Old Bailey Proceedings, 1st December 1831.
Reference Number: 18311201
Reference Number: f18311201-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR JOHN KEY , BART., MAYOR.

(SECOND MAYORALTY.) FIRST SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 1st DAY OF DECEMBER, 1831, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY GEORGE TITTERTON, No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1831.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON. AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable SIR JOHN KEY , BART., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Nicholas Conyngham Tyndal, Bart., Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Joseph Littledale, Knt, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Vanghan , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bernard Bosanquet, Knt., One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; John Ansley , Esq.; George Scholey, Esq.; John Atkins, Esq.; John Thomas Thorpe, Esq, and Robert Waithman, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; William Thomas Copeland, Esq.,; Thomas Kelly, Esq.; and Samuel Wilson , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law, Esq.; Common Sergeant of the said City, and William St. Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Edw. Couchman ,

Richard Harrison ,

John H. Israel ,

Edward Christie ,

John Bragg ,

Bernard Cracraft ,

Alexander Young ,

George Gordon ,

Samuel Smith ,

T. Wood Wilson ,

William Langhorn ,

Charles Furlong .

Second

George Beanmont ,

Henry Wix ,

William Crook ,

Theodore C. Bute ,

Robert Finch ,

N. T. Isherwood ,

John Sims ,

Henry Pryor ,

Edward Lamb ,

Richard Williams ,

Joseph Turner ,

John Brooks .

Third

John S. Clark ,

John Bental ,

Edward Clark ,

W. Roger Devey ,

Charles Throstle ,

Robert Milne ,

William Bailey ,

Joseph Mollineux ,

John Bishop ,

John Page ,

Joseph Routledge ,

Samuel Dalton .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Jas. H. Hummil ,

George Hurley ,

William Huffel ,

William Hooton ,

William Hull ,

Nicholas Hoskins ,

John N. Hemson,

Samuel Hoadley ,

Richard Hatfield .

John Hunter ,

Edward Hall ,

James Hoskin .

Second

Wm. Houghton ,

James Hedges ,

Richard Higham ,

John Hook ,

John Holland ,

George Hudson ,

Thomas Hall ,

Charles Hasque ,

Wm. Hodgkinson,

Edw. Hatchard ,

Morrie Hollis ,

T. R. Harrison .

Third

John Hughes ,

Charles Hall ,

Henry Hadgrass ,

Hanford Heath ,

Francis Hind .

Jacob Herring ,

William Harris ,

William Hancock ,

James Hoyle ,

Thomas James ,

Richard Jones ,

Henry Holmes .

Fourth

Edward Ham ,

Richard Harmon ,

James Halford ,

William Howard ,

Samuel Harbone ,

Joseph Haygett ,

Edward Hodges ,

George Hammond ,

Thomas Hodson ,

Jesse Hawkes ,

George Howton ,

Joshua Higgs .

Fifth

Thomas Howe ,

John Hulett ,

William Holding ,

Matthias Hooper ,

Joseph Hatwell ,

John Harrison ,

William Hart ,

John Hind ,

Henry Hatchman ,

Henry Howell ,

William Hunter ,

Richard Hughes .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 1, 1831.

KEY, MAYOR. - FIRST SESSION.

CAPITAL CONVICTIONS.

Reference Number: t18311201-1

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1. WILLIAM FEAR PARROTT was indicted for that he, on the 5th of October , at the Middle Temple, upon Harriet Ann Parrott , feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did strike, cut and would her upon the left side of her throat, with intent feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder her ; against the Statute.

2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable her.

3rd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do her some grievous bodily barm.

ANN CHELL . I live at No. 1, Middle Temple-lane - I have known the prisoner and his wife about six years; I was out of town, and do not know when they separated. On the 5th of October, about eight o'clock at night, the prisoner called on me - he appeared sober; he said he called, expecting a letter, or message; from his wife - I told him I had received no letter, nor message; his wife was at that time working at Mrs. Nightingale's, Fetter-lane- he asked if I would go and fetch her; I said I would not, but at last my niece went to see if she was there - she at last came to my room; that was between half-past eight and nine o'clock - the prisoner was still in the room; when she first came in he got up and caught hold of her by the hand, as if in friendship - he then pushed her into the corner, and asked her to live with him again; she replied, "Keep off, I cannot live with you any more; "I then got up, and said, "Parrott, leave her alone;" I took her into an adjoining room, and said, "Mrs. Parrott, you have weathered many storms with him, try him once more" - she said she could not, for she was in danger of her life; he was in my kitchen at the time, but could hear what passed, for he pushed into the room immediately, and I then took her into the bed-room - he followed us into that room, and asked her if she would return to him again; she told him No, she could not live with him any more - he said, "Won't you?" she said No, she could not; he pushed her into a corner, and then turned himself round quick - I turned round but for a moment; he did not speak, then he turned round, and I saw him put his hand into his pocket, pull out a piece of paper, and he directly seized her by the throat; she called out, "Oh, my throat! my throat!" I called to my husband, "Chell, for goodness sake come here, for he is choking her;" I did not suppose he was doing any thing more than throttling her - my husband came immediately; I then saw her throat was bleeding to an extreme - she said, "The instrument is in my throat;" he said, "No, it is not," and then he threw a razor away - it caught on my drawers, and broke the glass; I directly sent for an officer - I afterwards saw the officer take the razor up, and it was bloody; his wife bled so profusely, that my husband went without coat or hat on for Mr. Bradford, the surgeon - he arrived in about ten minutes; the bleeding had not stopped - my husband did all he could to stanch the blood.

Q. What did the prisoner do? A. I was supporting his wife on a chair, and he came and said, "Good bye, perhaps we shall meet again in another world;" he was then secured - I kept his wife at my house all night, and sat up with her all night, fearing it would hurt her to remove her; she was taken to the hospital next morning, and was there three weeks - the wound was very large; it went upwards, which prevented its cutting the arteries.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have you known them often quarrel, and be reconeiled again? A. I must leave that to the wife to say; she never left him before, to my knowledge, except to sleep at a friend's house for a night; I have known them quarrel - they never separated; I cannot say whether he had a strong affection for her - he expressed a strong affection that night, and entreated her to come back; he never would work for her, nor his family - he said, "My dear Harriet, for God's sake let us be reconciled;" I never saw any thing to lead me to conclude he was flighty in his mind - his wife has said his tricks were mad at times when he was tipsy, but he was quite sober then.

Q.His wife said his tricks were mad at times? A. No, not on that night, nor any thing like it; she has repeatedly said that he had mad tricks, and was tipsy - she never told me he had met with an accident in the head; I know nothing of his having a blow from a cricket-ball- he has had five children by his wife; the eldest is twenty-two, and the youngest nine years old.

Q. Did not the prisoner call out, at the instant he cut her throat, "Oh, God! what have I done?" A. No, he did not; he did not support her in his arms - he did not touch her till my husband got her out of the bed-

room into the kitchen; he then sat down opposite me, took up the beer, and drank the officer's good health - when the doctor came he knelt down on the hearth, and looked at the wound while the doctor was sewing her throat; we would not let him go out - it did not strike me that there was any thing extraordinary in his conduct.

HARRIET ANN PARROTT . The prisoner is my husband - he had not lived with me from the Tuesday five weeks before this happened; I was at work at Mrs. Nightingale's, and slept over the water - I did not then know where he lived. I went to Mrs. Chell's on the 5th of October, as she sent over for me - I got there between eight and pine o'clock, and saw my husband there; when I opened the room door he came to me in a hurry - I told him to keep off; he came to me - I said, "Keep off! keep off! let me alone!" Mrs. Chell asked me to go into the next room, and I told him to keep away and let me alone; Mrs. Chell then asked me to try him again, and live with him - I said I could not, and then he came into the room; I do not think he could hear what was said - he asked me to live with him again; I said I could not - he asked me again, and said, "Won't you?" I said No; he said again, "Won't you?" I said No - he turned sideways to me, took something out of his pocket like a letter, and tore it, then turned round, and took me by one side of the neck and pressed it, but what with I could not fell; I said afterwards, "Oh! you have left the instrument in my throat;" he said, "No, I have not - there it is," and threw something across; I perceived blood coming from my throat - there was a looking-glass opposite, and I could see it streaming down; I just recollect Mrs. Chell coming to me, and remember getting across the room into the kitchen, and sitting down there, and that is all: I just recollect my husband saying, "We shall meet in another world;" I was insensible when the surgeon came - I came to myself afterwards; I passed the night at Chells, then went to the hospital, and was there three weeks and one day; I had been married to the prisoner twenty-three years - I have three children with me now; the youngest is between nine and ten years old - I do not know how my husband got his living after I left him; I am quite sure I said nothing to him, but refused to live with him again; I did not reproach him, or strike him.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you had some quarrels? A. Yes, and had been reconciled again; Mrs. Nightingale had talked to him the day after I left him, but not particularly to reconcile us - she had not endeavoured to persuade me to return to him; I have seen my husband in rather a flighty and deranged state of mind when he has had a little to drink.

Q. Have you not seen him at times a little flighty without drink? A. No, not particularly - drink would make him flighty latterly; his actions were like a mad man sometimes - he was struck by a cricket-ball on Kenningnton-common six or seven years ago, and received an injury on the temple; he did attempt to destroy himself the day after I left him, which was five weeks before - I do not know of his having attempted it before at any time.

Q.Do you know whethere he has a mark on his neck of his having attempted to cut his throat? A. I have heard he attempted it; he was sober when I came to Chell's - it was all done in the space of five minutes.

Q. Did you not think he was in the state you had seen him before, crazy and heated? A. He did not appear so bad then - he was all of a work seemingly; I was not in the first room half a minute, and hardly know what condition he was in there - I was so flurried at seeing him, I hardly know; I think he said, "My dear Harriet, for God's sake let us make peace;" he appeared anxious to be reconciled - I do not know what happened to me after my throat was cut, and do not know what he said at the instant; I do not recollect his saying, "O, God! what have I done?" I know Richard Lance .

Q. Have you not lately said to him that you were sorry to appear against your husband - that he was certainly deranged at times? A. I said his actions were such at times - I was not separated more than once from him; my five children are all living - my eldest daughter is a dressmaker, and pretty well provided for.

RICHARD BRADFORD . I am a surgeon, and live in Fleet-street. I was sent for to Mrs. Chell's about nine o'clock in the evening; Mrs. Parrott was sitting in a chair- there was a puddle of blood, in the room, and a great deal over her clothes; Mr. Chell's hand was over her neck, and when it was with drawn the blood flowed freely - I said at first that she was dead, for she was cold and blanched, and her sight apparently gone, but Chell said she was not dead; it was a large wound, four or five inches long, of a semicircular shape - it had gone obliquely upwards; the large vessels were laid bare for an inch and a half - the jugular vein had a slight scratch; if the wound had not gone upwards it must have caused instant death; I secured the vessels, laid her down, and sewed the wound up- I went with her to the hospital: I thought the wound dangerous, and ordered her to lay on the floor all night, and not to be moved - I saw the prisoner in the room; my mind was engaged with the wound, but I heard him say, "I committed it;" when the wound was dressed he approached towards her, and used some expressions, but I thrust him back.

Cross-examined. Q.You do not recollect the expression? A. I do not, but I was afraid he would disturb the wound again by the excitement; he was in one corner of the room when I entered, and Mr. Chell was holding the wound; I found the room door open - I should think the prisoner might easily have gone before I came.

MR. BARRY to MRS. PARROTT. Q.Before you went into the second room you yourself said you would not live with him? A. I said I could not live with him - I did not say to Mrs. Chell, "You see he is mad in a moment;" I said, "See how he turns in a moment."

RICHARD LIGHTFOOT . I am an officer. Jenkins, the porter of the inn, fetched me to the room - he pointed to the prisoner, and said, "That is your prisoner;" the prisoner was on one knee, apparently looking at the wound; he looked at me, and said, "I will not go away;" I said I was not afraid that he would - I knew him very well: I requested him to sit down on a chair close by, till Mr. Jenkins came in - I then requested him to take care of him, and I looked about for the razor; I found it on the drawers - it was bloody; there was a glass broken - the wound was bleeding, and Mr. Bradford was endeavouring to stop it; he said he had the razor from his employer, Mr. Sidney, No. 5, Child's-place, that he had borrowed it to shave himself; I knew he was

living with Mr. Sidney, who is a Sheriff's officer, as a follower.

Prisoner. Q. I believe you have seen Mr. Sidney since? A. I have made application to him; he said he had lent him a razor that day I believe - the prisoner told me he had sharpened the razor, and shaved himself with it- Sidney owned the razor.

Prisoner's Defence. I borrowed the razor of Sidney that evening, between six and seven o'clock, as I was usually in the habit of doing; I had only lived with him a fortnight or three weeks - I went up to the laundress, and shaved myself; I went from there to Mr. Chell's - Mr. Chell said they could do nothing with my wife to bring her to a reconciliation, and advised me to pay no attention to her, but let her take her own course, she was so obstinate - she left me a fortnight before, and I was so distressed in my mind, I was six days in St. Bartholomew's hospital, through the affliction of my wound.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

(Dec. 4.) GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 44.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his former apparent aberration; the Prosecutrix joined in this recommendation.

Reference Number: t18311201-2

2. THOMAS HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , at St. Sepulchre, 1 gelding, price 4l. , the property of James Harwood .

JAMES HARWOOD . I am a wheelwright , and live at Woodford-bridge, in Essex. My gelding grazed on the forest, not in an enclosed field - I saw it safe on the 20th of October, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and missed it about half-past five that evening; I did not know the prisoner - I found him the next day, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, in Smithfield-market, with my gelding; he had got it in a halter - I asked how he got it; he said he was selling it for a man named Williams, but gave no further description of him; no Williams came forward to claim it; I took him into the public-house, and gave charge of him - he said nothing more than that he was selling it for Williams; I am quite sure it is mine - I have had it four or five years.

JOHN GOULD . I keep the White Horse public-house, at Woodford-bridge. I went with Harwood to Smithfield, and saw the prisoner there with the gelding in his possession - he said he was selling it for Williams; nobody came to claim it - Harwood took him into custody: I knew the gelding to be his.

JOHN VINN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge; I asked him where he got the pony - he said a man named Williams had hired him to sell it for him; I asked him where Williams lived - he said he did not know- that he was an entire stranger to him, but he had slept with him the night previous at a public-house in Kent-street; I asked him what Williams was - he said a hawker, and that he himself was also one, but he had had nothing to do for the last three months; I asked where Williams was to be found - he said he did not know, but he expected to meet him at Liverpool, to give him the money, and that he was gone there to ship some goods; on searching him I found a toll-ticket of the Bermondsey gate, dated the 21st of October.

Prisoner. Williams is a man I know very well, and I have worked with him many times. Witness. I am quite positive he said he only knew him by sleeping with him the night before.

Prisoner's Defence. I slept with Williams at the Royal Oak, Kent-street - he said he had a horse for sale, and knowing me to be out of employ he asked me to go to Smithfield, and sell it for him; he told me to lay out the money in goods, come to Liverpool, and meet him where the mail-coach starts for London.

(Dec. 7.) GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recemmended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Reference Number: t18311201-3

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

3. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , at St. George, Hanover-square, I clock, value 6l., and 1 china ornament, value 12s., the goods of the Right Honorable John Singleton Lord Lyndhurst, Baron Lyndhurst , of Lyndhurst, in the County of Southampton, in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the goods of Lord Lyndhurst, in his dwelling-house.

MARY BERRY . I was housemaid to Lord Lyndhurst in November last, at his house in George-street, Hanover-square - I have been backwards and forwards in the family for twelve years. This clock was kept on the mantelpiece in his Lordship's library - I did not miss it till his Lordship asked me about it; I had dusted it daily - his Lordship had been in Paris, and his family were at Hyde Park-terrace; I was in charge of the house - there was no other servant there; I cannot say when I last saw the clock.

JOSEPH TUCKER . I live in Cumberland-street, and am a boot and shoemaker - I have known the prisoner about nine weeks. On Sunday morning, the 6th of November, I saw him at his lodgings at the Masons' Arms, at the corner of Titchfield-street, between ten and eleven o'clock - George Piercy was with me; I took him there to look at a time-piece, as the prisoner had asked me if I was in want of such a thing - I said No, but I thought I knew a friend who did, and I took Piercy to look at it at the Masons' Arms; Piercy said he could not afford to buy it, and we parted - the prisoner owed me 11s. for a pair of shoes; he told me if I could sell the time-piece I should have my money, and asked me to try and find somebody or to buy it; I went on the Sunday evening, and asked if he objected to let me have the time-piece in my possession; he said none whatever - he went to the landlady at the bar, and asked if she had any objection to let me have it; she said she would ask her husband; she at last let me have it; I left a half-sovereign as security with her, that I should bring it back if I did not find a purchaser: I took it home to my own house, took it to several persons, and sold it on the following Wednesday to Mr. Baldock, in Hanway-yard, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning; the prisoner and a man named Smith went with me - they waited in Tottenham-court-road, and I went into the shop alone; Baldock was not at home - I saw his shopman, who knew me well; he desired me to call again, and to leave the clock - I told the prisoner this, and called between one and two o'clock; the prisoner went with me, but not Smith- the prisoner did not go into the shop, he waited in a

public-house in Hanway-yard; I saw Mr. Baldock, and offered it for sale to him - I came out, and asked the prisoner if he was agreeable to take 2l. for the clock, that was including my 11s.; he said Yes: I went back to Mr. Baldock, and sold it to him for 50s.

Q. How came you to ask the prisoner to take 2l.? A. Because I had had so much trouble about it; I received 50s. for it, and went to the prisoner - I deducted 10s. for myself, 10s. I left as security, and 11s. for the shoes - and paid him 19s.

JURY. Q. Why did you go to the prisoner's lodging on the Sunday morning - had you seen him before that? A. Yes, on the Saturday night I took the shoes home to him, and he asked me to come the next morning, and look at the clock; I asked him how he got it, and he said he took it for a bad debt.

THOMAS THOMAS . I keep the Massons' Arms. The prisoner came to lodge at my house about ten weeks ago; he brought a clock to my house on Sunday, the 30th of October - he asked me if he might leave it there, and said it was an old family affair, and he wished to sell it - it remained with me till the Sunday following, the 6th of November, when he brought Tucker and a friend to look at it; about seven o'clock in the evening the prisoner and Tucker fetched it away in a basket - I saw no more of it; I should know it again: he left a china ornament with me when he fetched the clock away - he brought it with him the evening he fetched the clock; I gave it to the officer on the Thursday evening.

Prisoner. It was in your possession a fortnight. Witness. It was from one Sunday to another.

SOPHIA WEBB . My husband is a plumber and painter, and lives in Castle-street, East. I knew the prisoner as my husband's shopmate - he is also a plumber and glazier- he called on us on Friday, the 28th of October, with the time-piece, and asked if my husband was at home; I said No; he said he had something to show him, if I would let him leave it - he produced this time-piece, and left it: and the same evening he brought an ornament - he left it there till Sunday morning, the 30th, when he took the time-piece away, about ten o'clock, and the next Sunday he took the ornament away.

WILLIAM OAKES . I am servant to Mr. Baldock. On Wednesday, the 9th of November, Tucker brought this time-piece to my master's, to be looked at; I desired him to leave it till Mr. Baldock returned, which he did - he was paid 50s. for it; this is it - it is a French clock, and worth about 6l. or 7l. - the ornament is English manufacture; I have known Tucker many years, and had a good opinion of him - when he brought it he said he thought it could be got for 50s.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I received this ornament at the Masons' Arms, from Thomas, on Thursday, the 17th of November, and have had it ever since; the time-piece was delivered to me by Oakes on the Tuesday following.

EDWARD HOLMES BALDOCK . I live in Hanway-yard, and am a dealer in French goods. This clock was offered to me for sale; the value of it, in the state it was produced to me, was 2l. 10s. or 3l.; I do not understand the movement of a clock - my foreman is very imperfectly acquainted with the value; I should not know the value of a movement if I looked at it - it has not been examined since; the regular market price which it would fetch from a person who is not a judge of movements, in 2l. 10s. - it is certainly not worth more than 3l.; the ornament is worth 10s.

MARY BERRY . I am certain this is the same clock and ornament - the clock was in the library, and the ornament in the dressing-room on the ground floor - I never saw the prisoner about the premises; I did not miss the clock till his Lordship asked about it, when he came back, on the Wednesday - his Lordship was moving at the time; I was backwards and forwards, and did not miss it - all the doors were open while the goods were being moved.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-4

4. JOHN JONES was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , at St. Marylebone, 4 gowns, value 2l.; 3 shawls, value 2l.; 14 handkerchiefs, value 17s.; 1 veil, value 10s.; 1 pair of stays, value 10s.; 1 brooch, value 5s.; 4 caps, value 5s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 3s. and 4 yards of ribbon, value 1s., the goods of Phoebe Mullings ; and 1 basket, value 2s., the goods of John Wilson , in the dwelling-house of Caroline Susannah Browne .

PHOEBE MULLINGS . I live with Mrs. Caroline Browne , of No. 2, Portland-place ; the house was under repair on the 17th of October, and about two o'clock, I heard the area bell ring - I opened the area door, and let the prisoner in; he said nothing, but I supposed him to be one of the workmen, as he rang the bell - I went into the servants hall, and told the butler he was a stranger; I remained in the hall - the butler went to him; there is a back staircase to the house - I went up stairs to my bedroom about three o'clock; I found my drawers all open - they had not been locked; I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which cost me more than 11l.; they were very good, but they had been worn, and were worth 6l. or 7l.; there were several other articles taken, a silk gown of my fellow-servant's, Mary Beecham, and a basket belonging to Wilson - the house is in the parish of St. Marylebone; I had seen my things in the drawer that morning- I do not know whether Mrs. Browne has any other Christian name; I am sure the prisoner is the man I let into the house.

JOHN WILSON . I was employed to work at Mrs. Browne's, as a painter ; I do not know her Christian name. On the 17th of October I had this basket in the house - I was painting the outside of the house, and left my basket at the bottom of the house, just by the passage door of the area; it was inside the house; I did not see the prisoner that day - the basket contained my tools, which I found under the table afterwards: I was leaving work at half-past five o'clock, and then missed the basket.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I have been in the habit of going backwards and forwards to Mrs. Browne's - her name is Caroline Susannah; in consequence of information which I received, I went to No. 4, Gray-street, where Mary James lodges, and found the basket in the front attic; I afterwards showed the basket to the prisoner - he said it was his, and that he had left it at James', and that he did not wish to get James into any trouble.

WILLIAM WHEADON . I was at work at Mrs. Browne's house on the 17th of November, as a carpenter, and as

near two o'clock as possible; I was outside, repairing the attic window, and could see into the attic - I saw a person come in, and come towards the drawers: I believe the prisoner to be that person - I have not a doubt of him; immediately that he saw me he walked back to the door, and went out; he did not take any thing with him - I remained there for nearly an hour, but saw no more of him; when I had finished outside the house I went inside, and met the servant, who said the house was robbed - I had not seen the prisoner come into the room, but saw him walking towards the drawers, which are between the two windows, one of which I was repairing; I was examining the sash - this was the front attic - the things were not taken from there; I could not see into the servants' room.

PHOEBE MULLINGS. The window of my room looks into Dutchess-street, but the one Wheadon was repairing looks into Portland-place; they are on the same floor - I let the prisoner in about two o'clock, and missed the things about three; I had seen them all safe in the morning.

MARY JAMES . I know nothing of this basket, and was not at home when it was brought; the prisoner was not acquainted with me.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . This witness stated that she took the basket in herself.

MARY JAMES . I was not at home when it was brought- I never said I took it in myself; I know nothing about the prisoner, and was not acquainted with him - I was taken up because the basket was left at my place; I found it there when I came home - I did not direct any body to go to Jones.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the basket, to my knowledge, nor the property; I never entered the house- the basket I owned to is now underneath the table.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am sure this is the basket I showed him: I have another in my possession, which was taken from Lord Lyndhurst's.

MRS. WEBB. It was a basket like this that he brought the clock to our house in, and he took it from our place to James': I believe this to be the same.

Prisoner. Q. How do you know I took it to James? A. My husband went with you, and you told me you were going to Gray-street.

(Dec. 1.) GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18311201-5

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

5. SAMUEL CONNIX was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , at St. George, Hanover-square, 6 spoons, value 3l., and 6 forks, value 3l., the goods of the Honourable George Poulett , in his dwelling-house .

THE HON. GEORGE POULETT. I am a captain in his Majesty's navy, and live at No. 40, Hertford-street, Mayfair, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square - the prisoner was in my service on the 5th of November as valet , and had been so about two years; he had the care of my plate, which is kept in the pantry, in front of my house. I missed nothing on the 5th of November, till I received information of his apprehension, and then missed six table-spoons and six forks, which were all that were out at that time - he had access to the others, but they were locked up; he had no authority to dispose of the plate, nor to take it out of the house - when information was given there were no spoons or forks left, but what were locked up - the pantry was examined the morning after I heard of my loss.

CHARLES HENRY WATERS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Gofton, a pawnbroker, in Gilbert-street, Oxford-street. -On Saturday, the 5th of November, I was in my master's shop, and saw the prisoner there, offering to pledge some table-spoons - I did not hear what he said at first; Mr. Gofton had the spoons in his hand - I heard him say he wanted to raise the money, and if he would lend him 3l. on them he would redeem them again in March; Mr. Gofton asked if they belonged to him; he said Yes, and that he had other plate at home, a small waiter and silver tea-pot - he was asked where his home was; he said in Mount-row, and mentioned a number, which I do not recollect - Mr. Gofton told me to get my hat and go with him; I then asked him if the plate was at Mount-row - he said it was not, but that a friend of his had had it at Lady Elizabeth Talbot's, No. 40, Hertford-street; I went part of the way up the street with him he then said he saw no reason why he should go with me, and he would not go - I had one spoon with me, and the rest were left at Gofton's; I then said, "We will go back to Mr. Gofton's;" he went back with me as far as the door- Mr. Gofton, seeing us coming back, asked one of the young men in the shop to fetch his hat - he went for it himself, as the young man did not bring it directly; the prisoner then walked up the street, and I by his side- be walked quietly till we got to South Moulton-street; he then said he should go down South Moulton-street; I collared him, and said he should not go - he knocked my arm from him and ran away; I ran after him, and called Stop thief! he then stopped in the middle of the road, turned round, and saw Gofton coming after us - he then walked quietly along to the station-house, and we gave him in charge; I heard him say in the shop that he was out of a situation, in very great distress, and wanted money very bad; this was just after I had got my hat in the shop, and was going to start with him - I produce the six table-spoons, which I have had ever since; I took one with me to the station-house - the other five were left at Gofton's, but when I came from the station-house they laid on the back counter, where I had left them; the six spoons would be worth about 3l.

WILLIAM GOFTON . I am a pawnbroker. On the 5th of November the prisoner came to my shop, and gave me six spoons to pledge - he said they were his own property, that he had been to sea, and mentioned the name of a captain, who, he said, had given him the spoons with other plate - he said that was three years ago, and from the apparent freshness of the spoons I suspected that could not be the case, as they were not tarnished, and I asked where he lived - he said in Mountrow; I said if I went to Mount-row with him could the person there give any satisfaction that the property was his own - he said they could not, but if I went to Hertford-street, May-fair, I might see various articles of plate that were his own; I sent Waters with him - I followed him to the station-house after they came back; I saw him searched, and six table-forks found on him - the forks are worth about 4l.; the weight of silver in the spoons is worth 3l. - they may be worth 4l.; I weighed them - I have not weighed the forks, but suppose them

at out the same value, or perhaps a few shillings more -I have not a doubt of the intrinsic value of them all being 6l.

ALEXANDER BROWN . I am a Policeman. I was at the station-house on the 5th of November, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon - Mr. Gofton and his man came in with the prisoner; I searched him, and he himself handed to the clerk these six forks - I found on him 4s. 6d. in silver and 5 1/2d, in copper; as Mr. Gofton said he had varied in his account, I told him not to give us trouble, but to tell us at once where he got them from; I did not either threaten or make him any promise - he said if we would go to No. 40, Hertford-street, May-fair, we should hear of them; that he took them from his master Captain Poulett; that he wanted to try the value of them.

HONORABLE CAPTAIN POULETT. These spoons and forks are all mine - there were but six of each in use.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) After the evidence adduced against me I beg your attention for a very short time, before proceeding to judge my case, while I state that I am a native of Nova Scotin, and having had an early propensity for a seafaring life I entered his Majesty's service, about twelve years ago, and continued to give every satisfaction to my various commanders untill the period I entered the service of Captain Poulett, of his Majesty's ship the Prince Regent, to whom I was recommended by Captain Southerby, of the Seringapatam. I have lived in the service of Captain Poulett upwards of three years, during which time it has been my only wish to serve him honestly and faithfully, in return for the confidence which he invariably reposed in me, and continued in his service until the fatal morning, when I am afraid that I for ever blasted my prospects in this life, and it renders me at the present time truly unhappy in my mind. Upon the forenoon of the day in question a young man, a former acquaintance, called upon me, and as he was going into the country I, much against my inclination, and totally at variance with the rules of sobriety, that I ever have practised, accompanied him to an adjoining public-house, where he called for some rum, and not being accustomed to drink spirits of any kind I was, from the effects of it, rendered quite insensible. When I returned home I had been cleaning some silver plate, and most unaccountably put some of the articles into my pocket; but from what motive I, after mature and deep reflection, cannot state. I could not have done the action from any dishonest motive, as I had a sufficiency of money in my possession, and my master, Captain Poulett, had also a sum of money of mine in his possession as wages, so that it could not proceed from want. I humble pray the leniency of the Court - I feel deeply impressed with a sense of shame for the act I have committed, which I never could have done in my sober moments, and more so, as my character, both as to honesty, attention to my master's interest in every respect, and sobriety, was formerly unimpeachable.

CAPTAIN POULETT. He lived with me three years - I really thought him one of the best servants I had, both on land and sea, and perfectly honest; he had every thing belonging to me in his charge, and I could leave my house with the greatest satisfaction; I never knew him drunk, water was his beverage - he was always ready to do his duty; I certainly feel much concerned to be his prosecutor, but the knowledge of the circumstance coming to me I could not do otherwise than I have - I think, if it had not been for the impulse of the moment, I should have been disposed to look it over; there were wages due to him, and I had given him money that day to pay bills, which he did pay - Lady Elizabeth Talbot rented my house before I came there.

MR. GOFTON. I did not know him before; I did not observe that he was tipsy.

CHARLES HENRY WATERS. I did not observe any appearance of his being intoxicated.

ALEXANDER BROWN . When he came to the station-house I thought him rather stupid, but I attributed it to his present situation.

(Dec. 1) GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Strongly recommended to Mercy on account of his character.

Reference Number: t18311201-6

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

6. WILLIAM BAILEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Andrew Beaton , on the 18th of November , at Edmonton, and stealing therein I till, value 6d.; 60 pennies, and 34 halfpennies , his property.

ANDREW BEATON . I live in the parish of Edmonton , and occupy the house; the shop communicates with the dwelling-house. On the 17th of November, about ten o'clock, I went to bed; I had secured my house and shop myself; the shop door is the street door - it was locked and bolted; the window shutters were secured with an iron bar: about three o'clock next morning I was awoke by a knocking at the door - I jumped out of bed, and opened the bed-room window; somebody said, "Make haste, and come down, for here are thieves, and we have got one:" it was not day-light - I went down to the stair-foot door, and saw the pannel of the street door was out; there was a man laying on his face on the outside, with his shoes off, and another person across his back, holding him down; I asked who it was; the person on him said, "My name is Biddle' - I asked if he knew who the prisoner was; he said, No, and the prisoner said, "You will soon know who it is" - I begged Biddle to keep him in that situation till I put on my clothes - he did so; the street door had been unlocked, and the bottom bolt lifted up - I had left the key inside the door; the top bolt was not down, therefore the door could not have been opened; the pannel was large enough for him to get through - two chisels were left on the premises; I found part of a partition in the shop between two doors was taken down, by which means a person could get into the shop, and take the till out of its place to the opposite side of the shop, and put it into the window, close to where the person entered - it was two or three yards from its place; there was 7s. 5d. in pence and halfpence, which I had left there on the previous night- about sixty pence and thirty-four halfpence and they were in the till in the morning: I took the prisoner to an officer - when I got a light I knew him - he had been employed by me, and should have been at work for me that very day - he had been binding hay for me with his father that week; his brother and father have been in my employ some years at different times, and he has been occasionally employed by me about two years.

HENRY BIDDLE . On the morning of the 18th of November, about three o'clock, I was near Beaton's house with Cline; we saw two men standing at the corner of Mr. Beaton's house - when they saw us they immediately went away; I then saw a light through Beaton's shop door, and on going up to it I found the pannel of the door was out - on looking through the hole in the door I saw a man stand

ing in the shop - werang the bell, and desired Beaton to come down, as there were thieves in the house; the prisoner then attempted to make his escape through the opening of the door - when he was about three parts through the opening I fell upon him, and held him down till Mr. Beaton arrived; we then took him to Camp, the officer - he was not one of the two I had seen at the corner.

JOHN CLINE . I was with Biddle about three o'clock in the morning, and saw two men; we went towards the shop, and saw a light - I went up to the door, and the pannel was cut completely out; Biddle and I looked in, and saw a man standing in the shop - Biddle said, "Ring the bell;" I rang, and knocked at the door with my stick, and at last the prisoner came half way out - Biddle kept him down; Beaton came down, and we took the prisoner to Camp.

JOHN CAMP . I am a constable of Edmonton. I was called up, and received the prisoner from the witnesses; I took him to the watch-house, searched him, and found some matches, two short pipes, a knife, and string in his pocket- I knew him before.

MR. BEATON. I have the chisels; I found the large one in the shop, and the small one outside, with a pair of shoes, by the cart shed; neither of them belong to me: the shop is part of the dwelling-house.

(Dec. 1.) GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

Reference Number: t18311201-7

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

7. DENNISTON ANGUS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Hutton , on the 15th of November , at St. Margaret, Westminster, and stealing therein 2 blankets, value 5s.; 2 sheets, value 3s.; 2 pillows, value 3s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 1s.; 1 pair of stays, value 2s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 jacket, value 18d.; 1 cap, value 1s., and 1 counterpane, value 3s. , her property.

MARY ANN HUTTON . I live in Castle-place, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster . On the 15th of November, about half past eleven o'clock, I left my house - I was the last person there, and locked the door; I returned about a quarter-past twelve, and found the door as I had left it, but before I entered I observed the ground floor window open - I had left it fastened with a little button inside; I am sure it was fastened - it could be opened by putting a knife through the casement; it consists of one large pane, sufficient to admit the body of a man: when I entered my room, which is on the ground floor, I missed from my bed, two blankets, two sheets, a counterpane, two pillows and cases, a pair of stays, an apron, a cap and a night-jacket; I take in washing, and am single - I locked my door, and fetched a constable, who took me to the watch-house, where I found the prisoner; he took me to the prisoner's house, No. 33. Gardener's-lane, and there we found the whole of the property - this was an hour or an hour and a half after it happened; the counterpane and one sheet were under the bed - the other sheet, two pillows and two blankets on the bed, and the prisoner's wife had got my night-jacket on; the property is worth 1l.; I have seen the prisoner come to and fro to a house in Queen-street, but only knew him by sight.

JOHN HYNDS . I am a Policeman. Mrs. Hutton came to me on the night in question; before that I had seen the prisoner at the corner of York-street, about two hundred yards from her house - he had a bundle of things, which he carried loose in his arms; he was going in a direction from Tothill-street; I soon afterwards saw Mrs. Hutton, and from what she said I gave information to a constable, and saw the prisoner in custody in about an hour or an hour and a half - I went to his house in Gardener's-lane, York-street, and found under the bed a sheet and counterpane, and on the bed two blankets, a sheet, and two pillows and cases - on the prisoner's wife I found a night jacket, a pair of stays, and an apron; she was in bed - Mrs. Hutton claimed them; the prisoner's wife said, in his presence, that she did not know how the things came there, but that they were there; the bundle I saw him with appeared to be things of this description - he dropped something in York-street, and stopped to take it up.

MRS. HUTTON. I know all these to be my property.

Prisoner. I was drunk at the time.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18311201-8

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

8. WILLIAM WEEDON and MARIA DOWLING were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Lawrence , on the 17th of November , at Hillingdon, and stealing from his person, and against his will, 1 canvas purse, value 2d.; 4 half-crowns, 10 shillings, and 10 sixpences ; and that, at the delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, on Thursday, the 16th of February, in the 7th year of his late Majesty's reign, the said William Weedon was convicted of felony.

JAMES LAWRENCE . I live at King's-end, near Ryeslip, and am a labourer . On Thursday, the 17th of November, I was at Uxbridge; it was market day - I saw Dowling at the Sun there, kept by Mr. Cherry, and in the evening, a little before six o'clock, I went with her to Mrs. Langdon's house, in Bell-yard, Uxbridge, for a certain purpose - I did not stay above five minutes there, and gave her a shilling; I had about 26s. in silver, in a purse in my watch pocket; I did not pull out my purse, as I had a shilling loose in my breeches pocket - I was sober; I had had a little beer, but was sensible; I am quite sure I had the money about me when I left the house, for before I left the room I felt for it, and not recollecting that I had shifted it from my breeches pocket to my fob, I accused her of having it, but found it in my fob, and she blamed me for accusing her falsely, and said, "If you don't stand half a pint of gin I will punch your head;" I said, "I have accused you wrong, and will stand a drop of gin;" we went down to the Sun, and had some gin together - she followed us from there to the Eight Bells; a man named Weatherly was with me; they followed me up to the town - we both drove our carts up into the town, and at the Eight Bells Weatherly called for a pint of beer; I went in after him, but before I went in the two prisoners attacked me against 'Squire Cox's park, about two hundred yards from the Bells.

Q. Did the prisoners come up to you together? A.She pushed me across the road, and wanted me to go with her again; she wanted me to pull off my great-coat, which I refused - she then said, "You have blamed me for the money, and I will give you a punch of the head;" she hit me a hard blow on the nose with her first, and was going to strike me again, but I caught hold of her arms; I held them, and the male prisoner came up behind me - I am

sure of him; I have every reason to believe he is the same man - it was quite a moon-light night; I had seen him that evening in the room, taking a pot of beer.

Q. Did he say any thing when he came up? A. No, he put his leg behind me, put his arm round me, and threw me back; we had a scuffle on the ground - I got the better of him, got up, and ran away to the Eight Bells, to Weatherly; it might be one hundred yards from there - I called Weatherly out; my face was all over blood: I said"Philip, come out and see what is the matter;" he came out, but they were both gone; I washed my face, sat down, and took a pint of beer or more with Weatherly, and before we left the house the prisoners had the impudence to come in where we were, and they took part of the beer which we were drinking - Weatherly asked them to drink.

Q. Did you then complain that they had attempted to rob you? A. No, I gave up thinking any thing about it; we seemed good friends; nothing passed between us - we remained there about half an hour - I and Weatherly then went out together, and each got into our cart; after going to the next public-house, kept by Mr. Honey, about a quarter of a mile from the Bells, the prisoners followed us, and we all went in together there; Weatherly called for a pot of beer - we all four drank it together; we had another pot there: Weatherly would not come away without having some more, and we had 4d. worth of bread and cheese- Weatherly and I came out; they followed us directly, and on going down the hill from that house to Hillingdonend, about a quarter of a mile from the house, Weedon jumped up into my cart; Weatherly's horse was going at full trot; I was keeping mine from going too fast, and when I turned my head round Weedon was in my cart- I asked what he did there; he did not answer - I told him to get out, or I would throw him out; he did not get out, but he took me by the collar in the cart, and began feeling outside my breeches pocket for my money; I caught hold of his collar and one of his legs, and threw him out of the cart as well as I could, but he hung to my collar, and we fell out together, and had several tussels on the ground- I got the better of him most of the times while he was by himself; and after we passed the canal bridge, at the bottom of the hill, he got me down again; we had two or three more ups and downs - Dowling stood at some distance, and finding me get the better of him, she said, "Get him down again, or else he will get away from you, and I will assist you;" I did not see her, but could hear what she said - I was not on the ground when she spoke, but we were having a scuffle; he got me down, and she came and helped him - they confined my hands, got hold of my neck handkerchief, and almost strangled me: the blood came out of my nose and mouth with their almost choking me; they cut my purse from me, with a knife - they cut the fob quite away, the lappels of my shirt, and part of my breeches with it; they left me almost insensible on the ground - I did not know whether I was dead or alive; they got 26s. as near as I can tell, within about 6d. - Weatherly was on forward with his horse, and mine followed him; I cried out Philip! twice, but he was laying down asleep in his cart - I could not make him hear, and suspect he was asleep: I overtook him about three-quarters of a mile from where the robbery was committed, which is in Hillingdon parish; I got up in the cart, awoke him, and told him I had been robbed - we both rode home in his cart, and after putting the horses up I went to the cart to take the sacks out, and found a white heaver hat in Weat herly's cart; I do not know how it got there - the prisoner was never in his cart that I know of; I was sober enough to know what happened.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. Are you married? A. Yes, and have two children; I have been married seventeen years - I left home that morning between eight and nine o'clock, with a load and a half of hay; I drank nothing before I started - I got to Uxbridge between ten and eleven; the hill was slippery, and we gave an old man some beer for helping us up - we had a pot among four of us at the Tom and Jerry new beer-shop; we then went into the market, and were there most of the day before we could sell the hay - I had nothing to drink till it was sold; I had no dinner - I went into the Ram, and had two pots of beer among three of us; I had no gin, nor anything to eat - I was paid there for half a load of bay; I then went out to see if Weatherly had sold his hay - I drank nothing till he came; we then went to the Sun, and had a pot of beer there, between himself, me, and Dowling, who was in Weatherly's company; he is married - I drank nothing at Langdon's; I had a glass of gin and a pint, or it might be, a pot of beer - I never pulled out my purse.

COURT. Q. Are you quite sure the prisoners are the two people who ill-used you? A. Yes; I have not a doubt of it - Weatherly is not here; he did not see me robbed - I struggled with Weedon, and we hit each each other several times on the ground; I do not think the blood was caused by that - it did not come till I was strangled; I spit blood from my mouth and nose -Dowling gave me a blow on my nose, and made it bleed, but I had washed that off; I had seen her before that day, but was not in her company.

WILLIAM CHERRY . I keep the Sun, at Uxbridge. On the 17th of November, about six o'clock, I saw Lawrence and Weatherly in my tap-room; I served them with two pots of beer, then Lawrence went out, and returned with the female prisoner, and had half a pint of gin - the woman went out with Lawrence, leaving Weatherly in the house, that was about seven; the two prisoners came to my house about a quarter to eleven o'clock - I had seen Weedon in there in the afternoon, but not with the woman; he had a pint of beer about four - he had a white hat on then; Lawrence was not there - when Weedon came in at eleven o'clock he had no hat on; my house is about half a mile from where Lawrence was ill-used- he and Weatherly had been drinking before they came to my house; they left about six, and were not tipsy then - they were capable of knowing what happened to them on the road.

ROBERT HONEY . I keep a beer-shop at Uxbridgecommon, half a mile from Uxbridge, in the parish of Hillingdon. On Thursday evening, about twenty minutes past nine o'clock, Lawrence and Weatherly came to my house with the two prisoners; they all came in together - they had two pots of beer, and 4d. worth of bread and cheese; they all left together about five or ten minutes to ten; it was a moon-light night - whether they eat and drank together I do not know; Lawrence paid for the beer and cheese - the prisoners paid nothing; I

was market day - Lawrence and Weatherly did not seem in liquor, so as not to know what they were about; I did not know the prisoners before - they did not appear in liquor; Weedon had neither hat nor cap on at my house.

Cross-examined. Q.Your house is a new beer-shop? A. Yes; they were all sober - they were not singing nor playing at cards.

THOMAS DREW . I am gardener to Mr. Fell, of Belmont, near Uxbridge. On Thursday, the 17th of November, I went to Honey's beer-shop, a little before ten o'clock; the prisoners were there, and Lawrence and his man (Weatherly) - Weedon had no hat then; they left the house altogether - all appeared in company; I did not see them drinking together - none of them appeared drunk.

Cross-examined. Q.Weedon had no hat on? A. No- I saw no hat of his.

FRANCIS WEEDON . I am a constable of Hillingdon; I am not related to the prisoner. I apprehended him on Monday, the 21st of November, at the Jolly Ostlers, Uxbridge; I did not tell him what it was for - he said, going along, that it was a bad job, and he thought he should go over the water for it; I had said nothing to him about what it was for - he did not ask; I asked him afterwards what he had done with his white hat; he swore, and said the b - y hat would do for him; I asked him where he bought it - he said of Chickey Reading, and that he had had it about three days; I have the hat here.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not tell him a word about what you apprehended him for? A. I told him I wanted him - the woman came with us nearly out of Uxbridge; I did not say a word to him before he said what I have told you; I did not tell him I had found his hat till afterwards; I had a warrant against him, but did not produce it, nor say any thing about it - he did not tell me Weatherly had taken away his hat in his cart.

JAMES LAWRENCE . The hay Weatherly had belonged to my mother; she has two hundred and fifty acres of land.

WILLIAM FAIR . I am a horse-patrol of Bow-street. -I apprehended Dowling on the night of the 22nd of November; she said she was in Lawrence's company at a house at Uxbridge, and saw all his money safe in his pocket then, and went from there to the Eight Bells, Hillingdon-end, and that Weedon was there; he wore a white bat - from there they got one of the carts and rode to the beer-shop on Uxbridge-common, then came back to Uxbridge afterwards; I had only said that I apprehended her on Lawrence's robbery,

Weedon's Defence. What I was convicted of before, I served for - this woman was not in my company that evening; I never saw her that evening.

JOHN FARRANT . I was a constable, and am now a shop-keeper at Uxbridge. I produce a certificate of Weedon's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office; (read) I know him perfectly well to be the man - I was present at his trial in the other Court.

Dowling's Defence. I never saw Lawrence's money after he accused me of it in the house.

WEEDON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

DOWLING - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

(Dec.4.)

Reference Number: t18311201-9

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

9. MARY ELTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Elton , on the 13th of November , at St. Anne, Westminster, and stealing therein 2 shirts, value 12s.; 4 tablecloths, value 5s.; 7 towels, value 5s.; 4 aprons, value 4s.; 1 pinafore, value 1s.; 7 handkerchiefs. value 4s.: 2 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 1 hat, value 6s.; 2 bottles, value 6d.; 1 pint of shrub, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pint of bitters, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s.; 1 tea-kettle, value 1s.; 1lb. of sugar, value 10d.; 2 loaves of bread, value 6d.; 3 sixpences and 17 pence , the property of the said William Elton.

SECOND COUNT. for having committed the said felony, and burglariously breaking out of the said dwelling-house.

WILLIAM ELTON . I am not related to the prisoner - her name is not Elton; she always went by the name of Johannah - I do not know her other name; I keep the Three Jolly Butchers, in Newport-market, in the parish of St. Anne, Westminster , and keep the house. On Sunday night, the 13th of November, I went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock - I was the last person up, and fastened the house up myself; I bolted the street door at the top and bottom, and a chain in the middle - I locked the parlour door, hung the key just inside the bar, then bolted the bottom door of the bar; there are two doors to it - I locked the top door; the back door of my house has no fastening, neither lock nor bolt - I got up next morning just after six o'clock; it was dark - I had a candle, it was not light enough to see a person's countenance without a candle in the open air; I found the bottom door of my bar unbolted - I unlocked the top door, went in, and found the till out of its place and empty; it was on a shelf immediately under its proper place - I had left four sixpences and some halfpence in it- they were gone; I missed two bottles off the mantelpiece, then missed my hat, and a pair of shoes, a tablecloth, towel, aprons, two sheets, and a bag, containing pieces of new linen and other things - they were all taken from the bar; I then went out of the bar, and in the passage found a pair of pincers and a pair of woman's shoes - I then went to the parlour door, and found the box of the lock had been forced off, and and old chisel there, which did not belong to me - she must have got over a partition between the parlour and the bar, which does not go up to the top by twenty inches; it is about six feet high from the floor, but there is a seat close to it, on which a person could stand, reach to the top, and get on a cupboard on the other side, and let themselves down; I went to the street door, found it unbolted, and the chain undone, but the door was shut; it has a spring lock - a person opening that could let themselves out and shut it after them - the prisoner had lived as servant to my first floor lodger for about six months, and left about eighteen months ago - I saw her on the Sunday evening, before this, pass along my passage, and go down stairs; the lodger left at the same time as the prisoner, and there was nobody in the house whom she could come to see - I do not know what she came for; I sent a boy to tell her to come up stairs - she came up, and went out; my wife, in my hearing, asked her what business she had there - she laughed, and said she wanted to go down stairs

(meaning to the water-closet) - it was between ten and eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Your back door has no fastening, where does it open to? A.Into a little yard down stairs; a person could not get into that yard without going through my house - there is a chapel behind my house; a person in the yard could not get into the street without getting over a wall, nearly three stories high - I have no kitchen below, only a cellar, which is kept locked - I did not look into the cellar the night before the robbery; I have eight rooms - a person might conceal themselves down stairs in my passage; I, my wife, and three families live in the house - I value the property at about 40s.; I gave the pincers, chisel, and shoes, to Handley - I secured my windows as well as the door, and could find no place where any body could possibly have got in.

JOHN HANDLEY . I am a Policeman. On Monday morning, the 14th of November, between four and five o'clock, I was on duty in Long-acre, near James-street, Covent-garden, and saw the prisoner coming from towards Newport-market; I could not know a person at that time without a light - she had a canvas bag on her head, and a hat and tea-kettle in her hand; I stopped her, and asked why she was moving at that early hour is the morning, and where she was coming from, or going to - she said she came from John's-court, Piccadilly, and was going to No.8, Duke-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields; I asked who owned the hat she had in her hand - she said her husband; I then asked what she had got in the bag on her head - she said her husband's shirts and his wearing apparel; I said I knew no John's-court, Piccadilly, I thought all was not right, and should take her to my superior officer for investigation - I took her to the station-house, and on examining the bag, the first thing I found were two bottles of liquor filled up, and a table-cloth partly full of things; I turned the contents of the bag out, and found all the articles which I now produce - she told me the bottles contained cordial belonging to her mistress; I asked who her mistress was - she refused to tell, but said her own name was Mary Elton; she was taken before a Magistrate, and remanded to Clerkenwell prison -I took her there a pair of shoes, which the prosecutor gave me; she said they were not her's - I took off the shoes she had on, and brought them home; I have had them ever since, and the other things also - they have been tied up, sealed, and locked up; I observed to her at the station-house that she had a pair of man's shoes on - she said they belonged to her husband; I have also a chisel, and a pair of pincers, which I got from the prosecutor.

WILLIAM ELTON . Here are four table-cloths, three of them are marked; there were some pieces of linen like these - these five towels are mine; they are marked - I know these four aprons by their appearance; these shirts are marked - I know one of these bottles by the word,"Patent" on it; these shoes I pulled off on the Saturday night; I know this tea-kettle by a peg on the top of it - this hat is mine, and this bag; I never saw these pincers till I found them in the house - I found the chisel in the parlour; the property was all in the house on the night of the robbery.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming through Newport-market, at half-past five o'clock, and found the things not twenty yards from the prosecutor's house; I stood there about a quarter of an hour - I saw neither Policeman nor watchman, and took them up; two Policeman met me in Long-acre, and said nothing - then this gentleman came and said, "Why do you not take this woman?" they said,"You may take her, if you like;" he said, "What have you there?" I said it was my husband's - I can give no account of them, only that I found them.

JOHN HANDLEY . The shoes I took to the prisoner were women's shoes, and seemed about her size, but whether they were made for her I cannot say; they seemed to go on without much trouble.

GUILTY on the 2nd Count - DEATH . Aged 23.

(Dec.5.)

Reference Number: t18311201-10

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

10. THOMAS PERRY , alias WILLIAMS , was indicted for that he, at the General Session of the Peace, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 25th of May, in the eleventh year of the reign of George the Fourth, together with one Joseph Brown, by the names of Thomas Perry , of St. Pancras, and Joseph Brown, of the same parish, weretried and convicted as common utterers of false money, and were sentenced to be imprisoned in the House of Correction, at Clerkenwell, for one year, and to find sureties for their good behaviour for two years more; and that the said Thomas Perry, now called Thomas Williams , having been so convicted as a common utterer of false money, afterwards, on the 4th of November last, at St. James, Westminster, 1 piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a good shilling, feloniously did utter to one John Bulpitt, he knowing it to be false and counterfeit ; against the Statute, & c.

MESSRS. SCARLET and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Thomas Perry , at Clerkenwell Session, in May, 1830; I examined it with the original, at the office of the Clerk of the Peace - (read, see indictment.)

JOHN SUMMERSELL . I am a turnkey of the House of Correction, Middlesex. In May, 1830, I had the prisoner in my custody there for twelve months, he was convicted on the indictment just read; I was present at his conviction.

JOHN BULPITT . I am a shopman to Railton and Co., haberdashers, No. 242, Regent-street, St. James'-parish. The prisoner came into our shop on Friday evening, the 4th of November, about seven o'clock, and asked for sufficient shoe-ribbon for a pair of shoes; I cut him three-quarters of a yard, which came to 1 1/2d. - he gave me a good half-crown - I gave him 2s. 4 1/2d., which I got from Mr. Peascod, our cashier; I observed the shillings which I gave him - they were two good shillings, I am confident, and they were a different stamp to what he afterwards produced; he took the 2s. 4 1/2d. up, and turned from the counter with the change in his hand - his back was then towards me; he immediately turned again, threw a shilling on the counter, and said, "You have given me a bad shilling;" I observed that shilling, and it was bad - the two I had given him had the coat of arms on them, and the one he produced had the lion and crown, I am positive of that; I took the shilling which he threw down, and told him it was a bad one, and I did not believe I had given it to him, but I took it to Peascod, and got him to change it - he said nothing in the prisoner's hearing; I gave the prisoner an

other shilling - I said nothing to him; he then left the shop - I followed him immediately, by direction of Peascod, and overtook him six or eight doors from the shop, in company with another man - I was within two yards of him; I followed them fifty or a hundred yards - both went down Regent-street in company together; he had joined the other man as soon as I got out, near our door - he crossed over the road alone, leaving the other man on the opposite side; he went into Mr. Waugh's, a chemist and druggist- I do not know what became of the other man; I stepped up to Mr. Waugh's window, and saw him served with something - he threw a half-crown down on the counter, which the young man took, and gave him change; he took up the change, then turned from the counter, and immediately turned back again to the young man, and threw down a shilling; I stepped into the shop at that moment, and asked the young man, in his hearing, if that was a bad shilling he had returned him - he said it was; I said he had served me in the like manner a few minutes before - the prisoner said he had never seen me, nor been in our shop; I have not a doubt of his person - the young man detained him; I got a Policeman, who apprehended him: the bad shilling which he returned to me I saw laid on one corner of the desk by Peascod - I left it there, and found it laying there when I came back; I had left Peascod there, and found him there when I returned - he marked the shilling in my presence, and I delivered it to the Policeman; I went with him to Waugh's - the prisoner was waiting there in the custody of another Policeman: the shilling the prisoner gave me was compared with the one he had passed at Waugh's, in the prisoner's presence.

Prisoner. I never saw him till he was at Waugh's. Witness. I am quite positive of his person - he stood by the side of a gas-light; I have not a doubt of him - he went out, and I followed him; he was not out of my sight above a moment, while he turned the window at the corner- our shop stands rather back - it is opposite St. George's chapel.

JOHN PEASCOD . I receive and change money at Messrs. Railton's. Bulpitt brought me half a crown about seven o'clock, and I gave him two shillings and 4 1/2d.; he brought me another shilling shortly after, which was a bad one - I said it was not one of those I gave him; I was satisfied of that at the time - I gave him another, and desired him to watch the prisoner; my desk is six or eight yards from where the prisoner stood - I saw him for a minute, but could not undertake to swear to him: Bulpitt returned to me in about tea minutes, with a Policeman - I had placed the shilling on the desk by itself when he gave it to me; it remained in my possession till it was delivered to the Policeman; I marked it before he had it, with an iron punch.

JOHN PETER WILMOT . I am assistant to Mr. Waugh, a chemist, of Regent-street, about one hundred yards from Mr. Railton's, on the opposite side of the way. On the 4th of November, about seven o'clock, the prisoner came in, and asked for two cathartic pills, which cost 3d.; I served him - he gave me a good half-crown: I gave him two shillings and 3d. - he turned from the counter, then turned again, as I was shutting the drawer the pills were in, and said, "You have given me a bad shilling," throwing one on the counter - I said, "I don't think I gave you that shilling, but I will give you another," and did so - I put the shilling he threw down in the till; there was no other there - Bulpitt came in at the time I was giving him the good shilling, and asked if he had given me a bad shilling- I said, "I think it is;" I rang it, and put a little nitric acid on it, and it turned black - I was satisfied it was not silver; the prisoner said nothing; I detained him while the Policeman was sent for - I kept the shilling in my hand; Mr Waugh came in - I gave the shilling to Burgess, the Policeman.

