw my purse at Guildhall, with the sovereign and keys in it, and am certain of it.

JOHN JOSEPH ROUTLEDGE . I am a linen-draper, and live in Watling-street. I was with my sister - there was a crowd at the corner of Bouverie-street; I had great difficulty to get her through the crowd - she complained of her reticule being cut; I looked round, and a gentleman directed my attention to the two prisoners, who I saw running down Bouverie-street; I followed - they made two or three turns, but I kept them in sight; they were stopped near Temple gate; when I got near them I laid hold of Jones first - he ran to the wall; they were then examining the purse, which was in his hand; just as I laid hold of him he ran to the wall, and threw the purse over, at the back of some chambers - I went afterwards and took it up- I knew the keys in it belonged to my sister.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Whether any body had given it to him you cannot say? A. He had run a considerable distance - I had not noticed him in the crowd; there was a very great crowd by Carlile's - I raised a cry of Stop thief! when I followed him.

Cross-examined by MR. STURGEON. Q. You never saw it in Wilson's hand? A. No, I saw him examining it.

WILLIAM TELFER . I am assistant to Mr. Charles Pearson , a solicitor, and live in New-street. I was in the parlour of No. 20, Bouverie-street, opposite Silver-street, looking out of window with a friend, and observed a number of persons running down Silver-street; I heard a cry of Stop thief! my friend and I immediately left the house, went down Silver-street and Little Lombard-street, and on arriving at the public-house opposite Temple gate, I saw the prisoners in custody of Mr. Routledge; I went with him, and saw the purse found on the coping of a wall at the back of Mr. Coppenden's chambers - it contained a sovereign and two keys, which Miss Routledge claimed before the Magistrate.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am an officer. I received the prisoners in charge with the purse.(Purse produced and sworn to)

Wilson's Defence. I was walking down Fleet-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran, and saw them catch hold of Jones, who I never saw before in my life.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320405-70

865. CHARLES BIRCH and JAMES JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Charles Trueman , from his person .

CHARLES TRUEMAN . I am a merchant , and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 1st of March, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was nearly opposite the North gate of St. Paul's cathedral , going towards Templebar - my handkerchief was in my outside coat pocket; I did not feel it taken - a gentleman behind gave me information; I felt and missed it - I immediately saw the prisoner Birch in Canon-alley, walking very quick; I laid hold of him - he denied the charge, and in about five minutes I saw Jones in custody of my friend, who had pursued him, and produced my handkerchief.

MATTHEW BRUNATTI . I live in Vale-street, Camberwell. I was in St. Paul's church-yard, and saw the prosecutor and a gentleman walking before me, and the prisoners walking behind them; I was standing talking to a gentleman, and saw one of them stoop and take up the tail of the prosecutor's coat; he put his hand into the pocket, and I saw him draw something out, which I believe was a handkerchief - I ran and told the gentleman; he stopped one of them in Canon-alley - I saw them both in the watch-house in a few minutes, and am certain of them. I am a sugar-refiner.

Birch. Q. Did you see me in company with the other prisoner? A. No.

JURY. Q. Could you see which took the handkerchief? A. No, but I am sure it was one of them - it was dark, but I was near the shops; people were passing.

JOHN MORLEY . I am a hosier. I was in St. Paul's church-yard, with Mr. Trueman; Brunatti informed me Mr. Trueman's pocket was picked, and pointed up Canon-alley - I immediately looked, and there was nobody in the court but the prisoners - Mr. Trueman took Birch, and I secured Jones in a court between Paternoster-row and Newgate-street; I saw him drop the handkerchief - a boy standing by took it up and gave it to me; he said nothing; I said, "This is the boy who has got the handkerchief;" Trueman immediately let go of Birch, and seized Jones - Birch immediately ran off as hard as he could, but was secured; I have no doubt of him. I live in Wood-street.

JOHN LAWS . I am a constable. I received the prisoners in charge - I found on Jones four picklock and two latch-keys.

Birch's Defence. My running away may tend to prove my guilt, but I delare my innocence.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

BIRCH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-71

866. BASIL HACKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 2 watch-keys, value 35s. , the goods of Edward Denman .

EDWARD DENMAN . I am a watchmaker , and live in Mark-lane . On the 19th of March, about half-past three o'clock, the prisoner came in to buy several articles, and asked for watch-keys, among others, but bought nothing; I put nine or ten keys on the counter, and turned from him to get some seals and a watch from the window for him - my back was to him; he was about three-quarters of an hour in the shop, and selected a few articles - he said he would pay me part of the money, and if I went with him to Holborn, he would pay me the rest - while he was saying this, I missed two keys from the counter, and told him so; he said I had better look on the work-board, to see if I had not put them there - I turned to it, but did not find them, and on turning suddenly round, I saw him shake one of them from his left hand sleeve; he had had several in his hand - his sleeve was very large, and one might probably get there by accident; I charged him with having another - he said he had not and that I had better look among the others on the board; I did so, but did not find it - in a few minutes he said, "Here it is," and gave it to me from the other end of the counter; I heard it fall on the counter, but do not know where from - I had laid the articles I showed him on a leather; I shook that leather, and possibly it might have got there - it is very probable; I said I would search him before he left, to see if he had my property - he said, "Oh no," then opened the door, and went away; I, not knowing whether my property was all safe or not, unfortunately pursued, and brought him back, but no property was found.

Cross-examined by MR. STURGEON. Q. What is the length of the counter? A. It is very short; he tried on a watch-guard - the key might have dropped into his sleeve, when he put up his hand to put the guard over his neck; I beg to say, before my servant gives evidence, that I cannot take her word at all times, and beg your Lordship and and the Jury not to consider what she says - I would not believe her, and intend to discharge her when her month is up; from what has occurred since, I should not like her evidence to be taken - she was behind the glass door of the parlour.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge, but found nothing on him relating to this charge.

EDWARD DENMAN . I have since found some of my property on the girl, and would have discharged her immediately, but I was bound for her appearance here.

EMMA WARD . I am the prosecutor's servant, and saw the prisoner in the shop; master shook the leather, and presently I saw the prisoner shuffling his left hand to his right-hand cuff - he put his hand to the leather, and produced the key to master; that is all I know.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-72

867. JOHN BRUTY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 packing-case, value 1s., and 80 books, value 20l., the goods of Joseph Bond in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH BOND. I am a merchant , and live in Edward-street, Portman-square. These books were in a case, at No. 79, Basinghall-street , where I have a counting-house;

they stood in my hall till it was convenient to remove them - I am one of the partners of the house; there are three partners; the house belongs to us all, and a servant of the firm sleeps there - the packing-case was nailed up; they had been packed up by my butler, and sent from my house at Clapham - I never saw the case opened till after the robbery; it then contained these books.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am porter to Mr. Bond and his partners; I sleep in the house. I saw this packing-case in the hall; on the 21st of February, about half-past five o'clock. I saw the prisoner come up the yard, and in about five minutes, saw him going down the yard, with the case on a porter's knot; it weighed 2 cwt. - I saw two men come up the yard with him; they went down the yard about a minute before him - I followed, and brought him back with it; I asked where he was going to take it - he said, to Chiswell - street, but did not tell me the number, or which end of the street; he then said he was employed by two persons who had gone down the street, and wished me to go after them, but I did not think proper - he said it was a pity he should get into trouble when he was innocent; I gave him in charge, and said I would go to anybody for him - I opened the case, and all the books were in it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see two gentlemen go in with me? A. Yes, they came out before you; he said those gentlemen had employed him - I did not see them when I stopped him, nor afterwards.

JOHN SALTER . I am a constable. Clark called me to take the prisoner; he said two persons employed him in Chiswell-street to come and fetch the case from Bond's- he did not say what part of Chiswell-street; he said he was well known at two houses, but when we went there they did not know much of him.

Prisoner. He took me to a public-house where I had been acting as porter for three months, but I owed the landlord 8d., and he said he knew me, but not lately; I lost a situation through getting intoxicated, and now get my living by portering for different gentlemen.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-73

868. HENRY JACKSON was indicted for stealing 28 yards of cotton, value 15s. , the goods of David McAlpine .

HENRY COCKERTON. I am in the employ of David McAlpine, warehouse man , Bread-street, Cheapside . On the 30th of March I saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, in the warehouse, putting a piece of print into a bag; he took it off a pile about four feet within the door - I laid hold of him; he did not offer to get away - I asked what he wanted with the print; he said he found it on the floor.

GEORGE GOOGE . I received him in custody; he said nothing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-74

869. SARAH THOROGOOD , MARY GLOVER and ESTHER HOWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 9 yards of cotton , the goods of William Greenwood .

JOHN ROE . I am shopman to William Greenwood , linen-draper, Farringdon-street. On the 31st of March, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came into the shop together; Howell asked to see some printed cottons, which Mr. Greenwood showed her, in my presence - she bought a yard, which came to 3 1/2d., and paid for it; this cotton was on the counter - I told Mr. Greenwood I had my suspicions, and he stopped them in the shop, and said he suspected they had taken something - they denied it; they were brought further into the shop, and while a person was sent for an officer, Glover dropped this piece of cotton from under her dress - she had not asked to see any thing; I took it up - she said she had not dropped it, but I saw it drop from her.

ABRAHAM CRAWLEY . I am a constable. I received the prisoners in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Howell's Defence. He called us back. and asked if we had the print - I saw him pick it up between the two counters.

Glover's Defence. He went to the window as if to take something out, then came back, and took up the print from between the counters.

JOHN ROE . I was not a yard from her, and I saw her drop it.

GLOVER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

THOROGOOD - NOT GUILTY .

HOWELL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-75

870 RICHARD WILLIAMS, alias BRISTOW , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 1 spoon, value 2s. , the goods of Michael Plumpton .

MICHAEL PLUMPTON . I am a confectioner , and live in Barbican . I was out, and on my coming home the prisoner was in custody, charged with stealing this spoon.

CAROLINE COWLAND . I am servant to Mr. Plumpton. On Sunday evening, the 25th of March, about half-past nine o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop; he sat down, and had 7d. worth of pastry - he then called for a jelly; I gave him a silver spoon to eat it with - he staid about a quarter of an hour, and went out without paying; I did not then miss the spoon, but went after him for the money - he ran, and a boy said he had thrown the spoon down an area - a watchman got it up; I am sure it is master's - he was searched at the watch-house, and had only three farthings; he said it was not him - he was the only person in the shop; I did not lose sight of him.

JOHN SCARCE . I am a watchman. The prisoner was given into my charge - I found the spoon in an area in Bridgewater-gardens - there was jelly on it.

JOHN ANDERSON . I am a constable of the night. The prisoner was delivered into my charge - I found a halfpenny and a farthing on him; he said distress had driven him to it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven years .

Reference Number: t18320405-76

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, APRIL 6.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

871. THOMAS PEARCE and EMANUEL BRACE

were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 2 fishing-rods, value 12s. , the goods of Jonathan Sparkhall .

JOSEPH BUNNION . On Tuesday, the 20th of March, I was at Uxbridge, and saw the two prisoners looking in at the prosecutor's shop - I then saw Pearce take two fishing-rods off the nails, and put them under his arm - they ran off together; Brace was close to him at the time he took them, and when they had got a short distance Pearce gave the rods to Brace, and they ran down Chequer-yard - I told Mr. Sparkhall of it.

JONATHAN SPARKHALL . I keep a toy-shop , at Uxbridge . On the afternoon of the 20th of March I went out- when I returned at five o'clock I saw the fishing-rods safe at my door - I saw the two prisoners about my shop; Bunnion gave me some information, and I saw the two prisoners running away - Pearce was carrying the rods, and he gave them to Brace; they ran to Chequer-yard, and there I lost sight of them - I then applied to the officer.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a head borough of Uxbridge. I received information, and looked after the prisoners, but could not find them; the two rods were brought to me the same evening, and an officer I spoke to found the prisoners.

Brace's Defence. I was not with Pearce all the day.

Pearce's Defence I did not see Brace at all.

PEARCE - GUILTY . Aged 10.

Whipped and Discharged.

BRACE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

See page 361.

Reference Number: t18320405-77

872. JOHN REDDING , THOMAS FIELDER , JOSEPH CANNON , and GEORGE HENWOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 3 loads of straw, value 5l. 9s. , the goods William Overell .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM OVERELL . I am a farmer , and live in Herts. I sent John Clinton with three loads of straw to town on the 10th of March, to be disposed of - he afterwards returned, but I never had any money for it.

COURT. Q. Where were they to be sold? A. On the road if he could, or if not he was to take it on to Smithfield - he was to sell it for 36s. or 37s. a load, and he was to have the money before he unloaded.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is that your rule? A. They sometimes do so, and sometimes not, but he was do so at that time.

JOHN CLINTON . I am carman to the prosecutor. I came to bring the straw to London on the 10th of March, and when I got on the London side of Stamford-hill, I met Redding and Fielder - they asked whether I would sell the straw, and what I wanted for it; I believe Redding spoke first - I had not known them before; I asked 38s. a load; I then asked 37s., and at last agreed to take 36s. a load, and 1s. over in the three loads - they told me to turn off at the Kingsland-gate, and to go towards the west-end of the town - I turned off at the gate, and when I had got a good bit on, Henwood met me, and asked if that was John Redding 's straw; I said I did not know, as I did not then know Redding's name - Henwood then went away, and I suppose went to the other two men - he and another man then came up to me, and Henwood said he was going with me to unload the straw; he did not say where we were to got to, but we went on to Mr. Nibb's livery-stable, in Crown-yard, Regent-street - I unloaded; Henwood and one of Mr. Nibb's men assisted me; Henwood had told me, as we went along, that we were to go to the corner of Regent-street, where I should have my money; Redding and Fielder had told me, when I left them at Kingsland-gate, that they would meet me, and pay me when I got my load off; when I had unloaded, Henwood popped off, and I did not see him again - I went to the corner of Regent-street, but I did not see Redding or Fielder - I saw Redding the same night at the King's Head, Tottenham-court-road; I asked him for my money, and he said they had been waiting for me with the money up at Kingsland-gate, but when we came to talk to him, he knew nothing about it; he was very tipsy.

Cross-examined. Q. How often have you brought hay and straw to town? A. Never before for my present master - I never sold it on the road before; I used to take it to Smithfield; I did not see Henwood when the bargain was made - my master told me to receive the money before I unloaded, if I could; I considered Henwood as the servant of the other two men - I went back to the yard afterwards, and asked Mr. Nibbs for the money.

Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Was Henwood to meet you at the corner of Regent-street? A. Yes.

WILLIAM NIBBS . I keep a livery-stable in Crown-yard. On the 10th of March Clinton came to my stable with three loads of straw, and Henwood, who was a stranger, came with him, and brought me a note from Redding, with the price of three loads of straw; I went out, looked at the straw, and told them to bring it in at the price expressed; after the straw was unloaded, I paid Henwood 5l. 8s.; the straw had been unloaded in my yard, but I did not see it, as it was a foggy morning, and I had a had cough - I paid Henwood 5l. 8s. for the straw, and 1s., which Redding was to have for purchasing the straw; when I paid him, he walked out of my passage, and I considered he was going to pay the carman - I saw the carman afterwards; he said he had not had the money.

COURT. Q. Did you know Redding before? A. Yes, for a good many years - I have purchased a deal of straw of him; I consider him honest; I have generally paid him, and he has paid the carters who have brought the straw or hay - I considered I was buying this of Redding, and I treated Henwood as his servant; I had no receipt; I knew that it could not be Redding's except by his buying it - I have not seen the carman paid before, but I believe the money has been paid regularly; I believe Redding gets his living by purchasing straw and hay; he has bought a good deal for me and other persons, who keep stables.

SAMUEL HUMM . I am a bricklayer. I went with Clinton to Mr. Nibbs, to help unload the straw; I went by Redding's direction, from the corner of the New-road, which is about half a mile from the stable; Cannon afterwards gave me 10s. for it.

COURT. Q. Where did you see Redding? A. At the corner of the New-road, Hampstead; he told me to go with clinton to Regent-street - Cannon was not there then, but he paid me at a public-house on

Saturday night; I thought it was a good deal; I had heard that Clinton had come to Redding for the money that afternoon; that was two or three hours before I saw Henwood at the Blue Posts, in Tottenham-court-road -Cannon came in there; Henwood and he went out; I staid at the bar; they came in again, and Cannon paid me - I do not know that I mentioned what I had heard to Cannon, as I got tipsy.

WILLIAM JEFFERYS . I keep the Blue Posts; I have seen Redding, Cannon, and Henwood at my house - Henwood and Redding were there in conversation on the night of the 10th of March; I had not seen Redding much before, but the other two had often been there.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am a Police-constable. I took all the prisoners; I took Fielder first, close to the station-house; the carman who was with me told him what he was taken for - he made no answer; I took Cannon and Henwood the same night, at the Blue Posts - I told them it was for selling some straw and keeping the money - Henwood, who was tipsy, said it was a druken frolic - Cannon was sober, and said nothing; I took Redding on the Saturday night afterwards; I told him I apprehended him for selling the straw and not paying the farmer; he made no reply- I had been looking for Redding all the week, and at last I watched his wife, and took him at a public-house up a mews in Regent-street.

MR. PHILLIPS to WILLIAM NIBBS . Q. Was Henwood sober when you paid him the money? A. Yes; it was about eight o'clock in the morning when he came to me.

JOHN CLINTON re-examined. Q. Did Redding give you any note? A. Yes, and I gave it to Mr. Harmer; I do not say that Henwood helped me to unload, but he took away the straw into the loft - I took it out of the cart, put it up into the loft, and he took it away.

SAMUEL HUMM . Clinton put it out of the waggon into the loft, and I and Henwood took it into the loft, and gave it to Nibbs' man. - (Note read)

Mr. Nibbs, Regent-street, three loads of straw, 5l. 8s.

Paid JOHN REDDING .

Redding's Defence. I never wrote the note; I cannot write; I never saw it till it was at the office - I sent the man to Mr. Nibbs, and expected he would get the money there, and when I found he had not, I looked after the man who had the money.

Henwood's Defence. I took the straw by Redding's orders, but I did not take any note.

REDDING - GUILTY . Aged 54.

FIELDER - GUILTY . Aged 55.

HENWOOD - GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

CANNON - NOT GUILTY .

873. JOHN REDDING , THOMAS FIELDER, JOSEPH CANNON , and GEORGE HENWOOD, were again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 2 loads of straw, value 3l. , the goods of Joseph Bostock Massey .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH BOSTOCK MASSEY . I am a farmer , and live at Coltrell, in Herts. I sent my man on the 10th of March with two loads of straw, for which he was to bring ready money - he never brought me any.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am servant to Mr. Massey. I was sent on the 10th of March with two loads of straw to London; on the road I met Redding and Fielder, just on the other side of Kingsland-gate - they asked if I would sell my straw; I told them I did not know, but I agreed to let them have it at 37s. a load, and 1s. in - they told me to turn off at Kingsland-gate, and they would overtake me, and pay me when I had unloaded, but they did not catch me - Cannon came up to me near Ball's-pond, and said he would take me where I was to deliver the straw; he went with me to a place which I have since heard was Green-street, Grosvenor-square , at Mr. Sherwood's livery stables; when I got there I put some of the straw out; Cannon and one of Mr. Sherwood's men put some out - Cannon said, "You may back the cart out of the yard," and he took the money I think from one of Mr. Sherwood's men; he told me to go up Regent-street, he would be with me, and pay me - I went with him ever so far; at last he slipped from me, and I lost him all at once; I saw Fielder as I was backing my cart out of the yard - he said "Have you got your money?" I said, No, and I saw him no more - I saw Cannon receive four sovereigns, and I lent him two shillings out of my own pocket; he told me to go down Regent-street, and he would get change and pay me.

SAMUEL SHERWOOD . I am a horse-dealer - I live in Green-street, Grosvenor-square. On the 9th of March Redding came to me and said he had some straw at 39s. a load; I said I would have nothing to do with it till I saw it, and the day following Cannon and Palmer brought it; I looked at it; and desired my man to take it in - I gave Davis the money; this note was brought to me by Cannon.

JOHN DAVIS . I am servant to Mr. Sherwood - I saw the straw brought on the 10th of March; I took it in with Cannon and Palmer; I gave Cannon four sovereigns, and he borrowed two shillings of Palmer - I asked Cannon if I was to pay him or Redding; he said I might pay him, it would be all the same, and he made this cross on the paper - (read.)

Mr. Sherwood, Green-street, Grosvenor-square, two loads of straw, 39s. per load. 3l. 18s. JOSEPH CANNON , his + mark.

Redding's Defence. I sent the man to Mr. Sherwood's with the straw: I went up expecting he had received his money, but he was gone: I heard the money had been paid, and I went away.

Fielder's Defence. I had nothing to do with selling either of the loads of straw.

REDDING - GUILTY . Aged 54.

FIELDER - GUILTY . Aged 55.

CANNON - GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years in addition .

HENWOOD - NOT GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18320405-78

874. GEORGE WATIS and WILLIAM CLARK were indicted, for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 130 lbs. weight of kitchen stuff, value 29s. , the goods of Francis Brewer .

WILLIAM GLASSCOCK . I am a Police-constable. On

the morning of the 23rd of March, between two and three o'clock, I was near the prosecutor's premises, in Kensington-gravel-pits; I heard a step, and then heard some person say, "Lay still" - I saw a cart near the wall; I went to it, and found in it two sacks of kitchen stuff, and saw some person laying down; I said,"What are you doing there?" - Clark got up and ran, and I after him, about one hundred yards, but I took him without losing sight of him; I went back, and saw Watts about three hundred yards from the prosecutor's, coming home- I took him, and asked who he had been with; he said,"With Clark and Avile" - I asked him to show me where Avile lived; he told me, and I went, but I could not find him - I examined a shed which had been broken open, and the padlock was broken all to pieces.

WILLIAM GRANT . I am servant to Mr. Francis Brewer, of Kensington-gravel-pits . We had some kitchen stuff in a shed in the yard; I saw it safe on the night of the 23rd of March, a little after nine o'clock - I have since seen some in the possession of the officer; there had been about 1 1/2cwt. in a tub, which was empty in the morning, and there were some scattered about the place- the padlock was broken off the door; I cannot swear to the kitchen stuff.

Watts' Defence. I had been to the play and was returning home.

Clark's Defence. I was behind the cart - I saw the Policeman, and was afraid of being taken to the watch-house.

WILLIAM GLASSCOCK . The cart belonged to a cowkeeper, and had discharged some grains the day before - there was no horse in it; there were marks of grease on the side of the door, as if the sacks had been lifted up; there were 126lbs. of kitchen stuff in the sacks - Clark's jacket looked greasy.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-79

875. THOMAS BUGDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 2 drinking-glasses, value 1s. 6d., and 2 spoons, value 1s. , the goods of John Meadows .

JOHN MEADOWS . I keep the Sun and Ship public-house, at Eastcott . I was not at home at the time of this robbery.

CHARLOTTE MEADOWS . I am the prosecutor's wife. On Wednesday, the 21st of March, I had some metal spoons on a dresser in the back room - I afterwards saw a rummer-glass on the bar; the prisoner came that evening, and had some bread and cheese - he went into the bar, and I think into the tap-room; I then missed a glass, and went to the tap-room - I saw the prisoner there; I had a stick in my hand - I struck his pocket, and heard a glass break - he took it from his pocket himself: it was ours - I then told him to feel again, and he took out a wine-glass; I then told him to let me look into his pocket, and he took out two spoons, one of which is ours.

Cross-examined by MR. DONNE. Q. What is there particular about these glasses? A. I know this one by the bottom of it - it was figured glass, but has been more broken since; there were several persons there - I do not know whether any were intoxicated; I do not think the prisoner was - I did not miss a pint pot; he denied having the glasses, and when he pulled them out, he said he did not know who had put them there - he offered me 1s. for them; he staid there, I suppose, two hours afterwards, and then went home - I knew where he had lived for some years; several persons in the tap-room said they thought he put them in himself.

COURT. Q. What did you first say to him? A. I said I thought he had some of my glasses - he said he had not: I said I should like to see - he then pulled out this glass; I asked if he had not another, and he pulled out this wine-glass - I said it was like mine - I then asked what he had in his other pocket, and he took out the spoons- they had been jovial together, but I did not see any tricks; I heard afterwards that Lawrence was accused - it did not appear that there had been any tricks played; he was not apprehended for a week afterwards - my husband was busy, and I could not go about it myself; he did not come to our house in the interim - he is a labourer; the things were taken from two different rooms.

ARTHUR PRITCHARD . I was at the house, and sat within two yards of the prisoner - Mrs. Meadows told him he had some glass in his pocket; he said he had not - she said she was sure he had, and she struck it with the stick; he then pulled out the broken glass, then the other, and then the spoons - he said he did not know how they came there; he said something to a man, as if he accused him of putting them in - I had not seen any joking.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not his pocket so constructed, that it might easily be got at? A. I cannot say - his coat was unbuttoned; he was not drunk - I had been there an hour or two; some of the men were rather merry.

Prisoner's Defence. The constable came and took me - I waited two hours for the prosecutor; he said I must go with him; I said, "I don't like all this, I would rather settle it;" he said he should not have done it, but that I had said that his wife had put broken glasses into my pockets, that she might accuse me of taking whole ones.

MR. MEADOWS. I did not say any such thing - he wanted to settle it, and I said it was impossible.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-80

876. JAMES BAOY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 dead fowl, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Frederick Blankley .

FREDERICK BLANKLEY . I am a poulterer , and live in White Lion-street, Pentonville . On the 10th of March Bennet had the prisoner in custody, and a dead fowl, which was mine, was put into my hands by my next door neighbour.

JAMES BENNET . I live in White Lion-street, and am a labourer. I saw the prisoner at the prosecutor's door, which is opposite to me; he had a basket - he ran off, and a person called to me to stop him; he threw down the basket; the fowl dropped out - I took him, and gave him to the prosecutor.

Prisoner. I was going home; a boy threw the fowl into my basket; I threw it out directly, and went to run after the boy. Witness. He ran fifteen or twenty yards, and then threw down the basket.

JOHN MILES . I live in Penton-grove. The prisoner was delivered to me - these are the legs of the fowl.

MR. BLANKLEY. I could swear to the fowl - it had been on my board ten minutes before.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-81

877. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 cloak, value 1l. , the goods of John Josiah Buttress .

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I am groom to Mr. John Josiah Buttress . On the 15th of March I drove his chaise to Homerton , where his country house is; his cloak was in it - I left it safe when I put the chaise up, and missed it the next morning; the doors of the coach-house were wide open, and a ladder fixed against the wall.

WILLIAM FYNNY BULLOCK . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty on Friday, the 16th, at the bottom of Homerton; I saw the prisoner with this cloak; I asked what he had got under his arm; he said a cloak belonging to his master, Mr. Cole; that he had been to London with some sheep, and his master had lent him the cloak to wear - in consequence of information I took his shoes, and they corresponded exactly with some marks I found on the premises - one of the shoes had a tip on the heel, and the other had not.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the cloak in Homerton.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-82

878. WILLIAM CHAMPION was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 1 hearth-rug, value 7s. , the goods of William Wells .

ANN WELLS . I am the wife of William Wells , a broker , in Hackney-road-crescent . On the 27th of March I was in the parlour; I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take the rug off a pianoforte - he put it under his arm, and ran out with it; I pursued, and called Stop thief! the officer brought him back in a quarter of an hour.

TIMOTHY HARVEY . I was in King-street, Hackney-road, about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's premises; between six and seven o'clock in the evening the prisoner ran past me; I pursued; he dropped this rug from under his arm - I took it up, and gave it to the officer; I saw him brought back.

EDWARD PHILLIPS . I was at my door, and saw the prisoner run past; I pursued, and came up with him when he was taken - I saw him drop this rug.

GEORGE GREGORY . I am a Police-constable. I saw the prisoner in the custody of Carter - I took him; the prosecutor identified him as soon as I brought him back.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at a person's door, looking at the road being so bad; I did not run - I was not near the Hackney-road.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-83

879. WILLIAM CARTER and GEORGE WHITE were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Samuel Cooper Christmas , from his person .

JAMES NEVILLE . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty in Finsbury-square on the 12th of March, at a quarter before nine o'clock; I saw the prisoners together, behind Mr. Christmas - I saw Carter take the handkerchief from his pocket, and give it to White; the prosecutor turned, and caught White - I went and caught Carter; when I got back White had broken from the prosecutor - I cried Stop thief! and he was brought back.

SAMUEL COOPER CHRISTMAS . On the evening of the 12th of March I was in Finsbury-square - I had this handkerchief in my pocket; I felt something - I turned, and caught White; he got away, and ran as far as Windmill-street - he was there taken; Carter was about a yard from me when I first caught hold of him, and the officer followed him.

GREY HITCHINGS . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty in Tabernacle-walk - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw White running towards me; I stopped him, and took him back to Finsbury-square - I there found Carter in custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Carter's Defence. I was going home, and the officer took me - I was five or six yards before the gentleman.

White's Defence (written.) I left my mother's about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, and on arriving at the Pavement in Moorfields, a gentleman turned round and missed his handkerchief, and he seized me by the collar, which attracted the notice of the Policeman, who immediately came up; he almost immediately perceived, at a distance, a handkerchief, which the gentleman owned; numbers of persons were passing at the time, rendering it impossible for the Policeman to speak with accuracy as to the guilty person - I certainly did resist when unjustly accused.

JAMES NEVILLE . I was against the rails, five or six yards from the prosecutor when the handkerchief was taken? A. I took it up from the ground, and then went to Carter - he did not run; I am sure he took the handkerchief, and gave it to White.

White received a good character.

CARTER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

WHITE - GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-84

880. WILLIAM CURTAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , 2 boots, value 18s. , the goods of John Palmer .

DANIEL HOUSDEN . I am shopman to John Palmer, of Oxford-street , a shoemaker . On the evening of the 22nd of February I saw the prisoner reach out his arm, and take two boots from the nails, inside the door; he ran off, I pursued, and took him about twenty yards off - he asked what I wanted; I said the boots he had just taken from inside of the shop - one of the boots fell from behind his coat; he struggled, and a man came up and assisted me - he fell twice in the course of his struggling; we got him to the shop, and the officer took him; this other boot was picked up in the street; they are not a pair.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking in a shop window at some pictures - he came up, and touched me on the shoulder.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-85

881. RALPH COUSINS was indicted for stealing, on

the 29th of February , 1 mahogany night-table, value 18s. , the goods of William Dyer .

MARY DYER . I am the wife of William Dyer , of Buckingham-place, Marylebone , he is a broker . On the afternoon of the 29th of February I was in my parlour; I missed a mahogany night-table, and went into Cirencester-place - I saw the prisoner with it on his shoulder; a witness stopped him, and I charged him with stealing it - he looked at me, and tried to throw it at me; a witness caught it, and he was going on till a person stopped him, about two hundred yards from my shop.

SARAH ALLEN . I am the wife of John Allen, of Upper Cleveland-street. I was at my second floor window - I saw the prisoner take up the table, and appear as if feeling the weight of it - he went a few yards, then came back, took it up by the handles, and went off with it; I saw him brought back, and know he is the man - it had stood within the rails, not far from the door.

JOHN TERRY . I am a Police-constable. Mrs. Dyer applied to me, and I took the prisoner at the corner of Cirencester-place; he stood by the side of the table - he said he was employed to carry it to the New-road by a gentleman, whom he did not know; I said he was going the wrong way.

Prisoner's Defence. I was engaged to carry it to Foley-place for 2s.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-86

882. SAMUEL DODDS and JAMES KENNY were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 3lbs. weight of soap, value 1s. 4d. , the goods of Isaac Page .

WILLIAM KING . I am shopman to Mr. Isaac Page , an oilman , of Marylebone-lane . On the afternoon of the 17th of March my attention was called to Bentinck-street; I saw the prisoners there, and Dodds was wrapping up this bar of soap in a blue handkerchief - as soon as they saw me they ran off, and dropped it; Kenny ran one way, and Dodds the other; a gentleman stopped Dodds, and I took him.

MARY BAKER . I am the wife of Benjamin Baker - I live opposite Mr. Page's shop. I saw the two prisoners on the area railing; Kenny took up the soap and handed it to Dodds - they were close together; I ran down and told Mr. King - he went in pursuit.

PETER NEWLAND . I am a Police-constable. I saw Dodds go close by me, and I took him.

WILLIAM KING . This is the soap.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where had it been? A. At the door-post, with a piece of wood on it, which had been forced away.

The prisoners received a good character.

DODDS - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined Fourteen Days , and Whipped .

