Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th February 1832.
Reference Number: 18320216
Reference Number: f18320216-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR JOHN KEY , BART., MAYOR.(SECOND MAYORALTY.)

THIRD SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 16th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1832, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY GEORGE TITTERTON , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE,

1832.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable SIR JOHN KEY , BART., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of, Exchequer; Sir John Bernard Bosanquet , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; John Gurney , Esq., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; John Ansley , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; William Heygate , Esq.; Anthony Brown , Esq.; and Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq.; Recorder of the said City; Charles Farebrother , Esq.; Henry Winchester , Esq.; Samuel Wilson , Esq.; Henry Hughes , Esq., and Sir Chapman Marshall , Knt., Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law, and John Mirehouse , Esq.; His Majesty's justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

James Watson ,

Stephen Bithray ,

George Palmer ,

Robert Holmes ,

Thomas Kennedy ,

William Grub ,

Joseph Stearn ,

James Morrison ,

Joseph Winbolt ,

Alfred Greenland ,

Francis Day ,

John James Medcalf .

Second

John Bailey ,

George Wheeler ,

William Mackie ,

Thomas Oliphant ,

James Perceval ,

Anthony Williams ,

John Mills ,

John Fox ,

John Jackson ,

Wm. George Watson ,

Charles Johns ,

John Hagget .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Richard James Rees ,

David Ray ,

James Rogers ,

George Robinson ,

Thomas Miller ,

Norris Marlow ,

Johathan Alex. Nunn ,

Joseph Norman ,

Thomas Owen ,

Robert Pringle ,

Richard Wm. Perry ,

James Robinson .

Second

John Thomas Neat ,

George Pitt ,

Rob. Henry Parkinson ,

George Poland ,

Thomas Partington ,

John Platt ,

Wm. Turner Newton ,

Thomas Penny ,

Benjamin Newman ,

Richard Nelmes ,

David Owen ,

Edward Pattison .

Third

Archiper Miett ,

George Miller ,

Thomas Randal ,

William Nicholls ,

Charles Noy ,

William Meads .

John Monument ,

Alfred Raystrick ,

Thomas Powell ,

William Overton ,

James Nesbit ,

William Nisbitt .

Fourth

George Mathews ,

Moses Mosely ,

William Mason ,

John Mullins ,

Francis Neale ,

Thomas Marsh ,

James Morris ,

Nathaniel Marsh ,

Samuel Murgatroyd ,

William Nicholls ,

Richard Nash ,

Robert Noyes .

Fifth

David Neave ,

Thomas Nunu ,

John O'Brian ,

James Oldfield ,

William Presley ,

Alexander Paris ,

John Powel ,

Horatio N. Phillips ,

Thomas Perry ,

George W. Ruck ,

George Rudd ,

George Richards .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 16, 1832.

KEY, MAYOR. - THIRD SESSION.

Reference Number: t18320216-1

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

507. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Gillman , on the 12th of February , at St. Pancras, and stealing 1 mustard-pot, value 2l.; 4 table-cloths, value 2l.; 5 napkins, value 10s.; 2 towels, value 1s.; 1 piece of holland, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 12lbs. of tea, value 2l. 14s., and 1 coat, value 5s., the goods of James Gillman , the younger; 1 coat, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 ring, value 5s.; 1 segar-tube, value 1s.; 1 hat, value 5s., and 1 pair of boots, value 1s., the goods of Henry Porter ; 1 waistcoat, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Samuel Taylor Coleridge ; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 2s.; 1 pair of boots, value 3s.; 2 thimbles, value 2s.; 2 shawls, value 2s., and 4 half-crowns, the property of Sarah Russell ; 1 gown, value 2l.; 1 pair of boots, value 3s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s.; 2 thimbles, value 2s., and 1 telescope, value 1s., the goods of Harriet Maclon ; 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 4d., and 3 pairs of scissors, value 3s., the goods of Harriet Beadle ; to which he pleaded

[Feb. 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18320216-2

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley.

508. HENRY STOCKWELL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Braley , on the 14th of January , putting, him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 tin box, value 2d.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, 17 shillings, and 1 sixpence, his property .

ROBERT BRALEY . I am a private of the 91st regiment of Foot Guards . I was paid off at the White Hart, at Chelsea, on Wednesday, and went to take Pickford's boat, to go down to Lancashire; I was on my way to Paddington, and saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, on my way, in a place called Park-lane - I am not acquainted with London, and spoke to him first; I asked him my nearest way to the office, to find the boat to go to Manchester - he said he was not much acquainted with it, but I was in the right way for it; we went into a public-house together, and had a pint of beer between us - I do not know the sign - I staid there about twenty minutes; I came out into the street, with my knapsack on my back - he came out after me, and overtook me about two hundred yards from the public-house; he struck me, and knocked me down; it was between twelve and one o'clock in the day time - I cannot tell in what street we were: there were houses on both sides of it - he came and pretended to help me up again, and while he was helping me up, he put his hand into my pocket, and took out my purse and a tin box from my right-hand trousers pocket; there was a little tobacco in the box, but no money - there was a sovereign and 17s. 6d. in the purse; he ran away - I pursued him: he got into the barracks before I could find him out; I was robbed about a mile from the barracks - I lost sight of him - I went into the barracks after him, and found him in the guard room; McIntyre, the serjeant, searched him, and my little tin box, with 2 1/2d. in it, was shewn to me - the halfpence were not in the box when I lost it; I did not find my purse or money - the prisoner and I had been together about twenty minutes; I knew the tin box by two letters on the lid of it - I cannot exactly say what the letters are, as Conroy, one of my comrades had only given it to me that day; I had often seen it in his possession before that - there was a little tobacco in it when it was lost and when it was found.

Q. How soon after you got to the barracks did you see the prisoner? A. In about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour - I knew him again.

GEORGE McINTYRE . I am serjeant of the Scotch Fusileer Guards. On the 14th of January, a little after one o'clock. I was ordered to search the prisoner's clothes, which hung up in the barracks, in the place appropriated for them, and took this box out of his clothes -the prosecutor was not present, nor was the prisoner; he was intoxicated when I found the box, and I said nothing to him about it; any body could get at his clothes - I did not search his person; I searched his clothes, because he was suspected of a robbery - I did not myself see the prosecutor till five minutes after the search; he knew the box, and swore to it.

ROBERT BRALEY. I know this box by two letters on it, which I had observed several times in my comrade's possession; I was robbed on the Saturday, the 14th of January; I passed the board on Wednesday, and got my money on Thursday; I stopped two days at an acquaintance's in London -I went to the barracks as soon as I could find them out; the prisoner appeared a little in liquor when he was with

me - he struck me with his fist; I do not know the letters on the box, as I am no scholar.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a baker. On the 14th of January, about half-past twelve o'clock, I saw Braley and the prisoner in Park-lane - I did not see them go into any public-house; they were walking together by the side of each other, but not arm-in-arm - I saw the prisoner knock Braley down - they were both a little intoxicated; the prisoner struck him in the neck - he fell down across the road: the prisoner picked him up, and put his hand into his right-hand breeches pocket - I saw him take out a purse; I did not see any thing else - I was about ten yards from them; the prisoner walked on tea or twelve yards, then pulled the purse out of his own pocket, pulled the ring back, and took some silver out of the purse; he put the silver into the purse again, turned back to Braley, and asked him to go down towards Bayswater-road - Braley refused; the prisoner then ran on down Oxford-street - Braley turned quite a contrary way; I went and told him I had seen the prisoner take his purse out, and took him (Braley) to the barracks - we got there nearly half an hour after I had seen them in Park-lane; we saw the prisoner a very few minutes after getting there - I knew him again; I have not a doubt of his person - I had never seen him before.

Q. How near to Oxford-street did the prisoner knock Braley down? A. About two hundred yards; there are not houses on both sides - it was in Park-lane - there is a dead wall on one side; there was a gentleman near: I gave no alarm, as I thought at first that the prisoner was Braley's son, and I knew the prisoner belonged to the Scotch Fusileers at the Portman-street harracks - I did not know him before; Braley was a little in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I was paraded at half-past ten o'clock, and dismissed a little before eleven - I went up stairs at the barracks, and told my comrade to put my belt and fire-lock in the room - I then came down, walked down Oxford-street, from there to Regent-street, and up Regent-street, into Oxford-street again; I went into the Horse Grenadier, Oxford-street, and called for a pint of beer - one of the Coldstream Guards came in, and called for a pint of beer; he offered this box for sale in the room, and asked me to buy it; I gave him 2d. for it - I left him, and went home to my barracks; I put the box into my jacket pocket at the barracks, and hung my jacket up- I then went into the Canteen, to get something to drink - I was ordered into the Guard room; this man came up, and said I was the man - he was then worse for liquor.

[Feb. 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18320216-3

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

509. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Haynes , on the 16th of January , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington , and stealing therein 4 frocks, value 10s.; 3 night-gowns, value 3s.; 3 shifts, value 2s.; 1 pinafore, value 6d.; 1 cap, value 1s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 6d.; 1 pair of socks, value 1s.; 2 pieces of ribbon, value 6d., and 1 pair of shoes, value 1s., his property .

RICHARD HAYNES. I am a butcher , and live in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington - I keep the house. On the 16th of January I left my house between twelve and one o'clock in the day; my wife was out - I left nobody in the house; I shut the door after me; it was fastened by a spring lock - I returned in about twenty minutes; I turned the key, let myself in, and saw the prisoner and another person, one coming out of the parlour, and the other coming up stairs from the kitchen: the prisoner was coming out of the parlour - I asked how he got there, and what his business was - he said the door was open, and he came to see a Mr. Richardson, at No. 8, Bedford-place, (which is the number of my house), who he had been recommended to, as a carpenter, for work; there was no such person living in the street - I am quite sure I fastened the door after me; there is no area gate to my house, nor any steps - the kitchen window, which looks into the area, has not fastening to it; it is a sash window - it was shut down when I went out; I went into the kitchen to see that it was shut before I left; the prisoner and the man jostled together, and tried to pass me in the passage, to get away - I kept the prisoner: I took hold of him, pushed him back several times, and detained him till Haines, a gardener, came up the street; I called for an officer, who came up, and I gave him in charge - I looked round my house, and found some clothes, which were tied up in a bundle, removed from a cradle, in which I had left them, and put on a table in the parlour; I saw them in the cradle when I left the house - the officer, Hart, took charge of the bundle; there were frocks, caps, nightgowns, shifts, shoes, stockings, handkerchiefs, and ribbons in it - I cannot say how they got into the house.

AMELIA BATTON . I live at an empty-house, No. 7, Bedford-place, Kensington, opposite Mr. Haynes'. On the 16th of January I was standing at the window, and saw the prisoner go up the yard in front of the house; it is five or six yards long - the prisoner and another man went up the yard, and went up to the street door; the prisoner got over the iron rail, and got down the area - the other man stood by the door; the prisoner opened the door inside, let him in, and shut the door - I saw Mr. Haynes come home in about eight or ten minutes; the door was still shut - I saw Mr. Haynes unlock it; he went in, and shut it after him, and in about two minutes he opened the door again, and two men came out into the middle of the yard; Haynes took the prisoner by the arm, and led him back again; the other man ran away - Haynes fetched Hart, the constable; he left the gardener with the prisoner.

- I am a Policeman. Hart is obliged to attend the Magistrate at Queen-square this morning, having apprehended four men last night - I know nothing of this business.

RICHARD HAYNES re-examined. I had put the bundle in the cradle myself just before I went out, with several other things; I had not seen the contents of it then - I had seen it about two days before; my wife had made up the bundle, in my presence, and I placed it in the cradle with other things, to put them away, as the sweeps were coming - there were frocks, shoes, socks, ribbons, caps, and nightgowns; they were my property - the bundle was exactly in the same state as when it was made up two days before - it had been in another room before I put it in the cradle.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from the country, and was out of work for seven weeks; I was in a public-house in Tottenham-court-road, drinking - a man said he could give me a job if I called at No. 8, Bedford-place, on Mon

day, and I went; a man opened the door, and told me to come in - he went down stairs, I stood in the passage - the gentleman came and asked what I did there; I said I was waiting for Mr. Richardson.

[Feb. 16.] GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18320216-4

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

510. JOSEPH JACOBS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Bramley , on the 10th of February , at Paddington, and stealing from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 20s., his property .

JOSEPH BRAMLEY. I live at Sandy-acre, Derbyshire, and have the care of a boat , which comes to Paddington with coals. I came there last Thursday week, and afterwards went to an hotel in Covent-garden to see a gentleman who I had bought the coals for; I was to see the gentleman at ten o'clock at night, but it was eleven before I saw him - I then had to go to Paddington again, and lost my way; I enquired the way; I saw the prisoner shortly after I left Covent-garden, and asked him to direct me - he said he knew Paddington very well, he was going that way, and would show me; we had not gone far before he said,"We must have something to drink," and called in at a gin-shop - we went into five or six gin-shops in all; I took a little gin at the two first shops, but not at the others - he drank at all the shops, and I paid for it; he wished me to drink more, very much, but I declined: it was half-past five o'clock in the morning when I got to Paddington .

Q. What was you doing all the time? A. He kept calling at different gin-shops; I kept saying I wished I was there - he said, "Well, we shall soon he there now;" I got him out of the gin-shops as soon as I could, and when I got to the Paddington canal I knew where I was - I was quite sober; I had just taken two small glasses, and eat nothing; when I got to the canal I said, "I know where I am now;" he said, "Well, before you leave, look if your money be right;" I felt rather fearful, and would not look - he asked me several times to take out my money, but I would not; he said, "I should wish you to look at your money, and see if it is right, for if I leave you, and your money should not be right I should feel uneasy;" he said,"Well, what o'clock is it?" I looked at my watch, which was a silver one - I took it out, and it was half-past five o'clock; I told him so - he said he thought I had made a mistake; he wished to look himself - he asked me several times to let him look, and at last I let him lay hold of the watch, and I held fast by the ribbon; he held it up, and said, "I thought you had made a mistake, it is two minutes more;" as soon as he had said those words he gave a snatch with one hand, and hit me over the breast with the other - I stood with my back against the canal, and thought his intention was to knock me into the water; I recovered myself - I did not fall, and he ran away.

Q. Did the blow stagger you at all? A. Yes - he hit me as hard as he could, but I did not fall; I should think I might be nearly a yard from the canal - I did not step back when he struck me; the blow, as I felt it, was with his first - it hurt me; he tore the ribbon of my watch - the swivel or ring broke by his pulling; I held the ribbon still in my hand, and he took the watch - he ran up the street; I ran after him, and caught him thirty or forty yards off; I cried Murder! as loud as I could, and then he cried Police! I held him but a very short time before the Policeman came up, and took him in charge; when the Policeman came up, he said, "I have not got his watch - you may search me;" the Policeman searched him, but did not find it on him - he found it on the ground, four or five yards from him; I saw it on the ground myself - the Policeman had a light; the watch flew out of the case with the fall - I picked the watch up, and the Policeman the case; I gave the watch to the Policeman, and he kept it -I have kept the ribbon ever since; the ring remains on the ribbon now.

WILLIAM MASSAM . I am a Policeman. I was near the canal in Praed-street - coming along I heard the cry of Murder! two or three times, and immediately began to run; I heard a cry of Police! I ran down the street towards the wharf road, and found the prosecutor holding the prisoner about forty yards from the cut; as soon as I came up, he said, "This man has taken my watch;" the prisoner said I might search him, which I did but found nothing - I turned my light on; it was a very had light - two boatmen came up with a lantern, and I picked up the watch-case, and saw the watch laying about six feet from it; the prosecutor took it up, and gave it to me - I have had it ever since; I took him to the watch-house.

JOSEPH BRAMLEY. This is my watch, which was taken from me that night.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny having the watch.

[Feb. 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18320216-5

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

511. ANN DRAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , at St. John, at Hampstead , 16 sovereigns and 1 shilling, the monies of Henry Taylor , in his dwelling-house : to which she pleaded

[Feb. 17.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18320216-6

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

512. HENRY RAMSEY , alias THOMPSON. alias RANSLEY was indicted for that he, at the Quarter Session of the Peace, holden by adjournment on Monday, the 4th of December, in the seventh year of the reign of George the Fourth, at St. Mary, Newington, was tried and convicted of feloniously stealing 3 shoes, value 7s., and was thereupon ordered to be transported beyond the seas for the term of seven years; and that he, afterwards, to wit, on the 15th of January last, feloniously was at large without lawful cause, within his Majesty's dominions, to wit, at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported ; against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, that he was, at the said Quarter Session, ordered to be transported for the term of seven years, and that he was feloniously at large, as in the first Count.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN GROSSMITH . I am a Police-constable of Union-hall. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's conviction, which I saw signed by Mr. Lawson, the clerk of the peace for the county of Surrey - (read.) I saw the prisoner in Church-street, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, on the 15th of January, and took him into custody; he resisted, but I overcame him.

GEORGE GOFF . I am a special constable. I was in the Court at Horsemonger-lane when the prisoner was tried

he is the man who was tried in the name of Thompson, alias Ramsey.

and convicted - I knew him well before, and am quite sure

Prisoner. I was very young when I was sent away in 1826, and not capable of knowing right from wrong; I was seduced by a man, or never should have done what I did: I was on board the Justicia hulk for three years - the captain's clerk I owed some money to; he said he would put down my name to go aboard out of spite, and that was the reason I came away - I brought nothing away belonging to the ship; I have been away two years and a half, and if my witnesses were here I could prove I have borne a good character since I returned; I worked for a Mr. Maud and several others - I can have dozens of characters since I have been home.

[Feb. 17.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18320216-7

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley.

513. GEORGE ATHEA was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , at St. Martin in the Fields , 78 yards of silk, value 10l.; 4 veils, value 9l.; 1 pair of gloves, value 7s., and 1 shawl, value 2l., the goods of Matthew Halling and others, in their dwelling-house .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS MARTIN. I am in the employ of Matthew Halling , John Pearce , and Edward Stone , retail linen draper s, who live at Waterloo-house - they have from eighty to ninety young men in their employ, and have a very large business. On the 11th of January I had occasion to go into the Manchester warehouse, and observed a piece of silk placed in a box there which had been done with; I never knew a piece of silk kept in that warehouse before - this created my suspicion, and I gave information to Mr. Pearce; he took it out, unrolled a few yards of it, and I marked it - Mr. Pearce replaced it in my presence, and next day I was watching; about five o'clock I observed the prisoner standing in the warehouse - he came nearer to the box, and took out the piece of silk; I was concealed - he forced out the block on which the silk was rolled; he put the silk up the back part of his coat, under his coat, and walked away; I gave information to Mr. Edward Stone - a constable was sent for; I was present when his boxes were searched.

JOSEPH HANSON . I am a Policeman. I was sent for on the 12th of January to the prosecutors' counting-house; the prisoner was present - Mr. Stone said he suspected him to have a piece of silk under his coat; the prisoner said nothing to it - I searched him, but did not find the silk or any thing which could be identified; I went up to his bedroom with him, and searched a box which he pointed out as his - it was locked, and he had the key in his pocket; I asked him to point out his box - I opened it, and the first thing I found was this piece of silk, which I have had ever since, and now produce; I found other property there.

JOHN PEARCE, I am in partnership with Matthew Halling and Edward Stone . This piece of silk is our property - I know it by this mark, which was made by Martin, in my presence; I was present on the 11th of January, when he found it in the box - it was taken the next day; there are seventy yards and three-quarters of it - the cost price is 2s. 3d. per yard, which would amount to between 7l. and 8l.; our warehouse is under the same roof as the dwelling-house, and in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you not more than one house? A. One front is in Cockspur-street, and the other in Pall-mall, East - it is the same house; I reside in the Cockspur-street front - all the young men belonging to the establishment sleep in the house, but neither of my partners sleep there; we have ninety-one young men - part sleep in one front, and part in the other; I pay to the firm the same amount for rent as they are allowed for their houses elsewhere - the whole building belongs to the firm, and is charged to the firm; we pay a ground rent to the Crown - the firm charge me 225l. for rent, and my partners are allowed that amount for their dwelling-house elsewhere; the firm pay the ground rent, which is 400l. and odd: the firm built the house - the warehouse is on the basement story.

COURT. Q. Do the young men feed in the house? A. Yes, at the expence of the firm: the prisoner came to us on the 16th of September last, with a good character.

THOMAS MARTIN . Here is my mark on the silk - it is the letters T. M. in ink.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[Feb. 17.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth and character .

Reference Number: t18320216-8

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

514. THOMAS COLLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , at Hillingdon, 1 mare, price 10l., and 1 set of harness, value 2l. , the property of John Emery .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS HALL . I was in the service of John Emery, who lives in Tunal's-lane, near Litchfield, in Stafford . I had the care of his brown mare, and put it into the stable on the evening of the 15th of January - I left the stable at nine o'clock; she was then locked in the stable - she had a flaxen mane and tail; I went to the stable about eleven o'clock that night, in consequence of something mistress said to me, and as the dog barked; I found the mare was gone - I went in pursuit, but could not find her: I saw her again about eight days after, at Uxbridge, in Middlesex, in the possession of Ingram; it was the same mare as I had locked up safe on the night of the 15th - I missed a set of harness for a shaft horse from the same stable, at the same time, and found that with Ingram.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is your master? A. A little farmer - he has no partner; I did not see the prisoner about the premises, and did not know him.

CHARLES JAMES MURRAY . I am a builder, and live at Uxbridge, in Middlesex. On the 20th of January, in the evening, I went to a public-house with Ingram, in consequence of information, and saw the prisoner; he had nothing then - Ingram said he wanted him; he asked what for - Ingram said he could not tell him, but asked him for the key of the warehouse or stable, which he rented; he at first refused to give it - Ingram said if he did not he should take it from him; he then gave it to him, and we went to a house for a light, and then to the warehouse; we took the prisoner with us - he said nothing, except asking if the landlord was afraid of his rent; I unlocked the door, and saw a dark brown mare there - I asked him whose it was; he said his - I said, "How came it yours?" he said he bought it of his brother, who bought it last August, at Stourbridge fair; a set of harness for a shaft horse hung

up there on a peg - Ingram questioned him about that; I did not hear what he said - the mare's mane and tail were flaxen; I was afterwards present when Hall saw the mare - he knew her the moment he saw her, and identified the harness.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen the prisoner in Uxbridge? A. Not for a year or two before, to my knowledge; we found a cart in the stable - the name of John Blakeman , Litchfield, Stafford, was painted on the side of it; the prisoner claimed that cart, and Blakeman claimed it.

WILLIAM INGRAM . I am constable of Uxbridge. I accompanied Murray to the public-house where the prisoner was found, and in the stable we found the mare and harness; I asked the prisoner whose harness that was - he said it was his; Murray's account of the conversation about the mare is true.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen the prisoner shortly before that? A. No, not for more than a month; I was informed he was in possession of a mare and cart, and went there - Uxbridge is a hundred and sixteen miles from Litchfield.

Prisoner's Defence. I went about the Tuesday before Christmas-day, for a holiday, to Birmingham, and on my return, about Woodstock, was overtaken by a man with this horse and cart together - I asked him to give me a ride; I got into his cart, and asked him where he was going - he said he did not know, for he was in trouble; I asked what trouble he was in - he said he had got the bailiffs on his premises, and brought the horse and cart from home intending to sell them, but did not know where - I said I wanted to buy a horse and cart; he said he would sell them - I got out, and looked at them; he asked thirty guineas for them - I offered him 20l., and then 25l.; he said he would take that - I wanted him to go into a little public-house just by, but he said he did not wish, because he was known there, and the people would want to know why he sold his horse and cart; I paid him on the road, just outside the public-house - it was on Wednesday; I came home; the man turned back, but where he went I cannot tell.

JOHN SIMMS . I live in Uxbridge, and have known the prisoner two years; he was in the habit of going about the country with earthenware - I saw him shortly before Christmas; I cannot tell where he was going - I saw him take out his pocket-book; he had a great bulk of money, and put some gold on the table - he bears a good character.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you ever know him keep a horse and cart? A. No, his father did; I do not know where he was on the 15th of January - he has two brothers younger than himself; the eldest is about sixteen - he goes about with a horse and cart for his master, Mr. Smith.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see the prisoner driving the horse and cart about Uxbridge? A. No.

One other witness gave the prisoner a good character.

[Feb. 17.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy on account of his character and youth .

Reference Number: t18320216-9

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

515. GEORGE BLECHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , at St. Margaret, Westminster , in the dwelling-house of Earl Grey, 6 sovereigns, one 10l., and one 5l. note, the property of William Young .

WILLIAM YOUNG. I am valet to Lord Howick. On the 5th of February I was living at the house of Earl Grey - I have known the prisoner eight or ten months; he has been an assistant in Earl Grey's house for about three months, and left on the 6th, when he was taken into custody - he was living in the house at that time; about twelve o'clock on Monday, the 6th, I missed a purse, which I kept in a drawer in the servants' hall - the key was in the drawer; the purse contained a 10l. and a 5l. Bank note, and six sovereigns - I had seen them on Sunday, the 5th, the day before, about ten o'clock in the morning; I was looking into the drawer for something about twelve o'clock on Monday, and missed the purse -I found the purse concealed in the coal cellar, with a 10l. note, three sovereigns, and 19s. remaining in it; the rest was gone - the prisoner was doing his duty in the house at that time; I made my loss known to my fellow servants - I saw the prisoner, and challenged him with it; he denied it - I said I believed he had taken it, and if he would own it perhaps it would not be so bad, but if he did not I would go for an officer; it was his business to fetch the coals from the cellar - I went for an officer, who took him into custody.

WILLIAM IVIMEY . I am an officer of Queen-square. I took the prisoner into custody on Young's charge, at the house of Earl Grey ; I had some conversation with him as I went along - I told him that whatever he said to me I should state before the Magistrate; that is all I said.

WILLIAM YOUNG re-examined. Q. Before the prisoner said any thing to you, what were your words to him? A. As near as I can remember I said, "I suspect you have taken the purse out of my drawer;" he said he had not taken any money - I said "You had better own it at once," and after that he said something; I said I would go for an officer, and did go - he denied it completely; he never acknowledged to me that he had stolen it.

WILLIAM IVIMEY. He told me he had taken the money, that he took one 5l. note out of the purse, and had been robbed of it by some girl in Westminster; I searched him, but found nothing - he did not say where he found the purse; I received 13l. 19s. from Young.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was Young present when he made this statement? A. No - I made him no premise to induce him to tell me about it; he was telling me of it while I cautioned him - Young had fetched me to the house.

DANIEL FORBES . On Sunday night, the 5th of February, the prisoner gave two women into my charge on suspicion of stealing a 5l. Bank note, and gave his name George Bishop - they were dismissed on Monday in consequence of his not apppearing.

Cross-examined. Q. Was what you said before the Magistrate taken down? A. Yes, on the day the prisoner was committed; I did not say the prosecutor gave him in charge - I never saw him.

COURT. Q. What parish is the Earl's house in? A. St. Margaret, Westminster, I believe; it is in Downing-street.

WILLIAM IVIMEY . I know the Earl's house is in St. Margaret's, Westminster.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[Feb. 18.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18320216-10

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley.

516. JAMES LITTLEBOY was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Dieguan on the 14th of December , and taking from his person and against his will, 4 shillings and 3 pence his monies .

JOHN DIEGNAN. I sell fruit about Uxbridge, and in London; I deal in oranges, and hawk them about - I have no settled home. On Wednesday, the 14th of December, I was coming from Cowley, with Matthew Donoghue , and going into Uxbridge , a cart overtook us, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon - it was quite light; four people were in the cart - the prisoner was one of them; he got out of the cart, and asked Donoghue how he sold his oranges - he took two oranges, and got up into the cart without paying for them; he put the oranges into his pocket - Donoghue went up to the cart, and said, "Will you pay me for my oranges?" he said he would; he came down out of the cart, and took another - Donoghue asked him to pay for them; the prisoner up with his fist, and struck him - I came up, and asked what he was about, and he said, "I will serve you worse," and struck me on the cheek; he gave me several blows on the neck and nose - he knocked me into the ditch, put his hand into my pocket, and took out my purse and money; there were eight shillings, four sixpences, and 3d. in copper - as soon as he took the money he ran away up the road; it did not happen a mile from the town - we followed him to a public-house in the town, and never lost sight of him till he got there.

Q. Was he the only person who came out of the cart? A. I cannot say whether two or one came, for I was nearly blind with the blood; I am sure he is the person who took my purse and money - I felt his hand in my pocket; he was taken in less than half an hour - I ran for a constable; he struck me with his fist - I was struck by somebody with a whip, but not by him - it was one of the people who came out of the cart.

Q. Did you pull off your coat? A. I left my coat in his hand, and thought to run away from him, but could not - it was not to defend myself against him that I pulled it off.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Have you told exactly the facts, as you stated them at the last Session? A. I think so; this happened in the high-road - nobody passed till it was over; the prisoner walked on before the cart to Uxbridge as quick as possible - my comrade never lost sight of him; he ran into Uxbridge, and we ran after him.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he ran after he got up to the cart? A. Yes; I am sure of it, for we were up with the cart, and he was a good bit before us - the cart kept going on; Donoghue said his oranges were 1d. each, upon which the prisoner took two - he offered to pay for one; he said he would give 1d. for the three - Donoghue said he must have 1d. for each; we did not say after he had taken them that we must have 3d. a piece for them - I did not demand 3d.; Donoghue demanded 3d. for the three.

Q. After he got into the cart, was there not a few words between him and your companion? A. I cannot tell, for I was a few yards before; I saw no knife in any body's hand - I did not draw a knife, for I had none; nobody had hold of me in the ditch but the prisoner - the prisoner held me, and I could not see, but there might be one or two others near me; I cannot say whether they were within reach of me - I am sure the prisoner had one hand on my neck, and the other in my pocket; I could see his hand in my pocket - the purse could not have fallen from my pocket; I have often been at the Chequers with Donoghue, and seen Michael Cronan there - I never said I was sorry the prisoner was committed, for I did not think he had robbed me; nor that I had given him as much as he had given me, meaning that we had fought; nor that I was sorry I had been persuaded to prosecute him, and could not sleep for it.

MATTHEW DONOGHUE . I deal in oranges. I had been out with Diegnan; a cart came up to us about half a mile from Uxbridge; there were four men in it - there were words between the prisoner and me about some oranges; he struck Diegnan, and knocked him into the ditch - the prisoner was down on him in the ditch.

Q. Was any other person who came from the cart at the ditch at the time? A. There was young Beach and Clarkson in the road - neither of them touched him; I saw them getting towards him. and I walked away - when the prisoner left Diegnan, he came along the road; he walked - he got into the cart when he got into town; he did not pass the cart till he got into the town; I and Diegnan also walked all the way from the ditch into the town - we did not run till we got into the town; Diegnan complained of being robbed of 10s. 3d. when he overtook me in the road - I had only walked on a few yards; I did not stand by him - we were then more than a quarter of a mile from town; I did not see Diegnan with his coat off.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see a knife drawn? A. No, nor did I see the prosecutor strike the prisoner; I demanded 3d. for all the oranges, not for one - he took two from me at first. and then one.

DAVID COCKRANE . I was in the cart with three others, Beach, Littleboy, and Clark; I am not in any business - it was Beach's cart - two Irishmen were going along with oranges; the prisoner asked the price of them - Littleboy got out; he took one orange, and got into the cart again; he got out again, and I cannot say whether he took one or two oranges - he struck Diegnan several times, and knocked him into a ditch; he was not on him in the ditch, and I do not think any body was within reach of him to be able to pick his pocket; I do not think the prisoner was near enough - he complained of having had his pocket picked; we were about a quarter of a mile from Uxbridge - the prisoner walked there, and so did the witnesses; I did not see the prosecutor's coat off.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prosecutor or witness demand 3d. for the first orange? A. I do not know - there was a regular fight between the prisoner and prosecutor;

I heard the prisoner say before they fought, "You demanded 1d. for the orange, now you want 3d." I did not hear him say, "If I am to pay 3d. I will have two more;" I did not see a knife drawn.

COURT. Q. Is Clark a man? A. No, a youth - he and the prisoner came out of the cart together; I did not see him interfere - I did not notice whether either of them had their coats off.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor and witness were coming along; he pulled off his coat, waistcoat, and hat, and challenged me to fight - I got out of the cart; they both pitched into me - I knocked Diegnan down, and then the other; they insulted me, or I should not have thought of hitting them at all.

ARTHUR CLARK . I am a labourer, and live at Cowley - I was in the cart with the prisoner: we were overtaken by Diegnan and Donoghue - the prosecutor asked the prisoner to buy some oranges; he got down, took one in his hand, then threw it up into the cart, and asked the price - they said 1d. each; he pulled 1d. out of his pocket, and offered it - they would not take it, but demanded 3d., saying he had had three; the prisoner got up into the cart again - the prosecutor kept following the cart, demanding 3d.; the prisoner got down, and offered him 1d. again - they would not take it: he got into the cart again, and went towards Uxbridge; they followed the cart, and challenged him down to fight; he got out of the cart - one of the men pulled off his hat, and then his coat and waistcoat - the prisoner got out of the cart, and fenced at them; he knocked one down on one side of the road, and the other on the other - one walked away towards Uxbridge; the other got out of the ditch, and came to the prisoner again; the prisoner struck him twice, and knocked him down towards the gate, but never closed with him - he kept him at arm's length; he never closed with either of them, and could not pick either of their pockets - the prisoner went towards the gate, and said "He has a knife;" I saw some instrument in the prosecutor's hand, and the prisoner said."Arthur, come down;" I then got down - the prisoner hit him directly he saw the knife, and cut his knuckle about half an inch long - the prisoner then walked by the side of the cart till he got to Uxbridge; he went into a public-house, where he was to meet two men, and stated this before the company.

WILLIAM SWIFT . I am a labourer. I was in a field close by, and saw the beginning of this; there was a regular fight - the Irishman pulled off his coat and waistcoat and then they began to fight; the prisoner kept him at arm's length, and never closed - he could not have robbed him.

JOSEPH TREADAWAY . I was in the field, and saw the prisoner knock one into one ditch, and the other into another; he never closed with them, and could not put his hand into either of their pockets.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-11

Before Mr. Baron Bayley.

517. HENRY GREEN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Curry , and stealing 1 tea-pot, value 1l., and 3 spoons, value 1l., her property .

ANN CURRY . I live in Clarence-place, Pentonville . -On the 21st of January, at two o'clock in the day, I was standing at my back yard door, and heard a noise; I came up the steps, and saw the prisoner in my front kitchen - he had got in from the area, which opens into the kitchen: I know the door was on the latch - it was shut and latched ten minutes before; I cannot say whether the latch had caught - I had not shut it myself - I was going to run down into the kitchen, but I felt alarmed, and ran into the front parlour, looked through the window, and saw him in the area, putting my plated tea-pot behind him, on the ground - I called the servant, but she paid no attention to me; I opened the street door, and followed him down the garden into the road, calling Stop thief! I pursued him part of the way down the street; he was followed by some boys and men - I did not see him stopped; I saw him at the station-house, and am certain he is the man - a table and tea-spoon were produced, which have my crest on them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

FRANCIS BROWN . I am a Policeman. I saw the prisoner immediately after he was apprehended - I received these spoons from Kennedy, who found them in a ditch; I returned them to Rawlinson.

JOSEPH KENNEDY . I heard a cry of Stop thief! and when I got out I found the prisoner in custody; I went down into a ditch, by direction of the witness, and found a table-spoon, and then a tea-spoon; I gave them to Brown.

GEORGE MEARS. I heard a ery of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running - I followed; a gentleman, who was before me, stopped him, in my sight; I saw him throw something, which was white, into a ditch - I could not tell whether it was more than one thing; I pointed the spot out to Kennedy, and he found the table-spoon there.

JOSEPH CANNON . I was in Baguigge-wells-road, and heard a cry of Stop thief! several people tried to stop him- I stopped him; he said, "I have done nothing - let me pass;" I kept him, and said, "If you have done nothing, meet your accusers;" he put his hand into his right-hand pocket, and threw something into the Fleet-ditch - I pointed the place out to Kennedy, and he found a tea and table-spoon there.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-12

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

518. HENRY STOREY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 32 half-crowns, 1 crown, 60 shillings, 40 sixpences, and 8 shilling, the monies of Thomas Russell , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS RUSSELL. I am a butcher , and live at Shadwell - the prisoner lived in the house with his mother before I did, and he occasionally assisted me at times. On Sunday, the 29th of January, I desired Chandler, my apprentice, to ask him to dinner - I went up to my bed-room about two o'clock, while he was there, and counted my money, which I put into a cupboard; there was 9l. 17s. 6d. not less than 4l. of it was in half-crowns; the money being counted made a noise - I put it on a sideboard first, and then counted it into the cupboard; Chandler came into the room while I was counting it, and I paid him 5s., which was his wages - I went out about three o'clock, and told Chandler I should be home about half-past nine o'clock; he had the key of the door, and was to be home before me

- I returned about a quarter to ten o'clock, and went to bed; I got up about half-past six, and went to the cupboard to get the silver to go to market, and when I went to pull the cupboard door it fell down: it had been broken off its hinges, but put in its place - something appeared to have been put into the crevice; it was forced by the hinges, not the lock side - the money was all gone; the prisoner was taken that evening.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long has Chandler been in your service? A. Four or five months; he lived with a neighbour before that - I had no character with him; I paid him from my pocket before I counted the money - I found him at home at night.

CHARLES CHANDLER . I am in the prosecutor's service. On the 29th of January the prisoner dined with master and me - master called me up stairs after dinner, and paid my wages; when I came down the prisoner asked if master had paid me - I said Yes; he asked if he paid me every Sunday - I said sometimes before it was due: master went out, telling me to take the key with me, which I generally do - the prisoner asked what time I should be at home; I told him about nine o'clock, and master had himself asked me that question, in the prisoner's hearing; the prisoner said, "I dare say you will be back by six or seven?" I said No - I went to wash myself, and saw the side door, which is close by the sink, unbolted; I bolted it, and went up stairs to put my clean things on, and while up stairs I heard the prisoner open the door leading to the passage, where the side door is - there was nobody else in the house - I ran down stairs directly; the prisoner then drew his chair to the fire, and said it was so cold he did not know what to do; he asked again what time I should be at home - I said about nine o'clock; he said, "I dare say you will be home by six or seven;" I again said I should not; he afterwards asked if there was a fastening to the parlour window - I said Yes; he went to see, and found there was- I went for a brush to a cupboard by the side door, which I had bolted, and saw it was unbolted again; I bolted it, then came into the parlour, and told the prisoner I was going to fetch master's dog from the cellar, - I went out at the front door, down the passage, into the cellar, and brought the dog into the shop; the prisoner then stood in the back part of the shop, where there is a door opening into the passage, in which the side door is - the prisoner played with the dog, and called it by its name; he was acquainted with it - it would bark at a stranger, but not at him; I called the prisoner out, and told him I must go- he asked what I was in such a hurry about: I said the sooner I went the sooner I should be back - he came out; I locked the front door, and put the key into my pocket - we went together to a public-house over the way; he asked me to treat him - we had a glass of rum and shrub each - he said he had no money; we parted there: I returned about half-past nine o'clock; master came home in about five minutes - we both went to bed: I got up about four o'clock in the morning, and about seven master called me up stairs, and complained of losing his money - I then examined, and found the side door was unbolted; I told master nobody but the prisoner could have done it - I had not examined the door after bolting it the second time; the key of that door was also missing - it is not usually locked at night; I had seen the key about a week before: it hung on a hook at the back part of the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. About what time did you leave? A. About a quarter-past three o'clock; I left all safe then - I did not speak to the prisoner about the bolts being undone; he had formerly lived in the house - I lived with Mr. Hand, a respectable butcher, before I came to master; he told me to leave, because he said I was looking after another place - that was the only reason; a young man out of doors had a sister at Brixton - she brought a bundle of things for him, tied in a white apron; he was going to leave, and gave me the apron to keep till she called for it; I gave it to the whasherwoman, and she told me not to tell master she had washed it - I put it into my bundle, thinking it was the young man's; I threw it out of my bundle when I was leaving - Mr. Hand's initials were on it: Hand had promised to give me 6s. a week, and only gave me 4s.

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at a public-house at Shadwell, about eight o'clock on Monday morning; I asked him to account for his time from half-past three till half-past nine; he said he was walking in the Commercial-road, and over the wooden bridge and back to this public-house; the wooden bridge is a quarter of a mile from the public-house - I said I knew better, for I knew he had been in a coach on Sunday evening; he said he was not in a coach at all - I said I knew he was, and that little Ann and another woman were with him: he denied having been in a coach - I then took him to Mr. Russell's, but found nothing on him; I told Russell that, having known him many years, I had no doubt he would attend the office next day, without being in custody, and told him to meet me at the office at twelve o'clock - he was there before me; I found an old knife in his pocket with the point broken off - the cupboard door had been opened with something small; this knife would open it, but I cannot say it did - I could not find the broken point - he was detained after the examination; I called him out of the lock-up place, and said he knew he was in a coach, and must tell me where he was that day; he said he was, that he went to a house where this girl lived, and then to a house in Creechurch-lane.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-13

Before Mr. Baron Bayley.

519. HANNAH CARTER , WILLIAM CARTER , and HANNAH HALL were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Frederick Greaves , and stealing 30 books, value 50s., his goods .

FREDERICK GREAVES . I keep an old book shop , in Church-street, Bethnal-green . On Friday morning, the 27th of January , the bar of my shutter was sprung, and one shutter slipped over the other; it would not require much strength to do it - a boy twelve years old might do it; I missed thirty books from the bottom-rach, close to the shutters - there is no glass to the window; about half-past eleven o'clock that day I saw two books at Mr. Hutchinson's, a cheesemonger, about fifty yards from my house - I went to the prisoners' house that morning, in Club-row, about a hundred yards from my house; I saw Hannah and William Carter in the passage, and fetched an officer - I went there, and under the grate, in a room where Hall and William Carter were, there was an

appearance of books and covers having been burnt; I said, "This seems to be books" - neither of them said anything; I had missed a black lettered Bible, which was printed in 1597, and had the appearance of a German Bible.

Hannah Hall. Q. Did I not tell you that I had burnt some books belonging to my brother, who was dead? A. She said no such thing.

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON . I am a cheesemonger. On the 27th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, William Carter brought a large book like a Bible to my shop; it was not plain English, but black German text, as I thought - I could not read it; he came to sell it for waste paper; it was thin dark paper - I told him it was dirty, and did not suit me; he came again in about half an hour, and said he had a lot of cleaner books at home - I had seen the prosecutor, and told him to bring them; he brought two - I asked him no questions, but nodded to my shopman to fetch the prosecutor, who came, and went with Carter to his house.

RICHARD GLIBBERY . I am an officer. I received two books from Mr. Greaves; I went with him to Club-row, and saw Hall and William Carter - I asked Hall what she had done with the Bible which was offered for sale - she at first said it was sold in Shoreditch; I discovered that books or paper had been burnt in the fire-place - I asked her again what was done with the bible; she said she had burnt it - Hannah Carter came in; she is William Carter and Hall's mother; she told me she had sent William to sell these books, and afterwards said they belonged to her son who was dead - I recollect the person they alluded to; he was about thirty years of age.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Hannah Carter's Defence. They were my son-in-law's books.

Hall's Defence. My mother wanted bread for the children's breakfast; the Bible was an old one - the boy had sold part of it a month before at the cheesemonger's, and we sent him with the rest; he would not buy it, and when he returned I took the rest out of his hands, and said, "Drat the things, they are all alike," and chucked it on the fire - my mother sent him with two other books; the prosecutor brought him to our room - he took the two books down to his wife at the door, and said, "Are not these ours?" she said Yes, and then a Policeman came; the child was taken to Worship-street - my mother and I went to see him, and were detained.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-14

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

520. WILLIAM SURREY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 6s. 6d. , the goods of Zachariah Foster ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-15

521. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th. of January , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of James Thomas Walsh , from his person .

MR. JAMES THOMAS WALSH . I live at Camberwell. On the 9th of January, about ten minutes to ten o'clock in the morning, I was between Darkhouse-lane and Billings-gate-market ; I had just left my carriage, and felt my handkerchief going from my outside pocket - I instantly turned round, and the prisoner was close to me; I collared him - he trod on my heels; nobody else was near enough to take it - the moment I laid hold of him I perceived my handkerchief laying behind him; it could not have dropped out of my pocket - I said, "You scoundrel, give me my handkerchief;" he said, "I have not got it," and at that moment a gentleman picked it up at his feet.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM STENNETT . I was in Thames-street, and heard Mr. Walsh charge the prisoner with having robbed him of a handkerchief; I stood a moment or two, and then saw a handkerchief drop from behind the prisoner; I do not think it could drop from any body but him.

JAMES JUDD . I took him into custody; he said nothing to the charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was seeking for work; there was a crowd, and I could not get on - the gentleman accused me of taking his handkerchief, of which I am innocent.

MR. WALSH. There was no crowd till the alarm was given.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-16

522. JAMES COPELAND, alias JOHNSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Alexander Cathie ; and 1 shirt, value 6s., the goods of Adam Cathie , from the person of Sarah Cathie ; and that he had been previously convicted of felony .

SARAH CATHIE . I am the wife of Alexander Cathie . On the 10th of January, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was between Giltspur-street Compter and Newgate-street, with a bundle under my arm - the prisoner came, and snatched it from me; I am quite certain of him - I was labouring under a severe hoarseness, and could not call out loud; he was in front of me, and with the force of the snatch turned me quite round - I had a full view of him; he got away, and was stopped about the middle of Newgate-street, but my bundle was then gone- I have not a doubt of his person; a shawl in the bundle belonged to my nephew, Adam Cathie .

JOSEPH GRAMSON . I am errand-boy to a gentleman in Newgate-street. I saw the prosecutrix in Giltspur-street, and saw the prisoner snatch her bundle; I am quite sure of him - he went up Newgate-street; I raised an alarm, followed, and laid hold of him - I did not see what he did with the bundle.

CHARLES HAYNES . I am a street-keeper. I found the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Newgate-street; a man tapped me on the shoulder, and said I was wanted - the woman said I had robbed her.

RICHARD MANNING . I am an officer of Bridge-ward. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clerk's office; I was present at his trial - (read) - I am certain he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320216-17

523. WILLIAM STARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of William Rose Stephenson , from his person .

WILLIAM ROSE STEPHENSON . I live in Essex. On the 10th of January, about one o'clock, I was in

Cheapside , and felt a hand at my pocket - I turned round, and saw the prisoner close at my elbow, with my handkerchief in his hand - I secured him; I dropped my umbrella, and while I did that I lost sight of my handkerchief - I kept the prisoner till the officer came; I did not take my umbrella up.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a coach-maker, and live at Chester. I saw the prisoner and another boy escaping out of a crowd at the end of Wood-street; I saw the other boy draw the handkerchief - I suppose he took it from the prisoner's hand; I did not see it taken from the prosecutor; the prisoner was in the prosecutor's hands, trying to get from him, when the other went off with the handkerchief.

JOHN LAWS . I received the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320216-18

524. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 ream of paper, value 16s. , the goods of John Spratt .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Edward Scott .

EDWARD SCOTT . I am porter to John Spratt , a stationer , in Tottenham-court-road. On the 12th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I received sixty reams of paper into my cart from Mr. Arthur's, on Garlick-hill; I did not miss this ream till the officer came - I only had one ream of that sort - it was a close-bodied cart.

WILLIAM GEORGE STEWART . I am warehouse-man to Mr. Arthur. I delivered Scott a ream of foolscap, marked"14 1/2lbs., Finch's superfine;" I put it into the cart, which Scott drove; I saw the prisoner in custody with it that evening, and am certain of it, by the wrapper.

RICHARD GEORGE STATHAM . I am a constable. On the evening of the 12th of January, about five o'clock, I met the prisoner in Bow-lane with four or five young men; I suspected them, knowing them, and when the prisoner came into Cheapside, he threw his apron over a ream of paper, which he had in his arms - I stopped him; the others crossed Cheapside instantly; he said he had bought the paper, and if I would go with him he would show me where - I asked if he had a bill; he said No -I took him to the watch-house, and told him to send for the person he bought it of; he would send for nobody, but said he was employed by one Brown to carry it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-19

525. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Joseph Cohen , from his person .

THOMAS GEORGE GORDON . I am a messenger to the East India Company, and live at Stepney. On the 14th of January, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Leadenhall-street , and saw the prisoner draw a handkerchief from Mr. Cohen's pocket - he was alone; I went, and told Mr. Cohen he had lost his handkerchief - he felt, and said he had; I went, and seized the prisoner about ten yards off - I saw him take the handkerchief from his pocket, and throw it down; I am certain of his person.

JOSEPH COHEN . I was in Leadenhall-street. Gordon came, and said I had lost a handkerchief - I felt, and missed it: I followed the officer to King's Arms-yard, and saw it at the prisoner's feet.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Somebody walked by me - I saw the handkerchief laying there; I went to pick it up - the gentleman took hold of me, but I am quite innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-20

526. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of George Staples .

GEORGE STAPLES . I am a horse-dealer . On the 13th of January, about three o'clock, I left my cart and horse in Cleasby's care, with my coat in the cart - in about an hour the coat was gone.

THOMAS PROTHERO . I am an officer. I was informed this coat was stolen from a cart in Cock-lane - I found the prisoner in custody with it.

WILLIAM CLEASBY . I work about Smithfield. Staples left his cart in my care - I saw the prisoner walking backwards and forwards for two or three minutes; I happened to go on the other side, and as a cart came by I saw him get on the wheel of the cart, and pull the coat out at the corner of Cock-lane - I pursued, and took him with it in his possession, without losing sight of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-21

527. WILLIAM BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Bennett Humphrys , from his person .

THOMAS BENNETT HUMPHRYS . I am apprentice to a druggist , in Tower-street. On the 13th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was on Holborn-hill , and felt a pull at my pocket - I turned round, and saw my pocket handkerchief in the prisoner's left hand; he threw it over his shoulder - I immediately collared him, took it up, and took him to the watch-house.