Prisoner. I returned him a shilling, but it was the one he gave me.

CHRISTOPHER BURGESS . I was a Policeman. I was on duty, and Bulpitt desired me to go into Waugh's shop: I saw the prisoner there, searched him in the shop, and found two shillings and 3d. in his hand; Bailey, another Policeman, came in - I received a counterfeit shilling from Wilmot, and kept it for some time: I afterwards delivered the same to Mr. Field - I received another shilling from Bailey; I kept that also, and delivered them both to Mr. Field. on the 17th of November.

THOMAS BAILEY . I am a Policeman. I was on duty. and went to Railton's shop; I received a bad shilling from Bulpitt; I saw it marked - I delivered the same to Burgess; I saw Peascod deliver it to Bulpitt, and saw him mark it.

JOHN FIFLD . I am inspector to the Mint. I produce two counterfeit shillings, which I received from Burgess at Marlborough-street, on the 17th of November; one of them appears as if acid had been applied to it - it has left a black mark; there appears to be an indenture on the other - they are both counterfeit, and both cast in the same mould; the reverse side is a crown surmounted by a lion - I produce them; they are both Britannia metal, and dated 1826.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home on Friday evening. the 4th of November, and went into Mr. Waugh's shop for two autibilious pills; he gave me two shillings -I sounded them on the counter; one sounded lighter than the other; I said, "Is this a good one?" he said, "I don't know; "he took it, and gave me another - I was going out when Bulpitt came in. and said, "Stop;" I said, "What for?" he said, "Has not this man given you a bad shilling?" he said, "I will see:" he went to the till, and said"Yes, what did you return me this bad shilling for?" I said, "Because it was a bad one;" if I uttered the money to Bulpitt I must have had two good shillings and 4d. in my possession.

(Dec.5.) GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18311201-11

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

11. JOHN WILLIAM BUTCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster, 1 tin box, value 1s.; 380 sovereigns, 40 half sovereigns, and one 40l. Bank note, the property of Stephen Fitzgerald , in his dwelling-house .

MR. BALL conducted the prosecution.

STEPHEN FITZGERALD . I am an oil and colourman , and live at No.43, Millbank-street, Westminster - the prisoner was in my service, as a kind of porter and general servant ; he lodged in the house - the shop is part of the dwelling-house. On Friday, the 21st of October, he told

me the mare's legs were swollen, and he thought a little exercise was necessary; I said, as the day was fine. and my daughter poorly, I would take her out - I went out between two and three o'clock, returned about half-past six, and the prisoner was not there then; I went to my desk about half-past nine, and found it locked as usual - it is in the shop; I took the money which had been taken in the day out of my till, and was going to put it into the box in the desk; I opened the desk with the key, as usual. and missed my tin cash-box, with its contents - it contained between 300l. and 400l. in gold, nearly 400l., also a 40l., a 10l., and a 5l. Bank note, a 20l. cheque on Curtis and Co., drawn by William Freeman, of Millbank-street, and an 8l. bill.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.Is your shop part of the dwelling-house? A. Yes, and in the parish of St. John the Evangelist, Westminster; he had been in my service between three and four years - I had a good character with him, and never suspected his honesty; he lodged and boarded in my house.

COURT. Q. Did the lock appear to have had any violence used to it? A. The cash-box was open, but locked in the desk; no violence had been used to the desk - I left it locked, and found it so.

JAMES MIDDLETON . I am a pencil-maker. I received information from Mr. Fitzgerald, and went down to Bristol on Tuesday, the 25th of October, in search of the prisoner; I went on board the James Cropper, bound for America, laying in the Bristol channel, and saw the prisoner, who I had known some time - I said, "I want you;" he said."Oh, Mr. Middleton, I am glad to see you, for it is the happiest moment I have had since I left home;" I took Smith, an officer, down with me - we did not hold out either threat or promise to him; we took him down to the cabin, and handcuffed him - he was a cabin passenger; he begged me to intercede that he should not be handcuffed. but I said he was in custody; he was searched, and a gold watch and chain found in his possession - I believe a bag of gold was found on him, and a musical snuff-box; in the course of the search we found two bags of gold - I observed to the prisoner that I thought the weight of the gold was not so much as he had; he said, "By G - d, Middleton, that is all I have got;" I requested him to give an account how he had spent the money, as I understood there was 455l. in gold missing; he said he would do the best he could to account for it, which he did - I have a paper in my own writing, taken at the time from his account - (reads) "We found in the two bags of gold about 312l. 10s. - he said he had paid for his passage 20l., musical snuff-boxes about 5l., a silver snuff-box 2l. 15s., travelling from London to Bristol, and contingent expences about 5l., a gold watch sixteen guineas, a gold chain 3l., the price of which was 10l, but he gave an old watch and 3l. for it, tailor's bill 5l. 13s. 6d., shaving-case 1l. books 1l., linen 2l. 7s., and portmanteau 2l." - that is all the account he gave.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe he said at once he did not wish to disguise any thing, and would restore all the money he had? A. Yes, he made all the restoration he could.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer of Bristol. I took the prisoner in charge; I told him he was charged with robbing his master - he said he was overcome in an evil hour, and had robbed one of the best of masters'; on his way to London he said he had left the bills and the box somewhere about his master's house.

JOHN SMITH . I was in the employ of Mr. Fitzgerald. I found the tin box in the cellar, in an empty candle-box, on the 26th of October, and gave information to Nainby.

FREDERICK NAINBY . Smith called me, and I saw the tin box in the cellar; I found in it a 40l., a 10l., and a 5l. Bank note, a 20l. cheque, and an 8l. bill.

Prisoner. I was overcome in an evil hour; I leave it entirely to the mercy of the Court.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

(Dec.5.) GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of his good character.

Reference Number: t18311201-12

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

12. WILLIAM SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , at St. George, 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 1s. 6d.; 3 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 5 half-crowns, 27 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of James Henderson , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES HENDERSON . I live in Thames-street. Wapping, in the parish of St. George - I occupy the whole house. The prisoner came to lodge at my house on the 13th of November, at six o'clock in the evening, with a shipmate; they stopped at my house till the 17th, and at eleven that night I was down in the kitchen with them and had a silver watch on the dresser, with a black ribbon, three gold keys, and a brass seal; my money was with the watch - I had put it down on the dresser; there were three sovereigns, a half-sovereign, five half-crowns, some shillings and sixpences, 5l. 10s. in all; the prisoner came into the kitchen at that time, and insisted on my going out to get him half a pint of gin; I refused - he said he would not go to bed till he had something to drink, and I went to the Fox and Grapes public house, about hundred yards from my house, eastward, to get him half a pint of gin, and as I came back I met him running towards me; I had been absent about five minutes - I called out to him, but got no answer; he passed me - I went on home, and when I came in I found the money was gone; the other man was in the room, packing up some things then, but before I went out he was talking to the prisoner; I did not look for my watch then; I went out, and recollecting the watch I turned back, and found it was gone also; I went in search of the prisoner, but did not find him for some time - I got information, and gave an alarm; I saw him in custody at four o'clock that morning - my watch was found on him.

JOHN BENT . I am a serjeant of the Police. I made inquiry for the prisoner, and went with Lee, the officer, to No. 3, Match-walk; it is a house of a certain description; we knocked repeatedly, and got in at last, and there found the prisoner coming down stairs; I asked Henderson, in his presence and hearing, if he was the person who stole his property - he said he was; the prisoner at first objected to be searched - I found 9s. 6d. on him, and 10d. in copper; before Lee searched him the prosecutor asked him where his property was - he said, "I have taken your property, but the greater part is spent or lost" (it was four o'clock in the morning) - Lee then searched him, and found a watch on him, but no gold.

HENRY LEE . I assisted in searching the prisoner, and found a watch, 1s. 6d. in silver, and two halfpence on him.

JAMES HENDERSON . This is my watch - it is worth 2l. - I have had it four years.

Prisoner's Defence. I was groggy, and do not know any thing about it.

[Dec. 5.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 36.

Reference Number: t18311201-13

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

13. WILLIAM ANTHONY , JAMES BROWN , and ANDREW ROGERS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Davis , on the 30th of November , at Hillingdon, and stealing therein 6 spoons, value 6s. , his property.

RICHARD DAVIS , JUN. I live at Uxbridge , with my father, Richard Davis, who occupies the house; it is in Uxbridge parish, and in Middlesex - my father is a pawnbroker. On Wednesday night last I went to bed about half-past ten o'clock; I was the last person up - I bolied and barred the front door, and my sister or the servant secured the back; the windows are generally kept fastened - we have no occasion to open them in general; they were fastened with a hasp - I know they were fastened that night, for I looked at them; I got up on Thursday morning, about half-past seven o'clock, and found the kitchen window, at the back of the house, open - it appeared they had attempted to take a square out; they broke sufficient of it out to get a hand in, and unfasten the hasp- they could then open the window, and get in; it was open - it was fastened the night before; there were marks all over the kitchen - the table was marked with red;the bricks are generally done over with red ochre - there were red footmarks all over the kitchen, the window of which was opened; we traced the footmarks to a part of the wall, where they got over - six silver tea-spoons were missed out of the kitchen cupboard, which is nine or ten feet from the window; I had not seen them there that night - I saw five of the spoons at tea time: a salt spoon was also missed off the dresser, by the side of the cupboard - I had seen that at dinner time: the spoons belong to my father - I am in partnership with him, but I have no interest in them - he keeps the house, and pays the rent and taxes; I live there

Q. Are the rent and taxes paid out of his pocket, or out of the business? A.Generally out of the business; my father pays the servants' wages, and the house provisions, and 1 allow 10s. 6d. a week for my board and lodging - I generally pay it every week; we never divide the profits of the trade - I am a tailor by trade.

Q. Then are you in partnership with your father in the pawnbroking business? A. I have part of the profits- what little money I have in the concern I reap the benefit of, in proportion to the money I put in; when I saw the silver salt-spoon at dinner time it was entire - in consequence of information on Thursday morning I went to Attwell, a silver smith and pawnbroker, at Uxbridge, between nine and ten o'clock, and told him what had occurred; while I was there the prisoner Rogers came in, and sold three of the spoons, which I have in my hand- here is the handle of one spoon, the bowl and handle of the salt-spoon, and one entire spoon; they are my father's - I can only swear to the salt-spoon; we have the fellow, and it has been in the family many years -Rogers received 2s. 11 1/2d. for them. and then left the shop- I borrowed the spoons of Attwell, and took them to my sister; she recognized them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You closed the front door, and nothing else? A. No; I looked to see that the back doors were fastened - every place was fastened; we are very particular about it - I carry on the business of a tailor in the house; my father and I have settled no account at present - I have been in partnership with him nearly three years; there is a running account between us; the business has been decreasing some time, and I am trying to bring it round - my father pays the servants' wages, but I have nothing to do with them; my father did not sleep in the house that night, only my two sisters, the servant-maid, and myself.

COURT. Q. You pay 10s. 6d. a week, is anything else paid on account of rent? A. No; my father pays the rent out of his own pocket - it is a charge upon him only, and not on the profits.

CHARLOTTE DAVIS . I am sister of the last witness-This salt spoon bowl and handle belong to the same spoon, and are my father's; also this whole spoon, and this handle - we have the fellow, which matches it; I am positive they are my father's; two of them are tea spoons - I saw them last Wednesday evening, before five o'clock, in the parlour; Dorvill, the constable, brought me two tea spoons - I know the doors and windows were all fastened on the Wednesday night.

Cross-examined. Q.Do you know any of the prisoners? A. I know Rogers; he keeps a lodging-house, and deals in small articles - he has kept a house at Uxbridge for twelve months.

CHARLOTTE DORMER . I am servant to Mr. Davis. Last Wednesday evening, at five o'clock, I put five silver tea-spoons in the kitchen closet; the two salt-spoons were on the dresser - I saw them on the dresser at seven o'clock; I know the salt-spoon to be my master's - it is one of those I saw on the dresser; the silver tea spoon and the handle of one are part of those I put away - they have the initials I.M. A. on them; all the windows and doors were fastened that night.

WILLIAM ATTWELL . I am a silversmith, and live at Uxbridge, in the parish of Hillingdon; Davis' house is in the same parish. Last Thursday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, Davis, Jun. came to my shop, and stated this circumstance; while he was there, Rogers came in to sell this spoon and three pieces - I bought them for 2s. 11 1/2d.; he said nothing - I showed them to Davis; he took them away, returned to me immediately with them, and took them away again; he made a statement to me, and I went to look after Rogers - I found him in the market-place; he lives in Uxbridge, and hawks little things about in a basket - I have known him some years; I told him the spoons had been stolen - he expressed much surprise, and told me he had them from the other two prisoners, describing them as Billy, the sweep, and Bagley's brother-in-law; the prisoners were apprehended in consequence of that.

Cross-examined. Q. You have known Rogers some years? A. Yes; I knew where to find him, or I should

not have bought them - I found him immediately; there was no concealment about it - I have known him three years; I would not have bought them of the other prisoners.

JOHN DRINKWATER . My father keeps the Grapes. at Uxbridge. I know the prisoners; I saw them come into my father's house together. on Thursday morning, between seven and eight o'clock - Rogers called for a pot of beer; I served him - he paid me for it; they drank it between them.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known Rogers long? A. Two or three years, living in the place, and getting his bread by industry.

THOMAS HEARN . I am a bird-stuffer, or animal preserver. Last Thursday, between ten and eleven o'clock, I went to Windsor with Mr. Dorvill, the constable; it is between eight and nine miles from Uxbridge - I saw An' hony and Brown there, who are called Billy, the sweep, and Bagley's brother-in-law; there are three or four mothers, and only one husband in the family - I told them they were the two men I wanted, that they had been into Davis', the pawnbroker's, shop the night before, according to the account given by Rogers, and I did not want to ask them any questions, as the Irishman had split all about the spoons; I did not either threaten or promise them - Billy, the sweep, said they had not been to Uxbridge for a fortnight, and Brown said he was innocent; Billy began to pipe his eye a little - I told him not to fret; I was sent by the high-constable to assist the other constable.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know them before? A. Yes, well - I used to see them at Uxbridge, but had not seen them for some time; I went after them, from the description Rogers gave - I have known Rogers more than three years; he rents a lodging-house under Mr. Davis - I am certain they said they had not been to Uxbridge for a fortnight.

JAMES DORVILL . I am a constable of Uxbridge, which is in the parish of Hillingdon; Davis' house is in that parish. Last Thursday Rogers was given into my charge by Davis, Jun. - he told me voluntarily that he bought the spoons of Billy, the sweep, and George Morgan - he believed that was the name he went by; I do not know Morgan, but Anthony is called Billy, the sweep - Rogers said if I would go with him, they were up at the lodging-house, in Chequer-yard, he believed; I went there, but did not find them - I put Rogers in the cage; he there told me he had got two more spoons, which he had not sold, and which he had bought of the other prisoners - he pulled them out of his pocket, and gave them to me; I have had them ever since - he told me if I went to Windsor I should find the two prisoners, for they had told him they were going there that day; I went with Hearn, and found them at a public-house - they were searched, and a knife and 1s. 6d. found on Anthony, but nothing on the other.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you present when they were conversing with Hearn? A. No; Anthony is called Billy, the sweep, and Brown is Bagley's brother-in-law.

CHARLOTTE DAVIS . I know these two spoons to be my father's, by the initials; one is marked J.P.

RICHARD DAVIS . I do not know them.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known Rogers? A. About twelve months; he rents three houses of my father. and bore an excellent character - he saw me in the shop, and sold them in my presence.

CHARLOTTE DORMER . I know these two spoons to be Mr. Davis', and part of those I put away on the Wednesday.

JAMES DORVILL . I was present when the prisoners were examined before Messrs. Clark and Newdigate, the Magistrates - what they said was taken down in writing by Mr. Richards, the clerk; it was read over to them afterwards - they said nothing to it - (looking at it); this is Richards' hand-writing - I cannot read well enough to say whether it is correct.

WILLIAM ATTWEIL . I was present at the examination; Mr. Clark said, "Now, prisoners, you may say any thing you think proper, but it is not necessary to say any thing"- he did not make them any threat or promise; what they said was taken down by Richards - he read it over to them; they said they had no further remark to make, that what was read was correct - I believe this to be Richards' hand-writing; I saw him writing while they were examined - this is an accurate account of what was said (read).

Rogers voluntarily states, that yesterday morning, about half past seven o'clock, he met Anthony and Brown in the street at Uxbridge, near the Grapes; Anthony said."Will you buy these old broken spoons?" they were dirty with soot; I said,"Perhaps you did not come honestly by them!" they both said they found them in the soot: I bought them for 2s. 6d., and a pot of beer.

Anthony voluntarily says, "I found two spoons as I was coming out of Acton - I found them among some dirt, picked them up, and that is all I know; we slept at the Green Man."

Brown voluntarily states, "I do not know any more than what he says - we were together when he picked them up; we laid in the loft at the Green Man."

CHARLOTTE DAVIS . The spoons were on the table when this examination was taken.

Anthony's Defence. When I came along the road I picked them up in the dirt on this side Acton - I went as far as the Green Man, and laid all night in the loft; I got up in the morning, and went to Uxbridge.

Brown's Defence. I was with him when he picked them up - we laid at the Green Man, and in the morning went to Uxbridge.

Roger's Defence. I went out to send a little boy to London in the waggon, with some rabbit-skins - I met these two men opposite Drinkwater's, who asked me to buy these articles - I asked how they came by them, and said I was fifty-three years old, had a large family, and would not wish to he disgraced; he said, "We found them in the dirt;" I said I had only 2s. 6d. and a few halfpence - they said, "Give us the half-crown and stand a pot of beer;" I left them, and went home - shortly after I wanted money to go to buy skins, and sold these - the constable then came. and told me they were stolen; I told him who I bought them of - we could not find them, and the constable said he would lock me up till he could;

Davis was in the shop, and I should not have sold them if I had known they were stolen.

ANTHONY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

BROWN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

[Dec. 6.] ROGERS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-14

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

14. ARTHUR POOLE and WILLIAM GIBSON were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Gilbert Ainslie Young , on the 28th of October , at St. Marylebone, and stealing therein 45 forks, value 60l. 12s.; 50 spoons, value 51l. 7s.; 3 ladles, value 7l. 9s.; 1 pair ofasparagus-tongs, value 24s.; 1 pair of kniferests, value 7s.; 1 bottle-table, value 12s., and 1 box, value 2l. 2s. , his property; THOMAS HALL and JOHN LACY were indicted for that they, well-knowing the prisoners to have done and committed the aforesaid felony, feloniously did receive, harbour, and maintain them ; and RALPH BENJAMIN was indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BARRY conducted the prosecution, and declined offering any evidence against Lacy, who was here ACQUITTED .

DAVID LEWIS . I am a tailor. In October last I lived at No. 40. Great Titchfield-street, Marylebone - I have known Poole about two months, and Gibson about three years; he is clerk to his father, who is a surveyor in Norton-street. About a week before the 27th of October Poole and I were at the Crown and Angel public-house: Poole told me he was in want of money - I said I had none to lend him; he said, "I don't mean any thing of that sort; if you can keep your own counsel, we can get money otherwise," and that he knew where to get some silver if I knew where to sell it; he said he could get the silver at Mr. Young's, No. 2, Upper Portland-place; I said I did not know where to make away with the silver, but I dare say Gibson knew - Gibson was not present; that was all that occurred at that time - Gibson and I went to the Crown and Angel on the Thursday night following; Poole came in there, and when we were going home, after we left the public-house, we were all three talking - Poole asked Gibson if he knew where to sell silver; Gibson said Yes, and it passed over till the next Thursday night - we all three met again on the Tuesday at the Angel and Crown, about ten o'clock, not by agreement - it was the Tuesday before the robbery; we then agreed that Poole should go on Wednesday and take a model of the key of Mr. Young's area door - he got a model on the Wednesday; he told us he had got it - he did not show it to us; Poole came to my lodgings on the Thursday night - Gibson was there at the time; we all three went together from Titchfield-street, as far as Portland-road - Poole went on to Mr. Young's; Gibson and I followed close behind him - we kept our eyes on him, and saw him go down Mr. Young's area; I went opposite the area gate, on the same side - Gibson and I walked up and down by the area gate; Poole remained down there about ten minutes; I saw him trying to open the area door, which leads into the house - he came up the area steps, and told us he had broken one of the keys in attempting to open the door; he had got three keys, something like the model; he came up the steps - we went as far as Weymonth-street, and agreed that he should directly go back to Mr. Young's to supper- we agreed to meet at the Crown and Angel, Eden-court, Eden-street, Regent-street, that night, about twelve o'clock - he left us, came to us there at twelve, and we all three went from there to the Black Bull, Great Windmill-street, Haymarket; we had no conversation there with him - there were two females with us; I told him to leave them as soon as possible, which he did, and after leaving the Black Bull we agreed that Poole should go to Mr. Young's the next night, to supper, to come out of the kitchen when the footman went to draw the beer for supper, and slip into the water-closet; to let the footman go and draw the beer, and wait there till he returned past the water-closet door, which is in the passage - he said he would then come out of the water-closet, open the area and pautry doors, go back into the kitchen, and shut the water-closet door, as if he had then come out of there - he said nothing more; we met at nine o'clock on Friday night, at Gibson's lodging, No. 1, Upper Charlton-street (Poole lodged at a milk-shop in Charlton-street) - it is about a minute's walk from Portland-place; Gibson came to my lodging at eight o'clock- we went from there to his house; Poole came to us there, and we all went together, about ten minutes after nine, to Portland-road - we walked all three in a row, till we got into Portland-road, and then Poole went before us- I saw him go down Mr. Young's area; I and Gibson were walking up and down - I did not see the footman; I saw a light - Poole went down, rang the bell, and went into the area door below, which leads into the house - I did not observe whether any body let him in; we walked up and down about twenty minutes, till we saw the footman come out into the area to draw the beer, and go back with it in his hand - I went down the area steps very shortly after that.

Q. Had you any signal to go down? A. No; Poole had been out before the footman drew the beer, and put us into the coal-cellar under the street, and told us to wait there till the footman had drawn the beer, but we came out as soon as Poole turned his back, and went into the street- after the footman had drawn the beer, I went down, and saw the area house door was open - Gibson followed me down, and he (Gibson) went into the house, and brought out a box; I remained in the area - Gibson was not gone a minute; he brought the box up to the top of the steps, with a pair of trousers on his arm - I helped him carry the box from the area gate to my lodging, at Mrs. Lacy's, No. 20, Titchfield-street; we got there about ten o'clock - I let myself in, and took the box up to the back garret, where I and Lacy's son used to sleep together; Gibson helped me carry the box into the garret - Mrs. Lacy lighted us up stairs from the second floor to the garret, and she went into the room; Gibson opened the box with a bodkin- it contained forks, spoons, a ladle, plated asparagus-tongs and silver articles - it was about a foot and a half long and a foot wide; we took the plate out of the box and put it into a handkerchief - I left the box in the middle of the room; Mrs. Lacy was in the room all this time: Mr. Lacy said he would not have it in his house - Mr. and Mrs. Lacy both came into the room, and Mr. Lacy said he did not like it to stop in his house; Gibson and I said we would

take it to Gibson's lodging, and Mrs. Lacy said she would take it under her shawl.

Q. How came she to say that? A.Because some of the forks were sticking out of the handkerchief, and I believe I asked her to take it; the bundle contained all the property except two knife-rests and a claret lable, which was left at Mrs. Lacy's - she consented to carry it; I and Mrs. Lacy went to Gibson's with it, leaving Gibson behind - we took it to No. 1, Upper Charlton-street, Fitzroy-square, and left it in the front garret there; Mrs. Lacy went up stairs with me - she threw the plate on the bed; we had met Poole as we were on our way there - he and I walked on before Mrs. Lacy to Gibson's lodging, and we left Poole there with the plate; I and Mrs. Lacy returned to her house - I was to take Gibson back to his lodging, where Poole was; we had a 1s. worth of gin between me, Mr. and Mrs. Lacy, and Gibson - I and Gibson then returned to his lodging to Poole: when I first met Poole in the street, he told us that the butler had missed the plate. and the servants had all consented to go and tell Mr. Young, and the butler told Poole he had better go, for Mr. Young would suspect he was having supper: we all went from Gibson's lodging to the Ball's Head, Dean-street, Soho, (this was about half-past ten or eleven o'clock) and expected to meet a man named Hall there to hear some singing - I knew him by his conducting concert-rooms; he know nothing of the plate at that time - we met there; the singing took place - Gibson then asked Hall if he knew a place where he could sell some plate; he said Yes, (it had been left at Gibson's) - I and Gibson agreed to meet Hall at ten o'clock next morning (Saturday) at the Three Tons, Smithfield; we met - I and Gibson carried the plate between us in two handkerchiefs; we met Hall there - we did not open the bundle there, but went from there to a public-house in Liverpool-street, where we had a pint of beer; Hall went out to fetch a blue bag to put the plate in - he had not seen the plate at this time; he returned with the bag, and put the two bundles into the bag himself, without untying them - I walked with them as far as the corner of Liverpool-street; Gibson and Hall left me, as Hall said it would not do for three to go to sell the plate, for the man would not buy it if so many went; they returned to the corner of Liverpool-street and Bishopsgate-street in about twenty-five minutes - I was waiting there for them; Gibson put both his hands up twice, and said, when he came up to me, that he got 20l. for the plate - I asked if he had given Hall any thing for showing him where to sell it - Hall was present; I told Gibson to ask Hall if a guinea would satisfy him - Hall said Yes; we had some oysters in Long-lane, and went from there to the Three Tuns, Smithfield - Hall was with us; Gibson there gave me 6l., and kept 1l. himself, which I was to spend - he took 6l. for himself, and 1l. he was going to spend; he reserved 5l. for Poole - Gibson gave some money for beefsteaks, which we had at the Three Tuns; we went to Field-lane - Hall bought a great-coat, Gibson bought a greatcoat, I bought a pair of shoes, and the others bought a pair- I forgot to state that at the office; I went to Mr. Lacy's, left a bundle I had there, and was taken into custody at my father's house, about half-past four o'clock that Saturday afternoon - the Policeman took four sovereigns from me, which was part of the money I had received as my share; I afterwards stated the part I took in this affair.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Notwithstanding that you were taken a prisoner to the Police-office? A. Yes; there were four examinations - I was examined on the Saturday, at the first examinations, but not as a witness; I was a prisoner all that time; I was in the office as a prisoner during the examinations, but not at the bar - I was not sworn and examined as a witness at the office, only at Hicks'-hall.

Q. Then before you were examined at Hicks'-hall had you not an opportunity of hearing the distinct account given in evidence by the witnesses? A. Yes, I knew what they had sworn; I heard the different depositions read at the office - I was never taken up for any thing in my life; I live by my trade as a tailor - I was in full business at that time, working with Lacy; I was not in want- I joined in the robbery of my own free will; I did not care who I robbed, but I never robbed any body before -I knew who it was proposed to rob; I had no animosity towards the prosecutor - I know I did enough to be placed at the bar myself.

Q. It is to avoid standing there that you give evidence? A. Yes, because Gibson said if I did not give evidence he would; I never went by any other name - I can only write a little - I can read; I have written a letter home since I have been in prison - I have written nothing else in prison that I recollect.

Q. Remember you are on your oath? A. Yes - I wrote a paper this morning, and wrote your name on the top of it; what I wrote was a falsehood - I did not do it deliberately; I did it to save myself from getting ill used by Poole and the prisoners in the prison - that was my only reason; I did not write what is at the bottom of the paper in pencil - I wrote what is in ink; I wrote it in the chapelyard - there might be seven or nine persons there; I cannot swear there were not twenty - I know the officers of the prison were there, but did not know I could complain to them; I did not suppose they would trouble about it: I wrote the paper to satisfy Poole till he was gone; nobody was near us at the desk - they were in the same room by the fire; Poole was going to write it himself, but he said, "Will you write this, for my hand shakes;" he did not threaten me, but I was afraid - I had not been threatened by any body.

COURT. Q. How came you there with persons you were going to give evidence against? A.After giving evidence at Hicks'-hall, I asked leave to be in a different yard to where I was before, and the turnkey put me in the chapel-yard; I was committed as a thief; I gave evidence at the office, but was not sworn.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If Poole did not threaten you, what was there to frighten you? A. Nothing, only when I first came into the yard, I went up stairs to Poole's apartment, and the rest of the prisoners said, "Poole, here is a friend of yours" - Poole said, "No friend of mine, I am afraid;" he had not threatened me with any violence.

Q. And yet, being afraid some mischief would be done, you wrote this "Sir, Poole knows nothing about the box, only by sleeping with me, as that is the chief thing against him;" you wrote that, and sent it to me, knowing I was Poole's counsel? A. Yes - it was not to mislead you; Poole said his hand shook, and asked me to write it for him - he put the words into my mouth, and I wrote it.

Q. Did you not know it to be a falsehood? A. No,

Sir; he told me you had taken the capital off - I wrote his own words, in his name, not as coming from me.

COURT. Q. Is his name put to it? A. No; Poole asked me to put my name to it; I said I would not, as Mr. Phillips would think it came from me.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not intend me to think it came from you? A. No, I did not think you would have it at all; Poole did not tell me be would send it to you - he intended to send it, but I thought he would not have occasion; I do not know why I thought so.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. How old are you? A.Sixteen; my father is a tailor; I did not live with him, because he has not sufficient work to keep me - that was my only reason; we are on good terms at present, and were so then, but are not always so - he charged me with pledging a coat of his about ten months ago; I was not taken before a Magistrate; I gave my father the money it was pawned for - I have only been charged once with robbing him; nobody charged me with selling a plane - I was never charged with stealing pocket-handkerchiefs in the street; I have not been apprenticed - I learned my trade with my father, and have worked with several people; Gibson was not present when the robbery was first walked of, and he stopped at Lacy's while the plate was taken to his lodging - he has not lived there above a month, for he came out of the House of Correction, having been there for three months.

MR. BARRY. Q. You wrote the paper under Poole's direction? A. Yes, and gave it to Poole - I did not send it to Mr. Phillips.

WILLIAM MALLETT . I am butler to Mr. Young; Poole was in his service, as footman, for seven or eight months, and left on the 1st of April, or about that time - he has occasionally called to see us since, about once in a month or six weeks. On Friday evening, the 28th of October, he came to the house about five minutes to nine o'clock; he was there on the Thursday, but to the best of my recollection I did not see him, but I gathered from his conversation on the Friday that he had been on Thursday, and I was in my pantry on the Thursday night, when he went away - he bade me good night as he went out, but I did not see him; when he came on Friday night, James, the footman, went to the door; he asked if he had not left an umbrella there the night before - he was told he had not; he then came in: I went out that evening while he was in the house, and at that time master's plate-chest, with the plate in it, was in my pantry, in a recess on the dresser, which is the place it was usually kept in while Poole was in the service - I was gone about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes the outside - when I came back Poole was there; as I came in I found the area gate open, the area door and my pantry door were also open - I had left the footman and Poole in my pantry when I went out, and told them I should not be gone more than ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I left them there, washing up the tea things - when I came back I went into my pantry; I thought something must be amiss, as my fellow-servant had left the pantry, and nobody was there - I missed the plate-box, which contained the articles stated in the indictment,(enumerating them) - the asparagus-tongs and knife-rests were plated; all the rest of the articles were silver, and worth more than 50l.; I have seen none of the plate again- I saw the box at Marylebone office - (looking at it) this is it; I know it well - I saw nothing of Gibson or Lewis.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. After missing the plate-chest did you go into the kitchen? A. No, I came out, and met my fellow-servant in the passage, and then all the other servants came; Poole came out of the kitchen with them, on my giving the alarm - I do not know whether he afterwards went into the kitchen, for I did not go in; I went out to look for a Policeman - he staid in the house a few minutes; I could not see a Policeman, and returned - I said, "I cannot see one, and will go and tell Mr. Young;" Poole was there then.

COURT. Q. Does the door fasten in any particular way? A. My pantry door fastens with a spring lock; nobody who was a stranger could open it; Poole merely walked in there with the footman when he was going to wash the tea things.

JAMES MITCHELL . I was in Mr. Young's service in October, as footman. and had lived there eight months. I knew Poole by his coming to the house; I saw him at the house on the Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday - I saw him about five minutes to six o'clock on the Wednesday night- he came into my pantry that night, but he went into the butler's pantry, and had a glass of beer; I saw nothing more of him that night. On the Thursday night, about half-past nine o'clock, as I sat at supper, I heard a key put into the area door, as if it was my fellow-servant coming; the door was fast - I went to the kitchen staircase, and seeing the door was shut I took no further notice, as nobody was there; I saw Poole walk by as I went to the area door, after I heard the noise - he passed by the area gate, on the pavement; he said to me as I was out at the area door, "James, what are you looking for?" I said I thought I heard somebody put a key into the door, as if Mallett had come in and gone out again - he came down the steps into my pantry, and stopped about half an hour - three of my fellow-servants were there; I let him out at the area gate, and he took leave of the butler as she went along the passage.

Q. Did you see Poole on the Friday night? A. Yes, at a few minutes before nine o'clock - I first saw him at the area door, down the steps; I said, "Why, Arthur, it is like an appointment, for Sarah is here," (who was an old fellow-servant of his) - he went up to her, and shook hands with her; she had come to return an umbrella which she had borrowed - Poole came back to me, and said,"James, did not I leave an umbrella here last night?" I said No, I had not seen one; I was in the butler's pantry - the butler said, "Arthur, you might as well walk a little way with Sarah;" he said, "I am otherwise engaged;" the butler said, "If you won't, I will;" he went, and said he should he home by nine o'clock; I said, "No you will not, for it is nine now;" he said he should be back in about a quarter of an hour; the butler's pantry was open at this time - he left me and Poole in the pantry; he returned in about twenty minutes - I put out the lamp in the pantry before the butler returned; I know the plate-chest was safe there at nine o'clock - it was safe when I put out the lamp and left the pantry the last time; it was in its place - Poole and I then went into my pantry; I waited there about five minutes till the porter boy came - I let the porter boy in; he delivered the porter in the kitchen - I saw him go out: he could not have taken the box out - I then went and drew the beer, leaving Poole in my pantry; after drawing the

beer I shut the area door, returned to Poole in my pantry, and asked if he would take supper; he said, "Thank you"- we came out of my pantry - I saw that the area door was fast; I shut the butler's pantry door and the hall door - we went along the passage, and Poole made a stop to go to the water-closet, which is within the house; I went into the kitchen, leaving him to go to the water-closet, which is about ten yards from the kitchen - he was absent two or three minutes, then returned to the kitchen, and took supper; I had heard a noise at the water-closet door, as if Poole was coming out - that was before supper; he took his seat at the table; the butler came in in about ten minutes, and said, "Jem, the small plate-chest is gone; you must have left the door open;" there was a general alarm, and Poole came out with the other servants.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is the area door lock like a common stable lock, opened by pressure? A. No, the butler's pantry opens by the pressure of the finger - I had pulled that door too when I came out with the prisoner; I am positive it was shut - I did not fasten it till I returned from drawing the beer: I had not clasped it - I shut it too before I went to supper; I never saw such a lock before - it does not open so easy as a stable lock; it opens by the pressure of the thumb over the handle - the spring is sunk in; any body looking at it could see that; I saw the beer boy going up the area steps; I was not in the pantry after he went out - Poole was absent a minute or two; the handle of the water-closet makes a noise, and there is a handle to the butler's pantry door - I am sure it was the handle of the water-closet I heard; Poole remained some time in the house - he made no attempt to go away: I do not believe he would have gone unless the maid-servants had told him to go; he staid about half an hour after I had invited him to supper, and about five minutes after the alarm; he said, in the butler's pantry, when the alarm was given, that he was a witness that I had shut the area door, which was the truth.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You heard the water-closet door shut? A. I heard a noise, as if it was shut - Poole staid two or three minutes after I heard that door shut before he made his appearance in the kitchen; the lock of the pantry door projects in - the spring dents into the wood; after the lamp in the pantry was put out it would be darkness; there was a lamp in the passage.

GILBERT AINSLIE YOUNG , ESQ. I live at No.2, Upper Portland-place, in the parish of Marylebone , and keep the house. On the 28th of October my attention was called to the state of my pantry; I discovered that one of my plate chests was gone - I went for a Policeman, and began a search; I did not see Poole in my house that night - he was brought to my house about eight o'clock next morning, by a Policeman - I did not make him any threat or promise; I took a memorandum in writing of what he stated to me at the time; (reads) - he said he had slept, on the Friday night, with one David Lewis , at a coffee-house, No.20 or 21, Great Titchfield-street, kept by Mr. Lacy - I asked how he came at my house that night; he said he called about nine o'clock, and asked James, the servant, for an umbrella, which he supposed he had left there; that he went into the butler's pantry, who was talking to Sarah Fulbrook, who had left my service about two months or six weeks, that he could not hear distinctly what the butler said to Sarah, but he asked him to go home with her, and as soon as the butler left the house he went into the footman's pantry with the footman, but did not remain there above five minutes, and was not alone from the time he came into the house till he left; but on recollection he said, "I now remember I was alone while James went to draw the beer, but I was not alone at any other time;" that after he had finished his supper he heard the butler return - that he heard high words in the passage, went out with the other servants, saw the butler go to where the chest usually stood, and point out to the servants that it was gone - he was told by the butler that he had better go out of the house before I came down; that he accordingly went for a Policeman with James, the footman; that he went as far as the New-road, and subsequently returned up Portland-place, as far as Weymouth-street, and met Lewis in Weymouth-street, by Portland-road - Lewis asked him to go to the Bull's Head in Dean-street, and he borrowed 6d. of his landlady, who he had seen standing at the door of his lodging, in Charlton-street - they had three pints of beer at the Bull's Head, and as he did not like to return to his lodging that night he went and slept with Lewis, in Titchfield-street, as he did not wish to disturb the people at his lodging, as he had remained so late at the Bull's Head - that it was seven o'clock in the morning when he left Titchfield-street, and went to Mr. Withers', in Dean's-court, Soho, a shoemaker, who he was in the habit of working with - he there heard the officers had been making inquiry for him, in consequence of which he returned immediately to his lodging, in Charlton-street, gave himself up to the Police, and was brought to my house.

Q. Have you seen some knife-rests and a claret-lable? A. Yes, these are them (looking at them) - I can swear positively to the lable, as it corresponds in pattern with mine, and the knife-rests correspond in pattern, but have no particular mark - in consequence of information I went with the officers (Thompson, Harrison, and Clark) to Benjamin's house, in Cutler-street, Houndsditch - we took the prisoner Gibson with us; Gibson and Harrison entered the house a very short time before I did - the house was searched, and Benjamin taken into custody - nothing of mine was found; the officers said they were in search of some plate, which was stolen from Portland-place - he said he knew nothing of it, and that he would know nothing of it; I am not aware that any further questions were asked.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You took down, from Poole's lips, what he said? A. I took the substance of it; what he said was voluntary - he had lived with me seven or eight months; I received an excellent character with him, and was prepared to give him one also.

WILLIAM MALLETT . I swear to one of the knife-rests, by one of the knobs being loose - it comes off occasionally - I am sure it is Mr. Young's, and believe the claretlabel to be his.

ELLEN LACY . I am the wife of John Lacy, a tailor, at No.20, Great Titchfield-street; there is a coffee-shop there - Lewis worked with my husband - I have known Gibson about seven weeks. On a Friday night, in October, between nine and ten o'clock, Gibson and Lewis came to my house; I and my husband were looking out of win

dow at the time - they had a small box, carrying it between them; I believe this to be the box - they went up stairs with it, into the front garret, where Lewis lodged and slept - Lewis came down, asked me for a light, and I went up to the room; I think Lewis carried the light up- I saw the box opened in the room; it appeared to be all of plate - my husband was in the room, and as soon he saw it open he thought it had not come into the house the right way - he said he thought the property did not belong to them, and both of us were in a great fright about it - my husband requested them to take it out of the house directly, and so did I - my husband then went down stairs, and said he would see nothing of it; Gibson took a handkerchief from his pocket, I believe - I know was his; he laid it on the floor, and they emptied the box, at the plate into the handkerchief, tied up the four corners of it, and several articles projected out - Lewis took he bundle off the floor, put it on his arms, and said, I can never carry it through the street like this, without its being seen;" he said, "Mrs. Lacy, will you carry I round to Gibson's lodging for us?" he did not say how, and without any thought or consideration of the danger I as exposing myself to, I said I would - Lewis walked before me, as I did not know my way; Gibson remained at our house - as we went up Titchfield-street Lewis met a young man, who I believe to be Poole, but when I saw him at the office I should not have known him but for his dress - they walked on some distance before me; I went to a house, which I heard was in Charlson-street, but I do not know - it seemed a good distance from my house; they went up stairs before me to a garret, and I went up; Mrs. Gibson was the only person there before we went - Lewis and Poole. I believe, went up before me (the woman I had seen there the night before, called herself Mrs. Gibson, and she called on me the next day) - as soon as I went into the room I said nothing, but threw the bundle out on the bed, with the plate in it, just as it was - two knife-rests and a claretable were left at my house; I believe those produced to be the same - Lewis went home with me; I know a stranger slept with him that night, but I did not see the person - a person, named Withers, called on me; he was quite a stranger to me - the knife-rests and label were found at my house, but I was not at home then - I was in the yard of the Police-office on the Saturday after, and gave Thompson, the Policeman, information of the matter voluntarily - it was about twelve o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you were terribly frightened that night, when you took the things away? A. Yes - nobody but my husband desired me to give information; he was taken up in consequence of the information, and so was I - we were kept in the watch-house from Saturday night till Monday; from the state of mind I was in I should be sorry to swear to a person, unless I had seen him before, and do not positively swear to Poole - I think it was him; he wore remarkable sort of clothes - I had not much view of his face, for I hurried out of Gibson's as fast as I could; he wore a brown coat with brass buttons, and a pair of grey trousers - I knew him by his clothes; I was not sure of his face - I think I went up to the attic (from the appearance of the room), but will not swear it was not the second floor - I was very frightened or I should not have carried it through the street, for the dearest friend I had - I did it from fright and want of thought.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. Your husband stood at the bar just now? A. Yes - I do not know of any arrangement that no evidence should be offered against him; I do not know the meaning of it - I heard last night that he was going to have an acquittal.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You saw a great deal of plate brought into your house, did you ever see so much before? A. No - I was alarmed at their bringing it there, and glad to carry it any where to get it out - I went, and told the Policeman next day; at that time neither I nor my husband had been taken, or questioned about it.

JOSEPH WITHERS . I am a boot and shoemaker - Poole was in my employ, as an apprentice. On Friday night, the 28th of October, Mr. Young called on me - I saw Poole next morning, the 29th; he rang my bell at seven o'clock to come to work, as usual - I told him some officers had been after him, and asked him what they came about - he said he did not know, it was not any thing concerning him, for he was innocent of every thing - I told him a gentleman had been with them, describing him, and that the officers said it was Mr. Young; I asked what he had been doing - he said let what would come against him he had been doing nothing; I said it was very strange so many officers should come after him, if he was innocent - he said he was innocent; after breakfast I was going to take some work home, and he said he would go to his lodging - as I was going up Bernard-street he asked me to go to Mr. and Mrs. Lacy's coffee-shop, in Titchfield-street, which I did, and to tell her to make away with the box and the other little articles she had had given to her - Mrs. Lacy pulled the box out from under the bed, and lifted up a piece of carpet at the foot of the bedstead; she took a pair of knife-rests and a claret label from a hole in the floor, covered up - I was to tell them to burn or make away with the box and articles, as Poole was to say that he slept there that night - I told Mrs. Lacy all this; she seemed very much frightened, and put the things down the hole again.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He did not say he had slept there, but that he was to say so? A. No - he did not say he had brought the things there; he had lived with me about six months - he did not lodge with me; he generally left me about nine o'clock to go home - he told me that he would go to his lodging directly, and wait there for the officers to come; he protested all through that he was innocent of the robbery - he left me about nine o'clock- I went to his lodging about eleven, but did not see him.

DANIEL MOORE . I am a Policeman of the division D. I apprehended Poole at No. 10, Charlton-street, about half-past nine o'clock on Saturday morning, the 29th of October, at his own lodging - when he came into the house he asked his landlady for the key of his own door, and at that moment I stepped up, seized him by the arm, and told him to come with me - he asked what for? I said he would know in a little time what it was for; he said, "I partly guess what it is for, for I have received information this morning, that there were several Police-constables after me last night, and rather than absent myself from my lodging I have come home, as I am not ashamed to show my face;" he said he had always an invitation from Mr.

Young's servants to go to the house whenever he liked - that on Friday he went and supped with them, and after supper, the butler who had been out, came home, and found the door open, also the pantry door open, and the plate-chest gone, and gave an alarm that his master was robbed; the footman came out, and words arose between them - he followed the footman, who told him as such a thing had happened, it was improper he should remain at the house longer; that he went off directly, and on his way met Lewis, who asked him to go to the Bull's Head, and have a pint or two of beer together - they sat part of the night together, that he(Poole) having no money, went to his landlady, and borrowed 6d. of her; they went to the Bull's Head, and remained there from ten to twelve o'clock, then went to Lewis' lodging, and remained there till the morning; he said all this voluntarily - I went to the station-house, and gave information to the inspector that he was suspected of the robbery which took place on the 28th.

CHARLES CLARKE. I am a Policeman. I apprehended Gibson in Eden-court, Regent-street, at a public-house - I told him I wanted him, by information I had got from Lewis; he asked what for - I told him, and he said he knew nothing about it; I told him it was for a robbery at Mr. Young's, Portland-place, and asked if he knew Arthur Poole ; he said he knew a young man named Arthur, but could not say whether it was Poole; I took him to the station, and found two sovereigns, 27s. 6d. in silver, and 6d. in copper - the inspector ordered me to lock him up, and go after Hall, in consequence of what Lewis' had told us. On Saturday evening, after Gibson heard Lewis' confession at the office, he told me Lewis had not spoken the truth - he said there was a pair of knife-rests which he had not named, and a claret-label left behind at Mrs. Lacy's, which Lewis had not mentioned; we then went to Lacy's, and found the rests and lable - Mr. Lacy told his little girl to get them, and they were produced; I and Thompson went to Eden-street - Hall came in with another man; and they had handkerchiefs on which Lewis had described.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q.At what time did you apprehended Gibson? A. About eight o'clock in the evening: he came into the tap-room while I was there - he said Lewis had not spoken all the truth.

The prisoners made no Defence.

THOMAS HARLEY. Poole lodged at my house, No. 10, Lower Charlton-street. The night before he was taken I lent him 6d. out of the drawer; my wife stood between me and the door; I saw her hand it to him - I have known him between three and four months; he hore a sober honest character.

Two other witnesses gave Poole a good character.

POOLE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

GIBSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

HALL and BENJAMIN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-15

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

15. WILLIAM WILLIAMS and GEORGE WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , at Chiswick, 1 sheep, price 45s. , the property of Samuel Minton .

SECOND COUNT, for killing a sheep, price 45s., with intent to steal the carcase; against the Statute.

SAMUEL MISTON . I am a butcher , and live at Turnham-green. On the night of Wednesday, the 23rd, or the morning of the 24th of November, I lost a sheep from a field near Turnham-green ; I had seen it on Wednesday afternoon, about three o'clock; it was not in the field then - on Thursday afternoon, about three or four o'clock, I was informed it was gone, and found it was so; the prisoners lived in the neighbourhood; I have since seen the skin, head, and part of the entrails - they were left in the field, where the sheep had been slaughtered; I know the sheep to be mine, from the skin - the prisoners were taken up on the Saturday; it was worth 45s. - I had only bought it on the Wednesday; some mutton was produced to me, which I compared with the skin, and can swear it was a portion of the mutton which must have been in that skin; there was the tail left in the skin, and I could match the meat with the tail; I first saw the mutton at the station-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had you known the prisoners before by sight? A. I must have seen them, but do not recollect them; they are gardeners - William has several children, and three sons grown up; George is one of his sons - two of his other sons have been taken up and discharged; I had thirty sheep - we make an ochre mark on the skin when we buy them, and that mark was left on the skin, and that is the only mark I can swear to; I had sold none of them, nor butchered them -I slaughtered some on the Wednesday; I was not present when they were slaughtered - I saw the mutton, which I swear to because a portion of the tail was in the skin; that is the only reason - the mutton had been salted down- I saw it on the Saturday; I must have lost the sheep on Wednesday night or early on Thursday morning, and on Saturday the prisoners were taken; I saw the mutton on the Saturday night at the station-house - it did not appear to have been salted long.

WILLIAM BONEVAL CHURCH . I am a Police-serjeant. I heard of this robbery, and applied to Mr. Scott for a search-warrant; I went to the house of William Williams, and saw him in the house; I told him my business, that I came on suspicion of his having stolen a sheep - he said I might search, which I did; I left a man below, to prevent any body going in or out, and I wished the front door to be shut, but he would not allow that; I searched the cellar, and there found a hatchet, which appeared to me to have recently cut up meat - William Williams went out into the garden, and began to dig up celery; I directed the Police-constable to watch him from the window - I went up stairs to the first floor, and found two pans in a safe there, containing a quantity of mutton; it had a little salt on it - the constable I left below was called from the window, as a noise was made in front, and during his absence William Williams made his escape from the garden- this was on Saturday, the 26th; there were 18lbs. or 20lbs. of mutton - the Policeman would not suffer any body to come in at the front door; I left the mutton in possession of the Policeman below, and went in pursuit of William Williams , but did not find him; he came to his own house about ten o'clock that night, very much in liquor, and I secured him - he offered a great deal of resistance, but I secured him - on my return to the house, about half-past four o'clock that afternoon, two of the sons came

to the door, and I took them - they were afterwards discharged; I found George Williams on the Monday evening, near the Pack Horse, Turnham-green, with a bundle under his arm, going towards Brentford; he told me himself that he lived with his father - the moment I told him he was my prisoner he threw his bundle away, and a girl who was present, and appeared to be in his company, picked it up; he said the bundle contained a coat for his father, but I did not examine it, as she went away with it; I ran after him, and secured him: on the Tuesday morning I went with my brother officer, with George Williams ' shoe, and examined the footmarks in the field from which the sheep was stolen, and found they exactly corresponded with the marks, the heel of one particularly, it having half a tip of iron, and the other no tip - the one with a half tip corresponded exactly; the other appeared to be the same, but would not exactly tally - I took William's shoes also to compare, but could find no marks to correspond with them; there were many shoe marks there - I heard William Williams say, before he went before the Magistrate, that he had bought the mutton, and would clear the robins, meaning his sons; Mr. Minton saw the mutton at the station-house on the Saturday night, and said he had not the least doubt of it being his; it is in Court, and does not appear to have been cut up by a butcher - the chump end of the loin exactly corresponded with the tail which remained in the skin where the bone had been cut in two.

Cross-examined. Q. You found the mutton in several pieces? A. Yes; the prisoners live very near the prosecutor - I heard of the sheep being stolen on the Friday; it was generally known that inquiry was making about it: William occupies the house - he seemed much flurried; the mutton was in a safe in the first floor room - it is common for poor people to have a hatchet; William was very drunk when he made resistance - he did not tell me he had bought the meat at Brentford; the field the sheep was slaughtered in was closed on one side by a wooden fence and a bedge on the other side; I examined the marks on Tuesday, before twelve o'clock - it is a grass field, but the marks were close to the bedge, where there is no grass; I swear one shoe has not had a tip on it.

MR. MINTON. I have been a butcher seven years - the mutton certainly had not been cut up by a butcher; I never saw any cut so.

JOHN REYNOLDS . I am a Policeman. I heard of Minton losing his sheep on the Friday afternoon, and on the Saturday morning I was at Queen-square; before I went away I advised my brother officer to get a search-warrant, as I suspected the prisoner; I returned at night from Queen-square, and went to assist in taking the elder prisoner at his own house - he was very drunk, and made a great deal of resistance, called for his spade, and said he would split our heads in pieces; the mutton was taken to the station-house before I got there - Minton saw it at the station on Monday, and claimed it; I never saw any cut by a butcher in that way: I was present on Monday when George was secured, on the road to Brentford - we had been looking for him from the Saturday, but could not find him; he had a bundle, which he threw away - a girl with him took it up, and went away with it; I heard William say he had bought the mutton, and would clear his robins, by which I understood his children: I went to the field, saw the shoes fitted to the marks on the Tuesday morning, and some corresponded with George's shoe - in my judgment that shoe made the impressions.

Cross-examined. Q. You examined them six days after the sheep was slaughtered? A. It was Tuesday morning; I did not search their house; the father was in custody at the time I took the son, and the meat was in possession of the officer; a reward of twenty guineas had been offered for the apprehension of the thieves - I did not see the bills till the Friday; they were at the station-house: I did not see any posted; the shoes were given to the prisoner again.

MR. MINTON. I saw the tip of the shoe compared, and think the footmarks could not have been made so long as the sheep had been slaughtered.

William Williams' Defence. I am innocent.

ISAAC JONES . I am a labourer, and live at Turnhamgreen, three or four hundred yards from Williams', and have known him two or three years. I was going to Brentford last Tuesday fortnight, about half-past two or three o'clock, and met old Williams against the Star and Garter, at Kew-bridge, walking towards Minton's premises, and in his road home - he said he had been to Brentford, and had some mutton in his blue apron; I saw several parts of it, part of a neck, and a piece of a loin - there might be 20lbs. or 24lbs. altogether: be bore an honest character - Tuesday is market day at Brentford.

COURT. Q. Are you sure this was last Tuesday fortnight? A. Yes, the Tuesday before he was taken up.

One witness gave the prisoners a good character.

W. WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 54.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his age and family.

G. WILLIAMS - NOT GUILTY .

[Dec. 7.]

Reference Number: t18311201-16

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

16. ROBERT SPRINGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , at St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel, 6 handkerchiefs, value 1l.; 2 shawls, value 8l.; 1 apron, value 3d.; 1 tea-caddy, value 4s.; 2 yards of cambric, value 2s.; 2 razors and case, value 3s.; 1 decanter, value 10s.; 1 snuff-box, value 6d.; 2 brushes, value 1s. 6d.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 3 sovereigns, 8 half-crowns, 15 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 21 1/2d. in copper monies, the property of William Wilkinson , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM WILKINSON . I am a baker , and live in Baker's-row, in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel - the prisoner lived five days in my family, as a journeyman . On the 23rd of November I went to bed at twelve o'clock, leaving him up in the bakehouse - I left the money stated in the indictment locked up in the secretary; there were three sovereigns, about 35s. 6d. in silver, and the other property was safe - I value the whole at about 15l.; I got up at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, and missed the prisoner and the property - he had given me no notice; it was his duty to have been in the shop: I went that morning to the station-house in Mile-end-road, and the inspector gave me information; I found the prisoner at the watch-house in Denmark-street, with the money and property all in the shawl; he asked me to forgive him.

THOMAS ARNOLD . I am a Policeman. On the 24th of November, about half-past three o'clock in the morn

ing, I saw the prisoner in Whitechapel-road, about three hundred yards from the prosecutor's, with a bundle under his arm; I asked where he got the bundle - he said he had come from Colchester; I asked what was in it - he said a few old stockings and things of his own, and an old broken box; I took him to the station: the prosecutor came and owned the things.

WILLIAM CARR . I was on duty with Arnold - his statement is correct.

WILLIAM WILKINSON. This is my property, and the shawl it is in - the money is the same as I lost.

[Dec. 2] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, on account of his youth, and believing it to be his first offence.

Reference Number: t18311201-17

Second Middlesex Jury,

Before Lord Chief Justice Tyndal.

17. JOHN BISHOP , THOMAS WILLIAMS , and JAMES MAY , were indicted for the wilful murder of Carlo Ferarai, alias Charles Ferrier .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be a certain male person, whose name is unknown.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS. CLARKSON. and BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HILL . I am porter at the dissecting-room at King's-college, Somerset-house. On Saturday, the 5th of November, about a quarter to twelve o'clock, the bell of the dissecting-room rang; I answered it, and found Bishop and May at the door - I knew them before: May asked if I wanted any thing - I said not particularly, and asked what he had got; he said a male subject: I asked him what size - he said it was a boy about fourteen years of age; I asked the price: he said twelve guineas - I said I could not think of giving that price for it; we did not care much about it, for we did not particularly want it, but if he would wait I would see Mr. Partridge, who is the demonstrator of anatomy; I left them, and told Mr. Partridge - he said he would see them; I went and told them to go round to the place appropriated for them, and when in that room Mr. Partridge joined them; they did not produce the body - there was a difference about the price at first; Mr. Partridge did not agree with them - he was talking with May in the room; May said he should have it for ten guineas - he went into the dissecting-room, leaving me with them; they asked me how it was to be, if we were going to have it - I went to Mr. Partridge, returned, and told them he offered nine guineas; May said he would be d - d if it should come in for less than ten guineas: he was tipsy at the time - May stood outside the door, for a necessary purpose; Bishop called me aside, and said, "He is drunk, it shall come in for nine guineas within half an hour" - whether May heard this I cannot say, but I think he must; they then left; May and Bishop returned the same afternoon, about a quarter-past two o'clock, in company with Williams and a person named Shields; they had a hamper - they came to the room appropriated for them; I was called - I went to the door, unlocked it, and to the best of my recollection the hamper was off the head of Shields, the porter; (I knew him as such) - all four persons stood round the hamper: it was on the ground; they all four came in - I told two of them to remain there: I could not let them through the body of the college - May and Bishop carried the hamper through into the other room, they opened it between from, and in it was a sack, containing the body in question; May turned it out of the sack very carelessly, as he was tipsy; I looked at it, and both May and Bishop observed that we could not have a fresher, or that it was a very good, one - I said Yes, it was certainly fresh; I observed that it was particularly fresh, and made some remarks upon it to myself. in consequence of which I went to Mr. Partridge; I asked the prisoners what the body had died with: they said they did not know, it was no business of mine or theirs - I cannot say which said so; it was said in the hearing of both.