KENNY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-87

883. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John McFee , from his person .

JOHN McFEE . I am clerk to a solicitor , in Clifton-street, Finsbury. On the 4th of March I was crossing Chiswell-street , at a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening; I felt my handkerchief removed - I looked round, and saw the prisoner with it in his hand; I made a step to take him - he threw it down, and ran off; a gentleman stopped him - I did not lose sight of him: this is the handkerchief.

JAMES NEVILLE . I saw a mob on the other side of the way; I found the prisoner in custody, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Chiswell-street; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw this gentleman running - when I came up another gentleman took hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 16 - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-88

884. ROBERT FISHER and JOHN SHUTTLEWORTH were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of Robert Howard .

ROBERT HOWARD , JUN. I am journeyman to my father, Robert Howard , a shoemaker , of Paternoster-row, Spitalfields . On the 28th of March the prisoners came and said they wanted a pair of shoes; Shuttleworth sat down, and tried two or three pairs on - Fisher stood against the mantel-piece, and I missed a pair from a shelf against the mantel-piece; I gave an alarm, and Fisher took a shoe out of his pocket, handed it to Shuttleworth, and said, "Here, Jem, try this on;" he then took another out of his right-hand pocket - I said I should detain them for taking the shoes; I sent for the officer - Shuttleworth had only tried shoes on; he said they were too large and they were not the sort he wanted; then he said he would go and pawn his watch, as he had no money.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Shuttleworth did not offer to get off the chair? A. No.

The prisoners received a good character.

FISHER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

SHUTTLEWORTH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-89

885. JAMES GARDNER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 1 shirt, value 5s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 9s.; 2 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and 16 shillings , the property of Anthony Revolter .

ANTHONY REVOLTER . I am a sweep , and lodge in Princes-street . The prisoner came to lodge there about a month before this happened; we slept in the same room -I had a box in another room, close by the copper; when I returned home on the 4th of March I found the box opened and the lock wrenched off; I missed a shirt, three handkerchiefs, two sovereigns, one half-sovereign, and the silver - the prisoner did not return: I went and found him in a lodging-house - he had my shirt and one of my handkerchiefs on.

WILLIAM WOODMAN . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and found on him this shirt, this silk handkerchief, and 1s. 11d. in money - he had a hat, a waistcoat, a pair of trousers, and a flannel waistcoat on, all new.

ANTHONY REVOLTER . When the prisoner was in our room he was dressed like myself - he was a sweep, and had no new clothes.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of taking the money.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-90

886. ALFRED GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March , 5 spoons, value 20s. , the goods of Anne Denman .

ANNE DENMAN. I am single , and live in King-street, Hammersmith . On the 22nd of March I missed two spoons from the dresser-drawer in the kitchen, and two from the pantry; the prisoner lodged in the house, with his father and mother, but the rooms the spoons were in did not belong to them; I have seen some broken pieces of spoons, which I know were part of what I had lost - the prisoner had stolen one spoon on the 19th: he then went away, and on the Thursday he came back and stole the others.

Prisoner. Q. Did they not belong to your father? Witness. No, four of them are mine, and one is my father's.

JOHN REYNOLDS . I am a Policeman (I T.) On Friday, the 23rd of March, I went in search of the prisoner - I took him; he said he knew nothing about the robbery on the 22nd - the spoon he took on the 19th had been found; I took him from London to Hammersmith, and when we got there he said he had sold the spoons to Mr. Buchanan, a refiner, in Raquet-court, Fleet-street - I went there, and found these pieces of spoons, which Miss Denman can swear to.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ALFRED EDWARDS . I am in the employ of Mr. James Buchanan , a gold and silver caster and refiner. I bought these pieces of spoons of the prisoner, for 14s. 3d.; there were 2 ozs. 19 dwts. of them - I did not ask him any questions, as he was in the habit of coming to my employer's, for sheet silver, as he was in the silver trade; I have heard he worked somewhere in Little Britain.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a surgical instrument-maker. I never was in his shop in my life.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix .

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-91

887. JOHN FRANCIS GALLAGHER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of George William Patrick , from his person .

GEORGE WILLIAM PATRICK . I am a smith , and live in Old Gravel-lane. I was in Shadwell on the 1st of April, and saw the prisoner and another boy following me; I put my hand to my coat pocket, and missed my handkerchief - I turned, and saw the prisoner before me, and the other behind me; I laid hold of the prisoner, and found my handkerchief in his bosom - this is it.

JAMES GRAHAM . I am a Police-constable (49 K.) I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. A boy threw it on my shoulder, and I put it into my bosom.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Fourteen Days , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18320405-92

888. GEORGE HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 tea-caddy, value 4s.; 3 penknives, value 3s., and 1 silver thimble, value 6d. , the goods of Ann King .

ANN KING . I am a widow , and live in Sion-terrace, St. Pancras . On the 20th of March the prisoner came to my house with a man and woman, who came in, and agreed for a lodging; the prisoner stood outside - the man and woman asked me to go and get some beer, which I did, and when I returned my place was broken open, and the articles stated were gone from my parlour, which was locked; I ran down Cromer-street, and overtook the prisoner - I asked him to give me my things, he used a great many bad words, and knocked me down: I left the man and woman up stairs when I went out - I shut the street door, but they might have opened it; I saw the prisoner with the caddy under his arm, and when I asked him for it, he threw it down and struck me - I screamed for the Policeman, and the man and woman, who had been with the prisoner, got away.

Prisoner. Q. How can you swear to me? A. By your person; it was a little after ten o'clock at night - I do not keep a brothel; two young women lodge with me- I have lived there six months; I let lodgings, and go out to wash - the man and woman asked for a lodging for the night; they sent for some gin and some beer - I showed them to a bed-room.

COURT. Q. Did they say they wanted the room for a little time? A. They said so, but in the bustle I do not know what I said; they sent me out for beer and gin - the young women in my house do not receive company to my knowledge; they do needle-work, and sometimes go out to work.

JOHN SMITH . I was in Cromer-street, and heard the prosecutrix speak to some man; I heard something fall, and saw the prisoner strike her.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you? A. About half-way down the street; it was light enough for me to distinguish you - you were opposite the public-house; there was only the young man and woman you were with - I never lost sight of you till you were taken.

TIMOTHY RYAN . I am a Police-constable (83 G.) I received the prisoner from Smith; he was running on, crying Stop thief! my lamp was lighted, and when he saw me he stood still.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Cromer-street; I saw a mob, and crossed the road - I heard a female cry Stop thief! I ran, like the rest, and being swift of foot, I got before them; a young man came to me in Gray's Inn-lane, and said he thought I was the person who had robbed the prosecutrix - when the prosecutrix came up, she would not lift up her head to look at me; I asked her two or three times, but she would not.

ANN KING. The prisoner had come to my house in the evening, and asked for my son; a young woman went to the door, and said he was not at home.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-93

889. ANN HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 4 gold brooches, value 2l., and 2 gold ear-rings, value 1l., the goods of Moses Abraham , her master .

ELIZA ABRAHAM . I am the wife of Moses Abraham , who is an attorney ; we live in Liverpool-street, New-road . The prisoner was our servant , she left on the 1st of February, and the same night I missed four brooches, two pairs of ear-rings, and some other articles, from a drawer in my bed-room; Richard Glover afterwards came to my house, and offered me the brooches and ear-rings - I said he had better give them to the officer.

JOSEPH GLOVER . I am a hackney-coachman, and live

in Rawstorne-street, Clerkenwell. One night in February I went down to Sadler's-wells, and saw the prisoner there; I had lived with her mother, when her husband was alive I was in his employ; the prisoner showed me these brooches and rings in her glove, in St. John-street-road; I asked where she got them - she said she had them given to her; I said she had better let me have them, and I got them, partly by force, from her - I took them home to my wife to take care of, while I made inquiry about them; I heard some account the next morning, and I sent word to my wife to give them up to the lady - I left the same brooches and rings with my wife that I got from the prisoner.

ALICE GLOVER . I am the wife of Joseph Glover ; he left the jewellery in my care, and he sent word the next day to give them to his father, to take to the lady, which I did.

RICHARD GLOVER . I live in Union-court, Chapel-street, Islington. I received these articles from Alice Glover; I took them to Mrs. Abraham - she told me to give them to the officer.

EDWARD BELL . I am a Police-officer. Richard Glover gave these things to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had known Joseph Glover a good while; he asked me if I was comfortable in my place - I said I was; he asked if they were well off, and if there was any jewellery, or anything which I could take, as it would not be missed - I met him up at Islington, when I left my place, and he persuaded me to go to the play; he came to me in the middle of the play, and asked what I had got - I told him, and he offered me 5s. for them; I would not take that - he then gave me 9s. for four brooches, two pairs of ear-rings and a diamond ring.

JOSEPH GLOVER . I gave her 7s. for them, but I had no diamond ring; I went to the theatre by accident, and went to the same part where she was - I did not know she had these things till she showed them to me, and said, "Look what I have got;" I did not know where she had lived till the next morning, when I saw her mother - I was with her about eleven o'clock at night, and then I left her; I went to the coach-rank in the City-road, till between two and three o'clock in the morning, which is my time to go home.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-94

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

890. THOMAS COX was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 basket, value 1s. 6d.: 7 caps, value 9s.; 5 cravats, value 2s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 4 night-caps, value 2s.; 13 aprons, value 9s.; 3 gowns, value 8s.; 2 shifts, value 6s.; 1 pocket, value 1d., and 1 yard of calico, value 1d. , the goods of Mary Ladd ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-95

891. CHARLES NORTHFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Charles Harris , from his person .

CHARLES HARRIS . I am a surgeon . On the 24th of February, about two o'clock, I was in Fenchurch-street , I felt something at my pocket; I felt, and missed my handkerchief - I turned, and the prisoner was close at my left hand; I collared him, and he instantly threw my handkerchief behind him - I picked it up, and took him to the watch-house - this is it.

BENJAMIN FIGGINS . I was coming from Aldgate. I saw the prisoner throw something behind him, which no doubt was the handkerchief - the prosecutor picked it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not pick the pocket; the handkerchief was thrown on the ground - I took it up; the gentleman turned, and seized me, and I threw it down.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-96

892. THOMAS DEDMAN & EDWARD PETTY were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 6 dead fish, called soles, value 10s. , the goods of William Gorton .

WILLIAM GORTON . I am a fishmonger , and live in Gutter-lane. On the 28th of February I was at Billingsgate ; the prisoner Dedman had been in my employ for two years - he had my cart, and was employed to take my fish home that morning; I saw Petty near the cart, as if he was waiting to have something out of the cart - he missed the cart, put down his knot, and ran after it - I sometimes employed him as a porter; I ran after him; he hallooed after Dedman to stop - we run as far as Calvert's brewery before the cart stopped; then Dedman gave Petty three pairs of soles, which weighed 12 1/2lbs.; directly I saw the three pairs put into his apron, I stepped across, and collared him with the soles in his possession; I had the cart stopped, and took them to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. DONNE. Q. You did not give Dedman into custody at first? A. I took Petty, and then him - I have trusted Dedman; I was fifteen or twenty yards from the cart; it was hardly light, but they stopped under a gas-lamp - I had bought the fish myself, and sent it to my shop by Dedman.

JOHN HACKETT . Mr. Gorton brought Petty to the watch-house, and in the blue apron were three pairs of soles - I sent out for Dedman, and took them to the Compter.

DEDMAN - GUILTY. Aged 27.

PETTY - GUILTY. Aged 43.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-97

893. CHARLES BOOTHMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 4lbs. weight of brass, value 2s., the goods of John Bath , his master .

JOHN BATH . I am a fancy cabinet-maker , and live in Coleman-street - the prisoner has been my apprentice for seven years. On the 27th of February I had suspicion, and watched him; he went out for the beer for supper, to Swan-alley; I followed him to the chandler's-shop, saw him take something from under his jacket, and place it on the counter; I went in, and found it was about 4lbs. of brass - I said to the man in the shop, "I beg you will take notice that this lad has brought my brass here;" he said, "You had better send for an officer," and either he or his wife went for one.

JAMES ALLEN . I am the officer. I took the prisoner.

MR. BATH. This is my brass - I found some of it secreted in my cellar on the Sunday; I marked it, and left it there - here is that, and some more with it.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the brass in question was refuse, which was allowed as perquisites throughout the trade.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-98

894. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 canvas bag, value 2d.; 2 half-crowns, and 1 sixpence, the property of William Hill , from his person .

WILLIAM HILL . I am a horse-keeper . I was in Holborn , between one and two o'clock in the morning of the 17th of March; I had been out with a friend, but was quite sober - I was in a public-house; the prisoner came in, and asked me for something to drink; I gave her some - I then went out; she followed, and asked me to go home with her, which I refused; in going along Holborn she put her hand into my right-hand pocket, and took out my purse, which contained two half-crowns and one sixpence - I felt her put her hand into my pocket; I took hold of her, and struggled with her; I tried to get away, and we both fell together on the pavement; I called for assistance - the watchman came up, and took her; he took the purse out of her hand.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What were you doing in the public-house? A. I was with a friend, but he went out before me - we went into the house between eleven and twelve o'clock, and left it about one; I was not drinking all the time - we had a little beer; it might be three pints - we had nothing but beer till the prisoner came in, and asked for gin, which I gave her, but I did not take any more than one glass; there had been no freedom between the prisoner and me - I wanted to get rid of her in the street - she was not drunk.

JOHN BEAN . I am a watchman of St. Andrew, Holborn. I was on duty, and saw the prosecutor and this woman struggling - they were both down; I heard him say, "You have got my purse;" there was a crowd round them - I got in, and asked what he had lost; he said, "She has got my purse;" I wrenched it, with a great deal of difficulty, from her hand; I took her to the watch-house, and found two half-crowns and one sixpence in it - she seemed to have been drinking, but he was quite sober - she said at the watch-house that he had agreed to go home with her.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not claim the purse as her own? A. Yes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He was quite intoxicated, and so was I.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-99

895. JAMES GARDNER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 115 handkerchiefs, value 11l., the goods of Starr Wood and another .

2nd COUNT, stating it to be 100 yards of silk.

THOMAS GARDNER NINER . I travel for Messrs. Starr Wood and John Gold . I had a gig in Gracechurch-street , on the 3rd of March, and a parcel in it belonging to them; I was absent about half an hour, and left the parcel in the gig, in care of a boy; when I returned it was gone; it contained the articles stated in the indictment - I do not know the prisoner.

JOHN VOWLER PITTS . I have a memorandum of the goods belonging to Wood and Gold - these are the articles; they were packed up, and delivered to Niner.

BENJAMIN ALLEN STONE . I am a City-officer. I first saw the prisoner going through Leadenhall-market, with a parcel; I followed, and asked where he was going with it; he said, "To Leadenhall-street, to book it to go to London-wall;" this was between two and three o'clock; I took and turned the flat part down - I then asked him what was in it; he could not tell me; he then said he was going to the mate of the Galligasker, (I think he called it,) to tell him to save it for him - I locked him up, and found the owner.

GEORGE WITHERS . I was left in care of the gig. I was at the head of the horse, and was buckling up his hand; before I could turn my head the parcel was gone; I went and told my master.

Prisoner's Defence. He said before the Lord Mayor that he never missed the parcel till his master came out of the shop - a gentleman gave it to me, and said he would give me 1s. to carry it - he was before me, and I told the officer so.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-100

896. RICHARD GADSDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 1 roasting-jack, value 16s. , the goods of David Evans .

JAMES GODDARD . I am warehouseman to Mr. David Evans , of Mansion-house-street . On the 20th of February the prisoner walked into his warehouse, took this vertical jack from the crane it was on, placed it before him, and walked away; I was in the counting-house, saw him, and followed him - when he got on the pavement I took him- this is the jack; I had not known him before.

SAMUEL NEALE . I am an officer. About ten minutes past three o'clock I was sent for - Mr. Goddard and I took the prisoner.

Prisoner. I was out of employ, and throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-101

897. CORNELIUS MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of James Orlando Williams , from his person .

JAMES ORLANDO WILLIAMS . I am a publican . On the 17th of March, about five o'clock, I was in Smithfield ; I did not feel any thing, but was told that my pocket was picked - I turned, and saw two boy s; the prisoner was one, and he had my handkerchief in his hand - he ran off, I pursued him, and called Stop thief! he turned a corner, and I lost sight of him, but when I turned the officer had got him and the handkerchief.

JAMES GRADY . I am an officer. I was on duty in West-street, Smithfield. I saw two boys running fast - I considered they had committed some depredation; on coming up to them the prisoner, who was one of them, dropped this handkerchief - I took it up, and took him.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was playing with two boys, one of whom, named Gibbs, ran by him, and threw the handkerchief into his bosom.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 13. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320405-102

898. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 sheep's carcase, value 32s. , the goods of Thomas Bean .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be 60lbs. weight of mutton.

GEORGE THOMPSON . I am in the employ of Mr. Bean, a butcher , who lives in Shepherd-street, May-fair. I had the carcass of a sheep in his cart on the 24th of March, which I had got from Newgate-market - I left the cart in St. Paul's church-yard , in the care of a man who usually minds it, while I went for some more sheep; I returned in a short time, and saw the prisoner in that man's custody, and this carcass was out of the cart - I knew it to be the same.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You did not know that to be the one you missed? A. No, but I missed one; I had not seen the prisoner before.

JOSEPH HAMM STONE . I was left in care of the cart, and between seven and eight o'clock I saw the prisoner come out of Londonhouse-yard; I was called to help another man with three sheep, and when I came from helping him I saw the prisoner pass the yard that leads to the Goose and Gridiron, with the carcass of a sheep on his shoulder; I went up to him, and asked him what he was going to do with that; he said he had just had it given him to carry - I took him into custody, and looked into the cart; there was no carcass there.

Cross-examined. Q. He was not running? A. No, walking; I had seen him about the market before, but I did not know him: he made no resistance.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

THOMAS BEAN . I am master of the cart. I had bought four sheep, and the one which was taken was the first which had been put into the cart.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-103

899. ANN SANTER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 coat, value 24s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of John Wade .

WILLIAM WADE . I live on Holborn-hill , and am a tailor. On the 31st of March the prisoner came to my house with a child - she asked to look at some suits for a child between seven and eight years of age, and I showed her some, but I could not please her in the colour; there were some dresses on the counter, and she folded one of them in half - I then could not please her in price; she wanted one at about 25s.; I had not one so low - she left the shop without buying any thing, and I missed the dress which she had folded - I went after her up Holborn, but could not see her; I was returning, and went into a public-house, where I saw the same infant, whom she had had with her, in a man's arms at the bar - I asked where the famale was; he said she had gone to the back part of the house - I desired him not to let her leave - I got an officer, and saw the prisoner come in with a child, who had the suit of clothes on, which she had taken from my shop - the officer took her.

JAMES WHITE . I am the officer, and took her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-104

900. HENRY GOUGH was indicted for embezzling the sum of 3l., which he had received on account of John Chandler , to whom he was servant .

The prisoner not being the prosecutor's servant, was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18320405-105

901. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 27 yards of printed cotton, value 12s., the goods of James Bailey and others .

JOHN CHAPLIN EAST . I live at Albion-house, St. Paul's church-yard , and am shawl buyer to Messrs. James Bailey and others. On the afternoon of the 23rd of February, between two and three o'clock, I was standing in the shop; there was a pile of print in the lobby - I saw the prisoner take a piece of print, and run off with it; I pursued him through Londonhouse-yard, across Paternoster-row, into Newgate-street; he got behind a carriage - he was taken in Christchurch-passage: this piece of print was picked up.

ROBERT HIGGS . I saw the crowd, and the prisoner was in custody.

JOHN RICHMOND . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to my master's, to look for work; he is a printer, and lives in Warwick-lane - I was turning round Christchurch-passage, and saw this lay; I took it up, and the gentleman said I had stolen it.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-106

902. HENRY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of John Brown Nasmyth , from his person .

JOHN BROWN NASMYTH . I was on Holborn-hill at seven o'clock in the evening on the 23rd of March - I had a handkerchief in my pocket; a person told me it was gone - I turned, and saw it on the ground, and the prisoner in custody close to it - there were several persons round.

WILLIAM HUISH WEBBER . I am clerk to a solicitor. I saw the prisoner, and another in company, following the prosecutor; I saw the prisoner take this handkerchief - I seized him, and he dropped it.

EDWARD COONEY . I was on Holborn-hill, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket; he had another boy with him.

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Holborn; a boy who was before me picked the pocket - I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-107

903. WILLIAM STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 pair of boots, value 5s., the goods of Elizabeth Norton ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

ELIZABETH NORTON . I keep a boot-shop in Baldwin's-gardens . On the 30th of March the prisoner and another came to try on some shoes; they said they were a little too long - they then asked the price of these boots, which hung on a nail; I did not bid any money for the shoes - two other persons then came in, and took our attention; the prisoner went away, without buying any thing - I missed

the boots soon after, and the officer came in about half an hour - I found the boots at the watch-house.

BENJAMIN CATMULL . I am an officer. I was on duty on Holborn-hill about five o'clock; I saw the prisoner come out of Brook-street, and go on to Fetter-lane; I followed - he saw me, and ran down Norwich-court: he threw these boots and this apron into a milk-house - a gentleman stopped him in Castle-street, and I took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JESSE CHESTERMAN . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office - I took him, and know he is the same man.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-108

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, APRIL 7.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

904. WILLIAM WELDON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 tub, value 3s. , the goods of Edward Potter .

JOHN POTTER . I am the son of Edward Potter , a cooper , of Ratcliff-highway . On the 20th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner run away with a tub; I told my father, who followed him, and took hold of the tub - the prisoner let go and ran off: I am sure of his person.

JOHN POTTER . My son called me; I followed, and overtook the prisoner, with the tub on his shoulder - he let go of it, and ran over the way; the Policeman took him in my sight; it was inside the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-109

905. BENJAMIN BRIGDEN was indicted for stealing' on the 18th of February , 1 hide of leather, value 36s. , the goods of George Southey and William Southey .

WILLIAM SOUTHEY . I and my brother, George Southey , are currier s, and live in Chenies-street, Bedford-square . -The prisoner was in the habit of coming to our warehouse, to buy waste leather; this hide is ours - we do not sell them in this state.

WILLIAM HOLLIDAY . I live with Mr. Southey. The prisoner used to come to buy roundings, which is waste-cuttings - I never sold him a whole hide: he hawks leather about - he was in our shop about the 18th of February - this hide was not missed till it was offered for sale.

EDWARD BULL . I am a currier. I have known the prisoner as a hawker of leather for about two years. On Saturday evening, the 18th of February, about eight o'clock, he brought this hide to me - he said he had a fine skin in his bag, which he wanted to sell me; he produced it, and on my examining it he said, "I will tell you where I got it - I got it at Mr. Southey's; I bought a bag of pieces there this morning, for which I gave a sovereign, and the hide was among them;" I said it evidently must be a mistake, and advised him to take it back, as it must be missed and suspicion would fall on him - he assured me he would take it back the next morning - I informed Mr. Southey on the Sunday.

THOMAS EAGLES . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Bull's shop, and found this leather in a copper, in his back kitchen on the following Thursday; he told me it was there.

MR. SOUTHEY. He never brought it back; I do not think it possible for a hide to get among waste leather - he never bought any thing but pieces.

The prisoner in a long written Defence, stated that he had found the hide with the pieces in his bag, and intended to have taken it back on the day he was apprehended; that he had heard he was accused, and went to Bull's to meet the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-110

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

906. JOHN MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously forging an acceptance upon a bill of exchange, with intent to defraud Cornelius Regan .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering the same with a like intent.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

CORNELIUS REGAN . I keep a coffee-shop and eating-house in John-street, Oxford-street . The prisoner boarded and lodged at my house for five months; he paid me nothing all the time, except 10s. - I applied to him for payment about the 22nd of December - he said he was afraid he should not be able to procure me money, but if I would take a bill from his friend Howell, who I had often seen at my house with him, he dare say he would stand his friend; I said, as Mr. Howell appeared a respectable man, and as he said he was an East India merchant, I had no objection to take the bill - he brought me one for 10l. a day or two after; this is it (looking at it) - it was accepted at that time; the prisoner endorsed it when he gave it to me, and I paid it to Mr. Howell, my butterman, (who is a different person,) three or four days after - on the 3rd of March it was returned dishonored; the prisoner had continued at my house all that time - I took the bill to No. 8, Great St. Helen's, where it is addressed, and found that Henry Howell did not live there, but was known there; the gentleman gave me a card with Howell's address, in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square - I found him there, but did not get the money.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not Mr. Howell appear exceedingly intimate with the prisoner? A. Yes - I told the prisoner the bill was dishonored, and sent one Burly with it, and the prisoner to the house of a lady of rank in Brook-street; I and the officer waited at the corner of Brook-street till they returned; the prisoner came back to us - he knew the officer was with me.

HENRY HOWELL . I know the prisoner. This bill was not accepted by me - I never authorized any body to accept it for me, not to my recollection.

Q. Why do you say not to your recollection? A. It is my belief that I never did; I did not tell the prisoner he might accept it for me, not to my recollection.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe you have been very intimate indeed with the prisoner? A. Yes, we have been on the most friendly terms; I knew him in much better circumstances.

Q. Had you not in the early part of your lives, accommodated each other with loans? A. Frequently; I

said that to the extent of 10l. or 20l. he might use my name - I said so about four months ago.

Q. Now, you seen very hard of hearing - perhaps he may have requested leave to write your name, and you might have made a mistake, and said Yes? A. Such a thing might happen - he bore a very good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-111

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

907. JOHN FERGUSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 1 clock, value 8l. the goods of Richard Oldfield , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH OLDFIELD. I am the wife of Richard Oldfield , an undertaker ; we live in Britannia-street, St. Pancras . This clock was in a middle room on the ground floor, on a chest of drawers - it cost 10l. eighteen years ago; it is worth 8l.; the shop door was bolted and locked, but two panes of glass were broken before, and a hand could be put in to unfasten it - I saw the clock safe about half-past seven o'clock, and missed it about ten minutes to eight - I have not seen it since.

ELIZABETH HORTON . I am fourteen years old; I have known the prisoner two years - I saw him at Oldfield's door a few minutes before eight o'clock; he pulled his jacket sleeves up, put his arm through the hole in the window, and unlocked the door - I was playing at hide in the court; after unlocking the door, he crossed the road, staid there a few minutes, then crossed, pushed the door open, and went in - I saw him come out with the clock in his hand; he crossed the road, and struck me on the head with the clock; he called me a bad name, and ran down the court with it, and up Charlotte-street - his companions threatened to murder me, and I did not go and tell the prosecutor till next morning - I told a shopwoman over the way that night,

MRS. OLDFIELD. I received the information the following morning.

WILLIAM PATTERSON . I am servant to the prosecutor. On Monday evening, the 5th of March, I went to the shop door, and found it locked, at twenty minutes to eight o'clock; I could not get in - I went in the back way, and as I sat in the back parlour I heard a noise, and took a light into the shop - I found nobody there, but the door open; I looked out, and saw the prisoner going away carrying something heavy before him, I could not tell what; I knew him before - he lives four doors from us.

Prisoner. He swore at the office that I ran in doors. Witness. No, I said another man went in at your door - his house was searched, but nothing found.

Prisoner's Defence. From seven o'clock till nine I was at Paddington, and as I returned, about a quarter-past nine o'clock, this young man laid hold of me.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-112

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

908. ELIZABETH KNOTTS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Anthony Thompson , and stealing 1 fender, value 19s.; 1 table-cover, value 1s.; 1 picture, value 4s., and 1 set of fire-irons, value 15s., his property .

ANTHONY THOMPSON . I live in Nottingham-street, Bethnal-green . On the 31st of March I got up about half-past six o'clock in the morning; I sleep in the ground floor back room - I found the street door and parlour door open; I found every thing in the parlour in confusion - the pictures and things taken down, the spoons on the chairs, and things ready to be taken away; I immediately called my wife - Church-street is about three hundred yards from my house.

MARTHA THOMPSON . I am the prosecutor's wife. I had locked the parlour door about half-past one o'clock the night before, and put the key on the mantel-piece in my bed room; a man and woman occupy my first floor - I heard the man unbolt the door, and go out to work about twenty minutes past six; they still lodge with me -I missed a brass fender, a baize, a set of fire-irons, and a painting; the lock did not appear to be injured - the key was still in my bed-room - I went to Limehouse about ten o'clock, and on my return met the prisoner in Thomas-street, three or four hundred yards from my house, with the fender sewed up in the baize, under her arm; I knew the baize - I went and took hold of her, and asked her to let me look at the fender which was tacked in the baize; I unpinned it, and knew the fender - she said she had found them, she did not know where - I said I had been robbed that morning; she said if so, I must have lost something else - I said I had lost some fire-irons, and a picture, and would not let go of her till I got assistance; she put the fender down at my feet, and said there was my fender, and I had nothing to do with her - I called my female lodger, who was with me, to hold the fender; the prisoner struggled very much to get from me; I held her till the constable took her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN ASHER . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner with the fender and baize; she said her son had bought the fender on purpose for her to look at, as she was going to be married, and she was taking it back to her son's, No. 2, Johnson's-court, Commercial-road - that she lived at No. 40, Church-street; I found a young woman there, who at first denied knowing her - I found a key on the mantelpiece, which opened the prosecutor's parlour door.

Prisoner's Defence. My son brought the fender that morning for my daughter to look at, to see if she would purchase it; I should not have carried it with the green cloth on it if I had stolen it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-113

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

909. SARAH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 pair of stays, value 5s.; 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 1 rule, value 1s.; 1 gown, value 10s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 18d.; 1 ring, value 2s., and 2 brooches, value 3s. , the goods of Elizabeth Forster .

ELIZABETH FORSTER . I keep a milk-shop in Dean-street, Soho ; the prisoner lived two months with me, and sold milk in doors . On Saturday evening, the 27th of February, on my coming home, she went out - I went to my trunks for something, and missed these articles, which I had locked in a trunk in the back room; I found the key where I had left it, and the trunk locked - I said nothing till Monday morning, when she said she wanted to go out very early; I said she must stop a little, and then fetched a Policeman - I had sent her to pawn two articles for me a few days be

fore; but never authorized her to pawn any of these - I have the duplicates of what I sent her with.

GABRIEL BURROWS . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker. On the 24th of February the prisoner pawned three brooches for 4s.; she went away, and afterwards pawned a ring for 1s., in the name of Sarah Tolmay.

Prisoner. Q. Look at me again? A. I am sure you are the person.

FRANCIS SHIRLEY . I am apprentice to Mr. Perryman, a pawnbroker, The prisoner pawned a pair of stays for 2s., a petticoat for 1s., and a rule for 9d., on the 11th, 17th, and 20th of February.

GEORGE EASTLAND . I am apprentice to Mr. Jones, a pawnbroker, of Holborn. On the 11th of February, the prisoner pawned a gown for 2s., in the name of Mary Williams .

THOMAS MUNTON . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on Monday, the 27th of February, and found on her twenty-one duplicates, two rings, a medal, a lace cap and veil; Forster claimed a good deal of other property, which pawnbrokers have given up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating, that she had pledged a considerable quantity of her own apparel to raise money for the prosecutrix to carry on her business, and had lent them money, and that the prosecutrix had sent her to pledge the articles in question, but she had given her in charge, because she would not lend her a 10l. note which had been sent her from Wales.

GUILTY. Aged 44. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320405-114

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

910. GEORGE WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 wooden till, value 2s., and 5 shillings in copper money , the property of Phillis Hughes .

SARAH HUGHES . I am the daughter of Phillis Hughes ; we live at Brentford . On the 28th of February I was in the parlour, and heard money rattle; I looked through the window, and saw the prisoner in the shop with the till in his hand - he saw me, then put it down, and ran off, and I after him - I never lost sight of him till Hughes stopped him; he had moved the till about two yards - there was about 5s. 5d. in copper in it.

WILLIAM HUGHES . I live near the prosecutrix. I was at my door; I saw the prisoner run out of the prosecutrix's shop, and stopped him; I am quite certain of his person.

Prisoner's Defence. A lady in Gravel-lane had missed her son for a fortnight, and sent me to look for him at Brentford; I heard an alarm, and saw a lad run out of the shop - I immediately pursued, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-115

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

911. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 coat, value 7s. , the goods of William Cole .

WILLIAM COLE . I live at Deptford . On the 15th of March, about eleven o'clock at night, I left my coat safe on the box of my fly, at Covent-garden theatre; I missed it soon after.