BENJAMIN CATMULL . I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman accused me - I gave him leave to search me, which he did, and about twelve yards from where I stood he took up the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for 14 Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-22

528 JAMES NEVILLE was indicted for stealing; on the 17th of January , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Cooper .

MR. THOMAS COOPER . I live in Monument-yard, and am a tea-dealer . On the 17th of January, about half-past five o'clock, I left my coat in my chaise, in Pudding-lane , in care of my servant, and in about ten minutes the prisoner was brought into my counting-house with it - I have had it twenty years.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has it not changed its appearance in twenty years? A. Yes; it is marked all over - I can swear to it from its general appearance; here are some stitches which I put into it myself.

JOHN SAUNDERS . I am in the employ of Mr. Cooper, and was in care of his chaise; I perceived the coat going out of the back of the chaise - I looked, and it was gone;

I saw the prisoner in possession of it; somebody said,"He is coming" - the prisoner threw it down, and ran away; I pursued, and he was secured - I had seen him throw it down; it was taken to Mr. Cooper's house.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it dark? A. Rather so; I never lost sight of him - he turned two turnings, and was taken in Gracechurch-street, but I was further from the wall than him, and did not lose sight of him; I was three or four yards from him, opposite the corner - he was in dark clothes; I am sure he is the man - I saw him the whole time; nobody else was running - he turned to the left into Eastcheap, and to the right to Gracechurch-street.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a Policeman. I was passing down Fish-street-hill, and heard a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner ran towards me - Saunders was pursuing, not above seven or eight yards behind; nobody was before them - he had not got the coat when I stopped him; it was afterwards produced, and claimed by Mr. Cooper.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it dark? A. No, the gas was lighted.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Cannon-street, and on crossing over I saw a number of people running - I went to see what was the matter, and accidentally ran against the Policeman; my hat fell off, and I fell down - this man charged me with stealing the coat; if any body else had happened to have fallen they might have said so.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for 14 Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-23

528. JEREMIAH PIERCEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Harris , from his person; and that he had been previously convicted of felony .

JOSEPH HARRIS . I am a surgeon , and live at Stoke Newington. On the 18th of January, between five and six o'clock, soon after I entered Jewry-street, Aldgate , walking with a friend, the officer called out; I turned my head - he had the prisoner in custody, and asked if I had lost any thing; I felt, and missed my handkerchief, which he produced to me.

JAMES YOUNG . I am a Policeman. I saw the prisoner in company with another - I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket; I laid hold of him about ten yards off - he crossed over, and his companion ran away; I took the handkerchief from him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

THOMAS DAVEY . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - (read) - he is the person named in that certificate; I was present at his conviction.

GUILTY . Aged 20 - Transported for 14 Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-24

529. EMANUEL ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 purse, value 10s.; 27 sovereigns, 4 half-sovereigns, 3 half-crowns, one 10l. and one 5l. Bank notes, and an order for payment of and value 185l., the goods of Benjamin Solomons , from the person of Elizabeth Solomons .

ELIZABETH SOLOMONS . I am the wife of Benjamin Solomons . On the 11th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I was in Leadenhall-street, coming towards Bread-street - I had a purse in my reticule, containing twenty-seven sovereigns, four half-sovereigns, three half-crowns, a 10l. and 5l. Bank note, and a draft on Maberly's, of Bread-street, for 185l. -I observed three men just by the India-house; they walked hastily by me - one of them turned round, and looked at me very attentively; that was the prisoner - he then talked to his companions, and he also turned round and looked at me attentively; they walked in that manner, turning round now and then, till they came to Leadenhall-market, and then they all three stopped; I walked on, and did not see any more of them till I came to the corner of Gracechurch-street - I had observed them look at me several times; I was waiting at the corner of Gracechurch-street for the carriages to pass - several persons were waiting to cross; they all stood with their backs towards me; I suddenly felt several persons surround me - I had my right hand at the bottom of my bag, and removed my right hand to extricate myself from the crowd, and suddenly felt a person's hand round my waist; I at that moment considered it an act of rudeness, and turned round to see who it was - I am quite positive it was the prisoner; I told him to be gone, as I considered it rude - he of course went off; I felt very much confused, and did not at that moment consider I was robbed - I crossed, and at the other corner I instantly discovered that my reticule had been cut, and the purse taken out; this was almost immediately after I felt the hand round my waist - I hastened across the road as quick as possible; it might be two or three minutes - I was very much alarmed, and said, "Oh, dear, I have been robbed!" several persons came round, and said,"Of what?" I did not know who they were - I instantly went to the banking-house to stop payment of the draft, and by their advice went to the Mansion-house; I have never seen any of the property - on the 25th I was sent for to the Mansion-house, as several persons were in custody, to see if I could identify any of them; I saw the prisoner among others, and am certain of him - I told the Lord Mayor he was the person who had his hand round my waist.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Where do you live? A. At No. 5, New-road, St. George in the East -I had come from home that day, and walked all the way alone; nobody had interrupted me before - I did not come along Whitechapel, but through Prescott-street, into the Minories; I had nothing else in my reticule but my handkerchief and card-case - here is the reticule; I had called on a tenant a short distance from home, and received four sovereigns, which I put into my purse, and after that had no occasion to open the reticule - I held it with the string twisted round my hand; it is very small- I had a cloak on; it was a beaded purse - I saw a man who was taken with the prisoner; I could not positively swear to him, but if I saw the other I should recollect him; nothing attracted my attention but their rudeness in looking at me several times; I was told to attend at the Mansion-house, as several were in custody, and perhaps I might recollect some of them - I described the person who had robbed me, and a stout gentleman said,"I don't think he is here;" I then went up stairs - I did not see the prisoner till he was brought before the Lord Mayor; several others were brought up first - I said I did not know them; the prisoner was then brought with

one rather taller - I thought that was one by his dress, but could not recollect sufficiently to swear to him, as I never saw his face, but I saw the faces of the other two; my handkerchief did not come out of my reticule - I cannot say whether the purse could have remained in it after it was cut; it was not cut before I got to Gracechurch-street, for I had it in my hand, and felt my purse in it - I had used my handkerchief coming along, but cannot recollect where; the purse was at the bottom of the reticule - it was exactly a fortnight before I saw the prisoner in custody; he had a hat on in the street, but not at the Mansion-house - I noticed him very much, because I considered him very rude; I described two of the persons at the Mansion-house the day it happened - one had a stye on his eye.

COURT. Q. Till the person's arm was round your waist, your hand was at the bottom of your reticule? A. Yes - the purse contained 20l. in gold, and would have dropped into my hand if it had been cut then.

BENJAMIN STONE . I am an officer. I received orders to take all persons into custody who I saw in the street and knew to be bad characters; the prisoner was in custody - the prosecutrix came to the Mansion-house, and saw him in the Justice-room at the bar, with another, and identified him.

Cross-examined. Q. He was placed at the bar with another? A. Yes, not mixed with people in the Court; she had seen several others, and did not identify them.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the lady in my life.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320216-25

530. CHARLES LORD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Benjamin Davison , from his person .

BENJAMIN DAVISON . I am a chemist and druggist , and live in Union-street, Hoxton. On the 21st of January, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was at the corner of Wood-street, Cheapside , looking at a print-shop- I had used my handkerchief five minutes before; I did not feel it taken - the officer gave me information in about two minutes, and produced it to me; he had hold of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. Was it in your outside pocket? A. Yes - I am quite certain of it.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. I saw the prosecutor looking into the shop; the prisoner was close behind him, looking over his shoulder - I saw him take the handkerchief out of his pocket; I laid hold of him, and took it out of his hand - the prosecutor claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it hanging out of the pocket? A. No.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined 1s., and delivered to his employer .

Reference Number: t18320216-26

NEW COURT. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

531. ELLEN CARROL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 bonnet, value 15s.; 1 veil, value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 gown, value 5s.; 2 shoes, value 1s., and 3 yards of ribbon, value 1s. , the goods of James Martin ; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-27

532. ANN GOULDING was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 7 lbs. weight of bacon, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Francis Molers ; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 65. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320216-28

533. CHRISTOPHER EBERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 umbrella, value 6s. , the goods of William Heslewood ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-29

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

534. ROBERT ALLISON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 truss of clover hay, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Gardiner , his master ; and JOHN PARKER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS GARDINER . I keep the New Globe-inn, Mileend-road . The Regent's-canal is by the side of my house, and I have a stable adjoining there - Allison was my ostler ; Parker lived in the neighbourhood. On the 7th of January I had been to Whitechapel hay market, and in consequence of what I heard when I returned, about four o'clock, I went to Allison in my yard, and asked him if he had been to the other stable, and delivered any clover - he said No, he had not been there; I went over to the other stable, and found under the loft door a quantity of clover, which had fallen from the loft, that had not been there before, as he had been delivering out some straw in the morning, and some of that had fallen, and this clover laid on that; I gathered up some of the clover, and went and told him I was convinced there was something wrong, and that I knew the party who had had the clover - he said he knew nothing about it; I sent for an officer, and when he came we sent for Parker out of my tap-room - the officer asked where he got that clover from, which he got out of the yard over the way; he hesitated a few minutes, and then said it was all right, it was a truss of clover he had brought from the watering-house the back-way; there is no back-way to the watering-house - his coat was covered with clover; he said he had carried it to a cart, and put it in Bow-common-lane.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not Parker offer to show you the cart on which he put it, and tell you he got a draught of porter? A. He said he brought it out for a poor man, and put it on his cart; I did not go with him to see the cart - Allison has been with me eight months; I had a very good opinion of him till latterly - the stable is in a private situation.

COURT. Q. You never saw the truss of clover afterwards? A. No - I could not miss one truss from my stock.

JOHN EASTERBROOK . I am the officer, and took the prisoner - what has been stated is correct.

MARY FLEXNEY . I live in a house adjoining Mr. Gardiner's stable. I was at home on the morning of the 7th of January; I saw Allison come several times that morning, and at one o'clock I saw Parker come and look round the stable - at half-past four Allison came down the yard- he unlocked the stable, and went up the ladder inside to the loft; Parker was a few yards behind him, and

when I came from my kitchen, Parker came from the loft door with a truss of clover on his head - Allison came out of the stable, locked the door, and went up the yard before Parker; a boy said to Parker, "John, that don't belong to you, drop it;" the boy was wheeling a barrow of dung at the time - Parker stopped to speak to him, and then went up the yard.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were you from him? A. Quite close to him; I worked at hay-making for fourteen years - I know clover hay.

FREDERICK ATTEWELL . I was wheeling the barrow of dung about half-past four o'clock; I saw Parker go past me with a truss of clover on his back, in a direction from Mr. Gardiner's loft - I said, "John, that don't belong to you, where are you going?" he said, "I am going to Robert," meaning Allison.

MARGARET SMITH . My house joins the stable. I had seen Allison go into the stable, and in five minutes Parker came with the truss, and passed my window - Robert then came out, locked the door, and went away.

ALLISON - GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

PARKER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-30

535. JAMES BURFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 2 wooden doors, value 10s.; 10 wooden stall-posts, value 10s.; 10 wooden story-posts, value 10s.; 6 wooden racks, value 6s.; 6 wooden mangers, value 6s.; 10 wooden rafters, value 10s.; 20 wooden flooring-boards, value 20s.; 20 other wooden boards, value 10s., and 10 wooden partitions, value 20s., the goods of the Mayor and Commonalty and Citizens of the City of London , and then being fixed to a certain building, belonging to them , against the Statute, &c.

2nd COUNT stating them to be the goods of the Hon. and Rev. Hugh Percy , Doctor in Divinity, Lord Bishop of Carlisle, then being the Prebendary of the Prebend of Halliwell and Finsbury, within the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, London .

TWO OTHER COUNTS like the first, omitting the words in italics.

MESSRS. BULLOCK and GURNEY conducted the prosecution.

MR. FRANCIS BLIGH HOOKEY . I have a lease from the Mayor and Commonalty of London, dated the 22nd of September, 1810, by which a piece of ground, with the messuages and buildings there on erected, or to be erected, was let to Matthew Bacon , of the City-road, in the parish of St. Luke, Old-street , stable-keeper, for twenty-one years, from Michaelmas, 1812, at the yearly rent of 66l.

MR. SCOTT. I know these premises; they are part of the manor of Halliwell and Finsbury, within the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, London - it belongs to the prebend of St. Paul's - Dr. Hugh Percy, Bishop of Carlisle, is the prebend.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Are they the property of the City of London? A. Yes, and the prebend of St. Paul's.

COURT. Q. Is it joint property? A. The property is leased by Act of Parliament to the City of London, subject to the payment of one sixth part of the profits of the estate to the prebend.

MR. WILLIAM MONTAGUE . I went to the premises in the City-road, which are the subject of this inquiry, in the latter end of November last; I found them considerably dilapidated - a roof, which had formed a covering for a general ride, was entirely taken away, and in a back building, at the extremity of the premises, I found the timber and boarding of a floor had been removed - the stalls, which had been in the stable, were taken away within a short time, and the doors and chimney-pieces in the house had been removed.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you inspected the lease? A. No, but I know generally what the terms of the City leases are; I do not know that I have seen this lease, but it was done in my office, and when I went to the premises the counterpart was put into my hand - I will not swear I read it, but I looked at the plan and at the premises; I believe this lease applies to these premises, but I have not read the lease; I do not think the plan was drawn in my office, but I have known the premises these fifty years.

GEORGE FITCH . I am a broker. I was employed by the City Comptroller to distress on these premises; I went there on or about the 10th of November - I went again, I think, on the last day of November or the first of December; I then found that some joists and boards had been taken away, and some doors and chimney-pieces.

COURT. Q. Can you state what property was taken from the first time you went to the last? A. The joists and boards of a whole floor had been cut away, but whether they had been taken off the premises or not, I cannot tell; the stalls and racks had been taken before I went.

THOMAS HALL . I live next door to the premises, and have known them these forty years; I think it is eight or nine months since the prisoner came there - when he had been there about four months he began pulling down the place; he first took off the covering of the ride where the horses go under, and on the 10th of November I saw a van loaded with doors, partitions, joists, and flooringboards, but I did not see the prisoner then; I met him about that time in Gee-street, and he said, "If you don't pay me my rent, I will serve you with an Exchequer writ" - I hold a four-stall stable and a loft, which are part of these premises; I saw Mr. Smirke in company with the prisoner about that time.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you pay rent to the prisoner? A. Yes, when I was forced.

JOHN SMIRKE . I deal in building-materials, and have had dealings with the prisoner - the first transaction was in September, and I think in the beginning of December I had some boards, some timber, and two pieces of partition from him.

HENRY NORTH . I live in George-street, Battle-bridge, and am a carter. I was employed by Mr. Smirke, about the 1st of November, to take one thousand pan-tiles from these premises in the City-road - they were in the yard.

WILLIAM COLLIER . I was set to watch these premises some time in November; I remained there fifteen days; on the 8th of December I saw two boys digging in the yard, and on the 19th I saw some lead brought out, but I did not see the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner, on which no evidence was offered.

Reference Number: t18320216-31

536. HORATIO WILLIAM HALL was indicted for embezzlement .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-32

537. GEORGE MONEYLAWS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 1 stock, and 42 bits, value 18s.; 1 plane, value 1s., and 1 guage, value 1s. , the goods of Robert Davies .

ROBERT DAVIES . I am a carpenter , and live in Eden-street. I lost my tools from Burlington-mews , on the 23rd of December, while I went to breakfast - I know nothing of the prisoner.

HENRY WILLIAM PARR . I am a pawnbroker. I have a stock and forty bits, pawned by the prisoner, for 6s., on the 23rd of December.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a Policeman. I met the prisoner, and having received information, I took him; I found on him a number of duplicates - he told me he had bought the tools; I said "It was not long before you pawned them" - he said, "Yes, I was forced, to get me a breakfast."(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a cabinet-maker; I bought these tools on the very day he lost them, and had I not been in custody I could have found the man.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320216-33

538. GEORGE POOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 12lbs. weight of bacon, value 8s. , the goods of Robert Cordwent .

JAMES MACINTYRE . I am in the employ of Mr. Robert Cordwent, a cheesemonger , in Coventry-street . On the 26th of January, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop - he asked the price of a ham- I took it to the scale, to weigh it; I turned my head, and saw his basket move - I said nothing then, but he went and took a piece of bacon; I went and took him, and found these two pieces of bacon in his basket - I distinctly saw him take the last piece.

JOSEPH MATTHEWS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 58. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320216-34

539. JAMES COCHRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Roxby , from his person .

JOHN ROXBY . I am master of a ship . On the 26th of January I was in Church-street , near Whitechapel church- a person touched me, and said two men had picked my pocket, and gone towards Whitechapel, one of whom was dressed as a sailor; I missed my handkerchief - I saw two persons, answering the description, standing on the opposite side of the way; I went towards them - they then ran off - I ran and caught the prisoner near the Constitution coffee-house; I have not seen my handkerchief since: it was yellow, with a red flower on it, and a border round it; I had it a few minutes before.

WILLIAM FELL . I am a baker. I saw the prosecutor in Whitechapel - he went on to Church-street; I saw the prisoner take from the prosecutor's pocket a yellow silk handkerchief - he put it behind him, and give it to another young man, who was close to him - they both walked away: the other person got away - the prisoner ran, and was taken; I swear he is the person who took it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing through Church-lane, to go to my father's, when this gentleman said I had his handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-35

540. SARAH DUDMARSH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1lb. 8ozs. of beef, value 9d.; 4 candles, value 2d.; 4 lbs. of potatoes, value 2d.; 8 ozs. weight of bread, value 1d.; 4 ozs. weight of cheese, value 1d., and I pen-knife, value 6d. , the goods of John Benjamin Sharp .

JOHN COLLINS . I am a Policeman. On the 27th of January I was on duty, between nine and ten o'clock at night, at the back of Mr. Sharp's house, in Vittoria-place - his garden goes down to some gravel-pits; I was going round the back premises, and saw a woman under suspicious circumstances - I asked what she wanted, but she would not tell me; I then got over the wall, and saw the prisoner in the privy - I asked what she wanted; she said she was the servant of the house - there was only the wall between me and the woman outside, so that she must have heard what the prisoner said; I had seen the prisoner pushing something down the privy, and I asked if she had seen any body about - she said No; I got out of the garden again, and went round to the front door of the house; I rang the bell, and the prisoner opened the door- I told her I wanted to see her master; the master came out - I went with him to the privy, and found a large bundle down there, containing four candles, some bread and cheese, and the other articles stated; I took the prisoner to the station - she then gave me her keys, and I went back and searched her box; I found this pen-knife and this muslin apron.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q. She made no objection to give up her key? A. No; I know nothing of the knife myself.

JOHN BENJAMIN SHARP . The prisoner was my servant for about eleven weeks: what has been stated is correct - I saw the bundle brought into the garden; I believe the things to be mine - her box was searched, and this pen-knife was found in it, which I have every reason to believe is one I had given to my daughter.

Cross-examined. Q. These things are broken victuals? A. There is some boiled beef, bread and cheese, candles and raw potatoes - I do not call that broken victuals; I have two servants - I never give away broken victuals, nor allow them to do it; I did not say I would hang the prisoner if the law would allow me - I did mention hanging.

MARY SHARP . I believe this knife to be mine - I can swear to it by the pattern; I know the case to be mine, because it was my grandfather's.

Cross-examined. Q. When had you seen the knife? A. I think it was some time in November or December; I looked for it the next day, but could not find it.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-36

Before J. Mirehouse, Esq.

541. WILLIAM GODFREY was indicted for steal

ing, on the 30th of January , 1 book, value 8s. , the goods of Edward Rainsford .

SAMUEL EVEREST. I am thirteen years old; I live with Mr. Edward Rainsford, who is a bookseller , in Red Lion-passage . On the evening of the 30th of January I saw the prisoner going down the passage very quick - he snatched a book from a string, and put it under his arm; it was Demosthenes in Greek - this is it; I ran after him up Red Lion-square - he ran up Princes-street, and dropped the book; I picked it up, and ran after him, down Lamb's Conduit-passage, where he was stopped by the officer.

JAMES COLE . I am a Police-officer. On the 30th of January I ran out of a house in Red Lion-street, and followed the prisoner; I took him at the corner of Lamb's Conduit-passage - this lad came up, and charged him with the robbery.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in Red Lion-passage; I was going to meet my wife - I was certainly running, but two men ran past me, and one said to the other, "Go on," using some bad word; there were others running.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-37

542. MARIA GREGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 gown, value 2s.; 1 scarf, value 1s. 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 1s., and 1 shawl, value 1s. , the goods of Hannah Westcott .

HANNAH WESTCOTT . I am a widow , and live in Kentish-town . The prisoner lodged with me for one month till the 12th of January, when she left me - I had repeatedly given her notice; I was out at the time she left, and when I returned I found some person had been in my room - I missed my gown, petticoat, shawl, and scarf; the prisoner had taken away her own things from my room; these are my articles.

FANNY WILLIAMS . I lodge with the prosecutrix. On the 12th of January the prisoner came into my room, and took a key of an adjoining room, by which means she could go into the prosecutrix's room; she went away.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a Police-constable. I produce a gown, petticoat, shawl, and scarf, which I found on the prisoner, when I took her in a singing-room, in Albany-street, Regent's-park, on the 13th of January.

Prisoner's Defence. The woman the key belonged to gave it me; I did not go the next day.

GUILTY. - Aged 20. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-38

543. ISAAC GUTERAGE was indicted for stealing, 1 lb. of sugar, value 6d.; 1 lb. of butter, value 1s.; 1 lb. of soap, value 6d.; 2 ozs. of tea, value 6d., and 3 lbs. of candles, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Benjamin Spittle .

BENJAMIN SPITTLE . I am a potatoe-dealer , and live at Hatton, in the parish of Bedfont. On the 7th of February I bought these articles; they were wrapped up in a brown paper parcel, which was in the tail of my cart, wrapped in a horse-cloth - I stopped at a neighbour's house on my way home, and stood talking with him; he told me to fetch my things in - I went to my cart, and missed this parcel; I had been in his house a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes - when I missed them I saw the prisoner going up the road; I called, and he stopped - I went, and found the parcel in his possession; I said,"What have you got here?" he said, "They don't belong to you;" I called my neighbour - we took him back, and gave him in charge.

CHARLES FELL . The prosecutor was talking with me- he went out, and missed his parcel; he called me - I went out, and saw the prisoner with it under his arm; he said it did not belong to the prosecutor; I asked how he got the things - he said, "They don't belong to you;" we took him back to my house, and he sat down and said again, "They don't belong to you."

Prisoner. I did not say they did not belong to him; I had picked them up on the road, as I was coming from my mother's - I had them when I passed the cart; I stopped as soon as he called me.

BENJAMIN SPITTLE . I am certain they were in the cart when I arrived at Mr. Fell's; these are the articles.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-39

544. GEORGE HITCHCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 gun, value 4s., the goods of Ann Allford ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

ANN ALLFORD . I am a widow - I keep a shop in Ironmonger-row . This gun is mine; I bought it of a neighbour for 4s. - I lost it out of my shop on Monday, and the prisoner was taken on the Tuesday; I had seen it safe on Monday morning - I told the officer on the Monday evening, that it had been cut from a string in my shop; on the Tuesday evening I was sent for, and knew it - I can swear to it; the pan is broken, and a bit of the stock.

JOHN MONTIER . I am a Policeman. I was on duty on the 10th of January; Norris came and gave the prisoner into my custody with this gun - the prosecutrix claimed it.

JOSEPH NORRIS . On Tuesday, the 10th of January, about a quarter before nine o'clock, I was shutting up my employer's shop, and saw the prisoner going down the turning by our shop with this gun; some person called him back - I followed them both to the next turning; I there saw him offer the gun to the other, for him to run through a court with it; I went up, and took the prisoner and the gun.

Prisoner's Defence. A boy gave it me, and I told him to take it back again.

THOMAS HOBBS KING. I am a Police-constable. I have a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner on the 20th of October, which I received from Mr. Clark's office; he was ordered to be whipped - I know he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 10. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-40

Before Mr. Recorder.

545. HENRY HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 6 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 6d. in copper monies , the monies of Abraham Holwell .

ABRAHAM HOLWELL . I live in Church-street, Hackney , and am a baker . On Wednesday evening, the 8th of February, between six and seven o'clock, I was in one of my shops, and saw the prisoner leaving my other shop- I went to the shop, and there was no one there; Dunn gave me some information; I pursued the prisoner, who was then from one hundred and fifty to two hundred yards off - I collared him, and brought him back; I met a Policeman, and gave him in charge - he was taken back

to my shop; all the silver which had been in the till was gone, but I had not been in that shop for some time - I saw the money, which will be produced, found on him.

JAMES DUNN . I am servant to Miss Cowling, at Hackney - she sent me to the prosecutor's shop for a loaf on the 8th of February - I was going in, and saw the prisoner come from behind the counter; there was no one else in the shop - the prisoner came out, and took a spice nut from the counter; I told Mr. Holwell what I had seen - I saw the prisoner brought back, and I am quite certain of him.

HENRY STEIB . I am six years and a half old - I know God will punish me in the next world if I tell a lie; I live with my parents in Church-street, Hackney. I was looking at the biscuits in the prosecutor's shop; I saw the prisoner behind the counter, taking some money out of the box in the till - he then came out, and took a spice nut - I saw Dunn tell Mr. Holwell of it; I saw the prisoner brought back - I am quite sure he is the person who took the money; I saw some money taken from him.

ELIZA HUGHES . I live servant at Mr. Holwell's. I had seen the till about half an hour before the money was taken; there was then about 8s. in silver in it - one half-crown, some shillings, some sixpences, and more than 6d. worth of copper; the copper was loose, and the silver in a box.

CHARLES OATS . I am a Police-officer. The prosecutor gave the prisoner into my custody - I took him back, and searched him; I found three shillings and one sixpence in one of his pockets, one sixpence in another, and four sixpences and 6d. worth of copper in another; he was charged with having been behind the counter, and robbing the till - I asked him, when I first took him, if he had any money; he said he had not - I took hold of his pocket, and then he said he had 4s. or 5s.; I found this money on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am charged with stealing six shillings, one sixpence, and 6d. worth of copper, and there were seven sixpence, three shillings, and 6d. worth of copper found on me, but no half-crowns.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-41

546. JOHN CHARLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 8 pairs of gloves, value 6s.; 1 night-cap, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 2 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and 5 half-crowns, the property of George Drake Sewell and another, his masters .

NICHOLAS CHALLICOMB . I live in Lowndes-terrace, Knightsbridge , and manage the concern for Messrs. George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross, silk-mercers and haberdashers . The prisoner was their apprentice for about twelve weeks - he lived in the house: I gave him into custody on the 20th of January, in consequence of our clerk finding among the cash some marked money which he had missed from his pocket; but the money mentioned in this indictment was not marked; I saw four pairs of gloves, which were found in the prisoner's box - they had the fingers cut off them; they had no mark on them, but corresponded in quality with the gloves in the shop: he acknowledged that he took them from the shop - they were worth about 6s.; there was a night-cap found in his box, which he also acknowledged taking - I think there were some handkerchiefs found in his box, but I am not certain; a handkerchief was found at his mother's; the officer found the money stated on his person, and he said he had taken it from the desk.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you know that before he acknowledged any thing, Mr. Cross said he would forgive him if he would acknowledge it? A. No, I do not - Mr. Cross was not at the Police-office.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I searched the prisoner's box - I found some gloves with the thumbs and fingers cut off, and one pair complete; the prisoner said he had cut the fingers off to make cots for his fingers - I found this night-cap in his box; he said he took them from the shop - I found this handkerchief and these other gloves at his mother's; I found on the prisoner this purse, a sovereign, five half-crowns, three shillings, a ring, a seal, and a silver franc: in answer to Mr. Cross' question, the prisoner said, "I will tell you as near as I can recollect - I first commenced with taking a shilling from the desk, afterwards a half-crown, and then 5s. - on two occasions I took a sovereign, and once a half-sovereign;" he was asked how he spent the money - he said he hired a phaeton and a pair of ponies, and drove some mantua-maker's daughter about.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Mr. Cross say to him, "I know you have been robbing me - tell me what you have done, and when you commenced, and I will forgive you?" A. Not exactly that; he said, "Now, young man, mind what I am going to say - we have been missing different sums of money from the desk, and we are aware of a great deal more than you think; we have found some marked money which was taken from a young man's pocket - did you take it?" he then said what I have stated; I do not recollect Newgate being mentioned - I think if it had I should have recollected it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 14. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-42

547. ELIZABETH HUMPHRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 candlestick, value 1s.; 2 knives, value 1s.; 3 forks, value 1s.; 1 curtain, value 6d.; 1 tin pot, value 4d.; 1 strainer, value 4s.; 1 spittoon, value 4d., and 12 clothes-pegs, value 3d., the goods of Jonathan Gill , her master .

ELIZA GILL . I am the wife of Jonathan Gill - we live at Kentish-town ; the prisoner was our servant of all work for six weeks. On the 17th of January her brother-in-law came, and demanded her to leave my house and go to another situation - I told him she could not go then, as I had a friend in the house, but on the morrow I would endeavour to spare her; I had not then charged her with any offence, but on the Saturday week before, I said she suited me very well, and I would give her 2l. a year more- her brother-in-law still insisted upon her going; I said if she did she should leave altogether, but it was customary to look into servants' boxes before they went; I went up with her to look into her box, where I found these articles, which I can swear to - the box was not locked; she took them out herself - I had no other servant or lodger; there was one young lady on a visit, and she saw her turn the things out of her box; I said they were

mine, and I would give her in charge - she then said it was her first offence.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was your daughter at home? A. No; there was no one there but that young lady - I am quite sure I did not go up alone and take the articles out of her box; she had given me warning at the end of a month, but I had prevailed on her to stay.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and have these articles - she said her mistress had not been very kind to her for a few days, and she had done it out of revenge; I found some stone blue, pepper, and some other things in her box, which the prosecutrix would not swear to - I found the box locked when I went, but that was after the prosecutrix had seen it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18320216-43

Before J. Mirehouse, Esq.

548. ANN JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 8 yards of lace, value 3s.; 5 yards of worked muslin, value 3s.; 5 pieces of other muslin, value 6d., and 2 cotton bags, value 6d., the goods of Charles Smith , her master .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

ALICIA ANN SMITH . I am the wife of Charles Smith - he lives at Enfield ; the prisoner was in our service about a week; we had her from the office in Bedford-row - I had given her notice to leave, but I did not then know that I had lost any thing. On the 5th of February I sent for the constable, who opened her boxes, and found the articles stated, which are ours.

JOHN MEAD . I am the constable. I was sent for on the 5th of February - the prisoner brought her boxes to me in the parlour; one of them was corded and locked; she gave me the key - I opened it, and found these articles.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 15. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-44

549. JOSEPH KING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 tea-kettle, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Reynolds .

JOSEPH REYNOLDS . I live in Cromer-street, Brunswick-square . On the 20th of January I saw the prisoner go out of my shop with something in his hand; I went to the door, and saw him running with this tea-kettle - I took him about two hundred yards off.

ISAAC SPREADBURY . I am a Policeman. The prosecutor brought the prisoner to the station.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-45

550. JAMES McLOUGHLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 smelling-bottle, value 3s. , the goods of George Watkins .

GEORGE WATKINS. I am a surgeon , and live in Queen's-row, Pimlico . The prisoner was bound to me by the Royal Military Asylum ; I suspected he was going on wrong, from his refusing to take his food, and yet being in good health - on the 31st of January I missed him, about eleven o'clock, and went out to look for him; I met him with one of my door-mats in his hand, which he was holding up, as if to conceal something - I then found he had got two pies; I told him to come in and be searched - he objected, but at last he agreed to come into a small room, but objected to be searched before my other servants; I at length took from his trousers pocket some trifling things, and among the rest this smelling-bottle, which he said he had picked up, but I think it was not likely - I have one similar to it; it is new, and one which the prisoner had lately used - they are not loose about, but in a drawer, which was not locked; I accused him of having taken it, and he then acknowledged that he had; I discovered that the private-mark had been recently removed.

JOHN JENNINGS . I am servant to the prosecutor - he called me out of the kitchen; I saw the prisoner searched - he said he took one bottle after the assistant went away but he put that back, and took this one.

Prisoner. I found the bottle rolled in paper, when I was cleaning the counter; there was no mark on it.

MR. WATKINS. I am certain it had the mark on it, on paper - it might have rubbed off in his pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-46

551. JOHN MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Harvey Piper , from his person .

HARVEY PIPER . I live in Cambridge-road, Mile-end. On the 6th of January I was passing Whitechapel church , about half-past one o'clock; I felt something unusual behind me - I turned, and saw the prisoner and his companion with him: I felt, and my handkerchief was gone- I first collared his companion, but seeing my handkerchief hanging out of the prisoner's pocket, I collared him, and held him till the Policeman came up.

WILLIAM PACKER . I am a Police-constable. The prisoner was given to me by the prosecutor, with this handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of employ for five months; I was looking for employ at the time; there was a crowd near the church - I saw two boys push in and pick this gentleman's pocket; I had my hands in my pockets - they threw the handkerchief at me, and it caught between my arm and my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-47

552. WILLIAM PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of January , 34 lbs. weight of cheese, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Brooks .

THOMAS BROOKS . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Shoreditch . On the 3rd of January, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening, a neighbour told me I was robbed; he brought the prisoner in with him while I was busy in the shop; this cheese is mine - it has the dairy mark on it, which I can swear to.

GEORGE PETTIT . I was going down Shoreditch on the 3rd of January, at a quarter before seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner take this cheese off the window-board - I was about giving my wife a bundle, which I had in my hand, in order to take hold of the prisoner, but he ran across the road, and Mr. Archer caught him in my presence; I saw the cheese fall from him - a person picked it up in the road.

SAMUEL ARCHER . I was going home at a quarter before seven o'clock, and when I was one door from Mr. Brooks I saw the prisoner and another lad; I heard one of them say, "Now be off;" I saw the prisoner endeavouring to cover this cheese up in an apron - he then ran across the road; I pursued, and collared him, and the cheese fell down.

WILLIAM SAWARD . I was walking down Shoreditch; I saw the prisoner with this cheese under part of his waistcoat; Mr. Archer pursued him - he dropped the cheese; I took it to the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home when the gentleman took hold of me; I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-48

553. CHARLES STANLEY and JOHN ROGERS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 3 window-sashes, value 30s., the goods of Thomas Smith , and fixed to a building of his ; against the Statute, &c.

THOMAS SMITH . I live at No. 16, Southampton-street, Leicester-square ; I have a house, No. 13, in that street. In consequence of what I heard I went there on the morning of the 28th of January - I found that three sash frames had been cut out; these are them - they had been cut out on the evening of the 27th of January, but I had not seen them for five or six weeks before; they were back window sashes - I had passed the house three or four times a day, and know the door was fast; an officer took me to Mr. Clements', Upper Rathbone-place, where I found the sashes.

GEORGE HARDISTY CLEMENTS . I live in Rathbone-place. I saw the two prisoners on the 7th of January, and again on the 27th - they brought me three sashes to sell; I agreed to buy them, in order that I might keep them in talk while I sent for a Policeman - they came about seven o'clock in the evening, and were taken; I had bought some of them before, and got into trouble about them.

JOHN TREVEY . I am a Policeman. I was sent for, and took the prisoners on the 27th of January, about twenty minutes after seven o'clock - they were in the shop, and Mr. Clements said they were the persons who brought the former sashes; I told them I took them on suspicion of stealing these sashes - they said they should tell those who sat in higher authority than I did, where they got them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

STANLEY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

ROGERS - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-49

554. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 cap, value 9s., the goods of George Paul , from his person .

GEORGE PAUL . I live in Cambridge-street, Hackney-road. On the 19th of January I was in Norton-falgate - the prisoner took my cap off my head, and threw it into the road; I had never seen him till I met him in Houndsditch about three-quarters of an hour before, while I was standing looking at a copper - he and another came up to me, and stumbled over my foot; I went on, and one of them came up again - one said, "Why don't you heave the soot bag in his eye?" I did not notice them again till I lost my cap; I caught the prisoner, collared him, and gave him in charge.

LAZARUS LEVI . I was in Norton-falgate - I saw the prisoner pull off the cap and throw it into the road; a chimney-sweep caught it and ran away with it; the prosecutor caught hold of the prisoner.

Prisoner. There were other boys all sky-larking together. Witness. No; I thought he was going to steal it - the prosecutor was looking at a boy standing with some toys, but they were not playing.

JOHN GILES . I am a Policeman. The prisoner was given into my custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing to look at some toys - this prosecutor said, "You have got my cap;" I said I had not - he said, "Who shall I get for a witness?" and Levi said, "I will come."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-50

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

555. JAMES ROBERTS and ISABELLA DAVIS were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 5th of January , 2 gowns, value 3l., and 1 pelisse, value 2l., the goods of Edward Bannister , well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

MARY ANN BANNISTER . I am the wife of Edward Bannister ; we live in the Fulham-road. On the 1st of January I went home as the clock was striking ten; I found every door except the back door had been opened - the drawers had been ransacked, and two broken open; the cupboard doors were all open, and I missed property to the amount of 18l. or 20l. - among the rest were two silk gowns, and a pelisse, worth 6l. or 7l.; I had left home about ten minutes before one o'clock - there was no one then in the house; I left every door in the house locked -I found in the passage a piece of sperm candle, and the remains of a phosphorus-match; these are my gowns and pelisse.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What is your husband? A. He has been in service; he has kept lodging-houses these last three years - he is now in the Isle of Wight with his friends; he was in the country when this happened, and has been ever since May last - my landlady is Mrs. Barr; she did not lay any claim to these dresses - she was examined before the Magistrate, but not bound over.

FREDERICK GROSSMITH . I am an inspector of the Police. On Thursday, the 5th of January, I was in Tothill-street, Westminster, with Evans - I saw the two prisoners and another woman, near the King's Arms; Roberts had this bundle under his arm - he was talking to Davis and the other woman, between a pawnbroker's and the public-house; I passed them a short distance and watched them- I saw them go into the King's Arms, and Evans followed them; I then went in, and Davis was abusing Evans - I asked Roberts what was in the bundle; he said some silk dresses, which were his own - I said, "You know me?" he said, "I do;" I said, "Where did you get these?" he said he bought them six months ago, of a man in Petticoat-lane; Davis was still making a great noise, and there were several women in the house - I requested Roberts to come into the street; he did so, and then he again said he bought them of a man six months ago, in Petticoat-lane, but he could not tell his name; I had left the bundle at the bar, and while I was talking to Roberts, Davis was coming out

with something under her cloak - I suspected she had got the bundle, and asked what she had got; she said it was her own - she was loath to show it me, but I pulled it from under her cloak, and found it was the same that Roberts had had; it was then near three o'clock - the bundle contained these articles, which Mrs. Bannister afterwards claimed; on the evening that I discovered where they were lost from I went to Davis, who had been discharged the first day, but could not find her - I found her on Sunday morning, the 8th, at lodgings, which she said were her own: I found in the parlour this screw-driver, which, in my opinion, fits the marks found on the drawers at Mrs. Bannister's - Roberts said he had been in the habit of dealing in such things for two years; he lives in Ann-place, Westminster-road, and he stated so before the Magistrate, but he had first given me another direction.

Cross-examined. Q. Then Davis was twice examined? A. Yes, and twice discharged, and I was ordered to take her again - Roberts then had an olive coat and dark trousers on: the bundle was larger than it is now - Evans was not examined the first day, I believe, but he confirmed my statement on the second day; I cannot say whether Evans heard me ask the question in the house, but he did in the street - I swear that I put the question in the house, and out of the house, as a precaution to myself; I am certain Roberts did not say in the house, that he had been a dealer, attending Petticoat-lane for six months; but he said, distinctly and correctly, that he bought those things six months ago, of a man in Petticoat-lane.

SAMUEL EVANS . I am a Police-officer. I was with Grossmith, and saw Roberts and Davis in Tothill-street -Davis left Roberts, and went into a pawnbroker's shop; I followed her in, and asked what she was pawning - she turned and said, "You vagabond, I am taking something out, "Which I found she was - I then said, "Where is the man that was with you?" she said, "I had no man with me:" I went into the public-house, and saw Roberts there- Davis followed me in; I said to her, "Here is the man, what have you now to say?" she made a great noise - Grossmith, came in and said, "We will have none of this;" he took Roberts out - I then went out, and heard Roberts say he had bought the things of a man in Petticoat-lane, six months before; Davis took a small parcel out of pawn, which she said was a gown.

Cross-examined. Q. What passed inside the public-house? A. There was such a confusion inside, that I did not hear what passed between Roberts and Grossmith - when I came out my attention was not called to any thing that passed, further than Grossmith said, "How long have you been a dealer in these things?" he said two years - that he bought things in the street, or of any body where he could get a bargain.

Davis. Q. Had I any bundle? A. Yes, the bundle you took out of pawn - she afterwards took up this bundle, and was coming out; Grossmith stopped her with it.

JOHN TRUEMAN . I am a gunsmith. I was at the Three Jolly Gardeners. in Rochester-row, on the 5th of January; I saw Roberts, who was a stranger to me, in that house, between twelve and one o'clock - he had nothing then; he took some gin, and went out for a quarter of an hour, when he came back with a bundle in a silk handkerchief, which he laid down by his side; the handkerchief had red spots, and I believe this is it - I left him there.

FREDERICK GROSSMITH . I saw them about half-past two o'clock, near half a mile from that house.

Davis's Defence. The screw-driver belongs to my husband's chest - he is a carpenter.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-51

556. JAMES LOVEGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 2 wooden posts, value 5s. , the goods of John Cumberland .

THOMAS BODEN . I work for Mr. John Cumberland, of Camden-town - he has a saw-pit in which were some posts, some of which were lost three or four months ago. On the 12th of January I had been to Somers-town on an errand: I returned down the King's-road, and saw a carpenter fixing up some posts to a paling in front of a garden - I knew them to be Mr. Cumberland's; I cannot say when I had last seen them, as we have a great number of them - I believe it was some day in October; we lost six of them; I knew them by their matching some others which we had; I told my employer of it, and he sent me to the Police inspector, who came with me - we went, and they were still there, fixed in the ground, but they had been painted over and altered in shape at the top - I had before that told James Martin, and he had been there and seen them; they were taken up and matched with those we had in our possession - they were oak posts, for fencing round fields; they were square originally, but there were not enough to go round the field, and Mr. Cumberland had them cut in two - I examined the quality and age of the timber; they are the same.

JAMES MARTIN . I work for Mr. Cumberland - he had such posts as these about three months ago; these are part of what he had - I remember some being lost: I matched these with what are left - they correspond exactly.

WILLIAM AGGS . I am an inspector of Police. On the 12th of January I went with Martin and Boden to the prisoner's house - he was painting the posts, which the carpenter was putting up; I asked whose they were - he said they were his, he had had them given him six months before, by Mr. Waite, who used to keep the Fortune of War, next door to him; I said Mr. Waite had not kept the Fortune of War for six months past - he said No, he had left it.

THOMAS BODEN . I saw the prisoner there the second time I went, but not the first.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You say you had seen these posts safe within three months? A. It might be four months; it was not so much as six - I think it was in october, or it might be in September: it could not be in August - I have been in Mr. Cumberland's service for fourteen years; I have now a discharge from him, in consequence of a letter which has been sent to him - I am to leave on Saturday week; I believe these posts came from Lord Camden's estate; his Lordship's work is not yet finished - I do not know whether the prisoner is his Lordship's tenant; the posts were not painted when I first saw them - I did not speak to the carpenter; they were next the pavement, in front of the garden - the prisoner consented to their being taken down, and then refused; he then consented again, and they were taken down - I did not say that I had a doubt whether they

were my master's; I went before the Justice - I do not know that I knew any body was coming up for the prisoner; I did not go to his wife, and say there was nothing in the charge, and there was no occasion to bring up any body; I did not go to her with any message - I saw her on the Thursday morning, before the prisoner was taken - I told her the posts were my master's, and she said they had been in their place a long time: I did not go to the house a second time - I do not know that I saw her again.

Q. Now, I ask you again, and desire you to recollect yourself - did you or did you not see the prisoner's wife again? A. No, Sir, I did not, nor speak to her any where - Hilyard was the carpenter who was putting up the posts; he told me that Lovegrove found the posts, and that he had had them for six months, and he himself was to find the rails.

WILLIAM AGGS. I made inquiry about the prisoner of the persons he referred to, and they gave him a good character.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see the prisoner's wife on any occasion? A. Yes, he desired me to go to the neighbourhood and inquire his character, and I went to his house, but not with an intention of seeing his wife; I went to see a lady named Lardner, who is now in Court - his wife said she was going down to the Police-office, and I said I did not think it was necessary - I did not think the prisoner was in danger; Mr. Cumberland desired me to say he did not wish to prosecute.

Q. Did you say to Mrs. Lardner, "Madam, you need not attend - it will save you a dirty walk? A. I did not say she need not attend; I do not recollect saying any thing about a dirty walk - I will not swear I did not: I told his wife she might expect him home by twelve or one o'clock, because the prosecutor said he did not wish to prosecute, he only wished him to be reprimanded, or to have some slight punishment.

COURT. Q. Did you let them know when you found the Magistrate was disposed to commit the prisoner? A. No, there were several of his friends there, who knew what the Magistrate did, and I thought they would let them know - I believe the prisoner is a painter and glazier; his house is about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's.

Witness for the Defence.

THOMAS HILYARD . I am a carpenter. I was employed to put up these posts and rails; about seven months ago I repaired the back part of the kitchen for the prisoner - he said, "What shall I give you to put up some palings in front of my garden?" I said, "What am I to find?" he said, "Nails and rails - I have the posts in my garden;" I went and looked at them, and on the day stated I was putting them up; any person might have looked over the wall, and seen the posts in his garden - the prisoner said to Boden and Martin, "If you can swear to the posts swear to them here;" they said they could not, and he then consented to their being taken up - I was at the first hearing, and I was preparing to go to the second hearing, but the inspector came, said that no person would be wanted, and that Mr. Lovegrove would be at home at twelve o'clock.

COURT. Q. When had you seen these posts? A. About May - I do not mean to say that these are the posts I saw in his garden, but he had oak posts; I looked at them, and said they were rather short - he said, "Yes, but I have an oak bedstead up stairs, which I mean to cut up for spars;" I then said they would do very well - I noticed one was longer than the others, and so are these - he said I might do the job at any time that suited me, and I had a house to finish, which prevented my doing this before; the prisoner is a painter - I heard him say he had the posts of Mr. Waite.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-52

557. CHARLES JAMES RAPLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 piece of gold, value 9s., the goods of Thomas Ausender , his master .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ANN AUSENDER . I am the wife of Thomas Ausender : he is a working goldsmith and Jeweller , and lives in Short's-buildings, Clerkenwell-close . The prisoner has been in his employ more than six vears - he worked in a shop at the back of our house; on the 18th of January he came, and asked me for a piece of gold to make six brooch borders, (I have been in the habit of supplying the workmen with gold for many years) - I gave him a box with several pieces of gold in it; he had a pair of dividers and a gauge with him - he took up several pieces of gold with his right hand, and passed them into his left; I then perceived three fingers of his left hand closed - I watched him, and saw him lay down a piece of gold on the gauge, which he said would do for his purpose; I still noticed that the fingers of his left hand were closed - he then took up the gauge with his right hand, put it into his left hand, and I heard it chink against something, which confirmed my suspicion: just as he was going out my husband came in - I said, "Run and see what he has got in his hand;" he went after him into the shop, and I heard a great many words - the prisoner took the piece of gold in his right hand, which he said would do for his purpose.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where were the dividers at the time? A. In his right hand - he was dividing the gold with them when he had laid the gauge down: there was a knock at the door while he was there - he said should he open it, and I said, "No, thank you," as I thought he would put the gold in his pocket; a lady came in - it is not the rule at the house if a person comes for the servants to go away; they often stop, and have what they want; I called my husband in to tea, after the words that passed in the work-shop; the prisoner then came in, and said he wished to have his wages settled - my husband said he could not settle them then, as he was in such a confused state, but he might call on the next day; he called the next day, and saw me - in the mean time my husband had been to his lodging; I did not see the prisoner again till he was at Hatton-garden - he was in general constantly employed, but sometimes only for four or five days in a week; he was never employed so little as three days till within about a month - he was a confidential man.

THOMAS AUSENDER. On the 18th of January I went into my counting-house, between four and five o'clock; my wife told me to follow the prisoner to the shop, which I did - I

went up to him, and said, "You have a piece of gold, have you not, Rapley?" he said Yes, and he hold up a piece of gold, which he had marked with the dividers, and said it would do for what he wanted, and in fact it was more than he wanted; I said, "You have more gold;" he said he had not - I said, "You have something in your left hand," which was doubled; he said, "Yes, the gauge;" and he held it out to me - I said, "You have a piece of gold in that hand;" he said he had not - I told him I would not stand any nonsense - I insisted upon seeing what was in his left hand; he then took the gauge out of his left hand, and from between the gauge and the palm of his hand he threw this piece of gold on the work-bench - this is it; I marked it - I called him a thieving villain, and said I suspected he had been robbing me for a long time; he said he had only one thing to blame himself for, and that was for denying that he had the gold in his hand, and he did not wonder at my suspecting he had stolen it - I desired him to leave my work-shop; I went for an officer, and went with him to the prisoner's house about two hours after he left me - he lodged in the attic; I went into the room on the left, and he was melting something in some charcoal, but I did not see the metal; I said, "I suppose you expected me?" he said, "Yes, I did, rather;" we went into the back room, and I found he had got a complete shop, a flatting-mill, and more tools than I have - there was some little talk between him and the officer, but I did not hear what the prisoner said; this is the piece of gold - there is about 2 dwts. of 18 carat gold - if I had known he had a shop of this description I would not have employed him; he surrendered at the office.