Q. When the body was produced from the sack was it in such a form as it would he if it came from a coffin? A. No, the left arm was turned up stiff, and the fingers clinched - I went to Mr. Partridge, and detailed to him what I had seen, and what I thought; he returned with me to the room where the body was, but before that I had taken the prisoners into another room where there was a fire, and told them to wait there - after Mr. Partridge saw the body he went to the secretary - the prisoners remained by the fire; some of the students saw the body, and their suspicions were created - Mr. Partridge returned to the prisoners, showed them a 50l. note, and said he must get that changed and he would pay them; he had some gold in his purse, and Bishop said, "Give us what money you have got, and I will call on Monday for the remainder;" May said if the note was given to him he would get it changed - Mr. Partridge smiled and said, "Oh no!" and left them without giving them any money - they remained there; Partridge returned in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes - he did not see them; Mr. Mayow came in with the Police, and they were all taken into custody - before that, as I left the room the body was in, Bishop said that when I paid them I was to give him only eight guineas, in the presence of Williams, and to give him the other guinea, and he would give me half a crown; I delivered the body to Rogers, also the hamper and sack - I accompanied them, and delivered the same body, hamper, and sack to Mr. Thomas, the superintendent; I know the body had not been laid out in a coffin, for there was no saw-dust about the head.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. The conversation you have detailed was with May and Bishop only? A. No, Williams was in the college, but not in the same room - he was present when the 50l. note was offered.

MR. RICHARD PARTRIDGE . I am demonstrator of anatomy at the King's-college. On Saturday, the 5th of November, about two o'clock, Hill made a communication to me, in consequence of which I went and looked at the body - the prisoners were not present, but Hill was: the external appearances were suspicious, which induced me to go to the Police - I observed the swollen state of the face, the blood-shot eyes, the freshness of the body, the rigidity of the limbs, and a cut over the left temple; the lips were swollen - no other circumstance attracted my attention; I did not observe the tongue particularly - I do not recollect whether I saw the prisoners before I went to the Police; I returned to the college, and showed May and Bishop a 50l. note - I found them near the stairs leading to the anatomical department; I proposed that change should be got for the note, with a view to detain them till the Police arrived - I more particularly observed the body on the fol

lowing day, Sunday, at the Police-station, Covent-garden, where it was in the possession of Mr. Thomas, the superintendent; Mr. Beaman and several medical gentlemen were with me - the external appearances were, the muscles were still flat, and rigid, though not so much so as the day before; there was a wound on the temple, which did not injure the bone - that was the only appearance of external injury; on the scull, beneath the scalp or bone there was some blood effused; on opening the body the whole contents of the abdomen and chest were found to be in a healthy condition - the stomach was full; before the chest and abdomen were examined, the scull was taken off, and the brain examined - that was perfectly healthy, as well as the spinal part; in cutting down to remove the bone which conceals the spinal part at the back of the neck, we found a quantity of coagulated blood within the muscles, and on removing the back part of the body canal, some coagulated blood was found laying in the cavity opposite the blood found in the muscles of the neck - there was blood uncoagulated within the rest of the spinal canal; the spinal marrow appeared perfectly healthy - these are all the remarkable appearances; I think these internal marks of violence were sufficient to produce death - I believe violence had been exerted to have the effect on the spinal cord.

Q. Must those appearances have been produced by some cause inflicted on the back of the neck? A. I believe so; I think a blow from a stick on the back of the neck would have caused those appearances, and think it would produce a rapid death, but perhaps not an instantaneous one.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Upon the external examination you saw nothing to lead you to judge that he had come by a violent death? A.Nothing but suspicion - the blow over the temple did not cause death; I think the coagulation of blood at the back of the neck and the spinal marrow might produce it - I do not say positively that it did, it is my belief.

Q.Might not this have been caused by other means as well as by a blow - by pressure otherwise applied? A. I think not - I cannot conceive any thing but a blow would produce those appearances; if he had fallen it would have been a blow - it might have been done otherwise than by a blow with a stick; I do not think it could have been done by a strong pressure of the knee on the neck.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you observe any other circumstance whatever which could cause death? A. The heart was empty and the countenance flushed, now death has occurred, and only those appearances found afterwards.

COURT. Q. What do you infer from the heart being empty? A. I do not infer any thing from it, except that that accompained with blood-shot eyes, has been found in persons who have died suddenly, and evidently from no violence, but what is called a natural death - I am not aware that the appearances on the spinal cord would be found in persons dying a natural death; they could only be caused by violence, as far as I could judge.

MR. GEORGE BEAMAN . I live in James-street, Covent-garden, and have been a surgeon nine years - I am employed professionally by the parish of St. Paul, Covent-garden. I first saw this body on Saturday night, the 5th of November, about twelve o'clock - it appeared to have died very recently; the weather was very favourable for its preservation - I should say it had not been dead more than thirty-six hours; the face appeared swollen, the eyes full, prominent, and blood-shot, the tongue swollen and protruding between the lips - the teeth had been extracted; the gums were bruised and lacerated, portions of the jaw broken out with the teeth, and at that time there was appearance of blood having issued from the gums - I should think the teeth had been taken from the gums at most within two or three hours after death; I examined the throat, neck, and chest very particularly - no marks of violence were apparent; I made no further observation at that time - I observed a wound over the left eye-brow, about three quarters of an inch long, through the skin to the bone- I pressed that part to ascertain if there was a fracture, and a small quantity of blood oozed from the wound.

Q. Could that blood have oozed from the wound if it had been made after death, by carelessly tumbling it out of the sack? A. I think it might; it was a red coloured bloody serum, not coagulated - I saw the body again about two o'clock on Sunday afternoon, but made no further examination then; the limbs were stiff - they were very stiff on the Saturday night, but not so stiff on the Sunday; I think the body had never been laid out - it was placed in an irregular position, on a board, near the station-house, in the church-yard; it was not opened when I saw it on Sunday, but soon after eight o'clock that evening I further examined it, assisted by Mr. Partridge and other gentlemen - I first, with a sponge and water, cleaused the neck and throat very particularly, but found no scratch nor any mark of violence; I then removed the skin covering the scull, and on the top of the scull we detected a patch of blood about the size of a crown - this appearance must have been produced by a blow given during life; the brain was next examined, and its appearances were perfectly healthy, as described by Mr. Partridge - the body was then turned, for the purpose of examining the spinal marrow, and on removing the skin at the back part of the neck, I should think from three to four ounces of coagulated blood were found among the muscles; that blood must have been effused while the subject was alive - on removing a portion of the spine to examine the spinal marrow a quantity of coagulated blood was laying in the canal, which, by pressure on the spinal marrow, must cause death - there was no injury to the bone of the spine, nor any displacement; all these appearances would follow from a blow with a staff, stick, or heavy instrument - the chest and the cavity of the belly were minutely examined; there was no disease - I should think there was about an ounce of blood in the spinal marrow; the intestines were perfectly healthy - the heart was empty, which is a very unusual circumstance, and denotes sudden death, by which I mean nearly instantaneous, perhaps in two or three minutes, not longer; the stomach contained a tolerably full meal, which smelt slightly of rum - digestion was going on at the time of death, and from the appearance I should think death had occurred about three hours after the meal; I removed the stomach for the purpose of having its contents analysed - the coats of the stomach appeared perfectly healthy; I ascribe the death to a blow on the back of the neck - that observation is verified by experiments I have made on animals, and in every case there was precisely the same appearances.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you use the sponge on the neck and throat to ascertain the extent of any external injury? A. I did it to cleanse the skin perfectly, to detect a scratch if it had been there - the body was not dirty; I found no external mark of injury on the back of the neck - if he had received a blow, and lived some time after, external marks would not necessarily he produced; it would be probable if he had lived.

Q. Do you agree with Mr. Partridge, that only the heart being empty and the flushed state of the countenance, such appearances might present themselves where death had not happened from injury? A. I think it might - I never found the heart empty before; I consider that more a proof of death being rather sudden: I think no blow on the top of the head would produce the appearance on the neck which I have described; any injury on the back of the neck, accidental or not, might produce it.

Q. If a person in a fit of apoplexy fell into the arms of a person or on a hard substance, might these appearances present themselves? A. I should hardly think it possible - I will not say it could not have happened if he had fallen with his neck on any projecting body; I will not swear how long after death the teeth were extracted.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long after death should you suppose they had been removed? A. I should think within two or three hours; I never knew death from apoplexy to leave the brain perfectly healthy, but I believe such cases have occurred in serous apoplexy - there was no serum in this boy's brain, nor the smallest symptom of apolexy; he was about fourteen years old, in very good health, not predisposed for apoplexy: I have opened many bodies which died of apoplexy, and always found marks to account for it, but I have read of some cases where there were no marks; if he received a blow on the neck, and died within a minute or two, there would be no external mark.

FREDERICK TYRRELL , ESQ. I am one of the surgeon's of St. Thomas' hospital. I have heard Mr. Beaman's evidence, and took notice of it - I agree with the conclusion he has come to in all material points; I never knew an instance of serous apoplexy in which the brain has not denoted some appearance of that kind; I have examined many - there has always been a certain quantity of fluid found sufficient to denote the death from that cause; the fluid acts by pressure on the brain generally. I hold some public appointments, and have lectured on anatomy for some time.

COURT. Q. You have heard the appearances described on the post mortem examination of the spinal canal, and the extravasted blood found there - in your judgment could those appearances have been produced but by violence? A.Certainly not, only by violence; it is not necessary that there should be any bruise, even if the patient survives many days - it is not necessary that there should be a blue or bruised state of the skin.

JOHN EARL ROGERS . I am an inspector of the Police. On Saturday, the 5th of November, I received a body from Mr. Hill - I conveyed it to the station-house, and gave it into the custody of Mr. Thomas; I saw Hill put it into the hamper.

JOHN WILSON . I am a Policeman. I assisted in apprehending the prisoners at King's-college, on the 5th of November, and in Catherine-street May resisted a great deal, and said he would not be taken; he struck me, but with the assistance of other officers, I brought him to the watch-house; he struck me because I would not let Bishop and him talk together.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS . I am superintendent of the Police division F. On the 5th of November I received information - I sent Rogers, Wilson, and others to King's-college; they afterwards returned with May and Williams in custody - I sent Rogers more particularly for the body - I think Bishop and Shields were the first persons brought to me, and then May and William; Rogers afterwards came with Hill, bringing the body, sack, and hamper - when the prisoners were all at the station, and the body and hamper in the back room, I told May he was charged on suspicion of having improper possession of a subject - he said, in the presence of the others, that he had nothing at all to do with it, that the subject was that gentleman's property, pointing to Bishop, and that he had merely accompanied him to get the money; I asked Bishop how he got the body - he said he was merely removing it from Guy's-hospital to King's-college; I asked whose it was - he said it was his own; I then asked Williams what he had to say - he said, "I know nothing at all about it; I merely went to King's-college, out of curiosity, to see the building:" I asked Bishop, when he said the body was his own, what he was - he said he was a bl - y body-snatcher; I should observe, that the prisoners were under the effects of liquor in my judgement; May and Bishop more particularly so; May was carried in on all-fours, and his frock over his face - he was scuffling; I ordered the body to be taken out of the hamper, which was done in my presence, and laid on a table; it struck me it was the body of a person who had recently died, as there was blood trickling from the mouth; the front teeth were all out - in consequence of further information I went to the house of Mr. Mills, Newington-causeway, on the Tuesday following, and received from him twelve teeth, which I now produce; I went on Tuesday, the 8th, to a cottage, No. 3, Nova Scotia-gardens, and in a back room, on the ground floor, I found a trunk; I went to the same cottage on the 20th of November, to make further search, and in the front parlour I found a hairy cap, covered with dirty linen, but I think that was by accident, as the things had been turned over before - I think I had seen the cap hanging up on the 8th; I produce it with the sack and hamper.

HENRY LOCK . In November last I was waiter at the Fortune of War, Giltspur-street; I know the prisoners -On Friday, the 4th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I remember seeing them all three at the Fortune of War - they had some drink there, and staid till about twelve; there was some man, a stranger to me, came with them, and all four went away together - the man appeared to be in their company, and about three o'clock the same afternoon the three prisoners came again, and staid till about dusk, about five - all three then went away together; they all three returned about eight o'clock the same evening, with a man who appeared to be a coachman, not the one who was with them before - the coachman had something to drink, and left them; one of them said in the

tap-room that he had had a ride; they all went into the taproom for some time, and a little before nine o'clock May went to the bar with something in a silk handkerchief, which afterwards turned out to be teeth, for I saw him pour water on the silk handkerchief and rub the teeth in his hand - he afterwards opened the handkerchief, so that I could see they were human teeth; I remarked to May that they appeared to be young ones, and were worth a few shillings - he said they were worth 2l. to him; they all left together some short time after this - on the following morning, Saturday, about eight o'clock, I saw Bishop, Williams, and Shields there; Bishop, speaking to Williams, said, "What shall we do for a hamper?" Williams made no answer - Bishop asked Shields to go over to the hospital, and get a hamper which was inside the rails; Shields refused to go - Bishop went out of the house himself, and returned shortly after with a hamper; Williams and Shields remained till he returned - they then left the house together; I did not see them again till they were in custody.

THOMAS WIGLEY . I am a porter at different coach-offices. On the 4th of November, about half-past six o'clock, I was at the Fortune of War, and between half-past seven and eight I saw Bishop come in; May followed in five or six minutes afterwards - Bishop sat down on a bench, and May sat down on a bench opposite him; Bishop said to May, "What do you think of our new one, did not he go up to him well, and collar him - was not he a game one?" May said, "I don't know what you mean;" Bishop said, "That is all right, then."

Q. Did May see you in the room? A. Yes; I sat in the corner, having a pint of beer, and he saw me - May got up, and went out; he came back in a few minutes with a handkerchief in his hand, and sat down rubbing it- Williams came in; Bishop said, "There he is; I knew he would come - I knew he was a game one;" Bishop seemed as if he had been drinking; he got up, and said,"I am going home" - May said, "I am not going away yet;" Bishop and Williams went out together - May sat down, but went out presently, and I saw no more of him; Bishop said to May, "You stick by me, I will stick by you;" that was just before he went out for the handkerchief - I did not see them again till they were in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. It was Bishop said, "Was not our new one a game one?" A. Yes - I do not know what he meant.

JAMES SEAGRAVES . I drive a cabriolet. On Friday evening, the 4th of November, I was at the stand in the Old Bailey, with my cab, and at twenty minutes before six o'clock I went into the watering-house to have my tea - Allcroft keeps the house; the waterman fetched me out for a fare, and I saw May and Bishop - I am sure of their persons; May asked if I wanted a job - I said I did not know; he said he wanted a cab, "a long job or a short job," and he led me by the tip of my coat to the near wheel of an errand-cart - Bishop remained by my cab; May told me plainly that he wanted me to fetch a stiff one, by which I understood a dead body - I told him I did not know, what would he stand - he said he would stand a guinea; I said I had not finished my tea, and the horse had not done his corn; May said, "Then we will take tea together;" I went into the watering-house to my tea - May and Bishop followed me, and took their places at the end of the table - they called for tea for two; a person in the room gave me a nudge on the elbow, and gave me a caution, but not in their hearing - I had resolved before not to accommodate them, but had given them to understand I would go; I directed the waterman to get my horse ready, and after tea I went out, got into my cab, and drove to the bottom of the rank, out of their way - I looked round, and saw May and Bishop going up the rank among the coaches, and I left them apparently bargaining with a coachman.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.How do you know this was on Friday? A.Because the person I drive for had a summons that day to attend at Essex-street before the Commissioners - there might be four or five persons in the watering-house.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. The conversation was by the errand-cart outside the house, when you and May were alone? A. Yes; Friday is the day the Commissioners hear summonses.

THOMAS TAVENER . I am waterman at the coach-stand at the Old Bailey. On Friday, the 4th of November, about a quarter to six o'clock, as it was just dark, Bishop and May came down the stand, and May asked me for the cab-man - I said he was in the watering-house at tea; I fetched Seagrave out - they both had smock-frocks on; Seagrave came and spoke to them - I heard them say it was to carry a stiff 'un - I heard Seagrave say he would have nothing to do with it, and he walked into the parlour; they walked in after him.

EDWARD CHANDLER . On the 4th of November I was waiter at the King of Denmark watering-house, Old Bailey - Bishop and May were at that house about six o'clock, I should think; I saw Seagrave there - May and Bishop had half a pint of gin with their tea - I observed May put some gin into Bishop's tea, and heard Bishop say, "Are you going to focus or Burke me?" I cannot say which - it was one of those two words; I know them both, and have not a doubt of them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you serve the gin? A. Yes; I cannot say whether Seagrave had any.

HENRY MANN . I am a hackney-coachman. I was on the stand in Bridge-street, Blackfriars, on Friday, the 4th of November, from five to six o'clock in the evening, and saw May, whom I knew before, with another whom I do not know; May asked if I would take a fare to go with him to Bethnal-green - I said I would not, as I knew what he was.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Had you an opportunity of seeing the other man? A. No, he stood behind me.

GEORGE GISSING . I am twelve years old - my father keeps the Bird Cage, Crabtree-row, near Nova Scotia-gardens. On Friday evening, the 4th of November, about half-past six o'clock, I saw a yellow-bodied hackneychariot draw up opposite my father's house - Bishop's cottage, No. 3, Nova Scotia-gardens, is a short distance from my father's house; I did not see who got out of the chariot - it had stopped before I saw it; I went to the door on seeing it, and saw Williams standing on the fore-wheel, talking with the coachman; I knew Williams before - the

chariot stood there ten or fifteen minutes; the door remained open, as if waiting for somebody - I then saw Williams coming from Nova Scotia-gardens; he had left the chariot and gone down there - he got into the chariot; I then saw a man, whom I did not know, carrying a sack in his arms; Bishop had hold of one end of it, coming on abreast - I knew Bishop before; they put the sack into the chariot - it appeared to have something heavy in it; they put it into the chariot - Williams helped them; he was still in the chariot, and put his arm out to help them - Bishop and the other man then got into the chariot; Williams remained there - it drove up Crab tree-row, which leads to Hackney-road, towards Shoreditch church and Bishopsgate; I am quite sure of Bishop and Williams - the third man was dressed in a smock-frock; I did not notice whether he was short or tall - I believe Bishop is Williams' father-in-law; I recollect one Monday, when it was said he had married Bishop's daughter, they came to our house for beer - I did not know his daughter before.

THOMAS TRAINER . I saw the hackney-chariot that night; I did not know the prisoners before - two of them had on a smock-frock, and one a fustian coat; Ann Channel was standing by with me.

ANN CHANNEL . I was passing the Bird Cage on the evening of the 4th of November: I heard a hackney-chariot, saw it stop, and three men get out - they went down Nova Scotia-gardens; two went first, the third said something to the coachman, and then followed them - I did not stop to see them return; I cannot speak to either of their persons; the first two who passed me had smock-frocks on, the other had a pipe in his mouth, but I did not notice his dress - the coach door continued open, and Trainer stood by the side of it.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am porter at the dissecting-room, Guy's-hospital. On Friday evening, the 4th of November, May and Bishop came there, about seven o'clock - when I opened the door I saw May with a sack, which he brought in; Bishop followed him - they asked if I wanted to purchase a subject; I knew them both before - I declined it; they asked if I would allow them to leave it there till morning; I gave them leave, and it was locked up in a room and joining the theatre during the night - I kept the key myself; Weeks, my assistant, has another key - I saw May and Bishop at the hospital next morning, about twelve o'clock; I had been out, and on my return I ascertained that the sack had been taken away - there was something in it when in my possession, which I supposed to be a dead body; while it was in my care I saw a foot, or a portion of a foot, obtrude from it - I should judge that it was the foot of a youth or a female, it was not large enough for a man; whether it protruded from the mouth of the sack or a hole I cannot say; it was a such a sack as the one produced.

JAMES WEEKS . I am assistant to Davis, at Guy's-hospital. On Friday, the 4th of November, I saw Bishop and May bring a sack there, which appeared to contain a human body - I saw a hole in the sack, and a portion of the knee projected through; the sack produced resembles the one they brought - I have a key of the room, and saw it placed there that night; I kept my key in my possession till the following morning - I saw the three prisoners and Shields next day, about one o'clock; I delivered to them the sack in the same state as I received it - they were all together: May said to me the night before, "Don't let the subject go unless I am present, and Bishop said the same; they brought a hamper with them on the Saturday, like the one produced, and all went away together, Shields carrying it.

JAMES APPLETON. I am procurator at Mr. Grainger's anatomical theatre, Webb-street, Southwark. I know all the prisoners - on Friday evening, the 4th of November, Bishop and May came to the theatre, about half-past seven o'clock, and told me they had a subject for sale; I asked what it was - they said a very fresh subject, a boy about fourteen years of age; I declined to purchase - they did not bring it with them; they both called again the next morning, about eleven o'clock, and made the same offer, but I declined it.

THOMAS MILLS . I live at No. 39, Bridgehouse-place, Newington-causeway. On the 5th of November May called and offered me a set of twelve human teeth - there were six of each jaw; I think it was between nine and ten o'clock - he asked me a guinea for the set; I said one of the front teeth was chipped, which leasened the value, and I would give him 12s.; I said the chipped one lessened the value of the teeth, and I did not believe they belonged to one set; he said he declared, upon his soul, to God, they all belonged to one head, and not long since, and that the body had never been buried - he at last agreed to take 12s., which I gave him, and he left; I examined them particularly afterwards, and found a portion of the gum, and some part of the socket attached to them - I cleaned it off: from that circumstance it appeared to me that the teeth had certainly been wrenched from the jaw by violence - they were so firmly attached I had great difficulty in separating them; I remarked to May that they had certainly belonged to a young subject, or a female - he said, "The fact is, they belong to a boy between fourteen and fifteen years old."

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q.Did not he say they did not look like ground teeth, but were as fresh as if they had never been buried? A. No, he did not.

AUGUSTINE BROOM (through an interpreter). I knew an Italian boy named Carlo Ferrier; I brought him over from Italy about two years ago - he was then about fourteen years old; he lived with me for about six weeks - I saw him alive on the 28th of July, 1830: the last place I knew him to lodge at was Mr. Elliott's, No. 2, Charles-street, Drury-lane; on the 19th of November I saw the body of a boy at the burial-ground near Covent-garden - I can only say that I suppose it to be the boy of whom I have spoken. by his size and hair, but the face I cannot give an opinion upon, from the state it was in, and the teeth were taken out; the size and the hair were exactly the same as Ferrier's - I have not seen that boy alive since.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q.Supposing you had heard nothing about Carlo Ferrier , and had looked at that body, should you at all have known it? -A. Yes, I should, from the hair and size - I should have given the same evidence if I had never heard the boy was killed.

COURT. Q.Have you seen him since July twelve months? A. No; he might grow a little in fifteen months, not much; when I saw his body the first time I could not speak to it, the face being so disfigured.

JOSEPH PARAGELL . I play an organ and pandean

pipes about the streets, with my wife and three children. I knew Carlo Ferrier ; I saw him every morning at Mr. Elliott's, No.2, Charles-street, Drury-lane; I knew he was once in Broom's service - I have known the boy from the 22nd of May, 1830; I saw him about different parts of London - I saw him alive in the Quadrant, Regent-street, at half-past two o'clock on a Saturday afternoon, four weeks before I saw him at the station-house, which will be a mouth ago next Sunday; he was then dead - when I saw him at the Quadrant he had a little cage round his neck, and two white mice in it; he was the same boy as I saw dead at the station-house, undoubtedly - (looking at a cap) I cannot swear to this cap- he always wore a cap; I cannot say whether I ever saw him in one like this - he had one on in the Quadrant, but I cannot say whether it was cloth, leather, or skin; I am sure the shade of this cap is of foreign manufacture.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is it not eleven months since you saw him? A. It was four weeks before I saw him a corpse - he lodged close to me; the rest of the Italian boys live by Saffron-hill - I have seen many about town; I do not keep company with my countrymen here.

MARY PARAGELLI . I am the wife of the last witness, I knew a boy who carried two white nice about; I do not know his name - I saw that boy on Tuesday, the 1st of November, in Oxford-street, near Hanover-square, exactley at a quarter-past twelve o'clock - he had a little cage, like a squirrel's cage, which turns round, with two little white mice in it; I did not speak to him - I do not recollect how he was dressed: he had a little cap on, but it is impossible for me to say what colour, or what it was made of. On Sunday morning, the 6th of November, about nine o'clock, I saw the dead body of the very same boy at the station-house, Covent-garden - I had known him all the summer; I known Broom, but did not know him till the boy had left him - I do not know what name the boy went by; I never spoke to him much - I was with my husband when we saw him in the Quadrant; that was the same boy that I saw dead - I have a son eight years old, who knew the boy well - he went with me to the station-house, and knew him; he is not here.

ANDREW COLLER. I live on Great Saffron-hill - I make bird-cages and sell them in the street. I knew Carlo Ferrier , by seeing him about the street: on Tuesday, the 1st of November, I saw him in Oxford-street, and spoke to him; I saw a dead body at the station-house in Covent-garden on the following Monday - it was the body of the same person as I had seen in Oxford-street; he had a cage, with white mice in it, and a tortoise - he had a cap on his head, something like the one produced; it was torn on one side - I believe this to he the same cap; he had on a blue coat and grey trousers - (looking at a pair of trousers) I observed a large patch on the left knee, and by the patch on the left knee of these trousers I believe them to be the same he had on; they are the same kind - I did not so particularly notice the colour or patch as I did the stitches being so great a distance from each other as these are; I do believe these to be the trousers - I have not seen them since I saw them on the boy in Oxford-street.

JOHN KING. I am ten years old, and live in Crabtree-row, Bethnal-green, facing the Bird Cage, near Nova Scotia-gardens; I live with my mother, who is now confined. I remember one day when my mother was wash ing, seeing a foreign boy near Nova Scotia-gardens - I believe it was on the Thursday before Guy Fawkes's-day, and between one and two o'clock; I was looking down upon him from the lost window, and could not see whether he had a cage or a box, as my mother would not let me to go down to him; I believe it was a cage, for I saw some wire on the top of it - he was standing still, with the cage hanging round his neck, by a string; he had a brown hairy cap on his head - the peak of it was lined with green; the cap produced looks exactly like it - I do not know how long he remained there; I was looking at him a few minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Were you in the first or second floor? A. On the first, not very high from the ground; I was looking out at the lost door, and could see the green of the peak.

MARTHA KING. I am eleven years old; the last witness is my brother - I remember seeing an Italian boy near the Bird Cage public-house; I was at the front part of the house, it was on the Wednesday or Thursday before Guy Fawkes' day, and about twelve o'clock, I am sure it was either Wednesday or Thursday - he was standing still opposite the Bird Cage, with his box slung round his neck, and a cap on his head; the cap was just like this: Bishop's house is about a minute's walk from our house - I have never seen the boy since.

REBECCA BAYLIS . I am the wife of William Baylis , cabinet-maker, of Virginia-row, Bethnal-green; I live opposite the Bird Cage. On Thursday the 3rd of November, about a quarter before twelve o'clock, I saw an Italian boy-(I know the day, because on Wednesday I was at Mr. Bird's sale-room, and it was the day after the sale) - he was very near my own window, standing side-ways; I could see the side of his face and one end of the box, which he had in front of him: I think it was slung round his neck - he had a brown for or seal skin cap on, a small one rather shabby; I could see the peak was lined with green, and cut off very sharp (looking at the cap), it was this colour, but the front appeared to me, to come more pointed - it was a cap much like this; I cannot swear whether this is it: he had on a dark blue or a dirty green jacket, and grey trousers, apparently a dark mixture, but very shabby - about a quarter of an hour after; I had occasion to go to the Virginia Planter , to see if it was time to put on my husband's potatoes - I went a little way down Nova Scotia-gardens to look for my little boy; I saw the Italian boy standing within two doors of No. 3, there are three houses together, and he stood by No. 1: I do not think the jacket produced is the one he had on, I thought it was darker - these have the appearance of the trousers he had on.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You do not think it is the jacket? A. No, it appeared darker at the distance I was, which was about six yards; I will not say it is the same - I have seen Italian boys about several times.

JOHN RANDALL . I am a labourer, and live in Orange-street, Bethnal Green, near Nova Scotia-gardens. On Thursday morning the 3rd of November, between nine and ten o'clock, I saw an Italian boy standing under the window of the Bird Cage public-house, near Nova Scotia-gardens - he had a box or cage with two white mice, the

cage part of the box went round; I turned round to the boy; I saw he looked very cold, and gave him a half-penny, and told him he had better go on - he had on a blue coarse jacket or coat, apparently very coarse, and a brown cap with a bit of leather in front; I did not notice whether it was for or not - it was similar to this in colour, and the jacket was this colour; I did not notice his trousers.

SARAH TRUBIN . I am the wife of John Trubin , who is landlord of the houses, Nos. 1, 2, and 3, Nova Scotia-gardens. I am in the habit of letting those houses and receiving the rents; I let No. 3, to Bishop and his wife last July twelve months, and they lived there till Bishop was taken into custody - he sometimes paid the rent, and sometimes his wife; I let No. 2 to the prisoner Williams about last July: he then went by the name of Head, he occupied that house six or seven weeks - it was afterwards taken by Woodcock, who has been there five or six weeks; it was empty for a few weeks: there are gardens behind the three houses, the fences are low, and there is a gate from No. 2, to a well which is in Bishop's garden, and serves the three houses - there is a privy at the bottom of No. 3, that joins the house I live in round the corner; I have seen Williams at No. 3, at different times since he has left No. 2: I may have seen him there about ten times, and have seen his wife at No. 3, with her mother, who is Mrs. Bishop.

WILLIAM WOODCOCK, JUN. I live with my father at No. 2, Nova Scotia-gardens, next door to Bishop. I know the prisoner Williams; I often saw him at Bishop's - I have seen him there about ten times, and have seen his wife washing there about a fornight or three weeks ago; I have seen her there several times of a morning, about ten or eleven o'clock, and about five in the evening: I saw Williams there two or three days before Guy Fawkes' day, walking in Bishop's garden, and smoaking his pipe.

ABRAHAM KEYMERS . I keep the Feathers public-house, Castle-street, Bethnal Green; about a quarter before twelve o'clock on Thursday night, the 3rd of November, Bishop came to my house with another person, who I think was Williams, but I am not quite certain of him - my house is one or two hundred yards from Bishop's; I think they had a quartern of rum, and half a gallon of beer: they took the beer away with them in a half-gallon can - this is the can (looking at one).

Cross-examined. Q.Who came? A.Bishop, and I think Williams, but I am not quite certain. as I had never seen him before.

WILLIAM WOODCOCK . I went to live at No. 2, Nova Scotia-gardens, on the 17th of October - Bishop lived at No. 3, and I have every reason to believe Williams lived there also - I lived there till after they were apprehended - I do not know that I ever saw Bishop till after he was at the office, but I have seen Williams in the garden of No. 3. twice; the first Sunday after I moved in, and the second Sunday also - I am never at home in the week day, except from one to two o'clock; the first Sunday I was there I was digging the garden up - Williams came, and conversed with me over the rails; he took me away from the part I was digging, and pointed to another part where I could get some lilies - I had been digging directly at the bottom of the garden, and he drew my attention to a spot close to the house, and more particularly within reach of the gate. On the Thursday, before the 5th of November, I went to bed about half-past nine o'clock, which is my usual hour I generally go to sleep almost directly, and suppose I had been asleep four hours, or four hours and a half; when I was awoke, (I was half asleep) - I sleep in the front parlour; I heard footsteps, and thought it was somebody at the back of my premises - I thoroughly awoke myself to be satisfied; I found it was not in my house, but in the adjoining parlour, No. 3 - I distinctly heard three men's footsteps; I remained laying in bed, and did not sit up - I heard a scuffle, which might last about a minute or two at the furtbest, and then all was silent - the scuffling was in the same room as I heard the foo'steps - before I entirely went to sleep again I heard the side gate open; it is a side gate, at No. 3, leading to a path-way, at the left side of the house, called the private-way - I could distinctly hear the footsteps of one person in the room, and heard the footsteps of two persons run by my window - I am positive I heard the footsteps of two leave the house, and I heard them run back again - before they returned I heard the footsteps of one person within the house; the two returned in about a minute, and then I distinctly heard the voices of three persons -I knew the voice of one to he Williams; after that all became silent, and I went to sleep.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Do you know the thickness of the wall between the houses? A. No -I believe about four inches; they are brick - I only suppose Williams lives in Bishop's house, from having seen him twice; he is Bishop's son-in-law.

Q. Was the struggling like three men struggling together? A. I cannot say - I heard a struggling, but considered it a family quarrel; Williams had conversed with me for above two hours on the second Sunday - I am certain of his voice.

COURT. Q, What period was there between the footsteps leaving the house and their returning? A. About a minute or a minute and a half.

HANNAH WOODCOCK . I am the wife of the last witness. Bishop, his wife, and family, with Mr. and Mrs. Williams, lived at No. 3.

JOSEPH HIGGINS . I am a Policeman. On the 9th of November I went to No. 3, Nova Scotia-gardens, about five o'clock in the evening, I searched the house, and found two crooked chisels, a brad-awl, and a file - there was some blood all over the brad-awl, which looked fresh - it is now more dried on; I went on the 11th to May's lodging, No. 4, Dorset-street, New Kent-road - I found some tools, and among other things a pair of breeches, which are here, and when I got to the station-house I observed marks of blood on the back part of them, which appeared fresh - I also found a waistcoat, which appears to have a quantity of clay on it, and some tools - on the 19th I went again to Bishop's house, with Wadey - we searched the garden, behind the house; we tried it with an iron rod, and found something rather soft - I told Wadey to dig there, and the first thing that came up was a jacket and trousers, and a small size shirt - they were close to the palings, about five yards from the back door; we dug in another part of the garden, and found a blue coat, a pair of trousers, with braces attached to them, a

striped waistcoat, which appeared to have been a man's, but was taken in at the back, as if to fit a boy - it had marks of blood on the collar and shoulder; also a shirt, which was torn right up the front - they are here; the jacket has been already produced, and spoken to by the witnesses - these are the trousers which have been spoken to; here is the waistcoat - the stains of blood are not near so plain now; this is the shirt - the whole of these things were found buried in the garden, about twelve inches in the ground.

Q. Are they clothes likely to be useful to children in Bishop's family? A. The coat would be very useful, and has not got a rent in it; it would be very useful for a working boy - there were cinders and ashes over the ground, which would prevent my noticing its having been turned up.

WILLIAM WADEY . I have heard the witness' evidence; it is correct - I have nothing to add.

MR. MILLS re-examined. The teeth had evidently been forced off with great violence - they could be got out with great facility with this brad-awl, but only the front ones - those I had were all front.

EDWARD WARD . (A boy six years and a half old, who appeared perfectly to understand the obligation of an oath). I live in Nova Scotia-gardens; I remember last Guy Fawkes '-day - my mother gave me a half-holiday, before Guy Fawkes '-day; I do not recollect what day of the week it was - I went to Bishop's house on the day I had the half holiday - belived in Nova Scotia-gardens, at a corner house; I have seen three of his children - he has one big boy, another about my age, and a little girl - I saw them that day in a room, next to the little room, and the little room is next to the garden - I played with the children there; I had often seen them before.

Q. Did the children show you any thing that day? A. Yes; two white mice - one little one and one big one; they were in a cage, which moved round and round - I never saw them with white mice before, nor with a cage; I often played with them before - I saw my brother John when I got home, and told him what I had seen.

JOHN WARD . I have heard my brother's statement; I know he had his half-holiday on the Friday, the day before Guy Fawkes day - I remember his coming home, and telling me what he had seen while he was out; we live about one hundred yards from Bishop's.

MR. JAMES CORDER . I am vestry-clerk of St. Paul, Covent-garden. I was apprised of the discovery of this body about five o'clock, on Saturday afternoon, the 5th of November, and have taken some interest in the investigation; I attended the Inquest which was held from day to day - it met on Tuesday afternoon, the 8th of November, and adjourned till Thursday, the 10th, when it closed; in the course of the examination Bishop was produced, and made a statement, before which he received a very strong caution from the Coroner, that he was not obliged to say any thing, but that the evidence affected him, and if he chose to make a statement of a voluntary nature he might, but what he stated might he made evidence for or against him hereafter; I took the liberty of telling him that I was about to take down every word he said, and informed him before I did so, that the inquiry might affect his life - he made a declaration, which I took down from his mouth, read it over to him, and he offered to sign it; May and Williams were also cautioned, and examined the same as Bishop - Williams declined signing his statement.

The statements being read were as follow:-

Bishop said, "I cannot account for the death of the deceased; I got the body out of a grave: the reason why I do not like to say the grave I took it out of is, there are two watchmen in the ground - they entrusted me; they are both men of family, and I do not wish to deceive them; I took it for sale to Guy's-hospital, and as they did not want it I left it there all night and part of the next day, and then I removed it to the King's-college. That is all I can say about it."

May said, "I live at No. 4, Dorset-street, Newington. I went in the country last Sunday week, and returned on the following Wednesday evening; I brought home a couple of subjects with me - I took them to Mr. Grainger's, in Webb street, the same evening, and on the following morning, which was Thursday, I removed them to Mr. Davis', at Guy's, and after receiving the money went away; I went to the Fortune of War in Smithfield, and I staid there I dare say for two or three hours - between four and five o'clock, to the best of my recollection. I went to Nag's Head-court, Golden-lane, and there I stopped with a female till eleven or twelve the next day, Friday; from Golden-lane I went to the Fortune or War again, and there I stopped drinking till six o'clock, or past - Williams and Bishop both came in there: they asked me if I would stand any thing to drink, which I did - Bishop then called me out, and asked me where I could get the best price for things - I told him where I had sold two at Guy's, and he told me he had got a good subject, and he had been offered eight guineas for it; I told him I could get more for it - he said all I could get over nine I might have for myself, and I agreed to it; we went from there to the Old Bailey, and we had some tea at the watering-house in the Old Bailey, leaving Williams at the Fortune of War: after we had tea we called a chariot off the stand, and drove to Bishop's house- when we came there Bishop showed me the lad in a box or trunk; I then put it into a sack, and took it to the chariot myself, and took it from thence to Mr. Davis', at Guy's; Mr. Davis said, "You know, John, I cannot take it, because I took two of you yesterday, and I have not got names enough down for one, or else I would;" I asked him if I might leave it there that night, and he said, "Certainly"; Bishop then desired Mr. Davis not to let any person have it but himself, for it was his own subject, which Mr. Davis said he would not, and told his man James not to let any person have it besides himself; I told Mr. Davis not to let it go until I came as well, for I should be money out of pocket if it went before I came - I went home that evening, where I slept, and in the morning I went to Mr. Davis', and had not been there many minutes before Bishop came in, and Shields, with a hamper, and took it from thence to King's-college, and there I was taken in to custody.

Williams said, "I live at No. 3, Nova Scotia-gardens, and am a glass-blower. In the first place, I met with Bishop last Saturday evening, in Long-lane, Smithfield; I asked him where he was going - he said he was going to King's-college - we then went to the Fortune of War public-house, instead of going to King's-college we went to Guy's-hospital, and he came out of there, and went to the King's-college; then May and the porter met him against the gate, then Bishop went in, and I asked him to let me go in with him - a porter took a basket from the Fortune of War to Guy's-hospital, and I helped him part of the way with it. That is all I have got to say.

WILLIAM DYOTT BURNABY. I acted as clerk to the Magistrate, at Bow-street; at the first examination of the prisoners among the articles produced was this brad-awl, and May said something about it, which was not taken down - he said, "That is the instrument which I punched the teeth out with."

JOHN KIRKMAN . I am a Policeman. I was attending at the station-house, in Covent-garden, at the time the Inquest was held on the body of the lad; I saw all the three prisoners in the front room - there was a printed bill stuck up there, referring to this supposed murder; it was behind where they sat - Bishop looked at the bill, and then sat down; Williams was between him and May - Bishop leaned his head over Williams to speak to May, and observed, in a low tone of voice, "It was the blood that sold us;" I heard no answer made to that - he then got up, looked at the bill, read it over a second time, and sat down with a sort of forced laugh, and said, "This states marks of violence, the marks of violence were only breakings out on the skin;" nothing was said in answer to that.

MR. THOMAS re-examined. When I first saw the body. I observed some patches of dirt on the breast, the side, and front of the legs - I particularly observed dirty marks on the left arm, which bore the appearance of fingers having grasped the arm; I now recollect that did observe on the breast a sort of falling in, as if it had been crushed if not broken- there was a continued stream of blood from the wound in the forehead, down the chest and body; it seemed as if it had been smeared off the breast, but sufficient was left to show that it had been blood.

MR. JOHN DAVIS . I had purchased two bodies of May the day before.

Bishop's Defence (written.) I, John Bishop, am thirty-three years of age, married, with three children, twelve, five, and three years of age, born at Highgate, was for some years a carrier, but have been engaged in procuring bodies for surgical and anatomical purposes twelve years; I have carried bodies to St. Thomas'-hospital, St. Bartholomew's-hospital, Guy's-hospital, and most of the private schools in London, at which places I am known - I declare that I never sold any body but what had died a natural death; I have had bodies from the various workhouses, together with the clothes which were on the bodies - I occupied the house in Nova Scotia-gardens, fifteen months; it consisted of three rooms and a wash-house, a garden, about twenty yards long, by about eight yards broad, three gardens adjoin, and are separated by a dwarf railing; I could have communication to either cottage, or the occupiers of them to mine - the well in my garden was for the joint use of all the tenants; there was also a privy to each house - the fact is, there are twenty cottages and gardens, which are only separated by the paling already described, and I could get easy access to any of them; I declare I know nothing at all about the various articles of wearing-apparel that have been found in the garden, but as regards the cap that was found in the house, and supposed to have belonged to the deceased Italian boy, I can prove that it was bought by my wife of a Mrs. Dodswell, of Hoxton Old-town, clothes-dealer, for my own son, Frederick - the front I sewed on myself after it was purchased; the front was bought with the cap, but not sewed to it - they were sold to my wife along with other articles; Mr. Dodswell is a pastry-cook, and has nothing to do with the business of the clothes-shop - the calling of Mrs. Dodswell, therefore, as evidence to prove the truth of my statement, will put it beyond a doubt that the cap never did belong to the deceased boy, and Mrs. Dodswell should also prove how long she had the cap in her possession, and how she came by it: as much stress has been laid upon the finding of several articles of wearing-apparel, and also the peculiar manner in which they appear to have been taken off the persons of those supposed to have came in an improper way into my hands, I most solemnly declare I know nothing whatever of them; the length of the examinations, and the repetition of them have been so diligently promulgated and impressed on the public mind, that it cannot but be supposed that a portion of the circumstances connected with this unfortunate case (if not all,) have reached and attracted the attention of the Jury; but I entreal them, as they value the solemn obligation of the oath they have this day taken, that they will at once divest themselves of all prejudice, and give me the whole benefit of a cool, dispassionate, and impartial hearing of the case, and record such a verdict as they, on their conscience, their honour, and their oath can return: May and Williams know nothing as to how I became possessed of the body.

Williams' Defence (written.) I, Thomas Williams, am now twenty-six years of age; I am a bricklayer by trade, and latterly worked at the glass-blowing business, as a fireman - I was never engaged in any instance as a procurer of dead bodies or subjects; into the present melancholy business I was invited by Bishop - I know nothing whatever about the manner in which he became possessed of the dead body; Bishop asked me to join him on the Friday - I made no inquiry about the nature of the business; I shall, therefore, leave my case entirely to the intelligence and discrimination of the Jury, and the learned and merciful Judge; but trust I may be allowed once more to state, that I am entirely innocent of any offence against the laws of my contry.

May's Defence (written.) I, James May , am thirty years of age, am married, with one child four years old, born at the New Inn, Strand, London, in the parish of St. Clement Danes, and received a moderate education; I was not apprenticed, but followed the calling of a butcher in the earlier part of my life - I was engaged by several masters, who carried on their business in Clare-market; men, who are circumstanced as I was, are backwards and forwards from one master butcher to another, as may be required: I first became engaged in the traffic of anatomical subjects six years since, and from that period, up to the time of my apprehension, have continued so, with occasionally looking after horses; I accidentally met Bishop at the Fortune of War, a house that persons of our calling generally frequent, and are known there as such - Bishop wanted to speak to me, called me outside the door, and asked me where the best price could be procured for things; I told him where I had sold two for ten guineas each, at Mr. Davis', and I had no doubt I could get rid of that thing for him at the same price - he said if I did I should keep all I got above nine guineas to myself; there was no question asked as to the manner in which the body had been procured, and I knew nothing about it: as to what has been said in the public papers, or the prejudice that exists against me and the other prisoners, is of no moment; I here declare, that during all the years that I have been in this business, I never came into possession of a living person, nor used any means for converting them into subjects for the purposes of dissection; I admit that I have traded largely in dead bodies, but I solemnly declare that I never took undue advantage of any person alive, whether man, woman, or child, however poor or unprotected - I have not been accustomed to make application for bodies at the different workhouses, and I now solemnly

declare that I know nothing at all of the circumstances connected with the procuring of the body, which is suspected to be that of the one named in the indictment, nor did I ever hear, nor understand, how Bishop became possessed thereof: I shall, therefore, leave my fate entirely to the intelligence and discernment of the Jury, and the learned Judge.

ROSINA CARPENTER. I have known May fourteen or fifteen years, but have not seen him for four or five years till within the last four months - on Thursday, the 3rd of November, he came to my house, in Nag's Head-court, Golden-lane, between four and five o'clock in the evening; I am sure it was Thursday - he stopped with me till between eleven and twelve o'clock next morning, which was Friday: I am sure he never left me - this was in Nag's Head-court, Golden-lane.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you live by yourself in Golden-lane? A. Yes - nobody was present during the time May was there; several people drank with us during that time - I am sure he did not go away till between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day on Friday; I know the Fortune of War - he was never out during the time; I cannot particularly name the persons who drank with us -I had frequently seen May for about three months, but before that had not seen him for four or five years; he had passed several nights with me before this - he had no human teeth in his possession, to my knowledge.

SARAH TRUBY re-examined. I never saw any white mice in possession of Bishop or his family.

Bishop. Q. Do you never recollect any mice running out of my garden into yours? A. Never.

Q. Six or seven months ago do not you recollect the cat catching some in your garden? A. No.

MARY DODSWELL . I am the wife of George Henry Dodswell - we live at No. 56, Hoxton Old-town, and sell second-hand clothes - my husband is employed as a pastry-cook. I know Bishop's wife perfectly well; I sold her a cap about two years ago - it was a cloth cap with a leather peak in front: I am perfectly sure it was cloth - the front was attached to the cap when I sold it; it had a black front, but I am not sure how it was lined.

Bishop. My wife bought two caps of you. Witness. She only bought one, I am quite confident.

Q.You recollect selling the two caps, my wife gave you 3d. for the peak? A. I never sold but one cap to her - I never saw Bishop nor any of the family but his wife; his daughter lived servant with me twelve months ago.

MARY ANN HORNE . I am single, and live at No. 4, Dorset-street, New Kent-road. On Sunday morning, the 30th of October, May left me, and said he was going into the country - I saw no more of him till the Wednesday night following, when I met him at the corner of William-street; we went home, and May went to bed; I sat up till three o'clock in the morning to air his jacket, which was very wet indeed, and also his under jacket - he got up on Thursday morning, put on a clean shirt, clean waistcoat, and braces, and went away; I saw no more of him till Friday night, when I met him by the Alfred's Head, facing the Elephant and Castle, at half-past eleven o'clock - he went home with me, got up about eight o'clock, and went out; I asked if he could give me a little money - he said he should be back by the time I wanted any. My landlady kept a jackdaw.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.What is your landlady's name? A. Mrs. Carrol - she is not here; I and May live up stairs- we do not live together exactly, but I think he is more with me than with any body else; he did not come home at all on Thursday night - he left at half-past seven o'clock on Thursday morning, and I saw no more of him till half-past eleven on Friday morning; where he had been I do not know - Charlotte Berry, the next witness, is single, and lives in the next room to us; I believe she occasionally sees gentleman - I do the same; I have been in custody at Bow-street twice on this charge, and stated to the Justice what I have now.

CHARLOTTE BERRY . I only know the last witness by lodging in the same house; the landlady has a jackdaw, which I pinched behind the door about Thursday evening, the 10th of November - that made it bleed, and it went away into the last witness' back room; I do not know of its injuring any clothes there.

MR. THOMAS. May requests that I will state about what I found at his lodging: - Higgins, having searched his lodging on the 11th, returned with some things, among the rest was a pair of trousers, stained with blood - I put my finger to it; it was not wet, but certainly glutinous - it was fresh blood, and must have been done since he was taken into custody.

EDWARD WILLIAM TUSON . I am a surgeon, and am subpoenaed on behalf of the prisoners. I know them by seeing them; I believe I have seen Bishop once or twice, but I do not know what I am to prove.

BISHOP - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

MAY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

[Dec. 2.]

Reference Number: t18311201-18

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

18. LUKE HAWKINS was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-19

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

19. FREDERICK POULSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Jacobs , on the 19th of November , and stealing 5 snuff-boxes, value 5s.; 2 cigar-tubes, value 1s., and 2 cigars, value 4d. , his property.

WILLIAM BLANCHARD . I am errand-boy to Mr. John Jacobs, a tobacconist , City-road . On the 19th of November, in the afternoon, about an hour before this happened, I wiped the window outside - there was no pane of glass out then, but one was cracked, and these things were in a tray close to the glass; the Policeman brought the prisoner into the shop about twenty minutes to nine o'clock that evening, and showed me a snuff-box, which I knew to be masters; I then found a corner of the pane had been broken out, large enough to admit a boy's hand - I missed five boxes, two cigars, and tubes; I had been this box on Friday morning, but cannot say whether I had seen it afterwards - one of the boxes has master's private mark on it; four of them were yellow, and the other a kind of tortoiseshell.

THOMAS WHITNEY . I am a Police-constable. On the 19th of November, about twenty minutes before nine o'clock, I was in Tabernacle-walk, and saw the prisoner showing a box to his companion; he immediately ran away - I followed, and caught him about one hundred yards off; he dropped a snuff-box, which I took up - I secured, and took him to the light; seeing it was a new box I took him to the first tobacconist's shop, which was Jacobs'- I found his window had been cut or broken; I found another box in the prisoner's waistcoat pocket, with a cigar and tube - he gave no account of himself; he at first said a boy gave him the box.

WILLIAM BLANCHARD . These are master's property - he only lodges in the house; the landlord lives there - there are two shops and two doors; there is an internal communication.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 11.

Whipped and Discharged.

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18311201-20

20. ELIJAH STUBBINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of John Ruston , from his person .

JOHN RUSTON . My place of business is at Salvador-house, Bishopsgate - I am in the corn trade . On the 14th of November, about half-past five or six o'clock in the afternoon, I was going home to the Kent-road, and before I got into Gracechurch-street, having lost handkerchiefs on that spot, I pressed my handkerchief down to the bottom of my pocket, and buttoned my coat quite tight, but as soon as I got to St. Peter's-alley , the prisoner snatched at my handkerchief - I turned instantly round; he immediately ran across the road up Half Moon-alley - I had seen him quite close to me before; I followed him as close as I could - a man came out of a shop, and laid hold of him, without my losing sight of him; I accused him of having taken my handkerchief - he replied that he had not; a youth ran up, and produced it, saying, "Here is your handkerchief, I saw it taken."

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Was nobody but the prisoner near you? A. No; I particularly observed that; I was walking with a gentleman - it is possible somebody besides him might have been behind me.

HENRY JOHN LEWIS AUGARD . I live in Shorter's-court, Throgmonton-street, with my father, who is a hairdresser; I am twelve years old. I was standing in Bishopsgate-street, near Peter's-alley, and saw Mr. Ruston with a gentleman; I saw the prisoner go near him, alone -I saw him take the handkerchief from Mr. Ruston's pocket; I turned round sharp upon him: Mr. Ruston turned round at the same time, and the prisoner dropped the handkerchief and ran off - I picked it up, went after Mr. Ruston, and gave it to him: the prisoner ran into Leadenhall-market, and was stopped before I lost sight of him; after Mr. Ruston collard him, he ran off a second time - I have not a doubt of his person.

Cross-examined. Q. The place is well lighted, I suppose? A. Yes; there was no gang or acquaintances of his about.

GEORGE BAKER . I am a patrol. The prisoner and handkerchief were delivered to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18311201-21

21. JOHN BLANCHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 24 1/2 yards of woollen cloth, value 16l., the goods of John Fox and another, in the dwelling house of John Fox .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FOX. I am in partnership with Thomas Preston; we are Blackwell-hall factors , and live in Basinghall-street ; I occupy the house as a dwelling-house. On the 18th of November, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, when the prisoner was apprehended, I missed two ends of cloth, one measuring twenty-four yards and a half, and the other twenty-three - Henman, next morning, showed me one end, which I had seen safe in the warehouse, about one or two o'clock the day before; it is worth 16l. - here it is; I know it by the number and the private mark made by my partner.

Cross-examined by MR. SMITH. Q.Was your partner at the house of business that day? A. Yes; he had authority to sell goods as well as me - he left about twelve o'clock, and did not return; I was in the warehouse the whole evening after he left - my partner does not live in the house; the rent is paid by the firm, but I pay a certain portion to the firm; the warehouse door fastens with a common spring latch, and a bell rings when the door opens - I do not recollect hearing it ring; nobody but myself was in the warehouse or counting house.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am a constable of the City. On the 18th of November, about five o'clock, I was in Aldermanbury, and saw the prisoner there with this cloth on his arm - he was going from Basinghall-street, and about three hundred yards from the prosecutor's; a man, who is of a suspicious character, was about two yards behind him - I followed him up Philip-lane to London-wall; I was disposed to let him go as far as the door beyond Deacon's yard, on account of there being a strong gas-light - I turned round towards him, and seeing me look at him, he threw the cloth down, and ran away; I had said nothing to him - I called Deacon's people to take care of the cloth- I pursued, calling Stop thief! he ran up Aldermanbury Postern; I secured him, without losing sight of him - I took him back to Deacon's, found the cloth safe, and then took him to the Compter; on our way there he asked me if this job could not be made up - that he had got a few pounds of his own, and money should be no object; I said it was of no use to trifle with me - after leaving him at the Compter I got the cloth from Deacon's, and have had it ever since; Hedges tripped him up, which enabled me to secure him; I did not hold out either threat or promise to him.

Cross-examined. Q.You know that what he said could not be given in evidence against him, if you said any thing to induce him to say it? A.Certainly I do - it was dark; the cloth was wrapped up, but I could see it: he put his hand over the front, which was uncovered; I never lost sight of him - nobody was between me and him; he ran in the middle of the road.

HENRY HEDGES . I was in the neighbourhood of Lon

don-wall. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I tripped up the prisoner, threw him down, took hold of him, and the officer came up.

Cross-examined. Q.Several other people were running? A. I did not notice any - I did not say it was so dark I should not know him again.

THOMAS NORRIS . I was near Mr. Deacon's, and heard the officer call for somebody to take care of the cloth; I saw it in London-wall, opposite Deacon's counting-house window - I took it up, in Pollard's presence, and carried it into the warehouse; this is it.

Cross-examined. Q.How do you know it? A. I made a mark on it.

JOHN POLLARD . I am clerk to Messrs. Deacon, of the White Horse-inn. On the 18th of November, about five o'clock, I heard a cry of Stop thief! Norris gave me a piece of cloth, which we both put a mark on, and delivered it to Henman - here is my mark on it; it is blue clot h

MR. PHESTON. I am in partnership with Mr. Fox - I left the premises about four o'clock; I did not sell this cloth - I saw it about half-past two o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. What do you know it by? A. By the number, by the colour, and number of yards, which is in my own hand-writing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up London-wall, and heard a cry of Stop thief! several persons were running - I ran with them; I turned up Aldermanbury, and got about ten yards, when Hedges pushed me down - he held me for some minutes, and the officer came up, and said,"That is right - I have got you, but I suppose I have lost the cloth.