JOSEPH NORTON . I am a Policeman. I stopped the prisoner in Tavistock-street, about a quarter-past eleven o'clock that night, with the great coat, and asked if it was his; he said it was - I said I thought it belonged to somebody about the theatre, and detained him. I found Cole.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-116

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

912. GEORGE PROVOSTO was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 18 shirts, value 3l., the goods of Skinner Turner , and others .

THREE OTHER COUNTS, stating them to belong to Benjamin Hewitt , John Moore , or some person unknown.

LUCY MOORE . I am the wife of John Moore - I am a pauper in St. Andrew's workhouse ; the prisoner was a pauper there - I superintended the needle-work: Turner, Freeman, and Co., of Northumberland-street, Strand, furnish us with materials to make into shirts. On the 26th of February I set out from the work-house, with two men, to deliver some shirts; one man had twelve dozen in a bag, and the prisoner had eighteen in his bag - the other man delivered his, but I saw nothing more of the prisoner till he was apprehended, and have not found the shirts.

WILLIAM PORTER . On the 26th of February Mrs. Moore gave me a bag, and the prisoner another - we set out together to deliver the shirts; when we got to Bream's-buildings the prisoner said, "Walk slow, and I shall overtake you;" he never came after me - I turned round soon after, but could not see him; he was taken next day.

BENJAMIN HEWITT . I am master of the workhouse - the linen is made up under my direction. On the 26th of March this linen was sent home, by my direction, by the prisoner and Porter - they were in my charge, and if I lose-them, the parish have to pay for them.

THOMAS ANTHONY PALMER . I am warehouseman to Skinner, Turner, and Co. - I was present when Porter delivered his shirts; the prisoner brought none.

PETER MURPHY . I am a Policeman. I met the prisoner at the corner of Bartlett's-buildings, Holborn, and told him I had information that he had run away from the workhouse with some linen - he said, "I did, and I would sooner go to Botany-bay than the workhouse again."

Prisoner's Defence. The Policeman was about half drunk, and took me to three different public-house to drink - if I had made away with the things, I should have had money or duplicates - I met three men, and was drinking with them; and while I went backwards my bundle was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-117

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

913 THOMAS BAKER, alias BACCHUS , and FREDERICK COOPER were indicted for stealing, on the 26th March , 9lbs of pork, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Nias : and that the said Thomas Baker had been previously convicted of felony .

JOSEPH WHINFIELD . I live at Islington. On the 26th of March I was in Rotherfield-street, and was called by Mrs. Nias, who complained of being robbed - I pursued, and overtook the prisoners - I found Cooper carrying this pig's-head under his arm; he dropped it - I told him

he had been robbing Mrs. Nias; he said he had not, for Baker had given it to him - Baker said nothing then, but afterwards said he had picked it up in the fields - Mr. Nias took it up; Cook assisted in securing them.

THOMAS NIAS . This pig's-chop is mine - on my coming home I found the prisoners in custody with it; I had seen it safe in the morning - I know it.

JOHN COOK . I am a Policeman. I came up when the prisoners were apprehended; Mrs. Nias delivered the chop to me - I took an apron from Cooper, with some pork brine on it.

JOHN BONNER . I am servant to Mr. Nias. I know this pig's-chop; it was in the trough in the coach-house ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before, at the back of the premises - my master's is a private house.

JOHN GOODWIN . I am a Policeman. I produce a certificate of Baker's former conviction here, in February, 1831 - I am certain he is the man (read); I saw him tried.

Cooper's Defence. I was coming by, and saw this man, who asked if I would have a pig's-head - I thanked him, and put it in my apron.

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

COOPER - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-118

914. WILLIAM DOWNES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 pair of boots, value 2s., and 6 shillings, the property of William Bibby , his master .

WILLIAM BIBBY . I am a tailor , and live in Cross-street, Carnaby-market - the prisoner was about two months in my employ. On the 1st of March he told me had seen a chaise, marked 6s., and I gave him 6s. to purchase it; he said he would return in an hour; he did not return - I had lent him the boots to wear the day before, but not on that day - I saw him put them on; I did not tell him not to do so.

PETER SKELLY . I am a Policeman. I apprehended him on the 26th of March, but did not find the boots.

Prisoner's Defence. I got into a crowd, and my pocket was picked.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320405-119

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

915. MORGAN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 6 combs, value 9s., the goods of Matthew Hornidge , and that he had been before convicted of felony .

ELIZA HORNIDGE . I am the wife of Matthew Hornidge - we live in Clerkenwell , and sell combs . On Saturday, the 24th of March, about half-past nine o'clock, I was serving a lady at my stall with combs; I saw the prisoner at a distance - Parker gave me information; I followed the prisoner, calling Stop thief! he ran as hard as he could, but was taken by the Policeman, without my losing sight of him - I saw him pull his hat off, and saw his hand go to his hat; he appeared to throw something into some old ruins in Aylesbury-street - I returned to my stall, and missed six combs.

ELEANOR PARKER . I was standing near the stall, and saw the prisoner take the combs; he put them into his hat - I gave information, and he run away.

THOMAS PHILPOTT . I am a Policeman. I heard an alarm, and saw the prisoner running; I followed; I saw him take his hat off, take the combs from it, and throw them into the ruins - I went there after taking him to the station, but found nothing - that was about half an hour after; he told the Magistrate he took three, but not six.

JOHN FRANCIS ATKINSON . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction - I was present at his trial, and know he is the same man - (read.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320405-120

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

916. LOUISA ELDRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 1 blanket, value 3s., and 1 bolster, value 4s. , the goods of Isaac Williams .

ISAAC WILLIAMS . The prisoner lodged with me for three or four months. On the 12th of March I missed a bolster from her room, and had her taken - the blanket was missed some time before.

Prisoner. You knew the blanket was pawned. Witness. No, she said it was gone to be washed - I told her to get it back.

JOHN READ . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and found nine duplicates on her - two are for these things.

GEORGE EASTLAND . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. These duplicates are in my writing - I remember the prisoner pawning the bolster on the 27th of February, but not the blanket.(Bolster produced and sworn to)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the articles were pawned with the prosecutor's knowledge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-121

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

917. MARGARET FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 3 curtains, value 10s. , the goods of John Robertson .

HANNAH ROBERTSON . I am the wife of John Robertson , and live in Shoreditch - the prisoner lodged with me for six or seven weeks, and is married. On Sunday afternoon I thought I heard the lid of my great chest open, but being ill, I was not able to go and see; on the Friday night, the 15th of March, I looked into it, and missed the curtains - the chest was not locked.

JOSEPH BIRCH . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and in the salt-box in her room I found two duplicates.

THOMAS FENTOM . I am a pawnbroker. On the 15th of March the prisoner pawned a bed-curtain with me.

JOHN SULLIVAN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 16th of March she pawned a curtain with me.

WILLIAM COOMBS . The prisoner pawned a curtain with me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I told her I had made use of them, and would replace them.

MRS. ROBERTSON. No, she said that she knew the person who took them, and if I waited with patience she would endeavour to get them, as she suspected a person who came to see her.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-122

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

918. ROBERT KEY was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN WILLIAM HUBBARD . I am a tobacconist , and live in Barbican. The prisoner has been seven years in my employ; it was his duty to account to me for what he received every night, if he came home in time, and if not he should give it to me early next day - it has sometimes gone on for three days. On the 15th of February he accounted to me for money received from Mrs. Jones, but it was for goods delivered in January - she lives in Lordship-row, Stoke Newlington , and had goods amounting to 2l. 15s. 5d. in February. for which he never accounted - Hillery had goods in February, amounting to 6s. 10d. and 5s. 10d.

FANNY JONES . I live at Stoke Newington, and buy tobacco of Mr. Hubbard - I always pay for it on delivery. On the 14th of February the prisoner delivered me goods, amounting to 1l. 14s. 11d. which I paid him - he wrote this receipt in my presence; and on the 28th of February I paid him 1l. 0s. 6d.; here is his receipt - Mr. Hubbard called in a week or ten days, and asked what I owed him; I told him nothing.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you always pay on delivery? A. Yes, except once, about twelve months ago, when I was ill - I did not then request him to pay his master for me; I paid him at the next delivery.

THOMAS HILLERY . I live in Barnsbury-row, White Conduit-fields, and manage the business for my mother, who deals with Mr. Hubbard. On the 28th of February the prisoner brought goods, which came to 6s. 10d.; I paid him for them, and took this receipt - (read.)

Cross-examined. Q. Have you often paid him money? A. Not very often; I received goods from him without paying.

MR. HURBARD. The prisoner has never paid me these sums; I am the person he should account to.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe he boarded and lodged with you? A. Yes - I allowed him 5s. a week besides; he was to find his clothes and washing - I never charged him with being deficient in his accounts, and afterwards found I was mistaken; I once gave him time to pay a sovereign, which he said he had lost - he never paid me money in advance for customers; I did not promise to give him time to make up these sums - he was apprehended on the 2nd of March; I settled with him on the 1st of March - I call over from the book the names of persons he has been to, and he states what he has received; when he came home on the 14th of February he said Mrs. Jones could not pay.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, charged with embezzlement; he said if he was allowed time he would pay up what he had spent of the money.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

919. ROBERT KEY was again indicted for embezzlement .

MR. HUBBARD. Mr. Allcroft owed me 22s. for goods delivered by the prisoner, on the 11th of February - the prisoner never accounted to me for that.

JAMES GREEN . I am servant to Mr. Allcroft, who keeps the sign of the King of Denmark, in the Old Bailey , and dealt with Hubbard. On the 11th of February I received some tobacco, and paid the person, who I believe was the prisoner; I took a receipt for it, which I saw him write.

MR. HUBBARD. I sent the prisoner with these goods, and this bill is in my hand-writing - the receipt is in the prisoner's.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

The prosecutor stated his loss at 13l. 6s. 4d.

Reference Number: t18320405-123

920. WILLIAM WIGLEY was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM HANNAY . I am a hosier , and live in Parkhill, Nottingham, but carry on business in town - the prisoner was in my employ for nearly two years - I apprehended him on suspicion of embezzling 350l., which he received from Messrs. Leaf and Co., but I have since found that he has by mistake paid the sum into another house, and it has come to my hands - I believe it to have been a mistake on his part.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-124

921. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 copper, value 7s. , the goods of Richard Hawkins .

RICHARD HAWKINS . I am a broker , and live in London-wall . On the 6th of March the officer produced this copper to me; I had seen it safe in front of my shop an hour before - it was tied with a string inside the shop; I swore to it at Guildhall, but have since sold it.

MOSS WOOLF . I am a broker. I bought the copper of Hawkins for 7s.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a City Policeman. On the 6th of March, about six or seven o'clock in the evening, I was on duty in Fore-street, and saw the prisoner turn up Mutton-hill, with the copper on his shoulder - I followed him a little way, and he called to another behind him, "Tom, where shall I stop?" I tapped him on the shoulder, and said, "Where are you going with this?" he said, "I am carrying it for a person, and am to have 6d.;" I took hold of him, and the other ran away - Hawkins claimed the copper before the Alderman.

Prisoner's Defence. A man overtook me in Fore-street, and asked if I was willing to earn 6d. - he put the copper on my shoulder, and said, "Go on till I tell you to stop;" I never saw him before.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-125

922. LETITIA PADWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 6lbs. of tea, value 2l. 8s., the goods of George Hodgkinson , her master .

GEORGE HODGKINSON . I am a grocer . The prisoner was my house-servant , and had been with me about two months - I had a good character with her; I was not aware of tea being taken, but in consequence of suspicion about some money, I searched her boxes, and found some articles of mine - I then went to her mother's, and there found two parcels of tea, between 6lbs. and 7lbs.; the prisoner was then at the Compter.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am an officer. I took her in charge, and searched her box on the 1st of April I found some tea and other things, which she said be

longed to her master; she told me where her mother lived, and I found at her mother's house a quantity of tea in a box; the key which opened the prisoner's box opened the box the tea was in - the prisoner said nothing about that tea.

MR. HODGKINSON. I cannot tell when this tea was taken; this indictment is for the tea found at her mother's.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-126

923. LETITIA PADWICK was again indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 2 shirts, value 1l.; 6 cakes of chocolate, value 4s.; 1 lb. of cocoa, value 3s.; 5 lbs. of starch, value 3s.; 3lbs. of sago, value 3s.; 2lbs. of almonds, value 6s., and 1 lb. of tea, value 5s., the goods of George Hodgkinson , her master .

GEORGE HODGKINSON . On the 1st of April I searched the prisoner's box, and found in it the articles stated in the indictment - they are worth 3l. or 4l.; the shirts have my name on them, and so have some other things - she said they were all mine, and that she had stolen them; she was my only female servant, and had to go through the shop to get to the safe.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I opened the prisoner's box, and found this property - it was full of the prosecutor's things; she said they were all her master's - she had another box, with her wearing-apparel in it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-127

924. JAMES GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 1 half-crown , the money of John Richard Cureton .

MARY ANN CURETON . I am the wife of John Richard Cureton . The prisoner came into our shop in Cannon-street , about nine o'clock in the evening on the 4th of April, and asked my apprentice to change a George the Third shilling for one of George the Fourth's; the apprentice came and asked if I could change it - I went out of the room, and saw the prisoner, who was then outside the shop - he came in; I went to the till, and directly he opened it he reached across the counter, took out a half-crown, and ran away with it - I cannot swear I saw him take a half-crown, but I know what I had in the till; he came back, voluntarily, and said, "You have charged me with taking a half-crown, take it;" I had not charged him with it - I sent for a constable, and he was secured.

JAMES PETER NAPPER . I am apprentice to the prosecutor. I was outside the shop, putting up the shutters, and saw the prisoner in the shop - he asked me to oblige him with a George the Fourth shilling for a George the Third's, and he would give me 6d. for my trouble, as it was to decide a wager - I went to mistress in the counting-house; she came and opened the till, to look for one - I saw him reach over the counter, put his hand into the till, and take up some half-crowns - he counted them, "One, two, three," and I noticed a half-crown between his fingers; I cannot say I saw him take it out of the shop, but a half-crown was missing from the till - I went after him, and he was coming out of a shop about six doors off; I followed him into another house four doors further on - I went in, and told him he had taken half a crown out of the till; I do not recollect what he said, but he asked where my mistress was - I told him, and he came back with me: I went for an officer.

JOHN WHITE . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on this charge - he said he had come from Yorkshire, his native place, the day before, and slept any where; I found some money on him and a silver watch - he said nothing to the charge.

JOSIAH EVANS . I am a street-keeper. I received him in charge - he said nothing; Mrs. Cureton gave me the half-crown, which laid on the counter - he endeavoured to escape from me.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came into the shop I asked the lady if she accused me of taking half a crown; she said, "I don't know," and said to the boy, "Are you sure how many half-crowns were in the till;" the boy made answer, and she said, "Go for an officer;" I said,"You need not send for an officer - if you say I have defrauded you of a half-crown, I will give you one;" a mob gathered, and the constable said, "You want to run away;" I said, "No, if set at liberty I would not run away."

MRS. CURETON. He did not offer to return it till he was brought back and accused of it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18320405-128

925. WILLIAM FLETCHER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

ALFRED STUCHBURY . I am in the employ of William Clay , woollen-draper , of West Smithfield . Davis, Barber and Co. were known to us in business; the prisoner was a stranger. On the 14th of January he came to the shop, and said, "I want a superfine cloth to match a pattern," which he produced - it was brown woollen cloth; he said he wanted two yards and a quarter - he produced a bill of exchange, which was endorsed by Davis, Barber, and Co.; I asked if he came from them - he said he did: he said he wanted the cloth for them - I cut him off two yards and a quarter, which came to 1l. 18s. 3d.; I entered it to Davis, Barber, and Co., and delivered it to him - he was about ten minutes with me, I am certain of him - I saw him in custody about a week after; I have never found the cloth.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Tell us exactly what took place? A. He told me he came from Davis, Barber, and Howse, and I gave him a bill in their names; he said the cloth must be of a good quality, as their customer was particular; I cannot say that he said he wanted it for Davis, Barber, and Howse - he showed me a bill endorsed by them; I said, "Do you come from Davis, Barber, and Howse?" he said, "I do;" I would not have let him have it for himself.

THOMAS HOWSE . I am in partnership with Messrs. Davis and Barber. The prisoner was in our employ; we discharged him on the 28th of December, and never after that sent him to Mr. clay's for cloth on our account - he never brought us this cloth; we occasionally dealt with Clay, which he knew well.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18320405-129

926. WILLIAM FLETCHER was again indicted for a like offence ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 21. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320405-130

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, APRIL 7.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

927. JOHN MAGRAW was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 18lbs. weight of coffee, value 20s. , the goods of the St. Katharine's Dock Company .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ROBINS . I am foreman at the St. Katharine's Docks . On Saturday, the 3rd of March, about eleven o'clock, I was walking through one of the ware-houses; I saw the prisoner there - I then heard something fall on the floor - I hid myself behind some bales, and in consequence of what I saw the prisoner do, I went out and collared him; I asked if he had been plandering - he said, "I have;" I said, "What have you got?" he said coffee - I took him into custody; I saw 18lbs. of coffee found on him, of the same description as that in the warehouse - the sack from which he took it was cut in two places, and was 53lbs. deficient in weight.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I was called in to take the prisoner. I found some coffee in his great coat pocket, some in his jacket pocket, some in his hat, and some in a bag; he said he had been out of work for some time, and was driven to it by distress.

The prisoner delivered in a paper, stating his contrition for the offence.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-131

928. JAMES HADDON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , 2 umbrellas, value 5s. , the goods of John Hight .

ELIZABETH JONES . I am servant to Mr. Hight, of Brunswick-place, City-road . On the 2nd of March I was cleaning the steps of the door; I had to get some water- I heard a noise; I came up, and saw some foot-marks in the passage - I went to the door, and missed two silk umbrellas from the passage.

JEMIMA STEVENS . I am servant to Mr. Greenwood, of Brunswick-place. A little after ten o'clock on the morning of the 2nd of March, I was at our window, which is next door to Mr. Hight's, and saw Jones cleaning the door; when she left, the prisoner went in, and came out again with two umbrellas - I told a young man to go after him.

EDWARD WILD . I live in Parson's-square, Shoreditch, and am a brush-maker. I was passing Brunswick-place - I saw the prisoner, followed him, and stopped him with these two umbrellas; he got from me, but I took him again, and gave him to the officer.

WILLIAM PERRY . I am a Policeman. I received the prisoner, and have the umbrellas.

JOHN HIGHT . These are my property.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18320405-132

929. ANN HEWITSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 shawl, value 6s. , the goods of William Combs .

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, pawnbroker, Brick-lane. On the 25th of February the prisoner came to our shop, and brought a shawl to pawn - I saw a ticket at the corner, and asked whose it was; she said her own - I saw W. C. on it, and said, "This is Mr. Combs', in Church-street, and here is a ticket for 5s. on it" - she said, "That is what I gave for it this morning;" I took her there, and when the officer took her she said she had picked it up outside the door.

WILLIAM COMBS . I live in Church-street, Bethnal-green , and am a pawnbroker ; this shawl is mine - I did not miss it till Edwards told me of it; I then missed it from a rail in the interior of the shop - I had seen it safe about four o'clock.

The prisoner put in a written defence, representing that she had found the shawl in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 52. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-133

930. JOHN WILSON and JOHN SAUNDERS were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 thermometer, value 30s. , the goods of Mary Ann West .

JOHN COWING . I am a tailor, and live in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square . On the 31st of March I was in my front room, and saw Wilson, the prisoner, go into No. 12, Margaret-street; the door was open - after some time he came out with this thermometer under his arm - he went down Market-street, and was joined by Saunders; they went on towards the Seven-dials, and in crossing Oxford-street Wilson gave it to Saunders, who put it under his arm - they went on, occasionally looking back, to see if any body was watching them; I saw a Police-officer just after they had got through a crowd - I told him to take Saunders, who still had the thermometer, and I took Wilson.

Saunders. Q. Did I look back? A. Yes, once or twice, and so did Wilson; and you stopped at a corner while I went into a baker's shop to inquire for a Policeman; I kept my back towards you, and got the lady of the house to observe you.

THOMAS MADDEN . I am a Policeman. I was on duty near the Seven-dials, and took Saunders, with this property under his arm.

MARY HOWE . I live with Mrs. Mary Ann West , at No. 12, Margaret-street, Cavendish-square; she is a widow . I have known this instrument fifteen years; it is both a barometer and thermometer.

Wilson's Defence. I was in Margaret-street; a respectable man tapped me on the shoulder - he asked if I would take a parcel for him to Long-acre; he took me close to the house, told me to go in, and I should find the article by a hair-broom - I went in and took it; as I was going towards Oxford-street he told me to go down Blenheim-steps and Marlborough-street; I was going there, and met Saunders - I asked him to carry it for me- I kept looking back to see if the gentleman was coming.

MR. COWING. I saw Wilson go into the house; he looked up stairs and then down - he then attempted a door at the end of the hall, and at last came out with this - the servant said he must have gone up two pairs of stairs to get it.

Saunder's Defence. I was coming down Oxford-market; I saw Wilson - I asked if he was in work; he said No, that he was going on an errand, and was to get 1s.

for carrying this - I walked with him, and he asked me to carry it.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

SAUNDERS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-134

931. JAMES HAMPSTEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 plane, value 3s.; 1 saw, value 3s., and 1 gimblet, value 2d. the goods of John Marson .

JOHN MARSON . I live in the Commercial-road, Chelsea. I employed the prisoner to assist me in putting up an organ in Denmark-street ; I left my tools there - among them was a plane, a saw, and a gimblet; I missed them on the 15th of March, and on the 16th I saw the prisoner, and told him he was a pretty sort of a fellow to go and take my tools when I was not there; I asked what he had done with them; he said he had pawned them, and if I would not say any thing to his father and mother, he would get them out - he said he was going to work at his employer's, in Belgrave-place, but he did not, for I saw him in about an hour afterwards; I had some tools at his father's; I went and took some of them away - and in the mean time, he went off with two saws and a plough from his father's.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. How long have you known him? A. About six weeks - I never allowed him to pawn any thing of mine, and I never pawned any thing of his; I know Mr. Blair, of Pimlico, I was his tenant at one time - I had some tools at the prisoner's father's at that time; the prisoner carried them there, and he asked me to come to his father's house, as he wanted to talk to me about going to America with him - I did not expect a distress from Mr. Blair, but there were three quarters of a year's taxes due when I went into the house, and I was not aware of it; the tools in this indictment were not taken to the prisoner's father, they were at the place where I was putting up an organ.

FREDERICK KING . I am shopman to Mr. Debenham, a pawnbroker; I have a saw and plane, pawned with me on the 14th of March, by the prisoner, I believe, in the name of John James , Hampstead, No. 3, James-street.

JOHN CURLL . I live in Denmark-street. The prosecutor was putting up an organ in my house, and the prisoner assisted him; on the 14th of March the prisoner called in the evening, and took away a saw, a plane, and a gimblet; he said they were his own.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him? A. I had seen him when he brought some of the tools, and worked on the premises.

JOHN BARKER . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner on the 16th of March, and found on him this gimblet.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me if I would let him put his tools into our house till he paid Mr. Blair his quarter's rent - I asked my father, and he consented; I helped for two days in moving the things from his house to my father's; he owed me 1l. for four days work.

JOHN MARSON . He only assisted me about two hours; I pawned a saw and paid him 1s. - I have now agreed to pay Mr. Blair 5s. a week.

Cross-examined. Was this money due from a former tenant? A. Yes, and Mr. Blair came to know if I would pay him the quarter due to him; I have agreed to do it in that way.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-135

932. CHARLES HEAD and CHARLES HIGGINS were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 19 live tame fowls, price 2l. 7s. , the property of George Fenning .

EDWARD FREEMAN . I am a Police-constable. On Wednesday morning, the 7th of March, at a quarter-past three o'clock, I was in Red Lion-lane, Church-street, Stoke Newington; I heard some persons talk - I then saw the two prisoners coming down from Lordship-road, and the Green-lanes; when they came in sight, I heard one say to the other, "Go on" - I stopped till Head came up to me with a basket on his shoulder; I said"Where are you going?" he said, "To the Bull and Mouth, and I have a parcel for my master:" he asked me what time it was - I told him; he said, "I shall get there by four o'clock;" I said "You must go with me?" I felt the basket, and said, "You do not send baskets to the country without a direction, do you?" he said, "You may look at it if you like;" I said, "I must look at you as well"- I put him into the watch-house; I felt something warm in the basket, and found in it one duck, one cock, and eight hens - I then sent our serjeant after Higgins, and he had one duck in each pocket; I found the prosecutor the next morning.

LUKE TITCOMBE . I am gardener to Mr. George Fenning, of Stamford-hill . We lost nineteen fowls on the 7th of March - I saw some of them at the office; these are the heads of them; I am quite sure of them - they were safe at six o'clock in the evening - our house is about a mile from where the prisoners were taken.

HENRY JAMES PITT . I am a Police-serjeant. I was in Lordship-lane; Freeman told me to go and take Higgins - I afterwards went to Mr. Fenning's, and found his back premises had been broken open.

Head's Defence. I was coming down the lane, and met a man, who asked if I was going to work; I said No; he asked me to carry this to the Bull and Mouth, and he would pay me for it - I took it, and met with Higgins; I asked where he was going; he said home; I asked if he would carry the two ducks for me, and I was taken.

Higgin's Defence. I was coming through Woodgreen; I overtook Head, who asked me to carry the two ducks for him.

HEAD - GUILTY . Aged 21.

HIGGINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-136

933. ELIZABETH HUMPHRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 3 sovereigns, the monies of Thomas Miller , from his person .

THOMAS MILLER . I lodge at the Snow Shoes public-house, Hospital-row, Chelsea. I met the prisoner on Saturday night, the 31st of March - I walked about with her, and then went with her to No. 2, Mermaid-yard ; I went to bed with her, and was there all night; I had a purse with three sovereigns and some silver in my trousers

pocket; we came out together in the morning, and when we got out I missed my money; we went back to the house; she pulled off her pocket, but there was nothing there - I then searched the bed, but there was nothing there; the mistress of the house said she was sure she must have it - the purse and three sovereigns were found in her hair; I had given her some money, but not the purse nor the sovereigns - I kept that in my trousers pocket, and put them under my head in the bed - she denied all knowledge of it.

MARIA ROWLING . I keep the house. The prosecutor and the prisoner passed the night there, and in the morning they came back; the prosecutor said he had lost his money; I searched the prisoner, and found three sovereigns and a purse in her hair - she at first denied any knowledge of them, but afterwards said he gave them to her.

HENRY WILLIAMS , (Police-constable, B 151.) I took the prisoner, and produce the purse and money - she said the prosecutor gave it her.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the money, but the landlady did not see him.

GUILTY (of stealing only) . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-137

937. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 10d. , the goods of James Walters .

STUART SUTHERLAND . I keep the Running Horse, at Shepherd's-market, May-fair. In consequence of information, on the 13th of March, I followed and came up with the prisoner in Sun-court; he had a basket with him- I asked what he had there; he said Nothing, but I might look if I pleased - I felt in his basket, and found two pint pots belonging to Mr. Edwards, and one quart and one pint belonging to Mr. Walters.

JOHN PHILLIPS , (Police-constable, C 159.) I took the prisoner, and received these pots at the Chesterfield Arms, Shepherd's-market.

RICHARD EDWARDS . I keep the Chesterfield Arms. The prisoner was brought to my house; two of the pots are mine.

JAMES WALTERS . I keep the City of Norwich public-house . These two pots are mine - I cannot tell when I lost them.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man in Piccadilly with this basket - I considered he was a carpenter, and I asked if he could tell me where I could get a job; he said he knew a place where they were taking on hands; he was going with me there, and asked me to carry his basket -I had not gone far before the witness took me to the house, and, to my surprise, he found the pots.

JURY to STUART SUTHERLAND . Q. Did the prisoner say this at the time you took him? A. No, he begged to be let go, he said it was the first time he had done anything of the sort, and distress drove him to it.

GUILTY . Aged 47. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320405-138

938. ELIZA JONES and HARRIET BAXTER were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 2 half-crowns, and 1 shilling, the monies of Thomas Pyle , from his person .

THOMAS PYLE . I live with Mr. George, a sugar-baker, in Deal-street. On Saturday, the 18th of February, about twelve o'clock at night, I met Jones near Whitechapel church; there were two other females with her, but I do not know whether Baxter was one - I went home with Jones to Wentworth-street ; I gave her some money, and was to sleep with her - I sent out half a crown for some gin; the landlady brought it, with the change - Jones took the change; she then had the 2s., the 1s. 6d. change, and the 1s. worth of gin - she called the landlady to come up, and then she called Baxter; they came up, and wanted some beer - the landlady, Jones, and I, had the gin; Baxter had none - I then went with Jones to a house in Whitechapel, and had some gin and raspberry; I had then two half-crowns and one shilling in my right-hand pocket - I went back with Jones to the house in Wentworth-street; the room we had been in was engaged, and we went to another room - I gave her some halfpence, but I still had the two half-crowns and the shilling in my right-hand pocket - she wished for more money; I said I had no more to give her - she then asked if I would allow her sister to come into the room; I said, Yes, and she called Baxter - they both sat down, and began to play tricks with me, and I missed my money; I got up, and said I should not stay there - they laughed at me, and said, "My dear, I love your temper" - I said I should know them another time; I went into the street, and in about a quarter of an hour they came out of the house, and I gave them in charge; one half-crown, one shilling, and one sixpence dropped from them - I had not allowed them to take my money, but I felt their hands in my pocket; I then missed my money, and said I would not stop there, and they said I must go.

JAMES JOHN CONERLEY , (Police-constable H 135.) I took the prisoners; some money passed from Jones to Baxter, and some fell on the ground - whether it dropped or not, I cannot tell; I found on Jones, one half-crown, two sixpences, and 8d. in copper; and on Baxter, one shilling, two sixpences, and 6d. in copper; the money, fell on a grating - I do not know whether any went down.

Baxter's Defence. As soon as I got to the room he got up and came away; I did not receive any money from Jones - I had half a crown when I met them.

Jones' Defence. He gave me 3s. 6d., and sent for some gin; we went out, and got some more - I then asked him to let this young woman come in; I went out to buy a candle, and dropped 1d. - he wanted me to give him the money back; I would not - I said he might stop with me.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

BAXTER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-139

939. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 1 yard of kerseymere, value 6s. , the goods of William Broderick .

WILLIAM BRODERICK . I am a tailor , and live in Hereford-place, Commercial-road . On the evening of the 23rd of March, I went into my area, to turn on the gas; I looked up, and saw the prisoner step across the railing over my head, and look into the window of my shop; he then went into the shop - I ran up as quick as I could, and when I got to the back parlour, which I had to pass through, I looked through the window of the door, and saw him go behind the counter; I saw him take this piece of kersey

mere from the shelf - he was walking round the counter again to go out with it; I opened the parlour door, and went into the shop - he stooped down, threw it back again, and rushed to the end of the counter; I met him, and he said, "Does one Jones, a tailor, live here" - I knocked for my wife to get an officer; the prisoner rushed round me to get out - I tried to put my foot to shut the door, but he dragged me into the street, and began to strike me with his fist; I still held him, and we fought a considerable time - a gentleman came up and advised me to go into the shop; I got him in, and the officer came and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did he not appear to be drunk? A. Yes, afterwards, but I did not notice it at the time - he threw me down, cut my knee, and tore my breeches; I do not recollect his saying that he wished to purchase a waistcoat - he was a stranger to me; I am sure he was not in front of the counter.

PETER COSTELLO , (Police-constable K 90.) I took the prisoner, and have the kerseymere; I took him to the station - he said if I would not say any thing about him, to make him better known, he would do something handsome for me and my brother officer; he said at first that he had done nothing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say that rather than be exposed he would give a pound? A. No.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to ask the price of a waistcoat; I turned round, and the prosecutor laid hold of my collar - I had not been behind the counter; I was at the end next the window.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-140

940. JOHN JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d., and 1 pair of stirrup irons, value 2s. , the goods of George Rabnett .

GEORGE RABNETT . I live in Welbeck-street , and am a blacking-manufacturer - I have some premises at Millhill-mews; the prisoner was recommended to me some time before Christmas - I allowed him to shelter himself at night in my stable, and I gave him meals; he used to sell paper in the street - he left my place, and some time after the officer gave me information: I then saw these stirrup irons, which are mine, and this pair of shoes, which my son had left in the stable or near there.