Cross-examined. Q. You went into the shop in consequence of what your wife told you? A. Yes; I did not see how his hands were when I followed him; the shop is about five yards from my house - I told him to go, and then he said he could not think of stopping; he came into my counting-house to ask for his wages - I said I was not in a state to talk to him about them then - he might call on me on the morrow, and I would settle; I saw an ingot of gold at his lodgings, in a box, about 8 ozs weight, and there were some cuttings, which I know came out of my work-shop, and there was some silver solder cut up in pannels: I said to the officer, "How the sight of the gold makes my heart ache, when I know that I have been robbed;" I did not desire the officer to take any thing else - we went away, and left him that night; I had decidedly expressed my opinion that some of the property was mine, but I have not had it taken - we sent for the prisoner the next day, but he was out; he came to the Police-office of his own accord - I have not sent his wages; I do not know what is due to him - his work is unfinished; he never had to ask me twice for his wages, though he has been with me nearly seven years.

JOSHUA POUNTAN . I am in the employ of the prosecutor. I was in the shop when he charged the prisoner with this; he asked what gold he had in his hand - he said,"This, Sir," but I did not see it as I was at work; Mr. Ausender then asked what he had in his other hand - he said the gauge; he then said, "Have you not got a bit of gold?" he said No - he said, "Open your hand," and I heard something fall on the board; I looked up, and saw a piece of gold in Mr. Ausender's hand - this is about the size of it; there was much altercation, and Mr. Ausender asked what excuse he could have for having it - he said he took it for a size; I suppose he meant to gauge the other by - the prosecutor said it looked very suspicious, having it in his hand, and denying it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know what is due to the prisoner? A. No - he might earn 2l. a week, more or less; I consider him a very good workman; he had to make the borders for six brooches - I did not look up till I heard the gold fall.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he say he took the gold in part of any wages? A. No.

WILLIAM JOHN LYNCH . I am in the prosecutors service. I was present when he came to the shop and asked the prisoner what he had in one of his hands; he held out his right hand, and said, "I have got this;" he said, "Have you got any more gold?" he said, No; he said, "What have you got in the other hand?" he said, "The gauge;" he said, "Have you no gold in that hand;" he said, No:" he said, "Open your hand and let me see;" - he opened his hand, and threw something out of it on the board - I saw a piece of gold taken up, something like this - this gauge would be quite sufficient to conceal a piece of gold of this size; I heard Mr. Ausender call him a thieving villain, and he asked him what he wanted with that piece of gold - he said at first, it was for a size and then he said if there was not enough in the large piece, to make up with that.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Ausender to search the prisoners lodgings - the back room was like a shop - the prosecutor said, "How I have been robbed," the prisoner said - "I never robbed you before, this is the first time I took any thing."

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did the prosecutor point to any particular articles which he could swear to? A. No, he said there was no one thing he could swear to, - I do not remember that Mr. Ausender made any reply when the prisoner said, "I never robbed you before" - he was looking over a box - it was not a large room - I did not take him into custody when he said that - I thought I should have done so, but Mr. Ausender did not wish me to do it - I certainly heard the word; I have been an officer thirty years - the prisoner showed us every thing about his premises - there was a piece of lighted charcoal, and he was at work, on a ring - I went to his house the next morning, but he was not at home, and he came down to the office.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was the gold and silver in the shop in shapeless masses? A. It seemed as if melted into masses, the prisoner was in his shirt sleeves - the piece of charcoal was all in a blaze, metal would have melted in it.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had applied to the prosecutrix for gold for six brooches, but not being able to find a piece large enough for more than two, he told her so, when she replied that he had better take a piece more, and flat it - a lady then came in, and that he said to the prosecutrix,"These will do," upon which she replied, "Very well, take them;" upon the prosecutor's charging him with having two pieces of gold, he replied that he had so, but not more than sufficient to do his work, and the prosecutor being too violent to hear an explanation, he determined to leave - he positively denied having used the words attributed to him by the officer, and had voluntarily surrendered on hearing inquiries had been made for him.

MRS. AUSENDER. The prisoner did not state when he took the principal piece of gold, that it was the only piece of the right substance, but it would only do for two brooches; I am certain he only took one piece for his work - there were larger piece of gold there than he wanted.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his character .

Confined Six Months, without labour .

Reference Number: t18320216-53

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

558. CHARLES CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 coat, value 25s.; 1 jacket, value 18s.: 1 pair of breeches, value 4s.; 1 shirt, value 5s., and 1 waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Cox .

ELIZA COX . I am the wife of Thomas Cox - we live at Hammersmith . On the 9th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went out, leaving nobody in the house; I locked the doors, but left the bed room window open - it is on the ground floor; I returned in half an hour. and, on unlocking the door, saw the prisoner coming out of my bed-room door with a large bundle; I immediately shut the door, ran into the room, and called for assistance - he was taken in my kitchen; the bundle contained this property, which had been in the bed-room - he opened it while I called for assistance.

EDMUND LARGE . I am a grocer. Mrs. Cox called me - I ran round her house, and found the prisoner in her kitchen; I secured him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 46. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-54

559. LOUISA CHAMBERS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 gold ring, value 5l.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 half-sovereign, 10 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Aaron Royce , in his dwelling house .

ELIZABETH ROYCE . I am the wife of Aaron Royce, a milkman - we live in Derby-road, Kingsland ; the prisoner came into our service on the 11th of November. On the 20th of December I gave her a purse, containing a half-sovereign, ten shillings, and a sixpence of William the Fourth: I told her to take it up stairs, and put it into her master's shirt drawer - when she came down I asked if she had put it in the drawer; she said Yes, that she had locked the drawer, and hung the key up; on the 21st we were washing - she asked leave to go out for twenty minutes or half an hour; I gave her leave about eight o'clock in the evening, and never saw her again till the 24th, when she was at Worship-street - she had not given warning; finding she did not return, I went to the drawer - the purse and money were gone, also a shawl and two gold rings, which I should think were worth about 5l., but I did not buy them, and cannot swear to the value - none of my property has been found; she had been with me once before for nine months.

CHARLES WALLER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at a bad house, in Rose-lane, Spitalfields, on the 23rd of December; I told her I wanted her on suspicion of robbing her mistress; there was a young man in her company - I said he must go also; she said he knew nothing about it - she said nothing else, except before the Magistrate.

GUILTY of stealing, to the value of 99s. only . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-55

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

560. JOHN JUDD was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Moore , on the 24th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, I hat, value 2s., his property .

EDWARD MOORE . I am a smith , and live in Peartree-court, Shoreditch. On the 24th of December, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I was coming from a friend's house, with Cooper - we called at the Eagle public-house, Kingsland-road , for something to drink; as we were going into the house I saw several people coming out - the prisoner was one of them; they rushed out - I knew the prisoner before by sight; they shoved us away from the door - I was going away, finding I could get nothing, and the prisoner up with his fist and hit me a punch in the mouth; I fell down, and lost my hat - I could not tell what became of it; it was gone before I got up - I inquired among the mob several times for it, but could not find it: I have not seen it since - I had been with Cooper to his mother's, but had been to no public-house, nor had we been drinking.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you strike me before I struck you? A. I did not.

GEORGE COOPER . I am a smith, and live in Booth-street, Pitfield-street. I was with Moore-as we were going into the Spread Eagle, some people were coming out; they pushed us off the threshold of the door, on to the pavement - I turned to look for Moore, and missed him from my side; I found him laying on the curb-stone on his back, bleeding at the mouth - I took him up; his hat was missing - I had not seen him struck; I asked several times for his hat, and was then knocked down myself - when I got up I found the Policeman had got the prisoner; Moore and I were both sober - we had not tried to push into the house, for the Policeman said we could not get any thing; we were going on home - I suppose about a dozen people came out of the public-house.

WILLIAM COOK . I am a Policeman. I was on duty, and stood next door to the Eagle - Moore and Cooper passed me, and went to go into the house; I took hold of each of them by the collar, and told them they could have nothing to drink, to prevent their going in, as I saw a mob was coming out; they went away directly, and never spoke a word to me - they had got eight or ten paces towards the curb; the prisoner got in front of them, knocked Moore down, and as he fell his hat came off - the prisoner took it up, and went behind his associates; I was immediately seized by the left arm, by a man named Goodwin, who said, "Let them go to work" - I pressed my arm from him, and charged him, in the King's name, to aid and assist; he is a night man's son - I went up and took the prisoner, who stood by the shutters; he kicked at me - I held him till my brother officer came: he was taken to the station, after great resistance; I never saw

the hat after he went behind his associates - I was seized by Goodwin, or I could have taken him with it; he had been in the public-house with Goodwin.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the prosecutor strike me before I struck him? A. Certainly not - you gave him a tremendous blow: he went down as if he was shot.

GEORGE GREGORY . I am a Policeman. I came up, and heard the prosecutor asking for his hat; the prisoner's associates surrounded Cook - he could not take the prisoner along by himself, and I assisted.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at work very hard all day, washing dandelion roots, and as I came out of the public-house, with a dozen more, this man shoved me, and several of us; I said, "You cannot come in;" he struck at me, and knocked my cap off - he was then struck, but was never knocked down.

ALEXANDER CRAWFORD . I keep the Spread Eagle. The prosecutor and his witness came to my door, and tried to force an entrance; I had just closed the door, and was sweeping up and getting the people out - they knocked and hammered at the door; my man opened it to see whether it was on the jar, and called me; I said I should not let them in; they then tried to force the door open against me: I used force to push them back; the other party in the house was in conversation in front of the bar.

Q. What party? A. The prisoner and several more, all relations and friends - I would not draw them any liquor, and they were just on the point of going - when I opened the door to let them out, the prosecutor and his friend went to force themselves in; I pushed the three men (the prisoner, Bartlett, and Goodwin) out against them; that is all I know - they had come to my house about seven o'clock in the evening, and were in and out all the evening; I think there were eight of them - I had closed my door on purpose to sweep the doorway and shut my shutter; I heard nothing which passed outside till the rattle sprang.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-56

Before Mr. Baron Bayley.

561. ABRAHAM HARRIS , AUGUSTINE WOOD , and CHARLES ANDERSON were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , 6 muffs, value 8l.; 8 fur tippets, value 12l.: 3 fur boas, value 3l.; 30 fur collars, value 4l. 10s.; 20 German lamb skins, value 4l. 10s., and 60 rabbit skins, value 2l., the goods of Samuel Michael , in his dwelling-house ; and LUCY HAMBRIDGE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

SAMUEL MICHAEL . I live in Brook's-court, Brook's-market, Holborn . On Monday morning, the 2nd of January, about eight o'clock, I missed all these furs, which I had seen safe the night before - (I knew the prisoner Harris; I had lived next door to his father - he came to my house about three weeks before the robbery, and said,"Oh, you have got a good stock of furs;" I said, "Yes, I wish I could sell them;") my lodger keeps a dog in the garret, and that had barked about six or seven o'clock that morning; one person could have carried them all away - Davey, the Policeman, found part of them next day; they were marked with my name.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you purchased any thing from Harris before this? A. He once brought some old muffs - I would not buy them, but I believe my wife gave him 3s. for them to cut up - that was three or four weeks before the robbery.

Q. Did you not tell Harris that three men had attempted to break open your house that night? A. Yes, on the Friday night they had opened my shutters and looked in at the window; that was two days before the robbery - I told him so on the Sunday night, when he called; he did not sit with me that night - I never kept him in conversation. for I knew his character; he stood at my cutting-board for about a quarter of an hour - I asked what was his pleasure: he said, "Have you sold your muffs and tippets?" I said No; and next morning I was robbed of them - he saw them all that night, and said he had a customer, and could sell them for me: I said if he did I would give him a commission - his father is in the same business as I am.

COURT. Q. Was he at your house three weeks before the robbery, and again on the night before? A. Yes - the property was worth 32l., 17s.

THOMAS DAVEY . I am a Policeman. On Tuesday night, the 3rd of January, I and Busain went to No. 10, Lion and Lamb-court, Playhouse-yard, and in a room up one pair of stairs, I found eighty-three pieces of fur, part of which the Magistrate ordered me to return to the prosecutor - I have a tippet, two skins, and three collars; I found no muffs - there are but two rooms in the house: Wood and Hambridge were in the room when we were searching - I found the skins on the floor, under a bed; I saw the letters M. T. on one of the skins - the inspector found the tippet on the left-hand side of the room, under another hed on the floor: Hambridge was up, but had not all her clothes on - I took Anderson that night, at the Castle, reville's-rents.

JOHN BUSAIN. I am a Policeman. On Tuesday, the 3rd of January, I went with Davey, about seven o'clock in the evening, to this house; Hambridge and Wood were there - I found this tippet between the bed and mattress; there were eighty-three pieces of fur in all found, but no muffs; there were two beds on the floor in the room - the skins were under the bed by the door, and only the tippet under the other bed; Wood and Hambridge were down stairs when the furs were found; the house is only one story high - I had taken Wood and Hambridge into custody in the ground floor room, before I found the furs; that was not on account of the furs - when the furs were first found, not suspecting they were stolen, we did not take them, but when we took them and counted them, the prisoners were in the room; they had been brought up - seeing some of them marked we said, "Here are some furs we don't think are honestly come by;" they made no reply.

MARY ANN HEARDSON . I am fourteen years old, and was in Mrs. Hambridge's service, at No. 10, Lion and Lamb-court; she had the whole house - the bottom room was hers, and she let the upper one to Anderson, at 2s. a week - she slept in the lower room, but moved her bed up into Anderson's room while her own was white-washed; one bed was hers, and the other his; I saw some furs in that room about eight o'clock on Monday morning; there

appeared a good many - I did not see them brought in: Mrs. Hambridge was then in bed in the room; Anderson and Wood were there - I do not know what they did with them, for a young man named Holley, who was there, sent me down stairs; I went there at eight o'clock in the morning - they must have been brought in before that; Hambridge's bed was nearest to the door - Anderson had not lodged there a week, but I heard him say he would pay 2s. a week for the room; nobody but him lodged there - nobody came to look at the skins while I was there: they always sent me down when they were going to do any thing - I never saw Harris there but once - that was a week before the skins came; Anderson, Wood, and Holley staid in the room a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after I was sent down - Harris lived in Play house-yard, about ten doors from Hambridge's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you remember seeing some bundles there when you and Mrs. Hambridge went up to light the fire? A. Yes, it was about eight o'clock in the morning - I heard her ask Wood how much he gave for them; I do not know whether he said 15s. or 16s. - she said she wished he would taken them out of her premises.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you recollect whether Sunday was a wet night? A. I believe it was dry - I did not clean their shoes that morning, but they were dry.

COURT. Q. Where did Wood live? A. He lived in the same room as Hambridge - they lived together, I believe; there was only one bed in the room; she had not been there a week.

JOHN DIXEY . I am a milkman. On Monday morning, the 2nd of January, about eight o'clock, I was in Brook's-court, and saw a man, dressed in a light great Coat, come out of Mr. Michaels' with a dark brown bag full of skins and furs - it was a large bag, and appeared to have a great many in it; I think Harris is the man - I never saw him before; he went towards Bell-court - I do not know Lion and Lamb-court; I did not speak to him - I saw him at Hatton-garden.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When you were at Hatton-garden was Harris brought out for you to see him? A. I saw him going through the office; I said I thought he was the man; I was never at the station-house - I said I thought I had never seen him before the Monday - I was not at the station, and never said I had never seen him before in my life; he was dressed in a light grey coat.

JOHN BUSAIN . Dixey was never at the station-house - he appeared very doubtful about Harris at Hatton-garden - his evidence was taken down subsequently; his words were, "I think it is him; I cannot swear positively" - but after considerable hesitation he said, to the best of his knowledge, he was the man.

THOMAS McCARTHY . I am a Policeman. I went with Phillips on Monday, the 2d of January, and apprehended Harris in Peter-street, Saffron-hill, between two and three o'clock in the morning - he was asked where he lived, and gave his address at his sister's, in Benjamin-street; he did not say what number - it is at the end of Red Lion-street, about three quarters of a mile from Lion and Lamb-court - I inquired in Benjamin-street, at his sister's, and found he did not live there: I told him we could not find him living in Benjamin-street - he then gave his address in West-street, with Mr. Miles; I inquired - Miles said he had lodged there one night, about a month before; when he was apprehended he had a dark blue or black bag with muffs in it; I cannot say what became of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Why did you not keep it? A. There was another officer in the case, who is ill; he had it till a young man, who was discharged, had it delivered to him - the furs did not belong to the prosecutor.

JOHN MILES . I live at No. 12, West-street, Smithfield. Harris lodged with me for near twelve months, and left about a week before January - he did not lodge with me till then; he had been away some time, and returned for a few nights - the last time he slept in my house was about a week before January.

SARAH LATIMER . I live at No. 27, Playhouse-yard; Harris and his wife lodged at my house when he was apprehended, and for three weeks or a month before. On the first Monday in January I was going to my yard. about ten o'clock, and he was coming down stairs - I had not seen him before; whether he had been out before I cannot tell; Mrs. Hambridge was a particular acquaintance of theirs, and Mrs. Harris was a great deal at Hambridge's; I was recommended there for their character.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. About what time did they generally breakfast? A. I cannot say - I often saw them go out late in the morning, and come home late at night - I never saw him out so early as eight o'clock in the morning; he wore a dark brown coat - I do not recollect ever seeing him in a light great coat.

JOHN BUSAIN . The bag that was delivered up was either a rusty black or a dark brown.

LYDIA BURROWES . I live in Michael's home. I went out a little before eight o'clock for milk, and fastened the door after me, and when I came back the door was still fast - it was on the single lock; a false key would open it- I returned about ten minutes past eight o'clock, and found it as I had left it: I went out afterwards, and left Dixey at the door.(Skins produced and sworn to.)

Harris' Defence. On Sunday I went to bed about twelve o'clock, and arose on Monday, between ten and eleven - I went down Peter-street, and two Policemen apprehended me with a brown bag and a black one; one was empty and the other full of furs, which were delivered up to the young man they belonged to.

RICHARD GROVES . I am a lapidary, and know Harris; he sells furs. On Monday, the 2nd of January, soon after two o'clock, I saw him at my place, in Benjamin-street - he went away with Thomas Harding, who had some furs in a bag, and I gave the prisoner a black bag out of my box to put them into - I am his brother-in-law; I have known him about four years, and never knew him wear a light great coat.

THOMAS HARDING . I am a furrier. On the 2nd of January I was standing at Groves' door, talking to Mrs. Groves, when Harris came up - Mrs. Groves went up stairs with him; he came down with a black bag under his arm.

ELEANOR GROVES . I am Harris' sister. I gave my

husband the keys, and he gave Harris a black bag out of the box - I never knew him wear a light coat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-57

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley.

562. SARAH BRAME was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of December , 1 jacket, value 2l.; 6 shells, value 6.; 2 table-spoons, value 40s.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 1 walking-stick, value 3s.; 1 shawl, value 1l.; 1 mahogany pillar, value 10s.; 1 gold ring, value, 5s. and 1 sovereign, the property of John Raines , in the dwelling-house of Sarah Flanders .

MR. HEATON conducted the prosecution.

ANN RAINES . I am the wife of John Raines, who is at sea . The prisoner helped me to move from Mrs. Francis', in Wellington-place, to Captain Watson's, in Clark-street, Stepney - I cannot say from which lodging these things were stolen; she was in the habit of coming to my apartment - I moved on the 20th of December; she came to me on the 21st to help to make the place tidy, and on the 22nd I missed these things; the sovereign was lost at Watson's I know, but I never saw the other things there.

GEORGE GRAY WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, Stepney. I have a jacket, pawned by the prisoner on the 26th of August, and a gold ring, with a necklace and two brooches, on the 11th of January, 1832; I have known her eighteen months.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you take them in yourself? A. Yes; she pawned them in the name of Brim, of Stepney-green.

WILLIAM EDWARD RUMSEY . I am shopman to Walker, a pawnbroker, of the Commercial-road. I have a waistcoat, two tea-spoons, and a shawl, pawned on the 18th of January, by Stephenson; also a pair of silver table-spoons - they were all pawned for 1l. 18s. 6d. at the same time, but in three lots.

MARY STEPHENSON. I pawned these things at Walker's - the prisoner had pawned them at Williams', and sold me the duplicates on the 31st of December; I redeemed them.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A broker; duplicates are often sold by poor people - she told me she had pawned them from want, and should never be able to redeem them - I gave her 3s. 6d. for the duplicates; they were pawned for 2l. 0s. 6d.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . These things had been pawned with me by the prisoner, and were taken out by Stephenson.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years . (See Third Day.)

Reference Number: t18320216-58

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

563. THOMAS GEORGE CLAY was indicted for embezzling the sum of 8l., which he had received on account of Abraham Wildey Robarts and others, to whom he was servant .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing a 5l. Bank note and 3 sovereigns, the property of his said masters.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JAMES RYLAND. I am cashier to the London Provident Institution, which is a bank for savings, held in Bloomfield-street, Moorfields . Mr. Abraham Wildey Robarts is one of the trustee s - there are several others; the prisoner was a messenger and door-keeper at the office - his duty was to carry messages to the trustees, and to arrange the persons who came to the office to make deposits - it was no part of his duty to receive money from the depositors; he did not, in September, 1830, or at any time, pay 8l. over to me for Hubbard and wife - he could not possibly pay it to me on the 13th, on the new account, which he states in this book, for Hubbard had no account whatever; here is a book which Mrs. Hubbard gave me - it contains an entry of 8l., dated the 13th of September, and stating it to be a new account; we never open new accounts on Monday, which was the 13th - this book is divided into columns; the fourth column is for the initials of the manager - the manager's initials are not to this book, nor has it a number, which ought to be the first thing entered; if this was a genuine entry the figures would be in the hand writing of the clerk who opens new accounts - the entry in the other column would be the hand-writing of the second clerk; it is not in the hand-writing of any of the authorised clerks of our office; I know their writing - we have the same clerks now, except one named Hill; I am certain no part of the book is in his writing - the prisoner left in April or May, 1831.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have the clerks books of this description? A. Yes; there are six clerks in the office - the hours for business with the public conclude at three o'clock - Mr. Robarts was a trustee in 1830, and, I believe, from the commencement of the Institution, in 1816; the prisoner had not left us quite a year when he was apprehended - I believe he was taken in the residence he occupied when in our office; he had no part of the clerk's duty to perform - all monies paid in there should be received by me; the clerks refer depositors to me, to make payments - I am responsible for the money received; the accounts are kept by the actuary - the prisoner was to arrange the depositors according to their turn; I pay the cash to the treasurer - nobody but myself is authorised to receive money; I am not aware of any express stipulation that no clerk is to receive money, but that is the course of business - I am not aware that about the time the prisoner left, it had been proposed to put him in livery.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. It was the prisoner's duty to present the depositors at the clerk's desk? A. Yes - the clerk enters the figures in the book, and after the money is paid to me, it is written in words, at length, by another clerk, and a manager signs his initials in the margin - that has not been done in this book.

JUDITH HUBBARD . I am the wife of John Hubbard - we keep a house for Mrs. Keemer, at Streatham, and by advice of her steward, on a Tuesday in September, 1830, I went to the London Provident Institution, to deposit a 5l. note and three severeigns; it was my husband's property - I got to the office, in Bloomfield-street, about a quarter-past twelve o'clock; Mr. Lock wood, the steward, had come with me - we saw the prisoner in the outer office; Lockwood told him he had brought me there to put a little money into the savings' bank - the prisoner asked if I was married; I said Yes; he asked if that was my husband - I said No; he then said I could not put it in without my husband, and he would give me some papers

to take home - that my husband was to fill them up and sign them, and when that was done Lockwood and I went back, in about a fortnight, with the papers.

Q. What had you done with the money the first time? A. The prisoner said the first time, that I could leave my money with him, and it would be all correct - I left him the 5l. note and sovereigns; we returned in a fortnight, and gave the prisoner the papers - he looked at them, and said there was something wrong in one of them concerning my husband's business; he gave them to Lockwood to take home again, and gave him his address, that he might send them up, and not have the trouble of coming again - Lockwood is now dead; I got the paper altered - Lockwood wrapped them in paper, and sent them up; a fortnight or three weeks after that, I went to the office for my book, as the prisoner had promised to send us one - (Lockwood and us were uneasy about it, and Lockwood paid my fare up to see about it;) when I went in, the prisoner said, "Good morning, Mrs. Hubbard, I was just going to send your book up;" he had got it in a brown paper parcel, directed to my husband, at the Horse and Groom, Streatham - he said he supposed I was uneasy about it; I said, "Not particularly, I suppose it is all right now;" he said, "Yes, it is all correct;" I was then satisfied - this is the book he gave me; he came to see me on the last Sunday in last March - I brought out my book, and he said something about 3 1/2 percent. for what I had deposited, and if I had any more to deposit at any time, he would take it as a friend, and see it deposited for me - about three weeks before last Christmas, I went up to the office again, with a little money we had saved, and found Clay had left; I presented my book, and was told that was not the day to make deposits - I wanted them to make it for me; they refused - we left, and six weeks ago next Monday, I came up with five sovereigns, and found we had no money there; inquiry was made about it.

Cross-examined. Q. You went at noon-day to make your deposit? A. Yes - I saw nobody but Clay; I was in the outer office - he appeared like a gentleman then, but, I believe, was called the porter; it was a kind of place I was never at before - I went on a Tuesday, the first and second time; the 8l. has never been put down to my account.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of any criminal intention - I merely took it in my duty, as I thought it was to promote the interest of the concern, but my memory being very bad, (I have been materially injured, several times severely, and consider) I must have overlooked the thing, which certainly an upright man should not have done - it is not likely I should have committed myself in this way, when there was no occasion for it; it must have arisen in some degree from being fully occupied in another extensive concern, which I hold at the present moment.

GUILTY. Aged 62. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-59

564. THOMAS ISAACS, alias BETON , was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 140 yards of printed cotton, value 3l., the goods of Thomas Darke Allin and another .

THOMAS SHEPPERSON . I am in partner ship with Thomas Darke Allin . On the 28th of January, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, on arriving at our ware-house, I was informed of this robbery, and found the prisoner in custody with the cotton.

JOHN GIBSON . I am porter to the prosecutors. About half-past seven o'clock in the morning, just as the warehouse was open, I saw the prisoner take this cotton, which was near the door - there were two other servants in the warehouse, but they were at the back part; I was about seven yards from the door - my back was towards the prisoner when he came in, but my face was to him when he took it; he went out with it - I went after him, overtook him with the print on his shoulder, and brought him back; he had five pieces of cotton.

JOHN RIDGLEY . I am a constable. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-60

565. GEORGE DEWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. 6d., the goods of John Parry and another .

JOHN PARRY. I am a linen-draper , and live on Ludgate-hill , and have one partner. On the 28th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I came down into the shop, and missed this handkerchief off the counter - the prisoner was in the shop charged with the theft; I saw him give it up.

JAMES RENIE . I am in the prosecutor's employ. The prisoner came to the shop, and presenting a pattern of flannel, asked at what price we could supply that quality, saying he had been sent by a gentleman from the Tower, who would want about three hundred yards, to make Cholera Morbus belts, that the guards had been charged 2s. 9d. each, and he thought he could supply them at 1s. 9d. - I watched him; there was nothing on the counter likely to attract his attention but a handkerchief, and in two or three minutes I missed that - I sent for an officer, and charged him with it; he denied it, but on my saying we should soon ascertain what he had about him, he took off his cap, presented the handkerchief, and said, "This is all I have of yours."(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather tipsy - I wanted four or five yards of flannel, and said I might want a large quantity afterwards - I took up this handkerchief, lifted it into my cap, and left my own by the side of a basket, thinking it was mine; he said, "You have made a mistake, you have got the wrong handkerchief;" I took off my cap, and saw it was his - I gave it to him, and took my own from the basket.

JAMES RENIE. I saw no handkerchief of his; he came into the middle of the shop, and then moved to where this handkerchief laid - he could not mistake it for his own - he did not appear tipsy.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-61

566. JOHN DONNOLY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 7 handkerchief, value 2l. 4s. , the goods of John Howell .

SECOND COUNT, calling it 7 yards of silk.

JOHN HOWELL . I am a hosier , and live in Aldersgate-street . On the 2nd of February, about four o'clock in the

afternoon, the prisoner came, and asked to see some black silk handkerchiefs, which I showed him, and immediately suspected him; I watched, and saw him secreting these handkerchiefs under his coat; I caught hold of his coat, but he broke from me, and got out of the shop while I went round the corner - I secured him about two hundred yards off - the moment I got up to him he unbuttoned his coat, and let the handkerchiefs fall - they are two pieces of black silk handkerchiefs, containing seven.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. I heard a cry of Stop thief! in Aldersgate-street; I saw the prisoner running, and Howell after him - he was stopped by a person, and about a yard from his feet I picked up four handkerchiefs; another person took up three - I found 1s. 2d. on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-62

567. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of George Goble , from his person .

GEORGE GOBLE. I live in Surrey-square, Old Kent-road. On the 4th of February I was on London-bridge , going home: I felt a strange motion at my coat, which drew my attention - I turned round immediately, and saw the prisoner at my right arm; I laid hold of him, put my hand into his pocket, and there found my handkerchief - he tried to get away; he did not claim it.

EDWARD THOROGOOD . I am an officer. I received him in custody - he did not deny the charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he saw the handkerchief drop from the gentleman's pocket, took it up, and was in the act of taking it to him, when he was apprehended - he received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-63

568. JOHN SMITH , THOMAS JONES , and JOHN WIMBLE were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Cyrus Jay , from his person .

MR. CYRUS JAY . I am an attorney , and live in Sergeant's-inn, Fleet-street. On the 16th of January, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was on the right-hand side of Ludgate-hill , going home; I had occasion to use my handkerchief shortly before it was taken - I was walking very fast, and just at Stationer's-court, suddenly, three men came out of Stationer's-court, as I thought; I felt them take my handkerchief, and seized one of them - I could not tell which took it; I am quite sure of all their persons - I held the man I seized, and delivered him to the watchman - the other two did not attempt to run away; in fact, they could not, for the watchman was close by - my handkerchief was found at the feet of one of them; I felt it taken - I did not see them actually come out of the court; I did not see them till I felt my handkerchief taken.

MERCY LEWIS . I live in Regent-circus, Piccadilly. I was on Ludgate-hill, alone, going home; I overtook three men on Ludgate-hill; a gentleman was in front of them, walking at a rapid pace - the three men appeared very close at his heels; I observed one of them flit the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket; they were all three together, in a line - I had been behind them about five minutes; they were in company - the gent'eman missed his handkerchief, and turned round; I pointed to one of them, and said, "That is the man;" he collared him, and called Watch! the watchman was there instantly, and they were secured; Jones is the one who took the handkerchief.

Jones. Q. Did you see me throw the handkerchief away? A. No; you were all three together - I had heard so much of Barking, I was anxious to pass them; I saw them together for five minutes - they seemed in conversation lowly, but were not arm-in-arm.

WILLIAM HONEY . I am ward-officer of Farringdon. -The prisoners were brought into the watch-house, and acknowledged they were acquaintances.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BUTTON . I am a watchman. I had noticed the three prisoners parading the hill for an hour previous to this transaction; I suspected they noticed me, and I lost sight of them for a quarter of an hour - I saw no more till I was called over by the prosecutor; he pointed out Jones, who I took first - I secured them all; Lewis said he was the man who took the handkerchief, which I picked up at his feet.

Jones' Defence. The gentleman was walking before me; he turned round, and said he had lost his handkerchief; the young woman said I took it - I was about three yards from it; they led me to it, and said it was at my feet - I know nothing of the other two men.

MERCY LEWIS re-examined. I first saw them on Ludgate-hill, and was behind them about five minutes; they were walking very fast after the prosecutor - I was anxious to get in front of them.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

WIMBLE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320216-64

569. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 shawl, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Dossetor .

HORATIO HOGARTH . I am in the employ of Thomas Dossetor , a hosier , of the Poultry . On the 28th of January this shawl hung inside the shop, near the door; I saw it going, but could not see who took it - I came round the counter, ran out, and ran by the prisoner, as he was not running, and when I returned I found him in the shop; I went out again, and found the shawl in a passage two doors from the shop.

ELEANOR DAVIS . I live at the Queen's Arms, Cheapside. I was passing, and saw the prisoner take this shawl, and roll it up - he put it into the doorway, two doors off, and walked on: I am sure he is the person - Ottley came out, and I told him that was the man.

Prisoner. Q. How far was I from the door when you told of me? A. About two doors; I was close by you when you took the shawl - I had just crossed; I said you had put it either in your pocket or the doorway, but you went inside the doorway; I saw you put it there.

RICHARD OTTLEY . I am in the prosecutor's employ -An alarm was given about eight o'clock in the evening: I directly ran out, and Davis pointed the prisoner out to me as the man who took the shawl: I collared, and took him

into the shop; Hogarth came in, then went out, and brought the shawl from the doorway.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-65

570. WILLIAM CLARY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a certain man, whose name is unknown, from his person .

JAMES CULPECK . I am a watchman of Aldgate. I was on duty last Saturday night, between eight and nine o'clock, near the Saracen's Head, and saw the prisoner in company with another rather taller than himself; a gentleman passed, who they followed into Leadenhall-street - I saw the prisoner draw a handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket: I immediately collared him - he dropped it on the ground, and his companion ran away; the gentleman walked on - he was fetched back to the watch-house, but would not give his name; he said he would appear if business would allow him.

WILLIAM PLAISTOW . I received the prisoner in charge: he did not deny it.

The prisoner handed in a paper, declaring his innocence.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-66

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

571. JOHN WILLIAM GOLDTHRICE was indicted for stealing. on the 2nd of February , 2 boots, value 3s., the goods of John Sullivan ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320216-67

Before J. Mirehouse, Esq.

572. JOSEPH SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 cap, value 7s., the goods of George Henry Briant , from his person .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Elizabeth Briant .

GEORGE HENRY BRIANT . I am nine years old, and live in Severn-street, St. George in the East. On the 20th of January, about a quarter-past six o'clock, I was in White Lion-street, Norton-falgate; I went on to Spital-square , and the prisoner took my cap off, and ran away with it - I ran after him, and cried Stop thief! I saw him turning round the corner, and followed him into the next street - I saw my cap in his hand till he got into the next street, and then I did not see it; a gentleman ran and caught him.

JOHN LEWIS . I am a clerk in the Bank, and live in London-fields. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and the prisoner passed me very quickly; I followed, and took him: the little boy came up, and charged him with stealing his cap - I did not see it, but the prisoner said he knew it was in Spital-square, and he could find it; I insisted upon his going with me to find it, but it was not to be found - he then denied all knowledge of it, and said he was going to his work.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my custody - he said he did not take the cap himself, but he knew the two boys who did, and I might find them if I went to a beer-shop in the City-road, as they were there every night.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it, and never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320216-68

573. WILLIAM WOODWARD and WILLIAM HOWARD were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 12lbs. of suet, value 6s., and 18lbs. weight of beef, value 9s. , the goods of Henry Hewitt and Jacob Housago .

JACOB HOUSAGO . I live in Edgware-road , and am a butcher , in partnership with Henry Hewitt - we have a slaughter-house at the back of our premises. On the 17th of January I had an ox killed, and at half-past ten at night, I went to look at it: I took particular notice of it, and saw that the kidneys were not so fat as they generally are - the next morning I went to the slaughter-house, from halfpast five to six o'clock, and found that the ox had been robbed of part of the fat, and of the kidneys, I should think of 30lbs. altogether; here is one piece of suet which I took particular notice of, and know it again; I received it from Webster - this is the kidney and the fat that I saw in the ox the night before.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. On the morning of the 18th of January I went to Edgware-road, and ascertained that the two prisoners had been seen there together, at half-past ten o'clock the night before; I then went to Howard's lodgings, which is about twenty-five yards from the place; I found him in bed - I awoke him, and told him he was suspected of robbing the slaughter-house; he said he knew nothing about it - I told him to get up and dress, which he did, and I saw a large patch of suet on the right knee of his trousers; I asked how that came there: he said he knew nothing about it - he got up, and in going down stairs I asked where his handkerchief was; he said he had pawned it; I locked him up, and then went to Woodward's lodgings; I knocked at the door, and his wife answered; I asked if he lived there; she said Yes, but he was just gone down; I said he was not out of the house, and I must wait - I waited, and he came to the door; I said I believe you are William Woodward , he said No; I called up the landlady, and she said he was; I locked the door, and said I must search the room, and in the cupboard I found this kidney and fat; I said, "I have found part of it, you may as well tell me where the rest is;" he said, "In the chest of drawers;" I opened the first drawer, and found the whole of the flank, which had been cut out, and the remainder of the beef suet. I found Howard's handkerchief in Woodward's lodgings, all over grease.

Woodward's Defence. Howard came to my lodging and brought some meat tied in that handkerchief; he asked me to take care of it till the morning; I said I would, as I knew him to be a butcher.

Howard's Defence. As I was going home, I found the meat wrapped up in that handkerchief, all over mud; I took it to Woodward and told him to clean it; I was afraid to tell the officer where it was, as I was afraid of its being stolen.

WOODWARD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

HOWARD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-69

574. CHARLES WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 purse, value 6d.; 4 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign, the property of John Vickers , from his person .

JOHN VICKERS . On the 24th of January I was going to Drury-lane theatre , and as the door was opening I felt a pressure on my back - I had before observed something, which made me rather suspicious; as soon as the pressure ceased, I felt, and my purse was gone - I turned to seize the prisoner, as I knew he had made the attempt before, because no other person was near; he had nearly opened my pocket before - to the best of my belief he had opened my right-hand pocket about two minutes before; I did not then speak to him, but I looked full at him, and buttoned my great coat round me - I had my wife and daughters with me; as soon as the pressure ceased, which was a peculiar sort of pressure, which made me sure I was robbed, I turned and was going to seize the prisoner, but a man threw his force against my chest, and tried to trip my heels up - I saw the prisoner's eyes were fixed on something in his hand; he moved off very slowly, but a man got between me and him - I cried out Stop thief! two or three of his friends tried to impede my progress, and when he got near the entrance of the lobby he ran - I got clear of those who impeded me and ran after him; an officer saw him run, and took him - I lost sight of him for a short time while he turned the corner of a court; when I came up I said, "That is the man, I will swear to him;" he made no reply - I had lost my purse with four sovereigns and a half, out of my pocket; there was no one else near enough to have taken it - he is the man, to a certainty.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If there were persons trying to trip you up, how can you say no one was near you? A. That was afterwards; it was about half-past six o'clock - at the pit door there might be fifty persons, but I was quite outside of them; the crowd was before me when I was robbed, and there was no one behind me but the prisoner - there was no person so close as to rob me; I turned, and would have taken him by the collar, if his companion, who was before me, had not pressed me back, and when I turned the prisoner was facing me in a side direction: just at the moment I first saw the prisoner, another man came between us - I put my arm out to grasp the prisoner, and the other pressed against me; I told the prisoner I thought he had been a clerk of ours, and when he was at the watch-house I called him Davis, but I had not seen that man for ten years - when asked at the watch-house how much I had lost, I said I was not certain, it was four sovereigns or four sovereigns and a half - they then said,"Here are four sovereigns and a half found on the prisoner," and I said, on reflection, "It was four sovereigns and a half;" I knew I had taken four sovereigns and two half-sovereigns from the cash, and did not at first recollect whether I had changed one half-sovereign or two - my purse has not been found; I only lost sight of the prisoner as he turned the corner, and the officer was then pursuing him, so that he was not out of the sight of the officer or me - the pressure was a pressure forwards, to get into the pit, but the prisoner was the only man behind me at the time; my wife had hold of my arm, and my daughters were before me - I did not notice to my wife that my pocket had been opened, but I felt it, buttoned it up, and then buttoned my coat: I was at the door about three minutes.

COURT. Q. If I understand you rightly, there was no one behind you but the prisoner? A. Not immediately behind me, and there was a sharp pressure upon me, which there was no occasion for, and in a quarter of a minute I found I had been robbed - the prisoner was not going forward when I turned, but he had something looking at in his hand, and was endeavouring to get out of the house - it was impossible for any one but the prisoner to take my purse; I have not the least doubt of that, nor had I from the first.

JAMES STACE . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty at the theatre - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner leave the pit entrance; I reached my hand out to take him, but he ran out of my reach, and I followed him to Eagle-court, where he was met by two persons, who stopped his progress - I then took hold of both his hands; I did not see any one following him till I had him in my custody, as the company going to the theatre was so thick - I might have seen the prosecutor before, but there were so many people I did not notice him; I found 15s. 6d. and a bunch of keys in one of the prisoner's pockets, and in his other pocket four sovereigns and a half.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Which of the pit doors was this? A. On the south side; I saw a concourse of people, enough to fill the avenue out of the street; the place was very full as it generally is - when I first saw him, he was coming down the steps from the crowd - I did not lose sight of him; he certainly turned some corners, but I turned and kept him in view - he might have got rid of a purse without my seeing him, or he might have thrown it down before he got out of the crowd - I did not see where his hand went while I was pursuing him - I took him in about two minutes - I looked along the line he run in, and in the lobby, but found nothing -I had taken him to the station-house before that; the prosecutor said he believed he had lost about 4l. 10s.; that was before I told him what I had taken from the prisoner - I do not recollect whether he said pounds or sovereigns; he recognized the prisoner as having stood on his right hand at the theatre, and just as the doors were being opened he felt himself hustled; he said several pressed up against him, and somebody called out "Don't press gentleman, there is time enough and room enough," and when he tried to get after the prisoner, he was attempted to he tripped up; I heard him call the prisoner Davis, and he said he thought he was a young man who had been a clerk of theirs, but afterwards he told me it was not him.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-70

575. JOHN TYLER and JAMES LAPAN were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 2 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 1 half-crown, and 6 shillings , the monies of Jane Freeman .

JANE FREEMAN . I am a widow , and live on Watford-heath ; James Lapan is my grandson, - he has been at my house several times, and he came there last Friday afternoon with Tyler, - Lapan said he was come to bid me good bye, for the last time, as he was going to sea - it was near night - I gave them a good supper, and lodged them; I got up in the morning, about six o'clock, to get their breakfast - I took a light up into their room, for them to dress themselves, and while I was getting their breakfast, they must have got my keys, opened my box, and took my money; there was almost 4l.; there were

wo soveriegns, a half-soveriegn, and some silver, which I had put in on the Friday night, and when they were gone in the morning I missed it - no other person had been in my house - I got on the Chesham coach, and followed them, and about five miles from London I saw Tyler laying on a bank, and Lapan near him - the coachman got down and pursued them; they ran across several meadows, but were taken - I charged them with the robbery; they said they knew nothing of it, but when they were chained up behind the coach, my grandson said to Tyler, "We may as well give it up;" and they gave up this money - but what they did with the rest I cannot tell.

WILLIAM WYATT . I am the coachman. I saw the prisoners on the bank - the prosecutrix called out, "There are the boys;" I stopped, and pursued them for about a mile and a half - I then took them; Tyler said to Lapan, "Give it up, it will be all right;" - Lapan then pulled this box out of his pocket, and gave me 1l. 3s. 6d., saying that was all he had; I took Tyler up to the coach, and put a chain round him; he began swearing, then pulled out 1l. 15s., and said, "That is all we have got - what else do you want?"

TYLER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

LAPAN - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-71

576. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 fowl, value 2s., and half a peck of pollard, value 3d. , the goods of Huntley Bacon .

RICHARD WATKINS . I am a horse-patrol on the Edmonton station. In consequence of what I heard, I went on the 16th of January, and stopped the prisoner, about two hundred yards from Mr. Bacon's farm gate, just as he left work; I found a hen, which had just been killed, in his great coat pocket; I then turned up his frock, and found a small bag of pollard tied round his middle with a string - he said his mistress gave him the fowl, but he owned he stole the pollard; I had not made him any promise; his mistress, before the Magistrate, stated, in the prisoner's presence, that she did not give him the fowl, and he acknowledged she did not.

RICHARD MARSHALL . I am bailiff to Mr. Huntley Bacon - the prisoner was in his employ for about eighteen months. On the 16th of January he was threshing wheat; I saw the fowl and the pollard; I am quite satisfied they were Mr. Bacon's.

GUILTY . Aged 42. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-72

577. JOHN HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 3 shirts, value 30s., and 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Henry Palmer ; 3 shirts, value 20s., and 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Charles Palmer .

ELIZABETH PALMER . I live at Euston-grove - the prisoner is the son of our laundress. On Monday, the 30th of January, he came to our house, and said he came for the linen for his mother; I gave him eight shirts in all, two silk handkerchief and other things; some of them belong to Mr. Henry Palmer , and some to Mr. Charles Palmer .

JOHN ROPE . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Battlebridge. I have three shirts, which I took in from the prisoner on the 30th of January, for 5s.; I am sure he is the person; I had seen him before.

ELIZABETH PALMER . These are the shirts I gave him; I can swear to them by the marks on them: part of them belong to Henry Palmer .

ANN HALL . The prisoner is my son. I did not send him for these things.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutors.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-73

578. JOHN WARNER and JAMES TOWNSEND were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 picture and frame, value 12s. , the goods of William Sutton .

WILLIAM SUTTON . I live in Stepney-fields ; I deal in prints and stationary . I had two prints in my shop window on Friday morning, the 20th of January; they were in black frames; I went out in the morning, and returned at night; I then missed one of them; this is it; it is my own work, and I am quite satisfied about it; I have brought the fellow to it.

JOHN EASTERBROOK . I am a Police-officer. On the evening of the 20th of January I met the prisoners in Whitechapel-road; I saw Townsend pull off his hat, and give Warner a handkerchief, who took something from under his arm, and covered it with the handkerchief; they passed me; I followed, stopped Warner, and asked what he had got; he said a picture, which he bought of a Jew in a public house in Baker's-row; I took him to the office, and the next day I found the prosecutor had lost the picture; Warner said he made the frame, and the glass was given him with the picture; I took Townsend on the Sunday morning - I said I wanted him about young Warner's concern; he said he had heard that Warner was taken about a picture, but he knew nothing of it.

WARNER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

TOWNSEND - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-74

579. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 hammer, value 6d.; 1 chisel, value 6d.; 2 knives, value 2s., and 1 basket, value 1s. , the goods of William Boothby .

WILLIAM BOOTHRY . I am a painter , and live with my father, in Lisle-street . About the 20th of December I lost a basket, containing these things - I have never seen them since.

HENRY RACKHAM . I worked for the prosecutor's father - on the 20th of December I saw the prisoner walking backwards and forwards before his shop; I then saw him come from the shop door with a basket - he put his hand into it, and took out a hammer and a chisel, which I knew were the prosecutor's; he put them into his pocket - I ran after him, but he turned the corner and I lost him; I knew the prisoner well - he had called at the shop for work.

Prisoner. He said, at the office, that he did not see me come out of the shop. Witness. I did not see him come out of the shop; I was at work at a first floor window, two or three doors from the shop - he was not taken for several weeks.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-75

580. MARY BENNETT and ELIZA GLASCOE were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 2 boots, value 3s. , the goods of William Wright .

MARY ELIZABETH WRIGHT . I am the daughter of William Wright - he lives in Holywell-street . On the 20th of January the two prisoners came into his shop, about eleven o'clock, to buy a shift - I showed them one; they said it was not large enough, and asked to look at another; I turned to get one, and saw Glasscoe take two boots off the counter, which she put under her right arm, and covered over with her shawl; I took hold of her, and called my mother - she came, and held her; I called my father, who sent me for an officer - these are the boots.

JOHN ROBERTSON . I am the officer. I took the prisoners - I found 8d. on Bennett and nothing on Glasscoe.

Bennett's Defence. I went to buy the shift, and had the money to pay for it.

Glasscoe's Defence. I saw the boots on the counter - I took one of them up, and said, "What is the price of these?" the lady did not hear me; she turned round, and said I wanted to steal them.

GLASSCOE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year .

BENNETT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-76

581. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 10 silver spoons, value 2l. 5s., and 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Davis .

THOMAS BIRKETT . I am in the service of Mr. Norman, a pawnbroker, in Princes-street, Soho. The prisoner pawned two table-spoons, six tea-spoons, two salt-spoons, and one pair of sugar-tongs with me - I lent 2l. on them; I have not the least doubt of him - I had seen him before.

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I am the wife of Thomas Davis - we live in Museum-street, Bloomsbury ; the prisoner is my son. I saw him at my door on the 10th of February -I immediately went into my parlour, saw a drawer open, and missed this plate out of it; these are my husband's property.

ALFRED JOHN LIST . I am an inspector of Police. I apprehended the prisoner; I asked him if his name was Davis - he denied it - I found in his watch-fob the duplicate of these articles, and a latch-key, which opens Mrs. Davis' side door.

GUILTY. Aged 21. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-77

582. JOSEPH DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 18 lbs. weight of cheese, value 10s. , the goods of William Marshall .

WILLIAM MARSHALL . I am a cheesemonger , and live in High-street, Shoreditch . On the 18th of January I went from my parlour, and saw the prisoner come up to my shop-board, and take something from my window; I ordered my servant to run out - he went out, and the officer was pursuing the prisoner with the cheese; the prisoner was taken to the station, and the cheese was brought back to me - I have no doubt it was mine.