MARY LEWIS . I am house-servant to Mr. Fox, I saw the prisoner standing at master's warehouse door, about five o'clock on the afternoon in question; I never saw him before, but am positive of his person - I did not see him do any thing; I saw him again in Newgate on the 25th.

Cross-examined. Q. What made you pay any particular attention to him? A. I was standing at the private door while the dustmen were taking the dust out - he was two or three yards from the warehouse door, and four or five minutes under my observation: he was carelessly turning round, and looking at me - I did not know whether he might have any business there.

GUILTY (of stealing only.) Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-22

22. JAMES PINK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 23 yards of woollen cloth, value 11l., the goods of John Fox and another, in the dwelling-house of the said John Fox .

JOHN FOX. I live in Basinghall-street ; the warehouse is part of the dwelling-house. On the 18th of November I missed an end of green cloth, containing twenty-three yards, worth about 11l., and a blue one, measuring twenty-four yards; I have not seen the green one since -I had seen it safe about one or two o'clock that afternoon.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.How do you know you saw it on the 18th? A. I recollect seeing it on the table - it was covered with paper, except at the end; I saw three cloths laying there with the tickets on them - a customer came in, and looked at this about one or two o'clock; I missed it at half-past five in the evening, when the officer came to inquire - it was a bright clear evening, about five o'clock; I cannot tell whether it was moonlight - my partner had put a private mark on the cloth, in my presence - I know nothing of the prisoner.

MARY LEWIS . I am servant to Mr. Fox. On the 18th of November, about five o'clock, I was at the door, and saw the prisoner pass the private door, and go into the warehouse; nobody was with him when he went in, but before he went in he was standing at the door talking to the former prisoner - I saw him go into the warehouse, but did not see him come out; I am quite sure he is the man - I did not know whether he had business there or not.

Cross-examined. Q. The dustmen were at the door? A. Yes, taking the dust out - I was not paying particular attention to who went into the warehouse; I had not seen the prisoner before; I remarked him more than the other prisoner, because he looked at me as he passed the door, and they both stood at the door with their hands in their pockets, and kept continually looking at me; they were there three or four minutes - I paid as much attention to one as the other; they stood sideways; I could see both their faces at the same time - the prisoner had a black handkerchief, and was dressed in black, or very dark clothes; I could see his features as well as his clothes- I knew him by his features, by his clothes, and his person - I did not notice his feet; I should have known him if I had met him in the street or in the country - I saw him again on the 22nd of November, at Guildhall; I was told to go there to see if he was the man I had seen on master's premises - I left the door when I saw him turn into the warehouse, to put a candle on the stairs; I noticed him, because he kept looking at the door; I thought he went in on business - I had no particular reason for looking at him; the dustmen were down in the cellar when the prisoner entered the warehouse - I am quite sure the prisoner is the man.

ROBERT EARL . I am a paper-hanger, and live in Three Herring-court, Redcross-street - I know the prisoner well by sight. On the 18th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Basinghall-street, and saw the prisoner come out of the passage of Mr. Fox's house; he had a piece of cloth under his arm about the size of that produced on the last trial - he proceeded from the passage, right opposite, up Church-passage, leading to Aldermanbury; I went down Basinghall-street and London-wall, and saw him cross from Aldermanbury to Aldermanbury-postern with the cloth under his arm - I there lost sight of him.

Cross-examined. Q.How near was you to him? A. I was close to him when he came out of the passage; it was not a very light night - it was gloomy; it was rather before five o'clock, I think; I work for Mr. Cooper, of St. Mary-axe, and a great many more people in the City - I was passing down the street, having done my work; I have known the prisoner for some months, but never spoke to him - he had dark clothes on; there was nobody in the street but the party who was with him, and I was rather afraid of them.

Q. How many were with him? A. I believe three or four - they were standing opposite; I walked after him some distance - he had a close bodied coat on; there was nobody with him, when I saw him again in Aldermambury; he did

not speak to the persons opposite, but one said to the other as I passed them, "They have only got two pieces:" it was too soon for me to see a watchman - I did not go into the prosecutor's to give information, because there was nobody passing in the street, and I thought I was in danger, as the others were standing opposite the door - I thought my life in danger, that was my only reason; it was too far to go to Cripplegate watch-house - I saw the end of the cloth out of the paper; I was asked to describe the colour before the Alderman, but could not: there was no dust cart at the door when I passed - I did not see the other man go in; I saw the prisoner come out, and two men opposite the door; it was a darkish evening, but I could see the features of the man by the gas, which shone on him in Aldermanbury Postern - he was at one corner and I at the other; I was about six yards from him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.About how long have you known the prisoner? A. About eighteen months, but I had not seen him for ten months; I saw him at the warehouse door for about five minutes.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am an officer. In consequence of information the prisoner was brought to me at Aldermanbury watch-house, on Monday, the 21st, between twelve and one o'clock at night; he was shown to Earl and Lewis, who both identified him directly they saw him.

Cross-examined. Q.Is there an officer named Norton? A. Yes; he brought him into my custody - he is not here.

MR. PRESTON. I am in partnership with Mr. Fox. I was on the premises on the 18th of November, and saw the green cloth about eleven o'clock in the morning; I never sold it - I left about four o'clock; I sleep at Pentonville.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you have no shopman? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 18th of November, I went out at half-past one o'clock, to dinner, returned about half-past two, and was at work till half-past eight: I can prove I was at work at that time - I had regular work from my uncle for three or four months, and had no occasion to steal.

HENRY ARCHBOLD TODD. I have been a satin-dresser, but am now in the watch-motion way, and live in Clark-street, Little Sutton-street. I have known the prisoner about two years; he makes pinions for watches.

COURT. Q. You knew where he worked perhaps? A.In the same shop as I do, at Mr. Pink's, his uncles; I occupy the first floor in the house: his uncle is now confined with the rheumatism - my wife is his daughter, she is here: the prisoner went out to get his dinner about half-past one o'clock that day; he had his meals in the house, but sometimes went out to dinner - he returned about half-past three, and worked till about eight, as near as I can guess.

Q. On your oath, did he not leave the house long before nine o'clock? A. I cannot say, for I left the house to meet my wife about a quarter-past eight - I swear he was constantly in the house, from half-past three till about eight; he was taken up on the Monday, but I did not hear of it till the Tuesday, when his aunt went to see him - I did not go to the Magistrate to state that he was at home at the time - I did not know what he was in custody for till his aunt came back, between two and three o'clock: she did not go there till twelve - a person had been sent to our house about eight that morning to let us know he was in custody, and the aunt went to the Compter about ten or eleven; she returned about half-past eleven o'clock - I heard her say he was taken on suspicion of robbery; I did not ask when it was committed - I thought if he was innocent he would get off; his aunt dressed, and went to Guildhall - I heard the robbery was committed somewhere in Basinghall-street; she said so before she went to Guildhall - I did not inquire what time it was done, nor on what day; I believe he was only examined once - I believe the aunt did not appear before the Magistrate.

MR. FOX. There is an inner door to our warehouse, which opens into a passage.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-23

NEW COURT. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

23. JANE BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October , 1 bolster, value 2s.; 1 tea-tray, value 2s.; 1 pillow, value 1s.; 1 tumbler-glass, value 1s.; 1 quilt, value 1s., and 2 pictures, value 6d. , the goods of Peter Ryan ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-24

24. HENRY NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , 1 bonnet, value 2s.; 3 feathers, value 2s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 cap, value 1s.; 2 collars, value 1s.; 3 tippets, value 1s. 6d.; 1 frock-body, value 6d.; 2 pairs of sleeves, value 1s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s., and 1 spencer, value 6d. , the goods of Elizabeth Camfield .

ELIZABEHT CAMFIELD. I am a widow , and live in a front parlour in Russell-place, Liverpool-road, Islington - the door is on the left-hand side of the passage, and the street door opens with a string from the outside. On the evening of the 2nd of October I went out, and when I returned I went to bed, forgetting to lock my door, but it was shut too; a person could get in at the front door, and then into my room - about a quarter before four o'clock in the morning, I was awoke by the Policeman, and missed the articles stated, which were safe the night before - the bonnet was hanging up, and the other articles in my trunk; the trunk was not locked - I went to bed about eleven o'clock.

GEORGE WALLER . I am a Policeman. I saw the prisoner, on the morning of the 3rd of October, at a quarter-past three o'clock, at the corner of Barnsbury-street, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutrix's; he had this bonnet in his hand, and the other articles in his pocket - it was a wet night; I asked how he came by the bonnet, and he said he picked it up in the Liverpool-road, but there was no appearance of dirt on it - there were two or three little slips of paper among the things, which led me to the prosecutrix's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the bonnet, and these other things fell out of it; I went into the old toll-house, and got a light for my pipe - the man asked where I got these things, and I told him; I put them down at his door while I went in - a man came along, and took them up;

I called him back, and he gave them to me - I then walked on, and the Policeman met me.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-25

25. OLIVIA LUCAS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 1 fish-slice, value 2l.; 5 spoons, value 3l. 10s.; 2 sauce-ladles, value 30s., and 1 fork, value 15s. , the goods of Dudley Stuart Erskine Macdonald .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

STEPHEN SMITH . I am an inspector of the Police. I was formerly in the service of the prosecutor - I was well acquainted with his plate; the initials on it are D. M. - I received some communication from the prosecutor, and went to his chambers, in the Albany. on the 29th of October: the prisoner was there, in his service - I wished her to produce the key of the plate-chest; she said it was all right, but refused to show it to me - I threatened that I would search, and take her into custody; after some persuasion she produced the key, and showed me the chest; there was some plate in it - some of the articles were plated, but I did not discover that at that time; I do not know whether the plated articles were the prosecutor's; I asked if she had any duplicates, and she said she had not - in my judgment some of the plate was then missing; I asked where the remainder was - she said that was all that Mr. Macdonald had - I then commenced searching, and found thirty-eight duplicates; about half of them were in the top drawer of a chest in her sitting-room, and the remainder on a shelf in her bed-room - among others was one for this fish-slice, which I marked; I gave her in charge - she afterwards said she pawned the articles, intending to get them out again.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. When was this mark made on this duplicate? A.In St. James' station-house, in my presence, by Clements - there was a person named Shingler there; I do not know whether he had lived in the prosecutor's service - I told the prisoner it would be better for her to confess, as I only wished to obtain the articles, and then she made the confession I have stated.

JOHN BUTTON . I am in the service of Ann Rochford, a pawnbroker, in Jermyn-street. I have a silver fishslice, pawned by the prisoner, on the 3rd of September, in the name of Mary Murchall; I gave this duplicate for it on that day, but whether I took it in of the prisoner on that day I cannot say; I had taken it of her more than once, and it had been redeemed - here is a table-spoon, pawned on the 1st of September, by the prisoner, to the best of my knowledge; here are some other articles, but I did not take them in.

JOSHUA FREDERICK CLEMENTS. I was at St. James' watch-house on the 29th of October, and received the prisoner in custody; I found some of these duplicates; the articles are here - here are five table-spoons, two sauce-ladles, and a fork.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find the whole of these duplicates? A. I had them from a servant of the prosecutor's, who is not here; the prisoner stated they were in a particular place; but the other servant had found them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THE HONORABLE DUDLEY STUART ERSKINE MACDONALD. This fish-slice is mine - I never authorized the prisoner to pawn it; I had not given it to her, or sold it - she was merely my servant, and, in consequence of some suspicion, I gave directions to Smith.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you brother to Lord Macdonald? A. Yes - he is an Irish Peer; I am his younger brother.

COURT to JOHN BUTTON . Q.You say the fish-slice had been pawned more than once, had any interest been paid upon it? A.Only up to the time of redemption; it had been pawned within six months of the last time.

JURY. Q.Had you received it from any other person beside the prisoner? A.I think I did once, but I am not positive when.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Year .

Reference Number: t18311201-26

26. HENRY JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 flute, value 25s. , the goods of Henry Harvey .

HENRY HARVEY. I am a broker , and live in Crown-court, St. James' . I have known the prisoner two or three years - I appointed him to come to my house on Wednesday, the 9th of November; I was out, but found him waiting when I returned at half-past nine o'clock in the morning; I was going to recommend him to a gentleman to put up some curtains. On the Saturday following I missed a flute, which cost me 25s. - I went to the prisoner's lodging, but he was out; I went again on the Monday, saw him, and accused him of taking the flute - he denied it; I told him we had found it, and that he had pawned it for 15s. - he then said, "I did take it out, as my little boy was crying for something to eat, and I intended to return it;" he gave up the duplicate.

WILLIAM GOFTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gilbert-street, Grosvenor-square. I have a flute, pawned at my shop on the 9th of November, in the name of Henry Jordan , Windmill-street - I did not see it taken in.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at his lodging, in Windmill-street; I accused him of stealing the flute - he made no answer, but when I told him we had found it at the pawnbroker's, he said he would give up the duplicate, which he did; he said he did it through distress, and he meant to redeem it again - I found 6s. 0 1/2d. on him, which he said was part of the money he kept to redeem the flute.

Prisoner. Q.Did you not find my apartment in great distress? A. I did - I know his wife went away about four years ago. and left him with an infant family, which I believe preyed on his mind.

The prisoner delivered in a written Defence, pleading extreme poverty - he received a good character.

MR. HARVEY. He was employed on the job I spoke of from the Wednesday till the Saturday, and he received a guinea for it.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18311201-27

27. WILLIAM HODGETTS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 10 quires of paper, value 15s., and 1 silver spoon, value 20s. , the goods of William Houghton , his master.

WILLIAM HOUGHTON. I live in New Bond-street , and am a stationer - the prisoner was my porter for about fourteen months. On the 15th of November he did not return to sleep at my house, as usual; on the following morning a sheet of foolscap paper was produced to me by the officer, and a paper wrapper, marked "Superfine fools - cap;" I knew the wrapper and the paper - I had not sent out that wrapper or any paper of that description the day before; I could not miss it from my stock - I had missed a silver spoon.

JOHN HARWOOD. I am a Police-officer. On the 15th of November I was on duty in Oxford-street; I was called to Mr. Gofton's in Gilbert-street - I found the prisoner there with this paper: he told me it belonged to his father, who was in the paper line, and lived in Tyler's-court, but he was pawning it unknown to his father, for his mother; I searched, and found on him this duplicate of a silver spoon and 4s.; I went to where he said his father lived, but could find no such person.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I am in the service of Mr. Fleming, a pawnbroker, in Lower John-street; I took in this spoon of the prisoner, on the 14th of November, for 7s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM GOFTON . The prisoner came to my shop on the 15th of November, and brought this paper and wrapper, which he said belonged to his father; I sent for the officer.

Prisoner's Defence. It was done from distress; my wife died six weeks ago, leaving me with four small children; I was threatened with a distress from the surgeon who attended my wife, and from the landlord.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy. - confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18311201-28

28. MICHAEL DWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 1 brush, value 1s.; 1 pair of pliers, value 1s. 3d., and 1 burnisher, value 6d. , the goods of William Gofton .

CHARLES WATERS . I am an apprentice to William Gofton - he is a pawnbroker , in Gilbert-street . On the 29th of October I saw the prisoner in one of the boxes of our shop; he offered a dusting-brush to pawn for 1s.; Mr. Gofton told me to make him a duplicate for 6d., which I did; I went up stairs, and when I came down Mr. Gofton asked me if I knew those other two articles, which the prisoner had offered to another young man in the shop; I saw this burnishing-iron and pliers on the counter - the prisoner was asked where he got them; he said from his shop where he worked - I then examined the brush, and found a mark on it, by which I knew that it was Mr. Gofton's - I fetched the officer; we had kept these things on a small ledge under the counter at the other end of the shop; he might have come in at the front door and got them, and gone round to the side door with them - I had only seen him once in the shop.

WILLIAM GOFTON. I heard the prisoner say these articles were all his own, and he brought them from the shop he worked at; I looked at the brush, and advanced 6d. on it - I then found it was my own.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up these things between the door and the counter, on the floor - I did not know who they belonged to.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-29

29. ANDREW DELZELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 120 pence, and 240 half-pence , the monies of William Renton , his master.

ISABELLA MARIA RENTON . I am the daughter of William Renton , a baker , in Wardour-street; the prisoner was in his employ. On Saturday the 12th of November I had assisted my mother in counting 20s. worth of copper, which was put into a bag, and we gave it to the prisoner to take to Mr. Banfield's, to change for a sovereign; he went out and did not return.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What time was it when he went? A.Between eleven and twelve o'clock; he had been two or three months at my father's.

CHARLES BANFIELD . I am a publican, and live in Maddox-street. I was in the habit of receiving 1l. worth of copper from the prosecutor, but on the 12th of November I did not receive any.

Cross-examined. Q. He had brought you copper before? A. Yes; I usually received it about twelve o'clock; I saw the prosecutor on the Monday following.

JOSEPH MATTREWS . I am a Police-constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 21st of November, in Princes-street, Soho. I told him he was charged with taking 20s. worth of copper; he said he had done what he ought not to do - he said he had spent most of the money.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not tell you he had been drinking? A. No, nor say where he had spent it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18311201-30

30. THOMAS HODGE and SARAH ROBERTS were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 5s.; 3 silver spoons, value 30s.; 1 set of fire-irons, value 12s.; 1 ink-case, value 7s.; 1 table-cover, value 5s.; 5 shirts, value 21.; 4 sheets, value 30s.; 1 butter-knife, value 10s.; 2 ladles, value 10s.; 1 fork, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 1 cloak, value 20s.; 1 tea-pot, value 30s., and 6 coffee-cups, value 30s. , the goods of Alfred Bunn , their master.

ALFRED BUNN. I lodge at Mr. Russell's, in Newman-street - Hodge was my servant for about three years; he quitted me on Friday the 11th of November; Roberts was in my service about six months, and she had left about a week before. On the 18th of November a Police-serjeant called on me, and from what he said I requested Hodge to show him two small silver ladles - he went down stairs with the officer, as I supposed to produce them; in a few minutes I heard a scuffle on the stairs, which was occasioned by the officer bringing up the two prisoners to my room - Roberts happened to be at the house that night, and when I went in, she told me she had come to assist my landlady; when the officer had brought them up I told Hodge what I had heard, and requested him to tell me the exact extent to which he had robbed me, and that in proportion as he informed me of the loss of my property, so I would deal with him - I have seen a number of my articles, produced by the pawnbrokers.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I am a Police-serjeant. In consequence of information I went to Mr. Bunn's, on the 18th of November, and made a communication to him; he desired Hodge to produce some ladles to me, and I went down stairs with him - he felt in his pockets, and said,"Dear me, what have I done with them?" he went towards the area, I said, "They are not in the house" - he said, "No, they are not;" I then took him up stairs, we met Roberts on the stairs - he said to her, "You have brought me to this;" she said,"You are as bad as I am:" so I took them both to the station-house - Hodge told me where he lodged; I went there, and they directed me to the garret, where I found thirty-four duplicates in a bottle - I asked Roberts where she lived, and she said, at No. 9, Norton-street, and I should find her sister there; I went and found her sister: I found six duplicates in a teacaddy, and one of them was for these six cups and saucers, and two glasses.

EDWARD FITCHEW . I am assistant to William Fitchew , a pawnbroker. These shoes, this tea-spoon, this tablespoon, and these fire-irons were pawned by Hodge; and this salt-spoon, pair of boots, and silver pen by Roberts - between the 12th of August and the 14th of November.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.Where are the duplicates of the articles pawned by Hodge? A. These are them: I knew him before, I am quite sure I received these articles from the prisoners: I knew Roberts before, and am quite sure she pawned these articles - all the duplicates are my writing: sometimes one of the prisoners has brought the same article, which had before been pawned and redeemed by the other.

BENJAMIN TIMMS . I am a shopman to Mr. Harrison, of Tottenham-court-road, a pawnbroker. I have some coffee-cups, pawned by Roberts, on the 11th of August; I am sure it was her - I have the counterpart of this duplicate.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the duplicate in your handwriting? A. Yes; I had not seen her before, but I swear to her person.

GEORGE NORMAN . I am a shopman to a pawnbroker, in Norfolk-street. I have a butter-knife, a fork, and several other articles, but they were not pawned by either of the prisoners.

JOHN MILTON . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker, in Berwick-street. I have a tea-pot pawned on the 2nd of August, and a cloak on the 5th of August, by Hodge.

MR. BUNN. I believe Roberts came into my service, on the 3rd of February. I had not missed any of these articles till the prisoners were taken; I cannot say when I lost them - when I had discharged Roberts, I commissioned Hodge to examine if my things were all right, and he said they were; that was about a week, before he was taken - these cups and other things are mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you recollect using the teapot? A. I do not think I ever did use it; there is no crest or arms on these coffee-cups, but they correspond with the pattern of a set I purchased - here is my crest and name on this salt-spoon, and the other articles I know by having similar ones; I had the management of the Dublin theatre: Hodge was at that time in my service, and he then had 1l. a week - I knew he was married and had a family; when I came to England, I paid him 10s. a week; the 1l. a week was not continued - I am not in debt to him for wages - I told him I could not give him the same as I had at the theatre; I cannot say that I fixed any sum with him, but to the best of my belief, I told him his wages would be 10s. a week - there is something due to his wife for washing, which has been witheld merely because my things were not returned, and there may be something due to her as a dresser at the theatre; Hodge did not sleep at my house - Roberts was not accustomed to pay for mangling and other things for me; I never left her without money to pay current expences: I was never absent for any length of time, but when I went to France for five weeks - I left some money with her then, but only enough for a few days; I do not know that she then pawned some articles to pay expences, for when I found my stay in France was protracted, I wrote to my solicitor to supply her, which he did - I found some letters had come while I was away.

COURT. Q.From the time you returned from France did either of the prisoners make any communication to you on that subject? A. No, Hodge did ask for some advance to his pay, and I got his wife a situation as dresser in a theatre; I have found my stock is deficient of six cups and saucers.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . This duplicate for the salt spoon, this for the pen, and the boots were found at Hodge's lodging, but were pawned by Roberts.

Roberts. All I pawned was the boots and the coffeecup.

EDWARD FITCHEW I am confident she pawned the spoon and the pen - she has pawned other things; I know her particularly, by an impediment in her speech.

HODGE. - GUILTY Aged 28.

ROBERTS. - GUILTY Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-31

31. HENRY JAMES MITCHELL was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN SHERBORNE . The prisoner was in the service of myself and my partner, Mr. Sands, as second clerk ; he was to collect money occasionally, and when he returned to pass it to the credit of the person from whom he received it, or to hand it to the senior clerk - he has not accounted to me for 5l. 18s. received from Mr. Charles Barron ; nor has he entered it in the book - I never had any cheque of Mr. Barron's in my possession for that sum.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.He was apprehended on another charge? A. Yes, and in consequence of that, I had indirectly a communication with him on his general conduct, and I agreed that if he furnished me with an account of all he had embezzled, I would forgive him; he was apprehended for embezzling 4l. in November, and between that and the time of his furnishing me with the account, I received information of this 5l. 18s.; he had no means of knowing that - when he furnished his account this sum of 5l. 18s. was included in it; the first charge went off for want of evidence - my partner was aware of what I had said to the prisoner, and concurred in it; his account arrived on the 16th, and I said to my partner,"If the 5l. 18s. is in this account, it is within our agreement; we are not to prosecute unless we find others," to which my partner agreed - I never

concurred in any proceedings against the prisoner; he had been with us eight years and seven months - his character stood unimpeached; I do not know who is the prosecutor, if Avis is not.

COURT. Q. Are we to understand that your arrangement was that you would treat this on the footing of a civil debt, in case he made no concealment in his account? A. I felt it my duty to state to him that if he would state the sums he had received I would not prosecute him.

ALFRED JAMES FOWLER . I am in the prosecutor's employ, as senior clerk. The prisoner never accounted to me for 5l. 18s. received from Mr. Barron, who was indebted to the firm in 6l. 11s. 7d., but by an agreement he paid 5l. 18s.

CHARLES BARRON . I deal with Messrs. Sherborne and Sands. On the 31st of October the prisoner called for the balance of their account - we made it 5l. 18s., for which I gave him a cheque, which I have had back from my bankers' - he gave me a memorandum for it.

GEORGE AVIS . I was employed by Mr. Sands to take the prisoner - I certainly was not aware that he had been told that if he would furnish a correct account he should not be prosecuted.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18311201-32

32. THOMAS NAIRN was indicted for stealing. on the 19th of October , 1 cloak, value 50s. , the goods of David Barclay , his master.

JOSEPH HARRINGTON . I am butler to David Barclay: the prisoner was his footman . On the 19th of October I placed my master's cloak on the box of the carriage, at Redsworth castle - the prisoner sat on the box, and the carriage drove away with it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Is there any female servant here? A. No; I do not know any thing about a letter being found in the hall - I do not know when it was taken.

ROBERT CURRIE . I am a Police-constable. On the 6th of November I took the prisoner at the Feathers public-house - he was in bed; I found in the room four duplicates, and one was for a gentleman's cloak, pawned for 2l. - I went to the pawnbroker's, and got it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any other person in the room? A.The landlord went in with me - this purse laid on the table, as if a person had put it down before going to bed - the prisoner was in liquor.

GEORGE COLLEY . I am a Police-constable. On the 6th of November I saw the prisoner at the watch-house -I asked if he knew what he was charged with: he said something about another indictment; I asked if he knew any thing about a cloak - he said he did, that it was his master's, and he had taken it and pawned it at Knights-bridge.

Cross-examined. Q.Had you made him any threat or promise? A. No.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am in the employ of Mr. Kimber, a pawnbroker, at Knightsbridge. This cloak was pawned on the 19th of October, for 2l. - this is the duplicate I gave - I have the counterpart of it; I cannot say who pawned it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN RAGAN . I am groom to Mr. Arthur Barclay. The carriage came to Mr. Charles Barclay's, my master's fathere, and when I got home I saw this cloak in the hall -I did not then know whose it was; the prisoner was there - he afterwards went out, and said he was going to deliver some notes in town.

Cross-examined. Q.Do you know any thing of finding a letter in the hall, which countained a duplicate? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-33

33. GEORGE ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 coat, value 8s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 1 hat, value 7s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s. , the goods of John William Revell .

JOHN WILLIAM REVELL. I live with my father, at the Fighting Cocks, in Dartmouth-street - the prisoner lived with him about three weeks - he slept with me. On the 9th of November he called me rather early in the morning, and when I left the room he was dressing on the side of the bed - I left the articles stated in the room, and afterwards missed them.

WILLIAM GILBY . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner on Westminster-bridge on the 9th of November - I found on him a handkerchief and 4s. 10d.

ROBERT DOYLE . I am a servant out of place, and lodged in New Pye-street, Westminster - I have known the prisoner some time. On the 9th of November he came to my lodging, said he had had some words with his master, and had left his place - he asked me to go out with him, which I did; he said he wanted to pawn his hat, which he had given a good price for when he lived with Mr. Revell the first time - I went and pawned it for him at Mr. Williams'.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. I received this hat from Doyle.

ALEXANDER GLASS . I live in Hartnell-street, Westminster. I received a bundle, containing these other articles, from Mrs. McDonald.

MARY McDONALD . On the 9th of November the prisoner came to lodge with me, and gave me this bundle.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. His father gave me notice to go, and had used me very ill - I had not enough food nor wages.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18311201-34

34. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 14lbs. weight of leather, value 1l. 8s. , the goods of Miles Wright .

WILLIAM BUTLER . I am shopman to Mr. Miles Wright - he lives in Dean-street, Soho , and is a currier . On the evening of the 19th of November a young man came into the shop, and while I was showing him some leather, the prisoner came in, went to a shelf, took a bundle of leather, and ran away down Queen-square, towards Greek-street - I followed him, and was within two or three yards of him; I saw him drop this leather - I took it up; he ran a few yards further, and a gentleman stopped him - I had never lost sight of him.

GEORGE BOARDMAN. I am a Police-constable, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it - I was running along, and was stopped by a gentleman; I went back to the shop with the witness.

WILLIAM BUTLER . When I got back to the shop the other man had run away with the things I was showing him, and the prisoner owned he was his companion.

GUILTY . Aged 30 - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-35

35. THOMAS CROUCH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 2 coats, value 30s. , the goods of Moses Solomon .

MOSES SOLOMON. I live in Russell-court . On the evening of the 8th of November, as I was passing from my shop to the parlour, I saw the prisoner in my shop with four coats - I went up to him; he dropped two of them in the shop, and got out at the door with the other two - I took him directly - these are the coats; they are mine - the prisoner seemed very poor, and the Magistrate sent him out to get some victuals.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-36

36. MARY McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 1 pair of ear-rings, value 1l. 5s.; 1 table-cloth, value 5s.; 6 shirts, value 10s.; 1 tea-spoon, value 5s.; 6 pinafores, value 6s.; 1 shift, value 1s., and 1 petticoat, value 1s. , the goods of Noel Norton Carter , her master.

VIRGINIA CARTER . I am the wife of Noel Norton Carter - we live in Charlotte-street, Portman-place ; the prisoner came into my service on the 17th of May, and left on the 17th of August; while she was with me I missed a silver spoon - she was afterwards apprehended.

ARTHUR JONES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Princes-street, Leicester-square. I have six shirts, a shift, and a petticoat, pawned by a woman on the 31st of August.

WILLIAM GREEN . The prisoner came into my service about a month ago. On the 6th of November I searched some boxes which she brought to my house, and said were hers - I found a small pocket-book, with a number of duplicates, which I delivered to Bennett.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am a Police-officer. I produce the duplicates.

GEORGE MACKEY . I am in the employ of Mr. Wells, a pawnbroker, in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. I have a table-cloth and spoon, pawned by the prisoner on the 18th of August.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The table-cloth is my own - I brought it from Ireland; I had given a drop of wine to Mrs. Carter's nurse, and she gave me this silver spoon for it - she gave me the shirts for making a dress; she said they were given her by a mistress in the country. where she was nursing, and the baby died - I had had the spoon in pawn six months before.

GEORGE MACKEY . She had the spoon in pawn some time before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-37

37. MARY McCARTHY was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 necklace, value 10s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 10s.; 2 brooches, value 4s.; 1 paste ornament, value 4s.; 1 buckle, value 1s., and 1 fan, value 5s. , the goods of William Green , her master.

WILLIAM GREEN. The prisoner was my servant ; she came on the 31st of October. On the Sunday following, in consequence of some suspicion, I went into the kitchen about four o'clock, and charged her with having taken a pair of amethyst bracelets, a pearl necklace, a pair of earrings, a buckle and ribbon; she denied it, and said I might search her boxes - I did so, and found this buckle, this ribbon, and this small brooch, which were part of the articles I had inquired after; she said they were her own property, and she had bought the brooch of a Jew six months before - I got the officer to take her; in consequence of something she said I searched an ottoman, and found the rest of the articles.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I took the prisoner, and produce the articles, which I received from Mr. Green; I saw part of them found in the ottoman.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to his service on a Monday, and on the Wednesday following he came into the kitchen, and asked how long I had been in England, and if I had been married; he asked me to leave my bed-room door open, which I refused - he asked me to come down stairs the next morning, and said he would give me these things if I would leave my door open; I said I would consider of it - on the Sunday morning he abused me; I said I would let Mrs. Green know of it - when I was accused of taking these things he winked at me to say nothing, and when I was at the lock-up place he came to me and said I was a foolish girl for not consenting to his wishes.

WILLIAM GREEN. Upon my oath, this allegation is entirely false.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-38

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

38. MARY ANN LING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 1 umbrella, value 6s. , the goods of Joel Walker , her master.

JOEL WALKER . I live in Jermyn-street ; the prisoner was one month in my employ. I missed an umbrella the first or second Sunday after she came; I asked if she had seen it - she denied it; I had bought it about a month before - in a day or two afterwards I saw a strange umbrella there, and I thought it very likely that was mine, but the prisoner said it was her sister's; she staid with me a month, and I found my umbrella at Mr. Tutton's, to whom she went from me - she had been strongly recommended to me, and I referred to the same lady again.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Had she a sister who was in the habit of coming to your house? A. I never saw her.

COURT. Q.You found your umbrella where she was living when she left you? A. Yes; I knew where she went, and when I saw the umbrella I owned it as mine - she did not say it had been changed by mistake; there was none left at my house in the room of mine.

JOHN TUTTON . I am a coach-maker. The prisoner came to my service from the prosecutor's - I found some of my articles, and some of my lodger's, in her box; I sent to

Mr. Walker to come and see if there was any of his property there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Mr. Walker give you half a crown to give her? A.No; I gave her one myself, and sent her another - she brought the umbrella into my house, and said it was given her by her aunt.

JOHN HARRAGAN . I sold this umbrella to the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-39

39. CHARLES KEMP was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 watch, value 18l., and 1 ring, value 7l. , the goods of Henry Collins .

HENRY COLLINS . I live in Piccadilly, and am a jeweller . On the 5th of November the prisoner, who was a stranger, came to my shop, and said he wanted some cards similar to one I had in the window; it was a dinner-ticket, engraved in the usual way, "Request the honour of company to dinner;" he desired to have one hundred of them struck off - I asked in what name; he said the Honourable Charles Kemp, Raggett's-hotel, Davies-street ; he produced a card of the hotel, which he told me to copy, and to return to him, which I did - he then said, "You deal in jewellery;" I said Yes - he said, "Will you have the goodness to let me see those diamond rings in the window?" I showed them to him - he put the diamond to his tongue, and said that was the test they had in China, and if it would feel cold as long as he could hold it to his tongue, it was a diamond, if not it was only imitation; I said,"Does this one answer the test?" he said Yes - he then asked for a piece of glass to try it on, and said it was a good one; he then said, "I have not time to stay this morning, but if you will bring this and two or three others up to Raggett's hotel, I will look at them," and smelling by his breath that he was a smoker, I produced a case to him; he looked at it, and said, "If we do any business together I shall expect you to give me this," and then recollecting himself, he said, "Have you any gold pen and pencil-holders?" I showed him some, but they were not good enough for him, and I was to take him some others, and be at the hotel at six o'clock; I went out, returned home at six, and scarcely had I got home, when the prisoner opened the door, and asked if I was at home - I said Yes; he said, "I have a call to make, make it five or ten minutes later:" I went to the hotel, and found him there, attended by his hair-dresser - he begged I would not feel any disappointment, and said he would soon dismiss his peruquier; he soon came out, and said, "Now, Sir, to business, pray take a chair;" I took a chair, and sat down by his side, at a table which was covered for dinner, on which was a great quantity of plate - he then took a pencil-case and a diamond ring, and agreed for them at a price; when he was at my shop, he asked if I had any ladies gold chains, and as I had three ladies' gold watches, I took them in my pocket, and showed them to him - he looked at them, took up the best of them, said that would do, and he wished to have a watch and a chain for himself - he then said, "I have two Trichinopoly gold chains in the next room, which I should like to exchange with you," and with my ring on his finger, and the watch in his hand, he went to the door of the room; he then said, "Shall I bring one or two?" I said, "Bring them both;" he went away, and I never saw him again - the waiter came into the room, and I said, "Where is Mr. Kemp?" he said, "I think I saw him go out;" I did not see the prisoner again till the 13th of November, when I was sent for to Tetsall's hotel, in the Adelphi - I said, "Well, Mr. Kemp, where is my watch and diamond ring?" he made no answer: I said,"Are they pawned?" he gave no answer, but he afterwards said they were, and he gave me an address, which I wrote down; he said, "Mr. Collins, my life is at your mercy, will you prosecute me?" I do not know whether I made him any promise or threat - he produced the duplicates from his fob.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was that in the presence of Mr. Tetsall? A. He was present part of the time; I did notmake him any promise before he said that the articles had been pawned; he did not order the gold watch - I had taken all the property from my pocket, and put it on the table.

EDWARD WOODS . I live with a pawnbroker. I took in this watch from the prisoner on the 7th of November - he had been in the shop before.

THOMAS BIRKET . I am in the service of a pawnbroker. I have a ring, pawned on the 9th of November, by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have but just returned to England, and got acquainted with a set of gamesters - I have lost a considerable sum of money; I had no intention to defraud the prosecutor; I told him to bring me a pencil-case to look at, and he brought a great deal more property - I could have taken a great deal of him; I had a gaming debt to pay that evening, and I thought if I could get a little money I should be able to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-40

40. ROBERT HUNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 copper, value 10s., the goods of Charles Field , and fixed to a certain building ; against the Statute.

WILLIAM PAKE . I lodge at No. 60, Monmouth-street, St. Giles' : Mr. Charles Field is the owner of the house - this copper was fixed secure on the 3rd of November; I was at home, about eleven o'clock in the day, in the front kitchen, where I lodge and work - my wife went into the back kitchen, and she said, "Bill, here is a man with the copper in his hand, run up the front way" -(we have an entrance from the street to our kitchen) - I ran up, and took the prisoner at the door; he had dropped the copper into its place again, when my wife saw him: we had used it ourselves every week; I held him till the officer came - he was quite a stranger.

Prisoner. Q.Was there any water in the copper when you saw it last? A. Yes, between three and four pails; I did not see you in the back kitchen - it was regularly fixed; you had emptied part of the water out with a large baking-dish, lifted the rest out in the copper, and poured the water out.

ANN PAKE . I am the prosecutor's wife. I had used the copper on the Friday before, and when I went into the back kitchen on the day stated, the prisoner had the copper out, and was pouring the water about the kitchen - I ran back, and told my husband; he went out with me - the prisoner placed the copper loosely in its place, and my husband stopped him in the passage; the copper was fixed

near my door, but my child was crying, and I did not hear it taken out; our street door is open, but not the back kitchen - it is only for the use of the lodgers in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent to the house, to a tailor named Conner, to tell him to call on a person about a coat- I met a person coming out; I asked if Conner was at home - they said they did not know, but I had better go up stairs; I went up, and left my message, and when I came down I was stopped on suspicion of stealing this copper; but I would ask if it were possible for an individual like me to remove a copper with four pails of water in it? and again, it was a very dark place; the woman could not distinguish my person.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-41

41. ROBERT FOLKS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 124lbs. weight of lead, value 10s., the goods of Catherine Fennyhough and Elizabeth Ann Fennyhough , and fixed to a certain building ; against the Statute, &c.; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS CASSIDY . I am a Police-constable. On the 29th of October, about twenty minutes past eleven o'clock at night, I observed two persons on the top of a house in Wharf-road, City-road ; the prisoner was one - he had something in his hand; the other had nothing - the building is not very high; I was two or three yards from the wall - they were not more than nine or ten yards from me- I did not find any thing but lead that the prisoner could have had; I asked what they had there - they made me no answer; but laid it down, and jumped down; I laid hold of the prisoner, and the other got away - I took the prisoner to the station; I then went with another officer, and found this lead where I had seen the prisoner lay something down; I fitted it to the roof - it corresponded in every respect; there are 124lbs. of it.

GEORGE KEMP . I am a Police-officer. I went and found the lead - it fitted the place exactly.

THOMAS TYRRELL . I know the wharf No. 35; I had seen the lead safe a day or two before - it matched exactly.

HENRY SIMPSON MAND . I know the building; I believe it belongs to Elizabeth Ann Fennyhough and Catherine Fennyhough - I receive the rent for them.

HENRY DAVIES . I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clarke's office -(read) - I was a witness on the trial; the prisoner is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out with some songs, and came across the fields home; some men jumped off the tiles, and the Policeman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18311201-42

42. MARY EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 2 sovereigns, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the monies of George Robins , from his person .

GEORGE ROBINS . I am a porter . On the 25th of November I was in Great Russell-street , at half-past eleven o'clock at night; the prisoner accosted me, and asked for a penny - I said I had no money to give away; she bustled up against me two or three times - there was a little woman begging in the street, and the prisoner asked me to give her a penny; I again said I had no money to give away; she then said, "I will give her a penny;" she came by my side again, and then walked away - I felt in my left-hand trousers pocket, and my money was all gone; she was not then above five yards from me - I know my money was safe when she first accosted me; I called the officer, and gave charge of her - he took her to the station, and with great force he found the money on her; I lost two sovereigns, a shilling, and a sixpence.

JAMES WHITAKER . I am a Police-officer. The prosecutor charged the prisoner with stealing two sovereigns and two shillings, and then he recollected that he had changed one shilling, and spent 4d. out of it - I took her to the station, saw her put some money into her mouth, and then take it out in her hand; I found in her left-hand two sovereigns and a shilling; and 1s. 8 1/2d. in her purse.

Prisoner. I had known the prosecutor two months before - he met me at the corner of Hanway-yard, and we walked together to Russell-street.

MR. ROBINS. I never saw her till met her in Russell-street.

Prisoner's Defence. When I met him I asked him for a penny - he said he was very sorry he had no more money, but he would give me a couple of shillings - he put his hand into his pocket, and gave me what he had; my purse was in my right hand - I put what he gave me into my glove; I had 2s. in silver, and 10d. in copper - he said he was sorry we could not go to a place where we could be comfortable; a woman then came up and asked for a penny, and I gave it her from my purse; the prosecutor then put his hand into his pocket, and said he had lost two sovereigns - the officer then came up; the prosecutor whispered to me not to tell what had taken place between us.

COURT to JAMES WHITAKER . Q. Was the prosecutor intelligent? A. Yes - there was another woman about two yards from the prisoner; the prisoner denied having any money.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-43

43. THOMAS COUNTESS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 6 sovereigns , the monies of Charles North .

CHARLES NORTH . I have just returned as an invalid seaman from Calcutta. On the 27th of October I went to sleep at the Turk's Head, in the Haymarket ; I went to bed between seven and eight o'clock - I had between eight and nine sovereigns in my trousers pocket; there were two bedsteads in the room I slept in, but only one bed; my trousers were wet, and I could not put them under my head, but I left them at the foot - the pin which fastened my sovereigns in my watch-pocket was then secure, and I had put a piece of paper over the sovereigns to keep them from shaking; the prisoner showed me up to bed, and then retired - I was unwell, and did not go to sleep; he came into the room again about nine o'clock, and asked if I was warm - I said Yes, I was then getting comfortable, and he said, "As your clothes are wet I will put them over the other bedstead;" I heard no more till a man came the next morning to call me - he said, "Did you tell that man to take any thing out of your pocket?" I said No; he said, "You are robbed;" I got my things on, came down, and was relating the circumstance to the nurse - she said, "I heard him in your room, and soon afterwards he went out;" I had lost all my money, and was left pennyless.

GEORGE COOPER . I am a cutler. On the morning of the 28th of October, I was at the Finish having a cup of coffee - the prisoner came in very tipsy, and another man was with him, who was persuading him to spend his money; another man then came in, and took the prisoner away, but I had heard the prisoner mention Mr. Hall's name - I went to the Turk's Head, in the Haymarket, where I found the prosecutor.

JAMES ATTFIELD . I am an officer. Cooper spoke to me, and said the prisoner had some sovereigns, and that he had changed one of them; I took him in company with two more persons - I found in his pocket a bottle of wine; I found 17s. on him - I asked where his sovereigns were; he said in his pocket, but I felt, and they were not there - he then said, "I beg your pardon, I put them in my stocking;" I took off his left stocking, and found five sovereigns in the foot of it.

THOMAS HALL . I keep the Turk's Head, in the Hay-market. The prisoner was in my service - I was not at home the night this happened.

Prisoner's Defence. I lighted him up to bed, and did not go into the room again - he was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-44

44. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 dead fowl, value 3s. , the goods of Robert Benjamin Greenwood ; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

GEORGE ROOKER . I am a butcher. On the 1st of November I saw the prisoner go to the shop of Mr. Greenwood, and come away with a fowl; he ran, and I pursued - he threw the fowl forward, as if to throw it down an area; I took him, and took the fowl back.

ROBERT BENJAMIN GREENWOOD . I keep a poulterer's shop . The fowl was mine - I missed it, but know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN SHEEHY . I am a Police-officer. I have a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner, by the name of John Blackmore - I took him, and know he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-45

45. LEVY BOWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 4 bushels of potatoes, value 6s. , the goods of Charles Russel , his master.

CHARLES RUSSEL , JUN. I am the son of Charles Russel - he lives at Winchmore-hill , about nine miles from London; his potato-house is in the yard of his premises. The prisoner had worked as a labourer for him for five weeks; on the 24th of November I watched in the yard, and saw Spikesley go to the potato-house; between four and five o'clock in the morning - the prisoner took a ladder, and set it against the window of the potato-house; Spikesley got in first, and then the prisoner - they were in there a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes: they had taken an empty sack in with them - the prisoner then came out, and I saw a sack with potatoes in it lifted out of the window; the prisoner took it on his back, and walked away with it a few yards - I then took him, and Spikesley got away.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Did you not state that the potatoes were yours? A. No - I am not in partnership with my father; the window of the potato-house ought not to have been opened but by me.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18311201-46

46. RICHARD HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 live tame duck, price 1s., and 1 live tame fowl, price 1s. , the property of Henry Philip Powys .

JOHN SMITH . I know Mr. Henry Philip Powys; he lives at Southgate , and keeps ducks. On the 15th of November I saw the prisoner and another man go to Mr. Powys' duck-pond; the other man got a duck out of the pond, and put it into a bag - the prisoner took the bag out of his hand, and they went away together; I gave an alarm, and the foreman took the prisoner- they had thrown the duck away, but I did not see it.

THOMAS GUTTERIDGE . I am foreman to the prosecutor. Smith told me which way the men had gone; I followed, and took the prisoner - the duck had been thrown into a shrubbery, but I did not see it thrown - this is the skin of it.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q.How do you know it is the skin of that duck? A. I had seen it every day, and knew it; we have some other ducks of the same colour.

CHARLES WELCH . I heard an alarm of Stop thief! on the 15th of November - I followed the prisoner about three quarters of a mile; I saw him take a fowl from the side of his waistcoat, and throw it over a hedge into a field; he then ran and hid himself in a ditch - he was taken there; this is the skin of the fowl.

THOMAS GUTTERIDGE . This is the skin of my master's fowl.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the lane, and a man picked up the duck in the bag - I had nothing to do with it, and I did not throw the fowl away.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18311201-47

47. EDWARD BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 bowl, value 1d.; 4 half-crowns, 3 shillings, 2 sixpences, 2 pennies, 3 half-pence, and 1 farthing , the monies of Anthony Clark .

JAMES COMPTON . On the 25th of November I saw the prisoner in company with two other lads, at half-past nine o'clock in the evening - they were looking into a shop window; they passed that, and separated - I then watched the prisoner, and saw him go into the prosecutor's shop, in Bury-street, St. James'; he was not in a minute - he came out, saw me by the window, and ran off; I pursued, and just as I was going to take him in Duke-street he threw this bowl over an area; a female gave it me up - I took the prisoner to the station, and found on him four half-crowns, three shillings, two sixpences, two penny-pieces, three halfpence, and one farthing in his left-hand trousers pocket.

ANTHONY CLARK . I am a baker . I know this bowl; it was in the till in my shop on the 25th of November - it had four or crowns in it, and some small money; I was in the back parlour - I had seen it quite safe not two minutes before it was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-48

48. GEORGE WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 12 sheets, value 3l.; 12 bolsters-cases, value 1l. 4s.; 20 pillow-cases, value 2l.; 6 toilet-covers, value 6d.; 123 towels, value 1l. 13s.; 20 table-cloths, value 10l.; 120 napkins, value 4l.; 30 d'Oyleys, value

2s. 6d., and 1 trunk, value 7s. , the goods of Robert Montgomery Hamilton , commonly called Lord Belhaven .

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the property of Lord Belhaven.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM MACKIE . I am butler to Lord Belhaven, he is a Scotch Peer, and is a Baron - his names are Robert Montgomery Hamilton . On the 14th of November, there were six packages to be forwarded to Scotland from his house in Stratton-street ; I packed up one trunk myself - it contained the articles stated in the indictment, but only part of them are here now; the prisoner came to the house about one o'clock that day, and brought a cart and a man; the six packages were all delivered to him, and he was to take them to the Glasgow-wharf , to be forwarded to Scotland - some time afterwards the prisoner's father, who keeps the coach-office in Coventry-street, came to make some inquiries about his son; on the Wednesday following I saw the prisoner in an empty house in Queen-street, Lincoln's Ian-fields - Dalton, the coachman took me there; I found the prisoner and the officer there - the trunk in question was there broken open, and the contents of it were partly out; it had been locked and ordered when I delivered it to him.

JACOB MILLER . I am an officer. On Wednesday, the 16th of November, about twelve o'clock, I went to an empty house in Little Queen-street, Holborn - I knocked at the door, but could not get in; I went into the next house and saw the prisoner was in the empty house - I threatened to break in if he did not let me in; he then let me in, and I found the trunk on the floor in the shop, broken open, and some of the things on the window - I took the prisoner and the trunk; I searched, but there was no other person in the house - the prisoner's father was with me; I asked the prisoner what he was going to do with the property - he said he should have sold it, but on account of the marks he was afraid of being detected; I have brought part of the property here; the rest has been delivered up - the articles in the trunk corresponded with the indictment.

JOHN NEWTON . I am a Police-officer. I went to the house a short time after Miller - I found no more than he has stated.

STEPHEN GOODALL . I am a carman. I went with the prisoner to Stratton-street; I took six packages from there, and in Farringdon-street the prisoner bired a backney-coach, put three of the packages into the coach, and told me to take the other three to the Glasgow-wharf, and said he would meet me there - the trunk was one of the packages which he took away; he did not say what he was going to do with them - he came to the wharf and paid me, but did not bring the packages.

WILLIAM DALTON . I am a hackney-coachman. On the 15th of November the prisoner hired my coach at St. Clement's church; he took me to the Norwich Arms in the City - I there received three packages by his orders, and I went to Little Queen-street; I stopped at an empty house - the prisoner went in, put the packages in the shop, paid me, and I went home.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-49

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

49. WILLIAM ARNOLD was indicted for embezzlement .

RICHARD MANWARING . I keep the Cock and Castle, at Kingsland . The prisoner was my pot-boy - he never accounted to me for 2s. 8d. received from Ann Gordon.

ANN GORDON . I dealt with the prosecutor for beer -I was indebted to him 2s, 8d., which I paid to the prisoner on the 23rd of November; he gave me a receipt for it, which I have here - I saw him write it.

RICHARD MANWARING . The prisoner remained two days in my service after the 23rd of November - he never accounted to me for this sum; I had not asked him for it,

JOSEPH BATES . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner on Friday last.

Prisoner. I am very sorry - I intended to have paid my master; I was led away by others, or I should not have done it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18311201-50

50. THOMAS TAYLOR (THE YOUNGER) was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 5 spoons, value 30s.; 1 scarf, value 1s. 6d., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Taylor .

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a cow-keeper , and live at Great Ealing, Middlesex . The prisoner is my son - he did not live with me, but in consequence of missing some articles I charged him with taking them - I did not threaten him nor make him any promise, but I told him he must not come into the house, as he was taking the things out and pawning them - I found some duplicates on him the day before he was taken before the Magistrate; some of them are here, which relate to my property - one of them is for a silver spoon, pawned at No. 95, Wardour-street.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not go with me to get me a place in the expedition of Don Pedro? A. Yes; you did not give me the duplicates - I did not say I would freely forgive him; I found some of the duplicates in his waistcoat pocket in my own house, and other things I have taken out at different times - I was aware that he had pawned things, but I never allowed it; I was not aware of his pawning these things, and I never gave him permission.

GEORGE FARMER . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker in Wardour-street. I have a table-spoon, pawned on the 17th of October, by the prisoner - this is the duplicate I gave; 9s. was lent on it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES CUSHIAN . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner on the 23rd of November - I received these duplicates from the prosecutor.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I had apprenticed him to a butcher; he said there about twelve months, and then left - he lived with a butcher at Hammersmith about three months ago; he came backwards and forwards to get money of his mother to take him to London.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that upon being out of employ he had gone to his parents, who would not allow him to remain under their roof, but that his mother had allowed him to pledge the property in question.

THOMAS TAYLOR re-examined. I would not give him shelter when he first came, because for the last twelve months he has never come without taking something - I should not have taken any steps if he had gone with the expedition; I took him twice before this - my wife is not here: he had his breakfast in the morning, and his mother gave him provision to take for his dinner, and money to take him to London.

Prisoner. My father refused to let me in - my mother said he would shoot me, and told me to sleep in the barn, which I did; I went into the house to breakfast, and asked my mother for sixpence - she would not give it me, and I took the spoon and pawned it - I am sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-51

51. ELIZABETH MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 11 handkerchiefs, value 4s. , the goods of John Wills .

JOHN WILLS. I am a hosier , and live in Oxford-street . On the evening of the 5th of November my attention was called to the loss of some handkerchiefs from the door; I ran out, and saw the prisoner crossing the road - I ran after her, and saw the handkerchiefs rolled round her arm; I took her about twenty yards from the shop, and gave her in charge; these are the handkerchiefs - there are eleven; they were hanging within the door, and I had an iron guard put round my door, to prevent these depredations.

HENRY BAKER. I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner- she said she had picked up the handkerchiefs; in crossing Regent-circus she threw two bottles of rum out of her apron, and some glasses, and told me she was a smuggler.

Prisoner's Defence. I exchanged some mats for these two bottles of liquor - as I returned back a boy made a stop, and I saw these handkerchiefs on the ground - I took them up; the boy said, "They are mine;" I said, "I shall keep them, as I picked them up;" I have four distressed fatherless children to do for - I never saw the shop, and do not know where it is.

GUILTY . Aged 50. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-52

52. JOSEPH GOODMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of John James .

JOHN JAMES . I am a builder , and live at Westbourngreen . On the 14th of November, between one and two o'clock, I saw the prisoner at my gate, as I sat in my parlour; he came in at my gate, and went towards my stable- I thought he was an acquaintance of my lad's; I had a great coat in my chaise, which was standing at my stable door; I saw him go out quite differently dressed to what he had been - I went to my lad, and said, "Do you know that man?" he said, "No, I did not see him;" I took my staff, being a constable, and pursued - he had then got about one hundred yards; he had my coat on, and the tail of it up under his arm - I cried Stop thief! an ostler tried to stop him, and he knocked him down - my lad got up to him, and he cut him down once or twice; two men came up to try to take him, and he used one of them very ill - I got up, and he was then secured; he had thrown off both my coat and his own before he was taken.

JOHN SUMBERS . I live with the prosecutor. I followed the prisoner, and saw him drop the coats - he cut me across the face with a great stick which he had in his hand; two men at last stopped him - I had not lost sight of him; this is my master's coat.

Prisoner. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-53

53. GEORGE FOX was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Taverner John Miller , from his person .

TAVERNER JOHN MILLER. I live in Old Compton-street, Soho. On the afternoon of the 25th of November, I was passing through Lincoln's Inn Old-square ; I felt a little knock against me - I put my hand to my pocket, and missed a silk handkerchief: I turned round, and saw the prisoner walking at a short distance from me; I saw no other person near me - I followed him, accused him of having taken my handkerchief, and requested permission to search his pockets, which he allowed, denying that he had any thing; I could not find any thing on him, but having some suspicion I requested him to walk with me- he made some resistance, and I collared him: he broke from me, and ran away - I pursued, and saw him throw down my handkerchief; he was then taken.

JOSEPH McGREAL . I am a Police-officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-54

54. LOUISA COLLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 brooch, value 7s. , the goods of Elizabeth Martin .

MARY ANN MARTIN . I am the daughter of Elizabeth Martin - she has a counter at the bazaar , in Soho-square : I assist her there. On the 7th of November the prisoner came to the counter, and asked the price of a brooch; I said 2s. 6d. - she offered 2s. for it, which I refused, and she went away - we lost one brooch from the counter, but I did not miss it till it was brought round by Mr. Burrows, about four o'clock; I had not sold it to the prisoner- I know it was safe when she came to our counter.

CATHERINE LOVICK . I am inspectress of the bazaar. A person told me he suspected the prisoner of stealing -I followed her; she went through a private door, and threw several articles out of her muff behind a basket - I asked what they were; she said goods which she had bought and paid for - this brooch was among them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who is Mr. Burrows? A.He attends the bazaar, and the officer gave him the brooch to make inquiries - I cannot say that I was in the room.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am a Police-officer. I received this brooch from Lovick, and I gave it into the hand of a gentleman, who, I suppose, was Mr. Burrows - I received it again from him, and it had not been out of my sight.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to say you went to the counter with it? A. No, I did not; if it went to the counter it was before I arrived - I did not see it shown at the counter.

COURT. Q. You received this from Lovick? A. Yes, and then I allowed Burrows to have it, but I did not lose sight of it - I got there about four o'clock in the afternoon.

CATHERINE LOVICK . I did not part with it till I gave it to Bennett, the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. You took the articles up from where she threw them down? A. Yes; I saw her throw them down - I took them up, and gave them to the officer- Mr. Burrown had not had them before that.

WILLIAM BENNETT. I received the brooch from Lovick, and gave it to Burrows.