JOHN TIERNEY , (Police-serjeant A 11.) On the 23rd of February I was at No. 5, Mill-hill-mews; I heard some one going before me, and when I got to the bottom of the stairs I saw the prisoner go out at the front door; he first walked, and then ran on to Chatham-place, where I took him - he had dropped a pair of shoes in Henrietta-street, which I took up, and pursued; he then threw something away, which rattled; I went on, and took him to the station - in going along a boy brought me one stirrup, which he said he picked up at the place where I heard the prisoner drop something; I then went back, and found this other iron.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the pump, drinking water; a person ran by me - the officer came and asked if I had dropped the shoes; I said I knew nothing of them.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-141

941. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 1 cheese, value 2s. , the goods of William Bridger .

WILLIAM BRIDGER. I live in Speldhurst-street , and am a cheesemonger . On the evening of the 19th of March I was in the parlour; I saw the prisoner take this cheese from my window, and run out - I followed, and caught him with it; he tried to throw it into an area.

JAMES FULLER , (Police-constable E 118.) I took the prisoner, and have the cheese; the prisoner had 4 1/2d. on him - he said he did it for want.

Prisoner I have no father or mother, and leave it to your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-142

942. THOMAS KILPACK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 shovel, value 2s. , the goods of John Lee .

JOHN LEE . I live in Godfrey-street, and am a labourer , in the employ of the surveyor of the highways. On the 28th of February I lost a shovel, which I had left in Mr. Evans' premises - I saw it again as I was coming from chapel, and knew it to be mine; the prisoner knew where I kept my tools - he had worked with them.

DANIEL MORAN , (Police-constable V 159.) I know where these tools were kept; I saw the prisoner in the yard, and apprehended him, as he came over the fence, about half-past five o'clock - he said he was going to work with the shovel; he ran from me - I took him again; he then said he stole the shovel, but was compelled to do it from want.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-143

943. ANN LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 2 guineas, 11 shillings, 9 sixpences, and 2 pieces of silver coin, value 1s., the property of Stephen Smith , her master .

STEPHEN SMITH . I keep the Cock public-house, in Grafton-street, Soho . The prisoner was in my service for five weeks: I had some guineas, a 7s. piece, and some French coins and others, some of which we had had for twenty years, in a little tin cash-box, in my bed-room; no one had access to that room but the servant, to make the bed; in consequence of missing some other things, I searched, and missed this money from the cash-box; I had the prisoner searched - this was on a Monday: she had asked to go out on the Sunday, but I would not let her.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you receive her from Wales? A. No, I had her from a private family at Bayswater - I believe she is a Welsh girl.

JOHN BURN . I am a glass and china dealer, and live in Old Compton-street. On Monday, the 5th of March, I went to the station, and got an officer; the prisoner was given into custody at Mr. Smith's - she was searched, but nothing found on her; she then desired the officer to leave the room, and then she voluntarily said she would tell me all about it - she pulled up her clothes, and from under her garter she produced, in a glove, this coin; here are two guineas and some silver - she said she had taken three guineas from her master's box, and one of them she had changed at Sewell and Cross', to buy a plaid cloak, which is now here.

GEORGE BEACH . I am a Police-constable (168 C.) I

went to Mr. Smith's on the 5th of March - I found this cloak in the prisoner's box; she said she changed one of the guineas which she took from her master's box, to buy it.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-144

944. JAMES LINLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 1 cloak, value 10s. , the goods of Arthur Spear Tanner .

THOMAS HEADSWORTH . I am an apprentice at No. 55, St. John-street. On the 3rd of March I saw a gig standing with a cloak in it - the prisoner went from the curb to the gig, he took the cloak, and I stopped him; he dropped it, and my father held him while I fetched the owner.

ARTHUR SPEAR TANNER . I live in Grenada-terrace, Commercial-road. This is my cloak, and was in my gig in St. John-street .

THOMAS SHEPHERD , (Police-constable G 28.) I took the prisoner, and have had the cloak.

Prisoner. I worked three years at a cooper's in Cow-cross, then went to Calcutts, and when I returned I worked five months at a cooper's in Gray's Inn-lane.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-145

942. ROBERT LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 razor, value 6d., and 1 pair of scissors, value 6d. , the goods of William Apps .

WILLIAM APPS . I live in May's-buildings, St. Martin's-lane , and am a tailor - I know the prisoner; he is a tailor . On the 17th of February he came to my house in the evening - I set him to work, and left him there - he was gone when I returned in about an hour and a quarter; I found my box broken open, and the articles stated were gone; the box was fastened when I went out; he was taken on the 6th of March, and I found on him my shirt, handkerchief, razor and scissors, and the duplicate of the coat and waistcoat.

GEORGE PEARCE . I am a Police-constable (76F.) I took the prisoner on the 6th of March - I found this shirt on his back, the handkerchief round his neck, and this razor and scissors on him, also three duplicates, two of which relate to the coat and waistcoat.

PETER DIXON . I am shopman to Mr. Howes, a pawnbroker, of High-street, Bloomsbury. I have the coat - it was pawned by a man; I do not know who - this is the duplicate.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-146

946. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 34 panes of glass, value 4l., the goods of John Gaylor , and fixed to a building of his ; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN DENNIS , (Police-constable H 38.) I was in Shoreditch on Sunday morning, the 26th of February; I saw the prisoner and another man, with each of them a bundle - I followed them, and they ran through Cock-lane to Nichol-street; I got close to them, and the prisoner threw his bundle away - I followed, and took him; I put him into the station, and there I found a bundle of the same appearance as that he threw away; it contains a number of squares of glass, most of which are broken.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What time was this? A. About half-past six o'clock in the morning; I did not lose sight of him - I met Burt, and passed him; it was rather dark - I did not pick up what he threw away.

JOHN BURT . I live in Acorn-street, and am a lamplighter. I was in Nichol-street - two men ran by me, each with a bundle under his arm; the officer was pursuing them; one of them threw down a bundle, which I took up and gave to a Police-officer - there were some corners of glass through the bundle.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot swear to the prisoner's person? A. No.

JOHN ARNOLD, (Police-constable H 74.) On Sunday morning, the 26th of February, I received this bundle from Burt - I took it to the station; there were more than thirty squares of glass in it - about twelve of them were whole.

JOHN HENRY GAYLOR . I am the son of John Gaylor , a baker , who lives in Shoreditch - he has an empty house in Shoreditch, and we missed thirty-four panes of glass from the shop front of that house on the 27th of February - the house had been entered from the back; I have seen some of these panes fitted to the sash, and they fit exactly - two of them had corners left in the sash.

GEORGE ALLEN . I am a glazier, and live in Old-street-road. I had put in these panes of glass on the 25th of February - I went on the Tuesday, and missed thirty-four panes; I fitted in some of these squares of glass, and they exactly corresponded - the corners of two of them had been left in the frame; the house is in Shoreditch parish.

JURY to JOHN DENNIS . Q. Did you hear any thing rattle when the bundle was thrown down? A. No; it was rather on a soft place - I had been running a great way, and the panes were stuck together with the putty, which was soft.

Cross-examined. Q. You said there were two bundles, are you sure that this was not the bundle which the other man had? A. Yes, because I saw the other man with his bundle after I took the prisoner.

JOHN BURT . I picked up the bundle on a heap of loose dry dust.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-147

947. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 vertical-jack, value 15s. , the goods of David James .

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker, of Brick-lane. On a Wednesday, early in March, the prisoner came and brought a vertical-jack to pawn - I asked if it was his own; he said Yes - I asked where the key of it was; he said at home, and if I did not like it I might send for a Policeman, which I did, and he was taken.

DAVID JAMES . I keep a tavern in the Minories . I lost a jack about the 5th of March - the prisoner was at my house, and offered his service as a broker, there being a sale on the premises; I saw him in the kitchen in the latter part of the day, and about ten minutes after he was gone the jack was missing.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. I take it for granted a great many people attended the sale? A. Yes; this jack was not sold - I am not mistaken in the prisoner's person - I heard a difference in the kitchen between him and

my servant, and as I was going down he rushed by me and got out.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am cook to the prosecutor. I recollect the sale - I saw the prisoner at the house; we had a vertical jack in the kitchen - I saw it while he was there, and missed it in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after he was gone; it was one like this, and had the name of Evans on it - I believe this is the one; I have no doubt of it - I cannot swear to it - I have another at home; I think this is rather lighter than that - they cost 34s. each.

GEORGE TEUKLE , (Police-constable H 26.) I took the prisoner - he said he bought the jack of Mr. Williams, at the corner of Finsbury-square, for 1s.; I went there, but could not find such a person - I found on him a catalogue of the prosecutor's sale.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you give the same evidence before the Magistrate? A. Yes - the prisoner was discharged; I had not then found the prosecutor - the prisoner came the next morning to get the jack, and I took him - he was in liquor when he was first taken.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-148

948. HENRY NATHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of John Fardell .

JOHN FARDELL. I had been paid off from the Athol on the 27th of February, and came from Portsmouth to the Elephant and Castle - I went in there on the 28th, to find a man to take my luggage home, and one man said he would take it for 10s.; I said I would rather spend the money on the road - the prisoner said he would take me to Old Ford , where I was going, for 6s.; when we got there I gave him the 6s. - he hove out my two bags of clothes, and drove off with my coat in his cart; I called to him to stop, and said he had my coat in his cart - he was near enough to hear me, but he did not stop, nor look back - I had paid him before I got out; I then got off the shafts, and shook hands with my mother, whom I had not seen for two years and a half - he then drove off with my coat; I gave a guinea for it on the 27th.

Cross-examined by MR. WALMESLEY. Q. What time did you get to the Elephant and Castle? A. A little after seven o'clock in the morning - I had travelled all night; I had not drank any thing from Portsmouth to London; when we got to the Elephant and Castle we had a glass of brandy-and-water between two of us - the prisoner's was a small one-horse cart; in going along we had a glass of rum a piece; the prisoner did not go into the house; he stood on the footpath - I sat on the front of the cart, and on the collar of my coat; it was a pea-jacket; I am sure I saw it there when I got out at my mother's door - I saw it at the last minute; the prisoner drove off as soon as I had paid him, as fast as he could; he was flogging his horse - he had not got more than twenty or thirty yards when I called him; I have always told the same story - he was taken on the 15th of March; I had been at home in the interval, and had been two or three times to the Elephant and Castle to look for him, from eleven o'clock till five; I at last found him standing against the door there - I did not see his cart then; I had talked with him on the road to Old Ford - I did not notice whether he was deaf; I have seen his wife since he was taken; I told her if she would pay me for my jacket and for my trouble I would not see further into the business - that was before I went to the office.

JOHN GRIXTON . I was with the prosecutor at the Elephant and Castle - I went with him to Old Ford; I recollect his calling after the prisoner - he must have heard him, but he drove away as fast as he could; I am sure the coat was there when we got out.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you on board the Athol? A. Yes; I had come from Portsmouth with the prosecutor - we had nothing on the road till we got to the Elephant and Castle; we had a glass of rum in the Whitechapel road - I am quite sure his coat was in the cart at the door; he missed it in two minutes, when we got into the house; the cart was not thirty yards off at the outside.

JOSEPH SAVON . I am a Police-constable (113L). The prisoner was given to me by the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-149

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

949. ALEXANDER MORRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 1 mattress, value 10s.; 1 pillow, value 2s.; 1 chest, value 5s.; 3 jackets, value 20s.; 5 pairs of trousers, value 15s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 4 shoes, value 7s.; 1 Guernsey frock, value 2s.; 3 pillow-cases, value 1s.; 2 pairs of drawers, value 2s.; 1 south-wester, value 6d.; 1 hat, value 1s.; 4 stockings, value 1s.; 4 razors, value 1s.; 2 canisters, value 6d.; 2 knives, value 1s.; 1 canvas bag, value 6d.; 4 shirts, value 3s., and 1 looking-glass, value 6d. , the goods of George Hall .

GEORGE HALL . I am a seaman, and was a patient on board the Dreadnought Hospital ship . On the 17th of March I took my chest of clothes, containing the articles stated, to the Dundee Arms, and delivered it to John Lambert, the warehouseman, to keep it for me till I came out of the hospital - the prisoner was a patient in the hospital-ship with me, and some days after I had left my chest at the Dundee Arms, I desired the boatswain to call and see if my clothes were safe, and he brought word down that they were gone - when I told the boatswain to call the prisoner was standing close to me, and he heard what I said; he left the ship the same day - I never authorized him to get my property; I only knew him by seeing him on board.

JOHN LAMBERT . I am the warehouseman at the Dundee Arms . I received the chest from the prosecutor, and put it by securely; on the Friday following, which was the 23rd of March, the prisoner came, and said he came from George Hall, a patient in the hospital, for his chest and bed - I showed him several others; he said they were not the one, but he pointed out this one, which had the bed lashed on it - I allowed him to take it, believing he came from the owner; he brought me this note:-

Mr. Scandenburg. - Please to let the bearer have my chest and bed, and you will oblige your humble servant; for George Hall,

D. R. COSDALE.

I told him there was 1s. to pay, and he said could not I

take less, as he was a poor fellow on board the hospital ship.

GEORGE HALL. I never wrote this note, but I told the boatswain that the bed was lashed on the chest.

Prisoner. You told me to go and look after your chest, and if I could get it, to send it to you. Witness. No, 1 did not.

MARY MANEY . I live in Rosemary-lane . On the 23rd of March the prisoner came, and called for half a pint of porter; I served him with it - he then asked if I could accommodate him with a lodging; I said Yes - he asked if I could recommend him an honest man to fetch a box, as he was a ship carpenter, and had just returned from sea; I sent a man with him to the Dundee Arms, who brought the chest, but not the bed - he slept there, and had breakfast and dinner the next day; he staid till the Tuesday, when two officers came and took him - they came afterwards, and took the chest.

MICHAEL GOLDSMITH . I am a slop-seller. I bought this bed of the prisoner on the 33rd of March.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I am a pawnbroker. I have a jacket, five pairs of trousers, and a pair of shoes, pawned by the prisoner on the 24th of March.

RICHARD THOMAS DOBBINSON , (Police-constable K 136.) I went and took the prisoner - I asked if he knew any body on board the hospital ship; he denied it, and said he had never been there, but in going to the watch-house he said he had been on board, and that he knew the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He has not lost any thing - the next day, when I came to my sober senses, I told him where every thing was; I did not go to steal it, but I met an old shipmate, and we had two or three glasses of grog - after I had the chest on the porter's back, to send it to the prosecutor, I met an old friend, who gave me some more drink; we drank till his money was gone, and then he persuaded me to take some of the things from the chest, and pawn them.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

947. ALEXANDER MORRISON was again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March, 1 silver thimble, value 1s., and 1 buckle, value 1s. , the goods of John Maney .

MARY MANEY . I am the wife of John Maney. On the 23rd of March the prisoner came and lodged at my house - while he was there I lost a silver thimble and a buckle from the till; these are the articles.

RICHARD THOMAS DOBBINSON . I took the prisoner, and found in his right-hand trousers pocket this thimble and buckle.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a dance at the house, and I found them in the passage.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years, for each offence .

Reference Number: t18320405-150

948. WILLIAM NORTHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 boot, value 2s. , the goods of George Purvis .

RICHARD FREWIN . I am shopman to Mr. George Purvis , of Brydges-street, Covent-garden . On the 17th of March I saw the prisoner step in, snatch this boot, and run away - I ran out, and he was stopped in about ten minutes; this is the boot.

RICHARD HUNT . On the 17th of March I saw the prisoner running, closely followed by the witness; I collared him, and took him back - when I got near the prosecutor's shop I saw this other boot on the pavement.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320405-151

949. RICHARD ONLY and JAMES HUMPHRIES were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 sack of potatoes, value 3s. , the goods of William Kendall .

WILLIAM KENDALL . I live near Isleworth , and grown a few potatoes - Only had worked for us, and I have known the other as a labourer . I was going home on the 15th of March, and saw a young man, who said there were two men in our rick-yard - I went across our little garden; I got behind a clover-rick, and saw the two prisoners, who had just got a sack of potatoes out of a pit - Only carried it, and Humphries helped him up with it; Humphries then opened the gate, and they went out - I ran across the garden, and met them; they put down the sack - I said, "Richard, this is bad work;" he said, "What are we to do? I have a wife and child starving, and the parish won't relieve me;" I said, "Take them back to where you got them from, and I will say nothing about them;" they said,"No, we will not, we will stick to our cargo" - they were taken into custody the same night.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You used the words,"Only worked for us?" A. I mean for my father, whose name is William - these potatoes had been sold to a person named Gisely, and he had them kept in our ground.

ONLY - GUILTY. Aged 25.

HUMPHRIES - GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-152

950. JAMES PHYPPERS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 watch-chain, value 1s.; 2 seals, value 1s., and 1 watch-key, value 1s., the goods of Charles Steward , from his person .

CHARLES STEWARD. I was coachman to Mr. Braham. On the 22nd of February I was in Holborn, about one o'clock in the morning - I had been to the theatre, and was in liquor, but I knew what I was about; I meant to go to Brompton, where I lived, but got out of my way-I saw the prisoner walking alongside of me; he spoke to me - I cannot tell what words he used, but I believe he asked where I was going, and when we got near to Gray's Inn , I found his hand on my watch-fob; a struggle ensued, but he got from me, and ran off with my watch and seals - I called Stop thief! but pursued, and took him myself; I took hold of his collar with one hand, and took the watch from him with the other.

Prisoner. Q. You say you took the watch out of my hand? A. Yes, I did.

CHARLES WILDING , (Police-constable E 125.) I was coming down towards Gray's Inn-gate, and saw the two men struggling; the prisoner got from the prosecutor- I followed, and came up just as the prosecutor had got the prisoner's collar by one hand, and the watch in the other; he appeared the worse for liquor, but he could run as well as I could.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had met the prosecutor in a state of intoxication, and was showing him the way to Long-acre, by his desire - that several persons had run against him on the road, but that he (the prisoner) had not taken the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-153

951. WILLIAM PINNIGAR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , one 5l. Bank note , the property of William Pinnigar , the elder; against the Statute, &c.

WILLIAM DANIEL TRIQUET. I am a clerk in the Bank of England, and live at Peckham. On the 11th of January I packed up this 5l. Bank note which I have now in my hand, with 4l. 3s. 7d. in cash, and directed it to R. W. Harting, King's-road, Cheltenham, to go by the Paul Pry coach; I delivered it to Middleton.

WILLIAM MIDDLETON . I delivered the parcel at the Blossoms inn, Lawrence-lane, and booked it.

DANIEL KNIGHT . I am book-keeper at the Blossoms inn. I recollect the parcel being delivered to me to go by the Paul Pry coach; I delivered it in due time to go by the coach.

Cross-examined by MR. DONNE. Q. To whom did you deliver it? A. To Pinnigar, the guard.

WILLIAM PINNIGAR . I am guard of the Paul Pry coach . The parcel was delivered to me, and I put it inside the coach to the prisoner, who is my son; I told him to put it into the seat, which he did - when we got to Cheltenham I missed it; I am responsible for the parcels.

Cross-examined. Q. It was not yours? A. Yes, Sir, it was then, and I have paid the money.

MARY PINNIGAR. I am the prisoner's mother. I remember his giving me a 5l. note to get changed, which I did at the Black Horse public-house, in Titchfield-street- I gave my name and place of abode,

THOMAS CODGBROOK . I gave this witness change for this note; I put her name and address on it, and it was paid away on the Saturday - I do not know to whom, but I have seen it since, and can swear to it.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320405-154

952. GEORGE ROGERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 4 handkerchiefs, value 14s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 4s.; 1 ring, value 12s.; 1 seal, value 25s.; 1 key, value 5s.; 3 breast-pins, value 12s, and 1 brooch, value 2s. , the goods of John Trimley .

JOHN TRIMLEY . I keep the Edinburgh Castle public-house, in the New-road . The prisoner came and represented himself to me as a servant out of place ; he lodged with me for a fortnight, in a room on the first floor. On Saturday night, the 31st of March, my wife said she heard some person in our bed-room, as we were sitting down stairs; I went up, and found no one there, but I saw one of the drawers had been opened - I went into the room in which the prisoner slept, and he was concealed under the bed; I said, "Who is here?" he turned his head, and I said, "It is you, is it? I did not expect to see you here - I thought you were a respectable man;" he said, "Pray forgive me;" I said,"I can't, I have been robbed several times" - I brought him down, and a person searched him, and found the gold pins, the ring, key, and seal, which were attached together, and the brooch; they had all been taken from a little box in my room - the other things were under the bed where I found him.

CHARLES MIZEN . I was in the house when the prosecutor brought the prisoner down; we found the articles as he has stated.

JOHN SHEPHERD . I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in my bed-room.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-155

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

953. ELIZABETH ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 5 sovereigns , the monies of John Taylor ; and HARVEY HUTCHINS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am master of the brig Mary , laying at Stone-stairs tier. On the evening of the 29th of March I was in Ratcliff-highway, and met Robinson - she laid hold of my arm, and I went with her to a house in Cornwall-street - before I undressed I gave her what silver and copper I had; I had then five sovereigns, which I took out of my trousers pocket, and put into my watch-pocket - I then put my trousers under my pillow; I went to bed between six and seven o'clock, and fell asleep instantly - I was rather tipsy at the time; Robinson did not follow me to bed; I heard a noise about half-past nine, as I was told it was - I got up, and was going into the next room when I met Robinson in the passage; I spoke to her, and she brought a light into the room - I looked at my clothes, and missed my property; I told her she had robbed me of five sovereigns - she said I had not looked well for them; I looked again at my fob, and there were no sovereigns there - I got up and dressed myself; in about an hour afterwards I heard the Policeman in the street, and I called him, but he did not hear me; I then tried to open the window, but I could not - I stood there some time; Robinson got up and shoved me from the window - I believe she said I had no business there; I had only part of my clothes on then - I could not find the rest of them, but she gave them to me; I then went into the street - she spoke to me twice, and said I might as well go away; I said I would not till I got a Policeman - I afterwards saw Robinson come out of the next house; she walked away fast - I went after her, and asked where she was going; she did not speak; I went on, and said "We shall fall in with a Policeman this way as well as the other;" she then said,"You are wrong;" I said, "I am not" - when we got to the bottom of the street I saw a Policeman; I called him- Robinson turned, and went back as fast as she could; I then went into the house with the Policeman - we searched the room, but could not find it; he was then going to take her to the watch-house, and she said if he would let her stop she would return the money; she would get some money and give it me - as she was going to the Police-station she told me to go back, and the old woman would give me the money; I went back to the house, and Hutchins told me she could not get it before seven o'clock, as the person would not be up before, and she could not think of disturbing them, but if I would go to bed in the next room she would call me at seven o'clock - I went to

bed, and got up again about a quarter before seven - I should have stated that when Robinson was going with the officer she said to Hutchins, "Be so good as to go out and get the money;" Hutchins asked where she was to go, and Robinson named some public-house - I asked Hutchins where the public-house was, and she said, "Bless you, it is no use my going there, he won't lend me any money nor her either;" when I got up, about seven o'clock, and was putting on my clothes, Hutchins came into the room-I said, "Are you going out to get the money?" she said,"I have been out," and she put four sovereigns into my hand - I said, "What house have you been to to get them?" she said, "If you will know, I got them off that chair," and she pointed to a chair in the back yard, with some chips on it; I told her there was more money - she went back, and searched among the chips; I went with her- she looked about some time, and I went back into the room- she then cried out that she had found some more money; I went back to her, and she gave me 12s. - we looked further, but did not find any more.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I dare say you were as drunk as you well could be? A. No, I was tipsy, but not insensible - I fell asleep in a very few minutes after I got to bed; I cannot tell what I paid at the last public-house I had been at - there were two or three of us in company; we had two or three glasses of gin-and-water - I paid about 1s.; I put my trousers under my pillow, and left my clothes on a chair - Robinson did not get to bed till after the money was stolen; I do not know what house it was - I had not put my money among the chips; I had not been into the yard at all, till the morning - I had left my watch on board my ship, and forgotten it; I had given Robinson about 2s.; I should know a sovereign from a shilling in the dark, by the weight of it; I had not had the sovereigns in the same pocket with the silver.

MICHAEL HENNESSEY , (Police-constable K 118.) I took Hutchins between seven and eight o'clock in the morning on the 29th of March; I found a 6d. in her pocket and 4s. 6d. in a trunk in the house - she denied its being any part of the money that was stolen, and said it was her own; I took her to the station, and then to the office; before she was examined she said she would tell the truth; thatafter Robinson took the money from Taylor she came into her room, and they both went out, and hid it among the chips - that Robinson had changed one sovereign, and she had returned the man 4l. 12s. of his money.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not talk of a daughter of Robinson's, who had shown her where the money was? A. No; there was no one present when she said this.

JOHN BARTON . I apprehended Robinson on the 29th of March, about three o'clock, about two hundred yards from the house; the prosecutor charged her with robbing him of five sovereigns; I went to the house and found Hutchins there, but could not find any money - Robinson wanted to make an arrangement to give the prosecutor 3l. or 4l. in the morning - she said she would get a friend to lend her the money.

Robinson. When the prosecutor met me he said all the money he had was three sixpences and some copper.

JOHN TAYLOR. I said I had about 2s. in silver; I cannot exactly say whether I had 2s. or 1s. 6d.

Robinson. He told me, previous to going before the Magistrate, that if I would make him up half the money he would not prosecute, and it was under that impression that I said the money should be made up.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I did not; I positively affirm I did not.

Hutchins. The Policeman heard him say the words, which Robinson has just repeated.

JOHN BARTON . I did not hear any thing of the kind; he said no more than I have stated.

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 36.

HUTCHINS - GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-156

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

954. JOHN DIAGER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Davidson , and stealing 1 clock, value 5l.; 1 coat, value 6l.; 1 cloak, value 1l., and 19 quires of paper, value 12s., his property .

JAMES DAVIDSON . I live at No. 28, Trinity-square, Tower-hill . On the 30th of January , I lost this property; it was all in my counting-house, which is part of my dwelling-house - it is under the same roof, and has an internal communication, but it has an outer door, which is generally open during the day; I had locked up the counting-house myself about a quarter before three o'clock, and all the property was then safe - I saw this dial, which is mine, at the pawnbroker's; about five weeks afterwards.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am a City-officer. I went, in consequence of a search-warrant, to a house in Cloth-fair; the prisoner had been in custody, from the night before, on a charge of ill-treating his wife, and I went to the house, with his wife - I there found the duplicate of this clock, and a quantity of wearing apparel, which the prisoner stated was his, and he offered to send to the tailors who made it - I found a small box there, which I took to the prisoner, and he had the key of it in his pocket; I went to the pawnbroker's and found this clock by means of the duplicate.

MR. DAVIDSON. No one could have entered my counting-house, but by a false key; they must have gone in at the street door, which is generally open during the hours of business.

JAMES STOCK PALMER . I am shopman to Mr. Muncaster, a pawnbroker, in Skinner-street. This dial was pawned there by the prisoner on the 30th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening; it is worth about 50s. at a sale - it was pawned in the name of John Hampson ; our shop is about a mile and a half from Trinity-square.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was in the habit of purchasing property and duplicates, and that the property found at his house, he had obtained by purchase from different persons.

JAMES DAVIDSON . I paid six guineas for the coat; it was worth more than 50s. - the paper was worth 6s., and the cloak was worth 1l.; before I went to the counting-house again, my servant had locked it.

GUILTY of stealing the clock only, value 50s . Aged 25.

955. JOHN DIAGER was again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse of William Hammond , and stealing 11 glasses, called tumblers, value 22s.; 12 candlesticks, value 10s.; 12 scent bottles, value

18s.; 56 toys, value 22s.; 1 coat, value 10s., and 7lbs. weight of cheese, value 5s., his property .

WILLIAM HAMMOND. I have a warehouse in Size-lane, in the parish of St. Pancras . At half-past five o'clock, on the 20th of January, I left it locked; I saw it again on the morning of the 21st, at ten o'clock - the door had been forced open, and I missed the articles stated from it; I found this crow-bar on the staircase, with which the door appeared to have been forced - I missed articles to the amount of 10l. in value, but only a part of them are here; what are here are worth about 15s.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear to these glasses. A. Those glasses are not mine, but the other articles are; I swear to these toys - I am the only person in London who imports them, and these scent bottles are part of eighty gross which I have in the warehouse.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. On the 6th of March I found these articles, where I found the others.

HENRY FORSTER . I am a marshalman. I know the prosecutor's warehouse; it is in the parish of St. Pancras, Soper-lane, in the City of London.

Prisoner. I purchased the things, not knowing them to have been stolen.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-157

956. JOHN POSTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 6 lbs. weight of thread, value 16s.; 24 yards of web, value 3s., and 1/4 lb weight of sewing silk, value 4s. the goods of Christopher Leaf , and another .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

JAMES MATTHEWS . I am in the employ of Mr. Christopher Leaf, and his partner, in Watling-street . On the 24th of February, the prisoner came to their warehouse; I served him in the morning with two pieces of thread web, and in the afternoon, with a gross of cannadine laces - I did not serve him with any thread or silk; in leaving the warehouse he had to ascend some stairs - I saw him stoop and open his bag: I then followed him up - I heard something fall; I still followed him, and when I saw him again, he was taking a parcel off a pile of thread on the stairs, and putting it into his bag; I asked him what he was going to do with it - he said he had picked it up on the stairs - I told him to come down, and called one of our young men; in the mean time he opened his bag, pulled out half a dozen of thread, and said he had picked it up - that was not the half-dozen which he had when I spoke to him; he must have had them before I saw him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you given the same account as you did before the Magistrate? A. Yes; he was out of my sight for some time in going up stairs - the threads lay in great piles on the stairs; they may fall if a person hits them - he has been in the habit of purchasing at our shop for years, I have understood - I had not served him with thread or silk that day.

ROBERT RENSHAW . I am an officer. I produce the thread and silk.

JAMES MATTHEWS . I had marked this parcel of thread, and had been serving some of this silk before he came - he was swinging his bag over his arm when he came in, and it appeared to be empty; this silk was found in his pocket at the watch-house - he said he had bought it of a Jew in Petticoat-lane, but he could not tell his name; this piece of web was found in his bag - I had not sold it to him; I know it by my mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence (written,) My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. - On the 24th of February, I went to the prosecutor's ware-house, and bought a few articles, which I took with me in my bag; as I was coming out of the warehouse, I took up the half-dozen of thread, which I am now charged with stealing, as is customary with every person that goes into a wholesale warehouse to buy goods, if they see an article they think will suit them; knowing the witness Matthews was behind me, I was in the act of turning round to ask him the price - to my great surprise, he then charged me with the intention of stealing it, which, I most solemnly declare, I had not the slightest intention of doing; the witness Matthews also swears I had the half-dozen threads in my bag, which is a direct falsehood, as the bag was never off my arm. and as he was walking behind me all the way, it was impossible I could have put it in without his knowledge.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

957. JOHN POSTLE was again indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , 3 1/2 yards of China crape, value 15s.; 32 gross of buttons, value 17l. 6s.; 360 lbs. weight of thread, value 37l., and 10 pieces of ribbon, value 7l., the goods of Christopher Leaf and another .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH RENSHAW . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and from information, I went to his house, at No. 3, Well-street, Mile-end - I saw the name of Postle over the door; I found the articles there, which I now produce -I got a bill of the prisoner's shop there.

ANN BONYARD . I have known the prisoner some years - I have bought goods at his shop; I have been there with him; it is in Well-street; I think he gave me one of these bills of his shop.

THOMAS COPLING . I was in December last in the employ of Mr. Christopher Leaf and his partner - I know this crape dress formed part of their stock; three of them had been out to a customer, and were returned; I saw them, and counted them; in less than half an hour I missed one - I have referred to the books, and find the prisoner had been there that day - I did not keep the books; I can swear this is one of the three; the other two are in our possession now; I had never sold one of this description.

Cross-examined by MR. DONNE. Q. Have you not many crapes of this colour? A. It is a common brown, but this is a real China crape - it was a bad black; I was compelled to have it dyed, and it would take no colour but this; I saw it on the 10th of December - I can swear no one ever purchased any of these dresses; they are under my care particularly.

NICHOLAS COPLING . I am in the employ of Leaf and Co. I know these ribbons formed part of their stock - they are not in the state in which they would be sold, not being blocked; these are what are called spindled; they have never been unrolled - I knew they were ours by the pattern; we have several manufacturers who supply us.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean no other house has these patterns? A. Yes; we purchase the whole of a pattern, but another house may have a similar pattern.