THOMAS WHITNEY . I was in the Police at that time. I saw the prisoner in company with Wilkins and another, loitering about the shop - the prisoner and Wilkins then went to the window; Dean reached in, and took this cheese out of the window, which was thrown open - he ran off; I pursued him, and just as I got up to him he threw the cheese at my feet - I called Stop thief! and another officer took him.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-78

583. THOMAS HULL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 2 lbs. weight of bacon, value 1s. 2d. , the goods of Henry Francis Piagett .

HENRY FRANCIS PIAGETT . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Whitecross-street . On the evening of the 20th of January I was going towards my shop, and saw two persons near it - I had been robbed before, and I watched them; I saw one of them make a snatch at the window - they both ran; I pursued, and took the prisoner with this bacon, which is mine.

Prisoner. I was out of work.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-79

584. LYDIA HESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 2 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d.; 3 aprons, value 2s.; 2 frills, value 1s.; 1 towel, value 6d., and 3 pieces of muslin, value 2s. , the goods of William Wary .

SARAH WRAY . I am the wife of William Wary - he is a tin plate-worker , and lives in Park-place, Kensington . The prisoner lodged for three weeks with us - I desired her to leave me, and as she was going I asked to see her things; she refused - I insisted upon it; she then opened a bundle, and I saw a pair of shoes which I knew - she would not let me see any more, but went away; I told the Policeman - he brought her back, and took her key from her: these articles, which are mine, were found in her box and in a drawer.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Is not she an old acquaintance of your's? A. I knew her when she was about twenty years of age, but I had lost sight of her from that time; she looked out the house for me in which we now live, but I took it - she did not assist me to remove; the same cart took her things and mine, but they were separately packed up - she did not keep her articles in my drawer or boxes; she paid me 1s. a week for one room - I told her that the shoes were mine, but she took them away, and came back for more things; my own articles are not marked, but here is one stocking marked, which is my nephew's, and this handkerchief is my sister's; all her furniture, and bed and bedding, are still at my house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-80

585. MICHAEL HOROGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 8 shillings, the monies of Sarah Boulland , his mistress .

ELIZABETH WEBB . I superintend the business of Sarah Boulland - she is a widow , and keeps a shoemaker's shop , in Newport-street, Soho ; the prisoner was her errand-boy . In consequence of suspicion I marked twenty shillings on the 16th of January, and put them into the till; in the afternoon I missed three of these shillings, and in the evening five more; I sent for an officer - the prisoner was searched, and seven of the marked shillings were found on him - he had been only one week with us; these are the shillings.

WILLIAM McGODDARD . I am an officer. I produce the shillings, which I found in the prisoner's pocket.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had received the marked money from his mistress as wages.

ELIZABETH WEBB . It is impossible that the money which he was paid with could be marked, for he was paid

on Saturday, and the money was not marked till Monday morning.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-81

586. ROBERT JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 7 newspapers, value 3s. 11d. , the goods of John Edwards .

JOHN EDWARDS . I live in Harrow-road, Paddington . The prisoner is errand-boy to Mr. Wilson, of Lissongrove, whom I supply with newspapers; the prisoner used to fetch them from me on Sunday morning - in consequence of what I heard from Mr. Wilson, I went into my parlour on the 29th of January, when the prisoner came to my house; I saw his pockets stick out - I went, and asked what he had in his pocket - he said a handkerchief, and an old newspaper; I said, "Let me look at it;" he felt a long time, then burst out crying, said he had some Dispatches, and he hoped I would forgive him - I found on him five "Dispatches" and two "Ages," which he had taken out of the parcel that I had brought in that morning from the Strand.

Prisoner's Defence. He did not bring the papers himself; he employed a young man and a boy to bring them, and I helped to fold them.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320216-82

587. HENRY JOHNSON and DAVID WELLS were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Keates , from his person .

THOMAS TOOL . I live in Hatfield-street, and am a shoemaker. On the 24th of January, about half-past one o'clock, I saw the two prisoners following Mr. Keates - Wells put his hand once or twice into his pocket; Mr. Keates then stopped at the corner of a gateway, and Johnson came up, took his handkerchief, and put it into his own breeches pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Are you not an amateur thief taker? A No - I was not here last Session; I had two cases the Session before last, and I have two more this - I do not think that I have had twenty in the last twelve months; I do not recollect whether I was in the case of Warren - I was not charged with making a mistake in any indictment, that the prisoner might escape, in order that I might get money; I never was in any other Court but this - I do not come for the sake of money - I was going home at the time; I saw this take place in Aldersgate-street - there had been an accident, and there was a great crowd; I was walking on the other side of the way - I was not watching about to get money here; I cannot tell how many days I work at my business in a week - I lived at Mr. Gibson's for six years, which is well known at the different Police-offices, where I have been the means of bringing a great many people to justice - I have since worked for a gentleman in Burlington-arcade; I was on the look out for business for myself.

JOHN MARTIN . I am an officer. I was assisting to take a person to the hospital - Tool told me that the two prisoners had robbed a gentleman of his handkerchief; as soon as I could leave the person I was with, I took hold of the prisoners, and Tool took this handkerchief from Johnson's left-hand pocket - Johnson said he had picked it up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-83

588. GEORGE JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 1 watch, value 3l. , the goods of Richard Reeves .

RICHARD REEVES . I am a watch-maker , and live in Holywell-street . On the 3rd of February the prisoner came to my shop, and asked to be shown a watch then hanging in my window - it was ticketed 3l. 10s.; I took the ticket off, and showed it to him; after a few trifling remarks he went to the door, and cried out "Hoy! Hoy!" as if he saw some one he knew; he then ran off with the watch in his hand - I and my man pursued him, but I lost sight of him; he was brought to me the same evening by the Policeman - I am quite sure he is the person; I did not know him before, but I looked at him particularly.

Prisoner. When he saw me he said he did not think I was the person. Witness. I never said such a word.

JOHN ADAMS . I am a Policeman. On the 3rd of February I heard a cry of Stop thief! - I drew back, and saw the prisoner run very swiftly across the road; I stopped him, and found this watch in his hand.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-84

Before Mr. Recorder.

589. THOMAS KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 cushion, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Honeywill and Henry Black .

GEORGE KELLY. I am a harness-maker, and work for Mr. Thomas Honeywill and Henry Black . On the 16th of January I was coming up Oxford-street , and saw the prisoner within the prosecutors' front gate, with this cushion in his hand - it belonged to a phaeton which stood there; I asked my son, who was with me, and who also works for the prosecutors, if he knew him - he said No; the prisoner then wrapped the cushion up in his apron, and came about three yards outside the gate - I went up to him, and asked what he was going to do with it; he said nothing, and threw it down on the pavement - I collared him.

JACOB MILLER . I am a Policeman. The prisoner was given to me; he said he did it through distress -I inquired, and find his family are in the greatest distress.

The prisoner received a good character, and a person engaged to employ him.

GUILTY . Aged 44. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320216-85

590. JOHN LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 tea-caddy, value 7s., and 1 sugar-basin, value 3s. , the goods of James King .

JAMES KING . I have a shop , parlour, and kitchen, in Seymour-place, Camden-town . On the 7th of January. I lost a tea-caddy and a sugar-basin - I saw the prisoner at my door between four and five o'clock; I did not see him take the caddy, but I saw him stoop to where it was, under a wash-hand stand at my door, within reach of a person going by - I went and looked, and it was gone; I

followed the prisoner, and cried Stop thief! he immediately ran away.

WILLIAM JAMIESON . I am an officer. I heard the cry, and saw the prisoner running at the corner of Wellington-street, and the prosecutor following him - he was taken, and given into my custody, with this caddy.

Prisoner. I was in great distress - I saw this caddy, and took it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18320216-86

591. JOHN MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 wheelbarrow, value 10s. , the goods of Joseph Cole .

JOSEPH COLE. I am an auctioneer , and live in Charlton-street, Somers'-town. On the 21st of January I lost this wheelbarrow, from the warehouse, in Luke's-row, near St. Pancras church - I saw it at a broker's shop on the Tuesday following.

THOMAS BAYES . I bought this barrow of the prisoner, for 4s. 6d.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q. Where do you live? A. In Tottenham-street, about half a mile from the prosecutor's - I had never seen the prisoner before; he was not many minutes with me - there was another man with him; I was passing another broker's, to whom they were offering the barrow, and he said he could not find room for it - I bought it; the broker said he knew the prisoner, and I might buy it of him safely.

JOHN LANDON . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner on Tuesday night, the 24th of January; this barrow was delivered to me by the witness.

Cross-examined. Q. Did a Mr. Wilding go with you to the prisoner's? A. Yes - the prisoner first offered the barrow to him, and he took me to where the prisoner lived; he was not at home then, and I took him afterwards in Tottenham-court-road.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-87

592. THOMAS MAJOR was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Patrick Crawley .

PATRICK CRAWLEY. I am a shoemaker , and live in Monmouth-street, St. Giles' . On the 11th of February, I lost a pair of shoes, which I had placed at the window of my cellar for sale - I saw them safe after nine o'clock, and did not miss them till the Policeman brought them back; they were within reach of a person going by, but were inside my cellar - I am quite sure they are my shoes.

THOMAS FARRANT . I am a Policeman. I saw the prisoner come from the corner of Monmouth-street, and stopped him in Greek-street, with these shoes - I asked where he got them; he said he did not know - he afterwards said he bought them, but he did not know where; I passed along Monmouth-street, and saw a vacancy in the prosecutor's window where they had been taken from.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-88

593. GEORGE OAKFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 earthen pan, value 6d., and 31 lbs. of honey, value 2l. , the goods of John Kirkland .

JOHN TIPLER . I am servant to Mr. John Kirkland , a grocer , of Marsham-street, Russel-square . I saw the prisoner come into the shop on the 20th of January, and take a pot of honey, which was about four yards within the shop - I was at tea in the room behind, and he could not see me; I followed him twenty or thirty yards, and took him with it on his shoulder - he begged me to let him go.

EDWARD BELL . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and have the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young man came out of the shop as I was passing, and asked me if I would earn 1s. by carrying that to the top of the street - as soon as I had got it I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-89

594. PETER STAPLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 23 yards of printed cotton, value 11s. , the goods of Thomas Williams .

JAMES COLLINS JONES . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Williams , of Duke-street . On the 4th of February I heard a noise at the door; I went there, and missed the print, which was safe five minutes before, inside the door - I was informed which was the person had gone, and followed him; I got sight of the prisoner, and kept him in sight till he turned into the Carpenters' Arms - he dropped this print, and I took hold of him; he was quite a stranger - he said he had not taken it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ALEXANDER BROWN . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; when I got to the house the cotton was loose in this apron - the prisoner said he had not taken it; I took him to the prosecutor's shop, and found in his pocket this ticket, which had been on the cotton; the prisoner took the apron, and put it on.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he saw a man with a bundle drop the shop ticket, which he took up, and the man immediately seized him.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-90

Before Mr. Alderman Brown.

595. JOHN DRISCOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Francis Armstrong , from his person .

FRANCIS ARMSTRONG . I live in Holborn, and am shopman to Mr. Graves. On the 16th of January, about twelve o'clock, I was in Broad-street, St. Giles' ; I heard a cry of Stop thief! but not knowing it was any thing of mine I passed on down Holborn; in about ten minutes the officer asked me if I had my handkerchief - I said Yes, but I felt, and I had not; he then produced it.

THOMAS FARRANT . I am a Policeman. On the 16th of January I saw the prisoner and another person with him named Tucker - I watched them, and saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take out his handkerchief; he ran away - I and my brother officer pursued - he threw down this handkerchief, which my brother officer picked up; I took the handkerchief, and followed the prisoner, but we lost sight of him - I am quite sure he is the person.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a Police-officer. I was with

Farrant; I saw the prisoner take this handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and put it into his own.(Property produced and sworn to)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, simply declaring his innocence. He received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-91

596. EDWARD STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 300 eggs, value 30s., and 1 basket, value 1s. , the goods of John Williamson .

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I live at Richmond, in Surrey, and am a carrier. On the 20th of January I was with my cart at the White Horse cellar, Piccadilly ; I had three hundred eggs in a flat on the foot-board of the cart - I saw the prisoner take them off the foot-board, and pursued him to the corner of Berkeley-street; I did not lose sight of him for a moment - I came up to him with the Policeman, and we took the flat from him; I had the eggs again, by order of the Magistrate - here is the flat; I can swear to it.

JOHN COBLEY . I am a Police-officer. I was at the corner of the Gloucester coffee-house - I saw the prosecutor come up and collar the prisoner with the basket of eggs on his shoulder; I took him into custody, and have had the flat ever since - the eggs were given to the prosecutor.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-92

597. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 shoulder of mutton, value 3s. , the goods of Robert Finnis Attwell .

ROBERT FINNIS ATTWELL . I am a butcher , and live in Brown's-lane, Spitalfields . On the 4th of February I lost a shoulder of mutton from the bar outside my shop, where it was exposed for sale; I saw some person remove it - I ran out, and pursued the prisoner, who had a piece of meat in his hand; he turned round, and threw it down - I passed that, and lost it entirely - I turned the next corner, and lost sight of the prisoner; a person, who heard the cry of Stop thief! took him, and he was given in charge, but I cannot say he is the person who dropped the meat, as I did not see his face.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a headborough. I was in Well-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner run up a court, and caught him in a privy - he said if he wanted a shoulder of mutton he could buy it; he was tipsy, but knew what he was about.

PHILIP SCOWN . I live in Well-street, and am a baker. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner turn up a court - I pursued, and saw him fall on his face and hands into a pool of water - he then got up, and ran into a privy; I stood at the door till the officer took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and knew nothing of what I was charged with till my wife came and told me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-93

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

598. WILLIAM WEBB and MARGARET WEBB were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 set of bed-furniture, value 14s.; 2 window-curtains, value 2s., and 1 sheet, value 1s. , the goods of Alexander Abernethy .

ALEXANDER ABERNETHY . I live in Great St. Andrew-street, Seven-dials . The prisoners took a furnished room of me on the 24th of January, at 5s a week - they came about seven o'clock in the evening, and brought what little they had with them; the man said he was employed at Howard and Co.'s, in Long-acre; they stopped till the 28th, and then both went away together, between seven and eight o'clock at night - they were not always at home together; they left the door wide open, and never returned - my wife went up stairs in about half an hour after they left, and then I went, and missed the articles stated.

WILLIAM MURDOCK . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Liquorpond-street. I have the curtain and bed-furniture, which was pawned by the female prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

W. WEBB - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

M. WEBB - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-94

599. JOSHUA PAFFEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 truck, value 1l. 5s. , the goods of William Shingles .

WILLIAM SHINGLES . I am a green-grocer , and live in Gloucester-terrace, Cannon-street-road . I lost one truck out of three which I had outside my door, close to the pavement, about five o'clock in the evening of the 12th of January - I received information that it was at the station-house; I went there, and saw it.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q. Are you in the habit of letting out your trucks? A. I was formerly, but not at that time; I do not know how it went from my door.

STEPHEN MORTIMER . I am a Police-officer. I was informed that the prisoner and another were dragging the truck down Brick-lane, about three-quarters of a mile from the prosecutor's; I stopped them with it, about six o'clock in the evening - the prisoner said he had borrowed it of a man, that he knew his name, but not where he lived, and if I would let him wait ten minutes the owner would come for it - I waited half an hour, and as no owner came I said I must take them to the station-house; I took the prisoner, but the other ran away; I took the prisoner before the Magistrate, but as the owner did not appear he was discharged, and when I found the prosecutor I took him again.

Cross-examined. Q. There was another man with him, and he said he borrowed it? A. Yes; he did not attempt to run away - I could not get hold of the other; I sent a man for the prisoner the second time, and he came to me.

SARAH HICKLING . On the evening in question the prisoner brought the truck to my husband, and offered it for sale for 5s.; he suspected it was stolen, and told me to give charge of him.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-95

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

600. CAROLINE ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 silver spoon, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Crafer .

JOHN CARTER . I am a watchmaker, and live in Hackney-road. On the 27th of January the prisoner came and offered a silver spoon for sale; I saw it was bent, and thought it was not right - she said her mother sent her to sell it, and she had had it in the drawer for a long time - that her mother lived in Union-buildings; I said I would

go to her mother - I went with her, and she took me to the corner of Crabtree-row - she then said she would take me to her mistress', which was only a few doors down; I went with her a considerable distance, and asked her how far it was - she said not much further: we still went on, she saying it was not much further, till we got to Bethnal-green-road - I then said I would take her to the station; she fought and bit me very much - a crowd collected, and she again said it was not much further; she then took me to Hope-town - I again asked where she was going; she said, "Up to the top, and round to the left;" I then took her to the station.

REBECCA CRAFER . I am the wife of Henry Crafer - the prisoner was in the habit of coming to nurse a lodger's child. On the 17th of January I washed this spoon; I did not miss it till the prisoner's mother and the officer brought it to me the next day.

CHARLES GRANT . I am a Policeman; I received the prisoner in charge, with this spoon from Mr. Carter.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-96

601. THOMAS GEORGE BAXTER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 cloth cap, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Baldwin .

HENRY BALDWIN . I am a hatter , and live in Longacre , I had a cloth cap exposed for sale in my shop. On the morning of the 20th of January a lad came in and asked me if I had seen a boy take it; I then missed it - this is it.

JOSEPH HAWKINS . I am in the employ of Mr. Matthews, a tallow-chandler, in Long-acre. On the morning of the 20th of January I saw the prisoner take a cap off a brass hook, at Mr. Baldwin's door; he put it on his head, and ran down Leg-alley - I went home at that time, but in about half an hour I saw the prisoner again; I went to him - he threw the cap down, and ran away; I pursued him into Castle-street: I am sure he is the boy who took it.

JOHN FLOOD . I am a Police man. I took the prisoner; he said a boy took the cap, and put it upon his head.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a boy who said he bought the cap, and he gave it to me. - I did not take it; that boy came up again and asked for this cap and, he gave me mine, but they would not take hold of him.

JOSEPH HAWKINS . There was another boy with him when it was taken, but the prisoner took it; and when I went to take the prisoner, the other boy put the prisoner's cap on his head, and asked me for this, but I would not give it him.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320216-97

602. GEORGE HENRY CHILDS was indicted for stealing on the 14th of January , 1 tin cash-box, value 5s., 1 sovereign, and 10 shillings , the property of Henry Colebrook .

HENRY COLEBROOK . I live in Castle-street, Leicester-square , and am a grocer . The prisoner was in my employ up to the 13th of January, when he was dismissed, because I had no further occasion for him; on the following morning he came and knocked at my door, about seven o'clock; my shopman let him in, and he staid in the shop while the shopman went down for a light; when he came up the prisoner was gone; when I came down I missed my cash-box - I suspected the prisoner, and sent for him - the box was afterwards seen at the station: there had been a sovereign and ten shillings in it the night before.

ANDREW WILLIAM ANGUS . I am a Policeman. On the 14th of January I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and found him in Queen-street, Seven-dials - I told him he was charged with stealing a cash-box from Mr. Colebrook - he denied it, but afterwards gave me a sovereign and some silver, and told me I should find the cash-box under Combe and Delafield's brewery.

Prisoner. A boy, who used to come about when I was working at the door, told me to do it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18320216-98

603. JOHN CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 coal-scuttle, value 18s., and 1 bell, value 3d. , the goods of Thomas Parker .

HENRY ROWLAND . I am apprentice to a shoemaker, in High-street, Stoke Newington. On the afternoon of the 10th of January I was at his shop door, and saw the prisoner and another person walking together - I saw the prisoner take a scuttle out of Mr. Parker's shop: he then put it down, went to the corner of the shop, and looked about; he then took it up, and walked away with it - I told my master's son, and he went over to them.

WILLIAM CLAPP . I am the son of William Clapp, the master of the last witness. In consequence of what I heard from him I went over the way, and saw the prisoner walking along with the scuttle in his hand, and another lad with him - I pointed out the prisoner to Mr. Parker.

THOMAS PARKER . I am a broker , at Stoke Newington . Clapp came to my shop, and said I had lost a scuttle - I went out, and saw the prisoner with it, before him; I followed him; he dropped the scuttle, and this bell was in it - he ran down a lane, and was taken.

HENRY WRIGHT . I saw the prisoner drop this scuttle just before Mr. Parker - I ran down a lane, and took him; he said, "Let me go, I have done nothing;" I stopped him till Mr. Parker came up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 1 Week .

Reference Number: t18320216-99

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

604. ELIZABETH ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 96 sheets of paper, value 8d., the goods of James William Freshfield and another .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be 2 lbs. of paper.

GEORGE DIGGANS . I am in the employ of Mr. James William Freshfield and his son; they are solicitor s, and live in Lothbury . On the evening of the 2nd of February I heard the outer door go about six o'clock - I went down stairs to a place we keep the papers in, but I found no one there; I came up again, and met the prisoner coming out of our right-hand office - she was quite a stranger; I stopped her, and asked what business she had there - she made no answer; I took this paper from her - it is two drafts of a will and some drafts of a deed, which I know are my employers'.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 60. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-100

605. FREDERICK ROFFEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 6 printed books, value 15s., the goods of James Webb Southgate and another .

JAMES WELLS . I am in the employ of Mr. James Webb Southgate and another - they are book auctioneer s. We lost these books from one of our rooms in Fleet-street , on the first floor - the prisoner was in the habit of coming to serve the house with milk; we missed six printed books about the 10th of February.

RICHARD BAYLIS . I am a Policeman. About halfpast nine o'clock, on the 7th of February, I was going up Portpool-lane, and heard a conversation in a public-house - I heard a voice say, "Fred carried off these books in one of the milk-pails, and one was a history of the Church of Christ;" the door then opened, and I heard singing -I then heard a voice say "He has sold them to Mother Davie for half a crown;" I made inquiry, and found where the books came from - I inquired who brought milk there; I then went, and took the prisoner - I told him I knew very well the books were at Mother Davie's, and asked what she gave him for them; he said 6s. - I did not then know any thing of these other six books, only the History of the the Church of Christ.

JOSEPH HUNT . I am in the prosecutors' service. All these books are theirs.

MARY ANN DAVIE . I live in Baldwin's-gardens. On the 7th of February the prisoner came, and asked if I would buy some books - I said, "Where are they?" he said outside the door - I got up, and saw him take the books from a very decent young man; he brought them to me, and said they were that young man's books, but there being one volume wanting he could not pawn them; I paid him 4s. for them, and gave him 3d. for himself - these are the four books; on the Friday he brought these other six books, and I bought them for 4s. - I have known him from a child, and his father and mother; I knew he was in the milk trade, but I never had any transaction with him before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-101

606. FREDERICK ROFFEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 4 printed bound books, value 20s., the goods of James Webb Southgate and another .

JAMES WELLS . I am in the prosecutors' employ. We lost four printed bound books, but I cannot say when - they were missed five or six days after the 7th of February - the prisoner used to come with milk, and pass through the warehouse.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer. I had a warrant to search Mrs. Davie's house, and I found all these books there.

MARY ANN DAVIE . I bought these four books of the prisoner on the Tuesday; I asked him where he got them, and if all was right - I saw him take them from a young man, over the way; I have been twelve years in the neighbourhood - I never bought any books of a boy in my life before; when he brought the second lot I said, "I don't like these books, I am afraid it is not all right;" he said,"Yes it is, they came out of the Strand, from the young man you saw."(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-102

607. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. 6d. , the goods of Zachariah Foster .

HENRY HODGES . I live with Mr. Zachariah Foster , in Newgate-street . We lost these shoes on the 13th of January - I was at home at the time, and heard Clark call out and run; I went out, and saw him pursuing the prisoner, who was running - he caught hold of him, and kept him till I came up to him; I took this pair of shoes from under his coat.

HENRY CLARK . I saw the prisoner run out, I followed him, and caught him,(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320216-103

608. GEORGE JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 jacket, value 12s. , the goods of Robert Lawrence .

ROBERT LAWRENCE . I live in Liquorpond-street - I work at Mr. Brown's, in the Old Bailey . I threw my jacket up in the loft, on the morning of the 4th of February, about eight o'clock - I then went out, and returned about twelve - it was then gone; I do not know the prisoner.

JAMES LARBY . I work for Mr. Brown. On the 4th of February I saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, in the loft, standing upright: I asked what he wanted - he made no answer; I went down the yard, and saw a man - I asked if he knew him; he said No - the prisoner then went down the gateway; I stopped him, and asked what he wanted - he asked if Mellish's man was come; I then found he had this jacket on - I took him up the yard, and he took it off; he had started, as if to go towards the market, and I stopped him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320216-104

609. JOHANNA CONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 3 handkerchiefs, value 12s., the goods of Isabella Mary Kipling ; and that she had been before convicted of felony .

JOHN MOODY . I am in the employ of Isabella Mary Kipling, a hosier , who lives in the Poultry . The prisoner came to her shop on the 31st instant, between three and four o'clock - she asked for some coloured silk handkerchiefs, which I showed her, and after some time she bought one for 4s. 6d.; she put down 1s. 6d. and said she would come on Saturday and bring the difference - I said we did not do business in that way; I then missed a piece of handkerchiefs - I went round and took her back to search her; she resisted, and said she had not got them, but afterwards she pulled them out herself.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer I took the prisoner - these are the handkerchiefs; this other new handkerchief was found on the prisoner, and a duplicate of a handkerchief pawned the day before.

Prisoner. He found nothing on me, but a duplicate of my husband's waistcoat, pawned the day before - when I put the 1s. 6d. down, I said I would call on Saturday, and he said that would do; he then came and said, had I a silk handkerchief? I said I had not - these handkerchiefs were found on the floor.

JOHN MOODY . No, she took them from her person, and put them behind her.

GEORGE BOARDMAN . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - I was then a constable; I know she is the person - (read.)

GUILTY. Aged 20. - Judgment Respited .

The prisoner received a good character, and a witness promised to employ her.

Reference Number: t18320216-105

610. ABRAHAM DESIZA was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 200 yards of canvas, value 2l., the goods of Ephraim Levin and another .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of William Gilbert .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MANTLE . I am carman to Mr. Gilbert, a waggon proprietor , at Blossoms Inn. I had a bale of canvas in my cart, in Swan-street, Minories , on the 9th of February - it is a very narrow street; I told the boy in the cart that I would run on to see if the street was clear; I then desired the boy to drive on faster - when he came up to me there was a bale of goods missing from the cart; I ran down the street and saw two or three persons huddled together - I have no knowledge of the prisoner; I only saw the backs of three men, and as I supposed they had the property, I called, Stop thief! I saw the prisoner when he was in custody at the watch-house - I did not notice him before; there was a mob passed me, but I had the bale on my shoulder: I first saw the bale on the pavement, but I do not know who threw it there.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Were there many bales in the cart? A. No, only that one and a box - it was a common car cart; I had seen the bale safe in Mansel-street, at the bottom of Swan-street - I only know the bale by the direction.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What direction was there on it? A."To Mr. Levin, Jewry-street, Aldgate," and I delivered it afterwards to that gentleman.

JOHN LIGHT . I am a master carman. I was going down Swan-street; I met the cart, with the boy in it, and about the middle of the street I saw the bale; the prisoner and two others were there - the prisoner had his hand on it - I did not see how they got it out of the cart; it was in the road when I first saw it - they pitched it up against the side of a house; one said, "Where is Joe?" the prisoner said, "D-n Joe! give me a tip up with it;" he did not get it up, because a boy came up and said "That it is not all right;" the prisoner then had his hand on the bale - he was near enough to hear what the boy said; the boy said they had taken it out of the cart - when they heard this, the prisoner and the two others ran away; I ran, but they were too light-heeled for me - I afterwards saw the prisoner in custody; he is one of the persons who had his hand on the bale - in the run I lost sight of his face, but not of his back.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see him before? A. Not to my knowledge; I first saw them throwing it out of the road into the foot-path - the cart was then about ten yards from the bale; it was going on at a full trot - the boy who was in the cart is not here; the prisoner ran about two-thirds of Swan-street - I never lost sight of him; it was about ten minutes past six o'clock, and nearly dark.

JAMES GIBSON . I heard an alarm of Stop thief! I pursued - coming down Swan-street I saw several persons in the road, and the bale of goods against the wall; I came up to Mr. Light, and knowing him, I said, "What is the matter?" the prisoner was not three yards from him- I said to Mr. Light, "I don't think all is right," and immediately after I heard a boy say No; previous to that I heard some one say, "Give me a lift up" - the boy then said, "I saw them take it out of a cart;" I saw the prisoner with his hand upon it - he was not three yards from me, and must have heard what I heard; he and the two others looked towards the bottom of Swan-street, and seeing the opening they ran off - I am sure the prisoner is the person; I ran after him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen him before? A. Not to my knowledge; there were two other persons with the hale, and three in the road.

ROBERT TURLE . I am an officer. The prisoner was given in charge to me.

EPHRAIM LEVIN . I have a partner. This bale of goods was consigned to me and another, and afterwards delivered to me.

Cross-examined. Q. To whom were these goods directed? A. To us; I am the assignee under a commission of bankruptcy.

JOHN MANTLE . Mr. William Gilbert is the master of the cart - I had the goods to deliver.

Cross-examined. Q. Is that Mr. Gilbert, of Blossoms-inn? A. Yes; I believe my master has partners - there are a great many names on the carts and vans which come to the yard.

COURT. Q. Who is your master? A. Mr. William Gilbert, and he pays me.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-106

611. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 writing desk, value 5s., and 1 pelisse, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Ann Gadsby .

ANN GADSBY . I live in Liverpool-street, Bishopsgate , and keep a lodging-house . On the 14th of February I lost a writing-desk and a pelisse; my servant ran out.

CATHERINE CURTIS . I am servant to the prosecutrix. On the 14th of February I saw a man come in at the street door, go into the parlour, and come out with the desk under his arm; I went out, crying Stop thief! - he dropped the desk, and ran off; I cannot say whether it was the prisoner.

PETER GEORGE HOVES . I was passing Liverpool-street, and saw the prisoner running towards Bishopsgate, with the desk and pelisse - I observed to my friend that it was too late for the coach, as I considered he was in all probability going to take a coach; I heard Stop thief! called I turned, and should have taken him, but my great coat got between my legs, and impeded it - I assisted the servant in taking up the desk, and am certain the prisoner is the person; I took notice of him as he was running.

DANIEL BREWER COOK . About five o'clock last Tuesday evening, I observed the prisoner running towards Bishopsgate - I saw him drop the desk.

JOSEPH STONE. I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the property.

Prisoner's Defence. They were given me to carry by a young man.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-107

612. JAMES KIRBY and RICHARD CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 4 sets of fire-irons, value 3l. , the goods of James Eve .

JAMES EVE . I live on Ludgate-hill , and am an ironmonger . On the 25th of January I lost this property - I do not know the prisoners.

JAMES WELLS . I am a Policeman. On the 25th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was coming down Ludgate-hill; I saw the two prisoners in conversation, opposite the prosecutor's shop; I went on to the Obelisk, then crossed, and returned; I passed them about twenty yards, and then saw Clark cross the road and stand opposite Mr. Eve's private door for a minute - Kirby then took off a white apron which he had on, and put it under his arm; Clark pushed open the private door, and in two minutes he came out with four sets of fire-irons on his shoulder; I pursued up Ludgate-hill, and Kirby followed me - I got above the Belle Sauvage , and then took Clark; I took him to the prosecutor's, and then to the Compter - I saw Kirby at the Compter door; I said, "I think I know you," and took him in - I was in a little agitation, and finding nothing on him, I thought I might be mistaken, and let him go, but I am confident he is the person.

Kirby. Q. Did you not say that I was not the person? A. I said I was positive you was the person, but I said, as I had got the property with the other, I might be deceived.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

KIRBY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-108

613. WILLIAM WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 watch, value 23s.; 1 watchchain, value 3s.; 2 seals, value 4s., and 1 watch-key, value 1s., the goods of John Wybrow , from his person .

BENJAMIN WYBROW . I am the son of John Wybrow - he is a chair-maker , and lives at Lambeth. We were at Smithfield-bars , at half-past one o'clock, on the 24th of January; we were returning home from a party - my father and I stepped off the pavement to let a gentleman aad lady pass; we were in the act of stepping up again, as the prisoner snatched my father's watch - he was in company with eight or nine more, I should think; he drew it out of my father's fob, and ran away; I told my father he had lost his watch - the prisoner instantly ran; I pursued, and took him before he had got fifty yards, at the most; I took him by the collar of his white great coat, and held him for some time - I had called out for assistance, and a watchman from the opposite side of the way came; I held the prisoner till a watchman came and took hold of him - another man then came from the seven or eight that were there, and took hold of me by the throat; he threw me down on my knees, and the prisoner got away from us - I saw nothing more of him till I saw him at the station-house the same morning - I can swear he is the same person; his hat came off in the scuffle.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where did you take the prisoner? A. Nearly opposite Charterhouse-lane; I never lost sight of him - my father's watch was not found; the prisoner's own watch was found on him; the party was in Northampton-street; we had after that called at a public-house, and taken a glass of cold gin-and-water -I believe it was the Red Lion; we did not go to any other - I was quite sober; he had the watch when I took him by the collar, but the other man coming up I lost all sight of the prisoner - he was one that rushed out of the crowd; he had been with five or six others in Smithfield; he had the watch in his right hand - the Policeman had a watch in his hand when he took the prisoner; I cannot say whether that was the watch I had seen in his hand - my father was not quite sober; he wound up his watch in the Red Lion, and put it into his pocket - he went to the Red Lion on the Wednesday, and I went with him, and I went on the Tuesday after we returned from Hatton-garden - we had been at Mr. Carey's, and left about halfpast twelve o'clock.

JOHN WYBROW . I am father to the witness. I think I was the worse for liquor: I never saw my watch after I left the Red Lion, in St. John-street - my son told me that my watch was gone - I felt my fob, and the watch was gone; my son left me, and pursued the prisoner - I attempted to follow him; I received a blow on my nose, and did not recollect any thing more for some minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons were in the public house where you last saw your watch? A. My son and three men; I took out my watch before two of the men; the third, I believe, had left the house - I put it into my fob, and never saw it again; I perfectly recollect what I was about till I received the blow - I went to the public-house to ascertain if they knew the young man, who had stood at the bar and drank some gin-and-water; I wanted to know whether he had gone forward to tell any person that I had a watch - I had been to the same house on Tuesday, and then ascertained that he had staid at the house half an hour after me - I called again on the Wednesday, but I merely went in to have a pint of ale, as I was ill; I was sober when I went there on the night of the robbery,

JOSEPH FLETCHER . I am a watchman. I was on duty and heard the cry of Stop thief! I had before that seen several persons on the opposite side of the way, as I was crying half-past one; I went down Smithfield-bars on the right hand side, and came up on the left; I there heard the cry, and saw several persons; I saw the prisoner running; I sprang my rattle, and pursued him; he ran as far as the reuts, and a private watchman, of John-street, came and stopped him; he resisted a great deal, and went down on his back - I was surrounded by ten or a dozen, who pushed me down, made an opening and rescued him. I got up, and pursued him, and when I came up, he was in custody of two Policeman - I am certain he is the person - as he ran his arm was swinging out; and I heard something chink on the stones; he had nothing when he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you have the place examined? A. I did not come back for an hour; and if

there had been any thing, it would have been gone; the prisoner was searched; but nothing but his own property was found on him.

WILLIAM DRAPER . I am a watchman. I was coming down Greenhill's-rents; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and stopped the prisoner in the rents; we both fell down, and I was upon him; there came a party, who rescued him from me, and he was taken at the corner of College-court; I never lost sight of him.

Cross-examined. Q. What was found on him? A. A watch and half a sovereign.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a watchman. I was crying half-past one o'clock, and when I had passed Smithfieldbars two or three house, I saw a party of men, and the other watchman was coming down - I went on, and cried the hour; I heard a cry of Stop thief! the prosecutor's son then came to me, and said his father had been struck and robbed; I assisted in taking the prisoner; he was rescued from us - I ran to the bottom of the court, where I met the Policemen coming back with him.

THOMAS DAVEY . I am a Policeman. I saw the prisoner about half-past one o'clock, in Cow-cross; I was in Greenhill's-rents; I heard a rattle, and ran out; I saw a number of persons running down the steps; I threw myself up, and caught a man, without a hat - Draper said,"That is not him:" I then ran on, and saw the prisoner; I overtook him, and conveyed him to the station - I found a half-sovereign and a watch on him.

COURT. Q. What became of the man that you seized on the steps? A. I let him go - he was going in the direction in which I heard the rattle.

WILLIAM DRAPER . We were all running down the steps; Davey trod on my coat, and we all fell down - he caught hold of a man who was not the prisoner; I said,"That is not the man, he is gone on."

Cross-examined. Q. Who was the man that had his hat off? A. He was one of the party; his hat had fallen off, but the prisoner threw his hat away - I did not know that man, but I had known the prisoner for a long time, and I knew he was the man I had taken hold of.

Prisoner's Defence. There was no one near me but the two Policemen; the others were not near me for some yards.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320216-109

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

614. JOHN McGUIRE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 2 jackets, value 10s. , the goods of William Carter .

MARY CARTER . I am the wife of William Carter , a slopseller , of Blackwall . On the 11th of January, about nine o'clock at night, the witness gave me information, and I missed these jackets; I have not found them.

DAVID SAUL . I am a carman, and live near Carter. -On the 11th of January. about nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner with another young man, and watched them for seven or eight minutes; I then went into a place opposite, and saw the prisoner go over to Carter's shop several times - he at last took these jackets from inside the door, and ran away with them; I have known him about six years - I went and informed Mrs. Carter - he got away and was taken about eleven o'clock.

THOMAS STEVENS . I am a Policeman, and took him into custody.

Prisoner. The Policeman took me and another, who struggled, and got away.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-110

615. JOHN HEALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 jacket, value 8s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 7s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 5s., and 2 shoes, value 5s., the goods of William Newman ; and 1 pair of drawers, value 2s., the goods of William Osborn .

WILLIAM OSBORN . I belong to the ship Friendship . -On the 21st of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I and my comrade came from the ship in the boat, and nearly pulled against a wherry, which the prisoner was in; he was quite a stranger - we were near our ship - he said to my comrade, "Is that you, Jack?" and asked who was on board our ship - the apprentice said there was nobody on board; he then pulled towards our ship - he had no right there at all; he knew my comrade: we went on shore, and returned in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and found him on deck; he went into the forecastle, and staid on board about an hour and a half - the mate then sent me ashore; I left the prisoner in the forecastle, and when I returned I missed a pair of drawers from my hammock.

WILLIAM NEWMAN. I belong to the ship . I went on shore about six o'clock, and bought this property - when I came on board I found the prisoner in the forecastle; I was showing the apprentice what I had bought - the prisoner asked what it was worth; I put it on the breast-hook, and missed them in the morning, when I got up; I do not know whether they were there when I went to bed - I have only found a pair of shoes.

GEORGE NORWOOD . I was waiter at the White Hart, Ratcliff-highway. The prisoner offered me a pair of shoes for sale, for 4s., on Sunday, the 22nd of January; he said he had bought them, and they were too small for him; I gave them to the officer.

WILLIAM SNELLING . I am a pawnbroker, of Ratcliff-highway. I have a pair of drawers, pawned by the prisoner, on Saturday evening.

RICHARD DOBBINS . I am an officer. I apprehended him on the 28th.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-111

616. ELLEN MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 4 towels, value 2s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s.; 2 cravats, value 1s., and 2 caps, value 1s. , the goods of William May .

ELIZABETH OLIVER . I am servant to William May , of Elizabeth-street, Eaton square . This linen was in a basket in the garden - I was in the back parlour, and saw the prisoner push the garden gate open, and take these articles - she put them into her own basket, covered them over, and went out directly; I stopped her, and found them in her basket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. My mother was very poor.

GUILTY. - Aged 11. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-112

617. EMMA JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1lb. of butter, value 1s. 4d. , the goods of John Richardson .

HENRY CARR . I am in the employ of John Richardson, a butterman , in Old Bond-street . On the 8th of February the Policeman brought the prisoner into the shop, with some butter, which corresponded with ours - I had not missed it.

SAMUEL PATMORE . On the 8th of February, about half-past eight o'clock, the prisoner was given into my charge in High-street; I searched her, and found some cheese and this butter on her - she said she had bought the butter in Bond-street, but next morning she said she took the cheese from a shop in Marylebone-lane, and the butter from a shop in Bond-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-113

618. EMMA JONES was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 2lbs. of butter, value 2s. , the goods of John Green Winter and Robert Winter .

ROBERT WINTER . I am a butterman , and live in High-street, Marylebone . On the 8th of February, about halfpast eight o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked me to give her something - I saw her draw a lump of butter from behind her, under the window, and put it under her shawl; I went forward - she went out; I said,"You have something belonging to me," and took it from her - she pushed me back into the shop, and ran away, but was secured, and this butter and cheese found on her.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-114

Before Mr. Justice Taunton.

619. JANE TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Isabella Richardson .

JAMES RUSSELL . I am a surgeon, and live in Broad-street, Golden-square. On the 7th of February I was called in to attend the deceased, whom I had known for some years; I saw her at her husband's house, which is a public-house, in Half Moon-street, Piccadilly - I found her in a state of insensibility, which appeared to proceed from an injury of the brain; I used the usual remedies, and attended her till the Saturday following, when she died - she always remained in a state of insensibility; I opened the head, and found the scull fractured across in one direction, and a second fracture extending from the right angle to the other - it was a very extensive fracture, but without any displacement of the bones; I found a quantity of blood effused, covering the whole of one side of the brain, and towards the anterior part of the brain I found it more effused, and in that part the brain had been lacerated to some extent; these injuries were fully sufficient to occasion death - I should have suspected, if I had not been informed of the circumstance, that it had been caused by falling from some height on some hard substance, which would produce such an injury.

JAMES POYNDER . I live in Shepherd's-market. On Tuesday evening, the 2nd of February, between seven and eight o'clock, I was going into the Griffin public-house, in Half Moon-street , which Richardson keeps - I was going in at the back door from Shepherd's-market, and saw Mrs. Richardson standing in the door-way, with one of the doors in her hand; it is a double door, which opens in the middle - the prisoner was on the second step; I heard her ask Mrs. Richardson for something -I could not ascertain what; she was in liquor - Mrs. Richardson said, "You had better go home to your family;" the prisoner immediately laid both her hands on the top of Mrs. Richardson's head, and most violently pulled her down the steps; Mrs. Richardson came down head foremost, and pitched her head on the stone pavement - I never heard her speak, nor saw her move; I said to the prisoner, "You have killed the landlady"- she immediately ran away; I followed, and took her -I held her till the Policeman came and took her; I returned to the house, and found a surgeon attending Mrs. Richardson.

JOHN CHANDLER . I live with Mr. John Richardson, at the Griffin. The prisoner came into the house about half-past seven o'clock; I had never seen her-before - she did not appear in liquor then - she had a quartern of gin, which a woman and her drank; they then had a pint of porter - the other woman left; the prisoner then began to make a noise, and sing; Mrs. Richardson wished her to be quiet - she then began to use bad language; my master came down, and said if she was not quiet he would send for a Policeman; she was quiet for a few minutes, and I left her standing at the bar - in a short time I heard a fall, and on coming up stairs saw mistress in master's arms; she appeared to be dead - her Christian name was Isabella.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the house with another person to drink; I said it was all right, and we would go- the bar-maid said I owed 4d. for an old score, which I had paid; the landlord came and took my parcel out of my hand for the 4d., which I said I could not pay - he pulled me to the kitchen stairs, and some female behind said, "Away with her - burke her," which very much frightened me; he gave me my parcel - as I went out, somebody took hold of me very violently, and I fell down the steps with somebody after me; my parcel fell out of my hand - my husband went the next morning, and got it; I know nothing of the accident, nor who it was that fell.

JAMES POYNDER re-examined. Nothing passed in my hearing about an old score; the prisoner did not fall down, or I must have seen it - I am sure she did not fall- she pulled Mrs. Richardson down with great force; it was not an accident - Mrs. Richardson did not fall down on her.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18320216-115

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

620. JAMES MURRAY, alias WILSON , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Burns , on the 24th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 seal, value 14s., and 1 watch-key, value 6d., his property .

EDWARD BURNS . On the 24th of November I was running down Ratcliff-highway , and had a small quantity of sugar and coffee in my hat, which was on my head - one of two men met me full in the face, and knocked me down by a blow in the stomach.

Q. Did two men meet you? A. One met me, and gave me a blow in the stomach; then another man came behind me, grabbed me, and got hold of my seal and key

- the ribbon broke; he ran off up the highway, with the seal and key; the man who struck me in the stomach ran a different way - I sung out Murder! and Robbery! the witness came up, and said, "I know the party quite well," and in about two or three minutes a Thames Police-officer came up; he went away with the witness Hicks, in pursuit of the man - I did not see the prisoner again till he was at the Thames Police, about a month after; I have never recovered my seal or key.

Q. What opportunity had you of seeing the man who came behind you? A. I turned round, and saw the shape of the man going away - I did not see his face; by the prisoner's appearance, I think he is the man who came behind me, and took my property; I am a Trinity waterman.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time was this? A. About nine o'clock at night, a few minutes before or after - it was dark: the witness was present at the time - he was not in my company.

WILLIAM THOMAS HICKS . I am a shoemaker, and live in Philip-street, St. George's in the East. I was in Ratcliff-highway on the the 24th of November - being out of work, I was selling things in the street, and saw two men come up to Burns, one behind and the other before him; one made a snatch at his seal and key, and with the blow which was struck in his side, he fell; I assised him up - he said, "Did you see those two men?" I said Yes; he asked if I knew them - I said I thought I did; the officer came up - I went with him, but did not find them then; I was taken ill, and obliged to go to the London hospital, and it was eight weeks after before I saw the prisoner - he was then at the Thames Police; I thought he was the man who went before the prosecutor - I took it to be Murray, by his appearance and dress.

Q. Did you know him before? A. I took it to be the person who I had known before - I had known the one I took it to be four years by selling pies in the street; I cannot positively swear he is the same man - the prosecutor was on one side of the way, and I on the other; the street is twelve or fourteen yards wide - it was a dark night; there was a gas-lamp a little way from him - I only had a momemary view of him; they no sooner struck him than they were off, one way, and the other the other.

Q. Had you at all seen them before they struck the prosecutor? A. I had seen two men come up the lane behind him, but had not observed them so as to know they are the two men who struck him.

GEORGE ELLIS . I am a Policeman. The prisoner was brought to the Thames Police for an assault.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-116

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

621. SARAH BRAME was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 2 brooches, value 30s.; 2 rings, value 7s.; 5 table-cloths, value 40s.; 3 shifts, value 7s.; 4 petticoats, value 10d.; 1 necklace, value 2s.; 3 tea-spoons, value 3s., and 3 sovereigns, the property of Sarah Flanders , in her dwelling-house .

SARAH FLANDERS . I live in Wellington-place, Stepney . The prisoner and her husband lodged with me for five or six months, and left on the 13th of January; she paid 5s. a week - I had no other lodger for two months, and have no family of my own - as the prisoner could not pay me I told her to go away; she came on Friday morning, the 13th, and asked if I would give her leave to stop till Monday, as she was going out to look for apartments, and she would pay me 10s. on the Saturday night - I gave her leave to stop; she came again, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and returned a shawl, which I had lent her - I did not see her again till she was in custody; I went out about six o'clock that evening, and went up to my drawers for a sovereign from a pocket-book in a drawer in my bed-room; the door of which was locked, and I had the key - I got the sovereign, and came down; I came home about ten o'clock, and concluded they had gone to bed - I got up next morning, about eight, and as they did not come down as usual I supposed they had left- I went up to my bed-room about two o'clock that afternoon, and found the door locked as usual; I went to the drawer, which was not locked - I opened it, looked into my pocket-book, and found three sovereigns gone, which I had left there when I took out one the night before, - I then missed from another small drawer, two brooches and a ring; and from another drawer, five damask table-cloths, worth 2l. -I had had them about fourteen years; I missed the other linen stated in the indictment - I had been to the drawer on the 8th, and every thing appeared safe.

BRIDGET AYLMER . I am the wife of Peter Aylmer . -The prisoner and her husband came to lodge at our house in Sampson-place, Stepney, on the 13th of January, and staid till the 16th, when the prisoner was taken: she took the lodging by the week, and paid me 10s. beforehand of her own accord; I saw none of the property.

GEORGE GRAY WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, of High-street, Stepney. On the 10th of January the prisoner pawned three table-cloths and one shift; and on the 11th, a necklace, two brooches, and a table-cloth, for 4s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took her 10s. on Saturday night, but she was out.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years more . (See page 259.)

Reference Number: t18320216-117

Before Mr. Justice Tannton.

622. JAMES WILSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Jones , on the 17th of January, and stealing 1 coat, value 3l., his property; and 1 hat, value 10s., the goods of Henry Jones .

HENRY JONES . I live in Shepperton-street, Islington. On the 17th of January I was at my father's house, in Upper Chadwell-street, Pentonville - I was about leaving at a quarter to eight o'clock, and on going into the passage I saw a man running towards the front door, which was then open; I followed him out, crying Stop thief! and when I got three or four yards from the door I saw a hat dropped on the pavement from his hand, I suppose, but could not see distinctly from what part of him - he was not above two or three yards before me; I still followed him across Amwell-street, about fifty yards; then recollecting I had left the street door open I returned, and found my father at the door, with the hat in his hand - I found it was my own; I had hung it in the passage - I had no opportunity of seeing the man's face, but noticed his dress, which was peculiar - he had a drab great coat, with very large white buttons, and top boots - the moment I

got my hat I went in the direction the man took, and met the prisoner in the Policeman's hands - I suppose that was in less than three minutes; I recognized his dress immediately - he was obliged to hold up his coat as he ran, and I saw his top-boots; his figure and general appearance also corresponded - there were gas-lights in the street and in the shops which he passed, by which I saw the colour of his coat and the buttons - I have not a doubt of his being the same person; while he was being searched, in my father's passage, the great coat was brought in by another man - my brother had gone out about a quarter to seven o'clock, and I shut the door after him; I am certain I shut it - it has a common spring lock, and could not be opened outside without a key; my father and a niece about ten years old, were the only persons in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You closed the door after your brother? A. Yes; I continued in the back parlour with my father from then till I was going away - my father has one servant; she is not here - the nearest coach-stand to the house is at the Angel, which is about five minutes' walk; I saw the hat drop from the prisoner - he mustv have carried it before him, as I did not see it in his hand - when I left off following him, I told other persons to follow him, and am certain of him.