MARY ANN HIGGINBOTTOM . I had placed the brooch on the counter in the morning - it was brought to me by Burrows afterwards, and owned at the counter before the officer came - I am clear of that; Lovick was in the room, but not at the counter.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-55

55. LOUISA COLLIER was again indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 vinegarette, value 6s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Mariner .

ELIZABETH MARINER . I am the wife of Joseph Mariner - I keep a counter at the Bazaar, in Soho-square . On the 7th of November the prisoner came and asked the price of a smelling-bottle; I said 2s. - she said she would give me 1s. 6d.; I said it was the custom of the place to make two prices, but I had some at 1s 6d.; I stooped down to get them; she said she would give 1s. 6d. for the one I first showed her, which I refused, and she went away - I afterwards saw her in custody; I had not sold her any vinegarette, but this one was shown to me - it is mine, and had been at my counter when the prisoner was there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you any one else who sells at that counter? A. Yes, one person, Burrows; this "6s. 6d." is her writing.

JEMIMA BURROWS . I assist Mrs. Mariner. On the 7th of November I put out this vinegarette; I know it by my figures being on it - I had not sold it; I recollect its being missed - the prisoner was at the counter that afternoon, and went round to the other counters; I heard there was a person taken - the Policeman produced this vinegarette to me in the room adjoining.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you had sold some vinagarettes in the course of your business? A. Not that day.

JURY. Q. Do you take off the tickets when you sell them? A. No - I am sure this particular vinegarette was on the tray that morning.

CATHERINE LOVICK. I am inspectress of the Bazaar. I recollect the prisoner being there on the 7th of November - I followed her down stairs; she went through a door to a private door, and asked to go to a back place -I was close to her; she went into a room, and threw these articles behind a basket, out of her muff; I asked why she threw them there - she said, "They are my own, what have you to do with it?" or something of that kind- I said, "Why have you thrown them there?" I picked them up, and gave them to the officer - this vinegarette was among them.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you quite as sure you delivered this to the officer, as you did the brooch? A. Yes - I did not see Mr. Burrows; she said she had bought these things, or something of that kind - I cannot undertake to state every word she said - I heard afterwards that Mr. Burrows had the brooch; I saw him that day, after the things were taken.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am the Police-officer. I produce the vinegratte, which I got from Lovick - I did not part with the possession of it at all.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you as sure you did not part with that as the brooch? A. I saw the gentleman with the brooch, but not the bottle - I saw Mr. Burrows in the room with Lovick for about two minutes, and then we went out at the door while Lovick searched the prisoner- I do not know what became of Burrows; I am confident he did not go away with the brooch after I had it.

Fourteen witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months

Reference Number: t18311201-56

56. JAMES CUTHBERTSON and ROBERT CUTHBERTSON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 purse, value 2d.; 1 watch, value 1l.; 9 half-crowns, 8 shillings, 3 sixpences, 3 pennies, and 6 halfpennies, the property of Catherine Madden , from her person .

CATHERINE MADDEN . I am a widow , and am servant to Mr. Cherry, in Queen-street, May-fair. On Friday, the 18th of November, I was sent by my mistress to Oxford-street, for some tea and sugar, and she gave me a sovereign - I went to Portman-street barracks to see James Cuthbertson, whom I have known these two or three years- I saw Cooper, and sent him to James Cuthbertson; I, Cooper, and James Cuthbertson, went into the Canteen at Portman-barracks , where we had half a pint of rum, for which I paid; we staid there from three o'clock till between nine and ten at night - we were first in the tap-room, and in the evening we went into the parlour; I lost my watch, five half-crowns, and a purse - I had my sovereign in my hand when I went to the Canteen; I had been and ordered the tea, and as I thought I should not be many minutes, I would call for it - I took out my watch two or three times while I was there; I was taken very ill, and fainted, and when I came to, a person asked if I had my watch - I felt, and it was gone, and my money too; Robert Cuthbertson was then in the room, and some other persons- I thought I had done wrong, and I wished to go several times; Serjeant Parson afterwards showed me my purse, which I knew - I had my sovereign in my hand while James Cuthbertson was present, and he asked me to change it; I said I would not - he said I had better, for there had not been one changed for some time in the Canteen; I then changed it, and got 19s. 6d., and some penny-pieces and halfpence - I gave the change to James Cuthbertson , to keep till I went home; he asked me for it several times, and said he could keep it as well as I could - I was not at all intoxicated; I did not go any where with James Cuthbertson - I have seen the ribbon and the key of my watch, but not the watch; I did not give that to any one to take care of.

James Cuthbertson . Q. What time did I leave you? A. I cannot say; I had my watch when you left - I did not know you had no money: you paid for some things after I gave you the money, and I told you not to spend

my money - you did not offer me the remainder; I only spent 3s. - the ale came to 7d.

Robert Cuthbertson. Q. Did you not give me the purse and money into my hand, tell me to go and dress, and see you home after my brother had left? A. No, I did not.

WILLIAM PARSON . I am a serjeant of the first battalion of Scotch Guards. I was called to the Canteen; I found Robert Cuthbertson, Cooper, and Jones there, the prosecutrix, and a good many others - Robert Cuthbertson was drunk; I took him to the guard-room - I found on him this purse, with two half-crowns and one sixpence in it, and 4s. 1 1/2d. loose; the prosecutrix afterwards claimed the purse - she did not tell me that she had handed the change to James Cuthbertson .

JAMES McGREGOR . I am a serjeant of the first battalion. I went to the guard-room, and found Robert Cuthbertson and Cooper: I then went to the Canteen, and found the prosecutrix in fits and insensible - I asked Robert Cuthbertson afterwards if he knew any thing about the watch; he said No - I found a shilling and a halfpenny in his mouth, and this key and ribbon I received from one of the drummers in the Canteen, where the prosecutrix was; I saw her going out late, and complaining that she had no money - I gave her 1s. to get a bed, as she was afraid to go home.

JAMES GREENWOOD. I am a serjeant. In consequence of what I heard, I went to the barrack-room, and found James Cuthbertson in bed; I told him what he was charged with - he said I was welcome to search his bed, and every thing about him; I found nothing on him, or in the bed - I afterwards searched the adjoining bed, and found 10s. between the bed and the blanket; James Cuthberton afterwards told me that the person whom I was well aware he had been keeping company with for some time, gave him the money - I found no watch.

Robert Cuthbertson. She gave me the purse and money to go to dress, and go home with her, and when I came back I found her in fits.

CATHERINE MADDEN . I did not deliver the purse to the care of Robert Cuthbertson, nor did I part with it to any person; there were five half-crowns in it, but no shillings.

JAMES GREENWOOD . The prisoners are two very good men - they were never complained of before; I have seen the prosecutrix among the soldiers before - she came while James Cuthbertson was on duty at Kew, and she took Robert Cuthbertson to the Canteen, and spent her time in drinking with him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-57

57. JAMES BILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Mack , from his person .

JOHN MACK . I live in Market-street, Bloomsbury, and am a bow and arrow-maker . On the 28th of October I was in Francis-street, Westminster ; I saw the prisoner, and from what I was told I followed him and took my handkerchief from his bosom - it was safe in my pocket five minutes before.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a Police-officer. I saw the prosecutor take this handkerchief from the prisoner - I have had it ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that two boys had ran by him, and dropped the handkerchief, which he picked up and called after them, but as they did not claim it he put it into his bosom.

JAMES MACK . I had my wife with me - I did not find my handkerchief on the prisoner at first, and then I took another boy with a basket of baked potatoes; I then took the prisoner again.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the jury.

Confined Ten Days , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18311201-58

58. WILLIAM ARNOLD was indicted for stealing; on the 16th of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 12s. the goods of Thomas Sharpe and others.

THOMAS WHITNEY. I am a Police-officer. On the afternoon of the 16th of November I was in Shoreditch - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running with his hat in his hand; I stopped him, and found a pair of trousers in his hat - I took him to Mr. Sharpe's, and produced the trousers to Ring.

MATTHEW RING. I am foreman to Mr. Thomas Sharpe and two others, tailors , in Shoreditch . The officer produced these trousers to me, which are my masters' - I was in the shop, and was about to take them down from the iron on which they hung; I had undone the fastening, and while I turned to the counter to put down some goods, my little child gave an alarm, and they were gone.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing, and saw them laying down; any person might have taken them.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-59

59. WILLIAM BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 boot, value 5s. , the goods of James Skinner .

JAMES SKINNER. I live in Connaught-terrace, Edgware-road, and am a boot-maker . This boot hung inside my door-post on the 3rd of November; the officer brought it back with the prisoner - this is it.

CHARLES CLARKE . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty - I saw the prisoner cross the road, go to the prosecutor's door, put his hand in, and take this boot; I ran and caught him with it under his jacket.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-60

60. EDWARD BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 3 iron doors, value 5s.; 1 iron cap, value 1s.; 1 iron box-spanner, value 2s.; 1 iron weight, value 1s., and 12 lbs. of iron, value 3d. , the goods of John Henry Taylor .

GEORGE WOODGATE . I live in Cooper-street, City-road , and am a parish constable. On the morning of the 20th of November I saw the prisoner and Cooper standing near a wall, where there had been a fire a month or two back, at a wadding manufactory - a man on the other side of the wall lifted something over, and the prisoner stooped down and took these articles on his head; I followed, and took him - he said he hoped I would let him go; I said I could not - I called for assistance - the other man got away.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I live in Cooper-street, and am a turner. I saw the basket of iron on the pavement - the

prisoner begged forgiveness, and said he would go on his bended knees to obtain it; I had worked on those premises - I know these doors, and this spanner and cap; they had belonged to the steam-engine there.

STEPHEN PHILLIPS . I was engineer on these premises - they belonged to Mr. John Henry Taylor, and this iron is his property; these doors belonged to the steam-engine, this box to the piston, and this cap to the fly-wheel- the premises are quite unprotected.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-61

61. ANN BOARD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 1 brush, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Ewin .

ANN NORMAN . I am the daughter of George Norman , a bricklayer. On the 29th of October I was in Church-street, Bethnal-green ; I saw the prisoner and two more girls - the prisoner took the brush off a small chest of drawers outside the prosecutor's house, and went to the other two girls, who burst out laughing; I gave information, and followed the prisoner - the brush was not found on her, but on another girl; the other two girls got away, but the prisoner is the girl who took it - when I went up to the prisoner, the prosecutor's daughter, who was with me, said to her, "You have got my father's brush;" the prisoner said, "You are a liar," and struck me - I struck her again; I did not like to go in to tell of it at first, as I did not know the people.

MARY ANN EWIN . I am the daughter of William Ewin , a brush-maker , in Church-street, Bethnal-green. Norman came and told me we had lost a brush; I saw the officer produce it in about a quarter of an hour - it is my father's manufacture; I had seen the prisoner pass the shop with two other young women - they went on first, and she after them; in going to the station the prisoner made a blow at me; it missed me, and struck Norman - when I told her she had taken our brush, she said, with an oath, that I was a liar; the officer took the brush out of another girl's lap.

ROBERT MOORE . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty - Norman gave me information respecting the prisoner and two other girls; I got this brush from another girl - I took the prisoner, who was a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's, and in a state of intoxication; I do not think she knew what she was doing.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with a friend, and had more to drink than I should have - I do not know whether I took it or not.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-62

62. CHARLES BURROWS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of November , 5 books, value 5s. , the goods of Frances Horsfall .

There being no person to identify the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18311201-63

63. THOMAS BAGGET was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 shirt, value 2s.; 2 crape bands, value 1s., and 1 half-handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of William Hill .

WILLIAM HILL . I am a labourer , and live at Pinner . On the evening of the 5th of November, I was at the Red Lion there; I had a basket with me, containing a shirt, a neck-handkerchief, and two crape hat-bands - I placed them under the seat on which I sat; I had occasion to go out, and when I returned I missed the articles from my basket.

CHARLES TURNER . I live at Pinner. I was at the Red Lion on the 5th of November; I saw the prisoner leave the tap-room with a bundle, which he gave to a young man named Hockley, who opened it - I asked Hockley for a bit of paper, which he gave me; I put it into my right hand pocket, and the next morning I found it contained two hat-bands - I came down the town, and told the prosecutor I had the two hat-bands, and that Hockley had had the parcel.

Prisoner. I was going into the house and a young man named Dudds gave me the parcel, and told me to take it to Hockley, which I did. Witness. He said to Hockley, "I have got some things which I got in doors, here, take them" - they do not live far off each other; I was standing there and saw Hockley pull out a lot of paper from the bundle; I asked him for it and he gave it me - I did not know there was any thing in it.

Prisoner. William Hill came into the house, and said he had lost his things; I said I had seen a lark played with a bundle, and very likely it might be his - I then went out: Turner and Hockley were gone; the prosecutor has worked for me.

WILLIAM HILL . I have worked under him; I do not know that he saw me with my things - I was in the house at supper, and when I came in, after going out, my bundle was gone; I asked all in the room if they had seen it; the prisoner swore, and said he had not seen it - I described the bundle, and offered to give them any thing they liked to drink if they would give it me, as I wanted the things.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I know the prisoner. On the 6th of November he was offering a half-handkerchief for sale in the street at Pinner, and I bought it of him for 6d. - I took it to the prosecutor, and gave it to him.

Prisoner. He is my brother-in-law; he bought the handkerchief of Hockley, when he went home I took him the handkerchief from Hockley, and he gave me the 6d. which I took to Hockley. Witness. The prisoner and Hockley were together.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-64

64. NATHAN BRYANT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 4 bushels of beans, value 15s., and 6 trusses of hay, value 15s. , the goods of William Marchant , his master.

MR. BALL conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM MARCHANT. I am a contractor to the East India Company , and keep a few cows. On Thursday night, the 10th of November, at twelve o'clock, I went to see that all my premises were safe; I left in my granary two quarters of split beans, which I had taken in the day previous - I and my son watched, and a little after one o'clock, I heard a person get over the fence from the prisoner's premises; he then went to a door immediately opposite to where I laid in ambush, and lifted it off the hinges - he then went to another door, and broke it with the bolt, which he took from the first door; I had fastened it with a staple and chain - he crept through an aperture

in the feather-edge boarding, and opened another door; I heard all this distinctly - he then went up the ladder to the granary door, and broke the lock off with the bolt - he left the bolt on the weighing-machine, and the lock and staple very near it; some time elapsed, and I thought the person had gone to take some more hay, as I had lost some - I went to the door he had first opened, or my son did, and we found the door closed against us, which prevented our following him that way - my son said he thought he was a long while; we looked and saw a man going across the lair with a sack on his back - I saw him go to the foot of a ladder placed against the wall, between the prisoner's premises and mine; the prisoner's barn is there, and there is a trap-door on the parapet wall, coming into my premises - my son called out, and said, "There he is, father;" he threw down the sack, and fell down, or got down, and ran as fast as he could across my meadow - the ladder was son placed as to afford a communication with the trap-door; the sack which contained beans remained at the foot of the ladder till one of the Police-officers assisted my son to take it back to my granary - I opened the sack in about ten minutes, it contained a hundred and a half of beans, and I had my beans in the granary which the person went up and forced the door of; I looked into my granary as soon as we took the sack back, and found half a quarter of beans gone.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Do you keep cows? A. I did; I have only one now, which I keep for my own purpose - I did not take the person at first, as I wished to take him with the property; I was about ten yards from him, when he opened the second door - it was dark; I knew him, he has worked for me seven or eight months -I have no doubt that it was him, but I could not exactly see his face; I said to the best of my knowledge the prisoner was the person - he had not left my service; he kept cows, and sold milk himself - I do not know that he was about leaving me.

WILLIAM MARTIN, JUN. I am the prosecutor's son - what he has stated is correct.

JAMES HOPKINS . I am a Police-officer. I know the prisoner - I saw him on the morning of the 11th of November, between two and half-past two o'clock, crossing from the field belonging to Mr. Marchant - he crossed the East and West India-road, and went down the street to his own dwelling, in Brick-street; he went in without knocking - in about a quarter of an hour afterwards I saw him come out again, and go towards his own barn; I am quite sure it was him - I had known him before, going out with milk.

COURT. Q. Is the field you saw him come from, the same that has been described by the prosecutor? A. Yes.

Cross-examined. Q.And is not that the direct road from his barn to his own house? A. No - he has a barn adjoining the prosecutor's premises; I have seen him coming from there, but not across that field.

THOMAS HALL STEVENS . I am a Police-constable. I searched the prisoner's house about four o'clock that morning, with an officer named Douglass: I found in the back room, under the bed, this pair of boots, which his wife tried to conceal from me - they were very wet, and had grass, which was very wet, and green on them; I tried the boots to the track leading from the back door of Mr. Marchant's barn, to the trap-door against which the ladder was standing; one of the boots is full of hob-nails and clinkers, and the inside edge of the right boot has not any - the boots exactly corresponded with the marks in the track- I believe, from my observation, that the impressions I saw were made by these boots; I did not see any impression in the grass field - I took the prisoner from the serjeant; he told me his wife had been ill for some time, and he had slept in the back room with the children.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it extraordinary for a cowkeeper to have wet boots? A. They would not have been wet if he had not been in a wet place; I did not look for any marks on the other side of the premises - I do not know that his wife was confined; she was dressed, and went with me - she asked us to wait while she put on her shoes and stockings.

WILLIAM BULL . I am a serjeant of the Police. I received information, and went to Mr. Marchant's premises; I received this sack of beans from the prosecutor - I went to the prisoner's barn, and found it locked; I saw a lad who generally assists the prisoner, and when I got into his barn I found five trusses of clover-hay, bound up, and one loose; I did not go to the prisoner's house - I took him in his barn; it was locked when I went to search the premises, but it was open when I took him; he had a pair of low shoes on, which appeared not to have been worn for a long time; he complained of them, and cut them.

THOMAS STANLEY . I am a labourer. On the 10th of November I was going for five quarters of oats; we were short of sacks, and my master borrowed half a dozen sacks of Mr. Hooper, and one of the prisoner; I had three sacks of our own - I brought the oats home, and shot out two of the sacks; the prisoner came and said, "Have you shot my sack?" I said, "What sort of a sack is yours?" he said,

"A black dirty sack;" I said, "No, I have not shot that," and I let him have this one, which is one of the half dozen belonging to Mr. Hooper.

COURT. Q.Then this is a sack you lent the prisoner? A. Yes.

Cross-examined. Q. You had half a dozen from Mr. Hooper? A. Yes; I took five of them home, and lent this to the prisoner - some of them were of softer cloth than the others; about three of them were like this one - they were double twilled sacks, and marked like this.

MR. BALL. Q.When did you take the other sacks home? A. The next day after I borrowed them; I borrowed them the day I lent one to the prisoner.

MR. MARCHANT. These beans are such as were in my granary, and they account for my deficiency, within 3 lbs. or 4 lbs.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-65

65. THOMAS CLARGO was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 4 planes, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Mahoney .

THOMAS MAHONEY. I live at Exeter-buildings Knights-bridge , and am a carpenter . On the 19th of September the prisoner hired a room in my house; his wife was with him - my tool-chest was to stand in that room; they remained fifteen days, and then left without notice; on the evening of the 3rd of October I missed these tools - the name of Williams was on them.

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I am a bricklayer. On the 2nd of October, I was at work at a building at Ball's-pond - I saw the prisoner there; he had five hand-rail planes, which he offered for sale - the maker's name was Williams; no one bought them, and he took them away.

JOHN ALLISON . I live at Canterbury-place, Lambeth. On the 21st of October I was at the Angel at Islington; the prisoner came in there with a hand-basket and some hand-rail planes with the name of Williams on them - I bought these three bead planes of him.

Prisoner. Q.You say you saw me at the Angel? A. Yes; you had a rush basket, and said you were a carpenter out of work.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never sold a thing, and Allison never saw me at the Angel.

JOHN ALLISON . I am confident I bought them of him, and he showed me five hand-rail planes at the same time, made by Williams - I said the maker was a very good one but I did not want them.

The prisoner received a good character, and a witness engaged to employ him.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18311201-66

66. EDWIN COWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 1 pair of breeches, value 6s. , the goods of Sophia Bradley .

WILLIAM BRADLEY . I live at Patriot-place, Bethnalgreen - my mother's name is Sophia; she sells wearing apparel . On the afternoon of the 28th of October I was in the cellar; my mother called me - I ran into the road; I saw the prisoner in the path with a bundle under his arm, running - I followed, and gave an alarm; he dropped this pair of breeches - they were wrapped in a white apron; I lost sight of him, but I saw him in custody in about three minutes - I am certain of him; I was pursuing him for about five minutes, and was constantly looking at him.

MICHAEL KELLY . I am a Police-constable. I was in Bethnal-green-road, and saw the prisoner running; he dropped these breeches, and I lost sight of him, but I got sight of him again, and know he is the person - I had seen him before with a set of boys; I took him at his mother's door.

GEORGE CORBY . I know the prisoner - I have seen him a great many times. On the 28th of October I saw him sitting on a bench next door to the prosecutrix with another boy - I saw a boy less than the prisoner take the breeches, and run off; the prisoner and the other boy followed him - the prisoner joined the other boy in my sight, but I did not see him give the prisoner any thing; I saw Bradley come out and pursue.

WILLIAM BRADLEY . I saw the prisoner about thirty or forty yards from my mother's - I did not see any other boys with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and a little boy threw these breeches down before me.

The prisoner received a good character from a witness, who engaged to employ him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18311201-67

67. WILLIAM KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 4 bushels of oats, value 13s. , the goods of Thomas Wright ; and THOMAS DUNFORD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

KNIGHT pleaded GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Two Months .

ROBERT WRIGHT . I live with Mr. Thomas Wright, at Milbank. On the 18th of November, I sent Knight, who was his servant with some oats to Mr. Gold's, at Chelsea.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. What relation are you to the prosecutor? A. His cousin; I saw Knight go from the yard with oats and beans - I counted the sacks just before he went away, there were ten quarters of them.

THOMAS WRIGHT . I am a corn merchant. In consequence of information I went to the Admiral Keppel, on Chelsea-common, on the 18th of November: Dunford is ostler there - I found a sack in a shed there, with my mark on it; it was such a sack as I send oats out in - I had seen my bulk of black oats on my premises the same morning, and they were black oats that Knight took out; I turned the sack which I found in the shed, and I found that had had black oats in it - I went to the Admiral Keppel again the same day, and saw a horse being fed with chaff and oats; I took some of the oats up, blew them, and found they were black oats - I saw Dunford and gave him into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you have many sacks of this description? A. Yes, and whether that was taken from my premises that day, or any other, I cannot tell; black oats are not uncommon - when I spoke to Dunford he said he knew nothing at all about them.

WILLIAM MOORE . I keep the Admiral Keppel. Dunford supplied the horses there with corn, on his account - he had been with me about three years; the sack was found in the small shed, which is used to keep sacks and small articles in - there were a few black oats in the sack, and some white ones.

Cross-examined. Q. Did this shed belong to Dunford? A. It is appropriated to his use, and is generally locked, but was not then; the sack appeared to have been used both for black and white oats.

THOMAS WATNEY . I live in Bailey's-place, Marlborough-row, and am a corn-dealer. I know Dunford by sight - on the 18th of November I saw a cart near his premises: I did not see the name on the cart, but I know it belonged to Mr. Wright, and Knight was driving it - I stopped opposite the stable, and saw Knight take a sack from the copse of the cart, and carry it into the stable; it appeared full - he came out again, shut the door, and left the sack there; I did not see Dunford there.

NOT GUILTY .

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18311201-68

68. CHARLES COSSON (THE YOUNGER) was indicted for stealing on the 23rd of November , 1 sovereign, 1 half-sovereign, 3 half-crowns, and 5 shillings , the monies of Charles Cosson , the elder; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18311201-69

69. THOMAS BEATON was indicted for stealing, on

the 8th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Francis Renwick , from his person .

FRANCIS RENWICK . I was in the street on the 8th of November - I felt my pocket handkerchief taken; I turned, and saw the prisoner - I collared him; he threw my handkerchief behind him - I took it up, and took him to the watch-house; this is it.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, declaring his innocence.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-70

70. THEOPHILUS LOWE was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. CURWOOD conducted the prosecution.

HENRY SMITH . I am brother to Mrs. Weston, who is a salt-merchant . The prisoner was her clerk ; it was his duty to receive money, which he was to account for to me - I am her assistant, acting with a power of attorney; when the prisoner had received any money, he generally gave me a written account, which I entered in the cash-book which I have here - Nelson, Adam, and Nelson dealt with us; I know the prisoner's hand-writing - this receipt is his writing - (read)

"Received, the 22nd of April, 1826. of Messrs. Nelson. Adam, and Nelson, 65l. 12s., for salt and expences, for F.D. Weston. THEOPHILUS LOWE ."

Witness. He ought to have paid this in on the same day, but it is not down in the cash-book, but about a year and a half after this date, he paid 50l., which he stated was paid on account of this money, and I have no doubt he gave me a written memorandum of it - here is the entry of it in the cash-book, in the prisoner's hand-writing, "Nelson, Adam, and Nelson, 50l,"; the other 15l. 12s. has not been paid - there were particular periods at which he used to render a balance-sheet; here is his balance-sheet to Midsummer, 1826, and in this he has entered the sum of 65l. 12s., as due from them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Where did you get this receipt from? A. From Mr. Stevens - I cannot tell whether they paid the money or not, but by the receipt- Mr. Weston has been dead about sixteen years; the prisoner was about two years in his service - I do not know on what terms he was engaged by him or by Mrs. Weston; he has been active in their service certainly - I did not ask him to make up his account, and to bring forward any sum of money which might be deficient, but there was an opportunity about Midsummer last, when Mr. Heard the executor, asked him to settle, but I was not present.

MR. CURWOOD. Q.Were you present when the prisoner was called upon to explain his accounts? A. I have no recollection of it - I heard Mr. Stevens ask him respecting a deficiency in his accounts; he had then an opportunity of explaining any deficiency.

FRANCES DIANA WESTON . The prisoner was a clerk in my house - he never accounted to me for this 65l. 12s., nor for any money; he should account to my brother.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any partner? A. No; the prisoner has been sixteen years in our service; he was engaged at 200l. a year - I never knew of any promise being made to him of his being one of the firm.

JURY to MR. SMITH. Q. Was the prisoner to make entries in the cash-book? A. No; he ought to account to me, and I entered it.

The prisoner, in his Defence, stated that the prosecutrix's husband had engaged him at a salary of 200l, to be advanced to 300l., which he had conceived himself entitled to, and had drawn at that rate - he also entered into a detail of business transactions which did not relate to the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-71

71. THEOPHILUS LOWE was again indicted for embezzlement .

MR. CURWOOD conducted the prosecution.

HENRY SMITH . This receipt is the prisoner's handwriting - it is dated the 28th of April, 1829, for 21l. 17s. 6d. - the prisoner's salary was 200l. a year; he was paid a little over that - on one occasion he applied to me for some money, and I made the observation that he had overdrawn his account; he acknowledged that he had; he never claimed, as his right, more than 200l. a year; he should have accounted to me for this 21l. 17s. 6d. on the same day, but he has never accounted to me for it - I have examined my books; in the next balance-sheet, which the prisoner rendered at Midsummer, 1829, he has charged Messrs. Nelson, Adams, and Nelson with 54l. 1s. 6d., which includes this sum of 21l. 17s. 6d. - here is an account in the ledger of 104l. 1s. 6d. due from them, and against it 50l., paid on account, which left the balance 54l. 1s. 6d.; the items are partly in my writing, and the casting up is the prisoner's - he stated, in October, that he had received the 54l. 1s. 6d.

COURT. Q. Did you ever speak to him about this specific sum? A. No; I got this 54l. from the ledger, which is taken from the journal; the latter part of which has been kept by Mr. Thomas Weston.

Cross-examined. Q. Then that balance was made by the prisoner? A. Yes, from the book.

JOHN HEARD . I am executor under Mr. Weston's will. I had a conversation with the prisoner about deficiencies in the accounts - there was a long list of sums stated to be deficient, amounting in the whole to near 1500l. - this is the list; I saw it produced to the prisoner, and in it there is "Messrs. Nelson, Adam, and Co. 54l. 1s. 6d.;" I can tell by the ledger that this included the 21l. 17s. 6d. - the account is made up of five items, which amount to 104l. 1s. 6d., and on the other side, in the prisoner's hand-writing, is "October 20, 1827, cash 50l.," leaving a balance of 54l. 1s. 6d. - his salary was 200l. a year, and his account is in this book, in his own hand-writing, from which it appears that he has sometimes over-drawn his salary; I think in April last he applied to me for an advance of salary, and stated that 200l. a year was not enough for him to maintain his family - he certainly never said he had a right to more.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can you tell that this sum of 21l. 17s. 6d. is part of the 54l. 1s. 6d.? A. Yes, because the two last items in the account amount to 21l. 17s. 6d., which are on the 8th and 10th of December, and in teh October before he had received the 50l.

COURT. Q.When was this meeting with respect to the deficiencies? A. I think the last week in last October - he was desired to explain his accounts.

JURY. Q. Did he explain? A. Yes; he was 1476l. deficient in his accounts, which he explained by his having been sixteen or eighteen years in the house, and considering himself entitled to 300l. a year.

The prisoner made the same Defence as before.

GUILTY . Aged 64.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, for his long services and good character.

Confined One Year .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18311201-72

72. JAMES BONNOR was indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE LOVELL . I am a chip-hat dyer , and live in Aldersgate-street. The prisoner was in my employ for eighteen months, as a journeyman ; he was to give me an account of what he had received, and I entered it in the book.

JESSE LACY . I am a customer of the prosecutor's. I paid the prisoner on his account, on the 14th of July, 13s. 4d.; on the 23rd of July, 10s. 5d., and on the 28th, 7s.; he gave me these receipts for them.

MR. LOVELL. I spoke to the prisoner several times about these accounts; he sometimes said Mr. Lacy was out of town, at other times, if I would send a stamped receipt it would be paid, but I never received the money - I gave him in charge in November; he begged me not to prosecute him, that it would be his ruin, and he knew I could transport him; we were then talking of the sums of money which he had received and not accounted for.

GUILTY . Aged 42. - Transported for Seven Years .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18311201-73

73. CHARLES WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 watch, value 25s.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 1 watch-key, value 6d., and 1 ribbon, value 1d., the goods of William Burton , from his person .

WILLIAM BURTON . I am a silk-dyer . On the 24th of October I was on Holborn-hill , nearly opposite St. Andrew's church, about seven o'clock in the evening; the prisoner met me, and snatched my watch out of my fob - we were so close together, that I was about to collar him, but he turned round, gave me a blow in the mouth, tripped me up, and ran off - he was pursued, and taken in a few minutes; I am quite sure he is the man - I saw him at the watch-house in five minutes.

WILLIAM HAWKES . I am an umbrella-maker. I was on the opposite side of the way - I saw the scuffle, saw the prisoner strike Mr. Burton in the face, and throw him down; as he fell he said, "Oh, dear, Stop thief!" I pursued the prisoner, who ran down George-court - he got to the bottom, and turned to the left; when I got to the bottom the Policeman had him by the collar - I said, "That is the man - he has knocked a gentleman down, and taken his watch;" I assisted in taking him back - I saw the Policeman take the watch from the prisoner's hand.

WILLIAM SHEEHY . I am a Police-officer. I was coming along Union-court, and heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner passed me, and went down George-alley - I followed, and took him: he was running very fast - I caught him in Black Boy-alley; as I was bringing him back he stooped down, and was putting this watch under his feet; I took it from him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18311201-74

74. WILLIAM OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 coral necklace, value 7s., the goods of Richard Powell , from the person of Lucretia Powell .

EMMA SHERMAN . My father and mother live in Fetter-lane. On the 21st of October I took Lucretia Powell down the Strand - she is two years and a half old; she had a necklace on her neck - as I came back I saw the prisoner and some other boys at the beginning of Clifford's Inn - I heard them speak together; I came on, and a little girl said, "That boy has taken the necklace;" I saw the prisoner running, I pursued, and called Stop thief! a gentleman took him in Chancery-lane, and showed me the necklace.

WILLIAM ARROWSMITH . I was in Clifford's Inn, and the prisoner ran past me; I pursued him up Chancery-lane to the corner of a court; I took him with this necklace under his jacket - I gave him in charge.

JOHN WALTER GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner running up Chancery-lane; I took him and the necklace.

RICHARD POWELL. I am the father of the child - this necklace is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 11. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18311201-75

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

75. WILLIAM CARPENTER was indicted for that he on the 7th of November , being in the dwelling-house of Thomas George Jordan , feloniously did steal 1 tea-pot, value 1s., and 17 cigars, value 18d., his property; and 1 hat, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Williams ; and having committed the said felony, about three o'clock in the night of the said day, feloniously and burglariously did break the said dwelling-house, and get out of the same .

THOMAS GEORGE JORDAN . I keep a public-house in Air-street, Piccadilly . On Sunday night, the 6th of November, I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock- the house was all fastened; I was called up about half-past four o'clock, by the Policeman, and missed a tea-pot and these cigars from the bar; I know nothing of the prisoner, and cannot say how the house was entered.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am servant to Mr. Jordan. I was alarmed between four and five o'clock in the morning by two watchmen, and called master; I found the street door open, and missed my hat off a nail on the stairs, where it was when I went to bed - the watchmen are not here; they found the door open - I do not know the prisoner, and had not seen him before.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I am a Policeman. On the 7th of November, about a quarter to five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Oxford-street, about ten minutes walk from the prosecutor's house, carrying a hat under his arm, and another on his head; I asked where he got that hat - he said, "My master gave it to me;" I asked who his master was - he said a Mr. Pemberton, that he had forgotten the hat-maker's name, but he lived in Bond-street; I found this tea-pot in the hat, and that the hatter lived in King-street, Covent-garden - I was going to take him, but he darted across the road, and ran away; I pur

sued, and he was stopped by another Policeman - I went to the prosecutor's, and called up Williams; he had before been called by the watchmen - I found the door shut.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner appear intoxicated? A. No - after he was committed he told the Magistrate a woman had given him the things, but he previously told me he had got into the back place, and fallen asleep, that he afterwards awoke, and let himself out with the things.

CHARLES FREEMAN . I am a Police-constable. I saw the prisoner stopped; the hat and tea-pot were found on him - I took him to the watch-house; he begged me to let him go, and said he had got a situation to go to - on the road he said he took the things from Jordan's public-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-76

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

76. WILLIAM ANGEL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 3 sovereigns, one 20l., two 10l., and two 5l. Bank notes, the property of Mary Bedford , in her dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MARY BEDFORD . I am a widow , and live in Mount-street, Berkeley-square . On Sunday, the 6th of November, the prisoner was in my service; I went to church about a quarter to eleven o'clock that morning, leaving him in the house - I left this property in a drawer in my bed-room; I locked it up there that morning - he has seen me put money into that drawer; about half-past twelve o'clock, while I was in church, I received information of this robbery; I went home, and found a 5l. note on the bed-room carpet; there was half a sovereign and some silver left in the bowl, where the money was kept - the rest of the money was gone; the drawer had been forced open- there was the mark of some instrument having been applied; the prisoner came home soon after me, but I had no conversation with him - as I left my bed-room to go to church I observed the shadow of the prisoner in the watercloset.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have the servants access to the water-closet? A. Yes; he was four years in my service; the room adjoining mine was broken into in March last; the back of the house was broken open- I have one female servant; the prisoner came home earlier than I expected him from church - the 5l. note laid open on the carpet; any body might have seen it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When your house was broken open, did the same female servant live with you? A. No, the prisoner did; the 5l. note laid flat on the carpet - I had left it in the bowl, folded up with the other money: I had left the female servant at home.

GEORGE BENJAMIN ASHMEAD . I am a brush-maker, and live in Duke-street, Grosvenor-square - the prosecutrix is also a brush-maker. I was called out of church about a quarter or twenty minutes past twelve o'clock; in consequence of this, (church is generally over about one) I went to Bedford's house, and on her bed-room carpet I saw a 5l. note, several loose keys, and a key ring, broken; I then turned round and saw two chests of drawers, two drawers of each were open - I saw Mrs. Bedford go to the wooden bowl, in which was 20s. in cash, and a piece of paper with 59l. written on it; after remaining in the house about twenty minutes, I went out, and met the prisoner in Mount-street - I called him, and gave him in charge on this robbery; he then declared, (holding a very small Prayer-book in his hand,) that he had been to chapel and no where else - he was taken to Mrs. Bedford's; I searched him, and in his waistcoat pocket found 1l. 16s. 1/2d and a key - he appeared much agitated, and asked for some water; I afterwards went to Castle-street Long-acre, and received information.

Q. How many persons did you find in the prosecutrix's house? A. Five, one man and four women - I met the prisoner coming towards home; it was about one o'clock; I found no tools on him.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Who was the man? A. The female servants' brother-in-law - her sister was there, and Mrs. Bedford, and Mrs. Turner, the second floor lodger; the prisoner had the Prayer-book in his hand very conspicuously.

SARAH GOULD . I am servant to Mrs. Bedford. On the 6th of November mistress went to church, Mrs. Turner, the prisoner and I, were in the house - my sister and brother-in-law were on the step of the door at the time Mrs. Bedford went out, they came in - they were in the habit of calling with mistresses knowledge; they had come to Mrs. Turner, who is a mantua-maker, to give orders about a dress - I went into the kitchen with them; I then took my sister up and left her with Mrs. Turner - as I came down to the bottom of the kitchen stairs, the prisoner was suddenly behind me; mistress had then been gone to church about five minutes - I told him my brother was down stairs; he said, "Oh, is he?" he did not come down after me, but went from the bottom of the stairs somewhere; but in ten or twelve minutes he came down stairs very quickly, and had hardly entered the kitchen when he asked for his book; I told him it was on the end of the dresser - he reached it hastily, knocked down some halfpence, and did not stay to pick them up; when he got near the street door he called out that he would leave his great coat, as it did not rain - I did not hear the door opened or shut, but saw no more of him; my sister came down stairs in about two minutes after the prisoner left the kitchen, and asked me to show her the watercloset, which I did - we staid there about eight minutes; I took her to show her Mrs. Bedford's bed-room, and on opening the door, I was surprised to find a door open which is never opened except when the room is scruhbed, and another door was shut, which is not usually shut in the day time - I felt alarmed, and the first thing I saw was some keys on the carpet - I did not see the ring; I then saw a piece of paper rumpled up - I called my sister to look at it; I took the paper up, it was a 5l. note - I called Mrs. Turner, who came down, and advised me to put it down again, and not touch anything - I did so; Mrs. Turner proposed that the house should be searched - I called up my brother-in-law; we all searched, and found nobody there; a few minutes after Mrs. Turner's son came to the door - I went and let him in, and the door was closed - I then went to St. George's church, for Mrs. Bedford; she came with Ashmead.

Q.From the time the prisoner took his Prayer-book

till you went to the room, had your brother or sister been out of your sight? A. Not at all - my brother did not go up to the water-closet, but I stood in sight of Mrs. Bedford's bed-room door, with the water-closet door open, and nobody went there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know your brother and sister were coming? A. No; I found no instrument in the bed-room - none of us were searched; I laid the note down, crumpled up, as I had found it - I went to show my sister the room, as she said the water-closet was clean; I did not look at the drawers for marks - I opened the note to see what it was; I crumpled it up again, and put it down as I had found it - I went into the room with Mrs. Bedford, but left again without seeing the note taken up.

COURT. Q. When the prisoner said he would leave his great coat, did you see what had become of him? A. I did not.

THOMAS FOX . I am a miniature-painter, and live in Cheapside; I am Gould's brother-in-law. On Sunday, the 6th of November, I went to Mrs. Bedford's house, about twenty minutes to eleven o'clock, with my wife: I had lost a child, and we went about getting some crape put on a dress - my sister did not know we were coming: she let Mrs. Bedford out as we rang the bell; while I was in the kitchen the prisoner came down, reached out his hand, took his Prayer-book off the tea-chest, and knocked a 1d. down - I was afterwards called up; I had never been up stairs before.

This witness described the state of the bed-room as the other witness had done, and Mr. Adolphus declined proceeding further in the case.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-77

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

77. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Ryder , on the 30th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 3 half-crowns, his monies .

THOMAS RYDER . I am a book-binder , and live in Whitecross-street. On Saturday night, the 29th of October, I was returning from Clare-market, and near the Cat public-house, Beech-street , I saw the prisoner and two others, sky-larking - the two outside ones shoved the prisoner against me; he immediately thrust his hands into my pocket, and took out three half-crowns, and out of my left hand pocket a brown bag - I immediately collared him, and said, "You have robbed me - I will not let you go till you have given up my money;" he then knocked me down with a blow on my right eye, and fell with me, as I did not lose my hold - I called for help several times, and a stranger came up; I was then on the ground, with the prisoner on the top of me - I said, "I shan't give him up to you - I doubt whether you are not one of his palls;" an officer directly came up, and took him from me; I had not let him out of my hands till then - I told the Policeman he had robbed me of three half-crowns; he said nothing, and was taken to the station - my pocket was torn down about three inches, and my money gone; I was not exactly sober, but perfectly in my senses; and noticed my money safe about two minutes before I met the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where did you see it safe? A. I had my hand in my pocket, and felt it; I was coming from the house of call in Stanhope-street, Clare-market - I am sure I lost three half-crowns and my bag, but I saw him give something to one of the two before I was knocked down, and he said, "Cut with that as quick as you can;" that man ran towards Golden-lane - as soon as I was down he told the prisoner to slog me; I had left work at about a quarter-past ten o'clock - I work in Bateman's-row, Shoreditch; I did not go home, because I was afraid I should be too late to get to the society - I received a sovereign and a half and four half-crowns that night; I gave my wife the sovereign and a half - she works at the same shop as me; I did not tell her I could only give her a sovereign, because I had been robbed by a woman - my pockets were unbuttoned when I was robbed; I had paid 2s. for a trade ticket: I never said I was so drunk I did not know what I had lost.

GEORGE BAXTER . I am a butcher, and live in Hoxton. I was in Beech-street, and heard Watch! cried several times; I approached the spot, and the prosecutor was holding the prisoner by the collar - another young man stood with him, who when I came up, said to the prisoner,"Down him, slog the b - r, slog him" - they were then standing up; the prisoner instantly knocked the prosecutor down - they both fell together, the prosecutor underneath - I then laid hold of the prisoner, and he said to the other, "Cut;" he immediately went away - I kept the prisoner till the Policeman came up, and took him; the prosecutor would not let him go till the Policeman took him - I saw him searched at the station, and three half-crowns, three sixpences, and some halfpence found on him.

cross-examined. Q. As soon as the other said slog him, he knocked the prosecutor down? A. Yes, and after he was down the prisoner said cut - the prosecutor was not quite sober, but sufficiently so to know what happened.

THOMAS ROBINSON . I am an ivory-worker, and live in Clerkenwell. I was in Beech-street, and saw the prisoner and prosecutor standing together, with one or two more - when I was about twelve yards off I saw the prosecutor fall; I came up, and took up his hat, which laid in the kennel - I then assisted in securing the prisoner; in a short time the Policeman came up, and took him; I saw the money found on him at the station - the prosecutor was a good deal in liquor, but knew what he was about.

Cross-examined. Q. He was drunk enough not to walk steady? A. Why, the blows might have made him worse, but he walked to the station without help - when I first saw them they were all standing together, as I thought in conversation, but when I had walked six yards further, the prosecutor fell; I was about eighteen yards off - I did not see his pocket picked; I heard some words spoken before I got up, but do not know what nor by whom - I saw one or two run away; the prisoner said,"Let me go, and let this man take me into custody" - so I thought the one who ran away was assisting the prosecutor to secure the prisoner; I did not hear the word cut used to my knowledge - they were standing very close together.

MATTHEW PEAKE . I am a Policeman. I was in Chiswell-street, and heard a cry of Watch! I proceded to the spot, and the first thing I saw was the prosecutor on his

back, and the prisoner over him - the prosecutor saw me, and said, "Hold him;" I collared him, and he asked me to let him go; I refused - the prosecutor got up, and said he had lost some money; I said, "How much," but do not recollect how much he said - I took him to the station, and found on him three half-crowns in his left-hand waistcoat pocket; three sixpences and some halfpence in his right hand pocket - the prosecutor had been drinking, but appeared to know what he was about, and walked steady.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever recollect how much he said he had lost? A. Never; I know he mentioned a sum - I never stated that he said he had only lost one half-crown; he said at the station, that he had lost three-I do not know what sum he mentioned when I took the prisoner; he never, in my hearing, said he had lost only one half-crown - the prisoner did not refuse to be searched till he said what he had lost; I never told the prosecutor to stick to his story - there was a prostitute by, and somebody tried to trip me up; two prostitutes and a boy followed him to the station - I saw no woman within a yards or two of him when I got up.

Prisoner's Defence. One witness has been bribed to keep away, who could prove he gave his wife only a sovereign that night.

ANN LEE . I sell fruit in Whitecross-street. I do not know the prisoner; I was present on this Saturday night, and heard the prosecutor say he had lost half a crown - that was close against the Cat, at the corner of Whitecross-street; the Policeman was not there.

Q. Who was there? A. I saw the prosecutor wrestling with a young man in the street; the young man got away, and ran away - I saw the prisoner come up to them; the prosecutor was very drunk; I heard him say he had lost half a crown - I followed them to the station, and waited outside the door; when the prosecutor got there, he said he had lost three half-crowns - he staggered very much indeed.

JOHN TOPLEY . I have known the prisoner four months. I am a hawker, and live in Prospect-terrace, Gray's Inn-road; I was at the Bull's Head, Smithfield, on Saturday night about twelve o'clock, and he called in there - he had four half-crowns, one was a new one; he changed one to pay for gin - he left five or ten minutes after twelve o'clock.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-78

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

78. CHARLES GARROW was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 gelding, price 20l.; 1 cart, value 9l., and 1 set of harness, value 1l. , the property of John Hodsden .

JOHN HODSDEN . I am a carman , and live in Little Albany-street, Regent's-park. On the 10th of November I was near the Windsor Castle public-house, Vauxhall-road, with a load of hay, which I delivered; I left my cart and horse in the street, while I had some beer at the Feathers, at the bottom of Grosvenor-place - I was not there more than ten minutes, and left my cart and horse opposite the door; nobody was in care of it - when I came out it was gone; I ran as fast as I could towards the Cumberland hay-market, where I had come from, as the horse knew its way home; I could hear nothing of it - I found my horse, cart, and harness next morning at Smith's livery stable, George-street, Sloane-street; the cart belonged to Simon Howard , of Rickmansworth - his name and address were on it; I was hired to drive it.

Cross-examined. Q. The cart was not yours? A. No; the horse and harness were; I was at the Feathers at half-past five o'clock - another hay-cart had unloaded at the same place, and we went to have a pot of beer together; before I went into the house I said I must keep a look out, for if a gig, which was before my horse, went on, mine would follow it; when I came out the first time the gig was gone, but my horse stood there quiet; the wasy for the horse to go home would be up Grosvenor-place and Park-lane - he knew the way home if nobody had interrupted him.

SAMUEL RUGGLES . I am a Policeman. On Thursday evening, about half-past nine o'clock, when I was in Chapel-street, Grosvenor-place, I saw a horse and cart standing in Pembroke-mews, which runs into Chapel-street; the name of Simon Howard , Rickmansworth, was on it - I left it there, keeping myself on the alert, and about half-past ten o'clock I was in Belgrave-square, and heard a cart going in the direction of Halton-street; the prisoner was in the cart, alone, driving it - I stopped the horse, and asked if it was his property; he said it was -I asked him the name on the cart; he said if I wished to know I might look - I said that would not satisfy me; he said I should have no further satisfaction - I said he must go to the station with me; he immediately jumped out of the cart, and said he did not know the name; that he had been drinking with the driver of it at the Feathers, in Grosvenor-place, and he wished him to drive it to Pembroke-mews, and to wait at the Sun public-house, Chapel-street, a few minutes, when he (the driver) would come to him, but he had not seen him since that time, which was seven o'clock; I asked where he was going to take the cart - he said to a livery-stable; I asked where - he said to no one in particular; I said then he was my prisoner - he immediately turned round, and ran off as fast as he could; I followed, springing my rattle, and he was stopped by another constable - I asked his name; he said if I would allow him three minutes to go to the Sun, he could give every satisfaction.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the Sun at the corner of Chapel-street and Belgrave-mews? A. Yes; the door is in Chapel-street - Grosvenor-place is a more public road than Pembroke-mews, which runs out of Chapel-street, and I consider there is more light in Grosvenor-place; there is a lamp nearly opposite the Sun - I first saw the horse and cart in the mews, just behind the Sun, as it were; I had not gone by there before that night - one or two persons said they did not know who it belonged to; I went on duty at nine o'clock - the prisoner was quite sober; he said he had been drinking at the Feathers, not at the Talbot, in Chester-street; he might say that at the watch-house.

JOSEPH GILL . I am a Policeman. I was alarmed by the rattle in Belgrave-square; I ran towards the spot, and found the prisoner running at a furious rate - I crossed and stopped him; as soon as he saw me coming towards him, he stood still - I asked what he had been

up to; he said he had been doing nothing - I detained him.

Cross-examined. Q.Was that all he said? A. Yes; he was out of breath with running, but did not appear intoxicated.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the Talbot, in Chester-street, and called for a pint of ale - the tap-room and parlour were quite full; I could not get a seat, and as I stood at the bar a man got into conversation with me - it was raining very hard, and he asked which way I was going- I said towards Regent's-park; he said he would give me a lift, if I would wait - he told me to get into the cart, which I did; he said he would not ride, as he was going to leave a note in Chapel-street; he turned the horses head close against the Sun, told me to go in there, call for a pint of beer, and he would be in directly - I waited some time; he never returned - I was taken ill there, and went out at the back of the house twice; I did not know what to do with the horse and cart - I got into it, intending to drive it to a livery-stable, or to the station, for advice how to act; the Policeman called after me, and told me to stop, which I did, and got out of the cart before he put a question to me.

CHARLES HATCHARD . I am a surveyor. I have made a plan of the neighbourhood, which is here - it is two hundred yards from the Feathers to the Talbot, and two hundred and eighty from the Talbot to the Sun, in Pemberton-mews.

RICHARD MEEK . On the 10th of November, about a quarter-past one o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Grosvenor-place, crossing Chapel-street - he is servant to Mr. Smith of Chapel-street, which is not half a minute's walk from the Sun - we went to the Sun, and had a glass of ale - I dined there off beef-steakes, and staid there till after three o'clock; the prisoner drank with me, but had no dinner - after that we went to a public-house, in Belgrave-mews, and had a pint of half and half; he went home with me to Dean-street, and waited outside till I came out - we then went to a public-house, opposite St. Ann's church, and each had a glass of gin - he went to the Admiralty with me, and we parted; it was then about half-past five o'clock, and I found him again at the Sun, about half-past seven - I am servant to Mr. Farmer, of Dorset-square.

ELIZA CARTER . I am servant to Mr. Smith, of Chapel-street, a barrister. On the day in question the prisoner went out about one o'clock, for the dinner beer, and to put a letter into the post - I did not see him again till about eight, when I was at the gate - he was then very much intoxicated; he gave me the key of the hall door -I asked him to come in and go to bed, but he would not.

JOHN HALL . I lodge at the Sun, I found the prisoner there about half-past seven o'clock - he appeared a good deal the worse for liquor; I did not know him before; he was absent some time, and I found him sitting in the water-closet, fast asleep, about half-past eight o'clock; I awoke him - he seemed stupid, and could hardly give me an answer, and afterwards I saw him asleep in the house - I saw a person come in, but he did not speak to him - the horse and cart stood at the corner of Pemberton-mews, at half-past seven o'clock, when I arrived - it went away about half-past ten; I believe the prisoner went with it, but I did not see him - I saw nobody in it; I heard a person inquire about a horse and cart that evening; I could not read the name on it, as it was splashed with dirt - I could see Rickmansworth on it; I should think it stood there three hours - it was a very wet night; I was out and in.

WILLIAM GRAY . I am a servant. I saw the prisoner at the Sun - he came in between seven and eight o'clock, and seemed tipsy; he turned very pale, and had some ale - I saw him leave at half-past ten - he seemed stupified then.

WILLIAM HARDY . I live in Chapel-mews, at the Sun. I saw the horse and cart there, between nine and ten o'clock, at the corner of Pemberton-mews - I told the Policeman I should take it home, if there was any inquiry for it, as the horse was shivering; I went into the parlour, and said, "Does any body belong to this horse?" nobody answered - the prisoner sat in the parlour, and asked me to drink; he was tipsy and could hardly stand- the Policeman said I had better not take it home, as I should get into trouble - I am a stable-keeper.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-79

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

79. JOHN HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Shackleton , from his person .

THOMAS SHACKLETON . I live in Goswell-road. On the 25th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I was at the corner of Long-lane, Smithfield , coming from St. John-street - there was a cry of Thieves! and people were running - I put my hand into my pocket and my handkerchief was gone; I am sure it was safe half an hour before, when I left home - it was produced to me after the prisoner was secured; I had not seen him near me.

JOHN ROSE . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner near Mr. Shackleton, and saw him take the handkerchief out of Mr. Shackleton's pocket; he had two companious with him - he ran away; I went after him, and lost the other two - there was a cry of Stop thief! and he was stopped at the corner of the first turning, about thirty yards off; I took the handkerchief out of his hand - he denied having had it; Mr. Shackleton claimed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it off the ground by a picture-shop, and told the officer so.

JOHN ROSE . He did not.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18311201-80

80. JOHN HICKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of November , 1 coat, value, 2s. 6d., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Ball .

THOMAS BALL . I am a bricklayer , and live in Fore-street, Cripplegate . These things were taken from a drawer in my counting-house - I did not miss them.

CHARLES CONNER . I was in Mr. Ball's employ - the prisoner came at times to ask for a job as a plasterer. On the 22nd of November I was coming in, and saw him in the yard, within five yards of the counting-house, with a bundle in his hand: I secured him - it was this coat wrapped in a handkerchief; I had seen it in the drawer an hour before - he said he was hungry, and desired me not to hurt him; he did not appear distressed.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see a man run away? A. No, there was one before you, but I did not notice him.

ROBERT HOWARD . I took him in charge; he said another man ran out of the yard, threw the things down, and he picked them up - I found six duplicates of tools on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner delivered in a written Defence, stating that he had gone to the premises to inquire for work, that a man threw the bundle down, which he took up, and was taken.

GUILTY Aged 25. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-81

81. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 56 lbs. of bacon, value 20s. , the goods of William Danby .

There being no evidence that the prisoner was ever in possession of the property he was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18311201-82

82. WILLIAM PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Robert Samuel Weakley , from his person .

ROBERT SAMUEL WEAKLEY. I am a linen-draper , and live on Ludgate-hill. On the 4th of November, about half-past four o'clock, I was going to Cheapside - I used my handkerchief in St. Paul's church-yard, and about two minutes after, I felt a motion at my coat; Mr. Stabb, who was with me, asked if I had lost my handkerchief - I said Yes; I turned round, and seized the prisoner, he being nearest to me: I found the handkerchief put up behind him, between his coat and waistcoat - I have not a doubt of its being mine; he at first said he had not got it, and then that he had picked it up - I could not have dropped it; I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. SMITH. Q. Is your pocket in the skirt of your coat? A. Yes - I am sure I put it into my pocket, and felt it there a moment before; I am in the habit of walking a good deal with my hand in my pocket.

HENRY STABB . I live with Mr. Weakley, and was with him - there was a crowd, and Mr. Weakley got a-head of me; I saw the prisoner putting a handkerchief under his coat, which I thought was Mr. Weakley's - I told him, and he took it from him.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a street-keeper, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18311201-83

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

83. DAVID GREENHILL was indicted for embezzlement .

DAVID PEDDY . I live in Davies-street, Berkeley-square, and am a baker . The prisoner had been about six months with me, and was employed to carry out bread - if he received money it was his duty to account to me for it every day.

RICHARD MORRIS . The prisoner was in the habit of bringing bread to me; in September I paid him 6s. 2 1/2d., for his master - he gave me this receipt for it on the bill.

RACHAEL DRUITT . On the 18th of October I paid the prisoner 2l. on account of his master - he wrote a receipt on the back of this bill, in pencil.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. I suppose you had known him before? A. Yes; I paid this money myself.

MR. PEDDY. The prisoner never paid these sums to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Does your wife serve in the shop? A. Yes, and takes money there; he never accounted to her to my knowledge - on the 18th of October he went out, and never returned.

JOHN MATTHEW FARREL . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner; I made him no promise or threat - I said, "I dare say you know what it is I want of you?" he said, "Yes I do, I dare say;" I said, "This is a curious job;" he said, "Yes it is, I am sorry for it."

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-84

84. WILLIAM WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 11 yards of printed cotton, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Kerr .

THOMAS KERR . I am a linen-draper , and live in the Commercial-road . On the evening of the 4th of November, between six and seven o'clock, I was in my shop - I received information, and missed a piece of print from my door; I ran out, and up Gloucester-street - I came up with the prisoner opposite Whitechapel church, and found the print on him.