JOHN ABLETT . I know these forty-six parcels of threads have been in Leaf and Co.'s stock - I cannot swear that they were stolen - I buy the buttons, and I

know these formed a part of our stock; I know they have not been sold to the prisoner, and I do not recollect selling them at all in such a quantity; the prisoner may have bought a gross or two, but here are nearly two hundred gross.

Cross-examined. Q. But you may have sold all these buttons to different people? Yes; some of these have marks on them - I cannot swear that some of these were not sold to the prisoner.

MR. BARRY. Q. Have you taken stock lately? A. Yes, and we found forty-three dozens of thread deficient, and twenty-seven dozens were found at the prisoner's.

JURY. Q. Did you give bills of parcels with what you sold? A. Yes, always.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was in the habit of purchasing goods at different houses, as well as at the prosecutor's, and as he had paid ready money for them, he did not have bills of parcels.

JOSEPH BIRNIE . I live at No. 11, Duke-street, Spitalfields - I am a tailor. I have known the prisoner about six years; I have often been with him at sales; I remember something about his buying a crape dress; I think this is it - yes, I can swear it is - he brought it to my house about eight months back; I saw him did for this and for two white dresses in Petticoat-lane - all sorts of things come to Petticoat-lane; it was long before December; I think it was about August - I know this is the dress; I had it in my hand the same evening at my place, about two hours after he bought it.

COURT. Q. Are you a judge of dyeing? A. No; I cannot tell whether this has been dyed once or twice; I have seen a great many shawls of this description; I noticed the pattern of that which was brought to my house- it was what I call a zig-zag; the border might be about twelve inches - I understood it was a shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-158

OLD COURT. MONDAY, APRIL 9.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

961. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of William Cox .

ROBERT WATTS . I live opposite William Cox 's shop, in Swan-yard . On the 20th of February, about five o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner go and take a pair of shoes, which hung at the door-post, on a nail; he run away with them about twenty yards - I called Stop thief! and the Policeman took him.

WILLIAM BURNETT . I am a Policeman. I heard an alarm, and stopped the prisoner with the shoes.

GEORGE FRANKS . I am servant to William Cox - these are his shoes.

The prisoner delivered in a written Defence, stating that he had found the shoes on the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-159

962. NEIL GOW was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , 1 cheese, value 6s. , the goods of Henry Binden .

ROBERT LOFTLING . I am a Policeman. On Sunday morning, the 4th of March, about half-past one o'clock, I met the prisoner in New Tothill-street, about two miles and a half from the prosecutor's, and asked what he had got - he refused to tell me; I found it was a cheese - he refused to tell me how he came by it, and I took him to the station - he there said he gave 18d. for it.

ROBERT LOFTY . I am shopman to Henry Binden , a cheesemonger , at Knightsbridge . I know this cheese to be his - I missed it about half-past twelve o'clock, on Saturday night, from the window; it weighs 10lbs.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at Westminster at the time he lost the cheese.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-160

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

963. JOHN HARMAN was charged on the Coroner's inquisition with killing and slaying Dinah Harman .

WILLIAM BROACKES . I am a surgeon, and live in Regent's-place, City-road. On the 16th of February I was called in by the parish-officers, to see the body of Dinah Harman , who was then dead - I appeared before the Magistrate on the 18th, and at his request, opened the body - there was a very considerable external wound on the cheek-bone; the bone was laid bare - on opening the head the temporal muscle was in a high state of inflammation, and an effusion of blood had taken place; the vessels of the brain were turgid - there were two wounds on the lower jaw, one several inches long, and a contusion on the upper part of the head, on the temple - it was clear she had come to her death by violence, which could not have been committed by herself; I ascribe the turgid state of the vessels to concussion - the blows must have been violent to produce such injury; it must have been done by some instrument, it could not be done by the fist - she had been dead some time when I first saw her; decomposition had taken place to a certain degree - she was a very old woman.

Q. Should you think that forcing open a door to go into a room, could have produced these wounds? A. Certainly not all the wounds, nor could a fall do it - it must have been violence offered by somebody.

ELIZA SINCLAIR . I was not acquainted with the deceased, but was called in to see her on the 8th of February, about an hour before she died - she was in bed and insensible; I gave her some wine, which revived her, but she did not live an hour - the prisoner was not present; I did not observe any marks of violence on her, but when she was being laid out, they were pointed out to me, but not thinking it important, I did not notice them much - I thought she might have had a fall; the prisoner is her son; he is married, and lived with her; she was above seventy years old - the prisoner was not in the house when she died; I saw him that evening - he seemed much affected when he came home; I asked him how the marks on her face came, and said, "People seem to blame your wife" - he said, "She is not to blame indeed, for when I came home last Thursday night, I could not be admitted for some time; I knocked at the door a long while, and when I did get in, I thought it was my drunken wife behind the door, but it proved to be the old lady, and it was I done it" - he laid on the stairs and cried bitterly - when I saw the deceased she had a large cap on, and nobody could see any part of her face.

ANN BARTON . On the 7th of February , about eleven o'clock at night, I was at the prisoner's house, Warwick-place, White-cross-street , and sat with the old lady about an hour and a half; she was sensible then, I believe, but could not speak - I went there because a crowd about the house were threatening to smash the windows if a light was not put up in the house - a light was produced; I went in and saw her in bed, in a dying state - she died about four o'clock the next afternoon; I did not see the prisoner; I examined her person on the 8th, about twelve o'clock, and observed two little scratches on the right eye; I did not think much of them- I saw the prisoner that night he seemed much affected; he looked at her, and burst out crying - the family consisted of the prisoner, his wife, and the deceased; I asked him how the bruises came on her head - he said he had done it with the door accidentally; that he had been a long while at the door, and thought it was his drunken wife had come down, but found it was his mother afterwards, and that he was in liquor himself.

JOHN MUMFORD . The prisoner had lodged at my house for five years. On the 8th of March I went to the house just after the deceased had died; she had a guinea a month paid by a gentleman she had lived with as servant - I always understood she and the prisoner lived on good terms, but his wife was not on good terms with her, they quarrelled - the prisoner appeared very affectionate to her; she was about seventy-five years old, and of sober habits; I saw a black mark under her eye on her cheek bone, and one on her left hand, and two on her left arm, after her death - she had been confined to her bed about a week.

JANE BATHO . I lived two doors from the deceased; I saw her on the 8th of February, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning; she laid in a deplorable state, and was very cold - I thought she was dead; we gave her wine, and she revived, but could not speak; I observed nothing but a slight scratch on her cheek bone and temple, as if she had fallen, or been shoved against some blunt instrument; I have known the prisoner six years, but never saw him in liquor but twice - his wife is a drunken woman.

ELIZABETH BOOTY . I assisted in laying the deceased out - when I took her cap off I found her right cheek cut, and a violent mark over her eye; her temple was very much bruised, also her right cheek, and her arms, from her fingers half way up were bruised.

JOHN WINDER . I am a surgeon. At the request of Mr. Broackes, I examined the deceased, ten or eleven days after her death as to the nature of the wound on her right cheek bone, and another on the right jaw; he wished my opinion whether they were caused before or after death - I have no doubt the wound on the right cheek was inflicted before death; it was sufficient to cause death in a person of her age - the wound had been opened when I saw it, and I cannot say how it had been done; she was a very thin woman.

JAMES ADAMS . I am a surgeon. I examined the body on the day of the Inquest; the head had already been examined, and I could only from an opinion from external appearances; I found a large coat used wound on the outer angle of the right temple - it was severe and dangerous, also two lacerated wounds on the chin, with some appearance of a bruise on the left side - the wound on the chin seemed very probably the cause of death; it might be inflicted by any hard substance - if by a door pushed suddenly on her it must have been with great violence; a clenched fist would have done it, I think - the other wounds appeared not dangerous, and to have been made after death; only one wound appeared to have been made during life.

Prisoner's Defence (written,) The prisoner most solemnly declares his innocence of the charge; his poor deceased mother was seventy-eight years of age - she had been very unwell for for several months: about nine o'clock on the evening of the 3rd of February, the prisoner returned home and knocked at his door two or three times before he could gain admittance - vexed with his wife for keeping him so long, and not suspecting but that it was his wife who was then letting him in, he flung the door back rather hastily and angrily - the edge of the door struck his poor mother on the cheek bone, who had come from her own bed, to which she was almost wholly confined, but was never aware that she had received this blow until after her death- somewhat in liqour, angry at having been kept waiting, (but extremely so on finding that his mother was obliged to leave her bed to open the door for him), on getting to his own room, he had words with his wife, and struck her, which induced her to call out murder; the cries were from his wife, and not from his mother - they proceeded from up stairs, and his mother slept below, on the ground floor, and it is presumed that it could hardly he possible for any of the witnesses to mistake the voice of a woman of fifty years of age for a poor old woman of seventy-eight, who had been for a long time ill, and whose voice was scarcely articulate; it has been asserted, although not attempted to be proved, that the prisoner had spent 5l. of his mother's money, and that he would derive an interest from her death - this is wholly unfounded; she had a small annuity of twelve guineas per annum, payable monthly, left her by the late Dr. Brown, of Islington, with whom she had lived as a servant, and which annuity died with her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-161

964. JOHN DANGER , THE YOUNGER, was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 watch, value 6l.; 1 watch-chain, value 4l.; 3 seals, value 2l., and 2 keys, value 30s., the goods of John Danger , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN DANGER . I am a gold and silver caster , and live in Span's-buildings, St. Pancras - the prisoner is my son, and always resided with me. On the 30th of March, in the morning, I left my watch hanging in a case at the head of my bed - I was in the shop at work, and did not go out all day; I missed it about twenty minutes to one o'clock.

HENRY ARCHER . I am a pawnbroker, of Ossulton-street, Somers'-town. On Friday, the 39th of March, the prisoner pawned this watch for 25s. - he wanted 30s.; it is worth about two guineas; the foreman, in my presence, asked whose it was - he said his own.

CHARLES STEWART . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday, the 6th of April, and told him it was for stealing his father's watch, seals, and chain; he said he had made it all right the night before, as he had seen his mother - I asked what he had done with the chain and seals; he refused to tell me, but said they were where they could not be recovered.

JOHN DANGER. This is my watch - it is worth two guineas; there was a gold chain, three seals, and two keys to it - I value them at between 3l. and 4l.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not send me word by my mo

ther, that if I brought the ticket, or the chain and seals, you would forgive me? A. No; I said I would not interfere at all about it - I went all round the neighbourhood, to stop it from being pledged; the; pawnbroker positively denied to my son-in-law, that such a watch had been pawned, and he had got it all the time.

CHARLES STEWART . He offered it to me about half-past one o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I was frequently in the habit of fetching a hundred ounces of plate to refine for my father.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-162

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

965. THOMAS HEARD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 weighing-machine, value 3l. , the goods of David Scott .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

DAVID SCOTT . I am a baker , and live in King-street, Portman-square - I know the prisoner. In November, 1830, I called at his house in Barbican, (he is a machine-maker ,) to tell him I had a machine that was out of repair - he called at my house, and saw the machine; I asked what he would repair it for - he said 12s.; I said I would give him 12s. - he said, "I should like to take it away, to do it at my own place;" I said if that was the case I should not have it done at all, because it wanted so little doing to it - I had no particular reason for that, except that I thought the repairs were so trifling it was not necessary to take it off the premises - he said then he would call and do it at my house; on the 19th of February, 1831, when I came home, I found the machine was gone - the prisoner had not, to my knowledge, called at my house from November till February; finding the machine gone I sent my young man to the prisoner's house the day after; I afterwards went to Barbican and found he was gone from there entirely, and no person could give any account of him - I did not find my machine; I made inquiry about him for ten or eleven months - I was sometimes till ten and eleven o'clock at night searching for him in all the parishes in London - I afterwards saw the name of "Heard" up in Long-lane, and laid a plan with a baker named Wincott; I was sent for to Wincott's house in November last year, and saw the prisoner; I asked what he had done with that machine which he stole from my house; he said he had got it at his house, and I might fetchlit if I liked, but he would not send it home; I had him taken to Marylebone office - the witness, Carney, was not there; the Magistrate said, "Let the case stand over, and you bring the machine back to Mr. Scott's," as he said he had got it; he undertook to produce it - the case was discharged afterwards; I afterwards found Carney, who had been in the prisoner's service; he enabled me to trace the machine, which I found at Mr. Wheeler's, in Oxford-street - I knew it the moment I saw it; this was not more than a fortnight ago - I have it here.

COURT. Q. Had he ever done work for you before November, 1830? A. Never - I considered he was the man who had first made it, which induced me to go there to have it repaired; I now know he did not make it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Although the Magistrate adjourned the case for the prisoner to produce the machine, when he came up without it he was discharged? A. The Magistrate let it stand over to give him an opportunity to produce it; this was on Saturday night- it was adjourned till Monday; I attended then, but the prisoner never came - I did not know him before; his father had made the machine; I did not call at the prisoner's house, and ask if the machine was to be sent for, nor did I send any body about it, nor did he call on me - I never called and said he was to send for it, nor say I had not made up my mind whether I would have that repaired or have a new one.

Q. How soon after the proceedings before a Magistrate was an action brought against you? A. I suppose three or four months; I was served with a copy of a writ, in November or December - I believe he has given notice of trial; I have pleaded to the action - I did not know where Carney was to be found at the time I went before the Magistrate - my wife is not here, nor my son, he is only a child; I had left my business in care of my wife when I was out; she keeps my books, and attends to what is going on - when I went to the prisoner's house, in February, he was gone; I saw no board nor bill on the house, nor any reference to Mr. Price's over the way- nobody could tell me where he was gone; he had taken all his things; I inquired at almost every machine-makers in the neighbourhood; when I found he had come to live in Long-lane I called at his house, but could not find him; I left an address for him to call at Wincott's, in Princes-street, Cavendish-square, on business - they sent for me when he came, and I had him, taken; I knew Wincott had ordered a machine of him, and he had brought it there that day; I took the Policeman, and he took him into custody - I knew nothing of a Policeman being there before, and refusing to take him - Wincott did not, in my presence, attempt to give him in charge for not leaving the premises with the new machine - the Magistrates did not desire it to be given up.

Q. Now, Chambers, the apprentice, is here; did you say on that occasion "You knew me Mr. Heard?" A. No, nor did he say, "Yes, Mr. Scott, I do - I have an old weighing machine of yours," nor that he hoped I was not offended at his not having repaired it; I did not say, "Now, old boy you are regularly done," nor any such words - I had him taken up as soon as I came into the house; (looking at a paper) this was not written by me - I believe it is Wincott's writing: I do not recollect whether he gave it to the prisoner in my presence - I did not see him write it; I was busy - I did not see it put into the prisoner's hands.

Q. Do you know the contents? A. I cannot say I know every word; it is within the last fortnight that I first spoke to Carney - I have given him no money, nor promised him any; I have not given him drink, nor kept him from work, nor made him any promise - I swear positively that the machine found is the one that was on my premises; I have my own mark on it, and could swear to it among one hundred and fifty - I have mended it and re-mended it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe your son is about thirteen years old? A. Yes, he was about eleven years old when this happened.

GEORGE CARNEY . I am a journeyman machine-maker,

and occasionally work for the prisoner - I still work for him at times; there is part of my work now in his shop, and some of my tools; I was present when Mr. Scott came and talked about repairing a machine; I heard him tell him it was to be repaired at his own place, and on Saturday night, the 19th of February following, I went with the prisoner, and took a truck there to take the machine off the premises - Mr. Scott was not at home; I saw Mrs. Scott behind the counter - the prisoner said,"We have come for the weighing-machine;" she said she knew nothing about the machine, and that Scott was not in; Mr. Heard came outside the door to me, and said,"This machine is not to go;" I said, "It is a very hard case we are to drag this truck home now without it;" then Heard called me back, and said, "We will have the machine;" "Yes," (said I) "we will have it;" so we went down stairs - Mrs. Scott never gave any consent that we should have it; she said she knew nothing about its going off the premises, and as Mr. Scott was not there, she would not have it off; we got down the stone steps down to the baker's-place, and the machine was there - we got it up, and put it into the truck.

Q. Of course you told Mrs. Scott? A. I never saw her any more - we took it home to the shop, and after a few days there was another machine we had sold which had come to be repaired, and the man came kicking up a row about it; it was Harper who lived in Fox-court, Charterhouse-lane; "Well" (said the prisoner) "we will put Scott's machine in the place of this; we will fit it up, so that it will appear like Harper's, and we will take it to Long-lane;" I knew he had sold Harper's machine, and saw him receive the money, and took it down to Brook-street; I afterwards went with him to Harper's and delivered the machine - Harper said, "This board to the machine is not mine;" Heard said, "Why, yes, in repairing the machine the bolt split, but you have got a better one" - it was better than Harper's.

Q. Do you remember afterwards seeing Mr. Scott's machine at Wheeler's in Oxford-street? A. Yes - I knew it at once; I have known it ten years - I had made some alterations in it, and knew my own work; the prisoner sent to me after that, about the 4th of April, 1832, and said, "Now we have got a machine, that will pass off for Scott's, and won't you swear to it?" I said, "If I am put on my oath I will tell the truth; anything you like to take down in writing you may, but I won't swear to it if I am brought to the oath; as soon as I am put to my oath I will never swear to it;" because I knew where the machine was.

Q. Did he say what you were to do to the machine when it was to pass for Scott's? A. Yes, he said, "We can put some iron hoops on the board to make it pass;" I said, "That is playing away with it, and when we are put to our oaths it won't do;" he said, "Well, don't you go at all, I will get another man to swear to it" - the prisoner lived in Charles-street, Bridgewater-gardens at the time we brought the machine from Scott's; he lived in Barbican when Scott called about it - he did not tell Mrs. Scott he had changed his residence; it was not a quarter of a mile off.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had a Mr. Price lived in the house the father occupied? A. He lives there now - he is a milkman; there was not a bill up at master's house till we removed to Long-lane; there was then one with a reference to Price; he had his name up in Long-lane, but not in Charles-street; he was there three-quarters of a year before there was a name put up; he carried on business there, and I worked for him - it was there I changed Scott's machine; Chambers, the apprentice, did not go with us to Scott's - I will swear that nobody went but master and me; he has given his name as having been, but on my oath he never went - I saw no boy at Scott's and heard nobody say, "Mother, it is all right, Mr. Heard is to have the machine home to repair," but Heard told me the boy said so.

COURT. Q. When did he say so? A. The day he was at Guildhall, some time before Christmas - he said,"If you are put to it, and questioned about this, you always say you heard Mr. Scott's son say that the machine was to go;" I said, "Will there be an oath required?" he said, "No, there won't;" I said, "Well then, it is all right, but never bring me where I am sworn;" he said, "Any thing I tell you you may say, there will be no oath required" - I said, "Well, that is all right."

MR. BARRY. Q. Have you ever been in trouble yourself? A. Never; I was never before a Magistrate in Ireland - a young woman robbed me of 15s. last Session, and no bill was found against her; I never knew Mr. Scott had a son - master said there was an action against Mr. Scott, and he took me before somebody; (looking at a paper) a paper was read to me - I do not know what is here; I was not sworn.

Q. Are the Jury to understand that all this time you were lending yourself to all these falsehoods? A. Falsehoods! No; what I have stated here about the machine is real truth - I did not go before a Magistrate; I went before the Grand Jury on Monday week - I have seen Chambers, the apprentice, since that; I have been at his master's ten times since - I did not say I should not come to work again for any b - y master; nor that Scott had given me money, and would give me 5l. more, or that I had been with Scott all the week, and had formed a plan against master; it is all false - I do not know Aggus a street-keeper of Aldersgate; I have told nobody that Scott had given me money, and would give me as much more as I wanted.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At what time of day did you go to Scott's for the machine? A. The lamps were lighted, and when we got there, I think it was between five and six o'clock; (looking at a machine) this is the very machine- it is Mr. Scott's; this part ought to be five inches higher - we cut it off to bring it down to the same height as the one we had sold, and here is a piece of wood which we coloured the same as a cast-iron pillar, which is here.

MR. BARRY. Q. How many machines have you made? A. A good many; I cannot tell how many - I do not swear to this by the pattern; we did not make this one, but repaired it - we took Scott's machine to Harper one Saturday night; it was in March, last year.

DAVID SCOTT . Here are two chisel marks on the machine, which I made in cutting it, to make it weigh flour, and I bored two holes to lap the bolts through - I have not the slightest doubt of it being mine.

MR. BARRY. Q. How long had it been in your possession? A. Since 1819; I found it at Wheeler's, in Oxford-street, and brought it here from there.

WILLIAM HARPER . I live in Orchard-street, Westminster. I have a brother, living in Church-lane; the prisoner had a machine of mine, but my nephew contracted with him to repair it in my absence - the prisoner brought a machine home in Charterhouse-lane; it was about thirtesen months ago - I said, "Mr. Heard, these are not the boards that were on my machine;" he said he had a machine at home, and in taking my machine to pieces, he split the boards, and put these on instead; Carney was present- I suppose he had had my machine in his possession about six weeks; I had been to his house to demand it once, twice, or thrice, but could not get it - I could never see him, till he brought the machine to me; I took the machine he brought me home, and afterwards disposed of it to Mr. Wheeler, of Oxford-street - this is the very machine (looking at it.)

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is it not the machine you originally had? A. It is not; I have never found my own machine - this is Mr. Scott's; not one particle of it is mine - but the boards were what I first found out to be wrong.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was any name on the machine which he had of yours? A. I believe the name of Nichols was on it.

MR. SCOTT. The prisoner's father made my machine, and his name is now on it.

(Prisoner's Defence (written.) I am a weighing-machine maker, now carrying on business in Long-lane, Smithfield; have lived all my life in the neighbourhood - I was applied to by Mr. Scott, the prosecutor, in February, 1830, while I resided in Barbican, to go to his house to look at the machine, which wanted repairing; I agreed with him about it, and was to send for it, and repair it when it suited me; I went with my apprentice, John Chambers, and my journeyman, George Carney, on the 19th of February, with a truck for the machine; Mr. Scott was not at home, and Mrs. Scott said she knew nothing about it, but her son said he did, and it was right that I should have it, as he heard his father agree with me about it; he then, with a light, accompanied me, my man, and apprentice, into the cellar - helped us with it, and helped us also to start the truck - shortly afterwards, I removed to Charles-street, Bridgewater-square, being prosecuted for not having my freedom of the City, and I put a bill up at Barbican, referring persons to a neighbour for my residence; it being down two or three streets - I remained these carrying on my business without any public show, until the half quarter between Michaelmas and Christmas, when I obtained a shop which I had long; been trying for on the privileged side of Long-lane; I then put up a board at my late residence, in Barbican, referring person to Long-lane - I kept the machine in a stable, with other lumbering, things, which I rented close by of a Mr. Field, and no application was made for it until after I had been taken before a Magistrate, at Malborought-street, for stealing it, who discharged me, and for which I brought an action, which is still pending - the action was commenced in December last, and I have been working in my shop, which is an open one, next the street, until I was taken into custody on the present indictment, which was only on Thursday last; I have not sent the machine home since the action for false imprisonment was commenced, under the advice of my solicitor.

JOHN CHAMBERS . I am the prisoner's apprentice, and was no in February, 1831. I went with master and Carney to Mr. Scott's house; it might be the latter end of February; on the begining of March - we went to No. 1, King-street, Portman-square; we saw Mrs. Scott, a young man, and a lad - I suppose the young man was a journeyman; master told Mrs. Scott he had come for the weighing machine to repair; she said she knew nothing about it, as Mr. Scott was out - the young lad said, "It is all right mother," for that he had heard master and his father agree about it;" they showed us a light down into the cellar, and helped us up with it - the lad showed the light, and the man helped us up with it; the young lad started the truck off for us - we brought the machine home, and pulled it to pieces; it could not be repaired on the prosecutor's premises - a forge fire would be required to mend it; I have been four years in the business - the iron work must all go through the fire before it could be repaired; it was put into the stable, some part, and some pieces were left about.

Q. Why was it not repaired immediately? A. Master said Mr. Scott was not particular and there was something about a new one, and he did not know what to do with it; it was put in the loft over the stable - my master lived in Charles-street then; he had left Barbican about three weeks; the night before he left I put up a bill referring persons to Mr. Price opposite, and cards were left there with the address - master left Barbican because the City prosecuted him for not being free; he remained in Charles street six or seven months, and carried on business there - it is about fifty yards from Barbican; he then moved to Long-lane, and attended to business regularly - in November last I remember a person coming to master's house for a machine; I saw Wincott, and I saw Mr. Scott; I know him now by sight - he called on the 4th of November, and asked if master was at home; I said No - he said"Give me a piece of chalk, I will write down my direction, for I want a new machine;" he wrote down,"Wincott, 7, Princes-street, Cavendish-square," and said;"Tell him to come there" - master made a new machine I and master went with it, on the 18th of November, to No. 7, Princes-street, Cavendish-square, to Wincott's; Wincott sent a little girl out of the parlour, to tell us to take it down into the cellar - master said, "I should like to see Mr. Wincott before I go into the cellar;" Wincott put his head out of the parlour, and Mr. Scott was with him-Scott said, "You know me, Mr. Heard;" "Yes, (said he) I have got an old weighing-machine of yours - I hope you are not offended at my keeping it so long;" Scott said, "Now old boy, you are regularly done" - master said, "Am I, how?" he put his hand into his pocket, took out the bill, gave it to Mr. Wincott, and said, "You are the man who ordered the machine, and I look to you for the money;" Wincott then said he would see master - (using some very bad expressions); master said he would take away the machine, if Wincott could not pay for it - Scott said, "Send your man for a Policeman, Wincott," and they used most dreadful expressions, and said they would lock him up; while Wincott's man was gone for the Policeman, Scott said; "I will go and fetch a Policeman myself," and used most dreadful expressions - while he was gone Wincott's man came with one; master was locked up in the shop - the Policeman was obliged to come in at the private door; Wincott told him to take charge of that man - the Policeman asked what for; Wincott said, "For committing felony;" master told him what it was about;

the Policeman said, "I will take the weighing-machine and Mr. Heard to the station, if you please;" Wincott would not allow that; while they were in conversation Mr. Scott came in with a Policeman, and took master in charge; the Policeman said, "Our inspector has sent for you, and you must go" and took master to the station-house I suppose; the machine was standing in the shop - master has never got it back; I went before the Magistrate, and after that went with master to Wincott's house, to fetch the machine or money; I saw Wincott, Scott, and many more - Wincott said, if he dare to put his foot over the threshold of the door, he would knock his *** out; master told me to fetch a Policeman - I got one; master told him he had his property - the Policeman said he could not interfere, and then master came away; master never concealed himself, nor kept out of the way - I worked for him constantly: he brought an action against Scott; Carney went before a attorney with me, to give an account of the transaction; he went into the room as I came out - I gave the same account there as I have now; (looking at a paper) I saw this at Wincott's house, after we came back from the Magistrate's; Wincott wrote it, in the presence of Scott and two or three more; Wincott offered it to master, to sign; master said he would take it and consider of it - Scott looked over Wincott while he was writing it, and when he had written it, he said that would do; I know it to be the same paper - I met Carney in Cow-cross last Friday, just;" as he came out of his lodging; he said, "Halloo, Jack;" I then stopped, and he said, "I will not come to work for my (using the most dreadful expressions) master any more"- I said, "Why not, there is work waiting for you;" (he had left seven or eight days) - he said he had got money at Mr. Scott's, and did not want to come to work; that he had 5s. on Monday, and had been getting drunk almost every day; he was half drunk that morning; he said, "If I tell you any thing, don't you tell master;" I said I would not - he said that he and Mr. Scott had formed a plan to go where one of master's machines were, where he had sold or repaired one, and to swear that was Mr. Scott's machine, and Mr. Scott would give him money for it; he doubled his fist, and said, "Don't you tell master" - master never told me to tell a falsehood about a machine; some part of Scott's machine is at home now, and some part is over the way; it has never been out of master's possession.

COURT. Q. Then that is not Scott's machine which has been produced? A. No; there is no name on the one we have at home - I do not know what name is on the one in Court.

MR. BARRY. Q. Did I understand you to say your master was busy, and it was thrown on one side? A. Yes, as he did not know whether Scott would have a new one; I am certain the part of the machine at home, and what is over the way, are parts of that we brought from Scott's.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you take sufficient notice of the machine you took away from Scott's, as to know it again? A. Yes, I helped to pull it to pieces - I noticed all the boards of it; there was no name on it, either printed or engraved; I am quite certain the machine brought from Scott's had no name on it - the name of Heard was not on it unless it was put on in writing, and got rubbed off - it was never cast on; there was no name at all on it: I recollect a machine going to Harperls; I cannot say whether there was a name on that - I will swear Harper's own machine was sent back to him; it went through the forge fire, and the pins were put to rights - the steels all thoroughly repaired, and it was put together again; another set of top boards were put to it - I do not know why, but I saw master put another board to it; some part of the old board was burnt - they were so shockingly split they were not worth putting on again; Harper had sent for his machine two or three times - he was not obliged to threaten about it; he was very good friends with master.

Q. Could the name of your master's father be printed or engraved on Harper's machine, without your noticing it? A. I cannot take on myself to swear whether it was or not; master told me Mr. Scott had authorized him to take the machine home to his house - I did not see Scott when he called about it; I saw no chisel marks on Harper's machine - Mrs. Scott did not desire the machine should not be taken off the premises; I think I should know the man I saw there - he was present when Mrs. Scott spoke, and heard the little boy tell his mother it was all right, I am sure of that; the boy was fifteen or sixteen years old, I cannot say exactly - he might be more; he was somewhere about my size - he might be shorter; I am eighteen years old; (looking at William Ingall ) I do not think that is the man who was there; I will not swear he is not- he has not the same dress - the man had a baker's dress on; there was only one man present - Carney worked for master a good deal, and was very much in his confidence.

Q. Did it not strike you as something very odd that for eleven months Mr. Scott never came to get his machine, nor a new one? A. I heard master say he had called on Mr. Scott, to know what was to be done, but I was at work, and did not take notice of it - I sometimes hear master say, "I am going so and so," or that he has been so and so; Carney has not worked for master since this day week - he has been in and out of the shop - master wanted him to come to work, but he would not; he said in the shop that he could get 5l.; that was in the patrol's presence - he was rather drunk at the time.

Q. On your oath, did not Carney say he would tell a false oath for no one, but if put to his oath he would speak the truth? A. No, he never said such a thing; he said he had prosecuted some girl, and he would go and swear any thing, right or wrong - it was on a Saturday, in 1831, that I went to Scott's for the machine; I am sure it was 1831, and the latter end of February, or the beginning of March- master generally goes himself, and it wants two persons to pull the truck.

COURT. Q. Was the little boy shorter or taller than you? A. Rather shorter, and of a ruddy complexion; I think he wore a pinafore - I do not know his age.

JONATHAN AGGIS . I am an extra patrol in the ward of Aldersgate. I was going down Long-lane, and was called by the last witness, who said his master wanted to see me- I went, and found the prisoner and Carney in an altercation about some law-suit; the prisoner said to me, "I wish you would listen to what this boy says;" he asked him to come to work for him - Carney said No, he would not work any more; he did not want work - the prisoner said he had had 5s. given him by Mr. Harper; Carney answered, "I have had 5s., and can have 5l. if I want it;"

he had been drinking, but was capable of knowing what he was saying - Heard's is a workshop quite open to the street; persons passing could see him in the shop; I have seen him there every night almost, for the last seven months.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Give us Carney's words? A. He said he would see him d - d first, he said he did not want work, for he had got money enough - the prisoner said,"He told me just now the party gave him 5s. last Monday;" he answered, "Yes, and I can have 5l.;" Mr. Scott's name was mentioned afterwards, but not at the time the money was spoken of; but the prisoner told me that there was an action pending, and Mr. Scott had gained this party over, and would not let him come to work - he said this in Carney's presence, after he mentioned the money; I did not take notice what reply Carney made - he might say, if he was put to his oath he would tell the truth, without my hearing it - he made no reply when it was said Scott had gained him over; when the prisoner told me the transaction, I turned round to Carney, and said, "If you have been examined by an attorney or Magistrate, what you have said is down in writing, and they will find you for perjury if you are in Ireland;" he swore, and said not one thousand people would find him.

Q. How came you to know he had been with an attorney, and his words taken down? A. The prisoner told me so, in his presence - it was my duty to go there when called by an inhabitant, I never spoke to Mr. Heard before in my life - I do not belong to that parish; I have not seen him since - he was taken into custody not five minutes after; Carney was the worse for drink - he was not drunk.