SAMUEL JONES. I live in Upper Chadwell-street. -When my son left the parlour I heard a rush - I immediately went to the front door, which I saw open, and heard my son cry Stop thief! a great many people were running - I went down the steps, and not two yards from there I took up this hat; my son returned in about a minute or a minute and a half - I gave him his hat, and he went back in pursuit; a crowd very shortly after brought the prisoner into the passage - the Policeman found on him a picklock-key, with wards at each end, and a latch-key; my great coat, which I had missed out of the passage, was brought in - it had hung on the same rail as the hat; a man brought it back at the same moment as the prisoner was brought in, and said he found it in Myddleton-square, which is about thirty-five yards from my house; I had heard my son Henry shut the door after my other son, about seven o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you remain in the parlour from that time till the alarm? A. Yes; I ran out directly I heard the alarm - the people were not near my house; they were running after the man, about fifty yards off - I saw my coat safe about six or half-past six o'clock; my maid servant was not at home.

WILLIAM HIX . I live at the Fountain, Amwell-street. I was in Upper Chadwell-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I followed the prisoner, who was running, and Mr. Henry Jones after him - I saw nobody else running at first; there was only us three in the street at that time - I know the prisoner by his person, his coat, and boots; he had very large buttons on his coat - the street was very light; there was a lamp at the corner - I could see his dress plainly; he had nothing about him at that time - I followed him about a hundred and fifty yards, and kept him in view all the while; a Policeman then came up in front, and took him - he was running as fast as he possibly could when the Policeman came up; he said, "You are mistaken in the person;" I followed him to the house, and saw two keys found in his inside breast pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a pot-boy? A. No, a plumber- I have worked for Mr. Bateman, Arlington-street, off and on, for four or five years; I was standing at the corner of the Fountain, for a necessary purpose, four or five doors from Jones' house; I lodge at the Fountain - I was quite sober; I had not been there above a minute when I heard the alarm, but my back was towards Jones' house; Mr. Jones was two or three doors from the house when I first saw him, and the prisoner almost close to him - he had not got the great coat then.

NATHANIEL BLACKWELL . I am a Policeman. I stopped the prisoner, as near as I can judge, at about a quarter to eight o'clock, in Solly-terrace - he was running very swiftly, and pursued by persons; he said, "You are mistaken in my person;" Myddleton-square is not between the prosecutor's house and where I stopped him; I found two keys on him, which I produce - I tried the skeleton-key; that would not open Mr. Jones' door - a hat was delivered to me by Mr. Jones, and a great coat was delivered to me, about nine o'clock, by Mr. Samuel Jones .

Cross-examined. Q. How many turnings are there between Jones' and where you took him? A. Two - I had seen people about.

HENRY JONES . This is my hat; I did not go near Myddleton-square in the pursuit; it lays in quite an opposite direction.

GUILTY (of stealing the hat only) . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-118

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

623. CHARLES ANDERSON and AUGUSTUS WOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , 13 pairs of boots, value 5l.; 16 pairs of boots, value 3l., and 4 shoes, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Redford ; and LUCY HAMBRIDGE and LYDIA EATON were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS REDFORD . I am a shoemaker , and live in Berkley-court - I have a shop in St. John's-lane, joining St. John's-gate . I left on Sunday, the 1st of January, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and secured the shop, leaving nobody in it - all my boots and shoes were then safe; I went to the shop again at eight on Monday morning - I found the padlock taken off, and laid by a pair of gates, close to the shop, and when I tried a key to the lock the door instantly flew open; I found my shop had been robbed, and three odd shoes laid down on the ground - the fellows were gone; I missed thirteen pairs of Wellington boots, and ten pairs and four odd shoes; on Tuesday night, the 3rd, I saw some of them again at the Police-station; the prisoner Wood had one pair of my boots on his legs - it was a pair I had lost from my shop.

EDMUND HARDWICK . I am a shoemaker, and live in Playhouse-yard, St. Luke's. I received information that some boots and shoes were to be sold at No. 10, Lion and Lamb-court, Playhouse-yard - in consequence of which, I went there on Tuesday night, the 3rd of January, about six o'clock; there are two rooms in the house - I went to the upper room, and found the four prisoners and another man, who was not taken; it is a bed-room - Hambridge was in bed; the others were up, dressed, and having tea

- I saw twelve pairs of boots, eight pairs of shoes, and three odd ones on the floor; I told them I had come to look at them for a person they had sent to - I paired them but, and told them they were unsaleable goods, because I had suspicion about them; I said I was placed in an awkward situation, as I was buying for another person - they asked me to bid money for them; I said I would give an answer in five minutes.

Q. Who did you speak to, and who spoke to you? A. I cannot name one in particular - they all spoke, the women as well as the men; I cannot say which spoke to me first - Anderson said, "You shall have them at your own price;" the one who is not here said."Not quite at your own price, but you shall have them for very little;" both the women spoke, but what they said I cannot say; I came away, and immediately went to the Police-station, Bunhill-row - they knew nothing of the robbery there, and I went to the Rosamond-street station; I then went to the prosecutor, and received information from him - I immediately went to the house with Busain, the inspector, another Policeman, and the prosecutor's man; the Policeman laid back, and the prosecutor's man knocked at the door - Hambridge came to the door, and asked who was there; I said I had come concerning the boots - she opened the door, and said she believed they were sold; she called Wood down - he said they were not sold; I said I had brought a customer for them - we went into the lower room, and he pulled the boots from under the stairs- the prosecutor's man looked at them; I said, "There were twelve pairs;" Wood said there were but ten pairs, for he had pawned two pairs - I looked them over, and asked the young man if they would do; he hesitated, and then said Yes, they would; I offered Wood 25s. for them(he asked 2l.); he said that was too little, I should have them for 30s. - I immediately went and opened the door; he then said, "Don't keep the door open, you shall have them" - I gave a whistle, and the inspector and officer came in and took Wood, and the boots and shoes; Hambridge was also taken; Anderson and Eaton were not in the house at the time - I had been gone about an hour and a half.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Anderson is not the person with whom you attempted to make the bargain finally? A. No, he was not in the room; I should know the other person if I saw him - he goes by the name of Holley; he has been searched for, and not found - I do not know whether he lived in the house.

Wood. Q. Was no other man in the house besides what you have named? A. Yes, there was a Jew in the room, looking at the boots and shoes, at the same time when I went up - he lived close by; I knew him well - he was sent for to buy the property, the same as I was; he told me so, in their presence and hearing - nobody fetched me; I received information from my wife that the boots and shoes were to be sold - I offered 1l. for them; Wood said I should have them for 25s. - I had not the money in my possession to offer.

THOMAS DAVEY . I am a Policeman. I accompanied Hardwick to the house - I remained outside till a signal was given; I then came, found a number of boots and shoes, and Wood in the room - Hambridge was standing on the stairs; I took them into custody, and brought away the boots and shoes - we went up stairs to search, and in a cupboard, on the left-hand side of the room, I found a pair of shoes, which I marked; Hambridge stated to me, when I took her, that she knew nothing of the transaction, and nothing of the boots and shoes, that the men were merely lodgers of hers.

JOHN BUSAIN . I accompanied Davey - on a signal being given we went in, and took the boots and shoes; the prosecutor identified a pair of shoes which were on Wood's feet - I have them here.

MARY ANN HEARDSON . I lived servant at this house, which was kept by Humbridge; Anderson lodged there, but nobody else - he had not lodged there a week; I had seen Wood come backwards and forwards, but he did not lodge there - I saw him there almost every day; I do not know whether he slept there - my mistress slept in the lower room; Anderson slept on the first floor - Mrs. Hambridge moved her things up there while her own room was whitewashed, and she slept there at that time; Anderson slept in the same room - I had seen Wood there on Sunday morning and Tuesday; I saw the boots and shoes on the Monday morning, about eight o'clock, in Anderson's room - Wood was in the room at that time, and Anderson and a young man named Holley; he was a friend of Anderson's and Wood's - I only saw him there two or three times.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe Hambridge had only come to the house about a week before? A. That was all - I was present when Anderson agreed to pay her 2s. a week for his room; there were two beds in the room - I remember about eight o'clock on Monday morning, going up with Hambridge to light the fire; there were some bundles in the room, which she took notice of; the strange man was in the room at that time - I remember Mrs. Hambridge making a remark about the bundles, but cannot say what it was; to the best of my recollection, she asked what the bundles were.

Q. I believe the man said they were his, and he was a dealer in Petticoat-lane? A. He might, but I cannot say - Hambridge said she thought they were not honestly come by, and desired they might be moved off her promises instantly.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. She said that to Holley? A. Yes; I never saw any thing in the room till Holley came.

COURT. Q. Did you sleep in the house? A. No - I found Holley, Anderson, and Wood there at eight o'clock on Monday morning, when I went.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. CLARKSON to JOHN BUSAIN . Q. Have you made inquiry for Holley? A. Yes, and understand he is in the House of Correction - I do not know that myself.

Anderson's Defence. I am innocent - I certainly knew they were in the house, but at that time I could not call the room mine - it was the only room that was occupied, on account of the other going under repair; I do not know that I ever saw Holley before in my life: I solemnly declare I never made any remark about the property - I was sitting at tea, and after tea left the house; I went to the Castle public-house - the officer came and apprehended me, as I stood there talking to two gentlemen, who I had business with; I was not drinking - I told him I was very

willing to go, for I had done nothing to be afraid of - as In the girl, I do not know what makes me think so, but I certainly think she would say any thing to convict me; I never did her an injury.

Wood's Defence. I was in the house on Sunday evening, late, and stopped all night, and when the girl came up in the morning, I was in the room; I had not long been out of bed - I had my breakfast between nine and ten o'clock, and left; I returned in the afternoon, between three and four, had tea, and a man came in, who appeared the owner of the boots and shoes - he said he would sell me a pair very cheap; I singled out this pair of boots, and paid him 8s. for them, in their presence - I had my tea, and went out on Monday night, and did not return till Tuesday afternoon; when I came up there were three men in the room, which were Anderson, a man not in custody, and a man who Hardwick calls a Jew; I sat down, had tea, and heard the bargain made with Hardwick; he said he could not deal with him then, but would go out, and give an answer in five minutes, and I believe he sent an answer that he could not deal with them - the man, after some hesitation, got up, went out, and said to me, "If that man should come again, you show him the boots, but do not sell them till I come back;" in about an hour and a half Hardwick returned, and said he thought he had a customer, if I would produce the boots - I produced them- he wanted me to take money for them, and said he would give 1l., but never offered the money, nor do I think he had it in his possession at the time; I told him I would not sell them as they did not belong to me, I would much rather wait till the owner came in - after urging me for five minutes to let him have them for the money, I said I would not, I would rather wait for the owner, who I expected in five or ten minutes; he opened the door, called in a Policeman, and I was taken; while they were searching the house a knock came at the door - I was on the first floor; Busain said to Davey, "Go down, open the door - whoever it is, let them in, and detain them;" he went and opened the door, and the man, seeing an officer, instantly made off, followed by the officer; they could not catch him - he came back, and told Busain a man had been to the door with a green coat and plated buttons, but he could not entice him in; I said the man, most likely, would prove to be the owner of the property - the little girl and Hambridge can prove I paid 8s. for the boots; my own shoes were found in the room, and they were a very old pair - I changed a sovereign to pay for them.

Hambridge's Defence. I am innocent of knowing they were stolen; Eaton had only come to drink tea at my house.

EDMUND HARDWICK . He did not desire me to wait till the owner came to deal about them, or say he could not deal with me - he never said such a thing.

MARY ANN HEARDSON . I recollect some bargaining for some boots between Holley and Wood, but I cannot tell what it was about - I heard some conversation about boots, but cannot say what they said.

Wood. I think it necessary Hardwick's character should be looked into - I understand he is a discharged Policeman.

EDMUND HARDWICK . I was nearly two years in the Police - I was not discharged; Busain, my inspector, can speak to my character.

Wood. Q. Did you not retain money belonging to a witness in the Court? A. Never; nor did I retain a watch belonging to a prisoner.

Anderson. Hardwick said before the Magistrate that I said, "There they are," not that I might have them at his own price; Heardson said on Saturday, that I said I would not take so much for my bargain, meaning my furs; if you will look at the depositions, that applied to the boots, and not the furs.

ANDERSON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

WOOD - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

HAMBRIDGE and EATON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-119

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

624. HENRY JARVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 pair of scales, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Morris .

CHARLES MORRIS. I am a tobacconist , and live in Foley-street, Marylebone . On the 25th of January, about eleven o'clock, I was sitting at the back of my shop, and heard the scales rattle; I saw the prisoner run out with the scales under his arm; I followed him about one hundred yards, and he dropped them - I called Stop thief! and a man stopped him, in my sight; I was about a dozen yards behind him, having taken up the scales, which checked my pace - I brought him back, and am certain he is the man.

JOHN HOWARD . I took him into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-120

Before Mr. Justice Taunton.

625. CHARLES SARTIN and GEORGE LOFTHOUSE were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of James Chignell , from his person .

JAMES CHIGNELL . I live in Gerard-street, Soho. On the 21st of January, about ten minutes to nine o'clock at night, I was in King-street, Covent-garden - a constable came up and asked if I had lost any thing from my pocket- I felt, and missed my handkerchief, which was safe half an hour before.

THOMAS TIPPER . I am a Policeman. I first saw the prosecutor near Temple-bar; the two prisoners were then following close to him - they followed him to King-street, and kept close to his pockets, and once Lofthouse had hold of his coat, to feel if he had any thing in it; in King-street I saw Lofthouse put his right hand into the prosecutor's left-hand coat pocket, and draw his handkerchief out- Sartin was alongside of him at the time; I asked the prosecutor if he had lost any thing - he felt, and missed his handkerchief: I instantly returned, and secured the two prisoners - I searched them, and found the handkerchief in Sartin's hat, which he had on his head; it was a little before nine o'clock - I searched them not half a minute after I saw it taken: I had not seen Lofthouse give it to Sartin; I was about two yards from them, and had my eyes on them all the time - I did not see Sartin take his hat off - that must have been done afterwards; I am sure they were in company all the way from Temple-bar, I saw them talking together.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Sartin's Defence. When the officer came back I was in the middle of Covent-garden - I was going on an errand for my grand-father, and as I walked up King-street, saw a handkerchief on the ground, and picked it up - I turned back, and saw this lad: I said I had found a handkerchief - then that gentleman and the officer came after me; I did not attempt to run away - it was in my pocket, not in my hat.

SARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

LOFTHOUSE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-121

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

626. JOHN HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 bill of exchange, for payment of and value 50l. , the property of James Price ; against the Statute.

JAMES PRICE . I am at present out of business; I have been a hosier . On the 29th of August I saw the prisoner at Peel's coffee-house, in Fleet-street, in consequence of an answer I gave to an advertisement for a traveller; I went there to apply for the initials L.P.F.C., and was introduced to the prisoner by the waiter - I told him my name; he proposed that I should travel for orders for pickled fish - the business was to be carried on at No. 32, St. Mary's-hill - he directed me to that house, and referred me to his partner, Mr. Earle, for particulars; I went next day to No. 32, St. Mary's-hill, and saw Earle, but did not see Brown; Earle and I did not come to terms that day - I think I went again the following day, and saw Brown and Earle together; I asked the terms which I was to travel on; they said they should allow me 7 1/2 per cent,; I said as it was a new concern, of course they must allow me something for travelling expences, till I could make sufficient commission to pay expences; it was agreed I should have 6l. a week, till the commission realized that amount; Earle then took out a sheet of paper, on behalf of himself and Brown, to make a memorandum to have an agreement drawn; Brown took part in dictating what should be stated in it, and at one time objected to his name being omitted in the agreement - there was an altercation between him and Earle about it; Earle said he did not know how many parties might be admitted into the concern, and Brown was reconciled to his name being omitted: this is the agreement.

WILLIAM MINITHORPE . I am the subscribing witness to that agreement, and saw it executed.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. With whom are you in partnership? A. Mr. Rowland Wilks , an attorney, in Finsbury-place. I was concerned for Earle; he had referred Price to me for a character; he was convicted last Session.

Q. Did you give Earle a most respectable character? A. I am not aware that I did - I stated to Price what Earle had represented himself to me, and what I knew of him: I stated that we had been concerned for Mr. Earle, in settling a lease of some premises, near Battle-bridge, for which he was to pay a rent of 2000l. a year, we being concerned for one of the ground-landlords, and that he represented to us that he had a fishery in Ireland, the lease of which was just out, and he had premises at St. Mary-at-hill: it was in contemplation to form a tontine; that he was to reveal a secret for the cure of fish; that he was to receive a large annuity; and that Earle stated to me, that the agent of the Duke of Devonshire was to be a party concerned; several other persons whom he named were to be parties, and that there had been a meeting at the London-tavern, to make the arrangements; but Earle had stated to me afterwards that the arrangements were broken off, and it was to be conducted according to the terms of the engagement; I left it to Price to judge for himself, and that he must see the danger of this security being negociated - I said that Earle was only a very recent acquaintance, and I relied on his representation to me, having no previous acquaintance.

Q. Did you state to him that Mr. Earle was a man of 5000l. a year? A. Certainly not, nor that he was in possession of a fishery in Ireland, nor what he had given for the fishery; nor that whether the pickled fish concern was successful or not, he would be sure to recover his money, for Earle was a man of property - nor that the company was sure to be successful, and that I was glad he had got into the company's service: I am positive nothing of the sort passed.

Q. Was the prisoner any party to that agreement? A. Only by inference; he was not present at the execution.

COURT Q. Did you see him on the subject of the agreement? A. I did - I think it was on the 6th of September; I went down to St. Mary-at-hill to read a draft of the agreement; I saw Brown in the counting-house; there were a number of circulars on the table: Brown entered into the subject of the agreement, and I understood from him that he was a partner in the concern, and that I might read the draft to him, which I did; some pencil alterations were made at the suggestion of Brown and Earle; some were made before Earle came in.

The agreement was here read; it was in the name of William Earle , Esq., on behalf of himself and other proprietors of the London Pickled Fish Company, engaging James Price as traveller to the said company, for the Counties of Nottingham, Derby, Leicester, and Warwick - and acknowledged that the said James Price had placed in the hands of the said William Earle , a bill of exchange, at three months' date, for 50l., drawn by him upon, and accepted by, Mr. Thomas Tebbutt , of No, 31, Polygon, Somers'-town, as a guarantee for the faithful performance of his duties.

JAMES PRICE re-examined. This agreement was executed at Mr. Minithorpe's office, on the 15th of September, and I there paid over into Earle's hands, a 50l. bill, dated on that day - there was nothing in the warehouse at St. Mary-at-hill but two chairs and a small counting-house desk; there were no barrels of pickled fish; I was there day after day, and was repeatedly ordered to prepare for a journey by Brown; I never saw any barrels of fish in the warehouse; I first went there on the 30th of August, and a month or five weeks after it was closed; I saw, perhaps, 30s. or 2l. worth of pickled fish; it was brought into the warehouse one morning - that was the only fish I ever saw; there were probably 6lbs. of eels; they filled four small pots; I never saw Brown after October - the warehouse has been shut up ever since - the bill was paid when it became due, and

I have it here; the prisoner's endorsement is on the back of it - there were probably two or three-thousand printed bills on the counting-house table; here is one of them.(this bill being read, was addressed to Merchants, Innkeepers, &c., recommending the pickled fish.) I never saw a greater stock of fish than I have mentioned, and part of that was thrown away - I had no notice that my bill was circulated - I never saw Brown after the warehouse was closed, which was in October, till he was apprehended; Eurle was in custody in October and discharged, as the bill being in negociation, could not be produced - I did not see him afterwards, till he was taken again - I know of no business having been transacted by the company; the bill was presented and paid when due, (bill read;) when I applied to know when I was to go my journey, Brown said the pots were not come in, and sent me to Palmer and Bernall's, to inquire after them - I went several times, and at last one hundred dozen pots came in; eight days after I signed the agreement, I said they had put me to some expence in preparing for my journey, and I must have assistance, but I did not require the 6l. per week; Brown asked what I wanted - I said 2l., and he gave it to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you told all you recollect of the business? A. There may be other things which I do not recollect; I am not aware of any thing else - I took a reference from Earle, and he had one from me; he referred me to Wilks and Minithorpe, on behalf of himself and Brown - they were both in the counting-house together.

Q. Did you apply to Mr. Minithorpe for a single tittle of the character of Brown? A. I consider I requested the reference from them both; I went to Mr. Minithorpe with a note, which they wrote - the reference was quite satisfactory; Mr. Minithorpe told me Earle was in possession of a salmon fishery in Ireland - he did not say he was in possession of 5000l. a year, nor tell me the value of the fishery, nor any thing of the kind; he said he had a right of a salmon fishery - he did not say the Pickled Fish Company was sure to succeed; he gave me his opinion that, according to the outline, it might be productive - he did not say he was glad I had got into the Company's service; he said Earle was a man of property, but not that whether the Company succeeded or not, I was sure of my salary from him.

Q. If Mr. Minithorpe has sworn he never told you that Earle had a salmon fishery in Ireland, that is not true? A. It is assertion against assertion; his assertion to me was, that he was a proprietor, or had a right of fishery on the coast of Ireland.

Q. Did you not understand from Mr. Minithorpe, from beginning to end, that Earle was a highly respectable man? A. I considered so, from his representing him as having a right of fishery.

Q. Did the prisoner ever tell you he believed Earle to be a very bad character? A. He told me he required from him 2000l. as a bonus for the secret of pickling fish, and likewise a capital to carry it on - this was a week or two after signing the agreement; he may have told me then that he began to suspect all was not right - the pots were fetched off the premises; he said he had given Mr. Bernal his opinion of Earle - I tasted some salmon in the warehouse; I may have told Earle it was a successful speculation - I have no doubt if there had been any thing real in it, I could have made it a very good thing in the quarter I was going; I searched for Brown repeatedly, after the bill was due - I did not include him in the indictment with Earle; I employed an attorney - I always intended to charge him with this offence; I was not told to do so in this Court - I have no recollection of it, and think I can swear I was not; Brown was not present when I gave the bill to Earle - Mr. Minithorpe might tell me I was giving a negociable security, and the face of it showed it to be so; he did not caution me against giving a negociable security - if he has sworn he did, it is assertion against assertion.

JOHN WALKER . I live in Allen-street, Lambeth. I received this bill at the warehouse, in St. Mary's-hill -Mr. Forty, the clerk to Earle and Brown, gave it to me, to inquire into the respectability of the party; I think Brown was on the premises at the time, but do not think he was present - I made inquiry, and found it was a very good one; I then appointed with Brown to meet me to endorse it, and he endorsed it at the Ship public-house, Charing-cross; I got it discounted in Vinegar-yard, Drury-lane, the same day - it was paid over to me for building an oven for the cure of pickled fish; my demand was 52l. 13s. - Earle gave me the order to build the oven- 2l. 13s. 6d. was left unpaid when Brown endorsed the bill; I was to give him 20l. out, if he gave me security which I should approve of for the 20l. and my balance - as I did not approve of the security he tendered, I kept the 20l. towards my account; the oven was to be 45l., but extra work came to 7l. 13s.; all Brown ordered was an extra boiler - I have not received the 2l. 13s.; I called at the warehouse twice afterwards, and saw three or four dozen pots - I saw Earle there, and saw Brown repeatedly, because he used to come after me, for this 20l.

Cross-examined. Q. You are the only person receiving benefit from the bill? A. I received it in a payment; Mr. Moses, of Vinegar-yard, discounted it for me - I have done work for him - when I get a hill I am obliged to discount it where I can; Moses gave me 48l. for it, which was 2l. for three months' interest, and I was glad to get it at that rate - Brown was repeatedly backwards and forwards; I was informed he was a partner; I had nothing to do with him till I had incurred a debt of 45l. with Earle; I saw him on the premises daily, but he gave me no directions; I do not think he was in the office when I received the bill from Forty - he wanted me to get the bill back again three or four days after I got it, and to arrest Earle; he said he found Earle had got no money, and if he could get him arrested he should he able to pay Mr. Noble his portion of the rent, and should be able to come in and carry on the business on his own account, and that he suspected Earle was deceiving the concern; that he had deceived him, and misrepresented the whole thing - that he was desirous to pay me - he never said he believed Earle to be a scoundrel and a swindler - what he said about Earle was when he applied to me for the 20l.

WILLIAM MINITHORPE I was at St. Mary's-hill shortly after the bill was given - the warehouse was

entirely closed early in October; I have seen none of the party since, except in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. The person who represented to you that he had 15,000l. worth of salmon fishery, was tried last Session? A. I never stated that he said so - I did not tell Price it would be a thriving concern; I did not express an opinion about it - I told him Earle told me he was proprietor of a salmon fishery, not that he was so; I never expressed an opinion whether it would be a successful company or not - I was not paid for drawing the agreement; I saw the inutility of applying to any body for it - I do not know where Brown or Earle lived; Earle lived in Chapel-street during part of the transaction - I had done business for him about a month before this transaction; that was all I knew of him.

HENRY ALFRED NOBLE . I am agent to my father, who holds the freehold, No. 32, St. Mary-at-Hill. On the 11th of August, 1831, by appointment, Brown waited on me for the purpose of taking those premises, on behalf of himself and a company, representing Earle as one of the partners; he said there were some noblemen, but they could not be named in the agreement, and if the premises were taken, it would be in the name of William Earle and John Henry Brown - he referred me to Mr. Pilling, of Red Lion-square; I was waited upon next day by Brown and Earle, and let them the premises, as yearly tenants, subject to six months' notice - they entered without making a deposit; the premises were open till I distrained some goods of Mr. Burnell's, the morning they were brought in; Brown had promised to pay me the rent, but did not, and he recommended me to distrain - he was present when the goods were distrained; Mr. Burnell satisfied me, and I got Brown to give me possession of the premises by a written order -Brown had represented to me that they were carrying on a very extensive business, and that he had employed Price as a traveller, at 6l. a week, and in the event of the business turning out profitable, he was to have 7 1/2 percent., and that Price had lodged a bill with him as a collateral security for certain trusts - that he had paid that bill away to Mr. Walker for an oven, in consequence of Walker dunning him, to keep him quiet.

Cross-examined. Q. You are a commission-agent, I presume? A. Acting by power of attorney; Mr. Burnell paid me the rent, and took the goods - Brown did not recommend me to distrain till after I could not get the rent- he had promised to pay me on the 29th; he then said there was a difference between him and his partner, and he feared I should not get it without distraining - I never saw him afterwards; the goods were going - a person on the premises told me of it, and I distrained; Brown told me long before the 29th, that he found Earle had deceived him - it was half a quarter's rent, and became due on the 29th; Brown told me he should not sign the articles of partnership till he was satisfied respecting Earle, and he thought he was a very bad character; he said,"I will pay your rent at any rate" - he afterwards came, and said he feared I must take my course; he said the proposals of Earle, and what had taken place latterly, was certainly very different to what he understood.

EMMA MATILDA WITT . I live in Wynyatt-street, Goswell-road. I know Brown as Earle's partner, and on the 15th of September I saw Earle give Brown the bill, at No. 20, Finsbury-place, for the purpose of inquiring whether it was the acceptance of Mr. Tibbutt; after that Earle asked Brown what he had done with it - Brown said he had returned it to Mr. Price, and that Price had cancelled the agreement; I repeatedly heard this conversation between them.

Cross-examined. Q, Are you married? A. Yes - my husband is alive; I do not live with him - I was living at Finsbury-place at the time, with Earle, on the first floor; my husband was living in Holborn at the time - I have two children by him: I first went to live at Finsbury-place on the 14th of September; my youngest child was then nine months old - I took that with me; Earle would not permit me to come forward on his trial - he said I should not be mixed up with public business, and it is against his wish that I come now, but I am subpoenaed, and am obliged to come.

Q. Was there any thing to prevent your coming forward on Earle's trial? A. Yes; I am not obliged to state what.

WILLIAM BAKER ASHTON . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 22nd of January - he was endeavouring to give this piece of paper to his brother, and I secured it - it is a receipt for 2l. from Price; (read.)

THOMAS PALMER . I am the overseer of Maurice's printing-office, Fenchurch-street. I printed one thousand circulars and three thousand six hundred labels for the company, by order of Brown; he ordered one thousand bills on the 27th of August, and on the 11th and 15th of September gave other orders; the first came to 2l. 5s. - that Brown paid; 8l. is still due.

GEORGE SANDFORD . I am clerk to Mr. Burnell, a potter and glass-seller. Brown came and gave us an order for some pots, in company with Earle, the latter end of July or the beginning of August; we were to furnish about 50l. worth of pots a week: on the 6th of October pots amounting to 51l. 0s. 8d. were delivered at the warehouse - some samples had been delivered before; we have never been paid for them - neither Brown nor Earle were to be met with when I delivered them - they had not been there three hours before I received information, and fetched them away - neither Brown nor Earle have applied for them since.

Cross-examined. Q. What number would come to 51l.? A. About ninety dozen of various sizes; it took about six weeks to execute the order - Brown came repeatedly, to know when it would be executed; the last time was about a week before; he did not come to Mr. Burnell, and complain that Earle was doing wrong, and beg him to get the pots away; the information was not given by him, but by John Galloway: Brown was not on the premises when I received them back.

ISRAEL LEVY . I am an agent and bill-broker. Forty offered me this bill to get discounted - I kept it three or four days, and then returned it to him, in Brown's presence, at No. 32, St. Mary-at-hill, because they would not take what I offered for it; Forty afterwards brought it to me again - I went with him to Walker's; I then gave it to Forty, and think he gave it to Walker's clerk.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you offer? A. They were to have 20l. in goods, and 30l. in cash - I should

have expected 2 1/2 per cent. commission; I asked for 5 per cent., nothing more.

Prisoner's Defence. I declare most solemnly I was introduced to Earle in a speculation for a monument to his present Majesty - he was introduced to me as a man of property; he afterwards proposed to me to manage some premises, in Gray's Inn-lane, which Mr. Minithorpe has mentioned - that not going forward he said, "You are an active man, I should like to have you a partner in the fish concern;" that he had a fishery in Ireland, which cost him 15,000l. - I embarked in it with him, and from that the whole of this calumniation has come on me; I was innocently brought into it - I did not do a single act with a dishonourable motive, and if the prosecutors speak like men, they will say my conduct throughout was honest and upright - having been deceived by a scoundrel, I am attainted as a felon, without having committed (with humble submission) an act of felony: it is scarcely necessary to call witnesses to rebut the evidence, as most of the conversation between Price and me was before my own family, who might he supposed to be partial - the fish company was exploded in consequence of my finding out Earle - he took 150l. out of my pocket to pay for the fittings up; the instant I found my name was not in the agreement I said it was most ungentlemanly, for if I was a partner why was not my name in it - I never made any fraudulent representation to the prosecutor, nor any other person - my conduct was perfectly honourable.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-122

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

627. HENRY WEBB was indicted for embezzlement ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-123

628. GEORGE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 saddle, value 50s. , the goods of Robert Turtill ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-124

629 JAMES GILMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 piece of wood, value 5s. , the goods of Zachariah Bowden and James Bowden .

AUGUSTUS PONDMAN . I am a Police-serjeant. On the 16th of January I was in the City-road - I saw the prisoner going towards George's-row, with the piece of timber on his shoulder - I asked where he was going with it; he said to Mr. Sowter's - I went with him to the gate; he put it down, and rang the bell - I said I wished to be correct in these things; he said he knew I did - he then ran off, but I took him; I went back, and Mr. Sowter said he knew the prisoner worked for his father, who lived in Golden-lane, and he had no doubt the timber was his father's, but it was not his.

Prisoner. I told him I had been hired by another man to carry it to Mr. Sowter's. Witness. He did afterwards, but not at first.

THOMAS SOWTER. I am a carpenter, and live in Nelson-street, City-road - I carry on business in George's-row . I saw the piece of timber against the gate; I marked it, and it was placed under my care, but I knew nothing of it, and did not expect any - the prisoner worked for my father for some years.

JAMES WARREN . I am a sawyer, in the employ of Zachariah and James Bowden , of the City-road - they are timber-merchants. I know this timber to be theirs - I had seen it safe about three weeks before.

ZACHARIAH BOWDEN . I am in partner ship with James Bowden - this timber is ours; the prisoner worked as a labourer for Mr. Sowter; he knew my premises, and was once a good workman.

Prisoner's Defence. A man in the street gave it me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-125

630. GEORGE HICKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 box, value 3d.; 29 rings, value 4s., and 1 snuff-box, value 3d. , the goods of Walter Morrison .

WALTER MORRISON. I keep a tobacconist's shop , in Wilstead-street, Somers'-town . On the 7th of January, on my return home, I found part of a pane of glass had been pulled out of my window - it had been cracked two or three nights before; I missed some rings, a snuff-box, and some combs.

CHARLES GREENHAM . I am a Policeman. I saw the prisoner in Charlton-street, with three other boy s; they went up a passage into Wilstead-street - I saw them standing round the prosecutor's shop, and then run away - I took the prisoner and another; I found on the prisoner this box and other articles - this knife was open in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18320216-126

631. ROBERT JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 1 whip, value 1s., and 2 horse-cloths, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Price .

THOMAS PRICE . I am owner and driver of a hackney-coach . About three o'clock in the morning of the 3rd of February, I went to the stand in Paddington-street - I saw the prisoner; he said, "I think it is all up here, I have just started three coaches off;" I said, "Are you acting as waterman?" he said Yes - I told him to give my horses a bit of hay, and he did so; I stuck my whip in the whip-hole, and got off to put the cloths on the horses, and as one horse had been ill, I put a sack on that - I then got on my box again, and dozed; when I awoke I missed my whip and my cloths.

DONALD McLEAN . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Paddington-street, and from information I went to York-court, a little after four o'clock in the morning - I found the prisoner there in bed; he was asleep, or pretended to be asleep - I aroused him, and asked what he had done with the man's whip and horse-cloths; he said he knew nothing about them - I searched, and found this whip under some straw, under the bed.

THOMAS PRICE. This is my whip.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a coachman going my way- I knew him, and asked him to give me a ride; we went on to Portland-road, and had something to drink -

he then said, "I have a whip in my coach, I wish you would mind it for me;" I took it home.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Confined Ten Days , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18320216-127

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

632. ROBERT NAY , WILLIAM NAY , and FREDERICK WILLIAMS , were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 5 handkerchiefs, value 18s., the goods of James Pincott ; and that William Nay had been before convicted of felony .

WILLIAM COLLETT . I am in the employ of Mr. James Pincott , a linen-draper , of Oxford-street . On the 3rd of January the two Nays came to the shop, about four o'clock, and asked to look at some black handkerchiefs at half a crown each - I looked over the box, but had not one at that price; I showed them one at 1s. 6d. - others laid before them; I turned to speak to a young man, and they went out, without buying any thing - I did not miss any handkerchiefs till the officer brought them back, with the prisoners, in about half an hour; we then missed these five handkerchiefs out of the box which I had shown them.

ROBERT CURRIE . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty, and saw the three prisoners in company in Regent-street - I followed them some distance; I did not see any of them go into the prosecutor's shop, nor come out, but I took Williams in Waterloo-place, about half-past four o'clock - I searched him at the station, and found these five handkerchiefs between his shirt and his skin.

THOMAS HOBBS . When Currie took Williams, I saw the two Nays running; I took them in Pull-Mall - nothing was found on them.

SAMUEL GREEN . I am a Policeman. I have a certificate of the conviction of William Nay , on the 1st of December - he was ordered to be whipped; I know he is the boy - (read)

Robert and William Nay put in a written defence, denying that they were in company with Williams, and declaring their innocence.

ROBERT NAY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

WILLIAM NAY - GUILTY . Aged 12.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-128

633. THOMAS BRAGG and JAMES GRAY were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 2 trusses of clover hay, value 6s.; 1 truss of hay, value 3s., and 1 sack, value 6d., the goods of William Walker , their master ; and JAMES ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH DAY . I am foreman to Mr. William Walker , a farmer at Enfield-highway ; his premises join the garden of the White Lion. In consequence of suspicion I was placed in a summer-house in that garden, which is nine or ten yards from a gap in the fence, between the garden and the lane, on the 23rd of January; in about half an hour I saw Gray and Bragg go by with a truss of clover on each of their backs - they put them through a gap in the fence; I then went out of the summer-house into the garden of the White Lion - Roberts is ostler there; I had before that written " William Walker " on some small pieces of paper, and put one into each of forty-one trusses of clover hay; I concealed myself in the garden, and in a few minutes I saw Roberts come and put his hands on each of the two trusses of hay; he then went and took a third truss from a third man who came up to the gap - I afterwards examined the trusses, and one of the papers which I had written was found in one of them - I have not the slightest doubt that they were all my master's; they were all of one sort.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What time was this? A. Between six and seven o'clock in the evening - it was not foggy; I was within two yards of them when they passed me with it on their backs - they were both in smock-frocks; I did not say that I only believed Bragg to be one of the men - I said I believed Webb was the third man who brought the other truss; he was taken up, but was discharged - he had a smock frock on; the barn was about two hundred yards from the gap in the fence; I do not know that any of my master's horses were ill - they were not allowed clover.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where were you when the third man brought the truss? A. In a trench in the garden - I had worked with Bragg and Gray for about a month.

WILLIAM BRIGGS . I keep the White Lion at Enfield-highway; Roberts was my ostler. I have nothing to do with finding the hay, corn, and straw for the horses; Roberts did that.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had he lived with you? A. About a month.

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a farmer, and live at Enfield-highway. Roberts had been in my service, and the other two prisoner were so at that time: I directed the tickets to be put into the trusses - I saw one ticket found in one of the trusses which were brought in from the garden of the White Lion; the hay was all of one growth, and cut out of one stack - the prisoners had no authority to part with it in any way; they only drove my teams.

Cross-examined. Q. Who usually gave out the hay? A. William Robinson - Roberts had been two or three years in my service; Bragg and Gray only a few months.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I am in Mr. Walker's service. -I used to give out the hay to Gray and Bragg - I did so on this night: they had nothing to do with the trusses in the barn - I saw Gray go across the yard with a truss of hay on his back; I said to him, "Come, that won't do, Jem;" he said, "Never mind that, old one;" he went towards the stable, but I did not see what became of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not that used to feed the horses? A. I do not know - I did not go to him or stop him.

GEORGE ABBOTT . I am the constable. I took the prisoners - I examined one truss, and found this ticket with" William Walker " on it in it.

Bragg's Defence. After I had done my horses I went home - the officer came, and took me; there was a man in the stable with me, and he knows I did not leave the stable.

BRAGG - GUILTY . Aged 27.

GRAY - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-129

634. MARGARET LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 2 sheets, value 10s.; 1

shirt, value 5s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s., and 10 books, value 10s. , the goods of James Hook .

JAMES HOOK . I live in Cross-street, Islington , and am a merchant - the prisoner had washed and chared at my house for the last twelve months; we had, during that time, missed a great deal of property. On Christmas-eve she came to remain with us for a few days, till we got a servant - we missed several things immediately afterwards, and on the 6th of January we missed a number of other things - I then charged her with it; she confessed she had taken the sheets, table linen, and some other articles, but not the whole of them - I gave her in charge.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and found part of this property in a box in a room, which she said was hers.

GEORGE BARBER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a table-cloth, pawned by the prisoner, on the 3rd of December, for 2s., and one shirt for 5s., in the name of Ann Cook.

ANN WELLS . The prisoner asked me to pawn a pair of sheets and a table-cloth, which she said was to redeem some shirts.

SAMUEL FLETCHER . I have a pair of sheets and a table-cloth, pawned by Wells - I have some books, which I think were pawned by the prisoner herself.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a petition, pleading poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 44. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-130

635. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 5 half-crowns, 4 shillings, and 3 sixpences, the monies of Peter Bell , from his person .

PETER BELL. I am a baker . On the 12th of February I was coming down Long-acre, a female in a coach cried out Murder! a young man, who was with me, stopped the coach - an officer came, and took him and me to the station-house, in Covent-garden - we were put down stairs, where two or three other persons were, and this prisoner was one of them - I had five half-crowns, four shillings, and three sixpences in my coat pocket, with some halfpence; I am sure I had it when I was put below - I fell asleep, and when I awoke I did not miss my money till after day-light, about eight or nine o'clock; I then put my hand into my pocket, and missed it - one of the persons then told me to call down the gaoler, and see who the money was found on; before the officer came down the prisoner went towards the water-closet - I saw him put his hand into his pocket, and saw something white in his hand - he dropped something down the water-closet, and the officer found exactly the money I had lost, wrapped in a piece of the prisoner's shirt.

MATTHIAS FOREMAN . I am a mill-maker. I was in the station-house on a charge of being disorderly - I saw the prosecutor brought in; he sat down, and fell asleep- I saw the prisoner get up from where he was, sit down by the prosecutor, and soon afterwards I heard the sound of a sixpence fall on the floor - I had some suspicion, and pushed the shutter partly open, which threw a light on them, but I did not see any more - soon after day-light the prosecutor said he had lost his money, and his friend said, "You changed a sovereign just before you came in"- I said, "You had better have the gaoler down to search the people who are here;" the prisoner sat there, pretending to be asleep, but when I spoke he got up, and went towards the water-closet; I jumped up, ran to him, and caught his hand over the hole; something fell from it, which sounded like silver - I said, "You rascal, you have robbed the man;" he said, "If I have, I must stand the consequence of it;" the piece of rag was taken up, and the money, which the prosecutor claimed, was found in it - the officer ordered the prisoner to take off his shirt, and three parts of the tail of it was torn off - the piece, the money was in, matched it exactly.

GEORGE COOPER . I am a Policeman. The prosecutor was brought in for being disorderly - I went down to the cell when I was called, and found the parcel down the water-closet; I got it up - it contained five half-crowns, four shillings, and three sixpences - Mr. Thomas ordered the prisoner's shirt to be taken off, and this piece, in which the money was, matched it exactly; it appeared to have been torn off.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-131

636. JAMES COLE was indicted for putting off to Frederick Daniel , on the 18th of January , 10 counterfeit shillings, for the sum of 2s. 6d .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be for 5 sixpences.

MESSRS. SCARLETT and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK DANIEL . I am a labourer , and live in White Lion-street, Pentonville. On the 18th of January I went, by direction of Hall, the officer, to Turville-street, Bethnal-green; I saw the prisoner there, about nine o'clock in the morning - I went, in about twenty minutes after, to a public-house called the Black Dog, in Church-street , by the prisoner's direction; and when I had been there about twenty minutes the prisoner came; I then went with him to the door - I gave him five good sixpences, and he put a paper parcel, containing ten counterfeit shillings, into my hand - I had received the sixpences which I gave him from Hall - the officers were in sight all the time, and when I had got the parcel from the prisoner, they came up immediately; the prisoner said "Cut it," meaning that I should move from where I was, and said, "We will go in and have a drop of gin;" Cooper took the parcel which the prisoner had given me out of my left hand - I had been searched by the officer, and had no money but the five sixpences which they had given me, and 6d. worth of copper, which they gave me to spend.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Have you given the Court an account of all that passed? A. No, I have as far as the questions were asked me - I went at eight o'clock that morning, according to appointment, to Mr. Hall's; Hall and Cooper were there - I was searched, and they found nothing on me; they gave me five good sixpences, and directed me to go to the prisoner's residence, where I had appointed to meet him - he was in bed: I knocked at the window, and he let me in; I stopped till he dressed - we went on to the Black Dog, and he told me to go in and wait till he came to me; he came and brought the ten bad shillings; he had before asked me what I wanted, and I said half a score, as usual - I should have told this had I been asked; he had appointed me to go to his house, and if he was in bed his hat was to be in the chair; I could look over the curtain into his room - I had made that appointment at the Feathers, in Castle-

street; I was in the Police, but was discharged about three months ago - this is the first transaction of the kind I have been engaged in, but I had made purchases of the prisoner three times before; I was introduced to him by a person whom I only know by the name of Jack - I was turned out of the Police because my serjeant did not please me, and I used language to him, which I ought not to have done; I have since been employed by different persons, and was at work at a wine-vaults till half-past eight o'clock last night - I was sixteen months in the Police, and before that I drove an omnibus from Turnham-green.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a Police-officer of Hatton-garden. In consequence of information I received, I applied to Daniel to assist me in taking the prisoner; the first transaction was on the 10th of January; when I receive information I inform the Mint - on the 18th Daniel came to my house at eight o'clock in the morning; I satisfied myself he had no money - I then gave him five marked sixpences, and 6d. in copper - he walked before us to Church-street, he went into Turville-street, and up a court; I then saw him and the prisoner coming back - they went as far as the Black Dog; Daniel went in there, and the prisoner went on - I went into a shop opposite, and in ten minutes I saw the prisoner come back, go into the Black Dog, and almost immediately come out with Daniel - I saw him give something to Daniel; I then crossed, and took the prisoner - Cooper was in another house; I saw the prisoner put his hand to his mouth - I pushed him into the house, and asked what he had in his mounth; I put my hand to the back of his head, and said I would have it out- he put up his hand, and I put up mine; the five sixpences which I had marked and given to Daniel, came out of his mouth: Cooper took this paper parcel from Daniel's hand - it contains ten bad shillings; we then all went to the office - the prisoner said, "I suppose this is a plant upon me, and I must make up my mind to be lagged, but I ought to have been down to that cove."

Cross-examined. Q. Was it by accident you went to the Black Dog? A. No, Daniel told me he was to go there: I saw a parcel given to Daniel; I should think I was about ten yards off; it was given quite openly; the prisoner took the money in his hand, and looked at it; then gave the parcel to Daniel; I was in a sale shop opposite; I had not introduced him to the prisoner, but I caused him to be introduced by a person I have known a long time, who is a very respectable man, and works for some of the first houses in the City of London.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I went to Hall's house on the morning in question; I saw Daniel come there; he was searched, and Hall gave him five good sixpences (which he had marked in my presence,) and 6d. worth of copper; we then went to Turville-street; Daniel went before us, and turned into a court; Hall and I went to a public-house and waited; we saw Daniel and the prisoner go by - Hall and I then went and stationed ourselves in two houses, nearly opposite the Black Dog -I saw Daniel go into the Black Dog and sit in the window; soon afterwards the prisoner went in; they then both came out together; I saw something change hands from the prisoner to Daniel, and from Daniel to the prisoner; Daniel then gave a signal agreed on - Hall and I went over and took them; Hall took the prisoner, and asked what he had in his mounth, and he dropped out the five sixpences - I then took these ten shillings from Daniel's hand; the prisoner said he ought to have been down to that cove.

Cross-examined. Q. How many houses were there in the court Daniel turned into? A. Perhaps ten.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin. These ten shillings are all counterfeits; they are cast and do not appear to have been in circulation.

Prisoner. I never said any thing about lagging.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-132

637. ELIZA KING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 4 half-crowns, 6 shillings, and 6 sixpences , the monies of Nathaniel Edwards .

NATHANIEL EDWARDS . I am a publican , and live in Bethnal-green. On the 26th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner, who is a stranger, came to my house and ordered a pot of half-and-half, to be sent to Mr. Lane, No. 6, Abbey-place , where I reside - I was to send change for a sovereign; I called my servant, and sent him with the half-and-half and the change, in half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences; I should have given him 19s. and 7d.; but I gave him 19s. and 8d. by mistake; I told him to be cautious; he went out, and was gone seven or eight minutes - I got anxious about him, and went out; I met him in the street, and he gave me the sovereign, as he supposed - the moment I got it into the light, I found it was a gilt shilling; the prisoner was not taken for three weeks or a month after - I am sure she is the person.

WILLIAM LOVETT . I am pot boy to the prosecutor. I took the pot of half-and-half to the mangler's, as I was ordered; I knocked - there was no one at home: I then went to another mangler; the persons there said they had not ordered it - I was crossing the road and met the prisoner; she said, "Have you got the half-and-half and the change?" I said "Yes, if you give me the sovereign;" she gave me what I thought was a sovereign, and I gave her the change; she said, "Take the half-and-half to the mangler's and tell them I am gone to Clark's, for some cheese" - I went there again, and they said they had ordered none; I stood looking about- my master came, and I went home with him; I would not have given the change if I had not thought it a good sovereign.

JOHN WILLIAM WINTLE . I took the prisoner and have the gilt shilling, which I received from the prosecutor.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin. This is a shilling which has been gilt.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not pass it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

638. ELIZA KING was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 half-sovereign, 9 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the monies of George Young .

SARAH YOUNG . I am the wife of George Young - he keeps the Black-horse, in Kingsland-road About nine o'clock in the evening on the 17th of January, a man came in and desired me to send a pot of half-and-half to Mr. Anderson's, the doctor, in North-place , and change for a sovereign; I sent my boy with it, giving him a half-sovereign and nine shillings and a sixpence; he returned, and brought me this gilt shilling.