WILLIAM MILLER . I was near the prosecutor's on the 4th of November - I saw the prisoner take this print from a bar, and run away with it; I gave information.

ROBERT THORPE . I am an officer. I came up, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-85

85. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing. on the 1st of November , 3 printed books, value 3s. , the goods of John Noble .

ADAM LOCBER . I live in Crombie's-row, Commercial-road , next door to the prosecutor's. On the 1st of November I saw the prisoner go to a stall outside the prosecutor's shop - he took up three books from the stall; he put them under his apron - he walked rather slowly past my window; I pursued him - I called Stop thief! and then he ran as far as Cottage-lane and threw down the books - he went down the lane, and was brought back directly; I am sure he is the same person - he first said he was not the person, and then wanted to go on his knees and beg pardon of Mrs. Noble, and said he would do so no more.

JOHN CHADNEY . I keep a ham and beef shop, at the corner of Cottage-lane. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner run by - he got six or seven yards from me, and threw down three books, which I took up; he ran out of my sight, but was brought back, and I am sure he is the same person.

THEOPHILUS NOBLE . I received these books from Mr. Chadney; I gave them to the officer - they are Mr. John Noble's.

JAMES SMITH . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner; I went with him to the prosecutor's shop - on the way to the watch-house he asked what I thought could be done; I said it depended on the evidence - he said nobody saw him take the books, but he supposed he should be committed.

JOHN NOBLE . I keep the shop in Crombie's-row -

these are my books; I had put them out, but I was in the City at the time.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-86

86. MARY WOODCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 2 napkins, value 1s. 6d.; 1 towel, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 collar, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 1s., and 1 cap, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Robert Ordway .

SUSANNAH ORDWAY . I am the wife of Joseph Robert Ordway, a butcher , at Homerton . The prisoner was employed to char in our house; I missed a great many articles, and she was given in charge - she went to the water-closet; the officer went afterwards, and called for a light - he brought out a duplicate.

SAMUEL AVILA . I live with my father, in Church-street, Hackney; he is a pawnbroker. I have the articles stated, which were pawned by the prisoner on the 8th and 13th of October - these are the counterparts of the duplicates.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN RADCLIFFE . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner - she went to the water-closet; I went in after her, and found this duplicate.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18311201-87

87. PATRICK SHIELDS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 2 shawls, value 6s. , the goods of William Jones .

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. William Jones, a pawnbroker , in Tothill-street, Westminster . On the morning of the 17th of November I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner take a bundle of shawls from the further end of the shop - he placed them under his coat, and ran off; I followed - he ran too fast for me; I called Stop thief! and he threw them down - he was stopped near Westminster Session-house; I took up the shawls - they were my master's

Prisoner. Q. Did I take them? A. I saw you put them under your coat - I did not see you take them down from the nail; You threw them down about twenty yards from our shop, in Dartmouth-street.

THOMAS CREA . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner near Westminster Session-house, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning; he was about sixty perches from Dartmonth-street - I saw him run out of Wilson-street; the witness and some labouring men were following him - I ran; when he saw me he stood still - the witness came up in less than a minute, with the shawls in his arms, and said he was the man who came into the shop; the prisoner denied it, but on the way to the watch-house he said, all that could be done was to transport him.

Prisoner. You never saw me run? Witness. Yes, you did, till you saw me within three or four yards of you, and then you stood still.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going towards the Session-house, and saw a good many people; I stood twenty minutes before the Policeman came up - Williams then came up, and said, "That is the man;" I was standing looking at the people, and asked what it was - I wish to ask Williams if he saw my face when I took them.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . Yes, I did; I know it was him - I only lost sight of him as he turned the corner, but I had seen him several times before, when he has come in and asked the price of things; we had lost several things in the course of that week.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-88

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

88. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 1 watch, value 10l.; 1 seal, value 1l.; 1 key, value 5s.; 1 ring, value 5s.; 1 net frill, value 6d.; 1 silver tongue-scraper, value 2s.; 1 dress, value 1l.; 1 crape collar, value 1s.; 2 pill-boxes, value 1/2d.; 1 portmanteau, value 5s., and two 10l. Bank notes , the property of Barbara Anson .

MARIAN PARK . I live at Gravesend - Barbara Anson is my cousin; she was at Gravesend accidentally. On the 29th of July I saw part of the articles stated put into a black leather portmanteau.

RUBINA MARY PARK . I did not see the portmanteau packed up, but I saw it put on board the Essex steamer, and accompanied Mrs. Barbara Anson to the steamer on Friday, the 29th of July; they left Gravesend at nine o'clock in the morning - Mrs. Anson is now in Scotland, and in bad health; I know her name is Barbara - she was coming to London, and I was with her.

JOHN RANGECROFT . I am an officer. I remember the Essex steamer coming to the new steam wharf on the 29th of July, with the passengers and luggage; as soon as the vessel came alongside, I saw the prisoner get over the paddle-box from the vessel, and he passed me in Upper-Thames-street, carrying a black portmanteau on his shoulder - I am sure he is the person.

WILLIAM GOFTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gilbert-street, Grosvenor-square. The prisoner came to my shop on the 8th of August, and pawned this picture; on the 21st of October he came again, and tendered this watch to pawn for 10l. - I asked if it was his own; he said it was, but seeing the crest on it, I had suspicion, and asked where he got it - he said he bought the duplicate of it in Sackville-street, Dublin, for 1l., of a boy in the street, but he did not know the name of the boy, or the pawnbroker he redeemed it from; I had him taken.

Prisoner. I never saw the picture. Witness. I can swear he is the person.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office on Friday, the 21st of October - I asked where he lived, and he told me correctly; I went there, looked in his box, and found this tongue-scraper, this needle-work with the needle in it, which the lady who is here says she worked, and two small boxes with Lady Anson's name on them; the prisoner said he bought them in Petticoat-lane.

MARIAN PARK . I know all this property to be Mrs. Anson's.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had been in Ireland from May till the 5th of October, and purchased the duplicate of the watch there, which he redeemed,

and offered it in pledge in London, but that he had not pledged the miniature.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-89

89. SIMON SOLOMON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 60 yards of printed cotton, value 30s. , the goods of Jabez Ranwell .

CHARLES BRENT . I lived with Mr. Jabez Ranwell. a linen-draper , of Bedford-street, Commercial-road . On the 29th of October, about half-past four o'clock, I had information about some prints, which I had seen safe a quarter of an hour before, tied on a chair outside the shop; I went up the Commercial-road, turned down Philpot-street, and met the prisoner with the prints in his hand; he ran off, and dropped them - I chased him to the bottom of the street; I lost sight of him, but he was taken soon after, and I know he is the person: these are the prints.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Did you see them taken? A. No, but I saw the prisoner when he turned down the second turning, which was about a quarter of a mile from the shop - I was then about twenty yards from him; it was a little dark - I lost sight of him for about two minutes - I am certain he is the man.

JOHN SHEROD . I heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was pointed out to me as the man who had stolen the prints - he was then about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's, and was walking.

Cross-examined. Q.Was he returning towards the shop? A.Certainly.

SAMUEL WESTGATE . I saw the prisoner take the prints from the door, and walk away with them - I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you were passing by? A. Yes - I had not known him before; I gave an alarm at the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-90

90. HENRY SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing on the 4th of November , 6 spoons, value 4l. , the goods of Patrick Kelly .

JOHN MOSS . I live with Dr. Patrick Kelly , in Finsbury-square . On the 4th of November, at half-past eight o'clock at night, I heard a noise at the door - I went up, and found the prisoner laying in the hall, with his head under a chair; I took him - he had his shoes in one hand, and these six spoons in the other; two of them are plated and four silver - they are my master's, and had been in a little room, up two pairs of stairs from the hall; they had been safe an hour before - it is supposed he got in by a back way, from Wilson-street, which is left open till five o'clock in the evening.

JAMES FITZGERALD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner. It is impossible for them to swear to the spoons, when they have been through four or five hands -I never had them in my possession - they were on a table in the hall.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-91

91. JAMES RICHARDSON , SOPHIA WESTERN , and ANN LEE were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 pocket-book, value 1s., 3 sovereigns, 10 half-crowns, and 6 shillings, the property of John Lock , from his person .

JOHN LOCK . I am a porter , and live at Chelsea-marsh. On the 25th of November I was at the Royal Hospital public-house, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening - I found the prisoner Western in the tap-room; I had never seen her before - I was taking a pot of half and half with a friend, and we asked if she would drink; she said she did not like that, and we called for some rum - my friend then went away; Western asked me to go home with her, which I did - I was sober; I said I would give her half a crown to sleep with her that night - she said she would not take it without I would stand some gin; we got a quartern of gin, and took it to her room in Jews'-row, Chelsea - it was a first floor front room, and we got there about a quarter-past nine o'clock; I paid her the half-crown; I put my trousers under my pillow, and went to bed - I had a pocket-book in my trousers pocket, containing three sovereigns and 16s. in silver, consisting chiefly of half-crowns; I believe there were four or five half-crowns - I saw it all safe when I gave her the half-crown; I then put the book back into my pocket - as soon as I was in bed she went down stairs, and sent up two girls; Lee was one of them: I expected Western to sleep with me- the two girls asked me if I would give them money to come to bed; I said I did not want them or any one else, but as I had paid for the bed I would stay there - they then went out of the room, but they came back again in three or four minutes, and said the bed did not belong to the girl I had given the half crown to; they told me to get up and go out, or I should be made to do it - I said I should not, as I had paid for the bed I meant to stay there - they then went away; Western came up in five or ten minutes, and said I could not stay there unless I would give her more money, as it was not her bed - I said I would not give any more money, and I would not go out; she then took the candle and blew it out - Lee and Richardson came suddenly into the room; Richardson caught hold of my arm, and lifted my head off the pillow - he then laid hold of my trousers; I jumped out of bed, and got hold of the trousers, and tried to get them away from him, but I found I could not; I then ran down, and called the Policeman - Richardson ran down at the time I did; I got the Policeman in two or three minutes, but the prisoners were all gone - there were two doors to the house, one front and one back; the Policeman and I went round to Collegevale, where we saw Richardson and Lee; the Policeman took them - Richardson made some resistance, and threw away two half-crowns from him; two half-crowns, two shillings, and a sixpence were found on Lee: the sovereigns and pocket-book have not been found - I had taken the half-crown when I had changed a sovereign an hour or an hour and a half before I saw Western; I remarked they were very dark coloured, as if they had been in beer.

Richardson. You never saw me in your life. Witness. I can swear you are the man that was in the room; I saw you by the light of the stars and the lamps.

JAMES OAKES . I am a Policeman. I was called, and saw the prosecutor with nothing on but his shirt - I went into the room, and searched, but the prisoners had made their escape; there are two back ways out of the house; I afterwards took Lee and Richardson - Richardson put

his hand into his pocket, and threw two half-crowns on the ground - I found on Lee one half-crown and 7d. in copper; the book has not been found.

GEORGE THATCHER . I am a Police-officer. On the night of the 25th of November I was passing at the time Oakes had Richardson and Lee in custody; he gave me information, and I took Western the next morning, at her own lodging, which is some distance from where the prosecutor went to - she said she knew nothing of the robbery; I took her to the watch-house - she then wanted to speak to the prosecutor, and said she had been with him, but knew nothing of the robbery - I searched her room, and found some duplicates, but not belonging to the prosecutor - I found on her 1 1/2d., which she said was all the money she had, and that she was going to pawn a cloak that morning to buy her some soap, but on seaching her room I found three shillings in a card-rack over the fireplace.

Richardson's Defence. These two females know nothing of the robbery - I was passing the row, and met a girl and a man - they said, "There is a man up in your room;" I told them not to go near the place, but let him be - I went and had half a pint of beer - I then went back to see what man it was. and just as I got to the door the prosecutor ran out, and said he was robbed.

Western's Defence. I met the prosecutor at the Royal-hospital - he asked me to drink; I staid about a quarter of an hour, and then came out - he came, and asked me where I lived; he was very much in liquor - I said I could not take him to my lodging, but I could go to another room, which we did; Lee came up - he said he preferred her, and I left the room, as he was going to bed.

Lee's Defence. He asked me if I would go with him; I said Yes, if he paid me - he gave me 1s.; I said I would not go for that, but if he would give me half a crown, as he had the other girl, I would; he would not - Carter then came in, and he asked her to go to bed with him, but would not give her any thing.

Richardson. It was Mary Carter and John Noble who robbed the man.

JOHN LOCK re-examined. Q. Were the trousers in your hand when they were taken from you? A. Yes; I caught hold of them with my hand, and Richardson pulled them from me.

RICHARDSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

WESTERN - GUILTY . Aged 28.

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-92

92. JOHN WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of November , 2 cheeses, value 5s. , the goods of Jonah Barker .

JONAH BARKER. I live in Chichester-terrace, Globe-road, and am a cheesemonger . On the 22nd of November, as I had lost several things, I hid myself by the side of some butter-flats, by my door, about seven o'clock, and in about a quarter of an hour I saw a man come up, take off his hat, stoop down, and take two cheeses from my window; he was coming out - I caught the skirt of his coat; he got to the palings, his coat gave way, and I fell - the Policeman came up, and took him; these are my cheeses.

SAUL ADAMS . I am a Policeman. I was watching the prisoner for a quarter of an hour - I ran across the road, and took him; here is the piece of his coat.

Prisoner. I have a wife and three children.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 6 Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-93

93. MARY MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 box mounted in gold, value 20s.; 1 knife, value 20s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 3s.; 6 yards of lace, value 6s.; 2 yards of cambric, value 2s.; 10 yards of ribbon, value 1s.; 1 dress, value 5s.; 5 yards of muslin, value 6d.; 1 reticule, value 6d., and 1 pair of stockings, value 6d. , the goods of William Charles Lambert , her master; to which she pleaded GUILTY .

Strongly recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, believing she was induced to do it by her husband.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18311201-94

94. FRANCIS MANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , 20 yards of printed cotton, value 20s. , the goods of James Tapp .

JAMES TAPP . I keep a haberdasher's-shop in King-street, Seven-dials . On the 2nd of November the prisoner and a woman came in; I was up stairs - I heard an alarm; I came down - the prisoner was pointed out to me: I followed him across the road - he saw me, and turned to the right, towards Broad-street; he fell down and I took him back - he had taken one piece of print entirely away, and another piece was removed; they had both been within the door - here is the piece that had been moved; the other is lost.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.You know nothing of the transaction, but that he had been in the shop? A. I did not see him there; this piece was on the floor in my shop, it was removed two or three feet from the shelf it had been upon - my daughter was serving; it was about six o'clock in the evening.

MARY ANN TAPP . I am the prosecutor's daughter. The prisoner came to the shop while I was serving a woman with some tape; he took two pieces of print, and while he was giving them to some person, one of them fell - I called my father; the prisoner staid till he heard him coming, and then ran off - I am sure he is the person; he spoke to the woman I was serving.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it rather dusk? A. Yes; I had never seen him before, but I saw his face, which was turned towards me - I am quite sure he is the man; he could not take them to look at the pattern.

ANN TREE . I went to the shop to buy some needles; there was a woman buying some tape - the prisoner came in and spoke to that woman; at that moment Miss Tapp had the tape in her hand - she screamed out, "Stop that man, he has taken some prints to the door" - I saw this piece laying and took it up; the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined. Q.Was it out of the shop? A. No.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-95

95. KENT MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing,

on the 12th of November , 1 bugle, value 2l. , the goods of Mark Spain .

MARK SPAIN . I am guard of an omnibus . On the 12th of November I put a bugle on the seat inside, and drove from the spare ground by the King's-mews to the British coffee-house , in Cockspur-street; when I got there the bugle was gone.

ELIZABETH PURDY . On the day in question I saw the prisoner with a dark waistcoat on, it was either blue or black. with dark sleeves; he was about five yards from me - it was in the spare ground near the King's-mews; I was nursing a child - I saw him jump up behind the omnibus, lean his body in at the door, and bring out the bugle; he walked away, not on the side the path is, but on the other side, and when he got to the last of the coaches, he crossed and went on the path - the prosecutor came, and I told him.

ELIZABETH MOXAM . I was with Pordy; I saw the omnibus - the prisoner went up to it, leaned in behind, and took out the bugle; he took it under his arm and walked inside the coaches till he came to the last coach, then he crossed and went towards Westminster - I have seen him before; he had a short sleeved waistcoat on.

JOHN REDMAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the evening of the 14th.

The prisoner put in a written Defence declaring his innocence, and that the female witnesses were persons of bad character

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-96

96. JAMES MEDLICOT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 4s. , the goods of John Smith .

LEWIS BAUCUTT . I am in the service of John Smith , he keeps a clothes shop in Basher's-court, Tottenham-court-road . On the 9th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner looking at a pair of trousers hanging at the door; he shortly afterwards ran away - he passed me as I was at our other shop in Oxford-street, with the trousers in his hand; I pursued - he ran among some boys, and dropped the trousers behind him - he turned and faced me; I collared him, and called a Policeman, but no one came - he said, what did I collar him for; I said I wanted him - he said if I did not loose him he would knock me down; a mob came round, and they got him from me - he ran down a street in St. Giles', and into a house; I stood there till the Policeman came up - we went in and found him in the back kitchen; I said I believed that to be the person - a tall man came up, and would insist upon taking the light from the Policeman, and he sent me for another officer; the prisoner and the other man were both taken, but the other was released on bail - I believe the prisoner was the man; I have no doubt of it in my mind.

EDMUND DAVIS . I am a Policeman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and ran to the house; the witness was there; I went into the house and found the prisoner in the back kitchen - the witness pointed him out, and I took him; the landlord of the house came and took the light out of my hand, and put out the lights in the room, with a view to rescue him; it was in Buckeridge-street - the landlord was taken for an assault.

Witnesses for the Defence.

THOMAS DICKENSON . I returned from my work about four o'clock in the afternoon on the 9th of November, and found the prisoner at home; I am a French polisher, and had worked that day for Mr. Nobbs, at Hampstead - the job only lasted the day; I had lodged with the prisoner a little time, for about a month, in the back room on the ground floor, only I and the prisoner lodge there; we have not lodged together above a month; we do not always eat and drink together - we do at night, and sometimes when I am at home; I had not worked any where the day before - I have not had work for nine months -I had been a gentleman's servant; I lived with a captain in the army named Blades - I left him about twelve months ago; I was then doing jobs at French polishing with a young man who had learned me the French polishing - his name is Gorman; I then lodged at another place - I received half a crown for my day's work; I went away about six o'clock in the morning, and got there about seven o'clock - I returned about three o'clock from Hampstead, and got home about four o'clock; I do not reside in the kitchen; it is a ground-floor room - the landlord's name is Delaney - I believe he has not long been married; he does not occupy the kitchen - I believe the house is full of lodgers, but I do not live there now -I have left; when I got home the prisoner and I sat there till the officer came and took the prisoner away - there was only me and the prisoner in that room; Delaney came in afterwards for a candle - the prisoner and I had not been doing anything, only he smoked a pipe occasionally; our door being open, we heard a noise at the door, and the young man who stole the trousers came running up to our door, and said "I am sailed;" he went over the wall, over the water-butt - he had lodged in the house I have learned since; I do not know the meaning of the word nailed; upon my oath I have not the least idea what it meant - I did not ask the prisoner what it meant; I never heard the word nailed before - I never walked about the place much; I should know that man - I had seen him several times; he would have rushed into our room - I did not assist the landlord in the rescue; I sat still and never said a word; the prosecutor ought to know the man very well - the officer told him he was wrong, but he said he was not wrong.

EDMUND DAVIS . I did not see this witness there at all. Witness. I can take my oath I was in the room at the time.

COURT. Q.Had you had any thing to eat and drink at Hampstead? A. Yes, my dinner; the man who ran through had a black coat and apron on - Baucutt, the witness, was not there; there were ten or twelve men in the house, but only two in that room - Baucutt was not there; it was a very thin young man, and the prisoner.

CATHERINE DELANEY . I lodged in that house, but I am no relation of the landlord's. The prosecutor has sworn to the wrong man; the prisoner had not been out of the house from two o'clock till the time the officer took him; he was ill in bed - he was in bed part of the time; he was in bed at five o'clock; the bed is in the room in the back-yard - I do not know how he came to get up; I have seen the man coming in - there is another witness that knows all about it; the person who went over the wall,

now stands at the door - he had on that night a black coat, a white apron, and light trousers; the Policeman took this prisoner - the young man at the door lodged in the house; the last witness was at home with the prisoner.

THOMAS WOOD . The prisoner is not the one that committed the crime, which he has been put in prison for, stealing this pair of trousers; I was the man that did the crime, and I did it through want - I am the man that jumped over the wall, and the linen-draper said, this was the man, that took the trousers, but I was the one that took them; I have left the house, because the landlord told me, I had better go from there - I have got work since; I have not been before the Magistrate - I heard the prisoner was taken up; I left the house three or four days afterwards.

LEWIS BAUCUTT . This witness is not the man; I never saw this man in my life, to the best of my knowledge - the woman who stood here said before that she was the wife of the prisoner, and she was gone out for beef-steaks for his supper at the time.

CATHERINE DELANEY . I did not say so, for my husband is in Ireland, and is a soldier. Witness. She said so immediately after we took the prisoner, and she followed us to Hatton-garden; she said so to me and the officer.

EDMUND DAVIS . Yes, she did, and I allowed her to walk with the prisoner, thinking she was his wife, and she called him her dear husband.

THOMAS WOOD re-examined. I was not stopped in the street.

LEWIS BAUCUTT . I stopped the prisoner at the corner of Lawrence-street, and held him some time.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

The witnesses, Dickenson, Delaney, and Wood were all committed.

Reference Number: t18311201-97

97. JOHN McGINNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 coat, value 1l. , the goods of Richard Rigby .

SAMUEL LINDLEY . I am a special-constable. On the 24th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Soho-square ; I saw the prisoner behind a carriage close against the rails - he went to the dickey, and took this coat off, he hung it across his arm, and I went up to him; he dropped the coat - I pursued, and took him in the next street.

RICHARD RIGBY . This coat is mine; I was at that time in the service of Mr. Stodhart, and this coat was on the dickey of his carriage.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming through the square, and saw a man cutting the trees; I saw a man run, the constable cried "Stop thief!" I ran, and he took me - I never had the coat at all.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-98

98. THOMAS HURREN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 musical-box, value 3l. , the goods of James Neil .

JAMES NEIL . I live in Regent-street. The prisoner was my servant ; he had been with me eight or ten days before I lost this box, which had been sent to me to be repaired - I did not miss it till two or three days after I had discharged him, which was three or four weeks afterwards.

ROBERT MILLER . I am a printer. Mr. Neil complained to me that he had lost this box and several other things, and that the prisoner had refused to pay several washing-bills - I went to the prisoner, and stated this; he hesitated some time, then said he dropped the box, and had taken it to a silver smith's to he repaired - I said I would go and see if that was correct; he then acknowleged he had pawned it, and after some hesitation gave me the duplicate of it.

WILLIAM PARKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Oxford-street. This box was pawned on the 20th of October, I believe by the prisoner.

The prisoner delivered in a petition for a lenient sentence.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-99

99. JAMES HAYE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 sovereign, and 5 half-sovereigns, the monies of Thomas Chennell , from his person .

THOMAS CHENNELL . I am a labourer , and live at Chelsea. On the 25th of July I met the prisoner, (whom I have known for eight years,) at the wooden bridge, Chelsea, as I was coming home with my money to my wife; I had six half-sovereigns and one sovereign at that time - I shook hands with him, and we came on to the Coach and Horses, in Dean's-yard; we afterwards went to the Hoop and Grapes, in Queen-square - we got there between four and five o'clock; I had had nothing to drink but what we drank at the Coach and Horses - I was not tipsy: we had a pint of half and half at the Hoop and Grapes - I put my head on the table, and fell asleep; I had walked thirty miles -I felt his hand at my breeches, but being so friendly with him I took no notice of it: when I awoke he was gone, and I missed my money - I did not think he was taking my money - I thought he was feeling if it was safe; he had before given me a bit of paper to wrap it up in - I lost five half-sovereigns and one sovereign, which I am sure were safe when I went into the house: I never saw him again till I gave him in charge, in the Fulham-road, on the last day of October - I told the Magistrate I felt the prisoner's hand in my fob, but I thought he was getting my money to take care of for me.

JOHN SULLIVAN . I am a Police-constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 31st of October - the prosecutor was with me; I told him he had better make him some recompence, and give him part of his money back - he said he knew nothing about it, but in going along he said he took one half-sovereign, which was loose, wrapped it in a bit of paper, and gave it him back.

THOMAS PRICE . I was in the Hoop and Grapes on the 25th of July; I saw the prosecutor and prisoner there, but I did not see him do any thing to him.

JOHN QUYE . I keep the Coach and Horses. In the latter end of July, the prosecutor came to my house with a person - he was fresh, and he was pulling out his money; I advised him to leave it with me - the person with him said he was a friend and a relation, and he would see him safe home; he put the money in his pocket, and then left the house.

Prisoner's Defence. Instead of meeting him at the wooden bridge, I met him in York-street, with a pensioner - we went to a public-house; he was accusing the pensioner of robbing him of a sovereign, but on searching his

pocket, he found a hole in the bottom, and there was one half-sovereign in the bottom of his trousers, which I gave him - he said, "Never mind, I know where the sovereign is, but I will go and pay something at the Coach and Horses," which he did; when we came out there were some girls of the town - we had some drink with them; we then went to the Cock, sat a long time, and I bade him good night.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-100

100. JOHN HAZELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of William Hubbard Odams , from his person .

WILLIAM HUBBARD ODAMS . At eight o'clock in the evening, on the 27th of November, I was in Goswell-street - I had a handkerchief in my pocket; I did not feel it taken, but the officer, who had hold of the prisoner, called me, and I missed it.

GEORGE DOSSON . I am a Police-officer. About twenty minutes before eight o'clock I saw the prisoner and another person; the prosecutor and another gentleman went by - the prisoner and his companion followed; I saw the other take this handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to the prisoner; my brother officer took the prisoner with it.

WILLIAM BARTLETT . I have heard what has been stated; it is correct - I was at the corner of Bell-alley, and saw the prisoner and his companion go behind the prosecutor and another gentleman; I rushed out, and the prisoner dropped this handkerchief at my feet.

Prisoner's Defence. The young man who took the handkerchief ran past me, and dropped it - I never had it in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-101

101. SAMUEL HERRING was indicted for stealing, 5 aprons, value 2s. 6d.; 2 petticoats, value 2s., and 1 night-dress, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Deborah Reeves .

WILLIAM JEFFERIES . Deborah Reeves is a fellow-servant of mine - I was laying the cloth in the dining-room on the 4th of November; I heard something fall in the area - I went to the parlour-window, and saw the prisoner: I said, "What have you there?" he went up the steps, and ran away - I pursued, and cried Stop thief! a person going by threw him down, and before he could recover I came up, and took him - I had not lost sight of him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I come up out of the area? A. Yes, with this bundle; you threw it on the step of the adjoining house - I suppose you got two hundred yards from our house, but I was close to you.

MARY JONES . I am the housekeeper, and Deborah Reeves is the cook - I know these things to be her property: I had seen them safe at one o'clock, in the housekeeper's room.

NICHOLAS MANN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner to the watch-house; I found on him a latch-key, a comb, and some matches.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 24 - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-102

102. MARY HAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 3 waistcoats, value 1s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 6d., and 2 pairs of hose, value 6d. , the goods of John Weston .

MARY WILKES . I live at Mr. John Weston 's, Hoopers'-court, Knightsbridge . On the 11th of November, about one o'clock, I met the prisoner in the passage, with these things in her apron - she was going out; I asked what she had got - she said nothing of mine; I told her to put them down - she said I was a brute, and I had better let her go; I said I would not till I had called the person belonging to the things - I know nothing of the prisoner.

MARTHA WESTON . I am the wife of John Weston. These articles are mine; I had left them in a clothesbasket, in the back kitchen - they were all wet.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by - the door was open; I went to go into the yard - I saw a man, and turned back; I met this young woman - she got the officer, and gave charged of me.

GEORGE WYATT. I am the officer. I took the prisoner, and found some other property on her.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18311201-103

103. MARY HAYDON was again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 frock, value 1s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s., and 2 pinafores, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Brown .

SUSAN BROWN . I am the wife of Charles Brown - we live at Chelsea . On the 11th of November I missed these things, which had been hanging in the passage; I went up the street next day, and heard of them.

GEORGE WYATT . I took the prisoner on the other case, and found on her this basket, which contains these articles; she said they were her own.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to have half a pint to beer; a woman told me to mind these things for her - she went away, and I waited some time; she did not return.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

Reference Number: t18311201-104

104. ADELAIDE LE GRANGE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 5 silver spoons, value 30s., and 1 pair of silver sugar-bows, value 10s. , the goods of Charles Crawley .

The prisoner being a native of France, the evidence was interpreted to her.

CHARLES CRAWLEY. I keep the York Hotel, in Albemarle-street . The prisoner came to my house one Sunday, about three weeks ago; she said she came from France, and desired to have a room for the night - having seen her last year with the family of Mr. Cadogan, where she was lady's-maid, I let her have a lodging - she did not bring any luggage: she staid till the Thursday following; she had access to the property - from some circumstances I did not feel satisfied, and I urged her to leave the house; she went away on the Thursday with a bundle - as she was leaving, a person observed that she looked very intently on some silver spoons; I followed her, and had her searched - four spoons were found in her bundle, one in her hair, and this pair of sugar-tongs was in her bosom; they are mine.

CHARLES WILLIAM HODGES . I am a Police-officer. The prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoner in High-

street; I took her to the station-house - I found these four spoons in her bundle.

JOHN CRESWELL . I am an inspector of the Police. Hodges brought in the prisoner - I saw these four spoons found in her bundle; I got a woman to search her - she found this other spoon in her hair, and these tongs in her bosom.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my own property.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-105

105. ELIZA GREENWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 umbrella, value 3s. , the goods of Henry Boyce .

HENRY BOYCE . I am a surveyor , and live in Edgware-road. On the 27th or 28th of October I met the prisoner in Crown-street, St. Giles', after twelve o'clock at night; I was perfectly sober - I was returning from the theatre; she asked me to go with her - I went with her to a court which I do not know the name of; we went to a room on the first floor - I did not like the appearance of the place, as there was only a fire, an old chair, and a table; I wished to go, but she would not let me - I had not made any bargain with her, but I told her I would give her all the money I had to let me go, as she said I should not go without I left something; I gave her a shilling and some halfpence; she then snatched my handkerchief out of my hat - I took up my umbrella, and was coming away, when she snatched my umbrella, and said I should leave that; I did not intend to part with them - I then got out, and gave an alarm to the Policeman; he went, found the handkerchief in her possession, and the umbrella in the room.

Prisoner. You had been drinking with me. Witness. I had had one glass of half and half before I went home with her; I did not say that I left the umbrella in the room, and found it where I left it.

JOHN STARR . I went to the house, and found the handkerchief in her hand and the umbrella in the room; she said he left them as security for the night's lodging.

Prisoner. I had the umbrella and the handkerchief as security, and I lighted him down stairs; he said he would call for them in the morning, and bring me some money.

MR. BOYCE. She did light me down, but I did not intend to leave the things.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-106

106. JOHN GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 cheese, value 10s. , the goods of John Bush .

JOHN BUSH. I keep a cheesemonger's-shop , in Kentish-town . I missed some cheese on the 18th of October - I did not see it taken; I know this to be mine.

THOMAS WAGSTAFF . This is part of a cheese which I left at the prosecutor's.

THOMAS SOPER . I am a Police-constable. On Wednesday, the 19th of October, I went to the prisoner's lodgings in search of some wet linen; I found this cheese in the cupboard - he said he had bought and paid for it, but would not tell me where; I heard that the prosecutor had lost one.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it, and paid for it.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-107

107. ISABELLA FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 6 lbs. of pork, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Walker .

ANN WALKER . I am the wife of John Walker , a butcher , in Whitecross-street . On the 8th of November we lost a piece of pork off the show-board; the prisoner was brought back with it, and it was taken from her.

SARAH SULLIVAN . I am the prosecutor's servant. I saw the prisoner at the show-board, and called my mistress, who sent me after her; I caught her with the pork in her apron, and gave her in charge.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a woman had given her the pork to hold while she tied her shoe.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-108

108. WILLIAM FINLAY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 hat, value 9s. , the goods of Henry Heath .

THOMAS COLE . I live with Mr. Henry Heath, a hatter, in Oxford-street. I did not see this hat taken, but shortly after seven o'clock in the evening of the 10th of November, I missed it from inside the door - I was thinking what my employer might say when a Policeman came; I found it at Bow-street.

WILLIAM McDONALD . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, offering this hat for sale in Monmouth-street; it had the shop-ticket on it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the hat of a woman in Drury-lane, who deals in clothes.

GUILTY . Aged 48. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18311201-109

109. JOHN CRAWFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 2 printed books, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph White .

JOSEPH WHITE . I am a bookseller , and live in Ratcliff-highway . On the evening of the 17th of November I was in my back parlour; a lad called me, and soon after the prisoner was brought with these books, which I knew to be mine.

WILLIAM RICHARD KING . I am errand-boy to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner looking at his window - he took up a bundle of books, and put them down again; he then took up some more - he saw no person looking at him - he took up a book, put it under his coat, and went off; I told a young man, who pursued, and took him with the books.

RICHARD WAPSHAW . I went in pursuit of the prisoner - I took him about one hundred yards from the house - I found one book on him, and the officer found the other.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 68. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18311201-110

110. WILLIAM CROCKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 17 lbs. of cheese, value 12s. , the goods of John James .

ROBERT CUSHION . I lodge in Mr. John James ' house, in Skinner-street . On the night of the 3rd of November I saw a boy come in in a very suspicious manner - he went out again, and did not take any thing; I then saw the prisoner come in, and take this cheese, which he put under his arm - I hastened out, and took him three or four yards from the step of the door with the cheese.

ANN DAVIS . I saw the prisoner stopped with the cheese.

CHARLES BARRETT . I am a patrol. I heard the scuffle, and went up - I took the prisoner and the cheese.

MARY JAMES . I am the wife of John James - this is our cheese.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18311201-111

111. WILLIAM MOODY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 coat, value 3s. , the goods of Henry Pope .

HENRY POPE . I am a painter . On the evening of the 19th of November I went to a pawnbroker's - I took a coat out of pawn, and laid it on a chair; I then looked at some diamonds, and when I turned the coat was gone - I went, by direction of the pawnbroker, to Mr. Merret's, another pawnbroker, where I found the prisoner pawning it; I had seen him in the shop where I lost it - this is it.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-112

112. CHARLES ARCHBILL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 9 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and 1 shilling , the monies of George Dixon , his master.

GEORGE DIXON . I live at Henley, and drive the Henley coach . I had employed the prisoner to carry parcels, but he was not my servant - on the 25th of November I had occasion to go round Belgrave-square, and stopped at a house where I was to leave a receipt for 9l. 11s., and a basket, and to say I would call for the money - I said to the prisoner, "Leave this basket and this paper, and I will call as I come out;" I never saw him again till he was in custody the following Monday.

HENRY GODING . I live in St. George's-place, Hyde Park-corner. The prisoner brought the basket and the receipt for my father, and I paid him the money - it was due to a man named Cox, for whom Mr. Dixon received it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-113

First London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

113. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of George John Clode , from his person .

GEORGE JOHN CLODE. On the 21st of October I was in Bishopsgate-street, and turned up Artillery-lane ; I was told my pocket was picked; I felt, and my handkerchief was gone - the prisoner was pointed out to me; I pursued, and captured him in Sun-square - I gave him in charge of an officer, who found my handkerchief on him - this is it.

JOHN BOOKER . I am an officer. I was at the Committee-room at the workhouse, and heard the alarm; I took the prisoner in Denning's-yard, and found the handkerchief in his hat; he had been taken in Sun-square.

HANNAH LAWRENCE . I saw a man in the prisoner's company take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to another person, but I cannot say it was to the prisoner.

Prisoner. She said she saw nothing given to me; I saw this handkerchief lay up a turning - I took it, and put it into my hat; I went on, and heard a cry of Stop thief! and the gentleman said I had got his handkerchief; I said I had one, which I found.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-114

114. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 clothes-basket, value 6d.; 8 shirts, value 2l. 16s.; 2 shifts, value 6s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s.; 1 table-cloth, value 8s.; 1 apron, value 3d.; 1 pinafore, value 6d.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 1s., and 1 night-cap, value 3d. , the goods of Richard Hart ; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer of the City. -On the evening of Monday, the 21st of November, I saw a cart cross from Tower-street towards Tower-hill; I saw two men come from behind the cart, and the prisoner was some distance a-head, carrying a basket: I followed him to Crutched-friars, and asked what he had got - he said he had been hired to carry it by a person on Tower-hill, and he thought he was behind him; I detained him, and have the basket - the articles stated were in it.

Prisoner. Q.When you stopped me, and I said I was hired to carry it, did you not see a person run away? A. There were two or three persons behind you, but I did not see any one run away; there was one person a little on the trot.

LOUISA HART . I take in washing. I know this basket - it contained the articles stated in the indictment - some of them are here; they belong to Mr. McGeary, in Love-lane, and my husband had to carry them.

RICHARD HART . I had the care of the basket and its contents on the night of the 21st of November - I packed it in my cart; it was safe when I left my cart at Billingsgate - I missed it on Tower-hill.

Prisoner. Q. Can you say you saw me near your cart? A. No.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - I was present at his trial, and know he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was asked by a young man to carry this basket - I did not know who it belonged to, or what was in it.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-115

115. JOHN MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of a person unknown, from his person .

JOSEPH HIGGINS . I am a Police-constable. On the 9th of November I saw the prisoner and another person in the Strand - I followed them to Fleet-street; they tried several gentleman's pockets; and at the corner of Water-lane I saw the prisoner take this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket - he ran down Boar's Headyard - I took him, and found this handkerchief on him.

Prisoner. Q.Why did not you apprise the gentleman of it? A. If I had, I must have lost you: I might be ten yards from you.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the handkerchief was his own; that on his taking it from his pocket, to wipe some coach-splashes from his face, the officer came up, and charged him with stealing it from a gentleman.

JOSEPH HIGGINS . There was a cart coming up, and the prisoner had another lad with him, covering him with an apron - I am certain I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the gentleman's left-hand pocket, and put it into his trousers pocket - here is the letter L. on

it; the gentleman looked round, but took no more notice - the prisoner ran down the yard, and I caught him about fifteen yards off; there was a great crowd about the gentleman - I had known the prisoner before, and had followed him down the Strand and Fleet-street.

JURY. Q. What time of day was this? A. About half-past two o'clock; I was on the other side of the street, and could see plainly - the prisoner was in the service of his brother-in-law for some time, who is a coach-carver.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-116

116. JAMES NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 7s., and 1 yard of floor-cloth, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of James Bennett , his master.

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-117

117. GEORGE DAPH PURCELL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 700 sheets of printed paper, value 2l. , the goods of John Williams , his master.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be 31 lbs. of paper.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a publisher , and live in Paternoster-row - the prisoner was in my service from November, 1830, till the 26th of October. I received information, and went to a cook-shop, in Newgate-street, about the 25th or 27th of October - I saw some sheets of a work called "The Medical Adviser," and "The Monuments of St. Paul's and Westminster Abbey;" they were my property, and worth about 1l. 15s. at the cost price - no person printed, published, or sold them but myself.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. How can you undertake to swear that no other person published these works? A.Because I am the proprietor of the copyright, and there are no other such works in existence - the printer's name was not on the sheets of paper; I can swear to the paper itself - I did not make it; it is possible another person may print this "Medical Adviser," but that they can copy these blocks and arrive to such a similarity, that I cannot see the difference, I cannot well imagine that; the prisoner never was left in management of my business - I never sold waste-paper, nor did any of my boys, by my permission: there is a cupboard in my room, in which there was waste-paper, but not such paper as this - I never gave the prisoner permission to sell waste-paper; I have sometimes got tipsy - I went home one night when his mother was there, but I did not tell her that he had no occasion to spend any of his money. as he might have waste-paper to sell; the fact is the cupboard was full of waste-paper for lighting the fire and making mattresses for other parcels, and recollecting that I had lessened my insurance, and this cupboard being so contiguous to the fire-place, I desired the boy to remove this waste-paper - he said, "Where shall I put it?" I said,"Where you like, but don't let it be there."

JAMES HENRY SAUNDERS . I live in Newgate-street, and am assistant to my father, who keeps an eating-house. A lad, named Birt, came to our house on the 19th or 20th of October, and brought some paper, similar to this; I showed it to my father when he came in, and he had in Mr. Laws, and examined the property - I had not bought the paper.

CHARLES BUNDOCK . I live in Tottenham-court-road - I did live in Newgate-street, and kept a ham and beef-shop. I bought a quantity of the "Medical Adviser" from the latter end of July to September - we used a great quantity there, and the rest I delivered to my mother - she gave it to the officer, but I was not at home; I know one of the parcels was not opened at all - the prisoner used to come to the shop and buy things; I had a bill in my window, "Waste paper bought here;" he said,"I see you buy waste-paper; we sell ours by the month - a man comes, and gives us two sovereigns for it; will you buy it?" I said I could not tell till I saw it - he brought some, and I bought it.

Cross-examined. Q.Whether it was this paper or not you cannot tell? A. No, it was like this; there was some small and some large - I bought three bundles of him.

JOHN LAWS . I live in Butcherhall-lane, and am a constable. I produce some paper, which I received from Mr. Saunders, and some which I received from Mrs. Bundock, of Tottenham-court-road.

RICHARD FREDERICK BIRT . I live with my father, in Newcastle-street, Farringdon-street. I have been in the employ of the prosecutor since August last - the prisoner told me that his master gave him and the other boy permission to sell the paper, which was their perquisite, and I carried some of it to Mr. Saunders - I received what I took from the prisoner; they were works of this description, but I do not think I took so much as there is here.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you lived with some booksellers before? A. No, with a printer - I did not partake of the profit of all this paper; I received a third of one lot - the prisoner and I took some paper to my mother's.

Prisoner's Defence. I had formerly leave to sell wastepaper that was in the cupboard - I should never have taken this if Birt had not told me that he used to sell paper from a printer, and as good as that was - his mother wished the paper to go to her house to be sold; she sold some, divided the money as she liked, and treated us with liquor - I did not see what paper went to Saunder's.

JAMES HENRY SAUNDERS . All I know of the prisoner is that he came on the Monday after Birt brought the paper, and demanded either the money or the paper back.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18311201-118

118. GEORGE DAPH PURCELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , 1100 sheets of printed paper, value 2l. 15s. , the goods of John Williams , his master.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be 46lbs. of paper.

CHARLES BUNDOCK . I lived in Newgate-street. I received three lots of paper from the end of July to September; to the best of my knowledge, it was from 30 lbs. to 32 lbs. - one work was the "Medical Adviser;" I paid 4d. per lb. for it - I gave one bundle to my mother, who gave it to the officer.

JOHN LAWS . I received this paper from Mrs. Bundock.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am the sole proprietor of the Medical Adviser; I had quantity of this paper in my possession on the 28th of July, and the prisoner had free access

to it - I have last a great deal of it; I paid the prisoner a week.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18311201-119

119. JAMES DIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 2 sheets of paper, value 1d., and 14 pairs of drawers, value 2l. , the goods of William Bousfield and others; and that he had been before convicted of felony, by the name of James Thompson .

CHARLES THOROGOOD . I am a City-officer. On the afternoon of the 23rd of November, I observed a truck near the Royal Exchange , drawn by two men, and two men were following it behind - I walked on to the end of the Exchange, by the Mansion-house, when I saw the prisoner lift up the tarpauling which was over the truck, and draw out this parcel; I took him into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. How long have you been an officer? A.Ten years - I have never been suspended; the prisoner had not got more than twenty yards from me - I had not lost sight of him; I asked him what he had got, and he said he did not choose to answer - when I asked him again, he said a gentleman gave it him to carry from Wood-street, Cheapside, to his house - he did not say to the Spread Eagle; I asked where he lived - he said in Wood-street, Spitalfields; I asked where the gentleman lived - he said he did not know; he did not ask me to go to Gracechurch-street - I went according to the direction on the parcel, to Cheapside, to ask whether they expected such a parcel, and they said they did; the truck was going towards Cheapside, and the prisoner towards Whitechapel: it was dark, but the lamps were lighted.

EDWARD HITCHCOCK . I packed up this parcel - it contained the articles stated in the indictment; they are the property of William and John Bousfield and others, of Houndsditch.

Cross-examined. Q.What are you? A. I am their warehouseman: I know this parcel by my own writing on it, and the drawers have my figures on them.

JOHN LUDFORD . I placed this parcel in the truck with other goods, which I received at the warehouse.

Cross-examined. Q.This was covered with a tarpauling, was it not? A. Yes, and that was tied down - no one could have got the parcel without lifting up the tarpauling.

Prisoner's Defence. What the officer states is all false - he asked what I had; I said I did not know, but a gentleman gave it to me to carry to the Spread Eagle - I asked him to go there, but he declined.

WILLIAM DRANE . I produce a certificate, which I got at Mr. Clark's office; (read) - I was present in April last, and saw the prisoner tried here by the name of James Thompson ; I apprehended him, and know he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-120

120. JEMIMA DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 5 lbs. 6ozs. of worsted, value 14s. 5d. , the goods of Robert Burgh .

ROBERT BURGH . I live in Cherrytree-court, Aldersgate-street, and am a worsted fringe manufacturer : the prisoner has been employed by me for the last five years. On the morning of the 9th of November she came with her work as usual to my front warehouse, where I keep my manufactured stock, and weigh the work given to my work-people - she brought her work, and had it weighed; I saw her basket emptied - she was then directed to go into the back warehouse, where I keep my unmanufactured stock, and there to wait: my young man had occasion to go into that warehouse, and from what he said to me, I went and looked into the prisoner's basket - I saw some worsted, and asked what she was going to do with it; she said to take it to Helmet-row, St. Luke's, where I have another manufactory.

JOHN HYDE . I am foreman to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner on the 9th of November; I went into the back warehouse to get some cotton, while she was waiting there; I saw her sitting against a basket, in which I had placed some worsted the night before - I heard the lid of the prisoner's basket move, and heard the rustling of some paper, I saw her manner was very flurried; there were other work-people sitting there, but not near the basket - I went into the front warehouse, and when the prisoner came in to have her turn, I said, "I shall want to speak to you, before you go" - I then went into the back warehouse, and found this green worsted in her basket, which is my master's.

JURY. Q.Had this green worsted been in the basket near which the prisoner was sitting? A. Yes.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had received the property from a young woman to make into tassels, before she called at the prosecutor's warehouse.

MR. BURGH. She has been seven years in my employ, and I believe her to be honest.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, having a bad husband, and her children being dependent on her.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18311201-121

121. HENRY SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Joseph Turner , from his person .

JOSEPH TURNER. I live on Ludgate-hill, and am a jeweller . On the afternoon of the 28th of October I was in Farringdon-street - I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; I received information and followed the prisoner, who was running at a rapid rate up Newcastle-street; I saw him taken near Skinner-street, and my handkerchief was brought to me.

WILLIAM WOODS . I live in Newcastle-street, and am a hardware-man. I saw the prisoner running in that street about four o'clock on the 28th of October; I followed him, and saw him throw a pocket handkerchief away in Sea Coal-lane, under the horse's feet; as soon as I took him he said, "I have not got the handkerchief;" I delivered it to the prosecutor.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. I received the prisoner, and the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I

took no notice of it; when I got to the top of the street, I heard it again, and stopped - a gentleman laid hold of me, and said, "Where is the handkerchief?" he felt my pockets; I said I had not seen it: he then saw one under the horse's heels, and took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18311201-122

122. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 gown, value 10s. , the goods of Mary Ann Burgess .

CHARLES EDWARDS . I keep a tavern in Aldersgate-street . On the 14th of November I was in my bed-room; I saw the prisoner come up stairs, and go into a watercloset - he staid there a few minutes, and then went into the servants' bed-room; he took something, and went into the water-closet again - I stopped a few minutes, then opened the door, and saw him concealing a dress in his small-clothes; I said, "What were you doing in that bed-room?" he said, "Nothing at all;" I said, "I heard you there? - he then said, "I have got a dress, but do not say any thing about it;" I called the girl up to whom it belonged.

MARY ANN BURGESS . I am servant to the prosecutor. this gown is mine.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner handed in a petition, pleading poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-123

OLD COURT. MONDAY, DECEMBER 5.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

123. PATRICK BOUCHELL was indicted for that he, on the 31st of October , feloniously did demand, with menaces, 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 chain, value 2l., and 1 seal, value 1l., the goods of Richard Stonehewer Illing worth, with intent violently and feloniously to steal the same from his person .

SEVEN OTHER COUNTS, for threatening to accuse him of a certain infamous crime.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Life .

There were two other indictments, charging the prisoner with the capital offence, upon which MR. ADOLPHUS, on behalf of the prosecution, offered no evidence.

Reference Number: t18311201-124

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

124. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 watch, value 6l., the goods of John Platts , in the dwelling-house of Andrew Rogers .

JOHN PLATTS . I lodge at Andrew Rogers ', in Cirencester-place, Fitzroy-square . On the 18th of October I went out to work, about six o'clock in the morning, leaving my watch hanging on the moulding of the window; it cost me 6l. 10s. seven years ago - I returned at six in the evening, and missed it; I had left my wife in the room -I found it at Queen-square office on the 3rd of November; I know the prisoner - the last time I saw him was about five years ago; he was apprenticed to a stationer - I found him in my room the evening before the robbery; my wife was at home - the watch was hanging up then, and so it was in the morning, when I went out; the watchmaker's name is James Halliwell , of Wakefield.

CATHERINE PLATT . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 17th of November, at half-past five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our lodging; the watch hung by the window - he went away about seven; he called again about a quarter past two o'clock next day, and was not up stairs more than twenty minutes - the watch hung in the same place as before; while he was there my bell rang - I was obliged to go down to answer it; I was not absent more than five minutes - the prisoner passed me as I stood at the door, and said he was going to call on his uncle, who lived in Warwick-street, and would call again in the evening; he had said up stairs that he was going to Wakefield, that he had booked his place for Thursday, and would take anything down for us - my husband came from there; I missed the watch the instant I went up stairs - I went out to look for him, but could not see him; he did not come in the evening - I gave information at several station-houses.

Prisoner. Q.Had you been out of your room that day? A. Yes, once, but am certain the watch was there when I went to answer the bell.

GEORGE LOWTHER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner came to my shop about two o'clock on the 18th of October, and pawned a silver guard chain for 10s.; he then offered a silver watch for 4l., which I objected to give, and he took it away - I looked at it, and noticed the maker's name was Halliwell of Wakefield; I should not suppose it worth above 3l. or 4l. in the trade - I am certain he is the man,

GEORGE HENRY PEBLES . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, pawnbroker, Minories. On the afternoon or evening of the 18th of October, the prisoner pawned a watch in the name of William Robinson , for 30s.; the maker's name is Halliwell, Wakefield - I believe the prisoner to be the man.

GEORGE LOWTHER . This is the watch he offered to me - I examined it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN DENSTON . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner at Knightsbridge on the evening of the 23rd of October; he told me outside the office that I should find the watch pawned at the second shop on the right-hand side of the Minories, which I did.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY of stealing, to the value of 99s. only . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-125

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

125. JOHN WEBB was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Thomas Fordham .

JAMES WESTWOOD . I am coachman to Mr. Biggs, a stable-keeper, South-place, Finsbury . Thomas Fordham was his ostler - the prisoner is a coachman in Mr. Bigg's employ. On Saturday, the 29th of October, I saw Webb and Fordham in the yard in South-place - I heard Fordham say, in the middle of the day, that Webb was a twofaced fellow, and something more which he could tell him, but what he meant I do not know - they were together in the yard about half-past six o'clock; Fordham said,

"I tell you to your face, you are a d-d two-faced fellow; Webb said, "You b-r, if you call me a two-faced fellow I'll cut your b-y head off" - he then flew forward with both his arms up at Fordham and hit him; I saw him give him a blow on the mouth - it was dark, but there was a gas-light; I did not hear Fordham speak - he fell; I went to help to pick him up - the prisoner also helped; we gat him on a corn basket for a few minutes and washed his face - the prisoner was very attenfive and assisted in carrying him home to Duggett's-court, Shoreditch; we laid him on the bed, and the prisoner went for a doctor of his own accord - he appeared very sorry; the doctor's assistant came - the prisoner went again and fetched the doctor himself; Fordham was in liquor, and was generally quarrelsome when in liquor - his hands were down when Webb struck him.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q.Fordham called the prisoner a two-faced fellow at twelve o'clock? A. Yes, but whether the prisoner was present then I cannot tell; the prisoner seemed anxious to render every assistance.

WILLIAM SAUNDERSON . I am ostler to Mr. Biggs. On the 29th of October, about the middle of the day, I saw Webb and Fordham together - Fordham called Webb a two-faced fellow, and a d-d two-faced fellow; I was not present when the blow was struck - I came up afterwards - Webb seemed sorry for what had occurred, and went for a doctor of his own accord.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether Fordham had not been aggravating the prisoner the day before? A. I cannot say.

CHARLES ROBARTS . I am a surgeon. I was called to see the deceased on Saturday evening, the 29th of October; he was then dying - I saw him after he was dead; he died at his own house - I examined his head, and found an extravasation of blood over the left hemisphere of the brain; I consider the concussion was the cause of his death, and not the blow - the blow caused the concussion, which was the fall; he died within two hours after I saw him - which was about eight o'clock; I was with him nearly all the time, and did what I could for him: the prisoner fetched me, and seemed very sorry for what had occurred.

Cross-examined. Q. He died from pressure of blood on the brain? A. Yes; he had a severe blow on the mouth, and the concussion was on the opposite side - he had fallen down: if he was intoxicated less violence would have caused his death - I do not think the blow would have caused his death if he had been sober.

WILLIAM FINER . I am a district surgeon of Shoreditch. I examined the deceased - his death was caused by a large coagulum of blood on the left hemisphere of the brain, occasioned by the blow or fall.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18311201-126

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

126. ISAAC PEARSON was indicted for feloniously cutting and maiming William Allden , with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to he to disable or do him some grievous bodily harm.

GEORGE MILES . I live in Chapel-place, Brompton, with my father, who was door-keeper at the Italian opera-house, but is now out of employ; I am a shop-boy or light porter. On the 5th of October. I heard a noise at No. 14, Chapel-place , four doors from my father's house; Mr. Thompson keeps the house - the prisoner lives there; he is a shoemaker - I found a few people outside the house; they were not making a noise -I heard a noise inside the door, and saw a Policeman parading up and down Chapel-place; I heard him say if there was any noise in the street, by man, woman, or child, he would take them in charge - the door being open, I went in to see what was the matter; Allden followed me in - as soon as I went in I heard the sound of a bell inside, and something else - I believe it was a tea-board, but I had not been in the passage five minutes before the prisoner came out of his parlour; I believe the noise was to serenade his marriage - I stood directly opposite the parlour door; he came out, and made no more to do but run a knife into my right side - he ran from me, and went towards Allden, but I did not see him stab him, but I heard Allden cry out- I had nothing in my hand when he came out, but when I first went in I had an empty quart pot, and knocked it against the wall two or three times, but I was desired to lay it down, and did so: I suppose the serenading was not agreeable to him - I cannot say whether he was angry, for I had not been there long.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know the prisoner? A. Only by sight; I never spoke to him -I went into his passage, seeing the neighbours there; I know the people were tormenting him night after night, but I had nothing to do with it - I made a noise with the quart pot: I knocked it against the opposite wall.

Q. Had he not been irritated by a gang of boys in this manner? A. He had been irritated the night previous - I did not intend to make a noise when I went, but seeing other people do so, I did so for my own amusement; they were all grown people there - some of them were tormenting him; six or eight people were there - I heard the Policeman say if any body made a noise outside he would take them, but if there was a noise inside he could not prevent it.

COURT. Q. Did not the Policeman tell them if they went inside they might make as much noise as they liked? A. It was something to that effect: he did say so - I believe the prisoner had been married the day previous; he had given the persons no provocation.

WILLIAM ALLDEN . I live in Chapel-place, with my father - I am a compositor . On the 5th of October I was going to bed, about half-past ten o'clock; my father was at the door, and called me down - I saw a few people assembled outside No. 14, where the prisoner lives; he had been married the day before - I went, and mixed with them; the Policeman said the first that made a noise outside should be taken to the watch-house, but if there was any noise inside he could not prevent it, they might make what noise they liked - I went in; six or eight people were there - I had a tea-board, and there was a person with a bell; Miles had a pewter pot - they were all making a noise; the bell was put into my hand - I began ringing it; this continued three or four minutes - I then saw Pearson open his room door, and come out; he stabbed Miles in his right side, then came, and stabbed me in the left side

with a knife; I have seen the knife since - it went through my coat and waistcoat; I was taken to Dr. Anderson's, Brompton-road - he dressed the wound, and I was taken to St. George's-hospital; he stabbed us the instant he came out - he had no malice towards me.