The paper referred to by Chambers, was here read, as follows:-"19th November, 1831, Received of David Scott , King-street, Portman-square, the sum of 1l., being a consideration due to me, in exchange for a weighing-machine, but if David Scott 's machine is returned in a complete state of repair, I am to have a new machine, which is now left at No. 7, Princes-street, Cavendish-square."

ROBERT HEATH . I am a solicitor at the Lord Mayor's court-office. On the 3rd of September last, in consequence of instructions from the prisoner, I brought an action for false imprisonment, against Scott and Wincott - I have the proceedings as far as they have gone; there was a plea to the action, that the machine had been obtained by false pretences - I advised the prisoner as to whether he should keep the machine or send it home; I saw Carney about the latter end of November, that I should know what he could prove - his master was not present; he gave me an account of what he could swear - I have the paper which I took work for word from his mouth; I read it over to him - he said, "That is the truth, and that I will swear to;" I had told him to mind, and state nothing but the truth.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you the attorney in the action on the record? A. I am an attorney, but not being at present admitted in the Common Pleas, it was drawn by Mr. Sangster, but I am the prisoner's attorney in the action.

Q. Is there not a plea that the machine was taken feloniously? A. There is.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a coppersmith and scale-pan maker. I knew the prisoner when he lived in Barbican; when I went my rounds one Monday, I found his house shut up, and saw a bill, stating that he was removed, and inquiries were to be made at No. 2; I found him out easily.

SAMUEL PRICE . I am a potatoe-dealer, and live in Barbican. When the prisoner removed, notice was put up at his house, and references made to my house; I knew he had moved to No. 9, Charles-street, Bridgewater-garden, and he afterwards went to Long-lane; he attended to his business all the time, and kept an open shop.

- HOW. I live in Charles-street, Bridgwater-square. The prisoner took my premises in Charles-street; there was no difficulty in finding him - so many people came after him, we wished him to move, the trouble was so great in answering them.

- WRIGHT. I am a weighing machine-maker.(Looking at the machine) the marks on this wood work are knots - there is nothing remarkable in the machine.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you discover any name on it? A. I can see the name of Heard cast in the iron-work; they are the smallest letters I ever saw - I am not related to the prisoner.

WILLIAM RUDGE . I am a machine-maker. There is nothing remarkable in these boards; the name of Heard is on the machine, but the boy might have made a mistake - the letters are small; if it required to go through the forge it must be taken home.

MR. PHILLIPS called

WILLIAM INGALL . I was at Mr. Scott's house on a Saturday night in February, when Heard came for the machine; I was in the parlour with Mrs. Scott - Scott's son must be eleven or twelve years old then; he is now between twelve and thirteen, but I do not recollect seeing the child there at all - I did not see Chambers there at all; he never came into the shop, and never made his appearance; Mrs. Scott never saw him, I am confident -I positively swear he was never within the door of the shop; Mrs. Scott said she knew nothing about it being arranged for the machine to be taken away, and she should not permit it to go from the premises in the absence of her husband - Heard then left the shop, and shut the door after him; I remained with Mrs. Scott till nearly eleven o'clock that night (they came about the machine about six); nobody could have spoken to Mrs. Scott about the machine without my hearing them, and nobody did speak to her about it - I had been there at least an hour before Heard came.

Q. Is there a word of truth in the declaration that when Mrs. Scott was applied to, a child said, "I was present when my father and Heard arranged it, and he agreed to let it go?" A. There is not.

MR. BARRY. Q. Where was the boy? A. I did not see him - Mrs. Scott was in the parlour with me after Heard closed the door; we were making out the weekly bills - I suppose the workmen were gone, but do not know; there are generally three young men, and sometimes four - I am merely employed there on Saturday, to make out the bills; I am a clerk at the Court-house, Marylebone, on parish the business.

Q. Were there not four or five men below, where the machine was? A. I believe not; it is their habit to go as soon as business is over on Saturday; I did not see the machine go; the shop-door was shut - I advised Mrs. Scott not to let it go, for Mr. Scott had heard something

derogatory about the prisoner, and that was the reason for not letting it go - we did not know it was gone till Mr. Scott returned, which was within half an hour; he went into the bakehouse, and missed it, and found fault that it had been allowed to go - the bakehouse door is not usually locked; the area gate is locked when all the men go, but it appears one man had not left.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you quite sure you recollect it so well that you advised Mrs. Scott to let it go? A. I did, and she positively refused to let it go.

MR. BARRY. Q. What did Mr. Scott say? A. He said, "You should not have allowed the man on any account to take the machine away, and why did you suffer it?" we said, "We did not suffer it; we insisted on his going away, or waiting till you returned, and did not know it was gone."

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-163

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

996. JAMES CAPLE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 weighing-machine, value 1l. 15s. , the goods of Thomas Burchfield .

THOMAS BURCHFIELD. I am a weighing-machine maker , and live in Smithfield . On Monday the 26th of March, about five o'clock in the morning, our inspector called me up - he had the prisoner at the watch-house; he had been on and off in my employ for two years, and was so five weeks before; I saw this machine at Guildhall, and recollect I had seen it safe in the yard, near my house, on Sunday night; there was a quantity of them under-tarpauling - it was not locked up; anybody could some into the court; I saw the prisoner on my premises a week before, and told him to go away.

JOHN MORLAND . I am a watchman of St. Sepulchre's. On the 26th of March, about twenty minutes past five o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner in King-street; Snew-hill, about two hundred yards from Mr. Burchfield's, with this machine, coming along at a very quick rate - I said, "Where did you bring that from?" he said, "Where do you think I brought it from besides from the shop?" I told him to stop; he would not - I followed him, and he said he brought it from Spitalfields; I secured him, and took him to the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I porter at the market; a man came up and asked me to carry this machine to the corner of Oxford-street for 1s.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-164

967. WILLIAM NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 pair of shoes, value 6s. , the the goods of Zachariah Foster .

ZACHARIAH FOSTER. I am a shoemaker , and live in Cheapside . On the 14th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come in and take these shoes off the floor; I stopped him three or four yards from the shop, with them under his apron.

RICHARD GEORGE STATHAM. I am a constable. I received him in charge - I found nothing on him but three duplicates; he said distress alone had driven him to it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320405-165

968. ARCHER PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 box, value 1l.; 1 coat, value 6s.; 6 shirts, value 16s.; 4 waistcoats, value 1ls.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 4s.; 1 cap, value 7s.; 2 petticoats, value 5s. 6d.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 7s., and 3 towels, value 18d. , the goods of James Howard .

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Edward Whitchurch .

JAMES HOWARD. I am a servant in the East India Company . On Saturday, the 24th of February, I left a box, containing the articles stated in the indictment, in care of Mr. Whitchurch, while I went to King-street, Towerhill; I returned there next morning, and he was gone - I had seen the prisoner three or four times at the public-house which I lodge at, but never gave him authority to fetch my box - it has never been found - there was no direction on it.

EDWIN WHITCHURCH. I am a tobacconist , and live in the Minories . Howard left a box in my shop, about three o'clock in the afternoon, for a short time; I was not at home when he left it; I saw it in my shop about ten o'clock, and about half-past ten the prisoner came, and said he had called for a box which Howard had left; I had never seen him before - he described Howard as living near Manchester-square - I knew he lived in that neighbourhood, but did not know the street; I thought it was correct, and he took the box away - Howard came for it about eight o'clock next morning.

HENRY HUDDY . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 27th, at the Pavilion theatre - I took him to the station, and told him I wanted to know where the box was which he took from the shop - he said he knew nothing of it, but before we got to the office he voluntarily said he had taken the box, and sold it to a Jew -I found on him two letters and a pair of traces, and 5s. 6d. - he had a shirt on, which Howard claime.

JAMES HOWARD. These letters were in my box; the traces are mine, and my name is on the shirt.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320405-166

969. ROBERT SPENCER and JOHN JENNINGS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 coat, value 18s. , the goods of Thomas Palmer .

THOMAS PALMER. I live in Carlisle-street, Marylebone. On the 17th of February I went into Whitecross-street prison , to see a friend, leaving my coat in a cart in the street; I left Jennings in care of the cart - I came out in about an hour; he was gone, leaving nobody in careful the cart, and the coat was gone - both the prisoners were standing by the cart when I went in; they had both come up together, and Jennings was left in care - I found the coat that day, in pledge.

CHARLES BATH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gosswell-street. On the 17th of February, about twelve o'clock in the day, Jennings pawned this coal for 10s. in the name of James Howlett; I asked how he got it - he said his father, who was an ironmonger, sent him with it; he was alone.

FRANCIS SAUNDERS . The cart was mine - I left the prisoners in care of it while we went into the prison; about eleven o'clock - I saw the coat in it, wrapped in paper.

JOHN HARRISON . I am a hair-dresser. I was in Golden-lane on the 17th of February, and met Spencer driving Saunders' cart; I afterwards met both the prisoners together - Jennings said, as he passed me, "When I have taken this parcel all this way, I shall only get 6d. for it;" I went and saw the prosecutor, and told him, as he missed his coat.

WILLIAM BISHOP . I am a clothes-salesman, and live in Goswell-street. I know this coat - I had sold it to Palmer that morning.

JOHN HILL . I am an officer. I apprehended Spencer on the 20th and Jennings on the 26th; I told Spencer he had been with Jennings, and robbed Mr. Palmer of a coat- he did not deny it, and when I searched him he said he only went with Jennings to the pawnbroker's - Jennings said he had given Spencer half the money, and torn up the duplicate.

Jennings pleaded distress.

JENNINGS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

SPENCER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-167

NEW COURT. MONDAY, APRIL 9.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

970. JOHN THACKER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 4 lbs. weight of beef, value 2s. , the goods of Daniel Fielding ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-168

971. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing' on the 17th of February , 1 shirt, value 6s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s. , the goods of James Baker .

JAMES BAKER. I am a surgeon , and live in Bradnall-place, New North-road - the prisoner was my servant . In consequence of information I asked him to turn out his pockets - there were several duplicates in them, but not belonging to me; this excited suspicion, and I went to some pawnbrokers - I found at Mr. Smith's, a pawnbroker, some articles belonging to me; and since the prisoner has been taken I found three duplicates, which relate to the articles, in a corner of my stable, between the rafters and the tiles; the prisoner had access to that stable - he looked after my house and chaise.

GABRIEL BURROWS . I was shopman to Mr. Smith, a pawnbroker. I have a silk handkerchief, pawned by the prisoner, on the 17th of February; I have another handkerchief and a shirt - I cannot say who pawned them, but the duplicates found are what were given for these things.

JAMES WHITE . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner. I pawned one handkerchief on the 17th of February, but not the other things.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-169

972. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 pocket-book, value 2s., and 1 pencil, value 6d., the goods of Joseph Matthews , from his person .

JOSEPH MATTHEWS. I am master of the ship Sampson , and lodge in Red Lion-street, Wapping. On the 7th of March I was returning home by St. George's church - there was an election, and I got into the crowd; I had a pocket - book and some ship's papers in it, and a silk hankerchief in my pocket - there was a complete shuffle just round me; the prisoner came up to me, and began to shove me an end - I told him to avast, or I would make him; there was no necessity, from the state of the crowd, for him to push me - when I told him not to shove me, he said I should get on a little faster; I then felt something at my coat tail - I then missed my pocket-book; I turned and saw the prisoner, and when I had followed him past two or three people, I grasped him, and said, "You rascal, you have got my pocket-book," and I felt it in his left breast - he said, "Here is your pocket-book, let me go;" I kept hold of him, and took up the book all over mud; my handkerchief was near it, quite out of my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. I suppose there were many people? A. Yes, in the center of the road - the prisoner was about two yards from me when I missed my book; I swear I saw the book fall from him - I had hold of him with my left hand, and was just going to knock him down.

JOHN ADAMS . I am a Thames Police-constable. I came up and took hold of the prisoner by the right breast - the captain had hold of him with his left hand; there were a great many odd characters there - as we were going along, the prisoner said he would give me a fiver if I would let him go - I suppose he meant a 5l. note.

Cross-examined. Q. Did it not mean a rap in the mouth? A. I do not know; I was not near enough to see who dropped the book - (this is it.)

JURY. Q. Was there any thing in his breast when he was taken? A. No.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutor had mistaken his person in the crowd, and declared his innocence.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-170

973. MARIA STOREY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 quart of wine, value 3s., 1 bottle, value 2d., 3 books, value 10s.; 1 neckcloth, value 1s., and 4 shillings, the property of John Burnell , her master .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

BEZALEEL BLOMFIELD BURNELL . The prisoner was cook , in the service of my father, John Burnell - I had put some marked shillings in a bag, into a drawer, in my father's bed-room, on the 4th of February; I saw them safe between that time and the 19th; on the 19th the prisoner was going out about six o'clock in the evening -I went to the bag, and missed four shillings; I went for an officer - she was stopped, and the shillings were found in her hand, with my mark on them, and a bottle of wine was found in her pocket - she said she had found it under the safe where my sister had put it - there were three keys found on her, and one of them I could swear to; it opened my father's drawer - I saw her box opened, and some articles were found in it; among them were three books, two of which are mine, and the other my sister's, and a neckcloth of my father's, with his mark on it.

COURT. Q. How long had she been at your father's?

A. I think about four months the last time, but she had been eighteen months in his service before.

SAMUEL THORNTON MILLER . I am chief constable at Lambeth-street office; I went to the prosecutor's on the 19th of February, between five and six o'clock - the prisoner had her bonnet and shawl on, and was standing in the parlour - I said she had some stolen money about her; she opened her hand, and gave me these four marked shillings - I asked where she got them; she said out of her master's drawer - I found this bottle of wine on her, and these three keys, one of which opens the drawer - she said she supposed Miss Burnell had left the wine out on the Friday evening, when she went to the wine-cellar, as it was standing near the safe - these books were in her box; she said she took them to read, and I found this handkerchief, of which I believe she gave no account.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My fellow servant and I took these books to read them and return them; they were put into my box for fear mistress should see them - my fellow servant was privy to all I did; the neckcloth was not in my box, it was in the room.

SAMUEL THORNTON MILLER . The neckcloth was in the box where the books were.

The prisoners received an excellent character.

GUILTY, of stealing the four shillings only. Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320405-171

974. JOHN QUIN and JANE (HIS WIFE ) were indicted for putting off to Richard Tripp, on the 28th of February, 9 counterfeit half-crowns, for the sum of 3s. against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, varying the manner of stating the charge.

MESSRS. SCARLETT and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD TRIPP (Police-constable, F 86.) On the 28th of February I went to Quin's room, No. 2, Church-lane, St. Giles' , about eleven o'clock; I saw Jane Quin in the room - I believe it is a lodging-house; there were several persons down stairs - I asked Jane how she was; she said, "Pretty well;" I asked whether Johnny was at home; she said No, he was out - I said I wanted to see him; she asked if I wanted some things; I said, Yes; she said if I came in the evening I might see him - I went then to Brownlow-street, where I saw Priest, Rogers, and Higgins; I was searched by Rogers in the presence of the others - I had no coin about me - they gave me three good marked shillings; we then all went to Quin's house; the other two stopped; Higgins and I went to the door - he stopped outside, and I went in; it was then about three o'clock; there was a man at the door, whom I had seen in their room once before, but I do not know his name; he gave a knock as a signal, and I was let into the room - on the right-hand side of the window I saw John Quin filing some half-crowns; he told me to sit down, and he would get them ready for me - while I was sitting there Jane Quin gave me four half-crowns; the other man did not go into the room with me, but there was a lad there - when I had sat a few minutes John Quin came and asked me for the four half-crowns which the woman had given me; he took them from me, rang them on a chair close by me, and said."If I were to go all London over I could not get them with such a good jink" - he then gave me nine half-crowns, and I gave him the 3s. which I had received at Browntow-street; he looked at them, and said to the female prisoner, "Jenny, these will do for a good die;" he handed them over to her, and she put them into her left-hand pocket; I then asked if they would have any thing to drink; they said Yes - we came down stairs, and in George-street Higgins took John Quin , and the woman was taken by Morris, close by my side - they were taken to the station-house; I then went there, was searched by Priest, and the nine half-crowns which I had received of the prisoner were found on me - I knew the three shillings again.

John Quin . Q. What took you to Brownlow-street first? A. I had not been there lately; I first saw you walking down George-street - Donovan was with me; I had got acquainted with him during the time I went backwards and forwards to St. Giles - he did not say, "There he is;" you came out of your house and went over to the Robin Hood - then you came out, and Donovan went and spoke to you; that was on the 22nd - you then turned to me, and said you had none by you, that you never sold less than a score; but you told me to wait - you went and fetched me six shillings, and gave me them under a lamp - we went, and had something to drink; Donovan stepped on one side, but I had not been in conversation with him - you then said if I could get you a customer you would give me a shilling's worth in, and appointed to meet me the next night at a quarter-past seven o'clock; I was against the pump at the time you appointed - you came, and asked me to go up; I went, and made a second purchase of you.

COURT. Q. Was it not in consequence of some conversation between Donovan and the prisoner that you were induced to call upon him to make these purchases? A. Yes, it was, but he was no spy - he was not employed to let me know where counterfeit coin was sold, that I might get the money for prosecuting - the prisoner spoke to me after he had spoken to Donovan, and without any introduction; I had told Donovan to go and ask the prisoner to let me have some things - I had not derived my first information from Donovan.

JOSEPH HIGGINS (Police-constable, F 35.) I went with Tripp on the 28th of April - he had his first information from me; I told him I wanted him to disguise himself and to go with me; he did not then know where he was going - the first information I received about this was the beginning of January, and what Tripp did was with my sanction and authority; I had given information to the Mint, and was ordered to procure a man to purchase; on the 28th of February I accompained Tripp to Brownlow-street - Mr. Priest and I there searched him; Priest gave him three shillings - I went with him to Church-street, and never lost sight of him; I stopped at a distance, and saw him go into the door - he came out with the prisoners in twenty minutes or half an hour; I took John Quin , and called to one of our men to secure his hands, as he had these eight half-crowns, which I have here, and which he was trying to get rid of - they are not finished; the top of the mould is not cut off - we went to the room, and found some pieces of metal, which appear to be the tops of moulds, and Morris found some shillings.

John Quin . Q. How much did you leave in Tripp's possession when you searched him? A. Three marked shillings, and a sixpence or a shilling, which he said he should want to treat you with.

COURT. Q. How did you search Tripp? A. The same as we would a prisoner taken for felouy - I am certain he had no money but what I have just stated.

JOSEPH PRIEST . I am an inspector of Police. I was at Brownlow-street on the 20th of February; I searched Tripp, and gave him three shillings, which I had marked, and he had one shilling besides - I was present at the search of John Quin , and at the room; this piece of metal was found there, also this spoon which it fits, and these two files - I took these nine half-crowns from Tripp.

JOHN EALES ROGERS. I am an inspector of Police. I saw Tripp searched, and confirm what Priest has stated.

WILLIAM SICKLE . I searched Jane Quin, and found these three marked shillings on her.

RICHARD MORRIS . I am an officer. I went to the room, and found these fourteen counterfeit shillings on the mantel-piece, in this bag - I marked them when I got to the station, and have had them ever since; I found also some plaster of Paris in the rooms - there was no one there.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin to the Mint. These nine half-crowns are all counterfeit - five of them appear to be cast in one mould, and four in another; they are white metal, and this piece of metal appears to be the same - this spoon is iron; these fourteen shillings are counterfeit, and cast in different moulds - these eight half-crowns are all counterfeit, and are not finished; they are in the state in which they came out of the mould - they have a spray on the edge, which is generally removed with a file; these files would answer that purpose - this is fine plaster of Paris, of which moulds are usually formed to make this coin in.

John Quin 's Defence. The first time Tripp came to my house, he spoke to my wife, wanted to seduce her away to Birmingham, and said he was a good hand at passing them - she told me, and I went to Mr. Powell and told him of it; it was not him only, but he sent a woman - I met that woman, and threatened that I would have her taken into custody; she said my wife had no business to let her husband know - they struck my wife, and gave her a black eye; I told Mr. Powell this, and he told me to live on as good terms as I could - Tripp then came again, and my wife said I was gone to the doctor's, but I should be there at three o'clock; he came again, and met a young lad at my door, who had a red handkerchief with something tied in it, and he took it from him - a person who is now in the Middlesex-hospital saw him do it: he then came up, gave my wife three shillings, and said he wished he could get some dinner - she said she had some fresh fish for dinner; he said he liked that very well - he then took out of the handkerchief some whiting or plaster, and he pulled out these nine half-crowns; he said, "Here are some which are not finished;" I took them to the window to examine them, when I gave them to him again - he said he was forced to leave that morning, but there was a man at the Cock, who would finish them for him; he asked me to go and give them to him - I said, "I don't know what man to give them to;" he said, "I will go and show him to you;" we went out, and he had the officer ready to take us - the first time I saw him; he said he had been at Birmingham, and saw a young man named Neale, who gave him a breakfast - he came to my place worse dressed than I was, and I gave him some tea.

RICHARD TRIPP. I had a fustain jacket on, and huff trousers, and a silk hat nearly new; the first time I saw his wife, which was when I went to his room, to ask for him I told her I knew a person named Neale, who was gone to Birmingham, and he told me to go and ask for some things - I did not ask about any dinner, nor pass myself off as a person in the same condition of life; I merely asked her to let me have some things - I had been at Birmingham, but I did not tell them so; I did not say I had a brother who drove a waggon to Covent-garden-market, and that he could pass the bad money.

COURT. Q. Do you mena solemnly to declare that you never held out any inducement to his wife to go to Birmingham, or say what he has stated? A. I did not.

JURY. Q. You found a person on the stairs? A. Yes, the person whom I had seen in the room the first time I was there; he knew I was going in, and he went up and gave three knocks with his hand - I had given him no sign, and was not in company with him.

JOHN QUIN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Twelve Months .

JANE QUIN - NOT GUILTY .

There was another indictment against Jane Quin .

Reference Number: t18320405-172

975. JAMES WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 9 shillings , the monies of James Graham .

ANN GRAHAM . I am the wife of James Graham - he is a carpenter ; we live in Harrow-street . On the forenoon of the 23rd of February the prisoner came to my house, to look at a lodging: I showed him a first floor room - he agreed to take it at 4s. 3d. a week, and said he would bring in his goods on the following Monday; he then proposed to leave a deposit, and asked me what was usual; I had not suggested it to him - I rather declined it- he asked me to give him change for a half-sovereign; I opened my pocket-book, and he took 9s., and gave into my hand the supposed half-sovereign, which I took and placed in my drawer; I then told him we always required a reference - he said he would give me one if I would give him a pen and ink; I went down for one, but could not find it - I came up to him, and he said his time was gone, but the reference was No. 20, John-street, Cleveland-street; he asked me three times if I would keep the room for him- I said Yes, and I would if he had not left the deposit; he went away, and never came back.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was he a stranger? A. Yes; this is the half-sovereign he gave me - I did not find it was bad till the Saturday after; I had put it into my pocket-book in the drawer - I had five sovereigns there, but no half-sovereign; I did not expect to get the nine shillings back - I gave him them as the change of the half-sovereign, and the shilling was retained in part payment of rent - I gave him the change on the faith of the half-sovereign being a good one.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin. - This is a sixpence which has been gilt; no gold coin has the same reverse as this has.

COURT to ANN GRAHAM . Q. What did the prisoner

say to you? A. He said, "It is usual to leave a deposit"- I said, "I don't require one;" he said twice "I would rather leave you a deposit;" I then looked what silver I had, and gave him 9s. - he had before asked what it was usual to leave; I said some left half a crown, but he might leave what he pleased - he said he was going to the timber yard, should want some silver, and he would leave 1s. if I could give him change for a half-sovereign; I had asked him what family there was, and he said his wife and himself; I could find no such place as that to which he referred.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to look for the place? A. No, my husband did - I have made inquiries, and there is no such place; I do not know how many Cleveland-streets there are in London; when I handed him the 9s. I expected a half-sovereign, and I had seen it in his hand-I parted with the 9s. upon the faith that I should get a half-sovereign.

COURT. Q. You would not have given him change if he had not spoken of taking your lodging? A. No, certainly not; he took the lodging, and expressed a desire to leave a deposit, and I believed this to be really a half-sovereign at the time - I dealt with him on the footing of supposing he was about to become a lodger of mine; I did not hear of him till he was in custody.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18320405-173

976. JAMES WEBB was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 9s. , the monies of Robert Burley .

CHARLOTTE BURLEY. I am the wife of Robert Burley ; we had a bill up to let apartments, at our house in Alfred-street, Vauxhall-bridge-road . On the 13th of February the prisoner came, and inquired what lodgings we had to let - I showed him our first-floor; he said he liked it very much, and he would have it if I would keep it till the Saturday following - I asked if he would not bring his wife to look at it; I then showed him our back cellar, which he was to have, and in going out he said was it not necessary to leave a deposit; I said as he pleased; he pulled out two half-sovereigns. and I laid 9s. 6d. down - he took up 9s., and gave me one half-sovereign; I then asked for a reference; he asked for a pen and ink; I had not one, but I gave him a pencil, and he wrote "No. 27, John-street, Chelsea" - he was then going away, and I said, "You have not told me your name;" he said,"Davies;" the next day I offered the same half-sovereign to my grocer, and he told me it was a gilt sixpence- I met the prisoner by accident in Piccadilly a month afterwards - the moment he saw me he run off; I gave an alarm - I should not have given him the 9s. if he had not represented himself as a person engaging my lodging.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you ring the half-sovereign? A. No, I laid it on the baize while he was writing the paper; I then took it up, and put it into my pocket - I had no other half-sovereign; I had not changed any half-sovereign after he came.

ROBERT CURRIE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 12th of March; he was running fast - I found a sovereign and fifteen shillings on him, but no had money.

JOHN FIELD . This is a gilt sixpence, in all respects the same as the other.

GUILTY. Aged 24. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320405-174

977. JOHN COOK and JOHN WHITING were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering a building within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of George Gudgin , on the 24th of February , and stealing 1 plane, value 3s.; 9 chisels, value 2l.; 3 draw shaves, value 4s.; 3 spoke shaves, value 3s.; 2 burzes, value 6s., and 1 googe, value 6d., his property, and that the said John Cook had been before convicted .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE GUDGIN . I live at Southgate , and am a wheelwright - I have a shop which joins my dwelling-house; Kendall and Frost were in my employ. On the 24th of February I was in my yard, and ordered the shop to he shut up, which I saw done; the next morning I got up early, and found the shop broken open; the tools that are mentioned in the indictment were not mine - I lost some tools, but I have not seen them; Kendall and Frost kept their tools there.

COURT. Q. Where is the building that was broken? A. It joins the dwelling-house, but the doors of the shop open into my yard, which is enclosed.

GEORGE KENDALL . I work for Mr. Gudgin. On the 24th of February I had some tools in his shop - I shut up the shop, and left them safe; there was, among other things, a burze, which was mine, and a chisel of Frost's; they were left there for safety; the next morning I saw one of the doors had been forced open, and there were the marks of the coulter of a plough on it - the articles stated were missing.

JOHN FROST. I worked for Mr. Gudgin. I left my tools at his shop on the 24th of February, and the next day I missed three chisels and a googe - I have seen one of my chisels in the officer's possession.

JOHN HICKS . I live at Lower Edmonton, and am a carpenter - I have a stable belonging to my premises; I had three rabbits in it. On the night of the 26th of February I was alarmed in my sleep, about eleven o'clock at night - I got up, and looked out of the window; I saw Cook, whom I knew, getting out of the stable window -I cried out "Halloo, who is there?" I then went to the other part of the house, and cried Stop thief! I saw Lawrance under the fence, but I have not seen him since - I afterwards examined the stable, and found about six feet from the door, facing the window Cook got out at, this chisel and burze - I lost one rabbit.

WILLIAM SOLE . I live at Lower Edmonton. I went into the William the Fourth public-house, kept by John Foot , to have a pint of beer, on the night of the 26th of February; I saw the two prisoners and the two Lawrances there, between nine and ten o'clock; this was about tea rods from the stable - the two prisoners came out about ten, and turned into Hick's garden, which leads to the stable; I had a pig; I made the best of my way home to take care of it - I said, "Good night" when they went away.

JOHN CAMP . I am a constable of Edmonton. I took both the prisoners on the night of the 27th of February; I had heard of the robbery, and I received these two tools from Hicks - the prosecutor's house and shop is in the parish of Edmonton, at Southgate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Cook's Defence. I am innocent of the charge; I had

an honest way of getting a bit of bread till the parish took my horse and cart away from me.

JURY to JOHN CAMP. Q. Did you compare these tools with any marks on the stable? A. Yes, and they correspond exactly - they did not quite get in, but they took out the window from the garden.

JOSEPH FOSTER. I am a constable. I have a certificate of Cook's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office - I was present at his trial here, and know he is the person.

COOK - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

WHITING - NOT GUILTY .

There was another indictment, on which no evidence was offered.

Reference Number: t18320405-175

978. JAMES ROSE and WILLIAM WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 2 bushels of wheat, value 30s., the goods of Edward Board , their master .

Mr. CLARKSON, on behalf of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-176

979. ELLEN RIORDAN and JOHN SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 4 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the monies of Henry Bush , from his person .

HENRY BUSH . I live in St. James'-street, and am a servant out of place . On the morning of the 27th of February, about a quarter before two o'clock I was going down Long-acre ; I stopped - Riordan and another woman came up, and began to push me about- I shoved one of them off the pavement; she was coming up to abuse me - I offered them some gin, and we went into a public-house and had some; when we came out, they wanted me to go home with them, but I would not - I left them, and went on to St. Martin's-lane; I there had a glass of porter - I then missed 5s.; I had had about 8s. in my pocket - I do not know whether I was robbed in the house or afterwards; I know I had it when I paid for the gin - I went back, and saw Riordan, and Sullivan with her, but he had not been with her before -I went up to Riordan, and said she had robbed me - she said she had not; they then went down Hanover-street - I saw a Policeman, and gave him charge of the woman; he told me to go on the other side, and take hold of the woman's hand - I told the officer she was dragging it out of her pocket; he seized Sullivan's hand; he had 4s. 6d. in it, and sixpence fell on the ground.

Riordan. You might as well charge the other woman as me. Witness. She did not pull me about so much, and you was nearer to my pocket; the other woman asked me for the gin, and I gave it them for fear they should abuse me - I did not say I lost two half-crowns; I said I had half a crown left.

JOHN STARR . (Police-constable F 78.) On the morning of the 27th of February, about a quarter before two o'clock, I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor; the prosecutor gave Riordan in charge for robbing him - Sullivan followed them; I desired him to keep back - I saw Riordan pass 4s. 6d. into his hand, and sixpence fell on the ground.

Riordan's Defence. I did not want the gin of him, but he forced us to have it; I had a cloak on my arm, and he said it was like a gentleman's cloak - be then broke the string of my pocket, and said, "You have got some money" - I said I had very little; he then followed us, and charged the officer with us - if I could have seen an officer, I would have given charge of him for pulling my clothes about.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-177

980. WILLIAM SYKES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Over , from his person .

JOHN OVER. I live in Charles-street, Northampton-square. On the afternoon of the 1st of March, I was near St. Luke's church ; I had felt something touch my pocket several yards before - I found my handkerchief was gone; the prisoner then passed me - I collared him, and found my handkerchief under his arm.

Prisoner. I came down a street, and happened to see this handkerchief laying down; I had not quite picked it up, when this gentleman seized me. Witness. It was raining very fast, and the handkerchief was quite clean and dry - no one else was near me.

WILLIAM KING . (Police-constable N 78.) I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-178

981. WILLIAM SIMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 300 lbs. weight of potatoes, value 7s. , the goods of Richard Laycock .

WILLIAM BOULTON . I am in the service of Richard Laycock , who is a cow-keeper and farmer . I was ordered to watch some potatoes of his on the 17th of March; I saw the prisoner and two others getting the potatoes up out of the pit where they were buried, and covered with straw and earth; the prisoner had about 1 cwt. of them on his back - I saw him put them into the sack.

WILLIAM HUBBARD . I was with Boulton at the back of the asylum; we saw the prisoner and two others at the potatoe-heap - I stopped him with this bag of potatoes on his back.

WILLIAM GILLETT (Police-constable N 19.) I took the prisoner, and said to him, "You have a pretty good lot there;" he pointed to this bag, and said, "That is the parcel I carried;" there were three bags, and each contained 1 cwt.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-179

982. JOHN SHEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 cheese, value 20s. , the goods of Henry Pannell .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-180

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

983. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 seal, value 22s.; 1 watch-key, value 6s., and 1 ring, value 2s., the goods of Charles Hayward , from his person .