JAMES DENT . I was pot-boy to the prosecutor. I took out the half-and-half and this change; the prisoner met

me just before I got to the doctor's; she asked if I was going there - I said "Yes;" she said she was coming for it, and asked if I had the change; she took the change and the half-and-half, and gave me what I thought was a sovereign, or I would not have parted with it; I am certain she is the person.

JOHN FIELD . This is a shilling, which has been gilt over.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not meet the boy.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years, for each offence .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18320216-133

639. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 5 lbs. weight of hares'-back, value 3l. , the goods of William Cooper .

WILLIAM COOPER . I am a furrier , and live in Princes-street, Drury-lane . I lost 5 lbs. weight of hares-back, for which I had paid 3l. 2s. 6d. Kebby brought it to me to sell, and asked 13s. 6d. a lb. for it; I said I would give 13s.; he said "I suppose you must have it" - I then found it was my own, and had been stolen from me; I can swear to the bag, and believe the hare's-back to be mine; I know the prisoner collects hare-skins and rabbit-skins; I do not know when I lost them.

JOHN KEBBY . I am a furrier. The prisoner brought these hares'-backs to me on the 5th of November, and asked if I would sell them for him; I said I would if possible, and I took them to Mr. Cooper; he bought them of me for 13s. per lb.; I returned and paid the money to the prisoner - I had not been at home above five minutes before Mr. Cooper came and said they had been stolen - I went to his house, to see that they had been stolen - I did not see the prisoner again till the 10th of February.

JAMES DENNIS . I received the information of this on the 5th of November; I had been in search of the prisoner, but did not find him till the 10th of February.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them at a public-house.

JOHN HARRISON . I live in Canterbury-place. On the 3rd of November I was at the Gun and Star, buying some flocks, in my business as an upholsterer; I saw the prisoner sell some skins, which came to 5l., and he took for them a bag of hare's-back, and two sovereigns - I remarked, "I should not like to take so small a bag for 3l." - the prisoner said, "I may possibly, in my dealing, get 1s. or 2s."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-134

640. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 4 pairs of shoes, value 12s.; 1 pair of gaiters, value 2s.; 4 brushes, value 5s.; 1 shirt, value 6s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s., and 1 carpet bag, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Cooper .

GEORGE READ . I am a hackney-coachman. I was on the stand, in Southampton-row, on the 11th of February, about six o'clock in the evening - the waterman told me to go to No. 23, Devonshire-street ; I went to the street- I got about three-parts of the way down, and, as I could not see very well, I asked a little boy what number that house was - he looked up, and said 22; I said, "Then it is next door I have to go;" the prisoner then looked up, and said, "Here you are, coachee;" I saw a young girl near him - she unlocked the door and went in, and he went in with her; I was sitting on my box - as I thought the prisoner belonged to the house, I need not get down, as it was very cold - I then saw the prisoner come out of the house with a carpet bag, which I thought he was going to put into the coach, but instead of that he went up the street, and turned down Boswell-court; I was sitting with my cloth round my knees, and in a minute I heard a lady sing out, "Mary, who is that you have left in the passage with the luggage?" she said, "Only the coachman's man, Ma'am;" then down I jumped, and went after the prisoner; I found him about half-way up the court, with the bag, but having my leggings on I could not run so fast as he could; I cried Stop thief! and he was stopped - I took hold of him, and brought him back; I asked what he was going to do with that - he said because he wanted it.

JOSEPH COOPER . I lodged in that house. I sent the servant for the coach; when I came down, I heard a man had taken my carpet bag, which contained this property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work a long time, and did not know what to do.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-135

641. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 90 yards of flannel, value 3l. 10s. , the goods of David Lloyd .

HENRY REFFELL . I live opposite to Mr. Lloyd - he is a hosier , and lives in Great Portland-street . On the 26th of January, about half-past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another lad lurking about his shop - I watched them, and saw the other loose the flannel from a string; the prisoner was then about twenty yards from him - the other went and spoke to him, and then walked back to the flannel; the prisoner put his shoulder down, and the other halped the flannel on his shoulder - I ran out, and called Stop thief! - the prisoner threw the flannel down, and ran, but I pursued, and did not lose sight of him till he was taken.

DAVID DAVIES . I live servant with Mr. Lloyd. This is his flannel, and was at his door.

WILLIAM OSBORN . I am an officer, and took him.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, declaring that the(property had never been in his possession.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-136

642. MARY ANN BRUCE & ELIZA RICHARDSON were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 watch-chain, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 5s., and 1 watch-key, value 2d. , the goods of Peter Nyholm .

PETER NYHOLM. I am a Swede. I am a mariner on board the William, which was in the St. Katherine-docks. On the 20th of January I met the two prisoners in Ratcliff-highway , about eleven o'clock in the evening - I was not exactly sober, but I had my senses about me, and was going home; the prisoners met me, and asked for something to drink - I went into a public-house, and gave them some gin; Richardson I can positively swear to, but Bruce I cannot - I believe she is one- I then wanted to go to my lodging, but Bruce would not let me; she kept close to me - I then missed my watch, and she ran away; I went to run after her, but I fell against a stone - Richardson was five or six yards from Bruce when I missed my watch; she went off in a contrary direction - I told an officer.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I am an unfortunate girl. I was walking with a girl named Lawe, in Ratcliff-highway, on the 20th of January; we met Bruce, whom I had seen before - she said she had very nearly been taken; we asked for what - she said for robbing a man of his watch, chain and seals; she asked us to have something to drink - we had a quartern of gin, and then she left us.

RACHAEL LAWE . I am an unfortunate girl. I was walking with Smith, between eleven and twelve o'clock- Bruce came up to me, and said she had been almost taken up for stealing a watch, chain and seals; we did not ask what man, nor did she tell us; there was no one with her then - she asked us to have some gin, and we did.

JAMES COOK . I am a Police-officer. On the night of the robbery I received this information; by the description I knew the prisoners, and went to where they lived, about two o'clock in the morning; I knocked, and Mrs. Miller answered - I told her I must come in; she told me to wait, as she was in bed - I then heard a rush up stairs; I asked Miller if Bruce lived there - she said No, she had left, but I went up stairs and found the prisoners in had together, with their clothes on.

Bruce's Defence. This officer owes me a spite; I was taken up one night for a row, and he came and asked if I had any money; I gave him a sovereign, and he brought me 1s. worth of gin - he kept 10s. 6d. of it and never gave it to me.

Richardson's Defence. I met this young woman, who asked me to take her home, which I did, as she had no room of her own; it was very cold, and we went to bed with our clothes on.

RICHARDSON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BRUCE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-137

643. JOHN BAILEY , JAMES LODER , and DANIEL BURK were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 3 brushes, value 7s. , the goods of Charles Charlton .

GEORGE COLLEY . I am a Police-officer. On the 28th of January I saw the prisoners at Mr. Charlton's shop-Loder went in, jumped up, and unbooked three brushes; I went up, and he threw them on a barrel.

ROBERT CURRIE. I was watching the boy s - I saw Loder go into the shop, and come out; I did not see him take the brushes.

JOHN FOSBURY . I am shopman to Mr. Charles Charlton, an oilman - these are his property.

Loder put in a written Defence, stating that he had gone into the shop to purchase a link, and as he came out accidentally knocked the brushes down.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-138

644. WILLIAM BARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 half-crown, the money of Peter Coates , his master .

PETER COATES . I live in Holywell-lane - I am a willow-cutter , and employed the prisoner. On the 25th of January I gave him half a crown to fetch half a pint of beer; I never saw him till eleven o'clock the same night, when I found him in custody.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had lost the half-crown, and was afraid to return to his master.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-139

645. JOHN CARR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 pair of boots, value 3s. , the goods of John Newman .

JOHN NEWMAN. I am a labourer . I lost these boots from under my bed on the 12th of February, at the poorhouse, near the Elephant and Castle - I suspected the prisoner, and the officer found him with my boots on; he left an old pair.

WILLIAM GILLET . I took the prisoner - he said he would have returned the boots, if he had not been taken to the station.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-140

646. SAMUEL BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 30 pence, the monies of James Chapman Butcher , his master .

THOMAS JAMES POCOCK . I am shopman to Mr. James Chapman Butcher , a pawnbroker , at New Brentford , The prisoner was employed to open and shut our shop - some money had been missed at different times, which induced me to watch, and on the 11th of February, he went through the shop with the bars of the shutters; I saw him stop and take a crown paper of halfpence from a board at the back of the shop - I sent for an officer, and gave him in charge; he was searched, but nothing found, but previous to that he had gone to some boxes which we have for the customers - I got a light, and the officer there found this crown paper of halfpence; I had seen it just as it is now on the board.

HENRY CREED . I am an officer. I found the money, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner. It is my first offence, I hope you will be merciful.

GUILTY. Aged 64.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-141

647. JOHN SAMUEL BAINBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 1 coat, value 55s. , the goods of Susannah Henson .

RICHARD BAYLIS . On the 3rd of February I saw the prisoner in Portpool-lane, carrying something in his apron - I followed him; he ran - I pursued, and when I came up to him at the corner of Tash-street, he threw this coat away, and was taken.

JOHN MARYEN . I conduct the business of Susannah Henson - she is a tailor . This coat is her property; it was buttoned round a block in the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Gray's Inn-lane, and was told to go to a marine store-shop and deliver a message - when I got a little way down, a young man asked me to take the coat to pawn.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-142

648. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 pair of breeches, value 7s. , the goods of James Harris .

JAMES HARRIS . I am ostler at the Bell, at Ealing , kept by Mr. Williams. On the 28th of January, the prisoner, who lives at Brentford, came to me; he is a tailor - he asked me for a job; I went to a box in the stable,

where I kept my clothes, and brought out a pair of small-clothes - I asked him if they wanted any thing done to them; he said No - he gave them back to me, and I put them into my box; I then went to look after a stage, and while I was gone with the horses, I saw the prisoner standing against the stable-door - when I went there again I found the box-lid open, and the small-clothes were gone.

- SPENCER. I buy and sell old clothes. The prisoner came to my house about three weeks ago, and said, "Mistress, will you buy these small-clothes?" he wanted 3s. 6d.; I said I could not give any such money for them - he said what were they worth; I said 1s. 6d. -I laid them down before him; he then gave me an old pair of stockings out of his hat, and asked 6d. for them -I said I could not give more than 4d. for them; I gave 1s. 10d. for them both.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-143

649. ROBERT MADGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Joseph Gibbons Merle .

ELIZA BROWN . My husband is a printer, and is occasionally employed at the Courier office, in the Strand - I am a charwoman there; this coat is Mr. Joseph Gibbons Merle 's - I do not know the prisoner.

HENRY LONG . I am shopman to Mr. Allen, a pawnbroker. This coat was pawned by the prisoner on the 21st of December, for 1l.; he was dressed respectably, and said he brought it for Mr. William Williams , his employer.

JOSEPH HIGGINS . I took the prisoner - he told me he took the coat, and where he pawned it.

JOSEPH GIBRONS MERLE . I am editor of the Courier - this is my coat; I did not miss it for two or three days after it was taken.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320216-144

650. HENRY MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 saucepan, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Coxill .

ROBERT MILLS. I live with Mr. Joseph Coxill , a cooper , of Upper Seymour-street . On the 13th of January we lost a saucepan out of the shop - the officer brought it back; this is it.

JOHN RADCLIFFE . I am a Policeman. On the 13th of January I saw the prisoner in Clarendon-square,with this saucepan - I asked where he got it; he would not give me an answer; there were two boys at some distance - I took the prisoner to the station, and then found the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-145

651. EDWARD McDONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Hindley .

SAMUEL HINDLEY. I am a shoemaker , and live on Great Saffron-hill . On the 21st of January these shoes hung on my door-post - the prisoner came and asked the price of them; I said if he wanted a pair he had better come in - he then took them, and ran away: I pursued, and came up to him - he put them down, and struck me several times - these are the shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18320216-146

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

652. MARY MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 7 lbs. of beef, value 3s. , the goods of Scipio Robinson .

JOHN DOWNES. I live next door to Mr. Scipio Robinson, in Broad-street, Ratcliff-highway . On the 19th of January I saw the prisoner in the shop - she took some beef-steaks out of the dish; she put them into her basket - she then came out, and said, "My dear boy, pray don't go in and tell;" she then went to a doctor's, and I went and told.

SCIPIO ROBINSON. I went in pursuit of the prisoner - she ran into a doctor's-shop, then out again, and into a doctor's shop, then out again, and into a public-house; I took her, and found in her basket the steaks, and two pieces of salt beef.

Prisoner. I hope you will have mercy - I was in distress.

GUILTY. Aged 43.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18320216-147

653. EDWARD KING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 brass cock, value 1s.; 1 piece of lead pipe, value 4d., and 1 copper ball, value 8d., the goods of William Constance , and fixed to a certain building .

WILLIAM EDGAR MERRITT . I am a Police-officer. -On the morning of the 26th of January I heard a person in the area of a house in John-street, Tottenbam-court-road ; I went and saw the prisoner take off this ball, cock, and pipe from the water-butt, and as he came up with them I took him.

WILLIAM CONSTANCE . I live in John-street, and am a carpenter. On the 26th of January my attention was called to my area; I missed the brass cock, the copper ball, and part of the pipe - it was fastened to the wall with holdfasts.

Prisoner. It was from distress I did it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-148

654. MARGARET HARRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 3 half-crowns, the monies of George Lipscombe , from his person .

GEORGE LIPSCOMBE. I went into a public-house under the Piazza in Covent-garden , on the 19th of January; I stood drinking at the bar - I saw the prisoner there; she put one arm round my neck, and with her other hand she took my purse; I did not know of it till I was informed, and then missed it; I had had three half-crowns in my purse - I had taken rather too much, but I was not the worse for liquor.

JAMES MOORE . I live in Short's-gardens. I was in the public-house - I saw the prisoner put her right arm round the prosecutor's neck, and attempt to kiss him; she then put her left hand into his trousers pocket, and took out the purse - she took one half-crown out of it, and called for half a pint of gin: she kept the purse in her hand - the landlady drew half a pint of gin; the prisoner went out,

and came in again in about two minutes - she then threw the purse down behind the prosecutor; I took it up, and gave it to the officer.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I give you the half-crown, and ask if there was any more in it, and you said No? A. No- I and the prosecutor had a pint of beer, but I had no money from her.

COURT. Q. When you saw her take the purse, how came you not to take her? A. I did, my Lord - she came back into the house, and I went for the officer.

JOHN KENT . I live in Hart-street. I was with Mr. Moore - I saw the prisoner put her arm round the prosecutor's neck, and take a purse from his pocket - she took half a crown out of it to pay for half a pint of gin; she went out for about three minutes, then returned, and was taken.

THOMAS WRAY . I am an officer. Mr. Moore came for me; this is the purse, which I took off the counter - they would not serve her with the gin, as they had seen her take the money from the purse; she committed a violent assault on the prosecutor - he bled all night, through the bed.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me to drink with him, which I did; I do not know what I did, as I was intoxicated.

GEORGE LIPSCOMBE. I had not drank with her at all; I do not know that I had seen her before.

JOHN KENT. I had not seen any thing pass between her and the prosecutor; I know she carries loads in the market - I have seen her with three or four children.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-149

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

655. CHARLOTTE CLARA DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 5 printed bound books, value 20s., and 15 other printed books, value 17s. , the goods of James Frith .

JAMES FRITH. I kept a shop in the ham trade , in Little Bell-alley - I let it to the prisoner; she allowed me the use of the premises to dispose of my stock. While I was there I had a free-admission order for two persons to the theatre - she asked me to take her; I agreed to do so, but when the time came she said she had seen the first piece several times, and if I would let her son go in to see the first piece he could then come out with a cheque, and she could go in - she came about ten o'clock; when I returned home I missed some bed-furniture, and some other things; I suspected the prisoner, and asked her about them - she said if I said she stole them she would swear I had stolen a 5l. bill of hers; I missed, among other things, five printed bound books, and fifteen other books - I missed the Life of Christ, eleven volumes of fugitive poetry, and others, to the amount of about one hundred; these are part of them - I had seen them safe in a chest, in the parlour - the chest was broken open.

HENRY FOSTER . I am a marshalman. I went with a warrant to Mr. Jones' shop, in Leathersellers-buildings, where I got these books.

JOSEPH JONES . I was sent for to Edward-street, Hoxton, to look at these books - the prisoner called on me to go, and I went and saw her son, but not her; she called on me about the middle of January, and asked me 40s. for the books - I ultimately agreed to buy them for 32s. -I sent my boy home immediately after her, and he brought them to me, but he is not here - the prisoner said they were the refuse of a set of books, which she had to dispose of, but she was not present when I saw them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-150

656. JAMES SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Richard Henry Jones , from his person .

RICHARD HENRY JONES . On the afternoon of the 6th of February, I was opposite Houndsditch ; I felt something touch my pocket - I turned, and saw the prisoner; I caught hold of him, and found my handkerchief, inside the breast of his coat - this is it.

JOHN WRIGHT. I am an officer, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. There were several people passing- some of them must have seen it; I was three yards from him when he turned, and said, "I have got you;" I said,"What for?" he said, "You dropped this handkerchief"- I said, "If I did, give me into custody;" he took me into a grocer's-shop - I waited half an hour before the officer took me.

MR. JONES. I am quite clear that I saw the handkerchief in his possession, and he was the nearest person to me.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for 14 Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-151

657. THOMAS BAKER and JOHN WEBB were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 3 account-books, value 2l. 13s. , the goods of Edward Boylon .

ANN WREAKS . I serve in the shop of Mr. Edward Boylon , a stationer , in Little Moorfields - I have seen Baker there several times; he used to buy articles there. On the 23rd of January, in the afternoon, he came into the shop, and asked to look at some prints in the window, which he did - he then looked at some quills; he said they were very good, and their governor used a great many, but they did not want any then - he then asked to look at some account-books; he said they were very good, and if I would allow him he would choese out three to go to Mr. Baker, the lawyer, No. 7, Finsbury-circus - he asked if I could send them; I said Yes - he went out of the shop, then returned, and said he would send a light-porter for them; Webb afterwards came, and said he had called for the three books, which their young man had chosen out for Mr. Baker, the lawyer, No. 7, Finsbury-circus - I was going to pack them up, but he said I need not be particular, as Mr. Baker was waiting in the office, and the other young man would call and tell me if they would do; he then went out with them - Evans followed him, and I was sent for in about ten minutes - these are the books.

WILLIAM EVANS . I live in Union-street, Little Moorfields, and am a carpenter. I saw Webb go from the shop- he went down Short-street, across Moorfields, and then into the Circus, where he joined the other prisoner - they began to run; they passed No. 7, and went on - I then called assistance, and took Webb; Baker was taken by the street-keeper - I know No. 7; no Mr. Baker lives there.

PETER KELLY . I was in the enclosure of the Circus when Mr. Evans came into West-street; he beckoned to - me, and pointed to the two persons who were on before-I opened the gate, and went with him; we followed them till they had passed No. 7, and gone on to the Institution; he then said it was high time to take them - I have been

employed in that Circus eleven years; no Mr. Baker, a lawyer, lives there.

JAMES ALLEN . I am an officer. I took charge of Webb and these books.

THOMAS SEAL . I am an officer. I secured Baker, and took him in charge.

COURT to ANN WREAKS. Q. When you parted with these books did you intend that the prisoner should have the property, or was it merely to take it to Mr. Baker? A. He was to take it to Mr. Baker, to see if it would suit him; it was to be a ready money transaction, and I was to allow him so much for each book - they were not sold on credit, or sold to either of the prisoners; Baker said he would give me a good order, and recommend the shop.

Webb's Defence. I was going along Finsbury-pavement, when a man came and said, "I will give you 1s. to go to Little Moorfields for three account-books, to go to No. 7, Finsbury-circus; I will meet you at the end of the Circus."

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

WEBB - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-152

658. STEPHEN GUTHRIE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 1 box, value 2s.; 2 shirts, value 8s; 7 collars, value 3s. 6d.; 7 neckerchiefs, value 10s.; 2 pairs of drawers, value 3s.; 1 gown, value 7s.; 7 nightgowns, value 9s.; 4 petticoats, value 3s.; 8 handkerchiefs, value 15s.; 10 pinafores, value 6s., and 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Lingham .

ELIZABETH MENSELL. I am servant to Mr. Thomas Lingham - he lives in Great Tower-street . On the 23rd of January the prisoner came, and said he was the carrier, and had come for the box of linen - I am in the habit of sending a box of linen every week by the Merton carrier; I gave him the box.

SARAH HOVILE . I am nurse at Mr. Lingham's. I made up the box of linen - it contained the articles stated in the indictment.

WILLIAM McDUFF . I am a carrier. I have been in the habit of fetching the linen from Mr. Lingham's, in Tower-street, and taking it to Mrs. Collins' at Merton - the prisoner lived with Mr. Ewins, a Merton carrier; I have asked the favour of him to take this box for me, but I did not send him for it on the 23rd of January - he told the servant that I was waiting in the street.

ELIZABETH MORRIS . I happened to be in the passage, at Mr. Lingham's, when the prisoner came - I observed his person - I know he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect, on the first examination, that you stated you saw, a man, but you could not describe his features? A. No, I did not - I am certain you are the man; none of the property has been found.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, declaring his innocence, and that the witnesses must be mistaken in his person.

ELIZABETH MENSELL . I am quite certain the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-153

659. JAMES KIRBY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 set of fire-irons, value 10s., the goods of James Eve ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

JAMES EVE . I am an ironmonger , and live on Ludgate-hill . I have lost twenty sets of fire-irons; I went with the officer to the pawnbroker's, and found this set.

STEPHEN STEPHENS . I am shopman to Mr. Whittaker, a pawnbroker, in Long-lane. These fire-irons were pawned with me on Saturday night, the 21st of January, by the prisoner, in the name of James Kirby , for 4s.

JAMES WELLS . I am a Police-constable. On the 25th of January I saw the prisoner on Ludgate-hill, in conversation with Clark, who has been convicted; he was opposite Mr. Evels shop, while Clark went in and brought out four sets of fire-irons - I took the prisoner then, but I let him go again; these fire-irons were found afterwards at the pawnbroker's.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at home on the night these fire-irons were pawned; the officer came to my house on the 2nd of February - he took me to another pawnbroker's. where a set of fire-irons had been pawned; they said I was not the man - he then took me to Mr. Whittaker's, and they did not say whether I was or not - I was then remanded till the Tuesday following, when three pawnbrokers came- none of them could say I was the person; but on the Friday Mr. Stephens swore I was the man.

STEPHEN STEPHENS . I never expressed any doubt that the prisoner was the man: I did not attend at the first examination.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a special constable. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office - I took him on that occasion, and know he is the man. - (read.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-154

660. JAMES ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 window-guard, value 7s. , the goods of John Boshill .

JOHN BOSHILL . I live in Fore-street, Cripplegate . On the evening of the 8th of February I was in a room behind my shop; I heard a noise at the door, and missed a brass guard which had been at my door - it slips into a socket, but was not nailed or screwed; before I got to the door I saw that it was gone - I ran out as fast as I could, and on the opposite side of the way I saw the prisoner looking in at a window, with the guard in his hand; I brought him back - he made no resistance.

JOHN HILL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - this is the guard: I have seen him selling wood - I believed him to be an honest lad.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my sister's, who was ill, and the gentleman came and took me; a boy with a flannel jacket had just run by me and put this down.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-155

661. LOUISA NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 purse, value 6d., and 11 sovereigns, the property of John Williams , from his person .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I live in Philpott-street, Commercial-road. On Saturday night, the 7th of January, I saw the prisoner in Holborn, at a quarter before twelve o'clock; she asked me to go with her to a house; I turned, looked at her and desired her to leave me, which she did, but when I got about one hundred and fifty yards further, she came up again, and requested me to go with her - I

had my coat on my arm, and an umbrella in my hand; she took hold of my arm; I said, if she did not leave me, I would charge an officer with her - I then went on till I got to St. Andrew's-church; she came to me again, opposite a lamp; I again told her to leave me; she looked angrily at me; I crossed to evade her, but she still kept with me till we came to a little court just beyond Farringdon-street ; she rather pushed me round the corner, then put her hand into my left trousers pocket, and pulled out my purse - I am a little afflicted with paralytic on my left side, and I could not take hold of her, but I tried to follow her as she ran off - I slipped and fell down, with my face in the mud - I got up, and still pursued till I lost sight of her - on the following Monday I was going up Holborn-hill, and heard two women saying that Louisa Norman had had a good chance on Saturday night; I went to the station-house, in Rosman-street, and gave information; the inspector sent one of the men with me; we went to No. 2, Pheasant-court, Gray's-inn-lane; we found the prisoner and two other women in the second floor front room - I identified her immediately, and I am quite sure she is the woman who had accosted me and taken my purse, which had eleven sovereigns in it; I know they were safe just before; the prisoner said that was not her room, she lived over-head; the officer search the room; the prisoner stood near the fire-place, and I saw her hand up to her bosom - I said, "What a pity it is you have got yourself into such a situation" - she said,"No pity at all" - the officer had searched the room, but found nothing - I said to him,"Now you must search her, and he found in her bosom a purse, which was not mine, with two sovereigns and a half, and 3s. in it; she then said,"I am the woman that robbed you" - I said,"Yes, you know you are" - she then said, "If you will wait till tomorrow evening, I will give you two sovereigns and a half more; we then asked for the purse, and she called to a woman, who brought up my purse, and gave it to the officer; she acknowledged it was the purse which had contained the eleven sovereigns.

GERALD McCARTHY . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor, on the 9th of January, to No. 2, Pheasant-court; this money was found on the prisoner, as Mr. Williams has stated; she then said she had robbed him, and was sorry for what she had done - if he would only overlook her fanlt, she would let him have 2l. 10s. the day following - I asked what she had done with the purse; she said I should have that another time; I insisted upon having it then, and she called Mary Austin, and told her to get it, which she did.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the purse, and know nothing about the money; what I had was given me by a gentleman, for the support of me and my child.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-156

562. JOHN COLSTON and GEORGE WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of a certain man unknown, from his person .

THOMAS FARRANT . I am a Police-officer. I saw the prisoners together on the 1st of February, in Cockspur-street; they went down the Hay-market, through the Strand, and down Fleet-street , following several gentlemen; I saw Colston lift up a gentleman's pocket - we then followed them down Cheapside ; and got beyond Bow-church - they went up to a gentleman and lady; Colston took the handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket; Williams was close by his side - they seemed to be acting together - they had been together from half-past eleven o'clock till half past one; we took the prisoners, and Hobbs took them to the Mausion-house - I asked the gentleman to appear at the Mansion-house, which he declined, and did not state his name; I am sure that Williams was engaged in the same object - Colston put the handkerchief in his right-hand trousers pocket, and turned round, and Williams went up close to him; they were touching each other when we took them.

THOMAS HOBBS . I was with Farrant - I saw the prisoners watching several gentlemen, and when they got into the Strand I saw Colston take a handkerchief a little way out of a gentleman's pocket, who was looking into a shop; we followed them to Cheapside, and there Colston took this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket - I crossed and collared him, and he threw it into a door, behind him; Williams was close to him, and so he was in the Strand - we had been watching them nearly two hours.

Colston. I am innocent.

Williams. This is the first time I have been in a Court.

COLSTON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-157

663. CHARLOTTE WILSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Rawlins, on the 17th of February , and stealing therein 6 1/2 yards of lawn, value 8s., the goods of William Rawlinson .

WILLIAM RAWLINSON. I live in the Minories , and am a linen-draper . On the evening of the 17th of February, about half-past nine o'clock, I had a piece of lawn in the window - I was standing in the shop, a few yards from the window - I heard a noise, and found my window was broken; I am sure it was whole just before - they were large squares of plate glass, worth two guineas each - I immediately went to the door, and saw the prisoner running away; I pursued her, and took the piece of lawn away from her - it has my private mark on it; the greater part of the square was forced in, and this might have fallen out - the window must have been broken from without; I did not miss the lawn till I took hold of her, and it fell from her.

JAMES HOPPE . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house between nine and ten o'clock, with this piece of lawn - I found nothing on her.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-158

OLD COURT. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

664. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 dead fowl, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Baxter ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-159

665. WILLIAM WALKER was indicted for stealing,

on the 15th of February , 17 pennies and 2 halfpence, the monies of James Imrie , his master ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

Fined 1s., and delivered to his master .

Reference Number: t18320216-160

666. JOHN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 3 candlesticks, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Robert Green ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

JOHN MARRS. I am servant to John Robert Green, who keeps the Bull's Head, Peter-street . The prisoner came in on the 28th of January, in the afternoon; I was in the yard - he opened the kitchen door, looked in, pulled the door a little too, and looked round to see if he was watched -I saw him take some candlesticks, which he found were too big to put into his basket; he put them down, took three small ones, and went out with them in his basket, into the yard, from the tap-room - I went and told Mr. Green, who came; he shoved Mr. Green down, and ran away - I ran after him, and secured him not far off; he had left the basket behind, with the candlesticks in it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT TAYLOR . I am a Policeman. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - (read.) - I was present at the trial, and am certain he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 41. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-161

Before Mr. Recorder.

667. ROSS CARNEY was indicted for feloniously forging a certain receipt for the delivery of goods , which is as follows:-

Gentlemen, - Be so good as to let the bearer have five yards and a half of blue, to patters, and to send the drab cloth up as the whole piece, on Monday morning, by ten o'clock; also a yard measure, as I do not know what quantity will be wanted.

N. B. Let the drab be good, as it is for a gentleman.

C. READING, Mortimer-street.

with intent to defraud Simon Mines ; against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, for uttering the same, with the like intent.

SIMON MINES. I am a woollen-draper , and live in Bedfordbury, Covent-garden . On the 5th of November the prisoner brought this order to me, with these patterns; he said he had brought that order from Mr. Reading of Mortimer-street - I looked at the order, and could hardly understand it; he read it to me - I asked if it was Mr. Reading's writing; he said it was, and that he saw him write it - I said I did not recollect seeing him about Reading's premises - he said he had seen me there several times, that he had been about six weeks in his service, and was articled to him; I then cut off the cloth, and he went away with it - I have not seen it since; he was apprehended on the 5th of December - I am confident he is the person; I knew him the moment I saw him - his answering every thing so satisfactorily removed my suspicion.(order read.)

WILLIAM READING . I live in Mortimer-street. The prisoner was never in my service, nor articled to me - he is an entire stranger; this order is not written by me, nor given to him - Mines has served me some years; I am a coachmaker - I never sent written orders.

EDWARD JONES . I am a Policeman. On the 5th of December I apprehended the prisoner in Portland-place- I asked his name; he said George Thomas, and that he lived at Bermondsey - I asked if he knew any thing of any cloth of Mr. Mines', Bedfordbury; he said No - he insisted on going into a public-house; I would not let him, and one of his companions brought him out a pint of beer - I got him to the watch-house, and he said, "Well, my name is Ross Carney, and what of it?"

Prisoner. I sent to see if a bill was filed against me; the Policeman had the kindness to say No, and my friends are not here - I never was in Reading's employ, and how could I know who he dealt with.

GUILTY. Aged 19. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-162

668. JAMES GAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 mare, price 10l.; 1 cart, value 10l.; 1 set of harness, value 1l.; 1 box, value 5s.; 1 basket, value 1s.; 80lbs. of candles, value 2l. 10s.; 3lbs. of rushlights, value 1s. 4d., and 4 ozs. of sealing-wax, value 1s. , the property of John Matthews .

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a tallow-chandler , and live in Long-acre. On the 18th of January I sent Hawkins, my servant, out with a mare and cart, and the goods stated in the indictment; my name was on the cart - the cart and horse were brought back by a Policeman, about twelve o'clock that night, and a basket, but none of the contents.

JOSEPH HAWKINS . I am in the employ of Mr. Matthews. I took these goods out in a cart on the 18th of January - I had occasion to deliver a box of candles in Allhallows-lane, Thames-street , about six o'clock in the evening, and left the cart at the top of the lane, while I took the box to a warehouse; I returned in about ten minutes, and the cart, horse, and all the goods were gone - I had not seen the prisoner near; he was quite a stranger - the cart and horse were brought back about twelve o'clock at night, and about three o'clock next day I saw the goods at a house in Kingsland-road, and the box which had contained the candles was found in that house.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was it a chandler's-shop you went to in Kingsland-road? A. Yes - they sell candles; I do not swear to the candles - some were in a little box, tied up as I left them, but not in the box I had left them in; I found two women at the house, but not the prisoner - I did not see him for three weeks,

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a Policeman. On the 18th of January, about ten o'clock at night, my attention was directed to a horse and cart, which stood at the door of the Lamb public-house, Kingsland-road - several persons were round it, who I knew had nothing to do with it; I did not see the prisoner - Matthews' name was on it; nobody owned it, and I took it to Matthews' - the mare and harness were to it.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. On the 19th of January I went with a search-warrant to the prisoner's house, near the King's Head, Kingsland-road; I had seen him in the house - he was not at home; it is a chandler's-shop; I went into a back room up stairs, and found this basket, containing 12lbs. or 14lbs of candles, on a

chair - the prosecutor, who was with me, said they were part of his property; I saw the prisoner in custody on the 7th or 8th of February - I had been to his house ten or twelve times, and to many other places, without finding him; he had been out of the way all the time - he appeared in a small way of trade.

Cross-examined. Q. Select from the basket the property claimed by the prosecutor? A. These two parcels, being at the top, he mentioned as his; the others were all loose - he did not claim the basket; the parcels contain about 6 lbs. of wax candles.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I accompanied Attfield to the house - three bundles of candles were found; they are not in the papers I sent them out in; they are of a certain size, and are exactly the order I had to send to Coleman-street - 3lbs. of composition short sixes, 3 lbs. of long fours, and 3lbs. of wax threes: they have the stamp of my wax-chandler on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Show me the mark? A. It is at the bottom - it is a crown or something; I never particularly noticed it - I said I could not swear to them; I said I believed them to be mine.

THOMAS WATERS . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house, with Vann and Attfield, and in the backroom down stairs, I found a large candle-box empty - I showed it to Hawkins: he said, "That is my master's, I know it by the grease where I sat upon it;" it has no name on it.

JOSEPH HAWKINS . I was at the prisoner's house when this box was produced - I know it was in the cart, nearly full of candles.

Cross-examined. Q. How many dozen does it hold? A. Twelve - here are no letters on it, but there is a mark where I have sat on it, and I know it by its general appearance; it has been used about three times.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house, and found a small box with candles in it, and a quantity of candles hanging up; the prosecutor selected some wrappers; Waters found the large box, and Hawkins claimed it by a mark where he had sat, and greased it.

JOHN MILLIGE . I keep the King's-head, Kingsland-road. I know nothing of the charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a neighbour of the prisoner's? A. I live two doors from him; he is a tenant of mine; the Lamb is nearly half a mile from where he lives; he was often from home; I have been a month without seeing him; his wife transacted the business.

JAMES ISAAC . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of February, at the Fitzroychapel, Tottenham-court-road.

JAMES LOVEL . I am a lace manufacturer, and live in the City-road. I went to the prisoner's house on the 4th or 5th of January, about a tub he had to sell; I saw a twelve-dozen candle box, as they said, and asked him if it was for sale - I have had a great deal to do with candles some years ago - there are so many of these boxes made it is impossible to swear to one, but this box I should have bought, had it not been for these nuts on the lid - I believe this to be the box.

THOMAS WEBB . I am a working-jeweller. I live in Penton-place - on the 18th of January, between three and four o'clock, I was in Chiswell-street, and met the prisoner; I went with him to a public-house in Barbican, and stayed there till nearly ten o'clock - he did not leave me all that time, except for a minute occasionally.

JOHN AVANT . I am a builder, and live in Moorfields. I was with Webb from between three and four o'clock on the 18th of January, till near ten, the prisoner was with us all that time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-163

669. A man called GOAS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Shack Hussan , on the 1st of February , and stealing from his person 1 turban, value 10s. and 2s. and 4d. his property .

SHACK HUSSAN, (through an interpreter.) I live in Union-street. The prisoner was a particular friend of mine - I was coming from where I slept, with a girl, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, when the prisoner caught hold of my collar and threw me down - he had lived with the girl before he came to this country, and I believe it arose more from jealousy than a wish to rob me; he took off my turban, but whether my money fell out of my pocket or he took it, I do not know - I cannot say whether he run or walked away; as a mob came round, the people said he took my turban up, but I did not see it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-164

670. THOMAS PHELPS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 1 clock, value 10s.; 1 bed, value 2l.; 2 pair of sheets, value 22s.; 3 blankets, value 18s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 4s.; 2 pillows, value 10s.; 1 bolster, value 10s.; 3 glasses, value 3s.; and 1 waistcoat, value 8s.; the goods of Joseph Hillier , in his dwelling-house .

MARY ANN HILLIER . I am the wife of Joseph Hillier - we live on Hounslow-heath , and keep a beer-shop ; the prisoner occasionally came to drink there. On Sunday the 22nd of January, 1831, during the night, the adjoining house, which belongs to us, but is not inhabited, was broken open, and these things stolen - the prisoner and several others were taken on suspicion next day, but as no property was found he was discharged - he had been at our house that day - I saw the clock at Hatton-garden last Saturday week; nothing else has been found.

WILLIAM GOULD . I am a labourer, and live in Hampshire. I married the prisoner's sister - I saw him bring this clock to his father's house one Sunday evening, nine or ten months ago, about seven o'clock; he told his father he had bought it - he left it there some time, and then his wife asked me to sell it for her, as she was in distress; I sold it to Long.

ROBERT LONG . I live at Alverton. I bought this clock of Gould last Whitsuntide, for 10s.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable. I found the clock at Gould's, by information from another man now in custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-165

677. SARAH MANLEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Wise Smith , on the 18th of January, and stealing 3 gowns, value 30s.: 1 frock, value 10s.; 1 cloak, value 5s.; 1 pelisse, value 3s.; 1 lace collar, value 4s.; 2 caps, value 5s.; 1 box of paints, value 20s.; 1 scarf, value 3s., and 1 petticoat, value 1s. 6d., his property .

ELIZABETH SMITH . I am the wife of Robert Wise

Smith , a tailor , of Church-street, Bethnal-green . The prisoner came to lodge in my first floor back room a fortnight before Christmas, by the name of Bishop; her husband slept there every night till I lost the property - on the 16th of January I know all this property was safe in my bedroom, which is the first floor front room - on Thursday, the 19th, I missed all these articles; we always kept the room locked - I slept there on the night of the 18th - the prisoner and her husband slept in the back room that night; I missed them about eleven o'clock at night on the 19th -I had not seen them after Monday, and have reason to think they were gone on the Tuesday; the prisoner remained in the house for a fortnight after the robbery - I do not know where her husband is; they left my house a fortnight ago.

MARY ANN BELL . The prisoner came to my house one Wednesday morning, between nine and ten o'clock - I was in bed; she awoke me, and said she had something for me to buy - she produced a brown silk gown, a nankeen pelisse, and the body of another gown; I did not buy them of her - I saw the same pelisse afterwards at the pawnbroker's.

SAMUEL VARLEY . I am servant to a pawnbroker, in Mile-end-road. I have a nankeen pelisse, which was pawned by the prisoner, on the 18th of January; she was alone.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a cloak, but I do not know who pawned it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES BROWN . I apprehended the prisoner - she said she knew all about the robbery, and she would "spoil the whole lot of it."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-166

672. RICHARD HEADNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 watch, value 6l., the goods of Catherine Sweetland , in her dwelling-house .

CATHERINE SWEETLAND . I am a widow , and live in Oxford-street . Last Tuesday fortnight, about ten o'clock at night, I lent my servant this watch, to enable her to rise early in the morning - she slept in the front kitchen; I did not see it again till the Saturday following, when Yardley, a watchmaker, brought it to me - I went to bed about twelve o'clock; the house was all safe then.

MARY WILLS . I am servant to Mrs. Sweetland - she delivered me the watch. I went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock, and put the watch on the kitchen dresser; there is a door which opens into the area - it was bolted; I was not disturbed in the night; I got up between five and six o'clock, and the watch was gone - I found the doors all closed, but the kitchen window had been opened - a person in the area could open it, as the bolt was rusty - it was shut at night, but not bolted; I never saw the prisoner in the house.

WILLIAM EDEN . I live with Mr. Fox, a green-grocer, in Broadway, Westminster. On Thursday, the 9th of February, I was at the Feathers public-house, next door to master's; the prisoner followed me out of that house, and asked if I had a watch to dispose of; I said No, that I had got a new one, which there had been a conversation about in the house - I exchanged my new watch with him for a gold one; I saw him in custody about a week afterwards - I had given the watch to the officer; Sweetland claimed it - no money passed between us.

DANIEL DAWKINS . I am an officer I found a watch on the prisoner, which Eden said he had delivered to him - I received the gold watch from a watchmaker.

WILLIAM EDEN . This is the watch I gave him, and here is the gold one I had from him; I took it to the watchmaker to value, and he produced it at the office.

MRS. SWEETLAND. This is my watch; I gave 11l. for it nine years ago - I value it at 6l.

Prisoner. I bought the watch - John Williams was with me at the time.

DANIEL DAWKINS . He told me his mother had given him the watch in the country.

GUILTY of stealing, to the value of 99s. only . Aged 29

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-167

673. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 coat, value 3l., the goods of Frederick Adlard ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

FREDERICK ADLARD . I am a tailor , of High Holborn . On the 13th of January, about eight o'clock in the morning, I missed this coat from my shop - the prisoner was brought in with it.

THOMAS COWLES . I am Mr. Adlard's errand-boy. I was opening the shop, and saw the prisoner come in and take this coat; I ran out, and lost sight of him for about two minutes - he was then secured, with the coat under his arm, by Annus; I am sure of his person.

JOHN ANNUS . I am a groom. I saw the prisoner run out of Southampton-street into Silver-street, and stopped him, hearing a cry of Stop thief! I asked if he was the thief; he said, "No, let me go - it is my brother's;" somebody said, "Why did not you keep him?" I ran and took him again, with the coat.

EDWARD BARKER . I received the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner handed in a petition, for a lenient sentence.

DANIEL BROWN . I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction - (read) - I was present when he was tried, and am positive he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 18. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-168

674. CAROLINE WASE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 5lbs. of beef, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Higgs .

WILLIAM HIGGS . I am a butcher , and live in Church-street, Bethnal-green . I saw the prisoner take this beef off the board in front of my shop, and walk away with it; I followed, and took her with it - it was on Saturday night.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320216-169

675. MARY POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 cloak, value 15s. , the goods of Harriet Woodham .

HARRIET WOODHAM. I live in Henry-street - I have seen the prisoner before this occurred, but was not acquainted with her. On the 7th of January I slept at No. 11, Field-lane, Holborn - she slept in the same bed, and got up before I awoke; about nine o'clock I saw her come

into the room, and take my cloak off the bed - she being the servant of the house, I had no idea she was going to take it out of the house - when I came down she had left the house, and never returned: it cost me 1l.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give it me to fetch you beer and liquor? A. No.

MARY PHILLIPS . The prisoner left the duplicate of this cloak at my place, in a housewife.

MARY LODGE . I live in Rawstorne-place, Goswell-road. My husband was in Bunhill-row station-house for being drunk - I took him his breakfast, and the prisoner asked me to fetch her some duplicates from Phillips'; I went, and received them in a housewife - I gave them to the Policeman.

MATTHEW PEEK . I am a Policeman. Lodge delivered a housewife to me, containing the duplicate of a cloak, with others; I gave them to Kingston.

THOMAS KINGSTON . I produce them - I received the prisoner in charge; she said she had pawned the cloak, and had not the money to get it out again.

THOMAS KIRKWOOD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane, Old-street. This cloak was pawned by a female, to whom I gave this duplicate; I believe it to be the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix lent it to me to fetch some liquor; I got rather too much, and did not return.

HARRIET WOODHAM . It is not true.

GUILTY . Aged 44. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18320216-170

676. THOMAS READ and GEORGE GOVIER were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 2 trusses of hay, value 5s. , the goods of Catherine Johnson .

JAMES HARRIS . On the 30th of January Mrs. Catherine Johnson 's gardener gave me information; I went down her field, and examined her hay stack - the stack appeared diminished; I got a stick, and measured the footsteps across the field, and traced them out of the field into the road - I found hay dropped all along the road for nearly half a mile, to a shed in Chapel-side, by Bayswater chapel - the shed was fast; we found Govier in the shed, and Read in the yard adjoining - I saw two bundles of hay there, tied up, and some undone; I took them both into custody - I asked Read when he had the hay in; he said,"This morning;" it was Read's shed - he keeps cows, and sells milk; this was about eleven o'clock in the morning -Govier said he knew nothing about it, that he had come there, as he had two hogs; there were four pigs there - I took them both before the Magistrate; the hay corresponded in quantity with what had been cut - Govier's shoes were taken off, and corresponded in length with the footmarks; there was a particular row of nails round the heel; Read said he had bought the hay that morning, at seven o'clock, on the Uxbridge-road, in three trusses, from a little cart, which came towards London - I told him it was not market morning; he said he had left a knife at his lodging, which he had used to cut some hay for Mrs. Johnson with, but I found it in the shed, under the loose hay.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say he gave 1s. 9d. a truss for the hay? A. Yes; these bundles of hay were not exactly the weight of a truss.

THOMAS DENNY . I am in Mrs. Johnson's employ. I saw her hay-stack safe on Sunday, and on Monday I found hay had been cut from it, and told Harris; I consider the hay found to be the same - I employed Read to cut hay sometimes; there appeared to be three or four trusses in all found.

Cross-examined. Q. At what hour did you miss it? A. Nine o'clock in the morning; it might have been stolen in the night.

Govier's Defence. I went to the shed. to my pigs.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-171

677. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 24 yards of flannel, value 20s. , the goods of Mary Ann Johnston .

JOHN EDWARD BEAL . About a quarter-past eight o'clock in the morning of the 8th of February, I saw the prisoner enter Mrs. Johnston's shop, in Tottenham-court-road ; he took a roll of flannel off the counter, and passed me with it on his shoulder; I went into the shop, and found nobody there - I called the boy up stairs, then went in pursuit, and overtook the prisoner in Rathbone-place, with the flannel on his shoulder - he made a great resistance, but I brought him back.

BENJAMIN KILPIN . I am foreman to Mary Ann Johnson. The prisoner was brought into the shop by Beal, with this flannel; I was in the kitchen when it was taken - it is worth 2l.

TERENCE MARTIN . I am a Policeman. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-172

678. RICHARD SHAW and RICHARD WEBB were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 purse, value 6d.; 4 half-crowns, 6 shillings, and 4 sixpences, the property of George Thurston , from his person .

GEORGE THURSTON . I am an artist , and live in the Poultry. On the 8th of February, about half-past six or seven o'clock, I was going into the Olympic theatre ; I had my purse safe when I got there - I took my money out to pay before I entered, and almost immediately as I got in I missed it; it contained four half-crowns and some silver - I had felt a pressure at my pocket.

JOSEPH SHACKEL . I am a serjeant of the Police. I apprehended both the prisoners in the theatre; I told them I had information that they were both thieves, and had no business there; I found on Webb a purse, containing four half-crowns, six shillings, and four sixpences; I called Mr. Thurston out, and he swore to the purse - nothing was found on Shaw.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Toole, I believe, gave you the information? A. He did.

GEORGE THURSTON. This is my purse, and contains the same money as I lost in it; I am certain of the purse, from the particular wear of it.

WEBB - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

SHAW - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-173

679. MARGARET THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 4 sovereigns, the monies of Thomas Shore , from his person ; and MARY FORGE

was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS SHORE . I am an old soldier . On the 20th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I went with two comrades to have a pot of beer, at the Coach and Horses, Ratcliff-highway , and we had a quartern of gin - both the prisoners were in the house; they afterwards came to the same box as I sat - they stood at the end of the table; Thompson wanted to toss for a quartern of gin - I told her to quit the box; we drank our beer, and my two comrades went out, leaving me there -Thompson came and asked me again; I said I would not toss - I pulled out 1s., and gave her to fetch a quartern of Old-Tom - she brought a quartern, and gave me the change - we drank it together, they standing up, but I sat down - neither of them sat by me; we then had some gin and beer, mixed, and all three came out of the room together - I turned down the steps into the yard, away from them; Thompson came jumping after me into the yard, while I had my clothes down for a certain purpose; she thrust her hand into my pocket, took out my four sovereigns, knocked my hat off, and away she ran up the steps - Forge was not by when this was done; I went to several public-houses, and in about half an hour found Forge at the Bunch of Grapes, changing a sovereign to pay for gin - Thompson was in the tap-room, four or five paces from her; I called in two officers, and pointed them out - my sovereigns were not found.

Thompson. Q. Did you not ask where we lived, and go home with us? A. No such thing; I did not offer to buy a pair of shoes, nor tell you to go to the Grapes; I was perfectly sensible, and am certain the money was in my pocket after my comrades left me.

WILLIAM WHEELER . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoners by Shore's direction - he said Thompson had taken his four sovereigns; I found one sovereign at the house, but none on either of them - I only found 2s. 7d. on Thompson - the prosecutor did not appear intoxicated, for he pointed them out from four women.

WILLIAM POUNCEBY . I am a waiter at the Coach and Horses. The prosecutor came in there alone - two persons were sitting there, who were acquainted with him; they staid there till after he went out - Shore went out, and the prisoners, one on each side of him; I do not know what passed afterwards - the prisoners had both sat down in the box, and one of them got up and said to the other, "He has got a sovereign;" Thompson said to him, "I have got 2s., if you will give me 4s. to buy a pair of boots;" he made no answer; he said neither of them should pay for any thing - he would pay himself, and did so.

Thompson's Defence. I am innocent.

Forge's Defence. The sovereign a friend gave me in the morning; Shore sent to say if I would make up the money he would not appear; he boasts of having transported five more.