Cross-examined. Q. You were ringing the bell three or four minutes? A. Yes - it was a little hand-bell; I heard no kettles - Weller and Driver were beating the teatray with their fists; the Policeman said we might go in and make what noise we liked - we made as much noise as we could, and no doubt irritated him very much.

WILLIAM WELLER . I live in Chapel-place, and am a paper-stainer. I went to the house to see Thompson, the landlord, but was not one of this party: I saw Miles and Allden there - the noise continued four or five minutes; the prisoner came out of his room with a knife in his hand - I saw him stab them both; I caught hold of Allden, unbuttoned his clothes, and put my hand on the wound - I took him to Dr. Anderson's, and then to the hospital; it was a pointed shoemaker's knife - the doctor said the wound was an inch and a half deep; the prisoner might be irritated - I have heard the boys in the street making a noise; he has insulted people as they passed his window, and children have made a noise - he has come out with a strap, and hurt a boy very much, which I believe caused it; there were grown up people there.

Cross-examined. Q.Who were the grown up people? A. I knew Miles and Allden, but not the others; Mr. and Mrs. Driver were there - one of them had a tea-board; the prisoner lived in the front parlour, and this was done in the passage - it is a lodging-house.

JAMES APPLEBY . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Chapel-place; I heard a noise, and went to quiet them - when I got to No. 14, it was over; five or six people were standing in the street - some at their own doors, and some looking out of window; I inquired what the noise was about, and understood there had been a wedding - I stood there a moment or two; some person came out of No. 10 or 11 with something in his hand, and hit it - I went to tell them the very first who made a noise in the street I would take them to the watch-house - I saw Miles and Allden go into No. 14; a female said, "If the Policeman won't let us do it in the street, we can go inside;" the landlord was standing in the door-way of his apartment, and I believe I said the landlord was master of his own house - I believe I said they might go to their own apartments and make a noise; I was standing a little distance from the door, and heard somebody say Allden was stabbed.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you not know the persons did not live in that house? A. Yes; if I told them to go in, and make as much noise as they liked, it is more than I recollect - I was on duty in the street, and should think the landlord master of his own house; if he had called me to prevent it, I should.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-127

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

127. WILLIAM LUCAS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 coat, value 10s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 6s. 6d. , the goods of Edward Simmonds Fleming ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 15. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18311201-128

128. WILLIAM WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 11 prints, value 2s. 3d.; 2 pocket-books, value 5s. 6d., and 12 books, value 22s. 6d. , the goods of John Harwood and another, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . - Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-129

129. JOHN SMITH and HENRY LANE were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 watch, value 30l.; 1 chain, value 5l.; 1 pocket-book, value 3d.; 1 watch-key, value 20s., and 2 seals, value 5l., the goods of Sir Robert Graham , Bart., from his person .

SIR ROBERT GRAHAM, BART. I carry on business in Walbrook. On the 9th of November, about three o'clock, I was within two or three doors of the London coffee-house, on the footpath, at the time the Stationers' Company were passing: there were a great number of persons - I felt myself surrounded by several well dressed men, of whom I had no suspicion; they squeezed against me very closely for some time - I had left home about ten minutes, and had in a purse in my trousers pocket 9l. - my watch and seals were in my fob, and the chain concealed in my trousers; I had also a pocket-book of no value - my watch and appendages were gold, and worth about 36l.; as soon as I got relived from the pressure, I missed my watch and pocket-book; my purse was not taken - I thought the men who were close to me were larger than the prisoners; I saw them before the Magistrate next day, and my pocket-book was produced; the memorandums in it are my own writing.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. No doubt many persons were there innocently? A.Certainly; my pocketbook was in my left-hand trousers pocket - I tucked my chain and seals into my right hand trousers pocket; I did not see the prisoners - one person had very large whiskers, and another was a tall man.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am a City-officer. I was on Ludgate-hill on the 9th of November - I did not see Sir Robert Graham, or know he had been robbed; I was on the opposite side to the London coffee-house, about three o'clock in the afternoon, as the procession was passing, and saw several persons collected near the coffee-house; the prisoners were among them - Smith was in the middle of them; their heads were all down, apparently examining something - I went over, and took hold of Smith; I took him into a public-house, and in his coat pocket found this pocket-book: I asked Smith whose it was - he said his master's; I opened it, and saw a letter addressed to Sir Robert Graham - I asked how he came by that letter; he then said, "I had the pocket-book given to me;" I asked who by - he described a person dressed as Lane; his description corresponded with the appearance of Lane, who was among the party when I took Smith; I put him into the Compter, went into Cheapside, and saw Lane standing by the pavement in a crowd - I told him he must come with me; he said, "What have I done?" I said I would tell him at the Compter - I took him there, and had Smith called up; I said."Is this the person who gave you the pocket-book?" he very reluctantly said, "I don't think he is the man," and hesitated several times; Lane said, "Do you say I gave it to you?" he said, "No, I don't say so;" I detained them both.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not search Smith before you took him to the public-house? A. I searched his waistcoat pocket, but not minutely; he was not out of my custody - I let go of him, but kept close to him; I knew him before, and he knew me - he is in the newspaper line.

SIR ROBERT GRAHAM . My own writing is in this book, and here is a letter addressed to me; I have not found my watch.

Smith's Defence. I was going up Ludgate-hill, and had not been there five minutes before the officer, who I well knew, took me; he searched all my pockets, and told me to go about my business - I walked from the coffee-house to the Old Bailey, and stood looking at the prison; if I had known of a robbery, I should have escaped; I picked the book up on Ludgate-hill, as a crowd was passing.

SMITH - GUILTY (of stealing the pocket-book.)

Aged 26. - Transported for Life .

LINE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-130

130. JOHN SEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 gold pin, set with pearls, value 5s., the goods of James Gadsden , from his person .

JAMES GADSDEN . I live in Furnival's Inn, and am a solicitor . On the 9th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Cheapside : my gold pin, set with pearls was in my stock; there was a very great crowd - I was walking in the middle of the road, to avoid the crowd - two or three people were round me; the prisoner came up to me, thrust his hand into my breast, and drew out my pin; I instantly seized him, and saw him throw something away, which I presume was my pin: I saw a scramble among the crowd, but I have not recovered it - I continued to hold him; he asked what he had done - I said he knew, and I should not let go of him; I was instantly surrounded by ten or twelve - they all asked what he had done; two of them thrust themselves between me and him, but I said I would not let go; one of the mob said, "Cut his b-y fingers;" I called for the Police - I was surrounded till the officer came and took him, but never let him go.

THOMAS PROTHEROE . I am a City-officer. A gentleman came to the corner of King-street, and gave me information; I went with another officer, and found the prosecutor holding the prisoner - we took hold of him; a great many persons were closed round the prosecutor; I had hard work to get up to him - I did not know the prisoner before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to see the procession, and had the misfortune to be shoved into the crowd; the gentleman accused me of robbing him of his pin - I said,"Take me into a shop and search me," but he would not; I am not the man who robbed him - when a man is taken a crowd generally follows.

MR. GADSDEN. He asked me in the middle of the crowd to search him; I am positive it was him who thrust his hand and took my pin.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18311201-131

131. EDWARD AUSTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 2 brooches, value 10s., and 1 ring, value 20s. , the goods of Sarah Oldham .

SARAH OLDHAM . I am servant at a cheesemonger's, in Newgate-street - the shop does not communicate with the house. On the 24th of October these things were in a drawer in the garret; I caught the prisoner, who is a stranger, coming down the stairs, between two and three o'clock, and secured him; he said he was looking for some merchant, who he knew lived somewhere about there - he did not name him, but said he was a foreigner, and could not speak English very well; but he understood what was said before the Alderman; an officer was sent for, who found this property of mine on him - I had seen it in the drawer about twelve o'clock.

JOHN RICHMOND . I am a street-keeper. I was fetched to Mr. Roberts', in Newgate-street, and found the prisoner in the parlour; I took him up to the second floor room, to search him, and as he entered I observed his hand go on one side, and on taking a handkerchief out of his pocket, this ring fell into his hat; among a variety of other things in his pocket, I found this brooch, and on the floor I found a brooch to match the ring - he said he came there to look for some foreigner; he spoke bad English, but spoke better before the Alderman, and understood every thing perfectly.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had come from Bavaria, in search of a merchant named Masenbach, who had told him he lived on the third floor of the house in question - that he had gone there to call on him, and finding the door open went up stairs.

SARAH OLDHAM . The private door is not usually open - it has occassionally been left a jar.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-132

132. SAMUEL WESTBROOK and ROBERT POLDEN were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 canvas bag, value 2s., and 170 lbs. of hops, value 8l. , the goods of Anthony Nichol .

POULDEN pleaded GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROBERT PATTERSON . I am servant to Anthony Nichol , a wharfinger , at Hackney. The prisoner Westbrook came with his waggon and a quantity of goods to be shipped to Alnwick - he came to Dowgate-wharf , which belongs to Mr. Nichol; there were two bags of hops in the warehouse: the goods he brought were deposited on the wharf - he did not inquire about any hops, but while we were getting a hogshead of sugar out of his waggon he and another must have got this bag of hops into his waggon, which stood on the wharf for about a quarter of an hour; Poulden was with him - one of the people belonging to the wharf gave me information; the foreman got a lantern to examine the pocket of hops which was in his waggon; I had not seen it put in, but am sure there was no hops in the waggon when I first saw it - I asked Westbrook how he came by the hops; he said he did not know - I said it could not get there without his knowledge; Poulden got out of the waggon, and went away then - I asked Westbrook his name; he said John Thomas - he was taken into custody; we looked into the warehouse, and missed a bag of hops, worth 8l. - the weight was marked on the bag.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was there any mark on the bag, by which you knew it? A. No - the direction was on it before, but that was torn off; I put a

mark on it, to know it was the one I took out of the waggon; I did not see the prisoners come on the wharf - I saw them both in the waggon together; it had just stopped at the wharf when I came up - I cannot say what representntion Poulden might make to Westbrook about the hope; I have seen Westbrook there two or three times before - I cannot say how often.

GRIFFITH ROBERTS . I am foreman at Mr. Nichol's wharf. Hughes called me - I came with a light, and saw the prisoners in the waggon rolling a pocket of hops from one side, of the waggon to the other; it was between five and six o'clock - I had seen the bag of hops in the warehouse after two o'clock that afternoon; the name of John Dale was on the waggon - his waggon is at our wharf two or three times a day; the prisoners were both in the waggon - I asked them what the hops were which they had there - Westbrook said he did not know; I said, "I must see what mark it is;" I went round the waggon to look, and found there was no mark on it - I jumped into the waggon, and said to Westbrook, "Why, you have torn the direction off this;" he said he knew nothing about it - I said, "Where is your mate?" he said he had no mate, and did not know who I meant; Poulden had gone out of the waggon while I went round - I missed a pocket of hops from the warehouse; Westbrook took and turned the hops out of the waggon, and said they did not belong to him, he did not want anything to do with them - he was given in charge; I had not seen the waggon enter the yard.

Cross-examined. Q.Poulden, I believe, jumped out of the waggon, and ran off? A.He ran off, and escaped - Westbrook remained behind to deliver his goods; I do not recollect ever seeing him before - Dale has different carmen - it was a quarter of an hour before the officer came; Westbrook did not attempt to escape - the officer brought Poulden back.

JURY. Q.Were the goods delivered before you saw the hops in the waggon? A.No; they were getting a hogshead of sugar out - I had not seen the prisoners in the warehouse.

JOHN HUGHES . I am porter to Mr. Nichol. I saw the waggon come to the wharf; it had a hogshead and some small goods in it, which were put on the wharf, not in the warehouse; both the prisoners came with the waggon; I saw them lifting the bag of hops into the waggon, and asked them if it had fallen out of the waggon - they said Yes, it had; they were both in the waggon - I then told our foreman I thought it had not; he went to look at the direction - if there had been a bag of hops in the waggon when it came in I must have seen it; there was none - Westbrook threw it out; Poulden had run away.

Cross-examined. Q.Which of them said it had fallen out? A. I cannot say which - some goods were still in the waggon; the hogshead was being taken out at the time - any body who went to the waggon must see them.

EDWARD KING . I am a street-keeper. I took charge of Westbrook on the wharf - Patterson said he and another had put the hops into the waggon, and asked Westbrook why he did so; he said he did not know who they belonged to - that some person asked him to put them up, and he supposed they wanted him to give them a cast some distance; I asked who the person was, or where he was to take them - he said he did not know: I asked where he was going next - he said to another wharf; I did not then take him, but watched him, and in a quarter of an hour took him in charge; I saw Poulden join him at the corner of Brick-hill-lane - I went up, and took him to the watch-house, then went with Westbrook to deliver a cask at another wharf, and then took him.

Cross-examined. Q. It is common for one man to ask another for "a lift?" A. Yes - I have known him two years driving for Mr. Dale, a town-carman, who employs eight or ten men - he was about three quarters of an hour delivering goods; he might have escaped, after I took Poulden, if he chose.

COURT. Q. Did you see any body but Poulden speak to him? A. No.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Westbrook's Defence. I was unloading; now the gentleman says he saw Poulden in the waggon, he was never in the waggon at all; I got up, and never got out of the waggon till I had unloaded every thing, and know nothing about the hops.

Westbrook received a good character.

WESTBROOK - GUILTY Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-133

133. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 watch, value 15l. 15s.; 1 chain, value 8l. 8s.; 1 seal, value 2l. 12s., and 1 key, value 10s., the goods of Thomas Nash , from his person .

THOMAS NASH . I live at Thavies-inn. On the 9th of November, about half-past two o'clock, I was passing over Blackfriars-bridge , in the road; there was no crowd in the road - the prisoner came in front of me, and I was immediately surrounded by about half a dozen, who came from the footpath, and so did the prisoner - I thought at first that the prisoner was an officer, and said, "Why do you stop me?" I was instantly pressed close, my arms thrown up, and at that instant, as soon as I could get my hand down, I found my watch was gone - I immediately seized the prisoner; he got from me, with the assistance of those who surrounded me; I tacked about, immediately pursued, and seized him as he went on the pavement - I held him, and called the Policeman, who secured him; my watch and chain were worth about 23l. - I have not found them.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. What business are you? A. I have a business in Cambridgeshire, which my partner conducts - I hardly know how to describe it.

Q. Do you mean to swear there was not a crowd on the bridge? A. I considered that the procession had passed: there was no crowd whatever on the road where I was - the Lancers were a head: the men in armour,&c., were at the foat of the bridge, not on it - it was quite still and quiet; I heard no shouting; I found the Lord Mayor had not arrived from Westminster - there was no rush of the crowd near me - the prisoner came and stopped me; I said, "What do you mean, are you an officer?" he said No, and then the others came round me - I do not believe there was any body off the pavement at the time - I looked at my watch in Stamford-street.

JAMES TURRELL . I live in Baker's-buildings, Liverpool-street. I saw the prisoner come off the pavement, and run against Mr. Nash - the Lancers were just coming at the time; they were about a yard from Mr. Nash - I

saw nobody but the prisoner run against Mr. Nash, and saw Mr. Nash catch hold of him; there were two or three more round, and a good many close to them, all shoving at one time.

Q.Who were they shoving? A. I could not make out - I staid till Martin secured the prisoner, Mr. Nash said he had lost his watch, but I did not see it go.

Q. You were examined before the Magistrate, do you mean to say, that when the prisoner first ran against Mr. Nash, the road was not clear? A. The road was not filled; it was clear then except that the horses were close at the side - there was a space between the horses and footpath; the place Mr. Nash was in was clear, and then the prisoner ran against him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the Lancers wheel round at the time? A. One of them turned and made a plunge, as he spurred his horse.

HENRY MARTIN . I am a constable. I was coming up Chatham-place, and saw the prosecutor holding the prisoner - I took him in charge, and found 6s. 6d. on him; Mr. Nash charged him with assisting to take his watch.

Cross-examined. Q. Has not Nash called on you, and said it was of no use to go on with the prosecution, as he could not swear to the prisoner, and ask for his watch to be given up? A.Certainly not; there was a crowd, but it was going from the bridge; the Lancers were at the bridge foot - the Lord Mayor was just landing.

MR. NASH. I never called on the constable, or told any body I did not mean to prosecute, for I could not swear to the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell the Alderman I was not the person who robbed you? A. I said I could not say you actually took it - you detained me, and assisted those who did; you confined me, and I believe the others took it; he was the most active in stopping me.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18311201-134

NEW COURT. MONDAY, DECEMBER 5.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

134. WILLIAM NAY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 8 lbs. of figs, value 3s., and 1 box, value 2d. , the goods of William Oakley .

SAMUEL GREEN . I am a Police-officer. On the 12th of November I saw the prisoner three or four hundred yards from Mr. Oakley's, in Whitechapel , with a bundle; I followed him into a house in George-street, and pulled him from under the bed, with these figs in his hand.

THOMAS PACKMAN . I am shopman to William Oakley . I know these figs to be his by the mark; they were taken from a pile of quarter-drums, in the middle of the shop.

The prisoner received a good character, and a witness promised to take him into his service.

GUILTY . Aged 10. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18311201-135

135. JAMES FAULKNER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 100 lbs. of rope yarn, value 25s. , the goods of John Robertson , his master; and THOMAS CRANSTON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM CHAMBERS . I am a Police-officer; I was on duty near Limehouse on the 21st of November - I met a boy about a quarter before seven o'clock that morning, proceeding in a direct line from the back part of Mr. Robertson's premises - he got some little distance before I overtook him; he had two pads of yarn with him - I questioned him where he came from, and he showed me a note - one was a pad of new yarn, the other was old; I saw him go to Cranston's dwelling-house, which is about two hundred yards from where I stopped him - I then went to Mr. Robertson's; I at last saw him, and in consequence of what he said. I went to Cranston's dwelling-house - Cranston was not at home; he was at his shop, which is about a hundred and fifty yards from his house - I went there, and saw Cranston in the counting-house at the shop; I asked if he had had some yarn brought there that morning - he said Yes, in the name of Thompson, and it was to be made up into points, or something of that kind, and it was so expressed in the note; I asked who Thompson was- he said he did not know, nor where he lived, but when it was done, he supposed he would come and fetch it away - I then said I had stopped that boy with some yarn that morning, and he had told me it came from Mr. Robertson's; I was then speaking of a boy who was in the shop at the time, similarly dressed to the boy I had stopped, and I thought it was him; Cranston then said he had spoken to Faulkner on Saturday night, and that the yarn came from Mr. Robertson's - Mr. Robertson, who was with me, then desired me to take Cranston and the boy into custody, and I did so; there was only the pad of new yarn in the counting-house - Cranston said the other pad was at his dwelling-house; we went, and found it there - I then took Cranston and the boy to the station-house, and went to Mr. Robertson's, where we found Faulkner getting his breakfast; Mr. Robertson questioned him whether he had sent any yarn away that morning - he said he had not sent any away, except two coils of rope, which went by a cart to some boat; Mr. Robertson said, "Here is a Policeman, who has stopped a boy with some yarn this morning, and he rather suspects it came from here;" he said he had not sent any thing away - I then asked if he had not sent any to Cranston's; he said No - I asked if he had made any arrangement or seen Cranston on Saturday evening; he said No, he had not seen him - I then left him with Mr. Robertson, and went away; I went to the station-house again, and found Faulkner there - Mr. Robertson came there soon after; I went with Cranston to Mr. Robertson's, and Mr. Robertson called all his men and boys down - Cranston said none of them had brought the yarn to him; Swansbury was the last boy that came down - Cranston looked at him, and said he was not the boy who brought it; I said he resembled the other boy, and they were so much alike that I could not swear which was the boy, nor can I now; it was a dark morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had you (Anderson) the boy you took into the counting-house, in custody? A. I could not swear to the boy - I told the Magistrate so; I never said positively he was the boy - I could not see his features; the yarn was so much over his face - I spoke from his dress; I said, at Cranston's place, that he was the boy - that boy was in custody, I suppose, three or four hours; Swansbury had a hairy cap on, and a fustian jacket and trousers; the boy I met had the same; he was stooping at the time,

but his hairy cap came through the yarn - I will not swear that the boy did not tell me that Faulkner had sent the yarn to be done for a Mr. Thompson; he might say so - this new yarn was laying just on the left-hand side at Cranston's counting-house, and the other in a back wash-house at his dwelling-house.

JOHN ROBERTSON . I am a rope-maker , and live at Limehouse - Faulkner has been my foreman four years and a half. The Policeman came to my house, and I went to Cranston's dwelling-house - I heard he was down at his shop, which is a marine-store shop, and he has a yard, where he makes up spun-yarn - this pad of new yarn was laying in the shop; the Policeman said, "This is part of the yarn which I stopped the boy with;" Cranston and Anderson were then in the shop - I said to Cranston, "Where is the other?" and said it was an infamous transaction - Cranston said, "You need not make a bother about it, I had it from your foreman;" the Policeman said, "This boy (meaning Anderson) exactly resembles the boy I stopped, in dress and appearance" - Anderson said, "You know, master, I am not the boy;" and began to cry - Cranston said the other pad of yarn was at his dwelling-house; we went there and found this - I had property of this description on my premises, and this new yarn, to the best of my belief, came from my premises - I had yarn of the same description as this old- Cranston and Anderson were then taken to the station; I went with Cranston and the Policeman to my premises, and what the Policeman has stated is correct - Faulkner distinctly stated that no yarn had gone from my premises - I went down to the station-house with Faulkner, and Cranston said, "You know, Mr. Faulkner, I saw you on Saturday night, and I told you I wanted some yarn: you agreed to send me some" - Faulkner replied, "That I deny, it is no such thing:" I showed all my men and boys to Cranston, and I pointed out Swansbury to him in particular - he said he was not the boy who brought the yarn; Cranston had before told me that the boy, who brought the yarn, was on my premises - I had some communication from Swansbury the day the prisoners were examined, in the morning at breakfast time; he was then taken, and examined before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q.How many examinations were there? A. Two; the first on the 21st of November, and the next on the Thursday following - it was on the second examination that Anderson was let go; Faulkner can write - when I went to Cranston's house I asked Mrs. Cranston for the note, which the boy had shown to the Policeman, and I believe she gave it into the Policeman's hands - the Policeman gave it into my hands; I did not know the hand-writing; Cranston does not spin yarn like this - he lives about a quarter of a mile from me; he said the boy, who took the yarn to him, worked for me, and he thought he could point him out -I took him there for that purpose.

THOMAS SWANSBURY . I was in the service of Mr. Robertson. On the morning in question some yarn was pointed out to me, and I took it, but I cannot swear whether it was Faulkner pointed it out to me - it was dark in the morning; I carried the yarn from Mr. Robertson's premises, but I cannot say who I received it from - Faulkner was there, but I cannot swear whether any one else was.

Q.You know you were examined before a Magistrate; what you then said was taken down, and my Lord has it, mind what you are about; what did you do with the yarn? A. I took it to Cranston's house, as I was ordered by the foreman, to the best of my knowledge - there was a note on the yarn, and I suppose the foreman put it there; when I got to Cranston's I saw a man in his night-clothes, who took it in of me, but I cannot say who it was - I believe it was Cranston; I was stopped by the Policeman, as I went there; I showed him that note, and he let me go on- I was called with the other boys and men for Cranston to see me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you put down the yarn when the Policeman spoke to you? A. No, Sir; it was on my two shoulders - I did not look up in the officer's face; the note was in my pocket - my head was not through the yarn; it was dark in the morning - I gave the note to the person I saw at Cranston's, and then went to my work; I saw Anderson on the Monday - I do not know whether he is younger than I am; I had fustian trousers on that morning, and a baragan jacket - I do not know whether Anderson was pitted with the small-pox; there was no disguise about the person who took the yarn of me.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What is the difference between a baragan jacket and a fustian? A. It is thicker, but they are the same colour.

COURT. Q.What did you say when you gave in the note? A. I told the man who took the yarn in, that I had been stopped by the Policeman, and I had shown him the note - I believe the man I saw was Cranston; I had never been there before - I saw Cranston the same morning; I had never seen him before - I knew the house he lived at, by the same party who gave me the yarn directing me there; I cannot swear who that party was, it was very dark - I have worked for Mr. Robertson three years; I thought by the voice the person who gave me this yarn was the foreman - I know what I carried was yarn, and that there were two bundles of it; the person who gave me the yarn told me to go up Limehouse-causeway, and then across Spread Eagle-street, and to take it to Cranston's house; it was the first job I had that morning - I cannot swear whether there was any more than one person present when I received the yarn; I cannot swear who it was gave it me.

Faulkner's Defence. I never sent any thing out of the premises of Mr. Robertson in my life, unless it was by his orders; he can testify that himself.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-136

136. JOHN CORBETT and AGNES CORBETT were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 160 yards of printed cotton, value 7l.; 9 pairs of stockings, value 2l., and 3 yards of silk, value 8s. , the goods of John Wharton Soppet .

MESSRS. PHILLIPS and BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WHARTON SOPPET. I am a linen-draper , and live in High-street, Marylebone. John Corbett was in my employ for about eight months, as shopman ; I then discharged him - I have five other shopmen; I never saw Agnes Corbett at my house.

ARTHUR MINTON . I am a Police-constable. On the 21st of the October I saw Agnes Corbett near Bryanstone-

square; she was very tipsy, and attracted my notice - I took her, and found on her twenty-seven duplicates, a note, and a shop-bill of Mr. Soppet's - I went to Mr. Soppet's the same evening, and I went to the different pawnbrokers - I went to the attic of a house in Hatton-wall, where I found a number of articles; I have no knowledge of who lived there - Agnes Corbett said she lived in Hatton-wall, but I do not think she said the number; this is the note I found on her.

ISAAC HUGHES PUGH . I am in the service of a pawnbroker, in Aldersgate-street. I have nine yards and a half of cotton, pawned by a woman for 4s.; I cannot say who, but this is the duplicate I gave.

FRANCIS HENRY PARKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Skinner-street, Somers'-town. I have a piece of cotton, pawned on the 3rd of October, for 4s. 6d., by a woman; I cannot say who - I gave her this duplicate.

ROBERT LINWOOD . I am a pawnbroker. I have fourteen yards of printed cotton, pawned on the 14th of October, for 6s., by a female, in the name of Ann Helps ; I gave her this duplicate.

JAMES MASTERS HOWIE . I am a pawnbroker. I have twelve yards of cotton, pawned on the 20th of October, by a woman, in the name of Sarah Hill, and to the best of my belief, Agnes Corbett is the person who pawned it - I gave her this duplicate.

JOSIAH PEARCE . I am in the service of a pawnbroker. I have a pair of stockings, and thirteen yards of cotton, pawned by a female on the 20th and 24th of September; I gave her these duplicates.

MR. WHITAKER. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-lane. I have fourteen yards of printed cotton, pawned on the 20th of October, for 6s.; I believe by the female prisoner - I gave her this duplicate.

JOHN DAVIS . I am in the service of a pawnbroker, in Exmouth-street. I have twelve yards of cotton, pawned on the 20th of October, by a woman, I believe it was the female prisoner.

WILLIAM HOOPER , I am in the service of a pawnbroker. I have twelve yards of printed cotton, pawned on the 22nd of September, to the best of my knowledge by the female prisoner.

JOHN WILLIAM ADLINGTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a piece of cotton pawned on the 5th of October, for 5s.; this is the duplicate that was given, but I did not take it in.

JOSEPH HALL . I am a pawnbroker. I have three pieces of cotton, and two pairs of stockings pawned; one on the 3rd of October by the female prisoner, and the other by another woman.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I am a pawnbroker in Theosald's-road. I have a grown, pawned by a woman; I do not know who - I gave her this duplicate.

JAMES TRAIL . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of stockings pawned by a female; I do not know who.

WILLIAM KING . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of stockings, pawned on the 26th of September, by a woman the name of Ann Green - I gave her this duplicate.

FREDERICK PRIEST . I am a pawnbroker. I have a piece of cotton, pawned in the name of Ann Adams.

JAMES HAYES . I am in the service of a pawnbroker. have two pair of stockings, pawned on the 15th of September by a man in the name of Matthew Jenkins .

WILLIAM HILL . I am landlord of the house in Hatton-garden; the two prisoners lodged in a back room there on the second floor as man and wife - the woman took the room; the officer searched the same room.

ARTHUR MINTON . I found in that room a piece of gros de Naples, and a great variety of other articles in a box.

MR. SOPPET. Several of these articles have my mark on them, and the others I believe are mine.

COURT. Q.Some of these are remnants? A. Yes, and if they had been sold the fag would have been left on; but it is torn off these - this piece of silk has my mark on it, and has not been sold; those articles found in the box are ribbons and little things which I cannot swear to, but I had similar articles - I always attend the shop myself.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You cannot tell what goods you may sell in any one day? A. No; I have occasion to go out to purchase goods - I cannot say that Agnes Corbett has not been there and made purchases.

JAMES HUNT . I am cashier to the prosecutor. I am there every day and take down what the customers pay; I know John Corbett, but I never recollect seeing Agnes.

JOHN CORBETT GUILTY - Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

AGNES CORBETT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-137

137. GEORGE ALLEN was indicted, for that he on on the 30th of October , unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously, did maim and wound certain cattle, that is to say 2 calves, price 6l. , the property of Thomas Wiltshire ; against the Statute. &c.

Two other COUNTS, for maiming or wounding the said cattle.

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS WILSHIRE. I am a farmer , and live at Pinner . On the 29th of October I had five calves; they were safe that night in a shed - three were loose and two tied up; the next morning I heard something and went to the shed; I found the door open and the calves gone, and two of their tails were left in the shed - they were the tails of the two which had been tied up; I found four of my calves at the foot of Harrow-hill, and one of them about one mile and a half another way - I have known the prisoner ever since he was a child; he has occasionally worked in the neighbourhood; I do not think he was in regular work -I had no quarrel with him.

JACOB BRADBURY . I keep the Red Lion, at Pinner. On Saturday, the 29th of October, Allen and some other man were at my house, which is about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's - they staid till a quarter after ten o'clock - Bigg and Dell were there; they all wenta way together.

JAMES DELL . I am a labourer, and live at Pinner. I was at the Red Lion that Saturday night; Allen and Bigg were there; we staid there till a quarter or half-past ten o'clock - we then went out, and stood about the bottom of the town till between eleven or twelve - we then went down the marsh, and Bagot proposed to go and let old Moore's calves out; Bigg and I said we would have nothing to do with it - we all went down the marsh, and Bagot went into Wilshire's yard; Allen and Hockley then went into the shed, and when they came out, Allen said "I have cut the b-rs tails off" - Bigg made answer and said "You are a d-d fool;" I did not say anything.

WILLIAM BIGG . I was there that night - I waited with Dell till Allen and Hockley went into the shed and came out again; Allen said "I have cut the b-r's tails off;" I said "You are a d-d fool for so doing."

WILLIAM SMITH TUTHELL . I am clerk to the Magistrate before whom the prisoner was brought. Here is the examination I took down, and this is the Magistrate's signature - the prisoner said, "I did not say I had cut the b-r's tails off;" I said "We had done so."

THOMAS WILSHIRE . One of the tails were cut very short, and the other about half way; there was much blood from both.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-138

138. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for bigamy .

MR. BALL conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD WHITTINGTON. I produce an examined copy of the register of the marriage of William Baker with Elizabeth Palmer , on the 4th of September, 1820, at Harmondsworth, by banns.

JOHN WYATT. I am parish-clerk of Harmondsworth. I was present at the marriage of the prisoner with Elizabeth Palmer - I knew them afterwards living together as man and wife; I saw her alive on the 1st of November.

RICHARD WHITTINGTON. I produce an examined copy from the register-book of the parish of Langley Marish, in Bucks - William Baker and Jane Atkins were married on the 25th of September, 1831.

SUSAN STEVENS . I know the prisoner - I was present at his marriage with Jane Atkins in September last.

CHARLES GATES . I am a constable. I took the prisoner at Harmondsworth, in Middlesex.

Prisoner's Defence. My first wife was a very bad woman, and left me for three or four days and nights together; we then had a few words, and she went off with another man - she returned again and stopped about a fortnight; she then went away with another man; she stopped away twelve months, then came back, and wanted me to take her again - I said I had no place, but if she would promise not to do so again, I would take a room for her, and I did so; she stopped with me three weeks, and then finally left me.

JOHN WYATT . I think his first wife and he lived together three or four years - he has been about Harmondsworth the whole time; I do not know what became of his wife - I had not seen her for five or six years till the 1st of November.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18311201-139

139. THOMAS MILLER and JOHN METCALFE were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 gallon of whiskey, value 12s., the goods of Thomas Petley , being in a certain barge on the navigable River Thames .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Joseph Crisp .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JAMES DENTON . I am a Custom-house officer. On the morning of the 27th of October, about eleven o'clock, I was on board a Spanish vessel in the Union-tier, on the Thames, - a Spanish boy gave me information; I jumped into the lug boat, and went on board the brig John, which was about twenty yards off; about five minutes before I went on board, I had seen a person leave the John in the revenue boat - I do not know whether he saw me; as soon as I got on board the John, I saw Miller standing in the cabin, with his head out of the hatchway, and I smelt a smell of whiskey coming from the hold; I said to Miller,"What have you got in this craft?" he said spirits, which he was going to take to Dundee-wharf: I said,"You have been broaching these spirits" - he said he had not; I said, "I know you have" - I was preparing to slip down a small space between the casks, when the boy Ramage came from underneath; I went below, and saw a bladder, containing about three pints of whiskey: one of the casks appeared to have been recently spiled, and it was in tears; I took the bladder on the deck, and went into the cabin; my surveyor came on board - he sent for an officer, who took Miller.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you see Metcalfe's brother going along the river? A. I did; I inquired of him about the prosecutor, and he told me.

JOHN LITTLE . I am a Thames Police-surveyor. I went on board the John, and found Miller, Ramage, and this bladder of spirits, I asked them how the bladder came on board; they said they did not know, if any one brought it, Metcalfe did; I saw Metcalfe at Union-stairs, and took him - he said he knew nothing about it; I should think no one could have gone on board the John without knowing that the whiskey was issuing out of the barrels: I took Metcalfe to the office, and in going along he told me his master had given him a shilling to take to Miller.

Cross-examined. Q.When you say you saw Metcalfe on the stairs, do you mean the prisoner or his brother? A. The prisoner; I had seen his brother before, and told him I wanted his brother - I found the prisoner standing at the stairs, like other watermen.

THOMAS PETLEY . I am a lighterman, and carry on business in Hermitage-street, Wapping; Ramage is my apprentice - Miller is a journeyman, and Metcalfe an extra man, whom I employ at different times. I employed him and Miller on the 26th of October, to go and get forty puncheons of whiskey from the Ann, and take it to Dundeewharf; Metcalfe was not to have left the John - it was off Union-stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you not another barge going to Lidyard's wharf? A. No - I had one there; Metcalfe came to me about ten o'clock on the 27th - he told me the brig was safe, and asked if he should send the two boys up to the other lighter; I gave him a shilling to take to Miller, and told him to send the two boys off, and to stop and mind the craft.

THOMAS SHOOBERT . I am a cooper, and live at Wapping. I was sent for to sound the puncheons on the 26th of October, they were then all correct, I sounded them again on the 27th, and one was deficient - Mr. Pitt guaged them, and one gallon was missing from one of them, and the whiskey was running from the cask.

WILLIAM RAMAGE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Petley. On the morning of the 27th of October I was on board the John - Miller and Metcalfe were on board; when I got on board, about ten o'clock, I told Metcalfe he was to go to the chain lighter, and take ten puncheons - he said he did not think so, he would go home, and ask his master - he went; before he went he asked Miller if he could do any

thing - he said No; Metcalfe then went on shore, and returned in ten minutes - he said I was to row a skiff up; Miller was to take in the whiskey, and I was to go away - Metcalfe then said we were fools if we did not take some spirits to keep the wet out, and Miller replied - "I like to taste the fruit, but I do not like to pick it;" they then both directed me to go down and get some: I waited two or three minutes, and then went down - I had a gimblet of my own on board; Miller was down in the cabin, and Metcalfe said he would keep a look out - he told me to give a look out, and see that there was nobody about; to go down by the bulkheads, and Miller told me to bore the cask in the bulge - I drew some into a bladder; Metcalfe was then in the cabin, with his head out of the scuttle, and Miller was down in the cabin - Miller had cut a spile for me, and said I was to put it into the hole when I was done; they both said I was to give it to them, but while I was drawing Metcalfe jumped up, and went away - Miller told me to stoop down, and the officer came on board.

Cross-examined. Q.What time did you go on board? A.About ten o'clock, and then they mentioned to me about the spirits - the officer came and took me before I had gone to row the skiff up; I will swear nothing had been said to me about spirits before I went on board at ten o'clock; I had not asked Savage to go on board and drink whiskey with me - I know Thomas Savage , and had seen him that morning on the stairs; it was my bladder, and I took it on board with me; when Metcalfe came on board, he said he was to pay Miller a 1s., and he paid it him when he had been home to master to get it; he staid on board about ten minutes after that, and then went on shore in the same boat.

Miller put in a written Defence, stating that Ramage had endeavoured to persuade him to take the whiskey, but he refused; that he was present when Ramage spiled the cask, for which he expressed his contrition, but that Metcalfe had no knowledge of the transaction.

GEORGE THOMAS METCALFE . I am the prisoner's brother. On the morning this happened I had been with a fare in a boat, and the Custom-house officer called me; he said the barge had been robbed - I saw my brother after that, and told him the brig had been robbed; the young man said he was implicated - he then went to the Thames Police-office, and came back.

THOMAS SAVAGE . I know Ramage. On the morning this matter happened, about four o'clock, he said to me,"We have a brig off the tier with some whiskey in it" - he did not ask me to go on board.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

METCALFE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-140

140. THOMAS KYNASTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 33lbs. weight of lead, value 5s. 6d., the goods of William Lovell and others, fixed to a certain building of theirs ; against the Statute, &c.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, stating it to belong to a person unknown.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a constable. On the 24th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was on duty in Cow-cross - I saw the prisoner and another just before me, pointing over to a marine-store shop; this lead was secreted under the coat of the other man - I took the lead and the prisoner, and went by direction of Mr. West to a house, where we found another piece, which we fitted.

JOHN GRAY . I was sent to take charge of the house. I missed the lead from the gutter; I fitted this lead and the other piece found in the house to the gutter - they fitted exactly; I have no doubt of their coming from there.

JOSEPH WEST . I am master of a workhouse. I sent the prisoner to take charge of the house where this lead was it was uninhabited, and jointly belongs to the trustees of the parish, Mr. William Lovell and others.

GUILTY . Aged 66. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-141

141. CHARLES CHANDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 2 saws, value 5s. , the goods of the overseer of the poor of the parish of St. Martin in the Fields .

JOSEPH WEST . I am one of the masters of St. Martin's workhouse. On the 26th of October the prisoner came for relief - he was quite drunk, and conducted himself in a very disorderly manner; it took four men to convey him to the watch-house.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer. I took this duplicate for two saws from the prisoner in the watch-house - he said he had stolen them from the carpenter's shop at the workhouse.

THOMAS STRUTT . I am a carpenter at St. Martin's workhouse . These saws are the property of the parish, and were kept in the workshop there.

Prisoner. Q.Were they locked up? A. Yes, the shop was locked.

JEREMIAH BEATON SMITH . I am a pawnbroker. I took in these saws from the prisoner, and gave him this duplicate.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven years .

Reference Number: t18311201-142

142. MATILDA BOX was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 book, value 1s.; 1 frock, value 9d., and 2 shoes, value 1s. , the goods of William John Eels .

SARAH EELS . I am the wife of William John Eels , a labourer ; I mend and sell old clothes. In the beginning of November the prisoner brought a Bible to me - she asked 6d. for it, which I gave her; I knew her before: she came again in two or three days, and said, "Take in that Bible, it belongs to my husband, and if you will keep it a day or two I will give you 7d. for it;" it passed on for ten days - she then came, and asked if I had any money; I said I had not - she said she should lose a blanket, and I gave her a tablecloth to get it; she came again the next evening, asked for the Bible, and put down the 7d. - I turned for it, and it was gone; I then missed a frock and two shoes.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, Shadwell. I have a Bible, a frock, and a pair of shoes, which were pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18311201-143

143. ROBERT BULLOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 weighing-machine, value 6s., and 7 weights, value 6s. , the goods of James Gibbs .

JAMES GIBBS . I am a butcher , and live in Holywell-lane. The prisoner lived in my service about ten weeks -

he got tipsy, and I discharged him: I have a place of business in Hare-alley - I usually keep the key of it in my shop; I missed the key when the prisoner was gone - he knew where the key was kept - an officer came to me, and I went with him to the place in Hare-alley; we found the door locked - I got it opened, and I missed the machine; this is it, I believe, but I cannot swear to it - I have one at home that matches it; and I missed just the same number of weights.

THOMAS FARROW . I am a cooper, and live at Rotherithe. On the 15th of November the prisoner came to me, and said he had won a pair of scales at a raffle; he asked if I knew any body who wanted to buy them; I said I did not, but I would inquire - in two days afterwards he brought these scales and weights; I sent to a gentleman to ask if he wanted them, but he was not at home - I at last bought them myself for 8s. 6d.; I did not want them, but he said he was out of work, and had no money.

JOHN PALMER . I am a pork-butcher. I was present when the prisoner was taken, and I saw him throw away a key, which fits the prosecutor's shed.

MR. GIBBS. This is my key; I gave a guinea for the machine.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-144

144. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 600 address-cards, value 2l. , the goods of John Williams .

NICHOLAS SAMUEL STEINBERG . I was in the employ of Mr. John Williams , a stationer , in Fleet-street, Six hundred address-cards were made up, and I took them to the Golden Cross, Charing-cross , directed to Mr. Ragel, of Halesham; they were to go by the coach the next morning, which would be the 22nd of October - I took them the night before; the cards were mislaid, and were then to go on the following Tuesday, as the coach went only on Saturday and Tuesday - I left them safe in the office, with one of the book-keepers.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.Is your master here? A.No - the cards were left at the inn; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN MILLS. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner on the 24th of October, and found on him these cards, and this paper.

WILLIAM ANDERDOWN . I am a porter at the Golden Cross. This paper has my mark on it, which I put on it in the booking-office; I missed it before the prisoner was taken, but could not find it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.When should it have gone? A. It was delivered on the Friday evening - I made the mark on it between eight and nine o'clock, and it should have gone on Saturday morning; I went out in the evening, and when I returned I missed this parcel and another.

MR. STEINBERG. These are my master's cards, which he had engraved; they have merely the gentleman's address on them.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18311201-145

145. GEORGE BROWN was again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 6 yards of lawn, value 10s. , the goods of John Gower .

JOHN GOWER . I am a linen-draper , and live in King-street, Covent-garden . On the 24th of October the prisoner came to my shop door, about nine o'clock in the evening, to look at a cloak; my young man went to speak to him - he then went to another part of the shop to look at some more cloaks; he said there were none large enough for him - he then left, and we missed a piece of lawn; I followed him, and the Police-constable took him - he was brought back; he denied having the lawn, but it was found on him - he then said he took it from the floor of the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

Reference Number: t18311201-146

146. JOSEPH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 umbrella, value 4s. , the goods of George Grace Laight .

JOHN DAVISON . I saw the prisoner near the prosecutor's shop, in Holborn , on the 1st of November, about half-past six o'clock in the evening; there was another man with him, who took the umbrella, and gave it to the prisoner - the other man then took another; they both went off - the prisoner was but two or three inches from the other man when he took them: I went into the shop, and told what I had seen - the prisoner went down Gray's Inn-lane, where he was taken with this umbrella.

JOHN SMITH . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner in a public-house, among twenty other thieves.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am in the employ of Mr. George Grace Laight . Mr. Davison gave me information; I went out, and we took the prisoner, with this umbrella, which had been at our door - there were two gone.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-147

147. CHARLOTTE BUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 2 candlesticks, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Parrott , her master.

THOMAS PARROTT. I am a silk-weaver , and live in Spitalfields . The prisoner was two days and part of another in my service: we hired her by the week - we missed this pair of candlesticks.

AMBROSE BRADLEY . I have two candlesticks, pawned by the prisoner; she said it was for her mother.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, declaring her innocence.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18311201-148

148. JOSEPH BEAK was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 11 knives, value 2s., and 15 forks, value 1s. , the goods of John Worrall .

JOHN WORRALL. I keep an eating-house in Ratcliff-highway. On the 26th of October I took the prisoner's cab on Fish-street-hill; I had these knives and forks, and some other articles, which were tied in a handkerchief - I gave the parcel to the prisoner to put in, and he put them on the seat in the cab: I went in, and sat on the seat where they were - he sat outside to drive; he took me to my house in Ratcliff-highway - I got out, and forgot the parcel, but I recollected it before I got in doors; I am sure it was on the seat inside when I got out of the cab - the prisoner had got about five or six houses off, and was going slowly; I called to him as loud as I could to stop, but he

drove on faster down Ratcliff-highway - I pursued him; he increased his pace, and went very fast - I pursued him till I came to a Police-officer, and I told him what I had lost; I had run as fast as I could - the officer afterwards produced my bundle.

THOMAS GAMMAGE . I am a Police-officer. The prosecutor told me to stop the cab, as there was a parcel in it- I pursued it; the prisoner drove on faster, and I lost sight of the cab at Ratcliff-cross; he went on as fast as the horse could well trot - I called after him to stop repeatedly - he must have heard me, but he drove on at a rapid rate; I told another officer of it.

GEORGE BLAKE . I am a Police-officer. I heard the cab coming on as fast as the horse could trot; I heard some cry out behind it, but I did not know what it was - Gammage came up, and told me to pursue and stop it; I went as far as I thought he would turn to go into the Commercial-road, but he went on the farthest way; I knew there was no way for him to return but the Commercial-road, and I cut across to meet him - I stopped one of the Blackwall stages, and asked if they had seen a cab - while I was speaking the prisoner came up with his cab at full trot; I stopped him - he said, "What is the matter?" I said, "You have a parcel belonging to a gentleman who you set down in Ratcliff-highway" - he said he had, and gave it me from under the seat where he himself was sitting - it was between the cushion and the hay, not inside the cab.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I set the gentleman down it was one o'clock in the morning - I went along the highway, and saw the parcel; I recollected it belonged to that gentleman - I took it out, and put it into the dickey, intending to take it to the coach-office in the morning; I did not know what number the prosecutor lived at.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-149

149. MARY JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 half-crown, and 9 shillings, the monies of Edmund Clarke , from his person .

EDMUND CLARKE . I am a gentleman's coachman . On the 25th of October, about two o'clock in the morning, I got out of a cab at my lodging in Adams-mews, Grosvenor-square ; I had been out with a friend, but I swear I was quite sober - the prisoner came and asked me to go with her: I stood talking with her for two or three minutes, but I would not go with her; I then went to undo my door, and missed 14s. or 15s., which had been in my right-hand breeches pocket; I had not felt her hand in my pocket, but she was taking liberties with my person - I knew my money had been safe not a minute before, when I had taken out a shilling to pay for the cab, and the moment she left I missed my money; I called the Policeman - he took her and charged her with taking the money; she denied it - she had been gone about ten minutes before she was taken, and had got into St. James'-street.

JOHN WELLS . I am an officer. I was coming along Charles-street, and the cab drove up at the end of the mews; the prosecutor got out, and this young woman went up to him - he was trying to get her away; she would not go, but kept hanging to him - he appeared quite sober, and when she was gone he said she had robbed him of his money - he told me the same story he has told here to-day; the prisoner had turned to the right when she left the mews -I followed, and took her by the Royal-hotel, in St. James'-street; she had her pocket off in her hand, but I found no money on her.

Prisoner's Defence. He stated that he went up stairs, took off his coat, and then missed the money; he came down, and thought he had dropped it - I know nothing of the money, and never saw it - I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

JOHN WELLS . I know her as a girl of the town - she committed a felony a few nights before.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18311201-150

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

150. HENRY FRANCIS WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 umbrella, value 4s., the goods of William Fair , from the person of William Fair , the younger.

WILLIAM FAIR . I am eight years old, and live with my father in Newgate-street. On the evening of the 1st of November I was in Farringdon-street - I had an umbrella in my right hand; a man came behind me, and took it from me - he ran up Turnagain-lane: I observed his dress, and saw he had a rag round his foot - his shoes were all torn to pieces, and his coat was torn; he turned round, but I did not see his face - I believe the prisoner is the man.

WALTER JAMES FELTON . I live with my father, in Duke-street, Waterloo-road. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and went down Turnagain-lane; I saw the prisoner in custody of the officer, and took up this umbrella about two yards from where he stood.

JAMES TERRY . I am a constable. I was in Skinner-street between six and seven o'clock in the evening of the 1st of November; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and crossed the road at the corner of Turnagain-lane, and heard the child cry out again; the prisoner came running up as fast as he could - I took him down the lane; the child had a crowd of people round him: as soon as he saw the prisoner he said, "That is the man who took my umbrella;" he pointed him out from the other people; I saw no one running but the prisoner.

JURY. Q. Did the child describe the man? A.He pointed him out - he had a rag on one of his feet, and very bad shoes and clothes.

WILLIAM FAIR . I live in Newgate-street. The witness is my son - this is my umbrella.

GUILTY . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18311201-151

157. MARY ANN MUMFORD was indicted for stealing on the 28th of November , 1 pair of sheets, value 25s.: 1 towel, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of Edward Kennard .

GEORGE CROCKATT . I live with my mother, at No. 17, Giltspur-street. On the 28th of November I saw the prisoner in our passage - I asked what she wanted; she said to go through to the yard - I saw something under her arm; I laid hold of her - she dropped one pair of sheets, a towel, and a handkerchief - these are the articles; they belong to Mr. Edward Kennard - my mother and a servant had them to wash for him; this handkerchief is mine, and was going to be washed.

Prisoner. I went in and asked for a drop of water -

you brought the things out in your hand and dropped them yourself. Witness. No, you brought them out of a room adjoining the passage.

HENRY KENNARD . I was present - I heard the witness call for one of the men; I looked out of window and saw the prisoner drop these - the towels and sheets belong to Edward Kennard.

JOSEPH PARROTT . I am an officer. I was sent for - they had taken the prisoner and the articles - the handkerchief was quite wet; the others were dry - the prisoner stated she had been washing that morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched these things.

GUILTY . Aged 28 - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-152

152. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 mustard-ladle, value 2s.; 5 silver spoons, value 52s.; 4 silver ladles, value 8s.; 3 cruets, value 3s.; 3 silver tops, value 4s. 6d.; 30 yards of ribbon, value 2s., and 2 umbrellas, value 20s. , the goods of James Bodfield and another; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JAMES BODFIELD. I live in Milk-street , and am a warehouseman . On the morning of the 15th of November I was in my warehouse, and saw the prisoner pass my door; the impression on my mind was that he had been up stairs - I opened the door, and saw my brother come across the street; I directed him to follow the prisoner, who was still in sight - I then rang the house-bell and ascertained what had been stolen - when he came back he brought these two umbrellas; one is mine, and one is my brother's - I know the prisoner is the man.

JOSEPH BODFIELD . I am in partnership with my brother; we live in Milk-street. I saw the prisoner and followed him by my brother's direction - he dropped these two umbrellas at the bottom of Milk-street, and then made off down Aldermanbury; a neighbour joined in the pursuit - he was stopped at the end of Love-lane, in Wood-street.

JOHN LACY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman. I stopped the prisoner; he had on a shooting jacket, with large pockets - I found all these articles in his pockets, except the ribbon, which was in his hat.(Property produced and sworn to)

Prisoner. Distress drove me to it.

JOHN LAWS . I am an officer. I have a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner, which I got at Mr. Clark's office (read) - I was present and saw the prisoner tried.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-153

153. JAMES FREDERICK BENNETT and HENRY BROUGHTON were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 wooden tea-chest, value 1s.; and 84 lbs. of tea, value 18l. 18s. , the goods of George Frederick Finden and another.

SECOND COUNT, stating itto be the goods of the United Company of Merchants of England trading to the East Indies .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

JOHN CONSTABLE. I am in partnership with Mr. George Frederick Finden. I purchased a chest of tea, No. 490, by the ship London, at last September sale - I have since seen the chest; it has the same number, and the same ships mark; this is it.

SAMUEL KING . I am clerk to Messrs. Clarance and Franks, tea-brokers. I was directed to clear some tea for the prosecutor - I took a request-note to the Excise-office; I received the locker's paper, and went to the East India Company's Lock-house yard, where the number was called out.

SAMUEL PRICE . I superintend the going out of the teas from the yard after delivery. On the 5th of November, I saw a horse and cart come to the yard; the two prisoners and another man were with it - the other man had some permits in his hand, and he said he wanted five chests of tea, for Brown, of Watling-street, and gave me two permits; I said it was usual for Mr. Brown to send his own cart, and likewise a man who I knew well, but it was not him, nor either of the two prisoners - the prisoners were within hearing at this time; Bennett then said, "You must know me, I lived with Watson and Heath, but I am now in the service of Brown of Watling-street;" the man who gave me the permits, saw I was very doubtful, and he said, "I will go home and send our own cart, and then you will be at a point - but there is Jones our porter at the bottom of the yard, you must know him, I will go and fetch him;" he then went down the yard - I walked round the cart, and saw on it the name of William Hill, Church-street, Newington, Surrey; my suspicions were then very much excited, and I looked again at the permits; I saw the name of Constable on one, and Bowyer on the other - they were Nos. 497, 498, 499, 400, and 491; I told my partner, in the prisoner's hearing, that I was persuaded things were not right - we shut the gates and detained the cart; one chest, No. 490, by the London, had been put into the cart by Bennett and a person acting in the yard - it is impossible that there could be another chest with the same number, and the same ship.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. In these permits, is the name of the ship mentioned? A. Yes, certainly - this is the permit which has this chest on it; the name of the proprietor is always on it - here is the name of Mr. Constable; they are quite right, except not being presented by the right person; this chest had been put into the cart - the person who brought the permits had a pen behind his ear, like a person serving in a shop - I think I had seen Bennett before, but I am not certain.

COURT. Q.Had the third man mentioned the name of Brown first? A. Yes, before Bennett had said any thing - I do not know Broughton; he did nothing but stand by the head of the horse.

JAMES EDWARDS . I am yardsman at the warehouse, at Crutched-friars. The two prisoners came there with a cart and another person - Price looked out the chests of tea, and Bennett, with my assistance, removed No. 490, by the London, into the cart; Price then said he had strong suspicious, and no more should go into the cart; I then made Bennett lift the chest out of the cart to the pile where it had been before, which he did very reluctantly; I have seen Mr. Brown's cart before, but I never saw these men with it - Bennett wanted to escape, but I ran and shut the gates; a man, named Hickman, had then got into the street, and cried Stop thief! no one has appeared to claim the horse and cart.

COURT. Q.These permits related to the goods in the

possession of the East India Company? A. Yes, they relate to these teas, but the names on the permits are not what they asked for.

Cross-examined. Q.Did not Bennett remain at the cart and say he would not go till he got his shilling? A. Not in my hearing.

SAMUEL PRICE re-examined. I sent to Mr. Brown's in Watling-street - I told him what Bennett had said; he said they never were in his employ.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him at his house? A. No; but the gentleman gave his name as Brown, and he came when I sent for him.

JOHN HICKMAN . I am a warehouseman at the East India Company's warehouse. I was present on the 5th of November, and I went to Mr. Brown's in Watling-street; I found but one tea-dealer of that name there - I brought Mr. Brown to the yard; he said, in the prisoners' presence, he had never employed them, and knew nothing about them - the prisoners made no answer to that - I was there when the prisoners first came with a horse and cart, about ten minutes past three o'clock; the other man, who was with them, had the two permits, which he gave to Price; I asked Price what they wanted - he said five chests; I went to some chests of green tea, which we call twankay - I pulled one over, which was No. 490; Edwards and Bennett lifted it into the cart; I said to Price, "This is not Mr. Brown's cart" - Bennett said, "Our cart is gone another way, and we were obliged to get this cart to come;" I said I never saw him with Mr. Brown's cart before - he said, "I come occssionally;" I turned, and said to one of our elders, "There is something suspicions in this case; I shall stop the horse and cart, and the men" - the man, who had brought the permits, had then walked out; I walked down the yard, and Bennett followed me - I said,"It is of no use your following me, you shall not go out;" he pointed to a man over the way, in black breeches and a blue waistcoat, and said, "That is the man that got the permits;" I beckoned to the man, but be ran away - he was not the man who had come into the yard with the pen in his ear; my partner cried Stop thief! and he was taken, but discharged at the Mansion-house.

COURT. Q. Bennett followed you down the yard? A. Yes, and I told him he should not go out; I was going to look for the man who brought the permits -I cannot say whether Bennett followed me for the purpose of pointing the man out; I had not said any thing about a man before we began to move - when we got about ten yards Bennett said, "That is the man that got the permits;" he could not see that man from where the cart stood.