CHARLES HAYWARD . I am a publican , and live in the Lower-road, Islington. On the 31st of March, between

three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the entrance of the Insolvent Debtors' Court - I had a watch in my pocket; as I ran up the steps I felt the seals with my hand - I did not see the prisoner when I first went, but there was a great crowd; I had heard an insolvent's name called out, and was very anxious to get in, but I heard the officer call out that it was put off; I retreated a little - I then felt a pressure on my watch-pocket, and saw the prisoner close upon me - as he passed me I put my hand down, and looked; I then missed my seal, key, and ring: I immediately seized the prisoner by the collar - he struggled very hard to get into the body of the Court, but I pulled him back, and called for an officer, saying I was robbed - I was some time before I got assistance, but I never let him go; I had a very desperatestruggle, and fought away with my umbrella, to keep the people from closing round me till I got him down the steps, and he was secured; a friend took up this key, and gave it to me three or four minutes after I had secured the prisoner, in the lobby of the Court - I am quite sure it was the key that was taken from me; it had been fastened to my watch by a chain; the ring, the seal, and the key had been taken from it; I saw the seal a very short time afterwards, when a gentleman produced it - I knew it to be mine.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. There were a great many persons? A. Yes; I was pressing against a great many persons - it is possible that the clothes of some of the persons might draw the things from me; I was going in at the centre door - the room is on the left side of the Court; the prisoner was taken in there - I took the prisoner as I found he was pressing against me.

RICHARD CRUTE . I am a saddler. I was at the Court- I was nearly on the floor; I saw the prisoner there, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran from my seat, and went to the door which leads towards the lobby; I saw Mr. Boar holding the prisoner - he said, "The seal is in his hand, try to take it out;" I went towards the prisoner, and saw the seal in his right hand - three or four were trying to get it from him - I at last got it from him, and said, "Here it is;" I then gave it to the officer - the prosecutor claimed it, and the prisoner denied that he had had it.

RICHARD BOAR. I am an accountant, and live in Kennington-lane. I was at the Court; I heard a scuffle, and the cry of Stop-thief! I was in the passage, and ran round to the lobby, where I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor struggling; I seized the prisoner by the right hand, in which I saw a seal, which Mr. Crute got from him - there was a violent struggle, and a person, who is not present, was forced to bite his hand to make him give way; I dragged the prisoner into the room, and gave him to the officer.

JOHN LEACH . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge - the seal and key were delivered to me, but the ring has not been found.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, merely declaring his innocence, and stating that his connexions were highly respectable.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320405-181

984. JOSEPH SAINT , THOMAS GOODFELLOW , and SAMUEL BENTOTE were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 1 till, value 1s., 3 half-crowns, 9 shillings, and 3 sixpences , the property of Timothy Coleman Johnson , the elder.

TIMOTHY COLEMAN JOHNSON , JUN. I am the son of Timothy Coleman Johnson; he keeps a public-house in Cheshire-street, Waterloo-town . On the 26th of February I saw Goodfellow, a boy who is admitted evidence, and a number of other boy s opposite my father's house; and between seven and eight in the evening I missed the till, which had been kept in the bar under the counter - I had seen if safe two minutes before, and, to the best of my belief, there were about 2l. in copper, and a half-crown in it, which I had put in about a quarter of an hour before, and a number of shillings and sixpences; I saw the till again about one o'clock in the morning, when it was produced by the officer - the prisoners were all in custody then; Goodfellow and Bentote's parents were tenants of my father's; when I missed the till I went to Bentote's father, and from what he said, I had Goodfellow taken; but before he was taken he had been sent to my father for a quartern of gin, and I questioned him about it, but did not make him any promise or threat; he said he knew nothing about it, but the afterwards said he was in company with Saint and Prince about four o'clock, and that he had been in Brick-lane that evening.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Do you conduct your father's business? A. I do sometimes - I am sure there was a half-crown in the till about two minutes before it was lost - we open the till to put the money into it; there is a pin to fasten it, but it was not fastened then - the bar is about twenty feet from the door; I have a room behind the bar; I can see a person who comes into the bar.

THOMAS PRINCE . I am fourteen years old; I am a weaver - I know the three prisoners. On the day stated I met them about twelve o'clock; they were at play, and I played with them till about two; while we were playing I heard Goodfellow say he had had 15s. one week out of Mr. Johnson's till, and 1l. the week afterwards - this was on the Sunday they were taken up, but I do not know the day of the month; he did not say how he had got it, but said he was by himself; I was taken up on this charge, and have been ever since in the House of Correction; I met the prisoners again about four o'clock, near the prosecutor's house - I played with them till about five, and then went to my tea; I came out and joined them again in about an hour; then Goodfellow said to me, "Will you be in getting Johnson's till?" he said it would be a gift to get it, and he would go and get it - I refused to have any thing to do with it - the other two prisoners were there at the time, and must have heard what was said - I left them, and in about an hour I saw them again in Bethnall-green-road - Goodfellow told me that he had got Johnson's till, and said there was a good load of money in it; the other two were close to him; he said they had chucked the till over some palings behind Johnson's house - I was taken at one o'clock on Monday morning - I told the officer what I have now stated; I showed him the place, and the till was found there - I saw the prisoners again an hour after; they told me of this, and Bentote asked me if I would put a pair of pigeons into my father's loft till Monday morning, and I did; he did not say where he got them from.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? A. Yes, I have been instructed in it since the prisoners were committed; if what I have said be false, I shall go to hell; the parson told me to say so - I have been to church, but have not been taught the catechism; I never was in gaol before this time - I worked for Mr. Wade two years; he never charged me with taking a sovereign; I left him to go home to my father - I swear I never robbed him; I have never told any one that I used to rob Mr. Wade weekly, to supply my father with tobacco - since I have been in prison Saint has charged me with stealing a knife from him, but I did not; I stated before the Magistrate the same that I have now - I did not say that I saw Goodfellow go into the house while another boy held the door open, and when Goodfellow brought out the till, we divided the money; I said, they told me so; I did not say I was present, and they told me they divided the money as fairly as they could, by handfulls - I did not tell Mr. Johnson they were going to rob him, for fear they should give me a good hiding; I did not say any thing about it till I was in custody; I then told directly - I had no part of the money, and did not know where it was.

Q. Now, did you not tell an officer that you had buried 12s. of this money in a garden? A. I did not; I said Bentote went into our garden, and I told the officer I thought he had buried some money there - I happened to tell the exact place where the money was; I do not know how much was found, nor whether it was copper or silver.

JOHN CONNOR . I am a weaver, and am almost fifteen years of age. On the Sunday in question I went out to take a walk, and as I was coming home the three prisoners and Prince called me; it was then ten minutes or a quarter-past six o'clock; they called to me, and said," Jack Connor , will you come with us?" and I thought they said crack a crib, but I cannot be certain - I went home.

ROBERT McGOVERN . I am a Police-officer. On the evening of Sunday, the 26th of February, I was on duty in Brick-lane, at a quarter-past six o'clock - my attention was attracted by three boys standing by a window -I can swear one of them was Saint; he had some copper money in his hand, and was trying to reckon it by the light of the window; I went up, and questioned him how he came by it; the other two ran away - Saint turned round, threw the money into my hands, and ran away; I overtook him, and asked how he got it; he said he got it from boys who he believed had thieved it - I asked if he knew the boys; he said Yes - I took him to the station-house; as we were going there, he told me the boys had more money, and some silver also; he told me the names of Prince, Goodfellow, and Bentote - when they were taken to the station, he charged them as being the boys; I found in Saint's pocket 1ls. 6d., in silver; there was one half-crown, with shillings, and sixpences; the other two prisoners were brought in about eleven o'clock, but nothing was found on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Then Saint gave you the name of Prince? A. Yes, he said he was one of the boys who gave him the money - I was present when the till was found.

WILLIAM CLAY . I am a Police-officer. I heard Prince say that the till was thrown into a valley; I went there, but could not find it - I went back to him, and then he said it was thrown over some palings; I went there, and found it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Prince tell you where the money was shared? A. No, Saint said that Prince was sharing the money in the valley.

MICHAEL DAY . I am a Police-officer. On the 26th of February, I was on duty in Selby-street, Waterloo-town, and a brother officer said there had been a till stolen; I found it was at Mr. Johnson's; I apprehended Goodfellow about eleven o'clock that night, and on our way to the station, he asked if I could tell him what their punishment would be - I said I could not; he said,"I dare say we shall get three months of it."

JOHN LAWRENCE MACDONNELL . I am an inspector of Police. Saint was brought to the station, and 16s. 2 1/2d. was found on him in copper and silver; he said the money had been divided among a certain number of boys who had committed a robbery.

JOHN CRAWLEY . I am pot-boy to Mr. Johnson. On Sunday, the 3rd of March, as I was getting in my pots, I saw Bentote at the back of my master's house; I asked how he thought he should get on - he said he did not know yet; I asked him if he had any of the money; he said he had but 1s. 6d. in silver, and some copper - he said the money was shared by handsfull; he said that Saint held the door, and Goodfellow went in and took the till, and they ran down in the hollow, emptied it into Goodfellow's cap, and he put it under his arm - they ran off where they thought no one could see them - I told him I thought they would get a severe flogging; he said he did not think that - he thought the case was not large enough, unless it went to Newgate, and he did not care about two or three month's imprisonment, so long as he did not get a teazing.

Cross-examined. Q. You seem to have a very perfect recollection of it, how often have you told this? A. Two or three times; I do not recollect any thing being said about Prince peeping through the window, or his name being mentioned.

TIMOTHY COLEMAND JOHNSON. This is my father's till, and I can identify some of the money.

SAINT - GUILTY . - Aged 14.

GOODFELLOW - GUILTY . Aged 14.

BENTOTE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-182

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

985. JOHN JONES , FELIX GOODFELLOW , and GEORGE BLOOMFIELD , were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 mahogany knife-case, value 8s. , the goods of Frederick Evans .

FREDERICK EVANS . I am a furniture-broker , and live in Bedford-street, Red Lion-square . On the 6th of March I had a mahogany knife-case, for sale, in my shop; I missed it in the evening - this is it.

EDWIN NOTT . (Police-constable F 21.) On the evening of the 6th of March I saw all the prisoners in Drury-lane; Jones had this knife-case under his arm, and a green apron covered over it; he went into a pawnbroker's shop, at the corner of Blackmore-street, and told the other two

to wait outside - they were talking together, and then Jones went in; the other two waited outside - I went into the shop; Jones had put it on the counter, and offered it to pawn; I asked him who brought it - he said he had, to pawn it for his master, who lived at No. 14, New Church-court, Strand; I asked if he had any odjection to come with me to his master - he said, "Oh, no, not the least;" when we came out, he said it was all nonsense, it was not his master's, but that he and his companions had bought it of a young man named Robert Jones, who lived in Golding-buildings, and was a cabinet-maker - the other two prisoners were close behind at the time; I took them all to the watch-house - they then said the same as Jones, that they purchased it the night before for 2s.; Mr. Thomas asked them if that was the truth, and they both said Yes.

Jones. Q. I did not say it was my master's, I said it was my own. Witness. He said it was his master's, and the pawnbroker said, "I think you will find it correct, officer, for he has often been here to pawn for his master."

Jones. Q. I said the young man lived in Baldwin's-gardens, not Golding-buildings, but we bought it of him in Lincoln's Inn-fields. Witness. He said Golding-buildings.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. Did you hear Jones tell them to wait outside the shop? A. I did not; they were talking together - he told them to wait, and he would see how much he could get for it; when I asked them if what Jones stated was the truth, they both agreed to it - I asked the question before Mr. Thomas came into the room, and when he came, I told him the charge; he asked them if it was bought of Robert Jones , and they both said it was true - I had asked them to discover who the property belonged to, and Jones told me that he and his companions had purchased it for 2s. the night before; when I saw them it was between five and six o'clock - it was not exactly dark; when I had brought Jones out, the other two walked behind us - I had my Police dress on; they must have known I was an officer, but I had directed two other officers to watch them - they were about two yards behind us.

MR. EVANS. This is my knife-case; I missed it about five o'clock in the evening - my premises are about ten minutes' walk from Drury-lane.

Cross-examined. Q. When had you last seen it? A. Perhaps about three o'clock.

Jones. There was a man followed us down Drury-lane, from Holborn, and he fetched the officer from the Strand, and that man said at the station-house, that he walked by our side; he came into the pawnbroker's and told the officer, "That is the boy, and those are the other two."

EDWIN NOTT . No, I was not fetched by any man; a man came to the station, and asked if the property was stolen; I said I did not know - he said he thought he had seen the prisoners before; that man stood at the door of the pawnbroker's - he did not go in.

Bloomfield's Defence. The officer was fetched out of the Strand by that man.

Goodfellow's Defence. He stated at Bow-street, that he had received information from a man who saw us in Holborn. JONES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

GOODFELLOW - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

BLOOMFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-183

OLD COURT. TUESDAY, APRIL 10.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

986. DAVID ANKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 1 half-crown and 1 sixpence , the monies of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN. I am a labourer , and live at Tottenham . On the 27th of February the prisoner slept in the same bed with me; I got up before him and missed this money from my pocket, which was safe over night; I told him nobody could have got into the room to take it besides him - I had gone to bed first, and put my trousers under the pillow and found them laying just at the top of the pillow; he said he knew nothing about it - he got up and went out, leaving me looking for the money; he was taken on Saturday; I have known him nine years - it was his father's house, and there was nobody in it but his mother; I am sure the money was in my pocket when I went to bed- I was sober.

Prisoner's Defence. We were both drinking together, and went to bed drunk.

WILLIAM BROWN. I was not drunk.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320405-184

987. WILLIAM DANCE was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , 8 printed books, value 20s., the goods of John Richardson , his master .

DANIEL CHAPMAN . I am a Policeman. I stopped the prisoner in Panton-street, Haymarket, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, with a bundle, and asked what he had there; he said waste-paper - I searched, and found it was these two bound books; one has Mr. Richardson's lable on it.

JOHN RICHARDSON. I keep a bookseller's shop in Berkeley-square - the prisoner was in my service for about two months. These are my books, and are worth 20s.; I did not authorize him to take them.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them merely for wastepaper.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320405-185

988. GEORGE WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 counter, value 10s., and 1 sideboard, value 1s. , the goods of William Morton .

ISABELLA MORTON . I am the wife of William Morton ; we live in Anthony-street, St. George in the East . The prisoner hired a shop and parlour of us at 4s. 6d. a week, and was to have the use of the fixtures; he was there ten weeks and did not pay the rent regularly; I went there on the 26th of March, and missed the counter and sideboard - he was at home; I fetched an officer, and then he was gone - he returned about half-past eleven o'clock at night, and was taken.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not agree to buy the counter and sideboard, and pay 2s. on account? A. I never agreed to sell him any thing.

JOHN DUNBAR . I keep a broker's shop, in Charles-street. St. George's. On the 26th of March I bought the counter and a bedstead of the prisoner; I went to his shop for it - it was not fixed.

WILLIAM MORTON . The house is mine, and all the fixtures I did not sell the prisoner any thing; I was not present when he took the place.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not seize my goods, and among them a stove, which was a fixture? A. He sent me notice twice to come and seize the goods; I seized chairs and different things - they were regularly sold by a broker, and paid the rent.

Prisoner's Defence. When I took the shop they said I could have the use of the counter, or pay for it if I thought proper, with a stove, which was there - I paid them 11s. 6d. rent and 2s. on account of the counter and stove - in about five weeks I could not keep up my payments, and they seized my goods; a squabble ensued, and we went to the office - the nephew was ordered out of the office for perjuring himself; I was discharged, and they have trumped up this story to prevent my proceeding against them for an illegal seizure; I sold the counter, because they should not seize that as well as the stove, which I had bought of them.

ANN LOCKWOOD . I went with the prisoner when he took the shop and parlour - he asked the landlady if she wished to sell the counter and stove - she said Yes - they were to give 4s. 6d. for them; the prisoner's wife paid 1s. deposit on them.

HANNAH ALLEN . I am the prisoner's niece. I called there on the 20th of March, and found the broker had seized the stove for rent, and pulled it down.

ISABELLA MORTON . The stove was a fixture - I did not seize it; I told the broker to take it away, as they should not have it if they would not pay the rent.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-186

Before Mr. Recorder.

989. GEORGE ROBSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 4 table cloths, value 35s.: 1 pair of stockings, value 6s.; and 1 pillow-case, value 1s., the goods of Mary Hog and Ida Johanna Hog , his mistresses .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

MISS MARY HOG . In 1830 I lived in Highbury-place, Islington - my sister, Ida Johanna Hog, lived with me at that time, and for the benefit of her health we went to Cheltenham; the articles we left at the house were our joint property - I engaged the prisoner and his wife to take the house entirely under their charge during my absence; they were to have 5s. a week, with coals and other necessaries which they required - we left on the 31st of August, 1830, and returned on the 18th of January, 1832; the prisoner told me, when I engaged him, that he had obtained a superior situation in the New Police, and that one night in six he should be obliged to be absent from the house, and he should not chose to take so responsible a situation without a man being in the house; it was agreed that his brother-in-law should be in the house one night in the week - on my return on the 18th of January, the prisoner was not in the house, but his wife was; the next day, or the day after, on examining, I found almost every one of my boxes and drawers had been forced open; upward of thirty-four locks had been broken - I lost property to the value of about 200l., all my wearing apparel, bed linen, and bed furniture; the house was literally stripped; he was apprehended on the 30th of January; I and my sister were the joint proprietors of the house.

THOMAS HARVEY . I am shopman to Mr. Goodburn, pawnbroker, of High-street, Islington. On the 17th of January, 1832, a damask table cloth was pawned for 15s., in the name of John Holmes , No. 5, Cross-street; the prisoner resembles the man very much, and I believe him to be the man; he corresponds in height and complexion- I have since seen the duplicate I gave him.

GEORGE BARBER . I am servant to Mr. Essex, pawnbroker, of Upper-street, Islington. On the 2nd of December a table cloth was pawned for 6s. 6d., in the name of William Jackson , No. 11, Queen-street; I cannot swear to the prisoner, I never said I could; but to the best of my belief he is the man who pawned it; a pair of black stockings were pawned in the name of John Jackson , No. 12. Queen-street, by the same person, and on the 11th of January two table clothes for 1l. by a different person, in the name of William Roberts, No. 1, Holloway-road.

THOMAS WELLS . I am shopman to Mr. Smith, a pawnbroker, in Lower-street, Islington. On the 9th of June a pillow-case was pawned for 6d., in the name of Charles Fisher; I do not who by.

JAMES CLARK . I am a Policeman. I went to a house in the Strand, where a Mrs. Robson lived; she is no relation to the prisoner; I searched the coal-cellar in that house, and found forty-six duplicates, wrapped in a piece of cloth - they laid right on the top of the coals; there is a grating to the area; I do not think the cellar opens into the street - the duplicates for all these articles are among them.

ELIZABETH ROBSON . I am the wife of Richard William Robson, a carpenter - we live at No. 370, in the Strand. I know the prisoner; he came to my house in March, and brought a small parcel, tied in paper, and told me to take particular care of it, till he either came or sent for it - he did not say what it was.

Q. Recollect, you have been examined before - do you mean to say he did not tell you what the parcel was? A. No, Sir; he did not tell me it was tickets - I kept the parcel by me until two young ladies were sent for it; it might he about the size of the parcel produced (the duplicates) - I never opened it; when the Police-officer came I did not like to deliver them up, without Mr. Robson's leave, and I put them in the coal-cellar.

Q. Where did you put them when the prisoner gave them to you? A. In the coal-cellar; I had workmen in the house, and did not wish them to know where they where - I took the Police-officer into the cellar, and he found the parcel I had received; I saw they were duplicates when he opened it - about a fortnight after I received them from the prisoner, Maria Rossan brought me a note, in the prisoner's hand-writing; this might be about a fortnight before the officer came - I had them three weeks or a month; I do not know what I have done with the note - I have destroyed it; the note directed me to deliver the parcel to Rossan, which I did, and three or four days after I received it again; I believe it was the same - it was delivered to me at the door, in a bit of brown paper - there was a cloth about it at first, but I did not take particular notice of it then; the Police-officer came three days after that, I believe - I did not tell him they were tickets; he came and asked me for the tickets - I said I would not deliver them up to him, as I did not

know him, but I would go the station, and give them up to Mr. Thomas, the superintendant.

Q. Did you take it to the station? A. No - I delivered it to the Policeman from the cellar; I did not put it into the cellar till after I received it back from Rossan - I cannot say it was the same as I had from the prisoner; it might he in the cellar about a week - nobody had any access to the cellar; it was the only place I had where nobody came -I put it into a box when I first received it, and then into the cellar, as there was no lock on the box - there was a lock to the cellar.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you tell where the parcel came from? A. I cannot - my husband is not here.

JAMES FRANKLIN . I am book-keeper to an ironfounder, and live in Robinson's-row. I have known the prisoner several years - on the morning he was apprehended I went to Bow-street, and saw him; I saw him a day or two after, at the New prison, Clerkenwell - I said I was sorry for his situation, and asked him the charge; he said it was a charge of robbing or plundering a house in Highbury-place - I did not hold out any promise or threat to him; I asked him what had become of the property - he said he believed it was pledged; I then asked if he could get the duplicates - he said he thought they could be got, or that he could get them; I told him he had better let me have them - he said, "Very well;" I was at the office at his next examination - I saw Rossan about a week after, and I had seen her before at the house she resided at, in Upper Stamford-street, Blackfriars - the prisoner requested me to call on her to send him a shawl and a night-cap; I told her poor George was in gaol, and she was astonished - he told me to tell her so; when she was at the office, she delivered me a square parcel, about that size - I think it had a piece of silk over it; it was wrapped in something - I opened it after I left the office, and it contained forty-nine duplicates; I immediately went over to Rossan, to return them to her - I only looked at them casually, and cannot tell any of the pawnbrokers' names; I went to Clerkenwell to the prisoner, the next day, or the day after - I wrote on a scrap of paper, that I had returned Rossan the duplicates, and gave it to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ascertain from the prisoner that a man named Robins occasionally slept in the house when he was absent? A. I think he did say so - I cannot say whether he said it was when he was absent; I do not know that Robins has absconded - the prisoner was on a station at Kingsland for four or five months, in the new Police.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was he dismissed from the Police? A. I believe he was: I had applied to the superintendent for leave of absence for him, and he did not return.

MARIA ROSSAN . I am a silk stock-manufacturer, and have the care of an uninhabited house in Upper Stamford-street; I am a friend of the prisoner's and his wife - Franklin brought me a message that the prisoner wanted a shawl, a cap, and a few things, which I had in my care: it was a ladies' shawl and cap - I sent them to him by a person; I did not know he was in custody till then - I went to the New prison two or three days after, and received a note from the prisoner, directed to Mrs. Robson, No. 370, Strand- he told me to take it to Mrs. Robson; I gave her the note, and she gave me a parcel, which I gave to Franklin; I did not see him open it - I gave it to him in the street the same evening.

Q. Did you see the parcel? A. I saw it on the table -Franklin had it open; I was at the other end of the room: I cannot say what it contained, for I did not look at it - it was like small cards; I cannot say whether they were like duplicates - I did not look at them; I saw Franklin tie it up; he then returned it to me - I cannot tell what they were: I saw they were small cards when he opened them, but not when he tied them up; I put them into a cupboard - a man afterwards came to me for them, and I delivered them to him; I am certain I delivered him the same parcel, in consequence of his telling me who he came from.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know that the prisoner had a brother named Robins? A. No; I know a man of that name - he was an inmate of the prosecutrix's house: he has absconded since this charge; he was very near the prisoner's height, and of the same complexion - one might easily be mistaken for the other.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Pray have you been with the prisoner's attorney this morning? A. No - yes, I have been with him this morning.

COURT. Q. How do you know Robins has absconded? did you know where he lived? A. No - he has left Miss Hog's house; I have been at Miss Hog's while the prisoner and his wife were there; I understand from the prisoner that Robins has absconded.

MRS. GIRTON. I am married, and live in Hornsey-road- I am an acquaintance of Miss Hog's. I have seen Robins, but do not think I should know him; I was in the habit of going to Miss Hog's house very frequently during her absence: after the prisoner was discharged from the New Police, he had another situation at the Milbank Penitentiary - he came to live at Miss Hog's house for good about July, and after that I never saw Robins there: I saw the prisoner at the house on the 17th of January, the day before Miss Hog returned - I had been there all day; he went out between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and I waited till twelve o'clock, as I was astonished at his leaving; I had told him before he went out that I wanted his assistance - be did not return; I met a Policeman in Highbury-place, and desired him to watch the premises.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you happen to know that the prisoner was looking about for Robins? A. I cannot possibly say that; I went to Miss Hog's house on an average twice a week during her absence.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You told the prisoner you wanted him that evening at the house? A. I did; I had sent him on an errand to the end of Highbury-place, and expected him home in half an hour; his wife was in the house.

THOMAS HARVEY re-examined. The tablecloth was pawned on the 17th of January, about five minutes to eight o'clock, by a man resembling the prisoner; I live about a mile and a half from Highbury.

EDWARD PRICE . I am beadle of Highbury-place. I know the prisoner; I have seen him come out of Miss Hog's house most mornings - he sometimes had a blue bag or a green bag, with books, and sometimes parcels - he very frequently came out with a bag, which appeared to contain something.

Cross-examined. Q. You had no suspicion of him? A. No - I have been looking diligently after Robins, but am not able to find him.

WILLIAM BOYD . I am a Policeman. On the night of the 17th of January I was desired by my serjeant to watch Miss Hog's house, and saw the prisoner come home at two o'clock in the morning.

MRS. GIRTON. Robins left in July, as I understand - I did not see him there after July, and the prisoner told me he was gone; when Miss Hog returned I asked the prisoner when he had seen Robins, and he said not for some months, as he had discharged him finally when he left the Penitentiary.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the 17th Mrs. Girton desired me to go to Mr. Roe, the chemist, to inquire after Miss Hog's late servant; it struck eight o'clock when I came out of Roe's house, and then I went in search of Robins.

EDMUND SWIFT . I am a barrister, and have a situation in the Tower. I have known the prisoner ten or eleven years, and believe him a well conducted man.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is he a relation of yours? A. No- he is connected with me by marriage; he is my brother-in-law, and his family are very respectable; he did not bring any knives and forks, with silver ferrules, to my house, not to my knowledge - I saw some in my house; they were not mine, and I sent them back - I spoke to the prisoner about them; I cannot say whether he had brought them, or that Robins did - I had been abroad, and my own property had not returned from the continent, and I was going to have a party, which was the cause of their being there.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you ever seen Robins? A. Very often - I forbid his coming to my house; I have not seen him since the prisoner has been in custody.

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner say who had brought the knives there? A. It is floating in my recollection that he said either he or Robins brought them; the prisoner was at my house almost every day for a fortnight before he was apprehended - he told me he was constantly looking after Robins.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you give the prisoner 1s. 6d. to get the knives repaired? A. I did not myself: I directed it to be given him to get them cleaned; Mr Girton called on me, and the prisoner called the next day - and I sent to Mr. Girton that he had an opportunity of bringing a Policeman if he thought fit, and next day he went with me to Miss Hog's; the prisoner remained outside the door while we went in, and when we came out he was waiting -Mr. Girton prohibited his going in, on account of Miss Hog's nerves.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18320405-187

First London Jury, before Mr. Common sergeant.

990. SAMUEL TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 60 penny-pieces , the monies of Henry Harben .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the monies of William Sutton .

WILLIAM SUTTON . I am carman to Henry Harben, a cheesemonger , of High-street, Bloomsbury. On Friday afternoon, the 30th of March, I left the prisoner in care of my cart, in Watling-street , while I went into a public-house - I returned in five minutes, and he was gone; I missed from the flap of the cart a parcel, containing 5s. in copper, and gave information to the Policeman when I got home - he had gone with me from my master's door, as a friend.

MAURICE NICHOLAS (Police-constable E 10.) I live in St. Giles'. I received information from Sutton, and apprehended the prisoner on Monday, the 2nd of April; I told him he was accused of stealing a 5s. paper of copper- he said he had taken it; I asked what he had done with it; he said he went to the Adelphi theatre, spent 1s. there, and the rest in oranges and things.

Prisoner's Defence. It is false - I know nothing about it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-188

991. THOMAS ROBINSON was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

JOHN YOUNGER AKERMAN. On the 12th of November I paid the prisoner this cheque for 20l. (looking at it) on account of my father, for Mr. Clemmitt, for transmission to a Mr. Daniels, of Purton - I told him so.

JOHN CLEMMITT . I live at the New inn, Old Bailey , and am an agent for carriers - I had more than one partner at the time in question. On the 12th of November the prisoner was in my employ, as clerk ; it was his duty to receive money on our account; it was the custom for him to enter the cash paid into a book which he had, or to hand the money immediately over to me - if he entered it in the book he would settle with me on the following Saturday; if he received a bill of exchange, or a cheque, he should pay it over immediately - I never received this cheque; he has never accounted to me for 6l. received from Good - if he had accounted to Mr. Bullock, my partner, he would have paid it to me.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am clerk to Dorrien and Co., bankers. On the 17th of November I paid a cheque for 20l. on Mr. Akerman's account: I cannot say this is the very cheque, but it appears to be cancelled by me, which I should not do without paying it.

WILLIAM GOOD . I am in partnership with Messrs. Wyatt, of Holborn-bridge. On the 17th of December, 1831, the prisoner called, and I paid him 6l. on account of Mr. Clemmitt. for carriage.

RICHARD BULLOCK . I am a partner in the firm. The prisoner did not at any time account to me for these sums of 20l. or 6l.; no other partner receives money, nor is there any clerk to whom he would account.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-189

992. HENRY PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 roller, value 1s. , the goods of William Biggerstaff .

ROBERT PERKS . I live with my father, in St. John-street. On the 18th of February I was in the Ram inn yard, Smithfield , and saw the prisoner go into a stable; as he came out he was stopped by Page, who took this roller from his breast.

JOHN PAGE . I am ostler at the Ram. I stopped the

prisoner, and took this roller from him, which belongs to William Biggerstaff.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I am a constable. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-190

993. JAMES PEAT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 counter, value 4l.; 1 iron chest, value 4l., and 1 desk, value 10s. , the goods of Adam Edwards .

ADAM EDWARDS. I am a paper-hanger , and live in Jewin-street. In December last the prisoner called on me in London-wall , where I then lived, as I had a notice up in my shop that it was to let; I agreed with him for the house - the terms of agreement were afterwards reduced to writing; it was part of the bargain that it should be reduced to writing - here is the agreement; it is not stamped; I faithfully reduced to writing the terms we agreed on - the desk was not a fixture; he never called to sign the agreement; he took possession on the 2nd of January - I missed the counter on the 19th; I did not show the prisoner the agreement; I told him it was ready for his signature, and begged him to bring the balance of 4l., he having paid 1l. in part of 5l. for the use of the fixtures, and as security for them - he was to pay 30l. a year for the premises, with three months' notice to quit -I let him the shop and parlour, with the use of the fixtures; I expressly observed to him that he was not to remove the fixtures on any account without my leave, which he was to have in writing - I never gave him leave; on the 17th or 18th of January he was gone, and when I went into the shop I found the iron safe was taken out of the brick-work, and gone, also the counter and a desk, which was not fixed; the counter and safe were worth 8l.; he was to deposit the 5l. in my hands for safety of the fixtures - it was to be deducted from the rent; he said he was going to commence the trade of a cornchandler, and the counter would suit him very well, but he never opened shop; he at first represented himself as a carpenter - his shop was open, but never fitted up; I was to have 5l. as security for the fixtures, and never received but 1l.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-191

994. GEORGE MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 2 coats, value 27s., the goods of Richard Edden , his master .

RICHARD EDDEN. I am a tailor , and live in Newgate-street . The prisoner was a workman in my employ - I delivered him a blue coat and black waistcoat to take to a customer, and two olive coats. which had been repaired the early part of March, to take to a customer; he left me four or five days after - he was apprehended, in about a fortnight or three weeks, and I asked him what had become of the things; he said he had delivered them safe to the person they belonged to - I left him with my clerk and the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not surrender? A. No, my clerk brought him to my house - he wrote to him to call on him, and when he went, he was detained.