THOMAS SHORE. I never intimated that I would not prosecute if they paid me money - a woman proposed it, but I refused.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

FORGE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-174

680. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 box, value 4d., and 50 lbs. of raisins, value 23s., the goods of William Barker ; and that he had previously been convicted of felony .

THOMAS PERRY . I am in the employ of William Barker , a grocer , in King-street, Holborn . On the 12th of January, about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw this box of raisins in the shop, and missed it in about half an hour - I looked out of the shop door, and saw the prisoner about thirty yards off, going down the street with it on his shoulder; I called my master, and went after him - I secured him, without losing sight of him; he had then thrown it down.

WILLIAM WENTWORTH . I saw the prisoner and two others standing opposite Barker's door, in King-street -I went on, and as I crossed Holborn I heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned, and saw the prisoner coming down King-street, and Perry following him; I stopped him in Little Queen-street - he immediately struck me; I still held him till Perry came up - he directly struck Perry in the face, and then the Policeman came up; I did not see him with the property.

CORNELIUS WINTLE . I am a Policeman. I received him in charge - Mr. Barker delivered me the box; he said he had not taken it, and knew nothing about it.

THOMAS PERRY . Here are two letters chalked on the box, by which I know it.

Prisoner. Q. Did not your master say there was no mark which he could swear to? A. Nothing to that effect - he afterwards marked the weight on it in ink.

Prisoner's Defence. I solemnly deny the charge - I believe the mark was made afterwards.

JOHN MURPHY . I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office(read) - I was present at his trial, and know him to be the man.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320216-175

First London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

681. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously uttering a certain forged request, for the delivery of goods, well knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud William Morley and another .

WILLIAM SHEARMAN . I am in the employ of William and James Morley , of Gutter-lane . On the 1st of February the prisoner, who was a stranger, came to the warehouse and delivered me a letter, which he said was from Mr. Tilley, of Brentwood; we had a customer of that name - I sent Shepherd, the beadle, with him with the goods - this is the note he gave me - (read.)

GENTLEMAN, - Having come to Plaistow upon particular business, and finding it detained me longer than I expected, this prevented me coming to town to-day, to get two pieces of fine Irish linen, about 3s. or 3s. 3d. for a very particular customer, which I have to leave in my road home - I have therefore sent the bearer, who is recommended to me as well known here, expressly for them; you will much oblige, by sending them by him, inclosing the bill, as he has instructions to lose no time.

Gentlemen, Your's obediently,

THOMAS TILLEY .

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am an officer. I was sent for to Mr. Morley's - the prisoner was there with this order;

I went with him as far as Mile-end-road, I carrying the goods, and on going through the turnpike he ran away - I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS TILLEY. I am a linen-draper, and deal with the prosecutor. I know nothing of the prisoner; this note was not written by me, or by my direction.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-176

682. JAMES ISEABY , SAMUEL GARRAD and THOMAS SPARKS were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 16 bushels of oats, value 2l. 8s., and 2 bushels of chaff, value 1s., the goods of Henry Gray , their master .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

HENRY GRAY. I am a livery-stable keeper - my premises are in Earl-street, Blackfriars ; Iseaby was my head ostler , and has been so since March, 1830; he has been in my employ eight or nine years. On the 10th of February, in consequence of some suspicion, I made arrangements to watch on the premises at night; my premises are entered at a gateway - on the left side of the ride is my house door, and on the opposite side are stables, numbered 1 to 5; they then turn a corner, and there are Nos. 6 and 7 - a large coach-house, and then No. 8, which is close to the dung-hill - the granary is over stable No. 3, on the right-hand, and the door is nearly opposite my house door; a room is built over the ride, from the side of my house, and joins stables Nos. 2 and 3 - there is a window at each end of that room, one looking towards the gate, and the other to the back part of the ride; I stationed Unwin, one of my post-boys, in that room - the prisoner Sparks was in the employ of a person who took away my dung; Garrad had also been in that person's employ - the usual time to come for the dung was six o'clock in the morning; on the morning in question, about twenty minutes to four, Unwin made a communication to me, and I went on the roof, near a sky-light, where I could see the granary - Unwin went out of the bed-room window on to No. 5 stable; he could see the back part of the yard - the first thing which attracted my notice was a small glare of light from the sky-light, which I presume was a candle being lighted by a gas-light which was near, but not in view; I then observed a man pass under the sky-light from the direction of the lamp to No. 3 stable - I did not perceive any thing in his hand: from the external appearance I believe it to be Iseaby - he had no light; the next thing attracting my attention was lights appearing through the granary - this was in a very few minutes: we have a number of pantile lights, made of iron and a pane of glass - I observed a number of these burning; they are used to light the granary - about half-past four o'clock the bell rang very loud, and was not answered; it was rang again, and then the lights were extinguished, and the person was let in -I found it was Montague; he went up the yard, towards his place of business, and I observed somebody come back again down the yard, obtain a light, and go up to the stable again, in the same direction - at three quarters past five o'clock the horse and cart were brought down the yard, and the cart placed towards No. 3 - I had seen that cart when I was first alarmed, just under the room where Unwin was watching; it was backed a little towards No. 3 - I observed a full sack cast into the cart; Sparks took it up, and placed it towards the body of the cart - I called Unwin; a person in a red night-cap immediately pitched up some dung or litter into the cart, which Sparks threw over the sack - four sacks were passed into the cart: I could not see who the person was that put them in - Sparks was in the cart; Unwin and I immediately passed through the house - I sent him for an officer; I opened the gate and let him and the officers in- they went up the ride to where the cart stood; I found Sparks on the cart, Garrad behind it, and Iseaby came out of the door of No. 3 stable, which has a loft over it - that is on the same floor as the granary; the granary is separated from the other parts of the loft by an inclosure - the stable No. 3 does not go directly into the granary; the prisoners were then taken into custody - it was Iseaby's duty to lock up the granary every night, and deposit the keys in a desk in my office, then to lock the office, and to bring to my house the key of the office; I went up into the granary, and found the door open, and the key in the lock - I know it was the regular key; there was a small quantity of oats in the granary - I am satisfied the oats had been moved from the granary to the cart; I have samples of both the bulk and that in the cart - I have no doubt of them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. It was the duty of the dung contractor to come at six o'clock? A. Yes - it appears they have been in the habit of coming at all hours in the night, but not with my knowledge; I knew it by information, but did not approve of it - I had Unwin in my sight all the time he was on the roof; I told the Magistrate I believed from the outward appearance that it was Iseaby who came from the gas-light - I do not recollect telling the Magistrate I did not know who it was; he was dressed - he appeared to have drab coloured clothes on, but I do not swear that; he had no hat on, but something in the shape of a cap - he had no smock-frock; I thought it was a cloth coat, but at that distance I cannot positively swear what description of coat, but swear he had a coat; I could not tell what the materials were - I have not sworn he had no coat on; if I have said I could not tell whether he had or not, I did not mean to say so - Iseaby knew Montague perfectly well; he was coming in to go to his business - he had come in late the night before, and had orders which required him to come early that morning; if Iseaby did not know that, he ought to - I should think he must have known Montague was on the premises; I saw French up the yard; Sparks got off the cart when the bell rang, and French passed the cart - Sparks then got into it again; the granary was over No. 3, and the bean granary over No. 1 - whether Iseaby has invariably brought the granary keys to the office at night, I cannot state, but it was his bounden duty to do so; my strict orders were that it should be done - it was never omitted, to my knowledge; the key of the office was brought that night - he had the care of the office, and it was his duty to put the key of the granary there; there was no specific hour to lock the office - it might be done at six or seven o'clock; the keys were generally put there about my tea time - it was his duty to take care of both granaries alike; we call him head ostler - it is a

place of confidence; I left him in charge during my absence.

Q. Had you the slightest reason to find fault with him? A. I had; a bridle was lost out of the stable three or four years ago, or it might be longer - I have no memorandum of it; I have frequently complained of his getting drunk within the last twelve months.

Q. Why not discharge him? A. The truth is, he was my customer's servant, and not mine, for he had a good hold of them.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Who is the person that takes your dung? A. Mercer - I believe Garrad has been many years in his employ; Montague and French were at their regular employ while the cart was being loaded; I was certainly surprised to see this done after Montague came in - Isenby knew the dung was not to be fetched before six o'clock - I never told Garrad so.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What duty would devolve on Montague and French? A. To feed their horses, and clean their harness to go out about eight o'clock - they generally clean their horses inside the stable No. 8, which is the further stable round the corner out of the ride - they would have no view of the granary; Montague was more likely to have come at eight o'clock than at that time.

Q. Is there any proper purpose for which the cart could have been opposite stable No. 3? A. It would have been their business to have been there to take the dung from the door, but not to turn the tail of the cart to the door.

SAMUEL UNWIN I am in Mr. Gray's service, and have been so for seven years. On the 10th of February, by his desire, I sat up to watch in the room over the gateway - about twenty minutes past four o'clock my attention was attracted by the dung-cart stopping at the gate, and in a moment I heard a very gentle ring indeed at the gate; I was so much awake that I heard the cart stop before the bell rang - I saw Iseaby go and open the gate; the cart came in - Sparks and Garrad were in it; Iseaby had the charge of the gate that night - the cart was backed up the yard, towards the counting-house, and round the corner, by No. 6, towards the dung-hill; I went and met master coming down stairs - I went through the house, and got on the roof to a side window, which commanded a view of the dung-heap; I saw Sparks and Garrad place a ladder, which we use to light the gas with; they placed it against the loft over No. 6 - master at that time was standing near a sky-light, against No. 3 loft; (I could see him, but it was rather dark) - I saw Sparks and Garrad ascend the ladder into the loft, with a candle, and the moment they entered, Mr. Gray called to me that there was a light in the loft; I said, "I know it, Sir - hold your tongue;" the ladder was then removed, and in a moment after I saw Garrad walking up the yard, towards the dung-hill; he had come down the ladder, and taken it away - he was on the ground, against No. 6; I had not seen how he came down - I then saw Garrad back the cart up to the dung-hill, and could see him throwing dung up into the cart; about half-past four o'clock the bell rang twice, the second time was rather violent - I could not see who answered it, nor see the gate, where I was; Montague came in, and went up to the top stable, No. 8 - the cart being in the way I could not see him go into the stable, but that was his place; after that I saw Garrad bring the cart down from No. 6 to opposite No. 3, before the loft window - master then called me to him; I saw sacks put into the cart - I could not see by whom; I was then sent for an officer - I went through the house, and fetched one.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Is Garrad a married man? A. I have heard so; Montague must have gone by the cart to get to his stable - Garrad was Spark's assistant.

LYDIA JOHNSON . I am in Mr. Gray's service. On Friday night, the 11th of February, between nine and ten o'clock, Iseaby brought me the key of the counting-house.

SAMUEL DOWDNEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoners in charge; here is a sample of the corn taken out of the cart.

MR. GRAY. I have a sample from the bulk, which I have compared with that in the cart; they correspond.

WILLIAM MONTAGUE . I was in Mr. Gray's service. I came on Saturday morning as the watchman was calling half-past four o'clock; Iseaby opened the gate - I asked him for a light; he said the dung-men had got it, up the yard - I went to the dung-men, and they had no light; the gas gave a very fair light on the dung-hill, sufficient to take the dung away - I went into No. 8 stable.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Iseaby had no notice at what time you would come? A. Not at all; I rang twice; he slept in No. 2; the bell does not go into that stable, but hangs a very little way off; the dung men had no light at the heap; whether they had it else - where I do not know.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Have you been there so early on other mornings? A. I do not recollect that I have; they did not seem surprised at my coming.

COURT. Q. You were unusually early? A. Yes, my time of coming was very uncertain; six men took it by turns to sit up; when any of us are out, they have to answer the bell; when I am ordered out early in the morning I am obliged to get there early; the man who sits up usually gives me a candle to get a light from the lantern, which hangs in No. 2; when the dung-men said they had no light I went back to get one; the bell did not ring so loud as usual the first time, though I pulled it as usual - I have found the dung-men there early before - I do not recollect having been sent to them before for a light.

WILLIAM FRENCH . I was in Mr. Gray's service. I came at a quarter to five o'clock; Sparks opened the gate to me; it was Iseaby's duty to open it - I went to No. 8, where my business was; I asked for a light; Garrad said"There is one up there;" he stood by the side of the cart which was opposite the granary - I saw nobody else by the cart - I did not see anybody else by the cart - I saw no light till I got to No. 8, and Montague had one there; I afterwards went to unload the dung-cart; there were four sacks of corn and two bushels of chaff; two in the front of the cart, with two nose-bags, and two behind, with the chaff and straw over them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When Sparks opened the gate, you asked for a light? A. No, I went up the yard and asked him for a light - Garrad said there was one up the yard - I did not go into No. 2

stable; there was a light there; Iseaby slept there, and should keep a light; I might have gone there if I chose; I saw Iseaby up the yard about half-past-five o'clock - he was dressed - he usually got up at six o'clock - he came round the corner, as if from No. 2, or he might come from No. 3.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. How far was the cart from the dung-hill? A. Twenty or thirty yards; the dung-hill is round the corner; Garrad did not attempt to conceal himself from me.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you ask what the light was in No. 2? A. No, I saw it through the window; there is usually a lamp there.

MR. GRAY. The corn was put into the cart at three-quarters past four o'clock; Iseaby was the only person who ought to have been on the premises at that time - I did not expect the glass-coachmen so early, but they afterwards satisfied me it was necessary for them to be there so early, or they could not have got ready, having to clean their coaches; Iseaby had the entire charge of the premises that night.

Iseaby's Defence. I let Montague in, and when the bell rang I came as far as the door of No. 2, and saw Sparks; he let French in - I then retired to my bed, and went to sleep, till I heard master sing out "Wells" - I then rose, and ran into No. 3. thinking the noise came from there - I then proceeded round the corner; Dowdney came in; it was customary for the men to feed their horses as they pleased; Mr. Gray took no account of the corn, and sometimes the horses would have none if I locked the granary, when I was gone home, if the men come early, as six, o'clock, was my time; the corn was often taken down above an hour after I got home.

ISEABY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen years .

GARRAD - GUILTY . Aged 30.

SPARKS - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven years .

MR. GRAY here stated that he had since made a calculation, and allowing very linerally for the consumption of corn by the horses, there was a deficiency of forty-five quarters unaccounted for, in the space of six weeks.

Reference Number: t18320216-177

683. CATHERINE LAMB & ELLEN ROBERTS were indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. SCARLET conducted the prosecution.

ANN VERGE . I am the wife of Benjamin Verge , a baker , of Holborn-hill . On the 12th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening the prisoners came into the shop; Lamb asked for two plum buns, and offered me a bad half-crown; I said I was confident she was aware it was bad; she said if I was, what odds were that to me, that I had the use of my eyes, and if I did not like to take it, to return it, for she might use it in the course of the night, and, cunning as I was, I had taken many before; I called my husband out of the parlour - I sent my servant for an officer; there was a great deal of abuse - she said she knew her trade too well to be taken by an officer - Roberts made a motion to her to go out of the shop; they were detained, and given in charge - I gave my husband the half-crown.

BENJAMIN VERGE . I received the half-crown from my wife, and gave it to the officer.

GEORGE CORBY . I am a constable. I took the prisoners to the watch-house; I saw a bad half-crown and a bad sixpence found on Roberts at the watch-house.

JOHN FIELD. I am inspector of counterfeit coin. These two half-crowns are counterfeits, and both from the same mould; the sixpence is also counterfeit.

Lamb's Defence. We picked the money up by the door.

LAMB - GUILTY . Aged 23.

ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Twelve Months , and to find sureties .

Reference Number: t18320216-178

684. MICHAEL MAGNAR was indicted for a like offence .

JAMES WOOD. I am servant to Mr. Greaves, a tobacconist , Royal-exchange . On the 8th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came for half an ounce of tobacco, and paid me a bad sixpence; I did not discover it was bad till he was gone; I then gave it to my master - he came again on the Saturday following, about five o'clock, for the same quantity, and offered a bad shilling; I knew him and sent for a constable, who detained him.

WILLIAM GREAVES . I am a tobacconist. I was present when the prisoner paid the counterfeit sixpence - Wood gave it to me; I put it in paper, and kept it in my pocket till I gave it to Parker - I was present again when he offered the shilling; I detained him - he said he found it in the kennel; I told him I had received a sixpence from him on the Wednesday; he made no answer - I am positive of him.

JOHN PARKER . I am an officer. I produce the counterfeit shilling and sixpence.

JOHN FIELD . These are both counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the shilling, and did not know it was bad; I was never in the shop before.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months , and to find sureties .

Reference Number: t18320216-179

685. JAMES GOODWIN was indicted for a like offence .

GEORGE AIKEN . I keep a chandler's shop , in Dovecourt, in the Old Bailey . On the 17th of October the prisoner came to my shop, and bought a half quartern loaf, which came to fourpence-halfpenny, and offered me a bad half-crown; I asked where he got it - he said he got it in change in the street - I asked him to show me the place; he declined and said he was afraid, he could not find the person, but if he did he would bring him forward - I kept the half-crown piece, he came again in the evening, with another person, and requested to see the half-crown piece - I declined showing it; the person said he had paid it to him for work done the previous night - I saw that person afterwards in custody at Guildhall, for being in company with the prisoner, and passing another bad half-crown; I gave Herdsfield the half-crown piece.

GEORGE HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 17th of December I was fetched to Aiken's shop, and took the prisoner - Aiken declined appearing against him; I kept the half-crown piece, and produce it.

GEORGE WILLIAM ANSELL . I am a shopman to Mr. Devey, brass founder, of Shoe-lane. In January about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came with a companion, to buy a beer cock which came to 1s. 8d.; he tendered me a counterfeit crown piece, which I marked and have here; master questioned him - he gave various accounts how he got it; I refused to sell them the cock - hi

companion then offered to pay for it with a good halfcrown - I gave them in custody.

CHARLES EAGLETON . I received him in charge with another man.

MR. FIELD. These half-crowns are both counterfeits, and of the same description.

Prisoner. I did not know it was bad.

GUILTY Aged 29.

Confined Six Months , and to find sureties .

Reference Number: t18320216-180

NEW COURT. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

686. JAMES HIRON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 2lbs. weight of leather, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Delaney .

JOSEPH DELANEY . I am the son of John Delaney , a shoemaker , of Whitecross-street . On the 20th of January, I was in the first floor, and saw the prisoner take a piece of leather, and lay it on the seat; he was our journeyman - the men in that room had been drinking; he went down to the yard, in the direction of the privy; I told my father of it - I then went and took the prisoner as he came out of the privy; he had no leather then.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many men were drinking? A. About eight in that room.

WILLIAM DELANEY . I am the prosecutor's son. We had twenty-two journeymen - they had all been drinking beer that day; the publican had made them a present of it - they were nearly all drunk, and this leather was thrown down the privy.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-181

687. THOMAS GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 46 lbs. of cheese, value 1l. 8s. , the goods of Charles Joel Kent .

CHARLES JOEL KENT . I live in Paradise-street, Shoreditch , and am a chandler . On the 9th of February I was opposite my shop, about half-past seven o'clock - I saw the prisoner and another person standing near my shop; the prisoner then went in, and took up this cheese from my counter - I went, and stopped him; I sent for the officer, and gave him into custody - here is one Cheshire cheese, and three pieces; a man named Nelson was with him, and he followed me in, but did not take any thing - my wife was in doors; I had been out about an hour and a half, and was just coming home.

JAMES BIRD . I live in Whitfield-street, and am the prosecutor's brother-in-law. I saw the prisoner and another man at his shop; I saw the prisoner go into the shop - the prosecutor followed him; the other man went in after him, but did not take any thing - I thought they were going to rob the shop; if we had gone in sooner, most likely they would have gone away.

PHILIP CHETWOOD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the cheese.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-182

688. CHARLES CLARK was indicted for embezzling eight 10l. Bank notes, the property of Jonathan Weymouth .

2nd COUNT, stating it to be for stealing eight 10l. Bank notes.

3rd COUNT, stating it to be for stealing an order for the payment of 80l.

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JONATHAN WEYMOUTH. I am a solicitor , and live in Gray's Inn-square . On the 18th of January I had a cheque on Herries and Co., for 80l. - this is it; my own clerk was ill in the country, and I asked Mr. Thornby, another solicitor, to let the prisoner, who was his clerk , get the cash for it; I gave the prisoner the cheque about ten o'clock in the morning, and told him to get eight 10l. Bank of England notes, and to make haste - he said he would be back in about an hour; I went to Mr. Thornby's about eleven o'clock, expecting to find him returned, but he was not - I went in and out several times, but I did not see the prisoner again till the next day, or next but one, when he was in custody at Marlborough-street.

JAMES MILNER . I am clerk to Messrs. Herries and Co. I paid this cheque to the prisoner on the 18th of January - I gave him eight 10l. notes. Nos. 6067 to 6074 inclusive; they were dated the 9th of December, 1831.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-183

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

689. EDMUND THOMAS LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , an order for the payment of 35l. , the property of Charles John Myles ; against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Edward Charles Eddrup .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES JOHN MYLES . I am an attorney . I live in Cobourg-road, Mile-end - I have known the prisoner by sight for twelve months, but not particularly for more than four months; I do not know that he is an attorney - he was recommended to me by Mr. Golding, an attorney. On the 8th of November I wrote a letter to Mr. Eddrup, near Euston-square - the purport of it was to borrow 35l. of him; I gave the note to the prisoner, and told him to take it the next morning, and deliver it to Mr. Eddrup, to whom it was directed on the outside - it was wafered; he was to bring back what answer he received - I said,"Be back as near twelve o'clock as you can, and we will dine together;" he did not return - I went to his lodging on the night of the 10th of November; I did not find him there, and did not find him again till the 31st of January - I received this letter from him, which I know is his writing - I had read the note to him, and told him to bring the answer directly back.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you been an attorney? A. I was admitted last Michaelmas term - I did not instruct my counsel to open that the prisoner was an attorney; I employed the prisoner in a confidential way, to call on my friends, and to see if he could make any arrangements, as I had lost a great deal of money in a Chancery suit - we dined together almost daily at my house; I should think he has pawned goods for me to the amount of 70l. or 80l., but I think nothing later than October - none since I became an attorney; he removed some furniture for me - I cannot tell to what amount; it might be about 50l. - I did not desire him to

remove it; I desired him to pawn, because I wanted money - he pawned four watches; I had five, one was my wife's - he pawned some gold chains and gold keys; he desired to remove my furniture, and I consented to it - he said I was not in the house, and he did it for security; he took just what pleased himself, and left the remainder - I did not owe any thing to my landlord; I owed several accommodation-bill debts - I know he removed a four-post bedstead and some furniture, which he said he was afraid thieves would take; he did not leave me a bed to lay on in that house - I was not obliged to ask him for a bed for me and my wife; I ordered him to bring them - this note is my writing, (read.)

DEAR LEWIS, - I have been much inconvenienced, as well as Mrs. Myles, by your not letting me have the bed and things, as you promised - the fact is we must sit up all this night, as we have no bed to lay on; the moment you receive this come with as many of the things I want, as you can bring in a coach, if you can get no better conveyance; but above all the two small mattresses, the bed, pillows, and bedding - I also want the portmanteau and boxes, as I have no change of linen.

Witness. The linen I alluded to was to be washed - he did not take all my linen, but it was locked up in his house; I sent it to his house, because I thought fit - I am not bound to tell the Jury or you my motives.

COURT. Q. Cannot you give a reason for this, which appears very extraordinary conduct? A. The fact is I locked up my linen, packed up my dirty linen, and took none with me; he at first stated he removed the furniture on account of thieves, and then he stated that the water came in - I sent for the bed and the mattresses to come to Waterloo-road, where I had taken apartments; I was within a short time of completing my articles, and there was an accommodation-bill, on which judgment had gone by default, and execution had issued - I would not have let them get into my house for that, if I could have helped it by keeping my door shut; I was not aware, when I removed, that the execution was out against me, but I removed as a matter of precaution - I had no other house at that time; I had chambers in Great St. Helen's - I do not know that I was afraid of any property being taken from there; I gave orders for my furniture to be removed, that it might be altogether at Battle-bridge, where he had a house - I took a room of him at 3s. a week as a warehouse.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many watches did he pawn for you? A. I cannot tell - he did not pawn at his own discretion; I had four gold watches and one gilt - I had had one of them about four years; I gave forty-two guineas for it - another I gave 30l. for; another I took for a debt of 17l. odd, the fourth cost eighteen guineas, and the other was a gilt watch which I gave about 9l. for - they were all regularly paid for; I have three of them now - the other two are sold; I pawned one of them myself; he had no commission for pledging - I gave him a dinner every day, and bed and bedding; I did not tell him my reason for removing my property was that I wanted to have it down to Chelmsford - this note is my writing: Chelmsford.

To E. T. LEWIS, Attorney.

" MY DEAR SIR, - Will you be kind enough; as early as possible, to go to my chambers, at St. Helens', and remove the whole of the books, papers, &c., and send them to me here."

Witness. I was in the first instance going to reside at Writtle, where I have a relation - I wrote this letter under the impression that I should go there; I saw the prisoner afterwards, and told him to take my things to Battle-bridge - they are there still, at Mr. Franklin's: the prisoner has left the house, as Mr. Franklin says - I have paid part of the rent for the room; I did not desire Franklin to sell my furniture, or to burn it if he could not sell it - I owe eleven or twelve weeks' rent for the room; I did not redeem the furniture, because I had other debts to pay; I did not give the prisoner authority to take the cheque, and get it changed - I never sent Mr. Golding to any body with a message about the prisoner; I know Mrs. Robinson, and believe she was subpoenaed here on the part of the prisoner - I did not subpoena her.

EDWARD CHARLES EDDRUP . I live in Tomlinson's-place, Euston-square. On the 9th of November I received a letter from the prisoner, which I have every reason to believe is destroyed - the purport of it was for the loan of 35l. for Mr. Myles, for a particular purpose, and it said,"The bearer of this, Mr. Lewis, can be trusted;" I was ill in bed, but I wrote a letter to Mr. Myles, and drew a cheque for 35l. on Drummond and Co. - I put it into the letter, and delivered it, sealed, to Sarah Tibbs , my servant; this is the cheque.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prisoner explain the urgency of getting the cheque? A. Yes, he said it would be of great service to Mr. Myles, as it was on business relative to the Court, and upon that ground I gave it him.

SARAH TIBBS . I am servant to Mr. Eddrup. On the 9th of November I received a letter from him - I gave it to the prisoner, and told him to give it to Mr. Myles; the cheque was enclosed inside.

JOSEPH EARLE . I am clerk to Messrs. Drummond. I paid this cheque in gold on the 9th of November - I do not know to whom.

A letter was here put in and read, from the prisoner to the prosecutor, stating that he had received the cheque, and got it cashed for the purpose of buying an admission stamp, but that he had had his pocket picked of the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-184

690. EDWARD DOCKHERTY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 2 silver spoons, value 4s.; 1 necklace, value 3s., and 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Benjamin Downes , his master .

BENJAMIN DOWNES. I keep the Bricklayers' Arms, Pimlico . The prisoner was my pot-boy for about six weeks - I lost these articles, and described them to the officer.

GEORGE HULL . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Chelsea. I have two spoons, a handkerchief, and a necklace, pawned by the prisoner, at different times.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He never used to give me enough victuals, and only allowed me 1s. a week; he several times beat me.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 15. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-185

691. WILLIAM GRIFFITHS and JOHN GRIFFITHS

were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 4 coach-wheels, value 3l. , the goods of John Felton .

MARK DYER . I am in the employ of Mr. John Felton, a coachmaker , of Old-street-road . On the 11th of February I saw the prisoners near his premises; I had known William before - he is a smith's striker ; I saw one handing wheels to the other, and when I came up I met John with a wheel on each shoulder - I asked if Mr. Felton had given him them to shoe, as they were not shod; he made no answer, and then made up to William, who was just leaving the premises with another pair of wheels - he dropped them, and ran away; I took them up, and delivered them to my employer; the pair which John had are quite lost.

John Griffiths. Q. Why did you not stop me? A. I thought, as you were a smith, you might have them to shoe.

ABEL COLLINS . I work for Mr. Felton. I made the wheels on the Wednesday, and they were taken on the Saturday - William Griffiths works there, and strikes in the smith's forge; he had no right with these wheels.

NICHOLAS PILBEAM . I work in the shop. I saw one of these pairs of wheels safe on the Saturday, and missed them on Sunday morning, when I went with Collins to the shop; William Griffiths worked for my master - I do not know John: they had no right to this property.

WILLIAM MOORE . I am a Policeman. I went to a public-house on Saturday night, and found William Griffiths - he denied all knowledge of the wheels, or being there at all, and John did the same.

STEPHEN GLADING . I am a Policeman. On the Saturday night I saw John Griffiths wheeling one wheel away, and carrying another on his shoulder; I knew him well, and I thought no harm of it - he had a fustain jacket on - he was taking them towards the top of Hoxton, a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's.

GEORGE KENT . I am a Policeman. I was in Hoxton on that Saturday night, and saw John Griffiths with two wheels; I knew him to be a smith, and did not stop him.

JOHN FELTON. William Griffiths worked for me - I had missed the key of the stable door about three weeks before; these wheels were in the wheeler's shop, to which they could get from the stable - it was from the stable door that they were seen taking the wheels.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

JOHN GRIFFITHS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-186

692. HENRY GRANTHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 1 saw, value 8s. , the goods of John Russell .

JOHN RUSSELL. I am a journeyman carpenter . I lost my saw from Mr. Grantham's shop, on the 21st of November; I found it at the pawnbroker's.

GEORGE TURNER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 6th of December this saw was pawned by the prisoner.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; this duplicate was given to me by his father.

JOEL GRANTHAM . I am a master carpenter, and the prisoner is my son - this duplicate was delivered to me by Foster.

JOHN HALL . The prisoner was at Clerkenwell for striking his father; I told him that Russell had got his saw - he said his father must have given him the duplicate - I went to his father, and got the duplicate.

JAMES FOSTER . I am a shoemaker. The prisoner gave me this duplicate and some others, to take care of for him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-187

693. HENRY GRANTHAM was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 2 saws, value 5s.; 4 squares, value 5s.; 8 planes, value 13s., and 2 rules, value 2s. , the goods of Joel Grantham .

JOEL GRANTHAM. I am the prisoner's father. I lost these tools, which were pawned against my consent.

JOHN MILTON . I am a pawnbroker. I produce the articles, pawned, to the best of my belief, by the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years more .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18320216-188

694. JANE FLETCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s., and 6 sovereigns, the property of Henry Hicks , from his person .

HENRY HICKS . I am a sail-maker . On the 25th of January I met the prisoner at the White Hart public-house, Shadwell, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; we went to No. 5, in the Match-walk - we went up stairs, but I am not sure whether it was a first or a second floor room; I had had too much to drink, but knew what I was doing - I had six sovereigns in my trouser's pocket, and a watch in my fob; we went to bed, but I kept my trousers on, and my money and watch were safe when I went to bed; I am sure of that - I had not given the prisoner any money, nor made any bargain with her; I fell fast asleep, and when I awoke she was gone - I still had my trousers on, but missed my watch and money; I cannot tell what time it was - the officer came and asked if I had lost any thing before I missed it.

JAMES GRAHAM . I am a Policeman. I went to the house, and the landlady produced this watch - I did not then know the prosecutor had lost any money; I went down my beat and found the prisoner - this handkerchief was afterwards found at the watch-house.

SARAH CUMMINS . I keep the house. The prisoner and the prosecutor came there about nine o'clock at night - he was very much intoxicated; they went up stairs, and were there a little while - she then came down, went over to the White Hart, and fetched a young woman to see if he had lost his watch - she then brought this watch down and told me if he asked for it, I was to give it him, and if he asked who came in with him, to say nothing, as she would not stop with him, because he had no money to pay her - he put a handkerchief round her neck when he first came in; the door was left open - two or three women lodge in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. He was in liquor - I took him into the landlady's room; he tied the handkerchief round my neck - we then went up stairs; he had no money, and as there was no lock to the door, I took his watch to give to Mrs. Cummins.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-189

695. JAMES FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 swing looking-glass, value 18s. , the goods of William Sadgrove .

JAMES MERRICK . I am porter to Mr. William Sadgrove , in Elder-street, Finsbury-circus . On the morning of the 9th of February I was sweeping opposite his door, and saw the prisoner take this glass and turn into Longalley - I pursued him, crying Stop him! he put down the glass - I pursued him, and took him; this is the glass.

Prisoner. I was out of work.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-190

696. EDWARD DUKE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 2 pairs of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Smith and Sydney Smith .

HENRY EVA . I was in Pitfield-street , between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, on the 30th of January - I saw the prisoner near the prosecutor's shop; I watched him for some time, and saw him unpin a pair of trousers and walk away - he came back and took the trousers; I told the prosecutor - I did not follow him, but he was taken; I am sure he is the person.

GABRIEL BURROWS . I live with Thomas and Sydney Smith. Mr. Eva gave us the information; I ran out, and saw a man running up Charles-street - I pursued him, and when I got to the top I found a pair of trousers on the ground, and a little boy had another pair; I took them and still pursued, but lost sight of the prisoner - I came up when he was taken; I believe he is the man who was running.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where had the trousers been? A. At the shop door, hanging on an iron rod; they cannot be taken without unpinning them.

JOHN CLEMENTS . I saw the prisoner run and drop the trousers.

DANIEL CHAPMAN . I saw the prisoner running - I took him: these trousers were given to me.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18320216-191

697. JOHN CONWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 30 yards of flannel, value 25s. , the goods of James Langridge .

AINGER LUCK . I am an upholsterer. On the evening of the 30th of January I saw the prisoner and another lad near Mr. James Langridge 's shop - the prisoner had a roll of flannel; I gave information, and they were pursued.

JAMES FULLER . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner carrying this flannel; I crossed and asked where he got it- he threw it down and ran; I took him.

JAMES LANGRIDGE . This is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the street, and saw William Collins, who told me to take this, and he would follow me - I took it and went on to the next street; he then came and told me to go on.

The prisoner received a good character, and a witness engaged to employ him.

GUILTY. Aged 16

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320216-192

698. MARY ANN ROBINSON and ANN WOOLHEAD were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 1 silver box, value 1l.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 1l., and 1 gold pin, value 8s., the goods of Isidore Denizard , from his person .

ISIDORE DENIZARD. I am a Frenchman - I am a hatter , and live in Bond-street. I had been out to supper on the 16th of January, and was returning with McCarthy - we had been drinking a little; we met the prisoners about half-past one o'clock in the morning, in Hanover-street, Long-acre; they asked us to go with them - we went to a house in White Hart-yard, Drury-lane; we had something to drink there, then went to the Finish, and had some coffee and a few glasses of wine and water - my friend then left me, saying he was going up stairs; the prisoners took me over the way - they had some gin, but I did not drink much; I went with them to another public-house, but I would not have any thing there; when I left them it was about half-past six o'clock, and I then missed a brooch, a silver snuff box, and a pair of spectacles - I did not go into any room with either of the prisoners, and I had paid for what was drank; I recollect one of them seemed very careful of me at the Finish, and put her hand into my pocket; I then felt and my articles were safe, but I did not button my coat again, as I did not think they meant to rob me - these are my spectacles.

JUSTIN McCARTHY . I was with the prosecutor - we had been to Mr. West's, in Hornsey-lane; we spent the evening there; we afterwards met the prisoners, as he has described, and he treated them, but I did not partake of anything myself - when we went to the Finish I wished him to come away, as I was afraid he might be robbed - I went up stairs, as the waiter said there was a better room there; I told the prosecutor, if he did not come away I would take away his little French cane - I snatched it away, but I returned it to him; when I went up stairs I laid my head down and went to sleep - I am certain the prisoners are the persons that were with him when I left him; I had stood at an opposite table and watched them; I saw him take out his snuff-box and hand it round to them to take a pinch - when I awoke I came down, but he was gone.

Woolhead. Q. Did you not leave his company by four o'clock? A. I do not know - I think it was later than that; I did not partake of five glasses of brandy and water- I took a cup of coffee, and he said it was not good; I had a little wine and water, and it was like water.

Robinson. Q. Did you not come to me at Bow-street, and say, "If I were you, I would say nothing about his giving me the spectacles to pawn," and I said I would certainly do it, when before the Magistrate? A. I said the Policeman would refute that, and you had better say nothing about it.

FREDERICK JAMES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. I have a pair of silver spectacles, pawned by the two prisoners, on the 16th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

JOHN SMITH . I am a Police-officer. On the Monday evening I received information from Mr. McCarthy - from his description I knew the prisoners, and took them that night - they said they knew nothing about it, but the next morning they said that Mr. Denizard sent them to pawn his spectacles, as he had spent his last shilling, and that they had given the duplicate to him.

MR. DENIZARD. I had spent all my silver, but did not give them the spectacles to pawn.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Woolhead's Defence. When he gave Robinson the spectacles to pawn, she wanted to take the case or he would not know them again - he said he should, as there was a French mark on them; he said he had no money - he put the duplicate of them into the spectacle-case - she gave him 4s. 6d. and 5 1/2d., and he told me to meet him in Jermyn-street, at eight o'clock the next night.

MR. DENIZARD. I did not tell her so. I had no duplicate brought to me - I lost the case with the spectacles.

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

WOOLHEAD - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-193

699. ADAM PURVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 2 spoons, value 20s. , the goods of James Cox .

SARAH COX . I am the wife of James Cox: we live near South Mimms, in Middlesex . On the 13th of February our girl called me, and I pursued the prisoner, who had come out of our wash-house - he ran a short distance, and threw these spoons down, which are ours.

THOMAS AUSTIN. I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

JOSEPH LAWRENCE . I saw the prisoner running, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. The spoons were not in the wash-house.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-194

700. JOHN NICHOLS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 10 yards of stuff, value 16s., and 1 board, value 2d. , the goods of John Williams .

JAMES WILLIAMS. I am shopman to my uncle, John Williams, a linen-draper , at Pentonville . This stuff is his property.

NEAL LYNCH . On Monday, the 30th of January, I was in Golden-lane, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; I saw the prisoner with a bundle - I asked what he had got there; he said a piece of stuff - I asked where he got it; he said from Wilson-street - I asked where he was going to take it; he said to Wilson-street - I said, "You said you got it from there;" he said, "No, I got it from Goswell-street."

Prisoner's Defence. He asked what I had got there: I said I should not tell him - I am a dealer in Petticoat-lane; I had two or three pieces a night or two before.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-195

701. WILLIAM RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 5 glass bottles, value 1s. 3d, the goods of John Hare ; and that he had been before convicted .

JOHN HARE . I keep the Bull and Bush, North-end, Hampstead . I lost several bottles from my premises, and on the 19th of January I was watching with the constable, from about five o'clock in the evening till about nine - I then heard something, but as somebody came in with some horses at the time, I could not hear any thing more - I waited till they were gone, and then I heard some bottles move; I ran up, and found the prisoner with the bottles - they had been in a shed in my garden; he had only moved them about two yards from where he took them.

RICHARD MILLS . I am an officer. I was watching with the prosecutor - I saw the prisoner come into the premises alone - I heard the bottles chink; we went up, and took him - he fell down, and dropped the bottles.

Prisoner. I did it from distress.

THOMAS HUNT . I am an officer. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, from Mr. Clark's office; he was ordered to be transported for seven years - I took him, and know him to be the man.

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-196

702. WILLIAM TUBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 12 ozs. of silk, value 24s., and 9 bobbins, value 9d. , the goods of George Devereux Ford .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Thomas Warland .

ROBERT FORD . I am nine years and a half old - I am the son of George Devereux Ford , a weaver , who lives in George-street, Bethnal-green . On the evening of the 24th of October my father and mother were not at home; I was looking out at the window - I saw two men crossing the street; I said, "Is that you, father?" one of them said, "It is not your father, it is me, little boy, come down, I want to speak to you;" I went down, and they said, "Where is your mother and father gone? is your father gone to the watch-house?" I said I did not know - they said, "Is your father gone to the public-house?" I said I did not know - one of them said, "Come to the top of the street, I will take you to see your mother and father;" they took me to the top of the street, and then they said, "Halloo, you have not got your cap, go back and find your cap;" before I could get up stairs, the two men rushed up stairs, and the prisoner, who was one of them, went behind my father's shelf, took some shute, put it into his pocket, and ran down - I called out Murder! and Thieves! the prisoner kicked me in the mouth with his knee, as he was passing me to go down stairs - I am sure he is one of them; I cried out, "Don't take my father's shute, I shall get murdered" - the other man was taken, but this one got away then.

Prisoner. Q. What apartment does your father keep? A. The second floor; I am certain you are the man.

MARY ANN MACAREE . I live opposite the prosecutor. On the 24th of October I was at my father's door, and saw the two men come along - this little boy was looking out at the window, and he called out, "Is that you, father?" he then came down - they asked if his name was not Bobby Ford; he said Yes - they asked where his father was; he said he did not know, and then they took him to the top of the street - he would not go any further - he came back, and the prisoner ran up stairs after him, then the other man went up and in a minute I heard the bobbins fall on the floor; I heard the little boy cry out, and my father ran down - the prisoner was then coming down stairs; my father ran after him, but he got away - the other man was taken, and tried here.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at the office, that you did not know what I said to the boy? A. Not when he was looking at the window - I did when he came to the

door; I could see you by the light of the gas-lamp - I am sure you are the person.

JAMES MACAREE . I am the father of this witness. I was up in my workshop - I heard two footsteps come along; they stopped opposite my door, and I heard Ford's boy say, "Is that you, father?" he then came down, and they said, "Is your name Ford?" he said Yes; they said, "Is your father gone to the watch-house or the public-house?" he said he did not know - they then said, "Come along;" they soon returned - I heard the boy go up stairs; there was then a great noise - I heard the bobbins roll about the shop, and the little boy cried out, "Don't take it, I shall be murdered;" my daughter called me - I ran down stairs, and when I got to the door I saw the prisoner walking away; I crossed over to him, and said, "You have been robbing those people;" he then ran off - I am certain of his person; I have known him from a child.

SAMUEL REED . I am a private watchman. I was going down George-street, and heard a female crying Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running from the door, and Macaree pursuing him; I followed, but as I saw Woodcock come out of the door I took him, and this prisoner got away.

GEORGE DEVEREUX FORD. I live in the house. I was out that night, and returned about a quarter-past ten o'clock - I saw Woodcock in custody in my passage; I went up stairs, and missed nine bobbins and 12 ozs. of silk - I have got some back, but six bobbins are quite gone; I have known the prisoner some time - he knows the consequence of a journeyman silk-weaver being robbed - I might have been reckoned the thief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at home and in bed at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-197

703. JOHN HENRY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 3 half-crowns, and 1 shilling, the monies of James Davison , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-198

704. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 leg of pork, value 3s., the goods of James Flower and Henry Flower ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

RICHARD LEE. I live with James Flower and Henry Flower - they are cheesemonger s, and live in Coppice-row . I had placed this leg of pork in the window, and while I turned to get another dish it was gone; I saw the prisoner walking very fast from the shop - I ran, and came up with him; he had a handkerchief, with two loaves of bread, a lump of butter, and my master's leg of pork - he said, "I am sorry I have done wrong," and desired me to take the pork, or said he would pay for it - the pork was sold, but the officer has the knuckle.

EDWARD GROGAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the knuckle.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

CHARLES STEWART . I am an officer. I produce a certificate, (which I got from Mr. Clark's office,) of the conviction of the prisoner on the 30th of June - he had seven days' imprisonment; I was a witness, and know he is the same man.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-199

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

705. GEORGE WARWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 cap, value 2s., the goods of William Craddock , from his person .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Anthony Craddock .

WILLIAM CRADDOCK. I live with my father, Anthony Craddock , in Little Turnstile, Holborn. On the 19th of January I was walking through Lincoln's Inn-fields , between eight and nine o'clock at night - the prisoner came suddenly behind me, took my cap off, and ran away with it; I called Stop thief! and a gentleman stopped him - I am sure he is the person.

GEORGE FORD . I am a Policeman. I heard the alarm - I ran, and saw the prisoner making his escape; a gentleman stopped him, and I took him - I saw this cap on the ground close to him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did it from distress.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-200

706. GEORGE WHITCOMB was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Charles Henshaw .

MICHAEL COLNAN . I am errand-boy to Mr. Hawkings. I took a letter from my master, on the 13th of January, to Mr. Jones' factory; I delivered it to Mr. Henshaw, and waited outside the counting-house for an answer - I saw a coachman speaking to Mr. Henshaw, and a man came in behind the coachman - he took a coat off a nail against the wall, and went out - I told Mr. Henshaw, who went out with me; we found the prisoner with the coat in a green bag - he was taken back, and I went for an officer.

JOHN HARDY . I am a Policeman. About half-past four o'clock on the evening in question, the prisoner was given into my charge; as I was taking him to the station he said he did not take the coat, but it was given him by a coachman, whom he knew by sight, but he did not know his name, nor where he lived.

CHARLES HENSHAW . I am a clerk to Mr. Jones, of George-street, Portman-square ; this is my coat - I took the prisoner with it in a bag, about twenty yards from the counting-house; it had been hanging on a peg - I recollect the coachman coming in, whom I have known for twelve or fourteen years.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down George-street- a man told me to mind this bag for him; I was walking gently - Mr. Henshaw came up, and asked which it was, as there were two men before me; Colnan said he did not know - Mr. Henshaw said he had lost a coat; I told him a person gave me that bag to mind, but I did not know what was in it.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-201

707. ALFRED TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 2 comforters, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Nixey .

THOMAS NIXEY. I keep a hosier's shop , in St. John-street . On the afternoon of the 20th of January, in consequence of information, I went out with a gentleman; the

prisoner was pointed out to me - I pursued, and overtook him, with these two worsted comforters in his hand; he turned several corners - he dropped them, and I picked them up; he said another boy stole them, and gave them to him.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320216-202

708. SARAH MOSELY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 1 counterpane, value 2s.; 1 blanket, value 2s., and 2 sheets, value 2s. , the goods of James Adams .

JAMES ADAMS. I live at Sloane's-place, Kensington . The prisoner hired a ready-furnished room of me on the 5th of December; she left me on the 30th of December, and took the key - we broke the door open, and missed these articles; we saw her two days afterwards, and took her - she had not paid any rent; a soldier was with, her when she took the room, but he was on duty when the property was missing.

JOHN BRYANT . I am a pawnbroker. I have two sheets pawned by a woman, for 2s., in the name of Sarah Williams .

JAMES STANTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a counterpane, pawned by a woman, in the name of Sarah Williams .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Jane Williams .(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES APPLEBY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

GUILTY of stealing the blanket only . Aged 21.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18320216-203

709. JOHN WILLSHIRE , WILLIAM MEALEY , and CHARLES COSSON were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 19 cigars, value 2s. , the goods of William Imeson .

THOMAS HALL . I live with my father, in the City-road- he is a bird-stuffer. On the afternoon of the 16th of January I was by the turnpike, in the City-road, and saw the three prisoners - Willshire took out of a broken pane of glass, in the prosecutor's shop window, a handful of cigars, and put them into Cosson's hat; then Cosson took some, and put them into his hat; some fell on the ground, and Mealey took them up.

CHARLES PRIME . I am shopman to Mr. William Imeson - his shop is at the corner of Vinegar-yard, City-road . On the afternoon of the 16th of January I was in the back room - Hall gave me information; I went out, and took Cosson with nineteen cigars in his cap; I took him - the other two escaped.

Willshire. Hall never saw me take any thing.

THOMAS HALL . Yes; he took them first, and then Cosson took some.

JOHN GEORGE BRAND . I am an officer. I took Cosson, and have the cigars; I took the other two prisoners the next morning, in Swan-alley.

WILLSHIRE - GUILTY . Aged 13.

MEALEY - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined Seven Days and Whipped .

COSSON - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-204

710. THOMAS MIDDLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 2 live tame geese, price 10s. , the property of Henry Walker .

JAMES HANNAH . I am a Police-serjeant. On the morning of the 27th of August I was at Brentford - I met the prisoner and two other men; I stopped them - the prisoner and I got into a scuffle, and he slipped his jacket off, which I have here - he appeared thickly clothed, and I found in his jacket a dead goose, a crow-bar, a turn-screw, a tinder-box, flint, and steel - I found another goose ten or twelve yards from where I stopped them.

Prisoner. Q. How can you swear it was me? A. I am positive you are the man; the other two ran away, and since that you have made a confession.

HENRY WALKER. I live at Isleworth . In August last I had two geese in my father's yard - I lost them, one Saturday night: I attended before the Magistrate, and saw them dead - they were tame geese, and were the same as I had lost; I knew them by their having four holes in each of their feet, which I had made - they had been in a shed, which had no door to it.

The prisoner here requested leave to try the jacket on, which he did; it appeared rather tight.

JAMES HANNAH. He had not so many clothes under his jacket then as he has now - I am positive he is the man I caught hold of, and this is the jacket.

Prisoner's Defence. This jacket belongs to Thomas Starling - I heard he was about, and sent word to my friends to tell the Policeman to take him; he is the man whom he took the jacket off, but he said he could not swear to him, and let him go.

JAMES MIDDLETON . I am the prisoner's brother - he gets his living as a labouring man. On the 27th of August I was at Hounslow, and saw him there about seven or eight o'clock; this jacket does not belong to him - I have seen Thomas Starling wear it.

JOHN HANNAH . The prisoner confessed that Starling and Thicket were the men who were with him; and they were taken, but not committed, as I could not state that I saw any property on them - I am confident I took the jacket from the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-205

711. JAMES HILL BALSDON and CHARLOTTE ANN BALSDON were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 1 counterpane. value 1s.; 2 blankets, value 2s.; 2 sheets, value 2s.; 2 pillows, value 2s.; 1 bolster, value 2s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 6d.; 1 bolster-case, value 6d.; 1 swing looking-glass, value 2s.; 4 pieces of earthenware, value 2s.; 2 flat-irons, value 8d.; 1 saucepan and cover, value 2s., and 1 tea-kettle, value 1s. , the goods of John Dale .