WILLIAM BREITENBACK . I am a carman. In consequence of direction from Messrs. Constable and Co. I got a chest of tea from the warehouse, in Crutched-friars - I took it, and delivered it to Thomas Spreadbury; it was No. 490, by the London.

THOMAS SPREADBURY . I am in the service of the prosecutor. I received the chest of tea from the carman - it was No. 490, by the London; this is the chest - it contained 84 lbs. of tea, worth about 18l.

Bennett's Defence. It is quite false about my wanting to get away - I merely walked down to point out the man.

BENNETT - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing him to have been the dupe of others.

Confined Six Months .

BROUGHTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-154

154. JOHN WILLIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of David Robert Remington , on the 24th of Ocotber , and stealing 1 clock, value 10l., and 1 barometer, value 2s.6d. , his property.

DAVID ROBERT REMIRGTON . I live in Old Broad-street , and sometimes sleep there; I do not occupy the house - I have only two chambers, which are distinct from the other parts of the house; I do not pay the inhabited house duty. On Monday, the 24th of October, I locked up my counting-house at four o'clock, and gave the key to the female servant, who is employed by the person residing in the house - the landlord does not live in the house, but a relation of his does; I do not know whether she is paid any thing - when I left my premises there was a clock and a barometer there; I returned about twelve o'clock at night, but did not miss any thing till the next morning at breakfast time - I have since been the clock and barometer in possession of the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You reside there occasionally? A. Yes, when I am in town, but my house is in Kent.

ESTHER HAYNER I am servant to Mr. Ferguson, of Old Broad-street; Mr. Remington has a counting-house, and sleeping-room there. On the 24th of October I received the key from him; I went the same evening, about a quarter past five o'clock, to sweep out the counting house, and found the door unlocked - I went in and swept the rooms, came out, locked the door, and took the key up stairs; I went again at half-past seven, and made a fire in the bed-room - I then left the door of the room unlocked, the street door was locked then, but between my receiving the key from the prosecutor, and my sweeping the room, the street door had been open; I went into the counting-house the next morning, and missed the clock and barometer.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 24th of October, a little before six o'clock in the evening, I was at the Crispiana, in Golden-lane, looking for a person, whom I could not find, in the tap-room; I went to the back parlour, and knocked at the door - I found it fast, I went to the back part of the premises; I returned to the door, and knocked again - some one inside said, "Who is there?" I said Attfield; I then stood back; Crowder, the landlord, and another man came out of the room - I went in, and saw this clock on the table, and the prisoner standing near it; I said, "What is all this, does this clock belong to you?" he said No, but a man who came there, had taken it out of the cupboard for Charley Crowder to buy; I said, "I would take him into custody - he was shifting, and wanted to go out; I said I would search him," and I found at the bottom of his trousers two skeleton-keys - he said he had picked them up in

Aldersgate-street; a lock was produced at the office, and I tried one of these keys to it, which turned the bolt of the lock, as well as its own key - Crowder shut the house up, ran away, and has not been heard of since.

Cross-examined. Q.Then the landlord and another man ran away, and you took the prisoner, who said he knew nothing about the clock? A. Yes; a small skeleton-key will open a large lock, if it is the same length.

WILLIAM BARKER . I produce a lock, which I took off Mr. Remington's door on the 25th of October; I took off this and another, and put two new ones on.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you do with the lock? A. I took it to my house, then to my employers, and he sent it to the office; it was out of my possession, but I know this is the lock.

COURT. Q.Had you before observed it, so as to know it again? A. I have no reason to doubt it; I did not mark it till it was at the office.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I should have mentioned that this barometer was in the room, when I took the prisoner, on a bench by his side.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-155

OLD COURT. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

155. JAMES GREGORY , WILLIAM ALLISON , ROBERT HILLIER , and THOMAS BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 1 iron bill, with a wooden handle, value 1s.; 1 hatchet, value 1s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s., and 1 knife, value 3d. , the goods of William Cook .

WILLIAM COOK. I live at Ruislip . On the night of the 4th of October I lost these things from my tool-house, which was locked; I found the door broken off the hinges in the morning - Gregory is a labourer, and lived at Ruislip; I do not know the other prisoners.

JOHN BIRCH . I am a constable. On the 4th of October the prisoners came to Uxbridge, and were committed under the Vagrant Act; these tools were found in their possession, and given to me.

JOHN LARKIN . I am a farmer, and live at lckenham, close to Ruislip. On the 4th of October, a friend said some suspicious characters were lurking about my premises, and he thought they wanted my poultry; about three o'clock in the morning my wife was awoke by the dog barking - I got out of bed, went to the window, and could see one person in my yard, going into my barn; I then saw another - I said, "Halloo! what do you want there?" they said, "We want to lay down here," and that they had come from Pinner; I said, "If you move a step I'll blow your brains out;" I put on my breeches; my wife went down and opened the door - I went out, and the two stood just inside the barn; I said, "How many of you are there?" he said, four - I sent for a constable, who came and took them in charge; it was the prisoners - there was another man outside, with a sack on his back; we found a knife on Gregory, which he claimed, and on the way to the cage he threw the knife away; my boy picked it up - I went to my barn, and close under where they stood, found this hatchet, and next morning the bill-knife, four skeleton-keys, and this glove, all close to where they stood; it was not in the barn over-night - the magistrate committed them as vagrants.

WILLIAM BALL . I am a constable. I found a knife in Gregory's hat, which the prosecutor claims.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GREGORY - GUILTY . Aged 24.

ALLISON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

HILLIER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-156

156. JEREMIAH FLINN & JOHN MANION were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Henry Baxter , from his person .

HENRY BAXTER . I am a wine-merchant . On the 9th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Holborn ; the witness gave me information - I found the prisoner in his custody with my handkerchief; I had not felt it taken.

WILLIAM THOMAS WHEELER. I am an officer. I was in Holborn, and saw the prisoners, and another much older (who I knew) within a few paces of Gray's Inn-lane- I saw Manion take this handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to Flinn, who ran across, down Middle-row; I followed, and took him at the end of the court - Manion stood looking to see if he got away, and I took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Flinn handed in a petition for a lenient sentence.

FLINN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Fourteen Days .

MANION - GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-157

157. GEORGE CROUCH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 4 shillings, the monies of James Andrews , from his person .

JAMES ANDREWS. I am a cabinet-maker . I came from Trowbridge, Wilts, and at the time in question, lodged in Castle-street, Westminster. On the 4th of November, at half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was in St. James'-park , going home; I had been over Westminster-bridge to buy some herrings - the prisoner met me, and asked me to show him the way to Charing-cross, where he said he lived, and when we got there he asked me to show him the way to Holborn, saying he lived there; I went part of the way with him - he said he did not understand the way, for he was most d-d drunk, which he pretended, and fell up against almost every body - he then went into an auction-room; a gentleman bid 2s. for some knives, and he bid 6s. - he asked me to advance the money; I said, "No, you bought them, and must pay for them;" we went on a little further - he stood by my side, and I wanted not to go farther; I felt his hand in my pocket, where I knew I had four shillings - I caught hold of his hand in which the money was; he struggled, and put it into his waistcoat pocket - I said, "You have picked my pocket;" he said, "Come on, come on," but I saw a Policeman about twenty yards further on, and called him; my money was safe when I was in the Park.

JOHN CRISPIN ROWLEY . I am a Policeman. The prosecutor charged the prisoner with robbing him of 4s.; he had walked on a little way - I went, and overtook him- I found 7s. 6d. in his left-hand waistcoat pocket; I am certain he was sober.

Prisoner's Defence. The money was my own; I had been to my sister's, in Tothill-street, but she was out - I asked a man, who sold fish by Storey's-gate, my way; this man said he would show me - I had a bundle under my arm; he asked me to let him carry it, which I did - he said he was in great distress, and had been out of work eleven weeks; I put my hand into my pocket to give him some halfpence, and dropped a shilling; he put his foot over it, and pretended to be looking for it, but I took it up; he stopped in the Strand, and said, "Are you not going to give me something to drink?" I said not till I got home; (I got a friend to go to Castle-street, but he could find no such person;) he bid me good night, and in about ten minutes two Policemen charged me with robbing him.

JAMES ANDREWS . I never saw the prisoner till I was in the Park; he never dropped a shilling while with me- he said he had no money to pay for the knives, and asked me to go and change a 10l. note for him; I had only been a week in London when this happened.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-158

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

158. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES PLEDGER . I am a tea-dealer, and live in Philpot-lane. On the 14th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came, and asked for an ounce of tea, at 4s. 8d.; my wife served him - I was present; he offered a shilling - I immediately perceived it was bad I desired him to walk into the room, to stand in the middle, and to strip - he took off his hat, coat, and waistcoat; 4d. we found in his waistcoat pocket, and a good sixpence, also a child's book, in the leaves of which I found a counterfeit shilling, similar to the one he tendered; perceiving me lame he ran out, leaving his coat and waistcoat behind - I had asked how he came by the first shilling: he said he took it from Mr. Allen, of Rood-lane - I said it was false, for there was no such person in the lane; he said he did not know the shilling was in the book - he wanted me to let him go to Mr. Allen, who he said was his master; I marked the two shillings, and gave them to the officer.

WILLIAM WILTSHIRE . I am an officer. I received the two shillings from Pledger, with this little book.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin. These shillings are both counterfeit, and appear to have been cast in one mould.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the shilling, and this song-book was by the side of it - I did not know there was another shilling in it; I was eager to know if it was good, and went for an ounce of tea - he said he would hang me if he could.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-159

159. SARAH DAVIS and MARY COLLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 3 handkerchiefs, value 12s. , the goods of John Howell .

JOHN HOWELL . I keep a hosier's shop in Aldersgate-street . On the 1st of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came into my shop, and asked to see some black silk handkerchiefs for a gentleman: I showed them part of several pieces - they were about ten minutes in the shop, and left suddenly, without buying any thing, or saying a word; I immediately looked over my goods, and missed a piece, containing three handkerchiefs - I went out, and met them in Barbican; they had got thirty or forty yards, and were coming back - I desired them to come into my shop; they wanted to know what they had done - I took them into the shop and sent for an officer; before he came in, Collins took the handkerchiefs from his person, and threw them on the counter - they were some I had shown to them.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Who assists in your shop? A. My daughter, but nobody was there on this occasion; I am positive these very handkerchiefs were in my hand not four minutes before - I had no others of that description; it was Davis asked to see them - they were close together, and left together; I never left the counter - they both left together; Davis might have said they were too dear.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a constable. I received the prisoners in charge; Davis denied all knowledge of it, and said she hoped I would let her go.(Property produced and sworn to)

Davis' Defence. I offered 2s. 6d. for a handkerchief; he would not take it, and I left the shop - he came out, and took Collins; I followed her into the shop.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

DAVIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-160

160. SARAH DAVIS and MARY COLLINS were again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 28 yards of lace, value 23s. , the goods of Frederick King .

MARTHA KING . I am the wife of Frederick King, haberdasher , St. John-street . On the 1st of November, between two and three o'clock, the prisoners came to our shop; Davis asked to look at some edging - I served her; I showed them some lace - Davis bought a yard and a half of edging, at 6d.; she gave me a shilling, and I gave her change - they both sat by the side of the counter; they looked at nothing else - the lace-box was before them; they were about ten minutes in the shop - Davis sat opposite the lace, and it was her who looked at it; I put the box away immediately she left, and in about half an hour a customer came in for lace - I took the box down, and missed this piece; I am certain the box had not been opened after they had left till then - nobody but the prisoners could have touched it; the customer had not been near the box - Harrison brought the lace to my shop the same night; I claimed it - it measures twenty-eight yards: I am sure it was in the shop at one o'clock, but will not swear it was there when they came.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON. I am an officer. I took the prisoners in charge at Howell's, about five o'clock - I asked Mrs. Copeland, the matron of the Compter, to search them in a private room; she brought this lace to me - I took it to King's that afternoon; Mrs. King claimed it.

MARIA COPELAND . I took the prisoners into a room to

search them - I found this piece of lace under Collins' stays; I found a yard of white satin ribbon on Daivs.(Property produced and sworn to.)

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-161

161. GEORGE WILLIAM TIBBS was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Harriet Easy .

MARTHA BALZDELL . I live in Church-street, Lissongrove. On the 3rd of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Bridge-street, Balckfriars , with Harriet Easy; she had a child in her arms - it rained fast, and she went into the road to call a coach, to proceed to Mr. Easy, at the King's Bench prison; she saw a cab coming along at a distance, and I saw it - it was going very quick; I first saw it twenty or thirty yards from her - the driver was in it; I saw nobody else - Mrs. Easy was turning round to get on the pathway, and fell before the cab came up to her; she got up, fell again, and tried to get up again on her knees, but could not - she crawled about a yard; the cub was then about eight yards from her - two gentlemen then called out Stop! I do not know whether the driver heard; they did not call loud - I did not call, for I was alarmed; I should think the driver might have seen her, but cannot be certain - the wheel went over her legs; she was near the footpath, but none of her person was on the footpath; we were on the right-hand side of the way - the cab was on its right side; she screamed out several times - the man drove on ten or a dozen yards, and then stopped; I cannot say whether he came back or not - Mrs. Easy was taken to the hospital, and died in about a fortnight.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She attempted to cross to the coaches, instead of calling one? A. Yes - she turned back to come on the pavement again; I cannot say whether the driver heard the gentlemen call; the cab itself made a noise going along - I did not see a gentleman in it; it was not a light night.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a porter. I was in Bridge-street, and saw the cab, it was driving very fast when I first saw it - I did not call out; my back was towards it - I did not see it go over the woman; several persons went to her assistance - I followed the cab, and took the number, which was 46; when I got up I said, "Why did you not stop before you went over the woman?" the prisoner got off his seat, and went and looked over the shoulders of the people who were assisting her, then returned to his cab, and drove off.

JAMES ABBOT . I am owner of the cab, No.46 The prisoner drove it on that day; he surrendered when he heard of the woman's death.

THOMAS LONGMAN . I am servant to Mr. Abbot. I was in the yard when the prisoner came home - he said he had driven over a person.

WILLIAM PENNINGTON . I am a surgeon of St. Bartholomew-hospital. I saw the deceased the instant she arrived there; both the bones of her legs were broken and came through the skin - the best attention was paid to her - crysipelas came on, and mortification subsequently; there is not a doubt that the injury caused her death - she lived thirteen days.

Prisoner's Defence. The accident occurred instantaneous, and was quite unavoidable, for which I am extremely sorry.

SARAH KING . I had a child at the hospital, and saw the deceased there; she expected to die - she told me she went to cross, and stepped from the curb with a baby in her arms, and the cab went over her legs - I said, "Do you think it was the driver's fault?" she said not at all, and if it had not been for the baby she could have moved before the cab came up, and that it was so dark the cabman could not see her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-162

162. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of William Proctor .

WILLIAM PROCTOR. I am a waiter at the Blue Boar, Aldgate . On the 3rd of November, about nine o'clock in the evening, this coat hung in the coffee-room; the prisoner came in, and called for gin and water - he had no great coat on; he sat down near the coat - I invited him nearer the fire, as it was cold, and he came; I served him: I returned to the room for a cork-screw, and found he had placed himself near the coat again - I left the room, went into the yard, and in a few minutes saw him go down the yard with the coat on his arm, leaving the house; I secured him - he went back without resistance, and finished his gin and water; I was answerable for the coat.

SAMUEL PATRICK . I am an officer. I was fetched, and found the prisoner in charge; I took him to the watch-house, and asked what could induce him to steal the coat; he said nothing, but being in liquor; he appeared to know what he was about, but might be in liquor; I said, "Did you take a coat into the room with you?" he said No - I said, "Why did you expect to bring one out;" he made no reply.

JOHN FORRESTER . I received him in charge, and found 4s. 9d. on him.

The prisoner delivered in a written Defence, stating that he was intoxicated, and had gone out with a coat on, and took this, thinking it was his own.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18311201-163

NEW COURT. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

163. WILLIAM FAIRBROTHER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 bushel of potatoes, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Walpole .

JOHN WALPOLE . I had a field of potatoes opposite William Pinnick 's house, at Enfield-chase ; I had taken some of them - there were a great many left out of the ground, barrowed up ready for me to take away; I have missed a great many.

WILLIAM PINNICK . I live opposite the prosecutor's field. On the 1st of November I saw the prisoner in the field, picking up the potatoes, and putting them into a bag - I went and told him to walk away, for fear Mr. Walpole should pursue him; he walked away with about a bushel of potatoes in his bag - I did not know I had a right to stop him.

Prisoner. I was not in the field - I was in London Witness. Yes, he and his sister were both in the field - it was about half-past eight o'clock in the morning; I had known him before.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-164

164. JOHN WALDON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 bushel of potatoes, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Walpole .

JOHN WALPOLE . I lost these potatoes from another field of mine next to Mr. Baker's; I had desired Thomas Edwards to look after these, and on the 2nd of November he brought me some potatoes - from what he said I took the prisoner.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I was employed by Mr. Walpole to watch the potatoes; they had been dug up; on the 1st of November, at eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and two other persons; they took away about a bushel of potatoes - the prisoner and a person named Inkes came again about half past ten o'clock; the prisoner then took about a bushel more - I stopped him, and took them from him; when I came up to him he put them down, and ran away; he had the bag on his shoulder when he came from the field.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-165

165. JAMES WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 load of hay, value 3l. , the goods of Silvester Tomlinson .

SILVESTER TOMLINSON. I live at Great Stanmore, Middlesex. I desired my carman, on the 3rd of November, to take a load of hay to my salesman, Mr. Cooper, at Smithfield, who was making 3l. a load of it at that time.

JAMES SMITH . I am carman to the prosecutor. On the 3rd of November I was taking the load of hay to London; I was coming up Windmill-hill, on the other side of Kilburn; I saw the prisoner, who said my master and he had dealt for that hay, and that hay he could have drawn where he liked, if he gave 50s. for it; I said my master had not said any thing to me about it - I then went on to the Black Lion, at Kilburn, where I generally stop - I set off again from there, and overtook the prisoner again near the Bell, at Kilburn; he called me, and said I was to go along with him and unload it; I said I did not know what to do, but if he had bought it I supposed he must take it, but not to bring me into any trouble; I went with him to Lincoln's Inn-fields, where I helped him to unload it - when I got home my master was very angry with me; I saw the prisoner the next day, and told him my master wanted to see him, if he pleased - he said he would go that night to my master's, but he never came - I saw him again the day following; he said he would come, and pay my master for it; I went home, and told my master - he desired me to go and fetch him; I went to him on the Sunday morning - he would not come, but he told me to tell my master to come to him; I told my master, who said he should not go; I went to the prisoner again on the Wednesday morning, and he gave me a sovereign to take to my master, and said he had no more then - I took it to my master, and he refused it.

MR. TOMLINSON. I had not made any bargain with the prisoner about the sale of this hay, or any other - I knew him before; I had never authorized my servant to sell it- I would not have sold it for 50s.

Prisoner. He told me that if the load of hay would do me any good at 50s. I might have it; that was the last word that passed between us the night before.

S. TOMLINSON. No such word was ever mentioned; he never proposed to buy it - we were at work in our yard, and the prisoner was going by; he came into the yard, and said,"What do you ask a load for your black hay at Harrowweal" - I said 50s. at the rick; he said, "I can buy it cheaper of your salesman" - I said, "If he sells it under price, he shall never sell another load for me;" he then turned away - this hay was no part of that; I sent this hay to be sold at the market price.

Prisoner. This was a load of hay from the same rick.

MR. TOMLINSON. It grew all on the same land, but was not all of one sort; we cut the rick in half, and half was saved, but the other half was damaged; the damaged hay we sold at 50s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-166

166. SUSAN BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October , 1 book, value 3s.; 1 blanket, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 6d.; 1 pair of boots, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 duplicate, value 6s., and 2 pinafores, value 6d. , the goods of William Webb , her master.

HANNAH WEBB . I am the wife of William Webb ; we live in Spitalfields-market . The prisoner was in my service for about three weeks, and before that she had been with me occasionally; I missed these articles - the first things I missed I did not charge her with, but I told her to keep my door shut, as she laid it to other persons in the house.

CHARLES STILL . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Spitalfields. I produce a book - I cannot swear whether the prisoner pawned it, but she came on the 24th of October, and had 4d. more advanced on it, in the name of Ann Webb ; she brought the duplicate, and said she came from her mistress - she redeemed a pair of women's shoes at the time, and 4d. more was advanced on this to make up the money.

HENRY BOLTON . I am a Police-constable. I received the prisoner in charge on the 24th of October; I asked how she came to rob her mistress - she said she did not know; she was a very ungrateful girl, and her mistress had been very kind to her, but she did it on purpose, and she said "Don't hurt my father, he is to meet me to night at Spitalfields church"- I took her to the office, and went back to the church, and from her description I took her father, but found nothing on him.

HANNAH WEBB re-examined. Q. Had you employed her to pawn any property?" A. Yes, a week or two before - a pair of boots for 1s. 6d.; and on the 24th of October I went to the drawer to take out the duplicate, and missed it; I told her to go to the pawnbroker and get an affidavit of them - she went, returned, and said, they were quite safe, and if I wanted them, the pawnbroker would let me have them without an affidavit; I then gave her 1s. 6 1/2d., which was what they were in for - she went and brought them; while she was gone I missed another duplicate of some articles which were pledged for 5s. - I desired her to go and get an affidavit for them; I went

to make my children's bed, and missed a blanket - I closed the door, and asked the prisoner what she had done with it; she said there never were but two - I said, "Yes, there were three, what have you done with it? if you have pawned it tell me the truth;" she then said her father came for sixpence and she had not got it - that he then asked for a slice of bread, and there was none out, and then she took the blanket and gave him the sixpence.

Prisoner. I said I took the blanket, but I did not say for my father.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, believing she had been the instrument of other persons.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18311201-167

167. MARGARET NOBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 blanket, value 2s.; 1 bolster, value 2s.; 5 sheets, value 5s.; 1 curtain, value 6d., and 1 gown, value 6d. , the goods of Abraham Belasco , her master.

ABRAHAM BELASCO. I am a hackney-coachman , and live in Two Spies-court, Catherine-street. The prisoner was in my service - I missed these articles.

JOHN SAYER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket, bolster, and sheet pawned I believe by the prisoner -I gave her these duplicates, and have the counterparts of them.

MICHAEL RUSSELL . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and found these duplicates in her pocket; three of them correspond with the articles produced - here are some other articles which came from the pawnbroker's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to return them when my wages were paid me.

ABRAHAM BELASCO. There are 8s. or 10s. due to her; my house is a house of accommodation.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-168

168. FRANCES CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing on the 22nd of November , 6 lbs. of feather, value 6s. , the goods of Arthur Oates .

SARAH OATES. I am the wife of Arthur Oates , and live in Bowl-yard, St. Giles' . On the 14th of November, the prisoner and her husband as she stated, came to my house and took a furnished room; there was a feather bed in the room, which weighed about 20 lbs. - on the 22nd of November I saw the prisoner go out with a bundle and a basket; when she returned I went up stairs, and saw her in the act of filling a bag with feathers out of the bed; her husband was not then in the room - I went to get a person to go for an officer, and she put the feathers into the bed again, all but a few, which are still in the bag; there were upwards of 6 lbs. missing from the bed.

JOHN NEWTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner -I found the bed about a foot cut open; I produce a few feathers in the bag.

Prisoner. The bed consisted of feathers and flock; I took them from my husband in the street, and put them back again - I told my husband I would rather die than do it; I said, "My husband has done what is wrong, but I hope you will forgive me."

SARAH OATES . I am positive she was in the act of taking the feathers from the bed when I saw her, and when I returned she was putting them back.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18311201-169

169. GEORGE COTTERELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Henry John Medley , from his person .

THOMAS TOOL . I live in Hatfield-street, and am a shoemaker. On the 8th of November I was in Holborn , and saw the prisoner and another person - I watched them for some time, and saw them attempt several gentlemen's pockets; they then came to the prosecutor and followed him some time - the prisoner at last took a handkerchief from his pocket; they turned back and walked away - I sent a person to tell the gentleman; I followed the prisoner - I saw him put the handkerchief into his hat; I then took him; he struggled very much - Medley then came up and took him the other got away.

PEDDER DAY . I was with Tool, I saw the prisoner and another, and as the prosecutor was crossing Gray's Inn-lane, the prisoner took his handkerchief, and put it into his hat - I had seen them attempt several pockets before.

HENRY JOHN MEDLEY . I lost this handkerchief on the 8th of November.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the handkerchief against a window; a gentleman who was going by, said,"What is it, a handkercheif, my lad?" I said yes; I put it into my hat, and was going along - when the gentleman saw there was a little bit of a mob he came back, and told him not to interfere; he gave his card at the station.

THOMAS TOOL. There was a person who wanted me to let him go - I have not got the card he gave - I am quite sure the prisoner took the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-170

170. JOHN DICKENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 seal, value 10s., and 1 key, value 5s., the goods of Joseph Dell , from his person .

JOSEPH DELL. I am clerk to a solicitor in Spring-gardens. On the evening of the 21st of November I was in Holborn , near Drury-lane, about a quarter-past six o'clock; the prisoner was coming towards me - he snatched my watch, and ran off towards Drury-lane; I pursued, calling Stop thief! Mr. Gilbert followed him and collared him - the prisoner threw my watch into the road, and broke the face and the glass; some person took it up and gave it to me.

WILLIAM GILBERT . I am a diamond setter, and live at Knightsbridge. I heard the alarm, saw the prisoner running and stopped him; he said, I was a b-y fool; I heard something fall, and saw the watch delivered to the prosecutor.

JACOB MILLER . I am a Police-constable. I met the prosecutor with the prisoner in custody - I took charge of him; I asked how he came to do it - he said through distress.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. The prosecutor said at the office, that he asked me for the watch, and now he says he had it given him.

MR. DELL. I did not ask him for it, and I did not say so at the office; I saw him throw it into the road.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work three months, and was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-171

171. DENNIS DALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 saw, value 3s., and 1 plane, value 5s. , the goods of John Daston .

JOHN DASTON. I lodge in Little Carlile-street. On the 20th of October, I went to dinner from No. 43, Tottenham-court-road where I was at work; on my return I found the premises safe to appearance, but missed a saw and a smoothing plane.

JOHN LOVICK . I am apprentice to a pawnbroker in Tottenham-court-road. On the 20th of Ocotber the prisoner pawned this saw and plane for 3s. - he came the next day with another saw, and was stopped.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear I pawned them? A. Yes - you pawned them separately; I could not swear that he went out of the shop; he then brought the other articles and the two chisels - the saw is pawned in the name of William Griffiths; he appeared like a carpenter.

THOMAS CARNEY . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner; he said he was starving, and could not help doing what he did - I found nothing on him but a knife.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of this charge.

JOHN LOVICK. He tried to go out; when my master asked if he had pawned a saw he said he had not - I jumped over the counter and stopped him

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-172

172. ROBERT ELLISTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 hat, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Adams ; and 1 hat, value 2s., and 1 knife, value 1s. , the goods of Walter Forest .

SAMUEL KING . I am private watchman at Mr. Clove's coal-wharf, at Ratcliff. On the morning of the 25th of November the prisoner came in a boat to the wharf; he came on the barges towards me - I asked what he did there; he said he came on shore for the mate - I went to the boat, and asked what he had in it; he said nothing at all - I then asked what ship he belonged to; he said the George - I said, "Very well, if you will go with me to the captain, I will let you go, but if not, I will give charge of you;" he said he would, but when we got to the boat, he would not go into it - I then locked him up, and found in the boat these two hats; the boat had come from Stone-stairs tier.

PETER COSTILLO . I am a Police-constable. I searched the prisoner, and found on him this knife and some tobacco - I went with King, and found the two hats in the boat; the prisoner said he knew nothing at all about them, and that he belonged to the George, but would not tell me the captain's name.

WALTER FOREST . I am cook of the Ocean, which was at Stone-stairs tier - this hat and knife are mine, and were safe at ten o'clock on the night of the 24th of November, when I went to bed; I missed them in the morning - I missed an oar from our boat; the Trident was next to the Ocean.

THOMAS ADAMS. This other hat is mine; I am a seaman on board the Ocean - I had put my hat in the box in the forecastle the night before.

PETER COSTILLO. The name Trident was on the boat the prisoner came in, and there was an oar in it.

GUILTY. Aged 16. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18311201-173

173. ROBERT FINCH was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 shawl, value 4s., the goods of Sarah Ann Stewart , from her person .

SARAH ANN STEWART . I am single . On the night of the 2nd of November my cousin went to the Pavillion theatre; I went to meet her as she came home, at a quarter-past twelve o'clock - we were going up Whitechapel-road , and two men followed us; they came up, and knocked me up against a public-house door - the prisoner took my shawl off, which was pinned round me, and ran off with it down Baker's-row; I followed, and never lost sight of him - I saw him stopped by the officer; I have not recovered my shawl; there were others in his company.

MICHAEL DAY . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty in Baker's-row, about one o'clock in the morning, I heard a female voice crying Stop him! Stop him! two persons then ran by me; the prisoner was the last, and I caught him - he said, "It is not me, it is the other - let me go, and take the other;" at that time the prosecutrix came up, and said, "Hold him fast - that is the one that knocked me down, robbed me of my shawl, and tore my gown;" she said she had seen his face by the gas-lamp, and she knew him by his face and clothes; I took him about four hundred yards from where she was robbed - I put my hand on the prisoner's heart; he appeared very much flurried and agitated.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from a friend's in the Dog-row; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran down Greyhound-lane; I was then stopped - the prosecutor said at the office, that there were three or four young men.

SARAH ANN STEWART. There were several more with him, but only two came up to me; the prisoner took my shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-174

174. MARGARET FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 1 iron pot, value 1s., and 1 rug, value 1s. , the goods of John Trimley .

SARAH TRIMLEY . I am the wife of John Trimley. -The prisoner came to live at my house on the 21st of November, and on the 23rd I went up to her room, found the door open, and no one there; I missed the rug off the bed, and the iron pot from the cupboard - a man lived with her, but she said he was taken into custody the day before; I was told where the prisoner was gone, and I went to a house in Pye-street - I found her there; she said, "I was going to give you the key;" I said, "I want my iron pot and rug;" she said, "I know nothing of them."

KEZIAH LOVELOCK . I live in Orchard-street, Westminster. I bought this iron pot of the prisoner, on the 23rd of November, for 7d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT GOOSE . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and found 7d. on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not live with the man; I did not carry away the iron pot and rug - when the man

was taken at Queen-square he gave me the key to give up the things.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18311201-175

175. MARY ANN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 3 blankets, value 12s.; 1 pillow, value 3s.; 1 sheet, value 3s., and 7 shirts, value 20s. , the goods of Richard Chapman .

MARY ANN CHAPMAN . I am the wife of Richard Chapman - we live in King-street, Commercial-road . The prisoner came to lodge with us on the 22nd of October, with her husband; they hired a furnished room, and left on the 14th of November: I went up to the room, and found it locked - I looked through the key-hole, and missed the chimney-ornaments; I then went in, and missed the blankets, sheet, and pillow, which were part of the bedding let to the prisoner with the room - the shirts I had to make for a gentleman, and gave them to her to mark; she and her husband went away together -I never authorized her to pawn any thing for me; they left a small box behind them, containing some implements for printing; I found the prisoner in Holborn the next day.

Prisoner. On the Monday morning I asked her to lend me a shilling - she said she had no money, but I might take four of the shirts, and pawn them for 7s., and if they were wanted, and I could not get them out she would help me - I did so, and took her a half-crown's-worth of halfpence, and she returned me 6d. of it. Witness. It is false - I never allowed her to pawn any thing, and she never brought me any thing as the produce of what she had pawned; she was constantly borrowing money of me.

ABRAHAM COLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in Holborn - I found on her eight duplicates; these are six of them; I told her it was on a charge of robbing her lodging - she made no reply.

WILLIAM HENRY BAYFIELD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Goswell-street. These two shirts were pawned by the prisoner, on the 15th of November - I lent 2s. 6d. on them - this is the duplicate I gave, it is in the name of Ann Freeman.

GEORGE KIRBY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel-road. I have five shirts, a pillow, a blanket, and a sheet, pawned by the prisoner in the name of Ann Greenwood - these are the duplicates I gave her.

Prisoner. About twelve o'clock on the Monday I pawned four shirts for 7s., and you gave me 5s. in copper in a paper, and 2s. in silver. Witness. Yes, I did; that was on the 14th of November.

Prisoner. I gave my prosecutrix part of that money in the same paper he gave to me.

MRS. CHAPMAN. She gave me no money at all that day - she came down for a light between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and I never saw her again that day.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-176

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

176. JOSEPH PRIOR and WILLIAM LANGHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Sears .

THOMAS SEARS. I live at Lea. I was with my gig in West-street, Pentonville , on the 28th of October - Prior asked to hold my horse, and I left the horse and gig in his possession, with the coat in it; I went into a house, and in five minutes a female called out, "The boy has taken your coat;" I went out, and took the coat from Prior, about a mile from the gig - he was in custody; I know nothing of Langham.

JAMES FULLER . I am a Policeman. I was on duty on the 28th of October; I met the two prisoners running about three quarters of a mile from the gig; Langham had this coat on his arm - I turned and looked at them; I then met the prosecutor who spoke to me; I went to a house of ill-fame, knocked at the door, and asked if two men had run in there; a woman said No, but I went through, and found Prior: I searched the house, and found the coat in a cupboard up stairs - I gave a description of Langham, and he was taken in about an hour.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JANE ARLE . I saw the gig; Prior took the coat from the gig - Langham was under a dead wall; I threw up my window, and cried "Stop thief! he has got your coat," and they both ran off - Langham was not four yards from the gig when the coat was taken.

JOHN AMBROSE. I am a Policeman. I found Langham in a house in Gray's Inn-road, from the description I received.

PRIOR - GUILTY . Aged 19.

LANGHAM - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-177

177. ANN HILL and SARAH WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 tea-pot, value 2s., and 1 veil, value 3s. , the goods of George Marriner .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18311201-178

178. ANN HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 watch, value 3l., the goods of James Kirkwood , from his person .

JAMES KIRKWOOD . I am a shoemaker . On the 21st of November I was rather tipsy, but knew what I was about; about half-past one o'clock in the morning, the prisoner and some other women accosted me in Gray's Inn-lane , and the prisoner persisted in following me till she came to a narrow turning; two other persons stood there, who seized me by my handkerchief, and pulled me down into the court; my hat fell off - I got away, and called the Police; we found the prisoner and the other two women in the court; the officer asked if I had lost any thing - I felt, and said, "Yes, my watch;" they took the prisoner, and found it in her stocking.

Prisoner. He went home with me. Witness. No, I did not; she wished me to go home, but I would not -I was on my way home.

DANIEL HUMPHRERYS . I am a Police-officer. I heard a great noise - I went into Gray's Inn-lane; the prosecutor said he had been knocked down, and his hat taken from him - the hat is quite lost; I went down the court, and found the prisoner in a room: I then asked the prosecutor if he had lost any thing else - he said Yes, his watch; the prisoner and two other women were in the room, and I saw the prisoner put her hand down - I felt, and found this watch between her stocking and her leg; there was

one man in the court quite a cripple, but the man who I believe had the hat, has got away.

Prisoner's Defence. He went home with me for three quarters of an hour; he left his watch for half a crown, and said he would call on Monday for it.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18311201-179

179. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 wooden-bowl, value 2d.; 1 half-crown; 3 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the property of Michael Peruzzi .

GEORGE WILLOUGHBY PERUZZI . I am the son of Michael Peruzzi; he keeps an eating-house near Golden-square - we have a till in the shop, and a bowl in it; I was at the back of the shop on the 27th of November, and heard a noise; I went forward, and saw the prisoner retiring from the house - I followed him, and told a Police-officer, who took him; we found on him a half-crown piece, three shillings, and one sixpence - my sister picked up the bowl next door, in the way the prisoner ran.

JANE PERUZZI . I was at home - I picked up the bowl.

WILLIAM FLATTELY. I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and found this money on him.(Bowl produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-180

180. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of James Limebeer .

RICHARD TAYLOR . I live in Somers'-town. I saw the prisoner cut a pair of shoes from the prosecutor's door on the 6th of November - he put them under his coat; he ran down a court, which I thought was no thoroughfare, and I ran back to tell the prosecutor; I afterwards found him in custody of the Policeman.

CHARLES STEWART . I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran, and took the prisoner with these shoes under his jacket - I found this blade of a razor on him and 1 1/2d.

JAMES LIMEBEER . These are my shoes, and were cut from my door.

Prisoner. I have been an orphan for eight years, and never committed an act of this kind before.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18311201-181

181. MARY LEAR was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 pair of stays, value 6d.; 1 frock, value 6d.; 1 pair of drawers, value 6d.; 1 napkin, value 3d., and 1 shift, value 6d. , the goods of Samuel Whatmore .

SAMUEL WHATMORE. I live in Drummond-crescent . The prisoner came to my house to nurse my wife - she had been there about ten days, when I missed a sheet -I asked where it was; she said it was at the mangle, that the mangling woman had gone out to tea, and she could not have it that day.

THOMAS MORTON . I am a pawnbroker, at Somers'-town. I have a child's gown, napkin, and shift, pawned by the prisoner.

JOHN CALLER . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and found five duplicates on her, which led to the pawnbroker's - when I took her she produced one duplicate, and said she hoped the prosecutor would not give her into custody - I saw her trying to conceal another duplicate, and I took it from her.

MR. BOURNE. I am a pawnbroker, at Somers'-town. I have a shirt and a pair of stays, pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned them meaning to return them.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-182

182. ROBERT LEWIS was indicted for stealing, 2 loaves of bread, value 9d.; 1 pail, value 1s., and 1 basket, value 3d. , the goods of Susannah Jennings ; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

GEORGE JENNINGS . I am a baker, in the service of my mother, Susannah Jennings . On the 25th of November I left my basket, with two loaves of bread and a pail, in Dorset-square - I was absent about a minute and a half, down an area: when I came up they were all gone.

THOMAS DUGGIN . I am a Police-officer. On the 25th of November, about half-past three o'clock, I saw the prosecutor at the corner of Dorset-square - I ran towards Blandford-square, and saw the basket on the pavement; I called the prosecutor - he said it was his; I then ran, and saw the prisoner leaving the pail, and running into Regent's-park - a servant stopped him: he said he was very sorry, but did it for want - he said he knew the prosecutor, and if I would allow him to see him he could make it up.

WILLIAM COLE . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner on the former occasion, and have a certificate of his conviction; (read) - he is the same man.

Prisoner. I did it from extreme distress.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-183

183. EDMUND MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 pair of clogs, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Hubert Dutton .

JOHN JONES . I live with William Hubert Dutton - he is a shoemaker , at Knightsbridge . On the 1st of November, at a quarter before nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner take a pair of lady's clogs from a shelf, eighteen inches within the door - I ran after him, and cried Stop thief! I never lost sight of him till he was taken by the Policeman; these clogs were found in the road, along which he had ran.

JAMES BROADWAY . I heard the alarm of Stop thief! I went to the spot, and saw the prisoner coming towards me - he ran into the arms of my brother-officer; he appeared to be throwing something away - I went, and looked after what he had thrown away, and found these clogs.

The prisoner delivered in a written Defence, stating that he was looking at the prosecutor's window, and on seeing the clogs taken, pursued the thief, and was himself taken.

GUILTY. - Aged 23. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18311201-184

184. JAMES MAILE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 56 lbs. of horse-flesh, value 6s. , the goods of Joseph List .

JOSEPH LIST. I keep a tripe-shop , in Little Earl-street, Seven-dials . I had 56 lbs. of horse-flesh boiled in my cellar on the 26th of November - I saw it safe at twelve o'clock at night - I missed it at seven in the morn

ing; I found it at Mr. Strube's house; I could swear to it - I do not know the prisoner.

JOHN STRUBE . I am a tripeman, and I live in Little St. Andrew's-street. About ten o'clock on Saturday evening, Sanderson came and asked if I would purchase a quantity of horse-flesh - the prosecutor had told me, in the course of the day, that he had lost some, and described it; I said I would buy it - he said a man at the corner had got it; I saw Sanderson go to the corner, and take it off the prisoner's shoulder, in a sack - he brought it into my cellar; I told List to come to my house - the prisoner was still at the corner, and when he saw me and List he ran off; when List saw the property in my cellar, he owned it - the prisoner was taken at his own lodging the same night.

ROBERT SANDERSON . I am a costermonger. I was standing at my own door last Saturday night week; the prisoner came to me, and asked if I had any dogs - I asked him why; he said he had found a lot of horse-flesh, and he wanted 1s. 6d. for it, as it was of no use to him - he said he had it at home; I said, "I don't want it, but I believe I know a man who will buy it;" I went, and spoke to Mr. Strube, who told me to bring it - I went, an I got it from the prisoner; Mr. Strube said it belonged to the prosecutor, and he went for him - the prisoner then ran away.

JOSEPH LIST. It was my property; the private door of my house was open, and I suppose one of my lodgers had gone out - there were twelve feet of pipe taken at the same time.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-185

185. HENRY MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 sheet, value 2s.; 2 petticoats, value 2s.; 2 window-curtains, value 1s., and 2 aprons, value 1s. , the goods of Mary Dyer .

MARY DYER . I live at Limehouse-causeway , and sell oysters . The articles stated were hanging in my shop to dry, on the 19th of November - the prisoner came in with two other boys; he asked one of them if he would have any oysters - the other said he did not care; I said, "What is it young man?" he said, "Let us have a pennyworth of oysters;" I opened one, and at that moment I heard the chairs rattle in my room - I said, "Who is in my house?" I then saw the prisoner run out with the things under his arm - I cried Stop thief! he ran round a corner; I ran to the corner, but returned, for fear any body should go into my house - two Police-officers were brought to me by my neighbours; they afterwards brought the property - these are the articles.

JAMES GRIMBLES . I am a Police-officer. I met the prisoner about a mile and a half or two miles from the prosecutor's, on the night of the 19th of November; there were two young lads with him, and two women, whom I knew to be suspicious characters - I saw the prisoner had this bundle; I asked him what it was - he said it was no business of mine; I insisted upon seeing, and took it from him - he then said it was his wife's gown and some check shirts; I found in it these articles.

WILLIAM OSMAN . I was with Grimbles; I heard the prisoner say there were some check shirts in the bundle, and the other things belonged to his wife, pointing to a girl who was there.

Prisoner's Defence. One of the women gave me the bundle to carry, and she owned the things.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-186

186. MARGARET RADCLIFFE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s.; 2 shifts, value 7s., and 1 shawl, value 10s. , the goods of Jane Earl .

JANE EARL. I am a laundress . The prisoner lodged in the same room with me for a fortnight - I went out on the 28th of June for about half an hour, and left her in the room; when I returned she was gone - I saw a box had been opened, and missed these articles, which were in my care, and I have had to pay for them; she never returned - last Wednesday week I met her in Brewer-street; I spoke to her about it - she did not deny it, but said she would rather go to the station than be taken in the street; I took her there - I did not make her any promise, or use any threat; she told the officer where she had pawned some of them, and he got this pair of shoes and this shift.

THOMAS FARRANT . I received the prisoner in charge -I got these shoes and this shift at the pawnbroker's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-187

187. JOHN McCLEW , JAMES EWLING , and JOSEPH DENHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 shoe, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Irons .

JOHN IRONS . I live in Union-street, Spitalfields , and am a shoemaker . This is my shoe; I was not at home when it was lost.

WILLIAM MILLER . I live opposite the prosecutor. I knew he had lost two pairs of shoes on the 12th of November, and in about an hour afterwards (about nine o'clock) I saw the three prisoners go to his shop, and look in at the window - McClew put his hand in at a pane of glass, which had been broken the same evening, by the persons who stole the other shoes; he took this one shoe out, and was in the act of taking another - I ran out, and took him and Denham; the other ran off, but was pursued and taken.

JOHN CLARK . I am an officer. I received the prisoners in charge.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am an officer. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and Ewling, who was running, was stopped and given to me.

McCLEW - GUILTY . Aged 14.

EWLING - GUILTY . Aged 13.

DENHAM - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-188

188. SAMUEL PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 2 shillings , the monies of William Homan , his master; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM HOMAN. I am a retired tradesman , and live in Gloucester-place, Hoxton. The prisoner was in my employ as a labourer ; I sent him for nine bushels of lime on the 25th of November, and gave him 4s. 6d. to pay for it; when he returned with it I found there was a deficiency - I sent him back for a ticket; he brought me one, which

I expect had been altered - he only brought five bushels of lime.

JOSHUA LESTER . I am clerk at a lime-wharf. The prisoner came and had five bushels of lime, for which he paid half a crown; he came back again, and asked for a ticket - I gave him this ticket, but all my writing is altered except the word "Paid;" he had only paid me half a crown.

WILLIAM SMITH . On the 25th of November I was called to take the prisoner - I found him in a public-house - I found 1s. 7 1/2d. on him; he told his master he was going to give him the money by and by.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. I have a certificate of the former conviction of the prisoner, which I got at Mr. Clark's office - (read) - I took him, and know he is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. My master gave me 5s. 6d., and 1s. for the truck; he sent me back for the ticket, and when I got it Tom Holmes took and altered it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-189

189. SARAH MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 1 sovereign, and 2 half-crowns , the monies of William Hibbard .

WILLIAM HIBBARD . On Sunday night, the 28th of October, about a quarter before twelve o'clock, I was passing Charing-cross - the prisoner accosted me; I went with her to a house in Whitcombe-street - I settled for the room, and gave her a shilling, which I had agreed to do; I was with her about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour: I was then about to leave, when I put my hand into my right-hand pocket, and missed my money - I accused her of picking my pocket; she said, "Of what?" I said, "Of a sovereign and two half-crowns;" she positively denied that she had a sovereign or any half-crowns in her possession; I said she should not go out till she was searched - the servant of the house and the master came into the room; the master sent for the Policeman, who opened the front of her gown - he found the two half-crowns inside her stays, and the sovereign in her left sleeve near the wrist; I had been drinking a little, but was quite collected.

WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM . I am an officer. I was called to the house; the prisoner said she had not a farthing of silver or gold about her; I found this sovereign in the sleeve of her gown, and the two half-crowns in her bosom.

Prisoner. He did not find the sovereign in my sleeve. Witness. Yes, I did; there were five or six persons in the room.

Prisoner's Defence. This money I had from a gentleman, whom I had frequently met - I had 1l. 8s. 6d.; I then met the prosecutor with a female; he left her, and came up to me - I went with him; he offered me his handkerchief, which I would not take; he then offered his waistcoat, and I would not take that - he saw me with the sovereign, and then said I had robbed him; he was very much intoxicated, and had not a farthing.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-190

190. CHARLES RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 11 pewter pots, value 1l. , the goods of Elizabeth Dodd .

ALEXANDER WILLIAM STEWART . I superintend my my mother-in-law's business, Elizabeth Dodd - she keeps the Ship, in Sun Tavern-fields ; we have lost a great many pots. On the 20th of October, as I was looking over the pots, an officer came in, and put down a quart pot; he said, "We have the man at the station-house, and a great many pots - come and see if you can own any of them;" I went, and saw thirty or forty pots, and out of them I found five quarts and five pints of my mother's.

JOHN COX . I am a Police-constable. On the 20th of October I was called to Mrs. Harris' shop, and found the prisoner there with thirty-six pots.

RACHAEL HARRIS . I keep a marine-store shop in the New-road. My husband went for an officer, and gave the prisoner in charge, on the 20th of October; the prisoner has brought three, four, five, or six pots in a day to our house, to sell; but on the 20th he only brought two - the pots we gave to the Policeman are what he brought; I have known him about five months - I used to give him 1s. for quart pots, and 8d. for pints.

Prisoner. Q.How long have you been in that shop? A. About three years; I never bought any pots but of you; I bought four measures, but no pots - I did not sell any pots to a person who opened a new beer-shop.

WILLIAM CARR. I am a Police-officer. I was at the station when the prisoner was brought in - I found one quart pot in his pocket, and seven duplicates.

A. W. STEWART. This pot found in his pocket, and these other ten are my mother's; I have seen him at our house repeatedly, but had no suspicion - he used to sit and read the newspaper, but it was rave that he had half a pint of porter.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Reference Number: t18311201-191

191. CHARLES RILEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 4 pewter pots, value 8s., the goods of Henry Cliffe ; 3 pewter pots, value 4s., the goods of Samuel Garratt ; and 2 pewter pots, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Lewis .

JOHN COX . I took the prisoner on the 20th of October, and found the pots now produced at Mrs. Harris'.

RACHAEL HARRIS . I bought the whole of these pots of the prisoner, sometimes five or six in a day; I have not sold any of them - my husband has nothing to do with the business; the prisoner brought them in the day time - he said he had kept the Ship, but was reduced in business, and did not like his name to be known; I bought them without a name on them.

RICHARD GURNEY . I am pot-boy to Mr. Samuel Garratt , of High-street, Shadwell. Three of these pots are his - he has lost a great many.

HENRY CLIFFE . I keep the George, in the Commercial-road. Four of these pots are mine - I never saw the prisoner.

EDWIN LEWIS . Two of these belong to Thomas Lewis.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence.

Reference Number: t18311201-192

192. THOMAS STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of James Thomas Beven , from his person ,

JAMES THOMAS BEVEN . On the 17th of November,

about half-past two o'clock, I was in Whitechapel ; I felt a tug at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner - I took him with my handkerchief in his hand; this is it.

WILLIAM HOMER. I am a Police-officer. I was opposite the hospital: the prosecutor gave the prisoner to me and this handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. Two men were quarrelling; some boys who stood by me dropped this handkerchief - the gentleman seized me; I showed him the boy who took it.

The prisoner received a good character, and a witness engaged to employ him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18311201-193

193. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 3 ivory balls, value 10s. , the goods of William Gooding .

WILLIAM GOODING. I keep a billiard-table in Piccadilly . On the 27th of October, I went into a closet under the billiard-room; I heard the door of that room open very gently, and some person came down stairs - I came out of the closet, and saw the prisoner going out; I went to the room, and missed the billiard-balls - I found my balls on the 30th of October, at a pawnbroker's in Longacre.

SAMUEL HASLOCK . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre; I have three billiard-balls, pawned by the prisoner, on the 27th of October, for 3s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE STONE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned them for another person. GUILTY . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18311201-194

194. JOHN SMITH was again indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 3 ivory balls, value 10s. , the goods of James Bridgland .

ANN MORRISON . I was engaged to nurse Mrs. Bridgland, in Leicester-square ; her husband keeps a billiard-table . On the 31st of October I was in the parlour; the prisoner came in and went up stairs - I went out, and he asked if Mitchell, the marker, was there; I said he was in the cellar - he then went into the billiard-room; I went in, and saw him walking round the table - he then left his name as John Smith, and said, he would call in ten minutes. I am sure he is the person.

JAMES BRIDGLAND . I keep the house; I was out at the time, but when I came home I missed the three balls; - the prisoner had lived with me eighteen months ago; the balls were safe when I went out - I was afterwards at a billiard-room in Cork-street; the prisoner came in and was taken.

CHARLES SUFFELL . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Long-acre. I took in these balls of a person in the name of John Rogers ; I believe the prisoner is the person.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Recommended to Mercy.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-195

195. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of Alfred Chardin .

ALFRED CHARDIN. I live in Lower James-street, Grosvenor-square . The prisoner was admitted to sleep in the house one night - I lost my trousers from a room which he had nothing to do with.

JAMES DON . I keep the house. I do not know the prisoner, but he slept there two nights, being in distress and having no lodging; he had no business in the prosecutor's room - he put on a shirt, a pair of shoes, and some other articles of the prosecutor's, and walked out with them; he was brought back and forgiven that offence - these trousers were then missed.

WILLIAM GOULD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Stevens, a pawnbroker, in Wardour-street. I have a pair of trousers, pawned by the prisoner, on the 15th of November, for 8s.

GEORGE BOX . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 16th of November; he owned to taking the trousers.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18311201-196

196. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 7s.; 2 shirts, value 9s.; 1 handkerchief, value 9s., and 1 pair of braces, value 6d., the goods of Alfred Samuel Wilson ; and 1 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 1 shirt, value 6s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s, and 1 pin, value 2s. , the goods of Samuel Raddle .

ALFRED SAMUEL WILSON. I lodge in my master's house, Mr. Henry Jarman - he is a cooper - the prisoner is a French polisher ; he had lodged in the room with me for six weeks or two months - Samuel Raddle lodged in the same room. On the 3rd of November Raddle and I got up and went to work, leaving the prisoner in bed - we came back between ten and eleven o'clock, and each of us missed our clothes; mine had been in a box, and Raddle's in a basket - I did not see the prisoner again till three days afterwards, when he was in custody.

SARAH ROSS . I have known the prisoner two or three months - he was out of work; he brought these things to me to pawn for him - I took them to Mr. Miller, in Kingsland-road; I took the money to the prisoner, and laid it out in bread and butter, tea and sugar - he staid one night in our house; he said he had no where to go.

EDMUND JULIUS SUTTON . I am shopman to Mr. Miller, of Kingsland-road, a pawnbroker. I produce a shirt, handkerchief, waistcoat, and coat, pawned by Ross.

WILLIAM BARTLETT . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner in Bunhill-row; he turned up Banner-street, and I took him - he had these trousers, waistcoat, and braces on.

SAMUEL RADDLE. I lodged in the room; part of these are mine.

A. S. WILSON. These articles are mine.

Prisoner. I was out of work; it is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-197

197. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 28 yards of merino, value 5l. 10s. , the goods of Griffith Humphreys .

JOHN THOMAS . I am shopman to Mr. Griffith Humphreys, a haberdasher , of Oxford-road . On the evening of the 31st of October, I saw a piece of merino moving from our shop, near the door; I called to Mr. Humphreys

and told him - he ran to the door, and I followed him; the prisoner was brought back by the officer, with the merino in his possession.

HERBERT KING . I am a Police-officer. I saw the prisoner fifteen or eighteen yards from the prosecutor's shop; he tapped me on the shoulder, and said, "Take notice of me;" I looked at him, not knowing what to make of him - he walked on to the prosecutor's shop, and took this piece from a parcel near the door.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress, and thought if I was sent out of the country I should get employ, and told the officer to watch me.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-198

198. ALEXANDER VINCENT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 cheese, value 6s. , the goods of Henry Gale .

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I know Mr. Henry Gale ; he keeps a cheesmonger's shop in Nottingham-place, Chelseacommon . On the evening of the 5th of November I saw the prisoner go into his house and take this cheese - I followed, and took him about fifteen yards off.

HENRY GALE. This cheese is mine; I missed it when the prisoner was brought back.

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18311201-199

First London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

199. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of John Waugh , from his person .

JOHN WAUGH. I am an agent . On the 20th of November, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I was in Farringdon-street - I felt my handkerchief going, turned, and seized the prisoner, who was about two feet from me, in company with another person who has escaped - I did not see my handkerchief in the prisoner's possession, but it was brought to me by another person.

PETER JACKSON . On the 20th of November I saw the prisoner following the prosecutor; I saw him put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take his handkerchief out; the prosecutor seized him; I ran up, and the prosecutor said, "He has taken my handkerchief" - I said,"Sir, he has," and I assisted in taking him to the watch-house; we were surrounded by a gang, who tried to get him away, and the prisoner kicked me about the feet and legs - I carried the marks for some time.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and received the handkerchief from the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18311201-200

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

200. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 1 watch, value 16l.; 1 watch-chain, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 20s., and 1 watch-key, value 1d., the goods of David Jones , from his person .

DAVID JONES. I reside at Peckham, but when in London, at No. 15, Size-lane. On the afternoon of the 26th of November, I was going through a little passage leading from St. Michael's-alley into Bell-yard; I had a coach cloak on my arm, and an umbrella in my right hand - the cloak hung down to my feet, and the moment I turned from St. Michael's church-yard into the little passage, I was surrounded by six or seven men, some before, and some behind me, pushing me; I turned to the prisoner, who was before me, and said, "Why can't you go on quietly?" the prisoner then came in front of me, and put his left arm across my body - I then had some suspicion, and I made a little room for myself; I put my hand down, and my watch was gone - they then separated, and the prisoner went back into St. Michael's-alley; I called Stop thief! and he was stopped - I got hold of him by the Jamaica coffee-house, and seized him by the collar - the rest of the party came up - they endeavoured to get him away, and some of them gave me a blow on the head; I saw the prisoner in communication with another of the party, but having no hand disengaged at the moment, I could not take hold of his other hand - they gave another rush he broke from me, and turned into Bell-yard; I immediately went after him and attempted to seize him, but he got away, and dropped his hat - I still followed, and he was taken in Finch-lane.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You saw the prisoner in the watch-house afterwards? A. Yes; I did not then say that I knew him by his swivel eye; I said by the cast in his eye - there was a great rush