HENRY NIBLETT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Farringdon-street. I have a blue coat and black waistcoat, pawned by the prisoner the beginning of March - I am certain of his person; I have also a great coat, which I do not know who pawned.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did he pawn it? A. In the evening - I made him further advances on them on the 13th; in all 2l.

EDWARD FULLER . I am a pawnbroker. I produce an olive coat, which was pawned in the name of John Williams ; I knew the prisoner by that name, but cannot say whether he pawned it.

JOHN RICHMOND . I apprehended the prisoner - he told me the things were delivered to the parties; he afterwards said he had better tell the truth at once, and he told me where they were pawned - the duplicates were given me by a person.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say it would be better for him? A. I did not.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Sussex, and wrote to Mr. Edden; when I returned he called at my lodgings, and left word that he particularly wished to see me; I went, and breakfasted with his clerk, and went with him to Mr. Edden.

MR. EDDEN. He lived nearly five months with me; he is married, and has three childron.

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Three Month (.

Reference Number: t18320405-192

995. THOMAS SIDEBOTTOM was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 21st of March , of an evildisposed person, 25 printed books, value 4l., the goods of John Shaw , well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN SHAW. I live in London-wall . I had a quantity of books left in my care by Andrew Bogle ; they were in book-cases, and part of my own books were in boxes - I discovered that my book-cases had been broken open, and some books taken, also some account-books - there is a trap-door between my premises and those occupied by the prisoner; a person could get in that way, and take them - there was a complete tract from the prisoner's bed-room to the roof of my premises; he might he there all day on Sundays without my knowledge; I found some of the books at Mr. Bay's; and on the 21st of March, in consequence of an arrangement with Bay's, I found the prisoner's brother at his shop; with some books - I never saw the prisoner in possession of any.

HENRY FORSTER . I apprehended Robert Sidebottom. I heard the prisoner say voluntarily at the watch-house, that he had given the books to his brother, and had received them from a person he had been removing goods for at the other end of the town.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-193

996. BENJAMIN SIDEBOTTOM was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 5th of March , 10 printed bound books, value 5s., and 8 account-books, value 5s., the goods of John Shaw , well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN SHAW . I lost ten printed books, and eight account-books; I found them on Tuesday, the 20th, in a box in the room, No. 9, Draper's-buildings , which is the prisoner's house - he was in custody, and gave the officer the key of the box; I had missed the books on the 19th

- the house is about twenty yards from my premises; the trap-door behind my premises and Thomas Sidebottom 's, is large enough for the prisoner to get through - when I went to the prisoner's premises. I found him sitting at the fire, burning the covers of books; we took him into custody, then went with the key he produced, and found the books.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. He could not be burning the covers of these ten books? A. No - he gave up the key without hesitation.

HENRY FORSTER . I am a marshalman. I went to the prisoner's lodging, and found him sitting at the fire, boiling his kettle with the backs of books; I took him to the watch-house - another officer went back with the key; here is part of the burnt covers.

WILLIAM RUDGE . I unlocked the box with the key which the prisoner gave me, and found these books in it.

FREDERICK SHAW . I am the prosecutor's son, and know some of these books - I found traces between the two trap-doors, as if persons had passed to and fro; I found a phosphorus-box, and a portion of one of my father's books, on the tiles - here is a riding-belt belonging to me, which was found in the box with the books; the prisoner's house is not on the same side of the way as my father's premises.

The prosecutor and his son here pointed out several particulars, by which they identified the books.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the books till they were at the Mansion-house, I solemnly declare; as to the covers being burned I never touched them - they were in the fire when I came into the room.

WILLIAM RUDGE . I received the key from the prosecutor - he said that was the key of the box, and that it was his box; I saw him deliver the key over - there were some other books in it, which Shaw could not swear to.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-194

NEW COURT. TUESDAY, APRIL 10.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

997. ROBERT THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April , 10 printed books, value 20s., the goods of Nathaniel Smith Machin and others .

WILLIAM WALL . I am in the employ of Mr. Machin and others. On the afternoon of the 3rd of April I was in their sale-room, and saw the prisoner take these books up, place them before him, and walk away - they were tied together; he had got about eleven or twelve yards when I stopped him, and delivered him to an officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there not to be a sale of books the next day? A. Yes - there were a great many persons in the room; it is the custom to inspect the books the day before; the prisoner had not gone out of the room - there were several tables between the place he took the books from and the door; I had seen him before - I do not know whether he has bid at the sales; there is a reward of 10l. to be paid to any one who detects a felony in the room - if the prisoner is convicted I expect to get that.

COURT. Q. Was there an opportunity for the prisoner to look at them where they were? A. Yes, but he had removed them about twelve yards - he was perhaps eight yards from the door; they had been on the floor, but there was a table against where they were, and he might have looked at them there; he had them in front of him.

NATHANIEL SMITH MACHIN. I know the place where these books were; there is a table and two shelves - it is the rule for persons to take them from the floor, lay them on the shelf, and examine them.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not the custom there for people to put shoes on their feet, and clothes on their backs? A. Yes, on the spot, but if they were to walk down the room with them they would be stopped.

GEORGE RICHARDSON . I am a porter. I was in the sale-room, and saw the prisoner walking away with them- as he was passing near me I asked if he wanted a porter; he said No; he would carry them himself, and when he had passed me he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he carrying them openly? A. They were partly concealed by his great coat - if any one had looked at him they might have seen part of the books; he had passed the sale table - there were other tables in the room.

JOHN SMITH . (Police-constable N 153.) I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the room while a sale was going on; I had a catalogue of the next day's sale - there was a lot of books in the catalogne, and the top of the table was covered with books; I took these books up, went to another table, and just as I got to the table I was charged with the robbery - I said I only wanted to examine the plates of this Gil Blas ; so far from wishing to rob the prosecutor, I myself gave him information in December last of a man whom I detected with property in his pocket, and Mr. Machin attended with me two days, but the man was discharged.

MR. MACHIN. I have not the least recollection of the prisoner's person, but I believe he is the man who did detect a thief, but he then went in another name.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-195

998. JAMES TOBY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 3 brass wheel caps, value 15s. , the goods of George Bryant Richardson .

WILLIAM MILLOE . I am in the service of George Bryant Richardson - he is a coachmaker , and lives in Smith's-buildings, City-road . On the afternoon of the 26th of March I was in his cellar - I saw the prisoner enter the shop, open a box which was there, and take out three brass wheel caps.

GEORGE BALDERY (Police-constable N 81.) I received the prisoner and these brass caps on the 26th of March, between three and four o'clock; he begged to be let go.

DAVID WRIGHT . I am in the prosecutor's employ. I saw the prisoner in the loft of the shop - I charged him with taking these caps; he gave me one of them from his pocket, and the other two were taken from some shavings.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know him? A. Yes; he worked there ten years ago, and was a hard-working man, but I have not seen him for some years

- he came after employ, but I said I thought it was not likely he would get any.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320405-196

999. WILLIAM FRY was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH DENNING . I live in Lucas-street, Commercial-road. In November, 1829, I had occasion to employ Mr. James Harmer as an attorney - I was afterwards arrested, and put into Whitecross-street prison; the prisoner came to me there - I think I saw him twice there, in the capacity of clerk to Mr. Harmer; he received my instructions and transacted my business - I was detained at the suit of Mr. Morton; it was arranged that a sum of money should be paid to release me from confinement; I desired my brother to pay the prisoner 40l. to obtain my discharge, but it was not paid in my presence.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was Mr. Witherby the attorney for your creditor? A. Yes - the 40l. was paid to the prisoner to endeavour to effect a compromise; I was arrested for more than that, and the prisoner was to make the best arrangement he could with Mr. Witherby; I remember an interview with the prisoner and Mr. Witherby at Whitecross-street prison in January - the prisoner did not then urge Mr. Witherby to accept the 40l. as a compromise; he certainly appeared to me to be doing what he could to serve me - I did not see Mr. Harmer after that, but I sent frequently to his office to say that I was detained; I supposed that Mr. Harmer was fully aware I had paid the 40l. to the prisoner, but I never mentioned it to them; my business was never settled.

MR. BODKIN. Q. When was the money paid? A. The latter end of December; I applied about my discharge in about a fortnight, but I did not send to Mr. Harmer's office till after the term.

COURT. Q. When you told the prisoner he was to receive 40l. of your brother, what did he say? A. If Mr. Witherby would not come to terms the money was to be returned - Mr. Witherby has never come to terms; I understood I was to look to Mr. Harmer for the money; the prisoner did not say so, but he said I should have the money again.

ANTHONY MARTIN . I live in Ratcliff-highway, and am Denning's brother-in-law. I received an order from her in 1829 to pay the prisoner this money; the prisoner came to me - he asked if my name was not Martin, and said he had made an arrangement with my sister, that I was to give him 40l., and I gave it him at the Grapes, in Whitecross-street , to settle this business.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you recollect what passed? A. He told me I was to give him 40l. on account of Mr. Harmer, to settle my sister's business, I am sure he said on account of Mr. Harmer.

JOHN WITHERBY . I was attorney for the plaintiff in the action against Miss Denning; I never received any money from the prisoner to settle it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any interviews with him on the subject? A. I had several; he endeavoured to effect a settlement - he said Mr. Harmer's business was of that nature, as to preclude him from entering into such low matters as Miss Denning's, and the whole matter was in his hands; he then said he would draw a cheque for 100l. to settle the business - I advised the plaintiff to take the 100l., and so get clear of the business, but it was refused; I think the prisoner offered to pay 40l. more than once, but the matter was so scandalous, I would not allow any compromise to be made - I always refused to take it; I thought it was all illusory - I forget whether he told me that he had received 40l. from Miss Denning's brother; he never produced a cheque to me - he invited me to attend at Whitecross-street, which I did, and, in Miss Denning's presence, he said he would draw a cheque if I would give her a discharge, and he subsequently offered 40l. at my office.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did he say where the money was? A. Yes, I asked where it was, and he said, "At Mr. Harmer's."

Prisoner. Q. Did you not repeatedly call at Mr. Harmer's, and address a letter to me on this subject? Witness. I cannot deny that I called, but you made no reference to the 40l. then.

COURT. Q. Did you communicate with the prisoner at Mr. Harmer's? A. Yes, I called, and I fancy the subject was talked of; there was not any concealment - it was my clients who refused the terms. I saw no reluctance on the part of the prisoner.

THOMAS BEADLE TUCKER . I live in Broad-street. In 1829, I employed Mr. Harmer, as my attorney, about some family property, which was disputed; the prisoner attended to that as Mr. Harmer's clerk - on the 18th of January, 1830, it was arranged that some stock should be sold out, and I attended at the Bank, with the prisoner; here is the receipt of the stock that was sold that day - it was 163l.; here is a deduction of 10l. on the back of it, made by Mr. Scholey, the executor, and 20l. the prisoner deducted for Mr. Harmer; this is the bill the prisoner delivered to me, it amounts to 20l. 0s. 8d. - he told me he kept the 20l. to pay that bill.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the 20l. paid to him? A. No, I saw him pay the money to the executor; Mr. Scholey expected a present - this is the prisoner's writing on the back of the receipt; I cannot tell who wrote the bill of costs, but the prisoner gave it to me - I went to Mr. Harmer's office, and stated to the prisoner, in the presence of the other clerks, that I was going to apply at the Bank to sell out the stock; I did not notice the attendances, which are set down in the bill of costs, at the time it was given to me - I only looked at the amount; the prisoner deducted it, and gave me the balance.

GEORGE ROBINSON . I am a clerk to Mr. Harmer. I went with the officer to the prisoner's lodgings in February, 1830; I think the prisoner had quitted the office about three weeks before - I had, in that interval, been endeavouring to find him; I found a paper in a tea-caddy, or a small box - it is an account at the back of a letter, which is the prisoner's writing; the account, I think, is his brother's writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prisoner quit the service himself? A. To the best of my belief he did; Mr. Harmer gave him notice to go, but he did not wait till the end of the time - Mr. Harmer's business is very extensive; if I wanted money to settle any expences I should go to Mr. Harmer for it, but if he had a client he did not know, he would say, "You had better ask the clients for it;" the accounts are settled every week, but sometimes

they are not, as we are at assizes, or on examination - if I received money from any client it would appear in the book when my cash account went in; our rule is to give the accounts in every week, and I think I can swear that not more than a fortnight has ever elapsed without their going in - I do not think that business has gone on for clients of whom Mr. Harmer knows nothing; if any one applied to me I should mention it - there is a bill-book in the office; I never keep drafts of bills, and enter them in the book a long time afterwards - I should say that it has never happened that the clerks have received sums of money above 20l. of clients of whom Mr. Harmer knows nothing; I never heard of any mortgage being taken by Mr. Harmer - it is not the custom for clerks to attend to clients, and not let Mr. Harmer know it.

COURT. Q. Are the clerks allowed to retain any money for occasional disbursements, and to bring it to account afterwards? A. No my Lord; if I received 20l. I should take it to Mr. Harmer, and if I wanted any money I should tell him, and he would give it me.

Prisoner. You know where I resided. Witness. Yes- I went to your lodging two or three days after you left the office, and found a number of vans; you had taken a van to go to Surrey, and then to come to Islington - I did not know there were any civil proceedings against you.

MR. JAMES HARMER. I am an attorney. The prisoner was in my service about two years; he quitted me, I think, the first week in February, 1830 - I think he states two weeks in February in his account, but I believe he charged one week more than he attended; his duty was if he received a small sum of money from a client to enter it in the petty cash-book, but if he received a larger sum he was to pay it to Mr. Tomlin, or to me; he certainly never accounted to me for 40l. received from Miss Denning - I did not know that any sum had been received by him till some time afterwards, when I heard it from her brother; he never accounted to me for 20l. received from Mr. Tucker - I did not know it had been received till some time after he was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. Has it ever been required of him to give an account of this 40l. or 20l.? A. No, Sir, but when I had reason to suspect him I told him he must make up all his accounts, which he never did - if I had received from him this account found at his house, in which the 20l. appears, and the 40l. had been added to it, I should not have been satisfied, because his duty was to make it known to the cash-clerk that he had received it; I do not look over the accounts of the clerks - I do not recollect that it has ever happened that clerks have received money on account of clients, and have not rendered an account of it, because they had applied it to the purposes of the clients; if they had received a large sum and had a large sum to pay, I should not have complained of it if they had entered it and communicated it to the cash-clerk - if he had not returned an account of the 40l. for two or three days I should not have complained, if there had been any prospect of the matter being settled, but if he rendered an account it should have appeared in it; I never knew of the clerks having received a large sum of which they have not given an account at the time.

Q. Do you remember a sum of money having been advanced by a clerk to Smallwood, which ended in a mortgage? A. I remember the prisoner applied on behalf of a person named Smallwood, a man in poverty, and I authorized some advances of 2l., to the amount I think of 30l. - I have no recollection of being made acquainted with an intention to sell the stock on this occasion; but finding it was a Chancery business, I introduced Mr. Tucker to Fry, and said, "Attend to this gentleman's business."

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner ever communicate to you that he had furnished a bill, and received the money? A. No, my Lord.

Cross-examined. Q. But if he had done so, you would not have complained? A. Yes, I should if he had not entered it; I do not see the bill-book once in six months- I should say it does not often happen that bills do not make their appearance in the bill-book; I know there have been two or three cases in which I have had occasion to look for very large bills in my bill-book, and I have found that a great part of them have not appeared in the book, for which I have given a lecture to my clerks.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Supposing the prisoner, on the 22nd of December, to have received 40l., and he made up his account on the 11th of January, ought it to have appeared? A. Certainly.

Prisoner. Q. Do you mean, Sir, to state, that the first payments I made to Mr. Smallwood were not made without your authority or direction? A. I will not swear that, but I never authorized any clerk of mine to lend money to a client without consulting me - I recollect your stating that the client was in distress, though he had a good and equitable claim - I do not recollect your furnishing me with an account of the receipts and payments in that action; I think you have handed me money received from clients, and I have handed it to Mr. Tomlin - there is another collecting-clerk in the house. Mr. Mills; the book will tell whether he was so in December, 1830; he had no authority to receive money in the office, but to collect from clients - he certainly has never received directions from me to require the clerks to pay to him monies which they received from clients - I cannot tell whether, when you have rendered accounts, the balances have been in your favour; I had been urging for some time before you left, that you should make up your accounts.

JAMES THOMAS TOMLIN . I am cash-clerk to Mr. Harmer, and was so in 1829 and 1830; it was the rule for the clerks to account to me - the prisoner did so, but he never accounted for 40l. received from Miss Denning; I did not know he had received it till about ten days after he left the office, when I heard it, in Mr. Harmer's private office; Mr. Martin was there at the time. The prisoner never accounted for 20l. received from Mr. Tucker - I heard of that about the same time; I have looked into the bill-book, and there is no such bill as this of Mr. Tucker's, entered there; the prisoner accounted to me on the 31st of January, 1830, in the usual way - here is the book; he gave an account of four items, but the 40l. and 20l. are not brought to account in that, or in any previous settlement - the last time he settled before was on the 12th of December; I had been urging him for his account in the interval.

COURT. Q. Was there a balance due to him in the

last account? A. Yes, 7l. 0s. 6d. on the account he has rendered.

Cross-examined. Q. Then this was longer than a week after he made his former account? A. Yes, it was six weeks - the accounts do sometimes go longer than a week- I should not have allowed clerks to say, "I have received a sum of money, but I have not settled the business yet;" I do not remember that any monies have never been received by the clerks from clients, which have never been entered in the book; I do not remember a sum of 80l. being received from Mr. Morris - I have heard there was a sum of money received on account of Mr. Harmer, in the case of Whitaker; I heard of 20l. which was accounted for to me, but not 520l. - I understood that had been paid to Mr. Whitaker; I never understood that the prisoner received it - I do not know that the prisoner received 80l. on account of Mr. Morris; it may be in the book - the sums on this receipt (looking at one) I know Mr. Harmer gave a cheque for, himself - they were probably both given to the prisoner to pay them; the prisoner had the management of the Chancery business, but it does not follow that if any money was paid he would receive it; it might have been handed to the clients at the time - there have been balances in the prisoner's favour, and on one occasion there was a large balance, but I think never so high as 40l.

Prisoner. Q. Do you produce that book as containing an exact copy of my accounts rendered from time to time to you? A. Precisely so - it contains the whole of the payments you have made to Mr. Harmer; there were balances in your favour - the sums stated in your last account were received in December; I cannot state what disbursements you have made since the receipt of the 40l. - it has been the case that bills have not been entered in the billbook.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am an officer. A warrant was placed in my hands on the 23rd of February, 1830 - I went with it in search of the prisoner - we were up three or four nights, seeking for him; I was at his house when this paper was found over the water, in Surrey - I saw his wife, but I saw nothing of him till I found him at Liverpool, on the 3rd of March last: I took him, and told him the charge against him - I made him no promise or threat; he stated that he was given to understand that the case against him was 300l., and he was sure it was not so much as 100l., or not more than 100l.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know that he had a writ against his person and his goods? A. No, Sir; he did not say that Mr. Harmer charged him with being in his debt 300l.

Prisoner. Q. When you went to my lodging in John-street, did you not hear that I had gone out within an hour? A. I do not recollect that - Mr. Robinson was in the house first; I do not recollect hearing that you were shortly to return - your wife did not tell me where you were.

The prisoner, in an exceedingly long address, stated that the accounts of the office were kept in a very irregular manner; that he was in the habbit of receiving money from clients, and only brought to account the costs, keeping the sums paid by clients to him, as a floating balance, to meet various disbursements; that the only fault he had committed, was having by mistake applied more to his own purposes than his salary amounted to, which arose from the balances remaining in his hand without any settlement, that he absconded in consequence of pecuniary embarrasment, but if a balance had been struck, the amounts in question would have been included.

GUILTY. Aged 43.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Twelve Months in Newgate .

Reference Number: t18320405-197

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1000. GEORGE DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 233lbs, weight of sarsaparilla, value 10l. , the goods of the West India Dock Company .

Mr. ADOLPHUS declined the prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-198

1001. JAMES SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 trunk, value 12s.; 8 gowns, value 3l. 10s.; 2 shawls, value 2l.; 6 petticoats, value 16s.; 8 pairs of stockings, value 8s.; 3 caps, value 6s.; 2 collars, value 5s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 1 cloak, value 1l.; 1 coat, value 30s.; 1 pair of boots, value 5s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 3s.; 3 sovereigns and 9 shillings , the property of Caroline Prescott .

CAROLINE PRESCOTT . I am servant to Mr. Leary, who is librarian to the House of Lords. I had been to see my friends in Cornwall, and returned by the mail, which arrived at a quarter before eight o'clock in the evening of the 14th of March - I saw the prisoner, whom I had seen about the House of Commons and the House of Lords; he came up to me, and asked if I wanted a porter to carry my box, which Contained the articles stated - I gave it him; it had a direction on it to my master; I went to my brother's at the west end of the town - I returned to my master's at ten o'clock at night; my box was not there - I have not seen it or any of the contents since.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You say it was the prisoner to whom you intrusted it? A. Yes; I saw him again in about a week; he had disguised himself - I said he had not his cap on, but I did not say he was not the man; when I delivered the box to him he had a black waistcoat with sleeves, a plush front, dark trousers, and a seal-skin cap, with a beak to it - it wanted a quarter to eight o'clock when I gave it him; I have known him about twelvemonths holding horses about the House - I did say at first I did not believe him to be the man.

HENRY BROWN . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner on the 23rd of March, near the Golden Cross -I looked at him some time, and thought he answered the prosecutrix's description; I then asked him if he remembered the Cornwall coach stopping on Wednesday week; he said Yes; he then asked me if I wanted a coach or a cab; I said, No, but I should like something to drink; I then asked him if he knew Caroline Prescott; he said No - I took him to where she lived, and asked for her - I said to the prisoner, "You had better walk in doors;" he said, "No, I shan't walk in doors," and he shoved his hat further over his face - the prosecutrix then came, and said, "That is not the man;" I said, "Don't be in a hurry, take a good look at him;" the prisoner then said, "Oh, I will go in doors" - when he got into the front-parlour, I desired him to take off his hat, and

then she said, "Yes, that is the man, but he wore a cap instead of a hat, and it was a dark cap with a leather front" - I took him to the station-house, and went directly to his lodgings, where I found this cap and comforter - the prosecutrix said this was the cap he wore, and he had a comforter round his neck.

Cross-examined. Q. How often did you go before the Magistrate? A. We had three examinations - the Magistrate said there was no case against the prisoner, but we might go before the Grand Jury if we liked; we went, but the Grand Jury at Westminster Court had broken up - the prosecutrix described the prisoner as wearing a black plush waistcoat, with sleeves, a cap with a beak, and black or blue trousers; she did not mention a comforter till this was found.

CAROLINE PRESCOTT. The cap and comforter answer the description of those he wore, but I cannot swear to them - I swear he is the man.

The prisoner's Counsel called -

CATHERINE WILKS . The prisoner lodged eight months with me in Charles-passage, Hungerford-market - he attended at the Golden Cross back gate. I remember that on the 14th of March he had ancle boots on, white stockings, knee breeches. a yellow striped waistcoat, a fustian jacket, and a hat - this cap was found in his box, but I told the officer I never saw him wear it.

COURT. Q. What dress had the prisoner on the 16th? A. I believe the same dress - it was his general dress; he never wore a cap in my house; I cannot tell why he had a cap which he never wore - I have seen him wear it once or twice on a Sunday; I have seen him with the comforter round his neck.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever see him in possession of a black waistcoat? A. Never, Sir, he has not got a black or a blue waistcoat.

SAMUEL KINGSLEY . I live with Mr. Jones, a surgeon, in the Strand - I am a fellow-townsman of the prisoner's. In the afternoon of the 14th of March, I saw him from three to four o'clock; he is a porter at the Golden Cross- he never holds horses at the House of Lords - on the 14th of March he had ancle boots on, white stockings, corderoy knee-breeches, a striped waistcoat, a deep hat, and a fustian jacket - we went to the Coach and Horses, and had a pint of beer; we were together half an hour, or not so much - he had no comforter on that day; I have seen him wear such a cap as this two or three times, on a Sunday, when my sister and I have been at his lodging, but I never saw him at work with it; I had seen him a day or two before, with a black plush waistcoat, with sleeves, but not dark trousers - there has not been ten days since he has been in London, that I have not seen him.

COURT. Q. It does not take a man long to change his dress? A. No - I did not know where he was at seven o'clock that evening; I remember the 14th of March, as it was a very wet day - I was remarking to him about his having his breeches on, and I thought trousers would have been more proper.

JURY. Q. Did you never see him in the week day with a cap on? A. Yes, with an old cap, which is here now, but not the one produced by the officer.

JOHN GOODHAND . I am coach-washer at the Golden Cross - I have known the prisoner for the last seven months; he was employed there every day up to the time he was taken. I saw him on the 14th of March there - he had a hat on, a fustian jacket, and knee-breeches, which was his general working dress; I saw him as late as seven o'clock that evening - I never saw him in a pair of dark trousers in my life.

COURT. Q. Did you ever see him with this cap? A. I did the morning he bought it, but I never saw it on his head; I have seen him with this old cap - I have seen him wear a comforter, but I do not know whether it was this or another.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-199

1002. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 13 live tame rabbits, price 12s. , the property of Daniel Stephen Page .

SARAH PAGE . I am the wife of Daniel Stephen Page; we live in Cross-street, City-road - we keep rabbits . On the 11th of March I fastened them up in hutches, and the next morning I went to feed them, and they were all gone- there had been thirteen of them in our yard, which is surrounded with pales and a wall; I went to several places, and while I was at one place, the prisoner brought in three of them for sale - there was another person with him, who ran away; I said, "These are mine" - the prisoner said he had bought them of a man in the street, and had exchanged a dog for them; he was a stranger to me - I sent for an officer, and gave him into custody; I can swear to these three rabbits.

WILLIAM HARD . I deal in rabbits and all sorts of poultry - I live in Willow-walk. On the 12th of March these rabbits were brought to me, about nine o'clock in the morning, by the prisoner: he asked me to buy them - I offered him 5s. for them: he refused to take it, and went away - in about an hour he returned, and asked if I would give another 1s.; I said No - he then said I should stand a pot of beer, but I refused; the prosecutrix then came in, and claimed them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Church-street, and bought the rabbits of a man who I met - I had a spaniel dog with me; he asked if that was for sale - I said "Yes, for 15s.;" he said if I would take a crown and these three rabbits, I might have them.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320405-200

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr Sergeant Arabin.

1003. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 62 yards of nankeen, value 20s.; 69 yards of jean, value 28s.; 22 yards of satin, value 15s.; 4 lbs. weight of whalebone, value 8s.; 2 pairs of stays, value 20s.: the materials for making 2 pair of stays, value 2s., and 5 busks, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Hobson , his master .

THOMAS HOBSON. I am a stay-maker , and live in Holywell-street, Strand . The prisoner has been in my employ about twenty-three months; I had reason to suspect him on the 15th of March - I let him go out, and then sent one of my men to tell him I wanted to speak with him - I took hold of the flap of his coat, and he took out of his other pocket, on the left side, a piece of satin and some jean, which had my mark on it; I said, "This is not yours" - he said, "No, it is yours, and I do not know how it came here;" we took him to the office, and then went to his

lodgings, where we found a number of other articles, in papers, and some husks, with my initials on them.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Do you know whether the prisoner had been in this way of business? A. I know his father was a stay-maker, and I understand he himself has been a publican, and has failed; he first said the articles he had about him were his own, and he had bought them of a person in Crown-court, but did not know his name; I never knew of his cutting out work for himself in my shop - I would not keep a man in my employ who did so; I have had a person in my employ who has had orders for himself, and he has told me of it, and I have let him have goods - this is the jean - it has the prisoners own mark on it. and he acknowledged it was mine, before he went out of the house; a day or two before he had some stays to cut out, and this was the lining of them - it happened to be seven yards long, and the night before, he wanted a little bit - I gave him this to cut the little bit off, and he did not return it - when I found it, he said it must have come into his pocket by mistake; he said at the station, that he lodged at No. 33, Maiden-lane.

HENRY HALLANDAL . I am in the employ of the prosecutor; he rang me down - I was in the shop when the prisoner returned, and what has been stated took place.

RICHARD MOORE. I am a Police-constable. I produce some stays and other property, which I found at the prisoner's lodging.

MR. HOBSON. Two pairs of these stays are mine; they are my pattern, and no other house has it - but a workman might take a pattern home; this other pair is not mine.

Prisoner's Defence. They are the pattern I did at his shop; I could do the same at home.

WILLIAM WEST . I am shopman to Mr. Sanders, of Walker's-court. Here are bills of jean, and other articles, bought at my master's shop, by the prisoner; they are articles used for stay-making.

COURT. Q. Will you swear that the jean here produced was purchased of you? A. It looks like ours, but I cannot swear to it.

MARY ANN COLGOUHON . My husband is a corn-porter: we live in Charles-street, Drury-lane. I am a stay-maker: I stitched and cottoned two pairs of stays for the prisoner - I did all but boneing, and pressing them; these two pairs are my making, to the best of my belief - the pattern is the same, and as far as I can tell, these are the pairs I did for him; I do not know this other pair.

COURT. Q. Will you swear positively that the work of these two pairs of stays is yours? A. They appear like it as near as I can tell; I put no private mark on them - the last I made was of this pattern; I have been a stay-maker ten years, and have been accustomed to needle-work all my life.

MR. HOBSON. This woman worked for me, and when I found she worked for the prisoner, I discharged her.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18320405-201

1004. ANN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 9 shillings, the monies of Maurice Conner , from his person .

MAURICE CONNER. I am a tailor . On Sunday morning, the 19th of February. I met the prisoner, about six o'clock - I had been out all night, but was not drinking; I was out till half-past twelve, and could not get into my lodgings - I had worked at my master's till about ten o'clock, and then went to a cook-shop to supper; I went out, and walked about - when I met the prisoner she asked for a glass of gin, and I gave it her; we then went to a house in George-street, St. Giles' - I paid her 2s., and was to sleep there the rest of the morning; I do not know exactly what I had left in my pocket then, but I had 15s. 0 1/2d. when I came from the cook-shop- I pulled off my coat and waistcoat, and laid down on the bed; she did not lay down with me - I saw her take my waistcoat, put her hand into the pocket, and take out the money; I saw the money in her hand - I heard it make a noise, and she put it into her bosom; she made an excuse to go down, and wanted to go out, but the woman below came up, and asked if I had been robbed - I then felt my pocket, and my money was gone; I put on my things, went down, and asked the prisoner for it - she abused me; we went out together, and I went to the station-house - when I returned she was gone, and we did not find her for half an hour.

EDMUND DAVIS . I am an officer. The prosecutor gave me information - I went, and took the prisoner; she had a farthing in one hand, and a shilling and sixpence in the other - the prosecutor was sober.

DANIEL MOBBS . I had the prisoner in the cell at the watch-house - she called me, and gave me five shillings, which she told me to take care of till this case was decided.

Prisoner's Defence. This man came to me in a public-house, and asked me to go home with him; he gave me 2s., and then he gave me 8s. more.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320405-202

1005. JAMES HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 tin can, value 3s.; 1 tin measure, value 6d., and 4 quarts of milk, value 1s. 4d. , the goods of Timothy Davis .

TIMOTHY DAVIS. I am a milkman . I left my pail of milk on the step of a door in Brick-lane , on the 19th of February, about eight o'clock in the morning - I returned in about five or ten minutes, and it was gone; there was a tin measure, and four quarts of milk in it.

SAMUEL MILTON . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner at the corner of Club-row the same day, with this can in his possession; I asked where he got it - he said he bought it for 2d.; the prosecutor's wife came by at the time, and said it was hers - there was the measure in it, but no milk.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. What time was this? A. About three o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner was quite drunk.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320405-203

1006. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 19 yards of calico, value 3s. , the goods of William Ashdown .

WILLIAM ASHDOWN . I am a linen-draper , and live in the Commercial-road . On the 23rd of March I received information - I went out, and saw the prisoner forty or fifty yards off - I came up with him, and found in his

apron a quantity of calico, which I had missed from my door.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near the door at all.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320405-204

1007. MARY ANN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 hed, value 30s.; 2 pillows, value 5s.; 2 blankets, value 4s.; 1 sheet, value 2s., and 1 candlestick, value 2s. , the goods of Elizabeth Shoebrook .

ELIZABETH SHOEBROOK. I am a widow , and live in Halford-street, Fitzroy-square - I let a furnished room to the prisoner; she was with me for fourteen weeks. On the 17th of March I went into her room, and missed the bed - I asked what she had done with it; she told me to be qui