MARY DALE . I am the wife of John Dale - he lives in High-street, Portland-town ; the prisoners had a furnished room of mine for four months. On the 22nd of January I went into the room, and missed these articles; all the bed-clothes were gone - when I asked the male prisoner to let me look at the bed he said, "No, Mrs. Dale, there is something gone, but we will make it all right on Tuesday" - I insisted on having the duplicates, and he took them from his wife, and gave them to me; I gave them to the officer, but he was not bound over.

HENRY MATTHEW BAYFIELD . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, at Paddington. I have two pillows, a bolster, a blanket, and a sheet, pawned in the name of Ann and Mary Hill - I do not know by whom.

THOMAS TRUEMAN . I am in the service of a pawnbroker. I have a blanket, pawned on the 16th of November - I do not know by whom.

WILLIAM JOHN LONGER . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker. I received some duplicates from the officer; Mrs. Dala was in the room, but I do not know that she saw them given - I have a sheet and two pillow-cases, pawned on the 14th of November; I do not know by whom - I have also a piece of patch-work and a gown, pawned by the female prisoner; I have the counterpart of the duplicates which the officer gave me.(Property produced and sworn to)

The prisoner James Hill Baldsdon put in a written Defence, stating that his wife had pledged the articles in his absence, to procure food.

J.H. BALSDON - GUILTY. Aged 54.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

C.A. BALSDON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-206

Fourth Middlesex Jury,

712 ANN BURTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. 6d, the goods of Robert Marchant ; and that she had been before convicted of felony. .

MARY HOOKER . I am the wife of George Hooker - I live in Little Coleman-street. On the 14th of January I went into a public-house in Golden-lane ; I saw Robert Marchant there with a bag of shoes, and a pair of carpet-shoes was on the top - the prisoner sat on one side of the bag; I saw her take the carpet-shoes, and go out of the house with them - I did not take any notice then, as I thought she might know him; I afterwards heard him claiming the property, and gave information - he and a young man brought the prisoner back with the shoes.

ROBERT MARCHANT. I live in Elder-walk, Lower-road. I was at the Cock public-house on Saturday, the 14th of January - I had a bag of carpet-shoes; I sold one pair, and set the bag down on the seat - I then turned, and missed these; the witness told me what she had seen.

JOSEPH CLARK . I am a wire-worker, and live in Dunk-street, Whitechapel. I was in the Cock, and saw the prosecutor with some shoes in a bag - in consequence of what I heard I went out, and found the prisoner with the shoes in her hand; I took her back.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I am a Policeman. I received the prisoner on the 14th of January - I received these shoes from Clark.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a shoe-binder - my husband and son make these shoes, and I had been out selling some; I sat down in the public-house - a little ale got into my head, and when I awoke I took up these shoes thinking they were my own - I did not conceal them.

MATTHEW CARTER . I was a constable last year. I have a certificate of the former conviction of the prisoner, which I got from Mr. Clar'ks office, on the 17th of February - I know she is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 53. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-207

713. MARGARET COCHLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 3 yards of linen cloth, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Coventry .

JOHN COVENTRY . I live with Mr. William Coventry , of Old-street , a linen-draper . On the 28th of January I was standing at his shop door - the prisoner asked me the price of some cloth; I told her 6 1/2d. a yard - she said she would give me 3 1/2d.; I said I could not take it - she went away, returned, and asked if I would take it; I said No - I then went in; I had information, went out, and took her about eighty yards from the shop - I asked what she had got; she said nothing belonging to me - I pulled down her apron, and found this piece of cloth, which she had asked the price of; she then knocked me down - the Policeman came up, took her, and picked up the cloth.

THOMAS JONES . I am a Policeman. On Saturday, the 28th of January, I was on duty in Old-street - I saw Coventry stop the prisoner; she knocked him down, and dropped this cloth - I took her; she said she had found the cloth on the ground, and took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 56. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-208

714. FREDERICK CAREY was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM GEORGE RICHARDSON . I am a butcher , and live in Mortimer-street - the prisoner was in my employ, and was to collect money. On the 4th of February I sent him to York-street, Middlesex-hospital , to a tallowchandler, to receive money for fat - he did not return on the Monday: I went to Masterman's bank to stop the cheque - a boy named Humphreys was brought to me with a cheque, which had not been paid.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-209

715. JOSEPH CLAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 waistcoat, value 10s. , the goods of Ann Johnston and Mary Hall .

JOHN ASKEW. I am shopman to Ann Johnston and Mary Hall - they keep a clothes-warehouse , in Edgware-road . On the 31st of January I was in the shop - I saw the prisoner come to the door, and lay hold of the waistcoat; he gave it a sudden snatch, broke the string which fastened it, and ran away with it - he was about ten yards off when I got to the door, and he had the waistcoat under his arm; I called Stop thief! and he dropped it on the pavement - I ran, and took him about fifty yards off; I had not lost sight of him - I have known him these two years, and am sure he is the person; he said I was mistaken - several persons said, "Let him go," which mistress agreed to; I told him to go about his business, but he said he did see why he should be accused of taking it when he had not.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I am a Police-serjeant. I took the prisoner from information, in Devonshire-street - he asked me to take him to the prosecutrix's, but I said I could not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-210

716. HENRY COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 3 sheep skins, value 5s. , the goods of Mary Stackard .

MARY ANN STACKARD . I am the daughter of Mary Stackard . On the morning of the 24th of January I was

in the room adjoining the shop; there was no one there - I saw a person leaving the shop: I could not recognize the prisoner's person - in a short time we missed three sheep skins, and in about five minutes they were brought in.

HENRY BANON . I was at my own door, near the prosecutrix's, and saw the prisoner running in a direction from her house, towards Great Garden-street; I took the skins from him, and he got away; I took the skins back to the prosecutrix's, where they were recognized - I knew the prisoner by sight before; I described him to the officer, and he was taken the same evening.

WILLIAM AGENT . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner the same evening, at the Red Lion, in Whitechapel-road - he said he picked the skins up in the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man came out of the shop, and gave me the skins to hold for him.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-211

717. JOHN CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 30 slates, value 7s. , the goods of William North .

ROBERT BURKE . I was in the employ of Mr. William North, a slate-merchant ; he was slating the new hospital at Charing-cross . On the 4th of January I saw the prisoner, whom I knew by sight, taking a load of fifteen slates from the building - he took them from the hall of the building, or from the barrow - he took them to Mr. Carter's, a builder, in Drury-lane; I did not lose sight of him till he went in there - I have since seen the slates in the possesion of Mr. Carter; they are worth 3d. each, at the wholesale price - I had no mark on them; they are common "dutchesses;" he was about ten yards from the building when I first saw him, and going from the hospital - I did not miss any slates from the building.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me in the hospital? A. I saw you on the premises of the hospital, within ten yards of it: I had seen you for three quarters of an hour.

WILLIAM CARTER . I live with my father, a builder, in Drury-lane. On the 4th of January the prisoner brought some slates for sale - he said he had them left of a job, and he wanted 1 1/2d. a piece for them; there were thirty in all: he brought them at twice - before he came the second time the prosecutor had called, and we detained him.

HENRY IBBERTSON . I work for Mr. Carter. On the 4th of January the prisoner came to my master's shop, between ten and eleven o'clock, with some slates on his shoulder; I did not count them - he said there were fifteen - he said he had a job of his own, and he wanted a few nails to finish it; he asked if Mr. Carter was at home - I said No; he afterwards if Mr. Carter was at home - I said No; he afterwards came and brought some more.

Prisoner's Defence. I took some slates to Mr. Carter's on the 4th and on the 6th; I went for the money - he said Mr. North had been there, and I waited for him; I had one thousand five hundred slates, which a gentleman bought for me to cover four houses with - I had two hundred left, and I took them to the top of Sloane-street; I used one hundred and seventy there, and this thirty were what I had left - I took them in a cart to the bottom of St. Martin's-lane; I then took them to Mr. Carter's; I had taken slates to his house once or twice before.

MR. CARTER. He never did, to my knowledge, but my father might have bought some of him, as we deal in building-materials.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-212

718. JAMES CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January, 1 petticoat, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Corbett .

WILLIAM CORBETT . I live at No. 4, Redborough-place, Burton-crescent , and am the son of Robert Corbett . On the 6th of January, in the morning, I got up to get breakfast, and put up a tub for my mother to wash her clothes; I then got an awl to mend my shoes - I went to sharpen it, and saw the prisoner with his hand in the tub; I came in doors, and asked what he had got - he would not show me, but asked if Dick Simms lived there: he ran off, and dropped this petticoat on the pavement - I followed him till a butcher stopped him.

Prisoner. It was laying at the door, and I took it up. Witness. He had his hands in the tub, and had hold of some other things; I spoke to him - he put them down, and then dropped this.

JOHN VENNELL . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and found on him a basket of other things, which a Mr. King claimed - the petticoat was quite wet.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked this up at the door, and when this lad came to me he said, "What are you doing with that? give it to me;" I said, "If it is yours, take it"- a friend of mine called on the prosecutor, who said no more would come of it.

ELIZABETH CORBETT . I am the prosecutor's wife. A person called on me - I told them if they know any thing of the prisoner, to come here; I did not say no more would come of it.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-213

719. SARAH HAMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 9 blankets, value 18s.; 3 sheets, value 4s.; 4 pairs of trousers, value 5s.; 16 shirts, value 18s.; 2 waistcoats, value 3s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 4 pairs of drawers, value 4s.; 3 pillows, value 6s.; 1 quilt, value 2s.; 2 curtains, value 1s.; 2 hats, value 4s.; 2 books, value 3s.; 24 pairs of stockings, value 6s., and 1 cap, value 6d. , the goods of James Driver . MARTHA HAMPTON and ANN DAVIES were indicted for feloniously receiving part of the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES DRIVER . I am a sailor , and keep a house in King Edward-street, Wapping - Sarah Hampton lodged in my house, with her father; Martha Hampton passes as her mother; she used to come to the house, but did not sleep there - the father was out all day, and Sarah and another child younger were left to themselves - on the 15th of December I missed some shirts and a blanket; on Christmas eve I removed to another house - Hampton and the two children moved with me - my things were put into a room, and when I afterwards went to put my things in order, I missed all these articles, and a great number more - I found in the room occupied by Hampton and her children, a piece of bone, and as I knew I had had such a piece in my chest, I asked Sarah where she got it; she gave me no answer, and I then found on their mantle-piece a key which opened the room in which my property was locked; she said it was one of her father's old keys.

Martha Hampton. I never was in his house in my life; I have called to ask for my husband. Witness. She has been in her husband's room in the house I first missed the things from; and I have seen her at the foot of the stairs of the house we live in now.

BOYD SYLVESTER . I am a Thames Police-constable. Mr. and Mrs. Driver brought Sarah Hampton to me, and in consequence of what she said, I went to find Martha Hampton and Ann Davis; I found Martha Hampton in Little Sutton-street; I told her she was charged with receiving the property belonging to Mr. Driver; she denied it - I then asked for the duplicates; she said she had none, but afterwards she said, "I will tell you the truth, come to my lodgings, and I will give them to you;" Sarah Hampton was with me, and she said to her, "You know, mother, you desired me to take the things, and I gave you the duplicates" - Martha Hampton then said, "I told my daughter to be very cautions about what she did, and when she gave me the duplicates I said I hoped she had done nothing wrong, as she knew a woman was hanged the other day by her own child" - we then went to her lodging, in a court facing St. Luke's-church, Old-street, where she gave me these duplicates, which led me to the pawnbrokers - she then took me to Ann Davis, in a court, in King Edward-street, Shadwell; Davis gave me four duplicates, and said that the girl (Sarah Hampton) had brought her things, and she had pawned them; she named two blankets as part of them - Martha Hampton said that Sarah had brought up a hat, and she had pawned it in Ratcliff-highway, that she thought it was her husband's - I found a hat with a person named Shaw, who said that she had sold the duplicate of it to him for 9d.; Davis said that she supposed the things were the property of Sarah Hampton's father - Sarah Hampton turned round and said to her, "No, you know very well that you did not think them my father's property; they belonged to a person in the house, Mr. Driver" - Davis put up her hands, and said, "No, you know that I did not know that" - Sarah said, "Yes, you knew they were not my father's at that time, for you told me to get them" -Sarah then said to Martha Hampton, "You called Ryder in, to scrape the name out of the hat, which he did" - Martha Hampton said she did so, but she did not know but that it was her husband's.

Martha Hampton. I never said any thing about the name in the hat, nor did I take you to Mr. Davis - you have been bribed to false swear, that my husband may cohabit with a woman he has been living with. Witness. I went to Davis in consequence of what Martha Hampton said - she said, "I can show you where I sold a duplicate of three articles, in Brick-lane;" the woman brought the things, but she was not bound over.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am in the employ of a pawnbroker in Old Gravel-lane. I have a number of shirts, blankets, sheets, and a variety of other articles, which were pawned by Sarah Hampton, at different times, between December and January - the money advanced on the whole was 2l. 14s. 9d.; they were worth about 3l. 10s. - she said she pawned them for her mother.

HENRY WELLS . I am in the employ of a pawnbroker. I have a coloured shirt and a pair of trousers, pawned on the 4th of January, to the best of my belief, by Davis.

Davis. Yes, I pawned them.

WILLIAM WARD . I am a pawnbroker. I have two blankets, one pawned by Davis, in the name of Watts; the other I do not know who pawned.

Davis. I pawned one, and the other I sent by my lodger. not knowing they were stolen.

JAMES RYDER . I live in Ship-street, Wapping. I called on Davis one Thursday, and found the other two prisoners there - I saw a hat there; Martha Hampton and Sarah both asked me if I would buy it - I tried it on, and it was too large for me; there was a name in it, but I cannot tell what, as I cannot read writing - it was on the leather inside - they asked me to scrape it out, and I did.

MARGARET DRIVER . I am the prosecutor's wife. I have examined all these articles; they are all my husband's, or what have been left in his care by seafaring men.

MATTHEW SHAW . I am a Greenwich pensioner. I received two duplicates from Martha Hampton - one I gave to Sylvester, and the other was for a hat, which I took out and gave to him, but he has not brought it.

Martha Hampton 's Defence. My daughter gave me the duplicates, and told me to take care of them.

SARAH HAMPTON - GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Judgment Respited .

MARTHA HAMPTON - NOT GUILTY .

ANN DAVIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-214

720. HENRY HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 book, value 15s. , the goods of Charles Stenson .

WILLIAM BRIDGLAND . I am a Policeman. On the night of the 26th of January I stopped the prisoner in High-street, St. Giles's, with this Bible under his left arm, about half-past eight o'clock - it is Dr. Geddes' Bible; he said he was going to take it to St. Giles' church - I took him into custody.

NOAH HUNT . I am in the service of Mr. Charles Stenson, of Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square. This Bible is his property - I saw it safe on the night in question, just within the door; I did not miss it till the officer brought it.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-215

721. HENRY JEMMETT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 hat, value 5s., the goods of Charles Delaport ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

ANN LANGDON . I am the wife of George Bullem Langdon - he lives in Essex-street, Globe-fields, and is an accountant. On the 28th of January I was with my niece, in Church-street, Bethnal-green - I saw the prisoner snatch a hat from a nail at Mr. Delaport's door; he ran away with it - I cried Stop thief! and he was brought back in custody; I am sure he is the person.

ELIZABETH MARY SCOTT . I am Mrs. Langdon's niece, and saw the prisoner take the hat.

DAVID CARR . I am a Policeman. On the 28th of January I heard an alarm in Church-street, and saw the prisoner running near Club-row - I took him, and a person said he had thrown the hat away; the hat was given into a shop; I think he was fifty yards from the prosecutor's.

ELIZABETH DELAPORT . I am the wife of Charles Delaport - he lives in Church-street, Bethnal-green, and is a

corn-meter - I keep the shop. On the 28th of January I heard an alarm, and missed this hat; I recovered it, with the paper round it, as it is now.

Prisoner's Defence. It was near nine o'clock; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran, as others did; I never saw the hat till I was taken to the shop.

DAVID CARR . There were a good many persons behind the prisoner, but none before him; he was turning the corner as I laid hold of him - there was light from the gas; he had lost a shoe in running, which he did not get again.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I am a Police-serjeant. I have a certificate of the former conviction of the prisoner, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - (read); he was imprisoned six months - I was present at his trial, and know he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 22 - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-216

722. NATHANIEL JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 jar, value 1s. 6d., and 4 ozs. of tobacco, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Michael Shaw .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Rebecca Shaw .

GEORGE KEMP . I am a Policeman. On Saturday, the 21st of January, I was in Old-street-road, between twelve and one o'clock in the day; I saw the prisoner pass me, in company with another boy - I opened the prisoner's apron, and asked what he had got in it; he said a jar, which a boy had given him to take to Church-street, Shoreditch; I found some tobacco in the jar, and some of the same sort of tobacco in his pocket.

REBECCA SHAW . I am the daughter of Michael Shaw - he has opened a tobacconist's shop , in Kingsland-road , which I attend to; the goods are mine, but my father holds the lease. On the 21st of January I missed a jar, with a 1/4 lb. of tobacco, which had stood on a shelf about two yards from the door - this is the jar; I know it from its having a bit broken off it - I had seen it safe about eleven o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the road, and a man asked me to carry it to Shoreditch church - there was no boy with me.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-217

723. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 plum cake, value 7s. , the goods of William Moore .

SARAH MOORE . I am the wife of William Moore - we keep a cake-shop in South-place, New-road . On the 6th of January the prisoner came in with another boy , and asked for 1/4 lb. of cake - it came to 2d.; he put a half-crown on the counter to pay for it - he then took up the half-crown, and said he thought he had got halfpence; he felt, and said, "No, I have not," and he put down the half-crown again in such a way that it rolled off the counter - I stooped for it, and in rising I saw the other boy with a cake in his apron - he ran off with it; I had before asked that boy what he wanted, and the prisoner said he had come with him - I cried Stop thief! after the other, but he got away; the prisoner staid and asked for his change: I kept the half-crown, and the prisoner was detained.

WILLIAM LODWICK . I am a Police-officer. The prisoner was given in charge - I asked him who the other boy was - he said he had seen him several times, but did not know his name, nor where he lived, that he had met him, and walked down Tottenham-court-road with him, but he did not know he meant to take the cake - the prisoner had some halfpence and a sixpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no connexion with the person who took it; I did not say he came with me - I did not attempt to go away.

MRS MOORE. He had no opportunity to go, for the mob assembled so quick; the other said something when he went out, but I did not hear what.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18320216-218

OLD COURT. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

724. WILLIAM SMITH and FRANCIS HUGHES were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of James Low , from his person .

MR. JAMES LOW. I am a wholesale stationer , and live in Gracechurch-street. I was in Parliament-street on Wednesday afternoon; a young man ran after me, and asked if I had lost any thing - I immediately missed my handkerchief and an orange; I did not feel it taken - he ran after the prisoners, and with the assistance of the Policeman brought them back: one of them had my handkerchief, and the other was sucking the orange.

SIMPSON SWENDELL . I was going along Parliament-street, and saw the prisoners walking close behind the prosecutor; I saw Hughes take the handkerchief from Mr. Low's pocket, then cross the road, and go down Charles-street - the other prisoner then crossed; I stopped and asked Mr. Low if he had lost a handkerchief, I then crossed, saw a Policeman, and sent him round one way - I went round the other; I got to the prisoners before him, and secured them - I took the handkerchief from Smith's breast.

RICHARD ARCHER . I am a Policeman. Swendell's evidence is correct - Hughes had the orange, and Smith the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

HUGHES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-219

725. JOHN WHITCOMBE was indicted for embezzlement .

MARTHA WINBOLT . I deal with Mr. Straw for bread, and owed him 2l. 19s. 7d., which I paid to the prisoner on the 7th of June, 1830 ; he gave me a receipt, which I gave Mr. Straw - this is it - (read.)

EDWARD STRAW . I am a baker . The prisoner was my journeyman for about four months; he received money on my account - he should have given me this money immediately he came home, but he absconded that day, and I did not see him again till he was apprehended.

MRS. STRAW. The prisoner never paid me this money.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-220

726. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on

the 15th of February , 1 firkin, value 1s., and 70 lbs. of butter, value 3l. , the goods of Henry Harben .

CHARLES PULLING . I am in the employ of Henry Harben, a cheesemonger , of High-street, Bloomsbury . On the 15th of February a cart stood at the door, loaded with butter; a cry of Stop thief! was raised, and the prisoner was taken with a firkin of butter, which had been in the cart.

HENRY GARNET . I am an officer. I was coming from Museum-street, and met the prisoner, in company with another man, and watched them - the other got on one side of the cart; the prisoner got up on the other side, and helped the firkin down; the prisoner put it on his shoulder, and walked off with it - I collard him, and said, "Halloo, where are you going?" he threw it down, and I lost my hold, but I secured him - he did not get an arm's length from me.

Prisoner. I was out of employ.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-221

727. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 1 gown, value 6s., and 1 pelisse, value 15s. , the goods of William Saunderson .

SUSAN SAUNDERSON . I am the wife of William Saunderson - we live at Hackney . The prisoner and her husband lodged with us for ten months - she gave me leave to put a box into her room last April; it was not locked - last Friday week I missed a pelisse; I mentioned it to her - she said she had pawned it for 2s.; I had not given her leave to do so - I had two boxes on the stairs, with the key left in them; I missed a gown from one of them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did her husband live with her? A. Yes.

SAMUEL GILTS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in her room - she said she meant to get the things out of pawn as soon as she could; I asked her to give me the duplicates - she refused, saying she would sooner throw them into the fire, which she tried to do; I took a pocket-book from her, containing fourteen duplicates - two were for this property.

SAMUEL AVILLA . I am a pawnbroker. This gown and pelisse were pawned at our shop - I cannot say who by; I took the gown in, and gave this duplicate for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-222

Before Mr. Recorder.

728. LOUISA JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 3 brushes, value 3s. , the goods of Edward Williams .

JAMES DODD . I am in the employ of Edward Williams, of Belgrave-street , solicitor . About four o'clock in the afternoon the prisoner came down the area, and rang the bell- I answered it; she asked for some victuals, and appeared destitute - I had no sooner turned my back than my fellow-servant called out that the brushes were gone; I went and took her with them by the area door.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.- Confined Seven Days

Reference Number: t18320216-223

729. WILLIAM JOLLY and HENRY DUNT were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 7 sheets, value 12s. , the goods of Benjamin Thompson .

ARCHIBALD BEAVEN . I am in the employ of Benjamin Thompson, who keeps a lodging-house , in Hampshire Hog-yard . Jolly has lodged there about three months; Dunt was a stranger; these sheets were in two different rooms on the third floor; I saw them about eleven o'clock in the morning, and missed them about eight o'clock at night; Jolly came home about one in the morning - I accused him of it; he said he was innocent; next morning I asked him about it - he said he would discover every thing to me - I gave him in charge and he took me to where they had been cut up and sold for rags - I found the fragments of about four, with marks on them, by which I knew them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did not Jolly behave with the greatest propriety in the house? A. Yes; he said he was out of employ; master would not prosecute, but he could not help it; Dunt formerly lodged there; some of the sheets were nearly new; I know Dunt was in great distress.

WILLIAM EVANS . I am a rag-merchant. Jolly sold me these pieces of sheets. I live at No. 8, Great Wild-street.

Cross-examined. Q. You bought them whole I believe? A. No, they were cut into small pieces, and are mere rags; I gave him 4d. for them, which was 1d. per lb.

MARIA ADAMS . I live in King-street, Seven-dials. Dunt sold me some rags; I never saw him before, but am certain of him.

MORRIS NICHOLAS . I am a Police-man. Jolly told me I should find Dunt in Nottingham-court; I went there and found him in bed.(Property produced and sworn to)

Dunt pleaded poverty.

JOLLY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

DUNT - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined for Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18320216-224

730. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 12 skins of leather, value 4l. , the goods of Thomas Hawkins .

The goods having been delivered to the prisoner, to sell on commisson, the evidence was not proceeded with.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-225

731. WILLIAM WALTON and GEORGE TINGEY were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 215 pairs of shoes, value 25l. , the goods of James Game ; and MARY COOK was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating them to belong to Charles Winter .

TWO OTHER COUNTS stating them to belong to Samuel Brown .

JAMES GAME . I am a carrier from London to Enfield . On the 24th of January I received a hamper at the Four Swans, Bishopsgate-street; it appeared to be full; I never saw it open - I helped it into the cart myself; it weighed nearly 1 1/2 cwt.; I was to take it to Mr. Brown at Enfield; I left London about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I missed the hamper at Edmonton, near the Horse and Groom - I had to leave a message close to the Angel at Edmonton, and think it must have been taken while I went there, as it was safe when I left; my lad was in front of the cart, and it was taken from the back; the prisoner Cook lived at Tottenham, and sold coals about in a cart; I went with a constable that night, but did not find the

property, - it was found by another constable that evening.

WILLIAM MANNING . I am a shoemaker, and live at Norwich. On the 21st of January I packed seventeen dozen and eleven pairs of shoes in a hamper, and sent them to Mack's office, to be conveyed to the Four Swans, London - I have seen twenty-seven pairs and an odd one at Edmonton, and am quite sure they are part of what I sent, from two or three circumstances.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you the manufacturer? A. I am foreman to Mr. Hunter - we stamp a mark on all our shoes, but I identify these by other circumstances.

RICHARD DENNY . I am porter to Mr. Winter, at Norwich. I took the hamper to Mack's office, to be conveyed to Brown, at Enfield.

ROBERT CARTER . I am book-keeper at the Four Swans. On the 25th of January a hamper came to our inn, directed to Brown at Enfield, and left in Game's errand cart.

WILLIAM BLANSHARD. I am porter at the Four Swans. I put the hamper into Game's cart.

MARY CATLIN . I live in Eaton-place, Edmonton; I go out to work - I know all the prisoners; Cook lives at Tottenham - I have seen both the other prisoners at her house. I met Walton on the 27th of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, alone, near Mr. Coventry's door, at Tottenham, about a quarter of a mile on this side the Bell; the errand-cart passed at the time - Walton went towards Enfield; I saw him about five minutes after the errand-cart passed - he went in a direction towards Edmonton.

THOMAS CARTER . I am a hair-dresser, and live at Tottenham, and know all the prisoners by sight - Cook lived near me. On the 25th of January, as the watchman was calling nine o'clock, I was standing at my door, and saw two men cross the road and pass me; it was Walton and Tingey; they went up the yard leading to Cook's house, which is in the yard my back door opens into - a fence parts my yard from theirs; Cook is married - I am quite sure of Walton and Tingey; one of them had a bundle under his arm, and the other a great bulk under his coat, which prevented my seeing what it was - I saw him turn into the yard leading to Cook's house. Tingey was taken into custody that night, and Walton a few days after; I saw them in custody at the Angel, and was positive of them - some shoes were produced at the examination, which Manning claimed - I gave the officer information of what I had seen.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What time of night was it? A. The watchman was going past nine o'clock - I was at my front door; my shop was open - they both passed me, and I knew them; I had seen Tingey at Cook's house before - he had the bundle under his arm; it seemed as large as four or five of these large boots.

JOHN INGRAM . I am a constable of Tottenham."On Wednesday night the 25th of January, about nine o'clock I was shutting up my shop; I am a hair-dresser - Carter came and gave me information; I immediately went to Fowler, Forster, and Aylin, and we proceeded to Cook's house - her husband was not at home; we found Mary Cook , her daughter Eliza, Tingey, David Blair, and a man named Hagan there, but not Walton, and there was a man in possession with a distress-warrant for rent; I went up stairs, and they all sat there, playing at dominoes - we found nothing in that room; I then went up to the next room, which has two beds in it, and there found twenty-three pairs of new shoes and an odd one - we brought them down, and took the prisoners into custody; I asked the broker if the shoes were in his inventory; he did not claim them - I have known Mr. and Mrs. Cook nine or ten years; they did not deal in shoes - they sold coals about in a cart: Manning claimed the shoes before the Magistrate - Walton was then in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Tingey was not in the room you found the shoes in? A. No - the man in possession was not playing with them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Mr. Cook was not in the house then, but you cannot tell how long the shoes had been there? A. No; I believe Cook is now in Newgate, on another charge - I went to the house about twenty minutes after Carter gave me the information.

JOHN FOWLER . I am a constable. I went to Cook's house with Ingram, and found twenty-three pairs of shoes and an odd one, strewed on the bed - Tingey and Mrs. Cook were there; I had taken Mr. Cook to Newgate on another charge that morning, having apprehended him on the Tuesday - he could not have been present when the shoes were brought there; Hagan and another were discharged before the Magistrate - I saw Camp find a piece of paper in Cook's house.

JOSEPH FORSTER . I am a constable. I was with Fowler and the others; we got to Cook's house at near ten o'clock- Mr. Cook had been sent to Newgate that morning - I saw Tingey, Mrs. Cook, and several others playing at dominoes - Fowler and lugram went up stairs; I stood at the door, to prevent the prisoners leaving the room - I found a large clasp knife in Tingey's pocket: there had been a rope round the hamper, which was cut; I saw part of the cord, which was found near where the shoes were lost.

BENJAMIN AVLIN . I am a barge-owner. I know all the prisoners - I went to Cook's house on the 25th of January, with the constables; I stood at the door while they went up - they called me up, and I saw the shoes in the bed room.

JOHN CAMP . I am a constable of Edmonton. On Wednesday evening Game informed me of his loss - I apprehended Walton on Sunday morning, about four o'clock, in bed, at his mother's, at Edmonton; I told him it was for stealing shoes from Game's cart - he denied the charge, and said it was the first he had heard of it: on the day after the robbery I went to Cook's house, to search for more property, and in the room where the shoes were found I found this paper laying by the side of the bed - it has been apparently burnt with a candle and dropped down.

WILLIAM MANNING . I know these shoes - they have all our stamp on them; one pair was made by our apprentice - I know his work; that pair was sent in the hamper; this paper is part of the invoice which was sent with them.

WILLIAM BOYSON . I am a watchman. On Wednesday evening, the 25th of January, about half-past seven o'clock, Game's cart passed me in Claremont-street, in the upper part of Edmonton, about a quarter of a mile on this side the Angel, and about twenty minutes to eight Walton and Tingey passed me; they were going after

the cart, walking very fast in the same direction - I saw Walton again about ten minutes past nine o'clock, coming in the same direction as before; I did not see that he had any thing with him - he was against Mr. Brooks', going down the lane towards his own home; I saw Camp, and told him.

Walton's Defence. I was not in the house that night.

Tingey's Defence. I went to Cook's, but took nothing with me.

Cook's Defence. When I go out on business I cannot say who goes into my place - there are no locks on any of the doors.

JOSEPH FORSTER. There is no lock on the street door- I did not observe the bed-room doors.

WALTON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

TINGEY - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

COOK - GUILTY . Aged 51.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-226

732. BRIDGET KELLEY was indicted for stealing, on 15th of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 9d., and 1 pair of boots, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Read Hayes .

MARY HAYES . I am the wife of Read Hayes , a shoemaker , of Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea . The prisoner had ordered a pair of shoes, and was to have come for them on the Saturday before this, but did not - I went out about ten o'clock in the morning, on the 15th of February, and left my mother in care of the shop; I put these boots in the window five minutes before I went out - I returned about twelve o'clock, and missed them about two; the shoes have not been found, but the boots I found in pawn - the prisoner is friendless, and has no parents; I never heard a charge against her.

SARAH TABOR . I am Hayes' mother. I was in care of the shop - the prisoner came, and asked if her shoes were done - I said my daughter was out, and I did not know; she turned to the window, took a pair of shoes down, and tried on - she said it was a very good fit, and she would come and fetch them in a minute; she was not in the shop after that - I sat there with the baby, and never left; about two o'clock my daughter discovered the loss - nobody but the prisoner had been to the shop; I saw her handling the boots, but she put them down again.

CHARLES BOND . I am apprentice to Mr. Perkins, a pawnbroker, On the 15th of February the prisoner pawned a pair of child's boots for 6d. - I am certain of her.

HENRY WILLIAMS . I am a Policeman. I took her into custody - she did not deny the charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-227

733. HENRY MESSENGER, alias MESSENBERG , and THOMAS COOK were indicted for breaking and entering a building, within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of John O'Brien , on the 23rd of January , and stealing 10 fowls, value 10s.; 1 stirrup, value 1s., and 1 pint pot, value 1d., the goods of John O'Brien ; 2 shirts, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 coat, value 1s. 6d., and 1 pair of stockings, value 6d., the goods of Henry Robinson .

JOHN O'BRIEN . I am a mariner , and rent a house in Edmonton parish . On the 23rd of January my servant reported that my hen-house was broken open; I was not at home that night - the hen-house is in my yard, and does not communicate with the house; Robinson sleeps in the same room with my father.

HENRY ROBINSON . I am servant to Mr. O'Brien, On the 23rd of January I went to bed about ten o'clock at night - I left two shirts, a handkerchief, a coat, and stockings in a bundle in the stable, which is enclosed in the yard; the door was shut, and the hen-house door was locked - I left all safe about half-past nine o'clock; about half-past six in the morning I found all the things laying about, and missed my clothes - I found an iron crow in the stable; it did not belong to us - the hen-house door was shut, but the lock had been shoved back, and fourteen fowls taken out of twenty; I saw the prisoners in custody the next day, with five fowls - I knew there were two particular French ones among them, which I can safely swear to.

JOSEPH FORSTER . I am a constable. On the 24th of January I received information about five o'clock, and went to Cook's house, with Fowler and Aylin - I have seen Messenger there a good deal, but do not think he lived there regularly; I found Cook, his son, and Messenger there - as soon as we could obtain a light, Fowler and I searched the house, leaving Aylin at the streetdoor, and while we were searching, Aylin brought up a bag, in which was a large doe-rabbit and a fowl - Ingram found a rabbit and three or four fowls; we immediately took the prisoners into custody - Robinson claimed the fowls before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. Messenger occasionally lived at Cook's? A. I do not say he lived there - I never saw him in bed there; I found him there dressed.

BENJAMIN AYLIN . I went to Cook's house, and was stationed at the door - while the officers were searching something came out of the window, and fell on my head -I sent for a light, and found a bag at my heels, with a rabbit and two fowls in it; they were warm and just killed - that must have been what came on my head; I went upstairs, and told them what I had found - a rabbit and three fowls were thrown out of a window into the yard; I could not say from which window they came, but only one was open when the light came; Robinson claimed the fowls.

Cross-examined. Q. How many houses are there together? A. There are three in the yard; there are two rooms and a cellar in Cook's house - there is no room on the ground floor; I know Messenger occasionally slept there; Cook's son is about twenty-one years old - he was sitting at the fire with them; the bag must have come from Cook's window.

JOHN FOWLER . I am a constable. I went to the house - we searched the room, and found nothing but the back part and the gut of a fowl in a part of water - Aylin called out that something was thrown out of window, and we immediately apprehended the prisoners - Robinson identified the fowls before the Magistrate; Cook's son was discharged.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he dressed? A. Yes, but his shoes were not laced.

JOHN INGRAM. I live near the yard, in which Cook's house is. On the 24th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, Fowler called me; I went to Cook's house with a candle - it went out; I went for another, and in the yard, under Cook's window, I found a rabbit and three fowls, dead, but quite warm - they were not in a bag; Robinson claimed them.

HENRY ROBINSON . I am quite sure the fowls were my master's - here are the wings and feet, which I swear to.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not that quite a common plumage? A. Perhaps it may be.

Cook's Defence. I was in bed at half-past ten o'clock, and did not get up till six.

Messenger's Defence. Fowler had stopped me the day day before, when I was coming up here to a young woman who was in trouble - I slept in town that night; I got up next morning, went to Tottenham, and called at Cook's, about six o'clock - Fowler saw me go in, and knew I had nothing.

JOHN FOWLER . I did not see him till he was found in the house; I was in bed when I received the information.

COOK - GUILTY . Aged 20.

MESSENGER - GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18320216-228

734. CHARLES MILLS was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HITCHCOCK , I am servant to Mrs. Constable, of Sloane-street , I have some table-cloths, which a young man brought to mistress's house about two months ago - I do not know who it was; I did not have a receipt.

JAMES CORDNER . I am in the employ of Messrs. Sewell and Cross , at their shop at Knightsbridge; the prisoner was in their service. On Thursday, the 15th of December, I sent him to Mrs. Constable's with some table-cloths, and as soon as he returned I asked him if they would suit - he said the lady could not give a deoided answer till the following morning; he afterwards told me the cloths were returned, that the lady objected to the price, and would not keep them; the cloths produced are the two which I sent him with to Mrs. Constable's - they came to 27s.; he should have accounted to Mr. Challacomb if he was paid for them.

NICHOLAS CHALLACOMB . I manage the branch concern for Messrs. George Drake Sewell and another, at Knights-bridge. If shopmen are sent out with goods and receive money for them they ought to account to me, and to nobody else - the prisoner never accounted to me for the cash for these cloths; he left, without notice, on the 26th of December.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you happen to know he is the son of a highly respectable linen-draper in Bond-street? A. No - he said his health had been bad before I engaged him.

JOSEPH MILLER . I am a fishmonger, and live in Piccadilly. I received goods amounting to 15l. 9s. 7d. from Messrs. Sewell and Cross on the 18th of December; I paid the prisoner for them; here is the receipt which I saw him write - (read.)

NICHOLAS CHALLACOMB. The prisoner never accounted to me for this sum, which it was his duty to do that very day - Mrs. Constable gave me this receipt, which he gave for the table-cloths; I know it to be his writing - (read.)

Prisoner. I wrote a letter to the prosecutors.

HENRY MILLS . The prisoner is my son. I was formerly in business in Bond-street and in Coventry-street for twenty-four years - my son has been in a bad state of health some years, from a violent fever; we consider him of very weak intellect - he left several situations on account of his intellects.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say he did not know right from wrong? A. He has gone on in that sort of way I should say he is not competent to know right from wrong.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is he competent to write a receipt? A. Yes; writing is the only thing he does tolerably well.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18320216-229

735. JAMES CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 720 strawberry pottle-baskets, value 20s. , the goods of James Norris , the younger.

GEORGE WARE . I am watchman to James Norris , a market-gardener , at Isleworth . On the 21st of January, about two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner - he came to the door of the shed where these baskets were, and tried to lift the latch, but found it fast; he then went to a window, wrenched one of the shutters open, then wrenched two iron bars, which were across the window, and got in - I was concealed inside the place; he began to throw the baskets out - he threw sixty dozens out, and was shutting the window up that they should not be missed - I went round, and secured him; he must have opened the gate or climbed over to get to the premises.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-230

736. HENRY TAYLOR and JOHN OAKHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 2 tons of stones, value 24s. , the goods of William Newman .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to John Leach Painton , the principal clerk for the time being of the Commissioners of the turnpike roads in the neighbourhood of the metropolis, north of the river Thames .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

HENRY BUNCE . I am a labourer, and live at Fulham; I was in the employ of Mr. Sparks to draw materials on the roads. On Friday, the 9th of February, I was unloading a load of stones at Badcock's wharf, Chelsea - Taylor was in Sparks' (the contractor) service, and drove the horse - about a quarter-past six o'clock the last cart was loaded from the barge, with about two tons; Taylor drove it away.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had he driven much that day? A. Five loads - I did not notice whether his horses were tired.

WILLIAM NEWMAN. I am sub-surveyor of the Metropolitan-roads . Sparks contracted to repair the roads - I directed Taylor to take the stones to the Western-roads; it is a peculiar set of stone, called Itam; on Friday evening Lee gave me information, and on Saturday night I went to Godfrey-street, and saw part of a load of stones, very few were left, but I have no doubt of it being Itam; the prisoner had no business to take the stones there; it is one hundred yards out of his direction, and a private

road, which the commissioners have nothing to do with - I went on the Monday morning to the Brompton-road, and found two lots of the same sort of stone spread before Mr. Harrison's and another house; Taylor had no business to carry stone to that road; it is quite a bye-road - I directed Hughes to apprehend Oakham; he came to me and said he hoped I would forgive him - I said I would not for 500l.; John Leach Painton is principal clerk to the Commissioners.

Cross-examined. Q. Might not somebody have persuaded Taylor to shoot stones there? A. That is impossible for me to tell; he had only four hundred yards to come into our road.

SAMUEL HARRISON. I am a nurseryman, and live in Alexander-square, Brompton. On Thursday, the 8th of February, I saw the prisoners at my door; Oakham asked if I wanted to buy gravel; I said I wanted a few loads, very course, to form the foundation of a road in front of my house; they said they could sell me some; I agreed for four loads at 4s. a load; they said they got it from the bed of the river, as it fell over from the barges; they brought two loads next morning, which I thought was chiefly stone - I did not see it shot; four cart loads were deposited there, two on Friday, and on Saturday another, that was of a different description; I said it was not what I was in the habit of having, and I should have no more.

CHARLES GALLATLY . I am servant to Mr. Bonnet, of Onslow-cottage, Fulham. On the 9th of February, about five o'clock in the morning, I saw Oakham nearly opposite Mr. Harrison's, shooting a load of stone, and while I was talking to him, my master came by - I told master a load of it would do for the road in front of his house; he asked Oakham the price - he said five shillings, and master said"Bring me a load to-morrow," and on Saturday morning at seven o'clock, when I went to work, there were two loads shot, one for master and one for Harrison; Oakham came, and master paid him.

JOHN LEE . I live in Godfrey-street. On Friday night, the 10th of February, I heard a cart-load of stones shot -I threw up my window, and saw Taylor shooting a load of stones; I went down, and said, "Young man, what does this mean? you are shooting on private property;" he said' "I am late, and have to fetch my hay and corn; I will take it away in the morning;" on the following morning, about a quarter to seven o'clock, I saw Oakham filling the same stones into a cart - he said, "Halloo, Lee!" I said, "I don't know what you are up to."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know Taylor before? A. I have seen him several times - it was moon-light.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Did you know Oakham before? A. Yes - I did not notice the cart.

COURT. Q. How far is Godfrey-street from Badcock's wharf? A. About half a mile.

CHARLES HUGHES . I am a constable of Chelsea. The stones that fall from the barges are taken up by the men -I am employed to prevent it. On Friday evening, the 10th of February, I saw Taylor draw a load of stones from the wharf, and next morning I traced the wheel of a cart out of Jubilee-place, where it should be shot down, to Godfrey-street, and some stones remained there, which I would swear were the same as were being unloaded - the cart had no business in Godfrey-street - I traced the wheel out of Godfrey-street into the road again to the stable - I compared the stones in Godfrey-street with those in Alexander-square; they are peculiar from all other stones; I went to Oakham's lodgings, and told him I wanted him for stealing stones, which belonged to the trust; he said he had picked up two loads of shoreings, and sold them to Harrison, and shot two loads in Godfrey-street - I took him to Newman; he then said,"I hope you will look over it this time" - I took Taylor, and told him it was for the two loads of stone in Godfrey-street; he said, "D-n it, I meant to have taken them up again;" I said he had no business to shoot them there - he said he wanted to go home for his corn.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Two Months .

OAKHAM - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18320216-231

737. WILLIAM PUZEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 5 pieces of veneer, value 30s., the goods of Uriah Macey and another .

SAMUEL TOPLIS . I am a cabinet-maker, and have been a bankrupt - Uriah Macey and another are our assignee s; we had given the prisoner leave to use our saw-pit - he was sawing there with another man; we had a quantity of veneers in a room opposite the saw-pit; it was never locked. On the 31st of January I was standing in the kitchen, opposite the gateway, and saw him taking some veneers under his arm up the gateway - I ran after him, and caught him about one hundred yards from the premises, with five pieces of veneer.

Prisoner. I was employed by Smith, who told me to take them to his house - I told Mr. Toplis so; he said,"They don't belong to him" - Smith is now in prison. Witness. He gave this account when I stopped him; I went back to Smith, who said he had given him no such directions.

JOHN MOULD . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner in charge - he said he was employed by Smith; I apprehended Smith on the 11th of February, in the Borough, and he is now in custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it by Smith's order.

MR. TOPLIS. The veneers were in a room nearly opposite the saw-pit, but further down the yard; I did not see him come out of the room - he and Smith were working together in the pit.

GUILTY . Aged 44. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-232

738. JAMES PULLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 iron weight, value 18d. , the goods of John Newton .

JOHN NEWTON . I am a baker , and live in Philip-street, Kingsland-road . On the 14th of February, when I came home, about nine o'clock at night, I missed this weight from the flour-machine, at the back of the shop; I do not know the prisoner; I found it at Woolf's marine-store shop at Hoxton.

THOMAS BULLOCK . I am fourteen years old, and live in Philip-street. I was in Newton's shop about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoner come into the shop and run out again - I did not see him take any thing; there was a gas-light on the counter - I am

sure of him: I saw him in custody that night - Mrs. Newton missed the weight in a quarter of an hour.

DAVID SAWYER . I am a gardener. I saw the prisoner with the weight in Cross-street, about a stone's throw from the iron shop, and going towards it; I asked where he got it - he said he took it out of a shop.

SARAH WOOLF . My husband is a plate-worker - we live at No. 116. Hoxton-town, and deal in marine-stores; I bought this weight of a youth, for 6d - I cannot swear to him.

JAMES CLAY . I apprehended the prisoner at his father's; he escaped into another house, and I found him concealed under a bed.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18320216-233

739. THOMAS SPEAK was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Robert Cox , his master .

ROBERT COX . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Tothill-street, Westminster ; the prisoner assisted in my shop on Saturdays. On the 11th of February, about ten o'clock, Blackford came and bought a rasher of bacon, which came to 4d. - I was close by the parlour door; he put a shilling on the counter - the prisoner gave him two penny-pieces, and at the same time put his hand in the till, took out some silver, and put into Blackford's hand - Blackford went off with it, without stopping to see if it was right; my son stopped him, and we found two shillings, two sixpences, and two pence in his hand; I took it from him, and both were taken into custody - I am sure I saw the prisoner deliver that money into his hand.

Cross-examined by MR. STURGEON. Q. Where were you standing? A. Inside the parlour door; there is a glass partition - there are six or seven gas-lights in the shop; Blackford had lived with a cheesemonger in the neighbourhood - he only put a shilling on the counter, and the prisoner rang it; I was watching, having had information that Blackford had received money twice before - he and the prisoner both live near Spitalfields.

CHARLES COX . I am the prosecutor's son. I saw Blackford come in the afternoon, and buy a piece of cheese, which came to 1s. 6d. - he put down half a crown; I thought the change given was wrong, as I heard silver sound in his hand - he came again about ten o'clock, and bought some bacon; I watched, and he had the right change that time - he came again in a quarter of an hour; I was then in the parlour, and told my father my suspicion - he had a rasher of bacon; I saw him put down a shilling - the prisoner put down some copper: his hand was then in the till for some time - I saw him take something out, and put into Blackford's hand; I went out, caught hold of Blackford's hand, and my father opened it; there were two shillings, two sixpences, and two pence - he said he had given the prisoner half a crown; but at the watch-house he said he had two shillings in his hand when he came into the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him come in the third time? A. No; I am sure it was a shilling he gave the prisoner, and he could not have other money in his hand, for I saw it open - I am certain the money came out of my father's till.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I know the prisoner and Blackford were acquainted.

JOSEPH BROWN . I received the prisoner in charge with Blackford, who said he had two shillings in his hand, and afterwards said he had given the prisoner half a crown.

Prisoner's Defence. The man gave me half a crown -I did not know him before.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-234

First London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

740. ABRAHAM BAMBRIDGE was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM BROWNING . I live with Messrs. Jenkins and Son, Queen-street, Cheapside , brass-founders. The prisoner came to the shop, and produced this order for two rings of wire, signed T. Giles, who is a customer of ours; he said he came from Giles for two rings of wire; I never saw him before - I had my doubts about it, but called master down, and by his direction gave him the wire -(order read.)

GEORGE HANDS . I manage Messrs. Jenkins' business . The porter called me down, and produced this order; the wire was delivered to the prisoner - I never saw him before.

THOMAS GILES . This order was not written by me, nor by my authority.

JOHN MARSHALL . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on the 1st of February.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had met a man in Chiswell-street, who had given him 6d. to fetch the wire - he received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18320216-235

741. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

GEORGE WILLIAM ACTON . I keep an oil-shop in Farringdon-street . On the 2nd of February the prisoner came and asked for three brushes to do some work for Devey and Son, of Shoe-lane, who are customers of ours; and crediting what he said, I gave him three - I did not know him before.

WILLIAM DEVEY . I am in partnership with William Rogers Devey , brass-founder, Shoe-lane. I did not authorise the prisoner to get brushes on our account; he had been in our service, and was discharged at Guildhall on the 4th of August.

GUILTY .

742. WILLIAM HARRIS was again indicted for a like offence .

THOMAS KELSEY . I am servant to Mr. Butler . On the 4th of August the prisoner, who was quite a stranger, came and produced an order for six panes of glass, fifteen inches by thirteen, for Devey and Son; I let him have them, believing the order came from them - (order read.)

WILLIAM ROGERS DEVEY . This order was not written by me or my father.

WILLIAM DEVEY. It is not written by me, nor by my authority.

GUILTY . Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18320216-236

743. WILLIAM PITHOUSE was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

The particulars of this case are of too indelicate a nature for publication.

GUILTY. - Aged 18. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18320216-237

NEW COURT. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

744. JOHN AUSTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , I shoulder of mutton, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Matthews ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Confined Three Months .